WorldWideScience

Sample records for gene arrays application

  1. Comparison of Affymetrix Gene Array with the Exon Array shows potential application for detection of transcript isoform variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coulombe-Huntington Jasmin

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The emergence of isoform-sensitive microarrays has helped fuel in-depth studies of the human transcriptome. The Affymetrix GeneChip Human Exon 1.0 ST Array (Exon Array has been previously shown to be effective in profiling gene expression at the isoform level. More recently, the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Gene 1.0 ST Array (Gene Array has been released for measuring gene expression and interestingly contains a large subset of probes from the Exon Array. Here, we explore the potential of using Gene Array probes to assess expression variation at the sub-transcript level. Utilizing datasets of the high quality Microarray Quality Control (MAQC RNA samples previously assayed on the Exon Array and Gene Array, we compare the expression measurements of the two platforms to determine the performance of the Gene Array in detecting isoform variations. Results Overall, we show that the Gene Array is comparable to the Exon Array in making gene expression calls. Moreover, to examine expression of different isoforms, we modify the Gene Array probe set definition file to enable summarization of probe intensity values at the exon level and show that the expression profiles between the two platforms are also highly correlated. Next, expression calls of previously known differentially spliced genes were compared and also show concordant results. Splicing index analysis, representing estimates of exon inclusion levels, shows a lower but good correlation between platforms. As the Gene Array contains a significant subset of probes from the Exon Array, we note that, in comparison, the Gene Array overlaps with fewer but still a high proportion of splicing events annotated in the Known Alt Events UCSC track, with abundant coverage of cassette exons. We discuss the ability of the Gene Array to detect alternative splicing and isoform variation and address its limitations. Conclusion The Gene Array is an effective expression profiling tool at gene and

  2. HAT: Hypergeometric Analysis of Tiling-arrays with application to promoter-GeneChip data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wouters Bas J

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tiling-arrays are applicable to multiple types of biological research questions. Due to its advantages (high sensitivity, resolution, unbiased, the technology is often employed in genome-wide investigations. A major challenge in the analysis of tiling-array data is to define regions-of-interest, i.e., contiguous probes with increased signal intensity (as a result of hybridization of labeled DNA in a region. Currently, no standard criteria are available to define these regions-of-interest as there is no single probe intensity cut-off level, different regions-of-interest can contain various numbers of probes, and can vary in genomic width. Furthermore, the chromosomal distance between neighboring probes can vary across the genome among different arrays. Results We have developed Hypergeometric Analysis of Tiling-arrays (HAT, and first evaluated its performance for tiling-array datasets from a Chromatin Immunoprecipitation study on chip (ChIP-on-chip for the identification of genome-wide DNA binding profiles of transcription factor Cebpa (used for method comparison. Using this assay, we can refine the detection of regions-of-interest by illustrating that regions detected by HAT are more highly enriched for expected motifs in comparison with an alternative detection method (MAT. Subsequently, data from a retroviral insertional mutagenesis screen were used to examine the performance of HAT among different applications of tiling-array datasets. In both studies, detected regions-of-interest have been validated with (qPCR. Conclusions We demonstrate that HAT has increased specificity for analysis of tiling-array data in comparison with the alternative method, and that it accurately detects regions-of-interest in two different applications of tiling-arrays. HAT has several advantages over previous methods: i as there is no single cut-off level for probe-intensity, HAT can detect regions-of-interest at various thresholds, ii it can

  3. Development and application of functional gene arrays for microbial community analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Z.L.HE; J.D.VAN NOSTRAND; L.Y.WU; J.Z.ZHOU

    2008-01-01

    Functional gene markers can provide important information about functional gene diversity and potential activity of microbial communities.Although microarray technology has been successfully applied to study gene expression for pure cultures,simple,and artificial microbial communities,adapting such a technology to analyze complex microbial communities still presents a lot of challenges in terms of design,sample preparation,and data analysis.This work is focused on the development and application of functional gene arrays (FGAs) to target key functional gene markers for microbial community studies.A few key issues specifically related to FGAs,such as oligonucleotide probe design,nucleic acid extraction and purification,data analysis,specificity,sensitivity,and quantitative capability are discussed in detail.Recent studies have demonstrated that FGAs can provide specific,sensitive,and potentially quantitative information about microbial communities from a variety of natural environments and controlled ecosystems.This technology is expected to revolutionize the analysis of microbial communities,and link microbial structure to ecosystem functioning.

  4. Application of affymetrix array and massively parallel signature sequencing for identification of genes involved in prostate cancer progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eichner Lillian J

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Affymetrix GeneChip Array and Massively Parallel Signature Sequencing (MPSS are two high throughput methodologies used to profile transcriptomes. Each method has certain strengths and weaknesses; however, no comparison has been made between the data derived from Affymetrix arrays and MPSS. In this study, two lineage-related prostate cancer cell lines, LNCaP and C4-2, were used for transcriptome analysis with the aim of identifying genes associated with prostate cancer progression. Methods Affymetrix GeneChip array and MPSS analyses were performed. Data was analyzed with GeneSpring 6.2 and in-house perl scripts. Expression array results were verified with RT-PCR. Results Comparison of the data revealed that both technologies detected genes the other did not. In LNCaP, 3,180 genes were only detected by Affymetrix and 1,169 genes were only detected by MPSS. Similarly, in C4-2, 4,121 genes were only detected by Affymetrix and 1,014 genes were only detected by MPSS. Analysis of the combined transcriptomes identified 66 genes unique to LNCaP cells and 33 genes unique to C4-2 cells. Expression analysis of these genes in prostate cancer specimens showed CA1 to be highly expressed in bone metastasis but not expressed in primary tumor and EPHA7 to be expressed in normal prostate and primary tumor but not bone metastasis. Conclusion Our data indicates that transcriptome profiling with a single methodology will not fully assess the expression of all genes in a cell line. A combination of transcription profiling technologies such as DNA array and MPSS provides a more robust means to assess the expression profile of an RNA sample. Finally, genes that were differentially expressed in cell lines were also differentially expressed in primary prostate cancer and its metastases.

  5. Antenna Arrays and Automotive Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Rabinovich, Victor

    2013-01-01

    This book throws a lifeline to designers wading through mounds of antenna array patents looking for the most suitable systems for their projects. Drastically reducing the research time required to locate solutions to the latest challenges in automotive communications, it sorts and systematizes material on cutting-edge antenna arrays that feature multi-element communication systems with enormous potential for the automotive industry. These new systems promise to make driving safer and more efficient, opening up myriad applications, including vehicle-to-vehicle traffic that prevents collisions, automatic toll collection, vehicle location and fine-tuning for cruise control systems. This book’s exhaustive coverage begins with currently deployed systems, frequency ranges and key parameters. It proceeds to examine system geometry, analog and digital beam steering technology (including "smart" beams formed in noisy environments), maximizing signal-to-noise ratios, miniaturization, and base station technology that ...

  6. A functional gene array for detection of bacterial virulence elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaing, C

    2007-11-01

    We report our development of the first of a series of microarrays designed to detect pathogens with known mechanisms of virulence and antibiotic resistance. By targeting virulence gene families as well as genes unique to specific biothreat agents, these arrays will provide important data about the pathogenic potential and drug resistance profiles of unknown organisms in environmental samples. To validate our approach, we developed a first generation array targeting genes from Escherichia coli strains K12 and CFT073, Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus. We determined optimal probe design parameters for microorganism detection and discrimination, measured the required target concentration, and assessed tolerance for mismatches between probe and target sequences. Mismatch tolerance is a priority for this application, due to DNA sequence variability among members of gene families. Arrays were created using the NimbleGen Maskless Array Synthesizer at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Purified genomic DNA from combinations of one or more of the four target organisms, pure cultures of four related organisms, and environmental aerosol samples with spiked-in genomic DNA were hybridized to the arrays. Based on the success of this prototype, we plan to design further arrays in this series, with the goal of detecting all known virulence and antibiotic resistance gene families in a greatly expanded set of organisms.

  7. Acoustic array systems theory, implementation, and application

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Mingsian R; Benesty, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    Presents a unified framework of far-field and near-field array techniques for noise source identification and sound field visualization, from theory to application. Acoustic Array Systems: Theory, Implementation, and Application provides an overview of microphone array technology with applications in noise source identification and sound field visualization. In the comprehensive treatment of microphone arrays, the topics covered include an introduction to the theory, far-field and near-field array signal processing algorithms, practical implementations, and common applic

  8. Tandemly Arrayed Genes in Vertebrate Genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng Pan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Tandemly arrayed genes (TAGs are duplicated genes that are linked as neighbors on a chromosome, many of which have important physiological and biochemical functions. Here we performed a survey of these genes in 11 available vertebrate genomes. TAGs account for an average of about 14% of all genes in these vertebrate genomes, and about 25% of all duplications. The majority of TAGs (72–94% have parallel transcription orientation (i.e., they are encoded on the same strand in contrast to the genome, which has about 50% of its genes in parallel transcription orientation. The majority of tandem arrays have only two members. In all species, the proportion of genes that belong to TAGs tends to be higher in large gene families than in small ones; together with our recent finding that tandem duplication played a more important role than retroposition in large families, this fact suggests that among all types of duplication mechanisms, tandem duplication is the predominant mechanism of duplication, especially in large families. Finally, several species have a higher proportion of large tandem arrays that are species-specific than random expectation.

  9. New fabrication and applications of carbohydrate arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Gangliang; Chen, Xin; Xiao, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Carbohydrate arrays are used as high-throughput screening platforms to study the carbohydrate-mediated recognition events for glycobiology. The polysaccharide arrays are easy to fabricate by non-covalently or covalently immobilizing polysaccharides onto array surfaces because polysaccharides have hydrophobic interactions. Oligosaccharides must be derived and covalently or non-covalently immobilized onto array surfaces to fabricate oligosaccharide arrays because they have hydrophilic interactions. At the moment, carbohydrate arrays are mainly used to study the carbohydrate-protein interactions and carbohydrate-binding lectins or antibodies, which are possible to be applied to clinics and diagnoses. This review mainly summed up the new fabrication strategies of carbohydrate arrays and their applications in recent four years.

  10. Evolution of orthologous tandemly arrayed gene clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand Denis

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tandemly Arrayed Gene (TAG clusters are groups of paralogous genes that are found adjacent on a chromosome. TAGs represent an important repertoire of genes in eukaryotes. In addition to tandem duplication events, TAG clusters are affected during their evolution by other mechanisms, such as inversion and deletion events, that affect the order and orientation of genes. The DILTAG algorithm developed in 1 makes it possible to infer a set of optimal evolutionary histories explaining the evolution of a single TAG cluster, from an ancestral single gene, through tandem duplications (simple or multiple, direct or inverted, deletions and inversion events. Results We present a general methodology, which is an extension of DILTAG, for the study of the evolutionary history of a set of orthologous TAG clusters in multiple species. In addition to the speciation events reflected by the phylogenetic tree of the considered species, the evolutionary events that are taken into account are simple or multiple tandem duplications, direct or inverted, simple or multiple deletions, and inversions. We analysed the performance of our algorithm on simulated data sets and we applied it to the protocadherin gene clusters of human, chimpanzee, mouse and rat. Conclusions Our results obtained on simulated data sets showed a good performance in inferring the total number and size distribution of duplication events. A limitation of the algorithm is however in dealing with multiple gene deletions, as the algorithm is highly exponential in this case, and becomes quickly intractable.

  11. Piezoresistive Foam Sensor Arrays for Marine Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Dusek, Jeff E; Lang, Jeffrey H

    2016-01-01

    Spatially-dense pressure measurements are needed on curved surfaces in marine environments to provide marine vehicles with the detailed, real-time measurements of the near-field flow necessary to improve performance through flow control. To address this challenge, a waterproof and conformal pressure sensor array comprising carbon black-doped-silicone closed-cell foam (CBPDMS foam) was developed for use in marine applications. The response of the CBPDMS foam sensor arrays was characterized using periodic hydrodynamic pressure stimuli from vertical plunging, from which a piecewise polynomial calibration was developed to describe the sensor response. Inspired by the distributed pressure and velocity sensing capabilities of the fish lateral line, the CBPDMS foam sensor arrays have significant advantages over existing commercial sensors for distributed flow reconstruction and control. Experimental results have shown the sensor arrays to have sensitivity on the order of 5 Pascal, dynamic range of 50-500 Pascal; are...

  12. The Use of High-Density SNP Array to Map Homozygosity in Consanguineous Families to Efficiently Identify Candidate Genes: Application to Woodhouse-Sakati Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molly B. Sheridan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Two consanguineous Qatari siblings presented for evaluation: a 17-4/12-year-old male with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, alopecia, intellectual disability, and microcephaly and his 19-year-old sister with primary amenorrhea, alopecia, and normal cognition. Both required hormone treatment to produce secondary sex characteristics and pubertal development beyond Tanner 1. SNP array analysis of both probands was performed to detect shared regions of homozygosity which may harbor homozygous mutations in a gene causing their common features of abnormal pubertal development, alopecia, and variable cognitive delay. Our patients shared multiple homozygous genomic regions; ten shared regions were >1 Mb in length and constituted 0.99% of the genome. DCAF17, encoding a transmembrane nuclear protein of uncertain function, was the only gene identified in a homozygous region known to cause hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. DCAF17 mutations are associated with Woodhouse-Sakati syndrome, a rare disorder characterized by alopecia, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, sensorineural hearing loss, diabetes mellitus, and extrapyramidal movements. Sequencing of the coding exons and flanking intronic regions of DCAF17 in the proband revealed homozygosity for a previously described founder mutation (c.436delC. Targeted DCAF17 sequencing of his affected sibling revealed the same homozygous mutation. This family illustrates the utility of SNP array testing in consanguineous families to efficiently and inexpensively identify regions of genomic homozygosity in which genetic candidates for recessive conditions can be identified.

  13. Gene cassette transcription in a large integron-associated array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Carolyn A

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The integron/gene cassette system is a diverse and effective adaptive resource for prokaryotes. Short cassette arrays, with less than 10 cassettes adjacent to an integron, provide this resource through the expression of cassette-associated genes by an integron-borne promoter. However, the advantage provided by large arrays containing hundreds of cassettes is less obvious. In this work, using the 116-cassette array of Vibrio sp. DAT722 as a model, we investigated the theory that the majority of genes contained within large cassette arrays are widely expressed by intra-array promoters in addition to the integron-borne promoter. Results We demonstrated that the majority of the cassette-associated genes in the subject array were expressed. We further showed that cassette expression was conditional and that the conditionality varied across the array. We finally showed that this expression was mediated by a diversity of cassette-borne promoters within the array capable of responding to environmental stressors. Conclusions Widespread expression within large gene cassette arrays could provide an adaptive advantage to the host in proportion to the size of the array. Our findings explained the existence and maintenance of large cassette arrays within many prokaryotes. Further, we suggested that repeated rearrangement of cassettes containing genes and/or promoters within large arrays could result in the assembly of operon-like groups of co-expressed cassettes within an array. These findings add to our understanding of the adaptive repertoire of the integron/gene cassette system in prokaryotes and consequently, the evolutionary impact of this system.

  14. Microfluidic gene arrays for rapid genomic profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Jay A.; Hukari, Kyle W.; Hux, Gary A.; Shepodd, Timothy J.

    2004-12-01

    Genomic analysis tools have recently become an indispensable tool for the evaluation of gene expression in a variety of experiment protocols. Two of the main drawbacks to this technology are the labor and time intensive process for sample preparation and the relatively long times required for target/probe hybridization. In order to overcome these two technological barriers we have developed a microfluidic chip to perform on chip sample purification and labeling, integrated with a high density genearray. Sample purification was performed using a porous polymer monolithic material functionalized with an oligo dT nucleotide sequence for the isolation of high purity mRNA. These purified mRNA"s can then rapidly labeled using a covalent fluorescent molecule which forms a selective covalent bond at the N7 position of guanine residues. These labeled mRNA"s can then released from the polymer monolith to allow for direct hybridization with oligonucletide probes deposited in microfluidic channel. To allow for rapid target/probe hybridization high density microarray were printed in microchannels. The channels can accommodate array densities as high as 4000 probes. When oligonucleotide deposition is complete, these channels are sealed using a polymer film which forms a pressure tight seal to allow sample reagent flow to the arrayed probes. This process will allow for real time target to probe hybridization monitoring using a top mounted CCD fiber bundle combination. Using this process we have been able to perform a multi-step sample preparation to labeled target/probe hybridization in less than 30 minutes. These results demonstrate the capability to perform rapid genomic screening on a high density microfluidic microarray of oligonucleotides.

  15. Piezoresistive Probe Array for High Throughput Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaitas, A.; French, P.

    2011-01-01

    Microcantilevers are used in a number of applications including atomic-force microscopy (AFM). In this work, piezoresistive deflection-sensing elements are integrated onto micromachined cantilevers to increase sensitivity, and reduce complexity and cost. An array of probes with 5 nm gold ultrathin f

  16. Array2BIO: from microarray expression data to functional annotation of co-regulated genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasley Amy

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are several isolated tools for partial analysis of microarray expression data. To provide an integrative, easy-to-use and automated toolkit for the analysis of Affymetrix microarray expression data we have developed Array2BIO, an application that couples several analytical methods into a single web based utility. Results Array2BIO converts raw intensities into probe expression values, automatically maps those to genes, and subsequently identifies groups of co-expressed genes using two complementary approaches: (1 comparative analysis of signal versus control and (2 clustering analysis of gene expression across different conditions. The identified genes are assigned to functional categories based on Gene Ontology classification and KEGG protein interaction pathways. Array2BIO reliably handles low-expressor genes and provides a set of statistical methods for quantifying expression levels, including Benjamini-Hochberg and Bonferroni multiple testing corrections. An automated interface with the ECR Browser provides evolutionary conservation analysis for the identified gene loci while the interconnection with Crème allows prediction of gene regulatory elements that underlie observed expression patterns. Conclusion We have developed Array2BIO – a web based tool for rapid comprehensive analysis of Affymetrix microarray expression data, which also allows users to link expression data to Dcode.org comparative genomics tools and integrates a system for translating co-expression data into mechanisms of gene co-regulation. Array2BIO is publicly available at http://array2bio.dcode.org.

  17. Polymeric Cantilever Arrays for Biosensing Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calleja, M.; Tamayo, J.; Johansson, Alicia

    2003-01-01

    We report the fabrication of arrays of polymeric cantilevers for biochemistry applications. The cantilevers are fabricated in the polymer SU-8. The use of a polymer as the component material for the cantilevers provides the sensors with very high sensitivity due to convenient mechanical material...... properties. The fabrication process is based on spin coating of the photosensitive polymer and near-ultraviolet exposure. The method allows obtaining well-controlled and uniform mechanical properties of the cantilevers. The elastic constant of the cantilevers was measured, and their dynamic response...

  18. A functional gene array for detection of bacterial virulence elements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crystal Jaing

    Full Text Available Emerging known and unknown pathogens create profound threats to public health. Platforms for rapid detection and characterization of microbial agents are critically needed to prevent and respond to disease outbreaks. Available detection technologies cannot provide broad functional information about known or novel organisms. As a step toward developing such a system, we have produced and tested a series of high-density functional gene arrays to detect elements of virulence and antibiotic resistance mechanisms. Our first generation array targets genes from Escherichia coli strains K12 and CFT073, Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus. We determined optimal probe design parameters for gene family detection and discrimination. When tested with organisms at varying phylogenetic distances from the four target strains, the array detected orthologs for the majority of targeted gene families present in bacteria belonging to the same taxonomic family. In combination with whole-genome amplification, the array detects femtogram concentrations of purified DNA, either spiked in to an aerosol sample background, or in combinations from one or more of the four target organisms. This is the first report of a high density NimbleGen microarray system targeting microbial antibiotic resistance and virulence mechanisms. By targeting virulence gene families as well as genes unique to specific biothreat agents, these arrays will provide important data about the pathogenic potential and drug resistance profiles of unknown organisms in environmental samples.

  19. Studies on coaxial circular array for underwater transducer applications

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakraborty, B.

    This thesis presents analytical methods to study important aspects of a coaxial circular array for wideband underwater transducer application. It begins with detailed theoretical study of a coaxial circular array of three turns and an analysis...

  20. FGX : a frequentist gene expression index for Affymetrix arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Purutçuoğlu, Vilda; Wit, Ernst

    2007-01-01

    We consider a new frequentist gene expression index for Affymetrix oligonucleotide DNA arrays, using a similar probe intensity model as suggested previously, called the Bayesian gene expression index (BGX). According to this model, the perfect match and mismatch values are assumed to be correlated a

  1. NORMAL NASAL GENE EXPRESSION LEVELS USING CDNA ARRAY TECHNOLOGY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normal Nasal Gene Expression Levels Using cDNA Array Technology. The nasal epithelium is a target site for chemically-induced toxicity and carcinogenicity. To detect and analyze genetic events which contribute to nasal tumor development, we first defined the gene expressi...

  2. Some statistical properties of gene expression clustering for array data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abreu, G C G; Pinheiro, A; Drummond, R D;

    2010-01-01

    DNA array data without a corresponding statistical error measure. We propose an easy-to-implement and simple-to-use technique that uses bootstrap re-sampling to evaluate the statistical error of the nodes provided by SOM-based clustering. Comparisons between SOM and parametric clustering are presented......DNA arrays have been a rich source of data for the study of genomic expression of a wide variety of biological systems. Gene clustering is one of the paradigms quite used to assess the significance of a gene (or group of genes). However, most of the gene clustering techniques are applied to c...... for simulated as well as for two real data sets. We also implement a bootstrap-based pre-processing procedure for SOM, that improves the false discovery ratio of differentially expressed genes. Code in Matlab is freely available, as well as some supplementary material, at the following address: https...

  3. Efficient searching and sorting applications using an associative array processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, W.; Quinn, M. J.

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe a method of searching and sorting data by using some of the unique capabilities of an associative array processor. To understand the application, the associative array processor is described in detail. In particular, the content addressable memory and flip network are discussed because these two unique elements give the associative array processor the power to rapidly sort and search. A simple alphanumeric sorting example is explained in hardware and software terms. The hardware used to explain the application is the STARAN (Goodyear Aerospace Corporation) associative array processor. The software used is the APPLE (Array Processor Programming Language) programming language. Some applications of the array processor are discussed. This summary tries to differentiate between the techniques of the sequential machine and the associative array processor.

  4. Experimental design, analysis of variance and slide quality assessment in gene expression arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draghici, S; Kuklin, A; Hoff, B; Shams, S

    2001-05-01

    A microarray experiment is a sequence of complicated molecular biology procedures relying on various laboratory tools, instrumentation and experimenter's skills. This paper discusses statistical models for distinguishing small changes in gene expression from the noise in the system. It describes methods for assigning statistical confidence to gene expression values derived from a single array slide. Some of the theory is discussed in the context of practical applications via software usage.

  5. Silver nanorod arrays for photocathode applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilayurganapathy, Subramanian [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Western Michigan Univ., Kalamazoo MI (United States); Nandasiri, Manjula I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Western Michigan Univ., Kalamazoo MI (United States); Joly, Alan G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); El-Khoury, Patrick Z. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Varga, Tamas [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Coffey, Greg W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schwenzer, Birgit [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pandey, Archana [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kayani, Asghar N. [Western Michigan Univ., Kalamazoo MI (United States); Hess, Wayne P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-10-16

    In this study, we explore the possibility of using plasmonic Ag nanorod arrays featuring enhanced photoemission as high-brightness photocathode material. Silver nanorod arrays are synthesized by the DC electrodeposition method and their dimensionality, uniformity, crystallinity and oxide/impurity content are characterized. These Ag nanorod arrays exhibit greatly enhanced two-photon photoemission under 400 nm femtosecond pulsed laser excitation. Plasmonic field enhancement in the array produces photoemission hot spots that are mapped using photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM). The relative photoemission enhancement of nanorod array hot spots relative to that of a flat Ag thin film is found to range between 102 and 3 x 103.

  6. APPLICATION OF MICROPHONE ARRAYS FOR DISTANT SPEECH CAPTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. B. Stolbov

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Application of microphone arrays and beamforming techniques for speech information collection has significant advantages compared to systems operating with a single microphone. This paper presents a brief overview of microphone array systems for collecting distant speech information. The paper is based on an analysis of publications on the use of microphone arrays for speech information collection tasks, as well as on the author’s experience in the development and practical application of planar microphone arrays. The paper describes the main stages of the development of systems for remote capture of audio information. It provides a review of the main applications of microphone arrays, the basic types of microphone arrays and their features. The bulk of the paper deals with planar microphone arrays. We analyze the work of microphone arrays in different acoustic environments. The paper contains the basic equations for calculating the parameters of equidistant planar microphone arrays. Some methods of designing non-equidistant arrays are also mentioned (a list of references is included. We also provide a list of basic digital signal processing algorithms for planar microphone arrays, as well as a list of references on processing algorithms in the frequency domain. The paper includes a list of foreign companies offering systems based on microphone arrays for a wide range of tasks associated with the processing of speech and audio signals. We describe some state-of-the-art speech information collection systems based on microphone arrays. Some promising directions for the development of speech information collection systems using microphone arrays are described in conclusion. The material of the review is usable in designing of microphone arrays for specific practical applications.

  7. Gene chip array for differentiation of mycobacterial species and detection of drug resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Xiao-chun; LIU Xiao-qing; XIE Xiu-li; XU Ying-chun; ZHAO Zhi-xian

    2012-01-01

    Background Gene chip array can differentiate isolated mycobacterial strains using vadous mycobacterium specific probes simultaneously.Gene chip array can evaluate drug resistance to isoniazid and rifampin of tuberculosis strains by detecting drug resistance related gene mutation.This technique has great potential for clinical application.We performed a retrospective study to investigate the capability of gene chip array in the rapid differentiation of species and detection of drug resistance in mycobacterium,and to evaluate its clinical efficacy.Methods We selected 39 patients (54 clinical mycobacterium isolates),used gene chip array to identify the species of these isolates and detect drug resistance to isoniazid and rifampin in Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates.Meanwhile,these patients' clinical data were analyzed retrospectively.Results Among these 39 patients whose mycopacterium culture were positive,32 patients' isolates were identified as Mycobacterium tubercu/osis, all of them were clinical infection. Seven patients' isolates were identified as non-tuberculosis mycobacterium.Analyzed with their clinical data,only two patients were considered as clinical infection,both of them were diagnosed as hematogenous disseminated Mycobacterium introcellulare infection.The other five patients' isolates were of no clinical significance; their clinical samples were all respiratory specimens.Clinical manifestations of tuberculosis and non-tuberculous mycobacterial infections were similar.Isoniazid resistance was detected in two tuberculosis patients,while rifampin resistance was detected in one tuberculosis patient; there was another patient whose Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolate was resistant to both isoniazid and rifampin (belongs to multidrug resistance tuberculosis).The fact that this patient did not respond to routine anti-tuberculosis chemotherapy also confirmed this result.Conclusions Gene chip array may be a simple,rapid,and reliable method for the

  8. The research progress of tiling array technology and applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LANG XianYu; WANG Jun; CHI XueBin

    2008-01-01

    Tiling array technology was improved from microarray technology. Over the past five years, tiling array has become an important tool for gathering genome information. Its features of high density and high throughput allow people to probe into life from the whole-genome level. This paper is a survey of tiling array technology and its applications. In addition, some typical algorithms for identifying expressed probe signals are described and compared.

  9. Array data extractor (ADE): a LabVIEW program to extract and merge gene array data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtenbach, Stefan; Kurtenbach, Sarah; Zoidl, Georg

    2013-12-01

    Large data sets from gene expression array studies are publicly available offering information highly valuable for research across many disciplines ranging from fundamental to clinical research. Highly advanced bioinformatics tools have been made available to researchers, but a demand for user-friendly software allowing researchers to quickly extract expression information for multiple genes from multiple studies persists. Here, we present a user-friendly LabVIEW program to automatically extract gene expression data for a list of genes from multiple normalized microarray datasets. Functionality was tested for 288 class A G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and expression data from 12 studies comparing normal and diseased human hearts. Results confirmed known regulation of a beta 1 adrenergic receptor and further indicate novel research targets. Although existing software allows for complex data analyses, the LabVIEW based program presented here, "Array Data Extractor (ADE)", provides users with a tool to retrieve meaningful information from multiple normalized gene expression datasets in a fast and easy way. Further, the graphical programming language used in LabVIEW allows applying changes to the program without the need of advanced programming knowledge.

  10. Combining gene expression data from different generations of oligonucleotide arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kong Sek

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the important challenges in microarray analysis is to take full advantage of previously accumulated data, both from one's own laboratory and from public repositories. Through a comparative analysis on a variety of datasets, a more comprehensive view of the underlying mechanism or structure can be obtained. However, as we discover in this work, continual changes in genomic sequence annotations and probe design criteria make it difficult to compare gene expression data even from different generations of the same microarray platform. Results We first describe the extent of discordance between the results derived from two generations of Affymetrix oligonucleotide arrays, as revealed in cluster analysis and in identification of differentially expressed genes. We then propose a method for increasing comparability. The dataset we use consists of a set of 14 human muscle biopsy samples from patients with inflammatory myopathies that were hybridized on both HG-U95Av2 and HG-U133A human arrays. We find that the use of the probe set matching table for comparative analysis provided by Affymetrix produces better results than matching by UniGene or LocusLink identifiers but still remains inadequate. Rescaling of expression values for each gene across samples and data filtering by expression values enhance comparability but only for few specific analyses. As a generic method for improving comparability, we select a subset of probes with overlapping sequence segments in the two array types and recalculate expression values based only on the selected probes. We show that this filtering of probes significantly improves the comparability while retaining a sufficient number of probe sets for further analysis. Conclusions Compatibility between high-density oligonucleotide arrays is significantly affected by probe-level sequence information. With a careful filtering of the probes based on their sequence overlaps, data from different

  11. Application of Array Measurement in Blind Identification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王勇; 孙连明; 刘文江

    2003-01-01

    This paper deals with blind identification and deconvolution algorithm for an arbitrary, possibly white or colored, stationary or nonstationary signal, which is observed through array sensors. By using multiple sensors with their individual outputs sampled at a rate 1/T, one can obtain cyclostationary signals. They can be considered as a single-input multiple-output model with an identical but unknown input signal. With the array measurement, an algorithm for estimating the system transfer function model and its parameters is presented.

  12. Ordered Au Nanodisk and Nanohole Arrays: Fabrication and Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Zheng, Yue Bing

    2010-01-01

    We have utilized nanosphere lithography (NSL) to fabricate ordered Au nanodisk and nanohole arrays on substrates and have studied the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of the arrays. Through these investigations, we demonstrate that the angle- dependent behavior of the LSPR in the Au nanodisk arrays enables real-time observation of exciton-plasmon couplings. In addition, we show that the NSL-fabricated Au nanohole arrays can be applied as templates for patterning micro-/nanoparticles under capillary force. The unique structural and plasmonic characteristics of the Au nanodisk and nano- hole arrays, as well as the low-cost and high-throughput NSL-based nanofabrication technique, render these arrays excellent platforms for numerous engineering applications. © 2010 by ASME.

  13. Graphene array antenna for 5G applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa'don, Siti Nor Hafizah; Kamarudin, Muhammad Ramlee; Ahmad, Fauzan; Jusoh, Muzammil; Majid, Huda A.

    2017-02-01

    Fifth generation (5G) needs to provide better coverage than the previous generation. However, high frequency and millimeter wave experience penetration loss, propagation loss and even more loss in energy for long distance. Hence, a graphene array antenna is proposed for high gain to cover a long distance communications since array antenna enables in providing more directive beams. The investigation is conducted on three types of substrates with gain achieved is more than 7 dBi. The gain obtained is good since it is comparable with other studies. In addition, these antennas consume small numbers of elements to achieve high gain.

  14. Use of functional gene arrays for elucidating in situ biodegradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joy D. Van Nostrand

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Microarrays have revolutionized the study of microbiology by providing a high-throughput method for examining thousands of genes with a single test and overcome the limitations of many culture-independent approaches. Functional gene arrays (FGA probe a wide range of genes involved in a variety of functions of interest to microbial ecology (e.g., carbon degradation, N-fixation, metal resistance from many different microorganisms, cultured and uncultured. The most comprehensive FGA to date is the GeoChip array, which targets tens of thousands of genes involved in the geochemical cycling of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulphur, metal resistance and reduction, energy processing, antibiotic resistance and contaminant degradation as well as phylogenetic information (gyrB. Since the development of GeoChips, many studies have been performed using this FGA and have shown it to be a powerful tool for rapid, sensitive and specific examination of microbial communities in a high-throughput manner. As such, the GeoChip is well-suited for linking geochemical processes with microbial community function and structure. This technology has been used successfully to examine microbial communities before, during and after in situ bioremediation at a variety of contaminated sites. These studies have expanded our understanding of biodegradation and bioremediation processes and the associated microorganisms and environmental conditions responsible. This review provides an overview of FGA development with a focus on the GeoChip and highlights specific GeoChip studies involving in situ bioremediation.

  15. Development of a coral cDNA array to examine gene expression profiles in Montastraea faveolata exposed to environmental stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edge, Sara E; Morgan, Michael B; Gleason, Daniel F; Snell, Terry W

    2005-01-01

    The development of a cDNA array of coral genes and its application to investigate changes in coral gene expression associated with stressful conditions is described. The array includes both well-characterized and previously unidentified coral genes from Acropora cervicornis and Montastraea faveolata. Corals were exposed to either natural or anthropogenic stressors to elicit the expression of stress genes for isolation and incorporation onto the array. A total of 32 genes involved in protein synthesis, apoptosis, cell signaling, metabolism, cellular defense and inflammation were included on the array. Labeled cDNA from coral (Montastraea faveolata) exposed to elevated seawater temperature, salinity and ultraviolet light was tested against the microarray to determine patterns of gene expression associated with each stressor. Carbonic anhydrase, thioredoxin, a urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) and three ribosomal genes demonstrated differential expression across all replicates on the array and between replicate colonies. Specific gene expression patterns produced in response to different stressors demonstrate the potential for gene expression profiling in characterizing the coral stress response.

  16. Expression Divergence of Tandemly Arrayed Genes in Human and Mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valia Shoja

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Tandemly arrayed genes (TAGs account for about one third of the duplicated genes in eukaryotic genomes, yet there has not been any systematic study of their gene expression patterns. Taking advantage of recently published large-scale microarray data sets, we studied the expression divergence of 361 two-member TAGs in human and 212 two-member TAGs in mouse and examined the effect of sequence divergence, gene orientation, and chromosomal proximity on the divergence of TAG expression patterns. Our results show that there is a weak negative correlation between sequence divergence of TAG members and their expression similarity. There is also a weak negative correlation between chromosomal proximity of TAG members and their expression similarity. We did not detect any significant relationship between gene orientation and expression similarity. We also found that downstream TAG members do not show significantly narrower expression breadth than upstream members, contrary to what we predict based on TAG expression divergence hypothesis that we propose. Finally, we show that both chromosomal proximity and expression correlation in TAGs do not differ significantly from their neighboring non-TAG gene pairs, suggesting that tandem duplication is unlikely to be the cause for the higher-than-random expression association between neighboring genes on a chromosome in human and mouse.

  17. Interleaved Array Antennas for FMCW Radar Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lager, I.E.; Trampuz, C.; Simeoni, M.; Ligthart, L.P.

    2009-01-01

    An effective and robust strategy for concurrently designing the transmit and receive antennas of a frequency-modulated, continuos-wave radar is discussed. The aperture architecture is based on the use of non-periodic, interleaved sub-arrays. Deterministic element placement is employed for ensuring d

  18. Development of a cDNA array for chicken gene expression analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burt David

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The application of microarray technology to functional genomic analysis in the chicken has been limited by the lack of arrays containing large numbers of genes. Results We have produced cDNA arrays using chicken EST collections generated by BBSRC, University of Delaware and the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. From a total of 363,838 chicken ESTs representing 24 different adult or embryonic tissues, a set of 11,447 non-redundant ESTs were selected and added to an existing collection of clones (4,162 from immune tissues and a chicken bursal cell line (DT40. Quality control analysis indicates there are 13,007 useable features on the array, including 160 control spots. The array provides broad coverage of mRNAs expressed in many tissues; in addition, clones with expression unique to various tissues can be detected. Conclusions A chicken multi-tissue cDNA microarray with 13,007 features is now available to academic researchers from genomics@fhcrc.org. Sequence information for all features on the array is in GenBank, and clones can be readily obtained. Targeted users include researchers in comparative and developmental biology, immunology, vaccine and agricultural technology. These arrays will be an important resource for the entire research community using the chicken as a model.

  19. Phased annular array transducers for ultrasonic guided wave applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Fei; Borigo, Cody; Liang, Yue; Koduru, Jaya P.; Rose, Joseph L.

    2011-04-01

    Mode and frequency control always plays an important role in ultrasonic guided wave applications. In this paper, theoretical understanding of guided wave excitations of axisymmetric sources on plate structures is established. It is shown that a wave number spectrum can be used to investigate the guided wave excitations of an axisymmetric source. The wave number spectrum is calculated from a Hankel transform of the axial source loading profile. On the basis of the theoretical understanding, phased annular array transducers are developed as a powerful tool for guided wave mode and frequency control. By applying appropriate time delays to phase the multiple elements of an annular array transducer, guided wave mode and frequency tuning can be achieved fully electronically. The phased annular array transducers have been successfully used for various applications. Example applications presented in this paper include phased annular arrays for guided wave beamforming and a novel ultrasonic vibration modal analysis technique for damage detection.

  20. Some statistical properties of gene expression clustering for array data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abreu, G C G; Pinheiro, A; Drummond, R D

    2010-01-01

    DNA array data without a corresponding statistical error measure. We propose an easy-to-implement and simple-to-use technique that uses bootstrap re-sampling to evaluate the statistical error of the nodes provided by SOM-based clustering. Comparisons between SOM and parametric clustering are presented...... for simulated as well as for two real data sets. We also implement a bootstrap-based pre-processing procedure for SOM, that improves the false discovery ratio of differentially expressed genes. Code in Matlab is freely available, as well as some supplementary material, at the following address: https...

  1. Simulation Application for Optimization of Solar Collector Array

    OpenAIRE

    Igor Shesho*,; Done Tashevsk

    2014-01-01

    Solar systems offer a comparatively low output density , so increasing the output always means a corresponding increase in the size of the collector area. Thus collector arrays are occasionally constructed (i.e. with different azimuth angles and/or slopes, which be imposed by the location and structure available to mount the collector. In this paper is developed simulation application for optimization for the solar collector array position and number of collectors in regard of...

  2. A Brassica exon array for whole-transcript gene expression profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher G Love

    Full Text Available Affymetrix GeneChip® arrays are used widely to study transcriptional changes in response to developmental and environmental stimuli. GeneChip® arrays comprise multiple 25-mer oligonucleotide probes per gene and retain certain advantages over direct sequencing. For plants, there are several public GeneChip® arrays whose probes are localised primarily in 3' exons. Plant whole-transcript (WT GeneChip® arrays are not yet publicly available, although WT resolution is needed to study complex crop genomes such as Brassica, which are typified by segmental duplications containing paralogous genes and/or allopolyploidy. Available sequence data were sampled from the Brassica A and C genomes, and 142,997 gene models identified. The assembled gene models were then used to establish a comprehensive public WT exon array for transcriptomics studies. The Affymetrix GeneChip® Brassica Exon 1.0 ST Array is a 5 µM feature size array, containing 2.4 million 25-base oligonucleotide probes representing 135,201 gene models, with 15 probes per gene distributed among exons. Discrimination of the gene models was based on an E-value cut-off of 1E(-5, with ≤98% sequence identity. The 135 k Brassica Exon Array was validated by quantifying transcriptome differences between leaf and root tissue from a reference Brassica rapa line (R-o-18, and categorisation by Gene Ontologies (GO based on gene orthology with Arabidopsis thaliana. Technical validation involved comparison of the exon array with a 60-mer array platform using the same starting RNA samples. The 135 k Brassica Exon Array is a robust platform. All data relating to the array design and probe identities are available in the public domain and are curated within the BrassEnsembl genome viewer at http://www.brassica.info/BrassEnsembl/index.html.

  3. Quantitative analysis of EDC-condensed DNA on vertically aligned carbon nanofiber gene delivery arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, David G. J. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Center for Environmental Biotechnology; McKnight, Timothy E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Engineering Science and Technology Division; Melechko, Anatoli V. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Center for Nanophase Materials Science (CNMS); Simpson, Michael L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Center for Nanophase Materials Science (CNMS); Sayler, Gary S. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Center for Environmental Biotechnology

    2006-12-08

    Vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (VACNFs) with immobilized DNA have been developed as a novel tool for direct physical introduction and expression of exogenous genes in mammalian cells. Immobilization of DNA base amines to the carboxylic acids on nanofibers can influence the accessibility and transcriptional activity of the DNA template, making it necessary to determine the number of accessible gene copies on nanofiber arrays. We used polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and in vitro transcription (IVT) to investigate the transcriptional accessibility of DNA tethered to VACNFs by correlating the yields of both IVT and PCR to that of non-tethered, free DNA. Yields of the promoter region and promoter/gene region of bound DNA plasmid were high. Amplification using primers designed to cover 80% of the plasmid failed to yield any product. These results are consistent with tethered, longer DNA sequences having a higher probability of interfering with the activity of DNA and RNA polymerases. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) was used to quantify the number of accessible gene copies tethered to nanofiber arrays. Copy numbers of promoters and reporter genes were quantified and compared to non-tethered DNA controls. In subsequent reactions of the same nanofiber arrays, DNA yields decreased dramatically in the non-tethered control, while the majority of tethered DNA was retained on the arrays. This decrease could be explained by the presence of DNA which is non-tethered to all samples and released during the assay. In conclusion,this investigation shows the applicability of these methods for monitoring DNA immobilization techniques.

  4. Design of a microchannel-nanochannel-microchannel array based nanoelectroporation system for precise gene transfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Keliang; Li, Lei; He, Lingna; Hinkle, Kevin; Wu, Yun; Ma, Junyu; Chang, Lingqian; Zhao, Xi; Perez, Daniel Gallego; Eckardt, Sigrid; McLaughlin, John; Liu, Boyu; Farson, Dave F; Lee, L James

    2014-03-12

    A micro/nano-fabrication process of a nanochannel electroporation (NEP) array and its application for precise delivery of plasmid for non-viral gene transfection is described. A dip-combing device is optimized to produce DNA nanowires across a microridge array patterned on the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surface with a yield up to 95%. Molecular imprinting based on a low viscosity resin, 1,4-butanediol diacrylate (1,4-BDDA), adopted to convert the microridge-nanowire-microridge array into a microchannel-nanochannel-microchannel (MNM) array. Secondary machining by femtosecond laser ablation is applied to shorten one side of microchannels from 3000 to 50 μm to facilitate cell loading and unloading. The biochip is then sealed in a packaging case with reservoirs and microfluidic channels to enable cell and plasmid loading, and to protect the biochip from leakage and contamination. The package case can be opened for cell unloading after NEP to allow for the follow-up cell culture and analysis. These NEP cases can be placed in a spinning disc and up to ten discs can be piled together for spinning. The resulting centrifugal force can simultaneously manipulate hundreds or thousands of cells into microchannels of NEP arrays within 3 minutes. To demonstrate its application, a 13 kbp OSKM plasmid of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) is injected into mouse embryonic fibroblasts cells (MEFCs). Fluorescence detection of transfected cells within the NEP biochips shows that the delivered dosage is high and much more uniform compared with similar gene transfection carried out by the conventional bulk electroporation (BEP) method.

  5. Microwave array applicator for radiometry-controlled superficial hyperthermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauffer, Paul R.; Jacobsen, Svein; Neuman, Daniel

    2001-06-01

    Hyperthermia therapy has been shown clinically effective for a variety of skin diseases but current heating equipment is inadequate for most patients. This effort describes the design and performance of a flexible microstrip array applicator intended for heating large regions of tissue over contoured anatomy while at the same time monitoring temperature of the underlying tissue by non-invasive radiometric sensing of blackbody radiation from the heated volume. For this dual purpose applicator, an array of broadband Archimedean spiral receive antennas is integrated into an array of Dual Concentric Conductor heating apertures. Applicator heating uniformity is assessed with electric field scans in homogenous muscle phantoms and with measured temperature distributions in clinical treatments of chestwall recurrence of breast carcinoma. The data demonstrate precisely controlled heating out to the perimeter of large (40 x 13 cm2) multiaperture conformal array applicators. Capabilities of the radiometry system are assessed by correlation of brightness temperatures measured in phantom loads of known temperature distribution as seen through an intervening 5 mm thick water bolus at constant 40°C. The radiometer demonstrates excellent sensitivity and an accuracy of +0.1-0.45°C for temperature measurements up to 5 cm deep in phantom when using a one dimensional weighting function analysis and up to 6 independent 500 MHz bandwidths within the 1-4 GHz range. The data clearly indicate that both heating and radiometric thermometry are possible using the same thin and flexible printed circuit board microstrip array applicator. Once development is complete, this dual mode conformal array applicator with multiplexed radiometric display system should provide significantly improved uniformity and ease of heating large area superficial tissue disease.

  6. Riordan arrays and applications via the classical umbral calculus

    CERN Document Server

    Agapito, José; Petrullo, Pasquale; Torres, Maria M

    2011-01-01

    We use the classical umbral calculus to describe Riordan arrays. Here, a Riordan array is generated by a pair of umbrae, and this provides efficient proofs of several basic results of the theory such as the multiplication rule, the recursive properties, the fundamental theorem and the connection with Sheffer sequences. In particular, we show that the fundamental theorem turns out to be a reformulation of the umbral Abel identity. As an application, we give an elementary approach to the problem of extending integer powers of Riordan arrays to complex powers in such a way that additivity of the exponents is preserved. Also, ordinary Riordan arrays are studied within the classical umbral perspective and some combinatorial identities are discussed regarding Catalan numbers, Fibonacci numbers and Chebyshev polynomials.

  7. Printed strain sensor array for application to structural health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zymelka, Daniel; Togashi, Kazuyoshi; Ohigashi, Ryoichi; Yamashita, Takahiro; Takamatsu, Seiichi; Itoh, Toshihiro; Kobayashi, Takeshi

    2017-10-01

    We demonstrate the development and practical use of low-cost printed strain sensor arrays built for applications in structural health monitoring. Sensors embedded in the array were designed to provide compensation for temperature variations and to enable their use in different seasons. The evaluation was carried out in laboratory tests and with practical application on a highway bridge. Measurements on the bridge were performed 7 months and 1 year after their installation. The developed devices were fully operational and could detect and localize cracks accurately in the monitored bridge structure.

  8. Simulation and Data Processing for Ultrasonic Phased-Arrays Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaffaï-Gargouri, S.; Chatillon, S.; Mahaut, S.; Le Ber, L.

    2007-03-01

    The use of phased-arrays techniques has considerably contributed to extend the domain of applications and the performances of ultrasonic methods on complex configurations. Their adaptability offers a great freedom for conceiving the inspection leading to a wide range of functionalities gathering electronic commutation, applications of different delay laws and so on. This advantage allows to circumvent the difficulties encountered with more classical techniques especially when the inspection is assisted by simulation at the different stages : probe design (optimization of the number and characteristics of the elements), evaluation of the performances in terms of flaw detection (zone coverage) and characterization, driving the array (computation of adapted delay laws) and finally analyzing the results (versatile model-based imaging tools allowing in particular to locate the data in the real space). The CEA is strongly involved in the development of efficient simulation-based tools adapted to these needs. In this communication we present the recent advances done at CEA in this field and show several examples of complex NDT phased arrays applications. On these cases we show the interest and the performances of simulation-helped array design, array-driving and data analysis.

  9. 1-Mb resolution array-based comparative genomic hybridization using a BAC clone set optimized for cancer gene analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greshock, J; Naylor, TL; Margolin, A; Diskin, S; Cleaver, SH; Futreal, PA; deJong, PJ; Zhao, SY; Liebman, M; Weber, BL

    2004-01-01

    Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) is a recently developed tool for genome-wide determination of DNA copy number alterations. This technology has tremendous potential for disease-gene discovery in cancer and developmental disorders as well as numerous other applications. However, w

  10. A statistical multiprobe model for analyzing cis and trans genes in genetical genomics experiments with short-oligonucleotide arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alberts, Rudi; Terpstra, Peter; Bystrykh, Leonid V.; Haan, Gerald de; Jansen, Ritsert C.

    2005-01-01

    Short-oligonucleotide arrays typically contain multiple probes per gene. In genetical genomics applications a statistical model for the individual probe signals can help in separating ‘‘true’’ differential mRNA expression from ‘‘ghost’’ effects caused by polymorphisms, misdesigned probes, and batch

  11. Blood pressure loci identified with a gene-centric array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Toby; Gaunt, Tom R; Newhouse, Stephen J; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Kumari, Meena; Morris, Richard W; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; O'Brien, Eoin T; Poulter, Neil R; Sever, Peter; Shields, Denis C; Thom, Simon; Wannamethee, Sasiwarang G; Whincup, Peter H; Brown, Morris J; Connell, John M; Dobson, Richard J; Howard, Philip J; Mein, Charles A; Onipinla, Abiodun; Shaw-Hawkins, Sue; Zhang, Yun; Davey Smith, George; Day, Ian N M; Lawlor, Debbie A; Goodall, Alison H; Fowkes, F Gerald; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Elliott, Paul; Gateva, Vesela; Braund, Peter S; Burton, Paul R; Nelson, Christopher P; Tobin, Martin D; van der Harst, Pim; Glorioso, Nicola; Neuvrith, Hani; Salvi, Erika; Staessen, Jan A; Stucchi, Andrea; Devos, Nabila; Jeunemaitre, Xavier; Plouin, Pierre-François; Tichet, Jean; Juhanson, Peeter; Org, Elin; Putku, Margus; Sõber, Siim; Veldre, Gudrun; Viigimaa, Margus; Levinsson, Anna; Rosengren, Annika; Thelle, Dag S; Hastie, Claire E; Hedner, Thomas; Lee, Wai K; Melander, Olle; Wahlstrand, Björn; Hardy, Rebecca; Wong, Andrew; Cooper, Jackie A; Palmen, Jutta; Chen, Li; Stewart, Alexandre F R; Wells, George A; Westra, Harm-Jan; Wolfs, Marcel G M; Clarke, Robert; Franzosi, Maria Grazia; Goel, Anuj; Hamsten, Anders; Lathrop, Mark; Peden, John F; Seedorf, Udo; Watkins, Hugh; Ouwehand, Willem H; Sambrook, Jennifer; Stephens, Jonathan; Casas, Juan-Pablo; Drenos, Fotios; Holmes, Michael V; Kivimaki, Mika; Shah, Sonia; Shah, Tina; Talmud, Philippa J; Whittaker, John; Wallace, Chris; Delles, Christian; Laan, Maris; Kuh, Diana; Humphries, Steve E; Nyberg, Fredrik; Cusi, Daniele; Roberts, Robert; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Franke, Lude; Stanton, Alice V; Dominiczak, Anna F; Farrall, Martin; Hingorani, Aroon D; Samani, Nilesh J; Caulfield, Mark J; Munroe, Patricia B

    2011-12-09

    Raised blood pressure (BP) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Previous studies have identified 47 distinct genetic variants robustly associated with BP, but collectively these explain only a few percent of the heritability for BP phenotypes. To find additional BP loci, we used a bespoke gene-centric array to genotype an independent discovery sample of 25,118 individuals that combined hypertensive case-control and general population samples. We followed up four SNPs associated with BP at our p < 8.56 × 10(-7) study-specific significance threshold and six suggestively associated SNPs in a further 59,349 individuals. We identified and replicated a SNP at LSP1/TNNT3, a SNP at MTHFR-NPPB independent (r(2) = 0.33) of previous reports, and replicated SNPs at AGT and ATP2B1 reported previously. An analysis of combined discovery and follow-up data identified SNPs significantly associated with BP at p < 8.56 × 10(-7) at four further loci (NPR3, HFE, NOS3, and SOX6). The high number of discoveries made with modest genotyping effort can be attributed to using a large-scale yet targeted genotyping array and to the development of a weighting scheme that maximized power when meta-analyzing results from samples ascertained with extreme phenotypes, in combination with results from nonascertained or population samples. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and transcript expression data highlight potential gene regulatory mechanisms at the MTHFR and NOS3 loci. These results provide candidates for further study to help dissect mechanisms affecting BP and highlight the utility of studying SNPs and samples that are independent of those studied previously even when the sample size is smaller than that in previous studies.

  12. Highly integrated application specific MMICs for active phased array radar applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogaart, F.L.M. van den

    1999-01-01

    Application specific MMIC solutions for active array radar, developed at TNO-FEL, are presented. The use and application of these MMICs in their respective radar systems will be shown. These MMICs address the needs for current and future phased-array topologies as for example the concept of "smart

  13. Highly Integrated Application Specific MMICS for Active Phased Array Radar Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogaart, F.L.M. van den

    2000-01-01

    Application specific MMIC solutions for active array radar, developed at TNO-FEL. are presented. The use and application of these MMICs in their respective radar systems will be shown. These MMICs address the needs for current and future phased-array topologies as for example the concept of "smart

  14. Highly Integrated Application Specific MMICS for Active Phased Array Radar Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogaart, F.L.M. van den

    2000-01-01

    Application specific MMIC solutions for active array radar, developed at TNO-FEL. are presented. The use and application of these MMICs in their respective radar systems will be shown. These MMICs address the needs for current and future phased-array topologies as for example the concept of "smart s

  15. Highly integrated application specific MMICs for active phased array radar applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogaart, F.L.M. van den

    1999-01-01

    Application specific MMIC solutions for active array radar, developed at TNO-FEL, are presented. The use and application of these MMICs in their respective radar systems will be shown. These MMICs address the needs for current and future phased-array topologies as for example the concept of "smart s

  16. Optimized shapes of magnetic arrays for drug targeting applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnsley, Lester C.; Carugo, Dario; Stride, Eleanor

    2016-06-01

    Arrays of permanent magnet elements have been utilized as light-weight, inexpensive sources for applying external magnetic fields in magnetic drug targeting applications, but they are extremely limited in the range of depths over which they can apply useful magnetic forces. In this paper, designs for optimized magnet arrays are presented, which were generated using an optimization routine to maximize the magnetic force available from an arbitrary arrangement of magnetized elements, depending on a set of design parameters including the depth of targeting (up to 50 mm from the magnet) and direction of force required. A method for assembling arrays in practice is considered, quantifying the difficulty of assembly and suggesting a means for easing this difficulty without a significant compromise to the applied field or force. Finite element simulations of in vitro magnetic retention experiments were run to demonstrate the capability of a subset of arrays to retain magnetic microparticles against flow. The results suggest that, depending on the choice of array, a useful proportion of particles (more than 10% ) could be retained at flow velocities up to 100 mm s-1 or to depths as far as 50 mm from the magnet. Finally, the optimization routine was used to generate a design for a Halbach array optimized to deliver magnetic force to a depth of 50 mm inside the brain.

  17. Area Array Technology Evaluations for Space and Military Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffarian, Reza

    1996-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is currently assessing the use of Area Array Packaging (AAP) for National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) spaceflight applications. this work is being funded through NASA Headquarters, Code Q. The paper discusses background of AAP, objectives, and uses of AAP.

  18. Parallel scanning probe arrays: their applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Liu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the invention of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM1 and the atomic force microscope (AFM2, the field of scanning probe microscopy (SPM instruments has grown steadily and has had a profound influence in materials research, chemistry, biology, nanotechnology, and electronics3,4. Today, scanning probe instruments are used for metrology, characterization5, detection6, manipulation7, patterning8,9, and material modification. A wide range of scanning probe applications are available, taking advantage of various modes of tip–substrate interactions, including force, optics10,11, electrochemistry12, electromagnetics, electrostatics, thermal and mass transfer13,14, and vibration15,16.

  19. INDUCIBLE RNAi-MEDIATED GENE SILENCING USING NANOSTRUCTURED GENE DELIVERY ARRAYS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, David George James [ORNL; McKnight, Timothy E [ORNL; Mcpherson, Jackson [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Hoyt, Peter R [ORNL; Melechko, Anatoli Vasilievich [ORNL; Simpson, Michael L [ORNL; Sayler, Gary Steven [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    RNA interference has become a powerful biological tool over the last decade. In this study, a tetracycline-inducible shRNA vector system was designed for silencing CFP expression and introduced alongside the yfp marker gene into Chinese hamster ovary cells using spatially indexed vertically aligned carbon nanofiber arrays (VACNFs) in a gene delivery process termed impalefection. The VACNF architecture provided simultaneous delivery of multiple genes, subsequent adherence and proliferation of interfaced cells, and repeated monitoring of single cells over time. 24 hours after nanofiber-mediated delivery, 53.1% 10.4% of the cells that expressed the yfp marker gene were also fully silenced by the inducible CFP-silencing shRNA vector. Additionally, efficient CFP-silencing was observed in single cells among a population of cells that remained CFP-expressing. This effective transient expression system enables rapid analysis of gene silencing effects using RNAi in single cells and cell populations.

  20. Gene electrotransfer into skin using noninvasive multi-electrode array for vaccination and wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kos, Spela; Vanvarenberg, Kevin; Dolinsek, Tanja; Cemazar, Maja; Jelenc, Jure; Préat, Véronique; Sersa, Gregor; Vandermeulen, Gaëlle

    2017-04-01

    Skin is an attractive target for gene electrotransfer due to its easy accessibility and its interesting immune properties. Since electrodes are often invasive and frequently induce discomfort during pulse application, there is a fundamental need for non-invasive electrodes for skin delivery. We developed circular pin non-invasive multi-electrode array (MEA), suitable for different clinical applications. MEA was first employed to deliver a luciferase reporter gene. Then, it was used to deliver a DNA vaccine coding for ovalbumin or a plasmid encoding hCAP-18/LL-37 for promoting wound healing. The results demonstrated a strong gene expression and an efficient delivery of both, DNA vaccine and wound healing agent, dependent on the pulses applied. The use of MEA to deliver the ovalbumin plasmid demonstrated a strong immune response, as evidenced by the presence of antibodies in sera, the IFN-gamma response and the delayed tumor growth when the mice were subsequently challenged with B16-OVA cells. The delivery of a plasmid encoding hCAP-18/LL-37 significantly accelerated wound closure. The easy applicability and non-invasiveness of MEA make it suitable for various clinical applications that require gene electrotransfer to skin. Specifically, by adapting electric pulses to the expected action of a transgene, non-invasive MEA can be employed either for vaccination or for wound healing.

  1. Low Power Systolic Array Based Digital Filter for DSP Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Karthick

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Main concepts in DSP include filtering, averaging, modulating, and correlating the signals in digital form to estimate characteristic parameter of a signal into a desirable form. This paper presents a brief concept of low power datapath impact for Digital Signal Processing (DSP based biomedical application. Systolic array based digital filter used in signal processing of electrocardiogram analysis is presented with datapath architectural innovations in low power consumption perspective. Implementation was done with ASIC design methodology using TSMC 65 nm technological library node. The proposed systolic array filter has reduced leakage power up to 8.5% than the existing filter architectures.

  2. Detectors based on silicon photomultiplier arrays for medical imaging applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llosa, G.; Barrio, J.; Cabello, J.; Lacasta, C.; Oliver, J. F. [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular - IFIC-CSIC/UVEG, Valencia (Spain); Rafecas, M. [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular - IFIC-CSIC/UVEG, Valencia (Spain); Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular Y Nuclear, Universitat de Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Stankova, V.; Solaz, C. [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular - IFIC-CSIC/UVEG, Valencia (Spain); Bisogni, M. G.; Del Guerra, A. [Universite di Pisa, INFN Pisa, Pisa (Italy)

    2011-07-01

    Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) have experienced a fast development and are now employed in different research fields. The availability of 2D arrays that provide information of the interaction position in the detector has had a high interest for medical imaging. Continuous crystals combined with segmented photodetectors can provide higher efficiency than pixellated crystals and very high spatial resolution. The IRIS group at IFIC is working on the development of detector heads based on continuous crystals coupled to SiPM arrays for different applications, including a small animal PET scanner in collaboration with the Univ. of Pisa and INFN Pisa, and a Compton telescope for dose monitoring in hadron therapy. (authors)

  3. Low Power Systolic Array Based Digital Filter for DSP Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthick, S; Valarmathy, S; Prabhu, E

    2015-01-01

    Main concepts in DSP include filtering, averaging, modulating, and correlating the signals in digital form to estimate characteristic parameter of a signal into a desirable form. This paper presents a brief concept of low power datapath impact for Digital Signal Processing (DSP) based biomedical application. Systolic array based digital filter used in signal processing of electrocardiogram analysis is presented with datapath architectural innovations in low power consumption perspective. Implementation was done with ASIC design methodology using TSMC 65 nm technological library node. The proposed systolic array filter has reduced leakage power up to 8.5% than the existing filter architectures.

  4. Application of gene array chip in diagnosis of cytogenetics of recurrent spontaneous abortion%基因芯片技术在复发性流产遗传学诊断中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈国松; 张甦; 何平亚

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨基因芯片单核苷酸多态性阵列(SNP-array)技术在复发性流产遗传学诊断中的应用价值.方法 选择2012年1-10月在浙江省湖州市妇幼保健院产前诊断中心就诊的、曾有自然流产≥2次、本次妊娠又发生自然流产的患者26例(RSA组),对流产物分别应用绒毛染色体核型分析技术和SNP-array技术进行分析;同时选取20例早孕期人工流产妇女作为对照组.结果 绒毛染色体核型分析获得结果19例,检测成功率为73% (19/26),发现染色体异常10例,异常检出率为10/19;SNP-array技术检测获得结果26例,检测成功率为100%,发现全基因组拷贝数异常15例,异常检出率为58% (15/26).对照组胚胎绒毛染色体核型分析获得结果16例,检测成功率为16/20,均未发现染色体核型异常;SNP-array技术检测获得结果20例,检测成功率为20/20,均未发现全基因组拷贝数异常.结论 SNP-array技术具有分辨率高、准确性好等优点,是自然流产特别是复发性流产遗传学诊断的有力工具.%Objective To investigate clinical value of single nucleotide polymorphism array (SNParray) gene chip technique in diagnosis of genetics of recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA).Methods From January to October 2012,the 26 patients with more than twice of spontaneous abortion in Huzhou Maternal and Child Health Care Hospital were enrolled in this study(RSA group).Meanwhile 20 cases with induced abortion were taken as control group.All aborted tissues were analyzed with conventional cytogenetic karyotyping and SNP-array,respectively.Results Chorionic villus chromosomal examination was successfully done in 19 cases (73%,19/26),which 10 cases were found with chromosomal anomaly,the overall detection rate is 10/19.However,SNP-array analysis was successfully performed in all 26 cases.The overall rate of detection was 100%,and abnormalities were found in 15 cases,which reached the detection rate was 58% (15

  5. Tandem gene arrays in Trypanosoma brucei: Comparative phylogenomic analysis of duplicate sequence variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson Andrew P

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genome sequence of the protistan parasite Trypanosoma brucei contains many tandem gene arrays. Gene duplicates are created through tandem duplication and are expressed through polycistronic transcription, suggesting that the primary purpose of long, tandem arrays is to increase gene dosage in an environment where individual gene promoters are absent. This report presents the first account of the tandem gene arrays in the T. brucei genome, employing several related genome sequences to establish how variation is created and removed. Results A systematic survey of tandem gene arrays showed that substantial sequence variation existed across the genome; variation from different regions of an array often produced inconsistent phylogenetic affinities. Phylogenetic relationships of gene duplicates were consistent with concerted evolution being a widespread homogenising force. However, tandem duplicates were not usually identical; therefore, any homogenising effect was coincident with divergence among duplicates. Allelic gene conversion was detected using various criteria and was apparently able to both remove and introduce sequence variation. Tandem arrays containing structural heterogeneity demonstrated how sequence homogenisation and differentiation can occur within a single locus. Conclusion The use of multiple genome sequences in a comparative analysis of tandem gene arrays identified substantial sequence variation among gene duplicates. The distribution of sequence variation is determined by a dynamic balance of conservative and innovative evolutionary forces. Gene trees from various species showed that intraspecific duplicates evolve in concert, perhaps through frequent gene conversion, although this does not prevent sequence divergence, especially where structural heterogeneity physically separates a duplicate from its neighbours. In describing dynamics of sequence variation that have consequences beyond gene dosage, this

  6. Close-field electroporation gene delivery using the cochlear implant electrode array enhances the bionic ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinyon, Jeremy L; Tadros, Sherif F; Froud, Kristina E; Y Wong, Ann C; Tompson, Isabella T; Crawford, Edward N; Ko, Myungseo; Morris, Renée; Klugmann, Matthias; Housley, Gary D

    2014-04-23

    The cochlear implant is the most successful bionic prosthesis and has transformed the lives of people with profound hearing loss. However, the performance of the "bionic ear" is still largely constrained by the neural interface itself. Current spread inherent to broad monopolar stimulation of the spiral ganglion neuron somata obviates the intrinsic tonotopic mapping of the cochlear nerve. We show in the guinea pig that neurotrophin gene therapy integrated into the cochlear implant improves its performance by stimulating spiral ganglion neurite regeneration. We used the cochlear implant electrode array for novel "close-field" electroporation to transduce mesenchymal cells lining the cochlear perilymphatic canals with a naked complementary DNA gene construct driving expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter. The focusing of electric fields by particular cochlear implant electrode configurations led to surprisingly efficient gene delivery to adjacent mesenchymal cells. The resulting BDNF expression stimulated regeneration of spiral ganglion neurites, which had atrophied 2 weeks after ototoxic treatment, in a bilateral sensorineural deafness model. In this model, delivery of a control GFP-only vector failed to restore neuron structure, with atrophied neurons indistinguishable from unimplanted cochleae. With BDNF therapy, the regenerated spiral ganglion neurites extended close to the cochlear implant electrodes, with localized ectopic branching. This neural remodeling enabled bipolar stimulation via the cochlear implant array, with low stimulus thresholds and expanded dynamic range of the cochlear nerve, determined via electrically evoked auditory brainstem responses. This development may broadly improve neural interfaces and extend molecular medicine applications.

