WorldWideScience

Sample records for ge substrates final

  1. Substrate Effects in Wideband SiGe HBT Mixer Circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Tom Keinicke; Vidkjær, Jens; Krozer, Viktor

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the influence from substrate effects on the performance of wideband SiGe HBT mixer circuits is investigated. Equivalent circuit models including substrate networks are extracted from on-wafer test structures and compared with electromagnetic simulations. Electromagnetic simulations...

  2. GaAs/Ge/Si epitaxial substrates: Development and characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yury Buzynin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We developed high quality 2-inch GaAs/Ge/Si (100 epitaxial substrates, which may be used instead of GaAs monolithic substrates for fabrication of solar cells, photodetectors, LEDs, lasers, etc. A 200–300 nm Ge buffer layer was grown on Si substrates using the HW-CVD technique at 300°C, a tantalum strip heated to 1400°C was used as the “hotwire”. The MOCVD method was used to grow a 1 μ GaAs layer on a Ge buffer. The TDD in the GaAs layers did not exceed (1–2∙105 cm-2 and the surface RMS roughness value was under 1 nm.

  3. GaAs Photovoltaics on Polycrystalline Ge Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilt, David M.; Pal, AnnaMaria T.; McNatt, Jeremiah S.; Wolford, David S.; Landis, Geoffrey A.; Smith, Mark A.; Scheiman, David; Jenkins, Phillip P.; McElroy Bruce

    2007-01-01

    High efficiency III-V multijunction solar cells deposited on metal foil or even polymer substrates can provide tremendous advantages in mass and stowage, particularly for planetary missions. As a first step towards that goal, poly-crystalline p/i/n GaAs solar cells are under development on polycrystalline Ge substrates. Organo Metallic Vapor Phase Epitaxy (OMVPE) parameters for pre-growth bake, nucleation and deposition have been examined. Single junction p/i/n GaAs photovoltaic devices, incorporating InGaP front and back window layers, have been grown and processed. Device performance has shown a dependence upon the thickness of a GaAs buffer layer deposited between the Ge substrate and the active device structure. A thick (2 m) GaAs buffer provides for both increased average device performance as well as reduced sensitivity to variations in grain size and orientation. Illumination under IR light (lambda > 1 micron), the cells showed a Voc, demonstrating the presence of an unintended photoactive junction at the GaAs/Ge interface. The presence of this junction limited the efficiency to approx.13% (estimated with an anti-refection coating) due to the current mismatch and lack of tunnel junction interconnect.

  4. HPC4Energy Final Report : GE Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Steven G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Van Zandt, Devin T. [GE Energy Consulting, Schenectady, NY (United States); Thomas, Brian [GE Energy Consulting, Schenectady, NY (United States); Mahmood, Sajjad [GE Energy Consulting, Schenectady, NY (United States); Woodward, Carol S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-02-25

    Power System planning tools are being used today to simulate systems that are far larger and more complex than just a few years ago. Advances in renewable technologies and more pervasive control technology are driving planning engineers to analyze an increasing number of scenarios and system models with much more detailed network representations. Although the speed of individual CPU’s has increased roughly according to Moore’s Law, the requirements for advanced models, increased system sizes, and larger sensitivities have outstripped CPU performance. This computational dilemma has reached a critical point and the industry needs to develop the technology to accurately model the power system of the future. The hpc4energy incubator program provided a unique opportunity to leverage the HPC resources available to LLNL and the power systems domain expertise of GE Energy to enhance the GE Concorda PSLF software. Well over 500 users worldwide, including all of the major California electric utilities, rely on Concorda PSLF software for their power flow and dynamics. This pilot project demonstrated that the GE Concorda PSLF software can perform contingency analysis in a massively parallel environment to significantly reduce the time to results. An analysis with 4,127 contingencies that would take 24 days on a single core was reduced to 24 minutes when run on 4,217 cores. A secondary goal of this project was to develop and test modeling techniques that will expand the computational capability of PSLF to efficiently deal with systems sizes greater than 150,000 buses. Toward this goal the matrix reordering implementation time was sped up 9.5 times by optimizing the code and introducing threading.

  5. Vertically grown Ge nanowire Schottky diodes on Si and Ge substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Nishant; Tracy, Clarence J.; Cho, Jeong-Hyun; Picraux, S. T.; Hathwar, Raghuraj; Goodnick, Stephen M.

    2015-07-01

    The processing and performance of Schottky diodes formed from arrays of vertical Ge nanowires (NWs) grown on Ge and Si substrates are reported. The goal of this work is to investigate CMOS compatible processes for integrating NWs as components of vertically scaled integrated circuits, and elucidate transport in vertical Schottky NWs. Vertical phosphorus (P) doped Ge NWs were grown using vapor-liquid-solid epitaxy, and nickel (Ni)-Ge Schottky contacts were made to the tops of the NWs. Current-voltage (I-V) characteristics were measured for variable ranges of NW diameters and numbers of nanowires in the arrays, and the I-V characteristics were fit using modified thermionic emission theory to extract the barrier height and ideality factor. As grown NWs did not show rectifying behavior due to the presence of heavy P side-wall doping during growth, resulting in a tunnel contact. After sidewall etching using a dilute peroxide solution, rectifying behavior was obtained. Schottky barrier heights of 0.3-0.4 V and ideality factors close to 2 were extracted using thermionic emission theory, although the model does not give an accurate fit across the whole bias range. Attempts to account for enhanced side-wall conduction due to non-uniform P doping profile during growth through a simple shunt resistance improve the fit, but are still insufficient to provide a good fit. Full three-dimensional numerical modeling using Silvaco Atlas indicates that at least part of this effect is due to the presence of fixed charge and acceptor like traps on the NW surface, which leads to effectively high ideality factors.

  6. Electrical isolation of dislocations in Ge layers on Si(001 substrates through CMOS-compatible suspended structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal Ajit Shah, Maksym Myronov, Chalermwat Wongwanitwatana, Lewis Bawden, Martin J Prest, James S Richardson-Bullock, Stephen Rhead, Evan H C Parker, Terrance E Whall and David R Leadley

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Suspended crystalline Ge semiconductor structures are created on a Si(001 substrate by a combination of epitaxial growth and simple patterning from the front surface using anisotropic underetching. Geometric definition of the surface Ge layer gives access to a range of crystalline planes that have different etch resistance. The structures are aligned to avoid etch-resistive planes in making the suspended regions and to take advantage of these planes to retain the underlying Si to support the structures. The technique is demonstrated by forming suspended microwires, spiderwebs and van der Pauw cross structures. We finally report on the low-temperature electrical isolation of the undoped Ge layers. This novel isolation method increases the Ge resistivity to 280 Ω cm at 10 K, over two orders of magnitude above that of a bulk Ge on Si(001 layer, by removing material containing the underlying misfit dislocation network that otherwise provides the main source of electrical conduction.

  7. Photoreflectance Spectroscopy Characterization of Ge/Si0.16Ge0.84 Multiple Quantum Wells on Ge Virtual Substrate

    OpenAIRE

    Hsu, Hung-Pin; Yang, Pong-Hong; Huang, Jeng-Kuang; Wu, Po-Hung; Huang, Ying-Sheng; Li, Cheng; Huang, Shi-Hao; Tiong, Kwong-Kau

    2013-01-01

    We report a detailed characterization of a Ge/Si0.16Ge0.84 multiple quantum well (MQW) structure on Ge-on-Si virtual substrate (VS) grown by ultrahigh vacuum chemical vapor deposition by using temperature-dependent photoreflectance (PR) in the temperature range from 10 to 300 K. The PR spectra revealed a wide range of optical transitions from the MQW region as well as transitions corresponding to the light-hole and heavy-hole splitting energies of Ge-on-Si VS. A detailed comparison of PR spec...

  8. GeSn-on-insulator substrate formed by direct wafer bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lei, Dian; Wang, Wei; Gong, Xiao, E-mail: elegong@nus.edu.sg, E-mail: yeo@ieee.org; Yeo, Yee-Chia, E-mail: elegong@nus.edu.sg, E-mail: yeo@ieee.org [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Lee, Kwang Hong; Wang, Bing [Low Energy Electronic Systems (LEES), Singapore MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART), 1 CREATE Way, #10-01 CREATE Tower, Singapore 138602 (Singapore); Bao, Shuyu [Low Energy Electronic Systems (LEES), Singapore MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART), 1 CREATE Way, #10-01 CREATE Tower, Singapore 138602 (Singapore); School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Tan, Chuan Seng [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2016-07-11

    GeSn-on-insulator (GeSnOI) on Silicon (Si) substrate was realized using direct wafer bonding technique. This process involves the growth of Ge{sub 1-x}Sn{sub x} layer on a first Si (001) substrate (donor wafer) followed by the deposition of SiO{sub 2} on Ge{sub 1-x}Sn{sub x}, the bonding of the donor wafer to a second Si (001) substrate (handle wafer), and removal of the Si donor wafer. The GeSnOI material quality is investigated using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD), atomic-force microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and spectroscopic ellipsometry. The Ge{sub 1-x}Sn{sub x} layer on GeSnOI substrate has a surface roughness of 1.90 nm, which is higher than that of the original Ge{sub 1-x}Sn{sub x} epilayer before transfer (surface roughness is 0.528 nm). The compressive strain of the Ge{sub 1-x}Sn{sub x} film in the GeSnOI is as low as 0.10% as confirmed using HRXRD and Raman spectroscopy.

  9. Photoreflectance Spectroscopy Characterization of Ge/Si0.16Ge0.84 Multiple Quantum Wells on Ge Virtual Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung-Pin Hsu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a detailed characterization of a Ge/Si0.16Ge0.84 multiple quantum well (MQW structure on Ge-on-Si virtual substrate (VS grown by ultrahigh vacuum chemical vapor deposition by using temperature-dependent photoreflectance (PR in the temperature range from 10 to 300 K. The PR spectra revealed a wide range of optical transitions from the MQW region as well as transitions corresponding to the light-hole and heavy-hole splitting energies of Ge-on-Si VS. A detailed comparison of PR spectral line shape fits and theoretical calculation led to the identification of various quantum-confined interband transitions. The temperature-dependent PR spectra of Ge/Si0.16Ge0.84 MQW were analyzed using Varshni and Bose-Einstein expressions. The parameters that describe the temperature variations of various quantum-confined interband transition energies were evaluated and discussed.

  10. In-situ Ga doping of fully strained Ge1-xSnx heteroepitaxial layers grown on Ge(001) substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shimura, Y.; Takeuchi, S.; Nakatsuka, O.

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated the Ga and Sn content dependence of the crystallinity and electrical properties of Ga-doped Ge1-xSnx layers that are heteroepitaxially grown on Ge(001) substrates. The doping of Ga to levels as high as the solubility limit of Ga at the growth temperature leads...... to the introduction of dislocations, due to the increase in the strain of the Ge1-xSnx layers. We achieved the growth of a fully strained Ge0.922Sn0.078 layer on Ge with a Ga concentration of 5.5×1019 /cm3 without any dislocations and stacking faults. The resistivity of the Ga-doped Ge1-xSnx layer decreased as the Sn...... content was increased. This decrease was due to an increase in the carrier concentration, with an increase in the activation level of Ga atoms in the Ge1-xSnx epitaxial layers being induced by the introduction of Sn. As a result, we found that the resistivity for the Ge0.950Sn0.050 layer annealed at 600°C...

  11. Growth and characterization of epitaxial layers of Ge on Si substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fathy, D.; White, C.W.; Holland, O.W.

    1987-03-01

    Thin single crystalline layers of Ge with atomically sharp boundaries have been formed epitaxially on (100) Si substrates. This was done by 74 Ge ion implantation into Si followed by steam oxidation. Using both Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), we have found that a Ge layer forms as a result of Ge segregated at the moving SiO 2 interface during steam oxidation. For a SiO 2 layer that has swept through the implanted region, essentially all of the Ge is snow-ploughed and no Ge is lost to the oxide layer. The Ge layers and its two bounding interfaces, i.e., Ge/SiO 2 and Ge/Si, have been characterized as a function of the implantation dose and energy. The thickness of the Ge layer formed is dependent on the implantation dose. Thicknesses from a fraction of a monolayer to greater than 50 monolayers of Ge can be formed on Si by this mechanism. Initially the Ge layer forms a coherent interface with the underlying Si with no misfit dislocations, and misfit dislocations only appear as the thickness of the film is increased

  12. Physical studies of strained Si/SiGe heterostructures. From virtual substrates to nanodevices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minamisawa, Renato Amaral

    2011-10-21

    During the past two decades, the decrease in intrinsic delay of MOSFETs has been driven by the scaling of the device dimensions. The performance improvement has relied mostly in the increase of source velocity with gate scaling, while the transport properties of the channel have remained constant, i.e., those of conventional Si. Starting at the 90 nm node, uniaxial strain has been introduced in the transistor channel in order to further increase the source velocity. Beyond the 32 nm node, novel channel materials, with superior carrier velocities, and novel device architectures are required in order to continue the performance enhancement of MOSFETs while preserving the electrostatic control. In this Thesis, different physical aspects of strained Si and SiGe materials are investigated as a mean to increase carrier velocity in MOSFET channels. Novel approaches for the fabrication of strained Si based on ion implantation and anneal induced relaxation of virtual substrates are developed. The strain relaxation of SiGe layers is improved using a buried thin Si:C layer in the Si(100) substrate. Further, a Si{sup +} ion implantation and annealing method is investigated for relaxing virtual substrates using lower implantation dose. Finally, the uniaxial relaxation of {l_brace}110{r_brace} surface oriented substrates is demonstrated using a He ion implantation and anneal technique. Apart of channel material studies, the fundamental and technological challenges involved in the integration of strained Si and SiGe into MOSFETs are assessed. The impact of source and drain formation on the elastic strain and electrical properties of strained Si layers and nanowires is examined. Also, the formation of ultra-shallow junction in strained Si/strained Si{sub 0.5}Ge{sub 0.5}/SSOI heterostructures is investigated using different types of ion implanted specie and annealing. The results show that BF{sup +}{sub 2} implantation and low temperature annealing are suitable approaches for

  13. XRD analysis of strained Ge-SiGe heterostructures on relaxed SiGe graded buffers grown by hybrid epitaxy on Si(0 0 1) substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco, N.; Barradas, N.P.; Alves, E.; Vallera, A.M.; Morris, R.J.H.; Mironov, O.A.; Parker, E.H.C.

    2005-01-01

    Ge/Si 1-x Ge x inverted modulation doped heterostructures with Ge channel thickness of 16 and 20 nm were grown by a method of hybrid epitaxy followed by ex situ annealing at 650 deg. C for p-HMOS application. The thicker layers of the virtual substrate (6000 nm graded SiGe up to x = 0.6 and 1000 nm uniform composition with x = 0.6) were produced by ultrahigh vacuum chemical vapor deposition (UHV-CVD) while the thinner, Si(2 nm)-SiGe(20 nm)-Ge-SiGe(15 nm + 5 nm B-doped + 20 nm) active layers were grown by low temperature solid-source (LT-SS) MBE at T = 350 deg. C. As-grown and annealed samples were measured by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Reciprocal space maps (RSMs) allowed us to determine non-destructively the precise composition (∼1%) and strain of the Ge channel, along with similar information regarding the other layers that made up the whole structure. Layer thickness was determined with complementary high-resolution Rutherford backscattering (RBS) experiments

  14. Room Temperature Electroluminescence from Tensile-Strained Si0.13Ge0.87/Ge Multiple Quantum Wells on a Ge Virtual Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangyang Lin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Direct band electroluminescence (EL from tensile-strained Si0.13Ge0.87/Ge multiple quantum wells (MQWs on a Ge virtual substrate (VS at room temperature is reported herein. Due to the competitive result of quantum confinement Stark effect and bandgap narrowing induced by tensile strain in Ge wells, electroluminescence from Γ1-HH1 transition in 12-nm Ge wells was observed at around 1550 nm. As injection current density increases, additional emission shoulders from Γ2-HH2 transition in Ge wells and Ge VS appeared at around 1300–1400 nm and 1600–1700 nm, respectively. The peak energy of EL shifted to the lower energy side superquadratically with an increase of injection current density as a result of the Joule heating effect. During the elevation of environmental temperature, EL intensity increased due to a reduction of energy between L and Γ valleys of Ge. Empirical fitting of the relationship between the integrated intensity of EL (L and injection current density (J with L~Jm shows that the m factor increased with injection current density, suggesting higher light emitting efficiency of the diode at larger injection current densities, which can be attributed to larger carrier occupations in the Γ valley and the heavy hole (HH valance band at higher temperatures.

  15. P-type Ge epitaxy on GaAs (100) substrate grown by MOCVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Y.J.; Chia, C.K.; Liu, H.F.; Wong, L.M.; Chai, J.W.; Chi, D.Z.; Wang, S.J., E-mail: sj-wang@imre.a-star.edu.sg

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • The heterogeneous integration of p-Ge/GaAs by MOCVD indicates significance for the application in optoelectronic devices such as p-MOSFET, dual band photodetector, etc. • Many undesired pillar-structures were observed on the p-Ge epilayers and we found that the cause of the pillar-like structures was related to the Ge-Ga dimers formed during the growth. • We found that a GaAs substrate with fewer Ga or Ge danglings was helpful in suppressing the formation of the unwanted pillar-like structures and thus obtaining high quality p-Ge epilayers. - Abstract: In this work, Ga-doped Geranium (Ge) films have been grown on GaAs (100) substrates by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Undesired pillar structures have been observed on the epilayers prepared at relatively lower temperatures. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) indicated that the pillars are mainly consisted of Ga atoms, which is totally different from that of the Ge film. It was demonstrated that the pillar structures could be reduced by simply raising the growth temperature while keeping the other growth conditions unchanged. In this regard, the growth mechanism of the pillars was related to the Ge-Ga dimers formed during the growth of p-Ge films. By further studying the influence of a GaAs or Ge buffer layer on the growth of p-Ge layers, we found that the GaAs substrate with lower density of Ga or Ge dangling bonds was helpful in suppressing the formation of the undesired pillar structures.

  16. SiGe quantum dot molecules grown on patterned Si (001) substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Hongbin; Zhang Xiangjiu; Jiang Zuiming; Yang Xinju; Fan Yongliang

    2008-01-01

    SiGe quantum dot molecules (QDMs) grown on patterned Si (001) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy were studied. Experimental results showed that the density, the dimension, and the dimension distribution of the SiGe QDMs grown in the windows were dependent on the window size. When the thickness of the Si 0.8 Ge 0.2 film was 40 nm, QDMs only appeared in the unpatterned areas of the Si substrate and none could be found inside the windows of 6x6 μm 2 on the same substrate. However, when the thickness of Si 0.8 Ge 0.2 film was increased to 80 nm, QDMs appeared both inside the windows and in the unpatterned areas, and the density of QDMs was reduced with the decrease in the window size. We attribute these results to the different strain relaxations in different size windows, which are caused by the edge effect of the epitaxial film in the window. Based on these experimental results we discuss the formation and the size stability of the QDMs and conclude that the formation of the SiGe QDM originates from an intrinsic cause of the strain relief mechanism. This work also shows that by means of the edge induced strain relaxation of the epitaxial film in the window, it is possible to reveal the influence of the strain on some physical properties of the SiGe film without changing its Ge atomic fraction

  17. Croissance epitaxiale de GaAs sur substrats de Ge par epitaxie par faisceaux chimiques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belanger, Simon

    de confirmer l'efficacite du procede de preparation de surface et d'identifier les conditions de croissance optimales. Les resultats de caracterisation indiquent que les materiaux obtenus presentent une tres faible rugosite de surface, une bonne qualite cristalline et un dopage residuel relativement important. De plus, l'interface GaAs/Ge possede une faible densite de defauts. Finalement, la diffusion d'arsenic dans le substrat de germanium est comparable aux valeurs trouvees dans la litterature pour la croissance a basse temperature avec les autres procedes d'epitaxie courants. Ces resultats confirment que la technique d'epitaxie par faisceaux chimiques (CBE) permet de produire des couches de GaAs sur Ge de qualite adequate pour la fabrication de cellules solaires a haute performance. L'apport a la communaute scientifique a ete maximise par le biais de la redaction d'un article soumis a la revue Journal of Crystal Growth et la presentation des travaux a la conference Photovoltaics Canada 2010 . Mots-cles : Epitaxie par jets chimiques, Chemical beam epitaxy, CBE, MOMBE, Germanium, GaAs, Ge

  18. Disentangling nonradiative recombination processes in Ge micro-crystals on Si substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pezzoli, Fabio, E-mail: fabio.pezzoli@unimib.it; Giorgioni, Anna; Gatti, Eleonora; Grilli, Emanuele; Bonera, Emiliano; Miglio, Leo [LNESS and Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, via Cozzi 55, I-20125 Milano (Italy); Gallacher, Kevin; Millar, Ross W.; Paul, Douglas J. [School of Engineering, University of Glasgow, Rankine Building, Oakfield Avenue, Glasgow G12 8LT (United Kingdom); Isa, Fabio [LNESS, Dipartimento di Fisica del Politecnico di Milano and IFN-CNR, Polo Territoriale di Como, Via Anzani 42, I-22100 Como (Italy); Laboratory for Solid State Physics, ETH Zurich, Otto-Stern-Weg 1, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Biagioni, Paolo [LNESS, Dipartimento di Fisica del Politecnico di Milano and IFN-CNR, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Isella, Giovanni [LNESS, Dipartimento di Fisica del Politecnico di Milano and IFN-CNR, Polo Territoriale di Como, Via Anzani 42, I-22100 Como (Italy)

    2016-06-27

    We address nonradiative recombination pathways by leveraging surface passivation and dislocation management in μm-scale arrays of Ge crystals grown on deeply patterned Si substrates. The time decay photoluminescence (PL) at cryogenic temperatures discloses carrier lifetimes approaching 45 ns in band-gap engineered Ge micro-crystals. This investigation provides compelling information about the competitive interplay between the radiative band-edge transitions and the trapping of carriers by dislocations and free surfaces. Furthermore, an in-depth analysis of the temperature dependence of the PL, combined with capacitance data and finite difference time domain modeling, demonstrates the effectiveness of GeO{sub 2} in passivating the surface of Ge and thus in enhancing the room temperature PL emission.

  19. Strain-Engineered Nanomembrane Substrates for Si/SiGe Heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sookchoo, Pornsatit

    For Group IV materials, including silicon, germanium, and their alloys, although they are most widely used in the electronics industry, the development of photonic devices is hindered by indirect band gaps and large lattice mismatches. Thus, any heterostructures involving Si and Ge (4.17% lattice mismatch) are subject to plastic relaxation by dislocation formation in the heterolayers. These defects make many devices impossible and at minimum degrade the performance of those that are possible. Fabrication using elastic strain engineering in Si/SiGe nanomembranes (NMs) is an approach that is showing promise to overcome this limitation. A key advantage of such NM substrates over conventional bulk substrates is that they are relaxed elastically and therefore free of dislocations that occur in the conventional fabrication of SiGe substrates, which are transferred to the epilayers and roughen film interfaces. In this thesis, I use the strain engineering of NMs or NM stacks to fabricate substrates for the epitaxial growth of many repeating units of Si/SiGe heterostructure, known as a 'superlattice', by the elastic strain sharing of a few periods of the repeating unit of Si/SiGe heterolayers or a Si/SiGe/Si tri-layer structure. In both cases, the process begins with the epitaxial growth of Si/SiGe heterolayers on silicon-on-insulator (SOI), where each layer thickness is designed to stay below its kinetic critical thickness for the formation of dislocations. The heterostructure NMs are then released by etching of the SiO2 sacrificial layer in hydrofluoric acid. The resulting freestanding NMs are elastically relaxed by the sharing of strain between the heterolayers. The NMs can be bonded in-place to their host substrate or transferred to another host substrate for the subsequent growth of many periods of superlattice film. The magnitude of strain sharing in these freestanding NMs is influenced by their layer thicknesses and layer compositions. As illustrated in this

  20. Stress-directed compositional patterning of SiGe substrates for lateral quantum barrier manipulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Swapnadip; Kaiser, Daniel; Sinno, Talid; Bonilla, Jose; Han, Sang M.

    2015-01-01

    While vertical stacking of quantum well and dot structures is well established in heteroepitaxial semiconductor materials, manipulation of quantum barriers in the lateral directions poses a significant engineering challenge. Here, we demonstrate lateral quantum barrier manipulation in a crystalline SiGe alloy using structured mechanical fields to drive compositional redistribution. To apply stress, we make use of a nano-indenter array that is pressed against a Si 0.8 Ge 0.2 wafer in a custom-made mechanical press. The entire assembly is then annealed at high temperatures, during which the larger Ge atoms are selectively driven away from areas of compressive stress. Compositional analysis of the SiGe substrates reveals that this approach leads to a transfer of the indenter array pattern to the near-surface elemental composition, resulting in near 100% Si regions underneath each indenter that are separated from each other by the surrounding Si 0.8 Ge 0.2 bulk. The “stress transfer” process is studied in detail using multiscale computer simulations that demonstrate its robustness across a wide range of applied stresses and annealing temperatures. While the “Si nanodot” structures formed here are not intrinsically useful as quantum structures, it is anticipated that the stress transfer process may be modified by judicious control of the SiGe film thickness and indenter array pattern to form more technologically useful structures

  1. Photo-sensitive Ge nanocrystal based films controlled by substrate deposition temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Stavarache, Ionel

    2017-07-21

    Lowering the temperature of crystallization by deposition of thin films on a heated substrate represents the easiest way to find new means to develop and improve new working devices based on nanocrystals embedded in thin films. The improvements are strongly related with the increasing of operation speed, substantially decreasing the energy consumption and reducing unit fabrication costs of the respective semiconductor devices. This approach avoids major problems, such as those related to diffusion or difficulties in controlling of nanocrystallites size, which appear during thermal treatments at high temperatures after deposition. It is reported here the significant progress introduced by synthesis procedure to the in-situ structuring of Ge nanocrystallites in SiO2 thin films by heating the substrate at low temperature, 400 °C during co-deposition of Ge and SiO2 by magnetron sputtering. As a proof-of-concept, a Si/Ge-NCs:SiO2 photo-sensitive structure was fabricated thereof and characterized. The structure shows superior performance on broad operation bandwidth from visible to near-infrared, as strong rectification properties in dark, significant current rise in the inversion mode when illuminated, high responsivity, high photo-detectivity of 1014 Jones, quick response and significant conversion efficiency of 850 %. This simple preparation approach brings an important contribution to the efort of structuring Ge nanocrystallites in SiO2 thin films at a lower temperature for the purpose of using these materials for devices in optoelectronics, solar cells and electronics on flexible substrates.

  2. Photoluminescence investigation of strictly ordered Ge dots grown on pit-patterned Si substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brehm, Moritz; Grydlik, Martyna; Tayagaki, Takeshi; Schmidt, Oliver G; Langer, Gregor; Schäffler, Friedrich

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the optical properties of ordered Ge quantum dots (QDs) by means of micro-photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL). These were grown on pit-patterned Si(001) substrates with a wide range of pit-periods and thus inter QD-distances (425–3400 nm). By exploiting almost arbitrary inter-QD distances achievable in this way we are able to choose the number of QDs that contribute to the PL emission in a range between 70 and less than three QDs. This well-defined system allows us to clarify, by PL-investigation, several points which are important for the understanding of the formation and optical properties of ordered QDs. We directly trace and quantify the amount of Ge transferred from the surrounding wetting layer (WL) to the QDs in the pits. Moreover, by exploiting different pit-shapes, we reveal the role of strain-induced activation energy barriers that have to be overcome for charge carriers generated outside the dots. These need to diffuse between the energy minimum of the WL in and between the pits, and the one in the QDs. In addition, we demonstrate that the WL in the pits is already severely intermixed with Si before upright QDs nucleate, which further enhances intermixing of ordered QDs as compared to QDs grown on planar substrates. Furthermore, we quantitatively determine the amount of Ge transferred by surface diffusion through the border region between planar and patterned substrate. This is important for the growth of ordered islands on patterned fields of finite size. We highlight that the Ge WL-facets in the pits act as PL emission centres, similar to upright QDs. (paper)

  3. Growth of Bi2Se3 topological insulator thin film on Ge(1 1 1) substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seungyeon; Lee, Sangsoo; Woo, Jeongseok; Lee, Geunseop

    2018-02-01

    Atomically smooth, single crystalline Bi2Se3 thin films were grown on a Ge(1 1 1) substrate using molecular beam epitaxy. Crystallinities of both the surface and the bulk as well as the stoichiometry of the grown film were characterized by using low-energy electron diffraction, scanning tunneling microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and photoelectron spectroscopies. Hexagonal atomic structures, quintuple layer steps observed in STM images confirmed that the Bi2Se3 film with a (0 0 0 1) surface was grown. Diffraction peak positions as well as the chemical composition determined from the core-level photoelectron spectra coincide well with those expected for the Bi2Se3 crystal. The surface state with a Dirac cone was observed in the valence photoelectron spectra, which also support that a high-quality Bi2Se3 film was grown on the Ge(1 1 1) substrate. The interface between Ge(1 1 1) and Bi2Se3(0 0 0 1) is expected to be abrupt due to the small lattice between them.

  4. Ordered GeSi nanorings grown on patterned Si (001 substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Yingjie

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An easy approach to fabricate ordered pattern using nanosphere lithography and reactive iron etching technology was demonstrated. Long-range ordered GeSi nanorings with 430 nm period were grown on patterned Si (001 substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. The size and shape of rings were closely associated with the size of capped GeSi quantum dots and the Si capping processes. Statistical analysis on the lateral size distribution shows that the high growth temperature and the long-term annealing can improve the uniformity of nanorings. PACS code1·PACS code2·more Mathematics Subject Classification (2000 MSC code1·MSC code2·more

  5. The structural and electrical characterisation of SiGe heterostructures deposited on strain relaxed virtual substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammond, R.

    1998-09-01

    The influence of lateral dimensions on the relaxation mechanism and the resulting effect on the surface topography of limited-area, linearly graded Si 1-x Ge x virtual substrates has been investigated for the first time. A dramatic change in the relaxation mechanism of such buffer layers has been observed for depositions on Si mesa pillars of lateral dimensions of 10μm and below. For such depositions, misfit dislocations are able to extend, unhindered, and terminate at the edges of the growth zone. In this manner, orthogonal misfit dislocation interactions are avoided, yielding a surface free of the problematic surface cross-hatch roughening. However, as the lateral dimension of the growth zone is increased to 20μm, orthogonal misfit interactions occur and relaxation is dominated by the Modified Frank-Read (MFR) multiplication mechanism. The resulting surface morphology shows a pronounced surface cross-hatch roughening. It is proposed that such cross-hatch roughening is a direct consequence of the cooperative stress fields associated with the MFR mechanism. It is postulated that the method of limited-area, linearly graded buffer layers provides a unique opportunity, by which 'ideal' virtual substrates, free of surface cross-hatch and threading dislocations, may be produced to any Ge content. In addition, a unique method by which the electrical performance of low temperature, strained layer depositions may be optimised is discussed. The method relies on the elimination of as-grown lattice imperfections via a post growth thermal anneal treatment. A 25-fold increase in low temperature hole mobility of a Si 0.5 Ge 0.5 /Si 0.7 Ge 0.3 heterostructure has been demonstrated using a 30minute, 750 deg C in-situ, post growth anneal. (author)

  6. Atom probe tomography study on Ge{sub 1−x−y}Sn{sub x}C{sub y} hetero-epitaxial film on Ge substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamiyama, Eiji, E-mail: ejkamiyama@aol.com [Technology, GlobalWafers Japan Corp. Ltd., 6-861-5 Higashiko, Seiro, Niigata 957-0197 (Japan); Department of Communication Engineering, Okayama Prefectural University, 111 Kuboki, Soja-shi, Okayama-ken 719-1197 (Japan); Sueoka, Koji [Department of Communication Engineering, Okayama Prefectural University, 111 Kuboki, Soja-shi, Okayama-ken 719-1197 (Japan); Terasawa, Kengo; Yamaha, Takashi; Nakatsuka, Osamu [Department of Crystalline Materials Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Zaima, Shigeaki [Department of Crystalline Materials Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); EcoTopia Science Institute, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Izunome, Koji; Kashima, Kazuhiko [Technology, GlobalWafers Japan Corp. Ltd., 6-861-5 Higashiko, Seiro, Niigata 957-0197 (Japan); Uchida, Hiroshi [Physical Analysis Technology Center, Toshiba Nanoanalysis Corporation, 8 Shinsugita-cho, Isogo-ku, Yokohama 235-8522 (Japan)

    2015-10-01

    We analyzed the incorporation of C atoms into a ternary alloy Ge{sub 1−x−y}Sn{sub x}C{sub y} epitaxial film on Ge substrates on a sub-nanometer scale by using atom probe tomography. Periodic atom distributions from individual (111) atomic planes were observed both in the Ge{sub 1−x−y}Sn{sub x}C{sub y} film and at the Ge substrates. Sn/C atoms had non-uniform distributions in the film. They also demonstrated a clear positive correlation in their distributions. Substitutional C atoms were only incorporated into the film when an Sn atom beam was applied onto the substrates under film growth conditions. - Highlights: • Incorporation of C atoms into epitaxial Ge{sub 1−x−y}Sn{sub x}C{sub y} film was studied. • Individual (111) atomic planes were observed by atom probe tomography. • Sn/C atoms had non-uniform distributions in the film. • Clear positive correlation in Sn/C atoms distributions was obtained.

  7. Electronic structures of GeSi nanoislands grown on pit-patterned Si(001) substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, Han; Yu, Zhongyuan

    2014-01-01

    Patterning pit on Si(001) substrate prior to Ge deposition is an important approach to achieve GeSi nanoislands with high ordering and size uniformity. In present work, the electronic structures of realistic uncapped pyramid, dome, barn and cupola nanoislands grown in (105) pits are systematically investigated by solving Schrödinger equation for heavy-hole, which resorts to inhomogeneous strain distribution and nonlinear composition-dependent band parameters. Uniform, partitioned and equilibrium composition profile (CP) in nanoisland and inverted pyramid structure are simulated separately. We demonstrate the huge impact of composition profile on localization of heavy-hole: wave function of ground state is confined near pit facets for uniform CP, at bottom of nanoisland for partitioned CP and at top of nanoisland for equilibrium CP. Moreover, such localization is gradually compromised by the size effect as pit filling ratio or pit size decreases. The results pave the fundamental guideline of designing nanoislands on pit-patterned substrates for desired applications

  8. Electronic structures of GeSi nanoislands grown on pit-patterned Si(001) substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Han, E-mail: Dabombyh@aliyun.com; Yu, Zhongyuan [State Key Laboratory of Information Photonics and Optical Communications, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Beijing 100876, P.R.China (China)

    2014-11-15

    Patterning pit on Si(001) substrate prior to Ge deposition is an important approach to achieve GeSi nanoislands with high ordering and size uniformity. In present work, the electronic structures of realistic uncapped pyramid, dome, barn and cupola nanoislands grown in (105) pits are systematically investigated by solving Schrödinger equation for heavy-hole, which resorts to inhomogeneous strain distribution and nonlinear composition-dependent band parameters. Uniform, partitioned and equilibrium composition profile (CP) in nanoisland and inverted pyramid structure are simulated separately. We demonstrate the huge impact of composition profile on localization of heavy-hole: wave function of ground state is confined near pit facets for uniform CP, at bottom of nanoisland for partitioned CP and at top of nanoisland for equilibrium CP. Moreover, such localization is gradually compromised by the size effect as pit filling ratio or pit size decreases. The results pave the fundamental guideline of designing nanoislands on pit-patterned substrates for desired applications.

  9. Si and Ge nanostructures epitaxy on a crystalline insulating LaAlO{sub 3}(001) substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bischoff, Jean-Luc; Mortada, Hussein; Dentel, Didier; Derivaz, Mickael [Institut de Science des Materiaux de Mulhouse (IS2M), LRC 7228 CNRS-UHA, Universite de Haute Alsace, Mulhouse (France); Ben Azzouz, Chiraz; Akremi, Abdelwahab; Chefi, Chaabanne [Equipe Surface et Interface (ESI) - Faculte des Sciences, Bizerte (Tunisia); Morales, Francisco Miguel; Herrera, Miriam; Manuel, Jose Manuel; Garcia, Rafael [Department of Materials Science, Metallurgical Engineering and Inorganic Chemistry, Cadiz University (Spain); Diani, Mustapha [Equipe de Recherche en Mecanique, Materiaux et Metallurgie, FST, Tanger (Morocco)

    2012-04-15

    We present a comparative structural study of the growth of Si and Ge deposited by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on a c(2 x 2) reconstructed LaAlO{sub 3}(001) substrate. Our findings are based on complementary experimental techniques such as in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED), low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and ex situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). While the layers are amorphous and wet uniformly the substrate in a low deposition temperature range, above 500 C both Si and Ge growths proceed in a Volmer-Weber (VW) mode leading to the formation of nanocrystals (NCs). The islands are found to be composed of pure Si and Ge and to have abrupt interfaces with the substrate. Both semiconductors (SCs) crystallize in their own diamond structure leading to relaxed NCs. No facets could be observed on the crystalline islands. An epitaxial relationship is established for which the (001) planes of Si and Ge are parallel to the LaAlO{sub 3}(001) surface but are rotated by 45 around the [001] growth axis. The Ge lattice undergoes a second rotation of 6 with respect to the (001) growth axis. This 6 tilt is an original mechanism to partially compensate the strain in the Ge islands induced by the large misfit. Whereas a unique epitaxial relationship is pointed out for Si NCs, many Ge NCs are randomly orientated on the surface. This is interpreted by the fact that the Ge islands are less anchored to the substrate due to a large misfit and to the fact that the Ge-O bonds are weaker than the Si-O ones. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. Strain relaxation of GaAs/Ge crystals on patterned Si substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taboada, A. G., E-mail: gonzalez@phys.ethz.ch; Kreiliger, T.; Falub, C. V.; Känel, H. von [Laboratory for Solid State Physics, ETH Zürich, Otto-Stern-Weg 1, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Isa, F.; Isella, G. [L-NESS, Department of Physics, Politecnico di Milano, via Anzani 42, I-22100 Como (Italy); Salvalaglio, M.; Miglio, L. [L-NESS, Department of Materials Science, Università di Milano-Bicocca, via Cozzi 55, I-20125 Milano (Italy); Wewior, L.; Fuster, D.; Alén, B. [IMM, Instituto de Microelectrónica de Madrid (CNM, CSIC), C/Isaac Newton 8, E-28760 Tres Cantos, Madrid (Spain); Richter, M.; Uccelli, E. [Functional Materials Group, IBM Research-Zürich, Säumerstrasse 4, CH-8803 Rüschlikon (Switzerland); Niedermann, P.; Neels, A.; Dommann, A. [Centre Suisse d' Electronique et Microtechnique, Jaquet-Droz 1, CH-2002 Neuchatel (Switzerland); Mancarella, F. [CNR-IMM of Bologna, Via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy)

    2014-01-13

    We report on the mask-less integration of GaAs crystals several microns in size on patterned Si substrates by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy. The lattice parameter mismatch is bridged by first growing 2-μm-tall intermediate Ge mesas on 8-μm-tall Si pillars by low-energy plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. We investigate the morphological evolution of the GaAs crystals towards full pyramids exhibiting energetically stable (111) facets with decreasing Si pillar size. The release of the strain induced by the mismatch of thermal expansion coefficients in the GaAs crystals has been studied by X-ray diffraction and photoluminescence measurements. The strain release mechanism is discussed within the framework of linear elasticity theory by Finite Element Method simulations, based on realistic geometries extracted from scanning electron microscopy images.

  11. Study of kaonic final states in $\\pi^{-}p$ at 190 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Schlüter, Tobias

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the status of analyses of data recorded in the 2008 and 2009 runs of the COMPASS experiment at CERN with sepcific focus on final states with $K^0_S K^0_S \\pi^-$ and $K^+K^-\\pi^-$ produced in $\\pi^-(190\\,\\textrm{GeV})p$ scattering. The interest in such final states is motivated by a summary of some of the relevant literature. We also show first results from the analysis of diffractively produced $K\\bar K\\pi$ states. Two prominent three-body structures, one around 1.8 GeV, the other at 2.2 GeV decaying via known $K\\bar K$ and $K\\pi$ states are seen.

  12. Design and fabrication of multi-layers infrared antireflection coating consisting of ZnS and Ge on ZnS substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei Moghadam, R.; Ahmadvand, H.; Jannesari, M.

    2016-03-01

    We have designed, fabricated and characterized a multi-layers antireflection coating on multispectral ZnS substrate, suitable for the infrared range of 8-12 μm. The 4-layers coating (Ge/ZnS/Ge/ZnS) with optimized thicknesses was fabricated by PVD technique and studied by FTIR, nanoindentation and AFM. From FTIR spectroscopy it was found that, in the wavelength range of 8-12 μm, the average transmittance of the double-side coated sample increases by about 26% and its maximum reaches about 98%. To improve the mechanical hardness, a bilayer of Y2O3/carbon was deposited on the coating. Nanoindentation test shows that the coating enhances the mechanical properties. The final coating have successfully passed durability and environmental tests.

  13. Investigation of microstructure and morphology for the Ge on porous silicon/Si substrate hetero-structure obtained by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gouder, S. [IM2NP Aix-Marseille Universités, UMR CNRS n°7334, Faculté des Sciences St-Jérôme - Case 142, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 France (France); Electronics Department, University Hadj Lakhdar, Batna 05000 (Algeria); Mahamdi, R. [Electronics Department, University Hadj Lakhdar, Batna 05000 (Algeria); Aouassa, M.; Escoubas, S.; Favre, L.; Ronda, A.; Berbezier, I. [IM2NP Aix-Marseille Universités, UMR CNRS n°7334, Faculté des Sciences St-Jérôme - Case 142, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 France (France)

    2014-01-01

    Thick porous silicon (PS) buffer layers are used as sacrificial layers to epitaxially grow planar and fully relaxed Ge membranes. The single crystal Ge layers have been deposited by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on PS substrate. During deposition, the pore network of PS layers has been filled with Ge. We investigate the structure and morphology of PS as fabricated and after annealing at various temperatures. We show that the PS crystalline lattice is distorted and expanded in the direction perpendicular to the substrate plane due to the presence of chemisorbed –OH. An annealing at high temperature (> 500 °C), greatly changes the PS morphology and structure. This change is marked by an increase of the pore diameter while the lattice parameter becomes tensily strained in the plane (compressed in the direction perpendicular). The morphology and structure of Ge layers are investigated by transmission electron microscopy, high resolution X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy as a function of the deposition temperature and deposited thickness. The results show that the surface roughness, level of relaxation and Si-Ge intermixing (Ge content) depend on the growth temperature and deposited thickness. Two sub-layers are distinguished: the layer incorporated inside the PS pores (high level of intermixing) and the layer on top of the PS surface (low level of intermixing). When deposited at temperature > 500 °C, the Ge layers are fully relaxed with a top Si{sub 1−x}Ge{sub x} layer x = 0.74 and a very flat surface. Such layer can serve as fully relaxed ultra-thin SiGe pseudo-substrate with high Ge content. The epitaxy of Ge on sacrificial soft PS pseudo-substrate in the experimental conditions described here provides an easy way to fabricate fully relaxed SiGe pseudo-substrates. Moreover, Ge thin films epitaxially deposited by MBE on PS could be used as relaxed pseudo-substrate in conventional microelectronic technology. - Highlights: • We have developed a rapid

  14. Organometallic chemical vapor deposition and characterization of ZnGe(1-x)Si(x)P2-Ge alloys on GaP substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, G. C.; Bachmann, Klaus J.; Posthill, J. B.; Timmons, M. L.

    1993-01-01

    The epitaxial growth of ZnGe(1-x)Si(x)P2-Ge alloys on GaP substrates by open tube organometallic chemical vapor deposition (OMCVD) is reported. The chemical composition of the alloys characterized by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy shows that alloys with x up to 0.13 can be deposited on (001) GaP. Epitaxial growth with mirror smooth surface morphology was achieved for x less than or equal to 0.05. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) micrographs of these alloys show specular epitaxy and the absence of microstructural defects indicating a defect density of less than 10(exp 7) cm(sup -2). Selected area electron diffraction pattern of the alloy shows that the epitaxial layer crystallizes in the chalcopyrite structure with relatively weak superlattice reflections indicating certain degree of randomness in the cation sublattice. Hall measurements show that the alloys are p-type, like the unalloyed films; the carrier concentration, however, dropped about 10 times from 2 x 10(exp 18) to 2 x 10(exp 17) cm(sup -3). Absorption measurements indicate that the band tailing in the absorption spectra of the alloy was shifted about 0.04 eV towards shorter wavelength as compared to the unalloyed material. Diodes fabricated from the n(+)-GaP/p-ZnSiP2-ZnGeP2-Ge heterostructure at x = 0.05 have a reverse break-down voltage of -10.8 V and a reverse saturation current density of approximately 6 x 10(exp -8) A/sq cm.

  15. (Tl, Sb) and (Tl, Bi) binary surface reconstructions on Ge(111) substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruznev, D. V.; Bondarenko, L. V.; Tupchaya, A. Y.; Yakovlev, A. A.; Mihalyuk, A. N.; Zotov, A. V.; Saranin, A. A.

    2018-03-01

    2D compounds made of Group-III and Group-V elements on the surface of silicon and germanium attract considerable attention due to prospects of creating III-V binary monolayers, which are predicted to hold advanced physical properties. In the present work, we have investigated two such systems, (Tl, Sb)/Ge(111) and (Tl, Bi)/Ge(111) using scanning tunneling microscopy, low energy electron diffraction observations and density-functional-theory calculations. In addition to the previously reported surface structures of 2D (Tl, Sb) and (Tl, Bi) compounds on Si(111), we found new ones, namely, √{ 7} × √{ 7} and 3 × 3. Formation processes and plausible models of their atomic arrangements are discussed.

  16. Selective growth of Ge1‑ x Sn x epitaxial layer on patterned SiO2/Si substrate by metal–organic chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Wakana; Washizu, Tomoya; Ike, Shinichi; Nakatsuka, Osamu; Zaima, Shigeaki

    2018-01-01

    We have investigated the selective growth of a Ge1‑ x Sn x epitaxial layer on a line/space-patterned SiO2/Si substrate by metal–organic chemical vapor deposition. We examined the behavior of a Sn precursor of tributyl(vinyl)tin (TBVSn) during the growth on Si and SiO2 substrates and investigated the effect of the Sn precursor on the selective growth. The selective growth of the Ge1‑ x Sn x epitaxial layer was performed under various total pressures and growth temperatures of 300 and 350 °C. The selective growth of the Ge1‑ x Sn x epitaxial layer on the patterned Si region is achieved at a low total pressure without Ge1‑ x Sn x growth on the SiO2 region. In addition, we found that the Sn content in the Ge1‑ x Sn x epitaxial layer increases with width of the SiO2 region for a fixed Si width even with low total pressure. To control the Sn content in the selective growth of the Ge1‑ x Sn x epitaxial layer, it is important to suppress the decomposition and migration of Sn and Ge precursors.

  17. Final state interaction in the pd → pnp reaction at 1 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deloff, A.

    1992-09-01

    The pd → pnp reaction at 1 GeV in both the direct and charge exchange channel has been investigated. The experimental data come from a line reversed beam-target experiment with 3.3 GeV/c deuterons incident on a proton target. In the direct channel data exhibit narrow structures in the np effective mass spectra: at threshold, at 2.02 GeV and at 2.12 GeV which have been seen before and we report on a new narrow enhancement at 1.95 GeV. In charge exchange channel the data show somewhat broader peak at 2.18 GeV. The data are explained by using a conventional approach, i.e. without sub-nucleonic degrees of freedom, but including the ΔN channel in NN scattering. 29 figs., 1 tab., 36 refs. (author)

  18. Textured Sb2Te3 films and GeTe/Sb2Te3 superlattices grown on amorphous substrates by molecular beam epitaxy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschker, Jos E.; Tisbi, E.; Placidi, E.; Momand, Jamo; Redaelli, Andrea; Kooi, Bart J.; Arciprete, Fabrizio; Calarco, Raffaella

    The realization of textured films of 2-dimensionally (2D) bonded materials on amorphous substrates is important for the integration of this material class with silicon based technology. Here, we demonstrate the successful growth by molecular beam epitaxy of textured Sb2Te3 films and GeTe/Sb2Te3

  19. Studies of boron diffusivities on (001) and (110) substrate orientation in Si and Ge along vertical/out-of plane and lateral/in-plane directions study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, M.-H.

    2013-01-01

    Systematic investigation on boron diffusivities along different diffusion directions in Si and Ge substrates is presented in this work. Dopant diffusivities along vertical and lateral directions are extracted experimentally with nano-meter-resolution from secondary ion mass spectroscopy measurement and capacitance–voltage measurement on a test pattern, respectively. The results show that boron diffusivities in Ge are smaller than in Si along random diffusion directions and substrate orientations (∼ 0.84 × in (001)/<001>, ∼ 0.86 × in (110)/<110>, ∼ 0.78 × in (001)/<110>, and ∼ 0.875 × in (110)/<1-10>). Moreover, boron diffusivities on the (110)-oriented substrate are also found to be higher ∼ 1.33 × than in (001)-oriented substrate. An interesting finding in this work is that wafer orientation, (001) or (110), plays a more important role than the substrate material in boron diffusion along the vertical direction, while the substrate material is more important than wafer orientation for diffusion in lateral direction. Combination with this observation and the understanding of the lateral dopant diffusion playing the more important role for the device junction design than the vertical dopant diffusion, Ge channel device can provide not only the higher mobility than Si channel device but also the higher capability to further retard the boron diffusion with the better short channel control along the lateral dopant diffusion direction, especially in the advanced FinFET structure having two (110) substrate orientation surfaces with looser crystal lattice density and larger dopant diffusivity. - Highlights: • Proposed method to extract lateral doping diffusion information. • Demonstration of doping diffusion behavior along different directions and substrate orientations. • Useful information for FinFET junction design

  20. High-quality III-V semiconductor MBE growth on Ge/Si virtual substrates for metal-oxide-semiconductor device fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Donghun; Harris, James S.; Kim, Eunji; McIntyre, Paul C.; Cagnon, Joel; Stemmer, Susanne

    2009-03-01

    We describe the molecular-beam epitaxial (MBE) growth and fabrication of III-V metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) devices on Ge/Si virtual substrates. We show that high-temperature in-situ H 2 annealing in the chemical-vapor deposition system changes the Ge surface configuration and produces a surface with predominantly double-step-layer conditions, which is crucial for the growth of single-domain GaAs. In addition, the surface morphology of III-V on Ge/Si improved significantly with an annealing treatment of the Ge surface carried out under high arsenic background pressure in the MBE chamber. This facilitates uniform As-monolayer formation on the entire Ge surface. Low-temperature migration-enhanced epitaxy (MEE) and low-temperature conventional GaAs growth not only enhance the growth of single-domain GaAs without Ge outdiffusion but also produce a sufficiently smooth surface for high-k dielectric deposition, achieving low leakage current. A 300-nm-thick GaAs buffer layer was grown, followed by a 10 nm growth of In 0.2Ga 0.8As high-mobility channel layer. A 7-8-nm-thick Al 2O 3 layer was deposited ex-situ by atomic-layer deposition (ALD). We verify the quality of III-V growth using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and photoluminescence (PL) measurement. The C-V characteristics show unpinning of the Fermi level, which is a necessary condition for gate voltage control of the drain current. This work suggests this materials combination is a promising candidate for the realization of advanced, nonclassical complementary-MOS and optoelectronic devices on Si substrates.

  1. Kirkendall void formation in reverse step graded Si1‑xGex/Ge/Si(001) virtual substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivadasan, Vineet; Rhead, Stephen; Leadley, David; Myronov, Maksym

    2018-02-01

    Formation of Kirkendall voids is demonstrated in the Ge underlayer of reverse step graded Si1‑xGex/Ge buffer layers grown on Si(001) using reduced pressure chemical vapour deposition (RP-CVD). This phenomenon is seen when the constant composition Si1‑xGex layer is grown at high temperatures and for x ≤ 0.7. The density and size of the spherical voids can be tuned by changing Ge content in the Si1‑xGex and other growth parameters.

  2. Effect of strain, substrate surface and growth rate on B-doping in selectively grown SiGe layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghandi, R.; Kolahdouz, M.; Hallstedt, J.; Wise, R.; Wejtmans, Hans; Radamson, H.H.

    2008-01-01

    In this work, the role of strain and growth rate on boron incorporation in selective epitaxial growth (SEG) of B-doped Si 1-x Ge x (x = 0.15-0.25) layers in recessed or unprocessed (elevated) openings for source/drain applications in CMOS has been studied. A focus has been made on the strain distribution and B incorporation in SEG of SiGe layers

  3. Monolithically integrated InGaAs/GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well laser grown by MOCVD on exact Ge/Si(001) substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleshkin, V. Ya.; Dubinov, A. A.; Krasilnik, Z. F.; Kudryavtsev, K. E.; Novikov, A. V.; Yurasov, D. V., E-mail: Inquisitor@ipm.sci-nnov.ru [Institute for Physics of Microstructures of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Baidus, N. V.; Samartsev, I. V. [Physical-Technical Research Institute of Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Fefelov, A. G. [FGUE “Salut,” 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Nekorkin, S. M. [Institute for Physics of Microstructures of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Physical-Technical Research Institute of Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Pavlov, D. A.; Sushkov, A. A. [Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Skorokhodov, E. V.; Shaleev, M. V.; Yablonskiy, A. N.; Yunin, P. A. [Institute for Physics of Microstructures of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-08

    We report on realization of the InGaAs/GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well laser grown by metallorganic chemical vapor deposition on a virtual Ge-on-Si(001) substrate. The Ge buffer layer has been grown on a nominal Si(001) substrate by solid-source molecular beam epitaxy. Such Ge buffer possessed rather good crystalline quality and smooth surface and so provided the subsequent growth of the high-quality A{sub 3}B{sub 5} laser structure. The laser operation has been demonstrated under electrical pumping at 77 K in the continuous wave mode and at room temperature in the pulsed mode. The emission wavelengths of 941 nm and 992 nm have been obtained at 77 K and 300 K, respectively. The corresponding threshold current densities were estimated as 463 A/cm{sup 2} at 77 K and 5.5 kA/cm{sup 2} at 300 K.

  4. Organometallic chemical vapor deposition and characterization of ZnGeP2/GaP multiple heterostructures on GaP substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, G. C.; Bachmann, Klaus J.

    1993-01-01

    The growth of ZnGeP2/GaP double and multiple heterostructures on GaP substrates by organometallic chemical vapor deposition is reported. These epitaxial films were deposited at a temperature of 580 C using dimethylzinc, trimethylgallium, germane, and phosphine as source gases. With appropriate deposition conditions, mirror smooth epitaxial GaP/ZnGeP2 multiple heterostructures were obtained on (001) GaP substrates. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) studies of the films showed that the interfaces are sharp and smooth. Etching study of the films showed dislocation density on the order of 5x10(exp 4)cm(sup -2). The growth rates of the GaP layers depend linearly on the flow rates of trimethylgallium. While the GaP layers crystallize in zinc-blende structure, the ZnGeP2 layers crystallize in the chalcopyrite structure as determined by (010) electron diffraction pattern. This is the first time that multiple heterostructures combining these two crystal structures were made.

  5. Stimulated emission in heterostructures with double InGaAs/GaAsSb/GaAs quantum wells, grown on GaAs and Ge/Si(001) substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yablonsky, A. N., E-mail: yablonsk@ipm.sci-nnov.ru; Morozov, S. V.; Gaponova, D. M.; Aleshkin, V. Ya. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Physics of Microstructures (Russian Federation); Shengurov, V. G.; Zvonkov, B. N.; Vikhrova, O. V.; Baidus’, N. V. [Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Krasil’nik, Z. F. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Physics of Microstructures (Russian Federation)

    2016-11-15

    We report the observation of stimulated emission in heterostructures with double InGaAs/GaAsSb/GaAs quantum wells, grown on Si(001) substrates with the application of a relaxed Ge buffer layer. Stimulated emission is observed at 77 K under pulsed optical pumping at a wavelength of 1.11 μm, i.e., in the transparency range of bulk silicon. In similar InGaAs/GaAsSb/GaAs structures grown on GaAs substrates, room-temperature stimulated emission is observed at 1.17 μm. The results obtained are promising for integration of the structures into silicon-based optoelectronics.

  6. Effects of a GaSb buffer layer on an InGaAs overlayer grown on Ge(111) substrates: Strain, twin generation, and surface roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajikawa, Y.; Nishigaichi, M.; Tenma, S.; Kato, K.; Katsube, S.

    2018-04-01

    InGaAs layers were grown by molecular-beam epitaxy on nominal and vicinal Ge(111) substrates with inserting GaSb buffer layers. High-resolution X-ray diffraction using symmetric 333 and asymmetric 224 reflections was employed to analyze the crystallographic properties of the grown layers. By using the two reflections, we determined the lattice constants (the unit cell length a and the angle α between axes) of the grown layers with taking into account the rhombohedral distortion of the lattices of the grown layers. This allowed us the independent determination of the strain components (perpendicular and parallel components to the substrate surface, ε⊥ and ε//) and the composition x of the InxGa1-xAs layers by assuming the distortion coefficient D, which is defined as the ratio of ε⊥ against ε//. Furthermore, the twin ratios were determined for the GaSb and the InGaAs layers by comparing asymmetric 224 reflections from the twin domain with that from the normal domain of the layers. As a result, it has been shown that the twin ratio in the InGaAs layer can be decreased to be less than 0.1% by the use of the vicinal substrate together with annealing the GaSb buffer layer during the growth interruption before the InGaAs overgrowth.

  7. Structure and Thermoelectric Properties of Te-Ag-Ge-Sb (TAGS) Materials Obtained by Reduction of Melted Oxide Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusz, B.; Miruszewski, T.; Bochentyn, B.; Łapiński, M.; Karczewski, J.

    2016-02-01

    Ge0.77Ag0.1Sb0.13Te1 alloy was fabricated by a novel two-step route. Firstly, oxide reagents were melted at high temperature and quenched into pellets. The pellets were milled to powder and then reduced in hydrogen at various temperatures for various periods of time. Energy-dispersive x-ray analysis indicated the possibility of successful fabrication of stoichiometric thermoelectric materials from the Te-Ag-Ge-Sb system. The electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient have been determined over the temperature range from 20°C to 340°C in argon atmosphere. It was also shown that, for most of the fabricated samples, the crystallite size as well as electrical parameters such as the electrical conductivity, Seebeck coefficient, and figure of merit ( ZT) increased with increasing reduction time. The highest value of ZT (˜1.0 at 340°C) was obtained for samples reduced in hydrogen atmosphere at 400°C for 20 h and 40 h.

  8. FEM for modelling 193 nm excimer laser treatment of SiO{sub 2}/Si/Si{sub (1-x)}Ge{sub x} heterostructures on SOI substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conde, J.C.; Chiussi, S.; Gontad, F.; Gonzalez, P. [Dpto. Fisica Aplicada, E.T.S.I.I. University of Vigo, Campus Universitario, Rua Maxwell s/n, 36310 Vigo (Spain); Martin, E. [Dpto. de Mecanica, Maquinas, Motores Termicos y Fluidos, E.T.S.I.I. University of Vigo, Campus Universitario, Rua Maxwell s/n, 36310 Vigo (Spain)

    2011-03-15

    Research on epitaxial crystalline silicon (c-Si) and silicon-germanium (Si{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x}) alloys growth and annealing for microelectronic purposes, such as Micro- or Nano-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS or NEMS) and Silicon-On-Nothing (SON) devices is continuously in progress. Laser assisted annealing techniques using commercial ArF Excimer Laser sources are based on ultra-rapid heating and cooling cycles induced by the 193 nm pulses of 20 ns, which are absorbed in the near surface region of the heterostructures. During and after the absorption of these laser pulses, complex physical processes appear that strongly depend on sample structure and applied laser pulse energy densities. The control of the experimental parameters is therefore a key task for obtaining high quality alloys. The Finite ElementsMethod (FEM) is a powerful tool for the optimization of such treatments, because it provides the spatial and temporal temperature fields that are produced by the laser pulses. In this work, we have used a FEM commercial software, to predict the temperatures gradients induced by ArF excimer laser over a wide energy densities range, 0.1<{phi}<0.4 J/cm{sup 2}, on different SiO{sub 2}/Si/Si{sub (1-x)}Ge{sub (x)} thin films deposited on SOI substrate. These numerical results allow us to predict the threshold energies needed to reach the melting point (MP) of the Si and SiGe alloy without oxidation of the thin films system. Therefore, it is possible to optimize the conditions to achieve high quality epitaxy films. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  9. Comparative Study of the Tuning Performances of the Nominal and Long L* CLIC Final Focus System at √s = 380 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Plassard, F; Marin, E; Tomás, R

    2017-01-01

    Mitigation of static imperfections for emittance preservation is one of the most important and challenging tasks faced by the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) beam delivery system. A simulation campaign has been performed to recover the nominal luminosity by means of different alignment procedures. The state of the art of the tuning studies is drawn up. Comparative studies of the tuning performances and a tuning-based final focus system design optimization for two L options are presented. The effectiveness of the tuning techniques applied to these different lattices will be decisive for the final layout of the CLIC final focus system at √s = 380 GeV.

  10. Multi-photon final states in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 130-172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerstaff, K; Allison, J; Altekamp, N; Anderson, K J; Anderson, S; Arcelli, S; Asai, S; Axen, D A; Azuelos, Georges; Ball, A H; Barberio, E; Barlow, R J; Bartoldus, R; Batley, J Richard; Baumann, S; Bechtluft, J; Beeston, C; Behnke, T; Bell, A N; Bell, K W; Bella, G; Bentvelsen, Stanislaus Cornelius Maria; Bethke, Siegfried; Biebel, O; Biguzzi, A; Bird, S D; Blobel, Volker; Bloodworth, Ian J; Bloomer, J E; Bobinski, M; Bock, P; Bonacorsi, D; Boutemeur, M; Bouwens, B T; Braibant, S; Brigliadori, L; Brown, R M; Burckhart, Helfried J; Burgard, C; Bürgin, R; Capiluppi, P; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Chrisman, D; Clarke, P E L; Cohen, I; Conboy, J E; Cooke, O C; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; Dallapiccola, C; Dallavalle, G M; Davis, R; De Jong, S; del Pozo, L A; Desch, Klaus; Dienes, B; Dixit, M S; do Couto e Silva, E; Doucet, M; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Eatough, D; Edwards, J E G; Estabrooks, P G; Evans, H G; Evans, M; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Fanti, M; Faust, A A; Fiedler, F; Fierro, M; Fischer, H M; Fleck, I; Folman, R; Fong, D G; Foucher, M; Fürtjes, A; Futyan, D I; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Gascon, J; Gascon-Shotkin, S M; Geddes, N I; Geich-Gimbel, C; Geralis, T; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Giacomelli, R; Gibson, V; Gibson, W R; Gingrich, D M; Glenzinski, D A; Goldberg, J; Goodrick, M J; Gorn, W; Grandi, C; Gross, E; Grunhaus, Jacob; Gruwé, M; Hajdu, C; Hanson, G G; Hansroul, M; Hapke, M; Hargrove, C K; Hart, P A; Hartmann, C; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, Richard J; Herndon, M; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hildreth, M D; Hill, J C; Hillier, S J; Hobson, P R; Homer, R James; Honma, A K; Horváth, D; Hossain, K R; Howard, R; Hüntemeyer, P; Hutchcroft, D E; Igo-Kemenes, P; Imrie, D C; Ingram, M R; Ishii, K; Jawahery, A; Jeffreys, P W; Jeremie, H; Jimack, Martin Paul; Joly, A; Jones, C R; Jones, G; Jones, M; Jost, U; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Karlen, D A; Kartvelishvili, V G; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Kayal, P I; Keeler, Richard K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kirk, J; Klier, A; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Koetke, D S; Kokott, T P; Kolrep, M; Komamiya, S; Kress, T; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Kyberd, P; Lafferty, G D; Lahmann, R; Lai, W P; Lanske, D; Lauber, J; Lautenschlager, S R; Layter, J G; Lazic, D; Lee, A M; Lefebvre, E; Lellouch, Daniel; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Long, G D; Losty, Michael J; Ludwig, J; Macchiolo, A; MacPherson, A L; Mannelli, M; Marcellini, S; Markus, C; Martin, A J; Martin, J P; Martínez, G; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McDonald, W J; McKenna, J A; McKigney, E A; McMahon, T J; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menke, S; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, J; Michelini, Aldo; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Mincer, A; Mir, R; Mohr, W; Montanari, A; Mori, T; Morii, M; Müller, U; Mihara, S; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Neal, H A; Nellen, B; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oakham, F G; Odorici, F; Ögren, H O; Oh, A; Oldershaw, N J; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pálinkás, J; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Patrick, G N; Patt, J; Pearce, M J; Pérez-Ochoa, R; Petzold, S; Pfeifenschneider, P; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, J L; Plane, D E; Poffenberger, P R; Poli, B; Posthaus, A; Rees, D L; Rigby, D; Robertson, S; Robins, S A; Rodning, N L; Roney, J M; Rooke, A M; Ros, E; Rossi, A M; Routenburg, P; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Runólfsson, O; Ruppel, U; Rust, D R; Rylko, R; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Sbarra, C; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharf, F; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schenk, P; Schieck, J; Schleper, P; Schmitt, B; Schmitt, S; Schöning, A; Schröder, M; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Schumacher, M; Schwick, C; Scott, W G; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Sherwood, P; Siroli, G P; Sittler, A; Skillman, A; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Snow, G A; Sobie, Randall J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Springer, R W; Sproston, M; Stephens, K; Steuerer, J; Stockhausen, B; Stoll, K; Strom, D; Szymanski, P; Tafirout, R; Talbot, S D; Tanaka, S; Taras, P; Tarem, S; Teuscher, R; Thiergen, M; Thomson, M A; Von Törne, E; Towers, S; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turcot, A S; Turner-Watson, M F; Utzat, P; Van Kooten, R; Verzocchi, M; Vikas, P; Vokurka, E H; Voss, H; Wäckerle, F; Wagner, A; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wermes, N; White, J S; Wilkens, B; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wolf, G; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Yekutieli, G; Zacek, V; Zer-Zion, D

    1998-01-01

    The process e^+e^- -> gamma gamma (gamma) is studied using data recorded with the OPAL detector at LEP. The data sample corresponds to a total integrated luminosity of 25.38 pb^{-1} taken at centre-of-mass energies of 130-172 GeV. The measured cross-sections agree well with the expectation from QED. In a combined fit using data from all centre-of-mass energies, the angular distribution is used to obtain improved limits on the cut-off parameters: Lambda_+ > 195 GeV and Lambda_- > 210 GeV (95% CL). In addition, limits on non-standard e^+e^-gamma couplings and contact interactions, as well as a 95% CL mass limit for an excited electron, M_{e^*} > 194 GeV for an e^+e^-gamma coupling kappa = 1, are determined.

