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Sample records for gel-based proteomic studies

  1. A comparison of protein extraction methods suitable for gel-based proteomic studies of aphid proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilia, M; Fish, T; Yang, X; McLaughlin, M; Thannhauser, T W; Gray, S

    2009-09-01

    Protein extraction methods can vary widely in reproducibility and in representation of the total proteome, yet there are limited data comparing protein isolation methods. The methodical comparison of protein isolation methods is the first critical step for proteomic studies. To address this, we compared three methods for isolation, purification, and solubilization of insect proteins. The aphid Schizaphis graminum, an agricultural pest, was the source of insect tissue. Proteins were extracted using TCA in acetone (TCA-acetone), phenol, or multi-detergents in a chaotrope solution. Extracted proteins were solubilized in a multiple chaotrope solution and examined using 1-D and 2-D electrophoresis and compared directly using 2-D Difference Gel Electrophoresis (2-D DIGE). Mass spectrometry was used to identify proteins from each extraction type. We were unable to ascribe the differences in the proteins extracted to particular physical characteristics, cell location, or biological function. The TCA-acetone extraction yielded the greatest amount of protein from aphid tissues. Each extraction method isolated a unique subset of the aphid proteome. The TCA-acetone method was explored further for its quantitative reliability using 2-D DIGE. Principal component analysis showed that little of the variation in the data was a result of technical issues, thus demonstrating that the TCA-acetone extraction is a reliable method for preparing aphid proteins for a quantitative proteomics experiment. These data suggest that although the TCA-acetone method is a suitable method for quantitative aphid proteomics, a combination of extraction approaches is recommended for increasing proteome coverage when using gel-based separation techniques.

  2. A Comparison of Protein Extraction Methods Suitable for Gel-Based Proteomics Studies of Aphid Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Few attempts have been made to methodically compare protein isolation methods from insect tissues for proteomic studies. To address this, we compared qualitative and quantitative differences among three methods for isolation, purification and solubilization of insect proteins. Schizaphis graminum,...

  3. Data Visualization and Feature Selection Methods in Gel-based Proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva, Tomé Santos; Richard, Nadege; Dias, Jorge P.;

    2014-01-01

    Despite the increasing popularity of gel-free proteomic strategies, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) is still the most widely used approach in top-down proteomic studies, for all sorts of biological models. In order to achieve meaningful biological insight using 2DE approaches, importance......-based proteomics, summarizing the current state of research within this field. Particular focus is given on discussing the usefulness of available multivariate analysis tools both for data visualization and feature selection purposes. Visual examples are given using a real gel-based proteomic dataset as basis....

  4. Sources of Experimental Variation in 2-D Maps: The Importance of Experimental Design in Gel-Based Proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valcu, Cristina-Maria; Valcu, Mihai

    2016-01-01

    The success of proteomic studies employing 2-D maps largely depends on the way surveys and experiments have been organized and performed. Planning gel-based proteomic experiments involves the selection of equipment, methodology, treatments, types and number of samples, experimental layout, and methods for data analysis. A good experimental design will maximize the output of the experiment while taking into account the biological and technical resources available. In this chapter we provide guidelines to assist proteomics researchers in all these choices and help them to design quantitative 2-DE experiments.

  5. Gel-based proteomics of liver cancer progression in rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrethsen, Jakob; Miller, Leah M; Novikoff, Phyllis M

    2011-01-01

    carcinoma (HCC) and we identify novel candidate proteomic aberrations for further analysis in human HCC. In particular, increased levels of HSP70, HSP90, AKR1B1, AKR7A3, GCLM, ANXA5, VDBP, RGN and SULT1E1 were associated specifically with rat hepatomas, or with liver cancer progression in rat. In addition...

  6. Proteomic study via a non-gel based approach of meningococcal outer membrane vesicle vaccine obtained from strain CU385: a road map for discovering new antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Jeovanis; Betancourt, L Zaro H; Sardiñas, Gretel; Yero, Daniel; Niebla, Olivia; Delgado, Maité; García, Darien; Pajón, Rolando; Sánchez, Aniel; González, Luis J; Padrón, Gabriel; Campa, Concepción; Sotolongo, Franklin; Barberó, Ramón; Guillén, Gerardo; Herrera, Luis; Besada, Vladimir

    2009-05-01

    This work presents the results from a study of the protein composition of outer membrane vesicles from VA-MENGOC-BC (Finlay Institute, Cuba), an available vaccine against serogroup B Neisseria meningitidis. Proteins were identified by means of SCAPE, a 2DE-free method for proteome studies. More than one hundred proteins were detected by tandem liquid chromatographymass spectrometry analysis of fractions enriched in peptides devoid of histidine or arginine residues, providing a detailed description of the vaccine. A bioinformatic analysis of the identified components resulted in the identification of 31 outer membrane proteins and three conserved hypothetical proteins, allowing the cloning, expression, purification and immunological study of two of them (NMB0088 and NMB1796) as new antigens.

  7. Integration of gel-based and gel-free proteomic data for functional analysis of proteins through Soybean Proteome Database

    KAUST Repository

    Komatsu, Setsuko

    2017-05-10

    The Soybean Proteome Database (SPD) stores data on soybean proteins obtained with gel-based and gel-free proteomic techniques. The database was constructed to provide information on proteins for functional analyses. The majority of the data is focused on soybean (Glycine max ‘Enrei’). The growth and yield of soybean are strongly affected by environmental stresses such as flooding. The database was originally constructed using data on soybean proteins separated by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, which is a gel-based proteomic technique. Since 2015, the database has been expanded to incorporate data obtained by label-free mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics, which is a gel-free proteomic technique. Here, the portions of the database consisting of gel-free proteomic data are described. The gel-free proteomic database contains 39,212 proteins identified in 63 sample sets, such as temporal and organ-specific samples of soybean plants grown under flooding stress or non-stressed conditions. In addition, data on organellar proteins identified in mitochondria, nuclei, and endoplasmic reticulum are stored. Furthermore, the database integrates multiple omics data such as genomics, transcriptomics, metabolomics, and proteomics. The SPD database is accessible at http://proteome.dc.affrc.go.jp/Soybean/. Biological significanceThe Soybean Proteome Database stores data obtained from both gel-based and gel-free proteomic techniques. The gel-free proteomic database comprises 39,212 proteins identified in 63 sample sets, such as different organs of soybean plants grown under flooding stress or non-stressed conditions in a time-dependent manner. In addition, organellar proteins identified in mitochondria, nuclei, and endoplasmic reticulum are stored in the gel-free proteomics database. A total of 44,704 proteins, including 5490 proteins identified using a gel-based proteomic technique, are stored in the SPD. It accounts for approximately 80% of all

  8. Integration of gel-based and gel-free proteomic data for functional analysis of proteins through Soybean Proteome Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Setsuko; Wang, Xin; Yin, Xiaojian; Nanjo, Yohei; Ohyanagi, Hajime; Sakata, Katsumi

    2017-06-23

    The Soybean Proteome Database (SPD) stores data on soybean proteins obtained with gel-based and gel-free proteomic techniques. The database was constructed to provide information on proteins for functional analyses. The majority of the data is focused on soybean (Glycine max 'Enrei'). The growth and yield of soybean are strongly affected by environmental stresses such as flooding. The database was originally constructed using data on soybean proteins separated by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, which is a gel-based proteomic technique. Since 2015, the database has been expanded to incorporate data obtained by label-free mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics, which is a gel-free proteomic technique. Here, the portions of the database consisting of gel-free proteomic data are described. The gel-free proteomic database contains 39,212 proteins identified in 63 sample sets, such as temporal and organ-specific samples of soybean plants grown under flooding stress or non-stressed conditions. In addition, data on organellar proteins identified in mitochondria, nuclei, and endoplasmic reticulum are stored. Furthermore, the database integrates multiple omics data such as genomics, transcriptomics, metabolomics, and proteomics. The SPD database is accessible at http://proteome.dc.affrc.go.jp/Soybean/. The Soybean Proteome Database stores data obtained from both gel-based and gel-free proteomic techniques. The gel-free proteomic database comprises 39,212 proteins identified in 63 sample sets, such as different organs of soybean plants grown under flooding stress or non-stressed conditions in a time-dependent manner. In addition, organellar proteins identified in mitochondria, nuclei, and endoplasmic reticulum are stored in the gel-free proteomics database. A total of 44,704 proteins, including 5490 proteins identified using a gel-based proteomic technique, are stored in the SPD. It accounts for approximately 80% of all predicted proteins from

  9. Full-length protein extraction protocols and gel-based downstream applications in formalin-fixed tissue proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanca, Alessandro; Uzzau, Sergio; Addis, Maria Filippa

    2015-01-01

    Archival formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue repositories and their associated clinical information can represent a valuable resource for tissue proteomics. In order to make these tissues available for protein biomarker discovery and validation studies, dedicated sample preparation procedures overcoming the intermolecular cross-links introduced by formalin need to be implemented. This chapter describes a full-length protein extraction protocol optimized for downstream gel-based proteomics applications. Using the procedures detailed here, SDS-PAGE, western immunoblotting, GeLC-MS/MS, 2D-PAGE, and 2D-DIGE can be carried out on FFPE tissues. Technical tips, critical aspects, and drawbacks of the method are presented and discussed.

  10. Assessment of the 2-d gel-based proteomics application of clinically archived formalin-fixed paraffin embedded tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davalieva, Katarina; Kiprijanovska, Sanja; Polenakovic, Momir

    2014-04-01

    Hospital tissue repositories possess a vast and valuable supply of disease samples with matched retrospective clinical information. Detection and characterization of disease biomarkers in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues will greatly aid the understanding of the diseases mechanisms and help in the development of diagnostic and prognostic markers. In this study, the possibility of using full-length proteins extracted from clinically archived FFPE tissues in two-dimensional (2-D) gel-based proteomics was evaluated. The evaluation was done based on two types of tumor tissues (breast and prostate) and two extraction protocols. The comparison of the 2-D patterns of FFPE extracts obtained by two extraction protocols with the matching frozen tissue extracts showed that only 7-10% of proteins from frozen tissues can be matched to proteins from FFPE tissues. Most of the spots in the 2-D FFPE's maps had pl 4-6, while the percentages of proteins with pl above 6 were 3-5 times lower in comparison to the fresh/frozen tissue. Despite the three-fold lower number of the detected spots in FFPE maps compared to matched fresh/frozen maps, 67-78% of protein spots in FFPE could not be matched to the corresponding spots in the fresh/frozen tissue maps indicating irreversible protein modifications. In conclusion, the inability to completely reverse the cross-linked complexes and overcome protein fragmentation with the present day FFPE extraction methods stands in the way of effective use of these samples in 2-D gel based proteomics studies.

  11. 2D Gel-Based Multiplexed Proteomic Analysis during Larval Development and Metamorphosis of the Biofouling Polychaete Tubeworm Hydroides elegans

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Yu

    2010-09-03

    Larval settlement and metamorphosis of a common biofouling polychaete worm, Hydroides elegans, involve remarkable structural and physiological changes during this pelagic to sessile habitat shift. The endogenous protein molecules and post-translational modifications that drive this larval transition process are not only of interest to ecologists but also to the antifouling paint industry, which aims to control the settlement of this biofouling species on man-made structures (e.g., ship hulls). On the basis of our recent proteomic studies, we hypothesize that rapid larval settlement of H. elegans could be mediated through changes in phosphorylation status of proteins rather than extensive de novo synthesis of proteins. To test this hypothesis, 2D gel-based multiplexed proteomics technology was used to monitor the changes in protein expression and phosphorylation status during larval development and metamorphosis of H. elegans. The protein expression profiles of larvae before and after they reached competency to attach and metamorphose were similar in terms of major proteins, but the percentage of phosphorylated proteins increased from 41% to 49% after competency. Notably, both the protein and phosphoprotein profiles of the metamorphosed individuals (adult) were distinctly different from that of the larvae, with only 40% of the proteins phosphorylated in the adult stage. The intensity ratio of all phosphoprotein spots to all total protein spots was also the highest in the competent larval stage. Overall, our results indicated that the level of protein phosphorylation might play a crucial role in the initiation of larval settlement and metamorphosis. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  12. Comparison of Different Protein Extraction Methods for Gel-Based Proteomic Analysis of Ganoderma spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Obaidi, Jameel R; Saidi, Noor Baity; Usuldin, Siti Rokhiyah Ahmad; Hussin, Siti Nahdatul Isnaini Said; Yusoff, Noornabeela Md; Idris, Abu Seman

    2016-04-01

    Ganoderma species are a group of fungi that have the ability to degrade lignin polymers and cause severe diseases such as stem and root rot and can infect economically important plants and perennial crops such as oil palm, especially in tropical countries such as Malaysia. Unfortunately, very little is known about the complex interplay between oil palm and Ganoderma in the pathogenesis of the diseases. Proteomic technologies are simple yet powerful tools in comparing protein profile and have been widely used to study plant-fungus interaction. A critical step to perform a good proteome research is to establish a method that gives the best quality and a wide coverage of total proteins. Despite the availability of various protein extraction protocols from pathogenic fungi in the literature, no single extraction method was found suitable for all types of pathogenic fungi. To develop an optimized protein extraction protocol for 2-DE gel analysis of Ganoderma spp., three previously reported protein extraction protocols were compared: trichloroacetic acid, sucrose and phenol/ammonium acetate in methanol. The third method was found to give the most reproducible gels and highest protein concentration. Using the later method, a total of 10 protein spots (5 from each species) were successfully identified. Hence, the results from this study propose phenol/ammonium acetate in methanol as the most effective protein extraction method for 2-DE proteomic studies of Ganoderma spp.

  13. 2-D gel-based proteomic approaches to antibiotic drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raatschen, Nadja; Bandow, Julia Elisabeth

    2012-08-01

    The global analysis of changes in the protein composition of bacterial cells in response to treatment with antibiotic agents grants insights into the physiological response of cells to inhibition of vital cellular functions. This unit gives an overview of how global proteomic studies can impact antibacterial drug discovery by identifying or validating compound mechanism of action and by increasing the confidence in the value of genes with unknown function as potential new targets. It describes the design and function of a reference compendium of proteomic responses to inhibition of vital cellular functions through antibacterial agents or genetic down-regulation of potential target genes. An overview of the workflow for two-dimensional gel electrophoresis-based experiments is also presented. © 2012 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  14. 2 D gel based analysis of biological variability of the human plasma proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rentsch, Maria Louise; Jessen, Flemming

    Human blood plasma is a valuable specimen for the biomarker discovery process, since it is easily accessible and contains proteins that are synthesised, secreted or lost from cells and tissue. In this way, changes in plasma proteome reflect the current state of the organism. The analysis of plasma...... by one-week interval. Blood samples were drawn before the meal intake and five times during 24 hours for proteome analysis. Plasma was fractionated by use of IgY-12 spin column depleting the 12 highly abundant proteins and further processed for two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The plasma proteome...... proteome is yet challenging due to the huge dynamic range of protein abundance. When evaluating a potential biomarker, stable basal level of the protein is needed before it can be considered a functional biomarker. However, basal level differences of plasma proteins are naturally occurring between...

  15. Coupling of gel-based 2-DE and 1-DE shotgun proteomics approaches to dig deep into the leaf senescence proteome of Glycine max.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ravi; Lee, Su Ji; Min, Cheol Woo; Kim, So Wun; Park, Ki-Hun; Bae, Dong-Won; Lee, Byong Won; Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar; Rakwal, Randeep; Kim, Sun Tae

    2016-10-04

    Leaf senescence is the last stage of leaf development that re-mobilizes nutrients from the source to sink. Here, we have utilized the soybean as a model system to unravel senescence-associated proteins (SAPs). A comparative proteomics approach was used at two contrasting stages of leaf development, namely mature (R3) and senescent (R7). Selection criteria for these two stages were the contrasting differences in their biochemical parameters - chlorophyll, carotenoids and malondialdehyde contents. Proteome analysis involved subjecting the total leaf proteins to 15% poly-ethylene glycol (PEG) pre-fractional method to enrich the low-abundance proteins (LAPs) and their analyses by gel-based 2-DE and 1-DE shotgun proteomics approaches. 2-DE profiling of PEG-supernatant and -pellet fractions detected 153 differential spots between R3 and R7 stages, of which 102 proteins were identified. In parallel, 1-DE shotgun proteomics approach identified 598 and 534 proteins in supernatant and pellet fractions of R3 and R7 stages, respectively. MapMan and Gene Ontology analyses showed increased abundance and/or specific accumulation of proteins related to jasmonic acid biosynthesis and defense, while proteins associated with photosynthesis and ROS-detoxification were decreased during leaf senescence. These findings and the generated datasets further our understanding on leaf senescence at protein level, providing a resource for the scientific community. Leaf senescence is a major biological event in the life cycle of plants that leads to the recycling of nutrients. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying leaf senescence still remain poorly understood. Here, we used a combination of gel-based 2-DE and 1-DE shotgun proteomics approaches to dig deeper into the leaf senescence proteome using soybean leaf as a model experimental material. For the identification of low-abundance proteins, polyethylene glycol (PEG) fractionation was employed and both PEG-supernatant and -pellet

  16. Two-dimensional gel-based alkaline proteome of the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majumder, Avishek; Cai, Liyang; Ejby, Morten

    2012-01-01

    Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM (NCFM) is a well‐documented probiotic bacterium isolated from human gut. Detailed 2D gel‐based NCFM proteomics addressed the so‐called alkaline range, i.e., pH 6–11. Proteins were identified in 150 of the 202 spots picked from the Coomassie Brilliant Blue stained 2D...

  17. Towards the entire proteome of the model bacterium Bacillus subtilis by gel-based and gel-free approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolff, Susanne; Antelmann, Haike; Albrecht, Dirk; Becher, Doerte; Bernhardt, Joerg; Bron, Sierd; Buettner, Knut; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Eymann, Christine; Otto, Andreas; Tam, Le Thi; Hecker, Michael

    2007-01-01

    With the emergence of mass spectrometry in protein science and the availability of complete genome sequences, proteomics has gone through a rapid development. The soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis, as one of the first DNA sequenced species, represents a model for Gram-positive bacteria and its proteo

  18. Association Study between BDNF Gene Polymorphisms and Autism by Three-Dimensional Gel-Based Microarray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuhong Lu

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs are important markers which can be used in association studies searching for susceptible genes of complex diseases. High-throughput methods are needed for SNP genotyping in a large number of samples. In this study, we applied polyacrylamide gel-based microarray combined with dual-color hybridization for association study of four BDNF polymorphisms with autism. All the SNPs in both patients and controls could be analyzed quickly and correctly. Among four SNPs, only C270T polymorphism showed significant differences in the frequency of the allele (χ2 = 7.809, p = 0.005 and genotype (χ2 = 7.800, p = 0.020. In the haplotype association analysis, there was significant difference in global haplotype distribution between the groups (χ2 = 28.19,p = 3.44e-005. We suggest that BDNF has a possible role in the pathogenesis of autism. The study also show that the polyacrylamide gel-based microarray combined with dual-color hybridization is a rapid, simple and high-throughput method for SNPs genotyping, and can be used for association study of susceptible gene with disorders in large samples.

  19. Immature Seed Endosperm and Embryo Proteomics of the Lotus (Nelumbo Nucifera Gaertn. by One-Dimensional Gel-Based Tandem Mass Spectrometry and a Comparison with the Mature Endosperm Proteome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo F. Moro

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Lotus (Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn. seed proteome has been the focus of our studies, and we have recently established the first proteome dataset for its mature seed endosperm. The current study unravels the immature endosperm, as well as the embryo proteome, to provide a comprehensive dataset of the lotus seed proteins and a comparison between the mature and immature endosperm tissues across the seed’s development. One-dimensional gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE linked with tandem mass spectrometry provided a protein inventory of the immature endosperm (122 non-redundant proteins and embryo (141 non-redundant proteins tissues. Comparing with the previous mature endosperm dataset (66 non-redundant proteins, a total of 206 non-redundant proteins were identified across all three tissues of the lotus seed. Results revealed some significant differences in proteome composition between the three lotus seed tissues, most notably between the mature endosperm and its immature developmental stage shifting the proteins from nutrient production to nutrient storage.

  20. A Crystallization Study of Nanocrystalline PZT 53/47Granular Arrays Using a Sol-Gel Based Precursor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A. Suárez-Gómez; J.M. Saniger-Blesa; F. Calderón-Pi(n)ar

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we intend to perform a detailed study on the crystallization process of PZT 53/47 nanostructured powders by starting out with an amorphous precursor synthesized by a sol-gel based solution. Our interests also lie in the feasibility for controlling the average grain size of the final structure in the submicron range on an ab initio basis. Purposely, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Raman (Stokes and Anti-Stokes), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are used to examine the microstructural characteristics based on previously reported differential thermal analysis/thermal gravimetric analysis (DTA/TGA) data. The results show a crystallization temperature of 800℃ to attain pure perovskite phase with excellent morphological quality, average grain size <DG>< 300 nm and with average crystallite size <DC><15 nm.

  1. STUDY OF THE DIGESTED SLUDGE DEWATERING EFFECTIVENESS USING POLYELECTROLYTE GEL BASED ON ORGANIC POLYMERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Głodniok

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper addresses the problems connected with sewage sludge dewatering. The premise of the study was the analysis of whether there are opportunities to increase the efficiency of dewatering sludge, a relatively low-cost involving the use of innovative polymers. The authors analyzed the impact of the new type of polyelectrolyte gel on the effectiveness of dewatering sludge. Laboratory studies were carried out at polyelectrolyte dose selection and laboratory testing on the press chamber designed to simulate the actual operation of sludge dewatering system. Two different doses of polyelectrolyte were tested for dose I – 4 ml/m3 and dose II – 8 ml/m3. The conducted analysis on laboratory press showed an increase of sludge dewatering efficiency by about 2% for dose no. I and by about 13% for dose no. II, in comparison to the test without polyelectrolyte.

  2. Combining high-throughput MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and isoelectric focusing gel electrophoresis for virtual 2D gel-based proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohnes, Karen; Quebbemann, Neil R; Liu, Kate; Kobzeff, Fred; Loo, Joseph A; Ogorzalek Loo, Rachel R

    2016-07-15

    The virtual two-dimensional gel electrophoresis/mass spectrometry (virtual 2D gel/MS) technology combines the premier, high-resolution capabilities of 2D gel electrophoresis with the sensitivity and high mass accuracy of mass spectrometry (MS). Intact proteins separated by isoelectric focusing (IEF) gel electrophoresis are imaged from immobilized pH gradient (IPG) polyacrylamide gels (the first dimension of classic 2D-PAGE) by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) MS. Obtaining accurate intact masses from sub-picomole-level proteins embedded in 2D-PAGE gels or in IPG strips is desirable to elucidate how the protein of one spot identified as protein 'A' on a 2D gel differs from the protein of another spot identified as the same protein, whenever tryptic peptide maps fail to resolve the issue. This task, however, has been extremely challenging. Virtual 2D gel/MS provides access to these intact masses. Modifications to our matrix deposition procedure improve the reliability with which IPG gels can be prepared; the new procedure is described. Development of this MALDI MS imaging (MSI) method for high-throughput MS with integrated 'top-down' MS to elucidate protein isoforms from complex biological samples is described and it is demonstrated that a 4-cm IPG gel segment can now be imaged in approximately 5min. Gel-wide chemical and enzymatic methods with further interrogation by MALDI MS/MS provide identifications, sequence-related information, and post-translational/transcriptional modification information. The MSI-based virtual 2D gel/MS platform may potentially link the benefits of 'top-down' and 'bottom-up' proteomics.

  3. Proteomics Study of Cotton Fiber Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jin-yuan

    2008-01-01

    @@ A comparative proteomic analysis was applied to explore the mechanism of fiber cell development in cotton.Initially,an efficient protein preparation method was established for proteomic analysis of developing cotton fibers by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis,and a microwave enhanced ink staining technique also was created for fast and sensitive protein quantification in proteomic studies.

  4. Proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Svend; Stougaard, Jens

    2014-01-01

    proteomics data. Two characteristics of legumes are the high seed protein level and the nitrogen fixing symbiosis. Thus, the majority of the proteomics studies in Lotus have been performed on seed/pod and nodule/root tissues in order to create proteome reference maps and to enable comparative analyses within...... Lotus tissues or toward similar tissues from other legume species. More recently, N-glycan structures and compositions have been determined from mature Lotus seeds using glycomics and glycoproteomics, and finally, phosphoproteomics has been employed...... and annotated Lotus japonicus (Lotus) genome has been essential for obtaining high-quality protein identifications from proteomics studies. Furthermore, additional genomics and transcriptomics studies from several Lotus species/ecotypes support putative gene structures and these can be further supported using...

  5. Comparative gel-based phosphoproteomics in response to signaling molecules

    KAUST Repository

    Marondedze, Claudius

    2013-09-03

    The gel-based proteomics approach is a valuable technique for studying the characteristics of proteins. This technique has diverse applications ranging from analysis of a single protein to the study of the total cellular proteins. Further, protein quality and to some extent distribution can be first assessed by means of one-dimensional gel electrophoresis and then more informatively, for comparative analysis, using the two-dimensional gel electrophoresis technique. Here, we describe how to take advantage of the availability of fluorescent dyes to stain for a selective class of proteins on the same gel for the detection of both phospho- and total proteomes. This enables the co-detection of phosphoproteins as well as total proteins from the same gel and is accomplished by utilizing two different fluorescent stains, the ProQ-Diamond, which stains only phosphorylated proteins, and Sypro Ruby, which stains the entire subset of proteins. This workflow can be applied to gain insights into the regulatory mechanisms induced by signaling molecules such as cyclic nucleotides through the quantification and subsequent identification of responsive phospho- and total proteins. © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013.

  6. Proteome studies of bacterial antibiotic resistance mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranakis, Iosif; Goniotakis, Ioannis; Psaroulaki, Anna; Sandalakis, Vassilios; Tselentis, Yannis; Gevaert, Kris; Tsiotis, Georgios

    2014-01-31

    Ever since antibiotics were used to help humanity battle infectious diseases, microorganisms straight away fought back. Antibiotic resistance mechanisms indeed provide microbes with possibilities to by-pass and survive the action of antibiotic drugs. Several methods have been employed to identify these microbial resistance mechanisms in an ongoing effort to reduce the steadily increasing number of treatment failures due to multi-drug-resistant microbes. Proteomics has evolved to an important tool for this area of research. Following rapid advances in whole genome sequencing, proteomic technologies have been widely used to investigate microbial gene expression. This review highlights the contribution of proteomics in identifying microbial drug resistance mechanisms. It summarizes different proteomic studies on bacteria resistant to different antibiotic drugs. The review further includes an overview of the methodologies used, as well as lists key proteins identified, thus providing the reader not only a summary of research already done, but also directions for future research. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Trends in Microbial Proteomics.

  7. Proteomic Technologies for the Study of Osteosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie D. Byrum

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteosarcoma is the most common primary bone cancer of children and is established during stages of rapid bone growth. The disease is a consequence of immature osteoblast differentiation, which gives way to a rapidly synthesized incompletely mineralized and disorganized bone matrix. The mechanism of osteosarcoma tumorogenesis is poorly understood, and few proteomic studies have been used to interrogate the disease thus far. Accordingly, these studies have identified proteins that have been known to be associated with other malignancies, rather than being osteosarcoma specific. In this paper, we focus on the growing list of available state-of-the-art proteomic technologies and their specific application to the discovery of novel osteosarcoma diagnostic and therapeutic targets. The current signaling markers/pathways associated with primary and metastatic osteosarcoma that have been identified by early-stage proteomic technologies thus far are also described.

  8. Proteomic Study of the Brassinosteroid Signalling Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhiyong Wang

    2012-01-01

    Plant growth is controlled by multiple environmental signals and endogenous hormones.In particular,brassinosteroid (BR) regulates a wide range of developmental processes throughout the life cycle of plants.BR acts through a receptor kinase signalling pathway,and BR signalling crosstalk with many other signalling pathways including light and gibberellin pathways as well as other receptor kinase pathways.My lab uses a combination of genetic,proteomic,and genomic approaches to elucidate not only the BR signaling pathway but also the global organization of the signaling network.We have successfully used proteomics to identify new components of the BR signalling pathway and to elucidated the mechanisms of signal transduction from the BRI1 receptor kinase to the BZR1 transcription factor.We have further uncovered mechanisms of crosstalk between different receptor kinase pathways,and we are dissecting the molecular mechanisms underlying signalling crosstalk and specificity.Our recent proteomic analysis of BR-regulated nuclear proteins has identified a potential link for BR regulation of flowering through RNA splicing and epigenetic mechanisms.I will discuss strategies and potential pitfalls in using proteomics to study signal transduction in plants.

  9. Chemical Component and Proteomic Study of the Amphibalanus (= Balanus amphitrite Shell.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gen Zhang

    Full Text Available As typical biofoulers, barnacles possess hard shells and cause serious biofouling problems. In this study, we analyzed the protein component of the barnacle Amphibalanus (= Balanus amphitrite shell using gel-based proteomics. The results revealed 52 proteins in the A. Amphitrite shell. Among them, 40 proteins were categorized into 11 functional groups based on KOG database, and the remaining 12 proteins were unknown. Besides the known proteins in barnacle shell (SIPC, carbonic anhydrase and acidic acid matrix protein, we also identified chorion peroxidase, C-type lectin-like domains, serine proteases and proteinase inhibitor proteins in the A. Amphitrite shell. The sequences of these proteins were characterized and their potential functions were discussed. Histology and DAPI staining revealed living cells in the shell, which might secrete the shell proteins identified in this study.

  10. From protein catalogues towards targeted proteomics approaches in cereal grains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finnie, Christine; Sultan, Abida; Grasser, Klaus D.

    2011-01-01

    Due to their importance for human nutrition, the protein content of cereal grains has been a subject of intense study for over a century and cereal grains were not surprisingly one of the earliest subjects for 2D-gel-based proteome analysis. Over the last two decades, countless cereal grain...... proteomes, mostly derived using 2D-gel based technologies, have been described and hundreds of proteins identified. However, very little is still known about post-translational modifications, subcellular proteomes, and protein–protein interactions in cereal grains. Development of techniques for improved...... of proteins. These “next-generation” proteomics studies will vastly increase our depth of knowledge about the processes controlling cereal grain development, nutritional and processing characteristics....

  11. The added value of proteomics for toxicological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, I; Serchi, T; Murk, A J; Gutleb, A C

    2014-01-01

    Proteomics has the potential to elucidate complex patterns of toxic action attributed to its unique holistic a posteriori approach. In the case of toxic compounds for which the mechanism of action is not completely understood, a proteomic approach may provide valuable mechanistic insight. This review provides an overview of currently available proteomic techniques, including examples of their application in toxicological in vivo and in vitro studies. Future perspectives for a wider application of state-of-the-art proteomic techniques in the field of toxicology are discussed. The examples concern experiments with dioxins, polychlorinated biphenyls, and polybrominated diphenyl ethers as model compounds, as they exhibit a plethora of sublethal effects, of which some mechanisms were revealed via successful proteomic studies. Generally, this review shows the added value of including proteomics in a modern tool box for toxicological studies.

  12. Recent advances in maize nuclear proteomic studies reveal histone modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casati, Paula

    2012-01-01

    The nucleus of eukaryotic organisms is highly dynamic and complex, containing different types of macromolecules including DNA, RNA, and a wide range of proteins. Novel proteomic applications have led to a better overall determination of nucleus protein content. Although nuclear plant proteomics is only at the initial phase, several studies have been reported and are summarized in this review using different plants species, such as Arabidopsis thaliana, rice, cowpea, onion, garden cress, and barrel clover. These include the description of the total nuclear or phospho-proteome (i.e., Arabidopsis, cowpea, onion), or the analysis of the differential nuclear proteome under different growth environments (i.e., Arabidopsis, rice, cowpea, onion, garden cress, and barrel clover). However, only few reports exist on the analysis of the maize nuclear proteome or its changes under various conditions. This review will present recent data on the study of the nuclear maize proteome, including the analysis of changes in posttranslational modifications in histone proteins.

  13. Quantitative proteomic approaches to studying histone modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zee, Barry M; Young, Nicolas L; Garcia, Benjamin A

    2011-01-01

    Histone post-translational modifications (PTMs) positively and negatively regulate gene expression, and are consequently a vital influence on the genomic profile of all eukaryotic species. The study of histone PTMs using classical methods in molecular biology, such as immunofluorescence and Western blotting, is challenging given the technical issues of the approaches, and chemical diversity and combinatorial patterns of the modifications. In light of these many technical limitations, mass spectrometry (MS) is emerging as the most unbiased and rigorous experimental platform to identify and quantify histone PTMs in a high-throughput manner. This review covers the latest developments in mass spectrometry for the analysis of histone PTMs, with the hope of inspiring the continued integration of proteomic, genomic and epigenetic research.

  14. Proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tølbøll, Trine Højgaard; Danscher, Anne Mette; Andersen, Pia Haubro;

    2012-01-01

    different proteins were identified, with 146 proteins available for identification in C, 279 proteins in D and 269 proteins in L. A functional annotation of the identified proteins was obtained using the on-line Blast2GO tool. Three hundred and sixteen of the identified proteins could be subsequently...... grouped manually to one or more of five major functional groups related to metabolism, cell structure, immunity, apoptosis and angiogenesis. These were chosen to represent basic cell functions and biological processes potentially involved in the pathogenesis of CHD. The LC–MS/MS-based proteomic analysis...

  15. Separation of single-walled carbon nanotubes by gel-based chromatography using surfactant step-gradient techniques and development of new instrumentation for studying SWCNT reaction processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breindel, Leonard M.

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) synthesis methods such as CoMoCATTM, HiPcoTM, pulsed laser vaporization (PLV), and catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) produce several different distributions of (n,m) SWCNT structures, where ( n,m) defines the nanotube diameter and chiral wrapping angle. Post-synthesis processing such as functionalization and/or separations must therefore be employed to yield high purity electronic or single (n,m) samples. Through the use of a surfactant gradient across a gel-based chromatographic column, separations of single (n,m) species can be achieved. Anionic surfactants such as SDS, SDBS, and AOT display different separation effectiveness for single (n,m) species. Results of near-infrared optical absorption for separated SWCNT surfactant suspensions will be discussed, leading to a broader understanding of the important factors necessary for the gel chromatography separation technique. In particular, the effects of SWCNT/surfactant micelle structure are found to be key to achieving fast, simple SWCNT electronic type separations. Additionally, development of new instrumentation for the near-infrared spectrofluorimetric analysis (NIR-SFA) of SWCNTs is useful to the advancement of fundamental SWCNT research and applications. NIR-SFA, for instance, allows for the (n,m) structures of a sample to be identified and monitored during the progress of a chemical reaction or separation experiment. Seeking to achieve the time resolutions necessary for such experiments, the design and optimizations of a system utilizing single-wavelength excitation by diode lasers coupled with a fast NIR detection system are presented.

  16. Proteome-Wide Analysis and Diel Proteomic Profiling of the Cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis PCC 8005

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The filamentous cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis has a long history of use as a food supply and it has been used by the European Space Agency in the MELiSSA project, an artificial microecosystem which supports life during long-term manned space missions. This study assesses progress in the field of cyanobacterial shotgun proteomics and light/dark diurnal cycles by focusing on Arthrospira platensis. Several fractionation workflows including gel-free and gel-based protein/peptide fractionat...

  17. Quantitative proteomics to study carbapenem resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Vishvanath; Tiwari, Monalisa

    2014-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic pathogen causing pneumonia, respiratory infections and urinary tract infections. The prevalence of this lethal pathogen increases gradually in the clinical setup where it can grow on artificial surfaces, utilize ethanol as a carbon source. Moreover it resists desiccation. Carbapenems, a β-lactam, are the most commonly prescribed drugs against A. baumannii. Resistance against carbapenem has emerged in Acinetobacter baumannii which can create significant health problems and is responsible for high morbidity and mortality. With the development of quantitative proteomics, a considerable progress has been made in the study of carbapenem resistance of Acinetobacter baumannii. Recent updates showed that quantitative proteomics has now emerged as an important tool to understand the carbapenem resistance mechanism in Acinetobacter baumannii. Present review also highlights the complementary nature of different quantitative proteomic methods used to study carbapenem resistance and suggests to combine multiple proteomic methods for understanding the response to antibiotics by Acinetobacter baumannii.

  18. Quantitative Proteomics to study Carbapenem Resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishvanath eTiwari

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic pathogen causing pneumonia, respiratory infections and urinary tract infections. The prevalence of this lethal pathogen increases gradually in the clinical setup where it can grow on artificial surfaces, utilize ethanol as a carbon source. Moreover it resists desiccation. Carbapenems, a β-lactam, are the most commonly prescribed drugs against A. baumannii. Resistance against carbapenem has emerged in Acinetobacter baumannii which can create significant health problems and is responsible for high morbidity & mortality. With the development of quantitative proteomics, a considerable progress has been made in the study of carbapenem resistance of Acinetobacter baumannii. Recent updates showed that quantitative proteomics has now emerged as an important tool to understand the carbapenem resistance mechanism in Acinetobacter baumannii. Present review also highlights the complementary nature of different quantitative proteomic methods used to study carbapenem resistance and suggests to combine multiple proteomic methods for understanding the response to antibiotics by Acinetobacter baumannii.

  19. Application of Proteomics in the Study of Tumor Metastasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen Cai; Jen-Fu Chiu; Qing-Yu He

    2004-01-01

    Tumor metastasis is the dominant cause of death in cancer patients. However, the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying tumor metastasis are still elusive.The identification of protein molecules with their expressions correlated to the metastatic process would help to understand the metastatic mechanisms and thus facilitate the development of strategies for the therapeutic interventions and clinical management of cancer. Proteomics is a systematic research approach aiming to provide the global characterization of protein expression and function under given conditions. Proteomic technology has been widely used in biomarker discovery and pathogenetic studies including tumor metastasis. This article provides a brief review of the application of proteomics in identifying molecular factors in tumor metastasis process. The combination of proteomics with other experimental approaches in biochemistry, cell biology, molecular genetics and chemistry, together with the development of new technologies and improvements in existing method ologies will continue to extend its application in studying cancer metastasis.

  20. Recent advances in maize nuclear proteomic studies reveal histone modifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula eCasati

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The nucleus of eukaryotic organisms is highly dynamic and complex, containing different types of macromolecules including DNA, RNA, and a wide range of proteins. Novel proteomic applications have led to a better overall determination of nucleus protein content. Although nuclear plant proteomics is only at the initial phase, several studies have been reported and are summarized in this review using different plants species, such as Arabidopsis thaliana, rice, cowpea, onion, garden cress, and barrel clover. These include the description of the total nuclear or phospho-proteome (i.e. Arabidopsis, cowpea, onion, or the analysis of the differential nuclear proteome under different growth environments (i.e. Arabidopsis, rice, cowpea, onion, garden cress and barrel clover. However, only few reports exist on the analysis of the maize nuclear proteome or its changes under various conditions. This review will present recent data on the study of the nuclear maize proteome, including the analysis of changes in posttranslational modifications in histone proteins.

  1. Proteomic Study to Survey the CIGB-552 Antitumor Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arielis Rodríguez-Ulloa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available CIGB-552 is a cell-penetrating peptide that exerts in vitro and in vivo antitumor effect on cancer cells. In the present work, the mechanism involved in such anticancer activity was studied using chemical proteomics and expression-based proteomics in culture cancer cell lines. CIGB-552 interacts with at least 55 proteins, as determined by chemical proteomics. A temporal differential proteomics based on iTRAQ quantification method was performed to identify CIGB-552 modulated proteins. The proteomic profile includes 72 differentially expressed proteins in response to CIGB-552 treatment. Proteins related to cell proliferation and apoptosis were identified by both approaches. In line with previous findings, proteomic data revealed that CIGB-552 triggers the inhibition of NF-κB signaling pathway. Furthermore, proteins related to cell invasion were differentially modulated by CIGB-552 treatment suggesting new potentialities of CIGB-552 as anticancer agent. Overall, the current study contributes to a better understanding of the antitumor action mechanism of CIGB-552.

  2. What gastric cancer proteomic studies show about gastric carcinogenesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Mariana Ferreira; Wisnieski, Fernanda; de Oliveira Gigek, Carolina; do Santos, Leonardo Caires; Calcagno, Danielle Queiroz; Burbano, Rommel Rodriguez; Smith, Marilia Cardoso

    2016-08-01

    Gastric cancer is a complex, heterogeneous, and multistep disease. Over the past decades, several studies have aimed to determine the molecular factors that lead to gastric cancer development and progression. After completing the human genome sequencing, proteomic technologies have presented rapid progress. Differently from the relative static state of genome, the cell proteome is dynamic and changes in pathologic conditions. Proteomic approaches have been used to determine proteome profiles and identify differentially expressed proteins between groups of samples, such as neoplastic and nonneoplastic samples or between samples of different cancer subtypes or stages. Therefore, proteomic technologies are a useful tool toward improving the knowledge of gastric cancer molecular pathogenesis and the understanding of tumor heterogeneity. This review aimed to summarize the proteins or protein families that are frequently identified by using high-throughput screening methods and which thus may have a key role in gastric carcinogenesis. The increased knowledge of gastric carcinogenesis will clearly help in the development of new anticancer treatments. Although the studies are still in their infancy, the reviewed proteins may be useful for gastric cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and patient management.

  3. Proteomic studies of drought stress response in Fabaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja ZADRAŽNIK

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Drought stress is a serious threat to crop production that influences plant growth and development and subsequently causes reduced quantity and quality of the yield. Plant stress induces changes in cell metabolism, which includes differential expression of proteins. Proteomics offer a powerful approach to analyse proteins involved in drought stress response of plants. Analyses of changes in protein abundance of legumes under drought stress are very important, as legumes play an important role in human and animal diet and are often exposed to drought. The presented results of proteomic studies of selected legumes enable better understanding of molecular mechanisms of drought stress response. The study of drought stress response of plants with proteomic approach may contribute to the development of potential drought-response markers and to the development of drought-tolerant cultivars of different legume crop species.

  4. Population proteomics: an emerging discipline to study metapopulation ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biron, David G; Loxdale, Hugh D; Ponton, Fleur; Moura, Hercules; Marché, Laurent; Brugidou, Christophe; Thomas, Frédéric

    2006-03-01

    Proteomics research has developed until recently in a relative isolation from other fast-moving disciplines such as ecology and evolution. This is unfortunate since applying proteomics to these disciplines has apparently the potential to open new perspectives. The huge majority of species indeed exhibit over their entire geographic range a metapopulation structure, occupying habitats that are fragmented and heterogeneous in space and/or through time. Traditionally, population genetics is the main tool used to studying metatopulations, as it describes the spatial structure of populations and the level of gene flow between them. In this Viewpoint, we present the reasons why we think that proteomics, because of the level of integration it promotes, has the potential to resolve interesting issues specific to metapopulation biology and adaptive processes.

  5. A proteomics study of colostrum and milk from the two major small ruminant dairy breeds from the Canary Islands: a bovine milk comparison perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Castellano, Lorenzo E; Almeida, André M; Renaut, Jenny; Argüello, Anastasio; Castro, Noemí

    2016-08-01

    Colostrum and milk feeding are key factors for the newborn ruminant survival, affecting the future performance of the animal. Nowadays, there is an increasing interest in the potential of feeding newborn ruminants (mainly goat kids and lambs) with colostrum and milk from other more productive ruminant species (mainly cows). Although some studies regarding differences between colostrum and milk from these three species have been performed, herein we conduct for the first time a comparison using a proteomics 2-Dimensional Electrophoresis gel-based approach between these three ruminant species. In this study colostrum and milk samples from six Holstein cows, six Canarian sheep and six Majorera goats were used to determine the chemical composition, immunoglobulin G (IgG) and M (IgM) concentrations and proteomics profiles. Results showed that in general sheep colostrum and milk contained higher fat, protein and lactose percentages compared to bovine and goat samples. Additionally, no differences in the IgG or IgM concentrations were found among any of the three studied species, with the exception of sheep colostrum that showed the highest IgM concentration. With reference to the proteomics-based approach, some high abundant proteins such as serum albumin precursor, beta-caseins or different immunoglobulins components were found in colostrum, milk or even both. Nevertheless, differences in other proteins with immune function such as serotransferrin or lactoperoxidase were detected. This study shows that despite the similar immunoglobulin concentrations in colostrum and milk from the three studied species, differences in several immune components can be detected when these samples are studied using a proteomics approach. Finally, this study also provides a base for future investigation in colostrum and milk proteomics and metabolomics.

  6. Using proteomics to study sexual reproduction in angiosperms

    Science.gov (United States)

    While a relative latecomer to the post-genomics era of functional biology, the application of mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis has increased exponentially over the past 10 years. Some of this increase is the result of transition of chemists physicists, and mathematicians to the study of ...

  7. Proteomic approaches to study the pig intestinal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, Laura; Niewold, Theo A; Moreno, Ángela; Garrido, Juan Jose

    2014-03-01

    One of the major challenges in pig production is managing digestive health to maximize feed conversion and growth rates, but also to minimize treatment costs and to warrant public health. There is a great interest in the development of useful tools for intestinal health monitoring and the investigation of possible prophylactic/ therapeutic intervention pathways. A great variety of in vivo and in vitro intestinal models of study have been developed in the recent years. The understanding of such a complex system as the intestinal system (IS), and the study of its physiology and pathology is not an easy task. Analysis of such a complex system requires the use of systems biology techniques, like proteomics. However, for a correct interpretation of results and to maximize analysis performance, a careful selection of the IS model of study and proteomic platform is required. The study of the IS system is especially important in the pig, a species whose farming requires a very careful management of husbandry procedures regarding feeding and nutrition. The incorrect management of the pig digestive system leads directly to economic losses related suboptimal growth and feed utilization and/or the appearance of intestinal infections, in particular diarrhea. Furthermore, this species is the most suitable experimental model for human IS studies. Proteomics has risen as one of the most promising approaches to study the pig IS. In this review, we describe the most useful models of IS research in porcine and the different proteomic platforms available. An overview of the recent findings in pig IS proteomics is also provided.

  8. Quantitative proteomic analyses of crop seedlings subjected to stress conditions; a commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanjo, Yohei; Nouri, Mohammad-Zaman; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2011-07-01

    Quantitative proteomics is one of the analytical approaches used to clarify crop responses to stress conditions. Recent remarkable advances in proteomics technologies allow for the identification of a wider range of proteins than was previously possible. Current proteomic methods fall into roughly two categories: gel-based quantification methods, including conventional two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis, and MS-based quantification methods consists of label-based and label-free protein quantification approaches. Although MS-based quantification methods have become mainstream in recent years, gel-based quantification methods are still useful for proteomic analyses. Previous studies examining crop responses to stress conditions reveal that each method has both advantages and disadvantages in regard to protein quantification in comparative proteomic analyses. Furthermore, one proteomics approach cannot be fully substituted by another technique. In this review, we discuss and highlight the basis and applications of quantitative proteomic analysis approaches in crop seedlings in response to flooding and osmotic stress as two environmental stresses.

  9. Preparation and corrosion resistance studies of nanometric sol-gel-based CeO{sub 2} film with a chromium-free pretreatment on AZ91D magnesium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Shiyan [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Li Qing, E-mail: liqingswu@yeah.ne [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Chen Bo [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Yang Xiaokui [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China)

    2010-01-01

    Magnesium alloy, although valuable, is reactive and requires protection before it can be applied in many fields. In this study, a novel protective environmental-friendly gradient coating was performed on AZ91D magnesium alloy by non-chromate surface treatments, which consisted of phytic acid chemical conversion coating and the sol-gel-based CeO{sub 2} thin film. The surface morphologies, microstructure and composition of the coatings were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy disperse spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. The corrosion resistance of the coatings was evaluated by potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. The effects of the concentration, layers, temperature of heat treatment of CeO{sub 2} sol on the anti-corrosion properties of the gradient coating for magnesium were also investigated. The results showed that the gradient coating was mainly composed of crystalline CeO{sub 2}. According to the results of electrochemical tests, the corrosion resistance of AZ91D magnesium alloy was found to be greatly improved by means of this new environmental-friendly surface treatment.

  10. Application of Proteomics to the Study of Pollination Drops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Prior

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Pollination drops are a formative component in gymnosperm pollen-ovule interactions. Proteomics offers a direct method for the discovery of proteins associated with this early stage of sexual reproduction. Methods: Pollination drops were sampled from eight gymnosperm species: Chamaecyparis lawsoniana (Port Orford cedar, Ephedra monosperma, Ginkgo biloba, Juniperus oxycedrus (prickly juniper, Larix ×marschlinsii, Pseudotsuga menziesii (Douglas-fir, Taxus ×media, and Welwitschia mirabilis. Drops were collected by micropipette using techniques focused on preventing sample contamination. Drop proteins were separated using both gel and gel-free methods. Tandem mass spectrometric methods were used including a triple quadrupole and an Orbitrap. Results: Proteins are present in all pollination drops. Consistency in the protein complement over time was shown in L. ×marschlinsii. Representative mass spectra from W. mirabilis chitinase peptide and E. monosperma serine carboxypeptidase peptide demonstrated high quality results. We provide a summary of gymnosperm pollination drop proteins that have been discovered to date via proteomics. Discussion: Using proteomic methods, a dozen classes of proteins have been identified to date. Proteomics presents a way forward in deepening our understanding of the biological function of pollination drops.

  11. Quantitative Proteomic Approaches for Studying Phosphotyrosine Signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Shi-Jian; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-02-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation is a fundamental mechanism for controlling many aspects of cellular processes, as well as aspects of human health and diseases. Compared to phosphoserine (pSer) and phosphothreonine (pThr), phosphotyrosine (pTyr) signaling is more tightly regulated, but often more challenging to characterize due to significantly lower level of tyrosine phosphorylation (a relative abundance of 1800:200:1 was estimated for pSer/pThr/pTyr in vertebrate cells[1]). In this review, we outline the recent advances in analytical methodologies for enrichment, identification, and accurate quantitation of tyrosine phosphorylated proteins and peptides using antibody-based technologies, capillary liquid chromatography (LC) coupled with mass spectrometry (MS), and various stable isotope labeling strategies, as well as non-MS-based methods such as protein or peptide array methods. These proteomic technological advances provide powerful tools for potentially understanding signal transduction at the system level and provide a basis for discovering novel drug targets for human diseases. [1] Hunter, T. (1998) The Croonian Lecture 1997. The phosphorylation of proteins on tyrosine: its role in cell growth and disease. Philos. Trans. R. Soc. Lond. B Biol. Sci. 353, 583–605

  12. Intestinal proteome changes during infant necrotizing enterocolitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Pingping; Smith, Birgitte; Qvist, Niels;

    2013-01-01

    Background: Changes in the intestinal and colonic proteome in patients with necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) may help to characterize the disease pathology and identify new biomarkers and treatment targets for NEC. Methods: Using gel-based proteomics, proteins in NEC-affected intestinal and coloni...

  13. A proteomics study of auxin effects in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meiqing Xing; Hongwei Xue

    2012-01-01

    Many phytohormones regulate plant growth and development through modulating protein degradation.In this study,a proteome study based on multidimensional non-gel shotgun approach was performed to analyze the auxin-induced protein degradation via ubiquitinproteasome pathway of Arabidopsis thaliana,with the emphasis to study the overall protein changes after auxin treatment (1 nM or 1 μM indole-3-acetic acid for 6,12,or 24 h).More than a thousand proteins were detected by using label-free shotgun method,and 386 increased proteins and 370 decreased ones were identified after indole-3-acetic acid treatment.By using the auxin receptor-deficient mutant,tir1-1,as control,comparative analysis revealed that 69 and 79 proteins were significantly decreased and increased,respectively.Detailed analysis showed that among the altered proteins,some were previously reported to be associated with auxin regulation and others are potentially involved in mediating the auxin effects on specific cellular and physiological processes by regulating photosynthesis,chloroplast development,cytoskeleton,and intracellular signaling.Our results demonstrated that label-free shotgun proteomics is a powerful tool for large-scale protein identification and the analysis of the proteomic profiling of auxin-regulated biological processes will provide informative clues of underlying mechanisms of auxin effects.These results will help to expand the understanding of how auxin regulates plant growth and development via protein degradation.

  14. Proteomic study on gender differences in aging kidney of mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristobal Susana

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study aims to analyze sex differences in mice aging kidney. We applied a proteomic technique based on subfractionation, and liquid chromatography coupled with 2-DE. Samples from male and female CD1-Swiss outbred mice from 28 weeks, 52 weeks, and 76 weeks were analysed by 2-DE, and selected proteins were identified by matrix assisted laser desorption ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS. Results This proteomic analysis detected age-related changes in protein expression in 55 protein-spots, corresponding to 22 spots in males and 33 spots in females. We found a protein expression signature (PES of aging composed by 8 spots, common for both genders. The identified proteins indicated increases in oxidative and proteolytic proteins and decreases in glycolytic proteins, and antioxidant enzymes. Conclusion Our results provide insights into the gender differences associated to the decline of kidney function in aging. Thus, we show that proteomics can provide valuable information on age-related changes in expression levels of proteins and related modifications. This pilot study is still far from providing candidates for aging-biomarkers. However, we suggest that the analysis of these proteins could suggest mechanisms of cellular aging in kidney, and improve the kidney selection for transplantation.

  15. Mitochondria in metabolic disease: getting clues from proteomic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peinado, Juan R; Diaz-Ruiz, Alberto; Frühbeck, Gema; Malagon, Maria M

    2014-03-01

    Mitochondria play a key role as major regulators of cellular energy homeostasis, but in the context of mitochondrial dysfunction, mitochondria may generate reactive oxidative species and induce cellular apoptosis. Indeed, altered mitochondrial status has been linked to the pathogenesis of several metabolic disorders and specially disorders related to insulin resistance, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes, and other comorbidities comprising the metabolic syndrome. In the present review, we summarize information from various mitochondrial proteomic studies of insulin-sensitive tissues under different metabolic states. To that end, we first focus our attention on the pancreas, as mitochondrial malfunction has been shown to contribute to beta cell failure and impaired insulin release. Furthermore, proteomic studies of mitochondria obtained from liver, muscle, and adipose tissue are summarized, as these tissues constitute the primary insulin target metabolic tissues. Since recent advances in proteomic techniques have exposed the importance of PTMs in the development of metabolic disease, we also present information on specific PTMs that may directly affect mitochondria during the pathogenesis of metabolic disease. Specifically, mitochondrial protein acetylation, phosphorylation, and other PTMs related to oxidative damage, such as nitrosylation and carbonylation, are discussed. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Proteomic Studies on Human and Experimental Cerebral Malaria

    KAUST Repository

    Moussa, Ehab

    2012-07-01

    Cerebral malaria (CM) is a severe neurological complication of malaria infection that results from interrelated pathologies. Despite extensive research efforts, the mechanism of the disease is not completely understood. Clinical studies, postmortem analysis, and animal models have been the main research arenas in CM. In this thesis, shotgun proteomics approach was used to further understand the pathology of human and experimental CM. The mechanism by which CM turns fatal is yet to be identified. A clinical proteomics study was conducted on pooled plasma samples from children with reversible or fatal CM from the Gambia. The results show that depletion of coagulation factors and increased levels of circulating proteasomes are associated with fatal pediatric CM. This data suggests that the ongoing coagulation during CM might be a disseminated intravascular coagulation state that eventually causes depletion of the coagulation factors leading to petechial hemorrhages. In addition, the mechanism(s) by which blood transfusion benefits CM in children was investigated. To that end, the concentration and multimerization pattern of von-willebrand factor, and the concentration of haptoglobin in the plasma of children with CM who received blood transfusions were measured. In addition to clinical studies, experimental cerebral malaria (ECM) in mice has been long used as a model for the disease. A shotgun proteomics workflow was optimized to identify the proteomic signature of the brain tissue of mice with ECM.Because of the utmost importance of membrane proteins in the pathology of the disease, sample fractionation and filter aided sample preparation were used to recover them. The proteomic signature of the brains of mice infected with P. berghei ANKA that developed neurological syndrome, mice infected with P. berghei NK56 that developed severe malaria but without neurological signs, and non-infected mice, were compared to identify CM specific proteins. Among the differentially

  17. Proteome-wide analysis and diel proteomic profiling of the cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis PCC 8005.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Matallana-Surget

    Full Text Available The filamentous cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis has a long history of use as a food supply and it has been used by the European Space Agency in the MELiSSA project, an artificial microecosystem which supports life during long-term manned space missions. This study assesses progress in the field of cyanobacterial shotgun proteomics and light/dark diurnal cycles by focusing on Arthrospira platensis. Several fractionation workflows including gel-free and gel-based protein/peptide fractionation procedures were used and combined with LC-MS/MS analysis, enabling the overall identification of 1306 proteins, which represents 21% coverage of the theoretical proteome. A total of 30 proteins were found to be significantly differentially regulated under light/dark growth transition. Interestingly, most of the proteins showing differential abundance were related to photosynthesis, the Calvin cycle and translation processes. A novel aspect and major achievement of this work is the successful improvement of the cyanobacterial proteome coverage using a 3D LC-MS/MS approach, based on an immobilized metal affinity chromatography, a suitable tool that enabled us to eliminate the most abundant protein, the allophycocyanin. We also demonstrated that cell growth follows a light/dark cycle in A. platensis. This preliminary proteomic study has highlighted new characteristics of the Arthrospira platensis proteome in terms of diurnal regulation.

  18. Proteome-wide analysis and diel proteomic profiling of the cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis PCC 8005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matallana-Surget, Sabine; Derock, Jérémy; Leroy, Baptiste; Badri, Hanène; Deschoenmaeker, Frédéric; Wattiez, Ruddy

    2014-01-01

    The filamentous cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis has a long history of use as a food supply and it has been used by the European Space Agency in the MELiSSA project, an artificial microecosystem which supports life during long-term manned space missions. This study assesses progress in the field of cyanobacterial shotgun proteomics and light/dark diurnal cycles by focusing on Arthrospira platensis. Several fractionation workflows including gel-free and gel-based protein/peptide fractionation procedures were used and combined with LC-MS/MS analysis, enabling the overall identification of 1306 proteins, which represents 21% coverage of the theoretical proteome. A total of 30 proteins were found to be significantly differentially regulated under light/dark growth transition. Interestingly, most of the proteins showing differential abundance were related to photosynthesis, the Calvin cycle and translation processes. A novel aspect and major achievement of this work is the successful improvement of the cyanobacterial proteome coverage using a 3D LC-MS/MS approach, based on an immobilized metal affinity chromatography, a suitable tool that enabled us to eliminate the most abundant protein, the allophycocyanin. We also demonstrated that cell growth follows a light/dark cycle in A. platensis. This preliminary proteomic study has highlighted new characteristics of the Arthrospira platensis proteome in terms of diurnal regulation.

  19. Proteome research in food science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pischetsrieder, Monika; Baeuerlein, Rainer

    2009-09-01

    The proteome is the totality of proteins present in a biological sample. In contrast to the static genome, the proteome is highly dynamic, influenced by the genome and many external factors, such as the state of development, tissue type, metabolic state, and various interactions. Thus, the proteome reflects very closely the biological (and chemical) processes occurring in a system. For proteome analysis, gel based and shotgun methods are most widely applied. Because of the potential to generate a systematic view of protein composition and biological as well as chemical interactions, the application of proteome analysis in food science is steadily growing. This tutorial review introduces several fields in food science, where proteomics has been successfully applied: analysis of food composition, safety assessment of genetically modified food, the search for marker proteins for food authentication, identification of food allergens, systematic analysis of the physiological activity of food, analysis of the effects of processing on food proteins and the improvement of food quality.

  20. Cordyceps cicadae induces G2/M cell cycle arrest in MHCC97H human hepatocellular carcinoma cells: a proteomic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Cordyceps cicadae is a medicinal fungus that is often used for treating cancer. However, the anticancer mechanisms of C. cicadae are largely unknown. This study aims to investigate the anticancer mechanisms of C. cicadae against hepatocellular carcinoma cells in vitro using a proteomic approach. Methods Human hepatocellular carcinoma MHCC97H cells were treated with a water extract of C. cicadae (0, 100, 250, 500, and 1000 μg/mL) for 48 h and harvested for cell viability assays. The significant differences in protein expression between control and C. cicadae-treated cells were analyzed by two-dimensional gel-based proteomics coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry. Flow cytometry analysis was employed to investigate the cell cycle and cell death. The anticancer molecular mechanism was analyzed by whole proteome mapping. Results The water extract of C. cicadae (0, 100, 250, 500, and 1000 μg/mL) inhibited the growth of MHCC97H cells in a dose-dependent manner via G2/M phase cell cycle arrest with no evidence of apoptosis. Among the identified proteins with upregulated expression were dynactin subunit 2, N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1, heat shock protein beta-1, alpha-enolase isoform 1, phosphatidylinositol transfer protein, and WD repeat-containing protein 1. Meanwhile, the proteins with downregulated expression were 14-3-3 gamma, BUB3, microtubule-associated protein RP/EB family member 1, thioredoxin-like protein, chloride intracellular channel protein 1, ectonucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase 5, xaa-Pro dipeptidase, enoyl-CoA delta isomerase 1, protein-disulfide isomerase-related chaperone Erp29, hnRNP 2H9B, peroxiredoxin 1, WD-40 repeat protein, and serine/threonine kinase receptor-associated protein. Conclusion The water extract of C. cicadae reduced the growth of human hepatocellular carcinoma MHCC97H cells via G2/M cell cycle arrest. PMID:24872842

  1. The added value of proteomics for toxicological studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miller, I.; Serchi, T.; Murk, A.J.; Gutleb, A.C.

    2014-01-01

    Proteomics has the potential to elucidate complex patterns of toxic action attributed to its unique holistic a posteriori approach. In the case of toxic compounds for which the mechanism of action is not completely understood, a proteomic approach may provide valuable mechanistic insight. This revie

  2. The application of proteomic approaches to the study of mammalian spermatogenesis and sperm function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macleod, Graham; Varmuza, Susannah

    2013-11-01

    Spermatogenesis is the process by which terminally differentiated sperm are produced from male germline stem cells. This complex developmental process requires the coordination of both somatic and germ cells through phases of proliferation, meiosis, and morphological differentiation, to produce the cell responsible for the delivery of the paternal genome. With infertility affecting ~ 15% of all couples, furthering our understanding of spermatogenesis and sperm function is vital for improving the diagnosis and treatment of male factor infertility. The emerging use of proteomic technologies has played an instrumental role in our understanding of spermatogenesis by providing information regarding the genes involved. This article reviews existing proteomic literature regarding spermatogenesis and sperm function, including the proteomic characterization of spermatogenic cell types, subcellular proteomics, post-translational modifications, interactomes, and clinical studies. Future directions in the application of proteomics to the study of spermatogenesis and sperm function are also discussed.

  3. Exposure to an extremely low-frequency electromagnetic field only slightly modifies the proteome of Chromobacterium violaceum ATCC 12472

    OpenAIRE

    Baraúna, Rafael A.; Santos, Agenor V; Graças, Diego A.; Daniel M. Santos; Rubens Ghilardi Júnior; Adriano M. C. Pimenta; Marta S.P. Carepo; Maria P.C. Schneider; Artur Silva

    2015-01-01

    Several studies of the physiological responses of different organisms exposed to extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) have been described. In this work, we report the minimal effects of in situ exposure to ELF-EMF on the global protein expression of Chromobacterium violaceum using a gel-based proteomic approach. The protein expression profile was only slightly altered, with five differentially expressed proteins detected in the exposed cultures; two of these proteins (DNA-...

  4. Proteomic approaches to the study of renal mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuma, Zdenek; Kuncova, Jitka; Mares, Jan; Grundmanova, Martina; Matejovic, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Dysfunction of kidney mitochondria plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of a number of renal diseases. Proteomics represents an untargeted attempt to reveal the remodeling of mitochondrial proteins during disease. Combination of separation methods and mass spectrometry allows identification and quantitative analysis of mitochondrial proteins including protein complexes. The aim of this review is to summarize the methods and applications of proteomics to renal mitochondria. Using keywords "mitochondria", "kidney", "proteomics", scientific databases (PubMed and Web of knowledge) were searched from 2000 to August 2015 for articles describing methods and applications of proteomics to analysis of mitochondrial proteins in kidney. Included were publications on mitochondrial proteins in kidneys of humans and animal model in health and disease. Proteomics of renal mitochondria has been/is mostly used in diabetes, hypertension, acidosis, nephrotoxicity and renal cancer. Integration of proteomics with other methods for examining protein activity is promising for insight into the role of renal mitochondria in pathological states. Several challenges were identified: selection of appropriate model organism, sensitivity of analytical methods and analysis of mitochondrial proteome in different renal zones/biopsies in the course of various kidney disorders.

  5. Subcellular Proteomics of Soybean under Flooding Stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Setsuko Komatsu

    2012-01-01

    Flooding is an environmental stress found worldwide and may increase in frequency due to changes in global climate,and causes significant reductions in the growth and yield of several crops.The application of proteomics techniques to clarify the molecular mechanisms underlying crop responses to flooding stress may facilitate the development of flood tolerant crops.To understand the response mechanism of soybean under flooding stress,proteomics analysis was carried out.Especially,subcellular proteomics studies have led to a better understanding of the mechanism of flooding stress tolerance in soybean.The effects of flooding stress on root plasma membrane were analyzed using an aqueous two-phase partitioning method in combination with gel-based and gel-free proteomics techniques.The results led to the following conclusions:proteins located in the cell wall were increased in the plasma membrane of flooded plants,indicating the contribution of plasma membrane to modification of the cell wall; superoxide dismutase was increased,indicating that the antioxidative system may play a crucial role in protecting cells from oxidative damage following exposure to flooding stress; heat shock cognate 70 kDa protein likely plays a significant role in protecting other proteins from denaturation and degradation during flooding stress; and signaling proteins might work cooperatively to regulate plasma membrane H +-ATPase and maintain ion homeostasis.Cell wall proteins were isolated from root of flooding stressed plants via sucrose gradient centrifugation and analyzed using gel-based proteomics technique.Cell wall proteins identified were related to lignification,and these results indicated that a decrease of lignification-related proteins is related to flooding decreased ROS and jasmonate biosynthesis.And also,lignin staining confirmed that lignification was suppressed in the roots of flooding stressed soybeans.Mitochondrial fractions were purified from root of flooding stressed

  6. [Progress in Proteomic Study of the Penicillin Producer---Penicillium Chrysogenum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shun; Wang, Peihong; Zhang, Nan; Gao, Ruichang

    2015-12-01

    Penicillin is a kind of β-lactam drug which has been applied in the clinical treatment firstly in the world, and it has still been widely used at present. The synthesis and regulation mechanism of Penicillium chrysogenum, which is used to produce penicillin, has been studied quite maturely, but its proteomics research started relatively late and fewer reports were published. This paper reviews the synthesis and application of penicillin, transformation of Penicillium chrysogenum, and the research progress of its proteomics. On this basis, the study highlights the advantages of proteomics in the research of protein expression.

  7. EPIC-DB: a proteomics database for studying Apicomplexan organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angeletti Ruth

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High throughput proteomics experiments are useful for analyzing the protein expression of an organism, identifying the correct gene structure of a genome, or locating possible post-translational modifications within proteins. High throughput methods necessitate publicly accessible and easily queried databases for efficiently and logically storing, displaying, and analyzing the large volume of data. Description EPICDB is a publicly accessible, queryable, relational database that organizes and displays experimental, high throughput proteomics data for Toxoplasma gondii and Cryptosporidium parvum. Along with detailed information on mass spectrometry experiments, the database also provides antibody experimental results and analysis of functional annotations, comparative genomics, and aligned expressed sequence tag (EST and genomic open reading frame (ORF sequences. The database contains all available alternative gene datasets for each organism, which comprises a complete theoretical proteome for the respective organism, and all data is referenced to these sequences. The database is structured around clusters of protein sequences, which allows for the evaluation of redundancy, protein prediction discrepancies, and possible splice variants. The database can be expanded to include genomes of other organisms for which proteome-wide experimental data are available. Conclusion EPICDB is a comprehensive database of genome-wide T. gondii and C. parvum proteomics data and incorporates many features that allow for the analysis of the entire proteomes and/or annotation of specific protein sequences. EPICDB is complementary to other -genomics- databases of these organisms by offering complete mass spectrometry analysis on a comprehensive set of all available protein sequences.

  8. The impact of growth hormone on proteomic profiles: a review of mouse and adult human studies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Silvana Duran-Ortiz; Alison L Brittain; John J Kopchick

    2017-01-01

    .... For instance, GH increases skeletal muscle and decreases adipose tissue mass. Our laboratory has spent the past two decades studying these effects, including the effects of GH excess and depletion, on the proteome of several mouse and human tissues...

  9. Application of Proteomics to the Study of Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Some Related Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yueguo Li; Xin Geng; Weiming Zhang

    2005-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is a malignant tumor causing one of the highest death rates in the world. Viral hepatitis, hepatic fibrosis and hepatocirrhosis etc. Are some of the most important causes of hepatocellular carcinoma. With the advent of the post-genomic age, studying carcinoma and some related diseases using the developing technology of proteomics has become a major focus of researchers. This article is a review of the application of proteomics to study hepatocellular carcinoma and some related diseases.

