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Sample records for gene expression domains

  1. Cell Sorting and Noise-Induced Cell Plasticity Coordinate to Sharpen Boundaries between Gene Expression Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    A fundamental question in biology is how sharp boundaries of gene expression form precisely in spite of biological variation/noise. Numerous mechanisms position gene expression domains across fields of cells (e.g. morphogens), but how these domains are refined remains unclear. In some cases, domain boundaries sharpen through differential adhesion-mediated cell sorting. However, boundaries can also sharpen through cellular plasticity, with cell fate changes driven by up- or down-regulation of gene expression. In this context, we have argued that noise in gene expression can help cells transition to the correct fate. Here we investigate the efficacy of cell sorting, gene expression plasticity, and their combination in boundary sharpening using multi-scale, stochastic models. We focus on the formation of hindbrain segments (rhombomeres) in the developing zebrafish as an example, but the mechanisms investigated apply broadly to many tissues. Our results indicate that neither sorting nor plasticity is sufficient on its own to sharpen transition regions between different rhombomeres. Rather the two have complementary strengths and weaknesses, which synergize when combined to sharpen gene expression boundaries. PMID:28135279

  2. The embryonic expression patterns of zebrafish genes encoding LysM-domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laroche, F J F; Tulotta, C; Lamers, G E M; Meijer, A H; Yang, P; Verbeek, F J; Blaise, M; Stougaard, J; Spaink, H P

    2013-10-01

    The function and structure of LysM-domain containing proteins are very diverse. Although some LysM domains are able to bind peptidoglycan or chitin type carbohydrates in bacteria, in fungi and in plants, the function(s) of vertebrate LysM domains and proteins remains largely unknown. In this study we have identified and annotated the six zebrafish genes of this family, which encode at least ten conceptual LysM-domain containing proteins. Two distinct sub-families called LysMD and OXR were identified and shown to be highly conserved across vertebrates. The detailed characterization of LysMD and OXR gene expression in zebrafish embryos showed that all the members of these sub-families are strongly expressed maternally and zygotically from the earliest stages of a vertebrate embryonic development. Moreover, the analysis of the spatio-temporal expression patterns, by whole mount and fluorescent in situ hybridizations, demonstrates pronounced LysMD and OXR gene expression in the zebrafish brain and nervous system during stages of larval development. None of the zebrafish LysMD or OXR genes was responsive to challenge with bacterial pathogens in embryo models of Salmonella and Mycobacterium infections. In addition, the expression patterns of the OXR genes were mapped in a zebrafish brain atlas. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Discrete domains of gene expression in germinal layers distinguish the development of gyrencephaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Juan Romero, Camino; Bruder, Carl; Tomasello, Ugo; Sanz-Anquela, José Miguel; Borrell, Víctor

    2015-07-14

    Gyrencephalic species develop folds in the cerebral cortex in a stereotypic manner, but the genetic mechanisms underlying this patterning process are unknown. We present a large-scale transcriptomic analysis of individual germinal layers in the developing cortex of the gyrencephalic ferret, comparing between regions prospective of fold and fissure. We find unique transcriptional signatures in each germinal compartment, where thousands of genes are differentially expressed between regions, including ~80% of genes mutated in human cortical malformations. These regional differences emerge from the existence of discrete domains of gene expression, which occur at multiple locations across the developing cortex of ferret and human, but not the lissencephalic mouse. Complex expression patterns emerge late during development and map the eventual location of folds or fissures. Protomaps of gene expression within germinal layers may contribute to define cortical folds or functional areas, but our findings demonstrate that they distinguish the development of gyrencephalic cortices.

  4. Plasmodium falciparum var genes expressed in children with severe malaria encode CIDRα1 domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Jakob S.; Wang, Christian W.; Mkumbaye, Sixbert I.;

    2016-01-01

    Most severe Plasmodium falciparum infections are experienced by young children. Severe symptoms are precipitated by vascular sequestration of parasites expressing a particular subset of the polymorphic P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) adhesion molecules. Parasites binding human...... endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) through the CIDRα1 domain of certain PfEMP1 were recently associated with severe malaria in children. However, it has remained unclear to which extend the EPCR-binding CIDRα1 domains epitomize PfEMP1 expressed in severe malaria. Here, we characterized the near full......-length transcripts dominating the var transcriptome in children with severe malaria and found that the only common feature of the encoded PfEMP1 was CIDRα1 domains. Such genes were highly and dominantly expressed in both children with severe malarial anaemia and cerebral malaria. These observations support...

  5. Effects of abhydrolase domain containing 5 gene (ABHD5) expression and variations on chicken fat metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Hongjia; Liu, Qing; Xu, Jiguo; Zeng, Fang; Pang, Xiaolin; Jebessa, Endashaw; Liang, Shaodong; Nie, Qinghua; Zhang, Xiquan

    2016-01-01

    Abhydrolase domain containing 5 gene (ABHD5), also known as comparative gene identification 58 (CGI-58), is a member of the α/β-hydrolase family as a protein cofactor of ATGL stimulating its triacylglycerol hydrolase activity. In this study, we aim to characterize the expression and variations of ABHD5 and to study their functions in chicken fat metabolism. We compared the ABHD5 expression level in various tissues and under different nutrition conditions, identified the variations of ABHD5, and associated them with production traits in an F2 resource population of chickens. Overexpression analysis with two different genotypes and siRNA interfering analysis of ABHD5 were performed in chicken preadipocytes. Chicken ABDH5 was expressed widely and most predominantly in adipose tissue. Five SNPs of the ABHD5 gene were identified and genotyped in the F2 resource population. The c.490C > T SNP was associated with subcutaneous fat thickness (P  C SNP was also associated with chicken body weight (P chicken preadipocytes, overexpression of wild type ABDH5 did not affect the mRNA level of ATGL (adipose triglyceride lipase) but markedly decreased (P chickens with a high fat diet. These results suggest that expression and variations of ABHD5 may affect fat metabolism through regulating the activity of ATGL in chickens.

  6. Cloning and expression of catalytic domain of Abl protein tyrosine kinase gene in E. coli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) regulate cell proliferation, differentiation and are involved in signal transduction. Uncontrolled signaling from receptor tyrosine kinases to intracellular tyrosine kinases can lead to inflamma tory responses and diseases such as cancer and atherosclerosis. Thus, inhibitors that block the activity of tyrosine kinases or the signaling pathways of PTKs activation could be assumed as the potential candidate for drug development. On this assumption, we cloned and expressed the Abl PTK gene in E. coli, and purified the PTK, which was used to screen the PTK inhibitors from the extracts of Chinese herbs. The catalytic domain sequence of PTK gene was amplified by PCR us ing the cDNA of abl from Abelson murine leukemia virus as template. The amplified fragment was then cloned into the GST-tagged expression vector pGEX2T. The recombinant plasmid was transformed into host cell E. coli DH5α and was induced to express PTK protein. The expression of the protein was detected using SDS-PAGE. The result showed that a specific protein was induced to express after 12 min induction, and reached peak level about 40% of the host total pro tein after 4 h induction. The molecular weight of the fusion protein was about 58 kD. The purified GST-PTK fusion pro tein presented higher activity for tyrosine phosphorylation.

  7. Expression of LIM-domain binding protein (ldb) genes during zebrafish embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyama, R; Kobayashi, M; Tomita, T; Dawid, I B

    1998-02-01

    LIM homeodomain proteins are developmental regulators whose functions depend on synergism with LIM domain binding proteins (Ldb proteins). We have isolated four members of the ldb gene family from the zebrafish, Danio rerio. Ldb1, Ldb2 and Ldb3 share 95%, 73% and 62% amino acid identity with mouse Ldb1, respectively. In overlay assays, Ldb proteins bind LIM homeodomain proteins and LMO1, but not zyxin or MLP. Whole mount in situ hybridization showed that zebrafish ldb1 is expressed ubiquitously from gastrulation onward. Ldb2 is ubiquitous at gastrulation, and later is found in many but not all tissues, especially the anterior central nervous system (CNS) and vasculature. Ldb3 mRNA was expressed primarily in the anterior CNS.

  8. Topography of somatostatin gene expression relative to molecular progenitor domains during ontogeny of the mouse hypothalamus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicanor eMorales-Delgado

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The hypothalamus comprises alar, basal and floor plate developmental compartments. Recent molecular data support a rostro-caudal subdivision into rostral (terminal and caudal (peduncular halves. In this context, the distribution of neuronal populations expressing somatostatin (Sst mRNA was analyzed in the developing mouse hypothalamus, comparing with the expression pattern of the genes Orthopedia (Otp, Distal-less 5 (Dlx5, Sonic Hedgehog (Shh and Nk2 homeobox 1 (Nkx2.1. At embryonic day 10.5 (E10.5, Sst mRNA was first detectable in the anterobasal nucleus, a Nkx2.1-, Shh- and Otp- positive basal domain. By E13.5, nascent Sst expression was also related to two additional Otp-positive domains within the alar plate and one in the basal plate. In the alar plate, Sst-positive cells were observed in rostral and caudal ventral subdomains of the Otp-positive paraventricular complex. An additional basal Sst-expressing cell group was found within a longitudinal Otp-positive periretromamillary band that separates the retromamillary area from tuberal areas. Apart of subsequent growth of these initial populations, at E13.5 and E15.5 some Sst-positive derivatives migrate tangentially into neighboring regions. A subset of cells produced at the anterobasal nucleus disperses ventralwards into the shell of the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus and the arcuate nucleus. Cells from the rostroventral paraventricular subdomain reach the suboptic nucleus, whereas a caudal contingent migrates radially into lateral paraventricular, perifornical and entopeduncular nuclei. Our data provide a topologic map of molecularly-defined progenitor areas originating a specific neuron type during early hypothalamic development. Identification of four main separate sources helps to understand causally its complex adult organization.

  9. Molecular breeding of transgenic rice expressing a xylanase domain of the xynA gene from Clostridium thermocellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, T; Mizutani, T; Tanaka, T; Koyama, T; Sakka, K; Ohmiya, K

    2003-09-01

    The gene encoding the catalytic domain of thermostable xylanase from Clostridium thermocellum F1 was expressed in rice plants under the control of a constitutive promoter. The gene encoding Xylanase A was modified to encode the catalytic domain of family 11 xylanase without the signal sequence (xynA1), and was introduced into rice plants and expressed under the control of a modified cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. Zymogram analysis indicated that the recombinant xylanase was produced in rice plants. The xynA1 gene was stably expressed in rice straw and seed grains. No phenotypic effect of xylanase expression was noted. The enzyme was detected in the desiccated grain. High levels of enzyme activity were maintained in the cell-free extract during incubation at 60 degrees C for 24 h. The results indicated that high levels of xylanase can be produced in rice plants.

  10. Expression profile and differential regulation of the Human I-mfa domain-Containing protein (HIC) gene in immune cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Lili; Dean, Jonathan; Oliveira, André L A; Sheehy, Noreen; Hall, William W; Gautier, Virginie W

    2009-04-27

    The Human I-mfa domain-Containing protein, HIC, is a 246 amino acid protein that functions as a transcriptional regulator. Although the precise function of HIC remains to be clarified, the association of the HIC gene locus with myeloid neoplasms, its interactions with lymphotropic viruses such as EBV, HIV-1 and HTLV-1 and its expression in immune tissues suggest that HIC might have a modulatory role in immune cells. To further characterise the HIC functional relationship with the immune system, we sought to analyse the HIC gene expression profile in immune cells and to determine if immunomodulatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-2, could regulate the expression of HIC mRNA. Relative quantitative real-time RT-PCR revealed that HIC mRNA is highly expressed in PBMCs and in various hematopoietic cell lines. The immunomodulatory cytokine IL-2 up-regulated HIC gene expression in PBMCs, CEM, MT-2 and U937 but markedly reduced HIC gene expression in Raji. Addition of cycloheximide indicated that the IL-2 effects were independent of de novo protein synthesis and that the HIC gene is a direct target of IL-2. Two cell lines (Jurkat and BJAB) displayed a distinct loss in HIC gene expression. However, when these cell lines were subjected to a combination of DNA methyltransferase and histone-deacetylase inhibitors, (5-aza-2-deoxycytidine and trichostatin A, respectively), HIC expression was de-repressed, indicating possible epigenetic control of HIC expression. Overall, our study describes that the immune expression of HIC is cell-specific, dynamic, and identifies the HIC gene as an IL-2 responsive gene. Furthermore, our de-repression studies support the hypothesis that HIC might represent a candidate tumor suppressor gene. Overall, this report provides new insights for a putative role of HIC in the modulation of immune and inflammatory responses and/or hematological malignancies.

  11. Plasmodium falciparum var genes expressed in children with severe malaria encode CIDRα1 domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Jakob S.; Wang, Christian W.; Mkumbaye, Sixbert I.;

    2016-01-01

    Most severe Plasmodium falciparum infections are experienced by young children. Severe symptoms are precipitated by vascular sequestration of parasites expressing a particular subset of the polymorphic P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) adhesion molecules. Parasites binding human...... endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) through the CIDRα1 domain of certain PfEMP1 were recently associated with severe malaria in children. However, it has remained unclear to which extend the EPCR-binding CIDRα1 domains epitomize PfEMP1 expressed in severe malaria. Here, we characterized the near full......-length transcripts dominating the var transcriptome in children with severe malaria and found that the only common feature of the encoded PfEMP1 was CIDRα1 domains. Such genes were highly and dominantly expressed in both children with severe malarial anaemia and cerebral malaria. These observations support...

  12. Biphasic Hoxd gene expression in shark paired fins reveals an ancient origin of the distal limb domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Freitas

    Full Text Available The evolutionary transition of fins to limbs involved development of a new suite of distal skeletal structures, the digits. During tetrapod limb development, genes at the 5' end of the HoxD cluster are expressed in two spatiotemporally distinct phases. In the first phase, Hoxd9-13 are activated sequentially and form nested domains along the anteroposterior axis of the limb. This initial phase patterns the limb from its proximal limit to the middle of the forearm. Later in development, a second wave of transcription results in 5' HoxD gene expression along the distal end of the limb bud, which regulates formation of digits. Studies of zebrafish fins showed that the second phase of Hox expression does not occur, leading to the idea that the origin of digits was driven by addition of the distal Hox expression domain in the earliest tetrapods. Here we test this hypothesis by investigating Hoxd gene expression during paired fin development in the shark Scyliorhinus canicula, a member of the most basal lineage of jawed vertebrates. We report that at early stages, 5'Hoxd genes are expressed in anteroposteriorly nested patterns, consistent with the initial wave of Hoxd transcription in teleost and tetrapod paired appendages. Unexpectedly, a second phase of expression occurs at later stages of shark fin development, in which Hoxd12 and Hoxd13 are re-expressed along the distal margin of the fin buds. This second phase is similar to that observed in tetrapod limbs. The results indicate that a second, distal phase of Hoxd gene expression is not uniquely associated with tetrapod digit development, but is more likely a plesiomorphic condition present the common ancestor of chondrichthyans and osteichthyans. We propose that a temporal extension, rather than de novo activation, of Hoxd expression in the distal part of the fin may have led to the evolution of digits.

  13. Identification and Expression Profiling of the BTB Domain-Containing Protein Gene Family in the Silkworm, Bombyx mori

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    Daojun Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The BTB domain is a conserved protein-protein interaction motif. In this study, we identified 56 BTB domain-containing protein genes in the silkworm, in addition to 46 in the honey bee, 55 in the red flour beetle, and 53 in the monarch butterfly. Silkworm BTB protein genes were classified into nine subfamilies according to their domain architecture, and most of them could be mapped on the different chromosomes. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that silkworm BTB protein genes may have undergone a duplication event in three subfamilies: BTB-BACK-Kelch, BTB-BACK-PHR, and BTB-FLYWCH. Comparative analysis demonstrated that the orthologs of each of 13 BTB protein genes present a rigorous orthologous relationship in the silkworm and other surveyed insects, indicating conserved functions of these genes during insect evolution. Furthermore, several silkworm BTB protein genes exhibited sex-specific expression in larval tissues or at different stages during metamorphosis. These findings not only contribute to a better understanding of the evolution of insect BTB protein gene families but also provide a basis for further investigation of the functions of BTB protein genes in the silkworm.

  14. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor N-terminal domain controls isotype-selective gene expression and adipogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummasti, Sarah; Tontonoz, Peter

    2006-06-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARgamma, PPARalpha, and PPARdelta) are important regulators of lipid metabolism. Although they share significant structural similarity, the biological effects associated with each PPAR isotype are distinct. For example, PPARalpha and PPARdelta regulate fatty acid catabolism, whereas PPARgamma controls lipid storage and adipogenesis. The different functions of PPARs in vivo can be explained at least in part by the different tissue distributions of the three receptors. The question of whether the receptors have different intrinsic activities and regulate distinct target genes, however, has not been adequately explored. We have engineered cell lines that express comparable amounts of each receptor. Transcriptional profiling of these cells in the presence of selective agonists reveals partially overlapping but distinct patterns of gene regulation by the three PPARs. Moreover, analysis of chimeric receptors points to the N terminus of each receptor as the key determinant of isotype-selective gene expression. For example, the N terminus of PPARgamma confers the ability to promote adipocyte differentiation when fused to the PPARdelta DNA binding domain and ligand binding domain, whereas the N terminus of PPARdelta leads to the inappropriate expression of fatty acid oxidation genes in differentiated adipocytes when fused to PPARgamma. Finally, we demonstrate that the N terminus of each receptor functions in part to limit receptor activity because deletion of the N terminus leads to nonselective activation of target genes. A more detailed understanding of the mechanisms by which the individual PPARs differentially regulate gene expression should aid in the design of more effective drugs, including tissue- and target gene-selective PPAR modulators.

  15. Expression analysis of Arabidopsis XH/XS-domain proteins indicates overlapping and distinct functions for members of this gene family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, Haroon; Graner, Sonja; Luschnig, Christian

    2014-03-01

    RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) is essential for de novo DNA methylation in higher plants, and recent reports established novel elements of this silencing pathway in the model organism Arabidopsis thaliana. Involved in de novo DNA methylation 2 (IDN2) and the closely related factor of DNA methylation (FDM) are members of a plant-specific family of dsRNA-binding proteins characterized by conserved XH/XS domains and implicated in the regulation of RdDM at chromatin targets. Genetic analyses have suggested redundant as well as non-overlapping activities for different members of the gene family. However, detailed insights into the function of XH/XS-domain proteins are still elusive. By the generation and analysis of higher-order mutant combinations affected in IDN2 and further members of the gene family, we have provided additional evidence for their redundant activity. Distinct roles for members of the XH/XS-domain gene family were indicated by differences in their expression and subcellular localization. Fluorescent protein-tagged FDM genes were expressed either in nuclei or in the cytoplasm, suggestive of activities of XH/XS-domain proteins in association with chromatin as well as outside the nuclear compartment. In addition, we observed altered location of a functional FDM1-VENUS reporter from the nucleus into the cytoplasm under conditions when availability of further FDM proteins was limited. This is suggestive of a mechanism by which redistribution of XH/XS-domain proteins could compensate for the loss of closely related proteins.

  16. Differential expression and characterization analysis of a new gene with WD domains in fish oogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEN; Jianjun(

    2001-01-01

    [1]Nagahama. N., Molecular biology of oocyte maturation in fish. in Perspectives in Comparative Endocrinology (eds. Davey.K. G.. Peter, R. E.. Tobe, S. S.), Ottawa: National Research Council of Canada, 1994. 193-198.[2]Selman. K.. Wallace, R. A., Sarka, A., Stages of oocyte development in the zebrafish, Brachydanio. rerio, J. Morphol..1993. 218: 203-224.[3]Tyler. C. R., Sumpter, J. P., Oocyte growth and development in teleosts. Rev. Fish Biol. Fisheries, 1996,6:287-318.[4]Nagahama, Y.. Yoshikuni, M., Tokumoto. T. et al., Regulation of oocyte growth and maturation in fish, Curr. Top. Dev.Biol., 1995.30: 104-145.[5]Amanai. K., Suzuki, Y., Ohtaki, T., Involvement of a maternally transcribed lectin gene in the early development of Bombyx mori, Rouxs-Arch. Dev. Biol., 1994, 203: 397-401.[6]Hales, K. H., Meredith. J. E., Storti, R. V., Transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation of maternal and zygotic cytoskeletal tropomyosin messenger RNA during Drosophila development correlates with specific morphogenic events. Dev.Biol., 1994, 165: 639-653.[7]Buccione, R., Schroeder. A. C., Epigg, J. J., Interactions between somatic cells and germ cells throughout mammalian oogenesis. Biol. Reprod., 1990, 43: 543-547.[8]Eppigg. J. J., Growth and development of mammalian oocytes in vitro, Arch Pathol. Lab. Med., 1992, 116: 379-382.[9]Hainaut. P., Kowalski, A., Giorgetti, S. et al.. Insulin and insulin-like growth-factor-I (IGF-I) receptors in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Biochem. J., 1991, 273: 673-678.[10]Hainaut, P., Kowalski, A. L., Marchand-Brustel, Y., Effects of insulin and insulin-like growth-factor-I (IGF-I) and progesterone on glucose and amino acid uptake in Xenopus laevis oocytes, Mol. Cell. Endocrinol., 1991, 75:133-139.[11]Hardie. L. J., Ling, K. J., Daniels, G. D. et al., Isolation of the first piscine transforming growth factor- β: analysis reveals tissue specific expression and a potential regulatory sequence in rainbow

  17. Regulatory elements associated with paternally-expressed genes in the imprinted murine Angelman/Prader-Willi syndrome domain.

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    Sara Rodriguez-Jato

    Full Text Available The Angelman/Prader-Willi syndrome (AS/PWS domain contains at least 8 imprinted genes regulated by a bipartite imprinting center (IC associated with the SNRPN gene. One component of the IC, the PWS-IC, governs the paternal epigenotype and expression of paternal genes. The mechanisms by which imprinting and expression of paternal genes within the AS/PWS domain - such as MKRN3 and NDN - are regulated by the PWS-IC are unclear. The syntenic region in the mouse is organized and imprinted similarly to the human domain with the murine PWS-IC defined by a 6 kb interval within the Snrpn locus that includes the promoter. To identify regulatory elements that may mediate PWS-IC function, we mapped the location and allele-specificity of DNase I hypersensitive (DH sites within the PWS-IC in brain cells, then identified transcription factor binding sites within a subset of these DH sites. Six major paternal-specific DH sites were detected in the Snrpn gene, five of which map within the 6 kb PWS-IC. We postulate these five DH sites represent functional components of the murine PWS-IC. Analysis of transcription factor binding within multiple DH sites detected nuclear respiratory factors (NRF's and YY1 specifically on the paternal allele. NRF's and YY1 were also detected in the paternal promoter region of the murine Mrkn3 and Ndn genes. These results suggest that NRF's and YY1 may facilitate PWS-IC function and coordinately regulate expression of paternal genes. The presence of NRF's also suggests a link between transcriptional regulation within the AS/PWS domain and regulation of respiration. 3C analyses indicated Mkrn3 lies in close proximity to the PWS-IC on the paternal chromosome, evidence that the PWS-IC functions by allele-specific interaction with its distal target genes. This could occur by allele-specific co-localization of the PWS-IC and its target genes to transcription factories containing NRF's and YY1.

  18. Synthetic genes specifying periodic polymers modelled on the repetitive domain of wheat gliadins: conception and expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmorjani, K; Thiévin, M; Michon, T; Popineau, Y; Hallet, J N; Guéguen, J

    1997-10-09

    In order to optimise new polypeptide based biomaterials, we developed a procedure for producing homoblock polypeptides using recombinant DNA technology. Synthetic genes encoding periodic polypeptides modelled on the consensus sequence of wheat gliadins (a family of wheat storage proteins) were devised to be expressed in Escherichia coli. The construction strategy followed allows the construction of three genes encoding 8, 16, and 32 copies of the PQQPY module. The optimal expression conditions in the enterobacteria were established and a convenient purification procedure was shown to be useful in recovery of sizable amounts of strictly periodic polypeptides. The identities of the synthesized polypeptides were assessed using positive cross reactions to antibodies raised against a synthetic decapeptide (PQQPYPQQPA) and amino acid composition was determined as well.

  19. Discrete domains of gene expression in germinal layers distinguish the development of gyrencephaly

    OpenAIRE

    de Juan Romero, Camino; Bruder, Carl; Tomasello, Ugo; Sanz-Anquela, José Miguel; Borrell, Víctor

    2015-01-01

    Gyrencephalic species develop folds in the cerebral cortex in a stereotypic manner, but the genetic mechanisms underlying this patterning process are unknown. We present a large-scale transcriptomic analysis of individual germinal layers in the developing cortex of the gyrencephalic ferret, comparing between regions prospective of fold and fissure. We find unique transcriptional signatures in each germinal compartment, where thousands of genes are differentially expressed between regions, inc...

  20. Gene expression in chromosomal Ridge domains : influence on transcription, mRNA stability, codon usage, and evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gierman, H.J.

    2010-01-01

    Chromosomes are the long DNA molecules that carry the genetic code of our genes. Each gene encodes a protein, but also contains the information that controls the activity of that gene. In this thesis, we find that chromosomal domains with many active genes (so-called 'Ridges'), also control gene

  1. Epoc-1: a POU-domain gene expressed in murine epidermal basal cells and thymic stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yukawa, K; Yasui, T; Yamamoto, A; Shiku, H; Kishimoto, T; Kikutani, H

    1993-11-15

    POU-domain transcription factors are known as developmental regulators which control organ development and cell phenotypes. In order to clarify the roles of POU-domain transcription factors in cell differentiation, we cloned a novel POU family gene, Epoc-1, from a murine thymus cDNA library. The amino acid (aa) sequence of the POU-specific domain of Epoc-1 is almost identical to those of Oct-1 and Oct-2. However, within the POU-homeodomain, 13 out of 60 aa differ between Epoc-1 and Oct-2. Recombinant Epoc-1 products were found to bind specifically to the octamer sequence. Epoc-1 was found to be expressed in skin, thymus, stomach and testis. In situ hybridization experiments and RNase protection assays indicated that Epoc-1 is expressed in the epidermal basal cells of the skin, which contain stem cells unipotent for keratinocyte differentiation and in thymic stromal elements. These results suggest that Epoc-1 might be one of the developmental regulators which controls epidermal development and thymic organogenesis.

  2. Recombinant MafA protein containing its own protein transduction domain stimulates insulin gene expression in IEC-6 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jun; Luo, Hailan; Wu, Huiling; Lan, Michael S; Tan, Jianming; Lu, Daru

    2011-07-18

    MafA, a basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor, functions as a potent activator of insulin gene transcription in β-cell. In this paper, we aimed to investigate whether the entire MafA protein has the self-delivery activity, and that the arginine- and lysine-rich sequence in MafA bZIP domain is an efficient protein transduction domain (PTD). Entire MafA protein internalization was evaluated with Western blot and immunofluorescence. The distribution of the PTD-EGFP (enhanced green fluorescence protein) was examined by fluorescent microscope observation. Luciferase reporter assay was used to investigate the effect of the transduced MafA protein on insulin 2 promoter activity. Additionally, we conducted RT-PCR to detect the expression of insulin mRNA in MafA treated IEC-6 cells. The arginine- and lysine-rich peptide of MafA serves as a novel PTD. PTD-EGFP can permeate into various cell types including Min6 (a β-cell line), and transduce in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The cellular uptake of MafA PTD can be completely blocked by heparin, whereas cytochalasin D and amiloride were partially effective in blocking the PTD-EGFP protein entry. Transduced intact MafA protein behaves in the same way as the endogenous MafA, stimulating the transcription of insulin promoter and further inducing insulin expression in treated non-β-cell line (IEC-6). These results indicate that the MafA PTD could serve as a therapeutic delivery vehicle, and further suggest that MafA protein transduction could be a valuable strategy for enhancing insulin gene transcription without requiring gene transfer technology. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Aberrant Behaviours of Reaction Diffusion Self-organisation Models on Growing Domains in the Presence of Gene Expression Time Delays

    KAUST Repository

    Seirin Lee, S.

    2010-03-23

    Turing\\'s pattern formation mechanism exhibits sensitivity to the details of the initial conditions suggesting that, in isolation, it cannot robustly generate pattern within noisy biological environments. Nonetheless, secondary aspects of developmental self-organisation, such as a growing domain, have been shown to ameliorate this aberrant model behaviour. Furthermore, while in-situ hybridisation reveals the presence of gene expression in developmental processes, the influence of such dynamics on Turing\\'s model has received limited attention. Here, we novelly focus on the Gierer-Meinhardt reaction diffusion system considering delays due the time taken for gene expression, while incorporating a number of different domain growth profiles to further explore the influence and interplay of domain growth and gene expression on Turing\\'s mechanism. We find extensive pathological model behaviour, exhibiting one or more of the following: temporal oscillations with no spatial structure, a failure of the Turing instability and an extreme sensitivity to the initial conditions, the growth profile and the duration of gene expression. This deviant behaviour is even more severe than observed in previous studies of Schnakenberg kinetics on exponentially growing domains in the presence of gene expression (Gaffney and Monk in Bull. Math. Biol. 68:99-130, 2006). Our results emphasise that gene expression dynamics induce unrealistic behaviour in Turing\\'s model for multiple choices of kinetics and thus such aberrant modelling predictions are likely to be generic. They also highlight that domain growth can no longer ameliorate the excessive sensitivity of Turing\\'s mechanism in the presence of gene expression time delays. The above, extensive, pathologies suggest that, in the presence of gene expression, Turing\\'s mechanism would generally require a novel and extensive secondary mechanism to control reaction diffusion patterning. © 2010 Society for Mathematical Biology.

  4. Genome-wide survey and developmental expression mapping of zebrafish SET domain-containing genes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sun, Xiao-Jian; Xu, Peng-Fei; Zhou, Ting; Hu, Ming; Fu, Chun-Tang; Zhang, Yong; Jin, Yi; Chen, Yi; Chen, Sai-Juan; Huang, Qiu-Hua; Liu, Ting Xi; Chen, Zhu

    2008-01-01

    .... Since some of these genes have been revealed to be essential for embryonic development, we propose that the zebrafish, a vertebrate model organism possessing many advantages for developmental studies...

  5. Novel exons in the tbx5 gene locus generate protein isoforms with distinct expression domains and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamak, Abir; Georges, Romain O; Sheikh-Hassani, Massomeh; Morin, Martin; Komati, Hiba; Nemer, Mona

    2015-03-13

    TBX5 is the gene mutated in Holt-Oram syndrome, an autosomal dominant disorder with complex heart and limb deformities. Its protein product is a member of the T-box family of transcription factors and an evolutionarily conserved dosage-sensitive regulator of heart and limb development. Understanding TBX5 regulation is therefore of paramount importance. Here we uncover the existence of novel exons and provide evidence that TBX5 activity may be extensively regulated through alternative splicing to produce protein isoforms with differing N- and C-terminal domains. These isoforms are also present in human heart, indicative of an evolutionarily conserved regulatory mechanism. The newly identified isoforms have different transcriptional properties and can antagonize TBX5a target gene activation. Droplet Digital PCR as well as immunohistochemistry with isoform-specific antibodies reveal differential as well as overlapping expression domains. In particular, we find that the predominant isoform in skeletal myoblasts is Tbx5c, and we show that it is dramatically up-regulated in differentiating myotubes and is essential for myotube formation. Mechanistically, TBX5c antagonizes TBX5a activation of pro-proliferative signals such as IGF-1, FGF-10, and BMP4. The results provide new insight into Tbx5 regulation and function that will further our understanding of its role in health and disease. The finding of new exons in the Tbx5 locus may also be relevant to mutational screening especially in the 30% of Holt-Oram syndrome patients with no mutations in the known TBX5a exons.

  6. Wheat beta-expansin (EXPB11 genes: Identification of the expressed gene on chromosome 3BS carrying a pollen allergen domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Jizeng

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expansins form a large multi-gene family found in wheat and other cereal genomes that are involved in the expansion of cell walls as a tissue grows. The expansin family can be divided up into two main groups, namely, alpha-expansin (EXPA and beta-expansin proteins (EXPB, with the EXPB group being of particular interest as group 1-pollen allergens. Results In this study, three beta-expansin genes were identified and characterized from a newly sequenced region of the Triticum aestivum cv. Chinese Spring chromosome 3B physical map at the Sr2 locus (FPC contig ctg11. The analysis of a 357 kb sub-sequence of FPC contig ctg11 identified one beta-expansin genes to be TaEXPB11, originally identified as a cDNA from the wheat cv Wyuna. Through the analysis of intron sequences of the three wheat cv. Chinese Spring genes, we propose that two of these beta-expansin genes are duplications of the TaEXPB11 gene. Comparative sequence analysis with two other wheat cultivars (cv. Westonia and cv. Hope and a Triticum aestivum var. spelta line validated the identification of the Chinese Spring variant of TaEXPB11. The expression in maternal and grain tissues was confirmed by examining EST databases and carrying out RT-PCR experiments. Detailed examination of the position of TaEXPB11 relative to the locus encoding Sr2 disease resistance ruled out the possibility of this gene directly contributing to the resistance phenotype. Conclusions Through 3-D structural protein comparisons with Zea mays EXPB1, we proposed that variations within the coding sequence of TaEXPB11 in wheats may produce a functional change within features such as domain 1 related to possible involvement in cell wall structure and domain 2 defining the pollen allergen domain and binding to IgE protein. The variation established in this gene suggests it is a clearly identifiable member of a gene family and reflects the dynamic features of the wheat genome as it adapted to a range of

  7. Characterization of big bang, a novel gene encoding for PDZ domain-containing proteins that are dynamically expressed throughout Drosophila development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sabrina Y; Renihan, Maia K; Boulianne, Gabrielle L

    2006-06-01

    PDZ (PSD-95, Discs-large, ZO-1) domain proteins often function as scaffolding proteins and have been shown to play important roles in diverse cellular processes such as the establishment and maintenance of cell polarity, and signal transduction. Here, we report the identification and cloning of a novel Drosophila melanogaster gene that is predicted to produce several different PDZ domain-containing proteins through alternative promoter usage and alternative splicing. This gene, that we have named big bang (bbg), was first identified as C96-GAL4, a GAL4 enhancer trap line that was generated in our lab. To further characterize bbg, its expression pattern was examined in ovaries, embryos, and late third instar larvae using UAS reporter gene constructs, in situ hybridization, or immunocytochemistry. In addition, the expression of alternatively spliced transcripts was examined in more detail using in situ hybridization. We find that during embryogenesis bbg is predominantly expressed in the developing gut, but it is also expressed in external sensory organs found in the epidermis. In the late third instar larva, bbg is expressed along the presumptive wing margin in the wing disc, broadly in the eye disc, and in other imaginal discs as well as in the brain. The expression patterns observed are dynamic and specific during development, suggesting that like other genes that encode for several different PDZ domain protein isoforms, bbg likely plays important roles in multiple developmental processes.

  8. DEFECTS IN CERVICAL VERTEBRAE IN BORIC ACID-EXPOSED RAT EMBRYOS ARE ASSOCIATED WITH ANTERIOR SHIFTS OF HOX GENE EXPRESSION DOMAINS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defects in cervical vertebrae in boric acid-exposed rat embryos are associated with anterior shifts of hox gene expression domainsNathalie Wery,1 Michael G. Narotsky,2 Nathalie Pacico,1 Robert J. Kavlock,2 Jacques J. Picard,1 AND Francoise Gofflot,1*1Unit of Developme...

  9. The Popeye domain-containing gene family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    The Popeye domain-containing gene family has been isolated on the basis of a subtractive screen aiming at the identification of novel genes with a heart-restricted gene expression pattern. The gene family codes for membrane proteins containing three transmembrane domains. The carboxy-terminal part of the protein is localized to the cytoplasm and contains a protein domain with high sequence conservation named the Popeye domain. This domain is involved in protein homo dimerization. The gene family is expressed in heart and skeletal muscle cells as well as smooth muscle cells. In addition, Popdc genes are expressed in other cell types such as neuronal cells in restricted areas of the brain, spinal cord, and dorsal root ganglia, and in various epithelial cells. Recently, it has been proposed that Popdc proteins may function as a novel family of adhesion proteins. That the expression pattern has been conserved during evolution and is very similar in all vertebrate classes and also in basal chordates suggests that Popdc proteins play an important role in cardiac and skeletal muscle.

  10. Expression of the WT1 gene -KTS domain isoforms suppresses the invasive ability of human lung squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriya, Shogo; Takiguchi, Masaki; Seki, Naohiko

    2008-02-01

    Although the WT1 gene was originally isolated as a tumor suppressor gene from Wilms' tumor, oncogenic roles for WT1 have been reported in several tumors. Here, we present new findings of high levels of WT1 expression associated with the suppression of lymph node metastasis in patients with human lung squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). We investigated the effect of down-regulated WT1 gene expression on the invasive phenotype of the SCC cell line RERF-LC-AI. Invasive ability was enhanced in WT1-specific siRNA-transfected cells, and a WT1 target gene p21(Waf1/Cip1) was isolated by comprehensive gene expression analysis. As several isoforms are produced from the WT1 gene, we isolated eight major WT1 isoforms from a cDNA library and cloned each variant into an expression vector. Luciferase reporter assays revealed that p21(Waf1/Cip1) expression was enhanced only by the WT1 cDNA variants that included a three-amino acid deletion (-KTS). Our results suggested that the -KTS-containing variants of WT1 are directly involved in the regulation of p21(Waf1/Cip1) expression and the subsequent suppression of lymph node metastasis in human lung squamous cell carcinoma.

  11. The construction and expression of chimeric urokinase-type plasminogen activator genes containing kringle domains of human plasminogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutaud, A; Castellino, F J

    1993-06-01

    A series of chimeric urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) genes, which contain combinations of kringle domains of human plasminogen (HPg) in place of the uPA kringle (KuPA), has been constructed and expressed. Some of the resulting recombinant (r) variant uPA chimeras contain modules that potentially mediate the macroscopic binding of HPg to its activation effectors, fibrin(ogen) and 6-aminohexanoic acid (EACA). Such binding sites are not possessed by KuPA, but are present in certain of the HPg kringles, viz., kringle 1 (K1HPg), kringle 4 (K4HPg), and kringle 5 (K5HPg). The recombinant (r) chimeras constructed included molecules with replacements of KuPA with K1HPg (r-[KuPA-->K1HPg]uPA), and with KuPA replaced by double kringle combinations of K1HPgK4HPg (r-[KuPA-->K1HPgK4HPg]uPA), K2HPgK3HPg (r-[KuPA-->K2HPgK3HPg]uPA), and K4HPgK5HPg (r-[KuPA-->K4HPgK5HPg]uPA). All of these variant genes, along with their wild-type (wt) r-uPA counterparts, were expressed in human kidney 293 cells. In cases wherein EACA-binding kringles from HPg have been placed in uPA, this property has been retained in the chimeric molecule and employed as an essential part of the purification procedures for the variants. The steady state amidolytic activity of two-chain (tc) wtr-uPA toward the chromogenic substrate, H-D-pyroglutamyl-Gly-L-Arg-p-nitroanilide (S2444), is characterized by a kcat/KM (pH 7.4, 37 degrees C) of 120 s-1 mM-1. This value ranges from 92 s-1 mM-1 (tcr-[KuPA-->K1HPg]uPA) to 166 s-1 mM-1 (tcr-[KuPA-->K1HPgK4HPg]uPA) for each of the variants, demonstrating that the catalytic efficiency of the active site is altered only in a small way by changes in the noncatalytic domain of uPA. Small differences are also observed in the abilities of these tcr variants to interact with the fast-acting plasma inhibitor of uPA, viz., plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). The second-order rate constant for the interaction of PAI-1 with tcr-uPA, 0.46 x 10(7) M-1s-1 (pH 7.4, 10 degrees

  12. Structure and expression of the maize (Zea mays L. SUN-domain protein gene family: evidence for the existence of two divergent classes of SUN proteins in plants

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    Simmons Carl R

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nuclear envelope that separates the contents of the nucleus from the cytoplasm provides a surface for chromatin attachment and organization of the cortical nucleoplasm. Proteins associated with it have been well characterized in many eukaryotes but not in plants. SUN (Sad1p/Unc-84 domain proteins reside in the inner nuclear membrane and function with other proteins to form a physical link between the nucleoskeleton and the cytoskeleton. These bridges transfer forces across the nuclear envelope and are increasingly recognized to play roles in nuclear positioning, nuclear migration, cell cycle-dependent breakdown and reformation of the nuclear envelope, telomere-led nuclear reorganization during meiosis, and karyogamy. Results We found and characterized a family of maize SUN-domain proteins, starting with a screen of maize genomic sequence data. We characterized five different maize ZmSUN genes (ZmSUN1-5, which fell into two classes (probably of ancient origin, as they are also found in other monocots, eudicots, and even mosses. The first (ZmSUN1, 2, here designated canonical C-terminal SUN-domain (CCSD, includes structural homologs of the animal and fungal SUN-domain protein genes. The second (ZmSUN3, 4, 5, here designated plant-prevalent mid-SUN 3 transmembrane (PM3, includes a novel but conserved structural variant SUN-domain protein gene class. Mircroarray-based expression analyses revealed an intriguing pollen-preferred expression for ZmSUN5 mRNA but low-level expression (50-200 parts per ten million in multiple tissues for all the others. Cloning and characterization of a full-length cDNA for a PM3-type maize gene, ZmSUN4, is described. Peptide antibodies to ZmSUN3, 4 were used in western-blot and cell-staining assays to show that they are expressed and show concentrated staining at the nuclear periphery. Conclusions The maize genome encodes and expresses at least five different SUN-domain proteins, of which the PM3

  13. Highly expressed captured genes and cross-kingdom domains present in Helitrons create novel diversity in Pleurotus ostreatus and other fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castanera, Raúl; Pérez, Gúmer; López, Leticia; Sancho, Rubén; Santoyo, Francisco; Alfaro, Manuel; Gabaldón, Toni; Pisabarro, Antonio G; Oguiza, José A; Ramírez, Lucía

    2014-12-05

    Helitrons are class-II eukaryotic transposons that transpose via a rolling circle mechanism. Due to their ability to capture and mobilize gene fragments, they play an important role in the evolution of their host genomes. We have used a bioinformatics approach for the identification of helitrons in two Pleurotus ostreatus genomes using de novo detection and homology-based searching. We have analyzed the presence of helitron-captured genes as well as the expansion of helitron-specific helicases in fungi and performed a phylogenetic analysis of their conserved domains with other representative eukaryotic species. Our results show the presence of two helitron families in P. ostreatus that disrupt gene colinearity and cause a lack of synteny between their genomes. Both putative autonomous and non-autonomous helitrons were transcriptionally active, and some of them carried highly expressed captured genes of unknown origin and function. In addition, both families contained eukaryotic, bacterial and viral domains within the helitron's boundaries. A phylogenetic reconstruction of RepHel helicases using the Helitron-like and PIF1-like helicase conserved domains revealed a polyphyletic origin for eukaryotic helitrons. P. ostreatus helitrons display features similar to other eukaryotic helitrons and do not tend to capture host genes or gene fragments. The occurrence of genes probably captured from other hosts inside the helitrons boundaries pose the hypothesis that an ancient horizontal transfer mechanism could have taken place. The viral domains found in some of these genes and the polyphyletic origin of RepHel helicases in the eukaryotic kingdom suggests that virus could have played a role in a putative lateral transfer of helitrons within the eukaryotic kingdom. The high similarity of some helitrons, along with the transcriptional activity of its RepHel helicases indicates that these elements are still active in the genome of P. ostreatus.

  14. Activation of Fetal γ-globin Gene Expression via Direct Protein Delivery of Synthetic Zinc-finger DNA-Binding Domains

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    Mir A Hossain

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactivation of γ-globin expression has been shown to ameliorate disease phenotypes associated with mutations in the adult β-globin gene, including sickle cell disease. Specific mutations in the promoter of the γ-globin genes are known to prevent repression of the genes in the adult and thus lead to hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin. One such hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin is associated with a sequence located 567 bp upstream of the Gγ-globin gene which assembles a GATA-containing repressor complex. We generated two synthetic zinc-finger DNA-binding domains (ZF-DBDs targeting this sequence. The -567Gγ ZF-DBDs associated with high affinity and specificity with the target site in the γ-globin gene promoter. We delivered the -567Gγ ZF-DBDs directly to primary erythroid cells. Exposure of these cells to the recombinant -567Gγ ZF-DBDs led to increased expression of the γ-globin gene. Direct protein delivery of ZF-DBDs that compete with transcription regulatory proteins will have broad implications for modulating gene expression in analytical or therapeutic settings.

  15. Gene transfer and expression in human neutrophils. The phox homology domain of p47phox translocates to the plasma membrane but not to the membrane of mature phagosomes

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    Brzezinska Agnieszka A

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neutrophils are non-dividing cells with poor survival after isolation. Consequently, exogenous gene expression in neutrophils is challenging. We report here the transfection of genes and expression of active proteins in human primary peripheral neutrophils using nucleofection. Results Exogenous gene expression in human neutrophils was achieved 2 h post-transfection. We show that neutrophils transfected by nucleofection are functional cells, able to respond to soluble and particulate stimuli. They conserved the ability to undergo physiological processes including phagocytosis. Using this technique, we were able to show that the phox homology (PX domain of p47phox localizes to the plasma membrane in human neutrophils. We also show that RhoB, but not the PX domain of p47phox, is translocated to the membrane of mature phagosomes. Conclusion We demonstrated that cDNA transfer and expression of exogenous protein in human neutrophils is compatible with cell viability and is no longer a limitation for the study of protein function in human neutrophils.

  16. The α-Crystallin Domain Containing Genes: Identification, Phylogeny and Expression Profiling in Abiotic Stress, Phytohormone Response and Development in Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum

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    Asosii ePaul

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The α-crystallin domain (ACD is an ancient domain conserved among all kingdoms. Plant ACD proteins have roles in abiotic stresses, transcriptional regulation, inhibiting virus movement and DNA demethylation. An exhaustive in-silico analysis using Hidden Markof Model-based conserved motif search of the tomato proteome yielded a total of 50 ACD proteins that belonged to 4 groups, sub-divided further into18 classes. One of these groups belongs to the small heat shock protein (sHSP class of proteins, molecular chaperones implicated in heat tolerance. Both tandem and segmental duplication events appear to have shaped the expansion of this gene family with purifying selection being the primary driving force for evolution. The expression profiling of the Acd genes in two different heat stress regimes suggested that their transcripts are differentially regulated with roles in acclimation and adaptive response during recovery. The co-expression of various genes in response to different abiotic stresses (heat, low temperature, dehydration, salinity and oxidative stress and phytohormones (abscisic acid and salicylic acid suggested possible cross-talk between various members to combat a myriad of stresses. Further, several genes were highly expressed in fruit, root and flower tissues as compared to leaf signifying their importance in plant development too. Evaluation of the expression of this gene family in field grown tissues highlighted the prominent role they have in providing thermo-tolerance during daily temperature variations. The function of three putative sHSPs was established as holdase chaperones as evidenced by protection to malate-dehydrogenase against heat induced protein-aggregation. This study provides insights into the characterization of the Acd genes in tomato and forms the basis for further functional validation in-planta.

  17. The RNA Domain Vc1 Regulates Downstream Gene Expression in Response to Cyclic Diguanylate in Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariisa, Ankunda T; Weeks, Kevin; Tamayo, Rita

    2016-01-01

    In many bacterial species, including the aquatic bacterium and human pathogen Vibrio cholerae, the second messenger cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) modulates processes such as biofilm formation, motility, and virulence factor production. By interacting with various effectors, c-di-GMP regulates gene expression or protein function. One type of c-di-GMP receptor is the class I riboswitch, representatives of which have been shown to bind c-di-GMP in vitro. Herein, we examined the in vitro and in vivo function of the putative class I riboswitch in Vibrio cholerae, Vc1, which lies upstream of the gene encoding GbpA, a colonization factor that contributes to attachment of V. cholerae to environmental and host surfaces containing N-acetylglucosamine moieties. We provide evidence that Vc1 RNA interacts directly with c-di-GMP in vitro, and that nucleotides conserved among this class of riboswitch are important for binding. Yet the mutation of these conserved residues individually in the V. cholerae chromosome inconsistently affects the expression of gbpA and production of the GbpA protein. By isolating the regulatory function of Vc1, we show that the Vc1 element positively regulates downstream gene expression in response to c-di-GMP. Together these data suggest that the Vc1 element responds to c-di-GMP in vivo. Positive regulation of gbpA expression by c-di-GMP via Vc1 may influence the ability of V. cholerae to associate with chitin in the aquatic environment and the host intestinal environment.

  18. The RNA Domain Vc1 Regulates Downstream Gene Expression in Response to Cyclic Diguanylate in Vibrio cholerae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankunda T Kariisa

    Full Text Available In many bacterial species, including the aquatic bacterium and human pathogen Vibrio cholerae, the second messenger cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP modulates processes such as biofilm formation, motility, and virulence factor production. By interacting with various effectors, c-di-GMP regulates gene expression or protein function. One type of c-di-GMP receptor is the class I riboswitch, representatives of which have been shown to bind c-di-GMP in vitro. Herein, we examined the in vitro and in vivo function of the putative class I riboswitch in Vibrio cholerae, Vc1, which lies upstream of the gene encoding GbpA, a colonization factor that contributes to attachment of V. cholerae to environmental and host surfaces containing N-acetylglucosamine moieties. We provide evidence that Vc1 RNA interacts directly with c-di-GMP in vitro, and that nucleotides conserved among this class of riboswitch are important for binding. Yet the mutation of these conserved residues individually in the V. cholerae chromosome inconsistently affects the expression of gbpA and production of the GbpA protein. By isolating the regulatory function of Vc1, we show that the Vc1 element positively regulates downstream gene expression in response to c-di-GMP. Together these data suggest that the Vc1 element responds to c-di-GMP in vivo. Positive regulation of gbpA expression by c-di-GMP via Vc1 may influence the ability of V. cholerae to associate with chitin in the aquatic environment and the host intestinal environment.

  19. Global gene expression analysis of fission yeast mutants impaired in Ser-2 phosphorylation of the RNA pol II carboxy terminal domain.

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    Reza Saberianfar

    Full Text Available In Schizosaccharomyces pombe the nuclear-localized Lsk1p-Lsc1p cyclin dependent kinase complex promotes Ser-2 phosphorylation of the heptad repeats found within the RNA pol II carboxy terminal domain (CTD. Here, we first provide evidence supporting the existence of a third previously uncharacterized Ser-2 CTD kinase subunit, Lsg1p. As expected for a component of the complex, Lsg1p localizes to the nucleus, promotes Ser-2 phosphorylation of the CTD, and physically interacts with both Lsk1p and Lsc1p in vivo. Interestingly, we also demonstrate that lsg1Δ mutants--just like lsk1Δ and lsc1Δ strains--are compromised in their ability to faithfully and reliably complete cytokinesis. Next, to address whether kinase mediated alterations in CTD phosphorylation might selectively alter the expression of genes with roles in cytokinesis and/or the cytoskeleton, global gene expression profiles were analyzed. Mutants impaired in Ser-2 phosphorylation display little change with respect to the level of transcription of most genes. However, genes affecting cytokinesis--including the actin interacting protein gene, aip1--as well as genes with roles in meiosis, are included in a small subset that are differentially regulated. Significantly, genetic analysis of lsk1Δ aip1Δ double mutants is consistent with Lsk1p and Aip1p acting in a linear pathway with respect to the regulation of cytokinesis.

  20. Random mutagenesis defines a domain of Theiler's virus leader protein that is essential for antagonism of nucleocytoplasmic trafficking and cytokine gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricour, Céline; Borghese, Fabian; Sorgeloos, Frédéric; Hato, Stanleyson V; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M; Michiels, Thomas

    2009-11-01

    The leader protein of cardioviruses, Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) and encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV), is a multifunctional protein known to antagonize type I interferon expression and to interfere with nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of host proteins and mRNA. This protein plays an important role in the capacity of TMEV to establish persistent infection of the central nervous system. Mutant forms of the TMEV leader protein were generated by random mutagenesis and selected after retroviral transduction on the basis of the loss of the highly toxic nature of this protein. Selected mutations define a short C-terminal domain of the leader conserved in TMEV and Saffold virus but lacking in the EMCV leader and thus called the Theilo domain. Mutations in this domain had a dramatic impact on TMEV L protein activity. Like the zinc finger mutation, Theilo domain mutations affected all of the activities of the L protein tested: interferon gene transcription and IRF-3 dimerization antagonism, alteration of nucleocytoplasmic trafficking, nucleoporin 98 hyperphosphorylation, and viral persistence in vivo. This suggests that the Zn finger and the Theilo domain of the protein cooperate for function. Moreover, the fact that all of the activities tested were affected by these mutations suggests that the various leader protein functions are somehow coupled.

  1. Multi-organ expression profiling uncovers a gene module in coronary artery disease involving transendothelial migration of leukocytes and LIM domain binding 2: The Stockholm Atherosclerosis Gene Expression (STAGE) study

    KAUST Repository

    Hägg, Sara

    2009-12-04

    Environmental exposures filtered through the genetic make-up of each individual alter the transcriptional repertoire in organs central to metabolic homeostasis, thereby affecting arterial lipid accumulation, inflammation, and the development of coronary artery disease (CAD). The primary aim of the Stockholm Atherosclerosis Gene Expression (STAGE) study was to determine whether there are functionally associated genes (rather than individual genes) important for CAD development. To this end, two-way clustering was used on 278 transcriptional profiles of liver, skeletal muscle, and visceral fat (n =66/tissue) and atherosclerotic and unaffected arterial wall (n =40/tissue) isolated from CAD patients during coronary artery bypass surgery. The first step, across all mRNA signals (n =15,042/12,621 RefSeqs/genes) in each tissue, resulted in a total of 60 tissue clusters (n= 3958 genes). In the second step (performed within tissue clusters), one atherosclerotic lesion (n =49/48) and one visceral fat (n =59) cluster segregated the patients into two groups that differed in the extent of coronary stenosis (P=0.008 and P=0.00015). The associations of these clusters with coronary atherosclerosis were validated by analyzing carotid atherosclerosis expression profiles. Remarkably, in one cluster (n =55/54) relating to carotid stenosis (P =0.04), 27 genes in the two clusters relating to coronary stenosis were confirmed (n= 16/17, P<10 -27and-30). Genes in the transendothelial migration of leukocytes (TEML) pathway were overrepresented in all three clusters, referred to as the atherosclerosis module (A-module). In a second validation step, using three independent cohorts, the Amodule was found to be genetically enriched with CAD risk by 1.8-fold (P<0.004). The transcription co-factor LIM domain binding 2 (LDB2) was identified as a potential high-hierarchy regulator of the A-module, a notion supported by subnetwork analysis, by cellular and lesion expression of LDB2, and by the

  2. Multi-organ expression profiling uncovers a gene module in coronary artery disease involving transendothelial migration of leukocytes and LIM domain binding 2: the Stockholm Atherosclerosis Gene Expression (STAGE study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Hägg

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Environmental exposures filtered through the genetic make-up of each individual alter the transcriptional repertoire in organs central to metabolic homeostasis, thereby affecting arterial lipid accumulation, inflammation, and the development of coronary artery disease (CAD. The primary aim of the Stockholm Atherosclerosis Gene Expression (STAGE study was to determine whether there are functionally associated genes (rather than individual genes important for CAD development. To this end, two-way clustering was used on 278 transcriptional profiles of liver, skeletal muscle, and visceral fat (n = 66/tissue and atherosclerotic and unaffected arterial wall (n = 40/tissue isolated from CAD patients during coronary artery bypass surgery. The first step, across all mRNA signals (n = 15,042/12,621 RefSeqs/genes in each tissue, resulted in a total of 60 tissue clusters (n = 3958 genes. In the second step (performed within tissue clusters, one atherosclerotic lesion (n = 49/48 and one visceral fat (n = 59 cluster segregated the patients into two groups that differed in the extent of coronary stenosis (P = 0.008 and P = 0.00015. The associations of these clusters with coronary atherosclerosis were validated by analyzing carotid atherosclerosis expression profiles. Remarkably, in one cluster (n = 55/54 relating to carotid stenosis (P = 0.04, 27 genes in the two clusters relating to coronary stenosis were confirmed (n = 16/17, P<10(-27 and-30. Genes in the transendothelial migration of leukocytes (TEML pathway were overrepresented in all three clusters, referred to as the atherosclerosis module (A-module. In a second validation step, using three independent cohorts, the A-module was found to be genetically enriched with CAD risk by 1.8-fold (P<0.004. The transcription co-factor LIM domain binding 2 (LDB2 was identified as a potential high-hierarchy regulator of the A-module, a notion supported by subnetwork analysis, by cellular and lesion expression of LDB2

  3. The receiver domain of the Agrobacterium tumfaciens VirA histidine kinase forms a stable interaction with VirG to activate virulence gene expression

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    Arlene A. Wise

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens carries a virulence gene system that is required for the initiation of crown gall tumors on susceptible plants. Expression of the vir genes is activated by the VirA/VirG two component regulatory system. VirA is a histidine kinase which signals the presence of certain chemicals found at the site of a plant wound. The receiver domain located at its carboxyl terminus defines VirA as a hybrid histidine kinase. Here, we show that the VirA receiver can interacts with the DNA-binding domain of VirG. This finding supports the hypothesis that the receiver acts as a recruiting factor for VirG. In addition, we show that removal of the VirA receiver allowed vir gene expression in response to glucose in a dose dependent manner, indicating that the receiver controls VirG activation and suggesting that the supplementary ChvE-sugar signal increases this activity.

  4. Fission yeast Cdk7 controls gene expression through both its CAK and C-terminal domain kinase activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devos, Maxime; Mommaerts, Elise; Migeot, Valerie; van Bakel, Harm; Hermand, Damien

    2015-05-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) activation and RNA polymerase II transcription are linked by the Cdk7 kinase, which phosphorylates Cdks as a trimeric Cdk-activating kinase (CAK) complex, and serine 5 within the polymerase II (Pol II) C-terminal domain (CTD) as transcription factor TFIIH-bound CAK. However, the physiological importance of integrating these processes is not understood. Besides the Cdk7 ortholog Mcs6, fission yeast possesses a second CAK, Csk1. The two enzymes have been proposed to act redundantly to activate Cdc2. Using an improved analogue-sensitive Mcs6-as kinase, we show that Csk1 is not a relevant CAK for Cdc2. Further analyses revealed that Csk1 lacks a 20-amino-acid sequence required for its budding yeast counterpart, Cak1, to bind Cdc2. Transcriptome profiling of the Mcs6-as mutant in the presence or absence of the budding yeast Cak1 kinase, in order to uncouple the CTD kinase and CAK activities of Mcs6, revealed an unanticipated role of the CAK branch in the transcriptional control of the cluster of genes implicated in ribosome biogenesis and cell growth. The analysis of a Cdc2 CAK site mutant confirmed these data. Our data show that the Cdk7 kinase modulates transcription through its well-described RNA Pol II CTD kinase activity and also through the Cdc2-activating kinase activity.

  5. Mutation of domain III and domain VI in L gene conserved domain of Nipah virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalani, Siti Aishah; Ibrahim, Nazlina

    2016-11-01

    Nipah virus (NiV) is the etiologic agent responsible for the respiratory illness and causes fatal encephalitis in human. NiV L protein subunit is thought to be responsible for the majority of enzymatic activities involved in viral transcription and replication. The L protein which is the viral RNA dependent RNA polymerase has high sequence homology among negative sense RNA viruses. In negative stranded RNA viruses, based on sequence alignment six conserved domain (domain I-IV) have been determined. Each domain is separated on variable regions that suggest the structure to consist concatenated functional domain. To directly address the roles of domains III and VI, site-directed mutations were constructed by the substitution of bases at sequences 2497, 2500, 5528 and 5532. Each mutated L gene can be used in future studies to test the ability for expression on in vitro translation.

  6. Questioned validity of Gene Expression Dysregulated Domains in Down's Syndrome [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/5ky

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long H. Do

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Recently, in studies examining fibroblasts obtained from the tissues of one set of monozygotic twins (i.e. fetuses derived from the same egg discordant for trisomy 21 (Down syndrome; DS, Letourneau et al., reported the presence of a defined pattern of dysregulation within specific genomic domains they referred to as Gene Expression Dysregulated Domains (GEDDs. GEDDs were described as alternating segments of increased or decreased gene expression affecting all chromosomes. Strikingly, GEDDs in fibroblasts were largely conserved in induced pluripotent cells (iPSCs generated from the twin’s fibroblasts as well as in fibroblasts from the Ts65Dn mouse model of DS. Our recent analysis failed to find GEDDs. We reexamined the human iPSCs RNAseq data from Letourneau et al., and data from this same research group published earlier examining iPSCs from the same monozygotic twins. An independent analysis of RNAseq data from Ts65Dn fibroblasts also failed to confirm presence of GEDDs. Our analysis questions the validity of GEDDs in DS.

  7. Three genes expressing Kunitz domains in the epididymis are related to genes of WFDC-type protease inhibitors and semen coagulum proteins in spite of lacking similarity between their protein products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilja Hans

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have previously identified a locus on human chromosome 20q13.1, encompassing related genes of postulated WFDC-type protease inhibitors and semen coagulum proteins. Three of the genes with WFDC motif also coded for the Kunitz-type protease inhibitor motif. In this report, we have reinvestigated the locus for homologous genes encoding Kunitz motif only. The identified genes have been analyzed with respect to structure, expression and function. Results We identified three novel genes; SPINT3, SPINT4 and SPINT5, and the structure of their transcripts were determined by sequencing of DNA generated by rapid amplification of cDNA ends. Each gene encodes a Kunitz domain preceded by a typical signal peptide sequence, which indicates that the proteins of 7.6, 8.7, and 9.7 kDa are secreted. Analysis of transcripts in 26 tissues showed that the genes predominantly are expressed in the epididymis. The recombinantly produced proteins could not inhibit the amidolytic activity of trypsin, chymotrypsin, plasmin, thrombin, coagulation factor Xa, elastase, urokinase and prostate specific antigen, whereas similarly made bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI had the same bioactivity as the protein isolated from bovine pancreas. Conclusions The similar organization, chromosomal location and site of expression, suggests that the novel genes are homologous with the genes of WFDC-type protease inhibitors and semen coagulum proteins, despite the lack of similarity in primary structure of their protein products. Their restricted expression to the epididymis suggests that they could be important for male reproduction. The recombinantly produced proteins are presumably bioactive, as demonstrated with similarly made BPTI, but may have a narrower spectrum of inhibition, as indicated by the lacking activity against eight proteases with differing specificity. Another possibility is that they have lost the protease inhibiting properties, which is

  8. G-patch domain containing 2, a gene highly expressed in testes, inhibits nuclear factor-κB and cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Fen; Gou, Lixia; Liu, Qing; Zhang, Wendian; Luo, Mengmeng; Zhang, Xiujun

    2015-02-01

    G-patch domain containing 2 (GPATC2), a human gene that is highly expressed in the testes, was implicated as a novel cancer/testis antigen. The present study investigated GPATC2 expression in a number of human cell lines and rat tissues, and its potential biological function in 293T cells. Semi‑quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that GPATC2 was widely expressed in 15 human cell lines (representing different lineages) and in 11 different rat tissues, and that the GPATC2 mRNA relative expression level was significantly higher in the testis than it was in other tissues. 293T cells were transiently transfected with GPATC2-p enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)‑N1 or GPATC2-pEGFP-C3 and the nuclei were stained with 4',6'‑diamidino‑2‑phenylindole. The results showed that GPATC2 is predominantly expressed in the nucleus of 293T cells. Overexpression of GPATC2 may inhibit transcription of the NF-κB reporter gene. The role of GPATC2 in proliferation was analyzed with cell counting kit-8, colony-forming efficiency and flow cytometry assays. The results indicated that over‑expression of GPATC2 in 293T cells significantly inhibited cell proliferation by decreasing the number of cells in S phase. By contrast, GPATC2 knockdown by RNA interference exhibited the opposite effect, suggesting that GPATC2 may be involved in inhibiting G1-S phase transition in 293T cells. In conclusion, these results provide novel insight into the breadth of expression of GPATC2 and its role in cell proliferation.

  9. Differential domain evolution and complex RNA processing in a family of paralogous EPB41 (protein 4.1) genes facilitates expression of diverse tissue-specific isoforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parra, Marilyn; Gee, Sherry; Chan, Nadine; Ryaboy, Dmitriy; Dubchak, Inna; Narla, Mohandas; Gascard, Philippe D.; Conboy, John G.

    2004-07-15

    The EPB41 (protein 4.1) genes epitomize the resourcefulness of the mammalian genome to encode a complex proteome from a small number of genes. By utilizing alternative transcriptional promoters and tissue-specific alternative pre-mRNA splicing, EPB41, EPB41L2, EPB41L3, and EPB41L1 encode a diverse array of structural adapter proteins. Comparative genomic and transcript analysis of these 140kb-240kb genes indicates several unusual features: differential evolution of highly conserved exons encoding known functional domains, interspersed with unique exons whose size and sequence variations contribute substantially to intergenic diversity: alternative first exons, most of which map far upstream of the coding regions; and complex tissue-specific alternative pre-mRNA splicing that facilitates synthesis of functionally different complements of 4.1 proteins in various cells. Understanding the splicing regulatory networks that control protein 4.1 expression will be critical to a full appreciation of the many roles of 4.1 proteins in normal cell biology and their proposed roles in human cancer.