  11. Growth of Si0.75Ge0.25 alloy layers grown on Si(001) substrates using step-graded short-period (Sim/Gen)N superlattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, M. M.; Matada, H.; Tambo, T.; Tatsuyama, C.

    2001-01-01

    Short-period (Si m /Ge n ) N superlattices (SSLs) are grown step by step on a Si(001) substrates by solid source molecular beam epitaxy. Using the step-graded SSLs as buffer layers, 2000 Aa uniform Si 0.75 Ge 0.25 alloy layers are grown on the same substrates. The growth temperature of the SSLs and uniform layers is 500 degree C. In the SSLs layers, m and n are the number of monolayers of Si and Ge, respectively. N is the period of (Si m /Ge n ) bilayers. The samples grown are characterized by x-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) as a function of the step number of SSL layers. The SSLs show very smooth surfaces [the root-mean-square (rms) surface roughness is between 7 and 12 Aa]. A dramatic decrease in roughness is observed in the uniform Si 0.75 Ge 0.25 alloy layers, when even a one-step SSL is used as a buffer layer. A noticeable increase in rms roughness is seen in both SSL and alloy layers when the number of Ge monolayers is changed from one to two. AFM observation shows that the rms surface roughness behavior of the SSLs is reflected to their corresponding top alloy layers. The residual strains in alloy layers are considerably lower, with a maximum relaxation rate of about 80% for the sample with a seven-step SSL buffer. Cross-sectional TEM images show that strained SSL buffer layers effectively deflect threading dislocations in the substrate or confine the dislocations in the SSL buffer layers. [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  12. Memory characteristics and tunneling mechanism of Ag nanocrystal embedded HfAlOx films on Si83Ge17/Si substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu, X.Y.; Zhou, G.D.; Li, J.; Chen, Y.; Wang, X.H.; Dai, J.Y.

    2014-01-01

    A nano-floating gate memory capacitor consisting of a stack of 3 nm-thick HfAlO x tunneling layer, self-organized Ag nanocrystals (NCs), and a 6 nm-thick HfAlO x control layer, has been fabricated on compressively strained p-type Si 83 Ge 17 /Si(100) substrates by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering. The Ag-NCs with a size of 5–8 nm and a density of 5.7 × 10 12 /cm 2 are well dispersed in the amorphous HfAlO x matrix. Counterclockwise hysteresis capacitance–voltage curve with a memory window of ∼ 2 V, corresponding to a charge storage density of about 1.3 × 10 13 electrons/cm 2 , is observed in this memory capacitor. The accumulation capacitance of this memory capacitor has no obvious decrease during electrical stressing process within a period of 10 4 s, but the memory window gradually becomes narrower, and only 54% stored charges are retained in the Ag-NCs after 10 5 s stressing. Defect-enhanced Poole–Frenkel tunneling is found to be responsible for the degradation of memory properties. - Highlights: • Dispersed Ag nanocrystals act as memory nodes. • Realize a 2 V memory window • Illustrate the memory degradation process • Identify a defect-enhanced tunneling mechanism

  13. Phase formation and texture of thin nickel germanides on Ge(001) and Ge(111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Schutter, B., E-mail: deschutter.bob@ugent.be; Detavernier, C. [Department of Solid-State Sciences, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281/S1, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Van Stiphout, K.; Santos, N. M.; Vantomme, A. [Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200 D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Bladt, E.; Bals, S. [Electron Microscopy for Materials Research (EMAT), University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Jordan-Sweet, J.; Lavoie, C. [IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States); Comrie, C. M. [Department of Physics, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7700 (South Africa)

    2016-04-07

    We studied the solid-phase reaction between a thin Ni film and a single crystal Ge(001) or Ge(111) substrate during a ramp anneal. The phase formation sequence was determined using in situ X-ray diffraction and in situ Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), while the nature and the texture of the phases were studied using X-ray pole figures and transmission electron microscopy. The phase sequence is characterized by the formation of a single transient phase before NiGe forms as the final and stable phase. X-ray pole figures were used to unambiguously identify the transient phase as the ϵ-phase, a non-stoichiometric Ni-rich germanide with a hexagonal crystal structure that can exist for Ge concentrations between 34% and 48% and which forms with a different epitaxial texture on both substrate orientations. The complementary information gained from both RBS and X-ray pole figure measurements revealed a simultaneous growth of both the ϵ-phase and NiGe over a small temperature window on both substrate orientations.

  14. Four-jet final state production in e+e- collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 130 and 136 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buskulic, D.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J. P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M. N.; Odier, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Orteu, S.; Padilla, C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Girone, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A. O.; Cattaneo, M.; Comas, P.; Coyle, P.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Lutters, G.; Martin, E. B.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Moneta, L.; Oest, T.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J. F.; Ranjard, F.; Rensing, P.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Venturi, A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J. C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Rossignol, J. M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Wäänänen, A.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J. C.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, F.; Thorn, S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Becker, U.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, J.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Abbaneo, D.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Stacey, A. M.; Williams, M. D.; Dissertori, G.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Sloan, T.; Whelan, E. P.; Williams, M. I.; Galla, A.; Greene, A. M.; Hoffmann, C.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H. G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Diaconu, C.; Konstantinidis, N.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Ragusa, F.; Abt, I.; Assmann, R.; Bauer, C.; Blum, W.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H. G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; St. Denis, R.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J. F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A. M.; Nikolic, I.; Park, H. J.; Park, I. C.; Schune, M. H.; Simion, S.; Veillet, J. J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignain, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Cerutti, F.; Chambers, J. T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Marx, B.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J. F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J. P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Johnson, R. P.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Koksal, A.; Letho, M.; Newton, W. M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Büscher, V.; Cowan, G.; Grupen, C.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R. W.; Armstrong, S. R.; Bellantoni, L.; Elmer, P.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; González, S.; Grahl, J.; Greening, T. C.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; McNamara, P. A.; Nachtman, J. M.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Schmitt, M.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, A. M.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.

    1996-03-01

    The four-jet final state is analyzed to search for hadronic decays of pair-produced heavy particles. The analysis uses the ALEPH data collected at LEP in November 1995 at centre-of-mass energies of 130 and 136 GeV, corresponding to a total integrated luminosity of 5.7 pb-1. An excess of four-jet events is observed with respect to the standard model predictions. In addition, these events exhibit an enhancement in the sum of the two di-jet masses around 105 GeV/ c 2. The properties of these events are studied and compared to the expectations from standard processes and to pair production hypotheses.

  15. Strategies for Direct Monolithic Integration of AlxGa(1-x)As/InxGa(1-x)As LEDS and Lasers On Ge/GeSi/Si Substrates Via Relaxed Graded GexSi(1-x) Buffer Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    densities as low as 2x10 cm enabled cw room-temperature lasing at a wavelength of 858nm. The laser structures are oxide -stripe gain-guided devices with...quantum wells in GaAs grown above it. GaAs grown on Ge can introduce complications for device integration due to autodoping effects from amphoteric Ge...dopant concentrations were measured using secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). Oxide -stripe gain-guided devices were fabricated from these structures

  16. Final results of the searches for neutral Higgs bosons in $e^{+}e^{-}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ up to 209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Heister, A.; Barate, R.; Bruneliere, R.; De Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Goy, C.; Jezequel, S.; Lees, J.P.; Martin, F.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Trocme, B.; Boix, G.; Bravo, S.; Casado, M.P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J.M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, L.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, J.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, L.M.; Pacheco, A.; Paneque, D.; Ruiz, H.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Filippis, N.; de Palma, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Azzurri, P.; Barklow, T.; Buchmuller, O.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Clerbaux, B.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R.W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Greening, T.C.; Hansen, J.B.; Harvey, J.; Hutchcroft, D.E.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kado, M.; Maley, P.; Mato, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, Gigi; Schlatter, D.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Valassi, A.; Videau, I.; Ward, J.J.; Badaud, F.; Dessagne, S.; Falvard, A.; Fayolle, D.; Gay, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Pallin, D.; Pascolo, J.M.; Perret, P.; Hansen, J.D.; Hansen, J.R.; Hansen, P.H.; Nilsson, B.S.; Waananen, A.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J.C.; Machefert, F.; Rouge, A.; Swynghedauw, M.; Tanaka, R.; Videau, H.; Ciulli, V.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G.P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Spagnolo, P.; Kennedy, J.; Lynch, J.G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Smith, D.; Thompson, A.S.; Wasserbaech, S.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E.E.; Leibenguth, G.; Putzer, A.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D.M.; Cameron, W.; Davies, G.; Dornan, P.J.; Girone, M.; Hill, R.D.; Marinelli, N.; Nowell, J.; Przysiezniak, H.; Rutherford, S.A.; Sedgbeer, J.K.; Thompson, J.C.; White, R.; Ghete, V.M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.; Bowdery, C.K.; Clarke, D.P.; Ellis, G.; Finch, A.J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R.W.L.; Pearson, M.R.; Robertson, N.A.; Smizanska, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Blumenschein, U.; Holldorfer, F.; Jakobs, K.; Kayser, F.; Kleinknecgt, K.; Muller, A.S.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.G.; Schmeling, S.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zeitnitz, C.; Ziegler, T.; Bonissent, A.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Leroy, O.; Kachelhoffer, T.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Tilquin, A.; Ragusa, F.; David, A.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Huttmann, K.; Lutjens, G.; Mannert, C.; Manner, W.; Moser, H.G.; Settles, R.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.F.; Heusse, P.; Jacholkowska, A.; Loomis, C.; Serin, L.; Veillet, J.J.; de Vivie de Regie, J.B.; Yuan, C.; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Boccali, T.; Foa, L.; Giammanco, A.; Giassi, A.; Ligabue, F.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciaba, A.; Tenchini, R.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P.G.; Awunor, O.; Blair, G.A.; Coles, J.; Cowan, G.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Green, M.G.; Jones, L.T.; Medcalf, T.; Misiejuk, A.; Strong, J.A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Clifft, R.W.; Edgecock, T.R.; Norton, P.R.; Tomalin, I.R.; Bloch-Devaux, Brigitte; Boumediene, D.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Lancon, E.; Lemaire, M.C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.F.; Rosowsky, A.; Seager, P.; Trabelsi, A.; Tuchming, B.; Vallage, B.; Konstantinidis, N.; Litke, A.M.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C.N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Hodgson, P.N.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L.F.; Affholderbach, K.; Boehrer, Armin; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Hess, J.; Ngac, A.; Prange, G.; Sieler, U.; Borean, C.; Giannini, G.; He, H.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Armstrong, S.R.; Berkelman, Karl; Cranmer, K.; Ferguson, D.P.S.; Gao, Y.; Gonzalez, S.; Hayes, O.J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; Kile, J.; McNamara, P.A., III; Nielsen, J.; Pan, Y.B.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J.H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wu, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.

    2002-01-01

    The final results of the ALEPH search for the Standard Model Higgs boson at LEP, with data collected in the year 2000 at centre-of-mass energies up to 209,GeV, are presented. The changes with respect to the preceding publication are described and a complete study of systematic effects is reported. The findings of this final analysis confirm the preliminary results published in November 2000 shortly after the closing down of the LEP collider: a significant excess of events is observed, consistent with the production of a $115, Gcs$ Standard Model Higgs boson.% The final results of the searches for the neutral Higgs bosons of the MSSM are also reported, in terms of limits on $mh$, $mA$ and $anb$.% Limits are also set on $mh$ in the case of invisible decays.

  17. Four-jet final state production in e+e- collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 130 and 136 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Buskulic, Damir; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Orteu, S; Padilla, C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Girone, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Cattaneo, M; Comas, P; Coyle, P; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Lutters, G; Martin, E B; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Moneta, L; Oest, T; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Venturi, A; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Wäänänen, A; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Brient, J C; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Videau, H L; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Thompson, A S; Thomson, F; Thorn, S; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Rensch, B; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Stenzel, H; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Abbaneo, D; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Sloan, Terence; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Greene, A M; Hoffmann, C; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Bencheikh, A M; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Diaconu, C A; Konstantinidis, N P; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Tilquin, A; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Ragusa, F; Abt, I; Assmann, R W; Bauer, C; Blum, Walter; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Jakobs, K; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Park, I C; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Walsh, J; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Cerutti, F; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Marx, B; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Köksal, A; Lehto, M H; Newton, W M; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Büscher, V; Cowan, G D; Grupen, Claus; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Williams, R W; Armstrong, S R; Bellantoni, L; Elmer, P; Feng, Z; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Schmitt, M; Scott, I J; Walsh, A M; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1996-01-01

    The four-jet final state is analyzed to search for hadronic decays of pair-produced heavy particles. The analysis uses the ALEPH data collected at LEP in November 1995 at centre-of-mass energies of 130 and 136~GeV, corresponding to a total integrated luminosity of 5.7~\\inpb. An excess of four-jet events is observed with respect to the standard model predictions. In addition, these events exhibit an enhancement in the sum of the two di-jet masses around 105~\\Gcs. The properties of these events are studied and compared to the expectations from standard processes and to pair production hypotheses.

  18. Assessment of substrate potential resources which can be used in methanization - Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastide, Guillaume

    2013-04-01

    This report proposes a method to elaborate a detailed and precise assessment of potential resources of substrates which can be used for methanization. It aims at obtaining global results at the national level while proposing figures at the district level which can be integrated into regional documents. Four types of resources have been addressed: the production raw resource, the available raw resource, the available net resource, and the mobilisable resource by 2030. These resources have different origins: agriculture (breeding effluents, crop residues, energetic intermediate crops), various agri-food industries, sanitation systems, green wastes, and bio-wastes from different origins (restaurants, small shops, retail trade, markets). Some other sources (green algae, micro-algae, roadside grass, meadows, farming fruits and vegetables) have only been identified but are considered as experiments or difficult to be assessed

  19. Comparison of PWA results of K+Kos π- final states produced in 8 GeV/c K-p, π- p and bar pp interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bar-Yam, Z.; Dowd, J.; Kern, W.; King, E.; Rulon, P.; Blessing, S.K.; Crittenden, R.R.; Dzierba, A.R.; Marshall, T.; Teige, S.W.; Zieminska, D.; Boehnlein, A.; Boehnlein, D.; Goldman, J.H.; Hagopian, V.; Bonner, B.E.; Clement, J.M.; Krishna, N.; Mutchler, G.S.; Roberts, J.B.; Chung, S.U.; Fernow, R.C.; Kirk, H.; Peaslee, D.C.; Protopopescu, S.D.; Weygand, D.P.; Willutzki, H.J.

    1991-01-01

    We have performed partial-wave analyses of the K + K o s π - system produced in the reactions K - p → K + K o sπ - , Λ/Σ, π - p → K + K o s π - n and bar pp → K + K o sπ - X at 8 GeV/c in substantially the same apparatus. We present and compare the results of the analysis of the three reactions in the mass range 1.24 GeV/c 2 2 . In all three reactions the J PG = O minus-plus, 1± and 1 ++ waves are the most important. A strong f 1 (1285) signal is evident in the π and bar p beam data sets but not in the K data. There is evidence of η(l280) production, especially in the n and 0 beam data. We find evidence of two O minus-plus states in the 1400 MeV/c 2 mass region, but no compelling case for a 1 ++ resonance in this region. Finally, the 1 ± wave in the K beam data is consistent with an h' state below the K*K threshold

  20. Phi meson and accompanying strange particle production in 16 GeV/c π+p interactions. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hylen, J.E.

    1982-01-01

    We have studied phi production in 16 GeV/c π + p interactions. K - identified in a Cherenkov counter were used to trigger the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center 2-meter streamer chamber. A sample of inclusive phi events was thus obtained where phi → K - K + . Information from a second Cherenkov counter was used to identify the K + off-line. In addition, the visible decays in the streamer chamber of Λ 0 → pπ - and K/sub s/ 0 → π + π - were used to obtain events of the type π + p → phi Λ 0 + anything and π + p → phi K/sub s/ 0 + anything. With 1.26 x 10 9 π + onto a 61 cm liquid hydrogen target, the experiment had a raw sensitivity of 3.1 events/nb. For the film measured so far, taking into account geometric acceptance, unseen decay modes, and all efficiency corrections, the sensitivities are 7.1 events/μb, 22 events/μb, and 27 events/μb respectively for the phi inclusive, phi with Λ 0 , and phi with K/sub x/ 0 samples. The acceptance covers the region in Feynman's x, x/sub phi/ > 0.5. The measured cross sections for x/sub phi > 0.5 are sigma(phi + chi) = 1.3 +- 2.0 μb, sigma(phi Λ 0 + chi) = 0.37 +- 0.16 μb, and sigma(phi K/sub s/ 0 + chi) = 0.33 +- 0.15 μb. When account is taken of unseen associated channels, it is concluded that phi is predominantly produced conjointly with pairs of strange particles. This agrees with the OZI rule, and is consistent with phi being produced by a quark fusion type process, rather than gluon fusion or light quark annihilation. 43 references

  1. Fabrication of multilayered Ge nanocrystals embedded in SiOxGeNy films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Fei; Green, Martin A.; Conibeer, Gavin; Cho, Eun-Chel; Huang Yidan; Perez-Wurfl, Ivan; Flynn, Chris

    2008-01-01

    Multilayered Ge nanocrystals embedded in SiO x GeN y films have been fabricated on Si substrate by a (Ge + SiO 2 )/SiO x GeN y superlattice approach, using a rf magnetron sputtering technique with a Ge + SiO 2 composite target and subsequent thermal annealing in N 2 ambient at 750 deg. C for 30 min. X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurement indicated the formation of Ge nanocrystals with an average size estimated to be 5.4 nm. Raman scattering spectra showed a peak of the Ge-Ge vibrational mode downward shifted to 299.4 cm -1 , which was caused by quantum confinement of phonons in the Ge nanocrystals. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that Ge nanocrystals were confined in (Ge + SiO 2 ) layers. This superlattice approach significantly improved both the size uniformity of Ge nanocrystals and their uniformity of spacing on the 'Z' growth direction

  2. Excitation intensity dependence of photoluminescence spectra of SiGe quantum dots grown on prepatterned Si substrates: Evidence for biexcitonic transition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klenovský, P.; Brehm, M.; Křápek, Vlastimil; Lausecker, E.; Munzar, D.; Hackl, F.; Steiner, H.; Fromherz, T.; Bauer, G.; Humlíček, J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 86, č. 11 (2012), "115305-1"-"115305-8" ISSN 1098-0121 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : semiconductors nanocrystals * cyclotron resonance * uniaxial-stress * band alignment * Ge islands * germanium * wells * silicon * Si(001) * luminescence Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.767, year: 2012 http://prb.aps.org/abstract/PRB/v86/i11/e115305

  3. Laser produced streams of Ge ions accelerated and optimized in the electric fields for implantation into SiO2 substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosinski, M; Giuffrida, L; Parys, P; Gasior, P; Fazio, E; Mezzasalma, A M; Torrisi, L; Ando, L; Wolowski, J

    2012-02-01

    Ge crystals were prepared by means of laser-induced ion implantation technique. A Nd:YAG pulsed laser (repetition rate: 10 Hz; pulse duration: 3.5 ns; pulse energy: ∼0.5 J) was used both as an ion source and to carry out the ablation processes. The optimization of the laser-generated ion beam parameters in a broad energy and current density range has been obtained controlling the electrostatic field parameters. Numerical simulations of the focusing system, performed adopting an OPERA 3D code, and an investigation of the ion characteristics, using the ion time-of-flight method, have allowed to optimize the preparation parameters. The structural properties of the samples were investigated by means of x-ray photoelectron, micro-Raman spectroscopies, and scanning electron microscopy techniques. Experimental results show that, by appropriately varying the ion implantation parameters and by a post-preparation annealing treatment, it is possible to achieve the development of a micrometer-sized crystalline Ge phase and∕or an amorphous one.

  4. Four-jet final state production in e+e- collisions at centre-of-mass energies ranging from 130 to 184 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ALEPH Collaboration; Barate, R.; Buskulic, D.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Nief, J.-Y.; Pietrzyk, B.; Boix, G.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Graugès, E.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Morawitz, P.; Park, I. C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Alemany, R.; Becker, U.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Casper, D.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Ciulli, V.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Hagelberg, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Lehraus, I.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moneta, L.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, L.; Rousseau, D.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Tomalin, I. R.; Vreeswijk, M.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Badaud, F.; Chazelle, G.; Deschamps, O.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Rensch, B.; Wäänänen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J.-C.; Machefert, F.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Boccali, T.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Cavanaugh, R.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Huehn, T.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Lynch, J. G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, F.; Buchmüller, O.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Martin, E. B.; Marinelli, N.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Spagnolo, P.; Williams, M. D.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Buck, P. G.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Whelan, E. P.; Williams, M. I.; Giehl, I.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Leroy, O.; Motsch, F.; Payre, P.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Antonelli, M.; Ragusa, F.; Berlich, R.; Blum, W.; Büscher, V.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Mannert, C.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Kado, M. M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Schune, M.-H.; Serin, L.; Tournefier, E.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Sguazzoni, G.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Chambers, J. T.; Coles, J.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Faïf, G.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M.-C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Przysiezniak, H.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Kim, H. Y.; Konstantinidis, N.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Kelly, M. S.; Lehto, M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Affholderbach, K.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Foss, J.; Grupen, C.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R. W.; Armstrong, S. R.; Charles, E.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y.; González, S.; Greening, T. C.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; McNamara, P. A., III; Nachtman, J. M.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zobernig, G.

    1998-02-01

    The four jet topology is analysed in the ALEPH data taken between November 1995 and October 1997, at centre-of-mass energies ranging from 130 to 184 GeV. While an unexpected accumulation of events with a dijet mass sum around 105 GeV/c2 had been observed during the first run in 1995 at 130/136 GeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.7 pb-1, no significant differences between data and standard model prediction is seen, either in the high energy runs (81.1 pb-1 taken at centre-of-mass energies from 161 to 184 GeV) or in the 7.1 pb-1 recorded during a new short run at 130/136 GeV in 1997. We have found no other explanation for the earlier reported ``four jet anomaly'' than a statistical fluctuation.

  5. Four-jet final state production in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at centre-of-mass energies ranging from 130 to 184 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Pietrzyk, B; Boix, G; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Graugès-Pous, E; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Merino, G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Morawitz, P; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Alemany, R; Becker, U; Bright-Thomas, P G; Casper, David William; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Ciulli, V; Dissertori, G; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Gianotti, F; Hagelberg, R; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Lehraus, Ivan; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Moneta, L; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rolandi, Luigi; Rousseau, D; Schlatter, W D; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Teubert, F; Tomalin, I R; Vreeswijk, M; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Badaud, F; Chazelle, G; Deschamps, O; Falvard, A; Ferdi, C; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Daskalakis, G; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Vayaki, Anna; Blondel, A; Brient, J C; Machefert, F P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Videau, H L; Boccali, T; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Zachariadou, K; Cavanaugh, R J; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Hühn, T; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Lynch, J G; Negus, P; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Thomson, F; Ward, J; Buchmüller, O L; Dhamotharan, S; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Girone, M; Goodsir, S M; Martin, E B; Marinelli, N; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Spagnolo, P; Williams, M D; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kneringer, E; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Buck, P G; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R W L; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Giehl, I; Hoffmann, C; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Carr, J; Coyle, P; Ealet, A; Fouchez, D; Leroy, O; Motsch, F; Payre, P; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Tilquin, A; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Antonelli, M; Ragusa, F; Berlich, R; Blum, Walter; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Mannert, C; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Chen, S; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Kado, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Schune, M H; Serin, L; Tournefier, E; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Sguazzoni, G; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Vannini, C; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Chambers, J T; Coles, J; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Fabbro, B; Faïf, G; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Przysiezniak, H; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Rosowsky, A; Roussarie, A; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Kim, H Y; Konstantinidis, N P; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Kelly, M S; Lehto, M H; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Affholderbach, K; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Foss, J; Grupen, Claus; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Williams, R W; Armstrong, S R; Charles, E; Elmer, P; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y; González, S; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; Jin, S; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Nielsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, J; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zobernig, G

    1998-01-01

    The four jet topology is analysed in the ALEPH data taken between November 1995 and November 1997, at centre-of-mass energies ranging from 130 to 184 GeV. While an unexpected accumulation of events with a dijet mas sum around 105 GeV/c**2 had been observed during the first run in 1995 at 130/136 GeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.7 pb-1, no significant differences between data and standard model prediction is noticed, either in the high energy runs (81.1 pb-1 taken at centre-of-mass energies from 161 to 184 GeV) or in the 7.1 pb-1 recorded during a new short run at 130/136 GeV in 1997. We have found no other explanation for the earlier reported ``four jet anomaly'' than a statistical fluctuation.

  6. On the compliant behaviour of free-standing Si nanostructures on Si(001) for Ge nanoheteroepitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozlowski, Grzegorz

    2012-04-24

    phenomenon was observed. In clear contradiction to the present NHE theory, no strain partitioning phenomenon was found even for {approx}50 nm wide Si pillars for which the compliant substrate effects are expected. The absence of the strain partitioning between Ge and Si is caused by the stress field exerted by the SiO{sub 2} growth mask on the Si nanopillar. In contrast to such nanostructures monolithically prepared from a Si(001) wafer, first results in this thesis clearly prove the strain partitioning phenomenon within Ge/Si nanostructures on Silicon-on-insulator substrate. Here, the compliant substrate effects were clearly observed for pillar widths even bigger than 50 nm. This experimental work demonstrates, that NHE with its compliant substrate effects, offers an interesting approach for high quality Ge nanostructures on Si, avoiding even the misfit dislocation network with its non-tolerable electrical activity in Ge nanodevices. However, the theory does not yet include important aspects of thin film growth on the nano-scale and must be further developed. It is the aim of this PhD thesis to provide this experimental basis for the Ge/Si heterosystem. Finally, it is noted that here developed growth approach is fully Si CMOS compatible and is not only relevant for Ge integration but also for other lattice mismatched alternative semiconductors (GaAs etc.) to enable higher performance / new functions in future Si microelectronics technologies.

  7. Two-dimensional partial-wave analysis of exclusive 190 GeV π-p scattering into the π-π-π+ final state at COMPASS (CERN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, Florian

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of strong interaction in the regime of low energies, i.e. large distances, is still not understood. Given its simplicity the non-relativistic simple quark model (SQM) describes successfully the observed hadronic spectra. QCD-inspired models, however, predict hadronic states where the gluonic content contributes to the hadron quantum numbers. These so-called hybrids cannot be explained within the SQM. A solid experimental proof of the existence of such systems would be the observation of spin-exotic states, with spin-parity quantum numbers, not allowed in the SQM. The study of mesons, the simplest hadrons, permits to gain insight into the realm of strong interaction where hadrons are the relevant degrees of freedom. The most promising spin-exotic meson candidate is the π 1 (1600), which was claimed in several experiments and in particular in data taken during a previous hadron campaign of the COMPASS experiment. The hadron spectroscopy program of the COMPASS experiment at CERN focuses on the investigation of the light-meson spectrum in order to enlighten this rarely understood regime of strong interaction. During the 2008 data taking an unprecedented statistical precision has been reached in peripheral interactions of 190 GeV/c pions with a proton target leading to the π - π - π + final state. A spin-parity analysis in the kinematical region of the squared fourmomentum transfer 0.1≤t'0≤1.0 GeV 2 /c 2 was carried out based on a model of 88 partial waves up to a total angular momentum of 6. Besides the precise determination of properties of known resonances, a new axial-vector state, the a 1 (1420), was observed for the first time in a mass region where neither model nor lattice calculations predict mesons with this quantum numbers. Noteworthy is the very small intensity of this signal and that it only couples to the f 0 (980) isobar which is assumed to have a large strangeness content. The spin-exotic π 1 (1600) was observed albeit as a

  8. Charged hadron composition of the final state in e+e- annihilation up to 1.9 GeV/c at E/sub cm/ = 29 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ong, P.P.

    1983-08-01

    The momentum distributions of hadrons produced in e+e - collisions at a center of mass energy of 29 GeV have been measured. The data used in this analysis were collected by the High Resolution Spectrometer (HRS) at the Positron Electron Project (PEP) in the Spring of 1982. The HRS is a general purpose particle detector consisting of a 16.2 kgauss solenoidal magnet, 17 layers of tracking chambers and multiple layers of lead-scintillator shower counters. The data consist of 8,200 hadronic events, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.6 pbarn -1 at E/sub cm/ = 29 GeV. Using the barrel shower counters' time-of-flight (TOF) measurements, charged particles in the momentum range 0.5 - 1.9 GeV/c are separated statistically. Measurements of differential cross sections, d sigma /dp, scaled cross sections, S*(dsigma/dXp), and charged particle fractions are presented and compared with measurements made by the TASSO and the JADE groups

  9. Ge nanobelts with high compressive strain fabricated by secondary oxidation of self-assembly SiGe rings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Weifang; Li, Cheng; Lin, Guangyang

    2015-01-01

    Curled Ge nanobelts were fabricated by secondary oxidation of self-assembly SiGe rings, which were exfoliated from the SiGe stripes on the insulator. The Ge-rich SiGe stripes on insulator were formed by hololithography and modified Ge condensation processes of Si0.82Ge0.18 on SOI substrate. Ge...... nanobelts under a residual compressive strain of 2% were achieved, and the strain should be higher before partly releasing through bulge islands and breakage of the curled Ge nanobelts during the secondary oxidation process. The primary factor leading to compressive strain is thermal shrinkage of Ge...... nanobelts, which extrudes to Ge nanobelts in radial and tangent directions during the cooling process. This technique is promising for application in high-mobility Ge nano-scale transistors...

  10. Magnetic anisotropy of (Ge,Mn) nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, A; Jamet, M; Barski, A; Devillers, T; Yu, I-S; Porret, C; Gambarelli, S; Maurel, V; Desfonds, G; Jacquot, J F, E-mail: abhinav.jain@cea.fr [Institut Nanosciences et Cryogenie, CEA-UJF, F-38054, Grenoble (France)

    2011-04-01

    We present a correlation between structural and magnetic properties of different (Ge,Mn) nanostructures grown on Ge(001) and Ge(111) substrates. Thin films of Ge{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x} were grown by low temperature molecular beam epitaxy to favor the out-of-equilibrium growth. Depending on the growth conditions crystalline or amorphous (Ge,Mn) nanocolumns have been observed on Ge(001) substrates. The magnetic properties were probed by superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). With the help of these complementary techniques (SQUID and EPR), magnetic anisotropy in these nanostructures has been investigated and different anisotropy constants were calculated.

  11. Nanostructured germanium deposited on heated substrates with enhanced photoelectric properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionel Stavarache

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Obtaining high-quality materials, based on nanocrystals, at low temperatures is one of the current challenges for opening new paths in improving and developing functional devices in nanoscale electronics and optoelectronics. Here we report a detailed investigation of the optimization of parameters for the in situ synthesis of thin films with high Ge content (50 % into SiO2. Crystalline Ge nanoparticles were directly formed during co-deposition of SiO2 and Ge on substrates at 300, 400 and 500 °C. Using this approach, effects related to Ge–Ge spacing are emphasized through a significant improvement of the spatial distribution of the Ge nanoparticles and by avoiding multi-step fabrication processes or Ge loss. The influence of the preparation conditions on structural, electrical and optical properties of the fabricated nanostructures was studied by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, electrical measurements in dark or under illumination and response time investigations. Finally, we demonstrate the feasibility of the procedure by the means of an Al/n-Si/Ge:SiO2/ITO photodetector test structure. The structures, investigated at room temperature, show superior performance, high photoresponse gain, high responsivity (about 7 AW−1, fast response time (0.5 µs at 4 kHz and great optoelectronic conversion efficiency of 900% in a wide operation bandwidth, from 450 to 1300 nm. The obtained photoresponse gain and the spectral width are attributed mainly to the high Ge content packed into a SiO2 matrix showing the direct connection between synthesis and optical properties of the tested nanostructures. Our deposition approach put in evidence the great potential of Ge nanoparticles embedded in a SiO2 matrix for hybrid integration, as they may be employed in structures and devices individually or with other materials, hence the possibility of fabricating various heterojunctions on Si, glass or flexible substrates for future development of Si

  12. Mono-fermentation of glycerine - Fermentation of a substrate in a dominant amount. Final report; Monovergaerung von Glycerin - Vergaerung von einem Substrat in dominierender Menge. Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erb, D.; Bueeler, E.; Spicher, M.

    2008-02-15

    The present study investigated the feasibility of a mono fermentation of the glycerine-fraction from biodiesel production. Part of the experiments took place in a single-stage, continuous system with 700 l usable volume. The maximum yield of biogas of the glycerine-fraction is 1100 l/l of glycerine, or 870 l/kg of glycerine, in continuous operation. The average methane content is 70 %. The adaptation rate of the biomass at the substrate of glycerine-fraction is high. Two or three days after starting the feed 100 % degradation rates will be achieved. The single-stage, continuous fermentation of the glycerine-fraction at 40 {sup o}C runs only stable at very low organic loading rate (0.65 kg oDM/(d m{sup 3})) and is therefore not currently economical. At higher organic loading rates (1.5 to 3.0 kg oDM/(d m{sup 3})) the adapted biomass collapsed after about 20 days due to massive instability of the process. A two-stage system with separate hydrolysis stage could probably allow a stable fermentation as search for literature has shown. Fed-batch experiments in the laboratory of the University of Waedenswil, Switzerland (ZHAW) demonstrated that the glycerine-fraction from biodiesel production is slightly better degradable than pure glycerine. The process dysfunctions arise because of the inhibition of intermediates resulting from the degradation of glycerine. At higher concentrations of 1.2-propanediol and 2.3-butanediol the degradation was incomplete. Further inhibitors can not be excluded. The failed stability of the process is not due to the lack of main nutrients or trace elements. (author)

  13. Structural characterisation of silicon-germanium virtual substrate- based heterostructures grown by low pressure chemical vapour deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Mihai-Dilliway, G D

    2002-01-01

    Silicon-germanium heterostructures incorporating compositionally graded virtual substrates are important for the fabrication of a variety of advanced electronic devices. Their successful application depends critically on their surface morphology and defect content. The aim of this research project is to characterise the way in which these structural properties are influenced by the growth parameters used in low pressure chemical vapour deposition (LPCVD) at the Southampton University Microelectronics Centre (SUMC). To this end, a comparative study of the surface quality and the distribution and density of misfit strain relaxation induced defects in SiGe virtual substrate-based heterostructures grown under varying conditions, was carried out. The growth parameters varied have been: growth temperature, initial and final Ge content, Ge concentration gradient, type of Ge grading profile (linear and stepwise) in the virtual substrate, and thickness and presence of a device structure in the capping layer of constan...

  14. Ge Quantum Dot Infrared Imaging Camera Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Luna Innovations Incorporated proposes to develop a high performance Ge quantum dots-based infrared (IR) imaging camera on Si substrate. The high sensitivity, large...

  15. Ge /Si heteronanocrystal floating gate memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bei; Liu, Jianlin; Liu, G. F.; Yarmoff, J. A.

    2007-09-01

    Metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor memories with Ge /Si heteronanocrystals (HNCs) as floating gate were fabricated and characterized. Ge /Si HNCs with density of 5×1011cm-2 were grown on n-type Si (100) substrate with thin tunnel oxide on the top. Enhanced device performances including longer retention time, faster programming speed, and higher charge storage capability are demonstrated compared with Si nanocrystal (NC) memories. The erasing speed and endurance performance of Ge /Si HNC memories are similar to that of Si NC devices. The results suggest that Ge /Si HNCs may be an alternative to make further floating gate memory scaling down possible.

  16. Critical current densities amd pinning mechanisms of high-Tc films on single crystalline and technologically relevant substrates. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adrian, H.

    1995-12-01

    The report deals with six project tasks: (1) Effects of impurity additions at atomic level on the pinning behaviour and the critical current densities, examined in epitactic YBA 2 (Cu 1-x Ni x ) 3 O 7 films. It could be proven that the Ni atoms increase the activation energy for flux movement and the critical current density in a concentration range of 0 2 Sr 2 Ca n-1 Cu n O 2n+4+δ films (n = 2 and 3) with good crystalline properties, high critical currents, and high current densities were prepared. Thin YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 films of high quality could be grown on saphire substrates, both by the MO-CVD process and by MBE. The aim of depositing biaxially textured YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 films with high critical current densities on polycrystalline, metallic substrates was achieved by the IBAD process combined with MBE. The buffer layer was YSZ. Heterostructures of the layer sequence YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 /CeO 2 /Y 0.3 Pr 0.7 Ba 2 Cu 3 O 7 /YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 and YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 /CeO 2 /Au were prepared by laser ablation and sputtering processes, in order to examine Josephson ramp contacts and superconducting field-effect transistors. (orig./MM) [de

  17. Selective Passivation of GeO2/Ge Interface Defects in Atomic Layer Deposited High-k MOS Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liangliang; Li, Huanglong; Guo, Yuzheng; Tang, Kechao; Woicik, Joseph; Robertson, John; McIntyre, Paul C

    2015-09-23

    Effective passivation of interface defects in high-k metal oxide/Ge gate stacks is a longstanding goal of research on germanium metal-oxide-semiconductor devices. In this paper, we use photoelectron spectroscopy to probe the formation of a GeO2 interface layer between an atomic layer deposited Al2O3 gate dielectric and a Ge(100) substrate during forming gas anneal (FGA). Capacitance- and conductance-voltage data were used to extract the interface trap density energy distribution. These results show selective passivation of interface traps with energies in the top half of the Ge band gap under annealing conditions that produce GeO2 interface layer growth. First-principles modeling of Ge/GeO2 and Ge/GeO/GeO2 structures and calculations of the resulting partial density of states (PDOS) are in good agreement with the experiment results.

  18. III-V/Ge channel MOS device technologies in nano CMOS era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Shinichi; Zhang, Rui; Suh, Junkyo; Kim, Sang-Hyeon; Yokoyama, Masafumi; Nishi, Koichi; Takenaka, Mitsuru

    2015-06-01

    CMOS utilizing high-mobility III-V/Ge channels on Si substrates is expected to be one of the promising devices for high-performance and low power advanced LSIs in the future, because of its enhanced carrier transport properties. However, there are many critical issues and difficult challenges for realizing III-V/Ge-based CMOS on the Si platform such as (1) the formation of high-crystal-quality Ge/III-V films on Si substrates, (2) gate stack technologies to realize superior MOS/MIS interface quality, (3) the formation of a source/drain (S/D) with low resistivity and low leakage current, (4) process integration to realize ultrashort channel devices, and (5) total CMOS integration including Si CMOS. In this paper, we review the recent progress in III-V/Ge MOS devices and process technologies as viable approaches to solve the above critical problems on the basis of our recent research activities. The technologies include MOS gate stack formation, high-quality channel formation, low-resistance S/D formation, and CMOS integration. For the Ge device technologies, we focus on the gate stack technology and Ge channel formation on Si. Also, for the III-V MOS device technologies, we mainly address the gate stack technology, III-V channel formation on Si, the metal S/D technology, and implementation of these technologies into short-channel III-V-OI MOSFETs on Si substrates. On the basis of the present status of the achievements, we finally discuss the possibility of various CMOS structures using III-V/Ge channels.

  19. L’espace domestique au Bronze final et au premier âge du Fer dans le sud de la Corse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peche-Quilichini, Kewin

    2015-12-01

    organización general como a nivel del espacio interno y de la arquitectura de las viviendas. [fr] L’objectif de cet article est de fournir une approche synthétique sur les formes de l’habitat en Corse au Bronze final (BF et au premier âge du Fer (F1, à l’échelle de la microrégion montagneuse de l’Alta Rocca, située dans le sud de la Corse, au coeur du bassin occidental de la Méditerranée. La problématique d’étude des sites protohistoriques non fortifiés est jeune sur l’île, mais les travaux se sont récemment multipliés et rendent compte de la complexité structurelle et évolutive des espaces habités, permettant ainsi une premiére analyse comparative. Le raisonnement s’appuie essentiellement sur l’apport des fouilles du grand habitat de Cuciurpula, initiées en 2008 et toujours en cours, ainsi que sur l’exploitation des villages de Puzzonu et de Nuciaresa, sondés en 2012. La chronologie des secteurs étudiés permet d’embrasser un arc chronologique complet entre le XIIe et le VIe siécle av. J.-C., et donc d’appréhender les phénoménes évolutifs, tant en termes d’organisation générale qu’au niveau de l’espace interne et de l’architecture des habitations.

  20. Prospects of a {beta}-SiC based IMPATT oscillator for application in THz communication and growth of a {beta}-SiC p-n junction on a Ge modified Si (100) substrate to realize THz IMPATTs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, Moumita [Centre of Millimeter-Wave Semiconductor Devices and Systems, Centre of Advanced Study in Radiophysics and Electronics, University of Calcutta, Girish Vidyaratna Lane, Kolkata 700009, West Bengal (India); Mazumder, Nilratan, E-mail: mm_drdo@yahoo.com [IERCEM Institute of Information Technology, West Bengal University of Technology, Kolkata 700017 (India)

    2010-12-15

    The prospects of a p{sup +}nn{sup +} cubic silicon carbide (3C-SiC/{beta}-SiC) based IMPATT diode as a potential solid-state terahertz source is studied for the first time through a modified generalized simulation scheme. The simulation predicts that the device is capable of generating an RF power output of 63.0 W at 0.33 THz with an efficiency of 13%. The effects of parasitic series resistance on the device performance and exploitable RF power level are further simulated. The studies clearly establish the potential of 3C-SiC as a base semiconductor material for a high-power THz IMPATT device. Based on the simulation results, an attempt has been made to fabricate {beta}-SiC based IMPATT devices in the THz region. Single crystalline, epitaxial 3C-SiC films are deposited on silicon (Si) (100) substrates by rapid thermal chemical vapour deposition (RTPCVD) at a temperature as low as 800 {sup 0}C using a single precursor methylsilane, which contains Si and C atoms in the same molecule. No initial surface carbonization step is required in this method. A p-n junction with an n-type doping concentration of 4 x 10{sup 24} m{sup -3} (which is similar to the simulated design data) has been grown successfully and the characterization of the grown 3C-SiC film is reported in this paper. It is found that the inclusion of Ge improves the crystal quality and reduces the surface roughness. (semiconductor devices)

  1. Study of Multiphoton Final States and Tests of QED in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ up to 209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alcaraz, J.; Alemanni, G.; Allaby, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alviggi, M.G.; Anderhub, H.; Andreev, Valery P.; Anselmo, F.; Arefev, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Bagnaia, P.; Bajo, A.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldew, S.V.; Banerjee, S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Barczyk, A.; Barillere, R.; Bartalini, P.; Basile, M.; Batalova, N.; Battiston, R.; Bay, A.; Becattini, F.; Becker, U.; Behner, F.; Bellucci, L.; Berbeco, R.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Betev, B.L.; Biasini, M.; Biglietti, M.; Biland, A.; Blaising, J.J.; Blyth, S.C.; Bobbink, G.J.; Bohm, A.; Boldizsar, L.; Borgia, B.; Bottai, S.; Bourilkov, D.; Bourquin, M.; Braccini, S.; Branson, J.G.; Brochu, F.; Burger, J.D.; Burger, W.J.; Cai, X.D.; Capell, M.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carlino, G.; Cartacci, A.; Casaus, J.; Cavallari, F.; Cavallo, N.; Cecchi, C.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo, M.; Chang, Y.H.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, G.; Chen, G.M.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, H.S.; Chiefari, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Clare, I.; Clare, R.; Coignet, G.; Colino, N.; Costantini, S.; de la Cruz, B.; Cucciarelli, S.; van Dalen, J.A.; de Asmundis, R.; Deglon, P.; Debreczeni, J.; Degre, A.; Deiters, K.; della Volpe, D.; Delmeire, E.; Denes, P.; DeNotaristefani, F.; De Salvo, A.; Diemoz, M.; Dierckxsens, M.; Dionisi, C.; Dittmar, M.; Doria, A.; Dova, M.T.; Duchesneau, D.; Echenard, B.; Eline, A.; El Mamouni, H.; Engler, A.; Eppling, F.J.; Ewers, A.; Extermann, P.; Falagan, M.A.; Falciano, S.; Favara, A.; Fay, J.; Fedin, O.; Felcini, M.; Ferguson, T.; Fesefeldt, H.; Fiandrini, E.; Field, J.H.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, P.H.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, I.; Forconi, G.; Freudenreich, K.; Furetta, C.; Galaktionov, Iouri; Ganguli, S.N.; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gataullin, M.; Gentile, S.; Giagu, S.; Gong, Z.F.; Grenier, Gerald Jean; Grimm, O.; Gruenewald, M.W.; Guida, M.; van Gulik, R.; Gupta, V.K.; Gurtu, A.; Gutay, L.J.; Haas, D.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hebbeker, T.; Herve, Alain; Hirschfelder, J.; Hofer, H.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzner, G.; Hou, S.R.; Hu, Y.; Jin, B.N.; Jones, Lawrence W.; de Jong, P.; Josa-Mutuberria, I.; Kafer, D.; Kaur, M.; Kienzle-Focacci, M.N.; Kim, J.K.; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, W.; Klimentov, A.; Konig, A.C.; Kopal, M.; Koutsenko, V.; Kraber, M.; Kraemer, R.W.; Krenz, W.; Kruger, A.; Kunin, A.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Laktineh, I.; Landi, G.; Lebeau, M.; Lebedev, A.; Lebrun, P.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Le Goff, J.M.; Leiste, R.; Levtchenko, P.; Li, C.; Likhoded, S.; Lin, C.H.; Lin, W.T.; Linde, F.L.; Lista, L.; Liu, Z.A.; Lohmann, W.; Longo, E.; Lu, Y.S.; Lubelsmeyer, K.; Luci, C.; Luminari, L.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, W.G.; Malgeri, L.; Malinin, A.; Mana, C.; Mangeol, D.; Mans, J.; Martin, J.P.; Marzano, F.; Mazumdar, K.; McNeil, R.R.; Mele, S.; Merola, L.; Meschini, M.; Metzger, W.J.; Mihul, A.; Milcent, H.; Mirabelli, G.; Mnich, J.; Mohanty, G.B.; Muanza, G.S.; Muijs, A.J.M.; Musicar, B.; Musy, M.; Nagy, S.; Natale, S.; Napolitano, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Newman, H.; Niessen, T.; Nisati, A.; Kluge, Hannelies; Ofierzynski, R.; Organtini, G.; Palomares, C.; Pandoulas, D.; Paolucci, P.; Paramatti, R.; Passaleva, G.; Patricelli, S.; Paul, Thomas Cantzon; Pauluzzi, M.; Paus, C.; Pauss, F.; Pedace, M.; Pensotti, S.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Petersen, B.; Piccolo, D.; Pierella, F.; Pioppi, M.; Piroue, P.A.; Pistolesi, E.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Pothier, J.; Prokofev, D.O.; Prokofiev, D.; Quartieri, J.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Rahaman, M.A.; Raics, P.; Raja, N.; Ramelli, R.; Rancoita, P.G.; Ranieri, R.; Raspereza, A.; Razis, P.; Ren, D.; Rescigno, M.; Reucroft, S.; Riemann, S.; Riles, Keith; Roe, B.P.; Romero, L.; Rosca, A.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Roth, Stefan; Rosenbleck, C.; Roux, B.; Rubio, J.A.; Ruggiero, G.; Rykaczewski, H.; Sakharov, A.; Saremi, S.; Sarkar, S.; Salicio, J.; Sanchez, E.; Sanders, M.P.; Schafer, C.; Schegelsky, V.; Schmidt-Kaerst, S.; Schmitz, D.; Schopper, H.; Schotanus, D.J.; Schwering, G.; Sciacca, C.; Servoli, L.; Shevchenko, S.; Shivarov, N.; Shoutko, V.; Shumilov, E.; Shvorob, A.; Siedenburg, T.; Son, D.; Spillantini, P.; Steuer, M.; Stickland, D.P.; Stoyanov, B.; Straessner, A.; Sudhakar, K.; Sultanov, G.; Sun, L.Z.; Sushkov, S.; Suter, H.; Swain, J.D.; Szillasi, Z.; Tang, X.W.; Tarjan, P.; Tauscher, L.; Taylor, L.; Tellili, B.; Teyssier, D.; Timmermans, Charles; Ting, Samuel C.C.; Ting, S.M.; Tonwar, S.C.; Toth, J.; Tully, C.; Tung, K.L.; Ulbricht, J.; Valente, E.; Van de Walle, R.T.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vetlitsky, I.; Vicinanza, D.; Viertel, G.; Villa, S.; Vivargent, M.; Vlachos, S.; Vodopianov, I.; Vogel, H.; Vogt, H.; Vorobev, I.; Vorobyov, A.A.; Wadhwa, M.; Wallraff, W.; Wang, X.L.; Wang, Z.M.; Weber, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wilkens, H.; Wynhoff, S.; Xia, L.; Xu, Z.Z.; Yamamoto, J.; Yang, B.Z.; Yang, C.G.; Yang, H.J.; Yang, M.; Yeh, S.C.; Zalite, A.; Zalite, Yu.; Zhang, Z.P.; Zhao, J.; Zhu, G.Y.; Zhu, R.Y.; Zhuang, H.L.; Zichichi, A.; Zilizi, G.; Zimmermann, B.; Zoller, M.

    2002-01-01

    The process e+ e- -> n gamma with n>=2 is studied at centre-of-mass energies ranging from \\root(s)=192 to 208 GeV. The data sample corresponds to a total integrated luminosity of 427 1/pb. The total and differential cross sections are found to be in agreement with the QED expectations. Using all the data collected with the L3 detector above the Z pole, limits on deviations from QED, excited electrons, contact interactions, extra space dimensions and excited spin-3/2 leptons are set.

  2. Improved techniques for the growth of optical-quality CdGeAs/sub 2/. Final report, December 1, 1976-December 31, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feigelson, R.S.; Route, R.K.

    1978-06-01

    The ternary chalcopyrite compound CdGeAs/sub 2/ is one of the most efficient nonlinear infrared materials known. With transparency extending from 2.3 ..mu..m to 18 ..mu..m and a damage threshold exceeding 40 Mw/cm/sup 2/, it has a large number of potential applications, including doubling of the 10.6 ..mu..m CO/sub 2/ laser and continuous phase-matched mixing throughout its transparent region. It is also potentially suitable for certain acousto-optic applications consistent with its 4 2m space group symmetry. However, the growth of high optical quality, uncracked crystals of this material has been difficult. Polycrystallinity, cracking, and variable optical transparency were consistent problems. In this section we describe experiments carried out to eliminate (or control) polycrystallinity and cracking during the melt growth of this material.

  3. Fabrication of Ge-on-insulator wafers by Smart-CutTM with thermal management for undamaged donor Ge wafers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Munho; Cho, Sang June; Jayeshbhai Dave, Yash; Mi, Hongyi; Mikael, Solomon; Seo, Jung-Hun; Yoon, Jung U.; Ma, Zhenqiang

    2018-01-01

    Newly engineered substrates consisting of semiconductor-on-insulator are gaining much attention as starting materials for the subsequent transfer of semiconductor nanomembranes via selective etching of the insulating layer. Germanium-on-insulator (GeOI) substrates are critically important because of the versatile applications of Ge nanomembranes (Ge NMs) toward electronic and optoelectronic devices. Among various fabrication techniques, the Smart-CutTM technique is more attractive than other methods because a high temperature annealing process can be avoided. Another advantage of Smart-CutTM is the reusability of the donor Ge wafer. However, it is very difficult to realize an undamaged Ge wafer because there exists a large mismatch in the coefficient of thermal expansion among the layers. Although an undamaged donor Ge wafer is a prerequisite for its reuse, research related to this issue has not yet been reported. Here we report the fabrication of 4-inch GeOI substrates using the direct wafer bonding and Smart-CutTM process with a low thermal budget. In addition, a thermo-mechanical simulation of GeOI was performed by COMSOL to analyze induced thermal stress in each layer of GeOI. Crack-free donor Ge wafers were obtained by annealing at 250 °C for 10 h. Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction (XRD) indicated similarly favorable crystalline quality of the Ge layer in GeOI compared to that of bulk Ge. In addition, Ge p-n diodes using transferred Ge NM indicate a clear rectifying behavior with an on and off current ratio of 500 at ±1 V. This demonstration offers great promise for high performance transferrable Ge NM-based device applications.

  4. Room Temperature Ferromagnetic, Anisotropic, Germanium Rich FeGe(001) Alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Lungu, George A.; Apostol, Nicoleta G.; Stoflea, Laura E.; Costescu, Ruxandra M.; Popescu, Dana G.; Teodorescu, Cristian M.

    2013-01-01

    Ferromagnetic Fe x Ge1?x with x = 2%?9% are obtained by Fe deposition onto Ge(001) at high temperatures (500 ?C). Low energy electron diffraction (LEED) investigation evidenced the preservation of the (1 ? 1) surface structure of Ge(001) with Fe deposition. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) at Ge 3d and Fe 2p core levels evidenced strong Fe diffusion into the Ge substrate and formation of Ge-rich compounds, from FeGe3 to approximately FeGe2, depending on the amount of Fe deposited. Room ...

  5. Study of $\\pi^{-}p$ Interactions at 85 GeV/c Leading to $K^{+}K^{+}K$^{-}K^{-}$ in the Final State - Search for New States

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this experiment is to study the properties of 2K|+2K|- systems and to search for new states produced centrally in the @p|-p collisions at 85 GeV/c. The experiment makes use of the high data rate capability of the upgraded @W' MWPC system and the large forward acceptance of the two hodoscoping Cerenkov counters. \\\\ \\\\ A sample of 20 M events was recorded using a selective trigger on 4 charged kaons with X~@$>$~0. Amongst the topics to be explored are : \\item a) Study of the @F@F(C=+1) and @F@F@p@+ mass spectrum including a search for the n^c; \\item b) Search for gluonium states decaying to K|+K|-, @F@F, @Ff', f'f'; \\item c) Study of @F production as a function of (X(F), p^t) and whether it prefers to be produced singly or in association with another @F; \\item d) Study of the KK@p, and KK@p@p systems including (i) a search for low-lying crypto exotic mesons (usds) predicted to decay to K|+K|-@p@+ or @F@p@+; (ii) a search for charmed-strange exotic mesons (udcs) predicted to decay into two kaons of th...

  6. Growth of Ge films by cluster beam deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, J L; Feng, J Y

    2002-01-01

    Ge epitaxial layers with reasonable quality were grown on the Si(1 1 1) substrates by cluster beam deposition (CBD) process. The growth temperature plays a dominant role in the epitaxial growth of Ge films. The substrate temperature for epitaxial growth is about 500 deg. C, which is lower than the reported critical temperature of Ge epitaxial growth by MBE and CVD. A stress induced phase transition of Ge lattice from cubic to tetragonal is also observed in the CBD process, and the mechanism is discussed.

  7. Epitaxial metastable Ge1-yCy (y≤0.02) alloys grown on Ge(001) from hyperthermal beams: C incorporation and lattice sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Arcy-Gall, J.; Desjardins, P.; Petrov, I.; Greene, J. E.; Paultre, J.-E.; Masut, R. A.; Gujrathi, S. C.; Roorda, S.

    2000-01-01

    Epitaxial metastable Ge 1-y C y alloy layers with y≤0.02 were grown on Ge(001) at temperatures T s =200-550 degree sign C using hyperthermal Ge and C beams with average energies of 16 and 24 eV, respectively, in order to investigate C incorporation pathways in the Ge lattice. High-resolution reciprocal lattice maps show that all as-deposited alloy layers are fully coherent with the substrate. Layers grown at T s ≤350 degree sign C are in compression due to higher C concentrations in interstitial than in substitutional sites. The compressive strain decreases (i.e., the substitutional C concentration increases) with increasing T s within this temperature range. At higher growth temperatures, as-deposited alloys are nearly strain free since the majority of the incorporated C is trapped at extended defects. Annealing the Ge 1-y C y layers at T a =450 and 550 degree sign C leads to a significant increase, proportional to the strain in the as-deposited films, in compressive strain. Further annealing at T a =650 degree sign C results in the formation of dislocation loops which act as sinks for interstitial and substitutional C atoms and thus relieves residual macroscopic strain. Finally, we show that the large compressive strain associated with interstitial C atoms must be accounted for in order to determine the total incorporated C fraction from diffraction analyses. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  8. Experiments on multiparton final states in e+e- annihilation at √s=30 GeV (MARK-J/PETRA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hariri, S.

    1982-03-01

    This work is devoted to an experimental study of the quantum chromodynamics (Q.C.D.) matrix element. The first chapter consists of a general introduction, theoretical and phenomenological. In the second chapter, we give an elementary description of the detector. In addition to the topological methods given there, the third chapter contains a presentation of the MULTIJET analysis especially designed to study Q.C.D. matrix element. The fourth chapter begins with an application to MARK J data of the topological analysis described in the third chapter. Since the detector is a calorimeter, the transformation of particles into pseudo-particles introduces an additional effect which adds to hadronization effects. The BantiB model is a restriction of the quark model to the production of b quarks. The comparison of this model to the data shows that such a purely hadronic model is able to reproduce the experimentally observed rate of events called three jets. Nevertheless, the matrix element, corresponding to the BantiB model three jet events, is completely excluded by the data. The same statement applies to the quark model with wide hadronization. The fact that the data favours clearly Q.C.D. predictions is shown for differents values of (epsilon, delta) and for different variables (Nsub(J), Tsub(J), σsub(3J)). In the fifth chapter our Q.C.D. model with 2 and 3 jets is precisely defined. The systematical errors, experimental and theoretical are given in this chapter. Since the number of active flavours can affect our results, the exclusions of an open production of a sixth flavour with +-2/3 or +-1/3 is given there and an upper limit on the possible rate of 4 jet events is defined. The obtained results being in full agreement with our (2 and 3)-jet Q.C.D. model, the rapid convergence of the perturbative series at √s=30 GeV is confirmed once more [fr

  9. Study of the K-barπ system in the 3 bodies final states, produced by 3 GeV/c K-p interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verglas, A.

    1966-01-01

    The K - p → K * (891) π reaction is a good example of a quasi two-body phenomenon, exhibiting the characteristics of 'peripherism'. The predictions of the 'one meson exchange', and 'absorption' models are compared with the experimental results. Conclusions are drawn concerning the production mechanism of the Kp → K * π reaction, as well as on the validity of the models. Finally, the K * (1400) resonance is studied and its isospin determined. (author) [fr

  10. Search for the 125 GeV Higgs Boson produced in association with top quarks: final run-1 results and first run-2 results from the ATLAS collaboration

    CERN Document Server

    Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The search for the production of the Higgs Boson with a pair of top-anti-top quarks is both very important and very challenging. The final results from run-1 are presented, with about 20 fb^(-1) of data at 8 TeV, as well as first run-2 results with 3.2 fb^(-1) of data at 13 TeV.

  11. Room Temperature Ferromagnetic Mn:Ge(001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Adrian Lungu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We report the synthesis of a room temperature ferromagnetic Mn-Ge system obtained by simple deposition of manganese on Ge(001, heated at relatively high temperature (starting with 250 °C. The samples were characterized by low energy electron diffraction (LEED, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID, and magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE. Samples deposited at relatively elevated temperature (350 °C exhibited the formation of ~5–8 nm diameter Mn5Ge3 and Mn11Ge8 agglomerates by HRTEM, while XPS identified at least two Mn-containing phases: the agglomerates, together with a Ge-rich MnGe~2.5 phase, or manganese diluted into the Ge(001 crystal. LEED revealed the persistence of long range order after a relatively high amount of Mn (100 nm deposited on the single crystal substrate. STM probed the existence of dimer rows on the surface, slightly elongated as compared with Ge–Ge dimers on Ge(001. The films exhibited a clear ferromagnetism at room temperature, opening the possibility of forming a magnetic phase behind a nearly ideally terminated Ge surface, which could find applications in integration of magnetic functionalities on semiconductor bases. SQUID probed the co-existence of a superparamagnetic phase, with one phase which may be attributed to a diluted magnetic semiconductor. The hypothesis that the room temperature ferromagnetic phase might be the one with manganese diluted into the Ge crystal is formulated and discussed.

  12. Ge Quantum Dot Infrared Imaging Camera, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Luna Innovations Incorporated proposes to develop a high performance Ge quantum dots-based infrared (IR) imaging camera on Si substrate. The high sensitivity, large...

  13. Self-assembled growth of nanostructural Ge islands on bromine ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We have deposited relatively thick (∼ 60 nm) Ge layers on Br-passivated Si(111) substrates by thermal evaporation under high vacuum conditions at room temperature. Ge has grown in a layer-plus-island mode although it is different from the Stranski–Krastanov growth mode observed in epitaxial growth. Both the islands ...

  14. MBE-grown Si and Si(1-x)Ge(x) quantum dots embedded within epitaxial Gd2O3 on Si(111) substrate for floating gate memory device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manna, S; Aluguri, R; Katiyar, A; Das, S; Laha, A; Osten, H J; Ray, S K

    2013-12-20

    Si and Si(1-x)Ge(x) quantum dots embedded within epitaxial Gd2O3 grown by molecular beam epitaxy have been studied for application in floating gate memory devices. The effect of interface traps and the role of quantum dots on the memory properties have been studied using frequency-dependent capacitance-voltage and conductance-voltage measurements. Multilayer quantum dot memory comprising four and five layers of Si quantum dots exhibits a superior memory window to that of single-layer quantum dot memory devices. It has also been observed that single-layer Si(1-x)Ge(x) quantum dots show better memory characteristics than single-layer Si quantum dots.

  15. Growth and electronic structure of graphene on semiconducting Ge(110)

    OpenAIRE

    Tesch, Julia; Voloshina, Elena; Fonin, Mikhail; Dedkov, Yuriy S.

    2017-01-01

    The direct growth of graphene on semiconducting or insulating substrates might help to overcome main drawbacks of metal-based synthesis, like metal-atom contaminations of graphene, transfer issues, etc. Here we present the growth of graphene on n-doped semiconducting Ge(110) by using an atomic carbon source and the study of the structural and electronic properties of the obtained interface. We found that graphene interacts weakly with the underlying Ge(110) substrate that keeps graphene's ele...

  16. Gate-stack engineering for self-organized Ge-dot/SiO2/SiGe-shell MOS capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Wei-Ting; Yang, Kuo-Ching; Liao, Po-Hsiang; George, Tom; Li, Pei-Wen

    2016-02-01

    We report the first-of-its-kind, self-organized gate-stack heterostructure of Ge-dot/SiO2/SiGe-shell on Si fabricated in a single step through the selective oxidation of a SiGe nano-patterned pillar over a Si3N4 buffer layer on a Si substrate. Process-controlled tunability of the Ge-dot size (7.5-90 nm), the SiO2 thickness (3-4 nm), and as well the SiGe-shell thickness (2-15 nm) has been demonstrated, enabling a practically-achievable core building block for Ge-based metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) devices. Detailed morphologies, structural, and electrical interfacial properties of the SiO2/Ge-dot and SiO2/SiGe interfaces were assessed using transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and temperature-dependent high/low-frequency capacitance-voltage measurements. Notably, NiGe/SiO2/SiGe and Al/SiO2/Ge-dot/SiO2/SiGe MOS capacitors exhibit low interface trap densities of as low as 3-5x10^11 cm^-2·eV^-1 and fixed charge densities of 1-5x10^11 cm^-2, suggesting good-quality SiO2/SiGe-shell and SiO2/Ge-dot interfaces. In addition, the advantage of having single-crystalline Si1-xGex shell (x > 0.5) in a compressive stress state in our self-aligned gate-stack heterostructure has great promise for possible SiGe (or Ge) MOS nanoelectronic and nanophotonic applications.

  17. Microwave Annealing for NiSiGe Schottky Junction on SiGe P-Channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hsien Lin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we demonstrated the shallow NiSiGe Schottky junction on the SiGe P-channel by using low-temperature microwave annealing. The NiSiGe/n-Si Schottky junction was formed for the Si-capped/SiGe multi-layer structure on an n-Si substrate (Si/Si0.57Ge0.43/Si through microwave annealing (MWA ranging from 200 to 470 °C for 150 s in N2 ambient. MWA has the advantage of being diffusion-less during activation, having a low-temperature process, have a lower junction leakage current, and having low sheet resistance (Rs and contact resistivity. In our study, a 20 nm NiSiGe Schottky junction was formed by TEM and XRD analysis at MWA 390 °C. The NiSiGe/n-Si Schottky junction exhibits the highest forward/reverse current (ION/IOFF ratio of ~3 × 105. The low temperature MWA is a very promising thermal process technology for NiSiGe Schottky junction manufacturing.

  18. Stress-Induced Crystallization of Ge-Doped Sb Phase-Change Thin Films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eising, Gert; Pauza, Andrew; Kooi, Bart J.

    The large effects of moderate stresses on the crystal growth rate in Ge-doped Sb phase-change thin films are demonstrated using direct optical imaging. For Ge6Sb94 and Ge7Sb93 phase-change films, a large increase in crystallization temperature is found when using a polycarbonate substrate instead of

  19. Ge-intercalated graphene: The origin of the p-type to n-type transition

    KAUST Repository

    Kaloni, Thaneshwor P.

    2012-09-01

    Recently huge interest has been focussed on Ge-intercalated graphene. In order to address the effect of Ge on the electronic structure, we study Ge-intercalated free-standing C 6 and C 8 bilayer graphene, bulk C 6Ge and C 8Ge, as well as Ge-intercalated graphene on a SiC(0001) substrate, by density functional theory. In the presence of SiC(0001), there are three ways to obtain n-type graphene: i) intercalation between C layers; ii) intercalation at the interface to the substrate in combination with Ge deposition on the surface; and iii) cluster intercalation. All other configurations under study result in p-type states irrespective of the Ge coverage. We explain the origin of the different doping states and establish the conditions under which a transition occurs. © Copyright EPLA, 2012.

  20. Fabrication of GeSn-multiple quantum wells by overgrowth of Sn on Ge by using molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, F. [Institute for Semiconductor Engineering, University of Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Centre of Physics, University of Minho, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal); Fischer, I. A.; Schulze, J. [Institute for Semiconductor Engineering, University of Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Benedetti, A. [CACTI, Univ. de Vigo, Campus Universitario Lagoas Marcosende 15, Vigo (Spain); Zaumseil, P. [IHP GmbH, Innovations for High Performance Microelectronics, Leibniz-Institut für innovative Mikroelektronik, Im Technologiepark 25, 15236 Frankfurt (Oder) (Germany); Cerqueira, M. F.; Vasilevskiy, M. I. [Centre of Physics, University of Minho, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal); Stefanov, S.; Chiussi, S. [Dpto. Fisica Aplicada, Univ. de Vigo, Rua Maxwell s/n, Campus Universitario Lagoas Marcosende, Vigo (Spain)

    2015-12-28

    We report on the fabrication and structural characterization of epitaxially grown ultra-thin layers of Sn on Ge virtual substrates (Si buffer layer overgrown by a 50 nm thick Ge epilayer followed by an annealing step). Samples with 1 to 5 monolayers of Sn on Ge virtual substrates were grown using solid source molecular beam epitaxy and characterized by atomic force microscopy. We determined the critical thickness at which the transition from two-dimensional to three-dimensional growth occurs. This transition is due to the large lattice mismatch between Ge and Sn (≈14.7%). By depositing Ge on top of Sn layers, which have thicknesses at or just below the critical thickness, we were able to fabricate ultra-narrow GeSn multi-quantum-well structures that are fully embedded in Ge. We report results on samples with one and ten GeSn wells separated by 5 and 10 nm thick Ge spacer layers that were characterized by high resolution transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. We discuss the structure and material intermixing observed in the samples.

