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Sample records for gender-based reciprocal expression

  1. Gender-based reciprocal expression of transforming growth factor-β1 and the inducible nitric oxide synthase in a rat model of cyclophosphamide-induced cystitis

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    Loughran Patricia A

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pluripotent cytokine transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1 is the central regulator of inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase (iNOS that is responsible for nitric oxide (NO production in inflammatory settings. Previous studies have implicated a role for NO, presumably derived from iNOS, in cyclophosphamide (CYP-induced cystitis in the bladder. TGF-β1 is produced in latent form and requires dissociation from the latency-associated peptide (LAP to act as primary anti-inflammatory and pro-healing modulator following tissue injury in the upper urinary tract. Since the role of TGF-β1 in lower urinary tract inflammation is currently unknown, and since gender-based differences exist in the setting of interstitial cystitis (IC, the present study examined the relationship between TGF-β1 and iNOS/NO in the pathogenesis of CYP-induced cystitis in both male and female rats. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats, 4 months of age, of either gender were given 150 mg/kg CYP intraperitoneally. Urinary and bladder tissue TGF-β1 and NO reaction products (NO2-/NO3- were quantified as a function of time following CYP. Expression of active and latent TGF-β1 as well as iNOS in harvested bladder tissue was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Results Female rats had significantly higher levels of NO2-/NO3- in urine even at baseline as compared to male rats (p 2-/NO3- and TGF-β1. Male rats responded to CYP with significantly lower levels of NO2-/NO3- and significantly higher levels of TGF-β1 in urine (p 2-/NO3- after CYP were inversely correlated to latent and active TGF-β1 (Pearson coefficient of -0.72 and -0.69 in females and -0.89 and -0.76 in males, respectively; p Conclusion The results of this study suggest that there exists an inverse relationship between the expression of TGF-β1 and iNOS/NO2-/NO3- in CYP-inflamed bladder. The gender of the animal appears to magnify the differences in urine levels of TGF-β1 and NO2-/NO3- in this inflammatory

  2. Gender-Based Differences in Cardiac Remodeling and ILK Expression after Myocardial Infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sofia, Renato Rodrigues; Serra, Andrey Jorge; Silva, Jose Antonio Jr; Antonio, Ednei Luiz; Manchini, Martha Trindade; Oliveira, Fernanda Aparecida Alves de; Teixeira, Vicente Paulo Castro; Tucci, Paulo José Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    Gender can influence post-infarction cardiac remodeling. To evaluate whether gender influences left ventricular (LV) remodeling and integrin-linked kinase (ILK) after myocardial infarction (MI). Female and male Wistar rats were assigned to one of three groups: sham, moderate MI (size: 20-39% of LV area), and large MI (size: ≥40% of LV area). MI was induced by coronary occlusion, and echocardiographic analysis was performed after six weeks to evaluate MI size as well as LV morphology and function. Real-time RT-PCR and Western blot were used to quantify ILK in the myocardium. MI size was similar between genders. MI resulted in systolic dysfunction and enlargement of end-diastolic as well as end-systolic dimension of LV as a function of necrotic area size in both genders. Female rats with large MI showed a lower diastolic and systolic dilatation than the respective male rats; however, LV dysfunction was similar between genders. Gene and protein levels of ILK were increased in female rats with moderate and large infarctions, but only male rats with large infarctions showed an altered ILK mRNA level. A negative linear correlation was evident between LV dimensions and ILK expression in female rats with large MI. Post-MI ILK expression is altered in a gender-specific manner, and higher ILK levels found in females may be sufficient to improve LV geometry but not LV function

  3. Gender-Based Differences in Cardiac Remodeling and ILK Expression after Myocardial Infarction

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    Renato Rodrigues Sofia

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gender can influence post-infarction cardiac remodeling. Objective: To evaluate whether gender influences left ventricular (LV remodeling and integrin-linked kinase (ILK after myocardial infarction (MI. Methods: Female and male Wistar rats were assigned to one of three groups: sham, moderate MI (size: 20-39% of LV area, and large MI (size: ≥40% of LV area. MI was induced by coronary occlusion, and echocardiographic analysis was performed after six weeks to evaluate MI size as well as LV morphology and function. Real-time RT-PCR and Western blot were used to quantify ILK in the myocardium. Results: MI size was similar between genders. MI resulted in systolic dysfunction and enlargement of end-diastolic as well as end-systolic dimension of LV as a function of necrotic area size in both genders. Female rats with large MI showed a lower diastolic and systolic dilatation than the respective male rats; however, LV dysfunction was similar between genders. Gene and protein levels of ILK were increased in female rats with moderate and large infarctions, but only male rats with large infarctions showed an altered ILK mRNA level. A negative linear correlation was evident between LV dimensions and ILK expression in female rats with large MI. Conclusions: Post-MI ILK expression is altered in a gender-specific manner, and higher ILK levels found in females may be sufficient to improve LV geometry but not LV function.

  4. Gender-Based Differences in Cardiac Remodeling and ILK Expression after Myocardial Infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sofia, Renato Rodrigues [Programa de Pós-graduação em Ciências da Reabilitação - Universidade Nove de Julho (Uninove), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Cardiologia - Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Serra, Andrey Jorge, E-mail: andreyserra@gmail.com; Silva, Jose Antonio Jr [Programa de Pós-graduação em Ciências da Reabilitação - Universidade Nove de Julho (Uninove), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Antonio, Ednei Luiz [Departamento de Cardiologia - Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Manchini, Martha Trindade [Programa de Pós-graduação em Ciências da Reabilitação - Universidade Nove de Julho (Uninove), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Oliveira, Fernanda Aparecida Alves de [Departamento de Cardiologia - Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Teixeira, Vicente Paulo Castro [Departamento de Patologia - Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Tucci, Paulo José Ferreira [Departamento de Cardiologia - Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    Gender can influence post-infarction cardiac remodeling. To evaluate whether gender influences left ventricular (LV) remodeling and integrin-linked kinase (ILK) after myocardial infarction (MI). Female and male Wistar rats were assigned to one of three groups: sham, moderate MI (size: 20-39% of LV area), and large MI (size: ≥40% of LV area). MI was induced by coronary occlusion, and echocardiographic analysis was performed after six weeks to evaluate MI size as well as LV morphology and function. Real-time RT-PCR and Western blot were used to quantify ILK in the myocardium. MI size was similar between genders. MI resulted in systolic dysfunction and enlargement of end-diastolic as well as end-systolic dimension of LV as a function of necrotic area size in both genders. Female rats with large MI showed a lower diastolic and systolic dilatation than the respective male rats; however, LV dysfunction was similar between genders. Gene and protein levels of ILK were increased in female rats with moderate and large infarctions, but only male rats with large infarctions showed an altered ILK mRNA level. A negative linear correlation was evident between LV dimensions and ILK expression in female rats with large MI. Post-MI ILK expression is altered in a gender-specific manner, and higher ILK levels found in females may be sufficient to improve LV geometry but not LV function.

  5. Expressions of Gender-based Violence in the Impact of Anti-personnel Mine Attacks in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel A. Ruiz Romero

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This text, based on fieldwork carried out between 2014 and 2015, firstly analyses the way that Gender-Based Violence (GBV in armed conflict is also expressed through forms of victimization like anti-personnel mine (APM attacks. It also studies how women who belong to associations of APM victims confront the consequences of this victimization, much of which has clear gender connotations, placing them at the highest level of vulnerability and stigmatization. The article shows that, although mines originated as an indiscriminate form of violence (given the nature of the instrument used, the violence exercised by their use contains two main components of GBV by which women are profoundly affected, in view of the patriarchal context in which such violence takes place: firstly by using the body as a space of dispute and secondly in the continuum that affects women’s lives. These two components enhance the physical and psychological consequences for the direct victims of these devices and the emotional impact for their indirect victims (victims’ relatives, and are a factor in the considerable disruption of women’s traditional roles within families, thus weakening the community’s social fabric.

  6. Isozyme expression of Chinese and Japanese populations of Chlamys farreri and their reciprocal hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Taiwu; Liu, Yan; Song, Linsheng; Sun, Xiuqin

    2005-06-01

    Chinese and Japanese population of Chlamys farreri and their reciprocal hybrids were surveyed in isozyme variability at 13 loci by polyacrytamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). Isozyme banding patterns indicated these hybrids were diploid. Loci that were observed as being monomorphic in inbred populations of C. farreri were also found to be monomorphic in filial progeny; loci that observed to be polymorphic in parental type generations were also polymorphic in hybrid generations. Differences existed among allelic frequency of the four types of cross. Within the reciprocal hybrids the expression of malic enzyme (ME) isozyme was sufficient to distinguishing individual hybrids because of the band, Rf=0.38. However, there were no noticeable variations among all the samples to differentiate one from another. Inbreeding was likely to be the main problem in aquaculture. The introduction of new broodstock can improve the genetic diversity. Hybrid vigor has manifested to a certain extent in the present study.

  7. Reciprocal expression of survivin and SMAC/DIABLO in primary breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, A; Nabil, M; Ali-Labib, R; Said, H; Annos, F

    2012-12-01

    There is an intimate relation between disturbance in survivin and SMAC/DIABLO expressions and cancer formation in many tissues; however, this was not confirmed in the primary breast cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between survivin and SMAC/DIABLO mRNA expressions in primary breast cancer using RT-PCR and their relationship to some of the risk factors (age, family history, breast-feeding, use of contraceptive pills and hormonal receptors). Breast cancer tissues were studied for the detection of the mRNA expression of survivin and SMAC/DIABLO. This was done by qualitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). SMAC/DIABLO mRNA was detected by RT-PCR only in 1 sample in breast cancer tissues (6.25%). However, it was expressed in 16 out of 25 (64%) of the benign tumor tissues (P=0.00). In contrast, survivin mRNA was highly expressed in breast cancer tissues, 36 out of 48 (75%) (P=0.00), while its expression was very low in benign tumor tissues, only 1 out of 37 (2.7%) (P=0.00). Expressions of SMAC/DIABLO and survivin were significantly reciprocal in breast cancer and benign tumor tissues. SMAC/DIABLO inhibits apoptosis of breast cancer cells by suppression of survivin. These two genes probably form an important link in the signaling pathway of formation of breast cancer cells, which may be chosen as therapeutic targets in the primary breast cancer.

  8. Reciprocity in EMI-EMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coren, Richard L.

    This paper reviews the basis of and errors in interpreting the law of reciprocity, and applies it to conducted and to radiated EMI-EMC. Conditions for reciprocity include reversibility and passivity of elements in the reciprocal system. The law is expressed in circuit form and the reciprocal signals are clearly distinguished. Symmetric and asymmetric line filters are used as examples of reciprocity in conducted interference. It is shown that an incompletely shielded circuit can be regarded as an antenna, allowing one to establish radiation reciprocity between it and a measuring antenna. Some difficulties encountered in EMI-EMC measurements, that give the impression of reciprocity being violated, are discussed.

  9. Reciprocal regulation of reactive oxygen species and phospho-CREB regulates voltage gated calcium channel expression during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

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    Arti Selvakumar

    Full Text Available Our previous work has demonstrated the roles played by L-type Voltage Gated Calcium Channels (VGCC in regulating Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb survival and pathogenesis. Here we decipher mechanisms and pathways engaged by the pathogen to regulate VGCC expression in macrophages. We show that M. tb and its antigen Rv3416 use phospho-CREB (pCREB, Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS, Protein Kinase C (PKC and Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK to modulate VGCC expression in macrophages. siRNA mediated knockdown of MyD88, IRAK1, IRAK2 or TRAF6 significantly inhibited antigen mediated VGCC expression. Inhibiting Protein Kinase C (PKC or MEK-ERK1/2 further increased VGCC expression. Interestingly, inhibiting intracellular calcium release upregulated antigen mediated VGCC expression, while inhibiting extracellular calcium influx had no significant effect. siRNA mediated knockdown of transcription factors c-Jun, SOX5 and CREB significantly inhibited Rv3416 mediated VGCC expression. A dynamic reciprocal cross-regulation between ROS and pCREB was observed that in turn governed VGCC expression with ROS playing a limiting role in the process. Further dissection of the mechanisms such as the interplay between ROS and pCREB would improve our understanding of the regulation of VGCC expression during M. tb infection.

  10. The Reciprocalizer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parigi, Dario; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2013-01-01

    The geometry of reciprocal structures is extremely difficult to predict and control, and it cannot be described with the available CAD software or by hierarchical, associative parametric modellers. The geometry of a network of reciprocally connected elements is a characteristic that emerges, bott...

  11. MicroRNA-194 reciprocally stimulates osteogenesis and inhibits adipogenesis via regulating COUP-TFII expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, B-C; Kang, I-H; Hwang, Y-C; Kim, S-H; Koh, J-T

    2014-01-01

    Osteoblasts and adipocytes are differentiated from common mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in processes which are tightly controlled by various growth factors, signaling molecules, transcriptional factors and microRNAs. Recently, chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factor II (COUP-TFII) was identified as a critical regulator of MSC fate. In the present study, we aimed to identify some microRNAs (miR), which target COUP-TFII, and to determine the effects on MSCs fate. During osteoblastic or adipocytic differentiation from MSCs lineage cells, miR-194 expression was found to be reversal. In the cultures of mesenchymal C3H10T1/2 and primary bone marrow stromal cells, osteogenic stimuli increased miR-194 expression with accompanying decreases in COUP-TFII expression, whereas adipogenic stimuli reduced miR-194 expression with accompanying increases in COUP-TFII expression. A luciferase assay with COUP-TFII 3′-untranslated region (UTR) reporter plasmid, including the miR-194 binding sequences, showed that the introduction of miR-194 reduced the luciferase activity. However, it did not affect the activity of mutated COUP-TFII 3′-UTR reporter. Enforced expression of miR-194 significantly enhanced osteoblast differentiation, but inhibited adipocyte differentiation by decreasing COUP-TFII mRNA and protein levels. In contrast, inhibition of the endogenous miR-194 reduced matrix mineralization in the MSCs cultures, promoting the formation of lipid droplets by rescuing COUP-TFII expression. Furthermore, overexpression of COUP-TFII reversed the effects of miR-194 on the cell fates. Taken together, our results showed that miR-194 acts as a critical regulator of COUP-TFII, and can determinate the fate of MSCs to differentiate into osteoblasts and adipocytes. This suggests that miR-194 and COUP-TFII may be good target molecules for controlling bone and metabolic diseases. PMID:25412310

  12. Reciprocal leaf and root expression of AtAmt1.1 and root architectural changes in response to nitrogen starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engineer, Cawas B; Kranz, Robert G

    2007-01-01

    Nitrogen is an essential macronutrient for plant growth and survival. Here, the temporal and spatial sensing of nitrogen starvation is analyzed in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The promoter for the high-affinity ammonium transporter, AtAmt1.1, is shown to be a valid indicator for nitrogen status in leaves and roots. An AtAmt1.1-Gal4 transgene using three 5x upstream activating sequence-driven reporters (luciferase, green fluorescent protein, and beta-glucuronidase) facilitated in vivo profiling at the whole-plant and cellular levels. The effects of nitrogen supply, light duration, light intensity, and carbon on the expression of the AtAmt1.1 gene in the roots and aerial tissues are reported. Under nitrogen starvation, high expression is observed in the roots and, under nitrogen-sufficient conditions, high expression is observed in the leaves. This reciprocal regulation of AtAmt1.1 was confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, which was also used to quantitate expression of the five other Amt genes in Arabidopsis. Although some of these show tissue specificity (roots or leaves), none exhibit reciprocal regulation like the AtAmt1.1-encoded high-affinity transporter. This robust reciprocal expression suggests that Arabidopsis undergoes rapid resource reallocation in plants grown under different nitrogen supply regimens. Ultimately, nitrogen starvation-mediated reallocation results in root architectural restructuring. We describe the precise timing and cellular aspects of this nitrogen limitation response.

  13. Electromagnetic Reciprocity.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldridge, David F.

    2014-11-01

    A reciprocity theorem is an explicit mathematical relationship between two different wavefields that can exist within the same space - time configuration. Reciprocity theorems provi de the theoretical underpinning for mod ern full waveform inversion solutions, and also suggest practical strategies for speed ing up large - scale numerical modeling of geophysical datasets . In the present work, several previously - developed electromagnetic r eciprocity theorems are generalized to accommodate a broader range of medi um, source , and receiver types. Reciprocity relations enabling the interchange of various types of point sources and point receivers within a three - dimensional electromagnetic model are derived. Two numerical modeling algorithms in current use are successfully tested for adherence to reciprocity. Finally, the reciprocity theorem forms the point of departure for a lengthy derivation of electromagnetic Frechet derivatives. These mathe matical objects quantify the sensitivity of geophysical electromagnetic data to variatio ns in medium parameters, and thus constitute indispensable tools for solution of the full waveform inverse problem. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Sandia National Labor atories is a multi - program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE - AC04 - 94AL85000. Signif icant portions of the work reported herein were conducted under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and CARBO Ceramics Incorporated. The author acknowledges Mr. Chad Cannan and Mr. Terry Pa lisch of CARBO Ceramics, and Ms. Amy Halloran, manager of SNL's Geophysics and Atmospheric Sciences Department, for their interest in and encouragement of this work. Special thanks are due to Dr . Lewis C. Bartel ( recently retired from Sandia National Labo ratories

  14. Prostitution and gender-based violence

    OpenAIRE

    D??ez Guti??rrez, Enrique Javier

    2014-01-01

    P. 96-101 Prostitution is not the oldest "trade" in the world; rather, it is the oldest form of exploitation, slavery and gender-based violence devised by men to subjugate women and keep them at men's sexual disposal. Whenever prostitution is discussed, the role played by the client is disregarded, protected and minimised. However, it is essential to understand the starting point of this situation: "There is no supply without demand". It is men who, as a class, maintain, enforce ...

  15. Media approach to gender-based violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mršević Zorica

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The author grounds her research and the latter analysis on continually conducted daily press-clipping of seven main printed daily newspapers and two main electronic media in Serbia, within the three years period (2009 - 2011. An analysis of media reports on gender based violence, with particular focus on the most frequent domestic violence cases within the two years period, 2010 to 2011 is presented. As the best of media reports on gender based violence, the author stressed out its „whistle blower“ role - media are the main source of information on cases, dimensions and forms of gender based violence. Also the worse moments of media reporting in the mentioned period are presented - when the violence was justified or when reality is deformed by presenting these cases as romantic love stories. For example, in 2010 the worst was reporting on the „Pajčin/Kapisoda“ case, while in 2011 it was the „Ponjiger“ case. In the end, the author also warned on the worrysome fact of sudden dissapearance of media reports on partners’ murdering their wives after the last such report published in mid-october 2011, which could mean that now we have a new problem of diminished freedom of media.

  16. Do Social and Cultural Factors Perpetuate Gender Based Violence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gender based violence in Malawi exist at a level that requires special acknowledgement. A survey was conducted to assess how social and cultural factors affect gender-based violence in Malawi. The study revealed that both men and women are victims of gender based violence although women bare the brunt of the ...

  17. The Reciprocal Pascal Matrix

    OpenAIRE

    Richardson, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    The reciprocal Pascal matrix is the Hadamard inverse of the symmetric Pascal matrix. We show that the ordinary matrix inverse of the reciprocal Pascal matrix has integer elements. The proof uses two factorizations of the matrix of super Catalan numbers.

  18. International Students and Gender-Based Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes-Mewett, Helen; McCulloch, Jude

    2016-03-01

    Headlines such as "Man Jailed for Train Station Attack on Indian Student," "Fatal Stabbing Hits Indian Student Hopes," and "Indian Student Bashings on the Rise in Sydney" highlight violent crimes against male international students by strangers in public spaces. The media reports run contrary to the perceptions of our interviewees who suggest that violence against female international students by known perpetrators in private spaces is common. We argue that intersecting inequalities relating to gender, race, and class are often compounded by the status of "international student." Discussions focus on various forms of gender-based violence and gender violence education and support programs in Australia and the United States. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. Gender-based abuse: the global epidemic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heise Lori

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Gender Based violence-including rape, domestic violence, murder and sexual abuse-is a profund health problem for women across the globe. Although a significant cause of female morbidity and mortality, violence against women has only recently begun to be recognized as an issue for public health. This paper draws together existing data on the dimensions of violence against women worldwide and reviews available literature on the health consequences of abuse. It argues that the health sector has an important role to play in combatting violence against women through increased research, screening and referral of victims, and behavioral interventions. Any strategy to confrnt violence must address the root causes of abuse in addition to meeting the immediate needs of victims. This means challenging the social attitudes and beliefs that undergird men's violence and renegotiating the balance of power between women and men at all levels of society.

  20. Gender-based violence: a crucial challenge for public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjel, S

    2013-01-01

    This article attempts to summarize the situations of gender-based violence, a major public health issue. Due to the unequal power relations between men and women, women are violated either in family, in the community or in the State. Gender-based violence takes different forms like physical, sexual or psychological/ emotional violence. The causes of gender-based violence are multidimensional including social, economic, cultural, political and religious. The literatures written in relation to the gender-based violence are accessed using electronic databases as PubMed, Medline and Google scholar, Google and other Internet Websites between 1994 and first quarter of 2013 using an internet search from the keywords such as gender-based violence, women violence, domestic violence, wife abuse, violence during pregnancy, women sexual abuse, political gender based violence, cultural gender-based violence, economical gender-based violence, child sexual abuse and special forms of gender-based violence in Nepal. As GBVs remain one of the most rigorous challenges of women's health and well-being, it is one of the indispensable issues of equity and social justice. To create a gender-based violence free environment, a lot works has to be done. Hence, it is suggested to provide assistance to the victims of violence developing the mechanism to support them.

  1. Non-neutral evolution and reciprocal monophyly of two expressed Mhc class II B genes in Leach's storm-petrel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dearborn, Donald C; Gager, Andrea B; Gilmour, Morgan E; McArthur, Andrew G; Hinerfeld, Douglas A; Mauck, Robert A

    2015-02-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (Mhc) is subject to pathogen-mediated balancing selection and can link natural selection with mate choice. We characterized two Mhc class II B loci in Leach's storm-petrel, Oceanodroma leucorhoa, focusing on exon 2 which encodes the portion of the protein that binds pathogen peptides. We amplified and sequenced exon 2 with locus-specific nested PCR and Illumina MiSeq using individually barcoded primers. Repeat genotyping of 78 single-locus genotypes produced identical results in 77 cases (98.7%). Sequencing of messenger RNA (mRNA) from three birds confirmed expression of both loci, consistent with the observed absence of stop codons or frameshifts in all alleles. In 48 birds, we found 9 and 12 alleles at the two loci, respectively, and all 21 alleles translated to unique amino acid sequences. Unlike many studies of duplicated Mhc genes, alleles of the two loci clustered into monophyletic groups. Consistent with this phylogenetic result, interlocus gene conversion appears to have affected only two short fragments of the exon. As predicted under a paradigm of pathogen-mediated selection, comparison of synonymous and non-synonymous substitution rates found evidence of a history of positive selection at putative peptide binding sites. Overall, the results suggest that the gene duplication event leading to these two loci is not recent and that point mutations and positive selection on the peptide binding sites may be the predominant forces acting on these genes. Characterization of these loci sets the stage for population-level work on the evolutionary ecology of Mhc in this species.

  2. Testing a Dual Process Model of Gender-Based Violence: A Laboratory Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berke, Danielle S; Zeichner, Amos

    2016-01-01

    The dire impact of gender-based violence on society compels development of models comprehensive enough to capture the diversity of its forms. Research has established hostile sexism (HS) as a robust predictor of gender-based violence. However, to date, research has yet to link men's benevolent sexism (BS) to physical aggression toward women, despite correlations between BS and HS and between BS and victim blaming. One model, the opposing process model of benevolent sexism (Sibley & Perry, 2010), suggests that, for men, BS acts indirectly through HS to predict acceptance of hierarchy-enhancing social policy as an expression of a preference for in-group dominance (i. e., social dominance orientation [SDO]). The extent to which this model applies to gender-based violence remains untested. Therefore, in this study, 168 undergraduate men in a U. S. university participated in a competitive reaction time task, during which they had the option to shock an ostensible female opponent as a measure of gender-based violence. Results of multiple-mediation path analyses indicated dual pathways potentiating gender-based violence and highlight SDO as a particularly potent mechanism of this violence. Findings are discussed in terms of group dynamics and norm-based violence prevention.

  3. Gender-Based Violence among Married Women in Debre Tabor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gender-based violence is one of the major public health problems in Ethiopia. This study aimed to assess the perception and attitude of the community towards gender-based violence among married women in Northwest Ethiopia. A qualitative study was conducted using the purposive sampling technique for the three focus ...

  4. Gender-Based Violence Prevention. Issues in Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higher Education Center for Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Violence Prevention, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This issue of "Issues in Prevention" focuses on gender-based violence prevention. This issue contains the following articles: (1) Preventing Gender-Based Violence: An Overview (Linda Langford); (2) Q&A With Amelia Cobb; (3) Denim Day at HBCUs; (4) Dear Colleague Letter; (5) ED Grants for Violence Prevention; and (6) Higher Education Center…

  5. Gender Based Violence among Infertile Women In Mara Region ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines women to women marriages (nyumba ntobhu) and its relation with gender-based violence (GBV) in Serengeti District of Mara Region. It also explores types of gender-based violence and consequences of women to women marriages among women, girls and children in the society. Both quantitative ...

  6. The transition probabilities of the reciprocity model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijders, T.A.B.

    1999-01-01

    The reciprocity model is a continuous-time Markov chain model used for modeling longitudinal network data. A new explicit expression is derived for its transition probability matrix. This expression can be checked relatively easily. Some properties of the transition probabilities are given, as well

  7. Men's Reflections on Their Experiences of Gender-Based Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinacore, Ada L; Durrani, Samir; Khayutin, Sarah

    2017-11-01

    Using Multicultural and Gender Case Conceptualization (MGCC) epistemology, the aim of this phenomenological study was to explore adult male victims' perceptions of gender and reflections on their experiences of gender-based violence (GBV). Data were analyzed using interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA). Results indicated that, regardless of sexual orientation, participants experienced verbal and physical abuse due to their feminine gender expression, beginning in primary school and continuing through university and into the workplace. To reduce victimization, the men developed a range of strategies, such as policing their gender and avoiding social situations. The experiences of violence affected the participants' social relationships, choice of occupation, self-esteem, and ability to trust. However, after entering university, heterosexual, gay, and bisexual participants interpreted their experiences differently, whereby heterosexual participants linked the abuse to gender, and gay and bisexual participants viewed it as homophobia. As well, gay and bisexual participants found respite in the gay and bisexual communities, while heterosexual participants remained silent, isolated, and afraid to discuss their experiences. Implications for future research are discussed.

  8. Onsager Reciprocity in Premelting Solids

    KAUST Repository

    Peppin, S. S. L.

    2009-02-01

    The diffusive motion of foreign particles dispersed in a premelting solid is analyzed within the framework of irreversible thermodynamics. We determine the mass diffusion coefficient, thermal diffusion coefficient and Soret coefficient of the particles in the dilute limit, and find good agreement with experimental data. In contrast to liquid suspensions, the unique nature of premelting solids allows us to derive an expression for the Dufour coefficient and independently verify the Onsager reciprocal relation coupling diffusion to the flow of heat. © 2009 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  9. Reciprocity, World Prices and Welfare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raimondos-Møller, Pascalis; Woodland, Alan D.

    it is possible to find tariff reforms that are consistent with both reciprocity and constant world prices, these reforms do not follow from the reciprocity condition, but rather from the requirement of unchanged world prices. We propose an alternative reciprocity rule that is guaranteed to raise the welfare...

  10. Cutting efficiency of Reciproc and waveOne reciprocating instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotino, Gianluca; Giansiracusa Rubini, Alessio; Grande, Nicola M; Testarelli, Luca; Gambarini, Gianluca

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the cutting efficiency of 2 new reciprocating instruments, Reciproc and WaveOne. Twenty-four new Reciproc R25 and 24 new WaveOne Primary files were activated by using a torque-controlled motor (Silver Reciproc) and divided into 4 groups (n = 12): group 1, Reciproc activated by Reciproc ALL program; group 2, Reciproc activated by WaveOne ALL program; group 3, WaveOne activated by Reciproc ALL program; and group 4, WaveOne activated by WaveOne ALL program. The device used for the cutting test consisted of a main frame to which a mobile plastic support for the handpiece is connected and a stainless steel block containing a Plexiglas block (inPlexiglass, Rome, Italy) against which the cutting efficiency of the instruments was tested. The length of the block cut in 1 minute was measured in a computerized program with a precision of 0.1 mm. Means and standard deviations of each group were calculated, and data were statistically analyzed with 1-way analysis of variance and Bonferroni test (P instruments used with their proper reciprocating motion presented a statistically significant higher cutting efficiency than WaveOne instruments used with their proper reciprocating motion (P instruments (P > .05). Reciproc instruments demonstrated statistically higher cutting efficiency than WaveOne instruments. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Understanding Gender-based Violence: Evidence from Kilimanjaro ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents findings from an empirical study on the prevalence and beliefs surrounding gender-based violence (GBV) in the Kilimanjaro region. The analysis and ensuing discussion is the result of a representative sample of adults (n=384) surveyed in two districts, Rombo and Moshi Rural, in Kilimanjaro, Tanzania.

  12. Effects of gender based violence on neurocognitive functioning in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Gender based violence is being recognized as a global problem1. Given the rampant trends of violence against women and girls in Zambia which include battery, sexual abuse and exploitation, sexual cleansing, assault and other forms of violence2, women are prone to increasingly mental health problems.

  13. The Couples' Gender-Based Communication Questionnaire (CGCQ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckstein, Daniel; Goldman, Alan

    2001-01-01

    Effective communication is a cornerstone of marital happiness. The Couples' Gender-Based Communication Questionnaire is presented as a method for identifying male-female different communication styles. Suggests that once people realize that their partners have different conversational styles, they are inclined to accept difference without blaming…

  14. Prevalence and correlates of gender-based violence among female ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The overall prevalence of gender-based violence was 58.8% [95% Confidence Interval (CI) = 52.9% to 64.5%]. Specifically, 22.8%, 22.2% and 50.8% of students experienced physical, sexual or emotional violence respectively. Religious affiliation, ethnicity, indigeneship, marital status, campus residence and faculty ...

  15. Adolescent reports of experiencing gender based violence: findings ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this paper is to describe adolescent reports of gender based violence (GBV) based on a cross-sectional survey conducted with grade 8 boys and girls in high schools. . Self-completed paper based surveys were implemented with 1756 adolescents in 24 Johannesburg high schools in 2012 and with 2202 ...

  16. Factors Influencing Gender Based Violence among Men and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study determined the factors associated with gender based violence among 3000 men and women in selected states in Nigeria. Respondents who had experienced physical violence were 806(26.9%), comprising 353(11.8%) males and 453(15.1%) females (p<0.001). Respondents who had experienced sexual ...

  17. Prevalence and Correlates of Gender-based Violence among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    Nigeria; 4Chiles Center for Healthy Mothers and Babies, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida, USA. *For correspondence: Email: ... valued human resources. Graduates have added value if they are not only ..... Prevalence and risk factors of gender-based violence among female college students in Awassa,. Ethiopia.

  18. Perceptions on Gender-Based Differences in Educational Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Fakhra; Kalsoom, Qudsia; Quraishi, Uzma; Hasan, Sibte

    2017-01-01

    This descriptive, qualitative study aimed at identifying disparities in perceptions of males and females regarding gender-based differences in educational leadership. Data were gathered purposively from 20 renowned male and female educationists having a long experience of leadership in various institutes of Pakistan. An open-ended questionnaire…

  19. Prevalence and risk factors for gender based violence during ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Gender Based Violence (GBV) is a pervasive and systemic public health problem affecting pregnant women but there is paucity of data on the magnitude of GBV during pregnancy and the factors associated with it in Kenya, particularly in areas where the prevalence of GBV in the general population is ...

  20. Preventing Gender-based Violence in Senegal | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Preventing Gender-based Violence in Senegal. Laws to protect women in Senegal against violence seem to have little effect in punishing the perpetrators, let alone in preventing the crimes. Senegal's constitution guarantees equality between women and men. The country has signed on to international agreements that ...

  1. Factors contributing to physical gender based violence reported at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Factors contributing to physical gender based violence reported at Ndola Central Hospital, Ndola, Zambia: a case control study. ... Sensitization campaigns and educational programmesought to be intensified in order to address factors that make females more prone to GBV-physical assault than males. Living in a high ...

  2. Experiences of gender based violence among refugee populations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These forms are heightened by the adverse conditions of lack of basic needs, unequal power relations, breakdown of institutions of social control and order, ... Our findings aver that, gender based violence is endemic in peripheral hard to reach, conflict and post-conflict settings than in more stable communities due to ...

  3. 16 Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2017-11-25

    Nov 25, 2017 ... ... more about how IDRC-supported projects are generating critical evidence to put an end to gender-based violence: five pregnant woman. Gender and violence in cities. Nepalese women use a handheld sheller to remove kernels from corn cobs. Reducing drudgery for women with new farming techniques.

  4. Gender-based violence: comparing the experiences of Sudanese ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research sought to understand the experiences of Sudanese women regarding gender-based violence before and after migration to the United States of America, specifically, the state of Iowa. The study demonstrates the practice of stereotypical gender roles, although there were changes in the role the women played ...

  5. Gender Based Violence and its Effects on Women's Reproductive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gender Based Violence and its Effects on Women's Reproductive Health: The Case of Hatcliffe, Harare, Zimbabwe. ... scaling up of policy enforcement in order to curb the gruesome effects of GBV. (Afr J Reprod Health 2014; 18[1]: 110-122). Keywords: physical abuse, sexual violence, forced marriages, Hatcliffe, Zimbabwe ...

  6. 313 Impact of Gender-Based Abuse on Women's Economic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FIRST LADY

    2011-01-18

    Jan 18, 2011 ... linking gender-based abuse and women's economic wellbeing and participation in public life have ever been conducted. It is against this background that, this .... Violence against women 5(4): 393-426. Carrillo, R. (1992). Battered dreams: Violence against women as an obstacle to development. New York ...

  7. Gender-based violence: comparing the experiences of Sudanese ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gender-based violence: comparing the experiences of Sudanese women in Iowa before and after migration to the United States of America. ... If you would like more information about how to print, save, and work with PDFs, Highwire Press provides a helpful Frequently Asked Questions about PDFs. Alternatively, you can ...

  8. Eliminating gender-based violence: learning from the widowhood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eliminating gender-based violence: learning from the widowhood practices elimination Initiative of a women organisation in Ozubulu, Anambra State of Nigeria. ... of violence, they were surprisingly also the perpetrators and astute enforcers of the practice, as well as those who vehemently opposed any form of change.

  9. Family Law Reform to Challenge Gender-Based Violence: A ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Although gender-based violence (GBV) is endemic globally, some of the highest rates in the world are found in Muslim-majority countries where conservative interpretations of Islamic Family Law persist. Such interpretations often lead to and justify practices such as early child and forced marriage, loss of guardianship by ...

  10. Reciprocating magnetic refrigerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D. L.

    1985-05-01

    A 4 to 15 K magnetic refrigerator to test as an alternative to the Joule-Thomson circuit as the low temperature stage of a 4 to 300 K closed-cycle refrigerator was developed. The reciprocating magnetic refrigerator consists of two matrices of gadolinium gallium garnet spheres located in tandem on a single piston which alternately moves each matrix into a 7 telsa magnetic field. A separate helium gas circuit is used as the heat exchange mechanism for the low and the high temperature extremes of the magnetic refrigerator. Details of the design and results of the initial refrigerator component tests are presented.

  11. Commentary: Gender-based Violence among the (H)mong

    OpenAIRE

    Jacques Lemoine

    2012-01-01

    Prepared for the Seminar on Cultural Factors in the Prevention and Promotion of Gender-Based Violence held at UNESCO Bangkok on 17-18 May 2012, this article presents the current state of the subject in the patrilineal, patrilocal and patriarchal (H)mong society.After delineating carefully (H)mong GBV through rape, marriage customs, domestic verbal and physical abuses and, in some cases, murder, the author investigates the roots of GBV in different directions: gender asymmetry and inequality; ...

  12. Gender-based violence in the Spanish cinema

    OpenAIRE

    Beatriz OGANDO DÍAZ

    2016-01-01

    Complex phenomena are hardly understood from one single viewpoint. Cinema has a polyhedral approach that discloses the hidden faces of reality. There are many aspects to be shown in gender?based violence (GBV), such as its genesis and the causes of its durability; emotional abuse in the form of controlling behaviors, isolation and submission; and the consequences of all this. The range of operation for GBV is very wide (within the couple, in the family and the workplace, institutional and com...

  13. Structural Behaviour of Reciprocal Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parigi, Dario; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2013-01-01

    The present paper focuses on the comparison of several two-dimensional and three-dimensional reciprocal configurations. The goal of such comparison is to analyse the structural behaviour when changing the geometric parameters used to describe the geometry of reciprocal structures.......The present paper focuses on the comparison of several two-dimensional and three-dimensional reciprocal configurations. The goal of such comparison is to analyse the structural behaviour when changing the geometric parameters used to describe the geometry of reciprocal structures....

  14. Direct reciprocity in structured populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veelen, C.M.; García, J.; Rand, D.G.; Nowak, M.A.

    2012-01-01

    Reciprocity and repeated games have been at the center of attention when studying the evolution of human cooperation. Direct reciprocity is considered to be a powerful mechanism for the evolution of cooperation, and it is generally assumed that it can lead to high levels of cooperation. Here we

  15. Expression and Function of Transmembrane-4 Superfamily (Tetraspanin Proteins in Osteoclasts: Reciprocal Roles of Tspan-5 and NET-6 during Osteoclastogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaori Iwai

    2007-01-01

    Conclusions: These data indicate that a diversity of tetraspanins is expressed in osteoclast precursors, and that cell fusion during osteoclastogenesis is regulated by cooperation of distinct tetraspanin family proteins such as Tspan-5 and NET-6. This study indicates that functional alterations of tetraspanin family proteins may have therapeutic potential in diseases where osteoclasts play a major role, such as rheumatoid arthritis and osteoporosis.

  16. Belief in reciprocity in a Chinese sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen; Zhang, Jianxin

    2012-08-01

    Belief in reciprocity refers to a personally internalized faith in the reciprocity norm: that people will return positive and negative interactions or favors in kind. The current study aims to examine the relationship between belief in reciprocity and altruism among a Chinese sample. The Personal Norm of Reciprocity Scale, Trait Forgiveness Scale, Prosocial Tendency Measure, and Altruism Scale were used to assess extent of belief in reciprocity, forgiveness, and prosocial motivation, respectively, among 204 Chinese undergraduates. The results indicated that belief in reciprocity was a partially negative, but not neutral, reciprocity norm for Chinese people. Specifically, belief in reciprocity was positively related to negative reciprocity, but not significantly related to positive reciprocity. Moreover, belief in reciprocity was negatively related to both prosocial tendency and altruistic motivation. The results also indicated that forgiveness largely mediated the effect of belief in reciprocity on altruism. Finally, the implications and limitations of the current study were discussed.

  17. Reciprocal MicroRNA Expression in Mesocortical Circuit and Its Interplay with Serotonin Transporter Define Resilient Rats in the Chronic Mild Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurawek, Dariusz; Kusmider, Maciej; Faron-Gorecka, Agata; Gruca, Piotr; Pabian, Paulina; Solich, Joanna; Kolasa, Magdalena; Papp, Mariusz; Dziedzicka-Wasylewska, Marta

    2017-10-01

    Prolonged stress perturbs physiological balance of a subject and thus can lead to depression. Nevertheless, some individuals are more resilient to stress than the others. Defining molecular factors underlying resilience to stress may contribute to the development of a new antidepressant strategy based on the restoration of resilient phenotype in depressed subjects. We used chronic mild stress (CMS) paradigm-well-characterized animal model of depression which caused in rats behavioral deficits (anhedonia) manifested by decreased consumption of sucrose solution. CMS also generated a proportion of resilient rats which did not alter sucrose consumption despite being stressed. Recently, regulation of a gene expression associated with microRNA (miRNA) is considered as an important factor modulating biochemical response to stress. Based on our previous work and literature survey, we investigated changes in the expression level of seven miRNAs (i.e., miR-18a-5p, miR-34a-5p, miR-135a-5p, miR-195-5p, miR-320-3p, miR-674-3p, miR-872-5p) in mesocortical circuit-crucially involved in stress response in order to find differences between susceptible and resilient phenotype. Bioinformatic analysis showed that all miRNAs of interest potentially target serotonin transporter (SERT). Chronic stress caused global increase in the expression of the abovementioned miRNAs in ventral tegmental area (VTA) of stressed rats followed by parallel decrease in miRNA expression in prefrontal cortex (PCx). This effect was more profound in resilient than anhedonic animals. Moreover, we observed decreased level of SERT in VTA of resilient rats. Our findings show that mesocortical circuit is involved in the response to stress and this phenomenon is more efficient in resilient animals.

  18. Novel reciprocal regulation of cAMP signaling and apoptosis by orphan G-protein-coupled receptor GPRC5A gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, Minoru; Zang, Liqing; Oka, Takehiko; Ito, Yoshiyuki; Shimada, Yasuhito; Nishimura, Yuhei; Tanaka, Toshio

    2006-01-01

    GPRC5A is a member of G-protein-coupled receptors, which was originally identified as an all-trans-retinoic acid-induced gene. Although recent studies reported that this gene was highly expressed in the cancer cell lines and that GPRC5A might positively regulate cell proliferation, its mechanism remains unknown. We investigated the upstream and downstream signaling of GPRC5A and its biological function, and found that cAMP signaling is the novel GPRC5A induction pathway. When GPRC5A gene was overexpressed, intracellular cAMP concentration was decreased, and Gsα gene expression was downregulated. On the other hand, RNA interference of GPRC5A increased mRNA levels of Gsα and intracellular cAMP, reduced cell number, and induced apoptosis. Conversely, cell number was increased by GPRC5A overexpression. We first report the novel negative feedback model of cAMP signaling through GPRC5A gene expression. This evidence explains one of the mechanisms of the GPRC5A-regulated cell growth in some cancer cell lines

  19. Exposure to Hedione Increases Reciprocity in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Berger

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Cooperation among unrelated humans is frequently regarded as a defining feature in the evolutionary success of our species. Whereas, much research has addressed the strategic and cognitive mechanisms that underlie cooperation, investigations into chemosensory processes have received very limited research attention. To bridge that gap, we build on recent research that has identified the chemically synthesized odorant Hedione (HED as a ligand for the putative human pheromone receptor (VN1R1 expressed in the olfactory mucosa, and hypothesize that exposure to HED may increase reciprocity. Applying behavioral economics paradigms, the present research shows that exposure to the ligand causes differentiated behavioral effects in reciprocal punishments (Study 1 as well as rewards (Study 2, two types of behaviors that are frequently regarded as essential for the development and maintenance of cooperation.

  20. Reciprocal Regulation of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 2α and GLI1 Expression Associated With the Radioresistance of Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jiancheng [Department of Urology, First Affiliated Hospital of Medical School, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China); Department of Urology, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Wu, Kaijie [Department of Urology, First Affiliated Hospital of Medical School, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China); Gao, Dexuan [Department of Urology, Shandong Provincial Hospital affiliated with Shandong University, Ji' nan (China); Zhu, Guodong; Wu, Dapeng; Wang, Xinyang; Chen, Yule; Du, Yuefeng; Song, Wenbin; Ma, Zhenkun [Department of Urology, First Affiliated Hospital of Medical School, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China); Authement, Craig; Saha, Debabrata [Department of Urology, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Hsieh, Jer-Tsong, E-mail: jt.hsieh@utsouthwestern.edu [Department of Urology, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); He, Dalin, E-mail: dalinhe@yahoo.com [Department of Urology, First Affiliated Hospital of Medical School, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China)

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is often considered a radioresistant tumor, but the molecular mechanism underlying its radioresistance is poorly understood. This study explored the roles of hypoxia-inducible factor 2α (HIF2α) and sonic hedgehog (SHH)-GLI1 signaling in mediating the radioresistance of RCC cells and to unveil the interaction between these 2 signaling pathways. Methods and Materials: The activities of SHH-GLI1 signaling pathway under normoxia and hypoxia in RCC cells were examined by real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and luciferase reporter assay. The expression of HIF2α and GLI1 in RCC patients was examined by immunohistochemistry, and their correlation was analyzed. Furthermore, RCC cells were treated with HIF2α-specific shRNA (sh-HIF2α), GLI1 inhibitor GANT61, or a combination to determine the effect of ionizing radiation (IR) on RCC cells based on clonogenic assay and double-strand break repair assay. Results: RCC cells exhibited elevated SHH-GLI1 activities under hypoxia, which was mediated by HIF2α. Hypoxia induced GLI1 activation through SMO-independent pathways that could be ablated by PI3K inhibitor or MEK inhibitor. Remarkably, the SHH-GLI1 pathway also upregulated HIF2α expression in normoxia. Apparently, there was a positive correlation between HIF2α and GLI1 expression in RCC patients. The combination of sh-HIF2α and GLI1 inhibitor significantly sensitized RCC cells to IR. Conclusions: Cross-talk between the HIF2α and SHH-GLI1 pathways was demonstrated in RCC. Cotargeting these 2 pathways, significantly sensitizing RCC cells to IR, provides a novel strategy for RCC treatment.

  1. Healthy reciprocity in sexual interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heino, J; Ojanlatva, A

    2000-02-01

    The purpose of the article is to discuss reciprocity in sexual interaction within a couple relationship in which heterosexual orientation is assumed and satisfaction considered. Reciprocity is modelled as an exchange of services which at its best functions as an unwritten contract, a mutual understanding regarding fairness of returned services, and a desire to comply with this principle together with a loved one/lover. An equal treatment of and balanced attitudes towards one another are present together with a just distribution of benefits and concessions or compromises. Reciprocity involves a relative term although healthy reciprocity can be defined for discussion and assessed as a degree of mutual satisfaction. Sexual interaction issues, skills to obtain satisfaction, and sexual and emotional compatibility are important elements in reciprocity. Understandable communication is an essential contributor in the implementation of reciprocity. Conflict-making dialogue should generally be avoided and connotive meanings of words taken into account. Erotophilia-erotophobia dimensions influence both the learning about and attitudes towards sexuality and contribute to personal and professional abilities to assess sexual problems and to attend to them. Erotic touch is a minimum requirement of love making. Sexual orientation, sexual desire, and intimacy influence sexual compatibility. Equity and exchange models are discussed, and a reciprocity model is proposed.

  2. Gender-based differences in pediatric nuclear medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alazraki, Adina L; Braithwaite, Kiery A

    2014-01-01

    Gender-based differences commonly encountered in pediatric nuclear medicine reflect both basic embryologic differences of the sexes, which are evident from infancy, and evolving physiological changes due to gender, which occur as the pediatric patient grows, undergoes puberty, and matures to adulthood. It is important for a nuclear medicine physician or radiologist to know both the gender and the age of a patient when interpreting her or his studies. It is also important that the reading physician be familiar with the normally evolving physiological changes that are specific for that patient's stage of development. It is particularly important that the reading physician consider such changes when comparing serial studies of the patient that are acquired during the patient's transitions through her or his different significant stages of development. Many pediatric nuclear medicine imaging protocols are modifications or adaptations of the protocols for adult imaging. Physicians reading pediatric studies must routinely incorporate knowledge on age and gender that is relevant to the patient for any given study. The age-defined gender-based subtleties of potential findings in pediatric nuclear medicine studies are often underrecognized. However, they are often of interest and at times important in the workup of both benign entities and pathologic processes of the pediatric patient.

  3. Electromagnetic reciprocity in antenna theory

    CERN Document Server

    Stumpf, Martin

    2018-01-01

    The reciprocity theorem is among the most intriguing concepts in wave field theory and has become an integral part of almost all standard textbooks on electromagnetic (EM) theory. This book makes use of the theorem to quantitatively describe EM interactions concerning general multiport antenna systems. It covers a general reciprocity-based description of antenna systems, their EM scattering properties, and further related aspects. Beginning with an introduction to the subject, Electromagnetic Reciprocity in Antenna Theory provides readers first with the basic prerequisites before offering coverage of the equivalent multiport circuit antenna representations, EM coupling between multiport antenna systems and their EM interactions with scatterers, accompanied with the corresponding EM compensation theorems.

  4. Proliferating fibroblasts and HeLa cells co-cultured in vitro reciprocally influence growth patterns, protein expression, chromatin features and cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delinasios, John G; Angeli, Flora; Koumakis, George; Kumar, Shant; Kang, Wen-Hui; Sica, Gigliola; Iacopino, Fortunata; Lama, Gina; Lamprecht, Sergio; Sigal-Batikoff, Ina; Tsangaris, George T; Farfarelos, Christos D; Farfarelos, Maria C; Vairaktaris, Eleftherios; Vassiliou, Stavros; Delinasios, George J

    2015-04-01

    to identify biological interactions between proliferating fibroblasts and HeLa cells in vitro. Fibroblasts were isolated from both normal and tumour human tissues. Coverslip co-cultures of HeLa and fibroblasts in various ratios with medium replacement every 48 h were studied using fixed cell staining with dyes such as Giemsa and silver staining, with immunochemistry for Ki-67 and E-cadherin, with dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) enzyme reaction, as well as live cell staining for non-specific esterases and lipids. Other techniques included carmine cell labeling, autoradiography and apoptosis assessment. Under conditions of feeding and cell: cell ratios allowing parallel growth of human fibroblasts and HeLa cells, co-cultured for up to 20 days, a series of phenomena occur consecutively: profound affinity between the two cell types and exchange of small molecules; encircling of the HeLa colonies by the fibroblasts and enhanced growth of both cell types at their contact areas; expression of carbonic anhydrase in both cell types and high expression of non-specific esterases and cytoplasmic argyrophilia in the surrounding fibroblasts; intense production and secretion of lipid droplets by the surrounding fibroblasts; development of a complex net of argyrophilic projections of the fibroblasts; E-cadherin expression in the HeLa cells; from the 10th day onwards, an increasing detachment of batches of HeLa cells at the peripheries of colonies and appearance of areas with many multi-nucleated and apoptotic HeLa cells, and small HeLa fragments; from the 17th day, appearance of fibroblasts blocked at the G2-M phase. Co-cultures at approximately 17-20 days display a cell-cell fight with foci of (a) sparse growth of both cell types, (b) overgrowth of the fibroblasts and (c) regrowth of HeLa in small colonies. These results indicate that during their interaction with HeLa cells in vitro, proliferating fibroblasts can be activated against HeLa. This type of activation is not observed

  5. Cyclic Fatigue Resistance of Reciproc Blue, Reciproc, and WaveOne Gold Reciprocating Instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Cangül; Inan, Uğur; Demiral, Murat; Keleş, Ali

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the cyclic fatigue resistance of Reciproc Blue R25 (VDW, Munich, Germany) with Reciproc R25 (VDW) and WaveOne Gold Primary (Denstply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland). Fifteen Reciproc Blue R25, 15 Reciproc R25, and 15 WaveOne Gold Primary instruments were collected and tested in a dynamic cyclic fatigue test device, which has an artificial canal with a 60° angle of curvature and a 5-mm radius of curvature. All instruments were operated until fracture occurred, and time to fracture (TF) and the lengths of the fractured fragments were recorded. The mean and standard deviations of TF and fragment length were calculated for each reciprocating system. TF data were subjected to Kruskal-Wallis 1-way analysis of variance and the Dunn test, whereas fractured fragment length data were subjected to 1-way analysis of variance (P  .05). Reciproc Blue R25 instruments had significantly higher cyclic fatigue resistance than WaveOne Gold and Reciproc R25 instruments. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Gender-based violence in India: long-term trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simister, John; Mehta, Parnika S

    2010-09-01

    This article examines long-term trends in Indian society regarding domestic violence between husband and wife, and attitudes to such violence. This article analyzes crime data and uses data from several Indian household surveys: "Work Attitudes and Spending" surveys (1992 to 2007); "World Values Survey" (1990, 1995, 2001, and 2006); and "Demographic and Health Surveys" (1992-1993, 1998-2000, and 2005). Several trends are apparent- some changes suggest that Indian women are becoming more liberated, but others imply worsening conditions for Indian women, such as more violence against women. This increase in violence may be temporary, as India is in transition to a more modern society: There is evidence that some gender-based violence is a male response to increasingly "modern" attitudes among Indian women.

  7. Gender based differences in management and outcomes of cholecystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dua, Anahita; Dua, Arshish; Desai, Sapan S; Kuy, Sreyreath; Sharma, Rishika; Jechow, Sarah E; McMaster, Jason; Patel, Bhavin; Kuy, Sreyram

    2013-11-01

    During the reproductive years, women have a 4-fold higher prevalence of gallstones than men, making gallbladder disease a critically important topic in women's health. Among age-matched women and men hospitalized for cholecystitis, gender based differences in demographics, management, and economic and clinical outcomes were identified. A cross-sectional study was conducted using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample. Outcomes were mortality, complications, length of stay, and cost. Women accounted for 65% of admissions for cholecystitis, with women more likely to have shorter time to surgery (1.6 vs. 1.9 days) and laparoscopy (86 vs. 76%) (P cholecystitis and cholecystectomy, women have better clinical and economic outcomes then age-matched men. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Perceptions of gender-based discrimination during surgical training and practice

    OpenAIRE

    Adrienne N. Bruce; Alexis Battista; Michael W. Plankey; Lynt B. Johnson; M. Blair Marshall

    2015-01-01

    Background: Women represent 15% of practicing general surgeons. Gender-based discrimination has been implicated as discouraging women from surgery. We sought to determine women’s perceptions of gender-based discrimination in the surgical training and working environment.Methods: Following IRB approval, we fielded a pilot survey measuring perceptions and impact of gender-based discrimination in medical school, residency training, and surgical practice. It was sent electronically to 1,065 indiv...

