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Sample records for gemtuzumab ozogamicin mylotargtm

  1. Gemtuzumab ozogamicin for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Jeffrey; Wang, Eunice S

    2018-06-11

    Gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO) is an antibody-drug conjugate consisting of a monoclonal antibody targeting CD33 linked to a cytotoxic derivative of calicheamicin. Despite the known clinical efficacy in relapsed/refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML), GO was withdrawn from the market in 2010 due to increased early deaths witnessed in newly diagnosed AML patients receiving GO + intensive chemotherapy. In 2017, new data on the clinical efficacy and safety of GO administered on a fractionated-dosing schedule led to re-approval for newly diagnosed and relapsed/refractory AML. Areas covered: Addition of fractionated GO to chemotherapy significantly improved event-free survival of newly diagnosed AML patients with favorable and intermediate cytogenetic-risk disease. GO monotherapy also prolonged survival in newly diagnosed unfit patients and relapse-free survival in relapsed/refractory AML. This new dosing schedule was associated with decreased incidence of hepatotoxicity, veno-occlusive disease, and early mortality. Expert commentary: GO represents the first drug-antibody conjugate approved (twice) in the United States for AML. Its re-emergence adds a valuable agent back into the armamentarium for AML. The approval of GO as well as three other agents for AML in 2017 highlights the need for rapid cytogenetic and molecular characterization of AML and incorporation into new treatment algorithms.

  2. Defining the dose of gemtuzumab ozogamicin in combination with induction chemotherapy in acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burnett, Alan; Cavenagh, Jamie; Russell, Nigel

    2016-01-01

    Arecent source data meta-analysis of randomized trials in adults assessing the immunoconjugate gemtuzumab ozogamicin combined with standard chemotherapy in acute myeloid leukemia showed a significant survival benefit in patients without an adverse karyotype. It is not clear whether the optimal dose...

  3. Gemtuzumab ozogamicin (Mylotarg) in children with refractory or relapsed acute myeloid leukemia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinhardt, D; Diekamp, S; Fleischhack, G; Corbacioglu, C; Jurgens, H; Dworzak, M; Kaspers, G.J.L.; Creutzig, U.; Zwaan, C.M.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO) is an immunoconjugate consisting of the CD33 antibody and calicheamicin, a potent cytotoxic agent. Developed for targeted treatment of CD33-positive AML, studies in adults showed its efficacy in relapsed and refractory AML. PATIENTS AND METHOD: We report 12

  4. The addition of gemtuzumab ozogamicin to chemotherapy in adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kell, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of acute myeloid leukaemia has remained largely unchanged for the last 30 years since the advent of combination chemotherapy with cytarabine arabinoside and daunorubicin with remission rates around 70% but with long term survival still only around 40% in young adults. Doses of chemotherapy have been pushed to the limit of toxicity. Gemtuzumab ozogamicin allows additional chemotherapy to be delivered to the leukaemic cells without significantly adding to toxicity since the active agent is coupled to a monoclonal anti-CD33 antibody. It was approved by the FDA in 2000 for the treatment of elderly patients with relapsed CD33 positive AML at a dose of 9mg/m(2) on two days two weeks apart. Almost at once, questions were raised about its safety, with a particular liver signal, and it was voluntarily withdrawn from practice in 2010. Many groups have been examining the role of gemtuzumab ozogamicin in combination with chemotherapy, usually at lower doses than originally recommended, with varying degrees of success and toxicity and gemtuzumab ozogamicin is now entering a period of rehabilitation. Currently it is only commercially available in Japan although it is currently also available in the UK Bloodwise AML18 study.

  5. Gemtuzumab ozogamicin as postremission treatment in AML at 60 years of age or more : results of a multicenter phase 3 study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lowenberg, Bob; Beck, Joachim; Graux, Carlos; van Putten, Wim; Schouten, Harry C.; Verdonck, Leo F.; Ferrant, Augustin; Sonneveld, Pieter; Jongen-Lavrencic, Mojca; von Lilienfeld-Toal, Marie; Biemond, Bart J.; Vellenga, Edo; Breems, Dimitri; de Muijnck, Hilde; Schaafsma, Ron; Verhoef, Gregor; Doehner, Hartmut; Gratwohl, Alois; Pabst, Thomas; Ossenkoppele, Gert J.; Maertens, Johan

    2010-01-01

    In older patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), the prevention of relapse has remained one of the major therapeutic challenges, with more than 75% relapses after complete remission. The anti-CD33 immunotoxin conjugate gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO) has shown antileukemic remission induction

  6. Gemtuzumab ozogamicin-induced sinusoidal obstructive syndrome treated with defibrotide: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lannoy, D; Decaudin, B; Grozieux de Laguérenne, A; Barrier, F; Pignon, J M; Wetterwald, M; Odou, P

