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Sample records for gene allele-specific binding

  1. Allele-specific locus binding and genome editing by CRISPR at the p16INK4a locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Toshitsugu; Yuno, Miyuki; Fujii, Hodaka

    2016-07-28

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) system has been adopted for a wide range of biological applications including genome editing. In some cases, dissection of genome functions requires allele-specific genome editing, but the use of CRISPR for this purpose has not been studied in detail. In this study, using the p16INK4a gene in HCT116 as a model locus, we investigated whether chromatin states, such as CpG methylation, or a single-nucleotide gap form in a target site can be exploited for allele-specific locus binding and genome editing by CRISPR in vivo. First, we showed that allele-specific locus binding and genome editing could be achieved by targeting allele-specific CpG-methylated regions, which was successful for one, but not all guide RNAs. In this regard, molecular basis underlying the success remains elusive at this stage. Next, we demonstrated that an allele-specific single-nucleotide gap form could be employed for allele-specific locus binding and genome editing by CRISPR, although it was important to avoid CRISPR tolerance of a single nucleotide mismatch brought about by mismatched base skipping. Our results provide information that might be useful for applications of CRISPR in studies of allele-specific functions in the genomes.

  2. A functional polymorphism in the Eta-1 promoter is associated with allele specific binding to the transcription factor Sp1 and elevated gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hummelshoj, Tina; Ryder, Lars P; Madsen, Hans O

    2005-01-01

    Early T lymphocyte activator 1 (Eta-1), also known as Osteopontin, is a cytokine produced by macrophages and T lymphocytes. It is involved in the regulation of IL-12 and IL-10 expression in macrophages and stimulates the polarization of T cells to the Th1 subset. Three promoter polymorphisms...... of the human Eta-1 gene, -443T/C, -156delG/G, -66T/G, were investigated for possible influence on gene expression. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) with nuclear extract from the human myeloid leukaemia premonocyte cell line, THP-1, revealed sequence specific binding of the transcription factor Sp1...... to the -66T allele but not the -66G allele, and haplotype -443C/-156G/-66T showed a marked increase in promoter activity of a luciferase reporter gene. Thus, a substitution of the T-base with G at position -66 in the Eta-1 promoter modulates the promoter activity of the Eta-1 gene, which might influence...

  3. Allele specific expression in worker reproduction genes in the bumblebee Bombus terrestris

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    Harindra E. Amarasinghe

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Methylation has previously been associated with allele specific expression in ants. Recently, we found methylation is important in worker reproduction in the bumblebee Bombus terrestris. Here we searched for allele specific expression in twelve genes associated with worker reproduction in bees. We found allele specific expression in Ecdysone 20 monooxygenase and IMP-L2-like. Although we were unable to confirm a genetic or epigenetic cause for this allele specific expression, the expression patterns of the two genes match those predicted for imprinted genes.

  4. BaalChIP: Bayesian analysis of allele-specific transcription factor binding in cancer genomes.

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    de Santiago, Ines; Liu, Wei; Yuan, Ke; O'Reilly, Martin; Chilamakuri, Chandra Sekhar Reddy; Ponder, Bruce A J; Meyer, Kerstin B; Markowetz, Florian

    2017-02-24

    Allele-specific measurements of transcription factor binding from ChIP-seq data are key to dissecting the allelic effects of non-coding variants and their contribution to phenotypic diversity. However, most methods of detecting an allelic imbalance assume diploid genomes. This assumption severely limits their applicability to cancer samples with frequent DNA copy-number changes. Here we present a Bayesian statistical approach called BaalChIP to correct for the effect of background allele frequency on the observed ChIP-seq read counts. BaalChIP allows the joint analysis of multiple ChIP-seq samples across a single variant and outperforms competing approaches in simulations. Using 548 ENCODE ChIP-seq and six targeted FAIRE-seq samples, we show that BaalChIP effectively corrects allele-specific analysis for copy-number variation and increases the power to detect putative cis-acting regulatory variants in cancer genomes.

  5. Quantification of allele-specific expression of a gene encoding strawberry polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein (PGIP) using Pyrosequencing((TM))

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaart, J.G.; Mehli, L.; Schouten, H.J.

    2005-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that allele-specific differences in gene expression are a common phenomenon. The extent to which differential allelic expression exists might be underestimated, due to the limited accuracy of the methods used so far. To demonstrate allele-specific expression, we investigated

  6. DEMETER DNA glycosylase establishes MEDEA polycomb gene self-imprinting by allele-specific demethylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehring, Mary; Huh, Jin Hoe; Hsieh, Tzung-Fu; Penterman, Jon; Choi, Yeonhee; Harada, John J; Goldberg, Robert B; Fischer, Robert L

    2006-02-10

    MEDEA (MEA) is an Arabidopsis Polycomb group gene that is imprinted in the endosperm. The maternal allele is expressed and the paternal allele is silent. MEA is controlled by DEMETER (DME), a DNA glycosylase required to activate MEA expression, and METHYLTRANSFERASE I (MET1), which maintains CG methylation at the MEA locus. Here we show that DME is responsible for endosperm maternal-allele-specific hypomethylation at the MEA gene. DME can excise 5-methylcytosine in vitro and when expressed in E. coli. Abasic sites opposite 5-methylcytosine inhibit DME activity and might prevent DME from generating double-stranded DNA breaks. Unexpectedly, paternal-allele silencing is not controlled by DNA methylation. Rather, Polycomb group proteins that are expressed from the maternal genome, including MEA, control paternal MEA silencing. Thus, DME establishes MEA imprinting by removing 5-methylcytosine to activate the maternal allele. MEA imprinting is subsequently maintained in the endosperm by maternal MEA silencing the paternal allele.

  7. H19-DMR allele-specific methylation analysis reveals epigenetic heterogeneity of CTCF binding site 6 but not of site 5 in head-and-neck carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Castro Valente Esteves, Leda Isabel; De Karla Cervigne, Nilva; Do Carmo Javaroni, Afonso

    2006-01-01

    Aberrant methylation of seven potential binding sites of the CTCF factor in the differentially methylated region upstream of the H19 gene (H19-DMR) has been suggested as critical for the regulation of IGF2 and H19 imprinted genes. In this study, we analyzed the allele-specific methylation pattern...... of CTCF binding sites 5 and 6 using methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme PCR followed by RFLP analysis in matched tumoral and lymphocyte DNA from head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients, as well as in lymphocyte DNA from control individuals who were cancer-free. The monoallelic...... methylation pattern was maintained in CTCF binding site 5 in 22 heterozygous out of 91 samples analyzed. Nevertheless, a biallelic methylation pattern was detected in CTCF binding site 6 in a subgroup of HNSCC patients as a somatic acquired feature of tumor cells. An atypical biallelic methylation was also...

  8. Efficient CRISPR-rAAV engineering of endogenous genes to study protein function by allele-specific RNAi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaulich, Manuel; Lee, Yeon J; Lönn, Peter; Springer, Aaron D; Meade, Bryan R; Dowdy, Steven F

    2015-04-20

    Gene knockout strategies, RNAi and rescue experiments are all employed to study mammalian gene function. However, the disadvantages of these approaches include: loss of function adaptation, reduced viability and gene overexpression that rarely matches endogenous levels. Here, we developed an endogenous gene knockdown/rescue strategy that combines RNAi selectivity with a highly efficient CRISPR directed recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus (rAAV) mediated gene targeting approach to introduce allele-specific mutations plus an allele-selective siRNA Sensitive (siSN) site that allows for studying gene mutations while maintaining endogenous expression and regulation of the gene of interest. CRISPR/Cas9 plus rAAV targeted gene-replacement and introduction of allele-specific RNAi sensitivity mutations in the CDK2 and CDK1 genes resulted in a >85% site-specific recombination of Neo-resistant clones versus ∼8% for rAAV alone. RNAi knockdown of wild type (WT) Cdk2 with siWT in heterozygotic knockin cells resulted in the mutant Cdk2 phenotype cell cycle arrest, whereas allele specific knockdown of mutant CDK2 with siSN resulted in a wild type phenotype. Together, these observations demonstrate the ability of CRISPR plus rAAV to efficiently recombine a genomic locus and tag it with a selective siRNA sequence that allows for allele-selective phenotypic assays of the gene of interest while it remains expressed and regulated under endogenous control mechanisms.

  9. High-throughput analysis of candidate imprinted genes and allele-specific gene expression in the human term placenta

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    Clark Taane G

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Imprinted genes show expression from one parental allele only and are important for development and behaviour. This extreme mode of allelic imbalance has been described for approximately 56 human genes. Imprinting status is often disrupted in cancer and dysmorphic syndromes. More subtle variation of gene expression, that is not parent-of-origin specific, termed 'allele-specific gene expression' (ASE is more common and may give rise to milder phenotypic differences. Using two allele-specific high-throughput technologies alongside bioinformatics predictions, normal term human placenta was screened to find new imprinted genes and to ascertain the extent of ASE in this tissue. Results Twenty-three family trios of placental cDNA, placental genomic DNA (gDNA and gDNA from both parents were tested for 130 candidate genes with the Sequenom MassArray system. Six genes were found differentially expressed but none imprinted. The Illumina ASE BeadArray platform was then used to test 1536 SNPs in 932 genes. The array was enriched for the human orthologues of 124 mouse candidate genes from bioinformatics predictions and 10 human candidate imprinted genes from EST database mining. After quality control pruning, a total of 261 informative SNPs (214 genes remained for analysis. Imprinting with maternal expression was demonstrated for the lymphocyte imprinted gene ZNF331 in human placenta. Two potential differentially methylated regions (DMRs were found in the vicinity of ZNF331. None of the bioinformatically predicted candidates tested showed imprinting except for a skewed allelic expression in a parent-specific manner observed for PHACTR2, a neighbour of the imprinted PLAGL1 gene. ASE was detected for two or more individuals in 39 candidate genes (18%. Conclusions Both Sequenom and Illumina assays were sensitive enough to study imprinting and strong allelic bias. Previous bioinformatics approaches were not predictive of new imprinted genes

  10. Ribosomal protein genes are highly enriched among genes with allele-specific expression in the interspecific F1 hybrid catfish.

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    Chen, Ailu; Wang, Ruijia; Liu, Shikai; Peatman, Eric; Sun, Luyang; Bao, Lisui; Jiang, Chen; Li, Chao; Li, Yun; Zeng, Qifan; Liu, Zhanjiang

    2016-06-01

    Interspecific hybrids provide a rich source for the analysis of allele-specific expression (ASE). In this work, we analyzed ASE in F1 hybrid catfish using RNA-Seq datasets. While the vast majority of genes were expressed with both alleles, 7-8 % SNPs exhibited significant differences in allele ratios of expression. Of the 66,251 and 177,841 SNPs identified from the datasets of the liver and gill, 5420 (8.2 %) and 13,390 (7.5 %) SNPs were identified as significant ASE-SNPs, respectively. With these SNPs, a total of 1519 and 3075 ASE-genes were identified. Gene Ontology analysis revealed that genes encoding cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins (RP) were highly enriched among ASE genes. Parent-of-origin was determined for 27 and 30 ASE RP genes in the liver and gill, respectively. The results indicated that genes from both channel catfish and blue catfish were involved in ASE. However, each RP gene appeared to be almost exclusively expressed from only one parent, indicating that ribosomes in the hybrid catfish were in the "hybrid" form. Overall representation of RP transcripts among the transcriptome appeared lower in the F1 hybrid catfish than in channel catfish or blue catfish, suggesting that the "hybrid" ribosomes may work more efficiently for translation in the F1 hybrid catfish.

  11. Polymorphism analysis of Chinese Theileria sergenti using allele-specific polymerase chain reaction of the major piroplasm surface protein gene.

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    Liu, Ai Hong; Guan, Gui Quan; Liu, Jun Long; Liu, Zhi Jie; Leblanc, Neil; Li, You Quan; Gao, Jin Liang; Ma, Mi Ling; Niu, Qing Li; Ren, Qiao Yun; Bai, Qi; Yin, Hong; Luo, Jian Xun

    2011-02-01

    Theileria sergenti is a tick-borne parasite found in many parts of the world. The major piroplasm surface protein (MPSP), a conserved protein in all Theileria species, has been used as a marker for epidemiological and phylogenetic studies of benign Theileria species. In this study, Chinese species of T. sergenti were characterized by allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequence analysis of the MPSP gene. Using universal or allele-specific primer sets for PCR amplification of the MPSP gene, 98 of 288 cattle blood samples, collected from 6 provinces in China, were found to be positive. Among the positive samples, only 3 allelic MPSP gene types (Chitose [C]-, Ikeda [I]-, and buffeli [B]-type) were successfully amplified. Moreover, the results revealed that the majority of the parasites sampled in this study were C- and I-type (prevalence of 84 and 69%, respectively), whereas the B-type was less common (prevalence of 36%). Co-infections with C-, I-, and B-type T. sergenti also were found. An additional known allele, Thai-type, was not detected. Phylogenetic analysis based on the MPSP gene sequences, including 3 standard stocks generated in the laboratory ( T. sergenti Wenchuan, T. sergenti Ningxian, and T. sergenti Liaoyang), revealed that the isolates of Chinese sergenti were comprised of at least 4 allelic MPSP gene types, i.e., C-, I-, B1-, and B2-type, and these parasites with 6 MPSP types 1-5 and 7 were present in China.

  12. Electromobility Shift Assay Reveals Evidence in Favor of Allele-Specific Binding of RUNX1 to the 5' Hypersensitive Site 4-Locus Control Region.

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    Dehghani, Hossein; Ghobakhloo, Sepideh; Neishabury, Maryam

    2016-08-01

    In our previous studies on the Iranian β-thalassemia (β-thal) patients, we identified an association between the severity of the β-thal phenotype and the polymorphic palindromic site at the 5' hypersensitive site 4-locus control region (5'HS4-LCR) of the β-globin gene cluster. Furthermore, a linkage disequilibrium was observed between this region and XmnI-HBG2 in the patient population. Based on this data, it was suggested that the well-recognized phenotype-ameliorating role assigned to positive XmnI could be associated with its linked elements in the LCR. To investigate the functional significance of polymorphisms at the 5'HS4-LCR, we studied its influence on binding of transcription factors. Web-based predictions of transcription factor binding revealed a binding site for runt-related transcription factor 1 (RUNX1), when the allele at the center of the palindrome (TGGGG(A/G)CCCCA) was A but not when it was G. Furthermore, electromobility shift assay (EMSA) presented evidence in support of allele-specific binding of RUNX1 to 5'HS4. Considering that RUNX1 is a well-known regulator of hematopoiesis, these preliminary data suggest the importance of further studies to confirm this interaction and consequently investigate its functional and phenotypical relevance. These studies could help us to understand the molecular mechanism behind the phenotype modifying role of the 5'HS4-LCR polymorphic palindromic region (rs16912979), which has been observed in previous studies.

  13. Powerful identification of cis-regulatory SNPs in human primary monocytes using allele-specific gene expression.

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    Jonas Carlsson Almlöf

    Full Text Available A large number of genome-wide association studies have been performed during the past five years to identify associations between SNPs and human complex diseases and traits. The assignment of a functional role for the identified disease-associated SNP is not straight-forward. Genome-wide expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL analysis is frequently used as the initial step to define a function while allele-specific gene expression (ASE analysis has not yet gained a wide-spread use in disease mapping studies. We compared the power to identify cis-acting regulatory SNPs (cis-rSNPs by genome-wide allele-specific gene expression (ASE analysis with that of traditional expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL mapping. Our study included 395 healthy blood donors for whom global gene expression profiles in circulating monocytes were determined by Illumina BeadArrays. ASE was assessed in a subset of these monocytes from 188 donors by quantitative genotyping of mRNA using a genome-wide panel of SNP markers. The performance of the two methods for detecting cis-rSNPs was evaluated by comparing associations between SNP genotypes and gene expression levels in sample sets of varying size. We found that up to 8-fold more samples are required for eQTL mapping to reach the same statistical power as that obtained by ASE analysis for the same rSNPs. The performance of ASE is insensitive to SNPs with low minor allele frequencies and detects a larger number of significantly associated rSNPs using the same sample size as eQTL mapping. An unequivocal conclusion from our comparison is that ASE analysis is more sensitive for detecting cis-rSNPs than standard eQTL mapping. Our study shows the potential of ASE mapping in tissue samples and primary cells which are difficult to obtain in large numbers.

  14. Ploidy mosaicism and allele-specific gene expression differences in the allopolyploid Squalius alburnoides

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    Matos Isa

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Squalius alburnoides is an Iberian cyprinid fish resulting from an interspecific hybridisation between Squalius pyrenaicus females (P genome and males of an unknown Anaecypris hispanica-like species (A genome. S. alburnoides is an allopolyploid hybridogenetic complex, which makes it a likely candidate for ploidy mosaicism occurrence, and is also an interesting model to address questions about gene expression regulation and genomic interactions. Indeed, it was previously suggested that in S. alburnoides triploids (PAA composition silencing of one of the three alleles (mainly of the P allele occurs. However, not a whole haplome is inactivated but a more or less random inactivation of alleles varying between individuals and even between organs of the same fish was seen. In this work we intended to correlate expression differences between individuals and/or between organs to the occurrence of mosaicism, evaluating if mosaics could explain previous observations and its impact on the assessment of gene expression patterns. Results To achieve our goal, we developed flow cytometry and cell sorting protocols for this system generating more homogenous cellular and transcriptional samples. With this set-up we detected 10% ploidy mosaicism within the S. alburnoides complex, and determined the allelic expression profiles of ubiquitously expressed genes (rpl8; gapdh and β-actin in cells from liver and kidney of mosaic and non-mosaic individuals coming from different rivers over a wide geographic range. Conclusions Ploidy mosaicism occurs sporadically within the S. alburnoides complex, but in a frequency significantly higher than reported for other organisms. Moreover, we could exclude the influence of this phenomenon on the detection of variable allelic expression profiles of ubiquitously expressed genes (rpl8; gapdh and β-actin in cells from liver and kidney of triploid individuals. Finally, we determined that the expression patterns

  15. Allele-specific expression of the low density lipoprotein receptor gene

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    Minnich, A.; Lussier-Cacan, S.; Roy, M. [Clincial Research Institute of Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    1994-09-01

    Approximately 60% of familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) in French Canadians is due to a > 10 kb deletion of the promoter region of the gene encoding the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor (LDL-R), allowing determination of the influence of a single LDL-R allele on phenotypic expression of FH. Normal allele haplotypes of approximately 250 heterozygotes were determined with 7 RFLPs. In vitro maximal LDL-R activity of blood lymphocytes from a subset of approximately 150 heterozygotes, measured by immunocytofluorometry, was significantly higher (20 to 30%) in subjects with LDL-R normal allele haplotype G (n=11), and O (n=7) compared to the most frequent haplotype F (n=43), while no differences were observed among F, E (n=11), and the 2 other most prevalent haplotypes (n=43). LDL-R mRNA in these lymphocytes was significantly elevated 2.3-, 1.7-, and 1.8- fold, in G, O, and E, respectively, compared to F, while no significant differences were apparent between F and the other two most frequent haplotyes. Large interindividual variability in lymphocyte LDL-R mRNA levels and activity was observed even among subjects with the same LDL-R normal allele haplotype. However, maximally induced lymphocyte LDL-R mRNA levels correlated poorly with levels measured in freshly isolated cells (n=14). Relative to haplotype F (n=47 women (W), 39 men (M)), mean plasma LDL cholesterol levels adjusted for age and apolipoprotein E genotype were 5-10% lower in men and women with haplotypes G (n=16 W, 12 M) and O (n=8 W, 6 M), and 20% lower in 7 W with haplotype E. These results suggest that (1) normal LDL-R allele haplotype G and O may contain sequence variations which confer relatively high gene expression and (2) environmental and genetic influences other than the LDL-R gene contribute substantially to variability in LDL-R expression and plasma LDL cholesterol levels in French Canadian FH heterozygotes.

  16. Identification of transcriptome SNPs between Xiphophorus lines and species for assessing allele specific gene expression within F1 interspecies hybrids☆

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    Shen, Yingjia; Catchen, Julian; Garcia, Tzintzuni; Amores, Angel; Beldroth, Ion; Wagner, Jonathon R; Zhang, Ziping; Postlethwait, John; Warren, Wes; Schartl, Manfred; Walter, Ronald B.

    2011-01-01

    Variations in gene expression are essential for the evolution of novel phenotypes and for speciation. Studying allelic specific gene expression (ASGE) within interspecies hybrids provides a unique opportunity to reveal underlying mechanisms of genetic variation. Using Xiphophorus interspecies hybrid fishes and high-throughput next generation sequencing technology, we were able to assess variations between two closely related vertebrate species, X. maculatus and X. couchianus, and their F1 interspecies hybrids. We constructed transcriptome-wide SNP polymorphism sets between two highly inbred X. maculatus lines (JP 163 A and B), and between X. maculatus and a second species, X. couchianus. The X. maculatus JP 163 A and B parental lines have been separated in the laboratory for ≈ 70 years and we were able to identify SNPs at a resolution of 1 SNP per 49 kb of transcriptome. In contrast, SNP polymorphisms between X. couchianus and X. maculatus species, which diverged ≈ 5–10 million years ago, were identified about every 700 bp. Using 6,524 transcripts with identified SNPs between the two parental species (X. maculatus and X. couchianus), we mapped RNA-seq reads to determine ASGE within F1 interspecies hybrids. We developed an in silico X. couchianus transcriptome by replacing 90,788 SNP bases for X. maculatus transcriptome with the consensus X. couchianus SNP bases and provide evidence that this procedure overcomes read mapping biases. Employment of the insilico reference transcriptome and tolerating 5 mismatches during read mapping allow direct assessment of ASGE in the F1 interspecies hybrids. Overall, these results show that Xiphophorus is a tractable vertebrate experimental model to investigate how genetic variations that occur during speciation may affect gene interactions and the regulation of gene expression. PMID:21466860

  17. Identification of transcriptome SNPs between Xiphophorus lines and species for assessing allele specific gene expression within F₁ interspecies hybrids.

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    Shen, Yingjia; Catchen, Julian; Garcia, Tzintzuni; Amores, Angel; Beldorth, Ion; Wagner, Jonathan; Zhang, Ziping; Postlethwait, John; Warren, Wes; Schartl, Manfred; Walter, Ronald B

    2012-01-01

    Variations in gene expression are essential for the evolution of novel phenotypes and for speciation. Studying allelic specific gene expression (ASGE) within interspecies hybrids provides a unique opportunity to reveal underlying mechanisms of genetic variation. Using Xiphophorus interspecies hybrid fishes and high-throughput next generation sequencing technology, we were able to assess variations between two closely related vertebrate species, Xiphophorus maculatus and Xiphophorus couchianus, and their F(1) interspecies hybrids. We constructed transcriptome-wide SNP polymorphism sets between two highly inbred X. maculatus lines (JP 163 A and B), and between X. maculatus and a second species, X. couchianus. The X. maculatus JP 163 A and B parental lines have been separated in the laboratory for ≈70 years and we were able to identify SNPs at a resolution of 1 SNP per 49 kb of transcriptome. In contrast, SNP polymorphisms between X. couchianus and X. maculatus species, which diverged ≈5-10 million years ago, were identified about every 700 bp. Using 6524 transcripts with identified SNPs between the two parental species (X. maculatus and X. couchianus), we mapped RNA-seq reads to determine ASGE within F(1) interspecies hybrids. We developed an in silico X. couchianus transcriptome by replacing 90,788 SNP bases for X. maculatus transcriptome with the consensus X. couchianus SNP bases and provide evidence that this procedure overcomes read mapping biases. Employment of the in silico reference transcriptome and tolerating 5 mismatches during read mapping allow direct assessment of ASGE in the F(1) interspecies hybrids. Overall, these results show that Xiphophorus is a tractable vertebrate experimental model to investigate how genetic variations that occur during speciation may affect gene interactions and the regulation of gene expression.

  18. Allele-specific Gene Silencing of Mutant mRNA Restores Cellular Function in Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy Fibroblasts

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    Satoru Noguchi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD is an inherited muscle disorder characterized clinically by muscle weakness, distal joint hyperlaxity, and proximal joint contractures. Sporadic and recessive mutations in the three collagen VI genes, COL6A1, COL6A2, and COL6A3, are reported to be causative. In the sporadic forms, a heterozygous point mutation causing glycine substitution in the triple helical domain has been identified in higher rate. In this study, we examined the efficacy of siRNAs, which target point mutation site, on specific knockdown toward transcripts from mutant allele and evaluated consequent cellular phenotype of UCMD fibroblasts. We evaluated the effect of siRNAs targeted to silence-specific COL6A1 alleles in UCMD fibroblasts, where simultaneous expression of both wild-type and mutant collagen VI resulted in defective collagen localization. Addition of mutant-specific siRNAs allowed normal extracellular localization of collagen VI surrounding fibroblasts, suggesting selective inhibition of mutant collagen VI. Targeting the single-nucleotide COL6A1 c.850G>A (p.G284R mutation responsible a sporadic autosomal dominant form of UCMD can potently and selectively block expression of mutant collagen VI. These results suggest that allele-specific knockdown of the mutant mRNA can potentially be considered as a therapeutic procedure in UCMD due to COL6A1 point mutations.

  19. Identification of transcriptome SNPs for assessing allele-specific gene expression in a super-hybrid rice Xieyou9308.

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    Rongrong Zhai

    Full Text Available Hybridization, a common process in nature, can give rise to a vast reservoir of allelic variants. Combination of these allelic variants may result in novel patterns of gene action and is thought to contribute to heterosis. In this study, we analyzed genome-wide allele-specific gene expression (ASGE in the super-hybrid rice variety Xieyou9308 using RNA sequencing technology (RNA-Seq. We identified 9325 reliable single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs distributed throughout the genome. Nearly 68% of the identified polymorphisms were CT and GA SNPs between R9308 and Xieqingzao B, suggesting the existence of DNA methylation, a heritable epigenetic mark, in the parents and their F1 hybrid. Of 2793 identified transcripts with consistent allelic biases, only 480 (17% showed significant allelic biases during tillering and/or heading stages, implying that trans effects may mediate most transcriptional differences in hybrid offspring. Approximately 67% and 62% of the 480 transcripts showed R9308 allelic expression biases at tillering and heading stages, respectively. Transcripts with higher levels of gene expression in R9308 also exhibited R9308 allelic biases in the hybrid. In addition, 125 transcripts were identified with significant allelic expression biases at both stages, of which 74% showed R9308 allelic expression biases. R9308 alleles may tend to preserve their characteristic states of activity in the hybrid and may play important roles in hybrid vigor at both stages. The allelic expression of 355 transcripts was highly stage-specific, with divergent allelic expression patterns observed at different developmental stages. Many transcripts associated with stress resistance were differently regulated in the F1 hybrid. The results of this study may provide valuable insights into molecular mechanisms of heterosis.

  20. Imprinted chromosomal domains revealed by allele-specific replication timing of the GABRB3 and GABRA5 genes

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    LaSalle, J.; Flint, A.; Lalande, M. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The GABRB3 and GABRA5 genes are organized as a cluster in chromosome 15q11-q13. The genes are separated by around 100 kb and arranged in opposite transcriptional orientations. The GABA{sub A} receptor cluster lies near the Angelman and Prader-Willi loci and displays asynchronous DNA replication, suggesting that this region is subject to parental imprinting. In order to further study the association between DNA replication and imprinting, allele-specific replication was assayed by fluorescence in situ hybridization with {lambda}-phage probes from the GABRB3/A5 region and a D15Z1 satellite probe to identify the parental origin of each chromosome. The replication kinetics of each allele was determined by using a flow sorter to fractionate mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes on the basis of cell cycle progression prior to FISH analysis. These kinetic studies reveal a 50-150 kb chromosomal domain extending from the middle of the GABRB3/A5 intergenic region into the GABRA5 5{prime}-UTR which displays maternal replication in early S with paternal replication delayed until the end of S. In contrast, genomic regions on either side of this maternal early replication domain exhibit the opposite pattern with paternal before maternal replication and both alleles replicating in the latter half of S. These results indicate that the GABRB3/A5 region is divided into domains in which replication timing is determined by parental origin. In addition to a loss of asynchronous replication, organization into replication timing domains is also lost in lymphocytes from maternal and paternal uniparental disomy 15 patients suggesting that a chromosome contribution from both parents is required for the establishment of the imprinted replication domains.

  1. The genetic association of RUNX3 with ankylosing spondylitis can be explained by allele-specific effects on IRF4 recruitment that alter gene expression.

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    Vecellio, Matteo; Roberts, Amity R; Cohen, Carla J; Cortes, Adrian; Knight, Julian C; Bowness, Paul; Wordsworth, B Paul

    2016-08-01

    To identify the functional basis for the genetic association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP), upstream of the RUNX3 promoter, with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). We performed conditional analysis of genetic association data and used ENCODE data on chromatin remodelling and transcription factor (TF) binding sites to identify the primary AS-associated regulatory SNP in the RUNX3 region. The functional effects of this SNP were tested in luciferase reporter assays. Its effects on TF binding were investigated by electrophoretic mobility gel shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation. RUNX3 mRNA levels were compared in primary CD8+ T cells of AS risk and protective genotypes by real-time PCR. The association of the RUNX3 SNP rs4648889 with AS (p<7.6×10(-14)) was robust to conditioning on all other SNPs in this region. We identified a 2 kb putative regulatory element, upstream of RUNX3, containing rs4648889. In reporter gene constructs, the protective rs4648889 'G' allele increased luciferase activity ninefold but significantly less activity (4.3-fold) was seen with the AS risk 'A' allele (p≤0.01). The binding of Jurkat or CD8+ T-cell nuclear extracts to the risk allele was decreased and IRF4 recruitment was reduced. The AS-risk allele also affected H3K4Me1 histone methylation and associated with an allele-specific reduction in RUNX3 mRNA (p<0.05). We identified a regulatory region upstream of RUNX3 that is modulated by rs4648889. The risk allele decreases TF binding (including IRF4) and reduces reporter activity and RUNX3 expression. These findings may have important implications for understanding the role of T cells and other immune cells in AS. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  2. Effect of metallothionein 2A gene polymorphism on allele-specific gene expression and metal content in prostate cancer

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    Krześlak, Anna; Forma, Ewa [Department of Cytobiochemistry, University of Łódź, Pomorska 141/143, 90-236 Łódź (Poland); Chwatko, Grażyna [Department of Environmental Chemistry, University of Łódź, Pomorska 163, 90-236 Łódź (Poland); Jóźwiak, Paweł; Szymczyk, Agnieszka [Department of Cytobiochemistry, University of Łódź, Pomorska 141/143, 90-236 Łódź (Poland); Wilkosz, Jacek; Różański, Waldemar [2nd Department of Urology, Medical University of Łódź, Pabianicka 62, 93-513 Łódź (Poland); Bryś, Magdalena, E-mail: zreg@biol.uni.lodz.pl [Department of Cytobiochemistry, University of Łódź, Pomorska 141/143, 90-236 Łódź (Poland)

    2013-05-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are highly conserved, small molecular weight, cysteine rich proteins. The major physiological functions of metallothioneins include homeostasis of essential metals Zn and Cu and protection against cytotoxicity of heavy metals. The aim of this study was to determine whether there is an association between the − 5 A/G single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP; rs28366003) in core promoter region and expression of metallothionein 2A (MT2A) gene and metal concentration in prostate cancer tissues. MT2A polymorphism was determined by the polymerase chain reaction–restriction fragment length polymorphism technique (PCR–RFLP) using 412 prostate cancer tissue samples. MT2A gene expression analysis was performed by real-time RT-PCR method. A significant association between rs28366003 genotype and MT2A expression level was found. The average mRNA level was found to be lower among minor allele carriers (the risk allele) than average expression among homozygotes for the major allele. Metal levels were analyzed by flamed atomic absorption spectrometer system. Highly statistically significant associations were detected between the SNP and Cd, Zn, Cu and Pb levels. The results of Spearman's rank correlation showed that the expressions of MT2A and Cu, Pb and Ni concentrations were negatively correlated. On the basis of the results obtained in this study, we suggest that SNP polymorphism may affect the MT2A gene expression in prostate and this is associated with some metal accumulation. - Highlights: • MT2A gene expression and metal content in prostate cancer tissues • Association between SNP (rs28366003) and expression of MT2A • Significant associations between the SNP and Cd, Zn, Cu and Pb levels • Negative correlation between MT2A gene expression and Cu, Pb and Ni levels.

  3. Simultaneous genotyping of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in alcoholism-related genes using duplex and triplex allele-specific PCR with two-step thermal cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirasu, Naoto; Kuroki, Masahide

    2014-01-01

    We developed a time- and cost-effective multiplex allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (AS-PCR) method based on the two-step PCR thermal cycles for genotyping single-nucleotide polymorphisms in three alcoholism-related genes: alcohol dehydrogenase 1B, aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 and μ-opioid receptor. Applying MightyAmp(®) DNA polymerase with optimized AS-primers and PCR conditions enabled us to achieve effective and selective amplification of the target alleles from alkaline lysates of a human hair root, and simultaneously to determine the genotypes within less than 1.5 h using minimal lab equipment.

  4. A Generalized Linear Model for Decomposing Cis-regulatory, Parent-of-Origin, and Maternal Effects on Allele-Specific Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuaki Takada

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Joint quantification of genetic and epigenetic effects on gene expression is important for understanding the establishment of complex gene regulation systems in living organisms. In particular, genomic imprinting and maternal effects play important roles in the developmental process of mammals and flowering plants. However, the influence of these effects on gene expression are difficult to quantify because they act simultaneously with cis-regulatory mutations. Here we propose a simple method to decompose cis-regulatory (i.e., allelic genotype, genomic imprinting [i.e., parent-of-origin (PO], and maternal [i.e., maternal genotype (MG] effects on allele-specific gene expression using RNA-seq data obtained from reciprocal crosses. We evaluated the efficiency of method using a simulated dataset and applied the method to whole-body Drosophila and mouse trophoblast stem cell (TSC and liver RNA-seq data. Consistent with previous studies, we found little evidence of PO and MG effects in adult Drosophila samples. In contrast, we identified dozens and hundreds of mouse genes with significant PO and MG effects, respectively. Interestingly, a similar number of genes with significant PO effect were detect in mouse TSCs and livers, whereas more genes with significant MG effect were observed in livers. Further application of this method will clarify how these three effects influence gene expression levels in different tissues and developmental stages, and provide novel insight into the evolution of gene expression regulation.

  5. Limited gene misregulation is exacerbated by allele-specific upregulation in lethal hybrids between Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila simulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Kevin H-C; Clark, Andrew G; Barbash, Daniel A

    2014-07-01

    Misregulation of gene expression is often observed in interspecific hybrids and is generally attributed to regulatory incompatibilities caused by divergence between the two genomes. However, it has been challenging to distinguish effects of regulatory divergence from secondary effects including developmental and physiological defects common to hybrids. Here, we use RNA-Seq to profile gene expression in F1 hybrid male larvae from crosses of Drosophila melanogaster to its sibling species D. simulans. We analyze lethal and viable hybrid males, the latter produced using a mutation in the X-linked D. melanogaster Hybrid male rescue (Hmr) gene and compare them with their parental species and to public data sets of gene expression across development. We find that Hmr has drastically different effects on the parental and hybrid genomes, demonstrating that hybrid incompatibility genes can exhibit novel properties in the hybrid genetic background. Additionally, we find that D. melanogaster alleles are preferentially affected between lethal and viable hybrids. We further determine that many of the differences between the hybrids result from developmental delay in the Hmr(+) hybrids. Finally, we find surprisingly modest expression differences in hybrids when compared with the parents, with only 9% and 4% of genes deviating from additivity or expressed outside of the parental range, respectively. Most of these differences can be attributed to developmental delay and differences in tissue types. Overall, our study suggests that hybrid gene misexpression is prone to overestimation and that even between species separated by approximately 2.5 Ma, regulatory incompatibilities are not widespread in hybrids. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Disagreement in genotyping results of drug resistance alleles of the Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (Pfdhfr) gene by allele-specific PCR (ASPCR) assays and Sanger sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Divya; Lather, Manila; Dykes, Cherry L; Dang, Amita S; Adak, Tridibes; Singh, Om P

    2016-01-01

    The rapid spread of antimalarial drug resistance in Plasmodium falciparum over the past few decades has necessitated intensive monitoring of such resistance for an effective malaria control strategy. P. falciparum dihydropteroate synthase (Pfdhps) and P. falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (Pfdhfr) genes act as molecular markers for resistance against the antimalarial drugs sulphadoxine and pyrimethamine, respectively. Resistance to pyrimethamine which is used as a partner drug in artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) is associated with several mutations in the Pfdhfr gene, namely A16V, N51I, C59R, S108N/T and I164L. Therefore, routine monitoring of Pfdhfr-drug-resistant alleles in a population may help in effective drug resistance management. Allele-specific PCR (ASPCR) is one of the commonly used methods for molecular genotyping of these alleles. In this study, we genotyped 55 samples of P. falciparum for allele discrimination at four codons of Pfdhfr (N51, C59, S108 and I164) by ASPCR using published methods and by Sanger's DNA sequencing method. We found that the ASPCR identified a significantly higher number of mutant alleles as compared to the DNA sequencing method. Such discrepancies arise due to the non-specificity of some of the allele-specific primer sets and due to the lack of sensitivity of Sanger's DNA sequencing method to detect minor alleles present in multiple clone infections. This study reveals the need of a highly specific and sensitive method for genotyping and detecting minor drug-resistant alleles present in multiple clonal infections.

  7. Allelic-specific expression in relation to Bombyx mori resistance to Bt toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yazhou; Li, Muwang; Islam, Iftakher; You, Lang; Wang, Yueqiang; Li, Zhiqian; Ling, Lin; Zeng, Baosheng; Xu, Jun; Huang, Yongping; Tan, Anjiang

    2014-11-01

    Understanding the mechanism of Bt resistance is one of the key elements of the effective application of Bt in pest control. The lepidopteran model insect, the silkworm, demonstrates qualities that make it an ideal species to use in achieving this understanding. We screened 45 strains of silkworm (Bombyx mori) using a Cry1Ab toxin variant. The sensitivity levels of the strains varied over a wide range. A resistant strain (P50) and a phylogenetically related susceptible strain (Dazao) were selected to profile the expressions of 12 Bt resistance-related genes. The SNPs in these genes were detected based on EST analysis and were validated by allelic-specific PCR. A comparison of allelic-specific expression between P50 and Dazao showed that the transcript levels of heterozygous genes containing two alleles rather than an imbalanced allelic expression contribute more to the resistance of P50 against Bt. The responses of the allelic-specific expression to Bt in hybrid larvae were then investigated. The results showed that the gene expression pattern of an ATP-binding cassette transporter C2 (ABCC2) and an aminopeptidase N (APN3), changed in an allelic-specific manner, with the increase of the resistant allele expression correlated with larval survival. The results suggest that a trans-regulatory mechanism in ABCC2 and APN3 allelic-specific expression is involved in the insect's response to the Bt toxin. The potential role of allelic-specific gene regulation in insect resistance to Bt toxins is discussed.

  8. Allele specific expression and methylation in the bumblebee, Bombus terrestris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoë Lonsdale

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The social hymenoptera are emerging as models for epigenetics. DNA methylation, the addition of a methyl group, is a common epigenetic marker. In mammals and flowering plants methylation affects allele specific expression. There is contradictory evidence for the role of methylation on allele specific expression in social insects. The aim of this paper is to investigate allele specific expression and monoallelic methylation in the bumblebee, Bombus terrestris. We found nineteen genes that were both monoallelically methylated and monoallelically expressed in a single bee. Fourteen of these genes express the hypermethylated allele, while the other five express the hypomethylated allele. We also searched for allele specific expression in twenty-nine published RNA-seq libraries. We found 555 loci with allele-specific expression. We discuss our results with reference to the functional role of methylation in gene expression in insects and in the as yet unquantified role of genetic cis effects in insect allele specific methylation and expression.

  9. Allele-specific KRT1 expression is a complex trait.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng Tao

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The differential expression of alleles occurs commonly in humans and is likely an important genetic factor underlying heritable differences in phenotypic traits. Understanding the molecular basis of allelic expression differences is thus an important challenge. Although many genes have been shown to display differential allelic expression, this is the first study to examine in detail the cumulative effects of multiple cis-regulatory polymorphisms responsible for allele-specific expression differences. We have used a variety of experimental approaches to identify and characterize cis-regulatory polymorphisms responsible for the extreme allele-specific expression differences of keratin-1 (KRT1 in human white blood cells. The combined data from our analyses provide strong evidence that the KRT1 allelic expression differences result from the haplotypic combinations and interactions of five cis-regulatory single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs whose alleles differ in their affinity to bind transcription factors and modulate KRT1 promoter activity. Two of these cis-regulatory SNPs bind transcriptional activators with the alleles on the high-expressing KRT1 haplotype pattern having a higher affinity than the alleles on the low-expressing haplotype pattern. In contrast, the other three cis-regulatory SNPs bind transcriptional inhibitors with the alleles on the low-expressing haplotype pattern having a higher affinity than the alleles on the high-expressing haplotype pattern. Our study provides important new insights into the degree of complexity that the cis-regulatory sequences responsible for allele-specific transcriptional regulation have. These data suggest that allelic expression differences result from the cumulative contribution of multiple DNA sequence polymorphisms, with each having a small effect, and that allele-specific expression can thus be viewed as a complex trait.

  10. Enhancement of allele discrimination by introduction of nucleotide mismatches into siRNA in allele-specific gene silencing by RNAi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Ohnishi

    Full Text Available Allele-specific gene silencing by RNA interference (RNAi is therapeutically useful for specifically inhibiting the expression of disease-associated alleles without suppressing the expression of corresponding wild-type alleles. To realize such allele-specific RNAi (ASP-RNAi, the design and assessment of small interfering RNA (siRNA duplexes conferring ASP-RNAi is vital; however, it is also difficult. In a previous study, we developed an assay system to assess ASP-RNAi with mutant and wild-type reporter alleles encoding the Photinus and Renilla luciferase genes. In line with experiments using the system, we realized that it is necessary and important to enhance allele discrimination between mutant and corresponding wild-type alleles. Here, we describe the improvement of ASP-RNAi against mutant alleles carrying single nucleotide variations by introducing base substitutions into siRNA sequences, where original variations are present in the central position. Artificially mismatched siRNAs or short-hairpin RNAs (shRNAs against mutant alleles of the human Prion Protein (PRNP gene, which appear to be associated with susceptibility to prion diseases, were examined using this assessment system. The data indicates that introduction of a one-base mismatch into the siRNAs and shRNAs was able to enhance discrimination between the mutant and wild-type alleles. Interestingly, the introduced mismatches that conferred marked improvement in ASP-RNAi, appeared to be largely present in the guide siRNA elements, corresponding to the 'seed region' of microRNAs. Due to the essential role of the 'seed region' of microRNAs in their association with target RNAs, it is conceivable that disruption of the base-pairing interactions in the corresponding seed region, as well as the central position (involved in cleavage of target RNAs, of guide siRNA elements could influence allele discrimination. In addition, we also suggest that nucleotide mismatches at the 3'-ends of sense

  11. The − 5 A/G single-nucleotide polymorphism in the core promoter region of MT2A and its effect on allele-specific gene expression and Cd, Zn and Cu levels in laryngeal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starska, Katarzyna, E-mail: katarzyna.starska@umed.lodz.pl [I Department of Otolaryngology and Laryngological Oncology, Medical University of Łódź, Kopcinskiego 22, 90-153 Łódź (Poland); Krześlak, Anna; Forma, Ewa [Department of Cytobiochemistry, University of Łódź, Pomorska 142/143, 90-236 Łódź (Poland); Olszewski, Jurek [II Department of Otolaryngology and Laryngological Oncology, Medical University of Łódź, Żeromskiego 113, 90-549 Łódź (Poland); Morawiec-Sztandera, Alina [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University of Łódź, Paderewskiego 4, 93-509 Łódź (Poland); Aleksandrowicz, Paweł [Department of Otolaryngology and Laryngological Oncology, Medical University of Lublin, Jaczewskiego 8, 20-954 Lublin (Poland); Lewy-Trenda, Iwona [Department of Pathology, Medical University of Łódź, Pomorska 251, 92-213 Łódź (Poland); and others

    2014-10-15

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are low molecular weight, cysteine-rich heavy metal-binding proteins which participate in the mechanisms of Zn homeostasis, and protect against toxic metals. MTs contain metal-thiolate cluster groups and suppress metal toxicity by binding to them. The aim of this study was to determine the − 5 A/G (rs28366003) single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the core promoter region of the MT2A gene and to investigate its effect on allele-specific gene expression and Cd, Zn and Cu content in squamous cell laryngeal cancer (SCC) and non-cancerous laryngeal mucosa (NCM) as a control. The MT2A promoter region − 5 A/G SNP was determined by restriction fragment length polymorphism using 323 SCC and 116 NCM. MT2A gene analysis was performed by quantitative real-time PCR. The frequency of A allele carriage was 94.2% and 91.8% in SCC and NCM, respectively, while G allele carriage was detected in 5.8% and 8.2% of SCC and NCM samples, respectively. As a result, a significant association was identified between the − 5 A/G SNP in the MT2A gene with mRNA expression in both groups. Metal levels were analyzed by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The significant differences were identified between A/A and both the A/G and G/G genotypes, with regard to the concentration of the contaminating metal. The Spearman rank correlation results showed that the MT2A expression and Cd, Zn, Cu levels were negatively correlated. Results obtained in this study suggest that − 5 A/G SNP in MT2A gene may have an effect on allele-specific gene expression and accumulation of metal levels in laryngeal cancer. - Highlights: • MT2A gene expression and metal content in laryngeal cancer tissues • Association between SNP (rs28366003) and expression of MT2A • Significant associations between the SNP and Cd, Zn and Cu levels • Negative correlation between MT2A gene expression and Cd, Zn and Cu levels.

  12. Allele-specific analysis of cell fusion-mediated pluripotent reprograming reveals distinct and predictive susceptibilities of human X-linked genes to reactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantone, Irene; Dharmalingam, Gopuraja; Chan, Yi-Wah; Kohler, Anne-Celine; Lenhard, Boris; Merkenschlager, Matthias; Fisher, Amanda G

    2017-01-25

    Inactivation of one X chromosome is established early in female mammalian development and can be reversed in vivo and in vitro when pluripotency factors are re-expressed. The extent of reactivation along the inactive X chromosome (Xi) and the determinants of locus susceptibility are, however, poorly understood. Here we use cell fusion-mediated pluripotent reprograming to study human Xi reactivation and allele-specific single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to identify reactivated loci. We show that a subset of human Xi genes is rapidly reactivated upon re-expression of the pluripotency network. These genes lie within the most evolutionary recent segments of the human X chromosome that are depleted of LINE1 and enriched for SINE elements, predicted to impair XIST spreading. Interestingly, this cadre of genes displays stochastic Xi expression in human fibroblasts ahead of reprograming. This stochastic variability is evident between clones, by RNA-sequencing, and at the single-cell level, by RNA-FISH, and is not attributable to differences in repressive histone H3K9me3 or H3K27me3 levels. Treatment with the DNA demethylating agent 5-deoxy-azacytidine does not increase Xi expression ahead of reprograming, but instead reveals a second cadre of genes that only become susceptible to reactivation upon induction of pluripotency. Collectively, these data not only underscore the multiple pathways that contribute to maintaining silencing along the human Xi chromosome but also suggest that transcriptional stochasticity among human cells could be useful for predicting and engineering epigenetic strategies to achieve locus-specific or domain-specific human Xi gene reactivation.

  13. Allelic diversity of a beer haze active protein gene in cultivated and Tibetan wild barley and development of allelic specific markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Lingzhen; Dai, Fei; Qiu, Long; Sun, Dongfa; Zhang, Guoping

    2011-07-13

    The formation of haze is a serious quality problem in beer production. It has been shown that the use of silica elute (SE)-ve malt (absence of molecular weight (MW) ∼14000 Da) for brewing can improve haze stability in the resultant beer, and the protein was identified as a barley trypsin inhibitor of the chloroform/methanol type (BTI-CMe). The objectives of this study were to determine (1) the allelic diversity of the gene controlling BTI-CMe in cultivated and Tibetan wild barley and (2) allele-specific (AS) markers for screening SE protein type. A survey of 172 Tibetan annual wild barley accessions and 71 cultivated barley genotypes was conducted, and 104 wild accessions and 35 cultivated genotypes were identified as SE+ve and 68 wild accessions and 36 cultivated genotypes as SE-ve. The allelic diversity of the gene controlling BTI-CMe was investigated by cloning, alignment, and association analysis. It was found that there were significant differences between the SE+ve and SE-ve types in single-nucleotide polymorphisms at 234 (SNP(234)), SNP(313), and SNP(385.) Furthermore, two sets of AS markers were developed to screen SE protein type based on SNP(313). AS-PCR had results very similar to those obtained by immunoblot method. Mapping analysis showed that the gene controlling the MW∼14 kDa band was located on the short arm of chromosome 3H, at the position of marker BPB-0527 (33.302 cM) in the Franklin/Yerong DH population.

  14. Overall and allele-specific expression of the SMC1A gene in female Cornelia de Lange syndrome patients and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parenti, Ilaria; Rovina, Davide; Masciadri, Maura; Cereda, Anna; Azzollini, Jacopo; Picinelli, Chiara; Limongelli, Giuseppe; Finelli, Palma; Selicorni, Angelo; Russo, Silvia; Gervasini, Cristina; Larizza, Lidia

    2014-07-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a rare multisystem disorder characterized by facial dysmorphisms, limb anomalies, and growth and cognitive deficits. Mutations in genes encoding subunits (SMC1A, SMC3, RAD21) or regulators (NIPBL, HDAC8) of the cohesin complex account for approximately 65% of clinically diagnosed CdLS cases. The SMC1A gene (Xp11.22), responsible for 5% of CdLS cases, partially escapes X chromosome inactivation in humans and the allele on the inactive X chromosome is variably expressed. In this study, we evaluated overall and allele-specific SMC1A expression. Real-time PCR analysis conducted on 17 controls showed that SMC1A expression in females is 50% higher than in males. Immunoblotting experiments confirmed a 44% higher protein level in healthy females than in males, and showed no significant differences in SMC1A protein levels between controls and patients. Pyrosequencing was used to assess the reciprocal level of allelic expression in six female carriers of different SMC1A mutations and 15 controls who were heterozygous at a polymorphic transcribed SMC1A locus. The two alleles were expressed at a 1:1 ratio in the control group and at a 2:1 ratio in favor of the wild type allele in the test group. Since a dominant negative effect is considered the pathogenic mechanism in SMC1A-defective female patients, the level of allelic preferential expression might be one of the factors contributing to the wide phenotypic variability observed in these patients. An extension of this study to a larger cohort containing mild to borderline cases could enhance our understanding of the clinical spectrum of SMC1A-linked CdLS.

  15. The Length Distribution of Class I-Restricted T Cell Epitopes Is Determined by Both Peptide Supply and MHC Allele-Specific Binding Preference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trolle, Thomas; McMurtrey, Curtis P.; Sidney, John;

    2016-01-01

    HLA class I-binding predictions are widely used to identify candidate peptide targets of human CD8+ T cell responses. Many such approaches focus exclusively on a limited range of peptide lengths, typically 9 aa and sometimes 9-10 aa, despite multiple examples of dominant epitopes of other lengths...

  16. Simultaneous SNP identification and assessment of allele-specific bias from ChIP-seq data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Yunyun

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs have been associated with many aspects of human development and disease, and many non-coding SNPs associated with disease risk are presumed to affect gene regulation. We have previously shown that SNPs within transcription factor binding sites can affect transcription factor binding in an allele-specific and heritable manner. However, such analysis has relied on prior whole-genome genotypes provided by large external projects such as HapMap and the 1000 Genomes Project. This requirement limits the study of allele-specific effects of SNPs in primary patient samples from diseases of interest, where complete genotypes are not readily available. Results In this study, we show that we are able to identify SNPs de novo and accurately from ChIP-seq data generated in the ENCODE Project. Our de novo identified SNPs from ChIP-seq data are highly concordant with published genotypes. Independent experimental verification of more than 100 sites estimates our false discovery rate at less than 5%. Analysis of transcription factor binding at de novo identified SNPs revealed widespread heritable allele-specific binding, confirming previous observations. SNPs identified from ChIP-seq datasets were significantly enriched for disease-associated variants, and we identified dozens of allele-specific binding events in non-coding regions that could distinguish between disease and normal haplotypes. Conclusions Our approach combines SNP discovery, genotyping and allele-specific analysis, but is selectively focused on functional regulatory elements occupied by transcription factors or epigenetic marks, and will therefore be valuable for identifying the functional regulatory consequences of non-coding SNPs in primary disease samples.

  17. A common polymorphism in the promoter region of the TNFSF4 gene is associated with lower allele-specific expression and risk of myocardial infarction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Ria

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The TNFSF4/TNFRSF4 system, along with several other receptor-ligand pairs, is involved in the recruitment and activation of T-cells and is therefore tentatively implicated in atherosclerosis and acute coronary syndromes. We have previously shown that genetic variants in TNFSF4 are associated with myocardial infarction (MI in women. This prompted functional studies of TNFSF4 expression. METHODS AND RESULTS: Based on a screening of the TNFSF4 genomic region, a promoter polymorphism (rs45454293 and a haplotype were identified, conceivably involved in gene regulation. The rs45454293T-allele, in agreement with the linked rs3850641G-allele, proved to be associated with increased risk of MI in women. Haplotype-specific chromatin immunoprecipitation of activated polymerase II, as a measure of transcriptional activity in vivo, suggested that the haplotype including the rs45454293 and rs3850641 polymorphisms is functionally important, the rs45454293T- and rs3850641G-alleles being associated with lower transcriptional activity in cells heterozygous for both polymorphisms. The functional role of rs45454293 on transcriptional levels of TNFSF4 was clarified by luciferase reporter assays, where the rs45454293T-allele decreased gene expression when compared with the rs45454293C-allele, while the rs3850641 SNP did not have any effect on TNFSF4 promoter activity. Electromobility shift assay showed that the rs45454293 polymorphism, but not rs3850641, affects the binding of nuclear factors, thus suggesting that the lower transcriptional activity is attributed to binding of one or more transcriptional repressor(s to the T-allele. CONCLUSIONS: Our data indicate that the TNFSF4 rs45454293T-allele is associated with lower TNFSF4 expression and increased risk of MI.

  18. Determination of cis/trans phase of variations in the MC1R gene with allele-specific PCR and single base extension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mengel-From, Jonas; Børsting, Claus; Sanchez, Juan J

    2008-01-01

    The MC1R gene encodes a protein with key regulatory functions in the melanin synthesis. A multiplex PCR and a multiplex single base extension protocol were established for genotyping six exonic MC1R variations highly penetrant for red hair (R), four exonic MC1R variations weakly penetrant for red...

  19. Allele-specific PCR genotyping of the HSP70 gene polymorphism discriminating the green and red color variants sea cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jung-Ha Kang; Ki Hwan Yu; Jung-Youn Park; Chul-Min An; Je-Cheon Jun; Sang-Jun Lee

    2011-01-01

    Color variation is a well-known feature of sea cucumbers (Apostichopus japonicus),which are classified into three groups based on their colors of red,green and black.It is also one of the most important traits related to how they taste,and it thereby affects their market price.Attempts were made to identify single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and to analyze differences associated with SNP genotypes between green and red color variants using HSP70 as the target gene.The HSP70 gene,which is found universally in organisms from bacteria to humans,is one of the most evolutionarily conserved genes and the most widely studied biomarker of stress response.DNA fragments of 1074 bp covering a partial sequence of the sea cucumber HSP70 gene,were amplified from both red and green variants,and subsequently analyzed for the presence of SNPs.Twenty-seven polymorphic sites in total,including heterozygous sites,were observed.Of these,six sites were found to be significantly different SNP genotypes between green and red variants.Furthermore,PCR with an internal primer designed to include an allelespecific SNP at the 3' end (site 443) showed differentiation between the two variants,100% and 4.2% amplification in green and red variants,respectively.The validated SNPs may serve as informative genetic markers that can be used to distinguish variants at the early developmental stage,prior to color differentiation.

  20. Potent and selective antisense oligonucleotides targeting single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the Huntington disease gene / allele-specific silencing of mutant huntingtin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carroll, Jeffrey B; Warby, Simon C; Southwell, Amber L;

    2011-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by CAG-expansion in the huntingtin gene (HTT) that results in a toxic gain of function in the mutant huntingtin protein (mHTT). Reducing the expression of mHTT is therefore an attractive therapy for HD. However, wild......-type HTT protein is essential for development and has critical roles in maintaining neuronal health. Therapies for HD that reduce wild-type HTT may therefore generate unintended negative consequences. We have identified single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) targets in the human HD population for the disease......-specific targeting of the HTT gene. Using primary cells from patients with HD and the transgenic YAC18 and BACHD mouse lines, we developed antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) molecules that potently and selectively silence mHTT at both exonic and intronic SNP sites. Modification of these ASOs with S-constrained-ethyl (c...

  1. Allele-specific marker development and selection efficiencies for both flavonoid 3'-hydroxylase and flavonoid 3',5'-hydroxylase genes in soybean subgenus soja.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yong; Qiu, Li-Juan

    2013-06-01

    Color is one of the phenotypic markers mostly used to study soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) genetic, molecular and biochemical processes. Two P450-dependent mono-oxygenases, flavonoid 3'-hydroxylase (F3'H; EC1.14.3.21) and flavonoid 3',5'-hydroxylase (F3'5'H, EC1.14.13.88), both catalyzing the hydroxylation of the B-ring in flavonoids, play an important role in coloration. Previous studies showed that the T locus was a gene encoding F3'H and the W1 locus co-segregated with a gene encoding F3'5'H in soybean. These two genetic loci have identified to control seed coat, flower and pubescence colors. However, the allelic distributions of both F3'H and F3'5'H genes in soybean were unknown. In this study, three novel alleles were identified (two of four alleles for GmF3'H and one of three alleles for GmF3'5'H). A set of gene-tagged markers was developed and verified based on the sequence diversity of all seven alleles. Furthermore, the markers were used to analyze soybean accessions including 170 cultivated soybeans (G. max) from a mini core collection and 102 wild soybeans (G. soja). For both F3'H and F3'5'H, the marker selection efficiencies for pubescence color and flower color were determined. The results showed that one GmF3'H allele explained 92.2 % of the variation in tawny and two gmf3'h alleles explained 63.8 % of the variation in gray pubescence colors. In addition, two GmF3'5'H alleles and one gmF3'5'h allele explained 94.0 % of the variation in purple and 75.3 % in white flowers, respectively. By the combination of the two loci, seed coat color was determined. In total, 90.9 % of accessions possessing both the gmf3'h-b and gmf3'5'h alleles had yellow seed coats. Therefore, seed coat colors are controlled by more than two loci.

  2. Genotyping of the 19-bp insertion/deletion polymorphism in the 5' flank of beta-hydroxylase gene by dissociation analysis of allele-specific PCR products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Berg; Werge, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    The 19-bp insertion/deletion polymorphism in the 5' flank of the dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH) gene has been associated with psychiatric disorders. We have developed a simple, reliable and inexpensive closed-tube assay for genotyping of this polymorphism based upon T(m) determination of amplified...... and a conventional approach based upon agarose gel electrophoresis of amplified fragments revealed complete concordance between the two procedures. The insights obtained in this study may be utilized to develop assays based upon dissociation analysis of PCR products for genotyping of other insertion...

  3. Allele-Specific DNA Methylation Detection by Pyrosequencing®

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer Kristensen, Lasse; Johansen, Jens Vilstrup; Grønbæk, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification that plays important roles in healthy as well as diseased cells, by influencing the transcription of genes. In spite the fact that human somatic cells are diploid, most of the currently available methods for the study of DNA methylation do not provide......-effective protocol for allele-specific DNA methylation detection based on Pyrosequencing(®) of methylation-specific PCR (MSP) products including a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) within the amplicon....

  4. Association of MMP7 -181A→G Promoter Polymorphism with Gastric Cancer Risk: INFLUENCE OF NICOTINE IN DIFFERENTIAL ALLELE-SPECIFIC TRANSCRIPTION VIA INCREASED PHOSPHORYLATION OF cAMP-RESPONSE ELEMENT-BINDING PROTEIN (CREB).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesh, Kousik; Subramanian, Lakshmi; Ghosh, Nillu; Gupta, Vinayak; Gupta, Arnab; Bhattacharya, Samir; Mahapatra, Nitish R; Swarnakar, Snehasikta

    2015-06-05

    Elevated expression of matrix metalloproteinase7 (MMP7) has been demonstrated to play a pivotal role in cancer invasion. The -181A→G (rs11568818) polymorphism in the MMP7 promoter modulates gene expression and possibly affects cancer progression. Here, we evaluated the impact of -181A→G polymorphism on MMP7 promoter activity and its association with gastric cancer risk in eastern Indian case-control cohorts (n = 520). The GG genotype as compared with the AA genotype was predisposed (p = 0.02; odds ratio = 1.9, 95% confidence interval = 1.1-3.3) to gastric cancer risk. Stratification analysis showed that tobacco addiction enhanced gastric cancer risk in GG subjects when compared with AA subjects (p = 0.03, odds ratio = 2.46, and 95% confidence interval = 1.07-5.68). Meta-analysis revealed that tobacco enhanced the risk for cancer more markedly in AG and GG carriers. Activity and expression of MMP7 were significantly higher in GG than in AA carriers. In support, MMP7 promoter-reporter assays showed greater transcriptional activity toward A to G transition under basal/nicotine-induced/cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) overexpressed conditions in gastric adenocarcinoma cells. Moreover, nicotine (a major component of tobacco) treatment significantly up-regulated MMP7 expression due to enhanced CREB phosphorylation followed by its nuclear translocation in gastric adenocarcinoma cells. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments revealed higher binding of phosphorylated CREB with the -181G than the -181A allele. Altogether, specific binding of phosphorylated CREB to the G allele-carrying promoter enhances MMP7 gene expression that is further augmented by nicotine due to increased CREB phosphorylation and thereby increases the risk for gastric cancer.

  5. 全血AS-PCR方法检测Wilson病ATP7B基因四个突变%Whole blood allele-specific PCR, a simple method to detect four ATP7B gene mutations in Wilson disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙玮; 管俊杰; 王进; 秦正红

    2014-01-01

    Objective To establish a simple method to detect four ATP7B gene mutations in Wilson disease using allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR) with whole blood polymerase chain reaction.Methods Four allele-specific PCR primers specific for the mutations(G2333T,C2850T,G2855A,G2975T) were designed,and PCR was optimized to screen the whole blood samples.The amplified gene products with mutation were separated with agarose gel electrophoresis to detect the pattern of point mutation and allele types.Exons 8,12 and 13 of the ATP7B gene were amplified with PCR,and the amplification products were sequenced to confirm the mutation.Results The detection of four ATP7B gene mutations by AS-PCR with whole blood was accomplished with 100% accuracy.In the 27 healthy subjects,the mutation rate of G2855A was 51.8%.No mutation was detected for G2333T,C2850T and G2975T.Among the 22 patients,11 were mutated for G2333T,C2850T or G2975T.The mutation rate was therefore 50%.Conclusion Our experiment has established an AS-PCR based method for detecting four ATP7B gene mutations using whole blood samples,which has provided a simple and effective means for the early diagnosis of Wilson disease.This method is rapid,convenient,accurate and economical for detecting point mutations of the ATP7B gene.%目的 研究肝豆状核变性ATP7B基因高频突变位点,探索全血等位基因特异性-PCR(allelespecific PCR,AS-PCR)技术在该基因4个常见突变检测中的应用.方法 针对ATP7B基因4个突变位点(G2333T、C2850T、G2855A、G2975T)设计等位基因特异性引物,应用高保真酶对人抗凝全血样本进行聚合酶链反应,扩增产物经琼脂糖凝胶电泳以判断待检样本有无基因突变及其等位基因型.PCR扩增人基因组A TP7B基因第8、12、13外显子,扩增产物直接进行基因序列测定.结果 全血AS-PCR法检测ATP7B基因4个基因突变,各位点检测结果与基因序列测定完全相符.27份健康对照血样分型结果G2333T、C2850T

  6. RNA-FISH to analyze allele-specific expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braidotti, G

    2001-01-01

    One of the difficulties associated with the analysis of imprinted gene expression is the need to distinguish RNA synthesis occurring at the maternal vs the paternally inherited copy of the gene. Most of the techniques used to examine allele-specific expression exploit naturally occurring polymorphisms and measure steady-state levels of RNA isolated from a pool of cells. Hence, a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) an be exploited in a heterozygote, by a reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR)- based procedure, to analyze maternal vs paternal gene expression. The human IGF2R gene was analyzed in this way. Smrzka et al. (1) were thus able to show that the IGF2R gene possesses a hemimethylated, intronic CpG island analogous to the mouse imprinting box. However, IGF2R mRNA was detected that possessed the RFLP from both the maternal and paternal alleles in all but one of the 70 lymphoblastoid samples. (The one monoallelic sample reactivated its paternal allele with continued cell culturing.) It was concluded that monoallelic expression of the human gene is a polymorphic trait occurring in a small minority of all tested samples (reviewed in refs. 2,3). Although this is a sound conclusion, the question remains: Is the human IGF2R gene imprinted?

  7. QuASAR: quantitative allele-specific analysis of reads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Chris T; Moyerbrailean, Gregory A; Davis, Gordon O; Wen, Xiaoquan; Luca, Francesca; Pique-Regi, Roger

    2015-04-15

    Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) studies have discovered thousands of genetic variants that regulate gene expression, enabling a better understanding of the functional role of non-coding sequences. However, eQTL studies are costly, requiring large sample sizes and genome-wide genotyping of each sample. In contrast, analysis of allele-specific expression (ASE) is becoming a popular approach to detect the effect of genetic variation on gene expression, even within a single individual. This is typically achieved by counting the number of RNA-seq reads matching each allele at heterozygous sites and testing the null hypothesis of a 1:1 allelic ratio. In principle, when genotype information is not readily available, it could be inferred from the RNA-seq reads directly. However, there are currently no existing methods that jointly infer genotypes and conduct ASE inference, while considering uncertainty in the genotype calls. We present QuASAR, quantitative allele-specific analysis of reads, a novel statistical learning method for jointly detecting heterozygous genotypes and inferring ASE. The proposed ASE inference step takes into consideration the uncertainty in the genotype calls, while including parameters that model base-call errors in sequencing and allelic over-dispersion. We validated our method with experimental data for which high-quality genotypes are available. Results for an additional dataset with multiple replicates at different sequencing depths demonstrate that QuASAR is a powerful tool for ASE analysis when genotypes are not available. http://github.com/piquelab/QuASAR. fluca@wayne.edu or rpique@wayne.edu Supplementary Material is available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Epidemiological survey of Theileria parasite infection of cattle in Northeast China by allele-specific PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Longzheng; Zhang, Shoufa; Liang, Wanfeng; Jin, Chunmei; Jia, Lijun; Luo, Yuzi; Li, Yan; Cao, Shinuo; Yamagishi, Junya; Nishikawa, Yoshifumi; Kawano, Suguru; Fujisaki, Kozo; Xuan, Xuenan

    2011-11-01

    An epidemiological survey on a Theileria parasite infection of cattle in Northeast China was carried out using allele-specific PCR and DNA sequence analysis of the major piroplasm surface protein (MPSP) gene. The results showed that 14 of 104 blood samples were positive for Theileria by PCR. Among the positive cases, co-infection with various combinations of C- and I-type parasites was detected in 12 samples; no B- and Thai-type parasites were detected by allele-specific PCR. Phylogenetic analysis based on the MPSP gene sequences revealed that Theileria parasites with the MPSP types 1, 2, and 4 were distributed in Northeast China.

  9. A majority of Huntington's disease patients may be treatable by individualized allele-specific RNA interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Maria Stella; Jaspers, Leonie; Spronkmans, Christine; Gellera, Cinzia; Taroni, Franco; Di Maria, Emilio; Donato, Stefano Di; Kaemmerer, William F

    2009-06-01

    Use of RNA interference to reduce huntingtin protein (htt) expression in affected brain regions may provide an effective treatment for Huntington disease (HD), but it remains uncertain whether suppression of both wild-type and mutant alleles in a heterozygous patient will provide more benefit than harm. Previous research has shown suppression of just the mutant allele is achievable using siRNA targeted to regions of HD mRNA containing single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). To determine whether more than a minority of patients may be eligible for an allele-specific therapy, we genotyped DNA from 327 unrelated European Caucasian HD patients at 26 SNP sites in the HD gene. Over 86% of the patients were found to be heterozygous for at least one SNP among those tested. Because the sites are genetically linked, one cannot use the heterozygosity rates of the individual SNPs to predict how many sites (and corresponding allele-specific siRNA) would be needed to provide at least one treatment possibility for this percentage of patients. By computing all combinations, we found that a repertoire of allele-specific siRNA corresponding to seven sites can provide at least one allele-specific siRNA treatment option for 85.6% of our sample. Moreover, we provide evidence that allele-specific siRNA targeting these sites are readily identifiable using a high throughput screening method, and that allele-specific siRNA identified using this method indeed show selective suppression of endogenous mutant htt protein in fibroblast cells from HD patients. Therefore, allele-specific siRNA are not so rare as to be impractical to find and use therapeutically.

  10. Allele Workbench: transcriptome pipeline and interactive graphics for allele-specific expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol A Soderlund

    Full Text Available Sequencing the transcriptome can answer various questions such as determining the transcripts expressed in a given species for a specific tissue or condition, evaluating differential expression, discovering variants, and evaluating allele-specific expression. Differential expression evaluates the expression differences between different strains, tissues, and conditions. Allele-specific expression evaluates expression differences between parental alleles. Both differential expression and allele-specific expression have been studied for heterosis (hybrid vigor, where the hybrid has improved performance over the parents for one or more traits. The Allele Workbench software was developed for a heterosis study that evaluated allele-specific expression for a mouse F1 hybrid using libraries from multiple tissues with biological replicates. This software has been made into a distributable package, which includes a pipeline, a Java interface to build the database, and a Java interface for query and display of the results. The required input is a reference genome, annotation file, and one or more RNA-Seq libraries with optional replicates. It evaluates allelic imbalance at the SNP and transcript level and flags transcripts with significant opposite directional allele-specific expression. The Java interface allows the user to view data from libraries, replicates, genes, transcripts, exons, and variants, including queries on allele imbalance for selected libraries. To determine the impact of allele-specific SNPs on protein folding, variants are annotated with their effect (e.g., missense, and the parental protein sequences may be exported for protein folding analysis. The Allele Workbench processing results in transcript files and read counts that can be used as input to the previously published Transcriptome Computational Workbench, which has a new algorithm for determining a trimmed set of gene ontology terms. The software with demo files is available

  11. Validation of a Multiplex Allele-Specific Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay for Detection of KRAS Gene Mutations in Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Tissues from Colorectal Cancer Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirirat Seekhuntod

    Full Text Available Patients with KRAS mutations do not respond to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR inhibitors and fail to benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy. Mutation analysis of KRAS is needed before starting treatment with monoclonal anti-EGFR antibodies in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC. The objective of this study is to develop a multiplex allele-specific PCR (MAS-PCR assay to detect KRAS mutations.We developed a single-tube MAS-PCR assay for the detection of seven KRAS mutations (G12D, G12A, G12R, G12C, G12S, G12V, and G13D. We performed MAS-PCR assay analysis for KRAS on DNA isolated from 270 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE colorectal cancer tissues. Sequences of all 270 samples were determined by pyrosequencing. Seven known point-mutation DNA samples diluted with wild-type DNA were assayed to determine the limitation of detection and reproducibility of the MAS-PCR assay.Overall, the results of MAS-PCR assay were in good concordance with pyrosequencing, and only seven discordant samples were found. The MAS-PCR assay reproducibly detected 1 to 2% mutant alleles. The most common mutations were G13D in codon 13 (49.17%, G12D (25.83% and G12V (12.50% in codon 12.The MAS-PCR assay provides a rapid, cost-effective, and reliable diagnostic tool for accurate detection of KRAS mutations in routine FFPE colorectal cancer tissues.

  12. [Allele-specific PCR and its application in forensic science].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Yan-chai; Wang, Bin; Zhao, Zi-qin; Zhou, Huai-gu

    2014-08-01

    Allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (AS-PCR) is a technique based on allele-specific primers, which can be used to analyze single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) effectively including the transition, transversion and insertion/deletion polymorphism and has been exploited in the study of diseases research, molecular diagnosis, and forensic biological evidence. The article systematically reviews the principle, the detection methods, improvement of AS-PCR, and its research updates in the fields of autosome, Y chromosome and mitochondrial SNP, as well as its application in forensic science.

  13. Tissue and allelic-specific expression of hsp70 gene in chickens: basal and heat-stress-induced mRNA level quantified with real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, F-S; Du, H-L; Xu, H-P; Luo, Q-B; Zhang, X-Q

    2006-08-01

    1. The 70 kDa heat shock proteins (hsp70) are a family of molecular chaperones, which promote protein folding and participate in many cellular functions. The objective of the current research was to investigate the relationship between tissue or allele and the expression of chicken hsp70 under normal growth conditions and during acute heat stress (44 degrees C for 4 h). 2. A total of 279 individuals were genotyped for two single nucleotide polymorphisms (A258G and C276G) in chicken hsp70 gene by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis. 3. The mRNA abundance of chicken hsp70 genes was evaluated by real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The expression of hsp70 gene in the liver (9.83 +/- 0.84, 10(7)) was significantly higher than that in the muscle (4.42 +/- 0.36, 10(7)) under normal growth conditions. However, during acute heat stress, the expression of hsp70 gene in the brain (1.82 +/- 0.25, 10(9)) was the highest and was significantly different from those in the liver (1.08 +/- 0.16, 10(9)) and muscle (1.08 +/- 0.13, 10(9)). 4. The expression of hsp70 among different genotypes or haplotype combinations is quite different under normal and heat-stress conditions. The haplotype H3 (GC) is probably advantageous to improving heat resistance of chickens. 5. The results from the present study indicate that the expression of hsp70 in chickens is affected by heat stress, and is tissue- and allele-dependent.