  10. [Application of modification-specific proteomics in the meat-quality study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Pu; Jia, Luo; Linyuan, Shen; Xuewei, Li; Shunhua, Zhang; Li, Zhu

    2015-04-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) play an important role in life science. The most widely studied protein modifications in biological science include protein phosphorylation, acylation, glycosylation, ubiquitination, acetylation, oxidation, methylation and so on. This review outlines current achievements in the study of protein modifications in muscle food using proteomic approaches. First we describe the general knowledge of protein modifications and then the development of proteomic approaches for the characterization of such modifications. Second, we describe the effects of protein modifications on muscle foods and devote our main attention to the application of proteomic approaches for the analysis of these modifications. We conclude that proteomics analysis is powerful for the study of protein modifications and analysis of meat quality characteristics in the process of food production.

  11. Proteomic Studies of Cholangiocarcinoma and Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Secretomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantragan Srisomsap

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC occur with relatively high incidence in Thailand. The secretome, proteins secreted from cancer cells, are potentially useful as biomarkers of the diseases. Proteomic analysis was performed on the secreted proteins of cholangiocarcinoma (HuCCA-1 and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC-S102, HepG2, SK-Hep-1, and Alexander cell lines. The secretomes of the five cancer cell lines were analyzed by SDS-PAGE combined with LC/MS/MS. Sixty-eight proteins were found to be expressed only in HuCCA-1. Examples include neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (lipocalin 2, laminin 5 beta 3, cathepsin D precursor, desmoplakin, annexin IV variant, and annexin A5. Immunoblotting was used to confirm the presence of lipocalin 2 in conditioned media and cell lysate of 5 cell lines. The results showed that lipocalin 2 was a secreted protein which is expressed only in the conditioned media of the cholangiocarcinoma cell line. Study of lipocalin 2 expression in different types of cancer and normal tissues from cholangiocarcinoma patients showed that lipocalin 2 was expressed only in the cancer tissues. We suggest that lipocalin 2 may be a potential biomarker for cholangiocarcinoma.

  12. A Proteomic Study of Clavibacter Michiganensis Subsp. Michiganensis Culture Supernatants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Hiery

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Clavibacter michiganensis, subsp. michiganensis is a Gram-positive plant pathogen infecting tomato (Solanum lycopersicum. Despite a considerable economic importance due to significant losses of infected plants and fruits, knowledge about virulence factors of C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis and host-pathogen interactions on a molecular level are rather limited. In the study presented here, the proteome of culture supernatants from C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis NCPPB382 was analyzed. In total, 1872 proteins were identified in M9 and 1766 proteins in xylem mimicking medium. Filtration of supernatants before protein precipitation reduced these to 1276 proteins in M9 and 976 proteins in the xylem mimicking medium culture filtrate. The results obtained indicate that C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis reacts to a sucrose- and glucose-depleted medium similar to the xylem sap by utilizing amino acids and host cell polymers as well as their degradation products, mainly peptides, amino acids and various C5 and C6 sugars. Interestingly, the bacterium expresses the previously described virulence factors Pat-1 and CelA not exclusively after host cell contact in planta but already in M9 minimal and xylem mimicking medium.

  13. A Proteomic Study of Clavibacter Michiganensis Subsp. Michiganensis Culture Supernatants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiery, Eva; Poetsch, Ansgar; Moosbauer, Tanja; Amin, Bushra; Hofmann, Jörg; Burkovski, Andreas

    2015-11-12

    Clavibacter michiganensis, subsp. michiganensis is a Gram-positive plant pathogen infecting tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). Despite a considerable economic importance due to significant losses of infected plants and fruits, knowledge about virulence factors of C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis and host-pathogen interactions on a molecular level are rather limited. In the study presented here, the proteome of culture supernatants from C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis NCPPB382 was analyzed. In total, 1872 proteins were identified in M9 and 1766 proteins in xylem mimicking medium. Filtration of supernatants before protein precipitation reduced these to 1276 proteins in M9 and 976 proteins in the xylem mimicking medium culture filtrate. The results obtained indicate that C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis reacts to a sucrose- and glucose-depleted medium similar to the xylem sap by utilizing amino acids and host cell polymers as well as their degradation products, mainly peptides, amino acids and various C5 and C6 sugars. Interestingly, the bacterium expresses the previously described virulence factors Pat-1 and CelA not exclusively after host cell contact in planta but already in M9 minimal and xylem mimicking medium.

  14. Nutrients Release from a Novel Gel-Based Slow/Controlled Release Fertilizer

    OpenAIRE

    Ding, H.; Y. S. Zhang; Li, W. H.; Zheng, X. Z.; Wang, M. K.; Tang, L. N.; Chen, D. L.

    2016-01-01

    A novel gel-based slow/controlled release fertilizer (G-CRF) was developed, which was produced by combining various natural, seminatural, and/or synthetic organic macromolecule materials and natural inorganic mineral with conventional NPK fertilizers. Its nutrient release characteristics were studied to compare with conventional fertilizers through the soil column leaching method. The influences of soil factors, including temperature, pH, water, and nutrient contents in the G-CRF on nutrient ...

  15. The Goat (Capra hircus) Mammary Gland Mitochondrial Proteome: A Study on the Effect of Weight Loss Using Blue-Native PAGE and Two-Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cugno, Graziano; Parreira, José R.; Ferlizza, Enea; Hernández-Castellano, Lorenzo E.; Carneiro, Mariana; Renaut, Jenny; Castro, Noemí; Arguello, Anastasio; Capote, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Seasonal weight loss (SWL) is the most important limitation to animal production in the Tropical and Mediterranean regions, conditioning producer’s incomes and the nutritional status of rural communities. It is of importance to produce strategies to oppose adverse effects of SWL. Breeds that have evolved in harsh climates have acquired tolerance to SWL through selection. Most of the factors determining such ability are related to changes in biochemical pathways as affected by SWL. In this study, a gel based proteomics strategy (BN: Blue-Native Page and 2DE: Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis) was used to characterize the mitochondrial proteome of the secretory tissue of the goat mammary gland. In addition, we have conducted an investigation of the effects of weight loss in two goat breeds with different levels of adaptation to nutritional stress: Majorera (tolerant) and Palmera (susceptible). The study used Majorera and Palmera dairy goats, divided in 4 sets, 2 for each breed: underfed group fed on wheat straw (restricted diet, so their body weight would be 15–20% reduced by the end of experiment), and a control group fed with an energy-balanced diet. At the end of the experimental period (22 days), mammary gland biopsies were obtained for all experimental groups. The proteomic analysis of the mitochondria enabled the resolution of a total of 277 proteins, and 148 (53%) were identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. Some of the proteins were identified as subunits of the glutamate dehydrogenase complex and the respiratory complexes I, II, IV, V from mitochondria, as well as numerous other proteins with functions in: metabolism, development, localization, cellular organization and biogenesis, biological regulation, response to stimulus, among others, that were mapped in both BN and 2DE gels. The comparative proteomics analysis enabled the identification of several proteins: NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase 75 kDa subunit and lamin B1 mitochondrial (up

  16. Transcriptomic and Proteomic Analysis of Arion vulgaris--Proteins for Probably Successful Survival Strategies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulat, Tanja; Smidak, Roman; Sialana, Fernando J; Jung, Gangsoo; Rattei, Thomas; Bilban, Martin; Sattmann, Helmut; Lubec, Gert; Aradska, Jana

    2016-01-01

    The Spanish slug, Arion vulgaris, is considered one of the hundred most invasive species in Central Europe. The immense and very successful adaptation and spreading of A. vulgaris suggest that it developed highly effective mechanisms to deal with infections and natural predators. Current transcriptomic and proteomic studies on gastropods have been restricted mainly to marine and freshwater gastropods. No transcriptomic or proteomic study on A. vulgaris has been carried out so far, and in the current study, the first transcriptomic database from adult specimen of A. vulgaris is reported. To facilitate and enable proteomics in this non-model organism, a mRNA-derived protein database was constructed for protein identification. A gel-based proteomic approach was used to obtain the first generation of a comprehensive slug mantle proteome. A total of 2128 proteins were unambiguously identified; 48 proteins represent novel proteins with no significant homology in NCBI non-redundant database. Combined transcriptomic and proteomic analysis revealed an extensive repertoire of novel proteins with a role in innate immunity including many associated pattern recognition, effector proteins and cytokine-like proteins. The number and diversity in gene families encoding lectins point to a complex defense system, probably as a result of adaptation to a pathogen-rich environment. These results are providing a fundamental and important resource for subsequent studies on molluscs as well as for putative antimicrobial compounds for drug discovery and biomedical applications.

  17. Transcriptomic and Proteomic Analysis of Arion vulgaris—Proteins for Probably Successful Survival Strategies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulat, Tanja; Smidak, Roman; Sialana, Fernando J.; Jung, Gangsoo; Rattei, Thomas; Bilban, Martin; Sattmann, Helmut; Lubec, Gert; Aradska, Jana

    2016-01-01

    The Spanish slug, Arion vulgaris, is considered one of the hundred most invasive species in Central Europe. The immense and very successful adaptation and spreading of A. vulgaris suggest that it developed highly effective mechanisms to deal with infections and natural predators. Current transcriptomic and proteomic studies on gastropods have been restricted mainly to marine and freshwater gastropods. No transcriptomic or proteomic study on A. vulgaris has been carried out so far, and in the current study, the first transcriptomic database from adult specimen of A. vulgaris is reported. To facilitate and enable proteomics in this non-model organism, a mRNA-derived protein database was constructed for protein identification. A gel-based proteomic approach was used to obtain the first generation of a comprehensive slug mantle proteome. A total of 2128 proteins were unambiguously identified; 48 proteins represent novel proteins with no significant homology in NCBI non-redundant database. Combined transcriptomic and proteomic analysis revealed an extensive repertoire of novel proteins with a role in innate immunity including many associated pattern recognition, effector proteins and cytokine-like proteins. The number and diversity in gene families encoding lectins point to a complex defense system, probably as a result of adaptation to a pathogen-rich environment. These results are providing a fundamental and important resource for subsequent studies on molluscs as well as for putative antimicrobial compounds for drug discovery and biomedical applications. PMID:26986963

  18. Transcriptomic and Proteomic Analysis of Arion vulgaris--Proteins for Probably Successful Survival Strategies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Bulat

    Full Text Available The Spanish slug, Arion vulgaris, is considered one of the hundred most invasive species in Central Europe. The immense and very successful adaptation and spreading of A. vulgaris suggest that it developed highly effective mechanisms to deal with infections and natural predators. Current transcriptomic and proteomic studies on gastropods have been restricted mainly to marine and freshwater gastropods. No transcriptomic or proteomic study on A. vulgaris has been carried out so far, and in the current study, the first transcriptomic database from adult specimen of A. vulgaris is reported. To facilitate and enable proteomics in this non-model organism, a mRNA-derived protein database was constructed for protein identification. A gel-based proteomic approach was used to obtain the first generation of a comprehensive slug mantle proteome. A total of 2128 proteins were unambiguously identified; 48 proteins represent novel proteins with no significant homology in NCBI non-redundant database. Combined transcriptomic and proteomic analysis revealed an extensive repertoire of novel proteins with a role in innate immunity including many associated pattern recognition, effector proteins and cytokine-like proteins. The number and diversity in gene families encoding lectins point to a complex defense system, probably as a result of adaptation to a pathogen-rich environment. These results are providing a fundamental and important resource for subsequent studies on molluscs as well as for putative antimicrobial compounds for drug discovery and biomedical applications.

  19. Proteomics Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Proteomics Core is the central resource for mass spectrometry based proteomics within the NHLBI. The Core staff help collaborators design proteomics experiments in a...

  20. Proteomics Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Proteomics Core is the central resource for mass spectrometry based proteomics within the NHLBI. The Core staff help collaborators design proteomics experiments in...

  1. Comparative proteomic analysis of human pancreatic juice : Methodological study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Lu; Lu, ZhaoHui; Yang, AiMing; Deng, RuiXue; Mai, CanRong; Sang, XinTing; Faber, Klaas Nico; Lu, XingHua

    Pancreatic cancer is the most lethal of all the common malignancies. Markers for early detection of this disease are urgently needed. Here, we optimized and applied a proteome analysis of human pancreatic juice to identify biomarkers for pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic juice samples, devoid of blood

  2. Comparative proteomic analysis of human pancreatic juice : Methodological study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Lu; Lu, ZhaoHui; Yang, AiMing; Deng, RuiXue; Mai, CanRong; Sang, XinTing; Faber, Klaas Nico; Lu, XingHua

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the most lethal of all the common malignancies. Markers for early detection of this disease are urgently needed. Here, we optimized and applied a proteome analysis of human pancreatic juice to identify biomarkers for pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic juice samples, devoid of blood o

  3. Comparative proteomic analysis of human pancreatic juice : Methodological study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Lu; Lu, ZhaoHui; Yang, AiMing; Deng, RuiXue; Mai, CanRong; Sang, XinTing; Faber, Klaas Nico; Lu, XingHua

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the most lethal of all the common malignancies. Markers for early detection of this disease are urgently needed. Here, we optimized and applied a proteome analysis of human pancreatic juice to identify biomarkers for pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic juice samples, devoid of blood o

  4. Comparative proteomic analysis of human pancreatic juice: Methodological study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Lu; Lu, Z.H.; Yang, A.M.; Deng, R.X.; Mai, C.R.; Sang, X.T.; Faber, Klaas Nico; Lu, X.H.

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the most lethal of all the common malignancies. Markers for early detection of this disease are urgently needed. Here, we optimized and applied a proteome analysis of human pancreatic juice to identify biomarkers for pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic juice samples, devoid of blood o

  5. Study of monocyte membrane proteome perturbation during lipopolysaccharide-induced tolerance using iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic approach

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Huoming

    2010-07-02

    Human monocytes\\' exposure to low-level lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces temporary monocytic insensitivity to subsequent LPS challenge. The underlying mechanism of this phenomenon could have important clinical utilities in preventing and/or treating severe infections. In this study, we used an iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic approach to comprehensively characterize the membrane proteomes of monocytes before and after LPS exposure. We identified a total of 1651 proteins, of which 53.6% were membrane proteins. Ninety-four percent of the proteins were quantified and 255 proteins were shown to be tightly regulated by LPS. Subcellular location analysis revealed organelle-specific response to LPS exposure: more than 90% of identified mitochondrial membrane proteins were significant downregulated, whereas the majority of proteins from other organelles such as ER, Golgi and ribosome were upregulated. Moreover, we found that the expression of most receptors potentially involved in LPS signal pathway (CD14, toll-like receptor 4, CD11/CD18 complex) were substantially decreased, while the expression of molecules involved in LPS neutralization were enhanced after LPS challenge. Together, these findings could be of significance in understanding the mechanism of LPS tolerance and provide values for designing new approaches for regulating monocytic responses in sepsis patients.

  6. Development of a multiplexed microfluidic proteomic reactor and its application for studying protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ruijun; Hoa, Xuyen Dai; Lambert, Jean-Philippe; Pezacki, John Paul; Veres, Teodor; Figeys, Daniel

    2011-06-01

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics techniques have been very successful for the identification and study of protein-protein interactions. Typically, immunopurification of protein complexes is conducted, followed by protein separation by gel electrophoresis and in-gel protein digestion, and finally, mass spectrometry is performed to identify the interacting partners. However, the manual processing of the samples is time-consuming and error-prone. Here, we developed a polymer-based microfluidic proteomic reactor aimed at the parallel analysis of minute amounts of protein samples obtained from immunoprecipitation. The design of the proteomic reactor allows for the simultaneous processing of multiple samples on the same devices. Each proteomic reactor on the device consists of SCX beads packed and restricted into a 1 cm microchannel by two integrated pillar frits. The device is fabricated using a combination of low-cost hard cyclic olefin copolymer thermoplastic and elastomeric thermoplastic materials (styrene/(ethylene/butylenes)/styrene) using rapid hot-embossing replication techniques with a polymer-based stamp. Three immunopurified protein samples are simultaneously captured, reduced, alkylated, and digested on the device within 2-3 h instead of the days required for the conventional protein-protein interaction studies. The limit of detection of the microfluidic proteomic reactor was shown to be lower than 2 ng of protein. Furthermore, the application of the microfluidic proteomic reactor was demonstrated for the simultaneous processing of the interactome of the histone variant Htz1 in wild-type yeast and in a swr1Δ yeast strain compared to an untagged control using a novel three-channel microfluidic proteomic reactor.

  7. Proteomic Applications in the Study of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Mateos

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are undifferentiated cells with an unlimited capacity for self-renewal and able to differentiate towards specific lineages under appropriate conditions. MSCs are, a priori, a good target for cell therapy and clinical trials as an alternative to embryonic stem cells, avoiding ethical problems and the chance for malignant transformation in the host. However, regarding MSCs, several biological implications must be solved before their application in cell therapy, such as safe ex vivo expansion and manipulation to obtain an extensive cell quantity amplification number for use in the host without risk accumulation of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities. Cell surface markers for direct characterization of MSCs remain unknown, and the precise molecular mechanisms whereby growth factors stimulate their differentiation are still missing. In the last decade, quantitative proteomics has emerged as a promising set of techniques to address these questions, the answers to which will determine whether MSCs retain their potential for use in cell therapy. Proteomics provides tools to globally analyze cellular activity at the protein level. This proteomic profiling allows the elucidation of connections between broad cellular pathways and molecules that were previously impossible to determine using only traditional biochemical analysis. However; thus far, the results obtained must be orthogonally validated with other approaches. This review will focus on how these techniques have been applied in the evaluation of MSCs for their future applications in safe therapies.

  8. Proteomic Applications in the Study of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateos, Jesús; Fernández Pernas, Pablo; Fafián Labora, Juan; Blanco, Francisco; Arufe, María del Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are undifferentiated cells with an unlimited capacity for self-renewal and able to differentiate towards specific lineages under appropriate conditions. MSCs are, a priori, a good target for cell therapy and clinical trials as an alternative to embryonic stem cells, avoiding ethical problems and the chance for malignant transformation in the host. However, regarding MSCs, several biological implications must be solved before their application in cell therapy, such as safe ex vivo expansion and manipulation to obtain an extensive cell quantity amplification number for use in the host without risk accumulation of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities. Cell surface markers for direct characterization of MSCs remain unknown, and the precise molecular mechanisms whereby growth factors stimulate their differentiation are still missing. In the last decade, quantitative proteomics has emerged as a promising set of techniques to address these questions, the answers to which will determine whether MSCs retain their potential for use in cell therapy. Proteomics provides tools to globally analyze cellular activity at the protein level. This proteomic profiling allows the elucidation of connections between broad cellular pathways and molecules that were previously impossible to determine using only traditional biochemical analysis. However; thus far, the results obtained must be orthogonally validated with other approaches. This review will focus on how these techniques have been applied in the evaluation of MSCs for their future applications in safe therapies.

  9. The impact of growth hormone on proteomic profiles: a review of mouse and adult human studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran-Ortiz, Silvana; Brittain, Alison L; Kopchick, John J

    2017-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is a protein that is known to stimulate postnatal growth, counter regulate insulin's action and induce expression of insulin-like growth factor-1. GH exerts anabolic or catabolic effects depending upon on the targeted tissue. For instance, GH increases skeletal muscle and decreases adipose tissue mass. Our laboratory has spent the past two decades studying these effects, including the effects of GH excess and depletion, on the proteome of several mouse and human tissues. This review first discusses proteomic techniques that are commonly used for these types of studies. We then examine the proteomic differences found in mice with excess circulating GH (bGH mice) or mice with disruption of the GH receptor gene (GHR(-/-)). We also describe the effects of increased and decreased GH action on the proteome of adult patients with either acromegaly, GH deficiency or patients after short-term GH treatment. Finally, we explain how these proteomic studies resulted in the discovery of potential biomarkers for GH action, particularly those related with the effects of GH on aging, glucose metabolism and body composition.

  10. Complete solubilization of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue may improve proteomic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Shan-Rong; Taylor, Clive R; Fowler, Carol B; Mason, Jeffrey T

    2013-04-01

    Tissue-based proteomic approaches (tissue proteomics) are essential for discovering and evaluating biomarkers for personalized medicine. In any proteomics study, the most critical issue is sample extraction and preparation. This problem is especially difficult when recovering proteins from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue sections. However, improving and standardizing protein extraction from FFPE tissue is a critical need because of the millions of archival FFPE tissues available in tissue banks worldwide. Recent progress in the application of heat-induced antigen retrieval principles for protein extraction from FFPE tissue has resulted in a number of published FFPE tissue proteomics studies. However, there is currently no consensus on the optimal protocol for protein extraction from FFPE tissue or accepted standards for quantitative evaluation of the extracts. Standardization is critical to ensure the accurate evaluation of FFPE protein extracts by proteomic methods such as reverse phase protein arrays, which is now in clinical use. In our view, complete solubilization of FFPE tissue samples is the best way to achieve the goal of standardizing the recovery of proteins from FFPE tissues. However, further studies are recommended to develop standardized protein extraction methods to ensure quantitative and qualitative reproducibility in the recovery of proteins from FFPE tissues. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Stressor-induced proteome alterations in zebrafish: A meta-analysis of response patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groh, Ksenia J., E-mail: ksenia.groh@eawag.ch [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); ETH Zürich, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, 8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Suter, Marc J.-F. [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); ETH Zürich, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Department of Environmental Systems Science, 8092 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • We compared reported proteome changes induced by various stressors in zebrafish. • Several proteins groups frequently responding to diverse stressors were identified. • These included energy metabolism enzymes, heat shock and cytoskeletal proteins. • Insufficient proteome coverage impedes identification of more specific responses. • Further research needs for proteomics in ecotoxicology are discussed. - Abstract: Proteomics approaches are being increasingly applied in ecotoxicology on the premise that the identification of specific protein expression changes in response to a particular chemical would allow elucidation of the underlying molecular pathways leading to an adverse effect. This in turn is expected to promote the development of focused testing strategies for specific groups of toxicants. Although both gel-based and gel-free global characterization techniques provide limited proteome coverage, the conclusions regarding the cellular processes affected are still being drawn based on the few changes detected. To investigate how specific the detected responses are, we analyzed a set of studies that characterized proteome alterations induced by various physiological, chemical and biological stressors in zebrafish, a popular model organism. Our analysis highlights several proteins and protein groups, including heat shock and oxidative stress defense proteins, energy metabolism enzymes and cytoskeletal proteins, to be most frequently identified as responding to diverse stressors. In contrast, other potentially more specifically responding protein groups are detected much less frequently. Thus, zebrafish proteome responses to stress reported by different studies appear to depend mostly on the level of stress rather than on the specific stressor itself. This suggests that the most broadly used current proteomics technologies do not provide sufficient proteome coverage to allow in-depth investigation of specific mechanisms of toxicant action

  12. Comparing Simplification Strategies for the Skeletal Muscle Proteome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bethany Geary

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle is a complex tissue that is dominated by the presence of a few abundant proteins. This wide dynamic range can mask the presence of lower abundance proteins, which can be a confounding factor in large-scale proteomic experiments. In this study, we have investigated a number of pre-fractionation methods, at both the protein and peptide level, for the characterization of the skeletal muscle proteome. The analyses revealed that the use of OFFGEL isoelectric focusing yielded the largest number of protein identifications (>750 compared to alternative gel-based and protein equalization strategies. Further, OFFGEL led to a substantial enrichment of a different sub-population of the proteome. Filter-aided sample preparation (FASP, coupled to peptide-level OFFGEL provided more confidence in the results due to a substantial increase in the number of peptides assigned to each protein. The findings presented here support the use of a multiplexed approach to proteome characterization of skeletal muscle, which has a recognized imbalance in the dynamic range of its protein complement.

  13. Contribution of Proteomic Studies Towards Understanding Plant Heavy Metal Stress Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahed eHossain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Modulation of plant proteome composition is an inevitable process to cope with the environmental challenges including heavy metal stress. Soil and water contaminated with hazardous metals not only cause permanent and irreversible health problems, but also result substantial reduction in crop yields. In course of time, plants have evolved complex mechanisms to regulate the uptake, mobilization and intracellular concentration of metal ions to alleviate the stress damages. Since, the functional translated portion of the genome plays an essential role in plant stress response, proteomic studies provide us a finer picture of protein networks and metabolic pathways primarily involved in cellular detoxification and tolerance mechanism. In the present review, an attempt is made to present the state of the art of recent development in proteomic techniques and significant contributions made so far for better understanding the complex mechanism of plant metal stress acclimation. Role of metal stress related proteins involved in antioxidant defense system and primary metabolism is critically reviewed to get a bird’s-eye view on the different strategies of plants to detoxify heavy metals. In addition to the advantages and disadvantages of different proteomic methodologies, future applications of proteome study of subcellular organelles are also discussed to get the new insights into the plant cell response to heavy metals.

  14. HOPE-fixation of lung tissue allows retrospective proteome and phosphoproteome studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevchuk, Olga; Abidi, Nada; Klawonn, Frank; Wissing, Josef; Nimtz, Manfred; Kugler, Christian; Steinert, Michael; Goldmann, Torsten; Jänsch, Lothar

    2014-11-07

    Hepes-glutamic acid buffer-mediated organic solvent protection effect (HOPE)-fixation has been introduced as an alternative to formalin fixation of clinical samples. Beyond preservation of morphological structures for histology, HOPE-fixation was demonstrated to be compatible with recent methods for RNA and DNA sequencing. However, the suitability of HOPE-fixed materials for the inspection of proteomes by mass spectrometry so far remained undefined. This is of particular interest, since proteins constitute a prime resource for drug research and can give valuable insights into the activity status of signaling pathways. In this study, we extracted proteins from human lung tissue and tested HOPE-treated and snap-frozen tissues comparatively by proteome and phosphoproteome analyses. High confident data from accurate mass spectrometry allowed the identification of 2603 proteins and 3036 phosphorylation sites. HOPE-fixation did not hinder the representative extraction of proteins, and investigating their biochemical properties, covered subcellular localizations, and cellular processes revealed no bias caused by the type of fixation. In conclusion, proteome as well as phosphoproteome data of HOPE lung samples were qualitatively equivalent to results obtained from snap-frozen tissues. Thus, HOPE-treated tissues match clinical demands in both histology and retrospective proteome analyses of patient samples by proteomics.

  15. Analyzing the platelet proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Angel; Zitzmann, Nicole; Watson, Steve P

    2004-08-01

    During the last 10 years, mass spectrometry (MS) has become a key tool for protein analysis and has underpinned the emerging field of proteomics. Using high-throughput tandem MS/MS following protein separation, it is potentially possible to analyze hundreds to thousands of proteins in a sample at a time. This technology can be used to analyze the protein content (i.e., the proteome) of any cell or tissue and complements the powerful field of genomics. The technology is particularly suitable for platelets because of the absence of a nucleus. Cellular proteins can be separated by either gel-based methods such as two-dimensional gel electrophoresis or one-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by liquid chromatography (LC) -MS/MS or by multidimensional LC-MS/MS. Prefractionation techniques, such as subcellular fractionations or immunoprecipitations, can be used to improve the analysis. Each method has particular advantages and disadvantages. Proteomics can be used to compare the proteome of basal and diseased platelets, helping to reveal information on the molecular basis of the disease.

  16. Good agreement of conventional and gel-based direct agglutination test in immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piek, C.J.; Teske, E.; van Leeuwen, M.W.; Day, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim of this study was to compare a gel-based test with the traditional direct agglutination test (DAT) for the diagnosis of immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia (IMHA). Methods Canine (n = 247) and feline (n = 74) blood samples were submitted for DAT testing to two

  17. Good agreement of conventional and gel-based direct agglutination test in immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piek, C.J.; Teske, E.; van Leeuwen, M.W.; Day, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim of this study was to compare a gel-based test with the traditional direct agglutination test (DAT) for the diagnosis of immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia (IMHA). Methods Canine (n = 247) and feline (n = 74) blood samples were submitted for DAT testing to two laboratories

  18. Proteomic-Based Approaches for the Study of Cytokines in Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrugal, Ángela; Ojeda, Laura; Paz-Ares, Luis; Molina-Pinelo, Sonia; Ferrer, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Proteomic techniques are currently used to understand the biology of different human diseases, including studies of the cell signaling pathways implicated in cancer progression, which is important in knowing the roles of different proteins in tumor development. Due to its poor prognosis, proteomic approaches are focused on the identification of new biomarkers for the early diagnosis, prognosis, and targeted treatment of lung cancer. Cytokines are proteins involved in inflammatory processes and have been proposed as lung cancer biomarkers and therapeutic targets because it has been reported that some cytokines play important roles in tumor development, invasion, and metastasis. In this review, we aim to summarize the different proteomic techniques used to discover new lung cancer biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Several cytokines have been identified as important players in lung cancer using these techniques. We underline the most important cytokines that are useful as biomarkers and therapeutic targets. We also summarize some of the therapeutic strategies targeted for these cytokines in lung cancer.

  19. Proteomic Study for Responses to Cadmium Stress in Rice Seedlings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GE Cai-lin; WANG Ze-gang; WAN Ding-zhen; DING Yan; WANG Yu-long; SHANG Qi; LUO Shi-shi

    2009-01-01

    A proteomic approach including two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometric (MALDI-TOF MS) analyses was used to investigate the responses to cadmium (Cd) stress in seedlings of rice (Oryza sativa L.) varieties Shanyou 63 and Aizaizhan. Cd stress significantly inhibited root and shoot growth, and affected the global proteome in rice roots and leaves, which induced or upregulated the expression of corresponding proteins in rice roots and leaves when rice seedlings were exposed to 0.1 or 1.0 mmol/L Cd. The Cd-induced proteins are involved in chelation and compartmentation of Cd, elimination of active oxygen free radicals, detoxification of toxic substances, degradation of denatured proteins or inactivated enzymes, regulation of physiologic metabolism and induction of pathogenesis-related proteins. Comparing the Cd-induced proteins between the two varieties, the β-glucosidase and pathogenesis-related protein family 10 proteins were more drastically induced by Cd stress in roots and leaves of Aizaizhan, and the UDP-glucose protein transglucosylase and translational elongation factor Tu were induced by 0.1 mmol/L Cd stress in roots of Shanyou 63. This may be one of the important mechanisms for higher tolerance to Cd stress in Shanyou 63 than in Aizaizhan.

  20. New proteomic approaches to study the organization of yeast mitochondrial membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gubbens, J.

    2008-01-01

    Despite their importance, membrane proteins have traditionally been underrepresented in proteomics studies due to their incompatibility with common methods used in this field. Therefore, new methods have to be developed for studying this class of proteins. In this thesis, new approaches are describe

  1. Proteomic Profiling of the Dystrophin-Deficient mdx Phenocopy of Dystrophinopathy-Associated Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashling Holland

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiorespiratory complications are frequent symptoms of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, a neuromuscular disorder caused by primary abnormalities in the dystrophin gene. Loss of cardiac dystrophin initially leads to changes in dystrophin-associated glycoproteins and subsequently triggers secondarily sarcolemmal disintegration, fibre necrosis, fibrosis, fatty tissue replacement, and interstitial inflammation. This results in progressive cardiac disease, which is the cause of death in a considerable number of patients afflicted with X-linked muscular dystrophy. In order to better define the molecular pathogenesis of this type of cardiomyopathy, several studies have applied mass spectrometry-based proteomics to determine proteome-wide alterations in dystrophinopathy-associated cardiomyopathy. Proteomic studies included both gel-based and label-free mass spectrometric surveys of dystrophin-deficient heart muscle from the established mdx animal model of dystrophinopathy. Comparative cardiac proteomics revealed novel changes in proteins associated with mitochondrial energy metabolism, glycolysis, signaling, iron binding, antibody response, fibre contraction, basal lamina stabilisation, and cytoskeletal organisation. This review summarizes the importance of studying cardiomyopathy within the field of muscular dystrophy research, outlines key features of the mdx heart and its suitability as a model system for studying cardiac pathogenesis, and discusses the impact of recent proteomic findings for exploring molecular and cellular aspects of cardiac abnormalities in inherited muscular dystrophies.

  2. Statistical design for biospecimen cohort size in proteomics-based biomarker discovery and verification studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skates, Steven J; Gillette, Michael A; LaBaer, Joshua; Carr, Steven A; Anderson, Leigh; Liebler, Daniel C; Ransohoff, David; Rifai, Nader; Kondratovich, Marina; Težak, Živana; Mansfield, Elizabeth; Oberg, Ann L; Wright, Ian; Barnes, Grady; Gail, Mitchell; Mesri, Mehdi; Kinsinger, Christopher R; Rodriguez, Henry; Boja, Emily S

    2013-12-01

    Protein biomarkers are needed to deepen our understanding of cancer biology and to improve our ability to diagnose, monitor, and treat cancers. Important analytical and clinical hurdles must be overcome to allow the most promising protein biomarker candidates to advance into clinical validation studies. Although contemporary proteomics technologies support the measurement of large numbers of proteins in individual clinical specimens, sample throughput remains comparatively low. This problem is amplified in typical clinical proteomics research studies, which routinely suffer from a lack of proper experimental design, resulting in analysis of too few biospecimens to achieve adequate statistical power at each stage of a biomarker pipeline. To address this critical shortcoming, a joint workshop was held by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), and American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC) with participation from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). An important output from the workshop was a statistical framework for the design of biomarker discovery and verification studies. Herein, we describe the use of quantitative clinical judgments to set statistical criteria for clinical relevance and the development of an approach to calculate biospecimen sample size for proteomic studies in discovery and verification stages prior to clinical validation stage. This represents a first step toward building a consensus on quantitative criteria for statistical design of proteomics biomarker discovery and verification research.

  3. Annotation of loci from genome-wide association studies using tissue-specific quantitative interaction proteomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lundby, Alicia; Rossin, Elizabeth J.; Steffensen, Annette B.; Acha, Moshe Ray; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Pfeufer, Arne; Lyneh, Stacey N.; Olesen, Soren-Peter; Brunak, Soren; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Jukema, J. Wouter; Trompet, Stella; Ford, Ian; Macfarlane, Peter W.; Krijthe, Bouwe P.; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Stricker, Bruno H.; Nathoe, Hendrik M.; Spiering, Wilko; Daly, Mark J.; Asselbergs, Ikea W.; van der Harst, Pim; Milan, David J.; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Lage, Kasper; Olsen, Jesper V.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified thousands of loci associated with complex traits, but it is challenging to pinpoint causal genes in these loci and to exploit subtle association signals. We used tissue-specific quantitative interaction proteomics to map a network of five genes

  4. Comparative study of the extracellular proteome of Sulfolobus species reveals limited secretion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellen, Albert F.; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Driessen, Arnold J. M.

    2010-01-01

    Although a large number of potentially secreted proteins can be predicted on the basis of genomic distribution of signal sequence-bearing proteins, protein secretion in Archaea has barely been studied. A proteomic inventory and comparison of the growth medium proteins in three hyperthermoacidophiles

  5. Novel possibilities in the study of the salivary proteomic profile using SELDI-TOF/MS technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ARDITO, FATIMA; PERRONE, DONATELLA; COCCHI, ROBERTO; LO RUSSO, LUCIO; DE LILLO, ALFREDO; GIANNATEMPO, GIOVANNI; LO MUZIO, LORENZO

    2016-01-01

    There is currently an increasing interest in exploring human saliva to identify salivary diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers, since the collection of saliva is rapid, non-invasive and stress-free. Diagnostic tests on saliva are common and cost-effective, particularly for patients who need to monitor their hormone levels or the effectiveness of undergoing therapies. Furthermore, salivary diagnostics is ideal for surveillance studies and in situations where fast results and inexpensive technologies are required. The most important constituents of saliva are proteins, the expression levels of which may be modified due to variations of the cellular conditions. Therefore, the different profile of proteins detected in saliva, including their absence, presence or altered levels, is a potential biomarker of certain physiological and/or pathological conditions. A promising novel approach to study saliva is the global analysis of salivary proteins using proteomic techniques. In the present study, surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight/mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF/MS), one of the most recent proteomic tools for the identification of novel biomarkers, is reviewed. In addition, the possible use of this technique in salivary proteomic studies is discussed, since SELDI technology combines the precision of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-TOF/MS proteomic analysis and the high-throughput nature of protein array analysis. PMID:26998108

  6. Proteomic study on the stability of proteins in bovine, camel, and caprine milk sera after processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Lina; Boeren, Sjef; Smits, Marcel; Hooijdonk, van Toon; Vervoort, Jacques; Hettinga, Kasper

    2016-01-01

    Milk proteins have been shown to be very sensitive to processing. This study aims to investigate the changes of the bovine, camel, and caprine milk proteins after freezing, pasteurization (62 °C, 30 min), and spray drying by proteomic techniques, filter-aided sample preparation (FASP) and dimethy

  7. Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomic Study Makes High-Density Lipoprotein a Biomarker for Atherosclerotic Vascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiz-Tzung Chang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available High-density lipoprotein (HDL is a lipid and protein complex that consists of apolipoproteins and lower level HDL-associated enzymes. HDL dysfunction is a factor in atherosclerosis and decreases patient survival. Mass spectrometry- (MS- based proteomics provides a high throughput approach for analyzing the composition and modifications of complex HDL proteins in diseases. HDL can be separated according to size, surface charge, electronegativity, or apoprotein composition. MS-based proteomics on subfractionated HDL then allows investigation of lipoprotein roles in diseases. Herein, we review recent developments in MS-based quantitative proteomic techniques, HDL proteomics and lipoprotein modifications in diseases, and HDL subfractionation studies. We also discuss future directions and perspectives in MS-based proteomics on HDL.

  8. Transcriptome and Proteome Studies Reveal Candidate Attachment Genes during the Development of the Barnacle Amphibalanus Amphitrite

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Aqeel, Sarah

    2016-09-21

    The acorn barnacle, Balanus amphitrite, is the main biofouling organism in marine environments. In the present study we profiled the transcriptome and proteome of B. amphitrite at different life stages (nauplius II, nauplius VI, and cyprid) from the Red Sea, where the average water surface temperature is 34°C and the salinity reaches 41%. We identified 65,784 expressed contigs, and a total of 1387 expressed proteins measured by quantitative proteomics. We found that osmotic stress, salt stress, hyperosmotic response and the Wnt signaling pathway were strongly up-regulated during the planktonic stage, while the MAPK pathway, lipid metabolism, and cuticle development genes were down-regulated. In the transition stage between the nauplius VI and the cyprid, genes that are involved in blood coagulation, cuticle development and eggshell formation were highly up-regulated, while the nitric oxide pathway, which stimulates the swimming and feeding response in marine invertebrates, was down-regulated. We are able to report for the first time that sound sensory system proteins are highly abundant in the nauplius VI stage, implying that these proteins are good targets for the development of new antifouling compounds. The results presented here together with the new genome-wide datasets for a non-model specie represent an important resource for the study of biofouling and development. Proteomics data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD004679.

  9. The Francisella tularensis proteome and its recognition by antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara L.N. Kilmury

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is the causative agent of a spectrum of diseases collectively known as tularemia. The extreme virulence of the pathogen in humans, combined with the low infectious dose and the ease of dissemination by aerosol have led to concerns about its abuse as a bioweapon. Until recently, nothing was known about the virulence mechanisms and even now, there is still a relatively poor understanding of pathogen virulence. Completion of increasing numbers of Francisella genome sequences, combined with comparative genomics and proteomics studies, are contributing to the knowledge in this area. Tularemia may be treated with antibiotics, but there is currently no licensed vaccine. An attenuated strain, the Live Vaccine Strain (LVS has been used to vaccinate military and at risk laboratory personnel, but safety concerns mean that it is unlikely to be licensed by the FDA for general use. Little is known about the protective immunity induced by vaccination with LVS, in humans or animals models. Immunoproteomics studies with sera from infected humans or vaccinated mouse strains, are being used in gel based or proteome microarray approaches to give insight into the humoral immune response. In addition, these data have the potential to be exploited in the identification of new diagnostic or protective antigens, the design of next generation live vaccine strains, and the development of subunit vaccines. Herein, we briefly review the current knowledge from Francisella comparative proteomics studies and then focus upon the findings from immunoproteomics approaches.

  10. Platelet proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zufferey, Anne; Fontana, Pierre; Reny, Jean-Luc; Nolli, Severine; Sanchez, Jean-Charles

    2012-01-01

    Platelets are small cell fragments, produced by megakaryocytes, in the bone marrow. They play an important role in hemostasis and diverse thrombotic disorders. They are therefore primary targets of antithrombotic therapies. They are implicated in several pathophysiological pathways, such as inflammation or wound repair. In blood circulation, platelets are activated by several pathways including subendothelial matrix and thrombin, triggering the formation of the platelet plug. Studying their proteome is a powerful approach to understand their biology and function. However, particular attention must be paid to different experimental parameters, such as platelet quality and purity. Several technologies are involved during the platelet proteome processing, yielding information on protein identification, characterization, localization, and quantification. Recent technical improvements in proteomics combined with inter-disciplinary strategies, such as metabolomic, transcriptomics, and bioinformatics, will help to understand platelets biological mechanisms. Therefore, a comprehensive analysis of the platelet proteome under different environmental conditions may contribute to elucidate complex processes relevant to platelet function regarding bleeding disorders or platelet hyperreactivity and identify new targets for antiplatelet therapy.

  11. Uncovering plant-pathogen crosstalk through apoplastic proteomic studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand eDelaunois

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Plant pathogens have evolved by developing different strategies to infect their host, which in turn have elaborated immune responses to counter the pathogen invasion. The apoplast, including the cell wall and extracellular space outside the plasma membrane, is one of the first compartments where pathogen-host interaction occurs. The plant cell wall is composed of a complex network of polysaccharides polymers and glycoproteins and serves as a natural physical barrier against pathogen invasion. The apoplastic fluid, circulating through the cell wall and intercellular spaces, provides a means for delivering molecules and facilitating intercellular communications. Some plant-pathogen interactions lead to plant cell wall degradation allowing pathogens to penetrate into the cells. In turn, the plant immune system recognizes microbial- or damage-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs or DAMPs and initiates a set of basal immune responses, including the strengthening of the plant cell wall. The establishment of defense requires the regulation of a wide variety of proteins that are involved at different levels, from receptor perception of the pathogen via signaling mechanisms to the strengthening of the cell wall or degradation of the pathogen itself. A fine regulation of apoplastic proteins is therefore essential for rapid and effective pathogen perception and for maintaining cell wall integrity. This review aims to provide insight into analyses using proteomic approaches of the apoplast to highlight the modulation of the apoplastic protein patterns during pathogen infection and to unravel the key players involved in plant-pathogen interaction.

  12. Proteomics Approaches to Identify Tumor Antigen Directed Autoantibodies as Cancer Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Imafuku

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The identification of autoantibodies to tumor cell proteins by proteomics approaches has great potential impact on cancer biomarker discovery. The humoral immune response represents a form of biological amplification of signals that are otherwise weak due to very low concentrations of antigen, especially in the early stages of cancers. In addition, proteomics can detect immunoreactivity directed against protein post-translational modifications. Two-dimensional gel based Western blots, protein antigen microarrays, and multiplex ELISA reactions have been applied by our group to antigen based biomarker detection and validation. The latter two are based on liquid-phase separations that are suitable for automation. This work has resulted in the identification of numerous cancer biomarker candidates. Large clinical studies are currently planned to establish their value in early cancer diagnosis.

  13. The goat (Capra hircus) mammary gland secretory tissue proteome as influenced by weight loss: A study using label free proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seasonal weight loss (SWL) is a significant limitation to animal production. Breeds that have evolved in harsh climates have acquired tolerance to SWL through selection. Herein, labelfree proteomics was used to characterize the effects of SWL in two goat breeds with different levels of adaptation to...

  14. Mass spectrometry based proteomic studies on viruses and hosts - A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng Jie [Division of Chemical Biology and Biotechnology, School of Biological Science, Nanyang Technological University, 60 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637551 (Singapore); Sugrue, Richard J. [Division of Molecular and Cell Biology, School of Biological Science, Nanyang Technological University, 60 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637551 (Singapore); Tang Kai, E-mail: ktang@pmail.ntu.edu.sg [Division of Chemical Biology and Biotechnology, School of Biological Science, Nanyang Technological University, 60 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637551 (Singapore)

    2011-09-30

    Graphical abstract: a) In the background, scanning electron micrograph of RSV infected cells reveals viral filaments budding from the surface of virus infected cells. b) Inserted at the top, MS spectrum represents the characterization of the digested RSV virus particles. c) Inserted at the bottom, RSV infected cells were imaged using immunofluorescence microscopy: red represents virus filaments; green is HSP90; yellow staining represents co-localization of both antigens within the virus filaments. Highlights: {yields} The current proteomic researches on viruses and hosts are described. {yields} TAP, IP, SILAC, ICAT, and iTRAQ facilitate sample enrichment and quantification. {yields} Clinically important viruses are discussed on their interactions with hosts. {yields} Functional validation is essential to confirm the roles of the identified proteins. - Abstract: In terms of proteomic research in the 21st century, the realm of virology is still regarded as an enormous challenge mainly brought by three aspects, namely, studying on the complex proteome of the virus with unexpected variations, developing more accurate analytical techniques as well as understanding viral pathogenesis and virus-host interaction dynamics. Progresses in these areas will be helpful to vaccine design and antiviral drugs discovery. Mass spectrometry based proteomics have shown exceptional display of capabilities, not only precisely identifying viral and cellular proteins that are functionally, structurally, and dynamically changed upon virus infection, but also enabling us to detect important pathway proteins. In addition, many isolation and purification techniques and quantitative strategies in conjunction with MS can significantly improve the sensitivity of mass spectrometry for detecting low-abundant proteins, replenishing the stock of virus proteome and enlarging the protein-protein interaction maps. Nevertheless, only a small proportion of the infectious viruses in both of animal and

  15. Metabolomics as an extension of proteomic analysis: study of acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portilla, Didier; Schnackenberg, Laura; Beger, Richard D

    2007-11-01

    Although proteomics studies the global expression of proteins, metabolomics characterizes and quantifies their end products: the metabolites, produced by an organism under a certain set of conditions. From this perspective it is apparent that proteomics and metabolomics are complementary and when joined allow a fuller appreciation of an organism's phenotype. Our studies using (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic analysis showed the presence of glucose, amino acids, and trichloroacetic acid cycle metabolites in the urine after 48 hours of cisplatin administration. These metabolic alterations precede changes in serum creatinine. Biochemical studies confirmed the presence of glucosuria, but also showed the accumulation of nonesterified fatty acids, and triglycerides in serum, urine, and kidney tissue, despite increased levels of plasma insulin. These metabolic alterations were ameliorated by the use of fibrates. We propose that the injury-induced metabolic profile may be used as a biomarker of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. These studies serve to illustrate that metabolomic studies add insight into pathophysiology not provided by proteomic analysis alone.

  16. Annotation of loci from genome-wide association studies using tissue-specific quantitative interaction proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundby, Alicia; Rossin, Elizabeth J.; Steffensen, Annette B.;

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified thousands of loci associated with complex traits, but it is challenging to pinpoint causal genes in these loci and to exploit subtle association signals. We used tissue-specific quantitative interaction proteomics to map a network of five genes...... involved in the Mendelian disorder long QT syndrome (LOTS). We integrated the LOTS network with GWAS loci from the corresponding common complex trait, QT-interval variation, to identify candidate genes that were subsequently confirmed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and zebrafish. We used the LOTS protein...... to propose candidates in GWAS loci for functional studies and to systematically filter subtle association signals using tissue-specific quantitative interaction proteomics....

  17. Proteomics as a tool for studying bacterial virulence and antimicrobial resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco José Pérez -Llarena

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Proteomic studies have improved our understanding of the microbial world. The most recent advances in this field have helped us to explore aspects beyond genomics. For example, by studying proteins and their regulation, researchers now understand how some pathogenic bacteria have adapted to the lethal actions of antibiotics. Proteomics has also advanced our knowledge of mechanisms of bacterial virulence and some important aspects of how bacteria interact with human cells and, thus, of the pathogenesis of infectious diseases. This review article addresses these issues in some of the most important human pathogens. It also reports some applications of MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry that may be important for the diagnosis of bacterial resistance in clinical laboratories in the future. The reported advances will enable new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies to be developed in the fight against some of the most lethal bacteria affecting humans.

  18. STEM CELLS AND PROTEOMICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Yong-ming; GUO Tian-nan; HUANG Shi-ang

    2006-01-01

    The distinctive features of proteomics are large-scale and high throughput. The key techniques of proteomics are two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, mass spectrometry and bioinformatics. Stem cell can differentiate into all kinds of cells, tissues and organs. There are many proteins and cytokines involved in the process of differentiation. Applying proteomics techniques to the research of the complex process of stem cell differentiation is of great importance to study the mechanism and applications of stem cell differentiation.

  19. Stressor-induced proteome alterations in zebrafish: a meta-analysis of response patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groh, Ksenia J; Suter, Marc J-F

    2015-02-01

    Proteomics approaches are being increasingly applied in ecotoxicology on the premise that the identification of specific protein expression changes in response to a particular chemical would allow elucidation of the underlying molecular pathways leading to an adverse effect. This in turn is expected to promote the development of focused testing strategies for specific groups of toxicants. Although both gel-based and gel-free global characterization techniques provide limited proteome coverage, the conclusions regarding the cellular processes affected are still being drawn based on the few changes detected. To investigate how specific the detected responses are, we analyzed a set of studies that characterized proteome alterations induced by various physiological, chemical and biological stressors in zebrafish, a popular model organism. Our analysis highlights several proteins and protein groups, including heat shock and oxidative stress defense proteins, energy metabolism enzymes and cytoskeletal proteins, to be most frequently identified as responding to diverse stressors. In contrast, other potentially more specifically responding protein groups are detected much less frequently. Thus, zebrafish proteome responses to stress reported by different studies appear to depend mostly on the level of stress rather than on the specific stressor itself. This suggests that the most broadly used current proteomics technologies do not provide sufficient proteome coverage to allow in-depth investigation of specific mechanisms of toxicant action. We suggest that the results of any differential proteomics experiment performed with zebrafish should be interpreted keeping in mind the list of the most frequent responders that we have identified. Similar reservations should apply to any other species where proteome responses are analyzed by global proteomics methods. Careful consideration of the reliability and significance of observed changes is necessary in order not to over

  20. Dynamic Proteomic Insights of Seed Germination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marc Galland; Romain Huguet; Erwann Arc; Gwendal Cueff; Dominique Job; Lo(i)c Rajjou

    2012-01-01

    Proteome analysis,which involves the identification and characterization of expressed proteins,is a powerful tool for determining the biological roles and functions of individual proteins.Furthermore,by providing a systematic and without any a priori mean for large-scale identification of cellular proteins,proteomics is expected to accelerate discoveries in complex processes such as plant development.Our research activity is mainly focused on the "Functional proteomics" approach in the field of seed biology.We are developing a proteome analysis of the model plant,Arabidopsis thaliana,in order to investigate seed development,dormancy,germination and longevity and identify related changes in the seed proteome.Combined approaches associating classical 2D gel-based proteome and dynamic radiolabeled proteome disclosed data regarding protein turnover and protein stability (http://www.seed-proteome.com).The selective translation of mRNAs emerges as an important mechanism regulating molecular functions involved in the control of seed germination.

  1. Proteomic and genomic studies of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease--clues in the pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jun Wei; Dillon, John; Miller, Michael

    2014-07-14

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a widely prevalent hepatic disorder that covers wide spectrum of liver pathology. NAFLD is strongly associated with liver inflammation, metabolic hyperlipidaemia and insulin resistance. Frequently, NAFLD has been considered as the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome. The pathophysiology of NAFLD has not been fully elucidated. Some patients can remain in the stage of simple steatosis, which generally is a benign condition; whereas others can develop liver inflammation and progress into non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, fibrosis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The mechanism behind the progression is still not fully understood. Much ongoing proteomic researches have focused on discovering the unbiased circulating biochemical markers to allow early detection and treatment of NAFLD. Comprehensive genomic studies have also begun to provide new insights into the gene polymorphism to understand patient-disease variations. Therefore, NAFLD is considered a complex and mutifactorial disease phenotype resulting from environmental exposures acting on a susceptible polygenic background. This paper reviewed the current status of proteomic and genomic studies that have contributed to the understanding of NAFLD pathogenesis. For proteomics section, this review highlighted functional proteins that involved in: (1) transportation; (2) metabolic pathway; (3) acute phase reaction; (4) anti-inflammatory; (5) extracellular matrix; and (6) immune system. In the genomic studies, this review will discuss genes which involved in: (1) lipolysis; (2) adipokines; and (3) cytokines production.

  2. A novel approach to the study of the functional proteome in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennessy, Bryan; Lu, Yiling; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana Maria; Carey, Mark; Myhre, Simen; Ju, Zhenlin; Coombes, Kevin; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Bedrosian, Isabelle; Davies, Michael A.; Siwak, Doris; Agarwal, Roshan; Zhang, Fan; Overgaard, Jens; Alsner, Jan; Neve, Richard M.; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Gray, Joe W.; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Mills, Gordon B.

    2008-10-10

    Factors including intratumoral heterogeneity and variability in tissue handling potentially hamper the application of reverse phase protein arrays (RPPA) to study of the solid tumor functional proteome. To address this, RPPA was applied to quantify protein expression and activation in 233 human breast tumors and 52 breast cancer cell lines. Eighty-two antibodies that recognize kinase and steroid signaling events and their effectors were validated for RPPA because of the importance of these proteins to breast carcinogenesis. Reproducibility in replicate lysates was excellent. Intratumoral protein expression was less variable than intertumoral expression, and prognostic biomarkers retained the ability to accurately predict patient outcomes when analyzed in different tumor sites. Although 21/82 total and phosphoproteins demonstrated time-dependent instability in breast tumors that were placed at room temperature after surgical excision for 24 hours prior to freezing, the functional proteomic 'fingerprint' was robust in most tumors until at least 24 hours before tissue freezing. Correlations between RPPA and immunohistochemistry were statistically significant for assessed proteins but RPPA demonstrated a superior dynamic range and detected, for example, an 866-fold difference in estrogen receptor alpha level across breast tumors. Protein and mRNA levels were concordant (at p {le} 0.05) for 41.3% and 61.1% of assayed targets in breast tumors and cell lines, respectively. Several phosphorylation and cleavage products did not correlate with the corresponding transcript levels. In conclusion, the reproducibility of RPPA, the faithfulness with which proteins and the functional proteomic 'fingerprint' are preserved in different sections derived from primary breast tumors, and the surprising stability of this 'fingerprint' with increasing time to freezing all facilitate the application of RPPA to the accurate study of protein biomarkers in non

  3. The Urine Proteome Profile Is Different in Neuromyelitis Optica Compared to Multiple Sclerosis: A Clinical Proteome Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helle H Nielsen

    Full Text Available Inflammatory demyelinating diseases of the CNS comprise a broad spectrum of diseases like neuromyelitis optica (NMO, NMO spectrum disorders (NMO-SD and multiple sclerosis (MS. Despite clear classification criteria, differentiation can be difficult. We hypothesized that the urine proteome may differentiate NMO from MS.The proteins in urine samples from anti-aquaporin 4 (AQP4 seropositive NMO/NMO-SD patients (n = 32, patients with MS (n = 46 and healthy subjects (HS, n = 31 were examined by quantitative liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS after trypsin digestion and iTRAQ labelling. Immunoglobulins (Ig in the urine were validated by nephelometry in an independent cohort (n = 9-10 pr. groups.The analysis identified a total of 1112 different proteins of which 333 were shared by all 109 subjects. Cluster analysis revealed differences in the urine proteome of NMO/NMO-SD compared to HS and MS. Principal component analysis also suggested that the NMO/NMO-SD proteome profile was useful for classification. Multivariate regression analysis revealed a 3-protein profile for the NMO/NMO-SD versus HS discrimination, a 6-protein profile for NMO/NMO-SD versus MS discrimination and an 11-protein profile for MS versus HS discrimination. All protein panels yielded highly significant ROC curves (AUC in all cases >0.85, p≤0.0002. Nephelometry confirmed the presence of increased Ig-light chains in the urine of patients with NMO/NMO-SD.The urine proteome profile of patients with NMO/NMO-SD is different from MS and HS. This may reflect differences in the pathogenesis of NMO/NMO-SD versus MS and suggests that urine may be a potential source of biomarkers differentiating NMO/NMO-SD from MS.

  4. Application of proteomics to investigate barley-Fusarium graminearum interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Fen

    the disease. Due to the advantages of gel-based proteomics that differentially expressed proteins involved in the interaction can be directly detected by comparing protein profiles displayed on 2-D gels, it is used as a tool for studying the barley- Fusarium graminearum interaction form three different....... The functional characterization of two proteins is undergoing. In Chapter 6, microarray data of F. graminearum during interaction with barley and wheat was analysed. The expression patterns of 11fungal genes in microarray analysis were different from qRT-PCR results in Chapter 4. Overall, our results will give...... some insights into the cellular activities during the interaction between barley and Fusarium graminearum for designing new efficient strategies for the control of FHB disease....

  5. Proteomic methodological recommendations for studies involving human plasma, platelets, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Roos, Baukje; Duthie, Susan J; Polley, Abigael C J; Mulholland, Francis; Bouwman, Freek G; Heim, Carolin; Rucklidge, Garry J; Johnson, Ian T; Mariman, Edwin C; Daniel, Hannelore; Elliott, Ruan M

    2008-06-01

    This study was designed to develop, optimize and validate protocols for blood processing prior to proteomic analysis of plasma, platelets and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and to determine analytical variation of a single sample of depleted plasma, platelet and PBMC proteins within and between four laboratories each using their own standard operating protocols for 2D gel electrophoresis. Plasma depleted either using the Beckman Coulter IgY-12 proteome partitioning kit or the Amersham albumin and IgG depletion columns gave good quality gels, but reproducibility appeared better with the single-use immuno-affinity column. The use of the Millipore Filter Device for protein concentration gave a 16% ( p appears as a single abundant spot. The average within-laboratory coefficient of variation (CV) for each of the matched spots after automatic matching using either PDQuest or ProteomWeaver software ranged between 18 and 69% for depleted plasma proteins, between 21 and 55% for platelet proteins, and between 22 and 38% for PBMC proteins. Subsequent manual matching improved the CV with on average between 1 and 16%. The average between laboratory CV for each of the matched spots after automatic matching ranged between 4 and 54% for depleted plasma proteins, between 5 and 60% for platelet proteins, and between 18 and 70% for PBMC proteins. This variation must be considered when designing sufficiently powered studies that use proteomics tools for biomarker discovery. The use of tricine in the running buffer for the second dimension appears to enhance the resolution of proteins especially in the high molecular weight range.

  6. Mild caloric restriction up-regulates the expression of prohibitin: A proteome study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Shoko; Masuda, Junko; Shimagami, Hiroshi [Department of Applied Biological Chemistry, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Ohta, Yutaka; Kanda, Tomomasa [Research Laboratories for Health and Gustatory Science, Asahi Breweries Limited, Ibaraki (Japan); Saito, Kenji [Department of Applied Biological Chemistry, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Corporate Sponsored Research Program ' Food for Life' , The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Kato, Hisanori, E-mail: akatoq@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Applied Biological Chemistry, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Corporate Sponsored Research Program ' Food for Life' , The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan)

    2011-02-18

    Research highlights: {yields} Proteomic analysis was performed to elucidate physiological alterations induced by mild CR. {yields} The results suggest good reproducibility and possibility to grasp the important response of CR. {yields} The increase in prohibitin abundance was observed in CR groups by proteomic analysis. {yields} We hypothesize that prohibitin might be involved in the longevity induced by CR. -- Abstract: Caloric restriction (CR) is well known to expand lifespan in a variety of species and to retard many age-related diseases. The effects of relatively mild CR on the proteome profile in relation to lifespan have not yet been reported, despite the more extensive studies of the stricter CR conditions. Thus, the present study was conducted to elucidate the protein profiles in rat livers after mild CR for a relatively short time. Young growing rats were fed CR diets (10% and 30% CR) for 1 month. We performed the differential proteomic analysis of the rat livers using two-dimensional electrophoresis combined with MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. The most remarkable protein among the differentially expressed proteins was found to be prohibitin, the abundance of which was increased by 30% CR. Prohibitin is a ubiquitously expressed protein shown to suppress cell proliferation and to be related to longevity. The increase in prohibitin was observed both in 10% and 30% CR by Western blot analysis. Furthermore, induction of AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) protein, related to the actions of prohibitin in promoting longevity, was observed. The increased prohibitin level in response to subtle CR suggests that this increase may be one of the early events leading to the expansion of lifespan in response to CR.

  7. Tribolium castaneum larval gut transcriptome and proteome: A resource for the study of the coleopteran gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Kaley; Lorenzen, Marcé D; Hiromasa, Yasuaki; Tomich, John M; Oppert, Cris; Elpidina, Elena N; Vinokurov, Konstantin; Jurat-Fuentes, Juan Luis; Fabrick, Jeff; Oppert, Brenda

    2009-08-01

    Tribolium castaneum is an important agricultural pest and an advanced genetic model for coleopteran insects. We have taken advantage of the recently acquired T. castaneum genome to identify T. castaneum genes and proteins in one of the more critical environmental interfaces of the insect, the larval alimentary tract. Genetic transcripts isolated from the T. castaneum larval gut were labeled and hybridized to a custom array containing oligonucleotides from predicted genes in the T. castaneum genome. Through a ranking procedure based on relative labeling intensity, we found that approximately 17.6% of the genes represented in the array were predicted to be highly expressed in gut tissue. Several genes were selected to compare relative expression levels in larval gut, head, or carcass tissues using quantitative real-time PCR, and expression levels were, with few exceptions, consistent with the gut rankings. In parallel with the microarrays, proteins extracted from the T. castaneum larval gut were subjected to proteomic analysis. Two-dimensional electrophoretic analysis combined with MALDI-TOF resulted in the identification of 37 of 88 selected protein samples. As an alternative strategy, one-dimensional electrophoretic separation of T. castaneum larval gut proteins followed by two-dimensional nano-HPLC and ESI-MS/MS resulted in the identification of 98 proteins. A comparison of the proteomic studies indicated that 16 proteins were commonly identified in both, whereas 80 proteins from the proteomic analyses corresponded to genes with gut rankings indicative of high expression in the microarray analysis. These data serve as a resource of T. castaneum transcripts and proteins in the larval gut and provide the basis for comparative transcriptomic and proteomic studies related to the gut of coleopteran insects.

  8. Studying Different Clinical Syndromes Of Paediatric Severe Malaria Using Plasma Proteomics

    KAUST Repository

    Ramaprasad, Abhinay

    2012-08-01

    Background- Severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria remains one of the major causes of childhood morbidity and mortality in Africa. Severe malaria manifests itself as three main clinical syndromes-impaired consciousness (cerebral malaria), respiratory distress and severe malarial anaemia. Cerebral malaria and respiratory distress are major contributors to malaria mortality but their pathophysiology remains unclear. Motivation/Objectives- Most children with severe malaria die within the first 24 hours of admission to a hospital because of their pathophysiological conditions. Thus, along with anti-malarial drugs, various adjuvant therapies such as fluid bolus (for hypovolaemia) and anticonvulsants (for seizures) are given to alleviate the sick child’s condition. But these therapies can sometimes have adverse effects. Hence, a clear understanding of severe malaria pathophysiology is essential for making an informed decision regarding adjuvant therapies. Methodology- We used mass spectrometry-based shotgun proteomics to study plasma samples from Gambian children with severe malaria. We compared the proteomic profiles of different severe malaria syndromes and generated hypotheses regarding the underlying disease mechanisms. Results/Conclusions- The main challenges of studying the severe malaria syndromes using proteomics were the high complexity and variability among the samples. We hypothesized that hepatic injury and nitric oxide play roles in the pathophysiology of cerebral malaria and respiratory distress.

  9. Proteomic and meta-transcriptomic study on lymph node metastasis in gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Ichikawa

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available To examine the proteomic background of lymph node metastasis (LNM in gastric cancer, we performed protein expression profiling of paired non-tumor, primary tumor, and LNM tissues. Using a label-free proteomic approach, we generated protein expression profiles of 3894 unique proteins and identified 109 differentially expressed proteins. Functional pathway analysis of the differentially expressed proteins showed that members of the beta-3 integrin (ITGB3 pathway were significantly enriched. Aberrations of ITGB3 were reported in various malignancies; however, ITGB3 in LNM tissues has not been examined to date. Different level of ITGB3 expression was confirmed in 20 gastric cancer cases by Western blotting. We analyzed the mRNA levels of the differentially expressed proteins by using a public mRNA expression database; 38.8% of the proteins examined, including those involved in oxidation and reduction, showed correlation between protein and mRNA levels. Proteins without such correlation included factors related to cell adhesion. Our study suggests a novel role for the integrin pathway in the development of LNM in gastric cancer and indicated possible benefits of observational transcriptomic analysis for proteomic studies.

  10. Saliva proteomics as an emerging, non-invasive tool to study livestock physiology, nutrition and diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamy, Elsa; Mau, Marcus

    2012-07-19

    Saliva is an extraordinary fluid in terms of research and diagnostic possibilities. Its composition in electrolytes, hormones and especially its proteome contains information about feeding status, nutritional requirements and adaptations to diet and environment, and also about health status of animals. It is easy to collect on a non-invasive and routine basis without any need for special training. Therefore, the analysis of salivary proteomes is going to emerge into a field of high interest with the future goal to maintain and improve livestock productivity and welfare. Moreover, the comprehensive analysis and identification of salivary proteins and peptides in whole and glandular saliva is a necessary pre-requisite to identify animal disease biomarkers and a powerful tool to better understand animal physiology. This review focuses on the different approaches used to study the salivary proteomes of farm animals, in respect to the physiology of nutrition and food perception in relation to food choices. The potential of animal saliva as a source of disease biomarkers will also be pointed out. Special emphasis is laid on the 'ruminating triad' - cattle, goat and sheep - as well as swine as major species of animal production in Western and Southern Europe.

  11. Proteomics Technologies and Challenges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Proteomics is the study of proteins and their interactions in a cell. With the completion of the Human Genome Project, the emphasis is shifting to the protein compliment of the human organism. Because proteome reflects more accurately on the dynamic state of a cell, tissue, or organism, much is expected from proteomics to yield better disease markers for diagnosis and therapy monitoring. The advent of proteomics technologies for global detection and quantitation of proteins creates new opportunities and challenges for those seeking to gain greater understanding of diseases. High-throughput proteomics technologies combining with advanced bioinformatics are extensively used to identify molecular signatures of diseases based on protein pathways and signaling cascades. Mass spectrometry plays a vital role in proteomics and has become an indispensable tool for molecular and cellular biology. While the potential is great, many challenges and issues remain to be solved, such as mining low abundant proteins and integration of proteomics with genomics and metabolomics data. Nevertheless, proteomics is the foundation for constructing and extracting useful knowledge to biomedical research. In this review, a snapshot of contemporary issues in proteomics technologies is discussed.

  12. Proteome Analysis of Subsarcolemmal Cardiomyocyte Mitochondria: A Comparison of Different Analytical Platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Giorgianni

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are complex organelles that play critical roles in diverse aspects of cellular function. Heart disease and a number of other pathologies are associated with perturbations in the molecular machinery of the mitochondria. Therefore, comprehensive, unbiased examination of the mitochondrial proteome represents a powerful approach toward system-level insights into disease mechanisms. A crucial aspect in proteomics studies is design of bioanalytical strategies that maximize coverage of the complex repertoire of mitochondrial proteins. In this study, we evaluated the performance of gel-based and gel-free multidimensional platforms for profiling of the proteome in subsarcolemmal mitochondria harvested from rat heart. We compared three different multidimensional proteome fractionation platforms: polymeric reversed-phase liquid chromatography at high pH (PLRP, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE, and isoelectric focusing (IEF separations combined with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS, and bioinformatics for protein identification. Across all three platforms, a total of 1043 proteins were identified. Among the three bioanalytical strategies, SDS-PAGE followed by LC-MS/MS provided the best coverage of the mitochondrial proteome. With this platform, 890 proteins with diverse physicochemical characteristics were identified; the mitochondrial protein panel encompassed proteins with various functional roles including bioenergetics, protein import, and mitochondrial fusion. Taken together, results of this study provide a large-scale view of the proteome in subsarcolemmal mitochondria from the rat heart, and aid in the selection of optimal bioanalytical platforms for differential protein expression profiling of mitochondria in health and disease.