  9. [The reciprocity rule in the construction of relationships as the key in relational processes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenelli, Antonio; Volpi, Cecilia; Guarracino, Emanuele; Galli, Virginia; Esposito, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    Reciprocity as an expression of the therapist-patient relationship is pointed-out by Mario Reda who refers to Comparetti's studies on the mother-foetus reciprocity, mediated by the so-called "jumps". Reciprocal behaviours are clearly observable during bird and other animal courtship behaviour, whereas in the Sapiens sapiens species, we may observe the establishing of a very complex reciprocity system, which starts with gestures and bodily attitudes, subsequently activating sensory-motor emotional schemata and internal working models, thus enabling the construction of personal meanings. A relationship may result from an encounter provided that "compatible" meanings are constructed in the context of "possible reciprocity" of significant systems. The observation of reciprocity provides a concrete possibility to reduce the risk of absolute subjectivity related to the I or the you, superceding it through the us.

  10. Gender-Based Violence following Social Media Acquaintance in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makinde, Olusesan A; Odimegwu, Clifford O; Abdulmalik, Jibril O; Babalola, Stella O; Fawole, Olufunmilayo I

    2016-12-01

    In Nigeria, the growth in mobile phone use has provided the opportunity for increased access to the internet, and through this, the social media. The social media in turn offers tremendous communication benefits but also results in some undesirable consequences. One of such is the experience of Gender-Based Violence (GBV). Internet searches using Google Search and Google Scholar in addition to information available to the authors from news media is reported in this study. Five cases were selected for reporting. All cases selected had first contact with their perpetrator(s) on Facebook. The perpetrators were usually men, older than the victims (24-34 years for perpetrators compared with 17-25 years for the victims). The victims experienced physical, psychological, sexual and economic violence from their aggressors. One case resulted in the death of the victim, while two required hospitalization following severe trauma. Three of the victims were raped, while rape was attempted for the other two cases. GBV associated with acquaintances made on social media channels is emerging as a new social problem in Nigeria. Interventions to educate female social media users about this potential danger are urgently necessary.

  11. Commentary: Gender-based Violence among the (Hmong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Lemoine

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Prepared for the Seminar on Cultural Factors in the Prevention and Promotion of Gender-Based Violence held at UNESCO Bangkok on 17-18 May 2012, this article presents the current state of the subject in the patrilineal, patrilocal and patriarchal (Hmong society.After delineating carefully (Hmong GBV through rape, marriage customs, domestic verbal and physical abuses and, in some cases, murder, the author investigates the roots of GBV in different directions: gender asymmetry and inequality; tribal culture and the clan system; the function of the bride price; women’s social mobility in the U.S. and values clashes with American values. After a thorough anthropological analysis, the author concludes that GBV has nothing to do with the clan system, the backbone of the tribal society, but rather involves a long-lasting borrowing of Chinese patterns from the (Hmong past in Imperial China, which could be amended. Gender inequality will hopefully regress if shame, a powerful means ofsocial control among the (Hmong, is used to deter GBV.

  12. Gender-based comorbidity in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluwaseye Ayoola Ogun

    Full Text Available It has been noted that benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV may be associated with certain disorders and medical procedures. However, most studies to date were done in Europe, and epidemiological data on the United States (US population are scarce. Gender-based information is even rarer. Furthermore, it is difficult to assess the relative prevalence of each type of association based solely on literature data, because different comorbidities were reported by various groups from different countries using different patient populations and possibly different inclusion/exclusion criteria. In this study, we surveyed and analyzed a large adult BPPV population (n = 1,360 surveyed, 227 completed, most of which were recurrent BPPV cases from Omaha, NE, US, and its vicinity, all diagnosed at Boys Town National Research Hospital (BTNRH over the past decade using established and consistent diagnostic criteria. In addition, we performed a retrospective analysis of patients' diagnostic records (n = 1,377, with 1,360 adults and 17 children. The following comorbidities were found to be significantly more prevalent in the BPPV population when compared to the age- and gender-matched general population: ear/hearing problems, head injury, thyroid problems, allergies, high cholesterol, headaches, and numbness/paralysis. There were gender differences in the comorbidities. In addition, familial predisposition was fairly common among the participants. Thus, the data confirm some previously reported comorbidities, identify new ones (hearing loss, thyroid problems, high cholesterol, and numbness/paralysis, and suggest possible predisposing and triggering factors and events for BPPV.

  13. Gender-based violence in the Spanish cinema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz OGANDO DÍAZ

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Complex phenomena are hardly understood from one single viewpoint. Cinema has a polyhedral approach that discloses the hidden faces of reality. There are many aspects to be shown in gender?based violence (GBV, such as its genesis and the causes of its durability; emotional abuse in the form of controlling behaviors, isolation and submission; and the consequences of all this. The range of operation for GBV is very wide (within the couple, in the family and the workplace, institutional and community?based, among others, as much as it is universal, cutting across social class, race, economic status, religion or nationality. Movies may prove useful in revealing violent male?chauvinist behaviors, some of them so deeply rooted in societies that they tend to become normalized and to go unnoticed. In spite of the efforts towards visibility, and understanding and stopping violence against women, the phenomenon remains largely unknown. The movie industry is now beginning to reflect it in motion pictures, sometimes in a more explicit or argumentative manner, at other times more covertly or obliquely. We have made a selection of ten Spanish movies depicting some of these multiple facets: violence against women in the domestic domain, sexual violence, and violence related to economic and sociocultural aspects.

  14. Cyclic fatigue of Reciproc and WaveOne reciprocating instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotino, G; Grande, N M; Testarelli, L; Gambarini, G

    2012-07-01

    To evaluate the cyclic fatigue resistance of Reciproc(®) and WaveOne(®) instruments in simulated root canals. Two groups of 15 NiTi endodontic instruments of identical tip size of 0.25 mm were tested, group A; Reciproc(®) R25 and group B: WaveOne(®) primary. Cyclic fatigue testing was performed in a stainless steel artificial canal manufactured by reproducing the instrument's size and taper. A simulated root canal with a 60° angle of curvature and 5-mm radius of curvature was constructed for both the instruments tested. The centre of the curvature was 5 mm from the tip of the instrument and the curved segment of the canal was approximately 5 mm in length. The Reciproc(®) instruments were activated using the preset programme specific for the Reciproc(®) instruments, whilst the WaveOne(®) instruments were activated using the preset programme specific for the WaveOne(®) instruments. All instruments were rotated until fracture occurred and the time to fracture (TtF) and the length of the fractured tip were recorded and registered. Means and standard deviations of TtF and fragment length were calculated for each system and data were subjected to Student's t-test (P  0.05) in the mean length of the fractured fragments between the instruments.   Reciproc(®) instruments were associated with a significantly higher cyclic fatigue resistance than WaveOne(®) instruments. © 2012 International Endodontic Journal.

  15. The Evolution of Policy Enactment on Gender-Based Violence in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkes, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    This article examines how policies and strategies to address school-related gender-based violence have evolved since 2000, when gender-based violence within education was largely invisible. Through an exploration of policy enactment in three countries--Liberia, South Africa, and Brazil--it traces remarkable progress in policy, programmes, and…

  16. Gender-based violence and the need for evidence-based primary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gender-based violence is a significant problem globally and in South Africa. The public and political discourse has been dominated by calls for increased penalties and convictions for perpetrators of various types of gender-based violence. However, these responses are unlikely to prevent such violence from occurring in ...

  17. Influence of Women's Attitude on the Perpetration of Gender-Based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examines the influence of women's attitude (tolerance level) towards domestic gender-based violence on the perpetration of domestic gender-based violence in Nigeria. With the aid of 2008 Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey women dataset, the authors were able to establish the following 1. Correlate ...

  18. Voices of Women Teachers about Gender Inequalities and Gender-Based Violence in Rural South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lange, Naydene; Mitchell, Claudia; Bhana, Deevia

    2012-01-01

    Gender-based violence is a reality in many societies and is linked to the spread of HIV and AIDS. There have been numerous studies that have attempted to acquire an understanding of the breadth and depth of the issues around gender-based violence. However, one area that has received scant attention is the voices of women teachers. Thus, in this…

  19. Making School Safe for Girls: Combating Gender-Based Violence in Benin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wible, Brent

    2004-01-01

    Gender-based violence is a global problem that causes more poor health and death than a host of other physical and psychological maladies combined, but it is only slowly being addressed by national public health policies and actions. Even more difficult to bring to the forefront is the issue of gender-based violence and sexual harassment in the…

  20. Depressive Symptoms among Female College Students Experiencing Gender-Based Violence in Awassa, Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelaye, Bizu; Arnold, Dodie; Williams, Michelle A.; Goshu, Miruts; Berhane, Yemane

    2009-01-01

    Little epidemiologic research has focused on the mental health effects of gender-based violence among sub-Saharan African women. The objective of this study was to assess risk of depression and depressive symptoms among 1,102 female undergraduate students who were victims of gender-based violence. Students who reported experience of any…

  1. Doorways I: Student Training Manual on School-Related Gender-Based Violence Prevention and Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Doorways training program was designed by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID)-funded Safe Schools Program (Safe Schools) to enable teachers, community members and students to prevent and respond to school-related gender-based violence (SRGBV). "Doorways I: Student Training Manual on School-Related Gender-Based Violence…

  2. Reciprocity and Humility in Wonderland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harry, Beth

    2011-01-01

    This article supports the perspective of Jan Valle regarding the importance of recognizing the subjectivity inherent in decisions about Learning Disabilities. The author argues that the perspectives of both parents and professionals are informed by subjective judgments that must be taken into account in decision making. A reciprocal approach to…

  3. Reciprocity theory of homogeneous reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbormbai, Adolf A.

    1990-03-01

    The reciprocity formalism is applied to the homogeneous gaseous reactions in which the structure of the participating molecules changes upon collision with one another, resulting in a change in the composition of the gas. The approach is applied to various classes of dissociation, recombination, rearrangement, ionizing, and photochemical reactions. It is shown that for the principle of reciprocity to be satisfied it is necessary that all chemical reactions exist in complementary pairs which consist of the forward and backward reactions. The backward reaction may be described by either the reverse or inverse process. The forward and backward processes must satisfy the same reciprocity equation. Because the number of dynamical variables is usually unbalanced on both sides of a chemical equation, it is necessary that this balance be established by including as many of the dynamical variables as needed before the reciprocity equation can be formulated. Statistical transformation models of the reactions are formulated. The models are classified under the titles free exchange, restricted exchange and simplified restricted exchange. The special equations for the forward and backward processes are obtained. The models are consistent with the H theorem and Le Chatelier's principle. The models are also formulated in the context of the direct simulation Monte Carlo method.

  4. A Theory of Sequential Reciprocity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dufwenberg, M.; Kirchsteiger, G.

    1998-01-01

    Many experimental studies indicate that people are motivated by reciprocity. Rabin (1993) develops techniques for incorporating such concerns into game theory and economics. His model, however, does not fare well when applied to situations with an interesting dynamic structure (like many

  5. Gender-Based Comorbidity in Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogun, Oluwaseye Ayoola; Janky, Kristen L.; Cohn, Edward S.; Büki, Bela; Lundberg, Yunxia Wang

    2014-01-01

    It has been noted that benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) may be associated with certain disorders and medical procedures. However, most studies to date were done in Europe, and epidemiological data on the United States (US) population are scarce. Gender-based information is even rarer. Furthermore, it is difficult to assess the relative prevalence of each type of association based solely on literature data, because different comorbidities were reported by various groups from different countries using different patient populations and possibly different inclusion/exclusion criteria. In this study, we surveyed and analyzed a large adult BPPV population (n = 1,360 surveyed, 227 completed, most of which were recurrent BPPV cases) from Omaha, NE, US, and its vicinity, all diagnosed at Boys Town National Research Hospital (BTNRH) over the past decade using established and consistent diagnostic criteria. In addition, we performed a retrospective analysis of patients’ diagnostic records (n = 1,377, with 1,360 adults and 17 children). The following comorbidities were found to be significantly more prevalent in the BPPV population when compared to the age- and gender-matched general population: ear/hearing problems, head injury, thyroid problems, allergies, high cholesterol, headaches, and numbness/paralysis. There were gender differences in the comorbidities. In addition, familial predisposition was fairly common among the participants. Thus, the data confirm some previously reported comorbidities, identify new ones (hearing loss, thyroid problems, high cholesterol, and numbness/paralysis), and suggest possible predisposing and triggering factors and events for BPPV. PMID:25187992

  6. Gender-based education during clerkships: a focus group study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Leerdam L

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Lotte van Leerdam, Lianne Rietveld, Doreth Teunissen, Antoine Lagro-JanssenDepartment of Primary and Community Care, Gender and Women's Health, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The NetherlandsObjectives: One of the goals of the medical master's degree is for a student to become a gender-sensitive doctor by applying knowledge of gender differences in practice. This study aims to investigate, from the students’ perspective, whether gender medicine has been taught in daily practice during clerkship.Methods: A focus group study was conducted among 29 medical students from Radboud University, Nijmegen, The Netherlands, who had just finished either their internal medicine or surgical clerkships. Data were analyzed in line with the principles of constant comparative analysis.Results: Four focus groups were conducted with 29 participating students. Clinical teachers barely discuss gender differences during students’ clerkships. The students mentioned three main explanatory themes: insufficient knowledge; unawareness; and minor impact. As a result, students feel that they have insufficient competencies to become gender-sensitive doctors.Conclusion: Medical students at our institution perceive that they have received limited exposure to gender-based education after completing two key clinical clerkships. All students feel that they have insufficient knowledge to become gender-sensitive doctors. They suppose that their clinical teachers have insufficient knowledge regarding gender sensitivity, are unaware of gender differences, and the students had the impression that gender is not regarded as an important issue. We suggest that the medical faculty should encourage clinical teachers to improve their knowledge and awareness of gender issues.Keywords: medical education, clerkship, gender, hidden curriculum, clinical teachers

  7. Using reciprocity in Boundary Element Calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Peter Møller; Cutanda Henriquez, Vicente

    2010-01-01

    The concept of reciprocity is widely used in both theoretical and experimental work. In Boundary Element calculations reciprocity is sometimes employed in the solution of computationally expensive scattering problems, which sometimes can be more efficiently dealt with when formulated as the recip......The concept of reciprocity is widely used in both theoretical and experimental work. In Boundary Element calculations reciprocity is sometimes employed in the solution of computationally expensive scattering problems, which sometimes can be more efficiently dealt with when formulated...

  8. Capuchin Monkeys Judge Third-Party Reciprocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, James R.; Takimoto, Ayaka; Kuroshima, Hika; Fujita, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    Increasing interest is being shown in how children develop an understanding of reciprocity in social exchanges and fairness in resource distribution, including social exchanges between third parties. Although there are descriptions of reciprocity on a one-to-one basis in other species, whether nonhumans detect reciprocity and violations of…

  9. Perceptions of gender-based discrimination during surgical training and practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrienne N. Bruce

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Women represent 15% of practicing general surgeons. Gender-based discrimination has been implicated as discouraging women from surgery. We sought to determine women's perceptions of gender-based discrimination in the surgical training and working environment. Methods: Following IRB approval, we fielded a pilot survey measuring perceptions and impact of gender-based discrimination in medical school, residency training, and surgical practice. It was sent electronically to 1,065 individual members of the Association of Women Surgeons. Results: We received 334 responses from medical students, residents, and practicing physicians with a response rate of 31%. Eighty-seven percent experienced gender-based discrimination in medical school, 88% in residency, and 91% in practice. Perceived sources of gender-based discrimination included superiors, physician peers, clinical support staff, and patients, with 40% emanating from women and 60% from men. Conclusions: The majority of responses indicated perceived gender-based discrimination during medical school, residency, and practice. Gender-based discrimination comes from both sexes and has a significant impact on women surgeons.

  10. Perceptions of gender-based discrimination during surgical training and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Adrienne N; Battista, Alexis; Plankey, Michael W; Johnson, Lynt B; Marshall, M Blair

    2015-01-01

    Women represent 15% of practicing general surgeons. Gender-based discrimination has been implicated as discouraging women from surgery. We sought to determine women's perceptions of gender-based discrimination in the surgical training and working environment. Following IRB approval, we fielded a pilot survey measuring perceptions and impact of gender-based discrimination in medical school, residency training, and surgical practice. It was sent electronically to 1,065 individual members of the Association of Women Surgeons. We received 334 responses from medical students, residents, and practicing physicians with a response rate of 31%. Eighty-seven percent experienced gender-based discrimination in medical school, 88% in residency, and 91% in practice. Perceived sources of gender-based discrimination included superiors, physician peers, clinical support staff, and patients, with 40% emanating from women and 60% from men. The majority of responses indicated perceived gender-based discrimination during medical school, residency, and practice. Gender-based discrimination comes from both sexes and has a significant impact on women surgeons.

  11. Using reciprocity in Boundary Element Calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Peter Møller; Cutanda Henriquez, Vicente

    2010-01-01

    The concept of reciprocity is widely used in both theoretical and experimental work. In Boundary Element calculations reciprocity is sometimes employed in the solution of computationally expensive scattering problems, which sometimes can be more efficiently dealt with when formulated as the recip......The concept of reciprocity is widely used in both theoretical and experimental work. In Boundary Element calculations reciprocity is sometimes employed in the solution of computationally expensive scattering problems, which sometimes can be more efficiently dealt with when formulated...... as the reciprocal radiation problem. The present paper concerns the situation of having a point source (which is reciprocal to a point receiver) at or near a discretized boundary element surface. The accuracy of the original and the reciprocal problem is compared in a test case for which an analytical solution...

  12. The Principle of Structural Reciprocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pugnale, Alberto; Parigi, Dario; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the principle of structural reciprocity, considering its origins in both Occidental and Orient culture and aiming to highlight the definition, main peculiarities and interesting aspects of such concept referring to its application to the world of construction. Issues spanning...... from history, form-finding and morphology, structural behaviour and construction techniques are discussed in the paper, which should be considered as a starting point to stimulate future research and design directions/approaches....

  13. The Effects of Gender-based Violence on Women's Unwanted Pregnancy and Abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCloskey, Laura A

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this research is to understand how gender-based violence across the life-course affects the likelihood of abortion. Women outpatients (n = 309) revealed their exposure to four different forms of gender-based abuse: child sexual abuse (25.7 percent), teenage physical dating violence (40.8 percent), intimate partner violence (43.1 percent), and sexual assault outside an intimate relationship (22 percent). Logistic regressions revealed that no single form of gender-based abuse predicted abortion. The cumulative effect of multiple forms of abuse did increase the odds of having an abortion (OR = 1.39, CI = 1.13-1.69). Child sexual abuse predicted intimate partner violence (OR = 6.71, CI = 3.36-13.41). The cumulative effect of gender-based violence on women's reproductive health warrants further research. Priority should be given to screening for multiple forms of victimization in reproductive healthcare settings.

  14. Perceptions about gender-based discrimination in a selection of South African companies / Renier Steyn

    OpenAIRE

    Steyn, Renier

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: From a legal point of view, gender-based discrimination is not condoned in the workplace. However, perceptions that such discrimination exists persist. Understanding the extent and nature of the phenomenon may contribute to the management thereof. Aim: The aim of this research was to report on the nature and level of workplace gender-based discrimination from the perspective of managers and employees, as well as by making use of objective measures. Method: Interviews were conduc...

  15. Reciprocal frame architecture in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    POPOVIC LARSEN, Olga

    2010-01-01

    p. 1866-1876 Reciprocal Frame Structures (RF) are a form of a three-dimensional grillage structure. In their simplest configuration they are formed by placing beams in a closed circuit in which each beam is supported by the preceding beam at the inner end, and by an external wall or ring beam on the outer end. In their more complex configurations gridshell-like structures with a double curvature can be formed. Although RFs have been used in many countries throughout history and are k...

  16. Emerging signs of strong reciprocity in human ontogeny

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin eRobbins

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Strong reciprocity is considered here as the propensity to sacrifice resources to be kind or to punish in response to prior acts, a behavior not simply reducible to self-interest and a likely force behind human cooperation and sociality. The aim was to capture emerging signs of strong reciprocity in human ontogeny. Three- and five-year-old middle class American children (N=162 were tested in a simple, multiple round, three-way sharing game involving the child, a generous puppet, and a stingy puppet. At the end of the game, the child was offered an opportunity to sacrifice some of her personal gains to punish one of the puppets. By three years, American children demonstrate a willingness to engage in costly punishment. However, only five-year-olds show some evidence of strong reciprocity by orienting their punishment systematically toward the stingy puppet. Further analyses and 3 additional control conditions demonstrate that such propensity is not simply reducible to a straight imitation, or b inequity aversion. To assess the relative universality of such development, a group of five- to six-year-old children from rural Samoa (N=14 were tested and compared to age and gender matched American children. Samoan children did not manifest the same propensity toward strong reciprocity. The results are interpreted as pointing to 1 the developmental emergence of an ethical stance between three and five years of age, and 2 that the expression of such stance by young children could depend on culture.

  17. Alternating sums of reciprocal generalized Fibonacci numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhapatanakul, Kantaphon

    2014-01-01

    Recently Holliday and Komatsu extended the results of Ohtsuka and Nakamura on reciprocal sums of Fibonacci numbers to reciprocal sums of generalized Fibonacci numbers. The aim of this work is to give similar results for the alternating sums of reciprocals of the generalized Fibonacci numbers with indices in arithmetic progression. Finally we note our generalizations of some results of Holliday and Komatsu. Primary 11B37; secondary 11B39.

  18. Detecting reciprocity at a global scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Morgan R.; Obradovich, Nick; Sun, Lijun; Woon, Wei Lee; LeVeck, Brad L.; Rahwan, Iyad

    2018-01-01

    Reciprocity stabilizes cooperation from the level of microbes all the way up to humans interacting in small groups, but does reciprocity also underlie stable cooperation between larger human agglomerations, such as nation states? Famously, evolutionary models show that reciprocity could emerge as a widespread strategy for achieving international cooperation. However, existing studies have only detected reciprocity-driven cooperation in a small number of country pairs. We apply a new method for detecting mutual influence in dynamical systems to a new large-scale data set that records state interactions with high temporal resolution. Doing so, we detect reciprocity between many country pairs in the international system and find that these reciprocating country pairs exhibit qualitatively different cooperative dynamics when compared to nonreciprocating pairs. Consistent with evolutionary theories of cooperation, reciprocating country pairs exhibit higher levels of stable cooperation and are more likely to punish instances of noncooperation. However, countries in reciprocity-based relationships are also quicker to forgive single acts of noncooperation by eventually returning to previous levels of mutual cooperation. By contrast, nonreciprocating pairs are more likely to exploit each other’s cooperation via higher rates of defection. Together, these findings provide the strongest evidence to date that reciprocity is a widespread mechanism for achieving international cooperation. PMID:29326983

  19. Reciprocally-Rotating Velocity Obstacles

    KAUST Repository

    Giese, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    © 2014 IEEE. Modern multi-agent systems frequently use highlevel planners to extract basic paths for agents, and then rely on local collision avoidance to ensure that the agents reach their destinations without colliding with one another or dynamic obstacles. One state-of-the-art local collision avoidance technique is Optimal Reciprocal Collision Avoidance (ORCA). Despite being fast and efficient for circular-shaped agents, ORCA may deadlock when polygonal shapes are used. To address this shortcoming, we introduce Reciprocally-Rotating Velocity Obstacles (RRVO). RRVO generalizes ORCA by introducing a notion of rotation for polygonally-shaped agents. This generalization permits more realistic motion than ORCA and does not suffer from as much deadlock. In this paper, we present the theory of RRVO and show empirically that it does not suffer from the deadlock issue ORCA has, permits agents to reach goals faster, and has a comparable collision rate at the cost of performance overhead quadratic in the (typically small) user-defined parameter δ.

  20. The perception and experience of gender-based discrimination related to professional advancement among Japanese physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasukawa, Kosuke; Nomura, Kyoko

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies from the US have found that female physicians often experience gender-based discrimination related to professional advancement. In Japan, female physicians are underrepresented in leadership positions but little is known about the prevalence of gender discrimination. We investigated the perception and prevalence of gender-based career obstacles and discrimination among Japanese physicians. The study was based on surveys of alumnae from 13 medical schools and alumni from 3 medical schools. In total, 1,684 female and 808 male physicians completed a self-administered questionnaire (response rate 83% and 58%). More women than men had the perception of gender-based career obstacles for women (77% vs. 55%; p gender discrimination related to professional advancement (21% vs. 3%; p gender discrimination included age (p gender discrimination compared with younger women (OR 5.77, 95% CI: 1.83-18.24 for women above 50, and OR 3.2, 95% CI: 1.48-7.28 for women between 40 and 49) and women with PhD were more likely to experience gender discrimination (OR 4.23, 95% CI: 1.81-9.89). Our study demonstrated that a significant proportion of Japanese women experienced gender-based discrimination and perceived gender-based career obstacles compared with male physicians.

  1. Information seeking and reciprocity: A transformational analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gallucci, M.; Perugini, M.

    2003-01-01

    The motivation to reciprocate is analyzed within the framework of interdependence theory, with focus on the process of transformation of situations. A model of transformation is presented for the motivation to reciprocate and hypotheses regarding allocation behavior and information seeking are

  2. Integral inequalities for self-reciprocal polynomials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    that is, the coefficients satisfy ak = an−k for k = 0, 1,...,n. We denote the class of self-reciprocal polynomials of order n by Pn. The properties of self-reciprocal polynomials have been studied by several mathemati- cians. We refer to [1–5] and the references given therein. Here, we are concerned with the following interesting ...

  3. Non-reciprocity in nonlinear elastodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Antoine; Sapsis, Themistoklis P.; Vakakis, Alexander F.

    2018-01-01

    Reciprocity is a fundamental property of linear time-invariant (LTI) acoustic waveguides governed by self-adjoint operators with symmetric Green's functions. The break of reciprocity in LTI elastodynamics is only possible through the break of time reversal symmetry on the micro-level, and this can be achieved by imposing external biases, adding nonlinearities or allowing for time-varying system properties. We present a Volterra-series based asymptotic analysis for studying spatial non-reciprocity in a class of one-dimensional (1D), time-invariant elastic systems with weak stiffness nonlinearities. We show that nonlinearity is neither necessary nor sufficient for breaking reciprocity in this class of systems; rather, it depends on the boundary conditions, the symmetries of the governing linear and nonlinear operators, and the choice of the spatial points where the non-reciprocity criterion is tested. Extension of the analysis to higher dimensions and time-varying systems is straightforward from a mathematical point of view (but not in terms of new non-reciprocal physical phenomena), whereas the connection of non-reciprocity and time irreversibility can be studied as well. Finally, we show that suitably defined non-reciprocity measures enable optimization, and can provide physical understanding of the nonlinear effects in the dynamics, enabling one to establish regimes of "maximum nonlinearity." We highlight the theoretical developments by means of a numerical example.

  4. Reciprocity Outperforms Conformity to Promote Cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Angelo; Balliet, Daniel

    2017-10-01

    Evolutionary psychologists have proposed two processes that could give rise to the pervasiveness of human cooperation observed among individuals who are not genetically related: reciprocity and conformity. We tested whether reciprocity outperformed conformity in promoting cooperation, especially when these psychological processes would promote a different cooperative or noncooperative response. To do so, across three studies, we observed participants' cooperation with a partner after learning (a) that their partner had behaved cooperatively (or not) on several previous trials and (b) that their group members had behaved cooperatively (or not) on several previous trials with that same partner. Although we found that people both reciprocate and conform, reciprocity has a stronger influence on cooperation. Moreover, we found that conformity can be partly explained by a concern about one's reputation-a finding that supports a reciprocity framework.

  5. Gender-based variability in disease presentation in pemphigus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseer, Sahar Y; Gill, Liza; Shah, Jay; Sinha, Animesh A

    2014-10-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris is a chronic autoimmune blistering disorder of the skin. As with many autoimmune diseases, a female predominance in pemphigus vulgaris is well established. The genetic and physiological basis for this gender bias is not well understood. Moreover, it is unclear whether the affect of gender extends beyond disease susceptibility to influence disease presentation. To address this issue, we performed a comprehensive analysis of 72 male and 125 female pemphigus vulgaris patients across a set of defined demographic (HLA type, ethnicity) and clinical (age at disease onset, anti-desmoglein antibody levels, site of lesions, and history of autoimmune disease) factors. We find that male patients are more likely to present with disease onset before age 40 than females. Additionally, we find that males have increased cutaneous involvement and display greater co-expression of anti-Dsg1 and anti-Dsg3 antibodies, while females tend to have mucosal predominance and stronger personal and family histories of autoimmunity. We do not find any differences in the distribution of HLA type or ethnicity between male and female pemphigus vulgaris patients. Our findings establish that gender does influence disease presentation in pemphigus vulgaris, supporting a role for genetic and hormonal factors in immune dysregulation and perpetuation of the autoimmune phenotype.

  6. [Women working at university restaurants: life and work conditions and gender-based violence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venâncio, Kelly Cristina Máxima Pereira; da Fonseca, Rosa Maria Godoy Serpa

    2013-10-01

    This is an exploratory and descriptive study with a quantitative approach that aimed to understand the social production and reproduction processes of women working at university restaurants and the occurrence and the magnitude of gender-based violence committed against them by their intimate partners. The data were collected through semi-structured interviews. The analysis categories used were social production and reproduction, gender and gender-based violence. The interviewees held a subordinate social position during the productive and reproductive periods of their lives. Approximately 70% reported having experienced gender-based violence from an intimate partner (66% psychological violence, 36.3% physical violence and 28.6% sexual violence). Most of the health problems resulting from violence were related to mental health. The results indicate that the situation requires immediate interventions, mostly guided by the instrumentalization of these women and the support by the state and the university as appropriate to address violence.

  7. Attempted suicide among transgender persons: The influence of gender-based discrimination and victimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements-Nolle, Kristen; Marx, Rani; Katz, Mitchell

    2006-01-01

    To determine the independent predictors of attempted suicide among transgender persons we interviewed 392 male-to-female (MTF) and 123 female-to-male (FTM) individuals. Participants were recruited through targeted sampling, respondent-driven sampling, and agency referrals in San Francisco. The prevalence of attempted suicide was 32% (95% CI = 28% to 36%). In multivariate logistic regression analysis younger age (history of substance abuse treatment, a history of forced sex, gender-based discrimination, and gender-based victimization were independently associated with attempted suicide. Suicide prevention interventions for transgender persons are urgently needed, particularly for young people. Medical, mental health, and social service providers should address depression, substance abuse, and forced sex in an attempt to reduce suicidal behaviors among transgender persons. In addition, increasing societal acceptance of the transgender community and decreasing gender-based prejudice may help prevent suicide in this highly stigmatized population.

  8. Women working at university restaurants: life and work conditions and gender-based violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Cristina Maxima Pereira Venancio

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This is an exploratory and descriptive study with a quantitative approach that aimed to understand the social production and reproduction processes of women working at university restaurants and the occurrence and the magnitude of gender-based violence committed against them by their intimate partners. The data were collected through semi-structured interviews. The analysis categories used were social production and reproduction, gender and gender-based violence. The interviewees held a subordinate social position during the productive and reproductive periods of their lives. Approximately 70% reported having experienced gender-based violence from an intimate partner (66% psychological violence, 36.3% physical violence and 28.6% sexual violence. Most of the health problems resulting from violence were related to mental health. The results indicate that the situation requires immediate interventions, mostly guided by the instrumentalization of these women and the support by the state and the university as appropriate to address violence.

  9. Gender-based street harassment and communication strategies. A comparative analysis between Spain and Morocco

    OpenAIRE

    Berenguer, Belén Zurbano; Vayá, Irene Liberia; Bouchara, Aicha

    2016-01-01

    Gender-based street harassment is a common form of intimidation and control of women in the patriarchal society. It constitutes a violation of human rights and it is widely present in all societies today. In this paper we assume the gender perspective to understand the street harassment as a manifestation of gender-based violence. Then, we go in depth into media representations of this kind of practices, focusing on traditional media as well as alternative media. All this assuming that this p...

  10. Impact of gender-based career obstacles on the working status of women physicians in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Kyoko; Gohchi, Kengo

    2012-11-01

    Research has shown that women physicians work fewer hours and are more likely to become inactive professionally and to switch to part-time labor, compared with their male counterparts. The published literature suggests that a gender disparity still exists in medicine which may decrease work motivation among women physicians. The authors investigated whether the experience and the perception of gender-based career obstacles among women physicians in Japan are associated with their working status (i.e., full-time vs. part-time). The present cross-sectional study is based on surveys of alumnae from 13 private medical schools in Japan conducted between June 2009 and May 2011. Of those who agreed to participate in this study, 1684 completed a self-administered questionnaire (overall response rate 83%). Experience of gender-based obstacles was considered affirmative if a woman physician had been overlooked for opportunities of professional advancement based on gender. Perception of gender-based obstacles referred to the self-reported degree of difficulty of promotion and opportunities for a position in higher education. Approximately 20% of the study participants responded that they experienced gender-based obstacles while 24% answered that they were not sure. The scores for perception of gender-based career obstacles were statistically higher among part-time workers compared with full-time workers (mean difference = 1.20, 95% CI: 0.39-2.00). Adjusting for age, marital status, the presence of children, workplace, board certification, holding a PhD degree, overall satisfaction of being a physician, and household income, stepwise logistic regression models revealed that physicians with the strongest perception of gender-based career obstacles were more likely to work part-time rather than full-time (OR, 0.59; 95% CI: 0.40-0.88). Although the experience of gender-based obstacles was not associated with working status among women physicians, the results demonstrated that a

  11. Reciprocity and Ethical Tuberculosis Treatment and Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Diego S; Dawson, Angus; Upshur, Ross E G

    2016-03-01

    This paper explores the notion of reciprocity in the context of active pulmonary and laryngeal tuberculosis (TB) treatment and related control policies and practices. We seek to do three things: First, we sketch the background to contemporary global TB care and suggest that poverty is a key feature when considering the treatment of TB patients. We use two examples from TB care to explore the role of reciprocity: isolation and the use of novel TB drugs. Second, we explore alternative means of justifying the use of reciprocity through appeal to different moral and political theoretical traditions (i.e., virtue ethics, deontology, and consequentialism). We suggest that each theory can be used to provide reasons to take reciprocity seriously as an independent moral concept, despite any other differences. Third, we explore general meanings and uses of the concept of reciprocity, with the primary intention of demonstrating that it cannot be simply reduced to other more frequently invoked moral concepts such as beneficence or justice. We argue that reciprocity can function as a mid-level principle in public health, and generally, captures a core social obligation arising once an individual or group is burdened as a result of acting for the benefit of others (even if they derive a benefit themselves). We conclude that while more needs to be explored in relation to the theoretical justification and application of reciprocity, sufficient arguments can be made for it to be taken more seriously as a key principle within public health ethics and bioethics more generally.

  12. ADVANCED RECIPROCATING COMPRESSION TECHNOLOGY (ARCT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danny M. Deffenbaugh; Klaus Brun; Ralph E. Harris; J. Pete Harrell; Robert J. Mckee; J. Jeffrey Moore; Steven J. Svedeman; Anthony J. Smalley; Eugene L. Broerman; Robert A Hart; Marybeth G. Nored; Ryan S. Gernentz; Shane P. Siebenaler

    2005-12-01

    The U.S. natural gas pipeline industry is facing the twin challenges of increased flexibility and capacity expansion. To meet these challenges, the industry requires improved choices in gas compression to address new construction and enhancement of the currently installed infrastructure. The current fleet of installed reciprocating compression is primarily slow-speed integral machines. Most new reciprocating compression is and will be large, high-speed separable units. The major challenges with the fleet of slow-speed integral machines are: limited flexibility and a large range in performance. In an attempt to increase flexibility, many operators are choosing to single-act cylinders, which are causing reduced reliability and integrity. While the best performing units in the fleet exhibit thermal efficiencies between 90% and 92%, the low performers are running down to 50% with the mean at about 80%. The major cause for this large disparity is due to installation losses in the pulsation control system. In the better performers, the losses are about evenly split between installation losses and valve losses. The major challenges for high-speed machines are: cylinder nozzle pulsations, mechanical vibrations due to cylinder stretch, short valve life, and low thermal performance. To shift nozzle pulsation to higher orders, nozzles are shortened, and to dampen the amplitudes, orifices are added. The shortened nozzles result in mechanical coupling with the cylinder, thereby, causing increased vibration due to the cylinder stretch mode. Valve life is even shorter than for slow speeds and can be on the order of a few months. The thermal efficiency is 10% to 15% lower than slow-speed equipment with the best performance in the 75% to 80% range. The goal of this advanced reciprocating compression program is to develop the technology for both high speed and low speed compression that will expand unit flexibility, increase thermal efficiency, and increase reliability and integrity

  13. On Reciprocal Causation in the Evolutionary Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Erik I

    2018-01-01

    Recent calls for a revision of standard evolutionary theory (SET) are based partly on arguments about the reciprocal causation. Reciprocal causation means that cause-effect relationships are bi-directional, as a cause could later become an effect and vice versa. Such dynamic cause-effect relationships raise questions about the distinction between proximate and ultimate causes, as originally formulated by Ernst Mayr. They have also motivated some biologists and philosophers to argue for an Extended Evolutionary Synthesis (EES). The EES will supposedly expand the scope of the Modern Synthesis (MS) and SET, which has been characterized as gene-centred, relying primarily on natural selection and largely neglecting reciprocal causation. Here, I critically examine these claims, with a special focus on the last conjecture. I conclude that reciprocal causation has long been recognized as important by naturalists, ecologists and evolutionary biologists working in the in the MS tradition, although it it could be explored even further. Numerous empirical examples of reciprocal causation in the form of positive and negative feedback are now well known from both natural and laboratory systems. Reciprocal causation have also been explicitly incorporated in mathematical models of coevolutionary arms races, frequency-dependent selection, eco-evolutionary dynamics and sexual selection. Such dynamic feedback were already recognized by Richard Levins and Richard Lewontin in their bok The Dialectical Biologist . Reciprocal causation and dynamic feedback might also be one of the few contributions of dialectical thinking and Marxist philosophy in evolutionary theory. I discuss some promising empirical and analytical tools to study reciprocal causation and the implications for the EES. Finally, I briefly discuss how quantitative genetics can be adapated to studies of reciprocal causation, constructive inheritance and phenotypic plasticity and suggest that the flexibility of this approach

  14. Two distinct neural mechanisms underlying indirect reciprocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takamitsu; Takezawa, Masanori; Nakawake, Yo; Kunimatsu, Akira; Yamasue, Hidenori; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Miyashita, Yasushi; Masuda, Naoki

    2014-03-18

    Cooperation is a hallmark of human society. Humans often cooperate with strangers even if they will not meet each other again. This so-called indirect reciprocity enables large-scale cooperation among nonkin and can occur based on a reputation mechanism or as a succession of pay-it-forward behavior. Here, we provide the functional and anatomical neural evidence for two distinct mechanisms governing the two types of indirect reciprocity. Cooperation occurring as reputation-based reciprocity specifically recruited the precuneus, a region associated with self-centered cognition. During such cooperative behavior, the precuneus was functionally connected with the caudate, a region linking rewards to behavior. Furthermore, the precuneus of a cooperative subject had a strong resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) with the caudate and a large gray matter volume. In contrast, pay-it-forward reciprocity recruited the anterior insula (AI), a brain region associated with affective empathy. The AI was functionally connected with the caudate during cooperation occurring as pay-it-forward reciprocity, and its gray matter volume and rsFC with the caudate predicted the tendency of such cooperation. The revealed difference is consistent with the existing results of evolutionary game theory: although reputation-based indirect reciprocity robustly evolves as a self-interested behavior in theory, pay-it-forward indirect reciprocity does not on its own. The present study provides neural mechanisms underlying indirect reciprocity and suggests that pay-it-forward reciprocity may not occur as myopic profit maximization but elicit emotional rewards.

  15. Pressure reciprocity calibration of a MEMS microphone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Randall P; Fick, Steven E

    2017-09-01

    This article reports the first use of the pressure reciprocity technique to calibrate a micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) microphone. This standardized primary calibration method is conventionally used to calibrate laboratory standard microphones. Results for the pressure reciprocity calibration of a MEMS microphone and two laboratory standard microphones are presented for the frequency range 100-10 000 Hz. Because the amplifier in the MEMS microphone package prevents reciprocal operation, this microphone was used only as a receiver of sound. A description of the procedure is presented along with checks of the measurement results and data regarding the uncertainties of these results.

  16. Reciprocity Effects in the Trust Game

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Smith

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available I use data from a previous experiment for classifying subjects based on their behavior in the trust game. Prior literature defines a “reciprocity effect” as the tendency for Second Movers to return proportions increasing in the amounts that they receive. In the data that I use, 31% of Second Movers show reciprocity effects, 31% are neutral, and 25% consistently free-ride, indicating that the aggregate reciprocity effect for the sample as a whole is attributable to a minority of the subjects.

  17. Morphogenesis of Kinetic Reciprocal Frames

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parigi, Dario; Sassone, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Kinetic structures in civil engineering and architecture gained considerable more attention in the very recent years as a practical solution to face time dependant performances. Realized projects are mostly bridges, retractable roofs, while in architecture the trend follows the category of intera......Kinetic structures in civil engineering and architecture gained considerable more attention in the very recent years as a practical solution to face time dependant performances. Realized projects are mostly bridges, retractable roofs, while in architecture the trend follows the category...... (RF) were studied in the past as a practical solution to span distances with shorter elements. Leonardo da Vinci discovered interesting RF patterns and studied three dimensional arch structures for bridges. RF are generally defined as structures that forms closed circuits of forces, and where elements...... joins in intermediate points. In the present paper we will describe a new subset of kinetic structures based on reciprocal frames topology and pin-slot constraint, a connection where a pin is constrained to move along a slot, and to rotate around its axis. The first step in obtaining a kinetic...

  18. Spite and Reciprocity in Auctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshikazu Ikeda

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a complete information model of bidding in second price sealed-bid and ascending-bid (English auctions, in which potential buyers know the unit valuation of other bidders and may spitefully prefer that their rivals earn a lower surplus. Bidders with spiteful preferences should overbid in equilibrium when they know their rival has a higher value than their own, and bidders with a higher value underbid to reciprocate the spiteful overbidding of the lower value bidders. The model also predicts different bidding behavior in second price as compared to ascending-bid auctions. The paper also presents experimental evidence broadly consistent with the model. In the complete information environment, lower value bidders overbid more than higher value bidders, and they overbid more frequently in the second price auction than in the ascending price auction. Overall, the lower value bidder submits bids that exceed value about half the time. These patterns are not found in the incomplete information environment, consistent with the model.

  19. Dimensions of gender-based violence against Syrian refugees in Lebanon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghida Anani

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Assessments of the impact of the Syrian crisis indicate high levels of sexual and gender-based violence, with rape, assault, intimate partner violence and survival sex appearing increasingly common. Humanitarian agencies urgently need to work together to address this trend.

  20. Research calls for preventive approach to gender-based violence in ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Their research looked at the root causes and impacts of violence against women and also assessed the effectiveness of existing strategies to prevent and combat gender-based violence. Their work has identified key strategies to strengthen civil society and public organizations engaged in preventing violence against ...

  1. Josephine's journey: Gender-based violence and Marian devotion in urban Papua New Guinea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermkens, A.K.

    2008-01-01

    This article deals with how, in the urban setting of Madang, Papua New Guinea, Marian devotion is deployed in response to domestic and gender-based violence. While providing insight into the lived religious experiences of Catholic women living in Madang, this article shows how Mary empowers her

  2. Josephine’s journey: Gender-based violence and Marian devotion in urban Papua New Guinea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermkens, A.K.

    2008-01-01

    This article deals with how, in the urban setting of Madang, Papua New Guinea, Marian devotion is deployed in response to domestic and gender-based violence. While providing insight into the lived religious experiences of Catholic women living in Madang, this article shows how Mary empowers her

  3. Guns and gender-based violence in South Africa | Abrahams | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We drew on several South African studies including national homicide studies, intimate partner studies, studies with male participants and studies from the justice sector, to discuss the role of gun ownership in gender-based violence. Conclusion. Guns play a significant role in violence against women in South Africa, most ...

  4. Sexual and gender-based violence in the European asylum and reception sector : A perpetuum mobile?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keygnaert, Ines; Dias, Sonia F.; Degomme, Olivier; Devillé, Walter; Kennedy, Patricia; Kováts, András; De Meyer, Sara; Vettenburg, Nicole; Roelens, Kristien; Temmerman, Marleen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Refugees, asylum seekers and undocumented migrants are at risk of sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV) and subsequent ill-health in Europe; yet, European minimum reception standards do not address SGBV. Hence, this paper explores the nature of SGBV occurring in this sector and

  5. Instructor Strategies for Responding to Disclosures of Gender-Based Violence on Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, Jennifer L.; Godderis, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    While increasing attention has been paid to the issue of sexual violence (SV) on university and college campuses, there is a paucity of research about how post-secondary instructors should respond to student disclosures of SV and other forms of gender-based violence (GBV). The limited amount of evidence suggests instructors who receive disclosures…

  6. A Black Experience-Based Approach to Gender-Based Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bent-Goodley, Tricia B.

    2009-01-01

    Gender-based violence (GBV) affects women across race, ethnicity, age, socioeconomic status, religion, sexual orientation, and geographic boundaries. No segments of society are immune from the vestiges of this problem. Yet GBV has been particularly harmful within communities of African ancestry African American communities suffer with greater…

  7. Sexual and gender-based violence in the European asylum and reception sector: a perpetuum mobile?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keygnaert, I.; Dias, S.F.; Degomme, O.; Devillé, W.; Kennedy, P.; Kovats, A.; Meyer, S. de; Vettenburg, N.; Roelens, K.; Temmerman, M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Refugees, asylum seekers and undocumented migrants are at risk of sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV) and subsequent ill-health in Europe; yet, European minimum reception standards do not address SGBV. Hence, this paper explores the nature of SGBV occurring in this sector and

  8. Sexual and gender-based violence in the European asylum and reception sector: a perpetuum mobile?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keygnaert, I.; Dias, S.F.; Degomme, O.; Devillé, W.; Kennedy, P.; Kováts, A.; De Meyer, S.; Vettenburg, N.; Roelens, K.; Temmerman, M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Refugees, asylum seekers and undocumented migrants are at risk of sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV) and subsequent ill-health in Europe; yet, European minimum reception standards do not address SGBV. Hence, this paper explores the nature of SGBV occurring in this sector and

  9. Ending sexual and gender-based violence: from knowledge to action

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... speak out and share common experiences had a significant impact on the psychological recovery and emotional well-being of these women. Read about what IDRC grantees are doing to challenge impunity against sexual violence in our brochure, Ending sexual and gender-based violence in English, French or Spanish ...

  10. 16 Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence | CRDI - Centre ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    25 nov. 2017 ... The World Health Organization reports that 35% of the world's women and girls experience sexual or physical violence in their lifetime. The International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women on November 25 — which marks the first of 16 days of activism against gender-based violence and ...

  11. Rural Teachers' Views: What Are Gender-Based Challenges Facing Free Primary Education in Lesotho?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morojele, Pholoho

    2013-01-01

    This paper gives prominence to rural teachers' accounts of gender-based challenges facing Free Primary Education in Lesotho. It draws on feminist interpretations of social constructionism to discuss factors within the Basotho communities that affect gender equality in the schools. The inductive analysis offered makes use of the data generated from…

  12. Doorways III: Teacher Training Manual on School-Related Gender-Based Violence Prevention and Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Doorways training program was designed by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID)-funded Safe Schools Program (Safe Schools) to enable teachers, community members and students to prevent and respond to school-related gender-based violence (SRGBV). Teachers can play a central role in violence prevention, and they can also help…

  13. Doorways III: Teacher Reference Materials. On School-Related Gender-Based Violence Prevention and Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Doorways training program was designed by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID)-funded Safe Schools Program (Safe Schools) to enable teachers, community members and students to prevent and respond to school-related gender-based violence (SRGBV). This booklet, "Doorways III: Teacher Reference Materials on School-Related…

  14. Research calls for preventive approach to gender-based violence in ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-05-04

    May 4, 2016 ... Despite laws and a constitution that guarantees gender equality, women in Senegal still experience high rates of violence. Critics point to an ... Need for a paradigm shift from current strategies addressing gender-based violence that are based on repression, reparation, and victimization. Instead, promote a ...

  15. Rethinking gender-based violence during war: is violence against civilian men a problem worth addressing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linos, Natalia

    2009-04-01

    Gender-based violence during conflict and post-conflict situations has received increased attention in research and in the work of development agencies. Viewed primarily as a form of violence against women, this commentary questions whether male civilians have also been victims of gender-based violence during conflict, invisible due to stereotypes surrounding masculinity and a culturally permissive approach towards violence perpetrated against men, especially at times of war. The experience of civilian males of violence, including sexual violence, during the war in Bosnia and Herzegovina and other contemporary wars, suggests that the discourse on gender-based violence and public health research should begin exploring the specific needs of men. Drawing on Nancy Krieger's (Krieger, N. (2003). Genders, sexes, and health: what are the connections-and why does it matter? International Journal of Epidemiology, 32, 652-657) analysis on the differential role of 'sex' and 'gender' on a given exposure-outcome association, this commentary suggests that the impact of gender-based violence on health during conflict may be different for men and women and may require distinct therapeutic approaches. Given that perpetrators are often male, an extra level of stigma is added when heterosexual men are sexually violated, which may lead to underreporting and reduced health-service seeking behavior. Further public health research is needed to guide the work of humanitarian agencies working with survivors of gender-based violence in conflict and post-conflict settings to ensure equal access to appropriate health services for men and women.

  16. Persistent junctional reciprocating tachycardia in the fetus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudijk, M. A.; Stoutenbeek, P.; Sreeram, N.; Visser, G. H. A.; Meijboom, E. J.

    2003-01-01

    Persistent junctional reciprocating tachycardia (PJRT) tends to be a persistent arrhythmia and requires aggressive therapeutic management. Diagnosis and management of this infrequently occurring tachycardia in the fetus at an early stage is of importance for the prevention of congestive heart

  17. The House Money Effect and Negative Reciprocity

    OpenAIRE

    Katarína Danková; Maroš Servátka

    2014-01-01

    In the vast majority of laboratory experiments documenting the existence of reciprocity subjects are endowed with windfall funds. In many environments with salient fairness considerations such endowments are known to inflate subjects’ other-regarding behavior, thereby creating a so-called “house money effect.” This suggests that laboratory experiments might also overestimate reciprocal behavior. In this study we identify two reasons why the source of endowment might matter for negative recipr...

  18. Balanced Reciprocal Translocations Detected at Amniocentesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ping Chen

    2010-12-01

    Conclusion: Balanced reciprocal translocations detected at amniocentesis may be associated with fetal anomalies in cases of concomitant aneuploidy, de novo X-autosome translocation or de novo CCR. Genetic counseling of a de novo simple reciprocal translocation at amniocentesis remains difficult because approximately one-fourth of the parents opt for termination of the pregnancy, and detailed ultrasonography and array comparative genomic hybridization are helpful for parental counseling under such circumstances.

  19. Free-Form Kinetic Reciprocal System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parigi, Dario; Sassone, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Kinetic Reciprocal System (KRS) are innovative moveable structures based on the principle of reciprocity [1] with internal pin-slot constraints [2]. The analysis of KRS kinematic and static determinacy is developed through the construction of kinematic matrices, accordingly with [3...... of the required kinetic behaviour and its validity has been tested on physical models. A set of case studies and possible applications are described, focusing on the morphologic variety of results and on the efficiency of the kinetic performance....