  14. Determination of DQB1 alleles using PCR amplification and allele-specific primers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepage, V; Ivanova, R; Loste, M N; Mallet, C; Douay, C; Naoumova, E; Charron, D

    1995-10-01

    Molecular genotyping of HLA class II genes is commonly carried out using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in combination with sequence-specific oligotyping (PCR-SSO) or a combination of the PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism methods (PCR-RFLP). However, the identification of the DQB1 type by PCR-SSO and PCR-RFLP is very time-consuming which is disadvantageous for the typing of cadaveric organ donors. We have developed a DQB1 typing method using PCR in combination with allele-specific amplification (PCR-ASA), which allows the identification of the 17 most frequent alleles in one step using seven amplification mixtures. PCR allele-specific amplification HLA-DQB1 typing is easy to perform, and the results are easy to interpret in routine clinical practice. The PCR-ASA method is therefore better suited to DQB1 typing for organ transplantation than other methods.

  15. Allele-specific amplification and electrochemiluminescence method for single nucleotide polymorphism analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A new approach combined the specificity of allele-specific amplification (ASA) with the sensitivity of electrochemiluminescence (ECL) assay for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis was proposed. Briefly, target gene was amplified by a biotin-labeled allele-specific forward primer and a Ru(bpy)32+ (TBR)-labeled universal reverse primer. Then, the amplicon was captured onto streptavidin-coated paramagnetic beads through biotin label, and detected by measuring the ECL signal of TBR label. Different genotypes were distinguished according to the ECL values of the amplicons by different genotypic primers. K-ras oncogene was used as a target to validate the feasibility of the method. The experiment results show that the different genotypes can be clearly distinguished by ASA-ECL assay. The method is useful in SNP analysis due to its sensitivity,safety, and simplicity.(C) 2007 Da Xing. Published by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of Chinese Chemical Society. All rights reserved.

  16. Allele-specific enzymatic amplification of. beta. -globin genomic DNA for diagnosis of sickle cell anemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, D.Y.; Ugozzoli, L.; Pal, B.K.; Wallace, B. (Beckman Research Institute of the City of Hope, Duarte, CA (USA))

    1989-04-01

    A rapid nonradioactive approach to the diagnosis of sickle cell anemia is described based on an allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (ASPCR). This method allows direct detection of the normal or the sickle cell {beta}-globin allele in genomic DNA without additional steps of probe hybridization, ligation, or restriction enzyme cleavage. Two allele-specific oligonucleotide primers, one specific for the sickle cell allele and one specific for the normal allele, together with another primer complementary to both alleles were used in the polymerase chain reaction with genomic DNA templates. The allele-specific primers differed from each other in their terminal 3{prime} nucleotide. Under the proper annealing temperature and polymerase chain reaction conditions, these primers only directed amplification on their complementary allele. In a single blind study of DNA samples from 12 individuals, this method correctly and unambiguously allowed for the determination of the genotypes with no false negatives or positives. If ASPCR is able to discriminate all allelic variation (both transition and transversion mutations), this method has the potential to be a powerful approach for genetic disease diagnosis, carrier screening, HLA typing, human gene mapping, forensics, and paternity testing.

  17. Allele-Specific Quantitative PCR for Accurate, Rapid, and Cost-Effective Genotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Han B; Schwab, Tanya L; Koleilat, Alaa; Ata, Hirotaka; Daby, Camden L; Cervera, Roberto Lopez; McNulty, Melissa S; Bostwick, Hannah S; Clark, Karl J

    2016-06-01

    Customizable endonucleases such as transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (CRISPR/Cas9) enable rapid generation of mutant strains at genomic loci of interest in animal models and cell lines. With the accelerated pace of generating mutant alleles, genotyping has become a rate-limiting step to understanding the effects of genetic perturbation. Unless mutated alleles result in distinct morphological phenotypes, mutant strains need to be genotyped using standard methods in molecular biology. Classic restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) or sequencing is labor-intensive and expensive. Although simpler than RFLP, current versions of allele-specific PCR may still require post-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) handling such as sequencing, or they are more expensive if allele-specific fluorescent probes are used. Commercial genotyping solutions can take weeks from assay design to result, and are often more expensive than assembling reactions in-house. Key components of commercial assay systems are often proprietary, which limits further customization. Therefore, we developed a one-step open-source genotyping method based on quantitative PCR. The allele-specific qPCR (ASQ) does not require post-PCR processing and can genotype germline mutants through either threshold cycle (Ct) or end-point fluorescence reading. ASQ utilizes allele-specific primers, a locus-specific reverse primer, universal fluorescent probes and quenchers, and hot start DNA polymerase. Individual laboratories can further optimize this open-source system as we completely disclose the sequences, reagents, and thermal cycling protocol. We have tested the ASQ protocol to genotype alleles in five different genes. ASQ showed a 98-100% concordance in genotype scoring with RFLP or Sanger sequencing outcomes. ASQ is time-saving because a single qPCR without post-PCR handling suffices to score

  18. DNA methylation in the CTCF-binding site I and the expression pattern of the H19 gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esteves, Leda I C V; Javaroni, Afonso C; Nishimoto, Inês N

    2005-01-01

    Loss of allele-specific expression by the imprinted genes IGF2 and H19 has been correlated with a differentially methylated region (DMR) upstream to the H19 gene. The H19-DMR contains seven potential CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) binding sites. CTCF is a chromatin insulator and a multifunctional...... of imprinting. We detected a significant correlation (P = 0.041, Fisher's exact test) between H19 expression and tumor recurrence. Among H19 positive cases, six were T2, in which five developed recurrence and/or metastasis. Inversely, in the group of tumors that showed no H19 gene expression, 5 out of 24 were T...

  19. Genome-wide survey of allele-specific splicing in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scheffler Konrad

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate mRNA splicing depends on multiple regulatory signals encoded in the transcribed RNA sequence. Many examples of mutations within human splice regulatory regions that alter splicing qualitatively or quantitatively have been reported and allelic differences in mRNA splicing are likely to be a common and important source of phenotypic diversity at the molecular level, in addition to their contribution to genetic disease susceptibility. However, because the effect of a mutation on the efficiency of mRNA splicing is often difficult to predict, many mutations that cause disease through an effect on splicing are likely to remain undiscovered. Results We have combined a genome-wide scan for sequence polymorphisms likely to affect mRNA splicing with analysis of publicly available Expressed Sequence Tag (EST and exon array data. The genome-wide scan uses published tools and identified 30,977 SNPs located within donor and acceptor splice sites, branch points and exonic splicing enhancer elements. For 1,185 candidate splicing polymorphisms the difference in splicing between alternative alleles was corroborated by publicly available exon array data from 166 lymphoblastoid cell lines. We developed a novel probabilistic method to infer allele-specific splicing from EST data. The method uses SNPs and alternative mRNA isoforms mapped to EST sequences and models both regulated alternative splicing as well as allele-specific splicing. We have also estimated heritability of splicing and report that a greater proportion of genes show evidence of splicing heritability than show heritability of overall gene expression level. Our results provide an extensive resource that can be used to assess the possible effect on splicing of human polymorphisms in putative splice-regulatory sites. Conclusion We report a set of genes showing evidence of allele-specific splicing from an integrated analysis of genomic polymorphisms, EST data and exon array

  20. Therapy for dominant inherited diseases by allele-specific RNA interference: successes and pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trochet, Delphine; Prudhon, Bernard; Vassilopoulos, Stéphane; Bitoun, Marc

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a conserved mechanism for post-transcriptional gene silencing mediated by messenger RNA (mRNA) degradation. RNAi is commonly induced by synthetic siRNA or shRNA which recognizes the targeted mRNA by base pairing and leads to target-mRNA degradation. RNAi may discriminate between two sequences only differing by one nucleotide conferring a high specificity of RNAi for its target mRNA. This property was used to develop a particular therapeutic strategy called "allele-specific-RNA interference" devoted to silence the mutated allele of genes causing dominant inherited diseases without affecting the normal allele. Therapeutic benefit was now demonstrated in cells from patients and animal models, and promising results of the first phase Ib clinical trial using siRNA-based allele-specific therapy were reported in Pachyonychia Congenita, an inherited skin disorder due to dominant mutations in the Keratin 6 gene. Our purpose is to review the successes of this strategy aiming to treat dominant inherited diseases and to highlight the pitfalls to avoid.

  1. Allele-specific silencing of mutant Ataxin-7 in SCA7 patient-derived fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholefield, Janine; Watson, Lauren; Smith, Danielle; Greenberg, Jacquie; Wood, Matthew J A

    2014-12-01

    Polyglutamine (polyQ) disorders are inherited neurodegenerative conditions defined by a common pathogenic CAG repeat expansion leading to a toxic gain-of-function of the mutant protein. Consequences of this toxicity include activation of heat-shock proteins (HSPs), impairment of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and transcriptional dysregulation. Several studies in animal models have shown that reducing levels of toxic protein using small RNAs would be an ideal therapeutic approach for such disorders, including spinocerebellar ataxia-7 (SCA7). However, testing such RNA interference (RNAi) effectors in genetically appropriate patient cell lines with a disease-relevant phenotype has yet to be explored. Here, we have used primary adult dermal fibroblasts from SCA7 patients and controls to assess the endogenous allele-specific silencing of ataxin-7 by two distinct siRNAs. We further identified altered expression of two disease-relevant transcripts in SCA7 patient cells: a twofold increase in levels of the HSP DNAJA1 and a twofold decrease in levels of the de-ubiquitinating enzyme, UCHL1. After siRNA treatment, the expression of both genes was restored towards normal levels. To our knowledge, this is the first time that allele-specific silencing of mutant ataxin-7, targeting a common SNP, has been demonstrated in patient cells. These findings highlight the advantage of an allele-specific RNAi-based therapeutic approach, and indicate the value of primary patient-derived cells as useful models for mechanistic studies and for measuring efficacy of RNAi effectors on a patient-to-patient basis in the polyQ diseases.

  2. Allele-specific amplification in cancer revealed by SNP array analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas LaFramboise

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Amplification, deletion, and loss of heterozygosity of genomic DNA are hallmarks of cancer. In recent years a variety of studies have emerged measuring total chromosomal copy number at increasingly high resolution. Similarly, loss-of-heterozygosity events have been finely mapped using high-throughput genotyping technologies. We have developed a probe-level allele-specific quantitation procedure that extracts both copy number and allelotype information from single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP array data to arrive at allele-specific copy number across the genome. Our approach applies an expectation-maximization algorithm to a model derived from a novel classification of SNP array probes. This method is the first to our knowledge that is able to (a determine the generalized genotype of aberrant samples at each SNP site (e.g., CCCCT at an amplified site, and (b infer the copy number of each parental chromosome across the genome. With this method, we are able to determine not just where amplifications and deletions occur, but also the haplotype of the region being amplified or deleted. The merit of our model and general approach is demonstrated by very precise genotyping of normal samples, and our allele-specific copy number inferences are validated using PCR experiments. Applying our method to a collection of lung cancer samples, we are able to conclude that amplification is essentially monoallelic, as would be expected under the mechanisms currently believed responsible for gene amplification. This suggests that a specific parental chromosome may be targeted for amplification, whether because of germ line or somatic variation. An R software package containing the methods described in this paper is freely available at http://genome.dfci.harvard.edu/~tlaframb/PLASQ.

  3. Rapid ABO genotyping by high-speed droplet allele-specific PCR using crude samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taira, Chiaki; Matsuda, Kazuyuki; Takeichi, Naoya; Furukawa, Satomi; Sugano, Mitsutoshi; Uehara, Takeshi; Okumura, Nobuo; Honda, Takayuki

    2017-03-13

    ABO genotyping has common tools for personal identification of forensic and transplantation field. We developed a new method based on a droplet allele-specific PCR (droplet-AS-PCR) that enabled rapid PCR amplification. We attempted rapid ABO genotyping using crude DNA isolated from dried blood and buccal cells. We designed allele-specific primers for three SNPs (at nucleotides 261, 526, and 803) in exons 6 and 7 of the ABO gene. We pretreated dried blood and buccal cells with proteinase K, and obtained crude DNAs without DNA purification. Droplet-AS-PCR allowed specific amplification of the SNPs at the three loci using crude DNA, with results similar to those for DNA extracted from fresh peripheral blood. The sensitivity of the methods was 5%-10%. The genotyping of extracted DNA and crude DNA were completed within 8 and 9 minutes, respectively. The genotypes determined by the droplet-AS-PCR method were always consistent with those obtained by direct sequencing. The droplet-AS-PCR method enabled rapid and specific amplification of three SNPs of the ABO gene from crude DNA treated with proteinase K. ABO genotyping by the droplet-AS-PCR has the potential to be applied to various fields including a forensic medicine and transplantation medical care. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Comparison of CYP2D6 genotyping by allele-specific PCR with DXT phe-notype and gene chip testing%CYP2D6 PCR基因型与DXT表型和基因芯片检测的比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    目的:为了评价CYP2D6的基因型和表型的联系以及基因芯片在CYP2D6多基因分析中的应用.方法:242健康志愿者,口服dextromethorphan后收集尿液测定其代谢率,收集20ml血提取DNA,并通过基因特异性PCR和/(或)基因芯片分析CYP2D6*2--*11,*17和多拷贝CYP2D6基因,其中5个基因(*3、*4、*6、*7和*9)用PCR和CYD450基因芯片同时分析.结果:CYP2D6基因型比表型更富有信息和更能反映CYP2D6酶的表达.CYP2D6*3、*4、*6、*7和*9的基因检测在CYP450基因芯片和基因特异性PCR中显示高度的一致性.结论:基因芯片在检测基因多位点的多基因中是一个有发展前途和可靠的方法.%To evaluate association of genotype and phenotype of CYP2D6 and the application of oligonucleotide microarray hybridization genetic testing in CYP2D6 multiple alleles analyses. METHODS: Two hundred forty-two healthy volunteers were recruited, and a 60 mg oral dose of dextromethorphan (DXT) was administered to each for assessment of the DXT metabolic ratio [ MR]. A 20 ml blood sample was also collected for DNA isolation and testing. CYP2D6 alleles * 2-*11; * 17 and multiple CYP2D6 gene copies were tested by allele-specific PCR and/or the affymetrix CYP450 gene chip assay. Five of the CYP2D6 alleles ( * 3, * 4, *6, * 7, and * 9) were evaluated by both PCR and the CYP450 gene chip assay. RESULTS: The CYP2D6genotype was more informative and reflective in CYP2D6 enzyme expression than a phenotype. Genetic tests for the CYP2D6 * 3, * 4, * 6, * 7 and * 9 alleles showed a high degree of concordance between the CYP450 gene chip and AS-PCR methods. CONCLUSION: Oligonucleotide microarray hybridization is a promising and reliable approach for detecting multiple alleles at gene loci.

  5. Dideoxy single allele-specific PCR - DSASP new method to discrimination allelic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonidas Moura Lima

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer (GC is a multifactorial disease with a high mortality rate in Brazil and worldwide. This work aimed to evaluate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP rs1695, in the Glutathione S-Transferase Pi (GSTP1 gene in GC samples by comparative analysis Specific PCR - ASP and Dideoxy Single Allele-Specific PCR - DSASP methods. The DSASP is the proposed new method for allelic discrimination. This work analyzed 60 GC samples, 26 diffuse and 34 intestinal types. The SNP rs1695 of the GSTP1 gene was significantly associated with GC analyzed by DSASP method (χ2 = 9.7, P 0.05. These results suggest that the SNP rs1695 of the GSTP1 gene was a risk factor associated with gastric carcinogens is and the DSASP method was a new successfully low-cost strategy to study allelic discrimination.

  6. Germline allele-specific expression of DAPK1 in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan-Xiang Wei

    Full Text Available We previously reported a rare germline variant (c.1-6531 that resulted in allele-specific expression (ASE of death-associated protein kinase 1 (DAPK1 and predisposition to chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL. We investigated a cohort of CLL patients lacking this mutation for the presence of ASE of DAPK1. We developed a novel strategy that combines single-nucleotide primer extension (SNuPE with MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, and detected germline DAPK1 ASE in 17 out of 120 (14.2% CLL patients associated with a trend towards younger age at diagnosis. ASE was absent in 63 healthy controls. Germline cells of CLL patients with ASE showed increased levels of DNA methylation in the promoter region, however, neither genetic nor further epigenetic aberrations could be identified in the DAPK1 5' upstream regulatory region, within distinct exons or in the 3'-UTR. We identified B-lymphoid malignancy related cell line models harboring allelic imbalance and found that allele-specific methylation in DAPK1 is associated with ASE. Our data indicate that ASE at the DAPK1 gene locus is a recurrent event, mediated by epigenetic mechanisms and potentially predisposing to CLL.

  7. Allele-specific interactions between CAST AWAY and NEVERSHED control abscission in Arabidopsis flowers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William D. Groner

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available An advantage of analyzing abscission in genetically tractable model plants is the ability to make use of classic genetic tools such as suppression analysis. We have investigated the regulation of organ abscission by carrying out suppression analysis in Arabidopsis flowers. Plants carrying mutations in the NEVERSHED (NEV gene, which encodes an ADP-ribosylation factor GTPase-activating protein, retain their outer floral organs after fertilization. Mutant alleles of CAST AWAY (CST, which encodes a receptor-like cytoplasmic kinase, were found to restore organ abscission in nev flowers in an allele-specific manner. To further explore the basis of the interactions between CST and NEV, we tested whether the site of a nev mutation is predictive of its ability to be suppressed. Our results suggest instead that the strength of a nev allele influences whether organ abscission can be rescued by a specific allele of CST.

  8. Allele-specific enzymatic amplification of beta-globin genomic DNA for diagnosis of sickle cell anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, D Y; Ugozzoli, L; Pal, B K; Wallace, R B

    1989-04-01

    A rapid nonradioactive approach to the diagnosis of sickle cell anemia is described based on an allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (ASPCR). This method allows direct detection of the normal or the sickle cell beta-globin allele in genomic DNA without additional steps of probe hybridization, ligation, or restriction enzyme cleavage. Two allele-specific oligonucleotide primers, one specific for the sickle cell allele and one specific for the normal allele, together with another primer complementary to both alleles were used in the polymerase chain reaction with genomic DNA templates. The allele-specific primers differed from each other in their terminal 3' nucleotide. Under the proper annealing temperature and polymerase chain reaction conditions, these primers only directed amplification on their complementary allele. In a single blind study of DNA samples from 12 individuals, this method correctly and unambiguously allowed for the determination of the genotypes with no false negatives or positives. If ASPCR is able to discriminate all allelic variation (both transition and transversion mutations), this method has the potential to be a powerful approach for genetic disease diagnosis, carrier screening, HLA typing, human gene mapping, forensics, and paternity testing.

  9. Self-(in)compatibility inheritance and allele-specific marker development in yellow mustard (Sinapis alba).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Fangqin; Cheng, Bifang

    2014-01-01

    Yellow mustard (Sinapis alba) has a sporophytic self-incompatibility reproduction system. Genetically stable self-incompatible (SI) and self-compatible (SC) inbred lines have recently been developed in this crop. Understanding the S haplotype of different inbred lines and the inheritance of the self-(in)compatibility (SI/SC) trait is very important for breeding purposes. In this study, we used the S-locus gene-specific primers in Brassica rapa and Brassica oleracea to clone yellow mustard S-locus genes of SI lines Y514 and Y1130 and SC lines Y1499 and Y1501. The PCR amplification results and DNA sequences of the S-locus genes revealed that Y514 carried the class I S haplotype, while Y1130, Y1499, and Y1501 had the class II S haplotype. The results of our genetic studies indicated that self-incompatibility was dominant over self-compatibility and controlled by a one-gene locus in the two crosses of Y514 × Y1499 and Y1130 × Y1501. Of the five S-locus gene polymorphic primer pairs, Sal-SLGI and Sal-SRKI each generated one dominant marker for the SI phenotype of Y514; Sal-SLGII and Sal-SRKII produced dominant marker(s) for the SC phenotype of Y1501 and Y1499; Sal-SP11II generated one dominant marker for Y1130. These markers co-segregated with the SI/SC phenotype in the F2 populations of the two crosses. In addition, co-dominant markers were developed by mixing the two polymorphic primer pairs specific for each parent in the multiplex PCR, which allowed zygosity to be determined in the F2 populations. The SI/SC allele-specific markers have proven to be very useful for the selection of the desirable SC genotypes in our yellow mustard breeding program.

  10. Detection of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum race 3 by single-base extension method and allele-specific polymerase chain reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    We developed allele specific (AS) SNP primers for rapid detection of Fusarium oxysporum f.sp vasinfectum (FOV) race 3. FOV_BT_SNP_R3 and FOV_BT_AS_R3 primers were designed based on single nucleotide polymorphisms of partial sequence alignment of the ß-tubulin (BT) gene from several FOV races. These ...

  11. Utilising polymorphisms to achieve allele-specific genome editing in zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel J. Capon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The advent of genome editing has significantly altered genetic research, including research using the zebrafish model. To better understand the selectivity of the commonly used CRISPR/Cas9 system, we investigated single base pair mismatches in target sites and examined how they affect genome editing in the zebrafish model. Using two different zebrafish strains that have been deep sequenced, CRISPR/Cas9 target sites containing polymorphisms between the two strains were identified. These strains were crossed (creating heterozygotes at polymorphic sites and CRISPR/Cas9 complexes that perfectly complement one strain injected. Sequencing of targeted sites showed biased, allele-specific editing for the perfectly complementary sequence in the majority of cases (14/19. To test utility, we examined whether phenotypes generated by F0 injection could be internally controlled with such polymorphisms. Targeting of genes bmp7a and chordin showed reduction in the frequency of phenotypes in injected ‘heterozygotes’ compared with injecting the strain with perfect complementarity. Next, injecting CRISPR/Cas9 complexes targeting two separate sites created deletions, but deletions were biased to selected chromosomes when one CRISPR/Cas9 target contained a polymorphism. Finally, integration of loxP sequences occurred preferentially in alleles with perfect complementarity. These experiments demonstrate that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs present throughout the genome can be utilised to increase the efficiency of in cis genome editing using CRISPR/Cas9 in the zebrafish model.

  12. Allele-specific PCR detection of sweet cherry self-incompatibility (S) alleles S1 to S16 using consensus and allele-specific primers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonneveld, T; Tobutt, K R; Robbins, T P

    2003-10-01

    PCR-based identification of all 13 known self-incompatibility (S) alleles of sweet cherry is reported. Two pairs of consensus primers were designed from our previously published cDNA sequences of S(1) to S(6) S-RNases, the stylar components of self-incompatibility, to reveal length variation of the first and the second introns. With the exception of the first intron of S(13), these also amplified S(7) to S(14) and an allele previously referred to as S(x), which we now label S(16). The genomic PCR products were cloned and sequenced. The partial sequence of S(11) matched that of S(7) and the alleles were shown to have the same functional specificity. Allele-specific primers were designed for S(7) to S(16), so that allele-specific primers are now available for all 13 S alleles of cherry (S(8), S(11) and S(15) are duplicates). These can be used to distinguish between S alleles with introns of similar size and to confirm genotypes determined with consensus primers. The reliability of the PCR with allele-specific primers was improved by the inclusion of an internal control. The use of the consensus and allele-specific primers was demonstrated by resolving conflicting genotypes that have been published recently and by determining genotypes of 18 new cherry cultivars. Two new groups are proposed, Group XXIII (S(3) S(16)), comprising 'Rodmersham Seedling' and 'Strawberry Heart', and Group XXIV (S(6) S(12)), comprising 'Aida' and 'Flamentiner'. Four new self-compatibility genotypes, S(3) S(3)', S(4)' S(6), S(4)' S(9) and S(4)' S(13), were found. The potential use of the consensus primers to reveal incompatibility alleles in other cherry species is also demonstrated.

  13. Efficient and allele-specific genome editing of disease loci in human iPSCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Cory; Abalde-Atristain, Leire; He, Chaoxia; Brodsky, Brett R; Braunstein, Evan M; Chaudhari, Pooja; Jang, Yoon-Young; Cheng, Linzhao; Ye, Zhaohui

    2015-03-01

    Efficient and precise genome editing is crucial for realizing the full research and therapeutic potential of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Engineered nucleases including CRISPR/Cas9 and transcription activator like effector nucleases (TALENs) provide powerful tools for enhancing gene-targeting efficiency. In this study, we investigated the relative efficiencies of CRISPR/Cas9 and TALENs in human iPSC lines for inducing both homologous donor-based precise genome editing and nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ)-mediated gene disruption. Significantly higher frequencies of NHEJ-mediated insertions/deletions were detected at several endogenous loci using CRISPR/Cas9 than using TALENs, especially at nonexpressed targets in iPSCs. In contrast, comparable efficiencies of inducing homologous donor-based genome editing were observed at disease-associated loci in iPSCs. In addition, we investigated the specificity of guide RNAs used in the CRISPR/Cas9 system in targeting disease-associated point mutations in patient-specific iPSCs. Using myeloproliferative neoplasm patient-derived iPSCs that carry an acquired JAK2-V617F point mutation and α1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency patient-derived iPSCs that carry an inherited Z-AAT point mutation, we demonstrate that Cas9 can specifically target either the mutant or the wild-type allele with little disruption at the other allele differing by a single nucleotide. Overall, our results demonstrate the advantages of the CRISPR/Cas9 system in allele-specific genome targeting and in NHEJ-mediated gene disruption.

  14. Allele-specific copy-number discovery from whole-genome and whole-exome sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, WeiBo; Wang, Wei; Sun, Wei; Crowley, James J.; Szatkiewicz, Jin P.

    2015-01-01

    Copy-number variants (CNVs) are a major form of genetic variation and a risk factor for various human diseases, so it is crucial to accurately detect and characterize them. It is conceivable that allele-specific reads from high-throughput sequencing data could be leveraged to both enhance CNV detection and produce allele-specific copy number (ASCN) calls. Although statistical methods have been developed to detect CNVs using whole-genome sequence (WGS) and/or whole-exome sequence (WES) data, information from allele-specific read counts has not yet been adequately exploited. In this paper, we develop an integrated method, called AS-GENSENG, which incorporates allele-specific read counts in CNV detection and estimates ASCN using either WGS or WES data. To evaluate the performance of AS-GENSENG, we conducted extensive simulations, generated empirical data using existing WGS and WES data sets and validated predicted CNVs using an independent methodology. We conclude that AS-GENSENG not only predicts accurate ASCN calls but also improves the accuracy of total copy number calls, owing to its unique ability to exploit information from both total and allele-specific read counts while accounting for various experimental biases in sequence data. Our novel, user-friendly and computationally efficient method and a complete analytic protocol is freely available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/asgenseng/. PMID:25883151

  15. Use of allele-specific FAIRE to determine functional regulatory polymorphism using large-scale genotyping arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Frank Andrew; Howard, Philip; Shah, Sonia;

    2012-01-01

    identified an allele-specific regulatory polymorphism within NR1H3 (coding for LXR-α), rs7120118, coinciding with a previously GWAS-identified SNP for HDL-C levels. This finding was confirmed using FAIRE-gen with the 200,000 SNP Illumina Metabochip and verified with the established method of TaqMan allelic...... variants, we describe the technique of allele-specific FAIRE, utilising large-scale genotyping technology (FAIRE-gen) to determine allelic effects on chromatin accessibility and regulatory potential. FAIRE-gen was explored using lymphoblastoid cells and the 50,000 SNP Illumina CVD BeadChip. The technique...... discrimination. Examination of this SNP in two prospective Caucasian cohorts comprising 15,000 individuals confirmed the association with HDL-C levels (combined beta = 0.016; p = 0.0006), and analysis of gene expression identified an allelic association with LXR-α expression in heart tissue. Using increasingly...

  16. Development of allele-specific therapeutic siRNA in Meesmann epithelial corneal dystrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haihui Liao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Meesmann epithelial corneal dystrophy (MECD is an inherited eye disorder caused by dominant-negative mutations in either keratins K3 or K12, leading to mechanical fragility of the anterior corneal epithelium, the outermost covering of the eye. Typically, patients suffer from lifelong irritation of the eye and/or photophobia but rarely lose visual acuity; however, some individuals are severely affected, with corneal scarring requiring transplant surgery. At present no treatment exists which addresses the underlying pathology of corneal dystrophy. The aim of this study was to design and assess the efficacy and potency of an allele-specific siRNA approach as a future treatment for MECD. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We studied a family with a consistently severe phenotype where all affected persons were shown to carry heterozygous missense mutation Leu132Pro in the KRT12 gene. Using a cell-culture assay of keratin filament formation, mutation Leu132Pro was shown to be significantly more disruptive than the most common mutation, Arg135Thr, which is associated with typical, mild MECD. A siRNA sequence walk identified a number of potent inhibitors for the mutant allele, which had no appreciable effect on wild-type K12. The most specific and potent inhibitors were shown to completely block mutant K12 protein expression with negligible effect on wild-type K12 or other closely related keratins. Cells transfected with wild-type K12-EGFP construct show a predominantly normal keratin filament formation with only 5% aggregate formation, while transfection with mutant K12-EGFP construct resulted in a significantly higher percentage of keratin aggregates (41.75%; p<0.001 with 95% confidence limits. The lead siRNA inhibitor significantly rescued the ability to form keratin filaments (74.75% of the cells contained normal keratin filaments; p<0.001 with 95% confidence limits. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that it is feasible to design highly potent si

  17. High-speed droplet-allele-specific polymerase chain reaction for genotyping of single nucleotide polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Kazuyuki; Honda, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    Single nucleotide alternations such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) or single nucleotide mutations are useful genetic markers for molecular diagnosis, prognosis, drug response, and predisposition to diseases. Rapid identification of SNPs or mutations is clinically important, especially for determining drug responses and selection of molecular-targeted therapy. Here, we describe a rapid genotyping assay based on the allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (AS-PCR) by using our droplet-PCR machine (droplet-AS-PCR).

  18. Allele-specific down-regulation of RPTOR expression induced by retinoids contributes to climate adaptations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Sun

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The mechanistic target of rapamycin (MTOR pathway regulates cell growth, energy homeostasis, apoptosis, and immune response. The regulatory associated protein of MTOR encoded by the RPTOR gene is a key component of this pathway. A previous survey of candidate genes found that RPTOR contains multiple SNPs with strong correlations between allele frequencies and climate variables, consistent with the action of selective pressures that vary across environments. Using data from a recent genome scan for selection signals, we honed in on a SNP (rs11868112 26 kb upstream to the transcription start site of RPTOR that exhibits the strongest association with temperature variables. Transcription factor motif scanning and mining of recently mapped transcription factor binding sites identified a binding site for POU class 2 homeobox 1 (POU2F1 spanning the SNP and an adjacent retinoid acid receptor (RAR binding site. Using expression quantification, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP, and reporter gene assays, we demonstrate that POU2F1 and RARA do bind upstream of the RPTOR gene to regulate its expression in response to retinoids; this regulation is affected by the allele status at rs11868112 with the derived allele resulting in lower expression levels. We propose a model in which the derived allele influences thermogenesis or immune response by altering MTOR pathway activity and thereby increasing fitness in colder climates. Our results show that signatures of genetic adaptations can identify variants with functional effects, consistent with the idea that selection signals may be used for SNP annotation.

  19. 用等位基因特异性PCR/限制性片段长度多态性策略构建原发性青光眼致病基因CYP1B1的单倍型%Construction of CYP1B1 gene haplotypes predisposing to primary congenital glaucoma through allele-specific PCR/restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张爱平; 李圣杰; 欧阳琦; 汤荔; 王晓蕾; 吉建; 曹文俊

    2015-01-01

    目的 建立等位基因特异性PCR/限制性片段长度多态性(allele-specific PCR/restriction fragment length polymorphism,AS-PCR/RFLP)法检测原发性先天性青光眼(primary congenital glaucoma,PCG)致病基因CYP1B1常见单核苷酸多态性(single nucleotide polymorphisms,SNPs)及其单倍型的方法.方法 收集20例原发性先天性青光眼患者和20名正常对照为研究对象,首先经测序筛查SNP位点后,再分别以PCR-RFLP和AS-PCR/RFLP策略构建CYP1B1基因rs10012(S1)和rs1056827(S2)及rs1056836(S3)和rs1056837(S4)位点的单倍型,并对这两种策略进行评价.结果 测序共发现4个SNP位点,为第2外显子rs10012 G/C(S1)及rs1056827 T/G (S2)、第3外显子rs1056836C/G(S3)及rs1056837T/C(S4).这些位点在PCG患者和正常对照中的分布呈现不同特点,同时存在rs10012 (S1)和rs1056827(S2)位点的PCG患者和正常对照分别为10例(50%)和5人(25%);同时存在rs1056836 (S3)和rs1056837(S4)位点的PCG患者和正常对照分别为5例(25%)和2人(10%);均未发现上述SNP位点单独存在.确定各位点的分布特点后,首先用PCR-RFLP策略构建rs10012(S1)和rs1056827(S2)位点单倍型,显示杂合突变型除出现目的条带外还存在底物条带,虽提示同时存在rs10012(S1)和rs1056827 (S2),但仍不能证实存在位点间的连锁;AS-PCR/RFLP构建的结果显示,AS-PCR扩增rs10012(S1)位点获得阳性结果的同时,针对rs1056827 (S2)位点的特异性RFLP分析也获得阳性结果.AS-PCR/RFLP对位点rs1056836(S3)和rs1056837 (S4)的分析获得了类似的结果.应用AS-PCR/RFLP成功构建了C-G[rs10012(S1)-rs1056827(S2)]和G-C[rs1056836 (S3)-rs1056837 (S4)]两种单倍型.结论 应用AS-PCR/RFLP策略成功构建PCG致病基因CYP1B1单倍型,该方法准确高效特异可用于构建遗传性疾病基因的单倍型.%Objective To develop an allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR)/restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) assay for CYP1B1 gene haplotypes

  20. Allelic mutations in noncoding genomic sequences construct novel transcription factor binding sites that promote gene overexpression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Erming; Børset, Magne; Sawyer, Jeffrey R; Brede, Gaute; Våtsveen, Thea K; Hov, Håkon; Waage, Anders; Barlogie, Bart; Shaughnessy, John D; Epstein, Joshua; Sundan, Anders

    2015-11-01

    The growth and survival factor hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is expressed at high levels in multiple myeloma (MM) cells. We report here that elevated HGF transcription in MM was traced to DNA mutations in the promoter alleles of HGF. Sequence analysis revealed a previously undiscovered single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and crucial single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) in the promoters of myeloma cells that produce large amounts of HGF. The allele-specific mutations functionally reassembled wild-type sequences into the motifs that affiliate with endogenous transcription factors NFKB (nuclear factor kappa-B), MZF1 (myeloid zinc finger 1), and NRF-2 (nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2). In vitro, a mutant allele that gained novel NFKB-binding sites directly responded to transcriptional signaling induced by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) to promote high levels of luciferase reporter. Given the recent discovery by genome-wide sequencing (GWS) of numerous non-coding mutations in myeloma genomes, our data provide evidence that heterogeneous SNVs in the gene regulatory regions may frequently transform wild-type alleles into novel transcription factor binding properties to aberrantly interact with dysregulated transcriptional signals in MM and other cancer cells.

  1. Sequenza: allele-specific copy number and mutation profiles from tumor sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favero, F; Joshi, T; Marquard, A M; Birkbak, N J; Krzystanek, M; Li, Q; Szallasi, Z; Eklund, A C

    2015-01-01

    Exome or whole-genome deep sequencing of tumor DNA along with paired normal DNA can potentially provide a detailed picture of the somatic mutations that characterize the tumor. However, analysis of such sequence data can be complicated by the presence of normal cells in the tumor specimen, by intratumor heterogeneity, and by the sheer size of the raw data. In particular, determination of copy number variations from exome sequencing data alone has proven difficult; thus, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays have often been used for this task. Recently, algorithms to estimate absolute, but not allele-specific, copy number profiles from tumor sequencing data have been described. We developed Sequenza, a software package that uses paired tumor-normal DNA sequencing data to estimate tumor cellularity and ploidy, and to calculate allele-specific copy number profiles and mutation profiles. We applied Sequenza, as well as two previously published algorithms, to exome sequence data from 30 tumors from The Cancer Genome Atlas. We assessed the performance of these algorithms by comparing their results with those generated using matched SNP arrays and processed by the allele-specific copy number analysis of tumors (ASCAT) algorithm. Comparison between Sequenza/exome and SNP/ASCAT revealed strong correlation in cellularity (Pearson's r = 0.90) and ploidy estimates (r = 0.42, or r = 0.94 after manual inspecting alternative solutions). This performance was noticeably superior to previously published algorithms. In addition, in artificial data simulating normal-tumor admixtures, Sequenza detected the correct ploidy in samples with tumor content as low as 30%. The agreement between Sequenza and SNP array-based copy number profiles suggests that exome sequencing alone is sufficient not only for identifying small scale mutations but also for estimating cellularity and inferring DNA copy number aberrations. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of

  2. Integrative analysis of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer: the contribution of allele-specific expression and other assays to diagnostic algorithms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura De Lellis

    Full Text Available The identification of germline variants predisposing to hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC is crucial for clinical management of carriers, but several probands remain negative for such variants or bear variants of uncertain significance (VUS. Here we describe the results of integrative molecular analyses in 132 HNPCC patients providing evidences for improved genetic testing of HNPCC with traditional or next generation methods. Patients were screened for: germline allele-specific expression (ASE, nucleotide variants, rearrangements and promoter methylation of mismatch repair (MMR genes; germline EPCAM rearrangements; tumor microsatellite instability (MSI and immunohistochemical (IHC MMR protein expression. Probands negative for pathogenic variants of MMR genes were screened for germline APC and MUTYH sequence variants. Most germline defects identified were sequence variants and rearrangements of MMR genes. Remarkably, altered germline ASE of MMR genes was detected in 8/22 (36.5% probands analyzed, including 3 cases negative at other screenings. Moreover, ASE provided evidence for the pathogenic role and guided the characterization of a VUS shared by 2 additional probands. No germline MMR gene promoter methylation was observed and only one EPCAM rearrangement was detected. In several cases, tumor IHC and MSI diverged from germline screening results. Notably, APC or biallelic MUTYH germline defects were identified in 2/19 probands negative for pathogenic variants of MMR genes. Our results show that ASE complements gDNA-based analyses in the identification of MMR defects and in the characterization of VUS affecting gene expression, increasing the number of germline alterations detected. An appreciable fraction of probands negative for MMR gene variants harbors APC or MUTYH variants. These results indicate that germline ASE analysis and screening for APC and MUTYH defects should be included in HNPCC diagnostic algorithms.

  3. A molecular method for S-allele identification in apple based on allele-specific PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssens, G A; Goderis, I J; Broekaert, W F; Broothaerts, W

    1995-09-01

    cDNA sequences corresponding to two self-incompatibility alleles (S-alleles) of the apple cv 'Golden Delicious' have previously been described, and now we report the identification of three additional S-allele cDNAs of apple, one of which was isolated from a pistil cDNA library of cv 'Idared' and two of which were obtained by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) on pistil RNA of cv 'Queen's Cox'. A comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences of these five S-allele cDNAs revealed an average homology of 69%. Based on the nucleotide sequences of these S-allele cDNAs, we developed a molecular technique for the diagnostic identification of the five different S-alleles in apple cultivars. The method used consists of allele-specific PCR amplification of genomic DNA followed by digestion of the amplification product with an allele-specific restriction endonuclease. Analysis of a number of apple cultivars with known S-phenotype consistently showed coincidence of phenotypic and direct molecular data of the S-allele constitution of the cultivars. It is concluded that the S-allele identification approach reported here provides a rapid and useful method to determine the S-genotype of apple cultivars.

  4. Optimized Multiplex Detection of 7 KRAS Mutations by Taqman Allele-Specific qPCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orue, Andrea; Rieber, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Establishing the KRAS mutational status of tumor samples is essential to manage patients with colorectal or lung cancer, since these mutations preclude treatment with monoclonal anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibodies. We report an inexpensive, rapid multiplex allele-specific qPCR method detecting the 7 most clinically relevant KRAS somatic mutations with concomitant amplification of non-mutated KRAS in tumor cells and tissues from CRC patients. Positive samples evidenced in the multiplex assay were further subjected to individual allele-specific analysis, to define the specific mutation. Reference human cancer DNA harbouring either G12A, G12C, G12D, G12R, G12S, G12V and G13D confirmed assay specificity with ≤1% sensitivity of mutant alleles. KRAS multiplex mutation analysis usefulness was also demonstrated with formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) from CRC biopsies. Conclusion. Co-amplification of non-mutated DNA avoided false negatives from degraded samples. Moreover, this cost effective assay is compatible with mutation detection by DNA sequencing in FFPE tissues, but with a greater sensitivity when mutant DNA concentrations are limiting. PMID:27632281

  5. Allele-specific enzymatic amplification of beta-globin genomic DNA for diagnosis of sickle cell anemia.

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    A rapid nonradioactive approach to the diagnosis of sickle cell anemia is described based on an allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (ASPCR). This method allows direct detection of the normal or the sickle cell beta-globin allele in genomic DNA without additional steps of probe hybridization, ligation, or restriction enzyme cleavage. Two allele-specific oligonucleotide primers, one specific for the sickle cell allele and one specific for the normal allele, together with another primer co...

  6. Allele-specific up-regulation of FGFR2 increases susceptibility to breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin B Meyer

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The recent whole-genome scan for breast cancer has revealed the FGFR2 (fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 gene as a locus associated with a small, but highly significant, increase in the risk of developing breast cancer. Using fine-scale genetic mapping of the region, it has been possible to narrow the causative locus to a haplotype of eight strongly linked single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs spanning a region of 7.5 kilobases (kb in the second intron of the FGFR2 gene. Here we describe a functional analysis to define the causative SNP, and we propose a model for a disease mechanism. Using gene expression microarray data, we observed a trend of increased FGFR2 expression in the rare homozygotes. This trend was confirmed using real-time (RT PCR, with the difference between the rare and the common homozygotes yielding a Wilcox p-value of 0.028. To elucidate which SNPs might be responsible for this difference, we examined protein-DNA interactions for the eight most strongly disease-associated SNPs in different breast cell lines. We identify two cis-regulatory SNPs that alter binding affinity for transcription factors Oct-1/Runx2 and C/EBPbeta, and we demonstrate that both sites are occupied in vivo. In transient transfection experiments, the two SNPs can synergize giving rise to increased FGFR2 expression. We propose a model in which the Oct-1/Runx2 and C/EBPbeta binding sites in the disease-associated allele are able to lead to an increase in FGFR2 gene expression, thereby increasing the propensity for tumour formation.

  7. Dynamics of gene silencing during X inactivation using allele-specific RNA-seq

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marks, Hendrik; Kerstens, Hindrik H D; Barakat, Tahsin Stefan; Splinter, Erik; Dirks, René A M; van Mierlo, Guido; Joshi, Onkar; Wang, Shuang-Yin; Babak, Tomas; Albers, Cornelis A; Kalkan, Tüzer; Smith, Austin; Jouneau, Alice; de Laat, Wouter; Gribnau, Joost; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: During early embryonic development, one of the two X chromosomes in mammalian female cells is inactivated to compensate for a potential imbalance in transcript levels with male cells, which contain a single X chromosome. Here, we use mouse female embryonic stem cells (ESCs) with

  8. Dynamics of gene silencing during X inactivation using allele-specific RNA-seq

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Marks (Hendrik); H.H.D. Kerstens (Hindrik H.D.); T.S. Barakat (Tahsin Stefan); D. Splinter (Daniël); R.A.M. Dirks (René A.M.); G. van Mierlo (Guido); O. Joshi (Onkar); S.-Y. Wang (Shuang-Yin); T. Babak (Tomas); C.A. Albers (Cornelis A.); T. Kalkan (Tüzer); A. Smith (Austin); A. Jouneau (Alice); W.L. de Laat (Wouter); J.H. Gribnau (Joost); H. Stunnenberg (Henk)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: During early embryonic development, one of the two X chromosomes in mammalian female cells is inactivated to compensate for a potential imbalance in transcript levels with male cells, which contain a single X chromosome. Here, we use mouse female embryonic stem cells (ESCs)

  9. Allele-specific suppression of mutant huntingtin using antisense oligonucleotides: providing a therapeutic option for all Huntington disease patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels H Skotte

    Full Text Available Huntington disease (HD is an inherited, fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the huntingtin gene. The mutant protein causes neuronal dysfunction and degeneration resulting in motor dysfunction, cognitive decline, and psychiatric disturbances. Currently, there is no disease altering treatment, and symptomatic therapy has limited benefit. The pathogenesis of HD is complicated and multiple pathways are compromised. Addressing the problem at its genetic root by suppressing mutant huntingtin expression is a promising therapeutic strategy for HD. We have developed and evaluated antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs targeting single nucleotide polymorphisms that are significantly enriched on HD alleles (HD-SNPs. We describe our structure-activity relationship studies for ASO design and find that adjusting the SNP position within the gap, chemical modifications of the wings, and shortening the unmodified gap are critical for potent, specific, and well tolerated silencing of mutant huntingtin. Finally, we show that using two distinct ASO drugs targeting the two allelic variants of an HD-SNP could provide a therapeutic option for all persons with HD; allele-specifically for roughly half, and non-specifically for the remainder.

  10. Allele-specific chromatin remodeling in the ZPBP2/GSDMB/ORMDL3 locus associated with the risk of asthma and autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verlaan, Dominique J; Berlivet, Soizik; Hunninghake, Gary M; Madore, Anne-Marie; Larivière, Mathieu; Moussette, Sanny; Grundberg, Elin; Kwan, Tony; Ouimet, Manon; Ge, Bing; Hoberman, Rose; Swiatek, Marcin; Dias, Joana; Lam, Kevin C L; Koka, Vonda; Harmsen, Eef; Soto-Quiros, Manuel; Avila, Lydiana; Celedón, Juan C; Weiss, Scott T; Dewar, Ken; Sinnett, Daniel; Laprise, Catherine; Raby, Benjamin A; Pastinen, Tomi; Naumova, Anna K

    2009-09-01

    Common SNPs in the chromosome 17q12-q21 region alter the risk for asthma, type 1 diabetes, primary biliary cirrhosis, and Crohn disease. Previous reports by us and others have linked the disease-associated genetic variants with changes in expression of GSDMB and ORMDL3 transcripts in human lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs). The variants also alter regulation of other transcripts, and this domain-wide cis-regulatory effect suggests a mechanism involving long-range chromatin interactions. Here, we further dissect the disease-linked haplotype and identify putative causal DNA variants via a combination of genetic and functional analyses. First, high-throughput resequencing of the region and genotyping of potential candidate variants were performed. Next, additional mapping of allelic expression differences in Yoruba HapMap LCLs allowed us to fine-map the basis of the cis-regulatory differences to a handful of candidate functional variants. Functional assays identified allele-specific differences in nucleosome distribution, an allele-specific association with the insulator protein CTCF, as well as a weak promoter activity for rs12936231. Overall, this study shows a common disease allele linked to changes in CTCF binding and nucleosome occupancy leading to altered domain-wide cis-regulation. Finally, a strong association between asthma and cis-regulatory haplotypes was observed in three independent family-based cohorts (p = 1.78 x 10(-8)). This study demonstrates the requirement of multiple parallel allele-specific tools for the investigation of noncoding disease variants and functional fine-mapping of human disease-associated haplotypes.

  11. Oncogene mutations, copy number gains and mutant allele specific imbalance (MASI frequently occur together in tumor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junichi Soh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Activating mutations in one allele of an oncogene (heterozygous mutations are widely believed to be sufficient for tumorigenesis. However, mutant allele specific imbalance (MASI has been observed in tumors and cell lines harboring mutations of oncogenes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We determined 1 mutational status, 2 copy number gains (CNGs and 3 relative ratio between mutant and wild type alleles of KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA and EGFR genes by direct sequencing and quantitative PCR assay in over 400 human tumors, cell lines, and xenografts of lung, colorectal, and pancreatic cancers. Examination of a public database indicated that homozygous mutations of five oncogenes were frequent (20% in 833 cell lines of 12 tumor types. Our data indicated two major forms of MASI: 1 MASI with CNG, either complete or partial; and 2 MASI without CNG (uniparental disomy; UPD, due to complete loss of wild type allele. MASI was a frequent event in mutant EGFR (75% and was due mainly to CNGs, while MASI, also frequent in mutant KRAS (58%, was mainly due to UPD. Mutant: wild type allelic ratios at the genomic level were precisely maintained after transcription. KRAS mutations or CNGs were significantly associated with increased ras GTPase activity, as measured by ELISA, and the two molecular changes were synergistic. Of 237 lung adenocarcinoma tumors, the small number with both KRAS mutation and CNG were associated with shortened survival. CONCLUSIONS: MASI is frequently present in mutant EGFR and KRAS tumor cells, and is associated with increased mutant allele transcription and gene activity. The frequent finding of mutations, CNGs and MASI occurring together in tumor cells indicates that these three genetic alterations, acting together, may have a greater role in the development or maintenance of the malignant phenotype than any individual alteration.

  12. Allele-specific deposition of macroH2A1 in Imprinting Control Regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choo, J H; Kim, J D; Chung, J H; Stubbs, L; Kim, J

    2006-01-13

    In the current study, we analyzed the deposition patterns of macroH2A1 at a number of different genomic loci located in X chromosome and autosomes. MacroH2A1 is preferentially deposited at methylated CpG CpG-rich regions located close to promoters. The macroH2A1 deposition patterns at the methylated CpG islands of several imprinted domains, including the Imprinting Control Regions (ICRs) of Xist, Peg3, H19/Igf2 Igf2, Gtl2/Dlk1, and Gnas domains, show consistent allele-specificity towards inactive, methylated alleles. The macroH2A1 deposition levels at the ICRs and other Differentially Methylated Regions (DMRs) of these domains are also either higher or comparable to those observed at the inactive X chromosome of female mammals. Overall, our results indicate that besides DNA methylation macroH2A1 is another epigenetic component in the chromatin of ICRs displaying differential association with two parental alleles.

  13. Allele-specific methylation occurs at genetic variants associated with complex disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John N Hutchinson

    Full Text Available We hypothesize that the phenomenon of allele-specific methylation (ASM may underlie the phenotypic effects of multiple variants identified by Genome-Wide Association studies (GWAS. We evaluate ASM in a human population and document its genome-wide patterns in an initial screen at up to 380,678 sites within the genome, or up to 5% of the total genomic CpGs. We show that while substantial inter-individual variation exists, 5% of assessed sites show evidence of ASM in at least six samples; the majority of these events (81% are under genetic influence. Many of these cis-regulated ASM variants are also eQTLs in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and monocytes and/or in high linkage-disequilibrium with variants linked to complex disease. Finally, focusing on autoimmune phenotypes, we extend this initial screen to confirm the association of cis-regulated ASM with multiple complex disease-associated variants in an independent population using next-generation bisulfite sequencing. These four variants are implicated in complex phenotypes such as ulcerative colitis and AIDS progression disease (rs10491434, Celiac disease (rs2762051, Crohn's disease, IgA nephropathy and early-onset inflammatory bowel disease (rs713875 and height (rs6569648. Our results suggest cis-regulated ASM may provide a mechanistic link between the non-coding genetic changes and phenotypic variation observed in these diseases and further suggests a route to integrating DNA methylation status with GWAS results.

  14. Assessing allele-specific expression across multiple tissues from RNA-seq read data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirinen, Matti; Lappalainen, Tuuli; Zaitlen, Noah A.; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; Donnelly, Peter; McCarthy, Mark I.; Rivas, Manuel A.

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: RNA sequencing enables allele-specific expression (ASE) studies that complement standard genotype expression studies for common variants and, importantly, also allow measuring the regulatory impact of rare variants. The Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project is collecting RNA-seq data on multiple tissues of a same set of individuals and novel methods are required for the analysis of these data. Results: We present a statistical method to compare different patterns of ASE across tissues and to classify genetic variants according to their impact on the tissue-wide expression profile. We focus on strong ASE effects that we are expecting to see for protein-truncating variants, but our method can also be adjusted for other types of ASE effects. We illustrate the method with a real data example on a tissue-wide expression profile of a variant causal for lipoid proteinosis, and with a simulation study to assess our method more generally. Availability and implementation: http://www.well.ox.ac.uk/~rivas/mamba/. R-sources and data examples http://www.iki.fi/mpirinen/ Contact: matti.pirinen@helsinki.fi or rivas@well.ox.ac.uk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25819081

  15. Infrequent detection of germline allele-specific expression of TGFBR1 in lymphoblasts and tissues of colon cancer patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Guda, Kishore

    2009-06-15

    Recently, germline allele-specific expression (ASE) of the gene encoding for transforming growth factor-beta type I receptor (TGFBR1) has been proposed to be a major risk factor for cancer predisposition in the colon. Germline ASE results in a lowered expression of one of the TGFBR1 alleles (>1.5-fold), and was shown to occur in approximately 20% of informative familial and sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC) cases. In the present study, using the highly quantitative pyrosequencing technique, we estimated the frequency of ASE in TGFBR1 in a cohort of affected individuals from familial clusters of advanced colon neoplasias (cancers and adenomas with high-grade dysplasia), and also from a cohort of individuals with sporadic CRCs. Cases were considered positive for the presence of ASE if demonstrating an allelic expression ratio <0.67 or >1.5. Using RNA derived from lymphoblastoid cell lines, we find that of 46 informative Caucasian advanced colon neoplasia cases with a family history, only 2 individuals display a modest ASE, with allelic ratios of 1.65 and 1.73, respectively. Given that ASE of TGFBR1, if present, would likely be more pronounced in the colon compared with other tissues, we additionally determined the allele ratios of TGFBR1 in the RNA derived from normal-appearing colonic mucosa of sporadic CRC cases. We, however, found no evidence of ASE in any of 44 informative sporadic cases analyzed. Taken together, we find that germline ASE of TGFBR1, as assayed in lymphoblastoid and colon epithelial cells of colon cancer patients, is a relatively rare event.

  16. Identifying breast cancer risk loci by global differential allele-specific expression (DASE analysis in mammary epithelial transcriptome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Chuan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The significant mortality associated with breast cancer (BCa suggests a need to improve current research strategies to identify new genes that predispose women to breast cancer. Differential allele-specific expression (DASE has been shown to contribute to phenotypic variables in humans and recently to the pathogenesis of cancer. We previously reported that nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD could lead to DASE of BRCA1/2, which is associated with elevated susceptibility to breast cancer. In addition to truncation mutations, multiple genetic and epigenetic factors can contribute to DASE, and we propose that DASE is a functional index for cis-acting regulatory variants and pathogenic mutations, and that global analysis of DASE in breast cancer precursor tissues can be used to identify novel causative alleles for breast cancer susceptibility. Results To test our hypothesis, we employed the Illumina® Omni1-Quad BeadChip in paired genomic DNA (gDNA and double-stranded cDNA (ds-cDNA samples prepared from eight BCa patient-derived normal mammary epithelial lines (HMEC. We filtered original array data according to heterozygous genotype calls and calculated DASE values using the Log ratio of cDNA allele intensity, which was normalized to the corresponding gDNA. We developed two statistical methods, SNP- and gene-based approaches, which allowed us to identify a list of 60 candidate DASE loci (DASE ≥ 2.00, P ≤ 0.01, FDR ≤ 0.05 by both methods. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis of DASE loci revealed one major breast cancer-relevant interaction network, which includes two known cancer causative genes, ZNF331 (DASE = 2.31, P = 0.0018, FDR = 0.040 and USP6 (DASE = 4.80, P = 0.0013, FDR = 0.013, and a breast cancer causative gene, DMBT1 (DASE=2.03, P = 0.0017, FDR = 0.014. Sequence analysis of a 5′ RACE product of DMBT1 demonstrated that rs2981745, a putative breast cancer risk locus, appears to be one of the causal variants leading to DASE

  17. Allele-specific PCR for detecting the deafness-associated mitochondrial 12S rRNA mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yu; Xia, Bo-Hou; Liu, Qi; Li, Mei-Ya; Huang, Shui-Xian; Zhuo, Guang-Chao

    2016-10-10

    Mutations in mitochondrial 12S rRNA (MT-RNR1) are the important causes of sensorineural hearing loss. Of these mutations, the homoplasmic m.1555A>G or m.1494C>T mutation in the highly conserved A-site of MT-RNR1 gene has been found to be associated with both aminoglycoside-induced and non-syndromic hearing loss in many families worldwide. Since the m.1555A>G and m.1494C>T mutations are sensitive to ototoxic drugs, therefore, screening for the presence of these mutations is important for early diagnosis and prevention of deafness. For this purpose, we recently developed a novel allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR) which is able to simultaneously detect these mutations. To assess its accuracy, in this study, we employed this method to screen the frequency of m.1555A>G and m.1494C>T mutations in 200 deafness patients and 120 healthy subjects. Consequently, four m.1555A>G and four m.1494C>T mutations were identified; among these, only one patient with the m.1494C>T mutation had an obvious family history of hearing loss. Strikingly, clinical evaluation showed that this family exhibited a high penetrance of hearing loss. In particular, the penetrances of hearing loss were 80% with the aminoglycoside included and 20% when excluded. PCR-Sanger sequencing of the mitochondrial genomes confirmed the presence of the m.1494C>T mutation and identified a set of polymorphisms belonging to mitochondrial haplogroup A. However, the lack of functional variants in mitochondrial and nuclear modified genes (GJB2 and TRMU) in this family indicated that mitochondrial haplogroup and nuclear genes may not play important roles in the phenotypic expression of the m.1494C>T mutation. Thus, other modification factors, such as environmental factor, aminoglycosides or epigenetic modification may have contributed to the high penetrance of hearing loss in this family. Taken together, our data showed that this assay is an effective approach that could be used for detection the deafness-associated MT-RNR1

  18. Visually Relating Gene Expression and in vivo DNA Binding Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Min-Yu; Mackey, Lester; Ker?,; nen, Soile V. E.; Weber, Gunther H.; Jordan, Michael I.; Knowles, David W.; Biggin, Mark D.; Hamann, Bernd

    2011-09-20

    Gene expression and in vivo DNA binding data provide important information for understanding gene regulatory networks: in vivo DNA binding data indicate genomic regions where transcription factors are bound, and expression data show the output resulting from this binding. Thus, there must be functional relationships between these two types of data. While visualization and data analysis tools exist for each data type alone, there is a lack of tools that can easily explore the relationship between them. We propose an approach that uses the average expression driven by multiple of ciscontrol regions to visually relate gene expression and in vivo DNA binding data. We demonstrate the utility of this tool with examples from the network controlling early Drosophila development. The results obtained support the idea that the level of occupancy of a transcription factor on DNA strongly determines the degree to which the factor regulates a target gene, and in some cases also controls whether the regulation is positive or negative.

  19. Detection of EGFR mutations in plasma and biopsies from non-small cell lung cancer patients by allele-specific PCR assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Britta; Meldgaard, Peter; Hager, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Lung cancer patients with mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are primary candidates for EGFR-targeted therapy. Reliable analyses of such mutations have previously been possible only in tumour tissue. Here, we demonstrate that mutations can be detected in plasma...... samples with allele-specific PCR assays. METHODS: Pairs of the diagnostic biopsy and plasma obtained just prior to start of erlotinib treatment were collected from 199 patients with adenocarcinoma of non-small-cell lung cancer. DNA from both sample types was isolated and examined for the presence...... identified in 24/199 (12%) plasma samples and 28/196 (14%) biopsy samples, and 17/196 (9%) matched pairs contained the same mutation. Six EGFR mutations were present only in plasma samples but not in the biopsy samples. The overall concordance of the EGFR gene mutations detected in plasma and biopsy tissue...

  20. WASP: a Web-based Allele-Specific PCR assay designing tool for detecting SNPs and mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assawamakin Anunchai

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Allele-specific (AS Polymerase Chain Reaction is a convenient and inexpensive method for genotyping Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs and mutations. It is applied in many recent studies including population genetics, molecular genetics and pharmacogenomics. Using known AS primer design tools to create primers leads to cumbersome process to inexperience users since information about SNP/mutation must be acquired from public databases prior to the design. Furthermore, most of these tools do not offer the mismatch enhancement to designed primers. The available web applications do not provide user-friendly graphical input interface and intuitive visualization of their primer results. Results This work presents a web-based AS primer design application called WASP. This tool can efficiently design AS primers for human SNPs as well as mutations. To assist scientists with collecting necessary information about target polymorphisms, this tool provides a local SNP database containing over 10 million SNPs of various populations from public domain databases, namely NCBI dbSNP, HapMap and JSNP respectively. This database is tightly integrated with the tool so that users can perform the design for existing SNPs without going off the site. To guarantee specificity of AS primers, the proposed system incorporates a primer specificity enhancement technique widely used in experiment protocol. In particular, WASP makes use of different destabilizing effects by introducing one deliberate 'mismatch' at the penultimate (second to last of the 3'-end base of AS primers to improve the resulting AS primers. Furthermore, WASP offers graphical user interface through scalable vector graphic (SVG draw that allow users to select SNPs and graphically visualize designed primers and their conditions. Conclusion WASP offers a tool for designing AS primers for both SNPs and mutations. By integrating the database for known SNPs (using gene ID or rs number

  1. Modulation of DNA binding by gene-specific transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleif, Robert F

    2013-10-01

    The transcription of many genes, particularly in prokaryotes, is controlled by transcription factors whose activity can be modulated by controlling their DNA binding affinity. Understanding the molecular mechanisms by which DNA binding affinity is regulated is important, but because forming definitive conclusions usually requires detailed structural information in combination with data from extensive biophysical, biochemical, and sometimes genetic experiments, little is truly understood about this topic. This review describes the biological requirements placed upon DNA binding transcription factors and their consequent properties, particularly the ways that DNA binding affinity can be modulated and methods for its study. What is known and not known about the mechanisms modulating the DNA binding affinity of a number of prokaryotic transcription factors, including CAP and lac repressor, is provided.

  2. A single tube modified allele-specific-PCR for rapid detection of erythromycin-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Shao-li; SUN Hong-mei; ZHAO Han-qing; CAO Ling; YUAN Yi; FENG Yan-ling; XUE Guan-hua

    2012-01-01

    Background Mycoplasma pneumoniae (M.pneumoniae) is one of the common pathogens causing atypical pneumonia.In recent years,resistance to macrolides has become more common,especially in China.Previous studies have confirmed that the mutation at position 2063 in domain V of the 23S rRNA is the most prevalent,followed by the mutation at position 2064.Reported molecular detection methods for the identification of these mutations include direct sequencing,restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis,real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with high-resolution melt analysis,and nested PCR-linked with capillary electrophoresis,etc.The most commonly used method for monitoring resistance-conferring mutations in M.pneumoniae is direct DNA sequencing of PCR or nested PCR products.However,these methods are time-consuming,labor-intensive or need expensive equipments.Therefore the development of rapid and sensitive methods is very important for monitoring the resistance globally.Methods In this study,we reported a fast and cost-effective method for detecting 2063 and/or 2064 macrolide resistant mutations from specimens using a modified allele-specific PCR analysis,and all results were compared with the sequencing data.We also analyzed the clinical courses of these samples to confirm the modified allele-specific PCR results.Results Among 97 M.pneumoniae specimens,88 were found to possess mutations by this method,and all modified allele-specific PCR analysis results were consistent with the sequencing data.The data of the clinical courses of these 97cases showed that they suffered from severe pneumonia.Erythromycin showed better efficacy on cases from which no macrolide resistance mutation was found on their specimens.However,in some cases from which mutations were detected,erythromycin monotherapy had poor efficacy,and on these patients severe symptoms improved only when azithromycin was added to the treatment.Conclusions The drug-resistant M.pneumoniae is very common in

  3. Allele-specific regulation of primary cilia function by the von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lolkema, M.P.; Mans, D.A.; Ulfman, L.H.; Volpi, S.; Voest, E.E.; Giles, R.H.

    2008-01-01

    Patients with von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease often develop VHL-/- kidney cysts, which possibly progress into clear-cell renal carcinomas (ccRCCs). Recent data link the VHL gene product to formation of the primary cilium, an organelle that extends apically into the renal lumen. Exactly how VHL induc

  4. A four-element based transposon system for allele specific tagging in plants – Theoretical considerations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sanjay Phogat; Pradeep Kumar Burma; Deepak Pental

    2000-03-01

    The two-element transposon constructs, utilizing either Ac/Ds or Spm/dSpm, allow random tagging of genes in heterologous model species, but are inadequate for directed tagging of specific alleles of agronomic importance. We propose the use of Ac/Ds in conjunction with Spm/dSpm to develop a four-element system for directed tagging of crop-specific alleles. The four-element based construct would include both Ds and dSpm along with relevant marker genes and would function in two steps. In the first step dSpm(Ds) stocks (a minimum of two) would be crossed to a line containing transposases of Spm and unlinked integrations would be selected from segregating population by the use of a negative selection marker to develop stocks representing integration of dSpm(Ds) at a large number of locations in the genome. Selections would be made for a line in which dSpm(Ds) shows partial or complete linkage to the allele of interest. In the second step selected line would be crossed to a line containing Ac transposase to induce transpositions of Ds element to linked sites thereby exploiting the natural tendency of Ds element to jump to linked sites. Unlinked jumps of dSpm(Ds) and linked jumps of Ds could be monitored by appropriate marker genes. The proposed model would allow tagging of allele of interest in chromosome addition lines and also help in the efficient use of genic male sterility systems for hybrid seed production by tightly marking the fertility restorer gene with a negative selection marker.

  5. Associations of a polymorphic AP-2 binding site in the 5'-flanking region of the bovine beta-lactoglobulin gene with milk proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuss, A W; Gogol, J; Geidermann, H

    2003-06-01

    Studies on a polymorphic position (R10) in an Activator-Protein-2 (AP-2) binding site of the bovine beta-Lactoglobulin (beta-Lg) gene promoter region and quantitative traits of individual milk proteins were based on material from 79 German Holstein Friesian (HF) and 61 Simmental (Sm) cows. At least four milk samples per cow were analyzed with alkaline Urea-PAGE in combination with densitometry for quantification of individual milk proteins. The two alleles of the R10 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) carry either G or C in position -435 bp of the beta-Lg promoter region. G- and C-alleles were found in Sm with nearly equal frequencies, while in HF the C-allele frequency was higher (0.73) than that of the G-allele. In both breeds, the R10 G-homozygotes had higher (P beta-Lg secreted per day and proportion of beta-Lg in milk protein compared with the C-homozygotes. A similar association was found for alpha-lactalbumin, whereas the relative proportions and daily secreted amounts of caseins (alphaS1, beta, kappa) showed lower values in beta-Lg R10 G-homozygotes. A positive association (P beta-Lg locus to a candidate gene for this trait. The association between the SNP in the AP-2 binding site of the beta-Lg gene and its gene product can be explained as the result of differences in protein binding activity, and, therefore, allele specific differences in gene expression. Thus, our study clearly links a DNA polymorphism of molecular function very closely with in vivo expression parameters of the same locus.

  6. Genome Binding and Gene Regulation by Stem Cell Transcription Factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H. Brandsma (Johan)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractNearly all cells of an individual organism contain the same genome. However, each cell type transcribes a different set of genes due to the presence of different sets of cell type-specific transcription factors. Such transcription factors bind to regulatory regions such as promoters

  7. Allele-specific recognition of the 3′ splice site of INS intron 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kralovicova, Jana

    2010-01-01

    Genetic predisposition to type 1 diabetes (T1D) has been associated with a chromosome 11 locus centered on the proinsulin gene (INS) and with differential steady-state levels of INS RNA from T1D-predisposing and -protective haplotypes. Here, we show that the haplotype-specific expression is determined by INS variants that control the splicing efficiency of intron 1. The adenine allele at IVS1-6 (rs689), which rapidly expanded in modern humans, renders the 3′ splice site of this intron more dependent on the auxiliary factor of U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (U2AF). This interaction required both zinc fingers of the 35-kD U2AF subunit (U2AF35) and was associated with repression of a competing 3′ splice site in INS exon 2. Systematic mutagenesis of reporter constructs showed that intron 1 removal was facilitated by conserved guanosine-rich enhancers and identified additional splicing regulatory motifs in exon 2. Sequencing of intron 1 in primates revealed that relaxation of its 3′ splice site in Hominidae coevolved with the introduction of a short upstream open reading frame, providing a more efficient coupled splicing and translation control. Depletion of SR proteins 9G8 and transformer-2 by RNA interference was associated with exon 2 skipping whereas depletion of SRp20 with increased representation of transcripts containing a cryptic 3′ splice site in the last exon. Together, these findings reveal critical interactions underlying the allele-dependent INS expression and INS-mediated risk of T1D and suggest that the increased requirement for U2AF35 in higher primates may hinder thymic presentation of autoantigens encoded by transcripts with weak 3′ splice sites. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00439-010-0860-1) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20628762

  8. Rapid identification of capybara (Hydrochaeris hydrochaeris through allele-specific PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Henrique-Silva

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available The capybara is the largest rodent in the world and is widely distributed throughout Central and South America.  It is an animal of economic interest due to the pleasant flavor of its meat and higher protein content in comparison  to beef and pork meat.  The hide, hair and fat also have economic advantages. Thus,  as an animal with such high economic potential, it is the target of hunters, even though  hunting capybara is prohibited by law in Brazil.   Due to their  similarities,  capybara meat  is easily confused with  pork  meat.   This  occurs  upon  the apprehension of the  meat  from hunters, as well as in some restaurants that serve capybara meat that was slaughtered clandestinely. In both cases, when the meat is confiscated, those responsible for the crimes claim it is pork meat,  hindering  the enforcement of the law. A practical  course was ministered  to undergraduate biology students enrolled in the elective course Introduction to Genetic  Engineering  at Federal  University  of Sao Carlos (UFSCar, Sao Paulo  State, Brazil.  The  objective  of the  course was to establish  and  apply  a Polymerase  Chain  Reaction  (PCR assay to identify capybara meat and discriminate it in relation  to other types of meat,  including pork. Primers  were designed based  on 12S rRNA,  transthyretin and  growth  hormone  receptor  genes.  The primers generated  capybara specific fragments  of approximately 220, 290 and 330 bp for transthyretin,12S rRNA  and  growth  hormone  receptor,  respectively.   The  duplexes  developed  in the  present work can be used effectively to discriminate capybara meat  from other  animals,  contributing to combating predatory capybara hunting. The results were extensively discussed and the students have contributed to written a paper  to be submitted to a publication.

  9. Lack of allele-specific efficacy of a bivalent AMA1 malaria vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellis Ruth D

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extensive genetic diversity in vaccine antigens may contribute to the lack of efficacy of blood stage malaria vaccines. Apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA1 is a leading blood stage malaria vaccine candidate with extreme diversity, potentially limiting its efficacy against infection and disease caused by Plasmodium falciparum parasites with diverse forms of AMA1. Methods Three hundred Malian children participated in a Phase 2 clinical trial of a bivalent malaria vaccine that found no protective efficacy. The vaccine consists of recombinant AMA1 based on the 3D7 and FVO strains of P. falciparum adjuvanted with aluminum hydroxide (AMA1-C1. The gene encoding AMA1 was sequenced from P. falciparum infections experienced before and after immunization with the study vaccine or a control vaccine. Sequences of ama1 from infections in the malaria vaccine and control groups were compared with regard to similarity to the vaccine antigens using several measures of genetic diversity. Time to infection with parasites carrying AMA1 haplotypes similar to the vaccine strains with respect to immunologically important polymorphisms and the risk of infection with vaccine strain haplotypes were compared. Results Based on 62 polymorphic AMA1 residues, 186 unique ama1 haplotypes were identified among 315 ama1 sequences that were included in the analysis. Eight infections had ama1 sequences identical to 3D7 while none were identical to FVO. Several measures of genetic diversity showed that ama1 sequences in the malaria vaccine and control groups were comparable both at baseline and during follow up period. Pre- and post-immunization ama1 sequences in both groups all had a similar degree of genetic distance from FVO and 3D7 ama1. No differences were found in the time of first clinical episode or risk of infection with an AMA1 haplotype similar to 3D7 or FVO with respect to a limited set of immunologically important polymorphisms found in the cluster 1 loop

  10. An allele-specific polymerase chain reaction assay for the differentiation of members of the Anopheles culicifacies complex

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    O P Singh; Geeta Goswami; N Nanda; K Raghavendra; D Chandra; S K Subbarao

    2004-09-01

    Anopheles culicifacies, the principal vector of malaria in India, is a complex of five cryptic species which are morphologically indistinguishable at any stage of life. In view of the practical difficulties associated with classical cytotaxonomic method for the identification of members of the complex, an allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (ASPCR) assay targeted to the D3 domain of 28S ribosomal DNA was developed. The assay discriminates An. culicifacies species A and D from species B, C and E. The assay was validated using chromosomally-identified specimens of An. culicifacies from different geographical regions of India representing different sympatric associations. The assay correctly differentiates species A and D from species B, C and E. The possible use of this diagnostic assay in disease vector control programmes is discussed.

  11. A Novel Real-time Fluorescence Mutant-allele-specific Amplification Method for Rapid Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Current methods for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis are timeconsuming and complicated. We aimed at development of one-step real-time fluorescence mutant-allele-specific amplification (MASA) method for rapid SNP analysis. The method is a marriage of two technologies: MASA primers for target DNA and a double-stranded DNA-selective fluorescent dye, SYBR Green I. Genotypes are separated according to the different threshold cycles of the wild-type and mutant primers. K-ras oncogene was used as a target to validate the feasibility of the method. The experimental results showed that the different genotypes can be clearly discriminated by the assay. The real-time fluorescence MASA method will have an enormous potential for fast and reliable SNP analysis due to its simplicity and low cost.