  13. Characterization of the rat liver membrane proteome using peptide immobilized pH gradient isoelectric focusing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chick, J M; Haynes, P A; Molloy, M P; Bjellqvist, B; Baker, M S; Len, A C L

    2008-03-01

    Membrane proteins are of particular interest in proteomics because of their potential therapeutic utility. Past proteomic approaches used to investigate membrane proteins have only been partially successful at providing a comprehensive analysis due to the inherently hydrophobic nature and low abundance for some of these proteins. Recently, these difficulties have been improved by analyzing membrane protein enriched samples using shotgun proteomics. In addition, the recent application of methanol-assisted trypsin digestion of membrane proteins has been shown to be a method to improve membrane protein identifications. In this study, a comparison of different concentrations of methanol was assessed for assisting membrane protein digestion with trypsin prior to analysis using a gel-based shotgun proteomics approach called peptide immobilized pH gradient isoelectric focusing (IPG-IEF). We demonstrate the use of peptide IEF on pH 3-10 IPG strips as the first dimension of two-dimensional shotgun proteomics for protein identifications from the membrane fraction of rat liver. Tryptic digestion of proteins was carried out in varying concentrations of methanol in 10 mM ammonium bicarbonate: 0% (v/v), 40% (v/v), and 60% (v/v). A total of 800 proteins were identified from 60% (v/v) methanol, which increased the protein identifications by 17% and 14% compared to 0% (v/v) methanol and 40% (v/v) methanol assisted digestion, respectively. In total, 1549 nonredundant proteins were identified from all three concentrations of methanol including 690 (42%) integral membrane proteins of which 626 of these proteins contained at least one transmembrane domain. Peptide IPG-IEF separation of peptides was successful as the peptides were separated into discrete pI regions with high resolution. The results from this study prove utility of 60% (v/v) methanol assisted digestion in conjunction with peptide IPG-IEF as an optimal shotgun proteomics technique for the separation and identification of

  14. Improving data quality and preserving HCD-generated reporter ions with EThcD for isobaric tag-based quantitative proteomics and proteome-wide PTM studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qing; Shi, Xudong; Feng, Yu; Kent, K Craig; Li, Lingjun

    2017-05-22

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based isobaric labeling has undergone rapid development in recent years due to its capability for high throughput quantitation. Apart from its originally designed use with collision-induced dissociation (CID) and higher-energy collisional dissociation (HCD), isobaric tagging technique could also work with electron-transfer dissociation (ETD), which provides complementarity to CID and is preferred in sequencing peptides with post-translational modifications (PTMs). However, ETD suffers from long reaction time, reduced duty cycle and bias against peptides with lower charge states. In addition, common fragmentation mechanism in ETD results in altered reporter ion production, decreased multiplexing capability, and even loss of quantitation capability for some of the isobaric tags, including custom-designed dimethyl leucine (DiLeu) tags. Here, we demonstrate a novel electron-transfer/higher-energy collision dissociation (EThcD) approach that preserves original reporter ion channels, mitigates bias against lower charge states, improves sensitivity, and significantly improves data quality for quantitative proteomics and proteome-wide PTM studies. Systematic optimization was performed to achieve a balance between data quality and sensitivity. We provide direct comparison of EThcD with ETD and HCD for DiLeu- and TMT-labeled HEK cell lysate and IMAC enriched phosphopeptides. Results demonstrate improved data quality and phosphorylation localization accuracy while preserving sufficient reporter ion production. Biological studies were performed to investigate phosphorylation changes in a mouse vascular smooth muscle cell line treated with four different conditions. Overall, EThcD exhibits superior performance compared to conventional ETD and offers distinct advantages compared to HCD in isobaric labeling based quantitative proteomics and quantitative PTM studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Serum Proteome Profiles in Stricturing Crohn’s Disease: A pilot study.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Townsend, Peter; Zhang, Qibin; Shapiro, Jason; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Bramer, Lisa M.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Weitz, Karl K.; Mallette, Meaghan; Moniz, Heather; Bright, Renee; Merrick, Marjorie; Shah, Samir A.; Sands, Bruce E.; Leleiko, Neal

    2015-08-01

    Background: Crohn’s disease (CD) is a form of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) with different described behaviors, including stricture. At present, there are no laboratory studies that can differentiate stricturing CD from other phenotypes of IBD. We performed a pilot study to examine differences in the proteome among patients with stricturing Crohn’s disease, non-stricturing Crohn’s disease, and ulcerative colitis (UC). Methods: Serum samples were selected from the Ocean State Crohn’s and Colitis Area Registry (OSCCAR), an established cohort of patients with IBD. Crohn’s disease patients with surgically-resected stricture were matched with similar patients with Crohn’s disease without known stricture, and with UC. Serum samples from each patient were digested and analyzed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to characterize the proteome. Statistical analyses were performed to identify peptides and proteins that can differentiate CD with stricture. Results: Samples from 9 patients in each group (27 total patients) were analyzed. Baseline demographic characteristics were similar among the three groups. We quantified 7668 peptides and 897 proteins for analysis. ROC analysis identified a subset of peptides with an area under the curve greater than 0.9, indicating greater separation potential. Partial least squares discriminant analysis was able to distinguish among the three groups with up to 70% accuracy by peptides, and up to 80% accuracy by proteins. We identified the significantly different proteins and peptides, and determined their function based on previously published literature. Conclusions: The serum of patients with stricturing CD, non-stricturing CD, and UC are distinguishable via proteomic analysis. Some of the proteins that differentiate the stricturing phenotype have been implicated in complement activation, fibrinolytic pathways, and lymphocyte adhesion.

  16. Model plant systems in salinity and drought stress proteomics studies: a perspective on Arabidopsis and Sorghum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngara, R; Ndimba, B K

    2014-11-01

    More than a decade after the sequencing of its genome, Arabidopsis still stands as the epitome of a model system in plant biology. Arabidopsis proteomics has also taught us great lessons on different aspects of plant growth, development and physiology. Without doubt our understanding of basic principles of plant biology would not have been this advanced if it were not for knowledge gained using Arabidopsis as a model system. However, with the projections of global climate change and rapid population growth, it is high time we evaluate the applicability of this model system in studies aimed at understanding abiotic stress tolerance and adaptation, with a particular emphasis on maintaining yield under hot and dry environmental conditions. Because of the innate nature of sorghum's tolerance to drought and moderate tolerance to salinity stresses, we believe sorghum is the next logical model system in such studies amongst cereals. In this acute view, we highlight the importance of Arabidopsis as a model system, briefly discuss its potential limitations in drought and salt stress studies, and present our views on the potential usefulness of sorghum as a model system for cereals in drought and salinity stress proteomic studies.

  17. Studies of a Biochemical Factory: Tomato Trichome Deep Expressed Sequence Tag Sequencing and Proteomics1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilmiller, Anthony L.; Miner, Dennis P.; Larson, Matthew; McDowell, Eric; Gang, David R.; Wilkerson, Curtis; Last, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    Shotgun proteomics analysis allows hundreds of proteins to be identified and quantified from a single sample at relatively low cost. Extensive DNA sequence information is a prerequisite for shotgun proteomics, and it is ideal to have sequence for the organism being studied rather than from related species or accessions. While this requirement has limited the set of organisms that are candidates for this approach, next generation sequencing technologies make it feasible to obtain deep DNA sequence coverage from any organism. As part of our studies of specialized (secondary) metabolism in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) trichomes, 454 sequencing of cDNA was combined with shotgun proteomics analyses to obtain in-depth profiles of genes and proteins expressed in leaf and stem glandular trichomes of 3-week-old plants. The expressed sequence tag and proteomics data sets combined with metabolite analysis led to the discovery and characterization of a sesquiterpene synthase that produces β-caryophyllene and α-humulene from E,E-farnesyl diphosphate in trichomes of leaf but not of stem. This analysis demonstrates the utility of combining high-throughput cDNA sequencing with proteomics experiments in a target tissue. These data can be used for dissection of other biochemical processes in these specialized epidermal cells. PMID:20431087

  18. [Analysis of protein ratios based on the studies of human urine proteome in an experiment with 105-day isolation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the work was to study urine proteome of healthy human subjects during 105-day isolation in controlled environment of the IBMP chamber with a self-sustained life support system. The parameters under study were diurnal rhythm, physical activity, water intake, as well as consumption of sodium, protein and some other basic nutrients. Urine was sampled by 6 male subjects at the age of 25 to 40 years admitted to the experiment by the medical certification commission. The studies were performed with the use of proteome data acquisition technologies; the cutting-edge bio-information analysis techniques including reconstruction of associative gene networks were applied to investigate the urine proteome profile, to structure experimental data in light of the existing physiological concepts and to formulate viable hypotheses for ensuing experimental verification. Proteins of different origin were identified in urine; appearance or disappearance of proteins was in tight correlation with salt consumption.

  19. A proteomics study of the response of North Ronaldsay sheep to copper challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haywood Susan

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this proteomics study was to identify proteins that changed expression as a result of copper challenge in the uniquely copper sensitive North Ronaldsay sheep and further, to compare those changes in expression with the more copper tolerant Cambridge breed. Such data gives us a proteome-centered perspective of the pathogenesis of copper-induced oxidative stress in this breed. Results Many proteins respond to copper challenge, but this study focuses on those exhibiting a differential response between the two breeds, related to liver copper content. As copper accumulated in the tissue, the pattern of expression of several proteins was markedly different, in North Ronaldsay sheep as compared to the Cambridge breed. Conclusion The pattern of changes was consistent with the greatly enhanced susceptibility of North Ronaldsay sheep to copper-induced oxidative stress, focused on mitochondrial disturbance with consequent activation of hepatic stellate cells. The expression profiles were sufficiently complex that the response could not simply be explained as a hypersensitivity to copper in North Ronaldsay sheep.

  20. Transcriptome and proteome studies reveal candidate attachment genes during the development of the barnacle Amphibalanus Amphitrite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Al-Aqeel

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The acorn barnacle, Balanus amphitrite, is the main biofouling organism in marine environments. In the present study we profiled the transcriptome and proteome of B. amphitrite at different life stages (nauplius II, nauplius VI and cyprid from the Red Sea, where the average water surface temperature is 34°C and the salinity reaches 41‰. We identified 65,784 expressed contigs, and a total of 1,387 expressed proteins measured by quantitative proteomics. We found that osmotic stress, salt stress, hyperosmotic response and the Wnt signaling pathway were strongly up-regulated during the planktonic stage, while the MAPK pathway, lipid metabolism, and cuticle development genes were down-regulated. In the transition stage between the nauplius VI and the cyprid, genes that are involved in blood coagulation, cuticle development and eggshell formation were highly up-regulated, while the nitric oxide pathway, which stimulates the swimming and feeding response in marine invertebrates, was down-regulated. We are able to report for the first time that sound sensory system proteins are highly abundant in the nauplius VI stage, implying that these proteins are good targets for the development of new antifouling compounds. The results presented here together with the new genome-wide datasets for a non-model specie represent an important resource for the study of biofouling and development.

  1. Proteomics in pulmonary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowler, Russell P; Ellison, Misoo C; Reisdorph, Nichole

    2006-08-01

    Proteomics is the study of the entire protein complement of the genome (the proteome) in a biological system. Proteomic studies require a multidisciplinary approach and have only been practical with the convergence of technical and methodologic improvements including the following: advances in mass spectrometry and genomic sequencing that now permit the identification and relative quantization of small amounts (femtomole) of nearly any single protein; new methods in gel electrophoresis that allow the detection of subtle changes in protein expression, including posttranslational modifications; automation and miniaturization that permit high-throughput analysis of clinical samples; and new bioinformatics and computational methods that facilitate analysis and interpretation of the abundant data that are generated by proteomics experiments. This convergence makes proteomics studies practical for pulmonary researchers using BAL fluid, lung tissue, blood, and exhaled breath condensates, and will facilitate the research of complex, multifactorial lung diseases such as acute lung injury and COPD. This review describes how proteomics experiments are conducted and interpreted, their limitations, and how proteomics has been used in clinical pulmonary medicine.

  2. Integrated Proteomic Pipeline Using Multiple Search Engines for a Proteogenomic Study with a Controlled Protein False Discovery Rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Gun Wook; Hwang, Heeyoun; Kim, Kwang Hoe; Lee, Ju Yeon; Lee, Hyun Kyoung; Park, Ji Yeong; Ji, Eun Sun; Park, Sung-Kyu Robin; Yates, John R; Kwon, Kyung-Hoon; Park, Young Mok; Lee, Hyoung-Joo; Paik, Young-Ki; Kim, Jin Young; Yoo, Jong Shin

    2016-11-04

    In the Chromosome-Centric Human Proteome Project (C-HPP), false-positive identification by peptide spectrum matches (PSMs) after database searches is a major issue for proteogenomic studies using liquid-chromatography and mass-spectrometry-based large proteomic profiling. Here we developed a simple strategy for protein identification, with a controlled false discovery rate (FDR) at the protein level, using an integrated proteomic pipeline (IPP) that consists of four engrailed steps as follows. First, using three different search engines, SEQUEST, MASCOT, and MS-GF+, individual proteomic searches were performed against the neXtProt database. Second, the search results from the PSMs were combined using statistical evaluation tools including DTASelect and Percolator. Third, the peptide search scores were converted into E-scores normalized using an in-house program. Last, ProteinInferencer was used to filter the proteins containing two or more peptides with a controlled FDR of 1.0% at the protein level. Finally, we compared the performance of the IPP to a conventional proteomic pipeline (CPP) for protein identification using a controlled FDR of <1% at the protein level. Using the IPP, a total of 5756 proteins (vs 4453 using the CPP) including 477 alternative splicing variants (vs 182 using the CPP) were identified from human hippocampal tissue. In addition, a total of 10 missing proteins (vs 7 using the CPP) were identified with two or more unique peptides, and their tryptic peptides were validated using MS/MS spectral pattern from a repository database or their corresponding synthetic peptides. This study shows that the IPP effectively improved the identification of proteins, including alternative splicing variants and missing proteins, in human hippocampal tissues for the C-HPP. All RAW files used in this study were deposited in ProteomeXchange (PXD000395).

  3. The mzQuantML data standard for mass spectrometry-based quantitative studies in proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walzer, Mathias; Qi, Da; Mayer, Gerhard; Uszkoreit, Julian; Eisenacher, Martin; Sachsenberg, Timo; Gonzalez-Galarza, Faviel F; Fan, Jun; Bessant, Conrad; Deutsch, Eric W; Reisinger, Florian; Vizcaíno, Juan Antonio; Medina-Aunon, J Alberto; Albar, Juan Pablo; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Jones, Andrew R

    2013-08-01

    The range of heterogeneous approaches available for quantifying protein abundance via mass spectrometry (MS)(1) leads to considerable challenges in modeling, archiving, exchanging, or submitting experimental data sets as supplemental material to journals. To date, there has been no widely accepted format for capturing the evidence trail of how quantitative analysis has been performed by software, for transferring data between software packages, or for submitting to public databases. In the context of the Proteomics Standards Initiative, we have developed the mzQuantML data standard. The standard can represent quantitative data about regions in two-dimensional retention time versus mass/charge space (called features), peptides, and proteins and protein groups (where there is ambiguity regarding peptide-to-protein inference), and it offers limited support for small molecule (metabolomic) data. The format has structures for representing replicate MS runs, grouping of replicates (for example, as study variables), and capturing the parameters used by software packages to arrive at these values. The format has the capability to reference other standards such as mzML and mzIdentML, and thus the evidence trail for the MS workflow as a whole can now be described. Several software implementations are available, and we encourage other bioinformatics groups to use mzQuantML as an input, internal, or output format for quantitative software and for structuring local repositories. All project resources are available in the public domain from the HUPO Proteomics Standards Initiative http://www.psidev.info/mzquantml.

  4. Proteomic Study Identifies Proteins Involved in Brassinosteroid Regulation of Rice Growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fengru Wang; Ming-Yi Bai; Zhiping Deng; Juan A. Oses-Prieto; Alma L. Burlingame; Tiegang Lu; Kang Chong; Zhi-Yong Wang

    2010-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are essential hormones for growth and development of plant. In rice, BRs regulate multiple developmental processes and affect many important traits such as height, leaf angle, fertility and seed filling. We identified brassinosteroid-regulated proteins in rice using proteomic approaches and performed functional analysis of some BR-regulated proteins by overexpression experiments. Using two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) followed by protein identification by mass spectrometry, we compared proteomic differences in the shoots and roots of the BR-insensitive mutant d61-4 and BR-deficient mutant brd1-3. We identified a large number of proteins differentially expressed in the mutants compared with wild type control. These include a glycine-rich RNA-binding protein (OsGRP1)and a DREPP2 protein, which showed reduced levels in the BR mutants. Overexpression of these two proteins partially suppressed the dwarf phenotype of the Arabidopsis BR-insensitive mutant bri1-5. In contrast to the reduced protein level, the RNA level of OsGRP1 was not significantly affected in the BR mutants or by BR treatment, suggesting BR regulation of OsGRP1 at the posttranslational level. This study identifies many BR-regulated proteins and demonstrates that OsGRP1 functions downstream in the BR signal transduction pathway to promote cell expansion.

  5. Talaromyces marneffei Genomic, Transcriptomic, Proteomic and Metabolomic Studies Reveal Mechanisms for Environmental Adaptations and Virulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna K. P. Lau

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Talaromyces marneffei is a thermally dimorphic fungus causing systemic infections in patients positive for HIV or other immunocompromised statuses. Analysis of its ~28.9 Mb draft genome and additional transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolomic studies revealed mechanisms for environmental adaptations and virulence. Meiotic genes and genes for pheromone receptors, enzymes which process pheromones, and proteins involved in pheromone response pathway are present, indicating its possibility as a heterothallic fungus. Among the 14 Mp1p homologs, only Mp1p is a virulence factor binding a variety of host proteins, fatty acids and lipids. There are 23 polyketide synthase genes, one for melanin and two for mitorubrinic acid/mitorubrinol biosynthesis, which are virulence factors. Another polyketide synthase is for biogenesis of the diffusible red pigment, which consists of amino acid conjugates of monascorubin and rubropunctatin. Novel microRNA-like RNAs (milRNAs and processing proteins are present. The dicer protein, dcl-2, is required for biogenesis of two milRNAs, PM-milR-M1 and PM-milR-M2, which are more highly expressed in hyphal cells. Comparative transcriptomics showed that tandem repeat-containing genes were overexpressed in yeast phase, generating protein polymorphism among cells, evading host’s immunity. Comparative proteomics between yeast and hyphal cells revealed that glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, up-regulated in hyphal cells, is an adhesion factor for conidial attachment.

  6. New nutrition, proteomics, and how both can enhance studies in cancer prevention and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Helen

    2005-11-01

    The increased application of MS technologies to nutrition and cancer prevention research has enabled unique insights into the health benefits of polyphenols. Polyphenols are phytochemicals that appear to have chemical properties that provide valuable health benefits when ingested. In particular, experiments have suggested that grape seed proanthocyanidins, oligomers of the catechin family of polyphenols, may have health benefits, possibly due to their capacity to be oxidized. Two-dimensional gel proteomics technology identified specific rat brain proteins that were differentially affected after ingestion of grape seed extract. Beneficial changes in the expression of these proteins were observed relative to changes seen in the brains of Alzheimer disease patients at autopsy and of transgenic mouse models of dementia. These findings were consistent with the hypothesis that grape seed polyphenols may have neuroprotective activity. Previous experiments showed that grape seed extract was significantly chemopreventive in a rat model of breast cancer, but this depended on the specific diet in which the grape seed was administered. Thus, phytochemicals such as polyphenols may have health benefits in mammalian tissues unrelated to classical nutritional deficiency models. This report illustrates how experimental approaches that combine proteomics technologies with a dietary intervention with specific phytochemicals in normal animals can enhance studies on cancer prevention and treatment.

  7. Quantitative proteomics study of larval settlement in the barnacle Balanus amphitrite

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Zhang-Fan

    2014-02-13

    Barnacles are major sessile components of the intertidal areas worldwide, and also one of the most dominant fouling organisms in fouling communities. Larval settlement has a crucial ecological effect not only on the distribution of the barnacle population but also intertidal community structures. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in the transition process from the larval to the juvenile stage remain largely unclear. In this study, we carried out comparative proteomic profiles of stage II nauplii, stage VI nauplii, cyprids, and juveniles of the barnacle Balanus amphitrite using label-free quantitative proteomics, followed by the measurement of the gene expression levels of candidate proteins. More than 700 proteins were identified at each stage; 80 were significantly up-regulated in cyprids and 95 in juveniles vs other stages. Specifically, proteins involved in energy and metabolism, the nervous system and signal transduction were significantly up-regulated in cyprids, whereas proteins involved in cytoskeletal remodeling, transcription and translation, cell proliferation and differentiation, and biomineralization were up-regulated in juveniles, consistent with changes associated with larval metamorphosis and tissue remodeling in juveniles. These findings provided molecular evidence for the morphological, physiological and biological changes that occur during the transition process from the larval to the juvenile stages in B. amphitrite. © 2014 Chen et al.

  8. A multicentric study to evaluate the use of relative retention times in targeted proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vialas, Vital; Colomé-Calls, Núria; Abian, Joaquín; Aloria, Kerman; Alvarez-Llamas, Gloria; Antúnez, Oreto; Arizmendi, Jesus M; Azkargorta, Mikel; Barceló-Batllori, Silvia; Barderas, María G; Blanco, Francisco; Casal, J Ignacio; Casas, Vanessa; de la Torre, Carolina; Chicano-Gálvez, Eduardo; Elortza, Felix; Espadas, Guadalupe; Estanyol, Josep M; Fernandez-Irigoyen, Joaquín; Fernandez-Puente, Patricia; Fidalgo, María José; Fuentes, Manuel; Gay, Marina; Gil, Concha; Hainard, Alexandre; Hernaez, Maria Luisa; Ibarrola, Nieves; Kopylov, Arthur T; Lario, Antonio; Lopez, Juan Antonio; López-Lucendo, María; Marcilla, Miguel; Marina-Ramírez, Anabel; Marko-Varga, Gyorgy; Martín, Luna; Mora, Maria I; Morato-López, Esperanza; Muñoz, Javier; Odena, Maria Antonia; de Oliveira, Eliandre; Orera, Irene; Ortea, Ignacio; Pasquarello, Carla; Ray, Kevin B; Rezeli, Melinda; Ruppen, Isabel; Sabidó, Eduard; Del Pino, Manuel M Sanchez; Sancho, Jaime; Santamaría, Enrique; Vazquez, Jesus; Vilaseca, Marta; Vivanco, Fernando; Walters, James J; Zgoda, Victor G; Corrales, Fernando J; Canals, Francesc; Paradela, Alberto

    2017-01-30

    Despite the maturity reached by targeted proteomic strategies, reliable and standardized protocols are urgently needed to enhance reproducibility among different laboratories and analytical platforms, facilitating a more widespread use in biomedical research. To achieve this goal, the use of dimensionless relative retention times (iRT), defined on the basis of peptide standard retention times (RT), has lately emerged as a powerful tool. The robustness, reproducibility and utility of this strategy were examined for the first time in a multicentric setting, involving 28 laboratories that included 24 of the Spanish network of proteomics laboratories (ProteoRed-ISCIII). According to the results obtained in this study, dimensionless retention time values (iRTs) demonstrated to be a useful tool for transferring and sharing peptide retention times across different chromatographic set-ups both intra- and inter-laboratories. iRT values also showed very low variability over long time periods. Furthermore, parallel quantitative analyses showed a high reproducibility despite the variety of experimental strategies used, either MRM (multiple reaction monitoring) or pseudoMRM, and the diversity of analytical platforms employed.

  9. Proteomic studies on protein modification by cyclopentenone prostaglandins: expanding our view on electrophile actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzón, Beatriz; Oeste, Clara L; Díez-Dacal, Beatriz; Pérez-Sala, Dolores

    2011-10-19

    Cyclopentenone prostaglandins (cyPG) are lipid mediators that participate in the mechanisms regulating inflammation and tumorigenesis. cyPG are electrophilic compounds that act mainly through the covalent modification of cellular proteins. The stability of many cyPG-protein adducts makes them suitable for proteomic analysis. Indeed, methodological advances in recent years have allowed identifying many cyPG targets, including components of pro-inflammatory transcription factors, cytoskeletal proteins, signaling kinases and proteins involved in redox control. Insight into the diversity of cyPG targets is providing a better understanding of their mechanism of action, uncovering novel links between resolution of inflammation, proliferation and redox regulation. Moreover, identification of the target residues has unveiled the selectivity of protein modification by these electrophiles, providing valuable information for potential pharmacological applications. Among the challenges ahead, the detection of proteins modified by endogenous cyPG and the quantitative aspects of the modification require further efforts. Importantly, only a few years after the appearance of the first proteomic studies, research on cyPG targets is yielding new paradigms for redox and electrophilic signaling.

  10. From Proteomics to Structural Studies of Cytosolic/Mitochondrial-Type Thioredoxin Systems in Barley Seeds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Azar Shahpiri; Birte Svensson; Christine Finnie

    2009-01-01

    Thioredoxins (Trx) are ubiquitous proteins that participate in thiol disulfide reactions via two active site cysteine residues,allowing Trx to reduce disulfide bonds in target proteins.Recent progress in proteome analysis has resulted in identification of a wide range of potential target proteins for Trx,indicating that Trx plays a key role in several aspects of cell metabolism.In contrast to other organisms,plants contain multiple forms of Trx that are classified based on their primary structures and sub-cellular localization.The reduction of cytosolic and mitochondrial types of Trx is dependenl on NADPH and catalyzed by NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase (NTR).In barley,two isoforms each of Trx and NTR have been identified and investigated using proteomics,gene expression,and structural studies.This review outlines the diverse roles suggested for cytosolic/mitochondrial-type Trx systems in cereal seeds and summarizes the current knowl-edge of the barley system including recent data on function,regulation,interactions,and structure.Directions for future research are discussed.

  11. Serum proteomic study on EGFR-TKIs target treatment for patients with NSCLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu X

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Xuan Wu,1,* Wenhua Liang,1,* Xue Hou,1,* Zhong Lin,2 Hongyun Zhao,1 Yan Huang,1 Wenfeng Fang,1 Yuanyuan Zhao,1 Jingxun Wu,3 Yunpeng Yang,1 Chong Xue,1 Zhihuang Hu,1 Jing Zhang,1 Jianwei Zhang,1 Yuxiang Ma,1 Ting Zhou,1 Tao Qin,1 Li Zhang1 1State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Department of Medical Oncology, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Medical Oncology, Fifth Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Zhuhai, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Medical Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University, Xiamen, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this article Background: Although epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs are widely used for EGFR mutated non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients, tumor sample availability and heterogeneity of the tumor remain challenging for physicians’ selection of these patients. Here, we developed a serum proteomic classifier based on matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS to predict the clinical outcome of patients treated with EGFR-TKIs. Method: A total of 68 patients were included in this study. All patients received EGFR-TKIs as second or third line treatment and blood samples were collected before treatment. Using magnetic bead assisted serum peptide capture coupled to MALDI-TOF-MS, pretreatment serum from 24 NSCLC patients was analyzed to develop a proteomic classifier (training set. In a blinded test set with 44 patients, each sample was classified into “good” or “poor” groups using this classifier. Survival analysis of each group was done based on this classification. Result: A 3-peptide proteomic classifier was developed from the training set. In the testing set, the classifier was able to distinguish patients of “good” or “poor” outcomes with 93% accuracy, sensitivity, and

  12. Labeling and label free shotgun proteomics approaches to characterize muscle tissue from farmed and wild gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piovesana, Susy; Capriotti, Anna Laura; Caruso, Giuseppe; Cavaliere, Chiara; La Barbera, Giorgia; Zenezini Chiozzi, Riccardo; Laganà, Aldo

    2016-01-01

    The proteome characterization of fish muscle tissues, together with the relative expression of each individual protein, provides knowledge on the biochemical response of the organisms and allows to assess the effect of different types of feeding, growth site and nutritional quality of the investigated species. This type of study is usually performed by gel-based proteomics approaches, however shotgun proteomics can serve as well, reducing analysis time and improving sample high-throughput. In this work, a shotgun proteomics method was thus developed and then applied to the characterization of gilthead sea bream edible muscle. The sarcoplasmic protein fraction was extracted, in-solution digested by trypsin and finally analyzed by nanoHPLC high resolution tandem mass spectrometry. Two different quantification strategies were also tested. One was based on chemical dimethyl labeling and the other one on label free quantification. A comparison between these two analytical workflows was performed, to evaluate their individual performance in the analysis of fish samples and assess the differences induced by farming practice on the final commercial product with respect to wild gilthead sea bream. Quantitative differences were detected, and the most relevant one regarded the common fish allergen parvalbumin, found overexpressed in farmed fish samples.

  13. Cell Type-Specific Effects of Mutant DISC1: A Proteomics Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Meng; Broek, Jantine A C; Jouroukhin, Yan; Schoenfelder, Jeannine; Abazyan, Sofya; Jaaro-Peled, Hanna; Sawa, Akira; Bahn, Sabine; Pletnikov, Mikhail

    2016-05-01

    Despite the recent progress in psychiatric genetics, very few studies have focused on genetic risk factors in glial cells that, compared to neurons, can manifest different molecular pathologies underlying psychiatric disorders. In order to address this issue, we studied the effects of mutant disrupted in schizophrenia 1 (DISC1), a genetic risk factor for schizophrenia, in cultured primary neurons and astrocytes using an unbiased mass spectrometry-based proteomic approach. We found that selective expression of mutant DISC1 in neurons affects a wide variety of proteins predominantly involved in neuronal development (e.g., SOX1) and vesicular transport (Rab proteins), whereas selective expression of mutant DISC1 in astrocytes produces changes in the levels of mitochondrial (GDPM), nuclear (TMM43) and cell adhesion (ECM2) proteins. The present study demonstrates that DISC1 variants can perturb distinct molecular pathways in a cell type-specific fashion to contribute to psychiatric disorders through heterogenic effects in diverse brain cells.

  14. Luminescence properties of pHEMA-TiO{sub 2} gels based hybrids materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Museur, Luc, E-mail: luc.museur@univ-paris13.fr [Laboratoire de Physique des Lasers-LPL, CNRS UMR 7538, Institut Galilee, Universite Paris 13, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Gorbovyi, Pavlo; Traore, Mamadou; Kanaev, Andrei [Laboratoire des Sciences des Procedes et des Materiaux-LSPM, UPR3407 CNRS, Institut Galilee, Universite Paris 13, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Rozes, Laurence; Sanchez, Clement [Laboratoire de Chimie de la Matiere Condensee de Paris, UPMC Univ Paris 06, CNRS UMR 7574, College de France, 11 place Marcelin Berthelot, 75005 Paris (France)

    2012-05-15

    Photoluminescence (PL) of photochromic pHEMA-TiO{sub 2} gels-based hybrids was studied by means of time- and energy-resolved spectroscopy at temperatures between 300 K and 10 K. The PL band at 485 nm is assigned to S0 Leftwards-Arrow T1 transition of methoxyphenol (organic molecule added to the commercial monomer hydroxyethyl methacrylate, HEMA and used as an inhibitor of spontaneous polymerisation) in the polymer environment, while the PL band at 600 nm is assigned to the self-trapped exciton onto octahedral TiO{sub 6} site of the inorganic component. The mechanisms of the excited states population are discussed. In particular it is shown that both singlet-triplet energy transfer in methoxyphenol and methoxyphenol-TiO{sub 2} charge transfer are strongly affected by the material composition and temperature. The hypothesis about the photoexcited holes annihilation with the trapped electrons is confirmed to be one of main mechanisms limiting the Ti{sup 3+} centres concentration. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer First study of photoluminescence properties of pHEMA-TiO{sub 2} organic/inorganic hybrids. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Observation and assignment of organic and inorganic components luminescence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analyse of energy transfer processes between organic and inorganic components.

  15. Proteomics and aging : studying the influence of aging on endothelial cells and human plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eman, M.R.

    2007-01-01

    In general, human aging is considered one of the most complex and less-well understood process in biology. In this thesis the possibilities of proteomics technology in the field of aging were explored. The complexity of the aging process was supposed to accompanied by relatively subtle proteome vari

  16. A comparative proteomics study on matrix vesicles of osteoblast-like Saos-2 and U2-OS cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Liang; Cui, Yazhou; Luan, Jing; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Zhou, Xiaoying; Han, Jinxiang

    2013-05-01

    Matrix vesicles (MVs) play an important role in the initial stage of the process of bone mineralization, and are involved in multiple rare skeletal diseases with pathological mineralization or calcification. The aim of the study was to compare the proteomic profiling of osteoblast-like cells with and without mineralization ability (Saos-2 and U2-OS), and to identify novel mineralization-associated MV proteins. MVs were extracted using ExoQuick solution from mineralization-induced Saos-2 and U2-OS cells, and then were validated by transmission electron microscopy. A label-free quantitative proteomic method was used to compare the protein profiling of MVs from Saos-2 and U2-OS cells. Western-blots were used to confirm the expression of MVs proteins identified in proteomic studies. In our proteomic studies, we identified that 89 mineralization-related proteins were significantly up-regulated in Saos-2 MVs compared with U2-OS MVs. We further validated that two MVs proteins, protein kinase C α and ras-related protein Ral-A, were up-regulated in MVs of Saos-2 cells compared to those of U2-OS cells under mineralization-induction. Our findings suggest that protein kinase C α and ras-related protein Ral-A might be involved in bone mineralization as MVs components.

  17. Fabrication and characterization of sol-gel based nanoparticles for drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Reeta

    Nanogels are cross linked polymeric sol-gel based nanoparticles that offer an interior network for incorporation and protection of biomolecules, exhibiting unique advantages for polymer based delivery systems. We have successfully synthesized stable sol-gel nanoparticles by means of [a] silicification reactions using cationic peptides like polylysine as gelating agents, and [b] lyophilization of sol-gels. Macromolecules such as Hemoglobin and Glucose Oxidase and small molecules such as Sodium Nitroprusside (SNP) and antibiotics were encapsulated within the nanogels. We have used transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, zeta potential analysis, and spectroscopy to perform a physicochemical characterization of the nanogels resulting from the two approaches. Our studies have indicated that the nanogel encapsulated proteins and small molecules remain intact, stable and functional. A Hydrogen Peroxide (H2O2) and Nitric Oxide (NO) generating drug carrier was synthesized using these nanogels and the effect of generation of H2O2 from Glucose Oxidase encapsulated nanogels and NO from SNP encapsulated nanogels was tested on E.coli. The results show that the nanoparticles exert antimicrobial activity against E.Coli, in addition NO generating nanogels potentiated H2O2 generating nanogels induced killing. These data suggest that these NO and H2O2 releasing nanogels have the potential to serve as a novel class of antimicrobials for the treatment of multidrug resistant bacteria. The unique properties of these protein/drug incorporated nanogels raise the prospect of fine tailoring to specific applications such as drug delivery and bio imaging.

  18. Nutrients Release from a Novel Gel-Based Slow/Controlled Release Fertilizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Ding

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel gel-based slow/controlled release fertilizer (G-CRF was developed, which was produced by combining various natural, seminatural, and/or synthetic organic macromolecule materials and natural inorganic mineral with conventional NPK fertilizers. Its nutrient release characteristics were studied to compare with conventional fertilizers through the soil column leaching method. The influences of soil factors, including temperature, pH, water, and nutrient contents in the G-CRF on nutrient release, were also investigated through soil-water incubation method. These results indicated that the G-CRF had better effect on controlling release of N, P, and K nutrients, and the effect was more efficient when soil-water content was lower than 45% (w/w, temperature was below 35°C, and soil pH was in the range from weak acid to neutral. In addition, considering the effect of controlling nutrient release and cost of the materials in the G-CRF, it is recommended that the most feasible NPK nutrient contents in the G-CRF ranged from 30 to 35%.

  19. Protein extraction method for the proteomic study of a Mexican traditional fermented starchy food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas, C; Barkla, B J; Wacher, C; Delgado-Olivares, L; Rodríguez-Sanoja, R

    2014-12-05

    Pozol is a traditional fermented maize dough prepared in southeastern Mexico. Wide varieties of microorganisms have already been isolated from this spontaneously fermented product; and include fungi, yeasts, and lactic- and non-lactic acid bacteria. Pozol presents physicochemical features different from that of other food fermentation products, such as a high starch content, in addition to a low protein content. It is these qualities that make it intractable for protein recovery and characterization. The aim of this study was to develop a methodology to optimize the recovery of proteins from the pozol dough following fermentation, by reducing the complexity of the mixture prior to 2D-PAGE analysis and sequencing, to allow the characterization of the metaproteome of the dough. The proteome of 15day fermented maize dough was characterized; proteins were separated and analyzed by mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Subsequent sequence homology database searching, identified numerous bacterial and fungi proteins; with a predominance of lactic acid bacterial proteins, mainly from the Lactobacillus genus. Fungi are mainly represented by Aspergillus. For dominant genera, the most prevalent proteins belong to carbohydrate metabolism and energy production, which suggest that at 15days of fermentation not only fungi but also bacteria are metabolically active. Several methodologies have been employed to study pozol, with a specific focus toward the identification of the microbiota of this fermented maize dough, using both traditional cultivation techniques and culture independent molecular techniques. However to date, the dynamics of this complex fermentation is not well understood. With the purpose to gain further insight into the nature of the fermentation, we used proteomic technologies to identify the origin of proteins and enzymes that facilitate substrate utilization and ultimately the development of the microbiota and fermentation. In this paper we overcome the first general

  20. From Proteomics to Structural Studies of Cytosolic/Mitochondrial-Type Thioredoxin Systems in Barley Seeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shahpiri, Azar; Svensson, Birte; Finnie, Christine

    2009-01-01

    for Trx, indicating that Trx plays a key role in several aspects of cell metabolism. In contrast to other organisms, plants contain multiple forms of Trx that are classified based on their primary structures and sub-cellular localization. The reduction of cytosolic and mitochondrial types of Trx...... is dependent on NADPH and catalyzed by NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase (NTR). In barley, two isoforms each of Trx and NTR have been identified and investigated using proteomics, gene expression, and structural studies. This review outlines the diverse roles suggested for cytosolic/mitochondrial-type Trx...... systems in cereal seeds and summarizes the current knowledge of the barley system including recent data on function, regulation, interactions, and structure. Directions for future research are discussed....

  1. Comparative study of the extracellular proteome of Sulfolobus species reveals limited secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellen, Albert F; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Driessen, Arnold J M

    2010-01-01

    Although a large number of potentially secreted proteins can be predicted on the basis of genomic distribution of signal sequence-bearing proteins, protein secretion in Archaea has barely been studied. A proteomic inventory and comparison of the growth medium proteins in three hyperthermoacidophiles, i.e., Sulfolobus solfataricus, S. acidocaldarius and S. tokodaii, indicates that only few proteins are freely secreted into the growth medium and that the majority originates from cell envelope bound forms. In S. acidocaldarius both cell-associated and secreted alpha-amylase activities are detected. Inactivation of the amyA gene resulted in a complete loss of activity, suggesting that the same protein is responsible for the a-amylase activity at both locations. It is concluded that protein secretion in Sulfolobus is a limited process, and it is suggested that the S-layer may act as a barrier for the free diffusion of folded proteins into the medium.

  2. Proteomics as the final step in the functional metagenomics study of antimicrobial resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona eFouhy

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The majority of clinically applied antimicrobial agents are derived from natural products generated by soil microorganisms and therefore resistance is likely to be ubiquitous in such environments. This is supported by the fact that numerous clinically important resistance mechanisms are encoded within the chromosomes of such bacteria. Advances in genomic sequencing have enabled the in silico identification of putative resistance genes present in these microorganisms. However, it is not sufficient to rely on the identification of putative resistance genes, we must also determine if the resultant proteins confer a resistant phenotype. This will require an analysis pipeline that extends from the extraction of environmental DNA, to the identification and analysis of potential resistance genes and their resultant proteins and phenotypes. This review focuses on the application of functional metagenomics and proteomics to study antimicrobial resistance in diverse environments.

  3. Proteomics Research in Schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Despite intense scientific efforts, the neuropathology and pathophysiology of schizophrenia are poorly understood. Proteomic studies, by testing large numbers of proteins for associations with disease, may contribute to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of schizophrenia. They may also indicate the types and locations of cells most likely to harbor pathological alterations. Investigations using proteomic approaches have already provided much information on quantitative and qualitat...

  4. A gel-based skin and blood flow model for a Doppler optical coherence tomography (DOCT) imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawlor, Kate; O'Connell, Marie-Louise; Jonathan, Enock; Leahy, Martin J.

    2010-02-01

    Since its discovery in 1842 by Christian Johann Doppler, the Doppler Effect has had many applications in the scientific world. In recent years, the phenomenon has been integrated with Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) yielding Doppler Optical Coherence Tomography (DOCT), a technique that is useful for high-resolution imaging of the skin microcirculation. However, interpretation of DOCT images is rather challenging. Thus, our study aims to aid understanding of DOCT images with respect to parameters of microcirculation components such as blood vessel size, depth and angular position. To this end, we have constructed a gel-based tissue and blood-flow model for performing DOCT studies under well controlled conditions. We present results from a pilot study using a gel-based tissue and blood flow model. Human blood was pumped through the model at various velocities from a commercial calibrated syringe pump, serving as a standard reference point for all velocity measurements. The range of velocity values was chosen to coincide with that found in the human vasculature. Simultaneous DOCT imaging at different flow rates contributed to establishing the capabilities and limitations of the DOCT system under investigation. We present preliminary results as first step to developing a robust validation protocol with which to aid future research in this area.

  5. Transcriptome and proteome exploration to provide a resource for the study of Agrocybe aegerita.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Agrocybe aegerita, the black poplar mushroom, has been highly valued as a functional food for its medicinal and nutritional benefits. Several bioactive extracts from A. aegerita have been found to exhibit antitumor and antioxidant activities. However, limited genetic resources for A. aegerita have hindered exploration of this species. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To facilitate the research on A. aegerita, we established a deep survey of the transcriptome and proteome of this mushroom. We applied high-throughput sequencing technology (Illumina to sequence A. aegerita transcriptomes from mycelium and fruiting body. The raw clean reads were de novo assembled into a total of 36,134 expressed sequences tags (ESTs with an average length of 663 bp. These ESTs were annotated and classified according to Gene Ontology (GO, Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COG, and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG metabolic pathways. Gene expression profile analysis showed that 18,474 ESTs were differentially expressed, with 10,131 up-regulated in mycelium and 8,343 up-regulated in fruiting body. Putative genes involved in polysaccharide and steroid biosynthesis were identified from A. aegerita transcriptome, and these genes were differentially expressed at the two stages of A. aegerita. Based on one-dimensional gel electrophoresis (1-DGE coupled with electrospray ionization liquid chromatography tandem MS (LC-ESI-MS/MS, we identified a total of 309 non-redundant proteins. And many metabolic enzymes involved in glycolysis were identified in the protein database. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first study on transcriptome and proteome analyses of A. aegerita. The data in this study serve as a resource of A. aegerita transcripts and proteins, and offer clues to the applications of this mushroom in nutrition, pharmacy and industry.

  6. Proteomic study of periovarian adipose tissue in 17β-estradiol-treated and untreated ovariectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amengual-Cladera, Emilia; Capllonch-Amer, Gabriela; Lladó, Isabel; Gianotti, Magdalena; Proenza, Ana M

    2016-04-01

    Taking into account the sexual dimorphism previously found in white adipose tissue (WAT) regarding mitochondrial function and biogenesis, as well as insulin sensitivity, the aim of this study was to go further into the role of sex hormones in this dimorphism. To achieve this objective, we used ovariectomized rats and performed a screening by means of proteomic analyses of the periovarian WAT, combined with a study of the protein levels of specific factors involved in mitochondrial function. Rats were ovariectomized at 5 weeks of age and subcutaneously injected every 48 h with corn-oil (OVX group) or with 17β-estradiol (E2, 10 μg/kg body mass; OVX + E2 group) for 4 weeks prior to sacrifice. Beside proteomic analysis, protein levels of Transcription Factor A, Mitochondrial (TFAM), cytochrome oxidase (COX)II, and COXIV were determined by Western blot, and mRNA levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator (PGC)-1α, ERα, ERβ, lipoprotein lipase (LPL), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ), and adiponectin were quantified by real-time PCR. Our results show that ovariectomy leads to an increase in anabolic processes and inflammatory protein levels as well as to a decrease in some of the markers of mitochondrial function, which are restored, at least in part, by E2 supplementation. Indeed, this E2 supplementation seems to be counteracted by a decline in ERα and in the ERα to ERβ ratio values that could be directed to avoid an over-stimulation of the E2 signaling pathway, given the possibility of an activation of extra-gonadal steroid biosynthetic pathways.

  7. Approaches for targeted proteomics and its potential applications in neuroscience

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sumit Sethi; Dipti Chourasia; Ishwar S Parhar

    2015-09-01

    An extensive guide on practicable and significant quantitative proteomic approaches in neuroscience research is important not only because of the existing overwhelming limitations but also for gaining valuable understanding into brain function and deciphering proteomics from the workbench to the bedside. Early methodologies to understand the functioning of biological systems are now improving with high-throughput technologies, which allow analysis of various samples concurrently, or of thousand of analytes in a particular sample. Quantitative proteomic approaches include both gel-based and non-gel-based methods that can be further divided into different labelling approaches. This review will emphasize the role of existing technologies, their advantages and disadvantages, as well as their applications in neuroscience. This review will also discuss advanced approaches for targeted proteomics using isotope-coded affinity tag (ICAT) coupled with laser capture microdissection (LCM) followed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) analysis. This technology can further be extended to single cell proteomics in other areas of biological sciences and can be combined with other ‘omics’ approaches to reveal the mechanism of a cellular alterations. This approach may lead to further investigation in basic biology, disease analysis and surveillance, as well as drug discovery. Although numerous challenges still exist, we are confident that this approach will increase the understanding of pathological mechanisms involved in neuroendocrinology, neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders by delivering protein biomarker signatures for brain dysfunction.

  8. Composite Gels Based on Poly (Vinyl alcohol) for Biomedical Uses

    OpenAIRE

    Hoppe, Cristina Elena; Alvarez, Vera Alejandra; Maiolo, Sebastián; Gonzalez, Jimena Soledad

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) hydrogels are being studied for several biomedical applications such as joint replacement, wound dressings and controlled drug-releasing devices, among others. Reinforced PVA hydrogels show good mechanical properties and are a suitable option to replace cartilages. Furthermore, these materials can prevent loss of body fluids, be a barrier against bacteria and also permeable to oxygen, for these all interesting properties, they are used like wound dressing...

  9. Comparative proteomic analysis of fibrotic liver of rats fed high fat diet contained lard versus corn oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hualin; Sit, Wat-Hung; Tipoe, George Lim; Liu, Zhiguo; Wan, Jennifer Man-Fan

    2017-02-01

    The influences of dietary fatty acids on the progress of chronic liver diseases have attracted lots of attentions, but the mechanisms of the effects of lipids rich in saturated fatty acids or PUFAs on hepatic fibrogenesis remain unclear. Female Fischer 344 rats were fed normal chow or chow plus 20% (w/w) of corn oil or lard, respectively, and injected CCl4 twice a week for 4 weeks to induce liver fibrosis. Masson's staining was adopted to illustrate the fibrosis level. The mRNA expression level of α-SMA and the DNA methylation level of its promoter region were analyzed. A 2-DE gel based proteomic approach was constructed to investigate the differential expression level of hepatic proteome between three diet groups. Histological evaluations and α-SMA expression analysis illustrated the high corn oil intake has no effects on hepatic fibrogenesis, but lard intake aggravated liver fibrosis, partly attributed to DNA demethylation of α-SMA promoter region. 2-DE Gel based proteomic study demonstrated excessive lard consumption elevated the expression of fibrosis related alpha-1-antitrypsin precursor, and endoplasmic reticulum stress related proteins such as heat shock cognate 71 kDa, eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4A1 and protein disulfide isomerase associated 3. Moreover, unlike corn oil rich in PUFAs, lard had no effects to elevate the expression of glutathione S-transferases, but decreased the expression of iron store related proteins heme binding protein 1 and ferritin. Lard intake aggravates CCl4 induced liver fibrosis via enhancing the expression of fibrogenesis and ER stress related proteins, and disturbing the hepatic transmethylation reaction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  10. Sol-gel based alumina powders with catalytic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crişan, Maria; Zaharescu, Maria; Kumari, Valluri Durga; Subrahmanyam, Machiraju; Crişan, Dorel; Drăgan, Nicolae; Răileanu, Mălina; Jitianu, Mihaela; Rusu, Adriana; Sadanandam, Gullapelli; Krishna Reddy, Jakkidi

    2011-10-01

    The sol-gel process provides a new approach to the preparation of oxide materials and offers many advantages for making catalysts. Since homogeneous mixing can be achieved at the molecular scale, the chemical reactivity of the oxide surface can be greatly enhanced; thus powders with high surface area and optimized pore size distribution can be obtained at low temperatures. In the present work NiO/Al 2O 3 sol-gel catalysts were obtained by simultaneous gelation of aluminium isopropoxide and nickel nitrate. A comparative study with pure sol-gel alumina was also realized. By physical-structural studies the changes induced by the introduction of the Ni precursor, before and after aluminium alkoxide hydrolysis were highlighted. The introduction of Ni at the beginning of the reaction favors γ-Al 2O 3 crystallization. When Ni is added at the end of reaction, it delays the alumina crystallization and induces the disorder of the lattice. The obtained Ni doped sol-gel derived alumina has been used as catalyst in the finished form for glycerol reforming to generate H 2 for fuel cell applications. Some evaluation results of Ni-doped alumina combined with TiO 2 in photocatalytic glycerol reforming reaction have been included.

  11. Creation of Functional Organic Gels Based on Oligothiophenes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Ping; Zhao Qi-zhong; Hu Jian-hua; Zhou Xiao-ping; Deng Wen-ji; Xu Yun-hua

    2004-01-01

    Polymer gels have received a great deal of attention not only from scientific interest but also for their practical applications. Recently, low molecular-weight organic gels have also been receiving growing attention. However, their have been few studies of low molecular-weight organic gels in contrast to extensive studies of polymer gels.In order to develop a novel class of low-molecular-weight organic gels and to gain an insight into the relationship between molecular structures of gel-forming compounds and gel-forming properties, a novel family of low molecular-weight organic compounds containing oligothiophene,N,N'-distearyl-5,5"-(2,2':5',2"-terthiophe-ne)dicarboxamide(DNC183T),N,N'-dialkyl-5,5"-(3,3"-dioctyl-2,2':5',2"-terthiophene)dicarboxamide(DNCnDOc3T, n = 5, 8, 16, 18)and N,N'-distearyl-5,5'"-( 3,3'"-dioctyl- 2,2':5',2 ":5",2'"-quaterthiophene)dicarboxamide(DNC1sDOc4T), were designed and synthesized. Whereas DNC183T did not form gels with organic solvents, DNCnDOc3T(n = 8, 16, 18) and DNC18DOc4T were found to form gels with certain organic solvents. These are the first examples of low molecular-weight organic gels containing an oligothiophene moiety. It is of intest to note that while DNC8DOc3T forms opaque gels with alcohols,e.g. ethanol and isopropanol, DNC16DOc3T, DNC18DOc3T and DNC18DOc4Tform transparent gels with hydrocarbon solvents such as heptane, octane, undecane, and others. It is shown that the intermolecular hydrogen bonding and intermolecular interactions between the long alkyl chain in the N-alkylcarboxamide group as well as the incorporation of an alkyl group at the β-position of the thiophene ring play an important role for the formation of gels. The optical micrographs of gels and the SEM images of xerogels showed three-dimensional networks of fibrous bundle structures.DNC18DOc4T gels was found to exhibit a reversible clear color change on electrochemical oxidation and reduction. Thus, low molecular-weight organic gels function as a new

  12. Sol-gel-based biosensing applied to medicinal science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Felismina T C; Moreira-Tavares, Ana P; Sales, M Goreti F

    2015-01-01

    Biosensors have opened new horizons in biomedical analysis, by ensuring increased assay speed and flexibility, and allowing point-of-care applications, multi-target analyses, automation and reduced costs of testing. This has been a result of many studies merging nanotechnology with biochemistry over the years, thereby enabling the creation of more suitable environments to biological receptors and their substitution by synthetic analogue materials. Sol-gel chemistry, among other materials, is deeply involved in this process. Sol-gel processing allows the immobilization of organic molecules, biomacromolecules and cells maintaining their properties and activities, permitting their integration into different transduction devices, of electrochemical or optical nature, for single or multiple analyses. Sol-gel also allows to the production of synthetic materials mimicking the activity of natural receptors, while bringing advantages, mostly in terms of cost and stability. Moreover, the biocompatibility of sol-gel materials structures of biological nature allowed the use of these materials in emerging in vivo applications. In this chapter, biosensors for biomedical applications based on sol-gel derived composites are presented, compared and described, along with current emerging applications in vivo, concerning drug delivery or biomaterials. Sol-gel materials are shown as a promising tool for current, emerging and future medical applications.

  13. A silica gel based method for extracting insect surface hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Dong-Hwan; Ramírez, Santiago R; Tsutsui, Neil D

    2012-02-01

    Here, we describe a novel method for the extraction of insect cuticular hydrocarbons using silica gel, herein referred to as "silica-rubbing". This method permits the selective sampling of external hydrocarbons from insect cuticle surfaces for subsequent analysis using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The cuticular hydrocarbons are first adsorbed to silica gel particles by rubbing the cuticle of insect specimens with the materials, and then are subsequently eluted using organic solvents. We compared the cuticular hydrocarbon profiles that resulted from extractions using silica-rubbing and solvent-soaking methods in four ant and one bee species: Linepithema humile, Azteca instabilis, Camponotus floridanus, Pogonomyrmex barbatus (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), and Euglossa dilemma (Hymenoptera: Apidae). We also compared the hydrocarbon profiles of Euglossa dilemma obtained via silica-rubbing and solid phase microextraction (SPME). Comparison of hydrocarbon profiles obtained by different extraction methods indicates that silica rubbing selectively extracts the hydrocarbons that are present on the surface of the cuticular wax layer, without extracting hydrocarbons from internal glands and tissues. Due to its surface specificity, efficiency, and low cost, this new method may be useful for studying the biology of insect cuticular hydrocarbons.

  14. Integrating cell biology and proteomic approaches in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takáč, Tomáš; Šamajová, Olga; Šamaj, Jozef

    2017-04-22

    Significant improvements of protein extraction, separation, mass spectrometry and bioinformatics nurtured advancements of proteomics during the past years. The usefulness of proteomics in the investigation of biological problems can be enhanced by integration with other experimental methods from cell biology, genetics, biochemistry, pharmacology, molecular biology and other omics approaches including transcriptomics and metabolomics. This review aims to summarize current trends integrating cell biology and proteomics in plant science. Cell biology approaches are most frequently used in proteomic studies investigating subcellular and developmental proteomes, however, they were also employed in proteomic studies exploring abiotic and biotic stress responses, vesicular transport, cytoskeleton and protein posttranslational modifications. They are used either for detailed cellular or ultrastructural characterization of the object subjected to proteomic study, validation of proteomic results or to expand proteomic data. In this respect, a broad spectrum of methods is employed to support proteomic studies including ultrastructural electron microscopy studies, histochemical staining, immunochemical localization, in vivo imaging of fluorescently tagged proteins and visualization of protein-protein interactions. Thus, cell biological observations on fixed or living cell compartments, cells, tissues and organs are feasible, and in some cases fundamental for the validation and complementation of proteomic data. Validation of proteomic data by independent experimental methods requires development of new complementary approaches. Benefits of cell biology methods and techniques are not sufficiently highlighted in current proteomic studies. This encouraged us to review most popular cell biology methods used in proteomic studies and to evaluate their relevance and potential for proteomic data validation and enrichment of purely proteomic analyses. We also provide examples of

  15. Nitrogen and carbon removal efficiency of a polyvinyl alcohol gel based moving bed biofilm reactor system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gani, Khalid Muzamil; Singh, Jasdeep; Singh, Nitin Kumar; Ali, Muntjeer; Rose, Vipin; Kazmi, A A

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the effectiveness of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) gel beads in treating domestic wastewater was investigated: a moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) configuration (oxic-anoxic and oxic) with 10% filling fraction of biomass carriers was operated in a continuously fed regime at temperatures of 25, 20, 15 and 6 °C with hydraulic retention times (HRTs) of 32 h, 18 h, 12 h and 9 h, respectively. Influent loadings were in the range of 0.22-1.22 kg N m(-3) d(-1) (total nitrogen (TN)), 1.48-7.82 kg chemical oxygen demand (COD) m(-3) d(-1) (organic) and 0.12-0.89 kg NH4(+)-N m(-3)d(-1) (ammonia nitrogen). MBBR performance resulted in the maximum TN removal rate of 1.22 kg N m(-3) d(-1) when the temperature and HRT were 6 °C and 9 h, respectively. The carbon removal rate at this temperature and HRT was 6.82 kg COD m(-3) d(-1). Ammonium removal rates ranged from 0.13 to 0.75 kg NH4(+)-N m(-3) d(-1) during the study. Total phosphorus and suspended solid removal efficiency ranged from 84 to 98% and 85 to 94% at an influent concentration of 3.3-7.1 mg/L and 74-356 mg/L, respectively. The sludge wasted from the MBBR exhibited light weight features characterized by sludge volume index value of 185 mL/g. Experimental data obtained can be useful in further developing the concept of PVA gel based wastewater treatment systems.

  16. Proteomics Study on Nonallergic Hypersensitivity Induced by Compound 4880 and Ovalbumin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yubin Xu

    Full Text Available Nonallergic hypersensitivity reaction (NHR accounts for more than 77% of all immune-mediated immediate hypersensitivity reactions and has become a serious threat to public health. Here, proteomics was used to study the NHR mechanism of two typical substances, the compound 4880 and ovalbumin. Twelve different proteins were suggested as potential biomarkers for examining the NHR mechanism, and our results revealed that the mechanism mainly encompassed 2 processes, i.e., generation and effect processes. The generation process could be classified as direct stimulation, complement (classical and alternative, coagulation, kallikrein-kinin, and integrated pathways. Thus glutathione peroxidase 1, terminal complement complex (complement factor 4d and Bb, coagulation 13, kininogen-1, and IgE could be used as candidate biomarkers for the indication of the corresponding pathways respectively, the proteins were further confirmed by ELISA. And the effect process was mainly composed of histamine as well as proteins such as DCD and MYLPF, which could be used as important indices for the symptoms of NHR. Our study differs from previous studies in that C4880 was found to not only be involved in the direct stimulation pathway, but also in the activated complement and kallikrein-kinin pathways through the coagulation pathway. We also report for the first time that ovalbumin-induced NHR could be a combination of the coagulation, classical complement, and integrated pathways.

  17. A pilot proteomic study of amyloid precursor interactors in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottrell, Barbara A; Galvan, Veronica; Banwait, Surita; Gorostiza, Olivia; Lombardo, Christian R; Williams, Tristan; Schilling, Birgit; Peel, Alyson; Gibson, Bradford; Koo, Edward H; Link, Christopher D; Bredesen, Dale E

    2005-08-01

    Several approaches have been used in an effort to identify proteins that interact with beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP). However, few studies have addressed the identification of proteins associated with APP in brain tissue from patients with Alzheimer's disease. We report the results of a pilot proteomic study performed on complexes immunoprecipitated with APP in brain samples of patients with Alzheimer's disease and normal control subjects. The 21 proteins identified could be grouped into five functional classes: molecular chaperones, cytoskeletal and structural proteins, proteins involved in trafficking, adaptors, and enzymes. Among the proteins identified, six had been reported previously as direct, indirect, or genetically inferred APP interactors. The other 15 proteins immunoprecipitated with APP were novel potential partners. We confirmed the APP interaction by Western blotting and coimmunolocalization in brain tissues, for 5 of the 21 interactors. In agreement with previous studies, our results are compatible with an involvement of APP in axonal transport and vesicular trafficking, and with a potential association of APP with cellular protein folding/protein degradation systems.

  18. A Pilot Proteomic Study of Amyloid Precursor Interactors in Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottrell, Barbara A.; Galvan, Veronica; Banwait, Surita; Gorostiza, Olivia; Lombardo, Christian R.; Williams, Tristan; Schilling, Birgit; Peel, Alyson; Gibson, Bradford; Koo, Edward H.; Link, Christopher D.; Bredesen, Dale E.

    2007-01-01

    Several approaches have been used in an effort to identify proteins that interact with β-amyloid precursor protein (APP). However, few studies have addressed the identification of proteins associated with APP in brain tissue from patients with Alzheimer’s disease. We report the results of a pilot proteomic study performed on complexes immunoprecipitated with APP in brain samples of patients with Alzheimer’s disease and normal control subjects. The 21 proteins identified could be grouped into five functional classes: molecular chaperones, cytoskeletal and structural proteins, proteins involved in trafficking, adaptors, and enzymes. Among the proteins identified, six had been reported previously as direct, indirect, or genetically inferred APP interactors. The other 15 proteins immunoprecipitated with APP were novel potential partners. We confirmed the APP interaction by Western blotting and coimmunolocalization in brain tissues, for 5 of the 21 interactors. In agreement with previous studies, our results are compatible with an involvement of APP in axonal transport and vesicular trafficking, and with a potential association of APP with cellular protein folding/protein degradation systems. PMID:16049941

  19. Searching urinary tumor-associated proteins for bladder transitional cell carcinoma in southwestern Taiwan using gel-based proteomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Cheng Su

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: In this paper, 11 de-regulated proteins were observed in the urinary specimens of BTTC patients from the southwestern coast of Taiwan where Blackfoot disease is endemic and the unusually high incidence of BTTC in this area might attribute to high arsenic content in the drinking water. It is possible that long-term arsenic-induced alteration of these de-regulated proteins, most of which were extracellularmatrix – (ECM related proteins which may play roles in regulating the immune response, signal transduction and tumor invasions, might be involved in BTTC development in southwestern Taiwan.

  20. Feature detection techniques for preprocessing proteomic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellers, Kimberly F; Miecznikowski, Jeffrey C

    2010-01-01

    Numerous gel-based and nongel-based technologies are used to detect protein changes potentially associated with disease. The raw data, however, are abundant with technical and structural complexities, making statistical analysis a difficult task. Low-level analysis issues (including normalization, background correction, gel and/or spectral alignment, feature detection, and image registration) are substantial problems that need to be addressed, because any large-level data analyses are contingent on appropriate and statistically sound low-level procedures. Feature detection approaches are particularly interesting due to the increased computational speed associated with subsequent calculations. Such summary data corresponding to image features provide a significant reduction in overall data size and structure while retaining key information. In this paper, we focus on recent advances in feature detection as a tool for preprocessing proteomic data. This work highlights existing and newly developed feature detection algorithms for proteomic datasets, particularly relating to time-of-flight mass spectrometry, and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Note, however, that the associated data structures (i.e., spectral data, and images containing spots) used as input for these methods are obtained via all gel-based and nongel-based methods discussed in this manuscript, and thus the discussed methods are likewise applicable.

  1. The prediction of late-onset preeclampsia: Results from a longitudinal proteomics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erez, Offer; Romero, Roberto; Maymon, Eli; Chaemsaithong, Piya; Done, Bogdan; Pacora, Percy; Panaitescu, Bogdan; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Hassan, Sonia S.

    2017-01-01

    Background Late-onset preeclampsia is the most prevalent phenotype of this syndrome; nevertheless, only a few biomarkers for its early diagnosis have been reported. We sought to correct this deficiency using a high through-put proteomic platform. Methods A case-control longitudinal study was conducted, including 90 patients with normal pregnancies and 76 patients with late-onset preeclampsia (diagnosed at ≥34 weeks of gestation). Maternal plasma samples were collected throughout gestation (normal pregnancy: 2–6 samples per patient, median of 2; late-onset preeclampsia: 2–6, median of 5). The abundance of 1,125 proteins was measured using an aptamers-based proteomics technique. Protein abundance in normal pregnancies was modeled using linear mixed-effects models to estimate mean abundance as a function of gestational age. Data was then expressed as multiples of-the-mean (MoM) values in normal pregnancies. Multi-marker prediction models were built using data from one of five gestational age intervals (8–16, 16.1–22, 22.1–28, 28.1–32, 32.1–36 weeks of gestation). The predictive performance of the best combination of proteins was compared to placental growth factor (PIGF) using bootstrap. Results 1) At 8–16 weeks of gestation, the best prediction model included only one protein, matrix metalloproteinase 7 (MMP-7), that had a sensitivity of 69% at a false positive rate (FPR) of 20% (AUC = 0.76); 2) at 16.1–22 weeks of gestation, MMP-7 was the single best predictor of late-onset preeclampsia with a sensitivity of 70% at a FPR of 20% (AUC = 0.82); 3) after 22 weeks of gestation, PlGF was the best predictor of late-onset preeclampsia, identifying 1/3 to 1/2 of the patients destined to develop this syndrome (FPR = 20%); 4) 36 proteins were associated with late-onset preeclampsia in at least one interval of gestation (after adjustment for covariates); 5) several biological processes, such as positive regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor

  2. Proteomic Study of Entamoeba histolytica Trophozoites, Cysts, and Cyst-Like Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna-Nácar, Milka; Navarrete-Perea, José; Moguel, Bárbara; Bobes, Raúl J; Laclette, Juan P; Carrero, Julio C

    2016-01-01

    The cyst stage of Entamoeba histolytica is a promising therapeutic target against human amoebiasis. Our research team previously reported the production in vitro of Cyst-Like Structures (CLS) sharing structural features with cysts, including rounded shape, size reduction, multinucleation, and the formation of a chitin wall coupled to the overexpression of glucosamine 6-phosphate isomerase, the rate-limiting enzyme of the chitin synthesis pathway. A proteomic study of E. histolytica trophozoites, cysts, and in vitro-produced CLS is reported herein to determine the nature of CLS, widen our knowledge on the cyst stage, and identify possible proteins and pathways involved in the encystment process. Total protein extracts were obtained from E. histolytica trophozoites, CLS, and partially purified cysts recovered from the feces of amoebic human patients; extracts were trypsin-digested and analyzed by LC-MS/MS. In total, 1029 proteins were identified in trophozoites, 550 in CLS, and 411 in cysts, with 539, 299, and 84 proteins unique to each sample, respectively, and only 74 proteins shared by all three stages. About 70% of CLS proteins were shared with trophozoites, even though differences were observed in the relative protein abundance. While trophozoites showed a greater abundance of proteins associated to a metabolically active cell, CLS showed higher expression of proteins related to proteolysis, redox homeostasis, and stress response. In addition, the expression of genes encoding for the cyst wall proteins Jessie and Jacob was detected by RT-PCR and the Jacob protein identified by Western blotting and immunofluorescence in CLS. However, the proteomic profile of cysts as determined by LC-MS/MS was very dissimilar to that of trophozoites and CLS, with almost 40% of hypothetical proteins. Our global results suggest that CLS are more alike to trophozoites than to cysts, and they could be generated as a rapid survival response of trophozoites to a stressful condition

  3. Proteomic Study of Entamoeba histolytica Trophozoites, Cysts, and Cyst-Like Structures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milka Luna-Nácar

    Full Text Available The cyst stage of Entamoeba histolytica is a promising therapeutic target against human amoebiasis. Our research team previously reported the production in vitro of Cyst-Like Structures (CLS sharing structural features with cysts, including rounded shape, size reduction, multinucleation, and the formation of a chitin wall coupled to the overexpression of glucosamine 6-phosphate isomerase, the rate-limiting enzyme of the chitin synthesis pathway. A proteomic study of E. histolytica trophozoites, cysts, and in vitro-produced CLS is reported herein to determine the nature of CLS, widen our knowledge on the cyst stage, and identify possible proteins and pathways involved in the encystment process. Total protein extracts were obtained from E. histolytica trophozoites, CLS, and partially purified cysts recovered from the feces of amoebic human patients; extracts were trypsin-digested and analyzed by LC-MS/MS. In total, 1029 proteins were identified in trophozoites, 550 in CLS, and 411 in cysts, with 539, 299, and 84 proteins unique to each sample, respectively, and only 74 proteins shared by all three stages. About 70% of CLS proteins were shared with trophozoites, even though differences were observed in the relative protein abundance. While trophozoites showed a greater abundance of proteins associated to a metabolically active cell, CLS showed higher expression of proteins related to proteolysis, redox homeostasis, and stress response. In addition, the expression of genes encoding for the cyst wall proteins Jessie and Jacob was detected by RT-PCR and the Jacob protein identified by Western blotting and immunofluorescence in CLS. However, the proteomic profile of cysts as determined by LC-MS/MS was very dissimilar to that of trophozoites and CLS, with almost 40% of hypothetical proteins. Our global results suggest that CLS are more alike to trophozoites than to cysts, and they could be generated as a rapid survival response of trophozoites to a

  4. Shell matrix proteins of the clam, Mya truncata: Roles beyond shell formation through proteomic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arivalagan, Jaison; Marie, Benjamin; Sleight, Victoria A; Clark, Melody S; Berland, Sophie; Marie, Arul

    2016-06-01

    Mya truncata, a soft shell clam, is presented as a new model to study biomineralization through a proteomics approach. In this study, the shell and mantle tissue were analysed in order to retrieve knowledge about the secretion of shell matrix proteins (SMPs). Out of 67 and 127 shell and mantle proteins respectively, 16 were found in both shell and mantle. Bioinformatic analysis of SMP sequences for domain prediction revealed the presence of several new domains such as fucolectin tachylectin-4 pentraxin-1 (FTP), scavenger receptor, alpha-2-macroglobulin (α2 M), lipocalin and myosin tail along with previously reported SMP domains such as chitinase, carbonic anhydrase, tyrosinase, sushi, and chitin binding. Interestingly, these newly predicted domains are attributed with molecular functions other than biomineralization. These findings suggest that shells may not only act as protective armour from predatory action, but could also actively be related to other functions such as immunity. In this context, the roles of SMPs in biomineralization need to be looked in a new perspective.

  5. A proteomic study on postdiapaused embryonic development of brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiwei; Meng, Bo; Chen, Weihua; Ge, Xiaomeng; Liu, Siqi; Yu, Jun

    2007-10-01

    Encysted gastrula of brine shrimp (Artemia, Crustacea, and Anostraca) provides an excellent model for studying molecular processes of diapause. We report a proteomic study on early molecular responses of Artemia's postdiapaused cysts and found that dehydrated cysts actually store more proteins, in both kind and amount, than developing cysts. We identified 75 differentially expressed proteins over a course of cyst development, and also exploited PTMs of dehydrate cysts. We further surveyed gene expression of postdiapaused cysts in early developmental phases in a 0.5 h interval up to the seventh hour, and discovered that the activation of cellular activities is ignited as early as 0.5 h after rehydration. We traced nine differentially expressed proteins (COXI, COXIII, heat shock proteins (HSP26, HSP60, and HSP70), CDC48, late embryogenesis abundant (LEA), GS1-like protein, and cathepsin L-associated protein (CLAP)) for quantitative transcriptional changes, monitored by real-time PCR, and found these proteins exhibiting distinct expression patterns that suggest complex gene regulations for cyst reactivation after diapause breakage. Future experiments should be designed to focus on early activation concerning signal transduction, energy generation, and PTMs.

