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Sample records for gemtuzumab ozogamicin mylotargtm

  1. Impaired CD163 Mediated Hemoglobin-Scavenging and Hemolytic Crisis in Patients Treated with CD33 Targeted Chemotherapy (Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin, MylotargTM)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maniecki, Maciej Bogdan; Hasle, Henrik; Friis-Hansen, Lennart

    2007-01-01

    Hemoglobin liberated to plasma during intravascular hemolyses is rapidly bound to haptoglobin. The hemoglobin-haptoglobin complexes undergo endocytosis through the monocyte/macrophage specific scavenger receptor for hemoglobin (CD163). This mechanism protects against oxidative and NO-scavenging...... adverse effects of free hemoglobin. In this study, we describe a novel syndrome of severe intravascular hemolysis and serious hemolytic crisis due to impaired hemoglobin scavenging in three acute myeloid leukemia patients following CD33-directed therapy with the immunotoxin gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO......-expressing monocytes. We show that CD163 positive monocytes and bone marrow macrophages coexpress CD33 thus suggesting that the GO-induced cellular cytotoxicity of CD33 positive cells eradicates a significant part of the CD163 positive monocytes and macrophages. The patients had severe inflammation...

  2. Gemtuzumab ozogamicin: an anti-CD33 immunoconjugate for the treatment of acute myeloid leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasi, Roberto

    2008-04-01

    Gemtuzumab ozogamicin consists of a semisynthetic derivative of calicheamicin, a potent cytotoxic antibiotic, linked to a humanized anti-CD33 monoclonal antibody. To describe the pharmacology of gemtuzumab ozogamicin and to provide an overview of clinical trials in acute myeloid leukaemia. Review and summary of publications on gemtuzumab ozogamicin indexed in the PubMed electronic database. Gemtuzumab ozogamicin has shown moderate activity as a single agent in patients with CD33-positive refractory or relapsed acute myeloid leukaemia, with more promising results in acute promyelocytic leukaemia. The side effect profile may be an improvement on conventional chemotherapy, except for a higher frequency of veno-occlusive disease or sinusoidal obstructive syndrome, especially after a subsequent haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Because of the different mechanisms of action and non-overlapping toxicities, the integration of this immunoconjugate with standard chemotherapy is a rational approach, and Phase III trials are ongoing both in the induction and in the post-remission settings.

  3. Defining the dose of gemtuzumab ozogamicin in combination with induction chemotherapy in acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burnett, Alan; Cavenagh, Jamie; Russell, Nigel

    2016-01-01

    Arecent source data meta-analysis of randomized trials in adults assessing the immunoconjugate gemtuzumab ozogamicin combined with standard chemotherapy in acute myeloid leukemia showed a significant survival benefit in patients without an adverse karyotype. It is not clear whether the optimal dose.......17-3.39), P=0.01, respectively, which in addition was associated with a higher rate of veno-occlusive disease (5.6% vs 0.5%; Pcombination with induction chemotherapy when...

  4. Gemtuzumab ozogamicin as postconsolidation therapy does not prevent relapse in children with AML

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasle, Henrik; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Forestier, Erik

    2012-01-01

    There are no data on the role of postconsolidation therapy with gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO; Mylotarg) in children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The NOPHO-AML 2004 protocol studied postconsolidation randomization to GO or no further therapy. GO was administered at 5 mg/m(2) and repeated after 3...... neutropenia followed 95% and febrile neutropenia 40% of the GO courses. Only a moderate decline in platelet count and a minor decrease in hemoglobin occurred. Relapse occurred in 24 and 25 of those randomized to GO or no further therapy. The median time to relapse was 16 months versus 10 months...

  5. Targeted drug delivery by gemtuzumab ozogamicin: Mechanism-Based mathematical model for treatment strategy improvement and therapy individualization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Jager (Eva); V.H.J. van der Velden (Vincent); J.G. te Marvelde (Jeroen); R.B. Walter (Roland B.); Z. Agur (Zvia); V. Vainstein (Vladimir)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractGemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO) is a chemotherapy-conjugated anti-CD33 monoclonal antibody effective in some patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The optimal treatment schedule and optimal timing of GO administration relative to other agents remains unknown. Conventional

  6. The histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid potently augments gemtuzumab ozogamicin-induced apoptosis in acute myeloid leukemic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Cate, B.; Samplonius, D. F.; Bijma, T.; de Leij, L. F. M. H.; Helfrich, W.; Bremer, E.

    Gemtuzumab ozogamicin ( GO) is a calicheamicin-conjugated antibody directed against CD33, an antigen highly expressed on acute myeloid leukemic (AML) cells. CD33-specific binding triggers internalization of GO and subsequent hydrolytic release of calicheamicin. Calicheamicin then translocates to the

  7. Gemtuzumab ozogamicin as postremission treatment in AML at 60 years of age or more : results of a multicenter phase 3 study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lowenberg, Bob; Beck, Joachim; Graux, Carlos; van Putten, Wim; Schouten, Harry C.; Verdonck, Leo F.; Ferrant, Augustin; Sonneveld, Pieter; Jongen-Lavrencic, Mojca; von Lilienfeld-Toal, Marie; Biemond, Bart J.; Vellenga, Edo; Breems, Dimitri; de Muijnck, Hilde; Schaafsma, Ron; Verhoef, Gregor; Doehner, Hartmut; Gratwohl, Alois; Pabst, Thomas; Ossenkoppele, Gert J.; Maertens, Johan

    2010-01-01

    In older patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), the prevention of relapse has remained one of the major therapeutic challenges, with more than 75% relapses after complete remission. The anti-CD33 immunotoxin conjugate gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO) has shown antileukemic remission induction

  8. Identification of patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia who benefit from the addition of gemtuzumab ozogamicin: results of the MRC AML15 trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burnett, Alan K; Hills, Robert K; Milligan, Donald

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: Antibody-directed chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) may permit more treatment to be administered without escalating toxicity. Gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO) is an immunoconjugate between CD33 and calicheamicin that is internalized when binding to the epitope. We previously establ...

  9. Impaired CD163-mediated hemoglobin-scavenging and severe toxic symptoms in patients treated with gemtuzumab ozogamicin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maniecki, M.B.; Hasle, H.; Friis-Hansen, L.

    2008-01-01

    We describe a novel syndrome of severe toxic symptoms during intravascular hemolysis due to impaired hemoglobin scavenging in 2 children with acute myeloid leukemia undergoing CD33-directed therapy with the immunotoxin gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO). A simultaneous high plasma hemoglobin, haptoglobin...... and macrophages from liver, spleen, and bone marrow coexpress CD33, thus suggesting that the GO-induced cellular cytotoxicity of CD33 positive cells eradicates a significant part of the CD163 positive monocytes and macrophages. The risk of severe toxic symptoms from plasma hemoglobin should be considered after CD......33-targeted chemotherapy when the disease is complicated by a pathologic intravascular hemolysis. Furthermore, the cases provide further circumstantial evidence of a key role of (CD163-expressing) monocytes/macrophages in plasma hemoglobin clearance in vivo Udgivelsesdato: 2008/8/15...