  12. Assignment of SNP allelic configuration in polyploids using competitive allele-specific PCR: application to citrus triploid progeny

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuenca, José; Aleza, Pablo; Navarro, Luis; Ollitrault, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Background Polyploidy is a major component of eukaryote evolution. Estimation of allele copy numbers for molecular markers has long been considered a challenge for polyploid species, while this process is essential for most genetic research. With the increasing availability and whole-genome coverage of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers, it is essential to implement a versatile SNP genotyping method to assign allelic configuration efficiently in polyploids. Scope This work evaluates the usefulness of the KASPar method, based on competitive allele-specific PCR, for the assignment of SNP allelic configuration. Citrus was chosen as a model because of its economic importance, the ongoing worldwide polyploidy manipulation projects for cultivar and rootstock breeding, and the increasing availability of SNP markers. Conclusions Fifteen SNP markers were successfully designed that produced clear allele signals that were in agreement with previous genotyping results at the diploid level. The analysis of DNA mixes between two haploid lines (Clementine and pummelo) at 13 different ratios revealed a very high correlation (average = 0·9796; s.d. = 0·0094) between the allele ratio and two parameters [θ angle = tan−1 (y/x) and y′ = y/(x + y)] derived from the two normalized allele signals (x and y) provided by KASPar. Separated cluster analysis and analysis of variance (ANOVA) from mixed DNA simulating triploid and tetraploid hybrids provided 99·71 % correct allelic configuration. Moreover, triploid populations arising from 2n gametes and interploid crosses were easily genotyped and provided useful genetic information. This work demonstrates that the KASPar SNP genotyping technique is an efficient way to assign heterozygous allelic configurations within polyploid populations. This method is accurate, simple and cost-effective. Moreover, it may be useful for quantitative studies, such as relative allele-specific expression analysis and bulk segregant analysis

  13. Development and validation of a bi-directional allele-specific PCR tool for differentiation in nurseries of dura, tenera and pisifera oil palms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola A. Reyes

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq. fruits are classified by shell thickness into three types: dura, pisifera, and tenera, the last one being the product of a dura × pisifera cross. The palm oil industry relies on the use of high-yield tenera plant material for production; however, it is usually generated with female infertile pisifera, so early identification of this trait is very important to oil production and breeding programs. Recently, the mapping and sequencing of the SHELL gene, which is responsible for endocarp formation in oil palms, made it possible to identify two mutations (type SNP, single nucleotide polymorphism that affect its function and that are useful to developing molecular markers for predicting shell thickness. The aim of this study was to standardize PCR-based methodologies in order to detect the SNP observed in codon 30 and validate it under our E. guineensis biological collections. We achieved the differentiation of SHELL alleles with both allele specific PCR and CAPS with the restriction enzyme HindIII in homozygous and heterozygous plants that contained the described mutation, and the prediction was correlated with the phenotype observed in oil palm fruits. These methodologies facilitated the discrimination of plants by fruit type in nursery and pre-nursery stages 24 months before production started, thereby reducing the time and area used in oil palm breeding programs.

  14. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) binding-mediated gene regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are synthetic oligonucleotides with chemically modified backbones. PNAs can bind to both DNA and RNA targets in a sequence-specific manner to form PNA/DNA and PNA/RNA duplex structures. When bound to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) targets, the PNA molecule replaces one DNA strand in the duplex by strand invasion to form a PNA/DNA/PNA [or (PNA)2/DNA] triplex structure and the displaced DNA strand exists as a singlestranded D-loop. PNA has been used in many studies as research tools for gene regulation and gene targeting. The Dloops generated from the PNA binding have also been demonstrated for its potential in initiating transcription and inducing gene expression. PNA provides a powerful tool to study the mechanism of transcription and an innovative strategy to regulate target gene expression. An understanding of the PNA-mediated gene regulation will have important clinical implications in treatment of many human diseases including genetic, cancerous, and age-related diseases.

  15. Concurrence of High Fat Diet and APOE Gene Induces Allele Specific Metabolic and Mental Stress Changes in an AD Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifat Segev

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aging is the main risk factor for neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD. However, evidence indicates that the pathological process begins long before actual cognitive or pathological symptoms are apparent. The long asymptomatic phase and complex integration between genetic, environmental, and metabolic factors make it one of the most challenging diseases to understand and cure. In the present study, we asked whether an environmental factor such as high-fat diet would synergize with a genetic factor to affect the metabolic and cognitive state in the ApoE4 mouse model of AD. Our data suggest that a high-fat diet induces diabetes mellitus-like metabolism in ApoE4 mice, as well as changes in BACE1 protein levels between the two ApoE strains. Furthermore, high-fat diet induces anxiety in this AD mouse model. Our results suggest that young ApoE4 carriers are prone to psychological stress and metabolic abnormalities related to AD, which can easily be triggered via high-fat nutrition.

  16. DETEKSI MUTASI V1016G PADA GEN VOLTAGE-GATED SODIUM CHANNEL PADA POPULASI Aedes aegypti (DIPTERA: CULICIDAE DI KABUPATEN KLATEN, JAWA TENGAH DENGAN METODE ALLELE-SPECIFIC PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyah Widiastuti

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakMeluasnya kejadian resistensi pada vektor virus Dengue di Jawa Tengah memerlukan strategi pengelolaan resistensi insektisida secara efektif. Oleh karena itu, informasi mengenai mutasi gen pada posisi 1016 di domain II segmen ke­6 gen VGSC pada nyamuk Aedes aegypti yang menyebabkan perubahan asam amino valin (V menjadi glisin (G akan dapat memperkuat penelitian operasional mengenai strategi pemilihan insektisida dalam program­pengendalian­vektor­Dengue.­Penelitian­ini­menggunakan­uji­Allele-Specific­Polymerase­Chain­Reaction(AS­PCR yang dapat mendeteksi mutasi V1016G. Sampel penelitian ini adalah 22 ekor nyamuk Aedes aegypti dari Kabupaten Klaten yang berumur 2­5 hari. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa 22,7% nyamuk belum mengalami mutasi (V/V, 59,1% nyamuk mengalami mutasi heterozigot (V/G dan 18,2% nyamuk mengalami mutasi homozigot (G/G. Hal ini menunjukkan indikasi terjadinya resistensi populasi nyamuk Ae.aegypti terhadap insektisida sintetik piretroid yang disebabkan oleh mekanisme knockdown resistance.Kata Kunci:­Aedes­aegypti,­mutasi­V1016G,­Allele-Specific­PCR,­VGSCAbstractInsecticides resistance has spread rapidly among dengue vectors from Central Java, and require an effective insecticide resistance management strategies.one of the resistance mechanism in Aedes aegypti may arise through knockdown resistance or kdr which consists of single point mutation within the genes that are targeted by insecticide compounds. Mutation at position 1016 in domain II, segment 6 of the Voltage Gated Sodium Channel gene in Ae. aegypti leads to a valine to glycine substitution (V1016G is associated with resistance to the type II pyrethroid. The result of this study will help us to strengthen basic and operational research on the­development­of­strategies­for­Dengue­vector­control­in­Indonesia.­This­study­utilized­an­allele-specificPolymerase Chain Reaction (AS­PCR assay that could be used to detect the V1016G

  17. Cooperative binding of transcription factors promotes bimodal gene expression response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo S Gutierrez

    Full Text Available In the present work we extend and analyze the scope of our recently proposed stochastic model for transcriptional regulation, which considers an arbitrarily complex cis-regulatory system using only elementary reactions. Previously, we determined the role of cooperativity on the intrinsic fluctuations of gene expression for activating transcriptional switches, by means of master equation formalism and computer simulation. This model allowed us to distinguish between two cooperative binding mechanisms and, even though the mean expression levels were not affected differently by the acting mechanism, we showed that the associated fluctuations were different. In the present generalized model we include other regulatory functions in addition to those associated to an activator switch. Namely, we introduce repressive regulatory functions and two theoretical mechanisms that account for the biphasic response that some cis-regulatory systems show to the transcription factor concentration. We have also extended our previous master equation formalism in order to include protein production by stochastic translation of mRNA. Furthermore, we examine the graded/binary scenarios in the context of the interaction energy between transcription factors. In this sense, this is the first report to show that the cooperative binding of transcription factors to DNA promotes the "all-or-none" phenomenon observed in eukaryotic systems. In addition, we confirm that gene expression fluctuation levels associated with one of two cooperative binding mechanism never exceed the fluctuation levels of the other.

  18. Detection of the MYD88 mutation by the combination of the allele-specific PCR and quenching probe methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogami, S; Kawaguchi-Ihara, N; Shiratori, E; Ohtaka, M; Itoh, M; Tohda, S

    2017-04-01

    The MYD88 missense mutation c.794T>C, p.Leu265Pro, is found in patients with Waldenstörm's macroglobulinemia and lymphoma. Direct sequencing, allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR), PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP), and high-resolution melting analysis (HRM) are currently used to detect the mutation; however, they are either time-consuming or have low detection sensitivity. Here, we developed a novel highly sensitive and rapid detection method based on the quenching probe (QP) technique and AS-PCR. A lymphoma cell line heterozygous for the MYD88 mutation, two wild-type cell lines, and two samples from Waldenstörm's macroglobulinemia patients were analyzed by AS-PCR, PCR-RFLP, HRM, and QP, and their detection sensitivity was examined using the mixtures of the mutant and wild-type DNA. For mutation-carrying heterozygous samples, the QP method produced W-shaped melting profiles presenting curves derived from the wild-type and mutant alleles. The QP analysis was performed in 2 h and demonstrated the detection limit of 5%, which was similar to that of the other methods. However, the combination of AS-PCR and QP (AS-QP) improved the sensitivity to 0.62% of the mutant allele. The AS-QP analysis is rapid and minimally improves detection sensitivity compared to the AS-PCR. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Visualizing allele-specific expression in single cells reveals epigenetic mosaicism in an H19 loss-of-imprinting mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginart, Paul; Kalish, Jennifer M; Jiang, Connie L; Yu, Alice C; Bartolomei, Marisa S; Raj, Arjun

    2016-03-01

    Imprinting is a classic mammalian epigenetic phenomenon that results in expression from a single parental allele. Imprinting defects can lead to inappropriate expression from the normally silenced allele, but it remains unclear whether every cell in a mutant organism follows the population average, which would have profound implications for human imprinting disorders. Here, we apply a new fluorescence in situ hybridization method that measures allele-specific expression in single cells to address this question in mutants exhibiting aberrant H19/Igf2 (insulin-like growth factor 2) imprinting. We show that mutant primary embryonic mouse fibroblasts are comprised of two subpopulations: one expressing both H19 alleles and another expressing only the maternal copy. Only in the latter cell population is Igf2 expression detected. Furthermore, the two subpopulations are stable in that cells do not interconvert between the two expression patterns. Combined small input methylation analysis and transcriptional imaging revealed that these two mutant subpopulations exhibit distinct methylation patterns at their imprinting control regions. Consistently, pharmacological inhibition of DNA methylation reduced the proportion of monoallelic cells. Importantly, we observed that the same two subpopulations are also present in vivo within murine cardiac tissue. Our results establish that imprinting disorders can display striking single-cell heterogeneity in their molecular phenotypes and suggest that such heterogeneity may underlie epigenetic mosaicism in human imprinting disorders.

  20. Genome-wide detection of allele specific copy number variation associated with insulin resistance in African Americans from the HyperGEN study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marguerite R Irvin

    Full Text Available African Americans have been understudied in genome wide association studies of diabetes and related traits. In the current study, we examined the joint association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and copy number variants (CNVs with fasting insulin and an index of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR in the HyperGEN study, a family based study with proband ascertainment for hypertension. This analysis is restricted to 1,040 African Americans without diabetes. We generated allele specific CNV genotypes at 872,243 autosomal loci using Birdsuite, a freely available multi-stage program. Joint tests of association for SNPs and CNVs were performed using linear mixed models adjusting for covariates and familial relationships. Our results highlight SNPs associated with fasting insulin and HOMA-IR (rs6576507 and rs8026527, 3.7*10(-7≤P≤1.1*10(-5 near ATPase, class V, type 10A (ATP10A, and the L Type voltage dependent calcium channel (CACNA1D, rs1401492, P≤5.2*10(-6. ATP10A belongs to a family of aminophospholipid-transporting ATPases and has been associated with type 2 diabetes in mice. CACNA1D has been linked to pancreatic beta cell generation in mice. The two most significant copy variable markers (rs10277702 and rs361367; P<2.0*10(-4 were in the beta variable region of the T-cell receptor gene (TCRVB. Human and mouse TCR has been shown to mimic insulin and its receptor and could contribute to insulin resistance. Our findings differ from genome wide association studies of fasting insulin and other diabetes related traits in European populations, highlighting the continued need to investigate unique genetic influences for understudied populations such as African Americans.

  1. Minority drug-resistant HIV-1 variants in treatment naive East-African and Caucasian patients detected by allele-specific real-time PCR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halime Ekici

    Full Text Available To assess the presence of two major non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI drug resistance mutations (DRMs, Y181C and K103N, in minor viral quasispecies of treatment naïve HIV-1 infected East-African and Swedish patients by allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (AS-PCR.Treatment naïve adults (n=191 with three epidemiological backgrounds were included: 92 Ethiopians living in Ethiopia; 55 East-Africans who had migrated to Sweden; and 44 Caucasians living in Sweden. The pol gene was analysed by standard population sequencing and by AS-PCR for the detection of Y181C and K103N.The Y181C was detected in the minority quasispecies of six Ethiopians (6.5%, in two Caucasians (4.5%, and in one East-African (1.8%. The K103N was detected in one East- African (1.8%, by both methods. The proportion of mutants ranged from 0.25% to 17.5%. Additional DRMs were found in all three treatment naïve patient groups by population sequencing.Major NNRTI mutations can be found by AS-PCR in minor quasispecies of treatment naïve HIV-1 infected Ethiopians living in Ethiopia, in East-African and Caucasian patients living in Sweden in whom population sequencing reveal wild-type virus only. Surveys with standard sequencing are likely to underestimate transmitted drug resistance and the presence of resistant minor quasispecies in treatment naïve patients should be topic for future large scale studies.

  2. Advantage of whole exome sequencing over allele-specific and targeted segment sequencing in detection of novel TULP1 mutation in leber congenital amaurosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Yiran; Prokudin, Ivan; Yu, Cong

    2015-01-01

    Background: Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is a severe form of retinal dystrophy with marked underlying genetic heterogeneity. Until recently, allele-specific assays and Sanger sequencing of targeted segments were the only available approaches for attempted genetic diagnosis in this condition. ...

  3. Allele-specific programming of Npy and epigenetic effects of physical activity in a genetic model of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melas, P A; Lennartsson, A; Vakifahmetoglu-Norberg, H; Wei, Y; Åberg, E; Werme, M; Rogdaki, M; Mannervik, M; Wegener, G; Brené, S; Mathé, A A; Lavebratt, C

    2013-05-07

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) has been implicated in depression, emotional processing and stress response. Part of this evidence originates from human single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) studies. In the present study, we report that a SNP in the rat Npy promoter (C/T; rs105431668) affects in vitro transcription and DNA-protein interactions. Genotyping studies showed that the C-allele of rs105431668 is present in a genetic rat model of depression (Flinders sensitive line; FSL), while the SNP's T-allele is present in its controls (Flinders resistant line; FRL). In vivo experiments revealed binding of a transcription factor (CREB2) and a histone acetyltransferase (Ep300) only at the SNP locus of the FRL. Accordingly, the FRL had increased hippocampal levels of Npy mRNA and H3K18 acetylation; a gene-activating histone modification maintained by Ep300. Next, based on previous studies showing antidepressant-like effects of physical activity in the FSL, we hypothesized that physical activity may affect Npy's epigenetic status. In line with this assumption, physical activity was associated with increased levels of Npy mRNA and H3K18 acetylation. Physical activity was also associated with reduced mRNA levels of a histone deacetylase (Hdac5). Conclusively, the rat rs105431668 appears to be a functional Npy SNP that may underlie depression-like characteristics. In addition, the achieved epigenetic reprogramming of Npy provides molecular support for the putative effectiveness of physical activity as a non-pharmacological antidepressant.

  4. EWS and FUS bind a subset of transcribed genes encoding proteins enriched in RNA regulatory functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Yonglun; Friis, Jenny Blechingberg; Fernandes, Ana Miguel;

    2015-01-01

    IP-seq). Our results show that FUS and EWS bind to a subset of actively transcribed genes, that binding often is downstream the poly(A)-signal, and that binding overlaps with RNA polymerase II. Functional examinations of selected target genes identified that FUS and EWS can regulate gene expression...... at different levels. Gene Ontology analyses showed that FUS and EWS target genes preferentially encode proteins involved in regulatory processes at the RNA level. Conclusions The presented results yield new insights into gene interactions of EWS and FUS and have identified a set of FUS and EWS target genes...

  5. Genome-scale study of the importance of binding site context for transcription factor binding and gene regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronne Hans

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rate of mRNA transcription is controlled by transcription factors that bind to specific DNA motifs in promoter regions upstream of protein coding genes. Recent results indicate that not only the presence of a motif but also motif context (for example the orientation of a motif or its location relative to the coding sequence is important for gene regulation. Results In this study we present ContextFinder, a tool that is specifically aimed at identifying cases where motif context is likely to affect gene regulation. We used ContextFinder to examine the role of motif context in S. cerevisiae both for DNA binding by transcription factors and for effects on gene expression. For DNA binding we found significant patterns of motif location bias, whereas motif orientations did not seem to matter. Motif context appears to affect gene expression even more than it affects DNA binding, as biases in both motif location and orientation were more frequent in promoters of co-expressed genes. We validated our results against data on nucleosome positioning, and found a negative correlation between preferred motif locations and nucleosome occupancy. Conclusion We conclude that the requirement for stable binding of transcription factors to DNA and their subsequent function in gene regulation can impose constraints on motif context.

  6. Impact of pre-existing MSP142-allele specific immunity on potency of an erythrocytic Plasmodium falciparum vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bergmann-Leitner Elke S

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MSP1 is the major surface protein on merozoites and a prime candidate for a blood stage malaria vaccine. Preclinical and seroepidemiological studies have implicated antibodies to MSP1 in protection against blood stage parasitaemia and/or reduced parasite densities, respectively. Malaria endemic areas have multiple strains of Plasmodium falciparum circulating at any given time, giving rise to complex immune responses, an issue which is generally not addressed in clinical trials conducted in non-endemic areas. A lack of understanding of the effect of pre-existing immunity to heterologous parasite strains may significantly contribute to vaccine failure in the field. The purpose of this study was to model the effect of pre-existing immunity to MSP142 on the immunogenicity of blood-stage malaria vaccines based on alternative MSP1 alleles. Methods Inbred and outbred mice were immunized with various recombinant P. falciparum MSP142 proteins that represent the two major alleles of MSP142, MAD20 (3D7 and Wellcome (K1, FVO. Humoral immune responses were analysed by ELISA and LuminexTM, and functional activity of induced MSP142-specific antibodies was assessed by growth inhibition assays. T-cell responses were characterized using ex vivo ELISpot assays. Results Analysis of the immune responses induced by various immunization regimens demonstrated a strong allele-specific response at the T cell level in both inbred and outbred mice. The success of heterologous regimens depended on the degree of homology of the N-terminal p33 portion of the MSP142, likely due to the fact that most T cell epitopes reside in this part of the molecule. Analysis of humoral immune responses revealed a marked cross-reactivity between the alleles. Functional analyses showed that some of the heterologous regimens induced antibodies with improved growth inhibitory activities. Conclusion The development of a more broadly efficacious MSP1 based vaccine may be

  7. Genes encoding calmodulin-binding proteins in the Arabidopsis genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Vaka S.; Ali, Gul S.; Reddy, Anireddy S N.

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of the recently completed Arabidopsis genome sequence indicates that approximately 31% of the predicted genes could not be assigned to functional categories, as they do not show any sequence similarity with proteins of known function from other organisms. Calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous and multifunctional Ca(2+) sensor, interacts with a wide variety of cellular proteins and modulates their activity/function in regulating diverse cellular processes. However, the primary amino acid sequence of the CaM-binding domain in different CaM-binding proteins (CBPs) is not conserved. One way to identify most of the CBPs in the Arabidopsis genome is by protein-protein interaction-based screening of expression libraries with CaM. Here, using a mixture of radiolabeled CaM isoforms from Arabidopsis, we screened several expression libraries prepared from flower meristem, seedlings, or tissues treated with hormones, an elicitor, or a pathogen. Sequence analysis of 77 positive clones that interact with CaM in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner revealed 20 CBPs, including 14 previously unknown CBPs. In addition, by searching the Arabidopsis genome sequence with the newly identified and known plant or animal CBPs, we identified a total of 27 CBPs. Among these, 16 CBPs are represented by families with 2-20 members in each family. Gene expression analysis revealed that CBPs and CBP paralogs are expressed differentially. Our data suggest that Arabidopsis has a large number of CBPs including several plant-specific ones. Although CaM is highly conserved between plants and animals, only a few CBPs are common to both plants and animals. Analysis of Arabidopsis CBPs revealed the presence of a variety of interesting domains. Our analyses identified several hypothetical proteins in the Arabidopsis genome as CaM targets, suggesting their involvement in Ca(2+)-mediated signaling networks.

  8. Allele-specific oligonucleotide polymerase chain reaction for the determination of Rh C/c and Rh E/e antigens in thalassaemic patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojjati, Mohammad Taher; Einollahi, Nahid; Nabatchian, Fariba; Pourfathollah, Ali Akbar; Mahdavi, Mohammad Reza

    2011-01-01

    Background Thalassaemia is a genetic disease in which there is a relative or complete lack of alpha or beta globin chains. Patients with moderate to severe forms of thalassaemia need transfusions from the early years of life. Antibody production against blood group antigens may cause many problems in preparing compatible blood units for transfusion. The identification of definite blood group phenotypes by the haemagglutination method can be difficult because of the mixed population of red blood cells from the donor and recipient. Materials and methods Forty multiply transfused thalassaemic patients and ten healthy controls with no history of blood transfusion were enrolled in this study. Allele-specific oligonucleotide polymerase chain reaction (ASO-PCR) and haemagglutination methods were used to determine the presence of Rhesus (Rh) C, c, E and e antigens. Results In this study four primer sets were used for ASO-PCR amplification of RhC/c and RhE/e. Although PCR assays for RhC/c and RHE/e genotyping have been described previously, in this study we used a new condition for PCR by decreasing the annealing temperature from 63 °C to 58 °C in order to amplify all four genes in the same condition. In order to evaluate this single run molecular method, we used the haemagglutination test as the standard method and compared the results from the two methods. We found discrepancies between phenotype and genotype results among patients with beta thalassaemia, but complete agreement between phenotype and genotype in the control group. Conclusions The advantage of this new ASO-PCR method compared to a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) PCR method is that with the former all four genes can be amplified at the same time by PCR, and electrophoresis can be performed immediately to determine individual antigen profiles. The simplicity of the ASO-PCR method makes it suitable for routine use in medical centres and it is also cheaper than RFLP-PCR. Furthermore, as shown

  9. An insulin-induced DNA-binding protein for the human growth hormone gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Prager, D; Gebremedhin, S; Melmed, S

    1990-01-01

    The control of gene transcription is usually mediated by transacting transcriptional factors that bind to upstream regulatory elements. As insulin regulates transcription of the growth hormone (GH) gene, we tested nuclear extracts from unstimulated and insulin-stimulated Chinese hamster ovarian (CHO) cells for binding to four human GH (hGH) gene promoter oligonucleotide fragments identified as target-binding sequences by DNAse I footprinting. Using a mobility shift assay, an insulin-induced D...

  10. Response of Fatty Acid Synthesis Genes to the Binding of Human Salivary Amylase by Streptococcus gordonii

    OpenAIRE

    Nikitkova, Anna E.; Haase, Elaine M.; Vickerman, M. Margaret; Gill, Steven R.; Scannapieco, Frank A.

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus gordonii, an important primary colonizer of dental plaque biofilm, specifically binds to salivary amylase via the surface-associated amylase-binding protein A (AbpA). We hypothesized that a function of amylase binding to S. gordonii may be to modulate the expression of chromosomal genes, which could influence bacterial survival and persistence in the oral cavity. Gene expression profiling by microarray analysis was performed to detect genes in S. gordonii strain CH1 that were di...

  11. A genome-wide screen in human embryonic stem cells reveals novel sites of allele-specific histone modification associated with known disease loci

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Prendergast, James G D

    2012-05-19

    AbstractBackgroundChromatin structure at a given site can differ between chromosome copies in a cell, and such imbalances in chromatin structure have been shown to be important in understanding the molecular mechanisms controlling several disease loci. Human genetic variation, DNA methylation, and disease have been intensely studied, uncovering many sites of allele-specific DNA methylation (ASM). However, little is known about the genome-wide occurrence of sites of allele-specific histone modification (ASHM) and their relationship to human disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the extent and characteristics of sites of ASHM in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs).ResultsUsing a statistically rigorous protocol, we investigated the genomic distribution of ASHM in hESCs, and their relationship to sites of allele-specific expression (ASE) and DNA methylation. We found that, although they were rare, sites of ASHM were substantially enriched at loci displaying ASE. Many were also found at known imprinted regions, hence sites of ASHM are likely to be better markers of imprinted regions than sites of ASM. We also found that sites of ASHM and ASE in hESCs colocalize at risk loci for developmental syndromes mediated by deletions, providing insights into the etiology of these disorders.ConclusionThese results demonstrate the potential importance of ASHM patterns in the interpretation of disease loci, and the protocol described provides a basis for similar studies of ASHM in other cell types to further our understanding of human disease susceptibility.

  12. Acyl-CoA-binding protein/diazepam-binding inhibitor gene and pseudogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandrup, S; Hummel, R; Ravn, S

    1992-01-01

    Acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) is a 10 kDa protein isolated from bovine liver by virtue of its ability to bind and induce the synthesis of medium-chain acyl-CoA esters. Surprisingly, it turned out to be identical to a protein named diazepam-binding Inhibitor (DBI) claimed to be an endogenous mod...

  13. ELK1 uses different DNA binding modes to regulate functionally distinct classes of target genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaneta Odrowaz

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic transcription factors are grouped into families and, due to their similar DNA binding domains, often have the potential to bind to the same genomic regions. This can lead to redundancy at the level of DNA binding, and mechanisms are required to generate specific functional outcomes that enable distinct gene expression programmes to be controlled by a particular transcription factor. Here we used ChIP-seq to uncover two distinct binding modes for the ETS transcription factor ELK1. In one mode, other ETS transcription factors can bind regulatory regions in a redundant fashion; in the second, ELK1 binds in a unique fashion to another set of genomic targets. Each binding mode is associated with different binding site features and also distinct regulatory outcomes. Furthermore, the type of binding mode also determines the control of functionally distinct subclasses of genes and hence the phenotypic response elicited. This is demonstrated for the unique binding mode where a novel role for ELK1 in controlling cell migration is revealed. We have therefore uncovered an unexpected link between the type of binding mode employed by a transcription factor, the subsequent gene regulatory mechanisms used, and the functional categories of target genes controlled.

  14. EWS and FUS bind a subset of transcribed genes encoding proteins enriched in RNA regulatory functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Yonglun; Friis, Jenny Blechingberg; Fernandes, Ana Miguel

    2015-01-01

    at different levels. Gene Ontology analyses showed that FUS and EWS target genes preferentially encode proteins involved in regulatory processes at the RNA level. Conclusions The presented results yield new insights into gene interactions of EWS and FUS and have identified a set of FUS and EWS target genes...... and involved in the human neurological diseases amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and fronto-temporal lobar degeneration. Results To determine the gene regulatory functions of FUS and EWS at the level of chromatin, we have performed chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by next generation sequencing (Ch......IP-seq). Our results show that FUS and EWS bind to a subset of actively transcribed genes, that binding often is downstream the poly(A)-signal, and that binding overlaps with RNA polymerase II. Functional examinations of selected target genes identified that FUS and EWS can regulate gene expression...

  15. Typing for HLA-DPB1*03 and HLA-DPB1*06 using allele-specific DNA in vitro amplification and allele-specific oligonucleotide probes. Detection of "new" DPB1*06 variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fugger, L; Morling, N; Ryder, L P;

    1989-01-01

    DP gene typing using in vitro DNA amplification combined with sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes has recently been reported. The resulting DNA amplification was specific for the HLA-DPB locus. Typing for the individual DPB alleles was exclusively dependent on the hybridizations of the probe...

  16. Identification of a DNA binding protein that recognizes the nonamer recombinational signal sequence of immunoglobulin genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halligan, B D; Desiderio, S V

    1987-10-01

    Extracts of nuclei from B- and T-lymphoid cells contain a protein that binds specifically to the conserved nonamer DNA sequence within the recombinational signals of immunoglobulin genes. Complexes with DNA fragments from four kappa light-chain joining (J) segments have the same electrophoretic mobility. Nonamer-containing DNA fragments from heavy-chain and light-chain genes compete for binding. Within the 5'-flanking DNA of the J kappa 4 gene segment, the binding site has been localized to a 27-base-pair interval spanning the nonamer region. The binding activity is recovered as a single peak after ion-exchange chromatography. The site of binding of the protein and its presence in nuclei of lymphoid cells suggest that it may function in the assembly of immunoglobulin genes.

  17. ANDROGEN REGULATION OF PROSTATIC STEROID BINDING PROTEIN GENE TRANSCRIPTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGYong-Lian; ZHOUZong-Xun; ZHANGYou-Duan; PARKERMalcolmG

    1989-01-01

    Prostatic steroid binding protein (PSBP) is a major protein secreted in the rat ventral prostate (V.P.) and also one of the components in seminal fluid, The potential importance of this protein in male fertility emerged from its ability of binding cholesterol which might modulate the proportion of phospholipids and cholesterol in sperm making it suitable

  18. Identification of Genes Encoding the Folate- and Thiamine-Binding Membrane Proteins in Firmicutes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eudes, Aymerick; Erkens, Guus B.; Slotboom, Dirk J.; Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Naponelli, Valeria; Hanson, Andrew D.

    2008-01-01

    Genes encoding high-affinity folate- and thiamine-binding proteins (FolT, ThiT) were identified in the Lactobacillus casei genome, expressed in Lactococcus lactis, and functionally characterized. Similar genes occur in many Firmicutes, sometimes next to folate or thiamine salvage genes. Most thiT ge

  19. Identification of Genes Encoding the Folate- and Thiamine-Binding Membrane Proteins in Firmicutes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eudes, Aymerick; Erkens, Guus B.; Slotboom, Dirk J.; Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Naponelli, Valeria; Hanson, Andrew D.

    2008-01-01

    Genes encoding high-affinity folate- and thiamine-binding proteins (FolT, ThiT) were identified in the Lactobacillus casei genome, expressed in Lactococcus lactis, and functionally characterized. Similar genes occur in many Firmicutes, sometimes next to folate or thiamine salvage genes. Most thiT ge

  20. Allele-specific polymerase chain reaction for detection of a mutation in the relax circular DNA and the covalently closed circular DNA of hepatitis B virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Wan-Long; Hu, Jie-Li; Fang, Yan; Luo, Qiang; Xu, Ge; Xu, Lei; Jing, Zhou-Hong; Shan, Xue-Feng; Zhu, Yan-Ling; Huang, Ai-Long

    2013-12-01

    The relax circle DNA (rcDNA) sequence and the covalently closed circle DNA (cccDNA) sequence in hepatitis B virus (HBV) are crucial regions for HBV infections. To analyze mutations in rcDNA and cccDNA, DNA sequencing is often used, although it is time-consuming and expensive. Herein, we report a simple, economic, albeit accurate allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (AS-PCR) to detect mutations in these regions of HBV. This method can be extensively used to screen for mutations at specific positions of HBV genome.

  1. Molecular characterization and a multiplex allele-specific PCR method for detection of thiabendazole resistance in Penicillium expansum from apple

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiabendazole (TBZ) is commonly used as a postharvest treatment for control of blue mold in apples caused by Penicillium expansum. Different point mutations in the ß-tubulin gene conferring benzimidazole resistance have been reported in plant pathogens, but molecular mechanisms of TBZ resistance in ...

  2. Acyl-CoA-binding protein/diazepam-binding inhibitor gene and pseudogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandrup, S; Hummel, R; Ravn, S

    1992-01-01

    have molecularly cloned and characterized the ACBP/DBI gene family in rat. The rat ACBP/DBI gene family comprises one expressed gene and four processed pseudogenes of which one was shown to exist in two allelic forms. The expressed gene is organized into four exons and three introns....... There is a remarkable correspondence between the structural modules of ACBP/DBI as determined by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and the exon-intron architecture of the ACBP/DBI gene. Detailed analyses of transcription of the ACBP/DBI gene in brain and liver were performed to map transcription initiation...

  3. Allele Specific Locked Nucleic Acid Quantitative PCR (ASLNAqPCR): An Accurate and Cost-Effective Assay to Diagnose and Quantify KRAS and BRAF Mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morandi, Luca; de Biase, Dario; Visani, Michela; Cesari, Valentina; De Maglio, Giovanna; Pizzolitto, Stefano; Pession, Annalisa; Tallini, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    The use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) requires the testing for hot spot mutations of the molecular effectors downstream the membrane-bound tyrosine kinases since their wild type status is expected for response to TKI therapy. We report a novel assay that we have called Allele Specific Locked Nucleic Acid quantitative PCR (ASLNAqPCR). The assay uses LNA-modified allele specific primers and LNA-modified beacon probes to increase sensitivity, specificity and to accurately quantify mutations. We designed primers specific for codon 12/13 KRAS mutations and BRAF V600E, and validated the assay with 300 routine samples from a variety of sources, including cytology specimens. All were analyzed by ASLNAqPCR and Sanger sequencing. Discordant cases were pyrosequenced. ASLNAqPCR correctly identified BRAF and KRAS mutations in all discordant cases and all had a mutated/wild type DNA ratio below the analytical sensitivity of the Sanger method. ASLNAqPCR was 100% specific with greater accuracy, positive and negative predictive values compared with Sanger sequencing. The analytical sensitivity of ASLNAqPCR is 0.1%, allowing quantification of mutated DNA in small neoplastic cell clones. ASLNAqPCR can be performed in any laboratory with real-time PCR equipment, is very cost-effective and can easily be adapted to detect hot spot mutations in other oncogenes. PMID:22558339

  4. Enhanced specificity of TPMT*2 genotyping using unidirectional wild-type and mutant allele-specific scorpion primers in a single tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dong; Yang, Zhao; Xia, Han; Huang, Jun-Fu; Zhang, Yang; Jiang, Tian-Nun; Wang, Gui-Yu; Chuai, Zheng-Ran; Fu, Wei-Ling; Huang, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Genotyping of thiopurine S-methyltransferase (TPMT) is recommended for predicting the adverse drug response of thiopurines. In the current study, a novel version of allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR), termed competitive real-time fluorescent AS-PCR (CRAS-PCR) was developed to analyze the TPMT*2 genotype in ethnic Chinese. This technique simultaneously uses wild-type and mutant allele-specific scorpion primers in a single reaction. To determine the optimal conditions for both traditional AS-PCR and CRAS-PCR, we used the Taguchi method, an engineering optimization process that balances the concentrations of all components using an orthogonal array rather than a factorial array. Instead of running up to 264 experiments with the conventional factorial method, the Taguchi method achieved the same optimization using only 16 experiments. The optimized CRAS-PCR system completely avoided non-specific amplification occurring in traditional AS-PCR and could be performed at much more relaxed reaction conditions at 1% sensitivity, similar to traditional AS-PCR. TPMT*2 genotyping of 240 clinical samples was consistent with published data. In conclusion, CRAS-PCR is a novel and robust genotyping method, and the Taguchi method is an effective tool for the optimization of molecular analysis techniques.

  5. New prediction model for probe specificity in an allele-specific extension reaction for haplotype-specific extraction (HSE) of Y chromosome mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothe, Jessica; Watkins, Norman E; Nagy, Marion

    2012-01-01

    Allele-specific extension reactions (ASERs) use 3' terminus-specific primers for the selective extension of completely annealed matches by polymerase. The ability of the polymerase to extend non-specific 3' terminal mismatches leads to a failure of the reaction, a process that is only partly understood and predictable, and often requires time-consuming assay design. In our studies we investigated haplotype-specific extraction (HSE) for the separation of male DNA mixtures. HSE is an ASER and provides the ability to distinguish between diploid chromosomes from one or more individuals. Here, we show that the success of HSE and allele-specific extension depend strongly on the concentration difference between complete match and 3' terminal mismatch. Using the oligonucleotide-modeling platform Visual Omp, we demonstrated the dependency of the discrimination power of the polymerase on match- and mismatch-target hybridization between different probe lengths. Therefore, the probe specificity in HSE could be predicted by performing a relative comparison of different probe designs with their simulated differences between the duplex concentration of target-probe match and mismatches. We tested this new model for probe design in more than 300 HSE reactions with 137 different probes and obtained an accordance of 88%.

  6. HLA-B*57 Micropolymorphism shapes HLA allele-specific epitope immunogenicity, selection pressure, and HIV immune control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kløverpris, Henrik Nyhus; Buus, Anette Stryhn; van der Stok, Mary;

    2012-01-01

    because of their similar peptide-binding motifs and HIV disease outcome associations. However, we show here that the apparently small differences between HLA-B*57 alleles, termed HLA-B*57 micropolymorphisms, have a significant impact on immune control of HIV. In a study cohort of >2,000 HIV C......The genetic polymorphism that has the greatest impact on immune control of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is expression of HLA-B*57. Understanding of the mechanism for this strong effect remains incomplete. HLA-B*57 alleles and the closely related HLA-B*5801 are often grouped together......-clade-infected subjects from southern Africa, HLA-B*5703 is associated with a lower viral-load set point than HLA-B*5702 and HLA-B*5801 (medians, 5,980, 15,190, and 19,000 HIV copies/ml plasma; P = 0.24 and P = 0.0005). In order to better understand these observed differences in HLA-B*57/5801-mediated immune control...

  7. Pituitary tumor transforming gene binding factor: a new gene in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Rachel J; Read, Martin L; Smith, Vicki E; Sharma, Neil; Reynolds, Gary M; Buckley, Laura; Doig, Craig; Campbell, Moray J; Lewy, Greg; Eggo, Margaret C; Loubiere, Laurence S; Franklyn, Jayne A; Boelaert, Kristien; McCabe, Christopher J

    2010-05-01

    Pituitary tumor transforming gene (PTTG) binding factor (PBF; PTTG1IP) is a relatively uncharacterized oncoprotein whose function remains obscure. Because of the presence of putative estrogen response elements (ERE) in its promoter, we assessed PBF regulation by estrogen. PBF mRNA and protein expression were induced by both diethylstilbestrol and 17beta-estradiol in estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha)-positive MCF-7 cells. Detailed analysis of the PBF promoter showed that the region -399 to -291 relative to the translational start site contains variable repeats of an 18-bp sequence housing a putative ERE half-site (gcccctcGGTCAcgcctc). Sequencing the PBF promoter from 122 normal subjects revealed that subjects may be homozygous or heterozygous for between 1 and 6 repeats of the ERE. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and oligonucleotide pull-down assays revealed ERalpha binding to the PBF promoter. PBF expression was low or absent in normal breast tissue but was highly expressed in breast cancers. Subjects with greater numbers of ERE repeats showed higher PBF mRNA expression, and PBF protein expression positively correlated with ERalpha status. Cell invasion assays revealed that PBF induces invasion through Matrigel, an action that could be abrogated both by siRNA treatment and specific mutation. Furthermore, PBF is a secreted protein, and loss of secretion prevents PBF inducing cell invasion. Given that PBF is a potent transforming gene, we propose that estrogen treatment in postmenopausal women may upregulate PBF expression, leading to PBF secretion and increased cell invasion. Furthermore, the number of ERE half-sites in the PBF promoter may significantly alter the response to estrogen treatment in individual subjects.

  8. Acute stress enhances heterodimerization and binding of corticosteroid receptors at glucocorticoid target genes in the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mifsud, Karen R; Reul, Johannes M H M

    2016-10-04

    A stressful event results in secretion of glucocorticoid hormones, which bind to mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs) and glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) in the hippocampus to regulate cognitive and affective responses to the challenge. MRs are already highly occupied by low glucocorticoid levels under baseline conditions, whereas GRs only become substantially occupied by stress- or circadian-driven glucocorticoid levels. Currently, however, the binding of MRs and GRs to glucocorticoid-responsive elements (GREs) within hippocampal glucocorticoid target genes under such physiological conditions in vivo is unknown. We found that forced swim (FS) stress evoked increased hippocampal RNA expression levels of the glucocorticoid-responsive genes FK506-binding protein 5 (Fkbp5), Period 1 (Per1), and serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase 1 (Sgk1). Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis showed that this stressor caused substantial gene-dependent increases in GR binding and surprisingly, also MR binding to GREs within these genes. Different acute challenges, including novelty, restraint, and FS stress, produced distinct glucocorticoid responses but resulted in largely similar MR and GR binding to GREs. Sequential and tandem ChIP analyses showed that, after FS stress, MRs and GRs bind concomitantly to the same GRE sites within Fkbp5 and Per1 but not Sgk1 Thus, after stress, MRs and GRs seem to bind to GREs as homo- and/or heterodimers in a gene-dependent manner. MR binding to GREs at baseline seems to be restricted, whereas after stress, GR binding may facilitate cobinding of MR. This study reveals that the interaction of MRs and GRs with GREs within the genome constitutes an additional level of complexity in hippocampal glucocorticoid action beyond expectancies based on ligand-receptor interactions.

  9. Evolution of the duplicated intracellular lipid-binding protein genes of teleost fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatachalam, Ananda B; Parmar, Manoj B; Wright, Jonathan M

    2017-08-01

    Increasing organismal complexity during the evolution of life has been attributed to the duplication of genes and entire genomes. More recently, theoretical models have been proposed that postulate the fate of duplicated genes, among them the duplication-degeneration-complementation (DDC) model. In the DDC model, the common fate of a duplicated gene is lost from the genome owing to nonfunctionalization. Duplicated genes are retained in the genome either by subfunctionalization, where the functions of the ancestral gene are sub-divided between the sister duplicate genes, or by neofunctionalization, where one of the duplicate genes acquires a new function. Both processes occur either by loss or gain of regulatory elements in the promoters of duplicated genes. Here, we review the genomic organization, evolution, and transcriptional regulation of the multigene family of intracellular lipid-binding protein (iLBP) genes from teleost fishes. Teleost fishes possess many copies of iLBP genes owing to a whole genome duplication (WGD) early in the teleost fish radiation. Moreover, the retention of duplicated iLBP genes is substantially higher than the retention of all other genes duplicated in the teleost genome. The fatty acid-binding protein genes, a subfamily of the iLBP multigene family in zebrafish, are differentially regulated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) isoforms, which may account for the retention of iLBP genes in the zebrafish genome by the process of subfunctionalization of cis-acting regulatory elements in iLBP gene promoters.

  10. Multiple ETS family proteins regulate PF4 gene expression by binding to the same ETS binding site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiaki Okada

    Full Text Available In previous studies on the mechanism underlying megakaryocyte-specific gene expression, several ETS motifs were found in each megakaryocyte-specific gene promoter. Although these studies suggested that several ETS family proteins regulate megakaryocyte-specific gene expression, only a few ETS family proteins have been identified. Platelet factor 4 (PF4 is a megakaryocyte-specific gene and its promoter includes multiple ETS motifs. We had previously shown that ETS-1 binds to an ETS motif in the PF4 promoter. However, the functions of the other ETS motifs are still unclear. The goal of this study was to investigate a novel functional ETS motif in the PF4 promoter and identify proteins binding to the motif. In electrophoretic mobility shift assays and a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, FLI-1, ELF-1, and GABP bound to the -51 ETS site. Expression of FLI-1, ELF-1, and GABP activated the PF4 promoter in HepG2 cells. Mutation of a -51 ETS site attenuated FLI-1-, ELF-1-, and GABP-mediated transactivation of the promoter. siRNA analysis demonstrated that FLI-1, ELF-1, and GABP regulate PF4 gene expression in HEL cells. Among these three proteins, only FLI-1 synergistically activated the promoter with GATA-1. In addition, only FLI-1 expression was increased during megakaryocytic differentiation. Finally, the importance of the -51 ETS site for the activation of the PF4 promoter during physiological megakaryocytic differentiation was confirmed by a novel reporter gene assay using in vitro ES cell differentiation system. Together, these data suggest that FLI-1, ELF-1, and GABP regulate PF4 gene expression through the -51 ETS site in megakaryocytes and implicate the differentiation stage-specific regulation of PF4 gene expression by multiple ETS factors.

  11. Isolation and characterization of the plasma hyaluronan-binding protein (PHBP) gene (HABP2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumiya, J; Asakawa, S; Tobe, T; Hashimoto, K; Saguchi, K; Choi-Miura, N H; Shimizu, Y; Minoshima, S; Shimizu, N; Tomita, M

    1997-11-01

    PHBP is a novel human plasma hyaluronan-binding protein that shows significant homology in amino acid sequence to hepatocyte growth factor activator. Two overlapping clones that encode the human plasma hyaluronan-binding protein (PHBP) gene (HABP2) were isolated and characterized. The PHBP gene spans 35 kb and is composed of 13 exons from 37 to 1,394 bp in size with consensus splice sites. The gene's regulatory sequences contain putative promoter elements, but no typical TATA box. Some exons of this gene showed significant similarities to those of coagulation factor XII, tissue-type plasminogen activator, and urokinase genes in nucleotide length and in intron phasing. We also report the chromosome mapping of this gene by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using a genomic DNA fragment as a probe. The PHBP gene (HABP2) was located on chromosome 10q25-q26.

  12. TATA-binding protein and the retinoblastoma gene product bind to overlapping epitopes on c-Myc and adenovirus E1A protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hateboer, G.; Timmers, H.T.M.; Rustgi, A.K.; Billaud, Marc; Veer, L.J. Van 't; Bernards, R.A.

    1993-01-01

    Using a protein binding assay, we show that the amino-teminal 204 amino acids of the c-Myc protein interact di y with a key component of the basal p tdon factor TFID, the TATA box-binding protein (TBP). Essentialy the same region of the c-Myc protein alo binds the product of the retinoblatoma gene,

  13. Investigation of parameters that affect the success rate of microarray-based allele-specific hybridization assays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena Poulsen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The development of microarray-based genetic tests for diseases that are caused by known mutations is becoming increasingly important. The key obstacle to developing functional genotyping assays is that such mutations need to be genotyped regardless of their location in genomic regions. These regions include large variations in G+C content, and structural features like hairpins. METHODS/FINDINGS: We describe a rational, stable method for screening and combining assay conditions for the genetic analysis of 42 Phenylketonuria-associated mutations in the phenylalanine hydroxylase gene. The mutations are located in regions with large variations in G+C content (20-75%. Custom-made microarrays with different lengths of complementary probe sequences and spacers were hybridized with pooled PCR products of 12 exons from each of 38 individual patient DNA samples. The arrays were washed with eight buffers with different stringencies in a custom-made microfluidic system. The data were used to assess which parameters play significant roles in assay development. CONCLUSIONS: Several assay development methods found suitable probes and assay conditions for a functional test for all investigated mutation sites. Probe length, probe spacer length, and assay stringency sufficed as variable parameters in the search for a functional multiplex assay. We discuss the optimal assay development methods for several different scenarios.

  14. Combining transcription factor binding affinities with open-chromatin data for accurate gene expression prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Florian; Gasparoni, Nina; Gasparoni, Gilles; Gianmoena, Kathrin; Cadenas, Cristina; Polansky, Julia K; Ebert, Peter; Nordström, Karl; Barann, Matthias; Sinha, Anupam; Fröhler, Sebastian; Xiong, Jieyi; Dehghani Amirabad, Azim; Behjati Ardakani, Fatemeh; Hutter, Barbara; Zipprich, Gideon; Felder, Bärbel; Eils, Jürgen; Brors, Benedikt; Chen, Wei; Hengstler, Jan G; Hamann, Alf; Lengauer, Thomas; Rosenstiel, Philip; Walter, Jörn; Schulz, Marcel H

    2017-01-09

    The binding and contribution of transcription factors (TF) to cell specific gene expression is often deduced from open-chromatin measurements to avoid costly TF ChIP-seq assays. Thus, it is important to develop computational methods for accurate TF binding prediction in open-chromatin regions (OCRs). Here, we report a novel segmentation-based method, TEPIC, to predict TF binding by combining sets of OCRs with position weight matrices. TEPIC can be applied to various open-chromatin data, e.g. DNaseI-seq and NOMe-seq. Additionally, Histone-Marks (HMs) can be used to identify candidate TF binding sites. TEPIC computes TF affinities and uses open-chromatin/HM signal intensity as quantitative measures of TF binding strength. Using machine learning, we find low affinity binding sites to improve our ability to explain gene expression variability compared to the standard presence/absence classification of binding sites. Further, we show that both footprints and peaks capture essential TF binding events and lead to a good prediction performance. In our application, gene-based scores computed by TEPIC with one open-chromatin assay nearly reach the quality of several TF ChIP-seq data sets. Finally, these scores correctly predict known transcriptional regulators as illustrated by the application to novel DNaseI-seq and NOMe-seq data for primary human hepatocytes and CD4+ T-cells, respectively.

  15. Combining transcription factor binding affinities with open-chromatin data for accurate gene expression prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Florian; Gasparoni, Nina; Gasparoni, Gilles; Gianmoena, Kathrin; Cadenas, Cristina; Polansky, Julia K.; Ebert, Peter; Nordström, Karl; Barann, Matthias; Sinha, Anupam; Fröhler, Sebastian; Xiong, Jieyi; Dehghani Amirabad, Azim; Behjati Ardakani, Fatemeh; Hutter, Barbara; Zipprich, Gideon; Felder, Bärbel; Eils, Jürgen; Brors, Benedikt; Chen, Wei; Hengstler, Jan G.; Hamann, Alf; Lengauer, Thomas; Rosenstiel, Philip; Walter, Jörn; Schulz, Marcel H.

    2017-01-01

    The binding and contribution of transcription factors (TF) to cell specific gene expression is often deduced from open-chromatin measurements to avoid costly TF ChIP-seq assays. Thus, it is important to develop computational methods for accurate TF binding prediction in open-chromatin regions (OCRs). Here, we report a novel segmentation-based method, TEPIC, to predict TF binding by combining sets of OCRs with position weight matrices. TEPIC can be applied to various open-chromatin data, e.g. DNaseI-seq and NOMe-seq. Additionally, Histone-Marks (HMs) can be used to identify candidate TF binding sites. TEPIC computes TF affinities and uses open-chromatin/HM signal intensity as quantitative measures of TF binding strength. Using machine learning, we find low affinity binding sites to improve our ability to explain gene expression variability compared to the standard presence/absence classification of binding sites. Further, we show that both footprints and peaks capture essential TF binding events and lead to a good prediction performance. In our application, gene-based scores computed by TEPIC with one open-chromatin assay nearly reach the quality of several TF ChIP-seq data sets. Finally, these scores correctly predict known transcriptional regulators as illustrated by the application to novel DNaseI-seq and NOMe-seq data for primary human hepatocytes and CD4+ T-cells, respectively. PMID:27899623

  16. Genes encoding FAD-binding proteins in Volvariella volvacea exhibit differential expression in homokaryons and heterokaryons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Li; Yan, Junjie; Xie, Baogui; Li, Yu; Chen, Bingzhi; Liu, Shuyan; Li, Dan; Yang, Zhiyun; Zeng, Xiancheng; Deng, Youjin; Jiang, Yuji

    2013-10-01

    Flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-binding proteins play a vital role in energy transfer and utilization during fungal growth and mycelia aggregation. We sequenced the genome of Volvariella volvacea, an economically important edible fungus, and discovered 41 genes encoding FAD-binding proteins. Gene expression profiles revealed that the expression levels of four distinctly differentially expressed genes in heterokaryotic strain H1521 were higher than in homokaryotic strains PYd15 and PYd21 combined. These observations were validated by quantitative real-time PCR. The results suggest that the differential expression of FAD-binding proteins may be important in revealing the distinction between homokaryons and heterokaryons on the basis of FAD-binding protein functionality.

  17. Transcriptional activation of the mouse obese (ob) gene by CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hwang, C S; Mandrup, S; MacDougald, O A

    1996-01-01

    Like other adipocyte genes that are transcriptionally activated by CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha (C/EBP alpha) during preadipocyte differentiation, expression of the mouse obese (ob) gene is immediately preceded by the expression of C/EBP alpha. While the 5' flanking region of the mouse ob...

  18. Chromosome-biased binding and gene regulation by the Caenorhabditis elegans DRM complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko M Tabuchi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available DRM is a conserved transcription factor complex that includes E2F/DP and pRB family proteins and plays important roles in development and cancer. Here we describe new aspects of DRM binding and function revealed through genome-wide analyses of the Caenorhabditis elegans DRM subunit LIN-54. We show that LIN-54 DNA-binding activity recruits DRM to promoters enriched for adjacent putative E2F/DP and LIN-54 binding sites, suggesting that these two DNA-binding moieties together direct DRM to its target genes. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and gene expression profiling reveals conserved roles for DRM in regulating genes involved in cell division, development, and reproduction. We find that LIN-54 promotes expression of reproduction genes in the germline, but prevents ectopic activation of germline-specific genes in embryonic soma. Strikingly, C. elegans DRM does not act uniformly throughout the genome: the DRM recruitment motif, DRM binding, and DRM-regulated embryonic genes are all under-represented on the X chromosome. However, germline genes down-regulated in lin-54 mutants are over-represented on the X chromosome. We discuss models for how loss of autosome-bound DRM may enhance germline X chromosome silencing. We propose that autosome-enriched binding of DRM arose in C. elegans as a consequence of germline X chromosome silencing and the evolutionary redistribution of germline-expressed and essential target genes to autosomes. Sex chromosome gene regulation may thus have profound evolutionary effects on genome organization and transcriptional regulatory networks.

  19. POF and HP1 bind expressed exons, suggesting a balancing mechanism for gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Anna-Mia; Stenberg, Per; Pettersson, Fredrik; Larsson, Jan

    2007-11-01

    Two specific chromosome-targeting and gene regulatory systems are present in Drosophila melanogaster. The male X chromosome is targeted by the male-specific lethal complex believed to mediate the 2-fold up-regulation of the X-linked genes, and the highly heterochromatic fourth chromosome is specifically targeted by the Painting of Fourth (POF) protein, which, together with heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1), modulates the expression level of genes on the fourth chromosome. Here we use chromatin immunoprecipitation and tiling microarray analysis to map POF and HP1 on the fourth chromosome in S2 cells and salivary glands at high resolution. The enrichment profiles were complemented by transcript profiles to examine the link between binding and transcripts. The results show that POF specifically binds to genes, with a strong preference for exons, and the HP1 binding profile is a mirror image of POF, although HP1 displays an additional "peak" in the promoter regions of bound genes. HP1 binding within genes is much higher than the basal HP1 enrichment on Chromosome 4. Our results suggest a balancing mechanism for the regulation of the fourth chromosome where POF and HP1 competitively bind at increasing levels with increased transcriptional activity. In addition, our results contradict transposable elements as a major nucleation site for HP1 on the fourth chromosome.

  20. POF and HP1 bind expressed exons, suggesting a balancing mechanism for gene regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna-Mia Johansson

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Two specific chromosome-targeting and gene regulatory systems are present in Drosophila melanogaster. The male X chromosome is targeted by the male-specific lethal complex believed to mediate the 2-fold up-regulation of the X-linked genes, and the highly heterochromatic fourth chromosome is specifically targeted by the Painting of Fourth (POF protein, which, together with heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1, modulates the expression level of genes on the fourth chromosome. Here we use chromatin immunoprecipitation and tiling microarray analysis to map POF and HP1 on the fourth chromosome in S2 cells and salivary glands at high resolution. The enrichment profiles were complemented by transcript profiles to examine the link between binding and transcripts. The results show that POF specifically binds to genes, with a strong preference for exons, and the HP1 binding profile is a mirror image of POF, although HP1 displays an additional "peak" in the promoter regions of bound genes. HP1 binding within genes is much higher than the basal HP1 enrichment on Chromosome 4. Our results suggest a balancing mechanism for the regulation of the fourth chromosome where POF and HP1 competitively bind at increasing levels with increased transcriptional activity. In addition, our results contradict transposable elements as a major nucleation site for HP1 on the fourth chromosome.

  1. The Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface protein-1 19 KD antibody response in the Peruvian Amazon predominantly targets the non-allele specific, shared sites of this antigen

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    Silva Claudia

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmodium falciparum re-emerged in Iquitos, Peru in 1994 and is now hypoendemic (P. falciparum infections can be followed using this population dynamic. Previous work demonstrated a strong association between this population's antibody response to PfMSP1-19KD and protection against febrile illness and parasitaemia. Therefore, some selection for PfMSP1-19KD allelic diversity would be expected if the protection is to allele-specific sites of PfMSP1-19KD. Here, the potential for allele-specific polymorphisms in this population is investigated, and the allele-specificity of antibody responses to PfMSP1-19KD are determined. Methods The 42KD region in PfMSP1 was genotyped from 160 individual infections collected between 2003 and 2007. Additionally, the polymorphic block 2 region of Pfmsp1 (Pfmsp1-B2 was genotyped in 781 infection-months to provide a baseline for population-level diversity. To test whether PfMSP1-19KD genetic diversity had any impact on antibody responses, ELISAs testing IgG antibody response were performed on individuals using all four allele-types of PfMSP1-19KD. An antibody depletion ELISA was used to test the ability of antibodies to cross-react between allele-types. Results Despite increased diversity in Pfmsp1-B2, limited diversity within Pfmsp1-42KD was observed. All 160 infections genotyped were Mad20-like at the Pfmsp1-33KD locus. In the Pfmsp1-19KD locus, 159 (99.4% were the Q-KSNG-F haplotype and 1 (0.6% was the E-KSNG-L haplotype. Antibody responses in 105 individuals showed that Q-KNG and Q-TSR alleles generated the strongest immune responses, while Q-KNG and E-KNG responses were more concordant with each other than with those from Q-TSR and E-TSR, and vice versa. The immuno-depletion ELISAs showed all samples responded to the antigenic sites shared amongst all allelic forms of PfMSP1-19KD. Conclusions A non-allele specific antibody response in PfMSP1-19KD may explain why other allelic forms have not

  2. Allele-specific real-time PCR testing for minor HIV-1 drug resistance mutations: assay preparation and application to reveal dynamic of mutations in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Dong-xing; LI Jing-yun; LI Han-ping; LI Lin; ZHUANG Dao-min; JIAO Li-yan; WANG Zheng; BAO Zuo-yi; LIU Si-yang; LIU Yong-jian

    2010-01-01

    Background It is very important for the clinical management to test for minor HIV-1 resistance mutations accurately and sensitively. The conventional genotypic assays of HIV drug resistance detection based on sequencing can only discriminate the mutations which present in more than 20%-30%. The aim of this study was to evaluate allele-specific real-time PCR (ASPCR) to detect the resistance-related mutations located at positions 103, 184 and 215.Methods We developed the allele-specific PCR assay, using the most common drug resistance mutations in Chinese AIDS patients, K103N, M184V/I, T215F/Y as a model system. The standards were constructed by cloning the wild-type and mutant DNA fragments into the T-vector. We designed specific primers to discriminate mutant templates in the real-time PCR using SYBR green as a fluorescence reporter. And then we evaluated the ASPCR assay and tested 140clinical samples using this method.Results The sensitivities of ASPCR assay were 0.04% for K103N, 0.30% for M1841, 0.40% for M184V, 0.03% for T215F and 0.02% for T215Y. The intra-assay and inter-assay coefficients of variation were less than 0.42. One hundred and forty plasma samples were tested by ASPCR and dynamic resistance curves of ten patients were obtained.Conclusions Drug resistance emerged half a year after the start of antiretroviral therapy. The mutation of T215Yemerged 1 to 1.5 years after starting treatment and then increased rapidly. The ASPCR assay we developed was a sensitive, accurate and rapid method to detect the minor HIV-1 variants and it can provide earlier and more drug-resistance information for HIV research and AIDS antiretroviral therapy.

  3. A population-wide applicable HLA-DQ2 and DQ8 genotyping using DNA from dried blood spots and duplex allele-specific qPCR amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguayo-Patrón, Sandra; Beltrán-Sauceda, Lizbeth; Calderón de la Barca, Ana María

    2016-11-01

    Genotyping of HLA-DQ2 and DQ8 haplotypes is important for diagnosis or for screening of early risk detection of celiac disease or type 1 diabetes. Usually, venous blood DNA extraction and expensive and time consuming amplification are used, that hinder population-wide studies. We assayed a friendly HLA-DQ2 and DQ8 genotyping procedure using a combination of DNA from dried blood spot (DBS) and duplex allele-specific qPCR amplification using SYBR Green. DNA was extracted using home-made buffers and compared to an extraction commercial kit. Duplex reactions by qPCR were designed using each Tm allele amplicon for reference samples (positive HLA-DQ2 or DQ8) with allele-specific primers. DBS samples from 558 children (7.99 ± 2.47 y) were collected. The DNA final yield obtained by the home-made extractive procedure was higher than from the commercial kit (1.11 ± 0.56 vs 0.23 ± 0.14 μg), while the quality was similar for both DNA samples. There was concordance in the amplification profiles for DNA samples obtained with both methods. All of four alleles from DQ2 and DQ8 haplotypes were accurately identified in duplex reactions. By using DBS samples and DNA extraction home-made procedure, the costs were reduced by 60%. The whole procedure is cost-effective for HLA-DQ2 and DQ8 genotyping.

  4. Response of fatty acid synthesis genes to the binding of human salivary amylase by Streptococcus gordonii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitkova, Anna E; Haase, Elaine M; Vickerman, M Margaret; Gill, Steven R; Scannapieco, Frank A

    2012-03-01

    Streptococcus gordonii, an important primary colonizer of dental plaque biofilm, specifically binds to salivary amylase via the surface-associated amylase-binding protein A (AbpA). We hypothesized that a function of amylase binding to S. gordonii may be to modulate the expression of chromosomal genes, which could influence bacterial survival and persistence in the oral cavity. Gene expression profiling by microarray analysis was performed to detect genes in S. gordonii strain CH1 that were differentially expressed in response to the binding of purified human salivary amylase versus exposure to purified heat-denatured amylase. Selected genes found to be differentially expressed were validated by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR). Five genes from the fatty acid synthesis (FAS) cluster were highly (10- to 35-fold) upregulated in S. gordonii CH1 cells treated with native amylase relative to those treated with denatured amylase. An abpA-deficient strain of S. gordonii exposed to amylase failed to show a response in FAS gene expression similar to that observed in the parental strain. Predicted phenotypic effects of amylase binding to S. gordonii strain CH1 (associated with increased expression of FAS genes, leading to changes in fatty acid synthesis) were noted; these included increased bacterial growth, survival at low pH, and resistance to triclosan. These changes were not observed in the amylase-exposed abpA-deficient strain, suggesting a role for AbpA in the amylase-induced phenotype. These results provide evidence that the binding of salivary amylase elicits a differential gene response in S. gordonii, resulting in a phenotypic adjustment that is potentially advantageous for bacterial survival in the oral environment.

  5. Thyroid hormone receptors bind to defined regions of the growth hormone and placental lactogen genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, J W; Voz, M L; Eliard, P H; Mathy-Harter, M; De Nayer, P; Economidis, I V; Belayew, A; Martial, J A; Rousseau, G G

    1986-12-01

    The intracellular receptor for thyroid hormone is a protein found in chromatin. Since thyroid hormone stimulates transcription of the growth hormone gene through an unknown mechanism, the hypothesis that the thyroid hormone-receptor complex interacts with defined regions of this gene has been investigated in a cell-free system. Nuclear extracts from human lymphoblastoid IM-9 cells containing thyroid hormone receptors were incubated with L-3,5,3'-tri[125I]iodothyronine and calf thymus DNA-cellulose. Restriction fragments of the human growth hormone gene were added to determine their ability to inhibit labeled receptor binding to DNA-cellulose. These fragments encompassed nucleotide sequences from about three kilobase pairs upstream to about four kilobase pairs downstream from the transcription initiation site. The thyroid hormone-receptor complex bound preferentially to the 5'-flanking sequences of the growth hormone gene in a region between nucleotide coordinates -290 and -129. The receptor also bound to an analogous promoter region in the human placental lactogen gene, which has 92% nucleotide sequence homology with the growth hormone gene. These binding regions appear to be distinct from those that are recognized by the receptor for glucocorticoids, which stimulate growth hormone gene expression synergistically with thyroid hormone. The presence of thyroid hormone was required for binding of its receptor to the growth hormone gene promoter, suggesting that thyroid hormone renders the receptor capable of recognizing specific gene regions.

  6. Development of an allele-specific, loop-mediated, isothermal amplification method (AS-LAMP to detect the L1014F kdr-w mutation in Anopheles gambiae s. l.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badolo Athanase

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria control relies heavily on treated bed nets and indoor residual spraying with pyrethroid insecticides. Unfortunately, the resistance to pyrethroid insecticides, mainly due to the kdr mutation, is spreading in the main malaria vector Anopheles gambiae s.l., decreasing the insecticides’ efficacy. To manage the insecticide resistance rapidly and flexibly, simple and effective tools for the early detection of resistant mosquitoes are needed. This study aimed to develop an allele-specific, loop-mediated, isothermal amplification (AS-LAMP method to detect the West African-type kdr mutation (kdr-w; L1014F in field-collected mosquitoes. Methods DNA fragments of the wild-type and the mutated kdr gene were used to select the primers and develop the method. The primers were designed with the mutation at the 5’ end of the backward inner primer (BIP. The AS-LAMP method was compared to the AS-PCR method using the genomic DNA of 120 field-collected mosquitoes. Results The AS-LAMP method could discriminate between the wild-type homozygote, the heterozygote, and the kdr-w homozygote within 75 min. The AS-LAMP method has the advantage of being faster and at least as sensitive and specific as the AS-PCR method. Conclusions The AS-LAMP method can be used to detect the kdr mutation for quick decision-making, even in less well-equipped laboratories.

  7. Diverse flavonoids stimulate NodD1 binding to nod gene promoters in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Melicent C; Fisher, Robert F; Long, Sharon R

    2006-08-01

    NodD1 is a member of the NodD family of LysR-type transcriptional regulators that mediates the expression of nodulation (nod) genes in the soil bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti. Each species of rhizobia establishes a symbiosis with a limited set of leguminous plants. This host specificity results in part from a NodD-dependent upregulation of nod genes in response to a cocktail of flavonoids in the host plant's root exudates. To demonstrate that NodD is a key determinant of host specificity, we expressed nodD genes from different species of rhizobia in a strain of S. meliloti lacking endogenous NodD activity. We observed that nod gene expression was initiated in response to distinct sets of flavonoid inducers depending on the source of NodD. To better understand the effects of flavonoids on NodD, we assayed the DNA binding activity of S. meliloti NodD1 treated with the flavonoid inducer luteolin. In the presence of luteolin, NodD1 exhibited increased binding to nod gene promoters compared to binding in the absence of luteolin. Surprisingly, although they do not stimulate nod gene expression in S. meliloti, the flavonoids naringenin, eriodictyol, and daidzein also stimulated an increase in the DNA binding affinity of NodD1 to nod gene promoters. In vivo competition assays demonstrate that noninducing flavonoids act as competitive inhibitors of luteolin, suggesting that both inducing and noninducing flavonoids are able to directly bind to NodD1 and mediate conformational changes at nod gene promoters but that only luteolin is capable of promoting the downstream changes necessary for nod gene induction.

  8. Germline V-genes sculpt the binding site of a family of antibodies neutralizing human cytomegalovirus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomson, Christy A.; Bryson, Steve; McLean, Gary R.; Creagh, A. Louise; Pai, Emil F.; Schrader, John W. (Toronto); (UBC)

    2008-10-17

    Immunoglobulin genes are generated somatically through specialized mechanisms resulting in a vast repertoire of antigen-binding sites. Despite the stochastic nature of these processes, the V-genes that encode most of the antigen-combining site are under positive evolutionary selection, raising the possibility that V-genes have been selected to encode key structural features of binding sites of protective antibodies against certain pathogens. Human, neutralizing antibodies to human cytomegalovirus that bind the AD-2S1 epitope on its gB envelope protein repeatedly use a pair of well-conserved, germline V-genes IGHV3-30 and IGKV3-11. Here, we present crystallographic, kinetic and thermodynamic analyses of the binding site of such an antibody and that of its primary immunoglobulin ancestor. These show that these germline V-genes encode key side chain contacts with the viral antigen and thereby dictate key structural features of the hypermutated, high-affinity neutralizing antibody. V-genes may thus encode an innate, protective immunological memory that targets vulnerable, invariant sites on multiple pathogens.

  9. Miz-1 activates gene expression via a novel consensus DNA binding motif.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonnie L Barrilleaux

    Full Text Available The transcription factor Miz-1 can either activate or repress gene expression in concert with binding partners including the Myc oncoprotein. The genomic binding of Miz-1 includes both core promoters and more distal sites, but the preferred DNA binding motif of Miz-1 has been unclear. We used a high-throughput in vitro technique, Bind-n-Seq, to identify two Miz-1 consensus DNA binding motif sequences--ATCGGTAATC and ATCGAT (Mizm1 and Mizm2--bound by full-length Miz-1 and its zinc finger domain, respectively. We validated these sequences directly as high affinity Miz-1 binding motifs. Competition assays using mutant probes indicated that the binding affinity of Miz-1 for Mizm1 and Mizm2 is highly sequence-specific. Miz-1 strongly activates gene expression through the motifs in a Myc-independent manner. MEME-ChIP analysis of Miz-1 ChIP-seq data in two different cell types reveals a long motif with a central core sequence highly similar to the Mizm1 motif identified by Bind-n-Seq, validating the in vivo relevance of the findings. Miz-1 ChIP-seq peaks containing the long motif are predominantly located outside of proximal promoter regions, in contrast to peaks without the motif, which are highly concentrated within 1.5 kb of the nearest transcription start site. Overall, our results indicate that Miz-1 may be directed in vivo to the novel motif sequences we have identified, where it can recruit its specific binding partners to control gene expression and ultimately regulate cell fate.

  10. Binding Sites of miR-1273 Family on the mRNA of Target Genes

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    Anatoly Ivashchenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined binding sites of 2,578 miRNAs in the mRNAs of 12,175 human genes using the MirTarget program. It found that the miRNAs of miR-1273 family have between 33 and 1,074 mRNA target genes, with a free hybridization energy of 90% or more of its maximum value. The miR-1273 family consists of miR-1273a, miR-1273c, miR-1273d, miR-1273e, miR-1273f, miR-1273g-3p, miR-1273g-5p, miR-1273h-3p, and miR-1273h-5p. Unique miRNAs (miR-1273e, miR-1273f, and miR-1273g-3p have more than 400 target genes. We established 99 mRNA nucleotide sequences that contain arranged binding sites for the miR-1273 family. High conservation of each miRNA binding site in the mRNA of the target genes was found. The arranged binding sites of the miR-1273 family are located in the 5′UTR, CDS, or 3′UTR of many mRNAs. Five repeating sites containing some of the miR-1273 family’s binding sites were found in the 3′UTR of several target genes. The oligonucleotide sequences of miR-1273 binding sites located in CDSs code for homologous amino acid sequences in the proteins of target genes. The biological role of unique miRNAs was also discussed.

  11. The artificial zinc finger coding gene 'Jazz' binds the utrophin promoter and activates transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbi, N; Libri, V; Fanciulli, M; Tinsley, J M; Davies, K E; Passananti, C

    2000-06-01

    Up-regulation of utrophin gene expression is recognized as a plausible therapeutic approach in the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). We have designed and engineered new zinc finger-based transcription factors capable of binding and activating transcription from the promoter of the dystrophin-related gene, utrophin. Using the recognition 'code' that proposes specific rules between zinc finger primary structure and potential DNA binding sites, we engineered a new gene named 'Jazz' that encodes for a three-zinc finger peptide. Jazz belongs to the Cys2-His2 zinc finger type and was engineered to target the nine base pair DNA sequence: 5'-GCT-GCT-GCG-3', present in the promoter region of both the human and mouse utrophin gene. The entire zinc finger alpha-helix region, containing the amino acid positions that are crucial for DNA binding, was specifically chosen on the basis of the contacts more frequently represented in the available list of the 'code'. Here we demonstrate that Jazz protein binds specifically to the double-stranded DNA target, with a dissociation constant of about 32 nM. Band shift and super-shift experiments confirmed the high affinity and specificity of Jazz protein for its DNA target. Moreover, we show that chimeric proteins, named Gal4-Jazz and Sp1-Jazz, are able to drive the transcription of a test gene from the human utrophin promoter.

