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Sample records for gene deletion syndromes

  1. Dissecting the phenotypes of Dravet syndrome by gene deletion.

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    Rubinstein, Moran; Han, Sung; Tai, Chao; Westenbroek, Ruth E; Hunker, Avery; Scheuer, Todd; Catterall, William A

    2015-08-01

    Neurological and psychiatric syndromes often have multiple disease traits, yet it is unknown how such multi-faceted deficits arise from single mutations. Haploinsufficiency of the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.1 causes Dravet syndrome, an intractable childhood-onset epilepsy with hyperactivity, cognitive deficit, autistic-like behaviours, and premature death. Deletion of Nav1.1 channels selectively impairs excitability of GABAergic interneurons. We studied mice having selective deletion of Nav1.1 in parvalbumin- or somatostatin-expressing interneurons. In brain slices, these deletions cause increased threshold for action potential generation, impaired action potential firing in trains, and reduced amplification of postsynaptic potentials in those interneurons. Selective deletion of Nav1.1 in parvalbumin- or somatostatin-expressing interneurons increases susceptibility to thermally-induced seizures, which are strikingly prolonged when Nav1.1 is deleted in both interneuron types. Mice with global haploinsufficiency of Nav1.1 display autistic-like behaviours, hyperactivity and cognitive impairment. Haploinsufficiency of Nav1.1 in parvalbumin-expressing interneurons causes autistic-like behaviours, but not hyperactivity, whereas haploinsufficiency in somatostatin-expressing interneurons causes hyperactivity without autistic-like behaviours. Heterozygous deletion in both interneuron types is required to impair long-term spatial memory in context-dependent fear conditioning, without affecting short-term spatial learning or memory. Thus, the multi-faceted phenotypes of Dravet syndrome can be genetically dissected, revealing synergy in causing epilepsy, premature death and deficits in long-term spatial memory, but interneuron-specific effects on hyperactivity and autistic-like behaviours. These results show that multiple disease traits can arise from similar functional deficits in specific interneuron types. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on

  2. Kallmann syndrome and ichthyosis: a case of contiguous gene deletion syndrome

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    Irene Berges-Raso

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Kallmann syndrome is a genetically heterogeneous form of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism caused by gonadotropin-releasing hormone deficiency and characterized by anosmia or hyposmia due to hypoplasia of the olfactory bulbs; osteoporosis and metabolic syndrome can develop due to longstanding untreated hypogonadism. Kallmann syndrome affects 1 in 10 000 men and 1 in 50 000 women. Defects in 17 genes, including KAL1, have been implicated. Kallmann syndrome can be associated with X-linked ichthyosis, a skin disorder characterized by early onset dark, dry, irregular scales affecting the limb and trunk, caused by a defect of the steroid sulfatase gene (STS. Both KAL1 and STS are located in the Xp22.3 region; therefore, deletions in this region cause a contiguous gene syndrome. We report the case of a 32-year-old man with ichthyosis referred for evaluation of excessive height (2.07 m and weight (BMI: 29.6 kg/m2, microgenitalia and absence of secondary sex characteristics. We diagnosed Kallmann syndrome with ichthyosis due to a deletion in Xp22.3, a rare phenomenon.

  3. Marfan syndrome with a complex chromosomal rearrangement including deletion of the FBN1 gene

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    Colovati Mileny ES

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The majority of Marfan syndrome (MFS cases is caused by mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene (FBN1, mapped to chromosome 15q21.1. Only few reports on deletions including the whole FBN1 gene, detected by molecular cytogenetic techniques, were found in literature. Results We report here on a female patient with clinical symptoms of the MFS spectrum plus craniostenosis, hypothyroidism and intellectual deficiency who presents a 1.9 Mb deletion, including the FBN1 gene and a complex rearrangement with eight breakpoints involving chromosomes 6, 12 and 15. Discussion This is the first report of MFS with a complex chromosome rearrangement involving a deletion of FBN1 and contiguous genes. In addition to the typical clinical findings of the Marfan syndrome due to FBN1 gene haploinsufficiency, the patient presents features which may be due to the other gene deletions and possibly to the complex chromosome rearrangement.

  4. Nance-Horan syndrome: a contiguous gene syndrome involving deletion of the amelogenin gene? A case report and molecular analysis.

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    Franco, E; Hodgson, S; Lench, N; Roberts, G J

    1995-03-01

    A case of Nance-Horan syndrome in a male is presented, with some features of the condition in his carrier mother and her mother. It is proposed that Nance-Horan syndrome might be a contiguous gene syndrome mapping to chromosome Xp21.2-p22.3. The proband had congenital cataract microphthalmia and dental abnormalities including screwdriver shaped incisors and evidence of enamel pitting hypoplasia. The region Xp21.2-p22.3 also contains the tooth enamel protein gene, amelogenin (AMGX). Using molecular genetic techniques, we have shown that there is no evidence that the AMGX gene is deleted in this case of the Nance-Horan syndrome.

  5. Severe visual impairment and retinal changes in a boy with a deletion of the gene for Nance-Horan syndrome.

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    Mathys, R; Deconinck, H; Keymolen, K; Jansen, A; Van Esch, H

    2007-01-01

    We present the ophthalmologic findings in a boy with a deletion of Xp22 comprising the gene for Nance-Horan syndrome. Different mechanisms underlying the visual impairment in Nance-Horan syndrome are discussed.

  6. Treacher Collins Syndrome with a de Novo 5-bp Deletion in the TCOF1 Gene

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    Su, Pen-Hua; Chen, Jia-Yu; Chen, Suh-Jen; Yu, Ju-Shan

    2006-01-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is an autosomal dominant disorder of craniofacial development with features including malar hypoplasia, micrognathia, microtia, downward slanting palpebral fissures, lower eyelid coloboma, conductive hearing loss, and cleft palate. TCS is caused by mutations in the TCOF1 gene, which encodes the nuclear phosphoprotein treacle. Here, we describe a 1-day-old male infant with classical TCS presentation. A 5-bp deletion in exon 22 of the TCOF1 gene (3469del ACTCT) w...

  7. Xp21 contiguous gene syndromes: Deletion quantitation with bivariate flow karyotyping allows mapping of patient breakpoints

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    McCabe, E.R.B.; Towbin, J.A. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)); Engh, G. van den; Trask, B.J. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States))

    1992-12-01

    Bivariate flow karyotyping was used to estimate the deletion sizes for a series of patients with Xp21 contiguous gene syndromes. The deletion estimates were used to develop an approximate scale for the genomic map in Xp21. The bivariate flow karyotype results were compared with clinical and molecular genetic information on the extent of the patients' deletions, and these various types of data were consistent. The resulting map spans >15 Mb, from the telomeric interval between DXS41 (99-6) and DXS68 (1-4) to a position centromeric to the ornithine transcarbamylase locus. The deletion sizing was considered to be accurate to [plus minus]1 Mb. The map provides information on the relative localization of genes and markers within this region. For example, the map suggests that the adrenal hypoplasia congenita and glycerol kinase genes are physically close to each other, are within 1-2 Mb of the telomeric end of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene, and are nearer to the DMD locus than to the more distal marker DXS28 (C7). Information of this type is useful in developing genomic strategies for positional cloning in Xp21. These investigations demonstrate that the DNA from patients with Xp21 contiguous gene syndromes can be valuable reagents, not only for ordering loci and markers but also for providing an approximate scale to the map of the Xp21 region surrounding DMD. 44 refs., 3 figs.

  8. Chronic granulomatous disease, the McLeod phenotype and the contiguous gene deletion syndrome-a review

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    Watkins Casey E

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chronic Granulomatous Disease (CGD, a disorder of the NADPH oxidase system, results in phagocyte functional defects and subsequent infections with bacterial and fungal pathogens (such as Aspergillus species and Candida albicans. Deletions and missense, frameshift, or nonsense mutations in the gp91phox gene (also termed CYBB, located in the Xp21.1 region of the X chromosome, are associated with the most common form of CGD. When larger X-chromosomal deletions occur, including the XK gene deletion, a so-called "Contiguous Gene Deletion Syndrome" may result. The contiguous gene deletion syndrome is known to associate the Kell phenotype/McLeod syndrome with diseases such as X-linked chronic granulomatous disease, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and X-linked retinitis pigmentosa. These patients are often complicated and management requires special attention to the various facets of the syndrome.

  9. A novel small deletion in the NHS gene associated with Nance-Horan syndrome

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    Li, Huajin; Yang, Lizhu; Sun, Zixi; Yuan, Zhisheng; Wu, Shijing; Sui, Ruifang

    2018-01-01

    Nance-Horan syndrome is a rare X-linked recessive inherited disease with clinical features including severe bilateral congenital cataracts, characteristic facial and dental abnormalities. Data from Chinese Nance-Horan syndrome patients are limited. We assessed the clinical manifestations of a Chinese Nance-Horan syndrome pedigree and identified the genetic defect. Genetic analysis showed that 3 affected males carried a novel small deletion in NHS gene, c.263_266delCGTC (p.Ala89TrpfsTer106), a...

  10. A novel small deletion in the NHS gene associated with Nance-Horan syndrome.

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    Li, Huajin; Yang, Lizhu; Sun, Zixi; Yuan, Zhisheng; Wu, Shijing; Sui, Ruifang

    2018-02-05

    Nance-Horan syndrome is a rare X-linked recessive inherited disease with clinical features including severe bilateral congenital cataracts, characteristic facial and dental abnormalities. Data from Chinese Nance-Horan syndrome patients are limited. We assessed the clinical manifestations of a Chinese Nance-Horan syndrome pedigree and identified the genetic defect. Genetic analysis showed that 3 affected males carried a novel small deletion in NHS gene, c.263_266delCGTC (p.Ala89TrpfsTer106), and 2 female carriers were heterozygous for the same variant. All 3 affected males presented with typical Nance-Horan syndrome features. One female carrier displayed lens opacities centered on the posterior Y-suture in both eyes, as well as mild dental abnormalities. We recorded the clinical features of a Chinese Nance-Horan syndrome family and broadened the spectrum of mutations in the NHS gene.

  11. Treacher Collins Syndrome with a de Novo 5-bp Deletion in the TCOF1 Gene

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    Pen-Hua Su

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS is an autosomal dominant disorder of craniofacial development with features including malar hypoplasia, micrognathia, microtia, downward slanting palpebral fissures, lower eyelid coloboma, conductive hearing loss, and cleft palate. TCS is caused by mutations in the TCOF1 gene, which encodes the nuclear phosphoprotein treacle. Here, we describe a 1-day-old male infant with classical TCS presentation. A 5-bp deletion in exon 22 of the TCOF1 gene (3469del ACTCT was found to cause a premature stop codon. This is the first report of TCOF1 gene mutation in the Taiwanese population.

  12. Treacher Collins syndrome with a de Novo 5-bp deletion in the TCOF1 gene.

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    Su, Pen-Hua; Chen, Jia-Yu; Chen, Suh-Jen; Yu, Ju-Shan

    2006-06-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is an autosomal dominant disorder of craniofacial development with features including malar hypoplasia, micrognathia, microtia, downward slanting palpebral fissures, lower eyelid coloboma, conductive hearing loss, and cleft palate. TCS is caused by mutations in the TCOF1 gene, which encodes the nuclear phosphoprotein treacle. Here, we describe a 1-day-old male infant with classical TCS presentation. A 5-bp deletion in exon 22 of the TCOF1 gene (3469del ACTCT) was found to cause a premature stop codon. This is the first report of TCOF1 gene mutation in the Taiwanese population.

  13. Multi-exon deletions of the FBN1 gene in Marfan syndrome

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    Schrijver Iris

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in the fibrillin -1 gene (FBN1 cause Marfan syndrome (MFS, an autosomal dominant multi-system connective tissue disorder. The 200 different mutations reported in the 235 kb, 65 exon-containing gene include only one family with a genomic multi-exon deletion. Methods We used long-range RT-PCR for mutation detection and long-range genomic PCR and DNA sequencing for identification of deletion breakpoints, allele-specific transcript analyses to determine stability of the mutant RNA, and pulse-chase studies to quantitate fibrillin synthesis and extracellular matrix deposition in cultured fibroblasts. Southern blots of genomic DNA were probed with three overlapping fragments covering the FBN1 coding exons Results Two novel multi-exon FBN1 deletions were discovered. Identical nucleotide pentamers were found at or near the intronic breakpoints. In a Case with classic MFS, an in-frame deletion of exons 42 and 43 removed the C-terminal 24 amino acids of the 5th LTBP (8-cysteine domain and the adjacent 25th calcium-binding EGF-like (6-cysteine domain. The mutant mRNA was stable, but fibrillin synthesis and matrix deposition were significantly reduced. A Case with severe childhood-onset MFS has a de novo deletion of exons 44–46 that removed three EGF-like domains. Fibrillin protein synthesis was normal, but matrix deposition was strikingly reduced. No genomic rearrangements were detected by Southern analysis of 18 unrelated MFS samples negative for FBN1 mutation screening. Conclusions Two novel deletion cases expand knowledge of mutational mechanisms and genotype/phenotype correlations of fibrillinopathies. Deletions or mutations affecting an LTBP domain may result in unstable mutant protein cleavage products that interfere with microfibril assembly.

  14. Large deletions encompassing the TCOF1 and CAMK2A genes are responsible for Treacher Collins syndrome with intellectual disability.

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    Vincent, Marie; Collet, Corinne; Verloes, Alain; Lambert, Laetitia; Herlin, Christian; Blanchet, Catherine; Sanchez, Elodie; Drunat, Séverine; Vigneron, Jacqueline; Laplanche, Jean-Louis; Puechberty, Jacques; Sarda, Pierre; Geneviève, David

    2014-01-01

    Mandibulofacial dysostosis is part of a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders of craniofacial development, which lead to malar and mandibular hypoplasia. Treacher Collins syndrome is the major cause of mandibulofacial dysostosis and is due to mutations in the TCOF1 gene. Usually patients with Treacher Collins syndrome do not present with intellectual disability. Recently, the EFTUD2 gene was identified in patients with mandibulofacial dysostosis associated with microcephaly, intellectual disability and esophageal atresia. We report on two patients presenting with mandibulofacial dysostosis characteristic of Treacher Collins syndrome, but associated with unexpected intellectual disability, due to a large deletion encompassing several genes including the TCOF1 gene. We discuss the involvement of the other deleted genes such as CAMK2A or SLC6A7 in the cognitive development delay of the patients reported, and we propose the systematic investigation for 5q32 deletion when intellectual disability is associated with Treacher Collins syndrome.

  15. Unusual presentation of Kallmannn syndrome with contiguous gene deletion in three siblings of a family

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    Sri Venkat Madhu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of 3 brothers aged 34, 24, and 22 years, unmarried, who presented to our endocrinology clinic with absence of secondary sexual characters. There was no such history in other siblings, but their maternal uncle had similar complaints. On examination, all 3 had pre-pubertal appearance, voice, and genitalia along with anosmia and bimanual synkinesia. Cryptorchidism was noticed in 2 while third person had small hypoplastic testes. It was also noted that all 3 patients had icthyosis mainly involving trunk, back, and limbs. The hormonal assays were consistent with isolated hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism. IQ testing revealed mental retardation in the 2 patients. Ultrasound showed ectopic right kidney in one patient, atrophic right kidney in the second patient while the third patient had normal kidneys. MRI brain of all the patients showed poorly visualized olfactory tract and bulb. Kallmann syndrome (KS was diagnosed based on hormonal evaluation and MRI results. Of the four types of KS: Synkinesia, renal anomaly, and X-linked pedigree pattern in our patients pointed towards X-linked type 1 KS as the possible cause. But, icthyosis and mental retardation are not usual presentation of type 1 KS. They are usually seen as a result of contiguous gene deletion of KAL1, steroid sulfatase (STS, and mental retardation (MRX gene on X chromosome. Hence, the possible gene defect in our cases is inherited defect in contiguous gene deletion. The contiguous gene deletion as the cause of KS in 3 patients of same family is very rare and worth reporting. Also, the significance of phenotype-genotypic association in Kallmann syndrome is discussed

  16. A single base-pair deletion in the WFS1 gene causes Wolfram syndrome.

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    Pitt, Katherine; James, Chela; Kochar, Inderpal S; Kapoor, Akshay; Jain, Shilpi; Hussain, Khalid; Bennett, Kate

    2011-01-01

    Wolfram syndrome is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder also known as DIDMOAD (diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy and deafness). The majority of cases are caused by mutations in the WFS1 gene. WFS1 is located at 4p16.1 and encodes wolframin, a transmembrane endoplasmic reticulum (ER) protein involved in the negative regulation of ER stress signalling. To date, over 120 WFS1 mutations have been described. In this study, we report a consanguineous family with three siblings affected by Wolfram syndrome. A homozygous single base pair deletion (c.877delC, L293fsX303) was found in the WFS1 gene in all three affected siblings.

  17. Nonalcoholic fatty liver in patients with Laron syndrome and GH gene deletion - preliminary report.

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    Laron, Zvi; Ginsberg, Shira; Webb, Muriel

    2008-10-01

    There is little information on the relationship between growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-I (GH/IGF-I) deficiency or IGF-I treatment on nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) a disorder linked to obesity and insulin resistance. To find out whether the markedly obese patients with Laron syndrome (LS) and GH gene deletion have fatty livers. We studied 11 untreated adult patients with LS (5M, 6F), five girls with LS treated by IGF-I and five adult patients with GH gene deletion (3M, 3F), four previously treated by hGH in childhood. Fatty liver was quantitatively evaluated by ultrasonography using a phase array US system (HITACHI 6500, Japan). Body adiposity was determined by DEXA, and insulin resistance was estimated by HOMA-IR using the fasting serum glucose and insulin values. Six out of 11 adult patients with LS, two out of the five IGF-I treated girls with LS and three out of five adult hGH gene deletion patients were found to have NAFLD (nonalcoholic fatty liver disease). NAFLD is a frequent complication in untreated and treated congenital IGF-I deficiency. No correlation between NAFLD and age, sex, degree of obesity, blood lipids, or degree of insulin resistance was observed.

  18. Heterozygous deletion at the SOX10 gene locus in two patients from a Chinese family with Waardenburg syndrome type II.

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    Wenzhi, He; Ruijin, Wen; Jieliang, Li; Xiaoyan, Ma; Haibo, Liu; Xiaoman, Wang; Jiajia, Xian; Shaoying, Li; Shuanglin, Li; Qing, Li

    2015-10-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a rare disease characterized by sensorineural deafness and pigment disturbance. To date, almost 100 mutations have been reported, but few reports on cases with SOX10 gene deletion. The inheritance pattern of SOX10 gene deletion is still unclear. Our objective was to identify the genetic causes of Waardenburg syndrome type II in a two-generation Chinese family. Clinical evaluations were conducted in both of the patients. Microarray analysis and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) were performed to identify disease-related copy number variants (CNVs). DNA sequencing of the SOX10, MITF and SNAI2 genes was performed to identify the pathogenic mutation responsible for WS2. A 280kb heterozygous deletion at the 22q13.1 chromosome region (including SOX10) was detected in both of the patients. No mutation was found in the patients, unaffected family members and 30 unrelated healthy controls. This report is the first to describe SOX10 heterozygous deletions in Chinese WS2 patients. Our result conform the thesis that heterozygous deletions at SOX10 is an important pathogenicity for WS, and present as autosomal dominant inheritance. Nevertheless, heterozygous deletion of the SOX10 gene would be worth investigating to understand their functions and contributions to neurologic phenotypes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Candidate Genes and the Behavioral Phenotype in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

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    Prasad, Sarah E.; Howley, Sarah; Murphy, Kieran C.

    2008-01-01

    There is an overwhelming evidence that children and adults with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) have a characteristic behavioral phenotype. In particular, there is a growing body of evidence that indicates an unequivocal association between 22q11.2DS and schizophrenia, especially in adulthood. Deletion of 22q11.2 is the third highest risk…

  20. Variable penetrance of hypogonadism in a sibship with Kallmann syndrome due to a deletion of the KAL gene

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    Parenti, G.; Rizzolo, M.G.; Ghezzi, M. [Federico II University, Naples (Italy)] [and others

    1995-07-03

    We report on the clinical and molecular characterization of 3 sibs with X-linked ichthyosis and variable expression of Kallmann syndrome. One of the affected brothers had mild hyposmia and showed normal pubertal progression. However, we demonstrated the same partial deletion of the X-linked Kallmann gene, sparing the first exon in the mildly affected patient as well as in one of his severely affected brothers. 13 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  1. Associations between neurodevelopmental genes, neuroanatomy, and ultra high risk symptoms of psychosis in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

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    Thompson, Carlie A; Karelis, Jason; Middleton, Frank A; Gentile, Karen; Coman, Ioana L; Radoeva, Petya D; Mehta, Rashi; Fremont, Wanda P; Antshel, Kevin M; Faraone, Stephen V; Kates, Wendy R

    2017-04-01

    22q11.2 deletion syndrome is a neurogenetic disorder resulting in the deletion of over 40 genes. Up to 40% of individuals with 22q11.2DS develop schizophrenia, though little is known about the underlying mechanisms. We hypothesized that allelic variation in functional polymorphisms in seven genes unique to the deleted region would affect lobar brain volumes, which would predict risk for psychosis in youth with 22q11.2DS. Participants included 56 individuals (30 males) with 22q11.2DS. Anatomic MR images were collected and processed using Freesurfer. Participants were genotyped for 10 SNPs in the COMT, DGCR8, GNB1L, PIK4CA, PRODH, RTN4R, and ZDHHC8 genes. All subjects were assessed for ultra high risk symptoms of psychosis. Allelic variation of the rs701428 SNP of RTN4R was significantly associated with volumetric differences in gray matter of the lingual gyrus and cuneus of the occipital lobe. Moreover, occipital gray matter volumes were robustly associated with ultra high risk symptoms of psychosis in the presence of the G allele of rs701428. Our results suggest that RTN4R, a relatively under-studied gene at the 22q11 locus, constitutes a susceptibility gene for psychosis in individuals with this syndrome through its alteration of the architecture of the brain. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. On two patients with and without the classical Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) sharing the same chromosome 4p16.3 specific probe deletion: evidence of a contiguous gene deletion syndrome.

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    Petit, P; Schmit, J; Van den Berghe, H; Fryns, J P

    1996-07-01

    We report here on phenotype-karyotype correlations in two patients with and without complete features of the WHS but sharing the lack of a specific cosmic probe (D4S96/D4Z1) from 4p16.3. These findings indicate that WHS is true a contiguous gene deletion syndrome in nature and expression.

  3. Genomic profiling in Down syndrome acute lymphoblastic leukemia identifies histone gene deletions associated with altered methylation profiles

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    Loudin, Michael G.; Wang, Jinhua; Leung, Hon-Chiu Eastwood; Gurusiddappa, Sivashankarappa; Meyer, Julia; Condos, Gregory; Morrison, Debra; Tsimelzon, Anna; Devidas, Meenakshi; Heerema, Nyla A.; Carroll, Andrew J.; Plon, Sharon E.; Hunger, Stephen P.; Basso, Giuseppe; Pession, Andrea; Bhojwani, Deepa; Carroll, William L.; Rabin, Karen R.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with Down syndrome (DS) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have distinct clinical and biological features. Whereas most DS-ALL cases lack the sentinel cytogenetic lesions that guide risk assignment in childhood ALL, JAK2 mutations and CRLF2 overexpression are highly enriched. To further characterize the unique biology of DS-ALL, we performed genome-wide profiling of 58 DS-ALL and 68 non-Down syndrome (NDS) ALL cases by DNA copy number, loss of heterozygosity, gene expression, and methylation analyses. We report a novel deletion within the 6p22 histone gene cluster as significantly more frequent in DS-ALL, occurring in 11 DS (22%) and only two NDS cases (3.1%) (Fisher’s exact p = 0.002). Homozygous deletions yielded significantly lower histone expression levels, and were associated with higher methylation levels, distinct spatial localization of methylated promoters, and enrichment of highly methylated genes for specific pathways and transcription factor binding motifs. Gene expression profiling demonstrated heterogeneity of DS-ALL cases overall, with supervised analysis defining a 45-transcript signature associated with CRLF2 overexpression. Further characterization of pathways associated with histone deletions may identify opportunities for novel targeted interventions. PMID:21647151

  4. A novel and de novo deletion in the OCRL1 gene associated with a severe form of Lowe syndrome.

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    Peces, Ramón; Peces, Carlos; de Sousa, Erika; Vega, Cristina; Selgas, Rafael; Nevado, Julián

    2013-12-01

    The oculocerebrorenal syndrome of Lowe (OCRL) is an X-linked disorder. The mutation of the gene OCRL1 localized at Xq26.1, coding for the enzyme phosphatidylinositol (4,5) bisphosphate (PIP2P) 5-phosphatase, is responsible for the phenotypic characteristics of the disease. We report a 22-year-old male with a severe form of OCRL syndrome, diagnosed on the basis of congenital cataracts, severe psychomotor and cognitive deficits, and renal tubular dysfunction without Fanconi syndrome. The patient presented low molecular weight proteinuria, nephrocalcinosis, nephrolithiasis, rickets, and growth retardation and developed progressive renal failure. Genetic analysis showed a novel and de novo deletion of exons 10-13 in the OCRL1 gene.

  5. Identification of the first intragenic deletion of the PITX2 gene causing an Axenfeld-Rieger Syndrome: case report

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    Dufier Jean-Louis

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome (ARS is characterized by bilateral congenital abnormalities of the anterior segment of the eye associated with abnormalities of the teeth, midface, and umbilicus. Most cases of ARS are caused by mutations in the genes encoding PITX2 or FOXC1. Here we describe a family affected by a severe form of ARS. Case presentation Two members of this family (father and daughter presented with typical ARS and developed severe glaucoma. The ocular phenotype was much more severe in the daughter than in the father. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI detected an aggressive form of meningioma in the father. There was no mutation in the PITX2 gene, determined by exon screening. We identified an intragenic deletion by quantitative genomic PCR analysis and characterized this deletion in detail. Conclusion Our findings implicate the first intragenic deletion of the PITX2 gene in the pathogenesis of a severe form of ARS in an affected family. This study stresses the importance of a systematic search for intragenic deletions in families affected by ARS and in sporadic cases for which no mutations in the exons or introns of PITX2 have been found. The molecular genetics of some ARS pedigrees should be re-examined with enzymes that can amplify medium and large genomic fragments.

  6. Otitis Media in a New Mouse Model for CHARGE Syndrome with a Deletion in the Chd7 Gene

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    Tian, Cong; Yu, Heping; Yang, Bin; Han, Fengchan; Zheng, Ye; Bartels, Cynthia F.; Schelling, Deborah; Arnold, James E.; Scacheri, Peter C.; Zheng, Qing Yin

    2012-01-01

    Otitis media is a middle ear disease common in children under three years old. Otitis media can occur in normal individuals with no other symptoms or syndromes, but it is often seen in individuals clinically diagnosed with genetic diseases such as CHARGE syndrome, a complex genetic disease caused by mutation in the Chd7 gene and characterized by multiple birth defects. Although otitis media is common in human CHARGE syndrome patients, it has not been reported in mouse models of CHARGE syndrome. In this study, we report a mouse model with a spontaneous deletion mutation in the Chd7 gene and with chronic otitis media of early onset age accompanied by hearing loss. These mice also exhibit morphological alteration in the Eustachian tubes, dysregulation of epithelial proliferation, and decreased density of middle ear cilia. Gene expression profiling revealed up-regulation of Muc5ac, Muc5b and Tgf-β1 transcripts, the products of which are involved in mucin production and TGF pathway regulation. This is the first mouse model of CHARGE syndrome reported to show otitis media with effusion and it will be valuable for studying the etiology of otitis media and other symptoms in CHARGE syndrome. PMID:22539951

  7. Angelman Syndrome due to a Maternally Inherited Intragenic Deletion Encompassing Exons 7 and 8 of the UBE3A Gene.

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    Ververi, Athina; Islam, Lily; Bewes, Beverley; Busby, Louise; Sullivan, Caroline; Canham, Natalie

    2017-01-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is characterised by developmental delay, lack of speech, seizures, a characteristic behavioural profile with a happy demeanour, microcephaly, and ataxia. More than two-thirds of cases are due to an approximately 5-Mb interstitial deletion of the imprinted region 15q11.2q13, which is usually de novo. The rest are associated with point mutations in the UBE3A gene, imprinting defects, and paternal uniparental disomy. Small intragenic UBE3A deletions have rarely been described. They are usually maternally inherited, increasing the recurrence risk to 50%, and may be missed by conventional testing (methylation studies and UBE3A gene sequencing). We describe a boy with AS due to an 11.7-kb intragenic deletion. The deletion was identified by array-CGH and was subsequently detected in his affected first cousin and unaffected maternal grandfather, mother, and aunt, confirming the silencing of the paternal allele. The patient had developmental delay, speech impairment, a happy demeanour, microcephaly, and an abnormal EEG, but no seizures by the age of 4 years. Delineation of the underlying genetic mechanism is of utmost importance for reasons of genetic counselling, as well as appropriate management and prognosis. Alternative techniques, such as array-CGH and MLPA, are necessary when conventional testing for AS has failed to identify the underlying genetic mechanism. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Central precocious puberty in a patient with X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita and Xp21 contiguous gene deletion syndrome

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    Ji Won Koh

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita is caused by the mutation of DAX-1 gene (dosage-sensitive sex reversal, adrenal hypoplasia critical region, on chromosome X, gene 1, and can occur as part of a contiguous gene deletion syndrome in association with glycerol kinase (GK deficiency, Duchenne muscular dystrophy and X-linked interleukin-1 receptor accessory protein-like 1 (IL1RAPL1 gene deficiency. It is usually associated with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, although in rare cases, it has been reported to occur in normal puberty or even central precocious puberty. This study addresses a case in which central precocious puberty developed in a boy with X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita who had complete deletion of the genes DAX-1, GK and IL1RAPL1 (Xp21 contiguous gene deletion syndrome. Initially he was admitted for the management of adrenal crisis at the age of 2 months, and managed with hydrocortisone and florinef. At 45 months of age, his each testicular volumes of 4 mL and a penile length of 5 cm were noted, with pubic hair of Tanner stage 2. His bone age was advanced and a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH stimulation test showed a luteinizing hormone peak of 8.26 IU/L, confirming central precocious puberty. He was then treated with a GnRH agonist, as well as steroid replacement therapy. In Korea, this is the first case of central precocious puberty developed in a male patient with X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita.

  9. Association of promoter methylation and 32-bp deletion of the PTEN gene with susceptibility to metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Mohammad; Rezaei, Hamzeh; Eskandari-Nasab, Ebrahim; Kaykhaei, Mahmoud-Ali; Taheri, Mohsen

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MeS), a cluster of several metabolic disorders, is increasingly being recognized as a risk factor for type II diabetes (T2D) and cardiovascular disease. Genetic and epigenetic alteration of the phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN) has been associated with components of MeS. The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible association of a 32-bp deletion polymorphism and promoter methylation of the PTEN gene with MeS. DNA was extracted from the peripheral blood of 151 subjects with and 149 subjects without MeS. The 32-bp deletion variant of PTEN was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and PTEN promoter methylation was defined by a nested methylation‑specific PCR (MSP) method. No significant differences were found in the allelic and genotypic frequencies of the 32-bp deletion variant of PTEN between the groups [odds ratio (OR), 0.77; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.41-1.45; P=0.431]. However, patients with MeS were identified to have lower levels of PTEN promoter hypermethylation than subjects without MeS. Promoter methylation may be a protective factor against susceptibility to MeS (OR, 0.52; 95% CI, 0.29-0.92; P=0.029). Our findings suggest that PTEN promoter methylation may be a mechanism for PTEN downregulation or silencing in MeS, which remains to be fully clarified.

  10. 1p36 deletion syndrome: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan VK

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Valerie K Jordan,1 Hitisha P Zaveri,2 Daryl A Scott1,2 1Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA; 2Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: Deletions of chromosome 1p36 affect approximately 1 in 5,000 newborns and are the most common terminal deletions in humans. Medical problems commonly caused by terminal deletions of 1p36 include developmental delay, intellectual disability, seizures, vision problems, hearing loss, short stature, distinctive facial features, brain anomalies, orofacial clefting, congenital heart defects, cardiomyopathy, and renal anomalies. Although 1p36 deletion syndrome is considered clinically recognizable, there is significant phenotypic variation among affected individuals. This variation is due, at least in part, to the genetic heterogeneity seen in 1p36 deletions which include terminal and interstitial deletions of varying lengths located throughout the 30 Mb of DNA that comprise chromosome 1p36. Array-based copy number variant analysis can easily identify genomic regions of 1p36 that are deleted in an affected individual. However, predicting the phenotype of an individual based solely on the location and extent of their 1p36 deletion remains a challenge since most of the genes that contribute to 1p36-related phenotypes have yet to be identified. In addition, haploinsufficiency of more than one gene may contribute to some phenotypes. In this article, we review recent successes in the effort to map and identify the genes and genomic regions that contribute to specific 1p36-related phenotypes. In particular, we highlight evidence implicating MMP23B, GABRD, SKI, PRDM16, KCNAB2, RERE, UBE4B, CASZ1, PDPN, SPEN, ECE1, HSPG2, and LUZP1 in various 1p36 deletion phenotypes. Keywords: chromosome 1p36, chromosome deletion, 1p36 deletion syndrome, monosomy 1p36

  11. Expansion of the clinical ocular spectrum of Wolfram Syndrome in a family carrying a novel WFS1 gene deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacón-Camacho, Oscar; Arce-Gonzalez, Rocio; Granillo-Alvarez, Mariella; Flores-Limas, Sanjuanita; Ramírez, Magdalena; Zenteno, Juan C

    2013-12-01

    To present the results of the clinical and molecular analyses of a familial case of Wolfram Syndrome (WFS) associated with a novel ocular anomaly. Full ophthalmologic examination was performed in two WFS siblings. Visante OCT imaging was used for assessing anterior segment anomalies. Genetic analysis included PCR amplification and exon-by-exon nucleotide sequencing of the WFS1 gene. Ocular anomalies in both affected siblings included congenital cataract, glaucoma, and optic atrophy. Interestingly, microspherophakia, a feature that has not been previously associated with WFS, was observed in both siblings. Genetic analysis disclosed a novel c.1525_1539 homozygous deletion in exon 8 of WFS1 in DNA from both affected patients. The recognition of microspherophakia in two siblings carrying a novel WFS1 mutation expands the clinical and molecular spectrum of Wolfram syndrome.

  12. Homozygous deletion of TRMT10A as part of a contiguous gene deletion in a syndrome of failure to thrive, delayed puberty, intellectual disability and diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zung, Amnon; Kori, Michal; Burundukov, Ella; Ben-Yosef, Tamar; Tatoor, Yasmin; Granot, Esther

    2015-12-01

    Two recent reports describe a new syndrome of intellectual disability, short stature, microcephaly, and young onset diabetes or disturbed glucose metabolism in association with inactivating mutations in the TRMT10A gene. We investigated the clinical spectrum presented by a 17-year-old female with a homozygous contiguous gene deletion involving the TRMT10A gene. From infancy, she presented with failure to thrive and microcephaly. Puberty was characterized by a slow and an inconsistent course of progression. Concomitantly, gonadotropin levels fluctuated between low and high levels which were compatible with gonadal failure. Unlike the previous reports, the patient had ketoacidosis at onset of diabetes and islet cell autoantibodies. Nevertheless, glycemic control was excellent (HbA1C 5.0%-6.2%). RT-PCR and Western blot analysis demonstrated a complete abolishment of TRMT10A mRNA and its translated protein. In order to elucidate the nature of diabetes in this patient, endogenous insulin secretion and glycemic control were evaluated by a glucagon stimulation test and continuous glucose monitoring both during insulin treatment and off therapy. Endogenous insulin secretion still persisted 22 months after onset of diabetes and relatively normal glucose levels were kept over 3 days without insulin treatment. The fluctuating course of puberty and diabetes may reflect intermittent apoptotic damages due to sensitization of the relevant cells to various stress agents in the absence of functional TRMT10A. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. 19-base pair deletion polymorphism of the dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR gene: maternal risk of Down syndrome and folate metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiani Cortez Mendes

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Polymorphisms in genes involved in folate metabolism may modulate the maternal risk of Down syndrome (DS. This study evaluated the influence of a 19-base pair (bp deletion polymorphism in intron-1 of the dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR gene on the maternal risk of DS, and investigated the association between this polymorphism and variations in the concentrations of serum folate and plasma homocysteine (Hcy and plasma methylmalonic acid (MMA. DESIGN AND SETTING: Analytical cross-sectional study carried out at Faculdade de Medicina de São José do Rio Preto (Famerp. METHODS: 105 mothers of individuals with free trisomy of chromosome 21, and 184 control mothers were evaluated. Molecular analysis on the polymorphism was performed using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR through differences in the sizes of fragments. Folate was quantified by means of chemiluminescence, and Hcy and MMA by means of liquid chromatography and sequential mass spectrometry. RESULTS: There was no difference between the groups in relation to allele and genotype frequencies (P = 0.44; P = 0.69, respectively. The folate, Hcy and MMA concentrations did not differ significantly between the groups, in relation to genotypes (P > 0.05. CONCLUSIONS: The 19-bp deletion polymorphism of DHFR gene was not a maternal risk factor for DS and was not related to variations in the concentrations of serum folate and plasma Hcy and MMA in the study population.

  14. AIRE variations in Addison's disease and autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes (APS): partial gene deletions contribute to APS I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bøe Wolff, A S; Oftedal, B; Johansson, S; Bruland, O; Løvås, K; Meager, A; Pedersen, C; Husebye, E S; Knappskog, P M

    2008-03-01

    Autoimmune Addison's disease (AAD) is often associated with other components in autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes (APS). Whereas APS I is caused by mutations in the AIRE gene, the susceptibility genes for AAD and APS II are unclear. In the present study, we investigated whether polymorphisms or copy number variations in the AIRE gene were associated with AAD and APS II. First, nine SNPs in the AIRE gene were analyzed in 311 patients with AAD and APS II and 521 healthy controls, identifying no associated risk. Second, in a subgroup of 25 of these patients, AIRE sequencing revealed three novel polymorphisms. Finally, the AIRE copy number was determined by duplex quantitative PCR in 14 patients with APS I, 161 patients with AAD and APS II and in 39 healthy subjects. In two Scandinavian APS I patients previously reported to be homozygous for common AIRE mutations, we identified large deletions of the AIRE gene covering at least exon 2 to exon 8. We conclude that polymorphisms in the AIRE gene are not associated with AAD and APS II. We further suggest that DNA analysis of the parents of patients found to be homozygous for mutations in AIRE, always should be performed.

  15. Deletion 22q13.3 syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phelan Mary C

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The deletion 22q13.3 syndrome (deletion 22q13 syndrome or Phelan-McDermid syndrome is a chromosome microdeletion syndrome characterized by neonatal hypotonia, global developmental delay, normal to accelerated growth, absent to severely delayed speech, and minor dysmorphic features. The deletion occurs with equal frequency in males and females and has been reported in mosaic and non-mosaic forms. Due to lack of clinical recognition and often insufficient laboratory testing, the syndrome is under-diagnosed and its true incidence remains unknown. Common physical traits include long eye lashes, large or unusual ears, relatively large hands, dysplastic toenails, full brow, dolicocephaly, full cheeks, bulbous nose, and pointed chin. Behavior is autistic-like with decreased perception of pain and habitual chewing or mouthing. The loss of 22q13.3 can result from simple deletion, translocation, ring chromosome formation and less common structural changes affecting the long arm of chromosome 22, specifically the region containing the SHANK3 gene. The diagnosis of deletion 22q13 syndrome should be considered in all cases of hypotonia of unknown etiology and in individuals with absent speech. Although the deletion can sometimes be detected by high resolution chromosome analysis, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH or array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH is recommended for confirmation. Differential diagnosis includes syndromes associated with hypotonia, developmental delay, speech delay and/or autistic-like affect (Prader-Willi, Angelman, Williams, Smith-Magenis, Fragile X, Sotos, FG, trichorhinophalangeal and velocardiofacial syndromes, autism spectrum disorders, cerebral palsy. Genetic counseling is recommended and parental laboratory studies should be considered to identify cryptic rearrangements and detect parental mosaicism. Prenatal diagnosis should be offered for future pregnancies in those families with inherited rearrangements

  16. Deletion of the telomerase reverse transcriptase gene and haploinsufficiency of telomere maintenance in Cri du chat syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Anju; Zheng, Chengyun; Hou, Mi; Lindvall, Charlotta; Li, Ke-Jun; Erlandsson, Fredrik; Björkholm, Magnus; Gruber, Astrid; Blennow, Elisabeth; Xu, Dawei

    2003-04-01

    Cri du chat syndrome (CdCS) results from loss of the distal portion of chromosome 5p, where the telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene is localized (5p15.33). hTERT is the rate-limiting component for telomerase activity that is essential for telomere-length maintenance and sustained cell proliferation. Here, we show that a concomitant deletion of the hTERT allele occurs in all 10 patients with CdCS whom we examined. Induction of hTERT mRNA in proliferating lymphocytes derived from five of seven patients was lower than that in unaffected control individuals (P<.05). The patient lymphocytes exhibited shorter telomeres than age-matched unaffected individuals (P<.0001). A reduction in replicative life span and a high rate of chromosome fusions were observed in cultured patient fibroblasts. Reconstitution of telomerase activity by ectopic expression of hTERT extended the telomere length, increased the population doublings, and prevented the end-to-end fusion of chromosomes. We conclude that hTERT is limiting and haploinsufficient for telomere maintenance in humans in vivo. Accordingly, the hTERT deletion may be one genetic element contributing to the phenotypic changes in CdCS.

  17. Unmasking of a hemizygous WFS1 gene mutation by a chromosome 4p deletion of 8.3 Mb in a patient with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flipsen-ten Berg, Klara; van Hasselt, Peter M; Eleveld, Marc J; van der Wijst, Suzanne E; Hol, Frans A; de Vroede, Monique A M; Beemer, Frits A; Hochstenbach, P F Ron; Poot, Martin

    2007-11-01

    The Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS (MIM 194190)), which is characterized by growth delay, mental retardation, epilepsy, facial dysmorphisms, and midline fusion defects, shows extensive phenotypic variability. Several of the proposed mutational and epigenetic mechanisms in this and other chromosomal deletion syndromes fail to explain the observed phenotypic variability. To explain the complex phenotype of a patient with WHS and features reminiscent of Wolfram syndrome (WFS (MIM 222300)), we performed extensive clinical evaluation and classical and molecular cytogenetic (GTG banding, FISH and array-CGH) and WFS1 gene mutation analyses. We detected an 8.3 Mb terminal deletion and an adjacent 2.6 Mb inverted duplication in the short arm of chromosome 4, which encompasses a gene associated with WFS (WFS1). In addition, a nonsense mutation in exon 8 of the WFS1 gene was found on the structurally normal chromosome 4. The combination of the 4p deletion with the WFS1 point mutation explains the complex phenotype presented by our patient. This case further illustrates that unmasking of hemizygous recessive mutations by chromosomal deletions represents an additional explanation for the phenotypic variability observed in chromosomal deletion disorders.

  18. Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome in a Family of Warmblood Horses Caused by a 25-bp Deletion of the DNA-Binding Domain of the Androgen Receptor Gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eastman Welsford, G.; Munk, Rikke; Villagómez, Daniel A.F.

    2017-01-01

    Testicular feminization, an earlier term coined for describing a syndrome resulting from failure of masculinization of target organs by androgen secretions during embryo development, has been well documented not only in humans but also in the domestic horse. The pathology, actually referred...... pedigree segregating AIS, where the molecular analyses of the androgen receptor gene in the family provided evidences that a 25-bp deletion of the DNA-binding domain is causative of this equine syndrome....

  19. Novel intragenic deletions within the UBE3A gene in two unrelated patients with Angelman syndrome: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera, Cinthia; Viñas-Jornet, Marina; Baena, Neus; Gabau, Elisabeth; Fernández, Concepción; Capdevila, Nuria; Cirkovic, Sanja; Sarajlija, Adrijan; Miskovic, Marijana; Radivojevic, Danijela; Ruiz, Anna; Guitart, Miriam

    2017-11-21

    Patients with Angelman syndrome (AS) are affected by severe intellectual disability with absence of speech, distinctive dysmorphic craniofacial features, ataxia and a characteristic behavioral phenotype. AS is caused by the lack of expression in neurons of the UBE3A gene, which is located in the 15q11.2-q13 imprinted region. Functional loss of UBE3A is due to 15q11.2-q13 deletion, mutations in the UBE3A gene, paternal uniparental disomy and genomic imprinting defects. We report here two patients with clinical features of AS referred to our hospital for clinical follow-up and genetic diagnosis. Methylation Specific-Multiplex Ligation-Dependent Probe Amplification (MS-MLPA) of the 15q11.2-q13 region was carried out in our laboratory as the first diagnostic tool detecting two novel UBE3A intragenic deletions. Subsequently, the MLPA P336-A2 kit was used to confirm and determine the size of the UBE3A deletion in the two patients. A review of the clinical features of previously reported patients with whole UBE3A gene or partial intragenic deletions is presented here together with these two new patients. Although rare, UBE3A intragenic deletions may represent a small fraction of AS patients without a genetic diagnosis. Testing for UBE3A intragenic exonic deletions should be performed in those AS patients with a normal methylation pattern and no mutations in the UBE3A gene.

  20. New recurrent deletions in the PPARgamma and TP53 genes are associated with childhood myelodysplastic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silveira, Cássia G T; Oliveira, Fábio M; Valera, Elvis T

    2009-01-01

    observed in 17 and 18 cases, respectively. Using quantitative RT-PCR, it was detected PPARgamma transcript downexpression in a subset of these cases. G-banding analysis revealed 17p deletions in a small number of these cases. One MDS therapy-related patient had neither a loss of PPARgamma nor TP53...

  1. Genes in a Refined Smith-Magenis Syndrome Critical Deletion Interval on Chromosome 17p11.2 and the Syntenic Region of the Mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Weimin; Yan, Jiong; Stankiewicz, Paweł; Park, Sung-Sup; Walz, Katherina; Boerkoel, Cornelius F.; Potocki, Lorraine; Shaffer, Lisa G.; Devriendt, Koen; Nowaczyk, Małgorzata J.M.; Inoue, Ken; Lupski, James R.

    2002-01-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a multiple congenital anomaly/mental retardation syndrome associated with behavioral abnormalities and sleep disturbance. Most patients have the same ∼4 Mb interstitial genomic deletion within chromosome 17p11.2. To investigate the molecular bases of the SMS phenotype, we constructed BAC/PAC contigs covering the SMS common deletion interval and its syntenic region on mouse chromosome 11. Comparative genome analysis reveals the absence of all three ∼200-kb SMS-REP low-copy repeats in the mouse and indicates that the evolution of SMS-REPs was accompanied by transposition of adjacent genes. Physical and genetic map comparisons in humans reveal reduced recombination in both sexes. Moreover, by examining the deleted regions in SMS patients with unusual-sized deletions, we refined the minimal Smith-Magenis critical region (SMCR) to an ∼1.1-Mb genomic interval that is syntenic to an ∼1.0-Mb region in the mouse. Genes within the SMCR and its mouse syntenic region were identified by homology searches and by gene prediction programs, and their gene structures and expression profiles were characterized. In addition to 12 genes previously mapped, we identified 8 new genes and 10 predicted genes in the SMCR. In the mouse syntenic region of the human SMCR, 16 genes and 6 predicted genes were identified. The SMCR is highly conserved between humans and mice, including 19 genes with the same gene order and orientation. Our findings will facilitate both the identification of gene(s) responsible for the SMS phenotype and the engineering of an SMS mouse model. PMID:11997338

  2. The gene for replication factor C subunit 2 (RFC2) is within the 7q11.23 Williams syndrome deletion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peoples, R.; Perez-Jurado, L.; Francke, U.; Yu-Ker Wang [Stanford Univ. Medical Center, CA (United States); Kaplan, P. [Children`s Hospital of Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1996-06-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a developmental disorder with multiple system manifestations, including supraval var aortic stenosis (SVAS), peripheral pulmonic stenosis, connective tissue abnormalities, short stature, characteristic personality profile and cognitive deficits, and variable hypercalcemia in infancy. It is caused by heterozygosity for a chromosomal deletion of part of band 7q11.23 including the elastin locus (ELN). Since disruption of the ELN gene causes autosomal dominant SVAS, it is assumed that ELN haploinsufficiency is responsible for the cardiovascular features of WS. The deletion that extends from the ELN locus in both directions is {ge}200 kb in size, although estimates of {ge}2 Mb are suggested by high-resolution chromosome banding and physical mapping studies. We have searched for additional dosage-sensitive genes within the deletion that may be responsible for the noncardiovascular features. We report here that the gene for replication factor C subunit 2 (RFC2) maps within the WS deletion region and was found to be deleted in all of 18 WS patients studied. The protein product of RFC2 is part of a multimeric complex involved in DNA elongation during replication. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  3. Novel mutations including deletions of the entire OFD1 gene in 30 families with type 1 orofaciodigital syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisschoff, Izak J; Zeschnigk, Christine; Horn, Denise

    2013-01-01

    have studied 55 sporadic and six familial cases of suspected OFD1. Comprehensive mutation analysis in OFD1 revealed mutations in 37 female patients from 30 families; 22 mutations have not been previously described including two heterozygous deletions spanning OFD1 and neighbouring genes. Analysis...

  4. A 725 kb deletion at 22q13.1 chromosomal region including SOX10 gene in a boy with a neurologic variant of Waardenburg syndrome type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siomou, Elisavet; Manolakos, Emmanouil; Petersen, Michael; Thomaidis, Loretta; Gyftodimou, Yolanda; Orru, Sandro; Papoulidis, Ioannis

    2012-11-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a rare (1/40,000) autosomal dominant disorder resulting from melanocyte defects, with varying combinations of sensorineural hearing loss and abnormal pigmentation of the hair, skin, and inner ear. WS is classified into four clinical subtypes (WS1-S4). Six genes have been identified to be associated with the different subtypes of WS, among which SOX10, which is localized within the region 22q13.1. Lately it has been suggested that whole SOX10 gene deletions can be encountered when testing for WS. In this study we report a case of a 13-year-old boy with a unique de novo 725 kb deletion within the 22q13.1 chromosomal region, including the SOX10 gene and presenting clinical features of a neurologic variant of WS2. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. A deletion in the Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome 4 (Hps4) gene appears to be responsible for albinism in channel catfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yueru; Geng, Xin; Bao, Lisui; Elaswad, Ahmed; Huggins, Kevin W; Dunham, Rex; Liu, Zhanjiang

    2017-06-01

    Albinism is caused by a series of genetic abnormalities leading to reduction of melanin production. Albinism is quite frequent in catfish, but the causative gene and the molecular basis were unknown. In this study, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) using the 250 K SNP array. The GWAS analysis allowed mapping of the albino phenotype in the Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome 4 (Hps4) gene, which is known to be involved in melanosome biosynthesis. Sequencing analysis revealed that a 99-bp deletion was present in all analyzed albino catfish at the intron 2 and exon 3 junction. This deletion led to the skipping of the entire exon 3 which was confirmed by RT-PCR. Therefore, Hps4 was determined to be the candidate gene of the catfish albinism.

  6. Mitochondria in complex psychiatric disorders: Lessons from mouse models of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: Hemizygous deletion of several mitochondrial genes in the 22q11.2 genomic region can lead to symptoms associated with neuropsychiatric disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaraju, Prakash; Zakharenko, Stanislav S

    2017-02-01

    Mitochondrial ATP synthesis, calcium buffering, and trafficking affect neuronal function and survival. Several genes implicated in mitochondrial functions map within the genomic region associated with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS), which is a key genetic cause of neuropsychiatric diseases. Although neuropsychiatric diseases impose a serious health and economic burden, their etiology and pathogenesis remain largely unknown because of the dearth of valid animal models and the challenges in investigating the pathophysiology in neuronal circuits. Mouse models of 22q11DS are becoming valid tools for studying human psychiatric diseases, because they have hemizygous deletions of the genes that are deleted in patients and exhibit neuronal and behavioral abnormalities consistent with neuropsychiatric disease. The deletion of some 22q11DS genes implicated in mitochondrial function leads to abnormal neuronal and synaptic function. Herein, we summarize recent findings on mitochondrial dysfunction in 22q11DS and extend those findings to the larger context of schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric diseases. © 2017 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Treacher Collins syndrome may result from insertions, deletions or splicing mutations, which introduce a termination codon into the gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gladwin, A. J.; Dixon, J.; Loftus, S. K.; Edwards, S.; Wasmuth, J. J.; Hennekam, R. C.; Dixon, M. J.

    1996-01-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder of craniofacial development the features of which include conductive hearing loss and cleft palate. Recently, the Treacher Collins syndrome gene (TCOF1) has been positionally cloned and a series of five mutations within the coding sequence

  8. Genetics Home Reference: distal 18q deletion syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Conditions Distal 18q deletion syndrome Distal 18q deletion syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Distal 18q deletion syndrome is a chromosomal condition that occurs when ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: proximal 18q deletion syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Conditions Proximal 18q deletion syndrome Proximal 18q deletion syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Proximal 18q deletion syndrome is a chromosomal condition that occurs when ...

  10. Nonrecurrent PMP22-RAI1 contiguous gene deletions arise from replication-based mechanisms and result in Smith-Magenis syndrome with evident peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Bo; Neira, Juanita; Gu, Shen; Harel, Tamar; Liu, Pengfei; Briceño, Ignacio; Elsea, Sarah H; Gómez, Alberto; Potocki, Lorraine; Lupski, James R

    2016-10-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) and Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) are genomic disorders associated with deletion copy number variants involving chromosome 17p12 and 17p11.2, respectively. Nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR)-mediated recurrent deletions are responsible for the majority of HNPP and SMS cases; the rearrangement products encompass the key dosage-sensitive genes PMP22 and RAI1, respectively, and result in haploinsufficiency for these genes. Less frequently, nonrecurrent genomic rearrangements occur at this locus. Contiguous gene duplications encompassing both PMP22 and RAI1, i.e., PMP22-RAI1 duplications, have been investigated, and replication-based mechanisms rather than NAHR have been proposed for these rearrangements. In the current study, we report molecular and clinical characterizations of six subjects with the reciprocal phenomenon of deletions spanning both genes, i.e., PMP22-RAI1 deletions. Molecular studies utilizing high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization and breakpoint junction sequencing identified mutational signatures that were suggestive of replication-based mechanisms. Systematic clinical studies revealed features consistent with SMS, including features of intellectual disability, speech and gross motor delays, behavioral problems and ocular abnormalities. Five out of six subjects presented clinical signs and/or objective electrophysiologic studies of peripheral neuropathy. Clinical profiling may improve the clinical management of this unique group of subjects, as the peripheral neuropathy can be more severe or of earlier onset as compared to SMS patients having the common recurrent deletion. Moreover, the current study, in combination with the previous report of PMP22-RAI1 duplications, contributes to the understanding of rare complex phenotypes involving multiple dosage-sensitive genes from a genetic mechanistic standpoint.

  11. Opposing phenotypes in mice with Smith-Magenis deletion and Potocki-Lupski duplication syndromes suggest gene dosage effects on fluid consumption behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, Detlef H; Gu, Wenli; Cao, Ying; Qi, Shuhua; Lacaria, Melanie; Lupski, James R

    2012-11-01

    A quantitative long-term fluid consumption and fluid-licking assay was performed in two mouse models with either an ∼2 Mb genomic deletion, Df(11)17, or the reciprocal duplication copy number variation (CNV), Dp(11)17, analogous to the human genomic rearrangements causing either Smith-Magenis syndrome [SMS; OMIM #182290] or Potocki-Lupski syndrome [PTLS; OMIM #610883], respectively. Both mouse strains display distinct quantitative alterations in fluid consumption compared to their wild-type littermates; several of these changes are diametrically opposing between the two chromosome engineered mouse models. Mice with duplication versus deletion showed longer versus shorter intervals between visits to the waterspout, generated more versus less licks per visit and had higher versus lower variability in the number of licks per lick-burst as compared to their respective wild-type littermates. These findings suggest that copy number variation can affect long-term fluid consumption behavior in mice. Other behavioral differences were unique for either the duplication or deletion mutants; the deletion CNV resulted in increased variability of the licking rhythm, and the duplication CNV resulted in a significant slowing of the licking rhythm. Our findings document a readily quantitated complex behavioral response that can be directly and reciprocally influenced by a gene dosage effect. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. MicroRNA Dysregulation, Gene Networks, and Risk for Schizophrenia in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merico, Daniele; Costain, Gregory; Butcher, Nancy J.; Warnica, William; Ogura, Lucas; Alfred, Simon E.; Brzustowicz, Linda M.; Bassett, Anne S.

    2014-01-01

    The role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in the etiology of schizophrenia is increasingly recognized. Microdeletions at chromosome 22q11.2 are recurrent structural variants that impart a high risk for schizophrenia and are found in up to 1% of all patients with schizophrenia. The 22q11.2 deletion region overlaps gene DGCR8, encoding a subunit of the miRNA microprocessor complex. We identified miRNAs overlapped by the 22q11.2 microdeletion and for the first time investigated their predicted target genes, and those implicated by DGCR8, to identify targets that may be involved in the risk for schizophrenia. The 22q11.2 region encompasses seven validated or putative miRNA genes. Employing two standard prediction tools, we generated sets of predicted target genes. Functional enrichment profiles of the 22q11.2 region miRNA target genes suggested a role in neuronal processes and broader developmental pathways. We then constructed a protein interaction network of schizophrenia candidate genes and interaction partners relevant to brain function, independent of the 22q11.2 region miRNA mechanisms. We found that the predicted gene targets of the 22q11.2 deletion miRNAs, and targets of the genome-wide miRNAs predicted to be dysregulated by DGCR8 hemizygosity, were significantly represented in this schizophrenia network. The findings provide new insights into the pathway from 22q11.2 deletion to expression of schizophrenia, and suggest that hemizygosity of the 22q11.2 region may have downstream effects implicating genes elsewhere in the genome that are relevant to the general schizophrenia population. These data also provide further support for the notion that robust genetic findings in schizophrenia may converge on a reasonable number of final pathways. PMID:25484875

  13. MicroRNA dysregulation, gene networks and risk for schizophrenia in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele eMerico

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The role of microRNAs (miRNAs in the aetiology of schizophrenia is increasingly recognized. Microdeletions at chromosome 22q11.2 are recurrent structural variants that impart a high risk for schizophrenia and are found in up to 1% of all patients with schizophrenia. The 22q11.2 deletion region overlaps gene DGCR8, encoding a subunit of the miRNA microprocessor complex. We identified miRNAs overlapped by the 22q11.2 microdeletion and for the first time investigated their predicted target genes, and those implicated by DGCR8, to identify targets that may be involved in the risk for schizophrenia. The 22q11.2 region encompasses seven validated or putative miRNA genes. Employing two standard prediction tools, we generated sets of predicted target genes. Functional enrichment profiles of the 22q11.2 region miRNA target genes suggested a role in neuronal processes and broader developmental pathways. We then constructed a protein interaction network of schizophrenia candidate genes and interaction partners relevant to brain function, independent of the 22q11.2 region miRNA mechanisms. We found that the predicted gene targets of the 22q11.2 deletion miRNAs, and targets of the genome-wide miRNAs predicted to be dysregulated by DGCR8 hemizygosity, were significantly represented in this schizophrenia network. The findings provide new insights into the pathway from 22q11.2 deletion to expression of schizophrenia, and suggest that hemizygosity of the 22q11.2 region may have downstream effects implicating genes elsewhere in the genome that are relevant to the general schizophrenia population. These data also provide further support for the notion that robust genetic findings in schizophrenia may converge on a reasonable number of final pathways.

  14. Identification of a Novel De Novo Heterozygous Deletion in the SOX10 Gene in Waardenburg Syndrome Type II Using Next-Generation Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haonan; Jin, Peng; Hao, Qian; Zhu, Wei; Chen, Xia; Wang, Ping

    2017-11-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder associated with pigmentation abnormalities and sensorineural hearing loss. In this study, we investigated the genetic cause of WSII in a patient and evaluated the reliability of the targeted next-generation exome sequencing method for the genetic diagnosis of WS. Clinical evaluations were conducted on the patient and targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) was used to identify the candidate genes responsible for WSII. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) were performed to confirm the targeted NGS results. Targeted NGS detected the entire deletion of the coding sequence (CDS) of the SOX10 gene in the WSII patient. MLPA results indicated that all exons of the SOX10 heterozygous deletion were detected; no aberrant copy number in the PAX3 and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) genes was found. Real-time qPCR results identified the mutation as a de novo heterozygous deletion. This is the first report of using a targeted NGS method for WS candidate gene sequencing; its accuracy was verified by using the MLPA and qPCR methods. Our research provides a valuable method for the genetic diagnosis of WS.

  15. A novel silent deletion, an insertion mutation and a nonsense mutation in the TCOF1 gene found in two Chinese cases of Treacher Collins syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Yin, Xiao-Juan; Han, Tao; Peng, Wei; Wu, Hong-Lin; Liu, Xin; Feng, Zhi-Chun

    2014-12-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is the most common and well-known craniofacial disorder caused by mutations in the genes involved in pre-rRNA transcription, which include the TCOF1 gene. This study explored the role of TCOF1 mutations in Chinese patients with TCS. Mutational analysis of the TCOF1 gene was performed in three patients using polymerase chain reaction and direct sequencing. Among these three patients, two additional TCOF1 variations, a novel 18 bp deletion and a novel 1 bp insertion mutation, were found in patient 1, together with a novel nonsense mutation (p.Ser476X) and a previously reported 4 bp deletion (c.1872_1875delTGAG) in other patients. Pedigree analysis allowed for prediction of the character of the mutation, which was either pathological or not. The 18 bp deletion of six amino acids, Ser-Asp-Ser-Glu-Glu-Glu (798*803), which was located in the CKII phosphorylation site of treacle, seemed relatively benign for TCS. By contrast, another novel mutation of c.1072_1073insC (p.Gln358ProfsX23) was a frameshift mutation and expected to result in a premature stop codon. This study provides insights into the functional domain of treacle and illustrates the importance of clinical and family TCS screening for the interpretation of novel sequence alterations.

  16. Familial isolated primary hyperparathyroidism/hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumour syndrome caused by germline gross deletion or point mutations of CDC73 gene in Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Jing; Wang, Ou; Nie, Min; Shi, Jie; Hu, Yingying; Jiang, Yan; Li, Mei; Xia, Weibo; Meng, Xunwu; Xing, Xiaoping

    2014-08-01

    Hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumour syndrome (HPT-JT) and familial isolated primary hyperparathyroidism (FIHP) are two subtypes of familial primary hyperparathyroidism, which are rarely reported in Chinese population. Here, we reported three FIHP families and one HPT-JT family with long-term follow-up and genetic analysis. A total of 22 patients, from four FIHP/HPT-JT families of Chinese descent, were recruited and genomic DNA was extracted from their peripheral blood lymphocytes. Direct sequencing for MEN1, CDC73, CASR gene was conducted. Reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) were used to study the effect of splice site mutations and gross deletion mutations. Immunohistochemistry was performed to analyse parafibromin expression in parathyroid tumours. Genotype-phenotype correlations were assessed through clinical characteristics and long-term follow-up data. Genetic analysis revealed four CDC73 germline mutations that were responsible for the four kindreds, including two novel point mutation (c.157 G>T and IVS3+1 G>A), one recurrent point mutation (c.664 C>T) and one deletion mutation (c.307+?_513-?del exons 4, 5, 6). RT-PCR confirmed that IVS3+1 G>A generated an aberrant transcript with exon3 deletion. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated reduced nuclear parafibromin expression in tumours supporting the pathogenic effects of these mutations. This study supplies information on mutations and phenotypes of HPT-JT/FIHP syndrome in Chinese. Screening for gross deletion and point mutations of the CDC73 gene is necessary in susceptible subjects. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Differentiated psychopharmacological treatment in three genetic subtypes of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, W.M.A.; Egger, J.I.M.; Leeuw, N. de

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS), mostly caused by the common deletion including the TBX- and COMT-genes (LCR22A-D), is highly associated with somatic anomalies. The distal deletion (distal of LCR22D) comprises the MAPK1-gene and is associated with specific heart defects. The

  18. Molecular analysis of the Retinoic Acid Induced 1 gene (RAI1 in patients with suspected Smith-Magenis syndrome without the 17p11.2 deletion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry Vilboux

    Full Text Available Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS is a complex neurobehavioral disorder characterized by multiple congenital anomalies. The syndrome is primarily ascribed to a ∼3.7 Mb de novo deletion on chromosome 17p11.2. Haploinsufficiency of multiple genes likely underlies the complex clinical phenotype. RAI1 (Retinoic Acid Induced 1 is recognized as a major gene involved in the SMS phenotype. Extensive genetic and clinical analyses of 36 patients with SMS-like features, but without the 17p11.2 microdeletion, yielded 10 patients with RAI1 variants, including 4 with de novo deleterious mutations, and 6 with novel missense variants, 5 of which were familial. Haplotype analysis showed two major RAI1 haplotypes in our primarily Caucasian cohort; the novel RAI1 variants did not occur in a preferred haplotype. RNA analysis revealed that RAI1 mRNA expression was significantly decreased in cells of patients with the common 17p11.2 deletion, as well as in those with de novo RAI1 variants. Expression levels varied in patients with familial RAI1 variants and in non-17p11.2 deleted patients without identified RAI1 defects. No correlation between SNP haplotype and RAI1 expression was found. Two clinical features, ocular abnormalities and polyembolokoilomania (object insertion, were significantly correlated with decreased RAI1 expression. While not significantly correlated, the presence of hearing loss, seizures, hoarse voice, childhood onset of obesity and specific behavioral aspects and the absence of immunologic abnormalities and cardiovascular or renal structural anomalies, appeared to be specific for the de novo RAI1 subgroup. Recognition of the combination of these features will assist in referral for RAI1 analysis of patients with SMS-like features without detectable microdeletion of 17p11.2. Moreover, RAI1 expression emerged as a genetic target for development of therapeutic interventions for SMS.

  19. Molecular analysis of the Retinoic Acid Induced 1 gene (RAI1) in patients with suspected Smith-Magenis syndrome without the 17p11.2 deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilboux, Thierry; Ciccone, Carla; Blancato, Jan K; Cox, Gerald F; Deshpande, Charu; Introne, Wendy J; Gahl, William A; Smith, Ann C M; Huizing, Marjan

    2011-01-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a complex neurobehavioral disorder characterized by multiple congenital anomalies. The syndrome is primarily ascribed to a ∼3.7 Mb de novo deletion on chromosome 17p11.2. Haploinsufficiency of multiple genes likely underlies the complex clinical phenotype. RAI1 (Retinoic Acid Induced 1) is recognized as a major gene involved in the SMS phenotype. Extensive genetic and clinical analyses of 36 patients with SMS-like features, but without the 17p11.2 microdeletion, yielded 10 patients with RAI1 variants, including 4 with de novo deleterious mutations, and 6 with novel missense variants, 5 of which were familial. Haplotype analysis showed two major RAI1 haplotypes in our primarily Caucasian cohort; the novel RAI1 variants did not occur in a preferred haplotype. RNA analysis revealed that RAI1 mRNA expression was significantly decreased in cells of patients with the common 17p11.2 deletion, as well as in those with de novo RAI1 variants. Expression levels varied in patients with familial RAI1 variants and in non-17p11.2 deleted patients without identified RAI1 defects. No correlation between SNP haplotype and RAI1 expression was found. Two clinical features, ocular abnormalities and polyembolokoilomania (object insertion), were significantly correlated with decreased RAI1 expression. While not significantly correlated, the presence of hearing loss, seizures, hoarse voice, childhood onset of obesity and specific behavioral aspects and the absence of immunologic abnormalities and cardiovascular or renal structural anomalies, appeared to be specific for the de novo RAI1 subgroup. Recognition of the combination of these features will assist in referral for RAI1 analysis of patients with SMS-like features without detectable microdeletion of 17p11.2. Moreover, RAI1 expression emerged as a genetic target for development of therapeutic interventions for SMS.

  20. Cole-Carpenter syndrome-1 with a de novo heterozygous deletion in the P4HB gene in a Chinese girl: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Lixue; Yang, Fan

    2017-12-01

    Cole-Carpenter syndrome-1 (CLCRP1) is an independent osteogenesis imperfect (OI)-like disorder that manifests as bone fragility, craniosynostosis, ocular proptosis, hydrocephalus, and distinctive facial features. Only 2 types of mutation sites in the P4HB and CRTAP genes have been reported. A 14-month-old Chinese girl presented with prominent ocular proptosis, frontal bossing, craniosynostosis, plump anterior fontanel, growth retardation, osteopenia, and distinctive facial features that were strikingly similar to those in the original 2 cases. Whole-exome sequencing revealed a novel deletion variation in exons 5 to 8 of the P4HB gene, which was found to be heterozygous using fluorogenic quantitative-polymerase chain reaction. This de novo deletion mutation in exons 5 to 8 of the P4HB gene advances our understanding of CLCRP1, expands the mutation spectrum of P4HB, and diversifies the cases reported for this condition. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Global deficits in development, function, and gene expression in the endocrine pancreas in a deletion mouse model of Prader-Willi syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, Mihaela; Simmons, Rebecca A; Bertera, Suzanne; Trucco, Massimo; Esni, Farzad; Drain, Peter; Nicholls, Robert D

    2011-05-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a multisystem disorder caused by genetic loss of function of a cluster of imprinted, paternally expressed genes. Neonatal failure to thrive in PWS is followed by childhood-onset hyperphagia and obesity among other endocrine and behavioral abnormalities. PWS is typically assumed to be caused by an unknown hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction, but the underlying pathogenesis remains unknown. A transgenic deletion mouse model (TgPWS) has severe failure to thrive, with very low levels of plasma insulin and glucagon in fetal and neonatal life prior to and following onset of progressive hypoglycemia. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that primary deficits in pancreatic islet development or function may play a fundamental role in the TgPWS neonatal phenotype. Major pancreatic islet hormones (insulin, glucagon) were decreased in TgPWS mice, consistent with plasma levels. Immunohistochemical analysis of the pancreas demonstrated disrupted morphology of TgPWS islets, with reduced α- and β-cell mass arising from an increase in apoptosis. Furthermore, in vivo and in vitro studies show that the rate of insulin secretion is significantly impaired in TgPWS β-cells. In TgPWS pancreas, mRNA levels for genes encoding all pancreatic hormones, other secretory factors, and the ISL1 transcription factor are upregulated by either a compensatory response to plasma hormone deficiencies or a primary effect of a deleted gene. Our findings identify a cluster of imprinted genes required for the development, survival, coordinate regulation of genes encoding hormones, and secretory function of pancreatic endocrine cells, which may underlie the neonatal phenotype of the TgPWS mouse model.