    2006-08-01

    New treatments for relapse of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), include gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO), an anti-CD33 monoclonal antibody. We describe a second case of GO-induced sinusoidal obstructive syndrome (SOS) effectively treated with defibrotide (DF). No stem-cell transplantation was involved. On day 23 after the first GO dose, a patient presented with ascites, weight gain, liver enlargement and pain in the right upper quadrant. Sudden hepatic cytolysis (transaminases at six times the normal range: grade 3) and cholestasis [alkaline phosphatase ALP and gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) respectively at four and eight times the normal range: grade 2] were observed but there was no evidence of increase serum bilirubin. Treatment with DF (Prociclide), Crinos; 10 mg/kg/day, or 200 mg, q.i.d.) improved the hepatic abnormality within a few days (serum transaminases decreased from 312 to 103 IU/L for aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and from 141 to 80 IU/L for alanine aminotransferase (ALT) within 3 days ALP increased from 253 to 383 IU/L and gamma-GT from 238 to 417 IU/L 4 days after administration of DF. The clinical and biological features of our case suggest a direct involvement of GO in causing SOS, even when used as monotherapy, without allogenic stem-cell transplantation. Low dose DF (10 mg/kg/day) given early during the development of SOS associated with GO was effective. Unfortunately, in our case the patient eventually died of multi-organ failure probably because of failure of GO.

  7. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin Versus Best Supportive Care in Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia Unsuitable for Intensive Chemotherapy: Results of the Randomized Phase III EORTC-GIMEMA AML-19 Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amadori, S.; Suciu, S.; Selleslag, D.; Aversa, F.; Gaidano, G.; Musso, M.; Annino, L.; Venditti, A.; Voso, M.T.; Mazzone, C.; Magro, D.; Fabritiis, P. De; Muus, P.; Alimena, G.; Mancini, M.; Hagemeijer, A.; Paoloni, F.; Vignetti, M.; Fazi, P.; Meert, L.; Ramadan, S.M.; Willemze, R.; Witte, T.J. de; Baron, F.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare single-agent gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO) with best supportive care (BSC) including hydroxyurea as first-line therapy in older patients with acute myeloid leukemia unsuitable for intensive chemotherapy. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In this trial, patients at least 61 years old were

  8. Identification of patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia who benefit from the addition of gemtuzumab ozogamicin: results of the MRC AML15 trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burnett, Alan K; Hills, Robert K; Milligan, Donald

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: Antibody-directed chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) may permit more treatment to be administered without escalating toxicity. Gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO) is an immunoconjugate between CD33 and calicheamicin that is internalized when binding to the epitope. We previously...... established that it is feasible to combine GO with conventional chemotherapy. We now report a large randomized trial testing the addition of GO to induction and/or consolidation chemotherapy in untreated younger patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In this open-label trial, 1,113 patients, predominantly younger...... in toxicity. There was no overall difference in response or survival in either induction of consolidation. However, a predefined analysis by cytogenetics showed highly significant interaction with induction GO (P = .001), with significant survival benefit for patients with favorable cytogenetics, no benefit...

  9. Efficacy and tolerability of gemtuzumab ozogamicin (anti-CD33 monoclonal antibody, CMA-676, Mylotarg® in children with relapsed/refractory myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand Yves

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO is a cytotoxic anti-CD33 monoclonal antibody that has given promising preliminary results in adult myeloid CD33+ AML. We conducted a retrospective multicenter study of 12 children treated with GO on a compassionate basis (median age 5.5 y. Three patients (2 MDS/AML, 1 JMML were refractory to first-line treatment, 8 patients with de novo AML were in refractory first relapse, and one patient with de novo AML was in 2nd relapse after stem cell transplantation (SCT. CD33 expression exceeded 20% in all cases. Methods GO was administered alone, at a unit dose of 3–9 mg/m2, once (3 patients, twice (3 patients, three (5 patients or five times (1 patient. Mean follow-up was 128 days (8–585 d. Results There were three complete responses (25% leading to further curative treatment (SCT. Treatment failed in the other nine patients, and only one patient was alive at the end of follow-up. NCI-CTC grade III/IV adverse events comprised hematological toxicity (n = 12, hypertransaminasemia (n = 2, allergy and hyperbilirubinemia (1 case each. There was only one major adverse event (grade IV allergy. No case of sinusoidal obstruction syndrome occurred. Conclusion These results warrant a prospective trial of GO in a larger population of children with AML.

  10. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin (GO Inclusion to Induction Chemotherapy Eliminates Leukemic Initiating Cells and Significantly Improves Survival in Mouse Models of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathy C Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO is an anti-CD33 antibody-drug conjugate for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML. Although GO shows a narrow therapeutic window in early clinical studies, recent reports detailing a modified dosing regimen of GO can be safely combined with induction chemotherapy, and the combination provides significant survival benefits in AML patients. Here we tested whether the survival benefits seen with the combination arise from the enhanced reduction of chemoresidual disease and leukemic initiating cells (LICs. Herein, we use cell line and patient-derived xenograft (PDX AML models to evaluate the combination of GO with daunorubicin and cytarabine (DA induction chemotherapy on AML blast growth and animal survival. DA chemotherapy and GO as separate treatments reduced AML burden but left significant chemoresidual disease in multiple AML models. The combination of GO and DA chemotherapy eliminated nearly all AML burden and extended overall survival. In two small subsets of AML models, chemoresidual disease following DA chemotherapy displayed hallmark markers of leukemic LICs (CLL1 and CD34. In vivo, the two chemoresistant subpopulations (CLL1+/CD117− and CD34+/CD38+ showed higher ability to self-renewal than their counterpart subpopulations, respectively. CD33 was coexpressed in these functional LIC subpopulations. We demonstrate that the GO and DA induction chemotherapy combination more effectively eliminates LICs in AML PDX models than either single agent alone. These data suggest that the survival benefit seen by the combination of GO and induction chemotherapy, nonclinically and clinically, may be attributed to the enhanced reduction of LICs.