  1. Thermal annealing studies of GeTe-Sb2Te3 alloys with multiple interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Bragaglia

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available A high degree of vacancy ordering is obtained by annealing amorphous GeTe-Sb2Te3 (GST alloys deposited on a crystalline substrate, which acts as a template for the crystallization. Under annealing the material evolves from amorphous to disordered rocksalt, to ordered rocksalt with vacancies arranged into (111 oriented layers, and finally converts into the stable trigonal phase. The role of the interface in respect to the formation of an ordered crystalline phase is studied by comparing the transformation stages of crystalline GST with and without a capping layer. The capping layer offers another crystallization interface, which harms the overall crystalline quality.

  2. Measurement of R and search for new quark flavors decaying into multi-jet final states in e sup + e sup - collisions between 54. 0 and 61. 4 GeV CM energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, K. (Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan)); Amako, K.; Arai, Y.; Fukawa, M.; Fukushima, Y.; Haidt, D.; Ishihara, N.; Kamitani, T.; Kanzaki, J.; Kondo, T.; Matsui, T.; Odaka, S.; Ogawa, K.; Ohama, T.; Sakamoto, H.; Sakuda, M.; Shirai, J.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Takasaki, F.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uehara, S.; Unno, Y.; Watase, Y.; Yamada, Y. (National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)); Asano, Y.; Koseki, T.; Mori, S.; Osabe, H.; Sakamoto, S.; Sakano, M.; Shirakata, S.; Takada, Y.; Yonezawa, Y. (Tsukuba Univ., Inst. of Applied Physics, Sajura, Ibaraki (Japan)); Chiba, M.; Fukui, T.; Hirose, T.; Minami, M.; Narita, Y.; Oyama, T.; Saito, H.; Utsumi, M.; Wakai, M.; Watanabe, T.; Yabuki, F.; Yamagata, T. (Tokyo Metropolitan Univ., (Japan)); Chiba, Y.; Endo, I.; Hayashibara, I.; Ohsugi, T.; Taketani, A.; Tanaka, R.; Terunuma, N. (Hiroshima Univ. (Japan)); Daigo, M. (Wakayama Medical Coll. (Japan)); Emura, T. (Tokyo Univ. of Agriculture and Technology, Koganei (Japan)); Haba, J.; Kane; VENUS Collaboration

    1990-01-11

    We accumulated e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilations into multi-hadrons at CM energies between 54.0 and 61.4 GeV with the VENUS detector at TRISTAN. Measured R-ratios are consistent with the standard model using the Z-boson mass; 91.1 GeV/c{sup 2}. Using two new observables, we searched for a planar four-jet and other multi-jet events resulting from the decay of a charge -1/3 eb' quark. Having observed no positive signals, we excluded b' masses between 19.4 and 28.2 GeV/c{sup 2} with a 95% confidence level, regardless of branching into charged current and loop-induced flavor-changing neutral current decay, including a possible Higgs decay process. The charge +2/3 e to quark was excluded below 30.2 GeV/c{sup 2}. (orig.).

  3. Epitaxial growth of Ge strain relaxed buffer on Si with low threading dislocation density

    OpenAIRE

    Abedin, Ahmad; Asadollahi, Ali; Garidis, Konstantinos; Hellström, Per-Erik; Östling, Mikael

    2016-01-01

    Epitaxial Ge with low dislocation density is grown on a low temperature grown Ge seed layer on Si substrate by reduced pressure chemical vapor deposition. The surface topography measured by AFM shows that the strain relaxation occurred through pit formation which resulted in freezing the defects at Ge/Si interface. Moreover a lower threading dislocation density compared to conventional strain relaxed Ge buffers on Si was observed. We show that by growing the first layer at temperatures below ...

  4. Characterization of Ge Nano structures Embedded Inside Porous Silicon for Photonics Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahim, A.F.A.; Hashim, M.R.; Rahim, A.F.A.; Ali, N.K.

    2011-01-01

    In this work we prepared germanium nano structures by means of filling the material inside porous silicon (PS) using conventional and cost effective technique, thermal evaporator. The PS acts as patterned substrate. It was prepared by anodization of silicon wafer in ethanoic hydrofluoric acid (HF). A Ge layer was then deposited onto the PS by thermal evaporation. This was followed by deposition of Si layer by thermal evaporation and anneal at 650 degree Celsius for 30 min. The process was completed by Ni metal deposition using thermal evaporator followed by metal annealing of 400 degree Celsius for 10 min to form metal semiconductor metal (MSM) photodetector. Structural analysis of the samples was performed using energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDX), scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy (RS). EDX spectrum suggests the presence of Ge inside the pores structure. Raman spectrum showed that good crystalline structure of Ge can be produced inside silicon pores with a phase with the diamond structure by (111), (220) and (400) reflections. Finally current-voltage (I-V) measurement of the MSM photodetector was carried out and showed lower dark currents compared to that of Si control device. Interestingly the device showed enhanced current gain compared to Si device which can be associated with the presence of Ge nano structures in the porous silicon. (author)

  5. Fabrication of SiGe/Ge core-shell nanowires by oxidation of SiGe

    OpenAIRE

    Kløw, Frode

    2011-01-01

    As Si technology is reaching its limits in solar cell and transistor applications, ways to improve these devices are being investigated. This study looks at the fabrication process of SiGe/Ge core-shell nanowires (NWs). Larger SiGe column structures can be oxidized to reduce their size and create a SiGe/Ge core-shell structure with a layer of SiO2 on the outside. Initially, SiGe dry oxidation was investigated in epitaxially grown SiGe films with 15% and 20% Ge, focusing on the Ge pileup r...

  6. [Ge=Ge](4-) Dumbbells in the Zintl Phase Li3NaGe2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruschewitz, Uwe

    2016-03-01

    Ge-Ge double bonds: The reaction of elemental lithium, sodium, and germanium at 750 °C results in the Zintl phase Li3NaGe2 , which, according to the Zintl-Klemm concept, contains [Ge=Ge](4-) dumbbells with unprecedented short Ge-Ge distances. Based on structural, spectroscopic, and theoretical considerations, convincing evidence is given that Ge-Ge double bonds are in fact present. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Undoped and in-situ B doped GeSn epitaxial growth on Ge by atmospheric pressure-chemical vapor deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vincent, B.; Gencarelli, F.; Bender, H.

    2011-01-01

    In this letter, we propose an atmospheric pressure-chemical vapor deposition technique to grow metastable GeSn epitaxial layers on Ge. We report the growth of defect free fully strained undoped and in-situ B doped GeSn layers on Ge substrates with Sit contents up to 8%. Those metastable layers stay...... fully strained after 30 min anneal in N-2 at 500 degrees C.; Ge-Sn interdiffusion is seen at 500 degrees C but not at lower temperature. B is 100% active in the in-situ GeSn:B layers up to a concentration of 1.7 x 10(19) cm(-3). GeSn:B provides slightly lower Hall hole mobility values than in pure p......-type Ge especially for low B concentrations. (C) 2011 American Institute of Physics [doi.10.1063/1.3645620]...

  8. Study of Ge loss during Ge condensation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue, Z.Y.; Di, Z.F.; Ye, L.; Mu, Z.Q.; Chen, D.; Wei, X.; Zhang, M.; Wang, X.

    2014-01-01

    Ge loss during Ge condensation process was investigated by transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. This work reveals that Ge loss can be attributed to the Ge oxidation at SiO 2 /SiGe interface, Ge diffusion in SiO 2 layers and Ge trapped at buried SiO 2 /Si interface. During Ge condensation process, with the increase of the Ge content, the Si atoms become insufficient for selective oxidation at the oxide/SiGe interface. Consequently, the Si and Ge are oxidized simultaneously. When the Ge composition in SiGe layer increases further and approaches 100%, the Ge atoms begin to diffuse into the top SiO 2 layer and buried SiO 2 layer. However, the X-ray photoelectron spectrometry analysis manifests that the chemical states of the Ge in top SiO 2 layer are different from those in buried SiO 2 layer, as the Ge atoms diffused into top SiO 2 layer are oxidized to form GeO 2 in the subsequent oxidation step. With the increase of the diffusion time, a quantity of Ge atoms diffuse through buried SiO 2 layer and pile up at buried SiO 2 /Si interface due to the interfacial trapping. The SiO 2 /Si interface acts like a pump, absorbing Ge from a Ge layer continuously through a pipe-buried SiO 2 layer. With the progress of Ge condensation process, the quantity of Ge accumulated at SiO 2 /Si interface increases remarkably. - Highlights: • Ge loss during Ge condensation process is attributed to the Ge oxidation at SiO 2 /SiGe interface. • Ge diffusion in SiO 2 layers and Ge trapped at buried SiO 2 /Si interface • When Ge content in SiGe layer approaches 100%, Ge diffusion into the SiO 2 layer is observed. • Ge then gradually diffuses through buried SiO 2 layer and pile up at SiO 2 /Si interface

  9. Hole mobility enhancement of p-MOSFETs using global and local Ge-channel technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, Shinichi; Tezuka, T.; Irisawa, T.; Nakaharai, S.; Maeda, T.; Numata, T.; Ikeda, K.; Sugiyama, N.

    2006-01-01

    Mobility enhancement technologies have currently been recognized as mandatory for future scaled MOSFETs. In this paper, we review our recent results on high hole mobility p-MOSFETs using global/local SiGe or Ge channels. There are two directions for introducing SiGe or Ge channels into Si CMOS platform. One is to use SiGe or Ge global substrates and the other is to form SiGe or Ge-channel regions locally on Si wafers. In both cases, the Ge condensation technique, where Ge-channel layers are formed by oxidizing SiGe films on SOI substrates, are effectively utilized. As for the global technologies, ultrathin GOI substrates are prepared and used to fabricate high mobility GOI p-MOSFETs. As for the local technologies, SGOI or GOI channels are formed locally in the active area of p-MOSFETs on SOI wafers. It is shown that the hole mobility enhancement factor of as high as 10 is obtained in locally fabricated p-MOSFETs through the effects of high-Ge content and the compressive strain. Furthermore, the local Ge-channel technologies are combined with global SiGe or Ge substrates for pursuing the optimal and individual design of n-MOSFETs and p-MOSFETs on a single Si wafer. The CMOS device composed of strained-Si n-MOSFETs and SGOI p-MOSFETs is successfully integrated on a same wafer, which is a promising CMOS structure under deep sub 100 nm technology nodes

  10. Research Update: Strain and composition effects on ferromagnetism of Mn0.05Ge0.95 quantum dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liming Wang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Mn0.05Ge0.95 quantum dots (QDs samples were grown by molecular beam epitaxy on Si substrates and 15-nm-thick fully strained Si0.8Ge0.2 virtual substrates, respectively. The QDs samples grown on the Si0.8Ge0.2 virtual substrates show a significant ferromagnetism with a Curie temperature of 227 K, while the QDs samples grown on the Si substrates are non-ferromagnetic. Microstructures of the QDs samples were characterized by high resolution transmission electron microscopy and synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction. Interdependence between microstructure and ferromagnetism of Mn-doped Ge QDs was investigated. For the QDs sample grown on the strained Si0.8Ge0.2 virtual substrate, although the ferromagnetic phase Mn5Ge3 clusters were found to be formed in small dome-shaped dots, the significant ferromagnetism observed in that sample is attributed to ferromagnetic phase Mn-doped large dome-shaped Ge QDs, rather than to the ferromagnetic phase Mn5Ge3 clusters. The fully strained Si0.8Ge0.2 virtual substrates would result in a residual strain into the QDs and an increase in Ge composition in the QDs. Both consequences favor the formations of ferromagnetic phase Mn-doped Ge QDs from points of view of quantum confinement effect as well as Mn doping at substitutional sites.

  11. Effect of GeO2 deposition temperature in atomic layer deposition on electrical properties of Ge gate stack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanematsu, Masayuki; Shibayama, Shigehisa; Sakashita, Mitsuo; Takeuchi, Wakana; Nakatsuka, Osamu; Zaima, Shigeaki

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the effect of GeO2 deposition temperature (T depo) on electronic properties of Al/Al2O3/GeO2/Ge MOS capacitors. Capacitance-voltage characteristics show frequency dispersions under depletion and strong inversion conditions, which can be attributed from the interface states at the atomic layer deposition (ALD)-GeO2/Ge interface and from the defect states in the quasi-neutral region in the Ge substrate, respectively. We found that the interface state density (D it) shows similar values and energy distributions as T depo decreases to 200 from 300 °C, while a higher D it is observed at a T depo of 150 °C. Also, from the temperature dependence of conductance, the frequency dispersion under the strong inversion condition can be related to the minority carrier diffusion to the quasi-neutral region of the Ge substrate. The frequency dependence of conductance reveals that the undesirable increment of the bulk defect density can be suppressed by decreasing T depo. In this study, the bulk defect density in a MOS capacitor prepared at a T depo of 200 °C decreases one tenth compared with that at a T depo of 300 °C. The ALD of GeO2 at a low temperature of around 200 °C is effective for both obtaining a low D it and preventing the undesirable introduction of bulk defect density.

  12. Search for neutral Higgs-bosons in 4-jet final states from e+e- collisions at √(s)=(192-202) GeV with the OPAL detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhl, T.

    1999-11-01

    An search of the standard model Higgs Boson with the Opal detector at Lep is presented. The data were collected in the year 1999 at center of mass energies between 192 GeV and 202 GeV. An integrated luminosity of 217 pb -1 is used. For the candidate selection a likelihood method is applied. Using a test-mass dependent discriminant, the sensitivity range for the Higgs-Boson mass is increased by 500 MeV compared to previous analyses. In addition, the method of confidence level calculation is studied in detail. No significant excess is observed in the data. For the 1999 data, in the combination of all search channels, a lower bound on the standard model Higgs Boson mass of 104.4 GeV is obtained. In the minimal supersymmetric standard model boundaries in the parameter space of three scenarios, the minimal mixing, the maximal m H , and the maximal μ scenario are calculated. (orig.)

  13. A search for the production of the final states τ+τ-e+e-, τ+τ-μ+μ-, and τ+τ-π+π- in e+e- collisions at √s = 29 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    We have searched for the reaction e + e - → τ + τ - bar ff, where f is either an electron, muon, or charged pion, at √s = 29 GeV using the Mark 2 detector at the PEP storage ring. One candidate event is found while 2.3 events are expected from known processes. We would expect to see 11 events if the cross-section for e + e - → τ + τ - bar ff at √s = 29 GeV were enhanced by the factor of 4.7 which the ALEPH collaboration reports for √s = 91 GeV. we also look for e + e - → e + e - bar ff and e + e - → μ + μ - bar ff, and for e + e - → τ + τ - γ using a similar analysis procedure and see the number of events predicted by the standard model. 10 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  14. Thermal stability of germanium-tin (GeSn) fins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Dian; Lee, Kwang Hong; Bao, Shuyu; Wang, Wei; Masudy-Panah, Saeid; Tan, Chuan Seng; Tok, Eng Soon; Gong, Xiao; Yeo, Yee-Chia

    2017-12-01

    We investigate the thermal stability of germanium-tin (Ge1-xSnx) fins under rapid thermal annealing in N2 ambient. The Ge1-xSnx fins were formed on a GeSn-on-insulator substrate and were found to be less thermally stable than blanket Ge1-xSnx films. The morphology change and material quality of the annealed Ge1-xSnx fin are investigated using scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and electron energy loss spectroscopy. Obvious degradation of crystalline quality of the Ge0.96Sn0.04 fin was observed, and a thin Ge layer was formed on the SiO2 surface near the Ge0.96Sn0.04 fin region after 500 °C anneal. A model was proposed to explain the morphology change of the Ge0.96Sn0.04 fin.

  15. Magnetic and electrical properties of epitaxial GeMn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlers, Stefan

    2009-01-15

    In this work, GeMn magnetic semiconductors will be investigated. The fabrication of GeMn thin films with Mn contents up to 11.7% was realised with molecular beam epitaxy. At a fabrication temperature of 60 C, the suppression of Mn{sub x}Ge{sub y} phases could reproducibly be obtained. Dislocation free epitaxy of diamond-lattice type GeMn thin films was observed. In all fabrication conditions where Mn{sub x}Ge{sub y} suppression was feasible, an inhomogeneous dispersion of Mn was observed in form of a self-assembly of nanometre sized, Mn rich regions in a Ge rich matrix. Each Mn rich region exhibits ferromagnetic coupling with high Curie temperatures exceeding, in part, room temperature. The local ferromagnetic ordering leads to the formation of large, spatially separated magnetic moments, which induce a superparamagnetic behaviour of the GeMn thin films. At low temperatures {<=} 20 K, remanent behaviour was found to emerge. X-ray absorption experiments revealed a similarity of the Mn incorporation in diamond-lattice type GeMn thin films and in the hexagonal lattice of the intermetallic Mn{sub 5}Ge{sub 3} phase, respectively. These tetrahedra represent building blocks of the Mn{sub 5}Ge{sub 3} unit cell. The incorporation of Mn{sub 5}Ge{sub 3} building blocks was found to be accompanied by local structural disorder. The electrical properties of GeMn thin films were addressed by transport measurements. It was shown that by using a n-type Ge substrate, a pn energy barrier between epilayers and substrate to suppress parallel substrate conduction paths can be introduced. With the pn barrier concept, first results on the magnetotransport behaviour of GeMn thin films were obtained. GeMn was found to be p-type, but of high resistivity. a series of GeMn thin films was fabricated, where intermetallic Mn{sub x}Ge{sub y} phase separation was supported in a controlled manner. Phase separation was found to result in the formation of partially coherent, nanometre sized Mn{sub 5

  16. Ge self-assembled islands grown on SiGe/Si(0 0 1) relaxed buffer layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaleev, M.V.; Novikov, A.V.; Kuznetsov, O.A.; Yablonsky, A.N.; Vostokov, N.V.; Drozdov, Yu.N.; Lobanov, D.N.; Krasilnik, Z.F.

    2005-01-01

    In this work, the results obtained in growth of Ge(Si) self-assembled islands on relaxed Si 1-x Ge x /Si(0 0 1) buffer layers (x ∼ 25%) and their photoluminescence study are presented. It is found out that growth of Ge(Si)/Si 1-x Ge x islands proceeds with an abrupt change in the surface morphology that is similar to the earlier observed transition (from dome to hut islands with a decreasing Ge growth temperature) in the case of island growth on Si(0 0 1) substrates. It is revealed that in growth of Ge(Si)/Si 1-x Ge x islands, in contrast to the Ge(Si)/Si(0 0 1) islands case, the interval of growth temperatures, in which there is a change in the islands morphology (dome-hut transition) shifts towards higher temperatures. For the first time a photoluminescence signal from Ge(Si) self-assembled islands embedded in a strained Si layer is observed

  17. Search for new resonances in the diphoton final state in the mass range between 70 and 110 GeV in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=$ 8 and 13 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The results of a search for a new resonance decaying into two photons are presented for a diphoton invariant mass in the range between 70 and 110 GeV. The analysis uses the entire dataset collected by the CMS experiment in proton-proton collisions during the 2012 and 2016 LHC running periods. The data samples correspond to integrated luminosities of $19.7~\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ at $\\sqrt{s}=8~\\mathrm{TeV}$ and $35.9~\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ at $\\sqrt{s}=13~\\mathrm{TeV}$. The expected and observed $95\\%$ confidence level upper limits on the product of the cross section times branching ratio into two photons are presented. No significant excess with respect to the expected limits is observed. The observed upper limit for the 2012 (2016) dataset ranges from approximately 133 (161) fb at the mass hypothesis of 91.1 (89.9) GeV to 31 (26) fb at a mass of 102.8 (103.0) GeV. The statistical combination of the results from the analysis of the two datasets in the mass range between 80 and 110 GeV yields a minimum (maximum) observe...

  18. Mechanical characterization of 'uncoated' and 'Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}-single-layer-coated' SiO{sub 2} substrates: results from GeNS suspension, and the CoaCh project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cesarini, E; Campagna, E; Martelli, F; Piergiovanni, F; Vetrano, F [Universita di Urbino, via S. Chiara 27, 61029 Urbino (Italy); Prato, M; Canepa, M; Chincarini, A; Gemme, G [INFN, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez. di Genova, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Lorenzini, M; Cagnoli, G; Losurdo, G, E-mail: cesarini@arcetri.astro.i [INFN, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez. di Firenze via G. Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy)

    2010-04-21

    Thermal noise of the mirrors limits the sensitivity of interferometric gravitational-wave detectors in the frequency range between 50 and 300 Hz. According to the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, the thermal noise amplitude is proportional to the mechanical loss of the mirrors. Fused silica substrates loss angle widely ranges from 10{sup -9} to 10{sup -6}, while for the coating it is around 10{sup -4}. Loss angle measurements in ultra low mechanical loss materials are normally affected by a large systematic error due to the excess losses introduced by the suspension system used to hold the samples. An innovative measurement system Gentle Nodal Suspension, where the disk-shaped sample is suspended in equilibrium on the top of a sphere, touching one of the nodal points of vibration, has been developed in INFN Florence Virgo laboratory. The advantages of this system are as follows: (i) the good reproducibility of loss angle measurements; (ii) one surface only (in any case uncoated) of the sample is touched; (iii) the contact surface is minimized because of the absence of applied forces. This suspension has been used to characterize annealing and coating deposition effects on the mechanical quality factor Q. An interesting comparison/analysis of these effects on mechanical, optical, chemical and surface properties using spectroscopic ellipsometry, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy has been carried out.

  19. The Effect of Ge Content on the Optical and Electrical Properties of A-Sige: H Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mursal Mursal

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of Ge content on the optical and electrical properties of a-SiGe:H thin films deposited by HWC-PECVD had been investigated. The a-SiGe:H films ware grown on corning glass 7059 substrate using 10% diluted mixture of GeH4 and SiH4 gases, respectively. The GeH4 gas flow rate was varied from 2.5 – 12.5 sccm, while the flow rate of SiH4 was kept constant at 70 sccm. The results showed that the deposition rate of a-SiGe:H thin films increased by  increasing of GeH4 gas flow rate. In addition, the Ge content in the film increased and  the optical band gap decreased. The dark conductivity of a-SiGe:H films were relatively constant, whereas the photo conductivity decreased with increasing of Ge content.

  20. Room Temperature Ferromagnetic, Anisotropic, Germanium Rich FeGe(001 Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian M. Teodorescu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Ferromagnetic FexGe1−x with x = 2%–9% are obtained by Fe deposition onto Ge(001 at high temperatures (500 °C. Low energy electron diffraction (LEED investigation evidenced the preservation of the (1 × 1 surface structure of Ge(001 with Fe deposition. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS at Ge 3d and Fe 2p core levels evidenced strong Fe diffusion into the Ge substrate and formation of Ge-rich compounds, from FeGe3 to approximately FeGe2, depending on the amount of Fe deposited. Room temperature magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE evidenced ferromagnetic ordering at room temperature, with about 0.1 Bohr magnetons per Fe atom, and also a clear uniaxial magnetic anisotropy with the in-plane  easy magnetization axis. This compound is a good candidate for promising applications in the field of semiconductor spintronics.

  1. Atomic structure of self-organizing iridium induced nanowires on Ge(001)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabanov, N.S., E-mail: n.kabanov@utwente.nl [Faculty of Physics, Moscow State University, 119991 (Russian Federation); Physics of Interfaces and Nanomaterials, MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P. O. Box 217, Enschede 7500 AE (Netherlands); Heimbuch, R.; Zandvliet, H.J.W. [Physics of Interfaces and Nanomaterials, MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P. O. Box 217, Enschede 7500 AE (Netherlands); Saletsky, A.M.; Klavsyuk, A.L. [Faculty of Physics, Moscow State University, 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Ir/Ge(001) structure has been studied with DFT calculations and scanning tunneling microscopy. • Ir/Ge(001) nanowires are composed of Ge atoms and Ir atoms are located in subsurface positions. • The regions in the vicinity of the nanowires are very dynamic, even at temperatures as low as 77 K. - Abstract: The atomic structure of self-organizing iridium (Ir) induced nanowires on Ge(001) is studied by density functional theory (DFT) calculations and variable-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy. The Ir induced nanowires are aligned in a direction perpendicular to the Ge(001) substrate dimer rows, have a width of two atoms and are completely kink-less. Density functional theory calculations show that the Ir atoms prefer to dive into the Ge(001) substrate and push up the neighboring Ge substrate atoms. The nanowires are composed of Ge atoms and not Ir atoms as previously assumed. The regions in the vicinity of the nanowires are very dynamic, even at temperatures as low as 77 K. Time-resolved scanning tunneling microscopy measurements reveal that this dynamics is caused by buckled Ge substrate dimers that flip back and forth between their two buckled configurations.

  2. Optical transitions in Ge/SiGe multiple quantum wells with Ge-rich barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfanti, M.; Grilli, E.; Guzzi, M.; Virgilio, M.; Grosso, G.; Chrastina, D.; Isella, G.; von Känel, H.; Neels, A.

    2008-07-01

    Direct-gap and indirect-gap transitions in strain-compensated Ge/SiGe multiple quantum wells with Ge-rich SiGe barriers have been studied by optical transmission spectroscopy and photoluminescence experiments. An sp3d5s∗ tight-binding model has been adopted to interpret the experimental results. Photoluminescence spectra and their comparison with theoretical calculations prove the existence of type-I band alignment in compressively strained Ge quantum wells grown on relaxed Ge-rich SiGe buffers. The high quality of the transmission spectra opens up other perspectives for application of these structures in near-infrared optical modulators.

  3. Study of low dimensional SiGe island on Si for potential visible Metal-Semiconductor-Metal photodetector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim, Alhan Farhanah Abd; Zainal Badri, Nur'Amirah; Radzali, Rosfariza; Mahmood, Ainorkhilah

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, an investigation of design and simulation of silicon germanium (SiGe) islands on silicon (Si) was presented for potential visible metal semiconductor metal (MSM) photodetector. The characterization of the performances in term of the structural, optical and electrical properties of the structures was analyzed from the simulation results. The project involves simulation using SILVACO Technology Computer Aided Design (TCAD) tools. The different structures of the silicon germanium (SiGe) island on silicon substrate were created, which were large SiGe, small SiGe, combination SiGe and bulk Ge. All the structures were tested for potential Metal Semiconductor Metal (MSM) photodetector. The extracted data such as current versus voltage characteristic, current gain and spectral response were obtained using ATLAS SILVACO tools. The performance of SiGe island structures and bulk Ge on Si substrate as (MSM) photodetector was evaluated by photo and dark current-voltage (I-V) characteristics. It was found that SiGe islands exhibited higher energy band gap compared to bulk Ge. The SiGe islands current-voltage characteristics showed improved current gain compared to bulk Ge. Specifically the enhancement of the islands gain was contributed by the enhanced photo currents and lower dark currents. The spectral responses of the SiGe islands showed peak response at 590 nm (yellow) which is at the visible wavelength. This shows the feasibility of the SiGe islands to be utilized for visible photodetections.

  4. Study of low dimensional SiGe island on Si for potential visible Metal-Semiconductor-Metal photodetector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abd Rahim Alhan Farhanah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an investigation of design and simulation of silicon germanium (SiGe islands on silicon (Si was presented for potential visible metal semiconductor metal (MSM photodetector. The characterization of the performances in term of the structural, optical and electrical properties of the structures was analyzed from the simulation results. The project involves simulation using SILVACO Technology Computer Aided Design (TCAD tools. The different structures of the silicon germanium (SiGe island on silicon substrate were created, which were large SiGe, small SiGe, combination SiGe and bulk Ge. All the structures were tested for potential Metal Semiconductor Metal (MSM photodetector. The extracted data such as current versus voltage characteristic, current gain and spectral response were obtained using ATLAS SILVACO tools. The performance of SiGe island structures and bulk Ge on Si substrate as (MSM photodetector was evaluated by photo and dark current-voltage (I-V characteristics. It was found that SiGe islands exhibited higher energy band gap compared to bulk Ge. The SiGe islands current-voltage characteristics showed improved current gain compared to bulk Ge. Specifically the enhancement of the islands gain was contributed by the enhanced photo currents and lower dark currents. The spectral responses of the SiGe islands showed peak response at 590 nm (yellow which is at the visible wavelength. This shows the feasibility of the SiGe islands to be utilized for visible photodetections.

  5. Structural and phonon transmission study of Ge-Au-Ge eutectically bonded interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowlton, W.B.; Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA

    1995-07-01

    This thesis presents a structural analysis and phonon transparency investigation of the Ge-Au-Ge eutectic bond interface. Interface development was intended to maximize the interfacial ballistic phonon transparency to enhance the detection of the dark matter candidate WIMPs. The process which was developed provides an interface which produces minimal stress, low amounts of impurities, and insures Ge lattice continuity through the interface. For initial Au thicknesses of greater than 1,000 angstrom Au per substrate side, eutectic epitaxial growth resulted in a Au dendritic structure with 95% cross sectional and 90% planar Au interfacial area coverages. In sections in which Ge bridged the interface, lattice continuity across the interface was apparent. Epitaxial solidification of the eutectic interface with initial Au thicknesses < 500 A per substrate side produced Au agglomerations thereby reducing the Au planar interfacial area coverage to as little as 30%. The mechanism for Au coalescence was attributed to lateral diffusion of Ge and Au in the liquid phase during solidification. Phonon transmission studies were performed on eutectic interfaces with initial Au thicknesses of 1,000 angstrom, 500 angstrom, and 300 angstrom per substrate side. Phonon imaging of eutectically bonded samples with initial Au thicknesses of 300 angstrom/side revealed reproducible interfacial percent phonon transmissions from 60% to 70%. Line scan phonon imaging verified the results. Phonon propagation TOF spectra distinctly showed the predominant phonon propagation mode was ballistic. This was substantiated by phonon focusing effects apparent in the phonon imaging data. The degree of interface transparency to phonons and resulting phonon propagation modes correlate with the structure of the interface following eutectic solidification. Structural studies of samples with initial Au thickness of 1,000 angstrom/side appear to correspond with the phonon transmission study

  6. Offshore Substrate

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — This shapefile displays the distribution of substrate types from Pt. Arena to Pt. Sal in central/northern California. Originally this data consisted of seven paper...

  7. Magnetotransport Properties of Epitaxial Ge/AlAs Heterostructures Integrated on GaAs and Silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudait, Mantu K; Clavel, Michael; Goley, Patrick S; Xie, Yuantao; Heremans, Jean J

    2015-10-14

    The magnetotransport properties of epitaxial Ge/AlAs heterostructures with different growth conditions and substrate architectures have been studied under ±9 T magnetic field and at 390 mK temperature. Systematic mobility measurements of germanium (Ge) epilayers grown on GaAs substrates at growth temperatures from 350 to 450 °C allow us to extract a precise growth window for device-quality Ge, corroborated by structural and morphological properties. Our results on Si substrate using a composite metamorphic AlAs/GaAs buffer at 400 °C Ge growth temperature, show that the Ge/AlAs system can be tailored to have a single carrier transport while keeping the charge solely in the Ge layer. Single carrier transport confined to the Ge layer is demonstrated by the weak-localization quantum correction to the conductivity observed at low magnetic fields and 390 mK temperature. The weak localization effect points to a near-absence of spin-orbit interaction for carriers in the electronically active layer and is used here for the first time to pinpoint Ge as this active layer. Thus, the epitaxial Ge grown on Si using AlAs/GaAs buffer architecture is a promising candidate for next-generation energy-efficient fin field-effect transistor applications.

  8. Ion beam induced epitaxy in Ge- and B- coimplanted silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, N.; Hasegawa, M.; Tanoue, H.; Takahashi, H.; Shimoyama, K.; Kuriyama, K.

    1992-01-01

    The epitaxial regrowth of amorphous surface layers in and Si substrate has been studied under irradiation with 400 keV Ar + ions at the temperature range from 300 to 435degC. The amorphous layers were obtained by Ge + implantation, followed by B + implantation. The ion beam assisted epitaxy was found to be sensitive to both the substrate orientation and the implanted Ge concentration, and the layer-by-layer epitaxial regrowth seemed to be precluded in Si layers with high doses of Ge implants, e.g., 2.5 x 10 15 ions/cm 2 . Electrical activation of implanted dopant B was also measured in the recrystallized Si layer. (author)

  9. Ultra thin films of nanocrystalline Ge studied by AFM and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    mismatch between Ge and Si. After tcri, the strain in the uniform two-dimensional layers is relaxed by the formation of three dimensional islands.3 Depending on the surface orientation of Si and substrate temperature (Ts), the critical thickness and the shape of the islands are found to vary. The critical thickness is ~ 3–7 ...

  10. Carrier storage in Ge nanoparticles produced by pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin-Sanchez, J. [University of Minho, Centre of Physics and Physics Department, Braga (Portugal); Laser Processing Group, Instituto de Optica, CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Chahboun, A. [University of Minho, Centre of Physics and Physics Department, Braga (Portugal); FST, Physics Department, Tanger (Morocco); Gomes, M.J.M.; Rolo, A.G. [University of Minho, Centre of Physics and Physics Department, Braga (Portugal); Pivac, B.; Capan, I. [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia)

    2012-05-15

    In this work, we report on the electrical characterization of Ge nanoparticles (NPs) produced by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) at room temperature (RT) in Ar gas inert atmosphere using a shadowed off-axis deposition geometry. Our results show that functional thin films of crystalline Ge NPs embedded between thin alumina films can be obtained on p-type Si(100) substrates following a low temperature and short rapid thermal annealing (RTA) treatment. Metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structures with and without Ge NPs embedded in the alumina were prepared for the electrical measurements. The results indicate a strong memory effect at relatively low programming voltages ({+-}4 V) due to the presence of Ge NPs. (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  11. Droplet dynamics on patterned substrates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... on a substrate comprising hydrophobic and hydrophilic stripes can depend sensitively on the dynamical pathway by which the state is reached. We also consider a substrate covered with micron-scale posts and investigate how this can lead to superhydrophobic behaviour. Finally we model how a Namibian desert beetle ...

  12. Materials and devices for quantum information processing in Si/SiGe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sailer, Juergen

    2010-12-15

    In this thesis, we cover and discuss the complete way from material science, the fabrication of two-dimensional electron systems (2DES) in Si/SiGe heterostructures in molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), to quantum effects in few-electron devices based on these samples. We applied and compared two different approaches for the creation of pseudo-substrates that are as smooth, relaxed and defect free as possible. In the 'graded buffer' concept, starting from pure Si, the Ge content of the SiGe alloy is slowly and linearly increased until the desired Ge content is reached. In contrast, in the so-called 'low-temperature Si' concept, the SiGe alloy is deposited directly with the final Ge content, but onto a layer of highly defective Si. In terms of crystal defects, the 'graded buffer' turned out to be superior in comparison to the 'low-temperature Si' concept at the expense of a significantly higher material consumption. By continued optimization of the growth process, aiming at reducing the influence of the impurity, it nevertheless became possible to improve the charge carrier mobility from a mere 2000 cm{sup 2}/(Vs) to a record mobility exceeding 100 000 cm{sup 2}/(Vs). Within this work, we extended our MBE system with an electron beam evaporator for nuclear spin free {sup 28}Si. Together with the already existing effusion cell for {sup 70}Ge we were able to realize first 2DES in a nuclear spin free environment after successfully putting it to operation. The highest mobility 2DES in a nuclear spin free environment which have been realized in this thesis exhibited electron mobilities of up to 55 000 cm{sup 2}/(Vs). Quantum effects in Si/SiGe have been investigated in two- and zero-dimensional nanostructures. A remarkable phenomenon in the regime of the integer quantum Hall effect in Si/SiGe 2DES has been discovered and researched. For applications in quantum information processing and for the creation of qubits it is mandatory to

  13. Si/Ge intermixing during Ge Stranski–Krastanov growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Portavoce

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Stranski–Krastanov growth of Ge islands on Si(001 has been widely studied. The morphology changes of Ge islands during growth, from nucleation to hut/island formation and growth, followed by hut-to-dome island transformation and dislocation nucleation of domes, have been well described, even at the atomic scale, using techniques such as scanning tunneling microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Although it is known that these islands do not consist of pure Ge (due to Si/Ge intermixing, the composition of the Ge islands is not precisely known. In the present work, atom probe tomography was used to study the composition of buried dome islands at the atomic scale, in the three-dimensional space. The core of the island was shown to contain about 55 atom % Ge, while the Ge composition surrounding this core decreases rapidly in all directions in the islands to reach a Ge concentration of about 15 atom %. The Ge distribution in the islands follows a cylindrical symmetry and Ge segregation is observed only in the {113} facets of the islands. The Ge composition of the wetting layer is not homogeneous, varying from 5 to 30 atom %.

  14. Molecular beam epitaxy growth of [CrGe/MnGe/FeGe] superlattices: Toward artificial B20 skyrmion materials with tunable interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Adam S.; Esser, Bryan D.; Rowland, James; McComb, David W.; Kawakami, Roland K.

    2017-06-01

    Skyrmions are localized magnetic spin textures whose stability has been shown theoretically to depend on material parameters including bulk Dresselhaus spin orbit coupling (SOC), interfacial Rashba SOC, and magnetic anisotropy. Here, we establish the growth of a new class of artificial skyrmion materials, namely B20 superlattices, where these parameters could be systematically tuned. Specifically, we report the successful growth of B20 superlattices comprised of single crystal thin films of FeGe, MnGe, and CrGe on Si(1 1 1) substrates. Thin films and superlattices are grown by molecular beam epitaxy and are characterized through a combination of reflection high energy electron diffraction, X-ray diffraction, and cross-sectional scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (XEDS) distinguishes layers by elemental mapping and indicates good interface quality with relatively low levels of intermixing in the [CrGe/MnGe/FeGe] superlattice. This demonstration of epitaxial, single-crystalline B20 superlattices is a significant advance toward tunable skyrmion systems for fundamental scientific studies and applications in magnetic storage and logic.

  15. GeSn/Si Avalanche Photodetectors on Si substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-16

    as shown in Fig. 43(b). For this set of devices wherein the dark current is high, the shot noise dominates over other noise mechanisms . As applied...The material growth mechanism was in-depth studied; secondly, the material and optical characterizations have been conducted, including SEM, TEM, XRD...investigated. The material growth mechanism was in-depth studied; secondly, the material and optical characterizations have been conducted, including

  16. Single-crystalline Ni2Ge/Ge/Ni2Ge nanowire heterostructure transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jianshi; Wang, Chiu-Yen; Xiu, Faxian; Hong, Augustin J; Chen, Shengyu; Wang, Minsheng; Zeng, Caifu; Yang, Hong-Jie; Tuan, Hsing-Yu; Tsai, Cho-Jen; Chen, Lih Juann; Wang, Kang L

    2010-12-17

    In this study, we report on the formation of a single-crystalline Ni(2)Ge/Ge/Ni(2)Ge nanowire heterostructure and its field effect characteristics by controlled reaction between a supercritical fluid-liquid-solid (SFLS) synthesized Ge nanowire and Ni metal contacts. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies reveal a wide temperature range to convert the Ge nanowire to single-crystalline Ni(2)Ge by a thermal diffusion process. The maximum current density of the fully germanide Ni(2)Ge nanowires exceeds 3.5 × 10(7) A cm(-2), and the resistivity is about 88 μΩ cm. The in situ reaction examined by TEM shows atomically sharp interfaces for the Ni(2)Ge/Ge/Ni(2)Ge heterostructure. The interface epitaxial relationships are determined to be [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]. Back-gate field effect transistors (FETs) were also fabricated using this low resistivity Ni(2)Ge as source/drain contacts. Electrical measurements show a good p-type FET behavior with an on/off ratio over 10(3) and a one order of magnitude improvement in hole mobility from that of SFLS-synthesized Ge nanowire.

  17. Search for exotic barton resonances in the final states of K/sup -/p and K/sup -/d interactions at 2. 9 GeV/c. [Cross section upper limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staab, R.W.

    1975-11-01

    The reactions K/sup -/p ..-->.. ..xi../sup 0/..pi../sup -/..pi../sup +/K/sup 0/ in hydrogen and K/sup -/n ..-->.. ..xi../sup -/..pi../sup -/K/sup +/ in deuterium were analyzed for isotopic spin-3/2 exotic cascade resonance production at a K/sup -/ beam momentum of 2.9 GeV/c. In addition, the strangeness +1 baryons (Z*'s) were searched for in the reaction K/sup -/d ..-->.. ..xi../sup -/Z* at the same beam momentum. The three particle states under consideration lie at the corners of an exotic decuplet. The data came from the Brandeis-Maryland-Syracuse-Tufts collaboration involving two experiments at the 31'' bubble chamber at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Each involved 10/sup 6/ pictures with a 30 event/..mu..barn exposure in hydrogen and a 17 event/..mu..barn exposure in deuterium.

  18. Search for a pseudoscalar boson decaying into a Z boson and the 125 GeV Higgs boson in $\\mathrm{\\ell^+ \\ell^- b \\bar{b}}$ final states

    CERN Document Server

    Khachatryan, Vardan; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Aşılar, Ece; Bergauer, Thomas; Brandstetter, Johannes; Brondolin, Erica; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Flechl, Martin; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Knünz, Valentin; König, Axel; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Matsushita, Takashi; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schieck, Jochen; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Lauwers, Jasper; Luyckx, Sten; Ochesanu, Silvia; Rougny, Romain; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Abu Zeid, Shimaa; Blekman, Freya; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Daci, Nadir; De Bruyn, Isabelle; Deroover, Kevin; Heracleous, Natalie; Keaveney, James; Lowette, Steven; Moreels, Lieselotte; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Strom, Derek; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Van Parijs, Isis; Barria, Patrizia; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Delannoy, Hugo; Dobur, Didar; Fasanella, Giuseppe; Favart, Laurent; Gay, Arnaud; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Léonard, Alexandre; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Perniè, Luca; Randle-conde, Aidan; Reis, Thomas; Seva, Tomislav; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Zenoni, Florian; Beernaert, Kelly; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Crucy, Shannon; Fagot, Alexis; Garcia, Guillaume; Gul, Muhammad; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Poyraz, Deniz; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Sigamani, Michael; Strobbe, Nadja; Tytgat, Michael; Van Driessche, Ward; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Beluffi, Camille; Bondu, Olivier; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Jafari, Abideh; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Mertens, Alexandre; Nuttens, Claude; Perrini, Lucia; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Popov, Andrey; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Dos Reis Martins, Thiago; Hensel, Carsten; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Moraes, Arthur; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, Ewerton; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Huertas Guativa, Lina Milena; Malbouisson, Helena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santaolalla, Javier; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Ahuja, Sudha; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; Dogra, Sunil; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Moon, Chang-Seong; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Romero Abad, David; Ruiz Vargas, José Cupertino; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Genchev, Vladimir; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Marinov, Andrey; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Ahmad, Muhammad; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Cheng, Tongguang; Du, Ran; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Plestina, Roko; Romeo, Francesco; Shaheen, Sarmad Masood; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Chunjie; Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Huaqiao; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Li, Qiang; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Zhang, Fengwangdong; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Sudic, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Rykaczewski, Hans; Bodlak, Martin; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Ali, Ahmed; Aly, Reham; Aly, Shereen

    2015-07-09

    Results are reported on a search for decays of a pseudoscalar A boson into a Z boson and a light scalar h boson, where the Z boson decays into a pair of oppositely-charged electrons or muons, and the h boson decays into $\\mathrm{b \\bar{b}}$. The search is based on data from proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV collected with the CMS detector, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb$^{-1}$. The h boson is assumed to be the recently discovered standard model-like Higgs boson with a mass of 125 GeV. With no evidence for signal, upper limits are obtained on the product of the production cross section and the branching fraction of the A boson in the Zh channel. Results are also interpreted in the context of two Higgs doublet models.

  19. 76 FR 14437 - Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor Standard Design: GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy; Issuance of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-16

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2011-0055] Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor Standard Design: GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy; Issuance of Final Design Approval The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has issued a final design approval (FDA) to GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy (GEH) for the economic...

  20. Surface Science in an MOCVD Environment: Arsenic on Vicinal Ge(100)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, J.M.; McMahon, W.E.

    1998-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscope (STM) images of arsine-exposed vicinal Ge(100) surfaces show that most As/Ge steps are reconstructed, and that a variety of different step structures exist. The entire family of reconstructed As/Ge steps can be divided into two types, which we have chosen to call ''single-row'' steps and ''double-row'' steps. In this paper we propose a model for a double-row step created by annealing a vicinal Ge(100) substrate under an arsine flux in a metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) chamber

  1. HfO2 nanocrystal memory on SiGe channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Hsien; Chien, Chao-Hsin

    2013-02-01

    This study proposes a novel HfO2 nanocrystal memory on epi-SiGe (Ge: 15%) channel. Because SiGe has a smaller bandgap than that of silicon, it increases electron/hole injection and the enhances program/erase speeds. This study compares the characteristics of HfO2 nanocrystal memories with different oxynitride tunnel oxide thicknesses on Si and epi-SiGe substrate. Results show that the proposed nonvolatile memory possesses superior characteristics in terms of considerably large memory window for two-bits operation, high speed program/erase for low power applications, long retention time, excellent endurance, and strong immunity to disturbance.

  2. Ge incorporated epitaxy of (110) rutile TiO{sub 2} on (100) Ge single crystal at low temperature by pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagata, Takahiro, E-mail: NAGATA.Takahiro@nims.go.jp [Nano-Electronics Materials Unit, International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics, National Institute for Materials Science (WPI-MANA), 1–1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305–0044 (Japan); JST, PREST, 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332–0012 (Japan); Kobashi, Kazuyoshi [Nano-Electronics Materials Unit, International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics, National Institute for Materials Science (WPI-MANA), 1–1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305–0044 (Japan); Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashimita, Tama-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214–8571 (Japan); Yamashita, Yoshiyuki [Nano-Electronics Materials Unit, International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics, National Institute for Materials Science (WPI-MANA), 1–1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305–0044 (Japan); Synchrotron X-ray Station at SPring-8, NIMS, 1-1-1 Koto, Sayo-cho, Sayo, Hyogo 679–5148 (Japan); Yoshikawa, Hideki [Synchrotron X-ray Station at SPring-8, NIMS, 1-1-1 Koto, Sayo-cho, Sayo, Hyogo 679–5148 (Japan); Paulsamy, Chinnamuthu [Nano-Electronics Materials Unit, International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics, National Institute for Materials Science (WPI-MANA), 1–1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305–0044 (Japan); Suzuki, Yoshihisa [Nano-Electronics Materials Unit, International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics, National Institute for Materials Science (WPI-MANA), 1–1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305–0044 (Japan); Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashimita, Tama-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214–8571 (Japan); Nabatame, Toshihide [Nano-Electronics Materials Unit, International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics, National Institute for Materials Science (WPI-MANA), 1–1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305–0044 (Japan); Ogura, Atsushi [Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashimita, Tama-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214–8571 (Japan); and others

    2015-09-30

    The thin film growth of (110) rutile TiO{sub 2} on a (100) Ge substrate at a substrate temperature of 450 °C, which is generally the growth temperature of anatase TiO{sub 2}, was demonstrated by using pulsed laser deposition. X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that the incorporation of Ge into TiO{sub 2} enhances the rutile phase formation, and the ambient oxygen condition enhances the Ge oxide diffusion. Photoelectron spectroscopy also revealed that the valence band offset of rutile TiO{sub 2} and p-type Ge is approximately 2.5 ± 0.1 eV with a type II band alignment. - Highlights: • We grew (110) rutile TiO{sub 2} film on (100) Ge substrate. • Rutile TiO{sub 2} crystallizes at the crystallization temperature of anatase phase. • Ge diffusion enhances the crystallization of rutile TiO{sub 2}. • Band alignment between rutile TiO{sub 2} and p-type Ge is type II band alignment.

  3. Measurement of Trilinear Gauge Couplings in $e^+ e^-$ Collisions at 161 GeV and 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Adye, T; Adzic, P; Alekseev, G D; Alemany, R; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Amaldi, Ugo; Amato, S; Andersson, P; Andreazza, A; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barão, F; Barbier, R; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G; Baroncelli, A; Bärring, O; Bates, M J; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Bérat, C; Berggren, M; Bertini, D; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Bianchi, F; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Billoir, P; Bizouard, M A; Bloch, D; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Boonekamp, M; Booth, P S L; Borgland, A W; Borisov, G; Bosio, C; Botner, O; Boudinov, E; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Bozovic, I; Bozzo, M; Branchini, P; Brand, K D; Brenke, T; Brenner, R A; Brown, R; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Burgsmüller, T; Buschmann, P; Cabrera, S; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camacho-Rozas, A J; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Canepa, M; Carena, F; Carroll, L; 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Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G

    1998-01-01

    Trilinear gauge boson couplings are measured using data taken by DELPHI at 161~GeV and 172~GeV. Values for $WWV$ couplings ($V=Z, \\gamma$) are determined from a study of the reactions \\eeWW\\ and \\eeWev, using differential distributions from the $WW$ final state in which one $W$ decays hadronically and the other leptonically, and total cross-section4AU LWit

  4. Growth of GaN on Ge(111) by molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lieten, R. R.; Degroote, S.; Cheng, K.; Leys, M.; Kuijk, M.; Borghs, G.

    2006-01-01

    The epitaxial growth of GaN on Ge is reported. The authors found that direct growth of GaN performs exceptionally well on Ge(111) with plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy. A streaky reflection high energy electron diffraction pattern is observed during growth. X-ray diffraction showed a rocking curve full width at half maximum of only 371 arc sec for a 38 nm GaN layer and indicates an abrupt interface between the GaN and Ge. Secondary ion mass spectrometry shows limited diffusion of Ga atoms into the Ge substrate and Ge atoms into the GaN layers. Current-voltage measurements show rectifying behavior for n-GaN on p-Ge. Their results indicate that GaN growth on Ge does not require intermediate layers, allowing the Ge substrate to be used as back contact in vertical devices. A p-n junction formed between GaN and Ge can be used in heterojunction devices

  5. Applications of Si/SiGe heterostructures to CMOS devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidek, R.M.

    1999-03-01

    For more than two decades, advances in MOSFETs used in CMOS VLSI applications have been made through scaling to ever smaller dimensions for higher packing density, faster circuit speed and lower power dissipation. As scaling now approaches nanometer regime, the challenge for further scaling becomes greater in terms of technology as well as device reliability. This work presents an alternative approach whereby non-selectively grown Si/SiGe heterostructure system is used to improve device performance or to relax the technological challenge. SiGe is considered to be of great potential because of its promising properties and its compatibility with Si, the present mainstream material in microelectronics. The advantages of introducing strained SiGe in CMOS technology are examined through two types of device structure. A novel structure has been fabricated in which strained SiGe is incorporated in the source/drain of P-MOSFETs. Several advantages of the Si/SiGe source/drain P-MOSFETs over Si devices are experimentally, demonstrated for the first time. These include reduction in off-state leakage and punchthrough susceptibility, degradation of parasitic bipolar transistor (PBT) action, suppression of CMOS latchup and suppression of PBT-induced breakdown. The improvements due to the Si/SiGe heterojunction are supported by numerical simulations. The second device structure makes use of Si/SiGe heterostructure as a buried channel to enhance the hole mobility of P-MOSFETs. The increase in the hole mobility will benefit the circuit speed and device packing density. Novel fabrication processes have been developed to integrate non-selective Si/SiGe MBE layers into self-aligned PMOS and CMOS processes based on Si substrate. Low temperature processes have been employed including the use of low-pressure chemical vapor deposition oxide and plasma anodic oxide. Low field mobilities, μ 0 are extracted from the transfer characteristics, Id-Vg of SiGe channel P-MOSFETs with various Ge

  6. ATLAS 750 GeV Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Fuquan; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    These slides are for BEACH 2016 presentation about 750 GeV searches at the ATLAS experiment with the 3.2 $\\text{fb}^{-1}$ $\\sqrt{s}$=13 TeV data collected in year 2015. The results from $\\gamma\\gamma$ and $Z\\gamma$ final states are summarized. For $\\gamma\\gamma$ analysis, the local significance is 3.9 $\\sigma$ for the spin-0 selection and 3.8 $\\sigma$ for spin-2 selection at 750 GeV, with global significance both at 2.1 $\\sigma$. For the $Z\\gamma$ analysis, both the leptonic and hadronic decays of the $Z$ boson are studied and no excess at the signal region is observed.

  7. Structure of 78Ge from the 76Ge(t,p)78Ge reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ardouin, D.; Lebrun, C.; Guilbault, F.; Remaud, B.; Vergnes, M.N.; Rotbard, G.; Kumar, K.

    1978-01-01

    The 76 Ge(t,p) 78 Ge reaction has been performed at a bombarding energy of 17 MeV. Thirteen excited states below 3 MeV excitation are reported with Jsup(π) values obtained by comparison to DWBA analysis. A comparison to a dynamical deformation theory is made and the results suggest 78 Ge is a transitional nucleus nearing spherical shape due to the proximity of the N-50 closed shell

  8. Type II band alignment in Ge1-x-ySixSny/Ge1-α-βSiαSnβ heterojunctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Swagata; Mukhopadhyay, Bratati; Sen, Gopa; Basu, P. K.

    2018-02-01

    We have examined type II band alignment in Ge1-x-ySixSny/Ge1-α-βSiαSβ heterojunctions grown on virtual substrates in Si platform. It is found that, for different values of x, y, α and β, direct band gap type II band line up can be achieved for both tensile and compressive strains. The calculated band gap energy corresponds to the mid infrared to far infrared regions in the electromagnetic spectrum.

  9. 75 FR 47318 - GE Asset Management Incorporated and GE Investment Distributors, Inc.; Notice of Application and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-05

    ...] GE Asset Management Incorporated and GE Investment Distributors, Inc.; Notice of Application and.... Applicants: GE Asset Management Incorporated (``GEAM'') and GE Investment Distributors, Inc. (``GEID... of Investment Management, Office of Investment Company Regulation). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The...

  10. SiGe/Si electronics and optoelectronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, K.L.; Karunasiri, R.P.G. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1993-05-01

    Recently, there is an increased interest in the use of SiGe layered material for integration with Si technology. SiGe offers the opportunity for the first time to realize the advantages of heterojunctions in Si-based technology. In this article, the present status of the SiGe epitaxial growth techniques will be discussed from the point of view of device application. New directions will be presented. Next, electronic devices to be reviewed include bipolars and field effect transistors. The progress of tunneling devices will also be discussed. Then, the realization of quantum wells and superlattices for optoelectronics will be discussed. Then, the realization of quantum wells and superlattices for optoelectronics will be discussed. These will include Si-based detectors and modulators based on interband and intersubband transitions. One of the focuses will be the normal incidence operation for intersubband devices. Finally, the current status in the quest of light emitters will be briefly addressed. 44 refs., 15 figs.

  11. Si, Ge and SiGe wires for sensor application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Druzhinin, A.A.; Khoverko, Yu.M.; Ostrovskii, I.P.; Nichkalo, S.I.; Nikolaeva, A.A.; Konopko, L.A.; Stich, I.

    2011-01-01

    Resistance and magnetoresistance of Si, Ge and Si-Ge micro- and nanowires were studied in temperature range 4,2-300 K at magnetic fields up to 14 T. The wires diameters range from 200 nm to 20 μm. Ga-In gates were created to wires and ohmic I-U characteristics were observed in all temperature range. It was found high elastic strain for Ge nanowires (of about 0,7%) as well as high magnitude of magnetoresistance (of about 250% at 14 T), which was used to design multifunctional sensor of simultaneous measurements of strain and magnetic field intensity. (authors)

  12. DFT study of cyanide oxidation on surface of Ge-embedded carbon nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wei; Milad Abrishamifar, Seyyed; Ebrahimzadeh Rajaei, Gholamreza; Razavi, Razieh; Najafi, Meysam

    2018-03-01

    In recent years, the discovery of suitable catalyst to oxidation of the cyanide (CN) has high importance in the industry. In present study, in the first step, the carbon nanotube (CNT) with the Ge atom embedded and the surface of Ge-CNT via the O2 molecule activated. In second step, the oxidation of CN on surface of the Ge-CNT via the Langmuir Hinshelwood (LH) and the Eley Rideal (ER) mechanisms was investigated. Results show that O2-Ge-CNT oxidized the CN molecule via the Ge-CNT-O-O∗ + CN → Ge-CNT-O-O∗-CN → Ge-CNT-O∗ + OCN and the Ge-CNT-O∗ + CN → Ge-CNT + OCN reactions. Results show that oxidation of CN on surface of Ge-CNT via the LH mechanism has lower energy barrier than ER mechanism. Finally, calculated parameters reveal that Ge-CNT is acceptable catalyst with high performance for CN oxidation, form theoretical point of view.

  13. First-principles study of SO2 sensors based on phosphorene and its isoelectronic counterparts: GeS, GeSe, SnS, SnSe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shiying; Yuan, Lu; Liu, Xuhai; Zhou, Wenhan; Song, Xiufeng; Zhang, Shengli

    2017-10-01

    Phosphorene and its isoelectronic counterparts, such as GeS, GeSe, SnS and SnSe monolayers, show great potential in electrical and sensing applications. Here, we study the SO2 sensing properties of phosphorene and its isoelectronic counterparts by first-principles calculations. Results predict that the SO2 molecule as electron acceptor holds high adsorption strength with the five monolayer substrates, especially for SnS and SnSe monolayers. Moreover, the electronic properties of the five substrates can be modified by the SO2 molecule, together with distinct charge transfer, rendering them promising for application as a high-performance gas sensor.

  14. Ge-on-Si optoelectronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Jifeng, E-mail: Jifeng.Liu@Dartmouth.edu [Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States); Camacho-Aguilera, Rodolfo; Bessette, Jonathan T.; Sun, Xiaochen [Microphotonics Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Wang Xiaoxin [Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States); Cai Yan; Kimerling, Lionel C.; Michel, Jurgen [Microphotonics Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Electronic-photonic synergy has become an increasingly clear solution to enhance the bandwidth and improve the energy efficiency of information systems. Monolithic integration of optoelectronic devices is the ideal solution for large-scale electronic-photonic synergy. Due to its pseudo-direct gap behavior in optoelectronic properties and compatibility with Si electronics, epitaxial Ge-on-Si has become an attractive solution for monolithic optoelectronics. In this paper we will review recent progress in Ge-on-Si optoelectronics, including photodetectors, electroabsorption modulators, and lasers. The performance of these devices has been enhanced by band-engineering such as tensile strain and n-type doping, which transforms Ge towards a direct gap material. Selective growth reduces defect density and facilitates monolithic integration at the same time. Ge-on-Si photodetectors have approached or exceeded the performance of their III-V counterparts, with bandwidth-efficiency product > 30 GHz for p-i-n photodiodes and bandwidth-gain product > 340 GHz for avalanche photodiodes. Enhanced Franz-Keldysh effect in tensile-strained Ge offers ultralow energy photonic modulation with < 30 fJ/bit energy consumption and > 100 GHz intrinsic bandwidth. Room temperature optically-pumped lasing as well as electroluminescence has also been achieved from the direct gap transition of band-engineered Ge-on-Si waveguides. These results indicate that band-engineered Ge-on-Si is promising to achieve monolithic active optoelectronic devices on a Si platform.

  15. Searches for a heavy scalar boson $ \\mathrm{H} $ decaying to a pair of 125 GeV Higgs bosons $ \\mathrm{ hh } $ or for a heavy pseudoscalar boson $ \\mathrm{A} $ decaying to $ \\mathrm{Zh} $, in the final states with $\\mathrm{h} \\to \\tau \\tau$

    CERN Document Server

    Khachatryan, Vardan; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Aşılar, Ece; Bergauer, Thomas; Brandstetter, Johannes; Brondolin, Erica; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Flechl, Martin; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Knünz, Valentin; König, Axel; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Matsushita, Takashi; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schieck, Jochen; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Lauwers, Jasper; Luyckx, Sten; Ochesanu, Silvia; Rougny, Romain; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Abu Zeid, Shimaa; Blekman, Freya; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Daci, Nadir; De Bruyn, Isabelle; Deroover, Kevin; Heracleous, Natalie; Keaveney, James; Lowette, Steven; Moreels, Lieselotte; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Strom, Derek; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Van Parijs, Isis; Barria, Patrizia; Brun, Hugues; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Delannoy, Hugo; Fasanella, Giuseppe; Favart, Laurent; Gay, Arnaud; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Karapostoli, Georgia; Lenzi, Thomas; Léonard, Alexandre; Maerschalk, Thierry; Marinov, Andrey; Perniè, Luca; Randle-conde, Aidan; Reis, Thomas; Seva, Tomislav; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Yonamine, Ryo; Zenoni, Florian; Zhang, Fengwangdong; Beernaert, Kelly; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Crucy, Shannon; Dobur, Didar; Fagot, Alexis; Garcia, Guillaume; Gul, Muhammad; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Poyraz, Deniz; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Sigamani, Michael; Strobbe, Nadja; Tytgat, Michael; Van Driessche, Ward; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Beluffi, Camille; Bondu, Olivier; Brochet, Sébastien; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; Delaere, Christophe; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Jafari, Abideh; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Mertens, Alexandre; Nuttens, Claude; Perrini, Lucia; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Popov, Andrey; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Beliy, Nikita; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Hamer, Matthias; Hensel, Carsten; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Moraes, Arthur; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, Ewerton; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Huertas Guativa, Lina Milena; Malbouisson, Helena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Ahuja, Sudha; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Souza Santos, Angelo; Dogra, Sunil; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Moon, Chang-Seong; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Romero Abad, David; Ruiz Vargas, José Cupertino; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Ahmad, Muhammad; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Cheng, Tongguang; Du, Ran; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Plestina, Roko; Romeo, Francesco; Shaheen, Sarmad Masood; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Chunjie; Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Huaqiao; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Li, Qiang; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Puljak, Ivica; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Micanovic, Sasa; Sudic, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Rykaczewski, Hans; Bodlak, Martin; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali

    2016-04-10

    A search for a heavy scalar boson $ \\mathrm{H} $ decaying into a pair of lighter standard-model-like 125 GeV Higgs bosons $ \\mathrm{h} $ and a search for a heavy pseudoscalar boson $ \\mathrm{A} $ decaying into a $ \\mathrm{Z} $ and an $ \\mathrm{h} $ boson are presented. The searches are performed on a dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb$^{-1}$ of pp collision data at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV, collected by CMS in 2012. A final state consisting of two $\\tau$ leptons and two b jets is used to search for the $\\mathrm{ H \\to h h }$ decay. A final state consisting of two $\\tau$ leptons from the $ \\mathrm{h} $ boson decay, and two additional leptons from the $ \\mathrm{Z} $ boson decay, is used to search for the decay $\\mathrm{ A \\to Z h } $. The results are interpreted in the context of both the minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model and two-Higgs-doublet models. No excess is found above the standard model expectation and upper limits are set on the heavy boson product...

  16. Molecular beam deposition of Al2O3 on p-Ge(001)/Ge0.95Sn0.05 heterostructure and impact of a Ge-cap interfacial layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merckling, C.; Franquet, A.; Vincent, B.; Vandervorst, W.; Loo, R.; Caymax, M.; Sun, X.; Shimura, Y.; Takeuchi, S.; Nakatsuka, O.; Zaima, S.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the molecular beam deposition of Al 2 O 3 on Ge 0.95 Sn 0.05 surface with and without an ultra thin Ge cap layer in between. We first studied the atomic configuration of both Ge 1-x Sn x and Ge/Ge 1-x Sn x surfaces after deoxidation by reflection high-energy electron diffraction and resulted, respectively, in a c(4x2) and (2x1) surface reconstructions. After in situ deposition of an Al 2 O 3 high-κ gate dielectric we evidenced using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy analyses that Sn diffusion was at the origin of high leakage current densities in the Ge 1-x Sn x /Al 2 O 3 gate stack. This damage could be avoided by inserting a thin 5-nm-thick Ge cap between the oxide and the Ge 1-x Sn x layer. Finally, metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors on the Ge capped sample showed well-behaved capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics with interface trap density (D it ) in the range of 10 12 eV -1 cm -2 in mid gap and higher close to the valence band edge.

  17. Vertical nanowire heterojunction devices based on a clean Si/Ge interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Fung, Wayne Y; Lu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Different vertical nanowire heterojunction devices were fabricated and tested based on vertical Ge nanowires grown epitaxially at low temperatures on (111) Si substrates with a sharp and clean Si/Ge interface. The nearly ideal Si/Ge heterojuctions with controlled and abrupt doping profiles were verified through material analysis and electrical characterizations. In the nSi/pGe heterojunction diode, an ideality factor of 1.16, subpicoampere reverse saturation current, and rectifying ratio of 10(6) were obtained, while the n+Si/p+Ge structure leads to Esaki tunnel diodes with a high peak tunneling current of 4.57 kA/cm(2) and negative differential resistance at room temperature. The large valence band discontinuity between the Ge and Si in the nanowire heterojunctions was further verified in the p+Si/pGe structure, which shows a rectifying behavior instead of an Ohmic contact and raises an important issue in making Ohmic contacts to heterogeneously integrated materials. A raised Si/Ge structure was further developed using a self-aligned etch process, allowing greater freedom in device design for applications such as the tunneling field-effect transistor (TFET). All measurement data can be well-explained and fitted with theoretical models with known bulk properties, suggesting that the Si/Ge nanowire system offers a very clean heterojunction interface with low defect density, and holds great potential as a platform for future high-density and high-performance electronics.

  18. Control of interfacial properties of Pr-oxide/Ge gate stack structure by introduction of nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Kimihiko; Kondo, Hiroki; Sakashita, Mitsuo; Nakatsuka, Osamu; Zaima, Shigeaki

    2011-06-01

    We have demonstrated the control of interfacial properties of Pr-oxide/Ge gate stack structure by the introduction of nitrogen. From C- V characteristics of Al/Pr-oxide/Ge 3N 4/Ge MOS capacitors, the interface state density decreases without the change of the accumulation capacitance after annealing. The TEM and TED measurements reveal that the crystallization of Pr-oxide is enhanced with annealing and the columnar structure of cubic-Pr 2O 3 is formed after annealing. From the depth profiles measured using XPS with Ar sputtering for the Pr-oxide/Ge 3N 4/Ge stack structure, the increase in the Ge component is not observed in a Pr-oxide film and near the interface between a Pr-oxide film and a Ge substrate. In addition, the N component segregates near the interface region, amorphous Pr-oxynitride (PrON) is formed at the interface. As a result, Pr-oxide/PrON/Ge stacked structure without the Ge-oxynitride interlayer is formed.

  19. Neutron diffraction studies of atomic structures of amorphous Fe-Ge and Ni-Ge alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Kazuyoshi; Endoh, Yasuo; Ishikawa, Yoshikazu; Watanabe, Noboru.