  20. Emerging Signs of Strong Reciprocity in Human Ontogeny

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Erin; Rochat, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Strong reciprocity is considered here as the propensity to sacrifice resources to be kind or to punish in response to prior acts, a behavior not simply reducible to self-interest and a likely force behind human cooperation and sociality. The aim was to capture emerging signs of strong reciprocity in human ontogeny and across highly contrasted cultures. Three- and 5-year-old middle class American children (N = 162) were tested in a simple, multiple round, three-way sharing game involving the child, a generous puppet, and a stingy puppet. At the end of the game, the child was offered an opportunity to sacrifice some of her personal gains to punish one of the puppets. By 3 years, American children demonstrate a willingness to engage in costly punishment. However, only 5-year-olds show some evidence of strong reciprocity by orienting their punishment systematically toward the stingy puppet. Further analyses and three additional control conditions demonstrate that such propensity is not simply reducible to (a) straight imitation, or (b) inequity aversion. To assess the relative universality of such development, a group of 5- to 6-year-old children from rural Samoa (N = 14) were tested and compared to age and gender-matched American children. Samoan children did not manifest the same propensity toward strong reciprocity. The results are interpreted as pointing to (1) the developmental emergence of an ethical stance between 3 and 5 years of age, and (2) that the expression of such stance by young children could depend on culture. PMID:22194730

  1. GENDER-BASED RESTORATIVE JUSTICE FOR VICTIMS OF VIOELENCE AGAINST WOMEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahya Wulandari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Positive law is less oriented towards the protection of victims, especially women. Restorative justice appears to protect and resolve problems with the interests of the victim-oriented. This article discuss the form of legal protection for victims of violence against women, gender-based and describe the form of restorative justice for victims of gender-based violence against women. Positive criminal law does not accommodate both the interests of the victim to determine the crime against him self and to restore his suffering. This is caused due to the dominance of retributive justice in the settlement mind set crime through the criminal law. The restorative justice allows for an active role in the completion of a crime victim who happens also allows the imposition of sanctions that are beneficial to the recovery of the suffering of the victims.

  2. The neural correlates of reciprocity are sensitive to prior experience of reciprocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cáceda, Ricardo; Prendes-Alvarez, Stefania; Hsu, Jung-Jiin; Tripathi, Shanti P; Kilts, Clint D; James, G Andrew

    2017-08-14

    Reciprocity is central to human relationships and is strongly influenced by multiple factors including the nature of social exchanges and their attendant emotional reactions. Despite recent advances in the field, the neural processes involved in this modulation of reciprocal behavior by ongoing social interaction are poorly understood. We hypothesized that activity within a discrete set of neural networks including a putative moral cognitive neural network is associated with reciprocity behavior. Nineteen healthy adults underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging scanning while playing the trustee role in the Trust Game. Personality traits and moral development were assessed. Independent component analysis was used to identify task-related functional brain networks and assess their relationship to behavior. The saliency network (insula and anterior cingulate) was positively correlated with reciprocity behavior. A consistent array of brain regions supports the engagement of emotional, self-referential and planning processes during social reciprocity behavior. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Gender-based power and couples' HIV risk in Uttar Pradesh and Uttarakhand, north India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Alpna; Bloom, Shelah S; Suchindran, Chirayath; Curtis, Siân; Angeles, Gustavo

    2014-12-01

    Gender inequality is a long-recognized driver of the HIV epidemic. However, few studies have investigated the association between gender-based power and HIV risk in India, which has the world's third largest HIV epidemic. Population-based data collected in 2003 from 3,385 couples residing in Uttar Pradesh and Uttarakhand, North India, were used to examine associations between gender-based power (wife's autonomy and husband's inequitable gender attitudes) and indicators of couples' HIV risk (whether the husband had had premarital sex with someone other than his eventual spouse, extramarital sex in the past year or STI symptoms in the past year). Structural equation modeling was used to create composite variables for the gender-based power measures and test their associations with HIV risk measures. Twenty-four percent of husbands had had premarital sex, 7% had had extramarital sex in the past year and 6% had had STI symptoms in the past year. Structural equation models indicated that wives who reported higher levels of autonomy were less likely than other wives to have husbands who had had extramarital sex in the past year (direct association) or STI symptoms in the past year (indirect association). Moreover, husbands who endorsed more inequitable gender attitudes were more likely than others to report having had premarital sex with someone other than their spouse, which in turn was associated with having had extramarital sex and STI symptoms in the past year. If the associations identified in this study reflect a causal relationship between gender-based power and HIV risk behavior, then HIV prevention programs that successfully address inequitable gender roles may reduce HIV risks in North India.

  4. EFL Students’ Social Identities Construction Through Gender-Based Short Stories

    OpenAIRE

    Catherine Benavides Buitrago

    2017-01-01

    This research study took place in a public school in Bogota with 38 students from 7th grade who were among 12 and 16 years of age. This qualitative action research intends (a) to identify discourses students draw on to construct social identities in the EFL classroom b) to describe social identities constructed discursively in relation to gender-based short stories and c) to study the potential relationship between these discursively constructed social identities in gendered-related reading a...

  5. Sexual and Gender Based Crimes in International Criminal Law: Moving Forwards or Backwards?

    OpenAIRE

    Khadija Ali

    2015-01-01

    Prosecution of sexual violence in international criminal law requires not only an understanding of the mechanisms employed to prosecute sexual violence but also a critical analysis of the factors facilitating perpetuation of such crimes in armed conflicts. The extrapolations laid out in this essay delve into the jurisprudence of international criminal law pertaining to sexual and gender based violence followed by the core question of this essay – has the entrenchment of s...

  6. Representative bureaucracy:does female police leadership affect gender-based violence arrests?

    OpenAIRE

    Johnston, K.; Houston, John

    2016-01-01

    Representative bureaucracy theory postulates that passive representation leads to active representation of minority groups. This article investigates the passive representation of female police officers at leadership levels and the active representation of women vis-a-vis gender-based violence arrest rates in the UK. Much of the extant research on representative bureaucracy is located at street level, with evidence showing that discretionary power of minority bureaucrats can lead to active re...

  7. The role of mental health in primary prevention of sexual and gender-based violence

    OpenAIRE

    Gevers, Aník; Dartnall, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    In this short communication, we assert that mental health has a crucial role in the primary prevention of sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV). However, we found that most research and practice to date has focused on the role of mental health post-violence, and SGBV primary prevention is relying on public health models that do not explicitly include mental health. Yet, key concepts, processes, and competencies in the mental health field appear essential to successful SGBV primary preventio...

  8. HIV testing and tolerance to gender based violence: a cross-sectional study in Zambia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Gari

    Full Text Available This paper explores the effect of social relations and gender-based conflicts on the uptake of HIV testing in the South and Central provinces of Zambia. We conducted a community-based cross-sectional study of 1716 randomly selected individuals. Associations were examined using mixed-effect multivariable logistic regression. A total of 264 men (64% and 268 women (56% had never tested for HIV. The strongest determinants for not being tested were disruptive couple relationships (OR = 2.48 95% CI = 1.00-6.19; tolerance to gender-based violence (OR = 2.10 95% CI = 1.05-4.32 and fear of social rejection (OR = 1.48 95% CI = 1.23-1.80. In the Zambian context, unequal power relationships within the couple and the community seem to play a pivotal role in the decision to test which until now have been largely underestimated. Policies, programs and interventions to rapidly increase HIV testing need to urgently address gender-power inequity in relationships and prevent gender-based violence to reduce the negative impact on the lives of couples and families.

  9. Gender-based violence, alcohol use, and sexual risk among female patrons of drinking venues in Cape Town, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitpitan, Eileen V; Kalichman, Seth C; Eaton, Lisa A; Cain, Demetria; Sikkema, Kathleen J; Skinner, Donald; Watt, Melissa H; Pieterse, Desiree

    2013-06-01

    Gender-based violence is a well-recognized risk factor for HIV infection among women. Alcohol use is associated with both gender-based violence and sexual risk behavior, but has not been examined as a correlate of both in a context of both high HIV risk and hazardous drinking. The purpose of this paper is to examine the association between recent abuse by a sex partner with alcohol and sexual risk behavior among female patrons of alcohol serving venues in South Africa. Specifically, the aim of this study is to determine whether sexual risk behaviors are associated with gender-based violence after controlling for levels of alcohol use. We surveyed 1,388 women attending informal drinking establishments in Cape Town, South Africa to assess recent history of gender-based violence, drinking, and sexual risk behaviors. Gender-based violence was associated with both drinking and sexual risk behaviors after controlling for demographics among the women. A hierarchical logistic regression analysis showed that after controlling for alcohol use sexual risk behavior remained significantly associated with gender-based violence, particularly with meeting a new sex partner at the bar, recent STI diagnosis, and engaging in transactional sex, but not protected intercourse or number of partners. In South Africa where heavy drinking is prevalent women may be at particular risk of physical abuse from intimate partners as well as higher sexual risk. Interventions that aim to reduce gender-based violence and sexual risk behaviors must directly work to reduce drinking behavior.

  10. The extended reciprocity: Strong belief outperforms persistence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurokawa, Shun

    2017-05-21

    The existence of cooperation is a mysterious phenomenon and demands explanation, and direct reciprocity is one key potential explanation for the evolution of cooperation. Direct reciprocity allows cooperation to evolve for cooperators who switch their behavior on the basis of information about the opponent's behavior. Here, relevant to direct reciprocity is information deficiency. When the opponent's last move is unknown, how should players behave? One possibility is to choose cooperation with some default probability without using any further information. In fact, our previous paper (Kurokawa, 2016a) examined this strategy. However, there might be beneficial information other than the opponent's last move. A subsequent study of ours (Kurokawa, 2017) examined the strategy which uses the own last move when the opponent's last move is unknown, and revealed that referring to the own move and trying to imitate it when information is absent is beneficial. Is there any other beneficial information else? How about strong belief (i.e., have infinite memory and believe that the opponent's behavior is unchanged)? Here, we examine the evolution of strategies with strong belief. Analyzing the repeated prisoner's dilemma game and using evolutionarily stable strategy (ESS) analysis against an invasion by unconditional defectors, we find the strategy with strong belief is more likely to evolve than the strategy which does not use information other than the opponent player's last move and more likely to evolve than the strategy which uses not only the opponent player's last move but also the own last move. Strong belief produces the extended reciprocity and facilitates the evolution of cooperation. Additionally, we consider the two strategies game between strategies with strong belief and any strategy, and we consider the four strategies game in which unconditional cooperators, unconditional defectors, pessimistic reciprocators with strong belief, and optimistic reciprocators with

  11. Enhanced additive manufacturing with a reciprocating platen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lind, Randall F.; Blue, Craig A.; Love, Lonnie J.; Post, Brian K.; Lloyd, Peter D.

    2018-02-06

    An additive manufacturing extrusion head that includes a heated nozzle for accepting a feedstock and extruding the feedstock onto a substrate at a deposition plane, the nozzle having a longitudinal extrusion axis. A reciprocating platen surrounds the nozzle, the platen operable to reciprocate along the extrusion axis at or above the deposition plane as the nozzle extrudes feedstock onto the substrate; and wherein the platen flattens the extruded feedstock such that it does not protrude above the deposition plane as the extrusion head traverses over the substrate.

  12. Gender-based violence against civilian women in postinvasion Iraq: (re)politicizing George W. Bush's silent legacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee-Koo, Katrina

    2011-12-01

    This article explores the increase in gender-based violence against civilian women in Iraq since 2003 and connects it to the U.S.-led invasion of that country. It outlines the complex nature of the gender-based violence and the impact that it has had on civilian women in Iraq. It then analyzes the links between this violence and the politics of the postinvasion period. This article also explores how this violence has been politicized. Ultimately, the article (re)politicizes gender-based violence through a feminist lens and argues that the security of Iraq's women is fundamental to the stability of Iraq as a whole.

  13. The effects of reciprocal cross on inheritance of DNA methylation in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DNA methylation plays an important role for regulation of gene expression. To study the inheritance of DNA methylation, we selected two F1 plant population by reciprocal cross with two cotton lines Zongcaixuan No.1 and HY428, and analyzed the variations of DNA methylation levels and patterns in F1 generations by ...

  14. Cooperation under indirect reciprocity and imitative trust.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serguei Saavedra

    Full Text Available Indirect reciprocity, a key concept in behavioral experiments and evolutionary game theory, provides a mechanism that allows reciprocal altruism to emerge in a population of self-regarding individuals even when repeated interactions between pairs of actors are unlikely. Recent empirical evidence show that humans typically follow complex assessment strategies involving both reciprocity and social imitation when making cooperative decisions. However, currently, we have no systematic understanding of how imitation, a mechanism that may also generate negative effects via a process of cumulative advantage, affects cooperation when repeated interactions are unlikely or information about a recipient's reputation is unavailable. Here we extend existing evolutionary models, which use an image score for reputation to track how individuals cooperate by contributing resources, by introducing a new imitative-trust score, which tracks whether actors have been the recipients of cooperation in the past. We show that imitative trust can co-exist with indirect reciprocity mechanisms up to a threshold and then cooperation reverses -revealing the elusive nature of cooperation. Moreover, we find that when information about a recipient's reputation is limited, trusting the action of third parties towards her (i.e. imitating does favor a higher collective cooperation compared to random-trusting and share-alike mechanisms. We believe these results shed new light on the factors favoring social imitation as an adaptive mechanism in populations of cooperating social actors.

  15. Integral Inequalities for Self-Reciprocal Polynomials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Annual Meetings · Mid Year Meetings · Discussion Meetings · Public Lectures · Lecture Workshops · Refresher Courses · Symposia · Live Streaming. Home; Journals; Proceedings – Mathematical Sciences; Volume 120; Issue 2. Integral Inequalities for Self-Reciprocal Polynomials. Horst Alzer. Volume 120 Issue 2 April 2010 ...

  16. Integral inequalities for self-reciprocal polynomials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Annual Meetings · Mid Year Meetings · Discussion Meetings · Public Lectures · Lecture Workshops · Refresher Courses · Symposia · Live Streaming. Home; Journals; Proceedings – Mathematical Sciences; Volume 120; Issue 2. Integral Inequalities for Self-Reciprocal Polynomials. Horst Alzer. Volume 120 Issue 2 April 2010 ...

  17. Generalized reciprocal method applied in processing seismic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A geophysical investigation was carried out at Shika, near Zaria, using seismic refraction method; with the aim of analyzing the data obtained using the generalized reciprocal method (GRM). The technique is for delineating undulating refractors at any depth from in-line seismic refraction data consisting of forward and ...

  18. Reciprocity, Materialism and Welfare: An Evolutionary Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Anders

    2001-01-01

    We analyze preference evolution in a simple bargaining situation. Preferences for reciprocity, who sustain a conflict-free outcome, may be viable if players have enough information about the opponent's preferences. However, depending on the initial starting point preference evolution can in gener...

  19. Human-animal amity and reciprocity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wissenburg, M.L.J.

    2014-01-01

    Animals are now widely accepted as subjects of justice: not equal but deserving equal consideration; not free but deserving liberties (that is, selfconstraining human duties). But liberty and equality are not all there is to a flourishing society – how about amity and reciprocity? Isn’t a minimal

  20. Reciprocal Teaching. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2013

    2013-01-01

    "Reciprocal teaching" is an instructional method designed to help teach reading comprehension skills to students with adequate decoding proficiency. During initial instructional sessions, the teacher introduces four comprehension strategies: summarizing, questioning, clarifying, and predicting. Then, the teacher and student read several…

  1. 37 CFR 11.24 - Reciprocal discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reciprocal discipline. 11.24... discipline. (a) Notification of OED Director. Within thirty days of being publicly censured, publicly... USPTO Director. The OED Director shall, in addition, without Committee on Discipline authorization, file...

  2. Transformative narratives and ethical witnessing: the 7N Feminist Platform’s discursive strategies against gender-based violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Núñez Puente

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to explore the transformative possibilites of the narratives produced on gender-based violence. Therefore, we will analyze the online discursive strategies developed by the Feminist Platform 7N to bring about an anlytical model built upon the concept of the ethical witnessing articulated by Oliver (2001; 2004. We will discuss the relationship between giving testimony and witnessing gender-based violence, the kind of discourse developed and if it helps to identify sencondary victimization. We will also discuss whether this kind of discourses could be emancipatory and at the same time whether these narratives could be part of the feminist fight for women’s rights. We conclude that certain activist praxis against gender-based violence can challenge the hegemonic frames of recognition of gender-based violence and thus produce discourses on the victims of the violence which can be ultimately emancipatory.

  3. Gender-Based Violence Against Transgender People in the United States: A Call for Research and Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirtz, Andrea L; Poteat, Tonia C; Malik, Mannat; Glass, Nancy

    2018-01-01

    Gender-based violence (GBV) is an umbrella term for any harm that is perpetrated against a person's will and that results from power inequalities based on gender roles. Most global estimates of GBV implicitly refer only to the experiences of cisgender, heterosexually identified women, which often comes at the exclusion of transgender and gender nonconforming (trans) populations. Those who perpetrate violence against trans populations often target gender nonconformity, gender expression or identity, and perceived sexual orientation and thus these forms of violence should be considered within broader discussions of GBV. Nascent epidemiologic research suggests a high burden of GBV among trans populations, with an estimated prevalence that ranges from 7% to 89% among trans populations and subpopulations. Further, 165 trans persons have been reported murdered in the United States between 2008 and 2016. GBV is associated with multiple poor health outcomes and has been broadly posited as a component of syndemics, a term used to describe an interaction of diseases with underlying social forces, concomitant with limited prevention and response programs. The interaction of social stigma, inadequate laws, and punitive policies as well as a lack of effective GBV programs limits access to and use of GBV prevention and response programs among trans populations. This commentary summarizes the current body of research on GBV among trans populations and highlights areas for future research, intervention, and policy.

  4. Film, Parable, Reciprocity. Frederick Wiseman’s “Reality Fictions” and Social Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyda Faber

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This essay argues that social criticism may be an effect of Frederick Wiseman’s “re¬ality fiction” films only if that effect is understood as analogous to that of parable, an awakened responsiveness to the unknown and the unresolved. The irresolution witnessed repeatedly in his films is the reality of “radical inequality” within institu¬tions in democracy, with domination ranging from explicit exploitative relations to subtle aural and bodily cues. Within those relations, Wiseman opens up the space of parable as a vision and practice of reciprocity and more-than-reciprocity through, among others, filmic strategies of “lyric portraiture” and expressive “democratic noise”. Furthermore, Wiseman’s camera extends more-than-reciprocity to animals in a filmic style that shows human and animal relations as visceral markers of what otherwise might remain unseen in human-to-human relations.

  5. Gender Based Within-Household Inequality in Childhood Immunization in India: Changes over Time and across Regions

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Ashish

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives Despite India's substantial economic growth in the past two decades, girls in India are discriminated against in access to preventive healthcare including immunizations. Surprisingly, no study has assessed the contribution of gender based within-household discrimination to the overall inequality in immunization status of Indian children. This study therefore has two objectives: to estimate the gender based within-household inequality (GWHI) in immunization status of ...

  6. Gender based within-household inequality in immunization status of children: some evidence from South Asian countries

    OpenAIRE

    Ashish Singh

    2015-01-01

    Using households with a pair of male-female siblings from DHS surveys, this paper estimates gender based within-household inequality in immunization status of children (aged 1-5 years) from Bangladesh, India, Nepal and Pakistan. I find substantial level of gender based within-household inequality in immunization status (with large inter-country variations) in the countries studied. Further, I estimate household fixed-effects models for immunization status and find significant difference betwe...

  7. Sex is not enough: the need for gender-based analysis in health research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowatzki, Nadine; Grant, Karen R

    2011-04-01

    To gain a more detailed understanding of health care utilization patterns, researchers have begun to disaggregate administrative data by a number of important variables, including sex. Our purpose in this article is to confirm the need for sex-disaggregated data in health research, but also to argue that the further step of gender-based analysis is necessary. We focus on a number of conceptual and methodological issues surrounding sex-disaggregated administrative data, and we conclude that sex disaggregation alone is insufficient. Gender-sensitive indicators must be developed and used in order to understand the context of health differences and develop appropriate policies and programs.

  8. Care Seeking Patterns Among Women Who Have Experienced Gender-Based Violence in Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Sonya; Seritan, Andreea L; Miller, Elizabeth

    2016-06-01

    This study explored patterns of abuse and care seeking among women victims of gender-based violence (GBV) in Afghanistan. Individual, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 22 Afghan women (M age = 19 years) living in a shelter for victims of GBV. Interviews were analyzed thematically. Participants reported experiencing multiple forms of abuse. The majority received medical treatment for abuse-related health concerns. However, less than half reported abuse to health care providers or were asked by health care providers about the context of their injuries. Strategies to improve health care responses to GBV are needed to ensure safety and support for Afghan women. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. A 1.5 GFLOPS Reciprocal Unit for Computer Graphics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nannarelli, Alberto; Rasmussen, Morten Sleth; Stuart, Matthias Bo

    2006-01-01

    The reciprocal operation 1/d is a frequent operation performed in graphics processors (GPUs). In this work, we present the design of a radix-16 reciprocal unit based on the algorithm combining the traditional digit-by-digit algorithm and the approximation of the reciprocal by one Newton-Raphson i...

  10. EFL Students’ Social Identities Construction Through Gender-Based Short Stories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Benavides Buitrago

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This research study took place in a public school in Bogota with 38 students from 7th grade who were among 12 and 16 years of age. This qualitative action research intends (a to identify discourses students draw on to construct social identities in the EFL classroom b to describe social identities constructed discursively in relation to gender-based short stories and c to study the potential relationship between these discursively constructed social identities in gendered-related reading activities and foreign language learning. Data was collected by observing and analyzing three pedagogical units, which were designed by following the stages of the Task Based Learning Approach (TBL. Besides that, I used field notes, video and audio recordings and students´ artifacts. Data was analyzed by following the steps proposed by Grounded theory (GT (Charmaz, 2006 and the principles of Critical Classroom Discourse Analysis (CCDA (Kumaravadivelu, 1999. Data revealed a main category and three subcategories, which showed the relationship between the gender-based short stories read by the students and the identities they portrayed during the lessons.

  11. Services utilization among recently homeless veterans: a gender-based comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Ann Elizabeth; Byrne, Thomas H

    2014-03-01

    As women emerge as a significant segment of the Veteran population, there is a need to understand how they enter the homeless system, the impact of homelessness on healthcare, and how this varies by gender. This study provides a gender-based comparison of Veterans' utilization of U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) health and behavioral health services following the onset of a homeless episode and assesses the relationship between services utilization and Veterans' entry into the homeless system. Male and female veterans were equally as likely to use mainstream and VA homeless services. There were few differences between genders in inpatient services use following a homeless episode. Men used more substance abuse outpatient treatment and emergency services whereas women used outpatient medical treatment. Veterans who sought non-VA homeless services were less likely to use outpatient services but more likely to access emergency services. Veterans experiencing homelessness who do not use VA homeless assistance services are less engaged with preventative VA health and behavioral healthcare. Veterans who are homeless but not identified as such by VA, particularly women, need additional engagement. Ongoing study of gender-based differences in services utilization among homeless and at-risk Veterans is needed. Reprint & Copyright © 2014 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  12. The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor flavopiridol disrupts sodium butyrate-induced p21WAF1/CIP1 expression and maturation while reciprocally potentiating apoptosis in human leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosato, Roberto R; Almenara, Jorge A; Cartee, Leanne; Betts, Vicki; Chellappan, Srikumar P; Grant, Steven

    2002-02-01

    Interactions between the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor flavopiridol (FP) and the histone deacetylase inhibitor sodium butyrate (SB) have been examined in human leukemia cells (U937) in relation to differentiation and apoptosis. Whereas 1 mM of SB or 100 nM of FP minimally induced apoptosis (4% and 10%, respectively) at 24 h, simultaneous exposure of U937 cells to these agents dramatically increased cell death (e.g., approximately 60%), reflected by both morphological and Annexin/propidium iodide-staining features, procaspase 3 activation, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage. Similar interactions were observed in human promyelocytic (HL-60), B-lymphoblastic (Raji), and T-lymphoblastic (Jurkat) leukemia cells. Coadministration of FP opposed SB-mediated accumulation of cells in G0G1 and differentiation, reflected by reduced CD11b expression, but instead dramatically increased procaspase-3, procaspase-8, Bid, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage, as well as mitochondrial damage (e.g., loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and cytochrome c release). FP also blocked SB-related p21WAF1-CIP1 induction through a caspase-independent mechanism and triggered the caspase-mediated cleavage of p27KIP1 and retinoblastoma protein. The latter event was accompanied by a marked reduction in retinoblastoma protein/E2F1 complex formation. However, FP did not modify the extent of SB-associated acetylation of histones H3 and H4. Treatment of cells with FP/SB also resulted in the caspase-mediated cleavage of Bcl-2 and caspase-independent down-regulation of Mcl-1. Levels of cyclins A, D1, and E, and X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis also declined in SB/FP-treated cells. Finally, FP/SB coexposure potently induced apoptosis in two primary acute myelogenous leukemia samples. Together, these findings demonstrate that FP, when combined with SB, induces multiple perturbations in cell cycle and apoptosis regulatory proteins, which oppose leukemic cell differentiation but instead

  13. Reciprocity, social ties, and competition in markets for experience goods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huck, Steffen; Tyran, Jean-Robert

    2007-01-01

    Reciprocal customers may disproportionately improve the performance of markets for experience goods. Reciprocal customers reward (punish) firms for providing good (bad) quality by upholding (terminating) the customer relation. This may induce firms to provide good quality which, in turn, may induce...... a positive externality for non-reciprocal customers who would, in the absence of reciprocal types, face market breakdown. This efficiency-enhancing effect of reciprocity is boosted when there are social ties between consumers and competition between firms. The existence of social ties or competition alone...

  14. Reciprocity as a Foundation of Financial Economics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Timothy C

    This paper argues that the subsistence of the fundamental theorem of contemporary financial mathematics is the ethical concept 'reciprocity'. The argument is based on identifying an equivalence between the contemporary, and ostensibly 'value neutral', Fundamental Theory of Asset Pricing with theories of mathematical probability that emerged in the seventeenth century in the context of the ethical assessment of commercial contracts in a framework of Aristotelian ethics. This observation, the main claim of the paper, is justified on the basis of results from the Ultimatum Game and is analysed within a framework of Pragmatic philosophy. The analysis leads to the explanatory hypothesis that markets are centres of communicative action with reciprocity as a rule of discourse. The purpose of the paper is to reorientate financial economics to emphasise the objectives of cooperation and social cohesion and to this end, we offer specific policy advice.

  15. Reciprocal Trading of Different Commodities in Norway Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweinfurth, Manon K; Taborsky, Michael

    2018-02-19

    The prevalence of reciprocal cooperation in non-human animals is hotly debated [1, 2]. Part of this dispute rests on the assumption that reciprocity means paying like with like [3]. However, exchanges between social partners may involve different commodities and services. Hitherto, there is no experimental evidence that animals other than primates exchange different commodities among conspecifics based on the decision rules of direct reciprocity. Here, we show that Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) apply direct reciprocity rules when exchanging two different social services: food provisioning and allogrooming. Focal rats were made to experience partners either cooperating or non-cooperating in one of the two commodities. Afterward, they had the opportunity to reciprocate favors by the alternative service. Test rats traded allogrooming against food provisioning, and vice versa, thereby acting by the rules of direct reciprocity. This might indicate that reciprocal altruism among non-human animals is much more widespread than currently assumed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Robustness of Long Span Reciprocal Timber Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balfroid, Nathalie; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Sassone, Mario SASSONE

    2011-01-01

    engineer may take necessary steps to design robust structures that are insensitive to accidental circumstances. The present paper makes a discussion of such robustness issues related to the future development of reciprocal timber structures. The paper concludes that these kind of structures can have...... a potential as long span timber structures in real projects if they are carefully designed with respect to the overall robustness strategies....

  17. The TORE SUPRA fast reciprocating RF probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, C.E. Jr.; Harris, J.H.; Haste, G.R.

    1994-01-01

    A fast reciprocating ICRF (Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies) probe was installed and operated on TORE SUPRA during 1992/1993. The body of the probe was originally used on the ATF experiment at ORNL. The probe was adapted for use on TORE SUPRA, and mounted on one of the two fast reciprocating probe mounts. The probe consists of two orthogonal single-turn wire loops, mounted so that one loop senses toroidal RF magnetic fields and the other senses poloidal RF magnetic fields. The probe began operation in June, 1993. The probe active area is approximately 5 cm long by 2 cm, and the reciprocating mount has a slow stroke (5 cm/sec) of 30 cm by 2 cm, and the reciprocating mount has a slow stroke (5 cm/sec) of 30 cm and a fast stroke (1.5 m/sec) of about 10 cm. The probe was operated at distances from the plasma edge ranging from 30 cm to -5 cm (i.e., inside the last closed flux surface). The probe design, electronics, calibration, data acquisition and data processing are discussed. First data from the probe are presented as a function of ICRF power, distance from the plasma, loop orientation, and other plasma parameters. Initial data shows parametric instabilities do not play an important role for ICRF in the TORE SUPRA edge and scrape-off-layer (SOL) plasmas. Additionally it is observed that the probe signal has little or no dependence on position in the SOL/plasma edge

  18. Reciprocal mass tensor : a general form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, C.L.

    1978-01-01

    Using the results of earlier treatment of wave packets, a general form of reciprocal mass tensor has been obtained. The elements of this tensor are seen to be dependent on momentum as well as space coordinates of the particle under consideration. The conditions under which the tensor would reduce to the usual space-independent form, are discussed and the impact of the space-dependence of this tensor on the motion of Bloch electrons, is examined. (author)

  19. Integral inequalities for self-reciprocal polynomials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Integral inequalities for self-reciprocal polynomials. HORST ALZER. Morsbacher Str. 10, D-51545 Waldbröl, Germany. E-mail: H.Alzer@gmx.de. MS received 14 November 2007. Abstract. Let n ≥ 1 be an integer and let Pn be the class of polynomials P of degree at most n satisfying znP(1/z) = P (z) for all z ∈ C. Moreover, ...

  20. Grooming reciprocity in male Tibetan macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Dong-Po; Li, Jin-Hua; Garber, Paul A; Matheson, Megan D; Sun, Bing-Hua; Zhu, Yong

    2013-10-01

    In several primate species, adult males are reported to compete for access to reproductive partners as well as forming affiliative and cohesive social bonds based on the exchange of goods or services. We hypothesized that among a broad set of fitness-maximizing strategies, grooming can be used by individual adult males to enhance social relationships through reciprocity and/or through the interchange of grooming for a different but equivalent good or service. We used focal animal sampling and continuously recorded dyadic grooming and agonistic interactions to test a series of predictions regarding male social interactions in a free-ranging group of Tibetan macaques (Macaca thibetana) at Huangshan, China. During the non-mating season or between males of similar rank throughout the year, grooming effort given was matched by grooming effort received. However, lower ranking males groomed higher ranking males at a greater rate and/or for a longer duration during both the mating and non-mating periods. We found that higher ranking males directed less aggression towards males with whom they formed a frequent grooming partnership, indicating that grooming received was interchanged for increased social tolerance. These data suggest that individual male Tibetan macaques employ alternative social strategies associated with grooming reciprocity or interchange depending on dominance rank and rates of aggression, and highlight the importance of both biological markets and grooming reciprocity as behavioral mechanisms used by resident adult males to form and maintain affiliative social bonds. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Reciprocal Regulation between Enterovirus 71 and the NLRP3 Inflammasome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongbin Wang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Enterovirus 71 (EV71 is the major etiological agent of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD. Early studies showed that EV71-infected patients with severe complications exhibited elevated plasma levels of IL-1β, indicating that EV71 may activate inflammasomes. Our current study demonstrates that the NLRP3 inflammasome plays a protective role against EV71 infection of mice in vivo. EV71 replication in myeloid cells results in the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and secretion of IL-1β. Conversely, EV71 counteracts inflammasome activation through cleavage of NLRP3 by viral proteases 2A and 3C, which cleave NLRP3 protein at the G493-L494 or Q225-G226 junction, respectively. Moreover, EV71 3C interacts with NLRP3 and inhibits IL-1β secretion when expressed in mammalian cells. These results thus reveal a set of reciprocal regulations between enterovirus 71 and the NLRP3 inflammasome.

  2. Mainstreaming domestic and gender-based violence into sociology and the criminology of violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walby, Sylvia; Towers, Jude; Francis, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Sociological and criminological views of domestic and gender-based violence generally either dismiss it as not worthy of consideration, or focus on specific groups of offenders and victims (male youth gangs, partner violence victims). In this paper, we take a holistic approach to violence, extending the definition from that commonly in use to encompass domestic violence and sexual violence. We operationalize that definition by using data from the latest sweep of the Crime Survey for England and Wales. By so doing, we identify that violence is currently under-measured and ubiquitous; that it is gendered, and that other forms of violence (family violence, acquaintance violence against women) are equally of concern. We argue that violence studies are an important form of activity for sociologists. PMID:25641992

  3. GENDER-BASED DIFFERENCES IN SCHOOL-AGED CHILDREN’S DIVERGENT THINKING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah Roue

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examines whether the shortage of females in science and engineering is linked to possible gender-based differences in school-aged children’s divergent thinking. Divergent thinking is a direct measure of creativity and an important characteristic in science and engineering. A survey instrument designed to measure divergent thinking was administered to 8th and 11th graders in a mid-western United States school district. Results showed that there were no difference between girls and boys on the three measures of divergent thinking: fluency, flexibility, and originality. These results indicate little reason as to why participation in science and engineering is male dominated, and support the notion that additional exposure to science and engineering through divergent-thinking activities will provide girls with the self-knowledge that they are capable of solving open-ended problems and engineering tasks.

  4. Rural teachers' views: What are gender-based challenges facing Free Primary Education in Lesotho?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pholoho Morojele

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives prominence to rural teachers' accounts of gender-based challenges facing Free Primary Education in Lesotho. It draws on feminist interpretations of social constructionism to discuss factors within the Basotho communities that affect gender equality in the schools. The inductive analysis offered makes use of the data generated from semi-structured interviews with 12 teachers in three primary schools. Basotho culture, superstitious symbolism, and family dynamics are found to be some of the factors that reinforce inequitable gender relations. The findings indicate how teachers exploited these factors to promote the polarisation of gender qualities, and to exalt masculinities at the expense of femininities. The paper argues for the promotion of counter-hegemonic discourses of gender, with an emphasis on conceptions of gender as multiple and fluid human qualities. It explains how paying attention to the cultural architecture of gender formations in localised contexts could become an effective strategy in promoting gender equality in schools.

  5. The role of mental health in primary prevention of sexual and gender-based violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevers, Aník; Dartnall, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    In this short communication, we assert that mental health has a crucial role in the primary prevention of sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV). However, we found that most research and practice to date has focused on the role of mental health post-violence, and SGBV primary prevention is relying on public health models that do not explicitly include mental health. Yet, key concepts, processes, and competencies in the mental health field appear essential to successful SGBV primary prevention. For example, empathy, self-esteem, compassion, emotional regulation and resilience, stress management, relationship building, and challenging problematic social norms are crucial. Furthermore, competencies such as rapport building, group processing, emotional nurturing, modelling, and the prevention of vicarious trauma among staff are important for the successful implementation of SGBV primary prevention programmes. SGBV primary prevention work would benefit from increased collaboration with mental health professionals and integration of key mental health concepts, processes, and skills in SGBV research.

  6. Mainstreaming domestic and gender-based violence into sociology and the criminology of violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walby, Sylvia; Towers, Jude; Francis, Brian

    2014-12-01

    Sociological and criminological views of domestic and gender-based violence generally either dismiss it as not worthy of consideration, or focus on specific groups of offenders and victims (male youth gangs, partner violence victims). In this paper, we take a holistic approach to violence, extending the definition from that commonly in use to encompass domestic violence and sexual violence. We operationalize that definition by using data from the latest sweep of the Crime Survey for England and Wales. By so doing, we identify that violence is currently under-measured and ubiquitous; that it is gendered, and that other forms of violence (family violence, acquaintance violence against women) are equally of concern. We argue that violence studies are an important form of activity for sociologists.

  7. Gender-Based Violence: The Romanian Public Agenda and its Missing Points

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Badea

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The current article examines recent trends in the development of public policies addressing gender- based violence in Romania. By undertaking an analysis of the legal and institutional framework from a gender perspective, we seek to understand how and if the new developments have the potential to promote women’s rights and actively support gender equality. As a contextual reading is key to understanding the current dynamics, specific references to the Romanian background will be made along the way. While recent legal progress in this area could indicate a promising perspective, our article will point out the inconsistencies and missing points of current policies, inviting to a cautious and vigilant approach. Potential avenues for improvements, as well as key challenges in how we address violence against women will briefly be discussed.

  8. Engaging the Voice of Patients Affected by Gender-Based Violence: Informing Practice and Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis-O'Connor, Annie; Chadwick, Mardi

    2015-01-01

    Evidence regarding the benefits, opportunities, and risks associated with providing health care to patients experiencing gender-based violence (GBV) and, moreover, their satisfaction with health care services is sparse. Using a patient- and trauma-informed relationship-based framework, survivors of GBV who were referred for follow-up care were asked to participate in a quality improvement (QI) initiative in an effort to understand their perspectives of receiving healthcare services. Patients were asked to answer three open-ended questions in regard to their healthcare experience. Individuals who were eligible for evidence collection after sexual assault (sexually assaulted should have evidence collected. More extensive research and program evaluation including outcomes research are warranted.

  9. The role of mental health in primary prevention of sexual and gender-based violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aník Gevers

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this short communication, we assert that mental health has a crucial role in the primary prevention of sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV. However, we found that most research and practice to date has focused on the role of mental health post-violence, and SGBV primary prevention is relying on public health models that do not explicitly include mental health. Yet, key concepts, processes, and competencies in the mental health field appear essential to successful SGBV primary prevention. For example, empathy, self-esteem, compassion, emotional regulation and resilience, stress management, relationship building, and challenging problematic social norms are crucial. Furthermore, competencies such as rapport building, group processing, emotional nurturing, modelling, and the prevention of vicarious trauma among staff are important for the successful implementation of SGBV primary prevention programmes. SGBV primary prevention work would benefit from increased collaboration with mental health professionals and integration of key mental health concepts, processes, and skills in SGBV research.

  10. Barriers and Facilitators to Engaging Communities in Gender-Based Violence Prevention following a Natural Disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloand, Elizabeth; Killion, Cheryl; Gary, Faye A; Dennis, Betty; Glass, Nancy; Hassan, Mona; Campbell, Doris W; Callwood, Gloria B

    2015-11-01

    Humanitarian workers in disaster settings report a dramatic increase in gender-based violence (GBV). This was true after the 2010 Haiti earthquake when women and girls lost the relative security of their homes and families. Researchers from the United States Virgin Islands and the United States mainland responded by collaborating with Haitian colleagues to develop GBV-focused strategies. To start, the research team performed a situational analysis to insure that the project was culturally, ethically, and logistically appropriate. The aim of this paper is to describe how the situational analysis framework helped the researchers effectively approach this community. Using post-earthquake Haiti as an exemplar, we identify key steps, barriers, and facilitators to undertaking a situational analysis. Barriers included logistics, infrastructure, language and community factors. Facilitators included established experts, organizations and agencies. Researchers in such circumstances need to be respectful of community members as experts and patient with local environmental and cultural conditions.

  11. A reciprocidade nos contratos: uma análise expressivista Contractual reciprocity: an expressivist analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Martins Zanitelli

    2011-06-01

    suas decisões. o artigo foi organizado da seguinte maneira. após a introdução, que contém breves notas sobre o expressivismo jurídico, a parte II oferece uma definição geral e algumas concepções mais precisas acerca da reciprocidade nos contratos. em relação a cada uma dessas concepções, referem-se algumas dificuldades ou inconvenientes, ligados, sobretudo, à tentativa de fazer valer a reciprocidade por meio de restrições à eficácia legal de contratos espontaneamente celebrados. a parte III é dedicada às duas formas de análise da expressão legal do valor da reciprocidade, correspondentes às duas formas de expressivismo antes referidas; trata, portanto, a uma, de definir por que a expressão em lei do valor da reciprocidade nos contratos é intrinsecamente importante e, a duas, de aventar que consequáncias essa expressão pode ter - com especial atenção, no último caso, à eventual influáncia que o acréscimo simbólico do valor da reciprocidade à legislação contratual pode exercer sobre as razões de agir dos contratantes. na parte IV, comparam-se duas maneiras pelas quais o valor da reciprocidade pode ser expresso na legislação: uma, abstrata, pela qual a reciprocidade seja proclamada sem que se faça alusão a uma concepção mais precisa sobre aquilo em que a reciprocidade consiste, e outra, concreta, na qual transpareça uma determinada concepção de reciprocidade ou uma particular demanda para a manutenção da reciprocidade em certos contratos. a parte V conclui o artigo com algumas sugestões para a pesquisa futura.This paper tries to establish why the law of contracts should express the value of reciprocity. Although scholars have intensively discussed equality in exchange and the prohibition of unfair terms in contracts, few attention has been paid to the questions of knowing if and why it matters that the value of reciprocity be incorporated to the expressive content of contract law, that is, that the law, through the

  12. Reciprocity on the hardwood: passing patterns among professional basketball players.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robb Willer

    Full Text Available Past theory and research view reciprocal resource sharing as a fundamental building block of human societies. Most studies of reciprocity dynamics have focused on trading among individuals in laboratory settings. But if motivations to engage in these patterns of resource sharing are powerful, then we should observe forms of reciprocity even in highly structured group environments in which reciprocity does not clearly serve individual or group interests. To this end, we investigated whether patterns of reciprocity might emerge among teammates in professional basketball games. Using data from logs of National Basketball Association (NBA games of the 2008-9 season, we estimated a series of conditional logistic regression models to test the impact of different factors on the probability that a given player would assist another player in scoring a basket. Our analysis found evidence for a direct reciprocity effect in which players who had "received" assists in the past tended to subsequently reciprocate their benefactors. Further, this tendency was time-dependent, with the probability of repayment highest soon after receiving an assist and declining as game time passed. We found no evidence for generalized reciprocity - a tendency to "pay forward" assists - and only very limited evidence for indirect reciprocity - a tendency to reward players who had sent others many assists. These findings highlight the power of reciprocity to shape human behavior, even in a setting characterized by extensive planning, division of labor, quick decision-making, and a focus on inter-group competition.

  13. Reinforcement learning account of network reciprocity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Ezaki

    Full Text Available Evolutionary game theory predicts that cooperation in social dilemma games is promoted when agents are connected as a network. However, when networks are fixed over time, humans do not necessarily show enhanced mutual cooperation. Here we show that reinforcement learning (specifically, the so-called Bush-Mosteller model approximately explains the experimentally observed network reciprocity and the lack thereof in a parameter region spanned by the benefit-to-cost ratio and the node's degree. Thus, we significantly extend previously obtained numerical results.

  14. Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang-Xia Wang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The miR-15/107 family comprises a group of 10 paralogous microRNAs (miRNAs, sharing a 5′ AGCAGC sequence. These miRNAs have overlapping targets. In order to characterize the expression of miR-15/107 family miRNAs, we employed customized TaqMan Low-Density micro-fluid PCR-array to investigate the expression of miR-15/107 family members, and other selected miRNAs, in 11 human tissues obtained at autopsy including the cerebral cortex, frontal cortex, primary visual cortex, thalamus, heart, lung, liver, kidney, spleen, stomach and skeletal muscle. miR-103, miR-195 and miR-497 were expressed at similar levels across various tissues, whereas miR-107 is enriched in brain samples. We also examined the expression patterns of evolutionarily conserved miR-15/107 miRNAs in three distinct primary rat brain cell preparations (enriched for cortical neurons, astrocytes and microglia, respectively. In primary cultures of rat brain cells, several members of the miR-15/107 family are enriched in neurons compared to other cell types in the central nervous system (CNS. In addition to mature miRNAs, we also examined the expression of precursors (pri-miRNAs. Our data suggested a generally poor correlation between the expression of mature miRNAs and their precursors. In summary, we provide a detailed study of the tissue and cell type-specific expression profile of this highly expressed and phylogenetically conserved family of miRNA genes.

  15. Reciprocal translocations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae formed by nonhomologous end joining.

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Xin; Gabriel, Abram

    2004-01-01

    Reciprocal translocations are common in cancer cells, but their creation is poorly understood. We have developed an assay system in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to study reciprocal translocation formation in the absence of homology. We induce two specific double-strand breaks (DSBs) simultaneously on separate chromosomes with HO endonuclease and analyze the subsequent chromosomal rearrangements among surviving cells. Under these conditions, reciprocal translocations via nonhomologous end joining ...

  16. Intention-Based Reciprocity and the Hidden Costs of Control

    OpenAIRE

    Ferdinand von Siemens

    2011-01-01

    Empirical research suggests that - rather than improving incentives - exerting control can reduce workers' performance by eroding motivation. The present paper shows that intention-based reciprocity can cause such motivational crowding-out if individuals differ in their propensity for reciprocity and preferences are private information. Not being controlled might then be considered to be kind, because not everybody reciprocates not being controlled with high effort. This argument stands in co...

  17. Neural correlate of human reciprocity in social interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiro eSakaiya

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Reciprocity plays a key role maintaining cooperation in society. However, little is known about the neural process that underpins human reciprocity during social interactions. Our neuroimaging study manipulated partner identity (computer, human and strategy (random, tit-for-tat in repeated prisoner’s dilemma games and investigated the neural correlate of reciprocal interaction with humans. Reciprocal cooperation with humans but exploitation of computers by defection was associated with activation in the left amygdala. Amygdala activation was also positively and negatively correlated with a preference change for human partners following tit-for-tat and random strategies, respectively. The correlated activation represented the intensity of positive feeling toward reciprocal and negative feeling toward non-reciprocal partners, and so reflected reciprocity in social interaction. Reciprocity in social interaction, however, might plausibly be misinterpreted and so we also examined the neural coding of insight into the reciprocity of partners. Those with and without insight revealed differential brain activation across the reward-related circuitry (i.e., the right middle dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and dorsal caudate and theory of mind (ToM regions (i.e., ventromedial prefrontal cortex [VMPFC] and precuneus. Among differential activations, activation in the precuneus, which accompanied deactivation of the VMPFC, was specific to those without insight into human partners who were engaged in a tit-for-tat strategy. This asymmetric (deactivation might involve specific contributions of ToM regions to the human search for reciprocity. Consequently, the intensity of emotion attached to human reciprocity was represented in the amygdala, whereas insight into the reciprocity of others was reflected in activation across the reward-related and ToM regions. This suggests the critical role of mentalizing, which was not equated with reward expectation during

  18. Acoustic reciprocity: An extension to spherical harmonics domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samarasinghe, Prasanga; Abhayapala, Thushara D; Kellermann, Walter

    2017-10-01

    Acoustic reciprocity is a fundamental property of acoustic wavefields that is commonly used to simplify the measurement process of many practical applications. Traditionally, the reciprocity theorem is defined between a monopole point source and a point receiver. Intuitively, it must apply to more complex transducers than monopoles. In this paper, the authors formulate the acoustic reciprocity theory in the spherical harmonics domain for directional sources and directional receivers with higher order directivity patterns.

  19. Neural correlate of human reciprocity in social interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaiya, Shiro; Shiraito, Yuki; Kato, Junko; Ide, Hiroko; Okada, Kensuke; Takano, Kouji; Kansaku, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Reciprocity plays a key role maintaining cooperation in society. However, little is known about the neural process that underpins human reciprocity during social interactions. Our neuroimaging study manipulated partner identity (computer, human) and strategy (random, tit-for-tat) in repeated prisoner's dilemma games and investigated the neural correlate of reciprocal interaction with humans. Reciprocal cooperation with humans but exploitation of computers by defection was associated with activation in the left amygdala. Amygdala activation was also positively and negatively correlated with a preference change for human partners following tit-for-tat and random strategies, respectively. The correlated activation represented the intensity of positive feeling toward reciprocal and negative feeling toward non-reciprocal partners, and so reflected reciprocity in social interaction. Reciprocity in social interaction, however, might plausibly be misinterpreted and so we also examined the neural coding of insight into the reciprocity of partners. Those with and without insight revealed differential brain activation across the reward-related circuitry (i.e., the right middle dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and dorsal caudate) and theory of mind (ToM) regions [i.e., ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC) and precuneus]. Among differential activations, activation in the precuneus, which accompanied deactivation of the VMPFC, was specific to those without insight into human partners who were engaged in a tit-for-tat strategy. This asymmetric (de)activation might involve specific contributions of ToM regions to the human search for reciprocity. Consequently, the intensity of emotion attached to human reciprocity was represented in the amygdala, whereas insight into the reciprocity of others was reflected in activation across the reward-related and ToM regions. This suggests the critical role of mentalizing, which was not equated with reward expectation during social interactions.

  20. Alternative energy efficient membrane bioreactor using reciprocating submerged membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, J; Smith, S; Roh, H K

    2014-01-01

    A novel membrane bioreactor (MBR) pilot system, using membrane reciprocation instead of air scouring, was operated at constant high flux and daily fluctuating flux to demonstrate its application under peak and diurnal flow conditions. Low and stable transmembrane pressure was achieved at 40 l/m(2)/h (LMH) by use of repetitive membrane reciprocation. The results reveal that the inertial forces acting on the membrane fibers effectively propel foulants from the membrane surface. Reciprocation of the hollow fiber membrane is beneficial for the constant removal of solids that may build up on the membrane surface and inside the membrane bundle. The membrane reciprocation in the reciprocating MBR pilot consumed less energy than coarse air scouring used in conventional MBR systems. Specific energy consumption for the membrane reciprocation was 0.072 kWh/m(3) permeate produced at 40 LMH flux, which is 75% less than for a conventional air scouring system as reported in literature without consideration of energy consumption for biological aeration (0.29 kWh/m(3)). The daily fluctuating flux test confirmed that the membrane reciprocation is effective to handle fluctuating flux up to 50 LMH. The pilot-scale reciprocating MBR system successfully demonstrated that fouling can be controlled via 0.43 Hz membrane reciprocation with 44 mm or higher amplitude.

  1. Advanced Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines(s)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zurlo, James [Dresser, Inc., Addison, TX (United States)

    2012-04-05

    The ARES program was initiated in 2001 to improve the overall brake thermal efficiency of stationary, natural gas, reciprocating engines. The ARES program is a joint award that is shared by Dresser, Inc., Caterpillar and Cummins. The ARES program was divided into three phases; ARES I (achieve 44% BTE), ARES II (achieve 47% BTE) and ARES III (achieve 50% BTE). Dresser, Inc. completed ARES I in March 2005 which resulted in the commercialization of the APG1000 product line. ARES II activities were completed in September 2010 and the technology developed is currently being integrated into products. ARES III activities began in October 2010. The ARES program goal is to improve the efficiency of natural gas reciprocating engines. The ARES project is structured in three phases with higher efficiency goals in each phase. The ARES objectives are as follows: 1. Achieve 44% (ARES I), 47% (ARES II), and 50% brake thermal efficiency (BTE) as a final ARES III objective 2. Achieve 0.1 g/bhp-hr NOx emissions (with after-treatment) 3. Reduce the cost of the produced electricity by 10% 4. Improve or maintain reliability, durability and maintenance costs

  2. Feminist Interventions for Southeast Asian Women Trauma Survivors: Deconstructing Gender-Based Violence and Developing Structures of Peace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norsworthy, Kathryn L.

    An analysis of structural and institutional violence against women in three cultures in Southeast Asia, Thailand, Cambodia, and among refugees of Burma, was generated by groups of women and men from these countries. Group members also discussed strategies for transforming systems supporting gender-based violence into structures of peace and…

  3. Gender-Based Violence: Young Women's Experiences in the Slums and Streets of Three Sub-Saharan African Cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oduro, Georgina Yaa; Swartz, Sharlene; Arnot, Madeleine

    2012-01-01

    Using a social ecological approach (Bronfenbrenner) to violence and including Hobsbawm's historical analysis of the collective uses of violence, this article shows how gender-based violence is experienced and used. Drawing on three distinct studies in Ghana, Kenya and South Africa, it shows the commonalities and divergence of young people's…

  4. Doorways II: Community Counselor Reference Materials. On School-Related Gender-Based Violence Prevention and Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Doorways training program was designed by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID)-funded Safe Schools Program (Safe Schools) to enable teachers, community members and students to prevent and respond to school-related gender-based violence (SRGBV). This booklet, "Doorways II: Community Counselor Reference Materials on…

  5. Creating Programs for Safe Schools: Opportunities and Challenges in Relation to Gender-Based Violence in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlamleli, Olly; Mabelane, Pontsho; Napo, Vernet; Sibiya, Ntombi; Free, Valerie

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on the problem of gender-based violence and sexual harassment in South African schools. Describes South African Departments of Education strategies and initiatives used to change attitudes and behaviors. Explores the role of the National Department of Education, teachers, students, and school policy. (CMK)

  6. Doorways II: Community Counselor Training Manual on School-Related Gender-Based Violence Prevention and Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Doorways training program was designed by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID)-funded Safe Schools Program (Safe Schools) to enable teachers, community members and students to prevent and respond to school-related gender-based violence (SRGBV). Doorways II was designed for community counselors to prevent and respond to…

  7. An Examination of Strategies for the Prevention of Gender-Based Violence at Four-Year Institutions of Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafonek, Katherine; Richards, Tara N.