  11. In vitro experimental (211)At-anti-CD33 antibody therapy of leukaemia cells overcomes cellular resistance seen in vivo against gemtuzumab ozogamicin.

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    Petrich, Thorsten; Korkmaz, Zekiye; Krull, Doris; Frömke, Cornelia; Meyer, Geerd J; Knapp, Wolfram H

    2010-05-01

    Monoclonal anti-CD33 antibodies conjugated with toxic calicheamicin derivative (gemtuzumab ozogamicin, GO) are a novel therapy option for acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). Key prognostic factors for patients with AML are high CD33 expression on the leukaemic cells and the ability to overcome mechanisms of resistance to cytotoxic chemotherapies, including drug efflux or other mechanisms decreasing apoptosis. Alpha particle-emitting radionuclides overwhelm such anti-apoptotic mechanisms by producing numerous DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs) accompanied by decreased DNA repair. We labelled anti-CD33 antibodies with the alpha-emitter (211)At and compared survival of leukaemic HL-60 and K-562 cells treated with the (211)At-labelled antibodies, GO or unlabelled antibodies as controls. We also measured caspase-3/7 activity, DNA fragmentation and necrosis in HL-60 cells after treatment with the different antibodies or with free (211)At. The mean labelling ratio of (211)At-labelled antibodies was 1:1,090 +/- 364 (range: 1:738-1:1,722) in comparison to 2-3:1 for GO. Tumour cell binding of (211)At-anti-CD33 was high in the presence of abundant CD33 expression and could be specifically blocked by unlabelled anti-CD33. (211)At-anti-CD33 decreased survival significantly more than did GO at comparable dilution (1:1,000). No significant differences in induction of apoptosis or necrosis or DNA DSB or in decreased survival were observed after (211)At-anti-CD33 (1:1,090) versus GO (1:1) treatment. Our results suggest that (211)At is a promising, highly cytotoxic radioimmunotherapy in CD33-positive leukaemia and kills tumour cells more efficiently than does calicheamicin-conjugated antibody. Labelling techniques leading to higher chemical yield and specific activities must be developed to increase (211)At-anti-CD33 therapeutic effects.

  12. In vitro experimental {sup 211}At-anti-CD33 antibody therapy of leukaemia cells overcomes cellular resistance seen in vivo against gemtuzumab ozogamicin

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    Petrich, Thorsten; Korkmaz, Zekiye; Krull, Doris; Meyer, Geerd J.; Knapp, Wolfram H. [Hanover University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hanover (Germany); Froemke, Cornelia [Hanover University School of Medicine, Department of Biometry, Hanover (Germany)

    2010-05-15

    Monoclonal anti-CD33 antibodies conjugated with toxic calicheamicin derivative (gemtuzumab ozogamicin, GO) are a novel therapy option for acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). Key prognostic factors for patients with AML are high CD33 expression on the leukaemic cells and the ability to overcome mechanisms of resistance to cytotoxic chemotherapies, including drug efflux or other mechanisms decreasing apoptosis. Alpha particle-emitting radionuclides overwhelm such anti-apoptotic mechanisms by producing numerous DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs) accompanied by decreased DNA repair. We labelled anti-CD33 antibodies with the alpha-emitter {sup 211}At and compared survival of leukaemic HL-60 and K-562 cells treated with the {sup 211}At-labelled antibodies, GO or unlabelled antibodies as controls. We also measured caspase-3/7 activity, DNA fragmentation and necrosis in HL-60 cells after treatment with the different antibodies or with free {sup 211}At. The mean labelling ratio of {sup 211}At-labelled antibodies was 1:1,090 {+-} 364 (range: 1:738-1:1,722) in comparison to 2-3:1 for GO. Tumour cell binding of {sup 211}At-anti-CD33 was high in the presence of abundant CD33 expression and could be specifically blocked by unlabelled anti-CD33. {sup 211}At-anti-CD33 decreased survival significantly more than did GO at comparable dilution (1:1,000). No significant differences in induction of apoptosis or necrosis or DNA DSB or in decreased survival were observed after {sup 211}At-anti-CD33 (1:1,090) versus GO (1:1) treatment. Our results suggest that {sup 211}At is a promising, highly cytotoxic radioimmunotherapy in CD33-positive leukaemia and kills tumour cells more efficiently than does calicheamicin-conjugated antibody. Labelling techniques leading to higher chemical yield and specific activities must be developed to increase {sup 211}At-anti-CD33 therapeutic effects. (orig.)

  13. Addition of gemtuzumab ozogamicin to induction chemotherapy improves survival in older patients with acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burnett, Alan K; Russell, Nigel H; Hills, Robert K

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE There has been little survival improvement in older patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in the last two decades. Improving induction treatment may improve the rate and quality of remission and consequently survival. In our previous trial, in younger patients, we showed improved...