  2. Novel single base-pair deletion in exon 1 of XK gene leading to McLeod syndrome with chorea, muscle wasting, peripheral neuropathy, acanthocytosis and haemolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiethoff, Sarah; Xiromerisiou, Georgia; Bettencourt, Conceição; Kioumi, Anna; Tsiptsios, Iakovos; Tychalas, Athanasios; Evaggelia, Markousi; George, Kaltsounis; Makris, Vasileios; Hardy, John; Houlden, Henry

    2014-04-15

    We present a 70-year-old male patient of Greek origin with choreatic movements of the tongue and face, lower limb muscle weakness, peripheral neuropathy, elevated creatinephosphokinase (CPK), acanthocytosis and haemolysis in the absence of Kell RBC antigens with an additional Factor IX-deficiency. Genetic testing for mutations in the three exons of the XK gene revealed a previously unreported hemizygous single base-pair frameshift deletion at exon 1 (c.229delC, p.Leu80fs). In conclusion, we hereby describe a rare phenotype of a patient with McLeod syndrome which was discovered coincidentally during routine blood group testing and consecutively genetically confirmed. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Seven gene deletions in seven days

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingemann Jensen, Sheila; Lennen, Rebecca; Herrgard, Markus

    2015-01-01

    genes and a rhamnose inducible flippase recombinase was constructed to facilitate fast marker-free deletions. To further speed up the procedure, we integrated the arabinose inducible lambda Red recombineering genes and the rhamnose inducible FLP into the genome of E. coli K-12 MG1655. This system...... in which four to seven genes were deleted in E. coli W and E. coli K-12. The growth rate of an E. coli K-12 quintuple deletion strain was significantly improved in the presence of high concentrations of acetate and NaCl. In conclusion, we have generated a method that enables efficient and simultaneous...... deletion of multiple genes in several E. coli variants. The method enables deletion of up to seven genes in as little as seven days....

  4. Phenotypic variability in Angelman syndrome: comparison among different deletion classes and between deletion and UPD subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, Monica Castro; Kok, Fernando; Otto, Paulo Alberto; Koiffmann, Celia Priszkulnik

    2004-12-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) can result from either a 15q11-q13 deletion (del), paternal uniparental disomy (UPD), imprinting, or UBE3A mutations. Here, we describe the phenotypic and behavioral variability detected in 49 patients with different classes of deletions and nine patients with UPD. Diagnosis was made by methylation pattern analysis of exon 1 of the SNRPN-SNURF gene and by microsatellite profiling of loci within and outside the 15q11-q13 region. There were no major phenotypic differences between the two main classes (BP1-BP3; BP2-BP3) of AS deletion patients, except for the absence of vocalization, more prevalent in patients with BP1-BP3 deletions, and for the age of sitting without support, which was lower in patients with BP2-BP3 deletions. Our data suggest that gene deletions (NIPA1, NIPA2, CYF1P1, GCP5) mapped to the region between breakpoints BP1 and BP2 may be involved in the severity of speech impairment, since all BP1-BP3 deletion patients showed complete absence of vocalization, while 38.1% of the BP2-BP3 deletion patients were able to pronounce syllabic sounds, with doubtful meaning. Compared to UPD patients, deletion patients presented a higher incidence of swallowing disorders (73.9% del x 22.2% UPD) and hypotonia (73.3% del x 28.57% UPD). In addition, children with UPD showed better physical growth, fewer or no seizures, a lower incidence of microcephaly, less ataxia and higher cognitive skills. As a consequence of their milder or less typical phenotype, AS may remain undiagnosed, leading to an overall underdiagnosis of the disease.

  5. A Rare Syndrome of Deletion in 2 Siblings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aravindhan Veerapandiyan MBBS

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The Glutamate receptor, ionotropic, delta 2 gene codes for an ionotropic glutamate delta-2 receptor, which is selectively expressed in cerebellar Purkinje cells, and facilitates cerebellar synapse organization and transmission. The phenotype associated with the deletion of Glutamate receptor, ionotropic, delta 2 gene in humans was initially defined in 2013. In this case report, the authors describe 2 brothers who presented with developmental delay, tonic upward gaze, nystagmus, oculomotor apraxia, hypotonia, hyperreflexia, and ataxia. They were found to have a homozygous intragenic deletion within the Glutamate receptor, ionotropic, delta 2 gene at exon 2. Our patients serve as an addition to the literature of previously reported children with this rare clinical syndrome associated with Glutamate receptor, ionotropic, delta 2 deletion.

  6. 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McDonald-McGinn, Donna M.; Sullivan, Kathleen E.; Marino, Bruno; Philip, Nicole; Swillen, Ann; Vorstman, Jacob A S; Zackai, Elaine H.; Emanuel, Beverly S.; Vermeesch, Joris R.; Morrow, Bernice E.; Scambler, Peter J.; Bassett, Anne S.

    2015-01-01

    22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) is the most common chromosomal microdeletion disorder, estimated to result mainly from de novo non-homologous meiotic recombination events occurring in approximately 1 in every 1,000 fetuses. The first description in the English language of the constellation of

  7. Deletion of the Wolfram syndrome-related gene Wfs1 results in increased sensitivity to ethanol in female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raud, Sirli; Reimets, Riin; Loomets, Maarja; Sütt, Silva; Altpere, Alina; Visnapuu, Tanel; Innos, Jürgen; Luuk, Hendrik; Plaas, Mario; Volke, Vallo; Vasar, Eero

    2015-08-01

    Wolfram syndrome, induced by mutation in WFS1 gene, increases risk of developing mood disorders in humans. In mice, Wfs1 deficiency cause higher anxiety-like behaviour and increased response to anxiolytic-like effect of diazepam, a GABAA receptor agonist. As GABAergic system is also target for ethanol, we analysed its anxiolytic-like and sedative properties in Wfs1-deficient mice using elevated plus-maze test and tests measuring locomotor activity and coordination, respectively. Additionally loss of righting reflex test was conducted to study sedative/hypnotic properties of ethanol, ketamine and pentobarbital. To evaluate pharmacokinetics of ethanol in mice enzymatic colour test was used. Finally, gene expression of alpha subunits of GABAA receptors following ethanol treatment was studied by real-time-PCR. Compared to wild-types, Wfs1-deficient mice were more sensitive to ethanol-induced anxiolytic-like effect, but less responsive to impairment of motor coordination. Ethanol and pentobarbital, but not ketamine, caused longer duration of hypnosis in Wfs1-deficient mice. The expression of Gabra2 subunit at 30 minutes after ethanol injection was significantly increased in the frontal cortex of Wfs1-deficient mice as compared to respective vehicle-treated mice. For the temporal lobe, similar change in Gabra2 mRNA occurred at 60 minutes after ethanol treatment in Wfs1-deficient mice. No changes were detected in Gabra1 and Gabra3 mRNA following ethanol treatment. Taken together, increased anxiolytic-like effect of ethanol in Wfs1-deficient mice is probably related to altered Gabra2 gene expression. Increased anti-anxiety effect of GABAA receptor agonists in the present work and earlier studies (Luuk et al., 2009) further suggests importance of Wfs1 gene in the regulation of emotional behaviour. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Molecular analysis of myelodysplastic syndrome with isolated deletion of the long arm of chromosome 5 reveals a specific spectrum of molecular mutations with prognostic impact: a study on 123 patients and 27 genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meggendorfer, Manja; Haferlach, Claudia; Kern, Wolfgang; Haferlach, Torsten

    2017-01-01

    The only cytogenetic aberration defining a myelodysplastic syndrome subtype is the deletion of the long arm of chromosome 5, which, along with morphological features, leads to the diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndrome with isolated deletion of the long arm of chromosome 5. These patients show a good prognosis and respond to treatment such as lenalidomide, but some cases progress to acute myeloid leukemia; however, the molecular mutation pattern is rarely characterized. Therefore, we investigated a large cohort of 123 myelodysplastic syndrome patients with isolated deletion of the long arm of chromosome 5, diagnosed following the World Health Organization classifications 2008 and 2016, by sequencing 27 genes. A great proportion of patients showed no or only one mutation. Only seven genes showed mutation frequencies >5% (SF3B1, DNMT3A, TP53, TET2, CSNK1A1, ASXL1, JAK2). However, the pattern of recurrently mutated genes was comparable to other myelodysplastic syndrome subtypes by comparison to a reference cohort, except that of TP53 which was significantly more often mutated in myelodysplastic syndrome with isolated deletion of the long arm of chromosome 5. As expected, SF3B1 was frequently mutated and correlated with ring sider-oblasts, while JAK2 mutations correlated with elevated platelet counts. Surprisingly, SF3B1 mutations led to significantly worse prognosis within cases with isolated deletion of the long arm of chromosome 5, but showed a comparable outcome to other myelodysplastic syndrome subtypes with SF3B1 mutation. However, addressing genetic stability in follow-up cases might suggest different genetic mechanisms for progression to secondary acute myeloid leukemia compared to overall myelodysplastic syndrome patients. PMID:28642303

  9. Genetics Home Reference: 2q37 deletion syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Twitter Home Health Conditions 2q37 deletion syndrome 2q37 deletion syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description 2q37 deletion syndrome is a condition that can affect many ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: 1p36 deletion syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Twitter Home Health Conditions 1p36 deletion syndrome 1p36 deletion syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description 1p36 deletion syndrome is a disorder that typically causes severe ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Conditions 22q11.2 deletion syndrome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (which is also known by several other ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: 22q13.3 deletion syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Conditions 22q13.3 deletion syndrome 22q13.3 deletion syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description 22q13.3 deletion syndrome , which is also commonly known as Phelan- ...

  13. Intragenic deletions affecting two alternative transcripts of the IMMP2L gene in patients with Tourette syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Birgitte; Melchior, Linea; Jensen, Lars R

    2014-01-01

    Tourette syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by multiple motor and vocal tics, and the disorder is often accompanied by comorbidities such as attention-deficit hyperactivity-disorder and obsessive compulsive disorder. Tourette syndrome has a complex etiology, but the underlyin...

  14. Autosomal dominant {open_quotes}Opitz{close_quotes} GBBB syndrome due to a 22q11.2 deletion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald-McGinn, D.M.; Emanuel, B.S.; Zackai, E.H. [Univ. of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1996-08-23

    The classification of Opitz GBBB syndrome has been associated with the deletion of the DiGeorge chromosome region on human chromosome 22q11.2. The broad phenotype involved in this deletion syndrome has been referred to as the DiGeorge/velocardiofacial syndrome. The clinical description of the patient will influence the diagnosis of the syndrome. More cooperation between the clinicians and the molecular researchers is necessary in order to locate the gene(s) for these disorders. 11 refs.

  15. Molecular dissection of a contiguous gene syndrome: Frequent submicroscopic deletions, evolutionarily conserved sequences, and a hypomethylated island in the Miller-Dieker chromosome region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledbetter, D.H.; Ledbetter, S.A.; vanTuinen, P.

    1989-01-01

    The Miller-Dieker syndrome (MDS), composed of characteristic facial abnormalities and a severe neuronal migration disorder affecting the cerebral cortex, is caused by visible or submicroscopic deletions of chromosome band 17p13. Twelve anonymous DNA markers were tested against a panel of somatic cell hybrids containing 17p deletions from seven MDS patients. All patients, including three with normal karyotypes, are deleted for a variable set of 5-12 markers. Two highly polymorphic VNTR (variable number of tandem repeats) probes, YNZ22 and YNH37, are codeleted in all patients tested and make molecular diagnosis for this disorder feasible. By pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, YNZ22 and YNH37 were shown to be within 30 kilobases (kb) of each other. Cosmid clones containing both VNTR sequences were identified, and restriction mapping showed them to be 100 kb were completely deleted in all patients, providing a minimum estimate of the size of the MDS critical region. A hypomethylated island and evolutionarily conserved sequences were identified within this 100-kb region, indications of the presence of one or more expressed sequences potentially involved in the pathophysiology of this disorder. The conserved sequences were mapped to mouse chromosome 11 by using mouse-rat somatic cell hybrids, extending the remarkable homology between human chromosome 17 and mouse chromosome 11 by 30 centimorgans, into the 17p telomere region

  16. Somatic mosaicism for a DMD gene deletion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Kayoko; Ikeya, Kiyoko; Kondo, Eri [Tokyo Women`s Medical College (Japan)] [and others

    1995-03-13

    Mosaicism is a mixed state, with two cell populations of different genetic origins caused by a cell mutation occurring after fertilization. In the present case, DNA analysis of lymphocytes led to a DMD diagnosis before death. Postmortem immunocytochemical and DNA analysis showed somatic mosaicism. At age 18 years, blood lymphocyte DNA analysis showed a DMD gene deletion, upstream from exon 7 to the 5{prime} end containing both muscle and brain promoters. As the patient`s mother and elder sister had no deletions, he was considered to have a new mutation. Immunocytochemical studies of postmortem tissues showed that dystrophin was absent from the tongue, deltoid, intercostal, psoas and rectus femoris muscles, but there was a mix of dystrophin-positive and negative fibers in the rectus abdominis, cardiac, temporalis and sternocleidomastoid muscles. All diaphragm cells were dystrophin positive. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification from all tissues except the temporalis and sternocleidomastoid muscles, diaphragm and kidney, in which no deletion was found, showed the deletion from at least exon 6 to the 5{prime} end containing both muscle and brain promoters. In this case, a genomic deletion of the DMD gene contributed to the formation of tissues derived from both ectoderm and endoderm, and cells of mesodermal origin showed genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneity. Our results indicate a mutation of the present case may have occurred just before the period of germ layer formation. 34 refs., 7 figs.

  17. Is the autosomal dominant Opitz GBBB syndrome part of the DiGeorge/velocardiofacial syndrome with deletions of chromosome area 22q11.2?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wulfsberg, E.A. [Univ. of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    1996-08-23

    The classification of Opitz GBBB syndrome has been associated with the deletion of the DiGeorge chromosome region on human chromosome 22q11.2. The broad phenotype involved in this deletion syndrome is usually referred to as the DiGeorge/velocardiofacial syndrome. The clinical description of the patient will influence the diagnosis of the syndrome. More exact descriptions are necessary in order to locate the gene(s) for these disorders. 13 refs.

  18. Phenotypic and molecular assessment of seven patients with 6p25 deletion syndrome: Relevance to ocular dysgenesis and hearing impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritch Robert

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thirty-nine patients have been described with deletions involving chromosome 6p25. However, relatively few of these deletions have had molecular characterization. Common phenotypes of 6p25 deletion syndrome patients include hydrocephalus, hearing loss, and ocular, craniofacial, skeletal, cardiac, and renal malformations. Molecular characterization of deletions can identify genes that are responsible for these phenotypes. Methods We report the clinical phenotype of seven patients with terminal deletions of chromosome 6p25 and compare them to previously reported patients. Molecular characterization of the deletions was performed using polymorphic marker analysis to determine the extents of the deletions in these seven 6p25 deletion syndrome patients. Results Our results, and previous data, show that ocular dysgenesis and hearing impairment are the two most highly penetrant phenotypes of the 6p25 deletion syndrome. While deletion of the forkhead box C1 gene (FOXC1 probably underlies the ocular dysgenesis, no gene in this region is known to be involved in hearing impairment. Conclusions Ocular dysgenesis and hearing impairment are the two most common phenotypes of 6p25 deletion syndrome. We conclude that a locus for dominant hearing loss is present at 6p25 and that this locus is restricted to a region distal to D6S1617. Molecular characterization of more 6p25 deletion patients will aid in refinement of this locus and the identification of a gene involved in dominant hearing loss.

  19. LETM1, a novel gene encoding a putative EF-hand Ca(2+)-binding protein, flanks the Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) critical region and is deleted in most WHS patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endele, S; Fuhry, M; Pak, S J; Zabel, B U; Winterpacht, A

    1999-09-01

    Deletions within human chromosome 4p16.3 cause Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS), which is characterized by severe mental and developmental defects. It is thought that haploinsufficiency of more than one gene contributes to the complex phenotype. We have cloned and characterized a novel gene (LETM1) that is deleted in nearly all WHS patients. LETM1 encodes a putative member of the EF-hand family of Ca(2+)-binding proteins. The protein contains two EF-hands, a transmembrane domain, a leucine zipper, and several coiled-coil domains. On the basis of its possible Ca(2+)-binding property and involvement in Ca(2+) signaling and/or homeostasis, we propose that haploinsufficiency of LETM1 may contribute to the neuromuscular features of WHS patients. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  20. FAMILIAL CASE OF CHROMOSOME 22q11.2 DELETION SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Tuzankina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The work represents a family which includes two siblings with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Their mother carries the same chromosome anomaly, but with apparently normal phenotype. Hence, this interesting case of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome exists in 2 generations of the same family. The aim of this study was analysis of phenotypic manifestations in the family members with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Clinical examination of the patients, their life story and pedigree and, along with routine clinical and biochemical analysis, and immune state testing, along with ultrasound imaging of thymus and thyroid glands, heart and abdominal cavity. We made conclusions that the phenotypic features associated with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion may be different for distinct family members. Further studies are required to determine length of deleted segment and the genes affected, as well as to establish the genotype-phenotype interactions and disease prognosis.

  1. Deletion mapping of 22q11 in CATCH22 syndrome: Identification of a second critical region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurahashi, Hiroki; Nakayama, Takahiro; Nishisho, Isamu [Osaka Univ. Medical School, Yokohama (Japan)] [and others

    1996-06-01

    The deletion at 22q11.2 implicates a variety of congenital anomaly syndromes, for which the acronym CATCH22 has been proposed . Most patients with these syndromes share the common large deletion spanning 1-2 Mb, while the phenotypic variability of the patients does not seem to correlate with the extent of the deletions. On the basis of the deletions of rare cases with unbalanced translocation, the shortest region of overlap (SRO) had been identified in the most-centromeric region of the common large deletion. One patient (ADU) has been reported to carry a balanced translocation with the breakpoint located in the SRO. Recently, three transcripts were identified at or very close to the ADU breakpoint (ADUBP), making them strong candidates for CATCH22 syndrome. Here, we describe one patient with a unique deletion at 22q11.2 revealed by quantitative hybridization and/or FISH with six DNA markers in the common large deletion. The patient was dizygous at loci within the SRO and hemizygous only at the most-telomeric locus in the common large deletion. This finding suggests that there must be another critical region in the common large deletion besides the breakpoint of the ADU and that haploinsufficiency of genes in this deletion may also play a major role in CATCH22 pathogenesis. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  2. 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald-McGinn, Donna M.; Sullivan, Kathleen E.; Marino, Bruno; Philip, Nicole; Swillen, Ann; Vorstman, Jacob A. S.; Zackai, Elaine H.; Emanuel, Beverly S.; Vermeesch, Joris R.; Morrow, Bernice E.; Scambler, Peter J.; Bassett, Anne S.

    2016-01-01

    22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) is the most common chromosomal microdeletion disorder, estimated to result mainly from de novo non-homologous meiotic recombination events occurring in approximately 1 in every 1,000 fetuses. The first description in the English language of the constellation of findings now known to be due to this chromosomal difference was made in the 1960s in children with DiGeorge syndrome, who presented with the clinical triad of immunodeficiency, hypoparathyroidism and congenital heart disease. The syndrome is now known to have a heterogeneous presentation that includes multiple additional congenital anomalies and later-onset conditions, such as palatal, gastrointestinal and renal abnormalities, autoimmune disease, variable cognitive delays, behavioural phenotypes and psychiatric illness — all far extending the original description of DiGeorge syndrome. Management requires a multidisciplinary approach involving paediatrics, general medicine, surgery, psychiatry, psychology, interventional therapies (physical, occupational, speech, language and behavioural) and genetic counselling. Although common, lack of recognition of the condition and/or lack of familiarity with genetic testing methods, together with the wide variability of clinical presentation, delays diagnosis. Early diagnosis, preferably prenatally or neonatally, could improve outcomes, thus stressing the importance of universal screening. Equally important, 22q11.2DS has become a model for understanding rare and frequent congenital anomalies, medical conditions, psychiatric and developmental disorders, and may provide a platform to better understand these disorders while affording opportunities for translational strategies across the lifespan for both patients with 22q11.2DS and those with these associated features in the general population. PMID:27189754

  3. More Clinical Overlap between 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome and CHARGE Syndrome than Often Anticipated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsten-Janssen, N.; Saitta, S.C.; Hoefsloot, L.H.; McDonald-McGinn, D.M.; Driscoll, D.A.; Derks, R.; Dickinson, K.A.; Kerstjens-Frederikse, W.S.; Emanuel, B.S.; Zackai, E.H.; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, C.M.A.

    2013-01-01

    CHARGE (coloboma, heart defects, atresia of choanae, retardation of growth and development, genital hypoplasia, and ear abnormalities) and 22q11.2 deletion syndromes are variable, congenital malformation syndromes that show considerable phenotypic overlap. We further explored this clinical overlap and proposed recommendations for the genetic diagnosis of both syndromes. We described 2 patients clinically diagnosed with CHARGE syndrome, who were found to carry a 22q11.2 deletion, and searched the literature for more cases. In addition, we screened our cohort of CHD7 mutation carriers (n = 802) for typical 22q11.2 deletion features and studied CHD7 in 20 patients with phenotypically 22q11.2 deletion syndrome but without haploinsufficiency of TBX1. In total, we identified 5 patients with a clinical diagnosis of CHARGE syndrome and a proven 22q11.2 deletion. Typical 22q11.2 deletion features were found in 30 patients (30/802, 3.7%) of our CHD7 mutation-positive cohort. We found truncating CHD7 mutations in 5/20 patients with phenotypically 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Differentiating between CHARGE and 22q11.2 deletion syndromes can be challenging. CHD7 and TBX1 probably share a molecular pathway or have common target genes in affected organs. We strongly recommend performing CHD7 analysis in patients with a 22q11.2 deletion phenotype without TBX1 haploinsufficiency and conversely, performing a genome-wide array in CHARGE syndrome patients without a CHD7 mutation. PMID:23885230

  4. Dermatoglyphic Profile in 22q Deletion Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, B.; Fañanás, L.; Gutiérrez, B.; Chow, E.W.C.; Bassett, A.S.

    2011-01-01

    A genetic subtype of schizophrenia has been described in 22q11 Deletion syndrome. Previous studies have described an excess of dermatoglyphic alterations in schizophrenia, such as low a–b ridge counts (ABRCs), a high frequency of ridge dissociations, and increased dermatoglyphic fluctuating asymmetry. Little is known however, about the dermatoglyphic profile of 22qDS subjects showing psychotic symptoms and its similarity to the previously reported anomalies in schizophrenia. We studied the palmar dermatoglyphics of 22 subjects with 22qDS of predominantly Caucasian origin, 15 of whom had psychotic illness, and in 84 healthy controls of similar ethnicity. We observed higher values for total ATD angle in cases than in controls (P = 0.04). In addition, there was an excess of radial figures in the hypothenar area in cases, especially in the left hand. Interestingly, greater fluctuating asymmetry, determined by the absolute difference between right and left ABRC, was observed in 22qDS subjects compared to controls (P = 0.05). However, no differences were found for ABRCs and frequency of dissociations. Despite the small sample size, the palmprints analyzed suggest the existence of an altered dermatoglyphic profile in 22qDS, involving: (i) ATD angle amplitude, (ii) presence of radial loops in the hypothenar area, and (iii) an increment of fluctuating asymmetry. The first two features are similar to those found in other genetic syndromes associated with low IQ, while high levels of fluctuating asymmetry have often been reported in schizophrenia. PMID:15211630

  5. Hematological abnormalities and 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Fabiano Machado Rosa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS is a common genetic disease characterized by broad phenotypic variability. Despite the small number of studies describing hematological alterations in individuals with 22q11DS, it appears that these abnormalities are more frequent than previously imagined. Thus, the objective of our study was to report on a patient with 22q11DS presenting thrombocytopenia and large platelets and to review the literature. The patient, a 13-year-old boy, was originally evaluated due to craniofacial dysmorphia and speech delay. He also had a history of behavioral changes, neuropsychomotor delay and recurrent otitis/sinusitis. The identification of a 22q11.2 microdeletion by fluorescent in situ hybridization diagnosed the syndrome. Despite his hematological alterations, he only had a history of epistaxis and bruising of the upper and lower limbs. Assessments of the prothrombin time, thrombin time, partial thromboplastin time, bleeding time, fibrinogen levels and platelet aggregation (including the ristocetin induced platelet aggregation test were all normal. Hematological alterations observed in 22q11DS are directly related to the genetic disorder itself (especially in respect to deletion of the GPIb gene and secondary to some clinical findings, such as immunodeficiency. Macrothrombocytopenia is increasingly being considered a feature of the broad spectrum of 22q11DS and may potentially be a clinical marker for the syndrome.

  6. Growth hormone deficiency in 18q deletion syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghidoni, P.D.; Cody, J.; Danney, J. [Univ. of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The 18q- syndrome is one of the most common chromosomal deletion syndromes. Clinical characteristics are variable but may include: hypotonia, cleft palate, mental retardation and hearing impairment. Growth failure (GF) (<3% weight/height) is present in 80% of affected individuals. We evaluated growth hormone (GH) sufficiency in 15 patients with 18q- syndrome. Of these 15 patients, 10 have growth failure (<3% weight/height); of the remaining 5, 3 had normal growth parameters and 2 had growth along the 5%. Twelve patients failed to produce adequate GH following standard stimulation testing. Of these 12 patients with inadequate GH production, 2 had normal growth (above 3%). Of the 15, only 1 has normal GH production and normal growth parameters. Bone age was obtained on 1 patient with both GH deficiency and GF, and revealed significant delays. GH levels in response to GH releasing factor were normal in 3 out of 4 patients. MRI studies of GH-deficient patients indicated normal midline structures. Myelination in the few studied GH-deficient patients appeared delayed. The gene for myelin basic protein (MBP) is known to be located on the terminal portion of the long arm of chromosome 18. Neither the gene for GH, GH releasing factor nor GH releasing factor receptor is on chromosome 18. These genes are located on chromosomes 17, chromosome 20 and chromosome 7, respectively. Findings to date suggest that GH deficiency is common in individuals with 18q- syndrome. The etiology of this finding is unknown. We postulate that a gene(s) on chromosome 18q is involved in GH expression.

  7. Prenatal diagnosis of interstitial deletion of 17(p11.2p11.2) (Smith-Magenis Syndrome)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-01-15

    Interstitial deletion of 17p11.2 is associated with Smith-Magenis syndrome. This is a recognizable chromosomal deletion syndrome, characterized by brachycephaly, midface hypoplasia, growth and mental retardation, behavioral problems, and ocular abnormalities. Molecular analysis indicates it is a contiguous gene syndrome. Over 50 patients have been reported since the deletion was first described by Smith et al. [1982]. Cases include one with mosaicism and a familial example. None were prenatally diagnosed. The authors report on the prenatal detection of interstitial deletion of 17p11.2. 11 refs., 1 fig.

  8. A Tunisian patient with Pearson syndrome harboring the 4.977kb common deletion associated to two novel large-scale mitochondrial deletions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayed, Imen Ben; Chamkha, Imen; Mkaouar-Rebai, Emna; Kammoun, Thouraya; Mezghani, Najla; Chabchoub, Imen; Aloulou, Hajer; Hachicha, Mongia; Fakhfakh, Faiza

    2011-07-29

    Pearson syndrome (PS) is a multisystem disease including refractory anemia, vacuolization of marrow precursors and pancreatic fibrosis. The disease starts during infancy and affects various tissues and organs, and most affected children die before the age of 3years. Pearson syndrome is caused by de novo large-scale deletions or, more rarely, duplications in the mitochondrial genome. In the present report, we described a Pearson syndrome patient harboring multiple mitochondrial deletions which is, in our knowledge, the first case described and studied in Tunisia. In fact, we reported the common 4.977kb deletion and two novel heteroplasmic deletions (5.030 and 5.234kb) of the mtDNA. These deletions affect several protein-coding and tRNAs genes and could strongly lead to defects in mitochondrial polypeptides synthesis, and impair oxidative phosphorylation and energy metabolism in the respiratory chain in the studied patient. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Coexistence of 9p Deletion Syndrome and Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günes, Serkan; Ekinci, Özalp; Ekinci, Nuran; Toros, Fevziye

    2017-01-01

    Deletion or duplication of the short arm of chromosome 9 may lead to a variety of clinical conditions including craniofacial and limb abnormalities, skeletal malformations, mental retardation, and autism spectrum disorder. Here, we present a case report of 5-year-old boy with 9p deletion syndrome and autism spectrum disorder.

  10. Targeted gene deletion in Zygosaccharomyces bailii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollapour, M; Piper, P

    2001-01-30

    Yeasts of the genus Zygosaccharomyces are notable agents of large-scale food spoilage. Despite the economic importance of these organisms, little is known about the stress adaptations whereby they adapt to many of the more severe conditions of food preservation. In this study it was shown that genes of Z. bailii, a yeast notable for its high resistances to food preservatives and ethanol, can be isolated by complementation of the corresponding mutant strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It was also discovered that the acquisition by S. cerevisiae of a single small Z. bailii gene (ZbYME2) was sufficient for the former yeast to acquire the ability to degrade two major food preservatives, benzoic acid and sorbic acid. Using DNA cassettes containing dominant selectable markers and methods originally developed for performing gene deletions in S. cerevisiae, the two copies of ZbYME2 in the Z. bailii genome were sequentially deleted. The resulting Zbyme2/Zbyme2 homozygous deletant strain had lost any ability to utilize benzoate as sole carbon source and was more sensitive to weak acid preservatives during growth on glucose. Thus, ZbYME2, probably the nuclear gene for a mitochondrial mono-oxygenase function, is essential for Z. bailii to degrade food preservatives. This ability to catabolize weak acid preservatives is a significant factor contributing to the preservative resistance of Z. bailii under aerobic conditions. This study is the first to demonstrate that it is possible to delete in Z. bailii genes that are suspected as being important for growth of this organism in preserved foods and beverages. With the construction of further mutant of Z. bailii strains, a clearer picture should emerge of how this yeast adapts to the conditions of food preservation. This information will, in turn, allow the design of new preservation strategies. GenBank Accession Nos: ZbURA3 (AF279259), ZbTIM9 (AF279260), ZbYME2 (AF279261), ZbTRP1 (AF279262), ZbHHT1(AF296170). Copyright 2000 John

  11. Genomic findings in patients with clinical suspicion of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koczkowska, Magdalena; Wierzba, Jolanta; Śmigiel, Robert; Sąsiadek, Maria; Cabała, Magdalena; Ślężak, Ryszard; Iliszko, Mariola; Kardaś, Iwona; Limon, Janusz; Lipska-Ziętkiewicz, Beata S

    2017-02-01

    Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, one of the most common human genomic syndromes, has highly heterogeneous clinical presentation. Patients usually harbor a 1.5 to 3 Mb hemizygous deletion at chromosome 22q11.2, resulting in pathognomic TBX1, CRKL and/or MAPK1 haploinsufficiency. However, there are some individuals with clinical features resembling the syndrome who are eventually diagnosed with genomic disorders affecting other chromosomal regions. The objective of this study was to evaluate the additive value of high-resolution array-CGH testing in the cohort of 41 patients with clinical features of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome and negative results of standard cytogenetic diagnostic testing (karyotype and FISH for 22q11.2 locus). Array-CGH analysis revealed no aberrations at chromosomes 22 or 10 allegedly related to the syndrome. Five (12.2 %) patients were found to have other genomic imbalances, namely 17q21.31 microdeletion syndrome (MIM#610443), 1p36 deletion syndrome (MIM#607872), NF1 microduplication syndrome (MIM#613675), chromosome 6pter-p24 deletion syndrome (MIM#612582) and a novel interstitial deletion at 3q26.31 of 0.65 Mb encompassing a dosage-dependent gene NAALADL2. Our study demonstrates that the implementation of array-CGH into the panel of classic diagnostic procedures adds significantly to their efficacy. It allows for detection of constitutional genomic imbalances in 12 % of subjects with negative result of karyotype and FISH targeted for 22q11.2 region. Moreover, if used as first-tier genetic test, the method would provide immediate diagnosis in ∼40 % phenotypic 22q11.2 deletion subjects.

  12. Variable immune deficiency related to deletion size in chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Blaine; Ruffner, Melanie; McDonald McGinn, Donna M; Sullivan, Kathleen E

    2018-01-17

    The clinical features of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome include virtually every organ of the body. This review will focus on the immune system and the differences related to deletion breakpoints. A hypoplastic thymus was one of the first features described in this syndrome and low T cell counts, as a consequence of thymic hypoplasia, are the most commonly described immunologic feature. These are most prominently seen in early childhood and can be associated with increased persistence of viruses. Later in life, evidence of T cell exhaustion may be seen and secondary deficiencies of antibody function have been described. The relationship of the immunodeficiency to the deletion breakpoints has been understudied due to the infrequent analysis of people carrying smaller deletions. This manuscript will review the immune deficiency in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome and describe differences in the T cell counts related to the deletion breakpoints. Distal, non-TBX1 inclusive deletions, were found to be associated with better T cell counts. Another new finding is the relative preservation of T cell counts in those patients with a 22q11.2 duplication. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. RBPJ is disrupted in a case of proximal 4p deletion syndrome with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Tojo; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Endo, Wakaba; Kikuchi, Atsuo; Uematsu, Mitsugu; Haginoya, Kazuhiro; Hino-fukuyo, Naomi; Kobayashi, Tomoko; Iwasaki, Masaki; Tominaga, Teiji; Kure, Shigeo; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2014-06-01

    Proximal 4p deletion syndrome is characterized clinically by mental retardation, minor dysmorphic facial features, and is occasionally complicated with epilepsy. More than 20 cases of proximal 4p deletion syndrome have been reported, but the causative gene(s) remain elusive. We describe here a 2-year-old female patient with a common manifestation of proximal 4p deletion syndrome and infantile epileptic encephalopathy possessing a de novo balanced translocation t(4;13)(p15.2;q12.13). The patient was diagnosed as infantile spasms at 9 months of age. She presented with dysmorphic facial features and global developmental delay, compatible with proximal 4p deletion syndrome. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, we determined the translocation breakpoint at 4p15.2 to be within RBPJ. RBPJ is a transcription factor in the Notch/RBPJ signaling pathway, playing a crucial role in the developing human brain, and particularly telencephalon development. Our findings, combined with those of previous studies, strongly suggest that RBPJ is causative for proximal 4p deletion syndrome and epilepsy in this case. Copyright © 2013 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect Alpha Globlin Gene Deletion And Gamma Globin Gene -158 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... have been unable to find a molecular basis for the benign clinical course in all our patients. Other genetic or acquired factors must be hypothesized which ameliorate the clinical condition. Keywords: β- thalassemia, Xmn1 polymorphism, α-globin gene deletion. Egyptian Journal of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Vol.

  15. Characterization of five partial deletions of the factor VIII gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youssoufian, H.; Antonarakis, S.E.; Aronis, S.; Tsiftis, G.; Phillips, D.G.; Kazazian, H.H. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Hemophilia A is an X-linked disorder of coagulation caused by a deficiency of factor VIII. By using cloned DNA probes, the authors have characterized the following five different partial deletions of the factor VIII gene from a panel of 83 patients with hemophilia A: (i) a 7-kilobase (kb) deletion that eliminates exon 6; (ii) a 2.5-kb deletion that eliminates 5' sequences of exon 14; (iii) a deletion of at least 7 kb that eliminates exons 24 and 25; (iv) a deletion of at least 16 kb that eliminates exons 23-25; and (v) a 5.5-kb deletion that eliminates exon 22. The first four deletions are associated with severe hemophilia A. By contrast, the last deletion is associated with moderate disease, possibly because of in-frame splicing from adjacent exons. None of those patients with partial gene deletions had circulating inhibitors to factor VIII. One deletion occurred de novo in a germ cell of the maternal grandmother, while a second deletion occurred in a germ cell of the maternal grandfather. These observations demonstrate that de novo deletions of X-linked genes can occur in either male or female gametes

  16. A novel mtDNA deletion in an infant with Pearson syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapsa, R; Thompson, G N; Thorburn, D R; Dahl, H H; Marzuki, S; Byrne, E; Blok, R B

    1994-01-01

    Pearson syndrome is a multisystem mitochondrial disorder of infancy that is associated with deletions in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genome. We report a study on a male infant with Pearson syndrome. Assessment of oxidative phosphorylation activity indicated combined respiratory-chain defects in muscle, liver and fibroblasts; in particular, activity of complex I was reduced. Analysis of the patient's mtDNA identified a novel heteroplasmic 2.461 kb deletion, present at levels greater than 50% of the total mtDNA in the tissues examined. The deletion spanned nucleotides 10368 to 12828 and was flanked by a 3 bp GCC direct repeat sequence. Gene sequences affected are subunits 3, 4, 4L and 5 of complex I, and tRNAs for arginine, histidine, serine and leucine. Our findings correlate with the multiorgan involvement observed in Pearson syndrome.

  17. Genotype-phenotype correlation in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaelovsky Elena

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS is caused by hemizygous microdeletions on chromosome 22q11.2 with highly variable physical and neuropsychiatric manifestations. We explored the genotype-phenotype relationship in a relatively large 22q11.2DS cohort treated and monitored in our clinic using comprehensive clinical evaluation and detailed molecular characterization of the deletion. Methods Molecular analyses in 142 subjects with 22q11.2DS features were performed by FISH and MLPA methods. Participants underwent clinical assessment of physical symptoms and structured psychiatric and cognitive evaluation. Results Deletions were found in 110 individuals including one with an atypical nested distal deletion which was missed by the FISH test. Most subjects (88.2% carried the 3Mb typically deleted region and 11.8% carried 4 types of deletions differing in size and location. No statistically significant genotype-phenotype correlations were found between deletion type and clinical data although some differences in hypocalcemia and cardiovascular anomalies were noted. Analysis of the patient with the distal nested deletion suggested a redundancy of genes causing the physical and neuropsychiatric phenotype in 22q11.2DS and indicating that the psychiatric and cognitive trajectories may be governed by different genes. Conclusions MLPA is a useful and affordable molecular method combining accurate diagnosis and detailed deletion characterization. Variations in deletion type and clinical manifestations impede the detection of significant differences in samples of moderate size, but analysis of individuals with unique deletions may provide insight into the underlying biological mechanisms. Future genotype-phenotype studies should involve large multicenter collaborations employing uniform clinical standards and high-resolution molecular methods.

  18. 3p14 deletion is a rare contiguous gene syndrome : Report of 2 new patients and an overview of 14 patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dimitrov, B. I.; Ogilvie, C.; Wieczorek, D.; Wakeling, E.; Sikkema-Raddatz, B.; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, C. M. A.; Josifova, D.

    Interstitial deletions of chromosome 3p14p12 are a rare chromosome rearrangement. Twenty-six patients have been reported in the literature to date, however, a specific clinical phenotype has not yet been delineated. We describe three patients (two new) with overlapping chromosome 3p14p12 deletions

  19. [An updated review of 1p36 deletion (monosomy) syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, Sabina; Rodríguez-Moreno, Antonio

    The Monosomy 1p36 deletion syndrome is part of the group of diseases known as Rare Diseases. The objective of the present work is to review the characteristics of Monosomy 1p36 deletion syndrome. The monosomy 1p36 deletion syndrome phenotype includes: dysmorphic craniofacial features; large anterior fontanelle, unibrow, deep-set eyes, epicanthus, wide nasal root/bridge, mandible hypoplasia, abnormal location of the pinna, philtrum and pointed chin; neurological alterations: seizures and hydrocephalus (in some cases). Cerebral malformations: ventricular hypertrophy, increased subarachnoid space, morphological alterations of corpus callosum, cortical atrophy, delays in myelinisation, periventricular leukomalacia and periventricular heterotopia. These alterations produce intellectual disability and delays in motor growth, communication skills, language, social and adaptive behaviour. It is Hearing and vision impairments are also observed in subjects with this syndrome, as well as alterations of cardiac, endocrine and urinary systems and alterations at skin and skeletal level. Approximately 100 cases have been documented since 1981. This rare disease is the most common subtelomeric-micro-deletion syndrome. In situ hybridization with fluorescence (FISH) and array-comparative genomic hybridization (CGH-array) are at present the two best diagnostic techniques. There is currently no effective medical treatment for this disease. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. The importance of understanding cognitive trajectories: the case of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swillen, Ann

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (DS) (velocardiofacial syndrome or DiGeorge syndrome) is the most common known contiguous gene deletion syndrome and is associated with neurodevelopmental problems and diverse neuropsychiatric disorders across the life span. In this review, we discuss the wide variability in intelligence, the developmental phenotypic transitions regarding cognitive development (intelligence) from preschool to adolescence, and the importance of understanding these cognitive trajectories in 22q11.2 DS for care/management and research. Recent findings Longitudinal data on the cognitive development of children and adolescents with 22q11.2 DS reveal divergent cognitive trajectories. A decline in verbal IQ precedes the onset of psychosis in 22q11.2 DS. Summary Understanding these cognitive trajectories is important since it can guide clinicians to develop adequate support, tailored remediation, and psychiatric care and individualized follow-up. PMID:26779858

  1. Xp22. 3 deletions in isolated familial Kallmann's syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardelin, J.P.; Levilliers, J.; Legouis, R.; Petit, C. (Institut Pasteur, Paris (France)); Young, J.; Pholsena, M.; Schaison, G. (Centre Hospitalier de Bicetre, Le Kremlin-Bicetre (France)); Kirk, J.; Bouloux, P. (Royal Free Hospital, London (United Kingdom))

    1993-04-01

    Several familial cases of Kallmann's syndrome (KS) have been reported, among which the X-chromosome-linked mode of inheritance is the most frequent. The gene responsible for the X-linked KS has been localized to the terminal part of the X-chromosome short arm (Xp22.3 region), immediately proximal to the steroid sulfatase gene responsible for X-linked ichthyosis. Large deletions of this region have been previously shown in patients affected with both X-linked ichthyosis and KS. The authors report here the search for Xp22.3 deletions in 20 unrelated males affected with isolated X-linked KS. Only 2 deletions were found using Southern blot analysis, indicating that large deletions are uncommon in patients affected with KS alone. Both deletions were shown to include the entire KAL gene responsible for X-linked KS. The patients carrying these deletions exhibit additional clinical anomalies, which are discussed: unilateral renal aplasia, unilateral absence of vas deferens, mirror movements, and sensory neural hearing loss. 47 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Mice deleted for cell division cycle 73 gene develop parathyroid and uterine tumours: model for the hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumour syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walls, G V; Stevenson, M; Lines, K E; Newey, P J; Reed, A A C; Bowl, M R; Jeyabalan, J; Harding, B; Bradley, K J; Manek, S; Chen, J; Wang, P; Williams, B O; Teh, B T; Thakker, R V

    2017-07-13

    The hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumour (HPT-JT) syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by occurrence of parathyroid tumours, often atypical adenomas and carcinomas, ossifying jaw fibromas, renal tumours and uterine benign and malignant neoplasms. HPT-JT is caused by mutations of the cell division cycle 73 (CDC73) gene, located on chromosome 1q31.2 and encodes a 531 amino acid protein, parafibromin. To facilitate in vivo studies of Cdc73 in tumourigenesis we generated conventional (Cdc73 +/- ) and conditional parathyroid-specific (Cdc73 +/L /PTH-Cre and Cdc73 L/L /PTH-Cre) mouse models. Mice were aged to 18-21 months and studied for survival, tumour development and proliferation, and serum biochemistry, and compared to age-matched wild-type (Cdc73 +/+ and Cdc73 +/+ /PTH-Cre) littermates. Survival of Cdc73 +/- mice, when compared to Cdc73 +/+ mice was reduced (Cdc73 +/- =80%; Cdc73 +/+ =90% at 18 months of age, Pfourfold higher than that in parathyroid glands of wild-type littermates (P<0.0001). Cdc73 +/- , Cdc73 +/L /PTH-Cre and Cdc73 L/L /PTH-Cre mice had higher mean serum calcium concentrations than wild-type littermates, and Cdc73 +/- mice also had increased mean serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) concentrations. Parathyroid tumour development, and elevations in serum calcium and PTH, were similar in males and females. Cdc73 +/- mice did not develop bone or renal tumours but female Cdc73 +/- mice, at 18 months of age, had uterine neoplasms comprising squamous metaplasia, adenofibroma and adenomyoma. Uterine neoplasms, myometria and jaw bones of Cdc73 +/- mice had increased proliferation rates that were 2-fold higher than in Cdc73 +/+ mice (P<0.05). Thus, our studies, which have established mouse models for parathyroid tumours and uterine neoplasms that develop in the HPT-JT syndrome, provide in vivo models for future studies of these tumours.

  3. Genetic contributions to visuospatial cognition in Williams syndrome: insights from two contrasting partial deletion patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadbent, Hannah; Farran, Emily K; Chin, Esther; Metcalfe, Kay; Tassabehji, May; Turnpenny, Peter; Sansbury, Francis; Meaburn, Emma; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette

    2014-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder arising from a hemizygotic deletion of approximately 27 genes on chromosome 7, at locus 7q11.23. WS is characterised by an uneven cognitive profile, with serious deficits in visuospatial tasks in comparison to relatively proficient performance in some other cognitive domains such as language and face processing. Individuals with partial genetic deletions within the WS critical region (WSCR) have provided insights into the contribution of specific genes to this complex phenotype. However, the combinatorial effects of different genes remain elusive. WE REPORT ON VISUOSPATIAL COGNITION IN TWO INDIVIDUALS WITH CONTRASTING PARTIAL DELETIONS IN THE WSCR: one female (HR), aged 11 years 9 months, with haploinsufficiency for 24 of the WS genes (up to GTF2IRD1), and one male (JB), aged 14 years 2 months, with the three most telomeric genes within the WSCR deleted, or partially deleted. Our in-depth phenotyping of the visuospatial domain from table-top psychometric, and small- and large-scale experimental tasks reveal a profile in HR in line with typically developing controls, albeit with some atypical features. These data are contrasted with patient JB's atypical profile of strengths and weaknesses across the visuospatial domain, as well as with more substantial visuospatial deficits in individuals with the full WS deletion. Our findings point to the contribution of specific genes to spatial processing difficulties associated with WS, highlighting the multifaceted nature of spatial cognition and the divergent effects of genetic deletions within the WSCR on different components of visuospatial ability. The importance of general transcription factors at the telomeric end of the WSCR, and their combinatorial effects on the WS visuospatial phenotype are also discussed.

  4. 22q11 deletion syndrome: a review of the neuropsychiatric features and their neurobiological basis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Squarcione C

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Chiara Squarcione, Maria Chiara Torti, Fabio Di Fabio, Massimo Biondi Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy Abstract: The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS is caused by an autosomal dominant microdeletion of chromosome 22 at the long arm (q 11.2 band. The 22q11DS is among the most clinically variable syndromes, with more than 180 features related with the deletion, and is associated with an increased risk of psychiatric disorders, accounting for up to 1%–2% of schizophrenia cases. In recent years, several genes located on chromosome 22q11 have been linked to schizophrenia, including those encoding catechol-O-methyltransferase and proline dehydrogenase, and the interaction between these and other candidate genes in the deleted region is an important area of research. It has been suggested that haploinsufficiency of some genes within the 22q11.2 region may contribute to the characteristic psychiatric phenotype and cognitive functioning of schizophrenia. Moreover, an extensive literature on neuroimaging shows reductions of the volumes of both gray and white matter, and these findings suggest that this reduction may be predictive of increased risk of prodromal psychotic symptoms in 22q11DS patients. Experimental and standardized cognitive assessments alongside neuroimaging may be important to identify one or more endophenotypes of schizophrenia, as well as a predictive prodrome that can be preventively treated during childhood and adolescence. In this review, we summarize recent data about the 22q11DS, in particular those addressing the neuropsychiatric and cognitive phenotypes associated with the deletion, underlining the recent advances in the studies about the genetic architecture of the syndrome. Keywords: 22q11 deletion syndrome, microdeletion, neuropsychiatric disorders, cognitive impairments

  5. Are there ethnic differences in deletions in the dystrophin gene?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, M.; Verma, I.C. [All India Inst. of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India)

    1997-01-20

    We studied 160 cases of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) drawn from all parts of India, using multiplex PCR of 27 exons. Of these, 103 (64.4%) showed intragenic deletions. Most (69.7%) of the deletions involved exons 45-51. The phenotype of cases with deletion of single exons did not differ significantly from those with deletion of multiple exons. The distribution of deletions in studies from different countries was variable, but this was accounted for either by the small number of cases studied, or by fewer exons analyzed. It is concluded that there is likely to be no ethnic difference with respect to deletions in the DMD gene. 38 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Mitochondrial DNA deletion in a patient with combined features of Leigh and Pearson syndromes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blok, R.B.; Thorburn, D.R.; Danks, D.M. [Royal Children`s Hospital, Melbourne (Australia)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    We describe a heteroplasmic 4237 bp mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletion in an 11 year old girl who has suffered from progressive illness since birth. She has some features of Leigh syndrome (global developmental delay with regression, brainstem dysfunction and lactic acidosis), together with other features suggestive of Pearson syndrome (history of pancytopenia and failure to thrive). The deletion was present at a level greater than 50% in skeletal muscle, but barely detectable in skin fibroblasts following Southern blot analysis, and only observed in blood following PCR analysis. The deletion spanned nt 9498 to nt 13734, and was flanked by a 12 bp direct repeat. Genes for cytochrome c oxidase subunit III, NADH dehydrogenase subunits 3, 4L, 4 and 5, and tRNAs for glycine, arginine, histidine, serine({sup AGY}) and leucine({sup CUN}) were deleted. Southern blotting also revealed an altered Apa I restriction site which was shown by sequence analysis to be caused by G{r_arrow}A nucleotide substitution at nt 1462 in the 12S rRNA gene. This was presumed to be a polymorphism. No abnormalities of mitochondrial ultrastructure, distribution or of respiratory chain enzyme complexes I-IV in skeletal muscle were observed. Mitochondrial disorders with clinical features overlapping more than one syndrome have been reported previously. This case further demonstrates the difficulty in correlating observed clinical features with a specific mitochondrial DNA mutation.

  7. Chromosomal deletion unmasking a recessive disease: 22q13 deletion syndrome and metachromatic leukodystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, A-M; Kirchhoff, M; Nielsen, J E

    2008-01-01

    A deletion on one chromosome and a mutant allele on the other may cause an autosomal recessive disease. We report on two patients with mental retardation, dysmorphic features and low catalytic activity of arylsulfatase A. One patient had a pathogenic mutation in the arylsulfatase A gene (ARSA......) and succumbed to metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD). The other patient had a pseudoallele, which does not lead to MLD. The presenting clinical features and low arylsulfatase A activity were explained, in each patients, by a deletion of 22q13 and, thereby, of one allele of ARSA....

  8. Detection of classical 17p11.2 deletions, an atypical deletion and RAI1 alterations in patients with features suggestive of Smith-Magenis syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Gustavo H; Rodriguez, Jayson D; Carmona-Mora, Paulina; Cao, Lei; Gamba, Bruno F; Carvalho, Daniel R; de Rezende Duarte, Andréa; Santos, Suely R; de Souza, Deise H; DuPont, Barbara R; Walz, Katherina; Moretti-Ferreira, Danilo; Srivastava, Anand K

    2012-02-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a complex disorder whose clinical features include mild to severe intellectual disability with speech delay, growth failure, brachycephaly, flat midface, short broad hands, and behavioral problems. SMS is typically caused by a large deletion on 17p11.2 that encompasses multiple genes including the retinoic acid induced 1, RAI1, gene or a mutation in the RAI1 gene. Here we have evaluated 30 patients with suspected SMS and identified SMS-associated classical 17p11.2 deletions in six patients, an atypical deletion of ~139 kb that partially deletes the RAI1 gene in one patient, and RAI1 gene nonsynonymous alterations of unknown significance in two unrelated patients. The RAI1 mutant proteins showed no significant alterations in molecular weight, subcellular localization and transcriptional activity. Clinical features of patients with or without 17p11.2 deletions and mutations involving the RAI1 gene were compared to identify phenotypes that may be useful in diagnosing patients with SMS.

  9. Frequency of KLK3 gene deletions in the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Santiago; Al-Ghamdi, Osama A; Guthrie, Philip Ai; Shihab, Hashem A; McArdle, Wendy; Gaunt, Tom; Alharbi, Khalid K; Day, Ian Nm

    2017-07-01

    Background One of the kallikrein genes ( KLK3) encodes prostate-specific antigen, a key biomarker for prostate cancer. A number of factors, both genetic and non-genetic, determine variation of serum prostate-specific antigen concentrations in the population. We have recently found three KLK3 deletions in individuals with very low prostate-specific antigen concentrations, suggesting a link between abnormally reduced KLK3 expression and deletions of KLK3. Here, we aim to determine the frequency of kallikrein gene 3 deletions in the general population. Methods The frequency of KLK3 deletions in the general population was estimated from the 1958 Birth Cohort sample ( n = 3815) using amplification ratiometry control system. In silico analyses using PennCNV were carried out in the same cohort and in NBS-WTCCC2 in order to provide an independent estimation of the frequency of KLK3 deletions in the general population. Results Amplification ratiometry control system results from the 1958 cohort indicated a frequency of KLK3 deletions of 0.81% (3.98% following a less stringent calling criterion). From in silico analyses, we found that potential deletions harbouring the KLK3 gene occurred at rates of 2.13% (1958 Cohort, n = 2867) and 0.99% (NBS-WTCCC2, n = 2737), respectively. These results are in good agreement with our in vitro experiments. All deletions found were in heterozygosis. Conclusions We conclude that a number of individuals from the general population present KLK3 deletions in heterozygosis. Further studies are required in order to know if interpretation of low serum prostate-specific antigen concentrations in individuals with KLK3 deletions may offer false-negative assurances with consequences for prostate cancer screening, diagnosis and monitoring.

  10. Deletion involving D15S113 in a mother and son without Angelman syndrome: Refinement of the Angelman syndrome critical deletion region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michaelis, R.C.; Skinner, S.A.; Lethco, B.A. [Greenwood Genetic Center, SC (United States)] [and others

    1995-01-02

    Deletions of 15q11-q13 typically result in Angelman syndrome when inherited from the mother and Prader-Willi syndrome when inherited from the father. The critical deletion region for Angelman syndrome has recently been restricted by a report of an Angelman syndrome patient with a deletion spanning less than 200 kb around the D15S113 locus. We report here on a mother and son with a deletion of chromosome 15 that includes the D15S113 locus. The son has mild to moderate mental retardation and minor anomalies, while the mother has a borderline intellectual deficit and slightly downslanting palpebral fissures. Neither patient has the seizures, excessive laughter and hand clapping, ataxia or the facial anomalies which are characteristic of Angelman syndrome. The proximal boundary of the deletion in our patients lies between the D15S10 and The D15S113 loci. Our patients do not have Angelman syndrome, despite the deletion of the D15S113 marker. This suggests that the Angelman syndrome critical deletion region is now defined as the overlap between the deletion found in the previously reported Angelman syndrome patient and the region that is intact in our patients. 28 refs., 6 figs.

  11. SNORD116 deletions cause Prader-Willi syndrome with a mild phenotype and macrocephaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, P; Grasso, M; Acquaviva, F; Gennaro, E; Galli, M L; Falco, M; Scarano, F; Scarano, G; Lonardo, F

    2017-10-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome is a complex condition caused by lack of expression of imprinted genes in the paternally derived region of chromosome 15 (15q11q13). A small number of patients with Prader-Willi phenotype have been discovered to have narrow deletions, not encompassing the whole critical region, but only the SNORD116 cluster, which includes genes codifying for small nucleolar RNAs. This kind of deletion usually is not detected by the classic DNA methylation analysis test. We present the case of a male patient with a mild Prader-Willi phenotype and a small deletion including SNORD116, diagnosed by methylation-sensitive multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA. The patient showed neonatal hypotonia, hyperphagia, obesity, central hypogonadism, hypothyroidism, strabismus. Stature and intellectual development are within the normal range. The presence of macrocephaly, observed in other cases of SNORD116 deletions as well, is uncommon for the classic phenotype of the syndrome. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Further case of Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome due to a deletion in EP300.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Foley, Patricia

    2012-02-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RSTS) is a heterogeneous disorder with approximately 45-55% of patients showing mutations in the CREB binding protein and a further 3% of patients having mutations in EP300. We report a male child with a deletion of exons 3-8 of the EP300 gene who has RSTS. He has a milder skeletal phenotype, a finding that has been described in other cases with EP300 mutations. The mother suffered from pre-eclampsia and HELLP syndrome in the pregnancy. She subsequently developed a mullerian tumor of her cervix 6 years after the birth of her son.

  13. Supporting Children with Genetic Syndromes in the Classroom: The Example of 22q Deletion Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Colin; Stedman, Lindsey

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of children are likely to have a known genetic cause for their special educational needs. One such genetic condition is 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22qDS), a genetic syndrome associated with early speech and language difficulties, global and specific cognitive impairments, difficulties with attention and difficulties with…

  14. First Report of a Single Exon Deletion in TCOF1 Causing Treacher Collins Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beygo, J; Buiting, K; Seland, S; Lüdecke, H-J; Hehr, U; Lich, C; Prager, B; Lohmann, D R; Wieczorek, D

    2012-01-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is a rare craniofacial disorder characterized by facial anomalies and ear defects. TCS is caused by mutations in the TCOF1 gene and follows autosomal dominant inheritance. Recently, mutations in the POLR1D and POLR1C genes have also been identified to cause TCS. However, in a subset of patients no causative mutation could be found yet. Inter- and intrafamilial phenotypic variability is high as is the variety of mainly family-specific mutations identified throughout TCOF1. No obvious correlation between pheno- and genotype could be observed. The majority of described point mutations, small insertions and deletions comprising only a few nucleotides within TCOF1 lead to a premature termination codon. We investigated a cohort of 112 patients with a tentative clinical diagnosis of TCS by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) to search for larger deletions not detectable with other methods used. All patients were selected after negative screening for mutations in TCOF1, POLR1D and POLR1C. In 1 patient with an unequivocal clinical diagnosis of TCS, we identified a 3.367 kb deletion. This deletion abolishes exon 3 and is the first described single exon deletion within TCOF1. On RNA level we observed loss of this exon which supposedly leads to haploinsufficiency of TREACLE, the nucleolar phosphoprotein encoded by TCOF1.

  15. Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome in a Family of Warmblood Horses Caused by a 25-bp Deletion of the DNA-Binding Domain of the Androgen Receptor Gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eastman Welsford, G.; Munk, Rikke; Villagómez, Daniel A.F.

    2017-01-01

    Testicular feminization, an earlier term coined for describing a syndrome resulting from failure of masculinization of target organs by androgen secretions during embryo development, has been well documented not only in humans but also in the domestic horse. The pathology, actually referred...

  16. Contribution of Large Genomic Rearrangements in Italian Lynch Syndrome Patients: Characterization of a Novel Alu-Mediated Deletion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Duraturo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lynch syndrome is associated with germ-line mutations in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR genes, mainly MLH1 and MSH2. Most of the mutations reported in these genes to date are point mutations, small deletions, and insertions. Large genomic rearrangements in the MMR genes predisposing to Lynch syndrome also occur, but the frequency varies depending on the population studied on average from 5 to 20%. The aim of this study was to examine the contribution of large rearrangements in the MLH1 and MSH2 genes in a well-characterised series of 63 unrelated Southern Italian Lynch syndrome patients who were negative for pathogenic point mutations in the MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6 genes. We identified a large novel deletion in the MSH2 gene, including exon 6 in one of the patients analysed (1.6% frequency. This deletion was confirmed and localised by long-range PCR. The breakpoints of this rearrangement were characterised by sequencing. Further analysis of the breakpoints revealed that this rearrangement was a product of Alu-mediated recombination. Our findings identified a novel Alu-mediated rearrangement within MSH2 gene and showed that large deletions or duplications in MLH1 and MSH2 genes are low-frequency mutational events in Southern Italian patients with an inherited predisposition to colon cancer.

  17. Deletion of locus D15S113 in a mother and son without features of Angelman syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michaelis, R.C.; Tarleton, J.C.; Donlon, T.A.; Simensen, R.J. [Greenwood Gneetic Center, SC (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Deletions of the proximal long arm of chromosome 15 result in Angelman syndrome when inherited from the mother and Prader-Willi syndrome when inherited from the father. The minimal critical deletion region for Angelman syndrome has been reported to include D15S74 (B1.5), D15S10 (TD3-21), and D15S113 (LS6-1). We report a mother and son who have deletions that include D15S113 but who do not have features of Angelman syndrome. D.H. is a 10-year-old white male referred for genetic evaluation due to mental retardation. He has mild to moderate mental retardation and minor dysmorphic features, including downslanting palpebral fissures, prominent nose, broad forehead, small chin, midface hypoplasia, and large ears. His mother (B.S.) has slightly downslanting palpebral fissures and a borderline intellectual deficit. Neither individual has the seizures, excessive laughter, hand clapping, ataxia or facial dysmorphism which are characteristic of Angelman syndrome. The linear order of probes mapping to 15q11-q13 is 15cen-D15S11-D15S13-D15S10-D15S113-GABRB3-D15S12-tel. The proximal border of the deletion in our patients lies between D15S10 and D15S113. The fact that these two individuals do not have Angelman syndrome, despite deletion of D15S113, suggests that the Angelman syndrome critical deletion region should be further refined to exclude the D15S113 locus. In addition, the findings of a more severe intellectual impairment in the son than in the mother suggests that the region immediately telomeric to the critical deletion region for Angelman syndrome may contain imprintable genes that influence intellectual function.

  18. Whole Gene Deletion of EBF3 Supporting Haploinsufficiency of This Gene as a Mechanism of Neurodevelopmental Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fátima Lopes

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in early B cell factor 3 (EBF3 were recently described in patients with a neurodevelopmental disorder (NDD that includes developmental delay/intellectual disability, ataxia, hypotonia, speech impairment, strabismus, genitourinary abnormalities, and mild facial dysmorphisms. Several large 10q terminal and interstitial deletions affecting many genes and including EBF3 have been described in the literature. However, small deletions (<1 MB affecting almost exclusively EBF3 are not commonly reported. We performed array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH (Agilent 180K and quantitative PCR analysis in a female patient with intellectual disability. A clinical comparison between our patient and overlapping cases reported in the literature was also made. The patient carries a de novo 600 Kb deletion at 10q26.3 affecting the MGMT, EBF3, and GLRX genes. The patient has severe intellectual disability, language impairment, conductive hearing loss, hypotonia, vision alterations, triangular face, short stature, and behavior problems. This presentation overlaps that reported for patients carrying EBF3 heterozygous point mutations, as well as literature reports of patients carrying large 10qter deletions. Our results and the literature review suggest that EBF3 haploinsufficiency is a key contributor to the common aspects of the phenotype presented by patients bearing point mutations and indels in this gene, given that deletions affecting the entire gene (alone or in addition to other genes are causative of a similar syndrome, including intellectual disability (ID with associated neurological symptoms and particular facial dysmorphisms.

  19. Signature MicroRNA expression patterns identified in humans with 22q11.2 deletion/DiGeorge syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Morena, M. Teresa; Eitson, Jennifer L.; Dozmorov, Igor M.; Belkaya, Serkan; Hoover, Ashley R.; Anguiano, Esperanza; Pascual, M. Virginia; van Oers, Nicolai S.C.

    2013-01-01

    Patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome have heterogeneous clinical presentations including immunodeficiency, cardiac anomalies, and hypocalcemia. The syndrome arises from hemizygous deletions of up to 3 Mb on chromosome 22q11.2, a region that contains 60 genes and 4 microRNAs. MicroRNAs are important post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression, with mutations in several microRNAs causal to specific human diseases. We characterized the microRNA expression patterns in the peripheral blood of patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (n=31) compared to normal controls (n=22). Eighteen microRNAs had a statistically significant differential expression (p22q11.2 deletion syndrome cohort exhibited microRNA expression hyper-variability and group dysregulation. Selected microRNAs distinguished patients with cardiac anomalies, hypocalcemia, and/or low circulating T cell counts. In summary, microRNA profiling of chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome/DiGeorge patients revealed a signature microRNA expression pattern distinct from normal controls with clinical relevance. PMID:23454892

  20. Chromosome 4q deletion syndrome: narrowing the cardiovascular critical region to 4q32.2-q34.3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenbo; Ahmad, Ayesha; Dagenais, Susan; Iyer, Ramaswamy K; Innis, Jeffrey W

    2012-03-01

    The 4q deletion syndrome is a rare chromosome deletion syndrome with a wide range of clinical phenotypes. There is limited clinical phenotype and molecular correlation for congenital heart defects (CHDs) reported so far for this region primarily because many cases are large deletions, often terminal, and because high-resolution array has not been reported in the evaluation of this group of patients. CHDs are reported in about 60% of patients with 4q deletion syndrome, occurring in the presence or absence of dHAND deletion, implying the existence of additional genes in 4q whose dosage influences cardiac development. We report an 8-month-old patient with a large mid-muscular to outlet ventricular septal defect (VSD), moderate-sized secundum-type atrial septal defect (ASD), thickened, dysplastic pulmonary valve with mild stenosis and moderate pulmonic regurgitation, and patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). Illumina CytoSNP array analysis disclosed a de novo, heterozygous, interstitial deletion of 11.6 Mb of genomic material from the long arm of chromosome 4, at 4q32.3-q34.3 (Chr4:167236114-178816031; hg18). The deleted region affects 37 RefSeq genes (hg18), including two provisional microRNA stemloops. Three genes in this region, namely TLL1 (Tolloid-like-1), HPGD (15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase), and HAND2 (Heart and neural crest derivatives-expressed protein 2), are known to be involved in cardiac morphogenesis. This report narrows the critical region responsible for CHDs seen in 4q deletion syndrome. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Gross deletions in TCOF1 are a cause of Treacher-Collins-Franceschetti syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Michael; Oldridge, Michael; Archer, Caroline; O'Rourke, Anthony; McParland, Joanna; Brekelmans, Roel; Seller, Anneke; Lester, Tracy

    2012-07-01

    Treacher-Collins-Franceschetti syndrome (TCS) is an autosomal dominant craniofacial disorder characterised by midface hypoplasia, micrognathia, downslanting palpebral fissures, eyelid colobomata, and ear deformities that often lead to conductive deafness. A total of 182 patients with signs consistent with a diagnosis of TCS were screened by DNA sequence and dosage analysis of the TCOF1 gene. In all, 92 cases were found to have a pathogenic mutation by sequencing and 5 to have a partial gene deletion. A further case had a novel in-frame deletion in the alternatively spliced exon 6A of uncertain pathogenicity. The majority of the pathogenic sequence changes were found to predict premature protein termination, however, four novel missense changes in the LIS1 homology motif at the 5' end of the gene were identified. The partial gene deletions of different sizes represent ~5.2% of all the pathogenic TCOF1 mutations identified, indicating that gene rearrangements account for a significant proportion of TCS cases. This is the first report of gene rearrangements resulting in TCS. These findings expand the TCOF1 mutation spectrum indicating that dosage analysis should be performed together with sequence analysis, a strategy that is predicted to have a sensitivity of 71% for patients in whom TCS is strongly suspected.

  2. Gross deletions in TCOF1 are a cause of Treacher–Collins–Franceschetti syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Michael; Oldridge, Michael; Archer, Caroline; O'Rourke, Anthony; McParland, Joanna; Brekelmans, Roel; Seller, Anneke; Lester, Tracy

    2012-01-01

    Treacher–Collins–Franceschetti syndrome (TCS) is an autosomal dominant craniofacial disorder characterised by midface hypoplasia, micrognathia, downslanting palpebral fissures, eyelid colobomata, and ear deformities that often lead to conductive deafness. A total of 182 patients with signs consistent with a diagnosis of TCS were screened by DNA sequence and dosage analysis of the TCOF1 gene. In all, 92 cases were found to have a pathogenic mutation by sequencing and 5 to have a partial gene deletion. A further case had a novel in-frame deletion in the alternatively spliced exon 6A of uncertain pathogenicity. The majority of the pathogenic sequence changes were found to predict premature protein termination, however, four novel missense changes in the LIS1 homology motif at the 5′ end of the gene were identified. The partial gene deletions of different sizes represent ∼5.2% of all the pathogenic TCOF1 mutations identified, indicating that gene rearrangements account for a significant proportion of TCS cases. This is the first report of gene rearrangements resulting in TCS. These findings expand the TCOF1 mutation spectrum indicating that dosage analysis should be performed together with sequence analysis, a strategy that is predicted to have a sensitivity of 71% for patients in whom TCS is strongly suspected. PMID:22317976

  3. Highly restricted deletion of the SNORD116 region is implicated in Prader–Willi Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieth, Eric; Eddiry, Sanaa; Gaston, Véronique; Lorenzini, Françoise; Buffet, Alexandre; Conte Auriol, Françoise; Molinas, Catherine; Cailley, Dorothée; Rooryck, Caroline; Arveiler, Benoit; Cavaillé, Jérome; Salles, Jean Pierre; Tauber, Maïthé

    2015-01-01

    The SNORD116 locus lies in the 15q11-13 region of paternally expressed genes implicated in Prader–Willi Syndrome (PWS), a complex disease accompanied by obesity and severe neurobehavioural disturbances. Cases of PWS patients with a deletion encompassing the SNORD116 gene cluster, but preserving the expression of flanking genes, have been described. We report a 23-year-old woman who presented clinical criteria of PWS, including the behavioural and nutritional features, obesity, developmental delay and endocrine dysfunctions with hyperghrelinemia. We found a paternally transmitted highly restricted deletion of the SNORD116 gene cluster, the shortest described to date (118 kb). This deletion was also present in the father. This finding in a human case strongly supports the current hypothesis that lack of the paternal SNORD116 gene cluster has a determinant role in the pathogenesis of PWS. Moreover, targeted analysis of the SNORD116 gene cluster, complementary to SNRPN methylation analysis, should be carried out in subjects with a phenotype suggestive of PWS. PMID:24916642

  4. Highly restricted deletion of the SNORD116 region is implicated in Prader-Willi Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieth, Eric; Eddiry, Sanaa; Gaston, Véronique; Lorenzini, Françoise; Buffet, Alexandre; Conte Auriol, Françoise; Molinas, Catherine; Cailley, Dorothée; Rooryck, Caroline; Arveiler, Benoit; Cavaillé, Jérome; Salles, Jean Pierre; Tauber, Maïthé

    2015-02-01

    The SNORD116 locus lies in the 15q11-13 region of paternally expressed genes implicated in Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS), a complex disease accompanied by obesity and severe neurobehavioural disturbances. Cases of PWS patients with a deletion encompassing the SNORD116 gene cluster, but preserving the expression of flanking genes, have been described. We report a 23-year-old woman who presented clinical criteria of PWS, including the behavioural and nutritional features, obesity, developmental delay and endocrine dysfunctions with hyperghrelinemia. We found a paternally transmitted highly restricted deletion of the SNORD116 gene cluster, the shortest described to date (118 kb). This deletion was also present in the father. This finding in a human case strongly supports the current hypothesis that lack of the paternal SNORD116 gene cluster has a determinant role in the pathogenesis of PWS. Moreover, targeted analysis of the SNORD116 gene cluster, complementary to SNRPN methylation analysis, should be carried out in subjects with a phenotype suggestive of PWS.