  12. APUM5, encoding a Pumilio RNA binding protein, negatively regulates abiotic stress responsive gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background A mutant screening was carried out previously to look for new genes related to the Cucumber mosaic virus infection response in Arabidopsis. A Pumilio RNA binding protein-coding gene, Arabidopsis Pumilio RNA binding protein 5 (APUM5), was obtained from this screening. Results APUM5 transcriptional profiling was carried out using a bioinformatics tool. We found that APUM5 was associated with both biotic and abiotic stress responses. However, bacterial and fungal pathogen infection susceptibility was not changed in APUM5 transgenic plants compared to that in wild type plants although APUM5 expression was induced upon pathogen infection. In contrast, APUM5 was involved in the abiotic stress response. 35S-APUM5 transgenic plants showed hypersensitive phenotypes under salt and drought stresses during germination, primary root elongation at the seedling stage, and at the vegetative stage in soil. We also showed that some abiotic stress-responsive genes were negatively regulated in 35S-APUM5 transgenic plants. The APUM5-Pumilio homology domain (PHD) protein bound to the 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of the abiotic stress-responsive genes which contained putative Pumilio RNA binding motifs at the 3′ UTR. Conclusions These results suggest that APUM5 may be a new post-transcriptional regulator of the abiotic stress response by direct binding of target genes 3′ UTRs. PMID:24666827

  13. Association of mannan-binding lectin gene polymorphisms with progression of severe lupus nephritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    常欣蓓

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms(SNPs)of the mannan-binding lectin(MBL)gene with serum levels,development,progression and prognosis of severe lupus nephritis(LN).Methods A total of 107 severe lupus nephritis patients were enrolled in the study from January 2003 to October2013.Integrated capillary electrophoresis was used to detect MBL gene polymorphism in peripheral blood

  14. Chicken genome analysis reveals novel genes encoding biotin-binding proteins related to avidin family

    OpenAIRE

    Nordlund Henri R; Grapputo Alessandro; Hytönen Vesa P; Niskanen Einari A; Kulomaa Markku S; Laitinen Olli H

    2005-01-01

    Background A chicken egg contains several biotin-binding proteins (BBPs), whose complete DNA and amino acid sequences are not known. In order to identify and characterise these genes and proteins we studied chicken cDNAs and genes available in the NCBI database and chicken genome database using the reported N-terminal amino acid sequences of chicken egg-yolk BBPs as search strings. Res...

  15. The ubiquitous octamer-binding protein(s) is sufficient for transcription of immunoglobulin genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D G; Carayannopoulos, L; Capra, J D; Tucker, P W; Hanke, J H

    1990-03-01

    All immunoglobulin genes contain a conserved octanucleotide promoter element, ATGCAAAT, which has been shown to be required for their normal B-cell-specific transcription. Proteins that bind this octamer have been purified, and cDNAs encoding octamer-binding proteins have been cloned. Some of these proteins (referred to as OTF-2) are lymphoid specific, whereas at least one other, and possibly more (referred to as OTF-1), is found ubiquitously in all cell types. The exact role of these different proteins in directing the tissue-specific expression of immunoglobulin genes is unclear. We have identified two human pre-B-cell lines that contain extremely low levels of OTF-2 yet still express high levels of steady-state immunoglobulin heavy-chain mRNA in vivo and efficiently transcribe an immunoglobulin gene in vitro. Addition of a highly enriched preparation of OTF-1 made from one of these pre-B cells or from HeLa cells specifically stimulated in vitro transcription of an immunoglobulin gene. Furthermore, OFT-1 appeared to have approximately the same transactivation ability as OTF-2 when normalized for binding activity. These results suggest that OTF-1, without OTF-2, is sufficient for transcription of immunoglobulin genes and that OTF-2 alone is not responsible for the B-cell-specific regulation of immunoglobulin gene expression.

  16. The ubiquitous octamer-binding protein(s) is sufficient for transcription of immunoglobulin genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D.G.; Carayannopoulos, L.; Capra, J.D.; Tucker, P.W. (Dept. of Microbiology, Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, TX (US)); Hanke, J.H. (Central Research, Dept. of Molecular Genetics, Pfizer, Inc., Groton, CT (US))

    1990-03-01

    All immunoglobulin genes contain a conserved octanucleotide promoter element, ATGCAAAT, which has been shown to be required for their normal B-cell-specific transcription. Proteins that bind this octamer have been purified, and cDNAs encoding octamer-binding proteins have been cloned. Some of these proteins (referred to as OTF-2) are lymphoid specific, whereas at least one other, and possibly more (referred to as OTF-1), is found ubiquitously in all cell types. The exact role of these different proteins in directing the tissue-specific expression of immunoglobulin genes is unclear. The authors have identified two human pre-B-cell lines that contain extremely low levels of OTF-2 yet still express high levels of steady-state immunoglobulin heavy-chain mRNA in vivo and efficiently transcribe an immunoglobulin gene in vitro. Addition of a highly enriched preparation of OTF-1 made from one of these pre-B cells or from HeLa cells specifically stimulated in vitro transcription of an immunoglobulin gene. Furthermore, OFT-1 appeared to have approximately the same transactivation ability as OTF-2 when normalized for binding activity. These results suggest that OTF-1, without OTF-2, is sufficient for transcription of immunoglobulin genes and that OTF-2 alone is not responsible for the B-cell-specific regulation of immunoglobulin gene expression.

  17. Lack of ligand-selective binding of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor to putative DNA binding sites regulating expression of Bax and paraoxonase 1 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGroot, Danica E; Hayashi, Ai; Denison, Michael S

    2014-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that mediates the biological and toxicological effects of structurally diverse chemicals through its ability to bind specific DNA recognition sites (dioxin responsive elements (DREs)), and activate transcription of adjacent genes. While the DRE has a highly conserved consensus sequence, it has been suggested that the nucleotide specificity of AhR DNA binding may be ligand-dependent. The upstream regulatory regions of the murine Bax and human paraoxonase 1 (PON1) genes reportedly contain unique DRE-like sequences that respond to AhRs activated by some ligands but not others. Given the significant implications of this observation to understanding the diversity in AhR responses and that of other ligand-dependent nuclear receptors, a combination of DNA binding, nuclear translocation and gene expression analysis was used to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying these ligand-selective responses. Although known AhR agonists stimulated AhR nuclear translocation, DRE binding and gene expression, the ligand-selective DRE-like DNA elements identified in the Bax and PON1 upstream regulatory regions failed to bind ligand-activated AhR or confer AhR-responsiveness upon a reporter gene. These results argue against the reported ligand-selectivity of AhR DNA binding and suggest DNA binding by ligand activated AhR involves DRE-containing DNA.

  18. Concordance between allele-specific PCR and ultra-deep pyrosequencing for the detection of HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor resistance mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Gillian M; Morris, Lynn; Moorthy, Anitha; Coovadia, Ashraf; Abrams, Elaine J; Strehlau, Renate; Kuhn, Louise; Persaud, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in genotyping technologies have allowed for detection of HIV-1 drug resistance mutations present at low levels. The presence and percentage of Y181C and K103N drug-resistant variants in the blood of 105 subtype C HIV-infected infants who failed single-dose nevirapine prophylaxis for HIV transmission were compared using two highly sensitive genotyping methods, allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR) and ultra-deep pyrosequencing. Significant correlations in detection between both methods were found for both Y181C (correlation coefficients of 0.94 [95% CI 0.91-0.96]) and K103N (0.89 [95% CI 0.84 – 0.92]) mutations. The majority of discordant specimens (3/5 Y181C and 8/11 K103N) had wild-type variants when population sequencing was used, but mutant variants were detectable at very low levels (≤5%) with either assay. This difference is most likely due to stochastic variations in the appearance of mutant variants. Overall, both AS-PCR and ultra-deep pyrosequencing methods have proven to be sensitive and accurate, and may confidently be used where feasible. PMID:25034127

  19. A single-tube allele specific-polymerase chain reaction to detect T315I resistant mutation in chronic myeloid leukemia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auewarakul Chirayu U

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background BCR-ABL kinase domain (KD mutation is the major mechanism contributing to suboptimal response to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI in BCR-ABL-positive chronic myeloid leukemia (CML patients. T315I mutation, as one of the most frequent KD mutations, has been shown to be strongly associated with TKI resistance and subsequent therapeutic failure. A simple and sensitive method is thus required to detect T315I mutation at the earliest stage. Methods A single-tube allele specific-polymerase chain reaction (AS-PCR method was developed to detect T315I mutation in a mixture of normal and mutant alleles of varying dilutions. Denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC and direct sequencing were performed as a comparison to AS-PCR. Results T315I mutant bands were observed in the mixtures containing as low as 0.5-1% of mutant alleles by AS-PCR. The detection sensitivity of DHPLC was around 1.5-3% dilution whereas sequencing analysis was unable to detect below 6.25% dilution. Conclusion A single-tube AS-PCR is a rapid and sensitive screening method for T315I mutation. Detection of the most resistant leukemic clone in CML patients undergoing TKI therapy should be feasible with this simple and inexpensive method.

  20. Detection of EGFR Mutations by TaqMan Mutation Detection Assays Powered by Competitive Allele-Specific TaqMan PCR Technology

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    Cristin Roma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR mutations in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC are predictive of response to treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Competitive Allele-Specific TaqMan PCR (castPCR is a highly sensitive and specific technology. EGFR mutations were assessed by TaqMan Mutation Detection Assays (TMDA based on castPCR technology in 64 tumor samples: a training set of 30 NSCLC and 6 colorectal carcinoma (CRC samples and a validation set of 28 NSCLC cases. The sensitivity and specificity of this method were compared with routine diagnostic techniques including direct sequencing and the EGFR Therascreen RGQ kit. Analysis of the training set allowed the identification of the threshold value for data analysis (0.2; the maximum cycle threshold (Ct=37; and the cut-off ΔCt value (7 for the EGFR TMDA. By using these parameters, castPCR technology identified both training and validation set EGFR mutations with similar frequency as compared with the Therascreen kit. Sequencing detected rare mutations that are not identified by either castPCR or Therascreen, but in samples with low tumor cell content it failed to detect common mutations that were revealed by real-time PCR based methods. In conclusion, our data suggest that castPCR is highly sensitive and specific to detect EGFR mutations in NSCLC clinical samples.

  1. PrimerSNP: a web tool for whole-genome selection of allele-specific and common primers of phylogenetically-related bacterial genomic sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemos Eliana

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increasing number of genomic sequences of bacteria makes it possible to select unique SNPs of a particular strain/species at the whole genome level and thus design specific primers based on the SNPs. The high similarity of genomic sequences among phylogenetically-related bacteria requires the identification of the few loci in the genome that can serve as unique markers for strain differentiation. PrimerSNP attempts to identify reliable strain-specific markers, on which specific primers are designed for pathogen detection purpose. Results PrimerSNP is an online tool to design primers based on strain specific SNPs for multiple strains/species of microorganisms at the whole genome level. The allele-specific primers could distinguish query sequences of one strain from other homologous sequences by standard PCR reaction. Additionally, PrimerSNP provides a feature for designing common primers that can amplify all the homologous sequences of multiple strains/species of microorganisms. PrimerSNP is freely available at http://cropdisease.ars.usda.gov/~primer. Conclusion PrimerSNP is a high-throughput specific primer generation tool for the differentiation of phylogenetically-related strains/species. Experimental validation showed that this software had a successful prediction rate of 80.4 – 100% for strain specific primer design.

  2. A Multiplex Allele Specific Polymerase Chain Reaction (MAS-PCR) for the Detection of Factor V Leiden and Prothrombin G20210A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Morteza; Rad, Isa Abdi

    2011-01-01

    In order to determine the frequencies of factor V Leiden and prothrombin G20210A point mutations in the Iranian population with Azeri Turkish origin. 120 unrelated individuals from general population randomly selected and were examined for factor V Leiden and prothrombin G20210A mutations using a multiplex allele specific polymerase chain reaction (MAS-PCR) assayOutcomes: The frequency of prothrombin G20210A mutation was 2.08%, which means 5 chromosomes out of 240 chromosomes had prothrombin G20210A mutation. The distribution of prothrombin 20210 GG, GA, AA genotypes and prothrombin 20210A allele were 37(92.5%), 3(7.5%), 0(0%) and 3(3.75%) in males and 78(97.5%), 2(2.5%), 0(0%) and 2(1.25%) in females, respectively. Factor V Leiden was not found in our tested group (zero chromosomes out of 240 chromosomes). Analysis of the observed frequencies in the studied groups indicates that there is no statistically significant difference between females and males, regarding prothrombin G20210A mutation (p value>0.05). This is the first study in its own kind in this population and implies that the frequency of Factor V Leiden G1691A (R506Q, FV-Leiden) allele is extremely low but the prothrombin G20210A mutation is more frequent in the tested group.

  3. Site-Specific Oligonucleotide Binding Represses Transcription of the Human c-myc Gene in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooney, Michael; Czernuszewicz, Graznya; Postel, Edith H.; Flint, S. Jane; Hogan, Michael E.

    1988-07-01

    A 27-base-long DNA oligonucleotide was designed that binds to duplex DNA at a single site within the 5' end of the human c-myc gene, 115 base pairs upstream from the transcription origin P1. On the basis of the physical properties of its bound complex, it was concluded that the oligonucleotide forms a colinear triplex with the duplex binding site. By means of an in vitro assay system, it was possible to show a correlation between triplex formation at -115 base pairs and repression of c-myc transcription. The possibility is discussed that triplex formation (site-specific RNA binding to a DNA duplex) could serve as the basis for an alternative program of gene control in vivo.

  4. The chicken CCAAT/Enhancer Binding Protein alpha gene. Cloning, characterisation and tissue distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calkhoven, CF; Gringhuis, SI; Ab, G

    1997-01-01

    We present the cloning and sequencing of the gene encoding the chicken CCAAT/Enhancer Binding Protein alpha (cC/EBP alpha). The coding region and 1.5 kb of 5' flanking DNA form a CpG island. Comparison of the chicken C/EBP alpha sequence to the homologous proteins of other species reveals several ev

  5. Coordinated effects of sequence variation on DNA binding, chromatin structure, and transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpinen, Helena; Waszak, Sebastian M; Gschwind, Andreas R; Raghav, Sunil K; Witwicki, Robert M; Orioli, Andrea; Migliavacca, Eugenia; Wiederkehr, Michaël; Gutierrez-Arcelus, Maria; Panousis, Nikolaos I; Yurovsky, Alisa; Lappalainen, Tuuli; Romano-Palumbo, Luciana; Planchon, Alexandra; Bielser, Deborah; Bryois, Julien; Padioleau, Ismael; Udin, Gilles; Thurnheer, Sarah; Hacker, David; Core, Leighton J; Lis, John T; Hernandez, Nouria; Reymond, Alexandre; Deplancke, Bart; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T

    2013-11-08

    DNA sequence variation has been associated with quantitative changes in molecular phenotypes such as gene expression, but its impact on chromatin states is poorly characterized. To understand the interplay between chromatin and genetic control of gene regulation, we quantified allelic variability in transcription factor binding, histone modifications, and gene expression within humans. We found abundant allelic specificity in chromatin and extensive local, short-range, and long-range allelic coordination among the studied molecular phenotypes. We observed genetic influence on most of these phenotypes, with histone modifications exhibiting strong context-dependent behavior. Our results implicate transcription factors as primary mediators of sequence-specific regulation of gene expression programs, with histone modifications frequently reflecting the primary regulatory event.

  6. Positive selection at reproductive ADAM genes with potential intercellular binding activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassey, Barb; Civetta, Alberto

    2004-05-01

    Many genes with a role in reproduction, including those implicated in fertilization and spermatogenesis, have been shown to evolve at a faster rate relative to genes associated with other functions and tissues. These survey studies usually group a wide variety of genes with different characteristics and evolutionary histories as reproductive genes based on their site of expression or function. We have examined the molecular evolution of the ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) gene family, a structurally and functionally diverse group of genes expressed in reproductive and somatic tissue to test whether a variety of protein characteristics such as phylogenetic clusters, tissue of expression, and proteolytic and adhesive function can group fast evolving ADAM genes. We found that all genes were evolving under purifying selection (d(N)/d(S) < 1), although reproductive ADAMs, including those implicated in fertilization and spermatogenesis, evolved at the fastest rate. Genes with a role in binding to cell receptors in endogenous tissue appear to be evolving under purifying selection, regardless of the tissue of expression. In contrast, positive selection of codon sites in the disintegrin/cysteine-rich adhesion domains was detected exclusively in ADAMs 2 and 32, two genes expressed in the testis with a potential role in sperm-egg adhesion. Positive selection was detected in the transmembrane/cytosolic tail region of ADAM genes expressed in a variety of tissues.

  7. Cloning and Sequence Analysis of Y-box Binding Protein Gene in Min Pig

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Dong-jie; Liu Di; Wang Liang; He Xin-miao; Wang Wen-tao

    2014-01-01

    In order to study the gene sequence of Min pig Y-box binding protein (YB-1) gene, the complete coding sequence of Min pig YB-1 gene was cloned by RT-PCR, the sequence features were analyzed by some software and online website. The results showed that the complete CDS of Min pig Y-box was found to be 975 bp long, encoding 324 amino acids. It contained a conserved cold shock domain and several phosphorylation sites, but had no transmembrane domains, and was consistent with a protein found in the cytoplasm. Min pig YB-1 nucleotides shared high similarity (61.37%-97.66%) with other mammals.

  8. Glutamine synthetase stabilizes the binding of GlnR to nitrogen fixation gene operators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Gabriela de C; Hauf, Ksenia; Sant'Anna, Fernando H; Forchhammer, Karl; Passaglia, Luciane M P

    2017-03-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) is a high energy demanding process carried out by diazotrophic microorganisms that supply combined nitrogen to the biosphere. The genes related to BNF are strictly regulated, but these mechanisms are poorly understood in gram-positive bacteria. The transcription factor GlnR was proposed to regulate nitrogen fixation-related genes based on Paenibacillus comparative genomics. In order to validate this proposal, we investigated BNF regulatory sequences in Paenibacillus riograndensis SBR5(T) genome. We identified GlnR-binding sites flanking σ(A) -binding sites upstream from BNF-related genes. GlnR binding to these sites was demonstrated by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. GlnR-DNA affinity is greatly enhanced when GlnR is in complex with feedback-inhibited (glutamine-occupied) glutamine synthetase (GS). GlnR-GS complex formation is also modulated by ATP and AMP. Thereby, gene repression exerted by the GlnR-GS complex is coupled with nitrogen (glutamine levels) and energetic status (ATP and AMP). Finally, we propose a DNA-looping model based on multiple operator sites that represents a strong and strict regulation for these genes. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  9. DNA-Binding Kinetics Determines the Mechanism of Noise-Induced Switching in Gene Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Margaret J; Chu, Brian K; Roy, Mahua; Read, Elizabeth L

    2015-10-20

    Gene regulatory networks are multistable dynamical systems in which attractor states represent cell phenotypes. Spontaneous, noise-induced transitions between these states are thought to underlie critical cellular processes, including cell developmental fate decisions, phenotypic plasticity in fluctuating environments, and carcinogenesis. As such, there is increasing interest in the development of theoretical and computational approaches that can shed light on the dynamics of these stochastic state transitions in multistable gene networks. We applied a numerical rare-event sampling algorithm to study transition paths of spontaneous noise-induced switching for a ubiquitous gene regulatory network motif, the bistable toggle switch, in which two mutually repressive genes compete for dominant expression. We find that the method can efficiently uncover detailed switching mechanisms that involve fluctuations both in occupancies of DNA regulatory sites and copy numbers of protein products. In addition, we show that the rate parameters governing binding and unbinding of regulatory proteins to DNA strongly influence the switching mechanism. In a regime of slow DNA-binding/unbinding kinetics, spontaneous switching occurs relatively frequently and is driven primarily by fluctuations in DNA-site occupancies. In contrast, in a regime of fast DNA-binding/unbinding kinetics, switching occurs rarely and is driven by fluctuations in levels of expressed protein. Our results demonstrate how spontaneous cell phenotype transitions involve collective behavior of both regulatory proteins and DNA. Computational approaches capable of simulating dynamics over many system variables are thus well suited to exploring dynamic mechanisms in gene networks.

  10. Biological characterization of liver fatty acid binding gene from miniature pig liver cDNA library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Y H; Wang, K F; Zhang, S; Fan, Y N; Guan, W J; Ma, Y H

    2015-01-01

    Liver fatty acid binding proteins (L-FABP) are a family of small, highly conserved, cytoplasmic proteins that bind to long-chain fatty acids and other hydrophobic ligands. In this study, a full-length enriched cDNA library was successfully constructed from Wuzhishan miniature pig, and then the L-FABP gene was cloned from this cDNA library and an expression vector (pEGFP-N3-L-FABP) was constructed in vitro. This vector was transfected into hepatocytes to test its function. The results of western blotting analysis demonstrated that the L-FABP gene from our full-length enriched cDNA library regulated downstream genes, including the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor family in hepatocytes. This study provides a theoretical basis and experimental evidence for the application of L-FABP for the treatment of liver injury.

  11. ISWI and CHD chromatin remodelers bind promoters but act in gene bodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel E Zentner

    Full Text Available ATP-dependent nucleosome remodelers influence genetic processes by altering nucleosome occupancy, positioning, and composition. In vitro, Saccharomyces cerevisiae ISWI and CHD remodelers require ∼30-85 bp of extranucleosomal DNA to reposition nucleosomes, but linker DNA in S. cerevisiae averages <20 bp. To address this discrepancy between in vitro and in vivo observations, we have mapped the genomic distributions of the yeast Isw1, Isw2, and Chd1 remodelers at base-pair resolution on native chromatin. Although these remodelers act in gene bodies, we find that they are also highly enriched at nucleosome-depleted regions (NDRs, where they bind to extended regions of DNA adjacent to particular transcription factors. Surprisingly, catalytically inactive remodelers show similar binding patterns. We find that remodeler occupancy at NDRs and gene bodies is associated with nucleosome turnover and transcriptional elongation rate, suggesting that remodelers act on regions of transient nucleosome unwrapping or depletion within gene bodies subsequent to transcriptional elongation.

  12. Concurrence of High Fat Diet and APOE Gene Induces Allele Specific Metabolic and Mental Stress Changes in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segev, Yifat; Livne, Adva; Mints, Meshi; Rosenblum, Kobi

    2016-01-01

    Aging is the main risk factor for neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However, evidence indicates that the pathological process begins long before actual cognitive or pathological symptoms are apparent. The long asymptomatic phase and complex integration between genetic, environmental and metabolic factors make it one of the most challenging diseases to understand and cure. In the present study, we asked whether an environmental factor such as high-fat (HF) diet would synergize with a genetic factor to affect the metabolic and cognitive state in the Apolipoprotein E (ApoE4) mouse model of AD. Our data suggest that a HF diet induces diabetes mellitus (DM)-like metabolism in ApoE4 mice, as well as changes in β-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) protein levels between the two ApoE strains. Furthermore, HF diet induces anxiety in this AD mouse model. Our results suggest that young ApoE4 carriers are prone to psychological stress and metabolic abnormalities related to AD, which can easily be triggered via HF nutrition. PMID:27656136

  13. Genotyping of the 19-bp insertion/deletion polymorphism in the 5' flank of beta-hydroxylase gene by dissociation analysis of allele-specific PCR products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Berg; Werge, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    DNA fragments. Mistyping of heterozygote samples due to preferential allele amplification was prevented by use of an optimized concentration of Mg(2+), addition of dimethyl sulfoxide and annealing/extension at an appropriate temperature. Comparison of results achieved by the closed-tube assay...

  14. High frequency of SLC22A12 variants causing renal hypouricemia 1 in the Czech and Slovak Roma population; simple and rapid detection method by allele-specific polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrikova, Dana; Bernasovska, Jarmila; Sokolova, Jitka; Stiburkova, Blanka

    2015-10-01

    Renal hypouricemia is a rare heterogeneous inherited disorder characterized by impaired tubular uric acid transport with severe complications, such as acute kidney injury. Type 1 and 2 are caused by loss-of-function mutations in the SLC22A12 and SLC2A9 gene, respectively. A cohort of 881 randomly chosen ethnic Roma from two regions in Eastern Slovakia and two regions in the Czech Republic participated. Genomic DNA was isolated from buccal swabs and/or from blood samples. The c.1245_1253del and c.1400C>T genotypes were determined using polymerase chain reaction with allele-specific primers in a multiplex arrangement and/or direct sequencing of exon 7 and 9. Allele frequencies and genotypes were tested for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium using the Chi-square test. 25 subjects were heterozygous and three were homozygous for the c.1245_1253del, while 92 subjects were heterozygous and two were homozygous for the c.1400C>T. Moreover, two participants were compound heterozygotes. Frequencies of the c.1245_1253del and c.1400C>T variants were 1.87 and 5.56 %, respectively. Our finding confirms an uneven geographical and ethnic distribution of SLC22A12 mutant variants. We found that the c.1245_1253del and c.1400C>T variants were present in the Czech and Slovak Roma population at unexpectedly high frequencies. Renal hypouricemia should be kept in mind during differential diagnostic on Roma patients with low serum uric acid concentrations.

  15. Heparin-binding secretory transforming gene (hst) facilitates rat lactotrope cell tumorigenesis and induces prolactin gene transcription.

    OpenAIRE

    Shimon, I; Hüttner, A; Said, J; Spirina, O M; Melmed, S

    1996-01-01

    We have shown previously that human prolactinomas express transforming sequences of the heparin-binding secretory transforming gene (hst) which encodes fibroblast growth factor-4 (FGF-4). To elucidate the role of hst in pituitary tumorigenesis we treated primary rat pituitary and pituitary tumor cell cultures with recombinant FGF-4 and also stably transfected pituitary cell lines with full-length human hst cDNA. Transfectants were screened for hst mRNA expression and FGF-4 production. FGF-4 (...

  16. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis with allele-specific oligonucleotide primers for individual IgH VDJ regions to evaluate tumor burden in myeloma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sata, Hiroshi; Shibayama, Hirohiko; Maeda, Ikuhiro; Habuchi, Yoko; Nakatani, Eiji; Fukushima, Kentaro; Fujita, Jiro; Ezoe, Sachiko; Tadokoro, Seiji; Maeda, Tetsuo; Mizuki, Masao; Kosugi, Satoru; Nakagawa, Masashi; Ueda, Shuji; Iida, Masato; Tokumine, Yukihiro; Azenishi, Yasuhiko; Mitsui, Hideki; Oritani, Kenji; Kanakura, Yuzuru

    2015-05-01

    Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with patient-specific, allele-specific oligonucleotide (ASO) primers for individual immunoglobulin H VDJ region (ASO-PCR) amplification was performed using several sources of clinical material, including mRNA from peripheral blood cells (PBMNCs), whole bone marrow cells (BMMNCs), and the CD20+ CD38- B-cell population in bone marrow, as well as cell-free DNA from the sera of patients with multiple myeloma (MM). We designed the ASO primers and produced sufficient PCR fragments to evaluate tumor burden in 20 of 30 bone marrow samples at diagnosis. Polymerase chain reaction amplification efficiency depended on primer sequences because the production of ASO-PCR fragments did not correlate with serum M-protein levels. However, the ASO-PCR levels in BMMNCs showed statistically significant correlations with those in PBMNCs and CD20+ CD38- B-cells. The good association between the BMMNC and PBMNC data indicated that PBMNCs could be a suitable source for monitoring minimal residual disease (MRD). In the case of cell-free DNA, ASO-PCR levels showed a unique pattern and remained high even after treatment. Because the sequence information for each ASO-PCR product was identical to the original, the cell-free DNA might also be useful for evaluating MRD. Moreover, the ASO-PCR products were clearly detected in 17 of 22 mRNA samples from CD20+ CD38- populations, suggesting that MM clones might exist in relatively earlier stages of B cells than in plasma cells. Thus, ASO-PCR analysis using various clinical materials is useful for detecting MRD in MM patients as well as for clarifying MM pathogenesis. Copyright © 2015 ISEH - International Society for Experimental Hematology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. SAAS-CNV: A Joint Segmentation Approach on Aggregated and Allele Specific Signals for the Identification of Somatic Copy Number Alterations with Next-Generation Sequencing Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongyang Zhang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cancer genomes exhibit profound somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs. Studying tumor SCNAs using massively parallel sequencing provides unprecedented resolution and meanwhile gives rise to new challenges in data analysis, complicated by tumor aneuploidy and heterogeneity as well as normal cell contamination. While the majority of read depth based methods utilize total sequencing depth alone for SCNA inference, the allele specific signals are undervalued. We proposed a joint segmentation and inference approach using both signals to meet some of the challenges. Our method consists of four major steps: 1 extracting read depth supporting reference and alternative alleles at each SNP/Indel locus and comparing the total read depth and alternative allele proportion between tumor and matched normal sample; 2 performing joint segmentation on the two signal dimensions; 3 correcting the copy number baseline from which the SCNA state is determined; 4 calling SCNA state for each segment based on both signal dimensions. The method is applicable to whole exome/genome sequencing (WES/WGS as well as SNP array data in a tumor-control study. We applied the method to a dataset containing no SCNAs to test the specificity, created by pairing sequencing replicates of a single HapMap sample as normal/tumor pairs, as well as a large-scale WGS dataset consisting of 88 liver tumors along with adjacent normal tissues. Compared with representative methods, our method demonstrated improved accuracy, scalability to large cancer studies, capability in handling both sequencing and SNP array data, and the potential to improve the estimation of tumor ploidy and purity.

  18. SAAS-CNV: A Joint Segmentation Approach on Aggregated and Allele Specific Signals for the Identification of Somatic Copy Number Alterations with Next-Generation Sequencing Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongyang; Hao, Ke

    2015-11-01

    Cancer genomes exhibit profound somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs). Studying tumor SCNAs using massively parallel sequencing provides unprecedented resolution and meanwhile gives rise to new challenges in data analysis, complicated by tumor aneuploidy and heterogeneity as well as normal cell contamination. While the majority of read depth based methods utilize total sequencing depth alone for SCNA inference, the allele specific signals are undervalued. We proposed a joint segmentation and inference approach using both signals to meet some of the challenges. Our method consists of four major steps: 1) extracting read depth supporting reference and alternative alleles at each SNP/Indel locus and comparing the total read depth and alternative allele proportion between tumor and matched normal sample; 2) performing joint segmentation on the two signal dimensions; 3) correcting the copy number baseline from which the SCNA state is determined; 4) calling SCNA state for each segment based on both signal dimensions. The method is applicable to whole exome/genome sequencing (WES/WGS) as well as SNP array data in a tumor-control study. We applied the method to a dataset containing no SCNAs to test the specificity, created by pairing sequencing replicates of a single HapMap sample as normal/tumor pairs, as well as a large-scale WGS dataset consisting of 88 liver tumors along with adjacent normal tissues. Compared with representative methods, our method demonstrated improved accuracy, scalability to large cancer studies, capability in handling both sequencing and SNP array data, and the potential to improve the estimation of tumor ploidy and purity.

  19. Chicken genome analysis reveals novel genes encoding biotin-binding proteins related to avidin family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nordlund Henri R

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A chicken egg contains several biotin-binding proteins (BBPs, whose complete DNA and amino acid sequences are not known. In order to identify and characterise these genes and proteins we studied chicken cDNAs and genes available in the NCBI database and chicken genome database using the reported N-terminal amino acid sequences of chicken egg-yolk BBPs as search strings. Results Two separate hits showing significant homology for these N-terminal sequences were discovered. For one of these hits, the chromosomal location in the immediate proximity of the avidin gene family was found. Both of these hits encode proteins having high sequence similarity with avidin suggesting that chicken BBPs are paralogous to avidin family. In particular, almost all residues corresponding to biotin binding in avidin are conserved in these putative BBP proteins. One of the found DNA sequences, however, seems to encode a carboxy-terminal extension not present in avidin. Conclusion We describe here the predicted properties of the putative BBP genes and proteins. Our present observations link BBP genes together with avidin gene family and shed more light on the genetic arrangement and variability of this family. In addition, comparative modelling revealed the potential structural elements important for the functional and structural properties of the putative BBP proteins.

  20. Chicken genome analysis reveals novel genes encoding biotin-binding proteins related to avidin family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niskanen, Einari A; Hytönen, Vesa P; Grapputo, Alessandro; Nordlund, Henri R; Kulomaa, Markku S; Laitinen, Olli H

    2005-03-18

    A chicken egg contains several biotin-binding proteins (BBPs), whose complete DNA and amino acid sequences are not known. In order to identify and characterise these genes and proteins we studied chicken cDNAs and genes available in the NCBI database and chicken genome database using the reported N-terminal amino acid sequences of chicken egg-yolk BBPs as search strings. Two separate hits showing significant homology for these N-terminal sequences were discovered. For one of these hits, the chromosomal location in the immediate proximity of the avidin gene family was found. Both of these hits encode proteins having high sequence similarity with avidin suggesting that chicken BBPs are paralogous to avidin family. In particular, almost all residues corresponding to biotin binding in avidin are conserved in these putative BBP proteins. One of the found DNA sequences, however, seems to encode a carboxy-terminal extension not present in avidin. We describe here the predicted properties of the putative BBP genes and proteins. Our present observations link BBP genes together with avidin gene family and shed more light on the genetic arrangement and variability of this family. In addition, comparative modelling revealed the potential structural elements important for the functional and structural properties of the putative BBP proteins.

  1. Molecular cloning of rhamnose-binding lectin gene and its promoter region from snakehead Channa argus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, W Z; Shang, N; Guo, Q L

    2010-09-01

    Lectins are sugar-binding proteins that mediate pathogen recognition and cell-cell interactions. A rhamnose-binding lectin (RBL) gene and its promoter region have been cloned and characterized from snakehead Channa argus. From the transcription initiation site, snakehead rhamnose-binding lectin (SHL) gene extends 2,382 bp to the end of the 3' untranslated region (UTR), and contains nine exons and eight introns. The open reading frame (ORF) of the SHL transcript has 675 bp which encodes 224 amino acids. The molecular structure of SHL is composed of two tandem repeat carbohydrate recognition domains (CRD) with 35% internal identity. Analysis of the gene organization of SHL indicates that the ancestral gene of RBL may diverge and evolve by exon shuffling and gene duplication, producing new forms to play their own roles in various organisms. The characteristics of SHL gene 5' flanking region are the presence of consensus nuclear factor of interleukin 6 (NF-IL6) and IFN-gamma activation (GAS) sites. The results provide indirect evidence that up-regulation of SHL expression may be induced in response to inflammatory stimuli, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and interferon gamma (IFN-gamma). The transcript of SHL mRNA was expressed in the head kidney, posterior kidney, spleen, liver, intestine, heart, muscle, and ovary. No tissue-specific expressive pattern is different from reported STLs, WCLs, and PFLs, suggesting that different types of RBLs exist in species-specific fish that have evolved and adapted to their surroundings.

  2. Lin28A Binds Active Promoters and Recruits Tet1 to Regulate Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yaxue; Yao, Bing; Shin, Jaehoon; Lin, Li; Kim, Namshik; Song, Qifeng; Liu, Shuang; Su, Yijing; Guo, Junjie U; Huang, Luoxiu; Wan, Jun; Wu, Hao; Qian, Jiang; Cheng, Xiaodong; Zhu, Heng; Ming, Guo-li; Jin, Peng; Song, Hongjun

    2016-01-07

    Lin28, a well-known RNA-binding protein, regulates diverse cellular properties. All physiological functions of Lin28A characterized so far have been attributed to its repression of let-7 miRNA biogenesis or modulation of mRNA translational efficiency. Here we show that Lin28A directly binds to a consensus DNA sequence in vitro and in mouse embryonic stem cells in vivo. ChIP-seq and RNA-seq reveal enrichment of Lin28A binding around transcription start sites and a positive correlation between its genomic occupancy and expression of many associated genes. Mechanistically, Lin28A recruits 5-methylcytosine-dioxygenase Tet1 to genomic binding sites to orchestrate 5-methylcytosine and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine dynamics. Either Lin28A or Tet1 knockdown leads to dysregulated DNA methylation and expression of common target genes. These results reveal a surprising role for Lin28A in transcriptional regulation via epigenetic DNA modifications and have implications for understanding mechanisms underlying versatile functions of Lin28A in mammalian systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Genome Wide Analysis of Nucleotide-Binding Site Disease Resistance Genes in Brachypodium distachyon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenglong Tan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nucleotide-binding site (NBS disease resistance genes play an important role in defending plants from a variety of pathogens and insect pests. Many R-genes have been identified in various plant species. However, little is known about the NBS-encoding genes in Brachypodium distachyon. In this study, using computational analysis of the B. distachyon genome, we identified 126 regular NBS-encoding genes and characterized them on the bases of structural diversity, conserved protein motifs, chromosomal locations, gene duplications, promoter region, and phylogenetic relationships. EST hits and full-length cDNA sequences (from Brachypodium database of 126 R-like candidates supported their existence. Based on the occurrence of conserved protein motifs such as coiled-coil (CC, NBS, leucine-rich repeat (LRR, these regular NBS-LRR genes were classified into four subgroups: CC-NBS-LRR, NBS-LRR, CC-NBS, and X-NBS. Further expression analysis of the regular NBS-encoding genes in Brachypodium database revealed that these genes are expressed in a wide range of libraries, including those constructed from various developmental stages, tissue types, and drought challenged or nonchallenged tissue.

  4. Isolation and characterization of a new mannose-binding lectin gene from Taxus media

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Guoyin Kai; Lingxia Zhao; Jingui Zheng; Lei Zhang; Zhiqi Miao; Xiaofen Sun; Kexuan Tanga

    2004-12-01

    In this paper, we report the cloning and characterization of the first mannose-binding lectin gene from a gymnosperm plant species, Taxus media. The full-length cDNA of T. media agglutinin (TMA) consisted of 676 bp and contained a 432 bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding a 144 amino acid protein. Comparative analysis showed that TMA had high homology with many previously reported plant mannose-binding lectins and that tma encoded a precursor lectin with a 26-aa signal peptide. Molecular modelling revealed that TMA was a new mannose-binding lectin with three typical mannose-binding boxes like lectins from species of angiosperms. Tissue expression pattern analyses revealed that tma is expressed in a tissue-specific manner in leaves and stems, but not in fruits and roots. Phylogenetic tree analyses showed that TMA belonged to the structurally and evolutionarily closely related monocot mannose-binding lectin superfamily. This study provides useful information to understand the molecular evolution of plant lectins.

  5. Identification of clustered YY1 binding sites in Imprinting Control Regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J D; Hinz, A; Bergmann, A; Huang, J; Ovcharenko, I; Stubbs, L; Kim, J

    2006-04-19

    Mammalian genomic imprinting is regulated by Imprinting Control Regions (ICRs) that are usually associated with tandem arrays of transcription factor binding sites. In the current study, the sequence features derived from a tandem array of YY1 binding sites of Peg3-DMR (differentially methylated region) led us to identify three additional clustered YY1 binding sites, which are also localized within the DMRs of Xist, Tsix, and Nespas. These regions have been shown to play a critical role as ICRs for the regulation of surrounding genes. These ICRs have maintained a tandem array of YY1 binding sites during mammalian evolution. The in vivo binding of YY1 to these regions is allele-specific and only to the unmethylated active alleles. Promoter/enhancer assays suggest that a tandem array of YY1 binding sites function as a potential orientation-dependent enhancer. Insulator assays revealed that the enhancer-blocking activity is detected only in the YY1 binding sites of Peg3-DMR but not in the YY1 binding sites of other DMRs. Overall, our identification of three additional clustered YY1 binding sites in imprinted domains suggests a significant role for YY1 in mammalian genomic imprinting.

  6. Diversity of the luciferin binding protein gene in bioluminescent dinoflagellates--insights from a new gene in Noctiluca scintillans and sequences from gonyaulacoid genera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiadi, Martha; Iglesias-Rodriguez, Maria Debora

    2014-01-01

    Dinoflagellate bioluminescence systems operate with or without a luciferin binding protein, representing two distinct modes of light production. However, the distribution, diversity, and evolution of the luciferin binding protein gene within bioluminescent dinoflagellates are not well known. We used PCR to detect and partially sequence this gene from the heterotrophic dinoflagellate Noctiluca scintillans and a group of ecologically important gonyaulacoid species. We report an additional luciferin binding protein gene in N. scintillans which is not attached to luciferase, further to its typical combined bioluminescence gene. This supports the hypothesis that a profound re-organization of the bioluminescence system has taken place in this organism. We also show that the luciferin binding protein gene is present in the genera Ceratocorys, Gonyaulax, and Protoceratium, and is prevalent in bioluminescent species of Alexandrium. Therefore, this gene is an integral component of the standard molecular bioluminescence machinery in dinoflagellates. Nucleotide sequences showed high within-strain variation among gene copies, revealing a highly diverse gene family comprising multiple gene types in some organisms. Phylogenetic analyses showed that, in some species, the evolution of the luciferin binding protein gene was different from the organism's general phylogenies, highlighting the complex evolutionary history of dinoflagellate bioluminescence systems.

  7. Arabidopsis SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex binds both promoters and terminators to regulate gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archacki, Rafal; Yatusevich, Ruslan; Buszewicz, Daniel; Krzyczmonik, Katarzyna; Patryn, Jacek; Iwanicka-Nowicka, Roksana; Biecek, Przemyslaw; Wilczynski, Bartek; Koblowska, Marta; Jerzmanowski, Andrzej; Swiezewski, Szymon

    2017-04-07

    ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes are important regulators of gene expression in Eukaryotes. In plants, SWI/SNF-type complexes have been shown critical for transcriptional control of key developmental processes, growth and stress responses. To gain insight into mechanisms underlying these roles, we performed whole genome mapping of the SWI/SNF catalytic subunit BRM in Arabidopsis thaliana, combined with transcript profiling experiments. Our data show that BRM occupies thousands of sites in Arabidopsis genome, most of which located within or close to genes. Among identified direct BRM transcriptional targets almost equal numbers were up- and downregulated upon BRM depletion, suggesting that BRM can act as both activator and repressor of gene expression. Interestingly, in addition to genes showing canonical pattern of BRM enrichment near transcription start site, many other genes showed a transcription termination site-centred BRM occupancy profile. We found that BRM-bound 3΄ gene regions have promoter-like features, including presence of TATA boxes and high H3K4me3 levels, and possess high antisense transcriptional activity which is subjected to both activation and repression by SWI/SNF complex. Our data suggest that binding to gene terminators and controlling transcription of non-coding RNAs is another way through which SWI/SNF complex regulates expression of its targets. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. Tolerance to acetic acid is improved by mutations of the TATA-binding protein gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Jieun; Kwon, Hyeji; Kim, Eunjung; Lee, Young Mi; Ko, Hyeok Jin; Park, Hongjae; Choi, In-Geol; Kim, Sooah; Kim, Kyoung Heon; Kim, Wankee; Choi, Wonja

    2015-03-01

    Screening a library of overexpressing mutant alleles of the TATA-binding gene SPT15 yielded two Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains (MRRC 3252 and 3253) with enhanced tolerance to acetic acid. They were also tolerant to propionic acid and hydrogen peroxide. Transcriptome profile analysis identified 58 upregulated genes and 106 downregulated genes in MRRC 3252. Stress- and protein synthesis-related transcription factors were predominantly enriched in the upregulated and downregulated genes respectively. Eight deletion mutants for some of the highly downregulated genes were acetic acid-tolerant. The level of intracellular reactive oxygen species was considerably lessened in MRRC 3252 and 3253 upon exposure to acetic acid. Metabolome profile analysis revealed that intracellular concentrations of 5 and 102 metabolites were increased and decreased, respectively, in MRRC 3252, featuring a large increase of urea and a significant decrease of amino acids. The dur1/2Δmutant, in which the urea degradation gene DUR1/2 is deleted, displayed enhanced tolerance to acetic acid. Enhanced tolerance to acetic acid was also observed on the medium containing a low concentration of amino acids. Taken together, this study identified two SPT15 alleles, nine gene deletions and low concentration of amino acids in the medium that confer enhanced tolerance to acetic acid.

  9. Molecular Identification and Sequencing of Mannose Binding Protein (MBP Gene of Acanthamoeba palestinensis

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    M Rezaeian

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Acanthamoeba keratitis develops by pathogenic Acanthamoeba such as A. pal­es­tinen­sis. Indeed this species is one of the known causative agents of amoebic keratitis in Iran. Mannose Binding Protein (MBP is the main pathogenicity factors for developing this sight threatening disease. We aimed to characterize MBP gene in pathogenic Acanthamoeba isolates such as A. palestinensis."nMethods: This experimental research was performed in the School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran during 2007-2008.  A. palestinensis was grown on 2% non-nutrient agar overlaid with Escherichia coli. DNA extraction was performed using phenol-chloroform method. PCR reaction and amplification were done using specific primer pairs of MBP. The amplified fragment were purified and sequenced. Finally, the obtained fragment was deposited in the gene data bank."nResults: A 900 bp PCR-product was recovered after PCR reaction. Sequence analysis of the purified PCR product revealed a gene with 943 nucleotides. Homology analysis of the ob­tained sequence showed 81% similarity with the available MBP gene in the gene data bank. The fragment was deposited in the gene data bank under accession number EU678895"nConclusion: MBP is known as the most important factor in Acanthamoeba pathogenesis cas­cade. Therefore, characterization of this gene can aid in developing better therapeutic agents and even immunization of high-risk people.

  10. Bicarbonate increases binding affinity of Vibrio cholerae ToxT to virulence gene promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Joshua J; Withey, Jeffrey H

    2014-11-01

    The major Vibrio cholerae virulence gene transcription activator, ToxT, is responsible for the production of the diarrhea-inducing cholera toxin (CT) and the major colonization factor, toxin coregulated pilus (TCP). In addition to the two primary virulence factors mentioned, ToxT is responsible for the activation of accessory virulence genes, such as aldA, tagA, acfA, acfD, tcpI, and tarAB. ToxT activity is negatively modulated by bile and unsaturated fatty acids found in the upper small intestine. Conversely, previous work identified another intestinal signal, bicarbonate, which enhances the ability of ToxT to activate production of CT and TCP. The work presented here further elucidates the mechanism for the enhancement of ToxT activity by bicarbonate. Bicarbonate was found to increase the activation of ToxT-dependent accessory virulence promoters in addition to those that produce CT and TCP. Bicarbonate is taken up into the V. cholerae cell, where it positively affects ToxT activity by increasing DNA binding affinity for the virulence gene promoters that ToxT activates regardless of toxbox configuration. The increase in ToxT binding affinity in the presence of bicarbonate explains the elevated level of virulence gene transcription.

  11. Grainyhead and Zelda compete for binding to the promoters of the earliest-expressed Drosophila genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Melissa M; Botchan, Michael R; Cline, Thomas W

    2010-09-15

    Maternally contributed mRNAs and proteins control the initial stages of development following fertilization. During this time, most of the zygotic genome remains transcriptionally silent. The initiation of widespread zygotic transcription is coordinated with the degradation of maternally provided mRNAs at the maternal-to-zygotic transition (MZT). While most of the genome is silenced prior to the MZT, a small subset of zygotic genes essential for the future development of the organism is transcribed. Previous work in our laboratory and others identified the TAGteam element, a set of related heptameric DNA-sequences in the promoters of many early-expressed Drosophila genes required to drive their unusually early transcription. To understand how this unique subset of genes is regulated, we identified a TAGteam-binding factor Grainyhead (Grh). We demonstrated that Grh and the previously characterized transcriptional activator Zelda (Zld) bind to different TAGteam sequences with varying affinities, and that Grh competes with Zld for TAGteam occupancy. Moreover, overexpression of Grh in the early embryo causes defects in cell division, phenocopying Zld depletion. Our findings indicate that during early embryonic development the precise timing of gene expression is regulated by both the sequence of the TAGteam elements in the promoter and the relative levels of the transcription factors Grh and Zld.

  12. Structures of genes encoding TATA box-binding proteins from Trimeresurus gramineus and T. flavoviridis snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, K; Nobuhisa, I; Deshimaru, M; Ogawa, T; Shimohigashi, Y; Fukumaki, Y; Hattori, M; Sakaki, Y; Hattori, S; Ohno, M

    1995-01-23

    A cDNA encoding the Trimeresurus gramineus (Tg; green habu snake) TATA-box-binding protein (TgTBP) was cloned and sequenced. The cDNA encodes a 33-kDa protein with an extensive sequence similarity to those derived from other organisms, except for the N-terminal domain. Genes encoding TgTBP and Trimeresurus flavoviridis (Tf; habu snake) TBP (TfTBP) were isolated using a TgTBP cDNA and their nt sequences were determined. They are the first TBP genes entirely sequenced in higher animals. Both genes span over 15 kb and are constructed from eight exons and seven introns. Comparison of the loci of introns on the aligned amino-acid sequences of TBP from six organisms (Tg, Tf, mouse, Arabidopsis thaliana, Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Acanthamoeba castellanii) indicated that there are three highly conserved loci in the C-terminal domain.

  13. Role of a liver fatty acid-binding protein gene in lipid metabolism in chicken hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, G L; Na, W; Wang, Y X; Zhang, H F; Li, H; Wang, Q G

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the role of the chicken liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) gene in lipid metabolism in hepatocytes, and the regulatory relationships between L-FABP and genes related to lipid metabolism. The short hairpin RNA (shRNA) interference vector with L-FABP and an eukaryotic expression vector were used. Chicken hepatocytes were subjected to shRNA-mediated knockdown or L-FABP cDNA overexpression. Expression levels of lipid metabolism-related genes and biochemical parameters were detected 24, 36, 48, 60, and 72 h after transfection with the interference or overexpression plasmids for L-FABP, PPARα and L-BABP expression levels, and the total amount of cholesterol, were significantly affected by L-FABP expression. L-FABP may affect lipid metabolism by regulating PPARα and L-BABP in chicken hepatocytes.

  14. Identification of transcription factor AML-1 binding site upstream of human cytomegalovirus UL111A gene.

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    Xiaoqun Zheng

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV interleukin-10 (hcmvIL-10, encoded by HCMV UL111A gene, is a homolog of human IL-10. It exerts immunomodulatory effects that allow HCMV to evade host defense mechanisms. However, the exact mechanism underlying the regulation of hcmvIL-10 expression is not well understood. The transcription factor acute myeloid leukemia 1 (AML-1 plays an important role in the regulation of various genes involved in the differentiation of hematopoietic lineages. A putative AML-1 binding site is present within the upstream regulatory region (URR of UL111A gene. To provide evidence that AML-1 is involved in regulating UL111A gene expression, we examined the interaction of AML-1 with the URR of UL111A in HCMV-infected human monocytic THP-1 cells using a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. HcmvIL-10 transcription was detected in differentiated THP-1 cells, but not in undifferentiated ones. Furthermore, the URR of UL111A showed a higher intensity of AML-1 binding, a higher level of histone H3 acetyl-K9, but a lower level of histone H3 dimethyl-K9 in differentiated THP-1 cells than undifferentiated cells. Down-regulation of AML1 by RNA interference decreased the expression of the UL111A gene. Our results suggest that AML-1 may contribute to the epigenetic regulation of UL111A gene via histone modification in HCMV-infected differentiated THP-1 cells. This finding could be useful for the development of new anti-viral therapies.

  15. Tuning riboswitch-mediated gene regulation by rational control of aptamer ligand binding properties.

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    Rode, Ambadas B; Endoh, Tamaki; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2015-01-12

    Riboswitch-mediated control of gene expression depends on ligand binding properties (kinetics and affinity) of its aptamer domain. A detailed analysis of interior regions of the aptamer, which affect the ligand binding properties, is important for both understanding natural riboswitch functions and for enabling rational design of tuneable artificial riboswitches. Kinetic analyses of binding reaction between flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and several natural and mutant aptamer domains of FMN-specific riboswitches were performed. The strong dependence of the dissociation rate (52.6-fold) and affinity (100-fold) on the identities of base pairs in the aptamer stem suggested that the stem region, which is conserved in length but variable in base-pair composition and context, is the tuning region of the FMN-specific aptamer. Synthetic riboswitches were constructed based on the same aptamer domain by rationally modifying the tuning regions. The observed 9.31-fold difference in the half-maximal effective concentration (EC50) corresponded to a 11.6-fold difference in the dissociation constant (K(D)) of the aptamer domains and suggested that the gene expression can be controlled by rationally adjusting the tuning regions.

  16. An adenovirus vector incorporating carbohydrate binding domains utilizes glycans for gene transfer.

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    Julius W Kim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vectors based on human adenovirus serotype 5 (HAdV-5 continue to show promise as delivery vehicles for cancer gene therapy. Nevertheless, it has become clear that therapeutic benefit is directly linked to tumor-specific vector localization, highlighting the need for tumor-targeted gene delivery. Aberrant glycosylation of cell surface glycoproteins and glycolipids is a central feature of malignant transformation, and tumor-associated glycoforms are recognized as cancer biomarkers. On this basis, we hypothesized that cancer-specific cell-surface glycans could be the basis of a novel paradigm in HAdV-5-based vector targeting. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: As a first step toward this goal, we constructed a novel HAdV-5 vector encoding a unique chimeric fiber protein that contains the tandem carbohydrate binding domains of the fiber protein of the NADC-1 strain of porcine adenovirus type 4 (PAdV-4. This glycan-targeted vector displays augmented CAR-independent gene transfer in cells with low CAR expression. Further, we show that gene transfer is markedly decreased in cells with genetic glycosylation defects and by inhibitors of glycosylation in normal cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data provide the initial proof-of-concept for HAdV-5 vector-mediated gene delivery based on the presence of cell-surface carbohydrates. Further development of this new targeting paradigm could provide targeted gene delivery based on vector recognition of disease-specific glycan biomarkers.

  17. Human Jk recombination signal binding protein gene (IGKJRB): Comparison with its mouse homologue

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    Amakawa, Ryuichi; Jing, Wu; Matsunami, Norisada; Hamaguchi, Yasushi; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Kawaichi, Masashi; Honjo, Tasuku (Kyoto Univ., Sakyo-ku, Kyoto (Japan)); Ozawa, Kazuo (Tsukuba Life Science Center, Tsukuba, Ibraraki (Japan))

    1993-08-01

    The mouse Igkjrb protein specifically binds to the immunoglobulin Jk recombination signal sequence. The IGKJRB gene is highly conserved among many species such as human, Xenopus, and Drosophila. Using cDNA fragments of the mouse Igkjrb gene, the authors isolated its human counterpart, IGKJRB. The human genome contains one functional IGKJRB gene and two types of processed pseudogenes. In situ chromosome hybridization analysis demonstrated that the functional gene is localized at chromosome 3q25, and the pseudogenes (IGKJRBP1 and IGKJRBP2, respectively) are located at chromosomes 9p13 and 9q13. The functional gene is composed of 13 exons spanning at least 67 kb. Three types of cDNA with different 5[prime] sequences were isolated by rapid amplification of cDNA ends, suggesting the presence of three proteins. The aPCR-1 protein, which possessed the exon 1 sequence, was the counterpart of the mouse RBP-2 type protein. The aPCR-2 and 3 proteins may be specific to human cells because the mouse counterparts were not detected. The amino acid sequences of the human and mouse IGKJRB genes were 98% homologous in exons 2-11, whereas the homology of the human and mouse exon 1 sequences was 75%. 40 refs., 7 figs.

  18. Is there a close relationship between synonymous codon bias and codon-anticodon binding strength in human genes?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Synonymous codon bias has been examined in 78 human genes (19967 codons) and measured by relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU). Relative frequencies of all kinds of dinucleotides in 2,3 or 3,4 codon positions have been calculated, and codon-anticodon binding strength has been estimated by the stacking energies of codon-anticodon bases in Watson-Crick pairs. The data show common features in synonymous codon bias for all codon families in human genes: all C-ending codons, which possess the strongest co-don-anticodon binding energies, are the most favored codons in almost all codon families, and those codons with medium codon-anticodon binding energies are avoided. Data analysis suggests that besides isochore and genome signature , codon-anticodon binding strength may be closely related to syn-onymous codon choice in human genes. The join-effect of these factors on human genes results in the common features in codon bias.

  19. Human-Phosphate-Binding-Protein inhibits HIV-1 gene transcription and replication

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    Candolfi Ermanno

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Human Phosphate-Binding protein (HPBP is a serendipitously discovered lipoprotein that binds phosphate with high affinity. HPBP belongs to the DING protein family, involved in various biological processes like cell cycle regulation. We report that HPBP inhibits HIV-1 gene transcription and replication in T cell line, primary peripherical blood lymphocytes and primary macrophages. We show that HPBP is efficient in naïve and HIV-1 AZT-resistant strains. Our results revealed HPBP as a new and potent anti HIV molecule that inhibits transcription of the virus, which has not yet been targeted by HAART and therefore opens new strategies in the treatment of HIV infection.

  20. Expression of LIM-domain binding protein (ldb) genes during zebrafish embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyama, R; Kobayashi, M; Tomita, T; Dawid, I B

    1998-02-01

    LIM homeodomain proteins are developmental regulators whose functions depend on synergism with LIM domain binding proteins (Ldb proteins). We have isolated four members of the ldb gene family from the zebrafish, Danio rerio. Ldb1, Ldb2 and Ldb3 share 95%, 73% and 62% amino acid identity with mouse Ldb1, respectively. In overlay assays, Ldb proteins bind LIM homeodomain proteins and LMO1, but not zyxin or MLP. Whole mount in situ hybridization showed that zebrafish ldb1 is expressed ubiquitously from gastrulation onward. Ldb2 is ubiquitous at gastrulation, and later is found in many but not all tissues, especially the anterior central nervous system (CNS) and vasculature. Ldb3 mRNA was expressed primarily in the anterior CNS.

  1. Cloning of the quail PIWI gene and characterization of PIWI binding to small RNAs.

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    Rong Chen

    Full Text Available The PIWI protein regulates gene expression at the epigenetic and post-transcriptional level with a variety of endogenous small non-coding RNAs. In poultry, the biological function of the PIWI protein and PIWI binding to small RNAs had not been determined. The present study cloned and analyzed the sequences of the PIWIL1 protein. We also characterized PIWIL1 binding to small RNAs from adult quail testis, where the PIWIL1 protein is specifically expressed. Small RNAs showed a strong peak at 24-27 nt in the testicular RNA library, mapped primarily to repeat sequences and were similar to rasiRNAs. MicroRNAs (miRNAs were abundant in the ovarian RNA library at a peak of 22 nt.

  2. Evolution of the B3 DNA binding superfamily: new insights into REM family gene diversification.

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    Elisson A C Romanel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The B3 DNA binding domain includes five families: auxin response factor (ARF, abscisic acid-insensitive3 (ABI3, high level expression of sugar inducible (HSI, related to ABI3/VP1 (RAV and reproductive meristem (REM. The release of the complete genomes of the angiosperm eudicots Arabidopsis thaliana and Populus trichocarpa, the monocot Orysa sativa, the bryophyte Physcomitrella patens,the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Volvox carteri and the red algae Cyanidioschyzon melorae provided an exceptional opportunity to study the evolution of this superfamily. METHODOLOGY: In order to better understand the origin and the diversification of B3 domains in plants, we combined comparative phylogenetic analysis with exon/intron structure and duplication events. In addition, we investigated the conservation and divergence of the B3 domain during the origin and evolution of each family. CONCLUSIONS: Our data indicate that showed that the B3 containing genes have undergone extensive duplication events, and that the REM family B3 domain has a highly diverged DNA binding. Our results also indicate that the founding member of the B3 gene family is likely to be similar to the ABI3/HSI genes found in C. reinhardtii and V. carteri. Among the B3 families, ABI3, HSI, RAV and ARF are most structurally conserved, whereas the REM family has experienced a rapid divergence. These results are discussed in light of their functional and evolutionary roles in plant development.

  3. Telomere binding protein TRB1 is associated with promoters of translation machinery genes in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrumpfová, Petra Procházková; Vychodilová, Ivona; Hapala, Jan; Schořová, Šárka; Dvořáček, Vojtěch; Fajkus, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Recently we characterised TRB1, a protein from a single-myb-histone family, as a structural and functional component of telomeres in Arabidopsis thaliana. TRB proteins, besides their ability to bind specifically to telomeric DNA using their N-terminally positioned myb-like domain of the same type as in human shelterin proteins TRF1 or TRF2, also possess a histone-like domain which is involved in protein-protein interactions e.g., with POT1b. Here we set out to investigate the genome-wide localization pattern of TRB1 to reveal its preferential sites of binding to chromatin in vivo and its potential functional roles in the genome-wide context. Our results demonstrate that TRB1 is preferentially associated with promoter regions of genes involved in ribosome biogenesis, in addition to its roles at telomeres. This preference coincides with the frequent occurrence of telobox motifs in the upstream regions of genes in this category, but it is not restricted to the presence of a telobox. We conclude that TRB1 shows a specific genome-wide distribution pattern which suggests its role in regulation of genes involved in biogenesis of the translational machinery, in addition to its preferential telomeric localization.

  4. Cellular retinol binding protein 1 could be a tumor suppressor gene in cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Rodriguez, Mónica; Arreola, Hugo; Valdivia, Alejandra; Peralta, Raúl; Serna, Humberto; Villegas, Vanessa; Romero, Pablo; Alvarado-Hernández, Beatriz; Paniagua, Lucero; Marrero-Rodríguez, Daniel; Meraz, Marco A; Salcedo, Mauricio

    2013-01-01

    Aims: Cervical Cancer (CC) is one of the most important health problems in women. It frequently presents genetic changes at chromosome region 3q21. This region contains the Cellular Retinol Binding Protein 1 gene (CRBP1) which has been implicated as an important element in the development of other types of cancer. The main goal of the present work was to determine the molecular alterations of CRBP1 and its relationship to CC. Methods: To determine the molecular alterations of CRBP1 gene in CC; twenty-six CC and twenty-six healthy cervix samples were evaluated for: 1) Copy number gain by real-time PCR analysis, 2) expression levels by an immunohistochemistry assay on tissue microarray, and 3) the methylation status of the CRBP1 promoter region. Results: The increase in CRBP1 copy number was observed in 10 out of the 26 CC samples analyzed, while healthy cervices samples showed no changes in the copy number. In addition, there was a lack of expression of the CRBP1 gene in an important number of the CC samples (17/26), and the CRBP1 gene promoter was methylated in 15/26 of the CC samples. Interestingly, there was a significant association between the lack of expression of the CRBP1 gene and its methylation status. Conclusions: The data indicates that, both activating and inactivating changes in the CRBP1 gene could be significant events in the development and progression of CC, and the lack of expression of the CRBP1 protein could be related with to the development of CC. We believe that there is enough evidence to consider to CRBP1 gene as a tumor suppressor gene for CC. PMID:24040446

  5. Analysis of Genes Encoding Penicillin-Binding Proteins in Clinical Isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayô, Rodrigo; Rodríguez, María-Cruz; Espinal, Paula; Fernández-Cuenca, Felipe; Ocampo-Sosa, Alain A.; Pascual, Álvaro; Ayala, Juan A.; Vila, Jordi; Martínez-Martínez, Luis

    2011-01-01

    There is limited information on the role of penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) in the resistance of Acinetobacter baumannii to β-lactams. This study presents an analysis of the allelic variations of PBP genes in A. baumannii isolates. Twenty-six A. baumannii clinical isolates (susceptible or resistant to carbapenems) from three teaching hospitals in Spain were included. The antimicrobial susceptibility profile, clonal pattern, and genomic species identification were also evaluated. Based on the six complete genomes of A. baumannii, the PBP genes were identified, and primers were designed for each gene. The nucleotide sequences of the genes identified that encode PBPs and the corresponding amino acid sequences were compared with those of ATCC 17978. Seven PBP genes and one monofunctional transglycosylase (MGT) gene were identified in the six genomes, encoding (i) four high-molecular-mass proteins (two of class A, PBP1a [ponA] and PBP1b [mrcB], and two of class B, PBP2 [pbpA or mrdA] and PBP3 [ftsI]), (ii) three low-molecular-mass proteins (two of type 5, PBP5/6 [dacC] and PBP6b [dacD], and one of type 7 (PBP7/8 [pbpG]), and (iii) a monofunctional enzyme (MtgA [mtgA]). Hot spot mutation regions were observed, although most of the allelic changes found translated into silent mutations. The amino acid consensus sequences corresponding to the PBP genes in the genomes and the clinical isolates were highly conserved. The changes found in amino acid sequences were associated with concrete clonal patterns but were not directly related to susceptibility or resistance to β-lactams. An insertion sequence disrupting the gene encoding PBP6b was identified in an endemic carbapenem-resistant clone in one of the participant hospitals. PMID:21947403

  6. Identification of co-regulated genes through Bayesian clustering of predicted regulatory binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Zhaohui S; McCue, Lee Ann; Thompson, William; Mayerhofer, Linda; Lawrence, Charles E; Liu, Jun S

    2003-04-01

    The identification of co-regulated genes and their transcription-factor binding sites (TFBS) are key steps toward understanding transcription regulation. In addition to effective laboratory assays, various computational approaches for the detection of TFBS in promoter regions of coexpressed genes have been developed. The availability of complete genome sequences combined with the likelihood that transcription factors and their cognate sites are often conserved during evolution has led to the development of phylogenetic footprinting. The modus operandi of this technique is to search for conserved motifs upstream of orthologous genes from closely related species. The method can identify hundreds of TFBS without prior knowledge of co-regulation or coexpression. Because many of these predicted sites are likely to be bound by the same transcription factor, motifs with similar patterns can be put into clusters so as to infer the sets of co-regulated genes, that is, the regulons. This strategy utilizes only genome sequence information and is complementary to and confirmative of gene expression data generated by microarray experiments. However, the limited data available to characterize individual binding patterns, the variation in motif alignment, motif width, and base conservation, and the lack of knowledge of the number and sizes of regulons make this inference problem difficult. We have developed a Gibbs sampling-based Bayesian motif clustering (BMC) algorithm to address these challenges. Tests on simulated data sets show that BMC produces many fewer errors than hierarchical and K-means clustering methods. The application of BMC to hundreds of predicted gamma-proteobacterial motifs correctly identified many experimentally reported regulons, inferred the existence of previously unreported members of these regulons, and suggested novel regulons.

  7. Functional evolution in the plant SQUAMOSA-PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE (SPL gene family

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    Jill Christine Preston

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The SQUAMOSA-PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE (SPL family of transcription factors is functionally diverse, controlling a number of fundamental aspects of plant growth and development, including vegetative phase change, flowering time, branching, and leaf initiation rate. In natural plant populations, variation in flowering time and shoot architecture have major consequences for fitness. Likewise, in crop species, variation in branching and developmental rate impact biomass and yield. Thus, studies aimed at dissecting how the various functions are partitioned among different SPL genes in diverse plant lineages are key to providing insight into the genetic basis of local adaptation and have already garnered attention by crop breeders. Here we use phylogenetic reconstruction to reveal nine major SPL gene lineages, each of which is described in terms of function and diversification. To assess evidence for ancestral and derived functions within each SPL gene lineage, we use ancestral character state reconstructions. Our analyses suggest an emerging pattern of sub-functionalization, neo-functionalization, and possible convergent evolution following both ancient and recent gene duplication. Based on these analyses we suggest future avenues of research that may prove fruitful for elucidating the importance of SPL gene evolution in plant growth and development.

  8. Design of a zinc finger protein binding a sequence upstream of the A20 gene

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    Cui Xiaoping

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Artificial transcription factors (ATFs are composed of DNA-binding and functional domains. These domains can be fused together to create proteins that can bind a chosen DNA sequence. To construct a valid ATF, it is necessary to design suitable DNA-binding and functional domains. The Cys2-His2 zinc finger motif is the ideal structural scaffold on which to construct a sequence-specific protein. A20 is a cytoplasmic zinc finger protein that inhibits nuclear factor kappa-B activity and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-mediated programmed cell death. A20 has been shown to prevent TNF-induced cytotoxicity in a variety of cell types including fibroblasts, B lymphocytes, WEHI 164 cells, NIH 3T3 cells and endothelial cells. Results In order to design a zinc finger protein (ZFP structural domain that binds specific target sequences in the A20 gene promoter region, the structure and sequence composition of this promoter were analyzed by bioinformatics methods. The target sequences in the A20 promoter were submitted to the on-line ZF Tools server of the Barbas Laboratory, Scripps Research Institute (TSRI, to obtain a specific 18 bp target sequence and also the amino acid sequence of a ZFP that would bind to it. Sequence characterization and structural modeling of the predicted ZFP were performed by bioinformatics methods. The optimized DNA sequence of this artificial ZFP was recombined into the eukaryotic expression vector pIRES2-EGFP to construct pIRES2-EGFP/ZFP-flag recombinants, and the expression and biological activity of the ZFP were analyzed by RT-PCR, western blotting and EMSA, respectively. The ZFP was designed successfully and exhibited biological activity. Conclusion It is feasible to design specific zinc finger proteins by bioinformatics methods.

  9. The human renin-binding protein gene (RENBP) maps in Xq28

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouweland, A.M.W. van der; Verdijk, M.; Oost, B.A. van (Univ. Hospital Nijmegen (Netherlands)); Kiochis, P.; Poustka, A. (Deutsches Krebsforschungszemtrum, Heidelberg (Germany))

    1994-05-01

    The authors report here the successful application of the method by which cDNA libraries are screened with positionally identified genomic clones. Human cosmid clones were selected from a cosmid library derived from the Q1Z cell line. This Q1Z cell line is a hamster-human somatic cell hybrid that contains the Xq28 region as its sole human component. To search for kidney-expressed genes, they screened a kidney cDNA library purchased from Clontech with cosmid-derived probes. Based on the physical mapping of the vasopressin V2 receptor gene close to the L1CAM gene, they analyzed cosmids derived from this region. One of the cosmids was 12B2, located 50 kb from the L1CAM gene. A 20-kb EcoRI subclone from the 12B2 cosmid was used as probe. This fragment did not hybridize to the probe 2-55 in contrast to the whole cosmid 12B2. Screening of 200,000 cDNA clones resulted in the identification of two positive clones. After sequence determination, it appeared that one of the positive cDNA clones contained Escherichia coli DNA as insert (data not shown). The other cDNA (pMV24) contained an open reading frame corresponding to the 243 amino-terminal amino acids of the human renin binding protein. The RENBP gene maps to interval 3 between the loci for DX52 and G-6-PD. This is the same interval as that for the color blindness gene, DXS707, and the AVPR2, L1CAM, and QM genes. This result confirms that the isolated RENBP cDNA originates from the same location as that from which the parental cosmid clone was derived. 28 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Predicting Polymerase Ⅱ Core Promoters by Cooperating Transcription Factor Binding Sites in Eukaryotic Genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Tu MA; Min-Ping QIAN; Hai-Xu TANG

    2004-01-01

    Several discriminate functions for predicting core promoters that based on the potential cooperation between transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) are discussed. It is demonstrated that the promoter predicting accuracy is improved when the cooperation among TFBSs is taken into consideration.The core promoter region of a newly discovered gene CKLFSF1 is predicted to locate more than 1.5 kb far away from the 5′ end of the transcript and in the last intron of its upstream gene, which is experimentally confirmed later. The core promoters of 3402 human RefSeq sequences, obtained by extending the mRNAs in human genome sequences, are predicted by our algorithm, and there are about 60% of the predicted core promoters locating within the ± 500 bp region relative to the annotated transcription start site.

  11. The spinal precerebellar nuclei: calcium binding proteins and gene expression profile in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, YuHong; Sengul, Gulgun; Paxinos, George; Watson, Charles

    2012-06-19

    We have localized the spinocerebellar neuron groups in C57BL/6J mice by injecting the retrograde neuronal tracer Fluoro-Gold into the cerebellum and examined the distribution of SMI 32 and the calcium-binding proteins (CBPs), calbindin-D-28K (Cb), calretinin (Cr), and parvalbumin (Pv) in the spinal precerebellar nuclei. The spinal precerebellar neuron clusters identified were the dorsal nucleus, central cervical nucleus, lumbar border precerebellar nucleus, lumbar precerebellar nucleus, and sacral precerebellar nucleus. Some dispersed neurons in the deep dorsal horn and spinal laminae 6-8 also projected to the cerebellum. Cb, Cr, Pv, and SMI 32 were present in all major spinal precerebellar nuclei and Pv was the most commonly observed CBP. A number of genes expressed in hindbrain precerebellar nuclei are also expressed in spinal precerebellar groups, but there were some differences in gene expression profile between the different spinal precerebellar nuclei, pointing to functional diversity amongst them.

  12. Molecular cloning and characterization of a novel mannose-binding lectin gene from Amorphophallus konjac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Jiong; Liao, Zhihua; Chai, Yourong; Pang, Yongzhen; Yao, Jianhong; Sun, Xiaofen; Tang, Kexuan

    2003-09-01

    A new lectin gene was cloned from Amorphophallus konjac. The full-length cDNA of Amorphophallus konjac agglutinin (aka) was 736 bp and contained a 474 bp open reading frame encoding a 158 amino acid protein. Homology analysis revealed that the lectin from this Araceae species belonged to the superfamily of monocot mannose-binding proteins. Molecular modeling of AKA indicated that the three-dimensional structure of AKA strongly resembles that of the snowdrop lectin. Southern blot analysis of the genomic DNA revealed that aka belonged to a low-copy gene family. Northern blot analysis demonstrated that aka expression was tissue-specific with the strongest expression being found in root.

  13. Chimeric Plant Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Gene with a Neural Visinin-Like Calcium-Binding Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Shameekumar; Takezawa, D.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1995-01-01

    Calcium, a universal second messenger, regulates diverse cellular processes in eukaryotes. Ca-2(+) and Ca-2(+)/calmodulin-regulated protein phosphorylation play a pivotal role in amplifying and diversifying the action of Ca-2(+)- mediated signals. A chimeric Ca-2(+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) gene with a visinin-like Ca-2(+)- binding domain was cloned and characterized from lily. The cDNA clone contains an open reading frame coding for a protein of 520 amino acids. The predicted structure of CCaMK contains a catalytic domain followed by two regulatory domains, a calmodulin-binding domain and a visinin-like Ca-2(+)-binding domain. The amino-terminal region of CCaMK contains all 11 conserved subdomains characteristic of serine/threonine protein kinases. The calmodulin-binding region of CCaMK has high homology (79%) to alpha subunit of mammalian Ca-2(+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase. The calmodulin-binding region is fused to a neural visinin-like domain that contains three Ca-2(+)-binding EF-hand motifs and a biotin-binding site. The Escherichia coli-expressed protein (approx. 56 kDa) binds calmodulin in a Ca-2(+)-dependent manner. Furthermore, Ca-45-binding assays revealed that CCaMK directly binds Ca-2(+). The CCaMK gene is preferentially expressed in developing anthers. Southern blot analysis revealed that CCaMK is encoded by a single gene. The structural features of the gene suggest that it has multiple regulatory controls and could play a unique role in Ca-2(+) signaling in plants.