    2017-01-01

    Although gender-based violence prevention programs at institutions of higher education (IHEs) are mandated by federal legislation, research focusing on the prevalence or content of programming is limited. The present exploratory research examines campus websites for a nationally representative sample of Title IX eligible IHEs that offer at least a…

  8. Gender-based differences and menstrual cycle-related changes in specific diseases: implications for pharmacotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensom, M H

    2000-05-01

    Pharmacists should be aware of gender-based differences and menstrual cycle-related changes in six diseases: asthma, arthritis, migraine, diabetes, depression, and epilepsy. In general, women report symptoms of physical illness at higher rates, visit physicians more frequently, and make greater use of other health care services than men. Whereas reasons for these gender differences are not fully clear, a combination of biologic, physiologic, social, behavioral, psychologic, and cultural factors most likely contributes. A significant percentage of women with asthma, arthritis, migraine, diabetes, depression, or epilepsy experience worsening of their disease premenstrually. The mechanism is unknown, but is speculated to be multifactorial because of many endogenous and exogenous modulators and mediators of each disease. As part of general therapy for cycle-related exacerbations of any one of these disorders, patients should be encouraged to use a menstrual calendar to track signs and symptoms for two to three cycles; if cyclic trends are identified, the women should anticipate exacerbations and avoid triggering factors. Cyclic modulation with pharmacotherapy may be attempted. If unsuccessful, a trial of medical ovulation suppression with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analog may be warranted. If that is successful, continuous therapy with a GnRH analog and steroid add-back therapy or less expensive alternatives may be effective. If pharmacotherapy is impractical, hysterectomy and bilateral oophorectomy with estrogen replacement therapy is a last resort. Gender differences and menstrual cycle-related changes are important areas for clinical and mechanistic research.

  9. Improving Medical Education Using a Sex- and Gender-Based Medicine Lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojek, Mary K; Jenkins, Marjorie R

    2016-10-01

    Sex- and Gender-Based Medicine (SGBM) is an emerging discipline within healthcare research, education, and practice. It addresses both the similarities and differences in men and women and it considers both biological and sociocultural factors that impact on the health of all individuals. On a basic level, sex refers to biology and gender refers to sociocultural factors. SGBM emerged after a body of knowledge had been established about health differences between women and men. However, these differences are not consistently considered and misperceptions are propagated when translations from the bench to the bedside are based on a predominantly one-sex model. Medical curricula are not yet integrating the evidence of sex and gender across students' educational experiences. We propose adopting a sex and gender lens to enable physicians and students to critically examine the scientific evidence and assess its applicability to specific patients. A Sex and Gender Medical Education Summit was held in 2015 to create a roadmap for integrating SGBM into medical education. We present examples that led to successful integration of SGBM in U.S. medical schools, as well as resources for medical educators and researchers, so that the health of both women and men can be positively impacted.

  10. Analysis of gender based differences in auditory evoked potentials among healthy elderly population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharat Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Influence of gender on auditory evoked potentials is contentious. Although there are quite a few studies documenting the gender as an influencing factor on auditory evoked potentials in younger subjects, but there is a lack of similar studies among elderly population. The present study was conducted to find out the pattern of gender based differences in auditory evoked potentials among healthy elderly subjects. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on age matched, healthy males (n = 35 and females (n = 34, aged 50-70 years. The measures included latencies of waves I-V and interpeak latencies (IPL I-III, III-V and I-V separately for both ears. Data was analyzed statistically using Students unpaired t-test, using Statistical Package for Social Sciences software v13.0. Results: The values of all the latencies and IPL for both the ears were non-significantly higher (P > 0.05 in males as compared to females. These results may be attributed to the differences in head circumference between both the genders and to the changed hormonal milieu of sex hormones after menopause. Conclusions: Statistical insignificance of latencies among male and female elderly subjects excludes gender as an influencing factor on auditory evoked potentials in this age group.

  11. Gender-based violence and absent fathers: a scoping review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikweyiya, Yandisa; Nduna, Mzikazi; Khuzwayo, Nelisiwe; Mthombeni, Andile; Mashamba-Thompson, Tivani Phosa

    2016-06-13

    Gender-based violence (GBV) and absent fathers are two epidemics that affect women and children in sub-Saharan Africa. However, the understanding of the complex links between GBV and absent fathers is currently inadequate. The aim of the study is to provide an overview of documented evidence that links GBV and absent fathers as well as identifies areas that require systematic review and where more primary research is needed. The search strategy for this scoping review study will involve electronic databases including: Academic Search Premier, Ingenta, Kluwer Online, PsycARTICLES (EBSCO), PsycINFO (EBSCO), Social Work Abstracts and Sociological Collection. The studies will be mapped in 2 stages: stage 1 will map studies descriptively by focus and method; stage 2 will involve additional inclusion criteria, quality assessment and data extraction undertaken by two reviewers in parallel. A thematic analysis of the studies will be carried out to extract relevant outcomes using NVIVO. We anticipate finding a large number of studies on GBV diagnostic interventions in sub-Saharan Africa which, once summarised, will be useful to guide future research. The protocol for the scoping review has been registered in PROSPERO. The study will be disseminated electronically and in print. It will also be presented to conferences related to GBV, Father Connections and Children's Health. CRD42015022094. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  12. Gender-based differences in the functional deformation of the foot longitudinal arch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukano, Mako; Fukubayashi, Toru

    2012-03-01

    Gender differences in physical characteristics are associated with differing incidences of sports-related injuries. However, functional differences in the foot arch, which acts as a shock absorber under dynamic conditions, have not been investigated. This study investigated gender-based differences in the medial and lateral longitudinal arches under static and dynamic conditions. Eleven males and 8 females participated in this study. Radiographic images of the subjects' feet were obtained under static conditions, with and without weight bearing. In addition, each subject performed single leg landing from 10cm platform with the knee extended, and cineangiographic images in the sagittal plane were obtained during landing. In the weight bearing position, the medial and lateral arch angles of the females were significantly greater than those of the males, but neither of the angles differed between the males and females without weight bearing. The magnitude of the angular changes of each arch was significantly greater in the females than in the males. These results suggest that females have a greater range of arch motion than males under static and dynamic loading conditions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Evaluation of a gender-based violence prevention program for student athletes in Mumbai, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Elizabeth; Das, Madhumita; Tancredi, Daniel J; McCauley, Heather L; Virata, Maria Catrina D; Nettiksimmons, Jasmine; O'Connor, Brian; Ghosh, Sancheeta; Verma, Ravi

    2014-03-01

    Gender-based violence, which includes sexual and intimate partner violence against women, is prevalent worldwide, prompting calls for primary prevention programs which engage men and boys in changing social norms that condone violence against women. Bystander intervention efforts which encourage males to say something to stop peers from enacting disrespectful and abusive behaviors toward females are a promising strategy for promoting non-violent, gender-equitable attitudes and behaviors. An evaluation of "Parivartan"--a U.S. program called "Coaching Boys Into Men" adapted for urban India cricket teams--was conducted in Mumbai, India. Baseline and 12 month follow-up surveys were administered to 309 male cricket athletes aged 10 to 16 years in 46 urban middle schools in Mumbai, India (27 intervention, 19 control). Athletes whose coaches were trained in the program demonstrated greater improvements in gender-equitable attitudes compared to athletes whose coaches provided standard coaching only. Marginally significant improvements were seen in reduction of negative bystander behavior. Violence prevention programs which utilize coaches as positive messengers for respect and non-violence may be a useful addition to global prevention efforts to reduce violence against women.

  14. Human rights of refugee-survivors of sexual and gender-based violence with communication disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Julie; Barrett, Helen

    2018-02-01

    Article 19 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (United Nations, 1948 ) states that all people have the right to seek, receive and impart information using any means. Ensuring that people with communication disability achieve this right is inherently challenging. For people with communication disability, who are refugee-survivors of sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV), additional human rights are challenged, including the right to education, protection from discrimination, a safe place to live, security of person and legal protection. Their experiences and needs, however, are poorly understood. This paper reports on a literature review of the intersectionality between SGBV, being a refugee and having a communication disability, and a preliminary investigation of the situation of refugee-survivors of SGBV with communication disability, in Rwanda. The project involved 54 participants, including 50 humanitarian and partner organisation staff and four carers of refugees with communication disabilities, from two locations (camp-based and urban refugees). Findings from both revealed that, for people with communication disability, barriers are likely to occur at each step of preventing and responding to SGBV. Moreover, stigmatisation of people with communication disability challenges SGBV prevention/support and people with communication disability may be targeted by SGBV perpetrators. SGBV service providers acknowledge their lack of knowledge and skills about communication disability, but wish to learn. Findings highlight the need for increased knowledge and skill development, in order to improve the situation for refugee-survivors of SGBV with communication disability.

  15. Gender-based violence and absent fathers: a scoping review protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikweyiya, Yandisa; Nduna, Mzikazi; Khuzwayo, Nelisiwe; Mthombeni, Andile; Mashamba-Thompson, Tivani Phosa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Gender-based violence (GBV) and absent fathers are two epidemics that affect women and children in sub-Saharan Africa. However, the understanding of the complex links between GBV and absent fathers is currently inadequate. The aim of the study is to provide an overview of documented evidence that links GBV and absent fathers as well as identifies areas that require systematic review and where more primary research is needed. Methods and analysis The search strategy for this scoping review study will involve electronic databases including: Academic Search Premier, Ingenta, Kluwer Online, PsycARTICLES (EBSCO), PsycINFO (EBSCO), Social Work Abstracts and Sociological Collection. The studies will be mapped in 2 stages: stage 1 will map studies descriptively by focus and method; stage 2 will involve additional inclusion criteria, quality assessment and data extraction undertaken by two reviewers in parallel. A thematic analysis of the studies will be carried out to extract relevant outcomes using NVIVO. Discussion We anticipate finding a large number of studies on GBV diagnostic interventions in sub-Saharan Africa which, once summarised, will be useful to guide future research. The protocol for the scoping review has been registered in PROSPERO. Dissemination The study will be disseminated electronically and in print. It will also be presented to conferences related to GBV, Father Connections and Children's Health. PROSPERO registration number CRD42015022094. PMID:27297007

  16. Static And Kinematic Formulation Of Planar Reciprocal Assemblies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parigi, Dario; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2013-01-01

    Planar reciprocal frames are two dimensional structures formed by elements joined together according to the principle of structural reciprocity. In this paper a rigorous formulation of the static and kinematic problem is proposed and developed by extending the work on pin-jointed assemblies...

  17. Apical extrusion of debris using reciprocating files and rotary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Procedure: Sixty extracted human mandibular premolars were used. The root canals were instrumented using reciprocating (WaveOne, Reciproc, SafeSider) or rotary ... and cross‑sections, and kinematics, and this situation may influence the amount of apically extruded debris through the apical foramen.[15]. The aim of this ...

  18. Static and kinematic formulation of planar reciprocal assemblies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parigi, Dario; Sassone, Mario; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2014-01-01

    Planar reciprocal frames are two dimensional structures formed by elements joined together according to the principle of structural reciprocity. In this paper a rigorous formulation of the static and kinematic problem is proposed and developed extending the theory of pin-jointed assemblies...

  19. Design and Fabrication of a Free-Form Reciprocal Roof

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parigi, Dario

    2015-01-01

    of relations between design parameters and a wide array of measurable performances. Due to the reciprocal structures geometric complexity, the shape generation process is handled using the Reciprocalizer, a software tool developed by the author that embeds in a computational environment the constructional...

  20. Strong reciprocity is not uncommon in the "wild".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runciman, W G

    2012-02-01

    Guala is right to draw attention to the difficulty of extrapolating from the experimental evidence for weak or strong reciprocity to what is observed in the "wild." However, there may be more strong reciprocity in real-world communities than he allows for, as strikingly illustrated in the example of the Mafia.

  1. Sex differences in the reciprocal behaviour of children with autism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Backer van Ommeren, Tineke; Koot, Hans M; Scheeren, Anke M; Begeer, Sander

    2017-01-01

    Differences in the social limitations of girls compared to boys on the autism spectrum are still poorly understood. Impaired social-emotional reciprocity is a core diagnostic criterion for an autism spectrum disorder. This study compares sex differences in reciprocal behaviour in children with

  2. Reciprocity, social ties, and competition in markets for experience goods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huck, Steffen; Tyran, Jean-Robert

    2007-01-01

    Reciprocal customers may disproportionately improve the performance of markets for experience goods. Reciprocal customers reward (punish) firms for providing good (bad) quality by upholding (terminating) the customer relation. This may induce firms to provide good quality which, in turn, may induce...

  3. Reciprocity in International Affairs: An Analysis of Nigeria/South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DrNneka

    2012-03-07

    Mar 7, 2012 ... It argued that the principle of reciprocity in international relations came to the fore in the row. The paper made the point ... Key Words: Reciprocity, International, Affairs, Diplomatic face-off, Nigeria, South. Africa. Introduction. In an increasingly ...... Public Law 3 (1), 105 – 111. Emewu, I. (2012). Nigeria, South ...

  4. Intention-based reciprocity and the hidden costs of control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    von Siemens, F.

    2011-01-01

    Empirical research suggests that - rather than improving incentives - exerting control can reduce workers' performance by eroding motivation. The present paper shows that intention-based reciprocity can cause such motivational crowding-out if individuals differ in their propensity for reciprocity

  5. Sex differences in the reciprocal behaviour of children with autism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Backer van Ommeren, Tineke; Koot, Hans M; Scheeren, Anke M; Begeer, Sander

    2016-01-01

    Differences in the social limitations of girls compared to boys on the autism spectrum are still poorly understood. Impaired social-emotional reciprocity is a core diagnostic criterion for an autism spectrum disorder. This study compares sex differences in reciprocal behaviour in children with

  6. Sex Differences in the Reciprocal Behaviour of Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backer van Ommeren, Tineke; Koot, Hans M.; Scheeren, Anke M.; Begeer, Sander

    2017-01-01

    Differences in the social limitations of girls compared to boys on the autism spectrum are still poorly understood. Impaired social-emotional reciprocity is a core diagnostic criterion for an autism spectrum disorder. This study compares sex differences in reciprocal behaviour in children with autism spectrum disorder (32 girls, 114 boys) and in…

  7. Instructional Guidance in Reciprocal Peer Tutoring With Task Cards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iserbyt, Peter; Elen, Jan; Behets, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    This article addresses the issue of instructional guidance in reciprocal peer tutoring with task cards as learning tools. Eighty-six Kinesiology students (age 17-19 years) were randomized across four reciprocal peer tutoring settings, differing in quality and quantity of guidance, to learn Basic Life Support (BLS) with task cards. The separate and…

  8. Reciprocal Relationships between Math Self-Concept and Math Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Wondimu; Minnaert, Alexander; Kuyper, Hans; van der Werf, Greetje

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined the reciprocal relationships between self-concept and anxiety in mathematics. A sample of 495 grade 7 students (51% girls) completed self-report measures assessing self-concept and anxiety three times in a school year. Structural equation modeling was used to test a cross-lagged panel model of reciprocal effects between…

  9. Reciprocal Pronouns Binding within Psych-Verb Constructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epoge, Napoleon

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims at giving an analysis of certain syntactic peculiarities of reciprocal pronouns within verbs of psychological state, commonly known as psych-verbs. The analysis reveal that psych-verbs constructions have a peculiar property in that the binding conditions of reciprocal pronouns are satisfied in Experiencer-Subject (ES) psychverbs…

  10. Thermal Powered Reciprocating-Force Motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatum, III, Paul F. (Inventor); McDow Elliott, Amelia (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A thermal-powered reciprocating-force motor includes a shutter switchable between a first position that passes solar energy and a second position that blocks solar energy. A shape memory alloy (SMA) actuator is coupled to the shutter to control switching thereof between the shutter's first and second position. The actuator is positioned with respect to the shutter such that (1) solar energy impinges on the SMA when the shutter is in its first position so that the SMA experiences contraction in length until the shutter is switched to its second position, and (2) solar energy is impeded from impingement on the SMA when the shutter is in its second position so that the SMA experiences extension in length. Elastic members coupled to the actuator apply a force to the SMA that aids in its extension in length until the shutter is switched to its first position.

  11. Comprehensive model of a hermetic reciprocating compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, B.; Ziviani, D.; Groll, E. A.

    2017-08-01

    A comprehensive simulation model is presented to predict the performance of a hermetic reciprocating compressor and to reveal the underlying mechanisms when the compressor is running. The presented model is composed of sub-models simulating the in-cylinder compression process, piston ring/journal bearing frictional power loss, single phase induction motor and the overall compressor energy balance among different compressor components. The valve model, leakage through piston ring model and in-cylinder heat transfer model are also incorporated into the in-cylinder compression process model. A numerical algorithm solving the model is introduced. The predicted results of the compressor mass flow rate and input power consumption are compared to the published compressor map values. Future work will focus on detailed experimental validation of the model and parametric studies investigating the effects of structural parameters, including the stroke-to-bore ratio, on the compressor performance.

  12. Retrofitting reciprocating compressors for noise control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, L.; Qualfe, R.

    1992-01-01

    The Alberta Energy Resources Conservation Board recently enacted their noise control directive ID 88-1. The effects of this regulation on the operation of an oil and gas facility are discussed, and a specific case history is presented to provide a disciplined strategy for noise attenuation retrofits. An investigation was carried out into sound sources at a reciprocating compressor gas plant, revealing several sound sources: engine exhaust stacks, engine exhaust silencer shells, direct-drive fan cooler inlets, direct drive fan cooler outlets, aerial cooler inlets and aerial cooler outlets. Details are presented of the investigative techniques and order-ranking of sources by decibel level. When controlling engine exhaust noise, silencers or mufflers are the preferred treatment. Choice of type (reactive or absorptive) and specification of acoustical performance of a silencer are discussed. The gas plant achieved noise reductions of 6-13 dB, measured at affected residences, through the use of engine exhaust silencers. 4 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Sleep and exercise: a reciprocal issue?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chennaoui, Mounir; Arnal, Pierrick J; Sauvet, Fabien; Léger, Damien

    2015-04-01

    Sleep and exercise influence each other through complex, bilateral interactions that involve multiple physiological and psychological pathways. Physical activity is usually considered as beneficial in aiding sleep although this link may be subject to multiple moderating factors such as sex, age, fitness level, sleep quality and the characteristics of the exercise (intensity, duration, time of day, environment). It is therefore vital to improve knowledge in fundamental physiology in order to understand the benefits of exercise on the quantity and quality of sleep in healthy subjects and patients. Conversely, sleep disturbances could also impair a person's cognitive performance or their capacity for exercise and increase the risk of exercise-induced injuries either during extreme and/or prolonged exercise or during team sports. This review aims to describe the reciprocal fundamental physiological effects linking sleep and exercise in order to improve the pertinent use of exercise in sleep medicine and prevent sleep disorders in sportsmen. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Sex differences in the reciprocal behaviour of children with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backer van Ommeren, Tineke; Koot, Hans M; Scheeren, Anke M; Begeer, Sander

    2017-08-01

    Differences in the social limitations of girls compared to boys on the autism spectrum are still poorly understood. Impaired social-emotional reciprocity is a core diagnostic criterion for an autism spectrum disorder. This study compares sex differences in reciprocal behaviour in children with autism spectrum disorder (32 girls, 114 boys) and in typically developing children (24 girls, 55 boys). While children with autism spectrum disorder showed clear limitations in reciprocal behaviour compared to typically developing children, sex differences were found only in the autism spectrum disorder group: girls with autism spectrum disorder had higher reciprocity scores than boys with autism spectrum disorder. However, compared to typically developing girls, girls with autism spectrum disorder showed subtle differences in reciprocal behaviour. The sex-specific response patterns in autism spectrum disorder can inform and improve the diagnostic assessment of autism in females.

  15. High-Resolution Reciprocal Space Mapping for Characterizing Deformation Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pantleon, Wolfgang; Wejdemann, Christian; Jakobsen, Bo

    2014-01-01

    With high-angular resolution three-dimensional X-ray diffraction (3DXRD), quantitative information is gained about dislocation structures in individual grains in the bulk of a macroscopic specimen by acquiring reciprocal space maps. In high-resolution 3D reciprocal space maps of tensile-deformed ......With high-angular resolution three-dimensional X-ray diffraction (3DXRD), quantitative information is gained about dislocation structures in individual grains in the bulk of a macroscopic specimen by acquiring reciprocal space maps. In high-resolution 3D reciprocal space maps of tensile...... dynamics is followed in situ during varying loading conditions by reciprocal space mapping: during uninterrupted tensile deformation, formation of subgrains is observed concurrently with broadening of Bragg reflections shortly after the onset of plastic deformation. When the traction is terminated, stress...

  16. 76 FR 12923 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-09

    ... National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines... pollutants for existing stationary spark ignition reciprocating internal combustion engines. The final rule... reciprocating internal combustion generation, engine. transmission, or distribution. 622110 Medical and surgical...

  17. Factors Affecting Gender-based Experiences for Residents in Radiation Oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barry, Parul N., E-mail: pnbarr01@louisville.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Louisville, School of Medicine, Louisville, Kentucky (United States); Miller, Karen H.; Ziegler, Craig [Department of Graduate Medical Education, University of Louisville, School of Medicine, Louisville, Kentucky (United States); Hertz, Rosanna [Departments of Women' s and Gender Studies and Sociology, Wellesley College, Wellesley, Massachusetts (United States); Hanna, Nevine [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Utah, School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Dragun, Anthony E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Louisville, School of Medicine, Louisville, Kentucky (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Purpose: Although women constitute approximately half of medical school graduates, an uneven gender distribution exists among many specialties, including radiation oncology, where women fill only one third of residency positions. Although multiple social and societal factors have been theorized, a structured review of radiation oncology resident experiences has yet to be performed. Methods and Materials: An anonymous and voluntary survey was sent to 611 radiation oncology residents practicing in the United States. Residents were asked about their gender-based experiences in terms of mentorship, their professional and learning environment, and their partnerships and personal life. Results: A total of 203 participants submitted completed survey responses. Fifty-seven percent of respondents were men, and 43% were women, with a mean age of 31 years (standard deviation=3.7 years). Although residents in general value having a mentor, female residents prefer mentors of the same gender (P<.001), and noted having more difficulty finding a mentor (P=.042). Women were more likely to say that they have observed preferential treatment based on gender (P≤.001), and they were more likely to perceive gender-specific biases or obstacles in their professional and learning environment (P<.001). Women selected residency programs based on gender ratios (P<.001), and female residents preferred to see equal numbers of male and female faculty (P<.001). Women were also more likely to perceive work-related strain than their male counterparts (P<.001). Conclusions: Differences in experiences for male and female radiation oncology residents exist with regard to mentorship and in their professional and learning environment.

  18. Gender-based discrimination in South Africa: A quantitative analysis of fairness of remuneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renier Steyn

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Equity is important to most individuals and its perceived absence  may impact negatively on individual and organisational performance. The concept of equity presupposes fair treatment, while discrimination implies unfair treatment. The perceptions of discrimination, or being treated unfairly, may result from psycho-social processes, or from data that justifies discrimination and is quantifiable. Objectives: To assess whether differences in post grading and remuneration for males and females are based on gender, rather than on quantifiable variables that could justify these differences. Method: Biographical information was gathered from 1740 employees representing 29 organisations. The data collected included self-reported post grading (dependent variable and 14 independent variables, which may predict the employees’ post gradings. The independent variables related primarily to education, tenure and family responsibility. Results: Males reported higher post gradings and higher salaries than those of females, but the difference was not statistically significant and the practical significance of this difference was slight. Qualification types, job specific training, and membership of professional bodies did not affect post grading along gender lines. The ways in which work experience was measured had no influence on post grading or salary for either males or females. Furthermore, family responsibility, union membership and the type of work the employees performed did not influence the employees’ post grading. The only difference found concerned the unfair treatment of males, particularly those who were well-qualified.   Conclusions: Objective evidence of unfair gender-based discrimination affecting post grading and salary is scarce, and the few differences that do occur have little statistical and practical significance. Perceptions of being discriminated against may therefore more often be seen as the result of psycho-social processes and

  19. Sexual and Gender-Based Violence Attitudes and Experiences among Nine Sub-Saharan African Militaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nightingale, Vienna R; Tran, Bonnie R; Harbertson, Judith; Langa, Antonio; Grillo, Michael; Kalombo, Olivier; Thomas, Anne G

    2017-01-01

    While sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV) is recognized as an important factor driving the HIV epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa, attitudes toward and prevalence of SGBV within sub-Saharan African military populations are unknown. Data on SGBV were collected from military service members of nine sub-Saharan African militaries. Attitudes related to SGBV and characteristics of those who commit and experience SGBV are reported. Data for 8815 service members (8165 men and 650 women) aged 18 years or older who voluntarily participated in the Seroprevalence and Behavioral Epidemiology Risk Surveys from 2009 to 2014 were included in this secondary data analysis. Data were collected on demographics, HIV prevalence, SGBV attitudes, and experiences. Descriptive and bivariate statistical analyses were performed. 5% of men and 9% of women reported experiencing SGBV, and 6% of men reported they had ever committed SGBV. Men and women who had experienced SGBV were significantly more likely to agree with negative gender attitudes toward SGBV, and the majority of those who reported experiencing SGBV reported that SGBV was committed by someone outside of the military. This is the first study to examine SGBV in sub-Saharan military populations during periods of limited conflict. It provides evidence that SGBV is experienced by both male and female service members at rates not typically found in previous research examining SGBV in other military populations. A better understanding of SGBV in sub-Saharan military service members is necessary to ensure appropriate services and interventions are part of the military infrastructure. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  20. Factors Affecting Gender-based Experiences for Residents in Radiation Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barry, Parul N.; Miller, Karen H.; Ziegler, Craig; Hertz, Rosanna; Hanna, Nevine; Dragun, Anthony E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Although women constitute approximately half of medical school graduates, an uneven gender distribution exists among many specialties, including radiation oncology, where women fill only one third of residency positions. Although multiple social and societal factors have been theorized, a structured review of radiation oncology resident experiences has yet to be performed. Methods and Materials: An anonymous and voluntary survey was sent to 611 radiation oncology residents practicing in the United States. Residents were asked about their gender-based experiences in terms of mentorship, their professional and learning environment, and their partnerships and personal life. Results: A total of 203 participants submitted completed survey responses. Fifty-seven percent of respondents were men, and 43% were women, with a mean age of 31 years (standard deviation=3.7 years). Although residents in general value having a mentor, female residents prefer mentors of the same gender (P<.001), and noted having more difficulty finding a mentor (P=.042). Women were more likely to say that they have observed preferential treatment based on gender (P≤.001), and they were more likely to perceive gender-specific biases or obstacles in their professional and learning environment (P<.001). Women selected residency programs based on gender ratios (P<.001), and female residents preferred to see equal numbers of male and female faculty (P<.001). Women were also more likely to perceive work-related strain than their male counterparts (P<.001). Conclusions: Differences in experiences for male and female radiation oncology residents exist with regard to mentorship and in their professional and learning environment.

  1. Reciprocal modulation of cognitive and emotional aspects in pianistic performances.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia K Kodama Higuchi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: High level piano performance requires complex integration of perceptual, motor, cognitive and emotive skills. Observations in psychology and neuroscience studies have suggested reciprocal inhibitory modulation of the cognition by emotion and emotion by cognition. However, it is still unclear how cognitive states may influence the pianistic performance. The aim of the present study is to verify the influence of cognitive and affective attention in the piano performances. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Nine pianists were instructed to play the same piece of music, firstly focusing only on cognitive aspects of musical structure (cognitive performances, and secondly, paying attention solely on affective aspects (affective performances. Audio files from pianistic performances were examined using a computational model that retrieves nine specific musical features (descriptors--loudness, articulation, brightness, harmonic complexity, event detection, key clarity, mode detection, pulse clarity and repetition. In addition, the number of volunteers' errors in the recording sessions was counted. Comments from pianists about their thoughts during performances were also evaluated. The analyses of audio files throughout musical descriptors indicated that the affective performances have more: agogics, legatos, pianos phrasing, and less perception of event density when compared to the cognitive ones. Error analysis demonstrated that volunteers misplayed more left hand notes in the cognitive performances than in the affective ones. Volunteers also played more wrong notes in affective than in cognitive performances. These results correspond to the volunteers' comments that in the affective performances, the cognitive aspects of piano execution are inhibited, whereas in the cognitive performances, the expressiveness is inhibited. CONCLUSIONS: Therefore, the present results indicate that attention to the emotional aspects of performance enhances expressiveness

  2. Reciprocal modulation of cognitive and emotional aspects in pianistic performances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Marcia K Kodama; Fornari, José; Del Ben, Cristina M; Graeff, Frederico G; Leite, João Pereira

    2011-01-01

    High level piano performance requires complex integration of perceptual, motor, cognitive and emotive skills. Observations in psychology and neuroscience studies have suggested reciprocal inhibitory modulation of the cognition by emotion and emotion by cognition. However, it is still unclear how cognitive states may influence the pianistic performance. The aim of the present study is to verify the influence of cognitive and affective attention in the piano performances. Nine pianists were instructed to play the same piece of music, firstly focusing only on cognitive aspects of musical structure (cognitive performances), and secondly, paying attention solely on affective aspects (affective performances). Audio files from pianistic performances were examined using a computational model that retrieves nine specific musical features (descriptors)--loudness, articulation, brightness, harmonic complexity, event detection, key clarity, mode detection, pulse clarity and repetition. In addition, the number of volunteers' errors in the recording sessions was counted. Comments from pianists about their thoughts during performances were also evaluated. The analyses of audio files throughout musical descriptors indicated that the affective performances have more: agogics, legatos, pianos phrasing, and less perception of event density when compared to the cognitive ones. Error analysis demonstrated that volunteers misplayed more left hand notes in the cognitive performances than in the affective ones. Volunteers also played more wrong notes in affective than in cognitive performances. These results correspond to the volunteers' comments that in the affective performances, the cognitive aspects of piano execution are inhibited, whereas in the cognitive performances, the expressiveness is inhibited. Therefore, the present results indicate that attention to the emotional aspects of performance enhances expressiveness, but constrains cognitive and motor skills in the piano execution

  3. Reciprocal Modulation of Cognitive and Emotional Aspects in Pianistic Performances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Marcia K. Kodama; Fornari, José; Del Ben, Cristina M.; Graeff, Frederico G.; Leite, João Pereira

    2011-01-01

    Background High level piano performance requires complex integration of perceptual, motor, cognitive and emotive skills. Observations in psychology and neuroscience studies have suggested reciprocal inhibitory modulation of the cognition by emotion and emotion by cognition. However, it is still unclear how cognitive states may influence the pianistic performance. The aim of the present study is to verify the influence of cognitive and affective attention in the piano performances. Methods and Findings Nine pianists were instructed to play the same piece of music, firstly focusing only on cognitive aspects of musical structure (cognitive performances), and secondly, paying attention solely on affective aspects (affective performances). Audio files from pianistic performances were examined using a computational model that retrieves nine specific musical features (descriptors) – loudness, articulation, brightness, harmonic complexity, event detection, key clarity, mode detection, pulse clarity and repetition. In addition, the number of volunteers' errors in the recording sessions was counted. Comments from pianists about their thoughts during performances were also evaluated. The analyses of audio files throughout musical descriptors indicated that the affective performances have more: agogics, legatos, pianos phrasing, and less perception of event density when compared to the cognitive ones. Error analysis demonstrated that volunteers misplayed more left hand notes in the cognitive performances than in the affective ones. Volunteers also played more wrong notes in affective than in cognitive performances. These results correspond to the volunteers' comments that in the affective performances, the cognitive aspects of piano execution are inhibited, whereas in the cognitive performances, the expressiveness is inhibited. Conclusions Therefore, the present results indicate that attention to the emotional aspects of performance enhances expressiveness, but constrains

  4. Conspiracy of Silence. The Loneliness of Victims of Gender-Based Peer Violence in Polish Junior High Schools. Research Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwona Chmura-Rutkowska

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This research report is an integral part of a larger research project focused on analyzing peer violence which is driven by gender stereotypes and prejudices (including sexual harassment and which is experienced by female and male students of Polish junior high schools. The present qualitative research results are the effect of eight interviews and group discussions carried out in the first half of 2013. The interviewees and discussion participants were students of four different junior high schools in different towns and villages. The discussions focused on the following issues: girls' and boys' strategies of enduring, resisting or confronting gender-based violence and harassment; their reactions and coping mechanisms as victims and/or witnesses of gender-based violence or harassment; how adolescents perceived the roles of adults (that is teachers, parents, professionals in the their experiences of violence.

  5. Trust and reciprocity: are effort and money equivalent?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris Vilares

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Trust and reciprocity facilitate cooperation and are relevant to virtually all human interactions. They are typically studied using trust games: one subject gives (entrusts money to another subject, which may return some of the proceeds (reciprocate. Currently, however, it is unclear whether trust and reciprocity in monetary transactions are similar in other settings, such as physical effort. Trust and reciprocity of physical effort are important as many everyday decisions imply an exchange of physical effort, and such exchange is central to labor relations. Here we studied a trust game based on physical effort and compared the results with those of a computationally equivalent monetary trust game. We found no significant difference between effort and money conditions in both the amount trusted and the quantity reciprocated. Moreover, there is a high positive correlation in subjects' behavior across conditions. This suggests that trust and reciprocity may be character traits: subjects that are trustful/trustworthy in monetary settings behave similarly during exchanges of physical effort. Our results validate the use of trust games to study exchanges in physical effort and to characterize inter-subject differences in trust and reciprocity, and also suggest a new behavioral paradigm to study these differences.

  6. Trust and reciprocity: are effort and money equivalent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilares, Iris; Dam, Gregory; Kording, Konrad

    2011-02-25

    Trust and reciprocity facilitate cooperation and are relevant to virtually all human interactions. They are typically studied using trust games: one subject gives (entrusts) money to another subject, which may return some of the proceeds (reciprocate). Currently, however, it is unclear whether trust and reciprocity in monetary transactions are similar in other settings, such as physical effort. Trust and reciprocity of physical effort are important as many everyday decisions imply an exchange of physical effort, and such exchange is central to labor relations. Here we studied a trust game based on physical effort and compared the results with those of a computationally equivalent monetary trust game. We found no significant difference between effort and money conditions in both the amount trusted and the quantity reciprocated. Moreover, there is a high positive correlation in subjects' behavior across conditions. This suggests that trust and reciprocity may be character traits: subjects that are trustful/trustworthy in monetary settings behave similarly during exchanges of physical effort. Our results validate the use of trust games to study exchanges in physical effort and to characterize inter-subject differences in trust and reciprocity, and also suggest a new behavioral paradigm to study these differences.

  7. The Role of Friendship Reciprocity in University Freshmen's Alcohol Consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giese, Helge; Stok, F Marijn; Renner, Britta

    2017-07-01

    The similarity of friends in the frequency and quantity of alcohol consumption is explored. During their first semester, 57 psychology freshmen indicated weekly drinking frequency and quantity and nominated the three peers of this group they liked most. These nominations were then used to derive the weekly alcohol consumption of friends that either did or did not reciprocate a nomination. Multilevel modeling of weekly variations showed that individuals' drinking frequency was similar to peers who reciprocated a friendship (b = 0.15, p = .001), but not to non-reciprocating peers (b = -0.01, p = .720). In contrast, weekly variation in quantity of individual students' drinking was similar to both reciprocating (b = 0.11, p = .018) and non-reciprocating peers' drinking (b = 0.10, p = .014). Yet across all weeks, quantity tended only to be similar to non-reciprocating peers (b = 0.49, p = .020). Freshmen might spend drinking time with peers who reciprocate a friendship, but are similar regarding the quantity of drinks consumed to all people they find interesting. Thus, alcohol consumption is used strategically for social purposes. This social purpose should also be acknowledged in alcohol-reduction interventions. © 2017 The International Association of Applied Psychology.

  8. Clustering in large networks does not promote upstream reciprocity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Masuda

    Full Text Available Upstream reciprocity (also called generalized reciprocity is a putative mechanism for cooperation in social dilemma situations with which players help others when they are helped by somebody else. It is a type of indirect reciprocity. Although upstream reciprocity is often observed in experiments, most theories suggest that it is operative only when players form short cycles such as triangles, implying a small population size, or when it is combined with other mechanisms that promote cooperation on their own. An expectation is that real social networks, which are known to be full of triangles and other short cycles, may accommodate upstream reciprocity. In this study, I extend the upstream reciprocity game proposed for a directed cycle by Boyd and Richerson to the case of general networks. The model is not evolutionary and concerns the conditions under which the unanimity of cooperative players is a Nash equilibrium. I show that an abundance of triangles or other short cycles in a network does little to promote upstream reciprocity. Cooperation is less likely for a larger population size even if triangles are abundant in the network. In addition, in contrast to the results for evolutionary social dilemma games on networks, scale-free networks lead to less cooperation than networks with a homogeneous degree distribution.

  9. ADVANCED RECIPROCATING COMPRESSION TECHNOLOGY (ARCT). FINAL REPORT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danny M. Deffenbaugh; Klaus Brun; Ralph E. Harris; J. Pete Harrell; Robert J. Mckee; J. Jeffrey Moore; Steven J. Svedeman; Anthony J. Smalley; Eugene L. Broerman; Robert A Hart; Marybeth G. Nored; Ryan S. Gernentz; Shane P. Siebenaler

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. natural gas pipeline industry is facing the twin challenges of increased flexibility and capacity expansion. To meet these challenges, the industry requires improved choices in gas compression to address new construction and enhancement of the currently installed infrastructure. The current fleet of installed reciprocating compression is primarily slow-speed integral machines. Most new reciprocating compression is and will be large, high-speed separable units. The major challenges with the fleet of slow-speed integral machines are: limited flexibility and a large range in performance. In an attempt to increase flexibility, many operators are choosing to single-act cylinders, which are causing reduced reliability and integrity. While the best performing units in the fleet exhibit thermal efficiencies between 90% and 92%, the low performers are running down to 50% with the mean at about 80%. The major cause for this large disparity is due to installation losses in the pulsation control system. In the better performers, the losses are about evenly split between installation losses and valve losses. The major challenges for high-speed machines are: cylinder nozzle pulsations, mechanical vibrations due to cylinder stretch, short valve life, and low thermal performance. To shift nozzle pulsation to higher orders, nozzles are shortened, and to dampen the amplitudes, orifices are added. The shortened nozzles result in mechanical coupling with the cylinder, thereby, causing increased vibration due to the cylinder stretch mode. Valve life is even shorter than for slow speeds and can be on the order of a few months. The thermal efficiency is 10% to 15% lower than slow-speed equipment with the best performance in the 75% to 80% range. The goal of this advanced reciprocating compression program is to develop the technology for both high speed and low speed compression that will expand unit flexibility, increase thermal efficiency, and increase reliability and integrity

  10. CSR as a Tool to Prevent Gender-Based Discrimination. A Case Study of the Textile Export Industry in India

    OpenAIRE

    Svedevall, Ida

    2015-01-01

    This thesis examines the ability of CSR as a tool in the efforts to reduce gender based discrimination in the textile industry in the Delhi area in India. This research focuses on the CSR work programs undertaken by foreign entities using the case study of the company Lindex. Given that discrimination occurs daily facilitated by embedded cultural structures this research questions how, and if, CSR interventions can be successful in address these underlying issues. This research draws on exist...

  11. Application of a gender-based approach to conducting a community health assessment for rural women in Southern Illinois.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Kristine; Khare, Manorama M; Wright, Cherie; Hasler, Allison; Kerch, Sarah; Moehring, Patricia; Geller, Stacie

    2015-08-01

    Rural populations in the United States experience unique challenges in health and health care. The health of rural women, in particular, is influenced by their knowledge, work and family commitments, as well as environmental barriers in their communities. In rural southern Illinois, the seven southernmost counties form a region that experiences high rates of cancer and other chronic diseases. To identify, understand, and prioritize the health needs of women living in these seven counties, a comprehensive gender-based community health assessment was conducted with the goal of developing a plan to improve women's health in the region. A gender-analysis framework was adapted, and key stakeholder interviews and focus groups with community women were conducted and analyzed to identify factors affecting ill health. The gender-based analysis revealed that women play a critical role in the health of their families and their communities, and these roles can influence their personal health. The gender-based analysis also identified several gender-specific barriers and facilitators that affect women's health and their ability to engage in healthy behaviors. These results have important implications for the development of programs and policies to improve health among rural women. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Attributing Responsibility, Sexist Attitudes, Perceived Social Support, and Self-Esteem in Aggressors Convicted for Gender-Based Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Molina, Mónica; Moreno-Manso, Juan Manuel; Guerrero-Barona, Eloísa; Cruz-Márquez, Beatriz

    2017-06-01

    This work analyzes how the assumption of responsibility by aggressors convicted for gender-based violence is related to sexist attitudes, self-esteem and perceived functional social support. Similarly, the predictive capacity of these variables is studied with respect to the aggressors' minimization of the harm done and a lack of attributing responsibility to themselves. The participants in the research were males condemned to prison sentences for crimes related with gender-based violence in Spain. The instruments applied were the Attribution of Responsibility and Minimization of Harm Scale, the Ambivalent Sexism Inventory (ASI), the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSE), the Functional Social Support Questionnaire (FSSQ), and the Social Desirability Scale (SDS). The study concludes that sexist attitudes are related with a greater lack of attribution of responsibility, as well as with a greater tendency to minimize the harm done by the aggression. In addition, the aggressors with low self-esteem use self-defense as a strategy to justify the violence. Similarly, the presence of an adequate social support network for the aggressor increases the attribution of responsibility on the part of those convicted for gender-based violence.

  13. Generalized Gribov-Lipatov Reciprocity and AdS/CFT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beccaria, M.; Macorini, G.; Forini, V.

    2010-01-01

    Planar □=4 SYM theory and QCD share the gluon sector, suggesting the investigation of Gribov-Lipatov reciprocity in the supersymmetric theory. Since the AdS/CFT correspondence links □=4 SYM and superstring dynamics on AdS 5 x S5, reciprocity is also expected to show up in the quantum corrected energies of certain classical string configurations dual to gauge theory twist-operators. We review recent results confirming this picture and revisiting the old idea of Gribov-Lipatov reciprocity as a modern theoretical tool useful for the study of open problems in AdS/CFT.

  14. Verifying of reciprocal relations for nonlinear quadripole in unsteady mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardin, Alexey; Ignatjev, Vyacheslav; Orlov, Andrey; Perchenko, Sergey

    This paper deals with experimental verification of reciprocal relations of nonlinear quadripole for unsteady mode in external magnetic field. We find out transients of measured voltages in the quadripole after current switch. These transients are caused by changing of current-voltage characteristics (CVC) of quadripole. We propose the reciprocal relations for linear part of full resistance matrix and its experimental verification method based on algorithm of separation of resistance matrix linear part. It is shown that the proposed reciprocal relations are valid with 10-3 relatively accuracy even for non-stationary case in external magnetic field.

  15. Early-life stress is associated with gender-based vulnerability to epileptogenesis in rat pups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Desgent

    Full Text Available During development, the risk of developing mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE increases when the developing brain is exposed to more than one insult in early life. Early life insults include abnormalities of cortical development, hypoxic-ischemic injury and prolonged febrile seizures. To study epileptogenesis, we have developed a two-hit model of MTLE characterized by two early-life insults: a freeze lesion-induced cortical malformation at post-natal day 1 (P1, and a prolonged hyperthermic seizure (HS at P10. As early life stressors lead to sexual dimorphism in both acute response and long-term outcome, we hypothesized that our model could lead to gender-based differences in acute stress response and long-term risk of developing MTLE. Male and female pups underwent a freeze-lesion induced cortical microgyrus at P1 and were exposed to HS at P10. Animals were monitored by video-EEG from P90 to P120. Pre and post-procedure plasma corticosterone levels were used to measure stress response at P1 and P10. To confirm the role of sex steroids, androgenized female pups received daily testosterone injections to the mother pre-natally and post-natally for nine days while undergoing both insults. We demonstrated that after both insults females did not develop MTLE while all males did. This correlated with a rise in corticosterone levels at P1 following the lesion in males only. Interestingly, all androgenized females showed a similar rise in corticosterone at P1, and also developed MTLE. Moreover, we found that the cortical lesion significantly decreased the latency to generalized convulsion during hyperthermia at P10 in both genders. The cortical dysplasia volumes at adulthood were also similar between male and female individuals. Our data demonstrate sexual dimorphism in long-term vulnerability to develop epilepsy in the lesion + hyperthermia animal model of MTLE and suggest that the response to early-life stress at P1 contributes significantly to

  16. Validity of the WHO VAW study instrument for estimating gender-based violence against women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schraiber, Lilia Blima; Latorre, Maria do Rosário Dias O; França, Ivan; Segri, Neuber José; D'Oliveira, Ana Flávia Pires Lucas

    2010-08-01

    To validate the instrument of the World Health Organization Violence Against Women (WHO VAW) study on psychological, physical and sexual violence against women perpetrated by intimate partners. This was a cross-sectional study conducted in several countries between 2000 and 2003, including Brazil. Representative random samples of women aged 15-49 years with intimate partners were selected, living in the city of São Paulo (n = 940) and in the Zona da Mata, Pernambuco (n = 1,188), southeastern and northeastern regions, respectively. Exploratory factor analysis on questions relating to violence was performed (four psychological, six physical and three sexual questions), with varimax rotation and creation of three factors. Cronbach's alpha was calculated to analyze the internal consistency. To validate through extreme groups, mean scores (0 to 13 points) for violence were tested in relation to the following outcomes: self-rated health, daily activities, presence of discomfort or pain, suicidal ideation or attempts, heavy alcohol consumption and presence of common mental disorders. Three factors were defined, with similar accumulated variance (0.6092 in São Paulo and 0.6350 in the Zona da Mata). For São Paulo, the first factor was determined by physical violence, the second by sexual violence and the third by psychological violence. For the Zona da Mata, the first factor was formed by psychological violence, the second by physical violence and the third by sexual violence. Cronbach's alpha coefficients were 0.88 in São Paulo and 0.89 in the Zona da Mata. The mean scores for violence were significantly higher for less favorable outcomes, with the exception of suicide attempts in São Paulo. The instrument was shown to be adequate for estimating gender-based violence against women perpetrated by intimate partners and can be used in studies on this subject. It has high internal consistency and a capacity to discriminate between different forms of violence

  17. [Gender based violence: knowledge and attitudes of health care providers in Nicaragua].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Bolaños, Rosibel de los Angeles; Márquez-Serrano, Margarita; Kageyama-Escobar, María de la Luz

    2005-01-01

    To assess the knowledge and attitudes of health care personnel towards the identification and referral of gender-based violence victims (GBV). Also, to identify barriers to identification and referral of GBV, and to assess the levels of knowledge about Norms and Procedures for Intra-Family Violence Care by the health care personnel of the Nicaraguan's Minister of Health (MINSA, for its initials in Spanish). A cross-sectional study was conducted among healthcare professionals, including physicians, nurses and nursing technical aides (n=213), in 5 of the 17 Local Systems of Integral Attention (SILAIS) from the Integral Program of Attention for Women, Children and Adolescence (AIMNA) in the primary level of attention in MINSA, from April to June 2003. Attitude was measured with a Likert scale and an awareness index was created for intra-family violence care guidelines. The information was obtained using a self-administered instrument, based on the questionnaire of the study made among the personnel of the Mexican Institute for Social Security (IMSS, for its initials in Spanish), Morelos, Mexico. A logistic regression model was used to evaluate the association between attitude and several factors, as well as with the knowledge of care guidelines. In our population, 76.06% showed an attitude opposing GBV. In the multivariate analysis, the factors associated with opposition to GBV were: medical profession (OR 6.5, 95%CI 2.70-15.82), having a middle (OR 4.3, 95%CI 1.87-10.26) or high level (OR 3.3, 95%CI 1.03-10.75) of knowledge about intra-family violence guidelines and the closeness to relatives or friends who were victims of gender violence (OR 3.2, 95%CI 1.56-6.80). The lack of training on the subject (59.9%), fear of getting involved in legal issues (52.6%), and the concept that violence is a private affair and not a social one (50.7%), constituted the most important barriers to providing medical care. The health care personnel generally were observed to have high

  18. Gender-based violence in conflict and displacement: qualitative findings from displaced women in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirtz, Andrea L; Pham, Kiemanh; Glass, Nancy; Loochkartt, Saskia; Kidane, Teemar; Cuspoca, Decssy; Rubenstein, Leonard S; Singh, Sonal; Vu, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Gender-based violence (GBV) is prevalent among, though not specific to, conflict affected populations and related to multifarious levels of vulnerability of conflict and displacement. Colombia has been marked with decades of conflict, with an estimated 5.2 million internally displaced persons (IDPs) and ongoing violence. We conducted qualitative research to understand the contexts of conflict, displacement and dynamics with GBV. This as part of a multi-phase, mixed method study, in collaboration with UNHCR, to develop a screening tool to confidentially identify cases of GBV for referral among IDP women who were survivors of GBV. Qualitative research was used to identify the range of GBV, perpetrators, contexts in conflict and displacement, barriers to reporting and service uptake, as well as to understand experiences of service providers. Thirty-five female IDPs, aged 18 years and older, who self-identified as survivors of GBV were enrolled for in-depth interviews in San Jose de Guaviare and Quibdo, Colombia in June 2012. Thirty-one service providers participated in six focus group discussions and four interviews across these sites. Survivors described a range of GBV across conflict and displacement settings. Armed actors in conflict settings perpetrated threats of violence and harm to family members, child recruitment, and, to a lesser degree, rape and forced abortion. Opportunistic violence, including abduction, rape, and few accounts of trafficking were more commonly reported to occur in the displacement setting, often perpetrated by unknown individuals. Intrafamilial violence, intimate partner violence, including physical and sexual violence and reproductive control were salient across settings and may be exacerbated by conflict and displacement. Barriers to reporting and services seeking were reported by survivors and providers alike. Findings highlight the need for early identification of GBV cases, with emphasis on confidential approaches and active

  19. Focal plane scanner with reciprocating spatial window

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Chengye (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A focal plane scanner having a front objective lens, a spatial window for selectively passing a portion of the image therethrough, and a CCD array for receiving the passed portion of the image. All embodiments have a common feature whereby the spatial window and CCD array are mounted for simultaneous relative reciprocating movement with respect to the front objective lens, and the spatial window is mounted within the focal plane of the front objective. In a first embodiment, the spatial window is a slit and the CCD array is one-dimensional, and successive rows of the image in the focal plane of the front objective lens are passed to the CCD array by an image relay lens interposed between the slit and the CCD array. In a second embodiment, the spatial window is a slit, the CCD array is two-dimensional, and a prism-grating-prism optical spectrometer is interposed between the slit and the CCD array so as to cause the scanned row to be split into a plurality of spectral separations onto the CCD array. In a third embodiment, the CCD array is two-dimensional and the spatial window is a rectangular linear variable filter (LVF) window, so as to cause the scanned rows impinging on the LVF to be bandpass filtered into spectral components onto the CCD array through an image relay lens interposed between the LVF and the CCD array.

  20. Monitoring fuel consumption for reciprocating engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zebelean, D.C.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that Northwest Pipeline Corp. has experienced substantial fuel cost savings through a program that provides continuous monitoring of predicted consumption against actual usage for reciprocating engines. With the continuous monitoring program, the company can gauge specific fuel consumption, flag inefficient engines and determine possible problems with computer software or hardware used to measure engine operations. The plan was initiated as part of an overall effort to reduce pipe line operating cost to remain market competitive by reducing cost of services to the customer. One of the factors in determining Northwest Pipeline's cost of service is the cost of fueling engines to transport natural gas. In 1990, Northwest consumed approximately 9,600,000 MMBtu in engine fuel. Fuel gas always has been accounted for and measured. However, the thermal efficiency of the fuel gas consumed was never quantified. Engineering management set a goal in 1989 to audit fuel consumption monthly on the basis of actual fuel consumed compared to the manufacturer's predicted consumption curves. The fuel consumption comparison between actual consumption with manufacturer's predicted consumption decreased 4% in six months after the first report was published. Unbalanced engines, faulty spark plugs, fuel valves, engines requiring overhauls, and even computer software and hardware problems were found, based on this report. Total decrease in the comparison of 4% was not all realized. Approximately 1.5% of the decrease was due to revising the manufacturer's fuel consumption curves to correctly predict Northwest's vintage of engine

  1. Improving reading comprehension through Reciprocal Teaching Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endang Komariah

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This study is aimed at discovering the benefits of the Reciprocal Teaching Method (RTM in the reading classroom, finding out the achievements of students after four comprehension training sessions of using RTM, and exploring the perceptions of students on the use of RTM. This method uses four comprehension strategies: predicting, questioning, clarifying, and summarizing, to help learners monitor their development of reading comprehension by themselves. Students work in groups of four or five and the members are divided into five roles which are the leader, predictor, clarifier, questioner, and summarizer. The subjects were 24 students from the twelfth grade at a high school in Banda Aceh. Observations, tests, documents and interviews were collected to get the data. The results showed that the students were more active and productive in the reading classroom after RTM sessions and their reading proficiency improved. They learnt how to apply several of the strategies from RTM while reading. The results also showed that they preferred this method for teaching-learning reading compared to the conventional one. Therefore, teachers are suggested to consider using this method for teaching reading that instils the students on how to apply the four comprehension strategies used in reading.

  2. Reciprocal Rights and Responsibilities in Parent-Child Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumrind, Diana

    1978-01-01

    This article examines critically the case for protecting children's rights as against the case for protecting children's welfare. The principle of reciprocity in parent-child relations is rejected. (Author/AM)

  3. Research on networked manufacturing system for reciprocating pump industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yangdong; Qi, Guoning; Xie, Qingsheng; Lu, Yujun

    2005-12-01

    Networked manufacturing is a trend of reciprocating pump industry. According to the enterprises' requirement, the architecture of networked manufacturing system for reciprocating pump industry was proposed, which composed of infrastructure layer, system management layer, application service layer and user layer. Its main functions included product data management, ASP service, business management, and customer relationship management, its physics framework was a multi-tier internet-based model; the concept of ASP service integration was put forward and its process model was also established. As a result, a networked manufacturing system aimed at the characteristics of reciprocating pump industry was built. By implementing this system, reciprocating pump industry can obtain a new way to fully utilize their own resources and enhance the capabilities to respond to the global market quickly.