    1980-01-01

    The structures of Ge rich amorphous Fe-Ge and Ni-Ge alloys were studied by pulsed neutron total scattering. The partial structure factors of S sub(GeGe)(Q), S sub(NiGe)(Q) and S sub(NiNi)(Q) were determined successfully by using Ni 60 isotope for the Ni-Ge alloys. The Ge atoms in the 10 at% Ni-Ge amorphous alloy were found to construct a similar atomic structure as that of the amorphous Ge, while the intermediate short range order configuration between the tetrahedral random network (TRN) and the dense random packing (DRP) structure was found for the 30 at% Ni-Ge alloy. The Ge-Ge pair correlation for this intermediate short range order could well be reproduced by the modified Ge II microcrystalline model. (author)

  20. Analysis of threshold current of uniaxially tensile stressed bulk Ge and Ge/SiGe quantum well lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jialin; Sun, Junqiang; Gao, Jianfeng; Zhang, Ruiwen

    2017-10-30

    We propose and design uniaxially tensile stressed bulk Ge and Ge/SiGe quantum well lasers with the stress along direction. The micro-bridge structure is adapted for introducing uniaxial stress in Ge/SiGe quantum well. To enhance the fabrication tolerance, full-etched circular gratings with high reflectivity bandwidths of ~500 nm are deployed in laser cavities. We compare and analyze the density of state, the number of states between Γ- and L-points, the carrier injection efficiency, and the threshold current density for the uniaxially tensile stressed bulk Ge and Ge/SiGe quantum well lasers. Simulation results show that the threshold current density of the Ge/SiGe quantum well laser is much higher than that of the bulk Ge laser, even combined with high uniaxial tensile stress owing to the larger number of states between Γ- and L- points and extremely low carrier injection efficiency. Electrical transport simulation reveals that the reduced effective mass of the hole and the small conduction band offset cause the low carrier injection efficiency of the Ge/SiGe quantum well laser. Our theoretical results imply that unlike III-V material, uniaxially tensile stressed bulk Ge outperforms a Ge/SiGe quantum well with the same strain level and is a promising approach for Si-compatible light sources.

  1. <300> GeV team

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1971-01-01

    The 300 GeV team had been assembled. In the photograph are Hans Horisberger, Clemens Zettler, Roy Billinge, Norman Blackburne, John Adams, Hans-Otto Wuster, Lars Persson, Bas de Raad, Hans Goebel, Simon Van der Meer.

  2. Thermoelectric energy conversion in layered structures with strained Ge quantum dots grown on Si surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korotchenkov, Oleg; Nadtochiy, Andriy; Kuryliuk, Vasyl; Wang, Chin-Chi; Li, Pei-Wen; Cantarero, Andres

    2014-03-01

    The efficiency of the energy conversion devices depends in many ways on the materials used and various emerging cost-effective nanomaterials have promised huge potentials in highly efficient energy conversion. Here we show that thermoelectric voltage can be enhanced by a factor of 3 using layer-cake growth of Ge quantum dots through thermal oxidation of SiGe layers stacked in SiO2/Si3N4 multilayer structure. The key to achieving this behavior has been to strain the Ge/Si interface by Ge dots migrating to Si substrate. Calculations taking into account the carrier trapping in the dot with a quantum transmission into the neighboring dot show satisfactory agreement with experiments above ≈200 K. The results may be of interest for improving the functionality of thermoelectric devices based on Ge/Si.

  3. Ion channeling study of epitaxy of iron based Heusler alloy films on Ge(111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeda, Yoshihito, E-mail: maeda@energy.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Energy Science and Technology, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Narumi, Kazumasa; Sakai, Seiji [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Terai, Yoshikazu [Department of Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Hamaya, Kohei; Sadoh, Taizoh; Miyao, Masanobu [Department of Electronics, Kyushu University, Motooka, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)

    2011-10-03

    We have investigated perfection of atomic rows on iron-based Heusler alloy films on Ge(111) planes by using ion channeling technique in order to find the dominant factors for the perfection. Fe{sub 3}Si/Ge(111) and Fe{sub 2}CoSi/Ge(111) have a high quality of atomic rows at the heterointerface like that of perfect crystals. Fe{sub 3-x}Mn{sub x}Si/Ge(111) (x = 0.84, 0.72 and 0.36) interfaces have imperfection of atomic rows which may be controlled by both the lattice mismatch with the Ge substrate and the Mn-Si pairs due to the site disorder in the film with the Mn content x > 0.75. Analysis of axial channeling parameters employed in this study is very useful for quantitative evaluation of perfection of atomic rows at the heterointerface.

  4. Deposition of crystalline Ge nanoparticle films by high-pressure RF magnetron sputtering method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichida, D; Seo, H; Itagaki, N; Koga, K; Shiratani, M; Uchida, G; Kamataki, K

    2014-01-01

    We report here deposition of crystalline Ge nanoparticle films using a radio frequency magnetron sputtering method in argon and hydrogen gas mixture under a high pressure condition. The size of Ge nanoparticles is deduced to be 6.3-6.4 nm from the peak frequency shift of Raman spectra. Raman and X-ray diffraction spectra show that the films are crystalline. The film crystallinity strongly depends on substrate temperature (T s ). Highly crystalline Ge nanoparticle films are successfully fabricated at T s = 180°C

  5. Experimental studies of the {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}, K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} and p anti p{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} final states produced in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation at {radical}(s)= 3.773 and 3.650 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ablikim, M.; Bai, J.Z.; Cai, X.; Chen, H.S.; Chen, H.X.; Chen, J.C.; Chen, Jin; Chen, Y.B.; Chu, Y.P.; Deng, Z.Y.; Du, S.X.; Fang, J.; Gao, C.S.; Gu, S.D.; Guo, Y.N.; He, K.L.; Heng, Y.K.; Hu, H.M.; Hu, T.; Ji, X.B.; Jiang, X.S.; Jin, D.P.; Jin, S.; Lai, Y.F.; Li, H.B.; Li, J.; Li, R.Y.; Li, S.M.; Li, W.D.; Li, W.G.; Li, X.L.; Li, X.N.; Liao, H.B.; Liu, B.J.; Liu, C.X.; Liu, Fang; Liu, H.H.; Liu, H.M.; Liu, J.B.; Liu, Jian; Liu, Q.; Liu, R.G.; Liu, Z.A.; Lu, F.; Lu, J.G.; Ma, Q.M.; Mao, Z.P.; Mo, X.H.; Nie, J.; Ping, R.G.; Qi, N.D.; Qin, H.; Qiu, J.F.; Ren, Z.Y.; Rong, G.; Shan, L.Y.; Shang, L.; Shen, D.L.; Shen, X.Y.; Sheng, H.Y.; Sun, H.S.; Sun, S.S.; Sun, Y.Z.; Sun, Z.J.; Tang, X.; Tong, G.L.; Wang, L.; Wang, L.L.; Wang, L.S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P.L.; Wang, Y.F.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z.Y.; Wang, Zheng; Wei, C.L.; Wei, D.H.; Weng, Y.; Wu, N.; Xia, X.M.; Xie, X.X.; Xu, G.F.; Yang, H.X.; Yu, G.W.; Yuan, C.Z.; Yuan, Y.; Zang, S.L.; Zhang, B.X.; Zhang, B.Y.; Zhang, C.C.; Zhang, D.H.; Zhang, H.Q.; Zhang, H.Y.; Zhang, J.W.; Zhang, J.Y.; Zhang, S.H.; Zhao, D.X.; Zhao, J.W.; Zhao, M.G.; Zhao, P.P.; Zhao, W.R.; Zheng, J.P.; Zheng, Z.P.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, K.J.; Zhu, Q.M.; Zhu, Y.C.; Zhu, Y.S.; Zhu, Z.A.; Zhuang, B.A.; Zhuang, X.A.; Zou, B.S. [Institute of High Energy Physics, P.O.Box 918-1, Beijing (China); Ban, Y.; Zhang, Z.X.; Zheng, H.Q. [Peking University, Beijing (China); Chen, H.F.; Yan, M.L.; Ye, Y.X.; Zhang, Z.P. [University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei (China); Dai, Y.S. [Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); Diao, L.Y.; Ma, F.C. [Liaoning University, Shenyang (China); Dong, Q.F.; Fu, C.D.; Gao, Y.N. [Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Fang, S.S. [Institute of High Energy Physics, P.O.Box 918-1, Beijing (China); DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Gu, Y.T.; Ruan, X.D. [Guangxi Univ., Nanning (China); He, M.; Huang, X.T.; Jiao, J.B.; Zhang, X.Y. [Shandong Univ., Jinan (China); Hou, J.; Li, X.Q.; Xu, Y. [Nankai Univ., Tianjin (China)] [and others

    2007-12-15

    We report measurements of the observed cross sections for e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}{omega}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, {omega}K{sup +}K{sup -}, {omega}p anti p, K{sup +}K{sup -}{rho}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, K{sup +}K{sup -}{rho}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}+c.c., K{sup *0}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}+c.c., K{sup *+}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}+c.c., {phi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} and {lambda} anti {lambda}{pi}{sup 0} at {radical}(s)= 3.773 and 3.650 GeV. Upper limits (90% C.L.) are given for observed cross sections and for {psi}(3770) decay branching fractions for production of these final states. These measurements are made by analyzing the data sets of 17.3 pb{sup -1} collected at {radical}(s)=3.773 GeV and 6.5 pb{sup -1} collected at {radical}(s)=3.650 GeV with the BES-II detector at the BEPC collider. (orig.) 9.

  6. Strain field mapping of dislocations in a Ge/Si heterostructure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quanlong Liu

    Full Text Available Ge/Si heterostructure with fully strain-relaxed Ge film was grown on a Si (001 substrate by using a two-step process by ultra-high vacuum chemical vapor deposition. The dislocations in the Ge/Si heterostructure were experimentally investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM. The dislocations at the Ge/Si interface were identified to be 90° full-edge dislocations, which are the most efficient way for obtaining a fully relaxed Ge film. The only defect found in the Ge epitaxial film was a 60° dislocation. The nanoscale strain field of the dislocations was mapped by geometric phase analysis technique from the HRTEM image. The strain field around the edge component of the 60° dislocation core was compared with those of the Peierls-Nabarro and Foreman dislocation models. Comparison results show that the Foreman model with a = 1.5 can describe appropriately the strain field around the edge component of a 60° dislocation core in a relaxed Ge film on a Si substrate.

  7. MAu2GeS4-Chalcogel (M = Co, Ni): Heterogeneous Intra- and Intermolecular Hydroamination Catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Davaasuren, Bambar

    2017-08-08

    High surface area macroporous chalcogenide aerogels (chalcogels) MAu2GeS4 (M = Co, Ni) were prepared from K2Au2GeS4 precursor and Co(OAc)2 or NiCl2 by one-pot sol-gel metathesis reactions in aqueous media. The MAu2GeS4-chalcogels were screened for catalytic intramolecular hydroamination of 4-pentyn-1-amine substrate at different temperatures. 87% and 58% conversion was achieved at 100 °C, using CoAu2GeS4- and NiAu2GeS4-chalcogels respectively, and the reaction kinetics follows the first order. It was established that the catalytic performance of the aerogels is associated with the M(2+) centers present in the structure. Intermolecular hydroamination of aniline with 1-R-4-ethynylbenzene (R = -H, -OCH3, -Br, -F) was carried out at 100 °C using CoAu2GeS4-chalcogel catalyst, due to its promising catalytic performance. The CoAu2GeS4-chalcogel regioselectively converted the pair of substrates to respective Markovnikov products, (E)-1-(4-R-phenyl)-N-phenylethan-1-imine, with 38% to 60% conversion.

  8. Genetic-algorithm discovery of a direct-gap and optically allowed superstructure from indirect-gap Si and Ge semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Avezac, Mayeul; Luo, Jun-Wei; Chanier, Thomas; Zunger, Alex

    2012-01-13

    Combining two indirect-gap materials-with different electronic and optical gaps-to create a direct gap material represents an ongoing theoretical challenge with potentially rewarding practical implications, such as optoelectronics integration on a single wafer. We provide an unexpected solution to this classic problem, by spatially melding two indirect-gap materials (Si and Ge) into one strongly dipole-allowed direct-gap material. We leverage a combination of genetic algorithms with a pseudopotential Hamiltonian to search through the astronomic number of variants of Si(n)/Ge(m)/…/Si(p)/Ge(q) superstructures grown on (001) Si(1-x)Ge(x). The search reveals a robust configurational motif-SiGe(2)Si(2)Ge(2)SiGe(n) on (001) Si(x)Ge(1-x) substrate (x≤0.4) presenting a direct and dipole-allowed gap resulting from an enhanced Γ-X coupling at the band edges.

  9. Influence of the Localization of Ge Atoms within the Si(001(4 × 2 Surface Layer on Semicore One-Electron States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olha I. Tkachuk

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Adsorption complexes of germanium on the reconstructed Si(001(4 × 2 surface have been simulated by the Si96Ge2Н84 cluster. For Ge atoms located on the surface layer, DFT calculations (B3LYP/6-31G** of their 3d semicore-level energies have shown a clear-cut correlation between the 3d5/2 chemical shifts and mutual arrangement of Ge atoms. Such a shift is positive when only one Ge atom penetrates into the crystalline substrate, while being negative for both penetrating Ge atoms. We interpret these results in terms of the charge distribution in clusters under consideration.

  10. Power electronics substrate for direct substrate cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Khiet [Mission Viejo, CA; Ward, Terence G [Redondo Beach, CA; Mann, Brooks S [Redondo Beach, CA; Yankoski, Edward P [Corona, CA; Smith, Gregory S [Woodland Hills, CA

    2012-05-01

    Systems and apparatus are provided for power electronics substrates adapted for direct substrate cooling. A power electronics substrate comprises a first surface configured to have electrical circuitry disposed thereon, a second surface, and a plurality of physical features on the second surface. The physical features are configured to promote a turbulent boundary layer in a coolant impinged upon the second surface.

  11. Ion Beam Synthesis of Ge Nanowires. rev. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, T.

    2001-01-01

    The formation of Ge nanowires in V-grooves has been studied experimentally as well as theoretically. As substrate oxide covered Si V-grooves were used formed by anisotropic etching of (001)Si wafers and subsequent oxidation of their surface. Implantation of 1 x 10{sup 17} Ge{sup +}cm{sup -2} at 70 keV was carried out into the oxide layer covering the V-grooves. Ion irradiation induces shape changes of the V-grooves, which are captured in a novel continuum model of surface evolution. It describes theoretically the effects of sputtering, redeposition of sputtered atoms, and swelling. Thereby, the time evolution of the target surface is determined by a nonlinear integro-differential equation, which was solved numerically for the V-groove geometry. A very good agreement is achieved for the predicted surface shape and the shape observed in XTEM images. Surprisingly, the model predicts material (Si, O, Ge) transport into the V-groove bottom which also suggests an Ge accumulation there proven by STEM-EDX investigations. In this Ge rich bottom region, subsequent annealing in N{sub 2} atmosphere results in the formation of a nanowire by coalescence of Ge precipitates shown by XTEM images. The process of phase separation during the nanowire growth was studied by means of kinetic 3D lattice Monte-Carlo simulations. These simulations also indicate the disintegration of continuous wires into droplets mediated by thermal fluctuations. Energy considerations have identified a fragmentation threshold and a lower boundary for the droplet radii which were confirmed by the Monte Carlo simulation. The here given results indicate the possibility of achieving nanowires being several nanometers wide by further growth optimizations as well as chains of equally spaced clusters with nearly uniform diameter. (orig.)

  12. Forbidden energy band gap in diluted a-Ge1−xSix:N films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guarneros, C.; Rebollo-Plata, B.; Lozada-Morales, R.; Espinosa-Rosales, J.E.; Portillo-Moreno, J.; Zelaya-Angel, O.

    2012-01-01

    By means of electron gun evaporation Ge 1−x Si x :N thin films, in the entire range 0 ≤ x ≤ 1, were prepared on Si (100) and glass substrates. The initial vacuum reached was 6.6 × 10 −4 Pa, then a pressure of 2.7 × 10 −2 Pa of high purity N 2 was introduced into the chamber. The deposition time was 4 min. Crucible-substrate distance was 18 cm. X-ray diffraction patterns indicate that all the films were amorphous (a-Ge 1−x Si x :N). The nitrogen concentration was of the order of 1 at% for all the films. From optical absorption spectra data and by using the Tauc method the energy band gap (E g ) was calculated. The Raman spectra only reveal the presence of Si-Si, Ge-Ge, and Si-Ge bonds. Nevertheless, infrared spectra demonstrate the existence of Si-N and Ge-N bonds. The forbidden energy band gap (E g ) as a function of x in the entire range 0 ≤ x ≤ 1 shows two well defined regions: 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.67 and 0.67 ≤ x ≤ 1, due to two different behaviors of the band gap, where for x > 0.67 exists an abruptly change of E g (x). In this case E g (x) versus x is different to the variation of E g in a-Ge 1−x Si x and a-Ge 1−x Si x :H. This fact can be related to the formation of Ge 3 N 4 and GeSi 2 N 4 when x ≤ 0.67, and to the formation of Si 3 N 4 and GeSi 2 N 4 for 0.67 ≤ x. - Highlights: ► Nitrogen doped amorphous Ge 1-x Si x thin films are grown by electron gun technique. ► Nitrogen atoms on E g of the a-Ge 1-x Si x films in the 0 £ x £ 1 range are analyzed. ► Variation in 0 £ x £ 1 range shows a warped change of E g in 1.0 – 3.6 eV range. ► The change in E g (x) behavior when x ∼ 0.67 was associated with Ge 2 SiN 4 presence.

  13. Whispering Gallery Mode Resonances from Ge Micro-Disks on Suspended Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelrahman Zaher Al-Attili

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Ge is considered to be one of the most promising materials for realizing full monolithic integration of a light source on a silicon (Si photonic chip. Tensile-strain is required to convert Ge into an optical gain material and to reduce the pumping required for population inversion. Several methods of strain application to Ge are proposed in literature, of which the use of free-standing beams fabricated by micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS processes are capable of delivering very high strain values. However, it is challenging to make an optical cavity within free-standing Ge beams, and here, we demonstrate the fabrication of a simple cavity while imposing tensile strain by suspension using Ge-On-Insulator (GOI wafers. Ge micro-disks are made on top of suspended SiO$_{2}$ beams by partially removing the supporting Si substrate. According to Raman spectroscopy, a slight tensile strain was applied to the Ge disks through the bending of the SiO2 beams. Whispering-Gallery-Mode (WGM resonances were observed from a disk with a diameter of 3um, consistent with the finite-domain time-difference simulations. The quality (Q factor was 192, and upon increasing the pumping power, the Q-factor was degraded due to the red-shift of Ge direct-gap absorption edge caused by heating.

  14. Scalar mesons above and below 1 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Close, Frank E. [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: F.Close@physics.ox.ac.uk; Toernqvist, Nils A. [Department of Physical Sciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland)]. E-mail: nils.tornqvist@helsinki.fi

    2002-10-01

    We show that two nonets and a glueball provide a consistent description of data on scalar mesons below 1.7 GeV. Above 1 GeV the states form a conventional qq-bar nonet mixed with the glueball of lattice QCD. Below 1 GeV the states also form a nonet, as implied by the attractive forces of QCD, but of a more complicated nature. Near the centre they are (qq)3-bar(q-barq-bar){sub 3} in S-wave, with some qq-bar in P-wave, but further out they rearrange as (qq-bar){sub 1}(qq-bar){sub 1} and finally as meson-meson states. A simple effective chiral model for such a system with two scalar nonets can be made involving two coupled linear sigma models. One of these could be looked upon as the Higgs sector of nonpertubative QCD. (author)

  15. Substrate tolerant direct block copolymer nanolithography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Tao; Wang, Zhongli; Schulte, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Block copolymer (BC) self-assembly constitutes a powerful platform for nanolithography. However, there is a need for a general approach to BC lithography that critically considers all the steps from substrate preparation to the final pattern transfer. We present a procedure that significantly...... plasma treatment enables formation of the oxidized PDMS hard mask, PS block removal and polymer or graphene substrate patterning....

  16. Epitaxial growth of Ge-Sb-Te based phase change materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perumal, Karthick

    2013-07-30

    Ge-Sb-Te based phase change materials are considered as a prime candidate for optical and electrical data storage applications. With the application of an optical or electrical pulse, they can be reversibly switched between amorphous and crystalline state, thereby exhibiting large optical and electrical contrast between the two phases, which are then stored as information in the form of binary digits. Single crystalline growth is interesting from both the academic and industrial perspective, as ordered Ge-Sb-Te based metamaterials are known to exhibit switching at reduced energies. The present study deals with the epitaxial growth and analysis of Ge-Sb-Te based thin films. The first part of the thesis deals with the epitaxial growth of GeTe. Thin films of GeTe were grown on highly mismatched Si(111) and (001) substrates. On both the substrate orientations the film grows along [111] direction with an amorphous-to-crystalline transition observed during the initial stages of growth. The amorphous-to-crystalline transition was studied in-vivo using azimuthal reflection high-energy electron diffraction scans and grazing incidence X-ray diffraction. In the second part of the thesis epitaxy and characterization of Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} thin films are presented. The third part of the thesis deals with the epitaxy of ternary Ge-Sb-Te alloys. The composition of the films are shown to be highly dependent on growth temperatures and vary along the pseudobinary line from Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} to GeTe with increase in growth temperatures. A line-of-sight quadrupole mass spectrometer was used to reliably control the GeSbTe growth temperature. Growth was performed at different Ge, Sb, Te fluxes to study the compositional variation of the films. Incommensurate peaks are observed along the [111] direction by X-ray diffraction. The possibility of superstructural vacancy ordering along the [111] direction is discussed.

  17. Epitaxial growth of Ge-Sb-Te based phase change materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perumal, Karthick

    2013-01-01

    Ge-Sb-Te based phase change materials are considered as a prime candidate for optical and electrical data storage applications. With the application of an optical or electrical pulse, they can be reversibly switched between amorphous and crystalline state, thereby exhibiting large optical and electrical contrast between the two phases, which are then stored as information in the form of binary digits. Single crystalline growth is interesting from both the academic and industrial perspective, as ordered Ge-Sb-Te based metamaterials are known to exhibit switching at reduced energies. The present study deals with the epitaxial growth and analysis of Ge-Sb-Te based thin films. The first part of the thesis deals with the epitaxial growth of GeTe. Thin films of GeTe were grown on highly mismatched Si(111) and (001) substrates. On both the substrate orientations the film grows along [111] direction with an amorphous-to-crystalline transition observed during the initial stages of growth. The amorphous-to-crystalline transition was studied in-vivo using azimuthal reflection high-energy electron diffraction scans and grazing incidence X-ray diffraction. In the second part of the thesis epitaxy and characterization of Sb 2 Te 3 thin films are presented. The third part of the thesis deals with the epitaxy of ternary Ge-Sb-Te alloys. The composition of the films are shown to be highly dependent on growth temperatures and vary along the pseudobinary line from Sb 2 Te 3 to GeTe with increase in growth temperatures. A line-of-sight quadrupole mass spectrometer was used to reliably control the GeSbTe growth temperature. Growth was performed at different Ge, Sb, Te fluxes to study the compositional variation of the films. Incommensurate peaks are observed along the [111] direction by X-ray diffraction. The possibility of superstructural vacancy ordering along the [111] direction is discussed.

  18. Ge and GeOx films as sacrificial layer for MEMS technology based on piezoelectric AlN: etching and planarization processes (Invited Paper)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangrador, J.; Olivares, J.; Iborra, E.; Vergara, L.; Clement, M.; Sanz-Hervas, A.

    2005-07-01

    In this article we present a study of deposition and etching techniques of germanium (Ge) and amorphous oxygen germanium (GeOx) films, with the aim of using them as sacrificial layer in the fabrication of AlN-based MEMS by surface micromachining processes. The Ge and GeOx layers were deposited by RF magnetron sputtering in Ar and Ar/O2 atmospheres. By controlling the process parameters we were able to set the final composition of the GeOx films, which was assessed by FTIR measurements. We have studied the etch rates of GeOx films with x ranging from 0 to 1 in H2O2 and H2O2/acid solutions. Depending on the etching temperature and the oxygen content in the layers, etch rates ranging from 0.2 to 2 μm/min were obtained. Nearly stoichiometric germanium oxide (GeO2) was etched in pure H2O at very high rate (>1 μm/min at room temperature). We have also developed a chemomechanical polishing (CMP) process for the planarization of Ge and GeOx. The influence of the slurries containing diverse powders (CeO2, Al2O3) and chemical agents (NH4OH, HCl), the different pads, and the various process parameters on the removal rate and the final sample topography has been studied. Finally, we have analysed the compatibility of the materials involved in the process flow with the processes of planarization and removal of the sacrificial layers.

  19. Segregation of Ge in B and Ge codoped Czochralski-Si crystal growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arivanandhan, Mukannan; Gotoh, Raira; Fujiwara, Kozo; Uda, Satoshi; Hayakawa, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Effective segregation of Ge in B and Ge codoped Czochralski-Si crystal growth was analyzed. • The equilibrium segregation coefficient of Ge was calculated. • The experimentally results were analytically analyzed using partitioning theory. - Abstract: The segregation of Ge in B and Ge codoped Czochralski (CZ)-Si crystal growth was investigated. The concentration of Ge in heavily Ge codoped CZ-Si was measured by electron probe micro analysis (EPMA) and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. The effective segregation coefficient of Ge (k eff ) was calculated by fitting the EPMA data to the normal freezing equation, and by taking the logarithmic ratio of the Ge concentrations at the seed and tail of the ingots (top to bottom approach). The k eff of Ge increased from 0.30 to 0.55, when the initial Ge concentration in the Si melt (C L(o) Ge ) was increased from 3 × 10 19 to 3 × 10 21 cm −3 . To avoid cellular growth, the crystal pulling rate was decreased for heavily Ge codoped crystal growth (C L(o) Ge > 3 × 10 20 cm −3 ). The equilibrium segregation coefficient (k 0 ) of Ge was calculated by partitioning theory, and was smaller than the experimentally estimated k eff . The variation of k eff from k 0 was discussed based on Ge clustering in the heavily Ge codoped crystal, which led to changes in the bonding and strain energies caused by the incorporation of Ge into Si

  20. Combined quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and generalized ellipsometry (GE) to characterize the deposition of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on model rough surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kananizadeh, Negin; Rice, Charles; Lee, Jaewoong; Rodenhausen, Keith B; Sekora, Derek; Schubert, Mathias; Schubert, Eva; Bartelt-Hunt, Shannon; Li, Yusong

    2017-01-15

    Measuring the interactions between engineered nanoparticles and natural substrates (e.g. soils and sediments) has been very challenging due to highly heterogeneous and rough natural surfaces. In this study, three-dimensional nanostructured slanted columnar thin films (SCTFs), with well-defined roughness height and spacing, have been used to mimic surface roughness. Interactions between titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO 2 NP), the most extensively manufactured engineered nanomaterials, and SCTF coated surfaces were measured using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). In parallel, in-situ generalized ellipsometry (GE) was coupled with QCM-D to simultaneously measure the amount of TiO 2 NP deposited on the surface of SCTF. While GE is insensitive to effects of mechanical water entrapment variations in roughness spaces, we found that the viscoelastic model, a typical QCM-D model analysis approach, overestimates the mass of deposited TiO 2 NP. This overestimation arises from overlaid frequency changes caused by particle deposition as well as additional water entrapment and partial water displacement upon nanoparticle adsorption. Here, we demonstrate a new approach to model QCM-D data, accounting for both viscoelastic effects and the effects of roughness-retained water. Finally, the porosity of attached TiO 2 NP layer was determined by coupling the areal mass density determined by QCM-D and independent GE measurements. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Delayed plastic relaxation limit in SiGe islands grown by Ge diffusion from a local source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanacore, G. M.; Zani, M.; Tagliaferri, A., E-mail: alberto.tagliaferri@polimi.it [CNISM-Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Nicotra, G. [IMM-CNR, Stradale Primosole 50, I-95121 Catania (Italy); Bollani, M. [CNR-IFN, LNESS, Via Anzani 42, I-22100 Como (Italy); Bonera, E.; Montalenti, F.; Picco, A.; Boioli, F. [Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali and L-NESS, Università Milano-Bicocca, via Cozzi 53, I-20125 Milano (Italy); Capellini, G. [Department of Sciences at the Università Roma Tre, Via Vasca Navale 79, 00146 Roma (Italy); Isella, G. [CNISM, LNESS, Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano (Polo di Como), Via Anzani 42, I-22100 Como (Italy); Osmond, J. [ICFO–The Institute of Photonic Sciences, Av. Carl Friedrich Gauss, 3, E-08860 Castelldefels (Barcelona) (Spain)

    2015-03-14

    The hetero-epitaxial strain relaxation in nano-scale systems plays a fundamental role in shaping their properties. Here, the elastic and plastic relaxation of self-assembled SiGe islands grown by surface-thermal-diffusion from a local Ge solid source on Si(100) are studied by atomic force and transmission electron microscopies, enabling the simultaneous investigation of the strain relaxation in different dynamical regimes. Islands grown by this technique remain dislocation-free and preserve a structural coherence with the substrate for a base width as large as 350 nm. The results indicate that a delay of the plastic relaxation is promoted by an enhanced Si-Ge intermixing, induced by the surface-thermal-diffusion, which takes place already in the SiGe overlayer before the formation of a critical nucleus. The local entropy of mixing dominates, leading the system toward a thermodynamic equilibrium, where non-dislocated, shallow islands with a low residual stress are energetically stable. These findings elucidate the role of the interface dynamics in modulating the lattice distortion at the nano-scale, and highlight the potential use of our growth strategy to create composition and strain-controlled nano-structures for new-generation devices.

  2. Magnetic phase diagrams of UNiGe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakotte, H.; Torikachvili, M.S.; Lacerda, A.H.

    1998-01-01

    UNiGe undergoes two magnetic transitions in zero field. Here, the magnetic diagrams of UNiGe for B parallel b and B parallel c are reported. We performed temperature scans of the magnetization in static magnetic fields up to 19.5 T applied along the b and c axes. For both orientations three magnetic phases have been identified in the B-T diagrams. We confirmed the previously reported phase boundaries for B parallel c, and in addition we determined the location of the phase boundaries for B parallel b. We discuss a possible relationship of the two zero-field antiferromagnetic phases (commensurate: T<42 K; incommensurate: 42 K< T<50 K) and the field-induced phase, which at low temperatures, occurs between 18 and 25 T or 4 and 10 T for B parallel b or B parallel c, respectively. Finally, we discuss the field dependence of the electronic contribution γ to the specific heat for B parallel c up to 17.5 T, and we find that its field dependence is similar to the one found in more itinerant uranium compounds. (orig.)

  3. Magnetic phase diagrams of UNiGe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakotte, H.; Hagmusa, I.H.; Klaasse, J.C.P.; Hagmusa, I.H.; Klaasse, J.C.P.

    1997-01-01

    UNiGe undergoes two magnetic transitions in zero field. Here, the magnetic diagrams of UNiGe for B parallel b and B parallel c are reported. We performed temperatures scans of the magnetization in static magnetic fields up to 19.5T applied along the b and c axes. For both orientations 3 magnetic phases have been identified in the B-T diagrams. We confirmed the previously reported phase boundaries for B parallel c, and in addition we determined the location of the phase boundaries for B parallel b. We discuss a possible relationship of the two zero-field antiferromagnetic phases (commensurate: T<42K; incommensurate: 42K< T<50K) and the field-induced phase, which, at low temperatures, occurs between 18 and 25T or 4 and 10T for B parallel b or B parallel c, respectively. Finally, we discuss the field dependence of the electronic contribution γ to the specific heat for B parallel c up to 17.5T, and we find that its field dependence is similar to the one found in more itinerant uranium compounds

  4. Antioxidant activity of Ge-132, a synthetic organic germanium, on cultured mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Takeyoshi; Hanyu, Takashi; Nozaki, Kota; Kataoka, Kosuke; Kawatani, Tomoro; Asahi, Toru; Sawamura, Naoya

    2018-03-02

    Ge-132 is a synthetic organic germanium that is used as a dietary supplement. The antioxidant activity of Ge-132 on cultured mammalian cells was investigated in this study. First, Ge-132 cytotoxicity on mammalian cultured cells was determined by measuring lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels. Ge-132 had no cytotoxic effect on three different cell lines. Second, the cell proliferative effect of Ge-132 was determined by measuring ATP content of whole cells and counting them. Ge-132 treatment of CHO-K1 and SH-SY5Y cells promoted cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. Finally, antioxidant activity of Ge-132 against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress was determined by measuring the levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and carbonylated proteins. Pre-incubation of CHO-K1 and SH-SY5Y cells with Ge-132 suppressed intracellular ROS production and carbonylated protein levels induced by hydrogen peroxide. Our results suggest that Ge-132 has antioxidant activity against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress.

  5. 76 FR 30573 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company (GE) GE90-110B1 and GE90-115B Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-26

    ... applies to General Electric Company (GE) GE90-110B1 and GE90-115B turbofan engines with high-pressure...-0278; Directorate Identifier 2010-NE-10-AD] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company (GE) GE90- 110B1 and GE90-115B Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT...

  6. Fractional Quantum Hall States in a Ge Quantum Well.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironov, O A; d'Ambrumenil, N; Dobbie, A; Leadley, D R; Suslov, A V; Green, E

    2016-04-29

    Measurements of the Hall and dissipative conductivity of a strained Ge quantum well on a SiGe/(001)Si substrate in the quantum Hall regime are reported. We analyze the results in terms of thermally activated quantum tunneling of carriers from one internal edge state to another across saddle points in the long-range impurity potential. This shows that the gaps for different filling fractions closely follow the dependence predicted by theory. We also find that the estimates of the separation of the edge states at the saddle are in line with the expectations of an electrostatic model in the lowest spin-polarized Landau level (LL), but not in the spin-reversed LL where the density of quasiparticle states is not high enough to accommodate the carriers required.

  7. Suppression of the superconductivity in ultrathin amorphous Mo78Ge22 films observed by STM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotnyk, D.; Onufriienko, O.; Samuely, T.; Shylenko, O.; Komanický, V.; Szabó, P.; Feher, A.; Samuely, P.

    2017-08-01

    In contact with a superconductor a normal metal modifies its properties due to Andreev reflection. In the current work the local density of states (LDOS) of superconductor-normal metal Mo78Ge22-Au bilayers are studied by means of STM applied from the Au side. Three bilayers have been prepared on silicate glass substrate consisting of 100, 10 and 5 nm MoGe thin films covered always by 5 nm Au layer. The tunneling spectra were measured at temperatures from 0.5 to 7 K. The two-dimensional cross-correlation between topography and normalized zero-bias conductance indicates a proximity effect between 100 and 10 nm MoGe thin films and Au layer where a superconducting gap slightly smaller than that of bulk MoGe is observed. The effect of the thinnest 5 nm MoGe layer on Au leads to much smaller gap moreover the LDOS reveals almost completely suppressed coherence peaks. This is attributed to a strong pair-breaking effect of spin-flip processes at the interface between MoGe films and the substrate.

  8. Adhesion of rhodium films on metallic substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marot, L.; Covarel, G.; Tuilier, M.-H.; Steiner, R.; Oelhafen, P.

    2008-01-01

    Rhodium coated metallic films were prepared by magnetron sputtering on metallic substrates. All films were elaborated in same conditions on copper, molybdenum and stainless steel. Adhesion strength tests were carried out by scratch test. The results reveal that the adhesion strength between the film and the substrate is influenced by the hardness of the substrate. Increase of deposition temperature improves the adhesion of the coating. In addition, pre-treatment of substrates by a filtered cathodic vacuum arc and the layer thickness have has some effects on the final adhesion strength

  9. Aqueous electrodeposition of Ge monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xuehai; Kim, Youn-Geun; Gebergziabiher, Daniel K; Stickney, John L

    2010-02-16

    The electrodeposition of germanium on Au(111) in aqueous solutions has been investigated by means of cyclic voltammetry, Auger electron spectroscopy, and in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The data yield a picture of germanium deposition, which starts with the formation of two well-ordered hydroxide phases, with 1/3 ML and 4/9 ML coverages upon initial reduction of the Ge(IV) species (probably H(2)GeO(3) at pH 4.7). Those structures appear to result from a three-electron reduction to form surface-limited structures with (square root(3) x square root(3))R30 degrees or (3 x 3) unit cells, respectively. Further reduction, probably in a two-electron process from the hydroxide structures, resulted in a germanium hydride structure, again surface-limited, with a coverage of close to 0.8 ML. The hydride structure is very flat, though with the periodic modulation characteristic of a Moiré pattern. Longer deposition times and lower potentials resulted in increased coverage of Ge in some cases, but with apparently limited coverage as a function of pH. The maximum Ge coverage, about 4 ML, was observed using a pH 9.32 deposition solution. At potentials negative of the Moiré pattern, about -850 mV versus Ag/AgCl, a "corruption" of the smooth Moiré pattern occurred. This roughening appears to mark the initial formation of a Au-Ge alloy, accounting for the observation of coverage in excess of that needed to form the Moiré pattern at some pH values.

  10. Single layer of Ge quantum dots in HfO2for floating gate memory capacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepadatu, A M; Palade, C; Slav, A; Maraloiu, A V; Lazanu, S; Stoica, T; Logofatu, C; Teodorescu, V S; Ciurea, M L

    2017-04-28

    High performance trilayer memory capacitors with a floating gate of a single layer of Ge quantum dots (QDs) in HfO 2 were fabricated using magnetron sputtering followed by rapid thermal annealing (RTA). The layer sequence of the capacitors is gate HfO 2 /floating gate of single layer of Ge QDs in HfO 2 /tunnel HfO 2 /p-Si wafers. Both Ge and HfO 2 are nanostructured by RTA at moderate temperatures of 600-700 °C. By nanostructuring at 600 °C, the formation of a single layer of well separated Ge QDs with diameters of 2-3 nm at a density of 4-5 × 10 15 m -2 is achieved in the floating gate (intermediate layer). The Ge QDs inside the intermediate layer are arranged in a single layer and are separated from each other by HfO 2 nanocrystals (NCs) about 8 nm in diameter with a tetragonal/orthorhombic structure. The Ge QDs in the single layer are located at the crossing of the HfO 2 NCs boundaries. In the intermediate layer, besides Ge QDs, a part of the Ge atoms is segregated by RTA at the HfO 2 NCs boundaries, while another part of the Ge atoms is present inside the HfO 2 lattice stabilizing the tetragonal/orthorhombic structure. The fabricated capacitors show a memory window of 3.8 ± 0.5 V and a capacitance-time characteristic with 14% capacitance decay in the first 3000-4000 s followed by a very slow capacitance decrease extrapolated to 50% after 10 years. This high performance is mainly due to the floating gate of a single layer of well separated Ge QDs in HfO 2 , distanced from the Si substrate by the tunnel oxide layer with a precise thickness.

  11. Phase transitions in two dimensions: The case of Sn adsorbed on Ge (111) surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunk, O.; Zeysing, J.H.; Falkenberg, G.

    1999-01-01

    . In the low-temperature phase one of the three Sn atoms per ( 3×3) unit cell is displaced outwards by 0.26±0.04Å relative to the other two. This displacement is accompanied by an increase in the first to second double-layer spacing in the Ge substrate. © 1999 The American Physical Society...

  12. One-step aluminium-assisted crystallization of Ge epitaxy on Si by magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Ziheng; Hao, Xiaojing; Ho-Baillie, Anita; Green, Martin A.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, one-step aluminium-assisted crystallization of Ge on Si is achieved via magnetron sputtering by applying an in-situ low temperature (50 °C to 150 °C) heat treatment in between Al and Ge depositions. The effect of heat treatment on film properties and the growth mechanism of Ge epitaxy on Si are studied via X-ray diffraction, Raman and transmission electron microscopy analyses. Compared with the conventional two-step process, the one-step aluminium-assisted crystallization requires much lower thermal budget and results in pure Ge epitaxial layer, which may be suitable for use as a virtual substrate for the fabrication of III-V solar cells

  13. Multimuon final states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crespo, J.-M.

    1980-04-01

    Multimuon final states have been detected by 3 experiments in the interactions of the muon beams of CERN (280 GeV) and FNAL (210 GeV) with heavy targets. For the first time production of J/PSI (3100) by space-like photons has been observed and its dependence on ν, Q 2 and t compared to Vector Dominance and photon-gluon fusion models. Also a clear signal has been seen for 3μ above QED tridents (outside J/PSI mass range) and 2μ events which are well described by charm production. An upper limit for the production of the T by high energy muons has been set

  14. Skyrmions and Novel Spin Textures in FeGe Thin Films and Artificial B20 Heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Adam Saied

    Skyrmions are magnetic spin textures that have a non-zero topological winding number associated with them. They have attracted much interest recently since they can be as small as 1 nm and could be the next generation of magnetic memory and logic. First, we grow epitaxial films of FeGe by molecular beam epitaxy and characterized the skyrmion properties. This had led us to image skyrmions in real-space with Lorentz transmission electron microscopy for the first time in the United States. Next, from an extensive series of thin and thick films, we have experimentally shown the existence of a magnetic surface state in FeGe and, consequently, any skyrmion material for the first time. Complementary theoretical calculations supported the existence of chiral bobbers--a surface state only predicted in 2015. Next, we fabricated for the first time a new class of skyrmion materials: B20 superlattices. These novel heterostructures of [FeGe/MnGe/CrGe] have now opened the door for tunable skyrmion systems with both Dresselhaus and Rashba Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions. Additionally, we perform resonant soft x-ray scattering to image magnetic spin textures in reciprocal space for FeGe thin films in transmission. We have accomplished the removal of substrate and left an isolated single-crystal FeGe film. Lastly, SrO is grown on graphene as a crystalline, atomically smooth, and pinhole free tunnel barrier for spin injection.

  15. Density functional theory calculations of stability and diffusion mechanisms of impurity atoms in Ge crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeta, Takahiro [Graduate School of System Engineering, Okayama Prefectural University, 111 Kuboki, Soja, Okayama 719-1197 (Japan); GlobalWafers Japan Co., Ltd., Higashikou, Seirou-machi, Kitakanbara-gun, Niigata 957-0197 (Japan); Sueoka, Koji [Department of Communication Engineering, Okayama Prefectural University, 111 Kuboki, Soja, Okayama 719-1197 (Japan)

    2014-08-21

    Ge-based substrates are being developed for applications in advanced nano-electronic devices because of their higher intrinsic carrier mobility than Si. The stability and diffusion mechanism of impurity atoms in Ge are not well known in contrast to those of Si. Systematic studies of the stable sites of 2nd to 6th row element impurity atoms in Ge crystal were undertaken with density functional theory (DFT) and compared with those in Si crystal. It was found that most of the impurity atoms in Ge were stable at substitutional sites, while transition metals in Si were stable at interstitial sites and the other impurity atoms in Si were stable at substitutional sites. Furthermore, DFT calculations were carried out to clarify the mechanism responsible for the diffusion of impurity atoms in Ge crystals. The diffusion mechanism for 3d transition metals in Ge was found to be an interstitial-substitutional diffusion mechanism, while in Si this was an interstitial diffusion mechanism. The diffusion barriers in the proposed diffusion mechanisms in Ge and Si were quantitatively verified by comparing them to the experimental values in the literature.

  16. Radiation emission from wrinkled SiGe/SiGe nanostructure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fedorchenko, Alexander I.; Cheng, H. H.; Sun, G.; Soref, R. A.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 96, č. 11 (2010), s. 113104-113107 ISSN 0003-6951 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : SiGe wrinkled nanostructures * si-based optical emitter * synchrotron radiation Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.820, year: 2010 http://apl.aip.org/resource/1/applab/v96/i11/p113104_s1?isAuthorized=no

  17. Enhanced Au induced lateral crystallization in electron-irradiated amorphous Ge on SiO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakiyama, Shin; Kaneko, Takahiro; Ootsubo, Takanobu; Sakai, Takatsugu; Nakashima, Kazutoshi; Moto, Kenta; Yoneoka, Masashi; Takakura, Kenichiro; Tsunoda, Isao, E-mail: isao_tsunoda@kumamoto-nct.ac.jp

    2014-04-30

    We have investigated the low temperature of Au induced lateral crystallization of electron irradiated amorphous Ge on SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate. The reduction of the critical annealing time to cause the Au induced lateral crystallization is realized by high energy electron irradiation. In addition, the lateral crystallization region of the sample with electron irradiation has high crystalline quality as well as the sample without electron irradiation. We have speculated that the Au induced lateral crystallization of amorphous Ge on SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate was enhanced by electron irradiation, due to the introduction of point defects into amorphous Ge able to diffuse easily of Au atoms. - Highlights: • Au induced lateral crystallization of electron irradiated Ge is investigated. • Crystallization annealing time is significantly reduced. • High crystalline quality of lateral region was not changed by electron irradiation.

  18. Search for Charged Higgs Bosons in $e^{+} e^{-}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$=189-202 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abdallah, J.; Adam, W.; Adye, T.; Adzic, P.; Albrecht, Z.; Alderweireld, T.; Alekseev, G.D.; Alemany, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P.P.; Almehed, S.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, S.; Anashkin, E.; Anassontzis, E.G.; Andersson, P.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, S.; Anjos, N.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.D.; Arnoud, Y.; Asman, B.; Augustin, J.E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Ballestrero, A.; Bambade, P.; Barao, F.; Barbiellini, G.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D.Yu.; Barker, G.J.; Baroncelli, A.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Bellunato, T.; Belokopytov, Yu.; Belous, K.; Benekos, N.C.; Benvenuti, A.C.; Berat, C.; Berggren, M.; Berntzon, L.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Besson, N.; Bilenky, Mikhail S.; Bloch, D.; Blom, H.M.; Bol, L.; Bonesini, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, P.S.L.; Borisov, G.; Bosio, C.; Botner, O.; Boudinov, E.; Bouquet, B.; Bowcock, T.J.V.; Boyko, I.; Bozovic, I.; Bozzo, M.; Bracko, M.; Branchini, P.; Brenner, R.A.; Brodet, E.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J.M.; Bugge, L.; Buschmann, P.; Caccia, M.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Carroll, L.; Caso, C.; Castillo Gimenez, M.V.; Cattai, A.; Cavallo, F.R.; Chapkin, M.; Charpentier, P.; Checchia, P.; Chelkov, G.A.; Chierici, R.; Shlyapnikov, P.; Chochula, P.; Chorowicz, V.; Chudoba, J.; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, R.; Cortina, E.; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, F.; Costa, M.; Crawley, H.B.; Crennell, D.; Croix, J.; Cuevas Maestro, J.; Czellar, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Dalmau, J.; Davenport, M.; Da Silva, W.; Della Ricca, G.; Delpierre, P.; Demaria, N.; De Angelis, A.; De Boer, W.; De Clercq, C.; De Lotto, B.; De Min, A.; De Paula, L.; Dijkstra, H.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Doroba, K.; Dracos, M.; Drees, J.; Dris, M.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, T.; Ellert, M.; Elsing, M.; Engel, J.P.; Espirito Santo, M.C.; Fanourakis, G.; Fassouliotis, D.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrer-Ribas, E.; Ferro, F.; Firestone, A.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fontanelli, F.; Franek, B.; Frodesen, A.G.; Fruhwirth, R.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Gamba, D.; Gamblin, S.; Gandelman, M.; Garcia, C.; Gaspar, C.; Gaspar, M.; Gasparini, U.; Gavillet, P.; Gazis, Evangelos; Gele, D.; Geralis, T.; Ghodbane, N.; Gil Botella, Ines; Glege, F.; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Gopal, G.; Gorn, L.; Guz, Yu.; Gracco, V.; Grahl, J.; Graziani, E.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hahn, F.; Hahn, S.; Haider, S.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hamilton, K.; Hansen, J.; Harris, F.J.; Haug, S.; Hauler, F.; Hedberg, V.; Heising, S.; Hernandez, J.J.; Herquet, P.; Herr, H.; Hertz, O.; Higon, E.; Holmgren, S.O.; Holt, P.J.; Hoorelbeke, S.; Houlden, M.; Hrubec, J.; Hughes, G.J.; Hultqvist, K.; Jackson, John Neil; Jacobsson, R.; Jalocha, P.; Jarlskog, C.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jean-Marie, B.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, Erik Karl; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Juillot, P.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, Frederic; Karafasoulis, K.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.C.; Keranen, R.; Kernel, G.; Kersevan, B.P.; Khokhlov, Yu.A.; Khomenko, B.A.; Khovansky, N.N.; Kiiskinen, A.; King, B.; Kinvig, A.; Kjaer, N.J.; Klapp, O.; Kluit, P.; Kokkinias, P.; Kostyukhin, V.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kuznetsov, O.; Krammer, M.; Kriznic, E.; Krumshtein, Z.; Kubinec, P.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kurowska, J.; Lamsa, J.W.; Laugier, J.P.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, Fabienne; Leinonen, L.; Leisos, A.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, J.; Lenzen, G.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Libby, J.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lippi, I.; Loken, J.G.; Lopes, J.H.; Lopez, J.M.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; MacNaughton, J.; Mahon, J.R.; Maio, A.; Malek, A.; Maltezos, S.; Malychev, V.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Marti i Garcia, S.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Matthiae, G.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; McCubbin, M.; McKay, R.; McNulty, R.; Merle, E.; Meroni, C.; Meyer, W.T.; Myagkov, A.; Migliore, E.; Mirabito, L.; Mitaroff, W.A.; Mjornmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Monig, Klaus; Monge, M.R.; Montenegro, J.; Moraes, D.; Morettini, P.; Morton, G.; Muller, U.; Munich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mundim, L.M.; Murray, W.J.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.L.; Nawrocki, K.; Negri, P.; Nemecek, S.; Neufeld, N.; Nicolaidou, R.; Niezurawski, P.; Nikolenko, M.; Nomokonov, V.; Nygren, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevsky, A.G.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Oyanguren, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Pain, R.; Paiva, R.; Palacios, J.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, T.D.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Peralta, L.; Perepelitsa, V.; Pernicka, M.; Perrotta, A.; Petridou, C.; Petrolini, A.; Phillips, H.T.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Podobnik, T.; Poireau, V.; Pol, M.E.; Polok, G.; Poropat, P.; Pozdnyakov, V.; Privitera, P.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Radojicic, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Rahmani, H.; Ratoff, P.N.; Read, Alexander L.; Rebecchi, P.; Redaelli, Nicola Giuseppe; Regler, M.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, P.B.; Resvanis, L.K.; Richard, F.; Ridky, J.; Rinaudo, G.; Ripp-Baudot, Isabelle; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Rosenberg, E.I.; Rosinsky, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ruiz, A.; Saarikko, H.; Sacquin, Y.; Sadovsky, A.; Sajot, G.; Salmi, L.; Salt, J.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sannino, M.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schwanda, C.; Schwemling, P.; Schwering, B.; Schwickerath, U.; Scuri, Fabrizio; Seager, P.; Sedykh, Yu.; Segar, A.M.; Sekulin, R.; Sette, G.; Shellard, R.C.; Siebel, M.; Simard, L.; Simonetto, F.; Sisakian, A.N.; Smadja, G.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, G.R.; Sokolov, A.; Solovianov, O.; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassoff, T.; Spiriti, E.; Squarcia, S.; Stanescu, C.; Stanitzki, M.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Strub, R.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Tabarelli, T.; Taffard, A.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Terranova, F.; Timmermans, Jan; Tinti, N.; Tkachev, L.G.; Tobin, M.; Todorova, S.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortora, L.; Tortosa, P.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, C.; Turluer, M.L.; Tyapkin, I.A.; Tyapkin, P.; Tzamarias, S.; Ullaland, O.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallazza, E.; Vander Velde, C.; Van Dam, Piet; Van Den Boeck, W.; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Eldik, J.; Van Lysebetten, A.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Ventura, L.; Venus, W.; Verbeure, F.; Verdier, P.; Verlato, M.; Vertogradov, L.S.; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vlasov, E.; Vodopianov, A.S.; Voulgaris, G.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Washbrook, A.J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.H.; Wilkinson, G.R.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Wolf, G.; Yi, J.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zevgolatakos, E.; Zimine, N.I.; Zinchenko, A.; Zoller, P.; Zumerle, G.; Zupan, M.

    2002-01-01

    A search for pair-produced charged Higgs bosons was performed in the high energy data collected by the DELPHI detector at LEP II at centre-of-mass energies from 189~GeV to 202~GeV\\@. The three different final states, $\\tau \

  19. 75 FR 21161 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company (GE) CJ610 Series Turbojet Engines and CF700...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-23

    ... Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company (GE) CJ610 Series Turbojet Engines and CF700 Series Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The FAA is adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for GE CJ610 series turbojet engines and CF700 turbofan engines...

  20. Bottomonium and Drell-Yan production in p-A collisions at 450 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Alessandro, B.; Arnaldi, R.; Atayan, M.; Beole, S.; Boldea, V.; Bordalo, P.; Borges, G.; Castor, J.; Chaurand, B.; Cheynis, B.; Chiavassa, E.; Cicalo, C.; Comets, M.P.; Constantinescu, S.; Cortese, P.; De Falco, A.; De Marco, N.; Dellacasa, G.; Devaux, A.; Dita, S.; Fargeix, J.; Force, P.; Gallio, M.; Gerschel, C.; Giubellino, P.; Golubeva, M.B.; Grigoryan, A.; Grossiord, J.Y.; Guber, F.F.; Guichard, A.; Gulkanyan, H.; Idzik, M.; Jouan, D.; Karavicheva, T.L.; Kluberg, L.; Kurepin, A.B.; Le Bornec, Y.; Lourenco, C.; MacCormick, M.; Marzari-Chiesa, A.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Monteno, M.; Musso, A.; Petiau, P.; Piccotti, A.; Pizzi, J.R.; Prino, F.; Puddu, G.; Quintans, C.; Ramello, L.; Ramos, S.; Riccati, L.; Santos, H.; Saturnini, P.; Scomparin, E.; Serci, S.; Shahoyan, R.; Sitta, M.; Sonderegger, P.; Tarrago, X.; Topilskaya, N.S.; Usai, G.L.; Vercellin, E.; Willis, N.

    2006-01-01

    The NA50 Collaboration has measured heavy-quarkonium production in p-A collisions at 450 GeV incident energy (sqrt(s) = 29.1 GeV). We report here results on the production of the Upsilon states and of high-mass Drell-Yan muon pairs (m > 6 GeV). The cross-section at midrapidity and the A-dependence of the measured yields are determined and compared with the results of other fixed-target experiments and with the available theoretical estimates. Finally, we also address some issues concerning the transverse momentum distributions of the measured dimuons.

  1. The 12 GeV Upgrade at Jefferson Lab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rolf Ent

    2002-01-01

    , direct evidence for the role of gluons in the QCD confinement region is still missing. Spectroscopy of light ''exotic'' mesons, with glue as essential part of their valence structure, would provide such essential evidence. In addition, with 12 GeV one crosses the threshold for charm production. The nearly final draft of the recent NSAC long-range plan states the 12 GeV Upgrade as one of three construction recommendations: ''We strongly recommend the upgrade of CEBAF at Jefferson Laboratory to 12 GeV as soon as possible. The 12 GeV upgrade of the unique CEBAF facility is critical for our continued leadership in the experimental study of hadronic matter.'' Presently, the status of the 12 GeV Upgrade is that the laboratory is waiting for ''CD-0'', a ''Statement of Mission Need'', approval by DOE. Conceptual Design Reports for both accelerator upgrades and the various experimental upgrades (Halls A, B, C, and D) are anticipated by September 15, 2002

  2. A TEM study of strained SiGe/Si and related heteroepitaxial structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benedetti, Alessandro

    2002-01-01

    The role of SiGe/Si heterostructures and related materials has become increasingly important within the last few decades. In order to increase the scale of integration, however, devices with active elements not larger than few tens of nanometer have been recently introduced. There is, therefore, a strong need for an analytical technique capable of giving information about submicron-sized components. An investigation on a nanometre scale can be performed by the combination of a fully equipped Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) with a Field Emission Gun (PEG) electron source, which enables one to use a wide range of analytical techniques with an electron probe as small as 0.5 nm. In this work, two different types of SiGe/Si-based devices were investigated. Strained-Si n-channel MOSFETs. The use of Strained-Si n-channel grown on SiGe should improve both carrier mobility and transconductance with respect to conventional MOSFETs. Materials analysed in this work showed an extremely high transconductance but a rather low mobility. In order to relate their microstructural properties to their electrical performance, as well as to improve the device design, a full quantitative and qualitative structural characterisation was performed. SiGe Multiple Quantum Wells (MQW) IR detectors Light detection is achieved by collecting the photogenerated carriers, injected from the SiGe QWs layers into the Si substrate. A key factor is the Ge profile across a single QW, since it governs the band structure and therefore the device performances. Four different TEM techniques were used to determine the Ge distribution across a single well, showing an overall good agreement among the results. The Ge profiles broadening, consistent with data available in literature, was successfully explained and theoretically predicted by the combined effect of Ge segregation and gas dwell times within the reactor. (author)

  3. Growth of Quantum Wires on Step-Bunched Substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Feng

    2005-02-01

    This proposal initiates a combined theoretical and experimental multidisciplinary research effort to explore a novel approach for growing metallic and magnetic nanowires on step-bunched semiconductor and dielectric substrates, and to lay the groundwork for understanding the growth mechanisms and the electronic, electrical, and magnetic properties of metallic and magnetic nanowires. The research will focus on four topics: (1) fundamental studies of step bunching and self-organization in a strained thin film for creating step-bunched substrates. (2) Interaction between metal adatoms (Al,Cu, and Ni) and semiconductor (Si and SiGe) and dielectric (CaF2) surface steps. (3) growth and characterization of metallic and magnetic nanowires on step-bunched templates. (4) fabrication of superlattices of nanowires by growing multilayer films. We propose to attack these problems at both a microscopic and macroscopic level, using state-of-the-art theoretical and experimental techniques. Multiscale (electronic-atomic-continuum) theories will be applied to investigate growth mechanisms of nanowires: mesoscopic modeling and simulation of step flow growth of strained thin films, in particular, step bunching and self-organization will be carried out within the framework of continuum linear elastic theory; atomistic calculation of interaction between metal adatoms and semiconductor and dielectric surface steps will be done by large-scale computations using first-principles total-energy methods. In parallel, thin films and nanowires will be grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), and the resultant structure and morphology will be characterized at the atomic level up to micrometer range, using a combination of different surface/interface probes, including scanning tunneling microscopy (STM, atomic resolution), atomic force microscopy (AFM, nanometer resolution), low-energy electron microscopy (LEEM, micrometer resolution), reflectance high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED), and x

  4. Elevated transition temperature in Ge doped VO2 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krammer, Anna; Magrez, Arnaud; Vitale, Wolfgang A.; Mocny, Piotr; Jeanneret, Patrick; Guibert, Edouard; Whitlow, Harry J.; Ionescu, Adrian M.; Schüler, Andreas

    2017-07-01

    Thermochromic GexV1-xO2+y thin films have been deposited on Si (100) substrates by means of reactive magnetron sputtering. The films were then characterized by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), four-point probe electrical resistivity measurements, X-ray diffraction, and atomic force microscopy. From the temperature dependent resistivity measurements, the effect of Ge doping on the semiconductor-to-metal phase transition in vanadium oxide thin films was investigated. The transition temperature was shown to increase significantly upon Ge doping (˜95 °C), while the hysteresis width and resistivity contrast gradually decreased. The precise Ge concentration and the film thickness have been determined by RBS. The crystallinity of phase-pure VO2 monoclinic films was confirmed by XRD. These findings make the use of vanadium dioxide thin films in solar and electronic device applications—where higher critical temperatures than 68 °C of pristine VO2 are needed—a viable and promising solution.

  5. SiGe nano-heteroepitaxy on Si and SiGe nano-pillars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastari, Marouane; Charles, Matthew; Bogumilowicz, Yann; Thai, Quang Minh; Pimenta Barros, Patricia; Argoud, Maxime; Papon, Anne-Marie; Gergaud, Patrice; Landru, Didier; Kim, Youngpil; Hartmann, Jean Michel

    2018-04-12

    In this paper, SiGe nano-heteroepitaxy on Si and SiGe nano-pillars was investigated in a 300 mm industrial Reduced Pressure-Chemical Vapour Deposition tool. An integration scheme based on diblock copolymer patterning was used to fabricate nanometer-sized templates for the epitaxy of Si and SiGe nano-pillars. Results showed highly selective and uniform processes for the epitaxial growth of Si and SiGe nano-pillars. 200 nm thick SiGe layers were grown on Si and SiGe nano-pillars and characterized by AFM, XRD and TEM. Smooth SiGe surfaces and full strain relaxation were obtained in the 650-700°C range for 2D SiGe layers grown either on Si or SiGe nano-pillars. © 2018 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  6. anti pp elastic scattering at 30 GeV/c incident momentum in the momentum transfer range 0.52

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asa'd, Z.; Coupland, M.; Davis, D.G.; Duff, B.G.; Fearnley, T.; Heymann, F.F.; Imrie, D.C.; Lush, G.J.; Phillips, M.; Baglin, A.; Guillard, J.P.; Poulet, M.; Brom, J.M.; Myrheim, J.; Kenyon Gjerpe, I.; Buran, T.; Buzzo, A.; Ferroni, S.; Gracco, V.; Khan, E.; Kirsebom, K.; Macri, M.; Rossi, L.; Santroni, A.; Skjevling, G.; Sorensen, S.O.

    1983-01-01

    The anti pp elastic differential cross section at 30 GeV/c incident momentum has been measured in a two-arm spectrometer experiment (WA7) at the CERN SPS. The vertical stroketvertical stroke-range covered extends from 0.5 to 5.8 (GeV/c) 2 . A pronounced dip-bump structure is observed, with a sharp minimum around vertical stroketvertical strokeapprox.=1.7 (GeV/c) 2 . The results are compared with existing anti pp data at lower energies and with our earlier anti pp data at 50 GeV/c. A number of model predictions are discussed. We also compare the anti pp 30 GeV/c differential cross section with that of pp at the same momentum. Finally, the energy dependence of the anti pp fixed-vertical stroketvertical stroke differential cross section in the incident momentum range 3.6 to 50 GeV/c is presented. (orig.)

  7. Cu2ZnGeS4 thin films deposited by thermal evaporation: the impact of Ge concentration on physical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courel, Maykel; Sanchez, T. G.; Mathews, N. R.; Mathew, X.

    2018-03-01

    In this work, the processing of Cu2ZnGeS4 (CZGS) thin films by a thermal evaporation technique starting from CuS, GeS and ZnS precursors, and post-deposition thermal processing, is discussed. Batches of films with GeS layers of varying thicknesses are deposited in order to study the role of Ge concentration on the structural, morphological, optical and electrical properties of CZGS films. The formation of the CZGS compound with a tetragonal phase and a kesterite structure is confirmed for all samples using XRD and Raman studies. An improvement in crystallite size for Ge-poor films is also observed in the XRD analysis, which is in good agreement with the grain size observed in the cross section SEM image. Furthermore, it is found that the band-gap of CZGS film can be tailored in the range of 2.0–2.23 eV by varying Ge concentration. A comprehensive electrical characterization is also performed which demonstrates that slightly Ge-poor samples are described by the lowest grain boundary defect densities and the highest photosensitivity and mobility values. A study of the work function of CZGS samples with different Ge concentrations is also presented. Finally, a theoretical evaluation is presented, considering, under ideal conditions, the possible impact of these films on device performance. Based on the characterization results, it is concluded that Ge-poor CZGS samples deposited by thermal evaporation present better physical properties for device applications.

  8. Self organization of FeGe/FeSi/FeGe layered structures on Ge and their electrical conduction properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsukura, B.; Hiraiwa, Y.; Nakajima, T.; Narumi, K.; Sakai, S.; Sadoh, T.; Miyao, M.; Maeda, Y.

    We have investigated self organization of novel FeGe/FeSi/FeGe layered structures on Ge(111) and their electrical conduction properties. From analyses of compositional change, diffusion dynamics analyses and microstructure observations, it was revealed that the self organization of the layered structures was enhanced by spinodal decomposition which may be induced by pronounced compositional changes associating to inhomogeneous interdiffusion. The electrical conduction showed singular temperature dependence which obviously reflected natureof Kondo insulator FeSi.

  9. Photoconductivity of Si/Ge multilayer structures with Ge quantum dots pseudomorphic to the Si matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talochkin, A. B.; Chistokhin, I. B.

    2011-01-01

    Longitudinal photoconductivity spectra of Si/Ge multilayer structures with Ge quantum dots grown pseudomorphically to the Si matrix are studied. Lines of optical transitions between hole levels of quantum dots and Si electronic states are observed. This allowed us to construct a detailed energy-level diagram of electron-hole levels of the structure. It is shown that hole levels of pseudomorphic Ge quantum dots are well described by the simplest “quantum box” model using actual sizes of Ge islands. The possibility of controlling the position of the long-wavelength photosensitivity edge by varying the growth parameters of Si/Ge structures with Ge quantum dots is determined.

  10. Raman scattering from Ge{sub 1-x}Sn{sub x} (x ≤ 0.14) alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro C, H.; Rodriguez, A. G.; Vidal, M. A. [Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Coordinacion para la Innovacion y la Aplicacion de la Ciencia y la Tecnologia, Alvaro Obregon No. 64, 78000 San Luis Potosi, S. L. P. (Mexico); Perez Ladron de G, H. [Universidad de Guadalajara, Centro Universitario de los Lagos, Av. Enrique Diaz de Leon No. 1144, Col. Paseos de la Montana, 47460 Lagos de Moreno, Jalisco (Mexico)

    2015-07-01

    Ge{sub 1-x}Sn{sub x} alloys with x concentration up to 0.14 were grown on Ge(001) and GaAs(001) substrates in a conventional R. F. Magnetron Sputtering system at low substrate temperatures. The structural characteristics of these alloys were studied for different Sn concentrations between 1 to 14% by high resolution X-ray diffraction, and Raman spectroscopy. Contrasting characteristics of the grown layers are observed if the Sn concentration is larger or smaller than 6% as revealed by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. (Author)

  11. Effect of Ge Content on the Formation of Ge Nanoclusters in Magnetron-Sputtered GeZrOx-Based Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khomenkova, L; Lehninger, D; Kondratenko, O; Ponomaryov, S; Gudymenko, O; Tsybrii, Z; Yukhymchuk, V; Kladko, V; von Borany, J; Heitmann, J

    2017-12-01

    Ge-rich ZrO 2 films, fabricated by confocal RF magnetron sputtering of pure Ge and ZrO 2 targets in Ar plasma, were studied by multi-angle laser ellipsometry, Raman scattering, Auger electron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction for varied deposition conditions and annealing treatments. It was found that as-deposited films are homogeneous for all Ge contents, thermal treatment stimulated a phase separation and a formation of crystalline Ge and ZrO 2 . The "start point" of this process is in the range of 640-700 °C depending on the Ge content. The higher the Ge content, the lower is the temperature necessary for phase separation, nucleation of Ge nanoclusters, and crystallization. Along with this, the crystallization temperature of the tetragonal ZrO 2 exceeds that of the Ge phase, which results in the formation of Ge crystallites in an amorphous ZrO 2 matrix. The mechanism of phase separation is discussed in detail.