  7. Application of peptide nucleic acid towards development of nanobiosensor arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ravindra P; Oh, Byung-Keun; Choi, Jeong-Woo

    2010-10-01

    Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) is the modified DNA or DNA analogue with a neutral peptide backbone instead of a negatively charged sugar phosphate. PNA exhibits chemical stability, resistant to enzymatic degradation inside living cell, recognizing specific sequences of nucleic acid, formation of stable hybrid complexes like PNA/DNA/PNA triplex, strand invasion, extraordinary thermal stability and ionic strength, and unique hybridization relative to nucleic acids. These unique physicobiochemical properties of PNA enable a new mode of detection, which is a faster and more reliable analytical process and finds applications in the molecular diagnostics and pharmaceutical fields. Besides, a variety of unique characteristic features, PNAs replace DNA as a probe for biomolecular tool in the molecular genetic diagnostics, cytogenetics, and various pharmaceutical potentials as well as for the development of sensors/arrays/chips and many more investigation purposes. This review paper discusses the various current aspects related with PNAs, making a new hot device in the commercial applications like nanobiosensor arrays.

  8. Modification of Microelectrode Arrays: New Microelectrochemical Devices for Sensor Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-08-22

    oxides. W03 is known to be such a redox active material and has been widely studied in connection with electrochromic display devices (Dautremont... devices . Quinone- Viologen Connected Microelectrodes: Use of an Electroactive Molecular Material With An Intrinsic pH Dependence. W03 is an example of an...REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Modification of Microelectrode Arrays: New Interim Technical Report Microelectrochemical Devices for Sensor Applications 6

  9. Applications of microlens-conditioned laser diode arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beach, R.J.; Emanuel, M.A.; Freitas, B.L. [and others

    1995-01-01

    The ability to condition the radiance of laser diodes using shaped-fiber cylindrical-microlens technology has dramatically increased the number of applications that can be practically engaged by diode laser arrays. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has actively pursued optical efficiency and engineering improvements in this technology in an effort to supply large radiance-conditioned laser diode array sources for its own internal programs. This effort has centered on the development of a modular integrated laser diode packaging technology with the goal of enabling the simple and flexible construction of high average power, high density, two-dimensional arrays with integrated cylindrical microlenses. Within LLNL, the principal applications of microlens-conditioned laser diode arrays are as high intensity pump sources for diode pumped solid state lasers (DPSSLs). A simple end-pumping architecture has been developed and demonstrated that allows the radiation from microlens-conditioned, two-dimensional diode array apertures to be efficiently delivered to the end of rod lasers. To date, pump powers as high as 2.5 kW have been delivered to 3 mm diameter laser rods. Such high power levels are critical for pumping solid state lasers in which the terminal laser level is a Stark level lying in the ground state manifold. Previously, such systems have often required operation of the solid state gain medium at low temperature to freeze out the terminal laser Stark level population. The authors recently developed high intensity pump sources overcome this difficulty by effectively pumping to much higher inversion levels, allowing efficient operation at or near room temperature. Because the end-pumping technology is scalable in absolute power, the number of rare-earth ions and transitions that can be effectively accessed for use in practical DPSSL systems has grown tremendously.

  10. Carbon Nanotube Arrays for Intracellular Delivery and Biological Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golshadi, Masoud

    Introducing nucleic acids into mammalian cells is a crucial step to elucidate biochemical pathways, modify gene expression in immortalized cells, primary cells, and stem cells, and intoduces new approaches for clinical diagnostics and therapeutics. Current gene transfer technologies, including lipofection, electroporation, and viral delivery, have enabled break-through advances in basic and translational science to enable derivation and programming of embryonic stem cells, advanced gene editing using CRISPR (Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats), and development of targeted anti-tumor therapy using chimeric antigen receptors in T-cells (CAR-T). Despite these successes, current transfection technologies are time consuming and limited by the inefficient introduction of test molecules into large populations of target cells, and the cytotoxicity of the techniques. Moreover, many cell types cannot be consistently transfected by lipofection or electroporation (stem cells, T-cells) and viral delivery has limitations to the size of experimental DNA that can be packaged. In this dissertation, a novel coverslip-like platform consisting of an array of aligned hollow carbon nanotubes (CNTs) embedded in a sacrificial template is developed that enhances gene transfer capabilities, including high efficiency, low toxicity, in an expanded range of target cells, with the potential to transfer mixed combinations of protein and nucleic acids. The CNT array devices are fabricated by a scalable template-based manufacturing method using commercially available membranes, eliminating the need for nano-assembly. High efficient transfection has been demonstrated by delivering various cargos (nanoparticles, dye and plasmid DNA) into populations of cells, achieving 85% efficiency of plasmid DNA delivery into immortalized cells. Moreover, the CNT-mediated transfection of stem cells shows 3 times higher efficiency compared to current lipofection methods. Evaluating the cell

  11. INDUCIBLE RNAi-MEDIATED GENE SILENCING USING NANOSTRUCTURED GENE DELIVERY ARRAYS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, David George James [ORNL; McKnight, Timothy E [ORNL; Mcpherson, Jackson [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Hoyt, Peter R [ORNL; Melechko, Anatoli Vasilievich [ORNL; Simpson, Michael L [ORNL; Sayler, Gary Steven [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    RNA interference has become a powerful biological tool over the last decade. In this study, a tetracycline-inducible shRNA vector system was designed for silencing CFP expression and delivered alongside the yfp marker gene into Chinese hamster ovary cells using impalefection on spatially indexed vertically aligned carbon nanofiber arrays (VACNFs). The VACNF architecture provided simultaneous delivery of multiple genes, subsequent adherence and proliferation of interfaced cells, and repeated monitoring of single cells over time. Following impalefection and tetracycline induction, 53.1% 10.4% of impalefected cells were fully silenced by the inducible CFP-silencing shRNA vector. Additionally, efficient CFP-silencing was observed in single cells among a population of cells that remained CFP-expressing. This effective transient expression system enables rapid analysis of gene silencing effects using RNAi in single cells and cell populations.

  12. Design of nested Halbach cylinder arrays for magnetic refrigeration applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trevizoli, Paulo V., E-mail: trevizoli@polo.ufsc.br; Lozano, Jaime A.; Peixer, Guilherme F.; Barbosa Jr, Jader R.

    2015-12-01

    We present an experimentally validated analytical procedure to design nested Halbach cylinder arrays for magnetic cooling applications. The procedure aims at maximizing the magnetic flux density variation in the core of the array for a given set of design parameters, namely the inner diameter of the internal magnet, the air gap between the magnet cylinders, the number of segments of each magnet and the remanent flux density of the Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B magnet grade. The design procedure was assisted and verified by 3-D numerical modeling using a commercial software package. An important aspect of the optimal design is to maintain an uniform axial distribution of the magnetic flux density in the region of the inner gap occupied by the active magnetocaloric regenerator. An optimal nested Halbach cylinder array was manufactured and experimentally evaluated for the magnetic flux density in the inner gap. The analytically calculated magnetic flux density variation agreed to within 5.6% with the experimental value for the center point of the magnet gap. - Highlights: • An analytical procedure to design nested Halbach cylinder arrays is proposed. • An optimal magnet configuration was built based on the analytical procedure. • The procedure was validated with 3D COMSOL simulations and experimental data.

  13. Analysis of Camera Arrays Applicable to the Internet of Things.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiachen; Xu, Ru; Lv, Zhihan; Song, Houbing

    2016-03-22

    The Internet of Things is built based on various sensors and networks. Sensors for stereo capture are essential for acquiring information and have been applied in different fields. In this paper, we focus on the camera modeling and analysis, which is very important for stereo display and helps with viewing. We model two kinds of cameras, a parallel and a converged one, and analyze the difference between them in vertical and horizontal parallax. Even though different kinds of camera arrays are used in various applications and analyzed in the research work, there are few discussions on the comparison of them. Therefore, we make a detailed analysis about their performance over different shooting distances. From our analysis, we find that the threshold of shooting distance for converged cameras is 7 m. In addition, we design a camera array in our work that can be used as a parallel camera array, as well as a converged camera array and take some images and videos with it to identify the threshold.

  14. Microfabricated Chemical Gas Sensors and Sensor Arrays for Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Gary W.

    2005-01-01

    Aerospace applications require the development of chemical sensors with capabilities beyond those of commercially available sensors. In particular, factors such as minimal sensor size, weight, and power consumption are particularly important. Development areas which have potential aerospace applications include launch vehicle leak detection, engine health monitoring, and fire detection. Sensor development for these applications is based on progress in three types of technology: 1) Micromachining and microfabrication (Microsystem) technology to fabricate miniaturized sensors; 2) The use of nanocrystalline materials to develop sensors with improved stability combined with higher sensitivity; 3) The development of high temperature semiconductors, especially silicon carbide. This presentation discusses the needs of space applications as well as the point-contact sensor technology and sensor arrays being developed to address these needs. Sensors to measure hydrogen, hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides (NO,), carbon monoxide, oxygen, and carbon dioxide are being developed as well as arrays for leak, fire, and emissions detection. Demonstrations of the technology will also be discussed. It is concluded that microfabricated sensor technology has significant potential for use in a range of aerospace applications.

  15. Genome Fusion Detection: a novel method to detect fusion genes from SNP-array data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieme, Sebastian; Groth, Philip

    2013-03-15

    Fusion genes result from genomic rearrangements, such as deletions, amplifications and translocations. Such rearrangements can also frequently be observed in cancer and have been postulated as driving event in cancer development. to detect them, one needs to analyze the transition region of two segments with different copy number, the location where fusions are known to occur. Finding fusion genes is essential to understanding cancer development and may lead to new therapeutic approaches. Here we present a novel method, the Genomic Fusion Detection algorithm, to predict fusion genes on a genomic level based on SNP-array data. This algorithm detects genes at the transition region of segments with copy number variation. With the application of defined constraints, certain properties of the detected genes are evaluated to predict whether they may be fused. We evaluated our prediction by calculating the observed frequency of known fusions in both primary cancers and cell lines. We tested a set of cell lines positive for the BCR-ABL1 fusion and prostate cancers positive for the TMPRSS2-ERG fusion. We could detect the fusions in all positive cell lines, but not in the negative controls.

  16. Dual-Polarized Planar Phased Array Analysis for Meteorological Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Pang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a theoretical analysis for the accuracy requirements of the planar polarimetric phased array radar (PPPAR in meteorological applications. Among many factors that contribute to the polarimetric biases, four factors are considered and analyzed in this study, namely, the polarization distortion due to the intrinsic limitation of a dual-polarized antenna element, the antenna pattern measurement error, the entire array patterns, and the imperfect horizontal and vertical channels. Two operation modes, the alternately transmitting and simultaneously receiving (ATSR mode and the simultaneously transmitting and simultaneously receiving (STSR mode, are discussed. For each mode, the polarimetric biases are formulated. As the STSR mode with orthogonal waveforms is similar to the ATSR mode, the analysis is mainly focused on the ATSR mode and the impacts of the bias sources on the measurement of polarimetric variables are investigated through Monte Carlo simulations. Some insights of the accuracy requirements are obtained and summarized.

  17. Simulation Application for Optimization of Solar Collector Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Shesho*,

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Solar systems offer a comparatively low output density , so increasing the output always means a corresponding increase in the size of the collector area. Thus collector arrays are occasionally constructed (i.e. with different azimuth angles and/or slopes, which be imposed by the location and structure available to mount the collector. In this paper is developed simulation application for optimization for the solar collector array position and number of collectors in regard of maximum annual energy gain and thermal efficiency. It is analyzed solar collector array which has parallel and serial connected solar collectors with different tilt, orientation and thermal characteristics. Measurements are performed for determine the thermal performance of the system. Using the programming language INSEL it is developed simulation program for the analyzed system where optimization is done through parametric runs in the simulation program. Accent is given on the SE orientated collectors regarding their tilt and number, comparing two solutions-scenarios and the current system set situation of the in means of efficiency and total annual energy gain. The first scenario envisages a change of angle from 35 to 25 solar panels on the SE orientation, while the second scenario envisages retaining the existing angle of 35 and adding additional solar collector. Scenario 1 accounts for more than 13% energy gain on annual basis while Scenario 2 has 2% bigger thermal efficiency.

  18. Application of cooled IR focal plane arrays in thermographic cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollheim, B.; Gaertner, M.; Dammass, G.; Krausz, M.

    2016-05-01

    The usage of cooled IR Focal Plane Array detectors in thermographic or radiometric thermal imaging cameras, respectively, leads to special demands on these detectors, which are discussed in this paper. For a radiometric calibration of wide temperature measuring ranges from -40 up to 2,000 °C, a linear and time-stable response of the photodiode array has to be ensured for low as well as high radiation intensities. The maximum detectable photon flux is limited by the allowed shift of the photodiode's bias that should remain in the linear part of the photodiode's I(V) curve even for the highest photocurrent. This limits the measurable highest object temperature in practice earlier than the minimum possible integration time. Higher temperature measuring ranges are realized by means of neutral or spectral filters. Defense and Security applications normally provide images at the given ambient temperature with small hot spots. The usage of radiometric thermal imagers for thermography often feature larger objects with a high temperature contrast to the background. This should not generate artifacts in the image, like pixel patterns or stripes. Further issues concern the clock regime or the sub-frame capabilities of the Read-Out-Circuit and the frame rate dependency of the signal. We will briefly describe the demands on the lens design for thermal imaging cameras when using cooled IR Focal Plane Array detectors with large apertures.

  19. Recovery and evolutionary analysis of complete integron gene cassette arrays from Vibrio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillings Michael R

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Integrons are genetic elements capable of the acquisition, rearrangement and expression of genes contained in gene cassettes. Gene cassettes generally consist of a promoterless gene associated with a recombination site known as a 59-base element (59-be. Multiple insertion events can lead to the assembly of large integron-associated cassette arrays. The most striking examples are found in Vibrio, where such cassette arrays are widespread and can range from 30 kb to 150 kb. Besides those found in completely sequenced genomes, no such array has yet been recovered in its entirety. We describe an approach to systematically isolate, sequence and annotate large integron gene cassette arrays from bacterial strains. Results The complete Vibrio sp. DAT722 integron cassette array was determined through the streamlined approach described here. To place it in an evolutionary context, we compare the DAT722 array to known vibrio arrays and performed phylogenetic analyses for all of its components (integrase, 59-be sites, gene cassette encoded genes. It differs extensively in terms of genomic context as well as gene cassette content and organization. The phylogenetic tree of the 59-be sites collectively found in the Vibrio gene cassette pool suggests frequent transfer of cassettes within and between Vibrio species, with slower transfer rates between more phylogenetically distant relatives. We also identify multiple cases where non-integron chromosomal genes seem to have been assembled into gene cassettes and others where cassettes have been inserted into chromosomal locations outside integrons. Conclusion Our systematic approach greatly facilitates the isolation and annotation of large integrons gene cassette arrays. Comparative analysis of the Vibrio sp. DAT722 integron obtained through this approach to those found in other vibrios confirms the role of this genetic element in promoting lateral gene transfer and suggests a high rate of gene

  20. Identification of SNP-containing regulatory motifs in the myelodysplastic syndromes model using SNP arrays and gene expression arrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Fan; Jennifer G.Dy; Chung-Che Chang; Xiaobo Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes have increased in frequency and incidence in the American population,but patient prognosis has not significantly improved over the last decade.Such improvements could be realized if biomarkers for accurate diagnosis and prognostic stratification were successfully identified.In this study,we propose a method that associates two state-of-the-art array technologies-single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array and gene expression array-with gene motifs considered transcription factor-binding sites (TFBS).We are particularly interested in SNP-containing motifs introduced by genetic variation and mutation as TFBS.The potential regulation of SNP-containing motifs affects only when certain mutations occur.These motifs can be identified from a group of co-expressed genes with copy number variation.Then,we used a sliding window to identify motif candidates near SNPs on gene sequences.The candidates were filtered by coarse thresholding and fine statistical testing.Using the regression-based LARS-EN algorithm and a level-wise sequence combination procedure,we identified 28 SNP-containing motifs as candidate TFBS.We confirmed 21 of the 28 motifs with ChIP-chip fragments in the TRANSFAC database.Another six motifs were validated by TRANSFAC via searching binding fragments on coregulated genes.The identified motifs and their location genes can be considered potential biomarkers for myelodysplastic syndromes.Thus,our proposed method,a novel strategy for associating two data categories,is capable of integrating information from different sources to identify reliable candidate regulatory SNP-containing motifs introduced by genetic variation and mutation.

  1. Evaluating methods for ranking differentially expressed genes applied to microArray quality control data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimizu Kentaro

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Statistical methods for ranking differentially expressed genes (DEGs from gene expression data should be evaluated with regard to high sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility. In our previous studies, we evaluated eight gene ranking methods applied to only Affymetrix GeneChip data. A more general evaluation that also includes other microarray platforms, such as the Agilent or Illumina systems, is desirable for determining which methods are suitable for each platform and which method has better inter-platform reproducibility. Results We compared the eight gene ranking methods using the MicroArray Quality Control (MAQC datasets produced by five manufacturers: Affymetrix, Applied Biosystems, Agilent, GE Healthcare, and Illumina. The area under the curve (AUC was used as a measure for both sensitivity and specificity. Although the highest AUC values can vary with the definition of "true" DEGs, the best methods were, in most cases, either the weighted average difference (WAD, rank products (RP, or intensity-based moderated t statistic (ibmT. The percentages of overlapping genes (POGs across different test sites were mainly evaluated as a measure for both intra- and inter-platform reproducibility. The POG values for WAD were the highest overall, irrespective of the choice of microarray platform. The high intra- and inter-platform reproducibility of WAD was also observed at a higher biological function level. Conclusion These results for the five microarray platforms were consistent with our previous ones based on 36 real experimental datasets measured using the Affymetrix platform. Thus, recommendations made using the MAQC benchmark data might be universally applicable.

  2. Low Average Sidelobe Slot Array Antennas for Radiometer Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rengarajan, Sembiam; Zawardzki, Mark S.; Hodges, Richard E.

    2012-01-01

    In radiometer applications, it is required to design antennas that meet low average sidelobe levels and low average return loss over a specified frequency bandwidth. It is a challenge to meet such specifications over a frequency range when one uses resonant elements such as waveguide feed slots. In addition to their inherent narrow frequency band performance, the problem is exacerbated due to modeling errors and manufacturing tolerances. There was a need to develop a design methodology to solve the problem. An iterative design procedure was developed by starting with an array architecture, lattice spacing, aperture distribution, waveguide dimensions, etc. The array was designed using Elliott s technique with appropriate values of the total slot conductance in each radiating waveguide, and the total resistance in each feed waveguide. Subsequently, the array performance was analyzed by the full wave method of moments solution to the pertinent integral equations. Monte Carlo simulations were also carried out to account for amplitude and phase errors introduced for the aperture distribution due to modeling errors as well as manufacturing tolerances. If the design margins for the average sidelobe level and the average return loss were not adequate, array architecture, lattice spacing, aperture distribution, and waveguide dimensions were varied in subsequent iterations. Once the design margins were found to be adequate, the iteration was stopped and a good design was achieved. A symmetric array architecture was found to meet the design specification with adequate margin. The specifications were near 40 dB for angular regions beyond 30 degrees from broadside. Separable Taylor distribution with nbar=4 and 35 dB sidelobe specification was chosen for each principal plane. A non-separable distribution obtained by the genetic algorithm was found to have similar characteristics. The element spacing was obtained to provide the required beamwidth and close to a null in the E

  3. Liver steatosis study_PFAA treated mouse gene array data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This file contains a link for Gene Expression Omnibus and the GSE designations for the publicly available gene expression data used in the study and reflected in...

  4. Identification of brassinosteroid responsive genes in Arabidopsis by cDNA array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡玉欣; 汪政科; 王永红; 包方; 李凝; 彭镇华; 李家洋

    2001-01-01

    We have systematically monitored brassinosteroid (BR) responsive genes in a BR-deficient mutant det2 suspension culture of Arabidopsis by using a cDNA array approach. Among 13000 cDNA clones arrayed on filters, 53 BR responsive clones were identified and designated BRR1-BRR53. Sequence analysis of 43 clones showed that 19 clones are novel genes, 3 clones are genes involved in the control of cell division, 4 clones are genes related to plant stress responses, 4 clones are transcriptional factor or signal transduction component genes, and 3 clones are genes involved in RNA splicing or structure forming. In addition, we also found that BR regulated the transcription of genes related to many physiological processes, such as photoreaction, ion transportation and some metabolic processes. These findings present molecular evidence that BR plays an essential role in plant growth and development.

  5. Mapping of bionic array electric field focusing in plasmid DNA-based gene electrotransfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, C J; Pinyon, J L; Housley, D M; Crawford, E N; Lovell, N H; Klugmann, M; Housley, G D

    2016-04-01

    Molecular medicine through gene therapy is challenged to achieve targeted action. This is now possible utilizing bionic electrode arrays for focal delivery of naked (plasmid) DNA via gene electrotransfer. Here, we establish the properties of array-based electroporation affecting targeted gene delivery. An array with eight 300 μm platinum ring electrodes configured as a cochlear implant bionic interface was used to transduce HEK293 cell monolayers with a plasmid-DNA green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene construct. Electroporation parameters were pulse intensity, number, duration, separation and electrode configuration. The latter determined the shape of the electric fields, which were mapped using a voltage probe. Electrode array-based electroporation was found to require ~100 × lower applied voltages for cell transduction than conventional electroporation. This was found to be due to compression of the field lines orthogonal to the array. A circular area of GFP-positive cells was created when the electrodes were ganged together as four adjacent anodes and four cathodes, whereas alternating electrode polarity created a linear area of GFP-positive cells. The refinement of gene delivery parameters was validated in vivo in the guinea pig cochlea. These findings have significant clinical ramifications, where spatiotemporal control of gene expression can be predicted by manipulation of the electric field via current steering at a cellular level.

  6. Applications of the theory of Gr?bner bases to the study of linear recurring arrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This is a small survey of applications of the theory of Gr?bner bases to the study of linear recurring arrays. It applies some properties of Gr?bner bases to studying linear recurring arrays and contains recent new results on linear recurring arrays.

  7. Significance of RNA reference in tumour-related gene expression analyses by cDNA array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laytragoon-Lewin, Nongnit; Lagerlund, Magnus; Lundgren, Jan; Nordlander, Britt; Elmberger, Göran; Södergren, Towe; Lagerros, Christofer; Rutqvist, Lars Erik; Lewin, Freddi

    2005-01-01

    The cDNA array technique is an efficient approach for studying the expression of a large number of genes in a single experiment. The cDNA array analysis indicates the relative level of corresponding gene expression from a specimen and a reference. Our investigation was performed to address the significance of reference RNA on the outcome of the cancer-related gene expression profile obtained from cDNA array analysis. Human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) biopsies and 5 sources of RNA reference were used for this purpose. In these biopsies, each individual patient expressed a unique set of genes both in normal and tumour tissue. It is important to note that 5 striking patterns of tumour-related gene expression were obtained according to the 5 references used. Significant differences in 60%, 16%, 15% and 15% of the genes expressed were shown when autologous normal matched tissue biopsy references were compared to pooled cell lines, allogenic normal mixed cell types, tumours or allogenic normal matched cell type references, respectively. Thus, theoretically and our study suggested that patient autologous normal cells matching with the tumour type should be the most suitable reference in cDNA array for the identification of individual tumour gene profiles with clinical purpose.

  8. Streptococcus pneumoniae Supragenome Hybridization Arrays for Profiling of Genetic Content and Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadam, Anagha; Janto, Benjamin; Eutsey, Rory; Earl, Joshua P; Powell, Evan; Dahlgren, Margaret E; Hu, Fen Z; Ehrlich, Garth D; Hiller, N Luisa

    2015-02-02

    There is extensive genomic diversity among Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates. Approximately half of the comprehensive set of genes in the species (the supragenome or pangenome) is present in all the isolates (core set), and the remaining is unevenly distributed among strains (distributed set). The Streptococcus pneumoniae Supragenome Hybridization (SpSGH) array provides coverage for an extensive set of genes and polymorphisms encountered within this species, capturing this genomic diversity. Further, the capture is quantitative. In this manner, the SpSGH array allows for both genomic and transcriptomic analyses of diverse S. pneumoniae isolates on a single platform. In this unit, we present the SpSGH array, and describe in detail its design and implementation for both genomic and transcriptomic analyses. The methodology can be applied to construction and modification of SpSGH array platforms, as well to other bacterial species as long as multiple whole-genome sequences are available that collectively capture the vast majority of the species supragenome.

  9. Acoustic Eaton lens array and its fluid application

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Sang-Hoon; Das, Mukunda P

    2016-01-01

    A principle of an acoustic Eaton Lens array and its application as a removable tsunami wall is proposed theoretically. The lenses are made of expandable rubber balloons and create a stop-band by the rotating the incoming tsunami wave and reduce the pressure by canceling each other. The diameter of each lens is larger than the wavelength of the tsunami near the coast, that is, order of a kilometer. The impedance matching on the border of the lenses results in little reflection. Before a tsunami, the balloons are buried underground in shallow water near the coast in folded or rounded form. Upon sounding of the tsunami alarm, water and air are pumped into the balloons, which expand and erect the wall above the sea level within a few hours. After the tsunami, the water and air are released from the balloons, which are then buried underground for reuse. Electricity is used to power the entire process.

  10. Active microelectronic array system for DNA hybridization, genotyping and pharmacogenomic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosnowski, Ron; Heller, Michael J; Tu, Eugene; Forster, Anita H; Radtkey, Ray

    2002-12-01

    Microelectronic arrays have been developed for DNA hybridization analysis of point mutations, single nucleotide polymorphisms, short tandem repeats and gene expression. In addition to a variety of molecular biology and genomic research applications, such devices will also be used for infectious disease detection, genetic and cancer diagnostics, and pharmacogenomic applications. These microelectronic array devices are able to produce defined electric fields on their surfaces that allow charged molecules and other entities to be transported to or from any test site or micro-location on the planar surface of the device. These molecules and entities include DNA, RNA, proteins, enzymes, antibodies and cells. Electronic-based molecule addressing and hybridization can then be carried out, where the electric field is now used to greatly accelerate the hybridization reactions that occur on the selected test sites. When reversed, the electric field can be used to provide an additional parameter for improved hybridization. Special low-conductance buffers have been developed that provide for the rapid transport of the DNA molecules and facilitate the electronic hybridization reactions under conditions that do not support hybridization. Important to the device function is the permeation layer that overcoats the underlying microelectrodes. Generally composed of a porous hydrogel material impregnated with attachment chemistry, this permeation layer prevents the destruction of analytes at the active microelectrode surface, ameliorates the adverse effects of electrolysis products on the sensitive hybridization and affinity reactions, and serves as a support structure for attaching DNA probes and other molecules to the array. The microelectronic chip or array device is incorporated into a cartridge package (NanoChip trade mark cartridge) that provides the electronic, optical, and fluidic interfacing. A complete instrument system (NanoChip trade mark Molecular Biology Workstation

  11. Application of multiplicative array techniques for multibeam sounder systems

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakraborty, B.

    Multiplicative array processing is well known for its narrow beamwidth and low sidelobe level, but the array gain is quite low. The effectiveness of such a system becomes lower, especially when the signal to noise ratio is low. Proposed some...

  12. Use of tiling array data and RNA secondary structure predictions to identify noncoding RNA genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weile, Christian; Gardner, Paul P; Hedegaard, Mads M

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Within the last decade a large number of noncoding RNA genes have been identified, but this may only be the tip of the iceberg. Using comparative genomics a large number of sequences that have signals concordant with conserved RNA secondary structures have been discovered in the human...... genome. Moreover, genome wide transcription profiling with tiling arrays indicate that the majority of the genome is transcribed. RESULTS: We have combined tiling array data with genome wide structural RNA predictions to search for novel noncoding and structural RNA genes that are expressed in the human...... of 3 of the hairpin structures and 3 out of 9 high covariance structures in SK-N-AS cells. CONCLUSION: Our results demonstrate that many human noncoding, structured and conserved RNA genes remain to be discovered and that tissue specific tiling array data can be used in combination with computational...

  13. Breast Carcinoma Cells in Primary Tumors and Effusions Have Different Gene Array Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophya Konstantinovsky

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The detection of breast carcinoma cells in effusions is associated with rapidly fatal outcome, but these cells are poorly characterized at the molecular level. This study compared the gene array signatures of breast carcinoma cells in primary carcinomas and effusions. The genetic signature of 10 primary tumors and 10 effusions was analyzed using the Array-Ready Oligo set for the Human Genome platform. Results for selected genes were validated using PCR, Western blotting, and immunohistochemistry. Array analysis identified 255 significantly downregulated and 96 upregulated genes in the effusion samples. The majority of differentially expressed genes were part of pathways involved in focal adhesion, extracellular matrix-cell interaction, and the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. Genes that were upregulated in effusions included KRT8, BCAR1, CLDN4, VIL2, while DCN, CLDN19, ITGA7, and ITGA5 were downregulated at this anatomic site. PCR, Western blotting, and immunohistochemistry confirmed the array findings for BCAR1, CLDN4, VIL2, and DCN. Our data show that breast carcinoma cells in primary carcinomas and effusions have different gene expression signatures, and differentially express a large number of molecules related to adhesion, motility, and metastasis. These differences may have a critical role in designing therapy and in prognostication for patients with metastatic disease localized to the serosal cavities.

  14. GENE EXPRESSION PROFILING OF GANGLIOGLIOMA MALIGNANT PROGRESSION BY cDNA ARRAY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Quan-bin; HUANG Qiang; DONG Jun; WANG Ai-dong; SUN Ji-yong; LAN Qing; HU Geng-xi

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To establish gene expression profiles associated with malignant progression of ganglioglioma. Methods: The primary and two recurrent glioma specimens were collected intraoperatively from the same patient who experienced tumor transformation into anaplastic astrocytoma and glioblastoma multiform for the first and second recurrence respectively. Gene expression was assayed through cDNA array and bioinformatics analysis. Results: A total of 197 differentially expressed genes with differential ratio value more than 3 compared with normal brain tissue were obtained. Among 109 functionally denned genes, those associated with development ranked the first by frequency, followed by genes associated with metabolism, differentiation, signal transduction and so on. As a result of cluster analysis among 368 genes, eleven genes were up regulated with malignant progression, while six genes were down regulated. Conclusion: Gene expression profiles associated with malignant progression of glioma were successfully established, which provides a powerful tool for research on molecular mechanisms of malignant progression of gliomas.

  15. Biconical Ring Antenna Array for Wide Band Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.SUBBA RAO

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Circular or ring arrays are conformal to the cylindrical surfaces unlike the linear arrays and can be mounted on moving objects. Biconical antenna is simple in construction and exhibits broad band characteristics. This antenna presents broad band radiation characteristics. In this paper circular or ring array of biconical antenna is proposed and its characteristics are analyzed for frequency band of 0.1 to 1GHz range. Radiation characteristicsof the array with excitation phase change are presented. Simulated results of the radiation characteristics of the circular array are analyzed.

  16. Start Up Application Concerns with Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Richard B.

    1999-01-01

    This note is being published to improve the visibility of this subject, as we continue to see problems surface in designs, as well as to add additional information to the previously published note for design engineers. The original application note focused on designing systems with no single point failures using Actel Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) for critical applications. Included in that note were the basic principles of operation of the Actel FPGA and a discussion of potential single-point failures. The note also discussed the issue of startup transients for that class of device. It is unfortunate that we continue to see some design problems using these devices. This note will focus on the startup properties of certain electronic components, in general, and current Actel FPGAs, in particular. Devices that are "power-on friendly" are currently being developed by Actel, as a variant of the new SX series of FPGAs. In the ideal world, electronic components would behave much differently than they do in the real world, The chain, of course, starts with the power supply. Ideally, the voltage will immediately rise to a stable V(sub cc) level, of course, it does not. Aside from practical design considerations, inrush current limits of certain capacitors must be observed and the power supply's output may be intentionally slew rate limited to prevent a large current spike on the system power bus. In any event, power supply rise time may range from less than I msec to 100 msec or more.

  17. Cloning chromosome specific genes by reciprocal probing of arrayed cDNA and cosmid libraries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yazdani, A.; Lee, C.C.; Wehnert, M. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    A human gene map will greatly facilitate the association of genes to single locus diseases and provide candidates for genes involved in complex genetic traits. Given the estimated 100,000 human genes an integrated strategy with a high throughput approach for isolation and mapping of expressed sequences is needed to create such a gene map. We have developed an approach that allows high throughput gene isolation and mapping using arrayed genomic and cDNA lambda libraries. Reciprocal probing of the arrayed genomic and cDNA cosmic libraries can rapidly establish cDNA-cosmid associations. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) chromosomal mapping and expressed sequence tag/sequence tag site (EST/STS) primers generated from DNA sequence of PCR-based mapping using somatic hybrid cell line mapping panels were utilized to characterize further the hybridization-based cDNA cosmid association. We have applied this approach to chromosome 17 using a placental cDNA library and have identified a total of 30 genes out of which 11 are novel. Furthermore seven cDNAs were mapped to 17q21 in this study, providing novel candidate genes for BRCA-1 gene for early onset breast cancer. The results of our study clearly show that an integration of an expression map into physical and genetic maps can provide candidate genes for human diseases that have been mapped to specific regions. This approach combined with the current physical mapping efforts could efficiently provide a detailed human gene map.

  18. Analyzing the gene expression profile of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia with real-time PCR arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Fang Tao

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Real-time PCR Array System is the ideal tool for analyzing the expression of a focused panel of genes. In this study, we will analyze the gene expression profile of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia with real-time PCR arrays. Methods Real-time PCR array was designed and tested firstly. Then gene expression profile of 11 pediatric AML and 10 normal controls was analyzed with real-time PCR arrays. We analyzed the expression data with MEV (Multi Experiment View cluster software. Datasets representing genes with altered expression profile derived from cluster analyses were imported into the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis Tool. Results We designed and tested 88 real-time PCR primer pairs for a quantitative gene expression analysis of key genes involved in pediatric AML. The gene expression profile of pediatric AML is significantly different from normal control; there are 19 genes up-regulated and 25 genes down-regulated in pediatric AML. To investigate possible biological interactions of differently regulated genes, datasets representing genes with altered expression profile were imported into the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis Tool. The results revealed 12 significant networks. Of these networks, Cellular Development, Cellular Growth and Proliferation, Tumor Morphology was the highest rated network with 36 focus molecules and the significance score of 41. The IPA analysis also groups the differentially expressed genes into biological mechanisms that are related to hematological disease, cell death, cell growth and hematological system development. In the top canonical pathways, p53 and Huntington’s disease signaling came out to be the top two most significant pathways with a p value of 1.5E-8 and2.95E-7, respectively. Conclusions The present study demonstrates the gene expression profile of pediatric AML is significantly different from normal control; there are 19 genes up-regulated and 25 genes down-regulated in pediatric AML. We

  19. Refinement of light-responsive transcript lists using rice oligonucleotide arrays: evaluation of gene-redundancy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki-Hong Jung

    Full Text Available Studies of gene function are often hampered by gene-redundancy, especially in organisms with large genomes such as rice (Oryza sativa. We present an approach for using transcriptomics data to focus functional studies and address redundancy. To this end, we have constructed and validated an inexpensive and publicly available rice oligonucleotide near-whole genome array, called the rice NSF45K array. We generated expression profiles for light- vs. dark-grown rice leaf tissue and validated the biological significance of the data by analyzing sources of variation and confirming expression trends with reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. We examined trends in the data by evaluating enrichment of gene ontology terms at multiple false discovery rate thresholds. To compare data generated with the NSF45K array with published results, we developed publicly available, web-based tools (www.ricearray.org. The Oligo and EST Anatomy Viewer enables visualization of EST-based expression profiling data for all genes on the array. The Rice Multi-platform Microarray Search Tool facilitates comparison of gene expression profiles across multiple rice microarray platforms. Finally, we incorporated gene expression and biochemical pathway data to reduce the number of candidate gene products putatively participating in the eight steps of the photorespiration pathway from 52 to 10, based on expression levels of putatively functionally redundant genes. We confirmed the efficacy of this method to cope with redundancy by correctly predicting participation in photorespiration of a gene with five paralogs. Applying these methods will accelerate rice functional genomics.

  20. Obtaining Relevant Genes by Analysis of Expression Arrays with a Multi-Agent System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso GONZÁLEZ

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC is an aggressive form of breast cancer. Despite treatment with chemotherapy, relapses are frequent and response to these treatments is not the same in younger women as in older women. Therefore, the identification of genes that provoke this disease is required, as well as the identification of therapeutic targets.There are currently different hybridization techniques, such as expression ar-rays, which measure the signal expression of both the genomic and tran-scriptomic levels of thousands of genes of a given sample. Probesets of Gene 1.0 ST GeneChip arrays provide the ultimate genome transcript coverage, providing a measurement of the expression level of the sample.This paper proposes a multi-agent system to manage information of expres-sion arrays, with the goal of providing an intuitive system that is also extensible to analyze and interpret the results.The roles of agent integrate different types of techniques, from statistical and data mining techniques that select a set of genes, to search techniques that find pathways in which such genes participate, and information extraction techniques that apply a CBR system to check if these genes are involved in the disease.

  1. An Efficient Beam Steerable Antenna Array Concept for Airborne Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Aliakbarian, H.; Van der Westhuizen, E.; Wiid, R.; Volskiy, V.; R. Wolhuter; G. A. E. Vandenbosch

    2014-01-01

    Deployment of a satellite borne, steerable antenna array with higher directivity and gain in Low Earth Orbit makes sense to reduce ground station complexity and cost, while still maintaining a reasonable link budget. The implementation comprises a digitally beam steerable phased array antenna integrated with a complete system, comprising the antenna, hosting platform, ground station, and aircraft based satellite emulator to facilitate convenient aircraft based testing of the antenna array and...

  2. Phased array antenna element for automotive radar application

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis work, a design of reliable antenna front-end for W band automotive radar is studied and the problems and considerations associated with phased array antenna design at W-band are addressed. Proposed phased array antenna consists of on chip patch antenna which has the advantages of being integrated by the active circuitry. A sample of patch antenna and patch array are designed and fabricated to be tested for their functionality. Printing antenna on Silicon substrate is a compact ...

  3. Application of conformal map theory for design of 2-D ultrasonic array structure for NDT imaging application: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadas, Sivaram N; Jackson, Joseph C; Dziewierz, Jerzy; O'Leary, Richard; Gachagan, Anthony

    2014-03-01

    Two-dimensional ultrasonic phased arrays are becoming increasingly popular in nondestructive evaluation (NDE). Sparse array element configurations are required to fully exploit the potential benefits of 2-D phased arrays. This paper applies the conformal mapping technique as a means of designing sparse 2-D array layouts for NDE applications. Modeling using both Huygens' field prediction theory and 2-D fast Fourier transformation is employed to study the resulting new structure. A conformal power map was used that, for fixed beam width, was shown in simulations to have a greater contrast than rectangular or random arrays. A prototype aperiodic 2-D array configuration for direct contact operation in steel, with operational frequency ~3 MHz, was designed using the array design principle described in this paper. Experimental results demonstrate a working sparse-array transducer capable of performing volumetric imaging.

  4. Ranking: a closer look on globalisation methods for normalisation of gene expression arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, Torsten C.; Wölfl, Stefan

    2002-01-01

    Data from gene expression arrays are influenced by many experimental parameters that lead to variations not simply accessible by standard quantification methods. To compare measurements from gene expression array experiments, quantitative data are commonly normalised using reference genes or global normalisation methods based on mean or median values. These methods are based on the assumption that (i) selected reference genes are expressed at a standard level in all experiments or (ii) that mean or median signal of expression will give a quantitative reference for each individual experiment. We introduce here a new ranking diagram, with which we can show how the different normalisation methods compare, and how they are influenced by variations in measurements (noise) that occur in every experiment. Furthermore, we show that an upper trimmed mean provides a simple and robust method for normalisation of larger sets of experiments by comparative analysis. PMID:12034851

  5. A new method of preparing fiber-optic DNA biosensor and its array for gene detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A new method of preparing fiber-optic DNA biosensor and its arrayfor the simultaneous detection of multiple genes is described. The optical fibers were first treated with poly-l-lysine, and then were made into fiber-optic DNA biosensors by adsorbing and immobilizing the oligonucleotide probe on its end. By assembling the fiber-optic DNA biosensors in a bundle in which each fiber carried a different DNA probe, the fiber-optic DNA biosensor array was well prepared. Hybridization of fluorescent- labeled cDNA of p53 gene, N-ras gene and Rb1 gene to the DNA array was monitored by CCD camera. A good result was achieved.

  6. A systemic lupus erythematosus gene expression array in disease diagnosis and classification: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juang, Y-T; Peoples, C; Kafri, R; Kyttaris, V C; Sunahori, K; Kis-Toth, K; Fitzgerald, L; Ergin, S; Finnell, M; Tsokos, G C

    2011-03-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a clinically heterogeneous disease diagnosed on the presence of a constellation of clinical and laboratory findings. At the pathogenetic level, multiple factors using diverse biochemical and molecular pathways have been recognized. Succinct recognition and classification of clinical disease subsets, as well as the availability of disease biomarkers, remains largely unsolved. Based on information produced by the present authors' and other laboratories, a lupus gene expression array consisting of 30 genes, previously claimed to contribute to aberrant function of T cells, was developed. An additional eight genes were included as controls. Peripheral blood was obtained from 10 patients (19 samples) with SLE and six patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) as well as 19 healthy controls. T cell mRNA was subjected to reverse transcription and PCR, and the gene expression levels were measured. Conventional statistical analysis was performed along with principal component analysis (PCA) to capture the contribution of all genes to disease diagnosis and clinical parameters. The lupus gene expression array faithfully informed on the expression levels of genes. The recorded changes in expression reflect those reported in the literature by using a relatively small (5 ml) amount of peripheral blood. PCA of gene expression levels placed SLE samples apart from normal and RA samples regardless of disease activity. Individual principal components tended to define specific disease manifestations such as arthritis and proteinuria. Thus, a lupus gene expression array based on genes previously claimed to contribute to immune pathogenesis of SLE may define the disease, and principal components of the expression of 30 genes may define patients with specific disease manifestations.

  7. Acoustic Eaton lens array and its fluid application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Hoon; Sy, Pham-Van; Das, Mukunda P.

    2017-03-01

    A principle of an acoustic Eaton lens array and its application as a removable tsunami wall is proposed theoretically. The lenses are made of expandable rubber pillars or balloons and create a stop-band by rotating the incoming tsunami wave and reduce the pressure by canceling each other. The diameter of each lens is larger than the wavelength of the tsunami near the coast, that is, order of a kilometer. The impedance matching on the border of the lenses results in a little reflection. Before a tsunami, the balloons are buried underground in shallow water near the coast in folded or rounded form. Upon sounding of the tsunami alarm, water and air are pumped into the pillars, which expand and erect the wall above the sea level within a few hours. After the tsunami, the water and air are released from the pillars, which are then buried underground for reuse. Electricity is used to power the entire process. A numerical simulation with a linear tsunami model was carried out.

  8. Field Emitter Arrays for a Free Electron Laser Application

    CERN Document Server

    Shing-Bruce-Li, Kevin; Ganter, Romain; Gobrecht, Jens; Raguin, Jean Yves; Rivkin, Leonid; Wrulich, Albin F

    2004-01-01

    The development of a new electron gun with the lowest possible emittance would help reducing the total length and cost of a free electron laser. Field emitter arrays (FEAs) are an attractive technology for electron sources of ultra high brightness. Indeed, several thousands of microscopic tips can be deposited on a 1 mm diameter area. Electrons are then extracted by applying voltage to a first grid layer close to the tip apexes, the so called gate layer, and focused by a second grid layer one micrometer above the tips. The typical aperture diameter of the gate and the focusing layer is in the range of one micrometer. One challenge for such cathodes is to produce peak currents in the ampere range since the usual applications of FEAs require less than milliampere. Encouraging peak current performances have been obtained by applying voltage pulses at low frequency between gate and tips. In this paper we report on different tip materials available on the market: diamond FEAs from Extreme Devices Inc., ZrC single ...

  9. Theory and applications of spherical microphone array processing

    CERN Document Server

    Jarrett, Daniel P; Naylor, Patrick A

    2017-01-01

    This book presents the signal processing algorithms that have been developed to process the signals acquired by a spherical microphone array. Spherical microphone arrays can be used to capture the sound field in three dimensions and have received significant interest from researchers and audio engineers. Algorithms for spherical array processing are different to corresponding algorithms already known in the literature of linear and planar arrays because the spherical geometry can be exploited to great beneficial effect. The authors aim to advance the field of spherical array processing by helping those new to the field to study it efficiently and from a single source, as well as by offering a way for more experienced researchers and engineers to consolidate their understanding, adding either or both of breadth and depth. The level of the presentation corresponds to graduate studies at MSc and PhD level. This book begins with a presentation of some of the essential mathematical and physical theory relevant to ...

  10. Analysis of Cylindrical Dipole Arrays for Smart Antenna Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAOXiangyu; GAOJun; K.M.Luk; LIANGChanghong

    2005-01-01

    A locally Conformal finite difference time domain (CFDTD) algorithm is studied and applied to model the radiation pattern of a linear dipole arrays mounted on a finite solid conducting cylinder. The numerical result shows that is in good agreement with the moment methods. Finally, the algorithm is applied to study smart antenna used in base station antenna. Several linear arrays mounted with uniform distribution on the cylinder are analyzed. The effects of the number of linear arrays on producing reasonably omnidirectional radiation pattern in the horizontal plane are investigated. It is shown that eight column dipole arrays may be a good choice for economical and practical considerations, and the omnidirection radiation characteristic can be better if the distance from the array axis to the cylinder surface is reduced.

  11. HuMiChip: Development of a Functional Gene Array for the Study of Human Microbiomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tu, Q.; Deng, Ye; Lin, Lu; Hemme, Chris L.; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-05-17

    Microbiomes play very important roles in terms of nutrition, health and disease by interacting with their hosts. Based on sequence data currently available in public domains, we have developed a functional gene array to monitor both organismal and functional gene profiles of normal microbiota in human and mouse hosts, and such an array is called human and mouse microbiota array, HMM-Chip. First, seed sequences were identified from KEGG databases, and used to construct a seed database (seedDB) containing 136 gene families in 19 metabolic pathways closely related to human and mouse microbiomes. Second, a mother database (motherDB) was constructed with 81 genomes of bacterial strains with 54 from gut and 27 from oral environments, and 16 metagenomes, and used for selection of genes and probe design. Gene prediction was performed by Glimmer3 for bacterial genomes, and by the Metagene program for metagenomes. In total, 228,240 and 801,599 genes were identified for bacterial genomes and metagenomes, respectively. Then the motherDB was searched against the seedDB using the HMMer program, and gene sequences in the motherDB that were highly homologous with seed sequences in the seedDB were used for probe design by the CommOligo software. Different degrees of specific probes, including gene-specific, inclusive and exclusive group-specific probes were selected. All candidate probes were checked against the motherDB and NCBI databases for specificity. Finally, 7,763 probes covering 91.2percent (12,601 out of 13,814) HMMer confirmed sequences from 75 bacterial genomes and 16 metagenomes were selected. This developed HMM-Chip is able to detect the diversity and abundance of functional genes, the gene expression of microbial communities, and potentially, the interactions of microorganisms and their hosts.

  12. X chromosome array-CGH for the identification of novel X-linked mental retardation genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauters, Marijke; Van Esch, Hilde; Marynen, Peter; Froyen, Guy

    2005-01-01

    Array-CGH technology for the detection of submicroscopic copy number changes in the genome has recently been developed for the identification of novel disease-associated genes. It has been estimated that submicroscopic genomic deletions or duplications will be present in 5-7% of patients with idiopathic mental retardation (MR). Since 30% more males than females are diagnosed with MR, we have developed a full coverage X chromosome array-CGH with a theoretical resolution of 82 kb, for the detection of copy number alterations in patients with suspected X-linked mental retardation (XLMR). First, we have validated the genomic location of X-derived clones through male versus female hybridisations. Next, we validated our array for efficient and reproducible detection of known alterations in XLMR patients. In all cases, we were able to detect the deletions and duplications in males as well as females. Due to the high resolution of our X-array, the boundaries of the genomic aberrations could clearly be identified making genotype-phenotype studies more reliable. Here, we describe the production and validation of a full coverage X-array-CGH, which will allow for fast and easy screening of submicroscopic copy number alterations in XLMR patients with the aim to identify novel MR genes or mechanisms involved in a deranged cognitive development.

  13. Application of MEMS Microphone Array Technology to Airframe Noise Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, William M., Jr.; Shams, Qamar A.; Graves, Sharon S.; Sealey, Bradley S.; Bartram, Scott M.; Comeaux, Toby

    2005-01-01

    Current generation microphone directional array instrumentation is capable of extracting accurate noise source location and directivity data on a variety of aircraft components, resulting in significant gains in test productivity. However, with this gain in productivity has come the desire to install larger and more complex arrays in a variety of ground test facilities, creating new challenges for the designers of array systems. To overcome these challenges, a research study was initiated to identify and develop hardware and fabrication technologies which could be used to construct an array system exhibiting acceptable measurement performance but at much lower cost and with much simpler installation requirements. This paper describes an effort to fabricate a 128-sensor array using commercially available Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) microphones. The MEMS array was used to acquire noise data for an isolated 26%-scale high-fidelity Boeing 777 landing gear in the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University Stability Tunnel across a range of Mach numbers. The overall performance of the array was excellent, and major noise sources were successfully identified from the measurements.

  14. Mass-array芯片技术在葡萄糖-6-磷酸脱氢酶基因突变位点检测中的应用%Application of Mass-array gene chip to detect glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase gene mutations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈瑶; 苏跃青; 周进福; 王旌; 赵红; 曾颖琳; 林庆颖; 林枫; 张洪华

    2015-01-01

    目的 探讨应用Mass-array基因芯片技术检测葡萄糖-6-磷酸脱氢酶(G6PD)基因突变位点的价值,并对其进行质量评价.方法 收集2006至2013年在福建省妇幼保健院新生儿疾病筛查中心进行G6PD筛查的婴儿,根据化学筛查结果分成2组:G6PD缺乏症患儿和正常儿童,随机抽取患儿和正常对照儿童各300例.采用基因分析工具(Genotyping Tools)与Mass-array Design软件,利用中国人群已报道的G6PD基因33个突变位点芯片,应用Mass-array基因技术检测G6PD基因突变位点,并通过DNASanger测序法验证基因芯片检测结果的准确性.结果 在300例G6PD患儿中,共检出单纯型单点突变9种:1376G>T、1388G>A、95A>G、1024C>T、392G>T、1360C>T、487G>A、517T>C、1365-13T>C;复合突变型7种:871G> A/1365-13T> C/1311C>T、1004C> A/1311C> T/1365-13T>C、1376G >T/1365-13T>C/1311C>T、1365-13T >C/1311C >T、1376G> T/1365-13T>C、95A> G/1365-13T> C/1311C>T、1388G> A/1365-13T>C;300名正常对照儿童中未检测到G6PD基因突变.进一步所有样本的Sanger DNA测序结果与基因芯片检测结果完全一致.结论 采用Massarray基因芯片技术检测G6PD基因突变方法是一种准确、高效的G6PD基因突变筛查方法.%Objective To develop the Mass-array gene chip to detect glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) gene mutations,and to evaluate its quality.Methods Randomly choosing the children who perform neonatal screening in Neonatal Screening Center of Fujian Maternity and Children Health Hospital from 2006 to 2013.Children were divided into control group and G6PD patient group.Using Genotyping Tools from Sequenom company and the software of Mass-array Assay Design to design the PCR amplification primer of 33 G6PD gene mutations which were well-known in Chinese.Then depending on Mass-array gene chip technology to detect glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase gene mutations.DNA Sanger sequencing was

  15. All-Metal Flared-Notch Array Radiator for Ultrawideband Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-15

    2. Lewis, L., M. Fassett, and J. Hunt, A broadband stripline array element. Dig. IEEE Antennas Propagation Symp., 1974. 12: p. 335-337. 3. Holter ...Technology, 2003: p. 383-386. 8. Holter , H., Dual-Polarized Broadband Array Antenna With BOR-Elements, Mechanical Design and Measurements. IEEE...Application Symp., Allerton Park, IL, 2001: p. 561–587. 14. Thors, B., H. Steyskal, and H. Holter , Broad-band fragmented aperture phased array

  16. Improvements to previous algorithms to predict gene structure and isoform concentrations using Affymetrix Exon arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aramburu Ander

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exon arrays provide a way to measure the expression of different isoforms of genes in an organism. Most of the procedures to deal with these arrays are focused on gene expression or on exon expression. Although the only biological analytes that can be properly assigned a concentration are transcripts, there are very few algorithms that focus on them. The reason is that previously developed summarization methods do not work well if applied to transcripts. In addition, gene structure prediction, i.e., the correspondence between probes and novel isoforms, is a field which is still unexplored. Results We have modified and adapted a previous algorithm to take advantage of the special characteristics of the Affymetrix exon arrays. The structure and concentration of transcripts -some of them possibly unknown- in microarray experiments were predicted using this algorithm. Simulations showed that the suggested modifications improved both specificity (SP and sensitivity (ST of the predictions. The algorithm was also applied to different real datasets showing its effectiveness and the concordance with PCR validated results. Conclusions The proposed algorithm shows a substantial improvement in the performance over the previous version. This improvement is mainly due to the exploitation of the redundancy of the Affymetrix exon arrays. An R-Package of SPACE with the updated algorithms have been developed and is freely available.

  17. Application of Regional Arrays in Seismic Verification Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-08-31

    world , and the arrays were gener- ally designed for optimum detection capabilities for events at teleseismic distances. The most ambitious...composed of gneisses and gabbro . A seismic reflection profile running north-south slightly east of the array center showed strong in- dications of a...sensors are deployed on gabbro , which is mostly exposed since the soil cover is nonexistent or very thin (up to 0.5 in). The short period seismometers

  18. Multi-Element CZT Array for Nuclear Safeguards Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, S.-W.; Lee, A.-R.; Shin, J.-K.; Park, U.-R.; Park, S.; Kim, Y.; Chung, H.

    2016-12-01

    Due to its electronic properties, a cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector has been used as a hand-held portable nuclear measurement instrument. However, a CZT detector has low detection efficiency because of a limitation of its single crystal growth. To address its low efficiency, we have constructed a portable four-CZT array based gamma-ray spectrometer consisting of a CZT array, electronics for signal processing and software. Its performance has been characterized in terms of energy resolution and detection efficiency using radioactive sources and nuclear materials. Experimental results showed that the detection efficiency of the four-CZT array based gamma-ray spectrometer was much higher than that of a single CZT detector in the array. The FWHMs of the CZT array were 9, 18, and 21 keV at 185.7, 662, and 1,332 keV, respectively. Some gamma-rays in a range of 100 keV to 200 keV were not clear in a single crystal detector while those from the CZT array system were observed to be clear. The energy resolution of the CZT array system was only slightely worse than those of the single CZT detectors. By combining several single crystals and summing signals from each single detector at a digital electronic circuit, the detection efficiency of a CZT array system increased without degradation of its energy resolution. The technique outlined in this paper shows a very promising method for designing a CZT-based gamma-ray spectroscopy that overcomes the fundamental limitations of a small volume CZT detector.

  19. Evaluation of low density array technology for quantitative parallel measurement of multiple genes in human tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harmer Daniel W

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low density arrays (LDAs have recently been introduced as a novel approach to gene expression profiling. Based on real time quantitative RT-PCR (QRT-PCR, these arrays enable a more focused and sensitive approach to the study of gene expression than gene chips, while offering higher throughput than more established approaches to QRT-PCR. We have now evaluated LDAs as a means of determining the expression of multiple genes simultaneously in human tissues and cells. Results Comparisons between LDAs reveal low variability, with correlation coefficients close to 1. By performing 2-fold and 10-fold serial dilutions of cDNA samples in the LDAs we determined a clear linear relationship between the gene expression data points over 5 orders of magnitude. We also showed that it is possible to use LDAs to accurately and quantitatively detect 2-fold changes in target copy number as well as measuring genes that are expressed with low and high copy numbers in the range of 1 × 102 – 1 × 106 copies. Furthermore, the data generated by the LDA from a cell based pharmacological study were comparable to data generated by conventional QRT-PCR. Conclusion LDAs represent a valuable new approach for sensitive and quantitative gene expression profiling.

  20. Quality assessment and data handling methods for Affymetrix Gene 1.0 ST arrays with variable RNA integrity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viljoen Katie S

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA and microarray quality assessment form an integral part of gene expression analysis and, although methods such as the RNA integrity number (RIN algorithm reliably asses RNA integrity, the relevance of RNA integrity in gene expression analysis as well as analysis methods to accommodate the possible effects of degradation requires further investigation. We investigated the relationship between RNA integrity and array quality on the commonly used Affymetrix Gene 1.0 ST array platform using reliable within-array and between-array quality assessment measures. The possibility of a transcript specific bias in the apparent effect of RNA degradation on the measured gene expression signal was evaluated after either excluding quality-flagged arrays or compensation for RNA degradation at different steps in the analysis. Results Using probe-level and inter-array quality metrics to assess 34 Gene 1.0 ST array datasets derived from historical, paired tumour and normal primary colorectal cancer samples, 7 arrays (20.6%, with a mean sample RIN of 3.2 (SD = 0.42, were flagged during array quality assessment while 10 arrays from samples with RINs Conclusions Here, we demonstrate an effective array-quality assessment strategy, which will allow the user to recognize lower quality arrays that can be included in the analysis once appropriate measures are applied to account for known or unknown sources of variation, such as array quality- and batch- effects, by implementing ComBat or Surrogate Variable Analysis. This approach of quality control and analysis will be especially useful for clinical samples with variable and low RNA qualities, with RIN scores ≥ 2.

  1. High NA diffractive array illuminators and application in a multi-spot scanning microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulsken, B.; Vossen, D.; Stallinga, S.

    2012-01-01

    Array illuminators generating spots with high NA at high efficiency are presented. They are designed via application of high-NA scalar optics methods, and implemented as periodic binary phase structures. These array illuminators are used in a multi-spot scanning microscope for scanning large sample

  2. Gene expression array analyses predict increased proto-oncogene expression in MMTV induced mammary tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popken-Harris, Pamela; Kirchhof, Nicole; Harrison, Ben; Harris, Lester F

    2006-08-01

    Exogenous infection by milk-borne mouse mammary tumor viruses (MMTV) typically induce mouse mammary tumors in genetically susceptible mice at a rate of 90-95% by 1 year of age. In contrast to other transforming retroviruses, MMTV acts as an insertional mutagen and under the influence of steroid hormones induces oncogenic transformation after insertion into the host genome. As these events correspond with increases in adjacent proto-oncogene transcription, we used expression array profiling to determine which commonly associated MMTV insertion site proto-oncogenes were transcriptionally active in MMTV induced mouse mammary tumors. To verify our gene expression array results we developed real-time quantitative RT-PCR assays for the common MMTV insertion site genes found in RIII/Sa mice (int-1/wnt-1, int-2/fgf-3, int-3/Notch 4, and fgf8/AIGF) as well as two genes that were consistently up regulated (CCND1, and MAT-8) and two genes that were consistently down regulated (FN1 and MAT-8) in the MMTV induced tumors as compared to normal mammary gland. Finally, each tumor was also examined histopathologically. Our expression array findings support a model whereby just one or a few common MMTV insertions into the host genome sets up a dominant cascade of events that leave a characteristic molecular signature.

  3. Array CGH improves detection of mutations in the GALC gene associated with Krabbe disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanner Alice K

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Krabbe disease is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in the GALC gene. The most common mutation in the Caucasian population is a 30-kb deletion of exons 11 through 17. There are few other reports of intragenic GALC deletions or duplications, due in part to difficulties detecting them. Methods and results We used gene-targeted array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH to analyze the GALC gene in individuals with Krabbe disease in whom sequence analysis with 30-kb deletion analysis identified only one mutation. In our sample of 33 cases, traditional approaches failed to identify two pathogenic mutations in five (15.2% individuals with confirmed Krabbe disease. The addition of array CGH deletion/duplication analysis to the genetic testing strategy led to the identification of a second pathogenic mutation in three (9.1% of these five individuals. In all three cases, the deletion or duplication identified through array CGH was a novel GALC mutation, including the only reported duplication in the GALC gene, which would have been missed by traditional testing methodologies. We report these three cases in detail. The second mutation remains unknown in the remaining two individuals (6.1%, despite our full battery of testing. Conclusions Analysis of the GALC gene using array CGH deletion/duplication testing increased the two-mutation detection rate from 84.8% to 93.9% in affected individuals. Better mutation detection rates are important for improving molecular diagnosis of Krabbe disease, as well as for providing prenatal and carrier testing in family members.

  4. A Broadband and High Gain Tapered Slot Antenna for W-Band Imaging Array Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Sik Woo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A broadband and high gain tapered slot antenna (TSA by utilizing a broadband microstrip- (MS- to-coplanar stripline (CPS balun has been developed for millimeter-wave imaging systems and sensors. This antenna exhibits ultrawideband performance for frequency ranges from 70 to over 110 GHz with the high antenna gain, low sidelobe levels, and narrow beamwidth. The validity of this antenna as imaging arrays is also demonstrated by analyzing mutual couplings and 4-element linear array. This antenna can be applied to mm-wave phased array, imaging array for plasma diagnostics applications.

  5. Identification of auxin responsive genes in Arabidopsis by cDNA array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The plant hormone auxin influences a variety of developmental and physiological processes. But the mechanism of its action is quite unclear. In order to identify and analyze the expression of auxin responsive genes, a cDNA array approach was used to screen for genes with altered expression from Arabidopsis suspension culture after IAA treatment and was identified 50 differentially expressed genes from 13824 cDNA clones. These genes were related to signal transduction, stress responses, senescence, photosynthesis, protein biosynthesis and transportation. The results provide the molecular evidence that auxin influences a variety of physiological processes and pave a way for further investigation of the mechanism of auxin action. Furthermore,we found that the expression of a ClpC (regulation subunit of Clp protease) was repressed by exogenous auxin, but increased in dark-induced senescing leaves. This suggests that ClpC may be a senescence-associated gene and can be regulated by auxin.

  6. Application of multidisciplinary analysis to gene expression.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xuefel (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Kang, Huining (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Fields, Chris (New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM); Cowie, Jim R. (New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM); Davidson, George S.; Haaland, David Michael; Sibirtsev, Valeriy (New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM); Mosquera-Caro, Monica P. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Xu, Yuexian (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Martin, Shawn Bryan; Helman, Paul (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Andries, Erik (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Ar, Kerem (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Potter, Jeffrey (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Willman, Cheryl L. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Murphy, Maurice H. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM)

    2004-01-01

    Molecular analysis of cancer, at the genomic level, could lead to individualized patient diagnostics and treatments. The developments to follow will signal a significant paradigm shift in the clinical management of human cancer. Despite our initial hopes, however, it seems that simple analysis of microarray data cannot elucidate clinically significant gene functions and mechanisms. Extracting biological information from microarray data requires a complicated path involving multidisciplinary teams of biomedical researchers, computer scientists, mathematicians, statisticians, and computational linguists. The integration of the diverse outputs of each team is the limiting factor in the progress to discover candidate genes and pathways associated with the molecular biology of cancer. Specifically, one must deal with sets of significant genes identified by each method and extract whatever useful information may be found by comparing these different gene lists. Here we present our experience with such comparisons, and share methods developed in the analysis of an infant leukemia cohort studied on Affymetrix HG-U95A arrays. In particular, spatial gene clustering, hyper-dimensional projections, and computational linguistics were used to compare different gene lists. In spatial gene clustering, different gene lists are grouped together and visualized on a three-dimensional expression map, where genes with similar expressions are co-located. In another approach, projections from gene expression space onto a sphere clarify how groups of genes can jointly have more predictive power than groups of individually selected genes. Finally, online literature is automatically rearranged to present information about genes common to multiple groups, or to contrast the differences between the lists. The combination of these methods has improved our understanding of infant leukemia. While the complicated reality of the biology dashed our initial, optimistic hopes for simple answers from

  7. Clinical applications of BAC array-CGH to the study of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robledo, Cristina; García, Juan Luis; Hernández, Jesús M

    2013-01-01

    BAC array-CGH is a powerful method to identify DNA copy number changes (gains, amplifications and deletions) on a genome-wide scale, and to map these changes to genomic sequence. It is based on the analysis of genomic DNA isolated from test and reference cell populations, the differential labelling with fluorescent dyes and the co-hybridization with a genomic array. BAC array-CGH has proven to be a specific, sensitive, and reliable technique, with considerable advantages compared to other methods used for the analysis of DNA copy number changes. The application of genome scanning technologies and the recent advances in bioinformatics tools that enable us to perform a robust and highly sensitive analysis of array-CGH data, useful not only for genome scanning of tumor cells but also in the identification of novel cancer related genes, oncogenes and suppressor genes. Cytogenetic analysis provides essential information for diagnosis and prognosis in patients with hematologic malignancies such as lymphomas. However, the chromosomal interpretation in non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is sometimes inconclusive. Copy number aberrations identified by BAC array-CGH analyses could be a complementary methodology to chromosomal analysis. In NHL the genomic imbalances might have a prognostic rather than a diagnostic value. In fact, the diagnosis of NHL is based on pathological and molecular cytogenetics data. Furthermore genetic variations and their association with specific types of lymphoma development, and elucidation of the variable genetic pathways leading to lymphoma development, are important directions for future cancer research. Array-CGH, along with FISH and PCR, will be used for routine diagnostic purposes in near future.

  8. An Efficient Beam Steerable Antenna Array Concept for Airborne Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Aliakbarian

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Deployment of a satellite borne, steerable antenna array with higher directivity and gain in Low Earth Orbit makes sense to reduce ground station complexity and cost, while still maintaining a reasonable link budget. The implementation comprises a digitally beam steerable phased array antenna integrated with a complete system, comprising the antenna, hosting platform, ground station, and aircraft based satellite emulator to facilitate convenient aircraft based testing of the antenna array and ground-space communication link. This paper describes the design, development and initial successful interim testing of the various subsystems. A two element prototype used in this increases the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR by 3 dB which is corresponding to more than 10 times better bit error rate (BER.

  9. Plasmonic nanopatch array for optical integrated circuit applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Shi-Wei; Nie, Zai-Ping

    2013-11-08

    Future plasmonic integrated circuits with the capability of extremely high-speed data processing at optical frequencies will be dominated by the efficient optical emission (excitation) from (of) plasmonic waveguides. Towards this goal, plasmonic nanoantennas, currently a hot topic in the field of plasmonics, have potential to bridge the mismatch between the wave vector of free-space photonics and that of the guided plasmonics. To manipulate light at will, plasmonic nanoantenna arrays will definitely be more efficient than isolated nanoantennas. In this article, the concepts of microwave antenna arrays are applied to efficiently convert plasmonic waves in the plasmonic waveguides into free-space optical waves or vice versa. The proposed plasmonic nanoantenna array, with nanopatch antennas and a coupled wedge plasmon waveguide, can also act as an efficient spectrometer to project different wavelengths into different directions, or as a spatial filter to absorb a specific wavelength at a specified incident angle.