  14. Polymorphisms in Genes Coding for Cytokines, Mannose-Binding Lectin, Collagen Metabolism and Thrombophilia in Women with Cervical Insufficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundtoft, Iben; Uldbjerg, Niels; Steffensen, Rudi

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the association between cervical insufficiency and single nucleotide polymorphisms in seven genes coding for pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine-related factors, mannose-binding lectin 2 (MBL2), collagen1α1 (COL1A1), factor II and factor V Leiden genes. METHODS: In a case-cont...

  15. Mitochondrial transcription termination factor 2 binds to entire mitochondrial DNA and negatively regulates mitochondrial gene expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weiwei Huang; Min Yu; Yang Jiao; Jie Ma; Mingxing Ma; Zehua Wang; Hong Wu; Deyong Tan

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial transcription termination factor 2 (mTERF2) is a mitochondriai matrix protein that binds to the mitochondriai DNA.Previous studies have shown that overexpression of mTERF2 can inhibit cell proliferation, but the mechanism has not been well defined so far.This study aimed to present the binding pattern of mTERF2 to the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in vivo, and investigated the biological function of mTERF2 on the replication of mtDNA, mRNA transcription, and protein translation.The mTERF2 binding to entire mtDNA was identified via the chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis.The mtDNA replication efficiency and expression levels of mitochondria genes were significantly inhibited when the mTERF2 was overexpressed in HeLa cells.The inhibition level of mtDNA content was the same with the decreased levels of mRNA and mitochondrial protein expression.Overall, the mTERF2 might be a cell growth inhibitor based on its negative effect on mtDNA replication, which eventually own-regulated all of the oxidative phosphorylation components in the mitochondria that were essential for the cell's energy metabolism.

  16. Inhibition of corticosteroid-binding globulin gene expression by glucocorticoids involves C/EBPβ.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolette Verhoog

    Full Text Available Corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG, a negative acute phase protein produced primarily in the liver, is responsible for the transport of glucocorticoids (GCs. It also modulates the bioavailability of GCs, as only free or unbound steroids are biologically active. Fluctuations in CBG levels therefore can directly affect GC bioavailability. This study investigates the molecular mechanism whereby GCs inhibit the expression of CBG. GCs regulate gene expression via the glucocorticoid receptor (GR, which either directly binds to DNA or acts indirectly via tethering to other DNA-bound transcription factors. Although no GC-response elements (GRE are present in the Cbg promoter, putative binding sites for C/EBPβ, able to tether to the GR, as well as HNF3α involved in GR signaling, are present. C/EBPβ, but not HNF3α, was identified as an important mediator of DEX-mediated inhibition of Cbg promoter activity by using specific deletion and mutant promoter reporter constructs of Cbg. Furthermore, knockdown of C/EBPβ protein expression reduced DEX-induced repression of CBG mRNA, confirming C/EBPβ's involvement in GC-mediated CBG repression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP after DEX treatment indicated increased co-recruitment of C/EBPβ and GR to the Cbg promoter, while C/EBPβ knockdown prevented GR recruitment. Together, the results suggest that DEX repression of CBG involves tethering of the GR to C/EBPβ.

  17. AtMBD6, a methyl CpG binding domain protein, maintains gene silencing in Arabidopsis by interacting with RNA binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parida, Adwaita Prasad; Sharma, Amrapali; Sharma, Arun Kumar

    2017-03-01

    DNA methylation, mediated by double-stranded RNA, is a conserved epigenetic phenomenon that protects a genome from transposons, silences unwanted genes and has a paramount function in plant or animal development. Methyl CpG binding domain proteins are members of a class of proteins that bind to methylated DNA. The Arabidopsis thaliana genome encodes 13 methyl CpG binding domain (MBD) proteins, but the molecular/biological functions of most of these proteins are still not clear. In the present study, we identified four proteins that interact with AtMBD6. Interestingly, three of them contain RNA binding domains and are co-localized with AtMBD6 in the nucleus. The interacting partners includes AtRPS2C (a 40S ribosomal protein), AtNTF2 (nuclear transport factor 2) and AtAGO4 (Argonoute 4). The fourth protein that physically interacts with AtMBD6 is a histone-modifying enzyme, histone deacetylase 6 (AtHDA6), which is a known component of the RNA-mediated gene silencing system. Analysis of genomic DNA methylation in the atmbd6, atrps2c and atntf2 mutants, using methylation-sensitive PCR detected decreased DNA methylation at miRNA/siRNA producing loci, pseudogenes and other targets of RNA-directed DNA methylation. Our results indicate that AtMBD6 is involved in RNA-mediated gene silencing and it binds to RNA binding proteins like AtRPS2C, AtAGO4 and AtNTF2. AtMBD6 also interacts with histone deacetylase AtHDA6 that might have a role in chromatin condensation at the targets of RdDM.

  18. Derivation of a myeloid cell-binding adenovirus for gene therapy of inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael O Alberti

    Full Text Available The gene therapy field is currently limited by the lack of vehicles that permit efficient gene delivery to specific cell or tissue subsets. Native viral vector tropisms offer a powerful platform for transgene delivery but remain nonspecific, requiring elevated viral doses to achieve efficacy. In order to improve upon these strategies, our group has focused on genetically engineering targeting domains into viral capsid proteins, particularly those based on adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5. Our primary strategy is based on deletion of the fiber knob domain, to eliminate broad tissue specificity through the human coxsackie-and-adenovirus receptor (hCAR, with seamless incorporation of ligands to re-direct Ad tropism to cell types that express the cognate receptors. Previously, our group and others have demonstrated successful implementation of this strategy in order to specifically target Ad to a number of surface molecules expressed on immortalized cell lines. Here, we utilized phage biopanning to identify a myeloid cell-binding peptide (MBP, with the sequence WTLDRGY, and demonstrated that MBP can be successfully incorporated into a knob-deleted Ad5. The resulting virus, Ad.MBP, results in specific binding to primary myeloid cell types, as well as significantly higher transduction of these target populations ex vivo, compared to unmodified Ad5. These data are the first step in demonstrating Ad targeting to cell types associated with inflammatory disease.

  19. Post-transcriptional gene regulation by RNA-binding proteins in vascular endothelial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, HongBo; Deng, KeYu; Fu, MinGui

    2014-08-01

    Endothelial cell dysfunction is a term which implies the dysregulation of normal endothelial cell functions, including impairment of the barrier functions, control of vascular tone, disturbance of proliferative and migratory capacity of endothelial cells, as well as control of leukocyte trafficking. Endothelial dysfunction is an early step in vascular inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis, diabetic vascular complications, sepsis-induced or severe virus infection-induced organ injuries. The expressions of inflammatory cytokines and vascular adhesion molecules induced by various stimuli, such as modified lipids, smoking, advanced glycation end products and bacteria toxin, significantly contribute to the development of endothelial dysfunction. The transcriptional regulation of inflammatory cytokines and vascular adhesion molecules has been well-studied. However, the regulation of those gene expressions at post-transcriptional level is emerging. RNA-binding proteins have emerged as critical regulators of gene expression acting predominantly at the post-transcriptional level in microRNA-dependent or independent manners. This review summarizes the latest insights into the roles of RNA-binding proteins in controlling vascular endothelial cell functions and their contribution to the pathogenesis of vascular inflammatory diseases.

  20. Comparative sequence analysis of double stranded RNA binding protein encoding gene of parapoxviruses from Indian camels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Nagarajan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The dsRNA binding protein (RBP encoding gene of parapoxviruses (PPVs from the Dromedary camels, inhabitating different geographical region of Rajasthan, India were amplified by polymerase chain reaction using the primers of pseudocowpoxvirus (PCPV from Finnish reindeer and cloned into pGEM-T for sequence analysis. Analysis of RBP encoding gene revealed that PPV DNA from Bikaner shared 98.3% and 76.6% sequence identity at the amino acid level, with Pali and Udaipur PPV DNA, respectively. Reference strains of Bovine papular stomatitis virus (BPSV and PCPV (reindeer PCPV and human PCPV shared 52.8% and 86.9% amino acid identity with RBP gene of camel PPVs from Bikaner, respectively. But different strains of orf virus (ORFV from different geographical areas of the world shared 69.5–71.7% amino acid identity with RBP gene of camel PPVs from Bikaner. These findings indicate that the camel PPVs described are closely related to bovine PPV (PCPV in comparison to caprine and ovine PPV (ORFV.

  1. The calcium binding protein ALG-2 binds and stabilizes Scotin, a p53-inducible gene product localized at the endoplasmic reticulum membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Draeby, Ingrid; Woods, Yvonne L; la Cour, Jonas Marstrand

    2007-01-01

    ALG-2 (apoptosis linked gene 2 product) is a calcium binding protein for which no clear cellular function has been established. In this study we identified Scotin as a novel ALG-2 target protein containing 6 PXY and 4 PYP repeats, earlier identified in the ALG-2 binding regions of AIP1/ALIX and TSG......101, respectively. An in vitro synthesized C-terminal fragment of Scotin bound specifically to immobilized recombinant ALG-2 and tagged ALG-2 and Scotin were shown by immunoprecipitation to interact in MCF7 and U2OS cell lines. Furthermore ALG-2 bound to endogenous Scotin in extracts from mouse NIH3T3...

  2. Molecular cloning of MSSP-2, a c-myc gene single-strand binding protein: characterization of binding specificity and DNA replication activity.

    OpenAIRE

    Takai, Toshiki; Nishita, Yoshinori; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M. M.; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    1994-01-01

    We have previously reported the human cDNA encoding MSSP-1, a sequence-specific double- and single-stranded DNA binding protein [Negishi, Nishita, Saëgusa, Kakizaki, Galli, Kihara, Tamai, Miyajima, Iguchi-Ariga and Ariga (1994) Oncogene, 9, 1133-1143]. MSSP-1 binds to a DNA replication origin/transcriptional enhancer of the human c-myc gene and has turned out to be identical with Scr2, a human protein which complements the defect of cdc2 kinase in S.pombe [Kataoka and Nojima (1994) Nucleic Ac...

  3. A scallop IGF binding protein gene: molecular characterization and association of variants with growth traits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liying Feng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Scallops represent economically important aquaculture shellfish. The identification of genes and genetic variants related to scallop growth could benefit high-yielding scallop breeding. The insulin-like growth factor (IGF system is essential for growth and development, with IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs serving as the major regulators of IGF actions. Although an effect of IGF on growth was detected in bivalve, IGFBP has not been reported, and members of the IGF system have not been characterized in scallop. RESULTS: We cloned and characterized an IGFBP (PyIGFBP gene from the aquaculture bivalve species, Yesso scallop (Patinopecten yessoensis, Jay, 1857. Its full-length cDNA sequence was 1,445 bp, with an open reading frame of 378 bp, encoding 125 amino acids, and its genomic sequence was 10,193 bp, consisting of three exons and two introns. The amino acid sequence exhibited the characteristics of IGFBPs, including multiple cysteine residues and relatively conserved motifs in the N-terminal and C-terminal domains. Expression analysis indicated that PyIGFBP was expressed in all the tissues and developmental stages examined, with a significantly higher level in the mantle than in other tissues and a significantly higher level in gastrulae and trochophore larvae than in other stages. Furthermore, three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were identified in this gene. SNP c.1054A>G was significantly associated with both shell and soft body traits in two populations, with the highest trait values in GG type scallops and lowest in AG type ones. CONCLUSION: We cloned and characterized an IGFBP gene in a bivalve, and this report also represents the first characterizing an IGF system gene in scallops. A SNP associated with scallop growth for both the shell and soft body was identified in this gene. In addition to providing a candidate marker for scallop breeding, our results also suggest the role of PyIGFBP in scallop growth.

  4. The Odorant Binding Protein Gene Family from the Genome of Silkworm, Bombyx mori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Ping

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemosensory systems play key roles in the survival and reproductive success of insects. Insect chemoreception is mediated by two large and diverse gene superfamilies, chemoreceptors and odorant binding proteins (OBPs. OBPs are believed to transport hydrophobic odorants from the environment to the olfactory receptors. Results We identified a family of OBP-like genes in the silkworm genome and characterized their expression using oligonucleotide microarrays. A total of forty-four OBP genes were annotated, a number comparable to the 57 OBPs known from Anopheles gambiae and 51 from Drosophila melanogaster. As seen in other fully sequenced insect genomes, most silkworm OBP genes are present in large clusters. We defined six subfamilies of OBPs, each of which shows lineage-specific expansion and diversification. EST data and OBP expression profiles from multiple larvae tissues of day three fifth instars demonstrated that many OBPs are expressed in chemosensory-specific tissues although some OBPs are expressed ubiquitously and others exclusively in non-chemosensory tissues. Some atypical OBPs are expressed throughout development. These results reveal that, although many OBPs are chemosensory-specific, others may have more general physiological roles. Conclusion Silkworms possess a number of OBPs genes similar to other insects. Their expression profiles suggest that many OBPs may be involved in olfaction and gustation as well as general carriers of hydrophobic molecules. The expansion of OBP gene subfamilies and sequence divergence indicate that the silkworm OBP family acquired functional diversity concurrently with functional constraints. Further investigation of the OBPs of the silkworm could give insights in the roles of OBPs in chemoreception.

  5. Epoxide-mediated CifR repression of cif gene expression utilizes two binding sites in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballok, Alicia E; Bahl, Christopher D; Dolben, Emily L; Lindsay, Allia K; St Laurent, Jessica D; Hogan, Deborah A; Madden, Dean R; O'Toole, George A

    2012-10-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa secretes an epoxide hydrolase virulence factor that reduces the apical membrane expression of ABC transporters such as the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). This virulence factor, named CFTR inhibitory factor (Cif), is regulated by a TetR-family, epoxide-responsive repressor known as CifR via direct binding and repression. We identified two sites of CifR binding in the intergenic space between cifR and morB, the first gene in the operon containing the cif gene. We have mapped these binding sites and found they are 27 bp in length, and they overlap the -10 and +1 sites of both the cifR and morB regulatory region and the start of transcription, respectively. In addition, we found that CifR binds to each repression site with differing affinity. Mutagenesis of these binding sites resulted in a loss of DNA binding in vitro, and mutation of one of these sites in vivo resulted in an increase in transcription of both the cif and cifR genes. We characterized cif and cifR gene expression in sputum and found that, whereas cif gene expression varied relative to an in vitro coculture control, cifR gene expression was consistently higher. Analysis of a longitudinal sample of CF isolates from nine patients revealed that Cif protein was expressed over time, although variably, and these changes could not be linked to mutations in the cifR gene or the promoters of these genes. Finally, we tested CifR responsiveness to other epoxides and showed that CifR can respond to multiple epoxides to various degrees.

  6. Discovery of inhibitors of aberrant gene transcription from Libraries of DNA binding molecules: inhibition of LEF-1-mediated gene transcription and oncogenic transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stover, James S; Shi, Jin; Jin, Wei; Vogt, Peter K; Boger, Dale L

    2009-03-11

    The screening of a >9000 compound library of synthetic DNA binding molecules for selective binding to the consensus sequence of the transcription factor LEF-1 followed by assessment of the candidate compounds in a series of assays that characterized functional activity (disruption of DNA-LEF-1 binding) at the intended target and site (inhibition of intracellular LEF-1-mediated gene transcription) resulting in a desired phenotypic cellular change (inhibit LEF-1-driven cell transformation) provided two lead compounds: lefmycin-1 and lefmycin-2. The sequence of screens defining the approach assures that activity in the final functional assay may be directly related to the inhibition of gene transcription and DNA binding properties of the identified molecules. Central to the implementation of this generalized approach to the discovery of DNA binding small molecule inhibitors of gene transcription was (1) the use of a technically nondemanding fluorescent intercalator displacement (FID) assay for initial assessment of the DNA binding affinity and selectivity of a library of compounds for any sequence of interest, and (2) the technology used to prepare a sufficiently large library of DNA binding compounds.

  7. Neighboring genes for DNA-binding proteins rescue male sterility in Drosophila hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liénard, Marjorie A; Araripe, Luciana O; Hartl, Daniel L

    2016-07-19

    Crosses between closely related animal species often result in male hybrids that are sterile, and the molecular and functional basis of genetic factors for hybrid male sterility is of great interest. Here, we report a molecular and functional analysis of HMS1, a region of 9.2 kb in chromosome 3 of Drosophila mauritiana, which results in virtually complete hybrid male sterility when homozygous in the genetic background of sibling species Drosophila simulans. The HMS1 region contains two strong candidate genes for the genetic incompatibility, agt and Taf1 Both encode unrelated DNA-binding proteins, agt for an alkyl-cysteine-S-alkyltransferase and Taf1 for a subunit of transcription factor TFIID that serves as a multifunctional transcriptional regulator. The contribution of each gene to hybrid male sterility was assessed by means of germ-line transformation, with constructs containing complete agt and Taf1 genomic sequences as well as various chimeric constructs. Both agt and Taf1 contribute about equally to HMS1 hybrid male sterility. Transgenes containing either locus rescue sterility in about one-half of the males, and among fertile males the number of offspring is in the normal range. This finding suggests compensatory proliferation of the rescued, nondysfunctional germ cells. Results with chimeric transgenes imply that the hybrid incompatibilities result from interactions among nucleotide differences residing along both agt and Taf1 Our results challenge a number of preliminary generalizations about the molecular and functional basis of hybrid male sterility, and strongly reinforce the role of DNA-binding proteins as a class of genes contributing to the maintenance of postzygotic reproductive isolation.

  8. Cutting Edge: Allele-specific and peptide-dependent interactions between KIR3DL1 and HLA-A and HLA-B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thananchai, Hathairat; Gillespie, Geraldine; Martin, Maureen P; Bashirova, Arman; Yawata, Nobuyo; Yawata, Makoto; Easterbrook, Philippa; McVicar, Daniel W; Maenaka, Katsumi; Parham, Peter; Carrington, Mary; Dong, Tao; Rowland-Jones, Sarah

    2007-01-01

    Although it is clear that KIR3DL1 recognizes Bw4(+) HLA-B, the role of Bw4(+) HLA-A allotypes as KIR3DL1 ligands is controversial. We therefore examined the binding of tetrameric HLA-A and -B complexes, including HLA*2402, a common Bw4(+) HLA-A allotype, to KIR3DL1*001, *005, *007, and *1502 allotypes. Only Bw4(+) tetramers bound KIR3DL1. Three of four HLA-A*2402 tetramers bound one or more KIR3DL1 allotypes and all four KIR3DL1 allotypes bound to one or more HLA-A*2402 tetramers, but with different binding specificities. Only KIR3DL1*005 bound both HLA-A*2402 and HLA-B*5703 tetramers. HLA-A*2402-expressing target cells were resistant to lysis by NK cells expressing KIR3DL1*001 or *005. This study shows that HLA-A*2402 is a ligand for KIR3DL1 and demonstrates how the binding of KIR3DL1 to Bw4(+) ligands depends upon the bound peptide as well as HLA and KIR3DL1 polymorphism.

  9. Role of intrinsic DNA binding specificity in defining target genes of the mammalian transcription factor PDX1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberzon, Arthur; Ridner, Gabriela; Walker, Michael D.

    2004-01-01

    PDX1 is a homeodomain transcription factor essential for pancreatic development and mature beta cell function. Homeodomain proteins typically recognize short TAAT DNA motifs in vitro: this binding displays paradoxically low specificity and affinity, given the extremely high specificity of action of these proteins in vivo. To better understand how PDX1 selects target genes in vivo, we have examined the interaction of PDX1 with natural and artificial binding sites. Comparison of PDX1 binding sites in several target promoters revealed an evolutionarily conserved pattern of nucleotides flanking the TAAT core. Using competitive in vitro DNA binding assays, we defined three groups of binding sites displaying high, intermediate and low affinity. Transfection experiments revealed a striking correlation between the ability of each sequence to activate transcription in cultured beta cells, and its ability to bind PDX1 in vitro. Site selection from a pool of oligonucleotides (sequence NNNTAATNNN) revealed a non-random preference for particular nucleotides at the flanking locations, resembling natural PDX1 binding sites. Taken together, the data indicate that the intrinsic DNA binding specificity of PDX1, in particular the bases adjacent to TAAT, plays an important role in determining the spectrum of target genes. PMID:14704343

  10. Prolactin regulatory element-binding protein is involved in suppression of the adiponectin gene in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X Z; Imachi, H; Lyu, J Y; Fukunaga, K; Sato, S; Ibata, T; Kobayashi, T; Yoshimoto, T; Kikuchi, F; Dong, T; Murao, K

    2017-04-01

    Prolactin regulatory element-binding protein (PREB), a member of the WD-repeat protein family, has been recognized as a transcriptional factor that regulates prolactin promoter activity in the anterior pituitary of rats. PREB is expressed not only in the pituitary but also in various other tissues, including the adipose tissue. Previous studies have shown that PREB acts as a transcriptional regulator and suppresses the expression of the adiponectin gene in cultured 3T3L1 preadipocytes. The aim of this study was to further examine the potential role of PREB in adipose tissue in vivo. Transgenic mice that overexpressing PREB (PREB transgenic mice) were generated. Insulin resistance was evaluated in PREB transgenic mice using glucose and insulin tolerance tests. Adiponectin expression in the adipose tissue was examined by western blot analysis and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The expression levels of stearoyl-CoA desaturase (Scd) and adiponectin receptor 2(ADIPOR2) were quantified by qPCR. Glucose and insulin tolerance tests revealed insulin resistance in PREB transgenic mice. Serum adiponectin and leptin concentrations were decreased. Adiponectin gene expression was decreased in the adipose tissue, which was confirmed by the downregulation of the adiponectin-dependent hepatic Scd gene and upregulation of the ADIPOR2 gene in the liver of PREB transgenic mice. We also found that pioglitazone, an agonist for the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-r, improved the insulin resistance in the PREB transgenic mice after a 10-day feeding period. These results demonstrated that PREB might contribute to the regulation of adiponectin gene expression in vivo.

  11. Epigenetic silencing of the XAF1 gene is mediated by the loss of CTCF binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victoria-Acosta, Georgina; Vazquez-Santillan, Karla; Jimenez-Hernandez, Luis; Muñoz-Galindo, Laura; Maldonado, Vilma; Martinez-Ruiz, Gustavo Ulises; Melendez-Zajgla, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    XAF1 is a tumour suppressor gene that compromises cell viability by modulating different cellular events such as mitosis, cell cycle progression and apoptosis. In cancer, the XAF1 gene is commonly silenced by CpG-dinucleotide hypermethylation of its promoter. DNA demethylating agents induce transcriptional reactivation of XAF1, sensitizing cancer cells to therapy. The molecular mechanisms that mediate promoter CpG methylation have not been previously studied. Here, we demonstrate that CTCF interacts with the XAF1 promoter in vivo in a methylation-sensitive manner. By transgene assays, we demonstrate that CTCF mediates the open-chromatin configuration of the XAF1 promoter, inhibiting both CpG-dinucleotide methylation and repressive histone posttranslational modifications. In addition, the absence of CTCF in the XAF1 promoter inhibits transcriptional activation induced by well-known apoptosis activators. We report for the first time that epigenetic silencing of the XAF1 gene is a consequence of the loss of CTCF binding. PMID:26443201

  12. KIT mutations confer a distinct gene expression signature in core binding factor leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lück, Sonja C; Russ, Annika C; Du, Juan; Gaidzik, Verena; Schlenk, Richard F; Pollack, Jonathan R; Döhner, Konstanze; Döhner, Hartmut; Bullinger, Lars

    2010-03-01

    Core binding factor (CBF) leukaemias, characterized by either inv(16)(p13.1q22) or t(8;21)(q22;q22), constitute acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) subgroups with favourable prognosis. However, 40-50% of patients relapse, emphasizing the need for risk-adapted treatment approaches. In this regard, studying secondary genetic aberrations, such as mutations of the KIT gene, is of great interest, particularly as they can be targeted by receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI). However, so far little is known about the biology underlying KIT-mutated CBF leukaemias. We analysed gene expression profiles of 83 CBF AML cases with known KIT mutation status in order to gain novel insights in KIT-mutated CBF pathogenesis. KIT-mutated cases were characterized by deregulation of genes belonging to the NFkB signalling complex suggesting impaired control of apoptosis. Notably, a subgroup of KIT wildtype cases was also characterized by the KIT mutation signature due to yet unknown aberrations. Our data suggest that this CBF leukaemia subgroup might profit from TKI therapy, however, the relevance of the KIT mutation-associated signature remains to be validated prior to clinical implementation. Nevertheless, the existence of such a signature supports the notion of relevant biological differences in CBF leukaemia and might serve as diagnostic tool in the future.

  13. Update of the human secretoglobin (SCGB gene superfamily and an example of 'evolutionary bloom' of androgen-binding protein genes within the mouse Scgb gene superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson Brian C

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The secretoglobins (SCGBs comprise a family of small, secreted proteins found in animals exclusively of mammalian lineage. There are 11 human SCGB genes and five pseudogenes. Interestingly, mice have 68 Scgb genes, four of which are highly orthologous to human SCGB genes; the remainder represent an 'evolutionary bloom' and make up a large gene family represented by only six counterparts in humans. SCGBs are found in high concentrations in many mammalian secretions, including fluids of the lung, lacrimal gland, salivary gland, prostate and uterus. Whereas the biological activities of most individual SCGBs have not been fully characterised, what already has been discovered suggests that this family has an important role in the modulation of inflammation, tissue repair and tumorigenesis. In mice, the large Scgb1b and Scgb2b gene families encode the androgen-binding proteins, which have been shown to play a role in mate selection. Although much has been learned about SCGBs in recent years, clearly more research remains to be done to allow a better understanding of the roles of these proteins in human health and disease. Such information is predicted to reveal valuable novel drug targets for the treatment of inflammation, as well as designing biomarkers that might identify tissue damage or cancer.

  14. Microarray analysis of E-box binding-related gene expression in young and replicatively senescent human fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semov, Alexandre; Marcotte, Richard; Semova, Natalie; Ye, Xiangyun; Wang, Eugenia

    2002-03-01

    An E-box (CACGTG) designer microarray was developed to monitor a group of genes whose expressions share a particular regulatory mode. Sensitivity and specificity of microarray hybridization, as well as variability of microarray data, were evaluated. This designer microarray was used to generate expression profiles of E-box binding-related genes in WI-38 fibroblast cultures at three different growth states: low-passage replicating, low-passage contact-inhibited quiescent, and replicatively senescent. Microarray gene screening reveals that quiescent and senescent cells, in comparison with replicating ones, are characterized by downregulation of Pam, a protein associated with c-Myc, and upregulation of Mad family genes, Max dimerization proteins. Moreover, quiescence and senescence can be distinguished by increased expression of Irlb, c-Myc transcription factor, and Miz-1, c-Myc-interacting Zn finger protein 1, only in the former state. Senescence is characterized by downregulation of Id4, inhibitor of DNA binding 4, and Mitf, microphthalmia-associated transcription factor, in comparison with young replicating and quiescent states. Differential expression of genes detected by microarray hybridization was independently confirmed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction technique. Alterations in the expression of E-box-binding transcription factors and c-Myc-binding proteins demonstrate the importance of these genes in establishing the contact-inhibited quiescent or senescent phenotypes.

  15. SSX2 is a novel DNA-binding protein that antagonizes polycomb group body formation and gene repression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, Morten; Greve, Katrine Buch Vidén; Møller, Jesper Bonnet

    G target genes. SSX2 further negatively regulates the level of the PcG-associated histone mark H3K27me3 in melanoma cells, and there is a clear inverse correlation between SSX2/3 expression and H3K27me3 in spermatogenesis. SSX2 does not affect the overall composition and stability of PcG complexes, but SSX......2-mediated derepression of the PcG target gene ATF3 is associated with widespread binding of SSX2 to this gene and a reduction in BMI1 and histone H3K27me3 at the proximal promoter. SSX2 binds double-stranded DNA in a sequence non-specific manner, suggesting that it modulates PcG activity through...... direct chromatin binding. Our results implicate SSX2 in regulation of chromatin structure and function....

  16. Regulatory elements in the promoter region of the rat gene encoding the acyl-CoA-binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elholm, M; Bjerking, G; Knudsen, J

    1996-01-01

    Acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) is an ubiquitously expressed 10-kDa protein which is present in high amounts in cells involved in solute transport or secretion. Rat ACBP is encoded by a gene containing the typical hallmarks of a housekeeping gene. Analysis of the promoter region of the rat ACBP...... gene by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) revealed specific binding of proteins from rat liver nuclear extracts to potential recognition sequences of NF-1/CTF, Sp1, AP-1, C/EBP and HNF-3. In addition, specific binding to a DR-1 type element was observed. By using in vitro translated...... for the ACBP DR-1 element. Addition of peroxisome proliferators (PP) to H4IIEC3 rat hepatoma cells led to an increase in the ACBP mRNA level, indicating that the DR-1 element could be a functional peroxisome proliferator responsive element (PPRE). Analysis of the ACBP promoter by transient transfection showed...

  17. Comparative mapping of the actin-binding protein 280 genes in human and mouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gariboldi, M.; Canzian, F.; Manenti, G.; De Gregorio, L. (Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan (Italy)); Maestrini, E.; Rivella, S. (Istituto di Genetica Biochimica ed Evoluzionistica, Pavia (Italy)); Chatterjee, A.; Herman, G.E. (Universita di Bari (Italy)); Archidiacono, N.; Antonacci, R. (Institute for Molecular Genetics, Houston, TX (United States)) (and others)

    1994-05-15

    Two genes encode actin-binding protein 280 isoforms. ABP-280 or filamin (FLN1) is present in the cytoskeleton of many cell types, whereas expression of FLN2 is limited to skeletal muscle and heart. FLN1 maps to human chromosome Xq28, and, by physical mapping in YAC clones, the authors have mapped the homologous murine locus (Fln1) to mouse chromosome X, in a region of syntenic homology with human chromosome X. They mapped FLN2 to human chromosome 7q32-q35 by analysis of somatic cell hybrids containing portions of chromosome 7, and, by using a mapping panel from an interspecific murine cross, they mapped the corresponding murine locus (Fln2) to murine chromosome 6 in a region homologous to human chromosome 7. 21 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  18. Comparative mapping of the actin-binding protein 280 genes in human and mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gariboldi, M; Maestrini, E; Canzian, F; Manenti, G; De Gregorio, L; Rivella, S; Chatterjee, A; Herman, G E; Archidiacono, N; Antonacci, R

    1994-05-15

    Two genes encode actin-binding protein 280 isoforms. ABP-280 or filamin (FLN1) is present in the cytoskeleton of many cell types, whereas expression of FLN2 is limited to skeletal muscle and heart. FLN1 maps to human chromosome Xq28, and, by physical mapping in YAC clones, we have mapped the homologous murine locus (Fln1) to mouse chromosome X, in a region of syntenic homology with human chromosome X. We mapped FLN2 to human chromosome 7q32-q35 by analysis of somatic cell hybrids containing portions of chromosome 7, and, by using a mapping panel from an interspecific murine cross, we mapped the corresponding murine locus (Fln2) to murine chromosome 6 in a region homologous to human chromosome 7.

  19. Pituitary tumor-transforming gene and its binding factor in endocrine cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Vicki E; Franklyn, Jayne A; McCabe, Christopher J

    2010-12-03

    The pituitary tumor-transforming gene (PTTG1) encodes a multifunctional protein (PTTG) that is overexpressed in numerous tumours, including pituitary, thyroid, breast and ovarian carcinomas. PTTG induces cellular transformation in vitro and tumourigenesis in vivo, and several mechanisms by which PTTG contributes to tumourigenesis have been investigated. Also known as the human securin, PTTG is involved in cell cycle regulation, controlling the segregation of sister chromatids during mitosis. This review outlines current information regarding PTTG structure, expression, regulation and function in the pathogenesis of neoplasia. Recent progress concerning the use of PTTG as a prognostic marker or therapeutic target will be considered. In addition, the PTTG binding factor (PBF), identified through its interaction with PTTG, has also been established as a proto-oncogene that is upregulated in several cancers. Current knowledge regarding PBF is outlined and its role both independently and alongside PTTG in endocrine and related cancers is discussed.

  20. Allele-Specific Chromatin Remodeling in the ZPBP2/GSDMB/ORMDL3 Locus Associated with the Risk of Asthma and Autoimmune Disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Verlaan, Dominique J; Berlivet, Soizik; Hunninghake, Gary M; Madore, Anne-Marie; Larivière, Mathieu; Moussette, Sanny; Grundberg, Elin; Kwan, Tony; Ouimet, Manon; Ge, Bing; Hoberman, Rose; Swiatek, Marcin; Dias, Joana; Lam, Kevin C.L; Koka, Vonda; Harmsen, Eef; Soto-Quiros, Manuel; Avila, Lydiana; Celedón, Juan C; Weiss, Scott T; Dewar, Ken; Sinnett, Daniel; Laprise, Catherine; Raby, Benjamin A; Pastinen, Tomi; Naumova, Anna K

    2009-01-01

    ... level of the ORM1-like 3 ( S. cerevisiae ) ( ORMDL3 ) gene 4 (MIM 611403 ). Furthermore, one SNP (rs7216389) based on evolutionary conservation was highlighted as the potential causal variant. To date, several other studies have replicated this association for adult asthma in different ethnic groups. 5–8 The rs7216389 SNP is found within a large CEU (C...

  1. Allele-specific cancer cell killing in vitro and in vivo targeting a single-nucleotide polymorphism in POLR2A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O.R.F. Mook; F. Baas; M.B. de Wissel; K. Fluiter

    2009-01-01

    Cancer is one of the diseases for which RNA interference is a potential therapeutic approach. Genes involved in the promotion or maintenance of tumor growth are obvious targets for RNAi. RNAi is also considered an attractive additional approach to conventional chemotherapy for cancer treatment. More

  2. Effects of gene carrier polyethyleneimines on the structure and binding capability of bovine serum albumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhiyong; Kong, Zhijie; Wei, Yanshan; Li, Hua; Wang, Yajing; Huang, Aimin; Ma, Lin

    2017-02-01

    Polyethyleneimine (PEI), one of the most effective non-viral gene carriers, is also cytotoxic, however the molecular basis is poorly understood. Little is known about the effects of PEI on the structure and functions of the biomacromolecules. In this work, fluorescence, UV-vis absorption, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and zeta-potential measurement were conducted to reveal the interaction between PEIs (average molecular weight 25, 10 and 1.8 kDa) and bovine serum albumin (BSA), and to evaluate the effects on the conformation of BSA as long as its binding capability to the model compounds, 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid (ANS) and quercetin. PEIs were found to complex with BSA and induced a conformational change of the protein by a major reduction of α-helix at PEI concentration protein. The polymer size played an important role in PEI-BSA interaction. PEI of higher molecular weight was more favorable to interact with BSA and more efficient to perturb the conformation and binding capability of the protein.

  3. Diazepam binding inhibitor gene expression: Location in brain and peripheral tissues of rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alho, H.; Fremeau, R.T. Jr.; Tiedge, H.; Wilcox, J.; Bovolin, P.; Brosius, J.; Roberts, J.L.; Costa, E.

    1988-09-01

    Diazepam binding inhibitor (DBI), an endogenous 10-kDa polypeptide was isolated from rat and human brain by monitoring displacement of radioactive diazepam bound to specific recognition sites in brain synaptic and mitochondrial membranes. The cellular location of DBI mRNA was studied in rat brain and selected peripheral tissues by in situ hybridization histochemistry with a /sup 35/S-labeled single-stranded complementary RNA probe. DBI mRNA was heterogeneously distributed in rat brain, with particularly high levels in the area postrema, the cerebellar cortex, and ependyma of the third ventricle. Intermediate levels were found in the olfactory bulb, pontine nuclei, inferior colliculi, arcuate nucleus, and pineal gland. Relatively low but significant levels of silver grains were observed overlying many mesencephalic and telencephalic areas that have previously been shown to contain numerous DBI-immunoreactive neurons and a high density of central benzodiazepine receptors. In situ hybridizations also revealed high levels of DBI mRNA in the posterior lobe of the pituitary gland, liver, and germinal center of the white pulp of spleen, all tissues that are rich in peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites. The tissue-specific pattern of DBI gene expression described here could be exploited to further understand the physiological function of DBI in the brain and periphery.

  4. Crystal structure of the DNA-binding domain of Myelin-gene Regulatory Factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Xiangkai; Li, Bowen; Hu, Fen; Yan, Shufeng; Meloni, Gabriele; Li, Huiliang; Shi, Ning

    2017-06-16

    Myelin-gene Regulatory Factor (MyRF) is one of the master transcription factors controlling myelin formation and development in oligodendrocytes which is crucial for the powerful brain functions. The N-terminal of MyRF, which contains a proline-rich region and a DNA binding domain (DBD), is auto-cleaved from the ER membrane, and then enters the nucleus to participate in transcription regulation of the myelin genes. Here we report the crystal structure of MyRF DBD. It shows an Ig-fold like architecture which consists of two antiparallel β-sheets with 7 main strands, packing against each other, forming a β-sandwich. Compared to its homolog, Ndt80, MyRF has a smaller and less complex DBD lacking the helices and the big loops outside the core. Structural alignment reveals that MyRF DBD possess less interaction sites with DNA than Ndt80 and may bind only at the major groove of DNA. Moreover, the structure reveals a trimeric assembly, agreeing with the previous report that MyRF DBD functions as a trimer. The mutant that we designed based on the structure disturbed trimer formation, but didn't affect the auto-cleavage reaction. It demonstrates that the activation of self-cleavage reaction of MyRF is independent of the presence of its N-terminal DBD homotrimer. The structure reported here will help to understand the molecular mechanism underlying the important roles of MyRF in myelin formation and development.

  5. Human Sterol Regulatory Element-Binding Protein 1a Contributes Significantly to Hepatic Lipogenic Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Bitter

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP 1, the master regulator of lipogenesis, was shown to be associated with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, which is attributed to its major isoform SREBP1c. Based on studies in mice, the minor isoform SREBP1a is regarded as negligible for hepatic lipogenesis. This study aims to elucidate the expression and functional role of SREBP1a in human liver. Methods: mRNA expression of both isoforms was quantified in cohorts of human livers and primary human hepatocytes. Hepatocytes were treated with PF-429242 to inhibit the proteolytic activation of SREBP precursor protein. SREBP1a-specifc and pan-SREBP1 knock-down were performed by transfection of respective siRNAs. Lipogenic SREBP-target gene expression was analyzed by real-time RT-PCR. Results: In human liver, SREBP1a accounts for up to half of the total SREBP1 pool. Treatment with PF-429242 indicated SREBP-dependent auto-regulation of SREBP1a, which however was much weaker than of SREBP1c. SREBP1a-specifc knock-down also reduced significantly the expression of SREBP1c and of SREBP-target genes. Regarding most SREBP-target genes, simultaneous knock-down of both isoforms resulted in effects of only similar extent as SREBP1a-specific knock-down. Conclusion: We here showed that SREBP1a is significantly contributing to the human hepatic SREBP1 pool and has a share in human hepatic lipogenic gene expression.

  6. Stable Binding of the Conserved Transcription Factor Grainy Head to its Target Genes Throughout Drosophila melanogaster Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevil, Markus; Bondra, Eliana R; Schulz, Katharine N; Kaplan, Tommy; Harrison, Melissa M

    2017-02-01

    It has been suggested that transcription factor binding is temporally dynamic, and that changes in binding determine transcriptional output. Nonetheless, this model is based on relatively few examples in which transcription factor binding has been assayed at multiple developmental stages. The essential transcription factor Grainy head (Grh) is conserved from fungi to humans, and controls epithelial development and barrier formation in numerous tissues. Drosophila melanogaster, which possess a single grainy head (grh) gene, provide an excellent system to study this conserved factor. To determine whether temporally distinct binding events allow Grh to control cell fate specification in different tissue types, we used a combination of ChIP-seq and RNA-seq to elucidate the gene regulatory network controlled by Grh during four stages of embryonic development (spanning stages 5-17) and in larval tissue. Contrary to expectations, we discovered that Grh remains bound to at least 1146 genomic loci over days of development. In contrast to this stable DNA occupancy, the subset of genes whose expression is regulated by Grh varies. Grh transitions from functioning primarily as a transcriptional repressor early in development to functioning predominantly as an activator later. Our data reveal that Grh binds to target genes well before the Grh-dependent transcriptional program commences, suggesting it sets the stage for subsequent recruitment of additional factors that execute stage-specific Grh functions. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  7. Prediction of DNA binding motifs from 3D models of transcription factors; identifying TLX3 regulated genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujato, Mario; Kieken, Fabien; Skiles, Amanda A; Tapinos, Nikos; Fiser, Andras

    2014-12-16

    Proper cell functioning depends on the precise spatio-temporal expression of its genetic material. Gene expression is controlled to a great extent by sequence-specific transcription factors (TFs). Our current knowledge on where and how TFs bind and associate to regulate gene expression is incomplete. A structure-based computational algorithm (TF2DNA) is developed to identify binding specificities of TFs. The method constructs homology models of TFs bound to DNA and assesses the relative binding affinity for all possible DNA sequences using a knowledge-based potential, after optimization in a molecular mechanics force field. TF2DNA predictions were benchmarked against experimentally determined binding motifs. Success rates range from 45% to 81% and primarily depend on the sequence identity of aligned target sequences and template structures, TF2DNA was used to predict 1321 motifs for 1825 putative human TF proteins, facilitating the reconstruction of most of the human gene regulatory network. As an illustration, the predicted DNA binding site for the poorly characterized T-cell leukemia homeobox 3 (TLX3) TF was confirmed with gel shift assay experiments. TLX3 motif searches in human promoter regions identified a group of genes enriched in functions relating to hematopoiesis, tissue morphology, endocrine system and connective tissue development and function. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. Expression cloning and characterization of a novel gene that encodes the RNA-binding protein FAU-1 from Pyrococcus furiosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanai, Akio; Oida, Hanako; Matsuura, Nana; Doi, Hirofumi

    2003-05-15

    We systematically screened a genomic DNA library to identify proteins of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus using an expression cloning method. One gene product, which we named FAU-1 (P. furiosus AU-binding), demonstrated the strongest binding activity of all the genomic library-derived proteins tested against an AU-rich RNA sequence. The protein was purified to near homogeneity as a 54 kDa single polypeptide, and the gene locus corresponding to this FAU-1 activity was also sequenced. The FAU-1 gene encoded a 472-amino-acid protein that was characterized by highly charged domains consisting of both acidic and basic amino acids. The N-terminal half of the gene had a degree of similarity (25%) with RNase E from Escherichia coli. Five rounds of RNA-binding-site selection and footprinting analysis showed that the FAU-1 protein binds specifically to the AU-rich sequence in a loop region of a possible RNA ligand. Moreover, we demonstrated that the FAU-1 protein acts as an oligomer, and mainly as a trimer. These results showed that the FAU-1 protein is a novel heat-stable protein with an RNA loop-binding characteristic.

  9. 等位基因特异性引物延伸法在婴儿型和幼儿型神经元蜡样质脂褐质沉积病产前诊断中的应用%Prenatal diagnostic testing for infantile and late-infantile neuronal ceroid lipofusinoses (NCL) using allele specific primer extension (ASPE)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nanbert ZHONG; Weina JU; Dorota MOROZIEWICZ; Anetta WRONSKA; Marilyn LI; Krystyna WISNIEWSKI; Susan Sklower BROOKS; Edmund JENKINS; W. Ted BROWN

    2005-01-01

    SUMMARY Infantile (INCL, NCL1) and late-infantile (LINCL, NCL2) neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses have been found to result from genetic deficiency of genes CLN1 and CLN2, respectively. The application of molecular analyses can facilitate prenatal diagnosis for families affected by NCL1 or NCL2, in which the familial mutation(s) have been identified. Molecular testing with allele-specific primer extension and DNA sequencing was performed in nine pregnancies, four from two NCL1 families and five from five NCL2 families. Lysosomal enzyme activity assays were carried out as well.Four fetuses from three pregnancies in NCL1 families were found to be carriers for a mutation 451C-T in the CLN1 gene and one was normal. Prenatal testing of three NCL2 families who carried mutation R208X in the CLN2 gene showed that all fetuses were carriers. In NCL2 families who carried either mutation IVS5-1C or/and IVS5-1A two normal pregnancies were detected. Our studies indicate that DNA testing, which may provide definitive prenatal diagnosis for NCL, may be used in combination with lysosomal enzyme activity analyses.

  10. Multilocus sequence typing analysis of Streptococcus mutans strains with the cnm gene encoding collagen-binding adhesin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapirattanakul, Jinthana; Nakano, Kazuhiko; Nomura, Ryota; Leelataweewud, Pattarawadee; Chalermsarp, Narumon; Klaophimai, Arthit; Srisatjaluk, Ratchapin; Hamada, Shigeyuki; Ooshima, Takashi

    2011-11-01

    Streptococcus mutans is one of the oral pathogens associated with infective endocarditis (IE). With respect to bacterial binding ability to the extracellular matrix, the Cnm protein, a cell surface collagen-binding adhesin of S. mutans, is known as one of the possible virulence factors with regard to IE. In this study, we aimed to determine the distribution of the cnm gene, which encodes Cnm, in a large number of clinical isolates of S. mutans from Thai subjects. Then, the cnm-positive strains were classified using a multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme, which we constructed previously. In addition, the data were analysed together with our previous MLST data of cnm-positive strains from Japan and Finland in order to evaluate the clonal relationship among S. mutans strains harbouring the cnm gene. The cnm gene was detected in 12.4 % of all 750 Thai isolates, and serotype f showed the highest rate of detection (54.5 %). According to the MLST data, two clonal complex groups were revealed as the important clones related to cnm-positive S. mutans from various origins of isolation. Moreover, the collagen-binding properties of S. mutans strains with the cnm gene were significantly greater than those of strains without the gene, although four cnm-negative strains classified into two sequence types (STs), ST110 and ST136, showed extremely high collagen-binding rates suggesting the presence of additional genes involved with collagen binding in these STs. Taken together, these results provided information on both epidemiological as well as evolutional aspects of S. mutans possessing the cnm gene.

  11. AtMBD6, a methyl CpG binding domain protein, maintains gene silencing in Arabidopsis by interacting with RNA binding proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ADWAITA PRASAD PARIDA; AMRAPALI SHARMA; ARUN KUMAR SHARMA

    2017-03-01

    DNA methylation, mediated by double-stranded RNA, is a conserved epigenetic phenomenon that protects a genome fromtransposons, silences unwanted genes and has a paramount function in plant or animal development. Methyl CpG bindingdomain proteins are members of a class of proteins that bind tomethylated DNA. The Arabidopsis thaliana genome encodes13 methyl CpG binding domain (MBD) proteins, but themolecular/biological functions of most of these proteins are still notclear. In the present study, we identified four proteins that interact with AtMBD6. Interestingly, three of them contain RNAbinding domains and are co-localized with AtMBD6 in the nucleus. The interacting partners includes AtRPS2C (a 40Sribosomal protein), AtNTF2 (nuclear transport factor 2) and AtAGO4 (Argonoute 4). The fourth protein that physicallyinteracts with AtMBD6 is a histone-modifying enzyme, histone deacetylase 6 (AtHDA6), which is a known component ofthe RNA-mediated gene silencing system. Analysis of genomic DNA methylation in the atmbd6, atrps2c and atntf2mutants, using methylation-sensitive PCR detected decreased DNA methylation at miRNA/siRNA producing loci,pseudogenes and other targets of RNA-directed DNA methylation. Our results indicate that AtMBD6 is involved inRNA-mediated gene silencing and it binds to RNA binding proteins like AtRPS2C, AtAGO4 and AtNTF2. AtMBD6 alsointeracts with histone deacetylase AtHDA6 that might have a role in chromatin condensation at the targets of RdDM.

  12. Immune response to dna vaccine expressing transferrin binding protein a gene of Pasteurella multocida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satparkash Singh

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Haemorrhagic Septicaemia (HS, an acute and fatal disease of cattle and buffalo is primarily caused by serotype B:2 or E:2 of Pasteurella multocida. The transferrin binding protein A (TbpA has been found to act as immunogen and potent vaccine candidate in various Gram negative bacteria including P. multocida. The present study was carried out to evaluate the potential of this antigen as a DNA vaccine against HS in mice model. The tbpA gene of P. multocida serotype B:2 was cloned in a mammalian expression vector alone and along with murine IL2 gene as immunological adjuvant to produce monocistronic and bicistronic DNA vaccine constructs, respectively. The immune response to DNA vaccines was evaluated based on serum antibody titres and lymphocyte proliferation assay. A significant increase in humoral and cell mediated immune responses was observed in mice vaccinated with DNA vaccines as compared to non immunized group. Additionally, the bicistronic DNA vaccine provided superior immune response and protection level following challenge as compared to monocistronic construct. The study revealed that DNA vaccine presents a promising approach for the prevention of HS.

  13. Immune response to dna vaccine expressing transferrin binding protein a gene of Pasteurella multocida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Satparkash; Singh, Vijendra Pal; Cheema, Pawanjit Singh; Sandey, Maninder; Ranjan, Rajeev; Gupta, Santosh Kumar; Sharma, Bhaskar

    2011-04-01

    Haemorrhagic Septicaemia (HS), an acute and fatal disease of cattle and buffalo is primarily caused by serotype B:2 or E:2 of Pasteurella multocida. The transferrin binding protein A (TbpA) has been found to act as immunogen and potent vaccine candidate in various Gram negative bacteria including P. multocida. The present study was carried out to evaluate the potential of this antigen as a DNA vaccine against HS in mice model. The tbpA gene of P. multocida serotype B:2 was cloned in a mammalian expression vector alone and along with murine IL2 gene as immunological adjuvant to produce monocistronic and bicistronic DNA vaccine constructs, respectively. The immune response to DNA vaccines was evaluated based on serum antibody titres and lymphocyte proliferation assay. A significant increase in humoral and cell mediated immune responses was observed in mice vaccinated with DNA vaccines as compared to non immunized group. Additionally, the bicistronic DNA vaccine provided superior immune response and protection level following challenge as compared to monocistronic construct. The study revealed that DNA vaccine presents a promising approach for the prevention of HS.

  14. Functional analysis of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporter gene family of Tribolium castaneum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Broehan Gunnar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters belong to a large superfamily of proteins that have important physiological functions in all living organisms. Most are integral membrane proteins that transport a broad spectrum of substrates across lipid membranes. In insects, ABC transporters are of special interest because of their role in insecticide resistance. Results We have identified 73 ABC transporter genes in the genome of T. castaneum, which group into eight subfamilies (ABCA-H. This coleopteran ABC family is significantly larger than those reported for insects in other taxonomic groups. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that this increase is due to gene expansion within a single clade of subfamily ABCC. We performed an RNA interference (RNAi screen to study the function of ABC transporters during development. In ten cases, injection of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA into larvae caused developmental phenotypes, which included growth arrest and localized melanization, eye pigmentation defects, abnormal cuticle formation, egg-laying and egg-hatching defects, and mortality due to abortive molting and desiccation. Some of the ABC transporters we studied in closer detail to examine their role in lipid, ecdysteroid and eye pigment transport. Conclusions The results from our study provide new insights into the physiological function of ABC transporters in T. castaneum, and may help to establish new target sites for insect control.

  15. Expression patterns and subcellular localization of porcine (Sus Scrofa) lectin,galactose-binding, soluble 1 gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haifang Qiu; Shuhong Zhao; Mei Yu; Bin Fan; Bang Liu

    2008-01-01

    Lectin,galactose-binding,soluble 1 (LGALS1) gene encodes galectin-1,an atypical secretory protein that plays an important role during myoblast proliferation and differentiation.In this study,the porcine LGALS1 gene was cloned and characterized from pig muscle.The predicted protein sequence shared a high identity with its mammalian counterparts.Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed that porcine LGALS1 was expressed at 33 day post-coitus (dpc) and 65 dpc at a relatively high level,and then decreased to 90 dpc during fetal skeletal muscle development,suggesting that galectin-1 is a potent factor implicated in the formation of myofibers.LGALS1 was found widely expressed in all tissues and transient transfection indicated that galectin-1 locates both in cytoplasm and nucleus.Genomic sequences and analysis predicted a promoter region at approximately 1.279.1.529 kb,but dualluciferase reporter assay indicated that it has little promoter activity.

  16. The yjdF riboswitch candidate regulates gene expression by binding diverse azaaromatic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sanshu; Hwang, Xue Ying; Stav, Shira; Breaker, Ronald R

    2016-04-01

    The yjdF motif RNA is an orphan riboswitch candidate that almost exclusively associates with the yjdF protein-coding gene in many bacteria. The function of the YjdF protein is unknown, which has made speculation regarding the natural ligand for this putative riboswitch unusually challenging. By using a structure-probing assay for ligand binding, we found that a surprisingly broad diversity of nitrogen-containing aromatic heterocycles, or "azaaromatics," trigger near-identical changes in the structures adopted by representative yjdF motif RNAs. Regions of the RNA that undergo ligand-induced structural modulation reside primarily in portions of the putative aptamer region that are highly conserved in nucleotide sequence, as is typical for riboswitches. Some azaaromatic molecules are bound by the RNA with nanomolar dissociation constants, and a subset of these ligands activate riboswitch-mediated gene expression in cells. Furthermore, genetic elements most commonly adjacent to the yjdF motif RNA or to the yjdF protein-coding region are homologous to protein regulators implicated in mitigating the toxic effects of diverse phenolic acids or polycyclic compounds. Although the precise type of natural ligand sensed by yjdF motif RNAs remains unknown, our findings suggest that this riboswitch class might serve as part of a genetic response system to toxic or signaling compounds with chemical structures similar to azaaromatics.

  17. Interaction of a rhizobial DNA-binding protein with the promoter region of a plant leghemoglobin gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welters, P.; Metz, B.; Felix, G.; Palme, K. (Max Planck Insitut fur Zuchtungsforschung, Koeln (Germany)); Szczyglowski, K. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)); Bruijn, F.J. de (Max Planck Institut fur Zuchtungsforschung, Koeln (Germany) Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States))

    1993-08-01

    A nucleotide sequence was identified approximately 650 bp upstream of the Sesbania rostrata leghemoglobin gene Srglb3 start codon, which interacts specifically with a proteinaceous DNA-binding factor found in nodule extracts but not in extracts from leaves or root. The binding site for this factor was delimited using footprinting techniques. The DNA-binding activity of this factor was found to be heat stable, dependent on divalent cations, and derived from the (infecting) Azorhizobium caulinodans bacteria or bacteroids (A. caulinodans bacterial binding factor 1, AcBBF1). A 9- to 10-kD protein was isolated from a free-living culture of A. caulinodans that co-purifies with the DNA-binding activity (A. caulinodans bacterial binding protein 1, AcBBP1) and interacts specifically with its target (S. rostrata bacterial binding site 1, SrBBS1). The amino acid sequence of the N-terminal 27 residues of AcBBP1 was determined and was found to share significant similarity (46% identity; 68% similarity) with a domain of the herpes simplex virus major DNA-binding protein infected cell protein 8(ICP8). An insertion mutation in the SrBBS1 was found to result in a substantial reduction of the expression of a Srglb3-gus reporter gene fusion in nodules of transgenic Lotus corniculatus plants, suggesting a role for this element in Srglb3 promoter activity. Based on these results, the authors propose that (a) bacterial transacting factor(s) may play a role in infected cell-specific expression of the symbiotically induced plant lb genes. 70 refs., 11 figs.

  18. Preliminary screening of differentially expressed genes involved in methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 gene-mediated proliferation in human osteosarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Gang; Li, Yi; Lv, YangFan; Dai, Huanzi; Zhang, Xi; Guo, Qiao-Nan

    2015-04-01

    Methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) is essential in human brain development and has been linked to several cancer types and neuro-developmental disorders. This study aims to screen the MeCP2 related differentially expressed genes and discover the therapeutic targets for osteosarcoma. CCK8 assay was used to detect the proliferation and SaOS2 and U2OS cells. Apoptosis of cells was detected by flow cytometry analysis that monitored Annexin V-APC/7-DD binding and 7-ADD uptake simultaneously. Denaturing formaldehyde agarose gel electrophoresis was employed to examine the quality of total RNA 18S and 28S units. Gene chip technique was utilized to discover the differentially expressed genes correlated with MeCP2 gene. Differential gene screening criteria were used to screen the changed genes. The gene up-regulation or down-regulation more than 1.5 times was regarded as significant differential expression genes. The CCK8 results indicated that the cell proliferation of MeCP2 silencing cells (LV-MeCP2-RNAi) was significantly decreased compared to non-silenced cells (LV-MeCP2-RNAi-CN) (P genes were screened from a total of 49,395 transcripts. Among the total 107 transcripts, 34 transcripts were up-regulated and 73 transcripts were down-regulated. There were five significant differentially expressed genes, including IGFBP4, HOXC8, LMO4, MDK, and CTGF, which correlated with the MeCP2 gene. The methylation frequency of CpG in IGFBP4 gene could achieve 55%. In conclusion, the differentially expressed IGFBP4, HOXC8, LMO4, MDK, and CTGF genes may be involved in MeCP2 gene-mediated proliferation and apoptosis in osteosarcoma cells.

  19. Molecular characterization and gene expression of juvenile hormone binding protein in the bamboo borer, Omphisa fuscidentalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritdachyeng, Eakartit; Manaboon, Manaporn; Tobe, Stephen S; Singtripop, Tippawan

    2012-11-01

    Juvenile hormone (JH) plays an important role in many physiological processes in insect development, diapause and reproduction. An appropriate JH titer in hemolymph is essential for normal development in insects. Information concerning its carrier partner protein, juvenile hormone binding protein (JHBP), provides an alternative approach to understanding how JH regulates metamorphosis. In this study, we cloned and sequenced the Omphisa juvenile hormone binding protein (OfJHBP). The full-length OfJHBP cDNA sequence is comprised of 849 nucleotides with an open reading frame of 726bp encoding 242 amino acids. The molecular mass of the protein was estimated to be 26.94kDa. The deduced protein sequence of OfJHBP showed moderate homology with the lepidopteran, Heliothis virescens JHBP (52% amino acid identity) and lower homology with the Bombyx mori JHBP (45%) and the Manduca sexta JHBP (44%). The OfJHBP was expressed mainly in the fat body. OfJHBP transcripts in the fat body was moderately high during 3rd, 4th and 5th instars, then rapidly increased, reaching a peak during early diapause. The expression remained high in mid-diapause, then decreased in late-diapause until the pupal stage. Both juvenile hormone analog (JHA), methoprene, 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) exhibited a similar stimulatory pattern in OfJHBP expression of diapausing larvae. OfJHBP mRNA levels gradually increased and showed a peak of gene expression on the penultimate, then declined to low levels in the pupal stage. For in vitro gene expression, both of JHA and 20E induced OfJHBP mRNA expression in fat body. Fat body maintenance in vitro in the presence of 0.1μg/50μl JHA induced OfJHBP mRNA expression to high levels within the first 30min whereas 0.1μg/50μl 20E induced gene expression at 120min. To study the synergistic effect of these two hormones, fat body was incubated in vitro with 0.1μg/50μl JHA or 0.1μg/50μl 20E or a combination of both hormone for 30min. Induction of OfJHBP expression by

  20. Role of fatty acid binding proteins and long chain fatty acids in modulating nuclear receptors and gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Friedhelm; Petrescu, Anca D; Huang, Huan; Atshaves, Barbara P; McIntosh, Avery L; Martin, Gregory G; Hostetler, Heather A; Vespa, Aude; Landrock, Danilo; Landrock, Kerstin K; Payne, H Ross; Kier, Ann B

    2008-01-01

    Abnormal energy regulation may significantly contribute to the pathogenesis of obesity, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. For rapid control of energy homeostasis, allosteric and posttranslational events activate or alter activity of key metabolic enzymes. For longer impact, transcriptional regulation is more effective, especially in response to nutrients such as long chain fatty acids (LCFA). Recent advances provide insights into how poorly water-soluble lipid nutrients [LCFA; retinoic acid (RA)] and their metabolites (long chain fatty acyl Coenzyme A, LCFA-CoA) reach nuclei, bind their cognate ligand-activated receptors, and regulate transcription for signaling lipid and glucose catabolism or storage: (i) while serum and cytoplasmic LCFA levels are in the 200 mircroM-mM range, real-time imaging recently revealed that LCFA and LCFA-CoA are also located within nuclei (nM range); (ii) sensitive fluorescence binding assays show that LCFA-activated nuclear receptors [peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARalpha) and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4alpha (HNF4alpha)] exhibit high affinity (low nM KdS) for LCFA (PPARalpha) and/or LCFA-CoA (PPARalpha, HNF4alpha)-in the same range as nuclear levels of these ligands; (iii) live and fixed cell immunolabeling and imaging revealed that some cytoplasmic lipid binding proteins [liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP), acyl CoA binding protein (ACBP), cellular retinoic acid binding protein-2 (CRABP-2)] enter nuclei, bind nuclear receptors (PPARalpha, HNF4alpha, CRABP-2), and activate transcription of genes in fatty acid and glucose metabolism; and (iv) studies with gene ablated mice provided physiological relevance of LCFA and LCFA-CoA binding proteins in nuclear signaling. This led to the hypothesis that cytoplasmic lipid binding proteins transfer and channel lipidic ligands into nuclei for initiating nuclear receptor transcriptional activity to provide new lipid nutrient signaling pathways that

  1. Cloning and structure of a yeast gene encoding a general transcription initiation factor TFIID that binds to the TATA box.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horikoshi, M; Wang, C K; Fujii, H; Cromlish, J A; Weil, P A; Roeder, R G

    1989-09-28

    The TATA sequence-binding factor TFIID plays a central role both in promoter activation by RNA polymerase II and other common initiation factors, and in promoter regulation by gene-specific factors. The sequence of yeast TFIID, which seems to be encoded by a single gene, contains interesting structural motifs that are possibly involved in these functions, and is similar to sequences of bacterial sigma factors.

  2. Tangier disease is caused by mutations in the gene encoding ATP-binding cassette transporter 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rust, S; Rosier, M; Funke, H; Real, J; Amoura, Z; Piette, J C; Deleuze, J F; Brewer, H B; Duverger, N; Denèfle, P; Assmann, G

    1999-08-01

    Tangier disease (TD) was first discovered nearly 40 years ago in two siblings living on Tangier Island. This autosomal co-dominant condition is characterized in the homozygous state by the absence of HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) from plasma, hepatosplenomegaly, peripheral neuropathy and frequently premature coronary artery disease (CAD). In heterozygotes, HDL-C levels are about one-half those of normal individuals. Impaired cholesterol efflux from macrophages leads to the presence of foam cells throughout the body, which may explain the increased risk of coronary heart disease in some TD families. We report here refining of our previous linkage of the TD gene to a 1-cM region between markers D9S271 and D9S1866 on chromosome 9q31, in which we found the gene encoding human ATP cassette-binding transporter 1 (ABC1). We also found a change in ABC1 expression level on cholesterol loading of phorbol ester-treated THP1 macrophages, substantiating the role of ABC1 in cholesterol efflux. We cloned the full-length cDNA and sequenced the gene in two unrelated families with four TD homozygotes. In the first pedigree, a 1-bp deletion in exon 13, resulting in truncation of the predicted protein to approximately one-fourth of its normal size, co-segregated with the disease phenotype. An in-frame insertion-deletion in exon 12 was found in the second family. Our findings indicate that defects in ABC1, encoding a member of the ABC transporter superfamily, are the cause of TD.

  3. Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins are regulators of the rat thyroid peroxidase gene in thyroid cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Rauer

    Full Text Available Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs-1c and -2, which were initially discovered as master transcriptional regulators of lipid biosynthesis and uptake, were recently identified as novel transcriptional regulators of the sodium-iodide symporter gene in the thyroid, which is essential for thyroid hormone synthesis. Based on this observation that SREBPs play a role for thyroid hormone synthesis, we hypothesized that another gene involved in thyroid hormone synthesis, the thyroid peroxidase (TPO gene, is also a target of SREBP-1c and -2. Thyroid epithelial cells treated with 25-hydroxycholesterol, which is known to inhibit SREBP activation, had about 50% decreased mRNA levels of TPO. Similarly, the mRNA level of TPO was reduced by about 50% in response to siRNA mediated knockdown of both, SREBP-1 and SREBP-2. Reporter gene assays revealed that overexpression of active SREBP-1c and -2 causes a strong transcriptional activation of the rat TPO gene, which was localized to an approximately 80 bp region in the intron 1 of the rat TPO gene. In vitro- and in vivo-binding of both, SREBP-1c and SREBP-2, to this region in the rat TPO gene could be demonstrated using gel-shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation. Mutation analysis of the 80 bp region of rat TPO intron 1 revealed two isolated and two overlapping SREBP-binding elements from which one, the overlapping SRE+609/InvSRE+614, was shown to be functional in reporter gene assays. In connection with recent findings that the rat NIS gene is also a SREBP target gene in the thyroid, the present findings suggest that SREBPs may be possible novel targets for pharmacological modulation of thyroid hormone synthesis.

  4. To be or not to be the odd one out - Allele-specific transcription in pentaploid dogroses (Rosa L. sect. Caninae (DC. Ser

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    Theißen Günter

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple hybridization events gave rise to pentaploid dogroses which can reproduce sexually despite their uneven ploidy level by the unique canina meiosis. Two homologous chromosome sets are involved in bivalent formation and are transmitted by the haploid pollen grains and the tetraploid egg cells. In addition the egg cells contain three sets of univalent chromosomes which are excluded from recombination. In this study we investigated whether differential behavior of chromosomes as bivalents or univalents is reflected by sequence divergence or transcription intensity between homeologous alleles of two single copy genes (LEAFY, cGAPDH and one ribosomal DNA locus (nrITS. Results We detected a maximum number of four different alleles of all investigated loci in pentaploid dogroses and identified the respective allele with two copies, which is presumably located on bivalent forming chromosomes. For the alleles of the ribosomal DNA locus and cGAPDH only slight, if any, differential transcription was determined, whereas the LEAFY alleles with one copy were found to be significantly stronger expressed than the LEAFY allele with two copies. Moreover, we found for the three marker genes that all alleles have been under similar regimes of purifying selection. Conclusions Analyses of both molecular sequence evolution and expression patterns did not support the hypothesis that unique alleles probably located on non-recombining chromosomes are less functional than duplicate alleles presumably located on recombining chromosomes.

  5. CP2 binding to the promoter is essential for the enhanced transcription of globin genes in erythroid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Ji Hyung; Kim, Chul Geun

    2003-02-28

    We have previously reported that the reduced level of CP2 suppresses the mouse alpha- and beta-globin gene expression and hemoglobin synthesis during terminal differentiation of mouse erythroleukemia (MEL) cells in vitro [Chae et al. (1999)]. As an extension of this study, we demonstrated that human alpha-, epsilon-, and gamma- globin genes were also suppressed by the reduced expression of CP2 in K562 cells. To address how much CP2 contributes in the regulation of globin gene expression, we measured transcriptional activities of the wild type alpha-globin promoter and its various factor-binding sites mutants in erythroid and nonerythroid cells. Interestingly, CP2 site dependent transcriptional activation occurred in an erythroid-cell specific manner, even though CP2 is ubiquitously expressed. In addition, CP2 site mutation within the alpha-promoter severely suppressed promoter activity in differentiated, but not in undifferentiated MEL cells, suggesting that the CP2 binding site is needed for the enhanced transcription of globin genes during erythroid differentiation. When the human beta-globin locus control region was linked to the alpha-promoter, suppression was more severe in the CP2 site mutant in differentiated MEL cells. Overall data indicate that CP2 is a major factor in the regulation of globin expression in human and mouse erythroid cells, and CP2 binding to the globin gene promoter is essential for the enhanced transcription of globin genes in erythroid differentiation.

  6. Amino-terminal domains of c-myc and N-myc proteins mediate binding to the retinoblastoma gene product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustgi, Anil K.; Dyson, Nicholas; Bernards, Rene

    1991-08-01

    THE proteins encoded by the myc gene family are involved in the control of cell proliferation and differentiation, and aberrant expression of myc proteins has been implicated in the genesis of a variety of neoplasms1. In the carboxyl terminus, myc proteins have two domains that encode a basic domain/helix-loop-helix and a leucine zipper motif, respectively. These motifs are involved both in DNA binding and in protein dimerization2-5. In addition, myc protein family members share several regions of highly conserved amino acids in their amino termini that are essential for transformation6,7. We report here that an N-terminal domain present in both the c-myc and N-myc proteins mediates binding to the retinoblastoma gene product, pRb. We show that the human papilloma virus E7 protein competes with c-myc for binding to pRb, indicating that these proteins share overlapping binding sites on pRb. Furthermore, a mutant Rb protein from a human tumour cell line that carried a 35-amino-acid deletion in its C terminus failed to bind to c-myc. Our results suggest that c-myc and pRb cooperate through direct binding to control cell proliferation.

  7. Molecular characterization and expression analysis of Triticum aestivum squamosa-promoter binding protein-box genes involved in ear development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin Zhang; a Xia Liu; a Guangyao Zhao; Xinguo Mao; Ang Li; Ruilian Jing

    2014-01-01

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is one of the most important crops in the world. Squamosa-promoter binding protein (SBP)-box genes play a critical role in regulating flower and fruit development. In this study, 10 novel SBP-box genes (TaSPL genes) were isolated from wheat ((Triticum aestivum L.) cultivar Yanzhan 4110). Phylogenetic analysis classified the TaSPL genes into five groups (G1-G5). The motif combinations and expression patterns of the TaSPL genes varied among the five groups with each having own distinctive characteristics: TaSPL20/21 in G1 and TaSPL17 in G2 mainly expressed in the shoot apical meristem and the young ear, and their expression levels responded to development of the ear; TaSPL6/15 belonging to G3 were upregulated and TaSPL1/23 in G4 were downregulated during grain development; the gene in G5 (TaSPL3) expressed constitutively. Thus, the consistency of the phylogenetic analysis, motif compositions, and expression patterns of the TaSPL genes revealed specific gene structures and functions. On the other hand, the diverse gene structures and different expression patterns suggested that wheat SBP-box genes have a wide range of functions. The results also suggest a potential role for wheat SBP-box genes in ear development. This study provides a significant beginning of functional analysis of SBP-box genes in wheat.

  8. Wild boars from Sweden, Austria, the Czech Republic and Japan possess intact mannose-binding lectin 2 (MBL2) genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergmann, Ingrid-Maria; OkumuRA, N; Uenishi, H

    2015-01-01

    The two-nucleotide deletion recently detected in the mannose-binding lectin 2 gene in purebred and crossbred domestic pigs was not found among 68 wild boars representing 4 populations from Europe and Asia. This suggests that the deletion is a result of breeding and/or genetic drift/bottle necks....

  9. An inverted repeat motif stabilizes binding of E2F and enhances transcription of the dihydrofolate reductase gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wade, M; Blake, M C; Jambou, R C

    1995-01-01

    An overlapping inverted repeat sequence that binds the eukaryotic transcription factor E2F is 100% conserved near the major transcription start sites in the promoters of three mammalian genes encoding dihydrofolate reductase, and is also found in the promoters of several other important cellular ...

  10. Homotypic clusters of transcription factor binding sites: A model system for understanding the physical mechanics of gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daphne Ezer

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The organization of binding sites in cis-regulatory elements (CREs can influence gene expression through a combination of physical mechanisms, ranging from direct interactions between TF molecules to DNA looping and transient chromatin interactions. The study of simple and common building blocks in promoters and other CREs allows us to dissect how all of these mechanisms work together. Many adjacent TF binding sites for the same TF species form homotypic clusters, and these CRE architecture building blocks serve as a prime candidate for understanding interacting transcriptional mechanisms. Homotypic clusters are prevalent in both bacterial and eukaryotic genomes, and are present in both promoters as well as more distal enhancer/silencer elements. Here, we review previous theoretical and experimental studies that show how the complexity (number of binding sites and spatial organization (distance between sites and overall distance from transcription start sites of homotypic clusters influence gene expression. In particular, we describe how homotypic clusters modulate the temporal dynamics of TF binding, a mechanism that can affect gene expression, but which has not yet been sufficiently characterized. We propose further experiments on homotypic clusters that would be useful in developing mechanistic models of gene expression.

  11. Homotypic clusters of transcription factor binding sites: A model system for understanding the physical mechanics of gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezer, Daphne; Zabet, Nicolae Radu; Adryan, Boris

    2014-07-01

    The organization of binding sites in cis-regulatory elements (CREs) can influence gene expression through a combination of physical mechanisms, ranging from direct interactions between TF molecules to DNA looping and transient chromatin interactions. The study of simple and common building blocks in promoters and other CREs allows us to dissect how all of these mechanisms work together. Many adjacent TF binding sites for the same TF species form homotypic clusters, and these CRE architecture building blocks serve as a prime candidate for understanding interacting transcriptional mechanisms. Homotypic clusters are prevalent in both bacterial and eukaryotic genomes, and are present in both promoters as well as more distal enhancer/silencer elements. Here, we review previous theoretical and experimental studies that show how the complexity (number of binding sites) and spatial organization (distance between sites and overall distance from transcription start sites) of homotypic clusters influence gene expression. In particular, we describe how homotypic clusters modulate the temporal dynamics of TF binding, a mechanism that can affect gene expression, but which has not yet been sufficiently characterized. We propose further experiments on homotypic clusters that would be useful in developing mechanistic models of gene expression.