  12. Effect of Ge Content on the Formation of Ge Nanoclusters in Magnetron-Sputtered GeZrOx-Based Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Khomenkova, L.; Lehninger, D.; Kondratenko, O.; Ponomaryov, S.; Gudymenko, O.; Tsybrii, Z.; Yukhymchuk, V.; Kladko, V.; von Borany, J.; Heitmann, J.

    2017-01-01

    Ge-rich ZrO2 films, fabricated by confocal RF magnetron sputtering of pure Ge and ZrO2 targets in Ar plasma, were studied by multi-angle laser ellipsometry, Raman scattering, Auger electron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction for varied deposition conditions and annealing treatments. It was found that as-deposited films are homogeneous for all Ge contents, thermal treatment stimulated a phase separation and a formation of crystalline Ge and ZrO2. The ?...

  13. Near-bandgap optical properties of pseudomorphic GeSn alloys grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Costa, Vijay Richard, E-mail: vdcosta@asu.edu; Wang, Wei; Yeo, Yee-Chia, E-mail: eleyeoyc@nus.edu.sg [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117583 (Singapore)

    2016-08-14

    We investigated the compositional dependence of the near-bandgap dielectric function and the E{sub 0} critical point in pseudomorphic Ge{sub 1-x}Sn{sub x} alloys grown on Ge (100) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. The complex dielectric functions were obtained using spectroscopic ellipsometry from 0.5 to 4.5 eV at room temperature. Analogous to the E{sub 1} and E{sub 1}+Δ{sub 1} transitions, a model consisting of the compositional dependence of relaxed alloys along with the strain contribution predicted by the deformation potential theory fully accounts for the observed compositional dependence in pseudomorphic alloys.

  14. III-V/Ge MOS device technologies for low power integrated systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, S.; Noguchi, M.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.-H.; Chang, C.-Y.; Yokoyama, M.; Nishi, K.; Zhang, R.; Ke, M.; Takenaka, M.

    2016-11-01

    CMOS utilizing high mobility III-V/Ge channels on Si substrates is expected to be one of the promising devices for high performance and low power integrated systems in the future technology nodes, because of the enhanced carrier transport properties. In addition, Tunneling-FETs (TFETs) using Ge/III-V materials are regarded as one of the most important steep slope devices for the ultra-low power applications. In this paper, we address the device and process technologies of Ge/III-V MOSFETs and TFETs on the Si CMOS platform. The channel formation, source/drain (S/D) formation and gate stack engineering are introduced for satisfying the device requirements. The plasma post oxidation to form GeOx interfacial layers is a key gate stack technology for Ge CMOS. Also, direct wafer bonding of ultrathin body quantum well III-V-OI channels, combined with Tri-gate structures, realizes high performance III-V n-MOSFETs on Si. We also demonstrate planar-type InGaAs and Ge/strained SOI TFETs. The defect-less p+-n source junction formation with steep impurity profiles is a key for high performance TFET operation.

  15. Fabrication of high-quality strain relaxed SiGe(1 1 0) films by controlling defects via ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, M.; Arimoto, K.; Yamanaka, J.; Nakagawa, K.; Sawano, K.

    2017-11-01

    We investigate effects of ion implantation on strain relaxation of SiGe(1 1 0) layers grown on Si(1 1 0) substrates. Ar+ or Si+ ion implantation is carried out before or after the SiGe growth. It is found that the strain relaxation of the SiGe(1 1 0) film is largely enhanced due to implantation-induced defects both for Ar and Si implantation. Particularly, the sample with Si implantation after the SiGe growth allows large strain relaxation and smaller surface roughness than Ar implantation. As a result, a 50-nm-thick Si0.79Ge0.21 or Si0.77Ge0.23(1 1 0) buffer layer with almost full relaxation and rms surface roughness below 0.5 nm was obtained. It is, therefore, expected that high-mobility strained Si/Ge(1 1 0) channels can be realized on the SiGe(1 1 0) relaxed buffer layers fabricated by Si implantation. It is also demonstrated that the local introduction of the implantation defects allows controlling of lateral strain states and dislocation generation, opening new concepts of engineering of both strain and surface orientation.

  16. Formation of uniform high-density and small-size Ge/Si quantum dots by scanning pulsed laser annealing of pre-deposited Ge/Si film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamza Qayyum

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The capability to fabricate Ge/Si quantum dots with small dot size and high dot density uniformly over a large area is crucial for many applications. In this work, we demonstrate that this can be achieved by scanning a pre-deposited Ge thin layer on Si substrate with a line-focused pulsed laser beam to induce formation of quantum dots. With suitable setting, Ge/Si quantum dots with a mean height of 2.9 nm, a mean diameter of 25 nm, and a dot density of 6×1010 cm−2 could be formed over an area larger than 4 mm2. The average size of the laser-induced quantum dots is smaller while their density is higher than that of quantum dots grown by using Stranski-Krastanov growth mode. Based on the dependence of the characteristics of quantum dots on the laser parameters, a model consisting of laser-induced strain, surface diffusion, and Ostwald ripening is proposed for the mechanism underlying the formation of the Ge/Si quantum dots. The technique demonstrated could be applicable to other materials besides Ge/Si.

  17. Formation of uniform high-density and small-size Ge/Si quantum dots by scanning pulsed laser annealing of pre-deposited Ge/Si film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qayyum, Hamza; Chen, Szu-yuan, E-mail: sychen@ltl.iams.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Department of Physics, National Central University, Zhongli, Taoyuan 320, Taiwan (China); Molecular Science and Technology Program, Taiwan International Graduate Program, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Lu, Chieh-Hsun [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Department of Physics, National Central University, Zhongli, Taoyuan 320, Taiwan (China); Chuang, Ying-Hung [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Department of Physics, National Chung Cheng University, Chiayi 621, Taiwan (China); Lin, Jiunn-Yuan [Department of Physics, National Chung Cheng University, Chiayi 621, Taiwan (China)

    2016-05-15

    The capability to fabricate Ge/Si quantum dots with small dot size and high dot density uniformly over a large area is crucial for many applications. In this work, we demonstrate that this can be achieved by scanning a pre-deposited Ge thin layer on Si substrate with a line-focused pulsed laser beam to induce formation of quantum dots. With suitable setting, Ge/Si quantum dots with a mean height of 2.9 nm, a mean diameter of 25 nm, and a dot density of 6×10{sup 10} cm{sup −2} could be formed over an area larger than 4 mm{sup 2}. The average size of the laser-induced quantum dots is smaller while their density is higher than that of quantum dots grown by using Stranski-Krastanov growth mode. Based on the dependence of the characteristics of quantum dots on the laser parameters, a model consisting of laser-induced strain, surface diffusion, and Ostwald ripening is proposed for the mechanism underlying the formation of the Ge/Si quantum dots. The technique demonstrated could be applicable to other materials besides Ge/Si.

  18. Abelian Hidden Sectors at a GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrissey, David E.; Poland, David; /Harvard U.; Zurek, Kathryn; /Fermilab /Michigan U.

    2009-04-16

    We discuss mechanisms for naturally generating GeV-scale hidden sectors in the context of weak-scale supersymmetry. Such low mass scales can arise when hidden sectors are more weakly coupled to supersymmetry breaking than the visible sector, as happens when supersymmetry breaking is communicated to the visible sector by gauge interactions under which the hidden sector is uncharged, or if the hidden sector is sequestered from gravity-mediated supersymmetry breaking. We study these mechanisms in detail in the context of gauge and gaugino mediation, and present specific models of Abelian GeV-scale hidden sectors. In particular, we discuss kinetic mixing of a U(1){sub x} gauge force with hypercharge, singlets or bi-fundamentals which couple to both sectors, and additional loop effects. Finally, we investigate the possible relevance of such sectors for dark matter phenomenology, as well as for low- and high-energy collider searches.

  19. Oriented Nucleation of both Ge-Fresnoite and Benitoite/BaGe4O9 during the Surface Crystallisation of Glass Studied by Electron Backscatter Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniewski, Wolfgang; Patschger, Marek; Murdzheva, Steliana; Thieme, Christian; Rüssel, Christian

    2016-02-01

    Two glasses of the compositions 2 BaO - TiO2 - 2.75 GeO2 and 2 BaO - TiO2 -3.67 GeO2 (also known as BTG55) are annealed at temperatures from 680 to 970 °C to induce surface crystallization. The resulting samples are analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) including electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Ge-Fresnoite (Ba2TiGe2O8, BTG) is observed at the immediate surface of all samples and oriented nucleation is proven in both compositions. After a very fast kinetic selection, the crystal growth of BTG into the bulk occurs via highly oriented dendrites where the c-axes are oriented perpendicular to the surface. The growth of this oriented layer is finally blocked by dendritc BTG originating from bulk nucleation. The secondary phases BaTiGe3O9 (benitoite) and BaGe4O9 are also identified near the surface by XRD and localized by EBSD which additionally indicates orientation preferences for these phases. This behaviour is in contrast with previous reports from the Ba2TiSi2O8 as well as the Sr2TiSi2O8 systems.

  20. Anti pp elastic scattering at 30 GeV/c incident momentum in the momentum transfer range 0. 5<-t<5. 8(GeV/c)/sup 2/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asa' d, Z.; Coupland, M.; Davis, D.G.; Duff, B.G.; Fearnley, T.; Heymann, F.F.; Imrie, D.C.; Lush, G.J.; Phillips, M. (University Coll., London (UK)); Baglin, A.

    1983-10-27

    The anti pp elastic differential cross section at 30 GeV/c incident momentum has been measured in a two-arm spectrometer experiment (WA7) at the CERN SPS. The vertical stroketvertical stroke-range covered extends from 0.5 to 5.8 (GeV/c)/sup 2/. A pronounced dip-bump structure is observed, with a sharp minimum around vertical stroketvertical strokeapprox.=1.7 (GeV/c)/sup 2/. The results are compared with existing anti pp data at lower energies and with our earlier anti pp data at 50 GeV/c. A number of model predictions are discussed. We also compare the anti pp 30 GeV/c differential cross section with that of pp at the same momentum. Finally, the energy dependence of the anti pp fixed-vertical stroketvertical stroke differential cross section in the incident momentum range 3.6 to 50 GeV/c is presented.

  1. Enhancing crystalline silicon solar cell efficiency with SixGe1-x layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Adnan; Cheow, S. L.; Azhari, A. W.; Sopian, K.; Zaidi, Saleem H.

    Crystalline silicon (c-Si) solar cell represents a cost effective, environment-friendly, and proven renewable energy resource. Industrially manufacturing of c-Si solar has now matured in terms of efficiency and cost. Continuing cost-effective efficiency enhancement requires transition towards thinner wafers in near term and thin-films in the long term. Successful implementation of either of these alternatives must address intrinsic optical absorption limitation of Si. Bandgap engineering through integration with SixGe1-x layers offers an attractive, inexpensive option. With the help of PC1D software, role of SixGe1-x layers in conventional c-Si solar cells has been intensively investigated in both wafer and thin film configurations by varying Ge concentration, thickness, and placement. In wafer configuration, increase in Ge concentration leads to enhanced absorption through bandgap broadening with an efficiency enhancement of 8% for Ge concentrations of less than 20%. At higher Ge concentrations, despite enhanced optical absorption, efficiency is reduced due to substantial lowering of open-circuit voltage. In 5-25-μm thickness, thin-film solar cell configurations, efficiency gain in excess of 30% is achievable. Therefore, SixGe1-x based thin-film solar cells with an order of magnitude reduction in costly Si material are ideally-suited both in terms of high efficiency and cost. Recent research has demonstrated significant improvement in epitaxially grown SixGe1-x layers on nanostructured Si substrates, thereby enhancing potential of this approach for next generation of c-Si based photovoltaics.

  2. Passivation of Ge/high-κ interface using RF Plasma nitridation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dushaq, Ghada; Nayfeh, Ammar; Rasras, Mahmoud

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, plasma nitridation of a germanium surface using NH3 and N2 gases is performed with a standard RF-PECVD method at a substrate temperature of 250 °C. The structural and optical properties of the Ge surface have been investigated using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR), and Variable Angle Spectroscopic Ellipsometery (VASE). Study of the Ge (100) surface revealed that it is nitrated after plasma treatment while the GeO2 regrowth on the surface has been suppressed. Also, stability of the treated surface under air exposure is observed, where all the measurements were performed at room ambient. The electrical characteristics of fabricated Al/Ti/HfO2/GeON/p-Ge capacitors using the proposed surface treatment technique have been investigated. The C-V curves indicated a negligible hysteresis compared to ˜500 mV observed in untreated samples. Additionally, the C-V characteristic is used to extract the high-κ/Ge interface trap density using the most commonly used methods in determining the interface traps. The discussion includes the Dit calculation from the high-low frequency (Castagné-Vapaille) method and Terman (high-frequency) method. The high-low frequency method indicated a low interface trap density of ˜2.5 × 1011 eV-1.cm-2 compared to the Terman method. The J-V measurements revealed more than two orders of magnitude reduction of the gate leakage. This improved Ge interface quality is a promising low-temperature technique for fabricating high-performance Ge MOSFETs.

  3. Germanium growth on electron beam lithography patterned Si3N4/Si(001) substrate using molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Subhendu Sinha; Katiyar, Ajit K.; Sarkar, Arijit; Dhar, Achintya; Rudra, Arun; Khatri, Ravinder K.; Ray, Samit Kumar

    2018-04-01

    It is important to investigate the growth dynamics of Ge adatoms under different surface stress regimes of the patterned dielectric to control the selective growth of self-assembled Ge nanostructures on silicon. In the present work, we have studied the growth of Ge by molecular beam epitaxy on nanometer scale patterned Si3N4/Si(001) substrates generated using electron beam lithography. The pitch of the patterns has been varied to investigate its effect on the growth of Ge in comparison to un-patterned Si3N4. For the patterned Si3N4 film, Ge did not desorbed completely from the Si3N4 film and hence no site selective growth pattern is observed. Instead, depending upon the pitch, Ge growth has occurred in different growth modes around the openings in the Si3N4. For the un-patterned substrate, the morphology exhibits the occurrence of uniform 3D clustering of Ge adatoms on Si3N4 film. This variation in the growth modes of Ge is attributed to the variation of residual stress in the Si3N4 film for different pitch of holes, which has been confirmed theoretically through Comsol Multiphysics simulation. The variation in stress for different pitches resulted in modulation of surface energy of the Si3N4 film leading to the different growth modes of Ge.

  4. Schottky barrier tuning via dopant segregation in NiGeSn-GeSn contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte-Braucks, Christian; Hofmann, Emily; Glass, Stefan; von den Driesch, Nils; Mussler, Gregor; Breuer, Uwe; Hartmann, Jean-Michel; Zaumseil, Peter; Schröder, Thomas; Zhao, Qing-Tai; Mantl, Siegfried; Buca, Dan

    2017-05-01

    We present a comprehensive study on the formation and tuning of the Schottky barrier of NiGeSn metallic alloys on Ge1-xSnx semiconductors. First, the Ni metallization of GeSn is investigated for a wide range of Sn contents (x = 0-0.125). Structural analysis reveals the existence of different poly-crystalline NiGeSn and Ni3(GeSn)5 phases depending on the Sn content. Electrical measurements confirm a low NiGeSn sheet resistance of 12 Ω/□ almost independent of the Sn content. We extracted from Schottky barrier height measurements in NiGeSn/GeSn/NiGeSn metal-semiconductor-metal diodes Schottky barriers for the holes below 0.15 eV. They decrease with the Sn content, thereby confirming NiGeSn as an ideal metal alloy for p-type contacts. Dopant segregation for both p- and n-type dopants is investigated as a technique to effectively modify the Schottky barrier of NiGeSn/GeSn contacts. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy is employed to analyze dopant segregation and reveal its dependence on both the Sn content and biaxial layer strain.

  5. Templated self-assembly of SiGe quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dais, Christian

    2009-08-19

    This PhD thesis reports on the fabrication and characterization of exact aligned SiGe quantum dot structures. In general, SiGe quantum dots which nucleate via the Stranski-Krastanov growth mode exhibit broad size dispersion and nucleate randomly on the surface. However, to tap the full potential of SiGe quantum dots it is necessary to control the positioning and size of the dots on a nanometer length, e.g. for electronically addressing of individual dots. This can be realized by so-called templated self-assembly, which combines top-down lithography with bottom-up selfassembly. In this process the lithographically defined pits serve as pre-defined nucleation points for the epitaxially grown quantum dots. In this thesis, extreme ultraviolet interference lithography at a wavelength of e=13.4 nm is employed for prepatterning of the Si substrates. This technique allows the precise and fast fabrication of high-resolution templates with a high degree of reproducibility. The subsequent epitaxial deposition is either performed by molecular beam epitaxy or low-pressure chemical vapour deposition. It is shown that the dot nucleation on pre-patterned substrates depends strongly on the lithography parameters, e.g. size and periodicity of the pits, as well as on the epitaxy parameters, e.g. growth temperature or material coverage. The interrelations are carefully analyzed by means of scanning force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction measurements. Provided that correct template and overgrowth parameters are chosen, perfectly aligned and uniform SiGe quantum dot arrays of different period, size as well as symmetry are created. In particular, the quantum dot arrays with the so far smallest period (35 nm) and smallest size dispersion are fabricated in this thesis. Furthermore, the strain fields of the underlying quantum dots allow the fabrication of vertically aligned quantum dot stacks. Combining lateral and vertical dot alignment results in three

  6. Structural, dynamical and thermodynamic properties of CdXP2 (X = Si, Ge) from first principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, H. J.; Zhu, H. J.; Li, S. P.; Li, T. J.; Tian, L.; Yang, J. W.

    2018-03-01

    The structural, elastic, dynamical and thermodynamic properties of CdXP2 (X = Si, Ge) with chalcopyrite semiconductors have been calculated by using the projector augmented wave method within the generalized gradient approximation. The obtained lattice constants and elastic constants of CdXP2 (X = Si, Ge) are compared with the available experimental and other theoretical results, and the agreements between them are quite well. Also, the elastic anisotropy of CdXP2 (X = Si, Ge) have been evaluated. In addition, the phonon dispersion curves and the corresponding phonon density of states of CdXP2 (X = Si, Ge) have been determined by virtue of a linear response approach to density functional perturbation theory method successfully. Finally, the Helmholtz free energy F, internal energy E, entropy S and the constant volume specific heat C V have also been predicted based on quasi-harmonic approximation.

  7. The composition dependence of magnetic, electronic and optical properties of Mn-doped SixGe1-x nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jianglin; Lan, Mu; Zhang, Xi; Xiang, Gang

    2017-07-01

    Mn-doped SixGe1-x nanowires (NWs) with different Ge concentrations have been studied by first-principles calculations. It is found that the spin dependent energy bands of the NWs show rich variations both in bandgap width and type (from indirect to direct) as the Ge concentration changes. The Mn-doped SixGe1-x NWs exhibit half-metallic characteristics for all Ge concentrations, and the ground states of the NWs are found to be ferromagnetic (FM). The net magnetization mapping and spin density of states calculations reveal that Mn 3d electrons have a strong hybridization effect with nearest Ge 4p electrons, which results in the Ge’s nontrivial contribution to the magnetic moment of the NWs. Further magnon dispersion studies show that the magnetic order stability of the NWs is influenced by Ge concentrations. Finally, the dependence of the optical properties of the magnetic NWs on the Ge concentration is demonstrated. Our results suggest that Mn-doped SixGe1-x NWs may be useful in spintronic and optoelectronic devices.

  8. The Ge(0 0 1) surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.

    2003-01-01

    Although germanium (Ge) (0 0 1) has a relatively small surface unit cell, this surface displays a wealth of fascinating phenomena. The Ge(0 0 1) surface is a prototypical example of a system possessing both a strong short-range interaction due to dimerization of the surface atoms, as well as an

  9. Studies of adsorber materials for preparing 68Ge/68Ga generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brambilla, Tania de Paula

    2013-01-01

    The 68 Ga is a promising radionuclide for nuclear medicine, decaying by positron emission with an abundance of 89%, with physical half-life of 68 minutes, which is compatible with the pharmacokinetics of many biomolecules and low molecular weight substrates. Another important feature is its availability through a generator system, where the parent radionuclide, 68 Ge (t 1/2 = 270.95 days) is adsorbed on a column and the daughter, 68 Ga, is eluted in an ionic form 68Ga 3+ . The development of 68 Ge/ 68 Ga generators began in the 60s, but its clinical use began to be acceptable and relevant only recently. The method of separation of 68 Ge and 68 Ga most used is the ion-exchange chromatographic system, due to its practical operation, but other generator systems have been proposed, such as solvent extraction and evaporation technique. Currently, 68 Ge/ 68 Ga generators are commercially available using inorganic matrices columns prepared with TiO 2 or SnO 2 as well using organic resin. The efficiency of 68 Ga elution ranges from 70% to 80%, decreasing over time. The 68 Ge breakthrough varies from 10 -2 to10 -3 % or lower in a fresh generator, but there is an increase in the levels of contamination after long periods of use. Even with all the technological advances in the development of 68 Ge/ 68 Ga generators in the past decades, the 68 Ga eluted from commercial generators is not suitable for direct use in humans and some improvements in the systems need to be made to reduce the 68 Ge breakthrough and chemical impurities levels. The main objective of this work was to develop a 68 Ge/ 68 Ga generator system is which 68 Ga could be eluted with quality required for clinical use. The chemical behavior of Ge and Ga was evaluated on various inorganic adsorbents materials. Two types of 68 Ge/ 68 Ga generator systems were developed using TiO 2 as adsorbent material: elution system with manual pressure and vacuum controlled. The efficiencies of the generators were similar to

  10. Final design of kaon beam K2 at KEK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurokawa, Shin-ichi; Yamamoto, Akira.

    1977-09-01

    Final design of the 2.3 GeV/c kaon beam K2 is given. The K2 beam starts from the production target in slow extracted beam. Momentum range is 1 GeV/c through 2.3 GeV/c. Nominal total beam length is 27.9 m and solid-angle momentum acceptance is 6.25 msr%ΔP/P. Using a platinum target of diameter 3 mm and length 6 cm, 2.0 GeV/c beam fluxes of 1.0 x 10 6 K + and 5.2 x 10 5 K - per 10 12 13 GeV/c incident protons are expected at the final focus. (auth.)

  11. High-efficiency Thin-film Fe2SiS4 and Fe2GeS4-based Solar Cells Prepared from Low-Cost Solution Precursors. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radu, Daniela Rodica [Delaware State Univ., Dover, DE (United States); Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States); Liu, Mimi [Delaware State Univ., Dover, DE (United States); Hwang, Po-yu [Delaware State Univ., Dover, DE (United States); Berg, Dominik [Rowan Univ., Glassboro, NJ (United States); Dobson, Kevin [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States). Inst. of Energy Conversion (IEC)

    2017-12-28

    The project aimed to provide solar energy education to students from underrepresented groups and to develop a novel, nano-scale approach, in utilizing Fe2SiS4 and Fe2GeS4 materials as precursors to the absorber layer in photovoltaic thin-film devices. The objectives of the project were as follows: 1. Develop and implement one solar-related course at Delaware State University and train two graduate students in solar research. 2. Fabricate and characterize high-efficiency (larger than 7%) Fe2SiS4 and Fe2GeS4-based solar devices. The project has been successful in both the educational components, implementing the solar course at DSU as well as in developing multiple routes to prepare the Fe2GeS4 with high purity and in large quantities. The project did not meet the efficiency objective, however, a functional solar device was demonstrated.

  12. Ge 1-xSn x stressors for strained-Ge CMOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, S.; Shimura, Y.; Nishimura, T.; Vincent, B.; Eneman, G.; Clarysse, T.; Demeulemeester, J.; Vantomme, A.; Dekoster, J.; Caymax, M.; Loo, R.; Sakai, A.; Nakatsuka, O.; Zaima, S.

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, we propose the fabrication of whole strained Ge complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) with Ge 1-xSn x materials as stressors to outperform the state-of-the-art uniaxial compressive strained Si CMOS. Ge 1-xSn x materials have larger lattice constant than that of Ge, which can apply the strain into Ge channel region. Firstly, we have demonstrated p-type doped Ge 1-xSn x growth by using either B implantation or in situ Ga doping technique. In the B-implanted Ge 1-xSn x formation case, fully strained B-doped Ge 1-xSn x layers with no Sn precipitation can be obtained even after solid phase epitaxial regrowth (SPER). However, the serious dislocation generation in the layer was occurred during SPER. This is caused by the point defects introduced by B implantation. In order to avoid this crystal damage, we have also demonstrated in situ Ga-doped Ge 1-xSn x growth. In this case, we can achieve fully strained Ga-doped Ge 1-xSn x growth without Sn precipitation and any defect generation. Secondary, we have demonstrated the formation of Ni(Ge 1-ySn y) layers for metal/semiconductor contact and investigated the crystalline qualities. The formation of polycrystalline Ni(Ge 1-ySn y) layers on Ge 1-xSn x layers with Sn contents ranging from 2.0% to 6.5% after annealing at from 350 °C to 550 °C can be achieved. Additionally, in the case of the Ni/Ge 1-xSn x/Ge sample with a Sn content of 3.5%, an epitaxial Ni 2(Ge 1-ySn y) layer on a Ge 1-xSn x layer was formed. However, the surface roughness due to the agglomeration of Ni(Ge 1-xSn x) increases with increasing the Sn content and the annealing temperature. Therefore, a low thermal budget must be required for the formation of Ni(Ge 1-xSn x) with high Sn content.

  13. 76 FR 82103 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company (GE) GE90-110B1 and GE90-115B Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-30

    ... Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company (GE) GE90- 110B1 and GE90-115B Turbofan Engines AGENCY... engine failure, and damage to the airplane. DATES: This AD is effective February 3, 2012. The Director of... General Electric, GE-Aviation, Room 285, 1 Neumann Way, Cincinnati, Ohio 45215; email: [email protected

  14. 2D device-level simulation study of strained-Si pnp heterojunction bipolar transistors on virtual substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankovic, N. D.; O'Neill, A.

    2004-02-01

    A novel strained-Si pnp heterojunction bipolar transistor (HBT) design, suitable for virtual substrate technology, is proposed that is inherently free from the detrimental valence band barrier effects usually encountered in conventional SiGe pnp HBTs on silicon. It takes advantage of the heterojunction formed between a strained-Si layer and a relaxed SiGe buffer (virtual substrate), whose associated valence band offset appears favorable for minority hole transport at the base/collector junction. From two-dimensional (2D) numerical simulation, it is found that the newly proposed strained-Si pnp HBT substantially outperforms the equivalent BJT on a silicon substrate in terms of DC and high-frequency characteristics. A threefold increase in maximum current gain β, a fourfold improvement in peak ft and a 2.5 times increase in peak fmax are predicted for strained-Si pnp HBTs on a 50% Ge virtual substrate in comparison with identical conventional silicon pnp BJTs.

  15. Electrical and Optical Properties of GeSi−:H Thin Films Prepared by Thermal Evaporation Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. J. Al-Douri

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Thin a-GeSi1−:H films were grown successfully by fabrication of designated ingot followed by evaporation onto glass slides. A range of growth conditions, Ge contents, dopant concentration (Al and As, and substrate temperature, were employed. Stoichiometry of the thin films composition was confirmed using standard surface techniques. The structure of all films was amorphous. Film composition and deposition parameters were investigated for their bearing on film electrical and optical properties. More than one transport mechanism is indicated. It was observed that increasing substrate temperature, Ge contents, and dopant concentration lead to a decrease in the optical energy gap of those films. The role of the deposition conditions on values of the optical constants was determined. Accordingly, models of the density of states for the Ge0.5Si0.5:H thin films as pure, doped with 3.5% of Al (p-type and that doped with 3.5% As (n-type, were proposed.

  16. Structural defects and epitaxial rotation of C-60 and C-70(111) films on GeS(001)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernaerts, D.; Van Tendeloo, G.; Amelinckx, S.

    1996-01-01

    A transmission electron microscopy study of epitaxial C60 and C70 films grown on a GeS (001) surface is presented. The relationship between the orientation of the substrate and the films and structural defects in the films, such as grain boundaries, unknown in bulk C60 and C70 crystals, are studied...

  17. Investigations of rapid thermal annealing induced structural evolution of ZnO: Ge nanocomposite thin films via GISAXS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceylan, Abdullah, E-mail: aceylanabd@yahoo.com [Department of Physics Eng., Hacettepe University, Beytepe, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Ozcan, Yusuf [Department of Electricity and Energy, Pamukkale University, Denizli (Turkey); Orujalipoor, Ilghar [Department of Nanotechnology and Nanomedicine, Hacettepe University, Beytepe, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Huang, Yen-Chih; Jeng, U-Ser [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, 101 Hsin-Ann Road, Hsinchu Science Park, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Ide, Semra [Department of Physics Eng., Hacettepe University, Beytepe, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Department of Nanotechnology and Nanomedicine, Hacettepe University, Beytepe, 06800 Ankara (Turkey)

    2016-06-07

    In this work, we present in depth structural investigations of nanocomposite ZnO: Ge thin films by utilizing a state of the art grazing incidence small angle x-ray spectroscopy (GISAXS) technique. The samples have been deposited by sequential r.f. and d.c. sputtering of ZnO and Ge thin film layers, respectively, on single crystal Si(100) substrates. Transformation of Ge layers into Ge nanoparticles (Ge-np) has been initiated by ex-situ rapid thermal annealing of asprepared thin film samples at 600 °C for 30, 60, and 90 s under forming gas atmosphere. A special attention has been paid on the effects of reactive and nonreactive growth of ZnO layers on the structural evolution of Ge-np. GISAXS analyses have been performed via cylindrical and spherical form factor calculations for different nanostructure types. Variations of the size, shape, and distributions of both ZnO and Ge nanostructures have been determined. It has been realized that GISAXS results are not only remarkably consistent with the electron microscopy observations but also provide additional information on the large scale size and shape distribution of the nanostructured components.

  18. Structural studies on Te-rich Ge Te melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaban, I.; Jóvári, P.; Hoyer, W.; Delaplane, R. G.; Wannberg, A.

    2006-03-01

    The structure of liquid Ge15Te85, Ge25Te75 and Ge33Te67 alloys has been studied by neutron and x-ray diffraction. Datasets obtained by the two techniques have been modelled simultaneously with the reverse Monte Carlo simulation method. As a result, the first coordination numbers and nearest neighbour distances for the studied alloys were estimated. On the basis of the experimental data, Ge-Ge bonding appears to be present in liquid Ge25Te75 and Ge33Te67. It has been found that temperature dependences of the physico-chemical properties correlate with the structural changes in liquid Ge15Te85.

  19. Nuclear energy outlook: a GE perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, J.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Full text: As one of the world's leading suppliers of power generation and energy delivery technologies, GE Energy provides comprehensive solutions for coal, oil, natural gas and nuclear energy; renewable resources such as wind, solar and biogas, along with other alternative fuels. With the ever increasing demand for energy and pressures to decrease greenhouse gas emissions, global trends indicate a move towards building more base line nuclear generation capacity. As a reliable, cost-competitive option for commercial power generation, nuclear energy also addresses many of the issues the world faces when it comes to the environment. Since developing nuclear reactor technology in the 1950s, GE's Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) technology accounts for more than 90 operating plants in the world today. Building on that success, GE's ABWR design is now the first and only Generation 111 nuclear reactor in operation today. This advanced reactor technology, coupled with current construction experience and a qualified global supply chain, make ESBWR, GE's Generation III+ reactor design, an attractive option for owners considering adding nuclear generation capacity. In pursuit of new technologies, GE has teamed with Silex to develop, commercialize and license third generation laser enrichment technology. By acquiring the exclusive rights to develop and commercialize this technology, GE is positioned to support the anticipated global demands for enriched uranium. At GE, we are continuing to develop imaginative ideas and investing in products that are cost effective, increase productivity, limit greenhouse gas emissions, and improve safety and security for our customers

  20. Germanium nitride and oxynitride films for surface passivation of Ge radiation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maggioni, G., E-mail: maggioni@lnl.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia G. Galilei, Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Viale dell’Universita’2, I-35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Carturan, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia G. Galilei, Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Viale dell’Universita’2, I-35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Fiorese, L. [Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Viale dell’Universita’2, I-35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Dipartimento di Ingegneria dei Materiali e delle Tecnologie Industriali, Università di Trento, Via Mesiano 77, I-38050 Povo, Trento (Italy); Pinto, N.; Caproli, F. [Scuola di Scienze e Tecnologie, Sezione di Fisica, Università di Camerino, Via Madonna delle Carceri 9, Camerino (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Napoli, D.R. [Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Viale dell’Universita’2, I-35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Giarola, M.; Mariotto, G. [Dipartimento di Informatica—Università di Verona, Strada le Grazie 15, I-37134 Verona (Italy)

    2017-01-30

    Highlights: • A surface passivation method for HPGe radiation detectors is proposed. • Highly insulating GeNx- and GeOxNy-based layers are deposited at room temperature. • Deposition parameters affect composition and electrical properties of the layers. • The improved performance of a GeNx-coated HPGe diode is assessed. - Abstract: This work reports a detailed investigation of the properties of germanium nitride and oxynitride films to be applied as passivation layers to Ge radiation detectors. All the samples were deposited at room temperature by reactive RF magnetron sputtering. A strong correlation was found between the deposition parameters, such as deposition rate, substrate bias and atmosphere composition, and the oxygen and nitrogen content in the film matrix. We found that all the films were very poorly crystallized, consisting of very small Ge nitride and oxynitride nanocrystallites, and electrically insulating, with the resistivity changing from three to six orders of magnitude as a function of temperature. A preliminary test of these films as passivation layers was successfully performed by depositing a germanium nitride film on the intrinsic surface of a high-purity germanium (HPGe) diode and measuring the improved performance, in terms of leakage current, with respect to a reference passivated diode. All these interesting results allow us to envisage the application of this coating technology to the surface passivation of germanium-based radiation detectors.

  1. Ge nitride formation in N-doped amorphous Ge2Sb2Te5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, M.-C.; Lee, Y. M.; Kim, H.-D.; Kim, M. G.; Shin, H. J.; Kim, K. H.; Song, S. A.; Jeong, H. S.; Ko, C. H.; Han, M.

    2007-01-01

    The chemical state of N in N-doped amorphous Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 (a-GST) samples with 0-14.3 N at. % doping concentrations was investigated by high-resolution x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HRXPS) and Ge K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). HRXPS showed negligible change in the Te 4d and Sb 4d core-level spectra. In the Ge 3d core-level spectra, a Ge nitride (GeN x ) peak developed at the binding energy of 30.2 eV and increased in intensity as the N-doping concentration increased. Generation of GeN x was confirmed by the Ge K-edge absorption spectra. These results indicate that the N atoms bonded with the Ge atoms to form GeN x , rather than bonding with the Te or Sb atoms. It has been suggested that the formation of Ge nitride results in increased resistance and phase-change temperature

  2. Vertical Ge/Si Core/Shell Nanowire Junctionless Transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Cai, Fuxi; Otuonye, Ugo; Lu, Wei D

    2016-01-13

    Vertical junctionless transistors with a gate-all-around (GAA) structure based on Ge/Si core/shell nanowires epitaxially grown and integrated on a ⟨111⟩ Si substrate were fabricated and analyzed. Because of efficient gate coupling in the nanowire-GAA transistor structure and the high density one-dimensional hole gas formed in the Ge nanowire core, excellent P-type transistor behaviors with Ion of 750 μA/μm were obtained at a moderate gate length of 544 nm with minimal short-channel effects. The experimental data can be quantitatively modeled by a GAA junctionless transistor model with few fitting parameters, suggesting the nanowire transistors can be fabricated reliably without introducing additional factors that can degrade device performance. Devices with different gate lengths were readily obtained by tuning the thickness of an etching mask film. Analysis of the histogram of different devices yielded a single dominate peak in device parameter distribution, indicating excellent uniformity and high confidence of single nanowire operation. Using two vertical nanowire junctionless transistors, a PMOS-logic inverter with near rail-to-rail output voltage was demonstrated, and device matching in the logic can be conveniently obtained by controlling the number of nanowires employed in different devices rather than modifying device geometry. These studies show that junctionless transistors based on vertical Ge/Si core/shell nanowires can be fabricated in a controlled fashion with excellent performance and may be used in future hybrid, high-performance circuits where bottom-up grown nanowire devices with different functionalities can be directly integrated with an existing Si platform.

  3. Sensor Substrate Development

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Novel substrates, such as aerogels and porous, low density ceramics may increase the sensitivities of chemical reaction-based sensors for toxic vapors. These sensors...

  4. Study of superconducting Ba-Ge-Co compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Ross, J. H.; Larrea, J. A.; Baggio-Saitovitch, Elisa

    2004-08-01

    We prepared samples with starting composition Ba 8-Ge 46- x-Co x ( x=0, 4 and 6) by direct melting. These Ge-based compounds were characterized by X-ray diffraction and WDS, and we found two superconducting transitions at TC=10 and 4 K in the Co-free sample. Co-doping results in the suppression of TC to 7 K. The superconducting volume fraction also decreases with increasing Co-doping. For Co-doped samples, there is no 4 K superconducting transition. X-ray refinement shows that the compounds are mixtures of several phases. The dominant phase is diamond Ge, and we found no Ge-clathrate phases. Besides diamond Ge, there are also several weak diffractions from an unknown Ba-Ge phase, and most of them were indexed on the basis of a monoclinic unit cell. Diffraction peaks for Ba 2Ge, BaGe, BaGe 2, BaGe 2O 5, BaGeO 3, Ba 3GeO 5, α-BaGeO 3, BaGe 2O 5, Ba 2Ge 5O 12, β-BaGeO 3, Ba 2GeO 4 and BaGe 4O 9 were carefully searched for but not seen in the samples. For the Co-doped sample, besides the main diamond Ge phase, there is also a semiconducting phase CoGe 2. With increasing Co content, the CoGe 2 content increases. The WDS results agree with this result. The main phase composition for the Co-free sample is Ba 0.01Ge 99.9. We also discuss the origin of two superconducting transitions in Ge-based compounds.

  5. Mesh-shape-and-size controlled rapid-melting growth for the formation of single-crystalline (100), (110), and (111) Ge networks on insulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizushima, Ichiro; Toko, Kaoru; Ohta, Yasuharu; Sakane, Takashi; Sadoh, Taizoh; Miyao, Masanobu

    2011-01-01

    Single-crystalline-Ge (c-Ge) networks with various crystal orientations on insulators formed on Si substrates are essential for integrating high-speed and multifunctional devices onto the Si platform. c-Ge networks are realized by rapid-melting growth of mesh-patterned amorphous-Ge over large areas (500x250 μm 2 ) on (110) and (111) as well as (100) Si substrates by optimizing the shape and the size of the mesh. It is revealed that latent-heat generated at the growth front can be controlled by selecting mesh-shape-and-size, which suppresses the spontaneous nucleation. In addition, essential role of the growth-direction on preventing the rotational growth is clarified.

  6. GeV electron microtron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    A strong consensus has developed recently in the nuclear physics community that research with electromagnetic probes in the 1 to 2 GeV range generated by a high current 100% duty factor electron accelerator represents an exciting new frontier. Because of this rapidly growing interest, a design group of 5 ANL physicists and accelerator specialists recently reviewed developments in accelerator technology and developed conceptual designs for technical evaluation and subsequent cost analysis. Exploratory designs were developed for two concepts, the linac-stretcher ring and a modified microtron system. These were used to make a critical comparison of the two conceptual designs along with an improved microtron design, the double-sided microtron. The results are presented in Table VIII-I. The double-sided microtron shows promise for development into a substantially less expensive facility than a linac-ring system, but its technical feasibility remains to be established. The potential savings in capital cost are large for the microtron system, perhaps $10 million. They dictate that in the absence of a major technical limitation the double-sided microtron is the preferred design

  7. Photon pair production by e+e- annihilation and search for supersymmetric photinos at energies greater than 40 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Althoff, M.; Braunschweig, W.; Kirschfink, F.J.; Luebelsmeyer, K.; Martyn, H.U.; Rosskamp, R.; Schmitz, D.; Siebke, H.; Wallraff, W.; Fohrmann, R.; Hilger, E.; Kracht, T.; Krasemann, H.L.; Leu, P.; Lohrmann, E.; Pandoulas, D.; Poelz, G.; Poesnecker, K.U.; Wiik, B.H.; Duchovni, E.; Eisenberg, Y.; Karshon, U.; Mikenberg, G.; Mir, R.; Revel, D.; Ronat, E.; Shapira, A.; Winik, M.; Baranko, G.; Caldwell, A.; Cherney, M.; Izen, J.M.; Merikides, M.; Ritz, S.; Rudolph, G.; Strom, D.; Takashima, M.; Venkataramania, H.; Wicklung, E.; Sau Lan Wu; Zobernig, G.

    1984-01-01

    The cross section for the process e + e - ->γγ has been measured for c.m. energies 39.5 61 GeV and Λsub(-)>56 GeV (95% confidence level) have been determined. A search for two photon final states with missing energy provided lower limits on the masses of the photino and selectron. (orig.)

  8. Predicting yield-stress anomalies in L12 alloys: Ni3Ge-Fe3Ge pseudo-binaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, J.B.; Johnson, D.D.; Smirnov, A.V.

    2005-01-01

    The L1 2 -based pseudo-binary (Ni 1-c Fe c ) 3 Ge is an ideal system to study yield-strength anomaly and its origin as it has a solid-solution phase vs. c and Ni 3 Ge exhibits an anomaly while Fe 3 Ge does not. Using two ab initio electronic-structure techniques, we calculate the planar-fault energies on the γ-surface, i.e., antiphase boundaries (APB) and stacking faults, both complex and superlattice intrinsic (SISF), for (Ni 1-c Fe c ) 3 Ge as a function of c. Generally, we use the fault energies combined with elasticity theory to predict occurrence/loss of the yield-strength anomaly and show that the loss of anomaly occurs due to APB(1 1 1)-to-SISF(1 1 1) instability. Assessing the stability of APB(1 1 1) on the γ-surface within linear elasticity theory, we predict the transition from anomalous to normal temperature dependence of yield strength for c ∼≥ 0.35 (or 26 at.% Fe), as is observed, after which type-II, rather than type-I, dissociation is energetically favorable. Hence, first-principles calculations can predict reliably the existence/loss of anomalous yield-strength. Finally, we show that (0 0 1) and (1 1 1) APB energies of the binaries and pseudo-binaries agree quantitatively with measured values when chemical antisite disorder, intrinsic to the samples characterized, is included, whereas they are too large by a factor of two in perfect L1 2 . We investigate three types of disorder: thermal and off-stoichiometric antisites, as well as chemical disorder vs. Fe-content in pseudo-binaries

  9. New pathway for the formation of metallic cubic phase Ge-Sb-Te compounds induced by an electric current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yong-Jin; Cho, Ju-Young; Jeong, Min-Woo; Na, Sekwon; Joo, Young-Chang

    2016-02-23

    The novel discovery of a current-induced transition from insulator to metal in the crystalline phase of Ge2Sb2Te5 and GeSb4Te7 have been studied by means of a model using line-patterned samples. The resistivity of cubic phase Ge-Sb-Te compound was reduced by an electrical current (~1 MA/cm(2)), and the final resistivity was determined based on the stress current density, regardless of the initial resistivity and temperature, which indicates that the conductivity of Ge-Sb-Te compound can be modulated by an electrical current. The minimum resistivity of Ge-Sb-Te materials can be achieved at high kinetic rates by applying an electrical current, and the material properties change from insulating to metallic behavior without a phase transition. The current-induced metal transition is more effective in GeSb4Te7 than Ge2Sb2Te5, which depends on the intrinsic vacancy of materials. Electromigration, which is the migration of atoms induced by a momentum transfer from charge carriers, can easily promote the rearrangement of vacancies in the cubic phase of Ge-Sb-Te compound. This behavior differs significantly from thermal annealing, which accompanies a phase transition to the hexagonal phase. This result suggests a new pathway for modulating the electrical conductivity and material properties of chalcogenide materials by applying an electrical current.

  10. Ab-initio study of NiGe/Ge Schottky contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Dhirendra; Lodha, Saurabh; Ganguly, Swaroop

    2017-04-01

    Germanium is a promising material for next-generation electronic and photonic devices, and engineering ohmic contacts to it can be expected to be a key challenge therein. The sensitivity of the Schottky barrier height of the NiGe/Ge contact to the detailed interfacial structure is revealed using the ab-initio study of pseudo-epitaxial NiGe(001)/Ge(100) contact using the computationally efficient meta-generalized-gradient-approximation, which can overcome the well-known bandgap underestimation problem. The p-type Schottky barrier height for an atomically flat pseudo-epitaxial NiGe(001)/Ge(100) contact is calculated to be 260 meV, an overestimate of about 160 meV compared to experiments. However, the estimated modulation of this barrier height, by about 270 meV, due to interface morphology points to a possible explanation for this discrepancy and suggests ways to engineer the contact for lesser resistivity.

  11. BaGe6 and BaGe(6-x): incommensurately ordered vacancies as electron traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akselrud, Lev; Wosylus, Aron; Castillo, Rodrigo; Aydemir, Umut; Prots, Yurii; Schnelle, Walter; Grin, Yuri; Schwarz, Ulrich

    2014-12-15

    We report the high-pressure high-temperature synthesis of the germanium-based framework compounds BaGe6 (P = 15 GPa, T = 1073 K) and BaGe(6-x) (P = 10 GPa, T = 1073 K) which are metastable at ambient conditions. In BaGe(6-x), partial fragmentation of the BaGe6 network involves incommensurate modulations of both atomic positions and site occupancy. Bonding analysis in direct space reveals that the defect formation in BaGe(6-x) is associated with the establishment of free electron pairs around the defects. In accordance with the electron precise composition of BaGe(6-x) for x = 0.5, physical measurements evidence semiconducting electron transport properties which are combined with low thermal conductivity.

  12. Synthesis and Structural and Optical Properties of Ga(As1-xPx)Ge3 and (GaP)yGe5-2y Semiconductors Using Interface-Engineered Group IV Platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Patrick M; Sims, Patrick E; Xu, Chi; Poweleit, Christian D; Kouvetakis, John; Menéndez, José

    2017-10-11

    Epitaxial synthesis of Ga(As 1-x P x )Ge 3 alloys on Si(100) substrates is demonstrated using chemical vapor deposition reactions of [D 2 GaN(CH 3 ) 2 ] 2 with P(GeH 3 ) 3 and As(GeH 3 ) 3 precursors. These compounds are chosen to promote the formation of GaAsGe 3 and GaPGe 3 building blocks which interlink to produce the desired crystalline product. Ge-rich (GaP) y Ge 5-2y analogues have also been grown with tunable Ge contents up to 90% by reactions of P(GeH 3 ) 3 with [D 2 GaN(CH 3 ) 2 ] 2 under similar deposition protocols. In both cases, the crystal growth utilized Ge 1-x Si x buffer layers whose lattice constants were specifically tuned as a function of composition to allow perfect lattice matching with the target epilayers. This approach yielded single-phase materials with excellent crystallinity devoid of mismatch-induced dislocations. The lattice parameters of Ga(As 1-x P x )Ge 3 interpolated among the Ge, GaAs, and GaP end members, corroborating the Rutherford backscattering measurements of the P/As ratio. A small deviation from the Vegard's law that depends on the As/P ratio was observed and corroborated by ab initio calculations. Raman scattering shows evidence for the existence of Ga-As and Ga-P bonds in the Ge matrix. The As-rich samples exhibited photoluminescence with wavelengths similar to those observed for pure GaAsGe 3 , indicating that the emission profile does not change in any measurable manner by replacing As by P over a broad range up to x = 0.2. Furthermore, the photoluminescence (PL) data suggested a large negative bowing of the band gap as expected on account of a strong valence band localization on the As atoms. Spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements of the dielectric function revealed a distinct direct gap transition that closely matches the PL emission energy. These measurements also showed that the absorption coefficients can be systematically tuned as a function of composition, indicating possible applications of the new materials

  13. Strain, stress, and mechanical relaxation in fin-patterned Si/SiGe multilayers for sub-7 nm nanosheet gate-all-around device technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reboh, S.; Coquand, R.; Barraud, S.; Loubet, N.; Bernier, N.; Audoit, G.; Rouviere, J.-L.; Augendre, E.; Li, J.; Gaudiello, J.; Gambacorti, N.; Yamashita, T.; Faynot, O.

    2018-01-01

    Pre-strained fin-patterned Si/SiGe multilayer structures for sub-7 nm stacked gate-all-around Si-technology transistors that have been grown onto bulk-Si, virtually relaxed SiGe, strained Silicon-On-Insulator, and compressive SiGe-On-Insulator were investigated. From strain maps with a nanometer spatial resolution obtained by transmission electron microscopy, we developed 3D quantitative numerical models describing the mechanics of the structures. While elastic interactions describe every other system reported here, the patterning on the compressive SiGe-On-Insulator substrate that is fabricated by Ge-condensation results in relaxation along the semiconductor/insulator interface, revealing a latent plasticity mechanism. As a consequence, Si layers with a uniaxial stress of 1.4 GPa are obtained, bringing fresh perspectives for strain engineering in advanced devices. These findings could be extended to other semiconductor technologies.

  14. Isothermal cross-sections of Sr-Al-Ge and Ba-Al-Ge systems at 673 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutsenok, N.L.; Yanson, T.I.

    1987-01-01

    X-ray and microstructural analyses are used to study phase equilibria in Sr-Al-Ge and Ba-Al-Ge systems. Existence of SrAl 2 Ge 2 , Sr(Al, Ge) 2 Ba(Al, Ge) 2 , Sr 3 Al 2 Ge 2 , Ba 3 Al 2 Ge 2 ternary compounds is confirmed, a new BaGe 4 binary compound and also new ternary compounds of approximate composition Sr 57 Al 30 Ge 13 and Ba 20 Al 40 Ge 40 , which crystal structure is unknown, are detected. Aluminium solubility in SrAl 4 and BaAl 4 binary compounds (0.05 atomic fraction) is determined. Ba(Al, Ge) 2 compound homogeneity region is defined more exactly (aluminium content varies from 0.27 to 0.51 at. fractions)

  15. Astronomical large Ge immersion grating by Canon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukegawa, Takashi; Suzuki, Takeshi; Kitamura, Tsuyoshi

    2016-07-01

    Immersion grating is a powerful optical device for thee infrared high-resolution spectroscope. Germanium (GGe) is the best material for a mid-infrared immersion grating because of Ge has very large reflective index (n=4.0). On the other hands, there is no practical Ge immersion grating under 5umm use. It was very difficult for a fragile IR crystal to manufacture a diffraction grating precisely. Our original free-forming machine has accuracy of a few nano-meter in positioning and stability. We already fabricated the large CdZnTe immersion grating. (Sukegawa et al. (2012), Ikeda et al. (2015)) Wee are developing Ge immersion grating that can be a good solution for high-resolution infrared spectroscopy with the large ground-based/space telescopes. We succeeded practical Ge immersion grating with the grooved area off 75mm (ruled direction) x 119mm (grove width) and the blaze angle of 75 degrees. Our astronomical large Ge immersion grating has the grooved area of 155mm (ruled direction) x 41mmm (groove width) and groove pitch off 91.74um. We also report optical performance of astronomical large Ge immersion grating with a metal coating on the diffraction surface.

  16. Measurement of the ZZ cross-section in $e^+ e^-$ interactions at 183-189 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P.; Adye, T.; Adzic, P.; Ajinenko, I.; Albrecht, Z.; Alderweireld, T.; Alekseev, G.D.; Alemany, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P.P.; Almehed, S.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, S.; Anassontzis, E.G.; Andersson, P.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, S.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.D.; Arnoud, Y.; Asman, B.; Augustin, J.E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Ballestrero, A.; Bambade, P.; Barao, F.; Barbiellini, G.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, Dmitri Yu.; Barker, G.J.; Baroncelli, A.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Beilliere, P.; Belokopytov, Yu.; Benekos, N.C.; Benvenuti, A.C.; Berat, C.; Berggren, M.; Berntzon, L.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Bilenky, Mikhail S.; Bizouard, M.A.; Bloch, D.; Blom, H.M.; Bonesini, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, P.S.L.; Borisov, G.; Bosio, C.; Botner, O.; Boudinov, E.; Bouquet, B.; Bourdarios, C.; Bowcock, T.J.V.; Boyko, I.; Bozovic, I.; Bozzo, M.; Bracko, M.; Branchini, P.; Brenner, R.A.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J.M.; Bugge, L.; Buran, T.; Buschmann, P.; Cabrera, S.; Caccia, M.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Carroll, L.; Caso, C.; Castillo Gimenez, M.V.; Cattai, A.; Cavallo, F.R.; Charpentier, P.; Checchia, P.; Chelkov, G.A.; Chierici, R.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chochula, P.; Chorowicz, V.; Chudoba, J.; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, R.; Cortina, E.; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, F.; Costa, M.; Crawley, H.B.; Crennell, D.; Croix, J.; Cuevas Maestro, J.; Czellar, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Dalmau, J.; Davenport, M.; Da Silva, W.; Della Ricca, G.; Delpierre, P.; Demaria, N.; De Angelis, A.; De Boer, W.; De Clercq, C.; De Lotto, B.; De Min, A.; De Paula, L.; Dijkstra, H.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Dolbeau, J.; Doroba, K.; Dracos, M.; Drees, J.; Dris, M.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, T.; Ellert, M.; Elsing, M.; Engel, J.P.; Espirito Santo, M.C.; Fanourakis, G.; Fassouliotis, D.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrer-Ribas, E.; Ferro, F.; Firestone, A.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fontanelli, F.; Franek, B.; Frodesen, A.G.; Fruhwirth, R.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Galloni, A.; Gamba, D.; Gamblin, S.; Gandelman, M.; Garcia, C.; Gaspar, C.; Gaspar, M.; Gasparini, U.; Gavillet, P.; Gazis, Evangelos; Gele, D.; Geralis, T.; Gerdyukov, L.; Ghodbane, N.; Gil Botella, Ines; Glege, F.; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Gopal, G.; Gorn, L.; Gouz, Yu.; Gracco, V.; Grahl, J.; Graziani, E.; Gris, P.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hahn, F.; Hahn, S.; Haider, S.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hansen, J.; Harris, F.J.; Haug, S.; Hauler, F.; Hedberg, V.; Heising, S.; Hernandez, J.J.; Herquet, P.; Herr, H.; Higon, E.; Holmgren, S.O.; Holt, P.J.; Hoorelbeke, S.; Houlden, M.; Hrubec, J.; Huber, M.; Hughes, G.J.; Hultqvist, K.; Jackson, John Neil; Jacobsson, R.; Jalocha, P.; Janik, R.; Jarlskog, C.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jean-Marie, B.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, Erik Karl; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Juillot, P.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, Frederic; Karafasoulis, K.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.C.; Keranen, R.; Kernel, G.; Kersevan, B.P.; Khokhlov, Yu.A.; Khomenko, B.A.; Khovanski, N.N.; Kiiskinen, A.; King, B.; Kinvig, A.; Kjaer, N.J.; Klapp, O.; Kluit, P.; Kokkinias, P.; Kostioukhine, V.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krammer, M.; Kriznic, E.; Krumstein, Z.; Kubinec, P.; Kurowska, J.; Kurvinen, K.; Lamsa, J.W.; Lane, D.W.; Laugier, J.P.; Lauhakangas, R.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, Fabienne; Leinonen, L.; Leisos, A.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, J.; Lenzen, G.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Libby, J.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lippi, I.; Loerstad, B.; Loken, J.G.; Lopes, J.H.; Lopez, J.M.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; MacNaughton, J.; Mahon, J.R.; Maio, A.; Malek, A.; Maltezos, S.; Malychev, V.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Marti i Garcia, S.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Matthiae, G.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; McCubbin, M.; McKay, R.; McNulty, R.; McPherson, G.; Merle, E.; Meroni, C.; Meyer, W.T.; Migliore, E.; Mirabito, L.; Mitaroff, W.A.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Moller, Rasmus; Monig, Klaus; Monge, M.R.; Montenegro, J.; Moraes, D.; Morettini, P.; Morton, G.; Muller, U.; Muenich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mulet-Marquis, C.; Mundim, L.M.; Muresan, R.; Murray, W.J.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Naraghi, F.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.L.; Nawrocki, K.; Negri, P.; Neufeld, N.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nielsen, B.S.; Niezurawski, P.; Nikolenko, M.; Nomokonov, V.; Nygren, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A.G.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Oyanguren, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Pain, R.; Paiva, R.; Palacios, J.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, T.D.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Pavel, T.; Pegoraro, M.; Peralta, L.; Pernicka, M.; Perrotta, A.; Petridou, C.; Petrolini, A.; Phillips, H.T.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Podobnik, T.; Poireau, V.; Pol, M.E.; Polok, G.; Poropat, P.; Pozdniakov, V.; Privitera, P.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Radojicic, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Rahmani, H.; Rames, J.; Ratoff, P.N.; Read, Alexander L.; Rebecchi, P.; Redaelli, Nicola Giuseppe; Regler, M.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinertsen, P.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, P.B.; Resvanis, L.K.; Richard, F.; Ridky, J.; Rinaudo, G.; Ripp-Baudot, Isabelle; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Rosenberg, E.I.; Rosinsky, P.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ruiz, A.; Saarikko, H.; Sacquin, Y.; Sadovsky, A.; Sajot, G.; Salt, J.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sannino, M.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schwanda, C.; Schwemling, P.; Schwering, B.; Schwickerath, U.; Scuri, Fabrizio; Seager, P.; Sedykh, Y.; Segar, A.M.; Seibert, N.; Sekulin, R.; Sette, G.; Shellard, R.C.; Siebel, M.; Simard, L.; Simonetto, F.; Sisakian, A.N.; Smadja, G.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, G.R.; Sokolov, A.; Solovianov, O.; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassov, T.; Spiriti, E.; Squarcia, S.; Stanescu, C.; Stanitzki, M.; Stevenson, K.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Strub, R.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Tabarelli, T.; Taffard, A.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Terranova, F.; Timmermans, Jan; Tinti, N.; Tkatchev, L.G.; Tobin, M.; Todorova, S.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortora, L.; Tortosa, P.; Transtromer, G.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, C.; Turluer, M.L.; Tyapkin, I.A.; Tyapkin, P.; Tzamarias, S.; Ullaland, O.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallazza, E.; Van Dam, Piet; Van den Boeck, W.; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Eldik, J.; Van Lysebetten, A.; van Remortel, N.; Van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Ventura, L.; Venus, W.; Verbeure, F.; Verdier, P.; Verlato, M.; Vertogradov, L.S.; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vlasov, E.; Vodopianov, A.S.; Voulgaris, G.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Washbrook, A.J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.H.; Wilkinson, G.R.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Wolf, G.; Yi, J.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zevgolatakos, E.; Zimine, N.I.; Zintchenko, A.; Zoller, P.; Zumerle, G.; Zupan, M.

    2001-01-01

    Measurements of on-shell $ZZ$ production are described, using data collected by DELPHI in 1997 and 1998, at centre-of-mass energies $\\sqrt s$ = 182.6 GeV and 188.6 GeV respectively. Results obtained in each of the final states $q \\bar{q} q \\bar{q}$, $\\mu^+ \\mu^- q \\bar{q}$, $e^+e^- q \\bar{q}$, $\

  17. Study of proton-deuteron break-up reaction in exclusive experiment at 1 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleshin, N.P.; Belostotskij, S.L.; Dotsenko, Yu.V.

    1987-07-01

    The exclusive proton-deuteron break-up reaction pD yields ppn was studied at 1 GeV. Differential cross sections and polarizations of the final protons were measured in the range of neutron-spectator momenta 0 3 3 <0.2 GeV/c, respectively. The data obtained are well described within the framework of impulse approximation with the Paris wave function of the deuteron. (author)

  18. Preparation of Si sub 1 sub - sub x sub - sub y Ge sub x C sub y semiconductor films on Si by ion implantation and solid phase epitaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Liu Xue Qin; Zhen Cong Mian; Zhang Jing; Yang Yi; Guo Yong

    2002-01-01

    Si sub 1 sub - sub x sub - sub y Ge sub x C sub y ternary alloy semiconductor films were prepared on Si(100) substrates by C ion implanting SiGe films and subsequent solid phase epitaxy (SPE). Two-step annealing technique was employed in the SPE processing. The properties of the alloy films were determined using Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and High-resolution x-ray diffraction (HRXRD) measurements. It is shown that C atoms are located at substitutional sites and the incorporation of C relieves the compressive strain in the SiGe layer

  19. Strain relaxation during solid-phase epitaxial crystallisation of Ge{sub x}Si{sub 1-x} alloy layers with depth dependent G{sub e} compositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Wahchung; Elliman, R.G.; Kringhoj, P. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia). Research School of Physical Sciences

    1993-12-31

    The solid-phase epitaxial crystallisation of depth dependent Ge{sub x}Si{sub lx} alloy layers produced by implanting Ge into Si substrates was studied. In-situ monitoring was done using time-resolved reflectivity (TRR) whilst post-anneal defect structures were characterised by Rutherford backscattering and channeling spectrometry (RBS-C) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Particular attention was directed at Ge concentrations above the critical concentration for the growth of fully strained layers. Strain relief is shown to be correlated with a sudden reduction in crystallisation velocity caused by roughening of the crystalline/amorphous interface. 11 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs.

  20. Surface potential, charging and local current transport of individual Ge quantum dots grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singha, R.K. [Department of Physics, Visva-Bharati, Santiniketan 731235 (India); Manna, S.; Bar, R.; Das, S. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology-Kharagpur, Kharagpur 721302 (India); Ray, S.K., E-mail: physkr@phy.iitkgp.ernet.in [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology-Kharagpur, Kharagpur 721302 (India)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: We have elaborately explained the individual Ge QD charging phenomena and current transport, which is very important to understand the Ge/Si nano devices. This paper will give a flavor to properly understand these phenomena linked together along with the photocurrent mechanism which is related to the Ge/Si valence band offset. • Both the CAFM and KPFM techniques point out the functionality of doping nature of the underneath Si substrate on the aforementioned characteristics of Ge QDs. • Analysis of the surface potential mapping using KPFM technique yields an approximate valence band offset measurement which is required to understand the intra-valence transition of holes for the realization of long wavelength infrared photodetector. • KPFM and CAFM can be utilized to explore the charging/discharging phenomena of dots and their composition variations. • Current-voltage (I–V) characteristics of the individual Ge QD strongly depends on the individual QD size. • Energy band diagrams for diamond tip and Ge QD shows the higher barrier for electrons and lower barrier for holes allowing the easy tunneling for holes to dominate the transport. - Abstract: It is fundamentally important to understand the nanoscale electronic properties of a single quantum dot (QD) contrary to an ensemble of QDs. Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) and conductive atomic force microscopy (CAFM) are two important tools, which could be employed to probe surface potential, charging phenomena, and current transport mechanism of individual QD. We demonstrate the aforementioned characteristics of self-assembled Ge QDs, which was grown on Si substrates by solid source molecular beam epitaxy driven by the Stranski-Krastanov method. Study reveals that each Ge QD acts as charge storage node even at zero applied bias. The shape, size and density of QDs could be well probed by CAFM and KPFM, whereas QD facets could be better resolved by the conductive tip. The CAFM investigation

  1. Role of the SiO2 buffer layer thickness in the formation of Si/SiO2/nc-Ge/SiO2 structures by dry oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kling, A.; Ortiz, M.I.; Prieto, A.C.; Rodriguez, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Jimenez, J.; Ballesteros, C.; Soares, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    Nanomemories, containing Ge-nanoparticles in a SiO 2 matrix, can be produced by dry thermal oxidation of a SiGe layer deposited onto a Si-wafer with a barrier SiO 2 layer on its top. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry has been used to characterize the kinetics of the oxidation process, the composition profile of the growing oxide, the Ge-segregation and its diffusion into the barrier oxide in samples with thin and thick barrier oxide layers. The Ge segregated during the oxidation of the SiGe layer diffuses into the barrier oxide. In the first case the diffusion through the thin oxide is enhanced by the proximity of the substrate that acts as a sink for the Ge, resulting in the formation of a low Ge concentration SiGe layer in the surface of the Si-wafer. In the second case, the Ge-diffusion progresses as slowly as in bulk SiO 2 . Since barrier oxide layers as thin as possible are favoured for device fabrication, the structures should be oxidized at lower temperatures and the initial SiGe layer thickness reduced to minimize the Ge-diffusion

  2. Influence of the step properties on submonolayer growth of Ge and Si at the Si(111) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romanyuk, Konstantin

    2009-10-21

    The present work describes an experimental investigation of the influence of the step properties on the submonolayer growth at the Si(111) surface. In particular the influence of step properties on the morphology, shape and structural stability of 2D Si/Ge nanostructures was explored. Visualization, morphology and composition measurements of the 2D SiGe nanostructures were carried out by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The formation of Ge nanowire arrays on highly ordered kink-free Si stepped surfaces is demonstrated. The crystalline nanowires with minimal kink densities were grown using Bi surfactant mediated epitaxy. The nanowires extend over lengths larger than 1 {mu}m have a width of 4 nm. To achieve the desired growth conditions for the formation of such nanowire arrays, a modified variant of surfactant mediated epitaxy was explored. It was shown that controlling the surfactant coverage at the surface and/or at step edges modifies the growth properties of surface steps in a decisive way. The surfactant coverage at step edges can be associated with Bi passivation of the step edges. The analysis of island size distributions showed that the step edge passivation can be tuned independently by substrate temperature and by Bi rate deposition. The measurements of the island size distributions for Si and Ge in surfactant mediated growth reveal different scaling functions for different Bi deposition rates on Bi terminated Si(111) surface. The scaling function changes also with temperature. The main mechanism, which results in the difference of the scaling functions can be revealed with data of Kinetic Monte-Carlo simulations. According to the data of the Si island size distributions at different growth temperatures and different Bi deposition rates the change of SiGe island shape and preferred step directions were attributed to the change of the step edge passivation. It was shown that the change of the step edge passivation is followed by a change of the

  3. Pulse number controlled laser annealing for GeSn on insulator structure with high substitutional Sn concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moto, Kenta; Sadoh, Taizoh; Miyao, Masanobu, E-mail: miyao@ed.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Electronics, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Matsumura, Ryo [Department of Electronics, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); JSPS, 5-3-1 Kojimachi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0083 (Japan); Ikenoue, Hiroshi [Department of Gigaphoton Next GLP, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)

    2016-06-27

    Crystalline GeSn-on-insulator structures with high Sn concentration (>8%), which exceeds thermal equilibrium solid-solubility (∼2%) of Sn in Ge, are essential to achieve high-speed thin film transistors and high-efficiency optical devices. We investigate non-thermal equilibrium growth of Ge{sub 1−x}Sn{sub x} (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.2) on quartz substrates by using pulsed laser annealing (PLA). The window of laser fluence enabling complete crystallization without film ablation is drastically expanded (∼5 times) by Sn doping above 5% into Ge. Substitutional Sn concentration in grown layers is found to be increased with decreasing irradiation pulse number. This phenomenon can be explained on the basis of significant thermal non-equilibrium growth achieved by higher cooling rate after PLA with a lower pulse number. As a result, GeSn crystals with substitutional Sn concentration of ∼12% are realized at pulse irradiation of single shot for the samples with the initial Sn concentration of 15%. Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy measurements reveal the high quality of the grown layer. This technique will be useful to fabricate high-speed thin film transistors and high-efficiency optical devices on insulating substrates.