  6. Proteomic Study of HPV-Positive Head and Neck Cancers: Preliminary Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Géraldine Descamps

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomavirus (HPV was recently recognized as a new risk factor for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. For oropharyngeal cancers, an HPV+ status is associated with better prognosis in a subgroup of nonsmokers and nondrinkers. However, HPV infection is also involved in the biology of head and neck carcinoma (HNC in patients with a history of tobacco use and/or alcohol consumption. Thus, the involvement of HPV infection in HN carcinogenesis remains unclear, and further studies are needed to identify and analyze HPV-specific pathways that are involved in this process. Using a quantitative proteomics-based approach, we compared the protein expression profiles of two HPV+ HNC cell lines and one HPV− HNC cell line. We identified 155 proteins that are differentially expressed (P<0.01 in these three lines. Among the identified proteins, prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA was upregulated and eukaryotic elongation factor 1 alpha (EEF1α was downregulated in the HPV+ cell lines. Immunofluorescence and western blotting analyses confirmed these results. Moreover, PSCA and EEF1α were differentially expressed in two clinical series of 50 HPV+ and 50 HPV− oral cavity carcinomas. Thus, our study reveals for the first time that PSCA and EEF1α are associated with the HPV-status, suggesting that these proteins could be involved in HPV-associated carcinogenesis.

  7. Fish gut-liver immunity during homeostasis or inflammation revealed by integrative transcriptome and proteome studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Nan; Song, Yu-Long; Wang, Bei; Zhang, Xiang-Yang; Zhang, Xu-Jie; Wang, Ya-Li; Cheng, Ying-Yin; Chen, Dan-Dan; Xia, Xiao-Qin; Lu, Yi-Shan; Zhang, Yong-An

    2016-11-01

    The gut-associated lymphoid tissue, connected with liver via bile and blood, constructs a local immune environment of both defense and tolerance. The gut-liver immunity has been well-studied in mammals, yet in fish remains largely unknown, even though enteritis as well as liver and gallbladder syndrome emerged as a limitation in aquaculture. In this study, we performed integrative bioinformatic analysis for both transcriptomic (gut and liver) and proteomic (intestinal mucus and bile) data, in both healthy and infected tilapias. We found more categories of immune transcripts in gut than liver, as well as more adaptive immune in gut meanwhile more innate in liver. Interestingly reduced differential immune transcripts between gut and liver upon inflammation were also revealed. In addition, more immune proteins in bile than intestinal mucus were identified. And bile probably providing immune effectors to intestinal mucus upon inflammation was deduced. Specifically, many key immune transcripts in gut or liver as well as key immune proteins in mucus or bile were demonstrated. Accordingly, we proposed a hypothesized profile of fish gut-liver immunity, during either homeostasis or inflammation. Current data suggested that fish gut and liver may collaborate immunologically while keep homeostasis using own strategies, including potential unique mechanisms.

  8. Proteomic study of 'Moncada' mandarin buds from on- versus off-crop trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Fambuena, Natalia; Mesejo, Carlos; Reig, Carmina; Agustí, Manuel; Tárraga, Susana; Lisón, Purificación; Iglesias, Domingo J; Primo-Millo, Eduardo; González-Mas, M Carmen

    2013-12-01

    A proteomic analysis of buds from mandarin trees with contrasting fruit load (on- and off-crop trees) was carried out during the onset of low-temperature induction. The aim of the study was to find out more about the molecular mechanism relating to alternate bearing in Citrus and its relationship with flowering. The 'Moncada' variety (Clementine 'Oroval'x'Kara' mandarin), displaying remarkable behaviour in alternate production, was used in this study. From 2D DIGE gel, 192 spots were isolated: 97 showed increased expression in the off-crop buds as compared to the on-crop buds, while 95 exhibited enhanced expression in the on-crop buds versus the off-crop buds. These spots were identified by MALDI-MS or LC-MS-MS. The largest groups of proteins up-expressed in the off-crop buds were the proteins involved in carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism, and the proteins expressed in response to stimuli such as reactive oxygen species. The largest groups of proteins up-expressed in the on-crop buds were related to primary metabolism, oxidative stress and defence responses. Depending on their function, some of these proteins can stimulate the flowering, such as fructose-bisphosphate aldolase or leucine-rich repeat transmembrane protein kinase, while others can inhibit it, such as cytochrome c oxidase subunit II. Twenty-two other proteins with unknown functions were up-expressed in the on- or off-crop buds.

  9. Proteomic signatures of infertile men with clinical varicocele and their validation studies reveal mitochondrial dysfunction leading to infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Agarwal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To study the major differences in the distribution of spermatozoa proteins in infertile men with varicocele by comparative proteomics and validation of their level of expression. The study-specific estimates for each varicocele outcome were combined to identify the proteins involved in varicocele-associated infertility in men irrespective of stage and laterality of their clinical varicocele. Expression levels of 5 key proteins (PKAR1A, AK7, CCT6B, HSPA2, and ODF2 involved in stress response and sperm function including molecular chaperones were validated by Western blotting. Ninety-nine proteins were differentially expressed in the varicocele group. Over 87% of the DEP involved in major energy metabolism and key sperm functions were underexpressed in the varicocele group. Key protein functions affected in the varicocele group were spermatogenesis, sperm motility, and mitochondrial dysfunction, which were further validated by Western blotting, corroborating the proteomics analysis. Varicocele is essentially a state of energy deprivation, hypoxia, and hyperthermia due to impaired blood supply, which is corroborated by down-regulation of lipid metabolism, mitochondrial electron transport chain, and Krebs cycle enzymes. To corroborate the proteomic analysis, expression of the 5 identified proteins of interest was validated by Western blotting. This study contributes toward establishing a biomarker "fingerprint" to assess sperm quality on the basis of molecular parameters.

  10. Comparative proteomics study on meglumine antimoniate sensitive and resistant Leishmania tropica isolated from Iranian anthroponotic cutaneous leishmaniasis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajjaran, H; Azarian, B; Mohebali, M; Hadighi, R; Assareh, A; Vaziri, B

    2012-02-01

    In order to define the protein expressional changes related to the process of meglumine antimoniate resistance in anthroponotic cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL), we performed a comparative proteomics analysis on sensitive and resistant strains of Leishmania tropica isolated from Iranian CL patients. Cell proteins were analysed with 2-dimensional electrophoresis and differentially expressed proteins were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Image analysis of the matched maps identified 7 proteins that were either over- or down-expressed: activated protein kinase c receptor(LACK), alpha tubulin (x2), prostaglandin f2-alpha synthase, protein disulfide isomerase, vesicular transport protein and a hypothetical protein. The study shows the usefulness of proteomics in identifying proteins that may express differences between sensitive and resistant L. tropica isolates.

  11. Experimental data of inorganic gel based smart window using silica sol–gel process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayeon Jung

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article experimental data are presented for inorganic gel based smart window fabricated using silica sol–gel process. Parallel beam transmittances were measured as functions of voltages for samples fabricated with different concentrations of nitric acid. Spectroscopic transmittance data at different driving voltages for samples fabricated with different LC concentrations are shown. Transmittance spectra of the Si–Ti based gel-based-liquid-crystal (GDLC device measured as different driving voltages were compared with those of PDLC. GDLC showed much lower operating voltages, 10–15 V, for on-state. Formation of the LC droplet in gelation process is illustrated. The methyl organic group surrounds LC droplets. Demonstration of GDLC based smart window showed the successful operation with low driving voltages. GDLC window shows clear color, even at off-state, compared with PDLC.

  12. Clinical proteomics: Current status, challenges, and future perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyh-Horng Chiou

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This account will give an overview and evaluation of the current advances in mass spectrometry (MS-based proteomics platforms and technology. A general review of some background information concerning the application of these methods in the characterization of molecular sizes and related protein expression profiles associated with different types of cells under varied experimental conditions will be presented. It is intended to provide a concise and succinct overview to those clinical researchers first exposed to this foremost powerful methodology in modern life sciences of postgenomic era. Proteomic characterization using highly sophisticated and expensive instrumentation of MS has been used to characterize biological samples of complex protein mixtures with vastly different protein structure and composition. These systems are then used to highlight the versatility and potential of the MS-based proteomic strategies for facilitating protein expression analysis of various disease-related organisms or tissues of interest. Major MS-based strategies reviewed herein include (1 matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-MS and electron-spray ionization proteomics; (2 one-dimensional or two-dimensional gel-based proteomics; (3 gel-free shotgun proteomics in conjunction with liquid chromatography/tandem MS; (4 Multiple reaction monitoring coupled tandem MS quantitative proteomics and; (5 Phosphoproteomics based on immobilized metal affinity chromatography and liquid chromatography-MS/MS.

  13. Environmental proteomics and metallomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Barea, Juan; Gómez-Ariza, José Luis

    2006-04-01

    Monitoring environmental pollution using biomarkers requires detailed knowledge about the markers, and many only allow a partial assessment of pollution. New proteomic methods (environmental proteomics) can identify proteins that, after validation, might be useful as alternative biomarkers, although this approach also has its limitations, derived mainly from their application to non-model organisms. Initial studies using environmental proteomics were carried out in animals exposed to model pollutants, and led to the concept of protein expression signatures. Experiments have been carried out in model organisms (yeast, Arabidopsis, rat cells, or mice) exposed to model contaminants. Over the last few years, proteomics has been applied to organisms from ecosystems with different pollution levels, forming the basis of an environmental branch in proteomics. Another focus is connected with the presence of metals bound to biomolecules, which adds an additional dimension to metal-biomolecule and metalloprotein characterization - the field of metallomics. The metallomic approach considers the metallome: a whole individual metal or metalloid species within a cell or tissue. A metallomic analytical approach (MAA) is proposed as a new tool to study and identify metalloproteins.

  14. Effective protein extraction protocol for proteomics studies of Jerusalem artichoke leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meide; Shen, Shihua

    2013-07-01

    Protein extraction is a crucial step for proteomics studies. To establish an effective protein extraction protocol suitable for two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE) analysis in Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.), three different protein extraction methods-trichloroacetic acid/acetone, Mg/NP-40, and phenol/ammonium acetate-were evaluated using Jerusalem artichoke leaves as source materials. Of the three methods, trichloroacetic acid/acetone yielded the best protein separation pattern and highest number of protein spots in 2DE analysis. Proteins highly abundant in leaves, such as Rubisco, are typically problematic during leaf 2DE analysis, however, and this disadvantage was evident using trichloroacetic acid/acetone. To reduce the influence of abundant proteins on the detection of low-abundance proteins, we optimized the trichloroacetic acid/acetone method by incorporating a PEG fractionation approach. After optimization, 363 additional (36.2%) protein spots were detected on the 2DE gel. Our results suggest that trichloroacetic acid/acetone method is a better protein extraction technique than Mg/NP-40 and phenol/ammonium acetate in Jerusalem artichoke leaf 2DE analysis, and that trichloroacetic acid/acetone method combined with PEG fractionation procedure is the most effective approach for leaf 2DE analysis of Jerusalem artichoke.

  15. Plasma proteomic study in patients with high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-jun LUO

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To investigate the differential expressions of protein in the plasma proteome in patients suffering from high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE and their implications. Methods  The plasmas of six HAPE patients and six healthy controls were studied. The high-abundant proteins in the plasma were removed. The low-abundant proteins in the plasma/serum were segregated by 2-DE. MALDI-TOF/MS was adopted to measure the peptide fingerprints after the differential protein spots were digested by enzymes. Comparison and analysis were made in the GenBank. Results  The immunoglobulin K1 light chain, serum transferrin protein precursor, and α-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain-related protein expressions were upregulated in HAPE patients compared with the control group. However the human fibrin glue coagulation protein 3 was down-regulated. Conclusion  The differential expression of the above four proteins in the plasma of HAPE patients may be related to the occurrence of HAPE and can be used as the target point for the prediction of HAPE.

  16. A proteome study of secreted prostatic factors affecting osteoblastic activity: identification and characterisation of cyclophilin A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard; Eriksen, E F

    2003-01-01

    on the proliferation or differentiation of hBMS cells. Cyclophilin A at 1, 10, and 100 nM and cyclophilin A at 10 nM combined with 10 ng/ml IGF decreased the proliferation of hBMS cells up to 49+/-30, 38+/-29, 50+/-8 and 60+/-16%, respectively [mean (treated/control)+/-standard error of the means (SEM)] of control...... with a molecular weight between 20 and 30 kDa. Even though a number of investigations have been performed to identify the osteoblastic mitogenic factor or factors produced by prostate cancer cells, it is still unknown what causes the mitogenic activation of osteoblasts. Therefore, the aim of this study...... was to characterise the protein profile of conditioned medium (CM) from PC3 cells in the molecular weight range of 5-30 kDa using proteome analysis. A protein profile of the CM from PC3 cells was performed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE). Thirty protein spots with molecular weights...

  17. A simple, economical and reproducible protein extraction protocol for proteomics studies of soybean roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisete Pains Rodrigues

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sample preparation is a critical step in two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE of plant tissues. Here we describe a phenol/SDS procedure that, although greatly simplified, produced well-resolved and reproducible 2-DE profiles of protein extracts from soybean [Glycine max (L. Merril] roots. Extractions were made in three replicates using both the original and simplified procedure. To evaluate the quality of the extracted proteins, ten spots were randomly selected and identified by mass spectrometry (MS. The 2-DE gels were equally well resolved, with no streaks or smears, and no significant differences were observed in protein yield, reproducibility, resolution or number of spots. Mass spectra of the ten selected spots were compared with database entries and allowed high-quality identification of proteins. The simplified protocol described here presents considerable savings of time and reagents without compromising the quality of 2-DE protein profiles and compatibility with MS analysis, and may facilitate the progress of proteomics studies of legume-rhizobia interactions.

  18. A proteomic study of protein variation between osteopenic and age-matched control bone tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaput, Christopher D; Dangott, Lawrence J; Rahm, Mark D; Hitt, Kirby D; Stewart, Donald S; Wayne Sampson, H

    2012-05-01

    The focus of this study was to identify changes in protein expression within the bone tissue environment between osteopenic and control bone tissue of human femoral neck patients with osteoarthritis. Femoral necks were compared from osteopenic patients and age-matched controls. A new method of bone protein extraction was developed to provide a swift, clear view of the bone proteome. Relative changes in protein expression between control and osteopenic samples were quantified using difference gel electrophoresis (DIGE) technology after affinity chromatographic depletion of albumin and IgG. The proteins that were determined to be differentially expressed were identified using standard liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) and database searching techniques. In order to rule out blood contamination, blood from age-matched osteoporotic, osteopenic and controls were analyzed in a similar manner. Image analysis of the DIGE gels indicated that 145 spots in the osteopenic bone samples changed at least ± 1.5-fold from the control samples (P proteins were identified by LC/MS/MS. Of the proteins that increased in the osteopenic femurs, two were especially significant: carbonic anhydrase I and phosphoglycerate kinase 1. Apolipoprotein A-I was the most prominent protein that significantly decreased in the osteopenic femurs. The blood samples revealed no significant differences between groups for any of these proteins. In conclusion, carbonic anhydrase I, phosphoglycerate kinase 1 and apolipoprotein A-I appeared to be the most significant variations of proteins in patients with osteopenia and osteoarthritis.

  19. Shotgun proteomic analytical approach for studying proteins adsorbed onto liposome surface

    KAUST Repository

    Capriotti, Anna Laura

    2011-07-02

    The knowledge about the interaction between plasma proteins and nanocarriers employed for in vivo delivery is fundamental to understand their biodistribution. Protein adsorption onto nanoparticle surface (protein corona) is strongly affected by vector surface characteristics. In general, the primary interaction is thought to be electrostatic, thus surface charge of carrier is supposed to play a central role in protein adsorption. Because protein corona composition can be critical in modifying the interactive surface that is recognized by cells, characterizing its formation onto lipid particles may serve as a fundamental predictive model for the in vivo efficiency of a lipidic vector. In the present work, protein coronas adsorbed onto three differently charged cationic liposome formulations were compared by a shotgun proteomic approach based on nano-liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry. About 130 proteins were identified in each corona, with only small differences between the different cationic liposome formulations. However, this study could be useful for the future controlled design of colloidal drug carriers and possibly in the controlled creation of biocompatible surfaces of other devices that come into contact with proteins into body fluids. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.

  20. Earthworms as agents for ecotoxicity in roxarsone-contaminated soil ecosystem: a modeling study of ultrastructure and proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ruizi; Ding, Xueyao; Xiong, Wenguang; Zhong, Xiaoxia; Liang, Wenfei; Gao, Shangji; Hong, Mei; Sun, Yongxue

    2015-08-01

    Contamination of roxarsone has been recognized as a potential environmental hazard. In this study, Eisenia fetida samples were collected after roxarsone exposures to analyze their intestinal epithelium ultrastructure, expression levels of stress-related genes, and proteomics. Our results showed that mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum in roxarsone-treated earthworms demonstrated variety of damages. Furthermore, 149 proteins were displayed in 2-DE, and 36 of them were identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS. Those identified proteins are involved in several important processes including cell immunity, cell stress responses, and cell genetic behaviors. Our study demonstrates the toxicity responses of earthworms toward arsenic-based animal drug roxarsone with practical usefulness and demonstrates a proteomic profile change that may be critical for the roxarsone stress survival mechanisms of E. fetida. Graphical Abstract Inspiration of this referred to the form of Fig. 4 in the article "Proteomic analysis of a high aluminum tolerant yeast Rhodotorula taiwanensis RS1 in response to aluminum stress" of Chao, W et al.

  1. A preliminary screening study on the associated proteins in human psoriasis vulgaris by serum proteomics technologies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhankui Liu; Shengshun Tan; Chunshui Yu; Jinghua Fan; Zhuanli Bai; Junjie Li

    2007-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the optimum screening conditions of associated proteins in human psoriasis vulgaris by serum proteomics technique, and to screen the different expression proteins related with psoriasis vulgaris. Methods:Serum samples of peripheral blood were collected from newly diagnosed psoriasis vulgaris patients in the clinic, and 20 matched healthy persons.Serum albumin IgG was removed by filtering with ProteoExtract Albumin/IgG. After comparative proteomics analysis the different protein spots were identified using 2-DE and MS. Results :Electrophoresis figures with high resolution and reproducibility were obtained. Three different expression proteins were found only in the serum from psoriasis vulgaris patients,while nine other different proteins expressing from healthy volunteers. Conclusion:The protein expression was different in the serum between the psoriasis vulgaris patients and healthy volunteers. It was hoped that we could find the biomarkers related to psoriasis vulgaris by using proteomics.

  2. Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis affects the grain proteome of Zea mays: a field study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bona, Elisa; Scarafoni, Alessio; Marsano, Francesco; Boatti, Lara; Copetta, Andrea; Massa, Nadia; Gamalero, Elisa; D'Agostino, Giovanni; Cesaro, Patrizia; Cavaletto, Maria; Berta, Graziella

    2016-05-24

    Maize is one of the most important crops worldwide and is strongly dependent on arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) fungi, organisms that form a mutualistic association with land plants. In maize, AM symbiosis enhances spike dry weight, spike length, spike circumference, and the dry weight and dimensions of the grain. Notwithstanding its ubiquitous nature, the detailed relationship between AM fungal colonization and plant development is not completely understood. To facilitate a better understanding of the effects of AM fungi on plants, the work reported here assessed the effects of a consortium of AM fungi on the kernel proteome of maize, cultivated in open-field conditions. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the modulation of a plant seed proteome following AM fungal inoculation in the field. Here, it was found that AM fungi modify the maize seed proteome by up-regulating enzymes involved in energetic metabolism, embryo development, nucleotide metabolism, seed storage and stress responses.

  3. Sorting signals, N-terminal modifications and abundance of the chloroplast proteome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Zybailov

    Full Text Available Characterization of the chloroplast proteome is needed to understand the essential contribution of the chloroplast to plant growth and development. Here we present a large scale analysis by nanoLC-Q-TOF and nanoLC-LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometry (MS of ten independent chloroplast preparations from Arabidopsis thaliana which unambiguously identified 1325 proteins. Novel proteins include various kinases and putative nucleotide binding proteins. Based on repeated and independent MS based protein identifications requiring multiple matched peptide sequences, as well as literature, 916 nuclear-encoded proteins were assigned with high confidence to the plastid, of which 86% had a predicted chloroplast transit peptide (cTP. The protein abundance of soluble stromal proteins was calculated from normalized spectral counts from LTQ-Obitrap analysis and was found to cover four orders of magnitude. Comparison to gel-based quantification demonstrates that 'spectral counting' can provide large scale protein quantification for Arabidopsis. This quantitative information was used to determine possible biases for protein targeting prediction by TargetP and also to understand the significance of protein contaminants. The abundance data for 550 stromal proteins was used to understand abundance of metabolic pathways and chloroplast processes. We highlight the abundance of 48 stromal proteins involved in post-translational proteome homeostasis (including aminopeptidases, proteases, deformylases, chaperones, protein sorting components and discuss the biological implications. N-terminal modifications were identified for a subset of nuclear- and chloroplast-encoded proteins and a novel N-terminal acetylation motif was discovered. Analysis of cTPs and their cleavage sites of Arabidopsis chloroplast proteins, as well as their predicted rice homologues, identified new species-dependent features, which will facilitate improved subcellular localization prediction. No evidence

  4. Beer and wort proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iimure, Takashi; Kihara, Makoto; Sato, Kazuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Proteome analysis provides a way to identify proteins related to the quality traits of beer. A number of protein species in beer and wort have been identified by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis combined with enzyme digestion such as trypsin, followed by mass spectrometry analyses and/or liquid chromatography mass/mass spectrometry. In addition, low molecular weight polypeptides in beer have been identified by the combination of non-enzyme digestion and mass analyses. These data sets of various molecular weight polypeptides (i.e., proteomes) provide a platform for analyzing protein functions in beer. Several novel proteins related to beer quality traits such as foam stability and haze formation have been identified by analyzing these proteomes. Some of the proteins have been applied to the development of efficient protein or DNA markers for trait selection in malting barley breeding. In this chapter, recent proteome studies of beer and wort are reviewed, and the methods and protocols of beer and wort proteome analysis are described.

  5. Proteomics in uveal melanoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ramasamy, Pathma

    2014-01-01

    Uveal melanoma is the most common primary intraocular malignancy in adults, with an incidence of 5-7 per million per year. It is associated with the development of metastasis in about 50% of cases, and 40% of patients with uveal melanoma die of metastatic disease despite successful treatment of the primary tumour. The survival rates at 5, 10 and 15 years are 65%, 50% and 45% respectively. Unlike progress made in many other areas of cancer, uveal melanoma is still poorly understood and survival rates have remained similar over the past 25 years. Recently, advances made in molecular genetics have improved our understanding of this disease and stratification of patients into low risk and high risk for developing metastasis. However, only a limited number of studies have been performed using proteomic methods. This review will give an overview of various proteomic technologies currently employed in life sciences research, and discuss proteomic studies of uveal melanoma.

  6. Good agreement of conventional and gel-based direct agglutination test in immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piek Christine J

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to compare a gel-based test with the traditional direct agglutination test (DAT for the diagnosis of immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia (IMHA. Methods Canine (n = 247 and feline (n = 74 blood samples were submitted for DAT testing to two laboratories. A subset of canine samples was categorized as having idiopathic IMHA, secondary IMHA, or no IMHA. Results The kappa values for agreement between the tests were in one laboratory 0.86 for canine and 0.58 for feline samples, and in the other 0.48 for canine samples. The lower agreement in the second laboratory was caused by a high number of positive canine DATs for which the gel test was negative. This group included significantly more dogs with secondary IMHA. Conclusions The gel test might be used as a screening test for idiopathic IMHA and is less often positive in secondary IMHA than the DAT.

  7. Proteomic study related to vascular connections in watermelon scions grafted onto bottle-gourd rootstock under different light intensities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sowbiya Muneer

    Full Text Available Although grafting is broadly used in the production of crops, no information is available about the proteins involved in vascular connections between rootstock and scion. Similarly, proteome changes under the light intensities widely used for grafted seedlings are of practical use. The objective of this study was to determine the proteome of vascular connections using watermelon (Citrullus vulgaris Schrad. 'Sambok Honey' and 'Speed' as the scion and bottle gourd (Lagenaria siceraria Stanld. 'RS Dongjanggun' as the rootstock grown under different light intensities (25, 50, 75 and 100 μmol m-2 s-1. Our proteomic analysis revealed 24 and 27 differentially expressed proteins in 'Sambok Honey' and 'Speed', respectively, under different light intensities. The identified proteins were largely involved in ion binding, amino acid metabolism, transcriptional regulation and defense response. The enhancement of ion-binding, transcriptional regulation, amino acid metabolism, and defense response proteins suggests a strengthening of the connection between the rootstock and scion under high light intensity. Indeed, the accumulation of key enzymes in the biological processes described above appears to play an important role in the vascular connections of grafted seedlings. Moreover, it appears that 100 μmol m-2 s-1 results in better protein expression responses in grafted seedlings.

  8. Studies of Complex Biological Systems with Applications to Molecular Medicine: The Need to Integrate Transcriptomic and Proteomic Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Silvestri

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Omics approaches to the study of complex biological systems with potential applications to molecular medicine are attracting great interest in clinical as well as in basic biological research. Genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics are characterized by the lack of an a priori definition of scope, and this gives sufficient leeway for investigators (a to discern all at once a globally altered pattern of gene/protein expression and (b to examine the complex interactions that regulate entire biological processes. Two popular platforms in “omics” are DNA microarrays, which measure messenger RNA transcript levels, and proteomic analyses, which identify and quantify proteins. Because of their intrinsic strengths and weaknesses, no single approach can fully unravel the complexities of fundamental biological events. However, an appropriate combination of different tools could lead to integrative analyses that would furnish new insights not accessible through one-dimensional datasets. In this review, we will outline some of the challenges associated with integrative analyses relating to the changes in metabolic pathways that occur in complex pathophysiological conditions (viz. ageing and altered thyroid state in relevant metabolically active tissues. In addition, we discuss several new applications of proteomic analysis to the investigation of mitochondrial activity.

  9. The human sperm proteome 2.0: An integrated resource for studying sperm functions at the level of posttranslational modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Wan, Jinyuan; Ling, Xiufeng; Liu, Mingxi; Zhou, Tao

    2016-10-01

    Various types of PTMs play important roles in the regulation of sperm proteins. However, most large-scale proteomic studies only focused on a single type of modification due to the limitation of enrichment methods. To investigate the complex composition of modified sperm proteins, we constructed the human sperm proteome 2.0 that integrated lysine acetylated, phosphorylated, N-linked glycosylated, and protein N-terminal acetylated proteins from previously published proteomic datasets. A total of 6069 modified sites on 2132 proteins were annotated. Functional enrichment analyses showed that different types of modified sperm proteins displayed different functional distributions. We found that acetylated, phosphorylated, and glycosylated proteins are more directly involved in sperm functions. While N-termnial acetylated proteins and nonmodified proteins appear to be more associated with the basic cellular functions. Thus, it is efficient to search for fertility-associated biomarkers in acetylated, phosphorylated, and glycosylated proteins. We also predicted modification cross-talks within the same proteins or between different proteins that provided potential hotspot targets for understanding the regulation of sperm functions via multiple modifications.

  10. Proteomic study related to vascular connections in watermelon scions grafted onto bottle-gourd rootstock under different light intensities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muneer, Sowbiya; Ko, Chung Ho; Soundararajan, Prabhakaran; Manivnnan, Abinaya; Park, Yoo Gyeong; Jeong, Byoung Ryong

    2015-01-01

    Although grafting is broadly used in the production of crops, no information is available about the proteins involved in vascular connections between rootstock and scion. Similarly, proteome changes under the light intensities widely used for grafted seedlings are of practical use. The objective of this study was to determine the proteome of vascular connections using watermelon (Citrullus vulgaris Schrad.) 'Sambok Honey' and 'Speed' as the scion and bottle gourd (Lagenaria siceraria Stanld.) 'RS Dongjanggun' as the rootstock grown under different light intensities (25, 50, 75 and 100 μmol m-2 s-1). Our proteomic analysis revealed 24 and 27 differentially expressed proteins in 'Sambok Honey' and 'Speed', respectively, under different light intensities. The identified proteins were largely involved in ion binding, amino acid metabolism, transcriptional regulation and defense response. The enhancement of ion-binding, transcriptional regulation, amino acid metabolism, and defense response proteins suggests a strengthening of the connection between the rootstock and scion under high light intensity. Indeed, the accumulation of key enzymes in the biological processes described above appears to play an important role in the vascular connections of grafted seedlings. Moreover, it appears that 100 μmol m-2 s-1 results in better protein expression responses in grafted seedlings.

  11. A workflow for peptide-based proteomics in a poorly sequenced plant: A case study on the plasma membrane proteome of banana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vertommen, A.; Laurell Blom Møller, Anders; Cordewener, J. H. G.

    2011-01-01

    Membrane proteins are an interesting class of proteins because of their functional importance. Unfortunately their analysis is hampered by low abundance and poor solubility in aqueous media. Since shotgun methods are high-throughput and partly overcome these problems, they are preferred......, integral plasma membrane proteins from banana leaves were successfully identified....... for membrane proteomics. However, their application in non-model plants demands special precautions to prevent false positive identification of proteins.In the current paper, a workflow for membrane proteomics in banana, a poorly sequenced plant, is proposed. The main steps of this workflow are (i...

  12. The gel electrophoresis markup language (GelML) from the Proteomics Standards Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Frank; Hoogland, Christine; Martinez-Bartolomé, Salvador; Medina-Aunon, J Alberto; Albar, Juan Pablo; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Wipat, Anil; Hermjakob, Henning; Almeida, Jonas S; Stanislaus, Romesh; Paton, Norman W; Jones, Andrew R

    2010-09-01

    The Human Proteome Organisation's Proteomics Standards Initiative has developed the GelML (gel electrophoresis markup language) data exchange format for representing gel electrophoresis experiments performed in proteomics investigations. The format closely follows the reporting guidelines for gel electrophoresis, which are part of the Minimum Information About a Proteomics Experiment (MIAPE) set of modules. GelML supports the capture of metadata (such as experimental protocols) and data (such as gel images) resulting from gel electrophoresis so that laboratories can be compliant with the MIAPE Gel Electrophoresis guidelines, while allowing such data sets to be exchanged or downloaded from public repositories. The format is sufficiently flexible to capture data from a broad range of experimental processes, and complements other PSI formats for MS data and the results of protein and peptide identifications to capture entire gel-based proteome workflows. GelML has resulted from the open standardisation process of PSI consisting of both public consultation and anonymous review of the specifications.

  13. 2D gels still have a niche in proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Le Bihan, Marie-Catherine; Thaysen-Andersen, Morten;

    2013-01-01

    ) alternative detection methods for modification specific proteomics; 3) identification of protein isoforms and modified proteins. With an example of the glycoprotein TIMP-1 protein we illustrate the unique properties of 2D gels for the separation and characterisation of multiply modified proteins. We also show......With the rapid advance of MS-based proteomics one might think that 2D gel-based proteomics is dead. This is far from the truth. Current research has shown that there are still a number of places in the field of protein and molecular biology where 2D gels still play a leading role. The aim...... of this review is to highlight some of these applications. Examples from our own research as well as from other published works are used to illustrate the 2D gel driven research in the areas of: 1) de novo sequencing and protein identification from organisms with no or incomplete genome sequences available; 2...

  14. Proteomics and insect immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Shi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Insect innate immunity is both a model for vertebrate immunity as well as a key system that impactsmedically important pathogens that are transmitted by insects. Recent developments in proteomics andprotein identification techniques combined with the completion of genome sequences for Anophelesgambiae and Drosophila melanogaster provided the tools for examining insect immunity at a new level ofmolecular detail. Application of proteomics to insect immunity resulted in predictions of new roles inimmunity for proteins already known in other contexts (e.g. ferritin, transferrin, Chi-lectins and helped totarget specific members of multi-gene families that respond to different pathogens (e.g. serine proteases,thioester proteins. In addition, proteomics studies verify that post-translational modifications play a keyrole in insect immunity since many of the identified proteins are modified in some way. These studiescomplement recent work on insect transcriptomes and provide new directions for further investigation ofinnate immunity.

  15. Optimized protein extraction methods for proteomic analysis of Rhizoctonia solani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshman, Dilip K; Natarajan, Savithiry S; Lakshman, Sukla; Garrett, Wesley M; Dhar, Arun K

    2008-01-01

    Rhizoctonia solani (Teleomorph: Thanatephorus cucumeris, T. praticola) is a basidiomycetous fungus and a major cause of root diseases of economically important plants. Various isolates of this fungus are also beneficially associated with orchids, may serve as biocontrol agents or remain as saprophytes with roles in decaying and recycling of soil organic matter. R. solani displays several hyphal anastomosis groups (AG) with distinct host and pathogenic specializations. Even though there are reports on the physiological and histological basis of Rhizoctonia-host interactions, very little is known about the molecular biology and control of gene expression early during infection by this pathogen. Proteamic technologies are powerful tools for examining alterations in protein profiles. To aid studies on its biology and host pathogen interactions, a two-dimensional (2-D) gel-based global proteomic study has been initiated. To develop an optimized protein extraction protocol for R. solani, we compared two previously reported protein extraction protocols for 2-D gel analysis of R. solani (AG-4) isolate Rs23. Both TCA-acetone precipitation and phosphate solubilization before TCA-acetone precipitation worked well for R. solani protein extraction, although selective enrichment of some proteins was noted with either method. About 450 spots could be detected with the densitiometric tracing of Coomassie blue-stained 2-D PAGE gels covering pH 4-7 and 6.5-205 kDa. Selected protein spots were subjected to mass spectrometric analysis with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). Eleven protein spots were positively identified based on peptide mass fingerprinting match with fungal proteins in public databases with the Mascot search engine. These results testify to the suitability of the two optimized protein extraction protocols for 2-D proteomic studies of R. solani.

  16. Current status and prospects of clinical proteomics studies on detection of colorectal cancer: Hopes and fears

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ME de Noo; RAEM Tollenaar; AM Deelder; LH Bouwman

    2006-01-01

    Colorectal adenocarcinoma (CRC) is the third most common type of cancer and the fourth most frequent cause of death due to cancer worldwide. Given the natural history of CRC, early diagnosis appears to be the most appropriate tool to reduce disease-related mortality. A field of recent interest is clinical proteomics, which was reported to lead to high sensitivity and specificities for early detection of several solid tumors. This emerging field uses mass spectrometry-based protein profiles/patterns of easy accessible body fluids to distinguish cancer from non-cancer patients. These discrepancies may be a result of: (1) proteins being abnormally produced or shed and added to the serum proteome, (2) proteins clipped or modified as a consequence of the disease process, or (3) proteins subtracted from the proteome owing to disease-related proteolytic degradation pathways. Therefore, protein pattern diagnostics would provide easy and reliable tools for detection of cancer. This paper focuses on the current status of clinical proteomics research in oncology and in colorectal cancer especially,and will reflect on pitfalls and fears in this relatively new area of clinical medicine, which are reproducibility issues and pre-analytical factors, statistical issues, and identification and nature of discriminating proteins/peptides.

  17. Proteomic studies related to genetic determinants of variability in protein concentrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horvatovich, Peter; Franke, Lude; Bischoff, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Genetic variation has multiple effects on the proteome. It may influence the expression level of proteins, modify their sequences through single nucleotide polymorphisms, the occurrence of allelic variants, or alternative splicing (ASP) events. This perspective paper summarizes the major effects of

  18. Understanding mechanism of sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus aestivation: Insights from TMT-based proteomic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Muyan; Li, Xingke; Zhu, Aijun; Storey, Kenneth B; Sun, Lina; Gao, Tianxiang; Wang, Tianming

    2016-09-01

    Marine invertebrate aestivation is a unique strategy for summer survival in response to hot marine conditions. The sea cucumber, Apostichopus japonicus, is an excellent model marine invertebrate for studies of environmentally-induced aestivation. In the present study, we used a tandem mass tag (TMT)-coupled LC-MS/MS approach to identify and quantify the global proteome expression profile over the aestivation-arousal cycle of A. japonicus. A total of 3920 proteins were identified from the intestine of sea cucumber. Among them, 630 proteins showed significant differential expression when comparing three conditions of sea cucumbers: non-aestivating (active), deep-aestivation (at least 15days of continuous aestivation), and arousal after aestivation (renewed moving and feeding). Sea cucumbers in deep aestivation showed substantial differentially expressed proteins (143 up-regulated and 267 down-regulated proteins compared with non-aestivating controls). These differentially expressed proteins suggested that protein and phospholipid probably are major fuel sources during hypometabolism and a general attenuation of carbohydrate metabolism was observed during deep aestivation. Differentially expressed proteins also provided the first global picture of a shift in protein synthesis, protein folding, DNA binding, apoptosis, cellular transport and signaling, and cytoskeletal proteins during deep aestivation in sea cucumbers. A comparison of arousal from aestivation with deep aestivation, revealed a general reversal of the changes that occurred in aestivation for most proteins. Western blot detection further validated the significant up-regulation of HSP70 and down-regulation of methyltransferase-like protein 7A-like in deep-aestivation. Our results suggest that there is substantial post-transcriptional regulation of proteins during the aestivation-arousal cycle in sea cucumbers.

  19. A data processing pipeline for mammalian proteome dynamics studies using stable isotope metabolic labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Shenheng; Price, John C; Prusiner, Stanley B; Ghaemmaghami, Sina; Burlingame, Alma L

    2011-12-01

    In a recent study, in vivo metabolic labeling using (15)N traced the rate of label incorporation among more than 1700 proteins simultaneously and enabled the determination of individual protein turnover rate constants over a dynamic range of three orders of magnitude (Price, J. C., Guan, S., Burlingame, A., Prusiner, S. B., and Ghaemmaghami, S. (2010) Analysis of proteome dynamics in the mouse brain. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 107, 14508-14513). These studies of protein dynamics provide a deeper understanding of healthy development and well-being of complex organisms, as well as the possible causes and progression of disease. In addition to a fully labeled food source and appropriate mass spectrometry platform, an essential and enabling component of such large scale investigations is a robust data processing and analysis pipeline, which is capable of the reduction of large sets of liquid chromatography tandem MS raw data files into the desired protein turnover rate constants. The data processing pipeline described in this contribution is comprised of a suite of software modules required for the workflow that fulfills such requirements. This software platform includes established software tools such as a mass spectrometry database search engine together with several additional, novel data processing modules specifically developed for (15)N metabolic labeling. These fulfill the following functions: (1) cross-extraction of (15)N-containing ion intensities from raw data files at varying biosynthetic incorporation times, (2) computation of peptide (15)N isotopic incorporation distributions, and (3) aggregation of relative isotope abundance curves for multiple peptides into single protein curves. In addition, processing parameter optimization and noise reduction procedures were found to be necessary in the processing modules in order to reduce propagation of errors in the long chain of the processing steps of the entire workflow.

  20. First systematic plant proteomics workshop in Botany Department, University of Delhi: transferring proteomics knowledge to next-generation researchers and students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deswal, Renu; Abat, Jasmeet Kaur; Sehrawat, Ankita; Gupta, Ravi; Kashyap, Prakriti; Sharma, Shruti; Sharma, Bhavana; Chaurasia, Satya Prakash; Chanu, Sougrakpam Yaiphabi; Masi, Antonio; Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar; Sarkar, Abhijit; Agrawal, Raj; Dunn, Michael J; Renaut, Jenny; Rakwal, Randeep

    2014-07-01

    International Plant Proteomics Organization (INPPO) outlined ten initiatives to promote plant proteomics in each and every country. With greater emphasis in developing countries, one of those was to "organize workshops at national and international levels to train manpower and exchange information". This third INPPO highlights covers the workshop organized for the very first time in a developing country, India, at the Department of Botany in University of Delhi on December 26-30, 2013 titled - "1(st) Plant Proteomics Workshop / Training Program" under the umbrella of INPPO India-Nepal chapter. Selected 20 participants received on-hand training mainly on gel-based proteomics approach along with manual booklet and parallel lectures on this and associated topics. In house, as well as invited experts drawn from other Universities and Institutes (national and international), delivered talks on different aspects of gel-based and gel-free proteomics. Importance of gel-free proteomics approach, translational proteomics, and INPPO roles were presented and interactively discussed by a group of three invited speakers Drs. Ganesh Kumar Agrawal (Nepal), Randeep Rakwal (Japan), and Antonio Masi (Italy). Given the output of this systematic workshop, it was proposed and thereafter decided to be organized every alternate year; the next workshop will be held in 2015. Furthermore, possibilities on providing advanced training to those students / researchers / teachers with basic knowledge in proteomics theory and experiments at national and international levels were discussed. INPPO is committed to generating next-generation trained manpower in proteomics, and it would only happen by the firm determination of scientists to come forward and do it.

  1. Differential proteome association study of freeze-thaw damage in ram sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yuxuan; Wang, Ke; Zhao, Xingxu; Zhang, Yong; Ma, Youji; Hu, Junjie

    2016-02-01

    In this study proteomics analysis was performed to investigate damage caused to ram sperm by the freeze-thaw process. Sperm motility, viability, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content were measured to evaluate sperm quality. Compared with fresh groups, motility, viability and ATP content were all lower in freeze-thawed sperm (P < 0.001), and ROS content was higher (P < 0.001). Moreover, 25 differential protein spots were detected in two-dimensional gels using PDQuest 8.0 software and the corresponding proteins were identified using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-TOF MS) coupled with searching of the NCBI protein sequence database. Among these proteins, hexokinase1 (HXK1), the enzyme that catalyzes the first step of glycolysis in the sperm glycolytic pathway, is known to be associated with sperm motility. Casein kinase II subunit alpha (CSNK2A2), a serine/threonine-selective protein kinase, is associated with sperm apoptosis. We used immunoblotting and immunofluorescence to analyze the expression and localization of these two proteins. HXK1 and CSNK2A2 expression levels in fresh sperm were significantly higher than that in freeze-thawed sperm (P < 0.001). HXK1 and CSNK2A2 were detected in the main part of the sperm flagellum, and the immunofluorescence signal from these proteins was weakened in the freeze-thawed group. Decreased expression of HXK1 and CSNK2A2 may be associated with decreased sperm motility and viability following freeze-thawing.

  2. Exposure to an extremely low-frequency electromagnetic field only slightly modifies the proteome of Chromobacterium violaceum ATCC 12472

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael A. Baraúna

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Several studies of the physiological responses of different organisms exposed to extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF have been described. In this work, we report the minimal effects of in situ exposure to ELF-EMF on the global protein expression of Chromobacterium violaceum using a gel-based proteomic approach. The protein expression profile was only slightly altered, with five differentially expressed proteins detected in the exposed cultures; two of these proteins (DNA-binding stress protein, Dps, and alcohol dehydrogenase were identified by MS/MS. The enhanced expression of Dps possibly helped to prevent physical damage to DNA. Although small, the changes in protein expression observed here were probably beneficial in helping the bacteria to adapt to the stress generated by the electromagnetic field.

  3. Exposure to an extremely low-frequency electromagnetic field only slightly modifies the proteome of Chromobacterium violaceumATCC 12472.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraúna, Rafael A; Santos, Agenor V; Graças, Diego A; Santos, Daniel M; Ghilardi, Rubens; Pimenta, Adriano M C; Carepo, Marta S P; Schneider, Maria P C; Silva, Artur

    2015-05-01

    Several studies of the physiological responses of different organisms exposed to extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) have been described. In this work, we report the minimal effects of in situ exposure to ELF-EMF on the global protein expression of Chromobacterium violaceum using a gel-based proteomic approach. The protein expression profile was only slightly altered, with five differentially expressed proteins detected in the exposed cultures; two of these proteins (DNA-binding stress protein, Dps, and alcohol dehydrogenase) were identified by MS/MS. The enhanced expression of Dps possibly helped to prevent physical damage to DNA. Although small, the changes in protein expression observed here were probably beneficial in helping the bacteria to adapt to the stress generated by the electromagnetic field.

  4. Comparative Skeletal Muscle Proteomics Using Two-Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Sandra; Dowling, Paul; Ohlendieck, Kay

    2016-09-09

    The pioneering work by Patrick H. O'Farrell established two-dimensional gel electrophoresis as one of the most important high-resolution protein separation techniques of modern biochemistry (Journal of Biological Chemistry1975, 250, 4007-4021). The application of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis has played a key role in the systematic identification and detailed characterization of the protein constituents of skeletal muscles. Protein changes during myogenesis, muscle maturation, fibre type specification, physiological muscle adaptations and natural muscle aging were studied in depth by the original O'Farrell method or slightly modified gel electrophoretic techniques. Over the last 40 years, the combined usage of isoelectric focusing in the first dimension and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide slab gel electrophoresis in the second dimension has been successfully employed in several hundred published studies on gel-based skeletal muscle biochemistry. This review focuses on normal and physiologically challenged skeletal muscle tissues and outlines key findings from mass spectrometry-based muscle proteomics, which was instrumental in the identification of several thousand individual protein isoforms following gel electrophoretic separation. These muscle-associated protein species belong to the diverse group of regulatory and contractile proteins of the acto-myosin apparatus that forms the sarcomere, cytoskeletal proteins, metabolic enzymes and transporters, signaling proteins, ion-handling proteins, molecular chaperones and extracellular matrix proteins.

  5. Comparative Skeletal Muscle Proteomics Using Two-Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Murphy

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The pioneering work by Patrick H. O’Farrell established two-dimensional gel electrophoresis as one of the most important high-resolution protein separation techniques of modern biochemistry (Journal of Biological Chemistry 1975, 250, 4007–4021. The application of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis has played a key role in the systematic identification and detailed characterization of the protein constituents of skeletal muscles. Protein changes during myogenesis, muscle maturation, fibre type specification, physiological muscle adaptations and natural muscle aging were studied in depth by the original O’Farrell method or slightly modified gel electrophoretic techniques. Over the last 40 years, the combined usage of isoelectric focusing in the first dimension and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide slab gel electrophoresis in the second dimension has been successfully employed in several hundred published studies on gel-based skeletal muscle biochemistry. This review focuses on normal and physiologically challenged skeletal muscle tissues and outlines key findings from mass spectrometry-based muscle proteomics, which was instrumental in the identification of several thousand individual protein isoforms following gel electrophoretic separation. These muscle-associated protein species belong to the diverse group of regulatory and contractile proteins of the acto-myosin apparatus that forms the sarcomere, cytoskeletal proteins, metabolic enzymes and transporters, signaling proteins, ion-handling proteins, molecular chaperones and extracellular matrix proteins.

  6. Towards system-level understanding of baculovirus host cell interactions: from molecular fundamental studies to large-scale proteomics approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisca eMonteiro

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Baculoviruses are insect viruses extensively exploited as eukaryotic protein expression vectors. Molecular biology studies have provided exciting discoveries on virus-host interactions, but the application of omic high throughput techniques on the baculovirus-insect cell system has been hampered by the lack of host genome sequencing. While a broader, systems level analysis of biological responses to infection is urgently needed, recent advances on proteomic studies have yielded new insights on the impact of infection on the host cell. These works are reviewed and critically assessed in the light of current biological knowledge of the molecular biology of baculoviruses and insect cells.

  7. Proteomic Study of Retinal Proteins Associated with Transcorneal Electric Stimulation in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Kanamoto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. To investigate how transcorneal electric stimulation (TES affects the retina, by identifying those proteins up- and downregulated by transcorneal electric stimulation (TES in the retina of rats. Methods. Adult Wistar rats received TES on the left eyes at different electrical currents while the right eyes received no treatment and served as controls. After TES, the eye was enucleated and the retina was isolated. The retinas were analyzed by proteomics. Results. Proteomics showed that twenty-five proteins were upregulated by TES. The identified proteins included cellular signaling proteins, proteins associated with neuronal transmission, metabolic proteins, immunological factors, and structural proteins. Conclusions. TES induced changes in expression of various functional proteins in the retina.

  8. Differential expression and redox proteomics analyses of an Alzheimer disease transgenic mouse model: effects of the amyloid-β peptide of amyloid precursor protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, R A S; Lange, M B; Sultana, R; Galvan, V; Fombonne, J; Gorostiza, O; Zhang, J; Warrier, G; Cai, J; Pierce, W M; Bredesen, D E; Butterfield, D A

    2011-03-17

    Among the pathological factors known to be associated with Alzheimer disease (AD), oxidative stress induced by the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) has been demonstrated to play a key role in human brain and animal models of AD. Recently, we reported elevated levels of oxidative damage in the brain of a transgenic (Tg) AD mouse model with Swedish and Indiana familial AD mutations in human amyloid precursor protein (APP) [PDAPP mice, line J20], as evidenced by increased levels of protein carbonyls, 3-nitrotyrosine, and protein-bound 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal. This oxidative damage was dependent on the methionine 35 residue within the Aβ peptide. Further insight into the molecular pathways affected in this Tg model of AD may be gained with discovery-based proteomics studies; therefore, two-dimensional gel-based expression proteomics was performed to compare differences in brain protein levels of J20 Tg mice with non-transgenic (NTg) littermate controls. Based on our studies, we identified six proteins that had significantly increased levels in J20 Tg relative to NTg mice: calcineurin subunit B type 1, ρ GDP-dissociation inhibitor 1, T-complex protein 1 subunit α A, α-enolase, peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase (Pin-1), and ATP synthase subunit α mitochondrial. Several of these proteins have previously been implicated in in vitro and in vivo models and subjects with AD. Additionally, using redox proteomics analyses we identified two oxidatively-modified proteins: phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein 1 and Pin-1 with decreased levels of protein 3-nitrotyrosine in J20 Tg mice relative to NTg. Western blotting and immunoprecipitation analyses were used to validate proteomics results. Overall, these studies provide information about changes in the brain proteome as a result of Aβ deposition and clues with which to further direct studies on elucidating AD pathogenesis. Copyright © 2011 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Toluene Dose-Response and Preliminary Study of Proteomics for Neuronal Cell Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Index, 1989). It is widely used in commercial products for paints and paints thinner, nail polish, lacquers, and rust inhibitors. It is also a...fluorocarbon film bottom; this film is vapor permeable and allows toluene vapor to pass, thereby exposing the cells. For control exposures, the...use of vapor permeable Lumox® microplates as suitable culture vessels for toluene in the glass chamber. The quantitative proteomics identified

  10. Proteomics: a tool for the study of plant response to abiotic stress

    OpenAIRE

    Hoyos Roveda, Gabriel; Fonseca Moreno, Liz Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Due in part to human activity, changes in global climate behavior have manifested in an increase in extreme temperature related events such as drought, salinization, contamination and flooding of vast areas of the planet. Regarding agricultural activity, these uncertain climatic scenarios are likely to cause biotic and abiotic stress increases, which must be dealt with through science and technology. Holistic approaches, also known as “omics”: proteomics, genomics, transcriptomics, and metabo...

  11. Urinary Proteomics Pilot Study for Biomarker Discovery and Diagnosis in Heart Failure with Reduced Ejection Fraction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasper Rossing

    Full Text Available Biomarker discovery and new insights into the pathophysiology of heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF may emerge from recent advances in high-throughput urinary proteomics. This could lead to improved diagnosis, risk stratification and management of HFrEF.Urine samples were analyzed by on-line capillary electrophoresis coupled to electrospray ionization micro time-of-flight mass spectrometry (CE-MS to generate individual urinary proteome profiles. In an initial biomarker discovery cohort, analysis of urinary proteome profiles from 33 HFrEF patients and 29 age- and sex-matched individuals without HFrEF resulted in identification of 103 peptides that were significantly differentially excreted in HFrEF. These 103 peptides were used to establish the support vector machine-based HFrEF classifier HFrEF103. In a subsequent validation cohort, HFrEF103 very accurately (area under the curve, AUC = 0.972 discriminated between HFrEF patients (N = 94, sensitivity = 93.6% and control individuals with and without impaired renal function and hypertension (N = 552, specificity = 92.9%. Interestingly, HFrEF103 showed low sensitivity (12.6% in individuals with diastolic left ventricular dysfunction (N = 176. The HFrEF-related peptide biomarkers mainly included fragments of fibrillar type I and III collagen but also, e.g., of fibrinogen beta and alpha-1-antitrypsin.CE-MS based urine proteome analysis served as a sensitive tool to determine a vast array of HFrEF-related urinary peptide biomarkers which might help improving our understanding and diagnosis of heart failure.

  12. A multicenter study benchmarks software tools for label-free proteome quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Pedro; Kuharev, Jörg; Gillet, Ludovic C; Bernhardt, Oliver M; MacLean, Brendan; Röst, Hannes L; Tate, Stephen A; Tsou, Chih-Chiang; Reiter, Lukas; Distler, Ute; Rosenberger, George; Perez-Riverol, Yasset; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I; Aebersold, Ruedi; Tenzer, Stefan

    2016-11-01

    Consistent and accurate quantification of proteins by mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics depends on the performance of instruments, acquisition methods and data analysis software. In collaboration with the software developers, we evaluated OpenSWATH, SWATH 2.0, Skyline, Spectronaut and DIA-Umpire, five of the most widely used software methods for processing data from sequential window acquisition of all theoretical fragment-ion spectra (SWATH)-MS, which uses data-independent acquisition (DIA) for label-free protein quantification. We analyzed high-complexity test data sets from hybrid proteome samples of defined quantitative composition acquired on two different MS instruments using different SWATH isolation-window setups. For consistent evaluation, we developed LFQbench, an R package, to calculate metrics of precision and accuracy in label-free quantitative MS and report the identification performance, robustness and specificity of each software tool. Our reference data sets enabled developers to improve their software tools. After optimization, all tools provided highly convergent identification and reliable quantification performance, underscoring their robustness for label-free quantitative proteomics.

  13. Cordyceps cicadae induces G2/M cell cycle arrest in MHCC97H human hepatocellular carcinoma cells: a proteomic study

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Hualin; ZHANG Jing; Sit, Wai-Hung; Lee, Chung-Yung Jetty; Wan, Jennifer Man-Fan

    2014-01-01

    Background Cordyceps cicadae is a medicinal fungus that is often used for treating cancer. However, the anticancer mechanisms of C. cicadae are largely unknown. This study aims to investigate the anticancer mechanisms of C. cicadae against hepatocellular carcinoma cells in vitro using a proteomic approach. Methods Human hepatocellular carcinoma MHCC97H cells were treated with a water extract of C. cicadae (0, 100, 250, 500, and 1000 μg/mL) for 48 h and harvested for cell viability assays. The...

  14. Protein extraction and gel-based separation methods to analyze responses to pathogens in carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus L).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardila, Harold Duban; Fernández, Raquel González; Higuera, Blanca Ligia; Redondo, Inmaculada; Martínez, Sixta Tulia

    2014-01-01

    We are currently using a 2-DE-based proteomics approach to study plant responses to pathogenic fungi by using the carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus L)-Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. dianthi pathosystem. It is clear that the protocols for the first stages of a standard proteomics workflow must be optimized to each biological system and objectives of the research. The optimization procedure for the extraction and separation of proteins by 1-DE and 2-DE in the indicated system is reported. This strategy can be extrapolated to other plant-pathogen interaction systems in order to perform an evaluation of the changes in the host protein profile caused by the pathogen and to identify proteins which, at early stages, are involved or implicated in the plant defense response.

  15. Heart mitochondrial proteome study elucidates changes in cardiac energy metabolism and antioxidant PRDX3 in human dilated cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Roselló-Lletí

    Full Text Available Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM is a public health problem with no available curative treatment, and mitochondrial dysfunction plays a critical role in its development. The present study is the first to analyze the mitochondrial proteome in cardiac tissue of patients with DCM to identify potential molecular targets for its therapeutic intervention.16 left ventricular (LV samples obtained from explanted human hearts with DCM (n = 8 and control donors (n = 8 were extracted to perform a proteomic approach to investigate the variations in mitochondrial protein expression. The proteome of the samples was analyzed by quantitative differential electrophoresis and Mass Spectrometry. These changes were validated by classical techniques and by novel and precise selected reaction monitoring analysis and RNA sequencing approach increasing the total heart samples up to 25. We found significant alterations in energy metabolism, especially in molecules involved in substrate utilization (ODPA, ETFD, DLDH, energy production (ATPA, other metabolic pathways (AL4A1 and protein synthesis (EFTU, obtaining considerable and specific relationships between the alterations detected in these processes. Importantly, we observed that the antioxidant PRDX3 overexpression is associated with impaired ventricular function. PRDX3 is significantly related to LV end systolic and diastolic diameter (r = 0.73, p value<0.01; r = 0.71, p value<0.01, fractional shortening, and ejection fraction (r = -0.61, p value<0.05; and r = -0.62, p value<0.05, respectively.This work could be a pivotal study to gain more knowledge on the cellular mechanisms related to the pathophysiology of this disease and may lead to the development of etiology-specific heart failure therapies. We suggest new molecular targets for therapeutic interventions, something that up to now has been lacking.

  16. Immunocapture strategies in translational proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredolini, Claudia; Byström, Sanna; Pin, Elisa; Edfors, Fredrik; Tamburro, Davide; Iglesias, Maria Jesus; Häggmark, Anna; Hong, Mun-Gwan; Uhlen, Mathias; Nilsson, Peter; Schwenk, Jochen M

    2016-01-01

    Aiming at clinical studies of human diseases, antibody-assisted assays have been applied to biomarker discovery and toward a streamlined translation from patient profiling to assays supporting personalized treatments. In recent years, integrated strategies to couple and combine antibodies with mass spectrometry-based proteomic efforts have emerged, allowing for novel possibilities in basic and clinical research. Described in this review are some of the field's current and emerging immunocapture approaches from an affinity proteomics perspective. Discussed are some of their advantages, pitfalls and opportunities for the next phase in clinical and translational proteomics.

  17. Proteomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosette, Pascal; Jouenne, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    Proteome provides highly valuable information on the amount, modifications, and subcellular localization of polypeptides. Accordingly, geneticists, molecular biologists, and biochemists have logically applied these new tools to respond to different lines of biological questions (inventory of proteins, impact of a mutation, dynamics of protein regulation under a given exposure, …). However, even if the results obtained are very informative, this approach needs an excellent experimental design which ensures robustness and thus yields reproducibility. The present chapter gives appropriate methods for assessing the proteome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by using a two-dimensional gel electrophoresis approach. Protocols for crude protein extraction, protein separation by using immobilized pH gradients, and protein identification by Liquid Chromatography coupled with tandem Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) are given.

  18. Investigation of optical properties of anthocyanin doped into sol-gel based matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Hasrina; Abdul Aziz, Nik Mohd Azmi Nik; Isnin, Aishah

    2012-06-01

    Anthocyanin dye was extracted from petal of Hibiscus rosasinensis (Bunga Raya) and doped into sol-gel based matrix to investigate an effect of pH change on its optical properties. Sol-gel matrix based on Vinyl triethoxysilene (VTES) as a precursor was prepared through Sol-gel process at pH 7. The sol was doped with 0.1% of Anthocyanin and the same amount of dye was also dissolved in ethanol as a comparative sample. Hydrochloric Acid, HCl and Tetramethylammonium Hydroxide, TMAH were used to change the pH value by adding them at various concentrations into each sample. The emission spectra and chemical structures of the samples were measured by Spectrofluorometer and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) respectively. When excited at 410 nm, two emission peaks at about 492 and 574 nm were observed for Anthocyanin in acidic environment both in ethanol and VTES sol. In base environment however, only Anthocyanin dissolved in ethanol produced emission peak with a single peak at about 539 nm. The sensitivity of Anthocyanin dye toward pH changes in VTES open a possibility to use it as sensing element in which sol-gel based matrix are known to have higher mechanical strength and thermal stability.

  19. Casein phosphopeptides drastically increase the secretion of extracellular proteins in Aspergillus awamori. Proteomics studies reveal changes in the secretory pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosalková Katarina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The secretion of heterologous animal proteins in filamentous fungi is usually limited by bottlenecks in the vesicle-mediated secretory pathway. Results Using the secretion of bovine chymosin in Aspergillus awamori as a model, we found a drastic increase (40 to 80-fold in cells grown with casein or casein phosphopeptides (CPPs. CPPs are rich in phosphoserine, but phosphoserine itself did not increase the secretion of chymosin. The stimulatory effect is reduced about 50% using partially dephosphorylated casein and is not exerted by casamino acids. The phosphopeptides effect was not exerted at transcriptional level, but instead, it was clearly observed on the secretion of chymosin by immunodetection analysis. Proteomics studies revealed very interesting metabolic changes in response to phosphopeptides supplementation. The oxidative metabolism was reduced, since enzymes involved in fermentative processes were overrepresented. An oxygen-binding hemoglobin-like protein was overrepresented in the proteome following phosphopeptides addition. Most interestingly, the intracellular pre-protein enzymes, including pre-prochymosin, were depleted (most of them are underrepresented in the intracellular proteome after the addition of CPPs, whereas the extracellular mature form of several of these secretable proteins and cell-wall biosynthetic enzymes was greatly overrepresented in the secretome of phosphopeptides-supplemented cells. Another important 'moonlighting' protein (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, which has been described to have vesicle fusogenic and cytoskeleton formation modulating activities, was clearly overrepresented in phosphopeptides-supplemented cells. Conclusions In summary, CPPs cause the reprogramming of cellular metabolism, which leads to massive secretion of extracellular proteins.

  20. The proteome of lysosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Bernd A; Wrocklage, Christian; Hasilik, Andrej; Saftig, Paul

    2010-11-01

    Lysosomes are organelles of eukaryotic cells that are critically involved in the degradation of macromolecules mainly delivered by endocytosis and autophagocytosis. Degradation is achieved by more than 60 hydrolases sequestered by a single phospholipid bilayer. The lysosomal membrane facilitates interaction and fusion with other compartments and harbours transport proteins catalysing the export of catabolites, thereby allowing their recycling. Lysosomal proteins have been addressed in various proteomic studies that are compared in this review regarding the source of material, the organelle/protein purification scheme, the proteomic methodology applied and the proteins identified. Distinguishing true constituents of an organelle from co-purifying contaminants is a central issue in subcellular proteomics, with additional implications for lysosomes as being the site of degradation of many cellular and extracellular proteins. Although many of the lysosomal hydrolases were identified by classical biochemical approaches, the knowledge about the protein composition of the lysosomal membrane has remained fragmentary for a long time. Using proteomics many novel lysosomal candidate proteins have been discovered and it can be expected that their functional characterisation will help to understand functions of lysosomes at a molecular level that have been characterised only phenomenologically so far and to generally deepen our understanding of this indispensable organelle.

  1. Energy Metabolism Disorder as a Contributing Factor of Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Comparative Proteomic and Metabolomic Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Yu Yang

    Full Text Available To explore the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA, the different metabolites were screened in synovial fluid by metabolomics.Synovial fluid from 25 RA patients and 10 normal subjects were analyzed by GC/TOF MS analysis so as to give a broad overview of synovial fluid metabolites. The metabolic profiles of RA patients and normal subjects were compared using multivariate statistical analysis. Different proteins were verified by qPCR and western blot. Different metabolites were verified by colorimetric assay kit in 25 inactive RA patients, 25 active RA patients and 20 normal subjects. The influence of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1α pathway on catabolism was detected by HIF-1α knockdown.A subset of 58 metabolites was identified, in which the concentrations of 7 metabolites related to energy metabolism were significantly different as shown by importance in the projection (VIP (VIP ≥ 1 and Student's t-test (p<0.05. In the 7 metabolites, the concentration of glucose was decreased, and the concentration of lactic acid was increased in the synovial fluid of RA patients than normal subjects verified by colorimetric assay Kit. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC analysis shows that the concentration of glucose and lactic acid in synovial fluid could be used as dependable biomarkers for the diagnosis of active RA, provided an AUC of 0.906 and 0.922. Sensitivity and specificity, which were determined by cut-off points, reached 84% and 96% in sensitivity and 95% and 85% in specificity, respectively. The verification of different proteins identified in our previous proteomic study shows that the enzymes of anaerobic catabolism were up-regulated (PFKP and LDHA, and the enzymes of aerobic oxidation and fatty acid oxidation were down-regulated (CS, DLST, PGD, ACSL4, ACADVL and HADHA in RA patients. The expression of HIF-1α and the enzymes of aerobic oxidation and fatty acid oxidation were decreased and the enzymes of anaerobic catabolism were

  2. Effects of Fuzheng Huayu Decoction on plasma proteome in cirrhosis: preliminary experimental study with rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie LIU; Jiyao WANG; Liming WEI; Ye LU; Hong JIN

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the effects of Fuzheng Huayu Decoction on the plasma proteome in cirrhotic rats. Twenty-six male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into three groups: cirrhotic model group (n=10), treated with CCl4 (CCl4/olive oil: v/v=1:1); Fuzheng Huayu Decoction intervention group (n=10), treated with CCl4 + Fuzheng Huayu Decoction; and normal control group (n=6), treated with olive oil only. After 8 weeks, blood samples were collected from the inferior vena cava to undergo bi-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE) and analysis by PDQuest 7.3 software. Differential protein spots were cut, enzyme hydrolysis was conducted, and peptide fragments extracted from the mixture underwent mass spectrometry (MS) with MALDI-TOF-TOF-MS. The liver fibrogenesis was assessed using a digital image analysis instrument of Masson's trichrome stained sections. The fibrosis area of the Fuzheng Huayu Decoction was (8.9±3.7)%, significantly smaller than that of the cirrhotic model group [(12.4±4.7)%, P<0.05]. Ten markedly changed protein spots were identified by MALDI-TOF-TOF-MS. Eight of the 10 proteins, including plasma glutathione peroxidase, plasma glutathione peroxidase precursor, prealbumin, haptoglobin, apolipoprotein A-Ⅳ precursor, complement C4, inter-alpha-inhibitor H4 heavy chain, and serine/threonine-protein kinase microtubule-affinity regulating kinase 1 (MARK1) were expressed very lowly in the cirrhotic model group while they were expressed highly in the Fuzheng Huayu Decoction group. The expression of liver regeneration-related protein LRRG03 and vimentin increased in the cirrhotic model group, and reduced in the Fuzheng Huayu Decoction group. Some proteins related to oxidative stress, cell proliferation and transformation have changed in the plasma of cirrhosis induced by CCl4. Fuzheng Huayu Decoction promotes protein synthesis and plays an anti-fibrotic role by anti-oxidation and accommodation of cell proliferation and transformation.

  3. ROCS: a Reproducibility Index and Confidence Score for Interaction Proteomics Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dazard Jean-Eudes

    2012-06-01

    it to five previously published AP-MS experiments, each containing well characterized protein interactions, allowing for systematic benchmarking of ROCS. We show that our method may be used on its own to make accurate identification of specific, biologically relevant protein-protein interactions, or in combination with other AP-MS scoring methods to significantly improve inferences. Conclusions Our method addresses important issues encountered in AP-MS datasets, making ROCS a very promising tool for this purpose, either on its own or in conjunction with other methods. We anticipate that our methodology may be used more generally in proteomics studies and databases, where experimental reproducibility issues arise. The method is implemented in the R language, and is available as an R package called “ROCS”, freely available from the CRAN repository http://cran.r-project.org/.

  4. Study on Profiling Mitochondria Proteome of Human Fetal Liver by Multi-dimensional Liquid Chromatography and Liquid Chromatography-Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry%多维液相色谱及液相色谱-离子阱质谱法研究人胎肝线粒体蛋白质组

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张养军; 石蓉; 孟庆芳; 王京兰; 蔡耘; 朱云平; 贺福初; 钱小红

    2004-01-01

    -scale study of the functions of human liver proteome. By using the technique on profiling mitochondrial proteome of human fetal liver, valuable experimental results were obtained and showed that combination of different orthogonal separation methods followed by capillary reversed-phase liquid chromatography and on-line ESI tandem mass spectrometry could expand the dynamic range and resolution, and enabled the identification of 915 proteins from 2 977 different peptides. After deletion of redundant proteins among different batches of data, 477 proteins were identified, in which 291 proteins were unique proteins and 186 proteins were cluster proteins. 144 proteins were clearly localized in mitochondria of human fetal liver. The molecular weights of the identified proteins ranged from about 7 000Da to 330 000Da and pI values from about 4.0-11.89.These results demonstrated that liquid phase based separation could overcome some shortcomings adherent to 2DE. However, some common issues, such as protein clusters or protein groups and peptide number limited for a reliable protein identification existed in both gel based separation and liquid phase based separation, still have to be addressed in the future researches.