  5. Cornelia de Lange syndrome caused by heterozygous deletions of chromosome 8q24: comments on the article by Pereza et al. [2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereza, Nina; Severinski, Srećko; Ostojić, Saša; Volk, Marija; Maver, Aleš; Dekanić, Kristina Baraba; Kapović, Miljenko; Peterlin, Borut

    2015-06-01

    In the March issue of the Journal in 2012, we reported on a girl with Langer-Giedion syndrome (LGS) phenotype and a 7.5 Mb interstitial deletion at 8q23.3q24.13, encompassing the EXT1, but not the TRPS1 gene. Recent discoveries have shown that heterozygous intragenic mutations or contiguous gene deletions including the RAD21 gene, which is located downstream of the TRPS1 gene, are the cause of Cornelia de Lange syndrome-4. Considering that the interstitial deletion in our patient included the RAD21 and 30 other RefSeq genes, we would like to suggest a revision of the diagnosis reported in our previous paper and compare our patient to other reported patients with Cornelia de Lange syndrome-4 caused by heterozygous deletions of chromosome 8q24. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Cardiac Defects and Results of Cardiac Surgery in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotti, Adriano; Digilio, Maria Cristina; Piacentini, Gerardo; Saffirio, Claudia; Di Donato, Roberto M.; Marino, Bruno

    2008-01-01

    Specific types and subtypes of cardiac defects have been described in children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome as well as in other genetic syndromes. The conotruncal heart defects occurring in patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome include tetralogy of Fallot, pulmonary atresia with ventricular septal defect, truncus arteriosus, interrupted aortic…

  7. Rare Deletions at 16p13.11 Predispose to a Diverse Spectrum of Sporadic Epilepsy Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinzen, Erin L.; Radtke, Rodney A.; Urban, Thomas J.; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L.; Depondt, Chantal; Need, Anna C.; Walley, Nicole M.; Nicoletti, Paola; Ge, Dongliang; Catarino, Claudia B.; Duncan, John S.; Kasperavičiūtė, Dalia; Tate, Sarah K.; Caboclo, Luis O.; Sander, Josemir W.; Clayton, Lisa; Linney, Kristen N.; Shianna, Kevin V.; Gumbs, Curtis E.; Smith, Jason; Cronin, Kenneth D.; Maia, Jessica M.; Doherty, Colin P.; Pandolfo, Massimo; Leppert, David; Middleton, Lefkos T.; Gibson, Rachel A.; Johnson, Michael R.; Matthews, Paul M.; Hosford, David; Kälviäinen, Reetta; Eriksson, Kai; Kantanen, Anne-Mari; Dorn, Thomas; Hansen, Jörg; Krämer, Günter; Steinhoff, Bernhard J.; Wieser, Heinz-Gregor; Zumsteg, Dominik; Ortega, Marcos; Wood, Nicholas W.; Huxley-Jones, Julie; Mikati, Mohamad; Gallentine, William B.; Husain, Aatif M.; Buckley, Patrick G.; Stallings, Ray L.; Podgoreanu, Mihai V.; Delanty, Norman; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.; Goldstein, David B.

    2010-01-01

    Deletions at 16p13.11 are associated with schizophrenia, mental retardation, and most recently idiopathic generalized epilepsy. To evaluate the role of 16p13.11 deletions, as well as other structural variation, in epilepsy disorders, we used genome-wide screens to identify copy number variation in 3812 patients with a diverse spectrum of epilepsy syndromes and in 1299 neurologically-normal controls. Large deletions (> 100 kb) at 16p13.11 were observed in 23 patients, whereas no control had a deletion greater than 16 kb. Patients, even those with identically sized 16p13.11 deletions, presented with highly variable epilepsy phenotypes. For a subset of patients with a 16p13.11 deletion, we show a consistent reduction of expression for included genes, suggesting that haploinsufficiency might contribute to pathogenicity. We also investigated another possible mechanism of pathogenicity by using hybridization-based capture and next-generation sequencing of the homologous chromosome for ten 16p13.11-deletion patients to look for unmasked recessive mutations. Follow-up genotyping of suggestive polymorphisms failed to identify any convincing recessive-acting mutations in the homologous interval corresponding to the deletion. The observation that two of the 16p13.11 deletions were larger than 2 Mb in size led us to screen for other large deletions. We found 12 additional genomic regions harboring deletions > 2 Mb in epilepsy patients, and none in controls. Additional evaluation is needed to characterize the role of these exceedingly large, non-locus-specific deletions in epilepsy. Collectively, these data implicate 16p13.11 and possibly other large deletions as risk factors for a wide range of epilepsy disorders, and they appear to point toward haploinsufficiency as a contributor to the pathogenicity of deletions. PMID:20398883

  8. Rare deletions at 16p13.11 predispose to a diverse spectrum of sporadic epilepsy syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinzen, Erin L; Radtke, Rodney A; Urban, Thomas J; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L; Depondt, Chantal; Need, Anna C; Walley, Nicole M; Nicoletti, Paola; Ge, Dongliang; Catarino, Claudia B; Duncan, John S; Kasperaviciūte, Dalia; Tate, Sarah K; Caboclo, Luis O; Sander, Josemir W; Clayton, Lisa; Linney, Kristen N; Shianna, Kevin V; Gumbs, Curtis E; Smith, Jason; Cronin, Kenneth D; Maia, Jessica M; Doherty, Colin P; Pandolfo, Massimo; Leppert, David; Middleton, Lefkos T; Gibson, Rachel A; Johnson, Michael R; Matthews, Paul M; Hosford, David; Kälviäinen, Reetta; Eriksson, Kai; Kantanen, Anne-Mari; Dorn, Thomas; Hansen, Jörg; Krämer, Günter; Steinhoff, Bernhard J; Wieser, Heinz-Gregor; Zumsteg, Dominik; Ortega, Marcos; Wood, Nicholas W; Huxley-Jones, Julie; Mikati, Mohamad; Gallentine, William B; Husain, Aatif M; Buckley, Patrick G; Stallings, Ray L; Podgoreanu, Mihai V; Delanty, Norman; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Goldstein, David B

    2010-05-14

    Deletions at 16p13.11 are associated with schizophrenia, mental retardation, and most recently idiopathic generalized epilepsy. To evaluate the role of 16p13.11 deletions, as well as other structural variation, in epilepsy disorders, we used genome-wide screens to identify copy number variation in 3812 patients with a diverse spectrum of epilepsy syndromes and in 1299 neurologically-normal controls. Large deletions (> 100 kb) at 16p13.11 were observed in 23 patients, whereas no control had a deletion greater than 16 kb. Patients, even those with identically sized 16p13.11 deletions, presented with highly variable epilepsy phenotypes. For a subset of patients with a 16p13.11 deletion, we show a consistent reduction of expression for included genes, suggesting that haploinsufficiency might contribute to pathogenicity. We also investigated another possible mechanism of pathogenicity by using hybridization-based capture and next-generation sequencing of the homologous chromosome for ten 16p13.11-deletion patients to look for unmasked recessive mutations. Follow-up genotyping of suggestive polymorphisms failed to identify any convincing recessive-acting mutations in the homologous interval corresponding to the deletion. The observation that two of the 16p13.11 deletions were larger than 2 Mb in size led us to screen for other large deletions. We found 12 additional genomic regions harboring deletions > 2 Mb in epilepsy patients, and none in controls. Additional evaluation is needed to characterize the role of these exceedingly large, non-locus-specific deletions in epilepsy. Collectively, these data implicate 16p13.11 and possibly other large deletions as risk factors for a wide range of epilepsy disorders, and they appear to point toward haploinsufficiency as a contributor to the pathogenicity of deletions. Copyright (c) 2010 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Alu-mediated deletion of SOX10 regulatory elements in Waardenburg syndrome type 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondurand, Nadége; Fouquet, Virginie; Baral, Viviane; Lecerf, Laure; Loundon, Natalie; Goossens, Michel; Duriez, Benedicte; Labrune, Philippe; Pingault, Veronique

    2012-09-01

    Waardenburg syndrome type 4 (WS4) is a rare neural crest disorder defined by the combination of Waardenburg syndrome (sensorineural hearing loss and pigmentation defects) and Hirschsprung disease (intestinal aganglionosis). Three genes are known to be involved in this syndrome, that is, EDN3 (endothelin-3), EDNRB (endothelin receptor type B), and SOX10. However, 15-35% of WS4 remains unexplained at the molecular level, suggesting that other genes could be involved and/or that mutations within known genes may have escaped previous screenings. Here, we searched for deletions within recently identified SOX10 regulatory sequences and describe the first characterization of a WS4 patient presenting with a large deletion encompassing three of these enhancers. Analysis of the breakpoint region suggests a complex rearrangement involving three Alu sequences that could be mediated by a FosTes/MMBIR replication mechanism. Taken together with recent reports, our results demonstrate that the disruption of highly conserved non-coding elements located within or at a long distance from the coding sequences of key genes can result in several neurocristopathies. This opens up new routes to the molecular dissection of neural crest disorders.

  10. Detection of Steroid Sulfatase Gene Deletion

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    rme

    reported a patient with XO Turner syndrome and ichthyosis which by the pedigree and by its clinical features was X-Linked. Clincial manifestations of microdeletion of Xp22.3 include ichthyosis, chondrodysplasia punctata, hypogonadotropic hypogonandism, anosmia, ocular albinism, short stature and mental retardation.8 ...

  11. Molecular characterization of HDAC8 deletions in individuals with atypical Cornelia de Lange syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgeson, Maria; Keller-Ramey, Jennifer; Knight Johnson, Amy; Lee, Jennifer A; Magner, Daniel B; Deml, Brett; Deml, Jacea; Hu, Ying-Ying; Li, Zejuan; Donato, Kirsten; Das, Soma; Laframboise, Rachel; Tremblay, Sandra; Krantz, Ian; Noon, Sarah; Hoganson, George; Burton, Jennifer; Schaaf, Christian P; Del Gaudio, Daniela

    2018-03-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a rare neurodevelopmental syndrome for which mutations in five causative genes that encode (SMC1A, SMC3, RAD21) or regulate (NIPBL, HDAC8) the cohesin complex, account for ~70% of cases. Herein we report on four female Subjects who were found to carry novel intragenic deletions in HDAC8. In one case, the deletion was found in mosaic state and it was determined to be present in ~38% of blood lymphocytes and in nearly all cells of a buccal sample. All deletions, for which parental blood samples were available, were shown to have arisen de novo. X-chromosome inactivation studies demonstrated marked skewing, suggesting strong selection against the mutated HDAC8 allele. Based on an investigation of the deletion breakpoints, we hypothesize that microhomology-mediated replicative mechanisms may be implicated in the formation of some of these rearrangements. This study broadens the mutational spectrum of HDAC8, provides the first description of a causative HDAC8 somatic mutation and increases the knowledge on possible mutational mechanisms underlying copy number variations in HDAC8. Moreover our findings highlight the clinical utility of considering copy number analysis in HDAC8 as well as the analysis on DNA from more than one tissue as an indispensable part of the routine molecular diagnosis of individuals with CdLS or CdLS-overlapping features.

  12. Investigation of deletions at 7q11.23 in 44 patients referred for Williams-Beuren syndrome, using FISH and four DNA polymorphisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndum-Nielsen, K; Beck, B; Gyftodimou, J

    1997-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is associated with a submicroscopic deletion of the elastin gene (ELN) at 7q11.23. The deletion encompasses closely linked DNA markers. We have investigated 44 patients referred for possible WS using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis with a P1 clone contain...... in WS patients, both for confirmation of diagnosis and for genetic counselling....

  13. Manifestation of recessive combined D-2-, L-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria in combination with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguchi, Mariko; Ozaki, Erina; Yamauchi, Toshifumi; Ohta, Masaaki; Higaki, Takashi; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Imoto, Issei; Ishii, Eiichi; Eguchi-Ishimae, Minenori

    2018-02-01

    22q11.2 deletion syndrome is one of the most common human microdeletion syndromes. The clinical phenotype of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome is variable, ranging from mild to life-threatening symptoms, depending mainly on the extent of the deleted region. Brain malformations described in association with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome include polymicrogyria, cerebellar hypoplasia, megacisterna magna, and agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACC), although these are rare. We report here for the first time a patient who manifested combined D-2- and L-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria as a result of a hemizygous mutation in SLC25A1 in combination with 22q11.2 deletion. The girl was diagnosed to have ACC shortly after birth and a deletion of 22q11.2 was identified by genetic analysis. Although the patient showed cardiac anomalies, which is one of the typical symptoms of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, her rather severe phenotype and atypical face prompted us to search for additional pathogenic mutations. Three genes present in the deleted 22q11.2 region, SLC25A1, TUBA8, and SNAP29, which have been reported to be associated with brain malformation, were analyzed for the presence of pathogenic mutations. A frameshift mutation, c.18_24dup (p.Ala9Profs*82), was identified in the first exon of the remaining SLC25A1 allele, resulting in the complete loss of normal SLC25A1 function in the patient's cells. Our results support the notion that the existence of another genetic abnormality involving the retained allele on 22q11.2 should be considered when atypical or rare phenotypes are observed. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Mathematical Learning Disabilities in Children with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Smedt, Bert; Swillen, Ann; Verschaffel, Lieven; Ghesquiere, Pol

    2009-01-01

    Mathematical learning disabilities (MLD) occur frequently in children with specific genetic disorders, like Turner syndrome, fragile X syndrome and neurofibromatosis. This review focuses on MLD in children with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS). This syndrome is the most common known microdeletion syndrome with a prevalence of at…

  15. Arterial Hypertension in a Child with Williams-Beuren Syndrome (7q11.23 Chromosomal Deletion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina de Sylos

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 7-year-old male child diagnosed with Williams-Beuren syndrome and arterial hypertension refractory to clinical treatment. The diagnosis was confirmed by genetic study. Narrowing of the descending aorta and stenosis of the renal arteries were also diagnosed. Systemic vascular alterations caused by deletion of the elastin gene may occur early in individuals with Williams-Beuren syndrome, leading to the clinical manifestation of systemic arterial hypertension refractory to drug treatment.

  16. Neuroradiographic findings in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohm, Lauren A; Zhou, Tom C; Mingo, Tyler J; Dugan, Sarah L; Patterson, Richard J; Sidman, James D; Roby, Brianne B

    2017-08-01

    22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) is a common genetic disorder with enormous phenotypic heterogeneity. Despite the established prevalence of developmental and neuropsychiatric issues in this syndrome, its neuroanatomical correlates are not as well understood. A retrospective chart review was performed on 111 patients diagnosed with 22q11.2DS. Of the 111 patients, 24 with genetically confirmed 22q11.2 deletion and brain MRI or MRA were included in this study. The most common indications for imaging were unexplained developmental delay (6/24), seizures of unknown etiology (5/24), and unilateral weakness (3/24). More than half (13/24) of the patients had significant radiographic findings, including persistent cavum septi pellucidi and/or cavum vergae (8/24), aberrant cortical veins (6/24), polymicrogyria or cortical dysplasia (4/24), inner ear deformities (3/24), hypoplastic internal carotid artery (2/24), and hypoplastic cerebellum (1/24). These findings reveal the types and frequencies of brain malformations in this case series, and suggest that the prevalence of neuroanatomical abnormalities in 22q11.2DS may be underestimated. Understanding indications for imaging and frequently encountered brain malformations will result in early diagnosis and intervention in an effort to optimize patient outcomes. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Li-Fraumeni-like syndrome associated with a large BRCA1 intragenic deletion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Amanda Gonçalves; Achatz, Maria Isabel W; Rosenberg, Carla; Krepischi, Ana C V; Ewald, Ingrid Petroni; Sapienza, Marina; Pinheiro, Manuela; Peixoto, Ana; Nóbrega, Amanda França de; Carraro, Dirce M; Teixeira, Manuel R; Ashton-Prolla, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Li-Fraumeni (LFS) and Li-Fraumeni-like (LFL) syndromes are associated to germline TP53 mutations, and are characterized by the development of central nervous system tumors, sarcomas, adrenocortical carcinomas, and other early-onset tumors. Due to the high frequency of breast cancer in LFS/LFL families, these syndromes clinically overlap with hereditary breast cancer (HBC). Germline point mutations in BRCA1, BRCA2, and TP53 genes are associated with high risk of breast cancer. Large rearrangements involving these genes are also implicated in the HBC phenotype. We have screened DNA copy number changes by MLPA on BRCA1, BRCA2, and TP53 genes in 23 breast cancer patients with a clinical diagnosis consistent with LFS/LFL; most of these families also met the clinical criteria for other HBC syndromes. We found no DNA copy number alterations in the BRCA2 and TP53 genes, but we detected in one patient a 36.4 Kb BRCA1 microdeletion, confirmed and further mapped by array-CGH, encompassing exons 9–19. Breakpoints sequencing analysis suggests that this rearrangement was mediated by flanking Alu sequences. This is the first description of a germline intragenic BRCA1 deletion in a breast cancer patient with a family history consistent with both LFL and HBC syndromes. Our results show that large rearrangements in these known cancer predisposition genes occur, but are not a frequent cause of cancer susceptibility

  18. Angiotensin-converting enzyme insertion/deletion gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme insertion/deletion gene polymorphism in cystic fibrosis patients. Sabrine Oueslati Sondess Hadj Fredj Hajer Siala Amina Bibi Hajer Aloulou Lamia Boughamoura Khadija Boussetta Sihem Barsaoui Taieb Messaoud. Research Note Volume 95 Issue 1 March 2016 pp 193-196 ...

  19. Association of insertion–deletion polymorphism of ACE gene and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive, neurodegenerative disease. Many studies proposed an association of the insertion (I)/deletion (D) polymorphism (indel) in intron 16 of the gene for angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) on chromosome 17q23 with Alzheimer's disease. ACE indel and related ...

  20. [Phenotypic and genotypic analysis of a fetus carrying an intermediate 22q11.2 deletion encompassing the CRKL gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shaobin; Zheng, Xiaohe; Gu, Heng; Li, Mingzhen

    2017-06-10

    To delineate the phenotypic characteristics of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome and the role of CRKL gene in the pathogenesis of cardiac abnormalities. G-banded karyotyping, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) were performed on a fetus with tetralogy of Fallot detected by ultrasound. Correlation between the genotype and phenotype was explored after precise mapping of the breakpoints on chromosome 22q11.2. SNP array was also performed on peripheral blood samples from both parents to clarify its origin. The fetus showed a normal karyotype of 46,XY. SNP array performed on fetal blood sample revealed a 749 kb deletion (chr22: 20 716 876-21 465 659) at 22q11.21, which encompassed the CRKL gene but not TBX1, HIRA, COMT and MAPK1. Precise mapping of the breakpoints suggested that the deleted region has overlapped with that of central 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. SNP array analysis of the parental blood samples suggested that the 22q11.21 deletion has a de novo origin. The presence of 22q11.21 deletion in the fetus was also confirmed by FISH analysis. Central 22q11.21 deletion probably accounts for the cardiac abnormalities in the fetus, for which the CRKL gene should be considered as an important candidate.

  1. Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Insertion/Deletion Gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: This study investigated the influence of angiotensin-1 converting enzyme (ACE) insertiondeletion (ID) gene polymorphism on the treatment responses of type 2 diabetic subjects at varying stages of nephropathy to ACE inhibitors (ACEI) with regard to blood pressure (MAP) and renal response (GFR). Methods: The ...

  2. Small deletions of SATB2 cause some of the clinical features of the 2q33.1 microdeletion syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill A Rosenfeld

    Full Text Available Recurrent deletions of 2q32q33 have recently been reported as a new microdeletion syndrome. Clinical features of this syndrome include severe mental retardation, growth retardation, dysmorphic features, thin and sparse hair, feeding difficulties and cleft or high palate. The commonly deleted region contains at least seven genes. Haploinsufficiency of one of these genes, SATB2, a DNA-binding protein that regulates gene expression, has been implicated as causative in the cleft or high palate of individuals with 2q32q33 microdeletion syndrome. In this study we describe three individuals with smaller microdeletions of this region, within 2q33.1. The deletions ranged in size from 173.1 kb to 185.2 kb and spanned part of SATB2. Review of clinical records showed similar clinical features among these individuals, including severe developmental delay and tooth abnormalities. Two of the individuals had behavioral problems. Only one of the subjects presented here had a cleft palate, suggesting reduced penetrance for this feature. Our results suggest that deletion of SATB2 is responsible for several of the clinical features associated with 2q32q33 microdeletion syndrome.

  3. [Diagnosis of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome in the context of newly developed psychosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltenboeck, Alexander; Friedrich, Fabian; Hinterbuchinger, Barbara; Litvan, Zsuzsa; Mossaheb, Nilufar

    2016-12-01

    22q11.2 deletion syndrome (clinically also known as velocardiofacial or DiGeorge syndrome) is the most common human microdeletion syndrome and can be associated with a multitude of clinical features. In this article we report the case of a 22-year-old patient from Austria who was diagnosed with previously unknown 22q11.2 deletion syndrome in the context of newly developed psychosis. Using this case as an example, we then discuss the implications of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome for clinical psychiatric practice.

  4. A Case of Concurrent Miller-Dieker Syndrome (17p13.3 Deletion) and 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwal, Paldeep S; Macmurdo, C

    2015-12-01

    Features of Miller-Dieker syndrome (MDS, 17p13.3 deletion syndrome, LIS1-associated lissencephaly) include classic lissencephaly, microcephaly, cardiac malformations, growth restriction, and characteristic facial changes. Individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (DiGeorge syndrome or velocardiofacial syndrome) are known to have congenital cardiac malformations (in particular conotruncal defects), palatal abnormalities (especially velopharyngeal insufficiency), hypocalcemia, immune deficiency, learning disabilities, and characteristic facial features. This case report describes phenotypic characteristics of a patient with extremely rare instance of having both MDS and 22q11.2 deletion syndrome that is unique in the medical literature. Prognosis in this concurrent phenotype is poor with our patient suffering from several malformations seen in both conditions and expiring in the neonatal period.

  5. Familial 22q11.2 deletion syndrome with autosomal dominant inheritance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahar Gokturk

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available 22q11.2 deletion syndrome is the most frequent microdeletion syndrome in humans and caused by hemizygote deletion on only one chromosome. Most of probands have a de novo deletion of 22q11.2, but 8-20% have inherited the 22q11.2 deletion from a parent (autosomal dominant mutation. Genotype-phenotype correlation is weak in this patient group. We aimed to present three members in the same family due to an autosomal dominant inheritance with 22q11.2 deletion and different clinical findings. [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(2.000: 379-385

  6. Characteristics of dystonia in the 18p deletion syndrome, including a new case

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, Anna G.; Verschuuren - Bemelmans, Corien C.; Kok, Klaas; van Laar, Teus

    2009-01-01

    Objective of the present study was to evaluate the possible pathophysiology and clinical characteristics of dystonia in patients with the 18p deletion syndrome by describing a new case and reviewing the literature. Dystonia in patients with the 18p deletion syndrome seems to present heterogeneously

  7. Autism, ADHD, Mental Retardation and Behavior Problems in 100 Individuals with 22q11 Deletion Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niklasson, Lena; Rasmussen, Peder; Oskarsdottir, Solveig; Gillberg, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    This study assessed the prevalence and type of associated neuropsychiatric problems in children and adults with 22q11 deletion syndrome. One-hundred consecutively referred individuals with 22q11 deletion syndrome were given in-depth neuropsychiatric assessments and questionnaires screens. Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and/or attention…

  8. Syndrome of proximal interstitial deletion 4p15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fryns, J.P. [Univ. of Leuven (Belgium)

    1995-09-11

    In this journal, Chitayat et al. reported on 2 boys and a girl with interstitial deletion in the short arm of chromosome 4, including p15.2p15.33. All 3 patients had a characteristic face distinct from that of Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome and multiple minor congenital anomalies. One patient had a congenitally enlarged penis. The authors noted that all had normal growth, and all had moderate psychomotor retardation (patient 1, developmental age of 4-6 years at age 9 years; patient 2, mental age 6 years at age 25 years; and patient 3, global delay with hypotonia, difficulties in both gross and fine motor development, and persistent delay in language skills). 5 refs., 1 fig.

  9. Williams syndrome deletions and duplications: Genetic windows to understanding anxiety, sociality, autism, and schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespi, Bernard J; Procyshyn, Tanya L

    2017-08-01

    We describe and evaluate an integrative hypothesis for helping to explain the major neurocognitive features of individuals with Williams syndrome region deletions and duplications. First, we demonstrate how the cognitive differences between Williams syndrome individuals, individuals with duplications of this region, and healthy individuals parallel the differences between individuals subject to effects of increased or decreased oxytocin. Second, we synthesize evidence showing that variation in expression of the gene GTF2I (General Transcription Factor II-I) underlies the primary social phenotypes of Williams syndrome and that common genetic variation in GTF2I mediates oxytocin reactivity, and its correlates, in healthy populations. Third, we describe findings relevant to the hypothesis that the GTF2I gene is subject to parent of origin effects whose behavioral expression fits with predictions from the kinship theory of genomic imprinting. Fourth, we describe how Williams syndrome can be considered, in part, as an autistic syndrome of Lorna Wing's 'active-but-odd' autism subtype, in contrast to associations of duplications with both schizophrenia and autism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparing the Broad Socio-Cognitive Profile of Youth with Williams Syndrome and 22Q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisman, O.; Feldman, R.; Burg-Malki, M.; Keren, M.; Geva, R.; Diesendruck, G.; Gothelf, D.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Numerous studies have assessed the socio-cognitive profile in Williams syndrome (WS) and, independently, in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS). Yet, a cross-syndrome comparison of these abilities between individuals with these two syndromes with known social deficits has not been conducted. Methods: Eighty-two children participated…

  11. 22q11.2 deletion (DiGeorge syndrome: a mother’s open letter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Baldini

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Dear E.G., this is an open letter on 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (DiGeorge syndrome. You are the mother of a beautiful 3 year old child. And you are one of the most active members of Aidel22, the Italian Association of 22q deletion syndrome patients and families. We would like to hear your story and learn from you. But before that, we asked some scholars in the field to help us understand what 22q11.2 deletion syndrome is.

  12. Thrombocytopenia and Postpartum Hemorrhage in a Woman with Chromosome 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah L. Pachtman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, also known as DiGeorge or velocardiofacial syndrome, is associated with a wide spectrum of phenotypic features. It is known to be associated with severe macrothrombocytopenia. Postpartum hemorrhage is a leading cause of maternal morbidity and mortality globally. Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome is rare cause of thrombocytopenia that can be a significant risk factor for life-threatening postpartum hemorrhage. We report a case of postpartum hemorrhage in a woman with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome causing severe macrothrombocytopenia.

  13. Sequence homology at the breakpoint and clinical phenotype of mitochondrial DNA deletion syndromes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bekim Sadikovic

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA deletions are a common cause of mitochondrial disorders. Large mtDNA deletions can lead to a broad spectrum of clinical features with different age of onset, ranging from mild mitochondrial myopathies (MM, progressive external ophthalmoplegia (PEO, and Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS, to severe Pearson syndrome. The aim of this study is to investigate the molecular signatures surrounding the deletion breakpoints and their association with the clinical phenotype and age at onset. MtDNA deletions in 67 patients were characterized using array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH followed by PCR-sequencing of the deletion junctions. Sequence homology including both perfect and imperfect short repeats flanking the deletion regions were analyzed and correlated with clinical features and patients' age group. In all age groups, there was a significant increase in sequence homology flanking the deletion compared to mtDNA background. The youngest patient group (<6 years old showed a diffused pattern of deletion distribution in size and locations, with a significantly lower sequence homology flanking the deletion, and the highest percentage of deletion mutant heteroplasmy. The older age groups showed rather discrete pattern of deletions with 44% of all patients over 6 years old carrying the most common 5 kb mtDNA deletion, which was found mostly in muscle specimens (22/41. Only 15% (3/20 of the young patients (<6 years old carry the 5 kb common deletion, which is usually present in blood rather than muscle. This group of patients predominantly (16 out of 17 exhibit multisystem disorder and/or Pearson syndrome, while older patients had predominantly neuromuscular manifestations including KSS, PEO, and MM. In conclusion, sequence homology at the deletion flanking regions is a consistent feature of mtDNA deletions. Decreased levels of sequence homology and increased levels of deletion mutant heteroplasmy appear to correlate with earlier

  14. Sequence homology at the breakpoint and clinical phenotype of mitochondrial DNA deletion syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadikovic, Bekim; Wang, Jing; El-Hattab, Ayman W; Landsverk, Megan; Douglas, Ganka; Brundage, Ellen K; Craigen, William J; Schmitt, Eric S; Wong, Lee-Jun C

    2010-12-20

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletions are a common cause of mitochondrial disorders. Large mtDNA deletions can lead to a broad spectrum of clinical features with different age of onset, ranging from mild mitochondrial myopathies (MM), progressive external ophthalmoplegia (PEO), and Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS), to severe Pearson syndrome. The aim of this study is to investigate the molecular signatures surrounding the deletion breakpoints and their association with the clinical phenotype and age at onset. MtDNA deletions in 67 patients were characterized using array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) followed by PCR-sequencing of the deletion junctions. Sequence homology including both perfect and imperfect short repeats flanking the deletion regions were analyzed and correlated with clinical features and patients' age group. In all age groups, there was a significant increase in sequence homology flanking the deletion compared to mtDNA background. The youngest patient group (deletion distribution in size and locations, with a significantly lower sequence homology flanking the deletion, and the highest percentage of deletion mutant heteroplasmy. The older age groups showed rather discrete pattern of deletions with 44% of all patients over 6 years old carrying the most common 5 kb mtDNA deletion, which was found mostly in muscle specimens (22/41). Only 15% (3/20) of the young patients (deletion, which is usually present in blood rather than muscle. This group of patients predominantly (16 out of 17) exhibit multisystem disorder and/or Pearson syndrome, while older patients had predominantly neuromuscular manifestations including KSS, PEO, and MM. In conclusion, sequence homology at the deletion flanking regions is a consistent feature of mtDNA deletions. Decreased levels of sequence homology and increased levels of deletion mutant heteroplasmy appear to correlate with earlier onset and more severe disease with multisystem involvement.

  15. Reciprocal deletion and duplication of 17p11.2-11.2: Korean patients with Smith-Magenis syndrome and Potocki-Lupski syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cha Gon; Park, Sang-Jin; Yun, Jun-No; Yim, Shin-Young; Sohn, Young Bae

    2012-12-01

    Deletion and duplication of the -3.7-Mb region in 17p11.2 result in two reciprocal syndrome, Smith-Magenis syndrome and Potocki-Lupski syndrome. Smith-Magenis syndrome is a well-known developmental disorder. Potocki-Lupski syndrome has recently been recognized as a microduplication syndrome that is a reciprocal disease of Smith-Magenis syndrome. In this paper, we report on the clinical and cytogenetic features of two Korean patients with Smith-Magenis syndrome and Potocki-Lupski syndrome. Patient 1 (Smith-Magenis syndrome) was a 2.9-yr-old boy who showed mild dysmorphic features, aggressive behavioral problems, and developmental delay. Patient 2 (Potocki-Lupski syndrome), a 17-yr-old boy, had only intellectual disabilities and language developmental delay. We used array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) and found a 2.6 Mb-sized deletion and a reciprocal 2.1 Mb-sized duplication involving the 17p11.2. These regions overlapped in a 2.1 Mb size containing 11 common genes, including RAI1 and SREBF.

  16. Patients Carrying 9q31.1-q32 Deletion Share Common Features with Cornelia de Lange Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruixue Cao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS is a rare but severe clinically heterogeneous developmental disorder characterized by facial dysmorphia, growth and cognitive retardation, and abnormalities of limb development. Objectives: To determine the pathogenesis of a patient with CdLS. Methods: We studied a patient with CdLS by whole exome sequencing, karyotyping and Agilent CGH Array. The results were confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR analysis of the patient and her parents. Further comparison of our patient and cases with partially overlapping deletions retrieved from the literature and databases was undertaken. Results: Whole exome sequencing had excluded the mutation of cohesion genes such as NIPBL,SMC1A and SMC3. The result of karyotyping showed a deletion of chromosome 9q31.1-q32 and the result of Agilent CGH Array further displayed a 12.01-Mb region of deletion at chromosome bands 9q31.1-q32. Reported cases with the deletion of 9q31.1-q32 share similar features with our CdLS patient. One of the genes in the deleted region, SMC2, belongs to the Structural Maintenance of Chromosomes (SMC family and regulates gene expression and DNA repair. Conclusions: Patients carrying the deletion of 9q31.1-q32 showed similar phenotypes with CdLS.

  17. Decreased DGCR8 expression and miRNA dysregulation in individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantal Sellier

    Full Text Available Deletion of the 1.5-3 Mb region of chromosome 22 at locus 11.2 gives rise to the chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS, also known as DiGeorge and Velocardiofacial Syndromes. It is the most common micro-deletion disorder in humans and one of the most common multiple malformation syndromes. The syndrome is characterized by a broad phenotype, whose characterization has expanded considerably within the last decade and includes many associated findings such as craniofacial anomalies (40%, conotruncal defects of the heart (CHD; 70-80%, hypocalcemia (20-60%, and a range of neurocognitive anomalies with high risk of schizophrenia, all with a broad phenotypic variability. These phenotypic features are believed to be the result of a change in the copy number or dosage of the genes located in the deleted region. Despite this relatively clear genetic etiology, very little is known about which genes modulate phenotypic variations in humans or if they are due to combinatorial effects of reduced dosage of multiple genes acting in concert. Here, we report on decreased expression levels of genes within the deletion region of chromosome 22, including DGCR8, in peripheral leukocytes derived from individuals with 22q11DS compared to healthy controls. Furthermore, we found dysregulated miRNA expression in individuals with 22q11DS, including miR-150, miR-194 and miR-185. We postulate this to be related to DGCR8 haploinsufficiency as DGCR8 regulates miRNA biogenesis. Importantly we demonstrate that the level of some miRNAs correlates with brain measures, CHD and thyroid abnormalities, suggesting that the dysregulated miRNAs may contribute to these phenotypes and/or represent relevant blood biomarkers of the disease in individuals with 22q11DS.

  18. Conotruncal anomaly face syndrome is associated with a deletion within chromosome 22q11.

    OpenAIRE

    Burn, J; Takao, A; Wilson, D; Cross, I; Momma, K; Wadey, R; Scambler, P; Goodship, J

    1993-01-01

    The conotruncal anomaly face syndrome was described in a Japanese publication in 1976 and comprises dysmorphic facial appearance and outflow tract defects of the heart. The authors subsequently noted similarities to Shprintzen syndrome and DiGeorge syndrome. Chromosome analysis in five cases did not show a deletion at high resolution, but fluorescent in situ hybridisation using probe DO832 showed a deletion within chromosome 22q11 in all cases.

  19. Encephalopathy and bilateral cataract in a boy with an interstitial deletion of Xp22 comprising the CDKL5 and NHS genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Esch, Hilde; Jansen, Anna; Bauters, Marijke; Froyen, Guy; Fryns, Jean-Pierre

    2007-02-15

    We describe a male patient with a deletion at Xp22, detected by high resolution X-array CGH. The clinical phenotype present in this infant boy, consists of severe encephalopathy, congenital cataracts and tetralogy of Fallot and can be attributed to the deletion of the genes within the interval. Among these deleted genes are the gene for Nance-Horan syndrome and the cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 gene (CDKL5), responsible for the early seizure variant of Rett syndrome. This is the first description of a male patient with a deletion of these genes, showing the involvement of CDKL5 in severe epileptic encephalopathy in males. Moreover it illustrates the added value of high resolution array-CGH in molecular diagnosis of mental retardation-multiple congenital anomaly cases. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. 22q11.2 deletion syndrome in diverse populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruszka, Paul; Addissie, Yonit A; McGinn, Daniel E; Porras, Antonio R; Biggs, Elijah; Share, Matthew; Crowley, T Blaine; Chung, Brian H Y; Mok, Gary T K; Mak, Christopher C Y; Muthukumarasamy, Premala; Thong, Meow-Keong; Sirisena, Nirmala D; Dissanayake, Vajira H W; Paththinige, C Sampath; Prabodha, L B Lahiru; Mishra, Rupesh; Shotelersuk, Vorasuk; Ekure, Ekanem Nsikak; Sokunbi, Ogochukwu Jidechukwu; Kalu, Nnenna; Ferreira, Carlos R; Duncan, Jordann-Mishael; Patil, Siddaramappa Jagdish; Jones, Kelly L; Kaplan, Julie D; Abdul-Rahman, Omar A; Uwineza, Annette; Mutesa, Leon; Moresco, Angélica; Obregon, María Gabriela; Richieri-Costa, Antonio; Gil-da-Silva-Lopes, Vera L; Adeyemo, Adebowale A; Summar, Marshall; Zackai, Elaine H; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M; Linguraru, Marius George; Muenke, Maximilian

    2017-04-01

    22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2 DS) is the most common microdeletion syndrome and is underdiagnosed in diverse populations. This syndrome has a variable phenotype and affects multiple systems, making early recognition imperative. In this study, individuals from diverse populations with 22q11.2 DS were evaluated clinically and by facial analysis technology. Clinical information from 106 individuals and images from 101 were collected from individuals with 22q11.2 DS from 11 countries; average age was 11.7 and 47% were male. Individuals were grouped into categories of African descent (African), Asian, and Latin American. We found that the phenotype of 22q11.2 DS varied across population groups. Only two findings, congenital heart disease and learning problems, were found in greater than 50% of participants. When comparing the clinical features of 22q11.2 DS in each population, the proportion of individuals within each clinical category was statistically different except for learning problems and ear anomalies (P 22q11.2 DS with 156 age and gender matched controls and found that sensitivity and specificity were greater than 96% for all populations. In summary, we present the varied findings from global populations with 22q11.2 DS and demonstrate how facial analysis technology can assist clinicians in making accurate 22q11.2 DS diagnoses. This work will assist in earlier detection and in increasing recognition of 22q11.2 DS throughout the world. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Velo-cardio-facial syndrome: Frequency and textent of 22q11 deletions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindsay, E.A.; Goldberg, R.; Jurecic, V. [and others

    1995-07-03

    Velo-cardio-facial (VCFS) or Shprintzen syndrome is associated with deletions in a region of chromosome 22q11.2 also deleted in DiGeorge anomaly and some forms of congenital heart disease. Due to the variability of phenotype, the evaluation of the incidence of deletions has been hampered by uncertainty of diagnosis. In this study, 54 patients were diagnosed with VCFS by a single group of clinicians using homogeneous clinical criteria independent of the deletion status. Cell lines of these patients were established and the deletion status evaluated for three loci within the commonly deleted region at 22q11.2 using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). In 81% of the patients all three loci were hemizygous. In one patient we observed a smaller interstitial deletion than that defined by the three loci. The phenotype of this patient was not different from that observed in patients with larger deletions. 22 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Microarray based analysis of an inherited terminal 3p26.3 deletion, containing only the CHL1 gene, from a normal father to his two affected children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lerone Margherita

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background terminal deletions of the distal portion of the short arm of chromosome 3 cause a rare contiguous gene disorder characterized by growth retardation, developmental delay, mental retardation, dysmorphisms, microcephaly and ptosis. The phenotype of individuals with deletions varies from normal to severe. It was suggested that a 1,5 Mb minimal terminal deletion including the two genes CRBN and CNTN4 is sufficient to cause the syndrome. In addition the CHL1 gene, mapping at 3p26.3 distally to CRBN and CNTN4, was proposed as candidate gene for a non specific mental retardation because of its high level of expression in the brain. Methods and Results we describe two affected siblings in which array-CGH analysis disclosed an identical discontinuous terminal 3p26.3 deletion spanning less than 1 Mb. The deletion was transmitted from their normal father and included only the CHL1 gene. The two brothers present microcephaly, light mental retardation, learning and language difficulties but not the typical phenotype manifestations described in 3p- syndrome. Conclusion a terminal 3p26.3 deletion including only the CHL1 gene is a very rare finding previously reported only in one family. The phenotype of the affected individuals in the two families is very similar and the deletion has been inherited from an apparently normal parent. As already described for others recurrent syndromes with variable phenotype, these findings are challenging in genetic counselling because of an evident variable penetrance.

  3. Familial Angelman syndrome with a crossover in the critical deletion region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelen, M.R.; Van der Burgt, C.J.A.M.; Nillesen, W.N.; Smeets, H.J.M. [University Hospital Nijmegen (Netherlands); Vis, A. [Institute for Mentally Handicapped De Winckelsteegh, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    1994-09-01

    More than two thirds of the patients with Angelman syndrome (AS) carry a deletion or other chromosomal abnormality in the 15q11-13 region. A much less frequent cause (4%) is paternal uniparental disomy of the entire chromosome. In general no abnormalities are detectable in familial cases and an inherited submicroscopic deletion was described only once. Here a familial case of 2 sibs with AS is reported. No major cytogenetic or molecular abnormality was identified, but a recombination event had occurred in the AS critical region. The AS locus, D15S113, D15S10, D15S11, and D15S18 mapped proximal and the GABRB3 gene, D15S97, and GABRA5 gene, and D15S12 distal to the crossover site. This recombination within the AS critical region confirmed the exclusion of GABRB3 as a candidate gene for AS. Other markers and candidate genes can be tested genetically as well for a possible role in AS. 36 refs., 4 figs.

  4. A new microduplication syndrome encompassing the region of the Miller-Dieker (17p13 deletion) syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roos, L; Jønch, A E; Kjaergaard, S

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The use of array comparative genome hybridisation (CGH) analyses for investigation of children with mental retardation has led to the identification of a growing number of new microdeletion and microduplication syndromes, some of which have become clinically well characterised and some...... that await further delineation. This report describes three children with de novo 17p13.1 duplications encompassing the PAFAH1B1 gene, who had similar phenotypic features, including mild to moderate developmental delay, hypotonia and facial dysmorphism, and compares them to the few previously reported cases...... to patients with deletion of the region (Miller-Dieker syndrome) the patients reported here had mild to moderate retardation and displayed no lissencephaly or gross brain malformations. Further cases with similar duplications are expected to be diagnosed, and will contribute to the delineation of a potential...

  5. Contiguous ABCD1 DXS1357E deletion syndrome: report of an autopsy case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasa, Mitsuaki; Yamagata, Takanori; Mizuguchi, Masashi; Itoh, Masayuki; Matsumoto, Ayumi; Hironaka, Mitsugu; Honda, Ayako; Momoi, Mariko Y; Shimozawa, Nobuyuki

    2013-06-01

    Contiguous ABCD1 DXS1357E deletion syndrome (CADDS) is a contiguous deletion syndrome involving the ABCD1 and DXS1357E/BAP31 genes on Xq28. Although ABCD1 is responsible for X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD), its phenotype differs from that of CADDS, which manifests with many features of Zellweger syndrome (ZS), including severe growth and developmental retardation, liver dysfunction, cholestasis and early infantile death. We report here the fourth case of CADDS, in which a boy had dysmorphic features, including a flat orbital edge, hypoplastic nose, micrognathia, inguinal hernia, micropenis, cryptorchidism and club feet, all of which are shared by ZS. The patient achieved no developmental milestones and died of pneumonia at 8 months. Biochemical studies demonstrated abnormal metabolism of very long chain fatty acids, which was higher than that seen in X-ALD. Immunocytochemistry and Western blot showed the absence of ALD protein (ALDP) despite the presence of other peroxisomal proteins. Pathological studies disclosed a small brain with hypomyelination and secondary hypoxic-ischemic changes. Neuronal heterotopia in the white matter and leptomeningeal glioneuronal heterotopia indicated a neuronal migration disorder. The liver showed fibrosis and cholestasis. The thymus and adrenal glands were hypoplastic. Array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analysis suggested that the deletion was a genomic rearrangement in the 90-kb span starting in DXS1357E/BACP31 exon 4 and included ABCD1, PLXNB3, SRPK3, IDH3G and SSR4, ending in PDZD4 exon 8. Thus, the absence of ALDP, when combined with defects in the B-cell antigen receptor associated protein 31 (BAP31) and other factors, severely affects VLCFA metabolism on peroxisomal functions and produces ZS-like pathology. © 2012 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  6. Copy number variations and risk for schizophrenia in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Bassett, Anne S.; Marshall, Christian R.; Lionel, Anath C.; Chow, Eva W.C.; Scherer, Stephen W.

    2008-01-01

    22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome (22q11.2DS) is a common microdeletion syndrome with congenital and late-onset features. Testing for the genomic content of copy number variations (CNVs) may help elucidate the 22q11.2 deletion mechanism and the variable clinical expression of the syndrome including the high (25%) risk for schizophrenia. We used genome-wide microarrays to assess CNV content and the parental origin of 22q11.2 deletions in a cohort of 100 adults with 22q11.2DS (44 with schizophrenia) an...

  7. Association Between Early-Onset Parkinson Disease and 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butcher, Nancy J.; Kiehl, Tim-Rasmus; Hazrati, Lili-Naz; Chow, Eva W. C.; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Lang, Anthony E.; Bassett, Anne S.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Clinical case reports of parkinsonism co-occurring with hemizygous 22q11.2 deletions and the associated multisystem syndrome, 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS), suggest that 22q11.2 deletions may lead to increased risk of early-onset Parkinson disease (PD). The frequency of PD and its neuropathological presentation remain unknown in this common genetic condition. OBJECTIVE To evaluate a possible association between 22q11.2 deletions and PD. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS An observational study of the occurrence of PD in the world’s largest cohort of well-characterized adults with a molecularly confirmed diagnosis of 22q11.2DS (n = 159 [6 with postmortem tissue]; age range, 18.1–68.6 years) was conducted in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Rare postmortem brain tissue from individuals with 22q11.2DS and a clinical history of PD was investigated for neurodegenerative changes and compared with that from individuals with no history of a movement disorder. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES A clinical diagnosis of PD made by a neurologist and neuropathological features of PD. RESULTS Adults with 22q11.2DS had a significantly elevated occurrence of PD compared with standard population estimates (standardized morbidity ratio = 69.7; 95% CI, 19.0–178.5). All cases showed early onset and typical PD symptom pattern, treatment response, and course. All were negative for family history of PD and known pathogenic PD-related mutations. The common use of antipsychotics in patients with 22q11.2DS to manage associated psychiatric symptoms delayed diagnosis of PD by up to 10 years. Postmortem brain tissue revealed classic loss of midbrain dopaminergic neurons in all 3 postmortem 22q11.2DS-PD cases. Typical α-synuclein–positive Lewy bodies were present in the expected distribution in 2 cases but absent in another. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE These findings suggest that 22q11.2 deletions represent a novel genetic risk factor for early-onset PD with variable neuropathological

  8. Molecular characterization of two proximal deletion breakpoint regions in both Prader-Willi and Angelman syndrome patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, S.L.; Huang, B.; Ledbetter, D.H. [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)] [and others

    1995-07-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) are distinct mental retardation syndromes caused by paternal and maternal deficiencies, respectively, in chromosome 15q11{minus}q13. Approximately 70% of these patients have a large deletion of {approximately}4 Mb extending from D15S9 (ML34) through D15S12 (IR10A). To further characterize the deletion breakpoints proximal to D15S9, three new polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed that showed observed heterozygosities of 60%-87%. D15S541 and D15S542 were isolated for YAC A124A3 containing the D15S18 (IR39) locus. D15S543 was isolated from a cosmid cloned from the proximal right end of YAC 254B5 containing the D15S9 (ML34) locus. Gene-centromere mapping of these markers, using a panel of ovarian teratomas of known meiotic origin, extended the genetic map of chromosome 15 by 2-3 cM toward the centromere. Analysis of the more proximal S541/S542 markers on 53 Prader-Willi and 33 Angelman deletion patients indicated two classes of patients: 44% (35/80) of the informative patients were deleted for these markers (class I), while 56% (45/80) were not deleted (class II), with no difference between PWS and AS. In contrast, D15S543 was deleted in all informative patients (13/48) or showed the presence of a single allele (in 35/48 patients), suggesting that this marker is deleted in the majority of PWS and AS cases. These results confirm the presence of two common proximal deletion breakpoint regions in both Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes and are consistent with the same deletion mechanism being responsible for paternal and maternal deletions. One breakpoint region lies between D15S541/S542 and D15S543, with an additional breakpoint region being proximal to D15S541/S542. 46 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Characterization of large genomic deletions in the FBN1 gene using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewis Tracey

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Connective tissue diseases characterized by aortic aneurysm, such as Marfan syndrome, Loeys-Dietz syndrome and Ehlers Danlos syndrome type IV are heterogeneous and despite overlapping phenotypes, the natural history, clinical manifestations and interventional course for each diagnosis can be quite unique. The majority of mutations involved in the etiology of these disorders are missense and nonsense mutations. However, large deletions and duplications undetected by sequencing may be implicated in their pathogenesis, and may explain the apparent lack of genotype-phenotype correlation in a subset of patients. The objective of this study was to search for large pathogenic deletions and/or duplications in the FBN1, TGFβR1, and TGFβR2 genes using multiplex-ligation dependent probe amplification (MLPA in patients with aortopathy, in whom no mutations in the FBN1, TGFβR1, and TGFβR2 genes were identified by sequencing. Methods The study included 14 patients from 11 unrelated families with aortic aneurysm. Of those, six patients (including 3 first-degree relatives, fulfilled the revised Ghent criteria for Marfan syndrome, and eight had predominantly aortic aneurysm/dilatation with variable skeletal and craniofacial involvement. MLPA for FBN1, TGFβR1, and TGFβR2 was carried out in all patients. A 385 K chromosome 15 specific array was used in two patients with a deletion of the entire FBN1 in order to define its size and boundaries. Results We identified two novel large deletions in the FBN1 gene in four patients of two unrelated families who met clinical diagnostic criteria for Marfan syndrome. One patient was found to have a FBN1 deletion encompassing exons 1-5. The other three patients had a 542 Kb deletion spanning the whole FBN1 gene and five additional genes (SLC24A5, MYEF2, CTXN2, SLC12A1, DUT in the chromosome 15. Conclusions Our findings expand the number of large FBN1 deletions, and emphasize the importance of

  10. Pearson syndrome and the role of deletion dimers and duplications in the mtDNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, L. J. A. M.; Jongbloed, R. J. E.; Wijburg, F. A.; de Klerk, J. B. C.; Geraedts, J. P. M.; Nijland, J. G.; Scholte, H. R.; de Coo, I. F. M.; Smeets, H. J. M.

    2004-01-01

    Pearson syndrome is an often fatal multisystem disease associated with mitochondrial DNA rearrangements. Here we report a patient with a novel mtDNA deletion of 3.4 kb ranging from nucleotides 6097 to 9541 in combination with deletion dimers. The mutation percentage in different tissues (blood,

  11. Neuroimaging Correlates of 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome: Implications for Schizophrenia Research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boot, E.; van Amelsvoort, T. A. M. J.

    2012-01-01

    22q11.2 Deletion syndrome (22q11DS) is the most common known recurrent copy-number variant disorder. It is also the most common known genetic risk factor for schizophrenia. The greater homogeneity of subjects with schizophrenia in 22q11DS compared with schizophrenia in the wider non-deleted

  12. Maladaptive Behavior Differences in Prader-Willi Syndrome Due to Paternal Deletion versus Maternal Uniparental Disomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykens, Elisabeth M.; King, Bryan H.; Cassidy, Suzanne B.

    1999-01-01

    This study compared maladaptive behavior in 23 people with Prader-Willi syndrome due to paternal deletion and in 23 age- and gender-matched subjects with maternal uniparental disomy. Controlling for IQs, the deletion cases showed significantly higher maladaptive ratings, more symptom-related distress, and more behavior problems. Findings suggest a…

  13. Neonatal hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia in a patient with 9p deletion syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bayat, Allan; Kirchhoff, Maria; Madsen, Camilla Gøbel

    2018-01-01

    We report the clinical and neuroradiological findings in a young boy harboring the 9p deletion syndrome including the novel findings of thalamic infarction and germinal matrix haemorrhage and neonatal hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia. Both the hypoglycemic events and the ventriculomegaly found...

  14. Molecular cytogenetic detection of chromosome 15 deletions in patients with Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chadwick, D.E.; Weksberg, R.; Shuman, C. [Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) are clinically distinct genetic disorders involving alterations of chromosome 15q11-q13. Approximately 75% of individuals with PWS and AS have deletions within 15q11-q13 by molecular analysis. We have evaluated fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for the clinical laboratory detection of del(15)(q11q13) using the cosmid probes D15S11 and GABRB3 (ONCOR, Gaithersburg, NY). 4/4 PWS and 1/1 AS patients previously identified as having cytogenetic deletions were deleted for both probes. In a prospectively ascertained series of 54 patient samples referred to rule out either PWS or AS, 8 were deleted for D15S11 and GABRB3. In addition, an atypical deletion patient with PWS was also identified who was found to be deleted for GABRB3 but not D15S11. The SNRPN locus was also deleted in this patient. Only 4 of the 9 patient samples having molecular cytogenetic deletions were clearly deleted by high resolution banding (HRB) analysis. The microscopic and submicroscopic deletions have been confirmed by dinucleotide (CA) repeat analysis. Microsatellite polymorphism analysis was also used to demonstrate that five non-deletion patients in this series had biparental inheritance of chromosome 15, including region q11-q13. Deletions were not detected by either HRB, FISH or microsatellite polymorphism analysis in samples obtained from parents of the deletion patients. Methylation studies of chromosome 15q11-q13 are in progress for this series of PWS and AS families. FISH analysis of chromosome 15q11-q13 in patients with PWS and AS is a rapid, sensitive and reliable method for deletion detection.

  15. Rare Genome-Wide Copy Number Variation and Expression of Schizophrenia in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, Anne S; Lowther, Chelsea; Merico, Daniele; Costain, Gregory; Chow, Eva W C; van Amelsvoort, Therese; McDonald-McGinn, Donna; Gur, Raquel E; Swillen, Ann; Van den Bree, Marianne; Murphy, Kieran; Gothelf, Doron; Bearden, Carrie E; Eliez, Stephan; Kates, Wendy; Philip, Nicole; Sashi, Vandana; Campbell, Linda; Vorstman, Jacob; Cubells, Joseph; Repetto, Gabriela M; Simon, Tony; Boot, Erik; Heung, Tracy; Evers, Rens; Vingerhoets, Claudia; van Duin, Esther; Zackai, Elaine; Vergaelen, Elfi; Devriendt, Koen; Vermeesch, Joris R; Owen, Michael; Murphy, Clodagh; Michaelovosky, Elena; Kushan, Leila; Schneider, Maude; Fremont, Wanda; Busa, Tiffany; Hooper, Stephen; McCabe, Kathryn; Duijff, Sasja; Isaev, Karin; Pellecchia, Giovanna; Wei, John; Gazzellone, Matthew J; Scherer, Stephen W; Emanuel, Beverly S; Guo, Tingwei; Morrow, Bernice E; Marshall, Christian R

    2017-11-01

    Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) is associated with a more than 20-fold increased risk for developing schizophrenia. The aim of this study was to identify additional genetic factors (i.e., "second hits") that may contribute to schizophrenia expression. Through an international consortium, the authors obtained DNA samples from 329 psychiatrically phenotyped subjects with 22q11.2DS. Using a high-resolution microarray platform and established methods to assess copy number variation (CNV), the authors compared the genome-wide burden of rare autosomal CNV, outside of the 22q11.2 deletion region, between two groups: a schizophrenia group and those with no psychotic disorder at age ≥25 years. The authors assessed whether genes overlapped by rare CNVs were overrepresented in functional pathways relevant to schizophrenia. Rare CNVs overlapping one or more protein-coding genes revealed significant between-group differences. For rare exonic duplications, six of 19 gene sets tested were enriched in the schizophrenia group; genes associated with abnormal nervous system phenotypes remained significant in a stepwise logistic regression model and showed significant interactions with 22q11.2 deletion region genes in a connectivity analysis. For rare exonic deletions, the schizophrenia group had, on average, more genes overlapped. The additional rare CNVs implicated known (e.g., GRM7, 15q13.3, 16p12.2) and novel schizophrenia risk genes and loci. The results suggest that additional rare CNVs overlapping genes outside of the 22q11.2 deletion region contribute to schizophrenia risk in 22q11.2DS, supporting a multigenic hypothesis for schizophrenia. The findings have implications for understanding expression of psychotic illness and herald the importance of whole-genome sequencing to appreciate the overall genomic architecture of schizophrenia.

  16. Nasal dimple as part of the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gripp, K.W.; Reed, L.A. [Children`s Hospital of Philadelphia, PA (United States); Emanuel, B.S. [Children`s Hospital of Philadelphia, PA (United States)]|[Univ. of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [and others

    1997-03-31

    The phenotype of the 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome is quite variable. We describe 2 patients with a 22q11.2 deletion and a dimpled nasal tip, which, we suggest can be the extreme of the broad or bulbous nose commonly found in the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, and should not be confused with the more severe nasal abnormalities seen in frontonasal dysplasia. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  17. Prenatal diagnosis of 17q12 duplication and deletion syndrome in two fetuses with congenital anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ru; Fu, Fang; Zhang, Yong-Ling; Li, Dong-Zhi; Liao, Can

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the genetic abnormalities in two fetuses with congenital anomalies in prenatal screening. The mother of Fetus 1 was 26 years old and had a second trimester serum screening that indicated the fetus was at low risk. The prenatal ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 28 weeks of gestation showed mild ventriculomegaly, microcephaly, and agenesis of the corpus callosum. The mother of Fetus 2 was 25 years old and also had a second trimester serum screening that indicated the fetus was at low risk. The prenatal ultrasound at 32 weeks of gestation showed the presence of hyperechogenic and enlarged kidneys with multicystic renal dysplasia bilaterally and a persistent left superior vena cava (PLSVC). Both pregnant women underwent cord blood samplings because of the abnormal imaging results. Karyotype analysis revealed normal results in the two fetuses. Chromosome microarray analysis (CMA) was then performed to provide genetic analysis of the cord blood and parental blood samples. Ultimately, the pregnancies were both terminated. CMA detected a 1.56-Mb duplication at 17q12 in Fetus 1 and a 1.93-Mb deletion of 17q12 in Fetus 2. Both the duplicated and deleted regions included the HNF1B and LHX1 genes. Neither the duplication nor deletion was inherited from the parents. This study is the first to report the prenatal diagnosis of a 17q12 duplication syndrome. Our results further confirmed that genes in this region, including HNF1B and LHX1, are essential for normal brain and kidney development, and also indicated some genes that may be associated with the cardiovascular abnormality. Combined with imaging examination, the use of CMA will improve the diagnosis of submicroscopic chromosomal aberrations in fetuses with congenital anomalies. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion in a boy with Opitz (G/BBB) syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fryburg, J.S.; Lin, K.Y.; Golden, W.L. [Univ. of Virginia Health Sciences Center, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    1996-03-29

    This report is on a 14-month-old boy with manifestations of Opitz (G/BBB) syndrome in whom a 22q11.2 deletion was found. Deletion analysis was requested because of some findings in this patient reminiscent of velocardiofacial (VCF) syndrome. The extent of aspiration and of respiratory symptoms in this child is not usually seen in VCF syndrome. Opitz syndrome maps to at least two loci, one on Xp, the other on 22q11.2. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Precise mapping of 17 deletion breakpoints within the central hotspot deletion region (introns 50 and 51) of the DMD gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Gabriella; Tremolaterra, Maria Roberta; Marsocci, Evelina; Tandurella, Igor Cm; Fioretti, Tiziana; Savarese, Maria; Carsana, Antonella

    2017-12-01

    Exon deletions in the human DMD gene, which encodes the dystrophin protein, are the molecular defect in 50-70% of cases of Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophies. Deletions are preferentially clustered in the 5' (exons 2-20) and the central (exons 45-53) region of DMD, likely because local DNA structure predisposes to specific breakage or recombination events. Notably, innovative therapeutic strategies may rescue dystrophin function by homology-based specific targeting of sequences within the central DMD hot spot deletion region. To further study molecular mechanisms that generate such frequent genome variations and to identify residual intronic sequences, we sequenced 17 deletion breakpoints within introns 50 and 51 of DMD and analyzed the surrounding genomic architecture. There was no breakpoint clustering within the introns nor extensive homology between sequences adjacent to each junction. However, at or near the breakpoint, we found microhomology, short tandem repeats, interspersed repeat elements and short sequence stretches that predispose to DNA deletion or bending. Identification of such structural elements contributes to elucidate general mechanisms generating deletion within the DMD gene. Moreover, precise mapping of deletion breakpoints and localization of repeated elements are of interest, because residual intronic sequences may be targeted by therapeutic strategies based on genome editing correction.

  20. Velo-Cardio-Facial syndrome and DiGeorge sequence with meningomyelocele and deletions of the 22q11 region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickel, R.E.; Pillers, D.M.; Merkens, M.; Magenis, R.E.; Zonana, J. [Oregon Health Sciences Univ., Portland, OR (United States); Driscoll, D.A.; Emanuel, B.S. [Univ. of Pennsylvania Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1994-10-01

    Approximately 5% of children with neural tube defects (NTDs) have a congenital heart defect and/or cleft lip and palate. The cause of isolated meningomyelocele, congenital heart defects, or cleft lip and palate has been largely thought to be multifactorial. However, chromosomal, teratogenic, and single gene causes of combinations of NTDs with congenital heart defects and/or cleft lip and palate have been reported. We report on 3 patients with meningomyelocele, congenital heart defects, and 22q11 deletions. Two of the children had the clinical diagnosis of velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS); both have bifid uvula. The third child had DiGeorge sequence (DGS). The association of NTDs with 22q11 deletion has not been reported previously. An accurate diagnosis of the 22q11 deletion is critical as this micro-deletion and its associated clinical problems is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait due to the inheritance of the deletion-bearing chromosome. We recommend that all children with NTDs and congenital heart defects, with or without cleft palate, have cytogenetic and molecular studies performed to detect 22q11 deletions. 31 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Interleukin 3 gene is located on human chromosome 5 and is deleted in myeloid leukemias with a deletion of 5q

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Beau, M.M.; Epstein, N.D.; O'Brien, S.J.; Nienhuis, A.W.; Yang, Y.C.; Clark, S.C.; Rowley, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    The gene IL-3 encodes interleukin 3, a hematopoietic colony-stimulating factor (CSF) that is capable of supporting the proliferation of a broad range of hematopoietic cell types. By using somatic cell hybrids and in situ chromosomal hybridization, the authors localized this gene to human chromosome 5 at bands q23-31, a chromosomal region that is frequently deleted [del(5q)] in patients with myeloid disorders. By in situ hybridization, IL-3 was found to be deleted in the 5q-chromosome of one patient with refractory anemia who had a del(5)(q15q33.3), of three patients with refractory anemia (two patients) or acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) de novo who had a similar distal breakpoint [del(5)(q13q33.3)], and of a fifth patient, with therapy-related ANLL, who had a similar distal breakpoint in band q33[del(5)(q14q33.3)]. Southern blot analysis of somatic cell hybrids retaining the normal or the deleted chromosome 5 from two patients with the refractory anemia 5q- syndrome indicated that IL-3 sequences were absent from the hybrids retaining the deleted chromosome 5 but not from hybrids that had a cytologically normal chromosome 5. Thus, a small segment of chromosome 5 contains IL-3, GM-CSF, CSF-1, and FMS. The findings and earlier results indicating that GM-CSF, CSF-1, and FMS were deleted in the 5q- chromosome, suggest that loss of IL-3 or of other CSF genes may play an important role in the pathogenesis of hematologic disorders associated with a del(5q)

  2. Clinical variability of Waardenburg-Shah syndrome in patients with proximal 13q deletion syndrome including the endothelin-B receptor locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tüysüz, Beyhan; Collin, Anna; Arapoğlu, Müjde; Suyugül, Nezir

    2009-10-01

    Waardenburg-Shah syndrome (Waardenburg syndrome type IV-WS4) is an auditory-pigmentary disorder that combines clinical features of pigmentary abnormalities of the skin, hair and irides, sensorineural hearing loss, and Hirschsprung disease (HSCR). Mutations in the endothelin-B receptor (EDNRB) gene on 13q22 have been found to cause this syndrome. Mutations in both alleles cause the full phenotype, while heterozygous mutations cause isolated HSCR or HSCR with minor pigmentary anomalies and/or sensorineural deafness. We investigated the status of the EDNRB gene, by FISH analysis, in three patients with de novo proximal 13q deletions detected at cytogenetic analysis and examined the clinical variability of WS4 among these patients. Chromosome 13q was screened with locus specific FISH probes and breakpoints were determined at 13q22.1q31.3 in Patients 1 and 3, and at 13q21.1q31.3 in Patient 2. An EDNRB specific FISH probe was deleted in all three patients. All patients had common facial features seen in proximal 13q deletion syndrome and mild mental retardation. However, findings related to WS4 were variable; Patient 1 had hypopigmentation of the irides and HSCR, Patient 2 had prominent bicolored irides and mild bilateral hearing loss, and Patient 3 had only mild unilateral hearing loss. These data contribute new insights into the pathogenesis of WS4.

  3. Phenotypic and Molecular Convergence of 2q23.1 Deletion Syndrome with Other Neurodevelopmental Syndromes Associated with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullegama, Sureni V.; Alaimo, Joseph T.; Chen, Li; Elsea, Sarah H.

    2015-01-01

    Roughly 20% of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are syndromic with a well-established genetic cause. Studying the genes involved can provide insight into the molecular and cellular mechanisms of ASD. 2q23.1 deletion syndrome (causative gene, MBD5) is a recently identified genetic neurodevelopmental disorder associated with ASD. Mutations in MBD5 have been found in ASD cohorts. In this study, we provide a phenotypic update on the prevalent features of 2q23.1 deletion syndrome, which include severe intellectual disability, seizures, significant speech impairment, sleep disturbance, and autistic-like behavioral problems. Next, we examined the phenotypic, molecular, and network/pathway relationships between nine neurodevelopmental disorders associated with ASD: 2q23.1 deletion Rett, Angelman, Pitt-Hopkins, 2q23.1 duplication, 5q14.3 deletion, Kleefstra, Kabuki make-up, and Smith-Magenis syndromes. We show phenotypic overlaps consisting of intellectual disability, speech delay, seizures, sleep disturbance, hypotonia, and autistic-like behaviors. Molecularly, MBD5 possibly regulates the expression of UBE3A, TCF4, MEF2C, EHMT1 and RAI1. Network analysis reveals that there could be indirect protein interactions, further implicating function for these genes in common pathways. Further, we show that when MBD5 and RAI1 are haploinsufficient, they perturb several common pathways that are linked to neuronal and behavioral development. These findings support further investigations into the molecular and pathway relationships among genes linked to neurodevelopmental disorders and ASD, which will hopefully lead to common points of regulation that may be targeted toward therapeutic intervention. PMID:25853262

  4. Phenotypic and Molecular Convergence of 2q23.1 Deletion Syndrome with Other Neurodevelopmental Syndromes Associated with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sureni V. Mullegama

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Roughly 20% of autism spectrum disorders (ASD are syndromic with a well-established genetic cause. Studying the genes involved can provide insight into the molecular and cellular mechanisms of ASD. 2q23.1 deletion syndrome (causative gene, MBD5 is a recently identified genetic neurodevelopmental disorder associated with ASD. Mutations in MBD5 have been found in ASD cohorts. In this study, we provide a phenotypic update on the prevalent features of 2q23.1 deletion syndrome, which include severe intellectual disability, seizures, significant speech impairment, sleep disturbance, and autistic-like behavioral problems. Next, we examined the phenotypic, molecular, and network/pathway relationships between nine neurodevelopmental disorders associated with ASD: 2q23.1 deletion Rett, Angelman, Pitt-Hopkins, 2q23.1 duplication, 5q14.3 deletion, Kleefstra, Kabuki make-up, and Smith-Magenis syndromes. We show phenotypic overlaps consisting of intellectual disability, speech delay, seizures, sleep disturbance, hypotonia, and autistic-like behaviors. Molecularly, MBD5 possibly regulates the expression of UBE3A, TCF4, MEF2C, EHMT1 and RAI1. Network analysis reveals that there could be indirect protein interactions, further implicating function for these genes in common pathways. Further, we show that when MBD5 and RAI1 are haploinsufficient, they perturb several common pathways that are linked to neuronal and behavioral development. These findings support further investigations into the molecular and pathway relationships among genes linked to neurodevelopmental disorders and ASD, which will hopefully lead to common points of regulation that may be targeted toward therapeutic intervention.