  4. Reciprocality of Recombination Events That Rearrange the Chromosome

    OpenAIRE

    Mahan, M. J.; Roth, J. R.

    1988-01-01

    We describe a genetic system for studying the reciprocality of chromosomal recombination; all substrates and recombination functions involved are provided exclusively by the bacterial chromosome. The genetic system allows the recovery of both recombinant products from a single recombination event. The system was used to demonstrate the full reciprocality of three different types of recombination events: (1) intrachromosomal recombination between direct repeats, causing deletions; (2) intrachr...

  5. Deformation and fracture incidence of Reciproc instruments: a clinical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotino, G; Grande, N M; Porciani, P F

    2015-02-01

    To investigate the incidence of fracture and deformation observed on Reciproc instruments after clinical use. A total of 1696 Reciproc NiTi instruments that were discarded after normal clinical usage over 30 months were collected. Of these 1580 instruments were R25 (93%), 76 were R40 (5%), and 40 were R50 (2%). The treatments included 3780 root canal preparations, 3023 primary treatments and 757 retreatments. Root canal preparation was standardized and followed the manufacturer's directions for the use of Reciproc files without creating prior glide path with hand instruments. In retreatment cases, Reciproc R25 instrument was used to remove all filling material and to complete the preparation. Each instrument was used for shaping only one tooth. All the instruments used were inspected under a microscope to detect signs of fracture or deformation and, if any fracture existed, the length of the files was measured. Data were analysed using a chi-square test with a level of significance set at P < .05. A total of 8 Reciproc R25 instruments fractured during treatment, which represents 0.47% of the number of instruments used and 0.21% of the root canals treated. Five instruments fractured in primary treatment cases and three instruments during retreatments. Six Reciproc R25 deformed during clinical use (0.35% of the number of instruments used and 0.15% of the root canals treated), four during retreatments and two during primary treatments. The deformation reported was unwinding of the blades, one at 1 mm from the tip and five between 2 and 3 mm from the tip. No deformations or fracture were registered for the Reciproc R40 and R50 instruments. Root canal instrumentation following the manufacturer's instructions can be performed with Reciproc instruments with a very low incidence of instrument fracture and deformation. © 2014 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Reciprocal cooperation in avian mobbing: playing nice pays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheatcroft, David J; Price, Trevor D

    2008-08-01

    Unrelated passerine birds often join together while mobbing, a widespread antipredator behavior during which birds harass a predator. Although previous analyses concluded that mobbing could not have evolved via reciprocity, Krams and colleagues' field experiments show that birds preferentially join mobs with neighbors that have aided them previously, suggesting that these birds utilize reciprocity-based strategies involving individual recognition and recollection of previous interactions with others. This implies a level of sophistication in bird communities greater than had previously been realized.

  7. The general chain transform and self-reciprocal functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyril Nasim

    1985-01-01

    Full Text Available A theory of a generalized form of the chain transforms of order n is developed, and various properties of these are established including the Parseval relation. Most known cases of the standard theory are derived as special cases. Also a theory of self-reciprocal functions is given, based on these general chain transforms; and relations among various classes of self-reciprocal functions are established.

  8. Efficient Design And Fabrication Of Free-Form Reciprocal Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parigi, Dario; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2013-01-01

    Structures based on the principle of reciprocity have been autonomously studied and used since the antiquity on the basis of different needs and purposes. The application of the principle of reciprocity requires the presence of at least two elements, at the same time both supporting and being sup......-notched wooden sticks of 22mm of diameter; this paper describes the overall process from the design to the fabrication....

  9. Asymmetric reproductive isolation during simultaneous reciprocal mating in pulmonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiwegweaw, Amporn; Seki, Keiichi; Mori, Hiroshi; Asami, Takahiro

    2009-04-23

    The generality of asymmetric reproductive isolation between reciprocal crosses suggests that the evolution of isolation mechanisms often proceeds in reciprocal asymmetry. In hermaphroditic snails that copulate simultaneously and reciprocally, asymmetry in premating isolation may not be readily detectable because the failure of the symmetric performance of courtship would prevent copulation from occurring. On the other hand, through their prolonged copulation, snails discriminate among mates when exchanging spermatophores for their benefit and thus may exhibit asymmetric reproductive isolation during interspecific mating. However, no clear case of reciprocal asymmetry has been found in reproductive isolation between snail species. Here we show a discrete difference in hybridization success between simultaneous reciprocal copulations between two species of pulmonate snails. Premating isolation of Bradybaena pellucida (BP) and Bradybaena similaris (BS) is incomplete in captivity. In interspecific copulation, BP removes its penis without transferring a spermatophore, while BS sires hybrids by inseminating BP. Thus, 'male' BP or 'female' BS rejects the other individual, while female BP and male BS accept each other, so that the two sexes of either BP or BS oppose each other in mate discrimination. Our results are a clear example of asymmetry in reproductive isolation during simultaneous reciprocal mating between hermaphroditic animals.

  10. Reciprocal Modulation of IK1-INa Extends Excitability in Cardiac Ventricular Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varghese, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    The inwardly rectifying potassium current (I K1 ) and the fast inward sodium current (I Na ) are reciprocally modulated in mammalian ventricular myocytes. An increase in the expression of channels responsible for one of these two currents results in a corresponding increase in expression of the other. These currents are critical in the propagation of action potentials (AP) during the normal functioning of the heart. This study identifies a physiological role for I K1 -I Na reciprocal modulation in ventricular fiber activation thresholds and conduction. Simulations of action potentials in single cells and propagating APs in cardiac fibers were carried out using an existing model of electrical activity in cardiac ventricular myocytes. The conductances, G K1 , of the inwardly rectifying potassium current, and G Na , of the fast inward sodium current were modified independently and in tandem to simulate reciprocal modulation. In single cells, independent modulation of G K1 alone resulted in changes in activation thresholds that were qualitatively similar to those for reciprocal G K1 -G Na modulation and unlike those due to independent modulation of G Na alone, indicating that G K1 determines the cellular activation threshold. On the other hand, the variations in conduction velocity in cardiac cell fibers were similar for independent G Na modulation and for tandem changes in G K1 -G Na , suggesting that G Na is primarily responsible for setting tissue AP conduction velocity. Conduction velocity dependence on G K1 -G Na is significantly affected by the intercellular gap junction conductance. While the effects on the passive fiber space constant due to changes in both G K1 and the intercellular gap junction conductance, G gj , were in line with linear cable theory predictions, both conductances had surprisingly large effects on fiber activation thresholds. Independent modulation of G K1 rendered cardiac fibers inexcitable at higher levels of G K1 whereas tandem G K1 -G Na

  11. Kidney disease and aging: A reciprocal relation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooman, Jeroen P; van der Sande, Frank M; Leunissen, Karel M L

    2017-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are overrepresented in elderly patients. This provides specific challenges for the treatment, as the start of dialysis in vulnerable elderly patients may be associated with a rapid decline in functional performance. However, prognosis in elderly patients with ESRD is quite variable and related to the presence of comorbidity and geriatric impairments. The decision to start dialysis in elderly patients should always be based on shared decision making, which may be aided by the use of prediction models which should however not be used to withhold dialysis treatment. The treatment of ESRD in elderly patients should be based on a multidimensional treatment plan with a role for active rehabilitation. Moreover, there also appears to be a reciprocal relationship between aging and CKD, as the presence of geriatric complications is also high in younger patients with ESRD. This has led to the hypothesis of a premature aging process associated with CKD, resulting in different phenotypes such as premature vascular aging, muscle wasting, bone disease, cognitive dysfunction and frailty. Prevention and treatment of this phenotype is based on optimal treatment of CKD, associated comorbidities, and lifestyle factors by established treatments. For the future, interventions, which are developed to combat the aging process in general, might also have relevance for the treatment of patients with CKD, but their role should always be investigated in adequately powered clinical trials, as results obtained in experimental trials may not be directly translatable to the clinical situation of elderly patients. In the meantime, physical exercise is a very important intervention, by improving both physical capacity and functional performance, as well as by a direct effect on the aging process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Atrioventricular reciprocal rhythm and chronic reciprocating tachycardia in a newborn infant with concealed Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, R J; Ferrer, P; Garcia, O L; Castellanos, A; Gelband, H

    1977-01-01

    A case of atrioventricular reciprocal rhythm and chronic reciprocating tachycardia in a newborn infant is presented. Electrophysiological studies suggest that these rhythm disturbances are related to the presence of a right-sided atrioventricular accessory pathway capable only of retrograde conduction (concealed Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome). The technique of recording the sequence of atrial activation during the tachycardia is described and its clinical importance emphasised. PMID:884032

  13. La Importancia de la Terminología en la Conceptualización de la Violencia de Género (The Importance of Terminology in the Conceptualization of Gender-based Violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Peris Vidal

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available AMany of the mass media of the Spanish State continue using, at present, certain expressions (as domestic violence that impede the understanding of the real meaning of the gender-based violence. In some cases there are some ideological intentions by certain sectors of society to use terms which conceal the true structural nature of the gender-based violence. In other cases, this confusion is reinforced by an inadequate understanding of this problem by journalists themselves, and the incorrect use of the names. The result is an important conceptual confusion which affects the understanding of the meaning of gender-based violence among citizens. Numerosos medios de comunicación del Estado español siguen empleando en la actualidad algunas expresiones (como violencia doméstica que impiden la comprensión del verdadero significado de la violencia de género. En algunos casos existe una intención ideológica por parte de ciertos sectores de la sociedad para emplear términos que ocultan el verdadero carácter estructural de la violencia de género. En otros casos se refuerza dicha confusión por la comprensión defectuosa de este problema por parte de los propios periodistas y la mala utilización de las denominaciones. El resultado es una importante confusión conceptual que afecta a la comprensión del significado de la violencia de género por parte de la ciudadanía.DOWNLOAD THIS PAPER FROM SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2612144

  14. Gender-based attitudes, HIV misconceptions and feelings towards marginalized groups are associated with stigmatization in Mumbai, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharat, Shalini; Ramakrishna, Jayashree; Heylen, Elsa; Ekstrand, Maria L

    2014-11-01

    Summary This study examined the association of gender-based attitudes, HIV misconceptions and community feelings for marginalized groups with stigmatizing responses towards people with HIV/AIDS in Mumbai, India. Participants included 546 men and women sampled in hospital settings during 2007-2008. Structured measures were used to assess avoidance intentions and denial of rights of people with HIV/AIDS. Mean age of participants was 32 years; 42% had less than 10 years of education. Higher HIV transmission misconceptions (β=0.47; pmisconceptions (β=0.20; pmisconceptions and addressing traditional gender attitudes are critical for reducing HIV stigma in Indian society.

  15. Auditing sex- and gender-based medicine (SGBM) content in medical school curriculum: a student scholar model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Michael M; Jones, Betsy G; Casanova, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    Sex- and gender-based medicine (SGBM) aims to (1) delineate and investigate sex- and gender-based differences in health, disease, and response to treatment and (2) apply that knowledge to clinical care to improve the health of both women and men. However, the integration of SGBM into medical school curricula is often haphazard and poorly defined; schools often do not know the current status of SGBM content in their curricula, even if they are committed to addressing gaps and improving SGBM delivery. Therefore, complete auditing and accounting of SGBM content in the existing medical school curriculum is necessary to determine the baseline status and prepare for successful integration of SGBM content into that curriculum. A review of course syllabi and lecture objectives as well as a targeted data analysis of the Curriculum Management and Information Tool (CurrMIT) were completed prior to a real-time curriculum audit. Subsequently, six "student scholars," three first-year and three second-year medical students, were recruited and trained to audit the first 2 years of the medical school curriculum for SGBM content, thus completing an audit for both of the pre-clinical years simultaneously. A qualitative analysis and a post-audit comparative analysis were completed to assess the level of SGBM instruction at our institution. The review of syllabi and the CurrMIT data analysis did not generate a meaningful catalogue of SGBM content in the curriculum; most of the content identified specifically targeted women's or men's health topics and not sex- or gender-based differences. The real-time student audit of the existing curriculum at Texas Tech revealed that most of the SGBM material was focused on the physiological/anatomical sex differences or gender differences in disease prevalence, with minimal coverage of sex- or gender-based differences in diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, and outcomes. The real-time student scholar audit was effective in identifying SGBM content in

  16. Pathway to social justice: research on human rights and gender-based violence in a Rwandan refugee cAMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlish, Carol; Ho, Anita

    2009-01-01

    Gender-based violence persists in postconflict settings. Implementing an ethnographic study with Congolese refugees in Rwanda, we investigated community perspectives on justice and human rights. As core concepts, participants described the right to equal value as human beings and the corresponding responsibility to respect human rights as the basis for justice. Three factors that impede human rights include cultural ideology, social distance, and lack of a rights-enabling environment. Men described gender similarities while women emphasized gender differences in human rights. Ecological perspectives and rights-based approaches to achieving social justice seem warranted.

  17. Accuracy Investigation of Seismic Reciprocity Using 3D FDM code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poor Moghaddam, P.; Kasahara, J.

    2003-12-01

    Application of Reciprocity theorem for the problem of marine seismology, which there is numerous shots on the surface and few receivers on the bottom of the ocean, is pivotal. The theory of reciprocity states that we can switch the location and direction of the force source and displacement component between source and receiver without changing in the observation waveform. In this work we performed a numerical simulation. In this simulation we solved wave propagation equations using Finite Difference method, which is 4th order in space and 2nd order in time. To investigate whether the discretizing affects the seismic reciprocity we calculate the 2D velocity components (x, z) respected to two orthogonal force components applied in the x and z directions. Finally reciprocal waveforms are compared. The degree of correlation between the reciprocal components is quite high which shows the excellency of the FDM method, which we employed. The structure for this work is obtained from 2D travel-time inversion estimated in the 1996 survey along North-South line at the Sanriku, Japan Trench. The size of this structure is 143km by 30 km (Fig.1), which discretized by 25 meter gird spacing. The structure is completely heterogeneous which any point has its own value of P-velocity, S-velocity and density. In this structure, two points for investigation of reciprocity are considered (Fig.1). A force source was applied in one point and the velocity measured in another point, further the directions and locations of source and receiver were interchanged to measure its reciprocal one. Figures 2 shows z-velocity component and its reciprocal one and the difference between them when a force source applied in the z-direction. Figures 3 shows x-velocity component and its reciprocal one and the difference between them when a force source applied in the x-direction. The source waveform is considered the Ricker wavelet with central frequency of 5 Hz. To gain faster computational time and

  18. Non-reciprocal transmission in the microresonators (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chunhua

    2017-02-01

    Non-reciprocal devices, such as circulators and isolators, are indispensable components in classical and quantum information processing in an integrated photonic circuit. Aside from those applications, the non-reciprocal phase shift is of fundamental interest for exploring exotic topological photonics, such as the realization of chiral edge states and topological protection. However, incorporating low optical-loss magnetic materials into a photonic chip is technically challenging. In this study, the non-reciprocal transmission in an optomechanical resonator is experimentally demonstrated for the first time. The underlying mechanism of the non-reciprocity demonstrated in this study is actually universal and can be generalized to any traveling wave resonators with a mechanical oscillator, such as the integrated disk-type microresonator coupled with a nanobeam. Considering that higher cooperativity and cascading of the optical devices have been reported in a photonic integrated chip, non-reciprocity in such an microresonator has applications for integrated photonic isolators and circulators, which will play important roles in a hybrid quantum Internet.

  19. Comparisons of orthodontic root resorption under heavy and jiggling reciprocating forces during experimental tooth movement in a rat model

    OpenAIRE

    Hikida, Takuji; Yamaguchi, Masaru; Shimizu, Mami; Kikuta, Jun; Yoshino, Tomokazu; Kasai, Kazutaka

    2016-01-01

    Objective Root mobility due to reciprocating movement of the tooth (jiggling) may exacerbate orthodontic root resorption (ORR). "Jiggling" describes mesiodistal or buccolingual movement of the roots of the teeth during orthodontic treatment. In the present study, buccolingual movement is described as "jiggling." We aimed to investigate the relationship between ORR and jiggling and to test for positive cell expression in odontoclasts in resorbed roots during experimental tooth movement (jiggli...

  20. Gender-based Violence and ‘Feminicide’ in Queer Italian Movements: Questioning Gender, Sexuality, and the (Heteronormative Order

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterina Peroni

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the development of the Italian feminist political lexicon on gender-based violence within the security frame in the last years. After the description of the historical main issues developed by feminism during the Seventies about the relation between gender-based violence, women’s self-determination and criminal law, this paper describes the new framework of feminist and queer movements against the security policies on gender-based violence adopted by the Italian government since 2007. On the one hand, feminist movements criticized the processes of criminalization and victimization produced by the security frame and denounced the underlying nexus between sexism and racism. On the other hand, they addressed the essentialism deriving from these processes. Despite the mainstream vocabulary used the term “feminicide” in order to focus on its victimizing and alarmist aspects, contemporary feminist and queer movements thus addressed gender-based violence as a problem related to the gender stereotypes and sexist prejudices by deconstructing concepts such as gender, sexuality, and (heteropatriarchy. In this perspective, gender-based violence is not only a form of dominion by men of women, but it also takes the shape of differential forms of inclusion and exclusion of LGBTQI persons in the neoliberal system, as in the case of homo- and trans-phobia Este artículo describe el desarrollo en los últimos años del léxico político feminista italiano sobre violencia de género en el marco de la seguridad. Después de describir los principales hitos históricos desarrollados por el feminismo en los años setenta, sobre la relación entre la violencia de género, la autodeterminación de las mujeres y el derecho penal, este artículo describe el nuevo marco de los movimientos feministas y queer contra las políticas de seguridad sobre violencia de género adoptadas por el gobierno italiano desde 2007. Por un lado, los movimientos

  1. Propagation of Economic Inequality Through Reciprocity and Reputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackel, Leor M; Zaki, Jamil

    2018-04-01

    Reciprocity and reputation are powerful tools for encouraging cooperation on a broad scale. Here, we highlight a potential side effect of these social phenomena: exacerbating economic inequality. In two novel economic games, we manipulated the amount of money with which participants were endowed and then gave them the opportunity to share resources with others. We found that people reciprocated more toward higher-wealth givers, compared with lower-wealth givers, even when those givers were equally generous. Wealthier givers also achieved better reputations than less wealthy ones and therefore received more investments in a social marketplace. These discrepancies were well described by a formal model of reinforcement learning: Individuals who weighted monetary outcomes, rather than generosity, when learning about interlocutors also most strongly helped wealthier individuals. This work demonstrates that reciprocity and reputation-although globally increasing prosociality-can widen wealth gaps and provides a precise account of how inequality grows through social processes.

  2. Feasibility of Applying Controllable Lubrication Techniques to Reciprocating Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pulido, Edgar Estupinan

    The use of active lubrication in journal bearings helps to enhance the thin fluid films by increasing the fluid film thickness and consequently reducing viscous friction losses and vibrations. One refers to active lubrication when conventional hydrodynamic lubrication is combined with dynamically...... modified hydrostatic lubrication. In this case, the hydrostatic lubrication is modified by injecting oil at controllable pressures, through orifices circumferentially located around the bearing surface. In order to study the performance of journal bearings of reciprocating machines, operating under...... conventional lubrication conditions, a mathematical model of a reciprocating mechanism connected to a rigid / flexible rotor via thin fluid films was developed. The mathematical model involves the use of multibody dynamics theory for the modelling of the reciprocating mechanism (rigid bodies), finite elements...

  3. Reciprocity and conjugation fidelity in double phase conjugate mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaye, Philippe; Fotiadi, Andrei A.; Roosen, Gerald

    1999-09-01

    It is well known that the conservation of energy in an optical system can be described by an invariant (intensity of the optical wave) during propagation. We identically show that reciprocity can be described by an invariant. This invariant is the overlap integral of two counterpropagating waves, that stays constant in every place of a reciprocal optical system. Applied to the double phase conjugate mirror (DPCM) this invariant can be rewritten as an equality between the ratio of the conjugation fidelity of the two ports of the DPCM and the ratio of the transmission in intensity of the two beams. If restricted to a plane wave case this relation becomes the well known equality of the diffraction efficiencies in both directions. We have implemented an experimental set-up that allows to show that the double phase conjugate mirror is reciprocal what confirms all the above discussion. We use the same set-up to measure the conjugation fidelity of the DPCM.

  4. Reciprocity as a Key Concept for Social Media and Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth C. Lewis

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The concept of reciprocity, particularly in the pro-social sense of mutually beneficial exchange, presents an opportunity befitting the start of a new journal on social media. Namely, how might a concept of social exchange help us understand a mediascape increasingly dominated by social exchange—where the sharing, receiving, and recirculating of information “gifts” is central to the very social and technical frameworks on which these media function? In essence, what might reciprocity, analyzed more purposefully, reveal about social media and society? The case of “reciprocal journalism” briefly described here is but one of many avenues for studying social (media interactions and their implications, whether positive or negative.

  5. Thermodynamic Analysis of an Irreversible Maisotsenko Reciprocating Brayton Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuli Zhu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available An irreversible Maisotsenko reciprocating Brayton cycle (MRBC model is established using the finite time thermodynamic (FTT theory and taking the heat transfer loss (HTL, piston friction loss (PFL, and internal irreversible losses (IILs into consideration in this paper. A calculation flowchart of the power output (P and efficiency (η of the cycle is provided, and the effects of the mass flow rate (MFR of the injection of water to the cycle and some other design parameters on the performance of cycle are analyzed by detailed numerical examples. Furthermore, the superiority of irreversible MRBC is verified as the cycle and is compared with the traditional irreversible reciprocating Brayton cycle (RBC. The results can provide certain theoretical guiding significance for the optimal design of practical Maisotsenko reciprocating gas turbine plants.

  6. Intensity and resolution of a general scan in reciprocal space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebech, B.; Nielsen, M.

    1975-01-01

    Elastic neutron scattering on single crystals is traditionally carried out either by rotating the sample and keeping the detector fixed, or by coupling the detector rotation to the sample rotation in the the ratio 2:1. In recent years, a number of papers have discussed the feasibility of other types of scans. General scans at oblique angles to reciprocal lattice vectors are commonly used in inelastic neutron scattering. Such scans are also useful in elastic neutron scattering and may easily be made by means of computer or tape controlled diffractometers. Formulas are derived for the intensity and width of Bragg reflections measured by scanning at oblique angles to reciprocal lattice vectors. The results of the calculations are compared to experimental results on simple structures. The limitations of general scans in reciprocal space are also discussed

  7. Facial Affect Reciprocity in Dyadic Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    1973; Freedman, 1964; Galati, Miceli, & Sini, 2001; Galati, Sini, Schmidt, & Tinti, 2003; Goodenough , 1932; Ortega, Iglesias, Fernandez, & Corraliza...relationships and friendship. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 81, 247–262. Goodenough , F. L. (1932). Expression of emotions in a blind-deaf

  8. Gender-based violence and HIV sexual risk behavior: alcohol use and mental health problems as mediators among women in drinking venues, Cape Town.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitpitan, Eileen V; Kalichman, Seth C; Eaton, Lisa A; Sikkema, Kathleen J; Watt, Melissa H; Skinner, Donald

    2012-10-01

    Gender-based violence is a key determinant of HIV infection among women in South Africa as elsewhere. However, research has not examined potential mediating processes to explain the link between experiencing abuse and engaging in HIV sexual risk behavior. Previous studies suggest that alcohol use and mental health problems may explain how gender-based violence predicts sexual risk. In a prospective study, we examined whether lifetime history of gender-based violence indirectly affects future sexual risk behavior through alcohol use, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in a high-risk socio-environmental context. We recruited a cohort of 560 women from alcohol drinking venues in a Cape Town, South African township. Participants completed computerized interviews at baseline and 4 months later. We tested prospective mediating associations between gender-based violence, alcohol use, depression, PTSD, and sexual risk behavior. There was a significant indirect effect of gender-based violence on sexual risk behavior through alcohol use, but not mental health problems. Women who were physically and sexually abused drank more, which in turn predicted more unprotected sex. We did not find a mediated relationship between alcohol use and sexual risk behavior through the experience of recent abuse or mental health problems. Alcohol use explains the link between gender-based violence and sexual risk behavior among women attending drinking venues in Cape Town, South Africa. Efforts to reduce HIV risk in South Africa by addressing gender-based violence must also address alcohol use. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Reciprocal regulation of LXRα activity by ASXL1 and ASXL2 in lipogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ui-Hyun; Seong, Mi-ran [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Institute of Bioscience, BK21 Graduate Program, Sejong University, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eun-Joo; Hur, Wonhee; Kim, Sung Woo [Department of Molecular Biology, BK21 Graduate Program, Dankook University, Gyeonggi-do 448-701 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Seung Kew [The Catholic University Liver Research Center and WHO Collaborating Center of Viral Hepatitis, The Catholic University, College of Medicine, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of); Um, Soo-Jong, E-mail: umsj@sejong.ac.kr [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Institute of Bioscience, BK21 Graduate Program, Sejong University, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •ASXL1 and ASXL2 directly interact with ligand-bound LXRα. •Ligand-induced LXRα activity is repressed by ASXL1 and activated by ASXL2. •ASXL1 and ASXL2 bind to the LXRE of the LXRα target promoter. •ASXL1 and ASXL2 reciprocally regulate lipogenesis in liver cells. -- Abstract: Liver X receptor alpha (LXRα), a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily, plays a pivotal role in hepatic cholesterol and lipid metabolism, regulating the expression of genes associated with hepatic lipogenesis. The additional sex comb-like (ASXL) family was postulated to regulate chromatin function. Here, we investigate the roles of ASXL1 and ASXL2 in regulating LXRα activity. We found that ASXL1 suppressed ligand-induced LXRα transcriptional activity, whereas ASXL2 increased LXRα activity through direct interaction in the presence of the ligand. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays showed ligand-dependent recruitment of ASXLs to ABCA1 promoters, like LXRα. Knockdown studies indicated that ASXL1 inhibits, while ASXL2 increases, lipid accumulation in H4IIE cells, similar to their roles in transcriptional regulation. We also found that ASXL1 expression increases under fasting conditions, and decreases in insulin-treated H4IIE cells and the livers of high-fat diet-fed mice. Overall, these results support the reciprocal role of the ASXL family in lipid homeostasis through the opposite regulation of LXRα.

  10. Fairness and Reciprocity in the Hawk-Dove Game

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Anders; Neugebauer, Tibor; Schram, Arthur

    2002-01-01

    We study fairness and reciprocity in a Hawk-Dove game, using an experimental approach. This allows us to test various models in one framework. We observe a large extent of selfish and rational behavior. Our results are inconsistent with leading models in this field.......We study fairness and reciprocity in a Hawk-Dove game, using an experimental approach. This allows us to test various models in one framework. We observe a large extent of selfish and rational behavior. Our results are inconsistent with leading models in this field....

  11. Development of timber reciprocal frame structures in the UK

    OpenAIRE

    CHILTON, John

    2010-01-01

    p. 1877-1884 Although the structural principle of closed circuits of mutually supporting beams was known by Leonardo Da Vinci and has been used for hundreds, if not thousands of years (Popovic Larsen [8]), its rediscovery and renaming as the Reciprocal Frame, by the designer Graham Brown in 1987, has led to more structures of this type being built in the UK over the last 20 years. This paper briefly traces the development of reciprocal frames in the UK from Brown¿s first simple...

  12. Awareness campaigns as survival tools in the fight against gender-based violence in peri-urban communities of Bulawayo in Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glory Damba

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Most of Zimbabwe’s urban settlements owe their existence to mining activities; hence most peri-urban communities around Bulawayo, Zimbabwe’s second largest city, are mining communities. However, research in these mining communities has shown that there is little focus on the strengthening of community dynamics that help members to cope with the challenges associated with Gender-Based Violence. Psychosocial support rarely arrives in time to effectively cover gaps left by traditional coping strategies. This paper presents and discusses experiences and insights accumulated from awareness campaigns meant to sensitise people about the nature and scope of gender-based violence. This article is a culmination of focus group discussions, informal interviews and participant observation as efforts were made towards capacity building for community members’ abilities to identify forms of risky behaviour associated with gender-based violence, and the appropriate actions members could take should they find themselves in such situations. In short, this article discusses the conceptualisation of domestic and gender violence as a risk, forms of gender-based violence, the rationale behind campaigns to reduce the internalisation of gender-based violence, and challenges faced in inculcating behaviour change efforts.

  13. The Girl Is Mine: Reframing Intimate Partner Violence and Sex Work as Intersectional Spaces of Gender-Based Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaller, Jonel; Cimino, Andrea N

    2016-04-03

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) and sex work have been primarily constructed as mutually exclusive phenomena within scholarly literature, though both can be situated under the umbrella of gender-based violence and traced to male sexual proprietariness. Specialized research has resulted in deeper understanding of nuanced categorizations of sub-phenomena within both IPV and sex work, with parallel constructions along a spectrum of increasing danger. However, the scholarly construction of these continua as parallel-and thus unrelated-disguises the systemic nature of each form of violence and potentially pits victims against each other in the struggle for legitimacy. We propose a more systemic approach to understanding and researching IPV and sex work and provide examples of research already moving in this direction. © The Author(s) 2016.

  14. Gender based violence as a risk factor for HIV-associated risk behaviors among female sex workers in Armenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Delia L; Salazar, Laura F; DiClemente, Ralph J; Markosyan, Karine

    2013-02-01

    This cross-sectional study identified the prevalence of gender based violence (GBV) and examined its association with sexual risk behavior among female sex workers (FSWs). Among 120 participants between ages 20 and 52, a total of 56.7 % reported lifetime GBV. Multivariate analyses revealed that GBV was significantly associated with inconsistent condom use, unprotected sex, condom misuse, fear of client reaction to requests of condom use, self-reported history of STIs, and earlier age of initiation of sex work. GBV must be considered an urgent public health priority among FSWs in Armenia. Interventions addressing FSWs, in addition to targeting skill-based, sexual risk reduction must also introduce a discourse among FSWs, sexual partners, clients and community members about the role of GBV in HIV-associated risk behaviors and infection. Structural level initiatives must address economic opportunities for women, health-sector policies and responses to FSWs' health needs, law enforcement training and societal norms toward women.

  15. Modeling time-lagged reciprocal psychological empowerment-performance relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, M Travis; Luciano, Margaret M; D'Innocenzo, Lauren; Mathieu, John E; Dean, Matthew D

    2014-11-01

    Employee psychological empowerment is widely accepted as a means for organizations to compete in increasingly dynamic environments. Previous empirical research and meta-analyses have demonstrated that employee psychological empowerment is positively related to several attitudinal and behavioral outcomes including job performance. While this research positions psychological empowerment as an antecedent influencing such outcomes, a close examination of the literature reveals that this relationship is primarily based on cross-sectional research. Notably, evidence supporting the presumed benefits of empowerment has failed to account for potential reciprocal relationships and endogeneity effects. Accordingly, using a multiwave, time-lagged design, we model reciprocal relationships between psychological empowerment and job performance using a sample of 441 nurses from 5 hospitals. Incorporating temporal effects in a staggered research design and using structural equation modeling techniques, our findings provide support for the conventional positive correlation between empowerment and subsequent performance. Moreover, accounting for the temporal stability of variables over time, we found support for empowerment levels as positive influences on subsequent changes in performance. Finally, we also found support for the reciprocal relationship, as performance levels were shown to relate positively to changes in empowerment over time. Theoretical and practical implications of the reciprocal psychological empowerment-performance relationships are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. Aging, Neighborhood Attachment, and Fear of Crime: Testing Reciprocal Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Joong-Hwan; Kim, Sangmoon

    2009-01-01

    This study attempts to examine the reciprocal effects between fear of crime and neighborhood attachment because aging is a critical factor in both discussions of fear of crime and neighborhood attachment (friendship, neighboring, social cohesion and trust, informal social control, and participation in neighborhood watch program). Using data from…

  17. Reciprocal Category Analysis in Major Fields of Psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Clifford O.; Stricherz, Mathias E.

    Client-therapist verbal interaction in content analysis research has just begun to be defined. Reciprocal Category Analysis (RCA) is used to measure therapeutic interactions between client and therapist. Three experienced therapists from each of the schools of client-centered, Rational Emotive (RET), Transactional Analysis (TA), and Gestalt…

  18. Reciprocal locomotion of dense swimmers in Stokes flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Rodriguez, David [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Lauga, Eric [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0411 (United States)], E-mail: davidgr@alum.mit.edu, E-mail: elauga@ucsd.edu

    2009-05-20

    Due to the kinematic reversibility of Stokes flow, a body executing a reciprocal motion (a motion in which the sequence of body configurations remains identical under time reversal) cannot propel itself in a viscous fluid in the limit of negligible inertia; this result is known as Purcell's scallop theorem. In this limit, the Reynolds numbers based on the fluid inertia and on the body inertia are all zero. Previous studies characterized the breakdown of the scallop theorem with fluid inertia. In this paper we show that, even in the absence of fluid inertia, certain dense bodies undergoing reciprocal motion are able to swim. Using Lorentz's reciprocal theorem, we first derive the general differential equations that govern the locomotion kinematics of a dense swimmer. We demonstrate that no reciprocal swimming is possible if the body motion consists only of tangential surface deformation (squirming). We then apply our general formulation to compute the locomotion of four simple swimmers, each with a different spatial asymmetry, that perform normal surface deformations. We show that the resulting swimming speeds (or rotation rates) scale as the first power of a properly defined 'swimmer Reynolds number', demonstrating thereby a continuous breakdown of the scallop theorem with body inertia.

  19. Social Dilemmas and Indirect Reciprocity: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Acosta

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Indirect reciprocity is an evolutionary theory of altruism and cooperation in social dilemmas. Its explanation of cooperation incorporates information on the reputation people hold of other people regarding whether they are cooperative or not. This study systematically reviewed the current empirical literature on indirect reciprocity in social dilemma situations. The following databases were consulted: ScienceDirect, EBSCO, and OVID, using has key words "indirect reciprocity" AND "dilemma" OR "cooperation" OR "charity". Twenty-three articles were selected which met the inclusion criteria (papers written in English and studies whose methodology was based on experimental games and the theories, objectives, the main types of samples used, and main results were analyzed. The results show that the games used were the indirect reciprocity and public goods games, which may vary according to the objectives. It was found that reputation is a key variable that helps to promote cooperation. In turn, information on previous cooperation helps to build reputation, which is subsequently involved in the decision to cooperate with others. Finally, we highlight the need for more experimental studies that incorporate other explanatory variables and evaluate them in new contexts.

  20. Longitudinal Study on Reciprocity between Personality Traits and Parenting Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantanen, Johanna; Tillemann, Kati; Metsäpelto, Riitta-Leena; Kokko, Katja; Pulkkinen, Lea

    2015-01-01

    Reciprocal associations between the Big Five personality traits and parenting stress--including both parents' feelings of their distress and perception of their incompetence as parents--were studied with 248 participants (49% of which were males). Longitudinal data, collected at ages 33/36, 42 and 50 years, were used. Cross-lagged path analysis…

  1. Potential Reciprocal Relationship between Motivation and Achievement: A Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan; Hou, Shumeng

    2018-01-01

    Among the non-cognitive factors that influence academic achievement, intrinsic motivation has been found to be a potential reciprocal factor. The present study aims to determine the causal relationship between other types of motivation and academic achievement. For this purpose, a large-scale data survey, the National Education Longitudinal Study…

  2. Achievement Emotions and Academic Performance: Longitudinal Models of Reciprocal Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekrun, Reinhard; Lichtenfeld, Stephanie; Marsh, Herbert W.; Murayama, Kou; Goetz, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    A reciprocal effects model linking emotion and achievement over time is proposed. The model was tested using five annual waves of the Project for the Analysis of Learning and Achievement in Mathematics (PALMA) longitudinal study, which investigated adolescents' development in mathematics (Grades 5-9; N = 3,425 German students; mean starting…

  3. This White 'I': The Reciprocal Shame of Oppressor and Oppressed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This White 'I': The Reciprocal Shame of Oppressor and Oppressed. A Hurst. Abstract. Vice's answer to the question of this white 'I' who must try to live well in South Africa, configures shame, political silence and humble self-reconfiguration. I accept her insightful analysis of 'whiteness' in terms of the oppressor's shame, but ...

  4. Evidence of Reciprocity in Reports on International Partnerships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel A. Umoren

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The increase in global health opportunities in medical education has been accompanied by calls for ethical and reciprocal institutional partnerships. The Working Group on Ethics Guidelines in Global Health Training (WEIGHT guidelines were developed in 2010 and are widely accepted by the global health community. We reviewed 43 articles on international partnerships from 1970 to 2010 for eight principles of reciprocity derived from the WEIGHT guidelines. The results showed that, while few articles reflected all principles, there was a trend to increasing consideration of the international partner’s local needs, pre-departure cultural training, and collaborative authorship. However, learner supervision and consideration of local cost/benefit ratios decreased over the same time period. Partnerships with only one international partner or with institutional partners in Africa had lower reciprocity scores than those with two or more partners and institutional partners in Asia and South America. We recommend that a new focus on ethics in global health partnerships leads to the inclusion of the principles of reciprocity in model program descriptions in order to enable and encourage ethical, sustainable, and mutually beneficial institutional partnerships.

  5. A Reciprocal Peer Review System to Support College Students' Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yu-Fen

    2011-01-01

    As students' problem-solving processes in writing are rarely observed in face-to-face instruction, they have few opportunities to participate collaboratively in peer review to improve their texts. This study reports the design of a reciprocal peer review system for students to observe and learn from each other when writing. A sample of 95…

  6. Reciprocity in International Affairs: An Analysis of Nigeria/South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper analysed the March 2012 yellow fever diplomatic row between Nigeria and South Africa. It argued that the principle of reciprocity in international relations came to the fore in the row. The paper made the point that the row was a mild explosion of underlying tensions between the two African giants. An issue is the ...

  7. Generation of the reciprocal-binomial state for optical fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valverde, C.; Avelar, A.T.; Baseia, B.; Malbouisson, J.M.C.

    2003-01-01

    We compare the efficiencies of two interesting schemes to generate truncated states of the light field in running modes, namely the 'quantum scissors' and the 'beam-splitter array' schemes. The latter is applied to create the reciprocal-binomial state as a travelling wave, required to implement recent experimental proposals of phase-distribution determination and of quantum lithography

  8. Reciprocal relationships between job demands, job resources, and recovery opportunities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Rodríguez-Muñoz (Alfredo); A.I. Sanz-Vergel (Ana Isabel); E. Demerouti (Eva); A.B. Bakker (Arnold)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of this study was to explore longitudinal relationships between job demands, job resources, and recovery opportunities. On the basis of the Job Demands-Resources model and Conservation of Resources theory we hypothesized that we would find reciprocal relations between job

  9. Cardiovascular response to resistive and non-resistive reciprocal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Reciprocal pulley exercise is usually recommended for physiotherapy patients undergoing rehabilitation for muscle strengthening exercises or improvement in joint range of motion but, very little is known of its effects on the cardiovascular system. Aims: This study aimed at investigating the blood pressure and ...

  10. Evaluation of layer type chickens under reciprocal recurrent selection

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Matings within pure male and female lines, and between pure male and female lines were carried out to produce purebred male line (AA x AA), female line (BB x BB), cross (AA x BB) and reciprocal cross (BB x AA). A total number of 364 pullets arising from 207 hens and 23 cocks in generation 1 and 440 pullets from 70 ...

  11. Apical extrusion of debris using reciprocating files and rotary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... the other groups, with the exception of the Typhoon group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: According to our study, all systems caused apical debris extrusion. However, the Reciproc group was associated with less debris extrusion when compared to the other groups. Key words: Apical extrusion, endodontics, single file systems ...

  12. Pharmacological treatment of young children with permanent junctional reciprocating tachycardia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Stuijvenberg, M; Beaufort-Krol, GCM; Haaksma, J; Bink-Boelkens, MTE

    2003-01-01

    Our objective was to assess the efficacy of pharmacological treatment in reducing the incidence of permanent junctional reciprocating tachycardia in young children, or to bring the mean heart rate over 24 h to a normal level. We included 21 children with a median age of 0.05 year seen with permanent

  13. Teacher, Team, and School Change through Reciprocal Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherkowski, Sabre; Schnellert, Leyton

    2018-01-01

    This paper documents the first year of a qualitative case study investigating the experiences of reciprocal learning teams of teachers within a small, rural secondary school. The purpose of this study was to examine how teachers experienced collaborative professional development (PD) and how their experiences contributed to developing the culture…

  14. Self-Esteem and Adolescent Problems: Modeling Reciprocal Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Morris; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Explores the reciprocal relationships between self-esteem and the following three problems of youth: (1) juvenile delinquency; (2) poor school performance; and (3) psychological depression. Findings include the following: (1) low self-esteem fosters delinquency, which may enhance self-esteem; (2) school performance affects self-esteem; and (3)…

  15. The Reciprocal Organization of Constructive Activity in Drug Addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhmetzyanova, Anna I.; Nikishina, Vera B.; Klyueva, Nadezhda V.; Petrash, Ekaterina A.

    2016-01-01

    The urgency of the problem stated in the article is caused by the fact that modern scientific studies show that sustainable neuro-associative connections with the object of addiction arise at chemical addiction. The aim of this study is to examine the features of the reciprocal organization of constructive activities in drug addiction. Study of…

  16. Modified condylotomy versus conventional conservative treatment in painful reciprocal clicking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakke, Merete; Eriksson, Lars; Thorsen, Niels Max

    2008-01-01

    patients, 19-44 years of age, with severe painful reciprocal clicking. Before and after treatment, assessments were performed by subjective reports, clinical recordings, and blinded evaluations of radiography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Based on the clinical evaluations before treatment, all...

  17. Paradoxical Effects of Feedback in International Online Reciprocal Peer Tutoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topping, K. J.; Dehkinet, R.; Blanch, S.; Corcelles, M.; Duran, D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports an online reciprocal peer tutoring project for improving language competence in Spanish and English. Students aged 9-12 years from Scotland and Catalonia were matched to act as tutors in their own language and as tutees in a modern foreign language. Students were intended to improve both their first language (through helping the…

  18. Reciprocity and its utilization in ultrasonic flow meters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lunde, Per; Vestrheim, Magne; Boe, Reidar; Smoergrav, Skule; Abrahamsen, Atle K.

    2005-07-01

    In ultrasonic transit time flow meters for gas and liquid (USMs), the flow direction, the flow velocity and the sound velocity are estimated from the measured up- and downstream transit times. At no-flow conditions, the up- and downstream transit times of such meters should ideally be the same, or the difference should be negligible. This may not be the case unless special precautions are made. In order to reduce the possibility of the meter to detect a false flow at no-flow conditions, USMs are typically ''dry calibrated'' before being installed in the field. ''Dry calibration'' (which may be made in different ways), in general involves measurement of (a) the time delays due to electronics, cables and transducers, (b) the so called ''{delta}t-correction'' (for each acoustic path, also denoted ''zero flow offset factor''), and (c) geometrical parameters. Various {delta}t-correction approaches may be used by different manufacturers, but these are basically similar and have the same purpose: to reduce the false flow detection and improve the accuracy at low and no-flow conditions (''zero flow adjustment''), without significantly affecting the accuracy at the high velocity measurements. The AGA-9 report and the API MPMS Ch. 5.8 standard both prescribe need for ''zero flow verification test (zero test)'' or ''zeroing the meter'', for gas and liquid USMs, respectively. Advances in USM technology based on the electro acoustic reciprocity principle have provided methods for reduction or even neglect ion of the need for ''{delta} t-correction'' of USMs. That means, if the USM measurement system is reciprocal, and operated in a ''sufficiently reciprocal'' way, the ''{delta}t-correction'' may be negligibly small over the operational range of pressure and temperature, and

  19. The reciprocal relations between morphological processes and reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruk, Richard S; Bergman, Krista

    2013-01-01

    Reciprocal relations between emerging morphological processes and reading skills were examined in a longitudinal study tracking children from Grade 1 through Grade 3. The aim was to examine predictive relationships between productive morphological processing involving composing and decomposing of inflections and derivations, reading ability for pseudoword and word decoding, and word and passage reading comprehension after controlling for initial abilities in reading, morphological processing, phonological awareness, and vocabulary. Reciprocal influences were indicated by predictive relations among initial morphological processes and later reading abilities co-occurring with relationships between initial reading abilities and later morphological processes. Using multilevel modeling, decomposing and composing were found to predict emerging word decoding and word and passage comprehension but not pseudoword decoding. Reading comprehension predicted growth in decomposing. Subsequent regression analyses of model-estimated early linear growth in predictors and later linear growth in outcomes showed that early growth in morphological processes predicted later growth in word decoding and passage comprehension. Although reciprocal relations between emerging morphological processes and reading skills were observed, the different patterns on each side of the reciprocal "coin" indicated that the mechanisms underlying predictive influences are likely different but related to quality of lexical representations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Reciprocal Teaching of Comprehension Strategies Improves EFL Learners' Writing Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbani, Mohammad Reza; Gangeraj, Atefeh Ardeshir; Alavi, Sahar Zahed

    2013-01-01

    Although the importance of reading in developing writing ability is undeniable, few competent readers in EFL contexts develop into competent writers. Since students are not aware that reading can assist them in writing, this study examined the effect of reciprocal teaching--which focuses on four reading comprehension strategies, namely…

  1. Reciprocal genomic evolution in the ant-fungus agricultural symbiosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Sanne; Hu, Haofu; Li, Cai

    2016-01-01

    The attine ant-fungus agricultural symbiosis evolved over tens of millions of years, producing complex societies with industrial-scale farming analogous to that of humans. Here we document reciprocal shifts in the genomes and transcriptomes of seven fungus-farming ant species and their fungal...

  2. Performance of oysters in reciprocal transplants between two ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Oyster spat were reciprocally transplanted between Benya Lagoon at Elmina and Nakwa Lagoon at Nakwa and grown on cultches. Shell growth, dry meat weight, and survival of the transplants were monitored for at least six months and compared with their counterparts at their new locations as well as their places of origin.

  3. Reciprocal Relationships between Math Self-Concept and Math Anxiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed, Wondimu; Minnaert, Alexander; Kuyper, Hans; Van der Werf, Greetje

    The present study examined the reciprocal relationships between self-concept and anxiety in mathematics. A sample of 495 grade 7 students (51% girls) completed self-report measures assessing self-concept and anxiety three times in a school year. Structural equation modeling was used to test a

  4. Grooming reciprocity in female tibetan macaques macaca thibetana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Dongpo; Li, Jinhua; Garber, Paul A; Sun, Lixing; Zhu, Yong; Sun, Binghua

    2012-06-01

    Grooming among nonhuman primates is widespread and may represent an important service commodity that is exchanged within a biological marketplace. In this study, using focal animal sampling methods, we recorded grooming relationships among 12 adult females in a free-ranging group of Tibetan macaques (Macaca thibetana) at Huangshan, China, to determine the influence of rank and kinship on grooming relationships, and whether females act as reciprocal traders (exchange grooming received for grooming given) or interchange traders (interchange grooming for social tolerance or other commodities). The results showed that: (1) grooming given was positively correlated with grooming received; (2) kinship did not exert a significant influence on grooming reciprocity; and (3) grooming reciprocity occurred principally between individuals of adjacent rank; however, when females of different rank groomed, females tended to groom up the hierarchy (lower ranking individuals groomed higher ranking individuals more than vice versa). Our results support the contention that both grooming reciprocity and the interchange of grooming for tolerance represent important social tactics used by female Tibetan macaques. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Unilateral or Reciprocal Climate Policy? Experimental Evidence from China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Bernauer

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The traditional political economy account of global climate change governance directs our attention to fundamental collective action problems associated with global public goods provision, resulting from positive or negative externalities as well as freeriding. The governance architecture of the 1997 Kyoto Protocol uses the traditional approaches of international diplomacy for addressing such challenges: legally binding commitments based on principles of reciprocity and (fair cost/burden sharing via formalized carbon-budgeting. Yet, the 2015 Paris Agreement has essentially abandoned this approach, as it now operates on the basis of internationally coordinated and monitored unilateralism. On the presumption that public opinion matters for government policy, we examine how citizens view this shift in climate policy from reciprocity to unilateralism, after many years of exposure to strong reciprocity rhetoric by governments and stakeholders. To that end, we fielded a survey experiment in China, the world’s largest greenhouse gas (GHG emitter. The results show that there is, perhaps surprisingly, strong and robust public support for unilateral, non-reciprocal climate policy. To the extent China is interested in pushing ahead with ambitious and thus costly GHG reduction policies, our results suggest that China can leverage segments of public support in order to overcome domestic obstacles to GHG mitigation policies.

  6. 32 CFR 634.16 - Reciprocal state-military action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Reciprocal state-military action. 634.16 Section 634.16 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MOTOR VEHICLE TRAFFIC SUPERVISION Driving Privileges § 634.16...

  7. 75 FR 75937 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-07

    ... National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines... internal combustion engines. Subsequently, the Administrator received two petitions for reconsideration... Any industry using a stationary 2211 Electric power reciprocating internal generation, combustion...

  8. 75 FR 37732 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-30

    ... National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines... hazardous air pollutants for existing stationary compression ignition reciprocating internal combustion... combustion engines. 40 CFR 63.6590 was amended by revising paragraphs (b)(1) and (3). Inadvertently...

  9. 77 FR 60341 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-03

    ... National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines; New Source Performance Standards for Stationary Internal Combustion Engines AGENCY: Environmental Protection... Pollutants for Stationary Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines to solicit comment on specific issues...

  10. 77 FR 37361 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-21

    ... National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines; New Source Performance Standards for Stationary Internal Combustion Engines AGENCY: Environmental Protection... Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines; New Source Performance...

  11. 76 FR 79051 - Airworthiness Directives; Lycoming Engines, Fuel Injected Reciprocating Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-21

    ... reciprocating engines manufactured by Lycoming Engines that incorporate externally mounted fuel injection lines.... (3) This AD is not applicable to engines having internally mounted fuel injection lines, which are... Airworthiness Directives; Lycoming Engines, Fuel Injected Reciprocating Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation...

  12. Evidence of direct reciprocity, but not of indirect and generalized reciprocity, in the grooming exchanges of wild Barbary macaques (Macaca sylvanus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molesti, Sandra; Majolo, Bonaventura

    2017-09-01

    Reciprocity is one of the mechanisms that have been proposed to explain the exchange of social behaviors, such as grooming, in animals. Reciprocity assumes that individuals act as the donor and recipient of grooming and switch roles over time to balance the benefits and costs of this behavior. Three main patterns of reciprocity may follow a grooming given: (i) direct reciprocity, where the former recipient returns the grooming to the former donor; (ii) indirect reciprocity, where another individual returns the grooming to the former donor; and (iii) generalized reciprocity, where the former recipient returns the grooming to another individual. While there is evidence that direct reciprocity plays an important role in various species of animals, the role of indirect and generalized reciprocity is less clear and has been rarely analyzed. We tested the role of direct, indirect, and generalized reciprocity in explaining grooming exchanges of wild Barbary macaques, by analyzing the temporal contingency between giving and receiving grooming. We collected the occurrence and latency of the three types of grooming reciprocation during 1 hr long focal sessions run simultaneously on two partners who just stopped grooming (post-grooming session) or who were in proximity (i.e., within 1.5 m) without grooming each other (control session). We ran the analyses on 284 post-grooming and 63 control sessions. The results revealed a temporal contingency of grooming interactions exchanged according to direct reciprocity but not according to indirect or generalized reciprocity. Our results indicate that grooming distribution in Barbary macaques is partner-specific. We discuss the possible role of cognition and emotions in explaining direct reciprocity in animals. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Transcranial electrical neuromodulation based on the reciprocity principle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariano eFernandez Corazza

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A key challenge in multi-electrode transcranial electrical stimulation (TES or transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS is to find a current injection pattern that delivers the necessary current density at a target and minimizes it in the rest of the head, which is mathematically modelled as an optimization problem. Such an optimization with the Least Squares (LS or Linearly Constrained Minimum Variance (LCMV algorithms is generally computationally expensive and requires multiple independent current sources. Based on the reciprocity principle in electroencephalography (EEG and TES, it could be possible to find the optimal TES patterns quickly whenever the solution of the forward EEG problem is available for a brain region of interest. Here, we investigate the reciprocity principle as a guideline for finding optimal current injection patterns in TES that comply with safety constraints. We define four different trial cortical targets in a detailed seven-tissue finite element head model, and analyze the performance of the reciprocity family of TES methods in terms of electrode density, targeting error, focality, intensity, and directionality using the LS and LCMV solutions as the reference standards. It is found that the reciprocity algorithms show good performance comparable to the LCMV and LS solutions. Comparing the 128 and 256 electrode cases, we found that use of greater electrode density improves focality, directionality, and intensity parameters. The results show that reciprocity principle can be used to quickly determine optimal current injection patterns in TES and help to simplify TES protocols that are consistent with hardware and software availability and with safety constraints.