  10. Recombinant Mitochondrial Transcription Factor A with N-terminal Mitochondrial Transduction Domain Increases Respiration and Mitochondrial Gene Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Iyer, Shilpa; Thomas, Ravindar R.; Portell, Francisco R.; Dunham, Lisa D.; Quigley, Caitlin K.; Bennett, James P

    2009-01-01

    We developed a scalable procedure to produce human mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) modified with an N-terminal protein transduction domain (PTD) and mitochondrial localization signal (MLS) that allow it to cross membranes and enter mitochondria through its “mitochondrial transduction domain” (MTD=PTD+MLS). Alexa488-labeled MTD-TFAM rapidly entered the mitochondrial compartment of cybrid cells carrying the G11778A LHON mutation. MTD-TFAM reversibly increased respiration and levels ...

  11. Regulation of OsSPX1 and OsSPX3 on Expression of OsSPX Domain Genes and Pi-starvation Signaling in Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-ye Wang; Han Hu; Hong-jie Huang; Ke Duan; Zhong-chang Wu; Ping Wu

    2009-01-01

    The rice (Oryza sativa L.) genome contains at least six genes exclusively with an SPX (SYG1/PHO81/XPR1) domain at the N-terminal, designated as OsSPX1-6. Here we report the diverse expression patterns of the OsSPX genes in different tissues and their responses to Pi-starvation. Among them, five genes, OsSPXI, 2,3, 5 and 6 are responsive to Pi-starvation in shoots and/or in roots. The subcellular localization analysis indicates that OsSPXI and OsSPX2 is exclusively located in nucleus, OsSPX3 in the cytoplasm, and OsSPX4 is a membrane localization protein. OsSPXI regulates OsSPX2, 3 and 5 at the transcription level and is positively involved in the responses of the genes to Pi-starvation. Overexpression of OsSPX3 downregulates OsSPXS in shoots under Pi-sufficiency. OsSPX3 negatively regulates the PSI (Pi-starvation induced) gene, OslPSI and is involved in the responses of miR399 and OsPHO2 to Pi-starvation. Our results suggest that OsSPXI may be a regulator involved in the transcriptions of OsSPX2, 3 and 5. OsSPX3 plays a role in OslPS1lmiR399 mediated long distance regulation on OsPHO2. Our results also indicate that OsSPX3 is involved in plant tolerance to Pi-starvation stress.

  12. Identification, molecular cloning and expression analysis of a HORMA domain containing Autophagy-related gene 13 (ATG13 from the coleopteran beetle, Tenebrio molitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Hee eLee

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a process that is necessary during starvation as it replenishes metabolic precursors by eliminating damaged organelles. Autophagy is mediated by more than 35 autophagy-related (Atg proteins that manifest in the nucleation, elongation, and curving of autophagosome membrane. We isolated a homolog of an ATG13 gene from the transcriptome database of the larva of the mealworm beetle, Tenebrio molitor (designated as TmATG13. The sequence analysis showed that TmATG13 cDNA comprises of 1,176 bp open reading frame that encodes a protein of 391 amino acids. Analyses of the structure-specific features of TmAtg13 showed an intrinsically disordered middle and C-terminal region, rich in regulatory phosphorylation sites. The N-terminal Atg13 domain show a HORMA (Hop1, Rev7, and Mad2 fold containing conserved amino acid residues across the Atg13 orthologs in insects. qRT-PCR revealed that TmATG13 was expressed ubiquitously in all the developmental stages of insect. TmATG13 mRNA expression was high in fat body and gut of the larval and adult stages of the insect. During ovary development and maturation, the TmATG13 transcripts showed high expression until six days of development, followed by a significant decline. The prospective functions mediated by TmAtg13 during autophagy will be clarified by further studies in the near future.

  13. ARF-Aux/IAA interactions through domain III/IV are not strictly required for auxin-responsive gene expression

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Auxin response factors (ARFs), together with auxin/indole acetic acid proteins (Aux/IAAs), are transcription factors that play key roles in regulating auxin-responsive transcription in plants. Current models for auxin signaling predict that auxin response is dependent on ARF-Aux/IAA interactions mediated by the related protein-protein interaction domain (i.e., referred to as the CTD) found in the ARF and Aux/IAA C-terminal regions. When auxin concentrations in a cell are low, ARF activators r...

  14. The WRKY57 Transcription Factor Affects the Expression of Jasmonate ZIM-Domain Genes Transcriptionally to Compromise Botrytis cinerea Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yanjuan; Yu, Diqiu

    2016-08-01

    Although necrotrophic pathogens cause many devastating plant diseases, our understanding of the plant defense response to them is limited. Here, we found that loss of function of WRKY57 enhanced the resistance of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) against Botrytis cinerea infection. Further investigation suggested that the negative regulation of WRKY57 against B cinerea depends on the jasmonic acid (JA) signaling pathway. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that WRKY57 directly binds to the promoters of JASMONATE ZIM-DOMAIN1 (JAZ1) and JAZ5, encoding two important repressors of the JA signaling pathway, and activates their transcription. In vivo and in vitro experiments demonstrated that WRKY57 interacts with nuclear-encoded SIGMA FACTOR BINDING PROTEIN1 (SIB1) and SIB2. Further experiments display that the same domain, the VQ motif, of SIB1 and SIB2 interact with WRKY33 and WRKY57. Moreover, transient transcriptional activity assays confirmed that WRKY57 and WRKY33 competitively regulate JAZ1 and JAZ5, SIB1 and SIB2 further enhance these competitions of WRKY57 to WRKY33. Therefore, coordinated regulation of Arabidopsis against B cinerea by transcription activators and repressors would benefit plants by allowing fine regulation of defense.

  15. Cloning, expression analysis, and RNA interference study of a HORMA domain containing autophagy-related gene 13 (ATG13) from the coleopteran beetle, Tenebrio molitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung Hee; Jo, Yong Hun; Patnaik, Bharat Bhusan; Park, Ki Beom; Tindwa, Hamisi; Seo, Gi Won; Chandrasekar, Raman; Lee, Yong Seok; Han, Yeon Soo

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a process that is necessary during starvation, as it replenishes metabolic precursors by eliminating damaged organelles. Autophagy is mediated by more than 35 autophagy-related (Atg) proteins that participate in the nucleation, elongation, and curving of the autophagosome membrane. In a pursuit to address the role of autophagy during development and immune resistance of the mealworm beetle, Tenebrio molitor, we screened ATG gene sequences from the whole-larva transcriptome database. We identified a homolog of ATG13 gene in T. molitor (designated as TmATG13) that comprises a cDNA of 1176 bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding a protein of 391 amino acids. Analyses of the structure-specific features of TmAtg13 showed an intrinsically disordered middle and C-terminal region that was rich in regulatory phosphorylation sites. The N-terminal Atg13 domain had a HORMA (Hop1, Rev7, and Mad2) fold containing amino acid residues conserved across the Atg13 insect orthologs. A quantitative reverse-transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that TmATG13 was expressed ubiquitously during all developmental stages of the insect. TmATG13 mRNA expression was high in the fat body and gut of the larval and adult stages of the insect. The TmATG13 transcripts were expressed at a high level until 6 days of ovarian development, followed by a significant decline. Silencing of ATG13 transcripts in T. molitor larvae showed a reduced survivability of 39 and 38% in response to Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus infection. Furthermore, the role of TmAtg13 in initiating autophagy as a part of the host cell autophagic complex of the host cells against the intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is currently under study and will be critical to unfold the structure-function relationships.

  16. Neighboring Genes Show Correlated Evolution in Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbarian, Avazeh T.; Hurst, Laurence D.

    2015-01-01

    When considering the evolution of a gene’s expression profile, we commonly assume that this is unaffected by its genomic neighborhood. This is, however, in contrast to what we know about the lack of autonomy between neighboring genes in gene expression profiles in extant taxa. Indeed, in all eukaryotic genomes genes of similar expression-profile tend to cluster, reflecting chromatin level dynamics. Does it follow that if a gene increases expression in a particular lineage then the genomic neighbors will also increase in their expression or is gene expression evolution autonomous? To address this here we consider evolution of human gene expression since the human-chimp common ancestor, allowing for both variation in estimation of current expression level and error in Bayesian estimation of the ancestral state. We find that in all tissues and both sexes, the change in gene expression of a focal gene on average predicts the change in gene expression of neighbors. The effect is highly pronounced in the immediate vicinity (genes increasing their expression in humans tend to avoid nuclear lamina domains and be enriched for the gene activator 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, we conclude that, most probably owing to chromatin level control of gene expression, a change in gene expression of one gene likely affects the expression evolution of neighbors, what we term expression piggybacking, an analog of hitchhiking. PMID:25743543

  17. Nuclear transfer alters placental gene expression and associated histone modifications of the placental-specific imprinted gene pleckstrin homology-like domain, family A, member 2 (PHLDA2) in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Daniel R; Gaspar, Roberta C; da Rocha, Carlos V; Sangalli, Juliano R; de Bem, Tiago H C; Corrêa, Carolina A P; Penteado, João C T; Meirelles, Flavio V; Lopes, Flavia L

    2017-03-01

    Abnormal placental development is frequent in nuclear transfer (NT) pregnancies and is likely to be associated with altered epigenetic reprogramming. In the present study, fetal and placental measurements were taken on Day 60 of gestation in cows with pregnancies produced by AI, IVF and NT. Placentas were collected and subjected to histological evaluation, the expression of genes important in trophoblast differentiation and expression of the placental imprinted gene pleckstrin homology-like domain, family A, member 2 (PHLDA2), as well as chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) for histone marks within the promoter of PHLDA2. Fewer binucleated cells were observed in NT cotyledons, followed by IVF and AI cotyledons (P<0.05). Expression of heart and neural crest derivatives expressed 1 (HAND1), placental lactogen (PL), pregnancy-associated glycoprotein 9 (PAG-9) and PHLDA2 was elevated in NT cotyledons compared with AI cotyledons. Expression of PHLDA2 was higher in IVF than AI samples (P<0.05). ChIP revealed an increase in the permissive mark dimethylation of lysine 4 on histone H3 (H3K4me2), surprisingly associated with the silent allele of PHLDA2, and a decrease in the inhibitory mark H3K9me2 in NT samples. Thus, genes critical for placental development were altered in NT placentas, including an imprinted gene. Allele-specific changes in the permissive histone mark in the PHLDA2 promoter indicate misregulation of imprinting in clones. Abnormal trophoblast differentiation could have resulted in lower numbers of binucleated cells following NT. These results suggest that the altered expression of imprinted genes associated with NT are also caused by changes in histone modifications.

  18. Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Gene Expression Omnibus is a public functional genomics data repository supporting MIAME-compliant submissions of array- and sequence-based data. Tools are provided...

  19. Characterization of fibronectin type III domain-containing protein 5 (FNDC5) gene in chickens: Cloning, tissue expression, and regulation of its expression in the muscle by fasting and cold exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Fang, Wenqian; Hu, Yuanyuan; Wang, Yajun; Li, Juan

    2015-10-10

    Irisin, a novel myokine encoded by fibronectin type III domain-containing protein 5 gene (FNDC5), is reported to stimulate brown fat-like development of white fat tissue and thermogenesis in mammals recently. However, information about the structure, tissue expression, and roles of FNDC5/irisin remains unknown in non-mammalian vertebrates including birds. In this study, we first cloned the FNDC5 (cFNDC5) cDNA from chickens. cFNDC5 is predicted to encode a 220-amino acid precursor containing the putative 'irisin peptide' of 112 amino acids, which shows high amino acid sequence identity with irisin of humans (97%), mice (97%), anole lizards (93%) and zebrafish (~80%). Using quantitative real-time PCR, we further examined cFNDC5 mRNA expression in chicken tissues. The results showed that in adult chickens, cFNDC5 is abundantly expressed in the muscle, heart, pituitary, ovary and various brain regions, and moderately expressed in adipose tissue, kidneys, lung, testes and small intestine. Moreover, cFNDC5 is also abundantly expressed in the muscle, brain, hypothalamus and pituitary of developing embryos and post-hatching chicks. Interestingly, we noted that cFNDC5 expression in the muscle of 3-week-old chicks could be induced by fasting and cold exposure, while its expression decreases during differentiation of pre-adipocytes cultured in vitro. Collectively, our data suggest that FNDC5/irisin is more than a 'myokine' and may be related to the development/functions of many tissues (e.g. muscle, brain, fat), as well as metabolic status of chickens. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Mutation in domain II of IAA1 confers diverse auxin-related phenotypes and represses auxin-activated expression of Aux/IAA genes in steroid regulator-inducible system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin-Young; Kim, Hye-Joung; Kim, Jungmook

    2002-12-01

    Most of Aux/IAA genes are rapidly induced by auxin. The Aux/IAA proteins are short-lived nuclear proteins sharing the four conserved domains. Domain II is critical for rapid degradation of Aux/IAA proteins. Among these gene family members, IAA1 is one of the earliest auxin-inducible genes. We used a steroid hormone-inducible system to reveal putative roles and downstream signaling of IAA1 in auxin response. Arabidopsis transgenic plants were generated expressing fusion protein of IAA1 (IAA1-GR) or IAA1 with a mutation in domain II (iaa1-GR) and the glucocorticoid hormone-binding domain (GR). IAA1-GR transgenic plants did not exhibit any discernable phenotypic differences by DEX treatment that allows nuclear translocation of the fusion protein. In contrast, diverse auxin-related physiological processes including gravitropism and phototropism were impaired by DEX treatment in roots, hypocotyls, stems, and leaves in iaa1-GR transgenic plants. Auxin induction of seven Aux/IAA mRNAs including IAA1 itself was repressed by DEX treatment, suggesting that IAA1 functions in the nucleus by mediating auxin response and might act as a negative feedback regulator for the expression of Aux/IAA genes including IAA1 itself. Auxin induction of Aux/IAA genes in the presence of cycloheximide can be repressed by DEX treatment, showing that the repression of transcription of the Aux/IAAs by the iaa1 mutant protein is primary. Wild-type IAA1-GR could not suppress auxin induction of IAA1 and IAA2. These results indicate that inhibition of auxin-activated transcription of Aux/IAA genes by the iaa1 mutant protein might be responsible for alteration of various auxin responses.

  1. Gene Cloning, Expression, Purification and Antigenicity Identification of Tamm-Horsfall Protein Domain%Tamm-Horsfall蛋白片段的基因克隆、表达、纯化及抗原性鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱美财; 马红雨; 王红; 陈涛

    2012-01-01

    目的 克隆并表达尿调节素(Tamm-Horsfall,THP)蛋白片段的基因,检测其抗原性.方法 利用RT-PCR技术扩增THP蛋白片段基因,测序后将目的基因克隆入原核表达质粒pET28a载体,转化至大场杆菌BL21(DE3),经IPTG诱导表达,获得重组THP蛋白片段.经NI亲和层析柱纯化,用western-blot检测重组蛋白与THP单克隆抗体结合活性.结果 克隆THP蛋白片段基因,其开放阅读框为195 bp编码65个氨基酸.表达的重组THP蛋白片段以包涵体形式存在,菌体蛋白纯化后,经western-blot检测具有较好的抗原性.结论 成功地克隆和表达了THP片段的基因,为抗THP单克隆抗体制备和THP检测试剂盒的研发奠定了基础.%Objective To investigate the cloning and expression of a part of gene encoding Tamm- Horsfall protein (THP) domain and exam its antigenicity. Methods A part of gene encoding Tamm-Horsfall protein domain was amplified by reverse-translation polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). After sequencing, the intent gene was cloned into expression plasmid vector pET28a and then transformed into Ecoli. BL21 (DE3). The THP domain was expressed by inducing with IPTG, purified by Ni-affinity chromatography. The combination activity of re-combinant protein with anti-THP monoclonal antibody was detected by western-blot. Results A 195 bp fragment from THP gene encoding 65 amino acids was cloned. The THP domains were expressed as inclusion bodies. After purification, it could be recognized by anti-THP monoclonal antibody by western-blot. Conclusion A part of gene encoding THP domain was successfully cloned and expressed. It could be used to develop anti-THP monoclonal antibody and THP test kit.

  2. Hypoxia influences expression profile of Pleckstrin homology-like domain, family A, member 2 in Indian catfish, Clarias batrachus (Linnaeus, 1758): A new candidate gene for hypoxia tolerance in fish

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vindhya Mohindra; Ratnesh K Tripathi; Prabhaker Yadav; Rajeev K Singh; Kuldeep K Lal

    2014-06-01

    Several physiologically important genes were found to be regulated by hypoxia at the transcriptional level. The Pleckstrin homology-like domain, family A, member 2 (PHLDA2) gene was previously identified as an imprinted gene. The present study was aimed to determine the structure of complete cDNA and the deduced protein of PHLDA2 along with analysing the changes in its mRNA expression in Clarias batrachus tissues under hypoxic conditions. The complete cDNA of CbPHLDA2 gene consisted of 1009 nucleotides with an open reading frame of 417 nucleotides. The deduced CbPHLDA2 protein of 139 amino acids shared high homology with PHLD2A of other fishes as well as that of vertebrates. Importantly, a single amino acid (asparagine/lysine) insertion was identified in the PH domain of CbPHLDA2 and other fishes, which was absent in other vertebrates studied. Furthermore, under normoxic conditions, CbPHLDA2 was constitutively expressed with varying levels in analysed tissues. Short- and long-term hypoxia exposure resulted in significant changes in the expression of CbPHLDA2 in liver, spleen, head kidney, brain and muscle in a time-dependent manner. The results suggested that CbPHLDA2 might play an important role for adaptive significance under hypoxia.

  3. EXPRESS: EXPressing REstful Semantic Services Using Domain Ontologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alowisheq, Areeb; Millard, David E.; Tiropanis, Thanassis

    Existing approaches to Semantic Web Services (SWS) require a domain ontology and a semantic description of the service. In the case of lightweight SWS approaches, such as SAWSDL, service description is achieved by semantically annotating existing web service interfaces. Other approaches such as OWL-S and WSMO describe services in a separate ontology. So, existing approaches separate service description from domain description, therefore increasing design efforts. We propose EXPRESS a lightweight approach to SWS that requires the domain ontology definition only. Its simplicity stems from the similarities between REST and the Semantic Web such as resource realization, self describing representations, and uniform interfaces. The semantics of a service is elicited from a resource's semantic description in the domain ontology and the semantics of the uniform interface, hence eliminating the need for ontologically describing services. We provide an example that illustrates EXPRESS and then discuss how it compares to SA-REST and WSMO.

  4. Tumor-specific gene expression patterns with gene expression profiles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RUAN Xiaogang; LI Yingxin; LI Jiangeng; GONG Daoxiong; WANG Jinlian

    2006-01-01

    Gene expression profiles of 14 common tumors and their counterpart normal tissues were analyzed with machine learning methods to address the problem of selection of tumor-specific genes and analysis of their differential expressions in tumor tissues. First, a variation of the Relief algorithm, "RFE_Relief algorithm" was proposed to learn the relations between genes and tissue types. Then, a support vector machine was employed to find the gene subset with the best classification performance for distinguishing cancerous tissues and their counterparts. After tissue-specific genes were removed, cross validation experiments were employed to demonstrate the common deregulated expressions of the selected gene in tumor tissues. The results indicate the existence of a specific expression fingerprint of these genes that is shared in different tumor tissues, and the hallmarks of the expression patterns of these genes in cancerous tissues are summarized at the end of this paper.

  5. Upregulated expression of La ribonucleoprotein domain family member 6 and collagen type I gene following water-filtered broad-spectrum near-infrared irradiation in a 3-dimensional human epidermal tissue culture model as revealed by microarray analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yohei; Nakayama, Jun

    2017-02-27

    Water-filtered broad-spectrum near-infrared irradiation can induce various biological effects, as our previous clinical, histological, and biochemical investigations have shown. However, few studies that examined the changes thus induced in gene expression. The aim was to investigate the changes in gene expression in a 3-dimensional reconstructed epidermal tissue culture exposed to water-filtered broad-spectrum near-infrared irradiation. DNA microarray and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis was used to assess gene expression levels in a 3-dimensional reconstructed epidermal model composed of normal human epidermal cells exposed to water-filtered broad-spectrum near-infrared irradiation. The water filter allowed 1000-1800 nm wavelengths and excluded 1400-1500 nm wavelengths, and cells were exposed to 5 or 10 rounds of near-infrared irradiation at 10 J/cm(2) . A DNA microarray with over 50 000 different probes showed 18 genes that were upregulated or downregulated by at least twofold after irradiation. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that, relative to control cells, the gene encoding La ribonucleoprotein domain family member 6 (LARP6), which regulates collagen expression, was significantly and dose-dependently upregulated (P < 0.05) by water-filtered broad-spectrum near-infrared exposure. Gene encoding transcripts of collagen type I were significantly upregulated compared with controls (P < 0.05). This study demonstrates the ability of water-filtered broad-spectrum near-infrared irradiation to stimulate the production of type I collagen. © 2017 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  6. Two pectin lyase genes, pnl-1 and pnl-2, from Colletotrichum gloeosporioides f. sp. malvae differ in a cellulose-binding domain and in their expression during infection of Malva pusilla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yangdou; Shih, Jenny; Li, Jieran; Goodwin, Paul H

    2002-07-01

    Two pectin lyase genes, designated pnl-1 and pnl-2, were cloned from Colletotrichum gloeosporioides f. sp. malvae, a pathogen of round-leaved mallow (Malva pusilla). pnl-1 was isolated using cDNA from infected plant material; pnl-2 was isolated using cDNA from 3-day-old mycelia grown in mallow-cell-wall extract (MCWE) broth. pnl-1 is the first pectinase gene described thus far to encode a cellulose-binding domain (CBD), which is common in cellulases and xylanases, whereas pnl-2 encodes a pectin lyase that lacks a CBD. In pure culture, pnl-1 expression could be detected when purified pectin or glucose was the sole carbon source, but not when MCWE was the sole carbon source. The lack of pnl-1 expression appeared to be due to gene repression by some unknown factor(s) in the cell-wall extract. In contrast, expression of pnl-2 was detected in cultures when MCWE, but not when purified pectin or glucose, was the sole carbon source. In infected tissue, detection of pnl-1 expression by Northern-blot hybridization and by RT-PCR began with the onset of the necrotrophic phase of infection. Expression ofpnl-2 was not detectable by Northern-blot hybridization, but was observed byRT-PCR in both the biotrophic and necrotrophic phases of infection. The differences between pnl-1 and pnl-2 (i.e. pnl-1 encoding a CBD and differences in the expression patterns of both genes) may be related to the requirements of C. gloeosporioides f. sp. malvae to be able to grow in host tissue under the different conditions present during the biotrophic and necrotrophic phases of infection.

  7. Characterization and expression analysis of EF hand domain-containing calcium-regulatory gene from disk abalone: calcium homeostasis and its role in immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikapitiya, Chamilani; De Zoysa, Mahanama; Whang, Ilson; Kim, Se-Jae; Choi, Cheol Young; Lee, Jae-Seong; Lee, Jehee

    2010-08-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of a calcium-regulatory gene (denoted as Ab-CaReg I) was identified from the disk abalone Haliotis discus discus cDNA library. The Ab-CaReg I is composed of 176 amino acids and the calculated molecular mass and isoelectric point were 20 and 4.2, respectively. The sequence homology of Ab-CaReg I was 28-30 and 18-27% of known calmodulin and troponin C, respectively. Four characteristic calcium-binding EF hand motifs with some modifications at conserved positions of known homologous calmodulin genes were observed in the sequence. The tissue-specific transcription analysis and variation of mRNA transcription level of Ab-CaReg I in gills and mantle after animals were immersed in seawater containing 2000 ppm CaCl(2) was quantified by SYBR Green real-time PCR analysis. Transcription variation of Ab-CaReg I in hemocytes and gills followed by bacteria challenge (Vibrio alginolyticus, Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Listeria monocytogenes) was used to investigate Ab-CaReg I in immune responses. Transcripts of Ab-CaReg I mRNA were mainly detected in hemocytes, mantle, muscle, gills, digestive tract and hepatopancreas with highest expression in hemocytes. The CaCl(2) immersion significantly altered the Ab-CaReg I mRNA transcription level by 3 h, compared to animals in normal seawater (control). The mRNA expression of Ab-CaReg I in gills and hemocytes was upregulated significantly to 11-fold and 4-fold in 3 h compared to control (uninfected), respectively, in bacteria-challenged abalones. The results suggest that Ab-CaReg I could be effectively induced to maintain internal Ca(2+) homeostasis of the animal due to influx of Ca(2+) in the cells by external stimuli such as a high dose of Ca(2+) and pathogens like bacteria.

  8. An A20/AN1-zinc-finger domain containing protein gene in tea is differentially expressed during winter dormancy and in response to abiotic stress and plant growth regulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asosii Paul

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The present manuscript describes cloning and expression characterization of A20/AN1-zinc-finger domain containing protein (CsZfp gene in an evergreen tree tea [Camellia sinensis (L. O. Kuntze] in response to winter dormancy (WD, abiotic stresses (polyethylene glycol, hydrogen peroxide, and sodium chloride and plant growth regulators [abscisic acid (ABA, and gibberellic acid (GA3]. CsZfp encoded a putative protein of 173 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 18.44 kDa, an isoelectric point (pI of 6.50 and grand average of hydropathicity (GRAVY value of −0.334. The gene did not have an intron, and belonged to a multi-gene family. During the period of active growth (PAG, CsZfp showed maximum expression in root and fruit as compared to leaf, floral bud and stem. Interaction studies between temperature and plant growth regulators on the expression of CsZfp showed that ABA upregulated CsZfp expression at growth temperature (GT; 25 °C but had no effect at low temperature (LT; 4 °C. In response to GA3, upregulation was observed at LT but not at GT. Further, the expression was not modulated by LT either in the tissue harvested during PAG or during WD. It was interesting to record that the expression of CsZfp was upregulated by hydrogen peroxide and sodium chloride, whereas it was non-responsive to polyethylene glycol. The possible role of CsZfp in playing key but differential roles in tea to various abiotic stresses is discussed.

  9. Dynamics of chromatin accessibility and gene regulation by MADS-domain transcription factorsin flower development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pajoro, A.; Madrigal, P.; Muiño, J.M.; Tomas Matus, J.; Jin, J.; Mecchia, M.A.; Debernardi, J.M.; Palatnik, J.F.; Balazadeh, S.; Arif, M.; Ó’Maoiléidigh, D.S.; Wellmer, F.; Krajewski, P.; Riechmann, J.L.; Angenent, G.C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Development of eukaryotic organisms is controlled by transcription factors that trigger specific and global changes in gene expression programs. In plants, MADS-domain transcription factors act as master regulators of developmental switches and organ specification. However, the mechanism

  10. The flow of gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misteli, Tom

    2004-03-01

    Gene expression is a highly interconnected multistep process. A recent meeting in Iguazu Falls, Argentina, highlighted the need to uncover both the molecular details of each single step as well as the mechanisms of coordination among processes in order to fully understand the expression of genes.

  11. Expression of the Adenovirus Early Gene 1A Transcription-Repression Domain Alone Downregulates HER2 and Results in the Death of Human Breast Cancer Cells Upregulated for the HER2 Proto-Oncogene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewenstein, Paul M; Green, Maurice

    2011-07-01

    Adenovirus (Ad) early gene 1A 243 residue protein (E1A 243R) possesses a potent transcription-repression function within the N-terminal 80 amino acids (E1A 1-80). We examined the ability of E1A 243R and E1A 1-80 to repress transcription of both an exogenous and the endogenous HER2 promoter in a human breast cancer cell line upregulated for the HER2 proto-oncogene (SK-BR-3). Both moieties repressed HER2 expression by over 90%. When E1A 1-80 was expressed from a nonreplicative Ad vector, levels of expression were lower than anticipated. Addition of nonspecific sequences to the E1A 1-80 C-terminus (E1A 1-80 C+) enhanced its expression 10- to 20-fold. Because "oncogene addiction" suggests that repression of HER2 could kill HER2 upregulated cells, we examined the ability of full-length E1A 243R and E1A 1-80 C+ delivered by an Ad vector to kill HER2 upregulated SK-BR-3 cells. Expression of both E1A 243R and E1A 1-80 C+ killed SK-BR-3 cells but not normal breast cells. E1A 1-80 C+ is a particularly effective killer of SK-BR-3 cells. At 144 h post infection, over 85% of SK-BR-3 cells were killed by a 100 moi of the Ad vector expressing E1A 1-80 C+. As controls, Ad vectors expressing E1A 243R with deletion of all known functional domains or expressing unrelated β-galactosidase had no effect. Three additional human breast cancer cells lines reported to be upregulated for HER2 or another EGF family member (EGFR) were found to be efficiently killed by expression of E1A 1-80 C+, whereas three additional "normal" cell lines (two derived from breast and one from foreskin) were not. The ability of the E1A transcription-repression domain alone to kill HER2 upregulated breast cancer cells has potential for development of therapies for treatment of aggressive human breast cancers and potentially other human cancers that overexpress HER2.

  12. Ascidian gene-expression profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Jeffery, William R.

    2002-01-01

    With the advent of gene-expression profiling, a large number of genes can now be investigated simultaneously during critical stages of development. This approach will be particularly informative in studies of ascidians, basal chordates whose genomes and embryology are uniquely suited for mapping developmental gene networks.

  13. Vitamin D-mediated gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, K E; Maiyar, A C; Norman, A W

    1992-01-01

    The steroid hormone 1,25(OH)2D3 modulates the expression of a wide variety of genes in a tissue- and developmentally specific manner. It is well established that 1,25(OH)2D3 can up- or downregulate the expression of genes involved in cell proliferation, differentiation, and mineral homeostasis. The hormone exerts its genomic effects via interactions with the vitamin D receptor or VDR, a member of the superfamily of hormone-activated nuclear receptors which can regulate eukaryotic gene expression. The ligand-bound receptor acts as a transcription factor that binds to specific DNA sequences, HREs, in target gene promoters. The DNA-binding domains of the steroid hormone receptors are highly conserved and contain two zinc-finger motifs that recognize the HREs. The spacing and orientation of the HRE half-sites, as well as the HRE sequence, are critical for proper discrimination by the various receptors. Other nuclear factors such as fos and jun can influence vitamin D-mediated gene expression. A wide range of experimental techniques has been used to increase our understanding of how 1,25(OH)2D3 and its receptor play a central role in gene expression.

  14. Seedling Lethal1, a Pentatricopeptide Repeat Protein Lacking an E/E+ or DYW Domain in Arabidopsis, Is Involved in Plastid Gene Expression and Early Chloroplast Development1[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyo, Young Jae; Kwon, Kwang-Chul; Kim, Anna; Cho, Myeon Haeng

    2013-01-01

    Chloroplasts are the site of photosynthesis and the biosynthesis of essential metabolites, including amino acids, fatty acids, and secondary metabolites. It is known that many seedling-lethal mutants are impaired in chloroplast function or development, indicating the development of functional chloroplast is essential for plant growth and development. Here, we isolated a novel transfer DNA insertion mutant, dubbed sel1 (for seedling lethal1), that exhibited a pigment-defective and seedling-lethal phenotype with a disrupted pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) gene. Sequence analysis revealed that SEL1 is a member of the PLS subgroup, which is lacking known E/E+ or DYW domains at the C terminus, in the PLS subfamily of the PPR protein family containing a putative N-terminal transit peptide and 14 putative PPR or PPR-like motifs. Confocal microscopic analysis showed that the SEL1-green fluorescent protein fusion protein is localized in chloroplasts. Transmission electron microscopic analysis revealed that the sel1 mutant is impaired in the etioplast, as well as in chloroplast development. In sel1 mutants, plastid-encoded proteins involved in photosynthesis were rarely detected due to the lack of the corresponding transcripts. Furthermore, transcript profiles of plastid genes revealed that, in sel1 mutants, the transcript levels of plastid-encoded RNA polymerase-dependent genes were greatly reduced, but those of nuclear-encoded RNA polymerase-dependent genes were increased or not changed. Additionally, the RNA editing of two editing sites of the acetyl-CoA carboxylase beta subunit gene transcripts in the sel1 mutant was compromised, though it is not directly connected with the sel1 mutant phenotype. Our results demonstrate that SEL1 is involved in the regulation of plastid gene expression required for normal chloroplast development. PMID:24144791

  15. A fasciclin-domain containing gene, ZeFLA11, is expressed exclusively in xylem elements that have reticulate wall thickenings in the stem vascular system of Zinnia elegans cv Envy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahiya, Preeti; Findlay, Kim; Roberts, Keith; McCann, Maureen C

    2006-05-01

    The vascular cylinder of the mature stem of Zinnia elegans cv Envy contains two anatomically distinct sets of vascular bundles, stem bundles and leaf-trace bundles. We isolated a full-length cDNA of ZeFLA11, a fasciclin-domain-containing gene, from a zinnia cDNA library derived from in vitro cultures of mesophyll cells induced to form tracheary elements. Using RNA in situ hybridization, we show that ZeFLA11 is expressed in the differentiating xylem vessels with reticulate type wall thickenings and adjacent parenchyma cells of zinnia stem bundles, but not in the leaf-trace bundles that deposit spiral thickenings. Our results suggest a function for this cell-surface GPI-anchored glycoprotein in secondary wall deposition during differentiation of metaxylem tissue with reticulate vessels.

  16. Distinct function of COAR and B3 domains of maize VP1 in induction of ectopic gene expression and plant developmental phenotypes in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maize VP1 enhancement of ABA sensitivity in roots is B3 independent. ABA and VP1 mediated suppression of auxin induced lateral root development is B3 independent. Arabidopsis transgenic system to delineate B3 dependent and COAR domain dependent regulatory functions of VP1. Analyses of ectopic ABA re...

  17. Human Lacrimal Gland Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aakalu, Vinay Kumar; Parameswaran, Sowmya; Maienschein-Cline, Mark; Bahroos, Neil; Shah, Dhara; Ali, Marwan; Krishnakumar, Subramanian

    2017-01-01

    Background The study of human lacrimal gland biology and development is limited. Lacrimal gland tissue is damaged or poorly functional in a number of disease states including dry eye disease. Development of cell based therapies for lacrimal gland diseases requires a better understanding of the gene expression and signaling pathways in lacrimal gland. Differential gene expression analysis between lacrimal gland and other embryologically similar tissues may be helpful in furthering our understanding of lacrimal gland development. Methods We performed global gene expression analysis of human lacrimal gland tissue using Affymetrix ® gene expression arrays. Primary data from our laboratory was compared with datasets available in the NLM GEO database for other surface ectodermal tissues including salivary gland, skin, conjunctiva and corneal epithelium. Results The analysis revealed statistically significant difference in the gene expression of lacrimal gland tissue compared to other ectodermal tissues. The lacrimal gland specific, cell surface secretory protein encoding genes and critical signaling pathways which distinguish lacrimal gland from other ectodermal tissues are described. Conclusions Differential gene expression in human lacrimal gland compared with other ectodermal tissue types revealed interesting patterns which may serve as the basis for future studies in directed differentiation among other areas. PMID:28081151

  18. A gene encoding a protein with a proline-rich domain (MtPPRD1), revealed by suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH), is specifically expressed in the Medicago truncatula embryo axis during germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouton, Sophie; Viau, Laure; Lelièvre, Eric; Limami, Anis M

    2005-03-01

    A gene MtPPRD1, encoding a protein of 132 amino acids containing a proline-rich domain (PRD), has been revealed by suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH) with two mRNA populations of embryo axes harvested immediately before and after radicle emergence. Although at the protein level MtPPRD1 showed low homology with plant lipid transfer proteins (LTPs), it did exhibit the eight cysteine residues conserved in all plant LTPs, a characteristic signature that allows the formation of a hydrophobic cavity adapted for loading hydrophobic molecules. Expression studies of MtPPRD1 have been carried out by quantitative real time RT-PCR throughout germination and post-germination processes in control seeds and seeds in which germination was delayed by abscisic acid (ABA) or the glutamine synthetase inhibitor methionine sulphoximine (MSX) treatments. The results showed that MtPPRD1 expression is developmentally regulated, induced in the embryo axis immediately before radicle emergence, reaches its maximum expression and declines during the early post-germination phase. Organ specificity studies showed that, except for a low and probably constitutive expression in roots, MtPPRD1 is specifically expressed in the embryo axis. Based on both experimental and in silico studies several putative roles are proposed for MtPPRD1 in Medicago truncatula, this protein can intervene (i) as an LTP in membrane biogenesis and regulation of the intracellular fatty acid pool by binding and transferring fatty acids and phospholipids between membranes, (ii) in the control of a developmental process specific to late germination and to early phases of post-germination, and (iii) and/or pathogen defence.

  19. Functional divergence of gene duplicates – a domain-centric view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaladkar Mugdha

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene duplicates have been shown to evolve at different rates. Here we further investigate the mechanism and functional underpinning of this phenomenon by assessing asymmetric evolution specifically within functional domains of gene duplicates. Results Based on duplicate genes in five teleost fishes resulting from a whole genome duplication event, we first show that a Fisher Exact test based approach to detect asymmetry is more sensitive than the previously used Likelihood Ratio test. Using our Fisher Exact test, we found that the evolutionary rate asymmetry in the overall protein is largely explained by the asymmetric evolution within specific protein domains. Moreover, among cases of asymmetrically evolving domains, for the gene copy containing a fast evolving domain, the non-synonymous substitutions often cluster within the fast evolving domain. We found that rare substitutions were preferred within asymmetrically evolving domains suggestive of functional divergence. While overall ~32 % of the domains tested were found to be evolving asymmetrically, certain protein domains such as the Tyrosine and Ser/Thr Kinase domains had a much greater prevalence of asymmetric evolution. Finally, based on the spatial expression of Zebra fish duplicate proteins during development, we found that protein pairs containing asymmetrically evolving domains had a greater divergence in gene expression as compared to the duplicate proteins that did not exhibit asymmetric evolution. Conclusions Taken together, our results suggest that the previously observed asymmetry in the overall duplicate protein evolution is largely due to divergence of specific domains of the protein, and coincides with divergence in spatial expression domains.

  20. Random mutagenesis defines a domain of Theiler's virus leader protein that is essential for antagonism of nucleocytoplasmic trafficking and cytokine gene expression.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ricour, C.; Borghese, F.; Sorgeloos, F.; Hato, S.V.; Kuppeveld, F.J.M. van; Michiels, T.

    2009-01-01

    The leader protein of cardioviruses, Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) and encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV), is a multifunctional protein known to antagonize type I interferon expression and to interfere with nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of host proteins and mRNA. This protein plays

  1. Cloning and Expression of Fusion Genes of Domain A-1 Protective Antigen of Bacillus Anthracis and Shigella Enterotoxin B Subunit (Stxb In E. Coil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AH ahmadi

    2015-02-01

    Conclusion: The findings of the current study revealed that this antigen can be raised as an anti-cancer and recombinant vaccine candidate against types of Shigella, Escherichia coli and Bacillus anthracis which can be due to such factors as identification of antigen(PA by antibody PA20, its apoptosis induction properties, property of immunogenicity, adjuvant and delivery of STxB protein and high expression levels of Gb3 in human cancer cells.

  2. Gene expression in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkenkamp-Demtroder, Karin; Christensen, Lise Lotte; Olesen, Sanne Harder

    2002-01-01

    Understanding molecular alterations in colorectal cancer (CRC) is needed to define new biomarkers and treatment targets. We used oligonucleotide microarrays to monitor gene expression of about 6,800 known genes and 35,000 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) on five pools (four to six samples in each p...... with a high frequency of loss of heterozygosity. The genes and ESTs presented in this study encode new potential tumor markers as well as potential novel therapeutic targets for prevention or therapy of CRC.......Understanding molecular alterations in colorectal cancer (CRC) is needed to define new biomarkers and treatment targets. We used oligonucleotide microarrays to monitor gene expression of about 6,800 known genes and 35,000 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) on five pools (four to six samples in each...... pool) of total RNA from left-sided sporadic colorectal carcinomas. We compared normal tissue to carcinoma tissue from Dukes' stages A-D (noninvasive to distant metastasis) and identified 908 known genes and 4,155 ESTs that changed remarkably from normal to tumor tissue. Based on intensive filtering 226...

  3. Zipf's Law in Gene Expression

    CERN Document Server

    Furusawa, C; Furusawa, Chikara; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2002-01-01

    Using data from gene expression databases on various organisms and tissues, including yeast, nematodes, human normal and cancer tissues, and embryonic stem cells, we found that the abundances of expressed genes exhibit a power-law distribution with an exponent close to -1, i.e., they obey Zipf's law. Furthermore, by simulations of a simple model with an intra-cellular reaction network, we found that Zipf's law of chemical abundance is a universal feature of cells where such a network optimizes the efficiency and faithfulness of self-reproduction. These findings provide novel insights into the nature of the organization of reaction dynamics in living cells.

  4. Zipf's Law in Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furusawa, Chikara; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2003-02-01

    Using data from gene expression databases on various organisms and tissues, including yeast, nematodes, human normal and cancer tissues, and embryonic stem cells, we found that the abundances of expressed genes exhibit a power-law distribution with an exponent close to -1; i.e., they obey Zipf’s law. Furthermore, by simulations of a simple model with an intracellular reaction network, we found that Zipf’s law of chemical abundance is a universal feature of cells where such a network optimizes the efficiency and faithfulness of self-reproduction. These findings provide novel insights into the nature of the organization of reaction dynamics in living cells.

  5. Correction of gene expression data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darbani Shirvanehdeh, Behrooz; Stewart, C. Neal, Jr.; Noeparvar, Shahin;

    2014-01-01

    This report investigates for the first time the potential inter-treatment bias source of cell number for gene expression studies. Cell-number bias can affect gene expression analysis when comparing samples with unequal total cellular RNA content or with different RNA extraction efficiencies...... an analytical approach to examine the suitability of correction methods by considering the inter-treatment bias as well as the inter-replicate variance, which allows use of the best correction method with minimum residual bias. Analyses of RNA sequencing and microarray data showed that the efficiencies...

  6. Coevolution of gene expression among interacting proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraser, Hunter B.; Hirsh, Aaron E.; Wall, Dennis P.; Eisen,Michael B.

    2004-03-01

    Physically interacting proteins or parts of proteins are expected to evolve in a coordinated manner that preserves proper interactions. Such coevolution at the amino acid-sequence level is well documented and has been used to predict interacting proteins, domains, and amino acids. Interacting proteins are also often precisely coexpressed with one another, presumably to maintain proper stoichiometry among interacting components. Here, we show that the expression levels of physically interacting proteins coevolve. We estimate average expression levels of genes from four closely related fungi of the genus Saccharomyces using the codon adaptation index and show that expression levels of interacting proteins exhibit coordinated changes in these different species. We find that this coevolution of expression is a more powerful predictor of physical interaction than is coevolution of amino acid sequence. These results demonstrate previously uncharacterized coevolution of gene expression, adding a different dimension to the study of the coevolution of interacting proteins and underscoring the importance of maintaining coexpression of interacting proteins over evolutionary time. Our results also suggest that expression coevolution can be used for computational prediction of protein protein interactions.

  7. A Parametric Abstract Domain for Lattice-Valued Regular Expressions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midtgaard, Jan; Nielson, Flemming; Nielson, Hanne Riis

    2016-01-01

    We present a lattice-valued generalization of regular expressions as an abstract domain for static analysis. The parametric abstract domain rests on a generalization of Brzozowski derivatives and works for both finite and infinite lattices. We develop both a co-inductive, simulation algorithm...

  8. Homeobox gene expression in Brachiopoda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altenburger, Andreas; Martinez, Pedro; Wanninger, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    The molecular control that underlies brachiopod ontogeny is largely unknown. In order to contribute to this issue we analyzed the expression pattern of two homeobox containing genes, Not and Cdx, during development of the rhynchonelliform (i.e., articulate) brachiopod Terebratalia transversa. Not...

  9. Vascular Gene Expression: A Hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica Concepción eMartínez-Navarro

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The phloem is the conduit through which photoassimilates are distributed from autotrophic to heterotrophic tissues and is involved in the distribution of signaling molecules that coordinate plant growth and responses to the environment. Phloem function depends on the coordinate expression of a large array of genes. We have previously identified conserved motifs in upstream regions of the Arabidopsis genes, encoding the homologs of pumpkin phloem sap mRNAs, displaying expression in vascular tissues. This tissue-specific expression in Arabidopsis is predicted by the overrepresentation of GA/CT-rich motifs in gene promoters. In this work we have searched for common motifs in upstream regions of the homologous genes from plants considered to possess a primitive vascular tissue (a lycophyte, as well as from others that lack a true vascular tissue (a bryophyte, and finally from chlorophytes. Both lycophyte and bryophyte display motifs similar to those found in Arabidopsis with a significantly low E-value, while the chlorophytes showed either a different conserved motif or no conserved motif at all. These results suggest that these same genes are expressed coordinately in non- vascular plants; this coordinate expression may have been one of the prerequisites for the development of conducting tissues in plants. We have also analyzed the phylogeny of conserved proteins that may be involved in phloem function and development. The presence of CmPP16, APL, FT and YDA in chlorophytes suggests the recruitment of ancient regulatory networks for the development of the vascular tissue during evolution while OPS is a novel protein specific to vascular plants.

  10. Structure, expression and functions of MTA genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rakesh; Wang, Rui-An

    2016-05-15

    Metastatic associated proteins (MTA) are integrators of upstream regulatory signals with the ability to act as master coregulators for modifying gene transcriptional activity. The MTA family includes three genes and multiple alternatively spliced variants. The MTA proteins neither have their own enzymatic activity nor have been shown to directly interact with DNA. However, MTA proteins interact with a variety of chromatin remodeling factors and complexes with enzymatic activities for modulating the plasticity of nucleosomes, leading to the repression or derepression of target genes or other extra-nuclear and nucleosome remodeling and histone deacetylase (NuRD)-complex independent activities. The functions of MTA family members are driven by the steady state levels and subcellular localization of MTA proteins, the dynamic nature of modifying signals and enzymes, the structural features and post-translational modification of protein domains, interactions with binding proteins, and the nature of the engaged and resulting features of nucleosomes in the proximity of target genes. In general, MTA1 and MTA2 are the most upregulated genes in human cancer and correlate well with aggressive phenotypes, therapeutic resistance, poor prognosis and ultimately, unfavorable survival of cancer patients. Here we will discuss the structure, expression and functions of the MTA family of genes in the context of cancer cells.

  11. Gene Expression in Trypanosomatid Parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Martínez-Calvillo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The parasites Leishmania spp., Trypanosoma brucei, and Trypanosoma cruzi are the trypanosomatid protozoa that cause the deadly human diseases leishmaniasis, African sleeping sickness, and Chagas disease, respectively. These organisms possess unique mechanisms for gene expression such as constitutive polycistronic transcription of protein-coding genes and trans-splicing. Little is known about either the DNA sequences or the proteins that are involved in the initiation and termination of transcription in trypanosomatids. In silico analyses of the genome databases of these parasites led to the identification of a small number of proteins involved in gene expression. However, functional studies have revealed that trypanosomatids have more general transcription factors than originally estimated. Many posttranslational histone modifications, histone variants, and chromatin modifying enzymes have been identified in trypanosomatids, and recent genome-wide studies showed that epigenetic regulation might play a very important role in gene expression in this group of parasites. Here, we review and comment on the most recent findings related to transcription initiation and termination in trypanosomatid protozoa.

  12. Synthetic promoter libraries- tuning of gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Karin; Mijakovic, Ivan; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    2006-01-01

    The study of gene function often requires changing the expression of a gene and evaluating the consequences. In principle, the expression of any given gene can be modulated in a quasi-continuum of discrete expression levels but the traditional approaches are usually limited to two extremes: gene ...

  13. The Role of Nuclear Bodies in Gene Expression and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Marie; Boerkoel, Cornelius F.

    2013-01-01

    This review summarizes the current understanding of the role of nuclear bodies in regulating gene expression. The compartmentalization of cellular processes, such as ribosome biogenesis, RNA processing, cellular response to stress, transcription, modification and assembly of spliceosomal snRNPs, histone gene synthesis and nuclear RNA retention, has significant implications for gene regulation. These functional nuclear domains include the nucleolus, nuclear speckle, nuclear stress body, transcription factory, Cajal body, Gemini of Cajal body, histone locus body and paraspeckle. We herein review the roles of nuclear bodies in regulating gene expression and their relation to human health and disease. PMID:24040563

  14. The Role of Nuclear Bodies in Gene Expression and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Morimoto

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes the current understanding of the role of nuclear bodies in regulating gene expression. The compartmentalization of cellular processes, such as ribosome biogenesis, RNA processing, cellular response to stress, transcription, modification and assembly of spliceosomal snRNPs, histone gene synthesis and nuclear RNA retention, has significant implications for gene regulation. These functional nuclear domains include the nucleolus, nuclear speckle, nuclear stress body, transcription factory, Cajal body, Gemini of Cajal body, histone locus body and paraspeckle. We herein review the roles of nuclear bodies in regulating gene expression and their relation to human health and disease.

  15. Genomewide analysis of the lateral organ boundaries domain gene family in Vitis vinifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hui; Liu, Cai-Yun; Liu, Chun-Xiang; Zhao, Yue-Ling; Xu, Rui-Rui

    2016-09-01

    In plants, the transcription factor families have been implicated in many important biological processes. These processes include morphogenesis, signal transduction and environmental stress responses. Proteins containing the lateral organ boundaries domain (LBD), which encodes a zinc finger-like domain are only found in plants. This finding indicates that this unique gene family regulates only plant-specific biological processes. LBD genes play crucial roles in the growth and development of plants such as Arabidopsis, Oryza sativa, Zea mays, poplar, apple and tomato. However, relatively little is known about the LBD genes in grape (Vitis vinifera). In this study, we identified 40 LBD genes in the grape genome. A complete overview of the chromosomal locations, phylogenetic relationships, structures and expression profiles of this gene family during development in grape is presented here. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the LBD genes could be divided into classes I and II, together with LBDs from Arabidopsis. We mapped the 40 LBD genes on the grape chromosomes (chr1-chr19) and found that 37 of the predicted grape LBD genes were distributed in different densities across 12 chromosomes. Grape LBDs were found to share a similar intron/exon structure and gene length within the same class. The expression profiles of grape LBD genes at different developmental stages were analysed using microarray data. Results showed that 21 grape LBD genes may be involved in grape developmental processes, including preveraison, veraison and ripening. Finally, we analysed the expression patterns of six LBD genes through quantitative real-time polymerase chain reation analysis. The six LBD genes showed differential expression patterns among the three representative grape tissues, and five of these genes were found to be involved in responses to mannitol, sodium chloride, heat stress and low temperature treatments. To our knowledge, this is the first study to analyse the LBD gene family in

  16. Genomewide analysis of the lateral organ boundaries domain gene family in Vitis vinifera

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    HUI CAO; CAI-YUN LIU; HUN-XIANG LIU; YUE-LING ZHAO; RUI-RUI XU

    2016-09-01

    In plants, the transcription factor families have been implicated in many important biological processes. These processes include morphogenesis, signal transduction and environmental stress responses. Proteins containing the lateral organ bound-aries domain (LBD), which encodes a zinc finger-like domain are only found in plants. This finding indicates that this unique gene family regulates only plant-specific biological processes. LBD genes play crucial roles in the growth and development of plants such as Arabidopsis, Oryza sativa, Zea mays , poplar, apple and tomato. However, relatively little is known about the LBD genes in grape ( Vitis vinifera). In this study, we identified 40 LBD genes in the grape genome. A complete overview of the chromosomal locations, phylogenetic relationships, structures and expression profiles of this gene family during development in grape is presented here. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the LBD genes could be divided into classes I and II, together with LBDs from Arabidopsis. We mapped the 40 LBD genes on the grape chromosomes (chr1–chr19) and found that 37 of the predicted grape LBD genes were distributed in different densities across 12 chromosomes. Grape LBDs were found to share a similar intron/exon structure and gene length within the same class. The expression profiles of grape LBD genes at different developmental stages were analysed using microarray data. Results showed that 21 grape LBD genes may be involved in grape developmental processes, including preveraison, veraison and ripening. Finally, we analysed the expres-sion patterns of six LBD genes through quantitative real-time polymerase chain reation analysis. The six LBD genes showed differential expression patterns among the three representative grape tissues, and five of these genes were found to be involved in responses to mannitol, sodium chloride, heat stress and low temperature treatments. To our knowledge, this is the first study to analyse the LBD gene

  17. Gene × Smoking Interactions on Human Brain Gene Expression: Finding Common Mechanisms in Adolescents and Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolock, Samuel L.; Yates, Andrew; Petrill, Stephen A.; Bohland, Jason W.; Blair, Clancy; Li, Ning; Machiraju, Raghu; Huang, Kun; Bartlett, Christopher W.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Numerous studies have examined gene × environment interactions (G × E) in cognitive and behavioral domains. However, these studies have been limited in that they have not been able to directly assess differential patterns of gene expression in the human brain. Here, we assessed G × E interactions using two publically available datasets…

  18. Gene × Smoking Interactions on Human Brain Gene Expression: Finding Common Mechanisms in Adolescents and Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolock, Samuel L.; Yates, Andrew; Petrill, Stephen A.; Bohland, Jason W.; Blair, Clancy; Li, Ning; Machiraju, Raghu; Huang, Kun; Bartlett, Christopher W.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Numerous studies have examined gene × environment interactions (G × E) in cognitive and behavioral domains. However, these studies have been limited in that they have not been able to directly assess differential patterns of gene expression in the human brain. Here, we assessed G × E interactions using two publically available datasets…

  19. Classification with binary gene expressions

    OpenAIRE

    Tuna, Salih; Niranjan, Mahesan

    2009-01-01

    Microarray gene expression measurements are reported, used and archived usually to high numerical precision. However, properties of mRNA molecules, such as their low stability and availability in small copy numbers, and the fact that measurements correspond to a population of cells, rather than a single cell, makes high precision meaningless. Recent work shows that reducing measurement precision leads to very little loss of information, right down to binary levels. In this paper we show how p...

  20. The diversity and evolution of Wolbachia ankyrin repeat domain genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanos Siozios

    Full Text Available Ankyrin repeat domain-encoding genes are common in the eukaryotic and viral domains of life, but they are rare in bacteria, the exception being a few obligate or facultative intracellular Proteobacteria species. Despite having a reduced genome, the arthropod strains of the alphaproteobacterium Wolbachia contain an unusually high number of ankyrin repeat domain-encoding genes ranging from 23 in wMel to 60 in wPip strain. This group of genes has attracted considerable attention for their astonishing large number as well as for the fact that ankyrin proteins are known to participate in protein-protein interactions, suggesting that they play a critical role in the molecular mechanism that determines host-Wolbachia symbiotic interactions. We present a comparative evolutionary analysis of the wMel-related ankyrin repeat domain-encoding genes present in different Drosophila-Wolbachia associations. Our results show that the ankyrin repeat domain-encoding genes change in size by expansion and contraction mediated by short directly repeated sequences. We provide examples of intra-genic recombination events and show that these genes are likely to be horizontally transferred between strains with the aid of bacteriophages. These results confirm previous findings that the Wolbachia genomes are evolutionary mosaics and illustrate the potential that these bacteria have to generate diversity in proteins potentially involved in the symbiotic interactions.

  1. The Gene Expression Omnibus database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clough, Emily; Barrett, Tanya

    2016-01-01

    The Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database is an international public repository that archives and freely distributes high-throughput gene expression and other functional genomics data sets. Created in 2000 as a worldwide resource for gene expression studies, GEO has evolved with rapidly changing technologies and now accepts high-throughput data for many other data applications, including those that examine genome methylation, chromatin structure, and genome–protein interactions. GEO supports community-derived reporting standards that specify provision of several critical study elements including raw data, processed data, and descriptive metadata. The database not only provides access to data for tens of thousands of studies, but also offers various Web-based tools and strategies that enable users to locate data relevant to their specific interests, as well as to visualize and analyze the data. This chapter includes detailed descriptions of methods to query and download GEO data and use the analysis and visualization tools. The GEO homepage is at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/. PMID:27008011

  2. Gene expression throughout a vertebrate's embryogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinton David E

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Describing the patterns of gene expression during embryonic development has broadened our understanding of the processes and patterns that define morphogenesis. Yet gene expression patterns have not been described throughout vertebrate embryogenesis. This study presents statistical analyses of gene expression during all 40 developmental stages in the teleost Fundulus heteroclitus using four biological replicates per stage. Results Patterns of gene expression for 7,000 genes appear to be important as they recapitulate developmental timing. Among the 45% of genes with significant expression differences between pairs of temporally adjacent stages, significant differences in gene expression vary from as few as five to more than 660. Five adjacent stages have disproportionately more significant changes in gene expression (> 200 genes relative to other stages: four to eight and eight to sixteen cell stages, onset of circulation, pre and post-hatch, and during complete yolk absorption. The fewest differences among adjacent stages occur during gastrulation. Yet, at stage 16, (pre-mid-gastrulation the largest number of genes has peak expression. This stage has an over representation of genes in oxidative respiration and protein expression (ribosomes, translational genes and proteases. Unexpectedly, among all ribosomal genes, both strong positive and negative correlations occur. Similar correlated patterns of expression occur among all significant genes. Conclusions These data provide statistical support for the temporal dynamics of developmental gene expression during all stages of vertebrate development.

  3. Ol-Prx 3, a member of an additional class of homeobox genes, is unimodally expressed in several domains of the developing and adult central nervous system of the medaka (Oryzias latipes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joly, J S; Bourrat, F; Nguyen, V; Chourrout, D

    1997-11-25

    Large-scale genetic screens for mutations affecting early neurogenesis of vertebrates have recently been performed with an aquarium fish, the zebrafish. Later stages of neural morphogenesis have attracted less attention in small fish species, partly because of the lack of molecular markers of developing structures that may facilitate the detection of discrete structural alterations. In this context, we report the characterization of Ol-Prx 3 (Oryzias latipes-Prx 3). This gene was isolated in the course of a large-scale screen for brain cDNAs containing a highly conserved DNA binding region, the homeobox helix-three. Sequence analysis revealed that this gene belongs to another class of homeobox genes, together with a previously isolated mouse ortholog, called OG-12 [Rovescalli, A. C., Asoh, S. & Nirenberg, M. (1996) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 93, 10691-10696] and with the human SHOX gene [Rao, E., Weiss, B., Fukami, M., Rump, A., Niesler, B., et al. (1997) Nat. Genet. 16, 54-62], thought to be involved in the short-stature phenotype of Turner syndrome patients. These three genes exhibit a moderate level of identity in the homeobox with the other genes of the paired-related (PRX) gene family. Ol-Prx 3, as well as the PRX genes, are expressed in various cartilaginous structures of head and limbs. These genes might thus be involved in common regulatory pathways during the morphogenesis of these structures. Moreover, this paper reports a complex and monophasic pattern of Ol-Prx 3 expression in the central nervous system, which differs markedly from the patterns reported for the PRX genes, Prx 3 excluded: this gene begins to be expressed in a variety of central nervous system territories at late neurula stage. Strikingly, it remains turned on in some of the derivatives of each territory during the entire life of the fish. We hope this work will thus help identify common features for the PRX 3 family of homeobox genes.

  4. Antisense expression increases gene expression variability and locus interdependency

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Zhenyu; Wei, Wu; Gagneur, Julien; Clauder-Münster, Sandra; Smolik, Miłosz; Huber, Wolfgang; Steinmetz, Lars M.

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide transcription profiling has revealed extensive expression of non-coding RNAs antisense to genes, yet their functions, if any, remain to be understood. In this study, we perform a systematic analysis of sense–antisense expression in response to genetic and environmental changes in yeast. We find that antisense expression is associated with genes of larger expression variability. This is characterized by more ‘switching off' at low levels of expression for genes with antisense compa...

  5. Cloning and Expression of Lateral Organ Boundaries Domain Genes (TcLBDs) in Taxus chinensis%红豆杉TcLBDs基因的克隆与表达分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李艳艳; 杨艳芳; 王俊青; 王帅; 刘洪伟; 邱德有

    2015-01-01

    Objective]LBD( LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES DOMAIN) transcription factors play a potential role in plant secondary growth. The aims were to clone the cDNA of LBDs from Taxus chinensis and reveal their potential regulatory role in tissues regeneration after bark girdling by investigating the expression profiles of these LBDs. [Method]According to the sequences of TcLBDs genes obtained from the transcriptome database of the regeneration tissues after bark girdling in T. chinensis,specific primers were designed. The two LBD genes were isolated using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction ( RT-PCR ) . Bioinformatic characteristics of the cloned TcLBDs were analyzed using online service. Lastly,the expression profiles of these genes in different tissues and at different regeneration stages after bark girdling were analyzed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR and quantitative real-time PCR ( qRT-PCR) respectively. [Result]The results showed that the cDNA of TcLBD1 contained a 549 bp open reading frame ( ORF ) in length which encoded polypeptide of 182 amino acids,and TcLBD6 contained a 687 bp ORF encoding 228 amino acid residues. The molecular weights of TcLBD1 and TcLBD6 encoded protein were 19. 97 kDa and 25. 13 kDa,respectively. The sequences analysis showed that the amino acid sequences of TcLBD1 and TcLBD6 contained one specific conserved LOB motifs in N-terminal and were classified into class Ⅰ of LBD transcription factors,both of them shared 55. 2% and 57. 9% sequence similarity in nucleotide and amino acid,respectively,and had high identity with each other in secondary structure of protein. Phylogenetic tree analysis suggested that TcLBD1 could be clustered together with protein ( ABK21479 ) of Picea sitchensis and they are closest in genetic relationship,TcLBD6 could be clustered with protein ASYMMETRIC LEAVES2/LBD6 of Arabidopsis thaliana. The analysis of tissues expression patterns showed that the transcript abundance of TcLBD1 was higher in stems and xylem

  6. Quantitative modeling of a gene's expression from its intergenic sequence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Abul Hassan Samee

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Modeling a gene's expression from its intergenic locus and trans-regulatory context is a fundamental goal in computational biology. Owing to the distributed nature of cis-regulatory information and the poorly understood mechanisms that integrate such information, gene locus modeling is a more challenging task than modeling individual enhancers. Here we report the first quantitative model of a gene's expression pattern as a function of its locus. We model the expression readout of a locus in two tiers: 1 combinatorial regulation by transcription factors bound to each enhancer is predicted by a thermodynamics-based model and 2 independent contributions from multiple enhancers are linearly combined to fit the gene expression pattern. The model does not require any prior knowledge about enhancers contributing toward a gene's expression. We demonstrate that the model captures the complex multi-domain expression patterns of anterior-posterior patterning genes in the early Drosophila embryo. Altogether, we model the expression patterns of 27 genes; these include several gap genes, pair-rule genes, and anterior, posterior, trunk, and terminal genes. We find that the model-selected enhancers for each gene overlap strongly with its experimentally characterized enhancers. Our findings also suggest the presence of sequence-segments in the locus that would contribute ectopic expression patterns and hence were "shut down" by the model. We applied our model to identify the transcription factors responsible for forming the stripe boundaries of the studied genes. The resulting network of regulatory interactions exhibits a high level of agreement with known regulatory influences on the target genes. Finally, we analyzed whether and why our assumption of enhancer independence was necessary for the genes we studied. We found a deterioration of expression when binding sites in one enhancer were allowed to influence the readout of another enhancer. Thus, interference

  7. Gene expression analysis identifies global gene dosage sensitivity in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fehrmann, Rudolf S. N.; Karjalainen, Juha M.; Krajewska, Malgorzata;

    2015-01-01

    expression. We reanalyzed 77,840 expression profiles and observed a limited set of 'transcriptional components' that describe well-known biology, explain the vast majority of variation in gene expression and enable us to predict the biological function of genes. On correcting expression profiles...... for these components, we observed that the residual expression levels (in 'functional genomic mRNA' profiling) correlated strongly with copy number. DNA copy number correlated positively with expression levels for 99% of all abundantly expressed human genes, indicating global gene dosage sensitivity. By applying...

  8. Engineering Fungal Nonreducing Polyketide Synthase by Heterologous Expression and Domain Swapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, Hsu-Hua; Chang, Shu-Lin; Chiang, Yi-Ming; Bruno, Kenneth S.; Oakley, Berl R.; Wu, Tung-Kung; Wang, Clay C. C.

    2013-02-15

    Heterologous expression of the A. niger NR-PKS gene, e_gw1_19.204 and the adjacent stand-alone R domain gene, est_GWPlus_C_190476 in A. nidulans demonstrated that they belong to a single gene named dtbA. The DtbA protein produces two polyketides, 2,4-dihydroxy-3,5,6-trimethylbenzaldehyde 1 and 2-ethyl-4,6-dihydroxy-3,5-dimethylbenzaldehyde 2. Generation of DtbA+R-TE chimeric PKSs by swapping the DtbA R domain with the AusA (austinol biosynthesis) or ANID_06448 TE domain enabled the production of two metabolites with carboxylic acids replacing the corresponding aldehydes.

  9. Noise in eukaryotic gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, William J.; KÆrn, Mads; Cantor, Charles R.; Collins, J. J.

    2003-04-01

    Transcription in eukaryotic cells has been described as quantal, with pulses of messenger RNA produced in a probabilistic manner. This description reflects the inherently stochastic nature of gene expression, known to be a major factor in the heterogeneous response of individual cells within a clonal population to an inducing stimulus. Here we show in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that stochasticity (noise) arising from transcription contributes significantly to the level of heterogeneity within a eukaryotic clonal population, in contrast to observations in prokaryotes, and that such noise can be modulated at the translational level. We use a stochastic model of transcription initiation specific to eukaryotes to show that pulsatile mRNA production, through reinitiation, is crucial for the dependence of noise on transcriptional efficiency, highlighting a key difference between eukaryotic and prokaryotic sources of noise. Furthermore, we explore the propagation of noise in a gene cascade network and demonstrate experimentally that increased noise in the transcription of a regulatory protein leads to increased cell-cell variability in the target gene output, resulting in prolonged bistable expression states. This result has implications for the role of noise in phenotypic variation and cellular differentiation.