  10. Plasmonic nanopatch array for optical integrated circuit applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Shi-Wei; Nie, Zai-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Future plasmonic integrated circuits with the capability of extremely high-speed data processing at optical frequencies will be dominated by the efficient optical emission (excitation) from (of) plasmonic waveguides. Towards this goal, plasmonic nanoantennas, currently a hot topic in the field of plasmonics, have potential to bridge the mismatch between the wave vector of free-space photonics and that of the guided plasmonics. To manipulate light at will, plasmonic nanoantenna arrays will definitely be more efficient than isolated nanoantennas. In this article, the concepts of microwave antenna arrays are applied to efficiently convert plasmonic waves in the plasmonic waveguides into free-space optical waves or vice versa. The proposed plasmonic nanoantenna array, with nanopatch antennas and a coupled wedge plasmon waveguide, can also act as an efficient spectrometer to project different wavelengths into different directions, or as a spatial filter to absorb a specific wavelength at a specified incident angle. PMID:24201454

  11. Wideband Array for C, X, and Ku-Band Applications with 5.3:1 Bandwidth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Markus H.; Volakis, John L.; Miranda, Felix A.

    2015-01-01

    Planar arrays that exploit strong intentional coupling between elements have allowed for very wide bandwidths in low-profile configurations. However, such designs also require complex impedance matching networks that must also be very compact. For many space applications, typically occurring at C-, X-, Ku-, and most recently at Ka-band, such designs require specialized and expensive fabrication techniques. To address this issue, a novel ultra-wideband array is presented, using a simplified feed network to reduce fabrication cost. The array operates from 3.5-18.5 GHz with VSWR less than 2.4 at broadside, and is of very low profile, having a total height of lambda/10 at the lowest frequency of operation. Validation is provided using a 64-element prototype array, fabricated using common Printed Circuit Board (PCB) technology. The low size, weight, and cost of this array make it attractive for space-borne applications.

  12. Inversion of Array Induction Logs and Its Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Jie; Zhao Aibin; Peng Fei; Li Hongqi

    2007-01-01

    With the help of the modified geometrical factor theory, the Marquardt method was used to calculate the true electrical parameters of the formation from array induction logs. The inversion results derived from the assumed model and some practical cases show that the rebuilt formation profile determined by 2-ft resolution array induction logs is reasonable when the formation thickness is greater than 1 m, which thus indicates that the inversion method is reliable and can provide quantitative information for the discrimination of oil/gas or water zone.

  13. Ultrasonic Phased-Array Characterization for NDE Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, John J.; Tennis, Richard F.; Pickens, Keith S.

    1995-01-01

    Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) recently fabricated and delivered the 100-channel Ultrasonic Phased-Array Testbed System (UPATS) for NASA's Langley Research Center. NASA prepared the specifications and provided the funding to develop UPATS in order to provide a tool for the improvement of ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and characterization of materials. UPATS incorporates state-of-the-art phased-array concepts such as beam steering, focusing, apodization, and phase-sensitive detection which make it possible to develop more sophisticated testing methodologies. It also can be used to investigate fundamental ultrasonic propagation and detection phenomena such as refraction, diffraction, scattering, and beam broadening.

  14. Microstrip Yagi array for MSAT vehicle antenna application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, John; Densmore, Arthur; Pozar, David

    1990-01-01

    A microstrip Yagi array was developed for the MSAT system as a low-cost mechanically steered medium-gain vehicle antenna. Because its parasitic reflector and director patches are not connected to any of the RF power distributing circuit, while still contributing to achieve the MSAT required directional beam, the antenna becomes a very efficient radiating system. With the complete monopulse beamforming circuit etched on a thin stripline board, the planar microstrip Yagi array is capable of achieving a very low profile. A theoretical model using the Method of Moments was developed to facilitate the ease of design and understanding of this antenna.

  15. Sequential displacement of Type VI Secretion System effector genes leads to evolution of diverse immunity gene arrays in Vibrio cholerae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchberger, Paul C.; Unterweger, Daniel; Provenzano, Daniele; Pukatzki, Stefan; Boucher, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Type VI secretion systems (T6SS) enable bacteria to engage neighboring cells in contact-dependent competition. In Vibrio cholerae, three chromosomal clusters each encode a pair of effector and immunity genes downstream of those encoding the T6SS structural machinery for effector delivery. Different combinations of effector-immunity proteins lead to competition between strains of V. cholerae, which are thought to be protected only from the toxicity of their own effectors. Screening of all publically available V. cholerae genomes showed that numerous strains possess long arrays of orphan immunity genes encoded in the 3′ region of their T6SS clusters. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that these genes are highly similar to those found in the effector-immunity pairs of other strains, indicating acquisition by horizontal gene transfer. Extensive genomic comparisons also suggest that successive addition of effector-immunity gene pairs replaces ancestral effectors, yet retains the cognate immunity genes. The retention of old immunity genes perhaps provides protection against nearby kin bacteria in which the old effector was not replaced. This mechanism, combined with frequent homologous recombination, is likely responsible for the high diversity of T6SS effector-immunity gene profiles observed for V. cholerae and closely related species. PMID:28327641

  16. A µsensor array in a fluidic system for space applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spiering, V.L.; Spiering, V.L.; Bergveld, Piet; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt; van den Berg, Albert

    1996-01-01

    The development of a hybrid integration method for a multi \\musensor array unit in a fluid channel on a breadboard is presented. The method is illustrated by means of the fabrication of a demonstrator micro fluid analysis system, also called a Micro Total Analysis System (uTAS), containing a

  17. Sunflower array antenna for multi-beam satellite applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vigano, M.C.

    2011-01-01

    Saving space on board, reducing costs and improving the antenna performances are tasks of outmost importance in the field of satellite communication. In this work it is shown how a non-uniformly spaced, direct radiating array designed according to the so called ‘sunflower’ law is able to satisfy str

  18. Analysis of Eigenspace Dynamics with Applications to Array Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    be met in most practical situations,1-2 in which large-aperture arrays operate in the presence of fast maneuvering interferers, or with towed...the improvement of subspace beamforming processors , in which the data snapshots are projected into particular subspaces of interest such as mm xPy

  19. Microstrip Yagi array antenna for mobile satellite vehicle application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, John; Densmore, Arthur C.

    1991-01-01

    A novel antenna structure formed by combining the Yagi-Uda array concept and the microstrip radiator technique is discussed. This antenna, called the microstrip Yagi array, has been developed for the mobile satellite (MSAT) system as a low-profile, low-cost, and mechanically steered medium-gain land-vehicle antenna. With the antenna's active patches (driven elements) and parasitic patches (reflector and director elements) located on the same horizontal plane, the main beam of the array can be tilted, by the effect of mutual coupling, in the elevation direction providing optimal coverage for users in the continental United States. Because the parasitic patches are not connected to any of the lossy RF power distributing circuit the antenna is an efficient radiating system. With the complete monopulse beamforming and power distributing circuits etched on a single thin stripline board underneath the microstrip Yagi array, the overall L-band antenna system has achieved a very low profile for vehicle's rooftop mounting, as well as a low manufacturing cost. Experimental results demonstrate the performance of this antenna.

  20. Dimpled Ball Grid Array process development for space flight applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, S. L.; Mehta, A.

    2000-01-01

    The 472 Dimpled Ball Grid Array (D-BGA) package has not been used in past space flight environments, therefore it is necessary to determine the robustness and reliability of the solder joints. The 472 D-BGA packages passed the above environmental tests within the specifications and are now qualified for use on space flight electronics.

  1. A head and neck hyperthermia applicator: Theoretical antenna array design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paulides, M.M.; Bakker, J.F.; Zwamborn, A.P.M.; Rhoon, G.C. van

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Investigation into the feasibility of a circular array of dipole antennas to deposit RF-energy centrally in the neck as a function of: 1) patient positioning, 2) antenna ring radius, 3) number of antenna rings, 4) number of antennas per ring and 5) distance between antenna rings. Materials

  2. A head and neck hyperthermia applicator: Theoretical antenna array design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M. Paulides (Margarethus); J.F. Bakker (Jurriaan); A.P.M. Zwamborn; G.C. van Rhoon (Gerard)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: Investigation into the feasibility of a circular array of dipole antennas to deposit RF-energy centrally in the neck as a function of: (1) patient positioning, (2) antenna ring radius, (3) number of antenna rings, (4) number of antennas per ring and (5) distance between antenna

  3. ArrayXPath: mapping and visualizing microarray gene-expression data with integrated biological pathway resources using Scalable Vector Graphics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hee-Joon; Kim, Mingoo; Park, Chan Hee; Kim, Jihoon; Kim, Ju Han

    2004-07-01

    Biological pathways can provide key information on the organization of biological systems. ArrayXPath (http://www.snubi.org/software/ArrayXPath/) is a web-based service for mapping and visualizing microarray gene-expression data for integrated biological pathway resources using Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG). By integrating major bio-databases and searching pathway resources, ArrayXPath automatically maps different types of identifiers from microarray probes and pathway elements. When one inputs gene-expression clusters, ArrayXPath produces a list of the best matching pathways for each cluster. We applied Fisher's exact test and the false discovery rate (FDR) to evaluate the statistical significance of the association between a cluster and a pathway while correcting the multiple-comparison problem. ArrayXPath produces Javascript-enabled SVGs for web-enabled interactive visualization of pathways integrated with gene-expression profiles.

  4. Self-Ordered Titanium Dioxide Nanotube Arrays: Anodic Synthesis and Their Photo/Electro-Catalytic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, York R.; Ray, Rupashree S.; Carlson, Krista; Sarma, Biplab; Misra, Mano

    2013-01-01

    Metal oxide nanotubes have become a widely investigated material, more specifically, self-organized titania nanotube arrays synthesized by electrochemical anodization. As a highly investigated material with a wide gamut of applications, the majority of published literature focuses on the solar-based applications of this material. The scope of this review summarizes some of the recent advances made using metal oxide nanotube arrays formed via anodization in solar-based applications. A general methodology for theoretical modeling of titania surfaces in solar applications is also presented. PMID:28811415

  5. Advanced array techniques for unattended ground sensor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Followill, F.E.; Wolford, J.K.; Candy, J.V.

    1997-05-06

    Sensor arrays offer opportunities to beam form, and time-frequency analyses offer additional insights to the wavefield data. Data collected while monitoring three different sources with unattended ground sensors in a 16-element, small-aperture (approximately 5 meters) geophone array are used as examples of model-based seismic signal processing on actual geophone array data. The three sources monitored were: (Source 01). A frequency-modulated chirp of an electromechanical shaker mounted on the floor of an underground bunker. Three 60-second time-windows corresponding to (a) 50 Hz to 55 Hz sweep, (b) 60 Hz to 70 Hz sweep, and (c) 80 Hz to 90 Hz sweep. (Source 02). A single transient impact of a hammer striking the floor of the bunker. Twenty seconds of data (with the transient event approximately mid-point in the time window.(Source 11)). The transient event of a diesel generator turning on, including a few seconds before the turn-on time and a few seconds after the generator reaches steady-state conditions. The high-frequency seismic array was positioned at the surface of the ground at a distance of 150 meters (North) of the underground bunker. Four Y-shaped subarrays (each with 2-meter apertures) in a Y-shaped pattern (with a 6-meter aperture) using a total of 16 3-component, high-frequency geophones were deployed. These 48 channels of seismic data were recorded at 6000 and 12000 samples per second on 16-bit data loggers. Representative examples of the data and analyses illustrate the results of this experiment.

  6. Application of Seismic Array Processing to Tsunami Early Warning

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, C.; Meng, L.

    2015-12-01

    Tsunami wave predictions of the current tsunami warning systems rely on accurate earthquake source inversions of wave height data. They are of limited effectiveness for the near-field areas since the tsunami waves arrive before data are collected. Recent seismic and tsunami disasters have revealed the need for early warning to protect near-source coastal populations. In this work we developed the basis for a tsunami warning system based on rapid earthquake source characterisation through regional seismic array back-projections. We explored rapid earthquake source imaging using onshore dense seismic arrays located at regional distances on the order of 1000 km, which provides faster source images than conventional teleseismic back-projections. We implement this method in a simulated real-time environment, and analysed the 2011 Tohoku earthquake rupture with two clusters of Hi-net stations in Kyushu and Northern Hokkaido, and the 2014 Iquique event with the Earthscope USArray Transportable Array. The results yield reasonable estimates of rupture area, which is approximated by an ellipse and leads to the construction of simple slip models based on empirical scaling of the rupture area, seismic moment and average slip. The slip model is then used as the input of the tsunami simulation package COMCOT to predict the tsunami waves. In the example of the Tohoku event, the earthquake source model can be acquired within 6 minutes from the start of rupture and the simulation of tsunami waves takes less than 2 min, which could facilitate a timely tsunami warning. The predicted arrival time and wave amplitude reasonably fit observations. Based on this method, we propose to develop an automatic warning mechanism that provides rapid near-field warning for areas of high tsunami risk. The initial focus will be Japan, Pacific Northwest and Alaska, where dense seismic networks with the capability of real-time data telemetry and open data accessibility, such as the Japanese HiNet (>800

  7. Phased-array radar design application of radar fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    Jeffrey, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Phased-Array Radar Design is a text-reference designed for electrical engineering graduate students in colleges and universities as well as for corporate in-house training programs for radar design engineers, especially systems engineers and analysts who would like to gain hands-on, practical knowledge and skills in radar design fundamentals, advanced radar concepts, trade-offs for radar design and radar performance analysis.

  8. Advanced reflector characterization with ultrasonic phased arrays in NDE applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Paul D; Holmes, Caroline; Drinkwater, Bruce W

    2007-08-01

    Ultrasonic arrays are increasingly widely used in nondestructive evaluation (NDE) due to their greater flexibility and potentially superior performance compared to conventional monolithic probes. The characterization of small defects remains a challenge for NDE and is of great importance for determining the impact of a defect on the integrity of a structure. In this paper, a technique for characterizing reflectors with subwavelength dimensions is described. This is achieved by post-processing the complete data set of time traces obtained from an ultrasonic array using two algorithms. The first algorithm is used to obtain information about reflector orientation and the second algorithm is used to distinguish between point-like reflectors that reflect uniformly in all directions and specular reflectors that have distinct orientations. Experimental results are presented using a commercial 64-element, 5-MHZ array on two aluminum test specimens that contain a number of machined slots and side-drilled holes. The results show that the orientation of 1-mm-long slots can be determined to within a few degrees and that the signals from 1-mm-long slots can be distinguished from that from a 1-mm-diameter circular hole. Techniques for quantifying both the orientation and the specularity of measured signals are presented and the effect of processing parameters on the accuracy of results is discussed.

  9. A 34K SNP genotyping array for Populus trichocarpa: design, application to the study of natural populations and transferability to other Populus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraldes, A; Difazio, S P; Slavov, G T; Ranjan, P; Muchero, W; Hannemann, J; Gunter, L E; Wymore, A M; Grassa, C J; Farzaneh, N; Porth, I; McKown, A D; Skyba, O; Li, E; Fujita, M; Klápště, J; Martin, J; Schackwitz, W; Pennacchio, C; Rokhsar, D; Friedmann, M C; Wasteneys, G O; Guy, R D; El-Kassaby, Y A; Mansfield, S D; Cronk, Q C B; Ehlting, J; Douglas, C J; Tuskan, G A

    2013-03-01

    Genetic mapping of quantitative traits requires genotypic data for large numbers of markers in many individuals. For such studies, the use of large single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping arrays still offers the most cost-effective solution. Herein we report on the design and performance of a SNP genotyping array for Populus trichocarpa (black cottonwood). This genotyping array was designed with SNPs pre-ascertained in 34 wild accessions covering most of the species latitudinal range. We adopted a candidate gene approach to the array design that resulted in the selection of 34 131 SNPs, the majority of which are located in, or within 2 kb of, 3543 candidate genes. A subset of the SNPs on the array (539) was selected based on patterns of variation among the SNP discovery accessions. We show that more than 95% of the loci produce high quality genotypes and that the genotyping error rate for these is likely below 2%. We demonstrate that even among small numbers of samples (n = 10) from local populations over 84% of loci are polymorphic. We also tested the applicability of the array to other species in the genus and found that the number of polymorphic loci decreases rapidly with genetic distance, with the largest numbers detected in other species in section Tacamahaca. Finally, we provide evidence for the utility of the array to address evolutionary questions such as intraspecific studies of genetic differentiation, species assignment and the detection of natural hybrids.

  10. Asymmetrical floating point array processors, their application to exploration and exploitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geriepy, B.L.

    1983-01-01

    An asymmetrical floating point array processor is a special-purpose scientific computer which operates under asymmetrical control of a host computer. Although an array processor can receive fixed point input and produce fixed point output, its primary mode of operation is floating point. The first generation of array processors was oriented towards time series information. The next generation of array processors has proved much more versatile and their applicability ranges from petroleum reservoir simulation to speech syntheses. Array processors are becoming commonplace in mining, the primary usage being construction of grids-by usual methods or by kriging. The Australian mining community is among the world's leaders in regard to computer-assisted exploration and exploitation systems. Part of this leadership role must be providing guidance to computer vendors in regard to current and future requirements.

  11. Applications of array processors in the analysis of remote sensing images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramapriyan, H. K.; Strong, J. P.

    1984-01-01

    The architectures, programming characteristics, and ranges of application of past, present, and planned array processors for the digital processing of remote-sensing images are compared. Such functions as radiometric and geometric corrections, principal-components analysis, cluster coding, histogram generation, grey-level mapping, convolution, classification, and mensuration and modeling operations are considered, and both pipeline-type and single-instruction/multiple-data-stream (SIMD) arrays are evaluated. Numerical results are presented in a table, and it is found that the pipeline-type arrays normally used with minicomputers increase their speed significantly at low cost, while even further gains are provided by the more expensive SIMD arrays. Most image-processing operations become I/O-limited when SIMD arrays are used with current I/O devices.

  12. A Comparative Performance Analysis of Two Printed Circular Arrays for Power-Based Vehicle Localization Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad S. Sharawi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A comparative study of the performance characteristics of a printed 8-element V-shaped circular antenna array and an 8-element Yagi circular array operating at 2.45 GHz for vehicular direction finding applications is presented. Two operating modes are investigated; switched and phased modes. The arrays were fabricated on FR-4 substrates with 0.8 mm thickness. Measured and simulated results were compared. Radiation gain patterns were measured on a 1 m diameter ground plane that resembles the rooftop of a vehicle. The HPBW of the Yagi was found to be about 3° narrower than its V-shaped counterpart when measured above a reflecting ground plane and operated in switched mode. The printed V-shaped antenna array offers 2.5 dB extra gain compared to the printed Yagi array.

  13. Alternative splicing and differential gene expression in colon cancer detected by a whole genome exon array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugnet Charles

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alternative splicing is a mechanism for increasing protein diversity by excluding or including exons during post-transcriptional processing. Alternatively spliced proteins are particularly relevant in oncology since they may contribute to the etiology of cancer, provide selective drug targets, or serve as a marker set for cancer diagnosis. While conventional identification of splice variants generally targets individual genes, we present here a new exon-centric array (GeneChip Human Exon 1.0 ST that allows genome-wide identification of differential splice variation, and concurrently provides a flexible and inclusive analysis of gene expression. Results We analyzed 20 paired tumor-normal colon cancer samples using a microarray designed to detect over one million putative exons that can be virtually assembled into potential gene-level transcripts according to various levels of prior supporting evidence. Analysis of high confidence (empirically supported transcripts identified 160 differentially expressed genes, with 42 genes occupying a network impacting cell proliferation and another twenty nine genes with unknown functions. A more speculative analysis, including transcripts based solely on computational prediction, produced another 160 differentially expressed genes, three-fourths of which have no previous annotation. We also present a comparison of gene signal estimations from the Exon 1.0 ST and the U133 Plus 2.0 arrays. Novel splicing events were predicted by experimental algorithms that compare the relative contribution of each exon to the cognate transcript intensity in each tissue. The resulting candidate splice variants were validated with RT-PCR. We found nine genes that were differentially spliced between colon tumors and normal colon tissues, several of which have not been previously implicated in cancer. Top scoring candidates from our analysis were also found to substantially overlap with EST-based bioinformatic

  14. The application of taylor weighting, digital phase shifters, and digital attenuators to phased-array antennas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brock, Billy C.

    2008-03-01

    Application of Taylor weighting (taper) to an antenna aperture can achieve low peak sidelobes, but combining the Taylor weighting with quantized attenuators and phase shifters at each radiating element will impact the performance of a phased-array antenna. An examination of array performance is undertaken from the simple point of view of the characteristics of the array factor. Design rules and guidelines for determining the Taylor-weighting parameters, the number of bits required for the digital phase shifter, and the dynamic range and number of bits required for the digital attenuator are developed. For a radar application, when each element is fed directly from a transmit/receive module, the total power radiated by the array will be reduced as a result of the taper. Consequently, the issue of whether to apply the taper on both transmit and receive configurations, or only on the receive configuration is examined with respect to two-way sidelobe performance.

  15. Design of a Compact Wideband Antenna Array for Microwave Imaging Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Puskely

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, wideband antenna arrays aimed at microwave imaging applications and SAR applications operating at Ka band were designed. The antenna array feeding network is realized by a low-loss SIW technology. Moreover, we have replaced the large feed network comprised of various T and Y junctions by a simple broadband network of compact size to more reduce losses in the substrate integrated waveguide and also save space on the PCB. The designed power 8-way divider is complemented by a wideband substrate integrated waveguide to a grounded coplanar waveguide transition and directly connected to the antenna elements. The measured results of antenna array are consistent with our simulation. Obtained results of the developed array demonstrated improvement compared to previously developed binary feed networks with microstrip or SIW splitters.

  16. A Compact Design of Planar Array Antenna with Fractal Elements for Future Generation Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ojaroudiparchin, Naser; Shen, Ming; Pedersen, Gert F.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a planar phased array fractal antenna for the future fifth generation (5G) applications is presented. The proposed array antenna is designed to operate at 22 GHz. 64 patch antenna elements with coaxial-probe feeds have been used for the proposed design. The antenna elements are based...... on Vicsek fractal geometry where the third iteration patches operate over a wide bandwidth and contribute to improve the efficiency and realized gain performance. The designed planar array has more than 22 dB realized gain and -0.3 dB total efficiency when its beam is tilted to 0 degrees elevation...

  17. Two-stage series array SQUID amplifier for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, J. G.; DiPirro, M. J.; Shirron, P. J.; Welty, R. P.; Radparvar, M.

    We present test results for a two-stage integrated SQUID amplifier which uses a series array of d.c. SQUIDS to amplify the signal from a single input SQUID. The device was developed by Welty and Martinis at NIST and recent versions have been manufactured by HYPRES, Inc. Shielding and filtering techniques were employed during the testing to minimize the external noise. Energy resolution of 300 h was demonstrated using a d.c. excitation at frequencies above 1 kHz, and better than 500 h resolution was typical down to 300 Hz.

  18. New Applications of Electrochemically Produced Porous Semiconductors and Nanowire Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leisner Malte

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The growing demand for electro mobility together with advancing concepts for renewable energy as primary power sources requires sophisticated methods of energy storage. In this work, we present a Li ion battery based on Si nanowires, which can be produced reliable and cheaply and which shows superior properties, such as a largely increased capacity and cycle stability. Sophisticated methods based on electrochemical pore etching allow to produce optimized regular arrays of nanowires, which can be stabilized by intrinsic cross-links, which serve to avoid unwanted stiction effects and allow easy processing.

  19. Application of the anisotropy field distribution method to arrays of magnetic nanowires

    OpenAIRE

    De La Torre Medina, Joaquin; Darques, Michaël; Piraux, Luc; Encinas, Armando

    2009-01-01

    The applicability of the anisotropy field distribution method and the conditions required for an accurate determination of the effective anisotropy field in arrays of magnetic nanowires have been evaluated. In arrays of magnetic nanowires that behave as ideal uniaxial systems having only magnetostatic contributions to the effective anisotropy field, i.e., shape anisotropy and magnetostatic coupling, the method yields accurate values of the average anisotropy field at low-moderate dipolar coup...

  20. Large-area nanogap plasmon resonator arrays for plasmonics applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Mingliang; van Wolferen, Henk; Wormeester, Herbert; van den Berg, Albert; Carlen, Edwin T.

    2012-07-01

    Large-area (~8000 mm2) Au nanogap plasmon resonator array substrates manufactured using maskless laser interference lithography (LIL) with high uniformity are presented. The periodically spaced subwavelength nanogap arrays are formed between adjacent nanopyramid (NPy) structures with precisely defined pitch and high length density (~1 km cm-2), and are ideally suited as scattering sites for surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), as well as refractive index sensing. The two-dimensional grid arrangement of NPy structures renders the excitation of the plasmon resonators minimally dependent on the incident polarization. The SERS average enhancement factor (AEF) has been characterized using over 30 000 individual measurements of benzenethiol (BT) chemisorbed on the Au NPy surfaces. From the 1(a1), βCCC + νCS ring mode (1074 cm-1) of BT on surfaces with pitch λg = 200 nm, AEF = 0.8 × 106 and for surfaces with λg = 500 nm, AEF = 0.3 × 107 from over 99% of the imaged spots. Maximum AEFs > 108 have been measured in both cases.

  1. Solution processed semiconductor alloy nanowire arrays for optoelectronic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimpi, Paresh R.

    In this dissertation, we use ZnO nanowire as a model system to investigate the potential of solution routes for bandgap engineering in semiconductor nanowires. Excitingly, successful Mg-alloying into ZnO nanowire arrays has been achieved using a two-step sequential hydrothermal method at low temperature (green-yellow-red band (˜400-660 nm) increased whereas intensity of NBE UV peak decreased and completely got quenched. This might be due to interface diffusion of oxidized Si (SiOx) and formation of (Zn,Mg)1.7SiO4 epitaxially overcoated around individual ZnMgO nanowire. On the other hand, ambient annealed ZnMgO nanowires grown on quartz showed a ˜6-10 nm blue-shift in NBE UV emission, indicating significantly enhanced inter-diffusion of Mg into ZnO nanowires in this oxygen-rich environment. The successfully developed solution process for semiconductor nanowires alloying has few advantages in low cost, large yield, environmental friendliness and low reaction temperature. This solution processed ZnMgO nanowire arrays could provide a new class of nanoscale building blocks for various optoelectronic devices in UV lighting and visible solar energy harvesting.

  2. Multiwavelength arrays of mode-locked lasers for WDM applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Lawrence J.; Young, Martin G.; Dougherty, David J.; Keo, Sam A.; Muller, Richard E.; Maker, Paul D.; Forouhar, Siamak

    1998-08-01

    The continued need for increased bandwidth is driving the pursuit of both increased speed in TDM and more channels in WDM for fiber optic communication systems. Multiwavelength arrays of monolithic mode-locked DBR lasers are an attractive source for future high bit rate (100 - 800 Gb/s) optical communication systems. Monolithic mode-locked lasers in the colliding-pulse mode-locked configuration have been fabricated, with DBR end mirrors for wavelength selection. A continuous gain region has been employed for ease of fabrication and the elimination of multiple reflections within the cavity. Arrays containing up to 9 wavelengths have been fabricated, with all the wavelengths within the erbium-doped fiber amplifier gain bandwidth. An RF signal is applied to the saturable absorber for synchronization to an external clock and reduction of the phase noise. For a 4.6 mm cavity, short (< 10 ps) optical pulses at high (approximately 18 GHz) repetition rates have been achieved. Low single side-band phase noise values (-107 dBc/Hz 100 kHz offset) have been demonstrated, nearly equal to that of the RF source.

  3. Expression Comparison of Oil Biosynthesis Genes in Oil Palm Mesocarp Tissue Using Custom Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yick Ching Wong

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression changes that occur during mesocarp development are a major research focus in oil palm research due to the economic importance of this tissue and the relatively rapid increase in lipid content to very high levels at fruit ripeness. Here, we report the development of a transcriptome-based 105,000-probe oil palm mesocarp microarray. The expression of genes involved in fatty acid (FA and triacylglycerol (TAG assembly, along with the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA and glycolysis pathway at 16 Weeks After Anthesis (WAA exhibited significantly higher signals compared to those obtained from a cross-species hybridization to the Arabidopsis (p-value < 0.01, and rice (p-value < 0.01 arrays. The oil palm microarray data also showed comparable correlation of expression (r2 = 0.569, p < 0.01 throughout mesocarp development to transcriptome (RNA sequencing data, and improved correlation over quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR (r2 = 0.721, p < 0.01 of the same RNA samples. The results confirm the advantage of the custom microarray over commercially available arrays derived from model species. We demonstrate the utility of this custom microarray to gain a better understanding of gene expression patterns in the oil palm mesocarp that may lead to increasing future oil yield.

  4. Correlation of Dynamic PET and Gene Array Data in Patients with Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludwig G. Strauss

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The results obtained with dynamic PET (dPET were compared to gene expression data obtained in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST. The primary aim was to assess the association of the dPET results and gene expression data. Material and Methods. dPET was performed following the injection of F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG in 22 patients with GIST. All patients were examined prior to surgery for staging purpose. Compartment and noncompartment models were used for the quantitative evaluation of the dPET examinations. Gene array data were based on tumor specimen obtained by surgery after the PET examinations. Results. The data analysis revealed significant correlations for the dPET parameters and the expression of zinc finger genes (znf43, znf85, znf91, znf189. Furthermore, the transport of FDG (k1 was associated with VEGF-A. The cell cycle gene cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1C was correlated with the maximum tracer uptake (SUVmax in the tumors. Conclusions. The data demonstrate a dependency of the tracer kinetics on genes associated with prognosis in GIST. Furthermore, angiogenesis and cell proliferation have an impact on the tracer uptake.

  5. Glycan Arrays: From Basic Biochemical Research to Bioanalytical and Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissner, Andreas; Seeberger, Peter H.

    2016-06-01

    A major branch of glycobiology and glycan-focused biomedicine studies the interaction between carbohydrates and other biopolymers, most importantly, glycan-binding proteins. Today, this research into glycan-biopolymer interaction is unthinkable without glycan arrays, tools that enable high-throughput analysis of carbohydrate interaction partners. Glycan arrays offer many applications in basic biochemical research, for example, defining the specificity of glycosyltransferases and lectins such as immune receptors. Biomedical applications include the characterization and surveillance of influenza strains, identification of biomarkers for cancer and infection, and profiling of immune responses to vaccines. Here, we review major applications of glycan arrays both in basic and applied research. Given the dynamic nature of this rapidly developing field, we focus on recent findings.

  6. Gene Expression Omnibus: NCBI gene expression and hybridization array data repository.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar, Ron; Domrachev, Michael; Lash, Alex E

    2002-01-01

    The Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) project was initiated in response to the growing demand for a public repository for high-throughput gene expression data. GEO provides a flexible and open design that facilitates submission, storage and retrieval of heterogeneous data sets from high-throughput gene expression and genomic hybridization experiments. GEO is not intended to replace in house gene expression databases that benefit from coherent data sets, and which are constructed to facilitate a particular analytic method, but rather complement these by acting as a tertiary, central data distribution hub. The three central data entities of GEO are platforms, samples and series, and were designed with gene expression and genomic hybridization experiments in mind. A platform is, essentially, a list of probes that define what set of molecules may be detected. A sample describes the set of molecules that are being probed and references a single platform used to generate its molecular abundance data. A series organizes samples into the meaningful data sets which make up an experiment. The GEO repository is publicly accessible through the World Wide Web at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo.

  7. Multi-lead ECG electrode array for clinical application of electrocardiographic inverse problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintermuller, Christoph; Fischer, Gerald; Seger, Michael; Pfeifer, Bernhard; Hanser, Friedrich; Modre, Robert; Tilg, Bernhard

    2004-01-01

    Methods for noninvasive imaging of electric function of the heart might become clinical standard procedure the next years. Thus, the overall procedure has to meet clinical requirements as easy and fast application. In this study we propose a new electrode array which improves the information content in the ECG map, considering clinical constraints such as easy to apply and compatibility with routine leads. A major challenge is the development of an electrode array which yields a high information content even for a large interindividual variation in torso shape. For identifying regions of high information content we introduce the concept of a locally applied virtual electrode array. As a result of our analysis we constructed a new electrode array consisting of two L-shaped regular spaced parts and compared it to the electrode array we use for clinical studies upon activation time imaging. We assume that one side effect caused by the regular shape and spacing of the new array be that the reconstruction of electrodes placed on the patients back is simplified. It may be sufficient to record a few characteristic electrode positions and merge them with a model of the posterior array.

  8. Steerable Space Fed Lens Array for Low-Cost Adaptive Ground Station Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Richard Q.; Popovic, Zoya; Rondineau, Sebastien; Miranda, Felix A.

    2007-01-01

    The Space Fed Lens Array (SFLA) is an alternative to a phased array antenna that replaces large numbers of expensive solid-state phase shifters with a single spatial feed network. SFLA can be used for multi-beam application where multiple independent beams can be generated simultaneously with a single antenna aperture. Unlike phased array antennas where feed loss increases with array size, feed loss in a lens array with more than 50 elements is nearly independent of the number of elements, a desirable feature for large apertures. In addition, SFLA has lower cost as compared to a phased array at the expense of total volume and complete beam continuity. For ground station applications, both of these tradeoff parameters are not important and can thus be exploited in order to lower the cost of the ground station. In this paper, we report the development and demonstration of a 952-element beam-steerable SFLA intended for use as a low cost ground station for communicating and tracking of a low Earth orbiting satellite. The dynamic beam steering is achieved through switching to different feed-positions of the SFLA via a beam controller.

  9. Hydrothermal synthesis of porous Co(OH)2 nanoflake array film and its supercapacitor application

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Z Chen; Y Chen; C Zuo; S Zhou; A G Xiao; A X Pan

    2013-04-01

    Porous -Co(OH)2 nanoflake array film is prepared by a facile hydrothermal synthesis method. The -Co(OH)2 nanoflake array film exhibits a highly porous net-like structure composed of interconnected nanoflakes with a thickness of 15 nm. The pseudo-capacitive behaviour of the Co(OH)2 nanoflake array film is investigated by cyclic voltammograms (CV) and galvanostatic charge–discharge tests in 2MKOH. The -Co(OH)2 nanoflake array film exhibits high capacitances of 1017 F g-1 at 2Ag-1 and 890 F g-1 at 40Ag-1 as well as rather good cycling stability for supercapacitor application. The porous architecture is responsible for the enhancement of the electrochemical properties because it provides fast ion and electron transfer, large reaction surface area and good strain accommodation.

  10. Investigation of the Sequential Rotation Technique and its Application in Phased Arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Niels Vesterdal

    2007-01-01

    This report documents the investigations of the sequential rotation technique in application to phased array antennas. A spherical wave expansion for the far field of sequentially phased arrays is derived for general antenna elements. This model is approximate in that it assumes that the element...... patterns are identical and it does not included the effects of mutual coupling between the elements. For this reason it is compared with more accurate numerical models which include the coupling effects. The results show that the sequential rotation technique generally improves the performance...... of the phased array also when it is scanned off bore sight. For array topologies where the elements are not positioned rotationally symmetric the performance of the sequential rotation is to some extent impaired by the mutual coupling and non-identical element patterns. These effects are not evident from...

  11. Parameterizing Quasiperiodicity: Generalized Poisson Summation and Its Application to Modified-Fibonacci Antenna Arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Galdi, V; Pierro, V; Pinto, I M; Felsen, L B; Galdi, Vincenzo; Castaldi, Giuseppe; Pierro, Vincenzo; Pinto, Innocenzo M.; Felsen, Leopold B.

    2005-01-01

    The fairly recent discovery of "quasicrystals", whose X-ray diffraction patterns reveal certain peculiar features which do not conform with spatial periodicity, has motivated studies of the wave-dynamical implications of "aperiodic order". Within the context of the radiation properties of antenna arrays, an instructive novel (canonical) example of wave interactions with quasiperiodic order is illustrated here for one-dimensional (1-D) array configurations based on the "modified-Fibonacci" sequence, with utilization of a two-scale generalization of the standard Poisson summation formula for periodic arrays. This allows for a "quasi-Floquet" analytic parameterization of the radiated field, which provides instructive insights into some of the basic wave mechanisms associated with quasiperiodic order, highlighting similarities and differences with the periodic case. Examples are shown for quasiperiodic infinite and spatially-truncated arrays, with brief discussion of computational issues and potential application...

  12. AnovArray: a set of SAS macros for the analysis of variance of gene expression data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renard Jean-Paul

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Analysis of variance is a powerful approach to identify differentially expressed genes in a complex experimental design for microarray and macroarray data. The advantage of the anova model is the possibility to evaluate multiple sources of variation in an experiment. Results AnovArray is a package implementing ANOVA for gene expression data using SAS® statistical software. The originality of the package is 1 to quantify the different sources of variation on all genes together, 2 to provide a quality control of the model, 3 to propose two models for a gene's variance estimation and to perform a correction for multiple comparisons. Conclusion AnovArray is freely available at http://www-mig.jouy.inra.fr/stat/AnovArray and requires only SAS® statistical software.

  13. Body conformable 915 MHz microstrip array applicators for large surface area hyperthermia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, E.R.; Tarczy-Hornoch, P.; Kapp, S.; Fessenden, P.; Lohrbach, A.W.; Prionas, S.D. (Stanford University Medical Center, CA (United States)); Wilsey, T. (Carian Associates, Palo Alto, CA (United States))

    1992-01-01

    The optimal treatment with hyperthermia of superficially located tumors which involve large surface areas requires applicators which can physically conform to body contours, and locally alter their power deposition patterns to adjust for nonuniform temperature caused by tissue inhomogeneities and blood flow variations. A series of 915 MHz microstrip array applicators satisfying these criteria have been developed and clinically tested. Clinical and engineering design tradeoffs for practical devices are discussed. Measurements taken in tissue equivalent phantoms and a summary of clinical experiences with these microstrip arrays are presented.

  14. Gene expression profiles in squamous cell cervical carcinoma using array-based comparative genomic hybridization analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Y-W; Bae, S M; Kim, Y-W; Lee, H N; Kim, Y W; Park, T C; Ro, D Y; Shin, J C; Shin, S J; Seo, J-S; Ahn, W S

    2007-01-01

    Our aim was to identify novel genomic regions of interest and provide highly dynamic range information on correlation between squamous cell cervical carcinoma and its related gene expression patterns by a genome-wide array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH). We analyzed 15 cases of cervical cancer from KangNam St Mary's Hospital of the Catholic University of Korea. Microdissection assay was performed to obtain DNA samples from paraffin-embedded cervical tissues of cancer as well as of the adjacent normal tissues. The bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) array used in this study consisted of 1440 human BACs and the space among the clones was 2.08 Mb. All the 15 cases of cervical cancer showed the differential changes of the cervical cancer-associated genetic alterations. The analysis limit of average gains and losses was 53%. A significant positive correlation was found in 8q24.3, 1p36.32, 3q27.1, 7p21.1, 11q13.1, and 3p14.2 changes through the cervical carcinogenesis. The regions of high level of gain were 1p36.33-1p36.32, 8q24.3, 16p13.3, 1p36.33, 3q27.1, and 7p21.1. And the regions of homozygous loss were 2q12.1, 22q11.21, 3p14.2, 6q24.3, 7p15.2, and 11q25. In the high level of gain regions, GSDMDC1, RECQL4, TP73, ABCF3, ALG3, HDAC9, ESRRA, and RPS6KA4 were significantly correlated with cervical cancer. The genes encoded by frequently lost clones were PTPRG, GRM7, ZDHHC3, EXOSC7, LRP1B, and NR3C2. Therefore, array-CGH analyses showed that specific genomic alterations were maintained in cervical cancer that were critical to the malignant phenotype and may give a chance to find out possible target genes present in the gained or lost clones.

  15. Preparation, applications, and digital simulation of carbon interdigitated array electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fei; Kolesov, Grigory; Parkinson, B A

    2014-08-05

    Carbon interdigitated array (IDA) electrodes with features sizes down to 1.2 μm were fabricated by controlled pyrolysis of patterned photoresist. Cyclic voltammetry of reversible redox species produced the expected steady-state currents. The collection efficiency depends on the IDA electrode spacing, which ranged from around 2.7 to 16.5 μm, with the smaller dimensions achieving higher collection efficiencies of up to 98%. The signal amplification because of redox cycling makes it possible to detect species at relatively low concentrations (10(-5) molar) and the small spacing allows detection of transient electrogenerated species with much shorter lifetimes (submillisecond). Digital simulation software that accounts for both the width and height of electrode elements as well as the electrode spacing was developed to model the IDA electrode response. The simulations are in quantitative agreement with experimental data for both a simple fast one electron redox reaction and an electron transfer with a following chemical reaction at the IDAs with larger gaps whereas currents measured for the smallest IDA electrodes, that were larger than the simulated currents, are attributed to convection from induced charge electrokinetic flow.

  16. Preparation, Applications, and Digital Simulation of Carbon Interdigitated Array Electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Fei; Kolesov, Grigory; Parkinson, Bruce A.

    2014-12-16

    Carbon interdigitated array (IDA) electrodes with features sizes down to 1.2 μm were fabricated by controlled pyrolysis of patterned photoresist. Cyclic voltam-metry of reversible redox species produced the expected steady-state currents. The collection efficiency depends on the IDA electrode spacing, which ranged from around 2.7 to 16.5 μm, with the smaller dimensions achieving higher collection efficiencies of up to 98%. The signal amplification because of redox cycling makes it possible to detect species at relatively low concentrations (10–5 molar) and the small spacing allows detection of transient electrogenerated species with much shorter lifetimes (submillisecond). Digital simulation software that accounts for both the width and height of electrode elements as well as the electrode spacing was developed to model the IDA electrode response. The simulations are in quantitative agreement with experimental data for both a simple fast one electron redox reaction and an electron transfer with a following chemical reaction at the IDAs with larger gaps whereas currents measured for the smallest IDA electrodes, that were larger than the simulated currents, are attributed to convection from induced charge electrokinetic flow. This work was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the Department of Energy, Office of Science Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  17. Global analysis of candidate genes important for fitness in a competitive biofilm using DNA-array-based transposon mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junker, Lauren M; Peters, Joseph E; Hay, Anthony G

    2006-08-01

    Escherichia coli strain PHL628 was subjected to saturating Tn5 transposon mutagenesis and then grown under competitive planktonic or biofilm conditions. The locations of transposon insertions from the remaining cells were then mapped on a gene array. The results from the array mapping indicated that 4.5 % of the E. coli genome was important under these conditions. Specifically, 114 genes were identified as important for the biofilm lifestyle, whereas 80 genes were important for the planktonic lifestyle. Four broad functional categories were identified as biofilm-important. These included genes encoding cell structures, small-molecule transport, energy metabolism and regulatory functions. For one of these genes, arcA, an insertion mutant was generated and its biofilm-related phenotype was examined. Results from both the transposon array and insertion mutagenesis indicated that arcA, which is known to be a negative response regulator of genes in aerobic pathways, was important for competitiveness in E. coli PHL628 biofilms. This work also demonstrated that ligation-mediated PCR, coupled with array-based transposon mapping, was an effective tool for identifying a large variety of candidate genes that are important for biofilm fitness.

  18. Gene Therapy and its applications in Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Lakhanpal Manisha

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This era of advanced technology is marked by progress in identifying and understanding the molecular and cellular cause of a disease. With the conventional methods of treatment failing to render satisfactory results, gene therapy is not only being used for the cure of inherited diseases but also the acquired ones. The broad spectrum of gene therapy includes its application in the treatment of oral cancer and precancerous conditions and lesions, treatment of salivary gland diseases, bone repair, autoimmune diseases, DNA vaccination, etc. The aim of this article is to throw light on the history, methodology, applications and future of gene therapy as it would change the nature and face of dentistry in the coming years.

  19. Heteroduplex analysis by capillary array electrophoresis for rapid mutation detection in large multiexon genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, Eladio; Infante, Mar; Durán, Mercedes; Pérez-Cabornero, Lucía; Sanz, David J; Esteban-Cardeñosa, Eva; Miner, Cristina

    2007-01-01

    Heteroduplex analysis (HA) has proven to be a robust tool for mutation detection. HA by capillary array electrophoresis (HA-CAE) was developed to increase throughput and allow the scanning of large multiexon genes in multicapillary DNA sequencers. HA-CAE is a straightforward and high-throughput technique to detect both known and novel DNA variants with a high level of sensitivity and specificity. It consists of only three steps: multiplex-PCR using fluorescently labeled primers, heteroduplex formation and electrophoresis in a multicapillary DNA sequencer. It allows, e.g., the complete coding and flanking intronic sequences of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes from two patients (approximately 25 kb each) to be scanned in a single run of a 16-capillary sequencer, and has enabled us to detect 150 different mutations to date (both single nucleotide substitutions, or SNSs, and small insertions/deletions). Here, we describe the protocol developed in our laboratory to scan BRCA1, BRCA2, MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 genes using an ABI3130XL sequencer. This protocol could be adapted to other instruments or to the study of other large multiexon genes and can be completed in 7-8 h.

  20. Ion cyclotron and lower hybrid arrays applicable to current drive in fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosia, G.; Helou, W.; Goniche, M.; Hillaret, J.; Ragona, R.

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents concepts for Ion Cyclotron and Lower Hybrid Current Drive arrays applicable to fusion reactors and based on periodically loaded line power division. It is shown that, in large arrays, such as the ones proposed for fusion reactor applications, these schemes can offer, in principle, a number of practical advantages, compared with currently adopted ones, such as in-blanket operation at significantly reduced power density, lay out suitable for water cooling, single ended or balanced power feed, simple and load independent impedance matching In addition, a remote and accurate real time measurement of the complex impedance of all array elements as well as detection, location, and measurement of the complex admittance of a single arc occurring anywhere in the structure is possible.

  1. Characterization of SPAD Array for Multifocal High-Content Screening Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Tsikouras

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Current instruments used to detect specific protein-protein interactions in live cells for applications in high-content screening (HCS are limited by the time required to measure the lifetime. Here, a 32 × 1 single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD array was explored as a detector for fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM in HCS. Device parameters and characterization results were interpreted in the context of the application to determine if the SPAD array could satisfy the requirements of HCS-FLIM. Fluorescence lifetime measurements were performed using a known fluorescence standard; and the recovered fluorescence lifetime matched literature reported values. The design of a theoretical 32 × 32 SPAD array was also considered as a detector for a multi-point confocal scanning microscope.

  2. Application of Uncooled Monolithic Thermoelectric Linear Arrays to Imaging Radiometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Paul W.

    Introduction Identification of Incipient Failure of Railcar Wheels Technical Description of the Model IR 1000 Imaging Radiometer Performance of the Model IR 1000 Imaging Radiometer Initial Application Summary Imaging Radiometer for Predictive and Preventive Maintenance Description Operation Specifications Summary References INDEX CONTENTS OF VOLUMES IN THIS SERIES

  3. Hexabundles: imaging fiber arrays for low-light astronomical applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Bryant, Julia; Robertson, Gordon;

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate for the first time an imaging fibre bundle (“hexabundle”) that is suitable for low-light applications in astronomy. The most successful survey instruments at optical-infrared wavelengths today have obtained data on up to a million celestial sources using hundreds of multimode fibre...

  4. A pulmonary rat gene array for screening altered expression profiles in air pollutant-induced lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadadur, S S; Schladweiler, M C; Kodavanti, U P

    2000-12-01

    Pulmonary tissue injury and repair processes involve complex and coordinated cellular events such as necrosis, inflammation, cell growth/differentiation, apoptosis, and remodeling of extracellular matrix. These processes are regulated by expression of multiple mediator genes. Commercially available microarray blots and slides allow screening of hundreds to thousands of genes in a given tissue or cell preparation. However, often these blots do not contain cDNAs of one's interest and are difficult to interpret. In order to analyze the tissue expression profile of a large number of genes involved in pulmonary injury and pathology, we developed a rat gene array filter using array technology. This array consisted of 27 genes representing inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines, growth factors, adhesion molecules, stress proteins, transcription factors and antioxidant enzymes; 3 negative controls, and 2 blank spots. Using rat gene-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primer pairs, cDNAs for these genes were amplified and cloned into a TA vector. Plasmids with recombinant cDNA inserts were purified and blotted onto a nylon membrane. Lung total RNA was isolated at 3 or 24 h following intratracheal (IT) exposure of male Sprague Dawley rats to either saline (control), residual oil fly ash (ROFA; 3.3 mg/kg) or metals found in one instillate of ROFA: nickel (NiSO(4); 1. 3 micromol/kg) or vanadium (VSO(4); 2.2 micromol/kg). (32)P-Labeled cDNA was generated from RNA samples in a reverse transcriptase reaction and subsequently hybridized to array blots. Densitometric scans of array blots revealed a twofold induction of interleukin (IL)-6 and TIMP-1 at 24 h post ROFA or Ni exposure. The pulmonary expressions of cellular fibronectin (cFn-EIIIA), ICAM-1, IL-1beta, and iNOS genes were also increased 24 h post ROFA-, V-, or Ni-exposure. Consistent hybridization of beta-actin in all array blots and absence of hybridization signals in negative controls indicated gene specific

  5. Rapid mutation detection in complex genes by heteroduplex analysis with capillary array electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, Eladio; Infante, Mar; Durán, Mercedes; Esteban-Cardeñosa, Eva; Lastra, Enrique; García-Girón, Carlos; Miner, Cristina

    2005-06-01

    Mutational analysis of large multiexon genes without prevalent mutations is a laborious undertaking that requires the use of a high-throughput scanning technique. The Human Genome Project has enabled the development of powerful techniques for mutation detection in large multiexon genes. We have transferred heteroduplex analysis (HA) by conformation-sensitive gel electrophoresis of the two major breast cancer (BC) predisposing genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, to a multicapillary DNA sequencer in order to increase the throughput of this technique. This new method that we have called heteroduplex analysis by capillary array electrophoresis (HA-CAE) is based on the use of multiplex-polymerase chain reaction (PCR), different fluorescent labels and HA in a 16-capillary DNA sequencer. To date, a total of 114 different DNA sequence variants (19 insertions/deletions and 95 single-nucleotide substitutions - SNS) of BRCA1 and BRCA2 from 431 unrelated BC families have been successfully detected by HA-CAE. In addition, we have optimized the multiplex-PCR conditions for the colorectal cancer genes MLH1 and MSH2 in order to analyze them by HA-CAE. Both genes have been amplified in 13 multiplex groups, which contain the 35 exons, and their corresponding flanking intronic sequences. MLH1 and MSH2 have been analyzed in nine hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer patients, and we have found six different DNA changes: one complex deletion/insertion mutation in MLH1 exon 19 and another five SNS. Only the complex mutation and one SNS may be classified as cancer-prone mutations. Our experience has revealed that HA-CAE is a simple, fast, reproducible and sensitive method to scan the sequences of complex genes.

  6. A light writable microfluidic "flash memory": optically addressed actuator array with latched operation for microfluidic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Zhishan; Pal, Rohit; Srivannavit, Onnop; Burns, Mark A; Gulari, Erdogan

    2008-03-01

    This paper presents a novel optically addressed microactuator array (microfluidic "flash memory") with latched operation. Analogous to the address-data bus mediated memory address protocol in electronics, the microactuator array consists of individual phase-change based actuators addressed by localized heating through focused light patterns (address bus), which can be provided by a modified projector or high power laser pointer. A common pressure manifold (data bus) for the entire array is used to generate large deflections of the phase change actuators in the molten phase. The use of phase change material as the working media enables latched operation of the actuator array. After the initial light "writing" during which the phase is temporarily changed to molten, the actuated status is self-maintained by the solid phase of the actuator without power and pressure inputs. The microfluidic flash memory can be re-configured by a new light illumination pattern and common pressure signal. The proposed approach can achieve actuation of arbitrary units in a large-scale array without the need for complex external equipment such as solenoid valves and electrical modules, which leads to significantly simplified system implementation and compact system size. The proposed work therefore provides a flexible, energy-efficient, and low cost multiplexing solution for microfluidic applications based on physical displacements. As an example, the use of the latched microactuator array as "normally closed" or "normally open" microvalves is demonstrated. The phase-change wax is fully encapsulated and thus immune from contamination issues in fluidic environments.

  7. Novel multi-sided, microelectrode arrays for implantable neural applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, John P.; Langhals, Nick B.; Anderson, David J.; Kipke, Daryl R.

    2014-01-01

    A new parylene-based microfabrication process is presented for neural recording and drug delivery applications. We introduce a large design space for electrode placement and structural flexibility with a six mask process. By using chemical mechanical polishing, electrode sites may be created top-side, back-side, or on the edge of the device having three exposed sides. Added surface area was achieved on the exposed edge through electroplating. Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) modified edge electrodes having an 85-μm2 footprint resulted in an impedance of 200 kΩ at 1 kHz. Edge electrodes were able to successfully record single unit activity in acute animal studies. A finite element model of planar and edge electrodes relative to neuron position reveals that edge electrodes should be beneficial for increasing the volume of tissue being sampled in recording applications. PMID:21301965

  8. Silicon Nanoridge Array Waveguides for Nonlinear and Sensing Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Puckett, Matthew W; Vallini, Felipe; Shahin, Shiva; Monifi, Faraz; Barrina, Peter N; Mehravar, Soroush; Kieu, Khanh; Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    2015-01-01

    We fabricate and characterize waveguides composed of closely spaced and longitudinally oriented silicon ridges etched into silicon-on-insulator wafers. Through both guided mode and bulk measurements, we demonstrate that the patterning of silicon waveguides on such a deeply subwavelength scale is desirable for nonlinear and sensing applications alike. The proposed waveguide geometry simultaneously exhibits comparable propagation loss to similar schemes proposed in literature, an enhanced effective third-order nonlinear susceptibility, and high sensitivity to perturbations in its environment.

  9. LEO resistant PI-B-PDMS block copolymer films for solar array applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lonkhuyzen, H. van; Bongers, E.; Fischer, H.R.; Dingemans, T.J.; Semprimoschnig, C.

    2013-01-01

    Due to their low atomic oxygen erosion yields PI-b-PDMS block copolymer films have considerable potential for application onto space exposed surfaces of satellites in low earth orbit. On solar arrays these materials might be used as electrical electrical insulation film, flexprint outer layer, elect

  10. A 28 GHz FR-4 Compatible Phased Array Antenna for 5G Mobile Phone Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ojaroudiparchin, Naser; Shen, Ming; Pedersen, Gert F.

    2015-01-01

    The design of a 28 GHz phased array antenna for future fifth generation (5G) mobile-phone applications has been presented in this paper. The proposed antenna can be implemented using low cost FR-4 substrates, while maintaining good performance in terms of gain and efficiency. This is achieved...

  11. LEO resistant PI-B-PDMS block copolymer films for solar array applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lonkhuyzen, H. van; Bongers, E.; Fischer, H.R.; Dingemans, T.J.; Semprimoschnig, C.

    2013-01-01

    Due to their low atomic oxygen erosion yields PI-b-PDMS block copolymer films have considerable potential for application onto space exposed surfaces of satellites in low earth orbit. On solar arrays these materials might be used as electrical electrical insulation film, flexprint outer layer,

  12. Phased-Array Monolithic PEM for FT Spectrometry With Applications in Explosive Detection and CB Defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    1 PHASED-ARRAY MONOLITHIC PEM FOR FT SPECTROMETRY WITH APPLICATIONS IN EXPLOSIVE DETECTION AND CB DEFENSE Tudor N. Buican* Semiotic ...PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Semiotic Engineering Associates LLC Albuquerque, NM 87108 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9

  13. Applications of a Networked Array of Small Satellites for Planetary Observation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gunter, B.C.; Maessen, D.C.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study is to explore those applications which can best utilize a network of orbiting satellites working as a distributed computing array. The satellites are presumed to be low-cost mini- or micro-satellites orbiting Earth or some other celestial body (i.e., an asteroid, moon, etc.),

  14. LEO resistant PI-B-PDMS block copolymer films for solar array applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lonkhuyzen, H. van; Bongers, E.; Fischer, H.R.; Dingemans, T.J.; Semprimoschnig, C.

    2013-01-01

    Due to their low atomic oxygen erosion yields PI-b-PDMS block copolymer films have considerable potential for application onto space exposed surfaces of satellites in low earth orbit. On solar arrays these materials might be used as electrical electrical insulation film, flexprint outer layer, elect

  15. Precise Calibration of a GNSS Antenna Array for Adaptive Beamforming Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Daneshmand

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The use of global navigation satellite system (GNSS antenna arrays for applications such as interference counter-measure, attitude determination and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR enhancement is attracting significant attention. However, precise antenna array calibration remains a major challenge. This paper proposes a new method for calibrating a GNSS antenna array using live signals and an inertial measurement unit (IMU. Moreover, a second method that employs the calibration results for the estimation of steering vectors is also proposed. These two methods are applied to the receiver in two modes, namely calibration and operation. In the calibration mode, a two-stage optimization for precise calibration is used; in the first stage, constant uncertainties are estimated while in the second stage, the dependency of each antenna element gain and phase patterns to the received signal direction of arrival (DOA is considered for refined calibration. In the operation mode, a low-complexity iterative and fast-converging method is applied to estimate the satellite signal steering vectors using the calibration results. This makes the technique suitable for real-time applications employing a precisely calibrated antenna array. The proposed calibration method is applied to GPS signals to verify its applicability and assess its performance. Furthermore, the data set is used to evaluate the proposed iterative method in the receiver operation mode for two different applications, namely attitude determination and SNR enhancement.

  16. Precise calibration of a GNSS antenna array for adaptive beamforming applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshmand, Saeed; Sokhandan, Negin; Zaeri-Amirani, Mohammad; Lachapelle, Gérard

    2014-05-30

    The use of global navigation satellite system (GNSS) antenna arrays for applications such as interference counter-measure, attitude determination and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) enhancement is attracting significant attention. However, precise antenna array calibration remains a major challenge. This paper proposes a new method for calibrating a GNSS antenna array using live signals and an inertial measurement unit (IMU). Moreover, a second method that employs the calibration results for the estimation of steering vectors is also proposed. These two methods are applied to the receiver in two modes, namely calibration and operation. In the calibration mode, a two-stage optimization for precise calibration is used; in the first stage, constant uncertainties are estimated while in the second stage, the dependency of each antenna element gain and phase patterns to the received signal direction of arrival (DOA) is considered for refined calibration. In the operation mode, a low-complexity iterative and fast-converging method is applied to estimate the satellite signal steering vectors using the calibration results. This makes the technique suitable for real-time applications employing a precisely calibrated antenna array. The proposed calibration method is applied to GPS signals to verify its applicability and assess its performance. Furthermore, the data set is used to evaluate the proposed iterative method in the receiver operation mode for two different applications, namely attitude determination and SNR enhancement.

  17. Applications of a Networked Array of Small Satellites for Planetary Observation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gunter, B.C.; Maessen, D.C.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study is to explore those applications which can best utilize a network of orbiting satellites working as a distributed computing array. The satellites are presumed to be low-cost mini- or micro-satellites orbiting Earth or some other celestial body (i.e., an asteroid, moon, etc.),

  18. Application of Celluspots peptide arrays for the analysis of the binding specificity of epigenetic reading domains to modified histone tails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhayalan Arunkumar

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epigenetic reading domains are involved in the regulation of gene expression and chromatin state by interacting with histones in a post-translational modification specific manner. A detailed knowledge of the target modifications of reading domains, including enhancing and inhibiting secondary modifications, will lead to a better understanding of the biological signaling processes mediated by reading domains. Results We describe the application of Celluspots peptide arrays which contain 384 histone peptides carrying 59 post translational modifications in different combinations as an inexpensive, reliable and fast method for initial screening for specific interactions of reading domains with modified histone peptides. To validate the method, we tested the binding specificities of seven known epigenetic reading domains on Celluspots peptide arrays, viz. the HP1ß and MPP8 Chromo domains, JMJD2A and 53BP1 Tudor domains, Dnmt3a PWWP domain, Rag2 PHD domain and BRD2 Bromo domain. In general, the binding results agreed with literature data with respect to the primary specificity of the reading domains, but in almost all cases we obtained additional new information concerning the influence of secondary modifications surrounding the target modification. Conclusions We conclude that Celluspots peptide arrays are powerful screening tools for studying the specificity of putative reading domains binding to modified histone peptides.

  19. Feasibility of a multipurpose transceiver module for phased array radar and EW applications using RFIC technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sarawi, Said; Hansen, Hedley; Zhu, Yingbo

    2007-12-01

    Phased array antennas have a large number of civilian and military applications. In this paper we briefly review common approaches to an integrated implementation of radar and electronic warfare digital phase array module and highlight features that are common to both of these applications. Then we discuss how the promising features of the radio frequency integrated circuit (RFIC)-based technology can be utilized in building a transceiver module that meets the requirements of both radar and electronic warfare applications with minimum number of external components. This is achieved by researching the pros and cons of the different receiver architectures and their performance from the targeted applications point of view. Then, we survey current RFIC technologies and highlight the pros and cons of these technologies and how they impact the performance of the discussed receiver architectures.

  20. Application of a Halbach magnetic array for long-range cell and particle separations in biological samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Joo H.; Driscoll, Harry; Super, Michael; Ingber, Donald E.

    2016-05-01

    Here, we describe a versatile application of a planar Halbach permanent magnet array for an efficient long-range magnetic separation of living cells and microparticles over distances up to 30 mm. A Halbach array was constructed from rectangular bar magnets using 3D-printed holders and compared to a conventional alternating array of identical magnets. We theoretically predicted the superiority of the Halbach array for a long-range magnetic separation and then experimentally validated that the Halbach configuration outperforms the alternating array for isolating magnetic microparticles or microparticle-bound bacterial cells at longer distances. Magnetophoretic velocities (ymag) of magnetic particles (7.9 μm diameter) induced by the Halbach array in a microfluidic device were significantly higher and extended over a larger area than those induced by the alternating magnet array (ymag = 178 versus 0 μm/s at 10 mm, respectively). When applied to 50 ml tubes (˜30 mm diameter), the Halbach array removed >95% of Staphylococcus aureus bacterial cells bound with 1 μm magnetic particles compared to ˜70% removed using the alternating array. In addition, the Halbach array enabled manipulation of 1 μm magnetic beads in a deep 96-well plate for ELISA applications, which was not possible with the conventional magnet arrays. Our analysis demonstrates the utility of the Halbach array for the future design of devices for high-throughput magnetic separations of cells, molecules, and toxins.

  1. Development of macropore arrays in silicon and related technologies for X-ray imaging applications

    OpenAIRE

    Badel, Xavier

    2003-01-01

    Digital devices have started to replace photographic film inX-ray imaging applications. As compared to photographic films,these devices are more convenient to obtain images and tohandle, treat and store these images. The goal of the presentstudy is to develop macropore arrays and related silicontechnologies in order to fabricate X-ray imaging detectors formedical applications, and in particular for dentistry. Althougha few detectors are already available on the market, theirperformances, such...

  2. Freestanding membrane composed of micro-ring array with ultrahigh sidewall aspect ratio for application in lightweight cathode arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lanlan [State Key Laboratory for Manufacturing Systems Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Liu, Hongzhong, E-mail: hzliu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Manufacturing Systems Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Jiang, Weitao, E-mail: wtjiang@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Manufacturing Systems Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Gao, Wei [Key Laboratory of Mechanics on Western Disasters and Environment, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Chen, Bangdao [State Key Laboratory for Manufacturing Systems Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Li, Xin [Department of Microelectronics, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Ding, Yucheng [State Key Laboratory for Manufacturing Systems Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); An, Ningli [Department of Packaging Engineering, Xi’an University of Technology, Xi’an 710048 (China)

    2014-12-15

    Graphical abstract: A freestanding multilayer ultrathin nano-membrane (FUN-membrane) with a micro-ring array (MRA), in which the dimension of each micro-ring is 3 μm in diameter, 2 μm in height and sub-100 nm in sidewall thickness is successfully fabricated, as shown in the SEM image of figure (a). Due to the MRA with ultrahigh aspect ratio of dielectric-metal sidewall, the FUN-membrane can be transferred to either rigid or flexible substrate to be used as the cathode for lightweight display panel, as shown in the schematic of figure (b). - Highlights: • Exploring a new fabrication method for the freestanding ultrathin nano-membrane (FUN-membrane). • FUN-membrane is composed of micro-ring array with ultrahigh aspect ratio of the insulator-metal sidewall. • The sharp metal edge of each micro-ring is preferred to be served as the micro-emitter. - Abstract: A freestanding multilayer ultrathin nano-membrane (FUN-membrane) with a micro-ring array (MRA) is successfully fabricated through the controllable film deposition. Each micro-ring of FUN-membrane is 3 μm in diameter, 2 μm in height and sub-100 nm in sidewall thickness, demonstrating an ultrahigh sidewall aspect ratio of 20:1. In our strategy, a silica layer (200 nm in thickness), a chromium transition layer (5 nm-thick) and a gold layer (40 nm-thick), were in sequence deposited on patterned photoresist. After removal of the photoresist by lift-off process, a FUN-membrane with MRA was peeled off from the substrate, where the gold layer acted as a protecting layer to prevent the MRA from fracture. The FUN-membrane was then transferred to a flexible polycarbonate (PC) sheet coated with indium tin oxide (ITO) layer, which was then used as a flexible and lightweight cathode. Remarkably, the field emission effect of the fabricated FUN-membrane cathode performs a high field-enhancement factor of 1.2 × 10{sup 4} and a low turn-on voltage of 2 V/μm, indicating the advantages of the sharp metal edge of MRA. Due

  3. Polymer nanopillar-gold arrays as surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy substrate for the simultaneous detection of multiple genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picciolini, Silvia; Mehn, Dora; Morasso, Carlo; Vanna, Renzo; Bedoni, Marzia; Pellacani, Paola; Marchesini, Gerardo; Valsesia, Andrea; Prosperi, Davide; Tresoldi, Cristina; Ciceri, Fabio; Gramatica, Furio

    2014-10-28

    In our study, 2D nanopillar arrays with plasmonic crystal properties are optimized for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) application and tested in a biochemical assay for the simultaneous detection of multiple genetic leukemia biomarkers. The special fabrication process combining soft lithography and plasma deposition techniques allows tailoring of the structural and chemical parameters of the crystal surfaces. In this way, it has been possible to tune the plasmonic resonance spectral position close to the excitation wavelength of the monochromatic laser light source in order to maximize the enhancing properties of the substrate. Samples are characterized by scanning electron microscopy and reflectance measurements and tested for SERS activity using malachite green. Besides, as the developed substrate had been prepared on a simple glass slide, SERS detection from the support side is also demonstrated. The optimized substrate is functionalized with thiol-modified capture oligonucleotides, and concentration-dependent signal of the target nucleotide is detected in a sandwich assay with labeled gold nanoparticles. Gold nanoparticles functionalized with different DNA and various Raman reporters are applied in a microarray-based assay recognizing a disease biomarker (Wilms tumor gene) and housekeeping gene expressions in the same time on spatially separated microspots. The multiplexing performance of the SERS-based bioassay is illustrated by distinguishing Raman dyes based on their complex spectral fingerprints.