  12. The correlation of vitamin D level and vitamin D-binding protein gene polymorphism in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晓晨

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the correlation of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D(25-OHD)levels with vitamin D-binding protein(the group-specific component,GC)gene polymorphism in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease(COPD).Methods In a cross-sectional case-control study,250 participants,including 116 COPD patients with smoking history and 134 healthy smokers,were in-

  13. Mannose-binding lectin gene, MBL2, polymorphisms are not associated with susceptibility to invasive pneumococcal disease in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundbo, Lene Fogt; Harboe, Zitta Barrella; Clausen, Louise Nygaard

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Most children are transiently colonized with Streptococcus pneumoniae, but very few develop invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). Host genetic variation of innate immunity may predispose to IPD. We investigated the effect of genetic variation in the mannose-binding lectin gene, MBL2...

  14. Wild boars from Sweden, Austria, the Czech Republic and Japan possess intact mannose-binding lectin 2 (MBL2) genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, I M; Okumura, N; Uenishi, H; Hammer, S E; Knoll, A; Edfors, I; Juul-Madsen, H R

    2015-06-01

    The two-nucleotide deletion recently detected in the mannose-binding lectin 2 gene in purebred and crossbred domestic pigs was not found among 68 wild boars representing 4 populations from Europe and Asia. This suggests that the deletion is a result of breeding and/or genetic drift/bottle necks.

  15. Stat3 enhances vimentin gene expression by binding to the antisilencer element and interacting with the repressor protein, ZBP-89.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yongzhong; Diab, Iman; Zhang, Xueping; Izmailova, Elena S; Zehner, Zendra E

    2004-01-08

    Vimentin exhibits a complex pattern of developmental- and tissue-specific expression and is aberrantly expressed in most metastatic tumors. The human vimentin promoter contains multiple DNA elements, some of which enhance gene expression and one that inhibits. A silencer element (at -319) binds the repressor ZBP-89. Further upstream (at -757) is an element, which acts positively in the presence of the silencer element and, thus, is referred to as an antisilencer (ASE). Previously, we showed that Stat1alpha binds to this element upon induction by IFN-gamma. However, substantial binding and reporter gene activity was still present in nontreated cells. Here, we have found that Stat3 binds to the ASE element in vitro. Transfection experiments in COS-1 cells with various vimentin promoter--reporter constructs show that gene activity is dependent upon the cotransfection and activation of Stat3. Moreover, activated Stat3 can overcome ZBP-89 repression. Coimmunoprecipitation studies demonstrate that Stat3 and ZBP-89 can interact and confocal microscopy detects these factors to be colocalized in the nucleus. Moreover, a correlation exists between the presence of activated Stat3 and vimentin expression in MDA-MB-231 cells, which is lacking in MCF7 cells where vimentin is not expressed. In the light of these results, we propose that the interaction of Stat3 and ZBP-89 may be crucial for overcoming the effects of the repressor ZBP-89, which suggests a novel mode for Stat3 gene activation.

  16. The MB2 gene family of Plasmodium species has a unique combination of S1 and GTP-binding domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogunjumo Oluwasanmi

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identification and characterization of novel Plasmodium gene families is necessary for developing new anti-malarial therapeutics. The products of the Plasmodium falciparum gene, MB2, were shown previously to have a stage-specific pattern of subcellular localization and proteolytic processing. Results Genes homologous to MB2 were identified in five additional parasite species, P. knowlesi, P. gallinaceum, P. berghei, P. yoelii, and P. chabaudi. Sequence comparisons among the MB2 gene products reveal amino acid conservation of structural features, including putative S1 and GTP-binding domains, and putative signal peptides and nuclear localization signals. Conclusions The combination of domains is unique to this gene family and indicates that MB2 genes comprise a novel family and therefore may be a good target for drug development.

  17. Selection shaped the evolution of mouse androgen-binding protein (ABP) function and promoted the duplication of Abp genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karn, Robert C; Laukaitis, Christina M

    2014-08-01

    In the present article, we summarize two aspects of our work on mouse ABP (androgen-binding protein): (i) the sexual selection function producing incipient reinforcement on the European house mouse hybrid zone, and (ii) the mechanism behind the dramatic expansion of the Abp gene region in the mouse genome. Selection unifies these two components, although the ways in which selection has acted differ. At the functional level, strong positive selection has acted on key sites on the surface of one face of the ABP dimer, possibly to influence binding to a receptor. A different kind of selection has apparently driven the recent and rapid expansion of the gene region, probably by increasing the amount of Abp transcript, in one or both of two ways. We have shown previously that groups of Abp genes behave as LCRs (low-copy repeats), duplicating as relatively large blocks of genes by NAHR (non-allelic homologous recombination). The second type of selection involves the close link between the accumulation of L1 elements and the expansion of the Abp gene family by NAHR. It is probably predicated on an initial selection for increased transcription of existing Abp genes and/or an increase in Abp gene number providing more transcriptional sites. Either or both could increase initial transcript production, a quantitative change similar to increasing the volume of a radio transmission. In closing, we also provide a note on Abp gene nomenclature.

  18. Structural Insights Into Amino Acid Binding and Gene Control by a Lysine Riboswitch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serganov, A.; Huang, L; Patel, D

    2008-01-01

    In bacteria, the intracellular concentration of several amino acids is controlled by riboswitches1, 2, 3, 4. One of the important regulatory circuits involves lysine-specific riboswitches, which direct the biosynthesis and transport of lysine and precursors common for lysine and other amino acids. To understand the molecular basis of amino acid recognition by riboswitches, here we present the crystal structure of the 174-nucleotide sensing domain of the Thermotoga maritima lysine riboswitch in the lysine-bound (1.9 A) and free (3.1 A) states. The riboswitch features an unusual and intricate architecture, involving three-helical and two-helical bundles connected by a compact five-helical junction and stabilized by various long-range tertiary interactions. Lysine interacts with the junctional core of the riboswitch and is specifically recognized through shape-complementarity within the elongated binding pocket and through several direct and K+-mediated hydrogen bonds to its charged ends. Our structural and biochemical studies indicate preformation of the riboswitch scaffold and identify conformational changes associated with the formation of a stable lysine-bound state, which prevents alternative folding of the riboswitch and facilitates formation of downstream regulatory elements. We have also determined several structures of the riboswitch bound to different lysine analogues5, including antibiotics, in an effort to understand the ligand-binding capabilities of the lysine riboswitch and understand the nature of antibiotic resistance. Our results provide insights into a mechanism of lysine-riboswitch-dependent gene control at the molecular level, thereby contributing to continuing efforts at exploration of the pharmaceutical and biotechnological potential of riboswitches.

  19. Drosophila TDP-43 RNA-Binding Protein Facilitates Association of Sister Chromatid Cohesion Proteins with Genes, Enhancers and Polycomb Response Elements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Swain

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The cohesin protein complex mediates sister chromatid cohesion and participates in transcriptional control of genes that regulate growth and development. Substantial reduction of cohesin activity alters transcription of many genes without disrupting chromosome segregation. Drosophila Nipped-B protein loads cohesin onto chromosomes, and together Nipped-B and cohesin occupy essentially all active transcriptional enhancers and a large fraction of active genes. It is unknown why some active genes bind high levels of cohesin and some do not. Here we show that the TBPH and Lark RNA-binding proteins influence association of Nipped-B and cohesin with genes and gene regulatory sequences. In vitro, TBPH and Lark proteins specifically bind RNAs produced by genes occupied by Nipped-B and cohesin. By genomic chromatin immunoprecipitation these RNA-binding proteins also bind to chromosomes at cohesin-binding genes, enhancers, and Polycomb response elements (PREs. RNAi depletion reveals that TBPH facilitates association of Nipped-B and cohesin with genes and regulatory sequences. Lark reduces binding of Nipped-B and cohesin at many promoters and aids their association with several large enhancers. Conversely, Nipped-B facilitates TBPH and Lark association with genes and regulatory sequences, and interacts with TBPH and Lark in affinity chromatography and immunoprecipitation experiments. Blocking transcription does not ablate binding of Nipped-B and the RNA-binding proteins to chromosomes, indicating transcription is not required to maintain binding once established. These findings demonstrate that RNA-binding proteins help govern association of sister chromatid cohesion proteins with genes and enhancers.

  20. Superovulation alters embryonic poly(A)-binding protein (Epab) and poly(A)-binding protein, cytoplasmic 1 (Pabpc1) gene expression in mouse oocytes and early embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Saffet; Yaba-Ucar, Aylin; Sozen, Berna; Mutlu, Derya; Demir, Necdet

    2016-03-01

    Embryonic poly(A)-binding protein (EPAB) and poly(A)-binding protein, cytoplasmic 1 (PABPC1) play critical roles in translational regulation of stored maternal mRNAs required for proper oocyte maturation and early embryo development in mammals. Superovulation is a commonly used technique to obtain a great number of oocytes in the same developmental stages in assisted reproductive technology (ART) and in clinical or experimental animal studies. Previous studies have convincingly indicated that superovulation alone can cause impaired oocyte maturation, delayed embryo development, decreased implantation rate and increased postimplantation loss. Although how superovulation results in these disturbances has not been clearly addressed yet, putative changes in genes related to oocyte and early embryo development seem to be potential risk factors. Thus, the aim of the present study was to determine the effect of superovulation on Epab and Pabpc1 gene expression. To this end, low- (5IU) and high-dose (10IU) pregnant mare's serum gonadotropin (PMSG) and human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) were administered to female mice to induce superovulation, with naturally cycling female mice serving as controls. Epab and Pabpc1 gene expression in germinal vesicle (GV) stage oocytes, MII oocytes and 1- and 2-cell embryos collected from each group were quantified using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Superovulation with low or high doses of gonadotropins significantly altered Epab and Pabpc1 mRNA levels in GV oocytes, MII oocytes and 1- and 2-cell embryos compared with their respective controls (Psuperovulation.

  1. Crystal Structure of an Integron Gene Cassette-Associated Protein from Vibrio cholerae Identifies a Cationic Drug-Binding Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deshpande, Chandrika N.; Harrop, Stephen J.; Boucher, Yan; Hassan, Karl A.; Di Leo, Rosa; Xu, Xiaohui; Cui, Hong; Savchenko, Alexei; Chang, Changsoo; Labbate, Maurizio; Paulsen, Ian T.; Stokes, H.W.; Curmi, Paul M.G.; Mabbutt, Bridget C. (MIT); (UT-Australia); (Macquarie); (Toronto); (New South)

    2012-02-15

    The direct isolation of integron gene cassettes from cultivated and environmental microbial sources allows an assessment of the impact of the integron/gene cassette system on the emergence of new phenotypes, such as drug resistance or virulence. A structural approach is being exploited to investigate the modularity and function of novel integron gene cassettes. We report the 1.8 {angstrom} crystal structure of Cass2, an integron-associated protein derived from an environmental V. cholerae. The structure defines a monomeric beta-barrel protein with a fold related to the effector-binding portion of AraC/XylS transcription activators. The closest homologs of Cass2 are multi-drug binding proteins, such as BmrR. Consistent with this, a binding pocket made up of hydrophobic residues and a single glutamate side chain is evident in Cass2, occupied in the crystal form by polyethylene glycol. Fluorescence assays demonstrate that Cass2 is capable of binding cationic drug compounds with submicromolar affinity. The Cass2 module possesses a protein interaction surface proximal to its drug-binding cavity with features homologous to those seen in multi-domain transcriptional regulators. Genetic analysis identifies Cass2 to be representative of a larger family of independent effector-binding proteins associated with lateral gene transfer within Vibrio and closely-related species. We propose that the Cass2 family not only has capacity to form functional transcription regulator complexes, but represents possible evolutionary precursors to multi-domain regulators associated with cationic drug compounds.

  2. Crystal structure of an integron gene cassette-associated protein from Vibrio cholerae identifies a cationic drug-binding module.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrika N Deshpande

    Full Text Available The direct isolation of integron gene cassettes from cultivated and environmental microbial sources allows an assessment of the impact of the integron/gene cassette system on the emergence of new phenotypes, such as drug resistance or virulence. A structural approach is being exploited to investigate the modularity and function of novel integron gene cassettes.We report the 1.8 Å crystal structure of Cass2, an integron-associated protein derived from an environmental V. cholerae. The structure defines a monomeric beta-barrel protein with a fold related to the effector-binding portion of AraC/XylS transcription activators. The closest homologs of Cass2 are multi-drug binding proteins, such as BmrR. Consistent with this, a binding pocket made up of hydrophobic residues and a single glutamate side chain is evident in Cass2, occupied in the crystal form by polyethylene glycol. Fluorescence assays demonstrate that Cass2 is capable of binding cationic drug compounds with submicromolar affinity. The Cass2 module possesses a protein interaction surface proximal to its drug-binding cavity with features homologous to those seen in multi-domain transcriptional regulators.Genetic analysis identifies Cass2 to be representative of a larger family of independent effector-binding proteins associated with lateral gene transfer within Vibrio and closely-related species. We propose that the Cass2 family not only has capacity to form functional transcription regulator complexes, but represents possible evolutionary precursors to multi-domain regulators associated with cationic drug compounds.

  3. Development of allele-specific PCR for detection of herbicide-resistance in Monochoria korsakowii Regel et Maack%采用ASPCR技术检测抗药性雨久花ALS突变基因碱基种类的探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴明根; 金万赫; 许勇男

    2011-01-01

    等位基因特异性扩增(Allele-specific PCR简称:ASPCR)技术是一项快速、简便、低成本的检测等位基因单核苷酸多态性的新方法.作者针对雨久花感抗磺酰脲类生态型ALS基因编码区第592位碱基密码(ALS氨基酸第197位)特征,采用在引物3'末端设有胸腺嘧啶核苷酸(感性)或鸟嘌呤(抗性)核苷酸的2种引物,对延边稻田发生的雨久花感抗磺酰脲类生态型ALS基因编码区第592位进行了ASPCR.检测结果显示,当以引物3'末端设有胸腺嘧啶引物时,感性类型出现ASPCR扩增带,而抗性类型无带出现,反之抗性类型有带而感性类型无带,检测到延边稻田发生的抗磺酰脲类雨久花生态型的ALS 197位点的脯氨酸被组氨酸替代,证明了该方法的有效性和可靠性.%Allele-specific PCR is a rapid, simple, and low-cost method for single-nucleotide polymorphism identification. Using this technique, a single-nucleotide polymorphism primer marker of thymine(susceptible) or guanine(resistant) at the 3'end on 592 point of ALS(acetolactate synthetase) gene encoding site (197 point of ALS amino acid) was designed to detect the herbicide-resistant type of Monochoria korsakowii Regel et Maack. in Yanbian region. The result shows that susceptibility primer marker can be used to detect the susceptibility biotype;otherwise can be detected resistant biotype; the cause of resistance to sulfonylurea herbicide type can be induced by substitution of Pro197 to histidine. It proved that the technique was efficient and feasible to detect ALS gene of herbicide-resistant type.

  4. Overlapping elements in the guanylate-binding protein gene promoter mediate transcriptional induction by alpha and gamma interferons.

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    The gene encoding a 67-kDa cytoplasmic guanylate-binding protein (GBP) is transcriptionally induced in cells exposed to interferon of either type I (alpha interferon [IFN-alpha] or type II (IFN-gamma). The promoter of the GBP gene was cloned and found to contain an IFN-alpha-stimulated response element, which mediated the response of the GBP gene to IFN-alpha. On the basis of transfection experiments with recombinant plasmids, two different elements were delineated. Both were required to obta...

  5. Gene synthesis, expression in Escherichia coli, purification and characterization of the recombinant bovine acyl-CoA-binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandrup, S; Højrup, P; Kristiansen, K;

    1991-01-01

    A synthetic gene encoding the 86 amino acid residues of mature acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP), and the initiating methionine was constructed. The synthetic gene was assembled from eight partially overlapping oligonucleotides. Codon usage and nucleotides surrounding the ATG translation......-initiation codon were chosen to allow efficient expression in Escherichia coli as well as in yeast. The synthetic gene was inserted into the expression vector pKK223-3 and expressed in E. coli. In maximally induced cultures, recombinant ACBP constitutes 12-15% of total cellular protein. A fraction highly enriched...

  6. Technical aspects of typing for HLA-DP alleles using allele-specific DNA in vitro amplification and sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes. Detection of single base mismatches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fugger, L; Morling, N; Ryder, L P

    1990-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is an effective method for in vitro DNA amplification which combined with probing with synthetic oligonucleotides can be used for, e.g., HLA-typing. We have studied the technical aspects of HLA-DP typing with the technique. DNA from mononuclear nucleated cells ...... mismatches may be detected in the PCR and typing for HLA-DP gene variants, which differ for only one base, may be performed.......The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is an effective method for in vitro DNA amplification which combined with probing with synthetic oligonucleotides can be used for, e.g., HLA-typing. We have studied the technical aspects of HLA-DP typing with the technique. DNA from mononuclear nucleated cells...... was extracted with either a simple salting out method or phenol/chloroform. Both DNAs could be readily used for PCR. The MgC2 concentration of the PCR buffer and the annealing temperature of the thermal cycle of the PCR were the two most important variables. The MgCl2 concentration and the temperature must...

  7. Computational identification of transcription factor binding sites by functional analysis of sets of genes sharing overrep-resented upstream motifs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silengo Lorenzo

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcriptional regulation is a key mechanism in the functioning of the cell, and is mostly effected through transcription factors binding to specific recognition motifs located upstream of the coding region of the regulated gene. The computational identification of such motifs is made easier by the fact that they often appear several times in the upstream region of the regulated genes, so that the number of occurrences of relevant motifs is often significantly larger than expected by pure chance. Results To exploit this fact, we construct sets of genes characterized by the statistical overrepresentation of a certain motif in their upstream regions. Then we study the functional characterization of these sets by analyzing their annotation to Gene Ontology terms. For the sets showing a statistically significant specific functional characterization, we conjecture that the upstream motif characterizing the set is a binding site for a transcription factor involved in the regulation of the genes in the set. Conclusions The method we propose is able to identify many known binding sites in S. cerevisiae and new candidate targets of regulation by known transcritpion factors. Its application to less well studied organisms is likely to be valuable in the exploration of their regulatory interaction network.

  8. POF regulates the expression of genes on the fourth chromosome in Drosophila melanogaster by binding to nascent RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Anna-Mia; Stenberg, Per; Allgardsson, Anders; Larsson, Jan

    2012-06-01

    In Drosophila, two chromosome-wide compensatory systems have been characterized: the dosage compensation system that acts on the male X chromosome and the chromosome-specific regulation of genes located on the heterochromatic fourth chromosome. Dosage compensation in Drosophila is accomplished by hypertranscription of the single male X chromosome mediated by the male-specific lethal (MSL) complex. The mechanism of this compensation is suggested to involve enhanced transcriptional elongation mediated by the MSL complex, while the mechanism of compensation mediated by the painting of fourth (POF) protein on the fourth chromosome has remained elusive. Here, we show that POF binds to nascent RNA, and this binding is associated with increased transcription output from chromosome 4. We also show that genes located in heterochromatic regions spend less time in transition from the site of transcription to the nuclear envelope. These results provide useful insights into the means by which genes in heterochromatic regions can overcome the repressive influence of their hostile environment.

  9. Proteins binding to the 5‘—flanking regualtory elements of the human β—globin gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENZHIGANG; YADICHEN; 等

    1993-01-01

    The binding of nuclear proteins prepared from mouse erythroid tissue in different developmental stages to the 5'-flanking regulatory elements of human β-globin gene,two negative control regions(NCR1,-610to-490 bp;NCR2,-338,to-233bp),was identified.Two stage specific protein factors corresponding to embryonic and fetal stages were found to be capable of binding to NCR2.These data provided evidence that the cis acting elements of the 5'-flanking region might be involved in the developmental control of β-globin gene and NCR2 might be responsible in art for the silence of β-glolbin gene in the embryonic and fetal stages.

  10. A novel PRD I and TG binding activity involved in virus-induced transcription of IFN-A genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Génin, P; Bragança, J; Darracq, N; Doly, J; Civas, A

    1995-01-01

    Comparative analysis of the inducible elements of the mouse interferon A4 and A11 gene promoters (IE-A4 and IE-A11) by transient transfection experiments, DNase 1 footprinting and electrophoretic mobility shift assays resulted in identification of a virus-induced binding activity suggested to be involved in NDV-induced activation of transcription of these genes. The virus-induced factor, termed VIF, is activated early by contact of virions with cells. It specifically recognizes the PRD I-like domain shared by both inducible elements, as well as the TG-like domain of IE-A4. This factor, distinct from the IRF-1, IRF-2 and the alpha F1 binding proteins and presenting a different affinity pattern from that of the TG protein, is proposed as a candidate for IFN-type I gene regulation. Images PMID:8559665

  11. Molecular characterization of a genetic variant of the steroid hormone-binding globulin gene in heterozygous subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, D.O.; Catterall, J.F. [Population Council, New York, NY (United States); Carino, C. [Instituto National de la Nutricion, Mexico City, MX (United States)] [and others

    1995-04-01

    Steroid hormone-binding globulin in human serum displays different isoelectric focusing (IEF) patterns among individuals, suggesting genetic variation in the gene for this extracellular steroid carrier protein. Analysis of allele frequencies and family studies suggested the existence of two codominant alleles of the gene. Subsequent determination of the molecular basis of a variant of the gene was carried out using DNA from homozygous individuals from a single Belgian family. It was of interest to characterize other variant individuals to determine whether all variants identified by IEF phenotyping were caused by the same mutation or whether other mutations occurred in the gene in different populations. Previous studies identified Mexican subjects who were heterozygous for the variant IEF phenotype. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis was used to localize the mutation in these subjects and to purify the variant allele for DNA sequence analysis. The results show that the mutation in this population is identical to that identified in the Belgian family, and no other mutations were detected in the gene. These data represent the first analysis of steroid hormone-binding globulin gene variation in heterozygous subjects and further support the conclusion of biallelism of the gene worldwide. 11 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Mutation and Methylation Analysis of the Chromodomain-Helicase-DNA Binding 5 Gene in Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kylie L. Gorringe

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Chromodomain, helicase, DNA binding 5 (CHD5 is a member of a subclass of the chromatin remodeling Swi/Snf proteins and has recently been proposed as a tumor suppressor in a diverse range of human cancers. We analyzed all 41 coding exons of CHD5 for somatic mutations in 123 primary ovarian cancers as well as 60 primary breast cancers using high-resolution melt analysis. We also examined methylation of the CHD5 promoter in 48 ovarian cancer samples by methylation-specific single-stranded conformation polymorphism and bisulfite sequencing. In contrast to previous studies, no mutations were identified in the breast cancers, but somatic heterozygous missense mutations were identified in 3 of 123 ovarian cancers. We identified promoter methylation in 3 of 45 samples with normal CHD5 and in 2 of 3 samples with CHD5 mutation, suggesting these tumors may have biallelic inactivation of CHD5. Hemizygous copy number loss at CHD5 occurred in 6 of 85 samples as assessed by single nucleotide polymorphism array. Tumors with CHD5 mutation or methylation were more likely to have mutation of KRAS or BRAF (P = .04. The aggregate frequency of CHD5 haploinsufficiency or inactivation is 16.2% in ovarian cancer. Thus, CHD5 may play a role as a tumor suppressor gene in ovarian cancer; however, it is likely that there is another target of the frequent copy number neutral loss of heterozygosity observed at 1p36.

  13. Mutation and methylation analysis of the chromodomain-helicase-DNA binding 5 gene in ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorringe, Kylie L; Choong, David Yh; Williams, Louise H; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Sridhar, Anita; Qiu, Wen; Bearfoot, Jennifer L; Campbell, Ian G

    2008-11-01

    Chromodomain, helicase, DNA binding 5 (CHD5) is a member of a subclass of the chromatin remodeling Swi/Snf proteins and has recently been proposed as a tumor suppressor in a diverse range of human cancers. We analyzed all 41 coding exons of CHD5 for somatic mutations in 123 primary ovarian cancers as well as 60 primary breast cancers using high-resolution melt analysis. We also examined methylation of the CHD5 promoter in 48 ovarian cancer samples by methylation-specific single-stranded conformation polymorphism and bisulfite sequencing. In contrast to previous studies, no mutations were identified in the breast cancers, but somatic heterozygous missense mutations were identified in 3 of 123 ovarian cancers. We identified promoter methylation in 3 of 45 samples with normal CHD5 and in 2 of 3 samples with CHD5 mutation, suggesting these tumors may have biallelic inactivation of CHD5. Hemizygous copy number loss at CHD5 occurred in 6 of 85 samples as assessed by single nucleotide polymorphism array. Tumors with CHD5 mutation or methylation were more likely to have mutation of KRAS or BRAF (P = .04). The aggregate frequency of CHD5 haploinsufficiency or inactivation is 16.2% in ovarian cancer. Thus, CHD5 may play a role as a tumor suppressor gene in ovarian cancer; however, it is likely that there is another target of the frequent copy number neutral loss of heterozygosity observed at 1p36.

  14. Differential gene expression of fatty acid binding proteins during porcine adipogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samulin, Johanna; Berget, Ingunn; Lien, Sigbjørn; Sundvold, Hilde

    2008-10-01

    Four different subtypes of fatty acid binding proteins i.e. liver-type FABP1, heart/muscle-type FABP3, adipocyte-type FABP4 and epithelial/epidermal-type FABP5 are expressed in adipose tissue. However, only the regulatory role of FABP4 in adipogenesis has been thoroughly investigated. To increase the knowledge on possible roles of these FABP subtypes in preadipocyte differentiation, gene expression patterns were examined during adipogenesis in pig (Sus scrofa). FABP1 expression was induced in proliferating cells, whereas FABP3, FABP4 and FABP5 expression increased throughout preadipocyte differentiation. Interestingly, the FABP4 and FABP5 expression increased early in the differentiation, followed by FABP3 later in the differentiation process. This indicates a role of FABP4 and FABP5 in intracellular fatty acid transport during initiation of differentiation, whereas, FABP3 likely is involved in the transport of fatty acids during intermediate stages of adipogenesis. In this study we demonstrate that FABP3, FABP4 and FABP5 expression is correlated with that of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors alpha and gamma (PPARA and PPARG). Altogether, this suggests a role of FABP1 during cell proliferation, whereas a coordinated expression of FABP3, FABP4 and FABP5 together with that of PPARA, PPARG1 and PPARG2 might be critical for the metabolic regulation during porcine adipogenesis.

  15. Mannose-Binding Lectin Promoter Polymorphisms and Gene Variants in Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients from Cantabria (Northern Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-Gonzalo Ocejo-Vinyals

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mannose-binding lectin is a central molecule of the innate immune system. Mannose-binding lectin 2 promoter polymorphisms and structural variants have been associated with susceptibility to tuberculosis. However, contradictory results among different populations have been reported, resulting in no convincing evidence of association between mannose-binding lectin 2 and susceptibility to tuberculosis. For this reason, we conducted a study in a well genetically conserved Spanish population in order to shed light on this controversial association. We analysed the six promoter and structural mannose-binding lectin 2 gene variants in 107 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and 441 healthy controls. Only D variant and HYPD haplotype were significantly more frequents in controls which would indicate that this allele could confer protection against pulmonary tuberculosis, but this difference disappeared after statistical correction. Neither the rest of alleles nor the haplotypes were significantly associated with the disease. These results would indicate that mannose-binding lectin promoter polymorphisms and gene variants would not be associated with an increased risk to pulmonary tuberculosis. Despite the slight trend of the D allele and HYPD haplotype in conferring protection against pulmonary tuberculosis, susceptibility to this disease would probably be due to other genetic factors, at least in our population.

  16. The mouse salivary androgen-binding protein (ABP) gene cluster on chromosomes 7: characterization and evolutionary relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laukaitis, Christina M; Dlouhy, Stephen R; Karn, Robert C

    2003-10-01

    Mouse salivary androgen-binding protein (ABP) is a pair of dimers, composed of an alpha subunit disulfide bridged to either a beta or a gamma subunit. It has been proposed that each subunit is encoded by a distinct gene: Abpa, Abpb, and Abpg for the alpha, beta, and gamma subunits, respectively. We report here the structures and sequences of the genes that encode these three subunits. Each gene has three exons separated by two introns. Mouse salivary ABP is a member of the secretoglobin family, and we compare the structure of the three ABP subunit genes to those of 18 other mammalian secretoglobins. We map the three genes as a gene cluster located 10 cM from the centromere of Chromosome (Chr) 7 and show that Abpa is the closest of the three to the gene for glucose phosphate isomerase (GPI) and that Abpg is the closest to the centromere, with Abpb mapping between them. Abpa is oriented in the opposite direction to Abpb and Abpg, with its 5' end directed toward their 5' ends. We compare the location of these genes with other secretoglobin genes in the mouse genome and with the known locations of secretoglobin genes in the human genome and present evidence that strong positive selection has driven the divergence of the coding regions of Abpb and Abpg since the putative duplication event that created them.

  17. Epoxide-Mediated CifR Repression of cif Gene Expression Utilizes Two Binding Sites in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Ballok, Alicia E.; Bahl, Christopher D.; Dolben, Emily L.; Lindsay, Allia K.; St. Laurent, Jessica D.; Hogan, Deborah A.; Madden, Dean R.; O'Toole, George A.

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa secretes an epoxide hydrolase virulence factor that reduces the apical membrane expression of ABC transporters such as the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). This virulence factor, named CFTR inhibitory factor (Cif), is regulated by a TetR-family, epoxide-responsive repressor known as CifR via direct binding and repression. We identified two sites of CifR binding in the intergenic space between cifR and morB, the first gene in the operon contain...

  18. Global expression analysis of nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat-encoding and related genes in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    St Clair Dina A

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat (NBS-LRR-encoding genes comprise the largest class of plant disease resistance genes. The 149 NBS-LRR-encoding genes and the 58 related genes that do not encode LRRs represent approximately 0.8% of all ORFs so far annotated in Arabidopsis ecotype Col-0. Despite their prevalence in the genome and functional importance, there was little information regarding expression of these genes. Results We analyzed the expression patterns of ~170 NBS-LRR-encoding and related genes in Arabidopsis Col-0 using multiple analytical approaches: expressed sequenced tag (EST representation, massively parallel signature sequencing (MPSS, microarray analysis, rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE PCR, and gene trap lines. Most of these genes were expressed at low levels with a variety of tissue specificities. Expression was detected by at least one approach for all but 10 of these genes. The expression of some but not the majority of NBS-LRR-encoding and related genes was affected by salicylic acid (SA treatment; the response to SA varied among different accessions. An analysis of previously published microarray data indicated that ten NBS-LRR-encoding and related genes exhibited increased expression in wild-type Landsberg erecta (Ler after flagellin treatment. Several of these ten genes also showed altered expression after SA treatment, consistent with the regulation of R gene expression during defense responses and overlap between the basal defense response and salicylic acid signaling pathways. Enhancer trap analysis indicated that neither jasmonic acid nor benzothiadiazole (BTH, a salicylic acid analog, induced detectable expression of the five NBS-LRR-encoding genes and one TIR-NBS-encoding gene tested; however, BTH did induce detectable expression of the other TIR-NBS-encoding gene analyzed. Evidence for alternative mRNA polyadenylation sites was observed for many of the tested genes. Evidence for

  19. The RNA Binding Protein IMP2 Preserves Glioblastoma Stem Cells by Preventing let-7 Target Gene Silencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Degrauwe

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSCs can drive tumor growth, and their maintenance may rely on post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression, including that mediated by microRNAs (miRNAs. The let-7 miRNA family has been shown to induce differentiation by silencing stem cell programs. Let-7-mediated target gene suppression is prevented by LIN28A/B, which reduce let-7 biogenesis in normal embryonic and some cancer stem cells and ensure maintenance of stemness. Here, we find that glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs lack LIN28 and express both let-7 and their target genes, suggesting LIN28-independent protection from let-7 silencing. Using photoactivatable-ribonucleoside-enhanced crosslinking and immunoprecipitation (PAR-CLIP, we show that insulin-like growth factor 2 mRNA-binding protein 2 (IMP2 binds to let-7 miRNA recognition elements (MREs and prevents let-7 target gene silencing. Our observations define the RNA-binding repertoire of IMP2 and identify a mechanism whereby it supports GSC and neural stem cell specification.

  20. The saci_2123 gene of the hyperthermoacidophile Sulfolobus acidocaldarius encodes an ATP-binding cassette multidrug transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Nuan; Driessen, Arnold J M

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) transporters are capable of secreting structurally and functionally unrelated toxic compounds from the cell. Among this group are ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. These membrane proteins are typically arranged as either hetero- or homo-dimers of ABC half-transporters with each subunit consisting of a membrane domain fused at the C-terminus to an ATP-binding domain, or as full transporters in which the two subunits are fused into a single polypeptide. The saci_2123 gene of the thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius is the only gene in the genome that encodes an ATP-binding cassette half-transporter, while a homologous gene is present in the genomes of S. solfataricus, S. tokodaii and S islandicus. Saci_2123 shares homology with well-characterized bacterial and mammalian MDR transporters. The saci_2132 gene is up-regulated when cells are exposed to drugs. A deletion mutant of saci_2132 was found to be more vulnerable to a set of toxic compounds, including detergents, antibiotics and uncouplers as compared to the wild-type strain, while the drug resistance could be restored through the plasmid-based expression of saci_2132. These data demonstrate that Saci_2132 is an archaeal ABC-MDR transporter and therefore it was termed Smr1 (Sulfolobus multidrug resistance transporter 1).

  1. Non-CpG methylation by DNMT3B facilitates REST binding and gene silencing in developing mouse hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Donghong; Wu, Bingruo; Wang, Ping; Wang, Yidong; Lu, Pengfei; Nechiporuk, Tamilla; Floss, Thomas; Greally, John M; Zheng, Deyou; Zhou, Bin

    2016-12-11

    The dynamic interaction of DNA methylation and transcription factor binding in regulating spatiotemporal gene expression is essential for embryogenesis, but the underlying mechanisms remain understudied. In this study, using mouse models and integration of in vitro and in vivo genetic and epigenetic analyses, we show that the binding of REST (repressor element 1 (RE1) silencing transcription factor; also known as NRSF) to its cognate RE1 sequences is temporally regulated by non-CpG methylation. This process is dependent on DNA methyltransferase 3B (DNMT3B) and leads to suppression of adult cardiac genes in developing hearts. We demonstrate that DNMT3B preferentially mediates non-CpG methylation of REST-targeted genes in the developing heart. Downregulation of DNMT3B results in decreased non-CpG methylation of RE1 sequences, reduced REST occupancy, and consequently release of the transcription suppression during later cardiac development. Together, these findings reveal a critical gene silencing mechanism in developing mammalian hearts that is regulated by the dynamic interaction of DNMT3B-mediated non-CpG methylation and REST binding.

  2. CPP1, a DNA-binding protein involved in the expression of a soybean leghemoglobin c3 gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvitanich, Cristina; Pallisgaard, Niels; Nielsen, Kirsten A.; Hansen, Anette Chemnitz; Larsen, Knud; Pihakaski-Maunsbach, Kaarina; Marcker, Kjeld A.; Jensen, Erik Østergaard

    2000-01-01

    Nodulin genes are specifically expressed in the nitrogen-fixing root nodules. We have identified a novel type of DNA-binding protein (CPP1) interacting with the promoter of the soybean leghemoglobin gene Gmlbc3. The DNA-binding domain of CPP1 contains two similar Cys-rich domains with 9 and 10 Cys, respectively. Genes encoding similar domains have been identified in Arabidopsis thaliana, Caenorhabditis elegans, the mouse, and human. The domains also have some homology to a Cys-rich region present in some polycomb proteins. The cpp1 gene is induced late in nodule development and the expression is confined to the distal part of the central infected tissue of the nodule. A constitutively expressed cpp1 gene reduces the expression of a Gmlbc3 promoter–gusA reporter construct in Vicia hirsuta roots. These data therefore suggest that CPP1 might be involved in the regulation of the leghemoglobin genes in the symbiotic root nodule. PMID:10859345

  3. dREAM co-operates with insulator-binding proteins and regulates expression at divergently paired genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korenjak, Michael; Kwon, Eunjeong; Morris, Robert T; Anderssen, Endre; Amzallag, Arnaud; Ramaswamy, Sridhar; Dyson, Nicholas J

    2014-08-01

    dREAM complexes represent the predominant form of E2F/RBF repressor complexes in Drosophila. dREAM associates with thousands of sites in the fly genome but its mechanism of action is unknown. To understand the genomic context in which dREAM acts we examined the distribution and localization of Drosophila E2F and dREAM proteins. Here we report a striking and unexpected overlap between dE2F2/dREAM sites and binding sites for the insulator-binding proteins CP190 and Beaf-32. Genetic assays show that these components functionally co-operate and chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments on mutant animals demonstrate that dE2F2 is important for association of CP190 with chromatin. dE2F2/dREAM binding sites are enriched at divergently transcribed genes, and the majority of genes upregulated by dE2F2 depletion represent the repressed half of a differentially expressed, divergently transcribed pair of genes. Analysis of mutant animals confirms that dREAM and CP190 are similarly required for transcriptional integrity at these gene pairs and suggest that dREAM functions in concert with CP190 to establish boundaries between repressed/activated genes. Consistent with the idea that dREAM co-operates with insulator-binding proteins, genomic regions bound by dREAM possess enhancer-blocking activity that depends on multiple dREAM components. These findings suggest that dREAM functions in the organization of transcriptional domains. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  4. Regulatory elements associated with paternally-expressed genes in the imprinted murine Angelman/Prader-Willi syndrome domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Rodriguez-Jato

    Full Text Available The Angelman/Prader-Willi syndrome (AS/PWS domain contains at least 8 imprinted genes regulated by a bipartite imprinting center (IC associated with the SNRPN gene. One component of the IC, the PWS-IC, governs the paternal epigenotype and expression of paternal genes. The mechanisms by which imprinting and expression of paternal genes within the AS/PWS domain - such as MKRN3 and NDN - are regulated by the PWS-IC are unclear. The syntenic region in the mouse is organized and imprinted similarly to the human domain with the murine PWS-IC defined by a 6 kb interval within the Snrpn locus that includes the promoter. To identify regulatory elements that may mediate PWS-IC function, we mapped the location and allele-specificity of DNase I hypersensitive (DH sites within the PWS-IC in brain cells, then identified transcription factor binding sites within a subset of these DH sites. Six major paternal-specific DH sites were detected in the Snrpn gene, five of which map within the 6 kb PWS-IC. We postulate these five DH sites represent functional components of the murine PWS-IC. Analysis of transcription factor binding within multiple DH sites detected nuclear respiratory factors (NRF's and YY1 specifically on the paternal allele. NRF's and YY1 were also detected in the paternal promoter region of the murine Mrkn3 and Ndn genes. These results suggest that NRF's and YY1 may facilitate PWS-IC function and coordinately regulate expression of paternal genes. The presence of NRF's also suggests a link between transcriptional regulation within the AS/PWS domain and regulation of respiration. 3C analyses indicated Mkrn3 lies in close proximity to the PWS-IC on the paternal chromosome, evidence that the PWS-IC functions by allele-specific interaction with its distal target genes. This could occur by allele-specific co-localization of the PWS-IC and its target genes to transcription factories containing NRF's and YY1.

  5. Identification of SNPs in Cellular Retinol Binding Protein 1 and Cellular Retinol Binding Protein 3 Genes and Their Associations with Laying Performance Traits in Erlang Mountainous Chicken

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available CRBP1 (cellular retinol binding protein 1 and CRBP3 (cellular retinol binding protein 3, are important components of the retinoid signaling pathway and take part in vitamin A absorption, transport and metabolism. Based on the role of vitamin A in chicken laying performance, we investigated the polymorphism of CRBP1 and CRBP3 genes in 349 chickens using single strand conformation polymorphism and DNA sequencing methods. Only one polymorphism was identified in the third intron of CRBP1, two polymorphisms were detected in CRBP3; they were located in the second intron and the third intron respectively. The association studies between these three SNPs and laying performance traits were performed in Erlang mountainous chicken. Notably, the SNP g.14604G>T of CRBP1 was shown to be significantly associated with body weight at first egg (BWFE, age at first egg (AFE, weight at first egg (WFE and total number of eggs with 300 age (EN. The CRBP3 polymorphism g.934C>G was associated with AFE, and the g.1324A>G was associated with AFE and BWFE, but none of these polymorphisms were associated with egg quality traits. Haplotype combinations constructed on these two SNPs of CRBP3 gene were associated with BWFE and AFE. In particular, diplotype H2H2 had positive effect on AFE, BWFE, EN, and average egg-laying interval. We herein describe for the first time basic research on the polymorphism of chicken CRBP1 and CRBP3 genes that is predictive of genetic potential for laying performance in chicken.

  6. Regulation of Insulin-Response Element Binding Protein-1 in Obesity and Diabetes: Potential Role in Impaired Insulin-Induced Gene Transcription

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    One of the major mechanisms by which insulin modulates glucose homeostasis is through regulation of gene expression. Therefore, reduced expression of transcription factors that are required for insulin-regulated gene expression may contribute to insulin resistance. We recently identified insulin response element-binding protein-1 (IRE-BP1) as a transcription factor that binds and transactivates multiple insulin-responsive genes, but the regulation of IRE-BP1 in vivo is largely unknown. In thi...

  7. Role of aldo-keto reductases and other doxorubicin pharmacokinetic genes in doxorubicin resistance, DNA binding, and subcellular localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Since proteins involved in chemotherapy drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics have a strong impact on the uptake, metabolism, and efflux of such drugs, they likely play critical roles in resistance to chemotherapy drugs in cancer patients. Methods To investigate this hypothesis, we conducted a whole genome microarray study to identify difference in the expression of genes between isogenic doxorubicin-sensitive and doxorubicin-resistant MCF-7 breast tumour cells. We then assessed the degree of over-representation of doxorubicin pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic genes in the dataset of doxorubicin resistance genes. Results Of 27,958 Entrez genes on the array, 7.4 per cent or 2,063 genes were differentially expressed by ≥ 2-fold between wildtype and doxorubicin-resistant cells. The false discovery rate was set at 0.01 and the minimum p value for significance for any gene within the “hit list” was 0.01. Seventeen and 43 per cent of doxorubicin pharmacokinetic genes were over-represented in the hit list, depending upon whether the gene name was identical or within the same gene family, respectively. The most over-represented genes were within the 1C and 1B families of aldo-keto reductases (AKRs), which convert doxorubicin to doxorubicinol. Other genes convert doxorubicin to other metabolites or affect the influx, efflux, or cytotoxicity of the drug. In further support of the role of AKRs in doxorubicin resistance, we observed that, in comparison to doxorubicin, doxorubincol exhibited dramatically reduced cytotoxicity, reduced DNA-binding activity, and strong localization to extra nuclear lysosomes. Pharmacologic inhibition of the above AKRs in doxorubicin-resistant cells increased cellular doxorubicin levels, restored doxorubicin cytotoxicity and re-established doxorubicin localization to the nucleus. The properties of doxorubicinol were unaffected. Conclusions These findings demonstrate the utility of using curated pharmacokinetic and

  8. Copy number variations of the ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCC6 gene and its pseudogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kringen Marianne K

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCC6 gene is located on chromosome 16 between its two pseudogenes (ABCC6P1 and ABCC6P2. Previously, we have shown that ABCC6P1 is transcribed and affects ABCC6 at the transcriptional level. In this study we aimed to determine copy number variations of ABCC6, ABCC6P1 and ABCC6P2 in different populations. Moreover, we sought to study the transcription pattern of ABCC6 and ABCC6 pseudogenes in 39 different human tissues. Findings Genomic DNA from healthy individuals from five populations, Chinese (n = 24, Middle East (n = 20, Mexicans (n = 24, Caucasians (n = 50 and Africans (n = 24, were examined for copy number variations of ABCC6 and its pseudogenes by pyrosequencing and quantitative PCR. Copy number variation of ABCC6 was very rare (2/142; 1.4%. However, one or three copies of ABCC6P1 were relatively common (3% and 8%, respectively. Only one person had a single copy of ABCC6P2 while none had three copies. In Chinese, deletions or duplications of ABCC6P1 were more frequent than in any other population (9/24; 37.5%. The transcription pattern of ABCC6P2 was highly similar to ABCC6 and ABCC6P1, with highest transcription in liver and kidney. Interestingly, the total transcription level of pseudogenes, ABCC6P1 + ABCC6P2, was higher than ABCC6 in most tissues, including liver and kidney. Conclusions Copy number variations of the ABCC6 pseudogenes are quite common, especially in populations of Chinese ancestry. The expression pattern of ABCC6P2 in 39 human tissues was highly similar to that of ABCC6 and ABCC6P1 suggesting similar regulatory mechanisms for ABCC6 and its pseudogenes.

  9. Molecular analysis of reticulocyte binding protein-2 gene in Plasmodium vivax isolates from India

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    Prajapati Surendra K

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmodium vivax reticulocyte binding protein-2 (PvRBP-2 is a promising candidate for development of vaccine against parasite. DNA sequence polymorphism in pvrbp-2 which may hamper the vaccine development program has been identified in laboratory strains. Therefore, unraveling genetic polymorphism in pvrbp-2 from field isolates is a prerequisite for success in vaccine development. This study was designed with a primary aim to uncover genetic polymorphism in pvrbp-2 among P. vivax field isolates. Results Using virtual restriction mapping of pvrbp-2 sequences, two restriction enzymes (AluI and ApoI were selected for the development of pvrbp-2 as a PCR-RFLP marker. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP analysis revealed a high degree of genetic polymorphism in the pvrbp-2 gene among field isolates of P. vivax. ApoI-RFLP was found to be more efficient in identifying the extent of genetic polymorphism in pvrbp-2 compared to AluI-RFLP. Combined genotyping/haplotyping of RFLP pattern revealed a total of 36 distinct RFLP patterns among 83 P. vivax isolates analyzed. DNA sequence analysis also supports high degree of genetic polymorphism among field isolates of P. vivax. Pvrbp-2 PCR-RFLP method is able to distinguish multiple infection up to 16.86% and it revealed a low level of shared genetic pool between more than two populations. Conclusion The study suggests that pvrbp-2 is highly polymorphic genetic marker which can be used for population genetic analyses. RFLP analysis suggests presence of nearly similar proportion of Sal-1 and Belem alleles in Indian P. vivax populations. The larger extent of genetic polymorphism identified from limited samples advocates to screen genetic polymorphism in pvrbp-2 from malaria endemic geographical regions and countries for designing pvrbp-2 based anti-malarial control measures.

  10. Mutations in the ligand-binding domain of the androgen receptor gene cluster in two regions of the gene.

    OpenAIRE

    McPhaul, M J; Marcelli, M; Zoppi, S; Wilson, C. M.; Griffin, J E; Wilson, J. D.

    1992-01-01

    We have analyzed the nucleotide sequence of the androgen receptor from 22 unrelated subjects with substitution mutations of the hormone-binding domain. Eleven had the phenotype of complete testicular feminization, four had incomplete testicular feminization, and seven had Reifenstein syndrome. The underlying functional defect in cultured skin fibroblasts included individuals with absent, qualitative, or quantitative defects in ligand binding. 19 of the 21 substitution mutations (90%) cluster ...

  11. Disruption of the acyl-coa binding protein gene delays hepatic adaptation to metabolic changes at weaning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neess, Ditte; Bloksgaard, Maria; Sørensen, Signe Bek;

    2011-01-01

    , little is known about the in vivo function in mammalian cells. We have generated mice with targeted disruption of ACBP (ACBP-/-). These mice are viable and fertile and develop normally. However, around weaning the ACBP-/- mice go through a crisis with overall weakness, and a slightly decreased growth...... rate. Using microarray analysis we show that the liver of ACBP-/- mice display a significantly delayed adaptation to weaning with late induction of target genes of the sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) family. As a result, hepatic de novo cholesterogenesis is decreased at weaning....... The delayed induction of SREBP target genes around weaning is caused by a compromised processing and decreased expression of SREBP precursors leading to reduced binding of SREBP to target sites in chromatin. In conclusion, lack of ACBP interferes with the normal metabolic adaptation to weaning and leads...

  12. Genome-wide analysis of glucocorticoid receptor binding regions in adipocytes reveal gene network involved in triglyceride homeostasis.

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    Chi-Yi Yu

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids play important roles in the regulation of distinct aspects of adipocyte biology. Excess glucocorticoids in adipocytes are associated with metabolic disorders, including central obesity, insulin resistance and dyslipidemia. To understand the mechanisms underlying the glucocorticoid action in adipocytes, we used chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing to isolate genome-wide glucocorticoid receptor (GR binding regions (GBRs in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Furthermore, gene expression analyses were used to identify genes that were regulated by glucocorticoids. Overall, 274 glucocorticoid-regulated genes contain or locate nearby GBR. We found that many GBRs were located in or nearby genes involved in triglyceride (TG synthesis (Scd-1, 2, 3, GPAT3, GPAT4, Agpat2, Lpin1, lipolysis (Lipe, Mgll, lipid transport (Cd36, Lrp-1, Vldlr, Slc27a2 and storage (S3-12. Gene expression analysis showed that except for Scd-3, the other 13 genes were induced in mouse inguinal fat upon 4-day glucocorticoid treatment. Reporter gene assays showed that except Agpat2, the other 12 glucocorticoid-regulated genes contain at least one GBR that can mediate hormone response. In agreement with the fact that glucocorticoids activated genes in both TG biosynthetic and lipolytic pathways, we confirmed that 4-day glucocorticoid treatment increased TG synthesis and lipolysis concomitantly in inguinal fat. Notably, we found that 9 of these 12 genes were induced in transgenic mice that have constant elevated plasma glucocorticoid levels. These results suggested that a similar mechanism was used to regulate TG homeostasis during chronic glucocorticoid treatment. In summary, our studies have identified molecular components in a glucocorticoid-controlled gene network involved in the regulation of TG homeostasis in adipocytes. Understanding the regulation of this gene network should provide important insight for future therapeutic developments for metabolic diseases.

  13. EBV noncoding RNA EBER2 interacts with host RNA-binding proteins to regulate viral gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nara; Yario, Therese A; Gao, Jessica S; Steitz, Joan A

    2016-03-22

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) produces a highly abundant noncoding RNA called EBV-encoded RNA 2 (EBER2) that interacts indirectly with the host transcription factor paired box protein 5 (PAX5) to regulate viral latent membrane protein 1/2 (LMP1/2) gene expression as well as EBV lytic replication. To identify intermediary proteins, we isolated EBER2-PAX5-containing complexes and analyzed the protein components by mass spectrometry. The top candidates include three host proteins splicing factor proline and glutamine rich (SFPQ), non-POU domain-containing octamer-binding protein (NONO), and RNA binding motif protein 14 (RBM14), all reported to be components of nuclear bodies called paraspeckles. In vivo RNA-protein crosslinking indicates that SFPQ and RBM14 contact EBER2 directly. Binding studies using recombinant proteins demonstrate that SFPQ and NONO associate with PAX5, potentially bridging its interaction with EBER2. Similar to EBER2 or PAX5 depletion, knockdown of any of the three host RNA-binding proteins results in the up-regulation of viral LMP2A mRNA levels, supporting a physiologically relevant interaction of these newly identified factors with EBER2 and PAX5. Identification of these EBER2-interacting proteins enables the search for cellular noncoding RNAs that regulate host gene expression in a manner similar to EBER2.

  14. Mutation analysis of the TATA box-binding protein (TBP) gene in Chinese Han patients with spinocerebellar ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Q; Li, X H; Wang, J L; Jiang, H; Zhang, S; Lei, L F; Shen, L; Xia, K; Pan, Q; Long, Z G; Tang, B S

    2009-10-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 17 (SCA17) is a rare autosomal dominant progressive neurodegenerative disease caused by the CAG/CAA expansion in the TATA box-binding protein (TBP) gene. This study aimed to assess the frequency of SCA17 in patients from mainland China. Analysis of CAG/CAA expansion in this gene was performed in 263 patients consisting of 100 probands with dominantly inherited ataxias and 163 patients with sporadic ataxias. Abnormal expansion of CAG/CAA repeats in the SCA17 locus was found in a proband and her younger sister. To our knowledge, we are providing the first kindred analysis of SCA17 in mainland China.

  15. Tank-Binding Kinase 1 (TBK1) Gene and Open-Angle Glaucomas (An American Ophthalmological Society Thesis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fingert, John H; Robin, Alan L; Scheetz, Todd E; Kwon, Young H; Liebmann, Jeffrey M; Ritch, Robert; Alward, Wallace L M

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the role of TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1) gene copy-number variations (ie, gene duplications and triplications) in the pathophysiology of various open-angle glaucomas. In previous studies, we discovered that copy-number variations in the TBK1 gene are associated with normal-tension glaucoma. Here, we investigated the prevalence of copy-number variations in cohorts of patients with other open-angle glaucomas-juvenile-onset open-angle glaucoma (n=30), pigmentary glaucoma (n=209), exfoliation glaucoma (n=225), and steroid-induced glaucoma (n=79)-using a quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay. No TBK1 gene copy-number variations were detected in patients with juvenile-onset open-angle glaucoma, pigmentary glaucoma, or steroid-induced glaucoma. A TBK1 gene duplication was detected in one (0.44%) of the 225 exfoliation glaucoma patients. TBK1 gene copy-number variations (gene duplications and triplications) have been previously associated with normal-tension glaucoma. An exploration of other open-angle glaucomas detected a TBK1 copy-number variation in a patient with exfoliation glaucoma, which is the first example of a TBK1 mutation in a glaucoma patient with a diagnosis other than normal-tension glaucoma. A broader phenotypic range may be associated with TBK1 copy-number variations, although mutations in this gene are most often detected in patients with normal-tension glaucoma.

  16. Cloning and expression of two human genes encoding calcium-binding proteins that are regulated during myeloid differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagasse, E.; Clerc, R.G.

    1988-06-01

    The cellular mechanisms involved in chronic inflammatory processes are poorly understood. This is especially true for the role of macrophages, which figure prominently in the inflammatory response. Two proteins, MRP8 and MRP14, which are expressed in infiltrate macrophages during inflammatory reactions but not in normal tissue macrophages, which have been characterized. Here the authors report that MRP8 and MRP14 mRNAs are specially expressed in human cells of myeloid origin and that their expression is regulated during monocycle-macrophage and granulocyte differentiation. To initiate the analysis of cis-acting elements governing the tissue-specific expression of the MRP genes, the authors cloned the human genes encoding MRP8 and MRP14. Both genes contain three exons, are single copy, and have a strikingly similar organization. They belong to a novel subfamily of highly homologous calcium-binding proteins which includes S100..cap alpha.., S100BETA, intestinal calcium-binding protein, P11, and calcyclin (2A9). A transient expression assay was devised to investigate the tissue-specific regulatory elements responsible for MRP gene expression after differentiation in leukemia HL60 cells. The results of this investigation demonstrated that the cis-acting element responsible for MRP expression are present on the cloned DNA fragment containing the MRP gene loci.

  17. A temporal switch in the insulin-signalling pathway that regulates hepatic IGF-binding protein-1 gene expression

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    PUBLISHED Insulin regulation of hepatic gene transcription is a vital component of glucose homeostasis. Understanding the molecular regulationof thisprocess aids the searchfor the defect(s) that promotesinsulin-resistant states, such asdiabetesmellitus. We havepreviously shownthat the insulin regulationof hepatic IGF-binding protein-1 (IGFBP1) expression requiresthe signalling proteins phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). In this report, we ...

  18. The carboxy-terminal domain of Dictyostelium C-module-binding factor is an independent gene regulatory entity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Lucas

    Full Text Available The C-module-binding factor (CbfA is a multidomain protein that belongs to the family of jumonji-type (JmjC transcription regulators. In the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, CbfA regulates gene expression during the unicellular growth phase and multicellular development. CbfA and a related D. discoideum CbfA-like protein, CbfB, share a paralogous domain arrangement that includes the JmjC domain, presumably a chromatin-remodeling activity, and two zinc finger-like (ZF motifs. On the other hand, the CbfA and CbfB proteins have completely different carboxy-terminal domains, suggesting that the plasticity of such domains may have contributed to the adaptation of the CbfA-like transcription factors to the rapid genome evolution in the dictyostelid clade. To support this hypothesis we performed DNA microarray and real-time RT-PCR measurements and found that CbfA regulates at least 160 genes during the vegetative growth of D. discoideum cells. Functional annotation of these genes revealed that CbfA predominantly controls the expression of gene products involved in housekeeping functions, such as carbohydrate, purine nucleoside/nucleotide, and amino acid metabolism. The CbfA protein displays two different mechanisms of gene regulation. The expression of one set of CbfA-dependent genes requires at least the JmjC/ZF domain of the CbfA protein and thus may depend on chromatin modulation. Regulation of the larger group of genes, however, does not depend on the entire CbfA protein and requires only the carboxy-terminal domain of CbfA (CbfA-CTD. An AT-hook motif located in CbfA-CTD, which is known to mediate DNA binding to A+T-rich sequences in vitro, contributed to CbfA-CTD-dependent gene regulatory functions in vivo.

  19. Computational identification of conserved transcription factor binding sites upstream of genes induced in rat brain by transient focal ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulliam, John V K; Xu, Zhenfeng; Ford, Gregory D; Liu, Cuimei; Li, Yonggang; Stovall, Kyndra C; Cannon, Virginetta S; Tewolde, Teclemichael; Moreno, Carlos S; Ford, Byron D

    2013-02-07

    Microarray analysis has been used to understand how gene regulation plays a critical role in neuronal injury, survival and repair following ischemic stroke. To identify the transcriptional regulatory elements responsible for ischemia-induced gene expression, we examined gene expression profiles of rat brains following focal ischemia and performed computational analysis of consensus transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) in the genes of the dataset. In this study, rats were sacrificed 24 h after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) stroke and gene transcription in brain tissues following ischemia/reperfusion was examined using Affymetrix GeneChip technology. The CONserved transcription FACtor binding site (CONFAC) software package was used to identify over-represented TFBS in the upstream promoter regions of ischemia-induced genes compared to control datasets. CONFAC identified 12 TFBS that were statistically over-represented from our dataset of ischemia-induced genes, including three members of the Ets-1 family of transcription factors (TFs). Microarray results showed that mRNA for Ets-1 was increased following tMCAO but not pMCAO. Immunohistochemical analysis of Ets-1 protein in rat brains following MCAO showed that Ets-1 was highly expressed in neurons in the brain of sham control animals. Ets-1 protein expression was virtually abolished in injured neurons of the ischemic brain but was unchanged in peri-infarct brain areas. These data indicate that TFs, including Ets-1, may influence neuronal injury following ischemia. These findings could provide important insights into the mechanisms that lead to brain injury and could provide avenues for the development of novel therapies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Prevention of adverse events of interferon γ gene therapy by gene delivery of interferon γ-heparin-binding domain fusion protein in mice

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    Mitsuru Ando

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sustained gene delivery of interferon (IFN γ can be an effective treatment, but our previous study showed high levels of IFNγ-induced adverse events, including the loss of body weight. These unwanted events could be reduced by target-specific delivery of IFNγ after in vivo gene transfer. To achieve this, we selected the heparin-binding domain (HBD of extracellular superoxide dismutase as a molecule to anchor IFNγ to the cell surface. We designed three IFNγ derivatives, IFNγ-HBD1, IFNγ-HBD2, and IFNγ-HBD3, each of which had 1, 2, or 3 HBDs, respectively. Each plasmid-encoding fusion proteins was delivered to the liver, a model target in this study, by hydrodynamic tail vein injection. The serum concentration of IFNγ-HBD2 and IFNγ-HBD3 after gene delivery was lower than that of IFNγ or IFNγ-HBD1. Gene delivery of IFNγ-HBD2, but not of IFNγ-HBD3, effectively increased the mRNA expression of IFNγ-inducible genes in the liver, suggesting liver-specific distribution of IFNγ-HBD2. Gene delivery of IFNγ-HBD2-suppressed tumor growth in the liver as efficiently as that of IFNγ with much less symptoms of adverse effects. These results indicate that the adverse events of IFNγ gene transfer can be prevented by gene delivery of IFNγ-HBD2, a fusion protein with high cell surface affinity.

  1. The tumor suppressor gene HIC1 (hypermethylated in cancer 1) is a sequence-specific transcriptional repressor: definition of its consensus binding sequence and analysis of its DNA binding and repressive properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinte, Sébastien; Stankovic-Valentin, Nicolas; Deltour, Sophie; Rood, Brian R; Guérardel, Cateline; Leprince, Dominique

    2004-09-10

    HIC1 (hypermethylated in cancer 1) is a tumor suppressor gene located at chromosome 17p13.3, a region frequently hypermethylated or deleted in human tumors and in a contiguous-gene syndrome, the Miller-Dieker syndrome. HIC1 is a transcriptional repressor containing five Krüppel-like C(2)H(2) zinc fingers and an N-terminal dimerization and autonomous repression domain called BTB/POZ. Although some of the HIC1 transcriptional repression mechanisms have been recently deciphered, target genes are still to be discovered. In this study, we determined the consensus binding sequence for HIC1 and investigated its DNA binding properties. Using a selection and amplification of binding sites technique, we identified the sequence 5'-(C)/(G)NG(C)/(G)GGGCA(C)/(A) CC-3' as an optimal binding site. In silico and functional analyses fully validated this consensus and highlighted a GGCA core motif bound by zinc fingers 3 and 4. The BTB/POZ domain inhibits the binding of HIC1 to a single site but mediates cooperative binding to a probe containing five concatemerized binding sites, a property shared by other BTB/POZ proteins. Finally, full-length HIC1 proteins transiently expressed in RK13 cells and more importantly, endogenous HIC1 proteins from the DAOY medulloblastoma cell line, repress the transcription of a reporter gene through their direct binding to these sites, as confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments. The definition of the HIC1-specific DNA binding sequence as well as the requirement for multiple sites for optimal binding of the full-length protein are mandatory prerequisites for the identification and analyses of bona fide HIC1 target genes.

  2. The DNA-binding factor Ctcf critically controls gene expression in macrophages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Nikolic (Tatjana); D. Movita (Dowty); M.E.H. Lambers (Margaretha); C. Ribeiro de Almeida (Claudia); P.J. Biesta (Paula); K. Kreefft (Kim); M.J.W. de Bruijn (Marjolein); I.M. Bergen (Ingrid); N.J. Galjart (Niels); P.A. Boonstra (André); R.W. Hendriks (Rudi)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractMacrophages play an important role in immunity and homeostasis. Upon pathogen recognition via specific receptors, they rapidly induce inflammatory responses. This process is tightly controlled at the transcriptional level. The DNA binding zinc-finger protein CCCTC-binding factor (Ctcf) i

  3. Molecular and functional characterization of odorant-binding protein genes in an invasive vector mosquito, Aedes albopictus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhua Deng

    Full Text Available Aedes albopictus is a major vector of dengue and Chikungunya viruses. Olfaction plays a vital role in guiding mosquito behaviors and contributes to their ability to transmit pathogens. Odorant-binding proteins (OBPs are abundant in insect olfactory tissues and involved in the first step of odorant reception. While comprehensive descriptions are available of OBPs from Aedes aegypti, Culex quinquefasciatus and Anopheles gambiae, only a few genes from Ae. albopictus have been reported. In this study, twenty-one putative AalbOBP genes were cloned using their homologues in Ae. aegypti to query an Ae. albopictus partial genome sequence. Two antenna-specific OBPs, AalbOBP37 and AalbOBP39, display a remarkable similarity in their overall folding and binding pockets, according to molecular modeling. Binding affinity assays indicated that AalbOBP37 and AalbOBP39 had overlapping ligand affinities and are affected in different pH condition. Electroantennagrams (EAG and behavioral tests show that these two genes were involved in olfactory reception. An improved understanding of the Ae. albopictus OBPs is expected to contribute to the development of more efficient and environmentally-friendly mosquito control strategies.

  4. Molecular mechanisms of cooperative binding of transcription factors Runx1-CBFβ-Ets1 on the TCRα gene enhancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasahara, Kota; Shiina, Masaaki; Fukuda, Ikuo; Ogata, Kazuhiro; Nakamura, Haruki

    2017-01-01

    Ets1 is an essential transcription factor (TF) for several important physiological processes, including cell proliferation and differentiation. Its recognition of the enhancer region of the TCRα gene is enhanced by the cooperative binding of the Runx1-CBFβ heterodimer, with the cancelation of phosphorylation-dependent autoinhibition. The detailed mechanism of this interesting cooperativity between Ets1 and the Runx1-CBFβ heterodimer is still largely unclear. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanisms of this cooperativity, by using molecular dynamics simulations. Consequently, we detected high flexibility of the loop region between the HI2 and H1 helices of Ets1. Upon Runx1-CBFβ heterodimer binding, this loop transiently adopts various sub-stable conformations in its interactions with the DNA. In addition, a network analysis suggested an allosteric pathway in the molecular assembly and identified some key residues that coincide with previous experimental studies. Our simulations suggest that the cooperative binding of Ets1 and the Runx1-CBFβ heterodimer alters the DNA conformation and induces sub-stable conformations of the HI2-H1 loop of Ets1. This phenomenon increases the flexibility of the regulatory module, including the HI2 helix, and destabilizes the inhibitory form of this module. Thus, we hypothesize that this effect facilitates Ets1-DNA binding and prevents the phosphorylation-dependent DNA binding autoinhibition.

  5. Localization of the cellular retinoic acid binding protein (CRABP) gene relative to the acute promyelocytic leukemia-associated breakpoint on human chromosome 15

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.H.M. Geurts van Kessel (Ad); H. de Leeuw (H.); E.J. Dekker (E.); J.M. Rijks (Jolianne); N. Spurr (N.); A.M. Ledbetter (Andrew M.); E. Kootwijk (E.); M.J. Vaessen (Marie-Josée)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractA human genomic fragment comprising the cellular retinoic acid binding protein (CRABP) gene was isolated. By using a panel of somatic cell hybrids, this gene could be assigned to human chromosome 15. Subsequently, a possible involvement of the CRABP gene in translocation (15;17) (q22;q11

  6. Drug binding to the inactivated state is necessary but not sufficient for high-affinity binding to human ether-à-go-go-related gene channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Mark J; Kuchel, Philip W; Campbell, Terence J; Vandenberg, Jamie I

    2008-11-01

    Drug block of the human ether-à-go-go-related gene K(+) channel (hERG) is the most common cause of acquired long QT syndrome, a disorder of cardiac repolarization that may result in ventricular tachycardia and sudden cardiac death. We investigated the open versus inactivated state dependence of drug block by using hERG mutants N588K and N588E, which shift the voltage dependence of inactivation compared with wild-type but in which the mutated residue is remote from the drug-binding pocket in the channel pore. Four high-affinity drugs (cisapride, dofetilide, terfenadine, and astemizole) demonstrated lower affinity for the inactivation-deficient N588K mutant hERG channel compared with N588E and wild-type hERG. Three of four low-affinity drugs (erythromycin, perhexiline, and quinidine) demonstrated no preference for N588E over N588K channels, whereas dl-sotalol was an example of a low-affinity state-dependent blocker. All five state-dependent blockers showed an even lower affinity for S620T mutant hERG (no inactivation) compared with N588K mutant hERG (greatly reduced inactivation). Computer modeling indicates that the reduced affinity for S620T compared with N588K and wild-type channels can be explained by the relative kinetics of drug block and unblock compared with the kinetics of inactivation and recovery from inactivation. We were also able to calculate, for the first time, the relative affinities for the inactivated versus the open state, which for the drugs tested here ranged from 4- to 70-fold. Our results show that preferential binding to the inactivated state is necessary but not sufficient for high-affinity binding to hERG channels.

  7. The ChIP-seq-defined networks of Bcl-3 gene binding support its required role in skeletal muscle atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W Jackman

    Full Text Available NF-kappaB transcriptional activation is required for skeletal muscle disuse atrophy. We are continuing to study how the activation of NF-kB regulates the genes that encode the protein products that cause atrophy. Using ChIP-sequencing we found that Bcl-3, an NF-kB transcriptional activator required for atrophy, binds to the promoters of a number of genes whose collective function describes two major aspects of muscle wasting. By means of bioinformatics analysis of ChIP-sequencing data we found Bcl-3 to be directing transcription networks of proteolysis and energy metabolism. The proteolytic arm of the Bcl-3 networks includes many E3 ligases associated with proteasomal protein degradation, including that of the N-end rule pathway. The metabolic arm appears to be involved in organizing the change from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis in atrophying muscle. For one gene, MuRF1, ChIP-sequencing data identified the location of Bcl-3 and p50 binding in the promoter region which directed the creation of deletant and base-substitution mutations of MuRF1 promoter constructs to determine the effect on gene transcription. The results provide the first direct confirmation that the NF-kB binding site is involved in the muscle unloading regulation of MuRF1. Finally, we have combined the ChIP-sequencing results with gene expression microarray data from unloaded muscle to map several direct targets of Bcl-3 that are transcription factors whose own targets describe a set of indirect targets for NF-kB in atrophy. ChIP-sequencing provides the first molecular explanation for the finding that Bcl3 knockout mice are resistant to disuse muscle atrophy. Mapping the transcriptional regulation of muscle atrophy requires an unbiased analysis of the whole genome, which we show is now possible with ChIP-sequencing.

  8. Mutations in the ligand-binding domain of the androgen receptor gene cluster in two regions of the gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhaul, M J; Marcelli, M; Zoppi, S; Wilson, C M; Griffin, J E; Wilson, J D

    1992-11-01

    We have analyzed the nucleotide sequence of the androgen receptor from 22 unrelated subjects with substitution mutations of the hormone-binding domain. Eleven had the phenotype of complete testicular feminization, four had incomplete testicular feminization, and seven had Reifenstein syndrome. The underlying functional defect in cultured skin fibroblasts included individuals with absent, qualitative, or quantitative defects in ligand binding. 19 of the 21 substitution mutations (90%) cluster in two regions that account for approximately 35% of the hormone-binding domain, namely, between amino acids 726 and 772 and between amino acids 826 and 864. The fact that one of these regions is homologous to a region of the human thyroid hormone receptor (hTR-beta) which is a known cluster site for mutations that cause thyroid hormone resistance implies that this localization of mutations is not a coincidence. These regions of the androgen receptor may be of particular importance for the formation and function of the hormone-receptor complex.

  9. Plant disease resistance genes encode members of an ancient and diverse protein family within the nucleotide-binding superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, B C; Dickerman, A W; Michelmore, R W; Sivaramakrishnan, S; Sobral, B W; Young, N D

    1999-11-01

    The nucleotide binding site (NBS) is a characteristic domain of many plant resistance gene products. An increasing number of NBS-encoding sequences are being identified through gene cloning, PCR amplification with degenerate primers, and genome sequencing projects. The NBS domain was analyzed from 14 known plant resistance genes and more than 400 homologs, representing 26 genera of monocotyledonous, dicotyle-donous and one coniferous species. Two distinct groups of diverse sequences were identified, indicating divergence during evolution and an ancient origin for these sequences. One group was comprised of sequences encoding an N-terminal domain with Toll/Interleukin-1 receptor homology (TIR), including the known resistance genes, N, M, L6, RPP1 and RPP5. Surprisingly, this group was entirely absent from monocot species in searches of both random genomic sequences and large collections of ESTs. A second group contained monocot and dicot sequences, including the known resistance genes, RPS2, RPM1, I2, Mi, Dm3, Pi-B, Xa1, RPP8, RPS5 and Prf. Amino acid signatures in the conserved motifs comprising the NBS domain clearly distinguished these two groups. The Arabidopsis genome is estimated to contain approximately 200 genes that encode related NBS motifs; TIR sequences were more abundant and outnumber non-TIR sequences threefold. The Arabidopsis NBS sequences currently in the databases are located in approximately 21 genomic clusters and 14 isolated loci. NBS-encoding sequences may be more prevalent in rice. The wide distribution of these sequences in the plant kingdom and their prevalence in the Arabidopsis and rice genomes indicate that they are ancient, diverse and common in plants. Sequence inferences suggest that these genes encode a novel class of nucleotide-binding proteins.

  10. Effects of norepinephrine transporter gene variants on NET binding in ADHD and healthy controls investigated by PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigurdardottir, Helen L; Kranz, Georg S; Rami-Mark, Christina; James, Gregory M; Vanicek, Thomas; Gryglewski, Gregor; Kautzky, Alexander; Hienert, Marius; Traub-Weidinger, Tatjana; Mitterhauser, Markus; Wadsak, Wolfgang; Hacker, Marcus; Rujescu, Dan; Kasper, Siegfried; Lanzenberger, Rupert

    2016-03-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a heterogeneous disorder with a strong genetic component. The norepinephrine transporter (NET) is a key target for ADHD treatment and the NET gene has been of high interest as a possible modulator of ADHD pathophysiology. Therefore, we conducted an imaging genetics study to examine possible effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the NET gene on NET nondisplaceable binding potential (BPND ) in patients with ADHD and healthy controls (HCs). Twenty adult patients with ADHD and 20 HCs underwent (S,S)-[18F]FMeNER-D2 positron emission tomography (PET) and were genotyped on a MassARRAY MALDI-TOF platform using the Sequenom iPLEX assay. Linear mixed models analyses revealed a genotype-dependent difference in NET BPND between groups in the thalamus and cerebellum. In the thalamus, a functional promoter SNP (-3081 A/T) and a 5'-untranslated region (5'UTR) SNP (-182 T/C), showed higher binding in ADHD patients compared to HCs depending on the major allele. Furthermore, we detected an effect of genotype in HCs, with major allele carriers having lower binding. In contrast, for two 3'UTR SNPs (*269 T/C, *417 A/T), ADHD subjects had lower binding in the cerebellum compared to HCs depending on the major allele. Additionally, symptoms of hyperactivity and impulsivity correlated with NET BPND in the cerebellum depending on genotype. Symptoms correlated positively with cerebellar NET BPND for the major allele, while symptoms correlated negatively to NET BPND in minor allele carriers. Our findings support the role of genetic influence of the NE system on NET binding to be pertubated in ADHD.