  14. "You Are a Part of the Solution": Negotiating Gender-Based Violence and Engendering Change in Urban Informal Settlements in Mumbai, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Proshant; Daruwalla, Nayreen; Jayaraman, Anuja; Pantvaidya, Shanti

    2016-08-04

    This article explores how women front-line workers engage with domestic and gender-based violence in the urban informal settlements of Dharavi in Mumbai, India. We conducted in-depth interviews with 13 voluntary front-line workers, along with ethnographic fieldwork in Dharavi, as a part of a pilot study. Our findings contribute to literature on context-specific approaches to understanding gender-based violence and "models" to prevent domestic violence in urban micro-spaces. Furthermore, we also discuss notions of "change" (badlaav) that the front-line workers experience. Finally, this article presents implications for socially engaged ethnographic research, as well as contextual and grounded insights on ways to reduce gender-based and domestic violence. © The Author(s) 2016.

  15. Some properties of generalized self-reciprocal polynomials over finite fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryul Kim

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Numerous results on self-reciprocal polynomials over finite fields have been studied. In this paper we generalize some of these to a-self reciprocal polynomials defined in [4]. We consider some properties of the divisibility of a-reciprocal polynomials and characterize the parity of the number of irreducible factors for a-self reciprocal polynomials over finite fields of odd characteristic.

  16. Lack of reciprocity among Dutch teachers: Validation of reciprocity indices and their relation to stress and well-being

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horn, J.E. van; Schaufeli, W.B.; Taris, T.W.

    2001-01-01

    This research presents the results of two related studies on the convergent and construct validity of three measures of reciprocity in exchange relationships at work. In Study 1, 71 Dutch teachers were interviewed about their specific investments and outcomes in the exchange relationships with their

  17. The Effect of Reciprocal Peer Tutoring and Non-Reciprocal Peer Tutoring on the Performance of Students in College Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dioso-Henson, Luzale

    2012-01-01

    Formalised peer-to-peer collaboration and the use of web-enhanced materials that are consistent with course objectives, graded assessments and learning outcomes is well known in educational practice. This study compared the academic gains of college students enrolled in Physics using Reciprocal Peer Tutoring (RPT) with others using non-Reciprocal…

  18. A Comparison of Several Statistical Tests of Reciprocity of Self-Disclosure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dindia, Kathryn

    1988-01-01

    Reports the results of a study that used several statistical tests of reciprocity of self-disclosure. Finds little evidence for reciprocity of self-disclosure, and concludes that either reciprocity is an illusion, or that different or more sophisticated methods are needed to detect it. (MS)

  19. 76 FR 56637 - Airworthiness Directives; Lycoming Engines Model IO-720-A1B Reciprocating Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-14

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Lycoming Engines Model IO-720-A1B Reciprocating Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation... directive (AD) for certain model IO-720-A1B Lycoming Engines reciprocating engines. This AD requires a... two Lycoming Engines model IO- 720-A1B reciprocating engines, installed on airplanes of U.S. registry...

  20. Reciprocal Interaction of Dendrite Geometry and Nuclear Calcium-VEGFD Signaling Gates Memory Consolidation and Extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemstedt, Thekla J; Bengtson, C Peter; Ramírez, Omar; Oliveira, Ana M M; Bading, Hilmar

    2017-07-19

    Nuclear calcium is an important signaling end point in synaptic excitation-transcription coupling that is critical for long-term neuroadaptations. Here, we show that nuclear calcium acting via a target gene, VEGFD, is required for hippocampus-dependent fear memory consolidation and extinction in mice. Nuclear calcium-VEGFD signaling upholds the structural integrity and complexity of the dendritic arbor of CA1 neurons that renders those cells permissive for the efficient generation of synaptic input-evoked nuclear calcium transients driving the expression of plasticity-related genes. Therefore, the gating of memory functions rests on the reciprocally reinforcing maintenance of an intact dendrite geometry and a functional synapse-to-nucleus communication axis. In psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders, therapeutic application of VEGFD may help to stabilize dendritic structures and network connectivity, which may prevent cognitive decline and could boost the efficacy of extinction-based exposure therapies. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT This study uncovers a reciprocal relationship between dendrite geometry, the ability to generate nuclear calcium transients in response to synaptic inputs, and the subsequent induction of expression of plasticity-related and dendritic structure-preserving genes. Insufficient nuclear calcium signaling in CA1 hippocampal neurons and, consequently, reduced expression of the nuclear calcium target gene VEGFD, a dendrite maintenance factor, leads to reduced-complexity basal dendrites of CA1 neurons, which severely compromises the animals' consolidation of both memory and extinction memory. The structure-protective function of VEGFD may prove beneficial in psychiatric disorders as well as neurodegenerative and aging-related conditions that are associated with loss of neuronal structures, dysfunctional excitation-transcription coupling, and cognitive decline. Copyright © 2017 the authors 0270-6474/17/376946-10$15.00/0.

  1. Reciprocal upregulation of Notch signaling molecules in hematopoietic progenitor and mesenchymal stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kikuchi Y

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Although mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs play pivotal supportive roles in hematopoiesis, how they interact with hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs is not well understood. We investigated the interaction between HSCs and surrogate MSCs (C3H10T1/2 stromal cells, focusing on the molecular events induced by cell contact of these bipartite populations. C3H10T1/2 is a mesenchymal stromal cell line that can be induced to differentiate into preadipocytes (A54 and myoblasts (M1601. The stromal cell derivatives were cocultured with murine HSCs (Lineage-Sca1+, and gene expression profiles in stromal cells and HSCs were compared before and after the coculture. HSCs gave rise to cobblestone areas only on A54 cells, with ninefold more progenitors than on M1601 or undifferentiated C3H10T1/2 cells. Microarray-based screening and a quantitative reverse transcriptase directed-polymerase chain reaction showed that the levels of Notch ligands (Jagged1 and Delta-like 3 were increased in A54 cells upon interaction with HSCs. On the other hand, the expression of Notch1 and Hes1 was upregulated in the HSCs cocultured with A54 cells. A transwell assay revealed that the reciprocal upregulation was dependent on cell-to-cell contact. The result suggested that in the hematopoietic niche, HSCs help MSCs to produce Notch ligands, and in turn, MSCs help HSCs to express Notch receptor. Such a reciprocal upregulation would reinforce the downstream signaling to determine the fate of hematopoietic cell lineage. Clarification of the initiating events on cell contact should lead to the identification of specific molecular targets to facilitate HSC engraftment in transplantation therapy.

  2. Gender Based Within-Household Inequality in Childhood Immunization in India: Changes over Time and across Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ashish

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives Despite India's substantial economic growth in the past two decades, girls in India are discriminated against in access to preventive healthcare including immunizations. Surprisingly, no study has assessed the contribution of gender based within-household discrimination to the overall inequality in immunization status of Indian children. This study therefore has two objectives: to estimate the gender based within-household inequality (GWHI) in immunization status of Indian children and to examine the inter-regional and inter-temporal variations in the GWHI. Data and Methods The present study used households with a pair of male-female siblings (aged 1–5 years) from two rounds of National Family Health Survey (NFHS, 1992–93 and 2005–06). The overall inequality in the immunization status (after controlling for age and birth order) of children was decomposed into within-households and between-households components using Mean log deviation to obtain the GWHI component. The analysis was conducted at the all-India level as well as for six specified geographical regions and at two time points (1992–93 and 2005–06). Household fixed-effects models for immunization status of children were also estimated. Results and Conclusions Findings from household fixed effects analysis indicated that the immunization scores of girls were significantly lower than that of boys. The inequality decompositions revealed that, at the all-India level, the absolute level of GWHI in immunization status decreased from 0.035 in 1992–93 to 0.023 in 2005–06. However, as a percentage of total inequality, it increased marginally (15.5% to 16.5%). In absolute terms, GWHI decreased in all the regions except in the North-East. But, as a percentage of total inequality it increased in the North-Eastern, Western and Southern regions. The main conclusions are the following: GWHI contributes substantially to the overall inequality in immunization status of Indian children

  3. Gender based within-household inequality in childhood immunization in India: changes over time and across regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ashish

    2012-01-01

    Despite India's substantial economic growth in the past two decades, girls in India are discriminated against in access to preventive healthcare including immunizations. Surprisingly, no study has assessed the contribution of gender based within-household discrimination to the overall inequality in immunization status of Indian children. This study therefore has two objectives: to estimate the gender based within-household inequality (GWHI) in immunization status of Indian children and to examine the inter-regional and inter-temporal variations in the GWHI. The present study used households with a pair of male-female siblings (aged 1-5 years) from two rounds of National Family Health Survey (NFHS, 1992-93 and 2005-06). The overall inequality in the immunization status (after controlling for age and birth order) of children was decomposed into within-households and between-households components using Mean log deviation to obtain the GWHI component. The analysis was conducted at the all-India level as well as for six specified geographical regions and at two time points (1992-93 and 2005-06). Household fixed-effects models for immunization status of children were also estimated. Findings from household fixed effects analysis indicated that the immunization scores of girls were significantly lower than that of boys. The inequality decompositions revealed that, at the all-India level, the absolute level of GWHI in immunization status decreased from 0.035 in 1992-93 to 0.023 in 2005-06. However, as a percentage of total inequality, it increased marginally (15.5% to 16.5%). In absolute terms, GWHI decreased in all the regions except in the North-East. But, as a percentage of total inequality it increased in the North-Eastern, Western and Southern regions. The main conclusions are the following: GWHI contributes substantially to the overall inequality in immunization status of Indian children; and though the overall inequality in immunization status declined in all the

  4. Gender based within-household inequality in childhood immunization in India: changes over time and across regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Singh

    Full Text Available Despite India's substantial economic growth in the past two decades, girls in India are discriminated against in access to preventive healthcare including immunizations. Surprisingly, no study has assessed the contribution of gender based within-household discrimination to the overall inequality in immunization status of Indian children. This study therefore has two objectives: to estimate the gender based within-household inequality (GWHI in immunization status of Indian children and to examine the inter-regional and inter-temporal variations in the GWHI.The present study used households with a pair of male-female siblings (aged 1-5 years from two rounds of National Family Health Survey (NFHS, 1992-93 and 2005-06. The overall inequality in the immunization status (after controlling for age and birth order of children was decomposed into within-households and between-households components using Mean log deviation to obtain the GWHI component. The analysis was conducted at the all-India level as well as for six specified geographical regions and at two time points (1992-93 and 2005-06. Household fixed-effects models for immunization status of children were also estimated.Findings from household fixed effects analysis indicated that the immunization scores of girls were significantly lower than that of boys. The inequality decompositions revealed that, at the all-India level, the absolute level of GWHI in immunization status decreased from 0.035 in 1992-93 to 0.023 in 2005-06. However, as a percentage of total inequality, it increased marginally (15.5% to 16.5%. In absolute terms, GWHI decreased in all the regions except in the North-East. But, as a percentage of total inequality it increased in the North-Eastern, Western and Southern regions. The main conclusions are the following: GWHI contributes substantially to the overall inequality in immunization status of Indian children; and though the overall inequality in immunization status declined

  5. Fault detection in reciprocating compressor valves under varying load conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichler, Kurt; Lughofer, Edwin; Pichler, Markus; Buchegger, Thomas; Klement, Erich Peter; Huschenbett, Matthias

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a novel approach for detecting cracked or broken reciprocating compressor valves under varying load conditions. The main idea is that the time frequency representation of vibration measurement data will show typical patterns depending on the fault state. The problem is to detect these patterns reliably. For the detection task, we make a detour via the two dimensional autocorrelation. The autocorrelation emphasizes the patterns and reduces noise effects. This makes it easier to define appropriate features. After feature extraction, classification is done using logistic regression and support vector machines. The method's performance is validated by analyzing real world measurement data. The results will show a very high detection accuracy while keeping the false alarm rates at a very low level for different compressor loads, thus achieving a load-independent method. The proposed approach is, to our best knowledge, the first automated method for reciprocating compressor valve fault detection that can handle varying load conditions.

  6. Indirect Reciprocity with Optional Interactions and Private Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Olejarz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We consider indirect reciprocity with optional interactions and private information. A game is offered between two players and accepted unless it is known that the other person is a defector. Whenever a defector manages to exploit a cooperator, his or her reputation is revealed to others in the population with some probability. Therefore, people have different private information about the reputation of others, which is a setting that is difficult to analyze in the theory of indirect reciprocity. Since a defector loses a fraction of his social ties each time he exploits a cooperator, he is less efficient at exploiting cooperators in subsequent rounds. We analytically calculate the critical benefit-to-cost ratio above which cooperation is successful in various settings. We demonstrate quantitative agreement with simulation results of a corresponding Wright–Fisher process with optional interactions and private information. We also deduce a simple necessary condition for the critical benefit-to-cost ratio.

  7. Intimate Partner Violence: A Rare Case of Reciprocal Homicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauchois, Aurélie; Paraire, François; Lorin de la Grandmaison, Geoffroy

    2017-06-01

    We present the case of a reciprocal homicide by stabbing that occurred within an unmarried couple without known history of spousal violence. Each partner killed the other one at the same time and at the same place using kitchen knives. They were both found dead at home lying on the floor after the neighbors heard an argument and screams coming from the couple's apartment, so they called the police and the fire department. The door was locked from the inside, and the fire department was forced to break the door. Two kitchen knives supporting blood traces were found at the scene. At autopsy, both bodies showed multiple stab wounds, and the lethal ones were due to heart injuries. Defense injuries were also found in both bodies. To our knowledge, this is the first case of reciprocal homicide described in the literature. Other manners of death are discussed, including homicide by a third party, homicide-suicide, and suicide pact.

  8. Hybrid Optimization in the Design of Reciprocal Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parigi, Dario; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Sassone, Mario

    2012-01-01

    . In this paper it is shown that the geometrically compatible position of the elements could be determined by local search algorithm gradient-based (GB). However the control on which bar sit on the top or in the bottom at each connection can be regarded as a topological problem and require the use of algorithms...... that explore the global domain of solutions as genetic algorithms (GAs). The benchmark tests show that when the control on the topology is required the best result is obtained by a hybrid approach that combines the global search of the GA with the local search of a GB algorithm. The optimization method......The paper presents a method to generate the geometry of reciprocal structures by means of a hybrid optimization procedure. The geometry of reciprocal structures where elements are sitting on the top or in the bottom of each other is extremely difficult to predict because of the non...

  9. Balanced reciprocal translocation 5,18: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahram Savad

    2014-05-01

    Conclusion: A balanced reciprocal translocation carrier is phenotypically normal, but during meiosis І, carrier chromosomes cant pair normally and form quadrivalant instead of bivalant that depend on type of their segregation (alternate, adjacent 1, adjacent 2,3:1,4:0, produce gametes that are chromosomally unbalanced which can result in early fetus abortion. Considering the number of abnormal gametes, the most effective way to help couples with this problem seems to be PGD 24sure, since it can identify reciprocal and Robertsonian translocation and allows concurrent screening of all chromosomes for aneuploidy. Another technique that can be compared with PGD 24sure is fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH, but it has several technical limitations such as it is expensive and complexity, in addition it has only few probes (for chromosomes 21, 13, 18, X, Y so sometimes necessary to create patient specific protocols.

  10. Marital conflict and children's sleep: reciprocal relations and socioeconomic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Ryan J; El-Sheikh, Mona

    2011-06-01

    We examined reciprocal relations between parental marital conflict and children's sleep disruptions over two years. The roles of ethnicity (African American and European American) and socioeconomic status were tested as moderators of the examined relations. A community sample of 176 school-age children (M age = 8.68 at T1) and their parents participated at T1 and T2 with a 2-year interval between waves. Mothers, fathers, and children reported on parental marital conflict, and children's sleep was measured via actigraphy and self-reports. Latent variable modeling indicated that T1 marital conflict predicted increases in children's sleep disruptions longitudinally; results were more pronounced for African American children and those from lower SES homes. Further, children's sleep disruptions at T1 predicted increases in marital conflict over time. Results demonstrate the importance of reciprocal relations between a prevalent familial stressor and a fundamental facet of children's health, especially when considering the sociocultural milieu. 2011 APA, all rights reserved

  11. Measuring reciprocity in high functioning children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ommeren, Tineke Backer; Begeer, Sander; Scheeren, Anke M; Koot, Hans M

    2012-06-01

    Few instruments have been developed that measure impairments in reciprocity, a defining feature of autism. We introduce a new test assessing the quality of reciprocal behaviour: the interactive drawing test (IDT). Children and adolescents (n = 49) with and without high functioning autism spectrum disorders (HFASD) were invited to collaborate with an experimenter in making a joint drawing. Within both groups the performance on collaborative reciprocity improved with age. However, compared to the control group, HFASD participants showed less collaborative and more basic reciprocal behaviour and preferred to draw their own objects. They were less tolerant of the experimenter's input as well. Performance on the IDT was independent of estimated verbal IQ. Reciprocal behaviour in self-initiated objects corresponded with more parental reported autistic traits, while reciprocal behaviour in other-initiated objects corresponded with less autistic traits. The findings of this study suggest that IDT is a promising instrument to assess reciprocity.

  12. An Examination of Reciprocal Influences in Sport Socialization

    OpenAIRE

    海老原, 修; 横山, 文人; 宮下, 充正

    1989-01-01

    This study was designed to clarify reciprocal influences in sport socialization. Parent-effects were assessed by their sport involvement before their child participated in organized sport, whereas child-effects were measured by a parent's attitudinal and behavioral changes of sport involvement caused by a child's participation. Eight indicators of sport involvement were selected as follows: 3 types of interest in sport involvement such as activities, sport consumption, and sport activity in o...

  13. CONSTRUCTING AND DERIVING RECIPROCAL TRIGONOMETRIC RELATIONS: A FUNCTIONAL ANALYTIC APPROACH

    OpenAIRE

    Ninness, Chris; Dixon, Mark; Barnes-Holmes, Dermot; Rehfeldt, Ruth Anne; Rumph, Robin; McCuller, Glen; Holland, James; Smith, Ronald; Ninness, Sharon K; McGinty, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Participants were pretrained and tested on mutually entailed trigonometric relations and combinatorially entailed relations as they pertained to positive and negative forms of sine, cosine, secant, and cosecant. Experiment 1 focused on training and testing transformations of these mathematical functions in terms of amplitude and frequency followed by tests of novel relations. Experiment 2 addressed training in accordance with frames of coordination (same as) and frames of opposition (reciproc...

  14. On the general Dedekind sums and its reciprocity formula

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Introduction. For a positive integer q and an arbitrary integer h, the Dedekind sums S(h, q) is defined as: S(h, q) = ... we obtain an interesting reciprocity formula for the general Dedekind sums S(h, 1, 3,q). That is, we ..... [3] Conrey J B, Fransen Eric, Klein Robert and Scott Clayton, Mean values of Dedekind sums,. J. Number ...

  15. Achievement emotions and academic performance: longitudinal models of reciprocal effects

    OpenAIRE

    Pekrun, Reinhard; Lichtenfeld, Stephanie; Marsh, Herbert, W.; Murayama, Kou; Goetz, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    A reciprocal effects model linking emotion and achievement over time is proposed. The model was tested using five annual waves of the PALMA longitudinal study, which investigated adolescents’ development in mathematics (grades 5-9; N=3,425 German students; mean starting age=11.7 years; representative sample). Structural equation modeling showed that positive emotions (enjoyment, pride) positively predicted subsequent achievement (math end-of-the-year grades and test scores), and that achievem...

  16. Dedicated monitoring and machinery protection systems on reciprocating compressors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grande, Alvaro; Wenisch, Markus [Hoerbiger Ventilwerke GmbH and Co KG, Wien (Austria); Jacobs, Denis [HOERBIGER do Brasil Industria de Equipamentos, Cajamar, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Growing demands on reciprocating compressors (recips) in the process gas industry require particular solutions for machinery protection and performance monitoring systems. Compared to rotating equipment, monitoring systems for recips have to consider the special mechanical and physical characteristics, such as oscillating masses, variable vibration behaviour and varying operating conditions. Furthermore, they provide valuable information about the performance of cylinder related components allowing the operator the optimization of efficiency and availability, and therefore increase production. (author)

  17. A Low Friction Thrust Bearing for Reciprocating Compressors

    OpenAIRE

    Nagata, Shuhei; Kousokabe, Hirokatsu; Sekiyama, Nobuya; Ono, Toshiaki

    2012-01-01

    A thrust bearing with a micro texture on its sliding surface that produces hydrodynamic pressure was developed for use in reciprocating compressors. Evaluation using an elemental friction test showed that its friction loss was 20–60 % lower than that of the current design. Measurement of the efficiency of a compressor with the developed thrust bearing showed that the coefficient of performance was 1.4 % higher than that of a compressor with a conventional thrust bearing.

  18. Novel Long Stroke Reciprocating Compressor for Energy Efficient Jaggery Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rane, M. V.; Uphade, D. B.

    2017-08-01

    Novel Long Stroke Reciprocating Compressor is analysed for jaggery making while avoiding burning of bagasse for concentrating juice. Heat of evaporated water vapour along with small compressor work is recycled to enable boiling of juice. Condensate formed during heating of juice is pure water, as oil-less compressor is used. Superheat of compressor is suppressed by flow of superheated vapours through condensate. It limits heating surface temperature and avoids caramelization of sugar. Thereby improves quality of jaggery and eliminates need to use chemicals for colour improvement. Stroke to bore ratio is 0.6 to 1.2 in conventional reciprocating drives. Long stroke in reciprocating compressors enhances heat dissipation to surrounding by providing large surface area and increases isentropic efficiency by reducing compressor outlet temperature. Longer stroke increases inlet and exit valve operation timings, which reduces inertial effects substantially. Thereby allowing use of sturdier valves. This enables handling liquid along with vapour in compressors. Thereby supressing the superheat and reducing compressor power input. Longer stroke increases stroke to clearance ratios which increases volumetric efficiency and ability of compressor to compress through higher pressure ratios efficiently. Stress-strain simulation is performed in SolidWorks for gear drive. Long Stroke Reciprocating Compressor is developed at Heat Pump Laboratory, stroke/bore 292 mm/32 mm. It is operated and tested successfully at different speeds for operational stability of components. Theoretical volumetric efficiency is 93.9% at pressure ratio 2.0. Specific energy consumption is 108.3 kWhe/m3 separated water, considering free run power.

  19. A reciprocal Wald theorem for varying gravitational function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fay, Stephane

    2004-01-01

    We study when a cosmological constant is a natural issue if it is mimicked by the potential of a massive Hyperextended Scalar Tensor theory with a perfect fluid for Bianchi type I and V models. We then deduce a reciprocal Wald theorem giving the conditions such that the potential tends to a non vanishing constant when the gravitational function varies. We also get the conditions allowing the potential to vanish or diverge. (orig.)

  20. Reciprocal Modulation of Cognitive and Emotional Aspects in Pianistic Performances

    OpenAIRE

    Higuchi, Marcia K. Kodama; Fornari, José; Del Ben, Cristina M.; Graeff, Frederico G.; Leite, João Pereira

    2011-01-01

    Background: High level piano performance requires complex integration of perceptual, motor, cognitive and emotive skills. Observations in psychology and neuroscience studies have suggested reciprocal inhibitory modulation of the cognition by emotion and emotion by cognition. However, it is still unclear how cognitive states may influence the pianistic performance. The aim of the present study is to verify the influence of cognitive and affective attention in the piano performances. Methods an...

  1. Variable speed hermetic reciprocating compressors for domestic refrigerators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Bjarne D.

    1998-01-01

    This article describes the results of a both theoretical and experimental investigation of the performance of variable speed hermetic reciprocating compressors for domestic refrigerators. The investigation was performed as a part of a larger research project with the objective of reducing...... the energy consumption of domestic refrigerators by increasing the efficiency of the refrigeration system. The improvement of the system efficiency was to be obtained by introducing continuous operation and use variable speed compressors for controlling the capacity of the refrigeration system...

  2. On the general Dedekind sums and its reciprocity formula

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    if x is an integer. The various properties of S(h, q) were investigated by many authors. Maybe the most famous property of Dedekind sums is the reciprocity formula (see [2–4]):. S(h, q) + S(q, h) = h2 + q2 + 1. 12hq. −. 1. 4. (1) for all (h, q) = 1,q > 0,h> 0. The main purpose of this paper is to introduce a general. Dedekind sum:.

  3. Explaining Gender-Based Language Use: Effects of Gender Identity Salience on References to Emotion and Tentative Language in Intra- and Intergroup Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomares, Nicholas A.

    2008-01-01

    An experiment tested hypotheses derived from self-categorization theory's explanation for gender-based language use. Under high or low conditions of gender salience, men and women sent e-mail to an ostensible male or female recipient yielding either an intra- or an intergroup setting. Gender salience was manipulated so that the stereotypically…

  4. Gender-Based Content of Educational Materials for the Study of Serbian Language in Lower-Stage Grades of Elementary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifunovic, Vesna; Petrovic, Ruzica

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of analysis of educational materials for the study of Serbian language in lower-stage grades of elementary education (intended for students from 7 through 11 years old) from gender perspective. The first part of the paper presents the process of institutionalization of gender-based education in the Republic of…

  5. Effectiveness of a brief behavioural intervention on psychological distress among women with a history of gender-based violence in urban Kenya : A randomised clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bryant, Richard A.; Schafer, Alison; Dawson, Katie S.; Anjuri, Dorothy; Mulili, Caroline; Ndogoni, Lincoln; Koyiet, Phiona; Sijbrandij, Marit; Ulate, Jeannette; Harper Shehadeh, Melissa; Hadzi-Pavlovic, Dusan; van Ommeren, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Background: Gender-based violence (GBV) represents a major cause of psychological morbidity worldwide, and particularly in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Although there are effective treatments for common mental disorders associated with GBV, they typically require lengthy treatment

  6. Reciprocity and the Emergence of Power Laws in Social Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnegg, Michael

    Research in network science has shown that many naturally occurring and technologically constructed networks are scale free, that means a power law degree distribution emerges from a growth model in which each new node attaches to the existing network with a probability proportional to its number of links (= degree). Little is known about whether the same principles of local attachment and global properties apply to societies as well. Empirical evidence from six ethnographic case studies shows that complex social networks have significantly lower scaling exponents γ ~ 1 than have been assumed in the past. Apparently humans do not only look for the most prominent players to play with. Moreover cooperation in humans is characterized through reciprocity, the tendency to give to those from whom one has received in the past. Both variables — reciprocity and the scaling exponent — are negatively correlated (r = -0.767, sig = 0.075). If we include this effect in simulations of growing networks, degree distributions emerge that are much closer to those empirically observed. While the proportion of nodes with small degrees decreases drastically as we introduce reciprocity, the scaling exponent is more robust and changes only when a relatively large proportion of attachment decisions follow this rule. If social networks are less scale free than previously assumed this has far reaching implications for policy makers, public health programs and marketing alike.

  7. Partner Choice Drives the Evolution of Cooperation via Indirect Reciprocity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilbert Roberts

    Full Text Available Indirect reciprocity potentially provides an important means for generating cooperation based on helping those who help others. However, the use of 'image scores' to summarize individuals' past behaviour presents a dilemma: individuals withholding help from those of low image score harm their own reputation, yet giving to defectors erodes cooperation. Explaining how indirect reciprocity could evolve has therefore remained problematic. In all previous treatments of indirect reciprocity, individuals are assigned potential recipients and decide whether to cooperate or defect based on their reputation. A second way of achieving discrimination is through partner choice, which should enable individuals to avoid defectors. Here, I develop a model in which individuals choose to donate to anyone within their group, or to none. Whereas image scoring with random pairing produces cycles of cooperation and defection, with partner choice there is almost maximal cooperation. In contrast to image scoring with random pairing, partner choice results in almost perfect contingency, producing the correlation between giving and receiving required for cooperation. In this way, partner choice facilitates much higher and more stable levels of cooperation through image scoring than previously reported and provides a simple mechanism through which systems of helping those who help others can work.

  8. Microscopic Perspective on Photovoltaic Reciprocity in Ultrathin Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aeberhard, Urs; Rau, Uwe

    2017-06-16

    The photovoltaic reciprocity theory relates the electroluminescence spectrum of a solar cell under applied bias to the external photovoltaic quantum efficiency of the device as measured at short circuit conditions. Its derivation is based on detailed balance relations between local absorption and emission rates in optically isotropic media with nondegenerate quasiequilibrium carrier distributions. In many cases, the dependence of density and spatial variation of electronic and optical device states on the point of operation is modest and the reciprocity relation holds. In nanostructure-based photovoltaic devices exploiting confined modes, however, the underlying assumptions are no longer justifiable. In the case of ultrathin absorber solar cells, the modification of the electronic structure with applied bias is significant due to the large variation of the built-in field. Straightforward use of the external quantum efficiency as measured at short circuit conditions in the photovoltaic reciprocity theory thus fails to reproduce the electroluminescence spectrum at large forward bias voltage. This failure is demonstrated here by numerical simulation of both spectral quantities at normal incidence and emission for an ultrathin GaAs p-i-n solar cell using an advanced quantum kinetic formalism based on nonequilibrium Green's functions of coupled photons and charge carriers. While coinciding with the semiclassical relations under the conditions of their validity, the theory provides a consistent microscopic relationship between absorption, emission, and charge carrier transport in photovoltaic devices at arbitrary operating conditions and for any shape of optical and electronic density of states.

  9. A reciprocal framework for spatial K-anonymity

    KAUST Repository

    Ghinita, Gabriel

    2010-05-01

    Spatial K-anonymity (SKA) exploits the concept of K-anonymity in order to protect the identity of users from location-based attacks. The main idea of SKA is to replace the exact location of a user U with an anonymizing spatial region (ASR) that contains at least K-1 other users, so that an attacker can pinpoint U with probability at most 1/K. Simply generating an ASR that includes K users does not guarantee SKA. Previous work defined the reciprocity property as a sufficient condition for SKA. However, the only existing reciprocal method, Hilbert Cloak, relies on a specialized data structure. In contrast, we propose a general framework for implementing reciprocal algorithms using any existing spatial index on the user locations. We discuss ASR construction methods with different tradeoffs on effectiveness (i.e., ASR size) and efficiency (i.e., construction cost). Then, we present case studies of applying our framework on top of two popular spatial indices (namely, R*-trees and Quad-trees). Finally, we consider the case where the attacker knows the query patterns of each user. The experimental results verify that our methods outperform Hilbert Cloak. Moreover, since we employ general-purpose spatial indices, the proposed system is not limited to anonymization, but supports conventional spatial queries as well. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Reciprocal burnout model: Interconnectedness of interpersonal and intrapersonal factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreja Pšeničny

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Burnout can be described as chronic state of extreme psychophysical and emotional exhaustion. Burning out is a stage process consisting of: the stage of exhaustion, the stage of captivity and the final stage – adrenal burnout. Adrenal burnout syndrome (ABS is the final stage of burning out process, resulting in a functional blocade of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis which causes secondary cortisol insufficiency. Even though they share similar symptoms, burnout and depression are two different types of disorder. They differ mainly in basic cortisol levels and self-esteem. Researchers tend to link the burnout syndrome and environmental stress (interpersonal causes. Recently, some of them found connection between burnout syndrome and personality traits (intrapersonal causes. Reciprocal burnout model links both causes. It shows that in the same circumstances only a few people suffer from adrenal burnout syndrome. It states that personal characteristics are one of the main causes why people suffering from burnout syndrome enroll in nonreciprocal personal and professional relations. Socialization process plays an important role in development of personality traits. The core of the reciprocal burnout model consists of one's attitude towards his or her basic needs' fulfillment, personal system of values, and correlation between fulfillment of basic needs (energy accumulation and burning out process (energy consumption. Reciprocal burnout model is opening a series of questions, concerning the connection between personality traits, life satisfaction and personal values, and burnout syndrome risk behavior, as well as the influence of whole life circumstances on burning out process.

  11. Evaluation of reciprocating electromagnetic air pumping for portable PEMFC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Kilsung; Kang, Ho; Kang, Seongwon; Kim, Daejoong

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) integrated with an electromagnetic (EM) air pump. The EM air pump provides the PEMFC with air by reciprocating motions of the permanent magnet attached to a flexible membrane. We performed a parametric study to decide the optimal dimensions of the reciprocating EM air pump. The effects of various operating parameters on the EM air pump were investigated with the root-mean-square (RMS) flow rate and current. A core with a higher relative permeability shows better performance. The RMS current linearly increases with the applied voltage and shows no dependence on the frequency. The RMS flow rate also increases with the voltage. The RMS flow rate per power consumption is highest at the frequency around 20 Hz and decreases as the applied voltage increases. When the reciprocating EM air pump was used to supply air to the portable PEMFC, it was found that the power density of the PEMFC increases with the applied voltage and shows the highest performance at the frequency of 10 Hz. We compared the performance of the PEMFC between the flow meter and the EM air pump used as an air supplier. About 81% of the output power using the flow meter was obtained when the EM air pump is operated at the applied voltage of 5 V. The parasitic power ratio reaches at its minimum value about 0.1 with an EM applied voltage of 0.25V. (paper)

  12. The association between female genital fistula symptoms and gender-based violence: A multicountry secondary analysis of household survey data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, Lindsay; Tripathi, Vandana

    2018-01-01

    The Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS), which include standardised questions on female genital fistula symptoms, provide a unique opportunity to evaluate the epidemiology of fistula. This study sought to examine associations between self-reported fistula symptoms and experience of gender-based violence (GBV) among women interviewed in DHS surveys. This study used data from thirteen DHS surveys with standardised fistula and domestic violence modules. Data from the most recent survey in each country were pooled, weighting each survey equally. Multivariable logistic regressions controlled for maternal and demographic factors. Prevalence of fistula symptoms in this sample of 95 625 women ranges from 0.3% to 1.8% by country. The majority of women reporting fistula symptoms (56%) have ever experienced physical violence, and more than one-quarter have ever experienced sexual violence (27%), compared with 38% and 13% among women with no symptoms, respectively. Similarly, 16% of women with fistula symptoms report recently experiencing sexual violence-twice the percentage among women not reporting symptoms (8%). Women whose first experience of sexual violence was from a non-partner have almost four times the odds of reporting fistula symptoms compared with women who never experienced sexual violence. These associations indicate a need to investigate temporal and causal relationships between violence and fistula. The increased risk of physical and sexual violence among women with fistula symptoms suggests that fistula programmes should incorporate GBV into provider training and services. © 2017 The Authors. Tropical Medicine & International Health Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. How sex puts you in gendered shoes: sexuality-priming leads to gender-based self-perception and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hundhammer, Tanja; Mussweiler, Thomas

    2012-07-01

    Scripts for sexual behavior dictate that women be submissive and tender and that men be assertive and dominant, reflecting the stereotypical view of women as communal and of men as agentic. Six experiments tested the hypothesis that exposure to sexuality cues causes men's and women's momentary self-perceptions and concomitant behavior to become more gender-typical. Using both pictorial and verbal prime materials that were presented both supraliminally and subliminally, we found that sex-priming strengthened gender-based self-perceptions (i.e., faster self-categorization as a woman or man; Study 1), heightened identification with one's own gender (Study 2), increased gender self-stereotyping (Study 3), and elicited greater submissiveness in women's behavior and greater assertiveness in men's behavior (Studies 4 and 5). These findings indicate that sex-priming causes self-perception and social behavior to become "attuned" to gender stereotypes. Study 6 demonstrated that these sex-priming effects can be eliminated by modern gender role primes. The potentially detrimental effects of sex-priming and possible countermeasures are discussed. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved

  14. A gender-based approach to developing a healthy lifestyle and healthy weight intervention for diverse Utah women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonsen, Sara E; Digre, Kathleen B; Ralls, Brenda; Mukundente, Valentine; Davis, France A; Rickard, Sylvia; Tavake-Pasi, Fahina; Napia, Eru Ed; Aiono, Heather; Chirpich, Meghan; Stark, Louisa A; Sunada, Grant; Keen, Kassy; Johnston, Leanne; Frost, Caren J; Varner, Michael W; Alder, Stephen C

    2015-08-01

    Utah women from some cultural minority groups have higher overweight/obesity rates than the overall population. We utilized a gender-based mixed methods approach to learn about the underlying social, cultural and gender issues that contribute to the increased obesity risk among these women and to inform intervention development. A literature review and analysis of Utah's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data informed the development of a focus group guide. Focus groups were conducted with five groups of women: African immigrants from Burundi and Rwanda, African Americans, American Indians/Alaskan Natives, Hispanics/Latinas, and Pacific Islanders. Six common themes emerged: (1) health is multidimensional and interventions must address health in this manner; (2) limited resources and time influence health behaviors; (3) norms about healthy weight vary, with certain communities showing more preference to heavier women; (4) women and men have important but different influences on healthy lifestyle practices within households; (5) women have an influential role on the health of families; and (6) opportunities exist within each group to improve health. Seeking insights from these five groups of women helped to identify common and distinct cultural and gender themes related to obesity, which can be used to help elucidate core obesity determinants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A gender-based analysis of work patterns, fatigue, and work/life balance among physicians in postgraduate training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gander, Philippa; Briar, Celia; Garden, Alexander; Purnell, Heather; Woodward, Alistair

    2010-09-01

    To document fatigue in New Zealand junior doctors in hospital-based clinical training positions and identify work patterns associated with work/life balance difficulties. This workforce has had a duty limitation of 72 hours/week since 1985. The authors chose a gender-based analytical approach because of the increasing proportion of female medical graduates. The authors mailed a confidential questionnaire to all 2,154 eligible junior doctors in 2003. The 1,412 respondents were working > or = 40 hours/week (complete questionnaires from 1,366: response rate: 63%; 49% women). For each participant, the authors calculated a multidimensional fatigue risk score based on sleep and work patterns. Women were more likely to report never/rarely getting enough sleep (P life (odds ratio: 3.83; 95% CI: 2.79-5.28), home life (3.37; 2.43-4.67), personal relationships (2.12; 1.57-2.86), and other commitments (3.06; 2.23-4.19).Qualitative analyses indicated a common desire among men and women for better work/life balance and for part-time work, particularly in relation to parenthood. Limitation of duty hours alone is insufficient to manage fatigue risk and difficulties in maintaining work/life balance. These findings have implications for schedule design, professional training, and workforce planning.

  16. Gender-based violence and HIV across the life course: adopting a sexual rights framework to include older women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Bergen; Crockett, Cailin

    2015-11-01

    It is widely known that older women are at lesser risk for sexual violence than younger women, but current inattention to older women in the gender-based violence (GBV) field has minimized the experiences of older women survivors at great detriment to their health and rights. For example, health providers seldom ask older women about their sexual activity and relationships, a neglect that leads to older women being excluded from necessary HIV testing and care as well as support services for abuse. This oversight is increasingly worrisome given the rise in new HIV infections among adults age 50 and older in recent years, with the majority of transmissions stemming from individuals unaware of their HIV-positive status. Building on sexual rights scholarship, this paper argues for an approach to public health interventions for GBV and HIV that acknowledges older women--their sexuality, sexual agency, and activity-- so that health providers and advocates acknowledge and serve older survivors. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Gender-based political harassment and violence: effects on the political work and public roles of women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valverde, María Eugenia Rojas

    2010-01-01

    This article shows the significance of the problems of political harassment and violence against women in positions of political responsibility in Bolivia. This phenomenon is seen in both rural and urban areas and transcends borders. It has been shown that these attacks constitute a violation of women's civil and political rights and a threat to the physical and mental health of women leaders in Bolivia. Furthermore, there is no punishment of guilty parties, reparation, or moral or material compensation for the women who are affected. In Bolivia, gender-based harassment and violence is a fundamental barrier to women's political participation. However, this phenomenon is still not addressed by government programs and is not part of the public discourse and debate. In spite of the measures taken to promote women's political participation, several different administrations have been unable to guarantee women the capacity to occupy positions of responsibility without being threatened or harassed. The results of our research led to a bill addressing this problem. Subsequently, Ecuador took this bill as an example and replicated it in a legislative initiative. These results show the importance of research by organizations that represent women in preventing unjust situations and health problems.

  18. Gender-based violence and sexual and reproductive health among low-income youth in three Brazilian cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacham, Alessandra Sampaio; Simão, Andrea Branco; Caetano, André Junqueira

    2016-05-01

    In this article, we investigate how gender-based violence (GBV) affects the sexual and reproductive health of impoverished adolescents and young adults. We analyse data from a 2011 survey of 450 young women and 300 young men aged 15-29, living in poor neighbourhoods of three middle-sized cities in Minas Gerais, Brazil. In this survey we used a closed-ended questionnaire to collect data from 150 women and 100 men in each city. Our main goal was to explore the relationship between GBV and young women's autonomy in relation to their sexuality, using indicators appropriate to Brazil. Our results showed a decreased prevalence of condom use at first intercourse and an increased prevalence of teenage pregnancies among young women who were in a relationship with a controlling and violent partner. Lower condom use was observed mostly among young men who acknowledged being violent and controlling towards a partner and they also were more likely to have made a partner pregnant as teenagers themselves. We conclude that some variables utilized here as indicators of control and violence from a partner and of young women's autonomy can help us to understand how GBV inside relationships affects the reproductive and sexual health of young men and women, and how empowering them can reduce their susceptibility to unwanted pregnancies and HIV and other STI infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Perceptions about safety and risks in gender-based violence research: implications for the ethics review process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikweyiya, Yandisa; Jewkes, Rachel

    2011-10-01

    Does research on gender-based violence (GBV) pose greater than minimal risk to researchers and participants? This question needs to be understood particularly in light of hesitancy by Institutional Review Boards to approve research on GBV. The safety and risks of doing GBV studies and the implications for the ethical review process have not been a focus of much research. This qualitative study collected data through in-depth interviews with 12 experienced GBV researchers from various countries and a desk review. This paper explores researchers' interpretation of and meanings of the safety recommendations as provided in the WHO guidelines and whether there is empirical evidence on the presence of risks and safety concerns unique to GBV research. Informants raised a number of safety concerns about GBV research, yet in the interviews there were very few examples of problems having occurred, possibly because of the precautions applied. This paper argues that the notion that GBV studies carry greater than minimal risk when ethics precautions are followed is based on speculation, not evidence. It highlights the need for empirical evidence to support assertions of risk in research.

  20. Systematic review of prevention and management strategies for the consequences of gender-based violence in refugee settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgary, Ramin; Emery, Eleanor; Wong, Marcia

    2013-06-01

    Uncertainties continue regarding effective strategies to prevent and address the consequences of gender-based violence (GBV) among refugees. The databases of PubMed, Cochrane Library, Scopus, PsycINFO, Web of Science, Anthropology Plus, EMBASE, DARE, Google Scholar, MSF Field Research, UNHCR and the regional and global indices of the WHO Global Health Library were searched twice within a 6-month period (April and September 2011) for English-language clinical, public health, basic and social science studies evaluating strategies to prevent and manage health sequelae of GBV among refugees before September 2011. Studies not primarily about prevention and treatment, and not describing population, health outcome and interventions, were excluded. The literature search for the prevention and management arms produced 1212 and 1106 results, respectively. After reviewing the titles and abstracts, 29 and 27 articles were selected for review in their entirety, none of which met the inclusion criteria. Multiple panels of expert recommendations and guidelines were not supported by primary data on actual displaced populations. There is a dire need for research that evaluates the efficacy and effectiveness of various responses to GBV to ultimately allow a transition from largely theoretical and expertise driven to a more evidence-based field. We recommend strategies to improve data collection and to overcome barriers in primary data driven research.

  1. Primary and reciprocal space-time experiments, relativistic reciprocity relations and Einstein's train-embankment thought experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Field, J. H.

    2008-01-01

    The concepts of primary and reciprocal experiments and base and travelling frames in special relativity are concisely described and applied to several different space-time experiments. These include Einstein's train/embankment thought experiment and a related thought experiment, due to Sartori, involving two trains in parallel motion with different speeds. Spatially separated clocks which are synchronised in their common proper frame are shown to be so in all inertial frames and their spatial...

  2. "By Seeing with Our Own Eyes, It Can Remain in Our Mind": Qualitative Evaluation Findings Suggest the Ability of Participatory Video to Reduce Gender-Based Violence in Conflict-Affected Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurman, Tilly A.; Trappler, Regan M.; Acosta, Angela; McCray, Pamella A.; Cooper, Chelsea M.; Goodsmith, Lauren

    2014-01-01

    Gender-based violence is pervasive and poses unique challenges in conflict-affected settings, with women and girls particularly vulnerable to its sequelae. Furthermore, widespread stigmatization of gender-based violence promotes silence among survivors and families, inhibiting access to services. Little evidence exists regarding effective…

  3. Reciprocal regulation of Yersinia pestis biofilm formation and virulence by RovM and RovA

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Lei; Fang, Haihong; Yang, Huiying; Zhang, Yiquan; Han, Yanping; Zhou, Dongsheng; Yang, Ruifu

    2016-01-01

    RovA is known to enhance Yersinia pestis virulence by directly upregulating the psa loci. This work presents a complex gene regulatory paradigm involving the reciprocal regulatory action of RovM and RovA on the expression of biofilm and virulence genes as well as on their own genes. RovM and RovA enhance and inhibit Y. pestis biofilm production, respectively, whereas RovM represses virulence in mice. RovM directly stimulates the transcription of hmsT, hmsCDE and rovM, while indirectly enhanci...

  4. Gender-Based Violence and Armed Conflict: A Community-Informed Socioecological Conceptual Model From Northeastern Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mootz, Jennifer J.; Stabb, Sally D.; Mollen, Debra

    2017-01-01

    The high prevalence of gender-based violence (GBV) in armed conflict has been documented in various national contexts, but less is known about the complex pathways that constitute the relation between the two. Employing a community-based collaborative approach, we constructed a community-informed socioecological conceptual model from a feminist perspective, detailing how armed conflict relates to GBV in a conflict-affected rural community in Northeastern Uganda. The research questions were as follows: (1) How does the community conceptualize GBV? and (2) How does armed conflict relate to GBV? Nine focus group discussions divided by gender, age, and profession and six key informant interviews were conducted. Participants’ ages ranged from 9 to 80 years (n =34 girls/women, n = 43 boys/men). Grounded theory was used in analysis. Participants conceptualized eight forms of and 22 interactive variables that contributed to GBV. Armed conflict affected physical violence/quarreling, sexual violence, early marriage, and land grabbing via a direct pathway and four indirect pathways initiated through looting of resources, militarization of the community, death of a parent(s) or husband, and sexual violence. The findings suggest that community, organizational, and policy-level interventions, which include attention to intersecting vulnerabilities for exposure to GBV in conflict-affected settings, should be prioritized. While tertiary psychological interventions with women and girls affected by GBV in these areas should not be eliminated, we suggest that policy makers and members of community and organizational efforts make systemic and structural changes. Online slides for instructors who want to use this article for teaching are available on PWQ’s website at http://journals.sagepub.com/page/pwq/suppl/index PMID:29563663

  5. Making and unmaking ethnicities in the Rwandan context: implication for gender-based violence, health, and wellbeing of women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubai, Anne; Ahlberg, Beth Maina

    2013-10-01

    To examine ethnicity and gender violence in Rwanda from cultural and historical perspectives and explore the encounters between cultural beliefs and practices and the new gender equality policy and programs and the implications of the particular encounters to the health of women. The study is a qualitative drawing from the growing range of interactive approaches and methods within an ethnographic framework of the research design. Twenty individual interviews, six focus group discussions and two 'community mobilization' dialogs were conducted. Violence has continued and there is a conflict between cultural tradition, the de-ethnicization, and gender equality policies. Some of the gender violence preventive programs are influenced by the ethos of the traditional norms, and therefore unwittingly perpetuate gender-based violence. In spite of the progress that Rwanda has made in political empowerment of women, it still seems a long way before real gender equality is achieved. It seems that women's empowerment is not only just an opportunity for political participation but also this is important. It is also about the capacity to make effective choices and to translate them into desired actions and outcomes, unfettered by cultural sanctions. Universalised, top-down gender policy programs have not furnished all women with the necessary capacity to make decisions that affect their traditionally all important reproductive functions; to challenge the embedded gender imbalance; and to strive for a holistic wellbeing of their families, where they play a central role. Indeed, some of the policies could have negative implications to the health of women, in particular, with sexually transmitted infections, including HIV and AIDS.

  6. Perceptions and experiences of research participants on gender-based violence community based survey: implications for ethical guidelines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yandisa Sikweyiya

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To explore how survey respondents perceived their experiences and the impact of participating in a survey, and to assess adverse consequences resulting from participation. DESIGN: Qualitative study involving purposefully selected participants who had participated in a household-based survey. METHODS: This qualitative study was nested within a survey that investigated the prevalence of gender-based violence perpetration and victimization with adult men and women in South Africa. 13 male- and 10 female-in-depth interviews were conducted with survey respondents. RESULTS: A majority of informants, without gender-differences, perceived the survey interview as a rare opportunity to share their adverse and or personal experiences in a 'safe' space. Gender-differences were noted in reporting perceptions of risks involved with survey participation. Some women remained fearful after completing the survey, that should breach of confidentiality or full survey content disclosure occur, they may be victimized by partners as a punishment for survey participation without men's approval. A number of informants generally discussed their survey participation with others. However, among women with interpersonal violence history or currently in abusive relationships, full survey content disclosure was done with fear; the partner responses were negative, and few women reported receiving threatening remarks but none reported being assaulted. In contrast no man reported adverse reaction by others. Informants with major life adversities reported that the survey had made them to relive the experiences causing them sadness and pain at the time. No informant perceived the survey as emotionally harmful or needed professional support because of survey questions. Rather the vast majority perceived benefit from survey participation. CONCLUSION: Whilst no informant felt answering the survey questions had caused them emotional or physical harm, some were distressed

  7. The contribution of gender-based violence and network trauma to gender differences in Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derrick Silove

    Full Text Available Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD occurs twice as commonly amongst women as men. Two common domains of trauma, network trauma and gender based violence (GBV, may contribute to this gender difference in PTSD rates. We examined data from a nationally representative sample of the Australian population to clarify the characteristics of these two trauma domains in their contributions to PTSD rates in men and women.We drew on data from the 2007 Australian National Survey of Mental Health and Well-being to assess gender differences across a comprehensive range of trauma domains, including (1 prevalence of lifetime exposure; (2 identification of an index trauma or DSM-IV Criterion A event; and (3 the likelihood of developing full DSM-IV PTSD symptoms once an index trauma was identified.Men reported more traumatic events (TEs overall but women reported twice the prevalence of lifetime PTSD (women, 13.4%; men, 6.3%. Women reported a threefold higher level of exposure to GBV and were seven times more likely to nominate GBV as the index trauma as compared to men. Women were twice more likely than men to identify a network trauma as the index trauma and more likely to meet full PTSD symptoms in relation to that event (women, 20.6%; men, 14.6%.Women are more likely to identify GBV and network trauma as an index trauma. Women's far greater exposure to GBV contributes to their higher prevalence of PTSD. Women are markedly more likely to develop PTSD when network trauma is identified as the index trauma. Preventing exposure to GBV and providing timely interventions for acute psychological reactions following network trauma may assist in reducing PTSD rates amongst women.