  14. Gemtuzumab ozogamicin as postconsolidation therapy does not prevent relapse in children with AML

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasle, Henrik; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Forestier, Erik

    2012-01-01

    neutropenia followed 95% and febrile neutropenia 40% of the GO courses. Only a moderate decline in platelet count and a minor decrease in hemoglobin occurred. Relapse occurred in 24 and 25 of those randomized to GO or no further therapy. The median time to relapse was 16 months versus 10 months...

  15. Impaired CD163-mediated hemoglobin-scavenging and severe toxic symptoms in patients treated with gemtuzumab ozogamicin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maniecki, M.B.; Hasle, H.; Friis-Hansen, L.

    2008-01-01

    , and low bilirubin after septicemia-induced intravascular hemolysis indicated abrogated clearance of haptoglobin-hemoglobin complexes. This was further supported by low levels of plasma soluble CD163 and a concordant low number of CD163-expressing monocytes. We show that CD163 positive monocytes...... and macrophages from liver, spleen, and bone marrow coexpress CD33, thus suggesting that the GO-induced cellular cytotoxicity of CD33 positive cells eradicates a significant part of the CD163 positive monocytes and macrophages. The risk of severe toxic symptoms from plasma hemoglobin should be considered after CD......33-targeted chemotherapy when the disease is complicated by a pathologic intravascular hemolysis. Furthermore, the cases provide further circumstantial evidence of a key role of (CD163-expressing) monocytes/macrophages in plasma hemoglobin clearance in vivo Udgivelsesdato: 2008/8/15...

  16. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin as Post-Consolidation Therapy Does Not Prevent Relapse In Children with AML. Results of the NOPHO-AML 2004 Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasle, Henrik; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Forestier, Erik

    . No significant decrease in hemoglobin was observed whereas severe neutropenia occurred in 96% of the patients. Recovery to neutrophils > 0.5 lasted a median of 15 days. Febrile neutropenia followed 39% of the GO courses but none were life-threatening. A moderate decline in platelet count was noted with platelets...... with severe neutropenia, modest thrombocytopenia and no clinical liver toxicity. GO did not change the frequency of relapses but there was a non-significant delay in the time to relapse from 10 to 16 months for patients randomized to GO....

  17. Inotuzumab ozogamicin in adults with relapsed or refractory CD22-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a phase 1/2 study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeAngelo, Daniel J; Stock, Wendy; Stein, Anthony S; Shustov, Andrei; Liedtke, Michaela; Schiffer, Charles A; Vandendries, Erik; Liau, Katherine; Ananthakrishnan, Revathi; Boni, Joseph; Laird, A Douglas; Fostvedt, Luke; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Advani, Anjali S

    2017-06-27

    This study evaluated the safety, antitumor activity, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of inotuzumab ozogamicin (InO) for CD22-positive relapsed/refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In phase 1, patients received InO 1.2 (n = 3), 1.6 (n = 12), or 1.8 (n = 9) mg/m 2 per cycle on days 1, 8, and 15 over a 28-day cycle (≤6 cycles). The recommended phase 2 dose (RP2D) was confirmed (expansion cohort; n = 13); safety and activity of InO were assessed in patients receiving the RP2D in phase 2 (n = 35) and in all treated patients (n = 72). The RP2D was 1.8 mg/m 2 per cycle (0.8 mg/m 2 on day 1; 0.5 mg/m 2 on days 8 and 15), with reduction to 1.6 mg/m 2 per cycle after complete remission (CR) or CR with incomplete marrow recovery (CRi). Treatment-related toxicities were primarily cytopenias. Four patients experienced treatment-related venoocclusive disease/sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (VOD/SOS; 1 fatal). Two VOD/SOS events occurred during treatment without intervening transplant; of 24 patients proceeding to poststudy transplant, 2 experienced VOD/SOS after transplant. Forty-nine (68%) patients had CR/CRi, with 41 (84%) achieving minimal residual disease (MRD) negativity. Median progression-free survival was 3.9 (95% confidence interval, 2.9-5.4) months; median overall survival was 7.4 (5.7-9.2) months for all treated patients, with median 23.7 (range, 6.8-29.8) months of follow-up for all treated patients alive at data cutoff. Achievement of MRD negativity was associated with higher InO exposure. InO was well tolerated and demonstrated high single-agent activity and MRD-negativity rates. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01363297.

  18. Phase 1 study of inotuzumab ozogamicin combined with R-GDP for the treatment of patients with relapsed/refractory CD22+ B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

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    Sangha, Randeep; Davies, Andrew; Dang, Nam H; Ogura, Michinori; MacDonald, David A; Ananthakrishnan, Revathi; Paccagnella, M Luisa; Vandendries, Erik; Boni, Joseph; Goh, Yeow Tee