  10. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin as Post-Consolidation Therapy Does Not Prevent Relapse In Children with AML. Results of the NOPHO-AML 2004 Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasle, Henrik; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Forestier, Erik

    There are no data on the role of post-consolidation therapy with gemtuzumab ozogamicin, (GO, Mylotarg) in children with AML. The NOPHO-AML 2004 protocol included two induction courses and four consolidation courses followed by a post-consolidation randomization to GO or no further therapy (Clinical....... No significant decrease in hemoglobin was observed whereas severe neutropenia occurred in 96% of the patients. Recovery to neutrophils > 0.5 lasted a median of 15 days. Febrile neutropenia followed 39% of the GO courses but none were life-threatening. A moderate decline in platelet count was noted with platelets...

  11. Sequential Combination of Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin and Standard Chemotherapy in Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Results of a Randomized Phase III Trial by the EORTC and GIMEMA Consortium (AML-17).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amadori, S.; Suciu, S.; Stasi, R.; Salih, H.R.; Selleslag, D.; Muus, P.; Fabritiis, P. De; Venditti, A.; Ho, A.D.; Lubbert, M.; Thomas, X.; Latagliata, R.; Halkes, C.J.; Falzetti, F.; Magro, D.; Guimaraes, J.E.; Berneman, Z.; Specchia, G.; Karrasch, M.; Fazi, P.; Vignetti, M.; Willemze, R.; Witte, T.J. de; Marie, J.P.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: This randomized trial evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of sequential gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO) and standard chemotherapy in older patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients (n = 472) age 61 to 75 years were randomly assigned to induction

  12. Targeted drug delivery by gemtuzumab ozogamicin: mechanism-based mathematical model for treatment strategy improvement and therapy individualization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Jager

    Full Text Available Gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO is a chemotherapy-conjugated anti-CD33 monoclonal antibody effective in some patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML. The optimal treatment schedule and optimal timing of GO administration relative to other agents remains unknown. Conventional pharmacokinetic analysis has been of limited insight for the schedule optimization. We developed a mechanism-based mathematical model and employed it to analyze the time-course of free and GO-bound CD33 molecules on the lekemic blasts in individual AML patients treated with GO. We calculated expected intravascular drug exposure (I-AUC as a surrogate marker for the response to the drug. A high CD33 production rate and low drug efflux were the most important determinants of high I-AUC, characterizing patients with favorable pharmacokinetic profile and, hence, improved response. I-AUC was insensitive to other studied parameters within biologically relevant ranges, including internalization rate and dissociation constant. Our computations suggested that even moderate blast burden reduction prior to drug administration enables lowering of GO doses without significantly compromising intracellular drug exposure. These findings indicate that GO may optimally be used after cyto-reductive chemotherapy, rather than before, or concomitantly with it, and that GO efficacy can be maintained by dose reduction to 6 mg/m(2 and a dosing interval of 7 days. Model predictions are validated by comparison with the results of EORTC-GIMEMA AML19 clinical trial, where two different GO schedules were administered. We suggest that incorporation of our results in clinical practice can serve identification of the subpopulation of elderly patients who can benefit most of the GO treatment and enable return of the currently suspended drug to clinic.

  13. High Dose Cytarabine plus Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin for Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Cancer and Leukemia Group B Study 19902

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Richard M.; Moser, Barry; Sanford, Ben; Schulman, Philip; Kolitz, Jonathan E.; Allen, Steven; Stock, Wendy; Galinsky, Ilene; Vij, Ravi; Marcucci, Guido; Hurd, David; Larson, Richard A.

    2010-01-01

    Gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO), an anti-CD33 immunoconjugate, was combined with high dose cytarabine (HiDAC; cytarabine 3 g/m2 over 3 hours daily for 5 days) for adults with relapsed or refractory AML. HiDAC plus GO 9 mg/m2 on day 7 and 4.5 mg/m2 on day 14 was not tolerated, but HiDAC followed by GO 9 mg/m2 on day 7 was safe: 12/37 (32%) patients with relapsed AML achieved complete remission. Median overall survival was 8.9 months. No grade 4 hepatic veno-occlusive disease was observed. This regimen merits further study, both in this setting and as a remission consolidation therapy. PMID:20688393

  14. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is in a class of medications called monoclonal antibodies. It works by helping to kill cancer cells. ... condition that increases the risk of developing an irregular heartbeat that may cause fainting or sudden death), ...

  15. Efficacy and tolerability of gemtuzumab ozogamicin (anti-CD33 monoclonal antibody, CMA-676, Mylotarg® in children with relapsed/refractory myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand Yves

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO is a cytotoxic anti-CD33 monoclonal antibody that has given promising preliminary results in adult myeloid CD33+ AML. We conducted a retrospective multicenter study of 12 children treated with GO on a compassionate basis (median age 5.5 y. Three patients (2 MDS/AML, 1 JMML were refractory to first-line treatment, 8 patients with de novo AML were in refractory first relapse, and one patient with de novo AML was in 2nd relapse after stem cell transplantation (SCT. CD33 expression exceeded 20% in all cases. Methods GO was administered alone, at a unit dose of 3–9 mg/m2, once (3 patients, twice (3 patients, three (5 patients or five times (1 patient. Mean follow-up was 128 days (8–585 d. Results There were three complete responses (25% leading to further curative treatment (SCT. Treatment failed in the other nine patients, and only one patient was alive at the end of follow-up. NCI-CTC grade III/IV adverse events comprised hematological toxicity (n = 12, hypertransaminasemia (n = 2, allergy and hyperbilirubinemia (1 case each. There was only one major adverse event (grade IV allergy. No case of sinusoidal obstruction syndrome occurred. Conclusion These results warrant a prospective trial of GO in a larger population of children with AML.

  16. Gemtuzumab ozogamicin (Mylotarg) as single-agent treatment for frail patients 61 years of age and older with acute myeloid leukemia: final results of AML-15B, a phase 2 study of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer and Gruppo Italiano Malattie Ematologiche dell'Adulto Leukemia Groups.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amadori, S.; Suciu, S.; Stasi, R.; Willemze, R.; Mandelli, F.; Selleslag, D.; Denzlinger, C.; Muus, P.; Stauder, R.; Berneman, Z.; Pruijt, J.F.M.; Nobile, F.; Cassibba, V.; Marie, J.P.; Beeldens, F.; Baila, L.; Vignetti, M.; Witte, T.J.M. de

    2005-01-01

    The therapeutic activity and toxicity profile of gemtuzumab ozogamicin were assessed in 40 patients >60 years of age with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who were not considered eligible for conventional chemotherapy because of advanced age or poor performance status. The drug was administered at