  4. Coating of substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cairns, J.A.; Nelson, R.L.; Woodhead, J.L.

    1979-01-01

    The process is concerned with providing substrates with coatings obtainable from sols, for example to protect the substrate (such as in nuclear reactors or hydrocarbon cracking plant) or to provide a carrier for catalytically active material. Hitherto, coatings obtained from sols have had a high porosity and high surface area so that they have not been entirely satisfactory for the above applications. In the process described, dense, low-porosity coatings are provided by contacting the substrate with a sol of refractory material (e.g. CeO 2 or SiO 2 ) convertible to a gel of density at least 40% of the theoretical density of the refractory material, and converting the sol to the gel. Optionally, the gel may be converted to a ceramic coating by firing. (author)

  5. Pseudomorphic GeSiSn, SiSn and Ge layers in strained heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeev, V. A.; Nikiforov, A. I.; Tuktamyshev, A. R.; Mashanov, V. I.; Loshkarev, I. D.; Bloshkin, A. A.; Gutakovskii, A. K.

    2018-04-01

    The GeSiSn, SiSn layer growth mechanisms on Si(100) were investigated and the kinetic diagrams of the morphological GeSiSn, SiSn film states in the temperature range of 150 °C-450 °C at the tin content from 0% to 35% were built. The phase diagram of the superstructural change on the surface of Sn grown on Si(100) in the annealing temperature range of 0 °C-850 °C was established. The specular beam oscillations were first obtained during the SiSn film growth from 150 °C to 300 °C at the Sn content up to 35%. The transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffractometry data confirm the crystal perfection and the pseudomorphic GeSiSn, SiSn film state, and also the presence of smooth heterointerfaces between GeSiSn or SiSn and Si. The photoluminescence for the multilayer periodic GeSiSn/Si structures in the range of 0.6-0.8 eV was detected. The blue shift with the excitation power increase is observed suggesting the presence of a type II heterostructure. The creation of tensile strained Ge films, which are pseudomorphic to the underlying GeSn layer, is confirmed by the results of the formation and analysis of the reciprocal space map in the x-ray diffractometry. The tensile strain in the Ge films reached the value in the range of 0.86%-1.5%. The GeSn buffer layer growth in the Sn content range from 8% to 12% was studied. The band structure of heterosystems based on pseudomorphic GeSiSn, SiSn and Ge layers was calculated and the valence and conduction band subband position dependences on the Sn content were built. Based on the calculation, the Sn content range in the GeSiSn, SiSn, and GeSn layers, which corresponds to the direct bandgap GeSiSn, SiSn, and Ge material, was obtained.

  6. Robust plasmonic substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kostiučenko, Oksana; Fiutowski, Jacek; Tamulevicius, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Robustness is a key issue for the applications of plasmonic substrates such as tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, surface-enhanced spectroscopies, enhanced optical biosensing, optical and optoelectronic plasmonic nanosensors and others. A novel approach for the fabrication of robust plasmonic...... substrates is presented, which relies on the coverage of gold nanostructures with diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin films of thicknesses 25, 55 and 105 nm. DLC thin films were grown by direct hydrocarbon ion beam deposition. In order to find the optimum balance between optical and mechanical properties...

  7. Substrate mediated enzyme prodrug therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betina Fejerskov

    Full Text Available In this report, we detail Substrate Mediated Enzyme Prodrug Therapy (SMEPT as a novel approach in drug delivery which relies on enzyme-functionalized cell culture substrates to achieve a localized conversion of benign prodrug(s into active therapeutics with subsequent delivery to adhering cells or adjacent tissues. For proof-of-concept SMEPT, we use surface adhered micro-structured physical hydrogels based on poly(vinyl alcohol, β-glucuronidase enzyme and glucuronide prodrugs. We demonstrate enzymatic activity mediated by the assembled hydrogel samples and illustrate arms of control over rate of release of model fluorescent cargo. SMEPT was not impaired by adhering cells and afforded facile time - and dose - dependent uptake of the in situ generated fluorescent cargo by hepatic cells, HepG2. With the use of a glucuronide derivative of an anticancer drug, SN-38, SMEPT afforded a decrease in cell viability to a level similar to that achieved using parent drug. Finally, dose response was achieved using SMEPT and administration of judiciously chosen concentration of SN-38 glucuronide prodrug thus revealing external control over drug delivery using drug eluting surface. We believe that this highly adaptable concept will find use in diverse biomedical applications, specifically surface mediated drug delivery and tissue engineering.

  8. Physical characterization of Cu{sub 2}ZnGeSe{sub 4} thin films from annealing of Cu-Zn-Ge precursor layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buffière, M., E-mail: buffiere@imec.be [Imec—Partner in Solliance, Leuven (Belgium); Department of Electrical Engineering (ESAT), KU Leuven, Heverlee (Belgium); ElAnzeery, H. [Imec—Partner in Solliance, Leuven (Belgium); KACST-Intel Consortium Center of Excellence in Nano-manufacturing Applications (CENA), Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Microelectronics System Design department, Nile University, Cairo (Egypt); Oueslati, S.; Ben Messaoud, K. [Imec—Partner in Solliance, Leuven (Belgium); KACST-Intel Consortium Center of Excellence in Nano-manufacturing Applications (CENA), Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences of Tunis, El Manar (Tunisia); Brammertz, G.; Meuris, M. [Imec Division IMOMEC — Partner in Solliance, Diepenbeek (Belgium); Institute for Material Research (IMO) Hasselt University, Diepenbeek (Belgium); Poortmans, J. [Imec—Partner in Solliance, Leuven (Belgium); Department of Electrical Engineering (ESAT), KU Leuven, Heverlee (Belgium)

    2015-05-01

    Cu{sub 2}ZnGeSe{sub 4} (CZGeSe) can be considered as a potential alternative for wide band gap thin film devices. In this work, CZGeSe thin films were deposited on Mo-coated soda lime glass substrates by sequential deposition of sputtered Cu, Zn and e-beam evaporated Ge layers from elemental targets followed by annealing at high temperature using H{sub 2}Se gas. We report on the effect of the precursor stack order and composition and the impact of the annealing temperature on the physical properties of CZGeSe thin films. The optimal layer morphology was obtained when using a Mo/Cu/Zn/Ge precursor stack annealed at 460 °C. We have observed that the formation of secondary phases such as ZnSe can be prevented by tuning the initial composition of the stack, the stack order and the annealing conditions. This synthesis process allows synthesizing CZGeSe absorber with an optical band gap of 1.5 eV. - Highlights: • Cu{sub 2}ZnGeSe{sub 4} (CZGeSe) thin films were deposited using a two-step process. • CZGeSe dense layers were obtained using a Mo/Cu/Zn/Ge precursor annealed at 460 °C. • Formation of ZnSe can be avoided by tuning the composition and order of the initial stack. • P-type CZGeSe absorber with an optical band gap of 1.5 eV was obtained.

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Ge V and Ge VI oscillator strengths (Rauch+, 2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauch, T.; Werner, K.; Biemont, E.; Quinet, P.; Kruk, J. W.

    2012-08-01

    Calculated HFR oscillator strengths (log gf) and transition probabilities (gA, in 1/s) in Ge V (table2.dat) and Ge VI (table4.dat). CF is the cancellation factor as defined by Cowan (1981, 1981tass.book.....C). In columns 3 and 6, e is written for even and o for odd. (2 data files).

  10. Compton profile study of V3Ge and Cr3Ge

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this paper the results of a Compton profile study of two polycrystalline. A15 compounds, namely, V3Ge and Cr3Ge, have been reported. The measurements have been performed using 59.54 keV γ-rays from an 241Am source. The theoretical Compton profiles have been computed for both the compounds using ...

  11. Mobility-limiting mechanisms in single and dual channel strained Si/SiGe MOSFETs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, S.H.; Dobrosz, P.; Escobedo-Cousin, E.; Bull, S.J.; O'Neill, A.G.

    2005-01-01

    Dual channel strained Si/SiGe CMOS architectures currently receive great attention due to maximum performance benefits being predicted for both n- and p-channel MOSFETs. Epitaxial growth of a compressively strained SiGe layer followed by tensile strained Si can create a high mobility buried hole channel and a high mobility surface electron channel on a single relaxed SiGe virtual substrate. However, dual channel n-MOSFETs fabricated using a high thermal budget exhibit compromised mobility enhancements compared with single channel devices, in which both electron and hole channels form in strained Si. This paper investigates the mobility-limiting mechanisms of dual channel structures. The first evidence of increased interface roughness due to the introduction of compressively strained SiGe below the tensile strained Si channel is presented. Interface corrugations degrade electron mobility in the strained Si. Roughness measurements have been carried out using AFM and TEM. Filtering AFM images allowed roughness at wavelengths pertinent to carrier transport to be studied and the results are in agreement with electrical data. Furthermore, the first comparison of strain measurements in the surface channels of single and dual channel architectures is presented. Raman spectroscopy has been used to study channel strain both before and after processing and indicates that there is no impact of the buried SiGe layer on surface macrostrain. The results provide further evidence that the improved performance of the single channel devices fabricated using a high thermal budget arises from improved surface roughness and reduced Ge diffusion into the Si channel

  12. Vibrational dynamics and band structure of methyl-terminated Ge(111)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    th Street, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States))" data-affiliation=" (The James Franck Institute and Department of Chemistry, The University of Chicago, 929 E. 57th Street, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States))" >Hund, Zachary M.; th Street, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States))" data-affiliation=" (The James Franck Institute and Department of Chemistry, The University of Chicago, 929 E. 57th Street, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States))" >Nihill, Kevin J.; th Street, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States))" data-affiliation=" (The James Franck Institute and Department of Chemistry, The University of Chicago, 929 E. 57th Street, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States))" >Sibener, S. J.; Campi, Davide; Bernasconi, M.; Wong, Keith T.; Lewis, Nathan S.; Benedek, G.

    2015-01-01

    A combined synthesis, experiment, and theory approach, using elastic and inelastic helium atom scattering along with ab initio density functional perturbation theory, has been used to investigate the vibrational dynamics and band structure of a recently synthesized organic-functionalized semiconductor interface. Specifically, the thermal properties and lattice dynamics of the underlying Ge(111) semiconductor crystal in the presence of a commensurate (1 × 1) methyl adlayer were defined for atomically flat methylated Ge(111) surfaces. The mean-square atomic displacements were evaluated by analysis of the thermal attenuation of the elastic He diffraction intensities using the Debye-Waller model, revealing an interface with hybrid characteristics. The methyl adlayer vibrational modes are coupled with the Ge(111) substrate, resulting in significantly softer in-plane motion relative to rigid motion in the surface normal. Inelastic helium time-of-flight measurements revealed the excitations of the Rayleigh wave across the surface Brillouin zone, and such measurements were in agreement with the dispersion curves that were produced using density functional perturbation theory. The dispersion relations for H-Ge(111) indicated that a deviation in energy and lineshape for the Rayleigh wave was present along the nearest-neighbor direction. The effects of mass loading, as determined by calculations for CD 3 -Ge(111), as well as by force constants, were less significant than the hybridization between the Rayleigh wave and methyl adlayer librations. The presence of mutually similar hybridization effects for CH 3 -Ge(111) and CH 3 -Si(111) surfaces extends the understanding of the relationship between the vibrational dynamics and the band structure of various semiconductor surfaces that have been functionalized with organic overlayers

  13. Vibrational dynamics and band structure of methyl-terminated Ge(111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hund, Zachary M.; Nihill, Kevin J.; Sibener, S. J., E-mail: s-sibener@uchicago.edu [The James Franck Institute and Department of Chemistry, The University of Chicago, 929 E. 57" t" h Street, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Campi, Davide; Bernasconi, M. [Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Universita di Milano-Bicocca, Via Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano (Italy); Wong, Keith T.; Lewis, Nathan S. [Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Beckman Institute and Kavli Nanoscience Institute, California Institute of Technology, 210 Noyes Laboratory, 127-72, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Benedek, G. [Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Universita di Milano-Bicocca, Via Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano (Italy); Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), Universidad del País Vasco (EHU), 20018 Donostia/San Sebastian (Spain)

    2015-09-28

    A combined synthesis, experiment, and theory approach, using elastic and inelastic helium atom scattering along with ab initio density functional perturbation theory, has been used to investigate the vibrational dynamics and band structure of a recently synthesized organic-functionalized semiconductor interface. Specifically, the thermal properties and lattice dynamics of the underlying Ge(111) semiconductor crystal in the presence of a commensurate (1 × 1) methyl adlayer were defined for atomically flat methylated Ge(111) surfaces. The mean-square atomic displacements were evaluated by analysis of the thermal attenuation of the elastic He diffraction intensities using the Debye-Waller model, revealing an interface with hybrid characteristics. The methyl adlayer vibrational modes are coupled with the Ge(111) substrate, resulting in significantly softer in-plane motion relative to rigid motion in the surface normal. Inelastic helium time-of-flight measurements revealed the excitations of the Rayleigh wave across the surface Brillouin zone, and such measurements were in agreement with the dispersion curves that were produced using density functional perturbation theory. The dispersion relations for H-Ge(111) indicated that a deviation in energy and lineshape for the Rayleigh wave was present along the nearest-neighbor direction. The effects of mass loading, as determined by calculations for CD{sub 3}-Ge(111), as well as by force constants, were less significant than the hybridization between the Rayleigh wave and methyl adlayer librations. The presence of mutually similar hybridization effects for CH{sub 3}-Ge(111) and CH{sub 3}-Si(111) surfaces extends the understanding of the relationship between the vibrational dynamics and the band structure of various semiconductor surfaces that have been functionalized with organic overlayers.

  14. Directional growth of Ge on GaAs at 175 deg. C using plasma-generated nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Erik V.; Roca i Cabarrocas, Pere; Patriarche, Gilles

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate the directional growth of Ge on a GaAs (100) wafer at 175 deg. C using radio-frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition at 13.56 MHz under conditions where nanocrystals are the primary contributors to film growth. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) verifies the transport of plasma-formed nanocrystals to the substrate surface where they are initially mobile. Furthermore, cross-sectional HRTEM images show directional growth on the GaAs wafer, wherein the incident Ge nanocrystals have adopted the orientation of the underlying lattice

  15. Multiple alternative substrate kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Vernon E

    2015-11-01

    The specificity of enzymes for their respective substrates has been a focal point of enzyme kinetics since the initial characterization of metabolic chemistry. Various processes to quantify an enzyme's specificity using kinetics have been utilized over the decades. Fersht's definition of the ratio kcat/Km for two different substrates as the "specificity constant" (ref [7]), based on the premise that the important specificity existed when the substrates were competing in the same reaction, has become a consensus standard for enzymes obeying Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The expansion of the theory for the determination of the relative specificity constants for a very large number of competing substrates, e.g. those present in a combinatorial library, in a single reaction mixture has been developed in this contribution. The ratio of kcat/Km for isotopologs has also become a standard in mechanistic enzymology where kinetic isotope effects have been measured by the development of internal competition experiments with extreme precision. This contribution extends the theory of kinetic isotope effects to internal competition between three isotopologs present at non-tracer concentrations in the same reaction mix. This article is part of a special issue titled: Enzyme Transition States from Theory and Experiment. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Enhanced formation of Ge nanocrystals in Ge : SiO2 layers by swift heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonova, I V; Volodin, V A; Marin, D M; Skuratov, V A; Smagulova, S A; Janse van Vuuren, A; Neethling, J; Jedrzejewski, J; Balberg, I

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we report the ability of swift heavy Xe ions with an energy of 480 MeV and a fluence of 10 12 cm -2 to enhance the formation of Ge nanocrystals within SiO 2 layers with variable Ge contents. These Ge-SiO 2 films were fabricated by the co-sputtering of Ge and quartz sources which followed various annealing procedures. In particular, we found that the irradiation of the Ge : SiO 2 films with subsequent annealing at 500 °C leads to the formation of a high concentration of nanocrystals (NCs) with a size of 2-5 nm, whereas without irradiation only amorphous inclusions were observed. This effect, as evidenced by Raman spectra, is enhanced by pre-irradiation at 550 °C and post-irradiation annealing at 600 °C, which also leads to the observation of room temperature visible photoluminescence. (paper)

  17. Structure of GeSe4-In and GeSe5-In glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaban, I.; Jóvári, P.; Petkova, T.; Petkov, P.; Stoilova, A.; Hoyer, W.; Beuneu, B.

    2010-10-01

    (Ge0.2Se0.8)100 - xInx and (Ge0.17Se0.83)100 - xInx (x = 0, 5, 10, 15 at.%) chalcogenide glasses have been studied with high-energy x-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction and extended x-ray absorption spectroscopy at Ge, Se and In K-edges. The experimental data were modelled simultaneously with the reverse Monte Carlo simulation method. GeSe4/2 tetrahedra are shown to be the main structural units in the binary and ternary glasses investigated. Indium bonds to the excess Se atoms in the ternary Ge-Se-In glasses. While the majority of In atoms have three Se neighbours, some In atoms may be tetrahedrally coordinated by Se.

  18. Lateral photoconductivity of multilayer Ge/Si structures with Ge quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talochkin, A. B.; Chistokhin, I. B.; Markov, V. A.

    2009-01-01

    Spectra of lateral photoconductivity of multilayer Ge/Si structures with Ge quantum dots, fabricated by molecular-beam epitaxy are studied. The photoresponse caused by optical transitions between hole levels of quantum dots and Si electronic states was observed in the energy range of 1.1-0.3 eV at T = 78 K. It was shown that the electronic states localized in the region of Si band bending near the Ge/Si interface mainly contribute to lateral photoconductivity. The use of the quantum box model for describing hole levels of quantum dots made it possible to understand the origin of peaks observed in the photoconductivity spectra. A detailed energy-level diagram of hole levels of quantum dots and optical transitions in Ge/Si structures with strained Ge quantum dots was constructed.

  19. Investigation of structural and electrical properties on substrate material for high frequency metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, M.; Yang, Sung-Hyun; Janardhan Reddy, K.; JagadeeshChandra, S. V.

    2017-04-01

    Hafnium oxide (HfO2) thin films were grown on cleaned P-type Ge and Si substrates by using atomic layer deposition technique (ALD) with thickness of 8 nm. The composition analysis of as-deposited and annealed HfO2 films was characterized by XPS, further electrical measurements; we fabricated the metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) devices with Pt electrode. Post deposition annealing in O2 ambient at 500 °C for 30 min was carried out on both Ge and Si devices. Capacitance-voltage (C-V) and conductance-voltage (G-V) curves measured at 1 MHz. The Ge MOS devices showed improved interfacial and electrical properties, high dielectric constant (~19), smaller EOT value (0.7 nm), and smaller D it value as Si MOS devices. The C-V curves shown significantly high accumulation capacitance values from Ge devices, relatively when compare with the Si MOS devices before and after annealing. It could be due to the presence of very thin interfacial layer at HfO2/Ge stacks than HfO2/Si stacks conformed by the HRTEM images. Besides, from current-voltage (I-V) curves of the Ge devices exhibited similar leakage current as Si devices. Therefore, Ge might be a reliable substrate material for structural, electrical and high frequency applications.

  20. Genetic-Algorithm Discovery of a Direct-Gap and Optically Allowed Superstructure from Indirect-Gap Si and Ge Semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    d' Avezac, M.; Luo, J. W.; Chanier, T.; Zunger, A.

    2012-01-13

    Combining two indirect-gap materials - with different electronic and optical gaps - to create a direct gap material represents an ongoing theoretical challenge with potentially rewarding practical implications, such as optoelectronics integration on a single wafer. We provide an unexpected solution to this classic problem, by spatially melding two indirect-gap materials (Si and Ge) into one strongly dipole-allowed direct-gap material. We leverage a combination of genetic algorithms with a pseudopotential Hamiltonian to search through the astronomic number of variants of Si{sub n}/Ge{sub m}/.../Si{sub p}/Ge{sub q} superstructures grown on (001) Si{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x}. The search reveals a robust configurational motif - SiGe{sub 2}Si{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}SiGe{sub n} on (001) Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1-x} substrate (x {le} 0.4) presenting a direct and dipole-allowed gap resulting from an enhanced {Gamma}-X coupling at the band edges.

  1. Study of Z Pair Production and Anomalous Couplings in $e^+ e^-$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ between 190 GeV and 209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Amaral, P.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Buesser, K.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Carnegie, R.K.; Caron, B.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Furtjes, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Harin-Dirac, M.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Hensel, C.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Horvath, D.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karapetian, G.; Karlen, D.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klein, K.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kormos, Laura L.; Kramer, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kruger, K.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Layter, J.G.; Leins, A.; Lellouch, D.; Lettso, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, J.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Martin, A.J.; Masetti, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.J.; McKenna, J.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Moed, S.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Nanjo, H.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Okpara, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Rick, H.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Taylor, R.J.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Vertesi, R.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Waller, D.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Warsinsky, M.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, D.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2003-01-01

    A study of Z-boson pair production in e+e- annihilation at center-of-mass energies between 190 GeV and 209 GeV is reported. Final states containing only leptons, (l+l-l+l- and l+l-nn), quark and lepton pairs, (qql+l-, qqnn) and only hadrons (qqqq) are considered. In all states with at least one Z boson decaying hadronically, lifetime, lepton and event-shape tags are used to separate bb pairs from qq final state. Limits on anomalous ZZgamma and ZZZ couplings are derived from the measured cross sections and from event kinematics using an optimal observable method. Limits on low scale gravity with large dimensions are derived from the cross sections and their dependence on polar angle.

  2. Optical spectroscopy study of c(4 x 2) Ge (001)-surfaces, covered with atomic Au wires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bass, Utz; Meyer, Sebastian; Schaefer, Joerg; Geurts, Jean [Universitaet Wuerzburg, Physikalisches Institut, Am Hubland, 97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); Speiser, Eugen; Esser, Norbert [ISAS, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 9, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Novel quasi-1D systems like e.g. atomic gold chains on a c(4x2) reconstructed Ge(001)-surfaces enable the investigation of 1D-effects like the possible occurrence of the Luttinger- to Fermi liquid transition. As there is a crucial interplay of the lattice vibrations and the electrical and structural properties on such sensitive systems, phonon dynamics are in the focus of this work. The phonons were addressed by Raman spectroscopy and reveal a clear change from the Ge-oxide layer to the final surface with Au-nano wires. Thermally deoxidizing the Ge-surface under UHV leads to a distinct low-frequency vibration around 65cm-1. Its frequency range and its persistence after Gold deposition in the submonolayer range indicate that this signal is surface related. Additionally, the surface-induced anisotropy of the optical reflectance was complementary investigated by Reflectance-Anisotropy-Spectroscopy (RAS) and IR-ellipsometry.

  3. Understanding the growth mechanism of graphene on Ge/Si(001) surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabrowski, J.; Lippert, G.; Avila, J.; Baringhaus, J.; Colambo, I.; Dedkov, Yu S.; Herziger, F.; Lupina, G.; Maultzsch, J.; Schaffus, T.; Schroeder, T.; Kot, M.; Tegenkamp, C.; Vignaud, D.; Asensio, M.-C.

    2016-01-01

    The practical difficulties to use graphene in microelectronics and optoelectronics is that the available methods to grow graphene are not easily integrated in the mainstream technologies. A growth method that could overcome at least some of these problems is chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of graphene directly on semiconducting (Si or Ge) substrates. Here we report on the comparison of the CVD and molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth of graphene on the technologically relevant Ge(001)/Si(001) substrate from ethene (C2H4) precursor and describe the physical properties of the films as well as we discuss the surface reaction and diffusion processes that may be responsible for the observed behavior. Using nano angle resolved photoemission (nanoARPES) complemented by transport studies and Raman spectroscopy as well as density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we report the direct observation of massless Dirac particles in monolayer graphene, providing a comprehensive mapping of their low-hole doped Dirac electron bands. The micrometric graphene flakes are oriented along two predominant directions rotated by 30° with respect to each other. The growth mode is attributed to the mechanism when small graphene “molecules” nucleate on the Ge(001) surface and it is found that hydrogen plays a significant role in this process. PMID:27531322

  4. Far-infrared study of superconducting MoGe thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashiro, H.; Graybeal, J. M.; Tanner, D. B.; Carr, G. L.

    2003-03-01

    Amorphous MoGe serves as a model system for studying the interplay between superconductivity and disorder [Phys. Rev. B 29, 4167 (1984)]. Thin films of α-MoGe, prepared by UHV co-sputtering onto sapphire substrates (with an α-Ge buffer layer), show progressively reduced T_c's as the thickness is decreased below 30 nm and the sheet resistance exceeds 100 Ω/sq. This suppression has been explained in terms of electron localization effects and reduced screening (i.e., an increase in μ^*, the renormalized Coulomb interaction parameter). We have measured the far-infrared transmission and reflection for a set of α-MoGe films to understand more fully this weakened superconducting state. Our results show the presence of an energy gap consistent with BCS theory and 2Δ/kTc near the BCS weak coupling limit of 3.5. We report a detailed analysis using the Mattis-Bardeen expressions for the optical conductivity, and possible deviations from these expressions, due to the localization, will be discussed. Funded by DOE contracts DE-FG02-02ER45984 at UF and DE-AC02-98CH10886 at BNL.

  5. Study of Si-Ge interdiffusion with phosphorus doping

    KAUST Repository

    Cai, Feiyang

    2016-10-28

    Si-Ge interdiffusion with phosphorus doping was investigated by both experiments and modeling. Ge/Si1-x Ge x/Ge multi-layer structures with 0.75Ge<1, a mid-1018 to low-1019 cm−3 P doping, and a dislocation density of 108 to 109 cm−2 range were studied. The P-doped sample shows an accelerated Si-Ge interdiffusivity, which is 2–8 times of that of the undoped sample. The doping dependence of the Si-Ge interdiffusion was modelled by a Fermi-enhancement factor. The results show that the Si-Ge interdiffusion coefficient is proportional to n2/n2i for the conditions studied, which indicates that the interdiffusion in a high Ge fraction range with n-type doping is dominated by V2− defects. The Fermi-enhancement factor was shown to have a relatively weak dependence on the temperature and the Ge fraction. The results are relevant to the structure and thermal processing condition design of n-type doped Ge/Si and Ge/SiGe based devices such as Ge/Si lasers.

  6. The fabrication and application of patterned Si(001) substrates with ordered pits via nanosphere lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Peixuan; Fan Yongliang; Zhong Zhenyang

    2009-01-01

    A new scalable approach has been developed for fabricating large-scale pit patterns with controllable periodicity on Si(001) substrates. The fabrication processes start with self-assembling a monolayer of polystyrene (PS) spheres on hydrogenated Si(001) substrates. A novel net-like mask in combination of the Au pattern thermally evaporated in between the PS spheres and the Au-catalyzed SiO 2 around them is naturally formed. After selective etching of Si by KOH solution, two-dimensionally ordered pits with a periodicity equal to the diameter of the PS spheres in the range from micrometers to less than 100 nm can be obtained. The shape of the pits can be modulated by controlling the chemical etching time. Such pit-patterned Si substrates facilitate the formation of ordered Si-based nanostructures, such as ordered self-assembled GeSi quantum dots, by deposition of Ge using molecular beam epitaxy.

  7. Mechanical characterization of poly-SiGe layers for CMOS–MEMS integrated application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modlinski, Robert; Witvrouw, Ann; Verbist, Agnes; De Wolf, Ingrid; Puers, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Measuring mechanical properties at the microscale is essential to understand and to fabricate reliable MEMS. In this paper a tensile testing system and matching microscale test samples are presented. The test samples have a dog-bone-like structure. They are designed to mimic standard macro-tensile test samples. The micro-tensile tests are used to characterize 0.9 µm thick polycrystalline silicon germanium (poly-SiGe) films. The poly-SiGe film, that can be considered as a close equivalent to polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si), is studied as a very promising material for use in CMOS/MEMS integration in a single chip due to its low-temperature LPCVD deposition (T < 450 °C). The fabrication process of the poly-SiGe micro-tensile test structure is explained in detail: the design, the processing and post-processing, the testing and finally the results' discussion. The poly-SiGe micro-tensile results are also compared with nanoindentation data obtained on the same poly-SiGe films as well as with results obtained by other research groups

  8. GE will finance 614-MW cogeneration plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    The General Electric Power Funding Corporation, a unit of GE Capital, will provide up to $870 million in construction and permanent financing, and letters of credit to Cogen Technologies of Houston, Texas. The agreement will fund the construction of a 614-megawatt (MW), combined-cycle cogeneration plant to be built in Linden, New Jersey, and for the purchase of gas properties. The plant will be owned by Cogen Technologies. The financing is one of the largest packages ever for a cogeneration plant, GE said

  9. Phase diagram of the Ge-rich of the Ba–Ge system and characterisation of single-phase BaGe{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prokofieva, Violetta K.; Pavlova, Lydia M., E-mail: fhim@mail.ru

    2014-06-25

    Highlights: • The Ba-Ge phase diagram for the range 50–100 at.% Ge was constructed. • Single-phase BaGe{sub 4} grown by the Czochralski method was characterised. • A phenomenological model for a liquid-liquid phase transition is proposed. - Abstract: The Ba–Ge binary system has been investigated by several authors, but some uncertainties remain regarding phases with Ba/Ge ⩽ 2. The goal of this work was to resolve the uncertainty about the current phase diagram of Ba–Ge by performing DTA, X-ray powder diffraction, metallographic and chemical analyses, and measurements of the electrical conductivity and viscosity. The experimental Ba–Ge phase diagram over the composition range of 50–100 at.% Ge was constructed from the cooling curves and single-phase BaGe{sub 4} grown by the Czochralski crystal pulling method was characterised. Semiconducting BaGe{sub 4} crystallised peritectically from the liquid phase near the eutectic. In the liquid state, the caloric effects were observed in the DTA curves at 1050 °C where there are no definite phase lines in the Ba–Ge phase diagram. These effects are confirmed by significant changes in the viscosity and electrical conductivity of a Ba–Ge alloy with eutectic composition at this temperature. A phenomenological model based on two different approaches, a phase approach and a chemical approach, is proposed to explain the isothermal liquid–liquid phase transition observed in the Ba–Ge system from the Ge side. Our results suggest that this transition is due to the peritectic reactions in the liquid phase. This reversible phase transition results in the formation of precursors of various metastable clathrate phases and is associated with sudden changes in the structure of Ba–Ge liquid alloys. Characteristics of both first- and second-order phase transitions are observed. Charge transfer appears to play an important role in this transition.

  10. Ultra-smooth epitaxial Ge grown on Si(001) utilizing a thin C-doped Ge buffer layer

    KAUST Repository

    Mantey, J.

    2013-01-01

    Here, we present work on epitaxial Ge films grown on a thin buffer layer of C doped Ge (Ge:C). The growth rate of Ge:C is found to slow over time and is thus unsuitable for thick (>20 nm) layers. We demonstrate Ge films from 10 nm to >150 nm are possible by growing pure Ge on a thin Ge:C buffer. It is shown that this stack yields exceedingly low roughness levels (comparable to bulk Si wafers) and contains fewer defects and higher Hall mobility compared to traditional heteroepitaxial Ge. The addition of C at the interface helps reduce strain by its smaller atomic radius and its ability to pin defects within the thin buffer layer that do not thread to the top Ge layer. © 2013 AIP Publishing LLC.

  11. Precision measurements of g1 of the proton and the deuteron with 6 GeV electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prok, Yelena; Bosted, Peter; Kvaltine, Nicholas; Adhikari, Krishna; Adikaram-Mudiyanselage, Dasuni; Aghasyan, Mher; Amaryan, Moskov; Anderson, Mark; Anefalos Pereira, Sergio; Avagyan, Harutyun; Baghdasaryan, Hovhannes; Ball, Jacques; Baltzell, Nathan; Battaglieri, Marco; Biselli, Angela; Bono, Jason; Briscoe, William; Brock, Joseph; Brooks, William; Bueltmann, Stephen; Burkert, Volker; Carlin, Christopher; Carman, Daniel; Celentano, Andrea; Chandavar, Shloka; Colaneri, Luca; Cole, Philip; Contalbrigo, Marco; Cortes, Olga; Crabb, Donald; Crede, Volker; D' Angelo, Annalisa; Dashyan, Natalya; De Vita, Raffaella; De Sanctis, Enzo; Deur, Alexandre; Djalali, Chaden; Dodge, Gail; Doughty, David; Dupre, Raphael; El Alaoui, Ahmed; El Fassi, Lamiaa; Elouadrhiri, Latifa; Fedotov, Gleb; Fegan, Stuart; Fersch, Robert; Fleming, Jamie; Forest, Tony; Garcon, Michel; Gevorgyan, Nerses; Ghandilyan, Yeranuhi; Gilfoyle, Gerard; Girod-Gard, Francois-Xavier; Giovanetti, Kevin; Goetz, John; Gohn, Wesley; Gothe, Ralf; Griffioen, Keith; Guegan, Baptiste; Guler, Nevzat; Hafidi, Kawtar; Hanretty, Charles; Harrison, Nathan; Hattawy, Mohammad; Hicks, Kenneth; Ho, Dao; Holtrop, Maurik; Ilieva, Yordanka; Ireland, David; Ishkhanov, Boris; Isupov, Evgeny; Jawalkar, Sucheta; Jiang, Xiaodong; Jo, Hyon-Suk; Joo, Kyungseon; Kalantarians, Narbe; Keith, Christopher; Keller, Daniel; Khandaker, Mahbubul; Kim, Andrey; Kim, Wooyoung; Klein, Andreas; Klein, Franz; Koirala, Suman; Kubarovsky, Valery; Kuhn, Sebastian; Kuleshov, Sergey; Lenisa, Paolo; Livingston, Kenneth; Lu, Haiyun; MacGregor, Ian; Markov, Nikolai; Mayer, Michael; McKinnon, Bryan; Meekins, David; Mineeva, Taisiya; Mirazita, Marco; Mokeev, Viktor; Montgomery, Rachel; MOUTARDE, Herve; Movsisyan, Aram; Munevar Espitia, Edwin; Munoz Camacho, Carlos; Nadel-Turonski, Pawel; Niccolai, Silvia; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria; Osipenko, Mikhail; Ostrovidov, Alexander; Pappalardo, Luciano; Paremuzyan, Rafayel; Park, K; Peng, Peng; Phillips, J J; Pierce, Joshua; Pisano, Silvia; Pogorelko, Oleg; Pozdniakov, Serguei; Price, John; Procureur, Sebastien; Protopopescu, Dan; Puckett, Andrew; Raue, Brian; Rimal, Dipak; Ripani, Marco; Rizzo, Alessandro; Rosner, Guenther; Rossi, Patrizia; Roy, Priyashree; Sabatie, Franck; Saini, Mukesh; Salgado, Carlos; Schott, Diane; Schumacher, Reinhard; Seder, Erin; Sharabian, Youri; Simonyan, Ani; Smith, Claude; Smith, Gregory; Sober, Daniel; Sokhan, Daria; Stepanyan, Stepan; Stepanyan, Samuel; Strakovski, Igor; Strauch, Steffen; Sytnik, Valeriy; Taiuti, Mauro; Tang, Wei; Tkachenko, Svyatoslav; Ungaro, Maurizio; Vernarsky, Brian; Vlasov, Alexander; Voskanyan, Hakob; Voutier, Eric; Walford, Natalie; Watts, Daniel; Weinstein, Lawrence; Zachariou, Nicholas; Zana, Lorenzo; Zhang, Jixie; Zhao, Bo; Zhao, Zhiwen; Zonta, Irene

    2014-08-01

    The inclusive polarized structure functions of the proton and deuteron, g1p and g1d, were measured with high statistical precision using polarized 6 GeV electrons incident on a polarized ammonia target in Hall B at Jefferson Laboratory. Electrons scattered at lab angles between 18 and 45 degrees were detected using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). For the usual DIS kinematics, Q^2>1 GeV^2 and the final-state invariant mass W>2 GeV, the ratio of polarized to unpolarized structure functions g1/F1 is found to be nearly independent of Q^2 at fixed x. Significant resonant structure is apparent at values of W up to 2.3 GeV. In the framework of perturbative QCD, the high-W results can be used to better constrain the polarization of quarks and gluons in the nucleon, as well as high-twist contributions.

  12. A Composite Structure of Cu3Ge/Ge/C Anode Promise Better Rate Property for Lithium Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jianwen; Li, Xiaona; Hou, Zhiguo; Jiang, Jun; Hu, Lei; Zhang, Wanqun; Zhu, Yongchun; Qian, Yitai

    2016-11-01

    Much effort has been made to search for high energy and high power density electrode materials for lithium ion batteries. Here, a composite structure among Ge, C and Cu3Ge in Cu3Ge/Ge/C materials with a high rate performance of lithium batteries has been reported. Such Cu3Ge/Ge/C composite is synthesized through the in-situ formation of Ge, C and Cu3Ge by one-pot reaction. Density function theory (DFT) calculations and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) suggest a higher electron mobility of the hibrid Cu3Ge/Ge/C composites through the in-situ preparation. As a result, remarkable charge rate over 300 C (fast delithiated capability) and outstanding cycling stability (≈0.02% capacity decay per cycle for 500 cycles at 0.5 C) are achieved for the Cu3Ge/Ge/C composites anode. These Cu3Ge/Ge/C composites demonstrate another perspective to explore the energy storage materials and should provide a new pathway for the design of advanced electrode materials. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph H. Simmons; Tracie J. Bukowski

    2002-08-07

    This grant was a continuation of research conducted at the University of Florida under Grant No. DE-FG05-91ER45462 in which we investigated the energy bandgap shifts produced in semiconductor quantum dots of sizes between 1.5 and 40 nm. The investigated semiconductors consisted of a series of Column 2-6 compounds (CdS, CdSe, CdTe) and pure Column IV elements (Si and Ge). It is well-known of course that the 2-6 semiconductors possess a direct-gap electronic structure, while the Column IV elements possess an indirect-gap structure. The investigation showed a major difference in quantum confinement behavior between the two sets of semiconductors. This difference is essentially associated with the change in bandgap energy resulting from size confinement. In the direct-gap semiconductors, the change in energy (blue shift) saturates when the crystals approach 2-3 nm in diameter. This limits the observed shift in energy to less than 1 eV above the bulk value. In the indirect-gap semiconductors, the energy shift does not show any sign of saturation and in fact, we produced Si and Ge nanocrystals with absorption edges in the UV. The reason for this difference has not been determined and will require additional experimental and theoretical studies. In our work, we suggest, but do not prove that mixing of conduction band side valleys with the central valley under conditions of size confinement may be responsible for the saturation in the blue-shift of direct-gap semiconductors. The discovery of large bandgap energy shifts with crystal size prompted us to suggest that these materials may be used to form photovoltaic cells with multi-gap layers for high efficiency in a U.S. Patent issued in 1998. However, this possibility depends strongly on the ability to collect photoexcited carriers from energy-confined crystals. The research conducted at the University of Arizona under the subject grant had a major goal of testing an indirect gap semiconductor in size-confined structures to

  14. Distribution and Substitution Mechanism of Ge in a Ge-(Fe-Bearing Sphalerite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel J. Cook

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The distribution and substitution mechanism of Ge in the Ge-rich sphalerite from the Tres Marias Zn deposit, Mexico, was studied using a combination of techniques at μm- to atomic scales. Trace element mapping by Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Mass Spectrometry shows that Ge is enriched in the same bands as Fe, and that Ge-rich sphalerite also contains measurable levels of several other minor elements, including As, Pb and Tl. Micron- to nanoscale heterogeneity in the sample, both textural and compositional, is revealed by investigation using Focused Ion Beam-Scanning Electron Microscopy (FIB-SEM combined with Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence mapping and High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy imaging of FIB-prepared samples. Results show that Ge is preferentially incorporated within Fe-rich sphalerite with textural complexity finer than that of the microbeam used for the X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES measurements. Such heterogeneity, expressed as intergrowths between 3C sphalerite and 2H wurtzite on  zones, could be the result of either a primary growth process, or alternatively, polystage crystallization, in which early Fe-Ge-rich sphalerite is partially replaced by Fe-Ge-poor wurtzite. FIB-SEM imaging shows evidence for replacement supporting the latter. Transformation of sphalerite into wurtzite is promoted by (111* twinning or lattice-scale defects, leading to a heterogeneous ZnS sample, in which the dominant component, sphalerite, can host up to ~20% wurtzite. Ge K-edge XANES spectra for this sphalerite are identical to those of the germanite and argyrodite standards and the synthetic chalcogenide glasses GeS2 and GeSe2, indicating the Ge formally exists in the tetravalent form in this sphalerite. Fe K-edge XANES spectra for the same sample indicate that Fe is present mainly as Fe2+, and Cu K-edge XANES spectra are characteristic for Cu+. Since there is no evidence for coupled substitution involving a monovalent

  15. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeTar, Carleton [P.I.

    2012-12-10

    This document constitutes the Final Report for award DE-FC02-06ER41446 as required by the Office of Science. It summarizes accomplishments and provides copies of scientific publications with significant contribution from this award.

  16. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurney, Kevin R. [Arizona Univ., Mesa, AZ (United States)

    2015-01-12

    This document constitutes the final report under DOE grant DE-FG-08ER64649. The organization of this document is as follows: first, I will review the original scope of the proposed research. Second, I will present the current draft of a paper nearing submission to Nature Climate Change on the initial results of this funded effort. Finally, I will present the last phase of the research under this grant which has supported a Ph.D. student. To that end, I will present the graduate student’s proposed research, a portion of which is completed and reflected in the paper nearing submission. This final work phase will be completed in the next 12 months. This final workphase will likely result in 1-2 additional publications and we consider the results (as exemplified by the current paper) high quality. The continuing results will acknowledge the funding provided by DOE grant DE-FG-08ER64649.

  17. Mechanism of the nanoscale localization of Ge quantum dot nucleation on focused ion beam templated Si(001) surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portavoce, A; Kammler, M; Hull, R; Reuter, M C; Ross, F M

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the fundamental mechanism by which self-assembled Ge islands can be nucleated at specific sites on Si(001) using ultra-low-dose focused ion beam (FIB) pre-patterning. Island nucleation is controlled by a nanotopography that forms after the implantation of Ga ions during subsequent thermal annealing of the substrate. This nanotopography evolves during the annealing stage, changing from a nanoscale annular depression associated with each focused ion beam spot to a nanoscale pit, and eventually disappearing (planarizing). The correspondence of Ge quantum dot nucleation sites to the focused ion beam features requires a growth surface upon which the nanotopography is preserved. A further key observation is that the Ge wetting layer thickness is reduced in patterned regions, allowing the formation of islands on the templated regions without nucleation elsewhere. These results provide routes to the greatly enhanced design and control of quantum dot distributions and dimensions

  18. New bonding configuration on Si(111) and Ge(111) surfaces induced by the adsorption of alkali metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lottermoser, L.; Landemark, E.; Smilgies, D.M.

    1998-01-01

    The structure of the (3×1) reconstructions of the Si(111) and Ge(111) surfaces induced by adsorption of alkali metals has been determined on the basis of surface x-ray diffraction and low-energy electron diffraction measurements and density functional theory. The (3×1) surface results primarily f...... from the substrate reconstruction and shows a new bonding configuration consisting of consecutive fivefold and sixfold Si (Ge) rings in 〈11̅ 0〉 projection separated by channels containing the alkali metal atoms. © 1998 The American Physical Society......The structure of the (3×1) reconstructions of the Si(111) and Ge(111) surfaces induced by adsorption of alkali metals has been determined on the basis of surface x-ray diffraction and low-energy electron diffraction measurements and density functional theory. The (3×1) surface results primarily...

  19. Laser-vibrometric ultrasonic characterization of resonant modes and quality factors of Ge membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oksana Trushkevych

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The vibrations of a single-crystal germanium (Ge membrane are studied in air and vacuum using laser vibrometry, in order to determine mechanical properties such as Q-factors, tensile stress, anisotropy, and robustness to shock. Resonance modes up to 3:2 are identified, giving a residual stress measurement of 0.22 GPa, consistent with the value obtained from x-ray relaxation studies. The membrane is found to be isotropic, with Q-factors ranging from around 40 at atmospheric pressure to over 3200 at mbar, significantly lower than those found in polycrystalline Ge micromechanical devices. The robustness to shock is explained through the high resonance mode frequencies and the dissipation mechanism into the substrate, which is a direct consequence of having a high quality film with low residual tensile stress, giving the potential for such films to be used in optoelectronic devices.

  20. Esaki tunnel diodes based on vertical Si-Ge nanowire heterojunctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Wayne Y.; Chen, Lin; Lu, Wei

    2011-08-01

    High performance Esaki tunnel diodes [L. Esaki, Phys. Rev. 109, 603 (1958)] based on small-diameter Ge/Si core/shell nanowires vertically grown on Si substrates are demonstrated. The devices exhibit pronounced negative differential resistance with peak-to-valley current ratio of 2.75, high peak current density of 2.4 kA/cm2, and high tunneling current density of 237 kA/cm2 at 1 V reverse bias, all obtained at room temperature. The peak current is found to increase with temperature and the data can be well explained with a band-to-band tunneling model. These results suggest that Si-Ge heterojunction with low defect density can be obtained for device applications such as tunnel diodes and tunnel field-effect transistors.

  1. Chemical and electronic properties of Fe/MgO/Ge heterostructures for spin electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petti, D; Cantoni, M; Rinaldi, C; Bertacco, R, E-mail: matteo.cantoni@polimi.it [LNESS, Dipartimento di Fisica - Politecnico di Milano, Via Anzani 42, 22100 Como (Italy)

    2011-04-01

    We report on the chemical and electronic properties of epitaxial Fe/MgO/Ge(001) heterostructures probed by X-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy. At variance with the Fe/MgO/Fe system, annealing at 570 K produces a sizable interdiffusion at the upper Fe/MgO interface, while at 470 K this process is inhibited. The XPS analysis of band alignment in heterostructures annealed at 470 K grown onto an intrinsic Ge substrate indicates that the Fermi level is placed at the center of the MgO gap and that the Schottky barrier height is 0.35{+-}0.1 eV, thus indicating a partial depinning of the Fermi level.

  2. Low-temperature (<200 oC solid-phase crystallization of high substitutional Sn concentration (∼10% GeSn on insulator enhanced by weak laser irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenta Moto

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Low temperature (8% on insulating substrates is essential to realize next generation flexible electronics. To achieve this, a growth method of high quality GeSn films on insulating substrates by combination of laser irradiation and subsequent thermal annealing is developed. Here, the laser fluence is chosen as weak, which is below the critical fluence for crystallization of GeSn. It is clarified that for samples irradiated with weak laser fluence, complete crystallization of GeSn films is achieved by subsequent thermal annealing at ∼170 oC without incubation time. In addition, the quality of GeSn films obtained by this method is higher compared with conventional growth techniques such as melting growth by pulsed laser annealing or solid-phase crystallization (SPC without pre-laser irradiation. Substitutional Sn concentrations in the grown layers estimated by Raman spectroscopy measurements are 8-10%, which far exceed thermal equilibrium solid-solubility of Sn in Ge (∼2%. These phenomena are explained by generation of a limited number of nuclei by weak laser irradiation and lateral SPC by subsequent thermal annealing. This method will facilitate realization of next-generation high performance devices on flexible insulating substrates.

  3. Recovery Act : Near-Single-Crystalline Photovoltaic Thin Films on Polycrystalline, Flexible Substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkat Selvamanickam; Alex Freundlich

    2010-11-29

    III-V photovoltaics have exhibited efficiencies above 40%, but have found only a limited use because of the high cost of single crystal substrates. At the other end of the spectrum, polycrystalline and amorphous thin film solar cells offer the advantage of low-cost fabrication, but have not yielded high efficiencies. Our program is based on single-crystalline-like thin film photovoltaics on polycrystalline substrates using biaxially-textured templates made by Ion Beam-Assisted Deposition (IBAD). MgO templates made by IBAD on flexible metal substrate have been successfully used for epitaxial growth of germanium films. In spite of a 4.5% lattice mismatch, heteroepitaxial growth of Ge was achieved on CeO2 that was grown on IBAD MgO template. Room temperature optical bandgap of the Ge films was identified at 0.67 eV indicating minimal residual strain. Refraction index and extinction coefficient values of the Ge films were found to match well with that measured from a reference Ge single crystal. GaAs has been successfully grown epitaxially on Ge on metal substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. RHEED patterns indicate self annihilation of antiphase boundaries and the growth of a single domain GaAs. The GaAs is found to exhibit strong photoluminescence signal and, an existence of a relatively narrow (FWHM~20 meV) band-edge excitons measured in this film indicates a good optoelectronic quality of deposited GaAs. While excellent epitaxial growth has been achieved in GaAs on flexible metal substrates, the defect density of the films as measured by High Resolution X-ray Diffraction and etch pit experiments showed a high value of 5 * 10^8 per cm^2. Cross sectional transmission electron microscopy of the multilayer architecture showed concentration of threading dislocations near the germanium-ceria interface. The defect density was found decrease as the Ge films were made thicker. The defects appear to originate from the MgO layer presumably because of large lattice mismatches

  4. Phase transitions in Ge-Sb phase change materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raoux, Simone; Virwani, Kumar; Cabral, Cyril Jr.; Krusin-Elbaum, Lia; Jordan-Sweet, Jean L.; Hitzbleck, Martina; Salinga, Martin; Madan, Anita; Pinto, Teresa L.

    2009-01-01

    Thin films of the phase change material Ge-Sb with Ge concentrations between 7.3 and 81.1 at. % were deposited by cosputtering from elemental targets. Their crystallization behavior was studied using time-resolved x-ray diffraction, Auger electron spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, x-ray reflectivity, profilometry, optical reflectivity, and resistivity versus temperature measurements. It was found that the crystallization temperature increases with Ge content. Calculations of the glass transition temperature (which is a lower limit for the crystallization temperature T x ) also show an increase with Ge concentration closely tracking the measured values of T x . For low Ge content samples, Sb x-ray diffraction peaks occurred during a heating ramp at lower temperature than Ge diffraction peaks. The appearance of Ge peaks is related to Ge precipitation and agglomeration. For Ge concentrations of 59.3 at. % and higher, Sb and Ge peaks occurred at the same temperature. Upon crystallization, film mass density and optical reflectivity increase as well as electrical contrast (ratio of resistivity in amorphous phase to crystalline phase) all showed a maximum for the eutectic alloy (14.5 at. % Ge). For the alloy with 59.3 at. % Ge there was very little change in any of these parameters, while the alloy with 81.1 at. % Ge behaved opposite to a typical phase change alloy and showed reduced mass density and reflectivity and increased resistivity

  5. Dynamics and energetics of Ge(001) dimers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Houselt, Arie; van Gastel, Raoul; Poelsema, Bene; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.

    2006-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of surface dimers on Ge(001) has been studied by positioning the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope over single flip-flopping dimers and measuring the tunneling current as a function of time. We observe that not just symmetric, but also asymmetric appearing dimers exhibit

  6. Analytical response function for planar Ge detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Alvarez, Juan A.; Maidana, Nora L.; Vanin, Vito R.; Fernández-Varea, José M.

    2016-04-01

    We model the response function (RF) of planar HPGe x-ray spectrometers for photon energies between around 10 keV and 100 keV. The RF is based on the proposal of Seltzer [1981. Nucl. Instrum. Methods 188, 133-151] and takes into account the full-energy absorption in the Ge active volume, the escape of Ge Kα and Kβ x-rays and the escape of photons after one Compton interaction. The relativistic impulse approximation is employed instead of the Klein-Nishina formula to describe incoherent photon scattering in the Ge crystal. We also incorporate a simple model for the continuous component of the spectrum produced by the escape of photo-electrons from the active volume. In our calculations we include external interaction contributions to the RF: (i) the incoherent scattering effects caused by the detector's Be window and (ii) the spectrum produced by photo-electrons emitted in the Ge dead layer that reach the active volume. The analytical RF model is compared with pulse-height spectra simulated using the PENELOPE Monte Carlo code.

  7. Preparation and characterization of co-evaporated Cu{sub 2}ZnGeSe{sub 4} thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uday Bhaskar, P.; Suresh Babu, G.; Kishore Kumar, Y.B.; Sundara Raja, V., E-mail: sundararajav@rediffmail.com

    2013-05-01

    Cu{sub 2}ZnGeSe{sub 4} (CZGSe), a member of Cu{sub 2}–II–IV–VI{sub 4} family, is a promising material for solar cell absorber layer in thin film heterojunction solar cells like Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} and Cu{sub 2}ZnSnSe{sub 4} which have been explored in recent years as alternate to CuInGaSe{sub 2} solar cells. The effect of substrate temperature (523 K–723 K) on the growth of CZGSe films is investigated by studying their structural, morphological and optical properties. Raman spectroscopy studies have been done to identify the phases in addition to X-ray diffraction studies. CZGSe films deposited at different substrate temperatures and annealed at 723 K in selenium atmosphere are Cu-rich and Ge-poor and contained secondary phases Cu{sub (2−x)}Se and ZnSe. CZGSe films obtained by reducing the starting Cu mass by 10% were found to be single phase with stannite structure, the lattice parameters being a = 0.563 nm, c = 1.101 nm. The direct optical band gap of CZGSe films is found to be 1.63 eV which is close to ideal band gap of 1.50 eV for the highest photovoltaic conversion efficiency. The films are found to be p-type. - Highlights: • Synthesis of Cu{sub 2}ZnGeSe{sub 4} films for solar cell absorber layer • Effect of substrate temperature on the growth of co-evaporated Cu{sub 2}ZnGeSe{sub 4} films • X-ray diffraction, Raman and morphological studies of Cu{sub 2}ZnGeSe{sub 4} thin films.

  8. Higgs Stability and the 750 GeV Diphoton Excess

    CERN Document Server

    Salvio, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    We study the implications of a possible unstable particle with mass $M_X<$ TeV for the Higgs stability, naturalness and inflation. We pay particular attention to the case $M_X\\approx$ 750 GeV, suggested by recent results of ATLAS and CMS on diphoton final states, and work within the minimal model: we add to the Standard Model field content a pseudoscalar and a vector-like charged quark. This can stabilize the electroweak vacuum without invoking new physics at very high energies, which would give an unnaturally large contribution to the Higgs mass. We also show that inflation can be obtained via a UV modification of General Relativity.

  9. Geïntegreerde woordeboekgebruik van vakwoordeboeke vir ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sleutelwoorde: aanleerderwoordeboek, geamalgameerde makrostruk-tuur, geamalgameerde sentrale teks, geïntegreerde binneteks, geïnte-greerde woordeboekgebruik, kognitiewe funksie, kommunikatiewe funk-sie, laaistruktuur, leksikografies verlore generasie, leksikografiese funk-sies, multiveldvakwoordeboek, ...

  10. Narrative Finality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armine Kotin Mortimer

    1981-01-01

    Full Text Available The cloturai device of narration as salvation represents the lack of finality in three novels. In De Beauvoir's Tous les hommes sont mortels an immortal character turns his story to account, but the novel makes a mockery of the historical sense by which men define themselves. In the closing pages of Butor's La Modification , the hero plans to write a book to save himself. Through the thrice-considered portrayal of the Paris-Rome relationship, the ending shows the reader how to bring about closure, but this collective critique written by readers will always be a future book. Simon's La Bataille de Pharsale , the most radical attempt to destroy finality, is an infinite text. No new text can be written. This extreme of perversion guarantees bliss (jouissance . If the ending of De Beauvoir's novel transfers the burden of non-final world onto a new victim, Butor's non-finality lies in the deferral to a future writing, while Simon's writer is stuck in a writing loop, in which writing has become its own end and hence can have no end. The deconstructive and tragic form of contemporary novels proclaims the loss of belief in a finality inherent in the written text, to the profit of writing itself.

  11. Structural and electrical studies of ultrathin layers with Si{sub 0.7}Ge{sub 0.3} nanocrystals confined in a SiGe/SiO{sub 2} superlattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, E. M. F.; Martin-Sanchez, J.; Rolo, A. G.; Levichev, S.; Gomes, M. J. M. [Centre of Physics and Physics Department, University of Minho, 4710 - 057 Braga (Portugal); Parisini, A. [CNR-IMM Sezione di Bologna, via P. Gobetti 101, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Buljan, M.; Capan, I. [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka cesta 54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Alves, E.; Barradas, N. P. [ITN, Ion Beam Laboratory, Unit of Physics and Accelerators, E.N. 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Conde, O. [Physics Department and ICEMS, University of Lisbon, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Bernstorff, S. [Sincrotrone Trieste, 34149 Basovizza (Italy); Chahboun, A. [Centre of Physics and Physics Department, University of Minho, 4710 - 057 Braga (Portugal); Physics Department, FST Tanger, Tanger (Morocco)

    2012-05-15

    In this work, SiGe/SiO{sub 2} multi-layer (ML) films with layer thickness in the range of a few nanometers were successfully fabricated by conventional RF-magnetron sputtering at 350 deg. C. The influence of the annealing treatment on SiGe nanocrystals (NCs) formation and crystalline properties were investigated by Raman spectroscopy and grazing incidence x-ray diffraction. At the annealing temperature of 800 deg. C, where well defined SiGe NCs were observed, a thorough structural investigation of the whole ML structure has been undertaken by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, and annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy. Our results show that the onset of local modifications to the ML composition takes place at this temperature for annealing times of the order of a few tens of minutes with the formation of defective regions in the upper portion of the ML structure. Only the very first layers over the Si substrate appear immune to this problem. This finding has been exploited for the fabrication of a defect free metal-oxide-semiconductor structure with a well-defined single layer of SiGe NCs. A memory effect attributed to the presence of the SiGe NCs has been demonstrated by high frequency capacitance-voltage measurements.

  12. Parity Violation Inelastic Scattering Experiments at 6 GeV and 12 GeV Jefferson Lab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulkosky, Vincent A. [University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA; Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA; et. al.,

    2015-03-01

    We report on the measurement of parity-violating asymmetries in the deep inelastic scattering and nucleon resonance regions using inclusive scattering of longitudinally polarized electrons from an unpolarized deuterium target. The effective weak couplings C$_{2q}$ are accessible through the deep-inelastic scattering measurements. Here we report a measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry, which yields a determination of 2C$_{2u}$ - C$_{2d}$ with an improved precision of a factor of five relative to the previous result. This result indicates evidence with 95% confidence that the 2C$_{2u}$ - C$_{2d}$ is non-zero. This experiment also provides the first parity-violation data covering the whole resonance region, which provide constraints on nucleon resonance models. Finally, the program to extend these measurements at Jefferson Lab in the 12 GeV era using the Solenoidal Large Intensity Device was also discussed.

  13. High-pressure structural behavior of nanocrystalline Ge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, H.; Liu, J. F.; Yan, H.

    2007-01-01

    The equation of state and the pressure of the I-II transition have been studied for nanocrystalline Ge using synchrotron x-ray diffraction. The bulk modulus and the transition pressure increase with decreasing particle size for both Ge-I and Ge-II, but the percentage volume collapse...

  14. BaGe(5): a new type of intermetallic clathrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydemir, Umut; Akselrud, Lev; Carrillo-Cabrera, Wilder; Candolfi, Christophe; Oeschler, Niels; Baitinger, Michael; Steglich, Frank; Grin, Yuri

    2010-08-18

    BaGe(5) constitutes a new type of intermetallic clathrate obtained by decomposition of clathrate-I Ba(8)Ge(43)(3) at low temperatures. The crystal structure consists of characteristic layers interconnected by covalent bonds. BaGe(5) is a semiconducting Zintl phase.

  15. High efficiency low cost GaAs/Ge cell technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Frank

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on high efficiency low cost GaAs/Ge cell technology are presented. Topics covered include: high efficiency, low cost GaAs/Ge solar cells; advantages of Ge; comparison of typical production cells for space applications; panel level comparisons; and solar cell technology trends.

  16. Growth and characterization of Ge nano-structures on Si(113) by adsorbate-mediated epitaxy; Wachstum und Charakterisierung von Ge-Nanostrukturen auf Si(113) durch Adsorbat-modifizierte Epitaxie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clausen, T.

    2006-11-15

    In the work presented here Ge nano-structures on Si(113) substrates have been grown by adsorbate-mediated epitaxy at sample temperatures between 400 C and 700 C. The Ge nano-islands and nano-layers have been investigated regarding their atomic reconstruction, morphology, strain state, chemical composition and defect structure. Various in-situ and ex-situ experimental techniques have been used, as there are low-energy electron diffraction, low-energy electron microscopy, X-ray photoemission electron microscopy, spot profile analysis low-energy electron diffraction, grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, scanning tunneling microscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. On a clean Si(113) surface Ge preferentially nucleates at surface step edges and forms a wetting layer exhibiting a Ge-(2 x 2) surface reconstruction. With increasing growth temperature the Ge islands are elongated in the [33 anti 2] direction. Simultaneously, the average island size increases with decreasing island density. From the Arrhenius-like behaviour of the island density, a Ge adatom diffusion barrier height of about 0.53 eV is deduced. At 600 C the Si concentration of the islands amounts to about 41% and the residual lattice strain of the islands is found to about 23 %. The adsorption of Gallium on a clean Si(113) substrate leads to the formation of well ordered surface facets in the [1 anti 10] direction with a periodicity of about 43 nm in the [33 anti 2] direction. From reciprocal space maps in different ({kappa} {sub perpendicular} {sub to} -{kappa} {sub parallel}) planes both facet angles are determined to be about 9.8 with respect to the [113] direction. Thus the facet orientations are identified to be (112) and (115), showing (6 x 1) and (4 x 1) surface reconstructions, respectively. Ge deposition on the faceted Si(113) leads to a high density of ordered 3D Ge nano-islands beaded at the surface facets. The size of these islands is

  17. Cube-textured metal substrates for reel-to-reel processing of coated conductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wulff, Anders Christian

    This thesis presents the results of a study aimed at investigating important fabrication aspects of reel-to-reel processing of metal substrates for coated conductors and identifying a new substrate candidate material with improved magnetic properties. The eect of mechanical polishing on surface r...... texture and the fraction of low angle grain boundaries. Finally, a Ni-5Cu-5W substrate may be a good candidate material as a substrate in future coated conductors....

  18. In-situ epitaxial growth of heavily phosphorus doped SiGe by low pressure chemical vapor deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, C J

    1998-01-01

    We have studied epitaxial crystal growth of Si sub 1 sub - sub x Ge sub x films on silicon substrates at 550 .deg. C by low pressure chemical vapor deposition. In a low PH sub 3 partial pressure region such as below 1.25x10 sup - sup 3 Pa, both the phosphorus and carrier concentrations increased with increasing PH sub 3 partial pressure, but the deposition rate and the Ge fraction remained constant. In a higher PH sub 3 partial pressure region, the deposition rate, the phosphorus concentration, and the carrier concentration decreased, while the Ge fraction increased. These suggest that high surface coverage of phosphorus suppresses both SiH sub 4 and GeH sub 4 adsorption/reactions on the surfaces, and its suppression effect on SiH sub 4 is actually much stronger than on GeH sub 4. In particular, epitaxial crystal growth is largely controlled by surface coverage effect of phosphorus in a higher PH sub 3 partial pressure region.

  19. Heteroepitaxy of Ge on Si(001) with pits and windows transferred from free-standing porous alumina mask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huangfu, Yourui; Zhan Wenbo; Hong Xia; Fang Xu; Ye Hui; Ding Guqiao

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the use of ultrathin free-standing porous alumina membrane (PAM) in pattern transferring for selective epitaxial growth (SEG) of Ge dots and films on Si. PAM, as a large-scale, controllable and lithography-free mask, can transfer nanopatterns onto Si without introducing any contaminants. High-density Ge dots are achievable with Ge adatoms confined in Si pits transferred from PAM. High-quality Ge films can also be grown on Si substrates through SiO 2 nano-windows. In this work, 80 and 60 nm pore sizes of PAM were transferred to 70, 50 and 20 nm windows for comparison. For the former two sizes, over-etching of Si beneath every SiO 2 window forms epi-seeds to improve intermixing of Ge–Si. No threading dislocations can be observed emanating from the epi-seeds due to the decreased lattice mismatch. An innovative shadow-etching technique utilizing the aspect ratio of PAM further decreased the lateral dimension of patterns from 60 to 20 nm. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy images show that the selective epitaxial Ge films grown from a 20 nm-width interface are defect free, which is attributed to the exponential decay of strain energy as well as Ge–Si intermixing. (paper)

  20. GeV excess electrons upscattering the CMB: a possible resolution to the "Photon Underproduction Crisis"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daylan, Tansu; Portillo, Stephen K. N.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.

    2015-01-01

    Recently a gamma-ray excess has been identified in the inner Milky Way, which may be associated with the final state photon shower following DM annihilation to standard model final states. In this scenario ~ GeV electrons are also produced and, given their long energy loss timescale (~ Gyr), they can diffuse and escape the galaxy before losing too much energy. If such an electron population exists in the IGM, one observable consequence would be inverse Compton scattering on the CMB, which would produce UV photons that can efficiently ionize the IGM. This may be a possible resolution to the "Photon Underproduction Crisis", recently pointed out by Kollmeier et al. (2014). Regardless of the relevance to this crisis, the existence of a ~ GeV electron population in the IGM can put constraints on DM annihilation parameters considering the known X-ray backgrounds.

  1. Final Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per; Brohus, Henrik; Nielsen, Peter V.

    This final report for the Hybrid Ventilation Centre at Aalborg University describes the activities and research achievement in the project period from August 2001 to August 2006. The report summarises the work performed and the results achieved with reference to articles and reports published...

  2. Direct Growth of Graphene Film on Germanium Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gang; Zhang, Miao; Zhu, Yun; Ding, Guqiao; Jiang, Da; Guo, Qinglei; Liu, Su; Xie, Xiaoming; Chu, Paul K.; Di, Zengfeng; Wang, Xi

    2013-01-01

    Graphene has been predicted to play a role in post-silicon electronics due to the extraordinary carrier mobility. Chemical vapor deposition of graphene on transition metals has been considered as a major step towards commercial realization of graphene. However, fabrication based on transition metals involves an inevitable transfer step which can be as complicated as the deposition of graphene itself. By ambient-pressure chemical vapor deposition, we demonstrate large-scale and uniform depositon of high-quality graphene directly on a Ge substrate which is wafer scale and has been considered to replace conventional Si for the next generation of high-performance metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs). The immiscible Ge-C system under equilibrium conditions dictates graphene depositon on Ge via a self-limiting and surface-mediated process rather than a precipitation process as observed from other metals with high carbon solubility. Our technique is compatible with modern microelectronics technology thus allowing integration with high-volume production of complementary metal-oxide-semiconductors (CMOS). PMID:23955352

  3. Smart substrates: Making multi-chip modules smarter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wunsch, T.F.; Treece, R.K.