  5. Widespread alterations in the synaptic proteome of the adolescent cerebral cortex following prenatal immune activation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Györffy, Balázs A; Gulyássy, Péter; Gellén, Barbara; Völgyi, Katalin; Madarasi, Dóra; Kis, Viktor; Ozohanics, Olivér; Papp, Ildikó; Kovács, Péter; Lubec, Gert; Dobolyi, Árpád; Kardos, József; Drahos, László; Juhász, Gábor; Kékesi, Katalin A

    2016-08-01

    An increasing number of studies have revealed associations between pre- and perinatal immune activation and the development of schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Accordingly, neuroimmune crosstalk has a considerably large impact on brain development during early ontogenesis. While a plethora of heterogeneous abnormalities have already been described in established maternal immune activation (MIA) rodent and primate animal models, which highly correlate to those found in human diseases, the underlying molecular background remains obscure. In the current study, we describe the long-term effects of MIA on the neocortical pre- and postsynaptic proteome of adolescent rat offspring in detail. Molecular differences were revealed in sub-synaptic fractions, which were first thoroughly characterized using independent methods. The widespread proteomic examination of cortical samples from offspring exposed to maternal lipopolysaccharide administration at embryonic day 13.5 was conducted via combinations of different gel-based proteomic techniques and tandem mass spectrometry. Our experimentally validated proteomic data revealed more pre- than postsynaptic protein level changes in the offspring. The results propose the relevance of altered synaptic vesicle recycling, cytoskeletal structure and energy metabolism in the presynaptic region in addition to alterations in vesicle trafficking, the cytoskeleton and signal transduction in the postsynaptic compartment in MIA offspring. Differing levels of the prominent signaling regulator molecule calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in the postsynapse was validated and identified specifically in the prefrontal cortex. Finally, several potential common molecular regulators of these altered proteins, which are already known to be implicated in schizophrenia and ASD, were identified and assessed. In summary, unexpectedly widespread changes in the synaptic molecular machinery in MIA rats were demonstrated which

  6. Evolutionary conservation of the mature oocyte proteome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamar Lotan

    2014-06-01

    Significance: The current study provides the first proteomic profile of an oocyte of a cnidarian organism the starlet sea anemone N. vectensis and gives new insights on the ancient origin of an oocyte proteome template. The comparative analysis with a chordate oocyte suggests that the oocyte proteome predates the divergence of the cnidarian and bilaterian lineages. In addition, the data generated in the study will serve as a valuable resource for further developmental and evolutional studies.

  7. Proteomics--a blessing or a curse? Application of proteomics technology to transplant medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kienzl-Wagner, Katrin; Pratschke, Johann; Brandacher, Gerald

    2011-09-15

    Proteomics has emerged as a powerful tool in clinical biomarker research. In the field of transplantation, proteomics aims not only at developing noninvasive tools for immune monitoring and identifying biomarkers of allograft rejection but also to gain mechanistic insights into the pathophysiology of an alloimmune response and hence defining new therapeutic targets. A basic knowledge of proteomic technology is a prerequisite to appreciate the complex data generated and required for critical evaluation/interpretation of proteomic-driven studies. This review provides an overview of proteomic approaches and its underlying concepts and discusses the advantages, clinical implications, challenges, and limitations of this exciting modality in transplantation.

  8. Proteomic expression of microfungal ripening starter Geotrichum candidum submitted to cold stress is strain-dependent: studies using 2d-dige technology and samespots software analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missous, Ghalia; Thammavongs, Bouachanh; Dieuleveux, Virginie; Houssin, Maryline; Henry, Joël; Panoff, Jean-Michel

    2012-01-01

    Geotrichum candidum is a micro-fungus widely used as a ripening starter in cheese making. In anthropogenic environments such as dairy industries, this microorganism is subjected to many environmental and technological stresses including low temperature exposure. Our aim was to study the proteomic response of G. candidum to cold stress using a comparative proteomic approach by two-dimensional Differential In Gel Electrophoresis (2D DIGE). This technique consists on the labeling of proteins by specific fluorescent dyes (CyDyes). The results, obtained with G. candidum cells subjected to cold temperature, show significant proteomic patterns differences compared with the standard conditions. Furthermore, this biochemical response seems strain specific. 2D DIGE technology combined with SameSpots™ software analysis support these results through an important statistical validity. The comparative studies in a single gel, using two different fluorescent CyDyes (Cy3 and Cy5), lead to proteins differentiation. Selected spots were treated and analyzed by mass spectrometry.

  9. A proteomic study to identify soya allergens--the human response to transgenic versus non-transgenic soya samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Rita; Martins, Isabel; Jeno, Paul; Ricardo, Cândido Pinto; Oliveira, Maria Margarida

    2007-01-01

    In spite of being among the main foods responsible for allergic reactions worldwide, soybean (Glycine max)-derived products continue to be increasingly widespread in a variety of food products due to their well-documented health benefits. Soybean also continues to be one of the elected target crops for genetic modification. The aim of this study was to characterize the soya proteome and, specifically, IgE-reactive proteins as well as to compare the IgE response in soya-allergic individuals to genetically modified Roundup Ready soya versus its non-transgenic control. We performed two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of protein extracts from a 5% genetically modified Roundup Ready flour sample and its non-transgenic control followed by Western blotting with plasma from 5 soya-sensitive individuals. We used peptide tandem mass spectrometry to identify soya proteins (55 protein matches), specifically IgE-binding ones, and to evaluate differences between transgenic and non-transgenic samples. We identified 2 new potential soybean allergens--one is maturation associated and seems to be part of the late embryogenesis abundant proteins group and the other is a cysteine proteinase inhibitor. None of the individuals tested reacted differentially to the transgenic versus non-transgenic samples under study. Soybean endogenous allergen expression does not seem to be altered after genetic modification. Proteomics should be considered a powerful tool for functional characterization of plants and for food safety assessment. Copyright (c) 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Mass spectrometric identification of proteins and characterization of their post-translational modifications in proteome analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roepstorff, P; Larsen, Martin Røssel

    2001-01-01

    dominant strategies for identification of proteins from gels based on peptide mass spectrometric fingerprinting and partial sequencing by mass spectrometry are described. After identification of the proteins the next challenge in proteome analysis is characterization of their post-translational...... modifications. The general problems associated with characterization of these directly from gel separated proteins are described and the current state of art for the determination of phosphorylation, glycosylation and proteolytic processing is illustrated....

  11. Transcriptomics and Proteomics in the Study of H1N1 2009

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lijun Zhang; Xiaojun Zhang; Qing Ma; Fang Ma; Honghao Zhou

    2010-01-01

    Influenza A virus (HINI) 2009, a new swine-origin influenza A virus, has been spread worldwidely and causedgreat public fear. High-throughput transcriptomics and proteomies methods are now being used to identify H1N1and H1N1-host interaction. This article reviews recent transcriptomics and proteomics research in H1N1 diagnosis,treatment, and H1N1 virus-host interaction, to offer some help for further understanding the infection mechanismand controlling H1N1 transmission.

  12. Proteomics Characterization of Exosome Cargo

    OpenAIRE

    Schey, Kevin L.; Luther, J. Matthew; Rose, Kristie L

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of exosomal cargo is of significant interest because this cargo can provide clues to exosome biogenesis, targeting, and cellular effects and may be a source of biomarkers for disease diagnosis, prognosis and response to treatment. With recent improvements in proteomics technologies, both qualitative and quantitative characterization of exosomal proteins is possible. Here we provide a brief review of exosome proteomics studies and provide detailed protocols for global qualitat...

  13. An integrated proteomic and metabolomic study on the gender-specific responses of mussels Mytilus galloprovincialis to tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Chenglong; Li, Fei; Wang, Qing; Zhao, Jianmin; Sun, Zuodeng; Wu, Huifeng

    2016-02-01

    Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), accounting for the largest production of brominated flame-retardants (BFRs) along the Laizhou Bay in China, is of great concern due to its diverse toxicities. In this study, we focused on the gender-specific responses of TBBPA in mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis using an integrated proteomic and metabolomic approach. After exposure of TBBPA (10 µg L(-1)) for one month, a total of 9 metabolites and 67 proteins were altered in mussel gills from exposed group. The significant changes of metabolites in female mussel gills from exposed group exhibited the disturbances in energy metabolism and osmotic regulation, while in male samples only be found the variation of metabolites related to osmotic regulation. iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis showed biological differences between male and female mussel gills from solvent control group. The higher levels of proteins related to primary and energy metabolism and defense mechanisms in male mussel gills meant a greater anti-stress capability of male mussels. Further analysis revealed that TBBPA exposure affected multiple biological processes consisting of production and development, material and energy metabolism, signal transduction, gene expression, defense mechanisms and apoptosis in both male and female mussels with different mechanisms. Specially, the responsive proteins of TBBPA in male mussels signified higher tolerance limits than those in female individuals, which was consistent with the biological differences between male and female mussel gills from solvent control group. This work suggested that the gender differences should be considered in ecotoxicology.

  14. Quantitative proteome analysis using isotope-coded affinity tags and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiio, Yuzuru; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2006-01-01

    A main objective of proteomics research is to systematically identify and quantify proteins in a given proteome (cells, subcellular fractions, protein complexes, tissues or body fluids). Protein labeling with isotope-coded affinity tags (ICAT) followed by tandem mass spectrometry allows sequence identification and accurate quantification of proteins in complex mixtures, and has been applied to the analysis of global protein expression changes, protein changes in subcellular fractions, components of protein complexes, protein secretion and body fluids. This protocol describes protein-sample labeling with ICAT reagents, chromatographic fractionation of the ICAT-labeled tryptic peptides, and protein identification and quantification using tandem mass spectrometry. The method is suitable for both large-scale analysis of complex samples including whole proteomes and small-scale analysis of subproteomes, and allows quantitative analysis of proteins, including those that are difficult to analyze by gel-based proteomics technology.

  15. Characterizing the Syphilis-Causing Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum Proteome Using Complementary Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Simon; Lithgow, Karen V.; Meehan, Conor J.; Strouhal, Michal; Šmajs, David; Cameron, Caroline E.; Van Ostade, Xaveer; Kenyon, Chris R.; Van Raemdonck, Geert A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The spirochete bacterium Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum is the etiological agent of syphilis, a chronic multistage disease. Little is known about the global T. pallidum proteome, therefore mass spectrometry studies are needed to bring insights into pathogenicity and protein expression profiles during infection. Methodology/Principal Findings To better understand the T. pallidum proteome profile during infection, we studied T. pallidum ssp. pallidum DAL-1 strain bacteria isolated from rabbits using complementary mass spectrometry techniques, including multidimensional peptide separation and protein identification via matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF) and electrospray ionization (ESI-LTQ-Orbitrap) tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 6033 peptides were detected, corresponding to 557 unique T. pallidum proteins at a high level of confidence, representing 54% of the predicted proteome. A previous gel-based T. pallidum MS proteome study detected 58 of these proteins. One hundred fourteen of the detected proteins were previously annotated as hypothetical or uncharacterized proteins; this is the first account of 106 of these proteins at the protein level. Detected proteins were characterized according to their predicted biological function and localization; half were allocated into a wide range of functional categories. Proteins annotated as potential membrane proteins and proteins with unclear functional annotations were subjected to an additional bioinformatics pipeline analysis to facilitate further characterization. A total of 116 potential membrane proteins were identified, of which 16 have evidence supporting outer membrane localization. We found 8/12 proteins related to the paralogous tpr gene family: TprB, TprC/D, TprE, TprG, TprH, TprI and TprJ. Protein abundance was semi-quantified using label-free spectral counting methods. A low correlation (r = 0.26) was found between previous microarray signal data and

  16. Proteomics in Discovery of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Biomarkers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To discover new proteomic biomarkers of hepatocellular carcinoma. Methods: Surface enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (SELDI-TOF) mass spectrometry was used to discover biomarkers for differentiating hepatocellular carcinoma and chronic liver disease. A population of 50 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and 33 patients with chronic liver disease was studied. Results: Twelve proteomic biomarkers of hepatocellular carcinoma were detected in this study. Three proteomic biomarkers were highly expressed in hepatocellular carcinoma and nine proteomic biomarkers were highly expressed in chronic liver disease. The most valuable proteomic biomarker with m/z=11498 had no similar diagnostic value as α-fetoprotein. Conclusion:Some of the twelve proteomic biomarkers may become new biomarkers of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  17. Protein extraction method for the proteomic study of Zymomonas mobilis during production of ethanol and levans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcanti, D R; Malafaia, C B; Silva, T D; Santos, B S; Calazans, G M T; Silva, M V

    2015-11-19

    Zymomonas mobilis has aroused considerable interest owing to its rapid metabolism and efficiency in producing ethanol and by-products such as levans, sorbitol, and gluconic acid from simple sugars. We performed a proteomic analysis of Z. mobilis UFPEDA241 to provide a global profile of regulatory proteins. The choice of the methods of extraction and cell lysis are fundamental steps and of great importance for the detection and identification of intra- and extracellular proteins of a proteome. Strains were subjected to protein extraction methods using three different reagents: TRIzol, lysis buffer, and phenol. The optimum method was taken to be the one that produced the greatest quantity and quality of proteins in one dimension for further analysis in two dimensions during the production of ethanol and levans over 72 h. The results showed that the greatest amount of protein was obtained by the phenol method (1.44 ± 0.07 mg/mL), which was significantly different (P 0.05). Fermentation at 20°C produced the highest level of levans, and using two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry it was possible to identify 34 differentially expressed spots.

  18. A proteomic study of rice cultivar TNG67 and its high aroma mutant SA0420.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Da-Gin; Chou, Szu-Yi; Wang, Arthur Z; Wang, Yi-Wen; Kuo, Shu-Ming; Lai, Chien-Chen; Chen, Liang-Jwu; Wang, Chang-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Fragrance is a very important economic trait for rice cultivars. To identify the aroma genes in rice, we performed a proteomics analysis of aroma-related proteins between Tainung 67 (TNG67) and its high aroma mutant SA0420. Seventeen of the differentially identified proteins were close related with the aroma phenotype of SA0420. Among them, 9 were found in leaves and 8 were found in grains. One protein (L3) was identified as the chloroplastic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase B (OsGAPDHB) which was less abundant in SA0420 than TNG67. Sequence analysis demonstrated that this protein in SA0420 carries a P425S mutation in the C-terminal extension domain, which might hinder the formation of holoenzyme, thereby changing the profile of aroma compounds. The protein profile of OsGAPDHB showed only a weak correlation to its transcription profile. This result indicated that the reduction of OsGAPDHB in SA0420 is regulated by post-translational processes and can only be analyzed by proteomics approach. Transgenic lines suppressing OsGAPDHB through RNAi harbored more fragrance than TNG67 but less than SA0420. With betaine-aldehyde dehydrogenase as the only fragrance gene identified in rice to date, OsGAPDHB may serve as the second protein known to contribute to the aroma phenotype.

  19. Proteomics-based study on asthenozoospermia: differential expression of proteasome alpha complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siva, Archana Bharadwaj; Kameshwari, Duvvuri Butchi; Singh, Vaibhav; Pavani, Kadupu; Sundaram, Curam Sreenivasacharlu; Rangaraj, Nandini; Deenadayal, Mamata; Shivaji, Sisinthy

    2010-07-01

    With a view to understand the molecular basis of sperm motility, we have tried to establish the human sperm proteome by two-dimensional PAGE MALDI MS/MS analysis. We report identification of 75 different proteins in the human spermatozoa. Comparative proteome analysis was carried out for asthenozoospermic and normozoospermic patients to understand the molecular basis of sperm motility. Analysis revealed eight proteins (including one unidentified) with altered intensity between the groups. Differential proteins distributed into three functional groups: 'energy and metabolism' (triose-phosphate isomerase, glycerol kinase 2, testis specific isoform and succinyl-CoA:3-ketoacid co-enzyme A transferase 1, mitochondrial precursor); 'movement and organization' (tubulin beta 2C and tektin 1) and 'protein turnover, folding and stress response' (proteasome alpha 3 subunit and heat shock-related 70 kDa protein 2). It was interesting to note that although the proteins falling in the functional group of 'energy and metabolism' are higher in the asthenozoospermic patients, the other two functional groups contain proteins, which are higher in the normozoospermic samples. Validation of results carried out for proteasome alpha 3 subunit by immunoblotting and confocal microscopy, confirmed significant changes in intensity of proteasome alpha 3 subunit in asthenozoospermic samples when compared with normozoospermic controls. Significant positive correlation too was found between proteasome alpha 3 subunit levels and rapid, linear progressive motility of the spermatozoa. In our understanding, this data would contribute appreciably to the presently limited information available about the proteins implicated in human sperm motility.

  20. Study of Nitrate Stress in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough Using iTRAQ Proteomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redding, A.M.; Mukhopadhyay, A.; Joyner, D.; Hazen, T.C.; Keasling, J.D.

    2006-10-12

    The response of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DvH),a sulphate-reducing bacterium, to nitrate stress was examined usingquantitative proteomic analysis. DvH was stressed with 105 m M sodiumnitrate(NaNO3), a level that caused a 50 percent inhibition in growth.The protein profile of stressed cells was compared with that of cellsgrown in the absence of nitrate using the iTRAQ peptide labellingstrategy and tandem liquid chromatography separation coupled with massspectrometry (quadrupoletime-of-flight) detection. A total of 737 uniqueproteins were identified by two or more peptides, representing 22 percentof the total DvH proteome and spanning every functional category. Theresults indicate that this was a mild stress, as proteins involved incentral metabolism and the sulphate reduction pathway were unperturbed.Proteins involved in the nitrate reduction pathway increased. Increasesseen in transport systems for proline, glycine^ betaineandglutamateindicate that the NaNO3 exposure led to both salt stress and nitratestress.Up-regulation observed in oxidative stress response proteins (Rbr,RbO, etc.) and a large number of ABC transport systems as well as in iron^ sulphur -cluster-containing proteins, however, appear to be specific tonitrate exposure. Finally, a number of hypothetical proteins were amongthe most significant changers, indicating that there may be unknownmechanisms initiated upon nitrate stress in DvH.

  1. Bioinformatics and Data Mining Studies in Oral Genomics and Proteomics: New Trends and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomelli, Luca; Covani, Ugo

    2010-01-01

    Genomics and proteomics have promised to change the practice of dentistry and oral pathology, allowing the identification and the characterization of risk factors and therapeutic targets at a molecular level. However, mass-scale molecular genomics and proteomics suffer from some pitfalls: gene/protein expression are significant only if inserted in a detailed network of molecular pathways and gene/gene, gene/protein and protein/protein interactions. The proper analysis of these complex pictures requires the contribution of theoretical disciplines, like bioinformatics and data mining. In particular, data-mining of existing information could become a strong starting point to formulate new targeted hypotheses and to plan ad hoc experimentation. In this review, advantages and disadvantages of the above-mentioned disciplines and their potential in oral pathology are discussed. The leader gene approach is a new data mining algorithm, recently applied to some oral diseases and their correlation with systemic conditions. The preliminary results of the application of the leader gene approach to the correlation between periodontitis and heart ischemia at a molecular level are presented for the first time. PMID:20871759

  2. Gel-based composite polymer electrolytes with novel hierarchical mesoporous silica network for lithium batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Xiaoliang; Cai Qiang [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, and State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Fan Lizhen [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Hua Tao; Lin Yuanhua [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, and State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Nan Cewen [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, and State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)], E-mail: cwnan@tsinghua.edu.cn

    2008-11-15

    In the present work, novel gel-based composite polymer electrolytes for lithium batteries were prepared by introducing a hierarchical mesoporous silica network to the poly(vinylidene fluoride-hexafluoropropylene) (PVDF-HFP)-based gel electrolytes. As compared with the PVDF-HFP-based gel electrolytes with/without conventional nano-sized silica fillers, the novel electrolytes have shown more homogeneous microstructure, higher ionic conductivity and better mechanical stability, which could be caused by the strong silica network and the effective interactions among the polymer, the liquid electrolytes and the silica. Moreover, the cell with this kind of electrolytes could achieve a discharge capacity as much as 150 mAh g{sup -1} at room temperature (LiCoO{sub 2} as the cathode active material), with high Coulomb efficiency.

  3. Gel-based composite polymer electrolytes with novel hierarchical mesoporous silica network for lithium batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiao-Liang; Cai, Qiang; Hua, Tao; Lin, Yuan-Hua; Nan, Ce-Wen [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, and State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Fan, Li-Zhen [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2008-11-15

    In the present work, novel gel-based composite polymer electrolytes for lithium batteries were prepared by introducing a hierarchical mesoporous silica network to the poly(vinylidene fluoride-hexafluoropropylene) (PVDF-HFP)-based gel electrolytes. As compared with the PVDF-HFP-based gel electrolytes with/without conventional nano-sized silica fillers, the novel electrolytes have shown more homogeneous microstructure, higher ionic conductivity and better mechanical stability, which could be caused by the strong silica network and the effective interactions among the polymer, the liquid electrolytes and the silica. Moreover, the cell with this kind of electrolytes could achieve a discharge capacity as much as 150 mAh g{sup -1} at room temperature (LiCoO{sub 2} as the cathode active material), with high Coulomb efficiency. (author)

  4. Proteomic approaches in research of cyanobacterial photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battchikova, Natalia; Angeleri, Martina; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2015-10-01

    Oxygenic photosynthesis in cyanobacteria, algae, and plants is carried out by a fabulous pigment-protein machinery that is amazingly complicated in structure and function. Many different approaches have been undertaken to characterize the most important aspects of photosynthesis, and proteomics has become the essential component in this research. Here we describe various methods which have been used in proteomic research of cyanobacteria, and demonstrate how proteomics is implemented into on-going studies of photosynthesis in cyanobacterial cells.

  5. Rheology of oleo gels based on sorbitan and glyceryl mono stearates and vegetable oils for lubricating applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, R.; Franco, J. M.; Delgado, M. A.; Valencia, C.; Gallegos, C.

    2011-07-01

    Oleo gels based on sorbitan and glyceryl mono stearates and different types of vegetable oils, potentially applicable as biodegradable alternatives to traditional lubricating greases, have been studied. In particular, the rheological behavior, by means of small-amplitude oscillatory shear (SAOS) measurements, and some lubrication performance-related properties (mechanical stability and tribological response) have been evaluated in this work. SAOS response and mechanical stability of these oleo gels are significantly influenced by the type and concentration of the organogelator and the vegetable oil used in the formulations. Glyceryl monostearate (GMS) generally produces stronger gels than sorbitan monostearate (SMS). The use of low-viscosity oils, such as rapeseed and soybean oils, yields gels with significantly higher values of the linear viscoelastic functions than oleo gels prepared with high-viscosity oils, i.e. castor oil. The rheological behavior of SMS-based oleo gels also depends on the cooling rate applied during the gelification process. On the other hand, the oleo gels studied present low values of the friction coefficient obtained in a tribological contact, although only some GMS/castor oil-based oleo gels exhibit a suitable mechanical stability. (Author) 28 refs.

  6. Recovery of Chinese hamster ovary host cell proteins for proteomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Kristin N; Schaefer, Amy K; Kempton, Hannah R; Lenhoff, Abraham M; Lee, Kelvin H

    2014-01-01

    Identification and characterization of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) host cell protein (HCP) impurities by proteomic techniques can aid bioprocess design and lead to more efficient development and improved biopharmaceutical manufacturing operations. Recovery of extracellular CHO HCP for proteomic analysis is particularly challenging due to the relatively low protein concentration and complex composition of media. In this article, we report the development of optimized protocols that improve proteome capture for CHO HCP. Eleven precipitation protocols were screened for protein recovery and optimized for a subset of precipitants by a design of experiments (DOE) approach. Because total protein recovery does not fully replicate a proteomics experiment, or detect non-protein agents that may interfere with proteomic methods, a subset of precipitation conditions were compared by two-dimensional electrophoresis and liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry, with optimized recovery shown to differ between the two proteomic methods. This work demonstrates broadly applicable methods that can be applied as initial steps to optimize sample preparation of any sample type for proteomic analysis, and presents optimized precipitation protocols for extracellular CHO HCP recovery, which can vary appreciably between gel-based and shotgun proteomic methods.

  7. Statistical data processing in clinical proteomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Smit

    2009-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is the analysis of data in clinical proteomics studies aimed at the discovery of biomarkers. The data sets produced in proteomics studies are huge, characterized by a small number of samples in which many proteins and peptides are measured. The studies described in this th

  8. Analysis of mass spectrometry data in proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiesen, Rune; Jensen, Ole N

    2008-01-01

    that in turn allow protein identification, annotation of secondary modifications, and determination of the absolute or relative abundance of individual proteins. Advances in mass spectrometry-driven proteomics rely on robust bioinformatics tools that enable large-scale data analysis. This chapter describes......The systematic study of proteins and protein networks, that is, proteomics, calls for qualitative and quantitative analysis of proteins and peptides. Mass spectrometry (MS) is a key analytical technology in current proteomics and modern mass spectrometers generate large amounts of high-quality data...... some of the basic concepts and current approaches to the analysis of MS and MS/MS data in proteomics....

  9. Proteomic and biochemical studies of lysine malonylation suggest its malonic aciduria-associated regulatory role in mitochondrial function and fatty acid oxidation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colak, G.; Pougovkina, O.; Dai, L.; Tan, M.; Brinke, te H.; Huang, H.; Wanders, R.J.; Locasale, J.W.; Lombard, D.B.; Boer, de V.C.J.; Zhao, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The protein substrates of sirtuin 5-regulated lysine malonylation (Kmal) remain unknown, hindering its functional analysis. In this study, we carried out proteomic screening, which identified 4042 Kmal sites on 1426 proteins in mouse liver and 4943 Kmal sites on 1822 proteins in human fibroblasts. I

  10. Proteomic and biochemical studies of lysine malonylation suggest its malonic aciduria-associated regulatory role in mitochondrial function and fatty acid oxidation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colak, G.; Pougovkina, O.; Dai, L.; Tan, M.; Brinke, te H.; Huang, H.; Wanders, R.J.; Locasale, J.W.; Lombard, D.B.; Boer, de V.C.J.; Zhao, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The protein substrates of sirtuin 5-regulated lysine malonylation (Kmal) remain unknown, hindering its functional analysis. In this study, we carried out proteomic screening, which identified 4042 Kmal sites on 1426 proteins in mouse liver and 4943 Kmal sites on 1822 proteins in human fibroblasts.

  11. Physiological and proteome studies of responses to heat stress during grain filling in contrasting wheat cultivars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Xiao; Dinler, Burcu Seckin; Vignjevic, Marija;

    2015-01-01

    Experiments to explore physiological and biochemical differences of the effects of heat stress in ten wheat (Triticum aestivum L) cultivars have been performed. Based on the response of photosynthesis rates, cell membrane lipid peroxide concentrations and grain yield to heat, six cultivars were...... compared to sensitive cultivars under heat stress. The tolerant cv. '810' and the sensitive cv. '1039' were selected for further proteome analysis of leaves. Proteins related to photosynthesis, glycolysis, stress defence, heat shock and ATP production were differently expressed in leaves of the tolerant...... and sensitive cultivar under heat stress in relation to the corresponding control. The abundance of proteins related to signal transduction, heat shock, photosynthesis, and antioxidants increased, while the abundance of proteins related to nitrogen metabolism decreased in the tolerant cv. '810' under heat...

  12. Urinary Proteomics Pilot Study for Biomarker Discovery and Diagnosis in Heart Failure with Reduced Ejection Fraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossing, Kasper; Bosselmann, Helle Skovmand; Gustafsson, Finn

    2016-01-01

    Background Biomarker discovery and new insights into the pathophysiology of heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) may emerge from recent advances in high-throughput urinary proteomics. This could lead to improved diagnosis, risk stratification and management of HFrEF. Methods......EF103 very accurately (area under the curve, AUC = 0.972) discriminated between HFrEF patients (N = 94, sensitivity = 93.6%) and control individuals with and without impaired renal function and hypertension (N = 552, specificity = 92.9%). Interestingly, HFrEF103 showed low sensitivity (12...... to determine a vast array of HFrEF-related urinary peptide biomarkers which might help improving our understanding and diagnosis of heart failure....

  13. A proteomic approach for studying the pathogenesis of spontaneous equine recurrent uveitis (ERU).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeg, Cornelia A

    2009-03-15

    Equine recurrent uveitis (ERU) is a wide spread disease of the eye, which is the main cause for blindness in horses worldwide. Meanwhile, ERU is also accepted as the only reliable spontaneous model for human autoimmune uveitis. We identified and characterized novel autoantigens by analyzing the autoantibody-binding pattern from ERU cases to the retinal proteome. Cellular retinaldehyde-binding protein (CRALBP) and malate dehydrogenase (MDH) were detected as novel ERU autoantigens by this approach. B- and T-cell autoreactivity was detected to both autoantigens in ERU cases. The evaluation of the pathological relevance of CRALBP and MDH brought surprising results. While CRALBP-induced uveitis with high incidence in rats and horses, MDH was only uveitogenic in Lewis rats, but not in the horse itself.

  14. Proteomic study of three component interactions:plant, pathogens and antagonistic fungi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marra R; Turrà D; Scala F; Lorito M; Ambrosino P; Scala V; Romano C; Vinale F; Ferraioli S; Ruocco M; Carbone V; Woo S L

    2004-01-01

    @@ The molecular factors involved in the three-way interaction between plant, pathogenic fungi and antagonistic/biocontrol fungi, such as Trichoderma,are still poorly understood, even if they represent a matter of interest for improving crop management and developing new strategies for plant diseases control. The aim of this work is to investigate the components involved in this interaction and, for this purpose, a proteomic approach was used. 2-D maps of the protein extracts from the single components in various interactions between plants (potato, bean,tobacco or tomato), pathogens (Botrytis cinerea, Rhizoctonia solani or Pythium ultimum) and biocontrol fungi ( Trichoderma atroviride strain P1 or Trichoderma harzianum strain T22) were obtained. The protcome of each partner was collected separately and extracted by acetone precipitation in presence of trichloroacetic acid and a reducing agent (DTT). The extracted proteins were separated by isoelectrofocusing (IEF), using IPG (Immobilized pH gradient) strips, followed by SDS-PAGE. In order to improve resolution the separations were performed both on wide than narrow pH range and on different gel lengths. Differential spots were noted in the proteome of the three-way interaction when compared to each single component. These were further characterized by mass spectrometry and in silico analysis with the aim of identifying and cloning the relative genes. During the in vitro interaction of T. harzianum strain T22 with tomato and the culture filtrate or cell walls of pathogens,the spot number was higher than in the presence of pathogen biomass. In terms of Trichoderma differential proteins displayed on 2D gels, the most important changes were obtained in the presence of P. ultimum . During the in vivo interaction with tomato, the antagonist proteome changed much more in presence of soilborne fungi R. solani and P. ultimum than with the foliar fungus B. cinerea, both in terms of total and increased or novel spots In

  15. Proteomic Changes between Male and Female Worms of the Polychaetous Annelid Neanthes arenaceodentata before and after Spawning

    KAUST Repository

    Chandramouli, Kondethimmanahalli

    2013-08-30

    The Neanthes acuminata species complex (Polychaeta) are cosmopolitan in distribution. Neanthes arenaceodentata, complex, has been widely used as toxicological test animal in the marine environment. Method of reproduction is unique in this polychaete complex. Same sexes fight and opposite sexes lie side by side until egg laying. Females lose about 75% of their weight and die after laying eggs. The male, capable of reproducing up to nine times, fertilizes the eggs and incubates the embryos for 3-4 weeks. The objective of this study was to determine if there is any set of proteins that influences this unique pattern of reproduction. Gel-based two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and gel-free quantitative proteomics methods were used to identify differential protein expression patterns before and after spawning in both male and female N. arenaceodentata. Males showed a higher degree of similarity in protein expression patterns but females showed large changes in phosphoproteme before and after spawning. There was a decrease (about 70%) in the number of detected phosphoproteins in spent females. The proteins involved in muscular development, cell signaling, structure and integrity, and translation were differentially expressed. This study provides proteomic insights of the male and female worms that may serve as a foundation for better understanding of unusual reproductive patterns in polychaete worms. © 2013 Chandramouli et al.

  16. Proteomic changes between male and female worms of the polychaetous annelid Neanthes arenaceodentata before and after spawning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kondethimmanahalli H Chandramouli

    Full Text Available The Neanthesacuminata species complex (Polychaeta are cosmopolitan in distribution. Neanthesarenaceodentata, Southern California member of the N. acuminata complex, has been widely used as toxicological test animal in the marine environment. Method of reproduction is unique in this polychaete complex. Same sexes fight and opposite sexes lie side by side until egg laying. Females lose about 75% of their weight and die after laying eggs. The male, capable of reproducing up to nine times, fertilizes the eggs and incubates the embryos for 3-4 weeks. The objective of this study was to determine if there is any set of proteins that influences this unique pattern of reproduction. Gel-based two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE and gel-free quantitative proteomics methods were used to identify differential protein expression patterns before and after spawning in both male and female N. arenaceodentata. Males showed a higher degree of similarity in protein expression patterns but females showed large changes in phosphoproteme before and after spawning. There was a decrease (about 70% in the number of detected phosphoproteins in spent females. The proteins involved in muscular development, cell signaling, structure and integrity, and translation were differentially expressed. This study provides proteomic insights of the male and female worms that may serve as a foundation for better understanding of unusual reproductive patterns in polychaete worms.

  17. Unique proteomic signature for radiation sensitive patients; a comparative study between normo-sensitive and radiation sensitive breast cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skiöld, Sara [Center for Radiation Protection Research, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wernner-Gren Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden); Azimzadeh, Omid [Institute of Radiation Biology, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Helmholtz Zentrum München (Germany); Merl-Pham, Juliane [Research Unit Protein Science, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Neuherberg (Germany); Naslund, Ingemar; Wersall, Peter; Lidbrink, Elisabet [Division of Radiotherapy, Radiumhemmet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Tapio, Soile [Institute of Radiation Biology, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Helmholtz Zentrum München (Germany); Harms-Ringdahl, Mats [Center for Radiation Protection Research, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wernner-Gren Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden); Haghdoost, Siamak, E-mail: Siamak.Haghdoost@su.se [Center for Radiation Protection Research, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wernner-Gren Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • The unique protein expression profiles were found that separate radiosensitive from normal sensitive breast cancer patients. • The oxidative stress response, coagulation properties and acute phase response suggested to be the hallmarks of radiation sensitivity. - Abstract: Radiation therapy is a cornerstone of modern cancer treatment. Understanding the mechanisms behind normal tissue sensitivity is essential in order to minimize adverse side effects and yet to prevent local cancer reoccurrence. The aim of this study was to identify biomarkers of radiation sensitivity to enable personalized cancer treatment. To investigate the mechanisms behind radiation sensitivity a pilot study was made where eight radiation-sensitive and nine normo-sensitive patients were selected from a cohort of 2914 breast cancer patients, based on acute tissue reactions after radiation therapy. Whole blood was sampled and irradiated in vitro with 0, 1, or 150 mGy followed by 3 h incubation at 37 °C. The leukocytes of the two groups were isolated, pooled and protein expression profiles were investigated using isotope-coded protein labeling method (ICPL). First, leukocytes from the in vitro irradiated whole blood from normo-sensitive and extremely sensitive patients were compared to the non-irradiated controls. To validate this first study a second ICPL analysis comparing only the non-irradiated samples was conducted. Both approaches showed unique proteomic signatures separating the two groups at the basal level and after doses of 1 and 150 mGy. Pathway analyses of both proteomic approaches suggest that oxidative stress response, coagulation properties and acute phase response are hallmarks of radiation sensitivity supporting our previous study on oxidative stress response. This investigation provides unique characteristics of radiation sensitivity essential for individualized radiation therapy.

  18. iTRAQ-Based and Label-Free Proteomics Approaches for Studies of Human Adenovirus Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung V. Trinh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Both isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ and label-free methods are widely used for quantitative proteomics. Here, we provide a detailed evaluation of these proteomics approaches based on large datasets from biological samples. iTRAQ-label-based and label-free quantitations were compared using protein lysate samples from noninfected human lung epithelial A549 cells and from cells infected for 24 h with human adenovirus type 3 or type 5. Either iTRAQ-label-based or label-free methods were used, and the resulting samples were analyzed by liquid chromatography (LC and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS. To reduce a possible bias from quantitation software, we applied several software packages for each procedure. ProteinPilot and Scaffold Q+ software were used for iTRAQ-labeled samples, while Progenesis LC-MS and ProgenesisF-T2PQ/T3PQ were employed for label-free analyses. R2 correlation coefficients correlated well between two software packages applied to the same datasets with values between 0.48 and 0.78 for iTRAQ-label-based quantitations and 0.5 and 0.86 for label-free quantitations. Analyses of label-free samples showed higher levels of protein up- or downregulation in comparison to iTRAQ-labeled samples. The concentration differences were further evaluated by Western blotting for four downregulated proteins. These data suggested that the label-free method was more accurate than the iTRAQ method.

  19. A proteomics study of in vitro cyst germination and appressoria formation in ¤Phytophthora infestans¤

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebstrup, T.; Saalbach, G.; Egsgaard, H.

    2005-01-01

    A proteomics study using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectrometry was performed on Phytophthora infestans. Proteins from cysts, germinated cysts and appressoria grown in vitro were isolated and separated by 2-DE. Statistical quantitative analysis of the protein spots from...... five independent experiments of each developmental stage revealed significant up-regulation of ten spots on gels from germinated cysts compared to cysts. Five spots were significantly up-regulated on gels from appressoria compared to germinated cysts and one of these up-regulated spots...... was not detectable on gels from cysts. In addition, one spot was significantly down-regulated and another spot not detectable on the gels from appressoria. The corresponding proteins to 13 of these spots were identified with high confidence using tandem mass spectrometry and database searches. The functions...

  20. Proteomic Biomarkers for Spontaneous Preterm Birth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kacerovsky, Marian; Lenco, Juraj; Musilova, Ivana

    2014-01-01

    This review aimed to identify, synthesize, and analyze the findings of studies on proteomic biomarkers for spontaneous preterm birth (PTB). Three electronic databases (Medline, Embase, and Scopus) were searched for studies in any language reporting the use of proteomic biomarkers for PTB published...

  1. Applications of proteomics in hepatic diseases research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN; Wei; HE; Fuchu

    2004-01-01

    Proteomics has become an important part in the leading research area and been widely used in the disease-associated study. In hepatic research field, proteomics could be applied in study of hepatic diseases including liver cancer, cirrhosis and hepatotoxicities, etc. Significant proteins could be identified as biomarkers, drug targets and clues for pathogenesis illumination.

  2. Proteômica na sepse: estudo piloto Proteomics in sepsis: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Azevedo de Paiva

    2010-12-01

    processes are expressed by proteins. This study was aimed to advance the insight into the molecular foundations of sepsis. It employed proteomic techniques to identify and analyze differential serum protein expressions taken from a patient throughout the stages of sepsis (sepsis, severe sepsis and septic shock. Serum samples were collected at each stage of sepsis and submitted to one-dimensional electrophoresis, on gradient strips of immobilized pH, followed by two-dimensional 12.5% polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The gels obtained were stained, scanned and analyzed by the ImageMasterPlatinum program. Proteins that were differentially expressed in the gels were excised, digested with trypsin and identified through mass spectrometry. Fourteen differentially expressed proteins were identified throughout the stages of sepsis, as well as a protein that was not expressed in all stages, suggesting the potential existence of a biomarker. The differentially expressed proteins identified were: serum amyloid A, apolipoprotein A-1 (2 isoforms, zinc finger protein 222, human albumin, PRO 2619, immunoglobulin kappa light chain VLJ region, monoclonal immunoglobulin M cold agglutinin, 7 proteinase inhibitors - alpha-1 antitrypsin. The findings of this pilot study demonstrate the involvement of the complement and coagulation pathways, of the lipid metabolism and of genetic information in sepsis. The vast majority of proteins identified are involved in the immune system and the proteinase inhibitor proteins are predominant.

  3. ELISA AND SOL-GEL BASED IMMUNOAFFINITY PURIFICATION OF THE PYRETHROID BIOALLETHRIN IN FOOD AND ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The peer-reviewed article describes the development of a new sol-gel based immunoaffinity purification procedure and an immunoassay for the pyrethroid bioallethrin. The immunoaffinity chromatography procedure was applied to food samples providing an efficient cleanup prior to im...

  4. Malária por Plasmodium falciparum: estudos proteômicos Plasmodium falciparum malaria: proteomic studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Siqueira-Batista

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A despeito dos avanços no tratamento e das campanhas de prevenção e de controle da malária nos distintos continentes nos quais a moléstia grassa, a entidade mórbida permanece com significativa relevância no mundo contemporâneo. O Plasmodium falciparum é o grande responsável pela malária grave, caracterizada por distúrbios em diferentes órgãos e sistemas, com possibilidade de evolução ao óbito. Embora incipientes, os estudos proteômicos na malária têm trazido boas perspectivas para melhor compreensão dos aspectos biológicos do Plasmodium, assim como dos mecanismos fisiopatológicos, diagnósticos, terapêuticos e profiláticos da enfermidade. Desse modo, o objetivo do presente artigo é apresentar uma breve revisão das aplicações da análise proteômica na malária por P. falciparum.Despite advances in treatment and campaigns for prevention and control of malaria on the various continents where it is still rampant, this disease remains significantly relevant to the contemporary world. Plasmodium falciparum is the organism that is mainly responsible for severe malaria, which is characterized by disturbances in different organs and systems, with possibly fatal outcomes. Although incipient, proteomic studies of malaria have yielded favorable prospects for elucidating the biological aspects of Plasmodium as well as the pathophysiological, diagnostic, prophylactic, and therapeutic mechanisms of the disease. Thus, the aim of the present article is to present a brief review of the applications of proteomic analysis in P. falciparum malaria.

  5. Dietary lysine imbalance affects muscle proteome in zebrafish (Danio rerio): a comparative 2D-DIGE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vareilles, Mahaut; Conceição, Luis E C; Gómez-Requeni, Pedro; Kousoulaki, Katerina; Richard, Nadège; Rodrigues, Pedro M; Fladmark, Kari E; Rønnestad, Ivar

    2012-10-01

    Lysine (Lys) is an indispensable amino acid (AA) and generally the first limiting AA in vegetable protein sources in fish feeds. Inadequate dietary Lys availability may limit protein synthesis, accretion and growth of fish. This experiment aimed to further elucidate the role of Lys imbalance on growth by examining the myotomal muscle proteome of juvenile zebrafish (Danio rerio). Quadruplicate groups of 8 fish were fed either a low-Lys [Lys(-), 1.34 g kg(-1)], medium/control (Lys, 2.47 g kg(-1)) or high-Lys [Lys(+), 4.63 g kg(-1)] diet. Fish growth was monitored from 33 to 49 days post-fertilization (dpf) and trunk myotomal muscle proteome of Lys(-) and Lys(+) treatments were screened by 2D-DIGE and MALDI ToF tandem mass spectrometry. Growth rate was negatively affected by diet Lys(-). Out of 527 ± 11 (mean ± S.E.M.) protein spots detected (∼10-150 kDa and 4-7 pI value), 30 were over-expressed and 22 under-expressed in Lys(-) fish (|fold-change| >1.2, p value muscle protein accretion. The Lys deficiency also possibly induced a higher feeding activity, reflected in the over-expression of beta enolase and mitochondrial ATP synthase. Contrarily, in the faster growing fish [Lys(+)], over-expression of apolipoprotein A-I, F-actin capping protein and Pdlim7 point to increased energy storage as fat and enhanced muscle growth, particularly by mosaic hyperplasia. Thus using an exploratory approach, this study pinpoints interesting candidates for further elucidating the role of dietary Lys on growth of juvenile fish.

  6. Quantitative Proteomic and Transcriptomic Study on Autotetraploid Paulownia and Its Diploid Parent Reveal Key Metabolic Processes Associated with Paulownia Autotetraploidization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yanpeng; Deng, Minjie; Zhao, Zhenli; Fan, Guoqiang

    2016-01-01

    Polyploidy plays a very important role in speciation and plant evolution by way of genomic merging and doubling. In the process of polyploidy, rapid genomic, and transcriptomic changes have been observed and researched. However, proteomic divergence caused by the effects of polyploidization is still poorly understood. In the present study, we used iTRAQ coupled with mass spectrometry to quantitatively analyze proteomic changes in the leaves of autotetraploid Paulownia and its diploid parent. A total of 2963 proteins were identified and quantified. Among them, 463 differentially abundant proteins were detected between autotetraploid Paulownia and its diploid parent, and 198 proteins were found to be non-additively abundant in autotetraploid Paulownia, suggesting the presence of non-additive protein regulation during genomic merger and doubling. We also detected 1808 protein-encoding genes in previously published RNA sequencing data. We found that 59 of the genes that showed remarkable changes at mRNA level encoded proteins with consistant changes in their abundance levels, while a further 48 genes that showed noteworthy changes in their expression levels encoded proteins with opposite changes in their abundance levels. Proteins involved in posttranslational modification, protein turnover, and response to stimulus, were significantly enriched among the non-additive proteins, which may provide some of the driving power for variation and adaptation in autopolyploids. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis verified the expression patterns of related protein-coding genes. In addition, we found that the percentage of differentially abundant proteins that matched previously reported differentially expressed genes was relatively low.

  7. Proteomic analysis reveals differential accumulation of small heat shock proteins and late embryogenesis abundant proteins between ABA-deficient mutant vp5 seeds and wild-type Vp5 seeds in maize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolin eWu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available ABA is a major plant hormone that plays important roles during many phases of plant life cycle, including seed development, maturity and dormancy, and especially the acquisition of desiccation tolerance. Understanding of the molecular basis of ABA-mediated plant response to stress is of interest not only in basic research on plant adaptation but also in applied research on plant productivity. Maize mutant viviparous-5 (vp5, deficient in ABA biosynthesis in seeds, is a useful material for studying ABA-mediated response in maize. Due to carotenoid deficiency, vp5 endosperm is white, compared to yellow Vp5 endosperm. However, the background difference at proteome level between vp5 and Vp5 seeds is unclear. This study aimed to characterize proteome alterations of maize vp5 seeds and to identify ABA-dependent proteins during seed maturation. We compared the embryo and endosperm proteomes of vp5 and Vp5 seeds by gel-based proteomics. Up to 46 protein spots, most in embryos, were found to be differentially accumulated between vp5 and Vp5. The identified proteins included small heat shock proteins (sHSPs, late embryogenesis abundant (LEA proteins, stress proteins, storage proteins and enzymes among others. However, EMB564, the most abundant LEA protein in maize embryo, accumulated in comparable levels between vp5 and Vp5 embryos, which contrasted to previously characterized, greatly lowered expression of emb564 mRNA in vp5 embryos. Moreover, LEA proteins and sHSPs displayed differential accumulations in vp5 embryos: six out of eight identified LEA proteins decreased while nine sHSPs increased in abundance. Finally, we discussed the possible causes of global proteome alterations, especially the observed differential accumulation of identified LEA proteins and sHSPs in vp5 embryos. The data derived from this study provides new insight into ABA-dependent proteins and ABA-mediated response during maize seed maturation.

  8. [Investigation of the abundance of proteins secreted by Fasciola hepatica, which is exposed to environmental change in experimental studies, with an advanced proteomic approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haçarız, Orçun; Baykal, Ahmet Tarık

    2014-06-01

    Investigation of the abundance of proteins secreted by Fasciola hepatica, which is exposed to environmental change after it is removed from the main host, with an advanced proteomic approach. Adult Fasciola hepatica parasites, obtained from the main host, were directly placed in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS, at room temperature) and incubated at 37°C for 2 hours (after arrival at the Institute within 1 hour). After this, without applying extra procedures, such as washing the parasites, secreted parasite proteins in PBS were investigated using an advanced proteomic method [a mass spectrometry system with electrospray ionization and quadrupole time-of-flight source coupled to ultra performance liquid chromatography, nano UPLC-ESI-QTOF-MS] with a reviewed F. hepatica protein database (Universal Protein Resource; UniProt) and data-independent acquisition method. With the proteomic analysis of the PBS, after incubation with the parasites, cathepsin L protease 1, fatty acid-binding protein 1 and 2, thioredoxin peroxidase (TPx), and kunitz-type proteinase inhibitor were identified. The abundance of Fasciola hepatica TPx was approximately 2-6 times higher than that of the other proteins identified in this study (p<0.01). The stress on the parasite stem from environmental change could be associated with the stimulation of the secretion of TPx. The application of advanced proteomic approaches could provide useful data in the development of effective protective methods against the parasite.

  9. Urinary proteomics predict onset of microalbuminuria in normoalbuminuric type 2 diabetic patients, a sub-study of the DIRECT-Protect 2 study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhardt, Morten; Persson, Frederik; Zürbig, Petra

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Early prevention of diabetic nephropathy is not successful as early interventions have shown conflicting results, partly because of a lack of early and precise indicators of disease development. Urinary proteomics has shown promise in this regard and could identify those at high risk...... who might benefit from treatment. In this study we investigate its utility in a large type 2 diabetic cohort with normoalbuminuria. METHODS: We performed a post hoc analysis in the Diabetic Retinopathy Candesartan Trials (DIRECT-Protect 2 study), a multi centric randomized clinical controlled trial...... strategies for diabetic nephropathy....

  10. Mitochondrial specialization revealed by single muscle fiber proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiaffino, S; Reggiani, C; Kostrominova, T Y

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a highly sensitive mass spectrometry-based proteomic workflow to examine the proteome of single muscle fibers. This study revealed significant differences in the mitochondrial proteome of the four major fiber types present in mouse skeletal muscle. Here, we focus on Krebs cycle ...... scavenging capacity to cope with the higher levels of reactive oxygen species production....

  11. Modification-specific proteomics in plant biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ytterberg, A Jimmy; Jensen, Ole N

    2010-01-01

    and proteomics. In general, methods for PTM characterization are developed to study yeast and mammalian biology and later adopted to investigate plants. Our point of view is that it is advantageous to enrich for PTMs on the peptide level as part of a quantitative proteomics strategy to not only identify the PTM...

  12. Proteomics: Protein Identification Using Online Databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eurich, Chris; Fields, Peter A.; Rice, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Proteomics is an emerging area of systems biology that allows simultaneous study of thousands of proteins expressed in cells, tissues, or whole organisms. We have developed this activity to enable high school or college students to explore proteomic databases using mass spectrometry data files generated from yeast proteins in a college laboratory…

  13. Proteomics: Protein Identification Using Online Databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eurich, Chris; Fields, Peter A.; Rice, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Proteomics is an emerging area of systems biology that allows simultaneous study of thousands of proteins expressed in cells, tissues, or whole organisms. We have developed this activity to enable high school or college students to explore proteomic databases using mass spectrometry data files generated from yeast proteins in a college laboratory…

  14. Two-dimensional gel-based protein standardization verified by western blot analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haniu, Hisao; Watanabe, Daisuke; Kawashima, Yusuke; Matsumoto, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    In data presentation of biochemical investigation the amount of a target protein is shown in the y-axis against the x-axis representing time, concentrations of various agents, or other parameters. Western blot is a versatile and convenient tool in such an analysis to quantify and display the amount of proteins. In western blot, so-called housekeeping gene product(s), or "housekeeping proteins," are widely used as internal standards. The rationale of using housekeeping proteins for standardization of western blot is based on the assumption that the expression of chosen housekeeping gene is always constant, which could be false under certain physiological or pathological conditions. We have devised a two-dimensional gel-based standardization method in which the protein content of each sample is determined by scanning the total protein density of two-dimensional gels and the expression of each protein is quantified as the density ratio of each protein divided by the density of the total proteins on the two-dimensional gel. The advantage of this standardization method is that it is not based on any presumed "housekeeping proteins" that are supposed to be being expressed constantly under all physiological conditions. We will show that the total density of a two-dimensional gel can render a reliable protein standardization parameter by running western blot analysis on one of the proteins analyzed by two-dimensional gels.

  15. Performance enhancement of phosphoric acid fuel cell using phosphosilicate gel based electrolyte

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kajari Kargupta; Swati Saha; Dipali Banerjee; Mrinal Seal; Saibal Ganguly

    2012-01-01

    Replacement of phosphoric acid electrolyte by phosphosilicate gel based electrolytes is proposed for performance enhancement of phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFG).Phosphosilicate gel in paste form and in powder form is synthesized from tetraethoxysilane and orthophosphoric acid using sol-gel method for two different P/Si ratio of 5 and 1.5 respectively.Replacement of phosphoric acid electrolyte by phosphosilicate gel paste enhances the peak power generation of the fuel cell by 133% at 120 ℃ cell temperature; increases the voltage generation in the ohmic regime and extends the maximum possible load current.Polyinyl alcohol (PVA) is used to bind the phosphosilicate gel powder and to form the hybrid crosslinked gel polymer electrolyte membrane.Soaking the membrane with phosphoric acid solution,instead of that with water improves the proton conductivity of the membrane,enhances the voltage and power generation by the fuel cell and extends the maximum possible operating temperature.At lower operating temperature of 70 ℃,peak power produced by phosphosilicate gel polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell ( PGMFC ) is increased by 40% compared to that generated by phosphoric acid fuel cell ( PAFC ).However,the performance of composite membrane diminishes as the cell temperature increases.Thus phosphosilicate gel in paste form is found to be a good alternative of phosphoric acid electrolyte at medium operating temperature range while phosphosilicate gel-PVA composite offers performance enhancement at low operating temperatures.

  16. Gel-free proteomic methodologies to study reversible cysteine oxidation and irreversible protein carbonyl formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boronat, S; García-Santamarina, S; Hidalgo, E

    2015-05-01

    Oxidative modifications in proteins have been traditionally considered as hallmarks of damage by oxidative stress and aging. However, oxidants can generate a huge variety of reversible and irreversible modifications in amino acid side chains as well as in the protein backbones, and these post-translational modifications can contribute to the activation of signal transduction pathways, and also mediate the toxicity of oxidants. Among the reversible modifications, the most relevant ones are those arising from cysteine oxidation. Thus, formation of sulfenic acid or disulfide bonds is known to occur in many enzymes as part of their catalytic cycles, and it also participates in the activation of signaling cascades. Furthermore, these reversible modifications have been usually attributed with a protective role, since they may prevent the formation of irreversible damage by scavenging reactive oxygen species. Among irreversible modifications, protein carbonyl formation has been linked to damage and death, since it cannot be repaired and can lead to protein loss-of-function and to the formation of protein aggregates. This review is aimed at researchers interested on the biological consequences of oxidative stress, both at the level of signaling and toxicity. Here we are providing a concise overview on current mass-spectrometry-based methodologies to detect reversible cysteine oxidation and irreversible protein carbonyl formation in proteomes. We do not pretend to impose any of the different methodologies, but rather to provide an objective catwalk on published gel-free approaches to detect those two types of modifications, from a biologist's point of view.

  17. Across intra-mammalian stages of the liver f luke Fasciola hepatica: a proteomic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Maggio, Lucía Sánchez; Tirloni, Lucas; Pinto, Antonio F. M.; Diedrich, Jolene K.; Yates III, John R.; Benavides, Uruguaysito; Carmona, Carlos; da Silva Vaz Jr., Itabajara; Berasain, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Fasciola hepatica is the agent of fasciolosis, a foodborne zoonosis that affects livestock production and human health. Although flukicidal drugs are available, re-infection and expanding resistance to triclabendazole demand new control strategies. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the complex interaction with the mammalian host could provide relevant clues, aiding the search for novel targets in diagnosis and control of fasciolosis. Parasite survival in the mammalian host is mediated by parasite compounds released during infection, known as excretory/secretory (E/S) products. E/S products are thought to protect parasites from host responses, allowing them to survive for a long period in the vertebrate host. This work provides in-depth proteomic analysis of F. hepatica intra-mammalian stages, and represents the largest number of proteins identified to date for this species. Functional classification revealed the presence of proteins involved in different biological processes, many of which represent original findings for this organism and are important for parasite survival within the host. These results could lead to a better comprehension of host-parasite relationships, and contribute to the development of drugs or vaccines against this parasite. PMID:27600774

  18. The response of Populus spp. to cadmium stress: chemical, morphological and proteomics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmiroli, Marta; Imperiale, Davide; Maestri, Elena; Marmiroli, Nelson

    2013-10-01

    Poplar (Populus) species are seen as candidates for removing heavy metal contamination from polluted soil. A bottom-up multidisciplinary approach was utilized to compare the performances of clones 58-861 and Poli (Populus nigra) and A4A, a Populus nigra × Populus deltoides hybrid to Cd toxicity. Qualitative and quantitative differences in their tolerance to Cd exposure and the uptake, accumulation and translocation of Cd were noted following the hydroponic exposure of rooted cuttings to 20 μM CdSO₄ for either 48 h or 14 d. Cadmium was less toxic for the hybrid clone A4A as compared to Poli and 58-861. Cd uptake and root to shoot translocation were determined by AAS, and its compartmentation was analyzed using SEM/EDX. A comparative proteomic approach was utilized to identify changes in proteins expression according to dose and time of exposure. Toxicity to Cd mainly influenced proteins related to general defense, stress response and carbohydrate metabolism.

  19. A proteomic study of memory after imprinting in the domestic chick

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maia eMeparishvili

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The intermediate and medial mesopallium (IMM of the domestic chick forebrain has previously been shown to be a memory system for visual imprinting. Learning-related changes occur in certain plasma membrane and mitochondrial proteins in the IMM. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis/mass spectrometry has been employed to identify more comprehensively learning-related expression of proteins in the membrane-mitochondrial fraction of the IMM 24 h after training. We inquired whether amounts of these proteins in the IMM and a control region (posterior pole of the nidopallium, PPN are correlated with a behavioural estimate of memory for the imprinting stimulus. Learning-related increases in amounts of the following proteins were found in the left IMM, but not the right IMM or the left or right PPN: (i membrane cognin; (ii a protein resembling the P32 subunit of splicing factor SF2; (iii voltage-dependent anionic channel-1; (iv dynamin-1; (v heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A2/B1. Learning-related increases in some transcription factors involved in mitochondrial biogenesis were also found, without significant change in mitochondrial DNA copy number. The results indicate that the molecular processes involved in learning and memory underlying imprinting include protein stabilization, increased mRNA trafficking, synaptic vesicle recycling and specific changes in the mitochondrial proteome.

  20. A systematic proteomic study of irradiated DNA repair deficient Nbn-mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Melchers

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The NBN gene codes for the protein nibrin, which is involved in the detection and repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs. The NBN gene is essential in mammals. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have used a conditional null mutant mouse model in a proteomics approach to identify proteins with modified expression levels after 4 Gy ionizing irradiation in the absence of nibrin in vivo. Altogether, amongst approximately 8,000 resolved proteins, 209 were differentially expressed in homozygous null mutant mice in comparison to control animals. One group of proteins significantly altered in null mutant mice were those involved in oxidative stress and cellular redox homeostasis (p<0.0001. In substantiation of this finding, analysis of Nbn null mutant fibroblasts indicated an increased production of reactive oxygen species following induction of DSBs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In humans, biallelic hypomorphic mutations in NBN lead to Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS, an autosomal recessive genetic disease characterised by extreme radiosensitivity coupled with growth retardation, immunoinsufficiency and a very high risk of malignancy. This particularly high cancer risk in NBS may be attributable to the compound effect of a DSB repair defect and oxidative stress.

  1. Mining the granule proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrethsen, Jakob; Goetze, Jens P; Johnsen, Anders H

    2015-01-01

    Proteomics of secretory granules is an emerging strategy for identifying secreted proteins, including potentially novel candidate biomarkers and peptide hormones. In addition, proteomics can provide information about the abundance, localization and structure (post-translational modification) of g...

  2. The UCSC Proteome Browser

    OpenAIRE

    Hsu, Fan; Tom H Pringle; Kuhn, Robert M.; Karolchik, Donna; Diekhans, Mark; Haussler, David; Kent, W. James

    2004-01-01

    The University of California Santa Cruz (UCSC) Proteome Browser provides a wealth of protein information presented in graphical images and with links to other protein-related Internet sites. The Proteome Browser is tightly integrated with the UCSC Genome Browser. For the first time, Genome Browser users have both the genome and proteome worlds at their fingertips simultaneously. The Proteome Browser displays tracks of protein and genomic sequences, exon structure, polarity, hydrophobicity, lo...

  3. Proteomics of the Peroxisome

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Genomes provide us with a blue print for the potential of a cell. However, the activity of a cell is expressed in its proteome. Full understanding of the complexity of cells demands a comprehensive view of the proteome; its interactions, activity states and organization. Comprehensive proteomic approaches applied to peroxisomes have yielded new insights into the organelle and its dynamic interplay with other cellular structures. As technologies and methodologies improve proteomics hold the pr...

  4. The proteome browser web portal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goode, Robert J A; Yu, Simon; Kannan, Anitha; Christiansen, Jeffrey H; Beitz, Anthony; Hancock, William S; Nice, Edouard; Smith, A Ian

    2013-01-01

    In 2010, the Human Proteome Organization launched the Human Proteome Project (HPP), aimed at identifying and characterizing the proteome of the human body. To support complete coverage, one arm of the project will take a gene- or chromosomal-centric strategy (C-HPP) aimed at identifying at least one protein product from each protein-coding gene. Despite multiple large international biological databases housing genomic and protein data, there is currently no single system that integrates updated pertinent information from each of these data repositories and assembles the information into a searchable format suitable for the type of global proteomics effort proposed by the C-HPP. We have undertaken the goal of producing a data integration and analysis software system and browser for the C-HPP effort and of making data collections from this resource discoverable through metadata repositories, such as Australian National Data Service's Research Data Australia. Here we present our vision and progress toward the goal of developing a comprehensive data integration and analysis software tool that provides a snapshot of currently available proteomic related knowledge around each gene product, which will ultimately assist in analyzing biological function and the study of human physiology in health and disease.

  5. Proteomic approaches to bacterial differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norbeck, Angela D.; Callister, Stephen J.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Jaitly, Navdeep; Elias, Dwayne A.; Lipton, Mary S.; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-12-01

    While genomic approaches have been applied for the detection and identification of individual bacteria within microbial communities, analogous proteomics approaches have been effectively precluded due to their inherent complexity. An in silico assessment of peptides that could potentially be present in the proteomes of artificial simple and complex communities was performed to evaluate the effect of proteome complexity on species detection. A mass spectrometry-based proteomics approach was employed to experimentally detect and validate the predicted tryptic peptides initially identified as distinctive within the simple community. An assessment of peptide distinctiveness and the potential for mapping to a particular bacterium within a community was made throughout each step of the study. A second in silico assessment of peptide distinctiveness for a complex community of 25 microorganisms was conducted to investigate the levels of instrumental performance that would be required to experimentally detect these peptides, as well as how performance varied with complexity (e.g., the number of different microorganisms). The experimental data for a simple community showed that it is feasible to predict, observe, and to quantify distinctive peptides from one organism in the presence of at least a 100-fold greater abundance of another, thus yielding putative markers for identifying a bacterium of interest. This work represents a first step towards quantitative proteomic characterization of complex microbial communities and the possible development of community wide markers of perturbations to such communities.

  6. New structural and functional defects in polyphosphate deficient bacteria: A cellular and proteomic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chávez Francisco P

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inorganic polyphosphate (polyP, a polymer of tens or hundreds of phosphate residues linked by ATP-like bonds, is found in all organisms and performs a wide variety of functions. PolyP is synthesized in bacterial cells by the actions of polyphosphate kinases (PPK1 and PPK2 and degraded by exopolyphosphatase (PPX. Bacterial cells with polyP deficiencies due to knocking out the ppk1 gene are affected in many structural and important cellular functions such as motility, quorum sensing, biofilm formation and virulence among others. The cause of this pleiotropy is not entirely understood. Results The overexpression of exopolyphosphatase in bacteria mimicked some pleitropic defects found in ppk1 mutants. By using this approach we found new structural and functional defects in the polyP-accumulating bacteria Pseudomonas sp. B4, which are most likely due to differences in the polyP-removal strategy. Colony morphology phenotype, lipopolysaccharide (LPS structure changes and cellular division malfunction were observed. Finally, we used comparative proteomics in order to elucidate the cellular adjustments that occurred during polyP deficiency in this bacterium and found some clues that helped to understand the structural and functional defects observed. Conclusions The results obtained suggest that during polyP deficiency energy metabolism and particularly nucleoside triphosphate (NTP formation were affected and that bacterial cells overcame this problem by increasing the flux of energy-generating metabolic pathways such as tricarboxilic acid (TCA cycle, β-oxidation and oxidative phosphorylation and by reducing energy-consuming ones such as active transporters and amino acid biosynthesis. Furthermore, our results suggest that a general stress response also took place in the cell during polyP deficiency.

  7. An LC-IMS-MS Platform Providing Increased Dynamic Range for High-Throughput Proteomic Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Erin Shammel; Livesay, Eric A.; Orton, Daniel J.; Moore, Ronald J.; Danielson, William F.; Prior, David C.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Lamarche, Brian L.; Mayampurath, Anoop M.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Hopkins, Derek F.; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.; Belov, Mikhail E.

    2010-02-05

    A high-throughput approach and platform using 15 minute reversed-phase capillary liquid chromatography (RPLC) separations in conjunction with ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) measurements was evaluated for the rapid analysis of complex proteomics samples. To test the separation quality of the short LC gradient, a sample was prepared by spiking twenty reference peptides at varying concentrations from 1 ng/mL to 10 µg/mL into a tryptic digest of mouse blood plasma and analyzed with both a LC-Linear Ion Trap Fourier Transform (FT) MS and LC-IMS-TOF MS. The LC-FT MS detected thirteen out of the twenty spiked peptides that had concentrations ≥100 ng/mL. In contrast, the drift time selected mass spectra from the LC-IMS-TOF MS analyses yielded identifications for nineteen of the twenty peptides with all spiking level present. The greater dynamic range of the LC-IMS-TOF MS system could be attributed to two factors. First, the LC-IMS-TOF MS system enabled drift time separation of the low concentration spiked peptides from the high concentration mouse peptide matrix components, reducing signal interference and background, and allowing species to be resolved that would otherwise be obscured by other components. Second, the automatic gain control (AGC) in the linear ion trap of the hybrid FT MS instrument limits the number of ions that are accumulated to reduce space charge effects, but in turn limits the achievable dynamic range compared to the TOF detector.

  8. [Application of differential proteomics in mechanism research of acupuncture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lin-na; Pei, Jian

    2011-08-01

    Proteomics, a new branch of science, has been used to study protein expressions on the molecular level with a dynamic perspective. Organisms under varying states may express different proteins, which results in the set-up of differential proteomics. Research methods of differential proteomics include the separation and identification of proteins. Differential proteomics has a rapid development in recent years. In the study of acupuncture, researchers have reached certain achievements using differential proteomics to investigate the mechanisms of acupuncture treatment for some diseases, including acute spinal cord injury, ischemic cerebrovascular disease, Parkinson's disease and neuralgia.

  9. The Potato Tuber Mitochondrial Proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salvato, Fernanda; Havelund, Jesper F; Chen, Mingjie

    2014-01-01

    manner using normalized spectral counts including as many as 5-fold more “extreme” proteins (low mass, high isoelectric point, hydrophobic) than previous mitochondrial proteome studies. We estimate that this compendium of proteins represents a high coverage of the potato tuber mitochondrial proteome...... that more than 50% of the identified proteins harbor at least one modification. The most prominently observed class of posttranslational modifications was oxidative modifications. This study reveals approximately 500 new or previously unconfirmed plant mitochondrial proteins and outlines a facile strategy...... for unbiased, near-comprehensive identification of mitochondrial proteins and their modified forms....

  10. Proteomics reveals the effects of sustained weight loss on the human plasma proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geyer, Philipp E; Wewer Albrechtsen, Nicolai J; Tyanova, Stefka;

    2016-01-01

    Sustained weight loss is a preferred intervention in a wide range of metabolic conditions, but the effects on an individual's health state remain ill-defined. Here, we investigate the plasma proteomes of a cohort of 43 obese individuals that had undergone 8 weeks of 12% body weight loss followed ...... evaluates and monitors intervention in metabolic diseases....... in the plasma proteome, and eight plasma proteins correlated better with insulin resistance than the known marker adiponectin. Nearly all study participants benefited from weight loss regarding a ten-protein inflammation panel defined from the proteomics data. We conclude that plasma proteome profiling broadly...

  11. Diagnostic Proteomics: Serum Proteomic Patterns for the Detection of Early Stage Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Rong Yu

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The ability to interrogate thousands of proteins found in complex biological samples using proteomic technologies has brought the hope of discovering novel disease-specific biomarkers. While most proteomic technologies used to discover diagnostic biomarkers are quite sophisticated, "proteomic pattern analysis" has emerged as a simple, yet potentially revolutionary, method for the early diagnosis of diseases. Utilizing this technology, hundreds of clinical samples can be analyzed per day and several preliminary studies suggest proteomic pattern analysis has the potential to be a novel, highly sensitive diagnostic tool for the early detection of cancer.