  17. Randomized trial of two schedules of low-dose gemtuzumab ozogamicin as induction monotherapy for newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukaemia in older patients not considered candidates for intensive chemotherapy. A phase II study of the EORTC and GIMEMA leukaemia groups (AML-19).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amadori, S.; Suciu, S.; Selleslag, D.; Stasi, R.; Alimena, G.; Baila, L.; Rizzoli, V.; Borlenghi, E.; Gaidano, G.; Magro, D.; Torelli, G.; Muus, P.; Venditti, A.; Cacciola, E.; Lauria, F; Vignetti, M.; Witte, T.J.M. de

    2010-01-01

    This study compared two schedules of low-dose gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO) as induction monotherapy for untreated acute myeloid leukaemia in older patients unfit for intensive chemotherapy, to identify the more promising regimen for further study. Patients were randomized to receive either best

  18. In vitro experimental 211At-anti-CD33 antibody therapy of leukaemia cells overcomes cellular resistance seen in vivo against gemtuzumab ozogamicin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrich, Thorsten; Korkmaz, Zekiye; Krull, Doris; Meyer, Geerd J.; Knapp, Wolfram H.; Froemke, Cornelia

    2010-01-01

    Monoclonal anti-CD33 antibodies conjugated with toxic calicheamicin derivative (gemtuzumab ozogamicin, GO) are a novel therapy option for acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). Key prognostic factors for patients with AML are high CD33 expression on the leukaemic cells and the ability to overcome mechanisms of resistance to cytotoxic chemotherapies, including drug efflux or other mechanisms decreasing apoptosis. Alpha particle-emitting radionuclides overwhelm such anti-apoptotic mechanisms by producing numerous DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs) accompanied by decreased DNA repair. We labelled anti-CD33 antibodies with the alpha-emitter 211 At and compared survival of leukaemic HL-60 and K-562 cells treated with the 211 At-labelled antibodies, GO or unlabelled antibodies as controls. We also measured caspase-3/7 activity, DNA fragmentation and necrosis in HL-60 cells after treatment with the different antibodies or with free 211 At. The mean labelling ratio of 211 At-labelled antibodies was 1:1,090 ± 364 (range: 1:738-1:1,722) in comparison to 2-3:1 for GO. Tumour cell binding of 211 At-anti-CD33 was high in the presence of abundant CD33 expression and could be specifically blocked by unlabelled anti-CD33. 211 At-anti-CD33 decreased survival significantly more than did GO at comparable dilution (1:1,000). No significant differences in induction of apoptosis or necrosis or DNA DSB or in decreased survival were observed after 211 At-anti-CD33 (1:1,090) versus GO (1:1) treatment. Our results suggest that 211 At is a promising, highly cytotoxic radioimmunotherapy in CD33-positive leukaemia and kills tumour cells more efficiently than does calicheamicin-conjugated antibody. Labelling techniques leading to higher chemical yield and specific activities must be developed to increase 211 At-anti-CD33 therapeutic effects. (orig.)

  19. In vitro experimental {sup 211}At-anti-CD33 antibody therapy of leukaemia cells overcomes cellular resistance seen in vivo against gemtuzumab ozogamicin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrich, Thorsten; Korkmaz, Zekiye; Krull, Doris; Meyer, Geerd J.; Knapp, Wolfram H. [Hanover University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hanover (Germany); Froemke, Cornelia [Hanover University School of Medicine, Department of Biometry, Hanover (Germany)

    2010-05-15

    Monoclonal anti-CD33 antibodies conjugated with toxic calicheamicin derivative (gemtuzumab ozogamicin, GO) are a novel therapy option for acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). Key prognostic factors for patients with AML are high CD33 expression on the leukaemic cells and the ability to overcome mechanisms of resistance to cytotoxic chemotherapies, including drug efflux or other mechanisms decreasing apoptosis. Alpha particle-emitting radionuclides overwhelm such anti-apoptotic mechanisms by producing numerous DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs) accompanied by decreased DNA repair. We labelled anti-CD33 antibodies with the alpha-emitter {sup 211}At and compared survival of leukaemic HL-60 and K-562 cells treated with the {sup 211}At-labelled antibodies, GO or unlabelled antibodies as controls. We also measured caspase-3/7 activity, DNA fragmentation and necrosis in HL-60 cells after treatment with the different antibodies or with free {sup 211}At. The mean labelling ratio of {sup 211}At-labelled antibodies was 1:1,090 {+-} 364 (range: 1:738-1:1,722) in comparison to 2-3:1 for GO. Tumour cell binding of {sup 211}At-anti-CD33 was high in the presence of abundant CD33 expression and could be specifically blocked by unlabelled anti-CD33. {sup 211}At-anti-CD33 decreased survival significantly more than did GO at comparable dilution (1:1,000). No significant differences in induction of apoptosis or necrosis or DNA DSB or in decreased survival were observed after {sup 211}At-anti-CD33 (1:1,090) versus GO (1:1) treatment. Our results suggest that {sup 211}At is a promising, highly cytotoxic radioimmunotherapy in CD33-positive leukaemia and kills tumour cells more efficiently than does calicheamicin-conjugated antibody. Labelling techniques leading to higher chemical yield and specific activities must be developed to increase {sup 211}At-anti-CD33 therapeutic effects. (orig.)

  20. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin (GO Inclusion to Induction Chemotherapy Eliminates Leukemic Initiating Cells and Significantly Improves Survival in Mouse Models of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathy C Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO is an anti-CD33 antibody-drug conjugate for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML. Although GO shows a narrow therapeutic window in early clinical studies, recent reports detailing a modified dosing regimen of GO can be safely combined with induction chemotherapy, and the combination provides significant survival benefits in AML patients. Here we tested whether the survival benefits seen with the combination arise from the enhanced reduction of chemoresidual disease and leukemic initiating cells (LICs. Herein, we use cell line and patient-derived xenograft (PDX AML models to evaluate the combination of GO with daunorubicin and cytarabine (DA induction chemotherapy on AML blast growth and animal survival. DA chemotherapy and GO as separate treatments reduced AML burden but left significant chemoresidual disease in multiple AML models. The combination of GO and DA chemotherapy eliminated nearly all AML burden and extended overall survival. In two small subsets of AML models, chemoresidual disease following DA chemotherapy displayed hallmark markers of leukemic LICs (CLL1 and CD34. In vivo, the two chemoresistant subpopulations (CLL1+/CD117− and CD34+/CD38+ showed higher ability to self-renewal than their counterpart subpopulations, respectively. CD33 was coexpressed in these functional LIC subpopulations. We demonstrate that the GO and DA induction chemotherapy combination more effectively eliminates LICs in AML PDX models than either single agent alone. These data suggest that the survival benefit seen by the combination of GO and induction chemotherapy, nonclinically and clinically, may be attributed to the enhanced reduction of LICs.