    1995-05-01

    A novel multi-chip module (MCM) design and manufacturing methodology which utilizes active CMOS circuits in what is normally a passive substrate realizes the `smart substrate` for use in highly testable, high reliability MCMS. The active devices are used to test the bare substrate, diagnose assembly errors or integrated circuit (IC) failures that require rework, and improve the testability of the final MCM assembly. A static random access memory (SRAM) MCM has been designed and fabricated in Sandia Microelectronics Development Laboratory in order to demonstrate the technical feasibility of this concept and to examine design and manufacturing issues which will ultimately determine the economic viability of this approach. The smart substrate memory MCM represents a first in MCM packaging. At the time the first modules were fabricated, no other company or MCM vendor had incorporated active devices in the substrate to improve manufacturability and testability, and thereby improve MCM reliability and reduce cost.

  4. Detection of Biomarkers Using LSPR Substrate with Gold Nanoparticle Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Min Bae

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the biosensing platform, label-free detection technique provides advantages such as the short analysis time and the cost-effectiveness. In this study, we showed the feasibility of the LSPR substrate with gold nanoparticle array for detecting low density lipoprotein (LDL and high density lipoprotein (HDL without labeling. The LSPR substrate was fabricated through the lift-off process with the anodized alumina mask, and its LSPR phenomenon was observed by measuring the optical transmission of substrate. The antibodies were immobilized on the gold nanoparticle array via the chemical binding, in which the 11-MUA was used as the linker to bind the antibodies. The binding of antibodies was confirmed by observing the shift of LSPR peak of the substrate. Finally, with the LSPR substrates with the antibodies immobilized, the detection of LDL and HDL was investigated. As a result, LDL and HDL could be detected in the clinically available concentration range, respectively.

  5. Search for neutral and charged Higgs bosons in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}= 161 GeV$ and $172 GeV$

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Adye, T; Adzic, P; Ajinenko, I; Alekseev, G D; Alemany, R; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Amaldi, Ugo; Amato, S; Andersson, P; Andreazza, A; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barbi, M S; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G; Baroncelli, A; Bärring, O; Bates, M J; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Baudot, J; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Bérat, C; Berggren, M; Bertini, D; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Bianchi, F; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Billoir, P; Bizouard, M A; Bloch, D; Blume, M; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Boonekamp, M; Booth, P S L; Borgland, A W; Borisov, G; Bosio, C; Botner, O; Boudinov, E; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzo, M; Branchini, P; Brand, K D; Brenke, T; Brenner, R A; Brown, R C A; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Burgsmüller, T; Buschmann, P; Cabrera, S; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camacho-Rozas, A J; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Canepa, M; Carena, F; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Chabaud, V; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chen, M; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P V; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Chudoba, J; Cindro, V; Collins, P; Colomer, M; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Cowell, J H; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; Dahm, J; D'Almagne, B; Damgaard, G; Dauncey, P D; Davenport, Martyn; Da Silva, W; Deghorain, A; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Brabandere, S; De Clercq, C; La Vaissière, C de; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Diodato, A; Djannati, A; Dolbeau, J; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Drees, K A; Dris, M; Durand, J D; Edsall, D M; Ehret, R; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, Gösta; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Erzen, B; Espirito-Santo, M C; Falk, E; Fanourakis, G K; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, Michael; Fenyuk, A; Ferrari, P; Ferrer, A; Fichet, S; Filippas-Tassos, A; Firestone, A; Fischer, P A; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Formenti, F; Franek, B J; Frodesen, A G; Frühwirth, R; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gandelman, M; García, C; García, J; Gaspar, C; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Gerber, J P; Gerdyukov, L N; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gonçalves, P; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Górski, M; Guz, Yu; Gracco, Valerio; Graziani, E; Green, C; Grefrath, A; Gris, P; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Günther, M; Guy, J; Hahn, F; Hahn, S; Hajduk, Z; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Harris, F J; Hedberg, V; Henriques, R P; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Heuser, J M; Higón, E; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Holthuizen, D J; Hoorelbeke, S; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Huet, K; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, C; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Johansson, E K; Jönsson, L B; Jönsson, P E; Joram, Christian; Juillot, P; Kaiser, M; Kapusta, F; Karafasoulis, K; Karvelas, E; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Khokhlov, Yu A; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; King, B J; Kjaer, N J; Klapp, O; Klein, H; Kluit, P M; Knoblauch, D; Kokkinias, P; Koratzinos, M; Korcyl, K; Kostyukhin, V; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Krammer, Manfred; Kreuter, C; Kronkvist, I J; Krumshtein, Z; Krupinski, W; Kubinec, P; Kucewicz, W; Kurvinen, K L; Lacasta, C; Laktineh, I; Lamsa, J; Lanceri, L; Lane, D W; Langefeld, P; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Leder, Gerhard; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Legan, C K; Leisos, A; Leitner, R; Lemonne, J; Lenzen, Georg; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Lethuillier, M; Libby, J; Liko, D; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lörstad, B; Loken, J G; López, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; Naughton, J M; Maehlum, G; Mahon, J R; Maio, A; Malmgren, T G M; Malychev, V; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R P; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Martí i García, S; Masik, J; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, R; McNulty, R; McPherson, G; Medbo, J; Meroni, C; Meyer, S; Meyer, W T; Michelotto, M; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mitaroff, Winfried A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Møller, R; Mönig, K; Monge, M R; Morettini, P; Müller, H; Münich, K; Mulders, M; Mundim, L M; Murray, W J; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Myklebust, T; Naraghi, F; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Navas, S; Nawrocki, K; Negri, P; Némécek, S; Neumann, W; Neumeister, N; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Nieuwenhuizen, M; Nikolaenko, V; Nikolenko, M; Niss, P; Nomerotski, A; Normand, Ainsley; Nygren, A; Oberschulte-Beckmann, W; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Orazi, G; Ortuno, S; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Paganini, P; Paganoni, M; Paiano, S; Pain, R; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Papageorgiou, K; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Parzefall, U; Passeri, A; Pegoraro, M; Peralta, L; Pernegger, H; Pernicka, Manfred; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Phillips, H T; Piana, G; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Piotto, E; Podobnik, T; Podobrin, O; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Reale, M; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Regler, Meinhard; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Rídky, J; Rinaudo, G; Røhne, O M; Romero, A; Ronchese, P; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Rosinsky, P; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Rybicki, K; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sannino, M; Schneider, H; Schwickerath, U; Schyns, M A E; Sciolla, G; Scuri, F; Seager, P; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Seitz, A; Sekulin, R L; Serbelloni, L; Shellard, R C; Sheridan, A; Siegrist, P; Silvestre, R; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Skaali, T B; Smadja, G; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Sokolov, A; Solovyanov, O; Sosnowski, R; Souza-Santos, D; Spassoff, Tz; Spiriti, E; Sponholz, P; Squarcia, S; Stampfer, D; Stanescu, C; Stanic, S; Stapnes, Steinar; Stavitski, I; Stevenson, K; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tavernet, J P; Chernyaev, E; Chikilev, O G; Tegenfeldt, F; Terranova, F; Thomas, J; Tilquin, A; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Todorov, T; Todorova, S; Toet, D Z; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortora, L; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Trombini, A; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A L; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyndel, M; Tzamarias, S; Überschär, B; Ullaland, O; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; Van der Velde, C; van Apeldoorn, G W; van Dam, P; Van Doninck, W K; Van Eldik, J; Van Lysebetten, A; Vassilopoulos, N; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Vilanova, D; Vincent, P; Vitale, L; Vlasov, E; Vodopyanov, A S; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Waldner, F; Weiser, C; Wetherell, Alan M; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wielers, M; Wilkinson, G R; Williams, W S C; Winter, M; Witek, M; Wlodek, T; Yi, J; Yip, K; Yushchenko, O P; Zach, F; Zaitsev, A; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G

    1998-01-01

    A search for neutral and charged Higgs bosons has been performed in the data collected by the {\\sc DELPHI} detector at centre-of-mass energies of 161~GeV and 172~GeV. The analysis assumes either the pair-production of charged Higgs bosons, ${\\mathrm H}^{\\pm}$, or the production of the lightest neutral Higgs boson, h, with either a Z or a neutral pseudoscalar Higgs boson, A. All final state topologies expected from the decay of h and A %neutral Higgs particles into hadrons or a pair of $\\tau$ leptons, and from the decay of ${\\mathrm H}^{\\pm}$ %charged Higgs bosons into a pair of quarks or a $\\tau \

  6. Electric performance of the ALICE Silicon Drift Detector irradiated with 1 GeV electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Piemonte, C; Rashevsky, A; Vacchi, A; Wheadon, R

    2002-01-01

    The final version of the ALICE Silicon Drift Detector was irradiated with 1 GeV electrons at the LINAC of the Synchrotron 'Elettra' in Trieste. The electron fluence was equivalent to the total particle fluence expected during 10 years of ALICE operation as far as the bulk damage is concerned. The anode current, the voltage distribution on the integrated divider, and the operation of the MOS injectors were tested. The detector was found to be sufficiently radiation hard for the ALICE experiment.

  7. Implementation of [18F]GE-180 for routine production on ORA Neptis Perform Synthesizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jivan, S.; Villeret, G.; Neumannn, K.; Slater, J.; Vanbrocklin, H.

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this work is to develop a method to produce [18F]GE-180 on a Neptis Perform Synthesizer® module with high radiochemical yield, purity and reproducibility. Herein is described the labelling, HPLC purification and final product formulation. Decay corrected yields of 45±5% (n=20) were achieved after a 60 minute synthesis. Radiochemical purity was >95% and all other quality control parameters were within specifications.

  8. Coating-substrate-simulations applied to HFQ® forming tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leopold Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a comparative analysis of coating-substrate simulations applied to HFQTM forming tools is presented. When using the solution heat treatment cold die forming and quenching process, known as HFQTM, for forming of hardened aluminium alloy of automotive panel parts, coating-substrate-systems have to satisfy unique requirements. Numerical experiments, based on the Advanced Adaptive FE method, will finally present.

  9. The 400 GeV proton synchrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-05-01

    A general account is given of the 400-GeV proton synchrotron, known as Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS), of the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) at Geneva. A brief chapter on the history of the project covers the steps leading to the earlier plan for a 300-GeV accelerator at a new CERN laboratory elsewhere in Europe, abandoned in 1971 in favour of the present machine, and the progress of construction of the latter. The general features of the SPS design are outlined, illustrated by an aerial view of the CERN site, a plan of the SPS, and interior views of the SPS ring tunnel and main control room. (WSN)

  10. Neutron scattering on molten Ge-Sn-Te alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halm, Th; Hinz, W.; Hoyer, W.

    1995-01-01

    Three molten ternary Ge-Sn-Te alloys lying on the quasibinary line Ge-SnTe, and the binary equiatomic alloys SnTe and GeTe have been investigated by neutron "time-of-flight" experiments. Published thermodynamic results are interpreted in terms of the coexistence of SnTe and Ge microgroupings in the melt. Using the experimental obtained data of the binary liquid alloy Sn50Te50 and of liquid Ge the structure factors of the ternary melts are calculated on the base of a microheterogeneous model.

  11. GRETEL, Ge(Li) Gamma Spectra Unfolding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    1 - Nature of physical problem solved: The program performs the quantitative analysis of gamma-ray spectra obtained by Ge(Li) detectors, using special libraries which are prepared for each particular problem. 2 - Method of solution: The computer routines which detect and evaluate peak areas perform the following operations: - local smoothing of the spectrum; - first derivative of the smoothed spectrum, - peak location according to the change of sign of the first derivative; - computation of the net area of each peak found

  12. Results of Final Focus Test Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walz, Dieter R

    2003-06-13

    The beam experiments of Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) started in September 1993 at SLAC, and have produced a 1.7 {micro}m x 75 nm spot of 46 GeV electron beam. A number of new techniques involving two nanometer spot-size monitors have been developed. Several beam diagnostic/tuning schemes are applied to achieve and maintain the small spot. This experiment opens the way toward the nanometer world for future linear colliders.

  13. Multiple band structures in 70Ge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haring-Kaye, R. A.; Morrow, S. I.; Döring, J.; Tabor, S. L.; Le, K. Q.; Allegro, P. R. P.; Bender, P. C.; Elder, R. M.; Medina, N. H.; Oliveira, J. R. B.; Tripathi, Vandana

    2018-02-01

    High-spin states in 70Ge were studied using the 55Mn(18O,p 2 n ) fusion-evaporation reaction at a beam energy of 50 MeV. Prompt γ -γ coincidences were measured using the Florida State University Compton-suppressed Ge array consisting of three Clover detectors and seven single-crystal detectors. An investigation of these coincidences resulted in the addition of 31 new transitions and the rearrangement of four others in the 70Ge level scheme, providing a more complete picture of the high-spin decay pattern involving both positive- and negative-parity states with multiple band structures. Spins were assigned based on directional correlation of oriented nuclei ratios, which many times also led to unambiguous parity determinations based on the firm assignments for low-lying states made in previous work. Total Routhian surface calculations, along with the observed trends in the experimental kinematic moment of inertia with rotational frequency, support the multiquasiparticle configurations of the various crossing bands proposed in recent studies. The high-spin excitation spectra predicted by previous shell-model calculations compare favorably with the experimental one determined from this study.

  14. Search for R-parity violation with a $\\overline{U}\\overline{D}\\overlin e{D}$ coupling at $\\sqrt{s}$=189 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P.; Adye, T.; Adzic, P.; Ajinenko, I.; Albrecht, Z.; Alderweireld, T.; Alekseev, G.D.; Alemany, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P.P.; Almehed, S.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, S.; Anassontzis, E.G.; Andersson, P.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, S.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.D.; Arnoud, Y.; Asman, B.; Augustin, J.E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Ballestrero, A.; Bambade, P.; Barao, F.; Barbiellini, G.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, Dmitri Yu.; Barker, G.J.; Baroncelli, A.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Beilliere, P.; Belokopytov, Yu.; Benekos, N.C.; Benvenuti, A.C.; Berat, C.; Berggren, M.; Berntzon, L.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Bilenky, Mikhail S.; Bizouard, M.A.; Bloch, D.; Blom, H.M.; Bonesini, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, P.S.L.; Borisov, G.; Bosio, C.; Botner, O.; Boudinov, E.; Bouquet, B.; Bourdarios, C.; Bowcock, T.J.V.; Boyko, I.; Bozovic, I.; Bozzo, M.; Bracko, M.; Branchini, P.; Brenner, R.A.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J.M.; Bugge, L.; Buran, T.; Buschbeck, B.; Buschmann, P.; Cabrera, S.; Caccia, M.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Carroll, L.; Caso, C.; Castillo Gimenez, M.V.; Cattai, A.; Cavallo, F.R.; Charpentier, P.; Checchia, P.; Chelkov, G.A.; Chierici, R.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chochula, P.; Chorowicz, V.; Chudoba, J.; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, R.; Cortina, E.; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, F.; Costa, M.; Crawley, H.B.; Crennell, D.; Crosetti, G.; Cuevas Maestro, J.; Czellar, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Dalmau, J.; Davenport, M.; Da Silva, W.; Della Ricca, G.; Delpierre, P.; Demaria, N.; De Angelis, A.; De Boer, W.; De Clercq, C.; De Lotto, B.; De Min, A.; De Paula, L.; Dijkstra, H.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Dolbeau, J.; Doroba, K.; Dracos, M.; Drees, J.; Dris, M.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, T.; Ellert, M.; Elsing, M.; Engel, J.P.; Espirito Santo, M.C.; Fanourakis, G.; Fassouliotis, D.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrer-Ribas, E.; Ferro, F.; Firestone, A.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fontanelli, F.; Franek, B.; Frodesen, A.G.; Fruhwirth, R.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Galloni, A.; Gamba, D.; Gamblin, S.; Gandelman, M.; Garcia, C.; Gaspar, C.; Gaspar, M.; Gasparini, U.; Gavillet, P.; Gazis, Evangelos; Gele, D.; Geralis, T.; Gerdyukov, L.; Ghodbane, N.; Gil Botella, Ines; Glege, F.; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Gopal, G.; Gorn, L.; Gouz, Yu.; Gracco, V.; Grahl, J.; Graziani, E.; Gris, P.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hahn, F.; Hahn, S.; Haider, S.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hansen, J.; Harris, F.J.; Hauler, F.; Hedberg, V.; Heising, S.; Hernandez, J.J.; Herquet, P.; Herr, H.; Higon, E.; Holmgren, S.O.; Holt, P.J.; Hoorelbeke, S.; Houlden, M.; Hrubec, J.; Huber, M.; Hughes, G.J.; Hultqvist, K.; Jackson, John Neil; Jacobsson, R.; Jalocha, P.; Janik, R.; Jarlskog, C.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jean-Marie, B.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, Erik Karl; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Juillot, P.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, Frederic; Karafasoulis, K.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.C.; Keranen, R.; Kernel, G.; Kersevan, B.P.; Khokhlov, Yu.A.; Khomenko, B.A.; Khovanski, N.N.; Kiiskinen, A.; King, B.; Kinvig, A.; Kjaer, N.J.; Klapp, O.; Kluit, P.; Kokkinias, P.; Kostioukhine, V.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krammer, M.; Kriznic, E.; Krumstein, Z.; Kubinec, P.; Kurowska, J.; Kurvinen, K.; Lamsa, J.W.; Lane, D.W.; Lapin, V.; Laugier, J.P.; Lauhakangas, R.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, Fabienne; Leinonen, L.; Leisos, A.; Leitner, R.; Lenzen, G.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Libby, J.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lippi, I.; Loerstad, B.; Loken, J.G.; Lopes, J.H.; Lopez, J.M.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; MacNaughton, J.; Mahon, J.R.; Maio, A.; Malek, A.; Maltezos, S.; Malychev, V.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Marti i Garcia, S.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Matthiae, G.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; McCubbin, M.; McKay, R.; McNulty, R.; McPherson, G.; Merle, E.; Meroni, C.; Meyer, W.T.; Migliore, E.; Mirabito, L.; Mitaroff, W.A.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Moller, Rasmus; Monig, Klaus; Monge, M.R.; Moraes, D.; Morettini, P.; Morton, G.; Mueller, U.; Muenich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mulet-Marquis, C.; Mundim, L.M.; Muresan, R.; Murray, W.J.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Naraghi, F.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.L.; Nawrocki, K.; Negri, P.; Neufeld, N.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nielsen, B.S.; Niezurawski, P.; Nikolenko, M.; Nomokonov, V.; Nygren, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A.G.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Orazi, G.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Oyanguren, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Pain, R.; Paiva, R.; Palacios, J.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, T.D.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Pavel, T.; Pegoraro, M.; Peralta, L.; Pernicka, M.; Perrotta, A.; Petridou, C.; Petrolini, A.; Phillips, H.T.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Podobnik, T.; Poireau, V.; Pol, M.E.; Polok, G.; Poropat, P.; Pozdniakov, V.; Privitera, P.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Radojicic, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Rahmani, H.; Rames, J.; Ratoff, P.N.; Read, Alexander L.; Rebecchi, P.; Redaelli, Nicola Giuseppe; Regler, M.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinertsen, P.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, P.B.; Resvanis, L.K.; Richard, F.; Ridky, J.; Rinaudo, G.; Ripp-Baudot, Isabelle; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Rosenberg, E.I.; Rosinsky, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ruiz, A.; Saarikko, H.; Sacquin, Y.; Sadovsky, A.; Sajot, G.; Salt, J.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sannino, M.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schwemling, P.; Schwering, B.; Schwickerath, U.; Scuri, Fabrizio; Seager, P.; Sedykh, Y.; Segar, A.M.; Seibert, N.; Sekulin, R.; Sette, G.; Shellard, R.C.; Siebel, M.; Simard, L.; Simonetto, F.; Sisakian, A.N.; Smadja, G.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, G.R.; Sokolov, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassov, T.; Spiriti, E.; Squarcia, S.; Stanescu, C.; Stanitzki, M.; Stevenson, K.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Strub, R.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Tabarelli, T.; Taffard, A.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Terranova, F.; Timmermans, Jan; Tinti, N.; Tkatchev, L.G.; Tobin, M.; Todorova, S.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortora, L.; Tortosa, P.; Transtromer, G.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, C.; Turluer, M.L.; Tyapkin, I.A.; Tyapkin, P.; Tzamarias, S.; Ullaland, O.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallazza, E.; Van Dam, Piet; Van den Boeck, W.; Van Eldik, J.; Van Lysebetten, A.; van Remortel, N.; Van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Ventura, L.; Venus, W.; Verbeure, F.; Verdier, P.; Verlato, M.; Vertogradov, L.S.; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vlasov, E.; Vodopianov, A.S.; Voulgaris, G.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Washbrook, A.J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.H.; Wilkinson, G.R.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Wolf, G.; Yi, J.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zevgolatakos, E.; Zimine, N.I.; Zintchenko, A.; Zoller, P.; Zumerle, G.; Zupan, M.

    2001-01-01

    Searches for pair production of gauginos and squarks in $e^{+} e^{-}$ collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 189 GeV have been performed on data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 158 pb$^{-1}$ collected by the DELPHI detector at LEP. The data were analyzed under the assumption of non-conservation of \\mbox{$R$-parity} through a single dominant $\\bar{U} \\bar{D} \\bar{D}$~coupling between squarks and quarks. Typical final states contain between 4 and 10 jets with or without additional leptons. No excess of data above Standard Model expectations was observed. The results were used to constrain domains of the MSSM parameter space and derive limits on the masses of supersymmetric particles. The following mass limits at 95\\% CL were obtained from these searches: \\begin{itemize} \\item neutralino mass: $m_{\\tilde{\\chi^0_{1}}} \\ge 32$ GeV \\item chargino mass: $m_{\\tilde{\\chi^+_{1}}} \\ge 94 $ GeV \\item stop and sbottom mass (indirect decay) with $\\Delta M > 5$ GeV: $m_{\\tilde{t_{1}}} \\ge 74$ GeV, for $\\Phi_{...

  15. The effects of Mn concentration on structural and magnetic properties of Ge{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x} diluted magnetic semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le, T-G; Dau, M-T; Thanh, V Le; Michez, L; Derrien, J [Centre Interdisciplinaire de Nanoscience de Marseille (CINaM-CNRS), Aix-Marseille Universite, Campus de Luminy, case 913, 13288 Marseille (France); Nam, D N H [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Virginia, 395 McCormick Road, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Luong, T K P; Khiem, N V, E-mail: lethanh@cinam.univ-mrs.fr [Department of Engineering and Technology, Hong Duc University, 307 Le Lai Street, Thanh Hoa City (Viet Nam)

    2011-04-01

    Reflexion high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) along with physical property measurement system (PPMS) were used to investigate the growth kinetics of Ge{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x} diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMS) grown on Ge(001) by means of molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). At a given intermediate growth temperature of 130 deg. C, we have identified the formation of successive heterogeneous phases when increasing the Mn concentration from 1 to 14 %: DMS phase containing nanosized Mn-rich clusters for x below 2%, DMS phase containing high Curie temperature (T{sub C}) nanocolumns for x ranging from 5 to 6 %, DMS phase in which GeMn nanocolumns and Mn{sub 5}Ge{sub 3} clusters coexist and then finally DMS containing mainly Mn{sub 5}Ge{sub 3} clusters at Mn concentration higher than 12%. Our results confirm that the low solubility of Mn in Ge is the main origin of the formation of heterogeneous phases and provide evidence that it is extremely difficult to form a homogenous GeMn DMS even for Mn concentrations being below 2%. We also demonstrate that high-T{sub C} nanocolumns and Mn{sub 5}Ge{sub 3} clusters are competing processes and the process window corresponding to the stabilisation of high-T{sub C} nanocolumns remains extremely tight.

  16. Optical substrate materials for synchrotron radiation beamlines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howells, M.R.; Paquin, R.A.

    1997-06-01

    The authors consider the materials choices available for making optical substrates for synchrotron radiation beam lines. They find that currently the optical surfaces can only be polished to the required finish in fused silica and other glasses, silicon, CVD silicon carbide, electroless nickel and 17-4 PH stainless steel. Substrates must therefore be made of one of these materials or of a metal that can be coated with electroless nickel. In the context of material choices for mirrors they explore the issues of dimensional stability, polishing, bending, cooling, and manufacturing strategy. They conclude that metals are best from an engineering and cost standpoint while the ceramics are best from a polishing standpoint. They then give discussions of specific materials as follows: silicon carbide, silicon, electroless nickel, Glidcop trademark, aluminum, precipitation-hardening stainless steel, mild steel, invar and superinvar. Finally they summarize conclusions and propose ideas for further research

  17. Optical substrate materials for synchrotron radiation beamlines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howells, M.R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Advanced Light Source; Paquin, R.A. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Optical Sciences Center

    1997-06-01

    The authors consider the materials choices available for making optical substrates for synchrotron radiation beam lines. They find that currently the optical surfaces can only be polished to the required finish in fused silica and other glasses, silicon, CVD silicon carbide, electroless nickel and 17-4 PH stainless steel. Substrates must therefore be made of one of these materials or of a metal that can be coated with electroless nickel. In the context of material choices for mirrors they explore the issues of dimensional stability, polishing, bending, cooling, and manufacturing strategy. They conclude that metals are best from an engineering and cost standpoint while the ceramics are best from a polishing standpoint. They then give discussions of specific materials as follows: silicon carbide, silicon, electroless nickel, Glidcop{trademark}, aluminum, precipitation-hardening stainless steel, mild steel, invar and superinvar. Finally they summarize conclusions and propose ideas for further research.

  18. The system BaOGeO 2 at high pressures and temperatures, with special reference to high-pressure transformations in BaGeO 3, BaGe 2O 5, and Ba 2Ge 5O 12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozima, Mituko; Susaki, Jun-Ichi; Akimoto, Syun-Iti; Shimizu, Yoshio

    1982-10-01

    Phase relations in the system BaOGeO 2 were investigated in the pressure range 20-70 kbar in the temperature range 750-1200°C. Several new phases were identified in this system: an atmospheric phase of BaGe 2O 5 (monoclinic BaGe 2O 5 I), two high-pressure phases of BaGe 2O 5 (monoclinic BaGe 2O 5 II and tetragonal BaGe 2O 5 III), and a high-pressure phase of Ba 2Ge 5O 12. The phase boundary curve between BaGe 2O 5 II and BaGe 2O 5 III was preliminarily determined as P(kbar) = 7.7 + 0.047 T (°C). The high-pressure phases of BaGeO 3, which were previously reported by Y. Shimizu, Y. Syono, and S. Akimoto ( High Temp.-High Pressures2, 113 (1970)) in the pressure range 15-95 kbar, were interpreted to be not single-phase materials but complicated mixtures of more than two phases in the system BaOGeO 2. X-Ray powder diffraction data for the new compounds synthesized in this study are given.

  19. [Ge2](4-) Dumbbells with Very Short Ge-Ge Distances in the Zintl Phase Li3NaGe2: A Solid-State Equivalent to Molecular O2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherf, Lavinia M; Karttunen, Antti J; Pecher, Oliver; Magusin, Pieter C M M; Grey, Clare P; Fässler, Thomas F

    2016-01-18

    The novel ternary Zintl phase Li3NaGe2 comprises alkali-metal cations and [Ge2](4-) dumbbells. The diatomic [Ge2](4-) unit is characterized by the shortest Ge-Ge distance (2.390(1) Å) ever observed in a Zintl phase and thus represents the first Ge=Ge double bond under such conditions, as also suggested by the (8-N) rule. Raman measurements support these findings. The multiple-bond character is confirmed by electronic-structure calculations, and an upfield (6)Li NMR shift of -10.0 ppm, which was assigned to the Li cations surrounded by the π systems of three Ge dumbbells, further underlines this interpretation. For the unperturbed, ligand-free dumbbell in Li3NaGe2, the π- bonding py and pz orbitals are degenerate as in molecular oxygen, which has singly occupied orbitals. The partially filled π-type bands of the neat solid Li3NaGe2 cross the Fermi level, resulting in metallic properties. Li3NaGe2 was synthesized from the elements as well as from binary reactants and subsequently characterized crystallographically. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Substitutionality of Ge atoms in ion implanted AlSb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, K.M.; Moll, A.J.; Chan, N.; Walukiewicz, W.; Becla, P.

    1995-01-01

    The substitution of Ge atoms into ion implanted AlSb is investigated by extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. Our results reveal that in the as-implanted material, the implanted Ge atoms are equally distributed between two specific sites, one surrounded by Al atoms and the other surrounded by Sb atoms. After annealing at 750 degree C for 5 s, the coordination number of the Ge atoms increases from ∼3 to ∼4 indicating solid phase regrowth of the implantation induced amorphous surface layer. Moreover, in the annealed AlSb, the substitution of Ge atoms into the Al sublattice dominates with an estimated Ge Al :[Ge Sb ]∼0.8:0.2. These results suggest that Ge atoms act preferentially as donor species in AlSb

  1. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stinis, Panos [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-08-07

    This is the final report for the work conducted at the University of Minnesota (during the period 12/01/12-09/18/14) by PI Panos Stinis as part of the "Collaboratory on Mathematics for Mesoscopic Modeling of Materials" (CM4). CM4 is a multi-institution DOE-funded project whose aim is to conduct basic and applied research in the emerging field of mesoscopic modeling of materials.

  2. Ultra-low specific contact resistivity (1.4 × 10-9 Ω.cm2) for metal contacts on in-situ Ga-doped Ge0.95Sn0.05 film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ying; Luo, Sheng; Wang, Wei; Masudy-Panah, Saeid; Lei, Dian; Liang, Gengchiau; Gong, Xiao; Yeo, Yee-Chia

    2017-12-01

    A heavily Ga-doped Ge0.95Sn0.05 layer was grown on the Ge (100) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), achieving an active doping concentration of 1.6 × 1020 cm-3 without the use of ion implantation and high temperature annealing that could cause Sn precipitation or surface segregation. An advanced nano-scale transfer length method was used to extract the specific contact resistivity ρc between the metal and the heavily doped p-Ge0.95Sn0.05 layer. By incorporating Sn into Ge and in-situ Ga doping during the MBE growth, an ultra-low ρc of 1.4 × 10-9 Ω.cm2 was achieved, which is 50% lower than the ρc of p+-Ge control and is also the lowest value obtained for metal/p-type semiconductor contacts.

  3. Low-mass lepton pair production in Pb–Au collisions at 40 A.GeV

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    compared to the expectation from known hadronic decay sources was observed. In the 40 A¡GeV data taken in 1999, an enhancement is again found; ... creation and the absence of any final state interaction conserves the primary information within the limits imposed by the space-time folding over the emission period.

  4. 77 FR 75426 - Decision and Order Granting a Waiver to GE Appliances From the Department of Energy Residential...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-20

    ... for products that employ these long-time or variable defrost control strategies, DOE is granting GE's... Energy (the Assistant Secretary) may grant a waiver subject to conditions, including adherence to... provisions for products with long time or variable defrost DOE published in an interim final rule (75 FR...

  5. Search for scalar leptons in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at centre-of-mass energies up to 209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Heister, A.; Barate, R.; Bruneliere, R.; De Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Goy, C.; Jezequel, S.; Lees, J.P.; Martin, F.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Trocme, B.; Boix, G.; Bravo, S.; Casado, M.P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J.M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, L.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, J.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, L.M.; Pacheco, A.; Paneque, D.; Ruiz, H.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Filippis, N.; de Palma, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Azzurri, P.; Barklow, T.; Buchmuller, O.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Clerbaux, B.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R.W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Greening, T.C.; Hansen, J.B.; Harvey, J.; Hutchcroft, D.E.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kado, M.; Maley, P.; Mato, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, Gigi; Schlatter, D.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Valassi, A.; Videau, I.; Ward, J.J.; Badaud, F.; Dessagne, S.; Falvard, A.; Fayolle, D.; Gay, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Pallin, D.; Pascolo, J.M.; Perret, P.; Hansen, J.D.; Hansen, J.R.; Hansen, P.H.; Nilsson, B.S.; Kyriakis, A.; Waananen, A.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J.C.; Machefert, F.; Rouge, A.; Swynghedauw, M.; Tanaka, R.; Videau, H.; Ciulli, V.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G.P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Spagnolo, P.; Kennedy, J.; Lynch, J.G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Smith, D.; Thompson, A.S.; Wasserbaech, S.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E.E.; Leibenguth, G.; Putzer, A.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D.M.; Cameron, W.; Davies, G.; Dornan, P.J.; Girone, M.; Hill, R.D.; Marinelli, N.; Nowell, J.; Przysiezniak, H.; Rutherford, S.A.; Sedgbeer, J.K.; Thompson, J.C.; Ghete, V.M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.; Bowdery, C.K.; Clarke, D.P.; Ellis, G.; Finch, A.J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R.W.L.; Pearson, M.R.; Robertson, N.A.; Smizanska, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Blumenschein, U.; Holldorfer, F.; Jakobs, K.; Kayser, F.; Kleinknecht, K.; Muller, A.S.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.G.; Schmeling, S.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zeitnitz, C.; Ziegler, T.; Bonissent, A.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Leroy, O.; Kachelhoffer, T.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Tilquin, A.; Ragusa, F.; David, A.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Huttmann, K.; Lutjens, G.; Mannert, C.; Manner, W.; Moser, H.G.; Settles, R.; Stenzel, H.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.F.; Heusse, P.; Jacholkowska, A.; Loomis, C.; Serin, L.; Veillet, J.J.; de Vivie de Regie, J.B.; Yuan, C.; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Boccali, T.; Foa, L.; Giammanco, A.; Giassi, A.; Ligabue, F.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciaba, A.; Tenchini, R.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P.G.; Awunor, O.; Blair, G.A.; Coles, J.; Cowan, G.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Green, M.G.; Jones, L.T.; Medcalf, T.; Misiejuk, A.; Strong, J.A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Clifft, R.W.; Edgecock, T.R.; Norton, P.R.; Tomalin, I.R.; Bloch-Devaux, Brigitte; Boumediene, D.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Lancon, E.; Lemaire, M.C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.F.; Rosowsky, A.; Seager, P.; Trabelsi, A.; Tuchming, B.; Vallage, B.; Konstantinidis, N.; Litke, A.M.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C.N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Hodgson, P.N.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L.F.; Affholderbach, K.; Boehrer, Armin; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Hess, J.; Ngac, A.; Prange, G.; Sieler, U.; Borean, C.; Giannini, G.; He, H.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Armstrong, S.R.; Berkelman, Karl; Cranmer, K.; Ferguson, D.P.S.; Gao, Y.; Gonzalez, S.; Hayes, O.J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; Kile, J.; McNamara, P.A., III; Nielsen, J.; Pan, Y.B.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J.H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wu, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.

    2002-01-01

    A search for selectron, smuon and stau pair production is performed with the data collected by the ALEPH detector at LEP at centre-of-mass energies up to 209 GeV. The numbers of candidate events are consistent with the background predicted by the Standard Model. Final mass limits from ALEPH are reported.

  6. Measurement of the $e^{+}e^{-} \\to ZZ$ Production Cross Section at Centre-of-Mass Energies of 183 and 189 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R.; Ghez, Philippe; Goy, C.; Jezequel, S.; Lees, J.P.; Martin, F.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Alemany, R.; Bravo, S.; Casado, M.P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J.M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, L.; Grauges, E.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, L.M.; Morawitz, P.; Pacheco, A.; Riu, I.; Ruiz, H.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Boix, G.; Buchmuller, O.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Ciulli, V.; Davies, G.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R.W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Greening, T.C.; Halley, A.W.; Hansen, J.B.; Harvey, John; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Lehraus, I.; Leroy, O.; Maley, P.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, Gigi; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Spagnolo, P.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Tournefier, E.; Wright, A.E.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Badaud, F.; Chazelle, G.; Deschamps, O.; Dessagne, S.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Hansen, J.D.; Hansen, J.R.; Hansen, P.H.; Nilsson, B.S.; Rensch, B.; Waananen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J.C.; Machefert, F.; Rouge, A.; Swynghedauw, M.; Tanaka, R.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G.P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Chalmers, M.; Curtis, L.; Lynch, J.G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Raeven, B.; Raine, C.; Smith, D.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A.S.; Ward, J.J.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E.E.; Putzer, A.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D.M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P.J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Marinelli, N.; Martin, E.B.; Nash, J.; Nowell, J.; Przysiezniak, H.; Sciaba, A.; Sedgbeer, J.K.; Thomson, Evelyn J.; Williams, M.D.; Ghete, V.M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bowdery, C.K.; Buck, P.G.; Ellis, G.; Finch, A.J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R.W.L.; Robertson, N.A.; Smizanska, M.; Williams, M.I.; Giehl, I.; Holldorfer, F.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Krocker, M.; Muller, A.S.; Nurnberger, H.A.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.G.; Schmeling, S.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zeitnitz, C.; Ziegler, T.; Aubert, J.J.; Bonissent, A.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Tilquin, A.; Aleppo, M.; Antonelli, M.; Gilardoni, Simone S.; Ragusa, F.; Buescher, Volker; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Huttmann, K.; Lutjens, G.; Mannert, C.; Manner, W.; Moser, H.G.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Azzurri, P.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.F.; Heusse, P.; Jacholkowska, A.; Kado, M.; Lefrancois, J.; Serin, L.; Veillet, J.J.; Videau, I.; de Vivie de Regie, J.B.; Zerwas, D.; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Boccali, T.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Dell'Orso, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Marrocchesi, P.S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tenchini, R.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P.G.; Blair, G.A.; Coles, J.; Cowan, G.; Green, M.G.; Hutchcroft, D.E.; Jones, L.T.; Medcalf, T.; Strong, J.A.; Botterill, D.R.; Clifft, R.W.; Edgecock, T.R.; Norton, P.R.; Thompson, J.C.; Tomalin, I.R.; Bloch-Devaux, Brigitte; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Faif, G.; Lancon, E.; Lemaire, M.C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.F.; Rosowsky, A.; Seager, P.; Trabelsi, A.; Tuchming, B.; Vallage, B.; Black, S.N.; Dann, J.H.; Loomis, C.; Kim, H.Y.; Konstantinidis, N.; Litke, A.M.; McNeil, M.A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C.N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Hodgson, P.N.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L.F.; Affholderbach, K.; Boehrer, Armin; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Hess, J.; Misiejuk, A.; Prange, G.; Sieler, U.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.E.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R.W.; Armstrong, S.R.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D.P.S.; Gao, Y.; Gonzalez, S.; Hayes, O.J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; Kile, J.; McNamara, P.A.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y.B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I.J.; Walsh, J.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J.H.; Wu, S.L.; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.

    1999-01-01

    The e+e- -> ZZ cross section at sqrt(s)=182.7 and 188.6 GeV has been measured using the ALEPH detector. The analysis covers all of the visible ZZ final states and yields cross section measurements of sigma_ZZ(182.7 GeV) = 0.11 +- (0.16,0.11) (stat.) +- 0.04 (syst.) pb and sigma_ZZ(188.6 GeV) = 0.67 +- 0.13 (stat.) +- 0.04 (syst.) pb consistent with the Standard Model expectations.

  7. SiGeC Optoelectronic Devices

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kolodzey, James

    2000-01-01

    .... These results indicate that strain, composition, and substrate orientation all play roles in quantum dot formation and provide different vehicles to control the self-assembly and self-organization...

  8. Investigation of the interactions of the components in the Sm-Pd-Ge system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurenbaeva, J.M.; Seropegin, Yu.D.; Nikiforov, V.N.

    1998-01-01

    A variety of physicochemical analysis techniques have been employed in constructing the isothermal section of the phase diagram of the Sm-Pd-Ge system at 870 K. Several new ternary compounds have been found: Sm 3 Pd 20-18.5 Ge 6-7.5 , SmPd 2.50-1.75 Ge 1.50-2.25 , Sm 2 Pd 3 Ge 5 , Sm 2 PdGe 6 , SmPd 3 Ge, SmPd 2 Ge, SmPdGe 2 , SmPdGe, SmPd 0.8-0.5 Ge 1.2-1.5 , and Sm 2 PdGe. The temperature dependencies of the specific resistance were investigated for Sm 20 Pd 35 Ge 45 , Sm 20 Pd 40 Ge 40 , Sm 20 Pd 45 Ge 35 , and Sm 3 Pd 20 Ge 6 . (orig.)

  9. Measurement of the W Mass and Width in $e^+ e^-$ Collisions at 189 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Jézéquel, S; Lees, J P; Martin, F; Merle, E; Minard, M N; Pietrzyk, B; Alemany, R; Bravo, S; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Graugès-Pous, E; Martínez, M; Merino, G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Pacheco, A; Ruiz, H; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Boix, G; Buchmüller, O L; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Dissertori, G; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Gianotti, F; Greening, T C; Halley, A W; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kado, M; Lemaître, V; Maley, P; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Moutoussi, A; Ranjard, F; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Spagnolo, P; Tejessy, W; Teubert, F; Tournefier, E; Valassi, Andrea; Ward, J J; Wright, A E; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Badaud, F; Chazelle, G; Deschamps, O; Dessagne, S; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Pascolo, J M; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Wäänänen, A; Daskalakis, G; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Vayaki, Anna; Blondel, A; Brient, J C; Machefert, F P; Rougé, A; Swynghedauw, M; Tanaka, R; Videau, H L; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Zachariadou, K; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Chiarella, V; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Chalmers, M; Kennedy, J; Lynch, J G; Negus, P; O'Shea, V; Räven, B; Smith, D; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Cavanaugh, R J; Dhamotharan, S; Geweniger, C; Hanke, P; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Leibenguth, G; Putzer, A; Tittel, K; Wannemacher, E; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Davies, G; Dornan, Peter J; Girone, M; Marinelli, N; Nowell, J; Przysiezniak, H; Sedgbeer, J K; Thompson, J C; Thomson, E; White, R; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kneringer, E; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Bowdery, C K; Buck, P G; Clarke, D P; Ellis, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R W L; Robertson, N A; Smizanska, M; Giehl, I; Hölldorfer, F; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Kröcker, M; Müller, A S; Nürnberger, H A; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Schmeling, S; Wachsmuth, H W; Zeitnitz, C; Ziegler, T; Bonissent, A; Carr, J; Coyle, P; Curtil, C; Ealet, A; Fouchez, D; Leroy, O; Kachelhoffer, T; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Tilquin, A; Aleppo, M; Antonelli, M; Gilardoni, S S; Ragusa, F; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Hüttmann, K; Lütjens, G; Mannert, C; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Azzurri, P; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Jacholkowska, A; Serin, L; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; De Vivie de Régie, J B; Zerwas, D; Bagliesi, G; Boccali, T; Calderini, G; Ciulli, V; Foà, L; Giassi, A; Ligabue, F; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Sguazzoni, G; Tenchini, Roberto; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Blair, G A; Coles, J; Cowan, G D; Green, M G; Hutchcroft, D E; Jones, L T; Medcalf, T; Strong, J A; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Norton, P R; Tomalin, I R; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Boumediene, D E; Fabbro, B; Faïf, G; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Rosowsky, A; Seager, P; Trabelsi, A; Tuchming, B; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Loomis, C; Kim, H Y; Konstantinidis, N P; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Hodgson, P N; Lehto, M H; Thompson, L F; Affholderbach, K; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Grupen, Claus; Hess, J; Misiejuk, A; Prange, G; Sieler, U; Borean, C; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; He, H; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Armstrong, S R; Cranmer, K; Elmer, P; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y; González, S; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; Jin, S; Kile, J; McNamara, P A; Nielsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, J; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Wu, J; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Zobernig, G

    2000-01-01

    The mass of the W boson is determined in e+e- collisions at LEP by the direct reconstruction of W decays in WW->qqqq and WW->lvqq events, supplemented by measurements using the kinematic properties of the leptons in the WW->lvlv decay channel. The main sample of W pairs is selected from an integrated luminosity of 174 pb^-1 collected with the ALEPH detector in 1998 at a centre-of-mass energy of 188.63 GeV.The combined result from all channels is mW = 80.432+-0.072(stat.)+-0.041(syst.)+-0.019(FSI)+-0.017(LEP) GeV/c^2, where FSI represents the possible effects of final state interactions in the qqqq channel. In a second two-parameter fit to the qqqq, evqq and mvqq channels, where the W mass and width are decoupled, the average W width is found to be 2.24+-0.20(stat.)+-0.13(syst.) GeV/c^2, consistent with the Standard Model prediction. The combination of the mass measurement presented in this paper together with those derived previously from the W pair cross section at 161 and 172 GeV and direct reconstruction a...

  10. PLZT capacitor on glass substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairchild, M. Ray; Taylor, Ralph S.; Berlin, Carl W.; Wong, Celine W. K.; Ma, Beihai; Balachandran, Uthamalingam

    2016-01-05

    A lead-lanthanum-zirconium-titanate (PLZT) capacitor on a substrate formed of glass. The first metallization layer is deposited on a top side of the substrate to form a first electrode. The dielectric layer of PLZT is deposited over the first metallization layer. The second metallization layer deposited over the dielectric layer to form a second electrode. The glass substrate is advantageous as glass is compatible with an annealing process used to form the capacitor.

  11. Z Boson Pair Production in e^+ e^- Collisions at √s between 183 and 202, GeV with the OPAL detector at LEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae Hwan; Strom, David

    2000-05-01

    A study of Z boson pair production in e^+ e^- annihilation at center-of-mass energies between 183, GeV and 202, GeV is reported. Final states containing only leptons, (l l l l and l l ν ν), quark and lepton pairs, (qq l l, qq ν ν) and the all-hadronic final state (qqqq) are considered. In all states with at least one Z boson decaying hadronically, q barq and b barb final states are considered separately using lifetime and event-shape tags, thereby improving the cross-section measurement. Limits on anomalous ZZγ and ZZZ couplings are derived.

  12. Cross section and coupling measurements with the ATLAS detector for the 125 GeV Higgs Boson in the fermion decay channels

    CERN Document Server

    Gregersen, Kristian; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Detailed measurements of the properties of the 125 GeV Higgs boson are fundamental for the understanding of the electroweak symmetry breaking mechanism. Measurements of the Higgs boson in fermion final states allow to study the Yukawa couplings of the Higgs boson through the decay mode and the gauge couplings of the Higgs boson through the production mode. This talk summarizes ATLAS measurements of the 125 GeV Higgs boson in decays involving b, tau and mu.

  13. Background model systematics for the Fermi GeV excess

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calore, Francesca; Cholis, Ilias; Weniger, Christoph

    2015-03-01

    The possible gamma-ray excess in the inner Galaxy and the Galactic center (GC) suggested by Fermi-LAT observations has triggered a large number of studies. It has been interpreted as a variety of different phenomena such as a signal from WIMP dark matter annihilation, gamma-ray emission from a population of millisecond pulsars, or emission from cosmic rays injected in a sequence of burst-like events or continuously at the GC. We present the first comprehensive study of model systematics coming from the Galactic diffuse emission in the inner part of our Galaxy and their impact on the inferred properties of the excess emission at Galactic latitudes 2° < |b| < 20° and 300 MeV to 500 GeV. We study both theoretical and empirical model systematics, which we deduce from a large range of Galactic diffuse emission models and a principal component analysis of residuals in numerous test regions along the Galactic plane. We show that the hypothesis of an extended spherical excess emission with a uniform energy spectrum is compatible with the Fermi-LAT data in our region of interest at 95% CL. Assuming that this excess is the extended counterpart of the one seen in the inner few degrees of the Galaxy, we derive a lower limit of 10.0° (95% CL) on its extension away from the GC. We show that, in light of the large correlated uncertainties that affect the subtraction of the Galactic diffuse emission in the relevant regions, the energy spectrum of the excess is equally compatible with both a simple broken power-law of break energy E(break) = 2.1 ± 0.2 GeV, and with spectra predicted by the self-annihilation of dark matter, implying in the case of bar bb final states a dark matter mass of m(χ)=49(+6.4)(-)(5.4)  GeV.

  14. Thermoelectric Properties of Nanograined Si-Ge-Au Thin Films Grown by Molecular Beam Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishino, Shunsuke; Ekino, Satoshi; Inukai, Manabu; Omprakash, Muthusamy; Adachi, Masahiro; Kiyama, Makoto; Yamamoto, Yoshiyuki; Takeuchi, Tsunehiro

    2017-11-01

    Conditions to achieve extremely large Seebeck coefficient and extremely small thermal conductivity in Si-Ge-Au thin films formed of nanosized grains precipitated in amorphous matrix have been investigated. We employed molecular beam deposition to prepare Si1-x Ge x Au y thin films on sapphire substrate. The deposited films were annealed under nitrogen gas atmosphere at 300°C to 500°C for 15 min to 30 min. Nanocrystals dispersed in amorphous matrix were clearly observed by transmission electron microscopy. We did not observe anomalously large Seebeck coefficient, but very low thermal conductivity of nearly 1.0 W K-1 m-1 was found at around 0.2 thermal conductivity was well accounted for by the compositional dependence of the mixing entropy. Some of these values agree exactly with the amorphous limit predicted by theoretical calculations. The smallest lattice thermal conductivity found for the present samples is lower than that of nanostructured Si-Ge bulk material for which dimensionless figure of merit of ZT ≈ 1 was reported at high temperature.

  15. Physical properties of (GaAs)1-x(Ge2)x: Influence of growth direction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, A.G.; Navarro-Contreras, H.; Vidal, M.A.

    2001-01-01

    (GaAs) 1-x (Ge 2 ) x metastable alloys were epitaxially grown on (001), (111), (112), and (113) GaAs by rf magnetron sputtering. A different long-range order parameter behavior with Ge concentration is observed for each growth direction. This provides a direct evidence that growth direction affects the long-range order-disorder transition exhibited by these alloys. The epitaxial growth of these alloys was modeled by a Monte Carlo simulation. The good agreement between the experimental and modeled long-range order parameter evidences that atomic ordering in these alloys is ruled mainly by growth direction and the avoidance of the formation of 'wrong' atomic pairs of As-As and Ga-Ga, and not by thermodynamic factors. On the other hand, measurements of the optical gap and Raman scattering, show that the optical properties are governed by near-neighbor correlations and therefore by their short-range order. Hence, the substrate orientation and the long-range order have negligible effect on the optical properties. Fitting the experimental data of the optical gap, we obtained linear expressions that show the fundamental gap behavior with Ge concentration of some of these alloys at room temperature. For 0 0 (x)=1.43-2.99x eV and E 0 (x)=0.45+0.35x eV, respectively

  16. Current mechanism and band alignment of Al (Pt)/HfGdO/Ge capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junjun, Yuan; Zebo, Fang; Yanyan, Zhu; Bo, Yao; Shiyan, Liu; Gang, He; Yongsheng, Tan

    2016-03-01

    HfGdO high-k gate dielectric thin films were deposited on Ge substrates by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering. The current transport properties of Al(Pt)/HfGdO/Ge MOS structures were investigated at room temperature. The results show that the leakage currents are mainly induced by Frenkel-Poole emissions at a low electric field. At a high electric field, Fowler Nordheim tunneling dominates the current. The energy barriers were obtained by analyzing the Fowler Nordheim tunneling characteristics, which are 1.62 eV and 2.77 eV for Al/HfGdO and Pt/HfGdO, respectively. The energy band alignments for metal/HfGdO/Ge capacitors are summarized together with the results of current-voltage and the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Project supported by the Natural Science Foundation of Shanghai (No. 15ZR1418700), the Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51272159, 61405118), and the Natural Science Foundation of Zhejiang (Nos. LY15A040001, LQ13A040004).

  17. Effect of compressive and tensile strain on misfit dislocation injection in SiGe epitaxial layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wegscheider, W. [Walter Schottky Institut, Garching (Germany); Cerva, H. [Siemens AG, Research Lab., Muenchen (Germany)

    1993-05-01

    The relaxation behavior of short-period Si/Ge superlattices and Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1-x} alloy layers under compressive and tensile strain field is compared experimentally by means of transmission electron microscopy as well as theoretically on ethebasis of a half-loop dislocation nucleation mode. It was found that misfit dislocations in tensily strained layers grown on Ge(001) substrates are imperfect and of the 90{degrees} Shockley type provided some critical misfit f{sub c} is exceeded. Subsequent nucleation and glide of these partial dislocations on adjacent (111) glide planes leads to the formation of stacking faults and microtwins. In the low misfit regime (f

  18. SERS substrate and a method of providing a SERS substrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    Source: US2011116089A A substrate primarily for SERS determination, the substrate has a number of elongate elements with a density of at least 1x108 elongate elements per cm2 and having metal coated tips. When the elements may be made to lean toward each other, such as by providing a drop...

  19. Conclusiones finales

    OpenAIRE

    Guerrero Gaitán, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    La investigación realizada permite extraer las siguientes conclusiones finales que serán agrupadas según los principales problemas abordados: 1. En relación a las cláusulas que impiden una adecuada transferencia de tecnología, en la presente investigación se demuestra: Primero. Que las cláusulas más frecuentes recogidas en los contratos internacionales de transferencia de tecnología son: la fijación de precios, las restricciones a la investigación y adaptación de la tecnología objeto del cont...

  20. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R Paul Drake

    2004-01-12

    OAK-B135 This is the final report from the project Hydrodynamics by High-Energy-Density Plasma Flow and Hydrodynamics and Radiation Hydrodynamics with Astrophysical Applications. This project supported a group at the University of Michigan in the invention, design, performance, and analysis of experiments using high-energy-density research facilities. The experiments explored compressible nonlinear hydrodynamics, in particular at decelerating interfaces, and the radiation hydrodynamics of strong shock waves. It has application to supernovae, astrophysical jets, shock-cloud interactions, and radiative shock waves.

  1. Integrated Plastic Substrates for OLED Lighting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaynor, Whitney

    2015-08-01

    manufacturing methods that can produce thousands of feet of material without defects. We have evaluated the materials and manufacturing costs of these films at scale and find that they meet the current and future cost targets for bringing down the cost of OLED lighting while enabling future roll-to-roll manufacturing of the complete device. And finally, we have demonstrated that the inherent light-scattering properties of our films enhance white OLED emission efficiency from 20% to 50% depending on the metric. This work has shown that these substrates can be created, manufactured, and will perform as needed to enable flexible OLED lighting to enter the marketplace.

  2. Sublattice reversal in GaAs/Ge/GaAs (113)B heterostructures and its application to THz emitting devices based on a coupled multilayer cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiangmeng; Kumagai, Naoto; Minami, Yasuo; Kitada, Takahiro

    2018-04-01

    We fabricated a coupled multilayer cavity with a GaAs/Ge/GaAs sublattice reversal structure for terahertz emission application. Sublattice reversal in GaAs/Ge/GaAs was confirmed by comparing the anisotropic etching profile of an epitaxial sample with those of reference (113)A and (113)B GaAs substrates. The interfaces of GaAs/Ge/GaAs were evaluated at the atomic level by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) mapping. Defect-free GaAs/Ge/GaAs heterostructures were observed in STEM images and the sublattice lattice was directly seen through atomic arrangements in EDX mapping. A GaAs/AlAs coupled multilayer cavity with a sublattice reversal structure was grown on the (113)B GaAs substrate after the confirmation of sublattice reversal. Smooth GaAs/AlAs interfaces were formed over the entire region of the coupled multilayer cavity structure both below and above the Ge layer. Two cavity modes with a frequency difference of 2.9 THz were clearly observed.

  3. Growth of InGaAs nanowires on Ge(111) by selective-area metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Akinobu; Tomioka, Katsuhiro; Ishizaka, Fumiya; Motohisa, Junichi

    2017-04-01

    We report the growth of InGaAs nanowires (NWs) on Ge(111) substrates using selective-area metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy (SA-MOVPE) for novel InGaAs/Ge hybrid complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) applications. Ge(111) substrates with periodic arrays of mask opening were prepared, and InGaAs was selectively grown on the opening region of Ge(111). A uniform array of InGaAs NWs with a diameter around 100 nm was successfully grown using appropriate preparation of the initial surfaces with an AsH3 thermal treatment and flow-rate modulation epitaxy (FME). We found that optimizing partial pressure of AsH3 and the number of FME cycles improved the yield of vertical InGaAs NWs. Line-scan profile analysis of energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectrometry showed that the In composition in the InGaAs NW was almost constant from the bottom to the top. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis revealed that the interface between InGaAs NW and Ge had misfit dislocations, but their distance was longer than that expected from the difference in their lattice constants.

  4. Evidence for Substrate Influence on Artificial Substrate Invertebrate Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Iain D; Prestie, Kate S

    2017-08-01

    Cobble baskets are frequently used as a tool to measure differences in benthic macroinvertebrate communities between waterbodies; however, underlying differences in substrate type may influence the resultant colonization of baskets, misrepresenting communities. This study tests the hypothesis that cobble basket placement influences the resulting benthic macroinvertebrate community. Cobble basket arrays (n = 4) were deployed in Dog Lake, Saskatchewan, in 2011 (97 d) and 2012 (95 d) on cobble habitats and soft or sandy substrates ∼100 m apart. Baskets placed on cobble substrate had significantly higher Shannon-Weaver diversity relative to those placed on soft substrate in both years, and higher % EPT (Ephemeroptera Plecoptera Trichoptera) in 2011, but total density was not significantly different. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling revealed that the community was different between both treatments, characterized by higher densities of Gammarus lacustris Sars in baskets placed on soft sediment in both years, higher densities of Aeshna sp. and Mystacides sp. on cobble substrate in 2011, and higher densities of Helobdella stagnalis (L.) and Glossophinia complanata (L.) on cobble substrate in 2012. The results were consistent with the hypothesis that baskets placed on cobble substrate versus soft substrate will result in differing community colonization. The resulting recommendation for monitoring and assessment using cobble baskets in lakes is that baskets be placed on comparable substrate type when comparing between lakes, and that cobble beds be chosen as a more appropriate substrate for deployment, as the added habitat complexity of baskets on soft sediment may act as an attractant and not reflect the true community composition of that habitat. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Shell morphology and Raman spectra of epitaxial Ge-SixGe1-x and Si-SixGe1-x core-shell nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Feng; Dillen, David C.; Kim, Kyounghwan; Tutuc, Emanuel

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the shell morphology and Raman spectra of epitaxial Ge-SixGe1-x and Si-SixGe1-x core-shell nanowire heterostructures grown using a combination of a vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth mechanism for the core, followed by in-situ epitaxial shell growth using ultra-high vacuum chemical vapor deposition. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy reveals that the VLS growth yields cylindrical Ge, and Si nanowire cores grown along the ⟨111⟩, and ⟨110⟩ or ⟨112⟩ directions, respectively. A hexagonal cross-sectional morphology is observed for Ge-SixGe1-x core-shell nanowires terminated by six {112} facets. Two distinct morphologies are observed for Si-SixGe1-x core-shell nanowires that are either terminated by four {111} and two {100} planes associated with the ⟨110⟩ growth direction or four {113} and two {111} planes associated with the ⟨112⟩ growth direction. We show that the Raman spectra of Si- SixGe1-x are correlated with the shell morphology thanks to epitaxial growth-induced strain, with the core Si-Si mode showing a larger red shift in ⟨112⟩ core-shell nanowires compared to their ⟨110⟩ counterparts. We compare the Si-Si Raman mode value with calculations based on a continuum elasticity model coupled with the lattice dynamic theory.

  6. Negative thermal expansion and magnetocaloric effect in Mn-Co-Ge-In thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Qiao, K. M.; Zuo, S. L.; Zhang, H. R.; Kuang, H.; Wang, J.; Hu, F. X.; Sun, J. R.; Shen, B. G.

    2018-01-01

    MnCoGe-based alloys with magnetostructural transition show giant negative thermal expansion (NTE) behavior and magnetocaloric effects (MCEs) and thus have attracted a lot of attention. However, the drawback of bad mechanical behavior in these alloys obstructs their practical applications. Here, we report the growth of Mn-Co-Ge-In films with thickness of about 45 nm on (001)-LaAlO3, (001)-SrTiO3, and (001)-Al2O3 substrates. The films grown completely overcome the breakable nature of the alloy and promote its multifunctional applications. The deposited films have a textured structure and retain first-order magnetostructural transition. NTE and MCE behaviors associated with the magnetostructural transition have been studied. The films exhibit a completely repeatable NTE around room temperature. NTE coefficient α can be continuously tuned from the ultra-low expansion (α ˜ -2.0 × 10-7/K) to α ˜ -6.56 × 10-6/K, depending on the growth and particle size of the films on different substrates. Moreover, the films exhibit magnetic entropy changes comparable to the well-known metamagnetic films. All these demonstrate potential multifunctional applications of the present films.

  7. Strong uniaxial magnetic anisotropy in Co films on highly ordered grating-like nanopatterned Ge surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam Mollick, Safiul; Singh, Ranveer; Kumar, Mohit; Bhattacharyya, Satyaranjan; Som, Tapobrata

    2018-03-01

    We present a systematic investigation on uniaxial magnetic anisotropy (UMA) in Co thin films induced by high aspect ratio nanopatterned anisotropic substrates. Self-organized long grating-like nanostructures, with extreme regularities, are fabricated on Ge surfaces using Au-ion implantation at room temperature. Subsequently deposition of Co films are carried out on the same at two different angles. Magneto-optical Kerr effect measurements show strong UMA in Co films grown on ion-patterned Ge substrates, fabricated under different ion fluences, along and perpendicular to the direction of the patterns (long grating-like nanostructures). Magnetic force microscopy measurements under different externally applied magnetic fields reveal an easy domain wall motion when the field is applied along the grating-like nanostructures. On the other hand, high amplitude grating-like nanostructures hinder the spin rotation when the field is applied along the hard axis. The present study will be useful for magnetic recording media and ultra-small magnetic field sensors.

  8. Device simulation of GeSn/GeSiSn pocket n-type tunnel field-effect transistor for analog and RF applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Suyuan; Zheng, Jun; Xue, Chunlai; Li, Chuanbo; Zuo, Yuhua; Cheng, Buwen; Wang, Qiming

    2017-11-01

    We present the device simulations of analog and radio frequency (RF) performances of four double-gate pocket n-type tunneling field-effect transistors (NTFETs). The direct current (DC), analog and RF performances of the Ge-homo, GeSn-homo, GeSn/Ge and GeSn/GeSiSn NTFETs, are compared. The GeSn NTFETs greatly improve the on-state current (ION) and average subthreshold slope (SS), when compared with the Ge NTFET. Moreover, the GeSn/GeSiSn NTFET has the largest intrinsic gain (Av), and exhibits a suppressed ambipolar behavior, improved cut-off frequency (fT), and gain bandwidth product (GBW), according to the analyzed analog and RF figures of merit (FOM). Therefore, it can be concluded that the GeSn/GeSiSn NTFET has great potential as a promising candidate for the realization of future generation low-power analog/RF applications.

  9. Two-photon mass spectra produced in p-p collision at √s = 52 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaldi, E.; Beneventano, M.; Borgia, B.; Capone, A.; De Notaristefani, F.; Dore, U.; Ferroni, F.; Longo, E.; Luminari, L.; Pistilli, P.; Sestili, I.; Dooher, J.

    1977-01-01

    The photon-photon final state in the interaction of p-p at √s = 52 GeV has been investigated, detecting the two photons on opposite sides around 90 0 with respect to the circulating beams of the ISR. In the invariant mass spectrum derived from this configuration no structure is observed above the background. Upper limits for production of narrow resonances decaying into two photons are derived for invariant masses larger than 2.5 GeV/c 2 . (author)

  10. Electronic structure of Ge-2 and Ge-2 and thermodynamic properties of Ge-2 from all electron ab initio investigations and Knudsen effusion mass spectroscopic measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shim, Irene; Baba, M. Sai; Gingerich, K.A.

    2002-01-01

    The low-lying states of the molecule Ge-2 and of the ion Ge-2(-) have been investigated by all electron ab initio multiconfiguration self-consistent field (CASSCF) and multi-reference configuration interaction (MRCI) calculations. The relativistic corrections for the Darwin contact term...... and for the mass-velocity term have been determined in perturbation calculations. Treatment of the spin-orbit coupling has been included. The ground state of Ge-2 is derived as 0(g)(+)((3)Sigma(g)(-)) with equilibrium distance 2.422 Angstrom, and vibrational frequency 270 cm(-1). The spectroscopic constants of 15...... excited states are presented. Thermal functions based on the theoretically determined molecular parameters were used to derive the thermodynamic properties of the Ge-2 molecule from new mass spectrometric equilibrium data. The literature value for the dissociation energy of Ge-2 has been re...

  11. Structure of Ag, Fe and Ge microclusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montano, P.A.; Shenoy, G.K.; Schulze, W.

    1989-01-01

    The structures of Ag, Fe and Ge microclusters were determined using EXAFS. The measurements were performed over a wide range of clusters sizes. The clusters were prepared using the gas aggregation technique and isolated in solid argon at 4.2 K. The measurements were performed at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at beam line X-18B. A strong contraction of the interatomic distances was observed for Ag dimers and multimers. Silver clusters larger than 12 A mean diameter show a small contraction of the nn distance and a structure consistent with an fcc lattice. By contrast clusters smaller than 12 A show the presence of a small expansion and a strong reduction or absence of nnn in the EXAFS signal. This points towards a different crystallographic structure for Ag microclusters with diameter less than 12 A. In iron clusters we observe a gradual reduction of the nn distance as the cluster size decreases. The interatomic distance for iron dimers was determined to be 1.94 A, in good agreement with earlier measurements. The iron microclusters show a bcc structure down to a mean diameter of 9 A. Iron clusters with 9 A mean diameter show a structure inconsistent with a bcc lattice. The new structure is consistent with an fcc or hcp lattice. The measurements on Ge clusters show the presence of only nearest neighbors. There was clear evidence of temporal annealing as determined by variations in the near edge structure of the K-absorption edge. Absorption edge measurements were also performed for free Ge clusters travelling perpendicular to the direction of the synchrotron radiation beam. The measurements performed on the free clusters were consistent with those obtained for matrix isolated clusters. (orig.)

  12. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2017-02-07

    This is the final report of our research program on electronic transport experiments on Topological Insulator (TI) devices, funded by the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences. TI-based electronic devices are attractive as platforms for spintronic applications, and for detection of emergent properties such as Majorana excitations , electron-hole condensates , and the topological magneto-electric effect . Most theoretical proposals envision geometries consisting of a planar TI device integrated with materials of distinctly different physical phases (such as ferromagnets and superconductors). Experimental realization of physics tied to the surface states is a challenge due to the ubiquitous presence of bulk carriers in most TI compounds as well as degradation during device fabrication.

  13. High spin spectroscopy of 70Ge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar Raju, M.; Sugathan, P.; Seshi Reddy, T.; Thirumala Rao, B.V.; Madhusudhana Rao, P.V.; Muralithar, S.; Singh, R.P.; Bhowmik, R.K.

    2011-01-01

    Structure of nuclei in mass 70 region is of interest due to presence of a variety of complex phenomenon. In these nuclei rapid change of nuclear shape with proton and neutron numbers, spin and excitation energy. Valance nucleons in f-p-g shell configuration will drive the nuclei towards high deformations. Relatively large values of quadrupole deformation are evident in the even-even nuclei in this region. Present study is aimed to explore the high spin structure of the 70 Ge nucleus. A negative parity structure was reported in an earlier study

  14. Composite substrate for bipolar electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekkanat, Bora; Bolstad, James J.