  12. In-depth proteomic analysis of Glycine max seeds during controlled deterioration treatment reveals a shift in seed metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Cheol Woo; Lee, Seo Hyun; Cheon, Ye Eun; Han, Won Young; Ko, Jong Min; Kang, Hang Won; Kim, Yong Chul; Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar; Rakwal, Randeep; Gupta, Ravi; Kim, Sun Tae

    2017-06-29

    Seed aging is one of the major events, affecting the overall quality of agricultural seeds. To analyze the effect of seed aging, soybean seeds were exposed to controlled deterioration treatment (CDT) for 3 and 7days, followed by their physiological, biochemical, and proteomic analyses. Seed proteins were subjected to protamine sulfate precipitation for the enrichment of low-abundance proteins and utilized for proteome analysis. A total of 14 differential proteins were identified on 2-DE, whereas label-free quantification resulted in the identification of 1626 non-redundant proteins. Of these identified proteins, 146 showed significant changes in protein abundance, where 5 and 141 had increased and decreased abundances, respectively while 352 proteins were completely degraded during CDT. Gene ontology and KEGG analyses suggested the association of differential proteins with primary metabolism, ROS detoxification, translation elongation and initiation, protein folding, and proteolysis, where most, if not all, had decreased abundance during CDT. Western blotting confirmed reduced level of antioxidant enzymes (DHAR, APx1, MDAR, and SOD) upon CDT. This in-depth integrated study reveals a major downshift in seed metabolism upon CDT. Reported data here serve as a resource for its exploitation to metabolic engineering of seeds for multiple purposes, including increased seed viability, vigor, and quality. Controlled deterioration treatment (CDT) is one of the major events that negatively affects the quality and nutrient composition of agricultural seeds. However, the molecular mechanism of CDT is largely unknown. A combination of gel-based and gel-free proteomic approach was utilized to investigate the effects of CDT in soybean seeds. Moreover, we utilized protamine sulfate precipitation method for enrichment of low-abundance proteins, which are generally masked due to the presence of high-abundance seed storage proteins. Reported data here serve as resource for its

  13. The 2012/2013 ABRF Proteomic Research Group Study: Assessing Longitudinal Intralaboratory Variability in Routine Peptide Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Keiryn L; Wang, Xia; Bystrom, Cory E; Chambers, Matthew C; Andacht, Tracy M; Dangott, Larry J; Elortza, Félix; Leszyk, John; Molina, Henrik; Moritz, Robert L; Phinney, Brett S; Thompson, J Will; Bunger, Maureen K; Tabb, David L

    2015-12-01

    Questions concerning longitudinal data quality and reproducibility of proteomic laboratories spurred the Protein Research Group of the Association of Biomolecular Resource Facilities (ABRF-PRG) to design a study to systematically assess the reproducibility of proteomic laboratories over an extended period of time. Developed as an open study, initially 64 participants were recruited from the broader mass spectrometry community to analyze provided aliquots of a six bovine protein tryptic digest mixture every month for a period of nine months. Data were uploaded to a central repository, and the operators answered an accompanying survey. Ultimately, 45 laboratories submitted a minimum of eight LC-MSMS raw data files collected in data-dependent acquisition (DDA) mode. No standard operating procedures were enforced; rather the participants were encouraged to analyze the samples according to usual practices in the laboratory. Unlike previous studies, this investigation was not designed to compare laboratories or instrument configuration, but rather to assess the temporal intralaboratory reproducibility. The outcome of the study was reassuring with 80% of the participating laboratories performing analyses at a medium to high level of reproducibility and quality over the 9-month period. For the groups that had one or more outlying experiments, the major contributing factor that correlated to the survey data was the performance of preventative maintenance prior to the LC-MSMS analyses. Thus, the Protein Research Group of the Association of Biomolecular Resource Facilities recommends that laboratories closely scrutinize the quality control data following such events. Additionally, improved quality control recording is imperative. This longitudinal study provides evidence that mass spectrometry-based proteomics is reproducible. When quality control measures are strictly adhered to, such reproducibility is comparable among many disparate groups. Data from the study are

  14. Proteomics characterization of exosome cargo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schey, Kevin L; Luther, J Matthew; Rose, Kristie L

    2015-10-01

    Characterization of exosomal cargo is of significant interest because this cargo can provide clues to exosome biogenesis, targeting, and cellular effects and may be a source of biomarkers for disease diagnosis, prognosis and response to treatment. With recent improvements in proteomics technologies, both qualitative and quantitative characterization of exosomal proteins is possible. Here we provide a brief review of exosome proteomics studies and provide detailed protocols for global qualitative, global quantitative, and targeted quantitative analysis of exosomal proteins. In addition, we provide an example application of a standard global quantitative analysis followed by validation via a targeted quantitative analysis of urine exosome samples from human patients. Advantages and limitations of each method are discussed as well as future directions for exosome proteomics analysis.

  15. Proteomic classification of breast cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kamel, Dalia

    2012-11-01

    Being a significant health problem that affects patients in various age groups, breast cancer has been extensively studied to date. Recently, molecular breast cancer classification has advanced significantly with the availability of genomic profiling technologies. Proteomic technologies have also advanced from traditional protein assays including enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry to more comprehensive approaches including mass spectrometry and reverse phase protein lysate arrays (RPPA). The purpose of this manuscript is to review the current protein markers that influence breast cancer prediction and prognosis and to focus on novel advances in proteomic classification of breast cancer.

  16. Generation of High-Quality SWATH(®) Acquisition Data for Label-free Quantitative Proteomics Studies Using TripleTOF(®) Mass Spectrometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Birgit; Gibson, Bradford W; Hunter, Christie L

    2017-01-01

    Data-independent acquisition is a powerful mass spectrometry technique that enables comprehensive MS and MS/MS analysis of all detectable species, providing an information rich data file that can be mined deeply. Here, we describe how to acquire high-quality SWATH(®) Acquisition data to be used for large quantitative proteomic studies. We specifically focus on using variable sized Q1 windows for acquisition of MS/MS data for generating higher specificity quantitative data.

  17. Trade-Off between Growth and Carbohydrate Accumulation in Nutrient-Limited Arthrospira sp. PCC 8005 Studied by Integrating Transcriptomic and Proteomic Approaches

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacteria have a strong potential for biofuel production due to their ability to accumulate large amounts of carbohydrates. Nitrogen (N) stress can be used to increase the content of carbohydrates in the biomass, but it is expected to reduce biomass productivity. To study this trade-off between carbohydrate accumulation and biomass productivity, we characterized the biomass productivity, biomass composition as well as the transcriptome and proteome of the cyanobacterium Arthrospira sp. PC...

  18. Identification of altered plasma proteins by proteomic study in valvular heart diseases and the potential clinical significance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge Gao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Little is known about genetic basis and proteomics in valvular heart disease (VHD including rheumatic (RVD and degenerative (DVD valvular disease. The present proteomic study examined the hypothesis that certain proteins may be associated with the pathological changes in the plasma of VHD patients. METHODS AND RESULTS: Differential protein analysis in the plasma identified 18 differentially expressed protein spots and 14 corresponding proteins or polypeptides by two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry in 120 subjects. Two up-regulated (complement C4A and carbonic anhydrase 1 and three down-regulated proteins (serotransferrin, alpha-1-antichymotrypsin, and vitronectin were validated by ELISA in enlarging samples. The plasma levels (n = 40 for each of complement C4A in RVD (715.8±35.6 vs. 594.7±28.2 ng/ml, P = 0.009 and carbonic anhydrase 1 (237.70±15.7 vs. 184.7±10.8 U/L, P = 0.007 in DVD patients were significantly higher and that of serotransferrin (2.36±0.20 vs. 2.93±0.16 mg/ml, P = 0.025 and alpha-1-antichymotrypsin (370.0±13.7 vs. 413.0±11.6 µg/ml, P = 0.019 in RVD patients were significantly lower than those in controls. The plasma vitronectin level in both RVD (281.3±11.0 vs. 323.2±10.0 µg/ml, P = 0.006 and DVD (283.6±11.4 vs. 323.2±10.0 µg/ml, P = 0.011 was significantly lower than those in normal controls. CONCLUSIONS: We have for the first time identified alterations of 14 differential proteins or polypeptides in the plasma of patients with various VHD. The elevation of plasma complement C4A in RVD and carbonic anhydrase 1 in DVD and the decrease of serotransferrin and alpha-1-antichymotrypsin in RVD patients may be useful biomarkers for these valvular diseases. The decreased plasma level of vitronectin - a protein related to the formation of valvular structure - in both RVD and DVD patients might indicate the possible genetic deficiency in these patients.

  19. Top-down proteomics with mass spectrometry imaging: a pilot study towards discovery of biomarkers for neurodevelopmental disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Ye

    Full Text Available In the developing mammalian brain, inhibition of NMDA receptor can induce widespread neuroapoptosis, inhibit neurogenesis and cause impairment of learning and memory. Although some mechanistic insights into adverse neurological actions of these NMDA receptor antagonists exist, our understanding of the full spectrum of developmental events affected by early exposure to these chemical agents in the brain is still limited. Here we attempt to gain insights into the impact of pharmacologically induced excitatory/inhibitory imbalance in infancy on the brain proteome using mass spectrometric imaging (MSI. Our goal was to study changes in protein expression in postnatal day 10 (P10 rat brains following neonatal exposure to the NMDA receptor antagonist dizocilpine (MK801. Analysis of rat brains exposed to vehicle or MK801 and comparison of their MALDI MS images revealed differential relative abundances of several proteins. We then identified these markers such as ubiquitin, purkinje cell protein 4 (PEP-19, cytochrome c oxidase subunits and calmodulin, by a combination of reversed-phase (RP HPLC fractionation and top-down tandem MS platform. More in-depth large scale study along with validation experiments will be carried out in the future. Overall, our findings indicate that a brief neonatal exposure to a compound that alters excitatory/inhibitory balance in the brain has a long term effect on protein expression patterns during subsequent development, highlighting the utility of MALDI-MSI as a discovery tool for potential biomarkers.

  20. 槲皮素醇质体凝胶剂的研制%Preparation of the Topical Gel Based on Quercetin-Loaded Ethosome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡蓉; 邓琪; 张纪法; 翟光喜

    2013-01-01

    To prepare the topical gel based on quercetin-loaded ethosome and to evaluate its characteristics and anti-inflammatory activity in rats, the quercetin-loaded ethosomes were prepared by injection method and the gels were prepared with carbomer as the gel base. The formulation of ethosomes was optimized based on encapsulation efficiency and drug loading as index. The morphology, particle size and Zeta potential were detected, and the anti-inflammatory activity of the topical gel based on quercetin-loaded ethosome was studied. The results showed that the obtained ethosomes were spherical under transmission electron microscope, and the mean size and Zeta potential were 352. 7 nm and - 10. 78 mV,respectively. The mean entrapment efficiency was 61. 25% and the mean drug loading was 3. 05%. The optimal ethosome gel showed stable characteristics and remarkable anti-inflammatory activity and. It will reveal a promising future for applications.%制备槲皮素醇质体凝胶剂并进行质量评价及其抗炎作用的研究.采用注入法制备槲皮素醇质体,再加入适量卡波姆制成凝胶剂.对槲皮素醇质体的形态、粒径、表面电位、包封率、载药量进行了考察,并研究了其抗炎作用.结果表明得到的槲皮素醇质体为类球形,粒径分布均匀,平均粒径为352.7 nm,Zeta电位为-10.78 mV,包封率为61.25%,载药量为3.05%,具有明显的抗炎作用.以上结果说明所制备的槲皮素醇质体凝胶剂性质稳定,具有良好的应用前景.

  1. Proteomic analyses in the study of vitreous humour%蛋白质组学方法在玻璃体研究中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林铁柱; 褚光辉; 王建伟; 李世洋

    2014-01-01

    Vitreoushumour ( VH) is a transparent, highly hydrated gel, which occupies the vitreous cavity. The protein composition of the VH would change in pathological conditions of the retina, which has been testified in many studies.In the last decade, proteomics analyses have been performed to study the proteome of the human VH and hope to find some specific proteins in the aetiology of diabeticretinopathy ( DR).Recent proteomic studies on the VH from animal models of autoimmune uveitis have identified some specific proteins in related entophthalmia.%玻璃体以透明的凝胶状态充填于玻璃体腔内,当视网膜发生病变时,相邻的玻璃体的蛋白质构成会发生一些变化,这在很多研究中得到证实。最近10 a ,蛋白质组学技术被用来研究玻璃体的蛋白质组,希望发现与糖尿病性视网膜病变( diabetic retinopathy , DR )病因相关的特异蛋白质。最近对动物自身免疫性葡萄膜炎的玻璃体样本进行蛋白质组学研究,发现了与眼内炎症相关的特异蛋白质。

  2. Sol-Gel-Based Titania-Silica Thin Film Overlay for Long Period Fiber Grating-Based Biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiavaioli, Francesco; Biswas, Palas; Trono, Cosimo; Jana, Sunirmal; Bandyopadhyay, Somnath; Basumallick, Nandini; Giannetti, Ambra; Tombelli, Sara; Bera, Susanta; Mallick, Aparajita; Baldini, Francesco

    2015-12-15

    An evanescent wave optical fiber biosensor based on titania-silica-coated long period grating (LPG) is presented. The chemical overlay, which increases the refractive index (RI) sensitivity of the sensor, consists of a sol-gel-based titania-silica thin film, deposited along the sensing portion of the fiber by means of the dip-coating technique. Changing both the sol viscosity and the withdrawal speed during the dip-coating made it possible to adjust the thickness of the film overlay, which is a crucial parameter for the sensor performance. After the functionalization of the fiber surface using a methacrylic acid/methacrylate copolymer, an antibody/antigen (IgG/anti-IgG) assay was carried out to assess the performance of sol-gel based titania-silica-coated LPGs as biosensors. The analyte concentration was determined from the wavelength shift at the end of the binding process and from the initial binding rate. This is the first time that a sol-gel based titania-silica-coated LPG is proposed as an effective and feasible label-free biosensor. The specificity of the sensor was validated by performing the same model assay after spiking anti-IgG into human serum. With this structured LPG, detection limits of the order of tens of micrograms per liter (10(-11) M) are attained.

  3. A review of studies of the proteomes of circulating microparticles: key roles for galectin-3-binding protein-expressing microparticles in vascular diseases and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Christoffer T; Østergaard, Ole; Rasmussen, Niclas S; Jacobsen, Søren; Heegaard, Niels H H

    2017-01-01

    Subcellular microvesicles (MVs) have attracted increasing interest during the past decades. While initially considered as inert cellular debris, several important roles for MVs in physiological homeostasis, cancer, cardiovascular, and autoimmune diseases have been uncovered. Although still poorly understood, MVs are involved in trafficking of information from cell-to-cell, and are implicated in the regulation of immunity, thrombosis, and coagulation. Different subtypes of extracellular MVs exist. This review focuses on the cell membrane-derived shedded MVs (ranging in size from 200 to 1000 nm) typically termed microparticles (MPs). The numbers and particularly the composition of MPs appear to reflect the state of their parental cells and MPs may therefore carry great potential as clinical biomarkers which can be elucidated and developed by proteomics in particular. Determination of the identity of the specific proteins and their quantities, i.e. the proteome, in complex samples such as MPs enables an in-depth characterization of the phenotypical changes of the MPs during disease states. At present, only a limited number of proteomic studies of circulating MPs have been carried out in healthy individuals and disease populations. Interestingly, these studies indicate that a small set of MP-proteins, in particular, overexpression of galectin-3-binding protein (G3BP) distinguish MPs in patients with venous thromboembolism and the systemic autoimmune disease, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). G3BP is important in cell-cell adhesion, clearance, and intercellular signaling. MPs overexpressing G3BP may thus be involved in thrombosis and hemostasis, vascular inflammation, and autoimmunity, further favoring G3BP as a marker of "pathogenic" MPs. MPs expressing G3BP may also hold a potential as biomarkers in other conditions such as cancer and chronic viral infections. This review highlights the methodology and results of the proteome studies behind these discoveries and

  4. A Technical Assessment of the Utility of Reverse Phase Protein Arrays for the Study of the Functional Proteome in Non-microdissected Human Breast Cancers.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hennessy, Bryan T

    2010-12-01

    INTRODUCTION: The lack of large panels of validated antibodies, tissue handling variability, and intratumoral heterogeneity potentially hamper comprehensive study of the functional proteome in non-microdissected solid tumors. The purpose of this study was to address these concerns and to demonstrate clinical utility for the functional analysis of proteins in non-microdissected breast tumors using reverse phase protein arrays (RPPA). METHODS: Herein, 82 antibodies that recognize kinase and steroid signaling proteins and effectors were validated for RPPA. Intraslide and interslide coefficients of variability were <15%. Multiple sites in non-microdissected breast tumors were analyzed using RPPA after intervals of up to 24 h on the benchtop at room temperature following surgical resection. RESULTS: Twenty-one of 82 total and phosphoproteins demonstrated time-dependent instability at room temperature with most variability occurring at later time points between 6 and 24 h. However, the 82-protein functional proteomic "fingerprint" was robust in most tumors even when maintained at room temperature for 24 h before freezing. In repeat samples from each tumor, intratumoral protein levels were markedly less variable than intertumoral levels. Indeed, an independent analysis of prognostic biomarkers in tissue from multiple tumor sites accurately and reproducibly predicted patient outcomes. Significant correlations were observed between RPPA and immunohistochemistry. However, RPPA demonstrated a superior dynamic range. Classification of 128 breast cancers using RPPA identified six subgroups with markedly different patient outcomes that demonstrated a significant correlation with breast cancer subtypes identified by transcriptional profiling. CONCLUSION: Thus, the robustness of RPPA and stability of the functional proteomic "fingerprint" facilitate the study of the functional proteome in non-microdissected breast tumors.

  5. Phloem sap proteome studied by iTRAQ provides integrated insight into salinity response mechanisms in cucumber plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Huaifu; Xu, Yanli; Du, Changxia; Wu, Xue

    2015-07-01

    Cucumber is an economically important crop as well as a model system for plant vascular biology. Salinity is one of the major environmental factors limiting plant growth. Here, we used an iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics approach for comparative analysis of protein abundances in cucumber phloem sap in response to salt. A total of 745 distinct proteins were identified and 111 proteins were differentially expressed upon salinity in sensitive and tolerant cultivars, of which 69 and 65 proteins changed significantly in sensitive and tolerant cultivars, respectively. A bioinformatics analysis indicated that cucumber phloem employed a combination of induced metabolism, protein turnover, common stress response, energy and transport, signal transduction and regulation of transcription, and development proteins as protection mechanisms against salinity. The proteins that were mapped to the carbon fixation pathway decreased in abundance in sensitive cultivars and had no change in tolerant cultivars under salt stress, suggesting that this pathway may promote salt tolerance by stabilizing carbon fixation and maintaining the essential energy and carbohydrates in tolerant cultivars. This study leads to a better understanding of the salinity mechanism in cucumber phloem and provides a list of potential gene targets for the further engineering of salt tolerance in plants.

  6. Stathmin reduction and cytoskeleton rearrangement in rat nucleus accumbens in response to clozapine and risperidone treatment - Comparative proteomic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedracka-Krok, S; Swiderska, B; Jankowska, U; Skupien-Rabian, B; Solich, J; Dziedzicka-Wasylewska, M

    2016-03-01

    The complex network of anatomical connections of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) makes it an interface responsible for the selection and integration of cognitive and affective information to modulate appetitive or aversively motivated behaviour. There is evidence for NAc dysfunction in schizophrenia. NAc also seems to be important for antipsychotic drug action, but the biochemical characteristics of drug-induced alterations within NAc remain incompletely characterized. In this study, a comprehensive proteomic analysis was performed to describe the differences in the mechanisms of action of clozapine (CLO) and risperidone (RIS) in the rat NAc. Both antipsychotics influenced the level of microtubule-regulating proteins, i.e., stathmin, and proteins of the collapsin response mediator protein family (CRMPs), and only CLO affected NAD-dependent protein deacetylase sirtuin-2 and septin 6. Both antipsychotics induced changes in levels of other cytoskeleton-related proteins. CLO exclusively up-regulated proteins involved in neuroprotection, such as glutathione synthetase, heat-shock 70-kDa protein 8 and mitochondrial heat-shock protein 75. RIS tuned cell function by changing the pattern of post-translational modifications of some proteins: it down-regulated the phosphorylated forms of stathmin and dopamine and the cyclic AMP-regulated phosphoprotein (DARPP-32) isoform but up-regulated cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5). RIS modulated the level and phosphorylation state of synaptic proteins: synapsin-2, synaptotagmin-1 and adaptor-related protein-2 (AP-2) complex.

  7. Tang-Luo-Ning Improves Mitochondrial Antioxidase Activity in Dorsal Root Ganglia of Diabetic Rats: A Proteomics Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yanbin; Gong, Yanbin; Zhou, Hui; Xie, Peifeng; Guan, Song; Yi, Wenming

    2017-01-01

    Tang-luo-ning (TLN) is a traditional Chinese herbal recipe for treating diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). In this study, we investigated mitochondrial protein profiles in a diabetic rat model and explored the potential protective effect of TLN. Diabetic rats were established by injection of streptozocin (STZ) and divided into model, alpha lipoic acid (ALA), and TLN groups. Mitochondrial proteins were isolated from dorsal root ganglia and proteomic analysis was used to quantify the differentially expressed proteins. Tang-luo-ning mitigated STZ-induced diabetic symptoms and blood glucose level, including response time to cold or hot stimulation and nerve conductive velocity. As compared to the normal, there were 388 differentially expressed proteins in the TLN group, 445 in ALA group, and 451 in model group. As compared to the model group, there were 275 differential proteins in TLN group and 251 in ALA group. As compared to model group, mitochondrial complex III was significantly decreased, while glutathione peroxidase and peroxidase were increased in TLN group. When compared with ALA group, the mitochondrial complex III was increased, and mitochondrial complex IV was decreased in TLN group. Together, TLN should have a strong antioxidative activity, which appears to be modulated through regulation of respiratory complexes and antioxidases. PMID:28133612

  8. Development of a Quantitative SRM-Based Proteomics Method to Study Iron Metabolism of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuorijoki, Linda; Isojärvi, Janne; Kallio, Pauli; Kouvonen, Petri; Aro, Eva-Mari; Corthals, Garry L; Jones, Patrik R; Muth-Pawlak, Dorota

    2016-01-04

    The cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (S. 6803) is a well-established model species in oxygenic photosynthesis research and a potential host for biotechnological applications. Despite recent advances in genome sequencing and microarray techniques applied in systems biology, quantitative proteomics approaches with corresponding accuracy and depth are scarce for S. 6803. In this study, we developed a protocol to screen changes in the expression of 106 proteins representing central metabolic pathways in S. 6803 with a targeted mass spectrometry method, selected reaction monitoring (SRM). We evaluated the response to the exposure of both short- and long-term iron deprivation. The experimental setup enabled the relative quantification of 96 proteins, with 87 and 92 proteins showing adjusted p-values 6803 was demonstrated by providing quantitative data for altogether 64 proteins that previously could not be detected with the classical data-dependent MS approach under similar conditions. This highlights the effectiveness of SRM for quantification and extends the analytical capability to low-abundance proteins in unfractionated samples of S. 6803. The SRM assays and other generated information are now publicly available via PASSEL and Panorama.

  9. A Comparative Study of the Outer Membrane Proteome from an Atypical and a Typical Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taddei, Carla R; Oliveira, Fernanda F; Piazza, Roxane M F; Paes Leme, Adriana F; Klitzke, Clécio F; Serrano, Solange M T; Martinez, Marina B; Elias, Waldir P; Sant Anna, Osvaldo A

    2011-01-01

    This study compared the proteomic profile of outer membrane proteins (OMPs) from one strain of atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (aEPEC) and one of typical EPEC (tEPEC). The OMPs fractions were obtained using sarcosine extraction, and analyzed by one- and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (1DE and 2DE, respectively). The 1DE OMPs analysis of typical and atypical EPEC evidenced similar patterns; however, the 2DE OMP profile from the aEPEC revealed more protein spots in the 40- to 70-kDa region. 2DE image analysis identified 159 protein spots in both strains whereas 53 protein spots were observed only in tEPEC and 128 were observed only in aEPEC. Remarkably, 41.5% of aEPEC spots showed higher levels of expression compared to tEPEC, some of which with two, others four or even five times more. Twenty-four selected spots were identified using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and they corresponded to proteins involved in cell structure and metabolism, as well as in gene regulation. Some of these proteins showed similarity with proteins identified in other E. coli pathotypes. Besides, the differential expression of some proteins in aEPEC may suggest that it could be related to their features that ascertain the adaptation to distinct environments and the worldwide spread distribution of these pathogens.

  10. Comparative studies of mitochondrial proteomics reveal an intimate protein network of male sterility in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuping; Zhang, Gaisheng; Zhang, Yingxin; Song, Qilu; Chen, Zheng; Wang, Junsheng; Guo, Jialin; Niu, Na; Wang, Junwei; Ma, Shoucai

    2015-01-01

    Plant male sterility has often been associated with mitochondrial dysfunction; however, the mechanism in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) has not been elucidated. This study set out to probe the mechanism of physiological male sterility (PHYMS) induced by the chemical hybridizing agent (CHA)-SQ-1, and cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) of wheat at the proteomic level. A total of 71 differentially expressed mitochondrial proteins were found to be involved in pollen abortion and further identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF MS (matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of fight/time of flight mass spectrometry). These proteins were implicated in different cellular responses and metabolic processes, with obvious functional tendencies toward the tricarboxylic acid cycle, the mitochondrial electron transport chain, protein synthesis and degradation, oxidation stress, the cell division cycle, and epigenetics. Interactions between identified proteins were demonstrated by bioinformatics analysis, enabling a more complete insight into biological pathways involved in anther abortion and pollen defects. Accordingly, a mitochondria-mediated male sterility protein network in wheat is proposed; this network was further confirmed by physiological data, RT-PCR (real-time PCR), and TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labelling) assay. The results provide intriguing insights into the metabolic pathway of anther abortion induced by CHA-SQ-1 and also give useful clues to identify the crucial proteins of PHYMS and CMS in wheat. PMID:26136264

  11. Proteome informatics research group (iPRG)_2012: a study on detecting modified peptides in a complex mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalkley, Robert J; Bandeira, Nuno; Chambers, Matthew C; Clauser, Karl R; Cottrell, John S; Deutsch, Eric W; Kapp, Eugene A; Lam, Henry H N; McDonald, W Hayes; Neubert, Thomas A; Sun, Rui-Xiang

    2014-01-01

    The proteome informatics research group of the Association of Biomolecular Resource Facilities conducted a study to assess the community's ability to detect and characterize peptides bearing a range of biologically occurring post-translational modifications when present in a complex peptide background. A data set derived from a mixture of synthetic peptides with biologically occurring modifications combined with a yeast whole cell lysate as background was distributed to a large group of researchers and their results were collectively analyzed. The results from the twenty-four participants, who represented a broad spectrum of experience levels with this type of data analysis, produced several important observations. First, there is significantly more variability in the ability to assess whether a results is significant than there is to determine the correct answer. Second, labile post-translational modifications, particularly tyrosine sulfation, present a challenge for most researchers. Finally, for modification site localization there are many tools being employed, but researchers are currently unsure of the reliability of the results these programs are producing.

  12. Global nutrient profiling by Phenotype MicroArrays: a tool complementing genomic and proteomic studies in conidial fungi*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanasova, Lea; Druzhinina, Irina S.

    2010-01-01

    Conidial fungi or molds and mildews are widely used in modern biotechnology as producers of antibiotics and other secondary metabolites, industrially important enzymes, chemicals and food. They are also important pathogens of animals including humans and agricultural crops. These various applications and extremely versatile natural phenotypes have led to the constantly growing list of complete genomes which are now available. Functional genomics and proteomics widely exploit the genomic information to study the cell-wide impact of altered genes on the phenotype of an organism and its function. This allows for global analysis of the information flow from DNA to RNA to protein, but it is usually not sufficient for the description of the global phenotype of an organism. More recently, Phenotype MicroArray (PM) technology has been introduced as a tool to characterize the metabolism of a (wild) fungal strain or a mutant. In this article, we review the background of PM applications for fungi and the methodic requirements to obtain reliable results. We also report examples of the versatility of this tool. PMID:20205302

  13. Gel-based phosphoproteomics analysis of sarcoplasmic proteins in postmortem porcine muscle with pH decline rate and time differences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Honggang; Larsen, Martin Røssel; Karlsson, Anders H

    2011-01-01

    Meat quality development is highly influenced by the pH decline caused by the postmortem (PM) glycolysis. Protein phosphorylation is an important mechanism in regulating the activity of glycometabolic enzymes. Here, a gel-based phosphoproteomic study was performed to analyze the protein...... phosphorylation in sarcoplasmic proteins from three groups of pigs with different pH decline rates from PM 1 to 24¿h. Globally, the fast pH decline group had the highest phosphorylation level at PM 1¿h, but lowest at 24¿h, whereas the slow pH decline group showed the reverse case. The same pattern was also...... observed in most individual bands in 1-DE. The protein phosphorylation levels of 12 bands were significantly affected by the synergy effects of pH and time (p...

  14. Toxic effects of male Perna viridis gonad exposed to BaP, DDT and their mixture: A metabolomic and proteomic study of the underlying mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qinqin; Zheng, Pengfei; Qiu, Liguo; Jiang, Xiu; Zhao, Hongwei; Zhou, Hailong; Han, Qian; Diao, Xiaoping

    2016-01-05

    Benzo(a)pyrene and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane are typical persistent organic pollutants, and also the widespread environmental estrogens with known toxicity towards green mussels Perna viridis. In this study, the toxicological effects of BaP and DDT and their mixture were assessed in green mussel gonads using proteomic and metabolomic approaches. Metabolomics by NMR spectroscopy revealed that BaP did not show obvious metabolite changes in the gonad of male green mussel. DDT mainly caused some disturbance of osmotic regulation and energy metabolism by changing BCAAs, alanine, threonine, arginine, etc., unknown metabolite (3.53 ppm), glycine, homarine and ATP at different levels. However, the mixture of BaP and DDT mainly caused some disturbance in osmotic regulation and energy metabolism by differentially altering branched chain amino acids, glutamate, alanine, arginine, unknown metabolite (3.53 ppm), glycine, 4-aminobutyrate, dimethylglycine, homarine and ATP. The results suggest that DDT alone may cause most of metabolites changes in the mixture exposed male mussel gonad, and the results also show that the male P. viridis gonad was more sensitive to DDT than BaP exposures. Proteomic study showed that BaP, DDT and their mixture may have different modes of action. Proteomic responses revealed that BaP induced signal transduction, oxidative stress, spermatogenesis, etc. in the male green mussel gonad; whereas DDT exposure altered proteins that were associated with signal transduction, oxidative stress, cytoskeleton and cell structure, cellular organization, energy metabolism, etc. However, the mixture of BaP and DDT affected proteins related to cytoskeleton and cell structure, oxidative stress, cellular organization, etc. This research demonstrated that metabolomic and proteomic approaches could better elucidate the underlying mechanism of environmental pollutants gonad toxicity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Proteomics Studies of Fungi——Methods and Progressions%真菌的蛋白质组学研究——方法与进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾丰颖; 高洁; 阮晖; 何国庆

    2012-01-01

    Proteomics, as an effective technique for studies about metabolisms and regulations of organisms, were generally applied in the analysis of metabolisms and regulations of microorganisms. Meanwhile, fungi are known as the important microorganisms for the close relationship with our life, the studies of metabolisms and regulations will become the theoretical basis of practical production. The paper review the techniques and strategies which are applied in the analysis of fungi proteomics, furthermore the recent proteome data generated for fungi also are summarized.%蛋白质组学分析作为对生物体代谢调控分析非常有效的技术手段,在近年来被广泛应用在微生物代谢调控研究中.真菌是与人们生产、生活密切相关的一类非常重要的微生物,弄清其代谢调控机制,可为日后的生产应用奠定理论基础.本文就近年来应用在真菌蛋白质组学上的研究方法以及研究进展作一综述.

  16. Studies on the immuno-modulating and antitumor activities of Ganoderma lucidum (Reishi) polysaccharides: functional and proteomic analyses of a fucose-containing glycoprotein fraction responsible for the activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan-Yuan; Khoo, Kay-Hooi; Chen, Shui-Tein; Lin, Chun-Cheng; Wong, Chi-Huey; Lin, Chun-Hung

    2002-04-01

    A fucose-containing glycoprotein fraction which stimulates spleen cell proliferation and cytokine expression has been identified from the water-soluble extract of Ganoderma lucidum. Proteomic analysis of mouse spleen cells treated with this glycoprotein fraction showed approximately 50% change of the proteome. Further studies on the activities of this glycoprotein fraction through selective proteolysis and glycosidic cleavage indicate that a fucose containing polysaccharide fraction is responsible for stimulating the expression of cytokines, especially IL-1, IL-2 and INF-gamma.

  17. Proteome data from a host-pathogen interaction study with Staphylococcus aureus and human lung epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Surmann

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available To simultaneously obtain proteome data of host and pathogen from an internalization experiment, human alveolar epithelial A549 cells were infected with Staphylococcus aureus HG001 which carried a plasmid (pMV158GFP encoding a continuously expressed green fluorescent protein (GFP. Samples were taken hourly between 1.5 h and 6.5 h post infection. By fluorescence activated cell sorting GFP-expressing bacteria could be enriched from host cell debris, but also infected host cells could be separated from those which did not carry bacteria after contact (exposed. Additionally, proteome data of A549 cells which were not exposed to S. aureus but underwent the same sample processing steps are provided as a control. Time-resolved changes in bacterial protein abundance were quantified in a label-free approach. Proteome adaptations of host cells were monitored by comparative analysis to a stable isotope labeled cell culture (SILAC standard. Proteins were extracted from the cells, digested proteolytically, measured by nanoLC–MS/MS, and subsequently identified by database search and then quantified. The data presented here are related to a previously published research article describing the interplay of S. aureus HG001 and human epithelial cells (Surmann et al., 2015 [1]. They have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange platform with the identifiers PRIDE: http://www.ebi.ac.uk/pride/archive/projects/PXD002384 for the S. aureus HG001 proteome dataset and PRIDE: http://www.ebi.ac.uk/pride/archive/projects/PXD002388 for the A549 proteome dataset.

  18. Proteome data from a host-pathogen interaction study with Staphylococcus aureus and human lung epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surmann, Kristin; Simon, Marjolaine; Hildebrandt, Petra; Pförtner, Henrike; Michalik, Stephan; Dhople, Vishnu M; Bröker, Barbara M; Schmidt, Frank; Völker, Uwe

    2016-06-01

    To simultaneously obtain proteome data of host and pathogen from an internalization experiment, human alveolar epithelial A549 cells were infected with Staphylococcus aureus HG001 which carried a plasmid (pMV158GFP) encoding a continuously expressed green fluorescent protein (GFP). Samples were taken hourly between 1.5 h and 6.5 h post infection. By fluorescence activated cell sorting GFP-expressing bacteria could be enriched from host cell debris, but also infected host cells could be separated from those which did not carry bacteria after contact (exposed). Additionally, proteome data of A549 cells which were not exposed to S. aureus but underwent the same sample processing steps are provided as a control. Time-resolved changes in bacterial protein abundance were quantified in a label-free approach. Proteome adaptations of host cells were monitored by comparative analysis to a stable isotope labeled cell culture (SILAC) standard. Proteins were extracted from the cells, digested proteolytically, measured by nanoLC-MS/MS, and subsequently identified by database search and then quantified. The data presented here are related to a previously published research article describing the interplay of S. aureus HG001 and human epithelial cells (Surmann et al., 2015 [1]). They have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange platform with the identifiers PRIDE: http://www.ebi.ac.uk/pride/archive/projects/PXD002384 for the S. aureus HG001 proteome dataset and PRIDE: http://www.ebi.ac.uk/pride/archive/projects/PXD002388 for the A549 proteome dataset.

  19. Mass Spectrometry Instrumentation in Proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sprenger, Richard Remko; Roepstorff, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has evolved into a crucial technology for the field of proteomics, enabling the comprehensive study of proteins in biological systems. Innovative developments have yielded flexible and versatile mass spectrometric tools, including quadrupole time-of-flight, linear ion trap...

  20. Identification of regulators of germ layer morphogenesis using proteomics in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, Vinzenz; Carvalho, Lara; Castanon, Irinka; Stockinger, Petra; Shevchenko, Andrej; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2006-05-15

    During vertebrate gastrulation, a well-orchestrated series of morphogenetic changes leads to the formation of the three germ layers: the ectoderm, mesoderm and endoderm. The analysis of gene expression patterns during gastrulation has been central to the identification of genes involved in germ layer formation. However, many proteins are regulated on a translational or post-translational level and are thus undetectable by gene expression analysis. Therefore, we developed a 2D-gel-based comparative proteomic approach to target proteins involved in germ layer morphogenesis during zebrafish gastrulation. Proteomes of ectodermal and mesendodermal progenitor cells were compared and 35 significantly regulated proteins were identified by mass spectrometry, including several proteins with predicted functions in cytoskeletal organization. A comparison of our proteomic results with data obtained in an accompanying microarray-based gene expression analysis revealed no significant overlap, confirming the complementary nature of proteomics and transcriptomics. The regulation of ezrin2, which was identified based on a reduction in spot intensity in mesendodermal cells, was independently validated. Furthermore, we show that ezrin2 is activated by phosphorylation in mesendodermal cells and is required for proper germ layer morphogenesis. We demonstrate the feasibility of proteomics in zebrafish, concluding that proteomics is a valuable tool for analysis of early development.

  1. 蛋白质组学在人类疾病研究中的应用%The application of proteomics to the study of human disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王玉

    2013-01-01

    蛋白质组学是后基因组时代生命科学研究的热点和前沿领域,应用蛋白质组学对临床疾病进行研究,不仅从蛋白质水平上揭示疾病的本质,还有助于全面探讨其病理生理机制,寻找诊断和预后标志物,发现药物治疗靶点.目前蛋白质组学广泛用于肿瘤、心血管疾病和肾脏疾病等领域.%Proteomics is a hot and frontier area of life science in post-genomic era. The application of proteomics to the study of human disease is useful to reveal the essence of disease from the level of protein, explore its pathophysiological mechanisms comprehensively,find diagnostic and prognostic biomarker,and discovery therapeutic target. In recent years, proteomics has been widely used in the field of cancer,cardiovascular and kidney disease.

  2. Response of Human Osteoblast to n-HA/PEEK—Quantitative Proteomic Study of Bio-effects of Nano-Hydroxyapatite Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Minzhi; Li, Haiyun; Liu, Xiaochen; Wei, Jie; Ji, Jianguo; Yang, Shu; Hu, Zhiyuan; Wei, Shicheng

    2016-03-01

    Nano-sized hydroxyapatite (n-HA) is considered as a bio-active material, which is often mixed into bone implant material, polyetheretherketone (PEEK). To reveal the global protein expression modulations of osteoblast in response to direct contact with the PEEK composite containing high level (40%) nano-sized hydroxyapatite (n-HA/PEEK) and explain its comprehensive bio-effects, quantitative proteomic analysis was conducted on human osteoblast-like cells MG-63 cultured on n-HA/PEEK in comparison with pure PEEK. Results from quantitative proteomic analysis showed that the most enriched categories in the up-regulated proteins were related to calcium ion processes and associated functions while the most enriched categories in the down-regulated proteins were related to RNA process. This enhanced our understanding to the molecular mechanism of the promotion of the cell adhesion and differentiation with the inhibition of the cell proliferation on n-HA/PEEK composite. It also exhibited that although the calcium ion level of incubate environment hadn’t increased, merely the calcium fixed on the surface of material had influence to intracellular calcium related processes, which was also reflect by the higher intracellular Ca2+ concentration of n-HA/PEEK. This study could lead to more comprehensive cognition to the versatile biocompatibility of composite materials. It further proves that proteomics is useful in new bio-effect discovery.

  3. Response of Human Osteoblast to n-HA/PEEK--Quantitative Proteomic Study of Bio-effects of Nano-Hydroxyapatite Composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Minzhi; Li, Haiyun; Liu, Xiaochen; Wei, Jie; Ji, Jianguo; Yang, Shu; Hu, Zhiyuan; Wei, Shicheng

    2016-03-09

    Nano-sized hydroxyapatite (n-HA) is considered as a bio-active material, which is often mixed into bone implant material, polyetheretherketone (PEEK). To reveal the global protein expression modulations of osteoblast in response to direct contact with the PEEK composite containing high level (40%) nano-sized hydroxyapatite (n-HA/PEEK) and explain its comprehensive bio-effects, quantitative proteomic analysis was conducted on human osteoblast-like cells MG-63 cultured on n-HA/PEEK in comparison with pure PEEK. Results from quantitative proteomic analysis showed that the most enriched categories in the up-regulated proteins were related to calcium ion processes and associated functions while the most enriched categories in the down-regulated proteins were related to RNA process. This enhanced our understanding to the molecular mechanism of the promotion of the cell adhesion and differentiation with the inhibition of the cell proliferation on n-HA/PEEK composite. It also exhibited that although the calcium ion level of incubate environment hadn't increased, merely the calcium fixed on the surface of material had influence to intracellular calcium related processes, which was also reflect by the higher intracellular Ca(2+) concentration of n-HA/PEEK. This study could lead to more comprehensive cognition to the versatile biocompatibility of composite materials. It further proves that proteomics is useful in new bio-effect discovery.

  4. Microbial proteomics using mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Harry B

    2012-01-01

    Proteomic analyses involve a series of intricate, interdependent steps involving approaches and technical issues that must be fully coordinated to obtain the optimal amount of required information about the test subject. Fortunately, many of these steps are common to most test subjects, requiring only modifications to or, in some cases, substitution of some of the steps to ensure they are relevant to the desired objective of a study. This fortunate occurrence creates an essential core of proteomic approaches and techniques that are consistently available for most studies, regardless of test subject. In this chapter, an overview of some of these core approaches, techniques, and mass spectrometric instrumentation is given, while indicating how such steps are useful for and applied to bacterial investigations. To exemplify how such proteomic concepts and techniques are applicable to bacterial investigations, a practical, quantitative method useful for bacterial proteomic analysis is presented with a discussion of possibilities, pitfalls, and some emerging technology to provide a compilation of information from the diverse literature that is intermingled with experimental experience.

  5. Network-based analysis of proteomic profiles

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Limsoon

    2016-01-26

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics is a widely used and powerful tool for profiling systems-wide protein expression changes. It can be applied for various purposes, e.g. biomarker discovery in diseases and study of drug responses. Although RNA-based high-throughput methods have been useful in providing glimpses into the underlying molecular processes, the evidences they provide are indirect. Furthermore, RNA and corresponding protein levels have been known to have poor correlation. On the other hand, MS-based proteomics tend to have consistency issues (poor reproducibility and inter-sample agreement) and coverage issues (inability to detect the entire proteome) that need to be urgently addressed. In this talk, I will discuss how these issues can be addressed by proteomic profile analysis techniques that use biological networks (especially protein complexes) as the biological context. In particular, I will describe several techniques that we have been developing for network-based analysis of proteomics profile. And I will present evidence that these techniques are useful in identifying proteomics-profile analysis results that are more consistent, more reproducible, and more biologically coherent, and that these techniques allow expansion of the detected proteome to uncover and/or discover novel proteins.

  6. Proteomic Analysis of Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baycin-Hizal, Deniz; Tabb, David L.; Chaerkady, Raghothama; Chen, Lily; Lewis, Nathan E.; Nagarajan, Harish; Sarkaria, Vishaldeep; Kumar, Amit; Wolozny, Daniel; Colao, Joe; Jacobson, Elena; Tian, Yuan; O'Meally, Robert N.; Krag, Sharon S.; Cole, Robert N.; Palsson, Bernhard O.; Zhang, Hui; Betenbaugh, Michael

    2013-01-01

    In order to complement the recent genomic sequencing of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, proteomic analysis was performed on CHO including the cellular proteome, secretome, and glycoproteome using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) of multiple fractions obtained from gel electrophoresis, multi-dimensional liquid chromatography, and solid phase extraction of glycopeptides (SPEG). From the 120 different mass spectrometry analyses generating 682,097 MS/MS spectra, 93,548 unique peptide sequences were identified with at most a 0.02 false discovery rate (FDR). A total of 6164 grouped proteins were identified from both glycoproteome and proteome analysis, representing an 8-fold increase in the number of proteins currently identified in the CHO proteome. Furthermore, this is the first proteomic study done using CHO genome exclusively which provides for more accurate identification of proteins. From this analysis, the CHO codon frequency was determined and found to be distinct from humans, which will facilitate expression of human proteins in CHO cells. Analysis of the combined proteomic and mRNA data sets indicated the enrichment of a number of pathways including protein processing and apoptosis but depletion of proteins involved in steroid hormone and glycosphingolipid metabolism. 504 of the detected proteins included N-acetylation modifications and 1292 different proteins were observed to be N-glycosylated. This first large-scale proteomic analysis will enhance the knowledge base about CHO capabilities for recombinant expression and provide information useful in cell engineering efforts aimed at modifying CHO cellular functions. PMID:22971049

  7. Legume proteomics: Progress, prospects, and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathi, Divya; Gayen, Dipak; Gayali, Saurabh; Chakraborty, Subhra; Chakraborty, Niranjan

    2016-01-01

    Legumes are the major sources of food and fodder with strong commercial relevance, and are essential components of agricultural ecosystems owing to their ability to carry out endosymbiotic nitrogen fixation. In recent years, legumes have become one of the major choices of plant research. The legume proteomics is currently represented by more than 100 reference maps and an equal number of stress-responsive proteomes. Among the 48 legumes in the protein databases, most proteomic studies have been accomplished in two model legumes, soybean, and barrel medic. This review highlights recent contributions in the field of legume proteomics to comprehend the defence and regulatory mechanisms during development and adaptation to climatic changes. Here, we attempted to provide a concise overview of the progress in legume proteomics and discuss future developments in three broad perspectives: (i) proteome of organs/tissues; (ii) subcellular compartments; and (iii) spatiotemporal changes in response to stress. Such data mining may aid in discovering potential biomarkers for plant growth, in general, apart from essential components involved in stress tolerance. The prospect of integrating proteome data with genome information from legumes will provide exciting opportunities for plant biologists to achieve long-term goals of crop improvement and sustainable agriculture.

  8. Virion Proteomics of Large DNA Viruses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ran-ran WANG; Zhi-hong HU; Hua-lin WANG; Fei DENG

    2009-01-01

    Large DNA viruses normally have complex structures with many of protein components derived from both viral and host origins. The development in proteomics, especially mass spectrometry identification techniques provide powerful tools for analyzing large viruses. In this review, we have summarized the recent achievements on proteomic studies of large DNA viruses, such as herpesvirus, poxvirus, nimavirus and baculoviruse. The proteomics of baculovirus occlusion-derived virions (ODV) were emphasized. Different mass spectrometry techniques used on ,carious baculoviruses were introduced, and the identified structurally associated proteins of baculoviruses are summarized.

  9. Preoperative protein profiles in cerebrospinal fluid in elderly hip fracture patients at risk for delirium : A proteomics and validation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westhoff, Dunja; Witlox, Joost; van Aalst, Corneli; Scholtens, Rikie M.; de Rooij, Sophia E; van Munster, Barbara C; de Jonghe, Jos F M; Houdijk, Alexander P J; Eikelenboom, Piet; van Westerloo, David J; van de Beek, Diederik; van Gool, Willem A; Koenderman, Leo

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A neuroinflammatory response is suggested to play an important role in delirium, a common complication in older hospitalized patients. We examined whether hip fracture patients who develop postoperative delirium have a different proteome in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) prior to surgery. MET

  10. Life in the cold: a proteomic study of cold-repressed proteins in the antarctic bacterium pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC125.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piette, Florence; D'Amico, Salvino; Mazzucchelli, Gabriel; Danchin, Antoine; Leprince, Pierre; Feller, Georges

    2011-06-01

    The proteomes expressed at 4°C and 18°C by the psychrophilic Antarctic bacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis were compared using two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis with special reference to proteins repressed by low temperatures. Remarkably, the major cold-repressed proteins, almost undetectable at 4°C, were heat shock proteins involved in folding assistance.

  11. Preoperative protein profiles in cerebrospinal fluid in elderly hip fracture patients at risk for delirium : A proteomics and validation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westhoff, Dunja; Witlox, Joost; van Aalst, Corneli; Scholtens, Rikie M.; de Rooij, Sophia E; van Munster, Barbara C; de Jonghe, Jos F M; Houdijk, Alexander P J; Eikelenboom, Piet; van Westerloo, David J; van de Beek, Diederik; van Gool, Willem A; Koenderman, Leo

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A neuroinflammatory response is suggested to play an important role in delirium, a common complication in older hospitalized patients. We examined whether hip fracture patients who develop postoperative delirium have a different proteome in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) prior to surgery.

  12. The core proteome and pan proteome of Salmonella Paratyphi A epidemic strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhang

    Full Text Available Comparative proteomics of the multiple strains within the same species can reveal the genetic variation and relationships among strains without the need to assess the genomic data. Similar to comparative genomics, core proteome and pan proteome can also be obtained within multiple strains under the same culture conditions. In this study we present the core proteome and pan proteome of four epidemic Salmonella Paratyphi A strains cultured under laboratory culture conditions. The proteomic information was obtained using a Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE technique. The expression profiles of these strains were conservative, similar to the monomorphic genome of S. Paratyphi A. Few strain-specific proteins were found in these strains. Interestingly, non-core proteins were found in similar categories as core proteins. However, significant fluctuations in the abundance of some core proteins were also observed, suggesting that there is elaborate regulation of core proteins in the different strains even when they are cultured in the same environment. Therefore, core proteome and pan proteome analysis of the multiple strains can demonstrate the core pathways of metabolism of the species under specific culture conditions, and further the specific responses and adaptations of the strains to the growth environment.

  13. Proteomic interrogation of human chromatin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana P Torrente

    Full Text Available Chromatin proteins provide a scaffold for DNA packaging and a basis for epigenetic regulation and genomic maintenance. Despite understanding its functional roles, mapping the chromatin proteome (i.e. the "Chromatome" is still a continuing process. Here, we assess the biological specificity and proteomic extent of three distinct chromatin preparations by identifying proteins in selected chromatin-enriched fractions using mass spectrometry-based proteomics. These experiments allowed us to produce a chromatin catalog, including several proteins ranging from highly abundant histone proteins to less abundant members of different chromatin machinery complexes. Using a Normalized Spectral Abundance Factor approach, we quantified relative abundances of the proteins across the chromatin enriched fractions giving a glimpse into their chromosomal abundance. The large-scale data sets also allowed for the discovery of a variety of novel post-translational modifications on the identified chromatin proteins. With these comparisons, we find one of the probed methods to be qualitatively superior in specificity for chromatin proteins, but inferior in proteomic extent, evidencing a compromise that must be made between biological specificity and broadness of characterization. Additionally, we attempt to identify proteins in eu- and heterochromatin, verifying the enrichments by characterizing the post-translational modifications detected on histone proteins from these chromatin regions. In summary, our results provide insights into the value of different methods to extract chromatin-associated proteins and provide starting points to study the factors that may be involved in directing gene expression and other chromatin-related processes.

  14. Periodontal Proteomics: Wonders Never Cease!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harpreet Singh Grover

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteins are vital parts of living organisms, as they are integral components of the physiological metabolic pathways of cells. Periodontal tissues comprise multicompartmental groups of interacting cells and matrices that provide continuous support, attachment, proprioception, and physical protection for the teeth. The proteome map, that is, complete catalogue of the matrix and cellular proteins expressed in alveolar bone, cementum, periodontal ligament, and gingiva, is to be explored for more in-depth understanding of periodontium. The ongoing research to understand the signalling pathways that allow cells to divide, differentiate, and die in controlled manner has brought us to the era of proteomics. Proteomics is defined as the study of all proteins including their relative abundance, distribution, posttranslational modifications, functions, and interactions with other macromolecules, in a given cell or organism within a given environment and at a specific stage in the cell cycle. Its application to periodontal science can be used to monitor health status, disease onset, treatment response, and outcome. Proteomics can offer answers to critical, unresolved questions such as the biological basis for the heterogeneity in gingival, alveolar bone, and cemental cell populations.

  15. Proteomic approaches to bacterial differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norbeck, Angela D.; Callister, Stephen J.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Jaitly, Navdeep; Elias, Dwayne A.; Lipton, Mary S.; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-01-02

    While genomic approaches have been applied to the detection and identification of individual bacteria within microbial communities, analogous proteomics approaches have been effectively precluded due to the inherent complexity. An in silico assessment of peptides derived from artificial simple and complex communities was performed to evaluate the effect of proteome complexity on species detection. Detection and validation of predicted peptides initially identified as distinctive within the simple community was experimentally performed using a mass spectrometry-based proteomics approach. An assessment of peptide distinctiveness and the potential for mapping to a particular bacterium within a community was made throughout each step of the study. A second assessment performed in silico of peptide distinctiveness for a complex community of 25 microorganisms was also conducted. The experimental data for a simple community, and the in silico data for a complex community revealed that it is feasible to predict, observe, and quantify distinctive peptides from one organism in the presence of at least a 100-fold greater abundance of another, thus yielding putative markers for the identification of a bacterium of interest. This work represents a first step towards quantitative proteomic characterization of complex microbial communities.

  16. Quantitative Proteomic Approaches for Analysis of Protein S-Nitrosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Zhe; Greenlief, C Michael; Gu, Zezong

    2016-01-01

    S-Nitrosylation is a redox-based post-translational modification of a protein in response to nitric oxide (NO) signaling, and it participates in a variety of processes in diverse biological systems. The significance of this type of protein modification in health and diseases is increasingly recognized. In the central nervous system, aberrant S-nitrosylation, due to excessive NO production, is known to cause protein misfolding, mitochondrial dysfunction, transcriptional dysregulation, and neuronal death. This leads to an altered physiological state and consequently contributes to pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. To date, much effort has been made to understand the mechanisms underlying protein S-nitrosylation, and several approaches have been developed to unveil S-nitrosylated proteins from different organisms. Interest in determining the dynamic changes of protein S-nitrosylation under different physiological and pathophysiological conditions has underscored the need for the development of quantitative proteomic approaches. Currently, both gel-based and gel-free mass spectrometry-based quantitative methods are widely used, and they each have advantages and disadvantages but may also be used together to produce complementary data. This review evaluates current available quantitative proteomic techniques for the analysis of protein S-nitrosylation and highlights recent advances, with emphasis on applications in neurodegenerative diseases. An important goal is to provide a comprehensive guide of feasible quantitative proteomic methodologies for examining protein S-nitrosylation in research to yield insights into disease mechanisms, diagnostic biomarkers, and drug discovery.

  17. Kinetics of hybridization on surface oligonucleotide microchips: theory, experiment, and comparison with hybridization on gel-based microchips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokin, N V; Chechetkin, V R; Pan'kov, S V; Somova, O G; Livshits, M A; Donnikov, M Y; Turygin, A Y; Barsky, V E; Zasedatelev, A S

    2006-08-01

    The optimal design of oligonucleotide microchips and efficient discrimination between perfect and mismatch duplexes strongly depend on the external transport of target DNA to the cells with immobilized probes as well as on respective association and dissociation rates at the duplex formation. In this paper we present the relevant theory for hybridization of DNA fragments with oligonucleotide probes immobilized in the cells on flat substrate. With minor modifications, our theory also is applicable to reaction-diffusion hybridization kinetics for the probes immobilized on the surface of microbeads immersed in hybridization solution. The main theoretical predictions are verified with control experiments. Besides that, we compared the characteristics of the surface and gel-based oligonucleotide microchips. The comparison was performed for the chips printed with the same pin robot, for the signals measured with the same devices and processed by the same technique, and for the same hybridization conditions. The sets of probe oligonucleotides and the concentrations of probes in respective solutions used for immobilization on each platform were identical as well. We found that, despite the slower hybridization kinetics, the fluorescence signals and mutation discrimination efficiency appeared to be higher for the gel-based microchips with respect to their surface counterparts even for the relatively short hybridization time about 0.5-1 hour. Both the divergence between signals for perfects and the difference in mutation discrimination efficiency for the counterpart platforms rapidly grow with incubation time. In particular, for hybridization during 3 h the signals for gel-based microchips surpassed their surface counterparts in 5-20 times, while the ratios of signals for perfect-mismatch pairs for gel microchips exceeded the corresponding ratios for surface microchips in 2-4 times. These effects may be attributed to the better immobilization efficiency and to the higher

  18. Clinical proteomics in obstetrics and neonatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Julie; Buffin-Meyer, Benedicte; Mullen, William; Carty, David M; Delles, Christian; Vlahou, Antonia; Mischak, Harald; Decramer, Stéphane; Bascands, Jean-Loup; Schanstra, Joost P

    2014-02-01

    Clinical proteomics has been applied to the identification of biomarkers of obstetric and neonatal disease. We will discuss a number of encouraging studies that have led to potentially valid biomarkers in the context of Down's syndrome, preterm birth, amniotic infections, preeclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction and obstructive uropathies. Obtaining noninvasive biomarkers (e.g., from the maternal circulation, urine or cervicovaginal fluid) may be more feasible for obstetric diseases than for diseases of the fetus, for which invasive methods are required (e.g., amniotic fluid, fetal urine). However, studies providing validated proteomics-identified biomarkers are limited. Efforts should be made to save well-characterized samples of these invasive body fluids so that many valid biomarkers of pregnancy-related diseases will be identified in the coming years using proteomics based analysis upon adoption of 'clinical proteomics guidelines'.

  19. Single Electron Transistor Platform for Microgravity Proteomics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Proteomic studies in microgravity are crucial to understanding the health effects of spaceflight on astronauts. Unfortunately, existing tools for measuring protein,...

  20. The Proteome of Seed Development in the Model Legume Lotus japonicus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Svend; Laursen, Brian S.; Ornfelt, Jane H.

    2009-01-01

    three developmental phases of legume seeds and the presence of embryo, endosperm, and seed coat in desiccated seeds. Furthermore, protein, oil, starch, phytic acid, and ash contents were determined, and this indicates that the composition of mature Lotus seed is more similar to soybean than to pea....... In a first attempt to determine the seed proteome, both a two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis approach and a gel-based liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry approach were used. Globulins were analyzed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and five legumins, LLP1 to LLP5...

  1. New Methods for Clinical Proteomics in Allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenichiro Kato

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent genomic studies have revealed many kinds of genetic polymorphisms. Some genetic polymorphisms have a correlation with allergic phenotypes, however there is only a statistical association without a precise molecular mechanism being demonstrated. Analysis of the molecular mechanisms from a proteomic perspective should contribute to a better understanding of diseases and indicate possible therapeutic approaches. Recent advances in identification and characterization of many immunological molecules have led to a shift to profiling research, clinical proteomics, of already known factors. However, analysis of such biomarkers in allergies requires methodological improvements because allergic reactions can be greatly influenced by subtle changes of factors. These subtle changes cannot be detected by conventional techniques such as 2D-PAGE, and the grammar behind the system is not well recognized by conventional proteomics. Examples of innovative methods useful for proteomic approaches to allergies are discussed here ; especially high throughput screening and structural methods for allergy targeting.

  2. Proteomics of aluminum tolerance in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lu; Lan, Ping; Shen, Ren Fang; Li, Wen Feng

    2014-03-01

    Aluminum (Al) toxicity is a major constraint for plant root development and growth as well as crop yield in acidic soils, which constitute approximately 40% of the potentially arable lands worldwide. The mechanisms of Al tolerance in plants are not well understood. As a whole systems approach, proteomic techniques have proven to be crucial as a complementary strategy to explore the mechanism in Al toxicity. Review here focuses on the potential of proteomics to unravel the common and plant species-specific changes at proteome level under Al stress, via comparative analysis of the Al-responsive proteins uncovered by recent proteomic studies using 2DE. Understanding the mechanisms of Al tolerance in plants is critical to generate Al resistance crops for developing sustainable agriculture practices, thereby contributing to food security worldwide.

  3. Combination of metallomics and proteomics to study the effects of the metallodrug RAPTA-T on human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolters, Dirk A; Stefanopoulou, Maria; Dyson, Paul J; Groessl, Michael

    2012-11-01

    An approach to characterize the interactions of RAPTA-T, a novel ruthenium-based anticancer drug candidate with intriguing antimetastatic properties, with human ovarian cancer cells in vitro is described. The distribution profile of the metallodrug within the cancer cells was determined by (size exclusion chromatography)-inductively coupled mass spectrometry combined with subcellular fractionation procedures (metallomics). Multidimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT) was then used to obtain insight into the alteration of the cellular proteome upon RAPTA-T treatment. The metallomics approach reveals striking differences in the intracellular behavior of the drug between cisplatin-sensitive and resistant cell lines and provides clues on possible mechanisms of action as well as detoxification, quantitative proteomics based on spectral counting sheds light on cellular response mechanisms to metallodrug treatment.

  4. The plant mitochondrial proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Millar, A.H.; Heazlewood, J.L.; Kristensen, B.K.

    2005-01-01

    The plant mitochondrial proteome might contain as many as 2000-3000 different gene products, each of which might undergo post-translational modification. Recent studies using analytical methods, such as one-, two- and three-dimensional gel electrophoresis and one- and two-dimensional liquid...... chromatography linked on-line with tandem mass spectrometry, have identified >400 mitochondrial proteins, including subunits of mitochondrial respiratory complexes, supercomplexes, phosphorylated proteins and oxidized proteins. The results also highlight a range of new mitochondrial proteins, new mitochondrial...... functions and possible new mechanisms for regulating mitochondrial metabolism. More than 70 identified proteins in Arabidopsis mitochondrial samples lack similarity to any protein of known function. In some cases, unknown proteins were found to form part of protein complexes, which allows a functional...

  5. Using quantitative proteomics methods for studying the secreteome of human mesenchymal stem cells during osteoblast differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Lars Peter

    selectin-like osteoblast-derived protein pga. dens umiddelbare osteoblast specificitet. Komplement faktor H var valgt til yderligere validering i forhold til slutfasen af osteoblast differentieringen pga. dens høje ekspression og indirekte forbindelse til osteoblast differentiering. Vores studie...

  6. Proteomics study of extracellular fibrinolytic proteases from Bacillus licheniformis RO3 and Bacillus pumilus 2.g isolated from Indonesian fermented food

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nur Afifah, Diana; Rustanti, Ninik; Anjani, Gemala; Syah, Dahrul; Yanti; Suhartono, Maggy T.

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents the proteomics study which includes separation, identification and characterization of proteins. The experiment on Indonesian fermented food such as extracellular fibrinolytic protease from Bacillus licheniformis RO3 and Bacillus pumilus 2.g isolated from red oncom and tempeh gembus was conducted. The experimental works comprise the following steps: (1) a combination of one- and two-dimensional electrophoresis analysis, (2) mass spectrometry analysis using MALDI-TOF-MS and (3) investigation using protein database. The result suggested that there were new two protein fractions of B. licheniformis RO3 and three protein fractions of B. pumilus 2.g. These result has not been previously reported.

  7. Site-Specific Proteomics Approach for Study Protein S-Nitrosylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Miao; Hou, Jinxuan; Huang, Lin; Huang, Xin; Heibeck, Tyler H.; Zhao, Rui; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Smith, Richard D.; Li, Yan; Fu, Kai; Zhang, Zhixin; Hinrichs, Steven; Ding, Shi-Jian

    2010-09-01

    Here we present a novel and robust method for the identification of protein S-nitrosylation sites in complex protein mixtures. The approach utilizes the cysteinyl affinity resin to selectively enrich S-nitrosylated peptides reduced by ascorbate followed by nanoscale liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Two alkylation agents with different added masses were employed to differentiate the S-nitrosylation sites from the non-Snitrosylation sites. We applied this approach to MDA-MB-231 cells treated with Angeli’s salt, a nitric oxide donor that has been shown to inhibit breast tumor growth and angiogenesis. A total of 162 S-nitrosylation sites were identified and an S-nitrosylation motif was revealed in our study. The 162 sites are significantly more than the number reported by previous methods, demonstrating the efficiency of our approach. Our approach will further facilitate the functional study of protein S-nitrosylation in cellular processes and may reveal new therapeutic targets.

  8. Antisense directed against PS-1 gene decreases brain oxidative markers in aged senescence accelerated mice (SAMP8) and reverses learning and memory impairment: a proteomics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorini, Ada; Sultana, Rukhsana; Förster, Sarah; Perluigi, Marzia; Cenini, Giovanna; Cini, Chiara; Cai, Jian; Klein, Jon B; Farr, Susan A; Niehoff, Michael L; Morley, John E; Kumar, Vijaya B; Allan Butterfield, D

    2013-12-01

    Amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) plays a central role in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) through the induction of oxidative stress. This peptide is produced by proteolytic cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by the action of β- and γ-secretases. Previous studies demonstrated that reduction of Aβ, using an antisense oligonucleotide (AO) directed against the Aβ region of APP, reduced oxidative stress-mediated damage and prevented or reverted cognitive deficits in senescence-accelerated prone mice (SAMP8), a useful animal model for investigating the events related to Aβ pathology and possibly to the early phase of AD. In the current study, aged SAMP8 were treated by AO directed against PS-1, a component of the γ-secretase complex, and tested for learning and memory in T-maze foot shock avoidance and novel object recognition. Brain tissue was collected to identify the decrease of oxidative stress and to evaluate the proteins that are differently expressed and oxidized after the reduction in free radical levels induced by Aβ. We used both expression proteomics and redox proteomics approaches. In brain of AO-treated mice a decrease of oxidative stress markers was found, and the proteins identified by proteomics as expressed differently or nitrated are involved in processes known to be impaired in AD. Our results suggest that the treatment with AO directed against PS-1 in old SAMP8 mice reverses learning and memory deficits and reduces Aβ-mediated oxidative stress with restoration to the normal condition and identifies possible pharmacological targets to combat this devastating dementing disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Methodologies and perspectives of proteomics applied to filamentous fungi: from sample preparation to secretome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Linda; Perrotta, Gaetano

    2015-03-12

    Filamentous fungi possess the extraordinary ability to digest complex biomasses and mineralize numerous xenobiotics, as consequence of their aptitude to sensing the environment and regulating their intra and extra cellular proteins, producing drastic changes in proteome and secretome composition. Recent advancement in proteomic technologies offers an exciting opportunity to reveal the fluctuations of fungal proteins and enzymes, responsible for their metabolic adaptation to a large variety of environmental conditions. Here, an overview of the most commonly used proteomic strategies will be provided; this paper will range from sample preparation to gel-free and gel-based proteomics, discussing pros and cons of each mentioned state-of-the-art technique. The main focus will be kept on filamentous fungi. Due to the biotechnological relevance of lignocellulose degrading fungi, special attention will be finally given to their extracellular proteome, or secretome. Secreted proteins and enzymes will be discussed in relation to their involvement in bio-based processes, such as biomass deconstruction and mycoremediation.

  10. The Gel Electrophoresis Markup Language (GelML) from the Proteomics Standards Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Frank; Hoogland, Christine; Martinez-Bartolomé, Salvador; Medina-Aunon, J. Alberto; Albar, Juan Pablo; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Wipat, Anil; Hermjakob, Henning; Almeida, Jonas S; Stanislaus, Romesh; Paton, Norman W; Jones, Andrew R

    2011-01-01

    The Human Proteome Organisation’s Proteomics Standards Initiative (HUPO-PSI) has developed the GelML data exchange format for representing gel electrophoresis experiments performed in proteomics investigations. The format closely follows the reporting guidelines for gel electrophoresis, which are part of the Minimum Information About a Proteomics Experiment (MIAPE) set of modules. GelML supports the capture of metadata (such as experimental protocols) and data (such as gel images) resulting from gel electrophoresis so that laboratories can be compliant with the MIAPE Gel Electrophoresis guidelines, while allowing such data sets to be exchanged or downloaded from public repositories. The format is sufficiently flexible to capture data from a broad range of experimental processes, and complements other PSI formats for mass spectrometry data and the results of protein and peptide identifications to capture entire gel-based proteome workflows. GelML has resulted from the open standardisation process of PSI consisting of both public consultation and anonymous review of the specifications. PMID:20677327

  11. Proteomic study of muscle sarcoplasmic proteins using AUT-PAGE/SDS-PAGE as two-dimensional gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picariello, Gianluca; De Martino, Alessandra; Mamone, Gianfranco; Ferranti, Pasquale; Addeo, Francesco; Faccia, Michele; Spagnamusso, Salvatore; Di Luccia, Aldo

    2006-03-20

    In the present study, an alternative procedure for two-dimensional (2D) electrophoretic analysis in proteomic investigation of the most represented basic muscle water-soluble proteins is suggested. Our method consists of Acetic acid-Urea-Triton polyacrylamide gel (AUT-PAGE) analysis in the first dimension and standard sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel (SDS-PAGE) in the second dimension. Although standard two-dimensional Immobilized pH Gradient-Sodium Dodecyl-Sulphate (2D IPG-SDS) gel electrophoresis has been successfully used to study these proteins, most of the water-soluble proteins are spread on the alkaline part of the 2D map and are poorly focused. Furthermore, the similarity in their molecular weights impairs resolution of the classical approach. The addition of Triton X-100, a non-ionic detergent, into the gel induces a differential electrophoretic mobility of proteins as a result of the formation of mixed micelles between the detergent and the hydrophobic moieties of polypeptides, separating basic proteins with a criterion similar to reversed phase chromatography based on their hydrophobicity. The acid pH induces positive net charges, increasing with the isoelectric point of proteins, thus allowing enhanced resolution in the separation. By using 2D AUT-PAGE/SDS electrophoresis approach to separate water-soluble proteins from fresh pork and from dry-cured products, we could spread proteins over a greater area, achieving a greater resolution than that obtained by IPG in the pH range 3-10 and 6-11. Sarcoplasmic proteins undergoing proteolysis during the ripening of products were identified by Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization-Time of Flight (MALDI-ToF) mass spectrometry peptide mass fingerprinting in a easier and more effective way. Two-dimensional AUT-PAGE/SDS electrophoresis has allowed to simplify separation of sarcoplasmic protein mixtures making this technique suitable in the defining of quality of dry-cured pork products by immediate

  12. A high-quality catalog of the Drosophila melanogaster proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunner, Erich; Ahrens, Christian H.; Mohanty, Sonaly

    2007-01-01

    % of the predicted Drosophila melanogaster proteome by detecting 9,124 proteins from 498,000 redundant and 72,281 distinct peptide identifications. This unprecedented high proteome coverage for a complex eukaryote was achieved by combining sample diversity, multidimensional biochemical fractionation and analysis...... matching approximately 50% of D. melanogaster gene models. This library of proteotypic peptides should enable fast, targeted and quantitative proteomic studies to elucidate the systems biology of this model organism....