  4. Application of a circular 2D hard-sphere microphone array for higher-order Ambisonics auralization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weller, Tobias; Favrot, Sylvain Emmanuel; Buchholz, Jörg

    2011-01-01

    A circular microphone array mounted on a rigid sphere was realized and its application to higherorder Ambisonics (HOA) auralization was analysed. Besides the 2D Ambisonics application this array design provides a promising basis for the development of a mixed-order Ambisonics recording system...

  5. Multiplexed optical operation of nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) arrays for sensing and signal-processing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampathkumar, Ashwin

    2014-06-01

    NEMS are rapidly being developed for a variety of sensing applications as well as for exploring interesting regimes in fundamental physics. In most of these endeavors, operation of a NEMS device involves actuating the device harmonically around its fundamental resonance and detecting subsequent motion while the device interacts with its environment. Even though a single NEMS resonator is exceptionally sensitive, a typical application, such as sensing or signal processing, requires the detection of signals from many resonators distributed over the surface of a chip. Therefore, one of the key technological challenges in the field of NEMS is development of multiplexed measurement techniques to detect the motion of a large number of NEMS resonators simultaneously. In this work, we address the important and difficult problem of interfacing with a large number of NEMS devices and facilitating the use of such arrays in, for example, sensing and signal processing applications. We report a versatile, all-optical technique to excite and read-out a distributed NEMS array. The NEMS array is driven by a distributed, intensity-modulated, optical pump through the photothermal effect. The ensuing vibrational response of the array is multiplexed onto a single, probe beam as a high-frequency phase modulation. The phase modulation is optically down converted to a low-frequency, intensity modulation using an adaptive full -field interferometer, and subsequently is detected using a charge-coupled device (CCD) array. Rapid and single-step mechanical characterization of approximately 60 nominally identical, high-frequency resonators is demonstrated. The technique may enable sensitivity improvements over single NEMS resonators by averaging signals coming from a multitude of devices in the array. In addition, the diffraction-limited spatial resolution may allow for position-dependent read-out of NEMS sensor chips for sensing multiple analytes or spatially inhomogeneous forces.

  6. [Subchromosomal microdeletion identified by molecular karyotyping using DNA microarrays (array CGH) in Rett syndrome girls negative for MECP2 gene mutations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorsanova, S G; Iurov, I Iu; Voinova, V Iu; Kurinnaia, O S; Zelenova, M A; Demidova, I A; Ulas, E V; Iurov, Iu B

    2013-01-01

    Molecular karyotyping using DNA microarrays (array CGH) was applied for identification of subchromosomal microdeletions in a cohort of 12 girls with clinical features of RETT syndrome, but negative for MECP2 gene mutations. Recurrent microdeletions of MECP2 gene in chromosome X (locus Xq28) were identified in 5 girls of 12 studied. Probably RTT girls with subchromosomic microdeletions in Xq28 could represent a special subtype of the disease, which appears as clinically milder than the classic form of disease. In one case, an atypical form of RTT was associated with genomic abnormalities affecting CDKL5 gene and region critical for microdeletion Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes (15q11.2). In addition, data are presented for the first time that genetic variation in regions 3p13, 3q27.1, and 1q21.1-1q21.2 could associate with RTT-like clinical manifestations. Without application of molecular karyotyping technology and bioinformatic method of assessing the pathogenic significance of genomic rearrangements these RTT-like girls negative for MECP2 gene mutations were considered as cases of idiopathic mental retardation associated with autism. It should be noted that absence of intragenic mutations in MECP2 gene is not sufficient criteria to reject the clinical diagnosis of RTT. To avoid errors in the genetic diagnosis of this genetically heterogeneous brain disease molecular cytogenetic studies using high resolution oligonucleotide array CGH (molecular karyotyping) are needed.

  7. Vaginal microbiome and epithelial gene array in post-menopausal women with moderate to severe dryness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummelen, Ruben; Macklaim, Jean M; Bisanz, Jordan E; Hammond, Jo-Anne; McMillan, Amy; Vongsa, Rebecca; Koenig, David; Gloor, Gregory B; Reid, Gregor

    2011-01-01

    After menopause, many women experience vaginal dryness and atrophy of tissue, often attributed to the loss of estrogen. An understudied aspect of vaginal health in women who experience dryness due to atrophy is the role of the resident microbes. It is known that the microbiota has an important role in healthy vaginal homeostasis, including maintaining the pH balance and excluding pathogens. The objectives of this study were twofold: first to identify the microbiome of post-menopausal women with and without vaginal dryness and symptoms of atrophy; and secondly to examine any differences in epithelial gene expression associated with atrophy. The vaginal microbiome of 32 post-menopausal women was profiled using Illumina sequencing of the V6 region of the 16S rRNA gene. Sixteen subjects were selected for follow-up sampling every two weeks for 10 weeks. In addition, 10 epithelial RNA samples (6 healthy and 4 experiencing vaginal dryness) were acquired for gene expression analysis by Affymetrix Human Gene array. The microbiota abundance profiles were relatively stable over 10 weeks compared to previously published data on premenopausal women. There was an inverse correlation between Lactobacillus ratio and dryness and an increased bacterial diversity in women experiencing moderate to severe vaginal dryness. In healthy participants, Lactobacillus iners and L. crispatus were generally the most abundant, countering the long-held view that lactobacilli are absent or depleted in menopause. Vaginal dryness and atrophy were associated with down-regulation of human genes involved in maintenance of epithelial structure and barrier function, while those associated with inflammation were up-regulated consistent with the adverse clinical presentation.

  8. Vaginal microbiome and epithelial gene array in post-menopausal women with moderate to severe dryness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruben Hummelen

    Full Text Available After menopause, many women experience vaginal dryness and atrophy of tissue, often attributed to the loss of estrogen. An understudied aspect of vaginal health in women who experience dryness due to atrophy is the role of the resident microbes. It is known that the microbiota has an important role in healthy vaginal homeostasis, including maintaining the pH balance and excluding pathogens. The objectives of this study were twofold: first to identify the microbiome of post-menopausal women with and without vaginal dryness and symptoms of atrophy; and secondly to examine any differences in epithelial gene expression associated with atrophy. The vaginal microbiome of 32 post-menopausal women was profiled using Illumina sequencing of the V6 region of the 16S rRNA gene. Sixteen subjects were selected for follow-up sampling every two weeks for 10 weeks. In addition, 10 epithelial RNA samples (6 healthy and 4 experiencing vaginal dryness were acquired for gene expression analysis by Affymetrix Human Gene array. The microbiota abundance profiles were relatively stable over 10 weeks compared to previously published data on premenopausal women. There was an inverse correlation between Lactobacillus ratio and dryness and an increased bacterial diversity in women experiencing moderate to severe vaginal dryness. In healthy participants, Lactobacillus iners and L. crispatus were generally the most abundant, countering the long-held view that lactobacilli are absent or depleted in menopause. Vaginal dryness and atrophy were associated with down-regulation of human genes involved in maintenance of epithelial structure and barrier function, while those associated with inflammation were up-regulated consistent with the adverse clinical presentation.

  9. Antibodies against Human Cytomegalovirus in the Pathogenesis of Systemic Sclerosis: A Gene Array Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Systemic sclerosis is an autoimmune disease characterized by immunological abnormalities, vascular damage, and fibroblast proliferation. We have previously shown that a molecular mimicry mechanism links antibodies against the human-cytomegalovirus-derived protein UL94 to the pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis. The UL94 epitope shows homology with NAG-2, a surface molecule highly expressed on endothelial cells. Anti-UL94 peptide antibodies purified from patients' sera induce apoptosis of endothelial cells upon engagement of the NAG-2-integrin complex. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We show here that NAG-2 is expressed on dermal fibroblasts and that anti-UL94 antibodies bind to fibroblasts. We have used the gene array strategy (Affimetrix oligonucleotide microarrays to analyze the transcriptional profile in response to a 4-h and an 8-h treatment with antibodies against the UL94 peptide in endothelial cells and dermal fibroblasts. Exposure of endothelial cells to anti-UL94 antibodies had a profound impact on gene expression, resulting in the upregulation of 1,645 transcripts. Several gene clusters were upregulated including genes encoding adhesion molecules, chemokines, colony-stimulating factors (CSFs, growth factors, and molecules involved in apoptosis. Following antibody stimulation, dermal fibroblasts showed an upregulation of 989 transcripts and acquired a "scleroderma-like" phenotype. Indeed, genes involved in extracellular matrix deposition, growth factors, chemokines, and cytokines were upregulated. We confirmed the microarray results by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and by measuring some of the corresponding proteins with ELISA and Western blotting. CONCLUSION: Our results show that anti-human-cytomegalovirus antibodies may be linked to the pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis not only by inducing endothelial cell activation and apoptosis but also by causing activation of fibroblasts, one of the hallmarks of the disease.

  10. Antibodies against human cytomegalovirus in the pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis: a gene array approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Lunardi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Systemic sclerosis is an autoimmune disease characterized by immunological abnormalities, vascular damage, and fibroblast proliferation. We have previously shown that a molecular mimicry mechanism links antibodies against the human-cytomegalovirus-derived protein UL94 to the pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis. The UL94 epitope shows homology with NAG-2, a surface molecule highly expressed on endothelial cells. Anti-UL94 peptide antibodies purified from patients' sera induce apoptosis of endothelial cells upon engagement of the NAG-2-integrin complex. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We show here that NAG-2 is expressed on dermal fibroblasts and that anti-UL94 antibodies bind to fibroblasts. We have used the gene array strategy (Affimetrix oligonucleotide microarrays to analyze the transcriptional profile in response to a 4-h and an 8-h treatment with antibodies against the UL94 peptide in endothelial cells and dermal fibroblasts. Exposure of endothelial cells to anti-UL94 antibodies had a profound impact on gene expression, resulting in the upregulation of 1,645 transcripts. Several gene clusters were upregulated including genes encoding adhesion molecules, chemokines, colony-stimulating factors (CSFs, growth factors, and molecules involved in apoptosis. Following antibody stimulation, dermal fibroblasts showed an upregulation of 989 transcripts and acquired a "scleroderma-like" phenotype. Indeed, genes involved in extracellular matrix deposition, growth factors, chemokines, and cytokines were upregulated. We confirmed the microarray results by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and by measuring some of the corresponding proteins with ELISA and Western blotting. CONCLUSION: Our results show that anti-human-cytomegalovirus antibodies may be linked to the pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis not only by inducing endothelial cell activation and apoptosis but also by causing activation of fibroblasts, one of the hallmarks of the disease.

  11. Bandwidth enhancement using Polymeric Grid Array Antenna for millimeter-wave application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhamad, Wan Asilah Wan; Ngah, Razali; Jamlos, Mohd Faizal; Soh, Ping Jack; Ali, Mohd Tarmizi

    2017-01-01

    A new grid array antenna designed on a polymeric polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate is presented. A good relative permittivity of the PDMS substrate increases the antenna bandwidth. The PDMS surface is also hardened to protect the proposed grid array antenna's radiating element. A SMA coaxial connector is used to feed the 36 × 35 mm2 antenna from its bottom. A bandwidth enhancement of 72.1% is obtained compared to conventional antenna. Besides, its efficiency is increased up to 70%. The simulated and measured results agreed well and the proposed antenna is validated to suit millimeter-wave applications.

  12. Laser fabrication of large-scale nanoparticle arrays for sensing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, Arseniy I; Evlyukhin, Andrey B; Gonçalves, Manuel R; Reinhardt, Carsten; Koroleva, Anastasia; Arnedillo, Maria Luisa; Kiyan, Roman; Marti, Othmar; Chichkov, Boris N

    2011-06-28

    A novel method for high-speed fabrication of large scale periodic arrays of nanoparticles (diameters 40-200 nm) is developed. This method is based on a combination of nanosphere lithography and laser-induced transfer. Fabricated spherical nanoparticles are partially embedded into a polymer substrate. They are arranged into a hexagonal array and can be used for sensing applications. An optical sensor with the sensitivity of 365 nm/RIU and the figure of merit of 21.5 in the visible spectral range is demonstrated.

  13. Hexabundles: imaging fibre arrays for low-light astronomical applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Bryant, Julie; Robertson, Gordon

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate for the first time an imaging fibre bundle (“hexabundle”) that is suitable for low-light applications in astronomy. The most successful survey instruments at optical-infrared wavelengths today have obtained data on up to a million celestial sources using hundreds of multimode fibres...... at a time fed to multiple spectrographs. But a large fraction of these sources are spatially extended on the celestial sphere such that a hexabundle would be able to provide spectroscopic information at many distinct locations across the source. Our goal is to upgrade single-fibre survey instruments...... with multimode hexabundles in place of the multimode fibres. We discuss two varieties of hexabundles: (i) closely packed circular cores allowing the covering fraction to approach the theoretical maximum of 91%; (ii) fused noncircular cores where the interstitial holes have been removed and the covering fraction...

  14. Hexabundles: imaging fiber arrays for low-light astronomical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Bryant, Julia; Robertson, Gordon; Gillingham, Peter; O'Byrne, John; Cecil, Gerald; Haynes, Roger; Croom, Scott; Ellis, Simon; Maack, Martin; Skovgaard, Peter; Noordegraaf, Danny

    2011-01-31

    We demonstrate a novel imaging fiber bundle ("hexabundle") that is suitable for low-light applications in astronomy. The most successful survey instruments at optical-infrared wavelengths use hundreds to thousands of multimode fibers fed to one or more spectrographs. Since most celestial sources are spatially extended on the celestial sphere, a hexabundle provides spectroscopic information at many distinct locations across the source. We discuss two varieties of hexabundles: (i) lightly fused, closely packed, circular cores; (ii) heavily fused non-circular cores with higher fill fractions. In both cases, we find the important result that the cladding can be reduced to ~2 μm over the short fuse length, well below the conventional ~10λ thickness employed more generally, with a consequent gain in fill factor. Over the coming decade, it is to be expected that fiber-based instruments will be upgraded with hexabundles in order to increase the spatial multiplex capability by two or more orders of magnitude.

  15. STATE-OF-THE-ART HUMAN GENE THERAPY: PART II. GENE THERAPY STRATEGIES AND APPLICATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    In Part I of this Review, we introduced recent advances in gene delivery technologies and explained how they have powered some of the current human gene therapy applications. In Part II, we expand the discussion on gene therapy applications, focusing on some of the most exciting clinical uses. To help readers to grasp the essence and to better organize the diverse applications, we categorize them under four gene therapy strategies: (1) gene replacement therapy for monogenic diseases, (2) gene...

  16. Development of a SNP array and its application to genetic mapping and diversity assessment in pepper (Capsicum spp.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jiaowen; Qin, Cheng; Tang, Xin; Zhou, Huangkai; Hu, Yafei; Zhao, Zicheng; Cui, Junjie; Li, Bo; Wu, Zhiming; Yu, Jiping; Hu, Kailin

    2016-01-01

    The development and application of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) is in its infancy for pepper. Here, a set of 15,000 SNPs were chosen from the resequencing data to develop an array for pepper with 12,720 loci being ultimately synthesized. Of these, 8,199 (~64.46%) SNPs were found to be scorable and covered ~81.18% of the whole genome. With this array, a high-density interspecific genetic map with 5,569 SNPs was constructed using 297 F2 individuals, and genetic diversity of a panel of 399 pepper elite/landrace lines was successfully characterized. Based on the genetic map, one major QTL, named Up12.1, was detected for the fruit orientation trait. A total of 65 protein-coding genes were predicted within this QTL region based on the current annotation of the Zunla-1 genome. In summary, the thousands of well-validated SNP markers, high-density genetic map and genetic diversity information will be useful for molecular genetics and innovative breeding in pepper. Furthermore, the mapping results lay foundation for isolating the genes underlying variation in fruit orientation of Capsicum. PMID:27623541

  17. Reliability models applicable to space telescope solar array assembly system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, S. A.

    1986-01-01

    A complex system may consist of a number of subsystems with several components in series, parallel, or combination of both series and parallel. In order to predict how well the system will perform, it is necessary to know the reliabilities of the subsystems and the reliability of the whole system. The objective of the present study is to develop mathematical models of the reliability which are applicable to complex systems. The models are determined by assuming k failures out of n components in a subsystem. By taking k = 1 and k = n, these models reduce to parallel and series models; hence, the models can be specialized to parallel, series combination systems. The models are developed by assuming the failure rates of the components as functions of time and as such, can be applied to processes with or without aging effects. The reliability models are further specialized to Space Telescope Solar Arrray (STSA) System. The STSA consists of 20 identical solar panel assemblies (SPA's). The reliabilities of the SPA's are determined by the reliabilities of solar cell strings, interconnects, and diodes. The estimates of the reliability of the system for one to five years are calculated by using the reliability estimates of solar cells and interconnects given n ESA documents. Aging effects in relation to breaks in interconnects are discussed.

  18. Microscale Bioadhesive Hydrogel Arrays for Cell Engineering Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ravi Ghanshyam; Purwada, Alberto; Cerchietti, Leandro; Inghirami, Giorgio; Melnick, Ari; Gaharwar, Akhilesh K; Singh, Ankur

    2014-09-01

    Bioengineered hydrogels have been explored in cell and tissue engineering applications to support cell growth and modulate its behavior. A rationally designed scaffold should allow for encapsulated cells to survive, adhere, proliferate, remodel the niche, and can be used for controlled delivery of biomolecules. Here we report a microarray of composite bioadhesive microgels with modular dimensions, tunable mechanical properties and bulk modified adhesive biomolecule composition. Composite bioadhesive microgels of maleimide functionalized polyethylene glycol (PEG-MAL) with interpenetrating network (IPN) of gelatin ionically cross-linked with silicate nanoparticles were engineered by integrating microfabrication with Michael-type addition chemistry and ionic gelation. By encapsulating clinically relevant anchorage-dependent cervical cancer cells and suspension leukemia cells as cell culture models in these composite microgels, we demonstrate enhanced cell spreading, survival, and metabolic activity compared to control gels. The composite bioadhesive hydrogels represent a platform that could be used to study independent effect of stiffness and adhesive ligand density on cell survival and function. We envision that such microarrays of cell adhesive microenvironments, which do not require harsh chemical and UV crosslinking conditions, will provide a more efficacious cell culture platform that can be used to study cell behavior and survival, function as building blocks to fabricate 3D tissue structures, cell delivery systems, and high throughput drug screening devices.

  19. Bandwidth enhancement of a multilayered polymeric comb array antenna for millimeter-wave applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhamad, Wan Asilah Wan; Ngah, Razali; Jamlos, Mohd Faizal; Soh, Ping Jack; Ali, Mohd Tarmizi; Narbudowicz, Adam

    2017-01-01

    This paper introduces a new multilayered polymeric comb array antenna fabricated on a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) dielectric substrate. PDMS is selected due to its excellent electrical and mechanical properties such as low permittivity, water resistance and robustness. The polymeric comb array antenna consists of a zigzag array aligned at -90° with respect to the radiating patch with full ground plane. The radiating patch is embedded inside the PDMS substrate while the coaxial connector is located at the bottom of the transmission line. The proposed antenna functions from 22.649 to 27.792 GHz. Simulated and measured reflection coefficients and radiation patterns agreed well. A maximum gain of 9.856 dB is recorded at 25 GHz, indicating suitability for implementation in millimeter-wave applications.

  20. Microelectrode arrays with overlapped diffusion layers as electroanalytical detectors: theory and basic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomčík, Peter

    2013-10-11

    This contribution contains a survey of basic literature dealing with arrays of microelectrodes with overlapping diffusion layers as prospective tools in contemporary electrochemistry. Photolithographic thin layer technology allows the fabrication of sensors of micrometric dimensions separated with a very small gap. This fact allows the diffusion layers of single microelectrodes to overlap as members of the array. Various basic types of microelectrode arrays with interacting diffusion layers are described and their analytical abilities are accented. Theoretical approaches to diffusion layer overlapping and the consequences of close constitution effects such as collection efficiency and redox cycling are discussed. Examples of basis applications in electroanalytical chemistry such as amperometric detectors in HPLC and substitutional stripping voltammetry are also given.

  1. Microelectrode Arrays with Overlapped Diffusion Layers as Electroanalytical Detectors: Theory and Basic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Tomčík

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This contribution contains a survey of basic literature dealing with arrays of microelectrodes with overlapping diffusion layers as prospective tools in contemporary electrochemistry. Photolithographic thin layer technology allows the fabrication of sensors of micrometric dimensions separated with a very small gap. This fact allows the diffusion layers of single microelectrodes to overlap as members of the array. Various basic types of microelectrode arrays with interacting diffusion layers are described and their analytical abilities are accented. Theoretical approaches to diffusion layer overlapping and the consequences of close constitution effects such as collection efficiency and redox cycling are discussed. Examples of basis applications in electroanalytical chemistry such as amperometric detectors in HPLC and substitutional stripping voltammetry are also given.

  2. Graphical Environment Tools for Application to Gamma-Ray Energy Tracking Arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todd, Richard A. [RIS Corp.; Radford, David C. [ORNL Physics Div.

    2013-12-30

    Highly segmented, position-sensitive germanium detector systems are being developed for nuclear physics research where traditional electronic signal processing with mixed analog and digital function blocks would be enormously complex and costly. Future systems will be constructed using pipelined processing of high-speed digitized signals as is done in the telecommunications industry. Techniques which provide rapid algorithm and system development for future systems are desirable. This project has used digital signal processing concepts and existing graphical system design tools to develop a set of re-usable modular functions and libraries targeted for the nuclear physics community. Researchers working with complex nuclear detector arrays such as the Gamma-Ray Energy Tracking Array (GRETA) have been able to construct advanced data processing algorithms for implementation in field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) through application of these library functions using intuitive graphical interfaces.

  3. Recent Advances in Genetic Technique of Microbial Report Cells and Their Applications in Cell Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Do Hyun Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbial cell arrays have attracted consistent attention for their ability to provide unique global data on target analytes at low cost, their capacity for readily detectable and robust cell growth in diverse environments, their high degree of convenience, and their capacity for multiplexing via incorporation of molecularly tailored reporter cells. To highlight recent progress in the field of microbial cell arrays, this review discusses research on genetic engineering of reporter cells, technologies for patterning live cells on solid surfaces, cellular immobilization in different polymers, and studies on their application in environmental monitoring, disease diagnostics, and other related fields. On the basis of these results, we discuss current challenges and future prospects for novel microbial cell arrays, which show promise for use as potent tools for unraveling complex biological processes.

  4. Development of Microfabricated Chemical Gas Sensors and Sensor Arrays for Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, G. W.; Neudeck, P. G.; Fralick, G.; Thomas, V.; Liu, C. C.; Wu, W. H.; Ward, B.; Makel, D.

    2002-01-01

    Aerospace applications require the development of chemical sensors with capabilities beyond those of commercially available sensors. In particular, factors such as minimal sensor size, weight, and power consumption are particularly important. Development areas which have potential aerospace applications include launch vehicle leak detection, engine health monitoring, fire detection, and environmental monitoring. Sensor development for these applications is based on progress in three types of technology: 1) Micromachining and microfabrication (Microsystem) technology to fabricate miniaturized sensors. 2) The use of nanocrystalline materials to develop sensors with improved stability combined with higher sensitivity. 3) The development of high temperature semiconductors, especially silicon carbide. However, due to issues of selectivity and cross-sensitivity, individual sensors are limited in the amount of information that they can provide in environments that contain multiple chemical species. Thus, sensor arrays are being developed to address detection needs in such multi-species environments. This paper discusses the needs of space applications as well as the point-contact sensor technology and sensor arrays being developed to address these needs. Sensors to measure hydrogen, hydrocarbons, hydrazine, nitrogen oxides (NO,), carbon monoxide, oxygen, and carbon dioxide are being developed as well as arrays for leak, fire, and emissions detection. Demonstrations of the technology will also be discussed. It is concluded that microfabricated sensor technology has significant potential for use in a range of aerospace applications.

  5. Altered expression of mitochondrial related genes in the native Tibetan placents by mitochondrial cDNA array analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luo Yongjun; Gao Wenxiang; Zhao Xiuxin; Suo Lang; Chen Li; Liu Fuyu; Song Tonglin; Chen Jian; Gao Yuqi

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To explore the mechanism of native Tibetan fetuses adaptation to hypoxia, we tried to find the different expression genes about mitochondrial function in the native Tibetan placents. Methods: In this study, the placents of native Tibetan and the high-altitude Han (ha-Han) were collected. After the total RNA extraction, the finally synthesized cDNAs were hybridized to mitochondrial array to find the altered expression genes between them. Then, the cytochrome c oxidase 17 (Coxl7), dynactin 2 (DCTN2, also known as p50), and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR, also known as KDR) were chosen from the altered expression genes to further verify the array results using the SYBR Green real-time PCR. Because the altered expression genes (such as Cybb and Coxl 7) in the array results related to the activities of COXI and COXIV, the placental mitochondria activities of COXI and COXIV were measured to find their changes in the hypoxia. Results: By a standard of >1.5 or <0.67, there were 24 different expressed genes between the native Tibetan and the ha-Han placents, including 3 up-regulated genes and 21 down-regulated genes. These genes were related to energy metabolism, signal transduction, cell proliferation, electron transport, cell adhesion, nucleotide-excision repair. The array results of Coxl7, DCTN2 and KDR were further verified by the real-time RT-PCR. Through the mitochondria respiration measurements, the activity of COXI in the native Tibetan placents were higher than that of ha-Han, there was no difference in COXIV activity between them. Conclusion: The altered mitochondrial related genes in the native Tibetan placents may have a role in the high altitude adaptation for fetuses through changing the activity of mitochondrial COX.

  6. Application of unified array calculus to connect 4-D spacetime sensing with string theory and relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauhala, U. A.

    2013-12-01

    Array algebra of photogrammetry and geodesy unified multi-linear matrix and tensor operators in an expansion of Gaussian adjustment calculus to general matrix inverses and solutions of inverse problems to find all, or some optimal, parametric solutions that satisfy the available observables. By-products in expanding array and tensor calculus to handle redundant observables resulted in general theories of estimation in mathematical statistics and fast transform technology of signal processing. Their applications in gravity modeling and system automation of multi-ray digital image and terrain matching evolved into fast multi-nonlinear differential and integral array calculus. Work since 1980's also uncovered closed-form inverse Taylor and least squares Newton-Raphson-Gauss perturbation solutions of nonlinear systems of equations. Fast nonlinear integral matching of array wavelets enabled an expansion of the bundle adjustment to 4-D stereo imaging and range sensing where real-time stereo sequence and waveform phase matching enabled data-to-info conversion and compression on-board advanced sensors. The resulting unified array calculus of spacetime sensing is applicable in virtually any math and engineering science, including recent work in spacetime physics. The paper focuses on geometric spacetime reconstruction from its image projections inspired by unified relativity and string theories. The collinear imaging equations of active object space shutter of special relativity are expanded to 4-D Lorentz transform. However, regular passive imaging and shutter inside the sensor expands the law of special relativity by a quantum geometric explanation of 4-D photogrammetry. The collinear imaging equations provide common sense explanations to the 10 (and 26) dimensional hyperspace concepts of a purely geometric string theory. The 11-D geometric M-theory is interpreted as a bundle adjustment of spacetime images using 2-D or 5-D membrane observables of image, string and

  7. A 34K SNP genotyping array for Populus trichocarpa: design, application to the study of natural populations and transferability to other Populus species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geraldes, Armando [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Hannemann, Jan [University of Victoria, Canada; Grassa, Chris [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Farzaneh, Nima [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Porth, Ilga [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; McKown, Athena [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Skyba, Oleksandr [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Li, Eryang [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Mike, Fujita [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Friedmann, Michael [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Wasteneys, Geoffrey [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Guy, Robert [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; El-Kassaby, Yousry [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Mansfield, Shawn [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Cronk, Quentin [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Ehlting, Juergen [University of Victoria, Canada; Douglas, Carl [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; DiFazio, Stephen P [West Virginia University, Morgantown; Slavov, Gancho [West Virginia University, Morgantown; Ranjan, Priya [ORNL; Muchero, Wellington [ORNL; Gunter, Lee E [ORNL; Wymore, Ann [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Martin, Joel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Schackwitz, Wendy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pennacchio, Christa [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Rokhsar, Daniel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

    2013-01-01

    Genetic mapping of quantitative traits requires genotypic data for large numbers of markers in many individuals. Despite the declining costs of genotyping by sequencing, for most studies, the use of large SNP genotyping arrays still offers the most cost-effective solution for large-scale targeted genotyping. Here we report on the design and performance of a SNP genotyping array for Populus trichocarpa (black cottonwood). This genotyping array was designed with SNPs pre-ascertained in 34 wild accessions covering most of the species range. Due to the rapid decay of linkage disequilibrium in P. trichocarpa we adopted a candidate gene approach to the array design that resulted in the selection of 34,131 SNPs, the majority of which are located in, or within 2 kb, of 3,543 candidate genes. A subset of the SNPs (539) was selected based on patterns of variation among the SNP discovery accessions. We show that more than 95% of the loci produce high quality genotypes and that the genotyping error rate for these is likely below 2%, indicating that high-quality data are generated with this array. We demonstrate that even among small numbers of samples (n=10) from local populations over 84% of loci are polymorphic. We also tested the applicability of the array to other species in the genus and found that due to ascertainment bias the number of polymorphic loci decreases rapidly with genetic distance, with the largest numbers detected in other species in section Tacamahaca (P. balsamifera and P. angustifolia). Finally, we provide evidence for the utility of the array for intraspecific studies of genetic differentiation and for species assignment and the detection of natural hybrids.

  8. A NEW FABRICATION PROCESS FOR A FLEXIBLE SKIN WITH TEMPERATURE SENSOR ARRAY AND ITS APPLICATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEE Gwo-Bin; HUANG Fu-Chun; Lee Chia-Yen; Mian Jiun-Jih

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports a novel technique for fabrication of a flexible skin with a temperature sensor array (40 × 1 sensors). A simplified MEMS technology using platinum resistors as sensing materials, which are sandwiched between two polyimide layers as flexible substrates is developed. The two polyimide layers are deposited on top of a thin aluminum layer, which serves as a sacrificial layer such that the flexible skin can be released by metal etching and peeled off easily. The flexible skin with a temperature sensor array has a high mechanical flexibility and can be handily attached on a highly curved surface to detect tiny temperature distribution inside a small area. The sensor array shows a linear output and has a sensitivity of 7.SmV/℃ (prior to amplifiers) at a drive current of 1 mA. To demonstrate its applications, two examples have been demonstrated, including measurement of temperature distribution around a micro heater of a micro PCR (polymerase chain reaction) chip for DNA amplification and detection of separation point for flow over a circular cylinder. The development of the flexible skin with a temperature sensor array may be crucial for measuring temperature distribution on any curved surface in the fields of aerodynamics, space exploration, auto making and biomedical applications etc.

  9. A Compact Two-Level Sequentially Rotated Circularly Polarized Antenna Array for C-Band Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Maddio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A compact circular polarized antenna array with a convenient gain/bandwidth/dimension trade-off is proposed for applications in the C-band. The design is based on the recursive application of the sequential phase architecture, resulting in a 4 × 4 array of closely packed identical antennas. The 16 antenna elements are disc-based patches operating in modal degeneration, tuned to exhibit a broad while imperfect polarization. Exploiting the compact dimension of the patches and a space-filling design for the feeding network, the entire array is designed to minimize the occupied area. A prototype of the proposed array is fabricated with standard photoetching procedure in a single-layer via less printed board of overall area 80 × 80 mm2. Adequate left-hand polarization is observed over a wide bandwidth, demonstrating a convenient trade-off between bandwidth and axial ratio. Satisfying experimental results validate the proposed design, with a peak gain of 12.6 dB at 6.7 GHz maintained within 3 dB for 1 GHz, a very wide 10 dB return loss bandwidth of 3 GHz, and a 4 dB axial ratio bandwidth of 1.82 GHz, meaning 31% of fractional bandwidth.

  10. Single strand conformation polymorphism analysis of candidate genes for reliable identification of alleles by capillary array electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    We investigated the reliability of capillary array electrophoresis-SSCP to determine if it can be used to identify novel alleles of candidate genes in a germplasm collection. Both strands of three different size fragments (160 bp, 245 pb and 437 bp) that differed by one or more nucleotides in sequen...

  11. The design and application of large area intensive lens array focal spots measurement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bingzhen; Yao, Shun; Yang, Guanghui; Dai, Mingchong; Wang, Zhiyong

    2014-12-01

    Concentrating Photovoltaic (CPV) modules are getting thinner and using smaller cells now days. Correspondingly, large area intensive lens arrays with smaller unit dimension and shorter focal length are wanted. However, the size and power center of lens array focal spots usually differ from the design value and are hard to measure, especially under large area situation. It is because the machining error and deformation of material of the lens array are hard to simulate in the optical design process. Thus the alignment error between solar cells and focal spots in the module assembly process will be hard to control. Under this kind of situation, the efficiency of CPV module with thinner body and smaller cells is much lower than expected. In this paper, a design of large area lens array focal spots automatic measurement system is presented, as well as its prototype application results. In this system, a four-channel parallel light path and its corresponding image capture and process modules are designed. These modules can simulate focal spots under sunlight and have the spots image captured and processed using charge coupled devices and certain gray level algorithm. Thus the important information of focal spots such as spot size and location will be exported. Motion control module based on grating scale signal and interval measurement method are also employed in this system in order to get test results with high speed and high precision on large area lens array no less than 1m×0.8m. The repeatability of the system prototype measurement is +/-10μm with a velocity of 90 spot/min. Compared to the original module assembled using coordinates from optical design, modules assembled using data exported from the prototype is 18% higher in output power, reaching a conversion efficiency of over 31%. This system and its design can be used in the focal spot measurement of planoconvex lens array and Fresnel lens array, as well as other kinds of large area lens array application

  12. Analysis of gene expression patterns with cDNA micro-array during late stage of spermatogenesis in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The differentiation process of round spermatids to spermatozoa during the late stage of spermatogenesis is called spermiogenesis. To explore spermiogenesis-related genes, cDNA microarray was used to study expression patterns of 1176 genes in pachytene spermatocytes, round spermatids and elongating spermatids of Balb/c mice. The results showed that 208 genes were detected in all the three cell types. Most of them were down-regulated from pachytene spermatocytes to round spermatids and elongating spermatids. However, up-regulation of 7 genes expression in round spermatids and 3 genes in elongating spermatids were found. Expression of 7 differentially expressed genes in cDNA arrays was further confirmed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR study. The RT-PCR results indicated that the expression of 6 genes was consistent with that in cDNA arrays, only one gene did not show differential expression by RT-PCR. These results may provide important clues for studying of expression, regulation, and function of spermiogenesis-related genes.

  13. DESIGN OF HYBRID COUPLER CONNECTED SQUARE ARRAY PATCH ANTENNA FOR Wi-Fi APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sahaya Anselin Nisha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Microstrip patch antennas being popular because of light weight, low volume, thin profile configuration which can be made conformal. Wireless communication systems applications circular polarization antenna is placing vital role. In this study we introduce a new technique to produce circular polarization. Hybrid coupler is directly connected to microstrip antenna to get circular polarization. Also gain is further increased by introducing antenna array technique. Each square in array having length of 4.6mm patch is having thickness of 0.381mm and the dielectric material used FR4. The designed antenna having high gain of 6.26dB and directivity of 5.11dB at the resonant frequency of 3.7GHz. Simulation results shows that the designed antenna characteristic is suitable for Wi-Fi applications.

  14. Highly uniform and vertically aligned SnO2 nanochannel arrays for photovoltaic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Yup; Kang, Jin Soo; Shin, Junyoung; Kim, Jin; Han, Seung-Joo; Park, Jongwoo; Min, Yo-Sep; Ko, Min Jae; Sung, Yung-Eun

    2015-04-01

    Nanostructured electrodes with vertical alignment have been considered ideal structures for electron transport and interfacial contact with redox electrolytes in photovoltaic devices. Here, we report large-scale vertically aligned SnO2 nanochannel arrays with uniform structures, without lateral cracks fabricated by a modified anodic oxidation process. In the modified process, ultrasonication is utilized to avoid formation of partial compact layers and lateral cracks in the SnO2 nanochannel arrays. Building on this breakthrough, we first demonstrate the photovoltaic application of these vertically aligned SnO2 nanochannel arrays. These vertically aligned arrays were directly and successfully applied in quasi-solid state dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) as photoanodes, yielding reasonable conversion efficiency under back-side illumination. In addition, a significantly short process time (330 s) for achieving the optimal thickness (7.0 μm) and direct utilization of the anodized electrodes enable a simple, rapid and low-cost fabrication process. Furthermore, a TiO2 shell layer was coated on the SnO2 nanochannel arrays by the atomic layer deposition (ALD) process for enhancement of dye-loading and prolonging the electron lifetime in the DSSC. Owing to the presence of the ALD TiO2 layer, the short-circuit photocurrent density (Jsc) and conversion efficiency were increased by 20% and 19%, respectively, compared to those of the DSSC without the ALD TiO2 layer. This study provides valuable insight into the development of efficient SnO2-based photoanodes for photovoltaic application by a simple and rapid fabrication process.Nanostructured electrodes with vertical alignment have been considered ideal structures for electron transport and interfacial contact with redox electrolytes in photovoltaic devices. Here, we report large-scale vertically aligned SnO2 nanochannel arrays with uniform structures, without lateral cracks fabricated by a modified anodic oxidation process

  15. High-performance SPAD array detectors for parallel photon timing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rech, I.; Cuccato, A.; Antonioli, S.; Cammi, C.; Gulinatti, A.; Ghioni, M.

    2012-02-01

    Over the past few years there has been a growing interest in monolithic arrays of single photon avalanche diodes (SPAD) for spatially resolved detection of faint ultrafast optical signals. SPADs implemented in planar technologies offer the typical advantages of microelectronic devices (small size, ruggedness, low voltage, low power, etc.). Furthermore, they have inherently higher photon detection efficiency than PMTs and are able to provide, beside sensitivities down to single-photons, very high acquisition speeds. In order to make SPAD array more and more competitive in time-resolved application it is necessary to face problems like electrical crosstalk between adjacent pixel, moreover all the singlephoton timing electronics with picosecond resolution has to be developed. In this paper we present a new instrument suitable for single-photon imaging applications and made up of 32 timeresolved parallel channels. The 32x1 pixel array that includes SPAD detectors represents the system core, and an embedded data elaboration unit performs on-board data processing for single-photon counting applications. Photontiming information is exported through a custom parallel cable that can be connected to an external multichannel TCSPC system.

  16. Freestanding membrane composed of micro-ring array with ultrahigh sidewall aspect ratio for application in lightweight cathode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lanlan; Liu, Hongzhong; Jiang, Weitao; Gao, Wei; Chen, Bangdao; Li, Xin; Ding, Yucheng; An, Ningli

    2014-12-01

    A freestanding multilayer ultrathin nano-membrane (FUN-membrane) with a micro-ring array (MRA) is successfully fabricated through the controllable film deposition. Each micro-ring of FUN-membrane is 3 μm in diameter, 2 μm in height and sub-100 nm in sidewall thickness, demonstrating an ultrahigh sidewall aspect ratio of 20:1. In our strategy, a silica layer (200 nm in thickness), a chromium transition layer (5 nm-thick) and a gold layer (40 nm-thick), were in sequence deposited on patterned photoresist. After removal of the photoresist by lift-off process, a FUN-membrane with MRA was peeled off from the substrate, where the gold layer acted as a protecting layer to prevent the MRA from fracture. The FUN-membrane was then transferred to a flexible polycarbonate (PC) sheet coated with indium tin oxide (ITO) layer, which was then used as a flexible and lightweight cathode. Remarkably, the field emission effect of the fabricated FUN-membrane cathode performs a high field-enhancement factor of 1.2 × 104 and a low turn-on voltage of 2 V/μm, indicating the advantages of the sharp metal edge of MRA. Due to the rational design and material versatility, the FUN-membrane thus could be transferred to either rigid or flexible substrate, even curved surface, such as the skin of bio-robot's arm or leg. Additionally, the FUN-membrane composed of MRA with extremely high aspect ratio of insulator-metal sidewall, also provides potential applications in optical devices, lightweight and flexible display devices, and electronic eye imagers.

  17. Simulation and Application of Dynamic Inspection Modes Using Ultrasonic Phased Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaut, Steve; Chatillon, Sylvain; Raillon-Picot, Raphaële; Calmon, Pierre

    2004-02-01

    NDT techniques using phased arrays are more and more applied in different industrial contexts. Their main advantage is the adaptability to the testing configuration : ability to steer and to focus the beam inside the inspected component taking account the geometry and the constitutive materials, high acquisition rates without raster scanning pattern of the probe using electronic commutation, sectorial scanning inspection to fully insonify the specimen, etc. Optimal use of phased arrays requires simulation tools accounting for the actual testing configuration. For several years, such tools have been developed at the French Atomic Energy Commission. Delay laws, beam forming and echo formation (interaction of the beam with defects or specimen boundaries) models are used to design the arrays, to conceive and to evaluate the performances of methods in realistic and complex configurations. Recently, works have been made to extend the simulation skills to advanced inspection modes : electronic commutation with separate Transmission/Reception patterns, non-symmetric Transmit/Receive delay laws, sectorial scanning inspections. This paper presents some examples of simulation and application of such inspections carried out over complex specimen. These examples demonstrate the interest for simulation tools in terms of prediction, optimization and interpretation of phased arrays techniques.

  18. MOF-Templated Synthesis of Ultrasmall Photoluminescent Carbon-Nanodot Arrays for Optical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Zhi-Gang; Li, De-Jing; Zheng, Chan; Kang, Yao; Wöll, Christof; Zhang, Jian

    2017-06-06

    Arrays of ultrasmall and uniform carbon nanodots (CDs) are of pronounced interest for applications in optical devices. Herein, we describe a low-temperature calcination approach with rather inexpensive reactants. After glucose molecules had been loaded into the pores of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), well-defined CD arrays were produced by heating to 200 °C. The size and spacing of the CDs could be controlled by the choice of templating MOF: HKUST-1, ZIF-8, or MIL-101. The sizes of the obtained CDs were approximately 1.5, 2.0, and 3.2 nm, which are close to the corresponding MOF pores sizes. The CD arrays exhibited interesting photophysical properties, including photoluminescence with tunable emission and pronounced nonlinear optical (NLO) effects. The NLO properties of the obtained CD arrays were significantly different from those of a CD suspension, thus indicating the existence of collective phenomena. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Low cost, high concentration ratio solar cell array for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, R. E.; Rauschenbach, H. S.; Cannady, M. D.; Whang, U. S.; Crabtree, W. L.

    1981-01-01

    A miniaturized Cassegrainian-type concentrator solar array concept for space applications is described. In-orbit cell operating temperatures near 80 C are achieved with purely passive cell cooling and a net concentration ratio of 100. A multiplicity of miniaturized, rigid solar cell concentrator subassemblies are electrically interconnected in conventional fashion and mounted into rigid frames to form concentrator solar panel assemblies approximately 14-mm thick. A plurality of such interconnected panels forms a stowable and deployable solar cell blanket. It is projected that for 20% efficient silicon cells an array of 500 kW beginning-of-life output capability, including orbiter cradle structures, can be transported by a single shuttle orbiter flight into low earth orbit. In-orbit array specific performance is calculated to be approximately 100 W/sq m and 20 W/kg, including all stowage, deployment and array figure control equipment designed for a 30-year orbital life. Higher efficiency gallium arsenide and multiple band gap solar cells will improve these performance factors correspondingly.

  20. Analysis of Global Expression Profiles of Arabidopsis Genes Under Abscisic Acid and H2O2 Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng-Cheng Wang; Yan-Yan Du; Guo-Yong An; Yun Zhou; Chen Miao; Chun-Peng Song

    2006-01-01

    To gain insight into the coordination of gene expression profiles under abscisic acid (ABA) and H2O2 applications,global changes in gene expression in response to ABA and H2O2 in Arabidopsis seedlings were investigated using GeneChip (Santa Clara, CA, USA) arrays. Among over 24 000 genes present in the arrays, 459 transcripts were found to be significantly increased, whereas another 221 decreased following H2O2 treatment compared with control. Similar to treatment with H2O2, ABA treatment elevated the transcription of 391 genes and repressed that of 322 genes. One hundred and forty-three upregulated genes and 75 downregulated genes were shared between the two treatments and these genes were mainly involved in metabolism, signal transduction, transcription, defense, and resistance. Only two genes, which encode an APETALA2/dehydration-responsive element binding protein (AP2/DREBP) family transcriptional factor and a late embryogenesisabundant protein, were downregulated by H2O2, but upregulated by ABA. These results suggest that, similar to ABA, H2O2 plays a global role in gene transcription of Arabidopsisseedlings. The transcriptional responses induced by the application of exogenous ABA and H2O2 overlapped substantially. These two treatments regulated most of the downstream genes in a coordinated manner.

  1. How to decide? Different methods of calculating gene expression from short oligonucleotide array data will give different results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voesenek Laurentius ACJ

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Short oligonucleotide arrays for transcript profiling have been available for several years. Generally, raw data from these arrays are analysed with the aid of the Microarray Analysis Suite or GeneChip Operating Software (MAS or GCOS from Affymetrix. Recently, more methods to analyse the raw data have become available. Ideally all these methods should come up with more or less the same results. We set out to evaluate the different methods and include work on our own data set, in order to test which method gives the most reliable results. Results Calculating gene expression with 6 different algorithms (MAS5, dChip PMMM, dChip PM, RMA, GC-RMA and PDNN using the same (Arabidopsis data, results in different calculated gene expression levels. Consequently, depending on the method used, different genes will be identified as differentially regulated. Surprisingly, there was only 27 to 36% overlap between the different methods. Furthermore, 47.5% of the genes/probe sets showed good correlation between the mismatch and perfect match intensities. Conclusion After comparing six algorithms, RMA gave the most reproducible results and showed the highest correlation coefficients with Real Time RT-PCR data on genes identified as differentially expressed by all methods. However, we were not able to verify, by Real Time RT-PCR, the microarray results for most genes that were solely calculated by RMA. Furthermore, we conclude that subtraction of the mismatch intensity from the perfect match intensity results most likely in a significant underestimation for at least 47.5% of the expression values. Not one algorithm produced significant expression values for genes present in quantities below 1 pmol. If the only purpose of the microarray experiment is to find new candidate genes, and too many genes are found, then mutual exclusion of the genes predicted by contrasting methods can be used to narrow down the list of new candidate genes by 64 to 73%.

  2. Trophic actions of extracellular ATP: gene expression profiling by DNA array analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neary, J T

    2000-07-01

    In addition to Professor Burnstock's work on the short-term signaling actions of extracellular nucleotides and nucleosides, Geoff has had a long-standing interest in trophic actions of purines in development and in pathophysiological conditions which has been instrumental in encouraging my work in this area. The trophic actions of extracellular ATP, alone or in combination with polypeptide growth factors, may play an important role in brain development and may contribute to the reactive gliosis that accompanies brain injury and neurodegeneration. P2Y receptors in astrocytes are coupled to the ERK/MAPK cascade, a signal transduction mechanism crucial for cellular proliferation and differentiation. The mitogenic signaling pathway from P2Y receptors to ERK involves phospholipase D and a calcium-independent PKC isoform, PKCdelta. DNA array analysis reveals a number of changes in gene expression after P2Y receptor occupancy, indicating that this methodology will be a powerful tool in understanding the mechanisms underlying the trophic actions of extracellular nucleotides and nucleosides.

  3. System-Level Integrated Circuit (SLIC) Technology Development for Phased Array Antenna Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windyka, John A.; Zablocki, Ed G.

    1997-01-01

    This report documents the efforts and progress in developing a 'system-level' integrated circuit, or SLIC, for application in advanced phased array antenna systems. The SLIC combines radio-frequency (RF) microelectronics, digital and analog support circuitry, and photonic interfaces into a single micro-hybrid assembly. Together, these technologies provide not only the amplitude and phase control necessary for electronic beam steering in the phased array, but also add thermally-compensated automatic gain control, health and status feedback, bias regulation, and reduced interconnect complexity. All circuitry is integrated into a compact, multilayer structure configured for use as a two-by-four element phased array module, operating at 20 Gigahertz, using a Microwave High-Density Interconnect (MHDI) process. The resultant hardware is constructed without conventional wirebonds, maintains tight inter-element spacing, and leads toward low-cost mass production. The measured performances and development issues associated with both the two-by-four element module and the constituent elements are presented. Additionally, a section of the report describes alternative architectures and applications supported by the SLIC electronics. Test results show excellent yield and performance of RF circuitry and full automatic gain control for multiple, independent channels. Digital control function, while suffering from lower manufacturing yield, also proved successful.

  4. The fabrication of a multi-spectral lens array and its application in assisting color blindness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Si; Jin, Jian; Tang, Guanrong; Chen, Xianshuai; Du, Ruxu

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a compact multi-spectral lens array and describes its application in assisting color-blindness. The lens array consists of 9 microlens, and each microlens is coated with a different color filter. Thus, it can capture different light bands, including red, orange, yellow, green, cyan, blue, violet, near-infrared, and the entire visible band. First, the fabrication process is described in detail. Second, an imaging system is setup and a color blindness testing card is selected as the sample. By the system, the vision results of normal people and color blindness can be captured simultaneously. Based on the imaging results, it is possible to be used for helping color-blindness to recover normal vision.

  5. Miniaturized dual-band antenna array with double-negative (DNG) metamaterial for wireless applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqadami, Abdulrahman Shueai Mohsen; Jamlos, Mohd Faizal; Soh, Ping Jack; Rahim, Sharul Kamal Abdul; Vandenbosch, Guy A. E.; Narbudowicz, Adam

    2017-01-01

    A miniaturized dual-band antenna array using a negative index metamaterial is presented for WiMAX, LTE, and WLAN applications. This left-handed metamaterial plane is located behind the antenna array, and its unit cell is a combination of split-ring resonator, square electric ring resonator, and rectangular electrical coupled resonator. This enables the achievement of a metamaterial structure exhibiting both negative permittivity and permeability, which results in antenna size miniaturization, efficiency, and gain enhancement. Moreover, the proposed metamaterial antenna has realized dual-band operating frequencies compared to a single frequency for normal antenna. The measured reflection coefficient (S11) shows a 50.25% bandwidth in the lower band (from 2.119 to 3.058 GHz) and 4.27% in the upper band (from 5.058 to 5.276 GHz). Radiation efficiency obtained in the lower and upper band are >95 and 80%, respectively.

  6. Mechanical design of a low concentration ratio solar array for a space station application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biss, M. S.; Hsu, L.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes a preliminary study and conceptual design of a low concentration ratio solar array for a space station application with approximately a 100 kW power requirement. The baseline design calls for a multiple series of inverted, truncated, pyramidal optical elements with a geometric concentration ratio (GCR) of 6. It also calls for low life cycle cost, simple on-orbit maintainability, 1984 technology readiness date, and gallium arsenide (GaAs) of silicon (Si) solar cell interchangeability. Due to the large area needed to produce the amount of power required for the baseline space station, a symmetrical wing design, making maximum use of the commonality of parts approach, was taken. This paper will describe the mechanical and structural design of a mass-producible solar array that is very easy to tailor to the needs of the individual user requirement.

  7. Sex-linked pheromone receptor genes of the European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis, are in tandem arrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Yasukochi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tuning of the olfactory system of male moths to conspecific female sex pheromones is crucial for correct species recognition; however, little is known about the genetic changes that drive speciation in this system. Moths of the genus Ostrinia are good models to elucidate this question, since significant differences in pheromone blends are observed within and among species. Odorant receptors (ORs play a critical role in recognition of female sex pheromones; eight types of OR genes expressed in male antennae were previously reported in Ostrinia moths. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We screened an O. nubilalis bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC library by PCR, and constructed three contigs from isolated clones containing the reported OR genes. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH analysis using these clones as probes demonstrated that the largest contig, which contained eight OR genes, was located on the Z chromosome; two others harboring two and one OR genes were found on two autosomes. Sequence determination of BAC clones revealed the Z-linked OR genes were closely related and tandemly arrayed; moreover, four of them shared 181-bp direct repeats spanning exon 7 and intron 7. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first report of tandemly arrayed sex pheromone receptor genes in Lepidoptera. The localization of an OR gene cluster on the Z chromosome agrees with previous findings for a Z-linked locus responsible for O. nubilalis male behavioral response to sex pheromone. The 181-bp direct repeats might enhance gene duplications by unequal crossovers. An autosomal locus responsible for male response to sex pheromone in Heliothis virescens and H. subflexa was recently reported to contain at least four OR genes. Taken together, these findings support the hypothesis that generation of additional copies of OR genes can increase the potential for male moths to acquire altered specificity for pheromone components, and accordingly

  8. Development and application of a novel genome-wide SNP array reveals domestication history in soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiao; Chu, Shanshan; Zhang, Huairen; Zhu, Ying; Cheng, Hao; Yu, Deyue

    2016-02-09

    Domestication of soybeans occurred under the intense human-directed selections aimed at developing high-yielding lines. Tracing the domestication history and identifying the genes underlying soybean domestication require further exploration. Here, we developed a high-throughput NJAU 355 K SoySNP array and used this array to study the genetic variation patterns in 367 soybean accessions, including 105 wild soybeans and 262 cultivated soybeans. The population genetic analysis suggests that cultivated soybeans have tended to originate from northern and central China, from where they spread to other regions, accompanied with a gradual increase in seed weight. Genome-wide scanning for evidence of artificial selection revealed signs of selective sweeps involving genes controlling domestication-related agronomic traits including seed weight. To further identify genomic regions related to seed weight, a genome-wide association study (GWAS) was conducted across multiple environments in wild and cultivated soybeans. As a result, a strong linkage disequilibrium region on chromosome 20 was found to be significantly correlated with seed weight in cultivated soybeans. Collectively, these findings should provide an important basis for genomic-enabled breeding and advance the study of functional genomics in soybean.

  9. Exome sequencing and arrayCGH detection of gene sequence and copy number variation between ILS and ISS mouse strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Laura; Dickens, C Michael; Anderson, Nathan; Davis, Jonathan; Bennett, Beth; Radcliffe, Richard A; Sikela, James M

    2014-06-01

    It has been well documented that genetic factors can influence predisposition to develop alcoholism. While the underlying genomic changes may be of several types, two of the most common and disease associated are copy number variations (CNVs) and sequence alterations of protein coding regions. The goal of this study was to identify CNVs and single-nucleotide polymorphisms that occur in gene coding regions that may play a role in influencing the risk of an individual developing alcoholism. Toward this end, two mouse strains were used that have been selectively bred based on their differential sensitivity to alcohol: the Inbred long sleep (ILS) and Inbred short sleep (ISS) mouse strains. Differences in initial response to alcohol have been linked to risk for alcoholism, and the ILS/ISS strains are used to investigate the genetics of initial sensitivity to alcohol. Array comparative genomic hybridization (arrayCGH) and exome sequencing were conducted to identify CNVs and gene coding sequence differences, respectively, between ILS and ISS mice. Mouse arrayCGH was performed using catalog Agilent 1 × 244 k mouse arrays. Subsequently, exome sequencing was carried out using an Illumina HiSeq 2000 instrument. ArrayCGH detected 74 CNVs that were strain-specific (38 ILS/36 ISS), including several ISS-specific deletions that contained genes implicated in brain function and neurotransmitter release. Among several interesting coding variations detected by exome sequencing was the gain of a premature stop codon in the alpha-amylase 2B (AMY2B) gene specifically in the ILS strain. In total, exome sequencing detected 2,597 and 1,768 strain-specific exonic gene variants in the ILS and ISS mice, respectively. This study represents the most comprehensive and detailed genomic comparison of ILS and ISS mouse strains to date. The two complementary genome-wide approaches identified strain-specific CNVs and gene coding sequence variations that should provide strong candidates to

  10. A pilot trial assessing urinary gene expression profiling with an mRNA array for diabetic nephropathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Zheng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The initiation and progression of diabetic nephropathy (DN is complex. Quantification of mRNA expression in urinary sediment has emerged as a novel strategy for studying renal diseases. Considering the numerous molecules involved in DN development, a high-throughput platform with parallel detection of multiple mRNAs is needed. In this study, we constructed a self-assembling mRNA array to analyze urinary mRNAs in DN patients with aims to reveal its potential in searching novel biomarkers. METHODS: mRNA array containing 88 genes were fabricated and its performance was evaluated. A pilot study with 9 subjects including 6 DN patients and 3 normal controls were studied with the array. DN patients were assigned into two groups according to their estimate glomerular rate (eGFR: DNI group (eGFR>60 ml/min/1.73 m(2, n = 3 and DNII group (eGFR<60 ml/min/1.73 m(2, n = 3. Urinary cell pellet was collected from each study participant. Relative abundance of these target mRNAs from urinary pellet was quantified with the array. RESULTS: The array we fabricated displayed high sensitivity and specificity. Moreover, the Cts of Positive PCR Controls in our experiments were 24±0.5 which indicated high repeatability of the array. A total of 29 mRNAs were significantly increased in DN patients compared with controls (p<0.05. Among these genes, α-actinin4, CDH2, ACE, FAT1, synaptopodin, COL4α, twist, NOTCH3 mRNA expression were 15-fold higher than those in normal controls. In contrast, urinary TIMP-1 mRNA was significantly decreased in DN patients (p<0.05. It was shown that CTGF, MCP-1, PAI-1, ACE, CDH1, CDH2 mRNA varied significantly among the 3 study groups, and their mRNA levels increased with DN progression (p<0.05. CONCLUSION: Our pilot study demonstrated that mRNA array might serve as a high-throughput and sensitive tool for detecting mRNA expression in urinary sediment. Thus, this primary study indicated that mRNA array probably could be a

  11. Improved performance of high average power semiconductor arrays for applications in diode pumped solid state lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beach, R.; Emanuel, M.; Benett, W.; Freitas, B.; Ciarlo, D.; Carlson, N.; Sutton, S.; Skidmore, J.; Solarz, R.

    1994-01-01

    The average power performance capability of semiconductor diode laser arrays has improved dramatically over the past several years. These performance improvements, combined with cost reductions pursued by LLNL and others in the fabrication and packaging of diode lasers, have continued to reduce the price per average watt of laser diode radiation. Presently, we are at the point where the manufacturers of commercial high average power solid state laser systems used in material processing applications can now seriously consider the replacement of their flashlamp pumps with laser diode pump sources. Additionally, a low cost technique developed and demonstrated at LLNL for optically conditioning the output radiation of diode laser arrays has enabled a new and scalable average power diode-end-pumping architecture that can be simply implemented in diode pumped solid state laser systems (DPSSL`s). This development allows the high average power DPSSL designer to look beyond the Nd ion for the first time. Along with high average power DPSSL`s which are appropriate for material processing applications, low and intermediate average power DPSSL`s are now realizable at low enough costs to be attractive for use in many medical, electronic, and lithographic applications.

  12. Standing-wave excited soft x-ray photoemission microscopy: application to Co microdot magnetic arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, Alexander; Kronast, Florian; Papp, Christian; Yang, See-Hun; Cramm, Stefan; Krug, Ingo P.; Salmassi, Farhad; Gullikson, Eric M.; Hilken, Dawn L.; Anderson, Erik H.; Fischer, Peter; Durr, Hermann A.; Schneider, Claus M.; Fadley, Charles S.

    2010-10-29

    We demonstrate the addition of depth resolution to the usual two-dimensional images in photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM), with application to a square array of circular magnetic Co microdots. The method is based on excitation with soft x-ray standing-waves generated by Bragg reflection from a multilayer mirror substrate. Standing wave is moved vertically through sample simply by varying the photon energy around the Bragg condition. Depth-resolved PEEM images were obtained for all of the observed elements. Photoemission intensities as functions of photon energy were compared to x-ray optical calculations in order to quantitatively derive the depth-resolved film structure of the sample.

  13. A Radio-Frequency-over-Fiber link for large-array radio astronomy applications

    CERN Document Server

    Mena, Juan; Cliche, Jean-Francois; Dobbs, Matt; Gilbert, Adam; Tang, Qing Yang

    2013-01-01

    A prototype 425-850 MHz Radio-Frequency-over-Fiber (RFoF) link for the Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME) is presented. The design is based on a directly modulated Fabry-Perot (FP) laser, operating at ambient temperature, and a single-mode fiber. The dynamic performance, gain stability, and phase stability of the RFoF link are characterized. Tests on a two-element interferometer built at the Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory for CHIME prototyping demonstrate that RFoF can be successfully used as a cost-effective solution for analog signal transport on the CHIME telescope and other large-array radio astronomy applications

  14. Application of high resolution SNP arrays in patients with congenital oral clefts in south China

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TING-YING LEI; HONG-TAO WANG; FAN LI; YING-QIU CUI; FANG FU; RU LI; CAN LIAO

    2016-12-01

    Chromosome microarray analysis (CMA) has proven to be a powerful tool in postnatal patients with intellectual disabilities. However, the diagnostic capability of CMA in patients with congenital oral clefts remain mysterious. Here, we present ourclinical experience in implementing whole-genome high-resolution SNP arrays to investigate 33 patients with syndromic and nonsyndromic oral clefts in whom standard karyotyping analyses showed normal karyotypes. We aim to identify the genomic aetiology and candidate genes in patients with congenital oral clefts. CMA revealed copy number variants (CNVs) in every patient, which ranged from 2 to 9 per sample. The size of detected CNVs varied from 100 to 3.2 Mb. In 33 patients, we identified six clinically significant CNVs. The incidence of clinically significant CNVs was 18.2% (6/33). Three of these six CNVs were detected in patients with nonsyndromic clefts, including one who presented with isolated cleft lip with cleft palate (CLP) and two with cleft palate only (CPO). The remaining three CNVs were detected in patients with syndromic clefts. However, no CNV was detected in patients with cleft lip only (CLO). The six clinically significant CNVs were as follows: 8p23.1 microduplication (198 kb); 10q22.2-q22.3 microdeletion (1766 kb); 18q12.3 microduplication (638 kb); 20p12.1 microdeletion (184 kb); 6q26 microdeletion (389 kb); and 22q11.21-q11.23 microdeletion (3163 kb). In addition, two novel candidate genes for oral clefts, KAT6B and MACROD2, were putatively identified. We also found a CNV of unknown clinical significance witha detection rate of 3.0% (1/33). Our results further support the notion that CNVs significantly contributed to the genetic aetiology of oral clefts and emphasize the efficacy of whole-genome high-resolution SNP arrays to detect novel candidate genes in patients with syndromic and nonsyndromic clefts.

  15. Biomedical Applications of Magnetic Nanoparticles: Delivering Genes and Remote Control of Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Jon

    2013-03-01

    The use of magnetic micro- and nanoparticles for biomedical applications was first proposed in the 1920s as a way to measure the rehological properties of the cell's cytoplasm. Since that time, magnetic micro- and nanoparticle synthesis, coating and bio-functionalization have advanced significantly, as have the applications for these particles. Magnetic micro- and nanoparticles are now used in a variety of biomedical techniques such as targeted drug delivery, MRI contrast enhancement, gene transfection, immno-assay and cell sorting. More recently, magnetic micro- and nanoparticles have been used to investigate and manipulate cellular processes both in vitro and in vivo. This talk will focus on magnetic nanoparticle targeting to and actuation of cell surface receptors to control cell signaling cascades to control cell behavior. This technology has applications in disease therapy, cell engineering and regenerative medicine. The use of magnetic nanoparticles and oscillating magnet arrays for enhanced gene delivery will also be discussed.

  16. SU-E-T-343: Valencia Applicator Commissioning Using a Micro-Chamber Array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmona-Meseguer, V; Palomo-Llinares, R; Candela-Juan, C; Gimeno-Olmos, J; Lliso-Valverde, F [Hospital La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Garcia-Martinez, T [Hospital de La Ribera, Alzira, Valencia (Spain); Richart-Sancho, J [Clinica Benidorm, Benidorm, Alicante (Spain); Granero, D [ERESA-Hospital General Universitario, Mislata, Valencia (Spain); Ballester, F [University of Valencia, Burjassot, Valencia (Spain); Perez-Calatayud, J [Hospital La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Clinica Benidorm, Benidorm, Alicante (Spain)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In the commissioning and QA of surface isotope-based applicators, source-indexer distance (SID) has a great influence in the flatness, symmetry and output. To these purposes, methods described in the literature are the use of a special insert at the entrance of dwell chamber or radiochromic films. Here we present the experience with a micro-chamber array to perform the commissioning and QA of Valencia applicators. Methods: Valencia applicators have been used, the classic and the new extra-shielded version. A micro-chamber array has been employed, 1000 SRS (PTW), with 977 liquid filled, 2.3×2.3×0.5 mm{sup 3} sized ion chambers covering 11×11 cm{sup 2}, which spacing is 2.5 mm in the central 5.5×5.5 cm{sup 2}, dedicated mainly in principle, in conjunction with Octavius 4D (PTW), to IMRT, VMAT, SBRT verifications. Verisoft software that allows for 3D and planar analysis has been used to evaluate the results. Applicators were located on the surface of the array. To verify the SID, measurements corresponding to the reference value, SID ± 1 mm and SID ± 2 mm were acquired (integration time was fixed in order to discard the influence of the source entrance/exit). Once SID was determined, standard protocol treatments corresponding to 3 Gy and 7 Gy were acquired in order to establish typical patient dose distribution. Results: The method is fast and sensitive. The SID obtained was 1321 mm which is the nominal value included in the applicator manual. For example at 1319 mm an asymmetry of ±8% with respect to the central value was measured, along with a central deviation of −4% referred to 1321 mm. Conclusion: A practical method for the commissioning and QA of Valencia applicators has been described. It has been shown that it is an efficient and accurate tool for these purposes as well as for the verification of the absolute output constancy.

  17. Gene Therapy Applications in Gastroenterology and Hepatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine H Wu

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Advantages and disadvantages of viral vectors and nonviral vectors for gene delivery to digestive organs are reviewed. Advances in systems for the introduction of new gene expression are described, including self-deleting retroviral transfer vectors, chimeric viruses and chimeric oligonucleotides. Systems for inhibition of gene expression are discussed, including antisense oligonucleotides, ribozymes and dominant-negative genes.