  5. [Neurocognitive and psychiatric management of the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demily, C; Rossi, M; Schneider, M; Edery, P; Leleu, A; d'Amato, T; Franck, N; Eliez, S

    2015-06-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) is caused by hemizygous microdeletions on chromosome 22. 22q11.2DS has several presentations including Di George's syndrome, velo-cardio-facial syndrome or Shprintzen's syndrome and it is the most frequent microdeletion syndrome in the general population (prevalence estimated at 1/4000 births, de novo: 90%). The inheritance of the syndrome (10%) is autosomal dominant. Most people with 22q11.2DS are missing a sequence of about 3 million DNA building blocks (base pairs) on one copy of chromosome 22 in each cell. A small percentage of affected individuals have shorter deletions in the same region (contiguous gene deletion syndrome). The general features of 22q11.2DS vary widely (more than 180 phenotypic presentations) and the syndrome is under diagnosed. Characteristic symptoms may include congenital heart disease, defects in the palate, neuromuscular problems, velo-pharyngeal insufficiency, hypoparathyroidism, craniofacial features and problems with the immune system T-cell mediated response (caused by hypoplasia of the thymus). The neurocognitive phenotype of the 22q11.2DS is complex. Cognitive deficits are seen in the majority (80-100%) of individuals with 22q11DS with impairments in sustained attention, executive function, memory and visual-spatial perception. Borderline intellectual function (IQ: 70-75) is most common, mild intellectual disability (IQ: 55-75) is slightly less frequent and a small percentage of children fall into the low average intelligence range. Most children with 22q11.2DS achieve higher scores in verbal tasks than in non-verbal tasks, although this pattern of dysfunction being not universal. Brain MRI studies have shown volumetric changes in multiple cortical and subcortical regions in individuals with 22q11DS that could be related to both cognition and psychoses. General psychiatric features included anxiety disorders, attention deficit disorder and poor social skills (40-50%). An elevated risk of

  6. The benefits and limitations of cell-free DNA screening for 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugoff, Lorraine; Mennuti, Michael T; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M

    2017-01-01

    Cell-free DNA testing is increasingly being used to screen pregnant women for fetal aneuploidy. This technology may also identify microdeletion syndromes, including 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, the most common microdeletion syndrome, and the 22q11.2 duplication syndrome. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, to review the early experience with cell-free DNA screening for this deletion and to consider the potential benefits that may be associated with prenatal detection of the deletion. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Overlapping submicroscopic deletions in Xq28 in two unrelated boys with developmental disorders: Identification of a gene near FRAXE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gedeon, A.K.; Sutherland, G.R. [Women`s and Children`s Hospital, North Adelaide (Australia)]|[Univ. of Adelaide (Australia); Ades, L.C.; Gecz, J.; Baker, E.; Mulley, J.C. [Women`s and Children`s Hospital, North Adelaide (Australia); Keinaenen, M. [Clinical Laboratory Medix, Espoo (Finland); Kaeaeriaeinen, H. [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland)

    1995-04-01

    Two unrelated boys are described with delay in development and submicroscopic deletions in Xq28, near FRAXE. Molecular diagnosis to exclude the fragile X (FRAXA) syndrome used the direct probe pfxa3, together with a control probe pS8 (DXS296), against PstI restriction digests of DNA. Deletions were detected initially by the control probe pS8, which is an anonymous fragment subcloned from YAC 539, within 1 Mb distal to FRAXA. Further molecular analyses determined that the maximum size of the deletion is <100 kb in one boy (MK) and is wholly overlapped by the deletion of up to {approximately}200 kb in the other (CB). These deletions lie between the sequences detected by the probe VK21C (DXS296) and a dinucleotide repeat VK18AC (DXS295). The patient MK had only speech delay with otherwise normal development, while patient CB had global developmental delay that included speech delay. Detection of overlapping deletions in these two cases led to speculation that coding sequences of a gene(s) important in language development may be affected. Hybridization of the pS8 and VK21A probes to zooblots revealed cross-species homology. This conservation during evolution suggested that this region contains sequences with functional significance in normal development. The VK21A probe detected a 9.5-kb transcript in placenta and brain and a smaller, 2.5-kb, transcript in other tissues analyzed. 26 refs., 6 figs.

  8. A novel heterozygous deletion in the EVC2 gene causes Weyers acrofacial dysostosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xiaoqian; Song, Guangtai; Fan, Mingwen; Shi, Lisong; Jabs, Ethylin Wang; Huang, Shangzhi; Guo, Ruiqiang; Bian, Zhuan

    2006-03-01

    Weyers acrofacial dysostosis (MIM 193530) is an autosomal dominant disorder clinically characterized by mild short stature, postaxial polydactyly, nail dystrophy and dysplastic teeth. Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EvC, MIM 225500) is an autosomal recessive disorder with a similar, but more severe phenotype. Mutations in the EVC have been identified in both syndromes. However, the EVC mutations only occur in a small proportion of EvC patients. Recently, mutations in a new gene, EVC2, were found to be associated with other EvC cases. The EVC and EVC2 are located close to each other in a head-to-head configuration and may be functionally related. In this study, we report identification of a novel heterozygous deletion in the EVC2 that is responsible for autosomal dominant Weyers acrofacial dysostosis in a large Chinese family. This constitutes the first report of Weyers acrofacial dysostosis caused by this gene. Hence, the spectrum of malformation syndromes due to EVC2 mutations is further extended. Our data provides conclusive evidence that Weyers acrofacial dysostosis and EvC syndrome are allelic and genetically heterogeneous conditions.

  9. The 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome in Congenital Heart Defects: Prevalence of Microdeletion Syndrome in Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wonkam, Ambroise; Toko, Ricardo; Chelo, David; Tekendo-Ngongang, Cedrik; Kingue, Samuel; Dahoun, Sophie

    2017-06-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome is amongst the most common microdeletion syndrome in humans. Its prevalence remains unknown in sub-Saharan Africa, and its clinical features are under-reported for people of African descent. We have investigated the prevalence of the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome in patients with congenital heart defects in Cameroon. A total of 70 of 100 cases of congenital cardiac malformation with echocardiographic evidence were examined prospectively and tested for the 22q11.2 deletion, using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Two of 70 patients (2.8%) were found to have 22q11.2 deletion. Both cases had conotruncal heart defects and exhibited extracardiac features of the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome that were either classical (e.g., puffy upper eyelids, bulbous tip of the nose) or less identifiable (telecanthus, hooding of eyelids and prominent nasal bridge). The report shows that the prevalence of the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome in patients with heart malformations in Cameroon (2.8%) is similar to that of various world populations. The clinical phenotypes will contribute to the Global Atlas for dysmorphology. "Omics" technologies offer much promise in genetic/genomic screening of severe global health problems. Copyright © 2017 World Heart Federation (Geneva). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Potential complications when developing gene deletion clones in Xylella fastidiosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kameka L; Cursino, Luciana; Athinuwat, Dusit; Burr, Thomas J; Mowery, Patricia

    2015-04-16

    The Gram-negative xylem-limited bacterium, Xylella fastidiosa, is an important plant pathogen that infects a number of high value crops. The Temecula 1 strain infects grapevines and induces Pierce's disease, which causes symptoms such as scorching on leaves, cluster collapse, and eventual plant death. In order to understand the pathogenesis of X. fastidiosa, researchers routinely perform gene deletion studies and select mutants via antibiotic markers. Site-directed pilJ mutant of X. fastidiosa were generated and selected on antibiotic media. Mutant cultures were assessed by PCR to determine if they were composed of purely transformant cells or included mixtures of non-transformants cells. Then pure pilJ mutant and wildtype cells were mixed in PD2 medium and following incubation and exposure to kanamycin were assessed by PCR for presence of mutant and wildtype populations. We have discovered that when creating clones of targeted mutants of X. fastidiosa Temecula 1 with selection on antibiotic plates, X. fastidiosa lacking the gene deletion often persist in association with targeted mutant cells. We believe this phenomenon is due to spontaneous antibiotic resistance and/or X. fastidiosa characteristically forming aggregates that can be comprised of transformed and non-transformed cells. A combined population was confirmed by PCR, which showed that targeted mutant clones were mixed with non-transformed cells. After repeated transfer and storage the non-transformed cells became the dominant clone present. We have discovered that special precautions are warranted when developing a targeted gene mutation in X. fastidiosa because colonies that arise following transformation and selection are often comprised of transformed and non-transformed cells. Following transfer and storage the cells can consist primarily of the non-transformed strain. As a result, careful monitoring of targeted mutant strains must be performed to avoid mixed populations and confounding results.

  11. Practical guidelines for managing adults with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fung, Wai Lun Alan; Butcher, Nancy J.; Costain, Gregory; Andrade, Danielle M.; Boot, Erik; Chow, Eva W. C.; Chung, Brian; Cytrynbaum, Cheryl; Faghfoury, Hanna; Fishman, Leona; García-Miñaúr, Sixto; George, Susan; Lang, Anthony E.; Repetto, Gabriela; Shugar, Andrea; Silversides, Candice; Swillen, Ann; van Amelsvoort, Therese; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M.; Bassett, Anne S.

    2015-01-01

    22q11.2 Deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) is the most common microdeletion syndrome in humans, estimated to affect up to 1 in 2,000 live births. Major features of this multisystem condition include congenital anomalies, developmental delay, and an array of early- and later-onset medical and psychiatric

  12. Mapping Cortical Morphology in Youth with Velocardiofacial (22q11.2 Deletion) Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kates, Wendy R.; Bansal, Ravi; Fremont, Wanda; Antshel, Kevin M.; Hao, Xuejun; Higgins, Anne Marie; Liu, Jun; Shprintzen, Robert J.; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS; 22q11.2 deletion syndrome) represents one of the highest known risk factors for schizophrenia. Insofar as up to 30% of individuals with this genetic disorder develop schizophrenia, VCFS constitutes a unique, etiologically homogeneous model for understanding the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Method:…

  13. Opitz GBBB syndrome and the 22q11.2 deletion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacassie, Y.; Arriaza, M.I. [Louisiani State Univ. Medical Center and Children`s Hospital, New Orleans, LA (United States)

    1996-03-29

    Recently, McDonald-McGinn et al. reported the presence of a deletion 22q11.2 in a family with autosomal dominant inheritance and in a sporadic case with the Opitz GBBB syndrome. The presence of a vascular ring in these patients prompted them to look for this deletion, since this anomaly may be associated with the 22q11.2 deletion. They reviewed the Opitz GBBB syndrome and the 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome, finding considerable overlap of manifestations. They proposed that, in some patients, the Opitz GBBB syndrome may be due to a 22q11.2 deletion. We recently examined a newborn boy referred because of MCA. The cardinal findings in this patient (hypertelorism, hypospadias with descended testicles, characteristic nose and truncus arteriosus type I) were suggestive of the Opitz GBBB syndrome and of the velocardiofacial syndrome. The chromosomes were apparently normal (46,XY), but the FISH study showed a 22q11.2 deletion. The patient developed hypocalcemia with very low level of PTH and heart failure requiring surgery. His immunological status was normal except that CD4 cells were mildly low and natural killer cells were increased in number. The family history was noncontributory, but the full evaluation of the family is pending. The mother at first glance presents apparent hypertelorism. 3 refs.

  14. Kearns-Sayre's syndrome developing in a boy who survived Pearson's syndrome caused by mitochondrial DNA deletion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.J. Simonsz (Huib); K.E. Bärlocher; A. Rötig

    1992-01-01

    textabstractDocumenta Ophthalmologica 1992, Volume 82, Issue 1-2, pp 73-79 Kearns-Sayre's syndrome developing in a boy who survived Pearson's syndrome caused by mitochondrial DNA deletion Dr H. J. Simonsz, K. Bärlocher, A. Rötig … show all 3 hide » Download PDF (2,322 KB) Abstract A 7-year-old

  15. More Clinical Overlap between 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome and CHARGE Syndrome than Often Anticipated

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corsten-Janssen, N; Saitta, S C; Hoefsloot, L H; McDonald-McGinn, D M; Driscoll, D A; Derks, R; Dickinson, K A; Kerstjens-Frederikse, W S; Emanuel, B S; Zackai, E H; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, C M A

    CHARGE (coloboma, heart defects, atresia of choanae, retardation of growth and development, genital hypoplasia, and ear abnormalities) and 22q11.2 deletion syndromes are variable, congenital malformation syndromes that show considerable phenotypic overlap. We further explored this clinical overlap

  16. The Neural Correlates of Non-Spatial Working Memory in Velocardiofacial Syndrome (22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kates, Wendy R.; Krauss, Beth R.; AbdulSabur, Nuria; Colgan, Deirdre; Antshel, Kevin M.; Higgins, Anne Marie; Shprintzen, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    Velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS), also known as 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, is a neurogenetic disorder that is associated with both learning disabilities and a consistent neuropsychological phenotype, including deficits in executive function, visuospatial perception, and working memory. Anatomic imaging studies have identified significant…

  17. The association between haematological manifestation and mtDNA deletions in Pearson syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraki, K; Nishimura, S; Goto, Y; Nonaka, I; Sakura, N; Ueda, K

    1997-09-01

    We studied the proportion of deleted mitochondrial DNA in blood cells from patients with Pearson syndrome. Patient 1 is a 17-year-old female with Kearns-Sayre syndrome who survived Pearson syndrome. Patient 2 is a 5-year-old boy with Pearson syndrome who recovered from refractory anaemia but continues to have thrombocytopenia and neutropenia. Patient 3 is a female neonate who died with severe acidosis and pancytopenia at 14 days of age. Southern blot analysis was performed with total DNA from three patients' blood cells and two samples of bone marrow cells from one patient. In peripheral blood, patients with a higher proportion of deleted mitochondrial DNA had lower blood cell counts. In patient 2, the percentage of mutant mitochondrial DNA in bone marrow cells decreased as anaemia improved. This indicates that the proportion of deleted mitochondrial DNA in peripheral blood and in bone marrow has a tendency to correlate to the severity of haematological manifestation.

  18. Spontaneous 8bp Deletion in Nbeal2 Recapitulates the Gray Platelet Syndrome in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomberg, Kärt; Khoriaty, Rami; Westrick, Randal J.; Fairfield, Heather E.; Reinholdt, Laura G.; Brodsky, Gary L.; Davizon-Castillo, Pavel; Ginsburg, David; Di Paola, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    During the analysis of a whole genome ENU mutagenesis screen for thrombosis modifiers, a spontaneous 8 base pair (bp) deletion causing a frameshift in exon 27 of the Nbeal2 gene was identified. Though initially considered as a plausible thrombosis modifier, this Nbeal2 mutation failed to suppress the synthetic lethal thrombosis on which the original ENU screen was based. Mutations in NBEAL2 cause Gray Platelet Syndrome (GPS), an autosomal recessive bleeding disorder characterized by macrothrombocytopenia and gray-appearing platelets due to lack of platelet alpha granules. Mice homozygous for the Nbeal2 8 bp deletion (Nbeal2gps/gps) exhibit a phenotype similar to human GPS, with significantly reduced platelet counts compared to littermate controls (p = 1.63 x 10−7). Nbeal2gps/gps mice also have markedly reduced numbers of platelet alpha granules and an increased level of emperipolesis, consistent with previously characterized mice carrying targeted Nbeal2 null alleles. These findings confirm previous reports, provide an additional mouse model for GPS, and highlight the potentially confounding effect of background spontaneous mutation events in well-characterized mouse strains. PMID:26950939

  19. Spontaneous 8bp Deletion in Nbeal2 Recapitulates the Gray Platelet Syndrome in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kärt Tomberg

    Full Text Available During the analysis of a whole genome ENU mutagenesis screen for thrombosis modifiers, a spontaneous 8 base pair (bp deletion causing a frameshift in exon 27 of the Nbeal2 gene was identified. Though initially considered as a plausible thrombosis modifier, this Nbeal2 mutation failed to suppress the synthetic lethal thrombosis on which the original ENU screen was based. Mutations in NBEAL2 cause Gray Platelet Syndrome (GPS, an autosomal recessive bleeding disorder characterized by macrothrombocytopenia and gray-appearing platelets due to lack of platelet alpha granules. Mice homozygous for the Nbeal2 8 bp deletion (Nbeal2gps/gps exhibit a phenotype similar to human GPS, with significantly reduced platelet counts compared to littermate controls (p = 1.63 x 10-7. Nbeal2gps/gps mice also have markedly reduced numbers of platelet alpha granules and an increased level of emperipolesis, consistent with previously characterized mice carrying targeted Nbeal2 null alleles. These findings confirm previous reports, provide an additional mouse model for GPS, and highlight the potentially confounding effect of background spontaneous mutation events in well-characterized mouse strains.

  20. Update on the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome and its relevance to schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van, Lily; Boot, Erik; Bassett, Anne S

    2017-05-01

    Schizophrenia occurs in ∼25% of individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS), the strongest known molecular genetic risk factor for schizophrenia. This review highlights recent literature in 22q11.2DS as it pertains to psychosis and schizophrenia. Advances in noninvasive prenatal testing allow for early detection of 22q11.2DS in utero, whereas premature birth has been shown to be a significant risk factor for development of psychotic illness in 22q11.2DS. Impairments in various domains of cognitive and social functioning, as well as neuroanatomical alterations, are comparable with those in other high-risk groups and may serve as early signs of psychosis in 22q11.2DS. Novel research on the pathogenesis of schizophrenia in 22q11.2DS using cellular and mouse models indicates changes in expression of genes within the 22q11.2 deletion region and elsewhere in the genome, implicating molecular pathways involved in schizophrenia and associated neurocognitive deficits. Increased risks of obesity and of Parkinson's disease in 22q11.2DS warrant consideration in antipsychotic management. Progress in characterizing and predicting psychotic illness in 22q11.2DS supports this identifiable subpopulation as a molecular model with important implications for understanding the pathogenesis of schizophrenia in the general population and for development of potential novel therapies.

  1. A high-throughput method for the detection of homoeologous gene deletions in hexaploid wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhongyi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutational inactivation of plant genes is an essential tool in gene function studies. Plants with inactivated or deleted genes may also be exploited for crop improvement if such mutations/deletions produce a desirable agronomical and/or quality phenotype. However, the use of mutational gene inactivation/deletion has been impeded in polyploid plant species by genetic redundancy, as polyploids contain multiple copies of the same genes (homoeologous genes encoded by each of the ancestral genomes. Similar to many other crop plants, bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L. is polyploid; specifically allohexaploid possessing three progenitor genomes designated as 'A', 'B', and 'D'. Recently modified TILLING protocols have been developed specifically for mutation detection in wheat. Whilst extremely powerful in detecting single nucleotide changes and small deletions, these methods are not suitable for detecting whole gene deletions. Therefore, high-throughput methods for screening of candidate homoeologous gene deletions are needed for application to wheat populations generated by the use of certain mutagenic agents (e.g. heavy ion irradiation that frequently generate whole-gene deletions. Results To facilitate the screening for specific homoeologous gene deletions in hexaploid wheat, we have developed a TaqMan qPCR-based method that allows high-throughput detection of deletions in homoeologous copies of any gene of interest, provided that sufficient polymorphism (as little as a single nucleotide difference amongst homoeologues exists for specific probe design. We used this method to identify deletions of individual TaPFT1 homoeologues, a wheat orthologue of the disease susceptibility and flowering regulatory gene PFT1 in Arabidopsis. This method was applied to wheat nullisomic-tetrasomic lines as well as other chromosomal deletion lines to locate the TaPFT1 gene to the long arm of chromosome 5. By screening of individual DNA samples from

  2. Angelman syndrome: Validation of molecular cytogenetic analysis of chromosome 15q11-q13 for deletion detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, L.; Knoll, J.H.M. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    1995-03-13

    In a series of 18 individuals comprising parents of Angelman syndrome (AS) patients and AS patients with large deletions, microdeletions, and no deletions, we utilized fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with genomic phage clones for loci D15S63 and GABRB3 for deletion detection of chromosome 15q11-q13. Utilization of probes at these loci allows detection of common large deletions and permits discrimination of less common small deletions. In all individuals the molecular cytogenetic data were concordant with the DNA deletion analyses. FISH provides an accurate method of deletion detection for chromosome 15q11-q13. 23 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Primary lymphedema and other lymphatic anomalies are associated with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unolt, Marta; Barry, Jessica; Digilio, Maria Cristina; Marino, Bruno; Bassett, Anne; Oechslin, Erwin; Low, David W; Belasco, Jean B; Kallish, Staci; Sullivan, Kathleen; Zackai, Elaine H; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M

    2018-02-12

    Lymphedema is an abnormal accumulation of interstitial fluid within the tissues. Primary lymphedema is caused by aberrant lymphangiogenesis and it has been historically classified based on age at presentation. Although most cases are sporadic, primary lymphedema may be familial or present in association with chromosomal abnormalities and syndromic disorders. To the best of our knowledge, primary lymphedema has never been described in patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. We identified 4 patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome and primary lymphedema via our International 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome Consortium. All patients underwent comprehensive clinical, laboratory and imaging assessments to rule out other causes of lymphedema. All patients had de novo typical deletions and family histories were negative for lymphedema. We report the novel association of primary lymphedema with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Importantly, animal models demonstrated Tbx1 playing a critical role in lymphangiogenesis by reducing Vegfr3 expression in lymphatic endothelial cells. Moreover, the VEGFR3 pathway is essential for lymphangiogenesis with mutations identified in hereditary primary lymphedema. Accordingly, our findings provide a new insight into understanding cellular mechanisms of lymphangiogenesis disorders. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Congenital respiratory tract disorders in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheij, Emmy; Speleman, Lucienne; Mink van der Molen, Aebele B; Thomeer, Henricus G X M

    2018-01-01

    Respiratory tract disorders have been reported in patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, however infrequently. This study describes the respiratory tract disorders encountered in a cohort of 278 patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. We conducted a retrospective, cross-sectional, study at a single tertiary referral center. We identified the patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome and with an upper and/or lower respiratory tract disorder at our otorhinolaryngologic department. The different disorders were described. Out of 278 patients referred to the otorhinolaryngologic department, we identified 14 patients with a laryngeal and/or tracheal disorder. Nine patients had more than one congenital disorder in this anatomical area. Disorders included a choanal stenosis (n = 1), laryngeal web (n = 5), laryngeal cleft (n = 2), subglottic stenosis (n = 3), pharyngo-, laryngo-, tracheo- and/or bronchomalacia (n = 11) and tracheal stenosis (n = 1). Different types of respiratory tract disorders can be present in patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Clinicians should be aware of this clinical association for timely and accurate diagnosis and treatment. In addition, the diagnosis 22q11.2 deletion syndrome should be considered in patients presenting with a congenital respiratory tract disorder. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Altered Ultrasonic Vocalization and Impaired Learning and Memory in Angelman Syndrome Mouse Model with a Large Maternal Deletion from Ube3a to Gabrb3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yong-hui; Pan, Yanzhen; Zhu, Li; Landa, Luis; Yoo, Jong; Spencer, Corinne; Lorenzo, Isabel; Brilliant, Murray; Noebels, Jeffrey; Beaudet, Arthur L.

    2010-01-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurobehavioral disorder associated with mental retardation, absence of language development, characteristic electroencephalography (EEG) abnormalities and epilepsy, happy disposition, movement or balance disorders, and autistic behaviors. The molecular defects underlying AS are heterogeneous, including large maternal deletions of chromosome 15q11–q13 (70%), paternal uniparental disomy (UPD) of chromosome 15 (5%), imprinting mutations (rare), and mutations in the E6-AP ubiquitin ligase gene UBE3A (15%). Although patients with UBE3A mutations have a wide spectrum of neurological phenotypes, their features are usually milder than AS patients with deletions of 15q11–q13. Using a chromosomal engineering strategy, we generated mutant mice with a 1.6-Mb chromosomal deletion from Ube3a to Gabrb3, which inactivated the Ube3a and Gabrb3 genes and deleted the Atp10a gene. Homozygous deletion mutant mice died in the perinatal period due to a cleft palate resulting from the null mutation in Gabrb3 gene. Mice with a maternal deletion (m−/p+) were viable and did not have any obvious developmental defects. Expression analysis of the maternal and paternal deletion mice confirmed that the Ube3a gene is maternally expressed in brain, and showed that the Atp10a and Gabrb3 genes are biallelically expressed in all brain sub-regions studied. Maternal (m−/p+), but not paternal (m+/p−), deletion mice had increased spontaneous seizure activity and abnormal EEG. Extensive behavioral analyses revealed significant impairment in motor function, learning and memory tasks, and anxiety-related measures assayed in the light-dark box in maternal deletion but not paternal deletion mice. Ultrasonic vocalization (USV) recording in newborns revealed that maternal deletion pups emitted significantly more USVs than wild-type littermates. The increased USV in maternal deletion mice suggests abnormal signaling behavior between mothers and pups that may reflect abnormal

  6. Altered ultrasonic vocalization and impaired learning and memory in Angelman syndrome mouse model with a large maternal deletion from Ube3a to Gabrb3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Hui Jiang

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Angelman syndrome (AS is a neurobehavioral disorder associated with mental retardation, absence of language development, characteristic electroencephalography (EEG abnormalities and epilepsy, happy disposition, movement or balance disorders, and autistic behaviors. The molecular defects underlying AS are heterogeneous, including large maternal deletions of chromosome 15q11-q13 (70%, paternal uniparental disomy (UPD of chromosome 15 (5%, imprinting mutations (rare, and mutations in the E6-AP ubiquitin ligase gene UBE3A (15%. Although patients with UBE3A mutations have a wide spectrum of neurological phenotypes, their features are usually milder than AS patients with deletions of 15q11-q13. Using a chromosomal engineering strategy, we generated mutant mice with a 1.6-Mb chromosomal deletion from Ube3a to Gabrb3, which inactivated the Ube3a and Gabrb3 genes and deleted the Atp10a gene. Homozygous deletion mutant mice died in the perinatal period due to a cleft palate resulting from the null mutation in Gabrb3 gene. Mice with a maternal deletion (m-/p+ were viable and did not have any obvious developmental defects. Expression analysis of the maternal and paternal deletion mice confirmed that the Ube3a gene is maternally expressed in brain, and showed that the Atp10a and Gabrb3 genes are biallelically expressed in all brain sub-regions studied. Maternal (m-/p+, but not paternal (m+/p-, deletion mice had increased spontaneous seizure activity and abnormal EEG. Extensive behavioral analyses revealed significant impairment in motor function, learning and memory tasks, and anxiety-related measures assayed in the light-dark box in maternal deletion but not paternal deletion mice. Ultrasonic vocalization (USV recording in newborns revealed that maternal deletion pups emitted significantly more USVs than wild-type littermates. The increased USV in maternal deletion mice suggests abnormal signaling behavior between mothers and pups that may reflect abnormal

  7. [Chromosomal large fragment deletion induced by CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, L H; Liu, Y; Niu, T

    2017-05-14

    Objective: Using CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing technology to achieve a number of genes co-deletion on the same chromosome. Methods: CRISPR-Cas9 lentiviral plasmid that could induce deletion of Aloxe3-Alox12b-Alox8 cluster genes located on mouse 11B3 chromosome was constructed via molecular clone. HEK293T cells were transfected to package lentivirus of CRISPR or Cas9 cDNA, then mouse NIH3T3 cells were infected by lentivirus and genomic DNA of these cells was extracted. The deleted fragment was amplified by PCR, TA clone, Sanger sequencing and other techniques were used to confirm the deletion of Aloxe3-Alox12b-Alox8 cluster genes. Results: The CRISPR-Cas9 lentiviral plasmid, which could induce deletion of Aloxe3-Alox12b-Alox8 cluster genes, was successfully constructed. Deletion of target chromosome fragment (Aloxe3-Alox12b-Alox8 cluster genes) was verified by PCR. The deletion of Aloxe3-Alox12b-Alox8 cluster genes was affirmed by TA clone, Sanger sequencing, and the breakpoint junctions of the CRISPR-Cas9 system mediate cutting events were accurately recombined, insertion mutation did not occur between two cleavage sites at all. Conclusion: Large fragment deletion of Aloxe3-Alox12b-Alox8 cluster genes located on mouse chromosome 11B3 was successfully induced by CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing system.

  8. Genetics Home Reference: 17q12 deletion syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... systems. Some females with this chromosomal change have Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome , which is characterized by ... to intellectual disability, behavioral and psychiatric conditions, and Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome . The loss of other ...

  9. Cat eye syndrome chromosome breakpoint clustering: identification of two intervals also associated with 22q11 deletion syndrome breakpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McTaggart, K E; Budarf, M L; Driscoll, D A; Emanuel, B S; Ferreira, P; McDermid, H E

    1998-01-01

    The supernumerary cat eye syndrome (CES) chromosome is dicentric, containing two copies of 22pter-->q11.2. We have found that the duplication breakpoints are clustered in two intervals. The more proximal, most common interval is the 450-650 kb region between D22S427 and D22S36, which corresponds to the proximal deletion breakpoint interval found in the 22q11 deletion syndrome (DiGeorge/velocardiofacial syndrome). The more distal duplication breakpoint interval falls between CRKL and D22S112, which overlaps with the common distal deletion interval of the 22q11 deletion syndrome. We have therefore classified CES chromosomes into two types based on the location of the two breakpoints required to generate them. The smaller type I CES chromosomes are symmetrical, with both breakpoints located within the proximal interval. The larger type II CES chromosomes are either asymmetrical, with one breakpoint located in each of the two intervals, or symmetrical, with both breakpoints located in the distal interval. The co-localization of the breakpoints of these different syndromes, plus the presence of low-copy repeats adjacent to each interval, suggests the existence of several specific regions of chromosomal instability in 22q11.2 which are involved in the production of both deletions and duplications. Since the phenotype associated with the larger duplication does not appear to be more severe than that of the smaller duplication, determination of the type of CES chromosome does not currently have prognostic value.

  10. Rare copy number variants and congenital heart defects in the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlynarski, Elisabeth E; Xie, Michael; Taylor, Deanne; Sheridan, Molly B; Guo, Tingwei; Racedo, Silvia E; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M; Chow, Eva W C; Vorstman, Jacob; Swillen, Ann; Devriendt, Koen; Breckpot, Jeroen; Digilio, Maria Cristina; Marino, Bruno; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Philip, Nicole; Simon, Tony J; Roberts, Amy E; Piotrowicz, Małgorzata; Bearden, Carrie E; Eliez, Stephan; Gothelf, Doron; Coleman, Karlene; Kates, Wendy R; Devoto, Marcella; Zackai, Elaine; Heine-Suñer, Damian; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Bassett, Anne S; Morrow, Bernice E; Emanuel, Beverly S

    2016-03-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS; velocardiofacial/DiGeorge syndrome; VCFS/DGS; MIM #192430; 188400) is the most common microdeletion syndrome. The phenotypic presentation of 22q11DS is highly variable; approximately 60-75 % of 22q11DS patients have been reported to have a congenital heart defect (CHD), mostly of the conotruncal type, and/or aortic arch defect. The etiology of the cardiac phenotypic variability is not currently known for the majority of patients. We hypothesized that rare copy number variants (CNVs) outside the 22q11.2 deleted region may modify the risk of being born with a CHD in this sensitized population. Rare CNV analysis was performed using Affymetrix SNP Array 6.0 data from 946 22q11DS subjects with CHDs (n = 607) or with normal cardiac anatomy (n = 339). Although there was no significant difference in the overall burden of rare CNVs, an overabundance of CNVs affecting cardiac-related genes was detected in 22q11DS individuals with CHDs. When the rare CNVs were examined with regard to gene interactions, specific cardiac networks, such as Wnt signaling, appear to be overrepresented in 22q11DS CHD cases but not 22q11DS controls with a normal heart. Collectively, these data suggest that CNVs outside the 22q11.2 region may contain genes that modify risk for CHDs in some 22q11DS patients.

  11. Prevalence and Nature of Hearing Loss in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Eynde, Charlotte; Swillen, Ann; Lambeens, Elien; Verhaert, Nicolas; Desloovere, Christian; Luts, Heleen; Vander Poorten, Vincent; Devriendt, Koenraad; Hens, Greet

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to clarify the prevalence, type, severity, and age-dependency of hearing loss in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Method: Extensive audiological measurements were conducted in 40 persons with proven 22q11.2 deletion (aged 6-36 years). Besides air and bone conduction thresholds in the frequency range between 0.125…

  12. Juvenile Moyamoya and Craniosynostosis in a Child with Deletion 1p32p31: Expanding the Clinical Spectrum of 1p32p31 Deletion Syndrome and a Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Prontera

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Moyamoya angiopathy (MA is a rare cerebrovascular disorder characterised by the progressive occlusion of the internal carotid artery. Its aetiology is uncertain, but a genetic background seems likely, given the high MA familial rate. To investigate the aetiology of craniosynostosis and juvenile moyamoya in a 14-year-old male patient, we performed an array-comparative genomic hybridisation revealing a de novo interstitial deletion of 8.5 Mb in chromosome region 1p32p31. The deletion involved 34 protein coding genes, including NF1A, whose haploinsufficiency is indicated as being mainly responsible for the 1p32-p31 chromosome deletion syndrome phenotype (OMIM 613735. Our patient also has a deleted FOXD3 of the FOX gene family of transcription factors, which plays an important role in neural crest cell growth and differentiation. As the murine FOXD3−/− model shows craniofacial anomalies and abnormal common carotid artery morphology, it can be hypothesised that FOXD3 is involved in the pathogenesis of the craniofacial and vascular defects observed in our patient. In support of our assumption, we found in the literature another patient with a syndromic form of MA who had a deletion involving another FOX gene (FOXC1. In addition to describing the clinical history of our patient, we have reviewed all of the available literature concerning other patients with a 1p32p31 deletion, including cases from the Decipher database, and we have also reviewed the genetic disorders associated with MA, which is a useful guide for the diagnosis of syndromic form of MA.

  13. Branchio-oto-renal syndrome caused by partial EYA1 deletion due to LINE-1 insertion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morisada, Naoya; Rendtorff, Nanna Dahl; Nozu, Kandai

    2010-01-01

    multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) analysis, a heterozygous EYA1 gene deletion comprising at least exons 5 to 7. In her parents, we did not detect any deletion in EYA1 by MLPA, so the deletion was a de novo mutation. PCR analysis and sequencing of patient DNA revealed a heterozygous...... approximately 17 kb EYA1 deletion starting from the eight last bases of exon 4 and proceeding to base 1,217 of intron 7. Furthermore, in place of this deleted region was inserted a 3756-bp-long interspersed nuclear elements-1 (LINE-1, L1). Accordingly, RT-PCR showed that exons 4-7 were not present in EYA1 m......RNA expressed from the mutated allele. Although there are reports of L1 element insertion occurring in various human diseases, this is the first report of a large EYA1 deletion in combination with L1 element insertion....

  14. The rates and patterns of deletions in the human factor IX gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketterling, R.P.; Vielhaber, E.L.; Lind, T.J.; Thorland, E.C.; Sommer S.S. (Mayo Clinic/Foundation, Rochester, MN (United States))

    1994-02-01

    Deletions are commonly observed in genes with either segments of highly homologous sequences or excessive gene length. However, in the factor IX gene and in most genes, deletions (of [ge]21 bp) are uncommon. The authors have analyzed DNA from 290 families with hemophilia B (203 independent mutations) and have found 12 deletions >20 bp. Eleven of these are >2 kb (range >3-163 kb), and one is 1.1 kb. The junctions of the four deletions that are completely contained within the factor IX gene have been determined. A novel mutation occurred in patient HB128: the data suggest that a 26.8-kb deletion occurred between two segments of alternating purines and pyrimidines and that a 2.3-kb sense strand segment derived from the deleted region was inserted. For a sample of 203 independent mutations, the authors estimate the [open quotes]baseline[close quotes] rates of deletional mutation per base pair per generation as a function of size. The rate for large (>2 kb)I deletions is exceedingly low. For every mutational event in which a given base is at the junction of a large deletion, there are an estimated 58 microdeletions (<20 bp) and 985 single-base substitutions at that base. Analysis of the nine reported deletion junctions in the factor IX gene literature reveals that (i) five are associated with inversion, orphan sequences, or sense strand insertions; (ii) four are simple deletions that display an excess of short direct repeats at their junctions; (iii) there is no dramatic clustering of junctions within the gene; and (iv) with the exception of alternating purines and pyrimidines, deletion junctions are not preferentially associated with repetitive DNA. 58 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. FISH detection of chromosome 15 deletions in Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teshima, I.; Chadwick, D.; Chitayat, D. [Hospital for Sick Children and Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    1996-03-29

    We have evaluated fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis for the clinical laboratory detection of the 15q11-q13 deletion seen in Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) using probes for loci D15S11, SNRPN, D15S10, and GABRB3. In a series of 118 samples from patients referred for PWS or AS, 29 had deletions by FISH analysis. These included two brothers with a paternally transmitted deletion detectable with the probe for SNRPN only. G-banding analysis was less sensitive for deletion detection but useful in demonstrating other cytogenetic alterations in four cases. Methylation and CA-repeat analyses of 15q11-q13 were used to validate the FISH results. Clinical findings of patients with deletions were variable, ranging from newborns with hypotonia as the only presenting feature to children who were classically affected. We conclude that FISH analysis is a rapid and reliable method for detection of deletions within 15q11-q13 and whenever a deletion is found, FISH analysis of parental chromosomes should also be considered. 41 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome due to a Translocation t(6;22) in a Patient Conceived via in vitro Fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollo Dantas, Anelisa; Bortolai, Adriana; Moysés-Oliveira, Mariana; Takeno Herrero, Sylvia; Azoubel Antunes, Adriana; Tavares Costa-Carvalho, Beatriz; Ayres Meloni, Vera; Melaragno, Maria Isabel

    2016-02-01

    We report on a patient conceived via in vitro fertilization (IVF) with a 22q11.2 deletion due to an unusual unbalanced translocation involving chromosomes 6 and 22 in a karyotype with 45 chromosomes. Cytogenomic studies showed that the patient has a 3.3-Mb deletion of chromosome 22q and a 0.4-Mb deletion of chromosome 6p, which resulted in haploinsufficiency of the genes responsible for the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome and also of the IRF4 gene, a member of the interferon regulatory factor family of transcription factors, which is expressed in the immune system cells. The rearrangement could be due to the manipulation of the embryo or as a sporadic event unrelated to IVF. Translocation involving chromosome 22 in a karyotype with 45 chromosomes is a rare event, with no previous reports involving chromosomes 6p and 22q.

  17. Evaluation of Potential Modifiers of the Cardiac Phenotype in the 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Driscoll, Deborah A.; Emanuel, Beverly S.; McDonald-McGinn, Donna; Mei, Minghua; Zackai, Elaine; Mitchell, Laura E.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND The phenotype associated with deletion of the 22q11.2 chromosomal region is highly variable, yet little is known about the source of this variability. Cardiovascular anomalies, including tetralogy of Fallot, truncus arteriosus, interrupted aortic arch type B, perimembranous ventricular septal defects, and aortic arch anomalies, occur in approximately 75% of individuals with a 22q11.2 deletion. METHODS Data from 343 subjects enrolled in a study of the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome were used to evaluate potential modifiers of the cardiac phenotype in this disorder. Subjects with and without cardiac malformations, and subjects with and without aortic arch anomalies were compared with respect to sex and race. In addition, in the subset of subjects from whom a DNA sample was available, genotypes for variants of four genes that are involved in the folate-homocysteine metabolic pathway and that have been implicated as risk factors for other birth defects were compared. Five variants in four genes were genotyped by heteroduplex or restriction digest assays. The chi-square or Fisher’s exact test was used to evaluate the association between the cardiac phenotype and each potential modifier. RESULTS The cardiac phenotype observed in individuals with a 22q11.2 deletion was not significantly associated with either sex or race. The genetic variants that were evaluated also did not appear to be associated with the cardiovascular phenotype. CONCLUSIONS Variation in the cardiac phenotype observed between individuals with a 22q11.2 deletion does not appear to be related to sex, race, or five sequence variants in four folate-related genes that are located outside of the 22q11.2 region. PMID:18770859

  18. Prader-Willi syndrome and atypical submicroscopic 15q11-q13 deletions with or without imprinting defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Maaz; Butler, Merlin G

    2016-11-01

    We report a 20 year follow up on a Caucasian female, now 26 years of age, with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) harboring an atypical 15q11-q13 submicroscopic deletion of 100-200 kb in size first detected in 1996 involving the imprinting center, SNRPN gene and surrounding region. PWS is a rare complex disorder caused by the loss of paternally expressed genes in the 15q11-q13 region. With high resolution chromosomal microarray and methylation - specific MLPA analysis, we updated the genetic findings on our patient and found a 209,819bp deletion including the SNURF-SNRPN gene complex which includes the imprinting center and the SNORD116 region. We compared with four other similarly reported individuals in the literature with atypical submicroscopic deletions within this region but without imprinting center involvement to better characterize the specific genetic lesions causing PWS clinical findings. Clinically, our patient met the diagnostic criteria of PWS including infantile hypotonia, a poor suck with feeding difficulties, global developmental delays and later food foraging, childhood obesity, small hands and skin picking. Small atypical deletions of comparable sizes were seen in the 15q11-q13 region in all five cases and similar behavioral/physical characteristics were found despite an imprinting defect in our patient. These results further support an overlapping critical deletion region involving the non-coding snoRNA SNORD116 in common in the five individuals playing a key role in contributing to the PWS phenotype. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. The Development of Cognitive Control in Children with Chromosome 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather M Shapiro

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome (22q11.2DS is caused by the most common human microdeletion, and it is associated with cognitive impairments across many domains. While impairments in cognitive control have been described in children with 22q11.2DS, the nature and development of these impairments are not clear. Children with 22q11.2DS and typically developing children (TD were tested on four well-validated tasks aimed at measuring specific foundational components of cognitive control: response inhibition, cognitive flexibility, and working memory. Molecular assays were also conducted in order to examine genotype of catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT, a gene located within the deleted region in 22q11.2DS and hypothesized to play a role in cognitive control. Mixed model regression analyses were used to examine group differences, as well as age-related effects on cognitive control component processes in a cross-sectional analysis. Regression models with COMT genotype were also conducted in order to examine potential effects of the different variants of the gene. Response inhibition, cognitive flexibility, and working memory were impaired in children with 22q11.2DS relative to TD children, even after accounting for global intellectual functioning (as measured by full-scale IQ. When compared with TD individuals, children with 22q11.2DS demonstrated atypical age-related patterns of response inhibition and cognitive flexibility. Both groups demonstrated typical age-related associations with working memory. The results of this cross-sectional analysis suggest a specific aberration in the development of systems mediating response inhibition in a sub-set of children with 22q11.2DS. It will be important to follow up with longitudinal analyses to directly examine these developmental trajectories, and correlate neurocognitive variables with clinical and adaptive outcome measures.

  20. RAI1 gene mutations: mechanisms of Smith-Magenis syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falco, Mariateresa; Amabile, Sonia; Acquaviva, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS; OMIM #182290) is a complex genetic disorder characterized by distinctive physical features, developmental delay, cognitive impairment, and a typical behavioral phenotype. SMS is caused by interstitial 17p11.2 deletions, encompassing multiple genes and including the retinoic acid-induced 1 gene ( RAI1 ), or by mutations in RAI1 itself. About 10% of all the SMS patients, in fact, carry an RAI1 mutation responsible for the phenotype. RAI1 (OMIM *607642) is a dosage-sensitive gene expressed in many tissues and highly conserved among species. Over the years, several studies have demonstrated that RAI1 (or its homologs in animal models) acts as a transcriptional factor implicated in embryonic neurodevelopment, neuronal differentiation, cell growth and cell cycle regulation, bone and skeletal development, lipid and glucose metabolisms, behavioral functions, and circadian activity. Patients with RAI1 pathogenic variants show some phenotypic differences when compared to those carrying the typical deletion. They usually have lower incidence of hypotonia and less cognitive impairment than those with 17p11.2 deletions but more frequently show the behavioral characteristics of the syndrome and overeating issues. These differences reflect the primary pathogenetic role of RAI1 without the pathogenetic contribution of the other genes included in the typical 17p11.2 deletion. The better comprehension of physiological roles of RAI1 , its molecular co-workers and interactors, and its contribution in determining the typical SMS phenotype will certainly open a new path for therapeutic interventions.

  1. Molecular analyses of 17p11.2 deletions in 62 Smith-Magenis syndrome patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juyal, R.C.; Figuera, L.E.; Hauge, X. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a clinically recognizable, multiple congenital anomalies/mental retardation syndrome caused by an interstitial deletion involving band p11.2 of chromosome 17. Toward the molecular definition of the interval defining this microdeletion syndrome, 62 unrelated SMS patients in conjunction with 70 available unaffected parents were molecularly analyzed with respect to the presence or absence of 14 loci in the proximal region of the short arm of chromosome 17. A multifaceted approach was used to determine deletion status at the various loci that combined (1) FISH analysis, (2) PCR and Southern analysis of somatic cell hybrids retaining the deleted chromosome 17 from selected patients, and (3) genotype determination of patients for whom a parent(s) was available at four microsatellite marker loci and at four loci with associated RFLPs. The relative order of two novel anonymous markers and a new microsatellite marker was determined in 17p11.2. The results confirmed that the proximal deletion breakpoint in the majority of SMS patients is located between markers D17S58 (EW301) and D17S446 (FG1) within the 17p11.1-17p11.2 region. The common distal breakpoint was mapped between markers cCI17-638, which lies distal to D17S71, and cCI17-498, which lies proximal to the Charcot Marie-Tooth disease type 1A locus. The locus D17S258 was found to be deleted in all 62 patients, and probes from this region can be used for diagnosis of the SMS deletion by FISH. Ten patients demonstrated molecularly distinct deletions; of these, two patients had smaller deletions and will enable the definition of the critical interval for SMS. 49 refs.

  2. Evans syndrome and antibody deficiency: an atypical presentation of chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Colarusso

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of an 8-year-old male patient with Evans syndrome and severe hypogammaglobulinemia, subsequently in whom the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2 DS was diagnosed. No other clinical sign of 22q11.2 DS was present with the exception of slight facial dysmorphism. The case is of particular interest because it suggests the need to research chromosome 22q11.2 deletion in patients who present with autoimmune cytopenia and peculiar facial abnormalities, which could be an atypical presentation of an incomplete form of 22q11.2 DS.

  3. Combined deletion of two Condensin II system genes (NCAPG2 and MCPH1) in a case of severe microcephaly and mental deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perche, Olivier; Menuet, Arnaud; Marcos, Mélanie; Liu, Luyan; Pâris, Arnaud; Utami, Kagistia H; Kervran, Dominique; Cacheux, Valere; Laudier, Béatrice; Briault, Sylvain

    2013-11-01

    7qter deletion syndrome includes prenatal and/or postnatal growth retardation, microcephaly, psychomotor delay or mental retardation and a characteristic dysmorphism. If clinical features are well described, the molecular mechanisms underlying the 7qter deletion syndrome remain unknown. Those deletions usually arise de novo. Here, we describe a young boy with an abnormal phenotype consistent with a 7qter deletion syndrome. High resolution genomic analysis (Affymetrix Human Genome Wide SNP 6.0) revealed a 7q36.3 deletion encompassing NCAPG2, ESYT2, WDR60 and VIPR2, inherited from his asymptomatic father and paternal grandfather. In addition, the patient also harbored a MCPH1 deletion inherited from his healthy mother. Combined NCAPG2 and MCPH1 deletions were correlated with low mRNA levels and protein expression in the patient. MCPH1 and NCAPG2 proteins interaction is known to control chromosome structure and we thus propose that double heterozygosity for null mutations of those two genes of the Condensin II system contribute to mental deficiency with severe microcephaly phenotype. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome: Laboratory Diagnosis and TBX1 and FGF8 Mutation Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgardioli, Ilária C.; Vieira, Társis P.; Simioni, Milena; Monteiro, Fabíola P.; Gil-da-Silva-Lopes, Vera L.

    2015-01-01

    Velocardiofacial syndrome is one of the recognized forms of chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2 DS) and has an incidence of 1 of 4,000 to 1 of 6,000 births. Nevertheless, the 22q11 deletion is not found in several patients with a 22q11.2 DS phenotype. In this situation, other chromosomal aberrations and/or mutations in the T-box 1 transcription factor C (TBX1) gene have been detected in some patients. A similar phenotype to that of the 22q11.2 DS has been reported in animal models with mutations in fibroblast growth factor 8 (Fgf8) gene. To date, FGF8 mutations have not been investigated in humans. We tested a strategy to perform laboratory testing to reduce costs in the investigation of patients presenting with the 22q11.2 DS phenotype. A total of 109 individuals with clinical suspicion were investigated using GTG-banding karyotype, fluorescence in situ hybridization, and/or multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. A conclusive diagnosis was achieved in 33 of 109 (30.2%) cases. In addition, mutations in the coding regions of TBX1 and FGF8 genes were investigated in selected cases where 22q11.2 deletion had been excluded, and no pathogenic mutations were detected in both genes. This study presents a strategy for molecular genetic characterization of patients presenting with the 22q11.2 DS using different laboratory techniques. This strategy could be useful in different countries, according to local resources. Also, to our knowledge, this is the first investigation of FGF8 gene in humans with this clinical suspicion. PMID:27617111

  5. Early onset intellectual disability in chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascella, Marco; Muzio, Maria Rosaria

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, or DiGeorge syndrome, or velocardiofacial syndrome, is one of the most common multiple anomaly syndromes in humans. This syndrome is commonly caused by a microdelection from chromosome 22 at band q11.2. Although this genetic disorder may reflect several clinical abnormalities and different degrees of organ commitment, the clinical features that have driven the greatest amount of attention are behavioral and developmental features, because individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome have a 30-fold risk of developing schizophrenia. There are differing opinions about the cognitive development, and commonly a cognitive decline rather than an early onset intellectual disability has been observed. We report a case of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome with both early assessment of mild intellectual disabilities and tetralogy of Fallot as the only physic manifestation. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Variety of prenatally diagnosed congenital heart disease in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mi-Young; Baek, Ju Won; Cho, Jae-Hyun; Shim, Jae-Yoon; Lee, Pil-Ryang; Kim, Ahm

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze the spectrum of prenatally diagnosed congenital heart disease in a Korean population with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, and to provide guidelines for screening 22q11.2 deletion prenatally. Methods This retrospective study evaluated 1,137 consecutive fetuses that had prenatal genetic testing for 22q11.2 deletion because of suspected congenital heart disease between September 2002 and December 2012, at Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. Results Main cardiovascular diseases in the 53 fetuses with confirmed 22q11.2 deletions were tetralogy of Fallot (n = 24, 45%), interrupted aortic arch (n = 10, 19%), ventricular septal defect (n = 5, 9%), double outlet right ventricle (n = 4, 8%), and coarctation of the aorta (n = 4, 8%). Other cardiac defects were rarely associated with 22q11.2 deletion. One fetus had persistent truncus arteriosus, one had aortic stenosis, and one had hypoplastic right heart syndrome. Two fetuses had normal intracardiac anatomy with an isolated right aortic arch, and one had an isolated bilateral superior vena cava. Conclusion A variety of congenital heart diseases were seen during the prenatal period. Conotruncal cardiac defects except transposition of great arteries were strongly associated with 22q11.2 deletion. When such anomalies are diagnosed by fetal echocardiography, genetic testing for 22q11.2 deletion should be offered. Even if less frequent deletion-related cardiac defects are detected, other related anomalies, such as thymic hypoplasia or aplasia, should be evaluated to rule out a 22q11.2 deletion. PMID:24596813

  7. Strong correlation of elastin deletions, detected by FISH, with Williams syndrome: Evaluation of 235 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowery, M.C.; Brothman, L.J.; Leonard, C.O. [Univ. of Utah Health Sciences Center, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)] [and others

    1995-07-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is generally characterized by mental deficiency, gregarious personality, dysmorphic facies, supravalvular aortic stenosis, and idiopathic infantile hypercalcemia. Patients with WS show allelic loss of elastin (ELN), exhibiting a submicroscopic deletion, at 7q11.23, detectable by FISH. Hemizygosity is likely the cause of vascular abnormalities in WS patients. A series of 235 patients was studied, and molecular cytogenetic deletions were seen in 96% of patients with classic WS. Patients included 195 solicited through the Williams Syndrome Association (WSA), plus 40 clinical cytogenetics cases referred by primary-care physicians. Photographs and medical records of most WSA subjects were reviewed, and patients were identified as {open_quotes}classic{open_quotes} (n = 114) or{open_quotes}uncertain{close_quotes} (n = 39). An additional 42 WSA patients were evaluated without clinical information. FISH was performed with biotinylated ELN cosmids on metaphase cells from immortalized lymphoblastoid lines from WSA patients and after high-resolution banding analysis on clinical referral patients. An alpha-satellite probe for chromosome 7 was included in hybridizations, as an internal control. Ninety-six percent of the patients with classic WS showed a deletion in one ELN allele; four of these did not show a deletion. Of the uncertain WS patients, only 3 of 39 showed a deletion. Of the 42 who were not classified phenotypically, because of lack of clinical information, 25 patients (60%) showed a deletion. Thirty-eight percent (15/40) of clinical cytogenetics cases showed an ELN deletion and no cytogenetic deletion by banded analysis. These results support the usefulness of FISH for the detection of elastin deletions as an initial diagnostic assay for WS. 14 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Small mosaic deletion encompassing the snoRNAs and SNURF-SNRPN results in an atypical Prader-Willi syndrome phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderlid, Britt-Marie; Lundin, Johanna; Malmgren, Helena; Lehtihet, Mikael; Nordgren, Ann

    2014-02-01

    Genetic analyses were performed in a male patient with suspected Prader-Willi syndrome who presented with hypogonadism, excessive eating, central obesity, small hands and feet and cognition within the low normal range. However, he had no neonatal hypotonia or feeding problems during infancy. Chromosome analysis showed a normal male karyotype. Further analysis with array-CGH identified a mosaic 847 kb deletion in 15q11-q13, including SNURF-SNRPN, the snoRNA gene clusters SNORD116 (HBII-85), SNORD115, (HBII-52), SNORD109 A and B (HBII-438A and B), SNORD64 (HBII-13), and NPAP1 (C15ORF2). MLPA confirmed the deletion and the results were compatible with a paternal origin. Metaphase-FISH verified the mosaicism with the deletion present in 58% of leukocytes analyzed. Three smaller deletions in this region have previously been reported in patients with Prader-Willi syndrome phenotype. All three deletions included SNORD116, but only two encompassed parts of SNURF-SNRPN, implicating SNORD116 as the major contributor to the Prader-Willi phenotype. Our case adds further information about genotype-phenotype correlation and supports the hypothesis that SNORD116 plays a major role in the pathogenesis of Prader-Willi syndrome. Furthermore, it examplifies diagnostic difficulties in atypical cases and illustrates the need for additional testing methods when Prader-Willi syndrome is suspected. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Enhanced maternal origin of the 22q11.2 deletion in velocardiofacial and DiGeorge syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delio, Maria; Guo, Tingwei; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M.; Zackai, Elaine; Herman, Sean; Kaminetzky, Mark; Higgins, Anne Marie; Coleman, Karlene; Chow, Carolyn; Jarlbrzkowski, Maria; Bearden, Carrie E.; Bailey, Alice; Vangkilde, Anders; Olsen, Line; Olesen, Charlotte; Skovby, Flemming; Werge, Thomas M.; Templin, Ludivine; Busa, Tiffany; Philip, Nicole; Swillen, Ann; Vermeesch, Joris R.; Devriendt, Koen; Schneider, Maude; Dahoun, Sophie; Eliez, Stephan; Schoch, Kelly; Hooper, Stephen R.; Shashi, Vandana; Samanich, Joy; Marion, Robert; van Amelsvoort, Therese; Boot, Erik; Klaassen, Petra; Duijff, Sasja N.; Vorstman, Jacob; Yuen, Tracy; Silversides, Candice; Chow, Eva; Bassett, Anne; Frisch, Amos; Weizman, Abraham; Gothelf, Doron; Niarchou, Maria; van den Bree, Marianne; Owen, Michael J.; Suñer, Damian Heine; Andreo, Jordi Rosell; Armando, Marco; Vicari, Stefano; Digilio, Maria Cristina; Auton, Adam; Kates, Wendy R.; Wang, Tao; Shprintzen, Robert J.; Emanuel, Beverly S.; Morrow, Bernice E.

    2013-01-01

    Velocardiofacial and DiGeorge syndromes, also known as 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS), are congenital-anomaly disorders caused by a de novo hemizygous 22q11.2 deletion mediated by meiotic nonallelic homologous recombination events between low-copy repeats, also known as segmental duplications.

  10. Unambiguous molecular detections with multiple genetic approach for the complicated chromosome 22q11 deletion syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Lung-Huang

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromosome 22q11 deletion syndrome (22q11DS causes a developmental disorder during the embryonic stage, usually because of hemizygous deletions. The clinical pictures of patients with 22q11DS vary because of polymorphisms: on average, approximately 93% of affected individuals have a de novo deletion of 22q11, and the rest have inherited the same deletion from a parent. Methods using multiple genetic markers are thus important for the accurate detection of these microdeletions. Methods We studied 12 babies suspected to carry 22q11DS and 18 age-matched healthy controls from unrelated Taiwanese families. We determined genomic variance using microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA. Results Changes in genomic copy number were significantly associated with clinical manifestations for the classical criteria of 22q11DS using MPLA and qPCR (p Conclusion Both MLPA and qPCR could produce a clearly defined range of deleted genomic DNA, whereas there must be a deleted genome that is not distinguishable using MLPA. These data demonstrate that such multiple genetic approaches are necessary for the unambiguous molecular detection of these types of complicated genomic syndromes.

  11. Periventricular nodular heterotopia and bilateral intraventricular xanthogranulomas in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moogeh Baharnoori

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS is the most common pathogenic copy number variant in humans. Neuropsychiatric phenotypes, including schizophrenia, are prominent. Imaging studies of individuals with this syndrome show a variety of abnormalities that may indicate abnormal neuronal migration. Here we present the neuroimaging and neuropathologic features of a 22q11DS patient with bilateral periventricular nodular heterotopias (PNH and intraventricular xanthogranulomas that were identified by post-mortem examination.

  12. Hypocalcemia due to 22q11.2 deletion syndrome diagnosed in adulthood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cabrer

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS is a genetic syndrome that may present with hypocalcemia due to primary hypoparathyroidism (PH at any age. We report a new diagnosis of 22q11.2DS in a 57-year-old man who presented with symptomatic hypocalcemia. It is important to consider genetic causes of hypocalcemia due to PH regardless of age.

  13. Improved pestalotiollide B production by deleting competing polyketide synthase genes in Pestalotiopsis microspora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Longfei; Li, Yingying; Zhang, Qian; Wang, Dan; Akhberdi, Oren; Wei, Dongsheng; Pan, Jiao; Zhu, Xudong

    2017-02-01

    Pestalotiollide B, an analog of dibenzodioxocinones which are inhibitors of cholesterol ester transfer proteins, is produced by Pestalotiopsis microspora NK17. To increase the production of pestalotiollide B, we attempted to eliminate competing polyketide products by deleting the genes responsible for their biosynthesis. We successfully deleted 41 out of 48 putative polyketide synthases (PKSs) in the genome of NK17. Nine of the 41 PKS deleted strains had significant increased production of pestalotiollide B (P polyketides.

  14. Multiple Patterns of FHIT Gene Homozygous Deletion in Egyptian Breast Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismail, H.M.S.; Zakhary, N.I.; Medhat, A.M.; Karim, A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Fragile histidine triad (FHIT) gene encodes a putative tumour suppressor protein. Loss of Fhit protein in cancer is attributed to different genetic alterations that affect the FHIT gene structure. In this study, we investigated the pattern of homozygous deletion that target the FHIT gene exons 3 to 9 genomic structure in Egyptian breast cancer patients. We have found that 65% (40 out of 62) of the cases exhibited homozygous deletion in at least one FHIT exon. The incidence of homozygous deletion was not associated with patients clinico pathological parameters including patients age, tumour grade, tumour type, and lymph node involvement. Using correlation analysis, we have observed a strong correlation between homozygous deletions of exon 3 and exon 4 (P<0.0001). Deletions in exon 5 were positively correlated with deletions in exon 7 (P<0.0001), Exon 8 (P<0.027), and exon 9 (P=0.04). Additionally, a strong correlation was observed between exons 8 and exon 9 (P<0.0001).We conclude that FHIT gene exons are homozygously deleted at high frequency in Egyptian women population diagnosed with breast cancer. Three different patterns of homozygous deletion were observed in this population indicating different mechanisms of targeting FHIT gene genomic structure.

  15. Matriptase Deletion Initiates a Sjögren’s Syndrome-Like Disease in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xibao; Swaim, William D.; Lai, Zhennan; Cabrera-Perez, Javier; Di Pasquale, Giovanni; Ambudkar, Indu S.; Bugge, Thomas H.; Chiorini, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to determine the effect of epithelial barrier disruption, caused by deficiency of the membrane-anchored serine protease, matriptase, on salivary gland function and the induction of autoimmunity in an animal model. Methods Embryonic and acute ablation of matriptase expression in the salivary glands of mice was induced, leading to decreased epithelial barrier function. Mice were characterized for secretory epithelial function and the induction of autoimmunity including salivary and lacrimal gland dysfunction, lymphocytic infiltration, serum anti-Ro/SSA, anti-La/SSB and antinuclear antibodies. Salivary glands immune activation/regulation, barrier function as well as tight junction proteins expression also were determined. Expression of matriptase in minor salivary gland biopsies was compared among pSS patients and healthy volunteers. Results Embryonic ablation of matriptase expression in mice resulted in the loss of secretory epithelial cell function and the induction of autoimmunity similar to that observed in primary Sjögren’s syndrome. Phenotypic changes included exocrine gland dysfunction, lymphocytic infiltrates, production of Sjögren’s syndrome-specific autoantibodies, and overall activation of the immune system. Acute ablation of matriptase expression resulted in significant salivary gland dysfunction in the absence of overt immune activation. Analysis of the salivary glands indicates a loss of electrical potential across the epithelial layer as well as altered distribution of a tight junction protein. Moreover, a significant decrease in matriptase gene expression was detected in the minor salivary glands of pSS patients compared with healthy volunteers. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that local impairment of epithelial barrier function can lead to loss of exocrine gland dysfunction in the absence of inflammation while systemic deletion can induce a primary Sjögren’s syndrome like phenotype with

  16. Matriptase deletion initiates a Sjögren's syndrome-like disease in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongen Yin

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the effect of epithelial barrier disruption, caused by deficiency of the membrane-anchored serine protease, matriptase, on salivary gland function and the induction of autoimmunity in an animal model.Embryonic and acute ablation of matriptase expression in the salivary glands of mice was induced, leading to decreased epithelial barrier function. Mice were characterized for secretory epithelial function and the induction of autoimmunity including salivary and lacrimal gland dysfunction, lymphocytic infiltration, serum anti-Ro/SSA, anti-La/SSB and antinuclear antibodies. Salivary glands immune activation/regulation, barrier function as well as tight junction proteins expression also were determined. Expression of matriptase in minor salivary gland biopsies was compared among pSS patients and healthy volunteers.Embryonic ablation of matriptase expression in mice resulted in the loss of secretory epithelial cell function and the induction of autoimmunity similar to that observed in primary Sjögren's syndrome. Phenotypic changes included exocrine gland dysfunction, lymphocytic infiltrates, production of Sjögren's syndrome-specific autoantibodies, and overall activation of the immune system. Acute ablation of matriptase expression resulted in significant salivary gland dysfunction in the absence of overt immune activation. Analysis of the salivary glands indicates a loss of electrical potential across the epithelial layer as well as altered distribution of a tight junction protein. Moreover, a significant decrease in matriptase gene expression was detected in the minor salivary glands of pSS patients compared with healthy volunteers.Our findings demonstrate that local impairment of epithelial barrier function can lead to loss of exocrine gland function [corrected] in the absence of inflammation while systemic deletion can induce a primary Sjögren's syndrome like phenotype with autoimmunity and loss of

  17. A recurrent deletion syndrome at chromosome bands 2p11.2-2p12 flanked by segmental duplications at the breakpoints and including REEP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Servi J C; Blom, Eveline W; Siegelaer, Ingrid T J; Smeets, Eric E J G L

    2015-04-01

    We identified an identical and recurrent 9.4-Mbp deletion at chromosome bands 2p11.2-2p12, which occurred de novo in two unrelated patients. It is flanked at the distal and proximal breakpoints by two homologous segmental duplications consisting of low copy repeat (LCR) blocks in direct orientation, which have >99% sequence identity. Despite the fact that the deletion was almost 10 Mbp in size, the patients showed a relatively mild clinical phenotype, that is, mild-to-moderate intellectual disability, a happy disposition, speech delay and delayed motor development. Their phenotype matches with that of previously described patients. The 2p11.2-2p12 deletion includes the REEP1 gene that is associated with spastic paraplegia and phenotypic features related to this are apparent in most 2p11.2-2p12 deletion patients, but not in all. Other hemizygous genes that may contribute to the clinical phenotype include LRRTM1 and CTNNA2. We propose a recurrent but rare 2p11.2-2p12 deletion syndrome based on (1) the identical, non-random localisation of the de novo deletion breakpoints in two unrelated patients and a patient from literature, (2) the patients' phenotypic similarity and their phenotypic overlap with other 2p deletions and (3) the presence of highly identical LCR blocks flanking both breakpoints, consistent with a non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR)-mediated rearrangement.

  18. Myopathology and a mitochondrial DNA deletion in the Pearson marrow and pancreas syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, D D; Buzing, C J; Ruitenbeek, W; van der Wouw, M P; Sperl, W; Sengers, R C; Trijbels, J M; van Oost, B A

    1992-01-01

    A patient with the Pearson marrow and pancreas syndrome is presented. She showed an anaemia with neutropenia and thrombopenia, failure to thrive, diarrhoea, disturbed glucose homeostasis and lactic acidosis. An exocrine pancreatic insufficiency was lacking. The disease followed a fatal course. Biochemical investigations of skeletal muscle revealed a disturbed mitochondrial energy metabolism, while many ultrastructural abnormal features were observed in the muscle tissue. Molecular genetic studies showed a de novo deletion in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), different in size from the already published deletions and flanked by two 4 bp direct repeats, interspaced by 4-5 non-repeated nucleotides. mtDNA from 12 other tissues showed the same deletion in different percentages. No obvious relation between these percentages and tissue dysfunction was found. In spite of an open reading frame of 74 codons, only little transcription product of the genomic region resulting from the deletion was found.

  19. Developmental Course of Conversational Behaviour of Children with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome and Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Den Heuvel, Ellen; Botting, Nicola; Boudewijns, Inge; Manders, Eric; Swillen, Ann; Zink, Inge

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated three conversational subskills in children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS, n = 8, ages 7-13) and Williams syndrome (WS, n = 8, ages 6-12). The researchers re-evaluated these subskills after 18 to 24 months and compared them to those of peers with idiopathic intellectual disability (IID) and IID and comorbid…

  20. Movement disorders and other motor abnormalities in adults with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boot, Erik; Butcher, Nancy J.; van Amelsvoort, Thérèse A. M. J.; Lang, Anthony E.; Marras, Connie; Pondal, Margarita; Andrade, Danielle M.; Fung, Wai Lun Alan; Bassett, Anne S.

    2015-01-01

    Movement abnormalities are frequently reported in children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS), but knowledge in this area is scarce in the increasing adult population. We report on five individuals illustrative of movement disorders and other motor abnormalities in adults with 22q11.2DS. In

  1. Deletion of short arm of chromosome 18, Del(18p syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Babaji

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Deletion of the short arm of chromosome 18 is a rare syndrome clinically presenting with variable mental retardation, growth retardation, low height, pectus excavatum, craniofacial malformations including long ear, ptosis, microcephaly and short neck. This case report presents with characteristic features along with rare feature of single nostril.

  2. Subtypes in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome Associated with Behaviour and Neurofacial Morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinderberry, Brooke; Brown, Scott; Hammond, Peter; Stevens, Angela F.; Schall, Ulrich; Murphy, Declan G. M.; Murphy, Kieran C.; Campbell, Linda E.

    2013-01-01

    22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) has a complex phenotype with more than 180 characteristics, including cardiac anomalies, cleft palate, intellectual disabilities, a typical facial morphology, and mental health problems. However, the variable phenotype makes it difficult to predict clinical outcome, such as the high prevalence of psychosis among…

  3. Children with Chromosome 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome Exhibit Impaired Spatial Working Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ling M.; Riggins, Tracy; Harvey, Danielle; Cabaral, Margarita; Simon, Tony J.

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) have been shown to have impairments in processing spatiotemporal information. The authors examined whether children with 22q11.2DS exhibit impairments in spatial working memory performance due to these weaknesses, even when controlling for maintenance of attention. Children with…

  4. Risk of malignancy in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Toer; van der Werff Ten Bosch, Jutte; De Rademaeker, Marjan; Van Den Bogaert, Ann; van den Akker, Machiel

    2017-04-01

    22q11.2DS is a significant health problem because of its fairly high incidence. It is relevant to be vigilant regarding the diagnosis of cancer amongst 22q11.2 patients as there might be an increased risk, especially amongst patients with the 22q11.2 distal deletion syndrome.

  5. Domain Specific Attentional Impairments in Children with Chromosome 22Q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bish, Joel P.; Chiodo, Renee; Mattei, Victoria; Simon, Tony J.