  10. Identification of four soybean reference genes for gene expression normalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gene expression analysis requires the use of reference genes stably expressed independently of specific tissues or environmental conditions. Housekeeping genes (e.g., actin, tubulin, ribosomal, polyubiquitin and elongation factor 1-alpha) are commonly used as reference genes with the assumption tha...

  11. Differential Expression of Specific Dermatan Sulfate Domains in Renal Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lensen, Joost F M; van der Vlag, Johan; Versteeg, Elly M M; Wetzels, Jack F M; van den Heuvel, Lambert P W J; Berden, Jo H M; van Kuppevelt, Toin H; Rops, Angelique L W M M

    2015-01-01

    Dermatan sulfate (DS), also known as chondroitin sulfate (CS)-B, is a member of the linear polysaccharides called glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). The expression of CS/DS and DS proteoglycans is increased in several fibrotic renal diseases, including interstitial fibrosis, diabetic nephropathy, mesangial sclerosis and nephrosclerosis. Little, however, is known about structural alterations in DS in renal diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the renal expression of two different DS domains in renal transplant rejection and glomerular pathologies. DS expression was evaluated in normal renal tissue and in kidney biopsies obtained from patients with acute interstitial or vascular renal allograft rejection, patients with interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy (IF/TA), and from patients with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), membranous glomerulopathy (MGP) or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), using our unique specific anti-DS antibodies LKN1 and GD3A12. Expression of the 4/2,4-di-O-sulfated DS domain recognized by antibody LKN1 was decreased in the interstitium of transplant kidneys with IF/TA, which was accompanied by an increased expression of type I collagen, decorin and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β), while its expression was increased in the interstitium in FSGS, MGP and SLE. Importantly, all patients showed glomerular LKN1 staining in contrast to the controls. Expression of the IdoA-Gal-NAc4SDS domain recognized by GD3A12 was similar in controls and patients. Our data suggest a role for the DS domain recognized by antibody LKN1 in renal diseases with early fibrosis. Further research is required to delineate the exact role of different DS domains in renal fibrosis.

  12. Differential Expression of Specific Dermatan Sulfate Domains in Renal Pathology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joost F M Lensen

    Full Text Available Dermatan sulfate (DS, also known as chondroitin sulfate (CS-B, is a member of the linear polysaccharides called glycosaminoglycans (GAGs. The expression of CS/DS and DS proteoglycans is increased in several fibrotic renal diseases, including interstitial fibrosis, diabetic nephropathy, mesangial sclerosis and nephrosclerosis. Little, however, is known about structural alterations in DS in renal diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the renal expression of two different DS domains in renal transplant rejection and glomerular pathologies. DS expression was evaluated in normal renal tissue and in kidney biopsies obtained from patients with acute interstitial or vascular renal allograft rejection, patients with interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy (IF/TA, and from patients with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS, membranous glomerulopathy (MGP or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, using our unique specific anti-DS antibodies LKN1 and GD3A12. Expression of the 4/2,4-di-O-sulfated DS domain recognized by antibody LKN1 was decreased in the interstitium of transplant kidneys with IF/TA, which was accompanied by an increased expression of type I collagen, decorin and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β, while its expression was increased in the interstitium in FSGS, MGP and SLE. Importantly, all patients showed glomerular LKN1 staining in contrast to the controls. Expression of the IdoA-Gal-NAc4SDS domain recognized by GD3A12 was similar in controls and patients. Our data suggest a role for the DS domain recognized by antibody LKN1 in renal diseases with early fibrosis. Further research is required to delineate the exact role of different DS domains in renal fibrosis.

  13. Evolutionary origin and genomic organisation of runt-domain containing genes in arthropods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith James M

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene clusters, such as the Hox gene cluster, are known to have critical roles in development. In eukaryotes gene clusters arise primarily by tandem gene duplication and divergence. Genes within a cluster are often co-regulated, providing selective pressure to maintain the genome organisation, and this co-regulation can result in temporal or spatial co-linearity of gene expression. It has been previously noted that in Drosophila melanogaster, three of the four runt-domain (RD containing genes are found in a relatively tight cluster on chromosome 1, raising the possibility of a putative functional RD gene cluster in D. melanogaster. Results To investigate the possibility of such a gene cluster, orthologues of the Drosophila melanogaster RD genes were identified in several endopterygotan insects, two exopterygotan insects and two non-insect arthropods. In all insect species four RD genes were identified and orthology was assigned to the Drosophila sequences by phylogenetic analyses. Although four RD genes were found in the crustacean D. pulex, orthology could not be assigned to the insect sequences, indicating independent gene duplications from a single ancestor following the split of the hexapod lineage from the crustacean lineage. In insects, two chromosomal arrangements of these genes was observed; the first a semi-dispersed cluster, such as in Drosophila, where lozenge is separated from the core cluster of three RD genes often by megabases of DNA. The second arrangement was a tight cluster of the four RD genes, such as in Apis mellifera. This genomic organisation, particularly of the three core RD genes, raises the possibility of shared regulatory elements. In situ hybridisation of embryonic expression of the four RD genes in Drosophila melanogaster and the honeybee A. mellifera shows no evidence for either spatial or temporal co-linearity of expression during embryogenesis. Conclusion All fully sequenced insect genomes

  14. Gene ordering in partitive clustering using microarray expressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Shubhra Sankar; Bandyopadhyay, Sanghamitra; Pal, Sankar K

    2007-08-01

    A central step in the analysis of gene expression data is the identification of groups of genes that exhibit similar expression patterns. Clustering and ordering the genes using gene expression data into homogeneous groups was shown to be useful in functional annotation, tissue classification, regulatory motif identification, and other applications. Although there is a rich literature on gene ordering in hierarchical clustering framework for gene expression analysis, there is no work addressing and evaluating the importance of gene ordering in partitive clustering framework, to the best knowledge of the authors. Outside the framework of hierarchical clustering, different gene ordering algorithms are applied on the whole data set, and the domain of partitive clustering is still unexplored with gene ordering approaches. A new hybrid method is proposed for ordering genes in each of the clusters obtained from partitive clustering solution, using microarray gene expressions.Two existing algorithms for optimally ordering cities in travelling salesman problem (TSP), namely, FRAG_GALK and Concorde, are hybridized individually with self organizing MAP to show the importance of gene ordering in partitive clustering framework. We validated our hybrid approach using yeast and fibroblast data and showed that our approach improves the result quality of partitive clustering solution, by identifying subclusters within big clusters, grouping functionally correlated genes within clusters, minimization of summation of gene expression distances, and the maximization of biological gene ordering using MIPS categorization. Moreover, the new hybrid approach, finds comparable or sometimes superior biological gene order in less computation time than those obtained by optimal leaf ordering in hierarchical clustering solution.

  15. Gene ordering in partitive clustering using microarray expressions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shubhra Sankar Ray; Sanghamitra Bandyopadhyay; Sankar K Pal

    2007-08-01

    A central step in the analysis of gene expression data is the identification of groups of genes that exhibit similar expression patterns. Clustering and ordering the genes using gene expression data into homogeneous groups was shown to be useful in functional annotation, tissue classification, regulatory motif identification, and other applications. Although there is a rich literature on gene ordering in hierarchical clustering framework for gene expression analysis, there is no work addressing and evaluating the importance of gene ordering in partitive clustering framework, to the best knowledge of the authors. Outside the framework of hierarchical clustering, different gene ordering algorithms are applied on the whole data set, and the domain of partitive clustering is still unexplored with gene ordering approaches. A new hybrid method is proposed for ordering genes in each of the clusters obtained from partitive clustering solution, using microarray gene expressions. Two existing algorithms for optimally ordering cities in travelling salesman problem (TSP), namely, FRAG_GALK and Concorde, are hybridized individually with self organizing MAP to show the importance of gene ordering in partitive clustering framework. We validated our hybrid approach using yeast and fibroblast data and showed that our approach improves the result quality of partitive clustering solution, by identifying subclusters within big clusters, grouping functionally correlated genes within clusters, minimization of summation of gene expression distances, and the maximization of biological gene ordering using MIPS categorization. Moreover, the new hybrid approach, finds comparable or sometimes superior biological gene order in less computation time than those obtained by optimal leaf ordering in hierarchical clustering solution.

  16. The Arabidopsis Adh gene exhibits diverse nucleosome arrangements within a small DNase I-sensitive domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega-Palas, M A; Ferl, R J

    1995-01-01

    The alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene from Arabidopsis shows enhanced sensitivity to DNase I in cells that express the gene. This generalized sensitivity to DNase I is demarcated by position -500 on the 5' side and the end of the mRNA on the 3' side. Thus, the gene defined as the promoter and mRNA coding region corresponds very closely in size with the gene defined as a nuclease-sensitive domain. This is a remarkably close correspondence between a sensitive domain and a eukaryotic transcriptional unit, because previously reported DNase I-sensitive domains include large regions of DNA that are not transcribed. Nucleosomes are present in the coding region of the Adh gene when it is expressed, indicating that the transcriptional elongation process causes nucleosome disruption rather than release of nucleosomes from the coding region. In addition, the regulatory region contains a loosely positioned nucleosome that is separated from adjacent nucleosomes by internucleosomic DNA segments longer than the average linker DNA in bulk chromatin. This specific array of nucleosomes coexists with bound transcription factors that could contribute to the organization of the nucleosome arrangement. These results enhance our understanding of the complex interactions among DNA, nucleosomes, and transcription factors during gene expression in plants. PMID:8535143

  17. MRI of Transgene Expression: Correlation to Therapeutic Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomotsugu Ichikawa

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI can provide highresolution 3D maps of structural and functional information, yet its use of mapping in vivo gene expression has only recently been explored. A potential application for this technology is to noninvasively image transgene expression. The current study explores the latter using a nonregulatable internalizing engineered transferrin receptor (ETR whose expression can be probed for with a superparamagnetic Tf-CLIO probe. Using an HSV-based amplicon vector system for transgene delivery, we demonstrate that: 1 ETR is a sensitive MR marker gene; 2 several transgenes can be efficiently expressed from a single amplicon; 3 expression of each transgene results in functional gene product; and 4 ETR gene expression correlates with expression of therapeutic genes when the latter are contained within the same amplicon. These data, taken together, suggest that MRI of ETR expression can serve as a surrogate for measuring therapeutic transgene expression.

  18. Correlating Expression Data with Gene Function Using Gene Ontology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU,Qi; DENG,Yong; WANG,Chuan; SHI,Tie-Liu; LI,Yi-Xue

    2006-01-01

    Clustering is perhaps one of the most widely used tools for microarray data analysis. Proposed roles for genes of unknown function are inferred from clusters of genes similarity expressed across many biological conditions.However, whether function annotation by similarity metrics is reliable or not and to what extent the similarity in gene expression patterns is useful for annotation of gene functions, has not been evaluated. This paper made a comprehensive research on the correlation between the similarity of expression data and of gene functions using Gene Ontology. It has been found that although the similarity in expression patterns and the similarity in gene functions are significantly dependent on each other, this association is rather weak. In addition, among the three categories of Gene Ontology, the similarity of expression data is more useful for cellular component annotation than for biological process and molecular function. The results presented are interesting for the gene functions prediction research area.

  19. Recurrent adenylation domain replacement in the microcystin synthetase gene cluster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laakso Kati

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microcystins are small cyclic heptapeptide toxins produced by a range of distantly related cyanobacteria. Microcystins are synthesized on large NRPS-PKS enzyme complexes. Many structural variants of microcystins are produced simulatenously. A recombination event between the first module of mcyB (mcyB1 and mcyC in the microcystin synthetase gene cluster is linked to the simultaneous production of microcystin variants in strains of the genus Microcystis. Results Here we undertook a phylogenetic study to investigate the order and timing of recombination between the mcyB1 and mcyC genes in a diverse selection of microcystin producing cyanobacteria. Our results provide support for complex evolutionary processes taking place at the mcyB1 and mcyC adenylation domains which recognize and activate the amino acids found at X and Z positions. We find evidence for recent recombination between mcyB1 and mcyC in strains of the genera Anabaena, Microcystis, and Hapalosiphon. We also find clear evidence for independent adenylation domain conversion of mcyB1 by unrelated peptide synthetase modules in strains of the genera Nostoc and Microcystis. The recombination events replace only the adenylation domain in each case and the condensation domains of mcyB1 and mcyC are not transferred together with the adenylation domain. Our findings demonstrate that the mcyB1 and mcyC adenylation domains are recombination hotspots in the microcystin synthetase gene cluster. Conclusion Recombination is thought to be one of the main mechanisms driving the diversification of NRPSs. However, there is very little information on how recombination takes place in nature. This study demonstrates that functional peptide synthetases are created in nature through transfer of adenylation domains without the concomitant transfer of condensation domains.

  20. Estradiol-induced gene expression in largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, C.J.; Kroll, K.J.; Gross, T.G.; Denslow, N.D.

    2002-01-01

    Vitellogenin (Vtg) and estrogen receptor (ER) gene expression levels were measured in largemouth bass to evaluate the activation of the ER-mediated pathway by estradiol (E2). Single injections of E2 ranging from 0.0005 to 5 mg/kg up-regulated plasma Vtg in a dose-dependent manner. Vtg and ER mRNAs were measured using partial cDNA sequences corresponding to the C-terminal domain for Vtg and the ligand-binding domain of ER?? sequences. After acute E2-exposures (2 mg/kg), Vtg and ER mRNAs and plasma Vtg levels peaked after 2 days. The rate of ER mRNA accumulation peaked 36-42 h earlier than Vtg mRNA. The expression window for ER defines the primary response to E2 in largemouth bass and that for Vtg a delayed primary response. The specific effect of E2 on other estrogen-regulated genes was tested during these same time windows using differential display RT-PCR. Specific up-regulated genes that are expressed in the same time window as Vtg were ERp72 (a membrane-bound disulfide isomerase) and a gene with homology to an expressed gene identified in zebrafish. Genes that were expressed in a pattern that mimics the ER include the gene for zona radiata protein ZP2, and a gene with homology to an expressed gene found in winter flounder. One gene for fibrinogen ?? was down-regulated and an unidentified gene was transiently up-regulated after 12 h of exposure and returned to basal levels by 48 h. Taken together these studies indicate that the acute molecular response to E2 involves a complex network of responses over time. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Adaptive Evolution of Gene Expression in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armita Nourmohammad

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression levels are important quantitative traits that link genotypes to molecular functions and fitness. In Drosophila, population-genetic studies have revealed substantial adaptive evolution at the genomic level, but the evolutionary modes of gene expression remain controversial. Here, we present evidence that adaptation dominates the evolution of gene expression levels in flies. We show that 64% of the observed expression divergence across seven Drosophila species are adaptive changes driven by directional selection. Our results are derived from time-resolved data of gene expression divergence across a family of related species, using a probabilistic inference method for gene-specific selection. Adaptive gene expression is stronger in specific functional classes, including regulation, sensory perception, sexual behavior, and morphology. Moreover, we identify a large group of genes with sex-specific adaptation of expression, which predominantly occurs in males. Our analysis opens an avenue to map system-wide selection on molecular quantitative traits independently of their genetic basis.

  2. The Popeye Domain Containing Genes and cAMP Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Brand

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP is a second messenger, which plays an important role in the heart. It is generated in response to activation of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs. Initially, it was thought that protein kinase A (PKA exclusively mediates cAMP-induced cellular responses such as an increase in cardiac contractility, relaxation, and heart rate. With the identification of the exchange factor directly activated by cAMP (EPAC and hyperpolarizing cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN channels as cAMP effector proteins it became clear that a protein network is involved in cAMP signaling. The Popeye domain containing (Popdc genes encode yet another family of cAMP-binding proteins, which are prominently expressed in the heart. Loss-of-function mutations in mice are associated with cardiac arrhythmia and impaired skeletal muscle regeneration. Interestingly, the cardiac phenotype, which is present in both, Popdc1 and Popdc2 null mutants, is characterized by a stress-induced sinus bradycardia, suggesting that Popdc proteins participate in cAMP signaling in the sinuatrial node. The identification of the two-pore channel TREK-1 and Caveolin 3 as Popdc-interacting proteins represents a first step into understanding the mechanisms of heart rate modulation triggered by Popdc proteins.

  3. Frequency domain analysis of noise in autoregulated gene circuits

    OpenAIRE

    Simpson, Michael L.; Cox, Chris D.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2003-01-01

    We describe a frequency domain technique for the analysis of intrinsic noise within negatively autoregulated gene circuits. This approach is based on the transfer function around the feedback loop (loop transmission) and the equivalent noise bandwidth of the system. The loop transmission, T, is shown to be a determining factor of the dynamics and the noise behavior of autoregulated gene circuits, and this T-based technique provides a simple and flexible method for the analysis of noise arisin...

  4. Differential endometrial gene expression in pregnant and nonpregnant sows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østrup, Esben; Bauersachs, Stefan; Blum, Helmut

    2010-01-01

    In an attempt to unveil molecular processes controlling the porcine placentation, we have investigated the pregnancy-induced gene expression in the endometrium using the Affymetrix GeneChip Porcine Genome Array. At Day 14 after insemination, at the time of initial placentation, samples were...... to the apical cell domain of the glandular epithelium suggest the concept of endometrial FGF9 acting as an embryonic growth factor in the pig....

  5. Amino-terminal domains of c-myc and N-myc proteins mediate binding to the retinoblastoma gene product

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rustgi, A.K.; Dyson, N.; Bernards, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    The proteins encoded by the myc gene family are involved is the control of cell proliferation and differentiation, and aberrant expression of myc proteins has been implicated in the genesis of a variety of neoplasms. In the carboxyl terminus, myc proteins have two domains that encode a basic domain/

  6. Examining Ancient Inter-domain Horizontal Gene Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisca C. Almeida

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Details of the genomic changes that occurred in the ancestors of Eukarya, Archaea and Bacteria are elusive. Ancient interdomain horizontal gene transfer (IDHGT amongst the ancestors of these three domains has been difficult to detect and analyze because of the extreme degree of divergence of genes in these three domains and because most evidence for such events are poorly supported. In addition, many researchers have suggested that the prevalence of IDHGT events early in the evolution of life would most likely obscure the patterns of divergence of major groups of organisms let alone allow the tracking of horizontal transfer at this level. In order to approach this problem, we mined the E. coli genome for genes with distinct paralogs. Using the 1,268 E. coli K-12 genes with 40% or higher similarity level to a paralog elsewhere in the E. coli genome we detected 95 genes found exclusively in Bacteria and Archaea and 86 genes found in Bacteria and Eukarya. These genes form the basis for our analysis of IDHGT. We also applied a newly developed statistical test (the node height test, to examine the robustness of these inferences and to corroborate the phylogenetically identifi ed cases of ancient IDHGT. Our results suggest that ancient inter domain HGT is restricted to special cases, mostly involving symbiosis in eukaryotes and specific adaptations in prokaryotes. Only three genes in the Bacteria + Eukarya class (Deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase (DXPS, fructose 1,6-phosphate aldolase class II protein and glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase and three genes–in the Bacteria + Archaea class (ABC-type FE3+ -siderophore transport system, ferrous iron transport protein B, and dipeptide transport protein showed evidence of ancient IDHGT. However, we conclude that robust estimates of IDHGT will be very difficult to obtain due to the methodological limitations and the extreme sequence saturation of the genes suspected of being involved in IDHGT.

  7. Transcriptional pausing coordinates folding of the aptamer domain and the expression platform of a riboswitch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdrizet, George A; Artsimovitch, Irina; Furman, Ran; Sosnick, Tobin R; Pan, Tao

    2012-02-28

    Riboswitches are cis-acting elements that regulate gene expression by affecting transcriptional termination or translational initiation in response to binding of a metabolite. A typical riboswitch is made of an upstream aptamer domain and a downstream expression platform. Both domains participate in the folding and structural rearrangement in the absence or presence of its cognate metabolite. RNA polymerase pausing is a fundamental property of transcription that can influence RNA folding. Here we show that pausing plays an important role in the folding and conformational rearrangement of the Escherichia coli btuB riboswitch during transcription by the E. coli RNA polymerase. This riboswitch consists of an approximately 200 nucleotide, coenzyme B12 binding aptamer domain and an approximately 40 nucleotide expression platform that controls the ribosome access for translational initiation. We found that transcriptional pauses at strategic locations facilitate folding and structural rearrangement of the full-length riboswitch, but have minimal effect on the folding of the isolated aptamer domain. Pausing at these regulatory sites blocks the formation of alternate structures and plays a chaperoning role that couples folding of the aptamer domain and the expression platform. Pausing at strategic locations may be a general mechanism for coordinated folding and conformational rearrangements of riboswitch structures that underlie their response to environmental cues.

  8. CTCF-mediated chromatin loops enclose inducible gene regulatory domains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oti, M.O.; Falck, J.; Huynen, M.A.; Zhou, Huiqing

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The CCTC-binding factor (CTCF) protein is involved in genome organization, including mediating three-dimensional chromatin interactions. Human patient lymphocytes with mutations in a single copy of the CTCF gene have reduced expression of enhancer-associated genes involved in response to

  9. Methods for monitoring multiple gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berka, Randy (Davis, CA); Bachkirova, Elena (Davis, CA); Rey, Michael (Davis, CA)

    2012-05-01

    The present invention relates to methods for monitoring differential expression of a plurality of genes in a first filamentous fungal cell relative to expression of the same genes in one or more second filamentous fungal cells using microarrays containing Trichoderma reesei ESTs or SSH clones, or a combination thereof. The present invention also relates to computer readable media and substrates containing such array features for monitoring expression of a plurality of genes in filamentous fungal cells.

  10. Methods for monitoring multiple gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berka, Randy; Bachkirova, Elena; Rey, Michael

    2013-10-01

    The present invention relates to methods for monitoring differential expression of a plurality of genes in a first filamentous fungal cell relative to expression of the same genes in one or more second filamentous fungal cells using microarrays containing Trichoderma reesei ESTs or SSH clones, or a combination thereof. The present invention also relates to computer readable media and substrates containing such array features for monitoring expression of a plurality of genes in filamentous fungal cells.

  11. Methods for monitoring multiple gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berka, Randy [Davis, CA; Bachkirova, Elena [Davis, CA; Rey, Michael [Davis, CA

    2012-05-01

    The present invention relates to methods for monitoring differential expression of a plurality of genes in a first filamentous fungal cell relative to expression of the same genes in one or more second filamentous fungal cells using microarrays containing Trichoderma reesei ESTs or SSH clones, or a combination thereof. The present invention also relates to computer readable media and substrates containing such array features for monitoring expression of a plurality of genes in filamentous fungal cells.

  12. Methods for monitoring multiple gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berka, Randy; Bachkirova, Elena; Rey, Michael

    2013-10-01

    The present invention relates to methods for monitoring differential expression of a plurality of genes in a first filamentous fungal cell relative to expression of the same genes in one or more second filamentous fungal cells using microarrays containing Trichoderma reesei ESTs or SSH clones, or a combination thereof. The present invention also relates to computer readable media and substrates containing such array features for monitoring expression of a plurality of genes in filamentous fungal cells.

  13. Cloning and Expressing Recombinant Protective Antigen Domains of B. anthracis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    Army Research Laboratory: 2010; p 19. 18. Sambrook, J.; Fritsch, E. F.; Maniatis , T. Molecular Cloning : A Laboratory Manual. 2nd ed.; Cold Spring...on a rotating platform until not viscous (adapted from Molecular Cloning : A Laboratory Manual) (18). Each solution was centrifuged at 45,000 x g for... Cloning and Expressing Recombinant Protective Antigen Domains of B. anthracis by Deborah A. Sarkes, Joshua M. Kogot, Irene Val-Addo

  14. Amplification of kinetic oscillations in gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdanov, V. P.

    2008-10-01

    Because of the feedbacks between the DNA transcription and mRNA translation, the gene expression in cells may exhibit bistability and oscillations. The deterministic and stochastic calculations presented illustrate how the bistable kinetics of expression of one gene in a cell can be influenced by the kinetic oscillations in the expression of another gene. Due to stability of the states of the bistable kinetics of gene 1 and the relatively small difference between the maximum and minimum protein amounts during the oscillations of gene 2, the induced oscillations of gene 1 are found to typically be related either to the low-or high-reactive state of this gene. The quality of the induced oscillations may be appreciably better than that of the inducing oscillations. This means that gene 1 can serve as an amplifier of the kinetic oscillations of gene 2.

  15. Network Security via Biometric Recognition of Patterns of Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Harry C.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular biology provides the ability to implement forms of information and network security completely outside the bounds of legacy security protocols and algorithms. This paper addresses an approach which instantiates the power of gene expression for security. Molecular biology provides a rich source of gene expression and regulation mechanisms, which can be adopted to use in the information and electronic communication domains. Conventional security protocols are becoming increasingly vulnerable due to more intensive, highly capable attacks on the underlying mathematics of cryptography. Security protocols are being undermined by social engineering and substandard implementations by IT organizations. Molecular biology can provide countermeasures to these weak points with the current security approaches. Future advances in instruments for analyzing assays will also enable this protocol to advance from one of cryptographic algorithms to an integrated system of cryptographic algorithms and real-time expression and assay of gene expression products.

  16. cis sequence effects on gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobs Kevin

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sequence and transcriptional variability within and between individuals are typically studied independently. The joint analysis of sequence and gene expression variation (genetical genomics provides insight into the role of linked sequence variation in the regulation of gene expression. We investigated the role of sequence variation in cis on gene expression (cis sequence effects in a group of genes commonly studied in cancer research in lymphoblastoid cell lines. We estimated the proportion of genes exhibiting cis sequence effects and the proportion of gene expression variation explained by cis sequence effects using three different analytical approaches, and compared our results to the literature. Results We generated gene expression profiling data at N = 697 candidate genes from N = 30 lymphoblastoid cell lines for this study and used available candidate gene resequencing data at N = 552 candidate genes to identify N = 30 candidate genes with sufficient variance in both datasets for the investigation of cis sequence effects. We used two additive models and the haplotype phylogeny scanning approach of Templeton (Tree Scanning to evaluate association between individual SNPs, all SNPs at a gene, and diplotypes, with log-transformed gene expression. SNPs and diplotypes at eight candidate genes exhibited statistically significant (p cis sequence effects in our study, respectively. Conclusion Based on analysis of our results and the extant literature, one in four genes exhibits significant cis sequence effects, and for these genes, about 30% of gene expression variation is accounted for by cis sequence variation. Despite diverse experimental approaches, the presence or absence of significant cis sequence effects is largely supported by previously published studies.

  17. Deriving Trading Rules Using Gene Expression Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian VISOIU

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents how buy and sell trading rules are generated using gene expression programming with special setup. Market concepts are presented and market analysis is discussed with emphasis on technical analysis and quantitative methods. The use of genetic algorithms in deriving trading rules is presented. Gene expression programming is applied in a form where multiple types of operators and operands are used. This gives birth to multiple gene contexts and references between genes in order to keep the linear structure of the gene expression programming chromosome. The setup of multiple gene contexts is presented. The case study shows how to use the proposed gene setup to derive trading rules encoded by Boolean expressions, using a dataset with the reference exchange rates between the Euro and the Romanian leu. The conclusions highlight the positive results obtained in deriving useful trading rules.

  18. Gene Expression Profiling of Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marimuthu, Arivusudar; Jacob, Harrys K.C.; Jakharia, Aniruddha; Subbannayya, Yashwanth; Keerthikumar, Shivakumar; Kashyap, Manoj Kumar; Goel, Renu; Balakrishnan, Lavanya; Dwivedi, Sutopa; Pathare, Swapnali; Dikshit, Jyoti Bajpai; Maharudraiah, Jagadeesha; Singh, Sujay; Sameer Kumar, Ghantasala S; Vijayakumar, M.; Veerendra Kumar, Kariyanakatte Veeraiah; Premalatha, Chennagiri Shrinivasamurthy; Tata, Pramila; Hariharan, Ramesh; Roa, Juan Carlos; Prasad, T.S.K; Chaerkady, Raghothama; Kumar, Rekha Vijay; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide, both in men and women. A genomewide gene expression analysis was carried out to identify differentially expressed genes in gastric adenocarcinoma tissues as compared to adjacent normal tissues. We used Agilent’s whole human genome oligonucleotide microarray platform representing ~41,000 genes to carry out gene expression analysis. Two-color microarray analysis was employed to directly compare the expression of genes between tumor and normal tissues. Through this approach, we identified several previously known candidate genes along with a number of novel candidate genes in gastric cancer. Testican-1 (SPOCK1) was one of the novel molecules that was 10-fold upregulated in tumors. Using tissue microarrays, we validated the expression of testican-1 by immunohistochemical staining. It was overexpressed in 56% (160/282) of the cases tested. Pathway analysis led to the identification of several networks in which SPOCK1 was among the topmost networks of interacting genes. By gene enrichment analysis, we identified several genes involved in cell adhesion and cell proliferation to be significantly upregulated while those corresponding to metabolic pathways were significantly downregulated. The differentially expressed genes identified in this study are candidate biomarkers for gastric adenoacarcinoma. PMID:27030788

  19. Frequency domain analysis of noise in autoregulated gene circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Michael L.; Cox, Chris D.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2003-01-01

    We describe a frequency domain technique for the analysis of intrinsic noise within negatively autoregulated gene circuits. This approach is based on the transfer function around the feedback loop (loop transmission) and the equivalent noise bandwidth of the system. The loop transmission, T, is shown to be a determining factor of the dynamics and the noise behavior of autoregulated gene circuits, and this T-based technique provides a simple and flexible method for the analysis of noise arising from any source within the gene circuit. We show that negative feedback not only reduces the variance of the noise in the protein concentration, but also shifts this noise to higher frequencies where it may have a negligible effect on the noise behavior of following gene circuits within a cascade. This predicted effect is demonstrated through the exact stochastic simulation of a two-gene cascade. The analysis elucidates important aspects of gene circuit structure that control functionality, and may provide some insights into selective pressures leading to this structure. The resulting analytical relationships have a simple form, making them especially useful as synthetic gene circuit design equations. With the exception of the linearization of Hill kinetics, this technique is general and may be applied to the analysis or design of networks of higher complexity. This utility is demonstrated through the exact stochastic simulation of an autoregulated two-gene cascade operating near instability. PMID:12671069

  20. Modulation of gene expression made easy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solem, Christian; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    2002-01-01

    A new approach for modulating gene expression, based on randomization of promoter (spacer) sequences, was developed. The method was applied to chromosomal genes in Lactococcus lactis and shown to generate libraries of clones with broad ranges of expression levels of target genes. In one example...... beta-glucuronidase, resulting in an operon structure in which both genes are transcribed from a common promoter. We show that there is a linear correlation between the expressions of the two genes, which facilitates screening for mutants with suitable enzyme activities. In a second example, we show......, overexpression was achieved by introducing an additional gene copy into a phage attachment site on the chromosome. This resulted in a series of strains with phosphofructokinase activities from 1.4 to 11 times the wild-type activity level. In this example, the pfk gene was cloned upstream of a gusA gene encoding...

  1. Intestinal lactase as an autologous beta-galactosidase reporter gene for in vivo gene expression studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Siamak; Eckley, Lorna; Sawyer, Greta J; Zhang, Xiaohong; Dong, Xuebin; Freund, Jean-Noel; Fabre, John W

    2009-01-01

    Intestinal lactase has potential as an autologous beta-galactosidase reporter gene for long-term gene expression studies in vivo, using chromogenic, luminescent, and fluorogenic substrates developed for Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase. In normal rat tissues, reactivity with a chromogenic fucopyranoside (X-Fuc, the preferred substrate of lactase) was present only at the lumenal surface of small intestine epithelial cells. Full-length lactase (domains I-IV), mature lactase (domains III and IV), and a cytosolic form of mature lactase (domains III and IV, without the signal sequence or transmembrane region) were evaluated. Transfection of HuH-7 cells in vitro, and hydrodynamic gene delivery to the liver in vivo, resulted in excellent gene expression. The full-length and mature (homodimeric, membrane-bound) forms reacted strongly with X-Fuc but not with the corresponding galactopyranoside (X-Gal). However, the presumptively monomeric cytosolic lactase unexpectedly reacted equally well with both substrates. The fluorogenic substrate fluorescein-di-beta-D-galactopyranoside was cleaved by cytosolic lactase, but not by full-length or mature lactase. Full-length lactase, when expressed ectopically in hepatocytes in vivo, localized exclusively to the bile canalicular membrane. Intestinal lactase is highly homologous in mice, rats, and humans and has considerable potential for evaluating long-term gene expression in experimental animals and the clinic.

  2. Evolution of AGL6-like MADS box genes in grasses (Poaceae): ovule expression is ancient and palea expression is new.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinheimer, Renata; Kellogg, Elizabeth A

    2009-09-01

    AGAMOUS-like6 (AGL6) genes encode MIKC-type MADS box transcription factors and are closely related to SEPALLATA and AP1/FUL-like genes. Here, we focus on the molecular evolution and expression of the AGL6-like genes in grasses. We have found that AGL6-like genes are expressed in ovules, lodicules (second whorl floral organs), paleas (putative first whorl floral organs), and floral meristems. Each of these expression domains was acquired at a different time in evolution, indicating that each represents a distinct function of the gene product and that the AGL6-like genes are pleiotropic. Expression in the inner integument of the ovule appears to be an ancient expression pattern corresponding to the expression of the gene in the megasporangium and integument in gymnosperms. Expression in floral meristems appears to have been acquired in the angiosperms and expression in second whorl organs in monocots. Early in grass evolution, AGL6-like orthologs acquired a new expression domain in the palea. Stamen expression is variable. Most grasses have a single AGL6-like gene (orthologous to the rice [Oryza sativa] gene MADS6). However, rice and other species of Oryza have a second copy (orthologous to rice MADS17) that appears to be the result of an ancient duplication.

  3. Characterisation of multiple regulatory domains spanning the major transcriptional start site of the FUS gene, a candidate gene for motor neurone disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khursheed, Kejhal; Wilm, Thomas P; Cashman, Christine; Quinn, John P; Bubb, Vivien J; Moss, Diana J

    2015-01-21

    Fused-In-Sarcoma (FUS) is a candidate gene for neurological disorders including motor neurone disease and Parkinson׳s disease in addition to various types of cancer. Recently it has been reported that over expression of FUS causes motor neurone disease in mouse models hence mutations leading to changes in gene expression may contribute to the development of neurodegenerative disease. Genome evolutionary conservation was used to predict important cis-acting DNA regulators of the FUS gene promoter that direct transcription. The putative regulators identified were analysed in reporter gene assays in cells and in chick embryos. Our analysis indicated in addition to regulatory domains 5' of the transcriptional start site an important regulatory domain resides in intron 1 of the gene itself. This intronic domain functioned both in cell lines and in vivo in the neural tube of the chick embryo including developing motor neurones. Our data suggest the interaction of multiple domains including intronic domains are involved in expression of FUS. A better understanding of the regulation of expression of FUS may give insight into how its stimulus inducible expression may be associated with neurological disorders.

  4. The Popeye Domain Containing Genes and their Function in Striated Muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Roland F. R. Schindler; Chiara Scotton; Vanessa French; Alessandra Ferlini; Thomas Brand

    2016-01-01

    The Popeye domain containing (POPDC) genes encode a novel class of cAMP effector proteins, which are abundantly expressed in heart and skeletal muscle. Here, we will review their role in striated muscle as deduced from work in cell and animal models and the recent analysis of patients carrying a missense mutation in POPDC1. Evidence suggests that POPDC proteins control membrane trafficking of interacting proteins. Furthermore, we will discuss the current catalogue of established protein-prote...

  5. Domain-oriented functional analysis based on expression profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greene Jonathan

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Co-regulation of genes may imply involvement in similar biological processes or related function. Many clusters of co-regulated genes have been identified using microarray experiments. In this study, we examined co-regulated gene families using large-scale cDNA microarray experiments on the human transcriptome. Results We present a simple model, which, for each probe pair, distills expression changes into binary digits and summarizes the expression of multiple members of a gene family as the Family Regulation Ratio. The set of Family Regulation Ratios for each protein family across multiple experiments is called a Family Regulation Profile. We analyzed these Family Regulation Profiles using Pearson Correlation Coefficients and derived a network diagram portraying relationships between the Family Regulation Profiles of gene families that are well represented on the microarrays. Our strategy was cross-validated with two randomly chosen data subsets and was proven to be a reliable approach. Conclusion This work will help us to understand and identify the functional relationships between gene families and the regulatory pathways in which each family is involved. Concepts presented here may be useful for objective clustering of protein functions and deriving a comprehensive protein interaction map. Functional genomic approaches such as this may also be applicable to the elucidation of complex genetic regulatory networks.

  6. Altered Chromosomal Positioning, Compaction, and Gene Expression with a Lamin A/C Gene Mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuisneineh, Fida; Fahrenbach, John P.; Zhang, Yuan; MacLeod, Heather; Dellefave, Lisa; Pytel, Peter; Selig, Sara; Labno, Christine M.; Reddy, Karen; Singh, Harinder; McNally, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Background Lamins A and C, encoded by the LMNA gene, are filamentous proteins that form the core scaffold of the nuclear lamina. Dominant LMNA gene mutations cause multiple human diseases including cardiac and skeletal myopathies. The nuclear lamina is thought to regulate gene expression by its direct interaction with chromatin. LMNA gene mutations may mediate disease by disrupting normal gene expression. Methods/Findings To investigate the hypothesis that mutant lamin A/C changes the lamina's ability to interact with chromatin, we studied gene misexpression resulting from the cardiomyopathic LMNA E161K mutation and correlated this with changes in chromosome positioning. We identified clusters of misexpressed genes and examined the nuclear positioning of two such genomic clusters, each harboring genes relevant to striated muscle disease including LMO7 and MBNL2. Both gene clusters were found to be more centrally positioned in LMNA-mutant nuclei. Additionally, these loci were less compacted. In LMNA mutant heart and fibroblasts, we found that chromosome 13 had a disproportionately high fraction of misexpressed genes. Using three-dimensional fluorescence in situ hybridization we found that the entire territory of chromosome 13 was displaced towards the center of the nucleus in LMNA mutant fibroblasts. Additional cardiomyopathic LMNA gene mutations were also shown to have abnormal positioning of chromosome 13, although in the opposite direction. Conclusions These data support a model in which LMNA mutations perturb the intranuclear positioning and compaction of chromosomal domains and provide a mechanism by which gene expression may be altered. PMID:21179469

  7. Altered chromosomal positioning, compaction, and gene expression with a lamin A/C gene mutation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie K Mewborn

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lamins A and C, encoded by the LMNA gene, are filamentous proteins that form the core scaffold of the nuclear lamina. Dominant LMNA gene mutations cause multiple human diseases including cardiac and skeletal myopathies. The nuclear lamina is thought to regulate gene expression by its direct interaction with chromatin. LMNA gene mutations may mediate disease by disrupting normal gene expression. METHODS/FINDINGS: To investigate the hypothesis that mutant lamin A/C changes the lamina's ability to interact with chromatin, we studied gene misexpression resulting from the cardiomyopathic LMNA E161K mutation and correlated this with changes in chromosome positioning. We identified clusters of misexpressed genes and examined the nuclear positioning of two such genomic clusters, each harboring genes relevant to striated muscle disease including LMO7 and MBNL2. Both gene clusters were found to be more centrally positioned in LMNA-mutant nuclei. Additionally, these loci were less compacted. In LMNA mutant heart and fibroblasts, we found that chromosome 13 had a disproportionately high fraction of misexpressed genes. Using three-dimensional fluorescence in situ hybridization we found that the entire territory of chromosome 13 was displaced towards the center of the nucleus in LMNA mutant fibroblasts. Additional cardiomyopathic LMNA gene mutations were also shown to have abnormal positioning of chromosome 13, although in the opposite direction. CONCLUSIONS: These data support a model in which LMNA mutations perturb the intranuclear positioning and compaction of chromosomal domains and provide a mechanism by which gene expression may be altered.

  8. Gene expression profiling during murine tooth development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A dos Santos silva Landin

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to describe the expression of genes, including ameloblastin (Ambn, amelogenin X chromosome (Amelx and enamelin (Enam during early (pre-secretory tooth development. The expression of these genes has predominantly been studied at post-secretory stages. Deoxyoligonucleotide microarrays were used to study gene expression during development of the murine first molar tooth germ at 24h intervals, starting at the eleventh embryonic day (E11.5 and up to the seventh day after birth (P7. The profile search function of Spotfire software was used to select genes with similar expression profile as the enamel genes (Ambn, Amelx and Enam. Microarray results where validated using real-time Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction (real-time RT-PCR, and translated proteins identified by Western blotting. In situ localisation of the Ambn, Amelx and Enam mRNAs were monitored from E12.5 to E17.5 using deoxyoligonucleotide probes. Bioinformatics analysis was used to associate biological functions with differentially (p ≤0.05 expressed (DE genes.Microarray results showed a total of 4362 genes including Ambn, Amelx and Enam to be significant differentially expressed throughout the time-course. The expression of the three enamel genes was low at pre-natal stages (E11.5-P0 increasing after birth (P1-P7. Profile search lead to isolation of 87 genes with significantly similar expression to the three enamel proteins. The mRNAs expressed in dental epithelium and epithelium derived cells. Although expression of Ambn, Amelx and Enam were lower during early tooth development compared to secretory stages enamel proteins were detectable by Western blotting. Bioinformatic analysis associated the 87 genes with multiple biological functions. Around thirty-five genes were associated with fifteen transcription factors.

  9. Gene Expression Patterns in Ovarian Carcinomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaner, Marci E.; Ross, Douglas T.; Ciaravino, Giuseppe; Sørlie, Therese; Troyanskaya, Olga; Diehn, Maximilian; Wang, Yan C.; Duran, George E.; Sikic, Thomas L.; Caldeira, Sandra; Skomedal, Hanne; Tu, I-Ping; Hernandez-Boussard, Tina; Johnson, Steven W.; O'Dwyer, Peter J.; Fero, Michael J.; Kristensen, Gunnar B.; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Hastie, Trevor; Tibshirani, Robert; van de Rijn, Matt; Teng, Nelson N.; Longacre, Teri A.; Botstein, David; Brown, Patrick O.; Sikic, Branimir I.

    2003-01-01

    We used DNA microarrays to characterize the global gene expression patterns in surface epithelial cancers of the ovary. We identified groups of genes that distinguished the clear cell subtype from other ovarian carcinomas, grade I and II from grade III serous papillary carcinomas, and ovarian from breast carcinomas. Six clear cell carcinomas were distinguished from 36 other ovarian carcinomas (predominantly serous papillary) based on their gene expression patterns. The differences may yield insights into the worse prognosis and therapeutic resistance associated with clear cell carcinomas. A comparison of the gene expression patterns in the ovarian cancers to published data of gene expression in breast cancers revealed a large number of differentially expressed genes. We identified a group of 62 genes that correctly classified all 125 breast and ovarian cancer specimens. Among the best discriminators more highly expressed in the ovarian carcinomas were PAX8 (paired box gene 8), mesothelin, and ephrin-B1 (EFNB1). Although estrogen receptor was expressed in both the ovarian and breast cancers, genes that are coregulated with the estrogen receptor in breast cancers, including GATA-3, LIV-1, and X-box binding protein 1, did not show a similar pattern of coexpression in the ovarian cancers. PMID:12960427

  10. Microanalysis of gene expression in cultured cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. van der Veer (Eveliene)

    1982-01-01

    textabstractIn this thesis two aspects of gene expression in cultured cells have been studied: the heterogeneity in gene expression in relation with the development and application of microchemical techniques for the prenatal diagnosis of inborn errors of metabolism and the possibility of inducing g

  11. Arabidopsis gene expression patterns during spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, A.-L.; Ferl, R. J.

    The exposure of Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) plants to spaceflight environments resulted in the differential expression of hundreds of genes. A 5 day mission on orbiter Columbia in 1999 (STS-93) carried transgenic Arabidopsis plants engineered with a transgene composed of the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene promoter linked to the β -Glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene. The plants were used to evaluate the effects of spaceflight on two fronts. First, expression patterns visualized with the Adh/GUS transgene were used to address specifically the possibility that spaceflight induces a hypoxic stress response, and to assess whether any spaceflight response was similar to control terrestrial hypoxia-induced gene expression patterns. (Paul et al., Plant Physiol. 2001, 126:613). Second, genome-wide patterns of native gene expression were evaluated utilizing the Affymetrix ATH1 GeneChip? array of 8,000 Arabidopsis genes. As a control for the veracity of the array analyses, a selection of genes identified with the arrays was further characterized with quantitative Real-Time RT PCR (ABI - TaqmanTM). Comparison of the patterns of expression for arrays of hybridized with RNA isolated from plants exposed to spaceflight compared to the control arrays revealed hundreds of genes that were differentially expressed in response to spaceflight, yet most genes that are hallmarks of hypoxic stress were unaffected. These results will be discussed in light of current models for plant responses to the spaceflight environment, and with regard to potential future flight opportunities.

  12. Expression of Sox genes in tooth development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Katsushige; Kawasaki, Maiko; Watanabe, Momoko; Idrus, Erik; Nagai, Takahiro; Oommen, Shelly; Maeda, Takeyasu; Hagiwara, Nobuko; Que, Jianwen; Sharpe, Paul T; Ohazama, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Members of the Sox gene family play roles in many biological processes including organogenesis. We carried out comparative in situ hybridization analysis of seventeen sox genes (Sox1-14, 17, 18, 21) during murine odontogenesis from the epithelial thickening to the cytodifferentiation stages. Localized expression of five Sox genes (Sox6, 9, 13, 14 and 21) was observed in tooth bud epithelium. Sox13 showed restricted expression in the primary enamel knots. At the early bell stage, three Sox genes (Sox8, 11, 17 and 21) were expressed in pre-ameloblasts, whereas two others (Sox5 and 18) showed expression in odontoblasts. Sox genes thus showed a dynamic spatio-temporal expression during tooth development.

  13. Expression of Sox genes in tooth development

    Science.gov (United States)

    KAWASAKI, KATSUSHIGE; KAWASAKI, MAIKO; WATANABE, MOMOKO; IDRUS, ERIK; NAGAI, TAKAHIRO; OOMMEN, SHELLY; MAEDA, TAKEYASU; HAGIWARA, NOBUKO; QUE, JIANWEN; SHARPE, PAUL T.; OHAZAMA, ATSUSHI

    2017-01-01

    Members of the Sox gene family play roles in many biological processes including organogenesis. We carried out comparative in situ hybridization analysis of seventeen sox genes (Sox1-14, 17, 18, 21) during murine odontogenesis from the epithelial thickening to the cytodifferentiation stages. Localized expression of five Sox genes (Sox6, 9, 13, 14 and 21) was observed in tooth bud epithelium. Sox13 showed restricted expression in the primary enamel knots. At the early bell stage, three Sox genes (Sox8, 11, 17 and 21) were expressed in pre-ameloblasts, whereas two others (Sox5 and 18) showed expression in odontoblasts. Sox genes thus showed a dynamic spatio-temporal expression during tooth development. PMID:26864488

  14. Gene set analysis for longitudinal gene expression data

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    Piepho Hans-Peter

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene set analysis (GSA has become a successful tool to interpret gene expression profiles in terms of biological functions, molecular pathways, or genomic locations. GSA performs statistical tests for independent microarray samples at the level of gene sets rather than individual genes. Nowadays, an increasing number of microarray studies are conducted to explore the dynamic changes of gene expression in a variety of species and biological scenarios. In these longitudinal studies, gene expression is repeatedly measured over time such that a GSA needs to take into account the within-gene correlations in addition to possible between-gene correlations. Results We provide a robust nonparametric approach to compare the expressions of longitudinally measured sets of genes under multiple treatments or experimental conditions. The limiting distributions of our statistics are derived when the number of genes goes to infinity while the number of replications can be small. When the number of genes in a gene set is small, we recommend permutation tests based on our nonparametric test statistics to achieve reliable type I error and better power while incorporating unknown correlations between and within-genes. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed method has a greater power than other methods for various data distributions and heteroscedastic correlation structures. This method was used for an IL-2 stimulation study and significantly altered gene sets were identified. Conclusions The simulation study and the real data application showed that the proposed gene set analysis provides a promising tool for longitudinal microarray analysis. R scripts for simulating longitudinal data and calculating the nonparametric statistics are posted on the North Dakota INBRE website http://ndinbre.org/programs/bioinformatics.php. Raw microarray data is available in Gene Expression Omnibus (National Center for Biotechnology Information with

  15. FARO server: Meta-analysis of gene expression by matching gene expression signatures to a compendium of public gene expression data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manijak, Mieszko P.; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although, systematic analysis of gene annotation is a powerful tool for interpreting gene expression data, it sometimes is blurred by incomplete gene annotation, missing expression response of key genes and secondary gene expression responses. These shortcomings may be partially...... circumvented by instead matching gene expression signatures to signatures of other experiments. FINDINGS: To facilitate this we present the Functional Association Response by Overlap (FARO) server, that match input signatures to a compendium of 242 gene expression signatures, extracted from more than 1700...

  16. Expression and Purification of the Bacillus anthracis Protective Antigen Receptor-binding Domain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    葛猛; 徐俊杰; 李冰; 董大勇; 宋小红; 郭强; 赵剑; 陈薇

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study is to express the receptor-binding domain of Bacillus anthracis protective antigen in E. coli. Signal sequence of the outer membrane protein A (OmpA) of E. coli was attached to the 5' end of the gene encoding protective antigen receptor-binding domain (the 4th domain of PA, PALM). The plasmid carrying the fusion gene was then transformed into E. coli and induced to express recombinant PAlM by IFFG. The recombinant protein was purified by chromatography and then identified by N-terrainal sequencing and Western blot. The recombinant protein, about 10% of the total bacterial protein in volume, was secreted to the periplasmic space of the cell. After a purification procedure including ionexchange chromatography and gel filtration, about 10 mg of homogenous recombinant PAD4 was obtained from 1 L culture. Data from N-terminal sequencing suggested that the amino acid sequence of recombinant PAD4 was identical with its natural counterpart. And the result of Western blot showed the recombinant protein could bind with anti-PA serum from rabbit. High level secreted expression of PAD4 was obtained in E. coli. The results reported here are parts of a continuing research to evaluate PAD4 as a potential drug for anthrax therapy or a candidate of new vaccine.

  17. Developmentally-regulated extended domains of DNA hypomethylation encompass highly transcribed genes of the human β-globin locus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathrop, Melissa J.; Hsu, Mei; Richardson, Christine A.; Olivier, Emmanuel N.; Bouhassira, Eric E.; Fiering, Steven; Lowrey, Christopher H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective DNA methylation has long been implicated in developmental β-globin gene regulation. However, the mechanism underlying this regulation is unclear, especially since these genes do not contain CpG islands. This has led us to propose and test the hypothesis that, just as for histone modifications, developmentally-specific changes in human β-like globin gene expression are associated with long-range changes in DNA methylation. Methods Bisulfite sequencing was used to determine the methylation state of individual CpG dinucleotides across the β-globin locus in uncultured primary human erythroblasts from fetal liver and bone marrow, and in primitive-like erythroid cells derived from human embryonic stem cells. Results β-globin locus CpGs are generally highly methylated but domains of DNA hypomethylation spanning thousands of base pairs are established around the most highly expressed genes during each developmental stage. These large domains of DNA hypomethylation are found within domains of histone modifications associated with gene expression. We also find hypomethylation of a small proportion of γ-globin promoters in adult erythroid cells, suggesting a mechanism by which adult erythroid cells produce fetal hemoglobin. Conclusion This is one of the first reports to show that changes in DNA methylation patterns across large domains around non-CpG island genes correspond with changes in developmentally-regulated histone modifications and gene expression. This data supports a new model in which extended domains of DNA hypomethylation and active histone marks are coordinately established to achieve developmentally-specific gene expression of non-CpG island genes. PMID:19460471

  18. An enigmatic fourth runt domain gene in the fugu genome: ancestral gene loss versus accelerated evolution

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    Hood Leroy

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The runt domain transcription factors are key regulators of developmental processes in bilaterians, involved both in cell proliferation and differentiation, and their disruption usually leads to disease. Three runt domain genes have been described in each vertebrate genome (the RUNX gene family, but only one in other chordates. Therefore, the common ancestor of vertebrates has been thought to have had a single runt domain gene. Results Analysis of the genome draft of the fugu pufferfish (Takifugu rubripes reveals the existence of a fourth runt domain gene, FrRUNT, in addition to the orthologs of human RUNX1, RUNX2 and RUNX3. The tiny FrRUNT packs six exons and two putative promoters in just 3 kb of genomic sequence. The first exon is located within an intron of FrSUPT3H, the ortholog of human SUPT3H, and the first exon of FrSUPT3H resides within the first intron of FrRUNT. The two gene structures are therefore "interlocked". In the human genome, SUPT3H is instead interlocked with RUNX2. FrRUNT has no detectable ortholog in the genomes of mammals, birds or amphibians. We consider alternative explanations for an apparent contradiction between the phylogenetic data and the comparison of the genomic neighborhoods of human and fugu runt domain genes. We hypothesize that an ancient RUNT locus was lost in the tetrapod lineage, together with FrFSTL6, a member of a novel family of follistatin-like genes. Conclusions Our results suggest that the runt domain family may have started expanding in chordates much earlier than previously thought, and exemplify the importance of detailed analysis of whole-genome draft sequence to provide new insights into gene evolution.

  19. LINE FUSION GENES: a database of LINE expression in human genes

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    Park Hong-Seog

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long Interspersed Nuclear Elements (LINEs are the most abundant retrotransposons in humans. About 79% of human genes are estimated to contain at least one segment of LINE per transcription unit. Recent studies have shown that LINE elements can affect protein sequences, splicing patterns and expression of human genes. Description We have developed a database, LINE FUSION GENES, for elucidating LINE expression throughout the human gene database. We searched the 28,171 genes listed in the NCBI database for LINE elements and analyzed their structures and expression patterns. The results show that the mRNA sequences of 1,329 genes were affected by LINE expression. The LINE expression types were classified on the basis of LINEs in the 5' UTR, exon or 3' UTR sequences of the mRNAs. Our database provides further information, such as the tissue distribution and chromosomal location of the genes, and the domain structure that is changed by LINE integration. We have linked all the accession numbers to the NCBI data bank to provide mRNA sequences for subsequent users. Conclusion We believe that our work will interest genome scientists and might help them to gain insight into the implications of LINE expression for human evolution and disease. Availability http://www.primate.or.kr/line

  20. The functional landscape of mouse gene expression

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    Zhang Wen

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Large-scale quantitative analysis of transcriptional co-expression has been used to dissect regulatory networks and to predict the functions of new genes discovered by genome sequencing in model organisms such as yeast. Although the idea that tissue-specific expression is indicative of gene function in mammals is widely accepted, it has not been objectively tested nor compared with the related but distinct strategy of correlating gene co-expression as a means to predict gene function. Results We generated microarray expression data for nearly 40,000 known and predicted mRNAs in 55 mouse tissues, using custom-built oligonucleotide arrays. We show that quantitative transcriptional co-expression is a powerful predictor of gene function. Hundreds of functional categories, as defined by Gene Ontology 'Biological Processes', are associated with characteristic expression patterns across all tissues, including categories that bear no overt relationship to the tissue of origin. In contrast, simple tissue-specific restriction of expression is a poor predictor of which genes are in which functional categories. As an example, the highly conserved mouse gene PWP1 is widely expressed across different tissues but is co-expressed with many RNA-processing genes; we show that the uncharacterized yeast homolog of PWP1 is required for rRNA biogenesis. Conclusions We conclude that 'functional genomics' strategies based on quantitative transcriptional co-expression will be as fruitful in mammals as they have been in simpler organisms, and that transcriptional control of mammalian physiology is more modular than is generally appreciated. Our data and analyses provide a public resource for mammalian functional genomics.

  1. The PPARgamma2 A/B-domain plays a gene-specific role in transactivation and cofactor recruitment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bugge, Anne Skovsø; Grøntved, Lars; Aagaard, Mads M

    2009-01-01

    PPARgammaCDE compared with cells expressing full-length PPARgamma2. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation, we demonstrate that PPARgamma binding to genomic target sites and recruitment of the mediator component TRAP220/MED1/PBP/DRIP205 is not affected by the deletion of the A/B-domain. By contrast......, the PPARgamma-mediated cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB)-binding protein (CBP) and p300 recruitment to A/B-domain-dependent target genes is compromised by deletion of the A/B-domain. These results indicate that the A/B-domain of PPARgamma2 is specifically involved in the recruitment or stabilization...

  2. Comprehensive analysis of gene expression patterns of hedgehog-related genes

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    Baillie David

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Caenorhabditis elegans genome encodes ten proteins that share sequence similarity with the Hedgehog signaling molecule through their C-terminal autoprocessing Hint/Hog domain. These proteins contain novel N-terminal domains, and C. elegans encodes dozens of additional proteins containing only these N-terminal domains. These gene families are called warthog, groundhog, ground-like and quahog, collectively called hedgehog (hh-related genes. Previously, the expression pattern of seventeen genes was examined, which showed that they are primarily expressed in the ectoderm. Results With the completion of the C. elegans genome sequence in November 2002, we reexamined and identified 61 hh-related ORFs. Further, we identified 49 hh-related ORFs in C. briggsae. ORF analysis revealed that 30% of the genes still had errors in their predictions and we improved these predictions here. We performed a comprehensive expression analysis using GFP fusions of the putative intergenic regulatory sequence with one or two transgenic lines for most genes. The hh-related genes are expressed in one or a few of the following tissues: hypodermis, seam cells, excretory duct and pore cells, vulval epithelial cells, rectal epithelial cells, pharyngeal muscle or marginal cells, arcade cells, support cells of sensory organs, and neuronal cells. Using time-lapse recordings, we discovered that some hh-related genes are expressed in a cyclical fashion in phase with molting during larval development. We also generated several translational GFP fusions, but they did not show any subcellular localization. In addition, we also studied the expression patterns of two genes with similarity to Drosophila frizzled, T23D8.1 and F27E11.3A, and the ortholog of the Drosophila gene dally-like, gpn-1, which is a heparan sulfate proteoglycan. The two frizzled homologs are expressed in a few neurons in the head, and gpn-1 is expressed in the pharynx. Finally, we compare the

  3. Differential gene expression during Trypanosoma cruzi metacyclogenesis

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    Marco Aurelio Krieger

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available The transformation of epimastigotes into metacyclic trypomastigotes involves changes in the pattern of expressed genes, resulting in important morphological and functional differences between these developmental forms of Trypanosoma cruzi. In order to identify and characterize genes involved in triggering the metacyclogenesis process and in conferring to metacyclic trypomastigotes their stage specific biological properties, we have developed a method allowing the isolation of genes specifically expressed when comparing two close related cell populations (representation of differential expression or RDE. The method is based on the PCR amplification of gene sequences selected by hybridizing and subtracting the populations in such a way that after some cycles of hybridization-amplification genes specific to a given population are highly enriched. The use of this method in the analysis of differential gene expression during T. cruzi metacyclogenesis (6 hr and 24 hr of differentiation and metacyclic trypomastigotes resulted in the isolation of several clones from each time point. Northern blot analysis showed that some genes are transiently expressed (6 hr and 24 hr differentiating cells, while others are present in differentiating cells and in metacyclic trypomastigotes. Nucleotide sequencing of six clones characterized so far showed that they do not display any homology to gene sequences available in the GeneBank.

  4. Multivariate search for differentially expressed gene combinations

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    Klebanov Lev

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To identify differentially expressed genes, it is standard practice to test a two-sample hypothesis for each gene with a proper adjustment for multiple testing. Such tests are essentially univariate and disregard the multidimensional structure of microarray data. A more general two-sample hypothesis is formulated in terms of the joint distribution of any sub-vector of expression signals. Results By building on an earlier proposed multivariate test statistic, we propose a new algorithm for identifying differentially expressed gene combinations. The algorithm includes an improved random search procedure designed to generate candidate gene combinations of a given size. Cross-validation is used to provide replication stability of the search procedure. A permutation two-sample test is used for significance testing. We design a multiple testing procedure to control the family-wise error rate (FWER when selecting significant combinations of genes that result from a successive selection procedure. A target set of genes is composed of all significant combinations selected via random search. Conclusions A new algorithm has been developed to identify differentially expressed gene combinations. The performance of the proposed search-and-testing procedure has been evaluated by computer simulations and analysis of replicated Affymetrix gene array data on age-related changes in gene expression in the inner ear of CBA mice.

  5. Gene Expression Profiling in Porcine Fetal Thymus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanjiong Chen; Shengbin Li; Lin Ye; Jianing Geng; Yajun Deng; Songnian Hu

    2003-01-01

    obtain an initial overview of gene diversity and expression pattern in porcinethymus, 11,712 ESTs (Expressed Sequence Tags) from 100-day-old porcine thymus(FTY) were sequenced and 7,071 cleaned ESTs were used for gene expressionanalysis. Clustered by the PHRAP program, 959 contigs and 3,074 singlets wereobtained. Blast search showed that 806 contigs and 1,669 singlets (totally 5,442ESTs) had homologues in GenBank and 1,629 ESTs were novel. According to theGene Ontology classification, 36.99% ESTs were cataloged into the gene expressiongroup, indicating that although the functional gene (18.78% in defense group) ofthymus is expressed in a certain degree, the 100-day-old porcine thymus still existsin a developmental stage. Comparative analysis showed that the gene expressionpattern of the 100-day-old porcine thymus is similar to that of the human infantthymus.

  6. Phytochrome-regulated Gene Expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter H. Quail

    2007-01-01

    Identification of all genes involved in the phytochrome (phy)-mediated responses of plants to their light environment is an important goal in providing an overall understanding of light-regulated growth and development. This article highlights and integrates the central findings of two recent comprehensive studies in Arabidopsis that have identified the genome-wide set of phy-regulated genes that respond rapidly to red-light signals upon first exposure of dark-grown seedlings, and have tested the functional relevance to normal seedling photomorphogenesis of an initial subset of these genes. The data: (a) reveal considerable complexity in the channeling of the light signals through the different phy-family members (phyA to phyE) to responsive genes; (b) identify a diversity of transcription-factor-encoding genes as major early, if not primary, targets of phy signaling, and, therefore, as potentially important regulators in the transcriptional-network hierarchy; and (c) identify auxin-related genes as the dominant class among rapidly-regulated, hormone-related genes. However, reverse-genetic functional profiling of a selected subset of these genes reveals that only a limited fraction are necessary for optimal phy-induced seedling deetiolation.

  7. Nucleosome repositioning underlies dynamic gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocetti, Nicolas; Whitehouse, Iestyn

    2016-03-15

    Nucleosome repositioning at gene promoters is a fundamental aspect of the regulation of gene expression. However, the extent to which nucleosome repositioning is used within eukaryotic genomes is poorly understood. Here we report a comprehensive analysis of nucleosome positions as budding yeast transit through an ultradian cycle in which expression of >50% of all genes is highly synchronized. We present evidence of extensive nucleosome repositioning at thousands of gene promoters as genes are activated and repressed. During activation, nucleosomes are relocated to allow sites of general transcription factor binding and transcription initiation to become accessible. The extent of nucleosome shifting is closely related to the dynamic range of gene transcription and generally related to DNA sequence properties and use of the coactivators TFIID or SAGA. However, dynamic gene expression is not limited to SAGA-regulated promoters and is an inherent feature of most genes. While nucleosome repositioning occurs pervasively, we found that a class of genes required for growth experience acute nucleosome shifting as cells enter the cell cycle. Significantly, our data identify that the ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling enzyme Snf2 plays a fundamental role in nucleosome repositioning and the expression of growth genes. We also reveal that nucleosome organization changes extensively in concert with phases of the cell cycle, with large, regularly spaced nucleosome arrays being established in mitosis. Collectively, our data and analysis provide a framework for understanding nucleosome dynamics in relation to fundamental DNA-dependent transactions.

  8. The C-terminal domain of Nrf1 negatively regulates the full-length CNC-bZIP factor and its shorter isoform LCR-F1/Nrf1β; both are also inhibited by the small dominant-negative Nrf1γ/δ isoforms that down-regulate ARE-battery gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yiguo; Qiu, Lu; Li, Shaojun; Xiang, Yuancai; Chen, Jiayu; Ren, Yonggang

    2014-01-01

    The C-terminal domain (CTD, aa 686-741) of nuclear factor-erythroid 2 p45-related factor 1 (Nrf1) shares 53% amino acid sequence identity with the equivalent Neh3 domain of Nrf2, a homologous transcription factor. The Neh3 positively regulates Nrf2, but whether the Neh3-like (Neh3L) CTD of Nrf1 has a similar role in regulating Nrf1-target gene expression is unknown. Herein, we report that CTD negatively regulates the full-length Nrf1 (i.e. 120-kDa glycoprotein and 95-kDa deglycoprotein) and its shorter isoform LCR-F1/Nrf1β (55-kDa). Attachment of its CTD-adjoining 112-aa to the C-terminus of Nrf2 yields the chimaeric Nrf2-C112Nrf1 factor with a markedly decreased activity. Live-cell imaging of GFP-CTD reveals that the extra-nuclear portion of the fusion protein is allowed to associate with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane through the amphipathic Neh3L region of Nrf1 and its basic c-tail. Thus removal of either the entire CTD or the essential Neh3L portion within CTD from Nrf1, LCR-F1/Nrf1β and Nrf2-C112Nrf1, results in an increase in their transcriptional ability to regulate antioxidant response element (ARE)-driven reporter genes. Further examinations unravel that two smaller isoforms, 36-kDa Nrf1γ and 25-kDa Nrf1δ, act as dominant-negative inhibitors to compete against Nrf1, LCR-F1/Nrf1β and Nrf2. Relative to Nrf1, LCR-F1/Nrf1β is a weak activator, that is positively regulated by its Asn/Ser/Thr-rich (NST) domain and acidic domain 2 (AD2). Like AD1 of Nrf1, both AD2 and NST domain of LCR-F1/Nrf1β fused within two different chimaeric contexts to yield Gal4D:Nrf1β607 and Nrf1β:C270Nrf2, positively regulate their transactivation activity of cognate Gal4- and Nrf2-target reporter genes. More importantly, differential expression of endogenous ARE-battery genes is attributable to up-regulation by Nrf1 and LCR-F1/Nrf1β and down-regulation by Nrf1γ and Nrf1δ.