  18. High-Throughput DNA Array for SNP Detection of KRAS Gene Using a Centrifugal Microfluidic Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedighi, Abootaleb; Li, Paul C H

    2016-01-01

    Here, we describe detection of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in genomic DNA samples using a NanoBioArray (NBA) chip. Fast DNA hybridization is achieved in the chip when target DNAs are introduced to the surface-arrayed probes using centrifugal force. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are used to assist SNP detection at room temperature. The parallel setting of sample introduction in the spiral channels of the NBA chip enables multiple analyses on many samples, resulting in a technique appropriate for high-throughput SNP detection. The experimental procedure, including chip fabrication, probe array printing, DNA amplification, hybridization, signal detection, and data analysis, is described in detail.

  19. Identification of brassinosteroid responsive genes in Arabidopsis by cDNA array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU; Yuxin; (

    2001-01-01

    [1]Grove, M. D., Spencer, G. F., Rohwedder, W. K. et al., Brassinolide, a plant growth-promoting steroid isolated from Brassica napus pollen, Nature, 1979, 281: 216-217.[2]Mandava, N. B., Plant growth-promoting brassinosteroids, Annu. Rev. Plant Physiol. Plant Mol. Biol., 1988, 39: 23-52.[3]Clouse, S. D., Sasse, J. M., Brassinosteroids: essential regulators of plant growth and development, Annu. Rev. Plant Physiol. Plant Mol. Biol., 1998, 49: 427-451.[4]Altmann, T., Recent advances in brassinosteroid molecular genetics, Curr. Opin. Plant Biol., 1998, 1: 378-383.[5]Aharoni, A., Keizer, L. C. P., Bouwmeester, H. J. et al., Identification of the SAAT gene involved in strawberry flavor biogenesis by use of DNA microarray, Plant Cell, 2000, 12: 647-661.[6]Reymond, P., Weber, H., Damond, M. et al., Differential gene expression in response to mechanical wounding and insect feeding in Arabidopsis, Plant Cell, 2000, 12: 707-719.[7]Hu, Y., Han, C., Mou, Z. et al., Monitoring gene expression by cDNA array, Chin. Sci. Bull., 1999, 44: 441-444.[8]Fujioka, S., Li, J., Choi, Y. H. et al., The Arabidopsis deetiolated2 mutant is blocked early in brassinosteroid biosynthesis, Plant Cell, 1997, 9: 1951-1962.[9]Wadsworth, G. J., Redinbaugh, M. G., Scandalios, J. G., A procedure for small-scale isolation of plant RNA suitable for RNA blot analysis, Anal. Biochem., 1988, 172: 279-283.[10]Church, G. M., Gilbert, W., Genomic sequencing, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 1984, 81: 1991-1995.[11]Huntley, R. P., Murray, J. A. H., The plant cell cycle, Curr. Opin. Plant Biol., 1999, 2: 440-446.[12]Riou-Khamlichi, C., Huntley, R., Jacqmard, A. et al., Cytokinin activation of Arabidopsis cell division through a D-type cyclin, Science, 1999, 283: 1541-1544.[13]Hu, Y., Bao, F., Li, J., Promotive effect of brassinosteroids on cell division involves a distinct CycD3-induction pathway, Plant J., 2000, 24: 693-701.[14]Hirayama, T., Shinozaki, K., A

  20. A Single-Array-Based Method for Detecting Copy Number Variants Using Affymetrix High Density SNP Arrays and its Application to Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Wen, Yalu; Fu, Wenjiang

    2014-01-01

    Cumulative evidence has shown that structural variations, due to insertions, deletions, and inversions of DNA, may contribute considerably to the development of complex human diseases, such as breast cancer. High-throughput genotyping technologies, such as Affymetrix high density single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays, have produced large amounts of genetic data for genome-wide SNP genotype calling and copy number estimation. Meanwhile, there is a great need for accurate and efficient statistical methods to detect copy number variants. In this article, we introduce a hidden-Markov-model (HMM)-based method, referred to as the PICR-CNV, for copy number inference. The proposed method first estimates copy number abundance for each single SNP on a single array based on the raw fluorescence values, and then standardizes the estimated copy number abundance to achieve equal footing among multiple arrays. This method requires no between-array normalization, and thus, maintains data integrity and independence of samples among individual subjects. In addition to our efforts to apply new statistical technology to raw fluorescence values, the HMM has been applied to the standardized copy number abundance in order to reduce experimental noise. Through simulations, we show our refined method is able to infer copy number variants accurately. Application of the proposed method to a breast cancer dataset helps to identify genomic regions significantly associated with the disease.

  1. Analysis of immune system gene expression in small rheumatoid arthritis biopsies using a combination of subtractive hybridization and high-density cDNA arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanders, E D; Goulden, M G; Kennedy, T C; Kempsell, K E

    2000-01-13

    Subtractive hybridization of cDNAs generated from synovial RNA which had been isolated from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or normal controls was used in conjunction with high-density array hybridization to identify genes of immunological interest. The method was designed to detect gene expression in small needle biopsy specimens by means of a prior amplification of nanogram amounts of total RNA to full-length cDNA using PCR. The latter was cut with Rsa I, ligated with adapters, hybridized with unmodified driver cDNA, and subjected to suppression subtraction PCR. Differentially expressed products were cloned into E. coli and picked into 384 well plates. Inserts were obtained by PCR across the multiple cloning site, and the products arrayed at high density on nylon filters. The subtracted cDNAs were also labelled by random priming for use as probes for library screening. The libraries chosen were the subtracted one described above and a set of 45,000 ESTs from the I.M. A.G.E consortium. Clones showing positive hybridization were identified by sequence analysis and homology searching. The results showed that the subtracted hybridization approach could identify many gene fragments expressed at different levels, the most abundant being immunoglobulins and HLA-DR. The expression profile was characteristic of macrophage, B cell and plasma cell infiltration with evidence of interferon induction. In addition, a significant number of sequences without matches in the nucleotide databases were obtained, this demonstrates the utility of the method in finding novel gene fragments for further characterisation as potential members of the immune system. Although RA was studied here, the technology is applicable to any disease process even in cases where amounts of tissue may be limited.

  2. A Reconfigurable Systolic Array Architecture for Multicarrier Wireless and Multirate Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Ho

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A reconfigurable systolic array (RSA architecture that supports the realization of DSP functions for multicarrier wireless and multirate applications is presented. The RSA consists of coarse-grained processing elements that can be configured as complex DSP functions that are the basic building blocks of Polyphase-FIR filters, phase shifters, DFTs, and Polyphase-DFT circuits. The homogeneous characteristic of the RSA architecture, where each reconfigurable processing element (PE cell is connected to its nearest neighbors via configurable switch (SW elements, enables array expansion for parallel processing and facilitates time sharing computation of high-throughput data by individual PEs. For DFT circuit configurations, an algorithmic optimization technique has been employed to reduce the overall number of vector-matrix products to be mapped on the RSA. The hardware complexity and throughput of the RSA-based DFT structures have been evaluated and compared against several conventional modular FFT realizations. Designs and circuit implementations of the PE cell and several RSAs configured as DFT and Polyphase filter circuits are also presented. The RSA architecture offers significant flexibility and computational capacity for applications that require real time reconfiguration and high-density computing.

  3. Real-time PCR array as a universal platform for the detection of genetically modified crops and its application in identifying unapproved genetically modified crops in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mano, Junichi; Shigemitsu, Natsuki; Futo, Satoshi; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Teshima, Reiko; Hino, Akihiro; Furui, Satoshi; Kitta, Kazumi

    2009-01-14

    We developed a novel type of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) array with TaqMan chemistry as a platform for the comprehensive and semiquantitative detection of genetically modified (GM) crops. Thirty primer-probe sets for the specific detection of GM lines, recombinant DNA (r-DNA) segments, endogenous reference genes, and donor organisms were synthesized, and a 96-well PCR plate was prepared with a different primer-probe in each well as the real-time PCR array. The specificity and sensitivity of the array were evaluated. A comparative analysis with the data and publicly available information on GM crops approved in Japan allowed us to assume the possibility of unapproved GM crop contamination. Furthermore, we designed a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet application, Unapproved GMO Checker version 2.01, which helps process all the data of real-time PCR arrays for the easy assumption of unapproved GM crop contamination. The spreadsheet is available free of charge at http://cse.naro.affrc.go.jp/jmano/index.html .

  4. Chemical modification of TiO2 nanotube arrays for label-free optical biosensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terracciano, Monica; Galstyan, Vardan; Rea, Ilaria; Casalino, Maurizio; De Stefano, Luca; Sbervegleri, Giorgio

    2017-10-01

    In this study, we have fabricated TiO2 nanotube arrays by the potentiostatic anodic oxidation of Ti foils in fluoride-containing electrolyte and explored them as versatile devices for biosensing applications. TiO2 nanotubes have been chemically modified in order to bind Protein A as a specific target analyte for the optical biosensing. The obtained structures have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, water contact angle, fluorescence microscopy, spectroscopic reflectometry and photoluminescence. Investigations show that the prepared TiO2 nanotubes, 2.5 μm long and 75 nm thick, can be easily and efficiently bio-modified, and the obtained structures are strongly photoluminescent, thus suitable for the label-free biosensing applications in the range of μM, due to their peculiar optical properties.

  5. Scalable, epitaxy-free fabrication of super-absorbing sparse III-V nanowire arrays for photovoltaic applications (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Wen-Hui; Fountaine, Katherine T.; Bukowsky, Colton R.; Atwater, Harry A.

    2016-09-01

    III-V compound semiconductor nanowire arrays are promising candidates for photovoltaics applications due to their high volumetric absorption. Uniform nanowire arrays exhibit high absorption at certain wavelengths due to strong coupling into lossy waveguide modes. Previously, simulations predicted near-unity, broadband absorption in sparse semiconductor nanowire arrays (Polymer-embedded wires are removed from the bulk InP substrate by a mechanical method that facilitates extensive reuse of a single bulk InP wafer to synthesize many polymer-embedded nanowire array thin films. Arrays containing multiple nanowire radii and tapered nanowires were successfully fabricated. For both designs, the polymer-embedded arrays achieved 90% broadband absorption (λ=400-900 nm) in less than 100 nm planar equivalence of InP. The addition of a silver back reflector increased this broadband absorption to 95%. The repeatable process of imprinting, etching and peeling to obtain many nanowire arrays from one single wafer represents an economical manufacturing route for high efficiency III-V photovoltaics. [1] K.T. Fountaine, C.G. Kendall, Harry A. Atwater, "Near-unity broadband absorption designs for semiconducting nanowire arrays via localized radial mode excitation," Opt. Exp. (2014).

  6. Generation of a genomic tiling array of the human Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC and its application for DNA methylation analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ottaviani Diego

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The major histocompatibility complex (MHC is essential for human immunity and is highly associated with common diseases, including cancer. While the genetics of the MHC has been studied intensively for many decades, very little is known about the epigenetics of this most polymorphic and disease-associated region of the genome. Methods To facilitate comprehensive epigenetic analyses of this region, we have generated a genomic tiling array of 2 Kb resolution covering the entire 4 Mb MHC region. The array has been designed to be compatible with chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP, methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP, array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH and expression profiling, including of non-coding RNAs. The array comprises 7832 features, consisting of two replicates of both forward and reverse strands of MHC amplicons and appropriate controls. Results Using MeDIP, we demonstrate the application of the MHC array for DNA methylation profiling and the identification of tissue-specific differentially methylated regions (tDMRs. Based on the analysis of two tissues and two cell types, we identified 90 tDMRs within the MHC and describe their characterisation. Conclusion A tiling array covering the MHC region was developed and validated. Its successful application for DNA methylation profiling indicates that this array represents a useful tool for molecular analyses of the MHC in the context of medical genomics.

  7. Assessing Apoptosis Gene Expression Profiling with a PCR Array in the Hippocampus of Ts65Dn Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Yu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that Down syndrome (DS is a condition in which extra genetic material causes delays in the way a child develops, both mentally and physically. Intellectual disability is the foremost and most debilitating trait, which caused loss of cognitive abilities and the development of early onset Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Ts65Dn mice were used in this study. We isolated the hippocampus. First, we used transmission scanning electron microscopy to directly observe the hippocampus and confirm if apoptosis had occurred. Second, we customized a PCR array with 53 genes, including several important genes related to cell apoptosis. Gene expression was detected by RT-PCR. There were varying degrees of changes characteristic of apoptosis in the hippocampus of Ts65Dn mice, which mainly included the following: nuclear membrane thinning, unevenly distributed chromosomes, the production of chromatin crescents, and pyknosis of the nuclei with some nuclear fragmentation. Meanwhile, three genes (API5, AIFM1, and NFκB1 showed changes of expression in the hippocampus of Ts65Dn mice compared with normal mice. Only NFκB1 expression was significantly increased, while the expressions of API5 and AIFM1 were notably decreased. The fold changes in the expression of API5, AIFM1, and NFκB1 were 11.55, 5.94, and 3.11, respectively. However, some well-known genes related to cell apoptosis, such as the caspase family, Bcl-2, Bad, Bid, Fas, and TNF, did not show changes in expression levels. The genes we found which were differentially expressed in the hippocampus of Ts65Dn mice may be closely related to cell apoptosis. PCR array technology can assist in the screening and identification of genes involved in apoptosis.

  8. Novel Genomic Aberrations in Testicular Germ Cell Tumors by Array-CGH, and Associated Gene Expression Changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf I. Skotheim

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Testicular germ cell tumors of adolescent and young adult men (TGCTs generally have near triploid and complex karyotypes. The actual genes driving the tumorigenesis remain essentially to be identified. Materials and Methods: To determine the detailed DNA copy number changes, and investigate their impact on gene expression levels, we performed an integrated microarray profiling of TGCT genomes and transcriptomes. We analyzed 17 TGCTs, three precursor lesions, and the embryonal carcinoma cell lines, NTERA2 and 2102Ep, by comparative genomic hybridization microarrays (array-CGH, and integrated the data with transcriptome profiles of the same samples. Results: The gain of chromosome arm 12p was, as expected, the most common aberration, and we found CCND2, CD9, GAPD, GDF3, NANOG, and TEAD4 to be the therein most highly over-expressed genes. Additional frequent genomic aberrations revealed some shorter chromosomal segments, which are novel to TGCT, as well as known aberrations for which we here refined boundaries. These include gains from 7p15.2 and 21q22.2, and losses of 4p16.3 and 22q13.3. Integration of DNA copy number information to gene expression profiles identified that BRCC3, FOS, MLLT11, NES, and RAC1 may act as novel oncogenes in TGCT. Similarly, DDX26, ERCC5, FZD4, NME4, OPTN, and RB1 were both lost and under-expressed genes, and are thus putative TGCT suppressor genes. Conclusion: This first genome-wide integrated array-CGH and gene expression profiling of TGCT provides novel insights into the genome biology underlying testicular tumorigenesis.

  9. Identification of Novel Stress-responsive Transcription Factor Genes in Rice by cDNA Array Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cong-Qing Wu; Hong-Hong Hu; Ya Zeng; Da-Cheng Liang; Ka-Bin Xie; Jian-Wei Zhang; Zhao-Hui Chu; Li-Zhong Xiong

    2006-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown that array of transcription factors has a role in regulating plant responses to environmental stresses. Only a small portion of them however, have been identified or characterized.More than 2 300 putative transcription factors were predicted in the rice genome and more than half of them were supported by expressed sequences. With an attempt to identify novel transcription factors involved in the stress responses, a cDNA array containing 753 putative rice transcription factors was generated to analyze the transcript profiles of these genes under drought and salinity stresses and abscisic acid treatment at seedling stage of rice. About 80% of these transcription factors showed detectable levels of transcript in seedling leaves. A total of 18 up-regulated transcription factors and 29 down-regulated transcription factors were detected with the folds of changes from 2.0 to 20.5 in at least one stress treatment.Most of these stress-responsive genes have not been reported and the expression patterns for five genes under stress conditions were further analyzed by RNA gel blot analysis. These novel stress-responsive transcription factors provide new opportunities to study the regulation of gene expression in plants under stress conditions.

  10. Functional gene array-based analysis of microbial community structure in groundwaters with a gradient of contaminant levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldron, P.J.; Wu, L.; Van Nostrand, J.D.; Schadt, C.W.; Watson, D.B.; Jardine, P.M.; Palumbo, A.V.; Hazen, T.C.; Zhou, J.

    2009-06-15

    To understand how contaminants affect microbial community diversity, heterogeneity, and functional structure, six groundwater monitoring wells from the Field Research Center of the U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Remediation Science Program (ERSP; Oak Ridge, TN), with a wide range of pH, nitrate, and heavy metal contamination were investigated. DNA from the groundwater community was analyzed with a functional gene array containing 2006 probes to detect genes involved in metal resistance, sulfate reduction, organic contaminant degradation, and carbon and nitrogen cycling. Microbial diversity decreased in relation to the contamination levels of the wells. Highly contaminated wells had lower gene diversity but greater signal intensity than the pristine well. The microbial composition was heterogeneous, with 17-70% overlap between different wells. Metal-resistant and metal-reducing microorganisms were detected in both contaminated and pristine wells, suggesting the potential for successful bioremediation of metal-contaminated groundwaters. In addition, results of Mantel tests and canonical correspondence analysis indicate that nitrate, sulfate, pH, uranium, and technetium have a significant (p < 0.05) effect on microbial community structure. This study provides an overall picture of microbial community structure in contaminated environments with functional gene arrays by showing that diversity and heterogeneity can vary greatly in relation to contamination.

  11. Large-scale analysis of antisense transcription in wheat using the Affymetrix GeneChip Wheat Genome Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Settles Matthew L

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Natural antisense transcripts (NATs are transcripts of the opposite DNA strand to the sense-strand either at the same locus (cis-encoded or a different locus (trans-encoded. They can affect gene expression at multiple stages including transcription, RNA processing and transport, and translation. NATs give rise to sense-antisense transcript pairs and the number of these identified has escalated greatly with the availability of DNA sequencing resources and public databases. Traditionally, NATs were identified by the alignment of full-length cDNAs or expressed sequence tags to genome sequences, but an alternative method for large-scale detection of sense-antisense transcript pairs involves the use of microarrays. In this study we developed a novel protocol to assay sense- and antisense-strand transcription on the 55 K Affymetrix GeneChip Wheat Genome Array, which is a 3' in vitro transcription (3'IVT expression array. We selected five different tissue types for assay to enable maximum discovery, and used the 'Chinese Spring' wheat genotype because most of the wheat GeneChip probe sequences were based on its genomic sequence. This study is the first report of using a 3'IVT expression array to discover the expression of natural sense-antisense transcript pairs, and may be considered as proof-of-concept. Results By using alternative target preparation schemes, both the sense- and antisense-strand derived transcripts were labeled and hybridized to the Wheat GeneChip. Quality assurance verified that successful hybridization did occur in the antisense-strand assay. A stringent threshold for positive hybridization was applied, which resulted in the identification of 110 sense-antisense transcript pairs, as well as 80 potentially antisense-specific transcripts. Strand-specific RT-PCR validated the microarray observations, and showed that antisense transcription is likely to be tissue specific. For the annotated sense

  12. Gene delivery with cationic lipids : fundamentals and potential applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wasungu, Luc Bakomma

    2006-01-01

    Principle of gene therapy. Although the objectives and principles of gene therapy have been well-defined over the last decades, its application as a versatile, therapeutically successful approach has not yet met expectations. At the onset, the primary goal of gene therapy was to replace a deficient

  13. Gene delivery with cationic lipids : fundamentals and potential applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wasungu, Luc Bakomma

    2006-01-01

    Principle of gene therapy. Although the objectives and principles of gene therapy have been well-defined over the last decades, its application as a versatile, therapeutically successful approach has not yet met expectations. At the onset, the primary goal of gene therapy was to replace a deficient

  14. Gene delivery with cationic lipids : fundamentals and potential applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wasungu, L.B.

    2006-01-01

    Principle of gene therapy.Although the objectives and principles of gene therapy have been well-defined over the last decades, its application as a versatile, therapeutically successful approach has not yet met expectations. At the onset, the primary goal of gene therapy was to replace a deficient g

  15. Study of the plasma interference with high voltage electrode array for space power application

    OpenAIRE

    Iwasa, Minoru; TANAKA, KOJI; Sasaki, Susumu; ODAWARA, OSAMU; 岩佐 稔; 田中 孝治; 佐々木 進; 小田原 修

    2005-01-01

    We are studying the problems associated with high voltage power systems in space. Especially we are interested in the potential distribution of the solar array that is resistant to the electrical discharge. We have carried out experiments on the interaction between the high voltage solar array and the ambient plasma. In the experiment, an array of electrodes distributed on the insulation panel was used to simulate the inter-connectors of the solar array. An electrode array without the insulat...

  16. Tissue array for Tp53, C-myc, CCND1 gene over-expression in different tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To rapidly detect molecular alterations in different malignancies and investigate the possible role of Tp53, C-myc, and CCND1 genes in development of tumors in human organs and their adjacent normal tissues, as well as the possible relation between well- and poorly-differentiated tumors. METHODS: A tissue array consisting of seven different tumors was generated. The tissue array included 120 points of esophagus, 120 points of stomach, 80 points of rectum, 60 points of thyroid gland, 100 points of mammary gland, 80 points ofliver, and 80 points of colon. Expressions of Tp53, C-myc, and CCND1 were determined by RNA in situ hybridization. 3' terminal digoxin-labeled anti-sense single stranded oligonucleotide and locked nucleic acid modifying probe were used.RESULTS: The expression level of Tp53 gene was higher in six different carcinoma tissue samples than in paracancerous tissue samples with the exception in colon carcinoma tissue samples (P < 0.05). The expression level of CCND1 gene was significantly different in different carcinoma tissue samples with the exception in esophagus and colon carcinoma tissue samples. The expression level of C-myc gene was different in esophagus carcinoma tissue samples (x2 = 18.495, P = 0.000), stomach carcinoma tissue samples (x2 = 23.750, P = 0.000), and thyroid gland tissue samples (x2 = 10.999, P = 0.004). The intensity of signals was also different in different carcinoma tissue samples and paracancerous tissue samples.CONCLUSION: Over-expression of the Tp53, CCND1, and C-myc genes appears to play a role in development of human cancer by regulating the expression of mRNA. Tp53, CCND1 and C-myc genes are significantly correlated with the development of different carcinomas.

  17. Gene expression and single nucleotide polymorphism array analyses of spindle cell lipomas and conventional lipomas with 13q14 deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartuma, Hammurabi; Nord, Karolin H; Macchia, Gemma; Isaksson, Margareth; Nilsson, Jenny; Domanski, Henryk A; Mandahl, Nils; Mertens, Fredrik

    2011-08-01

    Spindle cell lipomas (SCL) are circumscribed, usually s.c. tumors that typically occur on the posterior neck, shoulder, and back of middle aged men. Cytogenetically, almost all SCL are characterized by deletions of chromosome arm 13q, often in combination with loss of 16q. Deletions of 13q are seen also in approximately 15% of conventional lipomas. Through single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array analyses, we identified two minimal deleted regions (MDR) in 13q14 in SCL. In MDR1, four genes were located, including the tumor suppressor gene RB1. MDR1 in SCL overlapped with the MDR detected in conventional lipomas with 13q14 deletion. In MDR2 in SCL there were 34 genes and the two microRNA (miRNA) genes miR-15a and miR-16-1. Global gene expression analysis was used to study the impact of the deletions on genes mapping to the two SCL-associated MDR. Five genes (C13orf1, DHRS12, ATP7B, ALG11, and VPS36) in SCL and one gene (C13orf1) in conventional lipomas with 13q-deletions were found to be significantly underexpressed compared with control tissues. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that miR-16-1 was expressed at lower levels in SCL than in the control samples. No mutations were found at sequencing of RB1, miR-15a, and miR-16-1. Our findings further delineate the target region for the 13q deletion in SCL and conventional lipomas and show that the deletions are associated with down-regulated expression of several genes, notably C13orf1, which was the only gene to be significantly down-regulated in both tumor types. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Genes2GO: A web application for querying gene sets for specific GO terms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Konika; Kuiper, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Gene ontology annotations have become an essential resource for biological interpretations of experimental findings. The process of gathering basic annotation information in tables that link gene sets with specific gene ontology terms can be cumbersome, in particular if it requires above average computer skills or bioinformatics expertise. We have therefore developed Genes2GO, an intuitive R-based web application. Genes2GO uses the biomaRt package of Bioconductor in order to retrieve custom sets of gene ontology annotations for any list of genes from organisms covered by the Ensembl database. Genes2GO produces a binary matrix file, indicating for each gene the presence or absence of specific annotations for a gene. It should be noted that other GO tools do not offer this user-friendly access to annotations. Genes2GO is freely available and listed under http://www.semantic-systems-biology.org/tools/externaltools/.

  19. Fabrication of highly ordered TiO2 nanorod/nanotube adjacent arrays for photoelectrochemical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haimin; Liu, Porun; Liu, Xiaolu; Zhang, Shanqing; Yao, Xiangdong; An, Taicheng; Amal, Rose; Zhao, Huijun

    2010-07-06

    This work reports a facile approach to fabricate a perpendicularly aligned and highly ordered TiO(2) nanorod/nanotube (NR/NT) adjacent film by directly anodizing a modified titanium foil. The titanium foil substrate was modified with a layer of crystalline TiO(2) film via a hydrothermal process in 0.05 M (NH(4))(2)S(2)O(8). The resultant NR/NT architecture consists of a highly ordered nanorod top layer that directly adjoins to a highly ordered nanotube array bottom layer. The thickness of the top nanorod layer was approximately 90 nm with average nanorod diameter of 22 nm after 20 min of anodization. The thickness of the bottom nanotube array layer was found to be ca. 250 nm after 20 min of anodization, having an average outer and inner tubular diameters of 120 and 80 nm, respectively. A broad implication of the method is that a simple modification to the substrate surface can lead to new forms of nanostructures. For as-anodized NR/NT samples, XRD analysis reveals that the nanorods are of anatase TiO(2) crystalline form while the nanotubes are amorphous. Anatase TiO(2) crystalline form of NR/NT film with high crystallinity can be obtained by thermally treating the as-anodized sample at 450 degrees C for 2 h in air. The resultant NR/NT film was used as a photoanode for photoactivity evaluation. Comparing with a nanotube array photoanode prepared by direct anodization of unmodified titanium foil, the NR/NT photoanode exhibits a unique feature of selective photocatalytic oxidation toward organics, which makes it very attractive to photocatalytic degradation of organic pollutants, sensing, and other applications.

  20. Characterization of the chicken GCAP gene array and analyses of GCAP1, GCAP2, and GC1 gene expression in normal and rd chicken pineal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semple-Rowland, S L; Larkin, P; Bronson, J D; Nykamp, K; Streit, W J; Baehr, W

    1999-07-28

    This study had three objectives: (1) to characterize the structures of the chicken GCAP1 and GCAP2 genes; (2) to determine if GCAP1, GCAP2, and GC1 genes are expressed in chicken pineal gland; (3) if GC1 is expressed in chicken pineal, to determine if the GC1 null mutation carried by the retinal degeneration (rd) chicken is associated with degenerative changes within the pineal glands of these animals. GCAP1 and GCAP2 gene structures were determined by analyses of chicken cosmid and cDNA clones. The putative transcription start points for these genes were determined using 5'-RACE. GCAP1, GCAP2 and GC1 transcripts were analyzed using Northern blot and RT-PCR. Routine light microscopy was used to examine pineal morphology. Chicken GCAP1 and GCAP2 genes are arranged in a tail-to-tail array. Each protein is encoded by 4 exons that are interrupted by 3 introns of variable length, the positions of which are identical within each gene. The putative transcription start points for GCAP1 and GCAP2 are 314 and 243 bases upstream of the translation start codons of these genes, respectively. As in retina, GCAP1, GCAP2 and GC1 genes are expressed in the chicken pineal. Although the GC1 null mutation is present in both the retina and pineal of the rd chicken, only the retina appears to undergo degeneration. The identical arrangement of chicken, human, and mouse GCAP1/2 genes suggests that these genes originated from an ancient gene duplication/inversion event that occurred during evolution prior to vertebrate diversification. The expression of GC1, GCAP1, and GCAP2 in chicken pineal is consistent with the hypothesis that chicken pineal contains a functional phototransduction cascade. The absence of cellular degeneration in the rd pineal gland suggests that GC1 is not critical for pineal cell survival.

  1. State-of-the-art human gene therapy: part II. Gene therapy strategies and clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan; Gao, Guangping

    2014-09-01

    In Part I of this Review (Wang and Gao, 2014), we introduced recent advances in gene delivery technologies and explained how they have powered some of the current human gene therapy applications. In Part II, we expand the discussion on gene therapy applications, focusing on some of the most exciting clinical uses. To help readers to grasp the essence and to better organize the diverse applications, we categorize them under four gene therapy strategies: (1) gene replacement therapy for monogenic diseases, (2) gene addition for complex disorders and infectious diseases, (3) gene expression alteration targeting RNA, and (4) gene editing to introduce targeted changes in host genome. Human gene therapy started with the simple idea that replacing a faulty gene with a functional copy can cure a disease. It has been a long and bumpy road to finally translate this seemingly straightforward concept into reality. As many disease mechanisms unraveled, gene therapists have employed a gene addition strategy backed by a deep knowledge of what goes wrong in diseases and how to harness host cellular machinery to battle against diseases. Breakthroughs in other biotechnologies, such as RNA interference and genome editing by chimeric nucleases, have the potential to be integrated into gene therapy. Although clinical trials utilizing these new technologies are currently sparse, these innovations are expected to greatly broaden the scope of gene therapy in the near future.

  2. LDRD final report on Bloch Oscillations in two-dimensional nanostructure arrays for high frequency applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyo, Sungkwun Kenneth; Pan, Wei; Reno, John Louis; Wendt, Joel Robert; Barton, Daniel Lee

    2008-09-01

    We have investigated the physics of Bloch oscillations (BO) of electrons, engineered in high mobility quantum wells patterned into lateral periodic arrays of nanostructures, i.e. two-dimensional (2D) quantum dot superlattices (QDSLs). A BO occurs when an electron moves out of the Brillouin zone (BZ) in response to a DC electric field, passing back into the BZ on the opposite side. This results in quantum oscillations of the electron--i.e., a high frequency AC current in response to a DC voltage. Thus, engineering a BO will yield continuously electrically tunable high-frequency sources (and detectors) for sensor applications, and be a physics tour-de-force. More than a decade ago, Bloch oscillation (BO) was observed in a quantum well superlattice (QWSL) in short-pulse optical experiments. However, its potential as electrically biased high frequency source and detector so far has not been realized. This is partially due to fast damping of BO in QWSLs. In this project, we have investigated the possibility of improving the stability of BO by fabricating lateral superlattices of periodic coupled nanostructures, such as metal grid, quantum (anti)dots arrays, in high quality GaAs/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As heterostructures. In these nanostructures, the lateral quantum confinement has been shown theoretically to suppress the optical-phonon scattering, believed to be the main mechanism for fast damping of BO in QWSLs. Over the last three years, we have made great progress toward demonstrating Bloch oscillations in QDSLs. In the first two years of this project, we studied the negative differential conductance and the Bloch radiation induced edge-magnetoplasmon resonance. Recently, in collaboration with Prof. Kono's group at Rice University, we investigated the time-domain THz magneto-spectroscopy measurements in QDSLs and two-dimensional electron systems. A surprising DC electrical field induced THz phase flip was observed. More measurements are planned to investigate this

  3. ExonMiner: Web service for analysis of GeneChip Exon array data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imoto Seiya

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Some splicing isoform-specific transcriptional regulations are related to disease. Therefore, detection of disease specific splice variations is the first step for finding disease specific transcriptional regulations. Affymetrix Human Exon 1.0 ST Array can measure exon-level expression profiles that are suitable to find differentially expressed exons in genome-wide scale. However, exon array produces massive datasets that are more than we can handle and analyze on personal computer. Results We have developed ExonMiner that is the first all-in-one web service for analysis of exon array data to detect transcripts that have significantly different splicing patterns in two cells, e.g. normal and cancer cells. ExonMiner can perform the following analyses: (1 data normalization, (2 statistical analysis based on two-way ANOVA, (3 finding transcripts with significantly different splice patterns, (4 efficient visualization based on heatmaps and barplots, and (5 meta-analysis to detect exon level biomarkers. We implemented ExonMiner on a supercomputer system in order to perform genome-wide analysis for more than 300,000 transcripts in exon array data, which has the potential to reveal the aberrant splice variations in cancer cells as exon level biomarkers. Conclusion ExonMiner is well suited for analysis of exon array data and does not require any installation of software except for internet browsers. What all users need to do is to access the ExonMiner URL http://ae.hgc.jp/exonminer. Users can analyze full dataset of exon array data within hours by high-level statistical analysis with sound theoretical basis that finds aberrant splice variants as biomarkers.

  4. ExonMiner: Web service for analysis of GeneChip Exon array data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numata, Kazuyuki; Yoshida, Ryo; Nagasaki, Masao; Saito, Ayumu; Imoto, Seiya; Miyano, Satoru

    2008-01-01

    Background Some splicing isoform-specific transcriptional regulations are related to disease. Therefore, detection of disease specific splice variations is the first step for finding disease specific transcriptional regulations. Affymetrix Human Exon 1.0 ST Array can measure exon-level expression profiles that are suitable to find differentially expressed exons in genome-wide scale. However, exon array produces massive datasets that are more than we can handle and analyze on personal computer. Results We have developed ExonMiner that is the first all-in-one web service for analysis of exon array data to detect transcripts that have significantly different splicing patterns in two cells, e.g. normal and cancer cells. ExonMiner can perform the following analyses: (1) data normalization, (2) statistical analysis based on two-way ANOVA, (3) finding transcripts with significantly different splice patterns, (4) efficient visualization based on heatmaps and barplots, and (5) meta-analysis to detect exon level biomarkers. We implemented ExonMiner on a supercomputer system in order to perform genome-wide analysis for more than 300,000 transcripts in exon array data, which has the potential to reveal the aberrant splice variations in cancer cells as exon level biomarkers. Conclusion ExonMiner is well suited for analysis of exon array data and does not require any installation of software except for internet browsers. What all users need to do is to access the ExonMiner URL . Users can analyze full dataset of exon array data within hours by high-level statistical analysis with sound theoretical basis that finds aberrant splice variants as biomarkers. PMID:19036125

  5. Mapping gene clusters within arrayed metagenomic libraries to expand the structural diversity of biomedically relevant natural products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Jeremy G; Reddy, Boojala Vijay B; Ternei, Melinda A; Charlop-Powers, Zachary; Calle, Paula Y; Kim, Jeffrey H; Brady, Sean F

    2013-07-16

    Complex microbial ecosystems contain large reservoirs of unexplored biosynthetic diversity. Here we provide an experimental framework and data analysis tool to facilitate the targeted discovery of natural-product biosynthetic gene clusters from the environment. Multiplex sequencing of barcoded PCR amplicons is followed by sequence similarity directed data parsing to identify sequences bearing close resemblance to biosynthetically or biomedically interesting gene clusters. Amplicons are then mapped onto arrayed metagenomic libraries to guide the recovery of targeted gene clusters. When applied to adenylation- and ketosynthase-domain amplicons derived from saturating soil DNA libraries, our analysis pipeline led to the recovery of biosynthetic clusters predicted to encode for previously uncharacterized glycopeptide- and lipopeptide-like antibiotics; thiocoraline-, azinomycin-, and bleomycin-like antitumor agents; and a rapamycin-like immunosuppressant. The utility of the approach is demonstrated by using recovered eDNA sequences to generate glycopeptide derivatives. The experiments described here constitute a systematic interrogation of a soil metagenome for gene clusters capable of encoding naturally occurring derivatives of biomedically relevant natural products. Our results show that previously undetected biosynthetic gene clusters with potential biomedical relevance are very common in the environment. This general process should permit the routine screening of environmental samples for gene clusters capable of encoding the systematic expansion of the structural diversity seen in biomedically relevant families of natural products.

  6. Ex vivo evaluation of a microneedle array device for transdermal application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indermun, Sunaina; Choonara, Yahya E; Kumar, Pradeep; du Toit, Lisa C; Modi, Girish; van Vuuren, Sandy; Luttge, Regina; Pillay, Viness

    2015-12-30

    A new approach of transdermal drug delivery is the use of microneedles. This promising technique offers the potential to be broadly used for drug administration as it enables the dramatic increase in permeation of medicaments across the stratum corneum. The potential of microneedles has evolved to spawn a plethora of potential transdermal applications. In order to advance the microneedle capabilities and possibly revolutionize advanced drug delivery, this study introduces a novel transdermal electro-modulated hydrogel-microneedle array (EMH-MNA) device composed of a nano-porous, embeddable ceramic microneedle array as well as an optimized EMH for the electro-responsive delivery of indomethacin through the skin. The ex vivo permeation as well as drug release experiments were performed on porcine skin tissue to ascertain the electro-responsive capabilities of the device. In addition, the microbial permeation ability of the microneedles across the viable epidermis in both microneedle-punctured skin as well as hypodermic needle-punctured skin was determined. Ex vivo evaluation of the EMH-MNA device across porcine skin demonstrated that without electro-stimulation, significantly less drug release was obtained (±0.4540mg) as compared to electro-stimulation (±2.93mg).

  7. A multi-channel femtoampere-sensitivity conductometric array for biosensing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, Amit; Chakrabartty, Shantanu; Pal, Sudeshna; Alocilja, Evangelyn

    2006-01-01

    Rapid detection of pathogens using field deployable biosensors requires integrated sensing and data processing. Detection of low concentration of biological agents is possible using accurate and real-time signal characterization devices. This paper presents a multi-channel conductometric array that can detect and measure current up to femtoampere range. The architecture uses a novel semi-synchronous SigmaDelta modulation that allows measurement of ultra-small currents by using a hysteretic comparison technique. The architecture achieves higher energy efficiency over a conventional SigmaDelta by reducing the total switching cycles of the comparator. A 3 mm x 3 mm chip implementing a 42 channel potentiostat array has been prototyped in a 0.5 microm CMOS technology. Measured results show 10 bits of resolution, with a sensitivity of upto 50 fA of current. The power consumption of the potentiostat is 11 microW per channel at a sampling rate of 250 kHz. The multi-channel potentiostat has been integrated with a conductometric biosensor for field deployable applications. Results with a Bacillus Cereus based biosensor demonstrate the effectiveness of the potentiostat in characterizing different concentration levels of pathogens in realtime.

  8. Titanium plate supported MoS2 nanosheet arrays for supercapacitor application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lina; Ma, Ying; Yang, Min; Qi, Yanxing

    2017-02-01

    A promising new concept is to apply binder-free supercapacitor electrode by directly growing active materials on current collectors. However, there are many challenges to be solved, such as fabrication of well quality electronic contact and good mechanical stability films through a simple and feasible method. In this study, MoS2 nanosheet arrays supported on titanium plate has been synthesized by a hydrothermal method without other additives, surface active agents and toxic reagents. As the supercapacitor electrode, a good capacitance of 133 F g-1 is attained at a discharge current density of 1 A g-1. The specific energy density is 11.11 Wh kg-1 at a power density of 0.53 kW kg-1. Moreover, the electrode shows an excellent cyclic stability. The loss of capacity is only 7% even after 1000 cycles. In addition, the formation mechanism is proposed. The facile method of fabricating MoS2 nanosheet arrays on titanium plate affords an green and effective way to prepare other metal sulfides for the application in electrochemical capacitors.

  9. A Tutorial on Optical Feeding of Millimeter-Wave Phased Array Antennas for Communication Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Aldaya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Given the interference avoidance capacity, high gain, and dynamical reconfigurability, phased array antennas (PAAs have emerged as a key enabling technology for future broadband mobile applications. This is especially important at millimeter-wave (mm-wave frequencies, where the high power consumption and significant path loss impose serious range constraints. However, at mm-wave frequencies the phase and amplitude control of the feeding currents of the PAA elements is not a trivial issue because electrical beamforming requires bulky devices and exhibits relatively narrow bandwidth. In order to overcome these limitations, different optical beamforming architectures have been presented. In this paper we review the basic principles of phased arrays and identify the main challenges, that is, integration of high-speed photodetectors with antenna elements and the efficient optical control of both amplitude and phase of the feeding current. After presenting the most important solutions found in the literature, we analyze the impact of the different noise sources on the PAA performance, giving some guidelines for the design of optically fed PAAs.

  10. Infrared Range Sensor Array for 3D Sensing in Robotic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongtae Do

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design and testing of multiple infrared range detectors arranged in a two-dimensional (2D array. The proposed system can collect the sparse three-dimensional (3D data of objects and surroundings for robotics applications. Three kinds of tasks are considered using the system: detecting obstacles that lie ahead of a mobile robot, sensing the ground profile for the safe navigation of a mobile robot, and sensing the shape and position of an object on a conveyor belt for pickup by a robot manipulator. The developed system is potentially a simple alternative to high-resolution (and expensive 3D sensing systems, such as stereo cameras or laser scanners. In addition, the system can provide shape information about target objects and surroundings that cannot be obtained using simple ultrasonic sensors. Laboratory prototypes of the system were built with nine infrared range sensors arranged in a 3×3 array and test results confirmed the validity of system.

  11. Versatile, reprogrammable area pixel array detector for time-resolved synchrotron x-ray applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruner, Sol [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2010-05-01

    The final technical report for DOE grant DE-SC0004079 is presented. The goal of the grant was to perform research, development and application of novel imaging x-ray detectors so as to effectively utilize the high intensity and brightness of the national synchrotron radiation facilities to enable previously unfeasible time-resolved x-ray research. The report summarizes the development of the resultant imaging x-ray detectors. Two types of detector platforms were developed: The first is a detector platform (called a Mixed-Mode Pixel Array Detector, or MM-PAD) that can image continuously at over a thousand images per second while maintaining high efficiency for wide dynamic range signals ranging from 1 to hundreds of millions of x-rays per pixel per image. Research on an even higher dynamic range variant is also described. The second detector platform (called the Keck Pixel Array Detector) is capable of acquiring a burst of x-ray images at a rate of millions of images per second.

  12. A MEMS-based solid propellant microthruster array for space and military applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaalane, A.; Chemam, R.; Houabes, M.; Yahiaoui, R.; Metatla, A.; Ouari, B.; Metatla, N.; Mahi, D.; Dkhissi, A.; Esteve, D.

    2015-12-01

    Since combustion is an easy way to achieve large quantities of energy from a small volume, we developed a MEMS based solid propellant microthruster array for small spacecraft and micro-air-vehicle applications. A thruster is composed of a fuel chamber layer, a top-side igniter with a micromachined nozzle in the same silicon layer. Layers are assembled by adhesive bonding to give final MEMS array. The thrust force is generated by the combustion of propellant stored in a few millimeter cube chamber. The micro-igniter is a polysilicon resistor deposited on a low stress SiO2/SiNx thin membrane to ensure a good heat transfer to the propellant and thus a low electric power consumption. A large range of thrust force is obtained simply by varying chamber and nozzle geometry parameters in one step of Deep Reactive Ion Etching (DRIE). Experimental tests of ignition and combustion employing home made (DB+x%BP) propellant composed of a DoubleBase and Black-Powder. A temperature of 250 °C, enough to propellant initiation, is reached for 40 mW of electric power. A combustion rate of about 3.4 mm/s is measured for DB+20%BP propellant and thrust ranges between 0.1 and 3,5 mN are obtained for BP ratio between 10% and 30% using a microthruster of 100 μm of throat wide.

  13. The Application of Seismic Array Techniques to Image UXO-Contaminated Littoral Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritto, R.; Korneev, V.; Nihei, K.; Johnson, L.

    2004-12-01

    We investigate the application of seismic array techniques to increase the energy radiation and resolution of seismic waves in littoral areas to improve the success rate of detecting UXO in contaminated underwater sites. The investigation is carried out based on numerical modeling, including 2-D finite difference modeling and 3-D analytical solutions of the problem. In addition to various UXO orientations, we also modeled the presence of clutter in the subsurface. An array of 31 source and receiver elements was located floating in the water as well as sited on the seafloor, which allowed the comparison between single source-receiver combinations and beam-forming techniques. The numerical forward modeling involved noise-free and noisy data as well as interferences by free surface reflections (off the water-air interface), which produced the strongest phases on the seismograms. The inversion of the scattered seismic energy was performed using a 2-D eikonal solver (curved rays), which stacked and located the recorded amplitudes in space to determine the location of the UXO. The inversion also included the determination of the best fitting velocity model for the bay mud. The results of the 2-D modeling indicated that a single, horizontally oriented, UXO could be well detected as a function of depth and horizontal location. In the case of the source-receiver array being placed on the seafloor, the edges of the UXO were resolved indicating its horizontal extent, while the top of the UXO was correctly located. The cases of a second, vertically oriented, UXO and clutter located 0.1 m next to the first UXO, produced similar results. In each case the two objects produced slight interference in the backscattered seismic signal, yet the resolution of the seismic wave was still good enough to resolve the two objects from each other. The introduction of a rippled water-seafloor interface during the forward modeling didn't change the results for the case of a floating source

  14. Interference mitigation for simultaneous transmit and receive applications on digital phased array systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Trevor M.

    As analog-to-digital (ADC) and digital-to-analog conversion (DAC) technologies become cheaper and digital processing capabilities improve, phased array systems with digital transceivers at every element will become more commonplace. These architectures offer greater capability over traditional analog systems and enable advanced applications such as multiple-input, multiple-output (MIMO) communications, adaptive beamforming, space-time adaptive processing (STAP), and MIMO for radar. Capabilities for such systems are still limited by the need for isolating self-interference from transmitters at co-located receivers. The typical approach of time-sharing the antenna aperture between transmitters and receivers works but leaves the receivers blind for a period of time. For full-duplex operation, some systems use separate frequency bands for transmission and reception, but these require fixed filtering which reduces the system's ability to adapt to its environment and is also an inefficient use of spectral resources. To that end, tunable, high quality-factor filters are used for sub-band isolation and protect receivers while allowing open reception at other frequencies. For more flexibility, another emergent area of related research has focused on co-located spatial isolation using multiple antennas and direct injection of interference cancellation signals into receivers, which enables same-frequency full-duplex operation. With all these methods, self-interference must be reduced by an amount that prevents saturation of the ADC. Intermodulation products generated in the receiver in this process can potentially be problematic, as certain intermodulation products may appear to come from a particular angle and cohere in the beamformer. This work explores various digital phased array architectures and the how the flexibility afforded by an all-digital beamforming architecture, layered with other methods of isolation, can be used to reduce self-interference within the system

  15. Practical Applications of the Gene Ontology Resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntley, Rachael P.; Dimmer, Emily C.; Apweiler, Rolf

    The Gene Ontology (GO) is a controlled vocabulary that represents knowledge about the functional attributes of gene products in a structured manner and can be used in both computational and human analyses. This vocabulary has been used by diverse curation groups to associate functional information to individual gene products in the form of annotations. GO has proven an invaluable resource for evaluating and interpreting the biological significance of large data sets, enabling researchers to create hypotheses to direct their future research. This chapter provides an overview of the Gene Ontology, how it can be used, and tips on getting the most out of GO analyses.

  16. [Genetic algorithm application to multi-focus patterns of 256-element phased array for focused ultrasound surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Feng; Wan, Mingxi; Lu, Mingzhu

    2008-10-01

    The genetic optimal algorithm and sound field calculation approach for the spherical-section phased array are presented in this paper. The in-house manufactured 256-element phased array focused ultrasound surgery system is briefly described. The on-axis single focus and off-axis single focus are simulated along with the axis-symmetric six-focus patter and the axis-asymmetric four-focus pattern using a 256-element phased array and the genetic optimal algorithm and sound field calculation approach. The experimental results of the described 256-element phased array focused ultrasound surgery system acting on organic glass and phantom are also analyzed. The results of the simulations and experiments confirm the applicability of the genetic algorithm and field calculation approaches in accurately steering three dimensional foci and focus.

  17. Electrospun Aligned Fibrous Arrays and Twisted Ropes: Fabrication, Mechanical and Electrical Properties, and Application in Strain Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jie; Yan, Xu; Li, Meng-Meng; Yu, Gui-Feng; Zhang, Hong-Di; Pisula, Wojciech; He, Xiao-Xiao; Duvail, Jean-Luc; Long, Yun-Ze

    2015-12-01

    Electrospinning (e-spinning) is a versatile technique to fabricate ultrathin fibers from a rich variety of functional materials. In this paper, a modified e-spinning setup with two-frame collector is proposed for the fabrication of highly aligned arrays of polystyrene (PS) and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) nanofibers, as well as PVDF/carbon nanotube (PVDF/CNT) composite fibers. Especially, it is capable of producing fibrous arrays with excellent orientation over a large area (more than 14 cm × 12 cm). The as-spun fibers are suspended and can be easily transferred to other rigid or flexible substrates. Based on the aligned fibrous arrays, twisted long ropes are also prepared. Compared with the aligned arrays, twisted PVDF/CNT fiber ropes show enhanced mechanical and electrical properties and have potential application in microscale strain sensors.

  18. Applications of tensor (multiway array) factorizations and decompositions in data mining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Morten

    2011-01-01

    Tensor (multiway array) factorization and decomposition has become an important tool for data mining. Fueled by the computational power of modern computer researchers can now analyze large-scale tensorial structured data that only a few years ago would have been impossible. Tensor factorizations...... have several advantages over two-way matrix factorizations including uniqueness of the optimal solution and component identification even when most of the data is missing. Furthermore, multiway decomposition techniques explicitly exploit the multiway structure that is lost when collapsing some...... of the modes of the tensor in order to analyze the data by regular matrix factorization approaches. Multiway decomposition is being applied to new fields every year and there is no doubt that the future will bring many exciting new applications. The aim of this overview is to introduce the basic concepts...

  19. Isolation Improvement of a Microstrip Patch Array Antenna for WCDMA Indoor Repeater Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongmin Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the isolation improvement techniques of a microstrip patch array antenna for the indoor wideband code division multiple access (WCDMA repeater applications. One approach is to construct the single-feed switchable feed network structure with an MS/NRI coupled-line coupler in order to reduce the mutual coupling level between antennas. Another approach is to insert the soft surface unit cells near the edges of the microstrip patch elements in order to reduce backward radiation waves. In order to further improve the isolation level, the server antenna and donor antenna are installedinorthogonal direction. The fabricated antenna exhibits a gain over 7 dBi and higher isolation level between server and donor antennas below −70 dB at WCDMA band.

  20. Applications of tensor (multiway array) factorizations and decompositions in data mining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Morten

    2011-01-01

    Tensor (multiway array) factorization and decomposition has become an important tool for data mining. Fueled by the computational power of modern computer researchers can now analyze large-scale tensorial structured data that only a few years ago would have been impossible. Tensor factorizations...... have several advantages over two-way matrix factorizations including uniqueness of the optimal solution and component identification even when most of the data is missing. Furthermore, multiway decomposition techniques explicitly exploit the multiway structure that is lost when collapsing some...... of the modes of the tensor in order to analyze the data by regular matrix factorization approaches. Multiway decomposition is being applied to new fields every year and there is no doubt that the future will bring many exciting new applications. The aim of this overview is to introduce the basic concepts...

  1. Planar Array Sensor for High-speed Component Distribution Imaging in Fluid Flow Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Hampel

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available A novel planar array sensor based on electrical conductivity measurements ispresented which may be applied to visualize surface fluid distributions. The sensor ismanufactured using printed-circuit board fabrication technology and comprises of 64 x 64interdigital sensing structures. An associated electronics measures the electricalconductivity of the fluid over each individual sensing structure in a multiplexed manner byapplying a bipolar excitation voltage and by measuring the electrical current flowing from adriver electrode to a sensing electrode. After interrogating all sensing structures, a two-dimensional image of the conductivity distribution over a surface is obtained which in turnrepresents fluid distributions over sensor’s surface. The employed electronics can acquire upto 2500 frames per second thus being able to monitor fast transient phenomena. The systemhas been evaluated regarding measurement accuracy and depth sensitivity. Furthermore, theapplication of the sensor in the investigation of two different flow applications is presented.

  2. System-level integrated circuit (SLIC) development for phased array antenna applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalkhauser, K. A.; Raquet, C. A.

    1991-01-01

    A microwave/millimeter wave system-level integrated circuit (SLIC) being developed for use in phased array antenna applications is described. The program goal is to design, fabricate, test, and deliver an advanced integrated circuit that merges radio frequency (RF) monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) technologies with digital, photonic, and analog circuitry that provide control, support, and interface functions. As a whole, the SLIC will offer improvements in RF device performance, uniformity, and stability while enabling accurate, rapid, repeatable control of the RF signal. Furthermore, the SLIC program addresses issues relating to insertion of solid state devices into antenna systems, such as the reduction in number of bias, control, and signal lines. Program goals, approach, and status are discussed.

  3. Performance measurement of low concentration ratio solar array for space application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, M. W.

    1984-01-01

    The measured performance of a silicon and a gallium arsenide low concentration ratio solar array (LCRSA) element is presented. The element characteristics measured in natural sunlight are off pointing performance and response to mechanical distortions. Laboratory measurements of individual silicon and gallium-arsenide solar cell assemblies are also made. The characteristics measured in the laboratory involved responses to temperature and intensity variations as well as to the application of reverse bias potentials. The element design details covered include the materials, the solar cells, and the rationale for selecting these specific characteristics. The measured performance characteristics are contrasted with the predicted values for both laboratory testing and high altitude natural sunlight testing. Excellent agreement between analytical predictions and measured performance is observed.

  4. New CMOS readout circuit with background suppression and CDS for infrared focal plane array applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xin-yi; ZHAO Yi-qiang; YAO Su-ying

    2009-01-01

    A high injection, large dynamic range, stable detector bias, small area and low power consumption CMOS readout circuit with background current suppression and correlated double sampling (CDS) for a high-resolution infrared focal plane array applications is proposed. The detector bias error in this structure is less than 0.1 mV. The input resistance is ideally zero, which is important to obtain high injection efficiency. Unit-cell occupies 10 μm × 15 μm area and consumes less than 0.4 mW power. Charge storage capacity is 3 × 108 electrons. The function and performance of the proposed readout circuit have been verified by experimental results.

  5. Multiplex gene editing by CRISPR-Cpf1 using a single crRNA array

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zetsche, Bernd; Heidenreich, Matthias; Mohanraju, Prarthana; Fedorova, Iana; Kneppers, Jeroen; Degennaro, Ellen M.; Winblad, Nerges; Choudhury, Sourav R.; Abudayyeh, Omar O.; Wu, Wen Y.; Oost, van der John

    2017-01-01

    Targeting of multiple genomic loci with Cas9 is limited by the need for multiple or large expression constructs. Here we show that the ability of Cpf1 to process its own CRISPR RNA (crRNA) can be used to simplify multiplexed genome editing. Using a single customized CRISPR array, we edit up to fo

  6. DNA micro-array-based identification of bile-responsive genes in Lactobacillus plantarum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bron, P.A.; Molenaar, D.; Vos, de W.M.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the global transcriptional response in a food-associated lactic acid bacterium during bile stress. Methods and Results:¿ Clone-based DNA micro-arrays were employed to describe the global transcriptional response of Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 towards 0·1%

  7. A carbon nanotube field emission multipixel x-ray array source for microradiotherapy application

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Sigen; Calderon, Xiomara; Peng, Rui; Schreiber, Eric C.; Zhou, Otto; Chang, Sha

    2011-01-01

    The authors report a carbon nanotube (CNT) field emission multipixel x-ray array source for microradiotherapy for cancer research. The developed multipixel x-ray array source has 50 individually controllable pixels and it has several distinct advantages over other irradiation source including high-temporal resolution (millisecond level), the ability to electronically shape the form, and intensity distribution of the radiation fields. The x-ray array was generated by a CNT cathode array (5×10)...

  8. Application of Correlation and Coherency Methods to Naqu Seismic Array Design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Chunyue; Zheng Zhong

    2006-01-01

    The waveform data recorded during the site survey of the Naqu seismic array in Aug. 2004 were processed by the author. According to the relativity of site pairs in time and frequency domains, the reference values of the inner ring and outer ring were determined. The author evaluated the array deployed for site survey as the primary array, and the results show that the resolution of the primary array is high enough to locate earthquakes precisely.

  9. Nanowire-organic thin film transistor integration and scale up towards developing sensor array for biomedical sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Prashanth S.; Hankins, Phillip T.; Rai, Pratyush; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2010-04-01

    Exploratory research works have demonstrated the capability of conducting nanowire arrays in enhancing the sensitivity and selectivity of bio-electrodes in sensing applications. With the help of different surface manipulation techniques, a wide range of biomolecules have been successfully immobilized on these nanowires. Flexible organic electronics, thin film transistor (TFT) fabricated on flexible substrate, was a breakthrough that enabled development of logic circuits on flexible substrate. In many health monitoring scenarios, a series of biomarkers, physical properties and vital signals need to be observed. Since the nano-bio-electrodes are capable of measuring all or most of them, it has been aptly suggested that a series of electrode (array) on single substrate shall be an excellent point of care tool. This requires an efficient control system for signal acquisition and telemetry. An array of flexible TFTs has been designed that acts as active matrix for controlled switching of or scanning by the sensor array. This array is a scale up of the flexible organic TFT that has been fabricated and rigorously tested in previous studies. The integration of nanowire electrodes to the organic electronics was approached by growing nanowires on the same substrate as TFTs and fl ip chip packaging, where the nanowires and TFTs are made on separate substrates. As a proof of concept, its application has been explored in various multi-focal biomedical sensing applications, such as neural probes for monitoring neurite growth, dopamine, and neuron activity; myocardial ischemia for spatial monitoring of myocardium.

  10. An application of ultrasonic phased array imaging in electron beam welding inspection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周琦; 刘方军; 李志军; 李旭东; 齐铂金

    2002-01-01

    The basic principle and features of ultrasonic phased array imaging are discussed in this paper. Through the ultrasonic phased array technology, the electron beam welding defects and frozen keyholes characterization and imaging were realized. The ultrasonic phased array technology can detect kinds of defects in electron beam welding (EBW) quickly and easily.

  11. Analytical Description and Design of Printed Dipole Arrays for Wideband Wide-Scan Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cavallo, D.; Neto, A.; Gerini, G.

    2012-01-01

    Wideband arrays of printed dipoles with inter-element loads are investigated. A closed-form expression for the active input impedance of the array element is derived with a spectral domain approach. The procedure is based on an extension of the Green's function formulation for arrays of connected di

  12. Chemiluminescent detection of sequential DNA hybridizations to high-density, filter-arrayed cDNA libraries: a subtraction method for novel gene discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiliano, D; Ganatra, M; Ware, J; Parrot, J; Daub, J; Moran, L; Brennecke, H; Foster, J M; Supali, T; Blaxter, M; Scott, A L; Williams, S A; Slatko, B E

    1999-07-01

    A chemiluminescent approach for sequential DNA hybridizations to high-density filter arrays of cDNAs, using a biotin-based random priming method followed by a streptavidin/alkaline phosphatase/CDP-Star detection protocol, is presented. The method has been applied to the Brugia malayi genome project, wherein cDNA libraries, cosmid and bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries have been gridded at high density onto nylon filters for subsequent analysis by hybridization. Individual probes and pools of rRNA probes, ribosomal protein probes and expressed sequence tag probes show correct specificity and high signal-to-noise ratios even after ten rounds of hybridization, detection, stripping of the probes from the membranes and rehybridization with additional probe sets. This approach provides a subtraction method that leads to a reduction in redundant DNA sequencing, thus increasing the rate of novel gene discovery. The method is also applicable for detecting target sequences, which are present in one or only a few copies per cell; it has proven useful for physical mapping of BAC and cosmid high-density filter arrays, wherein multiple probes have been hybridized at one time (multiplexed) and subsequently "deplexed" into individual components for specific probe localizations.

  13. Combined subtractive cDNA cloning and array CGH: an efficient approach for identification of overexpressed genes in DNA amplicons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Paepe Anne

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activation of proto-oncogenes by DNA amplification is an important mechanism in the development and maintenance of cancer cells. Until recently, identification of the targeted genes relied on labour intensive and time consuming positional cloning methods. In this study, we outline a straightforward and efficient strategy for fast and comprehensive cloning of amplified and overexpressed genes. Results As a proof of principle, we analyzed neuroblastoma cell line IMR-32, with at least two amplification sites along the short arm of chromosome 2. In a first step, overexpressed cDNA clones were isolated using a PCR based subtractive cloning method. Subsequent deposition of these clones on a custom microarray and hybridization with IMR-32 DNA, resulted in the identification of clones that were overexpressed due to gene amplification. Using this approach, amplification of all previously reported amplified genes in this cell line was detected. Furthermore, four additional clones were found to be amplified, including the TEM8 gene on 2p13.3, two anonymous transcripts, and a fusion transcript, resulting from 2p13.3 and 2p24.3 fused sequences. Conclusions The combinatorial strategy of subtractive cDNA cloning and array CGH analysis allows comprehensive amplicon dissection, which opens perspectives for improved identification of hitherto unknown targeted oncogenes in cancer cells.

  14. Applications of LaBr3(Ce) Gamma-ray Spectrometer Arrays for Nuclear Spectroscopy and Radionuclide Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, PH; Shearman, R.; Daniel, T.; Lorusso, G.; Collins, SM; Judge, SM; Bell; Pearce, AK; Gurgi, LA; Rudigier, M.; Podolyák, Zs; Mărginean, N.; Mărginean, R.; Kisyov, S.

    2016-10-01

    An overview of the use of discrete energy gamma-ray detectors based on cerium- doped LaBr3 scintillators for use in nuclear spectroscopy is presented. This review includes recent applications of such detectors in mixed, 'hybrid' gamma-ray coincidence detection arrays such ROSPHERE at IFIN-HH, Bucharest; EXILL+FATIMA at ILL Grenoble, France; GAMMASPHERE+FATIMA at Argonne National Laboratory, USA; FATIMA + EURICA, at RIKEN, Japan; and the National Nuclear Array (NANA) at the UK's National Physical Laboratory. This conference paper highlights the capabilities and limitations of using these sub-nanosecond 'fast-timing', medium-resolution gamma-ray detectors for both nuclear structure research and radionuclide standardisation. Potential future application of such coincidence scintillator arrays in measurements of civilian nuclear fuel waste evaluation and assay is demonstrated using coincidence spectroscopy of a mixed 134,7Cs source.

  15. Gene expression arrays reveal a rapid return to normal homeostasis in immunologically-challenged trophoblast-like JAR cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, James N; Dozmorov, Igor; Jiang, Kaiyu; Chen, Yanmin; Frank, Mark Barton; Cadwell, Craig; Turner, Sean; Centola, Michael

    2004-04-01

    The immunologic adaptations of pregnancy have come under increasing scrutiny in the past 15 years. Existing experimental evidence clearly demonstrates that placental trophoblasts play an important role in regulating immunologic/inflammatory responses at the maternal-fetal interface. We used a well-developed gene expression array to examine in greater detail the physiologic response of trophoblast-like choriocarcinoma cells to a model immunologic 'challenge.' We co-cultured PHA-activated or resting peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) with the human choriocarcinoma cell line JAR for time periods ranging from 2 to 18 h. Messenger RNA expression in the JAR cells was then assessed using a 21,329-gene microarray and novel biostatistical analyses that we have previously published. Patterns of differential gene expression were assessed using a commercial pathway analysis software program. Differences in gene expression between JAR cells cultured with activated PBMC (experimental samples) and JAR cells cultured with resting PBMC (control samples) were seen only at the 2h time point. That is, multiple genes were transcribed in JAR cells in response to activated PBMC, but expression levels of the genes had all returned to baseline by 6h. Molecular modeling demonstrated that the differentially expressed genes were largely associated with cell growth and differentiation. This model was confirmed by noting a two-fold increase in CD10/neutral endopeptidase expression (a marker for cell differentiation) in JAR cells incubated with media from activated PBMC compared with JAR cells incubated with resting PBMC. These findings support the hypothesis that there is a delicate immunologic milieu at the maternal-fetal interface that must be maintained. Immunologic/inflammatory challenge at the maternal-fetal interface is compensated by cellular mechanisms that work to reduce inflammation and rapidly restore immunologic balance.

  16. CoNi(2)S(4) nanosheet arrays supported on nickel foams with ultrahigh capacitance for aqueous asymmetric supercapacitor applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wei; Chen, Ruqi; Xie, Wei; Zou, Lilan; Qin, Ni; Bao, Dinghua

    2014-11-12

    We report that CoNi2S4 nanosheet arrays exhibit ultrahigh specific capacitance of 2906 F g(-1) and areal capacitance of 6.39 F cm(-2) at a current density of 5 mA cm(-2), as well as good rate capability and cycling stability, and superior electrochemical performances with an energy density of 33.9 Wh kg(-1) at a power density of 409 W kg(-1) have been achieved in an assembled aqueous asymmetric supercapacitor. The CoNi2S4 nanosheet arrays were in situ grown on nickel foams by a facile two-step hydrothermal method. The formation mechanism of the CoNi2S4 nanosheet arrays was based on an anion-exchange reaction involving the pseudo Kirkendall effect. The two aqueous asymmetric supercapacitors in series using the CoNi2S4 nanosheet arrays as the positive electrodes can power four 3-mm-diameter red-light-emitting diodes. The outstanding supercapacitive performance of CoNi2S4 nanosheet arrays can be attributed to ravine-like nanosheet architectures with good mechanical and electrical contact, low crystallinity and good wettability without an annealing process, rich redox reactions, as well as high conductivity and transport rate for both electrolyte ions and electrons. Our results demonstrate that CoNi2S4 nanosheet arrays are promising electrode materials for supercapacitor applications.

  17. An L-Band, Circularly Polarised, Dual-Feed, Cavity-Backed Annular Slot Antenna For Phased-Array Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Niels Vesterdal; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2006-01-01

    The results of a parametric study for the development of an L-band, circularly polarised, dual-feed, cavity-backed annular slot antenna is presented. The study included detailed numerical simulations and measurements on a prototype with different ground planes, to assess the antenna’s applicability...... as an element in a small phased array antenna....

  18. Gene array analysis of adrenal glands in broiler chickens following ACTH treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guémené Daniel

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Difference in adaptability responses to stress has been observed amongst bird species, strains, and individuals. Components of the HPA axis, one of the internal systems involved in homeostasis re-establishment following stress, could play a role in this variability of responses. The aim of the present study was 1 to identify genes involved in the regulation of adrenal activity following ACTH stimulation and 2 to examine adrenal genes differentially expressed in individuals with high and low plasma corticosterone response following ACTH treatment. Results Analysis with 21 K poultry oligo microarrays indicated that ACTH treatment affected the expression of 134 genes. Several transcripts assigned to genes involved in the adrenal ACTH signaling pathway and steroidogenic enzymes were identified as differentially expressed by ACTH treatment. Real-time PCR on 18 selected genes confirmed changes in transcript levels of 11 genes, including MC2R, CREM, Cry, Bmal1, Sqle, Prax1, and StAR. Only 4 genes revealed to be differentially expressed between higher and lower adrenal responders to ACTH treatment. Conclusion The results from the present study reveal putative candidate genes; their role in regulation of adrenal functions and adaptability to stress should be further investigated.