    2007-01-01

    One of the defining cognitive characteristics of the chromosome 22q deletion syndrome (DS22q11.2) is visuospatial processing impairments. The purpose of this study was to investigate and extend the specific attentional profile of children with this disorder using both an object-based attention task and an inhibition of return task. A group of…

  6. The cognitive development of children with the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijff, S.N.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) is a genetic disorder associated with palatal abnormalities, cardiac defects and characteristic facial features. On a behavioural/ psychiatric level, children with 22q11DS are at an increased risk for various psychiatric problems, including Autism

  7. 22q11.2 Deletion syndrome is associated with perioperative outcome in tetralogy of Fallot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer-Rosa, Laura; Pinto, Nelangi; Yang, Wei; Tanel, Ronn; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth

    2013-10-01

    We sought to investigate the impact of 22q11.2 deletion on perioperative outcome in tetralogy of Fallot. We conducted a retrospective review of patients with tetralogy of Fallot who underwent complete surgical reconstruction at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia between 1995 and 2006. Inclusion criteria included diagnosis of tetralogy of Fallot and known genotype. Fisher exact and Mann-Whitney tests were used for categoric and continuous variables, respectively. Regression analysis was used to determine whether deletion status predicts outcome. We studied 208 subjects with tetralogy of Fallot, 164 (79%) without and 44 (20%) with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. There were no differences in sex, race, gestational age, age at diagnosis, admission weight, and duration of mechanical ventilation. Presenting anatomy, survival, complications and reoperations were also comparable between patients with and without 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Those with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome had more aortopulmonary shunts preceding complete surgical repair (21% vs 7%, P = .02). This association was present after adjustment for presenting anatomy (stenosis, atresia, or absence of pulmonary valve and common atrioventricular canal) and surgical era. In addition, those with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome had longer cardiopulmonary bypass time (84 vs 72 minutes, P = .02) and duration of intensive care (6 vs 4 days, P = .007). Genotype affects early operative outcomes in tetralogy of Fallot resulting, in particular, in longer duration of intensive care. Future studies are required to determine factors contributing to such differences in this susceptible population. Copyright © 2013 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Relatively low proportion of dystrophin gene deletions in Israeili Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shomrat, R.; Gluck, E.; Legum, C.; Shiloh, Y. [Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel)

    1994-02-15

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) are allelic disorders caused by mutations in the X-linked dystrophin gene. The most common mutations in western populations are deletions that are spread non-randomly throughout the gene. Molecular analysis of the dystrophin gene structure by hybridization of the full length cDNA to Southern blots and by PCR in 62 unrelated Israeli male DMD/BMD patients showed deletions in 23 (37%). This proportion is significantly lower than that found in European and North American populations (55-65%). Seventy-eight percent of the deletions were confined to exons 44-52, half of these exons 44-45, and the remaining 22% to exons 1 and 19. There was no correlation between the size of the deletion and the severity of the disease. All the deletions causing frameshift resulted in the DMD phenotypes. 43 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  9. Expansion of the clinical phenotype of the distal 10q26.3 deletion syndrome to include ataxia and hyperemia of the hands and feet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacaria, Melanie; Srour, Myriam; Michaud, Jacques L; Doja, Asif; Miller, Elka; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Goldsmith, Claire; Majewski, Jacek; Boycott, Kym M

    2017-06-01

    Distal deletion of the long arm of chromosome 10 is associated with a dysmorphic craniofacial appearance, microcephaly, behavioral issues, developmental delay, intellectual disability, and ocular, urogenital, and limb abnormalities. Herein, we present clinical, molecular, and cytogenetic investigations of four patients, including two siblings, with nearly identical terminal deletions of 10q26.3, all of whom have an atypical presentation of this syndrome. Their prominent features include ataxia, mild-to-moderate intellectual disability, and hyperemia of the hands and feet, and they do not display many of the other features commonly associated with deletions of this region. These results point to a novel gene locus associated with ataxia and highlight the variability of the clinical presentation of patients with deletions of this region. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. 20q13.2-q13.33 deletion syndrome: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Merlin G; Usrey, Kelly M; Roberts, Jennifer L; Manzardo, Ann M; Schroeder, Stephen R

    2013-01-01

    We report a 32-month-old female of Peruvian ethnicity identified with a rare 20q13.2-q13.33 deletion using microarray analysis. She presented with intellectual disability, absent speech, hypotonia, pre- and post-natal growth retardation and an abnormal face with a unilateral cleft lip. Clinical features and genetic findings with the loss of 30 genes, including GNAS, MC3R, CDH4 and TFAP2C , are described in relationship to the very few cases of 20q13 deletion reported in the literature. Deletion of this region may play an important role in neurodevelopment and function and in causing specific craniofacial features.

  11. Otologic and audiologic findings in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheij, E; Kist, A L; Mink van der Molen, A B; Stegeman, I; van Zanten, G A; Grolman, W; Thomeer, H G X M

    2017-02-01

    Hearing loss is frequently present in the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Our aim was to describe the audiologic and otologic features of patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. We conducted a retrospective cohort study in a single tertiary referral center. We reviewed medical files of all patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome who visited an otolaryngologist, plastic surgeon or speech therapist, for audiologic or otologic features. Hearing loss was defined as a pure tone average (of 0.5, 1, 2, and 4 kHz) of >20 decibel hearing level. Audiograms were available for 102 of 199 included patients, out of which 163 ears were measured in the required frquencies (0.5-4 kHz). Median age at time of most recent audiogram was 7 years (range 3-29 years). In 62 out of 163 ears (38%), hearing loss was present. Most ears had conductive hearing loss (n = 58) and 4 ears had mixed hearing loss. The severity of hearing loss was most frequently mild (pure tone average of ≤40 decibel hearing level). In 22.5% of ears, otitis media with effusion was observed at time of most recent audiogram. Age was not related to mean air conduction hearing thresholds or to otitis media with effusion (p = 0.43 and p = 0.11, respectively). In conclusion, hearing loss and otitis media are frequently present in patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Moreover, our results suggest that children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome remain susceptible for otitis media as they age.

  12. Association of AADAC Deletion and Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome in a Large European Cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Birgitte; Stefánsson, Hreinn; Riff Jensen, Lars

    2016-01-01

    -affecting microdeletions of four genes, including the gene encoding arylacetamide deacetylase (AADAC), were observed and merited further investigations. METHODS: We screened a Danish cohort of 243 GTS patients and 1571 control subjects for submicroscopic deletions and duplications of these four genes. The most promising....... Subsequently, expression of the candidate gene in the central nervous system was investigated using human and mouse brain tissues. RESULTS: In the Danish cohort, we identified eight patients with overlapping deletions of AADAC. Investigation of the additional five countries showed a significant association...... between the AADAC deletion and GTS, and a final meta-analysis confirmed the significant association (p = 4.4 × 10(-4); odds ratio = 1.9; 95% confidence interval = 1.33-2.71). Furthermore, RNA in situ hybridization and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction studies revealed that AADAC is expressed...

  13. Deletion of 7q33-q35 in a Patient with Intellectual Disability and Dysmorphic Features: Further Characterization of 7q Interstitial Deletion Syndrome

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    Kristen Dilzell

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report concerns a 16-year-old girl with a 9.92 Mb, heterozygous interstitial chromosome deletion at 7q33-q35, identified using array comparative genomic hybridization. The patient has dysmorphic facial features, intellectual disability, recurrent infections, self-injurious behavior, obesity, and recent onset of hemihypertrophy. This patient has overlapping features with previously reported individuals who have similar deletions spanning the 7q32-q36 region. It has been difficult to describe an interstitial 7q deletion syndrome due to variations in the sizes and regions in the few patients reported in the literature. This case contributes to the further characterization of an interstitial distal 7q deletion syndrome.

  14. Enhancement of astaxanthin production in Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous by efficient method for the complete deletion of genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Keisuke; Hara, Kiyotaka Y; Morita, Toshihiko; Nishimura, Akira; Sasaki, Daisuke; Ishii, Jun; Ogino, Chiaki; Kizaki, Noriyuki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2016-09-13

    Red yeast, Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous is the only yeast known to produce astaxanthin, an anti-oxidant isoprenoid (carotenoid) widely used in the aquaculture, food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. The potential of this microorganism as a platform cell factory for isoprenoid production has been recognized because of high flux through its native terpene pathway. Recently, we developed a multiple gene expression system in X. dendrorhous and enhanced the mevalonate synthetic pathway to increase astaxanthin production. In contrast, the mevalonate synthetic pathway is suppressed by ergosterol through feedback inhibition. Therefore, releasing the mevalonate synthetic pathway from this inhibition through the deletion of genes involved in ergosterol synthesis is a promising strategy to improve isoprenoid production. An efficient method for deleting diploid genes in X. dendrorhous, however, has not yet been developed. Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous was cultivated under gradually increasing concentrations of antibiotics following the introduction of antibiotic resistant genes to be replaced with target genes. Using this method, double CYP61 genes encoding C-22 sterol desaturases relating to ergosterol biosynthesis were deleted sequentially. This double CYP61 deleted strain showed decreased ergosterol biosynthesis compared with the parental strain and single CYP61 disrupted strain. Additionally, this double deletion of CYP61 genes showed increased astaxanthin production compared with the parental strain and the single CYP61 knockout strain. Finally, astaxanthin production was enhanced by 1.4-fold compared with the parental strain, although astaxanthin production was not affected in the single CYP61 knockout strain. In this study, we developed a system to completely delete target diploid genes in X. dendrorhous. Using this method, we deleted diploid CYP61 genes involved in the synthesis of ergosterol that inhibits the pathway for mevalonate, which is a common

  15. Discrimination of Deletion and Duplication Subtypes of the Deleted in Azoospermia Gene Family in the Context of Frequent Interloci Gene Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaszkó, Tibor; Papp, János; Krausz, Csilla; Casamonti, Elena; Géczi, Lajos; Olah, Edith

    2016-01-01

    Due to its palindromic setup, AZFc (Azoospermia Factor c) region of chromosome Y is one of the most unstable regions of the human genome. It contains eight gene families expressed mainly in the testes. Several types of rearrangement resulting in changes in the cumulative copy number of the gene families were reported to be associated with diseases such as male infertility and testicular germ cell tumors. The best studied AZFc rearrangement is gr/gr deletion. Its carriers show widespread phenotypic variation from azoospermia to normospermia. This phenomenon was initially attributed to different gr/gr subtypes that would eliminate distinct members of the affected gene families. However, studies conducted to confirm this hypothesis have brought controversial results, perhaps, in part, due to the shortcomings of the utilized subtyping methodology. This proof-of-concept paper is meant to introduce here a novel method aimed at subtyping AZFc rearrangements. It is able to differentiate the partial deletion and partial duplication subtypes of the Deleted in Azoospermia (DAZ) gene family. The keystone of the method is the determination of the copy number of the gene family member-specific variant(s) in a series of sequence family variant (SFV) positions. Most importantly, we present a novel approach for the correct interpretation of the variant copy number data to determine the copy number of the individual DAZ family members in the context of frequent interloci gene conversion.Besides DAZ1/DAZ2 and DAZ3/DAZ4 deletions, not yet described rearrangements such as DAZ2/DAZ4 deletion and three duplication subtypes were also found by the utilization of the novel approach. A striking feature is the extremely high concordance among the individual data pointing to a certain type of rearrangement. In addition to being able to identify DAZ deletion subtypes more reliably than the methods used previously, this approach is the first that can discriminate DAZ duplication subtypes as well

  16. Deletion of the MBII-85 snoRNA gene cluster in mice results in postnatal growth retardation.

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    Boris V Skryabin

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS [MIM 176270] is a neurogenetic disorder characterized by decreased fetal activity, muscular hypotonia, failure to thrive, short stature, obesity, mental retardation, and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. It is caused by the loss of function of one or more imprinted, paternally expressed genes on the proximal long arm of chromosome 15. Several potential PWS mouse models involving the orthologous region on chromosome 7C exist. Based on the analysis of deletions in the mouse and gene expression in PWS patients with chromosomal translocations, a critical region (PWScr for neonatal lethality, failure to thrive, and growth retardation was narrowed to the locus containing a cluster of neuronally expressed MBII-85 small nucleolar RNA (snoRNA genes. Here, we report the deletion of PWScr. Mice carrying the maternally inherited allele (PWScr(m-/p+ are indistinguishable from wild-type littermates. All those with the paternally inherited allele (PWScr(m+/p- consistently display postnatal growth retardation, with about 15% postnatal lethality in C57BL/6, but not FVB/N crosses. This is the first example in a multicellular organism of genetic deletion of a C/D box snoRNA gene resulting in a pronounced phenotype.

  17. Identical mitochondrial DNA deletion in mother with progressive external ophthalmoplegia and son with Pearson marrow-pancreas syndrome.

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    Bernes, S M; Bacino, C; Prezant, T R; Pearson, M A; Wood, T S; Fournier, P; Fischel-Ghodsian, N

    1993-10-01

    We describe a family in which the mother has progressive external ophthalmoplegia with the common 4977 base pair deletion, and her son has a syndrome similar to the Pearson marrow-pancreas syndrome with the identical deletion. This case extends the clinical phenotype of the Pearson syndrome and raises the possibility that developmentally regulated tissue-specific nuclear factors are responsible for the differential phenotypic expression of these two mitochondrial disorders.

  18. [Pearson's syndrome: a multi-system disorder based on a mt-DNA deletion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danse, P W; Jakobs, C; Rötig, A; Munnich, A; Veerman, A J

    1991-12-01

    In 1979 Pearson described a syndrome, in which the main symptoms were severe sideroblastic anemia and exocrine pancreas dysfunction. The aetiology was still unknown. A decade later, the Pearson syndrome can be described as a lethal multisystem disorder, in which the bone marrow and exocrine pancreas show major dysfunction, but also other organs (like kidneys, liver, gut and skin) can be affected. These patients also show growth retardation. The study of the mitochondrial DNA allowed identification of a deletion in the mitochondrial DNA. The case of a patient suffering from Pearson's syndrome is reported.

  19. Molecular Testing of MECP2 Gene in Rett Syndrome Phenotypes in Indian Girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lallar, Meenakshi; Rai, Archana; Srivastava, Priyanka; Mandal, Kausik; Gupta, Neerja; Kabra, Madhulika; Phadke, Shubha R

    2018-02-09

    To assess yield of MECP2 gene sequence variations analysis and large deletions in suspected cases of Rett syndrome. Descriptive study. Tertiary-care medical genetics center. Girls with neuroregression, postnatal microcephaly and signs and symptoms suggestive of classical and atypical Rett syndrome were classified into two groups. Group I consisted of girls with Classical and atypical Rett syndrome on basis on the Revised Rett Syndrome diagnostic criteria, 2010. Group II included girls with neuroregression and postnatal microcephaly and other Rett like features but not fulfilling the above criteria. Sanger sequencing of coding regions and large deletional analysis of MECP2 gene. Identification of mutation in MECP2 gene. Mutation in MECP2 gene was identified in 74% (14/19) in group I and none (0/17) in group II. The mutation detection rate was 92% (13/14) in group I classical Rett syndrome girls (2 with large deletions identified with Multiplex ligation dependent probe amplification) and 20% (1/5) in group I atypical Rett syndrome girls. One novel MECP2 sequence variation was identified in group I classical Rett syndrome. The yield of the mutation detection in MECP2 is much higher in classical than in atypical Rett syndrome. In girls with some Rett like features, but not fulfilling revised Rett syndrome diagnostic criteria, mutation testing for MECP2 gene has a low yield.

  20. Neuropsychiatric aspects of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: considerations in the prenatal setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, Anne S.; Costain, Gregory; Marshall, Christian R.

    2016-01-01

    Most major neuropsychiatric outcomes of concern to families are not detectable by prenatal ultrasound. The introduction of genome-wide chromosomal microarray analysis to prenatal clinical diagnostic testing has increased the detection of pathogenic 22q11.2 deletions, which cause the most common genomic disorder. The recent addition of this and other microdeletions to non-invasive prenatal screening methods using cell-free fetal DNA has further propelled interest in outcomes. Conditions associated with 22q11.2 deletions include intellect ranging from intellectual disability to average, schizophrenia and other treatable psychiatric conditions, epilepsy, and early-onset Parkinson’s disease. However, there is currently no way to predict how severe the lifetime expression will be. Available evidence suggests no major role in these neuropsychiatric outcomes for the congenital cardiac or most other structural anomalies that may be detectable on ultrasound. This article provides an outline of the lifetime neuropsychiatric phenotype of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome that will be useful to clinicians involved in prenatal diagnosis and related genetic counselling. The focus is on information that will be most relevant to two common situations: detection of a 22q11.2 deletion in a fetus or newborn, and new diagnosis of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome in a parent without a previous molecular diagnosis. PMID:27718271

  1. Schizophrenia and chromosomal deletions

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    Lindsay, E.A.; Baldini, A. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Morris, M. A. [Univ. of Geneva School of Medicine, NY (United States)] [and others

    1995-06-01

    Recent genetic linkage analysis studies have suggested the presence of a schizophrenia locus on the chromosomal region 22q11-q13. Schizophrenia has also been frequently observed in patients affected with velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS), a disorder frequently associated with deletions within 22q11.1. It has been hypothesized that psychosis in VCFS may be due to deletion of the catechol-o-methyl transferase gene. Prompted by these observations, we screened for 22q11 deletions in a population of 100 schizophrenics selected from the Maryland Epidemiological Sample. Our results show that there are schizophrenic patients carrying a deletion of 22q11.1 and a mild VCFS phenotype that might remain unrecognized. These findings should encourage a search for a schizophrenia-susceptibility gene within the deleted region and alert those in clinical practice to the possible presence of a mild VCFS phenotype associated with schizophrenia. 9 refs.

  2. Construction of a natural panel of 11p11.2 deletions and further delineation of the critical region involved in Potocki-Shaffer syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakui, Keiko; Gregato, Giuliana; Ballif, Blake C; Glotzbach, Caron D; Bailey, Kristen A; Kuo, Pao-Lin; Sue, Whui-Chen; Sheffield, Leslie J; Irons, Mira; Gomez, Enrique G; Hecht, Jacqueline T; Potocki, Lorraine; Shaffer, Lisa G

    2005-05-01

    Potocki-Shaffer syndrome (PSS) is a contiguous gene deletion syndrome that results from haploinsufficiency of at least two genes within the short arm of chromosome 11[del(11)(p11.2p12)]. The clinical features of PSS can include developmental delay, mental retardation, multiple exostoses, parietal foramina, enlarged anterior fontanel, minor craniofacial anomalies, ophthalmologic anomalies, and genital abnormalities in males. We constructed a natural panel of 11p11.2-p13 deletions using cell lines from 10 affected individuals, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), microsatellite analyses, and array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH). We then compared the deletion sizes and clinical features between affected individuals. The full spectrum of PSS manifests when deletions are at least 2.1 Mb in size, spanning from D11S1393 to D11S1385/D11S1319 (44.6-46.7 Mb from the 11p terminus) and encompassing EXT2, responsible for multiple exostoses, and ALX4, causing parietal foramina. Yet one subject with parietal foramina whose deletion does not include ALX4 indicates that ALX4 in this subject may be rendered functionally haploinsufficient by a position effect. Based on comparative deletion mapping of eight individuals with the full PSS syndrome including mental retardation and two PSS families with no mental retardation, at least one gene related to mental retardation is likely located between D11S554 and D11S1385/D11S1319, 45.6-46.7 Mb from the 11p terminus.

  3. Updating the profile of C-terminal MECP2 deletions in Rett syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebbington, A; Percy, A; Christodoulou, J; Ravine, D; Ho, G; Jacoby, P; Anderson, A; Pineda, M; Ben Zeev, B; Bahi-Buisson, N; Smeets, E; Leonard, H

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to compare the phenotype of Rett syndrome cases with C-terminal deletions to that of cases with different MECP2 mutations and to examine the phenotypic variation within C-terminal deletions. Methods Cases were selected from InterRett, an international database and from the population-based Australian Rett Syndrome Database. Cases (n=832) were included if they had a pathogenic MECP2 mutation in which the nature of the amino acid change was known. Three severity scale systems were used, and individual aspects of the phenotype were also compared. Results Lower severity was associated with C-terminal deletions (n=79) compared to all other MECP2 mutations (e.g. Pineda scale C-terminals mean 15.0 (95% CI 14.0–16.0) vs 16.2 (15.9–16.5). Cases with C-terminal deletions were more likely to have a normal head circumference (odds ratio 3.22, 95% CI 1.53 – 6.79) and weight (odds ratio 2.97, 95% CI 1.25–5.76). Onset of stereotypies tended to be later (median age 2.5 years vs 2 years, pRett syndrome. PMID:19914908

  4. MELAS syndrome associated with both A3243G-tRNALeu mutation and multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aharoni, Sharon; Traves, Teres A; Melamed, Eldad; Cohen, Sarit; Silver, Esther Leshinsky

    2010-09-15

    The syndrome of mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episode (MELAS) is characterized clinically by recurrent focal neurological deficits, epilepsy, and short stature. The phenotypic spectrum is extremely diverse, with multisystemic organ involvement leading to isolated diabetes, deafness, renal tubulopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and retinitis pigmentosa. In 80% of cases, the syndrome is associated with an AG transmission mutation (A3243G) in the tRNALeu gene of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). We describe a woman with a unique combination of the MELAS A3243G mutation and multiple mtDNA deletions with normal POLG sequence. The patient presented with diabetes mellitus, sensorineural deafness, short stature, and mental disorientation. All her three children died in early adolescence. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Deletion of a single-copy DAAM1 gene in congenital heart defect: a case report

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    Bao Bihui

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With an increasing incidence of congenital heart defects (CHDs in recent years, genotype-phenotype correlation and array-based methods have contributed to the genome-wide analysis and understanding of genetic variations in the CHD population. Here, we report a copy number deletion of chromosomal 14q23.1 in a female fetus with complex congenital heart defects. This is the first description of DAAM1 gene deletion associated with congenital heart anomalies. Case Presentation Compared with the control population, one CHD fetus showed a unique copy number deletion of 14q23.1, a region that harbored DAAM1 and KIAA0666 genes. Conclusions Results suggest that the copy number deletion on chromosome 14q23.1 may be critical for cardiogenesis. However, the exact relationship and mechanism of how DAAM1 and KIAA0666 deletion contributes to the onset of CHD is yet to be determined.

  6. Genes and Syndromic Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keats, Bronya J. B.

    2002-01-01

    This article provides a description of the human genome and patterns of inheritance and discusses genes that are associated with some of the syndromes for which hearing loss is a common finding, including: Waardenburg, Stickler, Jervell and Lange-Neilsen, Usher, Alport, mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, and sensorineural hearing loss. (Contains…

  7. Psychiatric manifestations of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrán, M; Tagle, F P; Irarrázaval, M

    2018-03-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome is a genetic disorder with variable clinical manifestations. It affects one out of 5950 neonates and has an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern. The aim of this article is to review its psychiatric manifestations and any underlying genetic alterations. We reviewed the scientific literature available as of October 2014 in the LILACS and Medline databases. Sixty per cent of these patients fulfilled diagnostic criteria for a mental disorder at some point in their lives, referring to psychotic disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, mood disorders, anxiety disorders, and autism spectrum disorders. Specific genes, such as COMT and PRODH, have been linked to these psychiatric manifestations. It is necessary to raise awareness among all health care professionals so that they understand the relevance of these manifestations, are able to anticipate them, and can provide appropriate information to patients and family members. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. How to diagnose the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome in patients with schizophrenia: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Ohi, Kazutaka; Hashimoto, Ryota; Yamamori, Hidenaga; Yasuda, Yuka; Fujimoto, Michiko; Nakatani, Noriko; Kamino, Kouzin; Takeda, Masatoshi

    2013-01-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome is caused by a microdeletion of chromosome 22. One third of all patients with 22q11.2 deletion develop schizophrenia-like symptoms. In general, the prevalence of 22q11.2 deletion in patients with schizophrenia is 1%?2%. The 22q11.2 deletion is one of the major known genetic risk factors for schizophrenia. However, clinical differences in the phenotypes between patients with schizophrenia who are 22q11.2 deletion carriers and those who are not are still unknown. T...

  9. Screening of autosomal gene deletions in patients with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification: detection of a hemizygosis for the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trarbach, Ericka Barbosa; Teles, Milena Gurgel; Costa, Elaine Maria Frade; Abreu, Ana Paula; Garmes, Heraldo Mendes; Guerra, Gil; Baptista, Maria Tereza Matias; de Castro, Margaret; Mendonca, Berenice Bilharinho; Latronico, Ana Claudia

    2010-03-01

    Congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism with anosmia (Kallmann syndrome) or with normal sense of smell is a heterogeneous genetic disorder caused by defects in the synthesis, secretion and action of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH). Mutations involving autosomal genes have been identified in approximately 30% of all cases of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. However, most studies that screened patients with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism for gene mutations did not include gene dosage methodologies. Therefore, it remains to be determined whether patients without detected point mutation carried a heterozygous deletion of one or more exons. We used the multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) assay to evaluate the potential contribution of heterozygous deletions of FGFR1, GnRH1, GnRHR, GPR54 and NELF genes in the aetiology of GnRH deficiency. We studied a mutation-negative cohort of 135 patients, 80 with Kallmann syndrome and 55 with normosmic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. One large heterozygous deletion involving all FGFR1 exons was identified in a female patient with sporadic normosmic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and mild dimorphisms as ogival palate and cavus foot. FGFR1 hemizygosity was confirmed by gene dosage with comparative multiplex and real-time PCRs. FGFR1 or other autosomal gene deletion is a possible but very rare event and does not account for a significant number of sporadic or inherited cases of isolated GnRH deficiency.

  10. Deletion of the mitochondrial DNA in a case of de Toni-Debré-Fanconi syndrome and Pearson syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niaudet, P; Heidet, L; Munnich, A; Schmitz, J; Bouissou, F; Gubler, M C; Rötig, A

    1994-04-01

    We report a patient with Pearson syndrome with failure to thrive, exocrine pancreas insufficiency, growth hormone deficiency and severe tubular dysfunction. The patient had no signs of liver involvement. Normal respiratory chain enzyme activity was found in the lymphocytes, but a mitochondrial DNA deletion was demonstrated in lymphocytes and in the kidney. Polymerase chain reaction amplification and sequence analysis revealed the presence of the 4,977 base pair "common" deletion in the mitochondrial genome. Our findings support the view that tubulopathies of unknown origin may be related to mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiency.

  11. Generalized Epilepsy and Myoclonic Seizures in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strehlow, Vincent; Swinkels, Marielle E M; Thomas, Rhys H; Rapps, Nora; Syrbe, Steffen; Dorn, Thomas; Lemke, Johannes R

    2016-09-01

    Prompted by the observations of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) and recurrent copy number variants in genetic generalized epilepsy (GGE), we searched for further evidence supporting a possible correlation of 22q11DS with GGE and with myoclonic seizures. Through routine diagnostics, we identified 3 novel individuals with the seemingly uncommon combination of 22q11DS and JME. We subsequently screened the literature for reports focussing on the epilepsy phenotype in 22q11DS. We additionally screened a database of 173 22q11DS patients and identified a fourth individual with JME as well as 2 additional cases with GGE. We describe 6 novel and 22 published cases with co-occurrence of 22q11DS and GGE. In many patients, GGE was associated with myoclonic seizures allowing for a diagnosis of JME in at least 6 individuals. Seventeen of the 173 22q11DS cases (10%) had a diagnosis of either focal or generalized epilepsy. In these cases, focal epilepsy could often be attributed to syndrome-associated hypocalcaemia, cerebral bleeds, or structural brain anomalies. However, the cause of GGE remained unclear. In this study, we describe and review 28 individuals with 22q11DS and GGE (especially JME), showing that both disorders frequently co-occur. Compared to the reported prevalence of 15-21%, in our case series only 10% of 22q11DS individuals were found to have epilepsy, often GGE. Since 22q11.2 does not contain convincing GGE candidate genes, we discuss the possibility of an aetiological correlation through a possibly disturbed interaction with the GABA B receptor.

  12. Hearing loss in a mouse model of 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome.

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    Jennifer C Fuchs

    Full Text Available 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome (22q11DS arises from an interstitial chromosomal microdeletion encompassing at least 30 genes. This disorder is one of the most significant known cytogenetic risk factors for schizophrenia, and can also cause heart abnormalities, cognitive deficits, hearing difficulties, and a variety of other medical problems. The Df1/+ hemizygous knockout mouse, a model for human 22q11DS, recapitulates many of the deficits observed in the human syndrome including heart defects, impaired memory, and abnormal auditory sensorimotor gating. Here we show that Df1/+ mice, like human 22q11DS patients, have substantial rates of hearing loss arising from chronic middle ear infection. Auditory brainstem response (ABR measurements revealed significant elevation of click-response thresholds in 48% of Df1/+ mice, often in only one ear. Anatomical and histological analysis of the middle ear demonstrated no gross structural abnormalities, but frequent signs of otitis media (OM, chronic inflammation of the middle ear, including excessive effusion and thickened mucosa. In mice for which both in vivo ABR thresholds and post mortem middle-ear histology were obtained, the severity of signs of OM correlated directly with the level of hearing impairment. These results suggest that abnormal auditory sensorimotor gating previously reported in mouse models of 22q11DS could arise from abnormalities in auditory processing. Furthermore, the findings indicate that Df1/+ mice are an excellent model for increased risk of OM in human 22q11DS patients. Given the frequently monaural nature of OM in Df1/+ mice, these animals could also be a powerful tool for investigating the interplay between genetic and environmental causes of OM.

  13. Clinical and molecuar characterization of Brazilian patients with growth hormone gene deletions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.J.P. Arnhold

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available Genomic DNA from 23 patients with isolated growth hormone (GH deficiency (12 males and 11 females: heights -4.9 ± 1.4 SDS was screened for GH gene deletions by restriction endonuclease analysis of polymerase chain reaction amplification products. Three unrelated patients had typical features of severe GH deficiency and deletions (6.7 kb in two and 7.6 kb in one of the GH gene. The two patients with 6.7-kb deletions developed growth-attenuating anti-GH antibodies whereas the patient with the 7.6-kb deletion continued to grow with GH replacement therapy. Our finding that 3/23 (~13% Brazilian subjects had GH gene deletions agrees with previous studies of severe isolated GH deficiency subjects in other populations. Two of three subjects (67% with deletions developed blocking antibodies despite administration of exogenous GH at low doses. Interestingly, only 1/10 of cases with affected relatives or parental consanguinity had GH-1 gene deletions

  14. Co-existence of other copy number variations with 22q11.2 deletion or duplication: a modifier for variable phenotypes of the syndrome?

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    Li Deling

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The phenotype in patients with a 22q11.2 deletion or duplication can be extremely variable, and the causes of such as variations are not well known. Results We observed additional copy number variations (CNVs in 2 of 15 cases with a 22q11.2 deletion or duplication. Both cases were newborn babies referred for severe congenital heart defects. The first case had a deletion with a size of approximately 1.56 Mb involving multiple genes including STS in the Xp22.31 region along with a 22q11.2 deletion. The second case had a duplication of 605 kb in the 15q13.3 region encompassing CHRNA7 and a deletion of 209 kb involving the RBFOX1 gene in the 16p13.2 region, in addition to 22q11.2 duplication. Discussion Our observations have shown that additional CNVs are not rare (2/15, 13% in patients with a 22q11.2 deletion or duplication. We speculate that these CNVs may contribute to phenotype variations of 22q11.2 microdeletion/duplication syndromes as genomic modifiers.

  15. Multiple causes of apnea in 1p36 deletion syndrome include seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanabar, Gorande; Boyd, Stewart; Schugal, Anna; Bhate, Sanjay

    2012-06-01

    Apneic episodes have not previously been described in children with 1p36 deletion syndrome with seizures. Having encountered one such patient, we reviewed our experience of breathing difficulties in this syndrome, with particular attention to evidence of ictal apnea. We describe four children with 1p36 deletion syndrome, seizures and apneic episodes. Retrospective analysis of clinical features, seizure semiology and video-EEG data. All patients showed characteristic craniofacial features, mental retardation, and diffuse hypotonia and apnea. Seizure semiology included focal motor, ± secondary generalized tonic clonic and tonic events. All had histories of status epilepticus; three showed clustering of their habitual seizures. Assessment of apnea was complicated by the presence of multiple other potential causes including obesity, reflux, respiratory, and cardiac problems Epileptic apneas were confirmed in one child by video-telemetry. In three other children, an epileptic basis for apneas was inferred from their clinical histories and treatment response supported by EEG findings. In three children, epileptiform discharges occurred over fronto-centro-temporal regions. Epileptic apnea is a feature of 1p36 deletion syndrome, though episodic apnea is multifactorial in these children, and may need repeated re-appraisal. Copyright © 2012 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. RAI1 gene mutations: mechanisms of Smith–Magenis Syndrome

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    Falco M

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Mariateresa Falco,1,* Sonia Amabile,1,* Fabio Acquaviva2 1Department of Molecular Medicine and Medical Biotechnology, University of Naples “Federico II”, Naples, Italy; 2Department of Translational Medical Sciences (DISMET, Section of Pediatric Clinical Genetics, University of Naples “Federico II”, Naples, Italy *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Smith–Magenis syndrome (SMS; OMIM #182290 is a complex genetic disorder characterized by distinctive physical features, developmental delay, cognitive impairment, and a typical behavioral phenotype. SMS is caused by interstitial 17p11.2 deletions, encompassing multiple genes and including the retinoic acid-induced 1 gene (RAI1, or by mutations in RAI1 itself. About 10% of all the SMS patients, in fact, carry an RAI1 mutation responsible for the phenotype. RAI1 (OMIM *607642 is a dosage-sensitive gene expressed in many tissues and highly conserved among species. Over the years, several studies have demonstrated that RAI1 (or its homologs in animal models acts as a transcriptional factor implicated in embryonic neurodevelopment, neuronal differentiation, cell growth and cell cycle regulation, bone and skeletal development, lipid and glucose metabolisms, behavioral functions, and circadian activity. Patients with RAI1 pathogenic variants show some phenotypic differences when compared to those carrying the typical deletion. They usually have lower incidence of hypotonia and less cognitive impairment than those with 17p11.2 deletions but more frequently show the behavioral characteristics of the syndrome and overeating issues. These differences reflect the primary pathogenetic role of RAI1 without the pathogenetic contribution of the other genes included in the typical 17p11.2 deletion. The better comprehension of physiological roles of RAI1, its molecular co-workers and interactors, and its contribution in determining the typical SMS phenotype will certainly open a new path

  17. Severe laryngeal stenosis in newly born twins with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clive, B; Corsten, G; Penney, L S; Van den Hof, M; El-Naggar, W

    2016-05-18

    Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome is common and presents with a range of clinical features from cardiac malformations to hypocalcemia. Laryngeal anomalies are not a common feature of this syndrome. We describe newly born twins who presented with unexpected severe birth depression secondary to severe type IV glottic webs requiring extensive resuscitation and emergency tracheostomy. They were diagnosed postnatally to have deletion of 22q11.2. The successful resuscitation of these infants at birth was only possible because they were born in a tertiary care hospital. This report shows the critical nature of prenatal diagnosis of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

  18. Deletion of the Developmentally Essential Gene ATR in Adult Mice Leads to Age-Related Phenotypes and Stem Cell Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzankina, Yaroslava; Pinzon-Guzman, Carolina; Asare, Amma; Ong, Tony; Pontano, Laura; Cotsarelis, George; Zediak, Valerie P.; Velez, Marielena; Bhandoola, Avinash; Brown, Eric J.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Developmental abnormalities, cancer and premature aging each have been linked to defects in the DNA damage response (DDR). Mutations in the ATR checkpoint regulator cause developmental defects in mice (pre-gastrulation lethality) and humans (Seckel syndrome). Herein we show that eliminating ATR in adult mice leads to defects in tissue homeostasis and the rapid appearance of age-related phenotypes, such as hair graying, alopecia, kyphosis, osteoporosis, thymic involution, fibrosis and other abnormalities. Histological and genetic analyses indicate that ATR deletion causes acute cellular loss in tissues where continuous cell proliferation is required for maintenance. Importantly, thymic involution and alopecia and hair graying in ATR knockout mice were associated with dramatic reductions in tissue-specific stem and progenitor cells and exhaustion of tissue renewal and homeostatic capacity. In aggregate, these studies suggest that reduced regenerative capacity in adults via deletion of a developmentally essential DDR gene is sufficient to cause characteristics of premature aging. PMID:18371340

  19. Microdeletion syndromes disclose replication timing alterations of genes unrelated to the missing DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freedman Jane

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The temporal order of allelic replication is interrelated to the epigenomic profile. A significant epigenetic marker is the asynchronous replication of monoallelically-expressed genes versus the synchronous replication of biallelically-expressed genes. The present study sought to determine whether a microdeletion in the genome affects epigenetic profiles of genes unrelated to the missing segment. In order to test this hypothesis, we checked the replication patterns of two genes – SNRPN, a normally monoallelically expressed gene (assigned to 15q11.13, and the RB1, an archetypic biallelically expressed gene (assigned to 13.q14 in the genomes of patients carrying the 22q11.2 deletion (DiGeorge/Velocardiofacial syndrome and those carrying the 7q11.23 deletion (Williams syndrome. Results The allelic replication timing was determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH technology performed on peripheral blood cells. As expected, in the cells of normal subjects the frequency of cells showing asynchronous replication for SNRPN was significantly (P -12 higher than the corresponding value for RB1. In contrast, cells of the deletion-carrying patients exhibited a reversal in this replication pattern: there was a significantly lower frequency of cells engaging in asynchronous replication for SNRPN than for RB1 (P -4 and P -3 for DiGeorge/Velocardiofacial and Williams syndromes, respectively. Accordingly, the significantly lower frequency of cells showing asynchronous replication for SNRPN than for RB1 is a new epigenetic marker distinguishing these deletion syndrome genotypes from normal ones. Conclusion In cell samples of each deletion-carrying individual, an aberrant, reversed pattern of replication is delineated, namely, where a monoallelic gene replicates more synchronously than a biallelic gene. This inverted pattern, which appears to be non-deletion-specific, clearly distinguishes cells of deletion-carriers from normal

  20. Pearson syndrome and the role of deletion dimers and duplications in the mtDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, L J A M; Jongbloed, R J E; Wijburg, F A; de Klerk, J B C; Geraedts, J P M; Nijland, J G; Scholte, H R; de Coo, I F M; Smeets, H J M

    2004-01-01

    Pearson syndrome is an often fatal multisystem disease associated with mitochondrial DNA rearrangements. Here we report a patient with a novel mtDNA deletion of 3.4 kb ranging from nucleotides 6097 to 9541 in combination with deletion dimers. The mutation percentage in different tissues (blood, muscle and liver) varied between 64% and 95%. After a remission period of about a year, the patient suddenly died at the age of 3 years owing to a severe lactic acidosis. A second patient with a previously reported deletion of 8 kb and a milder phenotype was found to have mitochondrial duplications and died at the age of 10 years. From these data and data from previous reports, we hypothesize that duplications might be beneficial in the clinical course of the disease and in life expectancy.

  1. Variations in angiotensin-converting enzyme gene insertion/deletion ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    deletion (I/D) polymorphism in the Indian population is poorly known. In order to determine the status of the polymorphism, young unrelated male army recruits were screened. The population had cultural and linguistic differences and lived in an ...

  2. Potential novel mechanism for Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome: deletion of a distant region containing regulatory elements of PITX2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkmann, Bethany A; Zinkevich, Natalya S; Mustonen, Aki; Schilter, Kala F; Bosenko, Dmitry V; Reis, Linda M; Broeckel, Ulrich; Link, Brian A; Semina, Elena V

    2011-03-01

    Mutations in PITX2 are associated with Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome (ARS), which involves ocular, dental, and umbilical abnormalities. Identification of cis-regulatory elements of PITX2 is important to better understand the mechanisms of disease. Conserved noncoding elements surrounding PITX2/pitx2 were identified and examined through transgenic analysis in zebrafish; expression pattern was studied by in situ hybridization. Patient samples were screened for deletion/duplication of the PITX2 upstream region using arrays and probes. Zebrafish pitx2 demonstrates conserved expression during ocular and craniofacial development. Thirteen conserved noncoding sequences positioned within a gene desert as far as 1.1 Mb upstream of the human PITX2 gene were identified; 11 have enhancer activities consistent with pitx2 expression. Ten elements mediated expression in the developing brain, four regions were active during eye formation, and two sequences were associated with craniofacial expression. One region, CE4, located approximately 111 kb upstream of PITX2, directed a complex pattern including expression in the developing eye and craniofacial region, the classic sites affected in ARS. Screening of ARS patients identified an approximately 7600-kb deletion that began 106 to 108 kb upstream of the PITX2 gene, leaving PITX2 intact while removing regulatory elements CE4 to CE13. These data suggest the presence of a complex distant regulatory matrix within the gene desert located upstream of PITX2 with an essential role in its activity and provides a possible mechanism for the previous reports of ARS in patients with balanced translocations involving the 4q25 region upstream of PITX2 and the current patient with an upstream deletion.

  3. The mitochondrial ND1 m.3337G>A mutation associated to multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions in a patient with Wolfram syndrome and cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mezghani, Najla; Mnif, Mouna; Mkaouar-Rebai, Emna; Kallel, Nozha; Salem, Ikhlass Haj; Charfi, Nadia; Abid, Mohamed; Fakhfakh, Faiza

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We reported a patient with Wolfram syndrome and dilated cardiomyopathy. → We detected the ND1 mitochondrial m.3337G>A mutation in 3 tested tissues (blood leukocytes, buccal mucosa and skeletal muscle). → Long-range PCR amplification revealed the presence of multiple mitochondrial deletions in the skeletal muscle. → The deletions remove several tRNA and protein-coding genes. -- Abstract: Wolfram syndrome (WFS) is a rare hereditary disorder also known as DIDMOAD (diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and deafness). It is a heterogeneous disease and full characterization of all clinical and biological features of this disorder is difficult. The wide spectrum of clinical expression, affecting several organs and tissues, and the similarity in phenotype between patients with Wolfram syndrome and those with certain types of respiratory chain diseases suggests mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) involvement in Wolfram syndrome patients. We report a Tunisian patient with clinical features of moderate Wolfram syndrome including diabetes, dilated cardiomyopathy and neurological complications. The results showed the presence of the mitochondrial ND1 m.3337G>A mutation in almost homoplasmic form in 3 tested tissues of the proband (blood leukocytes, buccal mucosa and skeletal muscle). In addition, the long-range PCR amplifications revealed the presence of multiple deletions of the mitochondrial DNA extracted from the patient's skeletal muscle removing several tRNA and protein-coding genes. Our study reported a Tunisian patient with clinical features of moderate Wolfram syndrome associated with cardiomyopathy, in whom we detected the ND1 m.3337G>A mutation with mitochondrial multiple deletions.

  4. The mitochondrial ND1 m.3337G>A mutation associated to multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions in a patient with Wolfram syndrome and cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mezghani, Najla [Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire Humaine, Faculte de Medecine de Sfax, Universite de Sfax (Tunisia); Mnif, Mouna [Service d' endocrinologie, C.H.U. Habib Bourguiba de Sfax (Tunisia); Mkaouar-Rebai, Emna, E-mail: emna_mkaouar@mail2world.com [Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire Humaine, Faculte de Medecine de Sfax, Universite de Sfax (Tunisia); Kallel, Nozha [Service d' endocrinologie, C.H.U. Habib Bourguiba de Sfax (Tunisia); Salem, Ikhlass Haj [Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire Humaine, Faculte de Medecine de Sfax, Universite de Sfax (Tunisia); Charfi, Nadia; Abid, Mohamed [Service d' endocrinologie, C.H.U. Habib Bourguiba de Sfax (Tunisia); Fakhfakh, Faiza [Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire Humaine, Faculte de Medecine de Sfax, Universite de Sfax (Tunisia)

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} We reported a patient with Wolfram syndrome and dilated cardiomyopathy. {yields} We detected the ND1 mitochondrial m.3337G>A mutation in 3 tested tissues (blood leukocytes, buccal mucosa and skeletal muscle). {yields} Long-range PCR amplification revealed the presence of multiple mitochondrial deletions in the skeletal muscle. {yields} The deletions remove several tRNA and protein-coding genes. -- Abstract: Wolfram syndrome (WFS) is a rare hereditary disorder also known as DIDMOAD (diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and deafness). It is a heterogeneous disease and full characterization of all clinical and biological features of this disorder is difficult. The wide spectrum of clinical expression, affecting several organs and tissues, and the similarity in phenotype between patients with Wolfram syndrome and those with certain types of respiratory chain diseases suggests mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) involvement in Wolfram syndrome patients. We report a Tunisian patient with clinical features of moderate Wolfram syndrome including diabetes, dilated cardiomyopathy and neurological complications. The results showed the presence of the mitochondrial ND1 m.3337G>A mutation in almost homoplasmic form in 3 tested tissues of the proband (blood leukocytes, buccal mucosa and skeletal muscle). In addition, the long-range PCR amplifications revealed the presence of multiple deletions of the mitochondrial DNA extracted from the patient's skeletal muscle removing several tRNA and protein-coding genes. Our study reported a Tunisian patient with clinical features of moderate Wolfram syndrome associated with cardiomyopathy, in whom we detected the ND1 m.3337G>A mutation with mitochondrial multiple deletions.

  5. Malan syndrome: Sotos-like overgrowth with de novo NFIX sequence variants and deletions in six new patients and a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaassens, Merel; Morrogh, Deborah; Rosser, Elisabeth M; Jaffer, Fatima; Vreeburg, Maaike; Bok, Levinus A; Segboer, Tim; van Belzen, Martine; Quinlivan, Ros M; Kumar, Ajith; Hurst, Jane A; Scott, Richard H

    2015-05-01

    De novo monoallelic variants in NFIX cause two distinct syndromes. Whole gene deletions, nonsense variants and missense variants affecting the DNA-binding domain have been seen in association with a Sotos-like phenotype that we propose is referred to as Malan syndrome. Frameshift and splice-site variants thought to avoid nonsense-mediated RNA decay have been seen in Marshall-Smith syndrome. We report six additional patients with Malan syndrome and de novo NFIX deletions or sequence variants and review the 20 patients now reported. The phenotype is characterised by moderate postnatal overgrowth and macrocephaly. Median height and head circumference in childhood are 2.0 and 2.3 standard deviations (SD) above the mean, respectively. There is overlap of the facial phenotype with NSD1-positive Sotos syndrome in some cases including a prominent forehead, high anterior hairline, downslanting palpebral fissures and prominent chin. Neonatal feeding difficulties and/or hypotonia have been reported in 30% of patients. Developmental delay/learning disability have been reported in all cases and are typically moderate. Ocular phenotypes are common, including strabismus (65%), nystagmus (25% ) and optic disc pallor/hypoplasia (25%). Other recurrent features include pectus excavatum (40%) and scoliosis (25%). Eight reported patients have a deletion also encompassing CACNA1A, haploinsufficiency of which causes episodic ataxia type 2 or familial hemiplegic migraine. One previous case had episodic ataxia and one case we report has had cyclical vomiting responsive to pizotifen. In individuals with this contiguous gene deletion syndrome, awareness of possible later neurological manifestations is important, although their penetrance is not yet clear.

  6. Diagnosis of a terminal deletion of 4p with duplication of Xp22.31 in a patient with findings of Opitz G/BBB syndrome and Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Joyce; Müller, Ines; Kunath, Melanie; Herrmann, Susanne; Ullmann, Reinhard; Schweiger, Susann

    2008-01-01

    Opitz G/BBB syndrome (OS) is a congenital midline malformation syndrome characterized by hypertelorism, hypospadias, cleft lip/palate, laryngotracheoesophageal abnormalities, imperforate anus, developmental delay and cardiac defects. The X-linked form is caused by mutations in the MID1 gene, while no gene has yet been identified for the autosomal dominant form. Here, we report on a 15-year-old boy who was referred for MID1 mutation analysis with findings typical of OS, including apparent hypertelorism, hypospadias, a history of feeding difficulties, dysphagia secondary to esophageal arteria lusoria, growth retardation and developmental delay. No MID1 mutation was found, but subsequent sub-megabase resolution array CGH unexpectedly documented a 2.34 Mb terminal 4p deletion, suggesting a diagnosis of WHS, and a duplication in Xp22.31. Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) is a contiguous gene deletion syndrome involving terminal chromosome 4p deletions, in particular 4p16.3. WHS is characterized by typical facial appearance ("Greek helmet facies"), mental retardation, congenital hypotonia, and growth retardation. While the severity of developmental delay in this patient supports the diagnosis of WHS rather than OS, this case illustrates the striking similarities of clinical findings in seemingly unrelated syndromes, suggesting common or interacting pathways at the molecular and pathogenetic level. This is the first report of arteria lusoria (esophageal vascular ring) in a patient with WHS. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Growth hormone (GH-1) gene deletions in children with isolated growth hormone deficiency (IGHD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Meena P; Mithbawkar, Shilpa M; Upadhye, Pradnya S; Shalia, Kavita K

    2012-07-01

    To detect growth hormone GH-1 gene deletions (6.7 kb, 7.6 kb, 7 kb) in familial/nonfamilial isolated growth hormone deficiency (IGHD) and note their clinical and investigative profile. Thirty (M16,F14) prepubertal IGHD patients aged 0.25 to 14 y, from 25 families were screened. Duration of growth failure, relevant history, clinical phenotype, and height SDS were recorded. Peak GH response to Clonidine (0.15 mg/m(2)), IGF-1, IGFBP-3 and pituitary/target gland hormones were studied. Genomic DNA of patients and family was analysed by PCR and DNA fragments were visualized on agarose gel electrophoresis. This series was divided into deletion +ve, Group I (n=12,40%) inclusive of six familial/six nonfamilial patients, and deletion -ve Group II (n=18,60%), 5 familial/13 nonfamilial cases; in total 11/30 were familial. Onset of growth failure was earlier in Group I (pGH hormones were normal and MRI showed hypoplastic adenohypophysis. 40% had GH-1 gene deletion (6.7 kb deletion in 83%, 7.6 kb and a compound heterozygote in 8% each). In this series of 30 IGHD patients, frequency of GH-1 gene deletions (12/30) was 40%, and 54% among familial patients, and 31% with height SDS>-4. 83% had 6.7 kb deletion. Height SDS>-4, clinical phenotype, peak GH<1 ng/ml and hypoglycemia characterised IGHD Type IA.

  8. Reciprocal Deletion and Duplication of 17p11.2-11.2: Korean Patients with Smith-Magenis Syndrome and Potocki-Lupski Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Cha Gon; Park, Sang-Jin; Yun, Jun-No; Yim, Shin-Young; Sohn, Young Bae

    2012-01-01

    Deletion and duplication of the -3.7-Mb region in 17p11.2 result in two reciprocal syndrome, Smith-Magenis syndrome and Potocki-Lupski syndrome. Smith-Magenis syndrome is a well-known developmental disorder. Potocki-Lupski syndrome has recently been recognized as a microduplication syndrome that is a reciprocal disease of Smith-Magenis syndrome. In this paper, we report on the clinical and cytogenetic features of two Korean patients with Smith-Magenis syndrome and Potocki-Lupski syndrome. Pat...

  9. Kousseff syndrome caused by deletion of chromosome 22q11-13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Shawnia; Kovach, Margaret J; Smith, Randell E; Rimer, Lisa; Wesson, Melissa; Kimonis, Virginia E

    2002-11-01

    Kousseff syndrome was originally described by Boris Kousseff in 1984: Pediatrics 74:395-398 in three siblings whose main features were conotruncal heart defects, neural tube defects, and dysmorphic features. The proband is a white male who has spina bifida, shunted hydrocephalus, cleft palate, short stature, cognitive impairment, and the typical craniofacial features of velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS), including low-set and dysplastic ears, broad base of the nose, narrow alae nasi, and retrognathia. The family history is significant for a brother who died at 2 weeks of age with myelomeningocele, hydrocephalus, transposition of the great vessels, and unilateral renal agenesis, and a sister who died at 11 days of age with myelomeningocele, truncus arteriosus, hypocalcemia, and autopsy findings of absent thymus and parathyroid glands, consistent with DiGeorge anomaly. Given the clinical findings, family history, and recent knowledge that open neural tube defects can occur in VCFS/DiGeorge anomaly, FISH analysis for 22q11-13 deletion was performed on the proband. A deletion was detected in him and subsequently confirmed in his father. Molecular analysis on autopsy material confirmed the deletion in the proband's deceased brother. We suggest that individuals with neural tube defects associated with other anomalies such as congenital heart defects or cleft palate be evaluated for 22q deletions. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Neuropsychological function in a child with 18p deletion syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willoughby, Brian L; Favero, Marcus; Mochida, Ganeshwaran H; Braaten, Ellen B

    2014-09-01

    We report the neuropsychological profile of a 4-year-old boy with the rare 18p deletion syndrome. We used a battery of standardized tests to assess his development in intellect, language, visuomotor integration, academic readiness, socialization, and emotional and behavioral health. The results showed borderline intellectual function except for low average nonverbal reasoning skills. He had stronger receptive than expressive language skills, although both were well below his age group. He had impaired visuomotor integration and pre-academic skills such as letter identification. Emotional and behavioral findings indicated mild aggressiveness, anxiety, low frustration tolerance, and executive function weaknesses, especially at home. Interestingly, he showed social strengths, responding to joint attention and sharing enjoyment with his examiner. With its assessment of development in many domains, this case report is among the first to characterize the neuropsychological and psychiatric function of a young child with 18p deletion syndrome. We discuss the implications of our findings for clinical practice.

  11. Hypertensive Cerebral Hemorrhage in a Patient with Turner Syndrome Caused by Deletion in the Short Arm of the X Chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Yusuke S; Ohkura, Takahiro; Ebisudani, Yuki; Umakoshi, Michiari; Ishi, Masato; Oda, Kazunori; Aoi, Mizuho; Inoue, Takushi; Furujo, Mahoko; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Fukuhara, Toru

    2017-12-23

    Turner syndrome is a chromosomal disorder usually caused by complete deletion of an X chromosome, with deletion in the short arm of the X chromosome being a rare cause of the condition. Patients with Turner syndrome commonly develop hypertension, and associated vascular complications such as aortic dissection or cerebral hemorrhage have been reported. Cerebral hemorrhage in Turner syndrome is a rare complication, and only a few reports have been published. In these reports, all patients have XO karyotypes or a mosaic type as the cause of Turner syndrome, while no other Turner syndrome types have been documented. In this report, we present for the first time a patient with Turner syndrome caused by deletion in the short arm of the X chromosome who experienced hypertensive hemorrhage as a late complication. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Practical guidelines for managing adults with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Fung, Wai Lun Alan; Butcher, Nancy J.; Costain, Gregory; Andrade, Danielle M.; Boot, Erik; Chow, Eva W.C.; Chung, Brian; Cytrynbaum, Cheryl; Faghfoury, Hanna; Fishman, Leona; García-Miñaúr, Sixto; George, Susan; Lang, Anthony E.; Repetto, Gabriela; Shugar, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    22q11.2 Deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) is the most common microdeletion syndrome in humans, estimated to affect up to 1 in 2,000 live births. Major features of this multisystem condition include congenital anomalies, developmental delay, and an array of early- and later-onset medical and psychiatric disorders. Advances in pediatric care ensure a growing population of adults with 22q11.2DS. Informed by an international panel of multidisciplinary experts and a comprehensive review of the existin...

  13. Familial DiGeorge/velocardiofacial syndrome with deletions of chromosome area 22q11.2: Report of five families with a review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leana-Cox, J.; Pangkanon, Suthipong; Eanet, K.R. [Univ. of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)] [and others

    1996-11-11

    The DiGeorge (DG), velocardiofacial (VCF), and conotruncal anomaly-face (CTAF) syndromes were originally described as distinct disorders, although overlapping phenotypes have been recognized. It is now clear that all three syndromes result from apparently similar or identical 22q11.2 deletions, suggesting that they represent phenotypic variability of a single genetic syndrome. We report on 12 individuals in five families with del(22)(q11.2) by fluorescent in situ hybridization, and define the frequency of phenotypic abnormalities in those cases and in 70 individuals from 27 del(22)(q11.2) families from the literature. Common manifestations include mental impairment (97%), abnormal face (93%), cardiac malformations (681%), thymic (64%) and parathyroid (63%) abnormalities, and cleft palate or velopharyngeal insufficiency (48%). Familial DG, VCF, and CTAF syndromes due to del(22)(q11.2) show significant inter- and intrafamilial clinical variability consistent with the hypothesis that a single gene or group of tightly linked genes is the common cause of these syndromes. Up to 25% of 22q deletions are inherited, indicating that parents of affected children warrant molecular cytogenetic evaluation. We propose use of the compound term {open_quotes}DiGeorge/velocardiofacial (DGNCF) syndrome{close_quotes} in referring to this condition, as it calls attention to the phenotypic spectrum using historically familiar names. 41 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. PCR detection of retinoblastoma gene deletions in radiation-induced mouse lung adenocarcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Churchill, M.E.; Gemmell, M.A.; Woloschak, G.E.

    1994-01-01

    From 1971--1986, Argonne National Laboratory conducted a series of large-scale studies of tumor incidence in 40,000 BCF 1 mice irradiated with 60 Co γ-rays or JANUS fission-spectrum neutrons. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique was used to detect deletions in the mouse retinoblastoma (mRb) gene. Six mRb gene exon fragments were amplified in a 40-cycle, 3-temperature PCR protocol. Absence of any of these fragments on a Southern blot indicated a deletion of that portion of the mRb gene. Tumors chosen for analysis were lung adenocarcinomas that were judged to be the cause of death in post-mortem analyses. Spontaneous tumors as well as those from irradiated mice were analyzed for mRb deletions. In all normal mouse tissues studies all six mRb exon fragments were present on Southern blots. Tumors in six neutron-irradiated mice also had no mRb deletions. However, 1 of 6 tumors from γ-irradiated mice and 6 of 18 spontaneous tumors from unirradiated mice showed a deletion in one or both mRb alleles. All deletions detected were in the 5' region of the mRb gene

  15. PCR detection of retinoblastoma gene deletions in radiation-induced mouse lung adenocarcinomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Churchill, M.E.; Gemmell, M.A.; Woloschak, G.E.

    1994-05-01

    From 1971--1986, Argonne National Laboratory conducted a series of large-scale studies of tumor incidence in 40,000 BCF{sub 1} mice irradiated with {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays or JANUS fission-spectrum neutrons. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique was used to detect deletions in the mouse retinoblastoma (mRb) gene. Six mRb gene exon fragments were amplified in a 40-cycle, 3-temperature PCR protocol. Absence of any of these fragments on a Southern blot indicated a deletion of that portion of the mRb gene. Tumors chosen for analysis were lung adenocarcinomas that were judged to be the cause of death in post-mortem analyses. Spontaneous tumors as well as those from irradiated mice were analyzed for mRb deletions. In all normal mouse tissues studies all six mRb exon fragments were present on Southern blots. Tumors in six neutron-irradiated mice also had no mRb deletions. However, 1 of 6 tumors from {gamma}-irradiated mice and 6 of 18 spontaneous tumors from unirradiated mice showed a deletion in one or both mRb alleles. All deletions detected were in the 5{prime} region of the mRb gene.

  16. A novel deletion mutation in the TUSC3 gene in a consanguineous Pakistani family with autosomal recessive nonsyndromic intellectual disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Nadir

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intellectual disability (ID is a serious disorder of the central nervous system with a prevalence of 1-3% in a general population. In the past decades, the research focus has been predominantly on X-linked ID (68 loci and 19 genes for non syndromic X linked ID while for autosomal recessive nonsyndromic ID (NSID only 30 loci and 6 genes have been reported to date. Methods Genome-wide homozygosity mapping with 500 K Nsp1 array (Affymetrix, CNV analysis, PCR based breakpoint mapping and DNA sequencing was performed to explore the genetic basis of autosomal recessive nonsyndromic ID in a large Pakistani family. Results Data analysis showed linkage at 8p23 locus with common homozygous region between SNPs rs6989820 and rs2237834, spanning a region of 12.494 Mb. The subsequent CNV analysis of the data revealed a homozygous deletion of 170.673 Kb which encompassed the TUSC3 gene. Conclusion We report a novel deletion mutation in TUSC3 gene which is the second gene after TRAPPC9 in which mutation has been identified in more than one family with autosomal recessive NSID. The study will aid in exploring the molecular pathway of cognition.

  17. Epilepsy in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome: A Case Series and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudigoudar, Basanagoud; Nune, Sunitha; Fulton, Stephen; Dayyat, Ehab; Wheless, James W

    2017-11-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome affects multiple organ systems, and the neurological manifestations are an important aspect of this disorder. Many are aware of cardiac anomalies associated with this uncommon genetic disorder. However, the different types of seizures, electroencephalography (EEG), and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings seen in this condition are not appreciated. Medical records of four patients with epilepsy due to 22q11.2 deletion syndrome were retrospectively reviewed for documentation of seizure types, EEG, and brain MRI findings. In addition, we also did a literature review of previously reported individuals with unprovoked seizures in this condition. A review of all published cases including our patients reveals that focal epilepsy (39 of 88, 44%) is the most common type followed by genetic generalized epilepsy (24 of 88, 27%). Diffuse cerebral atrophy and polymicrogyria were the most frequent MRI findings. Patients with structural brain abnormalities, especially polymicrogyria and associated epilepsy should have a chromosomal microarray (CMA) performed to screen for the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Focal epilepsy and genetic generalized epilepsy are the most frequent epilepsy types reported in this condition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Ocular Findings in Children With 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokturk, Bahar; Topcu-Yilmaz, Pinar; Bozkurt, Banu; Yildirim, Mahmut Selman; Guner, Sukru Nail; Sayar, Esra Hazar; Reisli, Ismail

    2016-07-01

    To identify the ocular features of children diagnosed as having 22q11.2 deletion syndrome in a Turkish population, which is the most common microdeletion syndrome with a wide range of facial and ocular abnormalities. Sixteen children aged between 4 months and 18 years with a microdeletion in chromosome 22q11.2 underwent a detailed ophthalmological examination including uncorrected and best corrected visual acuity testing, stereoscopic vision examination, biomicroscopic and indirect fundus examination, and ocular motility testing. All patients had at least one ocular abnormality. The major abnormalities were eyelid abnormalities (eye hooding, narrow palpebral fissure, telecanthus, hypertelorism, sparse and thin eyebrows and eyelashes, blepharitis, and distichiasis), posterior embryotoxon, and tortuous retinal vessels in at least half of the patients. Other ophthalmological disorders were refractive errors, iris remnants, and strabismus. The chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome is associated with a wide range of ocular disorders, which necessitates a comprehensive eye examination for appropriate treatment and follow-up. Ocular findings sometimes can provide a clue to the diagnosis of 22q11.2 deletion. [J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus. 2016;53(4):218-222]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. Compound Heterozygosity of Low-Frequency Promoter Deletions and Rare Loss-of-Function Mutations in TXNL4A Causes Burn-McKeown Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, Dagmar; Newman, William G.; Wieland, Thomas; Berulava, Tea; Kaffe, Maria; Falkenstein, Daniela; Beetz, Christian; Graf, Elisabeth; Schwarzmayr, Thomas; Douzgou, Sofia; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Daly, Sarah B.; Williams, Simon G.; Bhaskar, Sanjeev S.; Urquhart, Jill E.; Anderson, Beverley; O’Sullivan, James; Boute, Odile; Gundlach, Jasmin; Czeschik, Johanna Christina; van Essen, Anthonie J.; Hazan, Filiz; Park, Sarah; Hing, Anne; Kuechler, Alma; Lohmann, Dietmar R.; Ludwig, Kerstin U.; Mangold, Elisabeth; Steenpaß, Laura; Zeschnigk, Michael; Lemke, Johannes R.; Lourenco, Charles Marques; Hehr, Ute; Prott, Eva-Christina; Waldenberger, Melanie; Böhmer, Anne C.; Horsthemke, Bernhard; O’Keefe, Raymond T.; Meitinger, Thomas; Burn, John; Lüdecke, Hermann-Josef; Strom, Tim M.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in components of the major spliceosome have been described in disorders with craniofacial anomalies, e.g., Nager syndrome and mandibulofacial dysostosis type Guion-Almeida. The U5 spliceosomal complex of eight highly conserved proteins is critical for pre-mRNA splicing. We identified biallelic mutations in TXNL4A, a member of this complex, in individuals with Burn-McKeown syndrome (BMKS). This rare condition is characterized by bilateral choanal atresia, hearing loss, cleft lip and/or palate, and other craniofacial dysmorphisms. Mutations were found in 9 of 11 affected families. In 8 families, affected individuals carried a rare loss-of-function mutation (nonsense, frameshift, or microdeletion) on one allele and a low-frequency 34 bp deletion (allele frequency 0.76%) in the core promoter region on the other allele. In a single highly consanguineous family, formerly diagnosed as oculo-oto-facial dysplasia, the four affected individuals were homozygous for a 34 bp promoter deletion, which differed from the promoter deletion in the other families. Reporter gene and in vivo assays showed that the promoter deletions led to reduced expression of TXNL4A. Depletion of TXNL4A (Dib1) in yeast demonstrated reduced assembly of the tri-snRNP complex. Our results indicate that BMKS is an autosomal-recessive condition, which is frequently caused by compound heterozygosity of low-frequency promoter deletions in combination with very rare loss-of-function mutations. PMID:25434003

  20. Kearns-Sayre's syndrome developing in a boy who survived Pearson's syndrome caused by mitochondrial DNA deletion

    OpenAIRE

    Simonsz, Huib; Bärlocher, K.E.; Rötig, A.

    1992-01-01

    textabstractDocumenta Ophthalmologica 1992, Volume 82, Issue 1-2, pp 73-79 Kearns-Sayre's syndrome developing in a boy who survived Pearson's syndrome caused by mitochondrial DNA deletion Dr H. J. Simonsz, K. Bärlocher, A. Rötig … show all 3 hide » Download PDF (2,322 KB) Abstract A 7-year-old boy presented with bilateral ptosis and atypical retinitis pigmentosa. Before age two, he had had an Fe-refractory anemia, with neutropenia and thrombopenia. Just prior to the ophthalmic examination, th...

  1. [Unexpected discovery of a fetus with DMD gene deletion using single nucleotide polymorphism array].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shaobin; Zhou, Yu; Zhou, Bingyi; Gu, Heng

    2017-08-10

    To investigate the value of single nucleotide polymorphism array (SNP array) for the identification of de novo mutations in the DMD gene among fetuses. G-banded karyotyping and SNP array were performed on a fetus with intrauterine growth restriction but without family history of Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy (DMD/BMD). Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) was subsequently applied on amniocytes and maternal peripheral blood sample to detect DMD gene deletion/duplication mutations. Karyotyping of amniocytes showed a normal 46, XY karyotype. SNP array on amniocytes detected a 116 kb deletion (chrX: 32 455 741-32 571 504) at Xp21.1 with breakpoints at introns 16 and 30 respectively, encompassing exons 17-29 of the DMD gene. In addition, MLPA analysis of the DMD gene on amniocytes confirmed the deletion of exons 17 to 29 identified by SNP array. However, no deletion/duplication mutation was detected by MLPA in the mother. The de novo deletion of exons 17 to 29 of the DMD gene detected in the fetus may result in BMD or DMD. SNP array can improve the efficiency for detecting genomic disorders in fetuses with unidentified pathogenic genes, negative family history and nonspecific phenotypes.

  2. Identical Mitochondrial DNA Deletion in a Woman with Ocular Myopathy and in Her Son with Pearson Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Shanske, Sara; Tang, Yingying; Hirano, Michio; Nishigaki, Yutaka; Tanji, Kurenai; Bonilla, Eduardo; Sue, Carolyn; Krishna, Sindu; Carlo, Jose R.; Willner, Judith; Schon, Eric A.; DiMauro, Salvatore

    2002-01-01

    Single deletions of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are associated with three major clinical conditions: Kearns-Sayre syndrome, a multisystem disorder; Pearson syndrome (PS), a disorder of the hematopoietic system; and progressive external ophthalmoplegia (PEO), primarily affecting the ocular muscles. Typically, single mtDNA deletions are sporadic events, since the mothers, siblings, and offspring of affected individuals are unaffected. We studied a woman who presented with PEO, ptosis, and weaknes...

  3. LIN7A depletion disrupts cerebral cortex development, contributing to intellectual disability in 12q21-deletion syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayumi Matsumoto

    Full Text Available Interstitial deletion of 12q21 has been reported in four cases, which share several common clinical features, including intellectual disability (ID, low-set ears, and minor cardiac abnormalities. Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH analysis using the Agilent Human Genome CGH 180K array was performed with the genomic DNA from a two-year-old Japanese boy with these symptoms, as well as hypoplasia of the corpus callosum. Consequently, a 14 Mb deletion at 12q21.2-q21.33 (nt. 77 203 574-91 264 613 bp, which includes 72 genes, was detected. Of these, we focused on LIN7A, which encodes a scaffold protein that is important for synaptic function, as a possible responsible gene for ID, and we analyzed its role in cerebral cortex development. Western blotting analyses revealed that Lin-7A is expressed on embryonic day (E 13.5, and gradually increases in the mouse brain during the embryonic stage. Biochemical fractionation resulted in the enrichment of Lin-7A in the presynaptic fraction. Suppression of Lin-7A expression by RNAi, using in utero electroporation on E14.5, delayed neuronal migration on postnatal day (P 2, and Lin-7A-deficient neurons remained in the lower zone of the cortical plate and the intermediate zone. In addition, when Lin-7A was silenced in cortical neurons in one hemisphere, axonal growth in the contralateral hemisphere was delayed; development of these neurons was disrupted such that one half did not extend into the contralateral hemisphere after leaving the corpus callosum. Taken together, LIN7A is a candidate gene responsible for 12q21-deletion syndrome, and abnormal neuronal migration and interhemispheric axon development may contribute to ID and corpus callosum hypoplasia, respectively.

  4. Sequence characterisation of deletion breakpoints in the dystrophin gene by PCR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbs, S.; Sandhu, S.; Bobrow, M. [Guy`s Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    1994-09-01

    Partial deletions of the dystrophin gene account for 65% of cases of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. A high proportion of these structural changes are generated by new mutational events, and lie predominantly within two `hotspot` regions, yet the underlying reasons for this are not known. We are characterizing and sequencing the regions surrounding deletion breakpoints in order to: (i) investigate the mechanisms of deletion mutation, and (ii) enable the design of PCR assays to specifically amplify mutant and normal sequences, allowing us to search for the presence of somatic mosaicism in appropriate family members. Using this approach we have been able to demonstrate the presence of somatic mosaicism in a maternal grandfather of a DMD-affected male, deleted for exons 49-50. Three deletions, namely of exons 48-49, 49-50, and 50, have been characterized using a PCR approach that avoids any cloning procedures. Breakpoints were initially localized to within regions of a few kilobases using Southern blot restriction analyses with exon-specific probes and PCR amplification of exonic and intronic loci. Sequencing was performed directly on PCR products: (i) mutant sequences were obtained from long-range or inverse-PCR across the deletion junction fragments, and (ii) normal sequences were obtained from the products of standard PCR, vectorette PCR, or inverse-PCR performed on YACs. Further characterization of intronic sequences will allow us to amplify and sequence across other deletion breakpoints and increase our knowledge of the mechanisms of mutation in the dystophin gene.