  9. The C-terminal domain of Nrf1 negatively regulates the full-length CNC-bZIP factor and its shorter isoform LCR-F1/Nrf1β; both are also inhibited by the small dominant-negative Nrf1γ/δ isoforms that down-regulate ARE-battery gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiguo Zhang

    Full Text Available The C-terminal domain (CTD, aa 686-741 of nuclear factor-erythroid 2 p45-related factor 1 (Nrf1 shares 53% amino acid sequence identity with the equivalent Neh3 domain of Nrf2, a homologous transcription factor. The Neh3 positively regulates Nrf2, but whether the Neh3-like (Neh3L CTD of Nrf1 has a similar role in regulating Nrf1-target gene expression is unknown. Herein, we report that CTD negatively regulates the full-length Nrf1 (i.e. 120-kDa glycoprotein and 95-kDa deglycoprotein and its shorter isoform LCR-F1/Nrf1β (55-kDa. Attachment of its CTD-adjoining 112-aa to the C-terminus of Nrf2 yields the chimaeric Nrf2-C112Nrf1 factor with a markedly decreased activity. Live-cell imaging of GFP-CTD reveals that the extra-nuclear portion of the fusion protein is allowed to associate with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER membrane through the amphipathic Neh3L region of Nrf1 and its basic c-tail. Thus removal of either the entire CTD or the essential Neh3L portion within CTD from Nrf1, LCR-F1/Nrf1β and Nrf2-C112Nrf1, results in an increase in their transcriptional ability to regulate antioxidant response element (ARE-driven reporter genes. Further examinations unravel that two smaller isoforms, 36-kDa Nrf1γ and 25-kDa Nrf1δ, act as dominant-negative inhibitors to compete against Nrf1, LCR-F1/Nrf1β and Nrf2. Relative to Nrf1, LCR-F1/Nrf1β is a weak activator, that is positively regulated by its Asn/Ser/Thr-rich (NST domain and acidic domain 2 (AD2. Like AD1 of Nrf1, both AD2 and NST domain of LCR-F1/Nrf1β fused within two different chimaeric contexts to yield Gal4D:Nrf1β607 and Nrf1β:C270Nrf2, positively regulate their transactivation activity of cognate Gal4- and Nrf2-target reporter genes. More importantly, differential expression of endogenous ARE-battery genes is attributable to up-regulation by Nrf1 and LCR-F1/Nrf1β and down-regulation by Nrf1γ and Nrf1δ.

  10. The Medicago truncatula gene expression atlas web server

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Yuhong

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Legumes (Leguminosae or Fabaceae play a major role in agriculture. Transcriptomics studies in the model legume species, Medicago truncatula, are instrumental in helping to formulate hypotheses about the role of legume genes. With the rapid growth of publically available Affymetrix GeneChip Medicago Genome Array GeneChip data from a great range of tissues, cell types, growth conditions, and stress treatments, the legume research community desires an effective bioinformatics system to aid efforts to interpret the Medicago genome through functional genomics. We developed the Medicago truncatula Gene Expression Atlas (MtGEA web server for this purpose. Description The Medicago truncatula Gene Expression Atlas (MtGEA web server is a centralized platform for analyzing the Medicago transcriptome. Currently, the web server hosts gene expression data from 156 Affymetrix GeneChip® Medicago genome arrays in 64 different experiments, covering a broad range of developmental and environmental conditions. The server enables flexible, multifaceted analyses of transcript data and provides a range of additional information about genes, including different types of annotation and links to the genome sequence, which help users formulate hypotheses about gene function. Transcript data can be accessed using Affymetrix probe identification number, DNA sequence, gene name, functional description in natural language, GO and KEGG annotation terms, and InterPro domain number. Transcripts can also be discovered through co-expression or differential expression analysis. Flexible tools to select a subset of experiments and to visualize and compare expression profiles of multiple genes have been implemented. Data can be downloaded, in part or full, in a tabular form compatible with common analytical and visualization software. The web server will be updated on a regular basis to incorporate new gene expression data and genome annotation, and is accessible

  11. Expression, Purification, and Functional Characterization of Atypical Xenocin, Its Immunity Protein, and Their Domains from Xenorhabdus nematophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitendra Singh Rathore

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Xenorhabdus nematophila, a gram-negative bacterium belonging to the family Enterobacteriaceae is a natural symbiont of a soil nematode from the family Steinernematidae. In this study cloning, expression, and purification of broad range iron regulated multidomain bacteriocin called xenocin from X. nematophila (66 kDa, encoded by xcinA gene and its multidomain immunity protein (42 kDa, encoded by ximB gene have been done. xcinA-ximB (N′ terminal 270 bp, translocation, and translocation-receptor domain of xcinA, ximB, and its hemolysin domain were cloned, expressed, and purified by single step Ni-NTA chromatography under native conditions. In the functional characterization, neutralization of xcinA toxicity by immunity domain of ximB gene was determined by endogenous assay. Exogenous toxic assays results showed that only the purified recombinant xenocin-immunity domain (10 kDa protein complex had toxic activity. Atypical cognate immunity protein (42 kDa of xenocin was fusion of immunity domain (10 kDa and hemolysin domain (32 kDa. In silico analysis of immunity protein revealed its similarity with hemolysin and purine NTPase like proteins. Hemolytic activity was not observed in immunity protein or in its various domains; however, full-length immunity protein lacking Walker motif showed ATPase activity. Finally, using circular dichroism performed secondary structural analyses of all the recombinant proteins/protein complexes.

  12. Digital gene expression signatures for maize development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eveland, Andrea L; Satoh-Nagasawa, Namiko; Goldshmidt, Alexander; Meyer, Sandra; Beatty, Mary; Sakai, Hajime; Ware, Doreen; Jackson, David

    2010-11-01

    Genome-wide expression signatures detect specific perturbations in developmental programs and contribute to functional resolution of key regulatory networks. In maize (Zea mays) inflorescences, mutations in the RAMOSA (RA) genes affect the determinacy of axillary meristems and thus alter branching patterns, an important agronomic trait. In this work, we developed and tested a framework for analysis of tag-based, digital gene expression profiles using Illumina's high-throughput sequencing technology and the newly assembled B73 maize reference genome. We also used a mutation in the RA3 gene to identify putative expression signatures specific to stem cell fate in axillary meristem determinacy. The RA3 gene encodes a trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase and may act at the interface between developmental and metabolic processes. Deep sequencing of digital gene expression libraries, representing three biological replicate ear samples from wild-type and ra3 plants, generated 27 million 20- to 21-nucleotide reads with frequencies spanning 4 orders of magnitude. Unique sequence tags were anchored to 3'-ends of individual transcripts by DpnII and NlaIII digests, which were multiplexed during sequencing. We mapped 86% of nonredundant signature tags to the maize genome, which associated with 37,117 gene models and unannotated regions of expression. In total, 66% of genes were detected by at least nine reads in immature maize ears. We used comparative genomics to leverage existing information from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and rice (Oryza sativa) in functional analyses of differentially expressed maize genes. Results from this study provide a basis for the analysis of short-read expression data in maize and resolved specific expression signatures that will help define mechanisms of action for the RA3 gene.

  13. The human insulin gene is part of a large open chromatin domain specific for human islets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutskov, Vesco; Felsenfeld, Gary

    2009-10-13

    Knowledge of how insulin (INS) gene expression is regulated will lead to better understanding of normal and abnormal pancreatic beta cell function. We have mapped histone modifications over the INS region, coupled with an expression profile, in freshly isolated islets from multiple human donors. Unlike many other human genes, in which active modifications tend to be concentrated within 1 kb around the transcription start site, these marks are distributed over the entire coding region of INS as well. Moreover, a region of approximately 80 kb around the INS gene, which contains the {tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-(INS)-insulin-like growth factor 2 antisense (IGF2AS)-insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2)} gene cluster, unusually is marked by almost uniformly elevated levels of histone acetylation and H3K4 dimethylation, extending both downstream into IGF2 and upstream beyond the TH gene. This is accompanied by islet specific coordinate expression with INS of the neighboring TH and IGF2 genes. The presence of islet specific intergenic transcripts suggests their possible function in the maintenance of this unusual large open chromatin domain.

  14. Gene expression profile of sprinter's muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, M; Tanaka, H; Shono, N; Shindo, M; St-Amand, J

    2007-12-01

    We have characterized the global gene expression profile in left vastus lateralis muscles of sprinters and sedentary men. The gene expression profile was analyzed by using serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) method. The abundantly expressed transcripts in the sprinter's muscle were mainly involved in contraction and energy metabolism, whereas six transcripts were corresponding to potentially novel transcripts. Thirty-eight transcripts were differentially expressed between the sprinter and sedentary individuals. Moreover, sprinters showed higher expressions of both uncharacterized and potentially novel transcripts. Sprinters also highly expressed seven transcripts, such as glycine-rich protein, myosin heavy polypeptide (MYH) 2, expressed sequence tag similar to (EST) fructose-bisphosphate aldolase 1 isoform A (ALDOA), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and ATP synthase F0 subunit 6. On the other hand, 20 transcripts such as MYH1, tropomyosin 2 and 3, troponin C slow, C2 fast, I slow, T1 slow and T3 fast, myoglobin, creatine kinase, ALDOA, glycogen phosphorylase, cytochrome c oxidase II and III, and NADH dehydrogenase 1 and 2 showed lower expression levels in the sprinters than the sedentary controls. The current study has characterized the global gene expressions in sprinters and identified a number of transcripts that can be subjected to further mechanistic analysis.

  15. Widespread ectopic expression of olfactory receptor genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanai Itai

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Olfactory receptors (ORs are the largest gene family in the human genome. Although they are expected to be expressed specifically in olfactory tissues, some ectopic expression has been reported, with special emphasis on sperm and testis. The present study systematically explores the expression patterns of OR genes in a large number of tissues and assesses the potential functional implication of such ectopic expression. Results We analyzed the expression of hundreds of human and mouse OR transcripts, via EST and microarray data, in several dozens of human and mouse tissues. Different tissues had specific, relatively small OR gene subsets which had particularly high expression levels. In testis, average expression was not particularly high, and very few highly expressed genes were found, none corresponding to ORs previously implicated in sperm chemotaxis. Higher expression levels were more common for genes with a non-OR genomic neighbor. Importantly, no correlation in expression levels was detected for human-mouse orthologous pairs. Also, no significant difference in expression levels was seen between intact and pseudogenized ORs, except for the pseudogenes of subfamily 7E which has undergone a human-specific expansion. Conclusion The OR superfamily as a whole, show widespread, locus-dependent and heterogeneous expression, in agreement with a neutral or near neutral evolutionary model for transcription control. These results cannot reject the possibility that small OR subsets might play functional roles in different tissues, however considerable care should be exerted when offering a functional interpretation for ectopic OR expression based only on transcription information.

  16. Definition of the domain boundaries is critical to the expression of the nucleotide-binding domains of P-glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Ian D; Berridge, Georgina; Linton, Kenneth J; Higgins, Christopher F; Callaghan, Richard

    2003-11-01

    Heterologous expression of domains of eukaryotic proteins is frequently associated with formation of inclusion bodies, consisting of aggregated mis-folded protein. This phenomenon has proved a significant barrier to the characterization of domains of eukaryotic ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters. We hypothesized that the solubility of heterologously expressed nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) of ABC transporters is dependent on the definition of the domain boundaries. In this paper we have defined a core NBD, and tested the effect of extensions to and deletions of this core domain on protein expression. Of 10 NBDs constructed, only one was expressed as a soluble protein in Escherichia coli, with expression of the remaining NBDs being associated with inclusion body formation. The soluble NBD protein we have obtained corresponds to residues 386-632 of P-glycoprotein and represents an optimally defined domain. The NBD has been isolated and purified to 95% homogeneity by a two-step purification protocol, involving affinity chromatography and gel filtration. Although showing no detectable ATP hydrolysis, the protein retains specific ATP binding and has a secondary structure compatible with X-ray crystallographic data on bacterial NBDs. We have interpreted our results in terms of homology models, which suggest that the N-terminal NBD of P-glycoprotein can be produced as a stable, correctly folded, isolate domain with judicious design of the expression construct.

  17. The carboxy-terminal domain of Dictyostelium C-module-binding factor is an independent gene regulatory entity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Lucas

    Full Text Available The C-module-binding factor (CbfA is a multidomain protein that belongs to the family of jumonji-type (JmjC transcription regulators. In the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, CbfA regulates gene expression during the unicellular growth phase and multicellular development. CbfA and a related D. discoideum CbfA-like protein, CbfB, share a paralogous domain arrangement that includes the JmjC domain, presumably a chromatin-remodeling activity, and two zinc finger-like (ZF motifs. On the other hand, the CbfA and CbfB proteins have completely different carboxy-terminal domains, suggesting that the plasticity of such domains may have contributed to the adaptation of the CbfA-like transcription factors to the rapid genome evolution in the dictyostelid clade. To support this hypothesis we performed DNA microarray and real-time RT-PCR measurements and found that CbfA regulates at least 160 genes during the vegetative growth of D. discoideum cells. Functional annotation of these genes revealed that CbfA predominantly controls the expression of gene products involved in housekeeping functions, such as carbohydrate, purine nucleoside/nucleotide, and amino acid metabolism. The CbfA protein displays two different mechanisms of gene regulation. The expression of one set of CbfA-dependent genes requires at least the JmjC/ZF domain of the CbfA protein and thus may depend on chromatin modulation. Regulation of the larger group of genes, however, does not depend on the entire CbfA protein and requires only the carboxy-terminal domain of CbfA (CbfA-CTD. An AT-hook motif located in CbfA-CTD, which is known to mediate DNA binding to A+T-rich sequences in vitro, contributed to CbfA-CTD-dependent gene regulatory functions in vivo.

  18. Regulation of Gene Expression in Protozoa Parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Consuelo Gomez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Infections with protozoa parasites are associated with high burdens of morbidity and mortality across the developing world. Despite extensive efforts to control the transmission of these parasites, the spread of populations resistant to drugs and the lack of effective vaccines against them contribute to their persistence as major public health problems. Parasites should perform a strict control on the expression of genes involved in their pathogenicity, differentiation, immune evasion, or drug resistance, and the comprehension of the mechanisms implicated in that control could help to develop novel therapeutic strategies. However, until now these mechanisms are poorly understood in protozoa. Recent investigations into gene expression in protozoa parasites suggest that they possess many of the canonical machineries employed by higher eukaryotes for the control of gene expression at transcriptional, posttranscriptional, and epigenetic levels, but they also contain exclusive mechanisms. Here, we review the current understanding about the regulation of gene expression in Plasmodium sp., Trypanosomatids, Entamoeba histolytica and Trichomonas vaginalis.

  19. Expression of polarity genes in human cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wan-Hsin; Asmann, Yan W; Anastasiadis, Panos Z

    2015-01-01

    Polarity protein complexes are crucial for epithelial apical-basal polarity and directed cell migration. Since alterations of these processes are common in cancer, polarity proteins have been proposed to function as tumor suppressors or oncogenic promoters. Here, we review the current understanding of polarity protein functions in epithelial homeostasis, as well as tumor formation and progression. As most previous studies focused on the function of single polarity proteins in simplified model systems, we used a genomics approach to systematically examine and identify the expression profiles of polarity genes in human cancer. The expression profiles of polarity genes were distinct in different human tissues and classified cancer types. Additionally, polarity expression profiles correlated with disease progression and aggressiveness, as well as with identified cancer types, where specific polarity genes were commonly altered. In the case of Scribble, gene expression analysis indicated its common amplification and upregulation in human cancer, suggesting a tumor promoting function.

  20. Regulation of meiotic gene expression in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adele eZhou

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available With the recent advances in genomics and sequencing technologies, databases of transcriptomes representing many cellular processes have been built. Meiotic transcriptomes in plants have been studied in Arabidopsis thaliana, rice (Oryza sativa, wheat (Triticum aestivum, petunia (Petunia hybrida, sunflower (Helianthus annuus, and maize (Zea mays. Studies in all organisms, but particularly in plants, indicate that a very large number of genes are expressed during meiosis, though relatively few of them seem to be required for the completion of meiosis. In this review, we focus on gene expression at the RNA level and analyze the meiotic transcriptome datasets and explore expression patterns of known meiotic genes to elucidate how gene expression could be regulated during meiosis. We also discuss mechanisms, such as chromatin organization and non-coding RNAs, that might be involved in the regulation of meiotic transcription patterns.

  1. The Popeye domain containing genes: essential elements in heart rate control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Roland F; Poon, Kar Lai; Simrick, Subreena; Brand, Thomas

    2012-12-01

    The Popeye domain containing (Popdc) gene family displays preferential expression in skeletal muscle and heart. Only recently a significant gain in the understanding of the function of Popdc genes in the heart has been obtained. The Popdc genes encode membrane proteins harboring an evolutionary conserved Popeye domain, which functions as a binding domain for cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). Popdc proteins interact with the two-pore channel TREK-1 and enhance its current. This protein interaction is modulated by cAMP. Null mutations of members of the Popdc gene family in zebrafish and mouse are associated with severe cardiac arrhythmia phenotypes. While in zebrafish an atrioventricular block was prevalent, in mouse a stress-induced sinus bradycardia was observed, which was due to the presence of sinus pauses. Moreover, the phenotype develops in an age-dependent manner, being absent in the young animal and becoming increasingly severe, as the animals grow older. This phenotype is reminiscent of the sick sinus syndrome (SSS), which affects mostly the elderly and is characterized by the poor ability of the cardiac pacemaker to adapt the heart rate to the physiological demand. While being a prevalent disease, which is responsible for a large fraction of pacemaker implantations in Western countries, SSS is poorly understood at the molecular level. It is therefore expected that the study of the molecular basis of the stress-induced bradycardia in Popdc mice will shed new light on the etiology of pacemaker disease.

  2. Genomewide analysis of LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES Domain gene family in Zea mays

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yue-Min Zhang; Shi-Zhong Zhang; Cheng-Chao Zheng

    2014-04-01

    The investigation of transcription factor (TF) families is a major focus of postgenomic research. The plant-specific ASYMMETRIC LEAVES2-LIKE (ASL) / LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES Domain (LBD) proteins constitute a major zincfinger-like-domain transcription factor family, and regulate diverse biological processes in plants. However, little is known about LBD genes in maize (Zea mays). In this study, a total of 44 LBD genes were identified in maize genome and were phylogenetically clustered into two groups (I and II), together with LBDs from Arabidopsis. The predicted maize LBDs were distributed across all the 10 chromosomes with different densities. In addition, the gene structures of maize LBDs were analysed. The expression profiles of the maize LBD genes under normal growth conditions were analysed by microarray data and qRT-PCR. The results indicated that LBDs might be involved in various aspects of physiological and developmental processes in maize. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a genomewide analysis of the maize LBD gene family, which would provide valuable information for understanding the classification and putative functions of the gene family.

  3. Genetic Analysis of MEFV Gene Pyrin Domain in Patients With Behçet's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Behçet's disease (BD is a systemic vasculitis with recurrent oral and genital ulcers and uveitis. MEFV gene, which is the main factor in familial Mediterranean fever (FMF, is also reported to be a susceptibility gene for BD. The pyrin domain of MEFV gene is a member of death-domain superfamily and has been proposed to regulate inflammatory signaling in myeloid cells. This study was designed to determine if mutations in pyrin domain of MEFV gene are involved in BD. Methods. We analyzed the pyrin domain of MEFV gene in 54 Turkish patients with BD by PCR-analysis and direct sequencing. Results. Neither deletion or insertion mutations nor point mutations in pyrin domain were found in any patient. Conclusion. Although pyrin gene mutations have been reported in patients with BD, pyrin domain is not mutated. However, alterations in other regions of MEFV gene and interaction between pyrin domains are needed to be further investigated.

  4. Optimal Reference Genes for Gene Expression Normalization in Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Odelta; de Vargas Rigo, Graziela; Frasson, Amanda Piccoli; Macedo, Alexandre José; Tasca, Tiana

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the etiologic agent of trichomonosis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease worldwide. This infection is associated with several health consequences, including cervical and prostate cancers and HIV acquisition. Gene expression analysis has been facilitated because of available genome sequences and large-scale transcriptomes in T. vaginalis, particularly using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), one of the most used methods for molecular studies. Reference genes for normalization are crucial to ensure the accuracy of this method. However, to the best of our knowledge, a systematic validation of reference genes has not been performed for T. vaginalis. In this study, the transcripts of nine candidate reference genes were quantified using qRT-PCR under different cultivation conditions, and the stability of these genes was compared using the geNorm and NormFinder algorithms. The most stable reference genes were α-tubulin, actin and DNATopII, and, conversely, the widely used T. vaginalis reference genes GAPDH and β-tubulin were less stable. The PFOR gene was used to validate the reliability of the use of these candidate reference genes. As expected, the PFOR gene was upregulated when the trophozoites were cultivated with ferrous ammonium sulfate when the DNATopII, α-tubulin and actin genes were used as normalizing gene. By contrast, the PFOR gene was downregulated when the GAPDH gene was used as an internal control, leading to misinterpretation of the data. These results provide an important starting point for reference gene selection and gene expression analysis with qRT-PCR studies of T. vaginalis.

  5. Gene expression profiling in autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bovin, Lone Frier; Brynskov, Jørn; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2007-01-01

    A central issue in autoimmune disease is whether the underlying inflammation is a repeated stereotypical process or whether disease specific gene expression is involved. To shed light on this, we analysed whether genes previously found to be differentially regulated in rheumatoid arthritis (RA...

  6. Bayesian modeling of differential gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewin, Alex; Richardson, Sylvia; Marshall, Clare; Glazier, Anne; Aitman, Tim

    2006-03-01

    We present a Bayesian hierarchical model for detecting differentially expressing genes that includes simultaneous estimation of array effects, and show how to use the output for choosing lists of genes for further investigation. We give empirical evidence that expression-level dependent array effects are needed, and explore different nonlinear functions as part of our model-based approach to normalization. The model includes gene-specific variances but imposes some necessary shrinkage through a hierarchical structure. Model criticism via posterior predictive checks is discussed. Modeling the array effects (normalization) simultaneously with differential expression gives fewer false positive results. To choose a list of genes, we propose to combine various criteria (for instance, fold change and overall expression) into a single indicator variable for each gene. The posterior distribution of these variables is used to pick the list of genes, thereby taking into account uncertainty in parameter estimates. In an application to mouse knockout data, Gene Ontology annotations over- and underrepresented among the genes on the chosen list are consistent with biological expectations.

  7. Perspectives: Gene Expression in Fisheries Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Jennifer L.; Pavey, Scott A.

    2010-01-01

    Functional genes and gene expression have been connected to physiological traits linked to effective production and broodstock selection in aquaculture, selective implications of commercial fish harvest, and adaptive changes reflected in non-commercial fish populations subject to human disturbance and climate change. Gene mapping using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to identify functional genes, gene expression (analogue microarrays and real-time PCR), and digital sequencing technologies looking at RNA transcripts present new concepts and opportunities in support of effective and sustainable fisheries. Genomic tools have been rapidly growing in aquaculture research addressing aspects of fish health, toxicology, and early development. Genomic technologies linking effects in functional genes involved in growth, maturation and life history development have been tied to selection resulting from harvest practices. Incorporating new and ever-increasing knowledge of fish genomes is opening a different perspective on local adaptation that will prove invaluable in wild fish conservation and management. Conservation of fish stocks is rapidly incorporating research on critical adaptive responses directed at the effects of human disturbance and climate change through gene expression studies. Genomic studies of fish populations can be generally grouped into three broad categories: 1) evolutionary genomics and biodiversity; 2) adaptive physiological responses to a changing environment; and 3) adaptive behavioral genomics and life history diversity. We review current genomic research in fisheries focusing on those that use microarrays to explore differences in gene expression among phenotypes and within or across populations, information that is critically important to the conservation of fish and their relationship to humans.

  8. Gene Expression Profiles of Inflammatory Myopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available The simultaneous expression of 10,000 genes was measured, using Affymetrix GeneChip microarrays, in muscle specimens from 45 patients with various myopathies (dystrophy, congenital myopathy, and inflammatory myopathy examined at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and Children’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.

  9. Translational control of gene expression and disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calkhoven, Cornelis F; Müller, Christine; Leutz, Achim

    2002-01-01

    In the past decade, translational control has been shown to be crucial in the regulation of gene expression. Research in this field has progressed rapidly, revealing new control mechanisms and adding constantly to the list of translationally regulated genes. There is accumulating evidence that trans

  10. Inferring gene networks from discrete expression data

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, L.

    2013-07-18

    The modeling of gene networks from transcriptional expression data is an important tool in biomedical research to reveal signaling pathways and to identify treatment targets. Current gene network modeling is primarily based on the use of Gaussian graphical models applied to continuous data, which give a closedformmarginal likelihood. In this paper,we extend network modeling to discrete data, specifically data from serial analysis of gene expression, and RNA-sequencing experiments, both of which generate counts of mRNAtranscripts in cell samples.We propose a generalized linear model to fit the discrete gene expression data and assume that the log ratios of the mean expression levels follow a Gaussian distribution.We restrict the gene network structures to decomposable graphs and derive the graphs by selecting the covariance matrix of the Gaussian distribution with the hyper-inverse Wishart priors. Furthermore, we incorporate prior network models based on gene ontology information, which avails existing biological information on the genes of interest. We conduct simulation studies to examine the performance of our discrete graphical model and apply the method to two real datasets for gene network inference. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  11. Identification and validation of selected universal stress protein domain containing drought-responsive genes in pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallavi eSinha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pigeonpea is a resilient crop, which is relatively more drought tolerant than many other legume crops. To understand the molecular mechanisms of this unique feature of pigeonpea, 51 genes were selected using the Hidden Markov Models those codes for proteins having close similarity to universal stress protein domain. Validation of these genes was conducted on three pigeonpea genotypes (ICPL 151, ICPL 8755 and ICPL 227 having different levels of drought tolerance. Gene expression analysis using qRT-PCR revealed 6, 8 and 18 genes to be ≥2 fold differentially expressed in ICPL 151, ICPL 8755 and ICPL 227, respectively. A total of 10 differentially expressed genes showed ≥2 fold up-regulation in the more drought tolerant genotype. Of these, four genes each encoded proteins for plant U-box and universal stress protein A- (uspA like, while one gene encoded for cation/H(+ antiporter protein and one uncharacterized protein. Genes C.cajan_29830 and C.cajan_33874 belonging to uspA, were found significantly expressed in all the three genotypes with ≥2 fold expression variations. Expression profiling of these two genes on the four other legume crops revealed their specific role in pigeonpea. Therefore, these genes seem to be promising candidates for conferring drought tolerance specifically to pigeonpea.

  12. An Approach for Learning Expressive Ontologies in Medical Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios-Alvarado, Ana B; Lopez-Arevalo, Ivan; Tello-Leal, Edgar; Sosa-Sosa, Victor J

    2015-08-01

    The access to medical information (journals, blogs, web-pages, dictionaries, and texts) has been increased due to availability of many digital media. In particular, finding an appropriate structure that represents the information contained in texts is not a trivial task. One of the structures for modeling the knowledge are ontologies. An ontology refers to a conceptualization of a specific domain of knowledge. Ontologies are especially useful because they support the exchange and sharing of information as well as reasoning tasks. The usage of ontologies in medicine is mainly focussed in the representation and organization of medical terminologies. Ontology learning techniques have emerged as a set of techniques to get ontologies from unstructured information. This paper describes a new ontology learning approach that consists of a method for the acquisition of concepts and its corresponding taxonomic relations, where also axioms disjointWith and equivalentClass are learned from text without human intervention. The source of knowledge involves files about medical domain. Our approach is divided into two stages, the first part corresponds to discover hierarchical relations and the second part to the axiom extraction. Our automatic ontology learning approach shows better results compared against previous work, giving rise to more expressive ontologies.

  13. Expression, purification and characterization of the soluble CUA domain of cytochrome c oxidase of Paracoccus versutus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The key subunit Ⅱ of cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) contains a soluble binuclear copper center (CuA) do main. The CuA domain of Paracoccus versutus was cloned,expressed, purified and characterized. The gene encoding the CuA domain in pET11d vector was expressed in E. coli BL21(DE3). The results showed that the CuA domain was ex pressed mostly in inclusion bodies and the CuA domain pro tein synthesized in E. coli cells represents approximately 10percent of the total cellular proteins. Dissolved in urea, dia lyzed and recombined with Cu+/Cu2+ and purified by the Q-sepharose fast flow anion-exchange column and Sephadex G-75 gel filtration column, the soluble purple-colored protein,which shows a single band in electrophoresis, was obtained.The UV-visible absorption spectrum of CuA domain showed that there are intense band at 478 mn and a shoulder peak at 530 nm, and two weak bands at 360 and 806 nm respectively,which can be assigned to the charge transfer and the interac tions of obitals of Cu-S and Cu-Cu in the mixed-valence binuclear metal center (Cu2S2R2). The far-UV CD spectrum indicated that this domain is predominantly in β-sheet structure. The fluorescence spectra showed that its maximal excitation wavelength and maximal emission wavelength are at 280 and 345 nm, respectively.

  14. Gene expression studies using microarrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgess, Janette

    2001-01-01

    1. The rapid progression of the collaborative sequencing programmes that are unravelling the complete genome sequences of many organisms are opening pathways for new approaches to gene analysis. As the sequence data become available, the bottleneck in biological research will shift to understanding

  15. Insulin gene: organisation, expression and regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumonteil, E; Philippe, J

    1996-06-01

    Insulin, a major hormone of the endocrine pancreas, plays a key role in the control of glucose homeostasis. This review discusses the mechanisms of cell-specific expression and regulation of the insulin gene. Whereas expression is restricted to islet beta-cells in adults, the insulin gene is more widely expressed at several embryonic stages, although the role of extrapancreatic expression is still unclear. beta-cell-specific expression relies on the interactions of 5'-flanking sequence motifs of the promoter with a number of ubiquitous and islet-specific transcription factors. IEF1 and IPF-1, by their binding to the E and A boxes, respectively, of the insulin gene promoter, appear to be the major determinants of beta-cell-specific expression. IEF1 is a heterodimer of the basic helix-loop-helix family of transcription factors, whereas IPF-1 belongs to the homeodomain-containing family. beta-cell specific determinants are conserved throughout evolution, although the human insulin gene 5'-flanking sequence also contains a polymorphic minisatellite which is unique to primates and may play a role in insulin gene regulation. Glucose modulates insulin gene transcription, with multiple elements of the promoter involved in glucose responsiveness. Remarkably, IPF-1 and IEF1 are involved in both beta-cell-specific expression and glucose regulation of the insulin gene. cAMP also regulates insulin gene transcription through a CRE, in response to various hormonal stimuli. On the whole, recent studies have provided a better understanding of beta-cell differentiation and function.

  16. Hox genes define distinct progenitor sub-domains within the second heart field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Nicolas; Roux, Marine; Ryckebüsch, Lucile; Niederreither, Karen; Dollé, Pascal; Moon, Anne; Capecchi, Mario; Zaffran, Stéphane

    2011-01-01

    Much of the heart, including the atria, right ventricle and outflow tract (OFT) is derived from a progenitor cell population termed the second heart field (SHF) that contributes progressively to the embryonic heart during cardiac looping. Several studies have revealed anterior-posterior patterning of the SHF, since the anterior region (anterior heart field) contributes to right ventricular and OFT myocardium whereas the posterior region gives rise to the atria. We have previously shown that Retinoic Acid (RA) signal participates to this patterning. We now show that Hoxb1, Hoxa1, and Hoxa3, as downstream RA targets, are expressed in distinct sub-domains within the SHF. Our genetic lineage tracing analysis revealed that Hoxb1, Hoxa1 and Hoxa3-expressing cardiac progenitor cells contribute to both atria and the inferior wall of the OFT, which subsequently gives rise to myocardium at the base of pulmonary trunk. By contrast to Hoxb1Cre, the contribution of Hoxa1-enhIII-Cre and Hoxa3Cre-labeled cells is restricted to the distal regions of the OFT suggesting that proximo-distal patterning of the OFT is related to SHF sub-domains characterized by combinatorial Hox genes expression. Manipulation of RA signaling pathways showed that RA is required for the correct deployment of Hox-expressing SHF cells. This report provides new insights into the regulatory gene network in SHF cells contributing to the atria and sub-pulmonary myocardium. PMID:21385575

  17. Application of multidisciplinary analysis to gene expression.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xuefel (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Kang, Huining (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Fields, Chris (New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM); Cowie, Jim R. (New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM); Davidson, George S.; Haaland, David Michael; Sibirtsev, Valeriy (New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM); Mosquera-Caro, Monica P. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Xu, Yuexian (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Martin, Shawn Bryan; Helman, Paul (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Andries, Erik (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Ar, Kerem (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Potter, Jeffrey (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Willman, Cheryl L. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Murphy, Maurice H. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM)

    2004-01-01

    Molecular analysis of cancer, at the genomic level, could lead to individualized patient diagnostics and treatments. The developments to follow will signal a significant paradigm shift in the clinical management of human cancer. Despite our initial hopes, however, it seems that simple analysis of microarray data cannot elucidate clinically significant gene functions and mechanisms. Extracting biological information from microarray data requires a complicated path involving multidisciplinary teams of biomedical researchers, computer scientists, mathematicians, statisticians, and computational linguists. The integration of the diverse outputs of each team is the limiting factor in the progress to discover candidate genes and pathways associated with the molecular biology of cancer. Specifically, one must deal with sets of significant genes identified by each method and extract whatever useful information may be found by comparing these different gene lists. Here we present our experience with such comparisons, and share methods developed in the analysis of an infant leukemia cohort studied on Affymetrix HG-U95A arrays. In particular, spatial gene clustering, hyper-dimensional projections, and computational linguistics were used to compare different gene lists. In spatial gene clustering, different gene lists are grouped together and visualized on a three-dimensional expression map, where genes with similar expressions are co-located. In another approach, projections from gene expression space onto a sphere clarify how groups of genes can jointly have more predictive power than groups of individually selected genes. Finally, online literature is automatically rearranged to present information about genes common to multiple groups, or to contrast the differences between the lists. The combination of these methods has improved our understanding of infant leukemia. While the complicated reality of the biology dashed our initial, optimistic hopes for simple answers from

  18. Gene expression profiling: can we identify the right target genes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. Loyd

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression profiling allows the simultaneous monitoring of the transcriptional behaviour of thousands of genes, which may potentially be involved in disease development. Several studies have been performed in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF, which aim to define genetic links to the disease in an attempt to improve the current understanding of the underlying pathogenesis of the disease and target pathways for intervention. Expression profiling has shown a clear difference in gene expression between IPF and normal lung tissue, and has identified a wide range of candidate genes, including those known to encode for proteins involved in extracellular matrix formation and degradation, growth factors and chemokines. Recently, familial pulmonary fibrosis cohorts have been examined in an attempt to detect specific genetic mutations associated with IPF. To date, these studies have identified families in which IPF is associated with mutations in the gene encoding surfactant protein C, or with mutations in genes encoding components of telomerase. Although rare and clearly not responsible for the disease in all individuals, the nature of these mutations highlight the importance of the alveolar epithelium in disease pathogenesis and demonstrate the potential for gene expression profiling in helping to advance the current understanding of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

  19. Regulation of immunoglobulin gene rearrangement and expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taussig, M J; Sims, M J; Krawinkel, U

    1989-05-01

    The molecular genetic events leading to Ig expression and their control formed the topic of a recent EMBO workshop. This report by Michael Taussig, Martin Sims and Ulrich Krawinkel discusses contributions dealing with genes expressed in early pre-B cells, the mechanism of rearrangement, aberrant rearrangements seen in B cells of SCID mice, the feedback control of rearrangement as studied in transgenic mice, the control of Ig expression at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels, and class switching.

  20. Repeat organization and epigenetic regulation of the DH-Cmu domain of the immunoglobulin heavy-chain gene locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Tirtha; Chowdhury, Dipanjan; Keyes, Amanda; Jani, Anant; Subrahmanyam, Ramesh; Ivanova, Irina; Sen, Ranjan

    2007-09-07

    The first steps of murine immunoglobulin heavy-chain (IgH) gene recombination take place within a chromosomal domain that contains diversity (D(H)) and joining (J(H)) gene segments, but not variable (V(H)) gene segments. Here we show that the chromatin state of this domain is markedly heterogeneous. Specifically, only 5'- and 3'-most D(H) gene segments carry active chromatin modifications, whereas intervening D(H)s are associated with heterochromatic marks that are maintained by ongoing histone deacetylation. The intervening D(H)s form part of a tandemly repeated sequence that expresses tissue-specific, antisense oriented transcripts. We propose that the intervening D(H) genes are actively suppressed by repeat-induced epigenetic silencing, which is reflected in their infrequent representation in DJ(H) junctions compared to the flanking D(H) genes.

  1. 棉花LIM蛋白基因克隆及表达分析%Cloning and Expression Analysis of a LIM-Domain Protein Gene from Cotton (Gossypium hirsuturm L. )

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming LUO; Yue-hua XIAO; Zheng-sheng ZHANG; Wei-gou FANG; Lei HOU; Xiao-ying LUO; Shang-yong ZHENG; Yan PEI

    2002-01-01

    @@ LIM-domain proteins are implicated in multiple cellular and developmental processes in eukaryotes. Their essential roles have been well characterized in animals. It was revealed that LIM-domain protein plays an important role in various cellular processes, including construction of cytoskeleton, transcription control and signal transduction.

  2. Modulation of imprinted gene expression following superovulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortier, Amanda L; McGraw, Serge; Lopes, Flavia L; Niles, Kirsten M; Landry, Mylène; Trasler, Jacquetta M

    2014-05-05

    Although assisted reproductive technologies increase the risk of low birth weight and genomic imprinting disorders, the precise underlying causes remain unclear. Using a mouse model, we previously showed that superovulation alters the expression of imprinted genes in the placenta at 9.5days (E9.5) of gestation. Here, we investigate whether effects of superovulation on genomic imprinting persisted at later stages of development and assess the surviving fetuses for growth and morphological abnormalities. Superovulation, followed by embryo transfer at E3.5, as compared to spontaneous ovulation (controls), resulted in embryos of normal size and weight at 14.5 and 18.5days of gestation. The normal monoallelic expression of the imprinted genes H19, Snrpn and Kcnq1ot1 was unaffected in either the placentae or the embryos from the superovulated females at E14.5 or E18.5. However, for the paternally expressed imprinted gene Igf2, superovulation generated placentae with reduced production of the mature protein at E9.5 and significantly more variable mRNA levels at E14.5. We propose that superovulation results in the ovulation of abnormal oocytes with altered expression of imprinted genes, but that the coregulated genes of the imprinted gene network result in modulated expression. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  3. Gene expression of the endolymphatic sac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friis, Morten; Martin-Bertelsen, Tomas; Friis-Hansen, Lennart; Winther, Ole; Henao, Ricardo; Sørensen, Mads Sølvsten; Qvortrup, Klaus

    2011-12-01

    The endolymphatic sac is part of the membranous inner ear and is thought to play a role in the fluid homeostasis and immune defense of the inner ear; however, the exact function of the endolymphatic sac is not fully known. Many of the detected mRNAs in this study suggest that the endolymphatic sac has multiple and diverse functions in the inner ear. The objective of this study was to provide a comprehensive review of the genes expressed in the endolymphatic sac in the rat and perform a functional characterization based on measured mRNA abundance. Microarray technology was used to investigate the gene expression of the endolymphatic sac with the surrounding dura. Characteristic and novel endolymphatic sac genes were determined by comparing with expressions in pure dura. In all, 463 genes were identified specific for the endolymphatic sac. Functional annotation clustering revealed 29 functional clusters.

  4. Cloning and Expression Characteristics of the Pig Stra8 Gene

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    Xiaoyan Wang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Stra8 (Stimulated by Retinoic Acid 8 is considered a meiotic gatekeeper gene. Using reverse transcriptase PCR and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE, the complete sequence of the pig Stra8 gene was cloned. Bioinformatics analyses of this sequence were performed. Using semi-quantitative methods, the expression characteristics of Stra8 in Testis, cauda epididymis, body epididymis, caput epididymis, seminal vesicles, prostate gland, Cowper’s gland, heart, liver, spleen, lung, kidney, stomach, hypothalamus, pituitary gland, cerebrum, cerebellum, and hippocampus of adult Meishan boar and sow tissues were examined. The expression pattern in the testis of 2-, 30-, 60-, 90-, and 150-day old Meishan boars were analyzed using real-time PCR. We constructed a eukaryotic expression vector for the Stra8 gene and used it to transfect NIH-3T3 cells and third generation pig spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs cultured in vitro. Testes weight and sperm count in the cauda epididymis were evaluated at various time points. The results showed that the length of the pig Stra8 gene cDNA was 1444 bp encoding 366 amino acids with one typical helix-loop-helix (HLH domain. It is testes-specific expression. Expression was first detected in boar testis starting at day 2, and its expression significantly (p < 0.05 increased with age and body weight. When NIH-3T3 cells and pig SSCs were transfected with the eukaryotic expression vector EGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein-N1-pStra8, it was expressed in the cytoplasm of NIH-3T3 cells. However, in SSCs, Stra8 was expressed predominantly in cytoplasm and few in nucleus. Our data suggest that perhaps Stra8 acts as a transcription factor to initiate meiosis in young boar.

  5. Regulation of gene expression in human tendinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Chronic tendon injuries, also known as tendinopathies, are common among professional and recreational athletes. These injuries result in a significant amount of morbidity and health care expenditure, yet little is known about the molecular mechanisms leading to tendinopathy. Methods We have used histological evaluation and molecular profiling to determine gene expression changes in 23 human patients undergoing surgical procedures for the treatment of chronic tendinopathy. Results Diseased tendons exhibit altered extracellular matrix, fiber disorientation, increased cellular content and vasculature, and the absence of inflammatory cells. Global gene expression profiling identified 983 transcripts with significantly different expression patterns in the diseased tendons. Global pathway analysis further suggested altered expression of extracellular matrix proteins and the lack of an appreciable inflammatory response. Conclusions Identification of the pathways and genes that are differentially regulated in tendinopathy samples will contribute to our understanding of the disease and the development of novel therapeutics. PMID:21539748

  6. Noise minimization in eukaryotic gene expression.

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    Hunter B Fraser

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available All organisms have elaborate mechanisms to control rates of protein production. However, protein production is also subject to stochastic fluctuations, or "noise." Several recent studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli have investigated the relationship between transcription and translation rates and stochastic fluctuations in protein levels, or more generally, how such randomness is a function of intrinsic and extrinsic factors. However, the fundamental question of whether stochasticity in protein expression is generally biologically relevant has not been addressed, and it remains unknown whether random noise in the protein production rate of most genes significantly affects the fitness of any organism. We propose that organisms should be particularly sensitive to variation in the protein levels of two classes of genes: genes whose deletion is lethal to the organism and genes that encode subunits of multiprotein complexes. Using an experimentally verified model of stochastic gene expression in S. cerevisiae, we estimate the noise in protein production for nearly every yeast gene, and confirm our prediction that the production of essential and complex-forming proteins involves lower levels of noise than does the production of most other genes. Our results support the hypothesis that noise in gene expression is a biologically important variable, is generally detrimental to organismal fitness, and is subject to natural selection.

  7. Noise minimization in eukaryotic gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraser, Hunter B.; Hirsh, Aaron E.; Giaever, Guri; Kumm, Jochen; Eisen, Michael B.

    2004-01-15

    All organisms have elaborate mechanisms to control rates of protein production. However, protein production is also subject to stochastic fluctuations, or noise. Several recent studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli have investigated the relationship between transcription and translation rates and stochastic fluctuations in protein levels, or more generally, how such randomness is a function of intrinsic and extrinsic factors. However, the fundamental question of whether stochasticity in protein expression is generally biologically relevant has not been addressed, and it remains unknown whether random noise in the protein production rate of most genes significantly affects the fitness of any organism. We propose that organisms should be particularly sensitive to variation in the protein levels of two classes of genes: genes whose deletion is lethal to the organism and genes that encode subunits of multiprotein complexes. Using an experimentally verified model of stochastic gene expression in S. cerevisiae, we estimate the noise in protein production for nearly every yeast gene, and confirm our prediction that the production of essential and complex-forming proteins involves lower levels of noise than does the production of most other genes. Our results support the hypothesis that noise in gene expression is a biologically important variable, is generally detrimental to organismal fitness, and is subject to natural selection.

  8. Paternally expressed genes predominate in the placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu; Miller, Donald C; Harman, Rebecca; Antczak, Douglas F; Clark, Andrew G

    2013-06-25

    The discovery of genomic imprinting through studies of manipulated mouse embryos indicated that the paternal genome has a major influence on placental development. However, previous research has not demonstrated paternal bias in imprinted genes. We applied RNA sequencing to trophoblast tissue from reciprocal hybrids of horse and donkey, where genotypic differences allowed parent-of-origin identification of most expressed genes. Using this approach, we identified a core group of 15 ancient imprinted genes, of which 10 were paternally expressed. An additional 78 candidate imprinted genes identified by RNA sequencing also showed paternal bias. Pyrosequencing was used to confirm the imprinting status of six of the genes, including the insulin receptor (INSR), which may play a role in growth regulation with its reciprocally imprinted ligand, histone acetyltransferase-1 (HAT1), a gene involved in chromatin modification, and lymphocyte antigen 6 complex, locus G6C, a newly identified imprinted gene in the major histocompatibility complex. The 78 candidate imprinted genes displayed parent-of-origin expression bias in placenta but not fetus, and most showed less than 100% silencing of the imprinted allele. Some displayed variability in imprinting status among individuals. This variability results in a unique epigenetic signature for each placenta that contributes to variation in the intrauterine environment and thus presents the opportunity for natural selection to operate on parent-of-origin differential regulation. Taken together, these features highlight the plasticity of imprinting in mammals and the central importance of the placenta as a target tissue for genomic imprinting.

  9. Gene expression profiling of solitary fibrous tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Bertucci

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Solitary fibrous tumors (SFTs are rare spindle-cell tumors. Their cell-of-origin and molecular basis are poorly known. They raise several clinical problems. Differential diagnosis may be difficult, prognosis is poorly apprehended by histoclinical features, and no effective therapy exists for advanced stages. METHODS: We profiled 16 SFT samples using whole-genome DNA microarrays and analyzed their expression profiles with publicly available profiles of 36 additional SFTs and 212 soft tissue sarcomas (STSs. Immunohistochemistry was applied to validate the expression of some discriminating genes. RESULTS: SFTs displayed whole-genome expression profiles more homogeneous and different from STSs, but closer to genetically-simple than genetically-complex STSs. The SFTs/STSs comparison identified a high percentage (∼30% of genes as differentially expressed, most of them without any DNA copy number alteration. One of the genes most overexpressed in SFTs encoded the ALDH1 stem cell marker. Several upregulated genes and associated ontologies were also related to progenitor/stem cells. SFTs also overexpressed genes encoding therapeutic targets such as kinases (EGFR, ERBB2, FGFR1, JAK2, histone deacetylases, or retinoic acid receptors. Their overexpression was found in all SFTs, regardless the anatomical location. Finally, we identified a 31-gene signature associated with the mitotic count, containing many genes related to cell cycle/mitosis, including AURKA. CONCLUSION: We established a robust repertoire of genes differentially expressed in SFTs. Certain overexpressed genes could provide new diagnostic (ALDH1A1, prognostic (AURKA and/or therapeutic targets.

  10. Soybean physiology and gene expression during drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolf-Moreira, R; Medri, M E; Neumaier, N; Lemos, N G; Pimenta, J A; Tobita, S; Brogin, R L; Marcelino-Guimarães, F C; Oliveira, M C N; Farias, J R B; Abdelnoor, R V; Nepomuceno, A L

    2010-10-05

    Soybean genotypes MG/BR46 (Conquista) and BR16, drought-tolerant and -sensitive, respectively, were compared in terms of morphophysiological and gene-expression responses to water stress during two stages of development. Gene-expression analysis showed differential responses in Gmdreb1a and Gmpip1b mRNA expression within 30 days of water-deficit initiation in MG/BR46 (Conquista) plants. Within 45 days of initiating stress, Gmp5cs and Gmpip1b had relatively higher expression. Initially, BR16 showed increased expression only for Gmdreb1a, and later (45 days) for Gmp5cs, Gmdefensin and Gmpip1b. Only BR16 presented down-regulated expression of genes, such as Gmp5cs and Gmpip1b, 30 days after the onset of moisture stress, and Gmgols after 45 days of stress. The faster perception of water stress in MG/BR46 (Conquista) and the better maintenance of up-regulated gene expression than in the sensitive BR16 genotype imply mechanisms by which the former is better adapted to tolerate moisture deficiency.

  11. Identification of Expressed Resistance Gene Analogs from Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) Expressed Sequence Tags

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhanji Liu; Suping Feng; Manish K.Pandey; Xiaoping Chen; Albert K.Culbreath; Rajeev K.Varshney; Baozhu Guo

    2013-01-01

    Low genetic diversity makes peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) very vulnerable to plant pathogens,causing severe yield loss and reduced seed quality.Several hundred partial genomic DNA sequences as nucleotide-binding-site leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR) resistance genes (R) have been identified,but a small portion with expressed transcripts has been found.We aimed to identify resistance gene analogs (RGAs) from peanut expressed sequence tags (ESTs) and to develop polymorphic markers.The protein sequences of 54 known R genes were used to identify homologs from peanut ESTs from public databases.A total of 1,053 ESTs corresponding to six different classes of known R genes were recovered,and assembled 156 contigs and 229 singletons as peanut-expressed RGAs.There were 69 that encoded for NBS-LRR proteins,191 that encoded for protein kinases,82 that encoded for LRR-PK/transmembrane proteins,28 that encoded for Toxin reductases,11 that encoded for LRR-domain containing proteins and four that encoded for TM-domain containing proteins.Twenty-eight simple sequence repeats (SSRs)were identified from 25 peanut expressed RGAs.One SSR polymorphic marker (RGA121) was identified.Two polymerase chain reaction-based markers (Ahsw-1 and Ahsw-2) developed from RGA013 were homologous to the Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus (TSWV) resistance gene.All three markers were mapped on the same linkage group AhlV.These expressed RGAs are the source for RGA-tagged marker development and identification of peanut resistance genes.

  12. Early gene expression changes with rush immunotherapy

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    Barnett Sherry

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To examine whether whole genome expression profiling could reveal changes in mRNA expression of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC from allergic patients undergoing rush immunotherapy (RIT that might be manifest within the first few months of treatment. Methods For this study, PBMC from three allergic patients undergoing RIT were assessed at four timepoints: prior to RIT, at 1 week and 7 week post-RIT, during build-up and at 4 months, after establishment of a maintenance dose. PBMC mRNA gene expression changes over time were determined by oligonucleotide microarrays using the Illumina Human-6 BeadChip Platform, which simultaneously interrogates expression profiles of > 47,000 transcripts. Differentially expressed genes were identified using well-established statistical analysis for microarrays. In addition, we analyzed peripheral blood basophil high-affinity IgE receptor (Fc epsilon RI expression and T-regulatory cell frequency as detected by expression of CD3+CD4+CD25bright cells at each timepoint using flow cytometry. Results In comparing the initial 2 timepoints with the final 2 timepoints and analyzing for genes with ≥1.5-fold expression change (p less than or equal to 0.05, BH-FDR, we identified 507 transcripts. At a 2-fold change (p less than or equal to 0.05, BH-FDR, we found 44 transcripts. Of these, 28 were up-regulated and 16 were down-regulated genes. From these datasets, we have identified changes in immunologically relevant genes from both the innate and adaptive response with upregulation of expressed genes for molecules including IL-1β, IL-8, CD40L, BTK and BCL6. At the 4 month timepoint, we noted a downward trend in Fc epsilon RI expression in each of the three patients and increased allergen-specific IgG4 levels. No change was seen in the frequency of peripheral T-regulatory cells expressed over the four timepoints. Conclusions We observed significant changes in gene expression early in peripheral

  13. Gene Expression by PBMC in Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis: Evidence for Dysregulation of Immune Mediated Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher A. Aoki

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC is a chronic disease of the bile ducts characterized by an inflammatory infiltrate and obliterative fibrosis. The precise role of the immune system in the pathogenesis of PSC remains unknown. We used RNA microarray analysis to identify immune-related genes and pathways that are differentially expressed in PSC. Messenger RNA (mRNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC was isolated from both patients with PSC and age and sex matched healthy controls. Samples from 5 PSC patients and 5 controls were analyzed by microarray and based upon rigorous statistical analysis of the data, relevant genes were chosen for confirmation by RT-PCR in 10 PSC patients and 10 controls. Using unsupervised hierarchical clustering, gene expression in PSC was statistically different from our control population. Interestingly, genes within the IL-2 receptor beta, IL-6 and MAP Kinase pathways were found to be differently expressed in patients with PSC compared to controls. Further, individual genes, TNF-α induced protein 6 (TNFaip6 and membrane-spanning 4-domains, subfamily A (ms4a were found to be upregulated in PSC while similar to Mothers against decapentaplegic homolog 5 (SMAD 5 was downregulated. In conclusion, several immune-related pathways and genes were differentially expressed in PSC compared to control patients, giving further evidence that this disease is systemic and immune-mediated.

  14. A conserved gene family encodes transmembrane proteins with fibronectin, immunoglobulin and leucine-rich repeat domains (FIGLER

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    Haga Christopher L

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In mouse the cytokine interleukin-7 (IL-7 is required for generation of B lymphocytes, but human IL-7 does not appear to have this function. A bioinformatics approach was therefore used to identify IL-7 receptor related genes in the hope of identifying the elusive human cytokine. Results Our database search identified a family of nine gene candidates, which we have provisionally named fibronectin immunoglobulin leucine-rich repeat (FIGLER. The FIGLER 1–9 genes are predicted to encode type I transmembrane glycoproteins with 6–12 leucine-rich repeats (LRR, a C2 type Ig domain, a fibronectin type III domain, a hydrophobic transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic domain containing one to four tyrosine residues. Members of this multichromosomal gene family possess 20–47% overall amino acid identity and are differentially expressed in cell lines and primary hematopoietic lineage cells. Genes for FIGLER homologs were identified in macaque, orangutan, chimpanzee, mouse, rat, dog, chicken, toad, and puffer fish databases. The non-human FIGLER homologs share 38–99% overall amino acid identity with their human counterpart. Conclusion The extracellular domain structure and absence of recognizable cytoplasmic signaling motifs in members of the highly conserved FIGLER gene family suggest a trophic or cell adhesion function for these molecules.

  15. A simulation to analyze feature selection methods utilizing gene ontology for gene expression classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, Christopher E; Siadat, Mohammad-Reza; Patel, Nilesh V; Wilson, George D

    2013-12-01

    Gene expression profile classification is a pivotal research domain assisting in the transformation from traditional to personalized medicine. A major challenge associated with gene expression data classification is the small number of samples relative to the large number of genes. To address this problem, researchers have devised various feature selection algorithms to reduce the number of genes. Recent studies have been experimenting with the use of semantic similarity between genes in Gene Ontology (GO) as a method to improve feature selection. While there are few studies that discuss how to use GO for feature selection, there is no simulation study that addresses when to use GO-based feature selection. To investigate this, we developed a novel simulation, which generates binary class datasets, where the differentially expressed genes between two classes have some underlying relationship in GO. This allows us to investigate the effects of various factors such as the relative connectedness of the underlying genes in GO, the mean magnitude of separation between differentially expressed genes denoted by δ, and the number of training samples. Our simulation results suggest that the connectedness in GO of the differentially expressed genes for a biological condition is the primary factor for determining the efficacy of GO-based feature selection. In particular, as the connectedness of differentially expressed genes increases, the classification accuracy improvement increases. To quantify this notion of connectedness, we defined a measure called Biological Condition Annotation Level BCAL(G), where G is a graph of differentially expressed genes. Our main conclusions with respect to GO-based feature selection are the following: (1) it increases classification accuracy when BCAL(G) ≥ 0.696; (2) it decreases classification accuracy when BCAL(G) ≤ 0.389; (3) it provides marginal accuracy improvement when 0.389genes in a biological condition increases beyond 50 and

  16. Alternative-splicing-mediated gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qianliang; Zhou, Tianshou

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is a fundamental process during gene expression and has been found to be ubiquitous in eukaryotes. However, how AS impacts gene expression levels both quantitatively and qualitatively remains to be fully explored. Here, we analyze two common models of gene expression, each incorporating a simple splice mechanism that a pre-mRNA is spliced into two mature mRNA isoforms in a probabilistic manner. In the constitutive expression case, we show that the steady-state molecular numbers of two mature mRNA isoforms follow mutually independent Poisson distributions. In the bursting expression case, we demonstrate that the tail decay of the steady-state distribution for both mature mRNA isoforms that in general are not mutually independent can be characterized by the product of mean burst size and splicing probability. In both cases, we find that AS can efficiently modulate both the variability (measured by variance) and the noise level of the total mature mRNA, and in particular, the latter is always lower than the noise level of the pre-mRNA, implying that AS always reduces the noise. These results altogether reveal that AS is a mechanism of efficiently controlling the gene expression noise.

  17. Gene expression profiling for targeted cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuryev, Anton

    2015-01-01

    There is certain degree of frustration and discontent in the area of microarray gene expression data analysis of cancer datasets. It arises from the mathematical problem called 'curse of dimensionality,' which is due to the small number of samples available in training sets, used for calculating transcriptional signatures from the large number of differentially expressed (DE) genes, measured by microarrays. The new generation of causal reasoning algorithms can provide solutions to the curse of dimensionality by transforming microarray data into activity of a small number of cancer hallmark pathways. This new approach can make feature space dimensionality optimal for mathematical signature calculations. The author reviews the reasons behind the current frustration with transcriptional signatures derived from DE genes in cancer. He also provides an overview of the novel methods for signature calculations based on differentially variable genes and expression regulators. Furthermore, the authors provide perspectives on causal reasoning algorithms that use prior knowledge about regulatory events described in scientific literature to identify expression regulators responsible for the differential expression observed in cancer samples. The author advocates causal reasoning methods to calculate cancer pathway activity signatures. The current challenge for these algorithms is in ensuring quality of the knowledgebase. Indeed, the development of cancer hallmark pathway collections, together with statistical algorithms to transform activity of expression regulators into pathway activity, are necessary for causal reasoning to be used in cancer research.

  18. Muscle Biological Characteristics of Differentially Expressed Genes in Wujin and Landrace Pigs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Hong; HUANG Ying; LI Wei-zhen; YANG Ming-hua; GE Chang-rong; ZHANG Xi; LI Liu-an; GAO Shi-zheng; ZHAO Su-mei

    2014-01-01

    The biological chemistry would be responsible for the meat quality. This study tried to investigate the transcript expression proifle and explain the characteristics of differentially expressed genes between the Wujin and Landrace pigs. The results showed that 526 differentially expressed genes were found by comparing the transcript expression proifle of muscle tissue between Wujin and Landrace pigs. Among them, 335 genes showed up-regulations and 191 genes showed down-regulations in Wujin pigs compared with the Landrace pigs. Gene ontology (GO) analysis indicated that the differentially expressed genes were clustered into three groups involving in protein synthesis, energy metabolism and immune response. Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis found that these differentially expressed genes participated in protein synthesis metabolism, energy metabolism and immune response pathway. The Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID) analysis of protein function and protein domains function also conifrmed that differentially expressed genes belonged to protein synthesis, energy metabolism and immune response. Genes related protein synthesis metabolism pathway in Landrace was higher than in Wujin pigs. However, differentially expressed genes related energy metabolism and immune response was up-regulated in Wujin pigs compared with Landrace pigs. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR on selected genes was used to conifrm the results from the microarray. These suggested that the genes related to protein synthesis, energy metabolism and immune response would contribute to the growth performance, meat quality as well as anti-disease capacity.

  19. Predicting metastasized seminoma using gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruf, Christian G; Linbecker, Michael; Port, Matthias; Riecke, Armin; Schmelz, Hans U; Wagner, Walter; Meineke, Victor; Abend, Michael

    2012-07-01

    Treatment options for testis cancer depend on the histological subtype as well as on the clinical stage. An accurate staging is essential for correct treatment. The 'golden standard' for staging purposes is CT, but occult metastasis cannot be detected with this method. Currently, parameters such as primary tumour size, vessel invasion or invasion of the rete testis are used for predicting occult metastasis. Last year the association of these parameters with metastasis could not be validated in a new independent cohort. Gene expression analysis in testis cancer allowed discrimination between the different histological subtypes (seminoma and non-seminoma) as well as testis cancer and normal testis tissue. In a two-stage study design we (i) screened the whole genome (using human whole genome microarrays) for candidate genes associated with the metastatic stage in seminoma and (ii) validated and quantified gene expression of our candidate genes (real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction) on another independent group. Gene expression measurements of two of our candidate genes (dopamine receptor D1 [DRD1] and family with sequence similarity 71, member F2 [FAM71F2]) examined in primary testis cancers made it possible to discriminate the metastasis status in seminoma. The discriminative ability of the genes exceeded the predictive significance of currently used histological/pathological parameters. Based on gene expression analysis the present study provides suggestions for improved individual decision making either in favour of early adjuvant therapy or increased surveillance. To evaluate the usefulness of gene expression profiling for predicting metastatic status in testicular seminoma at the time of first diagnosis compared with established clinical and pathological parameters. Total RNA was isolated from testicular tumours of metastasized patients (12 patients, clinical stage IIa-III), non-metastasized patients (40, clinical stage I) and adjacent 'normal' tissue

  20. Laminin Mediates Tissue-specific Gene Expression in Mammary Epithelia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streuli, Charles H; Schmidhauser, Christian; Bailey, Nina; Yurchenco, Peter; Skubitz, Amy P. N.; Roskelley, Calvin; Bissell, Mina J

    1995-04-01

    Tissue-specific gene expression in mammary epithelium is dependent on the extracellular matrix as well as hormones. There is good evidence that the basement membrane provides signals for regulating beta-casein expression, and that integrins are involved in this process. Here, we demonstrate that in the presence of lactogenic hormones, laminin can direct expression of the beta-casein gene. Mouse mammary epithelial cells plated on gels of native laminin or laminin-entactin undergo functional differentiation. On tissue culture plastic, mammary cells respond to soluble basement membrane or purified laminin, but not other extracellular matrix components, by synthesizing beta-casein. In mammary cells transfected with chloramphenicol acetyl transferase reporter constructs, laminin activates transcription from the beta-casein promoter through a specific enhancer element. The inductive effect of laminin on casein expression was specifically blocked by the E3 fragment of the carboxy terminal region of the alpha 1 chain of laminin, by antisera raised against the E3 fragment, and by a peptide corresponding to a sequence within this region. Our results demonstrate that laminin can direct tissue-specific gene expression in epithelial cells through its globular domain.

  1. Gene expression profiles in skeletal muscle after gene electrotransfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hojman, Pernille; Zibert, John R; Gissel, Hanne;

    2007-01-01

    with the control muscles. Most interestingly, no changes in the expression of proteins involved in inflammatory responses or muscle regeneration was detected, indicating limited muscle damage and regeneration. Histological analysis revealed structural changes with loss of cell integrity and striation pattern......BACKGROUND: Gene transfer by electroporation (DNA electrotransfer) to muscle results in high level long term transgenic expression, showing great promise for treatment of e.g. protein deficiency syndromes. However little is known about the effects of DNA electrotransfer on muscle fibres. We have......) followed by a long low voltage pulse (LV, 100 V/cm, 400 ms); a pulse combination optimised for efficient and safe gene transfer. Muscles were transfected with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and excised at 4 hours, 48 hours or 3 weeks after treatment. RESULTS: Differentially expressed genes were...