  8. The association and a potential pathway between gender-based violence and induced abortion in Thai Nguyen province, Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Phuong Hong; Nguyen, Son Van; Nguyen, Manh Quang; Nguyen, Nam Truong; Keithly, Sarah Colleen; Mai, Lan Tran; Luong, Loan Thi Thu; Pham, Hoa Quynh

    2012-11-29

    Gender-based violence (GBV) has profound adverse consequences on women's physical, mental, and reproductive health. Although Vietnam has high rates of induced abortion and GBV, literature examining this relationship is lacking. This study examines the association of GBV with induced abortion among married or partnered women of reproductive age in Thai Nguyen province, Vietnam. In addition, we explore contraceptive use and unintended pregnancy as mediators in the pathway between GBV and induced abortion. Data were drawn from a cross-sectional survey of 1,281 women aged 18-49 years in four districts of Thai Nguyen province. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were applied to examine the associations between lifetime history of GBV, contraceptive use, unintended pregnancy, induced abortion, and repeat abortion, controlling for other covariates. One-third of respondents had undergone induced abortion in their lifetime (33.4%), and 11.5% reported having repeat abortions. The prevalence of any type of GBV was 29.1% (17.0% physical violence, 10.4% sexual violence, and 20.1% emotional violence). History of GBV was associated with induced abortion (OR=1.61, 95% CI: 1.20-2.16) and repeat abortion (OR=2.22, 95% CI: 1.48-3.32). Physical violence was significantly associated with induced abortion, and all three types of violence were associated with repeat abortion. Abused women were more likely than non-abused women to report using contraceptives and having an unintended pregnancy, and these factors were in turn associated with increased risk of induced abortion. GBV is pervasive in Thai Nguyen province and is linked to increased risks of induced abortion and repeat abortion. The findings suggest that a pathway underlying this relationship is increased risk of unintended pregnancy due in part to ineffective use of contraceptives. These findings emphasize the importance of screening and identification of GBV and incorporating women's empowerment in

  9. Agenda setting and framing of gender-based violence in Nepal: how it became a health issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombini, Manuela; Mayhew, Susannah H; Hawkins, Ben; Bista, Meera; Joshi, Sunil Kumar; Schei, Berit; Watts, Charlotte

    2016-05-01

    Gender-based violence (GBV) has been addressed as a policy issue in Nepal since the mid 1990s, yet it was only in 2010 that Nepal developed a legal and policy framework to combat GBV. This article draws on the concepts of agenda setting and framing to analyse the historical processes by which GBV became legitimized as a health policy issue in Nepal and explored factors that facilitated and constrained the opening and closing of windows of opportunity. The results presented are based on a document analysis of the policy and regulatory framework around GBV in Nepal. A content analysis was undertaken. Agenda setting for GBV policies in Nepal evolved over many years and was characterized by the interplay of political context factors, actors and multiple frames. The way the issue was depicted at different times and by different actors played a key role in the delay in bringing health onto the policy agenda. Women's groups and less powerful Ministries developed gender equity and development frames, but it was only when the more powerful human rights frame was promoted by the country's new Constitution and the Office of the Prime Minister that legislation on GBV was achieved and a domestic violence bill was adopted, followed by a National Plan of Action. This eventually enabled the health frame to converge around the development of implementation policies that incorporated health service responses. Our explicit incorporation of framing within the Kindgon model has illustrated how important it is for understanding the emergence of policy issues, and the subsequent debates about their resolution. The framing of a policy problem by certain policy actors, affects the development of each of the three policy streams, and may facilitate or constrain their convergence. The concept of framing therefore lends an additional depth of understanding to the Kindgon agenda setting model. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions

  10. Risk Factors for Smoking in Rural Women: The Role of Gender-Based Sexual and Intimate Partner Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Julianna M; Bonomi, Amy E; Lu, Bo; Lomax, Richard G; Wewers, Mary Ellen

    2016-12-01

    Women living in Ohio Appalachia experience cervical cancer at disproportionately high rates. Intimate partner and sexual gender-based violence (GBV) and smoking are independent risk factors for cervical cancer and interact to heighten risk. Appalachian women smoke at higher rates than other Ohio women, but little is known about GBV exposure in the region. The purpose of this study was to establish prevalence of women's exposure to GBV in Ohio Appalachia and examine the association between GBV and smoking among women in the region. A two-phase address-based random sampling approach was used in three purposefully selected Ohio Appalachian counties to identify women to complete an interviewer administered cross-sectional survey (n = 398). The primary exposure variable was GBV Index Score, a 4 level indices representing increasing exposure to eight abuse types. Correlation analysis and logistic regression were used to examine smoking correlations and risk. Almost 57% of women in the three selected Ohio Appalachian counties experienced GBV, with rate increasing to 77.5% among current smokers. The distribution of the GBV Exposure Index Score was significantly different across smoking status (p < = 0.0001), with exposure of GBV increasing when moving from never, to former, to current smokers. When controlling for depression, age, and adult socioeconomic position, GBV Exposure Index was significantly associated with current smoking behavior (OR:1.62, 95% CI [1.21-2.17]). Professionals working to reduce disparate disease burden among women in Ohio Appalachia should consider the role GBV plays in health behavior and behavioral change interventions, including smoking and smoking cessation.

  11. Gender-based violence against adolescent and young adult women in low- and middle-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Michele R; Latimore, Amanda D; Yasutake, Suzumi; Haviland, Miriam; Ahmed, Saifuddin; Blum, Robert W; Sonenstein, Freya; Astone, Nan Marie

    2015-02-01

    Gender-based violence (GBV) is a global health and human rights issue with individual and social determinants. Youth are considered high risk; national influences include norms, policies and practices. By age, nation, and region, we contrast key GBV indicators, specifically intimate partner violence (IPV) and forced sexual debut among adolescent and young adult women using Demographic and Health Surveys across low- and middle-income countries. National prevalence estimates were generated among adolescents (15-19 years) and young adults (20-24 years) for lifetime and the past-year physical and sexual IPV among ever-married/cohabitating women (30 nations) and forced sexual debut among sexually experienced women (17 nations). Meta-analyses provided regional estimates and cross-national comparisons, and compared the past-year IPV prevalence among adolescent and young adult women to adult women. An estimated 28% of adolescent and 29% of young adult women reported lifetime physical or sexual IPV, most prevalent in the East and Southern Africa region. Regional and cross-national variation emerged in patterns of violence by age; overall, young adult women demonstrated higher risk for the past-year IPV relative to adult women (meta-analysis odds ratio, 1.20; 95% confidence interval, 1.10-1.37) and adolescents had a comparable risk (meta-analysis odds ratio, 1.07; 95% confidence interval, .91-1.23). Forced sexual debut was estimated at 12% overall, highest in the East and Southern Africa region. GBV is pervasive among adolescent and young adult women in low- and middle-income countries. The unique risk to youth varies across nations, suggesting an age-place interaction. Future research is needed to clarify contextual determinants of GBV. Findings provide direction for integrating youth within GBV prevention efforts. Copyright © 2015 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The contribution of gender-based violence and network trauma to gender differences in Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silove, Derrick; Baker, Jess R.; Mohsin, Mohammed; Teesson, Maree; Creamer, Mark; O'Donnell, Meaghan; Forbes, David; Carragher, Natacha; Slade, Tim; Mills, Katherine; Bryant, Richard; McFarlane, Alexander; Steel, Zachary; Felmingham, Kim; Rees, Susan

    2017-01-01

    Background Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) occurs twice as commonly amongst women as men. Two common domains of trauma, network trauma and gender based violence (GBV), may contribute to this gender difference in PTSD rates. We examined data from a nationally representative sample of the Australian population to clarify the characteristics of these two trauma domains in their contributions to PTSD rates in men and women. Methods We drew on data from the 2007 Australian National Survey of Mental Health and Well-being to assess gender differences across a comprehensive range of trauma domains, including (1) prevalence of lifetime exposure; (2) identification of an index trauma or DSM-IV Criterion A event; and (3) the likelihood of developing full DSM-IV PTSD symptoms once an index trauma was identified. Results Men reported more traumatic events (TEs) overall but women reported twice the prevalence of lifetime PTSD (women, 13.4%; men, 6.3%). Women reported a threefold higher level of exposure to GBV and were seven times more likely to nominate GBV as the index trauma as compared to men. Women were twice more likely than men to identify a network trauma as the index trauma and more likely to meet full PTSD symptoms in relation to that event (women, 20.6%; men, 14.6%). Conclusion Women are more likely to identify GBV and network trauma as an index trauma. Women’s far greater exposure to GBV contributes to their higher prevalence of PTSD. Women are markedly more likely to develop PTSD when network trauma is identified as the index trauma. Preventing exposure to GBV and providing timely interventions for acute psychological reactions following network trauma may assist in reducing PTSD rates amongst women. PMID:28207775

  13. A Profile of Gender-Based Violence Research in Europe: Findings From a Focused Mapping Review and Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury-Jones, Caroline; Appleton, Jane V; Clark, Maria; Paavilainen, Eija

    2017-01-01

    This article reports the findings from a new form of review: a focused mapping review and synthesis. The aim was to create a contemporary, snapshot profile of the nature and scope of gender-based violence (GBV) studies conducted in Europe. GBV is one of the most prevalent human rights violations in the world affecting mainly women and girls. The policy context of GBV in Europe has gathered momentum in recent years, but we do not have a clear picture of how this relates to research activity. Thirteen journals were purposively selected on their likelihood to publish GBV research. All articles published in these journals during 2015 and meeting our inclusion criteria were retrieved. Data were extracted according to (1) types of methodologies used, (2) geographical location of research, and (3) patterns of research activity/interest. Thirty-two articles met the inclusion criteria. Many titles and abstracts were not explicit about the gendered nature of the research which made retrieval and analysis difficult. A range of methodologies were reported, with single-country research conducted more than international collaborations. Intimate partner violence and sexual abuse attracted most research interest. No studies explored female genital mutilation/cutting and only one investigated early and forced marriage. The findings have implications regarding GBV research in Europe, and we explore them in relation to relevant European policy. Researchers can help raise the profile of the gendered nature of most violence-related research by being explicit about this in their publications. Increasing opportunities for cross-national research will help address the global nature of GBV. Tackling GBV requires synergy of empirical evidence and policy to drive the agenda.

  14. Modeling of nonlinear responses for reciprocal transducers involving polarization switching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willatzen, Morten; Wang, Linxiang

    2007-01-01

    Nonlinearities and hysteresis effects in a reciprocal PZT transducer are examined by use of a dynamical mathematical model on the basis of phase-transition theory. In particular, we consider the perovskite piezoelectric ceramic in which the polarization process in the material can be modeled...... by Landau theory for the first-order phase transformation, in which each polarization state is associated with a minimum of the Landau free-energy function. Nonlinear constitutive laws are obtained by using thermodynamical equilibrium conditions, and hysteretic behavior of the material can be modeled...

  15. Breaking Lorentz Reciprocity with Frequency Conversion and Delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Eric I.; Chapman, Benjamin J.; Higginbotham, Andrew P.; Kerckhoff, Joseph; Lehnert, K. W.

    2017-10-01

    We introduce a method for breaking Lorentz reciprocity based upon the noncommutation of frequency conversion and delay. The method requires no magnetic materials or resonant physics, allowing for the design of scalable and broadband nonreciprocal circuits. With this approach, two types of gyrators—universal building blocks for linear, nonreciprocal circuits—are constructed. Using one of these gyrators, we create a circulator with >15 dB of isolation across the 5-9 GHz band. Our designs may be readily extended to any platform with suitable frequency conversion elements, including semiconducting devices for telecommunication or an on-chip superconducting implementation for quantum information processing.

  16. Reciprocity within the framework of nuclear civil liability law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldmann, F.J.

    1986-01-01

    With regard to reciprocity in international and national nuclear liability law, the Federal Republic of Germany attaches great importance to that principle, especially under the following three aspects: 1.) Application of the international conventions in national law, irrespective of their internationally binding nature, 2.) application of the international conventions in relations with non-convention states in cases of damage, 3.) application of supplementary national nuclear liability law in relations with convention as well as non-convention states in cases of damage. (CW) [de

  17. The reciprocal relationship between sexual victimization and sexual assertiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, Jennifer A; Testa, Maria; VanZile-Tamsen, Carol

    2007-03-01

    Low sexual assertiveness has been proposed as a possible mechanism through which sexual revictimization occurs, yet evidence for this has been mixed. In this study, prospective path analysis was used to examine the relationship between sexual refusal assertiveness and sexual victimization over time among a community sample of women. Results provide support for a reciprocal relationship, with historical victimization predicting low sexual assertiveness and low sexual assertiveness predicting subsequent victimization. The effect of recent sexual victimization on subsequent sexual assertiveness also was replicated prospectively. These findings suggest that strengthening sexual assertiveness may help reduce vulnerability to future victimization.

  18. Subjective performance evaluations and reciprocity in principal-agent relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sebald, Alexander Christopher; Walzl, Markus

    2014-01-01

    . In contrast to existing models of reciprocity, we find that agents tend to sanction whenever the feedback of principals is below their subjective self-evaluations even if agents' pay-offs are independent of it. In turn, principals provide more positive feedback (relative to their actual performance assessment......We conduct a laboratory experiment with agents working on, and principals benefiting from, a real effort task in which the agents' performance can only be evaluated subjectively. Principals give subjective performance feedback to agents, and agents have an opportunity to sanction principals...

  19. Optimal contracts based on subjective performance evaluations and reciprocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sebald, Alexander Christopher; Walzl, Markus

    2015-01-01

    As demonstrated in a recent laboratory experiment (see Sebald & Walzl, 2014), individuals tend to sanction others who subjectively evaluate their performance whenever this assessment falls short of the individuals’ self-evaluation. Interestingly, this is the case even if the individuals’ earnings...... are unaffected by the subjective performance appraisal. Hence, performance feedback which falls short of agents’ self- evaluations can be interpreted as an unkind act that triggers a negatively reciprocal response not only if the assessment determines agents’ earnings but also when it lacks monetary consequences...

  20. Reciprocity in nuclear third-party liability law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moser, B.

    1992-01-01

    The Pariser Convention, with its additional protocols, offers a substantial simplification of that part of nuclear law relating to international private and procedural law. This concerns, inter alia, the maximum ceiling of liability of a nuclear operator for damage caused by a nuclear incident. The paper presents in detail how the legislation of various contracting Parties to the Paris Convention and noncontracting parties deals with the question of reciprocity in nuclear civil liability and procedural law. The Vienna Convention on liability for nuclear damages of 1963, which is international private and procedural law. (orig./HSCH) [de

  1. Three-dimensional Reciprocal Structures: Morphology, Concepts, Generative Rules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parigi, Dario; Pugnale, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    This paper present seven different three dimensional structures based on the principle of structural reciprocity with superimposition joint and standardized un-notched elements. Such typology could be regarded as being intrinsically three-dimensional because elements sit one of the top of the oth......, causing every configuration to develop naturally out-of the plane. The structures presented here were developed and built by the students of the Master of Science in “Architectural Design” during a two week long workshop organized at Aalborg University in the fall semester 2011....

  2. Reciprocal activating crosstalk between c-Met and caveolin 1 promotes invasive phenotype in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peyda Korhan

    Full Text Available c-Met, the receptor for Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF, overexpressed and deregulated in Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC. Caveolin 1 (CAV1, a plasma membrane protein that modulates signal transduction molecules, is also overexpressed in HCC. The aim of this study was to investigate biological and clinical significance of co-expression and activation of c-Met and CAV1 in HCC. We showed that c-Met and CAV1 were co-localized in HCC cells and HGF treatment increased this association. HGF-triggered c-Met activation caused a concurrent rise in both phosphorylation and expression of CAV1. Ectopic expression of CAV1 accelerated c-Met signaling, resulted in enhanced migration, invasion, and branching-morphogenesis. Silencing of CAV1 downregulated c-Met signaling, and decreased migratory/invasive capability of cells and attenuated branching morphogenesis. In addition, activation and co-localization of c-Met and CAV1 were elevated during hepatocarcinogenesis. In conclusion reciprocal activating crosstalk between c-Met and CAV1 promoted oncogenic signaling of c-Met contributed to the initiation and progression of HCC.

  3. Reciprocal activating crosstalk between c-Met and caveolin 1 promotes invasive phenotype in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korhan, Peyda; Erdal, Esra; Kandemiş, Emine; Cokaklı, Murat; Nart, Deniz; Yılmaz, Funda; Can, Alp; Atabey, Neşe

    2014-01-01

    c-Met, the receptor for Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF), overexpressed and deregulated in Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC). Caveolin 1 (CAV1), a plasma membrane protein that modulates signal transduction molecules, is also overexpressed in HCC. The aim of this study was to investigate biological and clinical significance of co-expression and activation of c-Met and CAV1 in HCC. We showed that c-Met and CAV1 were co-localized in HCC cells and HGF treatment increased this association. HGF-triggered c-Met activation caused a concurrent rise in both phosphorylation and expression of CAV1. Ectopic expression of CAV1 accelerated c-Met signaling, resulted in enhanced migration, invasion, and branching-morphogenesis. Silencing of CAV1 downregulated c-Met signaling, and decreased migratory/invasive capability of cells and attenuated branching morphogenesis. In addition, activation and co-localization of c-Met and CAV1 were elevated during hepatocarcinogenesis. In conclusion reciprocal activating crosstalk between c-Met and CAV1 promoted oncogenic signaling of c-Met contributed to the initiation and progression of HCC.

  4. Reciprocal complementation of bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 lacking either the membrane or fusion gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Marina; Matsuura, Ryosuke; Kokuho, Takehiro; Tsuboi, Takamitsu; Kameyama, Ken-Ichiro; Takeuchi, Kaoru

    2017-11-01

    Two defective bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (BPIV3) strains were generated, one lacking the membrane (M) protein gene and expressing EGFP (ΔM-EGFP) and the other lacking the fusion (F) protein gene and expressing mStrawberry (ΔF-mSB), by supplying deficient proteins in trans. When Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells were co-infected with ΔM-EGFP and ΔF-mSB at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 0.1, complemented viruses were easily obtained. Complemented viruses grew as efficiently as wild-type BPIV3 and could be passaged in MDBK cell cultures even at an MOI of 0.01, possibly due to multiploid virus particles containing genomes of both ΔM-EGFP and ΔF-mSB. This reciprocal complementation method using two defective viruses would be useful to express large or multiple proteins in cell cultures using paramyxovirus vectors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A DISCUSSIN OVER RECIPROCITY PRINCIPLE’S AFFECT ON SOCIAL CAPITAL’S PROLIFICACY

    OpenAIRE

    Mustafa Latif Emek

    2014-01-01

    In this study two concepts, social capital and reciprocity principles, have been introduced and their reciprocal relationship and affects also been discussed. Social Capital, an indispensable notion for the development of society from all aspects has a close relationship with reciprocity principle which regulates and forms relationship webs. In this study we firstly examined both from emergence point and sources of social capital concept which can also be entitled as social webs. Afterward...

  6. Advances in Design and Fabrication of Free-Form Reciprocal Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parigi, Dario

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the advances in design and fabrication of free-form Reciprocal Structures, and their application a during a one-week long workshop with the students of the 1st semester of the Master of Science in Architecture and Design, fall 2015, at Aalborg University. Two new factors were...... introduced and tested: a new version of the software Reciprocalizer, and an evolution of the Reciprocalizer Robot. The workshop didactic framework Performance Aided/Assisted Design (PAD) is presented....

  7. Promises of protection? Article 16 of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and gender-based violence in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combrinck, Helene

    Article 16 of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) guarantees persons with disabilities freedom from exploitation, violence and abuse. This article explores the current status of implementation of article 16 in South Africa, with specific reference to the legislative framework underpinning protection from exploitation, violence and abuse. This investigation is done specifically in the context of gender-based violence, which remains a cause of great concern in this country. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Model of Wikipedia growth based on information exchange via reciprocal arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlatić, V.; Štefančić, H.

    2011-03-01

    We show how reciprocal arcs significantly influence the structural organization of Wikipedias, online encyclopedias. It is shown that random addition of reciprocal arcs in the static network cannot explain the observed reciprocity of Wikipedias. A model of Wikipedia growth based on preferential attachment and on information exchange via reciprocal arcs is presented. An excellent agreement between in-degree distributions of our model and real Wikipedia networks is achieved without fitting the distributions, but by merely extracting a small number of model parameters from the measurement of real networks.

  9. Participation of ghrelin signalling in the reciprocal regulation of hypothalamic NPY/POMC-mediated appetite control in amphetamine-treated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ching-Han; Chu, Shu-Chen; Chen, Pei-Ni; Hsieh, Yih-Shou; Kuo, Dong-Yih

    2017-06-01

    Hypothalamic neuropeptide Y (NPY) and proopiomelanocortin (POMC) have been documented to participate in amphetamine (AMPH)-induced appetite suppression. This study investigated whether ghrelin signalling is associated with changes in NPY/POMC-mediated appetite control. Rats were given AMPH daily for four days, and changes in food intake, body weight, plasma ghrelin, hypothalamic NPY, melanocortin 3 receptor (MC3R), ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT), acyl ghrelin (AG) and ghrelin receptor (GHSR1a) were examined and compared. Food intake, body weight and NPY expression decreased, while MC3R expression increased and expressed reciprocally to NPY expression during AMPH treatment. Plasma ghrelin and hypothalamic AG/GOAT/GHSR1a expression decreased on Day 1 and Day 2, which was associated with the positive energy metabolism, and returned to normal levels on Day 3 and Day 4, which was associated with the negative energy metabolism; this expression pattern was similar to that of NPY. Infusion with a GHSR1a antagonist or an NPY antisense into the brain enhanced the decrease in NPY and AG/GOAT/GHSR1a expression and the increase in MC3R expression compared to the AMPH-treated group. Peripheral ghrelin and the central ghrelin system participated in the regulation in AMPH-induced appetite control. These results shed light on the involvement of ghrelin signalling in reciprocal regulation of NPY/POMC-mediated appetite control and may prove useful for the development of anti-obesity drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. 'Even though a man takes the major role, he has no right to abuse': future male leaders' views on gender-based violence in Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darj, Elisabeth; Wijewardena, Kumudu; Lindmark, Gunilla; Axemo, Pia

    2017-01-01

    Distinct gender roles influence gender inequality and build the foundation for gender-based violence. Violence against women is a major public health problem in all societies, and a violation of human rights. Prevalence surveys on gender-based violence have been published from Sri Lanka, but qualitative studies on men's perceptions are lacking. The aim of this study was to explore young educated Sri Lankan men's perceptions of violence against women. Seven focus-group discussions were held. Men at the end of their university studies were purposefully selected. A topic guide was used, covering various scenarios of violence against women. Qualitative content analysis was carried out. Four categories were developed through the analytic process: fixed gender roles - patriarchal values are accepted in society, female mobility control, and slowly changing attitudes; violence not accepted but still exists - sexual harassment exists everywhere, different laws for different people, female tolerance of violence, and men's right to punish; multiple factors cause violence - alcohol, violent behavior is inherited, violence culturally accepted, low education, and lack of communication; and prevention of violence against women - both parents must engage and socialize girls and boys equally, life skills education, premarital counselling, working places value clarification, and more women in politics and boards are suggested. Medical and management students, possible future male leaders of the country, have suggestions of prevention strategies in life skills to reduce gender-based violence and to increase knowledge of health consequences with the aim of changing attitudes.

  11. Peltier cooling and onsager reciprocity in ferromagnetic thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, A D; Zink, B L

    2013-09-20

    We present direct measurements of the Peltier effect as a function of temperature from 77 to 325 K in Ni, Ni(80)Fe(20), and Fe thin films made using a suspended Si-N membrane structure. Measurement of the Seebeck effect in the same films allows us to directly test predictions of Onsager reciprocity between the Peltier and Seebeck effects. The Peltier coefficient Π is negative for both Ni and Ni(80)Fe(20) films and positive for the Fe film. The Fe film also exhibits a peak associated with the magnon drag Peltier effect. The observation of magnon drag in the Fe film verifies that the coupling between the phonon, magnon, and electron systems in the film is the same whether driven by heat current or charge current. The excellent agreement between Π values predicted using the experimentally determined Seebeck coefficient for these films and measured values offers direct experimental confirmation of the Onsager reciprocity between these thermoelectric effects in ferromagnetic thin films near room temperature.

  12. Isoenzymatic variability in tropical maize populations under reciprocal recurrent selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinto Luciana Rossini

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Maize (Zea mays L. is one of the crops in which the genetic variability has been extensively studied at isoenzymatic loci. The genetic variability of the maize populations BR-105 and BR-106, and the synthetics IG-3 and IG-4, obtained after one cycle of a high-intensity reciprocal recurrent selection (RRS, was investigated at seven isoenzymatic loci. A total of twenty alleles were identified, and most of the private alleles were found in the BR-106 population. One cycle of reciprocal recurrent selection (RRS caused reductions of 12% in the number of alleles in both populations. Changes in allele frequencies were also observed between populations and synthetics, mainly for the Est 2 locus. Populations presented similar values for the number of alleles per locus, percentage of polymorphic loci, and observed and expected heterozygosities. A decrease of the genetic variation values was observed for the synthetics as a consequence of genetic drift effects and reduction of the effective population sizes. The distribution of the genetic diversity within and between populations revealed that most of the diversity was maintained within them, i.e. BR-105 x BR-106 (G ST = 3.5% and IG-3 x IG-4 (G ST = 4.0%. The genetic distances between populations and synthetics increased approximately 21%. An increase in the genetic divergence between the populations occurred without limiting new selection procedures.

  13. Recent Russian-Hanford MPC and A reciprocal exchanges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorenson, R.J.; Schlegel, S.C.; Vogt, E.C.; Six, D.E.

    1995-01-01

    As part of the 1993 US/Russian Government-to-Government Nuclear Material Protection, Control, and Accounting (MPC and A) initiative, the US government has proposed a series of site visits to both countries to address nonproliferation concerns and to reduce the potential theft or diversion of direct-use materials in Russia. In 1994, four exchange visits were made between the Hanford Site, which is located in Richland, Washington, and the Mayak and Tomsk Sites in Russia. The two Hanford visits were historical in the sense that no Russians had previously been inside a plutonium storage facility in the United States. The reciprocal visit to the Mayak nuclear complex in Russia provided the US delegation with numerous insights to these facilities and their respective safeguards programs. The reciprocal visit to the Tomsk Site in central Siberia provided the US participants with many insights to the issues surrounding the cutoff of plutonium production and storage of plutonium. This paper describes the specific activities undertaken by exchange participants during the visits. In addition, several conclusions regarding the overall US/Russian exchange program are provided

  14. Earning points for moral behavior: organ allocation based on reciprocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravelingien, An; Krom, Andre

    2005-01-01

    Anticipating the reevaluation of the Dutch organ procurement system, in late 2003 the Rathenau Institute published a study entitled 'Gift or Contribution?' In this study, the author, Govert den Hartogh, carries out a thorough moral analysis of the problem of organ shortage and fair allocation of organs. He suggests there should be a change in mentality whereby organ donation is no longer viewed in terms of charity and the volunteer spirit, but rather in terms of duty and reciprocity. The procurement and allocation of donor organs should be seen as a system of mutually assured help. Fair allocation would imply to give priority to those who recognize and comply with their duty: the registered donors. The idea of viewing organ donation as an undertaking involving mutual benefit rather than as a matter of charity, however, is not new. Notwithstanding the fact that reference to charity and altruism is not required in order for the organ donation to be of moral significance, we will argue against the reciprocity-based scenario. Steering organ allocation towards those who are themselves willing to donate organs is both an ineffective and morally questionable means of attempting to counter organ shortage.

  15. The Role of Reciprocity in Verbally Persuasive Robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungcheol Austin; Liang, Yuhua Jake

    2016-08-01

    The current research examines the persuasive effects of reciprocity in the context of human-robot interaction. This is an important theoretical and practical extension of persuasive robotics by testing (1) if robots can utilize verbal requests and (2) if robots can utilize persuasive mechanisms (e.g., reciprocity) to gain human compliance. Participants played a trivia game with a robot teammate. The ostensibly autonomous robot helped (or failed to help) the participants by providing the correct (vs. incorrect) trivia answers. Then, the robot directly asked participants to complete a 15-minute task for pattern recognition. Compared to no help, results showed that a robot's prior helping behavior significantly increased the likelihood of compliance (60 percent vs. 33 percent). Interestingly, participants' evaluations toward the robot (i.e., competence, warmth, and trustworthiness) did not predict compliance. These results also provided an insightful comparison showing that participants complied at similar rates with the robot and with computer agents. This result documents a clear empirically powerful potential for the role of verbal messages in persuasive robotics.

  16. Modeling of flexible reciprocating compressor considering the crosshead subsidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Xiaogang; Liu, Shulin; Sun, Xin

    2018-01-01

    Crank-slider mechanisms are important parts of heavy duty machines, including reciprocating compressors, combustion motors. This paper targets on the dynamic response of the crosshead in a reciprocating compressor, taking into consideration the crosshead deviation from the original level. The traditional model of the compressor is usually a slider-mechanism system without considering the deflection of the crosshead, thus neglecting the influence of the piston rod, which has some flexible features. In this paper, a rigid-flexible model of slider-crank is described theoretically, using the commercial software MATLAB, where the crank, connecting rod and crosshead are treated as rigid bodies, while the piston rod connected to the crosshead is considered as a flexible body. The dynamic response of the mechanism with the crosshead subsidence is discussed detailedly in this paper. After calculated theoretically, the MATLAB simulation showed that the dynamic response of the crosshead will be greatly influenced if the crosshead subsided from the original level. Also, the influence of the crosshead subsidence was also investigated, and some extra vibration of the crosshead arises.

  17. Complementary coordination strategies in a joint Fitts’ reciprocal aiming task

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konvalinka, Ivana; Skewes, Lea; Michael, J.

    How do dyads coordinate their actions to achieve a common goal when one person has the more difficult task? In the present study, dyads were instructed to engage in a Fitts’s reciprocal aiming task as accurately as possible, and at a given tempo sent through their headphones. They were in conditi......How do dyads coordinate their actions to achieve a common goal when one person has the more difficult task? In the present study, dyads were instructed to engage in a Fitts’s reciprocal aiming task as accurately as possible, and at a given tempo sent through their headphones. They were...... in conditions where they either received auditory feedback of 1) SELF-generated taps, 2) taps generated by the OTHER co-actor, or 3) regular, COMPUTER-generated taps. In conditions 2) and 3), they were also instructed to synchronize with their feedback as best as possible. In each trial, each participant...... a joint goal, by taking on leader-follower roles....

  18. Gender-based workplace assessment in gynecology and obstetrics in Germany: results from the iCEPT Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Jan; Groneberg, David A; Brueggmann, Doerthe

    2016-08-01

    In the field of gynecology and obstetrics, studies exploring the workplace situation are important. We conducted this study with the overall aim to assess the subjective perception of working conditions of OB/GYNs in German hospitals. Since gender ratios are changing among German physicians in general and among OB/GYNs in particular, a special focus was put on gender-based differences. This study uses data from the iCEPT Study (n = 7090). From this database, data from physicians working in the field of gynecology and obstetrics (n = 381) were analyzed. The iCEPT questionnaire was based upon established questionnaires. 92.1 % (95 % CI 89.2-95.3) of respondents stated to be often under time pressure and 89.8 % (95 % CI 87.6-93.3) stated frequent disturbances during work time. Women felt significantly more often under time pressure than men (OR = 2.73; 95 % CI 1.25-5.92; p = 0.009). Moreover, only about every third respondent stated to be in control of his or her work. Feedback about their work was received by 27.6 % (95 % CI 23.4-32.1) of respondents. However, male physicians got significantly more often feedback with an odds ratio of OR = 2.03 (95 % CI 1.21-3.41; p = 0.007). In regard to job satisfaction, about one in two (55.1 %; 95 % CI 50.4-60.2) stated to be satisfied with his or her job. However, men seemed more often satisfied than women with an OR = 1.98 (95 % CI 1.18-3.32; p = 0.009). No significant gender difference was seen in the analysis of the social climate and the social support. It is important to be aware of the documented gender differences regarding perception of working conditions. In order to sustain the gender diversity in the specialty of OB/GYNs these differences should be resolved. Special attention should be drawn to the improvement of job demands and control of employees.

  19. The association and a potential pathway between gender-based violence and induced abortion in Thai Nguyen province, Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phuong Hong Nguyen

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gender-based violence (GBV has profound adverse consequences on women's physical, mental, and reproductive health. Although Vietnam has high rates of induced abortion and GBV, literature examining this relationship is lacking. Objective: This study examines the association of GBV with induced abortion among married or partnered women of reproductive age in Thai Nguyen province, Vietnam. In addition, we explore contraceptive use and unintended pregnancy as mediators in the pathway between GBV and induced abortion. Design and methods: Data were drawn from a cross-sectional survey of 1,281 women aged 18–49 years in four districts of Thai Nguyen province. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were applied to examine the associations between lifetime history of GBV, contraceptive use, unintended pregnancy, induced abortion, and repeat abortion, controlling for other covariates. Results: One-third of respondents had undergone induced abortion in their lifetime (33.4%, and 11.5% reported having repeat abortions. The prevalence of any type of GBV was 29.1% (17.0% physical violence, 10.4% sexual violence, and 20.1% emotional violence. History of GBV was associated with induced abortion (OR=1.61, 95% CI: 1.20–2.16 and repeat abortion (OR=2.22, 95% CI: 1.48–3.32. Physical violence was significantly associated with induced abortion, and all three types of violence were associated with repeat abortion. Abused women were more likely than non-abused women to report using contraceptives and having an unintended pregnancy, and these factors were in turn associated with increased risk of induced abortion. Conclusions: GBV is pervasive in Thai Nguyen province and is linked to increased risks of induced abortion and repeat abortion. The findings suggest that a pathway underlying this relationship is increased risk of unintended pregnancy due in part to ineffective use of contraceptives. These findings emphasize the importance of

  20. Gender-based abuse: the global epidemic Violência e genêro: uma epidemia global

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori Heise

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Gender Based violence-including rape, domestic violence, murder and sexual abuse-is a profund health problem for women across the globe. Although a significant cause of female morbidity and mortality, violence against women has only recently begun to be recognized as an issue for public health. This paper draws together existing data on the dimensions of violence against women worldwide and reviews available literature on the health consequences of abuse. It argues that the health sector has an important role to play in combatting violence against women through increased research, screening and referral of victims, and behavioral interventions. Any strategy to confrnt violence must address the root causes of abuse in addition to meeting the immediate needs of victims. This means challenging the social attitudes and beliefs that undergird men's violence and renegotiating the balance of power between women and men at all levels of society.Violência baseada no gênero, incluindo seqüestros, violência doméstica, homicídios e abuso sexual, é problema profundo de saúde para a mulher em todo o mundo. Embora sendo uma causas significativa de morbi-mortalidade, a violência cintra as mulheres só recentemente foi reconhecido como objeto de Saúde Pública. Este trabalho reune dados existentes sobre dimensões da violência contra as mulheres no mundo e revê a literatura sobre as conseqüências das abusos sobre a saúde. Argumenta-se que o setor tem importante papel no combate à violência contra a mulher, através do desenvolvimento de pesquisas, notificação, organização de serviços de referência para as vítimas e para propostas de intervenção. Qualquer estratégia para confrontar a violência necessita ser dirigida para as raízes dos abusos, além, evidentemente, de atender às necessidades imediatas das vítimas. Isto significa desafiar atitudes e crenças sociais que fundamentam a violência dos homens contra as mulheres e criar

  1. The association and a potential pathway between gender-based violence and induced abortion in Thai Nguyen province, Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Phuong Hong; Van Nguyen, Son; Nguyen, Manh Quang; Nguyen, Nam Truong; Keithly, Sarah Colleen; Tran Mai, Lan; Thi Thu Luong, Loan; Pham, Hoa Quynh

    2012-01-01

    Background Gender-based violence (GBV) has profound adverse consequences on women's physical, mental, and reproductive health. Although Vietnam has high rates of induced abortion and GBV, literature examining this relationship is lacking. Objective This study examines the association of GBV with induced abortion among married or partnered women of reproductive age in Thai Nguyen province, Vietnam. In addition, we explore contraceptive use and unintended pregnancy as mediators in the pathway between GBV and induced abortion. Design and methods Data were drawn from a cross-sectional survey of 1,281 women aged 18–49 years in four districts of Thai Nguyen province. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were applied to examine the associations between lifetime history of GBV, contraceptive use, unintended pregnancy, induced abortion, and repeat abortion, controlling for other covariates. Results One-third of respondents had undergone induced abortion in their lifetime (33.4%), and 11.5% reported having repeat abortions. The prevalence of any type of GBV was 29.1% (17.0% physical violence, 10.4% sexual violence, and 20.1% emotional violence). History of GBV was associated with induced abortion (OR=1.61, 95% CI: 1.20–2.16) and repeat abortion (OR=2.22, 95% CI: 1.48–3.32). Physical violence was significantly associated with induced abortion, and all three types of violence were associated with repeat abortion. Abused women were more likely than non-abused women to report using contraceptives and having an unintended pregnancy, and these factors were in turn associated with increased risk of induced abortion. Conclusions GBV is pervasive in Thai Nguyen province and is linked to increased risks of induced abortion and repeat abortion. The findings suggest that a pathway underlying this relationship is increased risk of unintended pregnancy due in part to ineffective use of contraceptives. These findings emphasize the importance of screening and

  2. Tissue architecture and function: dynamic reciprocity via extra- and intra-cellular matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Ren; Boudreau, Aaron; Bissell, Mina J

    2008-12-23

    Mammary gland development, functional differentiation, and homeostasis are orchestrated and sustained by a balance of biochemical and biophysical cues from the organ's microenvironment. The three-dimensional microenvironment of the mammary gland, predominantly 'encoded' by a collaboration between the extracellular matrix (ECM), hormones, and growth factors, sends signals from ECM receptors through the cytoskeletal intracellular matrix to nuclear and chromatin structures resulting in gene expression; the ECM in turn is regulated and remodeled by signals from the nucleus. In this chapter, we discuss how coordinated ECM deposition and remodeling is necessary for mammary gland development, how the ECM provides structural and biochemical cues necessary for tissue-specific function, and the role of the cytoskeleton in mediating the extra - to intracellular dialogue occurring between the nucleus and the microenvironment. When operating normally, the cytoskeletal-mediated dynamic and reciprocal integration of tissue architecture and function directs mammary gland development, tissue polarity, and ultimately, tissue-specific gene expression. Cancer occurs when these dynamic interactions go awry for an extended time.

  3. Reciprocal Relations Between Emotional Self-Efficacy Beliefs and Ego-Resiliency Across Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milioni, Michela; Alessandri, Guido; Eisenberg, Nancy; Castellani, Valeria; Zuffianò, Antonio; Vecchione, Michele; Caprara, Gian Vittorio

    2015-10-01

    The present study examined the longitudinal relations of adolescents' self-reported ego-resiliency to their emotional self-efficacy beliefs in expressing positive emotions and in managing negative emotions as they moved into early adulthood. Participants were 239 females and 211 males with a mean age of 17 years (SD = .80) at T1, 19 years (SD = .80) at T2, 21 years (SD = .82) at T3, and 25 years (SD = .80) at T4. A four-wave cross-lagged regression model and mediational analyses were used. In a panel structural equation model controlling for the stability of the constructs, reciprocal relationships across time were found between ego-resiliency and emotional self-efficacy beliefs related to the expression of positive emotions and to the management of negative emotions. Moreover, the relation between ego-resiliency assessed at T1 and T3, and ego-resiliency assessed at T2 and T4, was mediated through emotional self-efficacy beliefs (at T2 and T3, respectively), and vice versa. The posited conceptual model accounted for a significant portion of variance in ego-resiliency and has implications for understanding the development of ego-resiliency. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Reciprocal positive regulation between TRPV6 and NUMB in PTEN-deficient prostate cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung-Young; Hong, Chansik; Wie, Jinhong; Kim, Euiyong; Kim, Byung Joo; Ha, Kotdaji; Cho, Nam-Hyuk; Kim, In-Gyu; Jeon, Ju-Hong; So, Insuk

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • TRPV6 interacts with tumor suppressor proteins. • Numb has a selective effect on TRPV6, depending on the prostate cancer cell line. • PTEN is a novel regulator of TRPV6–Numb complex. - Abstract: Calcium acts as a second messenger and plays a crucial role in signaling pathways involved in cell proliferation. Recently, calcium channels related to calcium influx into the cytosol of epithelial cells have attracted attention as a cancer therapy target. Of these calcium channels, TRPV6 is overexpressed in prostate cancer and is considered an important molecule in the process of metastasis. However, its exact role and mechanism is unclear. NUMB, well-known tumor suppressor gene, is a novel interacting partner of TRPV6. We show that NUMB and TRPV6 have a reciprocal positive regulatory relationship in PC-3 cells. We repeated this experiment in two other prostate cancer cell lines, DU145 and LNCaP. Interestingly, there were no significant changes in TRPV6 expression following NUMB knockdown in DU145. We revealed that the presence or absence of PTEN was the cause of NUMB–TRPV6 function. Loss of PTEN caused a positive correlation of TRPV6–NUMB expression. Collectively, we determined that PTEN is a novel interacting partner of TRPV6 and NUMB. These results demonstrated a novel relationship of NUMB–TRPV6 in prostate cancer cells, and show that PTEN is a novel regulator of this complex

  5. Reciprocal positive regulation between TRPV6 and NUMB in PTEN-deficient prostate cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung-Young; Hong, Chansik; Wie, Jinhong [Department of Physiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biomedical Sciences, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Euiyong [Department of Physiology, College of Medicine, Inje University, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byung Joo [Division of Longevity and Biofunctional Medicine, Pusan National University School of Korean Medicine, Yangsan 626-870 (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Kotdaji [Department of Physiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biomedical Sciences, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Nam-Hyuk; Kim, In-Gyu [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Ju-Hong [Department of Physiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biomedical Sciences, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); So, Insuk, E-mail: insuk@snu.ac.kr [Department of Physiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biomedical Sciences, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-25

    Highlights: • TRPV6 interacts with tumor suppressor proteins. • Numb has a selective effect on TRPV6, depending on the prostate cancer cell line. • PTEN is a novel regulator of TRPV6–Numb complex. - Abstract: Calcium acts as a second messenger and plays a crucial role in signaling pathways involved in cell proliferation. Recently, calcium channels related to calcium influx into the cytosol of epithelial cells have attracted attention as a cancer therapy target. Of these calcium channels, TRPV6 is overexpressed in prostate cancer and is considered an important molecule in the process of metastasis. However, its exact role and mechanism is unclear. NUMB, well-known tumor suppressor gene, is a novel interacting partner of TRPV6. We show that NUMB and TRPV6 have a reciprocal positive regulatory relationship in PC-3 cells. We repeated this experiment in two other prostate cancer cell lines, DU145 and LNCaP. Interestingly, there were no significant changes in TRPV6 expression following NUMB knockdown in DU145. We revealed that the presence or absence of PTEN was the cause of NUMB–TRPV6 function. Loss of PTEN caused a positive correlation of TRPV6–NUMB expression. Collectively, we determined that PTEN is a novel interacting partner of TRPV6 and NUMB. These results demonstrated a novel relationship of NUMB–TRPV6 in prostate cancer cells, and show that PTEN is a novel regulator of this complex.

  6. Reciprocal Relations Between Emotional Self-Efficacy Beliefs and Ego-Resiliency across Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milioni, Michela; Alessandri, Guido; Eisenberg, Nancy; Castellani, Valeria; Zuffianò, Antonio; Vecchione, Michele; Caprara, Gian Vittorio

    2015-01-01

    Objective The present study examined the longitudinal relations of adolescents’ self-reported ego-resiliency to their emotional self-efficacy beliefs in expressing positive emotions and in managing negative emotions as they moved into early adulthood. Method Participants were 239 females and 211 males with a mean age of 17 years (SD = .80) at T1, 19 years (SD = .80) at T2, 21 years (SD = .82) at T3, and 25 years (SD = .80) at T4. A four-wave cross-lagged regression model and mediational analyses were used. Results In a panel structural equation model controlling for the stability of the constructs, reciprocal relationships across time were found between ego-resiliency and emotional self-efficacy beliefs related to the expression of positive emotions and to the management of negative emotions. Moreover, the relation between ego-resiliency assessed at T1 and T3, and ego-resiliency assessed at T2 and T4 was mediated through emotional self-efficacy beliefs (at T2 and T3, respectively), and vice versa. Conclusions The posited conceptual model accounted for a significant portion of variance in ego-resiliency and has implications for understanding the development of ego-resiliency. PMID:25204666

  7. Reciprocal regulation of p53 and malic enzymes modulates metabolism and senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Peng; Du, Wenjing; Mancuso, Anthony; Wellen, Kathryn E; Yang, Xiaolu

    2013-01-31

    Cellular senescence both protects multicellular organisms from cancer and contributes to their ageing. The pre-eminent tumour suppressor p53 has an important role in the induction and maintenance of senescence, but how it carries out this function remains poorly understood. In addition, although increasing evidence supports the idea that metabolic changes underlie many cell-fate decisions and p53-mediated tumour suppression, few connections between metabolic enzymes and senescence have been established. Here we describe a new mechanism by which p53 links these functions. We show that p53 represses the expression of the tricarboxylic-acid-cycle-associated malic enzymes ME1 and ME2 in human and mouse cells. Both malic enzymes are important for NADPH production, lipogenesis and glutamine metabolism, but ME2 has a more profound effect. Through the inhibition of malic enzymes, p53 regulates cell metabolism and proliferation. Downregulation of ME1 and ME2 reciprocally activates p53 through distinct MDM2- and AMP-activated protein kinase-mediated mechanisms in a feed-forward manner, bolstering this pathway and enhancing p53 activation. Downregulation of ME1 and ME2 also modulates the outcome of p53 activation, leading to strong induction of senescence, but not apoptosis, whereas enforced expression of either malic enzyme suppresses senescence. Our findings define physiological functions of malic enzymes, demonstrate a positive-feedback mechanism that sustains p53 activation, and reveal a connection between metabolism and senescence mediated by p53.

  8. Investigating Reciprocal Meaning-Making as an Element of Intercultural Language Learning in the Languages Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skene, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    The "Australian Curriculum: Languages" is based on an intercultural orientation to the teaching and learning of languages. Reciprocal meaning-making, or interpreting self in relation to others as language users, is a key element in an intercultural orientation. The concept of reciprocating is embedded in the language-specific curricula…

  9. Teaching Reciprocal Space to Undergraduates via Theory and Code Components of an IPython Notebook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srnec, Matthew N.; Upadhyay, Shiv; Madura, Jeffrey D.

    2016-01-01

    In this technology report, a tool is provided for teaching reciprocal space to undergraduates in physical chemistry and materials science courses. Reciprocal space plays a vital role in understanding a material's electronic structure and physical properties. Here, we provide an example based on previous work in the "Journal of Chemical…

  10. Children's Understanding of Indebtedness as a Feature of Reciprocal Help Exchanges between Peers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cooke, Peggy A.

    1992-01-01

    Studied 120 children's understanding of indebtedness. Fifth graders reported a diminished obligation to reciprocate help that was given at a low cost to the helper; the obligation remained high for first and third graders. All children reported more obligation to reciprocate help from acquaintances than help from friends. (LB)

  11. Talking about Service-Learning: Product or Process? Reciprocity or Solidarity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Joan

    2017-01-01

    Through an exploration of values of the neoliberal university and critical service-learning, this article explores how associating service-learning with products and relationships based on reciprocity negatively impacts its connection to social justice. By emphasizing the constructs of process and solidarity, instead of products and reciprocity,…

  12. 76 FR 12863 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-09

    ... National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines... combustion engines. The final rule was published on August 20, 2010. This direct final action amends certain... Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant for Stationary Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines...

  13. 78 FR 6673 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-30

    ... and 63 National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines; New Source Performance Standards for Stationary Internal Combustion Engines; Final Rule #0;#0... Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines; New Source...

  14. Measuring reciprocity in high functioning children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Backer van Ommeren, C.; Begeer, S.; Scheeren, A.M.; Koot, H.M.

    2012-01-01

    Few instruments have been developed that measure impairments in reciprocity, a defining feature of autism. We introduce a new test assessing the quality of reciprocal behaviour: the interactive drawing test (IDT). Children and adolescents (n = 49) with and without high functioning autism spectrum

  15. The Reciprocal Internal/External Frame of Reference Model Using Grades and Test Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, Jens; Zimmermann, Friederike; Köller, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    Background: The reciprocal I/E model (RI/EM) combines the internal/external frame of reference model (I/EM) with the reciprocal effects model (REM). The RI/EM extends the I/EM longitudinally and the REM across domains. The model predicts that, within domains, mathematics and verbal achievement (VACH) and academic self-concept have positive effects…

  16. The Reciprocal Effects Model Revisited: Extending Its Reach to Gifted Students Attending Academically Selective Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaton, Marjorie; Marsh, Herbert W.; Parker, Philip D.; Craven, Rhonda G.; Yeung, Alexander S.

    2015-01-01

    The reciprocal effects model (REM) predicts a reciprocal relation between academic self-concept and academic achievement, whereby prior academic self-concept is associated with future gains in achievement, and prior achievement is related to subsequent academic self-concept. Although research in this area has been extensive, there has been a…

  17. Socrates, Augustine, and Paul Gauguin on the Reciprocity between Speech and Silence in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caranfa, Angelo

    2013-01-01

    While most educational practices today place an excessive amount of attention on discourse, this article attaches great importance to the reciprocity between speech and silence by drawing from the writings of Plato's Socrates, Augustine, and Paul Gauguin for whom this reciprocity is of the essence in learning. These three figures teach that…

  18. Reciprocity in Online Markets: Empirical Studies of Auction and Barter Markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Shun

    2013-01-01

    My dissertation seeks to understand how reciprocity affects transaction outcomes and mechanism design in online markets. The first essay examines negative reciprocity illustrated as feedback-revoking behavior in the eBay auction market, focusing on its impact and implications for reputation system design. I utilize the biggest policy change of…

  19. 14 CFR 135.377 - Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: Landing limitations: Alternate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...: Reciprocating engine powered: Landing limitations: Alternate airports. 135.377 Section 135.377 Aeronautics and... Limitations § 135.377 Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: Landing limitations: Alternate airports. No person may list an airport as an alternate airport in a flight plan unless the...

  20. Confession and Carrying into Execution of Foreign Arbitration Courts' Decisions: Reciprocity and Public Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarina, Salima A.; Nukusheva, Aigul A.; Kalmagambetov, Kassym S.; Kumysbekova, Zhanara T.; Nesterova, Elena V.

    2016-01-01

    The article contains a comparative analysis of foreign arbitration courts' decisions, ensuring the reciprocity and public policy. The aim of the study is to explore such aspects as reciprocity and public policy of arbitration courts. The result is the view of the public policy, despite its apparent irrelevance in today's Kazakhstan, which is of…

  1. PERCEIVED RECIPROCITY, SOCIAL SUPPORT, AND STRESS AT WORK - THE ROLE OF EXCHANGE AND COMMUNAL ORIENTATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BUUNK, BP; DOOSJE, BJ; Jans, G.J.M.; HOPSTAKEN, LEM

    1993-01-01

    Perceived reciprocity regarding support in relationships at work was examined among employees of a psychiatric hospital (Study 1) and in a study of employees of the Dutch National Railway Company (Study 2). Relationships with colleagues were more often perceived as reciprocal than relationships with

  2. Apically extruded dentin debris by reciprocating single-file and multi-file rotary system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De-Deus, Gustavo; Neves, Aline; Silva, Emmanuel João; Mendonça, Thais Accorsi; Lourenço, Caroline; Calixto, Camila; Lima, Edson Jorge Moreira

    2015-03-01

    This study aims to evaluate the apical extrusion of debris by the two reciprocating single-file systems: WaveOne and Reciproc. Conventional multi-file rotary system was used as a reference for comparison. The hypotheses tested were (i) the reciprocating single-file systems extrude more than conventional multi-file rotary system and (ii) the reciprocating single-file systems extrude similar amounts of dentin debris. After solid selection criteria, 80 mesial roots of lower molars were included in the present study. The use of four different instrumentation techniques resulted in four groups (n = 20): G1 (hand-file technique), G2 (ProTaper), G3 (WaveOne), and G4 (Reciproc). The apparatus used to evaluate the collection of apically extruded debris was typical double-chamber collector. Statistical analysis was performed for multiple comparisons. No significant difference was found in the amount of the debris extruded between the two reciprocating systems. In contrast, conventional multi-file rotary system group extruded significantly more debris than both reciprocating groups. Hand instrumentation group extruded significantly more debris than all other groups. The present results yielded favorable input for both reciprocation single-file systems, inasmuch as they showed an improved control of apically extruded debris. Apical extrusion of debris has been studied extensively because of its clinical relevance, particularly since it may cause flare-ups, originated by the introduction of bacteria, pulpal tissue, and irrigating solutions into the periapical tissues.

  3. A note on number fields having reciprocal integer generators | Zaïmi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We prove that a totally complex algebraic number field K; having a conjugate which is not closed under complex conjugation, can be generated by a reciprocal integer, when the Galois group of its normal closure is contained in the hyperoctahedral group Bdeg(K)/2. Keywords: Reciprocal integers, unit primitive elements, ...

  4. Development and verification of a reciprocating test rig designed for investigation of piston ring tribology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Michael Torben; Imran, Tajammal; Klit, Peder

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the development and verification of a reciprocating test rig, which was designed to study the piston ring tribology. A crank mechanism is used to generate a reciprocating motion for a moving plate, which acts as the liner. A stationary block acting as the ring package is loaded......, which is suitable for the study of piston ring tribology....

  5. Reciprocal Teaching and Emotional Intelligence: A Study of Iranian EFL Learners' Reading Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izadi, Mehri; Nowrouzi, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed at exploring the effect of reciprocal reading strategies instruction on reading comprehension of EFL learners. Emotional intelligence, another variable of interest, was assessed to indicate whether it plays a role in learners' comprehension. In a pre- and post-test study, forty-two learners went through a reciprocal reading…

  6. Using Excel's Solver Function to Facilitate Reciprocal Service Department Cost Allocations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leese, Wallace R.

    2013-01-01

    The reciprocal method of service department cost allocation requires linear equations to be solved simultaneously. These computations are often so complex as to cause the abandonment of the reciprocal method in favor of the less sophisticated and theoretically incorrect direct or step-down methods. This article illustrates how Excel's Solver…

  7. Commitments and reciprocity in trust situations : Experimental studies on obligation, indignation, and self-consistency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vieth, M.D.

    2009-01-01

    Explaining social order is of primary concern for social theories. It requires the study of sanctioning mechanisms that help enforce social norms. Punishment for misbehavior and reward for good conduct are forms of reciprocity. Reciprocal behavior can be rooted in emotions that constitute the basis

  8. Social ties and coordination on negative reciprocity: The role of affect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reuben, E.; van Winden, F.