    2017-01-01

    Objective : To evaluate safety, tolerability, and preliminary activity of inotuzumab ozogamicin (InO) plus rituximab, gemcitabine, dexamethasone, and cisplatin (R-GDP) in patients with relapsed/refractory CD22+ B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Methods : Patients received InO plus R-GDP (21-day cycle; six-cycle maximum) using up-and-down dose-escalation schema for gemcitabine and cisplatin to define the highest dosage regimen(s) with acceptable toxicity (Part 1; n  = 27). Part 2 ( n  = 10) confirmed safety and tolerability; Part 3 ( n  = 18) evaluated preliminary efficacy. Results: Among 55 patients enrolled, 42% were refractory at baseline (median 2 [range, 1-6] prior therapies); 38% had diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). The highest dosage regimen with acceptable toxicity was InO 0.8 mg/m 2 , rituximab 375 mg/m 2 , cisplatin 50 mg/m 2 , gemcitabine 500 mg/m 2 (day 1 only) and dexamethasone 40 mg (days 1-4); this was confirmed in Part 2, in which three patients had dose-limiting toxicities (grade 4 thrombocytopenia [ n  = 2], febrile neutropenia [ n  = 2]). Most frequent treatment-related adverse events were thrombocytopenia (any grade, 85%; grade ≥3, 75%) and neutropenia (69%; 62%). Overall (objective) response rate (ORR) was 53% (11 complete, 18 partial responses); ORR was 71%, 33%, and 62% in patients with follicular lymphoma ( n  = 14), DLBCL ( n  = 21), and mantle cell lymphoma ( n  = 13), respectively. Conclusions: InO 0.8 mg/m 2 plus R-GDP was associated with manageable toxicity, although gemcitabine and cisplatin doses were lower than in the standard R-GDP regimen due to hematologic toxicity. Evidence of antitumor activity was observed; however, these exploratory data should be interpreted with caution due to the small sample size and short follow-up duration (Clinicaltrials.gov number: NCT01055496).

  19. Biting back: BiTE antibodies as a promising therapy for acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Roland B

    2014-06-01

    The experience with gemtuzumab ozogamicin has highlighted both the potential value and limitations of antibodies in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Recently, bispecific T-cell engager (BiTE) antibodies have emerged as a means to harness polyclonal cytotoxic T-cells and cause highly efficient lysis of targeted tumor cells. Promising early results have been obtained with the CD19-directed BiTE antibody, blinatumomab, in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. A first candidate for AML is the CD33/CD3 molecule, AMG 330, for which several recent preclinical studies demonstrated high potency and efficacy in destroying CD33(+) human AML cells. Many questions remain to be addressed, but BiTE antibodies may offer an exciting new tool in a disease for which the outcomes in many patients remain unsatisfactory.

  20. Investigational Antibody-Drug Conjugates for Treatment of B-lineage Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Alex F; Molina, Arturo

    2018-05-10

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) are tripartite molecules consisting of a monoclonal antibody, a covalent linker, and a cytotoxic payload. ADC development has aimed to target the specificity inherent in antigen-antibody interactions to deliver potent cytotoxins preferentially to tumor cells and maximize antitumor activity and simultaneously minimize off-target toxicity. The earliest ADCs provided disappointing results in the clinic; however, the lessons learned regarding the need for human or humanized antibodies, more stable linkers, and greater potency payloads led to improved ADCs. Three ADCs, gemtuzumab ozogamicin, brentuximab vedotin (BV), and inotuzumab ozogamicin, have been approved for hematologic malignancies. Site-specific conjugation methods have now resulted in a new generation of more uniform, molecularly defined ADCs. These are expected to display improved in vivo properties and have recently entered the clinic. We reviewed investigational ADCs currently in clinical testing for the treatment of B-cell lineage malignancies, including leukemias, lymphomas, and multiple myeloma. The rationales for antigen targeting, data reported to date, current trial status, and preclinical results for several newer ADCs expected to enter first-in-human studies are presented. Owing to the large number of ongoing and reported BV clinical studies, only the studies of BV for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and those combining BV with checkpoint inhibitors in B-lineage malignancies have been reviewed. With > 40 ongoing clinical trials and 7 investigational ADCs already having advanced to phase II studies, the role of ADCs in the armamentarium for the treatment of B-lineage malignancies continues to be elucidated. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. SGN-CD33A: a novel CD33-targeting antibody-drug conjugate using a pyrrolobenzodiazepine dimer is active in models of drug-resistant AML.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung Sutherland, May S; Walter, Roland B; Jeffrey, Scott C; Burke, Patrick J; Yu, Changpu; Kostner, Heather; Stone, Ivan; Ryan, Maureen C; Sussman, Django; Lyon, Robert P; Zeng, Weiping; Harrington, Kimberly H; Klussman, Kerry; Westendorf, Lori; Meyer, David; Bernstein, Irwin D; Senter, Peter D; Benjamin, Dennis R; Drachman, Jonathan G; McEarchern, Julie A

    2013-08-22

    Outcomes in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remain unsatisfactory, and novel treatments are urgently needed. One strategy explores antibodies and their drug conjugates, particularly those targeting CD33. Emerging data with gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO) demonstrate target validity and activity in some patients with AML, but efficacy is limited by heterogeneous drug conjugation, linker instability, and a high incidence of multidrug resistance. We describe here the development of SGN-CD33A, a humanized anti-CD33 antibody with engineered cysteines conjugated to a highly potent, synthetic DNA cross-linking pyrrolobenzodiazepine dimer via a protease-cleavable linker. The use of engineered cysteine residues at the sites of drug linker attachment results in a drug loading of approximately 2 pyrrolobenzodiazepine dimers per antibody. In preclinical testing, SGN-CD33A is more potent than GO against a panel of AML cell lines and primary AML cells in vitro and in xenotransplantation studies in mice. Unlike GO, antileukemic activity is observed with SGN-CD33A in AML models with the multidrug-resistant phenotype. Mechanistic studies indicate that the cytotoxic effects of SGN-CD33A involve DNA damage with ensuing cell cycle arrest and apoptotic cell death. Together, these data suggest that SGN-CD33A has CD33-directed antitumor activity and support clinical testing of this novel therapeutic in patients with AML.