  2. Gene expression analysis of flax seed development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharpe Andrew

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Flax, Linum usitatissimum L., is an important crop whose seed oil and stem fiber have multiple industrial applications. Flax seeds are also well-known for their nutritional attributes, viz., omega-3 fatty acids in the oil and lignans and mucilage from the seed coat. In spite of the importance of this crop, there are few molecular resources that can be utilized toward improving seed traits. Here, we describe flax embryo and seed development and generation of comprehensive genomic resources for the flax seed. Results We describe a large-scale generation and analysis of expressed sequences in various tissues. Collectively, the 13 libraries we have used provide a broad representation of genes active in developing embryos (globular, heart, torpedo, cotyledon and mature stages seed coats (globular and torpedo stages and endosperm (pooled globular to torpedo stages and genes expressed in flowers, etiolated seedlings, leaves, and stem tissue. A total of 261,272 expressed sequence tags (EST (GenBank accessions LIBEST_026995 to LIBEST_027011 were generated. These EST libraries included transcription factor genes that are typically expressed at low levels, indicating that the depth is adequate for in silico expression analysis. Assembly of the ESTs resulted in 30,640 unigenes and 82% of these could be identified on the basis of homology to known and hypothetical genes from other plants. When compared with fully sequenced plant genomes, the flax unigenes resembled poplar and castor bean more than grape, sorghum, rice or Arabidopsis. Nearly one-fifth of these (5,152 had no homologs in sequences reported for any organism, suggesting that this category represents genes that are likely unique to flax. Digital analyses revealed gene expression dynamics for the biosynthesis of a number of important seed constituents during seed development. Conclusions We have developed a foundational database of expressed sequences and collection of plasmid

  3. MicroRNAs Suppress NB Domain Genes in Tomato That Confer Resistance to Fusarium oxysporum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Shouqiang; Park, Gyungsoon; Atamian, Hagop S.; Han, Cliff S.; Stajich, Jason E.; Kaloshian, Isgouhi; Borkovich, Katherine A.

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) suppress the transcriptional and post-transcriptional expression of genes in plants. Several miRNA families target genes encoding nucleotide-binding site–leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) plant innate immune receptors. The fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici causes vascular wilt disease in tomato. We explored a role for miRNAs in tomato defense against F. oxysporum using comparative miRNA profiling of susceptible (Moneymaker) and resistant (Motelle) tomato cultivars. slmiR482f and slmiR5300 were repressed during infection of Motelle with F. oxysporum. Two predicted mRNA targets each of slmiR482f and slmiR5300 exhibited increased expression in Motelle and the ability of these four targets to be regulated by the miRNAs was confirmed by co-expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. Silencing of the targets in the resistant Motelle cultivar revealed a role in fungal resistance for all four genes. All four targets encode proteins with full or partial nucleotide-binding (NB) domains. One slmiR5300 target corresponds to tm-2, a susceptible allele of the Tomato Mosaic Virus resistance gene, supporting functions in immunity to a fungal pathogen. The observation that none of the targets correspond to I-2, the only known resistance (R) gene for F. oxysporum in tomato, supports roles for additional R genes in the immune response. Taken together, our findings suggest that Moneymaker is highly susceptible because its potential resistance is insufficiently expressed due to the action of miRNAs. PMID:25330340

  4. Lithium ions induce prestalk-associated gene expression and inhibit prespore gene expression in Dictyostelium discoideum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, Dorien J.M.; Lookeren Campagne, Michiel M. van; Haastert, Peter J.M. van; Spek, Wouter; Schaap, Pauline

    1989-01-01

    We investigated the effect of Li+ on two types of cyclic AMP-regulated gene expression and on basal and cyclic AMP-stimulated inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (Ins(1,4,5)P3) levels. Li+ effectively inhibits cyclic AMP-induced prespore gene expression, half-maximal inhibition occurring at about 2mM-LiCl.

  5. Polyandry and sex-specific gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mank, Judith E; Wedell, Nina; Hosken, David J

    2013-03-05

    Polyandry is widespread in nature, and has important evolutionary consequences for the evolution of sexual dimorphism and sexual conflict. Although many of the phenotypic consequences of polyandry have been elucidated, our understanding of the impacts of polyandry and mating systems on the genome is in its infancy. Polyandry can intensify selection on sexual characters and generate more intense sexual conflict. This has consequences for sequence evolution, but also for sex-biased gene expression, which acts as a link between mating systems, sex-specific selection and the evolution of sexual dimorphism. We discuss this and the remarkable confluence of sexual-conflict theory and patterns of gene expression, while also making predictions about transcription patterns, mating systems and sexual conflict. Gene expression is a key link in the genotype-phenotype chain, and although in its early stages, understanding the sexual selection-transcription relationship will provide significant insights into this critical association.

  6. Genome-Wide Analysis of BURP Domain-Containing Genes in Populus trichocarpa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuanhua Shao; Guo Wei; Ling Wang; Qing Dong; Yang Zhao; Beijiu Chen; Yan Xiang

    2011-01-01

    BURP domain-containing proteins have a conserved structure and are found extensively in plants.The functions of the proteins in this family are diverse,but remain unknown in Populus trichocarpa.In the present study,a complete genome of P.trichocarpa was analyzed bioinformatically.A total of 18 BURP family genes,named PtBURPs,were identified and characterized according to their physical positions on the P.trichocarpa chromosomes.A phylogenetic tree was generated from alignments of PtBURP protein sequences,while phylogenetic relationships were also examined between PtBURPs and BURP family genes in other plants,including rice,soybean,maize and sorghum.BURP genes in P.trichocarpa were classified into five classes,namely PG1β-Iike,BNM2-like,USP-like,RD22-like and BURP V.The multiple expectation maximization for motif elicitation (MEME) and multiple protein sequence alignments of PtBURPs were also performed.Results from the transcript level analyses of 10 PtBURP genes under different stress conditions revealed the expression patterns in poplar and led to a discussion on genome duplication and evolution,expression profiles and function of PtBURP genes.

  7. Visualizing Gene Expression In Situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burlage, R.S.

    1998-11-02

    Visualizing bacterial cells and describing their responses to the environment are difficult tasks. Their small size is the chief reason for the difficulty, which means that we must often use many millions of cells in a sample in order to determine what the average response of the bacteria is. However, an average response can sometimes mask important events in bacterial physiology, which means that our understanding of these organisms will suffer. We have used a variety of instruments to visualize bacterial cells, all of which tell us something different about the sample. We use a fluorescence activated cell sorter to sort cells based on the fluorescence provided by bioreporter genes, and these can be used to select for particular genetic mutations. Cells can be visualized by epifluorescent microscopy, and sensitive photodetectors can be added that allow us to find a single bacterial cell that is fluorescent or bioluminescent. We have also used standard photomultipliers to examine cell aggregates as field bioreporter microorganisms. Examples of each of these instruments show how our understanding of bacterial physiology has changed with the technology.

  8. Gene expression profiles in irradiated cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minafra, L.; Bravatà, V.; Russo, G.; Ripamonti, M.; Gilardi, M. C.

    2013-07-01

    Knowledge of the molecular and genetic mechanisms underlying cellular response to radiation may provide new avenues to develop innovative predictive tests of radiosensitivity of tumours and normal tissues and to improve individual therapy. Nowadays very few studies describe molecular changes induced by hadrontherapy treatments, therefore this field has to be explored and clarified. High-throughput methodologies, such as DNA microarray, allow us to analyse mRNA expression of thousands of genes simultaneously in order to discover new genes and pathways as targets of response to hadrontherapy. Our aim is to elucidate the molecular networks involved in the sensitivity/resistance of cancer cell lines subjected to hadrontherapy treatments with a genomewide approach by using cDNA microarray technology to identify gene expression profiles and candidate genes responsible of differential cellular responses.

  9. Gene expression profiles in irradiated cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minafra, L.; Bravatà, V.; Russo, G.; Ripamonti, M.; Gilardi, M. C. [IBFM CNR - LATO, Cefalù, Segrate (Italy)

    2013-07-26

    Knowledge of the molecular and genetic mechanisms underlying cellular response to radiation may provide new avenues to develop innovative predictive tests of radiosensitivity of tumours and normal tissues and to improve individual therapy. Nowadays very few studies describe molecular changes induced by hadrontherapy treatments, therefore this field has to be explored and clarified. High-throughput methodologies, such as DNA microarray, allow us to analyse mRNA expression of thousands of genes simultaneously in order to discover new genes and pathways as targets of response to hadrontherapy. Our aim is to elucidate the molecular networks involved in the sensitivity/resistance of cancer cell lines subjected to hadrontherapy treatments with a genomewide approach by using cDNA microarray technology to identify gene expression profiles and candidate genes responsible of differential cellular responses.

  10. Gene Expression in the Human Endolymphatic Sac

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Martin Nue; Kirkeby, Svend; Vikeså, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: The purpose of the present study is to explore, demonstrate, and describe the expression of genes related to the solute carrier (SLC) molecules of ion transporters in the human endolymphatic sac. STUDY DESIGN: cDNA microarrays and immunohistochemistry were used for analyses...... of fresh human endolymphatic sac tissue samples. METHODS: Twelve tissue samples of the human endolymphatic sac were obtained during translabyrinthine surgery for vestibular schwannoma. Microarray technology was used to investigate tissue sample expression of solute carrier family genes, using adjacent dura...... mater as control. Immunohistochemistry was used for verification of translation of selected genes, as well as localization of the specific protein within the sac. RESULTS: An extensive representation of the SLC family genes were upregulated in the human endolymphatic sac, including SLC26a4 Pendrin, SLC4...

  11. Extracting expression modules from perturbational gene expression compendia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Dijck Patrick

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Compendia of gene expression profiles under chemical and genetic perturbations constitute an invaluable resource from a systems biology perspective. However, the perturbational nature of such data imposes specific challenges on the computational methods used to analyze them. In particular, traditional clustering algorithms have difficulties in handling one of the prominent features of perturbational compendia, namely partial coexpression relationships between genes. Biclustering methods on the other hand are specifically designed to capture such partial coexpression patterns, but they show a variety of other drawbacks. For instance, some biclustering methods are less suited to identify overlapping biclusters, while others generate highly redundant biclusters. Also, none of the existing biclustering tools takes advantage of the staple of perturbational expression data analysis: the identification of differentially expressed genes. Results We introduce a novel method, called ENIGMA, that addresses some of these issues. ENIGMA leverages differential expression analysis results to extract expression modules from perturbational gene expression data. The core parameters of the ENIGMA clustering procedure are automatically optimized to reduce the redundancy between modules. In contrast to the biclusters produced by most other methods, ENIGMA modules may show internal substructure, i.e. subsets of genes with distinct but significantly related expression patterns. The grouping of these (often functionally related patterns in one module greatly aids in the biological interpretation of the data. We show that ENIGMA outperforms other methods on artificial datasets, using a quality criterion that, unlike other criteria, can be used for algorithms that generate overlapping clusters and that can be modified to take redundancy between clusters into account. Finally, we apply ENIGMA to the Rosetta compendium of expression profiles for

  12. Sequencing and Gene Expression Analysis of Leishmania tropica LACK Gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nour Hammoudeh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania Homologue of receptors for Activated C Kinase (LACK antigen is a 36-kDa protein, which provokes a very early immune response against Leishmania infection. There are several reports on the expression of LACK through different life-cycle stages of genus Leishmania, but only a few of them have focused on L.tropica.The present study provides details of the cloning, DNA sequencing and gene expression of LACK in this parasite species. First, several local isolates of Leishmania parasites were typed in our laboratory using PCR technique to verify of Leishmania parasite species. After that, LACK gene was amplified and cloned into a vector for sequencing. Finally, the expression of this molecule in logarithmic and stationary growth phase promastigotes, as well as in amastigotes, was evaluated by Reverse Transcription-PCR (RT-PCR technique.The typing result confirmed that all our local isolates belong to L.tropica. LACK gene sequence was determined and high similarity was observed with the sequences of other Leishmania species. Furthermore, the expression of LACK gene in both promastigotes and amastigotes forms was confirmed.Overall, the data set the stage for future studies of the properties and immune role of LACK gene products.

  13. Coevolution of gene expression among interacting proteins

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Physically interacting proteins or parts of proteins are expected to evolve in a coordinated manner that preserves proper interactions. Such coevolution at the amino acid-sequence level is well documented and has been used to predict interacting proteins, domains, and amino acids. Interacting proteins are also often precisely coexpressed with one another, presumably to maintain proper stoichiometry among interacting components. Here, we show that the expression levels of physically inter...

  14. Mechanical Feedback and Arrest in Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevier, Stuart; Levine, Herbert

    The ability to watch biochemical events at the single-molecule level has increasingly revealed that stochasticity plays a leading role in many biological phenomena. One important and well know example is the noisy, ``bursty'' manner of transcription. Recent experiments have revealed relationships between the level and noise in gene expression hinting at deeper stochastic connections. In this talk we will discuss how the mechanical nature of transcription can explain this relationship and examine the limits that the physical aspects of transcription place on gene expression.

  15. Argudas: arguing with gene expression information

    CERN Document Server

    McLeod, Kenneth; Burger, Albert

    2010-01-01

    In situ hybridisation gene expression information helps biologists identify where a gene is expressed. However, the databases that republish the experimental information are often both incomplete and inconsistent. This paper examines a system, Argudas, designed to help tackle these issues. Argudas is an evolution of an existing system, and so that system is reviewed as a means of both explaining and justifying the behaviour of Argudas. Throughout the discussion of Argudas a number of issues will be raised including the appropriateness of argumentation in biology and the challenges faced when integrating apparently similar online biological databases.

  16. Optogenetics for gene expression in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Konrad; Naumann, Sebastian; Weber, Wilfried; Zurbriggen, Matias D

    2015-02-01

    Molecular switches that are controlled by chemicals have evolved as central research instruments in mammalian cell biology. However, these tools are limited in terms of their spatiotemporal resolution due to freely diffusing inducers. These limitations have recently been addressed by the development of optogenetic, genetically encoded, and light-responsive tools that can be controlled with the unprecedented spatiotemporal precision of light. In this article, we first provide a brief overview of currently available optogenetic tools that have been designed to control diverse cellular processes. Then, we focus on recent developments in light-controlled gene expression technologies and provide the reader with a guideline for choosing the most suitable gene expression system.

  17. The mammalian PYHIN gene family: Phylogeny, evolution and expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cridland Jasmyn A

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteins of the mammalian PYHIN (IFI200/HIN-200 family are involved in defence against infection through recognition of foreign DNA. The family member absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2 binds cytosolic DNA via its HIN domain and initiates inflammasome formation via its pyrin domain. AIM2 lies within a cluster of related genes, many of which are uncharacterised in mouse. To better understand the evolution, orthology and function of these genes, we have documented the range of PYHIN genes present in representative mammalian species, and undertaken phylogenetic and expression analyses. Results No PYHIN genes are evident in non-mammals or monotremes, with a single member found in each of three marsupial genomes. Placental mammals show variable family expansions, from one gene in cow to four in human and 14 in mouse. A single HIN domain appears to have evolved in the common ancestor of marsupials and placental mammals, and duplicated to give rise to three distinct forms (HIN-A, -B and -C in the placental mammal ancestor. Phylogenetic analyses showed that AIM2 HIN-C and pyrin domains clearly diverge from the rest of the family, and it is the only PYHIN protein with orthology across many species. Interestingly, although AIM2 is important in defence against some bacteria and viruses in mice, AIM2 is a pseudogene in cow, sheep, llama, dolphin, dog and elephant. The other 13 mouse genes have arisen by duplication and rearrangement within the lineage, which has allowed some diversification in expression patterns. Conclusions The role of AIM2 in forming the inflammasome is relatively well understood, but molecular interactions of other PYHIN proteins involved in defence against foreign DNA remain to be defined. The non-AIM2 PYHIN protein sequences are very distinct from AIM2, suggesting they vary in effector mechanism in response to foreign DNA, and may bind different DNA structures. The PYHIN family has highly varied gene composition between

  18. Genes Expressed in Human Tumor Endothelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Croix, Brad; Rago, Carlo; Velculescu, Victor; Traverso, Giovanni; Romans, Katharine E.; Montgomery, Elizabeth; Lal, Anita; Riggins, Gregory J.; Lengauer, Christoph; Vogelstein, Bert; Kinzler, Kenneth W.

    2000-08-01

    To gain a molecular understanding of tumor angiogenesis, we compared gene expression patterns of endothelial cells derived from blood vessels of normal and malignant colorectal tissues. Of over 170 transcripts predominantly expressed in the endothelium, 79 were differentially expressed, including 46 that were specifically elevated in tumor-associated endothelium. Several of these genes encode extracellular matrix proteins, but most are of unknown function. Most of these tumor endothelial markers were expressed in a wide range of tumor types, as well as in normal vessels associated with wound healing and corpus luteum formation. These studies demonstrate that tumor and normal endothelium are distinct at the molecular level, a finding that may have significant implications for the development of anti-angiogenic therapies.

  19. [Imprinting genes and it's expression in Arabidopsis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong-Yu; Xu, Pei-Zhou; Yang, Hua; Wu, Xian-Jun

    2010-07-01

    Genomic imprinting refers to the phenomenon that the expression of a gene copy depends on its parent of origin. The Arabidopsis imprinted FIS (Fertilisation-independent seed) genes, mea, fis2, and fie, play essential roles in the repression of central cell and the regulation of early endosperm development. fis mutants display two phenotypes: autonomous diploid endosperm development when fertilization is absent and un-cellularised endosperm formation when fertilization occurs. The FIS Polycomb protein complex including the above three FIS proteins catalyzes histone H3 K27 tri-methylation on target loci. DME (DEMETER), a DNA glycosylase, and AtMET1 (Methyltransferase1), a DNA methyltransferase, are involved in the regulation of imprinted expression of both mea and fis2. This review summarizes the studies on the Arabidopsis imprinted FIS genes and other related genes. Recent works have shown that the insertion of transposons may affect nearby gene expression, which may be the main driving force behind the evolution of genomic imprinting. This summary covers the achievements on Arabidopsis imprinted genes will provide important information for studies on genomic imprinting in the important crops such as rice and maize.

  20. Designing genes for successful protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Mark; Villalobos, Alan; Gustafsson, Claes; Minshull, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    DNA sequences are now far more readily available in silico than as physical DNA. De novo gene synthesis is an increasingly cost-effective method for building genetic constructs, and effectively removes the constraint of basing constructs on extant sequences. This allows scientists and engineers to experimentally test their hypotheses relating sequence to function. Molecular biologists, and now synthetic biologists, are characterizing and cataloging genetic elements with specific functions, aiming to combine them to perform complex functions. However, the most common purpose of synthetic genes is for the expression of an encoded protein. The huge number of different proteins makes it impossible to characterize and catalog each functional gene. Instead, it is necessary to abstract design principles from experimental data: data that can be generated by making predictions followed by synthesizing sequences to test those predictions. Because of the degeneracy of the genetic code, design of gene sequences to encode proteins is a high-dimensional problem, so there is no single simple formula to guarantee success. Nevertheless, there are several straightforward steps that can be taken to greatly increase the probability that a designed sequence will result in expression of the encoded protein. In this chapter, we discuss gene sequence parameters that are important for protein expression. We also describe algorithms for optimizing these parameters, and troubleshooting procedures that can be helpful when initial attempts fail. Finally, we show how many of these methods can be accomplished using the synthetic biology software tool Gene Designer.

  1. Genes of periodontopathogens expressed during human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yo-Han; Kozarov, Emil V; Walters, Sheila M; Cao, Sam Linsen; Handfield, Martin; Hillman, Jeffrey D; Progulske-Fox, Ann

    2002-12-01

    Since many bacterial genes are environmentally regulated, the screening for virulence-associated factors using classical genetic and molecular biology approaches can be biased under laboratory growth conditions of a given pathogen, because the required conditions for expression of many virulence factors may not occur during in vitro growth. Thus, technologies have been developed during the past several years to identify genes that are expressed during disease using animal models of human disease. However, animal models are not always truly representative of human disease, and with many pathogens, there is no appropriate animal model. A new technology, in vivo-induced antigen technology (IVIAT) was thus engineered and tested in our laboratory to screen for genes of pathogenic organisms induced specifically in humans, without the use of animal or artificial models of infection. This technology uses pooled sera from patients to probe for genes expressed exclusively in vivo (or ivi, in vivo-induced genes). IVIAT was originally designed for the study of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans pathogenesis, but we have now extended it to other oral pathogens including Porphyromonas gingivalis. One hundred seventy-one thousand (171,000) clones from P. gingivalis strain W83 were screened and 144 were confirmed positive. Over 300,000 A. actinomycetemcomitans clones were probed, and 116 were confirmed positive using a quantitative blot assay. MAT has proven useful in identifying previously unknown in vivo-induced genes that are likely involved in virulence and are thus excellent candidates for use in diagnostic : and therapeutic strategies, including vaccine design.

  2. Sequence and gene expression evolution of paralogous genes in willows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harikrishnan, Srilakshmy L; Pucholt, Pascal; Berlin, Sofia

    2015-12-22

    Whole genome duplications (WGD) have had strong impacts on species diversification by triggering evolutionary novelties, however, relatively little is known about the balance between gene loss and forces involved in the retention of duplicated genes originating from a WGD. We analyzed putative Salicoid duplicates in willows, originating from the Salicoid WGD, which took place more than 45 Mya. Contigs were constructed by de novo assembly of RNA-seq data derived from leaves and roots from two genotypes. Among the 48,508 contigs, 3,778 pairs were, based on fourfold synonymous third-codon transversion rates and syntenic positions, predicted to be Salicoid duplicates. Both copies were in most cases expressed in both tissues and 74% were significantly differentially expressed. Mean Ka/Ks was 0.23, suggesting that the Salicoid duplicates are evolving by purifying selection. Gene Ontology enrichment analyses showed that functions related to DNA- and nucleic acid binding were over-represented among the non-differentially expressed Salicoid duplicates, while functions related to biosynthesis and metabolism were over-represented among the differentially expressed Salicoid duplicates. We propose that the differentially expressed Salicoid duplicates are regulatory neo- and/or subfunctionalized, while the non-differentially expressed are dose sensitive, hence, functionally conserved. Multiple evolutionary processes, thus drive the retention of Salicoid duplicates in willows.

  3. Reshaping of global gene expression networks and sex‐biased gene expression by integration of a young gene

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, Sidi; Ni, Xiaochun; Krinsky, Benjamin H; Zhang, Yong E; Vibranovski, Maria D; White, Kevin P; Long, Manyuan

    2012-01-01

    ...‐biased gene expression in Drosophila . This 4–6 million‐year‐old factor, named Zeus for its role in male fecundity, originated through retroposition of a highly conserved housekeeping gene, Caf40...

  4. The TRANSFAC system on gene expression regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingender, E; Chen, X; Fricke, E; Geffers, R; Hehl, R; Liebich, I; Krull, M; Matys, V; Michael, H; Ohnhäuser, R; Prüss, M; Schacherer, F; Thiele, S; Urbach, S

    2001-01-01

    The TRANSFAC database on transcription factors and their DNA-binding sites and profiles (http://www.gene-regulation.de/) has been quantitatively extended and supplemented by a number of modules. These modules give information about pathologically relevant mutations in regulatory regions and transcription factor genes (PathoDB), scaffold/matrix attached regions (S/MARt DB), signal transduction (TRANSPATH) and gene expression sources (CYTOMER). Altogether, these distinct database modules constitute the TRANSFAC system. They are accompanied by a number of program routines for identifying potential transcription factor binding sites or for localizing individual components in the regulatory network of a cell.

  5. G-NEST: a gene neighborhood scoring tool to identify co-conserved, co-expressed genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemay Danielle G

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In previous studies, gene neighborhoods—spatial clusters of co-expressed genes in the genome—have been defined using arbitrary rules such as requiring adjacency, a minimum number of genes, a fixed window size, or a minimum expression level. In the current study, we developed a Gene Neighborhood Scoring Tool (G-NEST which combines genomic location, gene expression, and evolutionary sequence conservation data to score putative gene neighborhoods across all possible window sizes simultaneously. Results Using G-NEST on atlases of mouse and human tissue expression data, we found that large neighborhoods of ten or more genes are extremely rare in mammalian genomes. When they do occur, neighborhoods are typically composed of families of related genes. Both the highest scoring and the largest neighborhoods in mammalian genomes are formed by tandem gene duplication. Mammalian gene neighborhoods contain highly and variably expressed genes. Co-localized noisy gene pairs exhibit lower evolutionary conservation of their adjacent genome locations, suggesting that their shared transcriptional background may be disadvantageous. Genes that are essential to mammalian survival and reproduction are less likely to occur in neighborhoods, although neighborhoods are enriched with genes that function in mitosis. We also found that gene orientation and protein-protein interactions are partially responsible for maintenance of gene neighborhoods. Conclusions Our experiments using G-NEST confirm that tandem gene duplication is the primary driver of non-random gene order in mammalian genomes. Non-essentiality, co-functionality, gene orientation, and protein-protein interactions are additional forces that maintain gene neighborhoods, especially those formed by tandem duplicates. We expect G-NEST to be useful for other applications such as the identification of core regulatory modules, common transcriptional backgrounds, and chromatin domains. The

  6. Statistical analysis of genomic protein family and domain controlled annotations for functional investigation of classified gene lists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masseroli Marco

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increasing protein family and domain based annotations constitute important information to understand protein functions and gain insight into relations among their codifying genes. To allow analyzing of gene proteomic annotations, we implemented novel modules within GFINDer, a Web system we previously developed that dynamically aggregates functional and phenotypic annotations of user-uploaded gene lists and allows performing their statistical analysis and mining. Results Exploiting protein information in Pfam and InterPro databanks, we developed and added in GFINDer original modules specifically devoted to the exploration and analysis of functional signatures of gene protein products. They allow annotating numerous user-classified nucleotide sequence identifiers with controlled information on related protein families, domains and functional sites, classifying them according to such protein annotation categories, and statistically analyzing the obtained classifications. In particular, when uploaded nucleotide sequence identifiers are subdivided in classes, the Statistics Protein Families&Domains module allows estimating relevance of Pfam or InterPro controlled annotations for the uploaded genes by highlighting protein signatures significantly more represented within user-defined classes of genes. In addition, the Logistic Regression module allows identifying protein functional signatures that better explain the considered gene classification. Conclusion Novel GFINDer modules provide genomic protein family and domain analyses supporting better functional interpretation of gene classes, for instance defined through statistical and clustering analyses of gene expression results from microarray experiments. They can hence help understanding fundamental biological processes and complex cellular mechanisms influenced by protein domain composition, and contribute to unveil new biomedical knowledge about the codifying genes.

  7. Characterization, cDNA cloning and expression pattern of relaxin gene during embryogenesis of Danio rerio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiengo, Marcella; Donizetti, Aldo; del Gaudio, Rosanna; Minucci, Sergio; Aniello, Francesco

    2012-06-01

    We report the identification, the cDNA cloning, the temporal and spatial expression pattern analysis of the rln gene in the zebrafish Danio rerio. The deduced Rln B and A domains show different evolutionary conservation. Rln B domain shows higher similarity when compared to zebrafish and human RLN3 B domain than human RLN1 and RLN2 B domain. Differently, the zebrafish Rln A domain shows relatively low amino acid sequence similarity when compared with the same sequences. The rln gene is transcribed both during embryogenesis and in adult organism, where higher transcript level has been particularly evidenced in the brain. Moreover, we provide the first description of rln spatial expression pattern during embryonic development. In particular, we show restricted transcript localization starting at the pharyngula stage in olfactory placode, branchial arch region, and in a cell cluster near to otic vesicle. In larval stage, new transcription territories have been detected in both neural and non-neural regions. In particular, in the brain, rln expression has been revealed in telencephalic region around anterior commissure, in the preoptic area, and in restricted rombencephalic cell clusters. Expression of rln gene in extra-neural territories has been detected in the pancreatic and thyroid gland regions. Danio rerio rln expression pattern analysis reveals shared features with the mammalian RLN gene, particularly in the brain, where it might have a role in the neurophysiological processes. In addition, expression in the thyroid and pancreas region suggests a function as a paracrine and endocrine hormone.

  8. Multi-gene engineering: simultaneous expression and knockdown of six genes off a single platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greber, David; Fussenegger, Martin

    2007-04-01

    Increases in our understanding of gene function have greatly expanded the repertoire of possible genetic interventions at our disposal with the consequence that many genetic engineering applications require multiple manipulations in which target genes can be both overexpressed and silenced in a simple and co-ordinated manner. Using synthetic introns as a source of encoding short-interfering RNA (siRNA), we demonstrate that it is possible to simultaneously express both a transgene and siRNA from a single polymerase (Pol) II promoter. By encoding siRNA as an intron between two protein domains requiring successful splicing for functionality, it was possible to demonstrate that splicing was occurring, that the coding genes (exonic transgenes) resulted in functional protein, and that the spliced siRNA-containing lariat was capable of modulating expression of a separate target gene. We subsequently extended this concept to develop pTRIDENT-based multi-cistronic vectors that were capable of co-ordinated expression of up to three siRNAs and three transgenes off a single genetic platform. Such multi-gene engineering technology, enabling concomitant transgene overexpression and target gene knockdown, should be useful for therapeutic, biopharmaceutical production, and basic research applications.

  9. A maize-specifically expressed gene cluster in Ustilago maydis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basse, Christoph W; Kolb, Sebastian; Kahmann, Regine

    2002-01-01

    The corn pathogen Ustilago maydis requires its host plant maize for development and completion of its sexual cycle. We have identified the fungal mig2-1 gene as being specifically expressed during this biotrophic stage. Intriguingly, mig2-1 is part of a gene cluster comprising five highly homologous and similarly regulated genes designated mig2-1 to mig2-5. Deletion analysis of the mig2-1 promoter provides evidence for negative and positive regulation. The predicted polypeptides of all five genes lack significant homologies to known genes but have characteristic N-terminal secretion sequences. The secretion signals of mig2-1 and mig2-5 were shown to be functional, and secretion of a full length Mig2-1-eGFP fusion protein to the extracellular space was demonstrated. The central domains of the Mig2 proteins are highly variable whereas the C-termini are strongly conserved and share a characteristic pattern of eight cysteine residues. The mig2 gene cluster was conserved in a wide collection of U. maydis strains. Interestingly, some U. maydis isolates from South America had lost the mig2-4 gene as a result of a homologous recombination event. Furthermore, the related Ustilago scitaminea strain, which is pathogenic on sugar cane, appears to lack the mig2 cluster. We describe a model of how the mig2 cluster might have evolved and discuss its possible role in governing host interaction.

  10. An adenovirus vector incorporating carbohydrate binding domains utilizes glycans for gene transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julius W Kim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vectors based on human adenovirus serotype 5 (HAdV-5 continue to show promise as delivery vehicles for cancer gene therapy. Nevertheless, it has become clear that therapeutic benefit is directly linked to tumor-specific vector localization, highlighting the need for tumor-targeted gene delivery. Aberrant glycosylation of cell surface glycoproteins and glycolipids is a central feature of malignant transformation, and tumor-associated glycoforms are recognized as cancer biomarkers. On this basis, we hypothesized that cancer-specific cell-surface glycans could be the basis of a novel paradigm in HAdV-5-based vector targeting. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: As a first step toward this goal, we constructed a novel HAdV-5 vector encoding a unique chimeric fiber protein that contains the tandem carbohydrate binding domains of the fiber protein of the NADC-1 strain of porcine adenovirus type 4 (PAdV-4. This glycan-targeted vector displays augmented CAR-independent gene transfer in cells with low CAR expression. Further, we show that gene transfer is markedly decreased in cells with genetic glycosylation defects and by inhibitors of glycosylation in normal cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data provide the initial proof-of-concept for HAdV-5 vector-mediated gene delivery based on the presence of cell-surface carbohydrates. Further development of this new targeting paradigm could provide targeted gene delivery based on vector recognition of disease-specific glycan biomarkers.

  11. The expression of the imprinted gene pleckstrin homology-like domain family A member 2 in placental tissues of preeclampsia and its effects on the proliferation, migration and invasion of trophoblast cells JEG-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Feng; Qiao, Chong; Luan, Nannan; Shang, Tao

    2015-11-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) is one of the most common hypertensive disorders and is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality for pregnant women and perinatal babies. Additionally, pleckstrin homology-like domain family A member 2 (PHLDA2) is associated with placental dysfunction. However, the effect of PHLDA2 on trophoblast cell proliferation, migration and invasion has not been investigated. In this study, 15 PE patients and 15 normal pregnant women were recruited and clinical characteristics were summarized. Pleckstrin homology-like domain family A member 2 levels in placental tissues were examined using real-time PCR and western blot. Overexpression plasmid and PHLDA2 siRNA was introduced into JEG-3 cells, respectively. Cell proliferation was measured using MTT assay and flow cytometry. Cell migration and invasion capacities were assessed by wound healing and Transwell assays. It was found that PE patients collectively presented proteinuria, elevated systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and lower gestational ages and birth weights. Pleckstrin homology-like domain family A member 2 levels in the preeclamptic placenta were significantly upregulated. Pleckstrin homology-like domain family A member 2 overexpression significantly arrested cells in the G0/G1 phase, inhibited cell proliferation and suppressed the migration and invasion of JEG-3 cells. Pleckstrin homology-like domain family A member 2 knockdown significantly blocked the cells in the S phase of the cell cycle. Knockdown of PHLDA2 alleviated the inhibition on the migration and invasion of trophoblast cells JEG-3. These findings illustrate that PHLDA2 may participate in PE pathogenesis and indicate its potential application in the early diagnosis of PE. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  12. The frustrated gene: origins of eukaryotic gene expression

    OpenAIRE

    Madhani, Hiten D.

    2013-01-01

    Eukarytotic gene expression is frustrated by a series of steps that are generally not observed in prokaryotes and are therefore not essential for the basic chemistry of transcription and translation. Their evolution may have been driven by the need to defend against parasitic nucleic acids.

  13. Organization, expression and evolution of a disease resistance gene cluster in soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Michelle A; Marek, Laura Fredrick; Shoemaker, Randy C

    2002-01-01

    PCR amplification was previously used to identify a cluster of resistance gene analogues (RGAs) on soybean linkage group J. Resistance to powdery mildew (Rmd-c), Phytophthora stem and root rot (Rps2), and an ineffective nodulation gene (Rj2) map within this cluster. BAC fingerprinting and RGA-specific primers were used to develop a contig of BAC clones spanning this region in cultivar "Williams 82" [rps2, Rmd (adult onset), rj2]. Two cDNAs with homology to the TIR/NBD/LRR family of R-genes have also been mapped to opposite ends of a BAC in the contig Gm_Isb001_091F11 (BAC 91F11). Sequence analyses of BAC 91F11 identified 16 different resistance-like gene (RLG) sequences with homology to the TIR/NBD/LRR family of disease resistance genes. Four of these RLGs represent two potentially novel classes of disease resistance genes: TIR/NBD domains fused inframe to a putative defense-related protein (NtPRp27-like) and TIR domains fused inframe to soybean calmodulin Ca(2+)-binding domains. RT-PCR analyses using gene-specific primers allowed us to monitor the expression of individual genes in different tissues and developmental stages. Three genes appeared to be constitutively expressed, while three were differentially expressed. Analyses of the R-genes within this BAC suggest that R-gene evolution in soybean is a complex and dynamic process. PMID:12524363

  14. The Low Noise Limit in Gene Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy D Dar

    Full Text Available Protein noise measurements are increasingly used to elucidate biophysical parameters. Unfortunately noise analyses are often at odds with directly measured parameters. Here we show that these inconsistencies arise from two problematic analytical choices: (i the assumption that protein translation rate is invariant for different proteins of different abundances, which has inadvertently led to (ii the assumption that a large constitutive extrinsic noise sets the low noise limit in gene expression. While growing evidence suggests that transcriptional bursting may set the low noise limit, variability in translational bursting has been largely ignored. We show that genome-wide systematic variation in translational efficiency can-and in the case of E. coli does-control the low noise limit in gene expression. Therefore constitutive extrinsic noise is small and only plays a role in the absence of a systematic variation in translational efficiency. These results show the existence of two distinct expression noise patterns: (1 a global noise floor uniformly imposed on all genes by expression bursting; and (2 high noise distributed to only a select group of genes.

  15. Identification of genes expressed during myocardial development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈小圆; 陈健宏; 张碧琪; 梁瑛; 梁平

    2003-01-01

    Objective To identify genes expressed in the fetal heart that are potentially important for myocardial development and cardiomyocyte proliferation.Methods mRNAs from fetal (29 weeks) and adult cardiomyocytes were use for suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH). Both forward (fetal as tester) and reverse (adult as driver) subtractions were performed. Clones confirmed by dot-blot analysis to be differentially expressed were sequenced and analyzed.Results Differential expressions were detected for 39 out of 96 (41%) clones on forward subtraction and 24 out of 80 (30%) clones on reverse. For fetal dominating genes, 28 clones matched to 10 known genes (COL1A2, COL3A1, endomucin, HBG1, HBG2, PCBP2, LOC51144, TGFBI, vinculin and PND), 9 clones to 5 cDNAs of unknown functions (accession AK021715, AF085867, AB040948, AB051460 and AB051512) and 2 clones had homology to hEST sequences. For the reverse subtraction, all clones showed homology to mitochondrial transcripts.Conclusions We successfully applied SSH to detect those genes differentially expressed in fetal cardiac myocytes, some of which have not been shown relative to myocardial development.

  16. Stochastic gene expression conditioned on large deviations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Jordan M.; Kulkarni, Rahul V.

    2017-06-01

    The intrinsic stochasticity of gene expression can give rise to large fluctuations and rare events that drive phenotypic variation in a population of genetically identical cells. Characterizing the fluctuations that give rise to such rare events motivates the analysis of large deviations in stochastic models of gene expression. Recent developments in non-equilibrium statistical mechanics have led to a framework for analyzing Markovian processes conditioned on rare events and for representing such processes by conditioning-free driven Markovian processes. We use this framework, in combination with approaches based on queueing theory, to analyze a general class of stochastic models of gene expression. Modeling gene expression as a Batch Markovian Arrival Process (BMAP), we derive exact analytical results quantifying large deviations of time-integrated random variables such as promoter activity fluctuations. We find that the conditioning-free driven process can also be represented by a BMAP that has the same form as the original process, but with renormalized parameters. The results obtained can be used to quantify the likelihood of large deviations, to characterize system fluctuations conditional on rare events and to identify combinations of model parameters that can give rise to dynamical phase transitions in system dynamics.

  17. Trigger finger, tendinosis, and intratendinous gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundin, A-C; Aspenberg, P; Eliasson, P

    2014-04-01

    The pathogenesis of trigger finger has generally been ascribed to primary changes in the first annular ligament. In contrast, we recently found histological changes in the tendons, similar to the findings in Achilles tendinosis or tendinopathy. We therefore hypothesized that trigger finger tendons would show differences in gene expression in comparison to normal tendons in a pattern similar to what is published for Achilles tendinosis. We performed quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction on biopsies from finger flexor tendons, 13 trigger fingers and 13 apparently healthy control tendons, to assess the expression of 10 genes which have been described to be differently expressed in tendinosis (collagen type 1a1, collagen 3a1, MMP-2, MMP-3, ADAMTS-5, TIMP-3, aggrecan, biglycan, decorin, and versican). In trigger finger tendons, collagen types 1a1 and 3a1, aggrecan and biglycan were all up-regulated, and MMP-3and TIMP-3 were down-regulated. These changes were statistically significant and have been previously described for Achilles tendinosis. The remaining four genes were not significantly altered. The changes in gene expression support the hypothesis that trigger finger is a form of tendinosis. Because trigger finger is a common condition, often treated surgically, it could provide opportunities for clinical research on tendinosis. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Analysis of Arabidopsis JAZ gene expression during Pseudomonas syringae pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demianski, Agnes J; Chung, Kwi Mi; Kunkel, Barbara N

    2012-01-01

    The jasmonates (JAs) comprise a family of plant hormones that regulate several developmental processes and mediate responses to various abiotic and biotic stresses, including pathogens. JA signalling is manipulated by several strains of the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae, including P. syringae strain DC3000, using the virulence factor coronatine (COR) as a mimic of jasmonyl-L-isoleucine (JA-Ile). To better understand the JA-Ile-mediated processes contributing to P. syringae disease susceptibility, it is important to investigate the regulation of JA signalling during infection. In Arabidopsis thaliana, JASMONATE ZIM-DOMAIN (JAZ) proteins are negative regulators of JA signalling. The transcription factor JASMONATE INSENSITIVE1 (JIN1/ATMYC2) has been implicated in the regulation of JAZ gene expression. To investigate the regulation of JAZ genes during P. syringae pathogenesis, we examined JAZ gene expression during infection of Arabidopsis by DC3000. We found that eight of the 12 JAZ genes are induced during infection in a COR-dependent manner. Unexpectedly, the induction of the majority of JAZ genes during infection was not dependent on JIN1, indicating that JIN1 is not the only transcription factor regulating JAZ genes. A T-DNA insertion mutant and an RNA interference line disrupted for the expression of JAZ10, one of the few JAZ genes regulated by JIN1 during infection, exhibited enhanced JA sensitivity and increased susceptibility to DC3000, with the primary effect being increased disease symptom severity. Thus, JAZ10 is a negative regulator of both JA signalling and disease symptom development.

  19. Cluster Analysis of Gene Expression Data

    CERN Document Server

    Domany, E

    2002-01-01

    The expression levels of many thousands of genes can be measured simultaneously by DNA microarrays (chips). This novel experimental tool has revolutionized research in molecular biology and generated considerable excitement. A typical experiment uses a few tens of such chips, each dedicated to a single sample - such as tissue extracted from a particular tumor. The results of such an experiment contain several hundred thousand numbers, that come in the form of a table, of several thousand rows (one for each gene) and 50 - 100 columns (one for each sample). We developed a clustering methodology to mine such data. In this review I provide a very basic introduction to the subject, aimed at a physics audience with no prior knowledge of either gene expression or clustering methods. I explain what genes are, what is gene expression and how it is measured by DNA chips. Next I explain what is meant by "clustering" and how we analyze the massive amounts of data from such experiments, and present results obtained from a...

  20. Annotation of gene function in citrus using gene expression information and co-expression networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Darren C J; Sweetman, Crystal; Ford, Christopher M

    2014-07-15

    The genus Citrus encompasses major cultivated plants such as sweet orange, mandarin, lemon and grapefruit, among the world's most economically important fruit crops. With increasing volumes of transcriptomics data available for these species, Gene Co-expression Network (GCN) analysis is a viable option for predicting gene function at a genome-wide scale. GCN analysis is based on a "guilt-by-association" principle whereby genes encoding proteins involved in similar and/or related biological processes may exhibit similar expression patterns across diverse sets of experimental conditions. While bioinformatics resources such as GCN analysis are widely available for efficient gene function prediction in model plant species including Arabidopsis, soybean and rice, in citrus these tools are not yet developed. We have constructed a comprehensive GCN for citrus inferred from 297 publicly available Affymetrix Genechip Citrus Genome microarray datasets, providing gene co-expression relationships at a genome-wide scale (33,000 transcripts). The comprehensive citrus GCN consists of a global GCN (condition-independent) and four condition-dependent GCNs that survey the sweet orange species only, all citrus fruit tissues, all citrus leaf tissues, or stress-exposed plants. All of these GCNs are clustered using genome-wide, gene-centric (guide) and graph clustering algorithms for flexibility of gene function prediction. For each putative cluster, gene ontology (GO) enrichment and gene expression specificity analyses were performed to enhance gene function, expression and regulation pattern prediction. The guide-gene approach was used to infer novel roles of genes involved in disease susceptibility and vitamin C metabolism, and graph-clustering approaches were used to investigate isoprenoid/phenylpropanoid metabolism in citrus peel, and citric acid catabolism via the GABA shunt in citrus fruit. Integration of citrus gene co-expression networks, functional enrichment analysis and gene

  1. A novel expression system of domain I of human beta2 glycoprotein I in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pearl Laurence H

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The antiphospholipid syndrome (APS, characterised by recurrent miscarriage and thrombosis, is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Domain I (DI of human beta 2 glycoprotein I (β2GPI is thought to contain crucial antibody binding epitopes for antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL, which are critical to the pathogenesis of APS. Expressing this protein in bacteria could facilitate studies investigating how this molecule interacts with aPL. Methods Using a computer programme called Juniper, sequentially overlapping primers were designed to be used in a recursive polymerase chain reaction (PCR to produce a synthetic DI gene. Specifically Juniper incorporates 'major' codons preferred by bacteria altering 41 codons out of 61. This was cloned into the expression plasmid pET(26b and expressed in BL21(DE3 Escherichia coli (E. coli. By virtue of a pelB leader sequence, periplasmic localisation of DI aided disulphide bond formation and toxicity was addressed by tightly regulating expression through the high stringency T7lac promoter. Results Purified, soluble his-tagged DI in yields of 750 μg/L bacterial culture was obtained and confirmed on Western blot. Expression using the native human cDNA sequence of DI in the same construct under identical conditions yielded significantly less DI compared to the recombinant optimised sequence. This constitutes the first description of prokaryotic expression of soluble DI of β2GPI. Binding to murine monoclonal antibodies that recognise conformationally restricted epitopes on the surface of DI and pathogenic human monoclonal IgG aPL was confirmed by direct and indirect immunoassay. Recombinant DI also bound a series of 21 polyclonal IgG samples derived from patients with APS. Conclusion By producing a synthetic gene globally optimised for expression in E. coli, tightly regulating expression and utilising periplasmic product translocation, efficient, soluble E. coli expression of the

  2. Gene expression profiling of human erythroid progenitors by micro-serial analysis of gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujishima, Naohito; Hirokawa, Makoto; Aiba, Namiko; Ichikawa, Yoshikazu; Fujishima, Masumi; Komatsuda, Atsushi; Suzuki, Yoshiko; Kawabata, Yoshinari; Miura, Ikuo; Sawada, Ken-ichi

    2004-10-01

    We compared the expression profiles of highly purified human CD34+ cells and erythroid progenitor cells by micro-serial analysis of gene expression (microSAGE). Human CD34+ cells were purified from granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mobilized blood stem cells, and erythroid progenitors were obtained by cultivating these cells in the presence of stem cell factor, interleukin 3, and erythropoietin. Our 10,202 SAGE tags allowed us to identify 1354 different transcripts appearing more than once. Erythroid progenitor cells showed increased expression of LRBA, EEF1A1, HSPCA, PILRB, RANBP1, NACA, and SMURF. Overexpression of HSPCA was confirmed by real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis. MicroSAGE revealed an unexpected preferential expression of several genes in erythroid progenitor cells in addition to the known functional genes, including hemoglobins. Our results provide reference data for future studies of gene expression in various hematopoietic disorders, including myelodysplastic syndrome and leukemia.

  3. Mining gene expression data by interpreting principal components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mortazavi Ali

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are many methods for analyzing microarray data that group together genes having similar patterns of expression over all conditions tested. However, in many instances the biologically important goal is to identify relatively small sets of genes that share coherent expression across only some conditions, rather than all or most conditions as required in traditional clustering; e.g. genes that are highly up-regulated and/or down-regulated similarly across only a subset of conditions. Equally important is the need to learn which conditions are the decisive ones in forming such gene sets of interest, and how they relate to diverse conditional covariates, such as disease diagnosis or prognosis. Results We present a method for automatically identifying such candidate sets of biologically relevant genes using a combination of principal components analysis and information theoretic metrics. To enable easy use of our methods, we have developed a data analysis package that facilitates visualization and subsequent data mining of the independent sources of significant variation present in gene microarray expression datasets (or in any other similarly structured high-dimensional dataset. We applied these tools to two public datasets, and highlight sets of genes most affected by specific subsets of conditions (e.g. tissues, treatments, samples, etc.. Statistically significant associations for highlighted gene sets were shown via global analysis for Gene Ontology term enrichment. Together with covariate associations, the tool provides a basis for building testable hypotheses about the biological or experimental causes of observed variation. Conclusion We provide an unsupervised data mining technique for diverse microarray expression datasets that is distinct from major methods now in routine use. In test uses, this method, based on publicly available gene annotations, appears to identify numerous sets of biologically relevant genes. It

  4. Gene Expression Commons: an open platform for absolute gene expression profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Seita

    Full Text Available Gene expression profiling using microarrays has been limited to comparisons of gene expression between small numbers of samples within individual experiments. However, the unknown and variable sensitivities of each probeset have rendered the absolute expression of any given gene nearly impossible to estimate. We have overcome this limitation by using a very large number (>10,000 of varied microarray data as a common reference, so that statistical attributes of each probeset, such as the dynamic range and threshold between low and high expression, can be reliably discovered through meta-analysis. This strategy is implemented in a web-based platform named "Gene Expression Commons" (https://gexc.stanford.edu/ which contains data of 39 distinct highly purified mouse hematopoietic stem/progenitor/differentiated cell populations covering almost the entire hematopoietic system. Since the Gene Expression Commons is designed as an open platform, investigators can explore the expression level of any gene, search by expression patterns of interest, submit their own microarray data, and design their own working models representing biological relationship among samples.

  5. Gene Expression Commons: an open platform for absolute gene expression profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seita, Jun; Sahoo, Debashis; Rossi, Derrick J; Bhattacharya, Deepta; Serwold, Thomas; Inlay, Matthew A; Ehrlich, Lauren I R; Fathman, John W; Dill, David L; Weissman, Irving L

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression profiling using microarrays has been limited to comparisons of gene expression between small numbers of samples within individual experiments. However, the unknown and variable sensitivities of each probeset have rendered the absolute expression of any given gene nearly impossible to estimate. We have overcome this limitation by using a very large number (>10,000) of varied microarray data as a common reference, so that statistical attributes of each probeset, such as the dynamic range and threshold between low and high expression, can be reliably discovered through meta-analysis. This strategy is implemented in a web-based platform named "Gene Expression Commons" (https://gexc.stanford.edu/) which contains data of 39 distinct highly purified mouse hematopoietic stem/progenitor/differentiated cell populations covering almost the entire hematopoietic system. Since the Gene Expression Commons is designed as an open platform, investigators can explore the expression level of any gene, search by expression patterns of interest, submit their own microarray data, and design their own working models representing biological relationship among samples.

  6. Regulation of methane genes and genome expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John N. Reeve

    2009-09-09

    At the start of this project, it was known that methanogens were Archaeabacteria (now Archaea) and were therefore predicted to have gene expression and regulatory systems different from Bacteria, but few of the molecular biology details were established. The goals were then to establish the structures and organizations of genes in methanogens, and to develop the genetic technologies needed to investigate and dissect methanogen gene expression and regulation in vivo. By cloning and sequencing, we established the gene and operon structures of all of the “methane” genes that encode the enzymes that catalyze methane biosynthesis from carbon dioxide and hydrogen. This work identified unique sequences in the methane gene that we designated mcrA, that encodes the largest subunit of methyl-coenzyme M reductase, that could be used to identify methanogen DNA and establish methanogen phylogenetic relationships. McrA sequences are now the accepted standard and used extensively as hybridization probes to identify and quantify methanogens in environmental research. With the methane genes in hand, we used northern blot and then later whole-genome microarray hybridization analyses to establish how growth phase and substrate availability regulated methane gene expression in Methanobacterium thermautotrophicus ΔH (now Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus). Isoenzymes or pairs of functionally equivalent enzymes catalyze several steps in the hydrogen-dependent reduction of carbon dioxide to methane. We established that hydrogen availability determine which of these pairs of methane genes is expressed and therefore which of the alternative enzymes is employed to catalyze methane biosynthesis under different environmental conditions. As were unable to establish a reliable genetic system for M. thermautotrophicus, we developed in vitro transcription as an alternative system to investigate methanogen gene expression and regulation. This led to the discovery that an archaeal protein

  7. Regulation of noise in gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Alvaro; Choubey, Sandeep; Kondev, Jane

    2013-01-01

    The biochemical processes leading to the synthesis of new proteins are random, as they typically involve a small number of diffusing molecules. They lead to fluctuations in the number of proteins in a single cell as a function of time and to cell-to-cell variability of protein abundances. These in turn can lead to phenotypic heterogeneity in a population of genetically identical cells. Phenotypic heterogeneity may have important consequences for the development of multicellular organisms and the fitness of bacterial colonies, raising the question of how it is regulated. Here we review the experimental evidence that transcriptional regulation affects noise in gene expression, and discuss how the noise strength is encoded in the architecture of the promoter region. We discuss how models based on specific molecular mechanisms of gene regulation can make experimentally testable predictions for how changes to the promoter architecture are reflected in gene expression noise.

  8. Fluid Mechanics, Arterial Disease, and Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarbell, John M; Shi, Zhong-Dong; Dunn, Jessilyn; Jo, Hanjoong

    2014-01-01

    This review places modern research developments in vascular mechanobiology in the context of hemodynamic phenomena in the cardiovascular system and the discrete localization of vascular disease. The modern origins of this field are traced, beginning in the 1960s when associations between flow characteristics, particularly blood flow-induced wall shear stress, and the localization of atherosclerotic plaques were uncovered, and continuing to fluid shear stress effects on the vascular lining endothelial) cells (ECs), including their effects on EC morphology, biochemical production, and gene expression. The earliest single-gene studies and genome-wide analyses are considered. The final section moves from the ECs lining the vessel wall to the smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts within the wall that are fluid me chanically activated by interstitial flow that imposes shear stresses on their surfaces comparable with those of flowing blood on EC surfaces. Interstitial flow stimulates biochemical production and gene expression, much like blood flow on ECs.

  9. Transmembrane START domain proteins: in silico identification, characterization and expression analysis under stress conditions in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satheesh, Viswanathan; Chidambaranathan, Parameswaran; Jagannadham, Prasanth Tejkumar; Kumar, Vajinder; Jain, Pradeep K; Chinnusamy, Viswanathan; Bhat, Shripad R; Srinivasan, R

    2016-01-01

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory related transfer (StART) proteins that are involved in transport of lipid molecules, play a myriad of functions in insects, mammals and plants. These proteins consist of a modular START domain of approximately 200 amino acids which binds and transfers the lipids. In the present study we have performed a genome-wide search for all START domain proteins in chickpea. The search identified 36 chickpea genes belonging to the START domain family. Through a phylogenetic tree reconstructed with Arabidopsis, rice, chickpea, and soybean START proteins, we were able to identify four transmembrane START (TM-START) proteins in chickpea. These four proteins are homologous to the highly conserved mammalian phosphatidylcholine transfer proteins. Multiple sequence alignment of all the transmembrane containing START proteins from Arabidopsis, rice, chickpea, and soybean revealed that the amino acid residues to which phosphatidylcholine binds in mammals, is also conserved in all these plant species, implying an important functional role and a very similar mode of action of all these proteins across dicots and monocots. This study characterizes a few of the not so well studied transmembrane START superfamily genes that may be involved in stress signaling. Expression analysis in various tissues showed that these genes are predominantly expressed in flowers and roots of chickpea. Three of the chickpea TM-START genes showed induced expression in response to drought, salt, wound and heat stress, suggesting their role in stress response.

  10. 抗前列腺特异抗原重链可变区单域抗体基因的构建及表达%Construction and expression of anti-prostate specific antigen VH sin gle domain antibody gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁建林; 王智; 武国军; 郝晓柯

    2001-01-01

    目的 扩增出抗前列腺特异抗原(PSA)单克隆抗体(MAb)的重链可变区(V H)单域抗体基因,并在大肠杆菌中表达. 方法 从分泌抗PSA mAb的杂交瘤细胞系E 4B7中提取总RNA,经RT-PCR扩增VH单域抗体基因,将其克隆到融合蛋白表达载体pGEX-4T-1中进行表达. 结果 VH单域抗体基因全长363 bp,含起始码和终止码.将其克隆 到pGEX-4T-1内,转化大肠杆菌DH5α,获得高效表达,表达量占全菌总蛋白质的38%,以包涵体形式存在.经初步纯化和复性后,用谷胱甘肽(GST)亲和色谱纯化,再经凝血酶水解获得抗PSA VH单域抗体. 竞争结合抑制实验证明,该表达产物具有前列腺癌细胞亲和活性. 结论  构建成功抗PSA的VH单域抗体,为进一步临床应用奠定基础.%AIM To amplify the VH single domain gene of anti-p rostate specific antigen (PSA) monoclonal antibody(mAb), and express it in E. coli. METHODS Total RNA was extracted from the hybridoma cell line E4B7, which se- creted McAb against PSA, and subjected to reverse transcri ption. The VH single domain antibody gene was amplified by PCR, clo ned into the prokaryotic fusion protein expression vector pGEX-4T-1 and expressed in E. c oli. RESULTS The VH single domain antibody gene consisted of 363 bp, which was cloned into an exp ression vector pGEX-4T-1 and transformed into E. coli DH5α. Clones harboring plasmid pGE X-VH produced a 40 kDa of fusion protein in E. coli at a level of 38% of the total cellular pro tein. After primary purification and renaturation, the fusion protein was further purified by GST-a ffinity chromatography. The fusion protein was digested with thrombin and the VH single domain antibod y was separated, the binding activity of anti-PSA VH single domain antibody was confirmed by competi tive binding inhibition assay in vitro. CONCLUSION Anti-PSA single dom ain antibody has been successfully constructed for the use in clinical studies.

  11. Regulation of methane genes and genome expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John N. Reeve

    2009-09-09

    At the start of this project, it was known that methanogens were Archaeabacteria (now Archaea) and were therefore predicted to have gene expression and regulatory systems different from Bacteria, but few of the molecular biology details were established. The goals were then to establish the structures and organizations of genes in methanogens, and to develop the genetic technologies needed to investigate and dissect methanogen gene expression and regulation in vivo. By cloning and sequencing, we established the gene and operon structures of all of the “methane” genes that encode the enzymes that catalyze methane biosynthesis from carbon dioxide and hydrogen. This work identified unique sequences in the methane gene that we designated mcrA, that encodes the largest subunit of methyl-coenzyme M reductase, that could be used to identify methanogen DNA and establish methanogen phylogenetic relationships. McrA sequences are now the accepted standard and used extensively as hybridization probes to identify and quantify methanogens in environmental research. With the methane genes in hand, we used northern blot and then later whole-genome microarray hybridization analyses to establish how growth phase and substrate availability regulated methane gene expression in Methanobacterium thermautotrophicus ΔH (now Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus). Isoenzymes or pairs of functionally equivalent enzymes catalyze several steps in the hydrogen-dependent reduction of carbon dioxide to methane. We established that hydrogen availability determine which of these pairs of methane genes is expressed and therefore which of the alternative enzymes is employed to catalyze methane biosynthesis under different environmental conditions. As were unable to establish a reliable genetic system for M. thermautotrophicus, we developed in vitro transcription as an alternative system to investigate methanogen gene expression and regulation. This led to the discovery that an archaeal protein

  12. Expanding the landscape of chromatin modification (CM-related functional domains and genes in human.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuye Pu

    Full Text Available Chromatin modification (CM plays a key role in regulating transcription, DNA replication, repair and recombination. However, our knowledge of these processes in humans remains very limited. Here we use computational approaches to study proteins and functional domains involved in CM in humans. We analyze the abundance and the pair-wise domain-domain co-occurrences of 25 well-documented CM domains in 5 model organisms: yeast, worm, fly, mouse and human. Results show that domains involved in histone methylation, DNA methylation, and histone variants are remarkably expanded in metazoan, reflecting the increased demand for cell type-specific gene regulation. We find that CM domains tend to co-occur with a limited number of partner domains and are hence not promiscuous. This property is exploited to identify 47 potentially novel CM domains, including 24 DNA-binding domains, whose role in CM has received little attention so far. Lastly, we use a consensus Machine Learning approach to predict 379 novel CM genes (coding for 329 proteins in humans based on domain compositions. Several of these predictions are supported by very recent experimental studies and others are slated for experimental verification. Identification of novel CM genes and domains in humans will aid our understanding of fundamental epigenetic processes that are important for stem cell differentiation and cancer biology. Information on all the candidate CM domains and genes reported here is publicly available.

  13. Topological features in cancer gene expression data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, S; Krishnamoorthy, B

    2015-01-01

    We present a new method for exploring cancer gene expression data based on tools from algebraic topology. Our method selects a small relevant subset from tens of thousands of genes while simultaneously identifying nontrivial higher order topological features, i.e., holes, in the data. We first circumvent the problem of high dimensionality by dualizing the data, i.e., by studying genes as points in the sample space. Then we select a small subset of the genes as landmarks to construct topological structures that capture persistent, i.e., topologically significant, features of the data set in its first homology group. Furthermore, we demonstrate that many members of these loops have been implicated for cancer biogenesis in scientific literature. We illustrate our method on five different data sets belonging to brain, breast, leukemia, and ovarian cancers.

  14. Positive selection in the adhesion domain of Mus sperm Adam genes through gene duplications and function-driven gene complex formations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grayson, Phil; Civetta, Alberto

    2013-09-30

    Sperm and testes-expressed Adam genes have been shown to undergo bouts of positive selection in mammals. Despite the pervasiveness of positive selection signals, it is unclear what has driven such selective bouts. The fact that only sperm surface Adam genes show signals of positive selection within their adhesion domain has led to speculation that selection might be driven by species-specific adaptations to fertilization or sperm competition. Alternatively, duplications and neofunctionalization of Adam sperm surface genes, particularly as it is now understood in rodents, might have contributed to an acceleration of evolutionary rates and possibly adaptive diversification. Here we sequenced and conducted tests of selection within the adhesion domain of sixteen known sperm-surface Adam genes among five species of the Mus genus. We find evidence of positive selection associated with all six Adam genes known to interact to form functional complexes on Mus sperm. A subset of these complex-forming sperm genes also displayed accelerated branch evolution with Adam5 evolving under positive selection. In contrast to our previous findings in primates, selective bouts within Mus sperm Adams showed no associations to proxies of sperm competition. Expanded phylogenetic analysis including sequence data from other placental mammals allowed us to uncover ancient and recent episodes of adaptive evolution. The prevailing signals of rapid divergence and positive selection detected within the adhesion domain of interacting sperm Adams is driven by duplications and potential neofunctionalizations that are in some cases ancient (Adams 2, 3 and 5) or more recent (Adams 1b, 4b and 6).

  15. Expression, purification and insights into structure and folding of the ADAM22 pro domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Hans Peter; Jacobsen, Jonas; Nielbo, Steen;

    2008-01-01

    . To understand the functions of human ADAM pro domains and to determine three-dimensional structures, we have screened promising targets for expression and purification properties when using Escherichia coli as the host. The pro domain of ADAM22 (ADAM22-P) expressed in E. coli was folded, as determined by CD...

  16. Bioenergetics and gene silencing approaches for unraveling nucleotide recognition by the human EIF2C2/Ago2 PAZ domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Kandeel

    Full Text Available Gene silencing and RNA interference are major cellular processes that control gene expression via the cleavage of target mRNA. Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2C2 (EIF2C2, Argonaute protein 2, Ago2 is considered to be the major player of RNAi as it is the core component of RISC complexes. While a considerable amount of research has focused on RNA interference and its associated mechanisms, the nature and mechanisms of nucleotide recognition by the PAZ domain of EIF2C2/Ago2 have not yet been characterized. Here, we demonstrate that the EIF2C2/Ago2 PAZ domain has an inherent lack of binding to adenine nucleotides, a feature that highlights the poor binding of 3'-adenylated RNAs with the PAZ domain as well as the selective high trimming of the 3'-ends of miRNA containing adenine nucleotides. We further show that the PAZ domain selectively binds all ribonucleotides (except adenosine, whereas it poorly recognizes deoxyribonucleotides. In this context, the modification of dTMP to its ribonucleotide analogue gave a drastic improvement of binding enthalpy and, hence, binding affinity. Additionally, higher in vivo gene silencing efficacy was correlated with the stronger PAZ domain binders. These findings provide new insights into the nature of the interactions of the EIF2C2/Ago2 PAZ domain.

  17. Bioenergetics and gene silencing approaches for unraveling nucleotide recognition by the human EIF2C2/Ago2 PAZ domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandeel, Mahmoud; Al-Taher, Abdullah; Nakashima, Remi; Sakaguchi, Tomoya; Kandeel, Ali; Nagaya, Yuki; Kitamura, Yoshiaki; Kitade, Yukio

    2014-01-01

    Gene silencing and RNA interference are major cellular processes that control gene expression via the cleavage of target mRNA. Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2C2 (EIF2C2, Argonaute protein 2, Ago2) is considered to be the major player of RNAi as it is the core component of RISC complexes. While a considerable amount of research has focused on RNA interference and its associated mechanisms, the nature and mechanisms of nucleotide recognition by the PAZ domain of EIF2C2/Ago2 have not yet been characterized. Here, we demonstrate that the EIF2C2/Ago2 PAZ domain has an inherent lack of binding to adenine nucleotides, a feature that highlights the poor binding of 3'-adenylated RNAs with the PAZ domain as well as the selective high trimming of the 3'-ends of miRNA containing adenine nucleotides. We further show that the PAZ domain selectively binds all ribonucleotides (except adenosine), whereas it poorly recognizes deoxyribonucleotides. In this context, the modification of dTMP to its ribonucleotide analogue gave a drastic improvement of binding enthalpy and, hence, binding affinity. Additionally, higher in vivo gene silencing efficacy was correlated with the stronger PAZ domain binders. These findings provide new insights into the nature of the interactions of the EIF2C2/Ago2 PAZ domain.