  1. Randomized trial of two schedules of low-dose gemtuzumab ozogamicin as induction monotherapy for newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia in older patients not considered candidates for intensive chemotherapy. A phase II study of the EORTC and GIMEMA leukemia groups (AML-19)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amadori, Sergio; Suciu, Stefan; Selleslag, Dominik; Stasi, Roberto; Alimena, Giuliana; Baila, Liliana; Rizzoli, Vittorio; Borlenghi, Erika; Gaidano, Gianluca; Magro, Domenico; Torelli, Giuseppe; Muus, Petra; Venditti, Adriano; Cacciola, Emma; Lauria, Francesco; Vignetti, Marco; de Witte, Theo

    2010-01-01

    Summary This study compared two schedules of low-dose gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO) as induction monotherapy for untreated acute myeloid leukemia in older patients unfit for intensive chemotherapy, to identify the more promising regimen for further study. Patients were randomized to receive either best supportive care or a course of GO according to one of two schedules: 3 mg/m2 on days 1, 3 and 5 (arm A), or GO 6 mg/m2 on day 1 and 3 mg/m2 on day 8 (arm B). Primary endpoint was the rate of disease non-progression (DnP), defined as the proportion of patients either achieving a response or maintaining a stable disease following GO induction in each arm. Fifty-six patients were randomized in the two GO arms (A, n=29; B, n=27). The rate of DnP was 38% (90% confidence interval [CI], 23%–55%) in arm A, and 63% (90% CI, 45%–78%) in arm B. Peripheral cytopenias were the most common adverse events for both regimens. The all-cause early mortality rate was 14% in arm A and 11% in arm B. The day 1+8 schedule, which was associated with the highest rate of DnP, met the statistical criteria to be selected as the preferred regimen for phase III comparison with best supportive care. PMID:20230405

  2. Addition of gemtuzumab ozogamicin to induction chemotherapy improves survival in older patients with acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burnett, Alan K; Russell, Nigel H; Hills, Robert K

    2012-01-01

    daunorubicin/ara-C or daunorubicin/clofarabine, with (n = 559) or without (n = 556) GO 3 mg/m(2) on day 1 of course one of therapy. The primary end point was overall survival (OS). Results The overall response rate was 69% (complete remission [CR], 60%; CR with incomplete recovery [CRi], 9...

  3. Inotuzumab Ozogamicin versus Standard Therapy for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantarjian, Hagop M; DeAngelo, Daniel J; Stelljes, Matthias; Martinelli, Giovanni; Liedtke, Michaela; Stock, Wendy; Gökbuget, Nicola; O'Brien, Susan; Wang, Kongming; Wang, Tao; Paccagnella, M Luisa; Sleight, Barbara; Vandendries, Erik; Advani, Anjali S

    2016-08-25

    The prognosis for adults with relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia is poor. We sought to determine whether inotuzumab ozogamicin, an anti-CD22 antibody conjugated to calicheamicin, results in better outcomes in patients with relapsed or refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia than does standard therapy. In this phase 3 trial, we randomly assigned adults with relapsed or refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia to receive either inotuzumab ozogamicin (inotuzumab ozogamicin group) or standard intensive chemotherapy (standard-therapy group). The primary end points were complete remission (including complete remission with incomplete hematologic recovery) and overall survival. Of the 326 patients who underwent randomization, the first 218 (109 in each group) were included in the primary intention-to-treat analysis of complete remission. The rate of complete remission was significantly higher in the inotuzumab ozogamicin group than in the standard-therapy group (80.7% [95% confidence interval {CI}, 72.1 to 87.7] vs. 29.4% [95% CI, 21.0 to 38.8], P<0.001). Among the patients who had complete remission, a higher percentage in the inotuzumab ozogamicin group had results below the threshold for minimal residual disease (0.01% marrow blasts) (78.4% vs. 28.1%, P<0.001); the duration of remission was longer in the inotuzumab ozogamicin group (median, 4.6 months [95% CI, 3.9 to 5.4] vs. 3.1 months [95% CI, 1.4 to 4.9]; hazard ratio, 0.55 [95% CI, 0.31 to 0.96]; P=0.03). In the survival analysis, which included all 326 patients, progression-free survival was significantly longer in the inotuzumab ozogamicin group (median, 5.0 months [95% CI, 3.7 to 5.6] vs. 1.8 months [95% CI, 1.5 to 2.2]; hazard ratio, 0.45 [97.5% CI, 0.34 to 0.61]; P<0.001); the median overall survival was 7.7 months (95% CI, 6.0 to 9.2) versus 6.7 months (95% CI, 4.9 to 8.3), and the hazard ratio was 0.77 (97.5% CI, 0.58 to 1.03) (P=0.04). In the safety population, the most frequent grade 3 or higher

  4. A method for optimizing dosage regimens in oncology by visualizing the safety and efficacy response surface: analysis of inotuzumab ozogamicin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luu, Kenneth T; Boni, Joseph

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this investigation was to develop a quantitative method to optimize inotuzumab ozogamicin (InO) dosage regimen in patients with indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) by simultaneously balancing safety and efficacy. Pharmacokinetics (PK), safety and efficacy data were obtained from a phase 2 trial of InO administered intravenously to patients (n = 81) with indolent NHL. The PK was described by a two-compartment model which was linked to: (1) an exponential tumor growth model to describe tumor size time course (efficacy determinant expressed as objective response rate) and (2) a precursor-dependent platelet inhibition model to describe platelet time course (safety determinant expressed as thrombocytopenia grade). The model was used to simulate virtual trials to construct safety and efficacy response surfaces. Using the simulated safety and efficacy contours, a clinical utility index (CUI) contour was then constructed, from which optimal InO regimens were then selected. The model-simulated efficacy response surface indicated near-optimal efficacy of InO at the dosage regimen used in the trial (1.8 mg/m(2) every 4 weeks). The model-simulated safety response surface indicated that modifying the dosage regimen resulted in modest improvements in safety with little compromise in efficacy. The CUI contour identified 2 mg/m(2) every 10, 11, or 12 weeks as the "sweet spot" for optimal InO dosage regimen in patients with indolent NHL. An approach to dosage regimen optimization was developed for simultaneously balancing safety and efficacy. This approach allows objective identification of optimal dosage regimens from early trial information and thus has broad utility across oncology trials.

  5. Inotuzumab ozogamicin in adults with relapsed or refractory CD22-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a phase 1/2 study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeAngelo, Daniel J; Stock, Wendy; Stein, Anthony S; Shustov, Andrei; Liedtke, Michaela; Schiffer, Charles A; Vandendries, Erik; Liau, Katherine; Ananthakrishnan, Revathi; Boni, Joseph; Laird, A Douglas; Fostvedt, Luke; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Advani, Anjali S

    2017-06-27

    This study evaluated the safety, antitumor activity, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of inotuzumab ozogamicin (InO) for CD22-positive relapsed/refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In phase 1, patients received InO 1.2 (n = 3), 1.6 (n = 12), or 1.8 (n = 9) mg/m 2 per cycle on days 1, 8, and 15 over a 28-day cycle (≤6 cycles). The recommended phase 2 dose (RP2D) was confirmed (expansion cohort; n = 13); safety and activity of InO were assessed in patients receiving the RP2D in phase 2 (n = 35) and in all treated patients (n = 72). The RP2D was 1.8 mg/m 2 per cycle (0.8 mg/m 2 on day 1; 0.5 mg/m 2 on days 8 and 15), with reduction to 1.6 mg/m 2 per cycle after complete remission (CR) or CR with incomplete marrow recovery (CRi). Treatment-related toxicities were primarily cytopenias. Four patients experienced treatment-related venoocclusive disease/sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (VOD/SOS; 1 fatal). Two VOD/SOS events occurred during treatment without intervening transplant; of 24 patients proceeding to poststudy transplant, 2 experienced VOD/SOS after transplant. Forty-nine (68%) patients had CR/CRi, with 41 (84%) achieving minimal residual disease (MRD) negativity. Median progression-free survival was 3.9 (95% confidence interval, 2.9-5.4) months; median overall survival was 7.4 (5.7-9.2) months for all treated patients, with median 23.7 (range, 6.8-29.8) months of follow-up for all treated patients alive at data cutoff. Achievement of MRD negativity was associated with higher InO exposure. InO was well tolerated and demonstrated high single-agent activity and MRD-negativity rates. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01363297.