  2. Antibody-Drug Conjugates (ADCs) for Personalized Treatment of Solid Tumors: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, John M; Morris, Charles Q

    2017-05-01

    Attaching a cytotoxic "payload" to an antibody to form an antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) provides a mechanism for selective delivery of the cytotoxic agent to cancer cells via the specific binding of the antibody to cancer-selective cell surface molecules. The first ADC to receive marketing authorization was gemtuzumab ozogamicin, which comprises an anti-CD33 antibody conjugated to a highly potent DNA-targeting antibiotic, calicheamicin, approved in 2000 for treating acute myeloid leukemia. It was withdrawn from the US market in 2010 following an unsuccessful confirmatory trial. The development of two classes of highly potent microtubule-disrupting agents, maytansinoids and auristatins, as payloads for ADCs resulted in approval of brentuximab vedotin in 2011 for treating Hodgkin lymphoma and anaplastic large cell lymphoma, and approval of ado-trastuzumab emtansine in 2013 for treating HER2-positive breast cancer. Their success stimulated much research into the ADC approach, with >60 ADCs currently in clinical evaluation, mostly targeting solid tumors. Five ADCs have advanced into pivotal clinical trials for treating various solid tumors-platinum-resistant ovarian cancer, mesothelioma, triple-negative breast cancer, glioblastoma, and small cell lung cancer. The level of target expression is a key parameter in predicting the likelihood of patient benefit for all these ADCs, as well as for the approved compound, ado-trastuzumab emtansine. The development of a patient selection strategy linked to target expression on the tumor is thus critically important for identifying the population appropriate for receiving treatment.

  3. Zosuquidar restores drug sensitivity in P-glycoprotein expressing acute myeloid leukemia (AML)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Ruoping; Faussat, Anne-Marie; Perrot, Jean-Yves; Marjanovic, Zora; Cohen, Simy; Storme, Thomas; Morjani, Hamid; Legrand, Ollivier; Marie, Jean-Pierre

    2008-01-01

    Chemotherapeutic drug efflux via the P-glycoprotein (P-gp) transporter encoded by the MDR1/ABCB1 gene is a significant cause of drug resistance in numerous malignancies, including acute leukemias, especially in older patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Therefore, the P-gp modulators that block P-gp-mediated drug efflux have been developed, and used in combination with standard chemotherapy. In this paper, the capacity of zosuquidar, a specific P-gp modulator, to reverse chemoresistance was examined in both leukemia cell lines and primary AML blasts. The transporter protein expressions were analyzed by flow cytometry using their specific antibodies. The protein functionalities were assessed by the uptake of their fluorescence substrates in presence or absence their specific modulators. The drug cytotoxicity was evaluated by MTT test. Zosuquidar completely or partially restored drug sensitivity in all P-gp-expressing leukemia cell lines tested and enhanced the cytotoxicity of anthracyclines (daunorubicin, idarubicin, mitoxantrone) and gemtuzumab ozogamicin (Mylotarg) in primary AML blasts with active P-gp. In addition, P-gp inhibition by zosuquidar was found to be more potent than cyclosporine A in cells with highly active P-gp. These in vitro studies suggest that zosuquidar may be an effective adjunct to cytotoxic chemotherapy for AML patients whose blasts express P-gp, especially for older patients

  4. Novel agents and regimens for acute myeloid leukemia: 2009 ASH annual meeting highlights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Xiongpeng

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Prognostic markers, such as NPM1, Flt3-ITD, and cytogenetic abnormalities have made it possible to formulate aggressive treatment plans for unfavorable acute myeloid leukemia (AML. However, the long-term survival of AML with unfavorable factors remains unsatisfactory. The latest data indicate that the standard dose of daunorubicin (DNR at 45 mg/m2 is inferior to high dose 90 mg/m2 for induction therapy. The rates of complete remission and overall survival are significantly better in the high dose induction regimen. New regimens exploring the new liposomal encapsulation of Ara-C and DNR as well as addition of gemtuzumab ozogamicin monoclonal antibody have been studied. New agents, including the nucleoside analogues (clofarabine, sapacitabine, elacytarabine, FLT3 inhibitor (sorafenib, farnesyl-transferase inhibitor (tipifarnib, histone deacetylase inhibitor (vorinostat, lenalidomide, as well as DNA methyltransferase inhibitors (decitabine, azacitidine, were recently reported for AML treatment in the 2009 ASH annual meeting. This review also summarizes the updates of the clinical trials on novel agents including voreloxin, AS1413, behenoylara-C, ARRY520, ribavirin, AZD1152, AZD6244, and terameprocol (EM-1421 from the 2009 ASH annual meeting.