  13. Statistical considerations of optimal study design for human plasma proteomics and biomarker discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Cong; Simpson, Kathryn L; Lancashire, Lee J; Walker, Michael J; Dawson, Martin J; Unwin, Richard D; Rembielak, Agata; Price, Patricia; West, Catharine; Dive, Caroline; Whetton, Anthony D

    2012-04-01

    A mass spectrometry-based plasma biomarker discovery workflow was developed to facilitate biomarker discovery. Plasma from either healthy volunteers or patients with pancreatic cancer was 8-plex iTRAQ labeled, fractionated by 2-dimensional reversed phase chromatography and subjected to MALDI ToF/ToF mass spectrometry. Data were processed using a q-value based statistical approach to maximize protein quantification and identification. Technical (between duplicate samples) and biological variance (between and within individuals) were calculated and power analysis was thereby enabled. An a priori power analysis was carried out using samples from healthy volunteers to define sample sizes required for robust biomarker identification. The result was subsequently validated with a post hoc power analysis using a real clinical setting involving pancreatic cancer patients. This demonstrated that six samples per group (e.g., pre- vs post-treatment) may provide sufficient statistical power for most proteins with changes>2 fold. A reference standard allowed direct comparison of protein expression changes between multiple experiments. Analysis of patient plasma prior to treatment identified 29 proteins with significant changes within individual patient. Changes in Peroxiredoxin II levels were confirmed by Western blot. This q-value based statistical approach in combination with reference standard samples can be applied with confidence in the design and execution of clinical studies for predictive, prognostic, and/or pharmacodynamic biomarker discovery. The power analysis provides information required prior to study initiation.

  14. Environmental proteomics: applications of proteome profiling in environmental microbiology and biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacerda, Carla M R; Reardon, Kenneth F

    2009-01-01

    In this review, we present the use of proteomics to advance knowledge in the field of environmental biotechnology, including studies of bacterial physiology, metabolism and ecology. Bacteria are widely applied in environmental biotechnology for their ability to catalyze dehalogenation, methanogenesis, denitrification and sulfate reduction, among others. Their tolerance to radiation and toxic compounds is also of importance. Proteomics has an important role in helping uncover the pathways behind these cellular processes. Environmental samples are often highly complex, which makes proteome studies in this field especially challenging. Some of these challenges are the lack of genome sequences for the vast majority of environmental bacteria, difficulties in isolating bacteria and proteins from certain environments, and the presence of complex microbial communities. Despite these challenges, proteomics offers a unique dynamic view into cellular function. We present examples of environmental proteomics of model organisms, and then discuss metaproteomics (microbial community proteomics), which has the potential to provide insights into the function of a community without isolating organisms. Finally, the environmental proteomics literature is summarized as it pertains to the specific application areas of wastewater treatment, metabolic engineering, microbial ecology and environmental stress responses.

  15. Dentistry proteomics: from laboratory development to clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende, Taia M B; Lima, Stella M F; Petriz, Bernardo A; Silva, Osmar N; Freire, Mirna S; Franco, Octávio L

    2013-12-01

    Despite all the dental information acquired over centuries and the importance of proteome research, the cross-link between these two areas only emerged around mid-nineties. Proteomic tools can help dentistry in the identification of risk factors, early diagnosis, prevention, and systematic control that will promote the evolution of treatment in all dentistry specialties. This review mainly focuses on the evolution of dentistry in different specialties based on proteomic research and how these tools can improve knowledge in dentistry. The subjects covered are an overview of proteomics in dentistry, specific information on different fields in dentistry (dental structure, restorative dentistry, endodontics, periodontics, oral pathology, oral surgery, and orthodontics) and future directions. There are many new proteomic technologies that have never been used in dentistry studies and some dentistry areas that have never been explored by proteomic tools. It is expected that a greater integration of these areas will help to understand what is still unknown in oral health and disease.

  16. Proteomics in medical microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cash, P

    2000-04-01

    The techniques of proteomics (high resolution two-dimensional electrophoresis and protein characterisation) are widely used for microbiological research to analyse global protein synthesis as an indicator of gene expression. The rapid progress in microbial proteomics has been achieved through the wide availability of whole genome sequences for a number of bacterial groups. Beyond providing a basic understanding of microbial gene expression, proteomics has also played a role in medical areas of microbiology. Progress has been made in the use of the techniques for investigating the epidemiology and taxonomy of human microbial pathogens, the identification of novel pathogenic mechanisms and the analysis of drug resistance. In each of these areas, proteomics has provided new insights that complement genomic-based investigations. This review describes the current progress in these research fields and highlights some of the technical challenges existing for the application of proteomics in medical microbiology. The latter concern the analysis of genetically heterogeneous bacterial populations and the integration of the proteomic and genomic data for these bacteria. The characterisation of the proteomes of bacterial pathogens growing in their natural hosts remains a future challenge.

  17. Novel molecular changes induced by Nrg1 hypomorphism and Nrg1-cannabinoid interaction in adolescence: a hippocampal proteomic study in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarrah R Spencer

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Neuregulin 1 (NRG1 is linked to an increased risk of developing schizophrenia and cannabis dependence. Mice that are hypomorphic for Nrg1 (Nrg1 HET mice display schizophrenia-relevant behavioural phenotypes and aberrant expression of serotonin and glutamate receptors. Nrg1 HET mice also display idiosyncratic responses to the main psychoactive constituent of cannabis, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC. To gain traction on the molecular pathways disrupted by Nrg1 hypomorphism and Nrg1-cannabinoid interactions we conducted a proteomic study. Adolescent wildtype (WT and Nrg1 HET mice were exposed to repeated injections of vehicle or THC and their hippocampi were submitted to 2D gel proteomics. Comparison of WT and Nrg1 HET mice identified proteins linked to molecular changes in schizophrenia that have not been previously associated with Nrg1. These proteins are involved in vesicular release of neurotransmitters such as SNARE proteins; enzymes impacting serotonergic neurotransmission, and; proteins affecting growth factor expression. Nrg1 HET mice treated with THC expressed a distinct protein expression signature compared to WT mice. Replicating prior findings, THC caused proteomic changes in WT mice suggestive of greater oxidative stress and neurodegeneration. We have previously observed that THC selectively increased hippocampal NMDA receptor binding of adolescent Nrg1 HET mice. Here we observed outcomes consistent with heightened NMDA-mediated glutamatergic neurotransmission. This included differential expression of proteins involved in NMDA receptor trafficking to the synaptic membrane; lipid raft stabilization of synaptic NMDA receptors; and homeostatic responses to dampen excitotoxicity. These findings uncover for the first time novel proteins altered in response to Nrg1 hypomorphism and Nrg1-cannabinoid interactions that improves our molecular understanding of Nrg1 signaling and Nrg1-mediated genetic vulnerability to the neurobehavioural effects

  18. The Succinated Proteome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merkley, Eric D.; Metz, Thomas O.; Smith, Richard D.; Baynes, John; Frizell, Norma

    2014-03-30

    Succination is a chemical modification of cysteine in protein by the Krebs cycle intermediate, fumarate, yielding S-(2-succino)cysteine (2SC). Intracellular fumarate concentration and succination of proteins are increased by hyperpolarization of the inner mitochondrial membrane, in concert with mitochondrial, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and oxidative stress in adipocytes grown in high glucose medium and in adipose tissue in obesity and diabetes. Increased succination of proteins is also detected in the kidney of a fumarase conditional knock-out mouse which develops renal tumors. Keap1, the gatekeeper of the antioxidant response, was identified as a major succinated protein in renal cancer cells, suggesting that succination may play a role in activation of the antioxidant response. A wide range of proteins is subject to succination, including enzymes, adipokines, cytoskeletal proteins and ER chaperones with functional cysteine residues. There is also significant overlap between succinated and glutathionylated proteins, and with proteins containing cysteine residues that are readily oxidized to the sulfenic (cysteic) acid. Succination of adipocyte proteins is inhibited by uncouplers, which discharge the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) and by ER stress inhibitors. 2SC serves as a biomarker of mitochondrial stress or dysfunction in chronic diseases, such as obesity, diabetes and cancer, and recent studies suggest that succination is a mechanistic link between mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative and ER stress, and cellular progression toward apoptosis. In this article, we review the history of the succinated proteome and the challenges associated with measuring this non-enzymatic post-translational modification of proteins by proteomics approaches.

  19. Characterisation of the circulating acellular proteome of healthy sheep using LC-MS/MS-based proteomics analysis of serum

    OpenAIRE

    Chemonges, Saul; Gupta, Rajesh; Mills, Paul C.; Steven R. Kopp; Sadowski, Pawel

    2017-01-01

    Background Unlike humans, there is currently no publicly available reference mass spectrometry-based circulating acellular proteome data for sheep, limiting the analysis and interpretation of a range of physiological changes and disease states. The objective of this study was to develop a robust and comprehensive method to characterise the circulating acellular proteome in ovine serum. Methods Serum samples from healthy sheep were subjected to shotgun proteomic analysis using nano liquid chro...

  20. Protein sulfenation as a redox sensor: proteomics studies using a novel biotinylated dimedone analogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Rebecca L; Schröder, Ewald; May, Georgina; Free, Paul; Gaffney, Piers R J; Wait, Robin; Begum, Shajna; Heads, Richard J; Eaton, Philip

    2007-09-01

    Protein sulfenic acids are reactive intermediates in the catalytic cycles of many enzymes as well as the in formation of other redox states. Sulfenic acid formation is a reversible post-translational modification with potential for protein regulation. Dimedone (5,5-dimethyl-1,3-cyclohexanedione) is commonly used in vitro to study sulfenation of purified proteins, selectively "tagging" them, allowing monitoring by mass spectrometry. However dimedone is of little use in complex protein mixtures because selective monitoring of labeling is not possible. To address this issue, we synthesized a novel biotinylated derivative of dimedone, keeping the dione cassette required for sulfenate reactivity but adding the functionality of a biotin tag. Biotin-amido(5-methyl-5-carboxamidocyclohexane 1,3-dione) tetragol (biotin dimedone) was prepared in six steps, combining 3,5-dimethoxybenzoic acid (Birch reduction, ultimately leading to the dimedone unit with a carboxylate functionality), 1-amino-11-azido-3,6,9-trioxaundecane (a differentially substituted tetragol spacer), and biotin. We loaded biotin dimedone (0.1 mm, 30 min) into rat ventricular myocytes, treated them with H(2)O(2) (0.1-10,000 microm, 5 min), and monitored derivatization on Western blots using streptavidin-horseradish peroxidase. There was a dose-dependent increase in labeling of multiple proteins that was maximal at 0.1 or 1 mm H(2)O(2) and declined sharply below basal with 10 mm treatment. Cell-wide labeling was observed in fixed cells probed with avidin-FITC using a confocal fluorescence microscope. Similar H(2)O(2)-induced labeling was observed in isolated rat hearts. Hearts loaded and subjected to hypoxia showed a striking loss of labeling, which returned when oxygen was resupplied, highlighting the protein sulfenates as oxygen sensors. Cardiac proteins that were sulfenated during oxidative stress were purified with avidin-agarose and identified by separation of tryptic digests by liquid chromatography with

  1. Comparative study of human mitochondrial proteome reveals extensive protein subcellular relocalization after gene duplications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Yong

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene and genome duplication is the principle creative force in evolution. Recently, protein subcellular relocalization, or neolocalization was proposed as one of the mechanisms responsible for the retention of duplicated genes. This hypothesis received support from the analysis of yeast genomes, but has not been tested thoroughly on animal genomes. In order to evaluate the importance of subcellular relocalizations for retention of duplicated genes in animal genomes, we systematically analyzed nuclear encoded mitochondrial proteins in the human genome by reconstructing phylogenies of mitochondrial multigene families. Results The 456 human mitochondrial proteins selected for this study were clustered into 305 gene families including 92 multigene families. Among the multigene families, 59 (64% consisted of both mitochondrial and cytosolic (non-mitochondrial proteins (mt-cy families while the remaining 33 (36% were composed of mitochondrial proteins (mt-mt families. Phylogenetic analyses of mt-cy families revealed three different scenarios of their neolocalization following gene duplication: 1 relocalization from mitochondria to cytosol, 2 from cytosol to mitochondria and 3 multiple subcellular relocalizations. The neolocalizations were most commonly enabled by the gain or loss of N-terminal mitochondrial targeting signals. The majority of detected subcellular relocalization events occurred early in animal evolution, preceding the evolution of tetrapods. Mt-mt protein families showed a somewhat different pattern, where gene duplication occurred more evenly in time. However, for both types of protein families, most duplication events appear to roughly coincide with two rounds of genome duplications early in vertebrate evolution. Finally, we evaluated the effects of inaccurate and incomplete annotation of mitochondrial proteins and found that our conclusion of the importance of subcellular relocalization after gene duplication on

  2. Effects of delayed NSAID administration after experimental eccentric contraction injury – A cellular and proteomics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldape, Michael J.; Bayer, Clifford R.; Katahira, Eva J.; Bond, Laura; Nicora, Carrie D.; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Clauss, Therese R. W.; Metz, Thomas O.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo; Stevens, Dennis L.

    2017-01-01

    Background Acute muscle injuries are exceedingly common and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely consumed to reduce the associated inflammation, swelling and pain that peak 1–2 days post-injury. While prophylactic use or early administration of NSAIDs has been shown to delay muscle regeneration and contribute to loss of muscle strength after healing, little is known about the effects of delayed NSAID use. Further, NSAID use following non-penetrating injury has been associated with increased risk and severity of infection, including that due to group A streptococcus, though the mechanisms remain to be elucidated. The present study investigated the effects of delayed NSAID administration on muscle repair and sought mechanisms supporting an injury/NSAID/infection axis. Methods A murine model of eccentric contraction (EC)-induced injury of the tibialis anterior muscle was used to profile the cellular and molecular changes induced by ketorolac tromethamine administered 47 hr post injury. Results NSAID administration inhibited several important muscle regeneration processes and down-regulated multiple cytoprotective proteins known to inhibit the intrinsic pathway of programmed cell death. These activities were associated with increased caspase activity in injured muscles but were independent of any NSAID effect on macrophage influx or phenotype switching. Conclusions These findings provide new molecular evidence supporting the notion that NSAIDs have a direct negative influence on muscle repair after acute strain injury in mice and thus add to renewed concern about the safety and benefits of NSAIDS in both children and adults, in those with progressive loss of muscle mass such as the elderly or patients with cancer or AIDS, and those at risk of secondary infection after trauma or surgery. PMID:28245256

  3. A proteomic study of cMyc improvement of CHO culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunn Michael J

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The biopharmaceutical industry requires cell lines to have an optimal proliferation rate and a high integral viable cell number resulting in a maximum volumetric recombinant protein product titre. Nutrient feeding has been shown to boost cell number and productivity in fed-batch culture, but cell line engineering is another route one may take to increase these parameters in the bioreactor. The use of CHO-K1 cells with a c-myc plasmid allowing for over-expressing c-Myc (designated cMycCHO gives a higher integral viable cell number. In this study the differential protein expression in cMycCHO is investigated using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE followed by image analysis to determine the extent of the effect c-Myc has on the cell and the proteins involved to give the new phenotype. Results Over 100 proteins that were differentially expressed in cMycCHO cells were detected with high statistical confidence, of which 41 were subsequently identified by tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS. Further analysis revealed proteins involved in a variety of pathways. Some examples of changes in protein expression include: an increase in nucleolin, involved in proliferation and known to aid in stabilising anti-apoptotic protein mRNA levels, the cytoskeleton and mitochondrial morphology (vimentin, protein biosysnthesis (eIF6 and energy metabolism (ATP synthetase, and a decreased regulation of all proteins, indentified, involved in matrix and cell to cell adhesion. Conclusion These results indicate several proteins involved in proliferation and adhesion that could be useful for future approaches to improve proliferation and decrease adhesion of CHO cell lines which are difficult to adapt to suspension culture.

  4. Application of proteomics to ecology and population biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karr, T L

    2008-02-01

    Proteomics is a relatively new scientific discipline that merges protein biochemistry, genome biology and bioinformatics to determine the spatial and temporal expression of proteins in cells, tissues and whole organisms. There has been very little application of proteomics to the fields of behavioral genetics, evolution, ecology and population dynamics, and has only recently been effectively applied to the closely allied fields of molecular evolution and genetics. However, there exists considerable potential for proteomics to impact in areas related to functional ecology; this review will introduce the general concepts and methodologies that define the field of proteomics and compare and contrast the advantages and disadvantages with other methods. Examples of how proteomics can aid, complement and indeed extend the study of functional ecology will be discussed including the main tool of ecological studies, population genetics with an emphasis on metapopulation structure analysis. Because proteomic analyses provide a direct measure of gene expression, it obviates some of the limitations associated with other genomic approaches, such as microarray and EST analyses. Likewise, in conjunction with associated bioinformatics and molecular evolutionary tools, proteomics can provide the foundation of a systems-level integration approach that can enhance ecological studies. It can be envisioned that proteomics will provide important new information on issues specific to metapopulation biology and adaptive processes in nature. A specific example of the application of proteomics to sperm ageing is provided to illustrate the potential utility of the approach.

  5. Proteomics reveals the effects of sustained weight loss on the human plasma proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyer, Philipp E; Wewer Albrechtsen, Nicolai J; Tyanova, Stefka; Grassl, Niklas; Iepsen, Eva W; Lundgren, Julie; Madsbad, Sten; Holst, Jens J; Torekov, Signe S; Mann, Matthias

    2016-12-22

    Sustained weight loss is a preferred intervention in a wide range of metabolic conditions, but the effects on an individual's health state remain ill-defined. Here, we investigate the plasma proteomes of a cohort of 43 obese individuals that had undergone 8 weeks of 12% body weight loss followed by a year of weight maintenance. Using mass spectrometry-based plasma proteome profiling, we measured 1,294 plasma proteomes. Longitudinal monitoring of the cohort revealed individual-specific protein levels with wide-ranging effects of losing weight on the plasma proteome reflected in 93 significantly affected proteins. The adipocyte-secreted SERPINF1 and apolipoprotein APOF1 were most significantly regulated with fold changes of -16% and +37%, respectively (P plasma proteome, and eight plasma proteins correlated better with insulin resistance than the known marker adiponectin. Nearly all study participants benefited from weight loss regarding a ten-protein inflammation panel defined from the proteomics data. We conclude that plasma proteome profiling broadly evaluates and monitors intervention in metabolic diseases. © 2016 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  6. Proteomics in Argentina - limitations and future perspectives: A special emphasis on meat proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadda, Silvina; Almeida, André M

    2015-11-01

    Argentina is one of the most relevant countries in Latin America, playing a major role in regional economics, culture and science. Over the last 80 years, Argentinean history has been characterized by several upward and downward phases that had major consequences on the development of science in the country and most recently on proteomics. In this article, we characterize the evolution of Proteomics sciences in Argentina over the last decade and a half. We describe the proteomics publication output of the country in the framework of the regional and international contexts, demonstrating that Argentina is solidly anchored in a regional context, showing results similar to other emergent and Latin American countries, albeit still far from the European, American or Australian realities. We also provide a case-study on the importance of Proteomics to a specific sector in the area of food science: the use of bacteria of technological interest, highlighting major achievements obtained by Argentinean proteomics scientists. Finally, we provide a general picture of the endeavors being undertaken by Argentinean Proteomics scientists and their international collaborators to promote the Proteomics-based research with the new generation of scientists and PhD students in both Argentina and other countries in the Southern cone.

  7. A visual approach to proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickell, Stephan; Kofler, Christine; Leis, Andrew P; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2006-03-01

    Cryo-electron tomography is an emerging imaging technique that has unique potential for molecular cell biology. At the present resolution of 4-5 nm, large supramolecular structures can be studied in unperturbed cellular environments and, in the future, it will become possible to map molecular landscapes inside cells in a more comprehensive manner. 'Visual proteomics' aims to complement and extend mass-spectrometry-based inventories, and to provide a quantitative description of the macromolecular interactions that underlie cellular functions.

  8. A proteomics approach to study synergistic and antagonistic interactions of the fungal-bacterial consortium Fusarium oxysporum wild-type MSA 35.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Marino; Grunau, Alexander; Minerdi, Daniela; Gehrig, Peter; Roschitzki, Bernd; Eberl, Leo; Garibaldi, Angelo; Gullino, Maria Lodovica; Riedel, Kathrin

    2010-09-01

    Fusarium oxysporum is an important plant pathogen that causes severe damage of many economically important crop species. Various microorganisms have been shown to inhibit this soil-borne plant pathogen, including non-pathogenic F. oxysporum strains. In this study, F. oxysporum wild-type (WT) MSA 35, a biocontrol multispecies consortium that consists of a fungus and numerous rhizobacteria mainly belonging to gamma-proteobacteria, was analyzed by two complementary metaproteomic approaches (2-DE combined with MALDI-Tof/Tof MS and 1-D PAGE combined with LC-ESI-MS/MS) to identify fungal or bacterial factors potentially involved in antagonistic or synergistic interactions between the consortium members. Moreover, the proteome profiles of F. oxysporum WT MSA 35 and its cured counter-part CU MSA 35 (WT treated with antibiotics) were compared with unravel the bacterial impact on consortium functioning. Our study presents the first proteome mapping of an antagonistic F. oxysporum strain and proposes candidate proteins that might play an important role for the biocontrol activity and the close interrelationship between the fungus and its bacterial partners.

  9. Advances on Honeybee Proteome Study%蜜蜂蛋白质组学研究新进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯毛; 李建科

    2015-01-01

    蛋白质组学是后基因组时代的重要技术之一,随着超高压液相色谱、高分辨率和高灵敏度生物大分子质谱技术的快速发展,近年来在蜜蜂生物学和蜂产品研究领域的研究应用越来越广,蜜蜂的许多重要生物学形成机理被解析,蜂产品中的重要功能成分不断被鉴定,这对促进我国蜂学领域的原始创新具有重要意义。对近年来国际蜜蜂蛋白质组学的研究进行系统综述,旨在促进我国蜜蜂生物学和养蜂业的发展。%Proteomics is one of the most important biotechnologies in post-genomic era. The advances of proteomics are driven by the fast development of technologies related to chromatography with ultrahigh pressure and mass spectrometry with high resolution and high sensitivity. It now becomes a public research platform to delineate mechanism of the important biological characteristics of the honeybees, and to identify previously unknown protein components in bee-products. This new technology has made great contribution to scientific innovation for beekeeping industry of China. We review the latest advances in honeybee proteomics research around the global in order to promote development of honeybee biology and beekeeping industry of China.

  10. Marine proteomics: a critical assessment of an emerging technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, Marc; Ankisetty, Sridevi; Corrales, Jone; Marsh-Hunkin, K Erica; Gochfeld, Deborah J; Willett, Kristine L; Rimoldi, John M

    2012-10-26

    The application of proteomics to marine sciences has increased in recent years because the proteome represents the interface between genotypic and phenotypic variability and, thus, corresponds to the broadest possible biomarker for eco-physiological responses and adaptations. Likewise, proteomics can provide important functional information regarding biosynthetic pathways, as well as insights into mechanism of action, of novel marine natural products. The goal of this review is to (1) explore the application of proteomics methodologies to marine systems, (2) assess the technical approaches that have been used, and (3) evaluate the pros and cons of this proteomic research, with the intent of providing a critical analysis of its future roles in marine sciences. To date, proteomics techniques have been utilized to investigate marine microbe, plant, invertebrate, and vertebrate physiology, developmental biology, seafood safety, susceptibility to disease, and responses to environmental change. However, marine proteomics studies often suffer from poor experimental design, sample processing/optimization difficulties, and data analysis/interpretation issues. Moreover, a major limitation is the lack of available annotated genomes and proteomes for most marine organisms, including several "model species". Even with these challenges in mind, there is no doubt that marine proteomics is a rapidly expanding and powerful integrative molecular research tool from which our knowledge of the marine environment, and the natural products from this resource, will be significantly expanded.

  11. PROTEOMICS in aquaculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodrigues, Pedro M.; Silva, Tomé S.; Dias, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    growth in production is still expected for decades to come. Aquaculture is, though, a very competitive market, and a global awareness regarding the use of scientific knowledge and emerging technologies to obtain a better farmed organism through a sustainable production has enhanced the importance...... nutritional, health or quality properties for functional foods and the integration of proteomics techniques in addressing this challenging issue. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Farm animal proteomics....

  12. Cell Wall Proteome

    OpenAIRE

    Boudart, Georges; Minic, Zoran; Albenne, Cécile; Canut, Hervé; Jamet, Elisabeth; Pont-Lezica, Rafael F

    2007-01-01

    In this chapter, we will focus on the contribution of proteomics to the identification and determination of the structure and function of CWPs as well as discussing new perspectives in this area. The great variety of proteins found in the plant cell wall is described. Some families, such as glycoside hydrolases, proteases, lectins, and inhibitors of cell wall modifying enzymes, are discussed in detail. Examples of the use of proteomic techniques to elucidate the structure of various cell wall...

  13. Rational construction of gel-based supramolecular logic gates by using a functional gelator with multiple-stimuli responsive properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Kaiqi; Yang, Jun; Wang, Xiaobo; Song, Jian

    2014-11-07

    A gelator containing a sorbitol moiety and a naphthalene-based salicylideneaniline group exhibits macroscopic gel-sol behavior in response to four complementary input stimuli: temperature, UV light, OH(-), and Cu(2+). On the basis of its multiple-stimuli responsive properties, we constructed a rational gel-based supramolecular logic gate that performed OR and INH types of reversible stimulus responsive gel-sol transition in the presence of various combinations of the four stimuli when the gel state was defined as an output. Moreover, a combination two-output logic gate was obtained, owing to the existence of the naked eye as an additional output. Hence, gelator 1 could construct not only a basic logic gate, but also a two-input-two-output logic gate because of its response to multiple chemical stimuli and multiple output signals, in which one input could erase the effect of another input.

  14. The proteome of seed development in the model legume Lotus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dam, Svend; Laursen, Brian S; Ornfelt, Jane H; Jochimsen, Bjarne; Staerfeldt, Hans Henrik; Friis, Carsten; Nielsen, Kasper; Goffard, Nicolas; Besenbacher, Søren; Krusell, Lene; Sato, Shusei; Tabata, Satoshi; Thøgersen, Ida B; Enghild, Jan J; Stougaard, Jens

    2009-03-01

    We have characterized the development of seeds in the model legume Lotus japonicus. Like soybean (Glycine max) and pea (Pisum sativum), Lotus develops straight seed pods and each pod contains approximately 20 seeds that reach maturity within 40 days. Histological sections show the characteristic three developmental phases of legume seeds and the presence of embryo, endosperm, and seed coat in desiccated seeds. Furthermore, protein, oil, starch, phytic acid, and ash contents were determined, and this indicates that the composition of mature Lotus seed is more similar to soybean than to pea. In a first attempt to determine the seed proteome, both a two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis approach and a gel-based liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry approach were used. Globulins were analyzed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and five legumins, LLP1 to LLP5, and two convicilins, LCP1 and LCP2, were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization quadrupole/time-of-flight mass spectrometry. For two distinct developmental phases, seed filling and desiccation, a gel-based liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry approach was used, and 665 and 181 unique proteins corresponding to gene accession numbers were identified for the two phases, respectively. All of the proteome data, including the experimental data and mass spectrometry spectra peaks, were collected in a database that is available to the scientific community via a Web interface (http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/cgi-bin/lotus/db.cgi). This database establishes the basis for relating physiology, biochemistry, and regulation of seed development in Lotus. Together with a new Web interface (http://bioinfoserver.rsbs.anu.edu.au/utils/PathExpress4legumes/) collecting all protein identifications for Lotus, Medicago, and soybean seed proteomes, this database is a valuable resource for comparative seed proteomics and pathway analysis within and beyond the legume family.

  15. Metabolic effects of the iodothyronine functional analogue TRC150094 on the liver and skeletal muscle of high-fat diet fed overweight rats: an integrated proteomic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestri, Elena; Glinni, Daniela; Cioffi, Federica; Moreno, Maria; Lombardi, Assunta; de Lange, Pieter; Senese, Rosalba; Ceccarelli, Michele; Salzano, Anna Maria; Scaloni, Andrea; Lanni, Antonia; Goglia, Fernando

    2012-07-06

    A novel functional iodothyronine analogue, TRC150094, which has a much lower potency toward thyroid hormone receptor (α1/β1) activation than triiodothyronine, has been shown to be effective at reducing adiposity in rats simultaneously receiving a high-fat diet (HFD). Here, by combining metabolic, functional and proteomic analysis, we studied how the hepatic and skeletal muscle phenotypes might respond to TRC150094 treatment in HFD-fed overweight rats. Drug treatment increased both the liver and skeletal muscle mitochondrial oxidative capacities without altering mitochondrial efficiency. Coherently, in terms of individual respiratory in-gel activity, blue-native analysis revealed an increased activity of complex V in the liver and of complexes II and V in tibialis muscle in TCR150094-treated animals. Subsequently, the identification of differentially expressed proteins and the analysis of their interrelations gave an integrated view of the phenotypic/metabolic adaptations occurring in the liver and muscle proteomes during drug treatment. TRC150094 significantly altered the expression of several proteins involved in key liver metabolic pathways, including amino acid and nitrogen metabolism, and fructose and mannose metabolism. The canonical pathways most strongly influenced by TRC150094 in tibialis muscle included glycolysis and gluconeogenesis, amino acid, fructose and mannose metabolism, and cell signaling. The phenotypic/metabolic influence of TRC150094 on the liver and skeletal muscle of HFD-fed overweight rats suggests the potential clinical application of this iodothyronine analogue in ameliorating metabolic risk parameters altered by diet regimens.

  16. Evaluation of Novel Multiplex Antibody Kit for Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1/2 and Hepatitis C Virus Using Sol-Gel Based Microarray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Gyu Yun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Microarrays enable high-throughput screening (HTS of disease-related molecules, including important signaling proteins/peptides and small molecules that are in low abundance. In this study, we developed a multiplex blood bank screening platform, referred to as the Hi3-1 assay, for simultaneous detection of human immunodeficiency virus 1/2 (HIV 1/2 and hepatitis C virus (HCV. Methods. The Hi3-1 assay was tested using four panels (Panel 1, n=4,581 patient samples; Panel 2, n=15 seroconversion samples; Panel 3, n=4 performance samples; and Panel 4, n=251 purchased positive control samples, and the results were collected by the Department of Laboratory Medicine, Korea University Medical College, Republic of Korea. The present study compares the sensitivity of the multiplex detection platform for both HIV and HCV using a sol-gel based microarray, which was based on a reference test (Architect HIV Ag/Ab Combo and Architect anti-HCV assays, in Korean patients. Results. The sensitivity of the multiplex detection platform for both HIV and HCV was 100%, and the specificity was 99.96% for HIV and 99.76% for HCV, which is equivalent to that of the reference test. Conclusion. We have successfully applied a novel screening technology to multiplex HIV and HCV diagnoses in a blood bank screening test.

  17. Comparative proteomic study and functional analysis of translationally controlled tumor protein in rice roots under Hg2+ stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feijuan Wang; Yongshen Shang; Ling Yang; Cheng Zhu

    2012-01-01

    So far,very little is known about mercury stress-induced intercellular metabolic changes in rice roots at the proteome level.To investigate the response of rice roots to mercury stress,changes in protein expression in rice roots were analyzed using a comparative proteomics approach.Six-leaf stage rice seedlings were treated with 50 μmol/L HgCl2 for 3 hr; 29 protein spots showed a significant changes in abundance under stress when compared with the Hg2+-tolerant rice mutant and wild type (Zhonghua 11).Furthermore,all these protein spots were identified by mass spectrometry to match 27 diverse protein species.The identified proteins were involved in several processes,including stress response,redox homeostasis,signal transduction,regulation and metabolism; some were found to be cellular structure proteins and a few were unknown.Among the up-regulated proteins,OsTCTP (translationally controlled tumor protein) was chosen to perform hetereologous expression in yeast which was presumed to participate in the Hg2+ tolerance of rice,providing evidence for its role in alleviating Hg2+ damage.Among the many tests,we found that OsTCTP-overexpressed yeast strains were more resistant to Hg2+ than wild-type yeast.Thus,we propose that OsTCTP contributes to Hg2+ resistance.Here we present,for the first time,the functional characterization of OsTCTP in connection with Hg2+ stress in plants.

  18. A guide through the computational analysis of isotope-labeled mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics data: an application study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haußmann Ute

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mass spectrometry-based proteomics has reached a stage where it is possible to comprehensively analyze the whole proteome of a cell in one experiment. Here, the employment of stable isotopes has become a standard technique to yield relative abundance values of proteins. In recent times, more and more experiments are conducted that depict not only a static image of the up- or down-regulated proteins at a distinct time point but instead compare developmental stages of an organism or varying experimental conditions. Results Although the scientific questions behind these experiments are of course manifold, there are, nevertheless, two questions that commonly arise: 1 which proteins are differentially regulated regarding the selected experimental conditions, and 2 are there groups of proteins that show similar abundance ratios, indicating that they have a similar turnover? We give advice on how these two questions can be answered and comprehensively compare a variety of commonly applied computational methods and their outcomes. Conclusions This work provides guidance through the jungle of computational methods to analyze mass spectrometry-based isotope-labeled datasets and recommends an effective and easy-to-use evaluation strategy. We demonstrate our approach with three recently published datasets on Bacillus subtilis 12 and Corynebacterium glutamicum 3. Special focus is placed on the application and validation of cluster analysis methods. All applied methods were implemented within the rich internet application QuPE 4. Results can be found at http://qupe.cebitec.uni-bielefeld.de.

  19. Comparative study of human and mouse postsynaptic proteomes finds high compositional conservation and abundance differences for key synaptic proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Bayés

    Full Text Available Direct comparison of protein components from human and mouse excitatory synapses is important for determining the suitability of mice as models of human brain disease and to understand the evolution of the mammalian brain. The postsynaptic density is a highly complex set of proteins organized into molecular networks that play a central role in behavior and disease. We report the first direct comparison of the proteome of triplicate isolates of mouse and human cortical postsynaptic densities. The mouse postsynaptic density comprised 1556 proteins and the human one 1461. A large compositional overlap was observed; more than 70% of human postsynaptic density proteins were also observed in the mouse postsynaptic density. Quantitative analysis of postsynaptic density components in both species indicates a broadly similar profile of abundance but also shows that there is higher abundance variation between species than within species. Well known components of this synaptic structure are generally more abundant in the mouse postsynaptic density. Significant inter-species abundance differences exist in some families of key postsynaptic density proteins including glutamatergic neurotransmitter receptors and adaptor proteins. Furthermore, we have identified a closely interacting set of molecules enriched in the human postsynaptic density that could be involved in dendrite and spine structural plasticity. Understanding synapse proteome diversity within and between species will be important to further our understanding of brain complexity and disease.

  20. DIGE proteome analysis reveals suitability of ischemic cardiac in vitro model for studying cellular response to acute ischemia and regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sina Haas

    Full Text Available Proteomic analysis of myocardial tissue from patient population is suited to yield insights into cellular and molecular mechanisms taking place in cardiovascular diseases. However, it has been limited by small sized biopsies and complicated by high variances between patients. Therefore, there is a high demand for suitable model systems with the capability to simulate ischemic and cardiotoxic effects in vitro, under defined conditions. In this context, we established an in vitro ischemia/reperfusion cardiac disease model based on the contractile HL-1 cell line. To identify pathways involved in the cellular alterations induced by ischemia and thereby defining disease-specific biomarkers and potential target structures for new drug candidates we used fluorescence 2D-difference gel electrophoresis. By comparing spot density changes in ischemic and reperfusion samples we detected several protein spots that were differentially abundant. Using MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS and ESI-MS the proteins were identified and subsequently grouped by functionality. Most prominent were changes in apoptosis signalling, cell structure and energy-metabolism. Alterations were confirmed by analysis of human biopsies from patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy.With the establishment of our in vitro disease model for ischemia injury target identification via proteomic research becomes independent from rare human material and will create new possibilities in cardiac research.

  1. Proteomic study of low-temperature responses in strawberry cultivars (Fragaria x ananassa) that differ in cold tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, Gage; Wilson, Robert C; Goodpaster, John V; Sønsteby, Anita; Lai, Xianyin; Witzmann, Frank A; You, Jin-Sam; Rohloff, Jens; Randall, Stephen K; Alsheikh, Muath

    2012-08-01

    To gain insight into the molecular basis contributing to overwintering hardiness, a comprehensive proteomic analysis comparing crowns of octoploid strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) cultivars that differ in freezing tolerance was conducted. Four cultivars were examined for freeze tolerance and the most cold-tolerant cultivar ('Jonsok') and least-tolerant cultivar ('Frida') were compared with a goal to reveal how freezing tolerance is achieved in this distinctive overwintering structure and to identify potential cold-tolerance-associated biomarkers. Supported by univariate and multivariate analysis, a total of 63 spots from two-dimensional electrophoresis analysis and 135 proteins from label-free quantitative proteomics were identified as significantly differentially expressed in crown tissue from the two strawberry cultivars exposed to 0-, 2-, and 42-d cold treatment. Proteins identified as cold-tolerance-associated included molecular chaperones, antioxidants/detoxifying enzymes, metabolic enzymes, pathogenesis-related proteins, and flavonoid pathway proteins. A number of proteins were newly identified as associated with cold tolerance. Distinctive mechanisms for cold tolerance were characterized for two cultivars. In particular, the 'Frida' cold response emphasized proteins specific to flavonoid biosynthesis, while the more freezing-tolerant 'Jonsok' had a more comprehensive suite of known stress-responsive proteins including those involved in antioxidation, detoxification, and disease resistance. The molecular basis for 'Jonsok'-enhanced cold tolerance can be explained by the constitutive level of a number of proteins that provide a physiological stress-tolerant poise.

  2. Differential expression of extracellular matrix proteins in senescent and young human fibroblasts: a comparative proteomics and microarray study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kyeong Eun; Kwon, Joseph; Rhim, Ji-Heon; Choi, Jong Soon; Kim, Seung Il; Lee, Seung-Hoon; Park, Junsoo; Jang, Ik-Soon

    2011-07-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) provides an essential structural framework for cell attachment, proliferation, and differentiation, and undergoes progressive changes during senescence. To investigate changes in protein expression in the extracellular matrix between young and senescent fibroblasts, we compared proteomic data (LTQ-FT) with cDNA microarray results. The peptide counts from the proteomics analysis were used to evaluate the level of ECM protein expression by young cells and senescent cells, and ECM protein expression data were compared with the microarray data. After completing the comparative analysis, we grouped the genes into four categories. Class I included genes with increased expression levels in both analyses, while class IV contained genes with reduced expression in both analyses. Class II and Class III contained genes with an inconsistent expression pattern. Finally, we validated the comparative analysis results by examining the expression level of the specific gene from each category using Western blot analysis and semiquantitative RT-PCR. Our results demonstrate that comparative analysis can be used to identify differentially expressed genes.

  3. Multicentric Validation of Proteomic Biomarkers in Urine Specific for Diabetic Nephropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alkhalaf, Alaa; Zurbig, Petra; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Bilo, Henk J. G.; Cerna, Marie; Fischer, Christine; Fuchs, Sebastian; Janssen, Bart; Medek, Karel; Mischak, Harald; Roob, Johannes M.; Rossing, Kasper; Rossing, Peter; Rychlik, Ivan; Sourij, Harald; Tiran, Beate; Winklhofer-Roob, Brigitte M.; Navis, Gerjan J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Urine proteome analysis is rapidly emerging as a tool for diagnosis and prognosis in disease states. For diagnosis of diabetic nephropathy (DN), urinary proteome analysis was successfully applied in a pilot study. The validity of the previously established proteomic biomarkers with respe

  4. Multivariate proteomic analysis of the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with peripheral neuropathic pain and healthy controls – a hypothesis-generating pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bäckryd E

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Emmanuel Bäckryd,1,2 Bijar Ghafouri,1,2 Anders K Carlsson,1,2 Patrik Olausson,1,2 Björn Gerdle1,2 1Division of Community Medicine, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; 2Pain and Rehabilitation Centre, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Centre, Region Östergötland, Linköping, SwedenAbstract: Pain medicine lacks objective biomarkers to guide diagnosis and treatment. Combining two-dimensional gel proteomics with multivariate data analysis by projection, we exploratively analyzed the cerebrospinal fluid of eleven patients with severe peripheral neuropathic pain due to trauma and/or surgery refractory to conventional treatment and eleven healthy controls. Using orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis, we identified a panel of 36 proteins highly discriminating between the two groups. Due to a possible confounding effect of age, a new model with age as outcome variable was computed for patients (n=11, and four out of 36 protein spots were excluded due to a probable influence of age. Of the 32 remaining proteins, the following seven had the highest discriminatory power between the two groups: an isoform of angiotensinogen (upregulated in patients, two isoforms of alpha-1-antitrypsin (downregulated in patients, three isoforms of haptoglobin (upregulated in patients, and one isoform of pigment epithelium-derived factor (downregulated in patients. It has recently been hypothesized that the renin–angiotensin system may play a role in the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain, and a clinical trial of an angiotensin II receptor antagonist was recently published. It is noteworthy that when searching for neuropathic pain biomarkers with a purely explorative methodology, it was indeed a renin–angiotensin system protein that had the highest discriminatory power between patients and controls in the present study. The results from this hypothesis

  5. Characterization of the porcine synovial fluid proteome and a comparison to the plasma proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennike, Tue Bjerg; Barnaby, Omar; Steen, Hanno;

    2015-01-01

    Synovial fluid is present in all joint cavities, and protects the articular cartilage surfaces in large by lubricating the joint, thus reducing friction. Several studies have described changes in the protein composition of synovial fluid in patients with joint disease. However, the protein...... concentration, content, and synovial fluid volume change dramatically during active joint diseases and inflammation, and the proteome composition of healthy synovial fluid is incompletely characterized. We performed a normative proteomics analysis of porcine synovial fluid, and report data from optimizing...... data used in the method optimization, human plasma proteomics data, and search results, have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PXD000935....

  6. Glycoproteins and Glycosylation Site Assignments in Cereal seed Proteomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dedvisitsakul, Plaipol

    The study of plant proteomes is important to further the understanding of biological processes and enhance the agronomical and nutritional value of crops and food products. To gain deeper understanding on the proteome level, it is important to characterize posttranslational modifications. Glycosy...

  7. Aspects of the barley seed proteome during development and germination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finnie, Christine; Maeda, K.; Østergaard, O.;

    2004-01-01

    Analysis of the water-soluble barley seed proteome has led to the identification of proteins by MS in the major spots on two-dimensional gels covering the pi ranges 4-7 and 6-11. This provides the basis for in-depth studies of proteome changes during seed development and germination, tissue...

  8. Urine proteomic profiling of uranium nephrotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malard, V.; Gaillard, J.C.; Sage, N. [CEA, DSV, IBEB, SBTN, Laboratoire de Biochimie des Systemes Perturbes (LBSP), Bagnols-sur-Ceze, F-30207 (France); Berenguer, F. [CEA, DSV, IBEB, SBTN, Laboratoire d' Etude des Proteines Cibles (LEPC), Bagnols-sur-Ceze, F-30207 (France); Quemeneur, E. [CEA, DSV, IBEB, SBTN, Bagnols-sur-Ceze, F-30207 (France)

    2009-07-01

    Uranium is used in many chemical forms in civilian and military industries and is a known nephro-toxicant. A key issue in monitoring occupational exposure is to be able to evaluate the potential damage to the body, particularly the kidney. In this study we used innovative proteomic techniques to analyse urinary protein modulation associated with acute uranium exposure in rats. Given that the rat urinary proteome has rarely been studied, we first identified 102 different proteins in normal urine, expanding the current proteome data set for this central animal in toxicology. Rats were exposed intravenously to uranyl nitrate at 2.5 and 5 mg/kg and samples were collected 24 h later. Using two complementary proteomic methods, a classic 2-DE approach and semi-quantitative SDS-PAGE-LC-MS/MS, 14 modulated proteins (7 with increased levels and 7 with decreased levels) were identified in urine after uranium exposure. Modulation of three of them was confirmed by western blot. Some of the modulated proteins corresponded to proteins already described in case of nephrotoxicity, and indicated a loss of glomerular permeability (albumin, alpha-1-anti-proteinase, sero-transferrin). Others revealed tubular damage, such as EGF and vitamin D-binding protein. A third category included proteins never described in urine as being associated with metal stress, such as ceruloplasmin. Urinary proteomics is thus a valuable tool to profile uranium toxicity non-invasively and could be very useful in follow-up in case of accidental exposure to uranium. (authors)

  9. Post-harvest proteomics and food security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedreschi, Romina; Lurie, Susan; Hertog, Maarten; Nicolaï, Bart; Mes, Jurriaan; Woltering, Ernst

    2013-06-01

    To guarantee sufficient food supply for a growing world population, efforts towards improving crop yield and plant resistance should be complemented with efforts to reduce post-harvest losses. Post-harvest losses are substantial and occur at different stages of the food chain in developed and developing countries. In recent years, a substantially increasing interest can be seen in the application of proteomics to understand post-harvest events. In the near future post-harvest proteomics will be poised to move from fundamental research to aiding the reduction of food losses. Proteomics research can help in reducing food losses through (i) identification and validation of gene products associated to specific quality traits supporting marker-assisted crop improvement programmes, (ii) delivering markers of initial quality that allow optimisation of distribution conditions and prediction of remaining shelf-life for decision support systems and (iii) delivering early detection tools of physiological or pathogen-related post-harvest problems. In this manuscript, recent proteomics studies on post-harvest and stress physiology are reviewed and discussed. Perspectives on future directions of post-harvest proteomics studies aiming to reduce food losses are presented.

  10. Proteomics of Eosinophil Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deane F. Mosher

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We recently identified and quantified >7,000 proteins in non-activated human peripheral blood eosinophils using liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS and described phosphoproteomic changes that accompany acute activation of eosinophils by interleukin-5 (IL5 (1. These data comprise a treasure trove of information about eosinophils. We illustrate the power of label-free LC–MS/MS quantification by considering four examples: complexity of eosinophil STATs, contribution of immunoproteasome subunits to eosinophil proteasomes, complement of integrin subunits, and contribution of platelet proteins originating from platelet–eosinophil complexes to the overall proteome. We describe how isobaric labeling enables robust sample-to-sample comparisons and relate the 220 phosphosites that changed significantly upon treatment with IL5 to previous studies of eosinophil activation. Finally, we review previous attempts to leverage the power of mass spectrometry to discern differences between eosinophils of healthy subjects and those with eosinophil-associated conditions and point out features of label-free quantification and isobaric labeling that are important in planning future mass spectrometric studies.

  11. Comparative study of transgenic and non-transgenic maize (Zea mays) flours commercialized in Brazil, focussing on proteomic analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Nádia; Barbosa, Herbert; Jacob, Silvana; Arruda, Marco

    2015-08-01

    Genetically modified foods are a major concern around the world due to the lack of information concerning their safety and health effects. This work evaluates differences, at the proteomic level, between two types of crop samples: transgenic (MON810 event with the Cry1Ab gene, which confers resistance to insects) and non-transgenic maize flour commercialized in Brazil. The 2-D DIGE technique revealed 99 differentially expressed spots, which were collected in 2-D PAGE gels and identified via mass spectrometry (nESI-QTOF MS/MS). The abundance of protein differences between the transgenic and non-transgenic samples could arise from genetic modification or as a result of an environmental influence pertaining to the commercial sample. The major functional category of proteins identified was related to disease/defense and, although differences were observed between samples, no toxins or allergenic proteins were found.

  12. Proteomics of Foodborne Bacterial Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagerquist, Clifton K.

    This chapter is intended to be a relatively brief overview of proteomic techniques currently in use for the identification and analysis of microorganisms with a special emphasis on foodborne pathogens. The chapter is organized as follows. First, proteomic techniques are introduced and discussed. Second, proteomic applications are presented specifically as they relate to the identification and qualitative/quantitative analysis of foodborne pathogens.

  13. Integrated and Quantitative Proteomics of Human Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakkioui, Y; Temel, Y; Chevet, E; Negroni, L

    2017-01-01

    Quantitative proteomics represents a powerful approach for the comprehensive analysis of proteins expressed under defined conditions. These properties have been used to investigate the proteome of disease states, including cancer. It has become a major subject of studies to apply proteomics for biomarker and therapeutic target identification. In the last decades, technical advances in mass spectrometry have increased the capacity of protein identification and quantification. Moreover, the analysis of posttranslational modification (PTM), especially phosphorylation, has allowed large-scale identification of biological mechanisms. Even so, increasing evidence indicates that global protein quantification is often insufficient for the explanation of biology and has shown to pose challenges in identifying new and robust biomarkers. As a consequence, to improve the accuracy of the discoveries made using proteomics in human tumors, it is necessary to combine (i) robust and reproducible methods for sample preparation allowing statistical comparison, (ii) PTM analyses in addition to global proteomics for additional levels of knowledge, and (iii) use of bioinformatics for decrypting protein list. Herein, we present technical specificities for samples preparation involving isobaric tag labeling, TiO2-based phosphopeptides enrichment and hydrazyde-based glycopeptides purification as well as the key points for the quantitative analysis and interpretation of the protein lists. The method is based on our experience with tumors analysis derived from hepatocellular carcinoma, chondrosarcoma, human embryonic intervertebral disk, and chordoma experiments.

  14. Introduction to mass spectrometry-based proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiesen, Rune; Bunkenborg, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has been widely applied to study biomolecules and one rapidly developing field is the global analysis of proteins, proteomics. Understanding and handling mass spectrometry data is a multifaceted task that requires many decisions to be made to get the most comprehensive information...... from an experiment. Later chapters in this book deal in-depth with various aspects of the process and how different tools can be applied to the many analytical challenges. This introductory chapter is intended as a basic introduction to mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics to set the scene...... for newcomers and give pointers to reference material. There are many applications of mass spectrometry in proteomics and each application is associated with some analytical choices, instrumental limitations and data processing steps that depend on the aim of the study and means of conducting it. Different...

  15. Structural Proteomics of Herpesviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baptiste Leroy

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Herpesviruses are highly prevalent viruses associated with numerous pathologies both in animal and human populations. Until now, most of the strategies used to prevent or to cure these infections have been unsuccessful because these viruses have developed numerous immune evasion mechanisms. Therefore, a better understanding of their complex lifecycle is needed. In particular, while the genome of numerous herpesviruses has been sequenced, the exact composition of virions remains unknown for most of them. Mass spectrometry has recently emerged as a central method and has permitted fundamental discoveries in virology. Here, we review mass spectrometry-based approaches that have recently allowed a better understanding of the composition of the herpesvirus virion. In particular, we describe strategies commonly used for proper sample preparation and fractionation to allow protein localization inside the particle but also to avoid contamination by nonstructural proteins. A collection of other important data regarding post-translational modifications or the relative abundance of structural proteins is also described. This review also discusses the poorly studied importance of host proteins in herpesvirus structural proteins and the necessity to develop a quantitative workflow to better understand the dynamics of the structural proteome. In the future, we hope that this collaborative effort will assist in the development of new strategies to fight these infections.

  16. Current advantages in the application of proteomics in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaiopoulou, Anna; Gazouli, Maria; Theodoropoulos, George; Zografos, George

    2012-11-01

    Since the formulation of the concept of proteomics, a plethora of proteomic technologies have been developed in order to study proteomes. In inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), several studies use proteomics to try to better understand the disease and discover molecules which can be used as biomarkers. Biomarkers should be able to be used for diagnosis, therapy and prognosis. Although several biomarkers have been discovered, few biomarkers have clinical value. In this review, we analyze and report the current use of proteomic techniques to highlight biomarkers characterizing IBD, and different stages of disease activity. We also report the biomarkers and their potential clinical value.

  17. Establishing Substantial Equivalence: Proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovegrove, Alison; Salt, Louise; Shewry, Peter R.

    Wheat is a major crop in world agriculture and is consumed after processing into a range of food products. It is therefore of great importance to determine the consequences (intended and unintended) of transgenesis in wheat and whether genetically modified lines are substantially equivalent to those produced by conventional plant breeding. Proteomic analysis is one of several approaches which can be used to address these questions. Two-dimensional PAGE (2D PAGE) remains the most widely available method for proteomic analysis, but is notoriously difficult to reproduce between laboratories. We therefore describe methods which have been developed as standard operating procedures in our laboratory to ensure the reproducibility of proteomic analyses of wheat using 2D PAGE analysis of grain proteins.

  18. [Proteomics in infectious diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quero, Sara; Párraga-Niño, Noemí; García-Núñez, Marian; Sabrià, Miquel

    2016-04-01

    Infectious diseases have a high incidence in the population, causing a major impact on global health. In vitro culture of microorganisms is the first technique applied for infection diagnosis which is laborious and time consuming. In recent decades, efforts have been focused on the applicability of "Omics" sciences, highlighting the progress provided by proteomic techniques in the field of infectious diseases. This review describes the management, processing and analysis of biological samples for proteomic research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  19. FORMULATION AND EVALUATION OF FLOATING IN SITU GEL BASED GASTRO RETENTIVE DRUG DELIVERY OF CIMETIDINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhargav D. Jayswal

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation deals with the formulation and evaluation of sodium alginate and pectin basedIn situ gel of Cimetidine. Sodium alginate and pectin were used as a polymer and CaCO3 was used as across-linking agent. In-situ forming polymeric formulations drug delivery systems is in sol form beforeadministration in the body, but once administered, undergoes gelation in-situ to form a gel. Theformulation of gel depends upon factors like temperature modulation, pH changes, presence of ions andultra-violet irradiation, from which drug gets released in sustained and controlled manner. The objectiveof this study was to develop a novel in- situ gel system for sustained drug delivery using naturalbiodegradable polymers. The system utilizes polymers that exhibit sol-to-gel phase transition due tochange in specific physico-chemical parameters. In-situ gel was formed at a biological pH. In vitrorelease studies were conducted in simulated gastric fluid and cumulative amount of drug release wasanalyzed by spectrophotometry. From designed set of experiments, it was evident that formulationcontaining 1.2% of sodium alginate and 1.5% of pectin control the release of drug for longer duration.The in-situ gel exhibited the expected, viscosity, drug content, pH, in vitro gelling capacity, in vitrofloating ability, water uptake ability and sustained drug release.The drug release from the in situ gelsfollows the fickian diffusion type of release.

  20. Proteomic analysis of oil bodies in mature Jatropha curcas seeds with different lipid content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Wang, Cuiping; Chen, Fan; Shen, Shihua

    2015-01-15

    To reveal the difference among three mature Jatropha curcas seeds (JcVH, variant with high lipid content; JcW, wild type and JcVL, variant with low lipid content) with different lipid content, comparative proteomics was employed to profile the changes of oil body (OB) associated protein species by using gels-based proteomic technique. Eighty-three protein species were successfully identified through LTQ-ES-MS/MS from mature JcW seeds purified OBs. Two-dimensional electrophoresis analysis of J. curcas OB associated protein species revealed they had essential interactions with other organelles and demonstrated that oleosin and caleosin were the most abundant OB structural protein species. Twenty-eight OB associated protein species showed significant difference among JcVH, JcW and JcVL according to statistical analysis. Complementary transient expression analysis revealed that calcium ion binding protein (CalBP) and glycine-rich RNA binding protein (GRP) were well targeted in OBs apart from the oleosins. This study demonstrated that ratio of lipid content to caleosins abundance was involved in the regulation of OB size, and the mutant induced by ethylmethylsulfone treatment might be related to the caleosin like protein species. These findings are important for biotechnological improvement with the aim to alter the lipid content in J. curcas seeds. The economic value of Jatropha curcas largely depends on the lipid content in seeds which are mainly stored in the special organelle called oil bodies (OBs). In consideration of the biological importance and applications of J. curcas OB in seeds, it is necessary to further explore the components and functions of J. curcas OBs. Although a previous study concerning the J. curcas OB proteome revealed oleosins were the major OB protein component and additional protein species were similar to those in other oil seed plants, these identified OB associated protein species were corresponding to the protein bands instead of protein

  1. A Review: Proteomics in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ze-Tan Chen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Although radiotherapy is generally effective in the treatment of major nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC, this treatment still makes approximately 20% of patients radioresistant. Therefore, the identification of blood or biopsy biomarkers that can predict the treatment response to radioresistance and that can diagnosis early stages of NPC would be highly useful to improve this situation. Proteomics is widely used in NPC for searching biomarkers and comparing differentially expressed proteins. In this review, an overview of proteomics with different samples related to NPC and common proteomics methods was made. In conclusion, identical proteins are sorted as follows: Keratin is ranked the highest followed by such proteins as annexin, heat shock protein, 14-3-3σ, nm-23 protein, cathepsin, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins, enolase, triosephosphate isomerase, stathmin, prohibitin, and vimentin. This ranking indicates that these proteins may be NPC-related proteins and have potential value for further studies.

  2. Proteomics and the dynamic plasma membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sprenger, Richard R; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    2010-01-01

    plasma membrane is of particular interest, by not only serving as a barrier between the "cell interior" and the external environment, but moreover by organizing and clustering essential components to enable dynamic responses to internal and external stimuli. Defining and characterizing the dynamic plasma...... membrane proteome is crucial for understanding fundamental biological processes, disease mechanisms and for finding drug targets. Protein identification, characterization of dynamic PTMs and protein-ligand interactions, and determination of transient changes in protein expression and composition are among...... the challenges in functional proteomic studies of the plasma membrane. We review the recent progress in MS-based plasma membrane proteomics by presenting key examples from eukaryotic systems, including mammals, yeast and plants. We highlight the importance of enrichment and quantification technologies required...

  3. Characterization of human pineal gland proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yelamanchi, Soujanya D; Kumar, Manish; Madugundu, Anil K; Gopalakrishnan, Lathika; Dey, Gourav; Chavan, Sandip; Sathe, Gajanan; Mathur, Premendu P; Gowda, Harsha; Mahadevan, Anita; Shankar, Susarla K; Prasad, T S Keshava

    2016-11-15

    The pineal gland is a neuroendocrine gland located at the center of the brain. It is known to regulate various physiological functions in the body through secretion of the neurohormone melatonin. Comprehensive characterization of the human pineal gland proteome has not been undertaken to date. We employed a high-resolution mass spectrometry-based approach to characterize the proteome of the human pineal gland. A total of 5874 proteins were identified from the human pineal gland in this study. Of these, 5820 proteins were identified from the human pineal gland for the first time. Interestingly, 1136 proteins from the human pineal gland were found to contain a signal peptide domain, which indicates the secretory nature of these proteins. An unbiased global proteomic profile of this biomedically important organ should benefit molecular research to unravel the role of the pineal gland in neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases.

  4. Oxidative stress and bivalves: a proteomic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B McDonagh

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Bivalves are of major importance in aquatic ecology, aquaculture, are widely used as sentinel species in environmental toxicology and show remarkable plasticity to molecular oxygen. Excess reactive oxygen species (ROS arising from molecular oxygen can cause oxidative stress and this is also a consequence of exposure to many common environmental pollutants. Indices of oxidative stress have therefore found favor as biomarkers of exposure and effect in environmental toxicology. However, there is a growing body of literature on the use of discovery-led proteomics methods to detect oxidative stress in bivalves. This is because proteins absorb up to 70 % of ROS leading to complication of the proteome. This article explores the background to these developments and assesses the practice and future potential of proteomics in the study of oxidative stress in bivalves.

  5. Proteomic study of frontotemporal dementia%额颞叶痴呆的蛋白质组研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭立威; 杨国锋; 纪建国; 王鲁宁

    2011-01-01

    目的 为深入理解额颞叶痴呆分子机制并寻找诊断治疗该疾病的蛋白质标记物,选取5例经病理证实的额颞叶痴呆患者与4例无神经系统疾病老年人尸检脑标本进行蛋白质组学研究.方法 死亡24 h内新鲜取材的尸检额叶、颞叶蛋白质以固相pH梯度等电聚焦为第一向,SDS-PAGE垂直电泳为第二向进行双向电泳(2-DE),图象分析软件Imagemaster 2D Elite分析电泳图谱,MALDI-TOF质谱或MALDI-TOF/TOF串联质谱鉴定蛋白质.结果 18种蛋白质的表达量在额颢叶痴呆患者与正常老年人显著不同.12个在额颞叶痴呆表达量上调的蛋白质被鉴定为3-磷酸甘油醛脱氢酶、尿嘧啶DNA糖苷水解酶、Cu-Zn超氧化物歧化酶、异柠檬酸脱氢酶亚单位、synaptotagmin I、Peroxiredoxin2、胶质纤维酸性蛋白、P25 alpha、烯酰辅酶A水合酶短链1、吡哆醇-5′-磁酸氧化酶、Mn超氧化物歧化酶、α-烯醇化酶;6个在额颞叶痴呆表达量下调的蛋白质被鉴定为抗氧化蛋白2(酸性钙离子依赖型磷脂酶A)、铁蛋白H链、谷氨酸脱氢酶、肽基脯氨酸顺反异构酶A、血清白蛋白前体、二氢嘧啶酶相关蛋白2.结论 额颞叶痴呆患者脑组织中神绛纤维缠结相关蛋白、氧应激蛋白、凋亡相关蛋白及重要代谢酶的表达发生变化,有助于深入理解额颞叶痴呆分子机制并有望在额颞叶痴呆的早期诊断及新药开发上发挥作用.%Objective To investigate molecular mechanisms of frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Methods Comparative proteomic analysis of brain proteins was employed to study 5 frontotemporal dementia patients compared to 4 controls. The brains of subjects who died without clinical or pathological involvement of nervous system and brains of frontotemporal dementia patients were obtained at autopsy. The brain proteins extracted with mixture of urea, CHAPS, DTT. IPG buffer and protease inhibitors were run immobilized pH gradient (IPG

  6. Trade-Off between Growth and Carbohydrate Accumulation in Nutrient-Limited Arthrospira sp. PCC 8005 Studied by Integrating Transcriptomic and Proteomic Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depraetere, Orily; Deschoenmaeker, Frédéric; Badri, Hanène; Monsieurs, Pieter; Foubert, Imogen; Leys, Natalie; Wattiez, Ruddy; Muylaert, Koenraad

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacteria have a strong potential for biofuel production due to their ability to accumulate large amounts of carbohydrates. Nitrogen (N) stress can be used to increase the content of carbohydrates in the biomass, but it is expected to reduce biomass productivity. To study this trade-off between carbohydrate accumulation and biomass productivity, we characterized the biomass productivity, biomass composition as well as the transcriptome and proteome of the cyanobacterium Arthrospira sp. PCC 8005 cultured under N-limiting and N-replete conditions. N limitation resulted in a large increase in the carbohydrate content of the biomass (from 14 to 74%) and a decrease in the protein content (from 37 to 10%). Analyses of fatty acids indicated that no lipids were accumulated under N-limited conditions. Nevertheless, it did not affect the biomass productivity of the culture up to five days after N was depleted from the culture medium. Transcriptomic and proteomic analysis indicated that de novo protein synthesis was down-regulated in the N-limited culture. Proteins were degraded and partly converted into carbohydrates through gluconeogenesis. Cellular N derived from protein degradation was recycled through the TCA and GS-GOGAT cycles. In addition, photosynthetic energy production and carbon fixation were both down-regulated, while glycogen synthesis was up-regulated. Our results suggested that N limitation resulted in a redirection of photosynthetic energy from protein synthesis to glycogen synthesis. The fact that glycogen synthesis has a lower energy demand than protein synthesis might explain why Arthrospira is able to achieve a similar biomass productivity under N-limited as under N-replete conditions despite the fact that photosynthetic energy production was impaired by N limitation.

  7. Trade-Off between Growth and Carbohydrate Accumulation in Nutrient-Limited Arthrospira sp. PCC 8005 Studied by Integrating Transcriptomic and Proteomic Approaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orily Depraetere

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria have a strong potential for biofuel production due to their ability to accumulate large amounts of carbohydrates. Nitrogen (N stress can be used to increase the content of carbohydrates in the biomass, but it is expected to reduce biomass productivity. To study this trade-off between carbohydrate accumulation and biomass productivity, we characterized the biomass productivity, biomass composition as well as the transcriptome and proteome of the cyanobacterium Arthrospira sp. PCC 8005 cultured under N-limiting and N-replete conditions. N limitation resulted in a large increase in the carbohydrate content of the biomass (from 14 to 74% and a decrease in the protein content (from 37 to 10%. Analyses of fatty acids indicated that no lipids were accumulated under N-limited conditions. Nevertheless, it did not affect the biomass productivity of the culture up to five days after N was depleted from the culture medium. Transcriptomic and proteomic analysis indicated that de novo protein synthesis was down-regulated in the N-limited culture. Proteins were degraded and partly converted into carbohydrates through gluconeogenesis. Cellular N derived from protein degradation was recycled through the TCA and GS-GOGAT cycles. In addition, photosynthetic energy production and carbon fixation were both down-regulated, while glycogen synthesis was up-regulated. Our results suggested that N limitation resulted in a redirection of photosynthetic energy from protein synthesis to glycogen synthesis. The fact that glycogen synthesis has a lower energy demand than protein synthesis might explain why Arthrospira is able to achieve a similar biomass productivity under N-limited as under N-replete conditions despite the fact that photosynthetic energy production was impaired by N limitation.

  8. The Presence of Pretreated Lignocellulosic Solids from Birch during Saccharomyces cerevisiae Fermentations Leads to Increased Tolerance to Inhibitors--A Proteomic Study of the Effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Koppram

    Full Text Available The fermentation performance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the cellulose to ethanol conversion process is largely influenced by the components of pretreated biomass. The insoluble solids in pretreated biomass predominantly constitute cellulose, lignin, and -to a lesser extent- hemicellulose. It is important to understand the effects of water-insoluble solids (WIS on yeast cell physiology and metabolism for the overall process optimization. In the presence of synthetic lignocellulosic inhibitors, we observed a reduced lag phase and enhanced volumetric ethanol productivity by S. cerevisiae CEN.PK 113-7D when the minimal medium was supplemented with WIS of pretreated birch or spruce and glucose as the carbon source. To investigate the underlying molecular reasons for the effects of WIS, we studied the response of WIS at the proteome level in yeast cells in the presence of acetic acid as an inhibitor. Comparisons were made with cells grown in the presence of acetic acid but without WIS in the medium. Altogether, 729 proteins were detected and quantified, of which 246 proteins were significantly up-regulated and 274 proteins were significantly down-regulated with a fold change≥1.2 in the presence of WIS compared to absence of WIS. The cells in the presence of WIS up-regulated several proteins related to cell wall, glycolysis, electron transport chain, oxidative stress response, oxygen and radical detoxification and unfolded protein response; and down-regulated most proteins related to biosynthetic pathways including amino acid, purine, isoprenoid biosynthesis, aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and pentose phosphate pathway. Overall, the identified differentially regulated proteins may indicate that the likelihood of increased ATP generation in the presence of WIS was used to defend against acetic acid stress at the expense of reduced biomass formation. Although, comparative proteomics of cells with and without WIS in the acetic acid containing medium

  9. Improved rheological properties of dimorphic magnetorheological gels based on flower-like carbonyl iron particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Pingan; Yu, Miao; Luo, Hongping; Fu, Jie; Qu, Hang; Xie, Yuanpeng

    2017-09-01

    In this study, a new kind of dimorphic magnetorheological gels (MRGs) based on the conventional carbonyl iron particles (CIPs) and flower-like CIPs have been prepared for improving the yield stress and dynamic mechanical properties. The flower-like CIPs are synthesized by a simple and facile in situ reduction method. Characterization results indicate that the flower-like CIPs are synthesized successfully and a layer of uniform and continuous Fe nanosheets are grown on the surface of the raw microsphere CIPs. In addition, the flower-like CIPs exhibit excellent magnetic properties, which the saturated mass magnetization (Ms) can achieve 168.76 emu/g. In order to study the influence of mass fraction of flower-like CIPs on the rheological properties of this dimorphic MRGs, a series of polyurethane-based dimorphic MRGs are prepared by partial substitution of the CIPs with as-synthesized flower-like CIPs, and the MR properties of them are systematically investigated under both oscillatory and rotational shear modes. The experimental results indicate that, with 8 wt% flower-like CIPs, the maximum dynamic yield stresses and magneto-induced shear yield stress of dimorphic MRGs are 58.11 kPa and 54.53 kPa, ∼1.39 and ∼1.37 times of the MRG without flower-like CIPs at the same magnetic particle content. Moreover, the average loss factor and the loss factor under 1 T of the sample (flower-like CIPs weight content 8 wt%) are 0.36 and 0.07, which are approximately 1.71 and 2.71 times than that in the non-substitution sample. The increased loss factor is beneficial to improving the vibration reduction effect of MRGs of damping devices in the whole magnetic field region. Furthermore, the possible mechanism for the enhanced MR properties in dimorphic MRGs is proposed. In summary, this work is expected to promote the design and application of MRG devices.