  6. Hepatic adverse event profile of inotuzumab ozogamicin in adult patients with relapsed or refractory acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: results from the open-label, randomised, phase 3 INO-VATE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantarjian, Hagop M; DeAngelo, Daniel J; Advani, Anjali S; Stelljes, Matthias; Kebriaei, Partow; Cassaday, Ryan D; Merchant, Akil A; Fujishima, Naohito; Uchida, Toshiki; Calbacho, Maria; Ejduk, Anna A; O'Brien, Susan M; Jabbour, Elias J; Zhang, Hui; Sleight, Barbara J; Vandendries, Erik R; Marks, David I

    2017-08-01

    The INO-VATE study demonstrated efficacy and safety of inotuzumab ozogamicin versus standard care in adults with relapsed or refractory B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Here, we report the frequency of, and potential risk factors for, hepatotoxicity in patients in this trial and after treatment and subsequent haemopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT). In this open-label, phase 3, multicentre, international study, adults with relapsed or refractory, CD22-positive, Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)-positive or Ph-negative B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia who were due to receive first or second salvage treatment were randomly assigned (1:1) via an interactive voice response system to receive inotuzumab ozogamicin (starting dose 1·8 mg/m 2 per cycle [0·8 mg/m 2 on day 1; 0·5 mg/m 2 on days 8 and 15 of a 21-28 day cycle for ≤6 cycles]) or standard care (either fludarabine plus cytarabine plus granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, mitoxantrone plus cytarabine, or high-dose cytarabine). Stratification factors at randomisation were duration of first remission (<12 months vs ≥12 months), salvage treatment phase (first vs second), and age (<55 years vs ≥55 years). We present data up to March 8, 2016. At this cutoff date, all patients had been discontinued from treatment but 54 patients were continuing in long-term follow-up. Long-term follow-up has now been completed, with the final patient's last visit on Jan 4, 2017. This prespecified safety analysis describes investigator-assessed treatment-emergent hepatotoxicity, including sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (also known as veno-occlusive disease) in patients during study treatment or thereafter (without follow-up HSCT) and after study treatment and subsequent HSCT, for all patients who received at least one dose of study treatment. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01564784. Between Aug 27, 2012, and and the data cutoff of March 8, 2016, 326 patients were randomly assigned to

  7. Inotuzumab Ozogamicin Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is in a class of medications called monoclonal antibodies. It works by activating the immune system to ... interval (a rare heart problem that may cause irregular heartbeat, fainting, or sudden death). Also, tell your ...

  8. Efficacy and safety analysis by age cohort of inotuzumab ozogamicin in patients with relapsed or refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia enrolled in INO-VATE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbour, Elias J; DeAngelo, Daniel J; Stelljes, Matthias; Stock, Wendy; Liedtke, Michaela; Gökbuget, Nicola; O'Brien, Susan; Wang, Tao; Paccagnella, M Luisa; Sleight, Barbara; Vandendries, Erik; Advani, Anjali S; Kantarjian, Hagop M

    2018-01-30

    Inotuzumab ozogamicin (InO) has demonstrated efficacy and tolerability in patients aged 18 to 78 years with relapsed/refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in the INO-VATE trial. This subset analysis compared the efficacy and safety of InO in younger and older patients. Intent-to-treat analyses of morphologic responses and overall survival (OS) included 326 randomized patients, and safety assessments included 307 patients receiving 1 or more doses of the study treatment. Of the 326 patients, 164 received InO at a starting dose of 1.8 mg/m 2 /cycle (0.8 mg/m 2 on day 1 and 0.5 mg/m 2 on days 8 and 15 of a 21- to 28-day cycle [≤6 cycles]); 60 patients were aged ≥55 years, and 104 were aged <55 years. For older and younger patients, the median duration of InO therapy and the types and frequencies of adverse events of any grade were generally similar. Although the remission rates, median duration of remission (DOR), and progression-free survival were similar with InO for those aged <55 years and those aged ≥55 years, OS was longer for younger patients (median, 8.6 vs 5.6 months; hazard ratio, 0.610). Among patients proceeding to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation after InO treatment (28% of older patients and 58% of younger patients), the incidence of veno-occlusive disease was greater in older patients (41% vs 17%). The study database was not locked at the time of this analysis. InO was tolerable in older patients with relapsed/refractory ALL. Although OS was longer for younger patients versus older patients, InO demonstrated high response rates with similar DOR in the 2 age groups. Cancer 2018. © 2018 American Cancer Society. © 2018 American Cancer Society.

  9. Safety and Clinical Activity of a Combination Therapy Comprising Two Antibody-Based Targeting Agents for the Treatment of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: Results of a Phase I/II Study Evaluating the Immunoconjugate Inotuzumab Ozogamicin With Rituximab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayad, Luis; Offner, Fritz; Smith, Mitchell R.; Verhoef, Gregor; Johnson, Peter; Kaufman, Jonathan L.; Rohatiner, Ama; Advani, Anjali; Foran, James; Hess, Georg; Coiffier, Bertrand; Czuczman, Myron; Giné, Eva; Durrant, Simon; Kneissl, Michelle; Luu, Kenneth T.; Hua, Steven Y.; Boni, Joseph; Vandendries, Erik; Dang, Nam H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Inotuzumab ozogamicin (INO) is an antibody-targeted chemotherapy agent composed of a humanized anti-CD22 antibody conjugated to calicheamicin, a potent cytotoxic agent. We performed a phase I/II study to determine the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD), safety, efficacy, and pharmacokinetics of INO plus rituximab (R-INO) for treatment of relapsed/refractory CD20+/CD22+ B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Patients and Methods A dose-escalation phase to determine the MTD of R-INO was followed by an expanded cohort to further evaluate the efficacy and safety at the MTD. Patients with relapsed follicular lymphoma (FL), relapsed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), or refractory aggressive NHL received R-INO every 4 weeks for up to eight cycles. Results In all, 118 patients received one or more cycles of R-INO (median, four cycles). Most common grade 3 to 4 adverse events were thrombocytopenia (31%) and neutropenia (22%). Common low-grade toxicities included hyperbilirubinemia (25%) and increased AST (36%). The MTD of INO in combination with rituximab (375 mg/m2) was confirmed to be the same as that for single-agent INO (1.8 mg/m2). Treatment at the MTD yielded objective response rates of 87%, 74%, and 20% for relapsed FL (n = 39), relapsed DLBCL (n = 42), and refractory aggressive NHL (n = 30), respectively. The 2-year progression-free survival (PFS) rate was 68% (median, not reached) for FL and 42% (median, 17.1 months) for relapsed DLBCL. Conclusion R-INO demonstrated high response rates and long PFS in patients with relapsed FL or DLBCL. This and the manageable toxicity profile suggest that R-INO may be a promising option for CD20+/CD22+ B-cell NHL. PMID:23295790