  18. Phasevarions mediate random switching of gene expression in pathogenic Neisseria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srikhanta, Yogitha N; Dowideit, Stefanie J; Edwards, Jennifer L; Falsetta, Megan L; Wu, Hsing-Ju; Harrison, Odile B; Fox, Kate L; Seib, Kate L; Maguire, Tina L; Wang, Andrew H-J; Maiden, Martin C; Grimmond, Sean M; Apicella, Michael A; Jennings, Michael P

    2009-04-01

    Many host-adapted bacterial pathogens contain DNA methyltransferases (mod genes) that are subject to phase-variable expression (high-frequency reversible ON/OFF switching of gene expression). In Haemophilus influenzae, the random switching of the modA gene controls expression of a phase-variable regulon of genes (a "phasevarion"), via differential methylation of the genome in the modA ON and OFF states. Phase-variable mod genes are also present in Neisseria meningitidis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae, suggesting that phasevarions may occur in these important human pathogens. Phylogenetic studies on phase-variable mod genes associated with type III restriction modification (R-M) systems revealed that these organisms have two distinct mod genes--modA and modB. There are also distinct alleles of modA (abundant: modA11, 12, 13; minor: modA4, 15, 18) and modB (modB1, 2). These alleles differ only in their DNA recognition domain. ModA11 was only found in N. meningitidis and modA13 only in N. gonorrhoeae. The recognition site for the modA13 methyltransferase in N. gonorrhoeae strain FA1090 was identified as 5'-AGAAA-3'. Mutant strains lacking the modA11, 12 or 13 genes were made in N. meningitidis and N. gonorrhoeae and their phenotype analyzed in comparison to a corresponding mod ON wild-type strain. Microarray analysis revealed that in all three modA alleles multiple genes were either upregulated or downregulated, some of which were virulence-associated. For example, in N. meningitidis MC58 (modA11), differentially expressed genes included those encoding the candidate vaccine antigens lactoferrin binding proteins A and B. Functional studies using N. gonorrhoeae FA1090 and the clinical isolate O1G1370 confirmed that modA13 ON and OFF strains have distinct phenotypes in antimicrobial resistance, in a primary human cervical epithelial cell model of infection, and in biofilm formation. This study, in conjunction with our previous work in H. influenzae, indicates that

  19. Phasevarions mediate random switching of gene expression in pathogenic Neisseria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogitha N Srikhanta

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Many host-adapted bacterial pathogens contain DNA methyltransferases (mod genes that are subject to phase-variable expression (high-frequency reversible ON/OFF switching of gene expression. In Haemophilus influenzae, the random switching of the modA gene controls expression of a phase-variable regulon of genes (a "phasevarion", via differential methylation of the genome in the modA ON and OFF states. Phase-variable mod genes are also present in Neisseria meningitidis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae, suggesting that phasevarions may occur in these important human pathogens. Phylogenetic studies on phase-variable mod genes associated with type III restriction modification (R-M systems revealed that these organisms have two distinct mod genes--modA and modB. There are also distinct alleles of modA (abundant: modA11, 12, 13; minor: modA4, 15, 18 and modB (modB1, 2. These alleles differ only in their DNA recognition domain. ModA11 was only found in N. meningitidis and modA13 only in N. gonorrhoeae. The recognition site for the modA13 methyltransferase in N. gonorrhoeae strain FA1090 was identified as 5'-AGAAA-3'. Mutant strains lacking the modA11, 12 or 13 genes were made in N. meningitidis and N. gonorrhoeae and their phenotype analyzed in comparison to a corresponding mod ON wild-type strain. Microarray analysis revealed that in all three modA alleles multiple genes were either upregulated or downregulated, some of which were virulence-associated. For example, in N. meningitidis MC58 (modA11, differentially expressed genes included those encoding the candidate vaccine antigens lactoferrin binding proteins A and B. Functional studies using N. gonorrhoeae FA1090 and the clinical isolate O1G1370 confirmed that modA13 ON and OFF strains have distinct phenotypes in antimicrobial resistance, in a primary human cervical epithelial cell model of infection, and in biofilm formation. This study, in conjunction with our previous work in H. influenzae, indicates

  20. Transcriptome-Level Signatures in Gene Expression and Gene Expression Variability during Bacterial Adaptive Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Keesha E.; Otoupal, Peter B.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are an increasingly serious public health concern, as strains emerge that demonstrate resistance to almost all available treatments. One factor that contributes to the crisis is the adaptive ability of bacteria, which exhibit remarkable phenotypic and gene expression heterogeneity in order to gain a survival advantage in damaging environments. This high degree of variability in gene expression across biological populations makes it a challenging task to identify key regulators of bacterial adaptation. Here, we research the regulation of adaptive resistance by investigating transcriptome profiles of Escherichia coli upon adaptation to disparate toxins, including antibiotics and biofuels. We locate potential target genes via conventional gene expression analysis as well as using a new analysis technique examining differential gene expression variability. By investigating trends across the diverse adaptation conditions, we identify a focused set of genes with conserved behavior, including those involved in cell motility, metabolism, membrane structure, and transport, and several genes of unknown function. To validate the biological relevance of the observed changes, we synthetically perturb gene expression using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-dCas9. Manipulation of select genes in combination with antibiotic treatment promotes adaptive resistance as demonstrated by an increased degree of antibiotic tolerance and heterogeneity in MICs. We study the mechanisms by which identified genes influence adaptation and find that select differentially variable genes have the potential to impact metabolic rates, mutation rates, and motility. Overall, this work provides evidence for a complex nongenetic response, encompassing shifts in gene expression and gene expression variability, which underlies adaptive resistance. IMPORTANCE Even initially sensitive bacteria can rapidly thwart antibiotic treatment

  1. Gene expression regulation in roots under drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janiak, Agnieszka; Kwaśniewski, Mirosław; Szarejko, Iwona

    2016-02-01

    Stress signalling and regulatory networks controlling expression of target genes are the basis of plant response to drought. Roots are the first organs exposed to water deficiency in the soil and are the place of drought sensing. Signalling cascades transfer chemical signals toward the shoot and initiate molecular responses that lead to the biochemical and morphological changes that allow plants to be protected against water loss and to tolerate stress conditions. Here, we present an overview of signalling network and gene expression regulation pathways that are actively induced in roots under drought stress. In particular, the role of several transcription factor (TF) families, including DREB, AP2/ERF, NAC, bZIP, MYC, CAMTA, Alfin-like and Q-type ZFP, in the regulation of root response to drought are highlighted. The information provided includes available data on mutual interactions between these TFs together with their regulation by plant hormones and other signalling molecules. The most significant downstream target genes and molecular processes that are controlled by the regulatory factors are given. These data are also coupled with information about the influence of the described regulatory networks on root traits and root development which may translate to enhanced drought tolerance. This is the first literature survey demonstrating the gene expression regulatory machinery that is induced by drought stress, presented from the perspective of roots.

  2. Predicting gene expression from sequence: a reexamination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Yuan

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Although much of the information regarding genes' expressions is encoded in the genome, deciphering such information has been very challenging. We reexamined Beer and Tavazoie's (BT approach to predict mRNA expression patterns of 2,587 genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae from the information in their respective promoter sequences. Instead of fitting complex Bayesian network models, we trained naïve Bayes classifiers using only the sequence-motif matching scores provided by BT. Our simple models correctly predict expression patterns for 79% of the genes, based on the same criterion and the same cross-validation (CV procedure as BT, which compares favorably to the 73% accuracy of BT. The fact that our approach did not use position and orientation information of the predicted binding sites but achieved a higher prediction accuracy, motivated us to investigate a few biological predictions made by BT. We found that some of their predictions, especially those related to motif orientations and positions, are at best circumstantial. For example, the combinatorial rules suggested by BT for the PAC and RRPE motifs are not unique to the cluster of genes from which the predictive model was inferred, and there are simpler rules that are statistically more significant than BT's ones. We also show that CV procedure used by BT to estimate their method's prediction accuracy is inappropriate and may have overestimated the prediction accuracy by about 10%.

  3. Expression of MTLC gene in gastric carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guang-Bin Qiu; Li-Guo Gong; Dong-Mei Hao; Zhi-Hong Zhen; Kai-Lai Sun

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression of c-myc target from laryngeal cancer cells (MTLC) gene in gastric carcinoma (GC)tissues and the effect of MTLC over-expression on gastric carcinoma cell line BGC823.METHODS: RT-PCR was performed to determine the expression of MTLC mRNA in GC and matched control tissues.BGC823 cells were transfected with an expression vector pcDNA3.1-MTLC by liposome and screened by G418. Growth of cells expressing MTLC was observed daily by manual counting. Apoptotic cells were determined by TdT-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay.RESULTS: The expression of MTLC mRNAs was downregulated in 9(60%) of 15 cases of GC tissues. The growth rates of the BGC823 cells expressing MTLC were indistinguishable from that of control cells. A marked acceleration of apoptosis was observed in MTLC-expressing cells.CONCLUSION: MTLC was down-regulated in the majority of GC tissues and could promote apoptosis of GC cell lines,which suggests that MTLC may play an important role in the carcinogenesis of gastric carcinoma.

  4. Relationship between promoter methylation of the Runx3 and Rassf1a genes and Dnmt1 expression in gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜相君

    2013-01-01

    Objective To analyze the promoter methylation of the human runt-related transcription factor3(Runx3) and ras-association domain family1a(Rassf1a) genes and Dnmt1protein expression in gastric cancer and to

  5. GRAS Proteins Form a DNA Binding Complex to Induce Gene Expression during Nodulation Signaling in Medicago truncatula

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sibylle Hirsch; Jiyoung Kim; Alfonso Muñoz; Anne B. Heckmann; J. Allan Downie; Giles E. D. Oldroyd

    2009-01-01

    .... Perception of the calcium oscillations is a function of a calcium-and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase, and this activates nodulation gene expression via two GRAS domain transcriptional regulators...

  6. Recombinant expression and purification of L2 domain of human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-08-16

    Aug 16, 2010 ... and plays an important role in some malignant processes. L2 domain of ..... production of monoclonal antibodies, screening for specific ligands and studies on ... Isolation and characterization of. A-431 cells that retain high ...

  7. Comparative transcriptomic analyses of differentially expressed genes in transgenic melatonin biosynthesis ovine HIOMT gene in switchgrass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Yuan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin serves pleiotropic functions in prompting plant growth and resistance to various stresses. The accurate biosynthetic pathway of melatonin remains elusive in plant species, while the N-acetyltransferase and O-methyltransferase were considered to be the last two key enzymes during its biosynthesis. To investigate the biosynthesis and metabolic pathway of melatonin in plants, the RNA-seq profile of overexpression of the ovine HIOMT was analyzed and compared with the previous transcriptome of transgenic oAANAT gene in switchgrass, a model plant for cellulosic ethanol production. A total of 946, 405 and 807 differentially expressed unigenes were observed in AANAT vs. control, HIOMT vs. control, and AANAT vs. HIOMT, respectively. The significantly upregulated (F-box/kelch-repeat protein, zinc finger BED domain-containing protein-3 genes were consistent with enhanced phenotypes of shoot, stem and root growth in transgenic oHIOMT switchgrass. Early flowering in overexpression of oHIOMT switchgrass involved in the regulation of flowering-time genes (APETALA2. Several stress resistant related genes (SPX domain-containing membrane protein, copper transporter 1, late blight resistance protein homolog R1A-6 OS etc. were specifically and significantly upregulated in transgenic oHIOMT only, while metabolism-related genes (phenylalanine-4-hydroxylase, tyrosine decarboxylase 1, protein disulfide-isomerase and galactinol synthase 2 etc. were significantly upregulated in transgenic oAANAT only. These results provide new sights into the biosynthetic and physiological functional networks of melatonin in plants.

  8. Toward stable gene expression in CHO cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariati; Koh, Esther YC; Yeo, Jessna HM; Ho, Steven CL; Yang, Yuansheng

    2014-01-01

    Maintaining high gene expression level during long-term culture is critical when producing therapeutic recombinant proteins using mammalian cells. Transcriptional silencing of promoters, most likely due to epigenetic events such as DNA methylation and histone modifications, is one of the major mechanisms causing production instability. Previous studies demonstrated that the core CpG island element (IE) from the hamster adenine phosphoribosyltransferase gene is effective to prevent DNA methylation. We generated one set of modified human cytomegalovirus (hCMV) promoters by insertion of one or two copies of IE in either forward or reverse orientations into different locations of the hCMV promoter. The modified hCMV with one copy of IE inserted between the hCMV enhancer and core promoter in reverse orientation (MR1) was most effective at enhancing expression stability in CHO cells without comprising expression level when compared with the wild type hCMV. We also found that insertion of IE into a chimeric murine CMV (mCMV) enhancer and human elongation factor-1α core (hEF) promoter in reverse orientation did not enhance expression stability, indicating that the effect of IE on expression stability is possibly promoter specific. PMID:25482237

  9. Gene expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa swarming motility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Déziel Eric

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is capable of three types of motilities: swimming, twitching and swarming. The latter is characterized by a fast and coordinated group movement over a semi-solid surface resulting from intercellular interactions and morphological differentiation. A striking feature of swarming motility is the complex fractal-like patterns displayed by migrating bacteria while they move away from their inoculation point. This type of group behaviour is still poorly understood and its characterization provides important information on bacterial structured communities such as biofilms. Using GeneChip® Affymetrix microarrays, we obtained the transcriptomic profiles of both bacterial populations located at the tip of migrating tendrils and swarm center of swarming colonies and compared these profiles to that of a bacterial control population grown on the same media but solidified to not allow swarming motility. Results Microarray raw data were corrected for background noise with the RMA algorithm and quantile normalized. Differentially expressed genes between the three conditions were selected using a threshold of 1.5 log2-fold, which gave a total of 378 selected genes (6.3% of the predicted open reading frames of strain PA14. Major shifts in gene expression patterns are observed in each growth conditions, highlighting the presence of distinct bacterial subpopulations within a swarming colony (tendril tips vs. swarm center. Unexpectedly, microarrays expression data reveal that a minority of genes are up-regulated in tendril tip populations. Among them, we found energy metabolism, ribosomal protein and transport of small molecules related genes. On the other hand, many well-known virulence factors genes were globally repressed in tendril tip cells. Swarm center cells are distinct and appear to be under oxidative and copper stress responses. Conclusions Results reported in this study show that, as opposed to

  10. Kinase impact assessment in the landscape of fusion genes that retain kinase domains: a pan-cancer study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Pora; Jia, Peilin; Zhao, Zhongming

    2016-12-24

    Assessing the impact of kinase in gene fusion is essential for both identifying driver fusion genes (FGs) and developing molecular targeted therapies. Kinase domain retention is a crucial factor in kinase fusion genes (KFGs), but such a systematic investigation has not been done yet. To this end, we analyzed kinase domain retention (KDR) status in chimeric protein sequences of 914 KFGs covering 312 kinases across 13 major cancer types. Based on 171 kinase domain-retained KFGs including 101 kinases, we studied their recurrence, kinase groups, fusion partners, exon-based expression depth, short DNA motifs around the break points and networks. Our results, such as more KDR than 5'-kinase fusion genes, combinatorial effects between 3'-KDR kinases and their 5'-partners and a signal transduction-specific DNA sequence motif in the break point intronic sequences, supported positive selection on 3'-kinase fusion genes in cancer. We introduced a degree-of-frequency (DoF) score to measure the possible number of KFGs of a kinase. Interestingly, kinases with high DoF scores tended to undergo strong gene expression alteration at the break points. Furthermore, our KDR gene fusion network analysis revealed six of the seven kinases with the highest DoF scores (ALK, BRAF, MET, NTRK1, NTRK3 and RET) were all observed in thyroid carcinoma. Finally, we summarized common features of 'effective' (highly recurrent) kinases in gene fusions such as expression alteration at break point, redundant usage in multiple cancer types and 3'-location tendency. Collectively, our findings are useful for prioritizing driver kinases and FGs and provided insights into KFGs' clinical implications.

  11. Engineering genes for predictable protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Claes; Minshull, Jeremy; Govindarajan, Sridhar; Ness, Jon; Villalobos, Alan; Welch, Mark

    2012-05-01

    The DNA sequence used to encode a polypeptide can have dramatic effects on its expression. Lack of readily available tools has until recently inhibited meaningful experimental investigation of this phenomenon. Advances in synthetic biology and the application of modern engineering approaches now provide the tools for systematic analysis of the sequence variables affecting heterologous expression of recombinant proteins. We here discuss how these new tools are being applied and how they circumvent the constraints of previous approaches, highlighting some of the surprising and promising results emerging from the developing field of gene engineering.

  12. Annotation of gene function in citrus using gene expression information and co-expression networks

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Darren CJ; Sweetman, Crystal; Ford, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The genus Citrus encompasses major cultivated plants such as sweet orange, mandarin, lemon and grapefruit, among the world’s most economically important fruit crops. With increasing volumes of transcriptomics data available for these species, Gene Co-expression Network (GCN) analysis is a viable option for predicting gene function at a genome-wide scale. GCN analysis is based on a “guilt-by-association” principle whereby genes encoding proteins involved in similar and/or related bi...

  13. Annotation of gene function in citrus using gene expression information and co-expression networks

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Darren CJ; Sweetman, Crystal; Ford, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The genus Citrus encompasses major cultivated plants such as sweet orange, mandarin, lemon and grapefruit, among the world’s most economically important fruit crops. With increasing volumes of transcriptomics data available for these species, Gene Co-expression Network (GCN) analysis is a viable option for predicting gene function at a genome-wide scale. GCN analysis is based on a “guilt-by-association” principle whereby genes encoding proteins involved in similar and/or related bi...

  14. Expression of Catalytic Domain of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B and Preparation of Its Polyclonal Antibody

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    This study focuses on the expression of human protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B(PTP1B) catalytic domain (△PTP1B) and preparation of polyclonal antibody against △PTP1B. △PTP1B gene was PCR amplified with the cDNA of human PTP1B as the template, and cloned into the pT7 expression vector. The recombinant pT7-△PTP1B was expressed in E. coli Rosetta( DE3 ) host cells and purified. The antiserum was prepared by immunizing rabbit with purified recombinant △PTP1B. The polyclonal antibody against △PTP1B was purified by PVDF immobilized antigen affinity chromatography. △PTP1B was correctly cloned, expressed, and purified as confirmed by PCR, DNA sequence ratio) and 0. 1 ng, respectively. This study provides an important basis for further studying the biological function of PTP1B and its relationship with human diseases.

  15. The rice B-box zinc finger gene family: genomic identification, characterization, expression profiling and diurnal analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianyan Huang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The B-box (BBX -containing proteins are a class of zinc finger proteins that contain one or two B-box domains and play important roles in plant growth and development. The Arabidopsis BBX gene family has recently been re-identified and renamed. However, there has not been a genome-wide survey of the rice BBX (OsBBX gene family until now. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we identified 30 rice BBX genes through a comprehensive bioinformatics analysis. Each gene was assigned a uniform nomenclature. We described the chromosome localizations, gene structures, protein domains, phylogenetic relationship, whole life-cycle expression profile and diurnal expression patterns of the OsBBX family members. Based on the phylogeny and domain constitution, the OsBBX gene family was classified into five subfamilies. The gene duplication analysis revealed that only chromosomal segmental duplication contributed to the expansion of the OsBBX gene family. The expression profile of the OsBBX genes was analyzed by Affymetrix GeneChip microarrays throughout the entire life-cycle of rice cultivar Zhenshan 97 (ZS97. In addition, microarray analysis was performed to obtain the expression patterns of these genes under light/dark conditions and after three phytohormone treatments. This analysis revealed that the expression patterns of the OsBBX genes could be classified into eight groups. Eight genes were regulated under the light/dark treatments, and eleven genes showed differential expression under at least one phytohormone treatment. Moreover, we verified the diurnal expression of the OsBBX genes using the data obtained from the Diurnal Project and qPCR analysis, and the results indicated that many of these genes had a diurnal expression pattern. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The combination of the genome-wide identification and the expression and diurnal analysis of the OsBBX gene family should facilitate additional functional studies of the Os

  16. Global gene expression in Escherichia coli biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schembri, Mark; Kjærgaard, K.; Klemm, Per

    2003-01-01

    in expression have no current defined function. These genes, as well as those induced by stresses relevant to biofilm growth such as oxygen and nutrient limitation, may be important factors that trigger enhanced resistance mechanisms of sessile communities to antibiotics and hydrodynamic shear forces.......It is now apparent that microorganisms undergo significant changes during the transition from planktonic to biofilm growth. These changes result in phenotypic adaptations that allow the formation of highly organized and structured sessile communities, which possess enhanced resistance...... to antimicrobial treatments and host immune defence responses. Escherichia coli has been used as a model organism to study the mechanisms of growth within adhered communities. In this study, we use DNA microarray technology to examine the global gene expression profile of E. coli during sessile growth compared...

  17. Aberrant Gene Expression in Acute Myeloid Leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Frederik Otzen

    model to investigate the role of telomerase in AML, we were able to translate the observed effect into human AML patients and identify specific genes involved, which also predict survival patterns in AML patients. During these studies we have applied methods for investigating differentially expressed......Summary Acute Myeloid Leukaemia (AML) is an aggressive cancer of the bone marrow, affecting formation of blood cells during haematopoiesis. This thesis presents investigation of AML using mRNA gene expression profiles (GEP) of samples extracted from the bone marrow of healthy and diseased subjects....... Here GEPs from purified healthy haematopoietic populations, with different levels of differentiation, form the basis for comparison with diseased samples. We present a mathematical transformation of mRNA microarray data to make it possible to compare AML samples, carrying expanded aberrant...

  18. Combinatorial engineering for heterologous gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwick, Friederike; Lale, Rahmi; Valla, Svein

    2013-01-01

    Tools for strain engineering with predictable outcome are of crucial importance for the nascent field of synthetic biology. The success of combining different DNA biological parts is often restricted by poorly understood factors deriving from the complexity of the systems. We have previously identified variants for different regulatory elements of the expression cassette XylS/Pm. When such elements are combined they act in a manner consistent with their individual behavior, as long as they affect different functions, such as transcription and translation. Interestingly, sequence context does not seem to influence the final outcome significantly. Expression of reporter gene bla could be increased up to 75 times at the protein level by combining three variants in one cassette. For other tested reporter genes similar results were obtained, except that the stimulatory effect was quantitatively less. Combination of individually characterized DNA parts thus stands as suitable method to achieve a desired phenotype.

  19. Evaluation of discoidin domain receptor-2 (DDR2) expression level in normal, benign, and malignant human prostate tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azemikhah, Mitra; Ashtiani, Hamidreza Ahmadi; Aghaei, Mahmoud; Rastegar, Hosein

    2015-01-01

    Discoidin domain receptor (DDR) is a new member of the receptor tyrosine kinase family. There are two isoforms of discoidin domain receptor (DDR), DDR1 and DDR2. These receptors play a major role in the adhesion, motility and cell proliferation. Due to the important role of DDR2 in the development of tumor extension, this receptor is pivotal in the field of carcinogenesis. The aim of this study was to investigate the mRNA and protein expression of DDR2, in the malignant, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and normal tissues of patients with prostate cancer. In this study the gene and protein expression of DDR2 in adjacent normal (n=40), BPH (n=40), and malignant (n=40) prostate tissue were measured using real-time PCR and Western blotting. Then, the correlation of DDR2 gene and protein expression with prognostic factors such as age, tumor grade, tumor stage, lymph node involvement, and serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration were evaluated. The relative mRNA and protein expression level of DDR2 in malignant and benign prostate tissue was significantly higher than those of adjacent normal tissues (PDDR2 mRNA and protein expression with prognostic factors such as tumor grade, stage, lymph node involvement, and serum PSA concentration. However, significant correlation with age was not observed. These findings suggest that DDR2 is a cancer-related gene associated with the aggressive progression of prostate cancer patients.

  20. Proteomic and gene expression patterns of keratoconus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkasubhra Ghosh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Keratoconus is a progressive corneal thinning disease associated with significant tissue remodeling activities and activation of a variety of signaling networks. However, it is not understood how differential gene and protein expression direct function in keratoconus corneas to drive the underlying pathology, ectasia. Research in the field has focused on discovering differentially expressed genes and proteins and quantifying their levels and activities in keratoconus patient samples. In this study, both microarray analysis of total ribonucleic acid (RNA and whole proteome analyses are carried out using corneal epithelium and tears from keratoconus patients and compared to healthy controls. A number of structural proteins, signaling molecules, cytokines, proteases, and enzymes have been found to be deregulated in keratoconus corneas. Together, the data provide clues to the complex process of corneal degradation which suggest novel ways to clinically diagnose and manage the disease. This review will focus on discussing these recent advances in the knowledge of keratoconus biology from a gene expression and function point-of-view.

  1. Chimeric Plant Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Gene with a Neural Visinin-Like Calcium-Binding Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Shameekumar; Takezawa, D.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1995-01-01

    Calcium, a universal second messenger, regulates diverse cellular processes in eukaryotes. Ca-2(+) and Ca-2(+)/calmodulin-regulated protein phosphorylation play a pivotal role in amplifying and diversifying the action of Ca-2(+)- mediated signals. A chimeric Ca-2(+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) gene with a visinin-like Ca-2(+)- binding domain was cloned and characterized from lily. The cDNA clone contains an open reading frame coding for a protein of 520 amino acids. The predicted structure of CCaMK contains a catalytic domain followed by two regulatory domains, a calmodulin-binding domain and a visinin-like Ca-2(+)-binding domain. The amino-terminal region of CCaMK contains all 11 conserved subdomains characteristic of serine/threonine protein kinases. The calmodulin-binding region of CCaMK has high homology (79%) to alpha subunit of mammalian Ca-2(+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase. The calmodulin-binding region is fused to a neural visinin-like domain that contains three Ca-2(+)-binding EF-hand motifs and a biotin-binding site. The Escherichia coli-expressed protein (approx. 56 kDa) binds calmodulin in a Ca-2(+)-dependent manner. Furthermore, Ca-45-binding assays revealed that CCaMK directly binds Ca-2(+). The CCaMK gene is preferentially expressed in developing anthers. Southern blot analysis revealed that CCaMK is encoded by a single gene. The structural features of the gene suggest that it has multiple regulatory controls and could play a unique role in Ca-2(+) signaling in plants.

  2. Analysis of gene expression in rabbit muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alena Gálová

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Increasing consumer knowledge of the link between diet and health has raised the demand for high quality food. Meat and meat products may be considered as irreplaceable in human nutrition. Breeding livestock to higher content of lean meat and the use of modern hybrids entails problems with the quality of meat. Analysing of livestock genomes could get us a great deal of important information, which may significantly affect the improvement process. Domestic animals are invaluable resources for study of the molecular architecture of complex traits. Although the mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTL responsible for economically important traits in domestic animals has achieved remarkable results in recent decades, not all of the genetic variation in the complex traits has been captured because of the low density of markers used in QTL mapping studies. The genome wide association study (GWAS, which utilizes high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP, provides a new way to tackle this issue. New technologies now allow producing microarrays containing thousands of hybridization probes on a single membrane or other solid support. We used microarray analysis to study gene expression in rabbit muscle during different developmental age stages. The outputs from GeneSpring GX sotware are presented in this work. After the evaluation of gene expression in rabbits, will be selected genes of interest in relation to meat quality parameters and will be further analyzed by the available methods of molecular biology and genetics.

  3. Isolation and characterization of the novel popeye gene family expressed in skeletal muscle and heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrée, B; Hillemann, T; Kessler-Icekson, G; Schmitt-John, T; Jockusch, H; Arnold, H H; Brand, T

    2000-07-15

    We identified a novel gene family in vertebrates which is preferentially expressed in developing and adult striated muscle. Three genes of the Popeye (POP) family were detected in human and mouse and two in chicken. Chromosomal mapping indicates that Pop1 and Pop3 genes are clustered on mouse chromosome 10, whereas Pop2 maps to mouse chromosome 16. We found evidence that POP1 and POP3 in chicken may also be linked and multiple transcript isoforms are generated from this locus. The POP genes encode proteins with three potential transmembrane domains that are conserved in all family members. Individual POP genes exhibit specific expression patterns during development and postnatally. Chicken POP3 and mouse Pop1 are first preferentially expressed in atrium and later also in the subepicardial compact layer of the ventricles. Chicken POP1 and mouse Pop2 are expressed in the entire heart except the outflow tract. All three Pop genes are expressed in heart and skeletal muscle of the adult mouse and lower in lung. Pop1 and Pop2 expression is upregulated in uterus of pregnant mice. Like the mouse genes, human POP genes are predominantly expressed in skeletal and cardiac muscle. The strong conservation of POP genes during evolution and their preferential expression in heart and skeletal muscle suggest that these novel proteins may have an important function in these tissues in vertebrates.

  4. Evolving expression patterns of the homeotic gene Scr in insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passalacqua, Karla D; Hrycaj, Steven; Mahfooz, Najmus; Popadic, Aleksandar

    2010-01-01

    While the mRNA expression patterns of homeotic genes have been examined in numerous arthropod species, data on their protein accumulation is extremely limited. To address this gap, we analyzed the protein expression pattern of the hox gene Sex combs reduced (Scr) in six hemimetabolous insects from four divergent orders (Thysanura, Orthoptera, Dictyoptera and Hemiptera). Our comparative analysis reveals that the original domain of SCR expression was likely confined to the head and then subsequently moved into the prothorax (T1) in winged insect lineages. The data also show a trend toward the posteriorization of the anterior boundary of SCR expression in the head, which starts in the mandibles (Thysanura) and then gradually shifts to the maxillary (Orthoptera) and labial segments (Dictyoptera and Hemiptera), respectively. In Thermobia (firebrat) and Oncopeltus (milkweed bug) we also identify instances where SCR protein is not detected in regions where mRNA is expressed. This finding suggests the presence of a post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism of Scr in these species. Finally, we show that SCR expression in insect T1 legs is highly variable and exhibits divergent patterning even among related species. In addition, signal in the prothoracic legs of more basal insect lineages cannot be associated with any T1 specific features, indicating that the acquisition of SCR in this region preceded any apparent gain of function. Overall, our results show that Scr expression has diverged considerably among hemimetabolous lineages and establish a framework for subsequent analyses to determine its role in the evolution of the insect head and prothorax.

  5. A LIM Domain Protein from Tobacco Involved in Actin-Bundling and Histone Gene Transcription

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Danièle Moes; Sabrina Gatti; Céline Hoffmann; Monika Dieterle; Flora Moreau; Katrin Neumann; Marc Schumacher

    2013-01-01

    The two LIM domain-containing proteins from plants (LIMs) typically exhibit a dual cytoplasmic-nuclear distribution,suggesting that,in addition to their previously described roles in actin cytoskeleton organization,they participate in nuclear processes.Using a south-western blot-based screen aimed at identifying factors that bind to plant histone gene promoters,we isolated a positive clone containing the tobacco LIM protein WLIM2 (NtWLIM2) cDNA.Using both green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion-and immunology-based strategies,we provide clear evidence that NtWLIM2 localizes to the actin cytoskeleton,the nucleus,and the nucleolus.Interestingly,the disruption of the actin cytoskeleton by latrunculin B significantly increases NtWLIM2 nuclear fraction,pinpointing a possible novel cytoskeletal-nuclear crosstalk.Biochemical and electron microscopy experiments reveal the ability of NtWLIM2 to directly bind to actin filaments and to crosslink the latter into thick actin bundles.Electrophoretic mobility shift assays show that NtWLIM2 specifically binds to the conserved octameric cis-elements (Oct) of the Arabidopsis histone H4A748 gene promoter and that this binding largely relies on both LIM domains.Importantly,reporter-based experiments conducted in Arabidopsis and tobacco protoplasts confirm the ability of NtWLIM2 to bind to and activate the H4A748 gene promoter in live cells.Expression studies indicate the constitutive presence of NtWLIM2 mRNA and NtWLIM2 protein during tobacco BY-2 cell proliferation and cell cycle progression,suggesting a role of NtWLIM2 in the activation of basal histone gene expression.Interestingly,both live cell and in vitro data support NtWLIM2 di/oligomerization.We propose that NtWLIM2 functions as an actin-stabilizing protein,which,upon cytoskeleton remodeling,shuttles to the nucleus in order to modify gene expression.

  6. Ankyrin repeat domain-encoding genes in the wPip strain of Wolbachia from the Culex pipiens group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parkhill Julian

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wolbachia are obligate endosymbiotic bacteria maternally transmitted through the egg cytoplasm that are responsible for several reproductive disorders in their insect hosts, such as cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI in infected mosquitoes. Species in the Culex pipiens complex display an unusually high number of Wolbachia-induced crossing types, and based on present data, only the wPip strain is present. Results The sequencing of the wPip strain of Wolbachia revealed the presence of 60 ankyrin repeat domain (ANK encoding genes and expression studies of these genes were carried out in adult mosquitoes. One of these ANK genes, pk2, is shown to be part of an operon of three prophage-associated genes with sex-specific expression, and is present in two identical copies in the genome. Another homolog of pk2 is also present that is differentially expressed in different Cx. pipiens group strains. A further two ANK genes showed sex-specific regulation in wPip-infected Cx. pipiens group adults. Conclusion The high number, variability and differential expression of ANK genes in wPip suggest an important role in Wolbachia biology, and the gene family provides both markers and promising candidates for the study of reproductive manipulation.

  7. Reduced expression of Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus ORF34, an essential gene, enhances heterologous gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salem, Tamer Z. [Department of Entomology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Department of Microbial Molecular Biology, AGERI, Agricultural Research Center, Giza 12619 (Egypt); Division of Biomedical Sciences, Zewail University, Zewail City of Science and Technology, Giza 12588 (Egypt); Zhang, Fengrui [Department of Entomology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Thiem, Suzanne M., E-mail: smthiem@msu.edu [Department of Entomology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

    2013-01-20

    Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus ORF34 is part of a transcriptional unit that includes ORF32, encoding a viral fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and ORF33. We identified ORF34 as a candidate for deletion to improve protein expression in the baculovirus expression system based on enhanced reporter gene expression in an RNAi screen of virus genes. However, ORF34 was shown to be an essential gene. To explore ORF34 function, deletion (KO34) and rescue bacmids were constructed and characterized. Infection did not spread from primary KO34 transfected cells and supernatants from KO34 transfected cells could not infect fresh Sf21 cells whereas the supernatant from the rescue bacmids transfection could recover the infection. In addition, budded viruses were not observed in KO34 transfected cells by electron microscopy, nor were viral proteins detected from the transfection supernatants by western blots. These demonstrate that ORF34 is an essential gene with a possible role in infectious virus production.

  8. Identification and characterization of a gene encoding a UBX domain-containing protein in the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria manilensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zheng-Bo; Xie, Yu; Si, Feng-Ling; Chen, Bin

    2013-08-01

    Ubiquitin regulatory X (UBX) domain-containing proteins are believed to function as cofactors for p97/CDC48, an adenosine triphosphatase shown to be involved in multiple cellular processes. In the present study, a full-length complementary DNA (cDNA) of UBX domain-containing gene, termed LmUBX1, was cloned from Locusta migratoria manilensis and characterized, using random amplification of cDNA ends polymerase chain reaction (RACE PCR), sequence analysis and quantitative real-time PCR. LmUBX1, 1 600 bp in length, is predicted to encode a 446-amino acid protein with a predicted molecular weight of 51.18 kDa that contains a central PUB domain and a carboxy-terminal UBX domain. Homology analysis revealed that LmUBX1 has higher similarity to the known UBX domain-containing proteins from insects than from other species. Moreover, based on sequence characteristics and phylogenetic relationships, it is suggested that LmUBX1 can be classified into the UBXD1 subfamily. Expression analysis founded that LmUBX1 exhibited significant expression variations at different developmental stages and in different tissues, suggesting that the expression of LmUBX1 was highly regulated. Interestingly, its messenger RNA transcript was more abundant in ovary and testis than in other tissues examined, suggesting that it may have more important roles in the reproductive system. In addition, LmUBX1 was differentially expressed in gregarious and solitary locusts and was significantly up-regulated in third and fifth instars of gregarious locusts, implying that LmUBX1 was also likely involved in the phase polyphenisms in L. migratoria manilensis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of cloning of a full-length cDNA of UBX domain-containing gene from L. migratoria manilensis.

  9. Expression of Intracellular Domain of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and Generation of Its Monoclonal Antibody

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Lin; Zhiduo Liu; Jianmin Jiang; Ziqing Jiang; Yongyong Ji; Bing Sun

    2004-01-01

    To prepare monoclonal antibody specific to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) intracellular domain, its gene was amplified from total RNA of A431 cell by RT-PCR. Then the gene was cloned into prokaryotic vector pET30a(+). The recombinant plasmid was transformed into E. Coli BL21 (DE3) strain for protein expression.Recombinant protein was induced with IPTG and purified using Ni2+-NTA agarose. Then the anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody (nAb) was prepared with classical hybridoma technique. Positive clones were selected using indirect enzyme-linked inmunoabsorbent assay (ELISA). Totally 4 hybridoma clones were obtained and these mAbs were IgG1 (3 clones) and IgG2a (1 clone), respectively. Their light chains were all kappa chains.Western blotting analysis and confocal immunofluorescence assays demonstrated that mAbs could specifically recognize EGFR expressing on A431 carcinoma cell line. The mAbs will be useful in the study of EGFR-mediated signal transduction.

  10. Expression of Intracellular Domain of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and Generation of Its Monoclonal Antibody

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YingLin; ZhiduoLiu; JianminJiang; ZiqingJiang; Yongyongji; BingSun

    2004-01-01

    To prepare monoclonal antibody specific to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) intracellular domain, its gene was amplified from total RNA of A431 cell by RT-PCR. Then the gene was cloned into prokaryotic vector pET30a(+). The recombinant plasmid was transformed into E. coli BL21 (DE3) strain for protein expression. Recombinant protein was induced with IPTG and purified using Nie2+-NTA agarose. Then the anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody (mAb) was prepared with classical hybridoma technique. Positive clones were selected using indirect enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay (ELISA). Totally 4 hybridoma clones were obtained and these mAbs were IgG1 (3 clones) and IgG2a (1 clone), respectively. Their light chains were all kappa chains. Western blotting analysis and confocal immunofluorescence assays demonstrated that mAbs could specifically recognize EGFR expressing on A431 carcinoma cell line. The mAbs will be useful in the study of EGFR-mediated signal transduction. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(2):137-141.

  11. Gene therapy with the caspase activation and recruitment domain reduces the ocular inflammatory response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ildefonso, Cristhian J; Jaime, Henrique; Biswal, Manas R; Boye, Shannon E; Li, Qiuhong; Hauswirth, William W; Lewin, Alfred S

    2015-05-01

    Inflammation is a key component of chronic and acute diseases of the eye. Our goal is to test anti-inflammatory genes delivered by an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector as potential treatments for retinal inflammation. We developed a secretable and cell penetrating form of the caspase activation and recruitment domain (CARD) from the apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD (ASC) gene that binds caspase-1 and inhibits its activation by the inflammasome. The secretion and cell penetration characteristics of this construct were validated in vitro by measuring its effects on inflammasome signaling in a monocyte cell line and in an retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) cell line. This vector was then packaged as AAV particles and tested in the endotoxin-induced uveitis mouse model. Gene expression was monitored one month after vector injection by fluorescence fundoscopy. Ocular inflammation was then induced by injecting lipopolysaccharide into the vitreous and was followed by enucleation 24 hours later. Eyes injected with the secretable and cell penetrating CARD AAV vector had both a significantly lower concentration of IL-1β as well as a 64% reduction in infiltrating cells detected in histological sections. These results suggest that anti-inflammatory genes such as the CARD could be used to treat recurring inflammatory diseases like uveitis or chronic subacute inflammations of the eye.

  12. Domain analyses of the Runx1 transcription factor responsible for modulating T-cell receptor-β/CD4 and interleukin-4/interferon-γ expression in CD4+ peripheral T lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchino, Ryuji

    2009-01-01

    The Runx1 transcription factor is one of the master regulators of T-lymphocyte differentiation. There have been several reports trying to assign a domain within the Runx1 protein that is responsible for gene expression in thymocytes. The Runx1 domains involved in regulating the expression of several genes in peripheral CD4+ T cells were analysed. It was observed that Runx1 over-expression enhanced the surface expression of CD4 and CD69 molecules via its activation domain and VWRPY domain, and decreased that of T-cell receptor-β via its activation domain. Runx1 over-expression enhanced interferon-γ expression via its activation and VWRPY domains, and abolished interleukin-4 expression through its activation domain. Transduction of Runx1 did not down-regulate CD4 expression until 72 hr of culture, but the repression of CD4 expression became evident after 96 hr. The main region responsible for repressing CD4 expression was the inhibitory domain of Runx1. Taken together, these results lead to a proposal that the regions in Runx1 responsible for modulating gene expression are distinct in thymocytes and in peripheral CD4+ T cells. PMID:19689732

  13. Screening of differentially expressed genes in pathological scar tissues using expression microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, L P; Mao, Z; Zhang, L; Liu, X X; Huang, C; Jia, Z S

    2015-09-09

    Pathological scar tissues and normal skin tissues were differentiated by screening for differentially expressed genes in pathologic scar tissues via gene expression microarray. The differentially expressed gene data was analyzed by gene ontology and pathway analyses. There were 5001 up- or down-regulated genes in 2-fold differentially expressed genes, 956 up- or down-regulated genes in 5-fold differentially expressed genes, and 114 up- or down-regulated genes in 20-fold differentially expressed genes. Therefore, significant differences were observed in the gene expression in pathological scar tissues and normal foreskin tissues. The development of pathological scar tissues has been correlated to changes in multiple genes and pathways, which are believed to form a dynamic network connection.

  14. APP intracellular domain derived from amyloidogenic β- and γ-secretase cleavage regulates neprilysin expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Marcus O W; Mett, Janine; Stahlmann, Christoph P; Grösgen, Sven; Haupenthal, Viola J; Blümel, Tamara; Hundsdörfer, Benjamin; Zimmer, Valerie C; Mylonas, Nadine T; Tanila, Heikki; Müller, Ulrike; Grimm, Heike S; Hartmann, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by an accumulation of Amyloid-β (Aβ), released by sequential proteolytic processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) by β - and γ-secretase. Aβ peptides can aggregate, leading to toxic Aβ oligomers and amyloid plaque formation. Aβ accumulation is not only dependent on de novo synthesis but also on Aβ degradation. Neprilysin (NEP) is one of the major enzymes involved in Aβ degradation. Here we investigate the molecular mechanism of NEP regulation, which is up to now controversially discussed to be affected by APP processing itself. We found that NEP expression is highly dependent on the APP intracellular domain (AICD), released by APP processing. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts devoid of APP processing, either by the lack of the catalytically active subunit of the γ-secretase complex [presenilin (PS) 1/2] or by the lack of APP and the APP-like protein 2 (APLP2), showed a decreased NEP expression, activity and protein level. Similar results were obtained by utilizing cells lacking a functional AICD domain (APPΔCT15) or expressing mutations in the genes encoding for PS1. AICD supplementation or retransfection with an AICD encoding plasmid could rescue the down-regulation of NEP further strengthening the link between AICD and transcriptional NEP regulation, in which Fe65 acts as an important adaptor protein. Especially AICD generated by the amyloidogenic pathway seems to be more involved in the regulation of NEP expression. In line, analysis of NEP gene expression in vivo in six transgenic AD mouse models (APP and APLP2 single knock-outs, APP/APLP2 double knock-out, APP-swedish, APP-swedish/PS1Δexon9, and APPΔCT15) confirmed the results obtained in cell culture. In summary, in the present study we clearly demonstrate an AICD-dependent regulation of the Aβ-degrading enzyme NEP in vitro and in vivo and elucidate the underlying mechanisms that might be beneficial to develop new therapeutic strategies for the

  15. Identification of common prognostic gene expression signatures with biological meanings from microarray gene expression datasets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Yao

    Full Text Available Numerous prognostic gene expression signatures for breast cancer were generated previously with few overlap and limited insight into the biology of the disease. Here we introduce a novel algorithm named SCoR (Survival analysis using Cox proportional hazard regression and Random resampling to apply random resampling and clustering methods in identifying gene features correlated with time to event data. This is shown to reduce overfitting noises involved in microarray data analysis and discover functional gene sets linked to patient survival. SCoR independently identified a common poor prognostic signature composed of cell proliferation genes from six out of eight breast cancer datasets. Furthermore, a sequential SCoR analysis on highly proliferative breast cancers repeatedly identified T/B cell markers as favorable prognosis factors. In glioblastoma, SCoR identified a common good prognostic signature of chromosome 10 genes from two gene expression datasets (TCGA and REMBRANDT, recapitulating the fact that loss of one copy of chromosome 10 (which harbors the tumor suppressor PTEN is linked to poor survival in glioblastoma patients. SCoR also identified prognostic genes on sex chromosomes in lung adenocarcinomas, suggesting patient gender might be used to predict outcome in this disease. These results demonstrate the power of SCoR to identify common and biologically meaningful prognostic gene expression signatures.

  16. Identification of common prognostic gene expression signatures with biological meanings from microarray gene expression datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jun; Zhao, Qi; Yuan, Ying; Zhang, Li; Liu, Xiaoming; Yung, W K Alfred; Weinstein, John N

    2012-01-01

    Numerous prognostic gene expression signatures for breast cancer were generated previously with few overlap and limited insight into the biology of the disease. Here we introduce a novel algorithm named SCoR (Survival analysis using Cox proportional hazard regression and Random resampling) to apply random resampling and clustering methods in identifying gene features correlated with time to event data. This is shown to reduce overfitting noises involved in microarray data analysis and discover functional gene sets linked to patient survival. SCoR independently identified a common poor prognostic signature composed of cell proliferation genes from six out of eight breast cancer datasets. Furthermore, a sequential SCoR analysis on highly proliferative breast cancers repeatedly identified T/B cell markers as favorable prognosis factors. In glioblastoma, SCoR identified a common good prognostic signature of chromosome 10 genes from two gene expression datasets (TCGA and REMBRANDT), recapitulating the fact that loss of one copy of chromosome 10 (which harbors the tumor suppressor PTEN) is linked to poor survival in glioblastoma patients. SCoR also identified prognostic genes on sex chromosomes in lung adenocarcinomas, suggesting patient gender might be used to predict outcome in this disease. These results demonstrate the power of SCoR to identify common and biologically meaningful prognostic gene expression signatures.

  17. Gravity-Induced Gene Expression in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sederoff, Heike; Heber, Steffen; Howard, Brian; Myburg-Nichols, Henrietta; Hammond, Rebecca; Salinas-Mondragon, Raul; Brown, Christopher S.

    Plants sense changes in their orientation towards the vector of gravity and respond with directional growth. Several metabolites in the signal transduction cascade have been identified. However, very little is known about the interaction between these sensing and signal transduction events and even less is known about their role in the differential growth response. Gravity induced changes in transcript abundance have been identified in Arabidopsis whole seedlings and root apices (Moseyko et al. 2002; Kimbrough et al. 2004). Gravity induced transcript abundance changes can be observed within less than 1 min after stimulation (Salinas-Mondragon et al. 2005). Gene expression however requires not only transcription but also translation of the mRNA. Translation can only occur when mRNA is associated with ribosomes, even though not all mRNA associated with ribosomes is actively translated. To approximate translational capacity we quantified whole genome transcript abundances in corn stem pulvini during the first hour after gravity stimulation in total and poly-ribosomal fractions. As in Arabidopsis root apices, transcript abundances of several clusters of genes responded to gravity stimulation. The vast majority of these transcripts were also found to associate with polyribosomes in the same temporal and quantitative pattern. These genes are transcriptionally regulated by gravity stimulation, but do not exhibit translational regulation. However, a small group of genes showed increased transcriptional regulation after gravity stimulation, but no association with polysomes. These transcripts likely are translationally repressed. The mechanism of translational repression for these transcripts is unknown. Based on the hypothesis that the genes essential for gravitropic responses should be expressed in most or all species, we compared the temporal gravity induced expression pattern of all orthologs identified between maize and Arabidopsis. A small group of genes showed high

  18. Gene expression regulators--MicroRNAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Fang; YIN Q. James

    2005-01-01

    A large class of non-coding RNAs found in small molecule RNAs are closely associated with the regulation of gene expression, which are called microRNA (miRNA). MiRNAs are coded in intergenic or intronic regions and can be formed into foldback hairpin RNAs. These transcripts are cleaved by Dicer, generating mature miRNAs that can silence their target genes in different modes of action. Now, research on small molecule RNAs has gotten breakthrough advance in biology. To discover miRNA genes and their target genes has become hot topics in RNA research. This review attempts to look back the history of miRNA discovery, to introduce the methods of screening miRNAs, to localize miRNA loci in genome, to seek miRNA target genes and the biological function, and to discuss the working mechanisms of miRNAs. Finally, we will discuss the potential important roles of miRNAs in modulating the genesis, development, growth, and differentiation of organisms. Thus, it can be predicted that a complete understanding of miRNA functions will bring us some new concepts, approaches and strategies for the study of living beings.

  19. Cholinergic regulation of VIP gene expression in human neuroblastoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Bo; Georg, Birgitte; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    1997-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, muscarinic receptor, neuroblastoma cell, mRNA, gene expression, peptide processing......Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, muscarinic receptor, neuroblastoma cell, mRNA, gene expression, peptide processing...

  20. Gene Expression Profiling of Xeroderma Pigmentosum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowden Nikola A

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP is a rare recessive disorder that is characterized by extreme sensitivity to UV light. UV light exposure results in the formation of DNA damage such as cyclobutane dimers and (6-4 photoproducts. Nucleotide excision repair (NER orchestrates the removal of cyclobutane dimers and (6-4 photoproducts as well as some forms of bulky chemical DNA adducts. The disease XP is comprised of 7 complementation groups (XP-A to XP-G, which represent functional deficiencies in seven different genes, all of which are believed to be involved in NER. The main clinical feature of XP is various forms of skin cancers; however, neurological degeneration is present in XPA, XPB, XPD and XPG complementation groups. The relationship between NER and other types of DNA repair processes is now becoming evident but the exact relationships between the different complementation groups remains to be precisely determined. Using gene expression analysis we have identified similarities and differences after UV light exposure between the complementation groups XP-A, XP-C, XP-D, XP-E, XP-F, XP-G and an unaffected control. The results reveal that there is a graded change in gene expression patterns between the mildest, most similar to the control response (XP-E and the severest form (XP-A of the disease, with the exception of XP-D. Distinct differences between the complementation groups with neurological symptoms (XP-A, XP-D and XP-G and without (XP-C, XP-E and XP-F were also identified. Therefore, this analysis has revealed distinct gene expression profiles for the XP complementation groups and the first step towards understanding the neurological symptoms of XP.

  1. X chromosome regulation of autosomal gene expression in bovine blastocysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Yuichiro; Arnold, Arthur P.

    2014-01-01

    Although X chromosome inactivation in female mammals evolved to balance the expression of X chromosome and autosomal genes in the two sexes, female embryos pass through developmental stages in which both X chromosomes are active in somatic cells. Bovine blastocysts show higher expression of many X genes in XX than XY embryos, suggesting that X inactivation is not complete. Here we reanalyzed bovine blastocyst microarray expression data from a network perspective with a focus on interactions between X chromosome and autosomal genes. Whereas male to female ratios of expression of autosomal genes were distributed around a mean of 1, X chromosome genes were clearly shifted towards higher expression in females. We generated gene coexpression networks and identified a major module of genes with correlated gene expression that includes female-biased X genes and sexually dimorphic autosomal genes for which the sexual dimorphism is likely driven by the X genes. In this module, expression of X chromosome genes correlates with autosome genes, more than the expression of autosomal genes with each other. Our study identifies correlated patterns of autosomal and X-linked genes that are likely influenced by the sexual imbalance of X gene expression when X inactivation is inefficient. PMID:24817096

  2. A spectrum of genes expressed during early stages of rice panicle and flower development

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kumuda M. Kushalappa; Autar K. Mattoo; Usha Vijayraghavan

    2000-08-01

    To unravel gene expression patterns during rice inflorescence development, particularly at early stages of panicle and floral organ specification, we have characterized random cloned cDNAs from developmental-stage-specific libraries. cDNA libraries were constructed from rice panicles at the stage of branching and flower primordia specification or from panicles undergoing floral organogenesis. Partial sequence analysis and expression patterns of some of these random cDNA clones from these two rice panicle libraries are presented. Sequence comparisons with known DNA sequences in databases reveal that approximately sixtyeight per cent of these expressed rice genes show varying degrees of similarity to genes in other species with assigned functions. In contrast, thirtytwo per cent represent uncharacterized genes. cDNAs reported here code for potential rice homologues of housekeeping molecules, regulators of gene expression, and signal transduction molecules. They comprise both single-copy and multicopy genes, and genes expressed differentially, both spatially and temporally, during rice plant development. New rice cDNAs requiring specific mention are those with similarity to COP1, a regulator of photomorphogenesis in Arabidopsis; sequence-specific DNA binding plant proteins like AP2-domain-containing factors; genes that specify positional information in shoot meristems like leucine-rich-repeat-containing receptor kinases; regulators of chromatin structure like Polycomb domain protein; and also proteins induced by abiotic stresses.

  3. Cloning and characterization of mr-s, a novel SAM domain protein, predominantly expressed in retinal photoreceptor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koike Chieko

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sterile alpha motif (SAM domains are ~70 residues long and have been reported as common protein-protein interaction modules. This domain is found in a large number of proteins, including Polycomb group (PcG proteins and ETS family transcription factors. In this work, we report the cloning and functional characterization of a novel SAM domain-containing protein, which is predominantly expressed in retinal photoreceptors and the pineal gland and is designated mouse mr-s (major retinal SAM domain protein. Results mr-s is evolutionarily conserved from zebrafish through human, organisms through which the mechanism of photoreceptor development is also highly conserved. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that the SAM domain of mr-s is most closely related to a mouse polyhomeotic (ph ortholog, Mph1/Rae28, which is known as an epigenetic molecule involved in chromatin modifications. These findings provide the possibility that mr-s may play a critical role by regulating gene expression in photoreceptor development. mr-s is preferentially expressed in the photoreceptors at postnatal day 3–6 (P3-6, when photoreceptors undergo terminal differentiation, and in the adult pineal gland. Transcription of mr-s is directly regulated by the cone-rod homeodomain protein Crx. Immunoprecipitation assay showed that the mr-s protein self-associates mainly through the SAM domain-containing region as well as ph. The mr-s protein localizes mainly in the nucleus, when mr-s is overexpressed in HEK293T cells. Moreover, in the luciferase assays, we found that mr-s protein fused to GAL4 DNA-binding domain functions as a transcriptional repressor. We revealed that the repression activity of mr-s is not due to a homophilic interaction through its SAM domain but to the C-terminal region. Conclusion We identified a novel gene, mr-s, which is predominantly expressed in retinal photoreceptors and pineal gland. Based on its expression pattern and biochemical analysis

  4. Over-expression of JcDREB, a putative AP2/EREBP domain-containing transcription factor gene in woody biodiesel plant Jatropha curcas, enhances salt and freezing tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Mingjuan; Liu, Xiaofei; Deng, Huaping; Shen, Shihua

    2011-12-01

    Jatropha curcas L. is an all-purpose biodiesel plant and is widely distributed in tropical and subtropical climates. It can grow well on poor quality soil which is not qualified for crop cultivation. This is very important for relieving land, food and energy crises. However, tropical and subtropical distribution limits the production of J. curcas seed. So it is valuable to know the molecular mechanism of J. curcas response to adverse abiotic environmental factors, especially freezing stress, in order to change the plant's characteristics. Until now there are just a few reports about J. curcas molecular biology. In this paper, we cloned and characterized a DNA binding protein from this plant, designated as JcDREB. Sequence analysis and yeast one-hybrid assays show that JcDREB can effectively function as a transcription factor of DREB protein family belonging to A-6 subgroup member. Expression patterns of JcDREB showed that it was induced by cold, salt and drought stresses, not by ABA. Over-expression of JcDREB in transgenic Arabidopsis exhibited enhanced salt and freezing stresses. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of J. curcas responses to environmental stresses, for example, high salinity, drought and low temperature, is crucial for improving their stress tolerance and productivity. This work provides more information about A-6 subgroup members of DREB subfamily.

  5. Mice mutant in the DM domain gene Dmrt4 are viable and fertile but have polyovular follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balciuniene, Jorune; Bardwell, Vivian J; Zarkower, David

    2006-12-01

    Proteins containing the DM domain, a zinc finger-like DNA binding motif, have been implicated in sexual differentiation in diverse metazoan organisms. Of seven mammalian DM domain genes, only Dmrt1 and Dmrt2 have been functionally analyzed. Here, we report expression analysis and targeted disruption of Dmrt4 (also called DmrtA1) in the mouse. Dmrt4 is widely expressed during embryonic and postnatal development. However, we find that mice homozygous for a putative null mutation in Dmrt4 develop essentially normally, undergo full sexual differentiation in both sexes, and are fertile. We observed two potential mutant phenotypes in Dmrt4 mutant mice. First, ovaries of most mutant females have polyovular follicles, suggesting a role in folliculogenesis. Second, 25% of mutant males consistently exhibited copulatory behavior toward other males. We also tested potential redundancy between Dmrt4 and two other gonadally expressed DM domain genes, Dmrt1 and Dmrt7. We observed no enhancement of gonadal phenotypes in the double mutants, suggesting that these genes function independently in gonadal development.

  6. Hybrid tetanus toxin C fragment-diphtheria toxin translocation domain allows specific gene transfer into PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barati, Shahram; Chegini, Fariba; Hurtado, Plinio; Rush, Robert A

    2002-09-01

    To study the mechanism by which genes can efficiently be transferred into specific cell types, we have constructed several novel, single-chain multicomponent proteins by recombining the nontoxic C fragment of tetanus toxin and the translocation domain of diphtheria toxin together with the DNA-binding fragment of GAL4 transcription factor, for transportation of plasmid DNA into neuronal cells. The C fragment of tetanus toxin provided neuronal selectivity, the translocation domain of diphtheria toxin permitted endosomal escape, and the GAL4 domain provided binding to DNA. To assess the cellular tasks of each component in gene transfer, different combinations of these fragments were produced by polymerase chain reaction, expressed in Escherichia coli, and purified under native conditions from the soluble proteins. We show that only fusion proteins bearing the C fragment of tetanus toxin bind to gangliosides and, followed by their specific binding to differentiated PC12 cells, are internalized within 10 min. These proteins delivered the green fluorescence protein gene to PC12 cells, with the highest transfection efficiency achieved with proteins containing both the C fragment and the translocation domain. Addition of chloroquine elevated the transfection efficiency, which was further increased by incorporation of a nuclear localization signal in the delivery system. In addition, the effect of different DNA-condensing materials (poly-L-lysine, protamine, lysine(n=8)-trytophan(n=2)-lysine(n=8)) on gene transfer was investigated.

  7. Assembly of Two Transgenes in an Artificial Chromatin Domain Gives Highly Coordinated Expression in Tobacco

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    The chromatin loop model predicts that genes within the same chromatin domain exhibit coordinated regulation. We here present the first direct experimental support for this model in plants. Two reporter genes, the E. coli beta-glucuronidase gene and the firefly luciferase gene, driven by different promoters, were placed between copies of the chicken lysozyme A element, a member of the matrix-associated region (MAR) group of chromatin boundary elements, and introduced in tobacco (Nicotiana tab...

  8. Molecular phylogeny of OVOL genes illustrates a conserved C2H2 zinc finger domain coupled by hypervariable unstructured regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Kumar

    Full Text Available OVO-like proteins (OVOL are members of the zinc finger protein family and serve as transcription factors to regulate gene expression in various differentiation processes. Recent studies have shown that OVOL genes are involved in epithelial development and differentiation in a wide variety of organisms; yet there is a lack of comprehensive studies that describe OVOL proteins from an evolutionary perspective. Using comparative genomic analysis, we traced three different OVOL genes (OVOL1-3 in vertebrates. One gene, OVOL3, was duplicated during a whole-genome-duplication event in fish, but only the copy (OVOL3b was retained. From early-branching metazoa to humans, we found that a core domain, comprising a tetrad of C2H2 zinc fingers, is conserved. By domain comparison of the OVOL proteins, we found that they evolved in different metazoan lineages by attaching intrinsically-disordered (ID segments of N/C-terminal extensions of 100 to 1000 amino acids to this conserved core. These ID regions originated independently across different animal lineages giving rise to different types of OVOL genes over the course of metazoan evolution. We illustrated the molecular evolution of metazoan OVOL genes over a period of 700 million years (MY. This study both extends our current understanding of the structure/function relationship of metazoan OVOL genes, and assembles a good platform for further characterization of OVOL genes from diverged organisms.

  9. Gene Expression Omnibus: NCBI gene expression and hybridization array data repository.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar, Ron; Domrachev, Michael; Lash, Alex E

    2002-01-01

    The Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) project was initiated in response to the growing demand for a public repository for high-throughput gene expression data. GEO provides a flexible and open design that facilitates submission, storage and retrieval of heterogeneous data sets from high-throughput gene expression and genomic hybridization experiments. GEO is not intended to replace in house gene expression databases that benefit from coherent data sets, and which are constructed to facilitate a particular analytic method, but rather complement these by acting as a tertiary, central data distribution hub. The three central data entities of GEO are platforms, samples and series, and were designed with gene expression and genomic hybridization experiments in mind. A platform is, essentially, a list of probes that define what set of molecules may be detected. A sample describes the set of molecules that are being probed and references a single platform used to generate its molecular abundance data. A series organizes samples into the meaningful data sets which make up an experiment. The GEO repository is publicly accessible through the World Wide Web at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo.

  10. Expression, purification and identification of LBD domain of human PPARδ in E. coli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Hua; Li Changqing; Ling Baodong; Zhou Qinxin

    2009-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors known to play a pivotal role in regulations of metabolism. In order to yield soluble ligand binding domain of PPARδ (PPARδLBD) for screening ligands, the cDNA was amplified using total RNA from HepG2 cells by RT-PCR. Then the enzyme-digested product was inserted downstream of the malE gene in the vector pMAL-p2x, which encoded maltose-binding protein (MBP), resulting in the expression of an MBP-PPARδLBD fusion protein. The recombinant plasmid was transformed into E. coli TB1 that was cultured shakily at 30 ℃, 200 r/min and induced by 0.4 mmol/L IPTG for 6 h. The cells were harvested by centrifugation and broken by sonication. The expressed fusion protein was soluble and accounted for 0.31 of the total protein in the supernatant. Western blot analysis showed that the expressed MBP-PPARδLBD could bind to anti-MBP-antibody. The MBP-PPARδLBD fusion protein of 77 kDa and the PPARδLBD protein of 34 kDa were obtained by amylose-resin affinity chromatography without or with digestion of Factor Xa.They were both homogeneity, judged by SDS-PAGE. The recombinant MBP-PPARδLBD and PPARδLBD protein with high purity is obtained, which provides the necessary material for screening and researching PPARδ ligands.

  11. Gene expression in developing watermelon fruit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wechter, W Patrick; Levi, Amnon; Harris, Karen R; Davis, Angela R; Fei, Zhangjun; Katzir, Nurit; Giovannoni, James J; Salman-Minkov, Ayelet; Hernandez, Alvaro; Thimmapuram, Jyothi; Tadmor, Yaakov; Portnoy, Vitaly; Trebitsh, Tova

    2008-01-01

    Background Cultivated watermelon form large fruits that are highly variable in size, shape, color, and content, yet have extremely narrow genetic diversity. Whereas a plethora of genes involved in cell wall metabolism, ethylene biosynthesis, fruit softening, and secondary metabolism during fruit development and ripening have been identified in other plant species, little is known of the genes involved in these processes in watermelon. A microarray and quantitative Real-Time PCR-based study was conducted in watermelon [Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. & Nakai var. lanatus] in order to elucidate the flow of events associated with fruit development and ripening in this species. RNA from three different maturation stages of watermelon fruits, as well as leaf, were collected from field grown plants during three consecutive years, and analyzed for gene expression using high-density photolithography microarrays and quantitative PCR. Results High-density photolithography arrays, composed of probes of 832 EST-unigenes from a subtracted, fruit development, cDNA library of watermelon were utilized to examine gene expression at three distinct time-points in watermelon fruit development. Analysis was performed with field-grown fruits over three consecutive growing seasons. Microarray analysis identified three hundred and thirty-five unique ESTs that are differentially regulated by at least two-fold in watermelon fruits during the early, ripening, or mature stage when compared to leaf. Of the 335 ESTs identified, 211 share significant homology with known gene products and 96 had no significant matches with any database accession. Of the modulated watermelon ESTs related to annotated genes, a significant number were found to be associated with or involved in the vascular system, carotenoid biosynthesis, transcriptional regulation, pathogen and stress response, and ethylene biosynthesis. Ethylene bioassays, performed with a closely related watermelon genotype with a similar

  12. Gene expression in developing watermelon fruit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernandez Alvaro

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cultivated watermelon form large fruits that are highly variable in size, shape, color, and content, yet have extremely narrow genetic diversity. Whereas a plethora of genes involved in cell wall metabolism, ethylene biosynthesis, fruit softening, and secondary metabolism during fruit development and ripening have been identified in other plant species, little is known of the genes involved in these processes in watermelon. A microarray and quantitative Real-Time PCR-based study was conducted in watermelon [Citrullus lanatus (Thunb. Matsum. & Nakai var. lanatus] in order to elucidate the flow of events associated with fruit development and ripening in this species. RNA from three different maturation stages of watermelon fruits, as well as leaf, were collected from field grown plants during three consecutive years, and analyzed for gene expression using high-density photolithography microarrays and quantitative PCR. Results High-density photolithography arrays, composed of probes of 832 EST-unigenes from a subtracted, fruit development, cDNA library of watermelon were utilized to examine gene expression at three distinct time-points in watermelon fruit development. Analysis was performed with field-grown fruits over three consecutive growing seasons. Microarray analysis identified three hundred and thirty-five unique ESTs that are differentially regulated by at least two-fold in watermelon fruits during the early, ripening, or mature stage when compared to leaf. Of the 335 ESTs identified, 211 share significant homology with known gene products and 96 had no significant matches with any database accession. Of the modulated watermelon ESTs related to annotated genes, a significant number were found to be associated with or involved in the vascular system, carotenoid biosynthesis, transcriptional regulation, pathogen and stress response, and ethylene biosynthesis. Ethylene bioassays, performed with a closely related watermelon

  13. Gene Expression Profile Changes in Germinating Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dongli He; Chao Han; Pingfang Yang

    2011-01-01

    Water absorption is a prerequisite for seed germination.During imbibition,water influx causes the resumption of many physiological and metabolic processes in growing seed.In order to obtain more complete knowledge about the mechanism of seed germination,two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was applied to investigate the protein profile changes of rice seed during the first 48 h of imbibition.Thirtynine differentially expressed proteins were identified,including 19 down-regulated and 20 up-regulated proteins.Storage proteins and some seed development- and desiccation-associated proteins were down regulated.The changed patterns of these proteins indicated extensive mobilization of seed reserves.By contrast,catabolism-associated proteins were up regulated upon imbibition.Semi-quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that most of the genes encoding the down- or upregulated proteins were also down or up regulated at mRNA level.The expression of these genes was largely consistent at mRNA and protein levels.In providing additional information concerning gene regulation in early plant life,this study will facilitate understanding of the molecular mechanisms of seed germination.