  19. Lentivirus Live Cell Array for Quantitative Assessment of Gene and Pathway Activation during Myogenic Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janhavi Moharil

    Full Text Available Stem cell differentiation involves multiple cascades of transcriptional regulation that govern the cell fate. To study the real-time dynamics of this complex process, quantitative and high throughput live cell assays are required. Herein, we developed a lentiviral library of promoters and transcription factor binding sites to quantitatively capture the gene expression dynamics over a period of several days during myogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs harvested from two different anatomic locations, bone marrow and hair follicle. Our results enabled us to monitor the sequential activation of signaling pathways and myogenic gene promoters at various stages of differentiation. In conjunction with chemical inhibitors, the lentiviral array (LVA results also revealed the relative contribution of key signaling pathways that regulate the myogenic differentiation. Our study demonstrates the potential of LVA to monitor the dynamics of gene and pathway activation during MSC differentiation as well as serve as a platform for discovery of novel molecules, genes and pathways that promote or inhibit complex biological processes.

  20. The principal and application of gene chips

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@Today we are living in an information era. Everyone can see what a tremendously change has been brought by the using of the computers. The advent of the computer chip let us embed our smarts in everything from satellite to greeting cards to internet.   People said that the human genome project is the second "Apollo". Human Genome Project, the international effort that is expected to unravel the structures of all 30 000 to 35 000 or so human genes by 2003. But deconstructing the genome is only the first step-like learning to pick out words in a foreign language before grappling with their meanings. Realizing the gene revolution's potential will require understanding how genes collaborate to cement memories in our brains, say, or how they malfunction to change a healthy adult into one dying of cancer. That's the goal of the second phase of the revolution, functional genomics.

  1. Exclusion of APC and VHL gene deletions by array-based comparative hybridization in two patients with microscopically visible chromosomal aberrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallerstein, Robert J; Brooks, Susan Sklower; Streck, Deanna L; Kurvathi, Rohini; Toruner, Gokce A

    2007-10-15

    Karyotyping is a major component of the genetic work-up of patients with dysmorphism. Cytogenetic aberrations close to a known tumor suppressor gene raise important clinical issues because deletion of that tumor suppressor gene can cause genetic predisposition to cancer. We present two cancer-free dysmorphic patients with karyotypes of 46,XX,del(5)(q15q22.3) and 46,XX,del(3)(p25.2~pter). These deletions are close to the APC and VHL genes that confer susceptibility to familial Adenomatous polyposis (OMIM #17510) and von-Hippel-Lindau syndrome (OMIM #193300), respectively. The array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) analysis using a custom Agilent 44K oligonucleotide array demonstrated an interstitial 20.7-megabase (Mb) deletion on 5q (chr5: 89,725,638-110,491,345) and a terminal 9.45-Mb deletion on 3p (chr3:pter-9,450,984). According to the March 2006 human reference sequence, the APC gene is located at chr5: 112,101,483-112,209,835 and the VHL gene is located at chr3: 10,158,319-10,168,746. These results indicate that the APC gene is 2,300 kilobases (kb) and the VHL gene is 700 kb away from deleted regions. Southern blot analysis for APC and VHL genes were negative, consistent with array-CGH findings. These results demonstrate the power of array-CCH to assess potential tumor suppressor gene involvement and cancer risk in patients with microscopically visible deletions in areas near tumor suppressors.

  2. Validation of RNAi Silencing Efficiency Using Gene Array Data shows 18.5% Failure Rate across 429 Independent Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gyöngyi Munkácsy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available No independent cross-validation of success rate for studies utilizing small interfering RNA (siRNA for gene silencing has been completed before. To assess the influence of experimental parameters like cell line, transfection technique, validation method, and type of control, we have to validate these in a large set of studies. We utilized gene chip data published for siRNA experiments to assess success rate and to compare methods used in these experiments. We searched NCBI GEO for samples with whole transcriptome analysis before and after gene silencing and evaluated the efficiency for the target and off-target genes using the array-based expression data. Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to assess silencing efficacy and Kruskal–Wallis tests and Spearman rank correlation were used to evaluate study parameters. All together 1,643 samples representing 429 experiments published in 207 studies were evaluated. The fold change (FC of down-regulation of the target gene was above 0.7 in 18.5% and was above 0.5 in 38.7% of experiments. Silencing efficiency was lowest in MCF7 and highest in SW480 cells (FC = 0.59 and FC = 0.30, respectively, P = 9.3E−06. Studies utilizing Western blot for validation performed better than those with quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR or microarray (FC = 0.43, FC = 0.47, and FC = 0.55, respectively, P = 2.8E−04. There was no correlation between type of control, transfection method, publication year, and silencing efficiency. Although gene silencing is a robust feature successfully cross-validated in the majority of experiments, efficiency remained insufficient in a significant proportion of studies. Selection of cell line model and validation method had the highest influence on silencing proficiency.

  3. Data Mining of Gene Arrays for Biomarkers of Survival in Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare Coveney

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The expected five-year survival rate from a stage III ovarian cancer diagnosis is a mere 22%; this applies to the 7000 new cases diagnosed yearly in the UK. Stratification of patients with this heterogeneous disease, based on active molecular pathways, would aid a targeted treatment improving the prognosis for many cases. While hundreds of genes have been associated with ovarian cancer, few have yet been verified by peer research for clinical significance. Here, a meta-analysis approach was applied to two carefully selected gene expression microarray datasets. Artificial neural networks, Cox univariate survival analyses and T-tests identified genes whose expression was consistently and significantly associated with patient survival. The rigor of this experimental design increases confidence in the genes found to be of interest. A list of 56 genes were distilled from a potential 37,000 to be significantly related to survival in both datasets with a FDR of 1.39859 × 10−11, the identities of which both verify genes already implicated with this disease and provide novel genes and pathways to pursue. Further investigation and validation of these may lead to clinical insights and have potential to predict a patient’s response to treatment or be used as a novel target for therapy.

  4. Data Mining of Gene Arrays for Biomarkers of Survival in Ovarian Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coveney, Clare; Boocock, David J; Rees, Robert C; Deen, Suha; Ball, Graham R

    2015-07-17

    The expected five-year survival rate from a stage III ovarian cancer diagnosis is a mere 22%; this applies to the 7000 new cases diagnosed yearly in the UK. Stratification of patients with this heterogeneous disease, based on active molecular pathways, would aid a targeted treatment improving the prognosis for many cases. While hundreds of genes have been associated with ovarian cancer, few have yet been verified by peer research for clinical significance. Here, a meta-analysis approach was applied to two carefully selected gene expression microarray datasets. Artificial neural networks, Cox univariate survival analyses and T-tests identified genes whose expression was consistently and significantly associated with patient survival. The rigor of this experimental design increases confidence in the genes found to be of interest. A list of 56 genes were distilled from a potential 37,000 to be significantly related to survival in both datasets with a FDR of 1.39859 × 10(-11), the identities of which both verify genes already implicated with this disease and provide novel genes and pathways to pursue. Further investigation and validation of these may lead to clinical insights and have potential to predict a patient's response to treatment or be used as a novel target for therapy.

  5. Baculovirus-mediated Gene Delivery and RNAi Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaisa-Emilia Makkonen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Baculoviruses are widely encountered in nature and a great deal of data is available about their safety and biology. Recently, these versatile, insect-specific viruses have demonstrated their usefulness in various biotechnological applications including protein production and gene transfer. Multiple in vitro and in vivo studies exist and support their use as gene delivery vehicles in vertebrate cells. Recently, baculoviruses have also demonstrated high potential in RNAi applications in which several advantages of the virus make it a promising tool for RNA gene transfer with high safety and wide tropism.

  6. Mass-sensing BioCD Protein Array towards Clinical Application: Prostate Specific Antigen Detection in Patient Sera

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Xuefeng; Nolte, David D; Ratliff, Timothy L

    2009-01-01

    Mass-sensing biosensor arrays for protein detection require no fluorophores or enzyme labels. However, few mass biosensor protein arrays have demonstrated successful application in high background samples, such as serum. In this paper, we test the BioCD as a mass biosensor based on optical interferometry of antibodies covalently attached through Schiff-base reduction. We use the BioCD to detect prostate specific antigen (PSA, a biomarker of prostate cancer) in patient sera in a 96-well anti-PSA microarray. We have attained a 4 ng/ml detection limit in full serum and have measured PSA concentrations in three patient sera.

  7. Application of Array-Based Comparative Genomic Hybridization to Pediatric Neurologic Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Array comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) is a technique used to analyze quantitative increase or decrease of chromosomes by competitive DNA hybridization of patients and controls. This study aimed to evaluate the benefits and yield of array-CGH in comparison with conventional karyotyping in pediatric neurology patients. Materials and Methods We included 87 patients from the pediatric neurology clinic with at least one of the following features: developmental delay, mental r...

  8. Fabrication of large NbSi bolometer arrays for CMB applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ukibe, M. [AIST, Tsukuba Central 2, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); CNRS-CSNSM, Bat 104, Orsay Campus F-91405 (France); Belier, B. [CNRS-IEF, Bat 220, Orsay Campus F-91405 (France); Camus, Ph. [CNRS-CRTBT, 25 avenue des Martyrs, Grenoble F-38042 (France)]. E-mail: philippe.camus@grenoble.cnrs.fr; Dobrea, C. [CNRS-CSNSM, Bat 104, Orsay Campus F-91405 (France); Dumoulin, L. [CNRS-CSNSM, Bat 104, Orsay Campus F-91405 (France); Fernandez, B. [CNRS-CRTBT, 25 avenue des Martyrs, Grenoble F-38042 (France); Fournier, T. [CNRS-CRTBT, 25 avenue des Martyrs, Grenoble F-38042 (France); Guillaudin, O. [CNRS-LPSC, 53 avenue des Martyrs, Grenoble F-38042 (France); Marnieros, S. [CNRS-CSNSM, Bat 104, Orsay Campus F-91405 (France); Yates, S.J.C. [CNRS-CSNSM, Bat 104, Orsay Campus F-91405 (France)

    2006-04-15

    Future cosmic microwave background experiments for high-resolution anisotropy mapping and polarisation detection require large arrays of bolometers at low temperature. We have developed a process to build arrays of antenna-coupled bolometers for that purpose. With adjustment of the Nb{sub x}Si{sub 1-x} alloy composition, the array can be made of high impedance or superconductive (TES) sensors.

  9. Profiling of differentially expressed chemotactic-related genes in MCP-1 treated macrophage cell line using human cDNA arrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guang-Xing Bian; Hong Miao; Lei Qiu; Dong-Mei Cao; Bao-Yu Guo

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To study the global gene expression of chemotactic genes in macrophage line U937 treated with human monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) through the use of ExpreeChipTMHO2 cDNA array.METHODS: Total RNA was extracted from MCP-1 treated macrophage line U937 and normal U937 cells, reversely transcribed to cDNA, and then screened in parallel with HO2 human cDNA array chip. The scanned result was additionally validated using RT-PCR.RESULTS: The result of cDNA array showed that one chemotactic-related gene was up-regulated more than two-fold (RANTES) and seven chemotactic-related genes were down-regulated more than two-fold (CCR1, CCR5,ccl16, GROβ, GROγ, IL-8 and granulocyte chemotactic protein 2) in MCP-1 treated U937 cells at mRNA level.RT-PCR analysis of four of these differentially expressed genes gave results consistent with cDNA array findings.CONCLUSION: MCP-1 could influence some chemokine and receptor expressions in macrophages in vitro. MCP-1mainly down-regulates the expression of chemotactic genes influencing neutrophilic granulocyte expression (GROβ, GROγ, IL-8 and granulocyte chemotactic protein 2), and the mRNA level of CCR5, which plays a critical role in many disorders and illnesses.

  10. Clinical applications of penetrating neural interfaces and Utah Electrode Array technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normann, Richard A.; Fernandez, Eduardo

    2016-12-01

    This paper briefly describes some of the recent progress in the development of penetrating microelectrode arrays and highlights the use of two of these devices, Utah electrode arrays and Utah slanted electrode arrays, in two therapeutic interventions: recording volitional skeletal motor commands from the central nervous system, and recording motor commands and evoking somatosensory percepts in the peripheral nervous system (PNS). The paper also briefly explores other potential sites for microelectrode array interventions that could be profitably pursued and that could have important consequences in enhancing the quality of life of patients that has been compromised by disorders of the central and PNSs.

  11. Characterization of Acousto-Electric Cluster and Array Levitation and its Application to Evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert E. Apfel; Zheng, Yibing

    2000-01-01

    An acousto-electric levitator has been developed to study the behavior of liquid drop and solid particle clusters and arrays. Unlike an ordinary acoustic levitator that uses only a standing acoustic wave to levitate a single drop or particle, this device uses an extra electric static field and the acoustic field simultaneously to generate and levitate charged drops in two-dimensional arrays in air without any contact to a solid surface. This cluster and array generation (CAG) instrument enables us to steadily position drops and arrays to study the behavior of multiple drop and particle systems such as spray and aerosol systems relevant to the energy, environmental, and material sciences.

  12. Application of different spatial sampling patterns for sparse-array transducer design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolov, Svetoslav; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2000-01-01

    $) must be used, if the conventional phased array transducers are extrapolated to the two-dimensional case. To decrease thenumber of channels, sparse arrays with different aperture apodization functions in transmit and receive have to be designed. The design is usually carried out in 1D...... of the ultrasound fields show a decrease of the grating-lobe level of 10 dB for the diagonally optimized 2D array transducers compared to the the previuosly designed 2D arrays which didn't consider the diagonals....

  13. Genetic correction using engineered nucleases for gene therapy applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongmei Lisa; Nakano, Takao; Hotta, Akitsu

    2014-01-01

    Genetic mutations in humans are associated with congenital disorders and phenotypic traits. Gene therapy holds the promise to cure such genetic disorders, although it has suffered from several technical limitations for decades. Recent progress in gene editing technology using tailor-made nucleases, such as meganucleases (MNs), zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), TAL effector nucleases (TALENs) and, more recently, CRISPR/Cas9, has significantly broadened our ability to precisely modify target sites in the human genome. In this review, we summarize recent progress in gene correction approaches of the human genome, with a particular emphasis on the clinical applications of gene therapy.

  14. Design, testing, and economics of a 430 W sub p photovoltaic concentrator array for non grid-connected applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maish, A. B.; Rios, M., Jr.; Togami, H.

    A stand-alone 430 W/sub p/ photovoltaic (PV) concentrating system for low power, non grid-connected applications has been designed, fabricated, and tested at Sandia National Laboratories. The array consists of four passively cooled Fresnel lens concentrating modules on a newly developed polar axis tracking structure. Two axis tracking is provided using a self powered clock drive unit mounted on a single post foundation. Test results of tracking accuracy, array output power, parasitic power, performance in winds and array reliability are discussed. using a range of estimated production costs for small production volumes, the life-cycle energy costs have been calculated and compared to the equivalent energy costs of a 3 kW diesel electric generator set and of an equivalent flat panel PV system.

  15. Identification of a novel gene by whole human genome tiling array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Hirokazu; Yagi, Tomohito; Tanaka, Masami; Tokuda, Yuichi; Kamoi, Kazumi; Hongo, Fumiya; Kawauchi, Akihiro; Nakano, Masakazu; Miki, Tsuneharu; Tashiro, Kei

    2013-03-01

    When the whole human genome sequence was determined by the Human Genome Project, the number of identified genes was fewer than expected. However, recent studies suggest that undiscovered transcripts still exist in the human genome. Furthermore, a new technology, the DNA microarray, which can simultaneously characterize huge amounts of genome sequence data, has become a useful tool for analyzing genetic changes in various diseases. A version of this tool, the tiling DNA microarray, was designed to search all the transcripts of the entire human genome, and provides huge amounts of data, including both exon and intron sequences, by a simple process. Although some previous studies using tiling DNA microarray analysis have indicated that numerous novel transcripts can be found in the human genome, none of them has reported any novel full-length human genes. Here, to find novel genes, we analyzed all the transcripts expressed in normal human prostate cells using this microarray. Because the optimal analytical parameters for using tiling DNA microarray data for this purpose had not been established, we established parameters for extracting the most likely regions for novel transcripts. The three parameters we optimized were the threshold for positive signal intensity, the Max gap, and the Min run, which we set to detect all transcriptional regions that were above the average length of known exons and had a signal intensity in the top 5%. We succeeded in obtaining the full-length sequence of one novel gene, located on chromosome 12q24.13. We named the novel gene "POTAGE". Its 5841-bp mRNA consists of 26 exons. We detected part of exon 2 in the tiling data analysis. The full-length sequence was then obtained by RT-PCR and RACE. Although the function of POTAGE is unclear, its sequence showed high homology with genes in other species, suggesting it might have an important or essential function. This study demonstrates that the tiling DNA microarray can be useful for

  16. A Customized Pigmentation SNP Array Identifies a Novel SNP Associated with Melanoma Predisposition in the SLC45A2 Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Santos; Boyano, M. Dolores; Peña-Chilet, Maria; Pita, Guillermo; Aviles, Jose A.; Mayor, Matias; Gomez-Fernandez, Cristina; Casado, Beatriz; Martin-Gonzalez, Manuel; Izagirre, Neskuts; De la Rua, Concepcion; Asumendi, Aintzane; Perez-Yarza, Gorka; Arroyo-Berdugo, Yoana; Boldo, Enrique; Lozoya, Rafael; Torrijos-Aguilar, Arantxa; Pitarch, Ana; Pitarch, Gerard; Sanchez-Motilla, Jose M.; Valcuende-Cavero, Francisca; Tomas-Cabedo, Gloria; Perez-Pastor, Gemma; Diaz-Perez, Jose L.; Gardeazabal, Jesus; de Lizarduy, Iñigo Martinez; Sanchez-Diez, Ana; Valdes, Carlos; Pizarro, Angel; Casado, Mariano; Carretero, Gregorio; Botella-Estrada, Rafael; Nagore, Eduardo; Lazaro, Pablo; Lluch, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Martinez-Cadenas, Conrado; Ribas, Gloria

    2011-01-01

    As the incidence of Malignant Melanoma (MM) reflects an interaction between skin colour and UV exposure, variations in genes implicated in pigmentation and tanning response to UV may be associated with susceptibility to MM. In this study, 363 SNPs in 65 gene regions belonging to the pigmentation pathway have been successfully genotyped using a SNP array. Five hundred and ninety MM cases and 507 controls were analyzed in a discovery phase I. Ten candidate SNPs based on a p-value threshold of 0.01 were identified. Two of them, rs35414 (SLC45A2) and rs2069398 (SILV/CKD2), were statistically significant after conservative Bonferroni correction. The best six SNPs were further tested in an independent Spanish series (624 MM cases and 789 controls). A novel SNP located on the SLC45A2 gene (rs35414) was found to be significantly associated with melanoma in both phase I and phase II (P<0.0001). None of the other five SNPs were replicated in this second phase of the study. However, three SNPs in TYR, SILV/CDK2 and ADAMTS20 genes (rs17793678, rs2069398 and rs1510521 respectively) had an overall p-value<0.05 when considering the whole DNA collection (1214 MM cases and 1296 controls). Both the SLC45A2 and the SILV/CDK2 variants behave as protective alleles, while the TYR and ADAMTS20 variants seem to function as risk alleles. Cumulative effects were detected when these four variants were considered together. Furthermore, individuals carrying two or more mutations in MC1R, a well-known low penetrance melanoma-predisposing gene, had a decreased MM risk if concurrently bearing the SLC45A2 protective variant. To our knowledge, this is the largest study on Spanish sporadic MM cases to date. PMID:21559390

  17. A customized pigmentation SNP array identifies a novel SNP associated with melanoma predisposition in the SLC45A2 gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maider Ibarrola-Villava

    Full Text Available As the incidence of Malignant Melanoma (MM reflects an interaction between skin colour and UV exposure, variations in genes implicated in pigmentation and tanning response to UV may be associated with susceptibility to MM. In this study, 363 SNPs in 65 gene regions belonging to the pigmentation pathway have been successfully genotyped using a SNP array. Five hundred and ninety MM cases and 507 controls were analyzed in a discovery phase I. Ten candidate SNPs based on a p-value threshold of 0.01 were identified. Two of them, rs35414 (SLC45A2 and rs2069398 (SILV/CKD2, were statistically significant after conservative Bonferroni correction. The best six SNPs were further tested in an independent Spanish series (624 MM cases and 789 controls. A novel SNP located on the SLC45A2 gene (rs35414 was found to be significantly associated with melanoma in both phase I and phase II (P<0.0001. None of the other five SNPs were replicated in this second phase of the study. However, three SNPs in TYR, SILV/CDK2 and ADAMTS20 genes (rs17793678, rs2069398 and rs1510521 respectively had an overall p-value<0.05 when considering the whole DNA collection (1214 MM cases and 1296 controls. Both the SLC45A2 and the SILV/CDK2 variants behave as protective alleles, while the TYR and ADAMTS20 variants seem to function as risk alleles. Cumulative effects were detected when these four variants were considered together. Furthermore, individuals carrying two or more mutations in MC1R, a well-known low penetrance melanoma-predisposing gene, had a decreased MM risk if concurrently bearing the SLC45A2 protective variant. To our knowledge, this is the largest study on Spanish sporadic MM cases to date.

  18. Profile of muscle tissue gene expression specific to water buffalo: Comparison with domestic cattle by genome array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingying; Wang, Hongbao; Gui, Linsheng; Wang, Hongcheng; Mei, Chugang; Zhang, Yaran; Xu, Huaichao; Jia, Cunlin; Zan, Linsen

    2016-02-10

    In contrast with the past, the water buffalo is now not only a draft animal, but also an important food source of milk and meat. It is increasingly apparent that the water buffalo have huge potential for meat production, but its breeding needs to be investigated. Regarding the molecular mechanisms involved in the meat quality difference between the buffalo (Bubalus bulabis) and yellow cattle (Bos taurus), 12 chemical-physical characteristics related to the meat quality of longissimus thoracis muscles (LTM) have been compared at the age of 36 months. Intramuscular lipid and b* (yellowness) were greater in cattle than the buffalo, whereas a* (redness) was greater in the buffalo. Gene expression profiles were constructed by bovine genome array. A total of 8884 and 10,960 probes were detected in buffalo and cattle, respectively, with 1580 genes being differentially expressed. Over 400 probes were upregulated and nearly 1200 were downregulated in LTM of the buffalo, most being involved in ribosomal RNA (rRNA) processing, cholesterol homeostasis, regulation of transcription, response to hypoxia, and glycolysis. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to validate the microarray data. Enriched GO analyses of highly expressed genes in LTM showed that protein biosynthesis, striated muscle contraction, iron homeostasis, iron transport, glycolysis and glucose metabolism were similar between the buffalo and cattle. High protein content, low fat content and deep meat color of buffalo LTM may be closely associated with the increased expression of genes involved in cholesterol and iron homeostasis, while also reducing the expression of genes involved in ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis and protein oxidative phosphorylation. These results establish the groundwork for further studies on buffalo meat quality and will be beneficial in improving water buffalo breeding by molecular biotechnology.

  19. Toward an active passive waveguide array for lower hybrid application on ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirizzi, F.; Gourlan, C.; Marra, A.; Roccon, M.; Tuccillo, A.A. [ENEA, Frascati (Italy); Bibet, P.; Froissard, P.; Goniche, M.; Kazarian, F.; Mailloux, J.; Rey, G.; Simoncini, J. [Association Euratom-CEA Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee

    1998-07-01

    Toward the realization of Advanced Tokamak scenarios on ITER, Lower Hybrid Wave is an efficient way to drive the current especially in the region of low to medium temperature of the discharge, leading therefore to hollow current profile with the possibility of improved confinement. The amount of power necessary to fulfill the task is estimated around 50 MW, that meansthousands of waveguides with the present design of the antenna. The thermal load on ITER, that is 0.5 MW/m{sup 2} and 10 MW/m{sup 3}, for neutron heating, calls for a very efficient water cooling at the mouth of the antenna. A new concept of launcher, made of an array of active and passive waveguides fed by multijunction, has been proposed to satisfy these constraints: the Passive-Active Multijunction (PAM) antenna. The aim of the work is to validate the PAM conceptual design for future applications on ITER like machine. In the first step of the collaboration the numerical analysis performed on this specific antenna has allowed to define the microwave design of the structure. A PAM module has been designed that, despite the small dimension of the FTU ports, can inject the required power spectra with good directivity and coupling for all the studied experimental conditions. Moreover the foreseen experimental situation on FTU will allow for direct comparison with traditional grill injecting spectra with same N{sub //peak} on the machine at the same time. (author)

  20. Metal capped polystyrene nanotubes arrays as super-hydrophobic substrates for SERS applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovera, Pierre; Creedon, Niamh; Alatawi, Hanan; O'Riordan, Alan

    2014-05-01

    We present a low-cost and rapid fabrication and characterisations of polymer nanotubes based substrates inspired by a Gecko's foot, and demonstrate its suitability for Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) applications. Substrates are fabricated in a simple, scalable and cost efficient way by melt wetting of polystyrene (PS) in an anodised alumina (AAO) template, followed by silver or gold evaporation. Scanning electron microscopy reveals the substrates are composed of a dense array of free-standing polystyrene nanotubes topped by silver nanocaps. The gaps (electromagnetic hot spots) between adjacent nanotubes are measured to be 30nm +/-15nm. SERS characterisation of the substrates, employing a monolayer of 4-aminothiophenol (4-ABT) as a model molecule, exhibits an enhancement factor of ~1.6 × 106. This value is consistent with the one obtained from 3D-Finite Difference Time Domain (3D-FDTD) simulations of a simplified version of the sample. The contact angle of the substrates is measured to be 150°, making them super-hydrophobic. This later property renders the samples compatible to very low sample volumes and highly sensitive detection (down to 408ppt) of the environmental pollutant crystal violet in water is demonstrated.

  1. Application of Hybrid Optimization Algorithm in the Synthesis of Linear Antenna Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezgi Deniz Ülker

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of hybrid algorithms for solving real-world optimization problems has become popular since their solution quality can be made better than the algorithms that form them by combining their desirable features. The newly proposed hybrid method which is called Hybrid Differential, Particle, and Harmony (HDPH algorithm is different from the other hybrid forms since it uses all features of merged algorithms in order to perform efficiently for a wide variety of problems. In the proposed algorithm the control parameters are randomized which makes its implementation easy and provides a fast response. This paper describes the application of HDPH algorithm to linear antenna array synthesis. The results obtained with the HDPH algorithm are compared with three merged optimization techniques that are used in HDPH. The comparison shows that the performance of the proposed algorithm is comparatively better in both solution quality and robustness. The proposed hybrid algorithm HDPH can be an efficient candidate for real-time optimization problems since it yields reliable performance at all times when it gets executed.

  2. Optimized high-power diode laser, laser arrays, and bars for pump applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hülsewede, R.; Schulze, H.; Sebastian, J.; Schröder, D.; Meusel, J.; Wolf, J.; Hennig, P.

    2009-02-01

    Broad area diode laser and diode laser bars are the most efficient light sources. In comparison to solid state laser or gas laser systems the over all beam quality of the diode laser is poor. Thus most application of diode laser bars is high efficient pumping of solid state lasers converting the beam quality and scaling the power of laser systems within the kW range. The pump efficiency and the beam coupling efficiency of the diode laser pumped systems has to be increased to meet the increasing laser market demands for reduced costs. JENOPTIK Diode Lab GmbH (JDL) has optimized their high power brilliance bars to enable reliable high power operation especially, for the 9xx nm wavelength range and low far field divergences. Superior reliability with long operation time of 13,000 hours and high power operation of 200 W are demonstrated for high power bars high filling factor mounted on passively cooled heat sinks. Smaller far field divergence at high power levels requires longer cavity length and higher efficiencies in the beam coupling needs requires lower filling factors. The new high brilliance bars and arrays with 20% filling factor are showing high power operation up to 95 W and a slow axis beam divergence of less than 8° (95% power content).

  3. Identification of Differentially Expressed Genes During Anther Abortion of Taigu Genic Male Sterile Wheat by Combining Suppression Subtractive Hybridization and cDNA Array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-Shan Chang; Rong-Hua Zhou; Xiu-Ying Kong; Zeng-Liang Yu; Ji-Zeng Jia

    2006-01-01

    Taigu Genic Male Sterile Wheat (TGMSW; Triticum aestivum L.), a dominant genic male sterile germplasm, is of considerable value in the genetic improvement of wheat because of its stable inherence, complete male abortion, and high cross-fertilization rate. To identify specially transcribed genes in sterile anther, a suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) library was constructed with sterile anther as the tester and fertile anther as the driver. A total of 2 304 SSH inserts amplified by polymerase chain reaction were arrayed using robotic printing. The cDNA arrays were hybridized with 32P-labeled probes prepared from the RNA of forward- and reverse-subtracted anthers. Ninety-six clones were scored as upregulated in sterile anthers compared with the corresponding fertile anthers and some clones were selected for sequencing and analysis in GenBank. Based on their putative functions, 87 non-redundant clones were classified into the following groups: (i) eight genes involved in metabolic processes; (ii) four material transportation genes;(iii) three signal transduction-associated genes; (iv) four stress response and senescence-associated protein genes; (v) seven other functional protein genes; (vi) five genes with no known function; and (vii)another 56 genes with no match to the databases. To test the hybridization efficiency, eight genes were selected and analyzed by Northern blot. The results of the present study provide a comprehensive overview of the genes and gene products involved in anther abortion in TGMSW.

  4. Novel low cost fabrication of microneedle arrays for drug delivery applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Pei Ying J.; Xu, Yuan; Chew, Yong T.; Li, Zongli; Kong, Yen P.

    2002-11-01

    This paper reports a process used for the microfabrication of an array of hollow microneedles. The purpose of the array is for painless transdermal drug delivery. The fabrication process uses wet bulk silicon technology and copper electroplating technology. First, a microneedle array mold on -oriented silicon was fabricated by wet anisotropic etching using KOH solution, then the silicon mold was electroplated with copper. After which, the hollow copper microneedle array was released by a lift-off process or by etching off the silicon mold in KOH solution. The hollow copper microneedle array has been mounted on a polycarbonate platform, which consist of laser ablated cavities and channel for external connection to drug source. In consideration of the contour of human"s skin and the geometry of the microneedle tip, which has walls of sloping gradient corresponding to the (111)-planes, the height of the microneedle array is 200 μm. Two arrays of hollow copper microneedle were fabricated. They have square base of dimensions 390 μm and 400 μm and square tips of size 100 μm and 120 μm with square holes of size 88 μm and 94 μm respectively. Both arrays have microneedle tips at 1900 μm apart from one another and consist of 10 × 10 microneedle tips.

  5. Single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis of candidate genes for reliable identification of alleles by capillary array electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, David N; Borrone, James; Meerow, Alan W; Motamayor, Juan C; Brown, J Steven; Schnell, Raymond J

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the reliability of capillary array electrophoresis-single strand conformation polymorphism (CAE-SSCP) to determine if it can be used to identify novel alleles of candidate genes in a germplasm collection. Both strands of three different size fragments (160, 245 and 437 bp) that differed by one or more nucleotides in sequence were analyzed at four different temperatures (18 degrees C, 25 degrees C, 30 degrees C, and 35 degrees C). Mixtures of amplified fragments of either the intron interrupting the C-terminal WRKY domain of the Tc10 locus or the NBS domain of the TcRGH1 locus of Theobroma cacao were electroinjected into all 16 capillaries of an ABI 3100 Genetic Analyzer and analyzed three times at each temperature. Multiplexing of samples of different size range is possible, as intermediate and large fragments were analyzed simultaneously in these experiments. A statistical analysis of the means of the fragment mobilities demonstrated that single-stranded conformers of the fragments could be reliably identified by their mobility at all temperatures and size classes. The order of elution of fragments was not consistent over strands or temperatures for the intermediate and large fragments. If samples are only run once at a single temperature, small fragments could be identified from a single strand at a single temperature. A combination of data from both strands of a single run was needed to identify correctly all four of the intermediate fragments and no combination of data from strands or temperatures would allow the correct identification of two large fragments that differed by only a single single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) from a single run. Thus, to adequately assess alleles at a candidate gene locus using SSCP on a capillary array, fragments should be strands and both temperatures, and undenatured double-stranded (ds)DNA molecular weight standards, such as ROX 2500, should be included as internal standards.

  6. Interpreting Patterns of Gene Expression with Self-Organizing Maps: Methods and Application to Hematopoietic Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamayo, Pablo; Slonim, Donna; Mesirov, Jill; Zhu, Qing; Kitareewan, Sutisak; Dmitrovsky, Ethan; Lander, Eric S.; Golub, Todd R.

    1999-03-01

    Array technologies have made it straightforward to monitor simultaneously the expression pattern of thousands of genes. The challenge now is to interpret such massive data sets. The first step is to extract the fundamental patterns of gene expression inherent in the data. This paper describes the application of self-organizing maps, a type of mathematical cluster analysis that is particularly well suited for recognizing and classifying features in complex, multidimensional data. The method has been implemented in a publicly available computer package, GENECLUSTER, that performs the analytical calculations and provides easy data visualization. To illustrate the value of such analysis, the approach is applied to hematopoietic differentiation in four well studied models (HL-60, U937, Jurkat, and NB4 cells). Expression patterns of some 6,000 human genes were assayed, and an online database was created. GENECLUSTER was used to organize the genes into biologically relevant clusters that suggest novel hypotheses about hematopoietic differentiation--for example, highlighting certain genes and pathways involved in "differentiation therapy" used in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia.

  7. Gene array and real time PCR analysis of the adrenal sensitivity to adrenocorticotropic hormone in pig

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SanCristobal Magali

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Variability in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis activity has been shown to be influenced by genetic factors and related to great metabolic differences such as obesity. The aim of this study was to investigate molecular bases of genetic variability of the adrenal sensitivity to ACTH, a major source of variability, in Meishan (MS and Large White (LW pigs, MS being reported to exhibit higher basal cortisol levels, response to ACTH and fatness than LW. A pig cDNA microarray was used to identify changes in gene expression in basal conditions and in response to ACTH stimulation. Results Genotype and/or ACTH affected the expression of 211 genes related to transcription, cell growth/maintenance, signal transduction, cell structure/adhesion/extra cellular matrix and protein kinase/phosphatase activity. No change in the expression of known key regulator proteins of the ACTH signaling pathway or of steroidogenic enzymes was found. However, Mdh2, Sdha, Suclg2, genes involved in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA pathway, were over-expressed in MS pigs. Higher TCA cycle activity in MS than in LW may thus result in higher steroidogenic activity and thus explain the typically higher cortisol levels in MS compared to LW. Moreover, up-regulation of Star and Ldlr genes in MS and/or in response to ACTH suggest that differences in the adrenal function between MS and LW may also involve mechanisms requisite for cholesterol supply to steroidogenesis. Conclusion The present study provides new potential candidate genes to explain genetic variations in the adrenal sensitivity to ACTH and better understand relationship between HPA axis activity and obesity.

  8. Statistical identification of gene association by CID in application of constructing ER regulatory network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lien Huang-Chun

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A variety of high-throughput techniques are now available for constructing comprehensive gene regulatory networks in systems biology. In this study, we report a new statistical approach for facilitating in silico inference of regulatory network structure. The new measure of association, coefficient of intrinsic dependence (CID, is model-free and can be applied to both continuous and categorical distributions. When given two variables X and Y, CID answers whether Y is dependent on X by examining the conditional distribution of Y given X. In this paper, we apply CID to analyze the regulatory relationships between transcription factors (TFs (X and their downstream genes (Y based on clinical data. More specifically, we use estrogen receptor α (ERα as the variable X, and the analyses are based on 48 clinical breast cancer gene expression arrays (48A. Results The analytical utility of CID was evaluated in comparison with four commonly used statistical methods, Galton-Pearson's correlation coefficient (GPCC, Student's t-test (STT, coefficient of determination (CoD, and mutual information (MI. When being compared to GPCC, CoD, and MI, CID reveals its preferential ability to discover the regulatory association where distribution of the mRNA expression levels on X and Y does not fit linear models. On the other hand, when CID is used to measure the association of a continuous variable (Y against a discrete variable (X, it shows similar performance as compared to STT, and appears to outperform CoD and MI. In addition, this study established a two-layer transcriptional regulatory network to exemplify the usage of CID, in combination with GPCC, in deciphering gene networks based on gene expression profiles from patient arrays. Conclusion CID is shown to provide useful information for identifying associations between genes and transcription factors of interest in patient arrays. When coupled with the relationships detected by GPCC, the

  9. Statistical identification of gene association by CID in application of constructing ER regulatory network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li-Yu D; Chen, Chien-Yu; Chen, Mei-Ju M; Tsai, Ming-Shian; Lee, Cho-Han S; Phang, Tzu L; Chang, Li-Yun; Kuo, Wen-Hung; Hwa, Hsiao-Lin; Lien, Huang-Chun; Jung, Shih-Ming; Lin, Yi-Shing; Chang, King-Jen; Hsieh, Fon-Jou

    2009-03-17

    A variety of high-throughput techniques are now available for constructing comprehensive gene regulatory networks in systems biology. In this study, we report a new statistical approach for facilitating in silico inference of regulatory network structure. The new measure of association, coefficient of intrinsic dependence (CID), is model-free and can be applied to both continuous and categorical distributions. When given two variables X and Y, CID answers whether Y is dependent on X by examining the conditional distribution of Y given X. In this paper, we apply CID to analyze the regulatory relationships between transcription factors (TFs) (X) and their downstream genes (Y) based on clinical data. More specifically, we use estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) as the variable X, and the analyses are based on 48 clinical breast cancer gene expression arrays (48A). The analytical utility of CID was evaluated in comparison with four commonly used statistical methods, Galton-Pearson's correlation coefficient (GPCC), Student's t-test (STT), coefficient of determination (CoD), and mutual information (MI). When being compared to GPCC, CoD, and MI, CID reveals its preferential ability to discover the regulatory association where distribution of the mRNA expression levels on X and Y does not fit linear models. On the other hand, when CID is used to measure the association of a continuous variable (Y) against a discrete variable (X), it shows similar performance as compared to STT, and appears to outperform CoD and MI. In addition, this study established a two-layer transcriptional regulatory network to exemplify the usage of CID, in combination with GPCC, in deciphering gene networks based on gene expression profiles from patient arrays. CID is shown to provide useful information for identifying associations between genes and transcription factors of interest in patient arrays. When coupled with the relationships detected by GPCC, the association predicted by CID are applicable

  10. Dense nanoimprinted silicon nanowire arrays with passivated axial p-i-n junctions for photovoltaic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Peng; Liu, Pei; Siontas, Stylianos; Zaslavsky, A.; Pacifici, D. [Department of Physics and School of Engineering, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912 (United States); Ha, Jong-Yoon; Krylyuk, S. [Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Material Measurement Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Davydov, A. V. [Material Measurement Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States)

    2015-03-28

    We report on the fabrication and photovoltaic characteristics of vertical arrays of silicon axial p-i-n junction nanowire (NW) solar cells grown by vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) epitaxy. NW surface passivation with silicon dioxide shell is shown to enhance carrier recombination time, open-circuit voltage (V{sub OC}), short-circuit current density (J{sub SC}), and fill factor (FF). The photovoltaic performance of passivated individual NW and NW arrays was compared under 532 nm laser illumination with power density of ∼10 W/cm{sup 2}. Higher values of V{sub OC} and FF in the NW arrays are explained by enhanced light trapping. In order to verify the effect of NW density on light absorption and hence on the photovoltaic performance of NW arrays, dense Si NW arrays were fabricated using nanoimprint lithography to periodically arrange the gold seed particles prior to epitaxial growth. Compared to sparse NW arrays fabricated using VLS growth from randomly distributed gold seeds, the nanoimprinted NW array solar cells show a greatly increased peak external quantum efficiency of ∼8% and internal quantum efficiency of ∼90% in the visible spectral range. Three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain simulations of Si NW periodic arrays with varying pitch (P) confirm the importance of high NW density. Specifically, due to diffractive scattering and light trapping, absorption efficiency close to 100% in the 400–650 nm spectral range is calculated for a Si NW array with P = 250 nm, significantly outperforming a blanket Si film of the same thickness.

  11. Application of a floating point systems AP190L array processor to finite element analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, R.C.

    1982-04-01

    This report discusses the implementation of a finite element program on a Floating Point Systems AP190L array processor attached to a Univac 1182 host computer. The array processor was used to perform all calculations on the global system of linear equations including matrix assembly, matrix factoring and vector solution. A large scratch disk was attached directly to the array processor for storing the factored matrix. The remaining calculations, including data preparation, element matrix formation, stress integration and output display were performed by the host computer.

  12. WO{sub 3} thin film based multiple sensor array for electronic nose application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramgir, Niranjan S., E-mail: niranjanpr@yahoo.com, E-mail: deepakcct1991@gmail.com; Goyal, C. P.; Datta, N.; Kaur, M.; Debnath, A. K.; Aswal, D. K.; Gupta, S. K. [Thin Film Devices Section, Technical Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai–400085 (India); Goyal, Deepak, E-mail: niranjanpr@yahoo.com, E-mail: deepakcct1991@gmail.com [Thin Film Devices Section, Technical Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai–400085 (India); Centre for Converging Technologies, University of Rajasthan, Jaipur-302004 (India)

    2015-06-24

    Multiple sensor array comprising 16 x 2 sensing elements were realized using RF sputtered WO{sub 3} thin films. The sensor films were modified with a thin layer of sensitizers namely Au, Ni, Cu, Al, Pd, Ti, Pt. The resulting sensor array were tested for their response towards different gases namely H{sub 2}S, NH{sub 3}, NO and C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH. The sensor response values measured from the response curves indicates that the sensor array generates a unique signature pattern (bar chart) for the gases. The sensor response values can be used to get both qualitative and quantitative information about the gas.

  13. Arrays in rays: terminal addition in echinoderms and its correlation with gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooi, Rich; David, Bruno; Wray, Gregory A

    2005-01-01

    The echinoderms are deuterostomes that superimpose radial symmetry upon bilateral larval morphology. Consequently, they are not the first animals that come to mind when the concepts of segmentation and terminal addition are being discussed. However, it has long been recognized that echinoderms have serial elements along their radii formed in accordance with the ocular plate rule (OPR). The OPR is a special case of terminal growth, forming elements of the ambulacra that define the rays in echinoderms. New elements are added at the terminus of the ray, which may or may not be marked by a calcified element called the terminal plate (the "ocular" of sea urchins). The OPR operates in every echinoderm, from the occasionally bizarre fossils of the Cambrian to the most familiar extant taxa. Using the OPR and other criteria of recognition, echinoderm body wall can be divided into two main regions: extraxial components are associated with the somatocoels, axial components (formed in accordance with the OPR) with the hydrocoel. We compare patterns of development in axial regions of echinoderms with those found in the anterior-posterior axes of the earliest echinoderms as well as other invertebrates. Although axial and extraxial skeletons appear to be composed of the same biomineral matrix, the genes involved in patterning these two skeletal components are likely distinct. During development of the axial skeleton, for instance, the genes engrailed and orthodenticle are expressed in spatial and temporal patterns consistent with the OPR. Other genes such as distal-less seem to demarcate early ontogenetic boundaries between the axial rudiment and the extraxial larval body. There is a complex and pervasive reorganization of gene expression domains to produce the highly divergent morphologies seen in the Echinodermata. We integrate morphological and genetic information, particularly with respect to the origins of radial symmetry in the rudiment, and the concomitant development of

  14. Fano-resonance boosted cascaded field enhancement in a plasmonic nanoparticle-in-cavity nanoantenna array and its SERS application

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Zhendong; You, Oubo; Li, Qunqing; Fan, Shoushan

    2015-01-01

    Cascaded optical field enhancement (CFE) can be realized in some specially designed multiscale plasmonic nanostructures, where the generation of extremely strong field at nanoscale volume is crucial for many applications, for example, surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). Here, we propose a strategy of realizing a high-quality plasmonic nanoparticle-in-cavity (PIC) nanoantenna array, where strong coupling between a nanoparticle dark mode with a high order nanocavity bright mode can produce Fano resonance at a target wavelength. The Fano resonance can effectively boost the CFE in the PIC, with a field enhancement factor up to 5X10^2. A cost-effective and reliable nanofabrication method is developed with room temperature nanoimprinting lithography to manufacture high-quality PIC arrays. This technique guarantees the generation of only one gold nanoparticle at the bottom of each nanocavity, which is crucial for the generation of the expected CFE. As a demonstration of the performance and application of the...

  15. Clustering Algorithms: Their Application to Gene Expression Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyelade, Jelili; Isewon, Itunuoluwa; Oladipupo, Funke; Aromolaran, Olufemi; Uwoghiren, Efosa; Ameh, Faridah; Achas, Moses; Adebiyi, Ezekiel

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression data hide vital information required to understand the biological process that takes place in a particular organism in relation to its environment. Deciphering the hidden patterns in gene expression data proffers a prodigious preference to strengthen the understanding of functional genomics. The complexity of biological networks and the volume of genes present increase the challenges of comprehending and interpretation of the resulting mass of data, which consists of millions of measurements; these data also inhibit vagueness, imprecision, and noise. Therefore, the use of clustering techniques is a first step toward addressing these challenges, which is essential in the data mining process to reveal natural structures and identify interesting patterns in the underlying data. The clustering of gene expression data has been proven to be useful in making known the natural structure inherent in gene expression data, understanding gene functions, cellular processes, and subtypes of cells, mining useful information from noisy data, and understanding gene regulation. The other benefit of clustering gene expression data is the identification of homology, which is very important in vaccine design. This review examines the various clustering algorithms applicable to the gene expression data in order to discover and provide useful knowledge of the appropriate clustering technique that will guarantee stability and high degree of accuracy in its analysis procedure. PMID:27932867

  16. Identification of genes differentially expressed in monocyte-derived dendritic cells with 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 using cDNA arrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈倩云; 郑树森

    2004-01-01

    In order to study the molecular mechanism of the inhibitory effect of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 on dendritic cells,experiments were performed using Atlas cDNA expression arrays from Clonetech to identify the differentially expressed genes of dendritic cells by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. Analysis ofcDNA arrays revealed changes in the expression of 9 genes,including those involved in DNA binding and transcription, extracellular cell signaling and communication, intracellular transducers, as well as cell adhesions. The results indicated that a multiple molecular network is involved in the inhibitory role of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 on dendritic cells. The Atlas Array technology may facilitate the elucidation of complex pharmacological process of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 on dendritic cells.

  17. Identification of genes differentially expressed in monocyte-deriveddendritic cells with 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 using cDNA arrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈倩云; 郑树森

    2004-01-01

    In order to study the molecular mechanism of the inhibitory effect of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 on dendritic cells, experiments were performed using Atlas cDNA expression arrays from Clonetech to identify the differentially expressed genes of dendritic cells by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. Analysis of cDNA arrays revealed changes in the expression of 9 genes, including those involved in DNA binding and transcription, extracellular cell signaling and communication, intracellular transducers, as well as cell adhesions. The results indicated that a multiple molecular network is involved in the inhibitory role of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 on dendritic cells. The Atlas Array technology may facilitate the elucidation of complex pharmacological nrocess of 1.25-dihvdroxvvitamin D3 on dondritie cells.

  18. Arc arrays: studies of high resolution techniques for multibeam bathymetric applications

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakraborty, B.; Schenke, H.W.

    arrayof 15 degrees arc. The superiorityof the high resolution methods is seen by examining the patterns of the 15 degrees arc array under multiple source/interference conditions, i.e. the situation for rough terrain or artefactcreating conditions...

  19. Medical applications of array CGH and the transformation of clinical cytogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, L G; Bejjani, B A

    2006-01-01

    Microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) merges molecular diagnostics with traditional chromosome analysis and is transforming the field of cytogenetics. Prospective studies of individuals with developmental delay and dysmorphic features have demonstrated that array CGH has the ability to detect any genomic imbalance including deletions, duplications, aneuploidies and amplifications. Detection rates for chromosome abnormalities with array CGH range from 5-17% in individuals with normal results from prior routine cytogenetic testing. In addition, copy number variants (CNVs) were identified in all studies. These CNVs may include large-scale variation and can confound the diagnostic interpretations. Although cytogeneticists will require additional training and laboratories must become appropriately equipped, array CGH holds the promise of being the initial diagnostic tool in the identification of visible and submicroscopic chromosome abnormalities in mental retardation and other developmental disabilities.

  20. A carbon nanotube field emission multipixel x-ray array source for microradiotherapy application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sigen; Calderon, Xiomara; Peng, Rui; Schreiber, Eric C.; Zhou, Otto; Chang, Sha

    2011-05-01

    The authors report a carbon nanotube (CNT) field emission multipixel x-ray array source for microradiotherapy for cancer research. The developed multipixel x-ray array source has 50 individually controllable pixels and it has several distinct advantages over other irradiation source including high-temporal resolution (millisecond level), the ability to electronically shape the form, and intensity distribution of the radiation fields. The x-ray array was generated by a CNT cathode array (5×10) chip with electron field emission. A dose rate on the order of >1.2 Gy/min per x-ray pixel beam is achieved at the center of the irradiated volume. The measured dose rate is in good agreement with the Monte Carlo simulation result.

  1. Periodically Aligned Si Nanopillar Arrays as Efficient Antireflection Layers for Solar Cell Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xiaocheng

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Periodically aligned Si nanopillar (PASiNP arrays were fabricated on Si substrate via a silver-catalyzed chemical etching process using the diameter-reduced polystyrene spheres as mask. The typical sub-wavelength structure of PASiNP arrays had excellent antireflection property with a low reflection loss of 2.84% for incident light within the wavelength range of 200–1,000 nm. The solar cell incorporated with the PASiNP arrays exhibited a power conversion efficiency (PCE of ~9.24% with a short circuit current density (JSC of ~29.5 mA/cm2 without using any extra surface passivation technique. The high PCE of PASiNP array-based solar cell was attributed to the excellent antireflection property of the special periodical Si nanostructure.

  2. Self-Assembled Wire Arrays and ITO Contacts for Silicon Nanowire Solar Cell Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Cheng; ZHANG Gang; LEE Dae-Young; LI Hua-Min; LIM Young-Dae; Y00 Won Jong; PARK Young-Jun; KIM Jong-Min

    2011-01-01

    Self-assembly of silicon nanowire(SiNW)arrays is studied using SF6/02 plasma treatment. The self-assembly method can be applied to single- and poly-crystalline Si substrates. Plasma conditions can control the length and diameter of the SiNW arrays. Lower reflectance of the wire arrays over the wavelength range 200-1100nm is obtained. The conducting transparent indium-tin-oxide(ITO) electrode can be fully coated on the self-assembled SiNW arrays by sputtering. The ITO-coated SiNW solar cells show the same low surface light reflectance and a higher carrier collection efficiency than SiNW solar cells without ITO coating. An efficiency enhancement of around 3 times for ITO coated SiNW solar cells is demonstrated via experiments.

  3. Synthesis of ZnO nanosheet arrays with exposed (100) facets for gas sensing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Chuanhai; Yang, Tianye; Chuai, Mingyan; Xiao, Bingxin; Zhang, Mingzhe

    2016-01-01

    ZnO nanosheet (NS) arrays have been synthesized by a facile ultrathin liquid layer electrodeposition method. The ion concentration and electrode potential play important roles in the formation of ZnO NS arrays. Studies on the structural information indicate that the NSs are exposed with (100) facets. The results of Raman and PL spectra indicate that there existed a large amount of oxygen vacancies in the NSs. The gas sensing performances of the ZnO NS arrays are investigated: the ZnO NS arrays exhibited high gas selectivity and quick response/recovery for detecting NO2 at a low working temperature. High binding energies between NO2 molecules and exposed ZnO(100) facets lead to large surface reconstructions, which is responsible for the intrinsic NO2 sensing properties. In addition, the highly exposed surface and a large amount of oxygen vacancies existing in the NSs also make a great contribution to the gas sensing performance.

  4. High Resolution, Radiation Tolerant Focal Plane Array for Lunar And Deep Space Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aerius Photonics and its partners propose the development of a high resolution, radiation hardened 3-D FLASH Focal Plane Array (FPA), with performance expected to be...

  5. [Ribozyme riboswitch based gene expression regulation systems for gene therapy applications: progress and challenges].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jing-Xian; Wang, Jia-wen; Lin, Jun-sheng; Diao, Yong

    2014-11-01

    Robust and efficient control of therapeutic gene expression is needed for timing and dosing of gene therapy drugs in clinical applications. Ribozyme riboswitch provides a promising building block for ligand-controlled gene-regulatory system, based on its property that exhibits tunable gene regulation, design modularity, and target specificity. Ribozyme riboswitch can be used in various gene delivery vectors. In recent years, there have been breakthroughs in extending ribozyme riboswitch's application from gene-expression control to cellular function and fate control. High throughput screening platforms were established, that allow not only rapid optimization of ribozyme riboswitch in a microbial host, but also straightforward transfer of selected devices exhibiting desired activities to mammalian cell lines in a predictable manner. Mathematical models were employed successfully to explore the performance of ribozyme riboswitch quantitively and its rational design predictably. However, to progress toward gene therapy relevant applications, both precision rational design of regulatory circuits and the biocompatibility of regulatory ligand are still of crucial importance.

  6. Applications of Flexible Ultrasonic Transducer Array for Defect Detection at 150 °C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiunn-Woei Liaw

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the feasibility of using a one dimensional 16-element flexible ultrasonic transducer (FUT array for nondestructive testing at 150 °C is demonstrated. The FUT arrays were made by a sol-gel sprayed piezoelectric film technology; a PZT composite film was sprayed on a titanium foil of 75 µm thickness. Since the FUT array is flexible, it was attached to a steel pipe with an outer diameter of 89 mm and a wall thickness of 6.5 mm at 150 °C. Using the ultrasonic pulse-echo mode, pipe thickness measurements could be performed. Moreover, using the ultrasonic pulse-echo and pitch-catch modes of each element of FUT array, the defect detection was performed on an Al alloy block of 30 mm thickness with a side-drilled hole (SDH of f3 mm at 150 °C. In addition, a post-processing algorithm based on the total focusing method was used to process the full matrix of these A-scan signals of each single transmitter and multi-receivers, and then the phase-array image was obtained to indicate this defect- SDH. Both results show the capability of FUT array being operated at 150 °C for the corrosion and defect detections.

  7. Increase Jc by Improving the Array of Nb3Sn strands for Fusion Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Xuan

    2012-12-17

    During Phase I, our efforts were focusing on improving the array of subelement in the tube type strands by hardening the Sn core and the subelement matrix to effectively increase the Jc of the strands. Below is a summary of the results. 1) We were unsuccessful in improving the array using a Cu-Sn matrix approach. 2) We slightly improved the array using Sn with 1.5at%Ti doped core, and a 217-subelement restacked strand was made and drawn down without any breakage. 3) We greatly improved the array using the Glidcop Al-15 to replace the pure Cu sheath in the subelement, and a 217-subelement restacked strand was made and drawn down. Both strands have very good drawability and the array showed good improvement. 4) We also improved the array using improved wire drawing techniques using Hyper Tech's new caterpillar wire drawing machines to enable straight wire drawing for the entire wire drawing process. 5) The 919-subelement restack strand shows its non-Cu Jc over 2100 A/mm2 at 12 T/4.2 K and AC loss of 508 mJ/cm3.

  8. A 91 kb microdeletion at Xq26.2 involving the GPC3 gene in a female fetus with Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome detected by prenatal arrayCGH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramsing, Mette; Becher, Naja Helene; Christensen, Rikke

    A 91 kb microdeletion at Xq26.2 involving the GPC3 gene in a female fetus with Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome detected by prenatal arrayCGH......A 91 kb microdeletion at Xq26.2 involving the GPC3 gene in a female fetus with Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome detected by prenatal arrayCGH...

  9. Controlled growth of standing Ag nanorod arrays on bare Si substrate using glancing angle deposition for self-cleaning applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Dhruv P.; Singh, J. P.

    2014-03-01

    A facile approach to manipulate the hydrophobicity of surface by controlled growth of standing Ag nanorod arrays is presented. Instead of following the complicated conventional method of the template-assisted growth, the morphology or particularly average diameter and number density (nanorods cm-2) of nanorods were controlled on bare Si substrate by simply varying the deposition rate during glancing angle deposition. The contact angle measurements showed that the evolution of Ag nanorods reduces the surface energy and makes an increment in the apparent water contact angle compared to the plain Ag thin film. The contact angle was found to increase for the Ag nanorod samples grown at lower deposition rates. Interestingly, the morphology of the nanorod arrays grown at very low deposition rate (1.2 Å sec-1) results in a self-cleaning superhydrophobic surface of contact angle about 157° and a small roll-off angle about 5°. The observed improvement in hydrophobicity with change in the morphology of nanorod arrays is explained as the effect of reduction in solid fraction within the framework of Cassie-Baxter model. These self-cleaning Ag nanorod arrays could have a significant impact in wide range of applications such as anti-icing coatings, sensors and solar panels.

  10. Arrayed Waveguide Gratings and Their Application Using Super-High-Δ Silica-Based Planar Lightwave Circuit Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maru, Koichi; Uetsuka, Hisato

    This paper reviews our recent progress on arrayed waveguide gratings (AWGs) using super-high-Δ silica-based planar lightwave circuit (PLC) technology and their application to integrated optical devices. Factors affecting the chip size of AWGs and the impact of increasing relative index difference Δ on the chip size are investigated, and the fabrication result of a compact athermal AWG using 2.5%-Δ silica-based waveguides is presented. As an application of super-high-Δ AWGs to integrated devices, a flat-passband multi/demultiplexer consisting of an AWG and cascaded MZIs is presented.

  11. Divergence in cis-regulatory sequences surrounding the opsin gene arrays of African cichlid fishes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Streelman J Todd

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Divergence within cis-regulatory sequences may contribute to the adaptive evolution of gene expression, but functional alleles in these regions are difficult to identify without abundant genomic resources. Among African cichlid fishes, the differential expression of seven opsin genes has produced adaptive differences in visual sensitivity. Quantitative genetic analysis suggests that cis-regulatory alleles near the SWS2-LWS opsins may contribute to this variation. Here, we sequence BACs containing the opsin genes of two cichlids, Oreochromis niloticus and Metriaclima zebra. We use phylogenetic footprinting and shadowing to examine divergence in conserved non-coding elements, promoter sequences, and 3'-UTRs surrounding each opsin in search of candidate cis-regulatory sequences that influence cichlid opsin expression. Results We identified 20 conserved non-coding elements surrounding the opsins of cichlids and other teleosts, including one known enhancer and a retinal microRNA. Most conserved elements contained computationally-predicted binding sites that correspond to transcription factors that function in vertebrate opsin expression; O. niloticus and M. zebra were significantly divergent in two of these. Similarly, we found a large number of relevant transcription factor binding sites within each opsin's proximal promoter, and identified five opsins that were considerably divergent in both expression and the number of transcription factor binding sites shared between O. niloticus and M. zebra. We also found several microRNA target sites within the 3'-UTR of each opsin, including two 3'-UTRs that differ significantly between O. niloticus and M. zebra. Finally, we examined interspecific divergence among 18 phenotypically diverse cichlids from Lake Malawi for one conserved non-coding element, two 3'-UTRs, and five opsin proximal promoters. We found that all regions were highly conserved with some evidence of CRX transcription

  12. Immunologic applications of conditional gene modification technology in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Suveena; Zhu, Jinfang

    2014-04-02

    Since the success of homologous recombination in altering mouse genome and the discovery of Cre-loxP system, the combination of these two breakthroughs has created important applications for studying the immune system in the mouse. Here, we briefly summarize the general principles of this technology and its applications in studying immune cell development and responses; such implications include conditional gene knockout and inducible and/or tissue-specific gene over-expression, as well as lineage fate mapping. We then discuss the pros and cons of a few commonly used Cre-expressing mouse lines for studying lymphocyte development and functions. We also raise several general issues, such as efficiency of gene deletion, leaky activity of Cre, and Cre toxicity, all of which may have profound impacts on data interpretation. Finally, we selectively list some useful links to the Web sites as valuable mouse resources.

  13. PMN-PT single crystal for endoscopic ultrasound 2D array application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yuhang; Liang, Huageng; Zhu, Benpeng; Zhou, Dan; Yang, Xiaofei

    2017-03-01

    Based on lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate single crystal, a 24 × 24 row-column addressing endoscopic two-dimensional array has been successfully fabricated using novel flanged electrodes and "semi-kerf" technologies. Each row/column array element was measured to have an electromechanical coupling coefficient of 0.81, a center frequency of 5MHz, and a fractional bandwidth of approximately 88% at -6 dB. Of particular significance was that the lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate element exhibits much higher sensitivity compared with lead zirconate titanate-based 2D arrays with similar operational frequency and element area. According to the Field II simulated results, although the obtained beamwidth at -6 dB was a little inferior to that of the fully sampled 24 × 24 two-dimensional array, it is believed that the beamwidth can be improved by appropriately increasing the element number. These results demonstrated that the lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate single-crystal 2D array is a promising candidate for real-time three-dimensional endoscopic ultrasound imaging.

  14. Application of simple array method in one-way traffic synthetic asessment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PEI Yu-long; LIU Guang-ping

    2005-01-01

    One-Way Traffic synthetic assessing can not only determine the assessment method, but can also provide an opportunity for further study of road systems. Comparing three Road Traffic Planning methods, which are Value Analysis method, Simple Array method and Step Analysis method, this paper concludes that Simple Array method has one prominent merit, avoiding the complicated relationship of various factors and simplifying the complex problem. Therefore Simple Array method is firstly presented in this paper to be the assessing measure to assess the One-Way Traffic Planning project. Although this assessing method cannot wholly give way to man's will, through consistently testing on qualitative factors and with the decision-making results of a multiprogram, this method is still an effective method. Using an example of Harbin One-Way Traffic planning, with seven assessing indexes including economic benefit index, Simple Array method is applied to synthetically assessing the program. This fully reflects the general function of One-Way Traffic planning program and objectively evaluates the program. It also proves that, as the method of One-Way Traffic synthetic assessing, Simple Array method is rational and practical.

  15. Low concentration ratio solar array for low Earth orbit multi-100 kW application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalbandian, S. J.

    1982-01-01

    An ongoing preliminary design effort directed toward a low-concentration-ratio photovoltaic array system based on 1984 technology and capable of delivering multi-hundred kilowatts (300 kW to 1000 kW range) in low earth orbit is described. The array system consists of two or more array modules each capable of delivering between 80 kW to 172 kW using silicon solar cells or gallium arsenide solar cells respectively. The array module deployed area is 1320 square meters and consists of 4356 pryamidal concentrator elements. The module, when stowed in the Space Shuttle's payload bay, has a stowage volume of a cube with 3.24 meters on a side. The concentrator elements are sized for a geometric concentration ratio (GCR) of six with an aperture area of 0.5 meters x 0.5 meters. The structural analysis and design trades leading to the baseline design are discussed. The configuration, as well as optical, thermal and electrical performance analyses that support the design and overall performance estimates for the array are described.

  16. Chitosan for gene delivery and orthopedic tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raftery, Rosanne; O'Brien, Fergal J; Cryan, Sally-Ann

    2013-05-15

    Gene therapy involves the introduction of foreign genetic material into cells in order exert a therapeutic effect. The application of gene therapy to the field of orthopaedic tissue engineering is extremely promising as the controlled release of therapeutic proteins such as bone morphogenetic proteins have been shown to stimulate bone repair. However, there are a number of drawbacks associated with viral and synthetic non-viral gene delivery approaches. One natural polymer which has generated interest as a gene delivery vector is chitosan. Chitosan is biodegradable, biocompatible and non-toxic. Much of the appeal of chitosan is due to the presence of primary amine groups in its repeating units which become protonated in acidic conditions. This property makes it a promising candidate for non-viral gene delivery. Chitosan-based vectors have been shown to transfect a number of cell types including human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293) and human cervical cancer cells (HeLa). Aside from its use in gene delivery, chitosan possesses a range of properties that show promise in tissue engineering applications; it is biodegradable, biocompatible, has anti-bacterial activity, and, its cationic nature allows for electrostatic interaction with glycosaminoglycans and other proteoglycans. It can be used to make nano- and microparticles, sponges, gels, membranes and porous scaffolds. Chitosan has also been shown to enhance mineral deposition during osteogenic differentiation of MSCs in vitro. The purpose of this review is to critically discuss the use of chitosan as a gene delivery vector with emphasis on its application in orthopedic tissue engineering.

  17. Concept, design and implementation of a cardiovascular gene-centric 50 k SNP array for large-scale genomic association studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendan J Keating

    Full Text Available A wealth of genetic associations for cardiovascular and metabolic phenotypes in humans has been accumulating over the last decade, in particular a large number of loci derived from recent genome wide association studies (GWAS. True complex disease-associated loci often exert modest effects, so their delineation currently requires integration of diverse phenotypic data from large studies to ensure robust meta-analyses. We have designed a gene-centric 50 K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP array to assess potentially relevant loci across a range of cardiovascular, metabolic and inflammatory syndromes. The array utilizes a "cosmopolitan" tagging approach to capture the genetic diversity across approximately 2,000 loci in populations represented in the HapMap and SeattleSNPs projects. The array content is informed by GWAS of vascular and inflammatory disease, expression quantitative trait loci implicated in atherosclerosis, pathway based approaches and comprehensive literature searching. The custom flexibility of the array platform facilitated interrogation of loci at differing stringencies, according to a gene prioritization strategy that allows saturation of high priority loci with a greater density of markers than the existing GWAS tools, particularly in African HapMap samples. We also demonstrate that the IBC array can be used to complement GWAS, increasing coverage in high priority CVD-related loci across all major HapMap populations. DNA from over 200,000 extensively phenotyped individuals will be genotyped with this array with a significant portion of the generated data being released into the academic domain facilitating in silico replication attempts, analyses of rare variants and cross-cohort meta-analyses in diverse populations. These datasets will also facilitate more robust secondary analyses, such as explorations with alternative genetic models, epistasis and gene-environment interactions.