  5. Therapeutic IgG4 antibodies engage in Fab-arm exchange with endogenous human IgG4 in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Labrijn, Aran F.; Buijsse, Antonio Ortiz; van den Bremer, Ewald T. J.; Verwilligen, Annemiek Y. W.; Bleeker, Wim K.; Thorpe, Susan J.; Killestein, Joep; Polman, Chris H.; Aalberse, Rob C.; Schuurman, Janine; van de Winkel, Jan G. J.; Parren, Paul W. H. I.

    Two humanized IgG4 antibodies, natalizumab and gemtuzumab, are approved for human use, and several others, like TGN1412, are or have been in clinical development. Although IgG4 antibodies can dynamically exchange half-molecules(1), Fab-arm exchange with therapeutic antibodies has not been

  6. Therapeutic IgG4 antibodies engage in Fab-arm exchange with endogenous human IgG4 in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Labrijn, Aran F.; Buijsse, Antonio Ortiz; van den Bremer, Ewald T. J.; Verwilligen, Annemiek Y. W.; Bleeker, Wim K.; Thorpe, Susan J.; Killestein, Joep; Polman, Chris H.; Aalberse, Rob C.; Schuurman, Janine; van de Winkel, Jan G. J.; Parren, Paul W. H. I.

    2009-01-01

    Two humanized IgG4 antibodies, natalizumab and gemtuzumab, are approved for human use, and several others, like TGN1412, are or have been in clinical development. Although IgG4 antibodies can dynamically exchange half-molecules, Fab-arm exchange with therapeutic antibodies has not been demonstrated

  7. A new Leukemia Prognostic Scoring System for refractory/relapsed adult acute myelogeneous leukaemia patients: a GOELAMS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevallier, P; Labopin, M; Turlure, P; Prebet, T; Pigneux, A; Hunault, M; Filanovsky, K; Cornillet-Lefebvre, P; Luquet, I; Lode, L; Richebourg, S; Blanchet, O; Gachard, N; Vey, N; Ifrah, N; Milpied, N; Harousseau, J-L; Bene, M-C; Mohty, M; Delaunay, J

    2011-06-01

    A simplified prognostic score is presented based on the multivariate analysis of 138 refractory/relapsed acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) patients (median age 55 years, range: 19-70) receiving a combination of intensive chemotherapy+Gemtuzumab as salvage regimen. Overall, 2-year event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) were 29±4% and 36±4%, respectively. Disease status (relapse Leukemia Prognostic Scoring System was then validated on an independent cohort of 111 refractory/relapsed AML patients. This new simplified prognostic score, using three clinical and biological parameters routinely applied, allow to discriminate around two third of the patients who should benefit from a salvage intensive regimen in the setting of refractory/relapsed AML patients. The other one third of the patients should receive investigational therapy.

  8. Frontline treatment of acute myeloid leukemia in adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamamyan, Gevorg; Kadia, Tapan; Ravandi, Farhad; Borthakur, Gautam; Cortes, Jorge; Jabbour, Elias; Daver, Naval; Ohanian, Maro; Kantarjian, Hagop; Konopleva, Marina

    2017-01-01

    Recent years have highlighted significant progress in understanding the underlying genetic and epigenetic signatures of acute myeloid leukemia(AML). Most importantly, novel chemotherapy and targeted strategies have led to improved outcomes in selected genetic subsets. AML is a remarkably heterogeneous disease, and individualized therapies for disease-specific characteristics (considering patients’ age, cytogenetics, and mutations) could yield better outcomes. Compared with the historical 5-to 10-year survival rate of 10%, the survival of patients who undergo modern treatment approaches reaches up to 40–50%, and for specific subsets, the improvements are even more dramatic; for example, in acute promyelocytic leukemia, the use of all-trans retinoic acid and arsenic trioxide improved survival from 30–40% up to 80–90%. Similar progress has been documented in core-binding-factor-AML, with an increase in survival from 30% to 80% upon the use of high-dose cytarabine/fludarabine/granulocyte colony-stimulating factor combination regimens. AML treatment was also recently influenced by the discovery of the superiority of regimens with higher dose Ara-C and nucleoside analogues compared with the “7+3” regimen, with about a 20% improvement in overall survival. Despite these significant differences, most centers continue to use the “7+3” regimen, and greater awareness will improve the outcome. The discovery of targetable molecular abnormalities and recent studies of targeted therapies (gemtuzumab ozagomycin, FLT3 inhibitors, isocitrate dehydrogenase inhibitors, and epigenetic therapies), future use of checkpoint inhibitors and other immune therapies such as chimeric antigen receptor T-cells, and maintenance strategies based on the minimal residual disease evaluation represent novel, exciting clinical leads aimed to improve AML outcomes in the near future. PMID:28109402