  11. Silkworm apolipophorin protein inhibits hemolysin gene expression of Staphylococcus aureus via binding to cell surface lipoteichoic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omae, Yosuke; Hanada, Yuichi; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa; Kaito, Chikara

    2013-08-30

    We previously reported that a silkworm hemolymph protein, apolipophorin (ApoLp), binds to the cell surface of Staphylococcus aureus and inhibits expression of the saePQRS operon encoding a two-component system, SaeRS, and hemolysin genes. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory mechanism of ApoLp on S. aureus hemolysin gene expression. ApoLp bound to lipoteichoic acids (LTA), an S. aureus cell surface component. The addition of purified LTA to liquid medium abolished the inhibitory effect of ApoLp against S. aureus hemolysin production. In an S. aureus knockdown mutant of ltaS encoding LTA synthetase, the inhibitory effects of ApoLp on saeQ expression and hemolysin production were attenuated. Furthermore, the addition of anti-LTA monoclonal antibody to liquid medium decreased the expression of S. aureus saeQ and hemolysin genes. In S. aureus strains expressing SaeS mutant proteins with a shortened extracellular domain, ApoLp did not decrease saeQ expression. These findings suggest that ApoLp binds to LTA on the S. aureus cell surface and inhibits S. aureus hemolysin gene expression via a two-component regulatory system, SaeRS.

  12. Second Intron of Mouse Nestin Gene Directs its Expression in Pluripotent Embryonic Carcinoma Cells through POU Factor Binding Site

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Gang JIN; Li LIU; Hua ZHONG; Ke-Jing ZHANG; Yong-Feng CHEN; Wei BIAN; Le-Ping CHENG; Nai-He JING

    2006-01-01

    Nestin, an intermediate filament protein, is expressed in the neural stem cells of the developing central nervous system. This tissue-specific expression is driven by the neural stem cell-specific enhancer in the second intron of the nestin gene. In this study, we showed that the mouse nestin gene was expressed in pluripotent embryonic carcinoma (EC) P19 and F9 cells, not in the differentiated cell types. This cell typespecific expression was conferred by the enhancer in the second intron. Mutation of the conserved POU factor-binding site in the enhancer abolished the reporter gene expression in EC cells. Oct4, a Class V POU factor, was found to be coexpressed with nestin in EC cells. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assays and supershift assays showed that a unique protein-DNA complex was formed specifically with nuclear extracts of EC cells, and Oct4 protein was included. Together, these results suggest the functional relevance between the conserved POU factor-binding site and the expression of the nestin gene in pluripotent EC cells.

  13. GA binding protein augments autophagy via transcriptional activation of BECN1-PIK3C3 complex genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wan; Swaminathan, Gayathri; Plowey, Edward D

    2014-09-01

    Macroautophagy is a vesicular catabolic trafficking pathway that is thought to protect cells from diverse stressors and to promote longevity. Recent studies have revealed that transcription factors play important roles in the regulation of autophagy. In this study, we have identified GA binding protein (GABP) as a transcriptional regulator of the combinatorial expression of BECN1-PIK3C3 complex genes involved in autophagosome initiation. We performed bioinformatics analyses that demonstrated highly conserved putative GABP sites in genes that encode BECN1/Beclin 1, several BECN1 interacting proteins, and downstream autophagy proteins including the ATG12-ATG5-ATG16L1 complex. We demonstrate that GABP binds to the promoter regions of BECN1-PIK3C3 complex genes and activates their transcriptional activities. Knockdown of GABP reduced BECN1-PIK3C3 complex transcripts, BECN1-PIK3C3 complex protein levels and autophagy in cultured cells. Conversely, overexpression of GABP increased autophagy. Nutrient starvation increased GABP-dependent transcriptional activity of BECN1-PIK3C3 complex gene promoters and increased the recruitment of GABP to the BECN1 promoter. Our data reveal a novel function of GABP in the regulation of autophagy via transcriptional activation of the BECN1-PIK3C3 complex.

  14. Sulfated galactans from Gracilaria fisheri bind to shrimp haemocyte membrane proteins and stimulate the expression of immune genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudtanatip, Tawut; Withyachumnarnkul, Boonsirm; Wongprasert, Kanokpan

    2015-11-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that sulfated galactans (SG) from Gracilaria fisheri (G. fisheri) exhibit immunostimulant activity in shrimp. The present study was conducted to test the hypothesis that SG stimulates signaling molecules of the immune response of shrimp by binding to receptors on the host cell membrane. Accordingly, we evaluated the ability of SG to bind to shrimp haemocytes and showed that SG bound to the shrimp haemocyte membrane (SHM), potentially to specific receptors. Furthermore, this binding was associated with an activation of immune response genes of shrimp. Data from confocal laser scanning micrographs revealed that FITC-labeled SG bound to haemocytes. Far western blot analysis demonstrated that SHM peptides, with molecular sizes of 13, 14, 15, 17, and 25 kDa, were associated with SG. Peptide sequence analysis of the isolated bands using LC-MS/MS and NCBI blast search revealed the identity of the 13, 14, and 17 kDa peptides as lipopolysaccharide and β-1,3-glucan binding protein (LGBP). SG induced the expression of immune related genes and downstream signaling mediators of LGBP including IMD, IKKs, NF-κB, antimicrobial peptides (crustin and PEN-4), the antiviral immunity (dicer), and proPO system (proPO-I and proPO-II). A LGBP neutralizing assay with anti-LGBP antibody indicated a decrease in SG-induced expression of LGBP downstream signaling mediators and the immune related genes. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the SG-stimulated immune activity in haemocytes is mediated, in part, through the LGBP, and IMD-NF-κB pathway.

  15. Computational identification and experimental validation of microRNAs binding to the Alzheimer-related gene ADAM10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augustin Regina

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs are post-transcriptional regulators involved in numerous biological processes including the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. A key gene of AD, ADAM10, controls the proteolytic processing of APP and the formation of the amyloid plaques and is known to be regulated by miRNA in hepatic cancer cell lines. To predict miRNAs regulating ADAM10 expression concerning AD, we developed a computational approach. Methods MiRNA binding sites in the human ADAM10 3' untranslated region were predicted using the RNA22, RNAhybrid and miRanda programs and ranked by specific selection criteria with respect to AD such as differential regulation in AD patients and tissue-specific expression. Furthermore, target genes of miR-103, miR-107 and miR-1306 were derived from six publicly available miRNA target site prediction databases. Only target genes predicted in at least four out of six databases in the case of miR-103 and miR-107 were compared to genes listed in the AlzGene database including genes possibly involved in AD. In addition, the target genes were used for Gene Ontology analysis and literature mining. Finally, we used a luciferase assay to verify the potential effect of these three miRNAs on ADAM10 3'UTR in SH-SY5Y cells. Results Eleven miRNAs were selected, which have evolutionary conserved binding sites. Three of them (miR-103, miR-107, miR-1306 were further analysed as they are linked to AD and most strictly conserved between different species. Predicted target genes of miR-103 (p-value = 0.0065 and miR-107 (p-value = 0.0009 showed significant overlap with the AlzGene database except for miR-1306. Interactions between miR-103 and miR-107 to genes were revealed playing a role in processes leading to AD. ADAM10 expression in the reporter assay was reduced by miR-1306 (28%, miR-103 (45% and miR-107 (52%. Conclusions Our approach shows the requirement of incorporating specific, disease-associated selection

  16. Molecular Characterization of Oxysterol Binding to the Epstein-Barr Virus-induced Gene 2 (GPR183)*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benned-Jensen, Tau; Norn, Christoffer; Laurent, Stephane; Madsen, Christian M.; Larsen, Hjalte M.; Arfelt, Kristine N.; Wolf, Romain M.; Frimurer, Thomas; Sailer, Andreas W.; Rosenkilde, Mette M.

    2012-01-01

    Oxysterols are oxygenated cholesterol derivates that are emerging as a physiologically important group of molecules. Although they regulate a range of cellular processes, only few oxysterol-binding effector proteins have been identified, and the knowledge of their binding mode is limited. Recently, the family of G protein-coupled seven transmembrane-spanning receptors (7TM receptors) was added to this group. Specifically, the Epstein-Barr virus-induced gene 2 (EBI2 or GPR183) was shown to be activated by several oxysterols, most potently by 7α,25-dihydroxycholesterol (7α,25-OHC). Nothing is known about the binding mode, however. Using mutational analysis, we identify here four key residues for 7α,25-OHC binding: Arg-87 in TM-II (position II:20/2.60), Tyr-112 and Tyr-116 (positions III:09/3.33 and III:13/3.37) in TM-III, and Tyr-260 in TM-VI (position VI:16/6.51). Substituting these residues with Ala and/or Phe results in a severe decrease in agonist binding and receptor activation. Docking simulations suggest that Tyr-116 interacts with the 3β-OH group in the agonist, Tyr-260 with the 7α-OH group, and Arg-87, either directly or indirectly, with the 25-OH group, although nearby residues likely also contribute. In addition, Tyr-112 is involved in 7α,25-OHC binding but via hydrophobic interactions. Finally, we show that II:20/2.60 constitutes an important residue for ligand binding in receptors carrying a positively charged residue at this position. This group is dominated by lipid- and nucleotide-activated receptors, here exemplified by the CysLTs, P2Y12, and P2Y14. In conclusion, we present the first molecular characterization of oxysterol binding to a 7TM receptor and identify position II:20/2.60 as a generally important residue for ligand binding in certain 7TM receptors. PMID:22875855

  17. Identification of two Y-box binding proteins that interact with the promoters of columbid annexin I genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, S L; Horseman, N D

    1998-07-01

    Two annexin I (anxI) genes, called cp35 and cp37, are expressed from the pigeon (Columba livia) genome, but they are regulated differently at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. The proximal promoter elements of these two genes are very similar. A conserved sequence from the cp35 and cp37 promoters bound specifically with proteins present in cropsac cell extracts. This sequence of DNA was used to screen a lambdagt11 cDNA expression library. Clones encoding two pigeon Y-box binding proteins (YB) were isolated. One of the pigeon YB cDNAs was found to be most similar to YB1 from other species, and the other was most similar to chicken YB2. Each YB is encoded by a single-copy gene in the pigeon, and their mRNAs are expressed in many tissues. On Northern blots, the sizes of the mRNAs encoding pigeon YB1 (pYB1) and pigeon YB2 (pYB2) were 1.8 and 1.7kb, respectively. The sequences of both pYB1 and pYB2 diverge from their previously identified relatives in the N-terminal domain 'A'. Antisera were developed to unique peptide epitopes in YB1 or 2. Affinity-purified anti-YB1 and anti-YB2 detected immunoreactive proteins in extracts from a variety of pigeon tissues, including the cropsac. To confirm that pYB1 and pYB2 interact with the cp35 promoter, electrophoretic gel mobility shift reactions were carried out in the presence or absence of YB antibodies. Binding to the cp35 promoter was specifically neutralized by either anti-pYB1 or anti-pYB2. These results are the first evidence that two YB proteins simultaneously bind to a promoter element, and thereby may interact during regulation of gene expression.

  18. Simulated microgravity alters the expression of cytoskeleton- and ATP-binding-related genes in MLO-Y4 osteocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhihao; Zhao, Fan; Qi, Yiduo; Hu, Lifang; Li, Dijie; Yin, Chong; Su, Peihong; Zhang, Yan; Ma, Jianhua; Qian, Jing; Zhou, Hongpo; Zou, Yiwei; Qian, Airong

    2016-12-01

    Bone undergoes dynamic modelling and remodelling processes, and it requires gravity-mediated mechanical stimulation for the maintenance of mineral content and structure. Osteocytes are the most commonly found cells in the mature bone, and they are sensitive to mechanical changes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of microgravity simulated with a random position machine (RPM) on the gene expression profile of osteocytes. Genes sensitive to RPM treatment were sorted on the basis of biological processes, interactions and signalling pathways. Overall, 504 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in osteocytes cultured under RPM conditions were found. The DEGs were further analysed using bioinformatics tools such as DAVID and iReport. A total of 15 ATP-binding and cytoskeleton-related genes were further confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Our findings demonstrate that the RPM affected the expression of genes involved in cytoskeleton remodelling and the energy-transfer process in osteocytes. The identification of mechanosensitive genes may enhance our understanding of the roles of osteocytes in mechanosensation and may provide some potential targets for preventing and treating bone-related diseases.

  19. A stimulus-specific role for CREB-binding protein (CBP) in T cell receptor-activated tumor necrosis factor gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falvo, James V.; Brinkman, Brigitta M. N.; Tsytsykova, Alla V.; Tsai, Eunice Y.; Yao, Tso-Pang; Kung, Andrew L.; Goldfeld, Anne E.

    2000-04-01

    The cAMP response element binding protein (CREB)-binding protein (CBP)/p300 family of coactivator proteins regulates gene transcription through the integration of multiple signal transduction pathways. Here, we show that induction of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-) gene expression in T cells stimulated by engagement of the T cell receptor (TCR) or by virus infection requires CBP/p300. Strikingly, in mice lacking one copy of the CBP gene, TNF- gene induction by TCR activation is inhibited, whereas virus induction of the TNF- gene is not affected. Consistent with these findings, the transcriptional activity of CBP is strongly potentiated by TCR activation but not by virus infection of T cells. Thus, CBP gene dosage and transcriptional activity are critical in TCR-dependent TNF-α gene expression, demonstrating a stimulus-specific requirement for CBP in the regulation of a specific gene.

  20. Molecular characterization of a defense-related AMP-binding protein gene, OsBIABP1, from rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-chun ZHANG; Xin YU; Hui-juan ZHANG; Feng-ming SONG

    2009-01-01

    We cloned and characterized a rice gene OsBIABPI encoding an AMP-binding protein. The full-length cDNA of OsBIABP1 is 1912-bp long and is predicted to encode a 558-aa protein. OsBIABP1 contains a typical AMP-binding signature motif and shows high similarity to members of AMP-binding protein family. OsBIABP1 is expressed in stems, leaves and flowers of rice plants, but is not expressed, or expressed at a very low level, in rice roots. The expression of OsBIABP1 was induced by some defense-related signal molecules, e.g., salicylic acid (SA), benzothiadiazole, jasmonic acid (JA), and 1-amino cyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid, which mediate SA-and JA/ethylene (ET)-dependent defense signaling pathways, respectively. Furthermore, the expression of OsBIABP1 is activated by the infection of Magnaporthe oryzae, and the induced expression is quicker and stronger during early stages of pathogenesis in incompatible interaction than that in compatible interaction between rice and M. oryzae. Our results suggest that OsBIABP1 may be a defense-related AMP-binding protein that is involved in the regulation of defense re-sponse through SA and/or JA/ET signaling pathways.

  1. SNPs in microRNA binding sites in 3'-UTRs of RAAS genes influence arterial blood pressure and risk of myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nossent, Anne Yaël; Hansen, Jakob Liebe; Doggen, Carine

    2011-01-01

    We hypothesized that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in microRNA (miR) binding sites in genes of the renin angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS) can influence blood pressure and risk of myocardial infarction.......We hypothesized that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in microRNA (miR) binding sites in genes of the renin angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS) can influence blood pressure and risk of myocardial infarction....

  2. Identification and positional distribution analysis of transcription factor binding sites for genes from the wheat fl-cDNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhen-Yong; Guo, Xiao-Jiang; Chen, Zhong-Xu; Chen, Wei-Ying; Wang, Ji-Rui

    2017-06-01

    The binding sites of transcription factors (TFs) in upstream DNA regions are called transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs). TFBSs are important elements for regulating gene expression. To date, there have been few studies on the profiles of TFBSs in plants. In total, 4,873 sequences with 5' upstream regions from 8530 wheat fl-cDNA sequences were used to predict TFBSs. We found 4572 TFBSs for the MADS TF family, which was twice as many as for bHLH (1951), B3 (1951), HB superfamily (1914), ERF (1820), and AP2/ERF (1725) TFs, and was approximately four times higher than the remaining TFBS types. The percentage of TFBSs and TF members showed a distinct distribution in different tissues. Overall, the distribution of TFBSs in the upstream regions of wheat fl-cDNA sequences had significant difference. Meanwhile, high frequencies of some types of TFBSs were found in specific regions in the upstream sequences. Both TFs and fl-cDNA with TFBSs predicted in the same tissues exhibited specific distribution preferences for regulating gene expression. The tissue-specific analysis of TFs and fl-cDNA with TFBSs provides useful information for functional research, and can be used to identify relationships between tissue-specific TFs and fl-cDNA with TFBSs. Moreover, the positional distribution of TFBSs indicates that some types of wheat TFBS have different positional distribution preferences in the upstream regions of genes.

  3. Obesity risk gene TMEM18 encodes a sequence-specific DNA-binding protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaana M Jurvansuu

    Full Text Available Transmembrane protein 18 (TMEM18 has previously been connected to cell migration and obesity. However, the molecular function of the protein has not yet been described. Here we show that TMEM18 localises to the nuclear membrane and binds to DNA in a sequence-specific manner. The protein binds DNA with its positively charged C-terminus that contains also a nuclear localisation signal. Increase in the amount of TMEM18 in cells suppresses expression from a reporter vector with the TMEM18 target sequence. TMEM18 is a small protein of 140 residues and is predicted to be mostly alpha-helical with three transmembrane parts. As a consequence the DNA binding by TMEM18 would bring the chromatin very near to nuclear membrane. We speculate that this closed perinuclear localisation of TMEM18-bound DNA might repress transcription from it.

  4. Resveratrol post-transcriptionally regulates pro-inflammatory gene expression via regulation of KSRP RNA binding activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollmann, Franziska; Art, Julia; Henke, Jenny; Schrick, Katharina; Besche, Verena; Bros, Matthias; Li, Huige; Siuda, Daniel; Handler, Norbert; Bauer, Florian; Erker, Thomas; Behnke, Felix; Mönch, Bettina; Härdle, Lorena; Hoffmann, Markus; Chen, Ching-Yi; Förstermann, Ulrich; Dirsch, Verena M.; Werz, Oliver; Kleinert, Hartmut; Pautz, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Resveratrol shows beneficial effects in inflammation-based diseases like cancer, cardiovascular and chronic inflammatory diseases. Therefore, the molecular mechanisms of the anti-inflammatory resveratrol effects deserve more attention. In human epithelial DLD-1 and monocytic Mono Mac 6 cells resveratrol decreased the expression of iNOS, IL-8 and TNF-α by reducing mRNA stability without inhibition of the promoter activity. Shown by pharmacological and siRNA-mediated inhibition, the observed effects are SIRT1-independent. Target-fishing and drug responsive target stability experiments showed selective binding of resveratrol to the RNA-binding protein KSRP, a central post-transcriptional regulator of pro-inflammatory gene expression. Knockdown of KSRP expression prevented resveratrol-induced mRNA destabilization in human and murine cells. Resveratrol did not change KSRP expression, but immunoprecipitation experiments indicated that resveratrol reduces the p38 MAPK-related inhibitory KSRP threonine phosphorylation, without blocking p38 MAPK activation or activity. Mutation of the p38 MAPK target site in KSRP blocked the resveratrol effect on pro-inflammatory gene expression. In addition, resveratrol incubation enhanced KSRP-exosome interaction, which is important for mRNA degradation. Finally, resveratrol incubation enhanced its intra-cellular binding to the IL-8, iNOS and TNF-α mRNA. Therefore, modulation of KSRP mRNA binding activity and, thereby, enhancement of mRNA degradation seems to be the common denominator of many anti-inflammatory effects of resveratrol. PMID:25352548

  5. Contribution of distinct homeodomain DNA binding specificities to Drosophila embryonic mesodermal cell-specific gene expression programs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian W Busser

    Full Text Available Homeodomain (HD proteins are a large family of evolutionarily conserved transcription factors (TFs having diverse developmental functions, often acting within the same cell types, yet many members of this family paradoxically recognize similar DNA sequences. Thus, with multiple family members having the potential to recognize the same DNA sequences in cis-regulatory elements, it is difficult to ascertain the role of an individual HD or a subclass of HDs in mediating a particular developmental function. To investigate this problem, we focused our studies on the Drosophila embryonic mesoderm where HD TFs are required to establish not only segmental identities (such as the Hox TFs, but also tissue and cell fate specification and differentiation (such as the NK-2 HDs, Six HDs and identity HDs (I-HDs. Here we utilized the complete spectrum of DNA binding specificities determined by protein binding microarrays (PBMs for a diverse collection of HDs to modify the nucleotide sequences of numerous mesodermal enhancers to be recognized by either no or a single subclass of HDs, and subsequently assayed the consequences of these changes on enhancer function in transgenic reporter assays. These studies show that individual mesodermal enhancers receive separate transcriptional input from both I-HD and Hox subclasses of HDs. In addition, we demonstrate that enhancers regulating upstream components of the mesodermal regulatory network are targeted by the Six class of HDs. Finally, we establish the necessity of NK-2 HD binding sequences to activate gene expression in multiple mesodermal tissues, supporting a potential role for the NK-2 HD TF Tinman (Tin as a pioneer factor that cooperates with other factors to regulate cell-specific gene expression programs. Collectively, these results underscore the critical role played by HDs of multiple subclasses in inducing the unique genetic programs of individual mesodermal cells, and in coordinating the gene regulatory

  6. Contribution of distinct homeodomain DNA binding specificities to Drosophila embryonic mesodermal cell-specific gene expression programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busser, Brian W; Gisselbrecht, Stephen S; Shokri, Leila; Tansey, Terese R; Gamble, Caitlin E; Bulyk, Martha L; Michelson, Alan M

    2013-01-01

    Homeodomain (HD) proteins are a large family of evolutionarily conserved transcription factors (TFs) having diverse developmental functions, often acting within the same cell types, yet many members of this family paradoxically recognize similar DNA sequences. Thus, with multiple family members having the potential to recognize the same DNA sequences in cis-regulatory elements, it is difficult to ascertain the role of an individual HD or a subclass of HDs in mediating a particular developmental function. To investigate this problem, we focused our studies on the Drosophila embryonic mesoderm where HD TFs are required to establish not only segmental identities (such as the Hox TFs), but also tissue and cell fate specification and differentiation (such as the NK-2 HDs, Six HDs and identity HDs (I-HDs)). Here we utilized the complete spectrum of DNA binding specificities determined by protein binding microarrays (PBMs) for a diverse collection of HDs to modify the nucleotide sequences of numerous mesodermal enhancers to be recognized by either no or a single subclass of HDs, and subsequently assayed the consequences of these changes on enhancer function in transgenic reporter assays. These studies show that individual mesodermal enhancers receive separate transcriptional input from both I-HD and Hox subclasses of HDs. In addition, we demonstrate that enhancers regulating upstream components of the mesodermal regulatory network are targeted by the Six class of HDs. Finally, we establish the necessity of NK-2 HD binding sequences to activate gene expression in multiple mesodermal tissues, supporting a potential role for the NK-2 HD TF Tinman (Tin) as a pioneer factor that cooperates with other factors to regulate cell-specific gene expression programs. Collectively, these results underscore the critical role played by HDs of multiple subclasses in inducing the unique genetic programs of individual mesodermal cells, and in coordinating the gene regulatory networks

  7. Clonal distribution of bone sialoprotein-binding protein gene among Staphylococcus aureus isolates associated with bloodstream infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiśniewska, Katarzyna; Piórkowska, Anna; Kasprzyk, Joanna; Bronk, Marek; Świeć, Krystyna

    2014-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of bloodstream infections (BSI) and diseases that may be caused by hematogenous spread. The staphylococcal adhesin, for which the association with the infections emerging as a complication of septicemia has been well documented, is a bone sialoprotein-binding protein (Bbp). The aim of the study was to assess the prevalence of a bbp gene in S. aureus bloodstream isolates associated with BSI and to investigate to what degree the distribution of this gene is linked to the clonality of the population. Spa typing, used in order to explore the genetic population structure of the isolates, yielded 29 types. Six spa clusters and seven singletons were identified. The most frequent was spa clonal complex CC021 associated with MLST CC30 (38%). The bbp gene was found in 47% of isolates. Almost all isolates (95%) clustered in spa clonal complex CC021 were positive for this gene. All isolates carrying the bbp gene were sensitive to methicillin, and if clustered in the spa CC021, belonged to agr group III. Our study shows that Bbp is not strictly associated with BSI. However, one may conclude that for clonally related S. aureus strains most commonly causing BSI, the risk of Bbp-mediated complications of septicemia is expected to be higher than for other strains.

  8. A microRNA-7 binding site polymorphism in HOXB5 leads to differential gene expression in bladder cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junhua Luo

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate the biological function of HOXB5 in human bladder cancer and explore whether the HOXB5 3'-UTR SNP (1010A/G, which is located within the microRNA-7 binding site, was correlated with clinical features of bladder cancer. METHODS: Expression of HOXB5 in 35 human bladder cancer tissues and 8 cell lines were examined using real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry. Next, we explored the biological function of HOXB5 in vitro using cell proliferation, migration and colony formation assays. Using bioinformatics, a SNP (1010A/G was found located within the microRNA-7 binding site in the 3'-UTR of HOXB5. Real-time PCR was used to test HOXB5 expression affected by different alleles. Finally, multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to determine the relationship between SNP (1010A/G frequency and clinical features in 391 cases. RESULTS: HOXB5 was frequently over-expressed both in bladder cancer tissues and cell lines. Inhibition of HOXB5 suppressed the oncogenic function of cancer cells. Next, we demonstrated that a SNP (1010A/G, located within the microRNA-7 binding site in the 3'-UTR of HOXB5, could affect HOXB5 expression in bladder cancer mainly by differential binding activity of microRNA-7 and SNP-related mRNA stability. Finally, we also showed the frequency of 1010G genotype was higher in cancer group compared to normal controls and correlated with the risk of high grade and high stage. CONCLUSION: HOXB5 is overexpressed in bladder cancer. A miRNA-binding SNP (1010A/G located within 3'-UTR of HOXB5 is associated with gene expression and may be a promising prognostic factor for bladder cancer.

  9. The Lepidoptera Odorant Binding Protein gene family: Gene gain and loss within the GOBP/PBP complex of moths and butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Richard G; Große-Wilde, Ewald; Zhou, Jing-Jiang

    2015-07-01

    Butterflies and moths differ significantly in their daily activities: butterflies are diurnal while moths are largely nocturnal or crepuscular. This life history difference is presumably reflected in their sensory biology, and especially the balance between the use of chemical versus visual signals. Odorant Binding Proteins (OBP) are a class of insect proteins, at least some of which are thought to orchestrate the transfer of odor molecules within an olfactory sensillum (olfactory organ), between the air and odor receptor proteins (ORs) on the olfactory neurons. A Lepidoptera specific subclass of OBPs are the GOBPs and PBPs; these were the first OBPs studied and have well documented associations with olfactory sensilla. We have used the available genomes of two moths, Manduca sexta and Bombyx mori, and two butterflies, Danaus plexippus and Heliconius melpomene, to characterize the GOBP/PBP genes, attempting to identify gene orthologs and document specific gene gain and loss. First, we identified the full repertoire of OBPs in the M. sexta genome, and compared these with the full repertoire of OBPs from the other three lepidopteran genomes, the OBPs of Drosophila melanogaster and select OBPs from other Lepidoptera. We also evaluated the tissue specific expression of the M. sexta OBPs using an available RNAseq databases. In the four lepidopteran species, GOBP2 and all PBPs reside in single gene clusters; in two species GOBP1 is documented to be nearby, about 100 kb from the cluster; all GOBP/PBP genes share a common gene structure indicating a common origin. As such, the GOBP/PBP genes form a gene complex. Our findings suggest that (1) the lepidopteran GOBP/PBP complex is a monophyletic lineage with origins deep within Lepidoptera phylogeny, (2) within this lineage PBP gene evolution is much more dynamic than GOBP gene evolution, and (3) butterflies may have lost a PBP gene that plays an important role in moth pheromone detection, correlating with a shift from

  10. The gene encoding acyl-CoA-binding protein is subject to metabolic regulation by both sterol regulatory element-binding protein and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha in hepatocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandberg, Maria B; Bloksgaard, Maria; Duran-Sandoval, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    gene in hepatocytes. Members of the SREBP family activate the rat ACBP gene through binding sites for SREBP and the auxiliary factors Sp1 and nuclear factor Y in the proximal promoter. In addition, we show that ACBP is a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) alpha target gene in cultured...... observation that ACBP expression in rodent liver is down-regulated by fasting, and we show that insulin but not glucose is the inducer of ACBP expression in primary rat hepatocytes. In keeping with the regulation by insulin, we show that ACBP is a sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c (SREBP-1c) target...... hepatocytes and is induced in the liver by fibrates in a PPARalpha-dependent manner. Thus, ACBP is a dual PPARalpha and SREBP-1c target gene in hepatocytes. Fasting leads to reduced activity of SREBP but increased activity of PPARalpha in hepatocytes, and in keeping with ACBP being a dual target gene, we show...

  11. Smoking and polymorphisms of genes encoding mannose-binding lectin and surfactant protein-D in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Malthe; Frisch, Morten; Madsen, Hans Ole;

    2014-01-01

    To investigate whether polymorphisms in genes coding for mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and surfactant protein-D (SP-D) are associated directly or by interaction with smoking with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), anti-citrullinated peptide antibody (ACPA) positive RA, and erosive RA. MBL2 genotypes, SFTPD...... genotype at codon 11, and HLA-shared epitope were determined in 456 patients with rheumatoid arthritis and 533 sex- and age-matched controls. Patients were grouped according to the presence of ACPA antibodies and RA-associated bone erosions and sub-stratified according to smoking status as never or ever...

  12. Somatic gene transfer of cAMP response element-binding protein attenuates memory impairment in aging rats

    OpenAIRE

    Mouravlev, Alexandre; Dunning, Jane; Young, Deborah; During, Matthew J.

    2006-01-01

    cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) is important for the formation and facilitation of long-term memory in diverse models. However, to our knowledge, involvement of CREB in age-associated memory impairment has not been reported. Here, we use a recombinant adeno-associated virus vector to obtain stable transgenic expression of CREB as well as the inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER) in the hippocampus of adult rats. In a longitudinal study, we show that somatic gene transfer of both ...

  13. A tandem sequence motif acts as a distance-dependent enhancer in a set of genes involved in translation by binding the proteins NonO and SFPQ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roepcke Stefan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bioinformatic analyses of expression control sequences in promoters of co-expressed or functionally related genes enable the discovery of common regulatory sequence motifs that might be involved in co-ordinated gene expression. By studying promoter sequences of the human ribosomal protein genes we recently identified a novel highly specific Localized Tandem Sequence Motif (LTSM. In this work we sought to identify additional genes and LTSM-binding proteins to elucidate potential regulatory mechanisms. Results Genome-wide analyses allowed finding a considerable number of additional LTSM-positive genes, the products of which are involved in translation, among them, translation initiation and elongation factors, and 5S rRNA. Electromobility shift assays then showed specific signals demonstrating the binding of protein complexes to LTSM in ribosomal protein gene promoters. Pull-down assays with LTSM-containing oligonucleotides and subsequent mass spectrometric analysis identified the related multifunctional nucleotide binding proteins NonO and SFPQ in the binding complex. Functional characterization then revealed that LTSM enhances the transcriptional activity of the promoters in dependency of the distance from the transcription start site. Conclusions Our data demonstrate the power of bioinformatic analyses for the identification of biologically relevant sequence motifs. LTSM and the here found LTSM-binding proteins NonO and SFPQ were discovered through a synergistic combination of bioinformatic and biochemical methods and are regulators of the expression of a set of genes of the translational apparatus in a distance-dependent manner.

  14. An Adenovirus Vector Incorporating Carbohydrate Binding Domains Utilizes Glycans for Gene Transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, Julius W.; Glasgow, Joel N.; Nakayama, Masaharu; Ak, Ferhat; Ugai, Hideyo; Curiel, David T.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Vectors based on human adenovirus serotype 5 (HAdV-5) continue to show promise as delivery vehicles for cancer gene therapy. Nevertheless, it has become clear that therapeutic benefit is directly linked to tumor-specific vector localization, highlighting the need for tumor-targeted gene

  15. SSX2 is a novel DNA-binding protein that antagonizes polycomb group body formation and gene repression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, Morten Frier; Relster, Mette Marie; Greve, Katrine Buch Viden

    2014-01-01

    formation and derepresses PcG target genes. SSX2 further negatively regulates the level of the PcG-associated histone mark H3K27me3 in melanoma cells, and there is a clear inverse correlation between SSX2/3 expression and H3K27me3 in spermatogenesis. However, SSX2 does not affect the overall composition...... and stability of PcG complexes, and there is no direct concordance between SSX2 and BMI1/H3K27me3 presence at regulated genes. This suggests that SSX2 antagonizes PcG function through an indirect mechanism, such as modulation of chromatin structure. SSX2 binds double-stranded DNA in a sequence non......-specific manner in agreement with the observed widespread association with chromatin. Our results implicate SSX2 in regulation of chromatin structure and function....

  16. A maize gene encoding an NADPH binding enzyme highly homologous to isoflavone reductases is activated in response to sulfur starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrucco, S; Bolchi, A; Foroni, C; Percudani, R; Rossi, G L; Ottonello, S

    1996-01-01

    we isolated a novel gene that is selectively induced both in roots and shoots in response to sulfur starvation. This gene encodes a cytosolic, monomeric protein of 33 kD that selectively binds NADPH. The predicted polypeptide is highly homologous ( > 70%) to leguminous isoflavone reductases (IFRs), but the maize protein (IRL for isoflavone reductase-like) belongs to a novel family of proteins present in a variety of plants. Anti-IRL antibodies specifically recognize IFR polypeptides, yet the maize protein is unable to use various isoflavonoids as substrates. IRL expression is correlated closely to glutathione availability: it is persistently induced in seedlings whose glutathione content is about fourfold lower than controls, and it is down-regulated rapidly when control levels of glutathione are restored. This glutathione-dependent regulation indicates that maize IRL may play a crucial role in the establishment of a thiol-independent response to oxidative stress under glutathione shortage conditions.

  17. Adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette member A3 gene mutation in children from one family from Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gawahir Mohamed Ahmed Mukhtar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutation in ABCA3, which is adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette member A3, a member of protein transporter family for phospholipids into the lamellar bodies during synthesis of surfactant, can cause lung disease related to surfactant dysfunction with autosomal recessive pattern. We reported three cases from same family with ABCA3 mutation, their gene, clinical course, and outcomes mentioning that one patient had successful lung transplantation, one started the process of the lung transplantation while the third one died during infancy. We concluded that the patients with ABCA3 gene mutations are increasing in numbers may be due to the availability of the genetic testing and high index of suspicion among physicians. Lung transplantation is the definitive treatment, but availability is limited in our region.

  18. Gene cloning and function analysis of ABP9 protein which specifically binds to ABRE2 motif of maize Cat1 gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A cDNA library was constructed using mRNA extracted from 17 days post-pollination (dpp) maize embryos and was screened by employing a yeast one-hybrid system for proteins specifically interacting with ABRE2 motif of maize Cat1 gene. Three truncated overlapping positive clones designated ABP9 were obtained and the full-length cDNA was isolated by 5′ RACE. Searching the database revealed that ABP9 protein belongs to a bZIP-type transcription factor family. ABP9 protein specifically binds to ABRE2 motif and activates the expression of downstream reporter gene in yeast cells. Our results strongly suggest that the ABP9 protein functions as a transcription activator.

  19. Estrogen regulation of chicken riboflavin carrier protein gene is mediated by ERE half sites without direct binding of estrogen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadur, Urvashi; Ganjam, Goutham K; Vasudevan, Nandini; Kondaiah, Paturu

    2005-02-28

    Estrogen is an important steroid hormone that mediates most of its effects on regulation of gene expression by binding to intracellular receptors. The consensus estrogen response element (ERE) is a 13bp palindromic inverted repeat with a three nucleotide spacer. However, several reports suggest that many estrogen target genes are regulated by diverse elements, such as imperfect EREs and ERE half sites (ERE 1/2), which are either the proximal or the distal half of the palindrome. To gain more insight into ERE half site-mediated gene regulation, we used a region from the estrogen-regulated chicken riboflavin carrier protein (RCP) gene promoter that contains ERE half sites. Using moxestrol, an analogue of estrogen and transient transfection of deletion and mutation containing RCP promoter/reporter constructs in chicken hepatoma (LMH2A) cells, we identified an estrogen response unit (ERU) composed of two consensus ERE 1/2 sites and one non-consensus ERE 1/2 site. Mutation of any of these sites within this ERU abolishes moxestrol response. Further, the ERU is able to confer moxestrol responsiveness to a heterologous promoter. Interestingly, RCP promoter is regulated by moxestrol in estrogen responsive human MCF-7 cells, but not in other cell lines such as NIH3T3 and HepG2 despite estrogen receptor-alpha (ER-alpha) co transfection. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) with promoter regions encompassing the half sites and nuclear extracts from LMH2A cells show the presence of a moxestrol-induced complex that is abolished by a polyclonal anti-ERalpha antibody. Surprisingly, estrogen receptor cannot bind to these promoter elements in isolation. Thus, there appears to be a definite requirement for some other factor(s) in addition to estrogen receptor, for the generation of a suitable response of this promoter to estrogen. Our studies therefore suggest a novel mechanism of gene regulation by estrogen, involving ERE half sites without direct binding of ER to the

  20. CORE_TF: a user-friendly interface to identify evolutionary conserved transcription factor binding sites in sets of co-regulated genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hestand, Matthew S; van Galen, Michiel; Villerius, Michel P; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B; den Dunnen, Johan T; 't Hoen, Peter AC

    2008-01-01

    Background The identification of transcription factor binding sites is difficult since they are only a small number of nucleotides in size, resulting in large numbers of false positives and false negatives in current approaches. Computational methods to reduce false positives are to look for over-representation of transcription factor binding sites in a set of similarly regulated promoters or to look for conservation in orthologous promoter alignments. Results We have developed a novel tool, "CORE_TF" (Conserved and Over-REpresented Transcription Factor binding sites) that identifies common transcription factor binding sites in promoters of co-regulated genes. To improve upon existing binding site predictions, the tool searches for position weight matrices from the TRANSFACR database that are over-represented in an experimental set compared to a random set of promoters and identifies cross-species conservation of the predicted transcription factor binding sites. The algorithm has been evaluated with expression and chromatin-immunoprecipitation on microarray data. We also implement and demonstrate the importance of matching the random set of promoters to the experimental promoters by GC content, which is a unique feature of our tool. Conclusion The program CORE_TF is accessible in a user friendly web interface at . It provides a table of over-represented transcription factor binding sites in the users input genes' promoters and a graphical view of evolutionary conserved transcription factor binding sites. In our test data sets it successfully predicts target transcription factors and their binding sites. PMID:19036135

  1. The effect of Nipped-B-like (Nipbl) haploinsufficiency on genome-wide cohesin binding and target gene expression: modeling Cornelia de Lange syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newkirk, Daniel A; Chen, Yen-Yun; Chien, Richard; Zeng, Weihua; Biesinger, Jacob; Flowers, Ebony; Kawauchi, Shimako; Santos, Rosaysela; Calof, Anne L; Lander, Arthur D; Xie, Xiaohui; Yokomori, Kyoko

    2017-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a multisystem developmental disorder frequently associated with heterozygous loss-of-function mutations of Nipped-B-like (NIPBL), the human homolog of Drosophila Nipped-B. NIPBL loads cohesin onto chromatin. Cohesin mediates sister chromatid cohesion important for mitosis but is also increasingly recognized as a regulator of gene expression. In CdLS patient cells and animal models, expression changes of multiple genes with little or no sister chromatid cohesion defect suggests that disruption of gene regulation underlies this disorder. However, the effect of NIPBL haploinsufficiency on cohesin binding, and how this relates to the clinical presentation of CdLS, has not been fully investigated. Nipbl haploinsufficiency causes CdLS-like phenotype in mice. We examined genome-wide cohesin binding and its relationship to gene expression using mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) from Nipbl+/- mice that recapitulate the CdLS phenotype. We found a global decrease in cohesin binding, including at CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) binding sites and repeat regions. Cohesin-bound genes were found to be enriched for histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) at their promoters; were disproportionately downregulated in Nipbl mutant MEFs; and displayed evidence of reduced promoter-enhancer interaction. The results suggest that gene activation is the primary cohesin function sensitive to Nipbl reduction. Over 50% of significantly dysregulated transcripts in mutant MEFs come from cohesin target genes, including genes involved in adipogenesis that have been implicated in contributing to the CdLS phenotype. Decreased cohesin binding at the gene regions is directly linked to disease-specific expression changes. Taken together, our Nipbl haploinsufficiency model allows us to analyze the dosage effect of cohesin loading on CdLS development.

  2. Structure and functional analysis of the siderophore periplasmic binding protein from the fuscachelin gene cluster of Thermobifida fusca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kunhua; Bruner, Steven D

    2016-01-01

    Iron acquisition is a complex, multicomponent process critical for most organisms' survival and virulence. Small iron chelating molecules, siderophores, mediate transport as key components of common pathways for iron assimilation in many microorganisms. The chemistry and biology of the extraordinary tight and specific metal binding siderophores is of general interest in terms of host/guest chemistry and is a potential target toward the development of therapeutic treatments for microbial virulence. The siderophore pathway of the moderate thermophile, Thermobifida fusca, is an excellent model system to study the process in Gram-positive bacteria. Here we describe the structure and characterization of the siderophore periplasmic binding protein, FscJ from the fuscachelin gene cluster of T. fusca. The structure shows a di-domain arrangement connected with a long α-helix hinge. Several X-ray structures detail ligand-free conformational changes at different pH values, illustrating complex interdomain flexibility of the siderophore receptors. We demonstrated that FscJ has a unique recognition mechanism and details the binding interaction with ferric-fuscachelin A through ITC and docking analysis. The presented work provides a structural basis for the complex molecular mechanisms of siderophore recognition and transportation.

  3. Identification of genes encoding photoconvertible (Class I) water-soluble chlorophyll-binding proteins from Chenopodium ficifolium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Shigekazu; Abe, Eriko; Nakayama, Katsumi; Satoh, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Photoconvertible water-soluble chlorophyll-binding proteins, called Class I WSCPs, have been detected in Chenopodiaceae, Amaranthaceae and Polygonaceae plant species. To date, Chenopodium album WSCP (CaWSCP) is the only cloned gene encoding a Class I WSCP. In this study, we identified two cDNAs encoding Chenopodium ficifolium Class I WSCPs, CfWSCP1, and CfWSCP2. Sequence analyses revealed that the open reading frames of CfWSCP1 and CfWSCP2 were 585 and 588 bp, respectively. Furthermore, both CfWSCPs contain cystein2 and cystein30, which are essential for the chlorophyll-binding ability of CaWSCP. Recombinant CfWSCP1 and CfWSCP2, expressed in Escherichia coli as hexa-histidine fusion proteins (CfWSCP1-His and CfWSCP2-His), formed inclusion bodies; however, we were able to solubilize these using a buffer containing 8 M urea and then refold them by dialysis. The refolded CfWSCP1-His and CfWSCP2-His could bind chlorophylls and exhibited photoconvertibility, confirming that the cloned CfWSCPs are further examples of Class I WSCPs.

  4. Cadherin-related family member 3, a childhood asthma susceptibility gene product, mediates rhinovirus C binding and replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochkov, Yury A; Watters, Kelly; Ashraf, Shamaila; Griggs, Theodor F; Devries, Mark K; Jackson, Daniel J; Palmenberg, Ann C; Gern, James E

    2015-04-28

    Members of rhinovirus C (RV-C) species are more likely to cause wheezing illnesses and asthma exacerbations compared with other rhinoviruses. The cellular receptor for these viruses was heretofore unknown. We report here that expression of human cadherin-related family member 3 (CDHR3) enables the cells normally unsusceptible to RV-C infection to support both virus binding and replication. A coding single nucleotide polymorphism (rs6967330, C529Y) was previously linked to greater cell-surface expression of CDHR3 protein, and an increased risk of wheezing illnesses and hospitalizations for childhood asthma. Compared with wild-type CDHR3, cells transfected with the CDHR3-Y529 variant had about 10-fold increases in RV-C binding and progeny yields. We developed a transduced HeLa cell line (HeLa-E8) stably expressing CDHR3-Y529 that supports RV-C propagation in vitro. Modeling of CDHR3 structure identified potential binding sites that could impact the virus surface in regions that are highly conserved among all RV-C types. Our findings identify that the asthma susceptibility gene product CDHR3 mediates RV-C entry into host cells, and suggest that rs6967330 mutation could be a risk factor for RV-C wheezing illnesses.

  5. Interplay between estrogen response element sequence and ligands controls in vivo binding of estrogen receptor to regulated genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieg, Adam J; Krieg, Sacha A; Ahn, Bonnie S; Shapiro, David J

    2004-02-06

    To examine the role of the estrogen response element (ERE) sequence in binding of liganded estrogen receptor (ER) to promoters, we analyzed in vivo interaction of liganded ER with the imperfect ERE in the pS2 gene and the composite estrogen-responsive unit (ERU) in the proteinase inhibitor 9 (PI-9) gene. In transient transfections of ER-positive HepG2-ER7 cells, PI-9 was strongly induced by estrogen, moxestrol (MOX), and 4-hydroxytamoxifen (OHT). PI-9 was not induced by raloxifene or ICI 182,780. Quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR showed that moxestrol strongly induced cellular PI-9 and pS2 mRNAs, whereas OHT moderately induced PI-9 mRNA and weakly induced pS2 mRNA. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated strong and similar association of 17beta-estradiol-hERalpha and MOX-hERalpha with the PI-9 ERU and with the pS2 ERE. Binding of MOX-hERalpha to the PI-9 ERU and the pS2 ERE was rapid and continuous. Although MOX-hERalpha bound strongly to the PI-9 ERU and less well to the pS2 ERE in chromatin immunoprecipitation, gel shift assays showed that estrogen-hERalpha binds with higher affinity to the deproteinized pS2 ERE than to the PI-9 ERU. Across a broad range of OHT concentrations, OHT-hERalpha associated strongly with the pS2 ERE and weakly with the PI-9 ERU. ICI-hERalpha bound poorly to the PI-9 ERU and effectively to the pS2 ERE. Raloxifene-hERalpha and MOX-hERalpha exhibited similar binding to the PI-9 ERU and the pS2 ERE. These studies demonstrate that ER ligand and ERE sequence work together to regulate in vivo binding of ER to estrogen-responsive promoters.

  6. Hepatic phenotype of liver fatty acid binding protein gene-ablated mice

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Gregory G.; Atshaves, Barbara P.; Huang, Huan; McIntosh, Avery L.; Williams, Brad J.; Pai, Pei-Jing; Russell, David H.; Kier, Ann B.; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2009-01-01

    Although the function of liver fatty acid binding protein in hepatic fatty acid metabolism has been extensively studied, its potential role in hepatic cholesterol homeostasis is less clear. Although hepatic cholesterol accumulation was initially reported in L-FABP-null female mice, that study was performed with early N2 backcross generation mice. To resolve whether the hepatic cholesterol phenotype in these L-FABP−/− mice was attributable to genetic inhomogeneity, these L-FABP−/− mice were fu...

  7. Detection of BRAF Mutations Using a Fully Automated Platform and Comparison with High Resolution Melting, Real-Time Allele Specific Amplification, Immunohistochemistry and Next Generation Sequencing Assays, for Patients with Metastatic Melanoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Harlé

    Full Text Available Metastatic melanoma is a severe disease with one of the highest mortality rate in skin diseases. Overall survival has significantly improved with immunotherapy and targeted therapies. Kinase inhibitors targeting BRAF V600 showed promising results. BRAF genotyping is mandatory for the prescription of anti-BRAF therapies.Fifty-nine formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded melanoma samples were assessed using High-Resolution-Melting (HRM PCR, Real-time allele-specific amplification (RT-ASA PCR, Next generation sequencing (NGS, immunohistochemistry (IHC and the fully-automated molecular diagnostics platform IdyllaTM. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value were calculated using NGS as the reference standard to compare the different assays.BRAF mutations were found in 28(47.5%, 29(49.2%, 31(52.5%, 29(49.2% and 27(45.8% samples with HRM, RT-ASA, NGS, IdyllaTM and IHC respectively. Twenty-six (81.2% samples were found bearing a c.1799T>A (p.Val600Glu mutation, three (9.4% with a c.1798_1799delinsAA (p.Val600Lys mutation and one with c.1789_1790delinsTC (p.Leu597Ser mutation. Two samples were found bearing complex mutations.HRM appears the less sensitive assay for the detection of BRAF V600 mutations. The RT-ASA, IdyllaTM and IHC assays are suitable for routine molecular diagnostics aiming at the prescription of anti-BRAF therapies. IdyllaTM assay is fully-automated and requires less than 2 minutes for samples preparation and is the fastest of the tested assays.

  8. The RFA regulatory sequence-binding protein in the promoter of prostate-specific antigen gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    To assure what sequence associated with the androgen regulation, a 15 bp region at the upstream of the ARE of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) promoter, termed RFA, was found indispensable for androgen receptor (AR)-mediated transactivation of PSA promoter. In transfection and CAT assays, some nucleotides substitution in RFA could significantly decrease the androgen inducibility for PSA promoter. The in vitro DNA binding assay demonstrated that RFA bound specifically with some non-receptor protein factors in prostate cell nucleus, but the mutant type of RFA lost this ability, so RFA might be a novel accessory cis-element. The RFA-binding proteins were isolated and purified by affinity chromatography using RFA probes. SDS-PAGE and preliminary protein identification showed these proteins possessed sequence high homology with multifunctional protein heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1, A2 (hnRNP A1, A2). RFA-binding proteins possibly cooperate with AR-mediated transactivation for PSA promoter as coactivator. The study results will facilitate further understanding the mechanism and tissue specificity of PSA promoter.

  9. High Throughput Sequencing Identifies Misregulated Genes in the Drosophila Polypyrimidine Tract-Binding Protein (hephaestus) Mutant Defective in Spermatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, Vinod; Heimiller, Joseph; Robida, Mark D; Singh, Ravinder

    2016-01-01

    The Drosophila polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (dmPTB or hephaestus) plays an important role during spermatogenesis. The heph2 mutation in this gene results in a specific defect in spermatogenesis, causing aberrant spermatid individualization and male sterility. However, the array of molecular defects in the mutant remains uncharacterized. Using an unbiased high throughput sequencing approach, we have identified transcripts that are misregulated in this mutant. Aberrant transcripts show altered expression levels, exon skipping, and alternative 5' ends. We independently verified these findings by reverse-transcription and polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis. Our analysis shows misregulation of transcripts that have been connected to spermatogenesis, including components of the actomyosin cytoskeletal apparatus. We show, for example, that the Myosin light chain 1 (Mlc1) transcript is aberrantly spliced. Furthermore, bioinformatics analysis reveals that Mlc1 contains a high affinity binding site(s) for dmPTB and that the site is conserved in many Drosophila species. We discuss that Mlc1 and other components of the actomyosin cytoskeletal apparatus offer important molecular links between the loss of dmPTB function and the observed developmental defect in spermatogenesis. This study provides the first comprehensive list of genes misregulated in vivo in the heph2 mutant in Drosophila and offers insight into the role of dmPTB during spermatogenesis.

  10. Glucose 6P binds and activates HlyIIR to repress Bacillus cereus haemolysin hlyII gene expression.

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    Elisabeth Guillemet

    Full Text Available Bacillus cereus is a Gram-positive spore-forming bacterium causing food poisoning and serious opportunistic infections. These infections are characterized by bacterial accumulation despite the recruitment of phagocytic cells. We have previously shown that B. cereus Haemolysin II (HlyII induces macrophage cell death by apoptosis. In this work, we investigated the regulation of the hlyII gene. We show that HlyIIR, the negative regulator of hlyII expression in B. cereus, is especially active during the early bacterial growth phase. We demonstrate that glucose 6P directly binds to HlyIIR and enhances its activity at a post-transcriptional level. Glucose 6P activates HlyIIR, increasing its capacity to bind to its DNA-box located upstream of the hlyII gene, inhibiting its expression. Thus, hlyII expression is modulated by the availability of glucose. As HlyII induces haemocyte and macrophage death, two cell types that play a role in the sequestration of nutrients upon infection, HlyII may induce host cell death to allow the bacteria to gain access to carbon sources that are essential components for bacterial growth.

  11. Automated discovery of tissue-targeting enhancers and transcription factors from binding motif and gene function data.

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    Geetu Tuteja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Identifying enhancers regulating gene expression remains an important and challenging task. While recent sequencing-based methods provide epigenomic characteristics that correlate well with enhancer activity, it remains onerous to comprehensively identify all enhancers across development. Here we introduce a computational framework to identify tissue-specific enhancers evolving under purifying selection. First, we incorporate high-confidence binding site predictions with target gene functional enrichment analysis to identify transcription factors (TFs likely functioning in a particular context. We then search the genome for clusters of binding sites for these TFs, overcoming previous constraints associated with biased manual curation of TFs or enhancers. Applying our method to the placenta, we find 33 known and implicate 17 novel TFs in placental function, and discover 2,216 putative placenta enhancers. Using luciferase reporter assays, 31/36 (86% tested candidates drive activity in placental cells. Our predictions agree well with recent epigenomic data in human and mouse, yet over half our loci, including 7/8 (87% tested regions, are novel. Finally, we establish that our method is generalizable by applying it to 5 additional tissues: heart, pancreas, blood vessel, bone marrow, and liver.

  12. Polymorphisms at the Ligand Binding Site of the Vitamin D Receptor Gene and Osteomalacia

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    Duygu Gezen Ak

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D receptor (VDR gene polymorphisms have been suggested as possible determinants of bone mineral density (BMD and calcium metabolism. In this study, our aim was to determine whether there is an association between VDR gene polymorphism and osteomalacia or not. We determined ApaI and TaqI polymorphisms in the vitamin D receptor gene in 24 patients with osteomalacia and 25 age-matched healthy controls. Serum calcium, phosphorus, ALP, PTH, 25OHD levels were also examined. We used PCR and RFLP methods to test for an association between osteomalacia and polymorphisms within, intron 8 and exon 9 of the VDR gene. When the control and patients were compared for their ApaI and TaqI genotypes there was no relationship between VDR gene allelic polymorphisms and osteomalacia. Whereas a nearly significant difference for A allele was found in the allellic distribution of the patients (p = 0.08. Also no association between biochemical data and VDR gene polymorphisms was observed.

  13. ATP-Binding Cassette Genes Genotype and Expression: A Potential Association with Pancreatic Cancer Development and Chemoresistance?

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    Li Pang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic polymorphisms in ABC (ATP-binding cassette transporter genes are associated with differential responses to chemotherapy in various cancers including pancreatic cancer. In this study, four SNPs in the ABCB1, ABCC1, and ABCG2 genes were investigated in normal and pancreatic cancerous specimens. The expression of the three transporters was also analyzed. The TT genotypes of G2677T and C3435T in ABCB1 gene were associated with lower risk of developing pancreatic cancer (P=0.013, OR = 0.35 and P=0.015, OR = 0.29, resp.. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the common polymorphisms in the ABCB1 gene affecting the genetic risk of developing pancreatic cancer. Moreover, the expression of ABCB1 in 2677TT and 3435TT carriers was lower compared to the wild-type homozygotes and heterozygotes. A cell viability assay, using standard pancreatic cancer cell lines, revealed that the ABCB1 2677TT-3455TT haplotype was more sensitive than the other haplotypes to gemcitabine. Conclusion. Polymorphisms in ABCB1 G2677T and G3435T were associated with differential susceptibility to pancreatic cancer and may predict responses to chemotherapy.

  14. Single nucleotide polymorphism analysis on chicken extra-celluar fatty acid binding protein gene and its associations with fattiness trait

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Fattiness is an important parameter to estimate meat quality, which has high heritability. In this experiment, F2 chickens derived from Broilers crossing to Silky were used to study the effect of extracellular fatty acid binding protein (EX-FABP) gene on abdominal fat accumulation. 1.6 kb of the 5′ region of the gene was amplified by six pairs of primers, and then single nucleotide poly-morphisms (SNPs) were detected by the technique of single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) and then confirmed by sequencing. There were four nucleotides variations found, A-G at -1807, C-A at -1805, T-C at -1011 and a C insertion at -1000 respectively. The result of least square analysis suggests that the birds with BB genotype defined by the second pair of primer have a higher abdominal fat weight and abdominal fat percentage than the birds with the other genotypes (AA and AB). It implied that EX-FABP gene could be a candidate locus or linked to a major gene to significantly affect abdominal fat traits in chicken.

  15. Genome-wide identification and analysis of FK506-binding protein family gene family in strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Xiangpeng; Liu, Dan; Zhao, Mizhen; Sun, Xin; Li, Yu; Mu, Qian; Zhu, Xudong; Li, Pengyu; Fang, Jinggui

    2014-01-25

    The FK506 binding proteins (FKBPs) are abundant and ubiquitous proteins belonging to the large peptidyl-prolylcis-trans isomerase superfamily. FKBPs are known to be involved in many biological processes including hormone signaling, plant growth, and stress responses through a chaperone or an isomerization of proline residues during protein folding. The availability of complete strawberry genome sequences allowed the identification of 23 FKBP genes by HMMER and blast analysis. Chromosome scaffold locations of these FKBP genes in the strawberry genome were determined and the protein domain and motif organization of FaFKBPs analyzed. The phylogenetic relationships between strawberry FKBPs were also assessed. The expression profiles of FaFKBPs genes results revealed that most FaFKBPs were expressed in all tissues, while a few FaFKBPs were specifically expressed in some of the tissues. These data not only contribute to some better understanding of the complex regulation of the strawberry FKBP gene family, but also provide valuable information for further research in strawberry functional genomics.

  16. Transcriptional regulator PerA influences biofilm-associated, platelet binding, and metabolic gene expression in Enterococcus faecalis.

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    Scott M Maddox

    Full Text Available Enterococcus faecalis is an opportunistic pathogen and a leading cause of nosocomial infections, traits facilitated by the ability to quickly acquire and transfer virulence determinants. A 150 kb pathogenicity island (PAI comprised of genes contributing to virulence is found in many enterococcal isolates and is known to undergo horizontal transfer. We have shown that the PAI-encoded transcriptional regulator PerA contributes to pathogenicity in the mouse peritonitis infection model. In this study, we used whole-genome microarrays to determine the PerA regulon. The PerA regulon is extensive, as transcriptional analysis showed 151 differentially regulated genes. Our findings reveal that PerA coordinately regulates genes important for metabolism, amino acid degradation, and pathogenicity. Further transcriptional analysis revealed that PerA is influenced by bicarbonate. Additionally, PerA influences the ability of E. faecalis to bind to human platelets. Our results suggest that PerA is a global transcriptional regulator that coordinately regulates genes responsible for enterococcal pathogenicity.

  17. Prospective evaluation of gene mutations and minimal residual disease in patients with core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jourdan, Eric; Boissel, Nicolas; Chevret, Sylvie; Delabesse, Eric; Renneville, Aline; Cornillet, Pascale; Blanchet, Odile; Cayuela, Jean-Michel; Recher, Christian; Raffoux, Emmanuel; Delaunay, Jacques; Pigneux, Arnaud; Bulabois, Claude-Eric; Berthon, Céline; Pautas, Cécile; Vey, Norbert; Lioure, Bruno; Thomas, Xavier; Luquet, Isabelle; Terré, Christine; Guardiola, Philippe; Béné, Marie C; Preudhomme, Claude; Ifrah, Norbert; Dombret, Hervé

    2013-03-21

    Not all patients with core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia (CBF-AML) display a good outcome. Modern risk factors include KIT and/or FLT3 gene mutations and minimal residual disease (MRD) levels, but their respective values have never been prospectively assessed. A total of 198 CBF-AML patients were randomized between a reinforced and a standard induction course, followed by 3 high-dose cytarabine consolidation courses. MRD levels were monitored prospectively. Gene mutations were screened at diagnosis. Despite a more rapid MRD decrease after reinforced induction, induction arm did not influence relapse-free survival (RFS) (64% in both arms; P = .91). Higher WBC, KIT, and/or FLT3-ITD/TKD gene mutations, and a less than 3-log MRD reduction after first consolidation, were associated with a higher specific hazard of relapse, but MRD remained the sole prognostic factor in multivariate analysis. At 36 months, cumulative incidence of relapse and RFS were 22% vs 54% (P gene mutations, should be used for future treatment stratifications in CBF-AML patients. This trial was registered at EudraCT as #2006-005163-26 and at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT 00428558.

  18. Functional Brachyury binding sites establish a temporal read-out of gene expression in the Ciona notochord.

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    Lavanya Katikala

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The appearance of the notochord represented a milestone in Deuterostome evolution. The notochord is necessary for the development of the chordate body plan and for the formation of the vertebral column and numerous organs. It is known that the transcription factor Brachyury is required for notochord formation in all chordates, and that it controls transcription of a large number of target genes. However, studies of the structure of the cis-regulatory modules (CRMs through which this control is exerted are complicated in vertebrates by the genomic complexity and the pan-mesodermal expression territory of Brachyury. We used the ascidian Ciona, in which the single-copy Brachyury is notochord-specific and CRMs are easily identifiable, to carry out a systematic characterization of Brachyury-downstream notochord CRMs. We found that Ciona Brachyury (Ci-Bra controls most of its targets directly, through non-palindromic binding sites that function either synergistically or individually to activate early- and middle-onset genes, respectively, while late-onset target CRMs are controlled indirectly, via transcriptional intermediaries. These results illustrate how a transcriptional regulator can efficiently shape a shallow gene regulatory network into a multi-tiered transcriptional output, and provide insights into the mechanisms that establish temporal read-outs of gene expression in a fast-developing chordate embryo.

  19. Association of ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter A1 Gene Polymorphisms in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus among Malaysians

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    Polin Haghvirdizadeh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is a complex polygenic disorder characterized by impaired insulin resistance, insulin secretion, and dysregulation of lipid and protein metabolism with environmental and genetic factors. ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1 gene polymorphisms are reported as the one of the genetic risk factors for T2DM in various populations with conflicting results. This study was conducted based on PCR-HRM to determine the frequency of ABCA1 gene by rs2230806 (R219K, rs1800977 (C69T, and rs9282541 (R230C polymorphisms Malaysian subjects. Methods. A total of 164 T2DM and 165 controls were recruited and their genotypes for ABCA1 gene polymorphisms were determined based on the real time high resolution melting analysis. Results. There was a significant difference between the subjects in terms of age, BMI, FPG, HbA1c, HDL, LDL, and TG P<0.05. There was a significant association between HOM of R219K P=0.005, among Malaysian subjects; moreover, allele frequency revealed the significant difference in A allele of R219K P=0.003. But, there was no significant difference in genotypic and allelic frequencies of C69T and R230C polymorphism. Conclusion. R219K polymorphism of ABCA1 gene can be considered as a genetic risk factor for T2DM subjects among Malaysians.

  20. Cold-inducible RNA binding protein (CIRP, a novel XTcf-3 specific target gene regulates neural development in Xenopus

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    Wedlich Doris

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As nuclear mediators of wnt/β-catenin signaling, Lef/Tcf transcription factors play important roles in development and disease. Although it is well established, that the four vertebrate Lef/Tcfs have unique functional properties, most studies unite Lef-1, Tcf-1, Tcf-3 and Tcf-4 and reduce their function to uniformly transduce wnt/β-catenin signaling for activating wnt target genes. In order to discriminate target genes regulated by XTcf-3 from those regulated by XTcf-4 or Lef/Tcfs in general, we performed a subtractive screen, using neuralized Xenopus animal cap explants. Results We identified cold-inducible RNA binding protein (CIRP as novel XTcf-3 specific target gene. Furthermore, we show that knockdown of XTcf-3 by injection of an antisense morpholino oligonucleotide results in a general broadening of the anterior neural tissue. Depletion of XCIRP by antisense morpholino oligonucleotide injection leads to a reduced stability of mRNA and an enlargement of the anterior neural plate similar to the depletion of XTcf-3. Conclusion Distinct steps in neural development are differentially regulated by individual Lef/Tcfs. For proper development of the anterior brain XTcf-3 and the Tcf-subtype specific target XCIRP appear indispensable. Thus, regulation of anterior neural development, at least in part, depends on mRNA stabilization by the novel XTcf-3 target gene XCIRP.

  1. Evolutionary conservation of zinc finger transcription factor binding sites in promoters of genes co-expressed with WT1 in prostate cancer

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    Brett Adina

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene expression analyses have led to a better understanding of growth control of prostate cancer cells. We and others have identified the presence of several zinc finger transcription factors in the neoplastic prostate, suggesting a potential role for these genes in the regulation of the prostate cancer transcriptome. One of the transcription factors (TFs identified in the prostate cancer epithelial cells was the Wilms tumor gene (WT1. To rapidly identify coordinately expressed prostate cancer growth control genes that may be regulated by WT1, we used an in silico approach. Results Evolutionary conserved transcription factor binding sites (TFBS recognized by WT1, EGR1, SP1, SP2, AP2 and GATA1 were identified in the promoters of 24 differentially expressed prostate cancer genes from eight mammalian species. To test the relationship between sequence conservation and function, chromatin of LNCaP prostate cancer and kidney 293 cells were tested for TF binding using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP. Multiple putative TFBS in gene promoters of placental mammals were found to be shared with those in human gene promoters and some were conserved between genomes that diverged about 170 million years ago (i.e., primates and marsupials, therefore implicating these sites as candidate binding sites. Among those genes coordinately expressed with WT1 was the kallikrein-related peptidase 3 (KLK3 gene commonly known as the prostate specific antigen (PSA gene. This analysis located several potential WT1 TFBS in the PSA gene promoter and led to the rapid identification of a novel putative binding site confirmed in vivo by ChIP. Conversely for two prostate growth control genes, androgen receptor (AR and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, known to be transcriptionally regulated by WT1, regulatory sequence conservation was observed and TF binding in vivo was confirmed by ChIP. Conclusion Overall, this targeted approach rapidly identified

  2. Molecular analysis of the murine C4b-binding protein gene. Chromosome assignment and partial gene organization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barum, Scott B; Kristensen, Torsten; Chaplin, David D

    1989-01-01

    molecules and a growing number of noncomplement molecules as well and are a major structural feature of some of these molecules. To characterize the structure of the murine C4BP gene, a cosmid library constructed from Balb/c liver DNA was screened. Several nearly identical, overlapping clones were...... identified; however, none of the clones, alone or in combination, covered the entire C4BP gene. One clone (D26) was chosen for detailed analysis and found to contain all but the leader region, the first SCR, and the first half of the second SCR. The SCRs three through six were each encoded by single exons....... Only the latter half of the second SCR was present on the clone, and it was encoded by a single exon, demonstrating that murine C4BP has a split SCR at the genomic level. Structural mapping of this portion of the gene demonstrates that the region extending from the second half of the second SCR through...

  3. A Survey of the ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC Gene Superfamily in the Salmon Louse (Lepeophtheirus salmonis.

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    Greta Carmona-Antoñanzas

    Full Text Available Salmon lice, Lepeophtheirus salmonis (Krøyer, 1837, are fish ectoparasites causing significant economic damage in the mariculture of Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar Linnaeus, 1758. The control of L. salmonis at fish farms relies to a large extent on treatment with anti-parasitic drugs. A problem related to chemical control is the potential for development of resistance, which in L. salmonis is documented for a number of drug classes including organophosphates, pyrethroids and avermectins. The ATP-binding cassette (ABC gene superfamily is found in all biota and includes a range of drug efflux transporters that can confer drug resistance to cancers and pathogens. Furthermore, some ABC transporters are recognised to be involved in conferral of insecticide resistance. While a number of studies have investigated ABC transporters in L. salmonis, no systematic analysis of the ABC gene family exists for this species. This study presents a genome-wide survey of ABC genes in L. salmonis for which, ABC superfamily members were identified through homology searching of the L. salmonis genome. In addition, ABC proteins were identified in a reference transcriptome of the parasite generated by high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-seq of a multi-stage RNA library. Searches of both genome and transcriptome allowed the identification of a total of 33 genes / transcripts coding for ABC proteins, of which 3 were represented only in the genome and 4 only in the transcriptome. Eighteen sequences were assigned to ABC subfamilies known to contain drug transporters, i.e. subfamilies B (4 sequences, C (11 and G (2. The results suggest that the ABC gene family of L. salmonis possesses fewer members than recorded for other arthropods. The present survey of the L. salmonis ABC gene superfamily will provide the basis for further research into potential roles of ABC transporters in the toxicity of salmon delousing agents and as potential mechanisms of drug resistance.

  4. A primary survey on bryophyte species reveals two novel classes of nucleotide-binding site (NBS genes.

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    Jia-Yu Xue

    Full Text Available Due to their potential roles in pathogen defense, genes encoding nucleotide-binding site (NBS domain have been particularly surveyed in many angiosperm genomes. Two typical classes were found: one is the TIR-NBS-LRR (TNL class and the other is the CC-NBS-LRR (CNL class. It is seldom known, however, what kind of NBS-encoding genes are mainly present in other plant groups, especially the most ancient groups of land plants, that is, bryophytes. To fill this gap of knowledge, in this study, we mainly focused on two bryophyte species: the moss Physcomitrella patens and the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha, to survey their NBS-encoding genes. Surprisingly, two novel classes of NBS-encoding genes were discovered. The first novel class is identified from the P. patens genome and a typical member of this class has a protein kinase (PK domain at the N-terminus and a LRR domain at the C-terminus, forming a complete structure of PK-NBS-LRR (PNL, reminiscent of TNL and CNL classes in angiosperms. The second class is found from the liverwort genome and a typical member of this class possesses an α/β-hydrolase domain at the N-terminus and also a LRR domain at the C-terminus (Hydrolase-NBS-LRR, HNL. Analysis on intron positions and phases also confirmed the novelty of HNL and PNL classes, as reflected by their specific intron locations or phase characteristics. Phylogenetic analysis covering all four classes of NBS-encoding genes revealed a closer relationship among the HNL, PNL and TNL classes, suggesting the CNL class having a more divergent status from the others. The presence of specific introns highlights the chimerical structures of HNL, PNL and TNL genes, and implies their possible origin via exon-shuffling during the quick lineage separation processes of early land plants.

  5. Transcription factor AP1 binds the functional region of the promoter and regulates gene expression of human PPARdelta in LoVo cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaogang; Yang, Xudong; Han, Yan; Lu, Shemin

    2013-12-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ gene (PPARδ) is correlated with carcinogenesis of colorectal cancer, but the regulation of its gene transcription remains unclear. We herein report that AP1 binds the promoter and regulates PPARδ gene expression. With a luciferase reporter system, we identified a functional promoter region of 30 bp of PPARδ gene by deletion and electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA). Using site-directed mutagenesis and decoy analyses, we demonstrated that AP1 bound the functional transcriptional factor binding site in a region extending from -176 to -73 of the PPARδ promoter, which was confirmed using EMSA and supershift assays. Consequently, inhibition of the AP1 binding site led to decreased PPARδ mRNA. Our study demonstrated that AP1 is the transcriptional factor that contributes to PPARδ expression in LoVo cells.

  6. Orally administered lactoperoxidase increases expression of the FK506 binding protein 5 gene in epithelial cells of the small intestine of mice: a DNA microarray study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Hiroyuki; Miyauchi, Hirofumi; Shin, Kouichirou; Yamauchi, Koji; Matsumoto, Ichiro; Abe, Keiko; Takase, Mitsunori

    2007-09-01

    Lactoperoxidase (LPO) is a component of milk and other external secretions. To study the influence of ingested LPO on the digestive tract, we performed DNA microarray analysis of the small intestine of mice administered LPO. LPO administration upregulated 78 genes, including genes involved in metabolism, immunity, apoptosis, and the cell cycle, and downregulated nine genes, including immunity-related genes. The most upregulated gene was FK506 binding protein 5 (FKBP5), a glucocorticoid regulating immunophilin. The upregulation of this gene was confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR in other samples. In situ hybridization revealed that expression of the FKBP5 gene in the crypt epithelial cells of the small intestine was enhanced by LPO. These results suggest that ingested LPO modulates gene expression in the small intestine and especially increases FKBP5 gene expression in the epithelial cells of the intestine.

  7. A mammalian model for Laron syndrome produced by targeted disruption of the mouse growth hormone receptor/binding protein gene (the Laron mouse)

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Yihua; Xu, Bixiong C.; Maheshwari, Hiralal G.; He, Li; Reed, Michael; Lozykowski, Maria; Okada, Shigeru; Cataldo, Lori; Coschigamo, Karen; Wagner, Thomas E.; Baumann, Gerhard; Kopchick, John J.

    1997-01-01

    Laron syndrome [growth hormone (GH) insensitivity syndrome] is a hereditary dwarfism resulting from defects in the GH receptor (GHR) gene. GHR deficiency has not been reported in mammals other than humans. Many aspects of GHR dysfunction remain unknown because of ethical and practical limitations in studying humans. To create a mammalian model for this disease, we generated mice bearing a disrupted GHR/binding protein (GHR/BP) gene through a homologous gene targeting approach. Homozygous GHR/...