  14. Regulation of endogenous human gene expression by ligand-inducible TALE transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Andrew C; Gaj, Thomas; Sirk, Shannon J; Lamb, Brian M; Barbas, Carlos F

    2014-10-17

    The construction of increasingly sophisticated synthetic biological circuits is dependent on the development of extensible tools capable of providing specific control of gene expression in eukaryotic cells. Here, we describe a new class of synthetic transcription factors that activate gene expression in response to extracellular chemical stimuli. These inducible activators consist of customizable transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins combined with steroid hormone receptor ligand-binding domains. We demonstrate that these ligand-responsive TALE transcription factors allow for tunable and conditional control of gene activation and can be used to regulate the expression of endogenous genes in human cells. Since TALEs can be designed to recognize any contiguous DNA sequence, the conditional gene regulatory system described herein will enable the design of advanced synthetic gene networks.

  15. Studying the Complex Expression Dependences between Sets of Coexpressed Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Huerta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Organisms simplify the orchestration of gene expression by coregulating genes whose products function together in the cell. The use of clustering methods to obtain sets of coexpressed genes from expression arrays is very common; nevertheless there are no appropriate tools to study the expression networks among these sets of coexpressed genes. The aim of the developed tools is to allow studying the complex expression dependences that exist between sets of coexpressed genes. For this purpose, we start detecting the nonlinear expression relationships between pairs of genes, plus the coexpressed genes. Next, we form networks among sets of coexpressed genes that maintain nonlinear expression dependences between all of them. The expression relationship between the sets of coexpressed genes is defined by the expression relationship between the skeletons of these sets, where this skeleton represents the coexpressed genes with a well-defined nonlinear expression relationship with the skeleton of the other sets. As a result, we can study the nonlinear expression relationships between a target gene and other sets of coexpressed genes, or start the study from the skeleton of the sets, to study the complex relationships of activation and deactivation between the sets of coexpressed genes that carry out the different cellular processes present in the expression experiments.

  16. Nuclear AXIN2 represses MYC gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rennoll, Sherri A.; Konsavage, Wesley M.; Yochum, Gregory S., E-mail: gsy3@psu.edu

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •AXIN2 localizes to cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments in colorectal cancer cells. •Nuclear AXIN2 represses the activity of Wnt-responsive luciferase reporters. •β-Catenin bridges AXIN2 to TCF transcription factors. •AXIN2 binds the MYC promoter and represses MYC gene expression. -- Abstract: The β-catenin transcriptional coactivator is the key mediator of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. In the absence of Wnt, β-catenin associates with a cytosolic and multi-protein destruction complex where it is phosphorylated and targeted for proteasomal degradation. In the presence of Wnt, the destruction complex is inactivated and β-catenin translocates into the nucleus. In the nucleus, β-catenin binds T-cell factor (TCF) transcription factors to activate expression of c-MYC (MYC) and Axis inhibition protein 2 (AXIN2). AXIN2 is a member of the destruction complex and, thus, serves in a negative feedback loop to control Wnt/β-catenin signaling. AXIN2 is also present in the nucleus, but its function within this compartment is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that AXIN2 localizes to the nuclei of epithelial cells within normal and colonic tumor tissues as well as colorectal cancer cell lines. In the nucleus, AXIN2 represses expression of Wnt/β-catenin-responsive luciferase reporters and forms a complex with β-catenin and TCF. We demonstrate that AXIN2 co-occupies β-catenin/TCF complexes at the MYC promoter region. When constitutively localized to the nucleus, AXIN2 alters the chromatin structure at the MYC promoter and directly represses MYC gene expression. These findings suggest that nuclear AXIN2 functions as a rheostat to control MYC expression in response to Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

  17. Genes and evolution of two-domain toxins from lynx spider venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachkova, Maria Y; Slavokhotova, Anna A; Grishin, Eugene V; Vassilevski, Alexander A

    2014-03-01

    Spiderines are comparatively long polypeptide toxins (∼110 residues) from lynx spiders (genus Oxyopes). They are built of an N-terminal linear cationic domain (∼40 residues) and a C-terminal knottin domain (∼60 residues). The linear domain empowers spiderines with strong cytolytic activity. In the present work we report 16 novel spiderine sequences from Oxyopes takobius and Oxyopes lineatus classified into two subfamilies. Strikingly, negative selection acts on both linear and knottin domains. Genes encoding Oxyopes two-domain toxins were sequenced and found to be intronless. We further discuss a possible scenario of lynx spider modular toxin evolution.

  18. In silico evolution of the hunchback gene indicates redundancy in cis-regulatory organization and spatial gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagrijchuk, Elizaveta A; Sabirov, Marat A; Holloway, David M; Spirov, Alexander V

    2014-04-01

    Biological development depends on the coordinated expression of genes in time and space. Developmental genes have extensive cis-regulatory regions which control their expression. These regions are organized in a modular manner, with different modules controlling expression at different times and locations. Both how modularity evolved and what function it serves are open questions. We present a computational model for the cis-regulation of the hunchback (hb) gene in the fruit fly (Drosophila). We simulate evolution (using an evolutionary computation approach from computer science) to find the optimal cis-regulatory arrangements for fitting experimental hb expression patterns. We find that the cis-regulatory region tends to readily evolve modularity. These cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) do not tend to control single spatial domains, but show a multi-CRM/multi-domain correspondence. We find that the CRM-domain correspondence seen in Drosophila evolves with a high probability in our model, supporting the biological relevance of the approach. The partial redundancy resulting from multi-CRM control may confer some biological robustness against corruption of regulatory sequences. The technique developed on hb could readily be applied to other multi-CRM developmental genes.

  19. In silico evolution of the hunchback gene indicates redundancy in cis-regulatory organization and spatial gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagrijchuk, Elizaveta A.; Sabirov, Marat A.; Holloway, David M.; Spirov, Alexander V.

    2014-01-01

    Biological development depends on the coordinated expression of genes in time and space. Developmental genes have extensive cis-regulatory regions which control their expression. These regions are organized in a modular manner, with different modules controlling expression at different times and locations. Both how modularity evolved and what function it serves are open questions. We present a computational model for the cis-regulation of the hunchback (hb) gene in the fruit fly (Drosophila). We simulate evolution (using an evolutionary computation approach from computer science) to find the optimal cis-regulatory arrangements for fitting experimental hb expression patterns. We find that the cis-regulatory region tends to readily evolve modularity. These cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) do not tend to control single spatial domains, but show a multi-CRM/multi-domain correspondence. We find that the CRM-domain correspondence seen in Drosophila evolves with a high probability in our model, supporting the biological relevance of the approach. The partial redundancy resulting from multi-CRM control may confer some biological robustness against corruption of regulatory sequences. The technique developed on hb could readily be applied to other multi-CRM developmental genes. PMID:24712536

  20. The relationship among gene expression, the evolution of gene dosage, and the rate of protein evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-François Gout

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The understanding of selective constraints affecting genes is a major issue in biology. It is well established that gene expression level is a major determinant of the rate of protein evolution, but the reasons for this relationship remain highly debated. Here we demonstrate that gene expression is also a major determinant of the evolution of gene dosage: the rate of gene losses after whole genome duplications in the Paramecium lineage is negatively correlated to the level of gene expression, and this relationship is not a byproduct of other factors known to affect the fate of gene duplicates. This indicates that changes in gene dosage are generally more deleterious for highly expressed genes. This rule also holds for other taxa: in yeast, we find a clear relationship between gene expression level and the fitness impact of reduction in gene dosage. To explain these observations, we propose a model based on the fact that the optimal expression level of a gene corresponds to a trade-off between the benefit and cost of its expression. This COSTEX model predicts that selective pressure against mutations changing gene expression level or affecting the encoded protein should on average be stronger in highly expressed genes and hence that both the frequency of gene loss and the rate of protein evolution should correlate negatively with gene expression. Thus, the COSTEX model provides a simple and common explanation for the general relationship observed between the level of gene expression and the different facets of gene evolution.

  1. Systematic expression analysis of Hox genes at adulthood reveals novel patterns in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutlet, Bertrand; Theys, Nicolas; Coste, Cécile; Ahn, Marie-Thérèse; Doshishti-Agolli, Konstantin; Lizen, Benoît; Gofflot, Françoise

    2016-04-01

    Hox proteins are key regulators of animal development, providing positional identity and patterning information to cells along the rostrocaudal axis of the embryo. Although their embryonic expression and function are well characterized, their presence and biological importance in adulthood remains poorly investigated. We provide here the first detailed quantitative and neuroanatomical characterization of the expression of the 39 Hox genes in the adult mouse brain. Using RT-qPCR we determined the expression of 24 Hox genes mainly in the brainstem of the adult brain, with low expression of a few genes in the cerebellum and the forebrain. Using in situ hybridization (ISH) we have demonstrated that expression of Hox genes is maintained in territories derived from the early segmental Hox expression domains in the hindbrain. Indeed, we show that expression of genes belonging to paralogy groups PG2-8 is maintained in the hindbrain derivatives at adulthood. The spatial colinearity, which characterizes the early embryonic expression of Hox genes, is still observed in sequential antero-posterior boundaries of expression. Moreover, the main mossy and climbing fibres precerebellar nuclei express PG2-8 Hox genes according to their migration origins. Second, ISH confirms the presence of Hox gene transcripts in territories where they are not detected during development, suggesting neo-expression in these territories in adulthood. Within the forebrain, we have mapped Hoxb1, Hoxb3, Hoxb4, Hoxd3 and Hoxa5 expression in restricted areas of the sensory cerebral cortices as well as in specific thalamic relay nuclei. Our data thus suggest a requirement of Hox genes beyond their role of patterning genes, providing a new dimension to their functional relevance in the central nervous system.

  2. Comparative genomic analysis of SET domain family reveals the origin, expansion, and putative function of the arthropod-specific SmydA genes as histone modifiers in insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Feng; Liu, Qing; Wang, Yanli; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Huimin; Song, Tianqi; Yang, Meiling

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The SET domain is an evolutionarily conserved motif present in histone lysine methyltransferases, which are important in the regulation of chromatin and gene expression in animals. In this study, we searched for SET domain–containing genes (SET genes) in all of the 147 arthropod genomes sequenced at the time of carrying out this experiment to understand the evolutionary history by which SET domains have evolved in insects. Phylogenetic and ancestral state reconstruction analysis revealed an arthropod-specific SET gene family, named SmydA, that is ancestral to arthropod animals and specifically diversified during insect evolution. Considering that pseudogenization is the most probable fate of the new emerging gene copies, we provided experimental and evolutionary evidence to demonstrate their essential functions. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis and in vitro methyltransferase activity assays showed that the SmydA-2 gene was transcriptionally active and retained the original histone methylation activity. Expression knockdown by RNA interference significantly increased mortality, implying that the SmydA genes may be essential for insect survival. We further showed predominantly strong purifying selection on the SmydA gene family and a potential association between the regulation of gene expression and insect phenotypic plasticity by transcriptome analysis. Overall, these data suggest that the SmydA gene family retains essential functions that may possibly define novel regulatory pathways in insects. This work provides insights into the roles of lineage-specific domain duplication in insect evolution. PMID:28444351

  3. Expressing exogenous genes in newts by transgenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casco-Robles, Martin Miguel; Yamada, Shouta; Miura, Tomoya; Nakamura, Kenta; Haynes, Tracy; Maki, Nobuyasu; Del Rio-Tsonis, Katia; Tsonis, Panagiotis A; Chiba, Chikafumi

    2011-05-01

    The great regenerative abilities of newts provide the impetus for studies at the molecular level. However, efficient methods for gene regulation have historically been quite limited. Here we describe a protocol for transgenically expressing exogenous genes in the newt Cynops pyrrhogaster. This method is simple: a reaction mixture of I-SceI meganuclease and a plasmid DNA carrying a transgene cassette flanked by the enzyme recognition sites is directly injected into fertilized eggs. The protocol achieves a high efficiency of transgenesis, comparable to protocols used in other animal systems, and it provides a practical number of transgenic newts (∼20% of injected embryos) that survive beyond metamorphosis and that can be applied to regenerative studies. The entire protocol for obtaining transgenic adult newts takes 4-5 months.

  4. Gene expression-targeted isoflavone therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Węgrzyn, Alicja

    2012-04-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSD) form a group of inherited metabolic disorders caused by dysfunction of one of the lysosomal proteins, resulting in the accumulation of certain compounds. Although these disorders are among first genetic diseases for which specific treatments were proposed, there are still serious unsolved problems that require development of novel therapeutic procedures. An example is neuronopathy, which develops in most of LSD and cannot be treated efficiently by currently approved therapies. Recently, a new potential therapy, called gene expression-targeted isoflavone therapy (GET IT), has been proposed for a group of LSD named mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS), in which storage of incompletely degraded glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) results in severe symptoms of virtually all tissues and organs, including central nervous system. The idea of this therapy is to inhibit synthesis of GAGs by modulating expression of genes coding for enzymes involved in synthesis of these compounds. Such a modulation is possible by using isoflavones, particularly genistein, which interfere with a signal transduction process necessary for stimulation of expression of certain genes. Results of in vitro experiments and studies on animal models indicated a high efficiency of GET IT, including correction of behavior of affected mice. However, clinical trials, performed with soy isoflavone extracts, revealed only limited efficacy. This caused a controversy about GET IT as a potential, effective treatment of patients suffering from MPS, especially neuronopathic forms of these diseases. It this critical review, I present possible molecular mechanisms of therapeutic action of isoflavones (particularly genistein) and suggest that efficacy of GET IT might be sufficiently high when using relatively high doses of synthetic genistein (which was employed in experiments on cell cultures and mouse models) rather than low doses of soy isoflavone extracts (which were used in clinical trials). This

  5. Popeye domain containing gene 2 (Popdc2) is a myocyte-specific differentiation marker during chick heart development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breher, Stephanie S; Mavridou, Eleftheria; Brenneis, Christian; Froese, Alexander; Arnold, Hans-Henning; Brand, Thomas

    2004-03-01

    The Popeye domain containing (popdc) genes constitute a novel gene family encoding proteins of the plasma membrane in muscle cells, with three N-terminal transmembrane domains and a cytoplasmic carboxy terminus. In vertebrates, three members of the Popdc gene family have been described. However, in the chick system only two cDNAs, Popdc1 and Popdc3, have been cloned previously. By screening a chick expressed sequence tag database, we report here the identification of five alternatively spliced chick Popdc2 cDNAs with different carboxy termini. Northern blot analysis revealed expression of Popdc2 predominantly in the myocardium and weaker expression in skeletal muscle. By whole-mount in situ hybridization, chick Popdc2 was first detected at Hamburger and Hamilton (HH) stage 7 within the anterior part of the heart fields. In the tubular heart, atrial and ventricular precursor cells stained positively for Popdc2. Weaker expression was observed in myocardium of the outflow tract and sinus venosus. By HH stage 18, the outer curvature myocardium was strongly stained, whereas expression in myocardium of the inner curvature was negligible. Popdc2 expression was absent from the endocardium and propepicardial organ. At HH stage 36, Popdc2 expression was confined to the compact layer myocardium. In addition to the heart, Popdc2 expression was also observed in the myotome and in the muscle-forming fields of the limbs. Our results indicate that Popdc2 is highly expressed in the developing heart and may serve as a novel marker of myocardial differentiation in the chick embryo.

  6. Recombinant Escherichia coli strains with inducible Campylobacter jejuni single domain hemoglobin CHb expression exhibited improved cell growth in bioreactor culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xu

    Full Text Available Maintaining an appropriate concentration of dissolved oxygen in aqueous solution is critical for efficient operation of a bioreactor, requiring sophisticated engineering design and a system of regulation to maximize oxygen transfer from the injected air bubbles to the cells. Bacterial hemoglobins are oxygen-binding proteins that transfer oxygen from the environment to metabolic processes and allow bacteria to grow even under microaerophilic conditions. To improve the oxygen utilization efficiency of cells and overcome the oxygen shortage in bioreactors, the gene coding for the Campylobacter jejuni single domain hemoglobin (CHb gene was artificially synthesized and functionally expressed under the control of inducible expression promoters PT7 and Pvgh in Escherichia coli. The effects of the recombinants PT7-CHb and Pvgh-CHb on cell growth were evaluated in aerobic shake flasks, anaerobic capped bottles and a 5-L bioreactor, and a pronounced improvement in cell biomass was observed for CHb-expressing cells. To determine the growth curves, CHb gene expression, and CHb oxygen-binding capacity of specific recombinants with different promoters, we determined the time course of CHb gene expression in the two recombinants by semi-quantitative RT-PCR and CO differential spectrum assays. Based on the growth patterns of the two recombinants in the bioreactor, we proposed different recombinant types with optimal performance under specific culture conditions.

  7. The impact of gene expression analysis on evolving views of avian brain organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montiel, Juan F; Molnár, Zoltán

    2013-11-01

    Recent studies have presented data on adult and developing avian brain organization. Jarvis et al. ([2013] J Comp Neurol. 521:3614-3665) identify four pallial and two subpallial gene expression domains and demonstrate that the mesopallium and adjoining divisions of the hyperpallium (hyperpallium intercalatum and hyperpallium densocellulare), have very similar gene expression profiles to each other, distinct from those of the nidopallium, the arcopallium, and the more distant divisions of the hyperpallium (hyperpallium apicale). The study proposes an update of the current nomenclature (Jarvis et al. [2005] Nat Rev Neurosci. 6:151-159). The authors perform densitometric quantifications of the in situ expression of 50 selected genes, use correlations of distances between vectors that represent these gene expression patterns within the 23 avian brain regions of their study, and group them according to similarity in their expression profiles. The generated cluster tree further supports their argument for a new terminology. The authors hypothesize that the mesopallium and adjoining divisions of the hyperpallium have a common developmental origin, and in the accompanying paper (Chen et al. [2013] J Comp Neurol. 521:3666-3701) show that these structures/subdivisions initially form continuous gene expression domains. With subsequent development these domains fold into distinct subdivisions in the dorsal and ventral avian pallium, forming mirror images to each other. Jarvis et al. ([2013] J Comp Neurol. 521:3614-3665) also demonstrate interesting principles of the functional organization of the avian brain by showing that specific sensory stimulation or motor behavior elicits gene expression in functional units perpendicular to the axis of the gene expression reversal and compare their arrangements and cell types with mammalian cortical columns.

  8. Evaluating Algorithms for the Generation of Referring Expressions: Going beyond Toy Domains.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sluis, Ielka; Gatt, A.; van Deemter, K.

    2007-01-01

    We describe a corpus-based evaluation method- ology, applied to a number of classic algorithms in the generation of referring expressions. Fol- lowing up on earlier work involving very simple domains, this paper deals with the issues asso- ciated with domains that contain ‘real-life’ ob- jects of so

  9. Gene Structures, Classification, and Expression Models of the DREB Transcription Factor Subfamily in Populus trichocarpa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunlin Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We identified 75 dehydration-responsive element-binding (DREB protein genes in Populus trichocarpa. We analyzed gene structures, phylogenies, domain duplications, genome localizations, and expression profiles. The phylogenic construction suggests that the PtrDREB gene subfamily can be classified broadly into six subtypes (DREB A-1 to A-6 in Populus. The chromosomal localizations of the PtrDREB genes indicated 18 segmental duplication events involving 36 genes and six redundant PtrDREB genes were involved in tandem duplication events. There were fewer introns in the PtrDREB subfamily. The motif composition of PtrDREB was highly conserved in the same subtype. We investigated expression profiles of this gene subfamily from different tissues and/or developmental stages. Sixteen genes present in the digital expression analysis had high levels of transcript accumulation. The microarray results suggest that 18 genes were upregulated. We further examined the stress responsiveness of 15 genes by qRT-PCR. A digital northern analysis showed that the PtrDREB17, 18, and 32 genes were highly induced in leaves under cold stress, and the same expression trends were shown by qRT-PCR. Taken together, these observations may lay the foundation for future functional analyses to unravel the biological roles of Populus’ DREB genes.

  10. Gene expression profiling of cutaneous wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Ena

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the sequence of events leading to wound repair has been described at the cellular and, to a limited extent, at the protein level this process has yet to be fully elucidated. Genome wide transcriptional analysis tools promise to further define the global picture of this complex progression of events. Study Design This study was part of a placebo-controlled double-blind clinical trial in which basal cell carcinomas were treated topically with an immunomodifier – toll-like receptor 7 agonist: imiquimod. The fourteen patients with basal cell carcinoma in the placebo arm of the trial received placebo treatment consisting solely of vehicle cream. A skin punch biopsy was obtained immediately before treatment and at the end of the placebo treatment (after 2, 4 or 8 days. 17.5K cDNA microarrays were utilized to profile the biopsy material. Results Four gene signatures whose expression changed relative to baseline (before wound induction by the pre-treatment biopsy were identified. The largest group was comprised predominantly of inflammatory genes whose expression was increased throughout the study. Two additional signatures were observed which included preferentially pro-inflammatory genes in the early post-treatment biopsies (2 days after pre-treatment biopsies and repair and angiogenesis genes in the later (4 to 8 days biopsies. The fourth and smallest set of genes was down-regulated throughout the study. Early in wound healing the expression of markers of both M1 and M2 macrophages were increased, but later M2 markers predominated. Conclusion The initial response to a cutaneous wound induces powerful transcriptional activation of pro-inflammatory stimuli which may alert the host defense. Subsequently and in the absence of infection, inflammation subsides and it is replaced by angiogenesis and remodeling. Understanding this transition which may be driven by a change from a mixed macrophage population to predominately M2

  11. Distinct epigenetic domains separated by a CTCF bound insulator between the tandem genes, BLU and RASSF1A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jer-Wei Chang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tumor suppressor gene (TSG RASSF1A and candidate TSG BLU are two tandem head-to-tail genes located at 3p21.3. We hypothesized that there may be a concordance on their gene expression and promoter methylation status. If not, then there may be an insulator located between RASSF1A and BLU genes that provides a barrier activity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We first identified potential transcriptionally important CpG sites using the methylation-specific oligonucleotide array in relation to mRNA expression of RASSF1A and BLU genes in primary lung tumors. We demonstrated that E2F1 bound to the potential transcriptionally important CpG sites in RASSF1A gene of a normal lung cell line expressing RASSF1A transcripts, whereas loss of E2F1 binding to RASSF1A in A549 cancer cell line was the result of DNA methylation. Both RASSF1A and BLU genes had their own potential transcriptionally important CpG regions. However, there was no correlation of methylation status between RASSF1A and BLU. Using gel shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation-PCR (ChIP-PCR, we found that CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF bound to insulator sequences located between these two genes. Bisulfite sequencing and ChIP-PCR revealed distinct methylation and chromatin boundaries separated by the CTCF binding domains in normal cells, whereas such distinct epigenetic domains were not observed in cancer cells. Note that demethylation reagent and histone deacetylase inhibitor treatments led to CTCF binding and recovery of barrier effect for RASSF1A and BLU genes in cancer cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study dissects the potential transcriptionally important CpG sites for RASSF1A and BLU genes at the sequence level and demonstrates that CTCF binding to the insulator of BLU gene provides a barrier activity within separate epigenetic domains of the juxtaposed BLU and RASSF1A loci in the 3p21.3 gene cluster region.

  12. Network Completion for Static Gene Expression Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natsu Nakajima

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We tackle the problem of completing and inferring genetic networks under stationary conditions from static data, where network completion is to make the minimum amount of modifications to an initial network so that the completed network is most consistent with the expression data in which addition of edges and deletion of edges are basic modification operations. For this problem, we present a new method for network completion using dynamic programming and least-squares fitting. This method can find an optimal solution in polynomial time if the maximum indegree of the network is bounded by a constant. We evaluate the effectiveness of our method through computational experiments using synthetic data. Furthermore, we demonstrate that our proposed method can distinguish the differences between two types of genetic networks under stationary conditions from lung cancer and normal gene expression data.

  13. Effect of obesity and exercise on the expression of the novel myokines, Myonectin and Fibronectin type III domain containing 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mart, Ryan; Bond, Cherie E.

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic dysfunction in skeletal muscle is a major contributor to the development of type 2 diabetes. Endurance exercise training has long been established as an effective means to directly restore skeletal muscle glucose and lipid uptake and metabolism. However, in addition to the direct effects of skeletal muscle on glucose and lipids, there is renewed interest in the ability of skeletal muscle to coordinate metabolic activity of other tissues, such as adipose tissue and liver. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of endurance exercise on the expression level of two novel muscle-derived secreted factors, or myokines, Myonectin and Fibronectin type III domain containing 5 (FNDC5), the precursor for Irisin. Methods. We performed immunoblot analysis and quantitative real-time PCR analysis of Myonectin and FNDC5 in the diaphragm muscles of obese Zucker rat (OZR) and lean Zucker rat (LZR) with 9 weeks of aerobic training on a motorized treadmill. Results. We show that myonectin gene expression is increased in the OZR model of obesity and decreases with exercise in both lean and obese Zucker rats. Conversely, myonectin protein concentration was elevated with exercise. Similarly, FNDC5 mRNA levels are significantly higher in the OZR, however exercise training had no effect on the expression level of FNDC5 in either the LZR or OZR. We did not observe any difference in muscle protein content of Irisin with obesity or exercise. Conclusion. Our data shows that exercise training does not increase either FNDC5 or myonectin gene expression, indicating that increased transcriptional regulation of these myokines is not induced by exercise. However, our data also indicates a yet to be explored disconnect between myonectin gene expression and protein content. Further, this report highlights the importance of verifying reference genes when completing gene expression analysis. We found that many commonly used reference genes varied significantly by obesity and

  14. Effect of obesity and exercise on the expression of the novel myokines, Myonectin and Fibronectin type III domain containing 5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan M. Peterson

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic dysfunction in skeletal muscle is a major contributor to the development of type 2 diabetes. Endurance exercise training has long been established as an effective means to directly restore skeletal muscle glucose and lipid uptake and metabolism. However, in addition to the direct effects of skeletal muscle on glucose and lipids, there is renewed interest in the ability of skeletal muscle to coordinate metabolic activity of other tissues, such as adipose tissue and liver. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of endurance exercise on the expression level of two novel muscle-derived secreted factors, or myokines, Myonectin and Fibronectin type III domain containing 5 (FNDC5, the precursor for Irisin.Methods. We performed immunoblot analysis and quantitative real-time PCR analysis of Myonectin and FNDC5 in the diaphragm muscles of obese Zucker rat (OZR and lean Zucker rat (LZR with 9 weeks of aerobic training on a motorized treadmill.Results. We show that myonectin gene expression is increased in the OZR model of obesity and decreases with exercise in both lean and obese Zucker rats. Conversely, myonectin protein concentration was elevated with exercise. Similarly, FNDC5 mRNA levels are significantly higher in the OZR, however exercise training had no effect on the expression level of FNDC5 in either the LZR or OZR. We did not observe any difference in muscle protein content of Irisin with obesity or exercise.Conclusion. Our data shows that exercise training does not increase either FNDC5 or myonectin gene expression, indicating that increased transcriptional regulation of these myokines is not induced by exercise. However, our data also indicates a yet to be explored disconnect between myonectin gene expression and protein content. Further, this report highlights the importance of verifying reference genes when completing gene expression analysis. We found that many commonly used reference genes varied significantly by

  15. Cloning, Expression and Purification of Wheat Acetyl-CoA Carboxylases CT Domain in E.coil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Rui-jian; YANG Xue-ying; ZHENG Liang-yu; YANG Ye; GAO Gui; CAO Shu-gui

    2008-01-01

    The entire gene of carboxyltransferase(CT) domain of acetyl-CoA carboxylase(ACCase) from Chinese Spring wheat(CSW) plastid was cloned firstly,and the 2.3 kb gene was inserted into PET28a+ vector and expressed in E.coil in a soluble state.The (His)6 fusion protein was identified by SDS-PAGE and Western blot.The recombinant protein was purified by affinity chromatography,and the calculated molecular mass(Mr) was 88000.The results of the sequence analysis indicate that the cloned gene(GeneBank accession No.EU124675) was a supplement and revision of the reported ACCase CT partial cDNA from Chinese Spring wheat plastid.The recombinant protein will be significant for us to investigate the recognizing mechanism between ACCase and herbicides,and further to screen new herbicides.

  16. In vivo interference of Rous sarcoma virus budding by cis expression of a WW domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patnaik, Akash; Wills, John W

    2002-03-01

    For all enveloped viruses, the actual mechanism by which nascent virus particles separate or "pinch off" from the cell surface is largely unknown. In the case of retroviruses, the Gag protein drives the budding process, and the virus release step is directed by the late (L) assembly domain within Gag. A PPPPY motif within the L domain of Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) was previously characterized as being critical for the release of virions and shown to interact in vitro with the WW domain of Yes-associated protein (Yap). To determine whether WW domain-L domain interactions can occur in vivo, we attempted to interfere with the host cell machinery normally recruited to the site of budding by inserting this WW domain in different locations within Gag. At a C-terminal location, the WW(Yap) domain had no effect on budding, suggesting that the intervening I domains (which provide the major region of Gag-Gag interaction) prevent its access to the L domain. When positioned on the other side of the I domains closer to the L domain, the WW(Yap) domain resulted in a dramatic interference of particle release, and confocal microscopy revealed a block to budding on the plasma membrane. Budding was restored by attachment of the heterologous L domain of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Gag, which does not bind WW(Yap). These findings suggest that cis expression of WW domains can interfere with RSV particle release in vivo via specific, high-affinity interactions at the site of assembly on the plasma membrane, thus preventing host factor accessibility to the L domain and subsequent virus-cell separation. In addition, they suggest that L domain-specific host factors function after Gag proteins begin to interact.

  17. Apopotic gene Bax expression in carotid plaque

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bao-Zhong MEN; Ding-Biao ZHOU; Huai-Yin SHI; Xiao-Ming ZHANG

    2006-01-01

    The expression of BAX in carotid atherosclerosis and its regulation is far from defined. Objectives To investigate BAX expression in stable/fibrous and instable/vulnerable carotid plaque and its clinical significance. Methods 25 cases of carotid plaque specimens obtained from endarterectomy were divided into two groups, stable/fibrous 14 cases, vulnerable/instable 11 cases; aortic artery and its branches from hepatic transplantation donors 6 case as control. The expression of proapoptotic BAX was detected by immunohistochemistry(IHC), in situ hybridization(ISH) and in situ TdT dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL). Results 5 cases of BAX ( + ) were detected by ICH and ISH, 4 case of TUNEL ( + ) were detected by TUNEL in stable/fibrous carotid plaque , while 10 cases were BAX ( + )by IHC(P < 0.05) , 11case by ISH and 9 case by TUNEL were detected in instable/vulnerable carotid plaque ( P < 0.01 ), respectively. The intensity of BAX ( + ) cells by IHC and ISH was 8.63 ± 2.62 and 10.32 ± 3.12 in fibrous plaques, whereas 122 ± 21.64and 152 ± 23.35 in vulnerable plaques, respectively. No expression of BAX was found in controlled group. Conclusion The higher expression of Bax in vulnerable carotid plaque may be one mechanisms in molecular pathogenesis of carotid atherosclerosis which affect plaque stability and be the cause of higher incidence of stroke than fibrous carotid plaques, the regulation of BAX expression in different stage of atherosclerosis may provide targets in gene therapy for carotid atherosclerosis.

  18. Global expression differences and tissue specific expression differences in rice evolution result in two contrasting types of differentially expressed genes

    KAUST Repository

    Horiuchi, Youko

    2015-12-23

    Background Since the development of transcriptome analysis systems, many expression evolution studies characterized evolutionary forces acting on gene expression, without explicit discrimination between global expression differences and tissue specific expression differences. However, different types of gene expression alteration should have different effects on an organism, the evolutionary forces that act on them might be different, and different types of genes might show different types of differential expression between species. To confirm this, we studied differentially expressed (DE) genes among closely related groups that have extensive gene expression atlases, and clarified characteristics of different types of DE genes including the identification of regulating loci for differential expression using expression quantitative loci (eQTL) analysis data. Results We detected differentially expressed (DE) genes between rice subspecies in five homologous tissues that were verified using japonica and indica transcriptome atlases in public databases. Using the transcriptome atlases, we classified DE genes into two types, global DE genes and changed-tissues DE genes. Global type DE genes were not expressed in any tissues in the atlas of one subspecies, however changed-tissues type DE genes were expressed in both subspecies with different tissue specificity. For the five tissues in the two japonica-indica combinations, 4.6 ± 0.8 and 5.9 ± 1.5 % of highly expressed genes were global and changed-tissues DE genes, respectively. Changed-tissues DE genes varied in number between tissues, increasing linearly with the abundance of tissue specifically expressed genes in the tissue. Molecular evolution of global DE genes was rapid, unlike that of changed-tissues DE genes. Based on gene ontology, global and changed-tissues DE genes were different, having no common GO terms. Expression differences of most global DE genes were regulated by cis-eQTLs. Expression

  19. SemanticSCo: a platform to support the semantic composition of services for gene expression analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guardia, Gabriela D.A.; Ferreira Pires, Luis; Goncalves da Silva, Eduardo; Guareis de farias, Cléver

    Gene expression studies often require the combined use of a number of analysis tools. However, manual integration of analysis tools can be cumbersome and error prone. To support a higher level of automation in the integration process, efforts have been made in the biomedical domain towards the

  20. Multiple sensors control reciprocal expression of Pseudomonas aeruginosa regulatory RNA and virulence genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ventre, I.; Goodman, A.L.; Vallet-Gely, I.

    2006-01-01

    S, a hybrid sensor kinase that controls the reciprocal expression of genes for type III secretion and biofilm-promoting polysaccharicles. Domain organization of LadS and the range of LadS-controlled genes suggest that it counteracts the activities of another sensor kinase, RetS. These two pathways converge...... by controlling the transcription of a small regulatory RNA, RsmZ. This work identifies a previously undescribed signal transduction network in which the activities of signal-receiving sensor kinases LadS, RetS, and GacS regulate expression of virulence genes associated with acute or chronic infection...

  1. Expression and bioinformatic analysis of lymphoma-associated novel gene KIAA0372

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Xiangyang; TANG Duozhuang; ZHU Tao; SUN Lishi; YAN Lingling; LU Yunping; ZHOU Jianfeng; MA Ding

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the differentially expressed genes in lymph-node cells (LNC) of lymphomas and reactive lymph node hyperplasia,and to perform an initial bioinformatic analysis on a novel gene,KIAA0372,which is highly expressed in the LNC of lymphomas.mRNA extracted from LNC of lymphomas and reactive lymph node hyperplasia were respectively marked with biotin and hybridized with Gene Expression Chips,resulting in differentially expressed genes.Initial bioinformatic analysis was then performed on a novel gene named KIAA0372,whose function has not yet been explored.Its structure and genomic location,its product's physical and chemical properties,subcellular localization and functional domains,were also predicted.Further,a systematic evolution analysis was performed on similar proteins from among several species.Using Gene Expression Chips,many differentially expressed genes were uncovered.Efficient bioinformatic analysis has fundamentally determined that KIAA0372 is an extracellular protein which may be involved in TGF-β signaling.Microarray is an efficient and high throughput strategy for detection of differentially expressed genes.And KIAA0372 is thought to be a potential target for tumor research using bioinformatic analysis.

  2. The transcription factor TEAD1 represses smooth muscle-specific gene expression by abolishing myocardin function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fang; Wang, Xiaobo; Hu, Guoqing; Wang, Yong; Zhou, Jiliang

    2014-02-07

    The TEAD (transcriptional enhancer activator domain) proteins share an evolutionarily conserved DNA-binding TEA domain, which binds to the MCAT cis-acting regulatory element. Previous studies have shown that TEAD proteins are involved in regulating the expression of smooth muscle α-actin. However, it remains undetermined whether TEAD proteins play a broader role in regulating expression of other genes in vascular smooth muscle cells. In this study, we show that the expression of TEAD1 is significantly induced during smooth muscle cell phenotypic modulation and negatively correlates with smooth muscle-specific gene expression. We further demonstrate that TEAD1 plays a novel role in suppressing expression of smooth muscle-specific genes, including smooth muscle α-actin, by abolishing the promyogenic function of myocardin, a key mediator of smooth muscle differentiation. Mechanistically, we found that TEAD1 competes with myocardin for binding to serum response factor (SRF), resulting in disruption of myocardin and SRF interactions and thereby attenuating expression of smooth muscle-specific genes. This study provides the first evidence demonstrating that TEAD1 is a novel general repressor of smooth muscle-specific gene expression through interfering with myocardin binding to SRF.

  3. Survey of compressed domain audio features and their expressiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Silvia; Vincent, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    We give an overview of existing audio analysis approaches in the compressed domain and incorporate them into a coherent formal structure. After examining the kinds of information accessible in an MPEG-1 compressed audio stream, we describe a coherent approach to determine features from them and report on a number of applications they enable. Most of them aim at creating an index to the audio stream by segmenting the stream into temporally coherent regions, which may be classified into pre-specified types of sounds such as music, speech, speakers, animal sounds, sound effects, or silence. Other applications centre around sound recognition such as gender, beat or speech recognition.

  4. Microarray Expression Data Identify DCC as a Candidate Gene for Early Meningioma Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulten, Hans-Juergen; Hussein, Deema; Al-Adwani, Fatima; Karim, Sajjad; Al-Maghrabi, Jaudah; Al-Sharif, Mona; Jamal, Awatif; Al-Ghamdi, Fahad; Baeesa, Saleh S; Bangash, Mohammed; Chaudhary, Adeel; Al-Qahtani, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Meningiomas are the most common primary brain tumors bearing in a minority of cases an aggressive phenotype. Although meningiomas are stratified according to their histology and clinical behavior, the underlying molecular genetics predicting aggressiveness are not thoroughly understood. We performed whole transcript expression profiling in 10 grade I and four grade II meningiomas, three of which invaded the brain. Microarray expression analysis identified deleted in colorectal cancer (DCC) as a differentially expressed gene (DEG) enabling us to cluster meningiomas into DCC low expression (3 grade I and 3 grade II tumors), DCC medium expression (2 grade I and 1 grade II tumors), and DCC high expression (5 grade I tumors) groups. Comparison between the DCC low expression and DCC high expression groups resulted in 416 DEGs (p-value2). The most significantly downregulated genes in the DCC low expression group comprised DCC, phosphodiesterase 1C (PDE1C), calmodulin-dependent 70kDa olfactomedin 2 (OLFM2), glutathione S-transferase mu 5 (GSTM5), phosphotyrosine interaction domain containing 1 (PID1), sema domain, transmembrane domain (TM) and cytoplasmic domain, (semaphorin) 6D (SEMA6D), and indolethylamine N-methyltransferase (INMT). The most significantly upregulated genes comprised chromosome 5 open reading frame 63 (C5orf63), homeodomain interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2), and basic helix-loop-helix family, member e40 (BHLHE40). Biofunctional analysis identified as predicted top upstream regulators beta-estradiol, TGFB1, Tgf beta complex, LY294002, and dexamethasone and as predicted top regulator effectors NFkB, PIK3R1, and CREBBP. The microarray expression data served also for a comparison between meningiomas from female and male patients and for a comparison between brain invasive and non-invasive meningiomas resulting in a number of significant DEGs and related biofunctions. In conclusion, based on its expression levels, DCC may constitute a valid biomarker to

  5. Molecular Cloning,Bioinformatics of the DuckYAP 1 Gene cDNA Coding Domain Sequence,and Its Differential Expression Profiles in Tissues%鸭YAP 1基因编码区的克隆、生物信息分析及其组织表达特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱佳闵; 刘贺贺; 王继文

    2015-01-01

    【目的】旨在克隆鸭YAP 1基因,预测其蛋白结构、功能及其组织表达特性。【方法】以北京肉鸭为材料,采用RT-PCR 技术克隆鸭YAP 1基因 CDS 区,利用多种生物信息学分析软件预测其结构与功能,并应用荧光定量 PCR检测其组织表达特性。【结果】结果表明:鸭YAP 1基因 CDS 全长1248 bp,编码415个氨基酸,氨基酸水平上与鸡相似性最高,达99.7%;氨基酸序列分析发现鸭 YAP1蛋白相对分子量为45417.5 Da,主要定位在细胞核,属水溶性蛋白,不属于分泌蛋白;预测鸭 YAP1氨基酸含有磷酸化、糖基化位点各30个;含两个 WW 结构域,且不同物种间结构域较保守;二级结构以无规则卷曲为主,三级结构呈弯曲状螺旋结构;荧光定量结果显示,YAP 1在胰脏中表达量最高,肌肉组织中最低。【结论】鸭YAP 1基因非常保守,结构、功能与哺乳动物具较高一致性。%Objective]The study was to clone the duckYAP 1 gene cDNA coding domain sequence and predict its structure,function and expression profiles.[Method]We took Peking duck for material,using RT-PCR cloned the duck YAP 1 coding domain sequence (CDS),predicted its protein structure and functions over several bioinformatics tools and analyzed its expression in 10 tissues of duck using real-time PCR.[Results]The results showed that the duckYAP 1 CDS con-sists of 1 248 nucleotides that encode 415 amino acids residues,and the amino acid homology of duck YAP 1 shares 99.7% identity with chicken.The analysis of amino acid sequence revealed that the duckYAP 1 encoded water-soluble protein and its relative molecular weight was 45 417.5 Da.Subcellular location of YAP1 was in the nucleus,and it did not belong to the secreted pro-tein.The YAP1 protein contained 30 phosphorylation sites,30 glycosylation sites and 2 WW do-mains which are relatively conserved in species.The secondary structure of YAP1 was mainly

  6. Expression profiles for six zebrafish genes during gonadal sex differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anne; Morthorst, Jane E.; Andersen, Ole;

    2008-01-01

    the precise timing of expression of six genes previously suggested to be associated with sex differentiation in zebrafish. The current study investigates the expression of all six genes in the same individual fish with extensive sampling dates during sex determination and -differentiation. RESULTS...... the same fish allowing comparison of the high and low expressers of genes that are expected to be highest expressed in either males or females. There were 78% high or low expressers of all three "male" genes (ar, sox9a and dmrt1) in the investigated period and 81% were high or low expressers of both...

  7. Autoregulation of Sinorhizobium meliloti exoR gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hai-Yang; Cheng, Hai-Ping

    2010-07-01

    The successful nitrogen-fixing symbiosis between the gram-negative soil bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti and its leguminous plant host alfalfa (Medicago sativa) requires the bacterial exopolysaccharide succinoglycan. Succinoglycan and flagellum production, along with the ability to metabolize more than 20 different carbon sources and control the expression of a large number of S. meliloti genes, is regulated by the ExoR-ExoS/ChvI signalling pathway. The ExoR protein interacts with and suppresses the sensing activities of ExoS, the membrane-bound sensor of the ExoS/ChvI two-component regulatory system. Here we show that exoR expression is clearly upregulated in the absence of any functional ExoR protein. This upregulation was suppressed by the presence of the wild-type ExoR protein but not by a mutated ExoR protein lacking signal peptide. The levels of exoR expression could be directly modified in real time by changing the levels of total ExoR protein. The expression of exoR was also upregulated by the constitutively active sensor mutation exoS96, and blocked by two single mutations, exoS* and exoS(supA), in the ExoS sensing domain. Presence of the wild-type ExoS protein further elevated the levels of exoR expression in the absence of functional ExoR protein, and reversed the effects of exoS96, exoS* and exoS(supA) mutations. Altogether, these data suggest that ExoR protein autoregulates exoR expression through the ExoS/ChvI system, allowing S. meliloti cells to maintain the levels of exoR expression based on the amount of total ExoR protein.

  8. Positive selection on gene expression in the human brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khaitovich, Philipp; Tang, Kun; Franz, Henriette

    2006-01-01

    Recent work has shown that the expression levels of genes transcribed in the brains of humans and chimpanzees have changed less than those of genes transcribed in other tissues [1] . However, when gene expression changes are mapped onto the evolutionary lineage in which they occurred, the brain...... shows more changes than other tissues in the human lineage compared to the chimpanzee lineage [1] , [2] and [3] . There are two possible explanations for this: either positive selection drove more gene expression changes to fixation in the human brain than in the chimpanzee brain, or genes expressed...... in the brain experienced less purifying selection in humans than in chimpanzees, i.e. gene expression in the human brain is functionally less constrained. The first scenario would be supported if genes that changed their expression in the brain in the human lineage showed more selective sweeps than other genes...

  9. Selection for the compactness of highly expressed genes in Gallus gallus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Ming

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coding sequence (CDS length, gene size, and intron length vary within a genome and among genomes. Previous studies in diverse organisms, including human, D. Melanogaster, C. elegans, S. cerevisiae, and Arabidopsis thaliana, indicated that there are negative relationships between expression level and gene size, CDS length as well as intron length. Different models such as selection for economy model, genomic design model, and mutational bias hypotheses have been proposed to explain such observation. The debate of which model is a superior one to explain the observation has not been settled down. The chicken (Gallus gallus is an important model organism that bridges the evolutionary gap between mammals and other vertebrates. As D. Melanogaster, chicken has a larger effective population size, selection for chicken genome is expected to be more effective in increasing protein synthesis efficiency. Therefore, in this study the chicken was used as a model organism to elucidate the interaction between gene features and expression pattern upon selection pressure. Results Based on different technologies, we gathered expression data for nuclear protein coding, single-splicing genes from Gallus gallus genome and compared them with gene parameters. We found that gene size, CDS length, first intron length, average intron length, and total intron length are negatively correlated with expression level and expression breadth significantly. The tissue specificity is positively correlated with the first intron length but negatively correlated with the average intron length, and not correlated with the CDS length and protein domain numbers. Comparison analyses showed that ubiquitously expressed genes and narrowly expressed genes with the similar expression levels do not differ in compactness. Our data provided evidence that the genomic design model can not, at least in part, explain our observations. We grouped all somatic-tissue-specific genes

  10. Spatiotemporal patterns of gene expression during fetal monkey brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, D Eugene; Zhao, Ji-Liang; Randall, Jeffry D; Eklund, Aron C; Eusebi, Leonard O V; Roth, Robert H; Gullans, Steven R; Jensen, Roderick V

    2003-12-19

    Human DNA microarrays are used to study the spatiotemporal patterns of gene expression during the course of fetal monkey brain development. The 444 most dynamically expressed genes in four major brain areas are reported at five different fetal ages. The spatiotemporal profiles of gene expression show both regional specificity as well as waves of gene expression across the developing brain. These patterns of expression are used to identify statistically significant clusters of co-regulated genes. This study demonstrates for the first time in the primate the relevance, timing, and spatial locations of expression for many developmental genes identified in other animals and provides clues to the functions of many unknowns. Two different microarray platforms are used to provide high-throughput cross validation of the most important gene expression changes. These results may lead to new understanding of brain development and new strategies for treating and repairing disorders of brain function.

  11. The Effects of Hallucinogens on Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, David A; Nichols, Charles D

    2017-07-05

    The classic serotonergic hallucinogens, or psychedelics, have the ability to profoundly alter perception and behavior. These can include visual distortions, hallucinations, detachment from reality, and mystical experiences. Some psychedelics, like LSD, are able to produce these effects with remarkably low doses of drug. Others, like psilocybin, have recently been demonstrated to have significant clinical efficacy in the treatment of depression, anxiety, and addiction that persist for at least several months after only a single therapeutic session. How does this occur? Much work has recently been published from imaging studies showing that psychedelics alter brain network connectivity. They facilitate a disintegration of the default mode network, producing a hyperconnectivity between brain regions that allow centers that do not normally communicate with each other to do so. The immediate and acute effects on both behaviors and network connectivity are likely mediated by effector pathways downstream of serotonin 5-HT2A receptor activation. These acute molecular processes also influence gene expression changes, which likely influence synaptic plasticity and facilitate more long-term changes in brain neurochemistry ultimately underlying the therapeutic efficacy of a single administration to achieve long-lasting effects. In this review, we summarize what is currently known about the molecular genetic responses to psychedelics within the brain and discuss how gene expression changes may contribute to altered cellular physiology and behaviors.

  12. Identification of Human HK Genes and Gene Expression Regulation Study in Cancer from Transcriptomics Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhang; Liu, Jingxing; Wu, Jiayan; Yu, Jun

    2013-01-01

    The regulation of gene expression is essential for eukaryotes, as it drives the processes of cellular differentiation and morphogenesis, leading to the creation of different cell types in multicellular organisms. RNA-Sequencing (RNA-Seq) provides researchers with a powerful toolbox for characterization and quantification of transcriptome. Many different human tissue/cell transcriptome datasets coming from RNA-Seq technology are available on public data resource. The fundamental issue here is how to develop an effective analysis method to estimate expression pattern similarities between different tumor tissues and their corresponding normal tissues. We define the gene expression pattern from three directions: 1) expression breadth, which reflects gene expression on/off status, and mainly concerns ubiquitously expressed genes; 2) low/high or constant/variable expression genes, based on gene expression level and variation; and 3) the regulation of gene expression at the gene structure level. The cluster analysis indicates that gene expression pattern is higher related to physiological condition rather than tissue spatial distance. Two sets of human housekeeping (HK) genes are defined according to cell/tissue types, respectively. To characterize the gene expression pattern in gene expression level and variation, we firstly apply improved K-means algorithm and a gene expression variance model. We find that cancer-associated HK genes (a HK gene is specific in cancer group, while not in normal group) are expressed higher and more variable in cancer condition than in normal condition. Cancer-associated HK genes prefer to AT-rich genes, and they are enriched in cell cycle regulation related functions and constitute some cancer signatures. The expression of large genes is also avoided in cancer group. These studies will help us understand which cell type-specific patterns of gene expression differ among different cell types, and particularly for cancer. PMID:23382867

  13. Brief isoflurane anaesthesia affects differential gene expression, gene ontology and gene networks in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowes, Damon A; Galley, Helen F; Moura, Alessandro P S; Webster, Nigel R

    2017-01-15

    Much is still unknown about the mechanisms of effects of even brief anaesthesia on the brain and previous studies have simply compared differential expression profiles with and without anaesthesia. We hypothesised that network analysis, in addition to the traditional differential gene expression and ontology analysis, would enable identification of the effects of anaesthesia on interactions between genes. Rats (n=10 per group) were randomised to anaesthesia with isoflurane in oxygen or oxygen only for 15min, and 6h later brains were removed. Differential gene expression and gene ontology analysis of microarray data was performed. Standard clustering techniques and principal component analysis with Bayesian rules were used along with social network analysis methods, to quantitatively model and describe the gene networks. Anaesthesia had marked effects on genes in the brain with differential regulation of 416 probe sets by at least 2 fold. Gene ontology analysis showed 23 genes were functionally related to the anaesthesia and of these, 12 were involved with neurotransmitter release, transport and secretion. Gene network analysis revealed much greater connectivity in genes from brains from anaesthetised rats compared to controls. Other importance measures were also altered after anaesthesia; median [range] closeness centrality (shortest path) was lower in anaesthetized animals (0.07 [0-0.30]) than controls (0.39 [0.30-0.53], pgenes after anaesthesia and suggests future targets for investigation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. DNA double-strand breaks coupled with PARP1 and HNRNPA2B1 binding sites flank coordinately expressed domains in human chromosomes.

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    Nickolai A Tchurikov

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Genome instability plays a key role in multiple biological processes and diseases, including cancer. Genome-wide mapping of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs is important for understanding both chromosomal architecture and specific chromosomal regions at DSBs. We developed a method for precise genome-wide mapping of blunt-ended DSBs in human chromosomes, and observed non-random fragmentation and DSB hot spots. These hot spots are scattered along chromosomes and delimit protected 50-250 kb DNA domains. We found that about 30% of the domains (denoted forum domains possess coordinately expressed genes and that PARP1 and HNRNPA2B1 specifically bind DNA sequences at the forum domain termini. Thus, our data suggest a novel type of gene regulation: a coordinated transcription or silencing of gene clusters delimited by DSB hot spots as well as PARP1 and HNRNPa2B1 binding sites.

  15. Detection of gene expression pattern in the early stage after spinal cord injury by gene chip

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘成龙; 靳安民; 童斌辉

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the changes of the gene expression pattern of spinal cord tissues in the early stage after injury by DNA microarray (gene chip). Methods: The contusion model of rat spinal cord was established according to Allen's falling strike method and the gene expression patterns of normal and injured spinal cord tissues were studied by gene chip. Results: The expression of 45 genes was significantly changed in the early stage after spinal cord injury, in which 22 genes up-regulated and 23 genes down-regulated. Conclusions: The expression of some genes changes significantly in the early stage after spinal cord injury, which indicates the complexity of secondary spinal cord injury.

  16. 去甲基化酶腺病毒载体构建及其在人颌下腺细胞中的表达%Cloning and expression of methyl-CpG binding domain 2 gene in human submandibular gland cell line by adenovirus vector transfection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李莹; 刘淑丹; 杨彦春; 董世武; 熊剑; 李方; 周继祥

    2011-01-01

    目的 构建去甲基化酶(methyl-CpG binding domain 2,MBD2)基因腺病毒载体,并观测其在人颌下腺(human submandibular gland,HSG)细胞中的表达.方法 以HSG细胞总RNA为模板,RT-PCR法扩增MBD2基因全长编码序列,克隆入载体pMD18-T后,亚克隆入pAdTrack-CMV腺病毒穿梭载体,构建pAdTrack-MBD2重组体.该重组体与腺病毒骨架质粒pAdEmy-1于BJ5183菌中同源重组,产生重组腺病毒质粒Ad-MBD2,该质粒经293细胞包装,获得具有感染力的Ad/MBD2重组腺病毒颗粒,将该病毒颗粒感染HSG细胞,倒置显微镜检测转染后HSG细胞生长变化及MBD2在其中的表达等情况.图像分析法计算感染效率.RT-PCR法检测MBD2基因在该细胞中的表达变化.结果 成功克隆到909 bp大小的MBD2基因,构建了其腺病毒载体Ad/MBD2,该腺病毒载体经293细胞成功包装,并获具感染力的Ad/MBD2重组腺病毒颗粒,其感染效率约70%.感染的HSG高表达MBD2.结论 成功克隆到MBD2基因,构建了其重组腺病毒载体Ad/MBD2,并证实了其感染HSG细胞的有效表达.%Objective To construct the adenovirus vector carrying methyl-CpG binding domain 2 (MBD2) gene and express this gene in human submandibular gland (HSG)cell line. Methods cDNA fragment encoding human MBD2 gene was amplified by reverse transcriptase-polynierase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with the total mRNA isolated from HSG cells as template. The PCR amplified product was first cloned into pMD18-T vector, and then subcloned into the shuttle vector pAdTrack-CMV in order to construct the recombi-nant plasmids pAdTrack-MBD2, which homologously recombinated with the adenoviral backbone vectors Adeasy-1 in BJ5183 bacterial cells, so as to generate recombinant adenoviral plasmids Ad-MBD2. The recombi-nant adenoviruses Ad/MBD2, which were employed to infect HSG cells, were generated by transfecting the recombinant adenoviral DNA into 293 cells. The growth of transfected HSG cells and the expression of enhanced

  17. Coactivators in PPAR-Regulated Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navin Viswakarma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPARα, β (also known as δ, and γ function as sensors for fatty acids and fatty acid derivatives and control important metabolic pathways involved in the maintenance of energy balance. PPARs also regulate other diverse biological processes such as development, differentiation, inflammation, and neoplasia. In the nucleus, PPARs exist as heterodimers with retinoid X receptor-α bound to DNA with corepressor molecules. Upon ligand activation, PPARs undergo conformational changes that facilitate the dissociation of corepressor molecules and invoke a spatiotemporally orchestrated recruitment of transcription cofactors including coactivators and coactivator-associated proteins. While a given nuclear receptor regulates the expression of a prescribed set of target genes, coactivators are likely to influence the functioning of many regulators and thus affect the transcription of many genes. Evidence suggests that some of the coactivators such as PPAR-binding protein (PBP/PPARBP/thyroid hormone receptor-associated protein 220 (TRAP220/mediator complex subunit 1 (MED1 may exert a broader influence on the functions of several nuclear receptors and their target genes. Investigations into the role of coactivators in the function of PPARs should strengthen our understanding of the complexities of metabolic diseases associated with energy metabolism.

  18. Gene expression profiling of mouse embryos with microarrays

    OpenAIRE

    Sharov, Alexei A; Piao, Yulan; Minoru S.H. Ko

    2010-01-01

    Global expression profiling by DNA microarrays provides a snapshot of cell and tissue status and becomes an essential tool in biological and medical sciences. Typical questions that can be addressed by microarray analysis in developmental biology include: (1) to find a set of genes expressed in a specific cell type; (2) to identify genes expressed commonly in multiple cell types; (3) to follow the time-course changes of gene expression patterns; (4) to demonstrate cell’s identity by showing s...

  19. Differential Expression of Specific Dermatan Sulfate Domains in Renal Pathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lensen, J.F.M.; Vlag, J. van der; Versteeg, E.M.M.; Wetzels, J.F.M.; Heuvel, L.P.W.J. van den; Berden, J.H.M.; Kuppevelt, T.H. van; Rops, A.

    2015-01-01

    Dermatan sulfate (DS), also known as chondroitin sulfate (CS)-B, is a member of the linear polysaccharides called glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). The expression of CS/DS and DS proteoglycans is increased in several fibrotic renal diseases, including interstitial fibrosis, diabetic nephropathy, mesangial

  20. Analysis of multiplex gene expression maps obtained by voxelation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Desmond J

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene expression signatures in the mammalian brain hold the key to understanding neural development and neurological disease. Researchers have previously used voxelation in combination with microarrays for acquisition of genome-wide atlases of expression patterns in the mouse brain. On the other hand, some work has been performed on studying gene functions, without taking into account the location information of a gene's expression in a mouse brain. In this paper, we present an approach for identifying the relation between gene expression maps obtained by voxelation and gene functions. Results To analyze the dataset, we chose typical genes as queries and aimed at discovering similar gene groups. Gene similarity was determined by using the wavelet features extracted from the left and right hemispheres averaged gene expression maps, and by the Euclidean distance between each pair of feature vectors. We also performed a multiple clustering approach on the gene expression maps, combined with hierarchical clustering. Among each group of similar genes and clusters, the gene function similarity was measured by calculating the average gene function distances in the gene ontology structure. By applying our methodology to find similar genes to certain target genes we were able to improve our understanding of gene expression patterns and gene functions. By applying the clustering analysis method, we obtained significant clusters, which have both very similar gene expression maps and very similar gene functions respectively to their corresponding gene ontologies. The cellular component ontology resulted in prominent clusters expressed in cortex and corpus callosum. The molecular function ontology gave prominent clusters in cortex, corpus callosum and hypothalamus. The biological process ontology resulted in clusters in cortex, hypothalamus and choroid plexus. Clusters from all three ontologies combined were most prominently expressed in

  1. Differentially expressed genes in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas identified through serial analysis of gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hustinx, Steven R; Cao, Dengfeng; Maitra, Anirban;

    2004-01-01

    Serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) is a powerful tool for the discovery of novel tumor markers. The publicly available online SAGE libraries of normal and neoplastic tissues (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/SAGE/) have recently been expanded; in addition, a more complete annotation of the human...

  2. Genome dynamics explain the evolution of flowering time CCT domain gene families in the Poaceae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Cockram

    Full Text Available Numerous CCT domain genes are known to control flowering in plants. They belong to the CONSTANS-like (COL and PREUDORESPONSE REGULATOR (PRR gene families, which in addition to a CCT domain possess B-box or response-regulator domains, respectively. Ghd7 is the most recently identified COL gene to have a proven role in the control of flowering time in the Poaceae. However, as it lacks B-box domains, its inclusion within the COL gene family, technically, is incorrect. Here, we show Ghd7 belongs to a larger family of previously uncharacterized Poaceae genes which possess just a single CCT domain, termed here CCT MOTIF FAMILY (CMF genes. We molecularly describe the CMF (and related COL and PRR gene families in four sequenced Poaceae species, as well as in the draft genome assembly of barley (Hordeum vulgare. Genetic mapping of the ten barley CMF genes identified, as well as twelve previously unmapped HvCOL and HvPRR genes, finds the majority map to colinear positions relative to their Poaceae orthologues. Combined inter-/intra-species comparative and phylogenetic analysis of CMF, COL and PRR gene families indicates they evolved prior to the monocot/dicot divergence ∼200 mya, with Poaceae CMF evolution described as the interplay between whole genome duplication in the ancestral cereal, and subsequent clade-specific mutation, deletion and duplication events. Given the proven role of CMF genes in the modulation of cereals flowering, the molecular, phylogenetic and comparative analysis of the Poaceae CMF, COL and PRR gene families presented here provides the foundation from which functional investigation can be undertaken.

  3. Genome dynamics explain the evolution of flowering time CCT domain gene families in the Poaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockram, James; Thiel, Thomas; Steuernagel, Burkhard; Stein, Nils; Taudien, Stefan; Bailey, Paul C; O'Sullivan, Donal M

    2012-01-01

    Numerous CCT domain genes are known to control flowering in plants. They belong to the CONSTANS-like (COL) and PREUDORESPONSE REGULATOR (PRR) gene families, which in addition to a CCT domain possess B-box or response-regulator domains, respectively. Ghd7 is the most recently identified COL gene to have a proven role in the control of flowering time in the Poaceae. However, as it lacks B-box domains, its inclusion within the COL gene family, technically, is incorrect. Here, we show Ghd7 belongs to a larger family of previously uncharacterized Poaceae genes which possess just a single CCT domain, termed here CCT MOTIF FAMILY (CMF) genes. We molecularly describe the CMF (and related COL and PRR) gene families in four sequenced Poaceae species, as well as in the draft genome assembly of barley (Hordeum vulgare). Genetic mapping of the ten barley CMF genes identified, as well as twelve previously unmapped HvCOL and HvPRR genes, finds the majority map to colinear positions relative to their Poaceae orthologues. Combined inter-/intra-species comparative and phylogenetic analysis of CMF, COL and PRR gene families indicates they evolved prior to the monocot/dicot divergence ∼200 mya, with Poaceae CMF evolution described as the interplay between whole genome duplication in the ancestral cereal, and subsequent clade-specific mutation, deletion and duplication events. Given the proven role of CMF genes in the modulation of cereals flowering, the molecular, phylogenetic and comparative analysis of the Poaceae CMF, COL and PRR gene families presented here provides the foundation from which functional investigation can be undertaken.

  4. Gene expression profiling of cuticular proteins across the moult cycle of the crab Portunus pelagicus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuballa Anna V

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Crustaceans represent an attractive model to study biomineralization and cuticle matrix formation, as these events are precisely timed to occur at certain stages of the moult cycle. Moulting, the process by which crustaceans shed their exoskeleton, involves the partial breakdown of the old exoskeleton and the synthesis of a new cuticle. This cuticle is subdivided into layers, some of which become calcified while others remain uncalcified. The cuticle matrix consists of many different proteins that confer the physical properties, such as pliability, of the exoskeleton. Results We have used a custom cDNA microarray chip, developed for the blue swimmer crab Portunus pelagicus, to generate expression profiles of genes involved in exoskeletal formation across the moult cycle. A total of 21 distinct moult-cycle related differentially expressed transcripts representing crustacean cuticular proteins were isolated. Of these, 13 contained copies of the cuticle_1 domain previously isolated from calcified regions of the crustacean exoskeleton, four transcripts contained a chitin_bind_4 domain (RR consensus sequence associated with both the calcified and un-calcified cuticle of crustaceans, and four transcripts contained an unannotated domain (PfamB_109992 previously isolated from C. pagurus. Additionally, cryptocyanin, a hemolymph protein involved in cuticle synthesis and structural integrity, also displays differential expression related to the moult cycle. Moult stage-specific expression analysis of these transcripts revealed that differential gene expression occurs both among transcripts containing the same domain and among transcripts containing different domains. Conclusion The large variety of genes associated with cuticle formation, and their differential expression across the crustacean moult cycle, point to the complexity of the processes associated with cuticle formation and hardening. This study provides a molecular entry path

  5. Transgenic mice expressing mutant Pinin exhibit muscular dystrophy, nebulin deficiency and elevated expression of slow-type muscle fiber genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Hsu-Pin; Hsu, Shu-Yuan [Department of Anatomy, Chang Gung University Medical College, Taiwan (China); Wu, Wen-Ai; Hu, Ji-Wei [Transgenic Mouse Core Laboratory, Chang Gung University, Taiwan (China); Ouyang, Pin, E-mail: ouyang@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Department of Anatomy, Chang Gung University Medical College, Taiwan (China); Transgenic Mouse Core Laboratory, Chang Gung University, Taiwan (China); Molecular Medicine Research Center, Chang Gung University, Taiwan (China)

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •Pnn CCD domain functions as a dominant negative mutant regulating Pnn expression and function. •Pnn CCD mutant Tg mice have a muscle wasting phenotype during development and show dystrophic histological features. •Pnn mutant muscles are susceptible to slow fiber type gene transition and NEB reduction. •The Tg mouse generated by overexpression of the Pnn CCD domain displays many characteristics resembling NEB{sup +/−} mice. -- Abstract: Pinin (Pnn) is a nuclear speckle-associated SR-like protein. The N-terminal region of the Pnn protein sequence is highly conserved from mammals to insects, but the C-terminal RS domain-containing region is absent in lower species. The N-terminal coiled-coil domain (CCD) is, therefore, of interest not only from a functional point of view, but also from an evolutionarily standpoint. To explore the biological role of the Pnn CCD in a physiological context, we generated transgenic mice overexpressing Pnn mutant in skeletal muscle. We found that overexpression of the CCD reduces endogenous Pnn expression in cultured cell lines as well as in transgenic skeletal muscle fibers. Pnn mutant mice exhibited reduced body mass and impaired muscle function during development. Mutant skeletal muscles show dystrophic histological features with muscle fibers heavily loaded with centrally located myonuclei. Expression profiling and pathway analysis identified over-representation of genes in gene categories associated with muscle contraction, specifically those related to slow type fiber. In addition nebulin (NEB) expression level is repressed in Pnn mutant skeletal muscle. We conclude that Pnn downregulation in skeletal muscle causes a muscular dystrophic phenotype associated with NEB deficiency and the CCD domain is incapable of replacing full length Pnn in terms of functional capacity.