  18. A low power 10 V programmable array based on Nb x Si1-x Josephson junctions for metrology applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knipper, Richard; Anders, Solveig; Schubert, Marco; Peiselt, Katja; Scheller, Thomas; Franke, Dirk; Dellith, Jan; Meyer, Hans-Georg

    2016-09-01

    Josephson junctions generate, when subjected to microwave irradiation, voltages with a very high precision and are used in metrology applications. So-called PJVS (programmable Josephson voltage-standards) are capable of generating both AC and DC voltages of up to 10 V. Our work addresses a full fabrication scenario for 10 V PJVS arrays driven at 70 GHz to be used in low microwave-power conditions as in, but not limited to GUNN diodes or cryocooler applications. Nb x Si1-x in its function as a barrier material was characterised with AFM, RBS and reflectometry in order to establish a reliable technological foundation. A 10 V PJVS array driven with microwave power below 50 mW is further presented, which was achieved by optimising the fabrication technology regarding the degree of homogeneity of the Josephson junctions composition and thickness. Control over these parameters is crucial in choosing a stable and well-suited characteristic voltage (I c R n product) and critical current density j c. With this, a low-power operation of a PJVS array is possible without the need for liquid helium cooling, which is currently limiting the availability of PJVS based metrology.

  19. A scalable multi-chip architecture to realise large-format microshutter arrays for coded aperture applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNie, Mark E.; King, David O.; Smith, Gilbert W.; Stone, Steven M.; Brown, Alan G.; Gordon, Neil T.; Slinger, Christopher W.; Cannon, Kevin; Riches, Stephen; Rogers, Stanley

    2009-08-01

    Coded aperture imaging has been used for astronomical applications for several years. Typical implementations used a fixed mask pattern and are designed to operate in the X-Ray or gamma ray bands. Recently applications have emerged in the visible and infra red bands for low cost lens-less imaging systems and system studies have shown that considerable advantages in image resolution may accrue from the use of multiple different images of the same scene - requiring a reconfigurable mask. Previously we reported on the realization of a 2x2cm single chip mask in the mid-IR based on polysilicon micro-opto-electro-mechanical systems (MOEMS) technology and its integration with ASIC drive electronics using conventional wire bonding. The MOEMS architecture employs interference effects to modulate incident light - achieved by tuning a large array of asymmetric Fabry-Perot optical cavities via an applied voltage and uses a hysteretic row/column scheme for addressing. In this paper we present the latest transmission results in the mid-IR band (3-5μm) and report on progress in developing a scalable architecture based on a tiled approach using multiple 2 x 2cm MOEMS chips with associated control ASICs integrated using flip chip technology. Initial work has focused on a 2 x 2 tiled array as a stepping stone towards an 8 x 8 array.

  20. Ag Nanorods-Oxide Hybrid Array Substrates: Synthesis, Characterization, and Applications in Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingwei Ma

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Over the last few decades, benefitting from the sufficient sensitivity, high specificity, nondestructive, and rapid detection capability of the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS technique, numerous nanostructures have been elaborately designed and successfully synthesized as high-performance SERS substrates, which have been extensively exploited for the identification of chemical and biological analytes. Among these, Ag nanorods coated with thin metal oxide layers (AgNRs-oxide hybrid array substrates featuring many outstanding advantages have been proposed as fascinating SERS substrates, and are of particular research interest. The present review provides a systematic overview towards the representative achievements of AgNRs-oxide hybrid array substrates for SERS applications from diverse perspectives, so as to promote the realization of real-world SERS sensors. First, various fabrication approaches of AgNRs-oxide nanostructures are introduced, which are followed by a discussion on the novel merits of AgNRs-oxide arrays, such as superior SERS sensitivity and reproducibility, high thermal stability, long-term activity in air, corrosion resistivity, and intense chemisorption of target molecules. Next, we present recent advances of AgNRs-oxide substrates in terms of practical applications. Intriguingly, the recyclability, qualitative and quantitative analyses, as well as vapor-phase molecule sensing have been achieved on these nanocomposites. We further discuss the major challenges and prospects of AgNRs-oxide substrates for future SERS developments, aiming to expand the versatility of SERS technique.

  1. Relaxing the electrostatic screening effect by patterning vertically-aligned silicon nanowire arrays into bundles for field emission application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hung, Yung-Jr, E-mail: yungjrhung@gmail.com [Department of Electronic Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 43, Sec. 4, Keelung Rd., Taipei 106, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Photonics, National Sun Yat-sen University, No. 70, Lienhai Rd., Kaohsiung 80424, Taiwan, ROC (China); Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 43, Sec. 4, Keelung Rd., Taipei 106, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lee, San-Liang [Department of Electronic Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 43, Sec. 4, Keelung Rd., Taipei 106, Taiwan, ROC (China); Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 43, Sec. 4, Keelung Rd., Taipei 106, Taiwan, ROC (China); Beng, Looi Choon [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, Jalan Multimedia, 63100 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia); Chang, Hsuan-Chen [Department of Electronic Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 43, Sec. 4, Keelung Rd., Taipei 106, Taiwan, ROC (China); Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 43, Sec. 4, Keelung Rd., Taipei 106, Taiwan, ROC (China); Huang, Yung-Jui [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 43, Sec. 4, Keelung Rd., Taipei 106, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lee, Kuei-Yi; Huang, Ying-Sheng [Department of Electronic Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 43, Sec. 4, Keelung Rd., Taipei 106, Taiwan, ROC (China); Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 43, Sec. 4, Keelung Rd., Taipei 106, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2014-04-01

    Top-down fabrication strategies are proposed and demonstrated to realize arrays of vertically-aligned silicon nanowire bundles and bundle arrays of carbon nanotube–silicon nanowire (CNT–SiNW) heterojunctions, aiming for releasing the electrostatic screening effect and improving the field emission characteristics. The trade-off between the reduction in the electrostatic screening effect and the decrease of emission sites leads to an optimal SiNW bundle arrangement which enables the lowest turn-on electric field of 1.4 V/μm and highest emission current density of 191 μA/cm{sup 2} among all testing SiNW samples. Benefiting from the superior thermal and electrical properties of CNTs and the flexible patterning technologies available for SiNWs, bundle arrays of CNT–SiNW heterojunctions show improved and highly-uniform field emission with a lower turn-on electric field of 0.9 V/μm and higher emission current density of 5.86 mA/cm{sup 2}. The application of these materials and their corresponding fabrication approaches is not limited to the field emission but can be used for a variety of emerging fields like nanoelectronics, lithium-ion batteries, and solar cells. - Highlights: • Aligned silicon nanowire (SiNW) bundle arrays are realized with top-down methods. • Growing carbon nanotubes atop SiNW bundle arrays enable uniform field emission. • A turn-on field of 0.9 V/μm and an emission current of > 5 mA/cm{sup 2} are achieved.

  2. Complementary bipolar application specific analog semicustom array, intended to implement front-end units

    CERN Document Server

    Atkin, E; Kondratenko, S; Maslennikov, V; Meshcheriakov, V; Mishin, Yu; Volkov, Yu

    2002-01-01

    The structure of an analog semicustom array, intended to implement front-end electronics ICs on its basis, is considered. The features of this array are: implementation with an inexpensive bipolar process despite containing an equal number of NPN and PNP structures with well matched characteristics, supply voltages from 1.5 V to 15 V, transistor current gains Bst~100 and unity gain frequencies Ft > 3 GHz at collector currents of (100...300) mu A, high- and low-ohmic resistors, MOS capacitors, minimum two variable plating levels available. Specific circuit diagrams and parameters of the front-end electronics ICs, created on the basis of the considered array, are presented. The results of their tests are given. (4 refs).

  3. Arrays of microscopic magnetic traps for cold atoms and their applications in atom optics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    印建平; 高伟建; 胡建军

    2002-01-01

    A single microscopic magnetic trap for neutral atoms using planar current-carrying wires was proposed and studiedtheoretically by Weinstein et al. In this paper, we propose three structures of composite current-carrying wires to provide1D, 2D and 3D arrays of microscopic magnetic traps for cold alkali atoms. The spatial distributions of magnetic fieldsgenerated by these structures are calculated and the field gradient and curvature in each single microtrap are analysed.Our study shows that arrays of microscopic magnetic traps can be used to provide 1D, 2D or 3D atomic magneticlattices, and even to realize 1D, 2D and 3D arrays of magneto-optical traps, and so on.

  4. Development and characterization of a TES optical imaging array for astrophysics applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burney, J. E-mail: burney@stanford.edu; Bay, T.J.; Brink, P.L.; Cabrera, B.; Castle, J.P.; Romani, R.W.; Tomada, A.; Nam, S.W.; Miller, A.J.; Martinis, J.; Wang, E.; Kenny, T.; Young, B.A

    2004-03-11

    Our research group has successfully developed photon detectors capable of both time-stamping and energy-resolving individual photons at very high rates in a wide band from the near-IR through optical and into the near-UV. We have fabricated 32-pixel arrays of these Transition-Edge Sensor (TES) devices and have mounted them in an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator equipped with windows for direct imaging. We have characterized single pixel behavior; we have also begun operating multiple pixels simultaneously, starting the scaling process towards use of the full array. We emphasize the development of a metalized mask for our array that blocks photons from hitting the inter-pixel areas and reflects them onto the TESs. We also present calibration data on detector resolution, electronics noise, and optical alignment.

  5. Flexible complementary metal oxide semiconductor microelectrode arrays with applications in single cell characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajouhi, H.; Jou, A. Y.; Jain, R.; Ziabari, A.; Shakouri, A.; Savran, C. A.; Mohammadi, S.

    2015-11-01

    A highly flexible microelectrode array with an embedded complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) instrumentation amplifier suitable for sensing surfaces of biological entities is developed. The array is based on ultrathin CMOS islands that are thermally isolated from each other and are interconnected by meandered nano-scale wires that can adapt to cellular surfaces with micro-scale curvatures. CMOS temperature sensors are placed in the islands and are optimally biased to have high temperature sensitivity. While no live cell thermometry is conducted, a measured temperature sensitivity of 0.15 °C in the temperature range of 35 to 40 °C is achieved by utilizing a low noise CMOS lock-in amplifier implemented in the same technology. The monolithic nature of CMOS sensors and amplifier circuits and their versatile flexible interconnecting wires overcome the sensitivity and yield limitations of microelectrode arrays fabricated in competing technologies.

  6. Clocked combustor can array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Won-Wook; McMahan, Kevin Weston; Srinivasan, Shiva Kumar

    2017-01-17

    The present application provides a clocked combustor can array for coherence reduction in a gas turbine engine. The clocked combustor can array may include a number of combustor cans positioned in a circumferential array. A first set of the combustor cans may have a first orientation and a second set of the combustor cans may have a second orientation.

  7. Clocked combustor can array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Won-Wook; McMahan, Kevin Weston; Srinivasan, Shiva Kumar

    2017-01-17

    The present application provides a clocked combustor can array for coherence reduction in a gas turbine engine. The clocked combustor can array may include a number of combustor cans positioned in a circumferential array. A first set of the combustor cans may have a first orientation and a second set of the combustor cans may have a second orientation.

  8. Matching of array CGH and gene expression microarray features for the purpose of integrative genomic analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Wieringen Wessel N

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An increasing number of genomic studies interrogating more than one molecular level is published. Bioinformatics follows biological practice, and recent years have seen a surge in methodology for the integrative analysis of genomic data. Often such analyses require knowledge of which elements of one platform link to those of another. Although important, many integrative analyses do not or insufficiently detail the matching of the platforms. Results We describe, illustrate and discuss six matching procedures. They are implemented in the R-package sigaR (available from Bioconductor. The principles underlying the presented matching procedures are generic, and can be combined to form new matching approaches or be applied to the matching of other platforms. Illustration of the matching procedures on a variety of data sets reveals how the procedures differ in the use of the available data, and may even lead to different results for individual genes. Conclusions Matching of data from multiple genomics platforms is an important preprocessing step for many integrative bioinformatic analysis, for which we present six generic procedures, both old and new. They have been implemented in the R-package sigaR, available from Bioconductor.

  9. Comparison of simulated and experimental 3D laser images using a GmAPD array: application to long range detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyac, Antoine; Riviere, Nicolas; Hespel, Laurent; Briottet, Xavier

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we show the feasibility and the benefit to use a Geiger-mode Avalanche Photo-Diode (GmAPD) array for long range detection, up to several kilometers. A simulation of a Geiger detection sensor is described, which is a part of our end-to-end laser simulator, to generate simulated 3D laser images from synthetic scenes. Resulting 3D point clouds have been compared to experimental acquisitions, performed with our GmAPD 3D camera on similar scenarios. An operational case of long range detection is presented: a copper cable outstretched above the ground, 1 kilometer away the experimental system and with a horizontal line-of-sight (LOS). The detection of such a small object from long distance observation strongly suggests that GmAPD focal plane arrays could be easily used for real-time 3D mapping or surveillance applications from airborne platforms, with good spatial and temporal resolutions.

  10. Fabrication, Modification, and Emerging Applications of TiO2 Nanotube Arrays by Electrochemical Synthesis: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Ying Huang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Titania nanotube arrays (TNAs as a hot nanomaterial have a unique highly ordered array structure and good mechanical and chemical stability, as well as excellent anticorrosion, biocompatible, and photocatalytic performance. It has been fabricated by a facile electrochemical anodization in electrolytes containing small amounts of fluoric ions. In combination with our research work, we review the recent progress of the new research achievements of TNAs on the preparation processes, forming mechanism, and modification. In addition, we will review the potential and significant applications in the photocatalytic degradation of pollutants, solar cells, water splitting, and other aspects. Finally, the existing problems and further prospects of this renascent and rapidly developing field are also briefly addressed and discussed.

  11. Liquid sodium testing of in-house phased array EMAT transducer for L-wave applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Bourdais, F.; Le Polles, T. [Non Destructive Testing Department at the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette CEDEX, (France); Baque, F. [Department of Sodium Technology at the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Cadarache, 13108 St Paul lez Durance CEDEX, (France)

    2015-07-01

    This paper describes the development of an in-house phased array EMAT transducer for longitudinal wave inspection in liquid sodium. The work presented herein is part of an undergoing project aimed at improving in-service inspection techniques for the ASTRID reactor project. The design process of the phased array EMAT probe is briefly explained and followed by a review of experimental test results. We first present test results obtained in the laboratory while the last part of the paper describes the liquid sodium testing and the produced ultrasound images. (authors)

  12. Frequency-domain imaging algorithm for ultrasonic testing by application of matrix phased arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolmatov Dmitry

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Constantly increasing demand for high-performance materials and systems in aerospace industry requires advanced methods of nondestructive testing. One of the most promising methods is ultrasonic imaging by using matrix phased arrays. This technique allows to create three-dimensional ultrasonic imaging with high lateral resolution. Further progress in matrix phased array ultrasonic testing is determined by the development of fast imaging algorithms. In this article imaging algorithm based on frequency domain calculations is proposed. This approach is computationally efficient in comparison with time domain algorithms. Performance of the proposed algorithm was tested via computer simulations for planar specimen with flat bottom holes.

  13. Digitalization decoupling method and its application to the phased array in MRI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Xiaoyu; WANG Weidong; ZHANG Bida; LEI Ming; BAO Shanglian

    2003-01-01

    A general network decoupling method for phased array radio frequency coil used in magnetic resonance imaging is developed. A more flexible digital approach further simplifies the method, which has an even higher signal-to-noise ratio. The performance of the digitalized decoupling method was confirmed by the calculated result by using a high frequency structure simulation software with the method of finite element for a tree-port phased array RF coil. The consistence was well established between the theoretical and simulated results.

  14. Formation of organic crystalline nanopillar arrays and their application to organic photovoltaic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirade, Masaya; Nakanotani, Hajime; Yahiro, Masayuki; Adachi, Chihaya

    2011-01-01

    To enhance the performance of organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells, preparation of organic nanometer-sized pillar arrays is fascinating because a significantly large area of a donor/acceptor heterointerface having continuous conduction path to both anode and cathode electrodes can be realized. In this study, we grew cupper phthalocyanine (CuPc) crystalline nanopillar arrays by conventional thermal gradient sublimation technique using a few-nanometer-sized trigger seeds composed of a CuPc and 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic-dianhydride (PTCDA) stacked layer. We optimized the pillar density by tuning crystal growth condition in order to apply it to OPV cells.

  15. Application of bistable optical logic gate arrays to all-optical digital parallel processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, A. C.

    1986-05-01

    Arrays of bistable optical gates can form the basis of an all-optical digital parallel processor. Two classes of signal input geometry exist - on- and off-axis - and lead to distinctly different device characteristics. The optical implementation of multisignal fan-in to an array of intrinsically bistable optical gates using the more efficient off-axis option is discussed together with the construction of programmable read/write memories from optically bistable devices. Finally the design of a demonstration all-optical parallel processor incorporating these concepts is presented.

  16. Eight-wavelength distributed-Bragg-reflector (DBR) laser array transmitter for WDM applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallahi, Mahmoud; McGreer, K. A.; Delage, Andre; Neophytou, A.; Templeton, Ian M.; Champion, Garth; Chatenoud, F.; Barber, Richard A.; Wang, Weijian; He, Jian Jun; Koteles, Emil S.

    1995-03-01

    We report on the design, growth, fabrication and characterization of monolithic wavelength division multiplexed (WDM) laser array transmitter and receiver chips produced by the Canadian Solid State Optoelectronics Consortium. The transmitter chip includes multiple, discrete wavelength, distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) laser diodes monolithically integrated with waveguide combiners fabricated using an InGaAs/GaAs heterostructure. The corresponding wavelength demultiplexer unit is based on a Rowland circle grating spectrometer monolithically integrated with a metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) detector array fabricated on an InGaAs/AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructure. The epitaxial layer wafers for both transmitter and receiver modules were grown in single molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) runs.

  17. Preparation and application of N-doped carbon nanotube arrays on graphene fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mochen; Zhang, Xiaohong; Jiang, Haibin; Wang, Xiang; Ru, Yue; Qiao, Jinliang

    2017-09-01

    A new kind of carbon hybrid material with a unique structure and outstanding mechanical and functional properties is reported in this article. Nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays with inside located Ni particles are in situ grown on the surface of phenolic carbon modified graphene fibers during their conversion from graphene oxide fibers. The carbon hybrid fibers exhibit not only high tensile strength and elongation at the break, but also excellent flexibility since the CNT arrays cover all the surface of the highly strong graphene fiber. This well-constructed carbon material would be suitable for catalysts, polymer composites, hydrogen storage, oxygen reduction reaction etc.

  18. Array microscopy technology and its application to digital detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Brian P.

    Tuberculosis causes more deaths worldwide than any other curable infectious disease. This is the case despite tuberculosis appearing to be on the verge of eradication midway through the last century. Efforts at reversing the spread of tuberculosis have intensified since the early 1990s. Since then, microscopy has been the primary frontline diagnostic. In this dissertation, advances in clinical microscopy towards array microscopy for digital detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis are presented. Digital array microscopy separates the tasks of microscope operation and pathogen detection and will reduce the specialization needed in order to operate the microscope. Distributing the work and reducing specialization will allow this technology to be deployed at the point of care, taking the front-line diagnostic for tuberculosis from the microscopy center to the community health center. By improving access to microscopy centers, hundreds of thousands of lives can be saved. For this dissertation, a lens was designed that can be manufactured as 4x6 array of microscopes. This lens design is diffraction limited, having less than 0.071 waves of aberration (root mean square) over the entire field of view. A total area imaged onto a full-frame digital image sensor is expected to be 3.94 mm2, which according to tuberculosis microscopy guidelines is more than sufficient for a sensitive diagnosis. The design is tolerant to single point diamond turning manufacturing errors, as found by tolerance analysis and by fabricating a prototype. Diamond micro-milling, a fabrication technique for lens array molds, was applied to plastic plano-concave and plano-convex lens arrays, and found to produce high quality optical surfaces. The micro-milling technique did not prove robust enough to produce bi-convex and meniscus lens arrays in a variety of lens shapes, however, and it required lengthy fabrication times. In order to rapidly prototype new lenses, a new diamond machining technique was

  19. The database of chromosome imbalance regions and genes resided in lung cancer from Asian and Caucasian identified by array-comparative genomic hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lo Fang-Yi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer-related genes show racial differences. Therefore, identification and characterization of DNA copy number alteration regions in different racial groups helps to dissect the mechanism of tumorigenesis. Methods Array-comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH was analyzed for DNA copy number profile in 40 Asian and 20 Caucasian lung cancer patients. Three methods including MetaCore analysis for disease and pathway correlations, concordance analysis between array-CGH database and the expression array database, and literature search for copy number variation genes were performed to select novel lung cancer candidate genes. Four candidate oncogenes were validated for DNA copy number and mRNA and protein expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR, chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH, reverse transcriptase-qPCR (RT-qPCR, and immunohistochemistry (IHC in more patients. Results We identified 20 chromosomal imbalance regions harboring 459 genes for Caucasian and 17 regions containing 476 genes for Asian lung cancer patients. Seven common chromosomal imbalance regions harboring 117 genes, included gain on 3p13-14, 6p22.1, 9q21.13, 13q14.1, and 17p13.3; and loss on 3p22.2-22.3 and 13q13.3 were found both in Asian and Caucasian patients. Gene validation for four genes including ARHGAP19 (10q24.1 functioning in Rho activity control, FRAT2 (10q24.1 involved in Wnt signaling, PAFAH1B1 (17p13.3 functioning in motility control, and ZNF322A (6p22.1 involved in MAPK signaling was performed using qPCR and RT-qPCR. Mean gene dosage and mRNA expression level of the four candidate genes in tumor tissues were significantly higher than the corresponding normal tissues (PP=0.06. In addition, CISH analysis of patients indicated that copy number amplification indeed occurred for ARHGAP19 and ZNF322A genes in lung cancer patients. IHC analysis of paraffin blocks from Asian Caucasian patients demonstrated that the frequency of

  20. High-throughput analysis of ammonia oxidiser community composition via a novel, amoA-based functional gene array.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy C J Abell

    Full Text Available Advances in microbial ecology research are more often than not limited by the capabilities of available methodologies. Aerobic autotrophic nitrification is one of the most important and well studied microbiological processes in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. We have developed and validated a microbial diagnostic microarray based on the ammonia-monooxygenase subunit A (amoA gene, enabling the in-depth analysis of the community structure of bacterial and archaeal ammonia oxidisers. The amoA microarray has been successfully applied to analyse nitrifier diversity in marine, estuarine, soil and wastewater treatment plant environments. The microarray has moderate costs for labour and consumables and enables the analysis of hundreds of environmental DNA or RNA samples per week per person. The array has been thoroughly validated with a range of individual and complex targets (amoA clones and environmental samples, respectively, combined with parallel analysis using traditional sequencing methods. The moderate cost and high throughput of the microarray makes it possible to adequately address broader questions of the ecology of microbial ammonia oxidation requiring high sample numbers and high resolution of the community composition.

  1. A transparency model and its applications for simulation of reflector arrays and sound transmission (A)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus Lynge; Rindel, Jens Holger

    2006-01-01

    The paper describes a new method for simulating the frequency-dependent reflection and transmission of reflector arrays, and the frequency-dependent airborne sound insulation between rooms by means of a room acoustic computer model. The method makes use of a transparency method in the ray...

  2. A Center-The Continuous Transverse (CTS) Array: Basic Theory, Experiment, and Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-02-01

    couplers are described. Performance, producibility, and packaging advantages relative to competing technologies are enumerated. Prototype antenna array...procedures and processes. Units can be thermoformed /extruded/injected in a single mioding process, and no additional joining or assentbly is required. Reduced

  3. Broadband High Efficiency Fractal-Like and Diverse Geometry Silicon Nanowire Arrays for Photovoltaic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    AL-Zoubi, Omar H.

    Solar energy has many advantages over conventional sources of energy. It is abundant, clean and sustainable. One way to convert solar energy directly into electrical energy is by using the photovoltaic solar cells (PVSC). Despite PVSC are becoming economically competitive, they still have high cost and low light to electricity conversion efficiency. Therefore, increasing the efficiency and reducing the cost are key elements for producing economically more competitive PVSC that would have significant impact on energy market and saving environment. A significant percentage of the PVSC cost is due to the materials cost. For that, thin films PVSC have been proposed which offer the benefits of the low amount of material and fabrication costs. Regrettably, thin film PVSC show poor light to electricity conversion efficiency because of many factors especially the high optical losses. To enhance conversion efficiency, numerous techniques have been proposed to reduce the optical losses and to enhance the absorption of light in thin film PVSC. One promising technique is the nanowire (NW) arrays in general and the silicon nanowire (SiNW) arrays in particular. The purpose of this research is to introduce vertically aligned SiNW arrays with enhanced and broadband absorption covering the entire solar spectrum while simultaneously reducing the amount of material used. To this end, we apply new concept for designing SiNW arrays based on employing diversity of physical dimensions, especially radial diversity within certain lattice configurations. In order to study the interaction of light with SiNW arrays and compute their optical properties, electromagnetic numerical modeling is used. A commercial numerical electromagnetic solver software package, high frequency structure simulation (HFSS), is utilized to model the SiNW arrays and to study their optical properties. We studied different geometries factors that affect the optical properties of SiNW arrays. Based on this study, we

  4. Optimal design of low-density SNP arrays for genomic prediction: algorithm and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low-density (LD) single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays provide a cost-effective solution for genomic prediction and selection, but algorithms and computational tools are needed for their optimal design. A multiple-objective, local optimization (MOLO) algorithm was developed for design of optim...

  5. Single-layer graphene-TiO{sub 2} nanotubes array heterojunction for ultraviolet photodetector application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Deng-Yue [School of Material Sciences and Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei, Anhui 230009 (China); Ge, Cai-Wang [School of Electronic Science and Applied Physics, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei, Anhui 230009 (China); Wang, Jiu-Zhen [School of Material Sciences and Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei, Anhui 230009 (China); Zhang, Teng-Fei [School of Electronic Science and Applied Physics, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei, Anhui 230009 (China); Wu, Yu-Cheng, E-mail: ycwu@hfut.edu.cn [School of Material Sciences and Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei, Anhui 230009 (China); Liang, Feng-Xia, E-mail: fxliang@hfut.edu.cn [School of Material Sciences and Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei, Anhui 230009 (China)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Heterostructures comprised of a single-layer graphene and TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays were constructed for ultraviolet detection. • The electrical properties of the fabricated heterostructures were dependent on the annealing atmospheres. • The effect of anodic TiO{sub 2} nanotube length on the performance of the photodetector were investigated. - Abstract: In this work, we reported on the fabrication of a single-layer graphene (SLG)-TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays (NTs) heterostructures ultraviolet photodetector (UVPD) by transferring chemical vapor deposition derived MLG on the surface of anodic TiO{sub 2}NTs array. Through varying the annealing atmosphere and anodization time in the TiO{sub 2} synthesis procedure, the electronic and optoelectronic properties of the as-fabricated Schottky junction UVPD were studied. It was revealed that the anodic TiO{sub 2}NTs annealed in air showed a better rectifying behavior and was highly sensitive to UV light irradiation. Further investigation found that the device performance of the UVPD can be readily modulated by the anodization time, and the anodic TiO{sub 2}NTs with a medium tube length of 9.6 μm exhibits the highest device performance. These results demonstrated that the present SLG-TiO{sub 2}NTs array hetero-junction UVPD will be highly promising for fabricating high-performance optoelectronic device and system in the future.

  6. Absorption and transmission of light in III-V nanowire arrays for tandem solar cell applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anttu, Nicklas; Dagytė, Vilgailė; Zeng, Xulu; Otnes, Gaute; Borgström, Magnus

    2017-05-01

    III-V semiconductor nanowires are a platform for next-generation photovoltaics. An interesting research direction is to embed a nanowire array in a transparent polymer, either to act as a stand-alone flexible solar cell, or to be stacked on top of a conventional Si bottom cell to create a tandem structure. To optimize the tandem cell performance, high energy photons should be absorbed in the nanowires whereas low energy photons should be transmitted to and absorbed in the Si cell. Here, through optical measurements on 1.95 eV bandgap GaInP nanowire arrays embedded in a polymer membrane, we identify two mechanisms that could be detrimental for the performance of the tandem cell. First, the Au particles used in the nanowire synthesis can absorb >50% of the low-energy photons, leading to a 80%. Second, after the removal of the Au particles, a 40% reflectance peak shows up due to resonant back-scattering of light from in-plane waveguide modes. To avoid the excitation of these optical modes in the nanowire array, we propose to limit the pitch of the nanowire array.

  7. Study of the characteristics of a scintillation array and single pixels for nuclear medicine imaging applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Jie; MA Hong-Guang; MA Wen-Yan; ZENG Hui; WANG Zhao-Min; XU Zi-Zong

    2009-01-01

    By using a pixelized Nal(T1) crystal array coupled to a R2486 PSPMT, the characteristics of the array and of a single pixel, such as the light output, energy resolution, peak-to-valley ratio (P/V) and imaging performance of the detector were studied. The pixel size of the NaI(TI) scintillation pixel array is 2 min×2 mm×5 mm. There are in total 484 pixels in a 22~22 matrix. In the pixel spectrum an average peak-to-valley ratio (P/V) of 16 was obtained. In the image of all the pixels, good values for the Peak-to-Valley ratios could be achieved, namely a mean of 17, a maximum of 45 and the average peak FWHM (the average value of intrinsic spatial resolution) of 2.3 mm. However, the PSPMT non-uniform response and the scintillation pixels array inhomogeneities degrade the imaging performance of the detector.

  8. Array Signal Processing Under Model Errors With Application to Speech Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-10-31

    Acoust. Speech Sig. Proc., pp. 1149-1152, Alburqueque NM, 1990. [37] E. A. Patrick , Fundamentals of Pattern Recognition, Englewood Cliffs, NJ, 1972...Proc., Toronto, pp. 1365-1368, 1991. [411 S. U. Pillai , Array Signal Processing, Springer Verlag, NY, 1989. [42] B. Porat and B. Friedlander

  9. Optimization of Positioning of Interferometric Array Antennas Using Division Algorithm for Radio Astronomy Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiehbadroudinezhad, Shahideh; Valente, Daniela; Cada, Michael; Kamariah Noordin, Nor; Shahabi, Adib

    2017-10-01

    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) ushers in the new generation of large radio telescopes that will work at wavelengths between meters and centimeters. In order to competitively design interferometric antenna arrays such as SKA, it is crucial to focus on the optimization of system performance. In this paper, we contribute to the solution by introducing a new optimization algorithm called Division Algorithm (DA). This algorithm finds the optimal positions of antennas to simultaneously maximize u–v coverage and decrease sidelobe level (SLL). The DA is able to optimize the configuration of the interferometric array in both snapshot and Earth rotation synthesis observations. To demonstrate its efficiency, the DA is applied to configure an optimum 30-element array for the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope. The proposed algorithm is able to improve the overlapped samples parameter by about 4% and the unsampled cells parameter by about 12%, at snapshot observation, compared to the Genetic Algorithm (GA). DA is able to improve these two parameters for a 6-hr tracking observation as well. Finally, the proposed algorithm is compared with the GA for different source declination. Results show that the DA is able to decrease the SLL better than the GA.

  10. Application of HEMT for multiplexing large arrays of high impedance LTDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benoit, A.; Camus, Ph. E-mail: camus@grenoble.cnrs.fr; Cavanna, A.; Elhdiy, A.; Jin, Y.; Leclercq, S

    2004-03-11

    The development of large arrays of detectors requires using a proximate electronics at low temperatures for signal multiplexing and amplification. We report the use of commercial High Electronic Mobility Transistors (HEMT) for multiplexing signals from high impedance LTD arrays (typ. 10-100 M{omega}). The electronic architecture is based on HEMTs cooled at 0.1 K for the multiplexer and a JFET amplifier cooled at 100 K with <1 nV/Hz{sup 1/2} noise figure. For this time-multiplexing scheme, a capacitor is used to integrate the signal between measurements. Two main solutions are compared for the detectors polarization: the first uses a classical resistive method; the second uses a common capacitor allowing to polarize the detectors individually. The multiplexing ratio is mainly limited by the amplifier noise to about 20 detectors per amplifier with a pixel sampling rate of about 60 Hz. A specific development of HEMT arrays with Quantum Point Contacts (QPC-HEMT) with very small grid-to-channel capacitor ({approx}1 fF) allows minimizing the transient effects and realizing a close integration with the LTD arrays.

  11. Applications of Generalized Cascade Scattering Matrix on the Microwave Circuits and Antenna Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun-Feng Cao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The ideal lossless symmetrical reciprocal network (ILSRN is constructed and introduced to resolve the complex interconnections of two arbitrary microwave networks. By inserting the ILSRNs, the complex interconnections can be converted into the standard one-by-one case without changing the characteristics of the previous microwave networks. Based on the algorithm of the generalized cascade scattering matrix, a useful derivation on the excitation coefficients of antenna arrays is firstly proposed with consideration of the coupling effects. And then, the proposed techniques are applied on the microwave circuits and antenna arrays. Firstly, an improved magic-T is optimized, fabricated, and measured. Compared with the existing results, the prototype has a wider bandwidth, lower insertion loss, better return loss, isolation, and imbalances. Secondly, two typical linear waveguide slotted arrays are designed. Both the radiation patterns and scattering parameters at the input ports agree well with the desired goals. Finally, the feeding network of a two-element microstrip antenna array is optimized to decrease the mismatch at the input port, and a good impedance matching is successfully achieved.

  12. A Time Modulated Printed Dipole Antenna Array for Beam Steering Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchi Gahley

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents time modulated beam steered antenna array without phase shifters. The beam steering is analyzed considering a two-element time modulated antenna array (TMAA of printed dipoles with microstrip via-hole balun. The proposed array resonates at the Industrial, Scientific, and Medical (ISM radio bands, 2.45 GHz and 5.8 GHz, and offers wide bandwidth inherited due to modified structure of ground plane. Array elements are excited by complex exponential excitation signal through broadband power divider and radio frequency (RF switches to achieve amplitude and phase variation without phase shifters. Differential Evolution algorithm is used to modify the time sequences of the RF switches connected to the antennas to generate radiation pattern with optimum dynamic efficiency by suppressing sideband radiations. Also switch-on time instant of RF switch connected to the subsequent element is modulated to steer the beam towards different directions. The proposed prototype is fabricated followed by parametric optimization. The fabrication results agree significantly well with simulated results.

  13. Application of a maximum likelihood type estimator to the towed array shape estimation problem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Been, R.

    1996-01-01

    At the TNO Physics and Electronics Laboratory (TNO-FEL), for a number of decades, the behaviour and performance of towed sonar systems has been studied extensively. Since the performance of towed sonars highly depends on the shape of the hydrophone array, the underwater acoustics group started perfo

  14. Microphone matching for hybrid-order directional arrays in hearing aid applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Daniel M.; Thompson, Steve C.

    2003-04-01

    The ability of a hearing aid user to distinguish a single speech source amidst general background noise (for example, dinner table or cocktail party conversation) may be improved by a directional array of microphones in the hearing instrument. The theoretical maximum directivity index (DI) of a first-order pairing of microphones is 6 dB, and a second-order array of three microphones is 9.5 dB, assuming all three microphones have identical frequency responses. The close spacing of microphone ports in a hearing aid body means that directivity degrades rapidly with differences in microphone sensitivities. A hybrid of first- and second-order arrays can mitigate this effect, although close microphone matching is still necessary for high directivity. This paper explores the effect of microphone mismatch on the directivity of such arrays, and describes practical criteria for selecting matched microphones out of production batches to maximize a speech intelligibility weighted directivity index. [Work supported by Knowles Electronics, LLC.

  15. Prussian Blue-coated interdigitated array electrodes for possible analytical application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartmann, M.; Grabner, E.W.; Bergveld, P.

    1991-01-01

    Thin films of iron(III) hexacyanoferrate(II) (Prussian Blue) were electrochemically deposited on interdigitated array (IDA) electrodes, yielding systems which can be considered as chemiresistors in sensing alkali metal ion concentrations in an adjacent electrolyte. This is due to the fact that the c

  16. Biological applications of an LCoS-BASED PROGRAMMABLE ARRAY MICROSCOPE (PAM)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagen, G.M.; Caarls, W.; Thomas, M.; Hill, A.; Lidke, K.A.; Rieger, B.; Fritsch, C.; Van Geest, B.; Jovin, T.M.; Arndt-Jovin, D.J.

    2007-01-01

    We report on a new generation, commercial prototype of a programmable array optical sectioning fluorescence microscope (PAM) for rapid, light efficient 3D imaging of living specimens. The stand-alone module, including light source(s) and detector(s), features an innovative optical design and a ferro

  17. A case for ZnO nanowire field emitter arrays in advanced x-ray source applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Vance S.; Bergkvist, Magnus; Chen, Daokun; Chen, Jun; Huang, Mengbing

    2016-09-01

    Reviewing current efforts in X-ray source miniaturization reveals a broad spectrum of applications: Portable and/or remote nondestructive evaluation, high throughput protein crystallography, invasive radiotherapy, monitoring fluid flow and particulate generation in situ, and portable radiography devices for battle-front or large scale disaster triage scenarios. For the most part, all of these applications are being addressed with a top-down approach aimed at improving portability, weight and size. That is, the existing system or a critical sub-component is shrunk in some manner in order to miniaturize the overall package. In parallel to top-down x-ray source miniaturization, more recent efforts leverage field emission and semiconductor device fabrication techniques to achieve small scale x-ray sources via a bottom-up approach where phenomena effective at a micro/nanoscale are coordinated for macro-scale effect. The bottom-up approach holds potential to address all the applications previously mentioned but its entitlement extends into new applications with much more ground-breaking potential. One such bottom-up application is the distributed x-ray source platform. In the medical space, using an array of microscale x-ray sources instead of a single source promises significant reductions in patient dose as well as smaller feature detectability and fewer image artifacts. Cold cathode field emitters are ideal for this application because they can be gated electrostatically or via photonic excitation, they do not generate excessive heat like other common electron emitters, they have higher brightness and they are relatively compact. This document describes how ZnO nanowire field emitter arrays are well suited for distributed x-ray source applications because they hold promise in each of the following critical areas: emission stability, simple scalable fabrication, performance, radiation resistance and photonic coupling.

  18. Development and application of the lux gene for environmental bioremediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burlage, R.S.; Yang, Z. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Palmer, R.J. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Center for Environmental Biotechnology; Khang, Y. [Yeungnam Univ., Kyongsan (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-09-01

    Bioremediation is the use of living systems, usually microorganisms, to treat a quantity of soil or water for the presence of hazardous wastes. Bioremediation has many advantages over other remediation approaches, including cost savings, versatility, and the ability to treat the wastes in situ. In order to study the processes of microbial bioremediation, the authors have constructed bacterial strains that incorporate genetically engineered bioreporter genes. These bioreporter genes allow the bacteria to be detected during in situ processes, as manifested by their ability to bioluminescence or to fluoresce. This bioreporter microorganisms are described, along with the technology for detecting them and the projects which are benefiting from their application.

  19. Development and application of the lux gene for environmental bioremediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlage, Robert S.; Yang, Zamin; Palmer, Robert J., Jr.; Sayler, Gary S.; Khang, Yongho

    1996-11-01

    Bioremediation is the use of living systems, usually microorganisms, to treat a quantity of soil or water for the presence of hazardous wastes. Bioremediation has many advantages over other remediation approaches, including cost savings, versatility, and the ability to treat the wastes in situ. In order to study the processes of microbial bioremediation, we have constructed bacterial strains that incorporate genetically engineered bioreporter genes. These bioreporter genes allow the bacteria to be detected during in situ processes, as manifested by their ability to bioluminesce or to fluoresce. This bioreporter microorganisms are described, along with the technology for detecting them and the projects which are benefiting from their application.

  20. A new method of preparing fiber-optic DNA biosensor and its array for gene detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG; Guangfen; (

    2001-01-01

    , 1146(1): 136.[12] Howlett, N. G., Avery, S. V., Relationship between cadmium sensitivity and degree of plasma membrane fatty acid unsatu-ration in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Appl. Microbiol. Biotechnol., 1997, 48(4): 539.[13] Petriz, J., Oconnor, J. E., Carmona, M. et al., Is Rhodamine-123 an appropriate fluorescent probe to assess P-glycoprotein mediated multidrug resistance in vinblastine-resistant CHO cells? Analytical Cellular Pathology, 1997, 14(3): 129.[14] Leonce, S., Burbridge, M., Flow cytometry: a useful technique in the study of multidrug resistance, J. Bio. Cell, 1993, 78(1-2): 63.[15] Le Moyec, L., Tatoud, R., Degorges, A. et al., Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy reveals cellular lipids in-volved in resistance to Adriamycin and Taxol by the K562 Leukemia cell line, Cancer Res., 1996, 56: 3461.[16] Callaghan, R., Stafford, A., Epand, R. M., Increased accumulation of drugs in a multidrug resistant cell line by alteration of membrane biophysical properties, Biochim. Biophys. Acta, 1993, 1175(3): 277.[17] Sinicrope, F. A., Dudeia, P. K., Bissommette, B. M. et al., Modulation of P-glycoprotein-mediated drug transport by al-terations in lipid fluidity of rat liver canlicular membrane vesicles, J. Biol. Chem., 1992, 267(35): 24995.[18] Romsicki, Y., Sharom, F. J., The membrane lipid environment modulates drug interactions with the P-glycoprotein multi-drug transporter, Biochemistry, 1999, 38(21): 6887.[19] Garel, O., Lecureur, V., Guillouzo, A., The P-glycoprotein multidrug transporter, Gen. Pharmacol., 1996, 27(8): 1283.[20] Aran, J. M., Pastan, I., Gottesman, M. M., Therapeutic strategies involving the multidrug resistance phenotype: the MDR1 gene as target, chemoprotectant, and selectable marker in gene therapy, Adv. Pharmacol., 1999, 46: 1.[21] Zaman, G. J., Flens, M. J., Vanleusden, M. R. et al., The human multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) is a plasma membrane drug efflux pump, Proc. Natl. Acad

  1. Gene expression arrays as a tool to unravel mechanisms of normal tissue radiation injury and prediction of response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jacqueline JCM Kruse; Fiona A Stewart

    2007-01-01

    Over the past 5 years there has been a rapid increase in the use of microarray technology in the field of cancer research. The majority of studies use microarray analysis of tumor biopsies for profiling of molecular characteristics in an attempt to produce robust classifiers for prognosis. There are now several published gene sets that have been shown to predict for aggressive forms of breast cancer, where patients are most likely to benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy and tumors most likely to develop distant metastases, or be resistant to treatment. The number of publications relating to the use of microarrays for analysis of normal tissue damage, after cancer treatment or genotoxic exposure, is much more limited. A PubMed literature search was conducted using the following keywords and combination of terms: radiation, normal tissue, microarray, gene expression profiling, prediction. With respect to normal tissue radiation injury, microarrays have been used in three ways: (1) to generate gene signatures to identify sensitive and resistant populations (prognosis); (2) to identify sets of biomarker genes for estimating radiation exposure, either accidental or as a result of terrorist attack (diagnosis); (3) to identify genes and pathways involved in tissue response to injury (mechanistic). In this article we will review all (relevant) papers that covered our literature search criteria on microarray technology as it has been applied to normal tissue radiation biology and discuss how successful this has been in defining predisposition markers for radiation sensitivity or how it has helped us to unravel molecular mechanisms leading to acute and late tissue toxicity. We also discuss some of the problems and limitations in application and interpretation of such data.

  2. Field application of phased array ultrasonic testing for structural weld overlay on dissimilar welds of pressurizer nozzles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Hoi; Kim, Yong Sik [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Company Ltd., Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    Weld overlay was first used in power plants in the US in the early 1980s as an interim method of repairing the welds of flawed piping joints. Weld overlaid piping joints in nuclear power plants must be examined periodically using ultrasonic examination technology. Portable phased array ultrasonic technology has recently become available. Currently, the application of preemptive weld overlays as a mitigation technique and/as a method to improve the examination surface condition for more complex configurations is becoming more common. These complex geometries may require several focused conventional transducers for adequate inspection of the overlay, the original weld, and the base material. Alternatively, Phased array ultrasonic probes can be used to generate several inspection angles simultaneously at various focal depths to provide better and faster coverage than that possible by conventional methods. Thus, this technology can increase the speed of examinations, save costs, and reduce radiation exposure. In this paper, we explain the general sequence of the inspection of weld overlay and the results of signal analysis for some PAUT (phased array ultrasonic testing) signals detected in on-site inspections.

  3. Non-invasive method for selection of electrodes and stimulus parameters for FES applications with intrafascicular arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowden, B. R.; Frankel, M. A.; Normann, R. A.; Clark, G. A.

    2012-02-01

    High-channel-count intrafascicular electrode arrays provide comprehensive and selective access to the peripheral nervous system. One practical difficulty in using several electrode arrays to evoke coordinated movements in paralyzed limbs is the identification of the appropriate stimulation channels and stimulus parameters to evoke desired movements. Here we present the use of a six degree-of-freedom load cell placed under the foot of a feline to characterize the muscle activation produced by three 100-electrode Utah Slanted Electrode Arrays (USEAs) implanted into the femoral nerves, sciatic nerves, and muscular branches of the sciatic nerves of three cats. Intramuscular stimulation was used to identify the endpoint force directions produced by 15 muscles of the hind limb, and these directions were used to classify the forces produced by each intrafascicular USEA electrode as flexion or extension. For 451 USEA electrodes, stimulus intensities for threshold and saturation muscle forces were identified, and the 3D direction and linearity of the force recruitment curves were determined. Further, motor unit excitation independence for 198 electrode pairs was measured using the refractory technique. This study demonstrates the utility of 3D endpoint force monitoring as a simple and non-invasive metric for characterizing the muscle-activation properties of hundreds of implanted peripheral nerve electrodes, allowing for electrode and parameter selection for neuroprosthetic applications.

  4. Design of crossing metallic metasurface arrays based on high sensitivity of gap enhancement and transmittance shift for plasmonic sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou Chau, Yuan-Fong; Syu, Jhih-Yu; Chou Chao, Chung-Ting; Chiang, Hai-Pang; Lim, Chee Ming

    2017-02-01

    We have systematically investigated a general approach to optimize the optical performances of a 2D array of crossing metal nanoparticle (MNP) thin film. These functionalized metasurface MNPs are designed for use as wavelength-selection filters in high-sensitivity infrared spectroscopic plasmonic sensors. The effects of different structural parameters corresponding to the gap-enhancement and bonded transmittance modes on MNP arrays are studied. Two types of sensor configurations based on gold MNP arrays are thoroughly investigated by using the finite element method. The calculated transmittance spectra of the proposed metasurfaces demonstrate near-infrared transmittance dips with a sensitivity range of 120-700 nm RIU-1 in a dielectric constant (ɛ) ranging from 1.0-3.0. We illustrate that it is possible to increase their sensitivity in the detection of chemical and biological substances. The proposed metasurfaces supporting both core-medium sensitivity and bonded-mode resonances are desirable for label-free sensing applications.

  5. Application of Pfortran and Co-Array Fortran in the Parallelization of the GROMOS96 Molecular Dynamics Module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Bała

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available After at least a decade of parallel tool development, parallelization of scientific applications remains a significant undertaking. Typically parallelization is a specialized activity supported only partially by the programming tool set, with the programmer involved with parallel issues in addition to sequential ones. The details of concern range from algorithm design down to low-level data movement details. The aim of parallel programming tools is to automate the latter without sacrificing performance and portability, allowing the programmer to focus on algorithm specification and development. We present our use of two similar parallelization tools, Pfortran and Cray's Co-Array Fortran, in the parallelization of the GROMOS96 molecular dynamics module. Our parallelization started from the GROMOS96 distribution's shared-memory implementation of the replicated algorithm, but used little of that existing parallel structure. Consequently, our parallelization was close to starting with the sequential version. We found the intuitive extensions to Pfortran and Co-Array Fortran helpful in the rapid parallelization of the project. We present performance figures for both the Pfortran and Co-Array Fortran parallelizations showing linear speedup within the range expected by these parallelization methods.

  6. Global Identification of Significantly Expressed Genes in Developing Endosperm of Rice by Expression Sequence Tags and cDNA Array Approaches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qichao Tu; Haitao Dong; Haigen Yao; Yongqi Fang; Cheng'en Dai; Hongmei Luo; Jian Yao; Dong Zhao; Debao Li

    2008-01-01

    Rice endosperm plays a very important role in seedling germination and determines the qualities of fice grain.Although studies on specific gene categories in endosperm have been carried out,global view of gene expression at a transcription level in rice endosperm is still limited.To gain a better understanding of the global and tissue-specific gene expression profiles in rice endosperm,a cDNA library from rice endosperm of immature seeds was sequenced.A cDNA array was constructed based on the tentative unique transcripts derived from expression sequence tag (EST) assembling results and then hybridized with cONAs from five different tissues or organs including endosperm,embryo,leaf,stem and root of rice.Significant redundancy was found for genes encoding prolamin,glutelin,allergen,and starch synthesis proteins,accounting for~34% of the total ESTs obtained.The cDNA array revealed 87 significantly expressed genes in endosperm compared with the other four organs or tissues.These genes included 13 prolamin family proteins,17 glutelin family proteins,12 binding proteins,nine catalytic proteins and four ribosomal proteins,indicating a complicated biological processing in rice endosperm.In addition,Northern verification of 1,4-alpha-glucan branching enzyme detected two isoforms in rice endosperm,the larger one of which only existed in endosperm.

  7. Silicon Detector Arrays with Absolute Quantum Efficiency over 50% in the Far Ultraviolet for Single Photon Counting Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Nikzad, Shouleh; Greer, Frank; Jones, Todd; Jacquot, Blake; Monacos, Steve; Blacksberg, J; Hamden, Erika; Schiminovich, David; Martin, Chris; Morrissey, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    We have used Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE)-based delta doping technology to demonstrate near 100% internal quantum efficiency (QE) on silicon electron-multiplied Charge Coupled Devices (EMCCDs) for single photon counting detection applications. Furthermore, we have used precision techniques for depositing antireflection (AR) coatings by employing Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) and demonstrated over 50% external QE in the far and near-ultraviolet in megapixel arrays. We have demonstrated that other device parameters such as dark current are unchanged after these processes. In this paper, we report on these results and briefly discuss the techniques and processes employed.

  8. Antennas for Terahertz Applications: Focal Plane Arrays and On-chip Non-contact Measurement Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trichopoulos, Georgios C.

    The terahertz (THz) band provides unique sensing opportunities that enable several important applications such as biomedical imaging, remote non-destructive inspection of packaged goods, and security screening. THz waves can penetrate most materials and can provide unique spectral information in the 0.1--10 THz band with high resolution. In contrast, other imaging modalities, like infrared (IR), suffer from low penetration depths and are thus not attractive for non-destructive evaluation. However, state-of-the-art THz imaging systems typically employ mechanical raster scans using a single detector to acquire two-dimensional images. Such devices tend to be bulky and complicated due to the mechanical parts, and are thus rather expensive to develop and operate. Thus, large-format (e.g. 100x100 pixels) and all-electronics based THz imaging systems are badly needed to alleviate the space, weight and power (SWAP) factors and enable cost effective utilization of THz waves for sensing and high-data-rate communications. In contrast, photonic sensors are very compact because light can couple directly to the photodiode without residing to radiation coupling topologies. However, in the THz band, due to the longer wavelengths and much lower photon energies, highly efficient antennas with optimized input impedance have to be integrated with THz sensors. Here, we implement novel antenna engineering techniques that are optimized to take advantage of recent technological advances in solid-state THz sensing devices. For example, large-format focal plane arrays (FPAs) have been the Achilles' heel of THz imaging systems. Typically, optical components (lenses, mirrors) are employed in order to improve the optical performance of FPAs, however, antenna sensors suffer from degraded performance when they are far from the optical axis, thus minimizing the number of useful FPA elements. By modifying the radiation pattern of FPA antennas we manage to alleviate the off-axis aberration

  9. Application of Ultrasonic Phased Array Technology to the Detection of Defect in Composite Stiffened-structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuan-Qi; Zhan, Li-Hua

    2016-05-01

    Composite stiffened-structure consists of the skin and stringer has been widely used in aircraft fuselage and wings. The main purpose of the article is to detect the composite material reinforced structure accurately and explore the relationship between defect formation and structural elements or curing process. Based on ultrasonic phased array inspection technology, the regularity of defects in the manufacture of composite materials are obtained, the correlation model between actual defects and nondestructive testing are established. The article find that the forming quality of deltoid area in T-stiffened structure is obviously improved by pre-curing, the defects of hat-stiffened structure are affected by the mandrel. The results show that the ultrasonic phased array inspection technology can be an effectively way for the detection of composite stiffened-structures, which become an important means to control the defects of composite and improve the quality of the product.

  10. Approach to fabricating Co nanowire arrays with perpendicular anisotropy: Application of a magnetic field during deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge, Shihui; Li, Chao; Ma, Xiao; Li, Wei; Xi, Li; Li, C. X.

    2001-07-01

    Cobalt (Co) nanowire arrays were electrodeposited into the pores of polycarbonate membranes. A magnetic field parallel or perpendicular to the membrane plane was applied during deposition to control the wire growth. X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometer were employed to investigate the structure as well as the magnetic properties of the nanowire arrays. The results show that the magnetic field applied during deposition strongly influences the growth of Co nanowires, inducing variations in their crystalline structure and magnetic properties. The sample deposited with the field perpendicular to the membrane plane exhibits a perpendicular magnetic anisotropy with greatly enhanced coercivity and squareness as a result of the preferred growth of Co grains with the c axis perpendicular to the film plane. In contrast, the deposition in a parallel magnetic field forces Co grains to grow with the c axis parallel to the film plane, resulting in in-plane anisotropy. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  11. Application of neural networks to digital pulse shape analysis for an array of silicon strip detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores, J.L. [Dpto de Ingeniería Eléctrica y Térmica, Universidad de Huelva (Spain); Martel, I. [Dpto de Física Aplicada, Universidad de Huelva (Spain); CERN, ISOLDE, CH 1211 Geneva, 23 (Switzerland); Jiménez, R. [Dpto de Ingeniería Electrónica, Sist. Informáticos y Automática, Universidad de Huelva (Spain); Galán, J., E-mail: jgalan@diesia.uhu.es [Dpto de Ingeniería Electrónica, Sist. Informáticos y Automática, Universidad de Huelva (Spain); Salmerón, P. [Dpto de Ingeniería Eléctrica y Térmica, Universidad de Huelva (Spain)

    2016-09-11

    The new generation of nuclear physics detectors that used to study nuclear reactions is considering the use of digital pulse shape analysis techniques (DPSA) to obtain the (A,Z) values of the reaction products impinging in solid state detectors. This technique can be an important tool for selecting the relevant reaction channels at the HYDE (HYbrid DEtector ball array) silicon array foreseen for the Low Energy Branch of the FAIR facility (Darmstadt, Germany). In this work we study the feasibility of using artificial neural networks (ANNs) for particle identification with silicon detectors. Multilayer Perceptron networks were trained and tested with recent experimental data, showing excellent identification capabilities with signals of several isotopes ranging from {sup 12}C up to {sup 84}Kr, yielding higher discrimination rates than any other previously reported.

  12. Plasmon enhanced broadband optical absorption in ultrathin silicon nanobowl array for photoactive devices applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Rui-Nan; Peng, Kui-Qing; Hu, Bo; Hu, Ya; Zhang, Fu-Qiang; Lee, Shuit-Tong

    2015-07-01

    Both photonic and plasmonic nanostructures are key optical components of photoactive devices for light harvesting, enabling solar cells with significant thickness reduction, and light detectors capable of detecting photons with sub-band gap energies. In this work, we study the plasmon enhanced broadband light absorption and electrical properties of silicon nanobowl (SiNB) arrays. The SiNB-metal photonic-plasmonic nanostructure-based devices exhibited superior light-harvesting ability across a wide range of wavelengths up to the infrared regime well below the band edge of Si due to effective optical coupling between the SiNB array and incident sunlight, as well as electric field intensity enhancement around metal nanoparticles due to localized surface plasmon resonance. The photonic-plasmonic nanostructure is expected to result in infrared-light detectors and high-efficiency solar cells by extending light-harvesting to infrared frequencies.

  13. A CMB-based approach to mapping gravitational-wave backgrounds: application to pulsar timing arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Gair, Jonathan R; Taylor, Stephen; Mingarelli, Chiara M F

    2014-01-01

    We describe an alternative approach to the analysis of gravitational-wave backgrounds, based on the formalism used to characterise the polarisation of the cosmic microwave background. An arbitrary background can be decomposed into modes whose angular dependence on the sky is given by gradients and curls of spherical harmonics. We derive the pulsar timing overlap reduction function for individual modes, which are given by simple combinations of spherical harmonics evaluated at the pulsar locations. We show how these can be used to recover the components of an arbitrary background, giving explicit results for both isotropic and anisotropic uncorrelated backgrounds. We also find that the response of a pulsar timing array to curl modes is identically zero, so half of the gravitational-wave sky will never be observed using pulsar timing, no matter how many pulsars are included in the array. An isotropic uncorrelated background can be accurately represented using only three components, and so a search of this type ...

  14. Microfabrication technology for large LEKID arrays : from NIKA2 to future applications

    CERN Document Server

    Goupy, J; Benoit, A; Bourrion, O; Calvo, M; Catalano, A; Coiffard, G; Hoarau, C; Leclercq, S; Sueur, H Le; Macias-Perez, J; Monfardini, A; Peck, I; Schuster, K

    2016-01-01

    The Lumped Element Kinetic Inductance Detectors (LEKID)demonstrated full maturity in the NIKA (New IRAM KID Arrays)instrument. These results allow directly comparing LEKID performance with other competing technologies (TES, doped silicon) in the mm and sub-mm range. A continuing effort is ongoing to improve the microfabrication technologies and concepts in order to satisfy the requirements of new instruments. More precisely, future satellites dedicated to CMB (Cosmic Microwave Background) studies will require the same focal plane technology to cover, at least, the frequency range of 60 to 600 GHz. Aluminium LEKID developed for NIKA have so far demonstrated, under real telescope conditions, performance approaching photon-noise limitation in the band 120-300 GHz. By implementing superconducting bi-layers we recently demonstrated LEKID arrays working in the range 80-120 GHz and with sensitivities approaching the goals for CMB missions. NIKA itself (350 pixels) is followed by a more ambitious project requiring se...

  15. Electrochemical Characterisation and Application of Multi Microelectrode Array Devices to Biological Electrochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William S. McIntire

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available A new design for microelectrode array (MEA devices fabricated by semiconductor-processing techniques is presented. The microelectrode surfaces consist of gold and are surrounded by an insulating silicon nitride layer. Each chip of these so-called Multi MEAs contains regular arrays with circular-shaped electrodes of eight different sizes: 1, 3, 5, 10, 50, 100, 500 and 1000μm. The Multi MEAs were electrochemically characterised by use of ferrocenecarboxylic acid. Well-defined cyclic voltammograms of the two small redox proteins, horse heart cytochrome c and amicyanin from Thiobacillus versutus, were obtained at variously surface-modified Multi MEAs. Furthermore, a very simple method to manufacture Multi MEAs with carbon surfaces is introduced.

  16. Application of Array-based Comparative Genome Hybridization in Children with Developmental Delay or Mental Retardation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jao-Shwann Liang

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Children with developmental delay or mental retardation (DD/MR are commonly en countered in child neurology clinics, and establishing an etiologic diagnosis is a challenge for child neurologists. Among the etiologies, chromosomal imbalance is one of the most important causes. However, many of these chromosomal imbalances are submicroscopic and cannot be detected by conventional cytogenetic methods. Microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH is considered to be superior in the investigation of chromosomal deletions or duplications in children with DD/MR, and has been demonstrated to improve the diagnostic detection rate for these small chromosomal abnormalities. Here, we review the recent studies of array CGH in the evaluation of patients with idiopathic DD/MR.

  17. Strong light absorption of self-organized 3-D nanospike arrays for photovoltaic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Rui; Ching, Kwong-Lung; Lin, Qingfeng; Leung, Siu-Fung; Arcrossito, Diaz; Fan, Zhiyong

    2011-11-22

    Three-dimensional (3-D) nanostructures have been widely explored for efficient light trapping; however, many of the nanostructure fabrication processes reported have high cost and/or limited scalability. In this work, self-organized 3-D Al nanospike arrays were successfully fabricated on thin Al foils with controlled nanospike geometry such as height and pitch. Thereafter, photovoltaic materials of a-Si and CdTe thin films were conformally deposited on the nanospikes structures thus forming 3-D nanostructures with strong light absorption over a broad wavelength range and photon incident angle. Specifically, 100 nm-thick CdTe film on nanospikes showed 97% peak absorption, and up to 95% day-integrated sunlight absorption. These results indicate that self-organized 3-D Al nanospike arrays can serve as lightweight and low cost substrates for cost-effective thin film photovoltaics.

  18. Application of neural networks to digital pulse shape analysis for an array of silicon strip detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, J. L.; Martel, I.; Jiménez, R.; Galán, J.; Salmerón, P.

    2016-09-01

    The new generation of nuclear physics detectors that used to study nuclear reactions is considering the use of digital pulse shape analysis techniques (DPSA) to obtain the (A,Z) values of the reaction products impinging in solid state detectors. This technique can be an important tool for selecting the relevant reaction channels at the HYDE (HYbrid DEtector ball array) silicon array foreseen for the Low Energy Branch of the FAIR facility (Darmstadt, Germany). In this work we study the feasibility of using artificial neural networks (ANNs) for particle identification with silicon detectors. Multilayer Perceptron networks were trained and tested with recent experimental data, showing excellent identification capabilities with signals of several isotopes ranging from 12C up to 84Kr, yielding higher discrimination rates than any other previously reported.

  19. Optical absorption enhancement in silicon nanowire arrays with a large lattice constant for photovoltaic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chenxi; Povinelli, Michelle L

    2009-10-26

    In this paper, we use the transfer matrix method to calculate the optical absorptance of vertically-aligned silicon nanowire (SiNW) arrays. For fixed filling ratio, significant optical absorption enhancement occurs when the lattice constant is increased from 100 nm to 600 nm. The enhancement arises from an increase in field concentration within the nanowire as well as excitation of guided resonance modes. We quantify the absorption enhancement in terms of ultimate efficiency. Results show that an optimized SiNW array with lattice constant of 600 nm and wire diameter of 540 nm has a 72.4% higher ultimate efficiency than a Si thin film of equal thickness. The enhancement effect can be maintained over a large range of incidence angles.

  20. Binary cobalt ferrite nanomesh arrays as the advanced binder-free electrode for applications in oxygen evolution reaction and supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Zhang, Huijuan; Mu, Yanping; Bai, Yuanjuan; Wang, Yu

    2016-09-01

    The porous CoFe2O4nanomesh arrays are successfully synthesized on nickel foam substrate through a high temperature and pressure hydrothermal method, following by the thermal post-treatment in air. The CoFe2O4 nanomesh arrays own numerous pores and large specific surface area, which is in favor of exposing more active sites. In consideration of the structural preponderances and versatility of the materials, the CoFe2O4 nanomesh arrays have been researched as the binder-free electrode materials for electrocatalysis and supercapacitors. When the CoFe2O4nanomesh arrays on nickel foam (CoFe2O4 NM-As/Ni) directly act as the free-binder catalyst toward catalyzing the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) of electrochemical water splitting, CoFe2O4 NM-As/Ni exhibits an admirable OER property with a low onset potential of 1.47 V(corresponding to the onset overpotential of 240 mV), a minimal overpotential (η10 = 253 mV), a small Tafel slope (44 mV dec-1), large anodic currents and long-term durability for 35 h in alkaline media. In addition, as an electrode of supercapacitors, CoFe2O4 NM-As/Ni obtains a desired specific capacitance (1426 F/g at the current density of 1 A/g), remarkable rate capability (1024 F/g at the current density of 20 A/g) and eminent capacitance retention (92.6% after 3000 cycles). The above results demonstrate the CoFe2O4 NM-As/Ni possesses great potential application in electrocatalysis and supercapacitors.

  1. High-frequency Ultrasound Doppler System for Biomedical Applications with a 30 MHz Linear Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaochen; Sun, Lei; Cannata, Jonathan M.; Yen, Jesse T.; Shung, K. Kirk

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we report the development of the first high-frequency (HF) pulsed-wave Doppler system using a 30 MHz linear array transducer to assess the cardiovascular functions in small animal. This array based pulsed-wave Doppler system included a 16-channel HF analog beamformer, a HF pulsed-wave Doppler module, timing circuits, HF bipolar pulsers, and analog front-ends. The beamformed echoes acquired by the 16 channel analog beamformer, were directly fed to the HF pulsed-wave Doppler module. Then the in-phase and quadrature-phase (IQ) audio Doppler signals were digitized by either a sound card or a Gage digitizer and stored in a PC. The Doppler spectrogram was displayed on a PC in real time. The two-way beam-widths were determined to be 160 μm to 320 μm when the array was electronically focused at different focal points at depths from 5–10 mm. A micro flow phantom, consisting of a polyimide tube with inner diameter of 127 μm, and the wire phantom were used to evaluate and calibrate the system. The results show that the system is capable of detecting motion velocity of the wire phantom as low as 0.1 mm/s, and detecting blood-mimicking flow velocity in the 127 μm tube lower than 7 mm/s. The system was subsequently used to measure the blood flow in vivo in two mouse abdominal superficial vessels with diameters of approximately 200 μm, and a mouse aorta close to the heart. These results demonstrated that this system may become an indispensable part of the current HF array based imaging systems for small animal studies. PMID:17993243

  2. Electrochemically Created Highly Surface Roughened Ag Nanoplate Arrays for SERS Biosensing Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Shikuan; Slotcavage, Daniel; Mai, John D.; Guo, Feng; Li, Sixing; Zhao, Yanhui; Lei, Yong; Cameron, Craig E.; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-01-01

    Highly surface-roughened Ag nanoplate arrays are fabricated using a simple electrodeposition and in situ electrocorrosion method with inorganic borate ions as capping agent. The electrocorrosion process is induced by a change in the local pH value during the electrochemical growth, which is used to intentionally carve the electrodeposited structures. The three dimensionally arranged Ag nanoplates are integrated with substantial surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) hot spots and are free o...