  8. Molecular evolution of a family of resistance gene analogs of nucleotide-binding site sequences in Solanum lycopersicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Pei-Chun; Lin, Kuan-Hung; Ko, Chin-Ling; Hwang, Shih-Ying

    2011-10-01

    Nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeats (NBS-LRR) gene families are one of the major plant resistance genes. Genomic NBS evolution was studied in many plant species for diverse arrays of NBS gene families. In this study, we focused on one family of NBS sequences in an attempt to understand how closely related NBS sequences evolved in the light of selection in domesticated plant species. A phylogenetic analysis revealed five major clades (A-E) and five subclades (A1-A5) within clade A of cloned NBS sequences. Positive selection was only detected in newly evolved NBS lineages in subclades of clade A. Positively selected codon sites were found among NBS sequences of clade A. A sliding-window analysis revealed that regions with Ka/Ks ratios of >1 were in the inter-motifs when paired clades were compared, but regions with Ka/Ks ratios of >1 were found across NBS sequences when subclades of clade A were compared. Our results based on a family of closely related NBS sequences showed that positive selection was first exerted on specific lineages across all NBS sequences after selective constraints. Subsequently, sequences with mutations in commonly conserved motifs were scrutinized by purifying selection. In the long term, conserved high frequency alleles in commonly conserved motifs and changes in inter-motifs were maintained in the investigated family of NBS sequences. Moreover, codons identified to be under positive selection in the inter-motifs were mainly located in regions involved in functions of ATP binding or hydrolysis.

  9. Human Sterol Regulatory Element-Binding Protein 1a Contributes Significantly to Hepatic Lipogenic Gene Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Andreas Bitter; Nüssler, Andreas K.; Thasler, Wolfgang E.; Kathrin Klein; Zanger, Ulrich M.; Matthias Schwab; Oliver Burk

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims: Sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) 1, the master regulator of lipogenesis, was shown to be associated with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, which is attributed to its major isoform SREBP1c. Based on studies in mice, the minor isoform SREBP1a is regarded as negligible for hepatic lipogenesis. This study aims to elucidate the expression and functional role of SREBP1a in human liver. Methods: mRNA expression of both isoforms was quantified in cohorts of human li...

  10. Tetranectin, a plasminogen kringle 4-binding protein. Cloning and gene expression pattern in human colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, U M; Albrechtsen, R

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tetranectin is a recently discovered protein that binds to kringle 4 region of plasminogen (Clemmensen I, Petersen LC, Kluft C. Eur J Biochem 1986; 156:327. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: The mRNA encoding human tetranectin was cloned by using degenerate primers in a reverse transcriptase...... reaction followed by polymerase chain reaction amplification. The resulting polymerase chain reaction product was examined by DNA sequencing and subsequently used as probe for screening a human placental cDNA library. A full length cDNA clone (TET-1) was isolated, characterized, and used for Northern blot...

  11. Diverse Flavonoids Stimulate NodD1 Binding to nod Gene Promoters in Sinorhizobium meliloti

    OpenAIRE

    Peck, Melicent C.; Fisher, Robert F.; Long, Sharon R.

    2006-01-01

    NodD1 is a member of the NodD family of LysR-type transcriptional regulators that mediates the expression of nodulation (nod) genes in the soil bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti. Each species of rhizobia establishes a symbiosis with a limited set of leguminous plants. This host specificity results in part from a NodD-dependent upregulation of nod genes in response to a cocktail of flavonoids in the host plant's root exudates. To demonstrate that NodD is a key determinant of host specificity, w...

  12. ZFP57 maintains the parent-of-origin-specific expression of the imprinted genes and differentially affects non-imprinted targets in mouse embryonic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riso, Vincenzo; Cammisa, Marco; Kukreja, Harpreet

    2016-01-01

    ZFP57 is necessary for maintaining repressive epigenetic modifications at Imprinting control regions (ICRs). In mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs), ZFP57 binds ICRs (ICRBS) and many other loci (non-ICRBS). To address the role of ZFP57 on all its target sites, we performed high-throughput and multi......-locus analyses of inbred and hybrid mouse ESC lines carrying different gene knockouts. By using an allele-specific RNA-seq approach, we demonstrate that ZFP57 loss results in derepression of the imprinted allele of multiple genes in the imprinted clusters. We also find marked epigenetic differences between ICRBS...... the imprinted expression over long distances. At non-ICRBS, ZFP57 inactivation results in acquisition of epigenetic features that are characteristic of poised enhancers, suggesting that another function of ZFP57 in early embryogenesis is to repress cis-acting regulatory elements whose activity is not yet...

  13. Imprinted genes show unique patterns of sequence conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helms Volkhard

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic imprinting is an evolutionary conserved mechanism of epigenetic gene regulation in placental mammals that results in silencing of one of the parental alleles. In order to decipher interactions between allele-specific DNA methylation of imprinted genes and evolutionary conservation, we performed a genome-wide comparative investigation of genomic sequences and highly conserved elements of imprinted genes in human and mouse. Results Evolutionarily conserved elements in imprinted regions differ from those associated with autosomal genes in various ways. Whereas for maternally expressed genes strong divergence of protein-encoding sequences is most prominent, paternally expressed genes exhibit substantial conservation of coding and noncoding sequences. Conserved elements in imprinted regions are marked by enrichment of CpG dinucleotides and low (TpG+CpA/(2·CpG ratios indicate reduced CpG deamination. Interestingly, paternally and maternally expressed genes can be distinguished by differences in G+C and CpG contents that might be associated with unusual epigenetic features. Especially noncoding conserved elements of paternally expressed genes are exceptionally G+C and CpG rich. In addition, we confirmed a frequent occurrence of intronic CpG islands and observed a decelerated degeneration of ancient LINE-1 repeats. We also found a moderate enrichment of YY1 and CTCF binding sites in imprinted regions and identified several short sequence motifs in highly conserved elements that might act as additional regulatory elements. Conclusions We discovered several novel conserved DNA features that might be related to allele-specific DNA methylation. Our results hint at reduced CpG deamination rates in imprinted regions, which affects mostly noncoding conserved elements of paternally expressed genes. Pronounced differences between maternally and paternally expressed genes imply specific modes of evolution as a result of differences in

  14. CCAAT/Enhancer-Binding Protein α Is a Crucial Regulator of Human Fat Mass and Obesity Associated Gene Transcription and Expression

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    Wei Ren

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Several susceptibility loci have been reported associated with obesity and T2DM in GWAS. Fat mass and obesity associated gene (FTO is the first gene associated with body mass index (BMI and risk for diabetes in diverse patient populations. FTO is highly expressed in the brain and pancreas, and is involved in regulating dietary intake and energy expenditure. While much is known about the epigenetic mutations contributing to obesity and T2DM, less is certain with the expression regulation of FTO gene. In this study, a highly conserved canonical C/EBPα binding site was located around position −45~−54 bp relative to the human FTO gene transcriptional start site. Site-directed mutagenesis of the putative C/EBPα binding sites decreased FTO promoter activity. Overexpression and RNAi studies also indicated that C/EBPα was required for the expression of FTO. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP experiment was carried out and the result shows direct binding of C/EBPα to the putative binding regions in the FTO promoter. Collectively, our data suggest that C/EBPα may act as a positive regulator binding to FTO promoter and consequently, activates the gene transcription.

  15. Genome-Wide microRNA Binding Site Variation between Extinct Wild Aurochs and Modern Cattle Identifies Candidate microRNA-Regulated Domestication Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braud, Martin; Magee, David A.; Park, Stephen D. E.; Sonstegard, Tad S.; Waters, Sinead M.; MacHugh, David E.; Spillane, Charles

    2017-01-01

    The domestication of cattle from the now-extinct wild aurochs (Bos primigenius) involved selection for physiological and behavioral traits, with underlying genetic factors that remain largely unknown. Non-coding microRNAs have emerged as key regulators of the spatio-temporal expression of target genes controlling mammalian growth and development, including in livestock species. During the domestication process, selection of mutational changes in miRNAs and/or miRNA binding sites could have provided a mechanism to generate some of the traits that differentiate domesticated cattle from wild aurochs. To investigate this, we analyzed the open reading frame DNA sequence of 19,994 orthologous protein-coding gene pairs from extant Bos taurus genomes and a single extinct B. primigenius genome. We identified miRNA binding site polymorphisms in the 3′ UTRs of 1,620 of these orthologous genes. These 1,620 genes with altered miRNA binding sites between the B. taurus and B. primigenius lineages represent candidate domestication genes. Using a novel Score Site ratio metric we have ranked these miRNA-regulated genes according to the extent of divergence between miRNA binding site presence, frequency and copy number between the orthologous genes from B. taurus and B. primigenius. This provides an unbiased approach to identify cattle genes that have undergone the most changes in miRNA binding (i.e., regulation) between the wild aurochs and modern-day cattle breeds. In addition, we demonstrate that these 1,620 candidate domestication genes are enriched for roles in pigmentation, fertility, neurobiology, metabolism, immunity and production traits (including milk quality and feed efficiency). Our findings suggest that directional selection of miRNA regulatory variants was important in the domestication and subsequent artificial selection that gave rise to modern taurine cattle. PMID:28197171

  16. Expression of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 and -2 genes through the perinatal period in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babajko, S; Hardouin, S; Segovia, B; Groyer, A; Binoux, M

    1993-06-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) are essential mediators of the bioavailability and biological effects of the IGFs. Liver expression of the rat (r) IGFBP-1 and rIGFBP-2 genes has been characterized between day 16 in utero (16 diu) and 16 days postnatally (+16 dpn). Run-on experiments showed transcriptional activity of the rIGFBP-1 and rIGFBP-2 genes at birth (B) to be 25 and 5 times that at 16 diu, respectively. After B, transcriptional activity of the rIGFBP-1 gene remained high (140% B at +6 dpn), but that of the rIGFBP-2 gene dropped to 70% B by +6 dpn. Northern blot analysis done simultaneously showed rIGFBP-1 messenger RNA (mRNA) levels to increase approximately 50-fold between 16 diu and B, whereas rIGFBP-2 mRNA increased only 5- to 10-fold. rIGFBP-1 mRNA levels decreased after birth, reaching about 20% B by +6 dpn; rIGFBP-2 mRNA, however, remained stable (about 80% B) at least up to +6 dpn. Parallel Western ligand blot and immunoblot analyses of serum rIGFBPs revealed rIGFBP-1 and rIGFBP-2 concentrations to be increased 3- and 2-fold, respectively between 20 diu and B. Maximal expression of rIGFBP-1 was at +1 dpn (220% B), and of rIGFBP-2, at B. Both rIGFBPs then decreased, reaching about 5% B at adulthood. All these data indicate that increased transcriptional activity of the rIGFBP-1 and rIGFBP-2 genes at birth would determine the increased synthesis in the liver and circulating levels of these proteins. In addition, it would seem that post-transcriptional events (reduced half-life of the rIGFBP-1 messenger after birth, translation efficiency of the rIGFBP-2 messenger) modulate transcriptional regulation.

  17. JARID2 regulates binding of the Polycomb repressive complex 2 to target genes in ES cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pasini, Diego; Cloos, Paul A C; Walfridsson, Julian

    2010-01-01

    The Polycomb group (PcG) proteins have an important role in controlling the expression of genes essential for development, differentiation and maintenance of cell fates. The Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) is believed to regulate transcriptional repression by catalysing the di- and tri-methy...

  18. Mutations in the polyglutamine binding protein 1 gene cause X-linked mental retardation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalscheuer, Vera M; Freude, Kristine; Musante, Luciana

    2003-01-01

    We found mutations in the gene PQBP1 in 5 of 29 families with nonsyndromic (MRX) and syndromic (MRXS) forms of X-linked mental retardation (XLMR). Clinical features in affected males include mental retardation, microcephaly, short stature, spastic paraplegia and midline defects. PQBP1 has previou...

  19. The evolution of gene expression and binding specificity of the largest transcription factor family in primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapopoulou, Adamandia; Mathew, Lisha; Wong, Alex; Trono, Didier; Jensen, Jeffrey D

    2016-01-01

    The KRAB-containing zinc finger (KRAB-ZF) proteins represent the largest family of transcription factors (TFs) in humans, yet for the great majority, their function and specific genomic target remain unknown. However, it has been shown that a large fraction of these genes arose from segmental duplications, and that they have expanded in gene and zinc finger number throughout vertebrate evolution. To determine whether this expansion is linked to selective pressures acting on different domains, we have manually curated all KRAB-ZF genes present in the human genome together with their orthologous genes in three closely related species and assessed the evolutionary forces acting at the sequence level as well as on their expression profiles. We provide evidence that KRAB-ZFs can be separated into two categories according to the polymorphism present in their DNA-contacting residues. Those carrying a nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in their DNA-contacting amino acids exhibit significantly reduced expression in all tissues, have emerged in a recent lineage, and seem to be less strongly constrained evolutionarily than those without such a polymorphism. This work provides evidence for a link between age of the TF, as well as polymorphism in their DNA-contacting residues and expression levels-both of which may be jointly affected by selection.

  20. Gene cloning and expression of cadherin in midgut of Helicoverpa armigera and its Cry1A binding region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Guirong; WU Kongming; LIANG Gemei; GUO Yuyuan

    2005-01-01

    Cadherins belong to one of the families of animal glycoproteins responsible for calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion. Recent literatures showed that the cadherin-like in midgut of several insects served as the receptor of Bt toxin Cry1A and the variation of cadherin-like is related to insect's resistance to Cry1A. The full-length cDNA encoding cadherin-like of Helicoverpa armigera is cloned by degenerate PCR and RACE techniques and the gene was designated as BtR-harm, which is 5581 bp in full-length, encoding 1730 amino acid residues (BtR-harm was deposited in GenBank and the accession number is AF519180). Its predicted molecular weight and isoelectric point were 195.39 kDa and 4.23, respectively. The inferred amino acid sequence includes a signal sequence, 11 cadherin repeats, a membrane-proximal region, a transmembrane region and a cytoplasmic region. Sequence analysis indicated that the deduced protein sequence was most similar to the cadherin-like from Heliothis virescens with 84.2% identity and highly similar to three other lepidopteran cadherin from Bombyx mori, Manduca sexta and Pectinophora gossypiella, with the sequence identities of 60.3.6%, 57.5% and 51.0%, respectively. The cDNA encoding cadherin gene was expressed successfully in E. coli and the recombinant proteins can bind with Cry1Ac. Truncation analysis and binding experiment of BtR-harm revealed that the Cry1A binding region was a contiguous 244-amino acid sequence, which located between amino acid 1217 and 1461. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that BtR-harm was highly expressed in midgut of H. armigera, very low expressed in foregut and hindgut and was not expressed in other tissues. After H. armigera producing resistance to Cry1Ac, the expression quantity of BtR-harm significantly decreased in midgut of H. armigera. It is the first confirmation that BtR-harm can function as receptor of Cry1Ac in H. armigera and the binding region was located on a contiguous 244 amino acid sequence

  1. Sexually dimorphic genome-wide binding of retinoid X receptor alpha (RXRα) determines male-female differences in the expression of hepatic lipid processing genes in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosters, Astrid; Sun, Deqiang; Wu, Hao; Tian, Feng; Felix, Julio C; Li, Wei; Karpen, Saul J

    2013-01-01

    Many hepatic functions including lipid metabolism, drug metabolism, and inflammatory responses are regulated in a sex-specific manner due to distinct patterns of hepatic gene expression between males and females. Regulation for the majority of these genes is under control of Nuclear Receptors (NRs). Retinoid X Receptor alpha (RXRα) is an obligate partner for multiple NRs and considered a master regulator of hepatic gene expression, yet the full extent of RXRα chromatin binding in male and female livers is unclear. ChIP-Seq analysis of RXRα and RNA Polymerase2 (Pol2) binding was performed livers of both genders and combined with microarray analysis. Mice were gavage-fed with the RXR ligand LG268 for 5 days (30 mg/kg/day) and RXRα-binding and RNA levels were determined by ChIP-qPCR and qPCR, respectively. ChIP-Seq revealed 47,845 (male) and 46,877 (female) RXRα binding sites (BS), associated with ∼12,700 unique genes in livers of both genders, with 91% shared between sexes. RXRα-binding showed significant enrichment for 2227 and 1498 unique genes in male and female livers, respectively. Correlating RXRα binding strength with Pol2-binding revealed 44 genes being male-dominant and 43 female-dominant, many previously unknown to be sexually-dimorphic. Surprisingly, genes fundamental to lipid metabolism, including Scd1, Fasn, Elovl6, and Pnpla3-implicated in Fatty Liver Disease pathogenesis, were predominant in females. RXRα activation using LG268 confirmed RXRα-binding was 2-3 fold increased in female livers at multiple newly identified RXRα BS including for Pnpla3 and Elovl6, with corresponding ∼10-fold and ∼2-fold increases in Pnpla3 and Elovl6 RNA respectively in LG268-treated female livers, supporting a role for RXRα regulation of sexually-dimorphic responses for these genes. RXRα appears to be one of the most widely distributed transcriptional regulators in mouse liver and is engaged in determining sexually-dimorphic expression of key lipid

  2. Effect of praziquantel on the differential expression of mouse hepatic genes and parasite ATP binding cassette transporter gene family members during Schistosoma mansoni infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa C Sanchez

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis is a chronic parasitic disease caused by sexually dimorphic blood flukes of the genus Schistosoma. Praziquantel (PZQ is the only drug widely available to treat the disease but does not kill juvenile parasites. Here we report the use of next generation sequencing to study the transcriptional effect of PZQ on murine hepatic inflammatory, immune and fibrotic responses to Schistosoma mansoni worms and eggs. An initial T helper cell 1 (Th1 response is induced against schistosomes in mice treated with drug vehicle (Vh around the time egg laying begins, followed by a T helper cell 2 (Th2 response and the induction of genes whose action leads to granuloma formation and fibrosis. When PZQ is administered at this time, there is a significant reduction in egg burden yet the hepatic Th1, Th2 and fibrotic responses are still observed in the absence of granuloma formation suggesting some degree of gene regulation may be induced by antigens released from the dying adult worms. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to examine the relative expression of 16 juvenile and adult S. mansoni genes during infection and their response to Vh and PZQ treatment in vivo. While the response of stress genes in adult parasites suggests the worms were alive immediately following exposure to PZQ, they were unable to induce transcription of any of the 9 genes encoding ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters tested. In contrast, juvenile schistosomes were able to significantly induce the activities of ABCB, C and G family members, underscoring the possibility that these efflux systems play a major role in drug resistance.

  3. Effect of praziquantel on the differential expression of mouse hepatic genes and parasite ATP binding cassette transporter gene family members during Schistosoma mansoni infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Melissa C; Krasnec, Katina V; Parra, Amalia S; von Cabanlong, Christian; Gobert, Geoffrey N; Umylny, Boris; Cupit, Pauline M; Cunningham, Charles

    2017-06-01

    Schistosomiasis is a chronic parasitic disease caused by sexually dimorphic blood flukes of the genus Schistosoma. Praziquantel (PZQ) is the only drug widely available to treat the disease but does not kill juvenile parasites. Here we report the use of next generation sequencing to study the transcriptional effect of PZQ on murine hepatic inflammatory, immune and fibrotic responses to Schistosoma mansoni worms and eggs. An initial T helper cell 1 (Th1) response is induced against schistosomes in mice treated with drug vehicle (Vh) around the time egg laying begins, followed by a T helper cell 2 (Th2) response and the induction of genes whose action leads to granuloma formation and fibrosis. When PZQ is administered at this time, there is a significant reduction in egg burden yet the hepatic Th1, Th2 and fibrotic responses are still observed in the absence of granuloma formation suggesting some degree of gene regulation may be induced by antigens released from the dying adult worms. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to examine the relative expression of 16 juvenile and adult S. mansoni genes during infection and their response to Vh and PZQ treatment in vivo. While the response of stress genes in adult parasites suggests the worms were alive immediately following exposure to PZQ, they were unable to induce transcription of any of the 9 genes encoding ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters tested. In contrast, juvenile schistosomes were able to significantly induce the activities of ABCB, C and G family members, underscoring the possibility that these efflux systems play a major role in drug resistance.

  4. Gene Augmentation Therapy for a Missense Substitution in the cGMP-Binding Domain of Ovine CNGA3 Gene Restores Vision in Day-Blind Sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gootwine, Elisha; Abu-Siam, Mazen; Obolensky, Alexey; Rosov, Alex; Honig, Hen; Nitzan, Tali; Shirak, Andrey; Ezra-Elia, Raaya; Yamin, Esther; Banin, Eyal; Averbukh, Edward; Hauswirth, William W.; Ofri, Ron; Seroussi, Eyal

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Applying CNGA3 gene augmentation therapy to cure a novel causative mutation underlying achromatopsia (ACHM) in sheep. Methods Impaired vision that spontaneously appeared in newborn lambs was characterized by behavioral, electroretinographic (ERG), and histologic techniques. Deep-sequencing reads of an affected lamb and an unaffected lamb were compared within conserved genomic regions orthologous to human genes involved in similar visual impairment. Observed nonsynonymous amino acid substitutions were classified by their deleteriousness score. The putative causative mutation was assessed by producing compound CNGA3 heterozygotes and applying gene augmentation therapy using the orthologous human cDNA. Results Behavioral assessment revealed day blindness, and subsequent ERG examination showed attenuated photopic responses. Histologic and immunohistochemical examination of affected sheep eyes did not reveal degeneration, and cone photoreceptors expressing CNGA3 were present. Bioinformatics and sequencing analyses suggested a c.1618G>A, p.Gly540Ser substitution in the GMP-binding domain of CNGA3 as the causative mutation. This was confirmed by genetic concordance test and by genetic complementation experiment: All five compound CNGA3 heterozygotes, carrying both p.Arg236* and p.Gly540Ser mutations in CNGA3, were day-blind. Furthermore, subretinal delivery of the intact human CNGA3 gene using an adeno-associated viral vector (AAV) restored photopic vision in two affected p.Gly540Ser homozygous rams. Conclusions The c.1618G>A, p.Gly540Ser substitution in CNGA3 was identified as the causative mutation for a novel form of ACHM in Awassi sheep. Gene augmentation therapy restored vision in the affected sheep. This novel mutation provides a large-animal model that is valid for most human CNGA3 ACHM patients; the majority of them carry missense rather than premature-termination mutations. PMID:28282490

  5. An Sp1/Sp3 binding polymorphism confers methylation protection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanis A Boumber

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Hundreds of genes show aberrant DNA hypermethylation in cancer, yet little is known about the causes of this hypermethylation. We identified RIL as a frequent methylation target in cancer. In search for factors that influence RIL hypermethylation, we found a 12-bp polymorphic sequence around its transcription start site that creates a long allele. Pyrosequencing of homozygous tumors revealed a 2.1-fold higher methylation for the short alleles (P<0.001. Bisulfite sequencing of cancers heterozygous for RIL showed that the short alleles are 3.1-fold more methylated than the long (P<0.001. The comparison of expression levels between unmethylated long and short EBV-transformed cell lines showed no difference in expression in vivo. Electrophorectic mobility shift assay showed that the inserted region of the long allele binds Sp1 and Sp3 transcription factors, a binding that is absent in the short allele. Transient transfection of RIL allele-specific transgenes showed no effects of the additional Sp1 site on transcription early on. However, stable transfection of methylation-seeded constructs showed gradually decreasing transcription levels from the short allele with eventual spreading of de novo methylation. In contrast, the long allele showed stable levels of expression over time as measured by luciferase and approximately 2-3-fold lower levels of methylation by bisulfite sequencing (P<0.001, suggesting that the polymorphic Sp1 site protects against time-dependent silencing. Our finding demonstrates that, in some genes, hypermethylation in cancer is dictated by protein-DNA interactions at the promoters and provides a novel mechanism by which genetic polymorphisms can influence an epigenetic state.

  6. Trans—acting factors from the human fetal liver binding to the human ε—globin gene silencer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANZHIJIANG; CHUJIANG; 等

    1997-01-01

    The developmental stage-specific silencing of the human ε-globin gene during embryonic life is controlled,in part,by the silencer (-392bp- -177bp) upstream of this gene.In order to elucidate its role,the nuclear extract from the human fetal liver has been prepared and the interactions between trans-acting factors and this silencer element have been examined.By using DNaseI footprinting assay,a major protected region from -278bp to -235bp within this silencer element was identified.Furthermore,we found in gel mobility shift assay and Southwestern blotting assay that there were at least four trans-acting factors (MV≈32,28,26 and 22kD) in the nuclear extract isolated from the human fetal liver,which could specifically bind to this region.Our results suggested that these trans-acting factors might play an important role in silencing the human embryonic ε-globin gene expression at the fetal stage through the interactions with this silencer.

  7. Chromosomal localization of the human gene encoding c-myc promoter-binding protein (MPB1) to chromosome 1p35-pter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, R.A.; Dowler, L.L. [Univ. of Missouri, Kansas City, MO (United States); Adkison, L.R. [Mercer Univ. School of Medicine, Macon, GA (United States); Ray, R.B. [St. Louis Univ. Health Sciences Center, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    1997-02-01

    We report the mapping of the human gene MPB1 (c-myc promoter binding protein), a recently identified gene regulatory protein. MPB1 binds to the c-myc P2 promoter and exerts a negative regulatory role on c-myc transcription. Since exogenous expression from transfection of the MPB1 gene suppresses the tumorigenic property of breast cancer cells, there was interest in determining the chromosomal location of this gene. The human MPB1 gene was assigned to human chromosome 1p35-pter using Southern blot analyses of genomic DNAs from rodent-human somatic hybrid cell lines. A specific human genomic fragment was observed only in the somatic cell lines containing human chromosome 1 or the p35-pter region of the chromosome. 10 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Identification of a regulatory variant that binds FOXA1 and FOXA2 at the CDC123/CAMK1D type 2 diabetes GWAS locus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie P Fogarty

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Many of the type 2 diabetes loci identified through genome-wide association studies localize to non-protein-coding intronic and intergenic regions and likely contain variants that regulate gene transcription. The CDC123/CAMK1D type 2 diabetes association signal on chromosome 10 spans an intergenic region between CDC123 and CAMK1D and also overlaps the CDC123 3'UTR. To gain insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying the association signal, we used open chromatin, histone modifications and transcription factor ChIP-seq data sets from type 2 diabetes-relevant cell types to identify SNPs overlapping predicted regulatory regions. Two regions containing type 2 diabetes-associated variants were tested for enhancer activity using luciferase reporter assays. One SNP, rs11257655, displayed allelic differences in transcriptional enhancer activity in 832/13 and MIN6 insulinoma cells as well as in human HepG2 hepatocellular carcinoma cells. The rs11257655 risk allele T showed greater transcriptional activity than the non-risk allele C in all cell types tested. Using electromobility shift and supershift assays we demonstrated that the rs11257655 risk allele showed allele-specific binding to FOXA1 and FOXA2. We validated FOXA1 and FOXA2 enrichment at the rs11257655 risk allele using allele-specific ChIP in human islets. These results suggest that rs11257655 affects transcriptional activity through altered binding of a protein complex that includes FOXA1 and FOXA2, providing a potential molecular mechanism at this GWAS locus.

  9. Identification of a regulatory variant that binds FOXA1 and FOXA2 at the CDC123/CAMK1D type 2 diabetes GWAS locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Marie P; Cannon, Maren E; Vadlamudi, Swarooparani; Gaulton, Kyle J; Mohlke, Karen L

    2014-09-01

    Many of the type 2 diabetes loci identified through genome-wide association studies localize to non-protein-coding intronic and intergenic regions and likely contain variants that regulate gene transcription. The CDC123/CAMK1D type 2 diabetes association signal on chromosome 10 spans an intergenic region between CDC123 and CAMK1D and also overlaps the CDC123 3'UTR. To gain insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying the association signal, we used open chromatin, histone modifications and transcription factor ChIP-seq data sets from type 2 diabetes-relevant cell types to identify SNPs overlapping predicted regulatory regions. Two regions containing type 2 diabetes-associated variants were tested for enhancer activity using luciferase reporter assays. One SNP, rs11257655, displayed allelic differences in transcriptional enhancer activity in 832/13 and MIN6 insulinoma cells as well as in human HepG2 hepatocellular carcinoma cells. The rs11257655 risk allele T showed greater transcriptional activity than the non-risk allele C in all cell types tested. Using electromobility shift and supershift assays we demonstrated that the rs11257655 risk allele showed allele-specific binding to FOXA1 and FOXA2. We validated FOXA1 and FOXA2 enrichment at the rs11257655 risk allele using allele-specific ChIP in human islets. These results suggest that rs11257655 affects transcriptional activity through altered binding of a protein complex that includes FOXA1 and FOXA2, providing a potential molecular mechanism at this GWAS locus.

  10. Comparison of 454 Ultra-Deep Sequencing and Allele-Specific Real-Time PCR with Regard to the Detection of Emerging Drug-Resistant Minor HIV-1 Variants after Antiretroviral Prophylaxis for Vertical Transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Hauser

    Full Text Available Pregnant HIV-infected women were screened for the development of HIV-1 drug resistance after implementation of a triple-antiretroviral transmission prophylaxis as recommended by the WHO in 2006. The study offered the opportunity to compare amplicon-based 454 ultra-deep sequencing (UDS and allele-specific real-time PCR (ASPCR for the detection of drug-resistant minor variants in the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT.Plasma samples from 34 Tanzanian women were previously analysed by ASPCR for key resistance mutations in the viral RT selected by AZT, 3TC, and NVP (K70R, K103N, Y181C, M184V, T215Y/F. In this study, the RT region of the same samples was investigated by amplicon-based UDS for resistance mutations using the 454 GS FLX System.Drug-resistant HIV-variants were identified in 69% (20/29 of women by UDS and in 45% (13/29 by ASPCR. The absolute number of resistance mutations identified by UDS was twice that identified by ASPCR (45 vs 24. By UDS 14 of 24 ASPCR-detected resistance mutations were identified at the same position. The overall concordance between UDS and ASPCR was 61.0% (25/41. The proportions of variants quantified by UDS were approximately 2-3 times lower than by ASPCR. Amplicon generation from samples with viral loads below 20,000 copies/ml failed more frequently by UDS compared to ASPCR (limit of detection = 650 copies/ml, resulting in missing or insufficient sequence coverage.Both methods can provide useful information about drug-resistant minor HIV-1 variants. ASPCR has a higher sensitivity than UDS, but is restricted to single resistance mutations. In contrast, UDS is limited by its requirement for high viral loads to achieve sufficient sequence coverage, but the sequence information reveals the complete resistance patterns within the genomic region analysed. Improvements to the UDS limit of detection are in progress, and UDS could then facilitate monitoring of drug-resistant minor variants in the HIV-1 quasispecies.

  11. Patient mutation in AIRE disrupts P-TEFb binding and target gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žumer, Kristina; Plemenitaš, Ana; Saksela, Kalle; Peterlin, B Matija

    2011-10-01

    Autoimmune regulator (AIRE) is a transcription factor that induces the expression of a large subset of otherwise strictly tissue restricted antigens in medullary thymic epithelial cells, thereby enabling their presentation to developing T cells for negative selection. Mutations in AIRE lead to autoimmune-polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED), a rare monogenetic disease. Although it has been reported that AIRE interacts with proteins involved in nuclear transport, DNA-damage response, chromatin remodeling, transcription and pre-mRNA-splicing, the precise mechanism of AIRE-induced tissue restricted antigen expression has remained elusive. In this study, we investigated an APECED patient mutation that causes the loss of the extreme C-terminus of AIRE and found that this mutant protein is transcriptionaly inactive. When tethered heterologously to DNA, this domain could stimulate transcription and splicing by itself. Moreover, the loss of this C-terminus disrupted interactions with the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb). Via P-TEFb, AIRE increased levels of RNA polymerase II on and enhanced pre-mRNA splicing of heterologous and endogenous target genes. Indeed, the inhibition of CDK9, the kinase subunit of P-TEFb, inhibited AIRE-induced pre-mRNA splicing of these genes. Thus, AIRE requires P-TEFb to activate transcription elongation and co-transcriptional processing of target genes.

  12. Diversity of flavin-binding monooxygenase genes (almA) in marine bacteria capable of degradation long-chain alkanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wanpeng; Shao, Zongze

    2012-06-01

    Many bacteria have been reported as degraders of long-chain (LC) n-alkanes, but the mechanism is poorly understood. Flavin-binding monooxygenase (AlmA) was recently found to be involved in LC-alkane degradation in bacteria of the Acinetobacter and Alcanivorax genera. However, the diversity of this gene and the role it plays in other bacteria remains unclear. In this study, we surveyed the diversity of almA in marine bacteria and in bacteria found in oil-enrichment communities. To identify the presence of this gene, a pair of degenerate PCR primers were was designed based on conserved motifs of the almA gene sequences in public databases. Using this approach, we identified diverse almA genes in the hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria and in bacterial communities from the surface seawater of the Xiamen coastal area, the South China Sea, the Indian Ocean, and the Atlantic Ocean. As a result, almA was positively detected in 35 isolates belonging to four genera, and a total of 39 different almA sequences were obtained. Five isolates were confirmed to harbor two to three almA genes. From the Xiamen coastal area and the Atlantic Ocean oil-enrichment communities, a total of 60 different almA sequences were obtained. These sequences mainly formed two clusters in the phylogenetic tree, named Class I and Class II, and these shared 45-56% identity at the amino acid level. Class I contained 11 sequences from bacteria represented by the Salinisphaera and Parvibaculum genera. Class II was larger and more diverse, and it was composed of 88 sequences from Proteobacteria, Gram-negative bacteria, and the enriched bacterial communities. These communities were represented by the Alcanivorax and Marinobacter genera, which are the two most popular genera hosting the almA gene. AlmA was also detected across a wide geographical range, as determined by the origin of the bacterial host. Our results demonstrate the diversity of almA and confirm its high rate of occurrence in hydrocarbon

  13. Analysis of the DNA-binding profile and function of TALE homeoproteins reveals their specialization and specific interactions with Hox genes/proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penkov, Dmitry; Mateos San Martín, Daniel; Fernandez-Díaz, Luis C; Rosselló, Catalina A; Torroja, Carlos; Sánchez-Cabo, Fátima; Warnatz, H J; Sultan, Marc; Yaspo, Marie L; Gabrieli, Arianna; Tkachuk, Vsevolod; Brendolan, Andrea; Blasi, Francesco; Torres, Miguel

    2013-04-25

    The interactions of Meis, Prep, and Pbx1 TALE homeoproteins with Hox proteins are essential for development and disease. Although Meis and Prep behave similarly in vitro, their in vivo activities remain largely unexplored. We show that Prep and Meis interact with largely independent sets of genomic sites and select different DNA-binding sequences, Prep associating mostly with promoters and housekeeping genes and Meis with promoter-remote regions and developmental genes. Hox target sequences associate strongly with Meis but not with Prep binding sites, while Pbx1 cooperates with both Prep and Meis. Accordingly, Meis1 shows strong genetic interaction with Pbx1 but not with Prep1. Meis1 and Prep1 nonetheless coregulate a subset of genes, predominantly through opposing effects. Notably, the TALE homeoprotein binding profile subdivides Hox clusters into two domains differentially regulated by Meis1 and Prep1. During evolution, Meis and Prep thus specialized their interactions but maintained significant regulatory coordination.

  14. Molecular characterization and phylogenetic analysis of three odorant binding protein gene transcripts in Dendrolimus species (Lepidoptera: Lasiocampidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Su-Fang; Zhang, Zhen; Kong, Xiang-Bo; Wang, Hong-Bin

    2014-10-01

    Pine caterpillar moths, Dendrolimus spp. (Lepidoptera: Lasiocampidae), are serious economic pest of pines. Previously, phylogenetic analyses of Dendrolimus using different methods yielded inconsistent results. The chemosensory systems of insects may play fundamental roles in promoting speciation. Odorant-binding proteins (OBPs) participate in the first step of odor detection. Studying the evolution of OBPs in closely related species may help us to identify their role in speciation. We identified three OBPs - one pheromone-binding protein and two general odorant-binding proteins - from male antennae of four Dendrolimus species, D. superans (Butler), D. punctatus (Walker), D. kikuchii Matsumura, and D. houi Lajonquiere, the olfactory recognition systems of which had not been previously investigated. We analyzed their molecular characteristics and compared their sequences to those of OBPs in D. tabulaeformis Tsai et Liu. Ka/Ks ratio analyses among the five Dendrolimus species indicate that PBP1 genes experienced more evolutionary pressure than the GOBPs. Phylogenetic relationships of PBP1 and GOBP1 both indicated that D. houi was the basal species, then branched D. kikuchii, while D. tabulaeformis, D. punctatus, and D. superans evolved more recently. These relationships are consistent with the changes in sex pheromone components of these five species. Dendrolimus tabulaeformis and D. punctatus are closely related sister species. However, the distances among GOBP2 sequences in the five Dendrolimus were very short, and the relationships of D. houi and D. kikuchii could not be resolved. Integrating our results with those of previous studies, we hypothesized that D. kikuchii, D. punctatus and D. superans evolved from the basal ancestor because of sex pheromone mutations and environmental pressure.

  15. Structures of the Inducer-Binding Domain of Pentachlorophenol-Degrading Gene Regulator PcpR from Sphingobium chlorophenolicum

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    Robert P. Hayes

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available PcpR is a LysR-type transcription factor from Sphingobium chlorophenolicum L-1 that is responsible for the activation of several genes involved in polychlorophenol degradation. PcpR responds to several polychlorophenols in vivo. Here, we report the crystal structures of the inducer-binding domain of PcpR in the apo-form and binary complexes with pentachlorophenol (PCP and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP. Both X-ray crystal structures and isothermal titration calorimetry data indicated the association of two PCP molecules per PcpR, but only one 2,4,6-TCP molecule. The hydrophobic nature and hydrogen bonds of one binding cavity allowed the tight association of both PCP (Kd = 110 nM and 2,4,6-TCP (Kd = 22.8 nM. However, the other cavity was unique to PCP with much weaker affinity (Kd = 70 μM and thus its significance was not clear. Neither phenol nor benzoic acid displayed any significant affinity to PcpR, indicating a role of chlorine substitution in ligand specificity. When PcpR is compared with TcpR, a LysR-type regulator controlling the expression of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol degradation in Cupriavidus necator JMP134, most of the residues constituting the two inducer-binding cavities of PcpR are different, except for their general hydrophobic nature. The finding concurs that PcpR uses various polychlorophenols as long as it includes 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, as inducers; whereas TcpR is only responsive to 2,4,6-trichlorophenol.

  16. The Sigma-2 Receptor and Progesterone Receptor Membrane Component 1 are Different Binding Sites Derived From Independent Genes

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    Uyen B. Chu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The sigma-2 receptor (S2R is a potential therapeutic target for cancer and neuronal diseases. However, the identity of the S2R has remained a matter of debate. Historically, the S2R has been defined as (1 a binding site with high affinity to 1,3-di-o-tolylguanidine (DTG and haloperidol but not to the selective sigma-1 receptor ligand (+-pentazocine, and (2 a protein of 18–21 kDa, as shown by specific photolabeling with [3H]-Azido-DTG and [125I]-iodoazido-fenpropimorph ([125I]-IAF. Recently, the progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1, a 25 kDa protein, was reported to be the S2R (Nature Communications, 2011, 2:380. To confirm this identification, we created PGRMC1 knockout NSC34 cell lines using the CRISPR/Cas9 technology. We found that in NSC34 cells devoid of or overexpressing PGRMC1, the maximum [3H]-DTG binding to the S2R (Bmax as well as the DTG-protectable [125I]-IAF photolabeling of the S2R were similar to those of wild-type control cells. Furthermore, the affinities of DTG and haloperidol for PGRMC1 (KI = 472 μM and 350 μM, respectively, as determined in competition with [3H]-progesterone, were more than 3 orders of magnitude lower than those reported for the S2R (20–80 nM. These results clarify that PGRMC1 and the S2R are distinct binding sites expressed by different genes.

  17. Association of polymorphisms in adipocyte fatty acid binding protein gene with fat-related traits in chicken

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Manhong YE; Jie WEN; Honghe CAO; Hongbin LI; Jilan CHEN; Guiping ZHAO; Maiqing ZHENG

    2008-01-01

    PCR-SSCP analysis was used to detect poly-morphic sites in chicken adipocyte fatty acid binding pro-tein (A-FABP) gene. Six Chinese local breeds, Beijing-You chicken, Dwarf chicken, Taihe silky chicken, Chong-renma chicken, Xiayan chicken, Luyuan chicken and an introduced foreign breed, Arbor Acre broiler, were used as test populations. Three PCR-SSCP loci were detected. Statistical results showed that frequencies of genotypes and alleles were significantly different in the test popula-tions. Sequence analysis revealed that C → T, G → A, and C → T transitions were responsible for the polymorph-isms. Some fat-related traits such as body weight, content of intramuscular fat (IMF) and percentage of abdominal fat (AFP) were measured in Dwarf chickens and male Beijing-You chickens. We found out that chicken quality was significantly related to different genotypes in these two populations.

  18. The fission yeast RNA binding protein Mmi1 regulates meiotic genes by controlling intron specific splicing and polyadenylation coupled RNA turnover.

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    Huei-Mei Chen

    Full Text Available The polyA tails of mRNAs are monitored by the exosome as a quality control mechanism. We find that fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, adopts this RNA quality control mechanism to regulate a group of 30 or more meiotic genes at the level of both splicing and RNA turnover. In vegetative cells the RNA binding protein Mmi1 binds to the primary transcripts of these genes. We find the novel motif U(U/C/GAAAC highly over-represented in targets of Mmi1. Mmi1 can specifically regulate the splicing of particular introns in a transcript: it inhibits the splicing of introns that are in the vicinity of putative Mmi1 binding sites, while allowing the splicing of other introns that are far from such sites. In addition, binding of Mmi1, particularly near the 3' end, alters 3' processing to promote extremely long polyA tails of up to a kilobase. The hyperadenylated transcripts are then targeted for degradation by the nuclear exonuclease Rrp6. The nuclear polyA binding protein Pab2 assists this hyperadenylation-mediated RNA decay. Rrp6 also targets other hyperadenylated transcripts, which become hyperadenylated in an unknown, but Mmi1-independent way. Thus, hyperadenylation may be a general signal for RNA degradation. In addition, binding of Mmi1 can affect the efficiency of 3' cleavage. Inactivation of Mmi1 in meiosis allows meiotic expression, through splicing and RNA stabilization, of at least 29 target genes, which are apparently constitutively transcribed.

  19. Isolation and identification of proteins binding to the major breakpoint region(mbr) of bcl2 gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nan Yang; Yujie Sun; Changyan Ma

    2009-01-01

    Objective: We have previously found that mbr is a regulatory element of the bcl2 gene. The objective of this study is to isolate and identify the proteins binding to the 37 mbr in the 3 '-end of the mbr. Methods: Streptavidin magnetic particles were ligated to concatameric oligonucleofides of 37 mbr and incubated with the nuclear extracts of Jurkat cells. The DNA-binding proteins were eluted and then resolved by SDS-PAGE. After silver staining, the protein bands were excised and subjected to MALDI-TOF MS. Results: Several protein bands were detected after the isolation with magnetic particles, and Splicing factor, proline-and glutamine-rich(SFPQ), Poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase I(PARP), and promyelocytic leukemia protein(PML) were identified by MALDI-TOF MS. Conclusion: Several proteins were isolated and identified from the 37 mbr-protein complex. Results of this study establish a foundation for further study of the mechanisms by which mbr executes its regulatory function.

  20. Fatty Acid-binding Proteins Interact with Comparative Gene Identification-58 Linking Lipolysis with Lipid Ligand Shuttling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Peter; Boeszoermenyi, Andras; Jaeger, Doris; Feiler, Ursula; Arthanari, Haribabu; Mayer, Nicole; Zehender, Fabian; Rechberger, Gerald; Oberer, Monika; Zimmermann, Robert; Lass, Achim; Haemmerle, Guenter; Breinbauer, Rolf; Zechner, Rudolf; Preiss-Landl, Karina

    2015-07-24

    The coordinated breakdown of intracellular triglyceride (TG) stores requires the exquisitely regulated interaction of lipolytic enzymes with regulatory, accessory, and scaffolding proteins. Together they form a dynamic multiprotein network designated as the "lipolysome." Adipose triglyceride lipase (Atgl) catalyzes the initiating step of TG hydrolysis and requires comparative gene identification-58 (Cgi-58) as a potent activator of enzyme activity. Here, we identify adipocyte-type fatty acid-binding protein (A-Fabp) and other members of the fatty acid-binding protein (Fabp) family as interaction partners of Cgi-58. Co-immunoprecipitation, microscale thermophoresis, and solid phase assays proved direct protein/protein interaction between A-Fabp and Cgi-58. Using nuclear magnetic resonance titration experiments and site-directed mutagenesis, we located a potential contact region on A-Fabp. In functional terms, A-Fabp stimulates Atgl-catalyzed TG hydrolysis in a Cgi-58-dependent manner. Additionally, transcriptional transactivation assays with a luciferase reporter system revealed that Fabps enhance the ability of Atgl/Cgi-58-mediated lipolysis to induce the activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors. Our studies identify Fabps as crucial structural and functional components of the lipolysome.

  1. Tumor susceptibility gene 101 (TSG101 is a novel binding-partner for the class II Rab11-FIPs.

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    Conor P Horgan

    Full Text Available The Rab11-FIPs (Rab11-family interacting proteins; henceforth, FIPs are a family of Rab11a/Rab11b/Rab25 GTPase effector proteins implicated in an assortment of intracellular trafficking processes. Through proteomic screening, we have identified TSG101 (tumor susceptibility gene 101, a component of the ESCRT-I (endosomal sorting complex required for transport complex, as a novel FIP4-binding protein, which we find can also bind FIP3. We show that α-helical coiled-coil regions of both TSG101 and FIP4 mediate the interaction with the cognate protein, and that point mutations in the coiled-coil regions of both TSG101 and FIP4 abrogate the interaction. We find that expression of TSG101 and FIP4 mutants cause cytokinesis defects, but that the TSG101-FIP4 interaction is not required for localisation of TSG101 to the midbody/Flemming body during abscission. Together, these data suggest functional overlap between Rab11-controlled processes and components of the ESCRT pathway.

  2. Haplotype of gene Nedd4 binding protein 2 associated with sporadic nasopharyngeal carcinoma in the Southern Chinese population

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    Feng Qi-Sheng

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bcl-3 as an oncoprotein is overexpressed in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC. Nedd4 binding protein 2 (N4BP2, which is located in the NPC susceptibility locus, is a Bcl-3 binding protein. This study is aimed to explore the association between N4BP2 genetic polymorphism and the risk of NPC. Methods We performed a hospital-based case-control study, including 531 sporadic NPC and 480 cancer-free control subjects from southern China. PCR-sequencing was carried out on Exons, promoter region and nearby introns of the N4BP2 gene. The expression pattern of N4BP2 and Bcl-3 was also analyzed. Results We observed a statistically significant difference in haplotype blocks ATTA and GTTG between cases and controls. In addition, three novel SNPs were identified, two of which were in exons (loc123-e3l-snp2, position 39868005, A/G, Met171Val; RS17511668-SNP2, position 39926432, G/A, Glu118Lys, and one was in the intron6 (RS794001-SNP1, position 39944127, T/G. Moreover, N4BP2 was at higher levels in a majority of tumor tissues examined, relative to paired normal tissues. Conclusion These data suggest that haplotype blocks ATTA and GTTG of N4BP2 is correlation with the risk of sporadic nasopharyngeal carcinoma in the Southern Chinese population and N4BP2 has a potential role in the development of NPC.

  3. An early ethylene up-regulated gene encoding a calmodulin-binding protein involved in plant senescence and death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, T.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2000-01-01

    35S-Labeled calmodulin (CaM) was used to screen a tobacco anther cDNA library. A positive clone (NtER1) with high homology to an early ethylene-up-regulated gene (ER66) in tomato, and an Arabidopsis homolog was isolated and characterized. Based on the helical wheel projection, a 25-mer peptide corresponding to the predicted CaM-binding region of NtER1 (amino acids 796-820) was synthesized. The gel-mobility shift assay showed that the peptide formed a stable complex with CaM only in the presence of Ca(2+). CaM binds to NtER1 with high affinity (K(d) approximately 12 nm) in a calcium-dependent manner. Tobacco flowers at different stages of development were treated with ethylene or with 1-methylcyclopropene for 2 h before treating with ethylene. Northern analysis showed that the NtER1 was rapidly induced after 15 min of exposure to ethylene. However, the 2-h 1-methylcyclopropene treatment totally blocked NtER1 expression in flowers at all stages of development, suggesting that NtER1 is an early ethylene-up-regulated gene. The senescing leaves and petals had significantly increased NtER1 induction as compared with young leaves and petals, implying that NtER1 is developmentally regulated and acts as a trigger for senescence and death. This is the first documented evidence for the involvement of Ca(2+)/CaM-mediated signaling in ethylene action.

  4. In silico analysis of transcription factor binding sites in promoters of germin-like protein genes in rice

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    Ilyas Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Germins (GERs and germin-like proteins (GLPs play important roles in responses to various stresses; however, their function is still not fully understood. Significant insight into their function can be obtained by analyzing their promoters. In the present study, the 5' upstream promoters (1000 bp of 43 Asian rice (Oryza sativa var. Japonica GLP genes were retrieved from the Plant Ensemble, based on the Rice Annotation Project database (RAP-DB. Phylogenetic analysis via MEGA6 showed a narrow genetic background (0.2% with a Tajima neutrality value (π of 0.69. Overall, 4234 transcription factor (TF binding sites (TFBSs were found on chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 9, 11 and 12 via “MatInspector” from 90 different TF families using a total of 444 families. Common TFs and DiAlign analyses showed that arabidopsis homeobox protein (AHBP, MYB-like proteins (MYBL and vertebrate TATA-box-binding protein (VTBP were the most abundant, common and evolutionarily conserved elements in the upstream region from 0 to -800. Finding their mutual interaction via Farmworker analysis uncovered three new cisregulatory modules (VTBP_VTBP, MYBS_MYBS, and AHBP_VTBP, which appear to be decisive for OsGLP regulation. In silico functional analysis via ModelInspector revealed 77 cis-regulatory modules, each comprised of two elements, among which DOFF_OPAQ_03 and GTBX_MYCL_01 were the most frequent and mostly found on chromosome 8 and 12, indicating that the combinatorial interaction of these elements has a fundamental role in various biological processes. The study revealed the importance of these elements in regulating OsGLP expression that will help in predicting the role of these genes in various stresses, and can have application in biotechnology.

  5. An early ethylene up-regulated gene encoding a calmodulin-binding protein involved in plant senescence and death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, T.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2000-01-01

    35S-Labeled calmodulin (CaM) was used to screen a tobacco anther cDNA library. A positive clone (NtER1) with high homology to an early ethylene-up-regulated gene (ER66) in tomato, and an Arabidopsis homolog was isolated and characterized. Based on the helical wheel projection, a 25-mer peptide corresponding to the predicted CaM-binding region of NtER1 (amino acids 796-820) was synthesized. The gel-mobility shift assay showed that the peptide formed a stable complex with CaM only in the presence of Ca(2+). CaM binds to NtER1 with high affinity (K(d) approximately 12 nm) in a calcium-dependent manner. Tobacco flowers at different stages of development were treated with ethylene or with 1-methylcyclopropene for 2 h before treating with ethylene. Northern analysis showed that the NtER1 was rapidly induced after 15 min of exposure to ethylene. However, the 2-h 1-methylcyclopropene treatment totally blocked NtER1 expression in flowers at all stages of development, suggesting that NtER1 is an early ethylene-up-regulated gene. The senescing leaves and petals had significantly increased NtER1 induction as compared with young leaves and petals, implying that NtER1 is developmentally regulated and acts as a trigger for senescence and death. This is the first documented evidence for the involvement of Ca(2+)/CaM-mediated signaling in ethylene action.

  6. Association analyses between brain-expressed fatty-acid binding protein (FABP) genes and schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwayama, Yoshimi; Hattori, Eiji; Maekawa, Motoko; Yamada, Kazuo; Toyota, Tomoko; Ohnishi, Tetsuo; Iwata, Yasuhide; Tsuchiya, Kenji J; Sugihara, Genichi; Kikuchi, Mitsuru; Hashimoto, Kenji; Iyo, Masaomi; Inada, Toshiya; Kunugi, Hiroshi; Ozaki, Norio; Iwata, Nakao; Nanko, Shinichiro; Iwamoto, Kazuya; Okazaki, Yuji; Kato, Tadafumi; Yoshikawa, Takeo

    2010-03-05

    Deficits in prepulse inhibition (PPI) are a biological marker for psychiatric illnesses such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. To unravel PPI-controlling mechanisms, we previously performed quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis in mice, and identified Fabp7, that encodes a brain-type fatty acid binding protein (Fabp), as a causative gene. In that study, human FABP7 showed genetic association with schizophrenia. FABPs constitute a gene family, of which members FABP5 and FABP3 are also expressed in the brain. These FABP proteins are molecular chaperons for polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) such as arachidonic and docosahexaenoic acids. Additionally, the involvement of PUFAs has been documented in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and mood disorders. Therefore in this study, we examined the genetic roles of FABP5 and 3 in schizophrenia (N = 1,900 in combination with controls) and FABP7, 5, and 3 in bipolar disorder (N = 1,762 in the case-control set). Three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from FABP7 showed nominal association with bipolar disorder, and haplotypes of the same gene showed empirical associations with bipolar disorder even after correction of multiple testing. We could not perform association studies on FABP5, due to the lack of informative SNPs. FABP3 displayed no association with either disease. Each FABP is relatively small and it is assumed that there are multiple regulatory elements that control gene expression. Therefore, future identification of unknown regulatory elements will be necessary to make a more detailed analysis of their genetic contribution to mental illnesses.

  7. Dynamics of Lewis b binding and sequence variation of the babA adhesin gene during chronic Helicobacter pylori infection in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nell, Sandra; Kennemann, Lynn; Schwarz, Sandra; Josenhans, Christine; Suerbaum, Sebastian

    2014-12-16

    Helicobacter pylori undergoes rapid microevolution during chronic infection, but very little is known about how this affects host interaction factors. The best-studied adhesin of H. pylori is BabA, which mediates binding to the blood group antigen Lewis b [Le(b)]. To study the dynamics of Le(b) adherence during human infection, we analyzed paired H. pylori isolates obtained sequentially from chronically infected individuals. A complete loss or significant reduction of Le(b) binding was observed in strains from 5 out of 23 individuals, indicating that the Le(b) binding phenotype is quite stable during chronic human infection. Sequence comparisons of babA identified differences due to mutation and/or recombination in 12 out of 16 strain pairs analyzed. Most amino acid changes were found in the putative N-terminal extracellular adhesion domain. One strain pair that had changed from a Le(b) binding to a nonbinding phenotype was used to study the role of distinct sequence changes in Le(b) binding. By transformations of the nonbinding strain with a babA gene amplified from the binding strain, H. pylori strains with mosaic babA genes were generated. Recombinants were enriched for a gain of Le(b) binding by biopanning or for BabA expression on the bacterial surface by pulldown assay. With this approach, we identified several amino acid residues affecting the strength of Le(b) binding. Additionally, the data showed that the C terminus of BabA, which is predicted to encode an outer membrane β-barrel domain, plays an essential role in the biogenesis of this protein. Helicobacter pylori causes a chronic infection of the human stomach that can lead to ulcers and cancer. The bacterium can bind to gastric epithelial cells with specialized outer membrane proteins. The best-studied protein is the BabA adhesin which binds to the Lewis b blood group antigen. Since H. pylori is a bacterium with very high genetic variability, we asked whether babA evolves during chronic infection and

  8. Identification of HTF (HER2 transcription factor) as an AP-2 (activator protein-2) transcription factor and contribution of the HTF binding site to ERBB2 gene overexpression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernimmen, Douglas; Begon, Dominique; Salvador, Christophe; Gofflot, Stéphanie; Grooteclaes, Madeleine; Winkler, Rosita

    2003-02-15

    The ERBB2 gene is overexpressed in 30% of human breast cancers and this is correlated with poor prognosis. Overexpression of the ERBB2 gene is due to increased transcription and gene amplification. Our previous studies have identified a new cis element in the ERBB2 promoter which is involved in the gene's overexpression. This cis element, located 501 bp upstream from the main ERBB2 transcription initiation site, binds a transcription factor called HTF (HER2 transcription factor). We report here the identification of HTF as an AP-2 (activator protein-2) transcription factor. The new cis element is bound by AP-2 with high affinity, compared with a previously described AP-2 binding site located 284 bp downstream. Co-transfection of an AP-2alpha expression vector with a reporter vector containing the newly identified AP-2 binding site in front of a minimal ERBB2 promoter induced a dose-dependent increase in transcriptional activity. We examined the contribution of the new AP-2 binding site to ERBB2 overexpression. For this purpose we abolished the new and/or the previously described AP-2 binding sequence by site-directed mutagenesis. The results show that the two functional AP-2 sites in the first 700 bp of the ERBB2 promoter co-operate to achieve maximal transcriptional activity.

  9. Partial deficiency of thyroxine-binding globulin-Allentown is due to a mutation in the signal peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fingerhut, Anja; Reutrakul, Sirimon; Knuedeler, Sebastian D; Moeller, Lars C; Greenlee, Carol; Refetoff, Samuel; Janssen, Onno E

    2004-05-01

    We present an unusual variant of T(4)-binding globulin (TBG) found in a family from Allentown, Pennsylvania (TBG-AT). The heterozygous proposita presented serum total T(4) and TBG levels ranging from low to normal. TBG gene sequencing revealed a C-to-T substitution in codon -2 (CAC to TAC) leading to the substitution of the normal histidine by a tyrosine within the signal peptide. No mutation within the mature peptide was found. Allele-specific PCR confirmed the H(-2)Y mutation in the propositas mother and son. T(4)-binding analysis of TBG in serum from the proposita and son showed normal affinity but reduced capacity when compared with the unaffected father. Heat stability and isoelectric focusing of TBG-AT were normal. In vitro expression of a recombinant TBG-AT in Xenopus oocytes revealed a diminished secretory efficiency and confirmed the normal binding affinity and heat stability of the small amount of secreted TBG-AT. This study has defined impaired cotranslational processing as a hitherto unrecognized cause of hereditary TBG deficiency.

  10. Gene regulation knowledge commons: community action takes care of DNA binding transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Sushil; Vercruysse, Steven; Chawla, Konika; Christie, Karen R; Blake, Judith A; Huntley, Rachael P; Orchard, Sandra; Hermjakob, Henning; Thommesen, Liv; Lægreid, Astrid; Kuiper, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A large gap remains between the amount of knowledge in scientific literature and the fraction that gets curated into standardized databases, despite many curation initiatives. Yet the availability of comprehensive knowledge in databases is crucial for exploiting existing background knowledge, both for designing follow-up experiments and for interpreting new experimental data. Structured resources also underpin the computational integration and modeling of regulatory pathways, which further aids our understanding of regulatory dynamics. We argue how cooperation between the scientific community and professional curators can increase the capacity of capturing precise knowledge from literature. We demonstrate this with a project in which we mobilize biological domain experts who curate large amounts of DNA binding transcription factors, and show that they, although new to the field of curation, can make valuable contributions by harvesting reported knowledge from scientific papers. Such community curation can enhance the scientific epistemic process.Database URL: http://www.tfcheckpoint.org. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  11. A polymorphism within the vitamin D-binding protein gene is associated with Graves' disease but not with Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pani, Michael A; Regulla, Karoline; Segni, Maria; Hofmann, Stefan; Hüfner, Michael; Pasquino, Anna Maria; Usadel, Klaus-H; Badenhoop, Klaus

    2002-06-01

    Graves' disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis are common autoimmune thyroid disorders. Experimentally, 1,25(OH)(2) D(3) prevents Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Vitamin D serum levels in Graves' disease were found to be significantly lower than in nonautoimmune hyperthyroidism. The polymorphic vitamin D-binding protein (DBP) greatly facilitates vitamin D actions, and DBP alleles differ regarding their affinity for 1,25(OH)(2) D(3). Therefore, we investigated polymorphisms of the DBP gene for an association with thyroid autoimmunity. Families with an offspring affected by Graves' disease (95 pedigrees) or by Hashimoto's thyroiditis (92 pedigrees) encompassing 561 individuals of Caucasian origin were genotyped for three DBP polymorphisms [(TAAA)(N) in intron 8; StyI; and HaeIII in exon 11]. Indirect haplotyping and (extended) transmission disequilibrium testing were performed. There was a significant transmission disequilibrium of the intron 8 polymorphism in patients with Graves' disease (P < 0.03) but not of the exon 11 polymorphism. In contrast, neither the intron 8 nor the exon 11 polymorphism was associated with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Maternal and paternal transmission as well as allele frequencies in DQ2(+) and DQ2(-) patients did not differ in either disease. Therefore, allelic variants of the DBP gene confer susceptibility to Graves' disease but not to Hashimoto's thyroiditis in our population. These findings support a role of the vitamin D endocrine system in thyroid autoimmunity.

  12. Algorithmic approach for methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene testing in patients with neurodevelopmental disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanmann, Jennifer N; Schaefer, G Bradley; Buehler, Bruce A; Sanger, Warren G

    2012-03-01

    Methyl-CpG binding protein 2 gene (MECP2) testing is indicated for patients with numerous clinical presentations, including Rett syndrome (classic and atypical), unexplained neonatal encephalopathy, Angelman syndrome, nonspecific mental retardation, autism (females), and an X-linked family history of developmental delay. Because of this complexity, a gender-specific approach for comprehensive MECP2 gene testing is described. Briefly, sequencing of exons 1 to 4 of MECP2 is recommended for patients with a Rett syndrome phenotype, unexplained neonatal encephalopathy, an Angelman syndrome phenotype (with negative 15q11-13 analysis), nonspecific mental retardation, or autism (females). Additional testing for large-scale MECP2 deletions is recommended for patients with Rett syndrome or Angelman syndrome phenotypes (with negative 15q11-13 analysis) following negative sequencing. Alternatively, testing for large-scale MECP2 duplications is recommended for males presenting with mental retardation, an X-linked family history of developmental delay, and a significant proportion of previously described clinical features (particularly a history of recurrent respiratory infections).

  13. Specific reduction of calcium-binding protein (28-kilodalton calbindin-D) gene expression in aging and neurodegenerative diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iacopino, A.M.; Christakos, S. (Univ. of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Newark (USA))

    1990-06-01

    The present studies establish that there are specific, significant decreases in the neuronal calcium-binding protein (28-kDa calbindin-D) gene expression in aging and in neurodegenerative diseases. The specificity of the changes observed in calbindin mRNA levels was tested by reprobing blots with calmodulin, cyclophilin, and B-actin cDNAs. Gross brain regions of the aging rat exhibited specific, significant decreases in calbindin{center dot}mRNA and protein levels in the cerebellum, corpus striatum, and brain-stem region but not in the cerebral cortex or hippocampus. Discrete areas of the aging human brain exhibited significant decreases in calbindin protein and mRNA in the cerebellum, corpus striatum, and nucleus basalis but not in the neocortex, hippocampus, amygdala, locus ceruleus, or nucleus raphe dorsalis. Comparison of diseased human brain tissue with age- and sex-matched controls yielded significant decreases calbindin protein and mRNA in the substantia nigra (Parkinson disease), in the corpus striatum (Huntington disease), in the nucleus basalis (Alzheimer disease), and in the hippocampus and nucleus raphe dorsalis (Parkinson, Huntington, and Alzheimer diseases) but not in the cerebellum, neocortex, amygdala, or locus ceruleus. These findings suggest that decreased calbindin gene expression may lead to a failure of calcium buffering or intraneuronal calcium homeostasis, which contributes to calcium-mediated cytotoxic events during aging and in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases.

  14. Cloning and characterization of the fatty acid-binding protein gene from the protoscolex of Taenia multiceps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Hua-Ming; Xie, Yue; Fu, Yan; Yang, Ying-Dong; Gu, Xiao-Bin; Wang, Shu-Xian; Peng, Xi; Lai, Wei-Ming; Peng, Xue-Rong; Yang, Guang-You

    2013-05-01

    Taenia multiceps (Cestoda: Taeniidae), a worldwide cestode parasite, is emerging as an important helminthic zoonosis due to serious or fatal central nervous system disease commonly known as coenurosis in domestic and wild ruminants including humans. Herein, a fatty acid-binding protein (FABP) gene was identified from transcriptomic data in T. multiceps. This gene, which contains a complete coding sequence, was amplified by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. The corresponding protein, which was named TmFABP, had a molecular weight of 14 kDa, and subsequently was recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli. The fusion protein was purified on Ni-NTA beads (Bio-Rad). Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blot analyses showed that the purified recombinant protein caused immunogenicity. Immunohistochemical studies showed that TmFABP was expressed at the tegumental level in the protoscolices and in the cells between the body wall and parenchyma layer of the cestode. In sections from gravid proglottids, intense staining was detected in the uterus and eggs. Based on this, TmFABP could be switched on during differentiation of germinative layers to protoscoleces and from metacestodes to adult worms. Taken together, our results already reported for T. multiceps suggest the possibility of TmFABP developing a vaccine to control and prevent coenurosis.

  15. Effects of androgen-binding protein (ABP) on spermatid Tnp1 gene expression in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della-Maria, Julie; Gerard, Anne; Franck, Patricia; Gerard, Hubert

    2002-12-30

    In vitro studies were designed to determine whether Sertoli cell-delivered ABP could act on spermatogenetic events, whether such an action could occur via a paracrine or a juxtacrine pathway and whether sex steroids could be involved in this action. ABP delivery to germ cells was achieved using an in vitro model based on recombinant rat ABP-producing mouse Sertoli cells cocultivated with rat spermatids. Using semi-quantitative RT-PCR, the expression of the Tnp 1 gene encoding the Transition Protein 1, involved in the histone to protamine replacement during spermatid nuclear transformation, was analyzed. Our results provide clear evidence that Sertoli cell-derived ABP acts on spermatids by modifying the TP1 mRNA level. This outcome, strictly requiring juxtacrine conditions, is obtained in the absence of sex steroid hormones. To our knowledge this is the first evidence of an effect of ABP itself on male germ cells.

  16. Physical properties and heavy metal uptake of encapsulated Escherichia coli expressing a metal binding gene (NCP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, S S; Pazirandeh, M

    1999-01-01

    A recombinant Escherichia coli expressing the Neurospora crassa metallothionein gene (NCP) has previously been shown to remove low levels of Cd and other metals from solution. For further development as a biosorbent, the encapsulation of the NCP is investigated by various matrices. The NCP was encapsulated in alginate, chitosan-alginate or kappa-carrageenan, and its physical properties characterized. Results indicated that encapsulation in alginate resulted in fragile beads, whereas encapsulation in kappa-carrageenan or chitosan-alginate provided more physical and chemical integrity to the beads. Maximal heavy metal removal by cells encapsulated in carrageenan occurred within 3 h, while a gradual increase in removal was observed up to 24 h for cells encapsulated in chitosan-alginate. Metal removal by cells encapsulated in alginate beads was lower than those encapsulated in carrageenan or chitosan-alginate.

  17. The yeast CDP1 gene encodes a triple-helical DNA-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musso, M; Bianchi-Scarrà, G; Van Dyke, M W

    2000-11-01

    The formation of triple-helical DNA has been implicated in several cellular processes, including transcription, replication and recombination. While there is no direct evidence for triplexes in vivo, cellular proteins that specifically recognize triplex DNA have been described. Using a purine-motif triplex probe and southwestern library screening, we isolated five independent clones expressing the same C-terminal 210 amino acids of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein Cdp1p fused with beta-galactosidase. In electrophoretic mobility shift assays, recombinant Cdp1pDelta1-867 bound Pu-motif triplex DNAs with high affinity (K:(d) approximately 5 nM) and bound Py-motif triplex, duplex and single-stranded DNAs with far lower affinity (0.5-5.0 microM). Genetic analyses revealed that the CDP1 gene product was required for proper chromosome segregation. The possible involvement of triplex DNA in this process is discussed.

  18. Polymorphisms in the Mannose-Binding Lectin Gene are Associated with Defective Mannose-Binding Lectin Functional Activity in Crohn's Disease Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choteau, Laura; Vasseur, Francis; Lepretre, Frederic; Figeac, Martin; Gower-Rousseau, Corine; Dubuquoy, Laurent; Poulain, Daniel; Colombel, Jean-Frederic; Sendid, Boualem; Jawhara, Samir

    2016-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin, together with mannose-associated serine proteases, activates the lectin pathway of the complement system and subsequent inflammatory mechanisms. An association between mannose-binding lectin deficiency and anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibody levels is observed in Crohn's disease and this deficiency is frequently associated with a severe Crohn's disease phenotype. In the present study, we assessed the relationship between serum concentrations of mannose-binding lectin, mannose-binding lectin functional activity, MBL2 and NOD2 polymorphisms, anti-S. cerevisiae antibody levels and clinical Crohn's disease phenotype in 69 Crohn's disease patients and 30 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. The results show that the MBL2 variant rs5030737 at codon 52 was associated with a low level of mannose-binding lectin and impaired mannose-binding lectin-mannose-associated serine protease (MBL-MASP) functional activity in Crohn's disease patients. This MBL2 variant was also associated with a higher level of anti-S. cerevisiae antibodies. In addition, the NOD2 variant rs2066844, which is associated with susceptibility to Crohn's disease, was significantly correlated with an impairment in MBL-MASP functional activity. These results provide evidence that Crohn's disease patients have an impairment in MBL-MASP functional activity and that this defect is associated with MBL2 and NOD2 variants.

  19. Folate deficiency facilitates recruitment of upstream binding factor to hot spots of DNA double-strand breaks of rRNA genes and promotes its transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Qiu; Li, Caihua; Song, Xiaozhen; Wu, Lihua; Jiang, Qian; Qiu, Zhiyong; Cao, Haiyan; Yu, Kaihui; Wan, Chunlei; Li, Jianting; Yang, Feng; Huang, Zebing; Niu, Bo; Jiang, Zhengwen; Zhang, Ting

    2016-12-06

    The biogenesis of ribosomes in vivo is an essential process for cellular functions. Transcription of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes is the rate-limiting step in ribosome biogenesis controlled by environmental conditions. Here, we investigated the role of folate antagonist on changes of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) landscape in mouse embryonic stem cells. A significant DSB enhancement was detected in the genome of these cells and a large majority of these DSBs were found in rRNA genes. Furthermore, spontaneous DSBs in cells under folate deficiency conditions were located exclusively within the rRNA gene units, representing a H3K4me1 hallmark. Enrichment H3K4me1 at the hot spots of DSB regions enhanced the recruitment of upstream binding factor (UBF) to rRNA genes, resulting in the increment of rRNA genes transcription. Supplement of folate resulted in a restored UBF binding across DNA breakage sites of rRNA genes, and normal rRNA gene transcription. In samples from neural tube defects (NTDs) with low folate level, up-regulation of rRNA gene transcription was observed, along with aberrant UBF level. Our results present a new view by which alterations in folate levels affects DNA breakage through epigenetic control leading to the regulation of rRNA gene transcription during the early stage of development.

  20. Integrative genomic analysis in K562 chronic myelogenous leukemia cells reveals that proximal NCOR1 binding positively regulates genes that govern erythroid differentiation and Imatinib sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Mark D; van den Berg, Patrick R; Russell, James L; Singh, Prashant K; Battaglia, Sebastiano; Campbell, Moray J

    2015-09-01

    To define the functions of NCOR1 we developed an integrative analysis that combined ENCODE and NCI-60 data, followed by in vitro validation. NCOR1 and H3K9me3 ChIP-Seq, FAIRE-seq and DNA CpG methylation interactions were related to gene expression using bootstrapping approaches. Most NCOR1 combinations (24/44) were associated with significantly elevated level expression of protein coding genes and only very few combinations related to gene repression. DAVID's biological process annotation revealed that elevated gene expression was uniquely associated with acetylation and ETS binding. A matrix of gene and drug interactions built on NCI-60 data identified that Imatinib significantly targeted the NCOR1 governed transcriptome. Stable knockdown of NCOR1 in K562 cells slowed growth and significantly repressed genes associated with NCOR1 cistrome, again, with the GO terms acetylation and ETS binding, and significantly dampened sensitivity to Imatinib-induced erythroid differentiation. Mining public microarray data revealed that NCOR1-targeted genes were significantly enriched in Imatinib response gene signatures in cell lines and chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) patients. These approaches integrated cistrome, transcriptome and drug sensitivity relationships to reveal that NCOR1 function is surprisingly most associated with elevated gene expression, and that these targets, both in CML cell lines and patients, associate with sensitivity to Imatinib.

  1. CORE_TF: a user-friendly interface to identify evolutionary conserved transcription factor binding sites in sets of co-regulated genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    den Dunnen Johan T

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of transcription factor binding sites is difficult since they are only a small number of nucleotides in size, resulting in large numbers of false positives and false negatives in current approaches. Computational methods to reduce false positives are to look for over-representation of transcription factor binding sites in a set of similarly regulated promoters or to look for conservation in orthologous promoter alignments. Results We have developed a novel tool, "CORE_TF" (Conserved and Over-REpresented Transcription Factor binding sites that identifies common transcription factor binding sites in promoters of co-regulated genes. To improve upon existing binding site predictions, the tool searches for position weight matrices from the TRANSFACR database that are over-represented in an experimental set compared to a random set of promoters and identifies cross-species conservation of the predicted transcription factor binding sites. The algorithm has been evaluated with expression and chromatin-immunoprecipitation on microarray data. We also implement and demonstrate the importance of matching the random set of promoters to the experimental promoters by GC content, which is a unique feature of our tool. Conclusion The program CORE_TF is accessible in a user friendly web interface at http://www.LGTC.nl/CORE_TF. It provides a table of over-represented transcription factor binding sites in the users input genes' promoters and a graphical view of evolutionary conserved transcription factor binding sites. In our test data sets it successfully predicts target transcription factors and their binding site