  6. Two lamprey Hedgehog genes share non-coding regulatory sequences and expression patterns with gnathostome Hedgehogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shungo Kano

    Full Text Available Hedgehog (Hh genes play major roles in animal development and studies of their evolution, expression and function point to major differences among chordates. Here we focused on Hh genes in lampreys in order to characterize the evolution of Hh signalling at the emergence of vertebrates. Screening of a cosmid library of the river lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis and searching the preliminary genome assembly of the sea lamprey Petromyzon marinus indicate that lampreys have two Hh genes, named Hha and Hhb. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that Hha and Hhb are lamprey-specific paralogs closely related to Sonic/Indian Hh genes. Expression analysis indicates that Hha and Hhb are expressed in a Sonic Hh-like pattern. The two transcripts are expressed in largely overlapping but not identical domains in the lamprey embryonic brain, including a newly-described expression domain in the nasohypophyseal placode. Global alignments of genomic sequences and local alignment with known gnathostome regulatory motifs show that lamprey Hhs share conserved non-coding elements (CNE with gnathostome Hhs albeit with sequences that have significantly diverged and dispersed. Functional assays using zebrafish embryos demonstrate gnathostome-like midline enhancer activity for CNEs contained in intron2. We conclude that lamprey Hh genes are gnathostome Shh-like in terms of expression and regulation. In addition, they show some lamprey-specific features, including duplication and structural (but not functional changes in the intronic/regulatory sequences.

  7. Chromosomal Loop Domains Direct the Recombination of Antigen Receptor Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiazhi; Zhang, Yu; Zhao, Lijuan; Frock, Richard L; Du, Zhou; Meyers, Robin M; Meng, Fei-long; Schatz, David G; Alt, Frederick W

    2015-11-05

    RAG initiates antibody V(D)J recombination in developing lymphocytes by generating "on-target" DNA breaks at matched pairs of bona fide recombination signal sequences (RSSs). We employ bait RAG-generated breaks in endogenous or ectopically inserted RSS pairs to identify huge numbers of RAG "off-target" breaks. Such breaks occur at the simple CAC motif that defines the RSS cleavage site and are largely confined within convergent CTCF-binding element (CBE)-flanked loop domains containing bait RSS pairs. Marked orientation dependence of RAG off-target activity within loops spanning up to 2 megabases implies involvement of linear tracking. In this regard, major RAG off-targets in chromosomal translocations occur as convergent RSS pairs at enhancers within a loop. Finally, deletion of a CBE-based IgH locus element disrupts V(D)J recombination domains and, correspondingly, alters RAG on- and off-target distributions within IgH. Our findings reveal how RAG activity is developmentally focused and implicate mechanisms by which chromatin domains harness biological processes within them. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The Expression and Bioinformatic Analysis of a Novel Gene C20orf14 Associated with Lymphoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liangping SU; Deng CHEN; Jianming ZHANG; Ximing LI; Guihong PAN; Xiangyang BAI; Yunping LU; Jianfeng ZHOU; Shuang LI

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore the differentially expressed genes in the blood vessel endothelial cells (BVECs) between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and reac- tive lymph node hyperplasia (RLNH), and to perform an initial bioinformatics analysis on a novel gene, C20orf14, which is highly expressed in lymph node of lymphoma. The mRNA of the tissue from the BVECs of DLBCL and RLNH tissues was labeled with biotin respectively and hybridized with expression profile microarray, and the differentially expressed genes were obtained. Initial bio- informatics analysis was performed on a novel gene named C20orf14. Its gene structure, genomic lo- calization, the physical and chemical characteristics of the putative protein, subcellular localization, functional domain etc. were predicted, and the systematic evolution analysis was performed on the similar proteins among several species. By using expression profile microarray, many differentially expressed genes were uncovered. The efficient bioinformatics analysis have fundamentally identified that C20orfl4 was a nuclear protein, and may be involved in the post-transcription modification of mRNA. Therefore, microarray is an efficient and high throughout strategy for the detection of differ- entially expressed genes, and C20orf14 is thought to be a potential target for tumor metastasis re- searches by bioinformatics analysis.

  9. Sequence and expression analyses of KIX domain proteins suggest their importance in seed development and determination of seed size in rice, and genome stability in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Jitendra Kumar; Agarwal, Pinky; Parida, Swarup; Bajaj, Deepak; Pasrija, Richa

    2013-08-01

    The KIX domain, which mediates protein-protein interactions, was first discovered as a motif in the large multidomain transcriptional activator histone acetyltransferase p300/CBP. Later, the domain was also found in Mediator subunit MED15, where it interacts with many transcription factors. In both proteins, the KIX domain is a target of activation domains of diverse transcription activators. It was found to be an essential component of several specific gene-activation pathways in fungi and metazoans. Not much is known about KIX domain proteins in plants. This study aims to characterize all the KIX domain proteins encoded by the genomes of Arabidopsis and rice. All identified KIX domain proteins are presented, together with their chromosomal locations, phylogenetic analysis, expression and SNP analyses. KIX domains were found not only in p300/CBP- and MED15-like plant proteins, but also in F-box proteins in rice and DNA helicase in Arabidopsis, suggesting roles of KIX domains in ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation and genome stability. Expression analysis revealed overlapping expression of OsKIX_3, OsKIX_5 and OsKIX_7 in different stages of rice seeds development. Moreover, an association analysis of 136 in silico mined SNP loci in 23 different rice genotypes with grain-length information identified three non-synonymous SNP loci in these three rice genes showing strong association with long- and short-grain differentiation. Interestingly, these SNPs were located within KIX domain encoding sequences. Overall, this study lays a foundation for functional analysis of KIX domain proteins in plants.

  10. Modeling of gap gene expression in Drosophila Kruppel mutants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin Kozlov

    Full Text Available The segmentation gene network in Drosophila embryo solves the fundamental problem of embryonic patterning: how to establish a periodic pattern of gene expression, which determines both the positions and the identities of body segments. The gap gene network constitutes the first zygotic regulatory tier in this process. Here we have applied the systems-level approach to investigate the regulatory effect of gap gene Kruppel (Kr on segmentation gene expression. We acquired a large dataset on the expression of gap genes in Kr null mutants and demonstrated that the expression levels of these genes are significantly reduced in the second half of cycle 14A. To explain this novel biological result we applied the gene circuit method which extracts regulatory information from spatial gene expression data. Previous attempts to use this formalism to correctly and quantitatively reproduce gap gene expression in mutants for a trunk gap gene failed, therefore here we constructed a revised model and showed that it correctly reproduces the expression patterns of gap genes in Kr null mutants. We found that the remarkable alteration of gap gene expression patterns in Kr mutants can be explained by the dynamic decrease of activating effect of Cad on a target gene and exclusion of Kr gene from the complex network of gap gene interactions, that makes it possible for other interactions, in particular, between hb and gt, to come into effect. The successful modeling of the quantitative aspects of gap gene expression in mutant for the trunk gap gene Kr is a significant achievement of this work. This result also clearly indicates that the oversimplified representation of transcriptional regulation in the previous models is one of the reasons for unsuccessful attempts of mutant simulations.

  11. Structure and expression of the S locus-related genes of maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, R; Walker, J C

    1993-03-01

    The extracellular of the putative receptor-like protein kinase, ZmPK1, is related to the self-incompatibility locus (S-locus) genes of Brassica. We have isolated and characterized a genomic DNA clone of ZmPK1 and three additional genes from maize that are highly related to ZmPK1. These three S-locus related genes do not appear to have the protein kinase catalytic domain that is found in ZmPK1. One or more of these genes are expressed specifically in the silks. This initial description of S-locus related genes in monocotyledonous plants suggests that the S-locus domain may be involved in several different cellular functions in a wide variety of plants.

  12. Bioinformatics analysis of the gene expression profile in Bladder carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Xiao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bladder carcinoma, which has the ninth highest incidence among malignant tumors in the world, is a complex, multifactorial disease. The malignant transformation of bladder cells results from DNA mutations and alterations in gene expression levels. In this work, we used a bioinformatics approach to investigate the molecular mechanisms of bladder carcinoma. Biochips downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO were used to analyze the gene expression profile in urinary bladder cells from individuals with carcinoma. The gene expression profile of normal genomes was used as a control. The analysis of gene expression revealed important alterations in genes involved in biological processes and metabolic pathways. We also identified some small molecules capable of reversing the altered gene expression in bladder carcinoma; these molecules could provide a basis for future therapies for the treatment of this disease.

  13. Developmental expression of "germline"- and "sex determination"-related genes in the ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitzel, Adam M; Pang, Kevin; Martindale, Mark Q

    2016-01-01

    An essential developmental pathway in sexually reproducing animals is the specification of germ cells and the differentiation of mature gametes, sperm and oocytes. The "germline" genes vasa, nanos and piwi are commonly identified in primordial germ cells, suggesting a molecular signature for the germline throughout animals. However, these genes are also expressed in a diverse set of somatic stem cells throughout the animal kingdom leaving open significant questions for whether they are required for germline specification. Similarly, members of the Dmrt gene family are essential components regulating sex determination and differentiation in bilaterian animals, but the functions of these transcription factors, including potential roles in sex determination, in early diverging animals remain unknown. The phylogenetic position of ctenophores and the genome sequence of the lobate Mnemiopsis leidyi motivated us to determine the compliment of these gene families in this species and determine expression patterns during development. Our phylogenetic analyses of the vasa, piwi and nanos gene families show that Mnemiopsis has multiple genes in each family with multiple lineage-specific paralogs. Expression domains of Mnemiopsis nanos, vasa and piwi, during embryogenesis from fertilization to the cydippid stage, were diverse, with little overlapping expression and no or little expression in what we think are the germ cells or gametogenic regions. piwi paralogs in Mnemiopsis had distinct expression domains in the ectoderm during development. We observed overlapping expression domains in the apical organ and tentacle apparatus of the cydippid for a subset of "germline genes," which are areas of high cell proliferation, suggesting that these genes are involved with "stem cell" specification and maintenance. Similarly, the five Dmrt genes show diverse non-overlapping expression domains, with no clear evidence for expression in future gametogenic regions of the adult. We also

  14. Differential Effects of Language Attrition in the Domains of Verb Placement and Object Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the differential effects of language attrition in two diverse linguistic domains: verb placement and object expression. Linguistic phenomena at the syntax--discourse interface, such as object expression, have been shown to be more vulnerable to attrition than narrow syntax properties, such as verb placement. This study aims…

  15. Domain combination of the vertebrate-like TLR gene family: implications for their origin and evolution

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Baojun Wu; Tianxiao Huan; Jing Gong; Pin Zhou; Zengliang Bai

    2011-12-01

    Domain shuffling, which is an important mechanism in the evolution of multi-domain proteins, has shaped the evolutionary development of the immune system in animals. Toll and Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a class of proteins that play a key role in the innate and adaptive immune systems. Draft genome sequences provide the opportunity to compare the Toll/TLR gene repertoire among representative metazoans. In this study, we investigated the combination of Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) and leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domains of metazoan Toll/TLRs. Before Toll with both domains occurred in Cnidaria (sea anemone, Nematostella vectensis), through domain combinations, TIR-only and LRR-only proteins had already appeared in sponges (Amphimedon queenslandica). Although vertebrate-like TIR (V-TIR) domain already appeared in Cnidaria, the vertebrate-like TLR (V-TLR) with both domains appeared much later. The first combination between V-TIR domain and vertebrate-like LRR (V-LRR) domain for V-TLR may have occurred after the divergence of Cnidaria and bilateria. Then, another combination for V-TLR, a recombination of both domains, possibly occurred before or during the evolution of primitive vertebrates. Taken together, two rounds of domain combinations may thus have co-shaped the vertebrate TLRs.

  16. Genome-wide identification, phylogeny, and expression analysis of the SWEET gene family in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Chao-Yang; Han, Jia-Xuan; Han, Xiao-Xue; Jiang, Jing

    2015-12-01

    The SWEET (Sugars Will Eventually Be Exported Transporters) gene family encodes membrane-embedded sugar transporters containing seven transmembrane helices harboring two MtN3 and saliva domain. SWEETs play important roles in diverse biological processes, including plant growth, development, and response to environmental stimuli. Here, we conducted an exhaustive search of the tomato genome, leading to the identification of 29 SWEET genes. We analyzed the structures, conserved domains, and phylogenetic relationships of these protein-coding genes in detail. We also analyzed the transcript levels of SWEET genes in various tissues, organs, and developmental stages to obtain information about their functions. Furthermore, we investigated the expression patterns of the SWEET genes in response to exogenous sugar and adverse environmental stress (high and low temperatures). Some family members exhibited tissue-specific expression, whereas others were more ubiquitously expressed. Numerous stress-responsive candidate genes were obtained. The results of this study provide insights into the characteristics of the SWEET genes in tomato and may serve as a basis for further functional studies of such genes.

  17. Structure and expression of three Emx genes in the dogfish Scyliorhinus canicula: functional and evolutionary implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derobert, Y; Plouhinec, J L; Sauka-Spengler, T; Le Mentec, C; Baratte, B; Jaillard, D; Mazan, S

    2002-07-15

    We report the characterization of three Emx genes in a chondrichthyan, the dogfish Scyliorhinus canicula. Comparisons of these genes with their osteichthyan counterparts indicate that the gnathostome Emx genes belong to three distinct orthology classes, each containing one of the dogfish genes and either the tetrapod Emx1 genes (Emx1 class), the osteichthyan Emx2 genes (Emx2 class) or the zebrafish Emx1 gene (Emx3 class). While the three classes could be retrieved from the pufferfish genome data, no indication of an Emx3-related gene in tetrapods could be found in the databases, suggesting that this class may have been lost in this taxon. Expression pattern comparisons of the three dogfish Emx genes and their osteichthyan counterparts indicate that not only telencephalic, but also diencephalic Emx expression territories are highly conserved among gnathostomes. In particular, all gnathostomes share an early, dynamic phase of Emx expression, spanning presumptive dorsal diencephalic territories, which involves Emx3 in the dogfish, but another orthology class, Emx2, in tetrapods. In addition, the dogfish Emx2 gene shows a highly specific expression domain in the cephalic paraxial mesoderm from the end of gastrulation and throughout neurulation, which suggests a role in the segmentation of the cephalic mesoderm.

  18. Analysis of pea HMG-I/Y expression suggests a role in defence gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klosterman, Steven J; Choi, Jane J; Hadwiger, Lee A

    2003-07-01

    SUMMARY HMG-I/Y proteins are characterized by the presence of AT-hook motifs, DNA binding domains that recognize AT-rich tracts of DNA. By facilitating protein:protein and protein:DNA interactions in the vicinity of these AT-rich binding sites, HMG-I/Y positively or negatively regulates gene expression. Several pea defence gene promoters have AT-rich tracts of DNA that are potential targets for modulation via HMG-I/Y. In this study, a comparison of the expression of a pea defence gene (DRR206) mRNA relative to the expression of HMG-I/Y mRNA was monitored by Northern analysis following the inoculation of a fungal pathogen, Fusarium solani or treatment with chitosan and a F. solani DNase (Fsph DNase). In pea pod endocarp tissue, HMG-I/Y expression was observed at high levels in untreated tissue and at lower levels 6 h following inoculation or wounding of the tissue. Western blots with an antipea HMG-I/Y polyclonal antibody also revealed that pea HMG-I/Y is expressed at decreased levels 6 h following inoculation or elicitor treatment. HMG-I/Y extracted from pea caused alterations in the gel migration of radio-labelled AT-rich sequences from the pea DRR206 promoter, suggesting that similar interactions could exist in vivo. Agroinfiltration was utilized to express the pea HMG-I/Y gene in tobacco containing a chimeric gene fusion of a promoter from the PR gene, DRR206, and the beta-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene. Transient expression of pea HMG-I/Y led to a decrease in GUS reporter gene activity in the heterologous tobacco system. These data implicate pea HMG-I/Y abundance in the down-regulation of DRR206 gene expression, and possibly HMG-I/Y depletion in the expression of defence genes in pea.

  19. Gene expression during fruit ripening in avocado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoffersen, R E; Warm, E; Laties, G G

    1982-06-01

    The poly(A) (+)RNA populations from avocado fruit (Persea americana Mill cv. Hass) at four stages of ripening were isolated by two cycles of oligo-dT-cellulose chromatography and examined by invitro translation, using the rabbit reticulocyte lysate system, followed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (isoelectric focusing followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis) of the resulting translation products. Three mRNAs increased dramatically with the climacteric rise in respiration and ethylene production. The molecular weights of the corresponding translation products from the ripening-related mRNAs are 80,000, 36,000, and 16,500. These results indicate that ripening may be linked to the expression of specific genes.

  20. Kinase domain insert containing receptor promotor controlled suicide gene system kills human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zong-Hai Huang; Wen-Yu Yang; Qi Cheng; Jing-Long Yu; Zhou Li; Zong-Yan Tong; Hui-Juan Song; Xiao-Yan Che

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the killing effect of double suicide gene mediated by adenovirus and regulated under kinase domain insert containing receptor (KDR) promoter on human umbilical vein endothelial cells. METHODS: By PCR technology, human KDR promoter gene, Escherichia coli(E. coli) cytosine deaminase (CD) gene and the herpes simple virus-thymidine kinase (TK) gene were cloned. Plasmid pKDR-CDglyTK was constructed with them. Then, a recombinant adenoviral plasmid pAdKDRCDglyTK was constructed in a "two-step transformation protocol". The newly constructed plasmids were transfected to 293 packaging cells to grow adenoviruses, which were further propagated and purified. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were infected with a different multiplicity of infection (MOI) of resultant recombinant adenovirus, the infection rate was measured with the aid of (GFP) expression. Infected cells were cultured in culture media containing different concentrations of (GCV) and/or 5-(FC), and the killing effects were measured.RESULTS: Recombinant adenoviruses AdKDR-CDglyTK were successfully constructed, and they infected HUVEC cells efficiently. Our data indicated that the infection rate was relevant to MOI of recombinant adenoviruses. HUVEC cells infected with AdKDR-CDglyTK were highly sensitive to the prodrugs, their survival rate correlated to both the concentration of the prodrugs and the MOI of recombinant adenoviruses. Our data also indicated that the two prodrugs used in combination were much more effective on killing transgeneic cells than GCV or 5-FC used alone. CONCLUSION: Prodrug/KDR-CDglyTK system is effective on killing HUVEC cells, its killing effect correlates to the concentration of prodrugs and recombinant adenovirus' MOI. Combined use of the two prodrugs confers better killing effects on transgeneic cells.

  1. Evolution of Gene Expression Balance Among Homeologs of Natural Polyploids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasdeep S. Mutti

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Polyploidy is a major evolutionary process in eukaryotes, yet the expression balance of homeologs in natural polyploids is largely unknown. To study this expression balance, the expression patterns of 2180 structurally well-characterized genes of wheat were studied, of which 813 had the expected three copies and 375 had less than three. Copy numbers of the remaining 992 ranged from 4 to 14, including homeologs, orthologs, and paralogs. Of the genes with three structural copies corresponding to homeologs, 55% expressed from all three, 38% from two, and the remaining 7% expressed from only one of the three copies. Homeologs of 76–87% of the genes showed differential expression patterns in different tissues, thus have evolved different gene expression controls, possibly resulting in novel functions. Homeologs of 55% of the genes showed tissue-specific expression, with the largest percentage (14% in the anthers and the smallest (7% in the pistils. The highest number (1.72/3 of homeologs/gene expression was in the roots and the lowest (1.03/3 in the anthers. As the expression of homeologs changed with changes in structural copy number, about 30% of the genes showed dosage dependence. Chromosomal location also impacted expression pattern as a significantly higher proportion of genes in the proximal regions showed expression from all three copies compared to that present in the distal regions.

  2. Evolution of Gene Expression Balance Among Homeologs of Natural Polyploids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutti, Jasdeep S; Bhullar, Ramanjot K; Gill, Kulvinder S

    2017-04-03

    Polyploidy is a major evolutionary process in eukaryotes, yet the expression balance of homeologs in natural polyploids is largely unknown. To study this expression balance, the expression patterns of 2180 structurally well-characterized genes of wheat were studied, of which 813 had the expected three copies and 375 had less than three. Copy numbers of the remaining 992 ranged from 4 to 14, including homeologs, orthologs, and paralogs. Of the genes with three structural copies corresponding to homeologs, 55% expressed from all three, 38% from two, and the remaining 7% expressed from only one of the three copies. Homeologs of 76-87% of the genes showed differential expression patterns in different tissues, thus have evolved different gene expression controls, possibly resulting in novel functions. Homeologs of 55% of the genes showed tissue-specific expression, with the largest percentage (14%) in the anthers and the smallest (7%) in the pistils. The highest number (1.72/3) of homeologs/gene expression was in the roots and the lowest (1.03/3) in the anthers. As the expression of homeologs changed with changes in structural copy number, about 30% of the genes showed dosage dependence. Chromosomal location also impacted expression pattern as a significantly higher proportion of genes in the proximal regions showed expression from all three copies compared to that present in the distal regions.

  3. Dissecting specific and global transcriptional regulation of bacterial gene expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerosa, Luca; Kochanowski, Karl; Heinemann, Matthias; Sauer, Uwe

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression is regulated by specific transcriptional circuits but also by the global expression machinery as a function of growth. Simultaneous specific and global regulation thus constitutes an additional-but often neglected-layer of complexity in gene expression. Here, we develop an experiment

  4. Phenotypic plasticity and divergence in gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Timothy M; Schulte, Patricia M

    2015-07-01

    The extent to which phenotypic plasticity, or the ability of a single genotype to produce different phenotypes in different environments, impedes or promotes genetic divergence has been a matter of debate within evolutionary biology for many decades (see, for example, Ghalambor et al. ; Pfennig et al. ). Similarly, the role of evolution in shaping phenotypic plasticity remains poorly understood (Pigliucci ). In this issue of Molecular Ecology, Dayan et al. () provide empirical data relevant to these questions by assessing the extent of plasticity and divergence in the expression levels of 2272 genes in muscle tissue from killifish (genus Fundulus) exposed to different temperatures. F. heteroclitus (Fig. A) and F. grandis are minnows that inhabit estuarine marshes (Fig. B) along the coasts of the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico in North America. These habitats undergo large variations in temperature both daily and seasonally, and these fish are known to demonstrate substantial phenotypic plasticity in response to temperature change (e.g. Fangue et al. ). Furthermore, the range of F. heteroclitus spans a large latitudinal gradient of temperatures, such that northern populations experience temperatures that are on average ~10°C colder than do southern populations (Schulte ). By comparing gene expression patterns between populations of these fish from different thermal habitats held in the laboratory at three different temperatures, Dayan et al. () address two important questions regarding the interacting effects of plasticity and evolution: (i) How does phenotypic plasticity affect adaptive divergence? and (ii) How does adaptive divergence affect plasticity?

  5. Expression regulation of design process gene in product design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fang, Lusheng; Li, Bo; Tong, Shurong

    2011-01-01

    is proposed and analyzed, as well as its three categories i.e., the operator gene, the structural gene and the regulator gene. Second, the trigger mechanism that design objectives and constraints trigger the operator gene is constructed. Third, the expression principle of structural gene is analyzed......To improve the design process efficiency, this paper proposes the principle and methodology that design process gene controls the characteristics of design process under the framework of design process reuse and optimization based on design process gene. First, the concept of design process gene...... with the example of design management gene. Last, the regulation mode that the regulator gene regulates the expression of the structural gene is established and it is illustrated by taking the design process management gene as an example. © (2011) Trans Tech Publications....

  6. Monoallelic expression of the human FOXP2 speech gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adegbola, Abidemi A; Cox, Gerald F; Bradshaw, Elizabeth M; Hafler, David A; Gimelbrant, Alexander; Chess, Andrew

    2015-06-02

    The recent descriptions of widespread random monoallelic expression (RMAE) of genes distributed throughout the autosomal genome indicate that there are more genes subject to RMAE on autosomes than the number of genes on the X chromosome where X-inactivation dictates RMAE of X-linked genes. Several of the autosomal genes that undergo RMAE have independently been implicated in human Mendelian disorders. Thus, parsing the relationship between allele-specific expression of these genes and disease is of interest. Mutations in the human forkhead box P2 gene, FOXP2, cause developmental verbal dyspraxia with profound speech and language deficits. Here, we show that the human FOXP2 gene undergoes RMAE. Studying an individual with developmental verbal dyspraxia, we identify a deletion 3 Mb away from the FOXP2 gene, which impacts FOXP2 gene expression in cis. Together these data suggest the intriguing possibility that RMAE impacts the haploinsufficiency phenotypes observed for FOXP2 mutations.

  7. Association study of 167 candidate genes for schizophrenia selected by a multi-domain evidence-based prioritization algorithm and neurodevelopmental hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhongming; Webb, Bradley T; Jia, Peilin; Bigdeli, T Bernard; Maher, Brion S; van den Oord, Edwin; Bergen, Sarah E; Amdur, Richard L; O'Neill, Francis A; Walsh, Dermot; Thiselton, Dawn L; Chen, Xiangning; Pato, Carlos N; Riley, Brien P; Kendler, Kenneth S; Fanous, Ayman H

    2013-01-01

    Integrating evidence from multiple domains is useful in prioritizing disease candidate genes for subsequent testing. We ranked all known human genes (n=3819) under linkage peaks in the Irish Study of High-Density Schizophrenia Families using three different evidence domains: 1) a meta-analysis of microarray gene expression results using the Stanley Brain collection, 2) a schizophrenia protein-protein interaction network, and 3) a systematic literature search. Each gene was assigned a domain-specific p-value and ranked after evaluating the evidence within each domain. For comparison to this ranking process, a large-scale candidate gene hypothesis was also tested by including genes with Gene Ontology terms related to neurodevelopment. Subsequently, genotypes of 3725 SNPs in 167 genes from a custom Illumina iSelect array were used to evaluate the top ranked vs. hypothesis selected genes. Seventy-three genes were both highly ranked and involved in neurodevelopment (category 1) while 42 and 52 genes were exclusive to neurodevelopment (category 2) or highly ranked (category 3), respectively. The most significant associations were observed in genes PRKG1, PRKCE, and CNTN4 but no individual SNPs were significant after correction for multiple testing. Comparison of the approaches showed an excess of significant tests using the hypothesis-driven neurodevelopment category. Random selection of similar sized genes from two independent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of schizophrenia showed the excess was unlikely by chance. In a further meta-analysis of three GWAS datasets, four candidate SNPs reached nominal significance. Although gene ranking using integrated sources of prior information did not enrich for significant results in the current experiment, gene selection using an a priori hypothesis (neurodevelopment) was superior to random selection. As such, further development of gene ranking strategies using more carefully selected sources of information is warranted.

  8. Association Study of 167 Candidate Genes for Schizophrenia Selected by a Multi-Domain Evidence-Based Prioritization Algorithm and Neurodevelopmental Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Peilin; Bigdeli, T. Bernard; Maher, Brion S.; van den Oord, Edwin; Bergen, Sarah E.; Amdur, Richard L.; O'Neill, Francis A.; Walsh, Dermot; Thiselton, Dawn L.; Chen, Xiangning; Pato, Carlos N.; Riley, Brien P.; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Fanous, Ayman H.

    2013-01-01

    Integrating evidence from multiple domains is useful in prioritizing disease candidate genes for subsequent testing. We ranked all known human genes (n = 3819) under linkage peaks in the Irish Study of High-Density Schizophrenia Families using three different evidence domains: 1) a meta-analysis of microarray gene expression results using the Stanley Brain collection, 2) a schizophrenia protein-protein interaction network, and 3) a systematic literature search. Each gene was assigned a domain-specific p-value and ranked after evaluating the evidence within each domain. For comparison to this ranking process, a large-scale candidate gene hypothesis was also tested by including genes with Gene Ontology terms related to neurodevelopment. Subsequently, genotypes of 3725 SNPs in 167 genes from a custom Illumina iSelect array were used to evaluate the top ranked vs. hypothesis selected genes. Seventy-three genes were both highly ranked and involved in neurodevelopment (category 1) while 42 and 52 genes were exclusive to neurodevelopment (category 2) or highly ranked (category 3), respectively. The most significant associations were observed in genes PRKG1, PRKCE, and CNTN4 but no individual SNPs were significant after correction for multiple testing. Comparison of the approaches showed an excess of significant tests using the hypothesis-driven neurodevelopment category. Random selection of similar sized genes from two independent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of schizophrenia showed the excess was unlikely by chance. In a further meta-analysis of three GWAS datasets, four candidate SNPs reached nominal significance. Although gene ranking using integrated sources of prior information did not enrich for significant results in the current experiment, gene selection using an a priori hypothesis (neurodevelopment) was superior to random selection. As such, further development of gene ranking strategies using more carefully selected sources of information is

  9. Gene expression profiling of TIR-domain-containing adaptor molecule (TICAM)in channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus challenged with different pathogens including bacteria and virus%斑点叉尾(鱼回)TICAM在细菌和病毒感染后的基因表达特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王启龙; 李敏; 路飏; 黄爱平; 曾令兵; 王文琪; 陈松林; 沙珍霞

    2012-01-01

    In mammals, Toll-IL-1 receptor (TIR) domain-containing adaptor molecule 1(TICAM-1) is a signaling adaptor for TLR3 and TLR4 that activates the transcription factors IRF-3, NF-kB, and AP-1, leading to the induction of type I interferon and cytokines. TICAM is also identified in some fish species, however, the gene expression profiling of TICAM is largely unknown in teleosts. Because bacteria such as Aeromonas hydrophila , Streptococcus spp. And Edwardsiella tarda and viruses such as channel catfish virus cause a multisystemic disease responsible for severe losses in channel catfish aquaculture in China. In this study, gene expression profiling of TICAM in different immune tissues(iver, headkidney, spleen,and intestine) after infection with these pathogens assayed by quantitative RT-PCR was described. After infection with A. Hydrophila, TICAM was up-regulated approximately 2. 3-fold at 24 h in liver and 1. 9-fold at 12 h in spleen, while expression of this gene was down-regulated in headkidney and intestine, with the lowest expression as 0. 15-fold at 48 h in headkidney, 0. 53-fold at 24 h in intestine, respectively. TICAM was up-regulated drastically in liver, spleen, headkidney and intestine after infection with Streptococcus spp. It reached the highest level with 23-fold in liver at 7 d post infection, and it increased about 10 times in headkidney and spleen after infection. The expression of TICAM increased in all tested tissues after infection with E. Tarda, especially it was up-regulated to the highest (23. 1-fold) at 7d in spleen. After infection with channel catfish virus, the gene TICAM expression was up-regulated in liver, headkidney and intestine moderately, with the highest expression of 3. 7-fold in liver at 72 h, 2. 8-fold in headkidney at 7 d, 1. 5-fold at 24 h in intestine. However, it was down-regulated in spleen,and its lowest expression was 0. 13-fold at 24 h. In conclusion, the results of this study suggest that the TICAM gene may play crucial

  10. Individual variation of adipose gene expression and identification of covariated genes by cDNA microarrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeuf, S.; Keijer, J.; Franssen-Hal, van N.L.W.; Klaus, S.

    2002-01-01

    Gene expression profiling through the application of microarrays provides comprehensive assessment of gene expression levels in a given tissue or cell population, as well as information on changes of gene expression in altered physiological or pathological situations. Microarrays are particularly su

  11. Modulation of R-gene expression across environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacQueen, Alice; Bergelson, Joy

    2016-03-01

    Some environments are more conducive to pathogen growth than others, and, as a consequence, plants might be expected to invest more in resistance when pathogen growth is favored. Resistance (R-) genes in Arabidopsis thaliana have unusually extensive variation in basal expression when comparing the same R-gene among accessions collected from different environments. R-gene expression variation was characterized to explore whether R-gene expression is up-regulated in environments favoring pathogen proliferation and down-regulated when risks of infection are low; down-regulation would follow if costs of R-gene expression negatively impact plant fitness in the absence of disease. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR was used to quantify the expression of 13 R-gene loci in plants grown in eight environmental conditions for each of 12 A. thaliana accessions, and large effects of the environment on R-gene expression were found. Surprisingly, almost every change in the environment--be it a change in biotic or abiotic conditions--led to an increase in R-gene expression, a response that was distinct from the average transcriptome response and from that of other stress response genes. These changes in expression are functional in that environmental change prior to infection affected levels of specific disease resistance to isolates of Pseudomonas syringae. In addition, there are strong latitudinal clines in basal R-gene expression and clines in R-gene expression plasticity correlated with drought and high temperatures. These results suggest that variation in R-gene expression across environments may be shaped by natural selection to reduce fitness costs of R-gene expression in permissive or predictable environments.

  12. Genome-wide identification, characterization and expression profiling of LIM family genes in Solanum lycopersicum L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatun, Khadiza; Robin, Arif Hasan Khan; Park, Jong-In; Ahmed, Nasar Uddin; Kim, Chang Kil; Lim, Ki-Byung; Kim, Min-Bae; Lee, Do-Jin; Nou, Ill Sup; Chung, Mi-Young

    2016-11-01

    LIM domain proteins, some of which have been shown to be actin binding proteins, are involved in various developmental activities and cellular processes in plants. To date, the molecular defense-related functions of LIM family genes have not been investigated in any solanaceous vegetable crop species. In this study, we identified 15 LIM family genes in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) through genome-wide analysis and performed expression profiling in different organs of tomato, including fruits at six different developmental stages. We also performed expression profiling of selected tomato LIM genes in plants under ABA, drought, cold, NaCl and heat stress treatment. The encoded proteins of the 15 tomato LIM genes were classified into two main groups, i.e., proteins similar to cysteine-rich proteins and plant-specific DAR proteins, based on differences in functional domains and variability in their C-terminal regions. The DAR proteins contain a so far poorly characterized zinc-finger-like motif that we propose to call DAR-ZF. Six of the 15 LIM genes were expressed only in flowers, indicating that they play flower-specific roles in plants. The other nine genes were expressed in all organs and at various stages of fruit development. SlβLIM1b was expressed relatively highly at the later stage of fruit development, but three other genes, SlWLIM2a, SlDAR2 and SlDAR4, were expressed at the early stage of fruit development. Seven genes were induced by ABA, five by cold, seven by drought, eight by NaCl and seven by heat treatment respectively, indicating their possible roles in abiotic stress tolerance. Our results will be useful for functional analysis of LIM genes during fruit development in tomato plants under different abiotic stresses. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  13. Molecular cloning, gene organization and expression of the human UDP-GalNAc:Neu5Acalpha2-3Galbeta-R beta1,4-N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase responsible for the biosynthesis of the blood group Sda/Cad antigen: evidence for an unusual extended cytoplasmic domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montiel, Maria-Dolores; Krzewinski-Recchi, Marie-Ange; Delannoy, Philippe; Harduin-Lepers, Anne

    2003-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the short and long transcripts of beta1,4- N -acetylgalactosaminyltransferase have been submitted to the DDBJ, EMBL, GenBank(R) and GSDB Nucleotide Sequence Databases under accession nos AJ517770 and AJ517771 respectively. The human Sd(a) antigen is formed through the addition of an N -acetylgalactosamine residue via a beta1,4-linkage to a sub-terminal galactose residue substituted with an alpha2,3-linked sialic acid residue. We have taken advantage of the previously cloned mouse cDNA sequence of the UDP-GalNAc:Neu5Acalpha2-3Galbeta-R beta1,4- N -acetylgalactosaminyltransferase (Sd(a) beta1,4GalNAc transferase) to screen the human EST and genomic databases and to identify the corresponding human gene. The sequence spans over 35 kb of genomic DNA on chromosome 17 and comprises at least 12 exons. As judged by reverse transcription PCR, the human gene is expressed widely since it is detected in various amounts in almost all cell types studied. Northern blot analysis indicated that five Sd(a) beta1,4GalNAc transferase transcripts of 8.8, 6.1, 4.7, 3.8 and 1.65 kb were highly expressed in colon and to a lesser extent in kidney, stomach, ileum and rectum. The complete coding nucleotide sequence was amplified from Caco-2 cells. Interestingly, the alternative use of two first exons, named E1(S) and E1(L), leads to the production of two transcripts. These nucleotide sequences give rise potentially to two proteins of 506 and 566 amino acid residues, identical in their sequence with the exception of their cytoplasmic tail. The short form is highly similar (74% identity) to the mouse enzyme whereas the long form shows an unusual long cytoplasmic tail of 66 amino acid residues that is as yet not described for any other mammalian glycosyltransferase. Upon transient transfection in Cos-7 cells of the common catalytic domain, a soluble form of the protein was obtained, which catalysed the transfer of GalNAc residues to alpha2,3-sialylated acceptor

  14. Radiolabeled PNAs for imaging gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wickstrom, Eric; Sauter, Edward; Tian, Xianben; Rao, Sampath; Quin, Weyng; Thakur, Mathew [Thomas Jefferson Univ., PA (United States)

    2002-09-01

    Scintigraphic imaging of gene expression in vivo by non-invasive means could precisely direct physicians to appropriate intervention at the onset of disease and could contribute extensively to the management of patients. However no method is currently available to image specific over expressed oncogene mRNAs in vivo by scintigraphic imaging. Nevertheless, we have observed that Tc 99 m peptides can delineate tumors, and that PNA-peptides are specific for receptors on malignant cells and are taken up specifically and concentrated in nuclei. We hypothesize that antisense Tc 99 m PNA peptides will be taken up by human breast cancer cells, hybridize to complementary mRNA targets, and permit imaging of oncogene mRNAs in human breast cancer xenografts in a mouse model, providing a proof-of-principle for non-invasive detection of precancerous and invasive breast cancer. Oncogenes cyclin D1, erB-2, c-MYC and tumor suppressor p53 will be probed. If successful, this technique will be useful for diagnostic imaging of other solid tumors as well. (author)

  15. Screening and expression of genes from metagenomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leis, Benedikt; Angelov, Angel; Liebl, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Microorganisms are the most abundant and widely spread organisms on earth. They colonize a huge variety of natural and anthropogenic environments, including very specialized ecological niches and even extreme habitats, which are made possible by the immense metabolic diversity and genetic adaptability of microbes. As most of the organisms from environmental samples defy cultivation, cultivation-independent metagenomics approaches have been applied since more than one decade to access and characterize the phylogenetic diversity in microbial communities as well as their metabolic potential and ecological functions. Thereby, metagenomics has fully emerged as an own scientific field for mining new biocatalysts for many industrially relevant processes in biotechnology and pharmaceutics. This review summarizes common metagenomic approaches ranging from sampling, isolation of nucleic acids, construction of metagenomic libraries and their evaluation. Sequence-based screenings implement next-generation sequencing platforms, microarrays or PCR-based methods, while function-based analysis covers heterologous expression of metagenomic libraries in diverse screening setups. Major constraints and advantages of each strategy are described. The importance of alternative host-vector systems is discussed, and in order to underline the role of phylogenetic and physiological distance from the gene donor and the expression host employed, a case study is presented that describes the screening of a genomic library from an extreme thermophilic bacterium in both Escherichia coli and Thermus thermophilus. Metatranscriptomics, metaproteomics and single-cell-based methods are expected to complement metagenomic screening efforts to identify novel biocatalysts from environmental samples.

  16. Integrated analysis of gene expression by association rules discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carazo Jose M

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray technology is generating huge amounts of data about the expression level of thousands of genes, or even whole genomes, across different experimental conditions. To extract biological knowledge, and to fully understand such datasets, it is essential to include external biological information about genes and gene products to the analysis of expression data. However, most of the current approaches to analyze microarray datasets are mainly focused on the analysis of experimental data, and external biological information is incorporated as a posterior process. Results In this study we present a method for the integrative analysis of microarray data based on the Association Rules Discovery data mining technique. The approach integrates gene annotations and expression data to discover intrinsic associations among both data sources based on co-occurrence patterns. We applied the proposed methodology to the analysis of gene expression datasets in which genes were annotated with metabolic pathways, transcriptional regulators and Gene Ontology categories. Automatically extracted associations revealed significant relationships among these gene attributes and expression patterns, where many of them are clearly supported by recently reported work. Conclusion The integration of external biological information and gene expression data can provide insights about the biological processes associated to gene expression programs. In this paper we show that the proposed methodology is able to integrate multiple gene annotations and expression data in the same analytic framework and extract meaningful associations among heterogeneous sources of data. An implementation of the method is included in the Engene software package.

  17. Using RNA-Seq data to select refence genes for normalizing gene expression in apple roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gene expression in apple roots in response to various stress conditions is a less-explored research subject. Reliable reference genes for normalizing quantitative gene expression data have not been carefully investigated. In this study, the suitability of a set of 15 apple genes were evaluated for t...

  18. Molecular characterization, sequence analysis and tissue expression of a porcine gene – MOSPD2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Jie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The full-length cDNA sequence of a porcine gene, MOSPD2, was amplified using the rapid amplification of cDNA ends method based on a pig expressed sequence tag sequence which was highly homologous to the coding sequence of the human MOSPD2 gene. Sequence prediction analysis revealed that the open reading frame of this gene encodes a protein of 491 amino acids that has high homology with the motile sperm domain-containing protein 2 (MOSPD2 of five species: horse (89%, human (90%, chimpanzee (89%, rhesus monkey (89% and mouse (85%; thus, it could be defined as a porcine MOSPD2 gene. This novel porcine gene was assigned GeneID: 100153601. This gene is structured in 15 exons and 14 introns as revealed by computer-assisted analysis. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that the porcine MOSPD2 gene has a closer genetic relationship with the MOSPD2 gene of horse. Tissue expression analysis indicated that the porcine MOSPD2 gene is generally and differentially expressed in the spleen, muscle, skin, kidney, lung, liver, fat and heart. Our experiment is the first to establish the primary foundation for further research on the porcine MOSPD2 gene.

  19. Prognostic significance of discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) expression in ovarian cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Yi; Xu, Zhe; Fan, Jin; Huang, Liu; Ye, Ming; Shi, Kun; Huang, Zheng; Liu, Yaqiong; He, Langchi; Huang, Jiezhen; Wang, Yibin; Li, Qiufeng

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence has suggested that discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) plays an important role in cancer development and metastasis. However, the correlation between DDR2 expression and clinical outcome in ovarian cancer has not been investigated. In this study, DDR2 expression was examined by Real-time PCR in surgically resected ovarian cancer and normal ovary tissues. Besides, DDR2 expression was analyzed immunohistochemically in 103 ovarian cancer patients, and the correlation between D...

  20. A Casparian strip domain-like gene, CASPL, negatively alters growth and cold tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jinghua; Ding, Changqing; Xu, Baochen; Chen, Cuiting; Narsai, Reena; Whelan, Jim; Hu, Zhongyuan; Zhang, Mingfang

    2015-09-24

    A cold-induced transcript encoding a Casparian strip membrane domain (CASP)-like protein (ClCASPL) was identified in watermelon (Citrullus lanatus). Fluorescence microscopy analysis showed that ClCASPL-GFP is localized in the plasma membrane. The orthologous gene in Arabidopsis thaliana (AtCASPL4C1) was also found to play an important role in cold tolerance. Expression analysis using a β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter reveals that AtCASPL4C1 is widely expressed in a variety of organs and is cold inducible. Analysis of AtCASPL4C1 T-DNA knock-out plants showed altered growth dynamics, faster growth, increased biomass (dry weight) and earlier flowering compared to wild type (Col-0) and ClCASPL overexpressing plants. AtCASPL4C1 knock-out plants showed elevated tolerance to cold stress, while overexpressing CICASPL resulted in increased sensitivity to cold stress in Arabidopsis. Interestingly, AtCASPL4C1 knock-out plants did not display significant alterations in the Casparian strip formation in roots. Thus, the combination of these results suggests a role for CICASPL and AtCASPL4C1 beyond Casparian strip formation in roots, possibly indicating a more fundamental role in vascular tissue.

  1. Whorl-specific expression of the SUPERMAN gene of Arabidopsis is mediated by cis elements in the transcribed region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Toshiro; Sakai, Hajime; Meyerowitz, Elliot M

    2003-09-02

    The SUPERMAN (SUP) gene of Arabidopsis is involved in controlling cell proliferation in stamen and carpel primordia and in ovules during flower development. The SUP gene encodes a transcription factor with a C2H2-type zinc finger motif, a serine/proline-rich domain, a basic domain, and a leucine-zipper-like domain and is expressed in a very limited region in stamen primordia and in the developing ovary during flower development. The SUP gene is susceptible to methylation, resulting in epigenetic gene silencing. To understand how the SUP gene is expressed spatially and temporally in its restricted domain, and why methylation of the transcribed region affects early-stage SUP expression, we have identified the SUP cis regulatory elements by characterizing SUP gene fusions. These studies show that the SUP gene has discrete upstream promoter elements required for expression in stamen primordia in early stages and in the ovary in later stages. The promoter activity for stamen primordia is modulated by several positive and negative elements located in the transcribed and translated regions. Several regulatory elements in the transcribed region correlate with the areas of the gene that are heavily methylated in epigenetic alleles; these data provide a possible explanation of how methylation of the transcribed region represses transcription.

  2. CDX2 gene expression in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

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    Hanaa H. Arnaoaut

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available CDX genes are classically known as regulators of axial elongation during early embryogenesis. An unsuspected role for CDX genes has been revealed during hematopoietic development. The CDX gene family member CDX2 belongs to the most frequent aberrantly expressed proto-oncogenes in human acute leukemias and is highly leukemogenic in experimental models. We used reversed transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR to determine the expression level of CDX2 gene in 30 pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL at diagnosis and 30 healthy volunteers. ALL patients were followed up to detect minimal residual disease (MRD on days 15 and 42 of induction. We found that CDX2 gene was expressed in 50% of patients and not expressed in controls. Associations between gene expression and different clinical and laboratory data of patients revealed no impact on different findings. With follow up, we could not confirm that CDX2 expression had a prognostic significance.

  3. Recombinant expression in E. coli of human FGFR2 with its transmembrane and extracellular domains

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    Adam Bajinting

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs are a family of receptor tyrosine kinases containing three domains: an extracellular receptor domain, a single transmembrane helix, and an intracellular tyrosine kinase domain. FGFRs are activated by fibroblast growth factors (FGFs as part of complex signal transduction cascades regulating angiogenesis, skeletal formation, cell differentiation, proliferation, cell survival, and cancer. We have developed the first recombinant expression system in E. coli to produce a construct of human FGFR2 containing its transmembrane and extracellular receptor domains. We demonstrate that the expressed construct is functional in binding heparin and dimerizing. Size exclusion chromatography demonstrates that the purified FGFR2 does not form a complex with FGF1 or adopts an inactive dimer conformation. Progress towards the successful recombinant production of intact FGFRs will facilitate further biochemical experiments and structure determination that will provide insight into how extracellular FGF binding activates intracellular kinase activity.

  4. Decoding the nucleoid organisation of Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli through gene expression data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grossmann Alex

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the organisation of the bacterial chromosome is an area of active research, little is known yet on that subject. The difficulty lies in the fact that the system is dynamic and difficult to observe directly. The advent of massive hybridisation techniques opens the way to further studies of the chromosomal structure because the genes that are co-expressed, as identified by microarray experiments, probably share some spatial relationship. The use of several independent sets of gene expression data should make it possible to obtain an exhaustive view of the genes co-expression and thus a more accurate image of the structure of the chromosome. Results For both Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli the co-expression of genes varies as a function of the distance between the genes along the chromosome. The long-range correlations are surprising: the changes in the level of expression of any gene are correlated (positively or negatively to the changes in the expression level of other genes located at well-defined long-range distances. This property is true for all the genes, regardless of their localisation on the chromosome. We also found short-range correlations, which suggest that the location of these co-expressed genes corresponds to DNA turns on the nucleoid surface (14–16 genes. Conclusion The long-range correlations do not correspond to the domains so far identified in the nucleoid. We explain our results by a model of the nucleoid solenoid structure based on two types of spirals (short and long. The long spirals are uncoiled expressed DNA while the short ones correspond to coiled unexpressed DNA.

  5. Automated discovery of functional generality of human gene expression programs.

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    Georg K Gerber

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available An important research problem in computational biology is the identification of expression programs, sets of co-expressed genes orchestrating normal or pathological processes, and the characterization of the functional breadth of these programs. The use of human expression data compendia for discovery of such programs presents several challenges including cellular inhomogeneity within samples, genetic and environmental variation across samples, uncertainty in the numbers of programs and sample populations, and temporal behavior. We developed GeneProgram, a new unsupervised computational framework based on Hierarchical Dirichlet Processes that addresses each of the above challenges. GeneProgram uses expression data to simultaneously organize tissues into groups and genes into overlapping programs with consistent temporal behavior, to produce maps of expression programs, which are sorted by generality scores that exploit the automatically learned groupings. Using synthetic and real gene expression data, we showed that GeneProgram outperformed several popular expression analysis methods. We applied GeneProgram to a compendium of 62 short time-series gene expression datasets exploring the responses of human cells to infectious agents and immune-modulating molecules. GeneProgram produced a map of 104 expression programs, a substantial number of which were significantly enriched for genes involved in key signaling pathways and/or bound by NF-kappaB transcription factors in genome-wide experiments. Further, GeneProgram discovered expression programs that appear to implicate surprising signaling pathways or receptor types in the response to infection, including Wnt signaling and neurotransmitter receptors. We believe the discovered map of expression programs involved in the response to infection will be useful for guiding future biological experiments; genes from programs with low generality scores might serve as new drug targets that exhibit minimal

  6. Serial Analysis of Gene Expression: Applications in Human Studies

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) is a powerful tool, which provides quantitative and comprehensive expression profile of genes in a given cell population. It works by isolating short fragments of genetic information from the expressed genes that are present in the cell being studied. These short sequences, called SAGE tags, are linked together for efficient sequencing. The frequency of each SAGE tag in the cloned multimers directly reflects the transcript abundance. Therefore, SAGE r...

  7. Phylogeny of forkhead genes in three spiralians and their expression in Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mei; Xu, Fei; Liu, Jun; Que, Huayong; Li, Li; Zhang, Guofan

    2014-11-01

    The Fox genes encode a group of transcription factors that contain a forkhead domain, which forms a structure known as a winged helix. These transcription factors play a crucial role in several key biological processes, including development. High-degree identity in the canonical forkhead domain has been used to divide Fox proteins into 23 families (FoxA to FoxS). We surveyed the genome of three spiralians, the oyster Crassostrea gigas, the limpet Lottia gigantea, and the annelid Capitella teleta. We identified 25 C. gigas fox genes, 21 L. gigantea fox genes, and 25 C. teleta fox genes. The C. gigas fox and L. gigantea fox genes represented 19 of the 23 families, whereas FoxI, Q1, R, and S were missing. The majority of the Fox families were observed within the C. teleta fox genes, with the exception of FoxR and S. In addition, the foxAB-like gene, foxY-like gene, and foxH gene were also present in the three genomes. The conserved FoxC-FoxL1 cluster, observed in mammals, was also found in C. gigas. The diversity of temporal expression patterns observed across the developmental process implies the C. gigas fox genes exert a wide range of functions. Further functional studies are required to gain insight into the evolution of Fox genes in bilaterians.

  8. Light-Dependent Expression of Four Cryptic Archaeal Circadian Gene Homologs

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    Michael eManiscalco

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms are important biological signals that have been found in almost all major groups of life from bacteria to man, yet it remains unclear if any members of the second major prokaryotic domain of life, the Archaea, also possess a biological clock. To investigate this question, we examined the regulation of four cyanobacterial-like circadian gene homologs present in the genome of the haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii. These genes, designated cirA, cirB, cirC, and cirD, display similarity to the KaiC-family of cyanobacterial clock proteins, which act to regulate rhythmic gene expression and to control the timing of cell division. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis was used to examine the expression of each of the four cir genes in response to 12 h light/12 h dark cycles (LD 12:12 during balanced growth in H. volcanii. Our data reveal that there is an approximately two to sixteen-fold increase in cir gene expression when cells are shifted from light to constant darkness and this pattern of gene expression oscillates with the light conditions in a rhythmic manner. Targeted single- and double-gene knockouts in the H. volcanii cir genes results in disruption of light-dependent, rhythmic gene expression, although it does not lead to any significant effect on growth under these conditions. Restoration of light-dependent, rhythmic gene expression was demonstrated by introducing, in trans, a wild-type copy of individual cir genes into knockout strains. These results are noteworthy as this is the first attempt to characterize the transcriptional expression and regulation of the ubiquitous kaiC homologs found among archaeal genomes.

  9. Analysis of castor bean ribosome-inactivating proteins and their gene expression during seed development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Loss-Morais

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs are enzymes that inhibit protein synthesis after depurination of a specific adenine in rRNA. The RIP family members are classified as type I RIPs that contain an RNA-N-glycosidase domain and type II RIPs that contain a lectin domain (B chain in addition to the glycosidase domain (A chain. In this work, we identified 30 new plant RIPs and characterized 18 Ricinus communis RIPs. Phylogenetic and functional divergence analyses indicated that the emergence of type I and II RIPs probably occurred before the monocot/eudicot split. We also report the expression profiles of 18 castor bean genes, including those for ricin and agglutinin, in five seed stages as assessed by quantitative PCR. Ricin and agglutinin were the most expressed RIPs in developing seeds although eight other RIPs were also expressed. All of the RIP genes were most highly expressed in the stages in which the endosperm was fully expanded. Although the reason for the large expansion of RIP genes in castor beans remains to be established, the differential expression patterns of the type I and type II members reinforce the existence of biological functions other than defense against predators and herbivory.

  10. Gene expression profiling of the rat sciatic nerve in early Wallerian degeneration after injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dengbing Yao; Meiyuan Li; Dingding Shen; Fei Ding; Shibi Lu; Qin Zhao; Xiaosong Gu

    2012-01-01

    Wallerian degeneration is an important area of research in modern neuroscience. A large number of genes are differentially regulated in the various stages of Wallerian degeneration, especially during the early response. In this study, we analyzed gene expression in early Wallerian degeneration of the distal nerve stump at 0, 0.5, 1, 6, 12 and 24 hours after rat sciatic nerve injury using gene chip microarrays. We screened for differentially-expressed genes and gene expression patterns. We examined the data for Gene Ontology, and explored the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Pathway. This allowed us to identify key regulatory factors and recurrent network motifs. We identified 1 546 differentially-expressed genes and 21 distinct patterns of gene expression in early Wallerian degeneration, and an enrichment of genes associated with the immune response, acute inflammation, apoptosis, cell adhesion, ion transport and the extracellular matrix. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analysis revealed components involved in the Jak-STAT, ErbB, transforming growth factor-β, T cell receptor and calcium signaling pathways. Key factors included interleukin-6, interleukin-1, integrin, c-sarcoma, carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecules, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand, matrix metalloproteinase, BH3 interacting domain death agonist, baculoviral IAP repeat-containing 3 and Rac. The data were validated with real-time quantitative PCR. This study provides a global view of gene expression profiles in early Wallerian degeneration of the rat sciatic nerve. Our findings provide insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying early Wallerian degeneration, and the regulation of nerve degeneration and regeneration.

  11. Differential Expression of Salinity Resistance Gene on Cotton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Wu-wei; YU Shu-xun

    2008-01-01

    @@ Salinity resistance and differential gene expression associated with salinity in cotton germplasm were studied,because of the large scale area of salinity in China,and its significant negative effects on the cotton production.The salinityresisted genes and their differential expression were studied under the stress of NaCI on cotton.There were found,under the NaCI stress,1644 genes differentially expressed from the salinity-sensitive cotton and only 817 genes differentially expressed from the salinityresisted cotton.

  12. Expression of genes encoding F-1-ATPase results in uncoupling of glycolysis from biomass production in Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Købmann, Brian Jensen; Solem, Christian; Pedersen, M.B.

    2002-01-01

    We studied how the introduction of an additional ATP-consuming reaction affects the metabolic fluxes in Lactococcus lactis. Genes encoding the hydrolytic part of the F-1 domain of the membrane-bound (F1F0) H+-ATPase were expressed from a range of synthetic constitutive promoters. Expression...

  13. Cloning and Expression of Low Molecular Weight Glutenin Genes from the Chinese Elite Wheat Cultivar "Xiaoyan 54"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The low molecular weight (LMW) glutenin subunits account for 40% of wheat gluten protein content by mass and these proteins are considered to significantly affect dough quality characteristics. Five new full-length LMW glutenin genes (designated LMW-5, LMW-7, LMW-42, LMW-58, and LMW-34) were isolated from the Chinese elite wheat cultivar "Xiaoyan 54" by PCR amplification of genomic DNA using a pair of degenerate primers designed from the conserved sequences of the N- and C-terminal regions of published LMW glutenln genes.Deduced amino acid sequence analysis showed that LMW-5 belongs to the LMW-itype genes and that the other four belong to LMW-m type genes. Sequence comparisons revealed that point mutations occasionally occurred in signal peptide and N-terminus domains and often existed in domain Ⅲ and domain V. Small insertions and deletions are represented in the repetitive domain. There is a stop codon after amino acid position 110 in the repetitive domain of LMW-34, indicating that it is a pseudogene. The other four genes have complete open reading frames and the putative mature regions of these genes were subcloned into pET-30a expression vector and successfully expressed in Escherichia coli. Protein sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis showed that all proteins expressed in E. coli by the four genes could be related to B-group LMW glutenin subunits of wheat.

  14. Expression patterns of protein kinases correlate with gene architecture and evolutionary rates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksey Y Ogurtsov

    /SIGNIFICANCE: PK genomic architecture, the size of gene functional domains and evolutionary rates correlate with the pattern of gene expression. Structure and evolutionary divergence of tissue-specific PK genes is related to the proliferative activity of the tissue where these genes are predominantly expressed. Our data provide evidence that physiological requirements for transcription intensity, ubiquitous expression, and tissue-specific regulation shape gene structure and affect rates of evolution.

  15. Fast identification of folded human protein domains expressed in E. coli suitable for structural analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schlegel Brigitte

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-throughput protein structure analysis of individual protein domains requires analysis of large numbers of expression clones to identify suitable constructs for structure determination. For this purpose, methods need to be implemented for fast and reliable screening of the expressed proteins as early as possible in the overall process from cloning to structure determination. Results 88 different E. coli expression constructs for 17 human protein domains were analysed using high-throughput cloning, purification and folding analysis to obtain candidates suitable for structural analysis. After 96 deep-well microplate expression and automated protein purification, protein domains were directly analysed using 1D 1H-NMR spectroscopy. In addition, analytical hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC was used to detect natively folded protein. With these two analytical methods, six constructs (representing two domains were quickly identified as being well folded and suitable for structural analysis. Conclusion The described approach facilitates high-throughput structural analysis. Clones expressing natively folded proteins suitable for NMR structure determination were quickly identified upon small scale expression screening using 1D 1H-NMR and/or analytical HIC. This procedure is especially effective as a fast and inexpensive screen for the 'low hanging fruits' in structural genomics.

  16. Mining Metatranscriptomic Data of a Cyanobacterial Bloom for Patterns of Secondary Metabolism Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, K.; Wang, J.; Thompson, J. R.

    2012-12-01

    The secondary metabolism of bacterial cells produces small molecules that can have both medicinal properties and toxigenic effects. This study focuses on mining metatranscriptomes from a tropical eutrophic water reservoir in Singapore experiencing a cyanobacterial Harmful Algal Bloom dominated by Microcystis, to identify the types of secondary metabolites genes being expressed and by what taxa. A phylogenomic approach as implemented in the online tool Natural Product Domain Seeker (NaPDoS) was used. NaPDoS was recently developed to classify ketosynthase and condensation domains from polyketide synthases and non-ribosomal peptide synthetases, respectively, to provide insight into potential types of pathway products. Water samples from the reservoir were collected six times over a day/night cycle. Total RNA was extracted and subjected to ribosomal depletion followed by cDNA synthesis and next-generation Illumina DNA sequencing, generating 493,468 to 678,064 95-101 base pairs post-quality control reads per sample. Evidence for expression of PKS and NRPS type genes based on identification of a ketosynthase and condensation domains are present in all time points. KS domains fall into to two main phylogenetic groups, type I and type II, within the type II group of domains are domains for fatty acid biosynthesis (fab), which is considered a part of primary metabolism. Type I KS domains are part of the classic PKS natural product biosynthetic genes that make things such as antibiotics and other toxins such as microcystin. 2849 KS domains were detected in the combined reservoir samples, of these 1141 were likely from fatty acid biosynthesis and 1708 were related to secondary metabolism type KS domains. The most abundant KS domains (485) besides the fab genes are closely related to a KS domain that is not currently experimentally linked to a known secondary metabolite but the domain is found in four Microcystis genomes along with two other species of cyanobacteria. The three

  17. Expression of genes encoding multi-transmembrane proteins in specific primate taste cell populations.

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    Bryan D Moyer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Using fungiform (FG and circumvallate (CV taste buds isolated by laser capture microdissection and analyzed using gene arrays, we previously constructed a comprehensive database of gene expression in primates, which revealed over 2,300 taste bud-associated genes. Bioinformatics analyses identified hundreds of genes predicted to encode multi-transmembrane domain proteins with no previous association with taste function. A first step in elucidating the roles these gene products play in gustation is to identify the specific taste cell types in which they are expressed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using double label in situ hybridization analyses, we identified seven new genes expressed in specific taste cell types, including sweet, bitter, and umami cells (TRPM5-positive, sour cells (PKD2L1-positive, as well as other taste cell populations. Transmembrane protein 44 (TMEM44, a protein with seven predicted transmembrane domains with no homology to GPCRs, is expressed in a TRPM5-negative and PKD2L1-negative population that is enriched in the bottom portion of taste buds and may represent developmentally immature taste cells. Calcium homeostasis modulator 1 (CALHM1, a component of a novel calcium channel, along with family members CALHM2 and CALHM3; multiple C2 domains; transmembrane 1 (MCTP1, a calcium-binding transmembrane protein; and anoctamin 7 (ANO7, a member of the recently identified calcium-gated chloride channel family, are all expressed in TRPM5 cells. These proteins may modulate and effect calcium signalling stemming from sweet, bitter, and umami receptor activation. Synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2B (SV2B, a regulator of synaptic vesicle exocytosis, is expressed in PKD2L1 cells, suggesting that this taste cell population transmits tastant information to gustatory afferent nerve fibers via exocytic neurotransmitter release. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Identification of genes encoding multi-transmembrane domain proteins

  18. Evidence for mitochondrial genetic control of autosomal gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassam, Irfahan; Qi, Tuan; Lloyd-Jones, Luke; Holloway, Alexander; Jan Bonder, Marc; Henders, Anjali K; Martin, Nicholas G; Powell, Joseph E; Franke, Lude; Montgomery, Grant W; Visscher, Peter M; McRae, Allan F

    2016-10-18

    The mitochondrial and nuclear genomes coordinate and co-evolve in eukaryotes in order to adapt to environmental changes. Variation in the mitochondrial genome is capable of affecting expression of genes on the nuclear genome. Sex-specific mitochondrial genetic control of gene expression has been demonstrated in Drosophila melanogaster, where males were found to drive most of the total variation in gene expression. This has potential implications for male-related health and disease resulting from variation in mtDNA solely inherited from the mother. We used a family-based study comprised of 47,323 gene expression probes and 78 mitochondrial SNPs (mtSNPs) from n = 846 individuals to examine the extent of mitochondrial genetic control of gene expression in humans. This identified 15 significant probe-mtSNP associations (P[Formula: see text]) corresponding to 5 unique genes on the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes, with three of these genes corresponding to mitochondrial genetic control of gene expression in the nuclear genome. The associated mtSNPs for three genes (one cis and two trans associations) were replicated (P expression in any of these five probes. Sex-specific effects were examined by applying our analysis to males and females separately and testing for differences in effect size. The MEST gene was identified as having the most significantly different effect sizes across the sexes (P [Formula: see text]). MEST was similarly expressed in males and females with the G allele; however, males with the C allele are highly expressed for MEST, while females show no expression of the gene. This study provides evidence for the mitochondrial genetic control of expression of several genes in humans, with little evidence found for sex-specific effects.

  19. Prevention of adverse events of interferon γ gene therapy by gene delivery of interferon γ-heparin-binding domain fusion protein in mice

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