  10. Low molecular weight heparin gels, based on nanoparticles, for topical delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loira-Pastoriza, C; Sapin-Minet, A; Diab, R; Grossiord, J L; Maincent, P

    2012-04-15

    A commercial suspension of nanoparticles (Eudragit RS 30D) was used to manufacture a gel for topical application. Gels were prepared by mixing a polycationic polymer (Eudragit(®) RS 30D) and a low molecular weight heparin (LMWH), an antithrombotic agent. Gels formed spontaneously at a ratio of 1:1 as a result of electrostatic interactions between the polyanionic drug and the polycationic polymer. Different types of heparin were used: Bemiparin, Enoxaparin (Lovenox), Nadroparin (Fraxiparin) and Tinzaparin (Innohep). Several LMWH concentrations were tested. Rheological measurements were performed to investigate the gel behavior. Gel formation was confirmed by dynamic rheological measurements as the elastic modulus (G') was higher than the viscous one (G″). The amount of heparin incorporated into the gel matrix was determined. A maximum of incorporation (100%) was reached using a heparin solution of 600 IU/mL. The release kinetics of LMWH from the gel were also studied. Regardless of the LMWH used in the formulation, a biphasic release profile was observed. Accordingly, a burst effect was observed. Afterwards, the release rate became steady. The penetration of the LMWH through the dermal barrier was also investigated. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A functionalizable reverse thermal gel based on a polyurethane/PEG block copolymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Daewon; Wu, Wei; Wang, Yadong

    2010-01-01

    Injectable reverse thermal gels have great potentials as biomaterials for tissue engineering and drug delivery. However, most existing gels lack functional groups that can be modified with biomolecules that can guide cell/material interactions. We created an amine-functionalized ABA block copolymer, poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(serinol hexamethylene urethane), or ESHU. This reverse thermal gel consists of a hydrophobic block (B): poly(serinol hexamethylene urethane) and a hydrophilic block (A): poly(ethylene glycol). The polymer was characterized by GPC, FTIR and 1H FTNMR. Rheological study demonstrated that ESHU solution in phosphate-buffered saline initiated phase transition at 32°C and reached maximum elastic modulus at 37°C. The in vitro degradation tests performed in PBS and cholesterol esterase solutions revealed that the polymer was hydrolyzable and the presence of cholesterol esterase greatly accelerated the hydrolysis. The in vitro cytotoxicity tests carried out using baboon smooth muscle cells demonstrated that ESHU had good cytocompatibility with cell viability indistinguishable from tissue culture treated polystyrene. Subcutaneous implantation in rats revealed well tolerated accurate inflammatory response with moderate ED-1 positive macrophages in the early stages, which largely resolved 4 weeks post-implantation. We functionalized ESHU with a hexapeptide, Ile-Lys-Val-Ala-Val-Ser (IKVAVS), which gelled rapidly at body temperature. We expect this new platform of functionalizable reverse thermal gels to provide versatile biomaterials in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:20937526

  12. Comparison of Dry and Gel Based Electrodes for P300 Brain–Computer Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guger, Christoph; Krausz, Gunther; Allison, Brendan Z.; Edlinger, Guenter

    2012-01-01

    Most brain–computer interfaces (BCIs) rely on one of three types of signals in the electroencephalogram (EEG): P300s, steady-state visually evoked potentials, and event-related desynchronization. EEG is typically recorded non-invasively with electrodes mounted on the human scalp using conductive electrode gel for optimal impedance and data quality. The use of electrode gel entails serious problems that are especially pronounced in real-world settings when experts are not available. Some recent work has introduced dry electrode systems that do not require gel, but often introduce new problems such as comfort and signal quality. The principal goal of this study was to assess a new dry electrode BCI system in a very common task: spelling with a P300 BCI. A total of 23 subjects used a P300 BCI to spell the word “LUCAS” while receiving real-time, closed-loop feedback. The dry system yielded classification accuracies that were similar to those obtained with gel systems. All subjects completed a questionnaire after data recording, and all subjects stated that the dry system was not uncomfortable. This is the first field validation of a dry electrode P300 BCI system, and paves the way for new research and development with EEG recording systems that are much more practical and convenient in field settings than conventional systems. PMID:22586362

  13. Comparison of dry and gel based electrodes for p300 brain-computer interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guger, Christoph; Krausz, Gunther; Allison, Brendan Z; Edlinger, Guenter

    2012-01-01

    Most brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) rely on one of three types of signals in the electroencephalogram (EEG): P300s, steady-state visually evoked potentials, and event-related desynchronization. EEG is typically recorded non-invasively with electrodes mounted on the human scalp using conductive electrode gel for optimal impedance and data quality. The use of electrode gel entails serious problems that are especially pronounced in real-world settings when experts are not available. Some recent work has introduced dry electrode systems that do not require gel, but often introduce new problems such as comfort and signal quality. The principal goal of this study was to assess a new dry electrode BCI system in a very common task: spelling with a P300 BCI. A total of 23 subjects used a P300 BCI to spell the word "LUCAS" while receiving real-time, closed-loop feedback. The dry system yielded classification accuracies that were similar to those obtained with gel systems. All subjects completed a questionnaire after data recording, and all subjects stated that the dry system was not uncomfortable. This is the first field validation of a dry electrode P300 BCI system, and paves the way for new research and development with EEG recording systems that are much more practical and convenient in field settings than conventional systems.

  14. Comparison of dry and gel based electrodes for P300 brain-computer interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph eGuger

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Most brain-computer interfaces (BCI rely on one of three types of signals in the electroencephalogram (EEG: P300s, steady-state visually evoked potentials (SSVEP, and event-related desynchronization (ERD. EEG is typically recorded non-invasively with electrodes mounted on the human scalp using conductive electrode gel for optimal impedance and data quality. The use of electrode gel entails serious problems that are especially pronounced in real-world settings when experts are not available. Some recent work has introduced dry electrode systems that do not require gel, but often introduce new problems such as comfort and signal quality. The principal goal of this study was to assess a new dry electrode BCI system in a very common task: spelling with a P300 BCI. A total of 23 subjects used a P300 BCI to spell the word LUCAS while receiving realtime, closed-loop feedback. The dry system yielded classification accuracies that were similar to those obtained with gel systems. All subjects completed a questionnaire after data recording, and all subjects stated that the dry system was not uncomfortable. This is the first field validation of a dry electrode P300 BCI system, and paves the way for new research and development with EEG recording systems that are much more practical and convenient in field settings than conventional systems.

  15. Sol-gel based TiO2 thin film deposition on frustules towards facile and scalable manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, A.; Wang, J.; Zhang, W.; McNaughton, R.; Anderson, S.; Zhang, X.

    2016-11-01

    Diatom frustules have drawn a lot of attention from engineering researchers in the past decades. As a type of biomaterial, diatom frustules have been applied in a variety of areas such as biosensors and solar cells due to their excellent material and optical properties. Titanium dioxide (TiO2), on the other hand, is also semiconductor material and photocatalyst, micro and nanoparticles of which can be found in applications such as dye sensitised solar cells (DSSC). It has been demonstrated that by using diatom frustule-TiO2 composite particles in DSSCs, the performance of the solar cells could be increased. In this paper, we introduce a sol- gel based method to deposit TiO2 layers on the surface of diatom frustules. TiO2 nanoparticles were deposited on the surface of the frustules. After a subsequent annealing process, TiO2 crystal grains were formed. The method in this paper has the potential for scalable manufacturing of frustule-TiO2 composite materials for future solar cell applications.

  16. Fabrication and characterization of size-controlled single-crystal-like PZT nanofibers by sol–gel based electrospinning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Juan; Gao, Qian; He, Haiyan; Li, Xiang, E-mail: xiang.li@zju.edu.cn; Ren, Zhaohui; Liu, Yong; Shen, Ge; Xu, Gang; Zhang, Xiwen; Han, Gaorong, E-mail: hgr@zju.edu.cn

    2013-12-05

    Highlights: •Single-crystal-like PZT nanofibers were fabricated by electrospinning and calcination. •Fiber diameter was precisely controlled by solution viscosity and electrospinning parameters. •Pyrolysis is a key factor for fabrication of single-crystal-like structure. -- Abstract: Size-controlled single-crystal-like lead zirconate titanate (PbZr{sub 0.52}Ti{sub 0.48}O{sub 3}, PZT) ceramic fibers have been successfully prepared by sol–gel based electrospinning and subsequent calcination process, and their morphology, crystal structure have been characterized at nanoscale. The fiber diameter can be precisely controlled from ∼50 to 540 nm by varying the PVP concentration and electrospinning process parameters. The crystal structure of the nanofibers pyrolyzed at 400 °C for 0.5 h and calcined at 650 °C for 2 h is proved to be single-crystal-like tetragonal perovskite phase. A formation mechanism is also discussed based on the thermal decomposition process, effect of the calcination and pyrolysis procedure, using the thermogravimetry/differential scanning caborimetry (TG/DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It is found that the pyrolysis procedure is a critical factor for the fabrication of single-crystal-like structure PZT nanofibers using electrospinning.

  17. Environmental Proteomics: Changes in the Proteome of Marine Organisms in Response to Environmental Stress, Pollutants, Infection, Symbiosis, and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomanek, Lars

    2011-01-01

    Environmental proteomics, the study of changes in the abundance of proteins and their post-translational modifications, has become a powerful tool for generating hypotheses regarding how the environment affects the biology of marine organisms. Proteomics discovers hitherto unknown cellular effects of environmental stressors such as changes in thermal, osmotic, and anaerobic conditions. Proteomic analyses have advanced the characterization of the biological effects of pollutants and identified comprehensive and pollutant-specific sets of biomarkers, especially those highlighting post-translational modifications. Proteomic analyses of infected organisms have highlighted the broader changes occurring during immune responses and how the same pathways are attenuated during the maintenance of symbiotic relationships. Finally, proteomic changes occurring during the early life stages of marine organisms emphasize the importance of signaling events during development in a rapidly changing environment. Changes in proteins functioning in energy metabolism, cytoskeleton, protein stabilization and turnover, oxidative stress, and signaling are common responses to environmental change.

  18. Aureolib - a proteome signature library: towards an understanding of staphylococcus aureus pathophysiology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Fuchs

    Full Text Available Gel-based proteomics is a powerful approach to study the physiology of Staphylococcus aureus under various growth restricting conditions. We analyzed 679 protein spots from a reference 2-dimensional gel of cytosolic proteins of S. aureus COL by mass spectrometry resulting in 521 different proteins. 4,692 time dependent protein synthesis profiles were generated by exposing S. aureus to nine infection-related stress and starvation stimuli (H2O2, diamide, paraquat, NO, fermentation, nitrate respiration, heat shock, puromycin, mupirocin. These expression profiles are stored in an online resource called Aureolib (http://www.aureolib.de. Moreover, information on target genes of 75 regulators and regulatory elements were included in the database. Cross-comparisons of this extensive data collection of protein synthesis profiles using the tools implemented in Aureolib lead to the identification of stress and starvation specific marker proteins. Altogether, 226 protein synthesis profiles showed induction ratios of 2.5-fold or higher under at least one of the tested conditions with 157 protein synthesis profiles specifically induced in response to a single stimulus. The respective proteins might serve as marker proteins for the corresponding stimulus. By contrast, proteins whose synthesis was increased or repressed in response to more than four stimuli are rather exceptional. The only protein that was induced by six stimuli is the universal stress protein SACOL1759. Most strikingly, cluster analyses of synthesis profiles of proteins differentially synthesized under at least one condition revealed only in rare cases a grouping that correlated with known regulon structures. The most prominent examples are the GapR, Rex, and CtsR regulon. In contrast, protein synthesis profiles of proteins belonging to the CodY and σ(B regulon are widely distributed. In summary, Aureolib is by far the most comprehensive protein expression database for S. aureus and provides

  19. Unraveling pancreatic islet biology by quantitative proteomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jianying; Dann, Geoffrey P.; Liew, Chong W.; Smith, Richard D.; Kulkarni, Rohit N.; Qian, Weijun

    2011-08-01

    The pancreatic islets of Langerhans play a critical role in maintaining blood glucose homeostasis by secreting insulin and several other important peptide hormones. Impaired insulin secretion due to islet dysfunction is linked to the pathogenesis underlying both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Over the past 5 years, emerging proteomic technologies have been applied to dissect the signaling pathways that regulate islet functions and gain an understanding of the mechanisms of islet dysfunction relevant to diabetes. Herein, we briefly review some of the recent quantitative proteomic studies involving pancreatic islets geared towards gaining a better understanding of islet biology relevant to metabolic diseases.

  20. The minotaur proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunkenborg, Jakob; García, Guadalupe Espadas; Paz, Marcia Ivonne Peña;

    2010-01-01

    Cell culture is a fundamental tool in proteomics where mammalian cells are cultured in vitro using a growth medium often supplemented with 5-15% FBS. Contamination by bovine proteins is difficult to avoid because of adherence to the plastic vessel and the cultured cells. We have generated peptide...

  1. Shaping the mitochondrial proteome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gabaldon, T.; Huynen, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    Mitochondria are eukaryotic organelles that originated from a single bacterial endosymbiosis some 2 billion years ago. The transition from the ancestral endosymbiont to the modern mitochondrion has been accompanied by major changes in its protein content, the so-called proteome. These changes

  2. Xylem sap proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bernonville, Thomas Dugé; Albenne, Cécile; Arlat, Matthieu; Hoffmann, Laurent; Lauber, Emmanuelle; Jamet, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Proteomic analysis of xylem sap has recently become a major field of interest to understand several biological questions related to plant development and responses to environmental clues. The xylem sap appears as a dynamic fluid undergoing changes in its proteome upon abiotic and biotic stresses. Unlike cell compartments which are amenable to purification in sufficient amount prior to proteomic analysis, the xylem sap has to be collected in particular conditions to avoid contamination by intracellular proteins and to obtain enough material. A model plant like Arabidopsis thaliana is not suitable for such an analysis because efficient harvesting of xylem sap is difficult. The analysis of the xylem sap proteome also requires specific procedures to concentrate proteins and to focus on proteins predicted to be secreted. Indeed, xylem sap proteins appear to be synthesized and secreted in the root stele or to originate from dying differentiated xylem cells. This chapter describes protocols to collect xylem sap from Brassica species and to prepare total and N-glycoprotein extracts for identification of proteins by mass spectrometry analyses and bioinformatics.

  3. A comparative proteomic study of human skin suction blister fluid from healthy individuals using immunodepletion and iTRAQ labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, André C; Breitwieser, Florian P; Fischer, Heinz; Schuster, Christopher; Brandt, Oliver; Colinge, Jacques; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Stingl, Georg; Elbe-Bürger, Adelheid; Bennett, Keiryn L

    2012-07-06

    Aberrations in skin morphology and functionality can cause acute and chronic skin-related diseases that are the focus of dermatological research. Mechanically induced skin suction blister fluid may serve as a potential, alternative human body fluid for quantitative mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics in order to assist in the understanding of the mechanisms and causes underlying skin-related diseases. The combination of abundant-protein removal with iTRAQ technology and multidimensional fractionation techniques improved the number of identified protein groups. A relative comparison of a cohort of 8 healthy volunteers was thus recruited in order to assess the net variability encountered in a healthy scenario. The technology enabled the identification, to date, of the highest number of reported protein groups (739) with concomitant relative quantitative data for over 90% of all proteins with high reproducibility and accuracy. The use of iTRAQ 8-plex resulted in a 66% decrease in protein identifications but, despite this, provided valuable insight into interindividual differences of the healthy control samples. The geometric mean ratio was close to 1 with 95% of all ratios ranging between 0.45 and 2.05 and a calculated mean coefficient of variation of 15.8%, indicating a lower biological variance than that reported for plasma or urine. By applying a multistep sample processing, the obtained sensitivity and accuracy of quantitative MS analysis demonstrates the prospective value of the approach in future research into skin diseases.

  4. Proteomic study participating the enhancement of growth and salt tolerance of bottle gourd rootstock-grafted watermelon seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yanjuan; Wang, Liping; Tian, Jing; Li, Jing; Sun, Jin; He, Lizhong; Guo, Shirong; Tezuka, Takafumi

    2012-09-01

    An insertion grafting technique to do research on salt tolerance was applied using watermelon (Citrullus lanatus [Thunb.] Mansf. cv. Xiuli) as a scion and bottle gourd (Lagenaria siceraria Standl. cv. Chaofeng Kangshengwang) as a rootstock. Rootstock-grafting significantly relieved the inhibition of growth and photosynthesis induced by salt stress in watermelon plants. Proteomic analysis revealed 40 different expressed proteins in response to rootstock-grafting and/or salt stress. These proteins were involved in Calvin cycle, amino acids biosynthesis, carbohydrate and energy metabolism, ROS defense, hormonal biosynthesis and signal transduction. Most of these proteins were up-regulated by rootstock-grafting and/or susceptible to salt stress. The enhancement of the metabolic activities of Calvin cycle, biosynthesis of amino acids, carotenoids and peroxisomes, glycolytic pathway and tricarboxylic acid cycle will probably contribute to intensify the biomass and photosynthetic capacity in rootstock-grafted seedlings under condition without salt. The accumulation of key enzymes included in these biological processes described above seems to play an important role in the enhancement of salt tolerance of rootstock-grafted seedlings. Furthermore, leucine-rich repeat transmembrane protein kinase and phospholipase may be involved in transmitting the internal and external stimuli induced by grafting and/or salt stress.

  5. Short communication: Evaluation of a sol-gel-based stainless steel surface modification to reduce fouling and biofilm formation during pasteurization of milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dylan Zhe; Jindal, Shivali; Amamcharla, Jayendra; Anand, Sanjeev; Metzger, Lloyd

    2017-04-01

    Milk fouling and biofilms are common problems in the dairy industry across many types of processing equipment. One way to reduce milk fouling and biofilms is to modify the characteristics of milk contact surfaces. This study examines the viability of using Thermolon (Porcelain Industries Inc., Dickson, TN), a sol-gel-based surface modification of stainless steel, during thermal processing of milk. We used stainless steel 316L (control) and sol-gel-modified coupons in this study to evaluate fouling behavior and bacterial adhesion. The surface roughness as measured by an optical profiler indicated that the control coupons had a slightly smoother finish. Contact angle measurements showed that the modified surface led to a higher water contact angle, suggesting a more hydrophobic surface. The modified surface also had a lower surface energy (32.4 ± 1.4 mN/m) than the control surface (41.36 ± 2.7 mN/m). We evaluated the susceptibility of control and modified stainless steel coupons to fouling in a benchtop plate heat exchanger. We observed a significant reduction in the amount of fouled layer on modified surfaces. We found an average fouling weight of 19.21 mg/cm(2) and 0.37 mg/cm(2) on the control and modified stainless steel coupons, respectively. We also examined the adhesion of Bacillus and biofilm formation, and observed that the modified stainless steel surface offered greater resistance to biofilm formation. Overall, the Thermolon-modified surface showed potential in the thermal processing of milk, offering significantly lower fouling and bacterial attachment than the control surface.

  6. Genomes to Proteomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panisko, Ellen A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Grigoriev, Igor [USDOE Joint Genome Inst., Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Daly, Don S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Baker, Scott E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2009-03-01

    Biologists are awash with genomic sequence data. In large part, this is due to the rapid acceleration in the generation of DNA sequence that occurred as public and private research institutes raced to sequence the human genome. In parallel with the large human genome effort, mostly smaller genomes of other important model organisms were sequenced. Projects following on these initial efforts have made use of technological advances and the DNA sequencing infrastructure that was built for the human and other organism genome projects. As a result, the genome sequences of many organisms are available in high quality draft form. While in many ways this is good news, there are limitations to the biological insights that can be gleaned from DNA sequences alone; genome sequences offer only a bird's eye view of the biological processes endemic to an organism or community. Fortunately, the genome sequences now being produced at such a high rate can serve as the foundation for other global experimental platforms such as proteomics. Proteomic methods offer a snapshot of the proteins present at a point in time for a given biological sample. Current global proteomics methods combine enzymatic digestion, separations, mass spectrometry and database searching for peptide identification. One key aspect of proteomics is the prediction of peptide sequences from mass spectrometry data. Global proteomic analysis uses computational matching of experimental mass spectra with predicted spectra based on databases of gene models that are often generated computationally. Thus, the quality of gene models predicted from a genome sequence is crucial in the generation of high quality peptide identifications. Once peptides are identified they can be assigned to their parent protein. Proteins identified as expressed in a given experiment are most useful when compared to other expressed proteins in a larger biological context or biochemical pathway. In this chapter we will discuss the automatic

  7. Serum Proteome Signature of Radiation Response: Upregulation of Inflammation-Related Factors and Downregulation of Apolipoproteins and Coagulation Factors in Cancer Patients Treated With Radiation Therapy—A Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widlak, Piotr, E-mail: widlak@io.gliwice.pl [Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Gliwice Branch, Gliwice (Poland); Jelonek, Karol; Wojakowska, Anna; Pietrowska, Monika [Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Gliwice Branch, Gliwice (Poland); Polanska, Joanna [Institute of Automatics Control, Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice (Poland); Marczak, Łukasz [Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences, Poznan (Poland); Miszczyk, Leszek; Składowski, Krzysztof [Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Gliwice Branch, Gliwice (Poland)

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: Ionizing radiation affects the proteome of irradiated cells and tissue, yet data concerning changes induced during radiation therapy (RT) in human blood are fragmentary and inconclusive. We aimed to identify features of serum proteome and associated processes involved in response to partial body irradiation during cancer treatment. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients with head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) and 20 patients with prostate cancer received definitive intensity modulated RT. Blood samples were collected before RT, just after RT, and 1 month after the end of RT. Complete serum proteome was analyzed in individual samples, using a shotgun liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry approach which allowed identification of approximately 450 proteins. Approximately 100 unique proteins were quantified in all samples after exclusion of immunoglobulins, and statistical significance of differences among consecutive samples was assessed. Processes associated with quantified proteins and their functional interactions were predicted using gene ontology tools. Results: RT-induced changes were marked in the HNSCC patient group: 22 upregulated and 33 downregulated proteins were detected in post-RT sera. Most of the changes reversed during follow-up, yet levels of some proteins remained affected 1 month after the end of RT. RT-upregulated proteins were associated with acute phase, inflammatory response, and complement activation. RT-downregulated proteins were associated with transport and metabolism of lipids (plasma apolipoproteins) and blood coagulation. RT-induced changes were much weaker in prostate cancer patients, which corresponded to differences in acute radiation toxicity observed in both groups. Nevertheless, general patterns of RT-induced sera proteome changes were similar in both of the groups of cancer patients. Conclusions: In this pilot study, we proposed to identify a molecular signature of radiation response, based on specific

  8. Proteomics of industrial fungi: trends and insights for biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, José Miguel P Ferreira; de Graaff, Leo H

    2011-01-01

    Filamentous fungi are widely known for their industrial applications, namely, the production of food-processing enzymes and metabolites such as antibiotics and organic acids. In the past decade, the full genome sequencing of filamentous fungi increased the potential to predict encoded proteins enormously, namely, hydrolytic enzymes or proteins involved in the biosynthesis of metabolites of interest. The integration of genome sequence information with possible phenotypes requires, however, the knowledge of all the proteins in the cell in a system-wise manner, given by proteomics. This review summarises the progress of proteomics and its importance for the study of biotechnological processes in filamentous fungi. A major step forward in proteomics was to couple protein separation with high-resolution mass spectrometry, allowing accurate protein quantification. Despite the fact that most fungal proteomic studies have been focused on proteins from mycelial extracts, many proteins are related to processes which are compartmentalised in the fungal cell, e.g. β-lactam antibiotic production in the microbody. For the study of such processes, a targeted approach is required, e.g. by organelle proteomics. Typical workflows for sample preparation in fungal organelle proteomics are discussed, including homogenisation and sub-cellular fractionation. Finally, examples are presented of fungal organelle proteomic studies, which have enlarged the knowledge on areas of interest to biotechnology, such as protein secretion, energy production or antibiotic biosynthesis.

  9. Market opportunity in computational proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razvi, Enal

    2002-03-01

    The current exuberance on the potential of proteomics as a means to deploy the wealth of the human genome is expected to last into the coming years. Unlike the genome, a finite entity with a fixed number of base pairs of the genetic material, the proteome is "plastic", changing throughout growth and development and environmental stresses, as well as in pathological situations. Our proteomes change over time, and therefore there is no one proteome; the proteome is for practical purposes an infinite entity. It is therefore crucial to build systems that are capable of manipulating the information content that is the proteome, thence the need for computational proteomics as a discipline. In this Market View article, we present the industry landscape that is emerging in the computational proteomics space. This space is still in its infancy and for the most part undefined; therefore we seek to present the market opportunity in informatics in the drug discovery space and then extend that to an examination of industry trends in proteomics. Thus, the gestalt is a set of predictions as to the evolution of the landscape in computational proteomics over the coming years.

  10. pH and temperature dual-sensitive liposome gel based on novel cleavable mPEG-Hz-CHEMS polymeric vaginal delivery system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Daquan; Sun, Kaoxiang; Mu, Hongjie; Tang, Mingtan; Liang, Rongcai; Wang, Aiping; Zhou, Shasha; Sun, Haijun; Zhao, Feng; Yao, Jianwen; Liu, Wanhui

    2012-01-01

    Background In this study, a pH and temperature dual-sensitive liposome gel based on a novel cleavable hydrazone-based pH-sensitive methoxy polyethylene glycol 2000-hydrazone-cholesteryl hemisuccinate (mPEG-Hz-CHEMS) polymer was used for vaginal administration. Methods The pH-sensitive, cleavable mPEG-Hz-CHEMS was designed as a modified pH-sensitive liposome that would selectively degrade under locally acidic vaginal conditions. The novel pH-sensitive liposome was engineered to form a thermogel at body temperature and to degrade in an acidic environment. Results A dual-sensitive liposome gel with a high encapsulation efficiency of arctigenin was formed and improved the solubility of arctigenin characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. The dual-sensitive liposome gel with a sol-gel transition at body temperature was degraded in a pH-dependent manner, and was stable for a long period of time at neutral and basic pH, but cleavable under acidic conditions (pH 5.0). Arctigenin encapsulated in a dual-sensitive liposome gel was more stable and less toxic than arctigenin loaded into pH-sensitive liposomes. In vitro drug release results indicated that dual-sensitive liposome gels showed constant release of arctigenin over 3 days, but showed sustained release of arctigenin in buffers at pH 7.4 and pH 9.0. Conclusion This research has shed some light on a pH and temperature dual-sensitive liposome gel using a cleavable mPEG-Hz-CHEMS polymer for vaginal delivery. PMID:22679372

  11. Comparative proteomics of oxidative stress response of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM reveals effects on DNA repair and cysteine de novo synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calderini, Elia; Celebioglu, Hasan Ufuk; Villarroel, Julia

    2017-01-01

    acidophilus NCFM to H2O2, simulating an oxidative environment. Bacterial growth was monitored by BioScreen and batch cultures were harvested at exponential phase for protein profiling of stress responses by 2D gel-based comparative proteomics. Proteins identified in 19 of 21 spots changing in abundance due...... to H2O2 were typically related to carbohydrate and energy metabolism, cysteine biosynthesis, and stress. In particular, increased cysteine synthase activity may accumulate a cysteine pool relevant for protein stability, enzyme catalysis and the disulfide-reducing pathway. The stress response further...... by refolding. The proteome analysis provides novel insight into resistance mechanisms in lactic acid bacteria against reactive oxygen species and constitutes a valuable starting point for improving industrial processes, food design or strain engineering preserving microorganism viability....

  12. Introduction to mass spectrometry-based proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiesen, R.; Bunkenborg, J.

    2013-01-01

    for newcomers and give pointers to reference material. There are many applications of mass spectrometry in proteomics and each application is associated with some analytical choices, instrumental limitations and data processing steps that depend on the aim of the study and means of conducting it. Different...

  13. Proteomics perspectives in rotator cuff research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sejersen, Maria Hee Jung; Frost, Poul; Hansen, Torben Bæk;

    2015-01-01

    tendinopathies, and to evaluate perspectives of proteomics – the comprehensive study of protein composition - in tendon research. Materials and Methods We conducted a systematic search of the literature published between 1 January 1990 and 18 December 2012 in PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science. We included...

  14. Introduction to mass spectrometry-based proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiesen, R.; Bunkenborg, J.

    2013-01-01

    for newcomers and give pointers to reference material. There are many applications of mass spectrometry in proteomics and each application is associated with some analytical choices, instrumental limitations and data processing steps that depend on the aim of the study and means of conducting it. Different...

  15. Mass Spectrometry-based Proteomics in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: A Powerful Modality for Pulmonary Precision Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-Feng Xu

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Although several previous studies have provided some useful information about the lung proteome in ARDS patients and gained several interesting disease-associated biomarkers, clinical proteomic studies in ARDS patients are still in the initial stage. An increased cooperation is still needed to establish a global and faithful database containing disease-specific proteome from the largest ARDS subsets.

  16. Metabolic remodeling in moderate synchronous versus dyssynchronous pacing-induced heart failure: integrated metabolomics and proteomics study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junko Shibayama

    Full Text Available Heart failure (HF is accompanied by complex alterations in myocardial energy metabolism. Up to 40% of HF patients have dyssynchronous ventricular contraction, which is an independent indicator of mortality. We hypothesized that electromechanical dyssynchrony significantly affects metabolic remodeling in the course of HF. We used a canine model of tachypacing-induced HF. Animals were paced at 200 bpm for 6 weeks either in the right atrium (synchronous HF, SHF or in the right ventricle (dyssynchronous HF, DHF. We collected biopsies from left ventricular apex and performed comprehensive metabolic pathway analysis using multi-platform metabolomics (GC/MS; MS/MS; HPLC and LC-MS/MS label-free proteomics. We found important differences in metabolic remodeling between SHF and DHF. As compared to Control, ATP, phosphocreatine (PCr, creatine, and PCr/ATP (prognostic indicator of mortality in HF patients were all significantly reduced in DHF, but not SHF. In addition, the myocardial levels of carnitine (mitochondrial fatty acid carrier and fatty acids (12:0, 14:0 were significantly reduced in DHF, but not SHF. Carnitine parmitoyltransferase I, a key regulatory enzyme of fatty acid ß-oxidation, was significantly upregulated in SHF but was not different in DHF, as compared to Control. Both SHF and DHF exhibited a reduction, but to a different degree, in creatine and the intermediates of glycolysis and the TCA cycle. In contrast to this, the enzymes of creatine kinase shuttle were upregulated, and the enzymes of glycolysis and the TCA cycle were predominantly upregulated or unchanged in both SHF and DHF. These data suggest a systemic mismatch between substrate supply and demand in pacing-induced HF. The energy deficit observed in DHF, but not in SHF, may be associated with a critical decrease in fatty acid delivery to the ß-oxidation pipeline, primarily due to a reduction in myocardial carnitine content.

  17. Analysis of the photosynthetic apparatus in transgenic tobacco plants with altered endogenous cytokinin content: a proteomic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valcke Roland

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cytokinin is a plant hormone that plays a crucial role in several processes of plant growth and development. In recent years, major breakthroughs have been achieved in the elucidation of the metabolism, the signal perception and transduction, as well as the biological functions of cytokinin. An important activity of cytokinin is the involvement in chloroplast development and function. Although this biological function has already been known for 50 years, the exact mechanisms remain elusive. Results To elucidate the effects of altered endogenous cytokinin content on the structure and function of the chloroplasts, chloroplast subfractions (stroma and thylakoids from transgenic Pssu-ipt and 35S:CKX1 tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum plants with, respectively, elevated and reduced endogenous cytokinin content were analysed using two different 2-DE approaches. Firstly, thykaloids were analysed by blue-native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by SDS-PAGE (BN/SDS-PAGE. Image analysis of the gel spot pattern thus obtained from thylakoids showed no substantial differences between wild-type and transgenic tobacco plants. Secondly, a quantitative DIGE analysis of CHAPS soluble proteins derived from chloroplast subfractions indicated significant gel spot abundance differences in the stroma fraction. Upon identification by MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry, these proteins could be assigned to the Calvin-Benson cycle and photoprotective mechanisms. Conclusion Taken together, presented proteomic data reveal that the constitutively altered cytokinin status of transgenic plants does not result in any qualitative changes in either stroma proteins or protein complexes of thylakoid membranes of fully developed chloroplasts, while few but significant quantitative differences are observed in stroma proteins.

  18. The Multinational Arabidopsis Steering Subcommittee for Proteomics Assembles the Largest Proteome Database Resource for Plant Systems Biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weckwerth, Wolfram; Baginsky, Sacha; Van Wijk, Klass; Heazlewood, Joshua; Millar, Harvey

    2009-12-01

    In the past 10 years, we have witnessed remarkable advances in the field of plant molecular biology. The rapid development of proteomic technologies and the speed with which these techniques have been applied to the field have altered our perception of how we can analyze proteins in complex systems. At nearly the same time, the availability of the complete genome for the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana was released; this effort provides an unsurpassed resource for the identification of proteins when researchers use MS to analyze plant samples. Recognizing the growth in this area, the Multinational Arabidopsis Steering Committee (MASC) established a subcommittee for A. thaliana proteomics in 2006 with the objective of consolidating databases, technique standards, and experimentally validated candidate genes and functions. Since the establishment of the Multinational Arabidopsis Steering Subcommittee for Proteomics (MASCP), many new approaches and resources have become available. Recently, the subcommittee established a webpage to consolidate this information (www.masc-proteomics.org). It includes links to plant proteomic databases, general information about proteomic techniques, meeting information, a summary of proteomic standards, and other relevant resources. Altogether, this website provides a useful resource for the Arabidopsis proteomics community. In the future, the website will host discussions and investigate the cross-linking of databases. The subcommittee members have extensive experience in arabidopsis proteomics and collectively have produced some of the most extensive proteomics data sets for this model plant (Table S1 in the Supporting Information has a list of resources). The largest collection of proteomics data from a single study in A. thaliana was assembled into an accessible database (AtProteome; http://fgcz-atproteome.unizh.ch/index.php) and was recently published by the Baginsky lab.1 The database provides links to major Arabidopsis online

  19. An introduction to proteome bioinformatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Andrew R; Hubbard, Simon J

    2010-01-01

    This book is part of the Methods in Molecular Biology series, and provides a general overview of computational approaches used in proteome research. In this chapter, we give an overview of the scope of the book in terms of current proteomics experimental techniques and the reasons why computational approaches are needed. We then give a summary of each chapter, which together provide a picture of the state of the art in proteome bioinformatics research.

  20. Proteomics applied to exercise physiology: a cutting-edge technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petriz, Bernardo A; Gomes, Clarissa P; Rocha, Luiz A O; Rezende, Taia M B; Franco, Octávio L

    2012-03-01

    Exercise research has always drawn the attention of the scientific community because it can be widely applied to sport training, health improvement, and disease prevention. For many years numerous tools have been used to investigate the several physiological adaptations induced by exercise stimuli. Nowadays a closer look at the molecular mechanisms underlying metabolic pathways and muscular and cardiovascular adaptation to exercise are among the new trends in exercise physiology research. Considering this, to further understand these adaptations as well as pathology attenuation by exercise, several studies have been conducted using molecular investigations, and this trend looks set to continue. Through enormous biotechnological advances, proteomic tools have facilitated protein analysis within complex biological samples such as plasma and tissue, commonly used in exercise research. Until now, classic proteomic tools such as one- and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis have been used as standard approaches to investigate proteome modulation by exercise. Furthermore, other recently developed in gel tools such as differential gel electrophoresis (DIGE) and gel-free techniques such as the protein labeling methods (ICAT, SILAC, and iTRAQ) have empowered proteomic quantitative analysis, which may successfully benefit exercise proteomic research. However, despite the three decades of 2-DE development, neither classic nor novel proteomic tools have been convincingly explored by exercise researchers. To this end, this review gives an overview of the directions in which exercise-proteome research is moving and examines the main tools that can be used as a novel strategy in exercise physiology investigation.

  1. [LEGUME-RHIZOBIUM SYMBIOSIS PROTEOMICS: ACHIEVEMENTS AND PERSPECTIVES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondratiuk, Iu Iu; Mamenko, P M; Kots, S Ya

    2015-01-01

    The present review contains results of proteomic researches of legume-rhizobium symbiosis. The technical difficulties associated with the methods of obtaining protein extracts from symbiotic structures and ways of overcoming them were discussed. The changes of protein synthesis under formation and functioning of symbiotic structures were shown. Special attention has been given to the importance of proteomic studies of plant-microbe structures in the formation of adaptation strategies under adverse environmental conditions. The technical and conceptual perspectives of legume-rhizobium symbiosis proteomics were shown.

  2. Evolutionary Transcriptomics and Proteomics: Insight into Plant Adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelckel, Claudia; Gruenheit, Nicole; Lockhart, Peter

    2017-06-01

    Comparative transcriptomics and proteomics (T&P) have brought biological insight into development, gene function, and physiological stress responses. However, RNA-seq and high-throughput proteomics remain underutilised in studies of plant adaptation. These methodologies have created discovery tools with the potential to significantly advance our understanding of adaptive diversification. We outline experimental recommendations for their application. We discuss analysis models and approaches that accelerate the identification of adaptive gene sets and integrate transcriptome, proteome, phenotypic, and environmental data. Finally, we encourage widespread uptake and future developments in T&P that will advance our understanding of evolution and adaptation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Identification of Analytical Factors Affecting Complex Proteomics Profiles Acquired in a Factorial Design Study with Analysis of Variance: Simultaneous Component Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Vikram; Govorukhina, Natalia; Zwanenburg, Gooitzen; Hoefsloot, Huub; Westra, Inge; Smilde, Age; Reijmers, Theo; van der Zee, Ate G J; Suits, Frank; Bischoff, Rainer; Horvatovich, Péter

    2016-04-19

    Complex shotgun proteomics peptide profiles obtained in quantitative differential protein expression studies, such as in biomarker discovery, may be affected by multiple experimental factors. These preanalytical factors may affect the measured protein abundances which in turn influence the outcome of the associated statistical analysis and validation. It is therefore important to determine which factors influence the abundance of peptides in a complex proteomics experiment and to identify those peptides that are most influenced by these factors. In the current study we analyzed depleted human serum samples to evaluate experimental factors that may influence the resulting peptide profile such as the residence time in the autosampler at 4 °C, stopping or not stopping the trypsin digestion with acid, the type of blood collection tube, different hemolysis levels, differences in clotting times, the number of freeze-thaw cycles, and different trypsin/protein ratios. To this end we used a two-level fractional factorial design of resolution IV (2(IV)(7-3)). The design required analysis of 16 samples in which the main effects were not confounded by two-factor interactions. Data preprocessing using the Threshold Avoiding Proteomics Pipeline (Suits, F.; Hoekman, B.; Rosenling, T.; Bischoff, R.; Horvatovich, P. Anal. Chem. 2011, 83, 7786-7794, ref 1) produced a data-matrix containing quantitative information on 2,559 peaks. The intensity of the peaks was log-transformed, and peaks having intensities of a low t-test significance (p-value > 0.05) and a low absolute fold ratio (factor were removed. The remaining peaks were subjected to analysis of variance (ANOVA)-simultaneous component analysis (ASCA). Permutation tests were used to identify which of the preanalytical factors influenced the abundance of the measured peptides most significantly. The most important preanalytical factors affecting peptide intensity were (1) the hemolysis level, (2) stopping trypsin digestion with

  4. Plant redox proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Navrot, Nicolas; Finnie, Christine; Svensson, Birte

    2011-01-01

    In common with other aerobic organisms, plants are exposed to reactive oxygen species resulting in formation of post-translational modifications related to protein oxidoreduction (redox PTMs) that may inflict oxidative protein damage. Accumulating evidence also underscores the importance of redox...... PTMs in regulating enzymatic activities and controlling biological processes in plants. Notably, proteins controlling the cellular redox state, e.g. thioredoxin and glutaredoxin, appear to play dual roles to maintain oxidative stress resistance and regulate signal transduction pathways via redox PTMs....... To get a comprehensive overview of these types of redox-regulated pathways there is therefore an emerging interest to monitor changes in redox PTMs on a proteome scale. Compared to some other PTMs, e.g. protein phosphorylation, redox PTMs have received less attention in plant proteome analysis, possibly...

  5. Progress on the HUPO Draft Human Proteome: 2017 Metrics of the Human Proteome Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omenn, Gilbert S; Lane, Lydie; Lundberg, Emma K; Overall, Christopher M; Deutsch, Eric W

    2017-08-30

    The Human Proteome Organization (HUPO) Human Proteome Project (HPP) continues to make progress on its two overall goals: (1) completing the protein parts list, with an annual update of the HUPO draft human proteome, and (2) making proteomics an integrated complement to genomics and transcriptomics throughout biomedical and life sciences research. neXtProt version 2017-01-23 has 17,008 confident protein identifications (Protein Existence [PE] level 1) that are compliant with the HPP Guidelines v2.1 (https://hupo.org/Guidelines), up from 13,664 in 2012-12 and 16,518 in 2016-04. Remaining to be found by mass spectrometry and other methods are 2579 "missing proteins" (PE2+3+4), down from 2949 in 2016. PeptideAtlas 2017-01 has 15,173 canonical proteins, accounting for nearly all of the 15,290 PE1 proteins based on MS data. These resources have extensive data on PTMs, single amino acid variants, and splice isoforms. The Human Protein Atlas v16 has 10,492 highly-curated protein entries with tissue and subcellular spatial localization of proteins and transcript expression. Organ-specific popular protein lists have been generated for broad use in quantitative targeted proteomics using SRM-MS or DIA-SWATH-MS studies of biology and disease.

  6. Targeted proteomics of solid cancers: from quantification of known biomarkers towards reading the digital proteome maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernikářová, Vendula; Bouchal, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    The concept of personalized medicine includes novel protein biomarkers that are expected to improve the early detection, diagnosis and therapy monitoring of malignant diseases. Tissues, biofluids, cell lines and xenograft models are the common sources of biomarker candidates that require verification of clinical value in independent patient cohorts. Targeted proteomics - based on selected reaction monitoring, or data extraction from data-independent acquisition based digital maps - now represents a promising mass spectrometry alternative to immunochemical methods. To date, it has been successfully used in a high number of studies answering clinical questions on solid malignancies: breast, colorectal, prostate, ovarian, endometrial, pancreatic, hepatocellular, lung, bladder and others. It plays an important role in functional proteomic experiments that include studying the role of post-translational modifications in cancer progression. This review summarizes verified biomarker candidates successfully quantified by targeted proteomics in this field and directs the readers who plan to design their own hypothesis-driven experiments to appropriate sources of methods and knowledge.

  7. Mitotic spindle proteomics in Chinese hamster ovary cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bonner, Mary Kate; Poole, Daniel S; Xu, Tao; Sarkeshik, Ali; Yates, 3rd, John R; Skop, Ahna R

    2011-01-01

    .... Here, we report a proteomic study of the mitotic spindle from Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells. Four different isolations of metaphase spindles were subjected to Multi-dimensional Protein Identification Technology...

  8. Proteomic profile of acute myeloid leukaemia: A review update

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Proteome analysis is a complex and dynamic process that encompasses several analytical platforms ... cellular processes, which in turn affect ..... chemical synthesis of new targeted ..... biomarkers: relevant issues on study design & technical.

  9. Proteome regulation during Olea europaea fruit development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Bianco

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Widespread in the Mediterranean basin, Olea europaea trees are gaining worldwide popularity for the nutritional and cancer-protective properties of the oil, mechanically extracted from ripe fruits. Fruit development is a physiological process with remarkable impact on the modulation of the biosynthesis of compounds affecting the quality of the drupes as well as the final composition of the olive oil. Proteomics offers the possibility to dig deeper into the major changes during fruit development, including the important phase of ripening, and to classify temporal patterns of protein accumulation occurring during these complex physiological processes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this work, we started monitoring the proteome variations associated with olive fruit development by using comparative proteomics coupled to mass spectrometry. Proteins extracted from drupes at three different developmental stages were separated on 2-DE and subjected to image analysis. 247 protein spots were revealed as differentially accumulated. Proteins were identified from a total of 121 spots and discussed in relation to olive drupe metabolic changes occurring during fruit development. In order to evaluate if changes observed at the protein level were consistent with changes of mRNAs, proteomic data produced in the present work were compared with transcriptomic data elaborated during previous studies. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study identifies a number of proteins responsible for quality traits of cv. Coratina, with particular regard to proteins associated to the metabolism of fatty acids, phenolic and aroma compounds. Proteins involved in fruit photosynthesis have been also identified and their pivotal contribution in oleogenesis has been discussed. To date, this study represents the first characterization of the olive fruit proteome during development, providing new insights into fruit metabolism and oil accumulation process.

  10. Shotgun proteomic analysis of mulberry dwarf phytoplasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Chengchao

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mulberry dwarf (MD, which is caused by phytoplasma, is one of the most serious infectious diseases of mulberry. Phytoplasmas have been associated with diseases in several hundred plant species. The inability to culture phytoplasmas in vitro has hindered their characterization at the molecular level. Though the complete genomes of two phytoplasmas have been published, little information has been obtained about the proteome of phytoplasma. Therefore, the proteomic information of phytoplasmas would be useful to elucidate the functional mechanisms of phytoplasma in many biological processes. Results MD phytoplasmas, which belong to the 16SrI-B subgroup based on the 16S DNA analysis, were purified from infected tissues using a combination of differential centrifugation and density gradient centrifugation. The expressed proteome of phytoplasma was surveyed by one-dimensional SDS-PAGE and nanocapillary liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 209 phytoplasma proteins were unambiguously assigned, including the proteins with the functions of amino acid biosynthesis, cell envelope, cellular processes, energy metabolism, nucleosides and nucleotide metabolism, replication, transcription, translation, transport and binding as well as the proteins with other functions. In addition to these known function proteins, 63 proteins were annotated as hypothetical or conserved hypothetical proteins. Conclusions Taken together, a total of 209 phytoplasma proteins have been experimentally verified, representing the most extensive survey of any phytoplasma proteome to date. This study provided a valuable dataset of phytoplasma proteins, and a better understanding of the energy metabolism and virulence mechanisms of MD phytoplasma.

  11. Mining the active proteome of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renier A. L. Van Der Hoorn

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Assigning functions to the >30.000 proteins encoded by the Arabidopsis genome is a challenging task of the Arabidopsis Functional Genomics Network. Although genome-wide technologies like proteomics and transcriptomics have generated a wealth of information that significantly accelerated gene annotation, protein activities are poorly predicted by transcript or protein levels as protein activities are post-translationally regulated. To directly display protein activities in Arabidopsis proteomes, we developed and applied Activity-based Protein Profiling (ABPP. ABPP is based on the use of small molecule probes that react with the catalytic residues of distinct protein classes in an activity-dependent manner. Labeled proteins are separated and detected from proteins gels and purified and identified by mass spectrometry. Using probes of six different chemotypes we have displayed of activities of 76 Arabidopsis proteins. These proteins represent over ten different protein classes that contain over 250 Arabidopsis proteins, including cysteine- serine- and metallo-proteases, lipases, acyltransferases, and the proteasome. We have developed methods for identification of in vivo labeled proteins using click-chemistry and for in vivo imaging with fluorescent probes. In vivo labeling has revealed novel protein activities and unexpected subcellular activities of the proteasome. Labeling of extracts displayed several differential activities e.g. of the proteasome during immune response and methylesterases during infection. These studies illustrate the power of ABPP to display the functional proteome and testify to a successful interdisciplinary collaboration involving chemical biology, organic chemistry and proteomics.

  12. Functional proteomics within the genus Lactobacillus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, Maria; Calasso, Maria; Cavallo, Noemi; Di Cagno, Raffaella; Gobbetti, Marco

    2016-03-01

    Lactobacillus are mainly used for the manufacture of fermented dairy, sourdough, meat, and vegetable foods or used as probiotics. Under optimal processing conditions, Lactobacillus strains contribute to food functionality through their enzyme portfolio and the release of metabolites. An extensive genomic diversity analysis was conducted to elucidate the core features of the genus Lactobacillus, and to provide a better comprehension of niche adaptation of the strains. However, proteomics is an indispensable "omics" science to elucidate the proteome diversity, and the mechanisms of regulation and adaptation of Lactobacillus strains. This review focuses on the novel and comprehensive knowledge of functional proteomics and metaproteomics of Lactobacillus species. A large list of proteomic case studies of different Lactobacillus species is provided to illustrate the adaptability of the main metabolic pathways (e.g., carbohydrate transport and metabolism, pyruvate metabolism, proteolytic system, amino acid metabolism, and protein synthesis) to various life conditions. These investigations have highlighted that lactobacilli modulate the level of a complex panel of proteins to growth/survive in different ecological niches. In addition to the general regulation and stress response, specific metabolic pathways can be switched on and off, modifying the behavior of the strains.

  13. An update on the mouse liver proteome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borlak Jürgen

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Decoding of the liver proteome is subject of intense research, but hampered by methodological constraints. We recently developed an improved protocol for studying rat liver proteins based on 2-DE-MALDI-TOF-MS peptide mass finger printing. This methodology was now applied to develop a mouse liver protein database. Results Liver proteins were extracted by two different lysis buffers in sequence followed by a liquid-phase IEF pre-fractionation and separation of proteins by 2 DE at two different pH ranges, notably 5-8 and 7-10. Based on 9600 in gel digests a total of 643 mouse liver proteins with high sequence coverage (> 20 peptides per protein could be identified by MALDI-TOF-MS peptide mass finger printing. Notably, 255 proteins are novel and have not been reported so far by conventional two-dimensional electrophoresis proteome mapping. Additionally, the results of the present findings for mouse liver were compared to published data of the rat proteome to compile as many proteins as possible in a rodent liver database. Conclusion Based on 2-DE MALDI-TOF-MS a significantly improved proteome map of mouse liver was obtained. We discuss some prominent members of newly identified proteins for a better understanding of liver biology.

  14. A proteomic approach to porcine saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Ana M; Cerón, José J; Fuentes-Rubio, María; Tecles, Fernando; Beeley, Josie A

    2014-02-01

    This paper reviews recent progress in salivary animal proteomics, with special reference to the porcine proteome. Until fairly recently, most studies on saliva as a diagnostic fluid have focused on humans, primates and rodents, and the development of salivary analysis in monitoring health in farm animals including pigs has received only limited consideration. The porcine salivary proteome has been characterised by 2D-electrophoresis followed by mass spectrometry. Major and minor proteins have been identified. The use of saliva as a non-invasive biological fluid in monitoring health and disease in pigs will be reviewed, together with the potential use of proteomics for the development of biomarkers. In this review, methods of collection and the composition of porcine saliva will be considered, together with saliva handling and analysis. The overall findings indicate that there is considerable potential for the development of salivary analysis as a non-invasive diagnostic fluid in the pig, and that it offers advantages over other body fluids in this animal.

  15. 2D electrophoresis-based expression proteomics: a microbiologist's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sá-Correia, Isabel; Teixeira, Miguel C

    2010-12-01

    Quantitative proteomics based on 2D electrophoresis (2-DE) coupled with peptide mass fingerprinting is still one of the most widely used quantitative proteomics approaches in microbiology research. Our view on the exploitation of this global expression analysis technique and its contribution and potential to push forward the field of molecular microbial physiology towards a molecular systems microbiology perspective is discussed in this article. The advances registered in 2-DE-based quantitative proteomic analysis leading to increased protein resolution, sensitivity and accuracy, and the promising use of 2-DE to gain insights into post-translational modifications at a proteome-wide level (considering all the proteins/protein forms expressed by the genome) are focused on. Given the progress made in this field, it is foreseen that the 2-DE-based approach to quantitative proteomics will continue to be a fundamental tool for microbiologists working at a genome-wide scale. Guidelines are also provided for the exploitation of expression proteomics data, based on useful computational tools, and for the integration of these data with other genome-wide expression information. The advantages and limitations of a complete 2-DE-based expression proteomics analysis, envisaging the quantification of the global changes occurring in the proteome of a given cell depending on environmental or genetic manipulations, are discussed from the microbiologist's perspective. Particular focus is given to the emerging field of toxicoproteomics, a new systems toxicity approach that offers a powerful tool to directly monitor the earliest stages of the toxicological response by identifying critical proteins and pathways that are affected by, and respond to, a chemical stress. The experimental design and the bioinformatics analysis of data used in our laboratory to gain mechanistic insights through expression proteomics into the responses of the eukaryotic model Saccharomyces cerevisiae or of

  16. 大麦发芽过程中蛋白质组的变化研究%Study on changes of barley proteome during the malting process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘宝祥; 朴永哲; 翟明昌; 董亮; 郭敏利; 周华成; 赵长新

    2013-01-01

    通过双向电泳技术监测大麦发芽过程中水溶蛋白质组的变化,明确大麦发芽过程中蛋白质组的变化规律,为麦芽制造提供一定理论依据.以澳麦“schooner”为研究对象,提取其水溶蛋白进行双向电泳分析,结合分析软件监测大麦发芽过程中蛋白质组的变化.结果显示,本实验检测出大麦种子中大约有804种蛋白质,发芽过程中有424种蛋白质未发生变化,379种蛋白质降解消失或浓度降低,另有77种新的蛋白质产生.结果表明,进一步证实浸麦阶段主要是蛋白质的降解过程;发芽前期蛋白质的降解和合成转化较为缓和,发芽中期(48~72h)蛋白质的降解最为旺盛;发芽后期蛋白质的变化基本趋于平衡.%Study on the change of barley proteome during the malting process by two-dimensional electrophoresis,providing a theory of malting.In this study,Australian barley-" Schooner" was chosen.Two-dimensional electrophoresis and analysis software were used to survey the change of water-soluble barley proteome during the malting process.The results showed that during the malting process,only less than 424 kinds of protein retained,while more than 379 kinds of protein disappeared.And 77 kinds of new protein appeared,compared with the 804 kinds of protein in barley.The results showed that barley protein mainly resolved in steeping process.The solution and synthetic transformation of barley protein changed small at the start of germination.And protein resolved the most clearly in the middle of the germination(48~72h).So it was a gradual process of equilibrium.Later of it,protein mostly did not change.

  17. CEBS--Chemical Effects in Biological Systems: a public data repository integrating study design and toxicity data with microarray and proteomics data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Michael; Stasiewicz, Stanley; Merrick, B Alex; Tomer, Kenneth; Bushel, Pierre; Paules, Richard; Stegman, Nancy; Nehls, Gerald; Yost, Kenneth J; Johnson, C Harris; Gustafson, Scott F; Xirasagar, Sandhya; Xiao, Nianqing; Huang, Cheng-Cheng; Boyer, Paul; Chan, Denny D; Pan, Qinyan; Gong, Hui; Taylor, John; Choi, Danielle; Rashid, Asif; Ahmed, Ayazaddin; Howle, Reese; Selkirk, James; Tennant, Raymond; Fostel, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    CEBS (Chemical Effects in Biological Systems) is an integrated public repository for toxicogenomics data, including the study design and timeline, clinical chemistry and histopathology findings and microarray and proteomics data. CEBS contains data derived from studies of chemicals and of genetic alterations, and is compatible with clinical and environmental studies. CEBS is designed to permit the user to query the data using the study conditions, the subject responses and then, having identified an appropriate set of subjects, to move to the microarray module of CEBS to carry out gene signature and pathway analysis. Scope of CEBS: CEBS currently holds 22 studies of rats, four studies of mice and one study of Caenorhabditis elegans. CEBS can also accommodate data from studies of human subjects. Toxicogenomics studies currently in CEBS comprise over 4000 microarray hybridizations, and 75 2D gel images annotated with protein identification performed by MALDI and MS/MS. CEBS contains raw microarray data collected in accordance with MIAME guidelines and provides tools for data selection, pre-processing and analysis resulting in annotated lists of genes of interest. Additionally, clinical chemistry and histopathology findings from over 1500 animals are included in CEBS. CEBS/BID: The BID (Biomedical Investigation Database) is another component of the CEBS system. BID is a relational database used to load and curate study data prior to export to CEBS, in addition to capturing and displaying novel data types such as PCR data, or additional fields of interest, including those defined by the HESI Toxicogenomics Committee (in preparation). BID has been shared with Health Canada and the US Environmental Protection Agency. CEBS is available at http://cebs.niehs.nih.gov. BID can be accessed via the user interface from https://dir-apps.niehs.nih.gov/arc/. Requests for a copy of BID and for depositing data into CEBS or BID are available at http://www.niehs.nih.gov/cebs-df/.

  18. Sol–gel-based silver nanoparticles-doped silica – Polydiphenylamine nanocomposite for micro-solid-phase extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagheri, Habib, E-mail: bagheri@sharif.edu; Banihashemi, Solmaz

    2015-07-30

    A nanocomposite of silica-polydiphenylamine doped with silver nanoparticles (Ag–SiO{sub 2}-PDPA) was successfully synthesized by the sol–gel process. For its preparation, PDPA was mixed with butanethiol capped Ag nanoparticles (NPs) and added to the silica sol solution. The Ag NPs were stabilized as a result of their adsorption on the SiO{sub 2} spheres. The surface characteristic of nanocomposite was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In this work the Ag–SiO{sub 2}-PDPA nanocomposite was employed as an efficient sorbent for micro-solid-phase extraction (μ-SPE) of some selected pesticides. An amount of 15 mg of the prepared sorbent was used to extract and determine the representatives from organophosphorous, organochlorine and aryloxyphenoxy propionic acids from aqueous samples. After the implementation of extraction process, the analytes were desorbed by methanol and determined using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS). Important parameters influencing the extraction and desorption processes such as pH of sample solution, salting out effect, type and volume of the desorption solvent, the sample loading and eluting flow rates along with the sample volume were experimentally optimized. Limits of detection (LODs) and the limits of quantification (LOQs) were in the range of 0.02–0.05 μg L{sup −1} and 0.1–0.2 μg L{sup −1}, respectively, using time scheduled selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. The relative standard deviation percent (RSD %) with four replicates was in the range of 6–10%. The applicability of the developed method was examined by analyzing different environmental water samples and the relative recovery (RR %) values for the spiked water samples were found to be in the range of 86–103%. - Highlights: • A sol–gel-based silver nanoparticles doped silica-polydiphenylamine nanocomposite was synthesized. • The sorbent was applied to micro-solid-phase extraction of some selected pesticides in water

  19. Proteomics and posttranslational proteomics of seed dormancy and germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajjou, Loïc; Belghazi, Maya; Catusse, Julie; Ogé, Laurent; Arc, Erwann; Godin, Béatrice; Chibani, Kamel; Ali-Rachidi, Sonia; Collet, Boris; Grappin, Philippe; Jullien, Marc; Gallardo, Karine; Job, Claudette; Job, Dominique

    2011-01-01

    The seed is the dispersal unit of plants and must survive the vagaries of the environment. It is the object of intense genetic and genomic studies because processes related to seed quality affect crop yield and the seed itself provides food for humans and animals. Presently, the general aim of postgenomics analyses is to understand the complex biochemical and molecular processes underlying seed quality, longevity, dormancy, and vigor. Due to advances in functional genomics, the recent past years have seen a tremendous progress in our understanding of several aspects of seed development and germination. Here, we describe the proteomics protocols (from protein extraction to mass spectrometry) that can be used to investigate several aspects of seed physiology, including germination and its hormonal regulation, dormancy release, and seed longevity. These techniques can be applied to the study of both model plants (such as Arabidopsis) and crops.

  20. Application of modification-specific proteomics in the meat-quality study%蛋白质修饰组学在肉品质研究中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒲强; 罗嘉; 沈林園; 李学伟; 张顺华; 朱砺

    2015-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) play an important role in life science. The most widely studied protein modifications in biological science include protein phosphorylation, acylation, glycosylation, ubiquitination, acetylation, oxidation, methylation and so on. This review outlines current achievements in the study of protein mod-ifications in muscle food using proteomic approaches. First we describe the general knowledge of protein modifica-tions and then the development of proteomic approaches for the characterization of such modifications. Second, we describe the effects of protein modifications on muscle foods and devote our main attention to the application of pro-teomic approaches for the analysis of these modifications. We conclude that proteomics analysis is powerful for the study of protein modifications and analysis of meat quality characteristics in the process of food production.%蛋白质翻译后修饰(Post-translational modifications, PTMs)在生命体中具有十分重要的作用。生命有机体中常见的PTMs有磷酸化、酰化、糖基化、泛素化、乙酰化、氧化和甲基化等。文章主要介绍了蛋白质组学在肉制品科学方面的应用、PTMs的主要内容以及分析蛋白修饰特性常见技术的发展,总结了PTMs对肌肉生理特性的影响和蛋白质组学方法在肉质蛋白质修饰研究中的重要性及前景,讨论了利用蛋白质修饰组学技术研究肌肉熟化过程中品质特性变化的特点。

  1. Quantitative definition and monitoring of the host cell protein proteome using iTRAQ - a study of an industrial mAb producing CHO-S cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiverton, Lesley M; Evans, Caroline; Pandhal, Jagroop; Landels, Andrew R; Rees, Byron J; Levison, Peter R; Wright, Phillip C; Smales, C Mark

    2016-08-01

    There are few studies defining CHO host cell proteins (HCPs) and the flux of these throughout a downstream purification process. Here we have applied quantitative iTRAQ proteomics to follow the HCP profile of an antibody (mAb) producing CHO-S cell line throughout a standard downstream purification procedure consisting of a Protein A, cation and anion exchange process. We used both 6 sample iTRAQ experiment to analyze technical replicates of three samples, which were culture harvest (HCCF), Protein A flow through and Protein A eluate and an 8 sample format to analyze technical replicates of four sample types; HCCF compared to Protein A eluate and subsequent cation and anion exchange purification. In the 6 sample iTRAQ experiment, 8781 spectra were confidently matched to peptides from 819 proteins (including the mAb chains). Across both the 6 and 8 sample experiments 936 proteins were identified. In the 8 sample comparison, 4187 spectra were confidently matched to peptides from 219 proteins. We then used the iTRAQ data to enable estimation of the relative change of individual proteins across the purification steps. These data provide the basis for application of iTRAQ for process development based upon knowledge of critical HCPs. © 2016 The Authors. Biotechnology Journal published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. A proteomic investigation of B lymphocytes in an autistic family: a pilot study of exposure to natural rubber latex (NRL) may lead to autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chen; Zhao, Xin-liang; Ju, Weina; Zou, Xiao-bing; Huo, Li-rong; Yan, Wu; Zou, Jun-hua; Yan, Guo-di; Jenkins, Edmund C; Brown, W Ted; Zhong, Nanbert

    2011-03-01

    Autism is a multi-factorial neurodevelopmental disorder. We have investigated the molecular mechanism involved in a Chinese family with autism by a proteomic approach. Antibody chips containing 500 spots of human protein antibodies were used to screen for differentially expressed proteins in the peripheral B lymphocytes between autistic and non-autistic siblings in this family. Four proteins relevant to immuno-pathway, including IKKα that was up-regulated and Tyk2, EIF4G1 and PRKCI that were down-regulated, were identified differentially expressed in autistic versus non-autistic siblings. Western blot analysis and reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction validated the differential expression of these four proteins. Based on the function of these differentially expressed proteins, relevant studies on immunoglobulin E (IgE) level, nuclear factor kappa B signaling activation and cell cycle were conducted in both autistic and non-autistic children of this family. Considering the fact that the family members were in close contact with natural rubber latex (NRL) and that IgE-mediated cross-reactions could be triggered by Hevea brasiliensis (Hev-b) proteins in NRL, we hypothesize that immune reactions triggered by close contact with NRL might influence the functions of B lymphocytes by altering expression of certain proteins identified in our experiments thus contributing to the occurrence of autism.

  3. Wear particles from studded tires and granite pavement induce pro-inflammatory alterations in human monocyte-derived macrophages: a proteomic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Helen; Lindbom, John; Ghafouri, Bijar; Lindahl, Mats; Tagesson, Christer; Gustafsson, Mats; Ljungman, Anders G

    2011-01-14

    Airborne particulate matter is considered to be one of the environmental contributors to the mortality in cancer, respiratory, and cardiovascular diseases. For future preventive actions, it is of major concern to investigate the toxicity of defined groups of airborne particles and to clarify their pathways in biological tissues. To expand the knowledge beyond general inflammatory markers, this study examined the toxicoproteomic effects on human monocyte derived macrophages after exposure to wear particles generated from the interface of studded tires and a granite-containing pavement. As comparison, the effect of endotoxin was also investigated. The macrophage proteome was separated using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Detected proteins were quantified, and selected proteins were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry. Among analyzed proteins, seven were significantly decreased and three were increased by exposure to wear particles as compared to unexposed control cells. Endotoxin exposure resulted in significant changes in the expression of six proteins: four decreased and two increased. For example, macrophage capping protein was significantly increased after wear particle exposure only, whereas calgizzarin and galectin-3 were increased by both wear particle and endotoxin exposure. Overall, proteins associated with inflammatory response were increased and proteins involved in cellular functions such as redox balance, anti-inflammatory response, and glycolysis were decreased. Investigating the effects of characterized wear particles on human macrophages with a toxicoproteomic approach has shown to be useful in the search for more detailed information about specific pathways and possible biological markers.

  4. Ambient pH stress inhibits spore germination of Penicillium expansum by impairing protein synthesis and folding: a proteomic-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Boqiang; Lai, Tongfei; Qin, Guozheng; Tian, Shiping

    2010-01-01

    Spore germination is the first step for fungal pathogens to infect host plants. The pH value, as one of the most important environmental parameters, has critical influence on spore germination. In this study, effects of ambient pH on spore germination were determined by culturing spores of Penicillium expansum in medium with pH values at 2.0, 5.0 and 8.0, and involved mechanisms were further investigated through methods of comparative proteomics. The results demonstrated that spore germination of P. expansum was obviously inhibited at pH 2.0 and 8.0. Using quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometer, 34 proteins with significant changes in abundance were identified. Among them, 17 proteins were related to protein synthesis and folding, and most of them were down-regulated at pH 2.0 and 8.0. Accordingly, lower content of total soluble proteins and higher ratio of aggregated proteins were observed in spores at pH 2.0 and 8.0. In addition, it was found that ambient pH could affect intracellular pH and ATP level of P. expansum spores. These findings indicated that ambient pH might affect spore germination of P. expansum by changing intracellular pH and regulating protein expression. Further, impairing synthesis and folding of proteins might be one of the main reasons.

  5. Characterization of protein complexes using targeted proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Yassel Ramos; Gallien, Sebastien; Huerta, Vivian; van Oostrum, Jan; Domon, Bruno; Gonzalez, Luis Javier

    2014-01-01

    Biological systems are not only controlled by the abundance of individual proteins, but also by the formation of complexes and the dynamics of protein-protein interactions. The identification of the components of protein complexes can be obtained by shotgun proteomics using affinity purification coupled to mass spectrometry. Such studies include the analyses of several samples and experimental controls in order to discriminate true specific interactions from unspecific interactions and contaminants. However, shotgun proteomics have limited quantification capabilities for low abundant proteins on large sample sets due to the undersampling and the stochastic precursor ion selection. In this context, targeted proteomics constitutes a powerful analytical tool to systematically detect and quantify peptides in multiple samples, for instance those obtained from affinity purification experiments. Hypothesis-driven strategies have mainly relied on the selected reaction monitoring (SRM) technique performed on triple quadrupole instruments, which enables highly selective and sensitive measurements of peptides, acting as surrogates of the pre-selected proteins, over a wide range of concentrations. More recently, novel quantitative methods based on high resolution instruments, such as the parallel reaction monitoring (PRM) technique implemented on the quadrupole-orbitrap instrument, have arisen and provided alternatives to perform quantitative analyses with enhanced selectivity.The application of targeted proteomics to protein-protein interaction experiments from plasma and other physiological fluid samples and the inclusion of parallel reaction monitoring (PRM), combined with other recent technology developments opens a vast area for clinical application of proteomics. It is anticipated that it will reveal valuable information about specific, individual, responses against drugs, exogenous proteins or pathogens.

  6. Integration of Proteomics and Transcriptomics Data Sets for the Analysis of a Lymphoma B-Cell Line in the Context of the Chromosome-Centric Human Proteome Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díez, Paula; Droste, Conrad; Dégano, Rosa M; González-Muñoz, María; Ibarrola, Nieves; Pérez-Andrés, Martín; Garin-Muga, Alba; Segura, Víctor; Marko-Varga, Gyorgy; LaBaer, Joshua; Orfao, Alberto; Corrales, Fernando J; De Las Rivas, Javier; Fuentes, Manuel

    2015-09-04

    A comprehensive study of the molecular active landscape of human cells can be undertaken to integrate two different but complementary perspectives: transcriptomics, and proteomics. After the genome era, proteomics has emerged as a powerful tool to simultaneously identify and characterize the compendium of thousands of different proteins active in a cell. Thus, the Chromosome-centric Human Proteome Project (C-HPP) is promoting a full characterization of the human proteome combining high-throughput proteomics with the data derived from genome-wide expression profiling of protein-coding genes. Here we present a full proteomic profiling of a human lymphoma B-cell line (Ramos) performed using a nanoUPLC-LTQ-Orbitrap Velos proteomic platform, combined to an in-depth transcriptomic profiling of the same cell type. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001933. Integration of the proteomic and transcriptomic data sets revealed a 94% overlap in the proteins identified by both -omics approaches. Moreover, functional enrichment analysis of the proteomic profiles showed an enrichment of several functions directly related to the biological and morphological characteristics of B-cells. In turn, about 30% of all protein-coding genes present in the whole human genome were identified as being expressed by the Ramos cells (stable average of 30% genes along all the chromosomes), revealing the size of the protein expression-set present in one specific human cell type. Additionally, the identification of missing proteins in our data sets has been reported, highlighting the power of the approach. Also, a comparison between neXtProt and UniProt database searches has been performed. In summary, our transcriptomic and proteomic experimental profiling provided a high coverage report of the e