  5. A 45 X male patient with 7q distal deletion and rearrangement with SRY gene translocation: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilen, S; Okten, A; Karaguzel, G; Ikbal, M; Aslan, Y

    2013-01-01

    Here we present a male newborn with multiple congenital anomalies who also has an extremely rare form of testicular disorder of sex development (DSD). His karyotype was 45X, without any mosaicism. SRY gene was positive by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and rearranged on distal part of the 7th chromosome by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis. SRY, normally located on the Y chromosome, is the most important gene that plays a role in the development of male sex. SRY gen may be translocated onto another chromosome, mostly X chromosome in the XX testicular DSD. On the other hand very few cases of 45 X testicular DSD were published to date. Other clinical manifestations of our patient were compatible with distal 7 q deletion syndrome. To the best of our knowledge this is the first case of 45 X testicular DSD with SRY gene rearranged on the 7th autosomal chromosome.

  6. Effect of 5'-flanking sequence deletions on expression of the human insulin gene in transgenic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fromont-Racine, M; Bucchini, D; Madsen, O

    1990-01-01

    Expression of the human insulin gene was examined in transgenic mouse lines carrying the gene with various lengths of DNA sequences 5' to the transcription start site (+1). Expression of the transgene was demonstrated by 1) the presence of human C-peptide in urine, 2) the presence of specific......, and -168 allowed correct initiation of the transcripts and cell specificity of expression, while quantitative expression gradually decreased. Deletion to -58 completely abolished the expression of the gene. The amount of human product that in mice harboring the longest fragment contributes up to 50......% of the total insulin does not alter the normal proportion of mice insulins I and II. These results suggest that expression of the human insulin gene in vivo results from the cooperation of several cis-regulatory elements present in the various deleted fragments. With none of the deletions used, expression...

  7. Gene deletion of cytosolic ATP: citrate lyase leads to altered organic acid production in Aspergillus niger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meijer, Susan Lisette; Nielsen, Michael Lynge; Olsson, Lisbeth

    2009-01-01

    With the availability of the genome sequence of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger, the use of targeted genetic modifications has become feasible. This, together with the fact that A. niger is well established industrially, makes this fungus an attractive micro-organism for creating a cell...... factory platform for production of chemicals. Using molecular biology techniques, this study focused on metabolic engineering of A. niger to manipulate its organic acid production in the direction of succinic acid. The gene target for complete gene deletion was cytosolic ATP: citrate lyase (acl), which...... the acl gene. Additionally, the total amount of organic acids produced in the deletion strain was significantly increased. Genome-scale stoichiometric metabolic model predictions can be used for identifying gene targets. Deletion of the acl led to increased succinic acid production by A. niger....

  8. Mapping of polyketide biosynthesis pathways in Aspergillus nidulans using a genome wide PKS gene deletion library

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld; Rank, Christian; Klejnstrup, Marie Louise

    In order to map new links between PKS genes and their products in Aspergillus nidulans we have systematically deleted all thirty-two individual genes predicted to encode polyketide synthases in this model organism. This number greatly exceeds the number of currently known PKs calling for new...... approaches for triggering “cryptic” or “silent” genes to see production of compounds not previously observed under laboratory conditions. We therefore decided to challenge our deletion library on eight different complex media, spanning a large variety of alternating carbon and nitrogen sources, vitamins...

  9. Deletion of UBE3A in brothers with Angelman syndrome at the breakpoint with an inversion at 15q11.2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Yukiko; Ohashi, Ikuko; Saito, Toshiyuki; Nagai, Jun-Ichi; Ida, Kazumi; Naruto, Takuya; Wada, Takahito; Kurosawa, Kenji

    2014-11-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is characterized by severe intellectual disability with ataxia, epilepsy, and behavioral uniqueness. The underlining molecular deficit is the absence of the maternal copy of the imprinted UBE3A gene due to maternal deletions, which is observed in 70-75% of cases, and can be detected using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) of the UBE3A region. Only a few familial AS cases have been reported with a complete deletion of UBE3A. Here, we report on siblings with AS caused by a microdeletion of 15q11.2-q12 encompassing UBE3A at the breakpoint of an inversion at 15q11.2 and 15q26.1. Karyotyping revealed an inversion of 15q, and FISH revealed the deletion of the UBE3A region. Array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) demonstrated a 467 kb deletion at 15q11.2-q12, encompassing only UBE3A, SNORD115, and PAR1, and a 53 kb deletion at 15q26.1, encompassing a part of SLCO3A1. Their mother had a normal karyotype and array CGH detected no deletion of 15q11.2-q12, so we assumed gonadal mosaicism. This report describes a rare type of familial AS detected using the D15S10 FISH test. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Heart defects and other features of the 22q11 distal deletion syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fagerberg, Christina R; Graakjaer, Jesper; Heinl, Ulrike D

    2013-01-01

    with 22q11 distal deletions, and discuss the possible roles of haploinsufficiency of the MAPK1 gene. We find the most frequent features in 22q11 distal deletion to be developmental delay or learning disability, short stature, microcephalus, premature birth with low birth weight, and congenital heart...... malformation ranging from minor anomalies to complex malformations. Behavioral problems are also seen in a substantial portion of patients. The following dysmorphic features are relatively common: smooth philtrum, abnormally structured ears, cleft palate/bifid uvula, micro-/retrognathia, upslanting palpebral...

  11. Chemical analysis of a genome wide polyketide synthase gene deletion library in Aspergillus nidulans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld; Klejnstrup, Marie Louise; Nielsen, Jakob Blæsbjerg

    to encode polyketide synthases have been individually been deleted. This presentation will highlight our recent linking of secondary metabolites in A. nidulans to genes, and in particular describe some recent work on characterization of ANID_6448 and associated genes responsible for biosynthesis of 3-methyl...

  12. Diagnosis and fine localization of deletion region in Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Tao-Yun; Chia, David; Wang, Jing-Min; Wu, Ye; Li, Jie; Xiao, Jing; Jiang, Yu-Wu

    2010-07-01

    Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) results from the partial deletion of 4p. This study aimed to identify and fine map the chromosome deletion regions of Chinese children with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome among the developmental delay/mental retardation (DD/MR) patients. We analyzed the relationship of phenotype and genotype. Inclusion criteria were: moderate to severe DD/MR, no definite perinatal brain injury, and no trauma, toxication, hypoxia, infection of central nervous system; routine karyotyping was normal, no evidence of typical inherited metabolic disorder or specific neurodegenerative disorders from cranial neuro-imaging and blood/urinary metabolic diseases screening; no mutation of FMR1 in male patients, no typical clinical manifestation of Rett syndrome in female patients. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) and Affymetrix genome-wide human SNP array 6.0 assays were applied to accurately define the exact size of subtelomeric aberration region of four WHS patients. All four WHS patients presented with severe DD, hypotonia and microcephaly, failure to thrive, 3/4 patients with typical facial features and seizures, 2/4 patients with congenital heart defects and cleft lip/palate, 1/4 patients with other malformations. The length of the deletions ranged from 3.3 Mb to 9.8 Mb. Two of four patients had "classic" WHS, 1/4 patients had "mild"-to-"classic" WHS, and 1/4 patients had "mild" WHS. WHS patients in China appear to be consistent with those previously reported. The prevalence of signs and symptoms, distribution of cases between "mild" and "classic" WHS, and the correlation between length of deletion and severity of disease of these patients were all similar to those of the patients from other populations.

  13. Array-based FMR1 sequencing and deletion analysis in patients with a fragile X syndrome-like phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen C Collins

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Fragile X syndrome (FXS is caused by loss of function mutations in the FMR1 gene. Trinucleotide CGG-repeat expansions, resulting in FMR1 gene silencing, are the most common mutations observed at this locus. Even though the repeat expansion mutation is a functional null mutation, few conventional mutations have been identified at this locus, largely due to the clinical laboratory focus on the repeat tract.To more thoroughly evaluate the frequency of conventional mutations in FXS-like patients, we used an array-based method to sequence FMR1 in 51 unrelated males exhibiting several features characteristic of FXS but with normal CGG-repeat tracts of FMR1. One patient was identified with a deletion in FMR1, but none of the patients were found to have other conventional mutations.These data suggest that missense mutations in FMR1 are not a common cause of the FXS phenotype in patients who have normal-length CGG-repeat tracts. However, screening for small deletions of FMR1 may be of clinically utility.

  14. Differential DNA methylation at birth associated with mental disorder in individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starnawska, A; Hansen, C S; Sparsø, T

    2017-01-01

    Individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (DS) have an increased risk of comorbid mental disorders including schizophrenia, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, depression, as well as intellectual disability. Although most 22q11.2 deletion carriers have the long 3-Mb form of the hemizygous...... deletion, there remains a large variation in the development and progression of psychiatric disorders, which suggests that alternative factors contribute to the pathogenesis. In this study we investigated whether neonatal DNA methylation signatures in individuals with the 22q11.2 deletion associate...

  15. Characterization of a novel mitochondrial DNA deletion in a patient with a variant of the Pearson marrow-pancreas syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Ouweland, J M; de Klerk, J B; van de Corput, M P; Dirks, R W; Raap, A K; Scholte, H R; Huijmans, J G; Hart, L M; Bruining, G J; Maassen, J A

    2000-03-01

    We have recently diagnosed a patient with anaemia, severe tubulopathy, and diabetes mellitus. As the clinical characteristics resembled Pearson marrow-pancreas syndrome, despite the absence of malfunctioning of the exocrine pancreas in this patient, we have performed DNA analysis to seek for deletions in mtDNA. DNA analysis showed a novel heteroplasmic deletion in mtDNA of 8034bp in length, with high proportions of deleted mtDNA in leukocytes, liver, kidney, and muscle. No deletion could be detected in mtDNA of leukocytes from her mother and young brother, indicating the sporadic occurrence of this deletion. During culture, skin fibroblasts exhibited a rapid decrease of heteroplasmy indicating a selection against the deletion in proliferating cells. We estimate that per cell division heteroplasmy levels decrease by 0.8%. By techniques of fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH) and mitochondria-mediated transformation of rho(o) cells we could show inter- as well as intracellular variation in the distribution of deleted mtDNA in a cell population of cultured skin fibroblasts. Furthermore, we studied the mitochondrial translation capacity in cybrid cells containing various proportions of deleted mtDNA. This result revealed a sharp threshold, around 80%, in the proportion of deleted mtDNA, above which there was strong depression of overall mitochondrial translation, and below which there was complementation of the deleted mtDNA by the wild-type DNA. Moreover, catastrophic loss of mtDNA occurred in cybrid cells containing 80% deleted mtDNA.

  16. The immune deficiency of chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morsheimer, Megan; Brown Whitehorn, Terri F; Heimall, Jennifer; Sullivan, Kathleen E

    2017-09-01

    The syndrome originally described by Dr. Angelo DiGeorge had immunodeficiency as a central component. When a 22q11.2 deletion was identified as the cause in the majority of patients with DiGeorge syndrome, the clinical features of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome became so expansive that the immunodeficiency became less prominent in our thinking about the syndrome. This review will focus on the immune system and the changes in our understanding over the past 50 years. Initially characterized as a pure defect in T cell development, we now appreciate that many of the clinical features related to the immunodeficiency are well downstream of the limitation imposed by a small thymus. Dysfunctional B cells presumed to be secondary to compromised T cell help, issues related to T cell exhaustion, and high rates of atopy and autoimmunity are aspects of management that require consideration for optimal clinical care and for designing a cogent monitoring approach. New data on atopy are presented to further demonstrate the association. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome after operative intervention for velopharyngeal insufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Jeffrey Crockett

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Surgical treatment of velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome is often warranted. In this patient population, VPI is characterized by poor palatal elevation and muscular hypotonia with an intact palate. We hypothesize that 22q11.2 deletion patients are at greater risk of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA after surgical correction of VPI, due, in part, to their functional hypotonia, large velopharyngeal gap size, and the need to surgically obstruct the velopharynx. Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome treated at a tertiary pediatric hospital between the years of 2002-2012. The incidence of VPI, need for surgery, post-operative polysomnogram, post-operative VPI assessment, and OSA treatments were evaluated. Results: Forty-three patients (18 males, 25 females, ages 1-14 years fitting the inclusion criteria were identified. Twenty-eight patients were evaluated by speech pathology due to hypernasality. Twenty-one patients had insufficient velopharyngeal function and required surgery. Fifteen underwent pharyngeal flap surgery, three underwent sphincter pharyngoplasty, two underwent Furlow palatoplasty, and one underwent combined sphincter pharyngoplasty with Furlow palatoplasty. Of these, eight had post-operative snoring. Six of these underwent polysomnography. Four patients were found to have OSA based on the results of the polysomnography (average apnea/hypopnea index of 4.9 events/hour, median=5.1, SD=2.1. Two required continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP due to moderate OSA.Conclusion: Surgery is often necessary to correct VPI in patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Monitoring for OSA should be considered after surgical correction of VPI due to a high occurrence in this population. Furthermore, families should be counseled of the risk of OSA after surgery and the potential need for treatment with CPAP.

  18. Distal Xq28 microdeletions: clarification of the spectrum of contiguous gene deletions involving ABCD1, BCAP31, and SLC6A8 with a new case and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, Amy R U L; Raymond, Gerald V

    2014-10-01

    The contiguous ABCD1/DXS1375E (BCAP31) deletion syndrome (CADDS) is a rare X-linked contiguous gene deletion syndrome with a severe clinical phenotype that includes marked delays, significant growth failure, liver dysfunction, and early death. The X-linked creatine transporter deficiency is a considerably more common and a cause of X-linked intellectual disability; however, multi-exon deletions of the creatine transporter are rare. We report the fifth case of CADDS, who also has a deletion of the X-linked creatine transporter. We also review reported cases of deletions in this region in order to clarify the clinical spectrum of contiguous microdeletions in this region. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Partial USH2A deletions contribute to Usher syndrome in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dad, Shzeena; Rendtorff, Nanna Dahl; Kann, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Usher syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by congenital hearing impairment, progressive visual loss owing to retinitis pigmentosa and in some cases vestibular dysfunction. Usher syndrome is divided into three subtypes, USH1, USH2 and USH3. Twelve loci and eleven genes have s...

  20. Site-specific deletions of the mitochondrial genome in the Pearson marrow-pancreas syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rötig, A; Cormier, V; Koll, F; Mize, C E; Saudubray, J M; Veerman, A; Pearson, H A; Munnich, A

    1991-06-01

    The Pearson marrow-pancreas syndrome is a fatal disorder involving the hematopoietic system and the exocrine pancreas in early infancy. We have previously shown that this disease results from a widespread defect of oxidative phosphorylation. Here, we describe deletions of the mitochondrial (mt) genome between repeated 8- to 13-bp sequences as consistent features of the disease. Studying a series of nine unrelated children, including the patient originally reported by H. Pearson, we found five different types of direct repeats at the boundaries of the mtDNA deletions and we provided evidence for conservation of the 3'-repeated sequence in the deletions. In addition, we found a certain degree of homology between the nucleotide composition of the direct repeats and several structures normally involved in mtDNA replication and mtRNA processing. These results are consistent either with the recognition and cleavage of a particular DNA sequence with a factor of still unknown origin or with a homologous recombination between direct-repeat mtDNA sequences in the Pearson syndrome.

  1. Clinical variability of chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyarchuk, Oksana; Volyanska, Liubov; Dmytrash, Liubov

    2017-01-01

    22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2 DS) is a disorder that has multiple symptoms and affects various organs and systems. Despite the great variability of clinical manifestations, common 22q11.2 DS includes congenital heart defect, immunodeficiency, characteristic facial features, palatal defects, developmental and/or learning disabilities, and hypocalcaemia. We present the cases of three patients with 22q11.2 DS that we have observed. Heart defects were revealed in all cases, and tetralogy of Fallot in one of them. Immune system disorders in these cases were highly variable and did not correlate with aplasia or hypoplasia of the thymus. Cleft palate was diagnosed only in one case. Characteristic facial features were presented in all cases but they were not significant and varied from subtle to mild. Developmental disability was presented by motor delays in two cases. Hypocalcaemia was revealed in one patient, and seizures were absent. Only one case completely fit CATCH-22 syndrome (cardiac defects, abnormal facies, thymic hypoplasia, cleft palate, and hypocalcaemia caused by22q11.2 deletion). The other cases had three out of the five main features, with some other, less significant signs also presented. In some cases, even just a few signs should be the reason for further examination to exclude 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Currently, immunological disorders are not a significant determinant in the diagnosis of this syndrome, and timely correction of heart defects can reduce the number of recurrent respiratory infections. A multidisciplinary approach to the management of these patients and providing timely, complex medical care will prevent serious complications.

  2. Polymerase chain reaction detection of retinoblastoma gene deletions in paraffin-embedded mouse lung adenocarcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Churchill, M.E.; Gemmell, M.A.; Woloschak, G.E.

    1991-01-01

    A Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique was used to detect deletions in the mouse retinoblastoma (mRb) gene using microtomed sections from paraffin-embedded radiation-induced and spontaneous tumors as the DNA source. Six mRb gene exon fragments were amplified in a 40-cycle, 3-temperature PCR protocol. Absence of any of these fragments relative to control PCR products on a Southern blot indicated a deletion of that portion of the mRb gene. Tumors chosen for analysis were lung adenocarcinomas that were judged to be the cause of death. Spontaneous tumors as well as those from irradiated mice (569 cGy of 60 Co γ rays or 60 cGy of JANUS neutrons) were analyzed. Tumors in six neutron-irradiated mice also had no mRb deletions. However, one of six tumors from γ-irradiated mice and 6 of 18 spontaneous tumors from unirradiated mice showed a deletion in one or both mRb alleles. All deletions detected were in the 5' region of the mRb gene

  3. Definition of 5q11.2 Microdeletion Syndrome Reveals Overlap with CHARGE Syndrome and 22q11 Deletion Syndrome Phenotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, Charlotte Snijders; Corsten-Janssen, Nicole; FitzPatrick, David R.; Romano, Corrado; Fichera, Marco; Vitello, Girolamo Aurelio; Willemsen, Marjolein H.; Schoots, Jeroen; Pfundt, Rolph; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M. A.; Hoefsloot, Lies; Kleefstra, Tjitske

    2014-01-01

    Microdeletions of the 5q11.2 region are rare; in literature only two patients with a deletion in this region have been reported so far. In this study, we describe four additional patients and further define this new 5q11.2 microdeletion syndrome. A comparison of the features observed in all six

  4. 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome Is Associated With Impaired Auditory Steady-State Gamma Response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kit Melissa; Pellegrino, Giovanni; Birknow, Michelle Rosgaard

    2017-01-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome confers a markedly increased risk for schizophrenia. 22q11.2 deletion carriers without manifest psychotic disorder offer the possibility to identify functional abnormalities that precede clinical onset. Since schizophrenia is associated with a reduced cortical gamma...... response to auditory stimulation at 40 Hz, we hypothesized that the 40 Hz auditory steady-state response (ASSR) may be attenuated in nonpsychotic individuals with a 22q11.2 deletion. Eighteen young nonpsychotic 22q11.2 deletion carriers and a control group of 27 noncarriers with comparable age range (12...... Hz click stimulation. Both gamma power and inter-trial phase coherence of the ASSR were markedly reduced in the 22q11.2 deletion group. The ability to phase lock cortical gamma activity to regular auditory 40 Hz stimulation correlated with the individual expression of negative symptoms in deletion...

  5. Two families with isolated cat cry without the cri-du-chat syndrome phenotype have an inherited 5p15.3 deletion: Delineation of the larynx malformation region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gersh, M.; Overhauser, J. [Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Pasztor, L.M. [Children`s Mercy Hospital, Kansas City, MO (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The cri-du-chat syndrome is a contiguous gene syndrome that results from a deletion of the short arm of chromosome 5 (5p). Patients present with a cat-like cry at birth that is usually considered diagnostic of this syndrome. Additional features of the syndrome include failure to thrive, microcephaly, hypertelorism, epicanthal folds, hypotonia, and severe mental retardation. We report on two families in which the patients with 5p deletions have only the characteristic cat-like cry with normal to mildly delayed development. One family has three children with varying levels of developmental delay and a deletion of 5p15.3 that was inherited from the father. The second family has a mother and daughter both presenting with a cat-like cry and normal intelligence. A de novo deletion in a patient with isolated cat cry and mild developmental delay was also identified. The precise locations of the deletions in each family were determined by fluorescent in situ hybridization using lambda phage, cosmids, and YAC clones. Cryptic translocations and mosaicism were not detected in the parents transmitting the deletion. All of the deletion breakpoints map distal to the previously defined cri-du-chat critical region. A YAC contig has been constructed for the chromosomal region implicated in the larynx malformation. DNA clones mapping in this region will be useful diagnostic tools for delineating 5p deletions that result in the typical features of cri-du-chat syndrome with deletions that result in the isolated cat-like cry feature which is associated with a better prognosis.

  6. Deleting the Arntl clock gene in the granular layer of the mouse cerebellum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bering, Tenna; Carstensen, Mikkel Bloss; Rath, Martin Fredensborg

    2017-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus houses the central circadian clock and is characterized by the timely regulated expression of clock genes. However, neurons of the cerebellar cortex also contain a circadian oscillator with circadian expression of clock genes being controlled by the suprachiasmatic...... is involved in circadian physiology and food anticipation, we therefore by use of Cre-LoxP technology generated a conditional knockout mouse with the core clock gene Arntl deleted specifically in granule cells of the cerebellum, since expression of clock genes in the cerebellar cortex is mainly located...... in this cell type. We here report that deletion of Arntl heavily influences the molecular clock of the cerebellar cortex with significantly altered and arrhythmic expression of other central clock and clock-controlled genes. On the other hand, daily expression of clock genes in the suprachiasmatic nucleus...

  7. De novo unbalanced translocation (4p duplication/8p deletion) in a patient with autism, OCD, and overgrowth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagar, Angela; Pinto, Dalila; Najjar, Fedra; Guter, Stephen J; Macmillan, Carol; Cook, Edwin H

    2017-06-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities, such as unbalanced translocations and copy number variants (CNVs), are found in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) [Sanders et al. (2011) Neuron 70: 863-885]. Many chromosomal abnormalities, including sub microscopic genomic deletions and duplications, are missed by G-banded karyotyping or Fragile X screening alone and are picked up by chromosomal microarrays [Shen et al. (2010) Pediatrics 125: e727-735]. Translocations involving chromosomes 4 and 8 are possibly the second most frequent translocation in humans and are often undetected in routine cytogenetics [Giglio et al. (2002) Circulation 102: 432-437]. Deletions of 4p16 have been associated with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome while 4p16 duplications have been associated with an overgrowth syndrome and mild to moderate mental retardation [Partington et al. (1997) Journal of Medical Genetics 34: 719-728]. The 8p23.3 region contains the autism candidate gene DLGAP2, which can contribute to autism when disrupted [Marshall et al. (2008) The American Journal of Human Genetics 82: 477-488] . There has been a case report of a family with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), prominent obsessional behavior, and overgrowth in patients with der (8) t (4;8) p (16;23) [Partington et al. (1997)]. This is an independent report of a male patient with autism, obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and an overgrowth syndrome, whose de novo unbalanced translocation der (8) t (4;8) p (16.1→ter; 23.1→ter) was initially missed by routine cytogenetics but detected with SNP microarray, allowing higher resolution of translocation breakpoints. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. A novel TP53 germline inframe deletion identified in a Spanish series of Li-fraumeni syndrome suspected families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llovet, Patricia; Illana, Francisco J; Martín-Morales, Lorena; de la Hoya, Miguel; Garre, Pilar; Ibañez-Royo, M Dolores; Pérez-Segura, Pedro; Caldés, Trinidad; García-Barberán, Vanesa

    2017-10-01

    Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is an autosomal dominant, inherited tumor predisposition syndrome associated with heterozygous germline mutations in the TP53 gene. The molecular diagnosis of LFS is important to develop strategies for early detection and access to the genetic counseling. Our study evaluated germline TP53 mutations in Spanish families with a history suggestive of LFS. Germline TP53 alterations in 22 families with a history suggestive of LFS were evaluated by Sanger sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. Loss of heterozygosity analysis and immunohistochemistry of the protein in the tumor were performed in order to evaluate the pathogenicity of a novel alteration detected. A total of seven TP53 mutations were detected, six point mutations (4 missense and 2 nonsense) and a novel inframe deletion. 93% of mutation carriers developed at least one malignancy (mainly breast cancer and sarcomas), with a mean age at diagnosis of the first tumor of 30.2 years. Two missense mutations acted as dominant-negative. The novel inframe mutation c.437_445del was located in the DNA-binding domain. This mutation segregated with cancer in the family, and both high expression of the protein and loss of the wild-type TP53 allele were detected in the tumor of the carrier. We have found a novel inframe deletion in TP53 that likely results in the loss of p53 function and acts in a non-dominant negative way, although further studies are necessary to clarify this issue. The identification of novel TP53 alterations is crucial for a personalized cancer-risk management of the Li-Fraumeni syndrome.

  9. Deletion Extents Are Not the Cause of Clinical Variability in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome: Does the Interaction between DGCR8 and miRNA-CNVs Play a Major Role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertini, Veronica; Azzarà, Alessia; Legitimo, Annalisa; Milone, Roberta; Battini, Roberta; Consolini, Rita; Valetto, Angelo

    2017-01-01

    In humans, the most common genomic disorder is the hemizygous deletion of the chromosome 22q11.2 region, that results in the "22q11.2 deletion syndrome" (22q11.2DS). A peculiarity of 22q11.2DS is its great phenotypic variability that makes this pathology a classic example of a syndrome with variable expressivity and incomplete penetrance. The reasons for this variability have not been elucidated yet, and the molecular substrates underlying the different clinical features of 22q11.2DS are still debated. A cohort of 21 patients has been analyzed by array CGH in order to detect some of the genetic differences that may influence this variability. Two aspects have been investigated: (1) the precise localization of the deletion breakpoints within the low copy repeats (LCRs), (2) the additional Copy Number Variations (CNVs) elsewhere in the genome, by analyzing their gene content. Both protein-coding genes and miRNAs were considered, in order to discover possible epistatic interactions between genes of the 22q11.2 region and the rest of the genome. Eighteen out of twenty-one patients had a deletion of ~3 Mb mediated by LCR22-A and D, whereas 3/21 had a smaller deletion. The breakpoints within the LCR22-A and D do not have a major role in the phenotypic variability since they are rather clustered and the small differences concern genes that are not directly related to clinical signs of 22q11.2DS. A detailed analysis of the gene content of 22q11.2 deleted region indicates that this syndrome could be a bioenergetic disorder or consequence of an altered post-transcriptional gene regulation, due to the presence of DGCR8 , a major player of the microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis. Only four genes with mitochondrial function are harbored in the additional CNVs, whereas 11 miRNA, all related to biological pathways present in the 22q11.2DS, have been detected in 19/21 patients. CNVs and miRNAs are new entities that have changed the order of complexity at the level of gene expression and

  10. Recurring exon deletions in the HP (haptoglobin) gene contribute to lower blood cholesterol levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boettger, Linda M; Salem, Rany M; Handsaker, Robert E; Peloso, Gina M; Kathiresan, Sekar; Hirschhorn, Joel N; McCarroll, Steven A

    2016-04-01

    One of the first protein polymorphisms identified in humans involves the abundant blood protein haptoglobin. Two exons of the HP gene (encoding haptoglobin) exhibit copy number variation that affects HP protein structure and multimerization. The evolutionary origins and medical relevance of this polymorphism have been uncertain. Here we show that this variation has likely arisen from many recurring deletions, more specifically, reversions of an ancient hominin-specific duplication of these exons. Although this polymorphism has been largely invisible to genome-wide genetic studies thus far, we describe a way to analyze it by imputation from SNP haplotypes and find among 22,288 individuals that these HP exonic deletions associate with reduced LDL and total cholesterol levels. We further show that these deletions, and a SNP that affects HP expression, appear to drive the strong association of cholesterol levels with SNPs near HP. Recurring exonic deletions in HP likely enhance human health by lowering cholesterol levels in the blood.

  11. Sensitivity to Lovastatin of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains Deleted for Pleiotropic Drug Resistance (PDR) Genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Formenti, Luca Riccardo; Kielland-Brandt, Morten

    2011-01-01

    The use of statins is well established in human therapy, and model organisms such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae are commonly used in studies of drug action at molecular and cellular levels. The investigation of the resistance mechanisms towards statins may suggest new approaches to improve therapy...... based on the use of statins. We investigated the susceptibility to lovastatin of S. cerevisiae strains deleted for PDR genes, responsible for exporting hydrophobic and amphi-philic drugs, such as lovastatin. Strains deleted for the genes tested, PDR1, PDR3, PDR5 and SNQ2, exhibited remarkably different...

  12. Biochemical activities of T-antigen proteins encoded by simian virus 40 A gene deletion mutants.

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, R; Peden, K; Pipas, J M; Nathans, D; Tjian, R

    1983-01-01

    We have analyzed T antigens produced by a set of simian virus 40 (SV40) A gene deletion mutants for ATPase activity and for binding to the SV40 origin of DNA replication. Virus stocks of nonviable SV40 A gene deletion mutants were established in SV40-transformed monkey COS cells. Mutant T antigens were produced in mutant virus-infected CV1 cells. The structures of the mutant T antigens were characterized by immunoprecipitation with monoclonal antibodies directed against distinct regions of th...

  13. A Turkish patient with large 17p11.2 deletion presenting with Smith Magenis syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tug, E; Cine, N; Aydin, H

    2011-01-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS), which occurs as a result of an interstitial deletion within chromosome 17p11.2-p12, is a disorder that presents itself with minor dysmorphic features, brachydactyly, short stature, hypotonia, delayed speech, cognitive deficits and neurobehavioral problems including sleep disturbances and maladaptive repetitive and self-injurious behavior. We present a girl with full SMS phenotype. G-banding cytogenetic analysis showed normal 46,XX karyotype. Whole-genome array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) was performed due to the severity of the phenotype and the unusual features present in the patient. An interstitial deletion in 17p11.2-p12, approximately 4.73 Mb in size was determined. Characteristic physical and behavioral phenotype strongly suggested SMS. This, to the best of our knowledge is the first patient with SMS reported in Turkey. We emphasize the need for whole genome analysis in multiple congenital abnormalities/mental retardation disorders with unusual and severe phenotypes.

  14. Eye Gaze During Face Processing in Children and Adolescents with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Bronwyn; Debbane, Martin; Ottet, Marie-Christine; Vuilleumier, Patrik; Zesiger, Pascal; Antonarakis, Stylianos E.; Eliez, Stephan

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) is a neurogenetic syndrome with high risk for the development of psychiatric disorder. There is interest in identifying reliable markers for measuring and monitoring socio-emotional impairments in 22q11DS during development. The current study investigated eye gaze as a potential marker during a…

  15. Childhood Predictors of Written Expression in Late Adolescents with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome: A Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamsho, N.; Antshel, K. M.; Eckert, T. L.; Kates, W. R.

    2017-01-01

    Background: 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) is the second most prevalent genetic syndrome and has a characteristic academic and behavioural phenotype. The primary objective of the current study was to examine the childhood predictors of written expression achievement in adolescents with 22q11DS. Written expression is an important skill that…

  16. Memory in Intellectually Matched Groups of Young Participants with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome and Those with Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravariti, Eugenia; Jacobson, Clare; Morris, Robin; Frangou, Sophia; Murray, Robin M.; Tsakanikos, Elias; Habel, Alex; Shearer, Jo

    2010-01-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22qDS) and schizophrenia have genetic and neuropsychological similarities, but are likely to differ in memory profile. Confirming differences in memory function between the two disorders, and identifying their genetic determinants, can help to define genetic subtypes in both syndromes, identify genetic risk factors…

  17. Overlapping Numerical Cognition Impairments in Children with Chromosome 22q11.2 Deletion or Turner Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, T. J.; Takarae, Y.; DeBoer, T.; McDonald-McGinn, D. M.; Zackai, E. H.; Ross, J. L.

    2008-01-01

    Children with one of two genetic disorders (chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome and Turner syndrome) as well typically developing controls, participated in three cognitive processing experiments. Two experiments were designed to test cognitive processes involved in basic aspects numerical cognition. The third was a test of simple manual motor…

  18. Tuberous sclerosis complex and polycystic kidney disease contiguous gene syndrome with Moyamoya disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Jonathan; Modi, Lopa; Ramai, Daryl; Tortora, Matthew

    2017-04-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) are two diseases sharing close genetic loci on chromosome 16. Due to contiguous gene syndrome, also known as contiguous gene deletion syndrome, the proximity of TSC2 and PKD1 genes increases the risk of co-deletion resulting in a shared clinical presentation. Furthermore, Moyamoya disease (MMD) is a rare vaso-occlusive disease in the circle of Willis. We present the first case of TSC2/PKD1 contiguous gene syndrome in a patient with MMD along with detailed histopathologic, radiologic, and cytogenetic analyses. We also highlight the clinical presentation and surgical complications in this case. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. Copy Number Deletion Has Little Impact on Gene Expression Levels in Racehorses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Do Park

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Copy number variations (CNVs, important genetic factors for study of human diseases, may have as large of an effect on phenotype as do single nucleotide polymorphisms. Indeed, it is widely accepted that CNVs are associated with differential disease susceptibility. However, the relationships between CNVs and gene expression have not been characterized in the horse. In this study, we investigated the effects of copy number deletion in the blood and muscle transcriptomes of Thoroughbred racing horses. We identified a total of 1,246 CNVs of deletion polymorphisms using DNA re-sequencing data from 18 Thoroughbred racing horses. To discover the tendencies between CNV status and gene expression levels, we extracted CNVs of four Thoroughbred racing horses of which RNA sequencing was available. We found that 252 pairs of CNVs and genes were associated in the four horse samples. We did not observe a clear and consistent relationship between the deletion status of CNVs and gene expression levels before and after exercise in blood and muscle. However, we found some pairs of CNVs and associated genes that indicated relationships with gene expression levels: a positive relationship with genes responsible for membrane structure or cytoskeleton and a negative relationship with genes involved in disease. This study will lead to conceptual advances in understanding the relationship between CNVs and global gene expression in the horse.

  20. Deletion of 11q12.3-11q13.1 in a patient with intellectual disability and childhood facial features resembling Cornelia de Lange syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Martine Isabel; Jespersgaard, Cathrine; Nazaryan, Lusine; Ravn, Kirstine; Brøndum-Nielsen, Karen; Bisgaard, Anne-Marie; Tümer, Zeynep

    2015-11-01

    Deletions within 11q12.3-11q13.1 are very rare and to date only two cases have been described in the literature. In this study we describe a 23-year-old male patient with intellectual disability, behavioral problems, dysmorphic features, dysphagia, gastroesophageal reflux and skeletal abnormalities. Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS, OMIM #122470; #300590; #610759; #300882; #614701) was suggested as a differential diagnosis in childhood although he lacked some of the features typical for this disorder. He does not have a mutation in any of the five known CdLS genes (NIPBL, SMC1A, SMC3, HDAC8, RAD21), but a 1.6Mb deletion at chromosome region 11q12.3-11q13.1 was detected by chromosome microarray. The deletion contains several genes including PPP2R5B, which has been associated with intellectual disability and overgrowth; NRXN2, which has been associated with intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorder; and CDCA5, which is part of the cohesin pathway, as are all the five known CdLS genes. It is therefore possible that deletion of CDCA5 may account for some of the CdLS like features of the present case. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome with Epibulbar Dermoid: An Unusual Association in a Patient with 4p Deletion and Functional Xp Disomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragagnolo, Silvia; Colovati, Mileny E S; Guilherme, Roberta S; Dantas, Anelisa G; de Souza, Malú Zamariolli; de Soares, Maria F; Melaragno, Maria I; Perez, Ana B

    2016-01-01

    Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) is a contiguous gene and multiple malformation syndrome that results from a deletion in the 4p16.3 region. We describe here a 6-month-old girl that presented with WHS features but also displayed unusual findings, such as epibulbar dermoid in the left eye, ear tags, and left microtia. Although on G-banding her karyotype appeared to be normal, chromosomal microarray analysis revealed an ∼13-Mb 4p16.3p15.33 deletion and an ∼9-Mb Xp22.33p22.31 duplication, resulting from a balanced maternal t(X;4)(p22.31;p15.33) translocation. The patient presented with functional Xp disomy due to an unbalanced X-autosome translocation, a rare cytogenetic finding in females with unbalanced rearrangements. Sequencing of both chromosome breakpoints detected no gene disruption. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first patient described in the literature with WHS and epibulbar dermoid, a typical characteristic of the oculoauriculovertebral spectrum (OAVS). Our data suggest that possible candidate genes for OAVS may have been deleted along with the WHS critical region. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Deletions and de novo mutations of SOX11 are associated with a neurodevelopmental disorder with features of Coffin–Siris syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempel, Annmarie; Pagnamenta, Alistair T; Blyth, Moira; Mansour, Sahar; McConnell, Vivienne; Kou, Ikuyo; Ikegawa, Shiro; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Lo-Castro, Adriana; Plessis, Ghislaine; Albrecht, Beate; Battaglia, Agatino; Taylor, Jenny C; Howard, Malcolm F; Keays, David; Sohal, Aman Singh; Kühl, Susanne J; Kini, Usha; McNeill, Alisdair

    2016-01-01

    Background SOX11 is a transcription factor proposed to play a role in brain development. The relevance of SOX11 to human developmental disorders was suggested by a recent report of SOX11 mutations in two patients with Coffin–Siris syndrome. Here we further investigate the role of SOX11 variants in neurodevelopmental disorders. Methods We used array based comparative genomic hybridisation and trio exome sequencing to identify children with intellectual disability who have deletions or de novo point mutations disrupting SOX11. The pathogenicity of the SOX11 mutations was assessed using an in vitro gene expression reporter system. Loss-of-function experiments were performed in xenopus by knockdown of Sox11 expression. Results We identified seven individuals with chromosome 2p25 deletions involving SOX11. Trio exome sequencing identified three de novo SOX11 variants, two missense (p.K50N; p.P120H) and one nonsense (p.C29*). The biological consequences of the missense mutations were assessed using an in vitro gene expression system. These individuals had microcephaly, developmental delay and shared dysmorphic features compatible with mild Coffin–Siris syndrome. To further investigate the function of SOX11, we knocked down the orthologous gene in xenopus. Morphants had significant reduction in head size compared with controls. This suggests that SOX11 loss of function can be associated with microcephaly. Conclusions We thus propose that SOX11 deletion or mutation can present with a Coffin–Siris phenotype. PMID:26543203

  3. Clinical and molecular consequences of exon 78 deletion in DMD gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traverso, Monica; Assereto, Stefania; Baratto, Serena; Iacomino, Michele; Pedemonte, Marina; Diana, Maria Cristina; Ferretti, Marta; Broda, Paolo; Minetti, Carlo; Gazzerro, Elisabetta; Madia, Francesca; Bruno, Claudio; Zara, Federico; Fiorillo, Chiara

    2018-03-19

    We present a 13-year-old patient with persistent increase of serum Creatine Kinase (CK) and myalgia after exertion. Skeletal muscle biopsy showed marked reduction of dystrophin expression leading to genetic analysis of DMD gene by MLPA, which detected a single deletion of exon 78. To the best of our knowledge, DMD exon 78 deletion has never been described in literature and, according to prediction, it should lead to loss of reading frame in the dystrophin gene. To further assess the actual effect of exon 78 deletion, we analysed cDNA from muscle mRNA. This analysis confirmed the absence of 32 bp of exon 78. Exclusion of exon 78 changes the open reading frame of exon 79 and generate a downstream stop codon, producing a dystrophin protein of 3703 amino acids instead of 3685 amino acids. Albeit loss of reading frame usually leads to protein degradation and severe phenotype, in this case, we demonstrated that deletion of DMD exon 78 can be associated with a functional protein able to bind DGC complex and a very mild phenotype. This study adds a novel deletion in DMD gene in human and helps to define the compliance between maintaining/disrupting the reading frame and clinical form of the disease.

  4. Rb and p53 gene deletions in lung adenocarcinomas from irradiated and control mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y.; Woloschak, G.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Center for Mechanistic Biology and Biotechnology

    1997-08-01

    This study was conducted on mouse lung adenocarcinoma tissues that were formalin-treated and paraffin-embedded 25 years ago to investigate the large gene deletions of mRb and p53 in B6CF{sub 1} male mice. A total of 80 lung tissue samples from irradiated mice and 40 lung samples from nonirradiated controls were randomly selected and examined in the mRb portion of this study. The results showed a significant (P < 0.05) higher percentage of mRb deletions in lung adenocarcinomas from mice exposed to 60 once-weekly {gamma}-ray doses than those from mice receiving 24 once-weekly {gamma}-ray doses at low doses and low dose rates; however, the percentage was not significantly different (P > 0.05) from that for spontaneous lung adenocarcinomas or lung adenocarcinomas from mice exposed to single-dose {gamma} irradiation at a similar total dose. mRb fragments 3 (71%) and 5 (67%), the parts of the gene that encoded the pocket binding region of Rb protein to adenovirus E1A and SV40 T-antigen, were the most frequently deleted fragments. p53 gene deletion analysis was carried out on normal lungs and lung adenocarcinomas that were initially found to bear mRb deletions. Exons 1,4,5,6, and 9 were chosen to be analyzed.

  5. Type I oculocutaneous albinism (OCA1) associated with a large deletion of the tyrosinase (TYR) gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spritz, R.A.; Wick, P.A.; Holmes, S.A.; Schnur, R.E. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)]|[Children`s Hospital of Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    OCA1 is an autosomal recessive disorder in which the biosynthesis of melanin is reduced or absent in skin, hair, and eyes, due to deficient enzymatic activity of tyrosinase. TYR consists of 5 exons spanning over 65 kb at 11q14-q21. Analyses of TYR in >400 unrelated patients with OCA1 have identified more than 50 different point mutations; however, no large deletions have been detected. Here we report a large deletion of TYR in a Caucasian boy with OCA1B. Simultaneous SSCP/heteroduplex screening and DNA sequence analysis indicated that the patient was apparently homozygous for a previously described TYR mutation, adjacent to the 3` splice site of IVS2 (-7, t{r_arrow}a). To distinguish between possible gene deletion vs. maternal uniparental isodisomy, we characterized several chromosome 11 polymorphisms. Maternal uniparental isodisomy was excluded by the patient`s heterozygosity for alleles at D11S35 (11q21-122) and HBG2 (11p15.5). In addition, the patient failed to inherit paternal alleles at an MboI RFLP in exon 1 of TYR and at a TaqI RFLP in the promoter region of the gene. To detect a possible submicroscopic deletion, we performed quantitative Southern blot hybridization using a full length TYR cDNA. Compared with controls, both the patient and his father appeared deleted for two or three TYR-derived PstI fragments; the two TYRL-derived fragments appeared normal. These data indicate that the patient and his father have a partial TYR deletion, including at least exons 1, 2, and IVS2. Based on the organization of the gene, this deletion is at least 50 kb in size. The patient is thus hemizygous for the maternally-inherited mutation in IVS2, accounting for his OCA1B phenotype.

  6. Recurring exon deletions in the haptoglobin (HP) gene associate with lower blood cholesterol levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boettger, Linda M.; Salem, Rany M.; Handsaker, Robert E.; Peloso, Gina; Kathiresan, Sekar; Hirschhorn, Joel; McCarroll, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    Two exons of the human haptoglobin (HP) gene exhibit copy number variation that affects HP multimerization and underlies one of the first protein polymorphisms identified in humans. The evolutionary origins and medical significance of this polymorphism have been uncertain. Here we show that this variation has likely arisen from the recurring reversion of an ancient hominin-specific duplication of these exons. Though this polymorphism has been largely invisible to genome-wide genetic studies to date, we describe a way to analyze it by imputation from SNP haplotypes and find among 22,288 individuals that these HP exonic deletions associate with reduced LDL and total cholesterol levels. We show that these deletions, and a SNP that affects HP expression, are the likely drivers of the strong but complex association of cholesterol levels to SNPs near HP. Recurring exonic deletions in the haptoglobin gene likely enhance human health by lowering cholesterol levels in the blood. PMID:26901066

  7. Unmarked gene deletion and host-vector system for the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon Sulfolobus islandicus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deng, Ling; Zhu, Haojun; Chen, Zhengjun

    2009-01-01

    , and unmarked lacS mutants were obtained by each method. A new alternative recombination mechanism, i.e., marker circularization and integration, was shown to operate in the latter method, which did not yield the designed deletion mutation. Subsequently, Sulfolobus-E. coli plasmid shuttle vectors were...... mutant was obtained containing only 233 bp of the original pyrE sequence in the mutant allele and it was used as a host to delete the beta-glycosidase (lacS) gene. Two unmarked gene deletion methods were employed, namely plasmid integration and segregation, and marker replacement and looping out...... constructed, which genetically complemented DeltapyrEFDeltalacS mutation after transformation. Thus, a complete set of genetic tools was established for S. islandicus with pyrEF and lacS as genetic markers....

  8. Identification of Gene Mutations and Fusion Genes in Patients with Sézary Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Aparna; Rabionet, Raquel; Espinet, Blanca; Zapata, Luis; Puiggros, Anna; Melero, Carme; Puig, Anna; Sarria-Trujillo, Yaris; Ossowski, Stephan; Garcia-Muret, Maria P; Estrach, Teresa; Servitje, Octavio; Lopez-Lerma, Ingrid; Gallardo, Fernando; Pujol, Ramon M; Estivill, Xavier

    2016-07-01

    Sézary syndrome is a leukemic form of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma with an aggressive clinical course. The genetic etiology of the disease is poorly understood, with chromosomal abnormalities and mutations in some genes being involved in the disease. The goal of our study was to understand the genetic basis of the disease by looking for driver gene mutations and fusion genes in 15 erythrodermic patients with circulating Sézary cells, 14 of them fulfilling the diagnostic criteria of Sézary syndrome. We have discovered genes that could be involved in the pathogenesis of Sézary syndrome. Some of the genes that are affected by somatic point mutations include ITPR1, ITPR2, DSC1, RIPK2, IL6, and RAG2, with some of them mutated in more than one patient. We observed several somatic copy number variations shared between patients, including deletions and duplications of large segments of chromosome 17. Genes with potential function in the T-cell receptor signaling pathway and tumorigenesis were disrupted in Sézary syndrome patients, for example, CBLB, RASA2, BCL7C, RAMP3, TBRG4, and DAD1. Furthermore, we discovered several fusion events of interest involving RASA2, NFKB2, BCR, FASN, ZEB1, TYK2, and SGMS1. Our work has implications for the development of potential therapeutic approaches for this aggressive disease. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Genetic diagnosis for a family without exonic deletions and duplications of dystrophin gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Hou, Qiaofang; Wu, Dong; Wang, Hongdan; Liu, Hongyan; Yang, Yangli; Zhang, Chaoyang; Ding, Xuebing; Liao, Shixiu

    2015-02-01

    To conduct genetic diagnosis for a family in which no exonic deletions and duplications of the dystrophin gene were detected. Potential exonic deletions and duplications of the dystrophin gene were initially analyzed with using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). Subsequently, all of the 79 exons of the dystrophin gene of the proband and a pregnant woman from the family were analyzed with PCR amplification and DNA sequencing. Following identification of the causative mutation, prenatal diagnosis was provided. MLPA analysis had detected no exonic deletions and duplications of the dystrophin gene. Sequence analysis has identified a C>T mutation on the 22nd nucleotide position of the 70th exon of the dystrophin gene (c.10108 C>T), which has replaced the codon CGA to a stop codon (TGA). The patient's mother and sister were both heterozygous for the same mutation. Upon prenatal diagnosis, the fetus was found to be positive for the Y chromosome sex-determining gene (SRY) and has carried above mutation. The result of short tandem repeat linkage analysis also confirmed that the fetus has inherited the mutant X chromosome. The causative mutation of the dystrophin gene has been discovered in an affected family, which has enabled prenatal diagnosis of the disease.

  10. Molecular characterization of the porcine deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 gene (DMBT1)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haase, Bianca; Humphray, Sean J; Lyer, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    The human gene deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 (DMBT1) is considered to play a role in tumorigenesis and pathogen defense. It encodes a protein with multiple scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) domains, which are involved in recognition and binding of a broad spectrum of bacterial pathogens...

  11. A novel contiguous deletion involving NDP, MAOB and EFHC2 gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 96; Issue 6. A novel contiguous deletion involving NDP, MAOBand EFHC2gene in a patient with familial Norrie disease: bilateral blindness and leucocoria without other deficits. BEI JIA LIPING HUANG YAOYU CHEN SIPING LIU CUIHUA CHEN KE XIONG LANLIN SONG YULAI ...

  12. Prevalence of the exon 2 deletion of the COMMD1 gene in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    rier appears to be related to the reduced biliary excretion of stored copper resulting from a genetic derangement in cop- per metabolism (Hardy 1984; Hyun and Filippich 2004). A mutation resulting in the deletion of exon 2 in the COMMD1. (formerly known as Murr1) gene was found to be responsible for copper toxicosis in a ...

  13. Alu insertion/deletion of ACE gene polymorphism might not affect ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Widodo

    2016-09-03

    Sep 3, 2016 ... ORIGINAL ARTICLE. Alu insertion/deletion of ACE gene polymorphism might not affect significantly the serum bradykinin level in hypertensive patients taking ACE inhibitors. Widodo a,1,. *, Shila Wisnasari b,d,1. , Mohammad Saifur Rohman c. , Lowry Yunita c,g. ,. Mifetika Lukitasari d. , Maulidiyatun Nuril e.

  14. A novel contiguous deletion involving NDP, MAOB and EFHC2 gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 96; Issue 6. A novel contiguous deletion involving NDP, MAOBitalic> and EFHC2italic> gene in a patient with familial Norrie disease: bilateral blindness and leucocoria without other deficits. BEI JIA LIPING HUANG YAOYU CHEN SIPING LIU CUIHUA CHEN KE XIONG LANLIN ...

  15. [Changes of biological behavioral of E. coli K1 after ppk1 gene deletion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Liang; Pan, Jiayun; Luo, Su; Yang, Zhenghui; Huang, Mufang; Cao, Hong

    2014-06-01

    To study the changes in biological behaviors of meningitis E. coli K1 strain E44 after deletion of polyphosphate kinase 1 (ppk1) gene and explore the role of ppk1 in the pathogenesis of E. coli K1-induced meningitis. The wild-type strain E. coli K1 and ppk1 deletion mutant were exposed to heat at 56 degrees celsius; for 6 min, and their survival rates were determined. The adhesion and invasion of the bacteria to human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs) were observed using electron microscopy and quantitative tests. HBMECs were co-incubated with wild-type strain or ppk1 deletion mutant, and the cytoskeleton rearrangement was observed under laser scanning confocal microscope. The survival rate of the ppk1 deletion mutant was significantly lower than that of the wild-type strain after heat exposure. The ppk1 deletion mutant also showed lowered cell adhesion and invasion abilities and weakened ability to induce cytoskeleton rearrangement in HBMECs. ppk1 gene is important for E.coli K1 for heat resistance, cell adhesion and invasion, and for inducing cytoskeletal rearrangement in HBMECs.

  16. The mitochondrial ND1 m.3337G>A mutation associated to multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions in a patient with Wolfram syndrome and cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezghani, Najla; Mnif, Mouna; Mkaouar-Rebai, Emna; Kallel, Nozha; Salem, Ikhlass Haj; Charfi, Nadia; Abid, Mohamed; Fakhfakh, Faiza

    2011-07-29

    Wolfram syndrome (WFS) is a rare hereditary disorder also known as DIDMOAD (diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and deafness). It is a heterogeneous disease and full characterization of all clinical and biological features of this disorder is difficult. The wide spectrum of clinical expression, affecting several organs and tissues, and the similarity in phenotype between patients with Wolfram syndrome and those with certain types of respiratory chain diseases suggests mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) involvement in Wolfram syndrome patients. We report a Tunisian patient with clinical features of moderate Wolfram syndrome including diabetes, dilated cardiomyopathy and neurological complications. The results showed the presence of the mitochondrial ND1 m.3337G>A mutation in almost homoplasmic form in 3 tested tissues of the proband (blood leukocytes, buccal mucosa and skeletal muscle). In addition, the long-range PCR amplifications revealed the presence of multiple deletions of the mitochondrial DNA extracted from the patient's skeletal muscle removing several tRNA and protein-coding genes. Our study reported a Tunisian patient with clinical features of moderate Wolfram syndrome associated with cardiomyopathy, in whom we detected the ND1 m.3337G>A mutation with mitochondrial multiple deletions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Practical guidelines for managing adults with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Wai Lun Alan; Butcher, Nancy J; Costain, Gregory; Andrade, Danielle M; Boot, Erik; Chow, Eva W C; Chung, Brian; Cytrynbaum, Cheryl; Faghfoury, Hanna; Fishman, Leona; García-Miñaúr, Sixto; George, Susan; Lang, Anthony E; Repetto, Gabriela; Shugar, Andrea; Silversides, Candice; Swillen, Ann; van Amelsvoort, Therese; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M; Bassett, Anne S

    2015-08-01

    22q11.2 Deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) is the most common microdeletion syndrome in humans, estimated to affect up to 1 in 2,000 live births. Major features of this multisystem condition include congenital anomalies, developmental delay, and an array of early- and later-onset medical and psychiatric disorders. Advances in pediatric care ensure a growing population of adults with 22q11.2DS. Informed by an international panel of multidisciplinary experts and a comprehensive review of the existing literature concerning adults, we present the first set of guidelines focused on managing the neuropsychiatric, endocrine, cardiovascular, reproductive, psychosocial, genetic counseling, and other issues that are the focus of attention in adults with 22q11.2DS. We propose practical strategies for the recognition, evaluation, surveillance, and management of the associated morbidities.Genet Med 17 8, 599-609.

  18. Exclusion of 22q11 deletion in Noonan syndrome with Tetralogy of Fallot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Digilio, M.C.; Marino, B.; Giannotti, A. [Bambino Gesu Hospital, Rome (Italy); Dallapiccola, B. [Univ. of Tor Vergata, Rome (Italy)]|[Casa Sollievo Sofferenza Hospital, San Giovanni Rotondo (Italy)

    1996-04-24

    We read with interest the report of Robin et al. [1995] published in recent issue of the Journal. The authors described 6 patients with Noonan syndrome (NS) who underwent molecular evaluation for submicroscopic deletion of chromosome band 22q11. None of those patients presented with conotruncal heart defects. Evidence for 22q11 hemizygosity was demonstrated in only one patient. This patient had NS-like manifestations without clinical manifestations of DiGeorge (DG) or velo-cardio-facial (VCF) syndromes. The molecular results obtained in the other 5 patients led the authors to conclude that classical NS is not due to del(22)(q11), even if some patients with del(22)(q11) may present NS-like manifestations. 12 refs., 1 tab.

  19. mtDNA Deletion in an Iranian Infant with Pearson Marrow Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzanian, Mohammad Taghi; Eghbali, Aziz; Karimzade, Parvaneh; Ahmadi, Mitra; Houshmand, Massoud; Rezaei, Nima

    2010-03-01

    Pearson syndrome (PS) is a rare multisystem mitochondrial disorder of hematopoietic system, characterized by refractory sideroblastic anemia, pancytopenia, exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, and variable neurologic, hepatic, renal, and endocrine failure. We describe a six-month-old female infant with Pearson marrow syndrome who presented with neurological manifestations. She had several episodes of seizures. Hematopoietic abnormalities were macrocytic anemia and neutropenia. Bone marrow aspiration revealed a cellular marrow with marked vacuolization of erythroid and myeloid precursors. Analysis of mtDNA in peripheral blood showed 8.5 kb deletion that was compatible with the diagnosis of PS. PS should be considered in infants with neurologic diseases, in patients with cytopenias, and also in patients with acidosis or refractory anemia.

  20. Practical guidelines for managing adults with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Wai Lun Alan; Butcher, Nancy J.; Costain, Gregory; Andrade, Danielle M.; Boot, Erik; Chow, Eva W.C.; Chung, Brian; Cytrynbaum, Cheryl; Faghfoury, Hanna; Fishman, Leona; García-Miñaúr, Sixto; George, Susan; Lang, Anthony E.; Repetto, Gabriela; Shugar, Andrea; Silversides, Candice; Swillen, Ann; van Amelsvoort, Therese; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M.; Bassett, Anne S.

    2015-01-01

    22q11.2 Deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) is the most common microdeletion syndrome in humans, estimated to affect up to 1 in 2,000 live births. Major features of this multisystem condition include congenital anomalies, developmental delay, and an array of early- and later-onset medical and psychiatric disorders. Advances in pediatric care ensure a growing population of adults with 22q11.2DS. Informed by an international panel of multidisciplinary experts and a comprehensive review of the existing literature concerning adults, we present the first set of guidelines focused on managing the neuropsychiatric, endocrine, cardiovascular, reproductive, psychosocial, genetic counseling, and other issues that are the focus of attention in adults with 22q11.2DS. We propose practical strategies for the recognition, evaluation, surveillance, and management of the associated morbidities. PMID:25569435

  1. Gene expression patterns of chicken neuregulin 3 in association with copy number variation and frameshift deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Hideaki; Aoya, Daiki; Takeuchi, Hiro-Aki; Inoue-Murayama, Miho

    2017-07-21

    Neuregulin 3 (NRG3) plays a key role in central nervous system development and is a strong candidate for human mental disorders. Thus, genetic variation in NRG3 may have some impact on a variety of phenotypes in non-mammalian vertebrates. Recently, genome-wide screening for short insertions and deletions in chicken (Gallus gallus) genomes has provided useful information about structural variation in functionally important genes. NRG3 is one such gene that has a putative frameshift deletion in exon 2, resulting in premature termination of translation. Our aims were to characterize the structure of chicken NRG3 and to compare expression patterns between NRG3 isoforms. Depending on the presence or absence of the 2-bp deletion in chicken NRG3, 3 breeds (red junglefowl [RJF], Boris Brown [BB], and Hinai-jidori [HJ]) were genotyped using flanking primers. In the commercial breeds (BB and HJ), approximately 45% of individuals had at least one exon 2 allele with the 2-bp deletion, whereas there was no deletion allele in RJF. The lack of a homozygous mutant indicated the existence of duplicated NRG3 segments in the chicken genome. Indeed, highly conserved elements consisting of exon 1, intron 1, exon 2, and part of intron 2 were found in the reference RJF genome, and quantitative PCR detected copy number variation (CNV) between breeds as well as between individuals. The copy number of conserved elements was significantly higher in chicks harboring the 2-bp deletion in exon 2. We identified 7 novel transcript variants using total mRNA isolated from the amygdala. Novel isoforms were found to lack the exon 2 cassette, which probably harbored the premature termination codon. The relative transcription levels of the newly identified isoforms were almost the same between chick groups with and without the 2-bp deletion, while chicks with the deletion showed significant suppression of the expression of previously reported isoforms. A putative frameshift deletion and CNV in chicken

  2. Variations in angiotensin-converting enzyme gene insertion/deletion ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    sterone system, numerous association studies have been carried out. Though the human ACE gene contains a number of variable polymorphic regions that can .... Indians in general, marry within the community and caste and this may also influence the genotype. The present results thus suggests an ethnic heterogeneity ...

  3. The entire β-globin gene cluster is deleted in a form of τδβ-thalassemia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.R. Fearon; H.H.Jr. Kazazian; P.G. Waber (Pamela); J.I. Lee (Joseph); S.E. Antonarakis; S.H. Orkin (Stuart); E.F. Vanin; P.S. Henthorn; F.G. Grosveld (Frank); A.F. Scott; G.R. Buchanan

    1983-01-01

    textabstractWe have used restriction endonuclease mapping to study a deletion involving the beta-globin gene cluster in a Mexican-American family with gamma delta beta-thalassemia. Analysis of DNA polymorphisms demonstrated deletion of the beta-globin gene from the affected chromosome. Using a DNA

  4. Obesity in adults with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voll, Sarah L; Boot, Erik; Butcher, Nancy J; Cooper, Samantha; Heung, Tracy; Chow, Eva W C; Silversides, Candice K; Bassett, Anne S

    2017-02-01

    To characterize the prevalence of and contributing factors to adult obesity in the most common recurrent copy-number variation (CNV), 22q11.2 deletion, given that other rare CNVs are known to have obesity phenotypes. In 207 adults with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS), we used available height and weight measurements to calculate body mass index (BMI) and recorded associated factors that could play a role in obesity. We used the maximum BMI per subject and logistic regression to test a model predicting obesity class. The prevalence of obesity (BMI ≥30) in 22q11.2DS (n = 90, 43.5%; at median age of 26.7 years) was significantly greater than for Canadian norms (odds ratio (OR) 2.30, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.74-3.02, P obesity level. Ten (4.8%) individuals were diagnosed with type 2 diabetes at a median age of 39.5 years; the prevalence was higher in those with obesity (P adult obesity is related to the 22q11.2 deletion. The findings expand the potential genetic causes of obesity and have important implications for management of 22q11.2DS.Genet Med 19 2, 204-208.

  5. Mother-Child Interaction as a Window to a Unique Social Phenotype in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome and in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisman, Omri; Feldman, Ruth; Burg-Malki, Merav; Keren, Miri; Geva, Ronny; Diesendruck, Gil; Gothelf, Doron

    2015-01-01

    Mother-child interactions in 22q11.2 Deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) and Williams syndrome (WS) were coded for maternal sensitivity/intrusiveness, child's expression of affect, levels of engagement, and dyadic reciprocity. WS children were found to express more positive emotions towards their mothers compared to 22q11.2DS children and those with…

  6. A Comparative Study of Cognition and Brain Anatomy between Two Neurodevelopmental Disorders: 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome and Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Linda E.; Stevens, Angela; Daly, Eileen; Toal, Fiona; Azuma, Rayna; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette; Murphy, Declan G. M.; Murphy, Kieran C.

    2009-01-01

    Background: 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) is associated with intellectual disability, poor social interaction and a high prevalence of psychosis. However, to date there have been no studies comparing cognition and neuroanatomical characteristics of 22q11DS with other syndromes to investigate if the cognitive strengths and difficulties and…

  7. [A de novo partial 5p deletion and cryptic 18p duplication detected by SNP-Array in a boy featuring Cri du Chat syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jian-cheng; Tan, Ke; Cheng, De-hua; Li, Lu-yun; Lu, Guang-xiu; Tan, Yue-qiu

    2013-02-01

    To determine the karyotype of a boy suspected to have Cri du Chat syndrome with severe clinical manifestations, and to assess the recurrence risk for his family. High-resolution GTG banding was performed to analyze the patient and his parents. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with Cri du Chat syndrome region probe as well as subregional probes mapped to 5pter, 5qter, 18pter, 18qter, and whole chromosome painting probe 18 was performed to analyze the patient and his parents. In addition, single nucleotide polymorphism-based arrays (SNP-Array) analysis with Affymetrix GeneChip Genome-wide Human SNP Nsp/Sty 6.0 were also performed to analyze the patient. Karyotype analysis indicated that the patient has carried a terminal deletion in 5p. FISH with Cri du Chat syndrome region probe confirmed that D5S23 and D5S721 loci are deleted. SNP-Array has detected a 15 Mb deletion at 5p and a 2 Mb duplication at 18p. FISH with 5p subtelomeric probes and 18p subtelomeric probe further confirmed that the derivative chromosome 5 has derived from a translocation between 5p and 18p, which has given rise to a 46,XY,der(5)t(5;18)(p15.1;p11.31)dn karyotype. A de novo 5p partial deletion in conjunction with a cryptic 18p duplication has been detected in a boy featuring Cri-du-Chat syndrome. His parents, both with negative findings, have a low recurrence risk. For its ability to detect chromosomal imbalance, SNP-Array has a great value for counseling of similar patients and assessment of recurrence risks.

  8. How to diagnose the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome in patients with schizophrenia: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome is caused by a microdeletion of chromosome 22. One third of all patients with 22q11.2 deletion develop schizophrenia-like symptoms. In general, the prevalence of 22q11.2 deletion in patients with schizophrenia is 1%–2%. The 22q11.2 deletion is one of the major known genetic risk factors for schizophrenia. However, clinical differences in the phenotypes between patients with schizophrenia who are 22q11.2 deletion carriers and those who are not are still unknown. Therefore, it may be difficult to diagnose 22q11.2 deletion in patients with schizophrenia on the basis of clinical symptoms. To date, only two Japanese patients with the deletion have been identified through microdeletion studies of patients with schizophrenia in the Japanese population. Herein, we report the case study of a 48-year-old Japanese woman with 22q11.2 deletion who had a 30-year history of schizophrenia. Based on craniofacial anomalies, unpredictable agitation, hypocalcemia, and brain imaging finding, we suspected the 22q11.2 deletion in clinical populations and diagnosed the deletion using fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis. To find common phenotypes in Japanese patients with the deletion who have schizophrenia-like symptoms, we compared phenotypes among three Japanese cases. The common phenotypes were an absence of congenital cardiovascular anomalies and the presence of current findings of low intellectual ability, agitation, and hypocalcemia. We propose that hypocalcemia and agitation in patients with schizophrenia may derive from the 22q11.2 deletion, particularly when these phenotypes are coupled with schizophrenia-like symptoms. PMID:24063534

  9. Prevalence of pfhrp2 and pfhrp3 gene deletions in Puerto Lempira, Honduras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Joseph F; Okoth, Sheila Akinyi; Fontecha, Gustavo A; Torres, Rosa Elena Mejia; Banegas, Engels I; Matute, María Luisa; Bucheli, Sandra Tamara Mancero; Goldman, Ira F; de Oliveira, Alexandre Macedo; Barnwell, John W; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam

    2015-01-21

    Recent studies have demonstrated the deletion of the histidine-rich protein 2 (PfHRP2) gene (pfhrp2) in field isolates of Plasmodium falciparum, which could result in false negative test results when PfHRP2-based rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) are used for malaria diagnosis. Although primary diagnosis of malaria in Honduras is determined based on microscopy, RDTs may be useful in remote areas. In this study, it was investigated whether there are deletions of the pfhrp2, pfhrp3 and their respective flanking genes in 68 P. falciparum parasite isolates collected from the city of Puerto Lempira, Honduras. In addition, further investigation considered the possible correlation between parasite population structure and the distribution of these gene deletions by genotyping seven neutral microsatellites. Sixty-eight samples used in this study, which were obtained from a previous chloroquine efficacy study, were utilized in the analysis. All samples were genotyped for pfhrp2, pfhrp3 and flanking genes by PCR. The samples were then genotyped for seven neutral microsatellites in order to determine the parasite population structure in Puerto Lempira at the time of sample collection. It was found that all samples were positive for pfhrp2 and its flanking genes on chromosome 8. However, only 50% of the samples were positive for pfhrp3 and its neighboring genes while the rest were either pfhrp3-negative only or had deleted a combination of pfhrp3 and its neighbouring genes on chromosome 13. Population structure analysis predicted that there are at least two distinct parasite population clusters in this sample population. It was also determined that a greater proportion of parasites with pfhrp3-(and flanking gene) deletions belonged to one cluster compared to the other. The findings indicate that the P. falciparum parasite population in the municipality of Puerto Lempira maintains the pfhrp2 gene and that PfHRP2-based RDTs could be considered for use in this region; however

  10. Identification of Nine New RAI1-Truncating Mutations in Smith-Magenis Syndrome Patients without 17p11.2 Deletions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubourg, C; Bonnet-Brilhault, F; Toutain, A; Mignot, C; Jacquette, A; Dieux, A; Gérard, M; Beaumont-Epinette, M-P; Julia, S; Isidor, B; Rossi, M; Odent, S; Bendavid, C; Barthélémy, C; Verloes, A; David, V

    2014-02-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is an intellectual disability syndrome with sleep disturbance, self-injurious behaviors and dysmorphic features. It is estimated to occur in 1/25,000 births, and in 90% of cases it is associated with interstitial deletions of chromosome 17p11.2. RAI1 (retinoic acid induced 1; OMIM 607642) mutations are the second most frequent molecular etiology, with this gene being located in the SMS locus at 17p11.2. Here, we report 9 new RAI1-truncating mutations in nonrelated individuals referred for molecular analysis due to a possible SMS diagnosis. None of these patients carried a 17p11.2 deletion. The 9 mutations include 2 nonsense mutations and 7 heterozygous frameshift mutations leading to protein truncation. All mutations map in exon 3 of RAI1 which codes for more than 98% of the protein. RAI1 regulates gene transcription, and its targets are themselves involved in transcriptional regulation, cell growth and cell cycle regulation, bone and skeletal development, lipid and glucide metabolisms, neurological development, behavioral functions, and circadian activity. We report the clinical features of the patients carrying these deleterious mutations in comparison with those of patients carrying 17p11.2 deletions.