    2008-01-01

    This is an experimental study of negative reciprocity in the case of multiple reciprocators. We use a three-player power-to-take game where a proposer is matched with two responders. We compare a treatment in which responders are anonymous to each other (strangers) with one in which responders know

  9. Commitments and Reciprocity in Trust Situations : Experimental Studies on Obligation, Indignation, and Self-Consistency.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vieth, Manuela

    2009-01-01

    Explaining social order is of primary concern for social theories. It requires the study of sanctioning mechanisms that help enforce social norms. Punishment for misbehavior and reward for good conduct are forms of reciprocity. Reciprocal behavior can be rooted in emotions that constitute the basis

  10. Naturalization, reciprocity and marks of marital violence: male defendants' perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilvânia Patrícia do Nascimento Paixão

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to analyze male criminals' perception about marital violence. Method: An exploratory, descriptive, qualitative study undertaken with 23 men who were criminally prosecuted for marital violence. A multimethod data collection was conducted, with individual interview and focal group techniques combined, between May and December 2015. The data collected were initially categorized using the NVIVO® 11 software program, and then organized using the Collective Subject Discourse method. Results: the collective discourses reveal that, in the male's perception, conjugal violence is inherent in a marital relationships: it is a private, reciprocal problem that leaves body marks. Conclusion: gender dissymmetry as a social construct is evidenced, signaling the need to create spaces for reflection and re-signification of men and women, from a gender perspective.

  11. Revising Sangiovanni's reciprocity-based internationalism: towards international egalitarian obligations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conor Heaney

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available To whom do we owe obligations of socio-economic justice? How are such obligations generated? Internationalism denotes a range of approaches to these questions. This paper examines Andrea Sangiovanni's—an internationalist—response to these questions. Sangiovanni argues that we owe egalitarian obligations only to those in the state, and that egalitarian obligations are generated through relationships of ‘reciprocity’. His is a ‘reciprocity-based internationalism’ (RBI. RBI has two components—one normative and another empirical. In this paper, I will assume the normative component, but reject its empirical component. My rejection of the empirical component has normative implications for RBI, which generate egalitarian obligations beyond the state. In other words, my revision of RBI is an argument in favour of international egalitarian obligations not generated through cosmopolitanism, but through internationalism.

  12. Obtaining local reciprocal lattice vectors from finite-element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, John P; Connolley, Thomas; Hill, Tim P; Huang, Houcheng; Sharp, Doug W; Drakopoulos, Michael

    2008-11-01

    Finite-element analysis is frequently used by engineers at synchrotron beamlines to calculate the elastic deformation of a single crystal undergoing mechanical bending or thermal load. ANSYS Workbench software is widely used for such simulations. However, although ANSYS Workbench software provides useful information on the displacements, strains and stresses within the crystal, it does not yield the local reciprocal lattice vectors that would be required for X-ray diffraction calculations. To bridge this gap, a method based on the shape functions and interpolation procedures of the software itself has been developed. An application to the double-crystal bent Laue monochromator being designed for the I12 (JEEP) wiggler beamline at the Diamond Light Source is presented.

  13. Up-regulation of reciprocal inhibition by explosive strength training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geertsen, Svend Sparre; Jensen, Jesper Lundbye; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    At the onset of dorsiflexion disynaptic reciprocal inhibition (DRI) of soleus motoneurones is increased in order to prevent activation of the antagonistic plantarflexors. This is caused by descending facilitation of transmission in the DRI pathway. Since the risk of eliciting stretch reflexes...... in the ankle plantarflexors at the onset of dorsiflexion is larger the quicker the movement, we hypothesized that DRI may be up-regulated when subjects are trained to perform dorsiflexion movements as quickly as possible.   For this purpose, 15 healthy human subjects (7 male, 8 female) with an average age...... by 6% before the training and by 22% after the training, which was a statistically significant difference (pregulated in healthy subjects following explosive strength training in order to ensure efficient suppression of the antagonist...

  14. Power relations and reciprocity: dialectics of knowledge construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ari, Adital; Enosh, Guy

    2013-03-01

    In this article we suggest a theoretical framework of knowledge construction by employing the concept of dialectics to power relationships between researcher and participants. Power distribution in research is perceived as dichotomous and asymmetrical in favor of the researcher, creating unequal power relations that make exploitation possible. Acknowledging such exploitation has led to a critical stance and attempts to bridge gaps through egalitarianism and empowerment of participants. Some scholars have focused on shifting expert knowledge differentials between researcher and participants throughout the research project. Others have evaluated such gaps as a source of knowledge construction. In the present work we applied a dialectical approach to understanding research relationships, suggesting reciprocity as their defining attribute, regardless of symmetry or asymmetry and as a source of knowledge construction. In this article we recommend avoiding a taken-for-granted attitude, because we see it as a direct obstacle to the construction of knowledge.

  15. Prostaglandins release plasma 'reciprocal coupling factor' in anaesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoult, J. R.; Moore, P. K.

    1981-01-01

    1. Prostaglandins E1, E2, I2 and endoperoxide analogue U46619 injected intra-arterially (i.a.) into anaesthetized rats at 2 micrograms/kg caused a substantial increase within 60 min of the plasma activity of prostaglandin 'reciprocal coupling factor' (RCF). RCF is the provisional name for the component(s) of plasma which inhibit microsomal prostaglandin synthesis and enhance cytosolic prostaglandin breakdown. 2. RCF is not released by inactive metabolite 13,14-dihydro-15-keto prostaglandin E2 (10 micrograms/kg, i.a.) or acetylcholine or histamine (2 micrograms/kg, i.a.). 3. We suggest that release by prostaglandins of RCF would provide the basis in vivo for a negative feedback mechanism controlling the activity of the prostaglandin system. PMID:7032632

  16. Domains of reciprocity beyond monetary compensation: How do non-pecuniary factors affect effort and shirking?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinori Tomohara

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This empirical study examines how sources of reciprocity are related to work motivation by distinguishing positive and negative work attitudes in practical working environments. We move away from the unidimensional perspective of monetary compensation and investigate employees’ reciprocal behaviors, together with non-pecuniary aspects of work relations such as human relationships and company management. The results show that positive reciprocity, represented by effort, is fundamentally distinct from negative reciprocity, represented by shirking, when examining the multi-dimensional sources of reciprocity. Additionally, our analyses reveal that non-pecuniary factors in the working environment have a relatively large degree of association with work motivation, even when compared to monetary compensation. Our results complement those from controlled laboratory experiments.

  17. Perceptions of intimacy and friendship reciprocity moderate peer influence on aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meter, Diana J; Casper, Deborah M; Card, Noel A

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has shown that close friends' influence can exacerbate adolescents' aggressive behavior, but results of studies which examine whether friendships of greater or lesser qualities moderate peer influence effects are inconsistent. The present study tested whether the perception of the positive friendship quality of intimate exchange and friendship reciprocity moderated best friend influence on participant aggression over time. The 243 participants were approximately 12 years old and ethnically diverse. Neither intimate exchange nor reciprocity significantly moderated friend influence on aggression in a simple way, but the interaction of intimate exchange and friendship reciprocity predicted peer influence on participants' aggression over time. Specifically, highly intimate, nonreciprocal best friendships and less intimate, reciprocal best friendships showed greatest influence when friends' proportion of peer nominations for aggression was high. Reciprocity and intimacy should be considered when predicting peer influence on aggression. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Query-Adaptive Reciprocal Hash Tables for Nearest Neighbor Search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xianglong; Deng, Cheng; Lang, Bo; Tao, Dacheng; Li, Xuelong

    2016-02-01

    Recent years have witnessed the success of binary hashing techniques in approximate nearest neighbor search. In practice, multiple hash tables are usually built using hashing to cover more desired results in the hit buckets of each table. However, rare work studies the unified approach to constructing multiple informative hash tables using any type of hashing algorithms. Meanwhile, for multiple table search, it also lacks of a generic query-adaptive and fine-grained ranking scheme that can alleviate the binary quantization loss suffered in the standard hashing techniques. To solve the above problems, in this paper, we first regard the table construction as a selection problem over a set of candidate hash functions. With the graph representation of the function set, we propose an efficient solution that sequentially applies normalized dominant set to finding the most informative and independent hash functions for each table. To further reduce the redundancy between tables, we explore the reciprocal hash tables in a boosting manner, where the hash function graph is updated with high weights emphasized on the misclassified neighbor pairs of previous hash tables. To refine the ranking of the retrieved buckets within a certain Hamming radius from the query, we propose a query-adaptive bitwise weighting scheme to enable fine-grained bucket ranking in each hash table, exploiting the discriminative power of its hash functions and their complement for nearest neighbor search. Moreover, we integrate such scheme into the multiple table search using a fast, yet reciprocal table lookup algorithm within the adaptive weighted Hamming radius. In this paper, both the construction method and the query-adaptive search method are general and compatible with different types of hashing algorithms using different feature spaces and/or parameter settings. Our extensive experiments on several large-scale benchmarks demonstrate that the proposed techniques can significantly outperform both

  19. Testing for local adaptation in brown trout using reciprocal transplants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stelkens Rike B

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Local adaptation can drive the divergence of populations but identification of the traits under selection remains a major challenge in evolutionary biology. Reciprocal transplant experiments are ideal tests of local adaptation, yet rarely used for higher vertebrates because of the mobility and potential invasiveness of non-native organisms. Here, we reciprocally transplanted 2500 brown trout (Salmo trutta embryos from five populations to investigate local adaptation in early life history traits. Embryos were bred in a full-factorial design and raised in natural riverbeds until emergence. Customized egg capsules were used to simulate the natural redd environment and allowed tracking the fate of every individual until retrieval. We predicted that 1 within sites, native populations would outperform non-natives, and 2 across sites, populations would show higher performance at ‘home’ compared to ‘away’ sites. Results There was no evidence for local adaptation but we found large differences in survival and hatching rates between sites, indicative of considerable variation in habitat quality. Survival was generally high across all populations (55% ± 3%, but ranged from 4% to 89% between sites. Average hatching rate was 25% ± 3% across populations ranging from 0% to 62% between sites. Conclusion This study provides rare empirical data on variation in early life history traits in a population network of a salmonid, and large-scale breeding and transplantation experiments like ours provide powerful tests for local adaptation. Despite the recently reported genetic and morphological differences between the populations in our study area, local adaptation at the embryo level is small, non-existent, or confined to ecological conditions that our experiment could not capture.

  20. A reciprocal connection factor for assessing knee-joint function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Wangdo; Kohles, Sean S

    2012-01-01

    In the knee joint, interactions between instantaneous kinetics and kinematics associated with ligamentous and articular tissues are not fully understood. These structures may be represented by the instantaneous screw axis ($) (ISA) and static force vectors ($'). Geometric changes to the joint structure affecting motion have not been fully explained, especially after surgical reconstruction and replacement procedures. The ISA offers a joint-characterisation approach, which is dependent on the combined forces of ligaments, articular contacts and muscles. The standard four-bar linkage model in the sagittal plane demonstrates that the normal contact force and the lines of action of the cruciate ligaments always intersect at the centre of rotation of the joint. A kinematic knee model in which the articular surfaces in the lateral and medial compartments as well as the isometric fascicles in the engaged ligaments may be represented as five constraints in a one-degree-of-freedom parallel spatial mechanism. This study provides a theoretical foundation to elucidate the role of each of these elements in the control of the ISA. A recourse to the principle of virtual work explained through d'Alembert's principle for reducing a dynamics problem to an instantaneous static scenario allows screws to be applied to the biomechanics of human motion. The principle of reciprocity links these approaches together to explain the transmitting load between the tibia and the femur as well as the relative motion within the knee joint. A principal clinical implication of this study is the introduction of the reciprocal connection factor to evaluate knee kinematics and kinetics in one simple term, allowing the quantitative assessment of the outcome of knee-joint treatment and rehabilitation methods.

  1. Reciprocal regulation of nuclear factor kappa B and its inhibitor ZAS3 after peripheral nerve injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madiai Francesca

    2006-01-01

    NF-κB, allowing Wallerian regeneration and induction of NF-κB-dependent gene expression, including pro-inflammatory cytokines. We propose that reciprocal changes in the expression of ZAS3 and NF-κB might generate neuropathic pain after peripheral nerve injury.

  2. ‘Even though a man takes the major role, he has no right to abuse’: future male leaders’ views on gender-based violence in Sri Lanka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darj, Elisabeth; Wijewardena, Kumudu; Lindmark, Gunilla; Axemo, Pia

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Distinct gender roles influence gender inequality and build the foundation for gender-based violence. Violence against women is a major public health problem in all societies, and a violation of human rights. Prevalence surveys on gender-based violence have been published from Sri Lanka, but qualitative studies on men’s perceptions are lacking. Objectives: The aim of this study was to explore young educated Sri Lankan men’s perceptions of violence against women. Methods: Seven focus-group discussions were held. Men at the end of their university studies were purposefully selected. A topic guide was used, covering various scenarios of violence against women. Qualitative content analysis was carried out. Results: Four categories were developed through the analytic process: fixed gender roles – patriarchal values are accepted in society, female mobility control, and slowly changing attitudes; violence not accepted but still exists – sexual harassment exists everywhere, different laws for different people, female tolerance of violence, and men’s right to punish; multiple factors cause violence – alcohol, violent behavior is inherited, violence culturally accepted, low education, and lack of communication; and prevention of violence against women – both parents must engage and socialize girls and boys equally, life skills education, premarital counselling, working places value clarification, and more women in politics and boards are suggested. Conclusions: Medical and management students, possible future male leaders of the country, have suggestions of prevention strategies in life skills to reduce gender-based violence and to increase knowledge of health consequences with the aim of changing attitudes. PMID:28753081

  3. Fatigue life enhancement of NiTi rotary endodontic instruments by progressive reciprocating operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, C S; Huang, Y H; Chi, C W; Lin, C P

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the effect of reciprocating amplitude and progressive angular increment on fatigue life enhancement of NiTi rotary endodontic instruments. ProTaper F2 instruments were operated in steel artificial canals with both stationary reciprocating (SR) and progressive reciprocating (PR) motions. The SR motions involved symmetric to and fro reciprocation of ± 180(o) , ± 135(o) , ± 90(o) , ± 60(o) and ± 45(o) . The PR motions were ± 45(o) stationary motion superimposed with angular increments of 7(o) , 11(o) , 22.5(o) or 31(o) whenever an instrument completed 1, 10 or 30 reciprocating cycles (rc). The fatigue lives were compared with those under continuous rotation (CR) and a reciprocating operation with a forward 144(o) and backward 72(o) motion proposed by Yared (2008). The statistical significance of these operating modes on fatigue life was examined using one way anova and post hoc Tukey's tests at P = 0.05. Fractographic analysis was also applied to probe the fracture mechanisms of different rotation motions. Fatigue life increased with decreasing reciprocating amplitude. Operating in the SR increased fatigue life by 355% over that in the CR. Except for the 22.5(o) increment, all PR motions yielded longer fatigue lives than the SR motion. A progressive reciprocating operation with a ± 45(o) reciprocating amplitude and a + 7(o) progressive angular increment every 10 reciprocating cycles (± 45(o) /10rc/+7(o) ) increased fatigue life by 990% over that in the CR motion. In terms of life enhancement over the CR motion, the larger the curvature the less are the differences between different movements. Single crack initiation sites were found in the CR and SR motions, while three crack initiation sites were typical in the ± 45(o) /10rc/+7(o) motion. Fatigue life increased with decreasing reciprocating amplitude in stationary reciprocation. A progressive reciprocating operation with ± 45(o) /10rc/+7(o) motion led to significant fatigue life enhancement and

  4. PRIMARY PREVENTION IS? A GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE ON HOW ORGANIZATIONS ENGAGING MEN IN PREVENTING GENDER-BASED VIOLENCE CONCEPTUALIZE AND OPERATIONALIZE THEIR WORK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storer, Heather L.; Casey, Erin A.; Carlson, Juliana; Edleson, Jeffrey L.; Tolman, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    Engaging men in addressing violence against women (VAW) has become a strategy in the global prevention of gender-based violence. Concurrently, Western public health frameworks have been utilized to guide prevention agendas worldwide. Using qualitative methods, this study describes how global anti-violence organizations that partner with men conceptualize primary prevention in their work. Findings suggest that ‘primary prevention’ is not a fixed term in the context of VAW and that front-line prevention work challenges rigidly delineated distinctions between levels of prevention. Much can be learned from global organizations’ unique and contextualized approaches to the prevention of VAW. PMID:26333283

  5. Integrating systematic screening for gender-based violence into sexual and reproductive health services: results of a baseline study by the International Planned Parenthood Federation, Western Hemisphere Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guedes, A; Bott, S; Cuca, Y

    2002-09-01

    Three Latin American affiliates of the International Planned Parenthood Federation, Western Hemisphere Region, Inc. (IPPF/WHR) have begun to integrate gender-based violence screening and services into sexual and reproductive health programs. This paper presents results of a baseline study conducted in the affiliates. Although most staff support integration and many had already begun to address violence in their work, additional sensitization and training, as well as institution-wide changes are needed to provide services effectively and to address needs of women experiencing violence. Copyright 2002 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics

  6. 'You already drank my beer, I can decide anything': using structuration theory to explore the dynamics of alcohol use, gender-based violence and HIV risk among female sex workers in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leddy, Anna M; Kerrigan, Deanna; Kennedy, Caitlin E; Mbwambo, Jessie; Likindikoki, Samuel; Underwood, Carol R

    2018-03-16

    Female sex workers experience high rates of gender-based violence and HIV. Alcohol has been shown to facilitate women's risk of both gender-based violence and HIV; however, little research has explored how aspects of the sex work environment shape this risk. Drawing on structuration theory, this study explored how social conduct is patterned across time and space within the sex work environment to influence alcohol consumption, gender-based violence and HIV risk among female sex workers. Qualitative in-depth interviews were conducted with 24 female sex workers enrolled in an ongoing community randomised controlled trial of a combination HIV prevention intervention in Iringa, Tanzania. Data were analysed using both inductive and deductive approaches. Findings reveal how routine interactions between female sex workers and their clients occur at three moments of time and space during the sex exchange process to facilitate alcohol consumption and increase women's risk of gender-based violence and HIV. Findings also highlight how sex workers utilise collective agency to address aspects of the sex work environment that place them at risk of alcohol abuse, gender-based violence and HIV. Implications for future interventions to prevent gender-based violence and HIV among female sex workers in Tanzania and similar contexts are discussed.

  7. Fostering reciprocity in global health partnerships through a structured, hands-on experience for visiting postgraduate medical trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umoren, Rachel A; Einterz, Robert M; Litzelman, Debra K; Pettigrew, Ronald K; Ayaya, Samuel O; Liechty, Edward A

    2014-06-01

    Global health programs that allow international experiences for US learners should also enable reciprocal learning experiences for international learners, particularly if that is a need identified by the partner institution. A partnership between Indiana University and Moi University, Kenya, has successfully hosted 41 visiting Kenyan internal medicine and pediatrics registrars at Indiana University since 2006. The program's logistics, curriculum, and evaluation are described. The registrars rotated through nephrology, cardiology, hematology and oncology, infectious diseases, and intensive care, as well as related ambulatory experiences, functioning on a level comparable to fourth-year medical students. They showed significant improvement in pretest and posttest scores on a standardized National Board of Medical Examiners examination (P  =  .048). International learners experienced culture shock, yet they felt the Indiana University elective was helpful and would recommend it to future participants. Global health programs can reciprocate the benefits derived for US students and residents by offering learning experiences to international learners if that is an expressed need from the international partner. Barriers to those experiences can be overcome, and the hands-on, elective experience has the potential to positively affect the knowledge and attitudes of participants as well as the home nation.

  8. Effect of processing conditions on quality of green beans subjected to reciprocating agitation thermal processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anika; Singh, Anubhav Pratap; Ramaswamy, Hosahalli S

    2015-12-01

    The effect of reciprocating agitation thermal processing (RA-TP) on quality of canned beans was evaluated in a lab-scale reciprocating retort. Green beans were selected due to their soft texture and sensitive color. Green beans (2.5cm length×0.8cm diameter) were filled into 307×409 cans with carboxylmethylcellulose (0-2%) solutions and processed at different temperatures (110-130°C) and reciprocation frequency (1-3Hz) for predetermined heating times to achieve a process lethality (F o ) of 10min. Products processed at higher temperatures and higher reciprocation frequencies resulted in better retention of chlorophyll and antioxidant activity. However, high reciprocation frequency also resulted in texture losses, with higher breakage of beans, increased turbidity and higher leaching. There was total loss of product quality at the highest agitation speed, especially with low viscosity covering solutions. Results suggest that reciprocating agitation frequency needs to be adequately moderated to get the best quality. For getting best quality, particularly for canned liquid particulate foods with soft particulates and those susceptible to high impact agitation, a gentle reciprocating motion (~1Hz) would be a good compromise. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Reciprocity in Interaction: A Window on the First Year of Life in Autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Apicella

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available From early infancy onwards, young children appear motivated to engage reciprocally with others and share psychological states during dyadic interactions. Although poor reciprocity is one of the defining features of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs, few studies have focused on the direct assessment of real-life reciprocal behavior; consequently, our knowledge of the nature and the development of this core feature of autism is still limited. In this study, we describe the phenomenon of reciprocity in infant-caregiver interaction by analyzing family movies taken during the first year of life of 10 infants with ASD and 9 infants with typical development (TD. We analyzed reciprocal behaviors by means of a coding scheme developed for this purpose (caregiver-infant reciprocity scale (CIRS. Infants with ASD displayed less motor activity during the first semester and subsequently fewer vocalizations, compared to TD infants. Caregivers of ASD infants showed in the second semester shorter periods of involvement and a reduction of affectionate touch. These results suggest that from the first months of life a nonsynchronic motor-vocal pattern may interfere in different ways with the development of reciprocity in the primary relationship between infants later diagnosed with ASD and their caregivers.

  10. Cyclic fatigue resistance of two reciprocating nickel-titanium instruments after immersion in sodium hypochlorite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedullà, E; Grande, N M; Plotino, G; Palermo, F; Gambarini, G; Rapisarda, E

    2013-02-01

    To assess resistance to cyclic fatigue of reciprocating nickel-titanium ( NiTi ) files (Reciproc and WaveOne) after immersion in NaOCl solution over several time periods. A total of 90 new Reciproc R25 and WaveOne Primary were tested. The 45 files of the same brand were randomly assigned to three groups (n = 15) and submitted to the following immersion protocol in 5% NaOCl at 37 °C for 16 mm: no immersion (control), 1 or 5 min dynamically. The dynamic immersion and the following cyclic fatigue tests were performed using the appropriate preset reciprocation modes ('RECIPROC ALL' or 'WAVEONE ALL') in a specially designed endodontic motor. Resistance to cyclic fatigue was determined by recording time to fracture (TtF) in a stainless steel artificial canal with a 60° angle of curvature and 5 mm radius of curvature. The artificial canal was manufactured reproducing the instrument's size and taper. Data were analysed by 2-way analyses of variance. Resistance to cyclic fatigue of the same NiTi file was not significantly affected by immersion in NaOCl . Reciproc R25 was associated with a higher cyclic fatigue resistance in all groups compared to WaveOne Primary (P < 0.0001). Reciprocating dynamic immersion in NaOCl for 1 or 5 min did not reduce the cyclic fatigue resistance of NiTi files significantly. However, the type of reciprocating instrument influenced cyclic fatigue resistance with Reciproc R25 being more resistant than WaveOne Primary. © 2012 International Endodontic Journal.

  11. Metformin Attenuates Experimental Autoimmune Arthritis through Reciprocal Regulation of Th17/Treg Balance and Osteoclastogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Hye-Jin; Lee, Seon-Yeong; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Park, Min-Jung; Kim, Kyoung-Woon; Park, Sung-Hwan; Cho, Mi-La

    2014-01-01

    Metformin is widely used to suppress certain functions of the cells found in diseases including diabetes and obesity. In this study, the effects of metformin on downregulating IL-17-producing T (Th17) cells, activating and upregulating regulatory T (Treg) cells, suppressing osteoclastogenesis, and clinically scoring collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) were investigated. To evaluate the effect of metformin on CIA, mice were orally fed with either metformin or saline as control three times a week for nine weeks. Histological analysis of the joints was performed using immunohistochemistry and Th17 cells and Treg cells of the spleen tissue were examined by confocal microscopy staining. Metformin mitigated the severity of CIA, reduced serum immunoglobulin concentrations, and reciprocally regulated Th17/Treg axis. Also, metformin treatment of normal cells cultured in Th17 conditions decreased the number of Th17 cells and increased the number of Treg cells. Metformin decreased gene expression and osteoclastogenic activity in CIA and normal mice. These results indicate that metformin had immunomodulatory actions influencing anti-inflammatory action on CIA through the inhibition of Th17 cell differentiation and the upregulation of Treg cell differentiation along with the suppression of osteoclast differentiation. Our results suggest that metformin may be a potential therapeutic for rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:25214721

  12. Non-Reciprocal Geometric Wave Diode by Engineering Asymmetric Shapes of Nonlinear Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Jie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Li, Nianbei [Tongji Univ., Shanghai Shi (China)

    2014-02-18

    Unidirectional nonreciprocal transport is at the heart of many fundamental problems and applications in both science and technology. Here we study how to design the novel wave diode devices to realize the non-reciprocal wave propagations. Analytical results reveal that such non-reciprocal wave propagation can be purely induced by asymmetric geometry in nonlinear materials. The detailed numerical simulations are performed for a more realistic geometric wave diode model with typical asymmetric shape, where good non-reciprocal wave diode effect has been demonstrated. The results open a way for making wave diodes efficiently simply through shape engineering.

  13. Measurements of reciprocity law failure in green-sensitive X-ray films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, B A; Eisenberg, H; Bjärngard, B E

    1978-02-01

    Reciprocity law failure was measured for four brands of medical x-ray films exposed with intensifying screens. Three of the films are green light-sensitized for use in combination with green light-emitting rare-earth screens. These films showed larger reciprocity failure effects than one conventional blue-sensitive film, Dupont Cronex-2. Development conditions had a small effect on reciprocity failure. As part of the investigation, a detector was constructed with a response that accurately monitors the light emission from the double screen-cassette combination over a wide range of x-ray photon energies.

  14. Developing a gender-based approach to chronic conditions and women's health: a qualitative investigation of community-dwelling women and service provider perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiGiacomo, Michelle; Green, Anna; Rodrigues, Emma; Mulligan, Kathryn; Davidson, Patricia M

    2015-11-21

    Chronic conditions contribute to over 70 % of Australia's total disease burden, and this is set to increase to 80 % by 2020. Women's greater longevity means that they are more likely than men to live with disability and have unique health concerns related to their gender based roles in society. Cultural and social issues can impact on women's health and are important to consider in health services planning and research. In this study, we aimed to identify barriers and facilitators to providing a gender-based approach to chronic conditions and women's health in an eastern metropolitan region of Australia. Focus groups were used to engage both community-dwelling women who had chronic conditions and relevant professional stakeholders in the target area. Recorded proceedings underwent thematic analysis. Five focus groups were conducted with professional stakeholders and women community members in February and March 2014. Resultant themes included: women's disempowerment through interactions with health systems; social and economic constraints and caregiving roles act to exclude women from participating in self-care and society; and empowerment can be achieved through integrated models of care that facilitate voice and enable communication and engagement. This study underscores the importance of including perspectives of sex and gender in health care services planning. Tailoring services to socio-demographic and cultural groups is critical in promoting access to health care services. Unique epidemiological trends, particularly the ageing of women and new migrant groups, require particular attention.

  15. Models of mixed irradiation with a 'reciprocal-time' pattern of the repair function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Shozo; Miura, Yuri; Mizuno, Shoichi [Tokyo Metropolitan Inst. of Gerontology (Japan); Furusawa, Yoshiya [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2002-09-01

    Suzuki presented models for mixed irradiation with two and multiple types of radiation by extending the Zaider and Rossi model, which is based on the theory of dual radiation action. In these models, the repair function was simply assumed to be semi-logarithmically linear (i.e., monoexponential), or a first-order process, which has been experimentally contradicted. Fowler, however, suggested that the repair of radiation damage might be largely a second-order process rather than a first-order one, and presented data in support of this hypothesis. In addition, a second-order repair function is preferred to an n-exponential repair function for the reason that only one parameter is used in the former instead of 2n-1 parameters for the latter, although both repair functions show a good fit to the experimental data. However, according to a second-order repair function, the repair rate depends on the dose, which is incompatible with the experimental data. We, therefore, revised the models for mixed irradiation by Zaider and Rossi and by Suzuki, by substituting a 'reciprocal-time' pattern of the repair function, which is derived from the assumption that the repair rate is independent of the dose in a second-order repair function, for a first-order one in reduction and interaction factors of the models, although the underlying mechanism for this assumption cannot be well-explained. The reduction factor, which reduces the contribution of the square of a dose to cell killing in the linear-quadratic model and its derivatives, and the interaction factor, which also reduces the contribution of the interaction of two or more doses of different types of radiation, were formulated by using a 'reciprocal-time' patterns of the repair function. Cell survivals calculated from the older and the newly modified models were compared in terms of the dose-rate by assuming various types of single and mixed irradiation. The result implies that the newly modified models for

  16. Intermediaries in Trust: Indirect Reciprocity, Incentives, and Norms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giangiacomo Bravo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Any trust situation involves a certain amount of risk for trustors that trustees could abuse. In some cases, intermediaries exist who play a crucial role in the exchange by providing reputational information. To examine under what conditions intermediary opinion could have a positive impact on cooperation, we designed two experiments based on a modified version of the investment game where intermediaries rated the behaviour of trustees under various incentive schemes and different role structures. We found that intermediaries can increase trust if there is room for indirect reciprocity between the involved parties. We also found that the effect of monetary incentives and social norms cannot be clearly separable in these situations. If properly designed, monetary incentives for intermediaries can have a positive effect. On the one hand, when intermediary rewards are aligned with the trustor’s interest, investments and returns tend to increase. On the other hand, fixed monetary incentives perform less than any other incentive schemes and endogenous social norms in ensuring trust and fairness. These findings should make us reconsider the mantra of incentivization of social and public conventional policy.

  17. Predicting and detecting reciprocity between indirect ecological interactions and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, James A; Brashares, Justin S; Power, Mary E

    2013-05-01

    Living nature can be thought of as a tapestry, defined not only by its constituent parts but also by how these parts are woven together. The weaving of this tapestry is a metaphor for species interactions, which can be divided into three broad classes: competitive, mutualistic, and consumptive. Direct interactions link together as more complex networks, for example, the joining of consumptive interactions into food webs. Food web dynamics are driven, in turn, by changes in the abundances of web members, whose numbers or biomass respond to bottom-up (resource limitation) and top-down (consumer limitation) forcing. The relative strengths of top-down and bottom-up forcing on the abundance of a given web member depend on its ecological context, including its topological position within the food web. Top-down effects by diverse consumers are nearly ubiquitous, in many cases influencing the structure and operation of ecosystems. While the ecological effects of such interactions are well known, far less is known of their evolutionary consequences. In this essay, we describe sundry consequences of these interaction chains on species and ecosystem processes, explain several known or suspected evolutionary effects of consumer-induced interaction chains, and identify areas where reciprocity between ecology and evolution involving the indirect effects of consumer-prey interaction chains might be further explored.

  18. Characterization of Consistent Completion of Reciprocal Comparison Matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Benítez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Analytic hierarchy process (AHP is a leading multi-attribute decision-aiding model that is designed to help make better choices when faced with complex decisions involving several dimensions. AHP, which enables qualitative analysis using a combination of subjective and objective information, is a multiple criteria decision analysis approach that uses hierarchical structured pairwise comparisons. One of the drawbacks of AHP is that a pairwise comparison cannot be completed by an actor or stakeholder not fully familiar with all the aspects of the problem. The authors have developed a completion based on a process of linearization that minimizes the matrix distance defined in terms of the Frobenius norm (a strictly convex minimization problem. In this paper, we characterize when an incomplete, positive, and reciprocal matrix can be completed to become a consistent matrix. We show that this characterization reduces the problem to the solution of a linear system of equations—a straightforward procedure. Various properties of such a completion are also developed using graph theory, including explicit calculation formulas. In real decision-making processes, facilitators conducting the study could use these characterizations to accept an incomplete comparison body given by an actor or to encourage the actor to further develop the comparison for the sake of consistency.

  19. Fitness consequences of reciprocally asymmetric hybridization between simultaneous hermaphrodites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiwegweaw, Amporn; Seki, Keiichi; Utsuno, Hiroki; Asami, Takahiro

    2009-03-01

    Depending on fitness consequences, hybridization may rescue Inbred populations; generate premating barriers, reproductive Interference, or hybrid species; or extinguish a species. However, the fitness of hybrids is unpredictable without direct quantification of their performance in fitness components across multiple generations. The land snails Bradybaena pellucida and B. similaris, which are Indigenous and non-Indigenous in Japan, respectively, copulate with each other simultaneously and reciprocally. However, only B. pellucida produces hybrids, because it ends mating by removing the penis before transferring a spermatophore, while B. similaris Inseminates B. pellucida. To evaluate the strength of an Intrinsic postzygotic barrier against the hybrids produced by B. pellucida, we conducted breeding experiments in the laboratory and measured six life-history traits: (1) growth rate, (2) body weight at maturity, (3) number of days to first oviposition after being permitted to mate, (4) clutch size, (5) fecundity, and (6) hatchability. We also calculated the relative intrinsic fitness based on five of these trait values (excluding clutch size). F(1) hybrids exhibited heterosis in growth rate, body weight at maturity and relative intrinsic fitness. F(2) hybrids also showed heterosis in body weight at maturity. Nevertheless, the F(2) hybrids produced significantly fewer progeny than the mid-point value of the parental species. Thus, the F(2) hybrids exhibited weak out-breeding depression in reproduction, offsetting their vigor in body size. These results indicate that only a weak postzygotic barrier, contrasting with strong F(1) heterosis, has evolved during genetic divergence of the two sibling species in allopatry.

  20. In situ stylus profilometer for a high frequency reciprocating tribometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamps, T. J.; Walker, J. C.; Plint, A. G.

    2017-09-01

    Measuring the friction and wear characteristics of a tribological contact is essential to gaining a detailed understanding of its performance and predicted life. Wear rate and friction coefficient measurements are obtained from instrumented benchtop tribometers designed to replicate specific tribological contacts. Due to the difficulty of measuring wear in situ, measurements are typically made before and after an experiment. The wear rate must be assumed to be linear for it to be used to predict product life, however this is assumption can hide changes occurring during an experiment which indicate wear transitions. This paper details the design and validation of an in situ stylus profilometer for a reciprocating sliding tribometer to provide an insight into the wear transitions occurring during dry sliding of 52100 bearing steel against graphitic flake cast iron. The profilometer’s performance was validated using ground roughness standards and the accuracy found to be approximately 110 nm. Incubation, run-in and steady state wear regimes were identified by the profilometer and corroborated with friction coefficient data, providing an enhanced understanding of the tribological contact behaviour.

  1. Conformity enhances network reciprocity in evolutionary social dilemmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szolnoki, Attila; Perc, Matjaž

    2015-02-06

    The pursuit of highest payoffs in evolutionary social dilemmas is risky and sometimes inferior to conformity. Choosing the most common strategy within the interaction range is safer because it ensures that the payoff of an individual will not be much lower than average. Herding instincts and crowd behaviour in humans and social animals also compel to conformity in their own right. Motivated by these facts, we here study the impact of conformity on the evolution of cooperation in social dilemmas. We show that an appropriate fraction of conformists within the population introduces an effective surface tension around cooperative clusters and ensures smooth interfaces between different strategy domains. Payoff-driven players brake the symmetry in favour of cooperation and enable an expansion of clusters past the boundaries imposed by traditional network reciprocity. This mechanism works even under the most testing conditions, and it is robust against variations of the interaction network as long as degree-normalized payoffs are applied. Conformity may thus be beneficial for the resolution of social dilemmas. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  2. Reciprocity, spatial mapping and time reversal in electromagnetics

    CERN Document Server

    Altman, C

    2011-01-01

    This long awaited second edition traces the original developments from the 1970s and brings them up to date with new and previously unpublished material to give this work a new lease of life for the early twenty-first century and readers new to the topic. In the winter of 1970-71, Colman Altman had been finding almost exact symmetries in the computed reflection and transmission matrices for plane-stratified magnetoplasmas when symmetrically related directions of incidence were compared. At the suggestion of Kurt Suchy the complex conjugate wave fields, used to construct the eigenmode amplitudes via the mean Poynting flux densities, were replaced by the adjoint wave fields that would propagate in a medium with transposed constitutive tensors, to yield a scattering theorem – reciprocity in k-space -- in the computer output. To prove the result analytically, one had to investigate the properties of the adjoint Maxwell system, and the two independent proofs that followed, in 1975 and 1979, proceeded according t...

  3. Pullulan fermentation using a prototype rotational reciprocating plate impeller.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yun; Thibault, Jules

    2013-05-01

    A rotational reciprocating plate impeller prototype, designed to improve the mixing homogeneity of viscous non-Newtonian fermentation broth, has been tested in pullulan fermentations. With this new impeller, the operating levels of several factors were investigated to improve pullulan production with Aureobasidium pullulans ATCC 42023 in a 22-L bioreactor using experimental designs. Because both high molecular weight (MW) and high concentration of pullulan were desired; the exopolysaccharide (EPS) concentration and the broth viscosity were used as optimization objective functions to be maximized. A 6-run uniform design was used to investigate five factors. Under the best operating conditions among the six runs, 29.0 g L(-1) EPS was produced at 102 h. This condition was used as the starting point for further investigation on the two statistically significant factors, the pH and the agitation speed. An 8-run 3-level custom design that investigates up to second-order effects was used in the second stage. An optimal zone of operating conditions for large quantity of high MW pullulan production was identified. A concentration of 23.3 g L(-1) EPS was produced at 78 h. This is equivalent to an EPS productivity of 0.30 g L(-1) h(-1). The corresponding apparent viscosity of the broth was 0.38 Pa s at the shear rate of 10 s(-1).

  4. Achievement Emotions and Academic Performance: Longitudinal Models of Reciprocal Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekrun, Reinhard; Lichtenfeld, Stephanie; Marsh, Herbert W; Murayama, Kou; Goetz, Thomas

    2017-09-01

    A reciprocal effects model linking emotion and achievement over time is proposed. The model was tested using five annual waves of the Project for the Analysis of Learning and Achievement in Mathematics (PALMA) longitudinal study, which investigated adolescents' development in mathematics (Grades 5-9; N = 3,425 German students; mean starting age = 11.7 years; representative sample). Structural equation modeling showed that positive emotions (enjoyment, pride) positively predicted subsequent achievement (math end-of-the-year grades and test scores), and that achievement positively predicted these emotions, controlling for students' gender, intelligence, and family socioeconomic status. Negative emotions (anger, anxiety, shame, boredom, hopelessness) negatively predicted achievement, and achievement negatively predicted these emotions. The findings were robust across waves, achievement indicators, and school tracks, highlighting the importance of emotions for students' achievement and of achievement for the development of emotions. © 2017 The Authors. Child Development © 2017 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  5. Reciprocal carbonyl-carbonyl interactions in small molecules and proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim, Abdur; Saha, Pinaki; Jha, Kunal Kumar; Sukumar, Nagamani; Sarma, Bani Kanta

    2017-07-19

    Carbonyl-carbonyl n→π* interactions where a lone pair (n) of the oxygen atom of a carbonyl group is delocalized over the π* orbital of a nearby carbonyl group have attracted a lot of attention in recent years due to their ability to affect the 3D structure of small molecules, polyesters, peptides, and proteins. In this paper, we report the discovery of a "reciprocal" carbonyl-carbonyl interaction with substantial back and forth n→π* and π→π* electron delocalization between neighboring carbonyl groups. We have carried out experimental studies, analyses of crystallographic databases and theoretical calculations to show the presence of this interaction in both small molecules and proteins. In proteins, these interactions are primarily found in polyproline II (PPII) helices. As PPII are the most abundant secondary structures in unfolded proteins, we propose that these local interactions may have implications in protein folding.Carbonyl-carbonyl π* non covalent interactions affect the structure and stability of small molecules and proteins. Here, the authors carry out experimental studies, analyses of crystallographic databases and theoretical calculations to describe an additional type of carbonyl-carbonyl interaction.

  6. Noise-induced enhancement of network reciprocity in social dilemmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Gui-Qing; Sun, Qi-Bo; Wang, Lin

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • We introduce the noise-induced mechanism into the prisoner’s dilemma game. • Cooperation will be largely enhanced by introducing the noise into the calculation of fitness. • Despite the defectors prevail initially, the stressed factor still promotes the cooperation. • The mechanism studied here is helpful on different kinds of interaction networks. -- Abstract: The network reciprocity is an important dynamic rule fostering the emergence of cooperation among selfish individuals. This was reported firstly in the seminal work of Nowak and May, where individuals were arranged on the regular lattice network, and played the prisoner’s dilemma game (PDG). In the standard PDG, one often assumes that the players have perfect rationality. However, in reality, we human are far from rational agents, as we often make mistakes, and behave irrationally. Accordingly, in this work, we introduce the element of noise into the measurement of fitness, which is determined by the parameter α controlling the degree of noise. The considered noise-induced mechanism remarkably promotes the behavior of cooperation, which may be conducive to interpret the emergence of cooperation within the population

  7. Effects of reciprocal teaching : A two-year intervention study among low achieving adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Okkinga, Mariska; van Gelderen, Amos; Sleegers, P.J.C.; van Steensel, Roel

    2015-01-01

    Low achieving adolescents are known to have difficulties with reading comprehension. This presentation discusses how reciprocal teaching can improve low achieving adolescents' reading comprehension in natural classroom settings (as opposed to small-group settings) and to what extent intervention

  8. Linear reciprocating wear behaviour of plasma-sprayed Al2O3 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    contact surface, are judged. Results have shown that the wear rate increases with increasing applied load and frequency and that decreases with increasing reciprocating amplitude. Plastic deformation, detachments of unmelted core, ...

  9. Fast Silencing Reveals a Lost Role for Reciprocal Inhibition in Locomotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moult, Peter R.; Cottrell, Glen A.; Li, Wen-Chang

    2013-01-01

    Summary Alternating contractions of antagonistic muscle groups during locomotion are generated by spinal “half-center” networks coupled in antiphase by reciprocal inhibition. It is widely thought that reciprocal inhibition only coordinates the activity of these muscles. We have devised two methods to rapidly and selectively silence neurons on just one side of Xenopus tadpole spinal cord and hindbrain, which generate swimming rhythms. Silencing activity on one side led to rapid cessation of activity on the other side. Analyses reveal that this resulted from the depression of reciprocal inhibition connecting the two sides. Although critical neurons in intact tadpoles are capable of pacemaker firing individually, an effect that could support motor rhythms without inhibition, the swimming network itself requires ∼23 min to regain rhythmic activity after blocking inhibition pharmacologically, implying some homeostatic changes. We conclude therefore that reciprocal inhibition is critical for the generation of normal locomotor rhythm. PMID:23312521

  10. Root canal retreatment using reciprocating and continuous rotary nickel-titanium instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Patricia Fonseca; Oliveira Goncalves, Leonardo Cantanhede; Franco Marques, Andre Augusto; Sponchiado Junior, Emilio Carlos; Roberti Garcia, Lucas da Fonseca; de Carvalho, Fredson Marcio Acris

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The complete filling material removal during endodontic retreatment is a clinical procedure difficult to achieve. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of reciprocating and continuous rotary nickel-titanium instruments used in root canal retreatment. Materials and Methods: Forty freshly extracted human premolars were cleaned and shaped by the crown-down technique, followed by filling by the lateral compaction technique. The teeth were randomly separated into two groups (n = 20), according to the system used for filling material removal: G1 - Reciproc and G2 - ProTaper Universal Retreatment System. The teeth were photographed under operating microscope at ×8 magnification; and the total area of the root canal and remaining filling material were quantified. Results: No statistically significant difference (P > 0.05) in residual filling material was observed between groups; however, the time required for filling removal was significantly shorter for Reciproc system (P retreatment was faster when reciprocating motion was used. PMID:26038656

  11. Coefficient Bounds for Some Families of Starlike and Convex Functions of Reciprocal Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arif, Muhammad; Darus, Maslina; Raza, Mohsan; Khan, Qaiser

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is to investigate coefficient estimates, Fekete-Szegő inequality, and upper bound of third Hankel determinant for some families of starlike and convex functions of reciprocal order. PMID:25506621

  12. PENINGKATAN KEMANDIRIAN MAHASISWA PENDIDIKAN FISIKA PADA MATA KULIAH MEKANIKA MELALUI METODE RECIPROCAL TEACHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fajar Fitri

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to describe thestudent independence after follow the Reciprocal Teaching of Learning. The subjects of this research are students in study program of physics education Ahmad Dahlan University who are studying Mechanics at school year of 2015/2016. Classroom Action Research consists of plan, do, and reflection. This activity repeated two cycles. The result is after follow the Reciprocal Teaching of Learning 80,3% students reached good individual and classical independence.This research aims to describe thestudent independence after follow the Reciprocal Teaching of Learning. The subjects of this research are students in study program of physics education Ahmad Dahlan University who are studying Mechanics at school year of 2015/2016. Classroom Action Research consists of plan, do, and reflection. This activity repeated two cycles. The result is after follow the Reciprocal Teaching of Learning 80,3% students reached good individual and classical independence.

  13. The evolution of non-reciprocal nuclear exchange in mushrooms as a consequence of genomic conflict

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aanen, D.K.; Kuyper, T.W.; Debets, A.J.M.; Hoekstra, R.F.

    2004-01-01

    Heterothallic mushrooms accomplish sex by exchanging nuclei without cytoplasm. Hyphal fusions occur between haploid mycelia resulting from germinated spores and subsequent reciprocal nuclear exchange without cytoplasmic mixing. The resulting dikaryon is therefore a cytoplasmic mosaic with uniformly

  14. I'm outgoing and she's reserved: the reciprocal dynamics of personality in close friendships in young adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Paul A; Thorne, Avril; Shapiro, Lauren A

    2011-10-01

    Close college-age friendships provide differential opportunities for reinforcing dispositional tendencies and fostering accommodation or change. This finding was obtained from a cross-sectional study of 66 pairs of same-sex college-age friends (58% female). Each pair of friends was extreme and either very similar or different with regard to extraversion-introversion. Interviews with each friend were analyzed for references to each other's role in various friendship domains, including the setting of the friendship and position with regard to chatting, disclosing, expressing opinions about peers, and energizing the friendship. Matched friends mutually reinforced each other's similar dispositional tendencies. Friends with contrasting personalities showed patterns of personality accommodation as well as complementary reinforcement. Implications are discussed for embedding reciprocal theories of personality development in close friendships. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Personality © 2011, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Love me, love my dog: an experimental study on social connections and indirect reciprocity

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Pinghan; Meng, Juanjuan

    2013-01-01

    This paper conducts a laboratory experiment to investigate the role of social connections in behavioral indirect reciprocity. We provide the evidence of spillovers effects of social ties, e.g., the recipient’s indirect reciprocal act varies with the relations between the donor and a third party. Naturally occurring friendship is employed to study social connections. Thus, a beneficiary might either be a “friend” or a “stranger” of the donor. We demonstrate that knowing social connections sign...

  16. Identification of groundwater flow parameters using reciprocal data from hydraulic interference tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinoni, Marianna; Delay, Frederick; Ackerer, Philippe; Riva, Monica; Guadagnini, Alberto

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the effect of considering reciprocal drawdown curves for the characterization of hydraulic properties of aquifer systems through inverse modeling based on interference well testing. Reciprocity implies that drawdown observed in a well B when pumping takes place from well A should strictly coincide with the drawdown observed in A when pumping in B with the same flow rate as in A. In this context, a critical point related to applications of hydraulic tomography is the assessment of the number of available independent drawdown data and their impact on the solution of the inverse problem. The issue arises when inverse modeling relies upon mathematical formulations of the classical single-continuum approach to flow in porous media grounded on Darcy's law. In these cases, introducing reciprocal drawdown curves in the database of an inverse problem is equivalent to duplicate some information, to a certain extent. We present a theoretical analysis of the way a Least-Square objective function and a Levenberg-Marquardt minimization algorithm are affected by the introduction of reciprocal information in the inverse problem. We also investigate the way these reciprocal data, eventually corrupted by measurement errors, influence model parameter identification in terms of: (a) the convergence of the inverse model, (b) the optimal values of parameter estimates, and (c) the associated estimation uncertainty. Our theoretical findings are exemplified through a suite of computational examples focused on block-heterogeneous systems with increased complexity level. We find that the introduction of noisy reciprocal information in the objective function of the inverse problem has a very limited influence on the optimal parameter estimates. Convergence of the inverse problem improves when adding diverse (nonreciprocal) drawdown series, but does not improve when reciprocal information is added to condition the flow model. The uncertainty on optimal parameter estimates is

  17. Reciprocal inhibition between motor neurons of the tibialis anterior and triceps surae in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavuz, Utku Şükrü; Negro, Francesco; Diedrichs, Robin; Farina, Dario

    2018-01-31

    Motor neurons innervating antagonist muscles receive reciprocal inhibitory afferent inputs in order to facilitate the joint movement in the two directions. The present study investigates the mutual transmission of reciprocal inhibitory afferent inputs between the tibialis anterior (TA) and triceps surae (soleus and medial gastrocnemius) motor units. We assessed this mutual mechanism in large populations of motor units for building a statistical distribution of the inhibition amplitudes during standardized input to the motor neuron pools in order to minimize the effect of modulatory pathways. Single motor unit activities were identified using high-density surface electromyography (HDsEMG) recorded from the TA, soleus (Sol) and medial gastrocnemius (GM) muscles during isometric dorsi- and plantar-flexion. Reciprocal inhibition on the antagonist muscle was elicited by electrical stimulation of the tibial (TN) or common peroneal nerves (CPN). The probability density distributions of reflex strength for each muscle were estimated in order to examine the strength of mutual transmission of reciprocal inhibitory input. The results showed that the strength of reciprocal inhibition in the TA motor units was a 4-fold greater than for the GM and the Sol motor units. This suggests an asymmetric transmission of reciprocal inhibition between ankle extensor and flexor muscles. This asymmetry cannot be explained by differences in motor unit type composition between the investigated muscles since we sampled low-threshold motor units in all cases. Therefore, the differences observed for the strength of inhibition are presumably due to a differential reciprocal spindle afferent input and the relative contribution of non-reciprocal inhibitory pathways.

  18. In-situ investigations of structural changes during cyclic loading by high resolution reciprocal space mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichs, Annika M.; Thiel, Felix; Lienert, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    Abstract A major failure reason for structural materials is fatigue-related damage due to repeatedly changing mechanical loads. During cyclic loading dislocations self-organize into characteristic ordered structures, which play a decisive role for the materials lifetime. These heterogeneous...... the materials behavior during cyclic deformation and to improve the material design. While monitoring macroscopic stress and strain during cyclic loading, reciprocal space maps of diffraction peaks from single grains are obtained with high resolution. High Resolution Reciprocal Space Mapping was applied...

  19. Relationship Reciprocation Modulates Resource Allocation in Adolescent Social Networks: Developmental Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Burnett Heyes, Stephanie; Jih, Yeou?Rong; Block, Per; Hiu, Chii?Fen; Holmes, Emily A.; Lau, Jennifer Y. F.

    2015-01-01

    Adolescence is characterized as a period of social reorientation toward peer relationships, entailing the emergence of sophisticated social abilities. Two studies (Study 1: N?=?42, ages 13?17; Study 2: N?=?81, ages 13?16) investigated age group differences in the impact of relationship reciprocation within school?based social networks on an experimental measure of cooperation behavior. Results suggest development between mid? and late adolescence in the extent to which reciprocation of social...

  20. Endodontic retreatment: clinical comparison of reciprocating systems versus rotary system in disinfecting root canals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinho, Frederico C; Freitas, Lilian F; Nascimento, Gustavo G; Fernandes, Aleteia M; Leite, Fabio R M; Gomes, Ana P M; Camões, Izabel C G

    2015-07-01

    This clinical study was conducted to compare the effectiveness of single-file reciprocating systems and rotary systems in removing endotoxins and cultivable bacteria in endodontic retreatment. Thirty endodontically treated teeth with post-treatment apical periodontitis were selected. The specimens were divided into three groups according to the system used: WaveOne (n = 10), Reciproc instrument (n = 10), and ProTaper Universal Retreatment system (n = 10). Samples were collected before and after chemomechanical preparation. The irrigation was performed by using 2.5% sodium hypochlorite. A chromogenic limulus amebocyte lysate assay test was used to quantify endotoxins. Culture techniques were used to determine bacterial colony-forming unit counts. At baseline, endotoxins and cultivable bacteria were recovered from 100% of the root canal samples in a median value of 5.84 EU/mL and 4.98 × 10(3) CFU/mL, respectively. After CMP, no differences were found in the median percentage values of endotoxin reduction achieved with reciprocating systems-WaveOne [94.11%] and Reciproc [93.29%] and with rotary systems-ProTaper [94.98%] (P > 0.05). Both single-file reciprocating systems [WaveOne (98.27%) and Reciproc (99.54%)] and rotary system [ProTaper (98.73%)] were effective in reducing bacterial load (P > 0.05). Moreover, no differences were found among the systems tested. The Reciproc and WaveOne reciprocating systems were as effective as the ProTaper system for removal of endotoxins and bacteria in endodontic retreatment. All systems tested were effective to remove cultivable bacteria and endotoxin in endodontic retreatment. As no differences among systems were observed, it is possible to suggest that clinicians should choose the preferred technique to perform endodontic.