  10. Targeted Delivery of Carbon Nanotubes to Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON USAMRMC a. REPORT U b. ABSTRACT...FA, Chen B, Kirschner AN, Wilson SR, Erlanger BF. X-ray crystal structure of an anti-buckminsterfullerene antibody Fab fragment: biomolecular...369. 4. Bross PF, et al. (2001) Approval summary: Gemtuzumab ozogamicin in relapsed acute myeloid leukemia . Clin Cancer Res 7:1490–1496. 5. Sharkey RM

  11. New agents: great expectations not realized.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancet, Jeffrey E

    2013-09-01

    A number of new agents in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have held much promise in recent years, but most have failed to change the therapeutic landscape. Indeed, with the exception of gemtuzumab ozogamicin (which was subsequently voluntarily withdrawn from the commercial market), no new agent has been approved for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) beyond the 7 + 3 regimen, which was has been in use for over 40 years. This review touches upon the potential reasons for these failures and explores the newer therapeutic approaches being pursued in AML. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Biting back: BiTE antibodies as a promising therapy for acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Roland B

    2014-06-01

    The experience with gemtuzumab ozogamicin has highlighted both the potential value and limitations of antibodies in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Recently, bispecific T-cell engager (BiTE) antibodies have emerged as a means to harness polyclonal cytotoxic T-cells and cause highly efficient lysis of targeted tumor cells. Promising early results have been obtained with the CD19-directed BiTE antibody, blinatumomab, in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. A first candidate for AML is the CD33/CD3 molecule, AMG 330, for which several recent preclinical studies demonstrated high potency and efficacy in destroying CD33(+) human AML cells. Many questions remain to be addressed, but BiTE antibodies may offer an exciting new tool in a disease for which the outcomes in many patients remain unsatisfactory.

  13. [Acute myeloid leukemia. Genetic diagnostics and molecular therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlenk, R F; Döhner, K; Döhner, H

    2013-02-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a genetically heterogeneous disease. The genetic diagnostics have become an essential component in the initial work-up for disease classification, prognostication and prediction. More and more promising molecular targeted therapeutics are becoming available. A prerequisite for individualized treatment strategies is a fast pretherapeutic molecular screening including the fusion genes PML-RARA, RUNX1-RUNX1T1 and CBFB-MYH11 as well as mutations in the genes NPM1, FLT3 and CEBPA. Promising new therapeutic approaches include the combination of all- trans retinoic acid and arsentrioxid in acute promyelocytic leukemia, the combination of intensive chemotherapy with KIT inhibitors in core-binding factor AML and FLT3 inhibitors in AML with FLT3 mutation, as well as gemtuzumab ozogamicin therapy in patients with low and intermediate cytogenetic risk profiles. With the advent of the next generation sequencing technologies it is expected that new therapeutic targets will be identified. These insights will lead to a further individualization of AML therapy.

  14. Gateways to clinical trials. March 2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2003-03-01

    Gateways to clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies knowledge area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and devlopment protal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: AAV-CF, adalimumab, ademetionine, afeletecan hydrochloride, agomelatine, alemtuzumab, almotriptan, amdoxovir, aplidine, aranose, arsenic sulfide, atazanavir, atlizumab; Bimatoprost, BMS-181176, BMS-188667, bortezomib, bryostatin 1; Combretastatin A-4 phosphate; Darbepoetin alfa, darusentan, deferasirox, desloratadine, DTaP-HBV-IPV/Hib-vaccine, DTI-0009; Eculizumab, edodekin alfa, emtricitabine, enfuvirtide, epoetin, esomeprazole magnesium etoricoxib; Fampridine, fenretinide, FR-146687; Galiximab, gamma-Hydroxybutyrate sodium, ganirelix acetate, gefitinib, Gemtuzumab ozogamicin, gimatecan; HEA125xOKT3, hIL-13-PE38QQR, HSV-2 theracine, Hu14.18-IL-2, human gammaglobulin; Idraparinux sodium, imatinib mesylate, IMiD3, insulin detemir, interleukin-4, irofulven, ISAtx-247; JT-1001; Levetiracetam, levosimendan, liposomal doxorubicin, liposomal vincristine sulfate, lixivaptan, lopinavir, lumiracoxib; Maxacalcitol, melatonin, midostaurin, MLN-518; Neridronic acid, nesiritide, nitronaproxen; Oblimersen sodium, oregovomab; PEG-filgrastim polyglutamate paclitaxel, prasterone, pregabalin; Rosuvastatin calcium, rotigotine hydrochloride; SGN-30; T-1249, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, teriparatide, tiotropium bromide, tipranavir, TMC-114, trabectedin, transdermal selegiline; UK-427857; Valdecoxib, valganciclovir hydrochloride, vardenafil, vatalanib succinate, vincristine sulfate TCS; Zofenopril calcium.

  15. Iron chelation therapy with deferasirox induced complete remission in a patient with chemotherapy-resistant acute monocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Toshihiro; Kawabata, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Takuji; Iwao, Haruka; Nakajima, Akio; Miki, Miyuki; Sakai, Tomoyuki; Sawaki, Toshioki; Fujita, Yoshimasa; Tanaka, Masao; Masaki, Yasufumi; Hirose, Yuko; Umehara, Hisanori

    2011-05-01

    A patient with chemotherapy-resistant acute monocytic leukemia who achieved complete remission (CR) after iron chelation therapy (ICT) with deferasirox is reported for the first time. A 73-year-old Japanese man with acute monocytic leukemia who was refractory to conventional remission induction chemotherapies achieved a partial response, with some improvement of his hemoglobin level and white blood cell count after gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO) treatment. Seven months after GO treatment, the disease relapsed and the patient developed pancytopenia. He declined further chemotherapy, and started receiving 1,200-1,800 ml of packed red blood cell transfusion per month together with ICT with deferasirox (baseline serum ferritin level was 1,412 ng/ml). Twelve months after the initiation of deferasirox, the patient's serum ferritin level decreased to below 1,000 ng/ml and deferasirox was discontinued. Four months after discontinuation of deferasirox, the blood cell count normalized and the patient became transfusion-independent. Bone marrow aspiration and biopsy revealed hematological and cytogenetic CR. CR was achieved after ICT with deferasirox in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia, suggesting that deferasirox may have an antileukemic effect in the clinical setting.