  11. Bilateral renal tumors in an adult man with Smith-Magenis syndrome: The role of the FLCN gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dardour, Leila; Verleyen, Pieter; Lesage, Karl; Holvoet, Maureen; Devriendt, Koen

    2016-10-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a contiguous-gene disorder most commonly caused by a deletion of chromosome 17p11.2. We report a 57 year-old man with SMS who presents bilateral renal tumors. This is most likely related to haploinsufficiency of FLCN gene, located in the deleted region, and a known tumor suppressor gene. Haploinsufficiency of FLCN causes Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHDS), characterized by pulmonary cysts, renal and skin tumors. The present observation suggests that the follow-up of patients with SMS should also focus on possible manifestations of BHDS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. B cell development in chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derfalvi, Beata; Maurer, Kelly; McDonald McGinn, Donna M; Zackai, Elaine; Meng, Wenzhao; Luning Prak, Eline T; Sullivan, Kathleen E

    2016-02-01

    Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome is a common immune deficiency associated with thymic hypoplasia. Most patients did not survive until the mid-1980s and now there is a growing adult population. B cell and immunoglobulin defects have been described and appear to be increased in the adult population. We used flow cytometry, B cell stimulation and repertoire analysis to understand B cell function. B cell production at early stages appeared to be normal in patients but adult patients exhibited a deficit of switched memory B cells. Follicular helper T cells were present at higher percentages in patients and they exhibited a more activated phenotype in patients compared to controls. In spite of that, somatic hypermutation was decreased in patients compared to controls at all ages. Fewer mutations per clone were seen, strongly implicating aberrant T cell help. Therefore, patients with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome have a progressive decrease in switched memory B cells and evidence of compromised T cell help. In children, evidence of compromised T cell help is limited to decreased somatic hypermutation. With age, greater manifestations become apparent even though a minority of patients have hypogammaglobulinemia. As this population ages, this has important implications for management. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Improving the Diagnosis of Children with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome: A Single-center Experience from Serbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuturilo, Goran; Drakulic, Danijela; Jovanovic, Ida; Krstic, Aleksandar; Djukic, Milan; Skoric, Dejan; Mijovic, Marija; Stefanovic, Igor; Milivojevic, Milena; Stevanovic, Milena

    2016-09-08

    The incidence of the 22q11.2 microdeletion among children who have at least two out of five major clinical criteria for 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Prospective study. University Childrens Hospital in Belgrade, Serbia between 2005 and 2014. 57 patients with clinical characteristics of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Standard G-banding cytogenetic analysis was performed in all children, and the 22q11.2 genomic region was examined using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). For patients with no deletion detected by FISH, multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) analysis was also done in order to detect cryptic deletions of this region and to analyze other genomic loci associated with phenotypes resembling the syndrome. A selected group of patients diagnosed to have 22q11.2 microdeletion by FISH underwent MLPA testing in order to characterize the size and position of deletion. The frequency of 22q11.2 microdeletion among children with at least two of the five major characteristics of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (heart malformations, facial dysmorphism, T-cell immunodeficiency, palatal clefts and hypocalcemia/hypoparathyroidism). Typical 22q11.2 microdeletion was detected in 42.1% of patients; heart malformation were identified in all of them, facial dysmorphism in 79.2%, immunological problems in 63.6%, hypocalcemia in 62.5% and cleft palate in 8.3%. A higher detection rate compared to one-feature criterion is obtained when at least two major features of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome are taking into consideration. The criteria applied in this study could be considered by centers in low-income countries.

  14. Characterizing the DNA Methyltransferases of Haloferax volcanii via Bioinformatics, Gene Deletion, and SMRT Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Ouellette

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available DNA methyltransferases (MTases, which catalyze the methylation of adenine and cytosine bases in DNA, can occur in bacteria and archaea alongside cognate restriction endonucleases (REases in restriction-modification (RM systems or independently as orphan MTases. Although DNA methylation and MTases have been well-characterized in bacteria, research into archaeal MTases has been limited. A previous study examined the genomic DNA methylation patterns (methylome of the halophilic archaeon Haloferax volcanii, a model archaeal system which can be easily manipulated in laboratory settings, via single-molecule real-time (SMRT sequencing and deletion of a putative MTase gene (HVO_A0006. In this follow-up study, we deleted other putative MTase genes in H. volcanii and sequenced the methylomes of the resulting deletion mutants via SMRT sequencing to characterize the genes responsible for DNA methylation. The results indicate that deletion of putative RM genes HVO_0794, HVO_A0006, and HVO_A0237 in a single strain abolished methylation of the sole cytosine motif in the genome (Cm4TAG. Amino acid alignments demonstrated that HVO_0794 shares homology with characterized cytosine CTAG MTases in other organisms, indicating that this MTase is responsible for Cm4TAG methylation in H. volcanii. The CTAG motif has high density at only one of the origins of replication, and there is no relative increase in CTAG motif frequency in the genome of H. volcanii, indicating that CTAG methylation might not have effectively taken over the role of regulating DNA replication and mismatch repair in the organism as previously predicted. Deletion of the putative Type I RM operon rmeRMS (HVO_2269-2271 resulted in abolished methylation of the adenine motif in the genome (GCAm6BN6VTGC. Alignments of the MTase (HVO_2270 and site specificity subunit (HVO_2271 demonstrate homology with other characterized Type I MTases and site specificity subunits, indicating that the rmeRMS operon is

  15. Altered auditory processing and effective connectivity in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Kit Melissa; Mørup, Morten; Birknow, Michelle Rosgaard; Fischer, Elvira; Hulme, Oliver; Vangkilde, Anders; Schmock, Henriette; Baaré, William Frans Christiaan; Didriksen, Michael; Olsen, Line; Werge, Thomas; Siebner, Hartwig R; Garrido, Marta I

    2018-01-30

    22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) is one of the most common copy number variants and confers a markedly increased risk for schizophrenia. As such, 22q11.2DS is a homogeneous genetic liability model which enables studies to delineate functional abnormalities that may precede disease onset. Mismatch negativity (MMN), a brain marker of change detection, is reduced in people with schizophrenia compared to healthy controls. Using dynamic causal modelling (DCM), previous studies showed that top-down effective connectivity linking the frontal and temporal cortex is reduced in schizophrenia relative to healthy controls in MMN tasks. In the search for early risk-markers for schizophrenia we investigated the neural basis of change detection in a group with 22q11.2DS. We recorded high-density EEG from 19 young non-psychotic 22q11.2 deletion carriers, as well as from 27 healthy non-carriers with comparable age distribution and sex ratio, while they listened to a sequence of sounds arranged in a roving oddball paradigm. Despite finding no significant reduction in the MMN responses, whole-scalp spatiotemporal analysis of responses to the tones revealed a greater fronto-temporal N1 component in the 22q11.2 deletion carriers. DCM showed reduced intrinsic connection within right primary auditory cortex as well as in the top-down, connection from the right inferior frontal gyrus to right superior temporal gyrus for 22q11.2 deletion carriers although not surviving correction for multiple comparison. We discuss these findings in terms of reduced adaptation and a general increased sensitivity to tones in 22q11.2DS. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. A large-scale survey of the novel 15q24 microdeletion syndrome in autism spectrum disorders identifies an atypical deletion that narrows the critical region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McInnes L

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 15q24 microdeletion syndrome has been recently described as a recurrent, submicroscopic genomic imbalance found in individuals with intellectual disability, typical facial appearance, hypotonia, and digital and genital abnormalities. Gene dosage abnormalities, including copy number variations (CNVs, have been identified in a significant fraction of individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs. In this study we surveyed two ASD cohorts for 15q24 abnormalities to assess the frequency of genomic imbalances in this interval. Methods We screened 173 unrelated subjects with ASD from the Central Valley of Costa Rica and 1336 subjects with ASD from 785 independent families registered with the Autism Genetic Resource Exchange (AGRE for CNVs across 15q24 using oligonucleotide arrays. Rearrangements were confirmed by array comparative genomic hybridization and quantitative PCR. Results Among the patients from Costa Rica, an atypical de novo deletion of 3.06 Mb in 15q23-q24.1 was detected in a boy with autism sharing many features with the other 13 subjects with the 15q24 microdeletion syndrome described to date. He exhibited intellectual disability, constant smiling, characteristic facial features (high anterior hairline, broad medial eyebrows, epicanthal folds, hypertelorism, full lower lip and protuberant, posteriorly rotated ears, single palmar crease, toe syndactyly and congenital nystagmus. The deletion breakpoints are atypical and lie outside previously characterized low copy repeats (69,838-72,897 Mb. Genotyping data revealed that the deletion had occurred in the paternal chromosome. Among the AGRE families, no large 15q24 deletions were observed. Conclusions From the current and previous studies, deletions in the 15q24 region represent rare causes of ASDs with an estimated frequency of 0.1 to 0.2% in individuals ascertained for ASDs, although the proportion might be higher in sporadic cases. These rates compare with a

  17. Phylogenetic analysis of mitochondrial DNA in a patient with Kearns-Sayre syndrome containing a novel 7629-bp deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montiel-Sosa, Jose Francisco; Herrero, María Dolores; Munoz, Maria de Lourdes; Aguirre-Campa, Luis Enrique; Pérez-Ramírez, Gerardo; García-Ramírez, Rubén; Ruiz-Pesini, Eduardo; Montoya, Julio

    2013-08-01

    Mitochondrial DNA mutations have been associated with different illnesses in humans, such as Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS), which is related to deletions of different sizes and positions among patients. Here, we report a Mexican patient with typical features of KSS containing a novel deletion of 7629 bp in size with 85% heteroplasmy, which has not been previously reported. Sequence analysis revealed 3-bp perfect short direct repeats flanking the deletion region, in addition to 7-bp imperfect direct repeats within 9-10 bp. Furthermore, sequencing, alignment and phylogenetic analysis of the hypervariable region revealed that the patient may belong to a founder Native American haplogroup C4c.

  18. Identical mitochondrial DNA deletion in a woman with ocular myopathy and in her son with pearson syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanske, Sara; Tang, Yingying; Hirano, Michio; Nishigaki, Yutaka; Tanji, Kurenai; Bonilla, Eduardo; Sue, Carolyn; Krishna, Sindu; Carlo, Jose R; Willner, Judith; Schon, Eric A; DiMauro, Salvatore

    2002-09-01

    Single deletions of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are associated with three major clinical conditions: Kearns-Sayre syndrome, a multisystem disorder; Pearson syndrome (PS), a disorder of the hematopoietic system; and progressive external ophthalmoplegia (PEO), primarily affecting the ocular muscles. Typically, single mtDNA deletions are sporadic events, since the mothers, siblings, and offspring of affected individuals are unaffected. We studied a woman who presented with PEO, ptosis, and weakness of pharyngeal, facial, neck, and limb muscles. She had two unaffected children, but another of her children, an infant son, had sideroblastic anemia, was diagnosed with PS, and died at age 1 year. Morphological analysis of a muscle biopsy sample from the mother showed cytochrome c oxidase-negative ragged-red fibers-a typical pattern in patients with mtDNA deletions. Southern blot analysis using multiple restriction endonucleases and probed with multiple mtDNA fragments showed that both the mother and her infant son harbored an identical 5,355-bp single deletion in mtDNA, without flanking direct repeats. The deletion was the only abnormal species of mtDNA identified in both patients, and there was no evidence for duplications. We conclude that, although the vast majority of single large-scale deletions in mtDNA are sporadic, in rare cases, single deletions can be transmitted through the germline.

  19. Detection of mtDNA deletion in Pearson syndrome by two independent PCR assays from Guthrie card.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, T; Bókay, J; Szönyi, L; Nagy, B; Papp, Z

    1998-03-01

    Pearson syndrome is a multisystem juvenile condition associated with deletions in the mitochondrial genome. The most common 4977 bp deletion of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) can mainly be detected in the patients' peripheral blood. Here we report a child with a clinically unclarified diagnosis where molecular genetic results proved Pearson syndrome from stored dried blood sample 6 months after the patient's death. PCR amplification around the breakpoint of the most common mtDNA deletion could detect the presence of mutated mtDNA. Another polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay indicated the low level of wild type mtDNA in patients' blood. We believe that this case shows the importance of storing Guthrie card and the availability of detection of Pearson syndrome from dried blood sample.

  20. Transcriptome Profiling of Peripheral Blood in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome Reveals Functional Pathways Related to Psychosis and Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Jalbrzikowski

    Full Text Available 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome (22q11DS represents one of the greatest known genetic risk factors for the development of psychotic illness, and is also associated with high rates of autistic spectrum disorders (ASD in childhood. We performed integrated genomic analyses of 22q11DS to identify genes and pathways related to specific phenotypes.We used a high-resolution aCGH array to precisely characterize deletion breakpoints. Using peripheral blood, we examined differential expression (DE and networks of co-expressed genes related to phenotypic variation within 22q11DS patients. Whole-genome transcriptional profiling was performed using Illumina Human HT-12 microarrays. Data mining techniques were used to validate our results against independent samples of both peripheral blood and brain tissue from idiopathic psychosis and ASD cases.Eighty-five percent of 22q11DS individuals (N = 39 carried the typical 3 Mb deletion, with significant variability in deletion characteristics in the remainder of the sample (N = 7. DE analysis and weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA identified expression changes related to psychotic symptoms in patients, including a module of co-expressed genes which was associated with psychosis in 22q11DS and involved in pathways associated with transcriptional regulation. This module was enriched for brain-expressed genes, was not related to antipsychotic medication use, and significantly overlapped with transcriptional changes in idiopathic schizophrenia. In 22q11DS-ASD, both DE and WGCNA analyses implicated dysregulation of immune response pathways. The ASD-associated module showed significant overlap with genes previously associated with idiopathic ASD.These findings further support the use of peripheral tissue in the study of major mutational models of diseases affecting the brain, and point towards specific pathways dysregulated in 22q11DS carriers with psychosis and ASD.

  1. Rb and p53 gene deletions in lung adenocarcinomas from irradiated and control mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y.; Woloschak, G.E.

    1997-01-01

    This study was conducted on mouse lung adenocarcinoma tissues that were formalin-treated and paraffin-embedded 25 years ago to investigate the large gene deletions of mRb and p53 in B6CF 1 male mice. A total of 80 lung tissue samples from irradiated mice and 40 lung samples from nonirradiated controls were randomly selected and examined in the mRb portion of this study. The results showed a significant (P 0.05) from that for spontaneous lung adenocarcinomas or lung adenocarcinomas from mice exposed to single-dose γ irradiation at a similar total dose. mRb fragments 3 (71%) and 5 (67%), the parts of the gene that encoded the pocket binding region of Rb protein to adenovirus E1A and SV40 T-antigen, were the most frequently deleted fragments. p53 gene deletion analysis was carried out on normal lungs and lung adenocarcinomas that were initially found to bear mRb deletions. Exons 1,4,5,6, and 9 were chosen to be analyzed

  2. Molecular analysis of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene in Spanish individuals: Deletion detection and familial diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patino, A.; Garcia-Delgado, M.; Narbona, J. [Univ. of Navarra, Pamplona (Spain)

    1995-11-06

    Deletion studies were performed in 26 Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients through amplification of nine different exons by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). DNA from paraffin-embedded muscle biopsies was analyzed in 12 of the 26 patients studied. Optimization of this technique is of great utility because it enables analysis of material stored in pathology archives. PCR deletion detection, useful in DMD-affected boys, is problematic in determining the carrier state in female relatives. For this reason, to perform familial linkage diagnosis, we made use of a dinucleotide repeat polymorphism (STRP, or short tandem repeat polymorphism) located in intron 49 of the gene. We designed a new pair of primers that enabled the detection of 22 different alleles in relatives in the 14 DMD families studied. The use of this marker allowed familial diagnosis in 11 of the 14 DMD families and detection of de novo deletions in 3 of the probands. 8 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Partial Gene Deletions of PMP22 Causing Hereditary Neuropathy with Liability to Pressure Palsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun-Mi Cho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP is an autosomal neuropathy that is commonly caused by a reciprocal 1.5 Mb deletion on chromosome 17p11.2, at the site of the peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22 gene. Other patients with similar phenotypes have been shown to harbor point mutations or small deletions, although there is some clinical variation across these patients. In this report, we describe a case of HNPP with copy number changes in exon or promoter regions of PMP22. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe analysis revealed an exon 1b deletion in the patient, who had been diagnosed with HNPP in the first decade of life using molecular analysis.

  4. Interstitial deletion of the short arm of chromosome 3. Fetal pathology and exclusion of the gene for beta-galactosidase-1 (GLB-1) from 3(p11----p14.2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Jens Michael; Coerdt, W; Hahnemann, N

    1988-01-01

    A de novo interstitial deletion of the short arm of chromosome 3 was prenatally diagnosed in a male fetus, karyotype 46,XY,del(3)(pter----p14.2::p11----qter). The fetus had craniofacial dysmorphisms, a single transverse palmar crease, ulnar deviation in the wrists, cardiovascular anomalies......, a slight ureteric dilatation and a mobile caecum. Our observations are compared with five other cases with interstitial deletion of the short arm of chromosome 3 to delineate further the proximal 3p deletion syndrome. The gene for beta-galactosidase-1 (GLB-1) has previously been assigned to chromosome 3(p...

  5. Deletion of the Snord116/SNORD116 Alters Sleep in Mice and Patients with Prader-Willi Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassi, Glenda; Priano, Lorenzo; Maggi, Silvia; Garcia-Garcia, Celina; Balzani, Edoardo; El-Assawy, Nadia; Pagani, Marco; Tinarelli, Federico; Giardino, Daniela; Mauro, Alessandro; Peters, Jo; Gozzi, Alessandro; Grugni, Graziano; Tucci, Valter

    2016-03-01

    Sleep-wake disturbances are often reported in Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS), a rare neurodevelopmental syndrome that is associated with paternally-expressed genomic imprinting defects within the human chromosome region 15q11-13. One of the candidate genes, prevalently expressed in the brain, is the small nucleolar ribonucleic acid-116 (SNORD116). Here we conducted a translational study into the sleep abnormalities of PWS, testing the hypothesis that SNORD116 is responsible for sleep defects that characterize the syndrome. We studied sleep in mutant mice that carry a deletion of Snord116 at the orthologous locus (mouse chromosome 7) of the human PWS critical region (PWScr). In particular, we assessed EEG and temperature profiles, across 24-h, in PWScr (m+/p-) heterozygous mutants compared to wild-type littermates. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed to explore morphoanatomical differences according to the genotype. Moreover, we complemented the mouse work by presenting two patients with a diagnosis of PWS and characterized by atypical small deletions of SNORD116. We compared the individual EEG parameters of patients with healthy subjects and with a cohort of obese subjects. By studying the mouse mutant line PWScr(m+/p-), we observed specific rapid eye movement (REM) sleep alterations including abnormal electroencephalograph (EEG) theta waves. Remarkably, we observed identical sleep/EEG defects in the two PWS cases. We report brain morphological abnormalities that are associated with the EEG alterations. In particular, mouse mutants have a bilateral reduction of the gray matter volume in the ventral hippocampus and in the septum areas, which are pivotal structures for maintaining theta rhythms throughout the brain. In PWScr(m+/p-) mice we also observed increased body temperature that is coherent with REM sleep alterations in mice and human patients. Our study indicates that paternally expressed Snord116 is involved in the 24-h regulation of

  6. Total alpha-globin gene cluster deletion has high frequency in Filipinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, J.A.; Haruyama, A.Z.; Chu, B.M. [Kapiolani Medical Center, Honolulu, HI (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Most {alpha}-thalassemias [Thal] are due to large deletions. In Southeast Asians, the (--{sup SEA}) double {alpha}-globin gene deletion is common, 3 (--{sup Tot}) total {alpha}-globin cluster deletions are known: Filipino (--{sup Fil}), Thai (--{sup Thai}), and Chinese (--{sup Chin}). In a Hawaii Thal project, provisional diagnosis of {alpha}-Thal-1 heterozygotes was based on microcytosis, normal isoelectric focusing, and no iron deficiency. One in 10 unselected Filipinos was an {alpha}-Thal-1 heterozygote, 2/3 of these had a (--{sup Tot}) deletion: a {var_sigma}-cDNA probe consistently showed fainter intensity of the constant 5.5 kb {var_sigma}{sub 2} BamHI band, with no heterzygosity for {var_sigma}-globin region polymorphisms; {alpha}-cDNA or {var_sigma}-cDNA probes showed no BamHI or BglII bands diagnostic of the (--{sup SEA}) deletion; bands for the (-{alpha}) {alpha}-Thal-2 single {alpha}-globin deletions were only seen in Hb H cases. A reliable monoclonal anti-{var_sigma}-peptide antibody test for the (--{sup SEA}) deletion was always negative in (--{sup Tot}) samples. Southern digests with the Lo probe, a gift from D. Higgs of Oxford Univ., confirmed that 49 of 50 (--{sup Tot}) chromosomes in Filipinos were (--{sup Fil}). Of 20 {alpha}-Thal-1 hydrops born to Filipinos, 11 were (--{sup Fil}/--{sup SEA}) compound heterozygotes; 9 were (--{sup SEA}/--{sup SEA}) homozygotes, but none was a (--{sup Fil}/--{sup Fil}).

  7. A de novo deletion mutation in SOX10 in a Chinese family with Waardenburg syndrome type 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiong; Zhu, Yaowu; Shen, Na; Peng, Jing; Wang, Chunyu; Liu, Haiyi; Lu, Yanjun

    2017-01-27

    Waardenburg syndrome type 4 (WS4) or Waardenburg-Shah syndrome is a rare genetic disorder with a prevalence of <1/1,000,000 and characterized by the association of congenital sensorineural hearing loss, pigmentary abnormalities, and intestinal aganglionosis. There are three types of WS4 (WS4A-C) caused by mutations in endothelin receptor type B, endothelin 3, and SRY-box 10 (SOX10), respectively. This study investigated a genetic mutation in a Chinese family with one WS4 patient in order to improve genetic counselling. Genomic DNA was extracted, and mutation analysis of the three WS4 related genes was performed using Sanger sequencing. We detected a de novo heterozygous deletion mutation [c.1333delT (p.Ser445Glnfs*57)] in SOX10 in the patient; however, this mutation was absent in the unaffected parents and 40 ethnicity matched healthy controls. Subsequent phylogenetic analysis and three-dimensional modelling of the SOX10 protein confirmed that the c.1333delT heterozygous mutation was pathogenic, indicating that this mutation might constitute a candidate disease-causing mutation.

  8. Deletion of OSH3 gene confers resistance against ISP-1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Tatsuya; Inukai, Masatoshi; Isono, Fujio

    2004-02-27

    Sphingolipids have been reported to regulate the growth and death of mammalian and yeast cells, but their precise mechanisms are unknown. In this paper, it was shown that the deletion of the oxysterol binding protein homologue 3 (OSH3) gene confers hyper resistance against ISP-1, an inhibitor of sphingolipid biosynthesis, in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Furthermore, the overexpression of the ROK1 gene, which directly binds to Osh3p, conferred resistance against ISP-1, and the deletion of the KEM1 gene, which regulates microtubule functions, exhibited ISP-1 hypersensitivity. And yet, an ISP-1 treatment caused an abnormal mitotic spindle formation, and the ISP-1-induced cell cycle arrest was rescued by the deletion of the OSH3 gene. Taken together, it is suggested that the expression levels of the OSH3 gene influence the ISP-1 sensitivity of S. cerevisiae, and the sphingolipids are necessary for normal mitotic spindle formation in which the Osh3p may play a pivotal role.

  9. Syndrome of proximal interstitial deletion 4p15: Report of three cases and review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chitayat, D.; Babul, R.; Teshima, I.E. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [and others

    1995-01-16

    We report on two boys and a girl with interstitial deletion in the short arm of chromosome 4 including the segment p15.2p15.33. All had normal growth with psychomotor retardation, multiple minor congenital anomalies, and a characteristic face distinct from that of the Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome. One of the patients had congenitally enlarged penis. These patients resemble some of the previously reported patients with similar cytogenetic abnormalities and suggests the recognition of a specific clinical chromosome deletion syndrome. 12 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Genomic analysis and pathogenic characteristics of Type 2 porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus nsp2 deletion strains isolated in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hwan-Won; Nam, Eeuri; Lee, Yoo Jin; Noh, Yun-Hee; Lee, Seung-Chul; Yoon, In-Joong; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Kang, Shien-Young; Choi, Young-Ki; Lee, Changhee

    2014-06-04

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is a globally ubiquitous swine virus that exhibits genetic and pathogenic heterogeneity among isolates. The present study was conducted to determine the complete genome sequence and pathogenicity of two Korean type 2 PRRSV nonstructural protein 2 (nsp2) deletion mutants, CA-2 and KNU-12-KJ4. The full-length genomes of CA-2 and KNU-12-KJ4 were determined to be 15,018 and 15,019 nucleotides in length, excluding the poly(A) tail, respectively, which were 393- or 392-nucleotide shorter than that of the type 2 NA prototype strain VR-2332 due to the presence of notable large deletions within the nsp2 gene. The genomes of CA-2 and KNU-12-KJ4 consisted of a 189- or 190-nucleotide 5' untranslated region (UTR), a 14,677-nucleotide protein-coding region, and a 151-nucleotide 3' UTR. Whole genome evaluation revealed that the nucleotide sequences of CA-2 and KNU-12-KJ4 are most similar to each other (10.7% sequence divergence), and then to the Korean strain CA-1 (11.3% sequence divergence) and the US strain MN184C (13.1% sequence divergence), respectively. To evaluate the in vitro immunity of nsp2 deletion variants, we sought to explore alteration of inflammatory cytokine and chemokine expression in PAM-pCD163 cells infected with each virus strain using quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Cytokine genes including IL-8, IL-10, and TNF-α, and chemokines such as MCP-1 and RANTES were found to be significantly elevated in nsp2 deletion virus-infected PAM cells. In contrast, expression of interferons (IFN-β, γ, and λ) and antiviral genes including ISG-15, -54, and -56 were unchanged or down-regulated in PAM cells infected with the nsp2 deletion mutants. Animal studies to assess the pathogenicity of nsp2 deletion PRRSVs demonstrated that both CA-2 and KNU-12-KJ4 strains notably produce weight loss in infected pigs. Furthermore, the nsp2 deletion mutants replicated well in pigs with significantly increased and prolonged

  11. Pediatric healthcare costs for patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benn, Peter; Iyengar, Sushma; Crowley, Terrence Blaine; Zackai, Elaine H; Burrows, Evanette K; Moshkevich, Solomon; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M; Sullivan, Kathleen E; Demko, Zachary

    2017-11-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome is a variably expressed disorder that can include cardiac, palate, and other physical abnormalities, immunodeficiency, and hypocalcemia. Because of the extreme variability in phenotype, there has been no available estimate of the total medical expenditure associated with the average case. We have developed a model to estimate the cost from the time of diagnosis to age 20. Costs were based on patients seen at a specialty center but also considered those components of care expected to have been provided by external healthcare facilities. Expense was based on billed medical charges extracted from the electronic medical billing system for all patients with a diagnosis of DiGeorge or velocardiofacial syndrome from 1993-2015. Expenditures included maternal prenatal care directly related to an affected pregnancy, molecular/cytogenetic diagnosis, consultations, surgery, and/or other treatment and management. Most mental health services (except inpatient), therapy related to cognitive, behavioral, speech, pharmacy, and nonmedical costs (special education, vocational, respite, lost earnings) were not included. Data were available for 642 patients with 50.7% diagnosed prenatally or in the first year of life. The average cost for a patient was $727,178. Costs were highest for patients ascertained prenatally ($2,599,955) or in the first year of life ($1,043,096), those with cardiac abnormalities or referred for cardiac evaluation ($751,535), and patients with low T-cell counts ($1,382,222). This study demonstrates that there are significant medical costs associated with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. © 2017 Natera. Molecular Genetics & Genomic Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Kearns-Sayre syndrome case presenting a mitochondrial DNA deletion with unusual direct repeats and a rudimentary RNAse mitochondria ribonucleotide processing target sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remes, A.M.; Hassinen, I.E. (Univ. of Oulu (Finland)); Peuhkurinen, K.J.; Herva, R.; Majamaa, K. (Oulu Univ. Central Hospital (Finland))

    1993-04-01

    A mitochondrial DNA deletion in a case of Kearns-Sayre syndrome is described. The deletion is bracketed by direct repeats that were unusual in that one of them was located 11--13 nucleotides from the deletion seam and both were conserved, which should not occur in slip replication or illegitimate elongation. The deleted region was demarcated on the deletion side by sequences that could be predicted to form hairpin structures. The 5[prime]-side of the deletion was flanked by a sequence homologous to a 9-nucleotide piece of the conserved sequence block II of the D-loop. This arrangement around the deletion in Kearns-Sayre syndrome bears some resemblance to the arrangement in the Pearson marrow- pancreas syndrome described by A. Rotig et al. (1991, Genomics 10: 502--504). 10 refs., 1 fig.

  13. Kearns-Sayre syndrome case presenting a mitochondrial DNA deletion with unusual direct repeats and a rudimentary RNAase mitochondrial ribonucleotide processing target sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remes, A M; Peuhkurinen, K J; Herva, R; Majamaa, K; Hassinen, I E

    1993-04-01

    A mitochondrial DNA deletion in a case of Kearns-Sayre syndrome is described. The deletion is bracketed by direct repeats that were unusual in that one of them was located 11-13 nucleotides from the deletion seam and both were conserved, which should not occur in slip replication or illegitimate elongation. The deleted region was demarcated on the deletion side by sequences that could be predicted to form hairpin structures. The 5'-side of the deletion was flanked by a sequence homologous to a 9-nucleotide piece of the conserved sequence block II of the D-loop. This arrangement around the deletion in Kearns-Sayre syndrome bears some resemblance to the arrangement in the Pearson marrow-pancreas syndrome described by A. Rötig et al. (1991, Genomics 10: 502-504).

  14. Differential DNA methylation at birth associated with mental disorder in individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starnawska, A; Hansen, C S; Sparsø, T; Mazin, W; Olsen, L; Bertalan, M; Buil, A; Bybjerg-Grauholm, J; Bækvad-Hansen, M; Hougaard, D M; Mortensen, P B; Pedersen, C B; Nyegaard, M; Werge, T; Weinsheimer, S

    2017-08-29

    Individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (DS) have an increased risk of comorbid mental disorders including schizophrenia, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, depression, as well as intellectual disability. Although most 22q11.2 deletion carriers have the long 3-Mb form of the hemizygous deletion, there remains a large variation in the development and progression of psychiatric disorders, which suggests that alternative factors contribute to the pathogenesis. In this study we investigated whether neonatal DNA methylation signatures in individuals with the 22q11.2 deletion associate with mental disorder later in life. DNA methylation was measured genome-wide from neonatal dried blood spots in a cohort of 164 individuals with 22q11.2DS, including 48 individuals diagnosed with a psychiatric disorder. Among several CpG sites with P-value<10 -6 , we identified cg23546855 (P-value=2.15 × 10 -7 ) mapping to STK32C to be associated with a later psychiatric diagnosis. Pathway analysis of the top findings resulted in the identification of several Gene Ontology pathways to be significantly enriched (P-value<0.05 after Benjamini-Hochberg correction); among them are the following: neurogenesis, neuron development, neuron projection development, astrocyte development, axonogenesis and axon guidance. In addition, we identified differentially methylated CpG sites in LRP2BP (P-value=5.37 × 10 -8 ) to be associated with intellectual disability (F70-79), in TOP1 (P-value=1.86 × 10 -7 ) with behavioral disorders (F90-98), in NOSIP (P-value=5.12 × 10 -8 ) with disorders of psychological development (F80-89) and in SEMA4B (P-value=4.02 × 10 -7 ) with schizophrenia spectrum disorders (F20-29). In conclusion, our study suggests an association of DNA methylation differences at birth with development of mental disorder later in life in 22q11.2DS individuals.

  15. Congenital Heart Defects and Measures of Fetal Growth in Newborns with Down Syndrome or 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthiesen, Niels B; Agergaard, Peter; Henriksen, Tine B; Bach, Cathrine C; Gaynor, J William; Hjortdal, Vibeke; Østergaard, John R

    2016-08-01

    To estimate the association between congenital heart defects (CHD) and indices of fetal growth in Down and 22q11.2 deletion syndromes. We established 2 Danish nationwide cohorts of newborn singletons with either Down syndrome (n = 670) or 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (n = 155), born 1997-2011. In both cohorts, we analyzed the association between CHD, CHD severity, and indices of fetal growth by multivariable linear regression adjusted for potential confounders. We report mean differences in gestational age specific z-scores compared with newborns without CHD. Down syndrome and 22q11.2 deletion syndrome were both associated with lower mean birth weight and head circumference z-scores. We found no association between CHD or CHD severity and indices of fetal growth. In Down syndrome, the association between any CHD and the mean difference in head circumference z-score was 0.03 (95% CI -0.12, 0.18), and the estimate regarding birth weight z-score was 0.09 (95% CI -0.08, 0.25). The corresponding estimates in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome were 0.00 (95% CI -0.33, 0.32) and -0.09 (95% CI -0.45, 0.26). We found no association between CHD and fetal growth measures in newborns with Down syndrome or 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Thus, in certain subtypes of CHD, the contribution of genetic factors to prenatal growth impairment may be more important than circulatory disturbances. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A 3.7 Mb Deletion Encompassing ZEB2 Causes a Novel Polled and Multisystemic Syndrome in the Progeny of a Somatic Mosaic Bull

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitan, Aurélien; Allais-Bonnet, Aurélie; Pinton, Alain; Marquant-Le Guienne, Brigitte; Le Bourhis, Daniel; Grohs, Cécile; Bouet, Stéphan; Clément, Laëtitia; Salas-Cortes, Laura; Venot, Eric; Chaffaux, Stéphane; Weiss, Bernard; Delpeuch, Arnaud; Noé, Guy; Rossignol, Marie-Noëlle; Barbey, Sarah; Dozias, Dominique; Cobo, Emilie; Barasc, Harmonie; Auguste, Aurélie; Pannetier, Maëlle; Deloche, Marie-Christine; Lhuilier, Emeline; Bouchez, Olivier; Esquerré, Diane; Salin, Gérald; Klopp, Christophe; Donnadieu, Cécile; Chantry-Darmon, Céline; Hayes, Hélène; Gallard, Yves; Ponsart, Claire; Boichard, Didier; Pailhoux, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Polled and Multisystemic Syndrome (PMS) is a novel developmental disorder occurring in the progeny of a single bull. Its clinical spectrum includes polledness (complete agenesis of horns), facial dysmorphism, growth delay, chronic diarrhea, premature ovarian failure, and variable neurological and cardiac anomalies. PMS is also characterized by a deviation of the sex-ratio, suggesting male lethality during pregnancy. Using Mendelian error mapping and whole-genome sequencing, we identified a 3.7 Mb deletion on the paternal bovine chromosome 2 encompassing ARHGAP15, GTDC1 and ZEB2 genes. We then produced control and affected 90-day old fetuses to characterize this syndrome by histological and expression analyses. Compared to wild type individuals, affected animals showed a decreased expression of the three deleted genes. Based on a comparison with human Mowat-Wilson syndrome, we suggest that deletion of ZEB2, is responsible for most of the effects of the mutation. Finally sperm-FISH, embryo genotyping and analysis of reproduction records confirmed somatic mosaicism in the founder bull and male-specific lethality during the first third of gestation. In conclusion, we identified a novel locus involved in bovid horn ontogenesis and suggest that epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition plays a critical role in horn bud differentiation. We also provide new insights into the pathogenicity of ZEB2 loss of heterozygosity in bovine and humans and describe the first case of male-specific lethality associated with an autosomal locus in a non-murine mammalian species. This result sets PMS as a unique model to study sex-specific gene expression/regulation. PMID:23152852

  17. Increased biomass production and glycogen accumulation in apcE gene deleted Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Ancy; Aikawa, Shimpei; Sasaki, Kengo; Matsuda, Fumio; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Kondo, Akihiko

    2014-01-01

    The effect of phycobilisome antenna-truncation in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 on biomass production and glycogen accumulation have not yet been fully clarified. To investigate these effects here, the apcE gene, which encodes the anchor protein linking the phycobilisome to the thylakoid membrane, was deleted in a glucose tolerant strain of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Biomass production of the apcE-deleted strain under photoautotrophic and atmospheric air conditions was 1.6 times higher than that of strain PCC 6803 (1.32 ± 0.01 versus 0.84 ± 0.07 g cell-dry weight L(-1), respectively) after 15 days of cultivation. In addition, the glycogen content of the apcE-deleted strain (24.2 ± 0.7%) was also higher than that of strain PCC 6803 (11.1 ± 0.3%). Together, these results demonstrate that antenna truncation by deleting the apcE gene was effective for increasing biomass production and glycogen accumulation under photoautotrophic and atmospheric air conditions in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

  18. First Report of a Single Exon Deletion in TCOF1 Causing Treacher Collins Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Beygo, J.; Buiting, K.; Seland, S.; Lüdecke, H.-J.; Hehr, U.; Lich, C.; Prager, B.; Lohmann, D.R.; Wieczorek, D.

    2012-01-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is a rare craniofacial disorder characterized by facial anomalies and ear defects. TCS is caused by mutations in the TCOF1 gene and follows autosomal dominant inheritance. Recently, mutations in the POLR1D and POLR1C genes have also been identified to cause TCS. However, in a subset of patients no causative mutation could be found yet. Inter- and intrafamilial phenotypic variability is high as is the variety of mainly family-specific mutations identified throug...

  19. Gross deletions in TCOF1 are a cause of Treacher–Collins–Franceschetti syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Bowman, Michael; Oldridge, Michael; Archer, Caroline; O'Rourke, Anthony; McParland, Joanna; Brekelmans, Roel; Seller, Anneke; Lester, Tracy

    2012-01-01

    Treacher–Collins–Franceschetti syndrome (TCS) is an autosomal dominant craniofacial disorder characterised by midface hypoplasia, micrognathia, downslanting palpebral fissures, eyelid colobomata, and ear deformities that often lead to conductive deafness. A total of 182 patients with signs consistent with a diagnosis of TCS were screened by DNA sequence and dosage analysis of the TCOF1 gene. In all, 92 cases were found to have a pathogenic mutation by sequencing and 5 to have a partial gene d...

  20. Brain and behaviour in children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: a volumetric and voxel-based morphometry MRI study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campbell, Linda E.; Daly, Eileen; Toal, Fiona; Stevens, Angela; Azuma, Rayna; Catani, Marco; Ng, Virginia; van Amelsvoort, Therese; Chitnis, Xavier; Cutter, William; Murphy, Declan G. M.; Murphy, Kieran C.

    2006-01-01

    In people with velo-cardio-facial syndrome [or 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22qDS)], a single interstitial deletion of chromosome 22q11.2 causes a wide spectrum of cognitive deficits ranging from global learning difficulties to specific cognitive deficits. People with 22qDS are also at high risk of

  1. Pharmaco-genetically guided treatment of recurrent rage outbursts in an adult male with 15q13.3 deletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubells, Joseph F; Deoreo, Elizabeth H; Harvey, Philip D; Garlow, Steven J; Garber, Kathryn; Adam, Margaret P; Martin, Christa Lese

    2011-04-01

    15q13.3 deletion syndrome (15q13.3DS) is a common recurrent genomic disorder associated with epilepsy, intellectual impairment, aggressive behavior, schizophrenia, and autism. A 39-year-old male presented with 15q13.3DS, epilepsy, intellectual impairment, psychosis, and recurrent episodes of aggressive rage. We hypothesized that the patient's aggressive behavior reflected deficits in α7 nicotinic cholinergic receptor (NChR)-mediated neurotransmission, arising from haploinsufficiency of the structural gene CHRNA7 due to the deletion. Treatment with the NChR allosteric modulator and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitor, galantamine, led to a dramatic decline in the frequency and intensity of rage outbursts, suggesting that enhancement of α7 NChR function can ameliorate 15q13.3DS-associated rage outbursts. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Parental somatic and germ-line mosaicism for a multiexon deletion with unusual endpoints in a type III collagen (COL3Al) allele produces ehlers-danlos syndrome type IV in the heterozygous offspring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGookey Milewicz, D.; Witz, A.M.; Byers, P.H. (Univ of Washington, Seattle (United States)); Smith, A.C.M.; Manchester, D.K.; Waldstein, G. (Children' s Hospital, Denver, CO (United States))

    1993-07-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) type IV is a dominantly inherited disorder that results from mutation in the type III collagen gene (COL3A1). The authors studied the structure of the COL3A1 gene of an individual with EDS type IV and that of her phenotypically normal parents. The proband was heterozygous for a 2-kb deletion in COL3A1, while her father was mosaic for the same deletion in somatic and germ cells. In fibroblasts from the father, approximately two-fifths of the COL3A1 alleles carried the deletion, but only 10% of the COL3A1 alleles in white blood cells were of the mutant species. The deletion in the mutant allele extended from intron 7 into intron 11. There was a 12-bp direct repeat in intron 7 and intron 11, the latter about 60 bp 5' to the junction. At the breakpoint there was a duplication of 10 bp from intron 11 separated by an insertion of 4 bp contained within the duplicated sequence. The father was mosaic for the deletion so that the gene rearrangement occurred during his early embryonic development prior to lineage allocation. These findings suggest that at least some of the deletions seen in human genes may occur during replication, rather than as a consequence of meiotic crossing-over, and that they thus have a risk for recurrence when observed de novo. 71 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Angelman syndrome and severe infections in a patient with de novo 15q11.2-q13.1 deletion and maternally inherited 2q21.3 microdeletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubert, Gerda; von Au, Katja; Drossel, Katrin; Tzschach, Andreas; Horn, Denise; Nickel, Renate; Kaindl, Angela M

    2013-01-10

    Angelman syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by mental retardation, severe speech disorder, facial dysmorphism, secondary microcephaly, ataxia, seizures, and abnormal behaviors such as easily provoked laughter. It is most frequently caused by a de novo maternal deletion of chromosome 15q11-q13 (about 70-90%), but can also be caused by paternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 15q11-q13 (3-7%), an imprinting defect (2-4%) or in mutations in the ubiquitin protein ligase E3A gene UBE3A mostly leading to frame shift mutation. In addition, for patients with overlapping clinical features (Angelman-like syndrome), mutations in methyl-CpG binding protein 2 gene MECP2 and cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 gene CDKL5 as well as a microdeletion of 2q23.1 including the methyl-CpG binding domain protein 5 gene MBD5 have been described. Here, we describe a patient who carries a de novo 5Mb-deletion of chromosome 15q11.2-q13.1 known to be associated with Angelman syndrome and a further, maternally inherited deletion 2q21.3 (~364kb) of unknown significance. In addition to classic features of Angelman syndrome, she presented with severe infections in the first year of life, a symptom that has not been described in patients with Angelman syndrome. The 15q11.2-q13.1 deletion contains genes critical for Prader-Willi syndrome, the Angelman syndrome causing genes UBE3A and ATP10A/C, and several non-imprinted genes: GABRB3 and GABRA5 (both encoding subunits of GABA A receptor), GOLGA6L2, HERC2 and OCA2 (associated with oculocutaneous albinism II). The deletion 2q21.3 includes exons of the genes RAB3GAP1 (associated with Warburg Micro syndrome) and ZRANB3 (not disease-associated). Despite the normal phenotype of the mother, the relevance of the 2q21.3 microdeletion for the phenotype of the patient cannot be excluded, and further case reports will need to address this point. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Dysphagia and disrupted cranial nerve development in a mouse model of DiGeorge (22q11 deletion syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beverly A. Karpinski

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We assessed feeding-related developmental anomalies in the LgDel mouse model of chromosome 22q11 deletion syndrome (22q11DS, a common developmental disorder that frequently includes perinatal dysphagia – debilitating feeding, swallowing and nutrition difficulties from birth onward – within its phenotypic spectrum. LgDel pups gain significantly less weight during the first postnatal weeks, and have several signs of respiratory infections due to food aspiration. Most 22q11 genes are expressed in anlagen of craniofacial and brainstem regions critical for feeding and swallowing, and diminished expression in LgDel embryos apparently compromises development of these regions. Palate and jaw anomalies indicate divergent oro-facial morphogenesis. Altered expression and patterning of hindbrain transcriptional regulators, especially those related to retinoic acid (RA signaling, prefigures these disruptions. Subsequently, gene expression, axon growth and sensory ganglion formation in the trigeminal (V, glossopharyngeal (IX or vagus (X cranial nerves (CNs that innervate targets essential for feeding, swallowing and digestion are disrupted. Posterior CN IX and X ganglia anomalies primarily reflect diminished dosage of the 22q11DS candidate gene Tbx1. Genetic modification of RA signaling in LgDel embryos rescues the anterior CN V phenotype and returns expression levels or pattern of RA-sensitive genes to those in wild-type embryos. Thus, diminished 22q11 gene dosage, including but not limited to Tbx1, disrupts oro-facial and CN development by modifying RA-modulated anterior-posterior hindbrain differentiation. These disruptions likely contribute to dysphagia in infants and young children with 22q11DS.

  5. Leigh-type neuropathology in Pearson syndrome associated with impaired ATP production and a novel mtDNA deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santorelli, F M; Barmada, M A; Pons, R; Zhang, L L; DiMauro, S

    1996-11-01

    Pearson syndrome is a systemic disorder of oxidative phosphorylation in infants, predominantly affecting the bone marrow and exocrine pancreas and associated with single deletions in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). CNS involvement may occur in patients who survive the infantile hematopoietic disorder. We describe a Pearson syndrome patient who developed neurologic manifestations associated with the pathologic features of Leigh syndrome. Biochemical studies in muscle and skin fibroblasts showed partial deficiencies of complexes I and IV of the respiratory chain. Adenosine triphosphate production in mitochondria isolated from skin fibroblasts was reduced to 25% of controls. We detected a novel 3.6 Kb mtDNA deletion in skin fibroblasts from the proband but not in his mother's white blood cells. Leigh syndrome seems to be the common neuropathologic expression of any disorder causing severe impairment of oxidative energy production in the CNS.

  6. Spontaneous deletion of a 20-kilobase DNA segment carrying genes specifying isopropylbenzene metabolism in Pseudomonas putida RE204.

    OpenAIRE

    Eaton, R W; Timmis, K N

    1986-01-01

    The genes encoding isopropylbenzene metabolism in Pseudomonas putida RE204 are readily lost in two ways: by loss (curing) of plasmid pRE4 which specifies the catabolic pathway and by deletion from pRE4 of an approximately 20-kilobase segment of DNA carrying the catabolic genes. The presence of DNA sequences at the ends of the catabolic gene region sharing homology with one another suggests that the deletions result from recombination events between these homologous sequences.

  7. Genetic basis of prune belly syndrome: screening for HNF1β gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granberg, Candace F; Harrison, Steven M; Dajusta, Daniel; Zhang, Shaohua; Hajarnis, Sachin; Igarashi, Peter; Baker, Linda A

    2012-01-01

    Although the cause of prune belly syndrome is unknown, familial evidence suggests a genetic component. Recently 2 nonfamilial cases of prune belly syndrome with chromosome 17q12 deletions encompassing the HNF1β gene have made this a candidate gene for prune belly syndrome. To date, there has been no large-scale screening of patients with prune belly syndrome for HNF1β mutations. We assessed the role of HNF1β in prune belly syndrome by screening for genomic mutations with functional characterization of any detected mutations. We studied patients with prune belly syndrome who were prospectively enrolled in our Pediatric Genitourinary DNA Repository since 2001. DNA from patient samples was amplified by polymerase chain reaction, sequenced for coding and splice regions of the HNF1β gene, and compared to control databases. We performed functional assay testing of the ability of mutant HNF1β to activate a luciferase construct with an HNF1β DNA binding site. From 32 prune belly syndrome probands (30 males, 2 females) HNF1β sequencing detected a missense mutation (V61G) in 1 child with prune belly syndrome. Absent in control databases, V61G was previously reported in 2 patients without prune belly syndrome who had congenital genitourinary anomalies. Functional testing showed similar luciferase activity compared to wild-type HNF1β, suggesting the V61G substitution does not disturb HNF1β function. One genomic HNF1β mutation was detected in 3% of patients with prune belly syndrome but found to be functionally normal. Thus, functionally significant HNF1β mutations are uncommon in prune belly syndrome, despite case reports of HNF1β deletions. Further genetic study is necessary, as identification of the genetic basis of prune belly syndrome may ultimately lead to prevention and improved treatments for this rare but severe syndrome. Copyright © 2012 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Genetic mapping of putative Chrna7 and Luzp2 neuronal transcriptional enhancers due to impact of a transgene-insertion and 6.8 Mb deletion in a mouse model of Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longnecker Richard

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prader-Willi and Angelman syndrome (PWS and AS patients typically have an ~5 Mb deletion of human chromosome 15q11-q13, of opposite parental origin. A mouse model of PWS and AS has a transgenic insertion-deletion (TgPWS/TgAS of chromosome 7B/C subsequent to paternal or maternal inheritance, respectively. In this study, we define the deletion endpoints and examine the impact on expression of flanking genes. Results Using molecular and cytological methods we demonstrate that 13 imprinted and 11 non-imprinted genes are included in the TgPWS/TgAS deletion. Normal expression levels were found in TgPWS brain for genes extending 9.1- or 5.6-Mb centromeric or telomeric of the deletion, respectively. Our molecular cytological studies map the proximal deletion breakpoint between the Luzp2 and Siglec-H loci, and we show that overall mRNA levels of Luzp2 in TgPWS and TgAS brain are significantly reduced by 17%. Intriguingly, 5' Chrna7 shows 1.7-fold decreased levels in TgPWS and TgAS brain whereas there is a ≥15-fold increase in expression in neonatal liver and spleen of these mouse models. By isolating a Chrna7-Tg fusion transcript from TgAS mice, we mapped the telomeric deletion breakpoint in Chrna7 intron 4. Conclusion Based on the extent of the deletion, TgPWS/TgAS mice are models for PWS/AS class I deletions. Other than for the first gene promoters immediately outside the deletion, since genes extending 5.6–9.1 Mb away from each end of the deletion show normal expression levels in TgPWS brain, this indicates that the transgene array does not induce silencing and there are no additional linked rearrangements. Using gene expression, non-coding conserved sequence (NCCS and synteny data, we have genetically mapped a putative Luzp2 neuronal enhancer responsible for ~33% of allelic transcriptional activity. The Chrna7 results are explained by hypothesizing loss of an essential neuronal transcriptional enhancer required for ~80% of

  9. Association among Complement Factor H Autoantibodies, Deletions of CFHR, and the Risk of Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Jiang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the association among complement factor H-related (CFHRs gene deficiency, complement factor H (CFH autoantibodies, and atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS susceptibility. EMBASE, PubMed, and the ISI Web of Science databases were searched for all eligible studies on the relationship among CFHRs deficiency, anti-FH autoantibodies, and aHUS risk. Eight case-control studies with 927 cases and 1182 controls were included in this study. CFHR1 deficiency was significantly associated with an increased risk of aHUS (odds ratio (OR = 3.61, 95% confidence interval (95% CI, 1.96, 6.63, p < 0.001, while no association was demonstrated in individuals with only CFHR1/R3 deficiency (OR = 1.32, 95% CI, 0.50, 3.50, p = 0.56. Moreover, a more significant correlation was observed in people with both FH-anti autoantibodies and CFHR1 deficiency (OR = 11.75, 95% CI, 4.53, 30.44, p < 0.001 in contrast to those with only CFHR1 deficiency. In addition, the results were essentially consistent among subgroups stratified by study quality, ethnicity, and gene detection methods. The present meta-analysis indicated that CFHR1 deletion was significantly associated with the risk of aHUS, particularly when combined with anti-FH autoantibodies, indicating that potential interactions among CFHR1 deficiency and anti-FH autoantibodies might impact the risk of aHUS.

  10. Somatic and germ-line mosaicism of deletion 15q11.2-q13 in a mother of dyzigotic twins with Angelman syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Javier; Fernández, Raquel; Madruga, Marcos; Bernabeu-Wittel, José; Antiñolo, Guillermo; Borrego, Salud

    2014-02-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS, OMIM105830) is a neurogenetic disorder caused by different genetic mechanisms. Determining the genetic mechanism is essential to establish the recurrence risk and the accuracy of genetic/reproductive counseling. The majority of AS patients present with a deletion of the 15q11.2-q13 region on the maternally derived chromosome. The other genetic mechanisms are: paternal disomy of chromosome 15, imprinting center defects, and mutations in the ubiquitin-protein ligase E3A gene (UBE3A). Different recurrence risks are associated with each specific genetic mechanism involved. We report on the study of dizygotic twins with classic phenotypic AS due to deletion of the same maternally derived chromosome 15. The mother presented with hypopigmented macular lesions on the inner side of both arms. Fibroblast culture studies of the maternal hypopigmented skin areas from both arms showed mosaicism for a normal cell line and for a second cell line with a 15q11.2-q13 deletion. This family represents the first demonstrated case of maternal somatic and germ line mosaicism for 15q11.2-q13 deletion as the cause of AS. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Large-scale evaluation of in silico gene deletions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Förster, Jochen; Famili, Iman; Palsson, Bernhard Ø

    2003-01-01

    A large-scale in silico evaluation of gene deletions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was conducted using a genome-scale reconstructed metabolic model. The effect of 599 single gene deletions on cell viability was simulated in silico and compared to published experimental results. In 526 cases (87.......8%), the in silico results were in agreement with experimental observations when growth on synthetic complete medium was simulated. Viable phenotypes were correctly predicted in 89.4% (496 out of 555) and lethal phenotypes were correctly predicted in 68.2% (30 out of 44) of the cases considered. The in silico...... evaluation was solely based on the topological properties of the metabolic network which is based on well-established reaction stoichiometry. No interaction or regulatory information was accounted for in the in silico model. False predictions were analyzed on a case-by-case basis for four possible...

  12. Large-scale evaluation of in silico gene deletions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Förster, Jochen; Famili, Iman; Palsson, Bernhard Ø

    2003-01-01

    A large-scale in silico evaluation of gene deletions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was conducted using a genome-scale reconstructed metabolic model. The effect of 599 single gene deletions on cell viability was simulated in silico and compared to published experimental results. In 526 cases (87.......8%), the in silico results were in agreement with experimental observations when growth on synthetic complete medium was simulated. Viable phenotypes were correctly predicted in 89.4% (496 out of 555) and lethal phenotypes were correctly predicted in 68.2% (30 out of 44) of the cases considered. The in silico...... inadequacies of the in silico model: (1) incomplete media composition, (2) substitutable biomass components, (3) incomplete biochemical information, and (4) missing regulation. This analysis eliminated a number of false predictions and suggested a number of experimentally testable hypotheses. A genome...

  13. Psychopathology and cognition in children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niarchou, Maria; Zammit, Stanley; van Goozen, Stephanie H. M.; Thapar, Anita; Tierling, Hayley M.; Owen, Michael J.; van den Bree, Marianne B. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) have been reported to have high rates of cognitive and psychiatric problems. Aims To establish the nature and prevalence of psychiatric disorder and neurocognitive impairment in children with 22q11.2DS and test whether risk of psychopathology is mediated by the children’s intellectual impairment. Method Neurocognition and psychopathology were assessed in 80 children with 22q11.2DS (mean age 10.2 years, s.d. = 2.1) and 39 sibling controls (mean age 10.9 years, s.d. = 2.0). Results More than half (54%) of children with 22q11.2DS met diagnostic criteria for one or more DSM-IV-TR psychiatric disorder. These children had lower IQ (mean 76.8, s.d. = 13.0) than controls (mean 108.6, s.d. = 15.2) (Ppsychopathology was not mediated by intellectual impairment. Conclusions 22q11.2DS is not related to a specific psychiatric phenotype in children. Moreover, the deletion has largely independent effects on IQ and risk of psychopathology, indicating that psychopathology in 22q11.2DS is not a non-specific consequence of generalised cognitive impairment. PMID:24115343

  14. Movement Disorders and Other Motor Abnormalities in Adults With 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boot, Erik; Butcher, Nancy J; van Amelsvoort, Thérèse AMJ; Lang, Anthony E; Marras, Connie; Pondal, Margarita; Andrade, Danielle M; Fung, Wai Lun Alan; Bassett, Anne S

    2015-01-01

    Movement abnormalities are frequently reported in children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS), but knowledge in this area is scarce in the increasing adult population. We report on five individuals illustrative of movement disorders and other motor abnormalities in adults with 22q11.2DS. In addition to an increased susceptibility to neuropsychiatric disorders, seizures, and early-onset Parkinson disease, the underlying brain dysfunction associated with 22q11.2DS may give rise to an increased vulnerability to multiple movement abnormalities, including those influenced by medications. Movement abnormalities may also be secondary to treatable endocrine diseases and congenital musculoskeletal abnormalities. We propose that movement abnormalities may be common in adults with 22q11.2DS and discuss the implications and challenges important to clinical practice. PMID:25684639

  15. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unolt, Marta; DiCairano, Lauren; Schlechtweg, Kathryn; Barry, Jessica; Howell, Lori; Kasperski, Stefanie; Nance, Michael; Adzick, N Scott; Zackai, Elaine H; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M

    2017-01-01

    We report the important association of congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) and 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS). The prevalence of CDH in our cohort of patients with 22q11.2DS is 0.8% (10/1246), which is greater than in the general population (0.025%). This observation suggests that 22q11.2DS should be considered when a child or fetus presents with CDH, in particular when other clinical findings associated with the 22q11.2DS are present, such as congenital cardiac defects. Furthermore, this finding may lead to the identification of an additional locus for diaphragmatic hernia in the general population. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. A child with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome and a bilobed gallbladder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarke, James R.; Macken, Marian B. [Dalhousie University, Department of Radiology, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Schmidt, Matthias H. [Dalhousie University, Department of Radiology, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); IWK Health Centre, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, 5850/5980 University Ave., P.O. Box 9700, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Morley, Charlotte; Cummings, Elizabeth A. [Dalhousie University, Department of Pediatrics, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada)

    2007-02-15

    We present an 11-year-old girl with a chromosome 22q11.2 microdeletion, velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS), and a bilobed gallbladder as an incidental finding on abdominal sonography. The finding was confirmed by magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP).This is the first report of a gallbladder anomaly associated with a chromosome 22q11.2 deletion and the second report of a biliary tract anomaly associated with a mutation in the chromosome 22q11 region. We suggest that close attention be paid to the anatomy of the biliary tree in patients with mutations in the chromosome 22q11 region. Further study is warranted to determine the range and prevalence of biliary tract anomalies in this population. (orig.)

  17. Psychiatric Disorders From Childhood to Adulthood in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome: Results From the International Consortium on Brain and Behavior in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Maude; Debbané, Martin; Bassett, Anne S.; Chow, Eva W.C.; Fung, Wai Lun Alan; van den Bree, Marianne B.M.; Owen, Michael; Murphy, Kieran C.; Niarchou, Maria; Kates, Wendy R.; Antshel, Kevin M.; Fremont, Wanda; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M.; Gur, Raquel E.; Zackai, Elaine H.; Vorstman, Jacob; Duijff, Sasja N.; Klaassen, Petra W.J.; Swillen, Ann; Gothelf, Doron; Green, Tamar; Weizman, Abraham; Van Amelsvoort, Therese; Evers, Laurens; Boot, Erik; Shashi, Vandana; Hooper, Stephen R.; Bearden, Carrie E.; Jalbrzikowski, Maria; Armando, Marco; Vicari, Stefano; Murphy, Declan G.; Ousley, Opal; Campbell, Linda E.; Simon, Tony J.; Eliez, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Objective Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome is a neurogenetic disorder associated with high rates of schizophrenia and other psychiatric conditions. The authors report what is to their knowledge the first large-scale collaborative study of rates and sex distributions of psychiatric disorders from childhood to adulthood in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. The associations among psychopathology, intellect, and functioning were examined in a subgroup of participants. Method The 1,402 participants with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, ages 6–68 years, were assessed for psychiatric disorders with validated diagnostic instruments. Data on intelligence and adaptive functioning were available for 183 participants ages 6 to 24 years. Results Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) was the most frequent disorder in children (37.10%) and was overrepresented in males. Anxiety disorders were more prevalent than mood disorders at all ages, but especially in children and adolescents. Anxiety and unipolar mood disorders were overrepresented in females. Psychotic disorders were present in 41% of adults over age 25. Males did not predominate in psychotic or autism spectrum disorders. Hierarchical regressions in the subgroup revealed that daily living skills were predicted by the presence of anxiety disorders. Psychopathology was not associated with communication or socialization skills. Conclusions To the authors' knowledge, this is the largest study of psychiatric morbidity in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. It validates previous findings that this condition is one of the strongest risk factors for psychosis. Anxiety and developmental disorders were also prevalent. These results highlight the need to monitor and reduce the long-term burden of psychopathology in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. PMID:24577245

  18. Very small deletions within the NESP55 gene in pseudohypoparathyroidism type 1b

    OpenAIRE

    Rezwan, Faisal I; Poole, Rebecca L; Prescott, Trine; Walker, Joanna M; Karen Temple, I; Mackay, Deborah JG

    2014-01-01

    Pseudohypoparathyroidism (PHP) is caused by reduced expression of genes within the GNAS cluster, resulting in parathormone resistance. The cluster contains multiple imprinted transcripts, including the stimulatory G protein α subunit (Gs-α) and NESP55 transcript preferentially expressed from the maternal allele, and the paternally expressed XLas, A/B and antisense transcripts. PHP1b can be caused by loss of imprinting affecting GNAS A/B alone (associated with STX16 deletion), or the entire GN...

  19. A novel deletion mutation of the ADAR1 gene in a Chinese patient ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    [Li W.-W., Wu Q.-Y., Li N., Deng D.-Q., Zhang R.-S., Cui Y.-X., Li X.-J. and Xia X.Y. 2014 A novel deletion mutation of the ADAR1 gene in a Chinese patient ... Genomic DNA was extracted from blood samples using Wizard Genomic. DNA Purification Kit (Promega, Madison, USA) accord- ing to the manufacturer's instruction.

  20. Durable Hematological and Major Cytogenetic Response in a Patient with Isolated 20q Deletion Myelodysplastic Syndrome Treated with Lenalidomide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bagi Jana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS is a clonal bone marrow disorder characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis. It is characterized by peripheral blood cytopenia and significant risk of progression to acute myeloid leukemia result. Deletion of the long arm of chromosome 20 (20q deletion is present in 3–7% of patients with MDS. Lenalidomide is an immunomodulatory agent with antiangiogenic activity. It is FDA approved for the treatment of anemia in patients with low or int-1 risk MDS with chromosome 5q deletion with or without additional cytogenetic abnormalities. Study of lenalidomide in patients with MDS without 5q deletion but other karyotypic abnormalities demonstrated meaningful activity in transfusion dependent patients; however, response of patients with isolated 20q deletion to lenalidomide is not known. We are reporting a patient with 20q deletion MDS treated with lenalidomide after he failed to respond to azacytidine; to our knowledge this is the first report of a patient with isolated 20q deletion treated with lenalidomide.

  1. Osteopathia striata congenita with cranial sclerosis and intellectual disability due to contiguous gene deletions involving the WTX locus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holman, Sk; Morgan, T; Baujat, G

    2013-01-01

    sclerosis, with a high prevalence of cleft palate and hearing loss. Intellectual disability or neurodevelopmental delay is not observed in females with point mutations in WTX leading to OSCS. One female has been described with a deletion spanning multiple neighbouring genes suggesting that deletion of some...

  2. Deletion of the sigB gene in Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579 leads to hydrogen peroxide hyperresistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaik, van W.; Zwietering, M.H.; Vos, de W.M.; Abee, T.

    2005-01-01

    The sigB gene of Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579 encodes the alternative sigma factor B. Deletion of sigB in B. cereus leads to hyperresistance to hydrogen peroxide. The expression of katA, which encodes one of the catalases of B. cereus, is upregulated in the sigB deletion mutant, and this may

  3. Temporal Lobe Anatomy and Psychiatric Symptoms in Velocardiofacial Syndrome (22Q11.2 Deletion Syndrome)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kates, Wendy R.; Miller, Adam M.; Abdulsabur, Nuria; Antshel, Kevin M.; Conchelos, Jena; Fremont, Wanda; Roizen, Nancy

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the association between mesial temporal lobe morphology, ratios of prefrontal cortex to amygdala and hippocampus volumes, and psychiatric symptomatology in children and adolescents with velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS). Method: Scores on behavioral rating scales and volumetric measures of the amygdala, hippocampus, and…

  4. Serotonergic, noradrenergic and dopaminergic markers are related to cognitive function in adults with 22q11 deletion syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, Laurens J. M.; Curfs, Leopold M. G.; Bakker, Jaap A.; Boot, Erik; da Silva Alves, Fabiana; Abeling, Nico; Bierau, Jörgen; Drukker, Marjan; van Amelsvoort, Therese A. M. J.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with 22q11 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) have a high prevalence of psychiatric disorders and intellectual disability. At present the neurobiology underlying psychopathology in 22q11DS is still not understood. In the present study, we analyzed urinary serotonergic, dopaminergic and

  5. Metopic and sagittal synostosis in Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome: five cases with intragenic mutations or complete deletions of GLI3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hurst, Jane A; Jenkins, Dagan; Vasudevan, Pradeep C

    2011-01-01

    Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome (GCPS) is a multiple congenital malformation characterised by limb and craniofacial anomalies, caused by heterozygous mutation or deletion of GLI3. We report four boys and a girl who were presented with trigonocephaly due to metopic synostosis, in association ...

  6. Maladaptive Conflict Monitoring as Evidence for Executive Dysfunction in Children with Chromosome 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bish, Joel P.; Ferrante, Samantha M.; McDonald-McGinn, Donna; Zackai, Elaine; Simon, Tony J.

    2005-01-01

    Using an adaptation of the Attentional Networks Test, we investigated aspects of executive control in children with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (DS22q11.2), a common but not well understood disorder that produces non-verbal cognitive deficits and a marked incidence of psychopathology. The data revealed that children with DS22q11.2…

  7. A Longitudinal Examination of the Psychoeducational, Neurocognitive, and Psychiatric Functioning in Children with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Stephen R.; Curtiss, Kathleen; Schoch, Kelly; Keshavan, Matcheri S.; Allen, Andrew; Shashi, Vandana

    2013-01-01

    The present study sought to examine the longitudinal psychoeducational, neurocognitive, and psychiatric outcomes of children and adolescents with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS), a population with a high incidence of major psychiatric illnesses appearing in late adolescence/early adulthood. Little is known of the developmental…

  8. Examining a New Method to Studying Velopharyngeal Structures in a Child with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollara, Lakshmi; Schenck, Graham; Jaskolka, Michael; Perry, Jamie L.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To date, no studies have imaged the velopharynx in children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2 DS) without the use of sedation. Dysmorphology in velopharyngeal structures has been shown to have significant negative implications on speech among these individuals. This single case study was designed to assess the feasibility of a…

  9. Social Skills and Associated Psychopathology in Children with Chromosome 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome: Implications for Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashi, V.; Veerapandiyan, A.; Schoch, K.; Kwapil, T.; Keshavan, M.; Ip, E.; Hooper, S.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Although distinctive neuropsychological impairments have been delineated in children with chromosome 22q11 deletion syndrome (22q11DS), social skills and social cognition remain less well-characterised. Objective: To examine social skills and social cognition and their relationship with neuropsychological function/behaviour and…

  10. Cognitive decline preceding the onset of psychosis in patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vorstman, Jacob A S|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304817023; Breetvelt, Elemi J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/357937414; Duijff, Sasja N.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/30481914X; Eliez, Stephan; Schneider, Maude; Jalbrzikowski, Maria; Armando, Marco; Vicari, Stefano; Shashi, Vandana; Hooper, Stephen R.; Chow, Eva W C; Fung, Wai Lun Alan; Butcher, Nancy J.; Young, Donald A.; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M.; Vogels, Annick; Van Amelsvoort, Therese; Gothelf, Doron; Weinberger, Ronnie; Weizman, Abraham; Klaassen, Petra W J; Koops, Sanne; Kates, Wendy R.; Antshel, Kevin M.; Simon, Tony J.; Ousley, Opal Y.; Swillen, Ann; Gur, Raquel E.; Bearden, Carrie E.; Kahn, René S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073778532; Bassett, Anne S.; Emanuel, Beverly S.; Zackai, Elaine H.; Kushan, Leila; Fremont, Wanda; Schoch, Kelly; Stoddard, Joel; Cubells, Joseph; Fu, Fiona; Campbell, Linda E.; Fritsch, Rosemarie; Vergaelen, Elfi; Neeleman, Marjolein; Boot, Erik; Debbané, Martin; Philip, Nicole; Green, Tamar; Van DenBree, Marianne B M; Murphy, Declan; Canyelles, Jaume Morey; Arango, Celso; Murphy, Kieran C.; Pontillo, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Importance: Patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) have an elevated (25%) risk of developing schizophrenia. Recent reports have suggested that a subgroup of children with 22q11DS display a substantial decline in cognitive abilities starting at a young age.Objective: To determine whether

  11. Working Memory Impairments in Chromosome 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome: The Roles of Anxiety and Stress Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Ashley F.; Hobbs, Diana A.; Stephenson, David D.; Laird, Robert D.; Beaton, Elliott A.

    2017-01-01

    Stress and anxiety have a negative impact on working memory systems by competing for executive resources and attention. Broad memory deficits, anxiety, and elevated stress have been reported in individuals with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS). We investigated anxiety and physiological stress reactivity in relation to visuospatial…

  12. Multimodal MRI reveals structural connectivity differences in 22q11 deletion syndrome related to impaired spatial working memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Hanlon, Erik; Howley, Sarah; Prasad, Sarah; McGrath, Jane; Leemans, Alexander; McDonald, Colm; Garavan, Hugh; Murphy, Kieran C

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Impaired spatial working memory is a core cognitive deficit observed in people with 22q11 Deletion syndrome (22q11DS) and has been suggested as a candidate endophenotype for schizophrenia. However, to date, the neuroanatomical mechanisms describing its structural and functional

  13. First report of a deletion encompassing an entire exon in the homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase gene causing alkaptonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zouheir Habbal, Mohammad; Bou-Assi, Tarek; Zhu, Jun; Owen, Renius; Chehab, Farid F

    2014-01-01

    Alkaptonuria is often diagnosed clinically with episodes of dark urine, biochemically by the accumulation of peripheral homogentisic acid and molecularly by the presence of mutations in the homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase gene (HGD). Alkaptonuria is invariably associated with HGD mutations, which consist of single nucleotide variants and small insertions/deletions. Surprisingly, the presence of deletions beyond a few nucleotides among over 150 reported deleterious mutations has not been described, raising the suspicion that this gene might be protected against the detrimental mechanisms of gene rearrangements. The quest for an HGD mutation in a proband with AKU revealed with a SNP array five large regions of homozygosity (5-16 Mb), one of which includes the HGD gene. A homozygous deletion of 649 bp deletion that encompasses the 72 nucleotides of exon 2 and surrounding DNA sequences in flanking introns of the HGD gene was unveiled in a proband with AKU. The nature of this deletion suggests that this in-frame deletion could generate a protein without exon 2. Thus, we modeled the tertiary structure of the mutant protein structure to determine the effect of exon 2 deletion. While the two β-pleated sheets encoded by exon 2 were missing in the mutant structure, other β-pleated sheets are largely unaffected by the deletion. However, nine novel α-helical coils substituted the eight coils present in the native HGD crystal structure. Thus, this deletion results in a deleterious enzyme, which is consistent with the proband's phenotype. Screening for mutations in the HGD gene, particularly in the Middle East, ought to include this exon 2 deletion in order to determine its frequency and uncover its origin.