  9. Monoclonal antibodies in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanale, Michelle A; Younes, Anas

    2007-01-01

    Antibody-based therapeutic approaches have had a significant impact in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Rituximab's development as an anti-CD20 antibody heralded a new era in treatment approaches for NHL. While rituximab was first shown to be effective in the treatment of relapsed follicular lymphoma, it is now standard monotherapy for front-line treatment of follicular lymphoma, and is also used in conjunction with chemotherapy for other indolent, intermediate and aggressive B-cell lymphomas. The development of rituximab has led to intense interest in this type of therapeutic approach and to development and approval of the radioimmunoconjugates of rituximab, (90)Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan and (131)I-tositumomab, which have added to the repertoire of treatments for relapsed follicular lymphoma and increased interest in developing other conjugated antibodies. Since rituximab is a chimeric antibody, there is a need to develop fully humanised antibodies, such as IMMU-106 (hA20), in order to minimise infusion reactions and eliminate the development of human antibodies against the drug. Further clinical evaluation of antibodies has been based largely on our knowledge of antigen expression on the surface of lymphoma cells and has led to the development of antibodies against CD22 (unconjugated epratuzumab and calicheamicin conjugated CMC-544 [inotuzumab ozogamicin]), CD80 (galiximab), CD52 (alemtuzumab), CD2 (MEDI-507 [siplizumab]), CD30 (SGN-30 and MDX-060 [iratumumab]), and CD40 (SGN-40). Furthermore, the VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) inhibitor bevacizumab, which was first approved for the treatment of colon cancer is currently under investigation in NHL, and agonists rather than antibodies to TRAIL (tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) [rApo2L/TRAIL, HGS-ETR1{mapatumumab}, HGS-ETR2] are currently being investigated as treatments for both advanced solid tumours and NHL. Knowledge of the ability of cancer cells to become

  10. Recent advances in the management of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Starý

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is the most common malignancy in childhood. Despite enormous improvement of prognosis during the last half century, ALL remains a major cause of childhood cancer-related mortality. During the past decade, whole genomic methods have enhanced our knowledge of disease biology. Stratification of therapy according to early treatment response measured by minimal residual disease allows risk group assignment into different treatment arms, ranging from reduction to intensification of treatment. Progress has been achieved in academic clinical trials by optimization of combined chemotherapy, which continues to be the mainstay of contemporary treatment. The availability of suitable volunteer main histocompatibility antigen-matched unrelated donors has increased the rates of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT over the past two decades. Allogeneic HSCT has become an alternative treatment for selected, very-high-risk patients. However, intensive treatment burdens children with severe acute toxic effects that can cause permanent organ damage and even toxic death. Immunotherapeutic approaches have recently come to the forefront in ALL therapy. Monoclonal antibodies blinatumomab and inotuzumab ozogamicin as well as gene-modified T cells directed to specific target antigens have shown efficacy against resistant/relapsed leukemia in phase I/II studies. Integration of these newer modalities into combined regimens with chemotherapy may rescue a subset of children not curable by contemporary therapy. Another major challenge will be to incorporate less toxic regimens into the therapy of patients with low-risk disease who have a nearly 100% chance of being cured, and the ultimate goal is to improve their quality of life while maintaining a high cure rate.

  11. Antibodies to watch in 2018

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplon, Hélène; Reichert, Janice M.

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT The pace of antibody therapeutics development accelerated in 2017, and this faster pace is projected to continue through 2018. Notably, the annual number of antibody therapeutics granted a first approval in either the European Union (EU) or United States (US) reached double-digits (total of 10) for the first time in 2017. The 10 antibodies granted approvals are: brodalumab, dupilumab, sarilumab, guselkumab, benralizumab, ocrelizumab, inotuzumab ozogamicin, avelumab, duvalumab, and emicizumab. Brodalumab, however, had already been approved in Japan in 2016. As of December 1, 2017, nine antibody therapeutics (ibalizumab, burosumab, tildrakizumab, caplacizumab, erenumab, fremanezumab, galcanezumab, romosozumab, mogamulizumab) were in regulatory review in the EU or US, and regulatory actions on their marketing applications are expected by the end of 2018. Based on company announcements and estimated clinical study primary completion dates, and assuming the study results are positive, marketing applications for at least 12 antibody therapeutics that are now being evaluated in late-stage clinical studies may be submitted by the end of 2018. Of the 12 candidates, 8 are for non-cancer indications (lanadelumab, crizanlizumab, ravulizumab, eptinezumab, risankizumab, satralizumab, brolucizumab, PRO140) and 4 are for cancer (sacituzumab govitecan, moxetumomab pasudotox, cemiplimab, ublituximab). Additional antibody therapeutics to watch in 2018 include 19 mAbs undergoing evaluation in late-stage studies with primary completion dates in late 2017 or during 2018. Of these mAbs, 9 are for non-cancer indications (lampalizumab, roledumab, emapalumab, fasinumab, tanezumab, etrolizumab, NEOD001, gantenerumab, anifrolumab) and 10 are for cancer indications (tremelimumab, isatuximab, BCD-100, carotuximab, camrelizumab, IBI308, glembatumumab vedotin, mirvetuximab soravtansine, oportuzumab monatox, L19IL2/L19TNF). Positive clinical study results may enable marketing application

  12. Burkitt lymphoma in adolescents and young adults: management challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dozzo M

    2016-12-01

    immunocompromised patients at risk of death by complications; the identification of very high-risk patients through positron-emission tomography and minimal residual disease assays; and the assessment in these and the few refractory/relapsed ones of new monoclonals (ofatumumab, blinatumomab, inotuzumab ozogamicin and new molecules targeting c-MYC and key proliferative steps of B-cell malignancies. Keywords: Burkitt lymphoma, adolescents, young adults, treatment, outcome