  16. Antibody-Drug Conjugates (ADCs) for Personalized Treatment of Solid Tumors: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, John M; Morris, Charles Q

    2017-05-01

    Attaching a cytotoxic "payload" to an antibody to form an antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) provides a mechanism for selective delivery of the cytotoxic agent to cancer cells via the specific binding of the antibody to cancer-selective cell surface molecules. The first ADC to receive marketing authorization was gemtuzumab ozogamicin, which comprises an anti-CD33 antibody conjugated to a highly potent DNA-targeting antibiotic, calicheamicin, approved in 2000 for treating acute myeloid leukemia. It was withdrawn from the US market in 2010 following an unsuccessful confirmatory trial. The development of two classes of highly potent microtubule-disrupting agents, maytansinoids and auristatins, as payloads for ADCs resulted in approval of brentuximab vedotin in 2011 for treating Hodgkin lymphoma and anaplastic large cell lymphoma, and approval of ado-trastuzumab emtansine in 2013 for treating HER2-positive breast cancer. Their success stimulated much research into the ADC approach, with >60 ADCs currently in clinical evaluation, mostly targeting solid tumors. Five ADCs have advanced into pivotal clinical trials for treating various solid tumors-platinum-resistant ovarian cancer, mesothelioma, triple-negative breast cancer, glioblastoma, and small cell lung cancer. The level of target expression is a key parameter in predicting the likelihood of patient benefit for all these ADCs, as well as for the approved compound, ado-trastuzumab emtansine. The development of a patient selection strategy linked to target expression on the tumor is thus critically important for identifying the population appropriate for receiving treatment.

  17. SGN-CD33A: a novel CD33-targeting antibody-drug conjugate using a pyrrolobenzodiazepine dimer is active in models of drug-resistant AML.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung Sutherland, May S; Walter, Roland B; Jeffrey, Scott C; Burke, Patrick J; Yu, Changpu; Kostner, Heather; Stone, Ivan; Ryan, Maureen C; Sussman, Django; Lyon, Robert P; Zeng, Weiping; Harrington, Kimberly H; Klussman, Kerry; Westendorf, Lori; Meyer, David; Bernstein, Irwin D; Senter, Peter D; Benjamin, Dennis R; Drachman, Jonathan G; McEarchern, Julie A

    2013-08-22

    Outcomes in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remain unsatisfactory, and novel treatments are urgently needed. One strategy explores antibodies and their drug conjugates, particularly those targeting CD33. Emerging data with gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO) demonstrate target validity and activity in some patients with AML, but efficacy is limited by heterogeneous drug conjugation, linker instability, and a high incidence of multidrug resistance. We describe here the development of SGN-CD33A, a humanized anti-CD33 antibody with engineered cysteines conjugated to a highly potent, synthetic DNA cross-linking pyrrolobenzodiazepine dimer via a protease-cleavable linker. The use of engineered cysteine residues at the sites of drug linker attachment results in a drug loading of approximately 2 pyrrolobenzodiazepine dimers per antibody. In preclinical testing, SGN-CD33A is more potent than GO against a panel of AML cell lines and primary AML cells in vitro and in xenotransplantation studies in mice. Unlike GO, antileukemic activity is observed with SGN-CD33A in AML models with the multidrug-resistant phenotype. Mechanistic studies indicate that the cytotoxic effects of SGN-CD33A involve DNA damage with ensuing cell cycle arrest and apoptotic cell death. Together, these data suggest that SGN-CD33A has CD33-directed antitumor activity and support clinical testing of this novel therapeutic in patients with AML.

  18. Novel agents and regimens for acute myeloid leukemia: 2009 ASH annual meeting highlights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Xiongpeng

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Prognostic markers, such as NPM1, Flt3-ITD, and cytogenetic abnormalities have made it possible to formulate aggressive treatment plans for unfavorable acute myeloid leukemia (AML. However, the long-term survival of AML with unfavorable factors remains unsatisfactory. The latest data indicate that the standard dose of daunorubicin (DNR at 45 mg/m2 is inferior to high dose 90 mg/m2 for induction therapy. The rates of complete remission and overall survival are significantly better in the high dose induction regimen. New regimens exploring the new liposomal encapsulation of Ara-C and DNR as well as addition of gemtuzumab ozogamicin monoclonal antibody have been studied. New agents, including the nucleoside analogues (clofarabine, sapacitabine, elacytarabine, FLT3 inhibitor (sorafenib, farnesyl-transferase inhibitor (tipifarnib, histone deacetylase inhibitor (vorinostat, lenalidomide, as well as DNA methyltransferase inhibitors (decitabine, azacitidine, were recently reported for AML treatment in the 2009 ASH annual meeting. This review also summarizes the updates of the clinical trials on novel agents including voreloxin, AS1413, behenoylara-C, ARRY520, ribavirin, AZD1152, AZD6244, and terameprocol (EM-1421 from the 2009 ASH annual meeting.

  19. Inclusion of chemotherapy in addition to anthracycline in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukaemia does not improve outcomes: results of the MRC AML15 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, A K; Hills, R K; Grimwade, D; Jovanovic, J V; Craig, J; McMullin, M F; Kell, J; Wheatley, K; Yin, J A L; Hunter, A; Milligan, D; Russell, N H

    2013-04-01

    Two hundred eighty-five patients, median age 42, with PML-RARα-positive acute promyelocytic leukaemia were randomised to Ara-C-containing 'Medical Research Council (MRC) Chemotherapy'+ATRA (All-trans-retinoic acid) or anthracycline+ATRA (modified 'Spanish') therapy. MRC treatment comprised four courses with ATRA in courses 1-2. Spanish treatment comprised four anthracycline-based courses with ATRA in courses 1-3. In course 3 patients were randomised to gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO) or not. The Spanish arm received 24-month maintenance. Patients were sequentially molecularly monitored. Quality of life was assessed at baseline, 3, 6, 9, 12, 24 months. Remission rates were similar in both arms (93%): cumulative incidence of haematological relapse (CIHR) was 6% at 5 years; 5 patients relapsed molecularly. Survival post relapse was 80%. There were more deaths in remission in the MRC arm (4% vs 10%: P=0.2). The overall 5-year relapse-free and overall survival was similar between arms (81% vs 82% and 84% vs 83%, respectively). More supportive care and hospitalisation (81.8 vs 63 days, PMRC arm. GO did not provide benefit. High white blood cell count (>10 × 10(9)/l) was not prognostic overall, or within treatment arms. Both approaches deliver similar results with minor differences in quality of life. MRC treatment required more hospitalisation. This suggests that additional chemotherapy, Ara-C in particular, is not required.