  14. Deletion lengthening at chromosomes 6q and 16q targets multiple tumor suppressor genes and is associated with an increasingly poor prognosis in prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kluth, Martina; Jung, Simon; Habib, Omar

    2017-01-01

    317 patients for 6q and 16q deletion length heterogeneity and found that the deletion expanded within 50-60% of 6q and 16q deleted cancers. Taken together, these data suggest continuous "deletion lengthening" as a key mechanism for prostate cancer progression leading to parallel down regulation......Prostate cancer is characterized by recurrent deletions that can considerably vary in size. We hypothesized that large deletions develop from small deletions and that this "deletion lengthening" might have a "per se" carcinogenic role through a combinatorial effect of multiple down regulated genes.......In vitroknockdown of 37 genes located inside the 6q12-q22 deletion region identified 4 genes with additive tumor suppressive effects, further supporting a role of the deletion size for cancer aggressiveness. Employing fluorescencein-situhybridization analysis on prostate cancer tissue microarrays, we determined...

  15. Exon skipping and translation in patients with frameshift deletions in the dystrophin gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherratt, T.G.; Dubowitz, V.; Sewry, C.A.; Strong, P.N. (Royal Postgraduate Medical School, London (United Kingdom)); Vulliamy, T. (Hammersmith Hospital, London (United Kingdom))

    1993-11-01

    Although many Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients have a deletion in the dystrophin gene which disrupts the translational reading frame, they express dystrophin in a small proportion of skeletal muscle fibers ([open quotes]revertant fibers[close quotes]). Antibody studies have shown, indirectly, that dystrophin synthesis in revertant fibers is facilitated by a frame-restoring mechanism; in the present study, the feasibility of mRNA splicing was investigated. Dystrophin transcripts were analyzed in skeletal muscle from individuals possessing revertant fibers and a frameshift deletion in the dystrophin gene. In each case a minor in-frame transcript was detected, in which exons adjacent to those deleted from the genome had been skipped. There appeared to be some correlation between the levels of in-frame transcripts and the predicted translation products. Low levels of alternatively spliced transcripts were also present in normal muscle. The results provide further evidence of exon skipping in the dystrophin gene and indicate that this may be involved in the synthesis of dystrophin by revertant fibers. 44 refs., 12 figs.

  16. Deletion of hepatocyte nuclear factor-1-beta in an infant with prune belly syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeri, Sina; Devers, Patricia L; Kaiser-Rogers, Kathleen A; Moylan, Vincent J; Torchia, Beth S; Horton, Amanda L; Wolfe, Honor M; Aylsworth, Arthur S

    2010-08-01

    Prune belly syndrome is a rare congenital disorder characterized by deficiency of abdominal wall muscles, cryptorchidism, and urinary tract anomalies. We have had the opportunity to study a baby with prune belly syndrome associated with an apparently de novo 1.3-megabase interstitial 17q12 microdeletion that includes the hepatocyte nuclear factor-1-beta gene at 17q12. One previous patient, an adult, has been reported with prune belly syndrome and a hepatocyte nuclear factor-1-beta microdeletion. Hepatocyte nuclear factor-1-beta is a widely expressed transcription factor that regulates tissue-specific gene expression and is expressed in numerous tissues including mesonephric duct derivatives, the renal tubule of the metanephros, and the developing prostate of the mouse. Mutations in hepatocyte nuclear factor-1-beta cause the "renal cysts and diabetes syndrome," isolated renal cystic dysplasia, and a variety of other malformations. Based on its expression pattern and the observation of two affected cases, we propose that haploinsufficiency of hepatocyte nuclear factor-1-beta may be causally related to the production of the prune belly syndrome phenotype through a mechanism of prostatic and ureteral hypoplasia that results in severe obstructive uropathy with urinary tract and abdominal distension. Copyright Thieme Medical Publishers.

  17. Neuro-behavioral profile and brain imaging study of the 22q13.3 deletion syndrome in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philippe, A.; Malan, V.; De Blois, M.C.; Colleaux, L.; Munnich, A.; Philippe, A.; De Blois, M.C.; Colleaux, L.; Munnich, A.; Boddaert, N.; Vaivre-Douret, L.; Robel, L.; Golse, B.; Vaivre-Douret, L.; Vaivre-Douret, L.; Danon-Boileau, L.; Heron, D.

    2008-01-01

    The 22q13.3 deletion syndrome (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man No. 606232) is a neuro-developmental disorder that includes hypotonia, severely impaired development of speech and language, autistic-like behavior, and minor dysmorphic features. Although the number of reported cases is increasing, the 22q13.3 deletion remains under-diagnosed because of failure in recognizing the clinical phenotype and detecting the 22qter deletion by routine chromosome analyses. Our goal is to contribute to the description of the neuro-behavioral phenotype and brain abnormalities of this micro-deletional syndrome. We assessed neuro-motor, sensory, language, communication, and social development and performed cerebral MRI and study of regional cerebral blood flow measured by positron emission tomography in 8 children carrying the 22q13.3 deletion. Despite variability in expression and severity, the children shared a common developmental profile characterized by hypotonia, sleep disorders, and poor response to their environment in early infancy; expressive language deficit contrasting with emergence of social reciprocity from ages similar to 3 to 5 years; sensory processing dysfunction; and neuro-motor disorders. Brain MRI findings were normal or showed a thin or morphologically atypical corpus callosum. Positron emission tomography study detected a localized dysfunction of the left temporal polar lobe and amygdala hypoperfusion. The developmental course of the 22q13.3 deletion syndrome belongs to pervasive developmental disorders but is distinct from autism. An improved description of the natural history of this syndrome should help in recognizing this largely under-diagnosed condition. (authors)

  18. Neuro-behavioral profile and brain imaging study of the 22q13.3 deletion syndrome in childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philippe, A.; Malan, V.; De Blois, M.C.; Colleaux, L.; Munnich, A. [Hop Necker Enfants Malad, Assistance Publ Hop Paris, Natl Inst Hlth and Med Res, Paris (France); Philippe, A.; De Blois, M.C.; Colleaux, L.; Munnich, A. [HopNecker Enfants Malad, Assistance Publ Hop Paris, Dept Genet, Paris (France); Boddaert, N. [Natl Inst Hlth and Med Res, Mixed Unit Res 0205, Orsay (France); Vaivre-Douret, L.; Robel, L.; Golse, B. [Hop Necker Enfants Malad, Assistance Publ Hop Paris, Dept Psychiat, Paris (France); Vaivre-Douret, L. [Univ Paris 10, Mixed Unit Res S0669, Univ Paris 05, Univ Paris 11, Paris 10 (France); Vaivre-Douret, L. [Assistance Publ Hop Paris, Dept Obstet et Gynaecol, Paris (France); Danon-Boileau, L. [Natl Ctr Sci Res, Mixed Unit Res 7114, Paris (France); Heron, D. [Hop La Pitie Salpetriere, Assistance Publ HopParis, Dept Genet, Paris (France)

    2008-07-01

    The 22q13.3 deletion syndrome (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man No. 606232) is a neuro-developmental disorder that includes hypotonia, severely impaired development of speech and language, autistic-like behavior, and minor dysmorphic features. Although the number of reported cases is increasing, the 22q13.3 deletion remains under-diagnosed because of failure in recognizing the clinical phenotype and detecting the 22qter deletion by routine chromosome analyses. Our goal is to contribute to the description of the neuro-behavioral phenotype and brain abnormalities of this micro-deletional syndrome. We assessed neuro-motor, sensory, language, communication, and social development and performed cerebral MRI and study of regional cerebral blood flow measured by positron emission tomography in 8 children carrying the 22q13.3 deletion. Despite variability in expression and severity, the children shared a common developmental profile characterized by hypotonia, sleep disorders, and poor response to their environment in early infancy; expressive language deficit contrasting with emergence of social reciprocity from ages similar to 3 to 5 years; sensory processing dysfunction; and neuro-motor disorders. Brain MRI findings were normal or showed a thin or morphologically atypical corpus callosum. Positron emission tomography study detected a localized dysfunction of the left temporal polar lobe and amygdala hypoperfusion. The developmental course of the 22q13.3 deletion syndrome belongs to pervasive developmental disorders but is distinct from autism. An improved description of the natural history of this syndrome should help in recognizing this largely under-diagnosed condition. (authors)

  19. Proline and COMT status affect visual connectivity in children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurice J C M Magnée

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Individuals with the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS are at increased risk for schizophrenia and Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs. Given the prevalence of visual processing deficits in these three disorders, a causal relationship between genes in the deleted region of chromosome 22 and visual processing is likely. Therefore, 22q11DS may represent a unique model to understand the neurobiology of visual processing deficits related with ASD and psychosis. METHODOLOGY: We measured Event-Related Potentials (ERPs during a texture segregation task in 58 children with 22q11DS and 100 age-matched controls. The C1 component was used to index afferent activity of visual cortex area V1; the texture negativity wave provided a measure for the integrity of recurrent connections in the visual cortical system. COMT genotype and plasma proline levels were assessed in 22q11DS individuals. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Children with 22q11DS showed enhanced feedforward activity starting from 70 ms after visual presentation. ERP activity related to visual feedback activity was reduced in the 22q11DS group, which was seen as less texture negativity around 150 ms post presentation. Within the 22q11DS group we further demonstrated an association between high plasma proline levels and aberrant feedback/feedforward ratios, which was moderated by the COMT(158 genotype. CONCLUSIONS: These findings confirm the presence of early visual processing deficits in 22q11DS. We discuss these in terms of dysfunctional synaptic plasticity in early visual processing areas, possibly associated with deviant dopaminergic and glutamatergic transmission. As such, our findings may serve as a promising biomarker related to the development of schizophrenia among 22q11DS individuals.

  20. A Codon Deletion at the Beginning of Green Fluorescent Protein Genes Enhances Protein Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Mejía, José-Luis; Roldán-Salgado, Abigail; Osuna, Joel; Merino, Enrique; Gaytán, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Recombinant protein expression is one of the key issues in protein engineering and biotechnology. Among the different models for assessing protein production and structure-function studies, green fluorescent protein (GFP) is one of the preferred models because of its importance as a reporter in cellular and molecular studies. In this research we analyze the effect of codon deletions near the amino terminus of different GFP proteins on fluorescence. Our study includes Gly4 deletions in the enhanced GFP (EGFP), the red-shifted GFP and the red-shifted EGFP. The Gly4 deletion mutants and their corresponding wild-type counterparts were transcribed under the control of the T7 or Trc promoters and their expression patterns were analyzed. Different fluorescent outcomes were observed depending on the type of fluorescent gene versions. In silico analysis of the RNA secondary structures near the ribosome binding site revealed a direct relationship between their minimum free energy and GFP production. Integrative analysis of these results, including SDS-PAGE analysis, led us to conclude that the fluorescence improvement of cells expressing different versions of GFPs with Gly4 deleted is due to an enhancement of the accessibility of the ribosome binding site by reducing the stability of the RNA secondary structures at their mRNA leader regions. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. An interstitial deletion of 8q23.3-q24.22 associated with Langer-Giedion syndrome, Cornelia de Lange syndrome and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Ping; Lin, Shuan-Pei; Liu, Yu-Peng; Chern, Schu-Rern; Wu, Peih-Shan; Su, Jun-Wei; Chen, Yu-Ting; Lee, Chen-Chi; Wang, Wayseen

    2013-10-15

    We present a 19-year-old male with laxity of skin and joints, sparse scalp hair, facial dysmorphism, epilepsy, multiple exostoses, scoliosis, gastroesophageal reflux, cardiovascular defects, and an 8q23.3-q24.22 deletion detected by array comparative genomic hybridization. The patient was previously misdiagnosed as having Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. However, his clinical findings are in fact correlated with trichorhinophalangeal syndrome type II/Langer-Giedion syndrome and Cornelia de Lange syndrome-4. We discuss the genotype-phenotype correlation and the consequence of haploinsufficiency of TRPS1, RAD21, EXT1 and KCNQ3 in this case. © 2013.

  2. Antithrombin Katowice: exon 1 deletion in the SERPINC1 gene associated with type I antithrombin deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieśla, Marek; Wypasek, Ewa; Corral, Javier; Alhenc-Gelas, Martine; Undas, Anetta

    2015-01-01

    Type I antithrombin deficiency is an autosomal dominant disorder associated with thromboembolic complications mainly related to single-point mutations in SERPINC1, the gene encoding antithrombin. Chromosomal rearrangements have been found in up to 10% of cases with type I antithrombin deficiency. We report here the first heterozygous deletion of SERPINC1 exon 1 identified in a 44-year-old man with type I deficiency who developed deep vein thrombosis of the left leg complicated by pulmonary embolism. This study demonstrates that the search for large gene rearrangements in SERPINC1 can be a useful diagnostic approach, particularly in patients with type I antithrombin deficiency without mutations in SERPINC1.

  3. Deletion of human GP1BB and SEPT5 is associated with Bernard-Soulier syndrome, platelet secretion defect, polymicrogyria, and developmental delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Ingrid; Sandrock, Kirstin; Lanza, Francois; Nurden, Paquita; Hainmann, Ina; Pavlova, Anna; Greinacher, Andreas; Tacke, Uta; Barth, Michael; Busse, Anja; Oldenburg, Johannes; Bommer, Martin; Strahm, Brigitte; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Zieger, Barbara

    2011-09-01

    The bleeding disorder Bernard-Soulier syndrome (BSS) is caused by mutations in the genes coding for the platelet glycoprotein GPIb/IX receptor. The septin SEPT5 is important for active membrane movement such as vesicle trafficking and exocytosis in non-dividing cells (i.e. platelets, neurons). We report on a four-year-old boy with a homozygous deletion comprising not only glycoprotein Ibβ (GP1BB) but also the SEPT5 gene, located 5' to GP1BB. He presented with BSS, cortical dysplasia (polymicrogyria), developmental delay, and platelet secretion defect. The homozygous deletion of GP1BB and SEPT5, which had been identified by PCR analyses, was confirmed by Southern analyses and denaturing HPLC (DHPLC). The parents were heterozygous for this deletion. Absence of GPIbβ and SEPT5 proteins in the patient's platelets was illustrated using transmission electron microscopy. Besides decreased GPIb/IX expression, flow cytometry analyses revealed impaired platelet granule secretion. Because the bleeding disorder was extremely severe, the boy received bone marrow transplantation (BMT) from a HLA-identical unrelated donor. After successful engraftment of BMT, he had no more bleeding episodes. Interestingly, also his mental development improved strikingly after BMT. This report describes for the first time a patient with SEPT5 deficiency presenting with cortical dysplasia (polymicrogyria), developmental delay, and platelet secretion defect.

  4. One Base Deletion (c.2422delT) in the TPO Gene Causes Severe Congenital Hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cangül, Hakan; Doğan, Murat; Sağlam, Yaman; Kendall, Michaela; Boelaert, Kristien; Barrett, Timothy G; Maher, Eamonn R

    2014-09-01

    Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) is the most common neonatal endocrine disorder and mutations in the TPO gene have been reported to cause CH. Our aim in this study was to determine the genetic basis of CH in two affected individuals coming from a consanguineous family. Since CH is usually inherited in autosomal recessive manner in consanguineous/multi-case families, we adopted a two-stage strategy of genetic linkage studies and targeted sequencing of the candidate genes. First, we investigated the potential genetic linkage of the family to any known CH locus using microsatellite markers and then screened for mutations in linked-gene by Sanger sequencing. The family showed potential linkage to the TPO gene and we detected a deletion (c.2422delT) in both cases. The mutation segregated with disease status in the family. This study demonstrates that a single base deletion in the carboxyl-terminal coding region of the TPO gene could cause CH and helps to establish a genotype/phenotype correlation associated with the mutation. The study also highlights the importance of molecular genetic studies in the definitive diagnosis and accurate classification of CH.

  5. Myeloid Malignancies with Chromosome 5q Deletions Acquire a Dependency on an Intrachromosomal NF-κB Gene Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Fang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome 5q deletions (del[5q] are common in high-risk (HR myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS and acute myeloid leukemia (AML; however, the gene regulatory networks that sustain these aggressive diseases are unknown. Reduced miR-146a expression in del(5q HR MDS/AML and miR-146a−/− hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs results in TRAF6/NF-κB activation. Increased survival and proliferation of HSPCs from miR-146alow HR MDS/AML is sustained by a neighboring haploid gene, SQSTM1 (p62, expressed from the intact 5q allele. Overexpression of p62 from the intact allele occurs through NF-κB-dependent feedforward signaling mediated by miR-146a deficiency. p62 is necessary for TRAF6-mediated NF-κB signaling, as disrupting the p62-TRAF6 signaling complex results in cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis of MDS/AML cells. Thus, del(5q HR MDS/AML employs an intrachromosomal gene network involving loss of miR-146a and haploid overexpression of p62 via NF-κB to sustain TRAF6/NF-κB signaling for cell survival and proliferation. Interfering with the p62-TRAF6 signaling complex represents a therapeutic option in miR-146a-deficient and aggressive del(5q MDS/AML.

  6. Malformations of the middle and inner ear on CT imaging in 22q11 deletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loos, Elke; Verhaert, Nicolas; Willaert, Annelore; Devriendt, Koenraad; Swillen, Ann; Hermans, Robert; Op de Beeck, Katya; Hens, Greet

    2016-11-01

    The 22q11 deletion syndrome (22q11DS), the most frequent microdeletion syndrome in humans, presents with a large variety of abnormalities. A common abnormality is hearing impairment. The exact pathophysiological explanation of the observed hearing loss remains largely unknown. The aim of this study was to analyze the middle and inner ear malformations as seen on computer tomographic imaging in patients with 22q11DS. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 11 22q11DS patients who had undergone a CT of the temporal bone in the past. Of the 22 examined ears, two showed an abnormal malleus and incus, 10 presented with a dense stapes superstructure, and three ears had an abnormal orientation of the stapes. With regard to the inner ear, 12 ears showed an incomplete partition type II with a normal vestibular aqueduct. In four ears the vestibule and lateral semicircular canal were composed of a single cavity, in 14 ears the vestibule was too wide, and three ears had a broadened lateral semicircular canal. These findings suggest that malformations of the stapes, cochlea, vestibule, and lateral semicircular canal are frequent in 22q11DS. To our knowledge, the current study involves the largest case series describing middle and inner ear malformations in 22q11DS. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Multi-disciplinary clinical study of Smith-Magenis syndrome (deletion 17p11.2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenberg, F.; Lewis, R.A.; Potocki, L. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1996-03-29

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a multiple congenital anomaly, mental retardation (MCA/MR) syndrome associated with deletion of chromosome 17 band p11.2. As part of a multi-disciplinary clinical, cytogenetic, and molecular approach to SMS, detailed clinical studies including radiographic neurologic, developmental, ophthalmologic, otolaryngologic, and audiologic evaluations were performed on 27 SMS patients. Significant findings include otolaryngologic abnormalities in 94%, eye abnormalities in 85%, sleep abnormalities (especially reduced REM sleep) in 75%, hearing impairment in 68% (approximately 65% conductive and 35% sensorineural), scoliosis in 65% brain abnormalities (predominantly ventriculomegaly) in 52%, cardiac abnormalities in at least 37%, renal anomalies (especially duplication of the collecting system) in 35%, low thyroxine levels in 29%, low immunoglobulin levels in 23%, and forearm abnormalities in 16%. The measured IQ ranged between 20-78, most patients falling in the moderate range of mental retardation at 40-54, although several patients scored in the mild or borderline range. The frequency of these many abnormalities in SMS suggests that patients should be evaluated thoroughly for associated complications both at the time of diagnosis and at least annually thereafter. 42 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Deletions and de novo mutations of SOX11 are associated with a neurodevelopmental disorder with features of Coffin-Siris syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempel, Annmarie; Pagnamenta, Alistair T; Blyth, Moira; Mansour, Sahar; McConnell, Vivienne; Kou, Ikuyo; Ikegawa, Shiro; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Lo-Castro, Adriana; Plessis, Ghislaine; Albrecht, Beate; Battaglia, Agatino; Taylor, Jenny C; Howard, Malcolm F; Keays, David; Sohal, Aman Singh; Kühl, Susanne J; Kini, Usha; McNeill, Alisdair

    2016-03-01

    SOX11 is a transcription factor proposed to play a role in brain development. The relevance of SOX11 to human developmental disorders was suggested by a recent report of SOX11 mutations in two patients with Coffin-Siris syndrome. Here we further investigate the role of SOX11 variants in neurodevelopmental disorders. We used array based comparative genomic hybridisation and trio exome sequencing to identify children with intellectual disability who have deletions or de novo point mutations disrupting SOX11. The pathogenicity of the SOX11 mutations was assessed using an in vitro gene expression reporter system. Loss-of-function experiments were performed in xenopus by knockdown of Sox11 expression. We identified seven individuals with chromosome 2p25 deletions involving SOX11. Trio exome sequencing identified three de novo SOX11 variants, two missense (p.K50N; p.P120H) and one nonsense (p.C29*). The biological consequences of the missense mutations were assessed using an in vitro gene expression system. These individuals had microcephaly, developmental delay and shared dysmorphic features compatible with mild Coffin-Siris syndrome. To further investigate the function of SOX11, we knocked down the orthologous gene in xenopus. Morphants had significant reduction in head size compared with controls. This suggests that SOX11 loss of function can be associated with microcephaly. We thus propose that SOX11 deletion or mutation can present with a Coffin-Siris phenotype. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  9. An interictal schizophrenia-like psychosis in an adult patient with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasutaka Tastuzawa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In addition to causing polymalformative syndrome, 22q11.2 deletion can lead to various neuropsychiatric disorders including mental retardation, psychosis, and epilepsy. However, few reports regarding epilepsy-related psychosis in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS exist. We describe the clinical characteristics and course of 22q11.2DS in a Japanese patient with comorbid mild mental retardation, childhood-onset localization-related epilepsy, and adult-onset, interictal schizophrenia-like psychosis. From a diagnostic viewpoint, early detection of impaired intellectual functioning and hyperprolinemia in patients with epilepsy with 22q11.2DS may be helpful in predicting the developmental timing of interictal psychosis. From a therapeutic viewpoint, special attention needs to be paid to phenytoin-induced hypocalcemia in this syndrome.

  10. Prevalence of glutathione S-transferase gene deletions and their effect on sickle cell patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandey Sanjay

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Glutathione S-transferase gene deletions are known detoxification agents and cause oxidative damage. Due to the different pathophysiology of anemia in thalassemia and sickle cell disease, there are significant differences in the pathophysiology of iron overload and iron-related complications in these disorders. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to estimate the frequency of the GSTM1 and GSTT1 genotypes in sickle cell disease patients and their effect on iron status. METHODS: Forty sickle cell anemia and sixty sickle ß-thalassemia patients and 100 controls were evaluated to determine the frequency of GST gene deletions. Complete blood counts were performed by an automated cell analyzer. Hemoglobin F, hemoglobin A, hemoglobin A2 and hemoglobin S were measured and diagnosis of patients was achieved by high performance liquid chromatography with DNA extraction by the phenol-chloroform method. The GST null genotype was determined using multiplex polymerase chain reaction and serum ferritin was measured using an ELISA kit. Statistical analysis was by EpiInfo and GraphPad statistics software. RESULTS: An increased frequency of the GSTT1 null genotype (p-value = 0.05 was seen in the patients. The mean serum ferritin level was higher in patients with the GST genotypes than in controls; this was statistically significant for all genotypes except GSTM1, however the higher levels of serum ferritin were due to blood transfusions in patients. CONCLUSION: GST deletions do not play a direct role in iron overload of sickle cell patients.

  11. Integrated genomic analysis implicates haploinsufficiency of multiple chromosome 5q31.2 genes in de novo myelodysplastic syndromes pathogenesis.

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    Timothy A Graubert

    Full Text Available Deletions spanning chromosome 5q31.2 are among the most common recurring cytogenetic abnormalities detectable in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS. Prior genomic studies have suggested that haploinsufficiency of multiple 5q31.2 genes may contribute to MDS pathogenesis. However, this hypothesis has never been formally tested. Therefore, we designed this study to systematically and comprehensively evaluate all 28 chromosome 5q31.2 genes and directly test whether haploinsufficiency of a single 5q31.2 gene may result from a heterozygous nucleotide mutation or microdeletion. We selected paired tumor (bone marrow and germline (skin DNA samples from 46 de novo MDS patients (37 without a cytogenetic 5q31.2 deletion and performed total exonic gene resequencing (479 amplicons and array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH. We found no somatic nucleotide changes in the 46 MDS samples, and no cytogenetically silent 5q31.2 deletions in 20/20 samples analyzed by array CGH. Twelve novel single nucleotide polymorphisms were discovered. The mRNA levels of 7 genes in the commonly deleted interval were reduced by 50% in CD34+ cells from del(5q MDS samples, and no gene showed complete loss of expression. Taken together, these data show that small deletions and/or point mutations in individual 5q31.2 genes are not common events in MDS, and implicate haploinsufficiency of multiple genes as the relevant genetic consequence of this common deletion.

  12. Speech and language abilities of children with the familial form of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

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    Rakonjac Marijana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome (22q11.2DS, which encompasses Shprintzen syndrome, DiGeorge and velocardiofacial syndrome, is the most common microdeletion syndrome in humans with an estimated incidence of approximately 1/4000 per live births. After Down syndrome, it is the second most common genetic syndrome associated with congenital heart malformations. The mode of inheritance of the 22q11.2DS is autosomal dominant. In approximately 72 - 94% of the cases the deletion has occurred de novo, while in 6 to 28% of patients deletion was inherited from a parent. As a part of a multidisciplinary study we examined the speech and language abilities of members of two families with inherited form of 22q11.2DS. The presence of 22q11.2 microdeletion was revealed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH and/or multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA. In one family we detected 1.5 Mb 22q11.2 microdeletion, while in the other family we found 3Mb microdeletion. Patients from both families showed delays in cognitive, socio-emotional, speech and language development. Furthermore, we found considerable variability in the phenotypic characteristics of 22q11.2DS and the degree of speech-language pathology not only between different families with 22q11.2 deletion, but also among members of the same family. In addition, we detected no correlation between the phenotype and the size of 22q11.2 microdeletion.

  13. Deletion and aberrant CpG island methylation of Caspase 8 gene in medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Gomez, Pilar; Bello, M Josefa; Inda, M Mar; Alonso, M Eva; Arjona, Dolores; Amiñoso, Cinthia; Lopez-Marin, Isabel; de Campos, Jose M; Sarasa, Jose L; Castresana, Javier S; Rey, Juan A

    2004-09-01

    Aberrant methylation of promoter CpG islands in human genes is an alternative genetic inactivation mechanism that contributes to the development of human tumors. Nevertheless, few studies have analyzed methylation in medulloblastomas. We determined the frequency of aberrant CpG island methylation for Caspase 8 (CASP8) in a group of 24 medulloblastomas arising in 8 adult and 16 pediatric patients. Complete methylation of CASP8 was found in 15 tumors (62%) and one case displayed hemimethylation. Three samples amplified neither of the two primer sets for methylated or unmethylated alleles, suggesting that genomic deletion occurred in the 5' flanking region of CASP8. Our findings suggest that methylation commonly contributes to CASP8 silencing in medulloblastomas and that homozygous deletion or severe sequence changes involving the promoter region may be another mechanism leading to CASP8 inactivation in this neoplasm.

  14. Haptoglobin genotyping of Vietnamese: global distribution of HP del, complete deletion allele of the HP gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soejima, Mikiko; Agusa, Tetsuro; Iwata, Hisato; Fujihara, Junko; Kunito, Takashi; Takeshita, Haruo; Lan, Vi Thi Mai; Minh, Tu Binh; Takahashi, Shin; Trang, Pham Thi Kim; Viet, Pham Hung; Tanabe, Shinsuke; Koda, Yoshiro

    2015-01-01

    The haptoglobin (HP) gene deletion allele (HP(del)) is responsible for anhaptoglobinemia and a genetic risk factor for anaphylaxis reaction after transfusion due to production of the anti-HP antibody. The distribution of this allele has been explored by several groups including ours. Here, we studied the frequency of HP(del) in addition to the distribution of common HP genotypes in 293 Vietnamese. The HP(del) was encountered with the frequency of 0.020. The present result suggested that this deletion allele is restricted to East and Southeast Asians. Thus, this allele seems to be a potential ancestry informative marker for these populations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Histology of the pharyngeal constrictor muscle in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome and non-syndromic children with velopharyngeal insufficiency.

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    Josine C C Widdershoven

    Full Text Available Plastic surgeons aim to correct velopharyngeal insufficiency manifest by hypernasal speech with a velopharyngoplasty. The functional outcome has been reported to be worse in patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome than in patients without the syndrome. A possible explanation is the hypotonia that is often present as part of the syndrome. To confirm a myogenic component of the etiology of velopharyngeal insufficiency in children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, specimens of the pharyngeal constrictor muscle were taken from children with and without the syndrome. Histologic properties were compared between the groups. Specimens from the two groups did not differ regarding the presence of increased perimysial or endomysial space, fiber grouping by size or type, internalized nuclei, the percentage type I fibers, or the diameters of type I and type II fibers. In conclusion, a myogenic component of the etiology of velopharyngeal insufficiency in children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome could not be confirmed.

  16. Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome: novel FLCN frameshift deletion in daughter and father with renal cell carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Näf, Ernst; Laubscher, Dominik; Hopfer, Helmut; Streit, Markus; Matyas, Gabor

    2016-01-01

    Germline mutation of the FLCN gene causes Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHD), a rare autosomal dominant condition characterized by skin fibrofolliculomas, lung cysts, spontaneous pneumothorax and renal tumours. We identified a hitherto unreported pathogenic FLCN frameshift deletion c.563delT (p.Phe188Serfs*35) in a family of a 46-year-old woman presented with macrohematuria due to bilateral chromophobe renal carcinomas. A heritable renal cancer was suspected due to the bilaterality of the tumour and as the father of this woman had suffered from renal cancer. Initially, however, BHD was overlooked by the medical team despite the highly suggestive clinical presentation. We assume that BHD is underdiagnosed, at least partially, due to low awareness of this variable condition and to insufficient use of appropriate genetic testing. Our study indicates that BHD and FLCN testing should be routinely considered in patients with positive family or personal history of renal tumours. In addition, we demonstrate how patients and their families can play a driving role in initiating genetic diagnosis, presymptomatic testing of at-risk relatives, targeted disease management, and genetic counselling of rare diseases such as BHD.

  17. Muir-Torre Syndrome: A Case Associated with an Infrequent Gene Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grob, Alexandra; Feser, Christina; Grekin, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Muir-Torre syndrome is a rare, autosomal dominant genodermatosis characterized by the presence of at least one sebaceous gland neoplasm, associated with an underlying visceral malignancy. Muir-Torre syndrome is believed to be a subtype of Lynch Syndrome. Affected individuals are found to have germline mutations predominantly in DNA mismatch repair gene MSH2, and much less frequently, MLH1. The authors report the case of a 55-year-old woman presenting with multiple cutaneous neoplasms including sebaceoma, basal cell carcinoma, and squamous cell carcinoma; personal history of colorectal and endometrial cancer; and family history of colorectal cancer; found to have a deletion at mismatch repair gene MLH1. It is important to recognize the role of these less common gene deletions in producing the Muir-Torre syndrome phenotype, and consider the correlation of cutaneous manifestations with internal disease. The authors discuss the clinical presentation of Muir-Torre syndrome, methods of diagnosis, and the importance of regular medical surveillance to detect and prevent disease progression in Muir-Torre syndrome patients and their family members.

  18. Social Cognition Dysfunction in Adolescents with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome (Velo-Cardio-Facial Syndrome): Relationship with Executive Functioning and Social Competence/Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, L. E.; McCabe, K. L.; Melville, J. L.; Strutt, P. A.; Schall, U.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Social difficulties are often noted among people with intellectual disabilities. Children and adults with 22q.11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) often have poorer social competence as well as poorer performance on measures of executive and social-cognitive skills compared with typically developing young people. However, the relationship…

  19. A mouse model for adult cardiac-specific gene deletion with CRISPR/Cas9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Kelli J; Makarewich, Catherine A; McAnally, John; Anderson, Douglas M; Zentilin, Lorena; Liu, Ning; Giacca, Mauro; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N

    2016-01-12

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated (Cas)9 genomic editing has revolutionized the generation of mutant animals by simplifying the creation of null alleles in virtually any organism. However, most current approaches with this method require zygote injection, making it difficult to assess the adult, tissue-specific functions of genes that are widely expressed or which cause embryonic lethality when mutated. Here, we describe the generation of cardiac-specific Cas9 transgenic mice, which express high levels of Cas9 in the heart, but display no overt defects. In proof-of-concept experiments, we used Adeno-Associated Virus 9 (AAV9) to deliver single-guide RNA (sgRNA) that targets the Myh6 locus exclusively in cardiomyocytes. Intraperitoneal injection of postnatal cardiac-Cas9 transgenic mice with AAV9 encoding sgRNA against Myh6 resulted in robust editing of the Myh6 locus. These mice displayed severe cardiomyopathy and loss of cardiac function, with elevation of several markers of heart failure, confirming the effectiveness of this method of adult cardiac gene deletion. Mice with cardiac-specific expression of Cas9 provide a tool that will allow rapid and accurate deletion of genes following a single injection of AAV9-sgRNAs, thereby circumventing embryonic lethality. This method will be useful for disease modeling and provides a means of rapidly editing genes of interest in the heart.

  20. Signs of dysarthria in adults with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Christina; Laakso, Katja; Edwardsson, Hannah; Lindblom, Johanna; Hartelius, Lena

    2017-03-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate how adults with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) performed on dysarthria and intelligibility tests compared with a control group. Ten participants with confirmed 22q11.2 deletion, five males and five females with a mean age of 31 years (range: 19-49), were compared with a control group matched for gender and age (five males and five females, mean age: 32 years, range: 19-49). Assessment of non-verbal and verbal tasks reflecting respiration, phonation, oral motor function, velopharyngeal function, articulation, and prosody was performed as well as the Swedish Test of Intelligibility (STI). All assessments were made by two raters; inter-rater and intra-rater reliability was acceptable. The participants with 22q11DS had significantly more problems than the control group on all investigated dimensions except the STI. Overall, the severity of their speech deviation was rated as mild to moderate. The largest difficulties were found regarding speech respiration, phonation, oral motor function, and velopharyngeal function. The results of the present study suggest that a neurological etiology could be added to the previously described structural etiology explaining the speech difficulties found in 22q11DS. Signs of difficulties in both speech motor planning and speech motor programming were found. Further studies are needed to confirm the results, as are studies of the association between structural brain abnormalities and neurological speech symptoms. For clinical purposes, it is important that clinicians have knowledge about the variable speech symptoms that may occur in individuals with 22q11DS and that they be aware of the complexity of the etiology of such speech symptoms. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. The dimensional structure of psychopathology in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niarchou, Maria; Moore, Tyler M; Tang, Sunny X; Calkins, Monica E; McDonald-McGuinn, Donna M; Zackai, Elaine H; Emanuel, Beverly S; Gur, Ruben C; Gur, Raquel E

    2017-09-01

    22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome (22q11.2DS) is one of the strongest known genetic risk factors for developing schizophrenia. Individuals with 22q11.2DS have high rates of neurodevelopmental disorders in childhood, while in adulthood ∼25% develop schizophrenia. Similar to the general population, high rates of comorbidity are common in 22q11.2DS. Employing a dimensional approach where psychopathology is examined at the symptom-level as complementary to diagnostic categories in a population at such high genetic risk for schizophrenia can help gain a better understanding of how psychopathology is structured as well as its genetic underpinnings. This is the first study to examine the dimensional structure of a wide spectrum of psychopathology in the context of a homogeneous genetic etiology like 22q11.2DS. We evaluated 331 individuals with 22q11.2DS, mean age (SD) = 16.9(8.7); 51% males, who underwent prospective comprehensive phenotyping. We sought to replicate previous findings by examining a bi-factor model that derives a general factor of psychopathology in addition to more specific dimensions of psychopathology (i.e., internalizing, externalizing and thought disorder). Psychopathology in 22q11.2DS was divided into one 'general psychopathology' factor and four specific dimensions (i.e., 'anxiety', 'mood', 'ADHD' and 'psychosis'). The 'psychosis' symptoms loaded strongly on the 'general psychopathology' factor. The similarity of the symptom structure of psychopathology between 22q11.2DS and community and clinical populations without the deletion indicate that 22q11.2DS can provide a model to explore alternative approaches to our current nosology. Our findings add to a growing literature indicating the need to reorganize current diagnostic classification systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. New corneal findings in chromosome 10 deletion syndrome: report of two cases of corneal ectasia of varying severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Lik Thai; Rehman, Ajmal; Masoud, Mohammad Tahir; Jaiya, Amrita; Tan, Peng Yi; Scott, J Angus

    2015-01-01

    To describe corneal changes associated with chromosome 10 terminal deletion (chromosome 10, monosomy 10qter) syndrome. Report of two cases of bilateral corneal ectasia with literature review. Corneal pathology has not previously been reported in the limited number of case reports on 10qter syndrome. However, Rodrigues et al.(1) have reported sclerocornea in 10q translocation. Ophthalmic manifestations of 10qter syndrome include strabismus, lid, and facial anomalies. We present two cases of corneal ectasia of varying severity. Possible etiologies include the following: secondary to genetic factors, acquired corneal exposure during sleep, or possible intrinsic immunocompromise exacerbating ocular surface infections. Corneal ectasia with specific histological changes is a feature of various genetic disorders (e.g., Down's, Ehler's Danlos, and Marfan's syndromes). It is unknown whether genetics plays a role in the development of corneal changes in 10qter syndrome. Management of inflammation and visual rehabilitation in these patients poses a therapeutic challenge.

  3. 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome Is Associated With Impaired Auditory Steady-State Gamma Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Kit Melissa; Pellegrino, Giovanni; Birknow, Michelle Rosgaard; Kjær, Trine Nørgaard; Baaré, William Frans Christiaan; Didriksen, Michael; Olsen, Line; Werge, Thomas; Mørup, Morten; Siebner, Hartwig Roman

    2018-02-15

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome confers a markedly increased risk for schizophrenia. 22q11.2 deletion carriers without manifest psychotic disorder offer the possibility to identify functional abnormalities that precede clinical onset. Since schizophrenia is associated with a reduced cortical gamma response to auditory stimulation at 40 Hz, we hypothesized that the 40 Hz auditory steady-state response (ASSR) may be attenuated in nonpsychotic individuals with a 22q11.2 deletion. Eighteen young nonpsychotic 22q11.2 deletion carriers and a control group of 27 noncarriers with comparable age range (12-25 years) and sex ratio underwent 128-channel EEG. We recorded the cortical ASSR to a 40 Hz train of clicks, given either at a regular inter-stimulus interval of 25 ms or at irregular intervals jittered between 11 and 37 ms. Healthy noncarriers expressed a stable ASSR to regular but not in the irregular 40 Hz click stimulation. Both gamma power and inter-trial phase coherence of the ASSR were markedly reduced in the 22q11.2 deletion group. The ability to phase lock cortical gamma activity to regular auditory 40 Hz stimulation correlated with the individual expression of negative symptoms in deletion carriers (ρ = -0.487, P = .041). Nonpsychotic 22q11.2 deletion carriers lack efficient phase locking of evoked gamma activity to regular 40 Hz auditory stimulation. This abnormality indicates a dysfunction of fast intracortical oscillatory processing in the gamma-band. Since ASSR was attenuated in nonpsychotic deletion carriers, ASSR deficiency may constitute a premorbid risk marker of schizophrenia. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center.

  4. Assessment of the Toxicity of CuO Nanoparticles by Using Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mutants with Multiple Genes Deleted

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Shaopan; Lu, Qicong; Dai, Heping; Zhang, Chao

    2015-01-01

    To develop applicable and susceptible models to evaluate the toxicity of nanoparticles, the antimicrobial effects of CuO nanoparticles (CuO-NPs) on various Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) strains (wild type, single-gene-deleted mutants, and multiple-gene-deleted mutants) were determined and compared. Further experiments were also conducted to analyze the mechanisms associated with toxicity using copper salt, bulk CuO (bCuO), carbon-shelled copper nanoparticles (C/Cu-NPs), and carbon nanoparticles (C-NPs) for comparisons. The results indicated that the growth inhibition rates of CuO-NPs for the wild-type and the single-gene-deleted strains were comparable, while for the multiple-gene deletion mutant, significantly higher toxicity was observed (P CuO-NPs to yeast cells was compared with the toxicities of copper salt and bCuO, we concluded that the toxicity of CuO-NPs should be attributed to soluble copper rather than to the nanoparticles. The striking difference in adverse effects of C-NPs and C/Cu-NPs with equivalent surface areas also proved this. A toxicity assay revealed that the multiple-gene-deleted mutant was significantly more sensitive to CuO-NPs than the wild type. Specifically, compared with the wild-type strain, copper was readily taken up by mutant strains when cell permeability genes were knocked out, and the mutants with deletions of genes regulated under oxidative stress (OS) were likely producing more reactive oxygen species (ROS). Hence, as mechanism-based gene inactivation could increase the susceptibility of yeast, the multiple-gene-deleted mutants should be improved model organisms to investigate the toxicity of nanoparticles. PMID:26386067

  5. Novel PITX2 gene mutations in patients with Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifi, Morteza; Footz, Tim; Taylor, Sherry A M; Elhady, Ghada M; Abdalla, Ebtesam M; Walter, Michael A

    2016-11-01

    Mutations in the bicoid-like transcription factor PITX2 gene often result in Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome (ARS), an autosomal-dominant inherited disorder. We report here the discovery and characterization of novel PITX2 deletions in a small kindred with ARS. Two familial patients (father and son) from a consanguineous family were examined in the present study. Patient DNA samples were screened for PITX2 mutations by DNA sequencing and for copy number variation by SYBR Green quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis. We report a novel deletion involving the coding region of PITX2 in both patients. The minimum size of the deletion is 1 421 914 bp that spans one upstream regulatory element (CE4), PITX2 and a minimum of 13 neighbouring genes. The maximum size of the deletion is 3 789 983 bp. The proband (son) additionally possesses a novel 2-bp deletion in a non-coding exon of the remaining PITX2 allele predicted to alter correct splicing. Our findings implicate a novel deletion of the PITX2 gene in the pathogenesis of ARS in the affected family. This ARS family presented with an atypical and extremely severe phenotype that resulted in four miscarriages and the death at 10 months of age of a sib of the proband. As the phenotypic manifestations in the proband are more severe than that of the father, we hypothesize that the deletion of the entire PITX2 allele plus a novel 2-bp deletion (observed in the proband) within the remaining PITX2 allele together contributed to the atypical ARS presentation in this family. This is the first study reporting on bi-allelic changes of PITX2 potentially contributing to a more severe ARS phenotype. © 2016 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Deletion of circadian gene Per1 alleviates acute ethanol-induced hepatotoxicity in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Tao; Yang, Ping; Zhan, Yibei; Xia, Lin; Hua, Zichun; Zhang, Jianfa

    2013-01-01

    The severity of ethanol-induced liver injury is associated with oxidative stress and lipid accumulation in the liver. Core circadian clock is known to mediate antioxidative enzyme activity and lipid metabolism. However, the link between circadian clock and ethanol-induced hepatotoxicity remains unclear. Here we showed that extents of acute ethanol-induced liver injury and steatosis in mice exhibit circadian variations consistent with hepatic expression of Period (Per) genes. Mice lacking clock gene Per1 displayed less susceptible to ethanol-induced liver injury, as evidenced by lower serum transaminase activity and less severe histopathological changes. Ethanol-induced lipid peroxidation was alleviated in Per1−/− mice. However, Per1 deletion had no effect on antioxidants depletion caused by ethanol administration. Ethanol-induced triglycerides (TG) accumulation in the serum and liver was significantly decreased in Per1−/− mice compared with that in wild-type (WT) mice. Analysis of gene expression in the liver revealed peroxisome proliferators activated receptor-gamma (PPARγ) and its target genes related to TG synthesis are remarkably down-regulated in Per1−/− mice. HepG2 cells were treated with ethanol at 150 mM for 3 days. Per1 overexpression augmented lipid accumulation after treatment with ethanol in HepG2 cells, but had no effect on ethanol-induced oxidative stress. Expression of genes related to lipogenesis, including PPARγ and its target genes, was up-regulated in cells overexpressing Per1. In conclusion, these results indicated that circadian rhythms of ethanol-induced hepatotoxicity are controlled by clock gene Per1, and deletion of Per1 protected mice from ethanol-induced liver injury by decreasing hepatic lipid accumulation

  7. A VNTR element associated with steroid sulfatase gene deletions stimulates recombination in cultured cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Y.; Li, X.M.; Shapiro, L.J. [UCSF School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Steroid sulfatase deficiency is a common genetic disorder, with a prevalence of approximately one in every 3500 males world wide. About 90% of these patients have complete gene deletions, which appear to result from recombination between members of a low-copy repeat family (CRI-232 is the prototype) that flank the gene. RU1 and RU2 are two VNTR elements found within each of these family members. RU1 consists of 30 bp repeating units and its length shows minimal variation among individuals. The RU2 element consists of repeating sequences which are highly asymmetric, with about 90% purines and no C`s on one strand, and range from 0.6 kb to over 23 kb among different individuals. We conducted a study to determine if the RU1 or RU2 elements can promote recombination in an in vivo test system. We inserted these elements adjacent to the neo gene in each of two pSV2neo derivatives, one of which has a deletion in the 5{prime} portion of the neo gene and the other having a deletion in the 3{prime} portion. These plasmids were combined and used to transfect EJ cells. Survival of cells in G418 indicates restoration of a functional neo gene by recombination between two deletion constructs. Thus counting G418 resistant colonies gives a quantitative measure of the enhancement of recombination by the inserted VNTR elements. The results showed no effect on recombination by the inserted RU1 element (compared to the insertion of a nonspecific sequence), while the RU2 element stimulated recombination by 3.5-fold (P<0.01). A separate set of constructs placed RU1 or RU2 within the intron of an exon trapping vector. Following tranfection of cells, recombination events were monitored by a PCR assay that detected the approximation of primer binding sites (as a result of recombination). These studies showed that, as in the first set of experiments, the highly variable RU2 element is capable of stimulating somatic recombination in mammalian cells.

  8. R3-R4 deletion in the PRNP gene is associated with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cervenakova, L.; Brown, P.; Nagle, J. [and others

    1994-09-01

    There are conflicting reports on the association of deletions in the PRNP gene on chromosome 20 with CJD, a rapidly progressive fatal spongiform encephalopathy. We accumulated data suggesting that a deletion of R3-R4 type (parts of the third and fourth repeats are deleted from the area of four repeating 24 bp sequences in the 5{prime} region of the gene) is causing CJD. Screening of 129 unaffected control individuals demonstrated presence of a deletion of R2 type in four (1.55% of the studied chromosomes), but none of them had the R3-R4 type. Of 181 screened patients with spongiform encephalopathies, two had a deletion of R3-R4 type with no other mutations in the coding sequence. Both patients had a classical rapidly progressive dementing disease and diffuse spongiform degeneration, and both cases were apparently sporadic. The same R3-R4 type of deletion was detected in three additional neuropathologically confirmed spongiform encephalopathy patients, of which two had other known pathogenic mutations in the PRNP gene: at codon 178 on the methionine allele exhibiting the phenotype of fatal familial insomnia, and codon 200 causing CJD with severe dementia; the third was a patient with iatrogenic CJD who developed the disease after treatment with growth hormone extracted from cadaveric human pituitary glands. In all cases the deletion coincided with a variant sequence at position 129 coding for methionine.

  9. Multi-species sequence comparison reveals dynamic evolution of the elastin gene that has involved purifying selection and lineage-specific insertions/deletions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Green Eric D

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The elastin gene (ELN is implicated as a factor in both supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS and Williams Beuren Syndrome (WBS, two diseases involving pronounced complications in mental or physical development. Although the complete spectrum of functional roles of the processed gene product remains to be established, these roles are inferred to be analogous in human and mouse. This view is supported by genomic sequence comparison, in which there are no large-scale differences in the ~1.8 Mb sequence block encompassing the common region deleted in WBS, with the exception of an overall reversed physical orientation between human and mouse. Results Conserved synteny around ELN does not translate to a high level of conservation in the gene itself. In fact, ELN orthologs in mammals show more sequence divergence than expected for a gene with a critical role in development. The pattern of divergence is non-conventional due to an unusually high ratio of gaps to substitutions. Specifically, multi-sequence alignments of eight mammalian sequences reveal numerous non-aligning regions caused by species-specific insertions and deletions, in spite of the fact that the vast majority of aligning sites appear to be conserved and undergoing purifying selection. Conclusions The pattern of lineage-specific, in-frame insertions/deletions in the coding exons of ELN orthologous genes is unusual and has led to unique features of the gene in each lineage. These differences may indicate that the gene has a slightly different functional mechanism in mammalian lineages, or that the corresponding regions are functionally inert. Identified regions that undergo purifying selection reflect a functional importance associated with evolutionary pressure to retain those features.

  10. The presence of two rare genomic syndromes, 1q21 deletion and Xq28 duplication, segregating independently in a family with intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Kyungsoo; Shen, Yiping; Graves, Tyler; Kim, Cheol-Hee; Kim, Hyung-Goo

    2016-01-01

    1q21 microdeletion syndrome is a rare contiguous gene deletion disorder with de novo or autosomal dominant inheritance patterns and its phenotypic features include intellectual disability, distinctive facial dysmorphism, microcephaly, cardiac abnormalities, and cataracts. MECP2 duplication syndrome is an X-linked recessive neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by intellectual disability, global developmental delay, and other neurological complications including late-onset seizures. Previously, these two different genetic syndromes have not been reported segregating independently in a same family. Here we describe two siblings carrying either a chromosome 1q21 microdeletion or a chromosome Xq28 duplication. Using a comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) array, we identified a 1.24 Mb heterozygous deletion at 1q21 resulting in the loss of 9 genes in a girl with learning disability, hypothyroidism, short stature, sensory integration disorder, and soft dysmorphic features including cupped ears and a unilateral ear pit. We also characterized a 508 kb Xq28 duplication encompassing MECP2 in her younger brother with hypotonia, poor speech, cognitive and motor impairment. The parental CGH and quantitative PCR (qPCR) analyses revealed that the 1q21 deletion in the elder sister is de novo , but the Xq28 duplication in the younger brother was originally inherited from the maternal grandmother through the mother, both of whom are asymptomatic carriers. RT-qPCR assays revealed that the affected brother has almost double the amount of MECP2 mRNA expression compared to other family members of both genders including maternal grandmother and mother who have the same Xq28 duplication with no phenotype. This suggests the X chromosome with an Xq28 duplication in the carrier females is preferentially silenced. From our understanding, this would be the first report showing the independent segregation of two genetically unrelated syndromes, 1q21 microdeletion and Xq28 duplication

  11. Analysis of 22q11.2 deletions by FISH in a series of velocardiofacial syndrome patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravnan, J.B.; Golabi, M.; Lebo, R.V. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Deletions in chromosome 22 band q11.2 have been associated with velocardiofacial (VCF or Shprintzen) syndrome and the DiGeorge anomaly. A study of VCF patients evaluated at the UCSF Medical Center was undertaken to correlate disease phenotype with presence or absence of a deletion. Patients referred for this study had at least two of the following: dysmorphic facial features, frequent ear infections or hearing loss, palate abnormalities, thymic hypoplasia, hypocalcemia, congenital heart defect, hypotonia, and growth or language delay. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using the DiGeorge critical region probe N25 was used to classify patients according to the presence or absence of a deletion in 22q11.2, and the results were compared to clinical characteristics. We have completed studies on 58 patients with features of VCF. Twenty-one patients (36%) were found to have a deletion in 22q11.2 by FISH. A retrospective study of archived slides from 14 patients originally studied only by prometaphase GTG banding found six patients had a deletion detected by FISH; of these, only two had a microscopically visible chromosome deletion. Our study of 11 sets of parents of children with the deletion found two clinically affected mothers with the deletion, including one with three of three children clinically affected. A few patients who did not fit the classical VCF description had a 22q11.2 deletion detected by FISH. These included one patient with both cleft lip and palate, and another with developmental delay and typical facial features but no cardiac or palate abnormalities. Both patients with the DiGeorge anomaly as part of VCF had the deletion. On the other hand, a number of patients diagnosed clinically with classical VCF did not have a detectable deletion. This raises the question whether they represent a subset of patients with a defect of 22q11.2 not detected by the N25 probe, or whether they represent a phenocopy of VCF.

  12. The mouse lethal nonagouti (a(x)) mutation deletes the S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase (Ahcy) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M W; Duhl, D M; Winkes, B M; Arredondo-Vega, F; Saxon, P J; Wolff, G L; Epstein, C J; Hershfield, M S; Barsh, G S

    1994-04-15

    The lethal nonagouti (a(x)) mutation is a hypomorphic allele of the agouti coat color locus which, when homozygous, also leads to embryonic death around the time of implantation. To understand the molecular basis of these phenotypes, we identified and cloned a deletion breakpoint junction present in the ax chromosome. Long range restriction mapping demonstrated a simple deletion of approximately 100 kb, which does not affect agouti coding sequences, but begins only 4 kb 3' of the last exon, and thus may affect coat color by removing an agouti 3' enhancer. The Ahcy gene, which codes for the enzyme S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase (SAHase), is contained within a 20 kb region within the a(x) deletion. SAHase RNA and protein were detectable in early blastocysts and in embryonic stem cells, respectively, and analysis of embryos derived from an a(x)/a x a(x)/a embryo intercross indicated that a(x)/a embryos die between the late blastocyst and early implantation stages. Treatment of cultured embryos with an SAHase inhibitor, 3-deazaaristeromycin, or with metabolites that can result in elevated levels of cellular SAH, resulted in an inhibition of inner cell mass development, suggesting that loss of SAHase activity in a(x)/a(x) embryos is sufficient to explain their death around the time of implantation.

  13. Novel 5.712 kb mitochondrial DNA deletion in a patient with Pearson syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joonhong; Ryu, Hyejin; Jang, Woori; Chae, Hyojin; Kim, Myungshin; Kim, Yonggoo; Kim, Jiyeon; Lee, Jae Wook; Chung, Nack-Gyun; Cho, Bin; Suh, Byung Kyu

    2015-05-01

    Pearson marrow‑pancreas syndrome (PS) is a progressive multi‑organ disorder caused by deletions and duplications of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). PS is often fatal in infancy, and the majority of patients with PS succumb to the disease before reaching three‑years‑of‑age, due to septicemia, metabolic acidosis or hepatocellular insufficiency. The present report describes the case of a four‑month‑old infant with severe normocytic normochromic anemia, vacuolization of hematopoietic precursors and metabolic acidosis. After extensive clinical investigation, the patient was diagnosed with PS, which was confirmed by molecular analysis of mtDNA. The molecular analysis detected a novel large‑scale (5.712 kb) deletion spanning nucleotides 8,011 to 13,722 of mtDNA, which lacked direct repeats at the deletion boundaries. The present report is, to the best of our knowledge, the first case reported in South Korea.

  14. An amino acid deletion inSZT2 in a family with non-syndromic intellectual disability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Falcone

    Full Text Available Autosomal recessive intellectual disability (ID is characterized by extensive genetic heterogeneity. Recently, three mutations in SZT2 were reported in two unrelated children with unexplained infantile epileptic encephalopathy with severe ID. Here we report a European American family with three children having non-syndromic mild or moderate ID without seizures. Whole-exome sequencing of three affected siblings revealed a three base pair deletion (c.4202_4204delTTC located in a 19 mb autozygous region on chromosome 1, leading to an amino acid deletion (p.Phe1401del in SZT2. All three children were homozygous for the deletion and their parents were heterozygous as expected in autosomal recessive inheritance. SZT2 is highly expressed in neuronal tissues and regulates seizure threshold and neuronal excitation in mice. We conclude that the disruption of SZT2 with some residual function might lead to mild or moderate ID without seizures.

  15. Homozygous deletion of the α- and β1-interferon genes in human leukemia and derived cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, M.O.; Ziemin, S.; Le Beau, M.M.; Pitha, P.; Smith, S.D.; Chilcote, R.R.; Rowley, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    The loss of bands p21-22 from one chromosome 9 homologue as a consequence of a deletion of the short arm [del(9p)], unbalanced translocation, or monosomy 9 is frequently observed in the malignant cells of patients with lymphoid neoplasias, including acute lymphoblastic leukemia and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The α- and β 1 -interferon genes have been assigned to this chromosome region (9p21-22). The authors now present evidence of the homozygous deletion of the interferon genes in neoplastic hematopoietic cell lines and primary leukemia cells in the presence or absence of chromosomal deletions that are detectable at the level of the light microscope. In these cell lines, the deletion of the interferon genes is accompanied by a deficiency of 5'-methylthioadenosine phosphorylase, an enzyme of purine metabolism. These homozygous deletions may be associated with the loss of a tumor-suppressor gene that is involved in the development of these neoplasias. The relevant genes may be either the interferon genes themselves or a gene that has a tumor-suppressor function and is closely linked to them

  16. Rare gross deletion in T-cell immune regulator-1 gene in Iranian familywith infantile malignant osteopetrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbaszadegan, Mohammad R.; Velayati, A.; Modarresi, A.; Khadevi-Zand, F.

    2008-01-01

    Infantile malignant osteopetrosis is an autosomal recessive disorder.Mutations in the T-cell immune regulator 1 (TCIG1) gene were found as thecause of arOP. We found the first Iranian patient with a rare gross deletionin this gene. The patient was a 5-year-old girl with macrocephaly, facialdysmorphism, blindness, mental retardation, hepatosplenomegaly, pancytopeniaand osteosclerotic changes in the skull and the limb. Molecular analysis wasperformed using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction for exons10-19 of the TCIRG1 gene followed by whole gene sequencing. She showed a 275bp unexpected amplified segment. Sequencing revealed a gross deletion inexons 10-15 transcript region of TCIRG1 that affected codon 389 to 518.Various types of mutations in the TCIRG1 gene in arOP have been reported,however, gross deletions are reported rarely. This gross deletion is thefirst mutation reported among Iranian patients in this gene. This deletion isalso the largest deletion of TCIRG1 gene reported to date. (author)

  17. Delineation of 2q32q35 Deletion Phenotypes: Two Apparent “Proximal” and “Distal” Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Mc Cormack

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on three patients with interstitial deletions of the long arm of chromosome 2 involving bands 2q32.1–q35. They presented with wide-ranging phenotypic variation including facial dysmorphisms, cleft palate, learning difficulties, behavioural issues and severe heart defects. Microarray analysis confirmed an 8.6 Mb deletion in patients 1 and 2 and a 24.7 Mb deletion in patient 3. We discuss the genes involved in the deleted regions including MYO1B, GLS, FRZB, SATB2, and CPS1 and compare the phenotype with those reported in the literature. Taken together, these data suggest that there is a spectrum of disease severity such that patients with deletions encompassing the region of 2q32.1q32.2, which includes the FRZB gene, show an apparently milder phenotype compared to those that lie further distal in 2q32.3q35 that encompasses the SATB2 gene.

  18. Chromosome 12p Deletion Spanning the GRIN2B Gene Presenting With a Neurodevelopmental Phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navin Mishra MD

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The GRIN2B (glutamate receptor, ionotropic, N-methyl- d -aspartate 2B gene, located in the short arm of chromosome 12, encoding the NR2B subunit of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, has recently been recognized to play an important role in corticogenesis and brain plasticity. Deletions in the short arm of chromosome 12 are rare. Hemizygous loss of function of the GRIN2B gene results in developmental delay, whereas gain of function leads to epilepsy, and infantile spasms in particular. In addition, GRIN2B variants have been associated with autism spectrum disorder and schizophrenia. Here the authors report a child with global developmental delay, autistic behavioural features, central hypotonia, dysmorphic features and isolated congenital anomalies of the fingers and toes, and a de novo heterozygous deletion in chromosome locus 12p13.2-p13.1, involving loss of several genes, including GRIN2B . This report and our review of the literature help clarify the distinct phenotypes associated with loss or gain of GRIN2B function.

  19. Parallel analysis of tagged deletion mutants efficiently identifies genes involved in endoplasmic reticulum biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Robin; Parrish, Mark L; Cadera, Emily; Larson, Lynnelle; Matson, Clinton K; Garrett-Engele, Philip; Armour, Chris; Lum, Pek Yee; Shoemaker, Daniel D

    2003-07-30

    Increased levels of HMG-CoA reductase induce cell type- and isozyme-specific proliferation of the endoplasmic reticulum. In yeast, the ER proliferations induced by Hmg1p consist of nuclear-associated stacks of smooth ER membranes known as karmellae. To identify genes required for karmellae assembly, we compared the composition of populations of homozygous diploid S. cerevisiae deletion mutants following 20 generations of growth with and without karmellae. Using an initial population of 1,557 deletion mutants, 120 potential mutants were identified as a result of three independent experiments. Each experiment produced a largely non-overlapping set of potential mutants, suggesting that differences in specific growth conditions could be used to maximize the comprehensiveness of similar parallel analysis screens. Only two genes, UBC7 and YAL011W, were identified in all three experiments. Subsequent analysis of individual mutant strains confirmed that each experiment was identifying valid mutations, based on the mutant's sensitivity to elevated HMG-CoA reductase and inability to assemble normal karmellae. The largest class of HMG-CoA reductase-sensitive mutations was a subset of genes that are involved in chromatin structure and transcriptional regulation, suggesting that karmellae assembly requires changes in transcription or that the presence of karmellae may interfere with normal transcriptional regulation. Copyright 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Functional dissection of regulatory models using gene expression data of deletion mutants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin'e Li

    Full Text Available Genome-wide gene expression profiles accumulate at an alarming rate, how to integrate these expression profiles generated by different laboratories to reverse engineer the cellular regulatory network has been a major challenge. To automatically infer gene regulatory pathways from genome-wide mRNA expression profiles before and after genetic perturbations, we introduced a new Bayesian network algorithm: Deletion Mutant Bayesian Network (DM_BN. We applied DM_BN to the expression profiles of 544 yeast single or double deletion mutants of transcription factors, chromatin remodeling machinery components, protein kinases and phosphatases in S. cerevisiae. The network inferred by this method identified causal regulatory and non-causal concurrent interactions among these regulators (genetically perturbed genes that are strongly supported by the experimental evidence, and generated many new testable hypotheses. Compared to networks reconstructed by routine similarity measures or by alternative Bayesian network algorithms, the network inferred by DM_BN excels in both precision and recall. To facilitate its application in other systems, we packaged the algorithm into a user-friendly analysis tool that can be downloaded at http://www.picb.ac.cn/hanlab/DM_BN.html.

  1. Total beta-globin gene deletion has high frequency in Filipinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patrick, N.; Miyakawa, F.; Hunt, J.A. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The distribution of {beta}-thalassemia [{beta}{sup Th}] mutations is unique to each ethnic group. Most mutations affect one or a few bases; large deletions have been rare. Among families screened in Hawaii, [{beta}{sup Th}] heterozygotes were diagnosed by microcytosis, absence of abnormal hemoglobins on isoelectric focusing, and raised Hb A{sub 2} by chromatography. Gene frequency for {beta}{sup Th} was 0.02 in Filipinos. In Filipinos, polymerase chain reaction [PCR] with denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis for {beta}{sup Th} mutations detected a mutation in only 6 of 42 {beta}{sup Th} heterozygotes; an IVS2-666 C/T polymorphism showed non-heterozygosity in 37 and heterozygosity in only 5 of these {beta}{sup Th} heterozygotes. One {beta}{sup Th}/{beta}{sup Th} major patient and his mother had no mutation detected by allele-specific oligomer hybridization; PCR failed to amplify any DNA from his {beta}-globin gene. After a total {beta}-globin gene deletion [{beta}{sup Del}] was found in a Filipino family in Ontario, specific PCR amplification for {beta}{sup Del} detected this in 43 of 53 {beta}{sup Th} Filipino samples tested; the above {beta}{sup Th}/{beta}{sup Th} patient was a ({beta}{sup Del}/{beta}{sup Del}) homozygote. The {beta}{sup Del} may account for over 60% of all {beta}{sup Th} alleles in Filipinos; this is the highest proportion of a deletion {beta}{sup Th} mutation reported from any population. Most but not all {beta}{sup Del} heterozygotes had high Hb F [5.13 {plus_minus} 3.94 mean {plus_minus} 1 s.d.] compared to the codon 41/42 four base deletion common in Chinese [2.30 {plus_minus} 0.86], or to {beta}{sup Th} heterozygotes with normal {alpha}-globin genes [2.23 {plus_minus} 0.80].

  2. Familial spinal neurofibromatosis due to a multiexonic NF1 gene deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzuti, Antonio; Bottillo, Irene; Inzana, Francesca; Lanari, Valentina; Buttarelli, Francesca; Torrente, Isabella; Giallonardo, Anna Teresa; De Luca, Alessandro; Dallapiccola, Bruno

    2011-08-01

    We report the detailed clinical presentation and molecular features of a spinal neurofibromatosis familial case where a 40-year-old woman, presenting with multiple bilateral spinal neurofibromas and no other clinical feature of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), inherited a paternal large multiexonic deletion (c.5944-?_7126+?del) which resulted in NF1 gene haploinsufficiency at the RNA level. In the clinically unaffected 73-year-old father, spinal cord MRI disclosed bilateral and symmetrical hypertrophy of spinal lumbosacral roots. Our study widens the phenotypic and mutational spectrum of NF1 and illustrates the difficulties of counseling patients with border-line or atypical presentation of this disorder.

  3. Mutations in epilepsy and intellectual disability genes in patients with features of Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Heather E; Tambunan, Dimira; LaCoursiere, Christopher; Goldenberg, Marti; Pinsky, Rebecca; Martin, Emilie; Ho, Eugenia; Khwaja, Omar; Kaufmann, Walter E; Poduri, Annapurna

    2015-09-01

    Rett syndrome and neurodevelopmental disorders with features overlapping this syndrome frequently remain unexplained in patients without clinically identified MECP2 mutations. We recruited a cohort of 11 patients with features of Rett syndrome and negative initial clinical testing for mutations in MECP2. We analyzed their phenotypes to determine whether patients met formal criteria for Rett syndrome, reviewed repeat clinical genetic testing, and performed exome sequencing of the probands. Using 2010 diagnostic criteria, three patients had classical Rett syndrome, including two for whom repeat MECP2 gene testing had identified mutations. In a patient with neonatal onset epilepsy with atypical Rett syndrome, we identified a frameshift deletion in STXBP1. Among seven patients with features of Rett syndrome not fulfilling formal diagnostic criteria, four had suspected pathogenic mutations, one each in MECP2, FOXG1, SCN8A, and IQSEC2. MECP2 mutations are highly correlated with classical Rett syndrome. Genes associated with atypical Rett syndrome, epilepsy, or intellectual disability should be considered in patients with features overlapping with Rett syndrome and negative MECP2 testing. While most of the identified mutations were apparently de novo, the SCN8A variant was inherited from an unaffected parent mosaic for the mutation, which is important to note for counseling regarding recurrence risks. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. An intronic deletion in the PROM1 gene leads to autosomal recessive cone-rod dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eidinger, Osnat; Leibu, Rina; Newman, Hadas; Rizel, Leah; Perlman, Ido; Ben-Yosef, Tamar

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the genetic basis for autosomal recessive cone-rod dystrophy (CRD) in a consanguineous Israeli Jewish family. Patients underwent a detailed ophthalmic evaluation, including eye examination, visual field testing, optical coherence tomography (OCT), and electrophysiological tests, electroretinography (ERG) and visual evoked potential (VEP). Genome-wide homozygosity mapping using a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array was performed to identify homozygous regions shared among two of the affected individuals. Mutation screening of the underlying gene was performed with direct sequencing. In silico and in vitro analyses were used to predict the effect of the identified mutation on splicing. The affected family members are three siblings who have various degrees of progressive visual deterioration, glare, color vision abnormalities, and night vision difficulties. Visual field tests revealed central scotomas of different extension. Cone and rod ERG responses were reduced, with cones more severely affected. Homozygosity mapping revealed several homozygous intervals shared among two of the affected individuals. One included the PROM1 gene. Sequence analysis of the 26 coding exons of PROM1 in one affected individual revealed no mutations in the coding sequence or in intronic splice sites. However, in intron 21, proximate to the intron-exon junction, we observed a homozygous 10 bp deletion between positions -26 and -17 (c.2281-26_-17del). The deletion was linked to a known SNP, c.2281-6C>G. The deletion cosegregated with the disease in the family, and was not detected in public databases or in 101 ethnically-matched control individuals. In silico analysis predicted that this deletion would lead to altered intron 21 splicing. Bioinformatic analysis predicted that a recognition site for the SRSF2 splicing factor is located within the deleted sequence. The in vitro splicing assay demonstrated that c.2281-26_-17del leads to complete exon 22 skipping. A novel

  5. Interstitial deletion 11(p11.12p11.2) and analphoid marker formation results in inherited Potocki-Shaffer syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Louise; Wakui, Keiko; Sue, Whey-Chen; Su, Mei-Hsu; Shaffer, Lisa G; Kuo, Pao-Lin

    2005-03-01

    We report a family with inherited Potocki-Shaffer syndrome. The phenotypically normal mother has an interstitial deletion of 11(p11.12p11.2) with neocentric marker chromosome formation. The marker chromosome contains the deleted material on 11p11.2 and is likely a ring. The patient inherited a maternal deleted chromosome 11 but not the marker chromosome, thus resulting in an unbalanced karyotype along with the phenotype of Potocki-Shaffer syndrome. The deleted region in our case-11p11.12p11.2-is a newly reported site of constitutional neocentromere formation. This is also the first report describing deletion of 11p11.12-p11.2 and neocentromere formation resulting in inherited Potocki-Shaffer syndrome. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. COMT Val(158) met genotype and striatal D(2/3) receptor binding in adults with 22q11 deletion syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Boot, Erik

    2011-09-01

    Although catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) activity evidently affects dopamine function in prefrontal cortex, the contribution is assumed less significant in striatum. We studied whether a functional polymorphism in the COMT gene (Val(158) Met) influences striatal D(2\\/3) R binding ratios (D(2\\/3) R BP(ND) ) in 15 adults with 22q11 deletion