  3. Microplasma Channels and Large Arrays: Applications to Photomedicine, Microlasers, and Reactors on a Chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    npn plasma bipolar junction transistor in a simple external circuit.doping level of the base. Thus, the sheath electric field reinforces the built-in...PBJT) has been discovered. A hybrid plasma/semiconductor device in which a microplasma replaces the collector in an otherwise conventional npn ... transistor , the PBJT is capable of switching and modulating a plasma with a base-emitter voltage of < 1V. 2. Large arrays of microcavity plasma devices

  4. SCUBA-2 instrument: an application of large-format superconducting bolometer arrays for submillimetre astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollister, Matthew Ian

    2009-01-01

    This thesis concerns technical aspects related to the design and operation of the submillimetre common-user bolometer array 2 (SCUBA-2) instrument, a new wide-field camera for submillimetre astronomy currently undergoing commissioning on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Offering unprecedented sensitivity and mapping capabilities, SCUBA-2 is expected to make a major impact in surveys of the sky at submillimetre wavelengths, a largely unexplored part of the electromagnetic spectrum, and provide better understanding of the formation and evolution of galaxies, stars and planets by providing large, unbiased samples of such objects. SCUBA-2 uses large arrays of bolometers, with superconducting transition edge sensors (TESs) as the temperature-sensitive element. TES devices are a relatively new technology, utilising the sharp resistance change between the normal and superconducting states to make a sensitive thermistor. Kilopixel arrays of such devices are multiplexed using superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). This thesis derives the key detector performance parameters, and presents analysis of engineering data to confirm the detector performance on array scales. A key issue for bolometric instruments for far infrared and submillimetre astronomy is the need to operate at extremely low temperatures in the sub-kelvin and millikelvin ranges to achieve the necessary detector sensitivity. This work describes the design, testing and performance of the liquid cryogen-free millikelvin cryostat, the first such instrument to be deployed for astronomy. Subsequent chapters detail the design and testing of a magnetic shielding scheme for the instrument, an important aspect of the operation of superconducting devices. Based on experience with the construction and testing of this instrument, a number of potential improvements for future instruments are presented and discussed.

  5. Frequency-domain photoacoustic phased array probe for biomedical imaging applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telenkov, Sergey; Alwi, Rudolf; Mandelis, Andreas; Worthington, Arthur

    2011-12-01

    We report the development of a frequency-domain biomedical photoacoustic imaging system that utilizes a continuous-wave laser source with a custom intensity modulation pattern, ultrasonic phased array for signal detection, and processing coupled with a beam-forming algorithm for reconstruction of photoacoustic correlation images. Sensitivity to optical contrast was demonstrated using tissue-mimicking phantoms and in-vivo tissue samples.

  6. In situ fabrication of cleavable peptide arrays on polydimethylsiloxane and applications for kinase activity assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Huang-Han, E-mail: z10008047@email.ncku.edu.tw; Hsiao, Yu-Chieh, E-mail: s10076221@hotmail.com; Li, Jie-Ren, E-mail: jierenli@mail.ncku.edu.tw; Chen, Shu-Hui, E-mail: shchen@mail.ncku.edu.tw

    2015-03-20

    Highlights: • A novel approach for in situ fabrication of cleavable peptide arrays on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). • The first report of peptide synthesis on PDMS. • Use of the PDMS peptide array for developing sensitive chip-based kinase activity bioassays. • The on-chip synthesized peptides can be cleaved for MS detection. - Abstract: Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is widely used for microfabrication and bioanalysis; however, its surface functionalization is limited due to the lack of active functional groups and incompatibility with many solvents. We presented a novel approach for in situ fabrication of cleavable peptide arrays on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) viatert-butyloxycarbonyl (t-Boc)/trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) chemistry using gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as the anchor and a disulfide/amine terminated hetero-polyethylene glycol as the cleavable linker. The method was fine tuned to use reagents compatible with the PDMS. Using 5-mer pentapeptide, Trp{sub 5}, as a model, step-by-step covalent coupling during the reaction cycles was monitored by Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (ATR-FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), or atomic force microscopy (AFM), and further confirmed by mass spectrometry (MS) detection of the cleaved peptides. Using such a method, heptapeptides of the PKA substrate, LRRASLG (Kemptide), and its point mutated analogs were fabricated in an array format for comparative studies of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) activity. Based on on-chip detection, Kemptide sequence exhibited the highest phosphorylation activity, which was detected to a 1.5-time lesser extent for the point mutated sequence (LRRGSLG) containing the recognition motif (RRXS), and was nearly undetectable for another point mutated sequence (LRLASLG) that lacked the recognition motif. These results indicate that the reported fabrication method is able to yield highly specific peptide sequences on PDMS, leading to a highly motif

  7. The Application of Phased Array Ultrasonic Techniques for Inspection of Railway Axles from Their End Face

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaptsis, D.; Cooper, I.; Boyle, K.; Nicholson, P. I.

    2011-06-01

    As part of the development of a non destructive testing (NDT) system combining complementary inspection techniques, an inspection system based on phased array ultrasonic testing (PAUT) for detection of transverse cracking in solid railway axles is being developed. This paper presents the initial study, which includes the PAUT experimental setup and the initial results obtained after testing the system on railway axle blocks. The inspection of solid axles from their axle end face is investigated.

  8. Human transcriptome array for high-throughput clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Weihong; Seok, Junhee; Mindrinos, Michael N; Schweitzer, Anthony C; Jiang, Hui; Wilhelmy, Julie; Clark, Tyson A; Kapur, Karen; Xing, Yi; Faham, Malek; Storey, John D; Moldawer, Lyle L; Maier, Ronald V; Tompkins, Ronald G; Wong, Wing Hung; Davis, Ronald W; Xiao, Wenzhong

    2011-03-01

    A 6.9 million-feature oligonucleotide array of the human transcriptome [Glue Grant human transcriptome (GG-H array)] has been developed for high-throughput and cost-effective analyses in clinical studies. This array allows comprehensive examination of gene expression and genome-wide identification of alternative splicing as well as detection of coding SNPs and noncoding transcripts. The performance of the array was examined and compared with mRNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) results over multiple independent replicates of liver and muscle samples. Compared with RNA-Seq of 46 million uniquely mappable reads per replicate, the GG-H array is highly reproducible in estimating gene and exon abundance. Although both platforms detect similar expression changes at the gene level, the GG-H array is more sensitive at the exon level. Deeper sequencing is required to adequately cover low-abundance transcripts. The array has been implemented in a multicenter clinical program and has generated high-quality, reproducible data. Considering the clinical trial requirements of cost, sample availability, and throughput, the GG-H array has a wide range of applications. An emerging approach for large-scale clinical genomic studies is to first use RNA-Seq to the sufficient depth for the discovery of transcriptome elements relevant to the disease process followed by high-throughput and reliable screening of these elements on thousands of patient samples using custom-designed arrays.

  9. Application of multi-channel photoelastic imaging technology in array type ultrasonic nondestructive testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhen-zhong; Bi, Chao

    2015-08-01

    With the rapid development of modern nondestructive testing technologies, ultrasonic phased array and Ultrasonic array testing technology has been used widely, at the same time the propagation process of ultrasonic in the material becomes more and more complex. In order to make the ultrasonic propagation path become visible and researchers can observe the acoustic field directly, considering the properties of the ultrasonic as a stress wave, according to the theory of polarized light interference, a multi-channel dynamic photoelastic imaging system is developed successfully. The system can generate many kinds of focusing ultrasonic fields in optical specimen by controlling the ultrasonic transmission delay time of each equipment channel, and the system has the ability to simulate the acoustic field's focusing process of the ultrasonic phased array. The image shot by CCD camera reflects the propagation process of the acoustic field in the specimen, and the dynamic video is formed under control of the timing circuit, and the system has the ability to save the captured image in the computer.

  10. Application of Gas Sensor Arrays in Assessment of Wastewater Purification Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łukasz Guz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A gas sensor array consisting of eight metal oxide semiconductor (MOS type gas sensors was evaluated for its ability for assessment of the selected wastewater parameters. Municipal wastewater was collected in a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP in a primary sedimentation tank and was treated in a laboratory-scale sequential batch reactor (SBR. A comparison of the gas sensor array (electronic nose response to the standard physical-chemical parameters of treated wastewater was performed. To analyze the measurement results, artificial neural networks were used. E-nose—gas sensors array and artificial neural networks proved to be a suitable method for the monitoring of treated wastewater quality. Neural networks used for data validation showed high correlation between the electronic nose readouts and: (I chemical oxygen demand (COD (r = 0.988; (II total suspended solids (TSS (r = 0.938; (III turbidity (r = 0.940; (IV pH (r = 0.554; (V nitrogen compounds: N-NO3 (r = 0.958, N-NO2 (r = 0.869 and N-NH3 (r = 0.978; (VI and volatile organic compounds (VOC (r = 0.987. Good correlation of the abovementioned parameters are observed under stable treatment conditions in a laboratory batch reactor.

  11. Synthesis of ZnO/Si Hierarchical Nanowire Arrays for Photocatalyst Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dingguo; Yan, Xiaolan; Lin, Chunhua; Huang, Shengli; Tian, Z Ryan; He, Bing; Yang, Qianqian; Yu, Binbin; He, Xu; Li, Jing; Wang, Jiayuan; Zhan, Huahan; Li, Shuping; Kang, Junyong

    2017-12-01

    ZnO/Si nanowire arrays with hierarchical architecture were synthesized by solution method with ZnO seed layer grown by atomic layer deposition and magnetron sputtering, respectively. The photocatalytic activity of the as-grown tree-like arrays was evaluated by the degradation of methylene blue under ultraviolet light at ambient temperature. The comparison of morphology, crystal structure, optical properties, and photocatalysis efficiency of the two samples in different seeding processes was conducted. It was found that the ZnO/Si nanowire arrays presented a larger surface area with better crystalline and more uniform ZnO branches on the whole sidewall of Si backbones for the seed layer by atomic layer deposition, which gained a strong light absorption as high as 98% in the ultraviolet and visible range. The samples were proven to have a potential use in photocatalyst, but suffered from photodissolution and memory effect. The mechanism of the photocatalysis was analyzed, and the stability and recycling ability were also evaluated and enhanced.

  12. Synthesis of ZnO/Si Hierarchical Nanowire Arrays for Photocatalyst Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dingguo; Yan, Xiaolan; Lin, Chunhua; Huang, Shengli; Tian, Z. Ryan; He, Bing; Yang, Qianqian; Yu, Binbin; He, Xu; Li, Jing; Wang, Jiayuan; Zhan, Huahan; Li, Shuping; Kang, Junyong

    2017-01-01

    ZnO/Si nanowire arrays with hierarchical architecture were synthesized by solution method with ZnO seed layer grown by atomic layer deposition and magnetron sputtering, respectively. The photocatalytic activity of the as-grown tree-like arrays was evaluated by the degradation of methylene blue under ultraviolet light at ambient temperature. The comparison of morphology, crystal structure, optical properties, and photocatalysis efficiency of the two samples in different seeding processes was conducted. It was found that the ZnO/Si nanowire arrays presented a larger surface area with better crystalline and more uniform ZnO branches on the whole sidewall of Si backbones for the seed layer by atomic layer deposition, which gained a strong light absorption as high as 98% in the ultraviolet and visible range. The samples were proven to have a potential use in photocatalyst, but suffered from photodissolution and memory effect. The mechanism of the photocatalysis was analyzed, and the stability and recycling ability were also evaluated and enhanced.

  13. Single-layer graphene-TiO2 nanotubes array heterojunction for ultraviolet photodetector application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Deng-Yue; Ge, Cai-Wang; Wang, Jiu-Zhen; Zhang, Teng-Fei; Wu, Yu-Cheng; Liang, Feng-Xia

    2016-11-01

    In this work, we reported on the fabrication of a single-layer graphene (SLG)-TiO2 nanotube arrays (NTs) heterostructures ultraviolet photodetector (UVPD) by transferring chemical vapor deposition derived MLG on the surface of anodic TiO2NTs array. Through varying the annealing atmosphere and anodization time in the TiO2 synthesis procedure, the electronic and optoelectronic properties of the as-fabricated Schottky junction UVPD were studied. It was revealed that the anodic TiO2NTs annealed in air showed a better rectifying behavior and was highly sensitive to UV light irradiation. Further investigation found that the device performance of the UVPD can be readily modulated by the anodization time, and the anodic TiO2NTs with a medium tube length of 9.6 μm exhibits the highest device performance. These results demonstrated that the present SLG-TiO2NTs array hetero-junction UVPD will be highly promising for fabricating high-performance optoelectronic device and system in the future.

  14. Photocatalytic TiO2 Nanorod Spheres and Arrays Compatible with Flexible Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Nunes

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, titanium dioxide nanostructures were synthesized through microwave irradiation. In a typical microwave synthesis, nanorod spheres in the powder form were simultaneously produced with nanorod arrays grown on polyethylene terephthalate (PET substrates. The syntheses were performed in water or ethanol with limited temperature at 80 °C and 200 °C. A simple and low-cost approach was used for the arrays growth, which involved a PET substrate with a zinc oxide seed layer deposited by spin-coating. X-ray diffraction (XRD and Raman spectroscopy revealed that synthesis in water result in a mixture of brookite and rutile phases, while using ethanol as solvent it was only observed the rutile phase. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM showed that the synthesized spheres were in the micrometer range appearing as aggregates of fine nanorods. The arrays maintained the sphere nanorod aggregate structures and the synthesis totally covered the flexible substrates. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM was used to identify the brookite structure. The optical band gaps of all materials have been determined from diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. Photocatalytic activity was assessed from rhodamine B degradation with remarkable degradability performance under ultraviolet (UV radiation. Reusability experiments were carried out for the best photocatalyst, which also revealed notable photocatalytic activity under solar radiation. The present study is an interesting and competitive alternative for the photocatalysts existing nowadays, as it simultaneously results in highly photoactive powders and flexible materials produced with low-cost synthesis routes such as microwave irradiation.

  15. Human skin gene expression: Natural (trans) resveratrol versus five resveratrol analogs for dermal applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lephart, Edwin D; Andrus, Merritt B

    2017-09-01

    Resveratrol (RV) is a polyphenolic compound naturally produced by plants. Polyphenolic compounds incorporated into medicinal products are beneficial but, RV is rapidly metabolized with an associated decline in biological activity. This study tested RV as the standard and compared five structurally modified RV analogs: butyrate, isobutyrate, palmitoate, acetate, and diacetate (to improve functionality) at 1% concentration(s) for 24 h in epiderm full thickness cultures by gene array/qPCR mRNA analysis. When silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog 1, extracellular elements (collagen1A1, 3A1, 4A1; elastin, tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase 1, fibrillin 1 laminin beta1 and matrix metalloproteinase 9), anti-aging and aging genes, inflammatory biomarkers (interleukin-1A [IL1A], IL1R2, IL-6 and IL-8), nerve growth factor, and the antioxidants (proliferating cell nuclear antigen, catalase, superoxide dismutase and metallothionein 1H/2H) were evaluated, ranking each from highest-to-lowest for gene expression: butyrate > isobutyrate > diacetate > acetate > palmitoate. This study showed that the butyrate and isobutyrate analogs are more biologically active compared to resveratrol and have potential use in topical applications to improve dermal and other health applications. Impact statement Resveratrol has been reported to have a wide variety of health benefits but its rapid metabolism especially after oral ingestion results in very low bioavailability. Notably, the first human skin gene expression study of resveratrol was not published until 2014. The purpose of this study was to determine if increased stability and biological activity could be obtained by modifying the chemical structure of natural (trans) resveratrol and quantifying human gene expression by qPCR of skin biomarkers that enhance dermal health. Five resveratrol analogs were synthesized that increased their lipophilic index to enhance tissue penetration and augment

  16. Glad nanostructured arrays with enhanced carrier collection and light trapping for photoconductive and photovoltaic device applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cansizoglu, Hilal

    Solar energy harvesting has been of great interest for researchers over the past 50 years. Main emphasis has been on developing high quality materials with low defect density and proper band gaps. However, high cost of bulk materials and insufficient light absorption in thin films led to utilization of semiconductor nanostructures in photovoltaics and photonics. Light trapping abilities of nanostructures can provide high optical absorption whereas core/shell nanostructured arrays can allow enhanced charge carrier collection. However, most of the nanofabrication methods that can produce uniform nanostructure geometries are limited in materials, dimensions, and not compatible with industrial production systems. Therefore, it is essential to develop innovative low-cost fabrication approaches that can address these issues. The primary goal of this project is to investigate light trapping and carrier collection properties of glancing angle deposited (GLAD) nanostructured arrays for high-efficiency, low-cost photoconductive and photovoltaic devices using characterization techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), ultraviolet-visible-near infrared (UV-vis-NIR) spectroscopy and time resolved photocurrent measurements. Indium sulfide (In2S3) has been chosen as a model material system in this study. GLAD nanostructured arrays of vertical rods, screws, springs, zigzags and tilted rods were fabricated and characterized. A strong dependence of optical absorption on the shapes of nanostructures is observed from UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy. A simulation study using finite difference time domain (FDTD) shows that introducing 3D geometry results in diffuse scattering of light and leads to high optical absorption. Monte Carlo simulations were conducted to determine a simple and scalable fabrication technique for conformal and uniform shell coatings. The results suggest that an atomic flux with angular distribution, which can be

  17. Application of Stacking Technique in ANA: Method and Practice with PKU Seismological Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J.; Tang, Y.; Ning, J.; Chen, Y. J.

    2010-12-01

    Cross correlation of ambient noise records is now routinely used to get dispersion curve and then do seismic tomography; however little attention has been paid to array techniques. We will present a spacial-stacking method to get high resolution dispersion curves and show practices with the observation data of PKU seismological array. Experiential Green Functions are generally obtained by correlation between two stations, and then the dispersion curves are obtained from the analysis of FTAN. Popular method to get high resolution dispersion curves is using long time records. At the same time, if we want to get effectual signal, the distance between the two stations must be at least 3 times of the longest wavelength. So we need both long time records and appropriate spaced stations. Now we use a new method, special-stacking, which allows shorter observation period and utilizes observations of a group of closely distributed stations to get fine dispersion curves. We correlate observations of every station in the station group with those of a far station, and then stack them together. However we cannot just simply stack them unless the stations in the station group at a circle, of which the center is the far station owing to dispersion characteristics of the Rayleigh waves. Thus we do antidispersion on the observation data of every station in the array, then do stacking. We test the method using the theoretical seismic surface wave records which obtained by qseis06 compiled by Rongjiang Wang both with and without noise. For the cases of three imaginary stations (distance is 1 degree) have the same underground structure and without noise, result is that the center station had the same dispersion with and without spacial-stacking. Then we add noise to the theoretical records. The center station's dispersion curves obtained by our method are much closer to the dispersion curve without noise than contaminated ones. We can see that our method has improved the resolution of

  18. BRB-ArrayTools Data Archive for Human Cancer Gene Expression: A Unique and Efficient Data Sharing Resource

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Simon

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The explosion of available microarray data on human cancer increases the urgency for developing methods for effectively sharing this data among clinical cancer investigators. Lack of a smooth interface between the databases and statistical analysis tools limits the potential benefits of sharing the publicly available microarray data. To facilitate the efficient sharing and use of publicly available microarray data among cancer investigators, we have built a BRB-ArrayTools Data Archive including over one hundred human cancer microarray projects for 28 cancer types. Expression array data and clinical descriptors have been imported into BRB-ArrayTools and are stored as BRB-ArrayTools project folders on the archive. The data archive can be accessed from: http://linus.nci.nih.gov/~brb/DataArchive.html Our BRB-ArrayTools data archive and GEO importer represent ongoing efforts to provide effective tools for efficiently sharing and utilizing human cancer microarray data.

  19. Cryogenic phased-array for high resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); assessment of clinical and research applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Flora S.

    Magnetic Resonance (MR) imaging is one of the most powerful tools in diagnostic medicine for soft tissue imaging. Image acquisition techniques and hardware receivers are very important in achieving high contrast and high resolution MR images. An aim of this dissertation is to design single and multi-element room and cryogenic temperature arrays and make assessments of their signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and SNR gain. In this dissertation, four sets of MR receiver coils are built. They are the receiver-only cryo-coils that are not commercially available. A tuning and matching circuit is attached to each coil. The tuning and matching circuits are simple; however, each device component has to operate at a high magnetic field and cryogenic temperature environment. Remote DC bias of the varactor controls the tuning and matching outside the scanner room. Active detuning of the resonator is done by two p-i-n junction (PIN) diodes. Cooling of the receiver is done by a customized liquid nitrogen cryostat. The first application is to build a 3-Tesla 2x1 horseshoe counter-rotating current (CRC) cryogenic array to image the tibia in a human body. With significant increase in SNR, the surface coil should deliver high contrast and resolution images that can show the trabecular bone and bone marrow structure. This structural image will be used to model the mechanical strength of the bone as well as bone density and chance of fracture. The planar CRC is a unique design of this surface array. The second application is to modify the coil design to 7-Tesla to study the growth of infant rhesus monkey eyes. Fast scan MR images of the infant monkey heads are taken for monitoring shapes of their eyeballs. The monkeys are induced with shortsightedness by eye lenses, and they are scanned periodically to get images of their eyeballs. The field-of-view (FOV) of these images is about five centimeters and the area of interest is two centimeters deep from the surface. Because of these reasons

  20. APPLICATION OF GENETIC DEAFNESS GENE CHIP FOR DETECTION OF GENE MUTATION OF DEAFNESS IN PREGNANT WOMEN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHANG Liang; ZHONG Su; ZHAO Nan; LIU Ping; ZHAO Yangyu; QIAO Jie

    2014-01-01

    Objective The study is to identify the carrier rate of common deafness mutation in Chinese pregnant women via detecting deafness gene mutations with gene chip. Methods The pregnant women in obstetric clinic without hearing impairment and hearing disorders family history were selected. The informed consent was signed. Peripheral blood was taken to extract genom-ic DNA. Application of genetic deafness gene chip for detecting 9 mutational hot spot of the most common 4 Chinese deafness genes, namely GJB2 (35delG,176del16bp, 235delC, 299delAT), GJB3 (C538T) ,SLC26A4 ( IVS72A>G, A2168G) and mito-chondrial DNA 12S rRNA (A1555G, C1494T) . Further genetic testing were provided to the spouses and newborns of the screened carriers. Results Peripheral blood of 430 pregnant women were detected,detection of deafness gene mutation carri-ers in 24 cases(4.2%), including 13 cases of the GJB2 heterozygous mutation, 3 cases of SLC26A4 heterozygous mutation, 1 cases of GJB3 heterozygous mutation, and 1 case of mitochondrial 12S rRNA mutation. 18 spouses and 17 newborns took fur-ther genetic tests, and 6 newborns inherited the mutation from their mother. Conclusion The common deafness genes muta-tion has a high carrier rate in pregnant women group,235delC and IVS7-2A>G heterozygous mutations are common.

  1. A ChIP-on-chip tiling array approach detects functional histone-free regions associated with boundaries at vertebrate HOX genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surabhi Srivastava

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Hox genes impart segment identity to body structures along the anterior–posterior axis and are crucial for proper development. A unique feature of the Hox loci is the collinearity between the gene position within the cluster and its spatial expression pattern along the body axis. However, the mechanisms that regulate collinear patterns of Hox gene expression remain unclear, especially in higher vertebrates. We recently identified novel histone-free regions (HFRs that can act as chromatin boundary elements demarcating successive murine Hox genes and help regulate their precise expression domains (Srivastava et al., 2013. In this report, we describe in detail the ChIP-chip analysis strategy associated with the identification of these HFRs. We also provide the Perl scripts for HFR extraction and quality control analysis for this custom designed tiling array dataset.

  2. A ChIP-on-chip tiling array approach detects functional histone-free regions associated with boundaries at vertebrate HOX genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Surabhi; Sowpati, Divya Tej; Garapati, Hita Sony; Puri, Deepika; Dhawan, Jyotsna; Mishra, Rakesh K

    2014-12-01

    Hox genes impart segment identity to body structures along the anterior-posterior axis and are crucial for proper development. A unique feature of the Hox loci is the collinearity between the gene position within the cluster and its spatial expression pattern along the body axis. However, the mechanisms that regulate collinear patterns of Hox gene expression remain unclear, especially in higher vertebrates. We recently identified novel histone-free regions (HFRs) that can act as chromatin boundary elements demarcating successive murine Hox genes and help regulate their precise expression domains (Srivastava et al., 2013). In this report, we describe in detail the ChIP-chip analysis strategy associated with the identification of these HFRs. We also provide the Perl scripts for HFR extraction and quality control analysis for this custom designed tiling array dataset.

  3. Triple Band Parasitic Array Antenna for C-X-Ku-Band Application Using Out-of-Phase Coupling Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anubhuti Khare

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Triple band parasitic array antenna for C-X-Ku-band application is presented. The proposed antenna is designed using the concept of parasitic array and out-of-phase coupling approach. The objects of research are to optimize total inductance of geometry by using out-of-phase inductance approach. The out of phase inductance of geometry consists of using two U-patches novel director on the left side of geometry, appropriate dimension of ground plan, and gap coupling between parasitic and active patches. The dimension of the ground plan geometry is 0.5λ mil × 0.5154λ mil. The usable impedance bandwidth of design antenna is “5.8 GHz to 18 GHz” (102% impedance bandwidth and gain enhancement is up to 11.8 dBi. The proposed antenna can be used for X-Ku band and C-band applications. Both simulated and measured results are presented, which are in good agreement. The proposed antenna was fabricated with a thin copper layer printed on a thin lossy FR4 substrate for low-cost production.

  4. Algorithm for real-time detection of signal patterns using phase synchrony: an application to an electrode array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Saman; MacKay, William A.; van Dam, R. Michael; Thompson, Michael

    2011-02-01

    Real-time analysis of multi-channel spatio-temporal sensor data presents a considerable technical challenge for a number of applications. For example, in brain-computer interfaces, signal patterns originating on a time-dependent basis from an array of electrodes on the scalp (i.e. electroencephalography) must be analyzed in real time to recognize mental states and translate these to commands which control operations in a machine. In this paper we describe a new technique for recognition of spatio-temporal patterns based on performing online discrimination of time-resolved events through the use of correlation of phase dynamics between various channels in a multi-channel system. The algorithm extracts unique sensor signature patterns associated with each event during a training period and ranks importance of sensor pairs in order to distinguish between time-resolved stimuli to which the system may be exposed during real-time operation. We apply the algorithm to electroencephalographic signals obtained from subjects tested in the neurophysiology laboratories at the University of Toronto. The extension of this algorithm for rapid detection of patterns in other sensing applications, including chemical identification via chemical or bio-chemical sensor arrays, is also discussed.

  5. Fabrication, characterization and applications of flexible vertical InGaN micro-light emitting diode arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Pengfei; McKendry, Jonathan J D; Gu, Erdan; Chen, Zhizhong; Sun, Yongjian; Zhang, Guoyi; Dawson, Martin D; Liu, Ran

    2016-01-11

    Flexible vertical InGaN micro-light emitting diode (micro-LED) arrays have been fabricated and characterized for potential applications in flexible micro-displays and visible light communication. The LED epitaxial layers were transferred from initial sapphire substrates to flexible AuSn substrates by metal bonding and laser lift off techniques. The current versus voltage characteristics of flexible micro-LEDs degraded after bending the devices, but the electroluminescence spectra show little shift even under a very small bending radius 3 mm. The high thermal conductivity of flexible metal substrates enables high thermal saturation current density and high light output power of the flexible micro-LEDs, benefiting the potential applications in flexible high-brightness micro-displays and high-speed visible light communication. We have achieved ~40 MHz modulation bandwidth and 120 Mbit/s data transmission speed for a typical flexible micro-LED.

  6. The preparation of highly ordered TiO2 nanotube arrays by an anodization method and their applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Yongseok; Park, Jong Hyeok; Kang, Man Gu

    2012-07-04

    The tubular-shaped nanostructure of TiO(2) is very interesting, and highly ordered arrays of TiO(2) nanotubes (TNTs) can be easily fabricated by anodization of the Ti substrate in specific electrolytes. Here in this feature article, we review synthesis methods for various TNTs including normal, alloy, and architectural forms such as bamboos, lace, and flowers. Specific nanosize architectures such as bamboo and lace types can be regulated by alternating voltage and further anodizing. In order to extend light response of TNTs to visible solar spectra, various dopings of specific elements have been discussed. The normal and modified TNTs are suggested for applications such as dye sensitized solar cells, water splitting, photocatalytic degradation of pollutants, CO(2) reduction, sensors, energy storage devices including Li ion batteries and supercapacitors, and other applications such as flexible substrate and biomaterials.

  7. SAW synthesis with IDTs array and the inverse filter: toward a versatile SAW toolbox for microfluidics and biological applications

    CERN Document Server

    Riaud, Antoine; Thomas, Jean-Louis; Matar, Olivier Bou

    2016-01-01

    Surface acoustic waves (SAWs) are versatile tools to manipulate fluids at small scales for microfluidics and bio- logical applications. A non-exhaustive list of operations that can be performed with SAW includes sessile droplet displacement, atomization, division and merging but also the actuation of fluids embedded in microchannels or the manipulation of suspended particles. However, each of these operations requires a specific design of the wave generation system, the so-called interdigitated transducers (IDTs). Depending on the application, it might indeed be necessary to generate focused or plane, propagating or standing, aligned or shifted waves. Furthermore, the possibilities offered by more complex wave-fields such as acoustical vortices for particle tweezing and liquid twisting cannot be explored with classical IDTs. In this paper, we show that the inverse filter technique coupled with an interdigitated transducers array (IDTA) enables to synthesize all classical wave-fields used in microfluidics and ...

  8. Controlled synthesis of ZnO branched nanorod arrays by hierarchical solution growth and application in dye-sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang Xiaoming, E-mail: cexmfang@scut.edu.cn; Peng Lihua; Shang Xiaoying; Zhang Zhengguo

    2011-07-29

    We demonstrate the controlled synthesis of ZnO branched nanorod arrays on fluorine-doped SnO{sub 2}-coated glass substrates by the hierarchical solution growth method. In the secondary growth, the concentration of Zn(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}/hexamethylenetetramine plays an important role in controlling the morphology of the branched nanorod arrays, besides that of diaminopropane used as a structure-directing agent to induce the growth of branches. The population density and morphology of the branched nanorod arrays depend on those of the nanorod arrays obtained from the primary growth, which can be modulated though the concentration of Zn(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}/hexamethylenetetramine in the primary growth solution. The dye-sensitized ZnO branched nanorod arrays exhibit much stronger optical absorption as compared with its corresponding primary nanorod arrays, suggesting that the addition of the branches improves light harvesting. The dye-sensitized solar cell based on the optimized ZnO branched nanorod array reaches a conversion efficiency of 1.66% under the light radiation of 1000 W/m{sup 2}. The branched nanorod arrays can also be applied in other application fields of ZnO.

  9. GeneBrowser 2: an application to explore and identify common biological traits in a set of genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira José

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of high-throughput laboratory techniques created a demand for computer-assisted result analysis tools. Many of these techniques return lists of genes whose interpretation requires finding relevant biological roles for the problem at hand. The required information is typically available in public databases, and usually, this information must be manually retrieved to complement the analysis. This process is a very time-consuming task that should be automated as much as possible. Results GeneBrowser is a web-based tool that, for a given list of genes, combines data from several public databases with visualisation and analysis methods to help identify the most relevant and common biological characteristics. The functionalities provided include the following: a central point with the most relevant biological information for each inserted gene; a list of the most related papers in PubMed and gene expression studies in ArrayExpress; and an extended approach to functional analysis applied to Gene Ontology, homologies, gene chromosomal localisation and pathways. Conclusions GeneBrowser provides a unique entry point to several visualisation and analysis methods, providing fast and easy analysis of a set of genes. GeneBrowser fills the gap between Web portals that analyse one gene at a time and functional analysis tools that are limited in scope and usually desktop-based.

  10. Fabrication of polyaniline/graphene/titania nanotube arrays nanocomposite and their application in supercapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Hua; Gan, Mengyu; Ma, Li, E-mail: mlsys607@126.com; Yu, Lei; Hu, Haifeng; Yang, Fangfang; Li, Yanjun; Ge, Chengqiang

    2015-05-05

    Highlights: • The PANI/graphene/TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays were fabricated firstly. • The composite shows a high specific capacitance and superior rate capability. • A high capacity retention rate of 91% after 1000 cycles can be achieved. • The composite possesses a novel three-dimensional (3D) highly ordered nanostructure. • TiO{sub 2} NTs enhance the adhesion between PANI and substrate. - Abstract: Polyaniline/graphene/titania nanotube arrays (PGTNs) nanocomposite as a supercapacitor electrode is fabricated by in-situ polymerization for the first time. Herein, the PGTNs possesses a novel three-dimensional (3D) highly ordered hybrid nanostructure consisting of coaxial polyaniline (PANI)/TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays and graphene coated with PANI on the surface of TiO{sub 2} in some degree. The synthesized three-dimensional PGTNs is characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy, and its electrochemical performance is measured by cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and galvanostatic charge/discharge. The maximum specific capacitance of PGTNs is as high as 933 F g{sup −1} at current density of 0.75 A g{sup −1} and the specific capacitance retains 91% of the initial after constant charge–discharge 1000 cycles. The improved electrochemical performance is due to the 3D nanostructure, which effectively prevents the mechanical deformation during the fast charge/discharge process and favors the diffusion of the electrolyte ions into the inner region of active materials. The composite electrode material is very promising for the next generation of high-performance electrochemical supercapacitors.

  11. Strong adhesion and friction coupling in hierarchical carbon nanotube arrays for dry adhesive applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shihao; Xia, Zhenhai; Gao, Xiaosheng

    2012-04-01

    The adhesion and friction coupling of hierarchical carbon nanotube arrays was investigated with a hierarchical multiscale modeling approach. At device level, vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VA-CNT) arrays with laterally distributed segments on top were analyzed via finite element methods to determine the macroscopic adhesion and friction force coupling. At the nanoscale, molecular dynamics simulation was performed to explore the origin of the adhesion enhancement due to the existence of the laterally distributed CNTs. The results show interfacial adhesion force is drastically promoted by interfacial friction force when a single lateral CNT is being peeled from an amorphous carbon substrate. By fitting with experiments, we find that under shearing loadings the maximum interfacial adhesion force is increased by a factor of ~5, compared to that under normal loadings. Pre-existing surface asperities of the substrate have proven to be the source of generating large interfacial friction, which in turn results in an enhanced adhesion. The critical peeling angles derived from the continuum and nano- levels are comparable to those of geckos and other synthetic adhesives. Our analysis indicates that the adhesion enhancement factor of the hierarchically structured VA-CNT arrays could be further increased by uniformly orienting the laterally distributed CNTs on top. Most importantly, a significant buckling of the lateral CNT at peeling front is captured on the molecular level, which provides a basis for the fundamental understanding of local deformation, and failure mechanisms of nanofibrillar structures. This work gives an insight into the durability issues that prevent the success of artificial dry adhesives.

  12. Evaluation of a SiPM array detector coupled to a LFS-3 pixellated scintillator for PET/MR applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, Stratos; Fysikopoulos, Eleftherios [Technological Educational Institute of Athens (Greece); Georgiou, Maria [Technological Educational Institute of Athens (Greece); Department of Medical School, University of Thessaly, Larissa (Greece); Loudos, George [Technological Educational Institute of Athens (Greece)

    2015-05-18

    SiPM arrays are insensitive to magnetic fields and thus good candidates for hybrid PET/MR imaging systems. Moreover, due to their small size and flexibility can be used in dedicated small field of view small animal imaging detectors and especially in head PET/MR studies in mice. Co-doped LFS-3 scintillator crystals have higher light yield and slightly faster response than that of LSO:Ce mainly due to the co-doped activation of emission centers with varying materials such as Ce, Gd, Sc, Y, La, Tb, or Ca distributed at the molecular scale through the lutetium silicate crystal host. The purpose of this study is to investigate the behavior of the SensL ArraySL-4 (4x4 element array of 3x3 mm{sup 2} silicon photomultipliers) optical detector coupled to a 6x6 LFS-3 scintillator array, with 2x2x5 mm{sup 3} crystal size elements, for possible applications in small field of view PET/MR imaging detectors. We have designed a symmetric resistive charge division circuit to read out the signal outputs of 4x4 pixel SiPM array reducing the 16 pixel outputs of the photodetector to 4 position signals. The 4 position signals were digitized using free running Analog to Digital Converters. The ADCs sampling rate was 50 MHz. An FPGA (Spartan 6 LX150T) was used for triggering and digital signal processing of the pulses. Experimental evaluation was carried out with {sup 22}Na radioactive source and the parameters studied where energy resolution and peak to valley ratio. The first preliminary results of the evaluation shows a clear visualization of the discrete 2x2x5 mm{sup 3} LFS-3 scintillator elements. The mean peak to valley ratio of the horizontal profiles on the raw image was measured equal to 11 while the energy resolution was calculated equal to 30% at the central pixels.

  13. Application of Global Dynamic Reconfiguration in Artificial Neural Network System based on Field Programmable Gate Array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wei; WANG Wei; MA Yi-mei; WANG Jin-hai

    2008-01-01

    Presented is a global dynamic reconfiguration design of an artificial neural network based on field programmable gate array(FPGA). Discussed are the dynamic reconfiguration principles and methods. Proposed is a global dynamic reconfiguration scheme using Xilinx FPGA and platform flash. Using the revision capabilities of Xilinx XCF32P platform flash, an artificial neural network based on Xilinx XC2V30P Virtex-Ⅱ can be reconfigured dynamically from back propagation(BP) learning algorithms to BP network testing algorithms. The experimental results indicate that the scheme is feasible, and that, using dynamic reconfiguration technology, FPGA resource utilization can be reduced remarkably.

  14. Reversible Programmable Logic Array (RPLA) using Feynman & MUX Gates for Low Power Industrial Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Singla, Pradeep

    2012-01-01

    This paper present the research work directed towards the design of reversible programmable logic array using very high speed integrated circuit hardware description language (VHDL). Reversible logic circuits have significant importance in bioinformatics, optical information processing, CMOS design etc. In this paper the authors propose the design of new RPLA using Feynman & MUX gate.VHDL based codes of reversible gates with simulating results are shown .This proposed RPLA may be further used to design any reversible logic function or Boolean function (Adder, subtractor etc.) which dissipate very low or ideally no heat.

  15. [Application of FTIR array of correlation coefficient to the identification of Salvia miltiorrhizae Bge].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, De-Ren; Zhou, Qun; Yu, Lu; Sun, Su-Qin

    2007-09-01

    Based on the fingerprint infrared spectrum database, array of correlation coefficient has been first applied to identify traditional Chinese medicine slviae miltiorrhizae Bge. from different producing areas and growing environments. The result showed that the setting of high correlation coefficient in particular ranges of spectrum could differentiate the producing area of Slviae, while the setting of low correlation coefficient threshold of R5 to R7 ranges could identify wild or cultivated samples. This approach seems to be not only a simple but also an accurate method for identifying the character of different Slviae.

  16. Comparative GO: a web application for comparative gene ontology and gene ontology-based gene selection in bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Fruzangohar

    Full Text Available The primary means of classifying new functions for genes and proteins relies on Gene Ontology (GO, which defines genes/proteins using a controlled vocabulary in terms of their Molecular Function, Biological Process and Cellular Component. The challenge is to present this information to researchers to compare and discover patterns in multiple datasets using visually comprehensible and user-friendly statistical reports. Importantly, while there are many GO resources available for eukaryotes, there are none suitable for simultaneous, graphical and statistical comparison between multiple datasets. In addition, none of them supports comprehensive resources for bacteria. By using Streptococcus pneumoniae as a model, we identified and collected GO resources including genes, proteins, taxonomy and GO relationships from NCBI, UniProt and GO organisations. Then, we designed database tables in PostgreSQL database server and developed a Java application to extract data from source files and loaded into database automatically. We developed a PHP web application based on Model-View-Control architecture, used a specific data structure as well as current and novel algorithms to estimate GO graphs parameters. We designed different navigation and visualization methods on the graphs and integrated these into graphical reports. This tool is particularly significant when comparing GO groups between multiple samples (including those of pathogenic bacteria from different sources simultaneously. Comparing GO protein distribution among up- or down-regulated genes from different samples can improve understanding of biological pathways, and mechanism(s of infection. It can also aid in the discovery of genes associated with specific function(s for investigation as a novel vaccine or therapeutic targets.http://turing.ersa.edu.au/BacteriaGO.

  17. End-Fire Phased Array 5G Antenna Design Using Leaf-Shaped Bow-Tie Elements for 28/38 GHz MIMO Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ojaroudiparchin, Naser; Shen, Ming; Pedersen, Gert F.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a new design of mm-Wave phased array 5G antenna for multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) applications has been introduced. Two identical linear phased arrays with eight leaf-shaped bow-tie antenna elements have been used at different sides of the mobile-phone PCB. An Arlon AR 350...... at 28 and 38 GHz which both are powerful candidates to be the carrier frequency of the future 5G cellular networks....

  18. Gene editing for cell engineering: trends and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sanjeev K; Shukla, Pratyoosh

    2016-08-18

    Gene editing with all its own advantages in molecular biology applications has made easy manipulation of various production hosts with the discovery and implementation of modern gene editing tools such as Crispr (Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats), TALENs (Transcription activator-like effector nucleases) and ZFNs (Zinc finger nucleases). With the advent of these modern tools, it is now possible to manipulate the genome of industrial production hosts such as yeast and mammalian cells which allows developing a potential and cost effective recombinant therapeutic protein. These tools also allow single editing to multiple genes for knocking-in or knocking-out of a host genome quickly in an efficient manner. A recent study on "multiplexed" gene editing revolutionized the knock-out and knock-in events of yeast and CHO, mammalian cells genome for metabolic engineering as well as high, stable, and consistent expression of a transgene encoding complex therapeutic protein such as monoclonal antibody. The gene of interest can either be integrated or deleted at single or multiple loci depending on the strategy and production requirement. This review will give a gist of all the modern tools with a brief description and advances in genetic manipulation using three major tools being implemented for the modification of such hosts with the emphasis on the use of Crispr-Cas9 for the "multiplexing gene-editing approach" for genetic manipulation of yeast and CHO mammalian hosts that ultimately leads to a fast track product development with consistent, improved product yield, quality, and thus affordability for a population at large.

  19. Array-based techniques for fingerprinting medicinal herbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Charlie

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Poor quality control of medicinal herbs has led to instances of toxicity, poisoning and even deaths. The fundamental step in quality control of herbal medicine is accurate identification of herbs. Array-based techniques have recently been adapted to authenticate or identify herbal plants. This article reviews the current array-based techniques, eg oligonucleotides microarrays, gene-based probe microarrays, Suppression Subtractive Hybridization (SSH-based arrays, Diversity Array Technology (DArT and Subtracted Diversity Array (SDA. We further compare these techniques according to important parameters such as markers, polymorphism rates, restriction enzymes and sample type. The applicability of the array-based methods for fingerprinting depends on the availability of genomics and genetics of the species to be fingerprinted. For the species with few genome sequence information but high polymorphism rates, SDA techniques are particularly recommended because they require less labour and lower material cost.

  20. Application of Neuro-Wavelet Algorithm in Ultrasonic-Phased Array Nondestructive Testing of Polyethylene Pipelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Bohlouli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyethylene (PE pipelines with electrofusion (EF joining is an essential method of transportation of gas energy. EF joints are weak points for leakage and therefore, Nondestructive testing (NDT methods including ultrasonic array technology are necessary. This paper presents a practical NDT method of fusion joints of polyethylene piping using intelligent ultrasonic image processing techniques. In the proposed method, to detect the defects of electrofusion joints, the NDT is applied based on an ANN-Wavelet method as a digital image processing technique. The proposed approach includes four steps. First an ultrasonic-phased array technique is used to provide real time images of high resolution. In the second step, the images are preprocessed by digital image processing techniques for noise reduction and detection of ROI (Region of Interest. Furthermore, to make more improvement on the images, mathematical morphology techniques such as dilation and erosion are applied. In the 3rd step, a wavelet transform is used to develop a feature vector containing 3-dimensional information on various types of defects. In the final step, all the feature vectors are classified through a backpropagation-based ANN algorithm. The obtained results show that the proposed algorithms are highly reliable and also precise for NDT monitoring.

  1. Matched field noise suppression: Principle with application to towed hydrophone line array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Discrete noise source suppression in underwater acoustic channel has attracted great attention in recent years. The paper proposes a new principle for dealing with the problem. This new principle is called matched field noise suppression (MFNS). Based on a previous work of the authors group, a full understanding about how a discrete noise source shows effects on the performance of a towed hydrophone line array has been obtained. In light of that finding, MFNS is proposed, which explores and utilizes the characteristics of the noise transmission channel to achieve much greater suppression of the noise in comparison with existing approaches. MFNS combines the concept of matched field processing (MFP) and optimal sensor array processing (OSAP) together to suppress the discrete noise source and to maintain an optimal beam for receiving far-field wanted plane wave signals. A MFNS beam-former is deduced in constraint with signal plane-wave response being unit and noise matched field response being zero. A closed-form solution of the weight vector for the beam-former is given. Computer simulation results agree well to the theoretical analysis.

  2. Fabrication and Electrochemical Characterization of Micro- and Nanoelectrode Arrays for Sensor Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Said, Nur Azura Mohd; Twomey, Karen; Ogurtsov, Vladimir I; Herzog, Gregoire [Tyndall National Institute, Lee Maltings, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Arrigan, Damien W M, E-mail: gregoire.herzog@tyndall.ie [Nanochemistry Research Institute, Department of Chemistry, Curtin University, Perth (Australia)

    2011-08-17

    This paper describes the fabrication of microelectrode arrays, with two different geometries: disc (Designs d1 and d2) and band (Designs b1, b2 and b3) using three critical dimensions (100 nm, 1 {mu}m and 10 {mu}m) leading to 5 different designs, fabricated by the combination of UV photolithographic and e-beam lithographic techniques. Three silicon nitride layer thicknesses (200, 300 and 500 nm) were chosen to determine an optimized transducer design and fabrication process. Cyclic voltammetry characterisation using a simple redox probe ion, ferreocenecarboxylic acid in phosphate buffered saline electrolyte solution, demonstrated steady-state voltammetric curves for d1, d2, b1 and b2. A good agreement between experimental and theoretical data is found for devices d1, d2, b1 and b2. The experimental current for b3, on the other hand, is much lower compared to the calculated one- perhaps due to the overlapping of the diffusion layers of neighbouring microelectrodes in the array.

  3. Reconfigurable Plasma Antenna Array by Using Fluorescent Tube for Wi-Fi Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Ja’afar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new design of reconfigurable plasma antenna array using commercial fluorescent tube. A round shape reconfigurable plasma antenna array is proposed to collimate beam radiated by an omnidirectional antenna (monopole antenna operates at 2.4GHz in particular direction. The antenna design is consisted of monopole antenna located at the center of circular aluminum ground. The monopole antenna is surrounded by a cylindrical shell of conducting plasma. The plasma shield consists of 12 commercial fluorescent tubes aligned in series containing a mixture of Argon gas and mercury vapor which upon electrification forms plasma columns. The plasma behaves as a conductor and acts as a reflector in radiation, in the condition where plasma frequency,ωp is higher than operating frequency. From this concepts, when all plasma elements are activated or switched to ON, the radiation signal from monopole antenna will trapped inside the plasma blanket and meanwhile when one or more plasma elements is deactivated (switched OFF, the radiation from monopole antenna will escape. This antenna has the capability to change its patterns with beam direction at 0°, 30°, 60°, 90°, 120°, 150°, 180°, 210°, 240°, 270°, 300° and 330° at frequency 2.4 GHz. The proposed antenna has been successfully fabricated and measured with conclusive results.

  4. Microfabrication Technology for Large Lekid Arrays: From Nika2 to Future Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goupy, J.; Adane, A.; Benoit, A.; Bourrion, O.; Calvo, M.; Catalano, A.; Coiffard, G.; Hoarau, C.; Leclercq, S.; Le Sueur, H.; Macias-Perez, J.; Monfardini, A.; Peck, I.; Schuster, K.

    2016-08-01

    The lumped element kinetic inductance detectors (LEKID) demonstrated full maturity in the New IRAM KID Arrays (NIKA) instrument. These results allow directly comparing LEKID performance with other competing technologies (TES, doped silicon) in the mm and sub-mm range. A continuing effort is ongoing to improve the microfabrication technologies and concepts in order to satisfy the requirements of new instruments. More precisely, future satellites dedicated to cosmic microwave background (CMB) studies will require the same focal plane technology to cover, at least, the frequency range of 60-600 GHz. Aluminium LEKID developed for NIKA have so far demonstrated, under real telescope conditions, a performance approaching photon noise limitation in the band 120-300 GHz. By implementing superconducting bi-layers, we recently demonstrated LEKID arrays working in the range 80-120 GHz and with sensitivities approaching the goals for CMB missions. NIKA itself (350 pixels) is followed by a more ambitious project requiring several thousand (3000-5000) pixels. NIKA2 has been installed in October 2015 at the IRAM 30-m telescope. We will describe in detail the technological improvements that allowed a relatively harmless tenfold up-scaling in pixels count without degrading the initial sensitivity. In particular, we will briefly describe a solution to simplify the difficult fabrication step linked to the slot-line propagation mode in coplanar waveguide.

  5. Strigolactone biology: genes, functional genomics, epigenetics and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhzoum, Abdullah; Yousefzadi, Morteza; Malik, Sonia; Gantet, Pascal; Tremouillaux-Guiller, Jocelyne

    2017-03-01

    Strigolactones (SLs) represent an important new plant hormone class marked by their multifunctional role in plant and rhizosphere interactions. These compounds stimulate hyphal branching in arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and seed germination of root parasitic plants. In addition, they are involved in the control of plant architecture by inhibiting bud outgrowth as well as many other morphological and developmental processes together with other plant hormones such as auxins and cytokinins. The biosynthetic pathway of SLs that are derived from carotenoids was partially decrypted based on the identification of mutants from a variety of plant species. Only a few SL biosynthetic and regulated genes and related regulatory transcription factors have been identified. However, functional genomics and epigenetic studies started to give first elements on the modality of the regulation of SLs related genes. Since they control plant architecture and plant-rhizosphere interaction, SLs start to be used for agronomical and biotechnological applications. Furthermore, the genes involved in the SL biosynthetic pathway and genes regulated by SL constitute interesting targets for plant breeding. Therefore, it is necessary to decipher and better understand the genetic determinants of their regulation at different levels.

  6. Establishment and application of a multiplex genetic mutation-detection method of lung cancer based on MassARRAY platform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Xia Tian; Xu-Chao Zhang; Zhen Wang; Jian-Guang Chen; Shi-Liang Chen; Wei-Bang Guo; Yi-Long Wu

    2016-01-01

    Objective:This study aims to establish a method for highly parallel multiplexed detection of genetic mutations in Chinese lung cancer samples through Agena iPLEX chemistry and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight analysis on MassARRAY mass spectrometry platform. Methods:We reviewed the related literature and data on lung cancer treatments. We also identified 99 mutation hot spots in 13 target genes closely related to the pathogenesis, drug resistance, and metastasis of lung cancer. A total of 297 primers, composed of 99 paired forward and reverse amplification primers and 99 matched extension primers, were designed using Assay Design software. The detection method was established by analyzing eight cell lines and six lung cancer specimens. The proposed method was then validated through comparisons by using a LungCartaTM kit. The sensitivity and specificity of the proposed method were evaluated by directly sequencingEGFR andKRAS genes in 100 lung cancer cases. Results:The proposed method was able to detect multiplex genetic mutations in lung cancer cell lines. This finding was consistent with the observations on previously reported mutations. The proposed method can also detect such mutations in clinical lung cancer specimens. This result was consistent with the observations with LungCartaTM kit. However, anFGFR2 mutation was detected only through the proposed method. The measured sensitivity and specificity were 100% and 96.3%, respectively. Conclusions:The proposed MassARRAY technology-based multiplex method can detect genetic mutations in Chinese lung cancer patients. Therefore, the proposed method can be applied to detect mutations in other cancer tissues.

  7. Genome-wide SNPs and re-sequencing of growth habit and inflorescence genes in barley: implications for association mapping in germplasm arrays varying in size and structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muehlbauer Gary J

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Considerations in applying association mapping (AM to plant breeding are population structure and size: not accounting for structure and/or using small populations can lead to elevated false-positive rates. The principal determinants of population structure in cultivated barley are growth habit and inflorescence type. Both are under complex genetic control: growth habit is controlled by the epistatic interactions of several genes. For inflorescence type, multiple loss-of-function alleles in one gene lead to the same phenotype. We used these two traits as models for assessing the effectiveness of AM. This research was initiated using the CAP Core germplasm array (n = 102 assembled at the start of the Barley Coordinated Agricultural Project (CAP. This array was genotyped with 4,608 SNPs and we re-sequenced genes involved in morphology, growth and development. Larger arrays of breeding germplasm were subsequently genotyped and phenotyped under the auspices of the CAP project. This provided sets of 247 accessions phenotyped for growth habit and 2,473 accessions phenotyped for inflorescence type. Each of the larger populations was genotyped with 3,072 SNPs derived from the original set of 4,608. Results Significant associations with SNPs located in the vicinity of the loci involved in growth habit and inflorescence type were found in the CAP Core. Differentiation of true and spurious associations was not possible without a priori knowledge of the candidate genes, based on re-sequencing. The re-sequencing data were used to define allele types of the determinant genes based on functional polymorphisms. In a second round of association mapping, these synthetic markers based on allele types gave the most significant associations. When the synthetic markers were used as anchor points for analysis of interactions, we detected other known-function genes and candidate loci involved in the control of growth habit and inflorescence type. We

  8. Identification of salt-stress responsive genes in rice (Oryza sativa L.) by cDNA array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何新建; 陈建权; 张志刚; 张劲松; 陈受宜

    2002-01-01

    To identify salt stress-responsive genes, we constructed a cDNA library with the salt-tolerant rice cultivar, Lansheng. About 15000 plasmids were extracted and dotted on filters with Biomeck 2000 HDRT system or by hand. Thirty genes were identified to display altered expression levels responding to 150 mmol/L NaCl. Among them eighteen genes were up-regulated and the remainders down-regulated. Twenty-seven genes have their homologous genes in GenBank Databases. The expression of twelve genes was studied by Northern analysis. Based on the functions, these genes can be classified into five categories, including photosynthesis-related gene, transport-related gene, metabolism-related gene, stress- or resistance-related gene and the others with various functions. The results showed that salt stress influenced many aspects of rice growth. Some of these genes may play important roles in plant salt tolerance.

  9. Positron emission tomography reporter genes and reporter probes: gene and cell therapy applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaghoubi, Shahriar S; Campbell, Dean O; Radu, Caius G; Czernin, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging reporter genes (IRGs) and PET reporter probes (PRPs) are amongst the most valuable tools for gene and cell therapy. PET IRGs/PRPs can be used to non-invasively monitor all aspects of the kinetics of therapeutic transgenes and cells in all types of living mammals. This technology is generalizable and can allow long-term kinetics monitoring. In gene therapy, PET IRGs/PRPs can be used for whole-body imaging of therapeutic transgene expression, monitoring variations in the magnitude of transgene expression over time. In cell or cellular gene therapy, PET IRGs/PRPs can be used for whole-body monitoring of therapeutic cell locations, quantity at all locations, survival and proliferation over time and also possibly changes in characteristics or function over time. In this review, we have classified PET IRGs/PRPs into two groups based on the source from which they were derived: human or non-human. This classification addresses the important concern of potential immunogenicity in humans, which is important for expansion of PET IRG imaging in clinical trials. We have then discussed the application of this technology in gene/cell therapy and described its use in these fields, including a summary of using PET IRGs/PRPs in gene and cell therapy clinical trials. This review concludes with a discussion of the future direction of PET IRGs/PRPs and recommends cell and gene therapists collaborate with molecular imaging experts early in their investigations to choose a PET IRG/PRP system suitable for progression into clinical trials.

  10. Positron Emission Tomography Reporter Genes and Reporter Probes: Gene and Cell Therapy Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahriar S. Yaghoubi, Dean O. Campbell, Caius G. Radu, Johannes Czernin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Positron emission tomography (PET imaging reporter genes (IRGs and PET reporter probes (PRPs are amongst the most valuable tools for gene and cell therapy. PET IRGs/PRPs can be used to non-invasively monitor all aspects of the kinetics of therapeutic transgenes and cells in all types of living mammals. This technology is generalizable and can allow long-term kinetics monitoring. In gene therapy, PET IRGs/PRPs can be used for whole-body imaging of therapeutic transgene expression, monitoring variations in the magnitude of transgene expression over time. In cell or cellular gene therapy, PET IRGs/PRPs can be used for whole-body monitoring of therapeutic cell locations, quantity at all locations, survival and proliferation over time and also possibly changes in characteristics or function over time. In this review, we have classified PET IRGs/PRPs into two groups based on the source from which they were derived: human or non-human. This classification addresses the important concern of potential immunogenicity in humans, which is important for expansion of PET IRG imaging in clinical trials. We have then discussed the application of this technology in gene/cell therapy and described its use in these fields, including a summary of using PET IRGs/PRPs in gene and cell therapy clinical trials. This review concludes with a discussion of the future direction of PET IRGs/PRPs and recommends cell and gene therapists collaborate with molecular imaging experts early in their investigations to choose a PET IRG/PRP system suitable for progression into clinical trials.

  11. Clinical array-based karyotyping of breast cancer with equivocal HER2 status resolves gene copy number and reveals chromosome 17 complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zadeh Soheila

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HER2 gene copy status, and concomitant administration of trastuzumab (Herceptin, remains one of the best examples of targeted cancer therapy based on understanding the genomic etiology of disease. However, newly diagnosed breast cancer cases with equivocal HER2 results present a challenge for the oncologist who must make treatment decisions despite the patient's unresolved HER2 status. In some cases both immunohistochemistry (IHC and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH are reported as equivocal, whereas in other cases IHC results and FISH are discordant for positive versus negative results. The recent validation of array-based, molecular karyotyping for clinical oncology testing provides an alternative method for determination of HER2 gene copy number status in cases remaining unresolved by traditional methods. Methods In the current study, DNA extracted from 20 formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE tissue samples from newly diagnosed cases of invasive ductal carcinoma referred to our laboratory with unresolved HER2 status, were analyzed using a clinically validated genomic array containing 127 probes covering the HER2 amplicon, the pericentromeric regions, and both chromosome 17 arms. Results Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH analysis of chromosome 17 resolved HER2 gene status in [20/20] (100% of cases and revealed additional chromosome 17 copy number changes in [18/20] (90% of cases. Array CGH analysis also revealed two false positives and one false negative by FISH due to "ratio skewing" caused by chromosomal gains and losses in the centromeric region. All cases with complex rearrangements of chromosome 17 showed genome-wide chromosomal instability. Conclusions These results illustrate the analytical power of array-based genomic analysis as a clinical laboratory technique for resolution of HER2 status in breast cancer cases with equivocal results. The frequency of complex chromosome 17

  12. Array based detection of antibiotic resistance genes in Gram negative bacteria isolated from retail poultry meat in the UK and Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeece, Grainne; Naughton, Violetta; Woodward, Martin J; Dooley, James S G; Naughton, Patrick J

    2014-06-02

    The use of antibiotics in birds and animals intended for human consumption within the European Union (EU) and elsewhere has been subject to regulation prohibiting the use of antimicrobials as growth promoters and the use of last resort antibiotics in an attempt to reduce the spread of multi-resistant Gram negative bacteria. Given the inexorable spread of antibiotic resistance there is an increasing need for improved monitoring of our food. Using selective media, Gram negative bacteria were isolated from retail chicken of UK-Intensively reared (n=27), Irish-Intensively reared (n=19) and UK-Free range (n=30) origin and subjected to an oligonucleotide based array system for the detection of 47 clinically relevant antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and two integrase genes. High incidences of β-lactamase genes were noted in all sample types, acc (67%), cmy (80%), fox (55%) and tem (40%) while chloramphenicol resistant determinants were detected in bacteria from the UK poultry portions and were absent in bacteria from the Irish samples. Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) was used to qualitatively analyse the Gram negative population in the samples and showed the expected diversity based on band stabbing and DNA sequencing. The array system proved to be a quick method for the detection of antibiotic resistance gene (ARG) burden within a mixed Gram negative bacterial population.

  13. A general framework for optimization of probes for gene expression microarray and its application to the fungus Podospora anserina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bidard Frédérique

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of new microarray technologies makes custom long oligonucleotide arrays affordable for many experimental applications, notably gene expression analyses. Reliable results depend on probe design quality and selection. Probe design strategy should cope with the limited accuracy of de novo gene prediction programs, and annotation up-dating. We present a novel in silico procedure which addresses these issues and includes experimental screening, as an empirical approach is the best strategy to identify optimal probes in the in silico outcome. Findings We used four criteria for in silico probe selection: cross-hybridization, hairpin stability, probe location relative to coding sequence end and intron position. This latter criterion is critical when exon-intron gene structure predictions for intron-rich genes are inaccurate. For each coding sequence (CDS, we selected a sub-set of four probes. These probes were included in a test microarray, which was used to evaluate the hybridization behavior of each probe. The best probe for each CDS was selected according to three experimental criteria: signal-to-noise ratio, signal reproducibility, and representative signal intensities. This procedure was applied for the development of a gene expression Agilent platform for the filamentous fungus Podospora anserina and the selection of a single 60-mer probe for each of the 10,556 P. anserina CDS. Conclusions A reliable gene expression microarray version based on the Agilent 44K platform was developed with four spot replicates of each probe to increase statistical significance of analysis.

  14. The Development of Low Threshold Laser Arrays and Their Applications in Parallel Optical Datalinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hanmin

    We present the analytical and experimental study for the development of ultra-low threshold InGaAs/GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well semiconductor lasers and laser arrays grown on non planar substrates by MOCVD. This study has resulted in the demonstration of some of the lowest threshold currents and current densities yet reported as well as the demonstration of multichannel optical datalinks working at 1Gbit/sec/channel. The gain properties of the InGaAs/GaAs strained quantum wells and the lasing properties of InGaAs/GaAs lasers were theoretically analysed. Using MOCVD growth technique, the growth condition for InGaAs/GaAs quantum wells and InGaAs/GaAs broad area lasers were optimized. InGaAs/GaAs broad area laser threshold current density as low as 56 A/cm^{-2} were obtained. The growth and doping properties of InGaAs/GaAs quantum wells and AlGaAs bulk layer on non planar substrates were studied and the unique properties we learned from the above study were used to design and fabricate a new buried heterostructure InGaAs/GaAs laser for low threshold and high efficiency operation. Record low threshold current of 0.5 mA and 0.6 mA were obtained for as cleaved DQW lasers and SQW lasers respectively. HR coated SQW laser threshold currents as low as 0.15 mA were obtained which is the lowest reported threshold current in a diode laser. This new technique produces high yield and high laser uniformity because of the simple growth and processing procedures involved. Highly uniform InGaAs/GaAs SQW and DQW laser arrays with sub-milliampere threshold currents were obtained. Using the above low threshold lasers, a unique three terminal laser structure that is suitable for high speed, high efficiency, large signal, digital modulation was investigated. Three terminal laser arrays were used in a wide bandwidth parallel optical datalink system. High data transfer rate (1GBit/sec/channel) and low bit error rate (BER) ({phase margin were obtained. This parallel optical datalink system can

  15. Investigation of the Optical and Sensing Characteristics of Nanoparticle Arrays for High Temperature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharmalingam, Gnanaprakash

    realized through control of the shape and geometry of the catalytically active Au nanoparticles. While this is not possible through the layer by layer sputter deposition approach, this level of control has been realized through the use of electron beam lithography to fabricate nanocomposite arrays. Sensing results towards the detection of H2 will be highlighted with specific concerns related to optimization of these nanorod arrays detailed. The proposed work will discuss the various parameters for optimization of these arrays, which would enable them to be used as reliable, sensitive and selective harsh environmental sensors.

  16. Polycistronic transcription of fused cassettes and identification of translation initiation signals in an unusual gene cassette array from Pseudomonas aeruginosa [version 3; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Érica L. Fonseca

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The gene cassettes found in class 1 integrons are generally promoterless units composed by an open reading frame (ORF, a short 5’ untranslated region (UTR and a 3’ recombination site (attC. Fused gene cassettes are generated by partial or total loss of the attC from the first cassette in an array, creating, in some cases, a fusion with the ORF from the next cassette. These structures are rare and little is known about their mechanisms of mobilization and expression. The aim of this study was to evaluate the dynamic of mobilization and transcription of the gcu14-blaGES-1/aacA4 gene cassette array, which harbours a fused gene cassette represented by blaGES-1/aacA4. The cassette array was analyzed by Northern blot and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR in order to assess the transcription mechanism of blaGES-1/aacA4 fused cassette. Also, inverse polymerase chain reactions (PCR were performed to detect the free circular forms of gcu14, blaGES-1 and aacA4. The Northern blot and real time RT-PCR revealed a polycistronic transcription, in which the fused cassette blaGES-1/aacA4 is transcribed as a unique gene, while gcu14 (with a canonical attC recombination site has a monocistronic transcription. The gcu14 cassette, closer to the weak configuration of cassette promoter (PcW, had a higher transcription level than blaGES-1/aacA4, indicating that the cassette position affects the transcript amounts. The presence of ORF-11 at attI1, immediately preceding gcu14, and of a Shine-Dalgarno sequence upstream blaGES-1/aacA4 composes a scenario for the occurrence of array translation. Inverse PCR generated amplicons corresponding to gcu14, gcu14-aacA4 and gcu14-blaGES-1/aacA4 free circular forms, but not to blaGES-1 and aacA4 alone, indicating that the GES-1 truncated attC is not substrate of integrase activity and that these genes are mobilized together as a unique cassette. This study was original in showing the transcription

  17. Current Approach in Surface Plasmons for Thin Film and Wire Array Solar Cell Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keya Zhou

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Surface plasmons, which exist along the interface of a metal and a dielectric, have been proposed as an efficient alternative method for light trapping in solar cells during the past ten years. With unique properties such as superior light scattering, optical trapping, guide mode coupling, near field concentration, and hot-electron generation, metallic nanoparticles or nanostructures can be tailored to a certain geometric design to enhance solar cell conversion efficiency and to reduce the material costs. In this article, we review current approaches on different kinds of solar cells, such as crystalline silicon (c-Si and amorphous silicon (a-Si thin film solar cells, organic solar cells, nanowire array solar cells, and single nanowire solar cells.

  18. Optical characterization of nonimaging dish concentrator for the application of dense-array concentrator photovoltaic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Ming-Hui; Chong, Kok-Keong; Wong, Chee-Woon

    2014-01-20

    Optimization of the design of a nonimaging dish concentrator (NIDC) for a dense-array concentrator photovoltaic system is presented. A new algorithm has been developed to determine configuration of facet mirrors in a NIDC. Analytical formulas were derived to analyze the optical performance of a NIDC and then compared with a simulated result obtained from a numerical method. Comprehensive analysis of optical performance via analytical method has been carried out based on facet dimension and focal distance of the concentrator with a total reflective area of 120 m2. The result shows that a facet dimension of 49.8 cm, focal distance of 8 m, and solar concentration ratio of 411.8 suns is the most optimized design for the lowest cost-per-output power, which is US$1.93 per watt.

  19. Enhanced extraordinary optical transmission (EOT) through arrays of bridged nanohole pairs and their sensing applications

    KAUST