  20. Distribution and levels of cell surface expression of CD33 and CD123 in acute myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehninger, A; Kramer, M; Röllig, C; Thiede, C; Bornhäuser, M; von Bonin, M; Wermke, M; Feldmann, A; Bachmann, M; Ehninger, G; Oelschlägel, U

    2014-01-01

    Owing to the more recent positive results with the anti-CD33 immunotoxin gemtuzumab ozogamicin, therapy against acute myeloid leukemias (AMLs) targeting CD33 holds many promises. Here, CD33 and CD123 expression on AML blasts was studied by flow cytometry in a cohort of 319 patients with detailed information on French–American–British/World Health Organization (FAB/WHO) classification, cytogenetics and molecular aberrations. AMLs of 87.8% express CD33 and would therefore be targetable with anti-CD33 therapies. Additionally, 9.4% of AMLs express CD123 without concomitant CD33 expression. Thus, nearly all AMLs could be either targeted via CD33 or CD123. Simultaneous presence of both antigens was observed in 69.5% of patients. Most importantly, even AMLs with adverse cytogenetics express CD33 and CD123 levels comparable to those with favorable and intermediate subtypes. Some patient groups with unfavorable alterations, such as FMS-related tyrosine kinase 3-internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD) mutations, high FLT3-ITD mutant/wild-type ratios and monosomy 5 are even characterized by high expression of CD33 and CD123. In addition, blasts of patients with mutant nucleophosmin (NPM1) revealed significantly higher CD33 and CD123 expression pointing toward the possibility of minimal residual disease-guided interventions in mutated NPM1-positive AMLs. These results stimulate the development of novel concepts to redirect immune effector cells toward CD33- and CD123-expressing blasts using bi-specific antibodies or engineered T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors. PMID:24927407

  1. The Role of Monoclonal Antibodies in the Management of Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Cherry

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This article will review the monoclonal antibodies more commonly used in leukemias. In the last three decades, scientists have made considerable progress understanding the structure and the functions of various surface antigens, such as CD20, CD33. The introduction of rituximab, an anti CD20 monoclonal antibody, had a great impact in the treatment of lymphoproliferative disorders. Gemtuzumab, an anti CD 33 conjugated monoclonal antibody has activity in acute mylegenous leukemia (AML. As this field is undergoing a rapid growth, the years will see an increasing use of monoclonal antibodies in hematological malignancies.

  2. A new Leukemia Prognostic Scoring System for refractory/relapsed adult acute myelogeneous leukaemia patients: a GOELAMS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevallier, P; Labopin, M; Turlure, P; Prebet, T; Pigneux, A; Hunault, M; Filanovsky, K; Cornillet-Lefebvre, P; Luquet, I; Lode, L; Richebourg, S; Blanchet, O; Gachard, N; Vey, N; Ifrah, N; Milpied, N; Harousseau, J-L; Bene, M-C; Mohty, M; Delaunay, J

    2011-06-01

    A simplified prognostic score is presented based on the multivariate analysis of 138 refractory/relapsed acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) patients (median age 55 years, range: 19-70) receiving a combination of intensive chemotherapy+Gemtuzumab as salvage regimen. Overall, 2-year event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) were 29±4% and 36±4%, respectively. Disease status (relapse Leukemia Prognostic Scoring System was then validated on an independent cohort of 111 refractory/relapsed AML patients. This new simplified prognostic score, using three clinical and biological parameters routinely applied, allow to discriminate around two third of the patients who should benefit from a salvage intensive regimen in the setting of refractory/relapsed AML patients. The other one third of the patients should receive investigational therapy.

  3. Nye medicinske behandlingsprincipper inden for haematologien

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselbalch, H.C.; Birgens, H.; Dufva, I.H.

    2008-01-01

    Today several monoclonal antibodies, including the anti-CD20 antibody (rituximab), the anti-CD52 antibody (alemtuzumab) and the anti-CD33 antibody (gemtuzumab ozogamacin) are all integrated in the therapeutic armamentarium of patients with malignant lymphoma, chronic lymphocytic leukaemia and acute...... myelogenous leukaemia, respectively. Rituximab has also been shown to be highly effective in the treatment of refractory autoimmune haemolytic anemias, idiopathic thrombocytopenia, and relapsing thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. New signal transduction inhibitors, dasatinib and nilotinib, are being used...... in patients with chronic myelogeneous leukaemia who develop resistance to imatinib. Thalidomide, lenalidomide and bortezomib have all been shown to be highly effective in multiple myeloma, and JAK2-inhibitors have entered phase II studies of patients with JAK2-positive primary myelofibrosis and related...

  4. MANAGEMENT OF ACUTE PROMYELOCYTIC LEUKEMIA IN THE ELDERLY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Lococo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Unlike other forms of AML, APL is less frequently diagnosed in the elderly and has a relatively favourable outcome. Elderly patients with APL seem at least as responsive to therapy as do younger patients, but rates of response and survival are lower in this age setting owing to a higher incidence of early deaths and deaths in remission when conventional treatment with ATRA and chemotherapy is used. Elderly APL patients are more likely to present with low-risk features compared with younger patients, and this may explain the relative low risk of relapse reported in several clinical studies. Alternative approaches, such as arsenic trioxide and gentuzumab ozogamicin have been tested with success in this setting and could replace in the near future frontline conventional chemotherapy and ATRA.

  5. Recent advances in the management of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Starý

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is the most common malignancy in childhood. Despite enormous improvement of prognosis during the last half century, ALL remains a major cause of childhood cancer-related mortality. During the past decade, whole genomic methods have enhanced our knowledge of disease biology. Stratification of therapy according to early treatment response measured by minimal residual disease allows risk group assignment into different treatment arms, ranging from reduction to intensification of treatment. Progress has been achieved in academic clinical trials by optimization of combined chemotherapy, which continues to be the mainstay of contemporary treatment. The availability of suitable volunteer main histocompatibility antigen-matched unrelated donors has increased the rates of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT over the past two decades. Allogeneic HSCT has become an alternative treatment for selected, very-high-risk patients. However, intensive treatment burdens children with severe acute toxic effects that can cause permanent organ damage and even toxic death. Immunotherapeutic approaches have recently come to the forefront in ALL therapy. Monoclonal antibodies blinatumomab and inotuzumab ozogamicin as well as gene-modified T cells directed to specific target antigens have shown efficacy against resistant/relapsed leukemia in phase I/II studies. Integration of these newer modalities into combined regimens with chemotherapy may rescue a subset of children not curable by contemporary therapy. Another major challenge will be to incorporate less toxic regimens into the therapy of patients with low-risk disease who have a nearly 100% chance of being cured, and the ultimate goal is to improve their quality of life while maintaining a high cure rate.

  6. Burkitt lymphoma in adolescents and young adults: management challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dozzo M

    2016-12-01

    immunocompromised patients at risk of death by complications; the identification of very high-risk patients through positron-emission tomography and minimal residual disease assays; and the assessment in these and the few refractory/relapsed ones of new monoclonals (ofatumumab, blinatumomab, inotuzumab ozogamicin and new molecules targeting c-MYC and key proliferative steps of B-cell malignancies. Keywords: Burkitt lymphoma, adolescents, young adults, treatment, outcome