    1992-12-22

    Substrates for electrode systems, particularly those to be used for bipolar electrodes in zinc-bromine batteries, are disclosed. The substrates preferably include carbon-black as a conductive filler in a polymeric matrix, with reinforcing materials such as glass fibers. Warpage of the zinc-bromine electrodes which was experienced in the prior art and which was believed to be caused by physical expansion of the electrodes due to bromine absorption by the carbon-black, is substantially eliminated when new substrate fabrication techniques are employed. In the pesent invention, substrates are prepared using a lamination process known as glass mat reinforced thermoplastics technology or, in an alternate embodiment, the substrate is made using a slurry process.

  15. Radiation-modified structure of Ge25Sb15S60 and Ge35Sb5S60 glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavetskyy, T.; Shpotyuk, O.; Kaban, I.; Hoyer, W.

    2008-06-01

    Atomic structures of Ge25Sb15S60 and Ge35Sb5S60 glasses are investigated in the γ-irradiated and annealed after γ-irradiation states by means of high-energy synchrotron x-ray diffraction technique. The first sharp diffraction peak (FSDP) is detected at around 1.1 A˚-1 in the structure factors of both alloys studied. The FSDP position is found to be stable for radiation/annealing treatment of the samples, while the FSDP intensity shows some changes between γ-irradiated and annealed states. The peaks in the pair distribution functions observed between 2 and 4 A˚ are related to the Ge-S, Ge-Sb, and Sb-Sb first neighbor correlations and Ge-Ge second neighbor correlations in the edge-shared GeS4/2 tetrahedra, and S-S and/or Ge-Ge second neighbor correlations in the corner-shared GeS4/2 tetrahedra. Three mechanisms of the radiation-/annealing-induced changes are discussed in the framework of coordination topological defect formation and bond-free solid angle concepts.

  16. Growth Mechanism and Surface Structure of Ge Nanocrystals Prepared by Thermal Annealing of Cosputtered GeSiO Ternary Precursor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ge nanocrystals (Ge-ncs embedded in a SiO2 superlattice structure were prepared by magnetron cosputtering and postdeposition annealing. The formation of spherical nanocrystals was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and their growth process was studied by a combination of spectroscopic techniques. The crystallinity volume fraction of Ge component was found to increase with crystallite size, but its overall low values indicated a coexistence of crystalline and noncrystalline phases. A reduction of Ge-O species was observed in the superlattice during thermal annealing, accompanied by a transition from oxygen-deficient silicon oxide to silicon dioxide. A growth mechanism involving phase separation of Ge suboxides (GeOx was then proposed to explain these findings and supplement the existing growth models for Ge-ncs in SiO2 films. Further analysis of the bonding structure of Ge atoms suggested that Ge-ncs are likely to have a core-shell structure with an amorphous-like surface layer, which is composed of GeSiO ternary complex. The surface layer thickness was extracted to be a few angstroms and equivalent to several atomic layer thicknesses.

  17. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susan S. Golden

    2005-03-31

    The originally funded project was geared to pursue research on regulation of photosystem II (PSII) in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. We characterized a locus, psfR, (psbA stimulating factor) that affects expression of the psbAI gene, which encodes the PSII protein D1. Over-expression of psfR, which encodes a protein with receiver and pseudo-receiver domains, acts at the promoter region to elevate expression of psbAI and a subset of other loci. We reoriented the remainder of the funding to make a greater impact through completion of a functional genomics project that had been initiated with funding from another agency. The goal is inactivation of each gene individually in the S. elongatus genome, and completion of the entire genome sequence. At the end of the project we will have screened all loci for involvement in circadian rhythms of gene expression and assembled an archived set of clones that can be used to create the mutations to screen for any other phenotype. During the project period we: (1) prepared a functional genomics website for S. elongatus PCC 7942 that posts sequences prior to GenBank release, and presents the strategy and progress for the genomics project (http://www.bio.tamu.edu/synecho/); (2) determined the sequence of and annotated the S. elongatus 46 kb plasmid, pANL; (3) submitted assembled sequences with annotation of 8 cosmid inserts to GenBank (313 kb), with sites of transposon insertions indicated; (4) mutagenized approximately an additional 600 kb of the genome (16 cosmids) and identified sequences flanking the mutations; (5) recombined mutagenesis substrates into the S. elongatus genome to produce gene inactivations (at the sites of transposon insertions) for approximately 415 kb of mutagenized sequence (85% of these have already been screened for circadian phenotypes) (6) identified the clpPIIclpX locus as important in determining circadian period; and (7) demonstrated effectiveness of antisense RNA for decreasing

  18. Controlled drive-in and precipitation of hydrogen during plasma hydrogenation of silicon using a thin compressively strained SiGe layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okba, F.; Cherkashin, N.; Claverie, A.; Di, Z.; Nastasi, M.; Rossi, F.; Merabet, A.

    2010-01-01

    We have quantitatively studied by transmission electron microscopy the growth kinetics of platelets formed during the continuous hydrogenation of a Si substrate/SiGe/Si heterostructure. We have evidenced and explained the massive transfer of hydrogen from a population of platelets initially generated in the upper Si layer by plasma hydrogenation towards a population of larger platelets located in the SiGe layer. We demonstrate that this type of process can be used not only to precisely localize the micro-cracks, then the fracture line at a given depth but also to 'clean' the top layer from pre-existing defects.

  19. An Investigation of ELDRS in Different SiGe Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pei; He, Chaohui; Guo, Hongxia; Guo, Qi; Zhang, Jinxin; Liu, Mohan

    2017-05-01

    Enhanced low dose rate sensitivity (ELDRS) in different process Silicon-Germanium heterojunction bipolar transistors (SiGe HBTs) is investigated. Low and high dose rate irradiations are performed to evaluate the ELDRS of SiGe HBTs manufactured by Tsinghua University (THU). THU SiGe HBTs experience significantly low dose rate sensitivity than that of IBM 8HP SiGe HBTs and behave a “true” dose rate effect. TCAD models were used to explicate the microcosmic structure in THU and IBM 8HP SiGe HBTs. Comparison and discussion show that different SiGe processes may involve different HBT structures and device designs which are the critical influence of ELDRS effect. The different responses of ELDRS should be first attributed to the device structure and design in nature, particularly the geometry of emitter-base junction and the isolation structure.

  20. Low Friction Droplet Transportation on a Substrate with a Selective Leidenfrost Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Linzi E; Wood, David; Geraldi, Nicasio R; Wells, Gary G; McHale, Glen; Xu, Ben B; Stuart-Cole, Simone; Martin, James; Newton, Michael I

    2016-08-31

    An energy saving Leidenfrost levitation method is introduced to transport microdroplets with virtually frictionless contact between the liquid and solid substrate. Through microengineering of the heating units, selective areas of the whole substrate can be electrothermally activated. A droplet can be levitated as a result of the Leidenfrost effect and further transported when the substrate is tilted slightly. Selective electroheating produces a uniform temperature distribution on the heating units within 1 s in response to a triggering voltage. Alongside these experimental observations, finite element simulations were conducted to understand the role of substrate thermal conductivity on the temperature profile of the selectively heated substrate. We also generated phase diagrams to verify the Leidenfrost regime for different substrate materials. Finally, we demonstrated the possibility of controlling low friction high speed droplet transportation (∼65 mm/s) when the substrate is tilted (∼7°) by structurally designing the substrate. This work establishes the basis for an entirely new approach to droplet microfluidics.

  1. Impact of oxidation and reduction annealing on the electrical properties of Ge/La2O3/ZrO2gate stacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkel, Christoph; Hellström, Per-Erik; Ostling, Mikael; Stöger-Pollach, Michael; Bethge, Ole; Bertagnolli, Emmerich

    2012-08-01

    The paper addresses the passivation of Germanium surfaces by using layered La 2 O 3 /ZrO 2 high- k dielectrics deposited by Atomic Layer Deposition to be applied in Ge-based MOSFET devices. Improved electrical properties of these multilayered gate stacks exposed to oxidizing and reducing ambient during thermal post treatment in presence of thin Pt cap layers are demonstrated. The results suggest the formation of thin intermixed La x Ge y O z interfacial layers with thicknesses controllable by oxidation time. This formation is further investigated by XPS, EDX/EELS and TEM analysis. An additional reduction annealing treatment further improves the electrical properties of the gate dielectrics in contact with the Ge substrate. As a result low interface trap densities on (1 0 0) Ge down to 3 × 10 11  eV -1  cm -2 are demonstrated. The formation of the high- k La x Ge y O z layer is in agreement with the oxide densification theory and may explain the improved interface trap densities. The scaling potential of the respective layered gate dielectrics used in Ge-based MOS-based device structures to EOT of 1.2 nm or below is discussed. A trade-off between improved interface trap density and a lowered equivalent oxide thickness is found.

  2. On the Potential Application of the Wrinkled SiGe/SiGe Nanofilms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fedorchenko, Alexander I.; Cheng, H. H.; Wang, W.; Ch.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 2 (2016), s. 19-23 ISSN 2160-049X Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : wrinkled SiGe nanofilms * terahertz radiation * terahertz gap Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics http://www.scirp. org /journal/wjm,http://dx. doi . org /10.4236/wjm.2016.62003

  3. Dumbbells of five-connected Ge atoms and superconductivity in CaGe3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnelle, Walter; Ormeci, Alim; Wosylus, Aron; Meier, Katrin; Grin, Yuri; Schwarz, Ulrich

    2012-05-21

    CaGe(3) has been synthesized at high-pressure, high-temperature conditions. The atomic pattern comprises intricate germanium layers of condensed moleculelike dimers. Below T(c) = 6.8 K, type II superconductivity with moderately strong electron-phonon coupling is observed.

  4. Room temperature ferromagnetic Cr doped Ge/GeOx core-shell nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katkar, Amar S; Gupta, Shobhnath P; Seikh, Md Motin; Chen, Lih-Juann; Walke, Pravin S

    2018-03-19

    The Cr doped tunable thickness core-shell Ge/GeOx nanowires were synthesized and characterized using X-ray diffraction, FESEM, TEM, EDS, XPS and magnetization studies. The shell thickness increases with the increase in synthesis temperature. The presence of metallic Cr and Cr3+ in core-shell structure was confirmed from XPS study. The magnetic property is highly sensitive to the core-shell thickness and intriguing room temperature ferromagnetism is realized only in core-shell nanowires. The magnetization decreases with increase in shell thickness and practically ceases to exist when there is no core. These nanowires shows high Curie temperature (TC>300 K) remarkably with the dominating values of its magnetic remanence (MR) and coercivity (HC) as compared to germanium dilute magnetic semiconductor nanomaterials. We believe that our finding on these Cr doped Ge/GeOX core-shell nanowires have potential to use as a hard magnet for forthcoming spintronic devices, owing to their higher characteristic values of FM ordering. © 2018 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  5. Commissioning and Operation of 12 GeV CEBAF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freyberger, Arne P. [Jefferson Lab., Newport News, VA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) located at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Laboratory (JLab) has been recently upgraded to deliver continuous electron beams to the experimental users at a maximum energy of 12 GeV, three times the original design energy of 4 GeV. This paper will present an overview of the upgrade, referred to as the 12GeV upgrade, and highlights from recent beam commissioning results.

  6. Reassessing SERS enhancement factors: using thermodynamics to drive substrate design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guicheteau, J A; Tripathi, A; Emmons, E D; Christesen, S D; Fountain, Augustus W

    2017-12-04

    Over the past 40 years fundamental and application research into Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) has been explored by academia, industry, and government laboratories. To date however, SERS has achieved little commercial success as an analytical technique. Researchers are tackling a variety of paths to help break through the commercial barrier by addressing the reproducibility in both the SERS substrates and SERS signals as well as continuing to explore the underlying mechanisms. To this end, investigators use a variety of methodologies, typically studying strongly binding analytes such as aromatic thiols and azarenes, and report SERS enhancement factor calculations. However a drawback of the traditional SERS enhancement factor calculation is that it does not yield enough information to understand substrate reproducibility, application potential with another analyte, or the driving factors behind the molecule-metal interaction. Our work at the US Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center has focused on these questions and we have shown that thermodynamic principles play a key role in the SERS response and are an essential factor in future designs of substrates and applications. This work will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of various experimental techniques used to report SERS enhancement with planar SERS substrates and present our alternative SERS enhancement value. We will report on three types of analysis scenarios that all yield different information concerning the effectiveness of the SERS substrate, practical application of the substrate, and finally the thermodynamic properties of the substrate. We believe that through this work a greater understanding for designing substrates will be achieved, one that is based on both thermodynamic and plasmonic properties as opposed to just plasmonic properties. This new understanding and potential change in substrate design will enable more applications for SERS based methodologies including targeting

  7. The sensitivity of graphene “snap-through” to substrate geometry

    KAUST Repository

    Wagner, Till J. W.

    2012-01-01

    We study theoretically the deposition of few layer graphene sheets onto a grooved substrate incorporating adhesion between substrate and sheet. We develop a model to understand the equilibrium of the sheet allowing for partial conformation of sheet to substrate. This model gives physical insight into recent observations of snap-through from flat to conforming states and emphasizes the crucial role of substrate shape in determining the nature of this transition. Our analytical results are consistent with numerical simulations using a van der Waals-like interaction. Finally, we propose a substrate shape that should exhibit a continuous, rather than snap-through, transition. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  8. A 100 GeV SLAC Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farkas, Zoltan D

    2002-01-01

    The SLAC beam energy can be increased from the current 50 GeV to 100 GeV, if we change the operating frequency from the present 2856 MHz to 11424 MHz, using technology developed for the NLC. We replace the power distribution system with a proposed NLC distribution system as shown in Fig. 1. The four 3 meter s-band 820 nS fill time accelerator sections are replaced by six 2 meter x-band 120 nS fill time sections. Thus the accelerator length per klystron retains the same length, 12 meters. The 4050 65MW-3.5(micro)S klystrons are replaced by 75MW-1.5(micro)S permanent magnet klystrons developed here and in Japan. The present input to the klystrons would be multiplied by a factor of 4 and possibly amplified. The SLED [1] cavities have to be replaced. The increase in beam voltage is due to the higher elastance to group velocity ratio, higher compression ratio and higher unloaded to external Q ratio of the new SLED cavities. The average power input is reduced because of the narrower klystron pulse width and because the klystron electro-magnets are replaced by permanent magnets

  9. Density measurement of amorphous SixGe1-x alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laaziri, K.; Roorda, S.; Cliche, L.

    1994-01-01

    The atomic density of amorphous Si x Ge 1-x alloys (x = 1, 0.85, 0.67, 0.50, 0.20 and 0) has been measured. Mono-crystalline Si x Ge 1-x layers were implanted with 1.50-2.75 MeV Si 2+ and Ge 2+ ions to produce the amorphous material. Using surface profilometry and RBS/channeling, it was found that amorphous alloys are less dense than the crystalline alloys, and that Vegard's law underestimates the a-Si x Ge 1-x density. (orig.)

  10. The first acceleration to 300 GeV

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1976-01-01

    After the acceleration to 80 GeV in May the 200 GeV energy was attained on June 4, followed by a successful attempt to reach 300 GeV and then 400 GeV by the Council session on June 17. Here at the desk (centre) Boris Milman and Bas de Raad, (right) Pat Mills and a machine operator. Then standing on the back Jacques Althaber, Simon Van der Meer, Hans-Peter Kindermann, Raymond Rausch, John Adams, Klaus Batzner, and still back Antonio Millich, Jim Allaby, Wim Middelkoop, Bo Angerth, Hans Horisberger.

  11. Anomalous temperature-induced volume contraction in GeTe

    OpenAIRE

    Chatterji, Tapan; Kumar, C. M. N.; Wdowik, Urszula D.

    2015-01-01

    The recent surge of interest in phase-change materials GeTe, Ge2Sb2Te5, and related compounds motivated us to revisit the structural phase transition in GeTe in more detail than was done before. The rhombohedral-to-cubic ferroelectric phase transition in GeTe has been studied using high-resolution neutron powder diffraction on a spallation neutron source. We determined the temperature dependence of the structural parameters in a wide temperature range extending from 309 to 973 K. The results ...

  12. Study of two pronged antipd interactions at 5.55GeV/c incident momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voltolini, Christian.

    1976-01-01

    Many experimental problems connected with the two pronged topology, such as correction for various losses and resolution of ambiguous kinematical identifications were treated in detail. Cross sections are given and a detailed analysis of the reactions studied is made. Informations on the antipn→antipn scattering are extracted from the coherent antipd→antipd reaction using the Glauber model. They are in good agreement with the results obtained from the direct study of the elastic antipn diffusion made on a subsample of the reaction antipd→pantipn. The coherent antipd→antindπ - reaction was studied. The analysis of the low mass antinπ - enhancement observed around 1.3GeV/c 2 in the antindπ - final state is made in terms of the Regge pole exchange model accounting for the most important part of the observed 1.3GeV/c 2 bump [fr

  13. Insights on the origin of the Tb5Ge4 magnetocaloric effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belo, J. H.; Barbosa, M. B.; Pires, A. L.; Costa, R. M.; Teixeira, J. G. V.; Silva, J.; Algarabel, P. A.; Magen, C.; Morellon, L.; Amaral, J. S.; Zeitler, U.; Veerendra, G.; dos Santos, A. M.; Ren, Y.; Ibarra, M. R.; Araújo, J. P.; Pereira, A. M.

    2017-05-01

    In this report the magnetic, atomic structures and spin-lattice coupling have been thoroughly studied through high magnetic field magnetometry, Synchrotron X-ray diffraction under applied magnetic field and magnetostriction measurements in the Tb5Ge4 compounds. A field induced phase transition from an antiferromagnetic towards a ferromagnetic ordering was confirmed but with absence of structural transformation. This absence has been confirmed experimentally through synchrotron x-ray diffraction under applied field (up to 30 T). Moreover, this absence was explained via a thermodynamic free energy model: first principles calculations determined a large energy gap (ΔE=0.65 eV) between the two possible structures, O(I) and O(II). From magnetic and structural properties, a H-T phase diagram has been proposed for Tb5Ge4. Finally it was observed a large magnetostriction (up to 600 ppm) induced by ΔH=7 T.

  14. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, Robert C. [Texas A& M University; Kamon, Teruki [Texas A& M University; Toback, David [Texas A& M University; Safonov, Alexei [Texas A& M University; Dutta, Bhaskar [Texas A& M University; Dimitri, Nanopoulos [Texas A& M University; Pope, Christopher [Texas A& M University; White, James [Texas A& M University

    2013-11-18

    Overview The High Energy Physics Group at Texas A&M University is submitting this final report for our grant number DE-FG02-95ER40917. This grant has supported our wide range of research activities for over a decade. The reports contained here summarize the latest work done by our research team. Task A (Collider Physics Program): CMS & CDF Profs. T. Kamon, A. Safonov, and D. Toback co-lead the Texas A&M (TAMU) collider program focusing on CDF and CMS experiments. Task D: Particle Physics Theory Our particle physics theory task is the combined effort of Profs. B. Dutta, D. Nanopoulos, and C. Pope. Task E (Underground Physics): LUX & NEXT Profs. R. Webb and J. White(deceased) lead the Xenon-based underground research program consisting of two main thrusts: the first, participation in the LUX two-phase xenon dark matter search experiment and the second, detector R&D primarily aimed at developing future detectors for underground physics (e.g. NEXT and LZ).

  15. Growth and characterization of gold catalyzed SiGe nanowires and alternative metal-catalyzed Si nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potié, Alexis; Baron, Thierry; Dhalluin, Florian; Rosaz, Guillaume; Salem, Bassem; Latu-Romain, Laurence; Kogelschatz, Martin; Gentile, Pascal; Oehler, Fabrice; Montès, Laurent; Kreisel, Jens; Roussel, Hervé

    2011-12-01

    The growth of semiconductor (SC) nanowires (NW) by CVD using Au-catalyzed VLS process has been widely studied over the past few years. Among others SC, it is possible to grow pure Si or SiGe NW thanks to these techniques. Nevertheless, Au could deteriorate the electric properties of SC and the use of other metal catalysts will be mandatory if NW are to be designed for innovating electronic. First, this article's focus will be on SiGe NW's growth using Au catalyst. The authors managed to grow SiGe NW between 350 and 400°C. Ge concentration ( x) in Si1- x Ge x NW has been successfully varied by modifying the gas flow ratio: R = GeH4/(SiH4 + GeH4). Characterization (by Raman spectroscopy and XRD) revealed concentrations varying from 0.2 to 0.46 on NW grown at 375°C, with R varying from 0.05 to 0.15. Second, the results of Si NW growths by CVD using alternatives catalysts such as platinum-, palladium- and nickel-silicides are presented. This study, carried out on a LPCVD furnace, aimed at defining Si NW growth conditions when using such catalysts. Since the growth temperatures investigated are lower than the eutectic temperatures of these Si-metal alloys, VSS growth is expected and observed. Different temperatures and HCl flow rates have been tested with the aim of minimizing 2D growth which induces an important tapering of the NW. Finally, mechanical characterization of single NW has been carried out using an AFM method developed at the LTM. It consists in measuring the deflection of an AFM tip while performing approach-retract curves at various positions along the length of a cantilevered NW. This approach allows the measurement of as-grown single NW's Young modulus and spring constant, and alleviates uncertainties inherent in single point measurement.

  16. Study of Sn and Mg doping effects on TiO2/Ge stack structure by combinatorial synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Takahiro; Suzuki, Yoshihisa; Yamashita, Yoshiyuki; Ogura, Atsushi; Chikyow, Toyohiro

    2018-04-01

    The effects of Sn and Mg doping of a TiO2 film on a Ge substrate were investigated to improve leakage current properties and Ge diffusion into the TiO2 film. For systematic analysis, dopant-composition-spread TiO2 samples with dopant concentrations of up to 20.0 at. % were fabricated by RF sputtering and a combinatorial method. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that the instability of Mg doping of TiO2 at dopant concentrations above 10.5 at. %. Both Sn and Mg dopants reduced Ge diffusion into TiO2. Sn doping enhanced the crystallization of the rutile phase, which is a high-dielectric-constant phase, although the Mg-doped TiO2 film indicated an amorphous structure. Sn-doping indicated systematic leakage current reduction with increasing dopant concentration. Doping at Sn concentrations higher than 16.8 at. % improved the leakage properties (˜10-7 A/cm2 at -3.0 V) and capacitance-voltage properties of metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) operation. The Sn doping of TiO2 may be useful for interface control and as a dielectric material for Ge-based MIS capacitors.

  17. Direct cooled power electronics substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiles, Randy H [Powell, TN; Wereszczak, Andrew A [Oak Ridge, TN; Ayers, Curtis W [Kingston, TN; Lowe, Kirk T [Knoxville, TN

    2010-09-14

    The disclosure describes directly cooling a three-dimensional, direct metallization (DM) layer in a power electronics device. To enable sufficient cooling, coolant flow channels are formed within the ceramic substrate. The direct metallization layer (typically copper) may be bonded to the ceramic substrate, and semiconductor chips (such as IGBT and diodes) may be soldered or sintered onto the direct metallization layer to form a power electronics module. Multiple modules may be attached to cooling headers that provide in-flow and out-flow of coolant through the channels in the ceramic substrate. The modules and cooling header assembly are preferably sized to fit inside the core of a toroidal shaped capacitor.

  18. Substrate noise coupling in RFICs

    CERN Document Server

    Helmy, Ahmed

    2008-01-01

    Substrate Noise Coupling in RFICs addresses substrate noise coupling in RF and mixed signal ICs when used in a system on chip (SoC) containing digital ICs as well. This trend of integrating RF, mixed signal ICs with large digital ICs is found in many of today's commercial ICs such as single chip Wi-Fi or Bluetooth solutions and is expected to grow rapidly in the future. The book reports modeling and simulation techniques for substrate noise coupling effects in RFICs and introduces isolation structures and design guides to mitigate such effects with the ultimate goal of enhancing the yield of R

  19. What has been discovered at 125 GeV by the CMS and the ATLAS experiments?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbas, Syed Afsar [Jafar Sadiq Research Institute, New Sir Syed Nagar, AGMEC, 1173 (T-1), Aligarh (India)

    2013-06-15

    While looking for the putative Higgs boson of the Standard Model of particle physics, recently, the CMS and the ATLAS experiments at CERN have found strong signals of a new particle at about 125GeV. However in July 2012 the decay channels of this particle had some unexpected and puzzling anomalies not explainable by the Standard Model. By March 2013 they had seen these signals at about well less than 3 {sigma} confidence level. It is expected that the final definitive analysis shall still take quite some time. Here we show that what they may have found at 125GeV is the long sought for and missing ingredient of the strong interaction: the sigma-meson of the Chiral Sigma Model, within the framework of the Skyrme model with a topological interpretation of the baryons. Just like a massless gauge boson is a requirement, and hence a prediction of the local gauge theories, in the the same manner, a very heavy scalar meson is a requirement and hence a prediction of the Skyrme model of the hadrons. The 125GeV particle discovered by the CMS and the ATLAS groups may be an experimental confirmation of this unique prediction of the topological Skyrme model. However the bottom line is that even if the experimentalists finally confirm that this 125GeV entity is the expected Higgs boson, then there still remains to discover another heavier scalar particle as the sigma-meson of the chiral sigma model/Skyrme model, which remains its unique prediction, as shown in this paper. (orig.)

  20. Serial and parallel Si, Ge, and SiGe direct-write with scanning probes and conducting stamps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasko, Stephanie E.; Kapetanovic, Adnan; Talla, Vamsi; Brasino, Michael D.; Zhu, Zihua; Scholl, Andreas; Torrey, Jessica D.; Rolandi, Marco

    2011-05-16

    Precise materials integration in nanostructures is fundamental for future electronic and photonic devices. We demonstrate Si, Ge, and SiGe nanostructure direct-write with deterministic size, geometry, and placement control. The biased probe of an atomic force microscope (AFM) reacts diphenylsilane or diphenylgermane to direct-write carbon-free Si, Ge, and SiGe nano and heterostructures. Parallel directwrite is available on large areas by substituting the AFM probe with conducting microstructured stamps. This facile strategy can be easily expanded to a broad variety of semiconductor materials through precursor selection.

  1. Structural and optical properties of GaAs-based heterostructures with Ge and Ge/InGaAs quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleshkin, V. Ya.; Dubinov, A. A., E-mail: sanya@ipm.sci-nnov.ru; Drozdov, M. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Physics of Microstructures (Russian Federation); Zvonkov, B. N. [Nizhni Novgorod State University, Research Physical Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Kudryavtsev, K. E.; Tonkikh, A. A.; Yablonskiy, A. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Physics of Microstructures (Russian Federation); Werner, P. [Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics (Germany)

    2013-05-15

    GaAs-based heterostructures with Ge and Ge/InGaAs quantum wells are grown by laser-assisted sputtering. Structural and optical studies of the heterostructures are carried out. A broad photoluminescence line is observed in the wavelength range from 1300 to 1650 nm. The line corresponds to indirect transitions in the momentum space of the Ge quantum wells and to transitions between the In{sub 0.28}Ga{sub 0.72}As and Ge layers, indirect in coordinate space, but direct in momentum space.

  2. Impact of Ge profile on the performance of PNP SiGe HBT on thin film SOI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Prasanna K.; Qureshi, S.

    2012-10-01

    The pnp SiGe HBT on thin film SOI is investigated with different Ge profiles using 2D numerical simulations in MEDICI. The base current, collector current, DC current gain, AC voltage gain, unity current gain frequency and breakdown voltage is obtained for a 0.09 × 1.0 μm2 pnp SiGe HBT with triangular (0%-30%), trapezoidal (10%- 20%) and box (15%) Ge profiles in the base layer. The results obtained with the Ge profiles, has been analyzed and compared. The Ft BVCEO product for triangular, trapezoidal and box Ge profiles has been found as 190.8, 401, and 359.6 GHzV respectively. The tradeoff between voltage gain and unity current gain frequency for the Ge profiles has been analyzed. The simulation result suggests that the pnp SiGe HBT on thin film SOI with trapezoidal Ge profile is a potential candidate for the high speed complementary bipolar circuits that can be used in high performance mixed signal applications.

  3. Equation of state of scheelite-structured ZrGeO{sub 4} and HfGeO{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panchal, Vinod [Synchrotron Radiation Section, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Garg, Nandini [Synchrotron Radiation Section, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Achary, S N [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Tyagi, A K [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Sharma, Surinder M [Synchrotron Radiation Section, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2006-09-06

    The high-pressure behaviour of scheelite-structured ZrGeO{sub 4} and HfGeO{sub 4} has been investigated with the help of angle-dispersive powder x-ray diffraction measurements. Our results show that these compounds do not undergo any phase transition up to the pressures of 20.7 and 19.0 GPa, respectively. The isothermal bulk modulus and its pressure derivatives are found to be 238 GPa and 4.5 for ZrGeO{sub 4}, and 242 GPa and 4.8 for HfGeO{sub 4}, implying that these germanates are highly incompressible.

  4. Bounds on dark matter interpretation of Fermi-LAT GeV excess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoungchul Kong

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Annihilation of light dark matter of mDM≈(10–40 GeV into the Standard Model fermions has been suggested as a possible origin of the gamma-ray excess at GeV energies in the Fermi-LAT data. In this paper, we examine possible model-independent signatures of such dark matter models in other experiments such as AMS-02, colliders, and cosmic microwave background (CMB measurements. We point out that first generation of fermion final states is disfavored by the existing experimental data. Currently AMS-02 positron measurements provide stringent bounds on cross sections of dark matter annihilation into leptonic final states, and e+e− final state is in severe tension with this constraint, if not ruled out. The e+e− channel will be complementarily verified in an early stage of ILC and future CMB measurements. Light quark final states (qq¯ are relatively strongly constrained by the LHC and dark matter direct detection experiments even though these bounds are model-dependent. Dark matter signals from annihilations into qq¯ channels would be constrained by AMS-02 antiproton data which will be released in very near future. In optimistic case, diffuse radio emission from nearby galaxy (clusters and the galactic center might provide another hint or limit on dark matter annihilation.

  5. A final focus system for the Next Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmermann, F.; Brown, K.; Emma, P.; Helm, R.; Irwin, J.; Tenenbaum, P.; Wilson, P.

    1995-06-01

    The final focus of the Next Linear Collider (NLC) demagnifies electron and positron beams of 250--750 GeV energy down to a transverse size of about 2.5 x 350 nm 2 at the interaction point (IP). The basic layout, momentum bandwidth, vibration tolerances, wakefield effects, and the tunability of the proposed final focus design are discussed. Also a perspective is given on the crab cavity and on effects of the solenoid field in the interaction region

  6. Search for Massive Colored Scalars in Four-Jet Final States in $\\sqrt{s}$=7 TeV proton-proton collisions with the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Abdesselam, Abdelouahab; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Acerbi, Emilio; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adams, David; Addy, Tetteh; Adelman, Jahred; Aderholz, Michael; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adragna, Paolo; Adye, Tim; Aefsky, Scott; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Aharrouche, Mohamed; Ahlen, Steven; Ahles, Florian; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahsan, Mahsana; Aielli, Giulio; Akdogan, Taylan; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Akiyama, Kunihiro; Alam, Mohammad; Alam, Muhammad Aftab; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alessandria, Franco; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Aliyev, Magsud; Allport, Phillip; Allwood-Spiers, Sarah; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alon, Raz; Alonso, Alejandro; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral, Pedro; Amelung, Christoph; Ammosov, Vladimir; Amorim, Antonio; Amorós, Gabriel; Amram, Nir; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Andrieux, Marie-Laure; Anduaga, Xabier; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoun, Sahar; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Arce, Ayana; Archambault, John-Paul; Arfaoui, Samir; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Arik, Engin; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnault, Christian; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Arutinov, David; Asai, Shoji; Asfandiyarov, Ruslan; Ask, Stefan; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astbury, Alan; Astvatsatourov, Anatoli; Atoian, Grigor; Aubert, Bernard; Auge, Etienne; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Austin, Nicholas; Avolio, Giuseppe; Avramidou, Rachel Maria; Axen, David; Ay, Cano; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Baccaglioni, Giuseppe; Bacci, Cesare; Bach, Andre; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Bachy, Gerard; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bahinipati, Seema; Bai, Yu; Bailey, David; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baker, Mark; Baker, Sarah; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Piyali; Banerjee, Swagato; Banfi, Danilo; Bangert, Andrea Michelle; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barashkou, Andrei; Barbaro Galtieri, Angela; Barber, Tom; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Bardin, Dmitri; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Barrillon, Pierre; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartsch, Detlef; Bartsch, Valeria; Bates, Richard; Batkova, Lucia; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Andreas; Battistin, Michele; Battistoni, Giuseppe; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beare, Brian; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Beckingham, Matthew; Becks, Karl-Heinz; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Begel, Michael; Behar Harpaz, Silvia; Behera, Prafulla; Beimforde, Michael; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellina, Francesco; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belloni, Alberto; Beloborodova, Olga; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Ben Ami, Sagi; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Benchouk, Chafik; Bendel, Markus; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benjamin, Douglas; Benoit, Mathieu; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Berglund, Elina; Beringer, Jürg; Bernardet, Karim; Bernat, Pauline; Bernhard, Ralf; Bernius, Catrin; Berry, Tracey; Bertin, Antonio; Bertinelli, Francesco; Bertolucci, Federico; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besson, Nathalie; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biscarat, Catherine; Bitenc, Urban; Black, Kevin; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanchot, Georges; Blazek, Tomas; Blocker, Craig; Blocki, Jacek; Blondel, Alain; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Boddy, Christopher Richard; Boehler, Michael; Boek, Jennifer; Boelaert, Nele; Böser, Sebastian; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bogouch, Andrei; Bohm, Christian; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Bolnet, Nayanka Myriam; Bona, Marcella; Bondarenko, Valery; Bondioli, Mario; Boonekamp, Maarten; Boorman, Gary; Booth, Chris; Bordoni, Stefania; Borer, Claudia; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borjanovic, Iris; Borroni, Sara; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boterenbrood, Hendrik; Botterill, David; Bouchami, Jihene; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bozhko, Nikolay; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, Ivanka; Bracinik, Juraj; Braem, André; Branchini, Paolo; Brandenburg, George; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brelier, Bertrand; Bremer, Johan; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Breton, Dominique; Britton, Dave; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Brodbeck, Timothy; Brodet, Eyal; Broggi, Francesco; Bromberg, Carl; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, William; Brown, Gareth; Brown, Heather; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Brunet, Sylvie; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Buanes, Trygve; Bucci, Francesca; Buchanan, James; Buchanan, Norman; Buchholz, Peter; Buckingham, Ryan; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Budick, Burton; Büscher, Volker; Bugge, Lars; Buira-Clark, Daniel; Bulekov, Oleg; Bunse, Moritz; Buran, Torleiv; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burgess, Thomas; Burke, Stephen; Busato, Emmanuel; Bussey, Peter; Buszello, Claus-Peter; Butin, François; Butler, Bart; Butler, John; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Buttinger, William; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cakir, Orhan; Calafiura, Paolo; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Calkins, Robert; Caloba, Luiz; Caloi, Rita; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarri, Paolo; Cambiaghi, Mario; Cameron, David; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Canale, Vincenzo; Canelli, Florencia; Canepa, Anadi; Cantero, Josu; Capasso, Luciano; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capriotti, Daniele; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Cardarelli, Roberto; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Bryan; Caron, Sascha; Carrillo Montoya, German D; Carter, Antony; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Cascella, Michele; Caso, Carlo; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo Martin; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Cataldi, Gabriella; Cataneo, Fernando; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Cattani, Giordano; Caughron, Seth; Cauz, Diego; Cavalleri, Pietro; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Santiago Cerqueira, Augusto; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Cevenini, Francesco; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chan, Kevin; Chapleau, Bertrand; Chapman, John Derek; Chapman, John Wehrley; Chareyre, Eve; Charlton, Dave; Chavda, Vikash; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Cheatham, Susan; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Tingyang; Chen, Xin; Cheng, Shaochen; Cheplakov, Alexander; Chepurnov, Vladimir; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Cheung, Sing-Leung; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiefari, Giovanni; Chikovani, Leila; Childers, John Taylor; Chilingarov, Alexandre; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chizhov, Mihail; Choudalakis, Georgios; Chouridou, Sofia; Christidi, Illectra-Athanasia; Christov, Asen; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chu, Ming-Lee; Chudoba, Jiri; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciba, Krzysztof; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Ciftci, Rena; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Ciobotaru, Matei Dan; Ciocca, Claudia; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirilli, Manuela; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Philip; Cleland, Bill; Clemens, Jean-Claude; Clement, Benoit; Clement, Christophe; Clifft, Roger; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coe, Paul; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Coggeshall, James; Cogneras, Eric; Cojocaru, Claudiu; Colas, Jacques; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collard, Caroline; Collins, Neil; Collins-Tooth, Christopher; Collot, Johann; Colon, German; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Conidi, Maria Chiara; Consonni, Michele; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conventi, Francesco; Cook, James; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cooper-Smith, Neil; Copic, Katherine; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Costin, Tudor; Côté, David; Courneyea, Lorraine; Cowan, Glen; Cowden, Christopher; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Crescioli, Francesco; Cristinziani, Markus; Crosetti, Giovanni; Crupi, Roberto; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Cuciuc, Constantin-Mihai; Cuenca Almenar, Cristóbal; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Curatolo, Maria; Curtis, Chris; Cwetanski, Peter; Czirr, Hendrik; Czyczula, Zofia; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; D'Orazio, Alessia; Da Silva, Paulo Vitor; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dai, Tiesheng; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dameri, Mauro; Damiani, Daniel; Danielsson, Hans Olof; Dannheim, Dominik; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darlea, Georgiana Lavinia; Daum, Cornelis; Davey, Will; Davidek, Tomas; Davidson, Nadia; Davidson, Ruth; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davison, Adam; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Dawson, John; Daya, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Castro Faria Salgado, Pedro; De Cecco, Sandro; de Graat, Julien; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De La Taille, Christophe; De la Torre, Hector; De Lotto, Barbara; De Mora, Lee; De Nooij, Lucie; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dean, Simon; Debbe, Ramiro; Dedovich, Dmitri; Degenhardt, James; Dehchar, Mohamed; Del Papa, Carlo; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delruelle, Nicolas; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demirkoz, Bilge; Deng, Jianrong; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Devetak, Erik; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; DeWilde, Burton; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Dhullipudi, Ramasudhakar; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Luise, Silvestro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diblen, Faruk; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Dietzsch, Thorsten; Diglio, Sara; Dindar Yagci, Kamile; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dionisi, Carlo; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; Barros do Vale, Maria Aline; Do Valle Wemans, André; Doan, Thi Kieu Oanh; Dobbs, Matt; Dobinson, Robert; Dobos, Daniel; Dobson, Ellie; Dobson, Marc; Dodd, Jeremy; Doglioni, Caterina; Doherty, Tom; Doi, Yoshikuni; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolenc, Irena; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Dohmae, Takeshi; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donega, Mauro; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dos Anjos, Andre; Dosil, Mireia; Dotti, Andrea; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Dowell, John; Doxiadis, Alexander; Doyle, Tony; Drasal, Zbynek; Drees, Jürgen; Dressnandt, Nandor; Drevermann, Hans; Driouichi, Chafik; Dris, Manolis; Dubbert, Jörg; Dube, Sourabh; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Dudarev, Alexey; Dudziak, Fanny; Dührssen, Michael; Duerdoth, Ian; Duflot, Laurent; Dufour, Marc-Andre; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Duxfield, Robert; Dwuznik, Michal; Dydak, Friedrich; Düren, Michael; Ebenstein, William; Ebke, Johannes; Eckert, Simon; Eckweiler, Sebastian; Edmonds, Keith; Edwards, Clive; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Ehrich, Thies; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Eisenhandler, Eric; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Ellis, Katherine; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Engelmann, Roderich; Engl, Albert; Epp, Brigitte; Eppig, Andrew; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Eriksson, Daniel; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Ernwein, Jean; Errede, Deborah; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Escobar, Carlos; Espinal Curull, Xavier; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienne, Francois; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evangelakou, Despoina; Evans, Hal; Fabbri, Laura; Fabre, Caroline; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farley, Jason; Farooque, Trisha; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Fatholahzadeh, Baharak; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Fazio, Salvatore; Febbraro, Renato; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Woiciech; Fehling-Kaschek, Mirjam; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Fenyuk, Alexander; Ferencei, Jozef; Ferland, Jonathan; Fernando, Waruna; Ferrag, Samir; Ferrando, James; Ferrara, Valentina; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrer, Maria Lorenza; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filippas, Anastasios; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Gordon; Fischer, Peter; Fisher, Matthew; Flechl, Martin; Fleck, Ivor; Fleckner, Johanna; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Flick, Tobias; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Fokitis, Manolis; Fonseca Martin, Teresa; Forbush, David Alan; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fortin, Dominique; Foster, Joe; Fournier, Daniel; Foussat, Arnaud; Fowler, Andrew; Fowler, Ken; Fox, Harald; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchino, Silvia; Francis, David; Frank, Tal; Franklin, Melissa; Franz, Sebastien; Fraternali, Marco; Fratina, Sasa; French, Sky; Friedrich, Felix; Froeschl, Robert; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gadfort, Thomas; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallo, Valentina Santina; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galyaev, Eugene; Gan, KK; Gao, Yongsheng; Gapienko, Vladimir; Gaponenko, Andrei; Garberson, Ford; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garitaonandia, Hegoi; Garonne, Vincent; Garvey, John; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaumer, Olivier; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gayde, Jean-Christophe; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gee, Norman; Geerts, Daniël Alphonsus Adrianus; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Gellerstedt, Karl; Gemme, Claudia; Gemmell, Alistair; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Matthias; George, Simon; Gerlach, Peter; Gershon, Avi; Geweniger, Christoph; Ghazlane, Hamid; Ghez, Philippe; Ghodbane, Nabil; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giakoumopoulou, Victoria; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Gianotti, Fabiola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Adam; Gibson, Stephen; Gilbert, Laura; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gilewsky, Valentin; Gillberg, Dag; Gillman, Tony; Gingrich, Douglas; Ginzburg, Jonatan; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giordano, Raffaele; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giovannini, Paola; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giugni, Danilo; Giunta, Michele; Giusti, Paolo; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glazov, Alexandre; Glitza, Karl-Walter; Glonti, George; Godfrey, Jennifer; Godlewski, Jan; Goebel, Martin; Göpfert, Thomas; Goeringer, Christian; Gössling, Claus; Göttfert, Tobias; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golovnia, Serguei; Gomes, Agostinho; Gomez Fajardo, Luz Stella; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; Gonidec, Allain; Gonzalez, Saul; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Silva, Laura; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goodson, Jeremiah Jet; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorfine, Grant; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Gorokhov, Serguei; Goryachev, Vladimir; Gosdzik, Bjoern; Gosselink, Martijn; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gough Eschrich, Ivo; Gouighri, Mohamed; Goujdami, Driss; Goulette, Marc Phillippe; Goussiou, Anna; Goy, Corinne; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grafström, Per; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Grancagnolo, Francesco; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Grau, Nathan; Gray, Heather; Gray, Julia Ann; Graziani, Enrico; Grebenyuk, Oleg; Greenfield, Debbie; Greenshaw, Timothy; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grigalashvili, Nugzar; Grillo, Alexander; Grinstein, Sebastian; Grishkevich, Yaroslav; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Groh, Manfred; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Groth-Jensen, Jacob; Grybel, Kai; Guarino, Victor; Guest, Daniel; Guicheney, Christophe; Guida, Angelo; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Guler, Hulya; Gunther, Jaroslav; Guo, Bin; Guo, Jun; Gupta, Ambreesh; Gusakov, Yury; Gushchin, Vladimir; Gutierrez, Andrea; Gutierrez, Phillip; Guttman, Nir; Gutzwiller, Olivier; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haas, Stefan; Haber, Carl; Hackenburg, Robert; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Hadley, David; Haefner, Petra; Hahn, Ferdinand; Haider, Stefan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haller, Johannes; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamer, Matthias; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamilton, Samuel; Han, Hongguang; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hance, Michael; Handel, Carsten; Hanke, Paul; Hansen, John Renner; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hansson, Per; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hare, Gabriel; Harenberg, Torsten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harper, Devin; Harrington, Robert; Harris, Orin; Harrison, Karl; Hartert, Jochen; Hartjes, Fred; Haruyama, Tomiyoshi; Harvey, Alex; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hassani, Samira; Hatch, Mark; Hauff, Dieter; Haug, Sigve; Hauschild, Michael; Hauser, Reiner; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawes, Brian; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Donovan; Hayakawa, Takashi; Hayashi, Takayasu; Hayden, Daniel; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Hazen, Eric; He, Mao; Head, Simon; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heinemann, Beate; Heisterkamp, Simon; Helary, Louis; Heller, Matthieu; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, Robert; Henke, Michael; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Henry-Couannier, Frédéric; Hensel, Carsten; Henß, Tobias; Medina Hernandez, Carlos; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg, Ruth; Hershenhorn, Alon David; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hessey, Nigel; Hidvegi, Attila; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Daniel; Hill, John; Hill, Norman; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillert, Sonja; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hirose, Minoru; Hirsch, Florian; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoffman, Julia; Hoffmann, Dirk; Hohlfeld, Marc; Holder, Martin; Holmgren, Sven-Olof; Holy, Tomas; Holzbauer, Jenny; Homma, Yasuhiro; Hong, Tae Min; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Horazdovsky, Tomas; Horn, Claus; Horner, Stephan; Horton, Katherine; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Houlden, Michael; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howarth, James; Howell, David; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hruska, Ivan; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Huang, Guang Shun; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Hughes-Jones, Richard; Huhtinen, Mika; Hurst, Peter; Hurwitz, Martina; Husemann, Ulrich; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibbotson, Michael; Ibragimov, Iskander; Ichimiya, Ryo; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Idarraga, John; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Yuri; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Imbault, Didier; Imori, Masatoshi; Ince, Tayfun; Inigo-Golfin, Joaquin; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Ishikawa, Akimasa; Ishino, Masaya; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Ivashin, Anton; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, John; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakubek, Jan; Jana, Dilip; Jankowski, Ernest; Jansen, Eric; Jantsch, Andreas; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Jeanty, Laura; Jelen, Kazimierz; Jen-La Plante, Imai; Jenni, Peter; Jeremie, Andrea; Jež, Pavel; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Jha, Manoj Kumar; Ji, Haoshuang; Ji, Weina; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jimenez Belenguer, Marcos; Jin, Ge; Jin, Shan; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Joffe, David; Johansen, Lars; Johansen, Marianne; Johansson, Erik; Johansson, Per; Johnert, Sebastian; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tegid; Jones, Tim; Jonsson, Ove; Joram, Christian; Jorge, Pedro; Joseph, John; Jovin, Tatjana; Ju, Xiangyang; Jung, Christian; Juranek, Vojtech; Jussel, Patrick; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kabachenko, Vasily; Kabana, Sonja; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kadlecik, Peter; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kaiser, Steffen; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalinin, Sergey; Kalinovskaya, Lidia; Kama, Sami; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kanno, Takayuki; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kaplon, Jan; Kar, Deepak; Karagoz, Muge; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karr, Kristo; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kasieczka, Gregor; Kasmi, Azzedine; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Mayuko; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katsoufis, Elias; Katzy, Judith; Kaushik, Venkatesh; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kayl, Manuel; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Keates, James Robert; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keil, Markus; Kekelidze, George; Kelly, Marc; Kennedy, John; Kenney, Christopher John; Kenyon, Mike; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerschen, Nicolas; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Kessoku, Kohei; Keung, Justin; Khakzad, Mohsen; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Kharchenko, Dmitri; Khodinov, Alexander; Kholodenko, Anatoli; Khomich, Andrei; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khoriauli, Gia; Khoroshilov, Andrey; Khovanskiy, Nikolai; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Min Suk; Kim, Peter; Kim, Shinhong; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Robert Steven Beaufoy; Kirk, Julie; Kirsch, Lawrence; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kittelmann, Thomas; Kiver, Andrey; Kladiva, Eduard; Klaiber-Lodewigs, Jonas; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klemetti, Miika; Klier, Amit; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinkby, Esben; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Klok, Peter; Klous, Sander; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluge, Thomas; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Knecht, Neil; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knobloch, Juergen; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Ko, Byeong Rok; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kocnar, Antonin; Kodys, Peter; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Koenig, Sebastian; Köpke, Lutz; Koetsveld, Folkert; Koevesarki, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kohn, Fabian; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kokott, Thomas; Kolachev, Guennady; Kolanoski, Hermann; Kolesnikov, Vladimir; Koletsou, Iro; Koll, James; Kollar, Daniel; Kollefrath, Michael; Kolya, Scott; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kono, Takanori; Kononov, Anatoly; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kootz, Andreas; Koperny, Stefan; Kopikov, Sergey; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Koreshev, Victor; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Korotkov, Vladislav; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotamäki, Miikka Juhani; Kotov, Sergey; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kral, Vlastimil; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, James; Kraus, Jana; Kreisel, Arik; Krejci, Frantisek; Kretzschmar, Jan; Krieger, Nina; Krieger, Peter; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Kruker, Tobias; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kruth, Andre; Kubota, Takashi; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kuhn, Dietmar; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kummer, Christian; Kuna, Marine; Kundu, Nikhil; Kunkle, Joshua; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurata, Masakazu; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; Kwee, Regina; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rotonda, Laura; Labarga, Luis; Labbe, Julien; Lablak, Said; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Rémi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Laisne, Emmanuel; Lamanna, Massimo; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lancon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Landsman, Hagar; Lane, Jenna; Lange, Clemens; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Larionov, Anatoly; Larner, Aimee; Lasseur, Christian; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Laycock, Paul; Lazarev, Alexandre; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Maner, Christophe; Le Menedeu, Eve; Lebel, Céline; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Hurng-Chun; Lee, Jason; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Michel; Legendre, Marie; Leger, Annie; LeGeyt, Benjamin; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehmacher, Marc; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Leltchouk, Mikhail; Lemmer, Boris; Lendermann, Victor; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatiana; Lenzen, Georg; Lenzi, Bruno; Leonhardt, Kathrin; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Leroy, Claude; Lessard, Jean-Raphael; Lesser, Jonas; Lester, Christopher; Leung Fook Cheong, Annabelle; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levitski, Mikhail; Lewis, Adrian; Lewis, George; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bo; Li, Haifeng; Li, Shu; Li, Xuefei; Liang, Zhihua; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberti, Barbara; Lichard, Peter; Lichtnecker, Markus; Lie, Ki; Liebig, Wolfgang; Lifshitz, Ronen; Lilley, Joseph; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Limper, Maaike; Lin, Simon; Linde, Frank; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipinsky, Lukas; Lipniacka, Anna; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Chuanlei; Liu, Dong; Liu, Hao; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Shengli; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Livermore, Sarah; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loddenkoetter, Thomas; Loebinger, Fred; Loginov, Andrey; Loh, Chang Wei; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Loken, James; Lombardo, Vincenzo Paolo; Long, Robin Eamonn; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Losty, Michael; Lou, Xinchou; Lounis, Abdenour; Loureiro, Karina; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lowe, Andrew; Lu, Feng; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Ludwig, Andreas; Ludwig, Dörthe; Ludwig, Inga; Ludwig, Jens; Luehring, Frederick; Luijckx, Guy; Lumb, Debra; Luminari, Lamberto; Lund, Esben; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lundberg, Björn; Lundberg, Johan; Lundquist, Johan; Lungwitz, Matthias; Lupi, Anna; Lutz, Gerhard; Lynn, David; Lys, Jeremy; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Macana Goia, Jorge Andres; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Mackeprang, Rasmus; Madaras, Ronald; Mader, Wolfgang; Maenner, Reinhard; Maeno, Tadashi; Mättig, Peter; Mättig, Stefan; Magnoni, Luca; Magradze, Erekle; Mahalalel, Yair; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahout, Gilles; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Mal, Prolay; Malecki, Pawel; Malecki, Piotr; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mameghani, Raphael; Mamuzic, Judita; Manabe, Atsushi; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Mangeard, Pierre-Simon; Manjavidze, Ioseb; Mann, Alexander; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Manz, Andreas; Mapelli, Alessandro; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchand, Jean-Francois; Marchese, Fabrizio; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marin, Alexandru; Marino, Christopher; Marroquim, Fernando; Marshall, Robin; Marshall, Zach; Martens, Kalen; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Andrew; Martin, Brian; Martin, Brian Thomas; Martin, Franck Francois; Martin, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Philippe; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martin–Haugh, Stewart; Martinez, Mario; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massaro, Graziano; Massol, Nicolas; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mathes, Markus; Matricon, Pierre; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Matsunaga, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Takashi; Mattravers, Carly; Maugain, Jean-Marie; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; May, Edward; Mayne, Anna; Mazini, Rachid; Mazur, Michael; Mazzanti, Marcello; Mazzoni, Enrico; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; McGlone, Helen; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McLaren, Robert Andrew; Mclaughlan, Tom; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Meade, Andrew; Mechnich, Joerg; Mechtel, Markus; Medinnis, Mike; Meera-Lebbai, Razzak; Meguro, Tatsuma; Mehdiyev, Rashid; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meinhardt, Jens; Meirose, Bernhard; Melachrinos, Constantinos; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Mendoza Navas, Luis; Meng, Zhaoxia; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Menot, Claude; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer, Joerg; Meyer, Thomas Christian; Meyer, W Thomas; Miao, Jiayuan; Michal, Sebastien; Micu, Liliana; Middleton, Robin; Miele, Paola; Migas, Sylwia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Miller, David; Miller, Robert; Mills, Bill; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Milstein, Dmitry; Minaenko, Andrey; Miñano, Mercedes; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mirabelli, Giovanni; Miralles Verge, Lluis; Misiejuk, Andrzej; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitrofanov, Gennady; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Mitsui, Shingo; Miyagawa, Paul; Miyazaki, Kazuki; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mockett, Paul; Moed, Shulamit; Moeller, Victoria; Mönig, Klaus; Möser, Nicolas; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Mohrdieck-Möck, Susanne; Moisseev, Artemy; Moles-Valls, Regina; Molina-Perez, Jorge; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montesano, Simone; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Moorhead, Gareth; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Moraes, Arthur; Morange, Nicolas; Morel, Julien; Morello, Gianfranco; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morii, Masahiro; Morin, Jerome; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morozov, Sergey; Morris, John; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Mudrinic, Mihajlo; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Müller, Thomas; Muenstermann, Daniel; Muir, Alex; Munwes, Yonathan; Murray, Bill; Mussche, Ido; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Nanava, Gizo; Napier, Austin; Nash, Michael; Nation, Nigel; Nattermann, Till; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Neal, Homer; Nebot, Eduardo; Nechaeva, Polina; Negri, Andrea; Negri, Guido; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nelson, Andrew; Nelson, Silke; Nelson, Timothy Knight; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Nesterov, Stanislav; Neubauer, Mark; Neusiedl, Andrea; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen Thi Hong, Van; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicolas, Ludovic; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Niedercorn, Francois; Nielsen, Jason; Niinikoski, Tapio; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolaev, Kirill; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolics, Katalin; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Henrik; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nishiyama, Tomonori; Nisius, Richard; Nodulman, Lawrence; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Nordberg, Markus; Nordkvist, Bjoern; Norton, Peter; Novakova, Jana; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Nugent, Ian Michael; Nuncio-Quiroz, Adriana-Elizabeth; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; Nyman, Tommi; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'Neale, Steve; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Odier, Jerome; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohshima, Takayoshi; Ohshita, Hidetoshi; Ohsugi, Takashi; Okada, Shogo; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olcese, Marco; Olchevski, Alexander; Oliveira, Miguel Alfonso; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olivito, Dominick; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Omachi, Chihiro; Onofre, António; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlov, Iliya; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Osuna, Carlos; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Ottersbach, John; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Ouyang, Qun; Owen, Mark; Owen, Simon; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganis, Efstathios; Paige, Frank; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Paleari, Chiara; Palestini, Sandro; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Palmer, Jody; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panes, Boris; Panikashvili, Natalia; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Panuskova, Monika; Paolone, Vittorio; Papadelis, Aras; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Paramonov, Alexander; Park, Woochun; Parker, Andy; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passeri, Antonio; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Patricelli, Sergio; Pauly, Thilo; Pecsy, Martin; Pedraza Morales, Maria Isabel; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Peng, Haiping; Pengo, Ruggero; Penson, Alexander; Penwell, John; Perantoni, Marcelo; Perez, Kerstin; Perez Cavalcanti, Tiago; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perez Reale, Valeria; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrino, Roberto; Perrodo, Pascal; Persembe, Seda; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Jorgen; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Petschull, Dennis; Petteni, Michele; Pezoa, Raquel; Phan, Anna; Phillips, Alan; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Piec, Sebastian Marcin; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinder, Alex; Pinfold, James; Ping, Jialun; Pinto, Belmiro; Pirotte, Olivier; Pizio, Caterina; Placakyte, Ringaile; Plamondon, Mathieu; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskach, Anatoly; Poblaguev, Andrei; Poddar, Sahill; Podlyski, Fabrice; Poggioli, Luc; Poghosyan, Tatevik; Pohl, Martin; Polci, Francesco; Polesello, Giacomo; Policicchio, Antonio; Polini, Alessandro; Poll, James; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pomarede, Daniel Marc; Pomeroy, Daniel; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Portell Bueso, Xavier; Posch, Christoph; Pospelov, Guennady; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Prabhu, Robindra; Pralavorio, Pascal; Prasad, Srivas; Pravahan, Rishiraj; Prell, Soeren; Pretzl, Klaus Peter; Pribyl, Lukas; Price, Darren; Price, Lawrence; Price, Michael John; Prichard, Paul; Prieur, Damien; Primavera, Margherita; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Prudent, Xavier; Przysiezniak, Helenka; Psoroulas, Serena; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Pueschel, Elisa; Purdham, John; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Pylypchenko, Yuriy; Qian, Jianming; Qian, Zuxuan; Qin, Zhonghua; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Quinonez, Fernando; Raas, Marcel; Radescu, Voica; Radics, Balint; Rador, Tonguc; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rahimi, Amir; Rahm, David; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rammes, Marcus; Ramstedt, Magnus; Randle-Conde, Aidan Sean; Randrianarivony, Koloina; Ratoff, Peter; Rauscher, Felix; Rauter, Emanuel; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Reichold, Armin; Reinherz-Aronis, Erez; Reinsch, Andreas; Reisinger, Ingo; Reljic, Dusan; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Zhongliang; Renaud, Adrien; Renkel, Peter; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Resende, Bernardo; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richards, Alexander; Richter, Robert; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ridel, Melissa; Rijpstra, Manouk; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Rios, Ryan Randy; Riu, Imma; Rivoltella, Giancesare; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robinson, Mary; Robson, Aidan; Rocha de Lima, Jose Guilherme; Roda, Chiara; Roda Dos Santos, Denis; Rodier, Stephane; Rodriguez, Diego; Roe, Adam; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Rojo, Victoria; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romanov, Victor; Romeo, Gaston; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Anthony; Rose, Matthew; Rosenbaum, Gabriel; Rosenberg, Eli; Rosendahl, Peter Lundgaard; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rosselet, Laurent; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexander; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubinskiy, Igor; Ruckert, Benjamin; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Christian; Rudolph, Gerald; Rühr, Frederik; Ruggieri, Federico; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rumiantsev, Viktor; Rumyantsev, Leonid; Runge, Kay; Runolfsson, Ogmundur; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Rust, Dave; Rutherfoord, John; Ruwiedel, Christoph; Ruzicka, Pavel; Ryabov, Yury; Ryadovikov, Vasily; Ryan, Patrick; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Rzaeva, Sevda; Saavedra, Aldo; Sadeh, Iftach; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Saleem, Muhammad; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvachua Ferrando, Belén; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Samset, Björn Hallvard; Sanchez, Arturo; Sandaker, Heidi; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Tanya; Sandoval, Carlos; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sandvoss, Stephan; Sankey, Dave; Sansoni, Andrea; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Saraiva, João; Sarangi, Tapas; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, Edward; Sarri, Francesca; Sartisohn, Georg; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Takashi; Sasao, Noboru; Satsounkevitch, Igor; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Savard, Pierre; Savinov, Vladimir; Savu, Dan Octavian; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, David; Says, Louis-Pierre; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scallon, Olivia; Scannicchio, Diana; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schäfer, Uli; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R. Dean; Schamov, Andrey; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Scherzer, Max; Schiavi, Carlo; Schieck, Jochen; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schlereth, James; Schmidt, Evelyn; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Sebastian; Schmitz, Martin; Schöning, André; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schram, Malachi; Schroeder, Christian; Schroer, Nicolai; Schuh, Silvia; Schuler, Georges; Schultes, Joachim; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Jan; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwierz, Rainer; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Scott, Bill; Searcy, Jacob; Sedov, George; Sedykh, Evgeny; Segura, Ester; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Sellden, Bjoern; Sellers, Graham; Seman, Michal; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sevior, Martin; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shank, James; Shao, Qi Tao; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaver, Leif; Shaw, Kate; Sherman, Daniel; Sherwood, Peter; Shibata, Akira; Shichi, Hideharu; Shimizu, Shima; Shimojima, Makoto; Shin, Taeksu; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shochet, Mel; Short, Daniel; Shupe, Michael; Sicho, Petr; Sidoti, Antonio; Siebel, Anca-Mirela; Siegert, Frank; Siegrist, James; Sijacki, Djordje; Silbert, Ohad; Silva, José; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Daniel; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simmons, Brinick; Simonyan, Margar; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sipica, Valentin; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sircar, Anirvan; Sisakyan, Alexei; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skinnari, Louise Anastasia; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skovpen, Kirill; Skubic, Patrick; Skvorodnev, Nikolai; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Sloper, John erik; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Ben Campbell; Smith, Douglas; Smith, Kenway; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snow, Steve; Snow, Joel; Snuverink, Jochem; Snyder, Scott; Soares, Mara; Sobie, Randall; Sodomka, Jaromir; Soffer, Abner; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solfaroli Camillocci, Elena; Solodkov, Alexander; Solovyanov, Oleg; Sondericker, John; Soni, Nitesh; Sopko, Vit; Sopko, Bruno; Sosebee, Mark; Soualah, Rachik; Soukharev, Andrey; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spanò, Francesco; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spila, Federico; Spiriti, Eleuterio; Spiwoks, Ralf; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; Spurlock, Barry; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stahl, Thorsten; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staude, Arnold; Stavina, Pavel; Stavropoulos, Georgios; Steele, Genevieve; Steinbach, Peter; Steinberg, Peter; Stekl, Ivan; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stevenson, Kyle; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockmanns, Tobias; Stockton, Mark; Stoerig, Kathrin; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stonjek, Stefan; Strachota, Pavel; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strang, Michael; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Strong, John; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Strube, Jan; Stugu, Bjarne; Stumer, Iuliu; Stupak, John; Sturm, Philipp; Soh, Dart-yin; Su, Dong; Subramania, Halasya Siva; Succurro, Antonella; Sugaya, Yorihito; Sugimoto, Takuya; Suhr, Chad; Suita, Koichi; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Sushkov, Serge; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Yu; Suzuki, Yuta; Svatos, Michal; Sviridov, Yuri; Swedish, Stephen; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Szeless, Balazs; Sánchez, Javier; Ta, Duc; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takahashi, Yuta; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tamsett, Matthew; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Satoshi; Tanaka, Shuji; Tanaka, Yoshito; Tani, Kazutoshi; Tannoury, Nancy; Tappern, Geoffrey; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tardif, Dominique; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tassi, Enrico; Tatarkhanov, Mous; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Christopher; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Wendy; Teinturier, Marthe; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, Matilde; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terwort, Mark; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Thadome, Jocelyn; Therhaag, Jan; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thioye, Moustapha; Thoma, Sascha; Thomas, Juergen; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Peter; Thompson, Stan; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Thun, Rudolf; Tian, Feng; Tic, Tomáš; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timmermans, Charles; Tipton, Paul; Tique Aires Viegas, Florbela De Jes; Tisserant, Sylvain; Tobias, Jürgen; Toczek, Barbara; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Toggerson, Brokk; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokunaga, Kaoru; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Tong, Guoliang; Tonoyan, Arshak; Topfel, Cyril; Topilin, Nikolai; Torchiani, Ingo; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Traynor, Daniel; Trefzger, Thomas; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alesandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Trinh, Thi Nguyet; Tripiana, Martin; Trischuk, William; Trivedi, Arjun; Trocmé, Benjamin; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trzupek, Adam; Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiakiris, Menelaos; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsionou, Dimitra; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsung, Jieh-Wen; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tua, Alan; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tuggle, Joseph; Turala, Michal; Turecek, Daniel; Turk Cakir, Ilkay; Turlay, Emmanuel; Turra, Ruggero; Tuts, Michael; Tykhonov, Andrii; Tylmad, Maja; Tyndel, Mike; Tyrvainen, Harri; Tzanakos, George; Uchida, Kirika; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ugland, Maren; Uhlenbrock, Mathias; Uhrmacher, Michael; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Underwood, David; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Unno, Yoshinobu; Urbaniec, Dustin; Urkovsky, Evgeny; Urrejola, Pedro; Usai, Giulio; Uslenghi, Massimiliano; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Vahsen, Sven; Valenta, Jan; Valente, Paolo; Valentinetti, Sara; Valkar, Stefan; Valladolid Gallego, Eva; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; van der Graaf, Harry; van der Kraaij, Erik; Van Der Leeuw, Robin; van der Poel, Egge; van der Ster, Daniel; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; van Kesteren, Zdenko; van Vulpen, Ivo; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vandoni, Giovanna; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vannucci, Francois; Varela Rodriguez, Fernando; Vari, Riccardo; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vassilakopoulos, Vassilios; Vazeille, Francois; Vegni, Guido; Veillet, Jean-Jacques; Vellidis, Constantine; Veloso, Filipe; Veness, Raymond; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Ventura, Daniel; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinek, Elisabeth; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Virchaux, Marc; Virzi, Joseph; Vitells, Ofer; Viti, Michele; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vives Vaque, Francesc; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vladoiu, Dan; Vlasak, Michal; Vlasov, Nikolai; Vogel, Adrian; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; Volpini, Giovanni; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Loeben, Joerg; von Radziewski, Holger; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorobiev, Alexander; Vorwerk, Volker; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Voss, Thorsten Tobias; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vu Anh, Tuan; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wagner, Peter; Wahlen, Helmut; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walbersloh, Jorg; Walch, Shannon; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wall, Richard; Waller, Peter; Wang, Chiho; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Joshua C; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Warsinsky, Markus; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Anthony; Waugh, Ben; Weber, Jens; Weber, Marc; Weber, Michele; Weber, Pavel; Weidberg, Anthony; Weigell, Philipp; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Wellenstein, Hermann; Wells, Phillippa; Wen, Mei; Wenaus, Torre; Wendler, Shanti; Weng, Zhili; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Werth, Michael; Wessels, Martin; Weydert, Carole; Whalen, Kathleen; Wheeler-Ellis, Sarah Jane; Whitaker, Scott; White, Andrew; White, Martin; Whitehead, Samuel Robert; Whiteson, Daniel; Whittington, Denver; Wicek, Francois; Wicke, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik, Liv Antje Mari; Wijeratne, Peter Alexander; Wildauer, Andreas; Wildt, Martin Andre; Wilhelm, Ivan; Wilkens, Henric George; Will, Jonas Zacharias; Williams, Eric; Williams, Hugh; Willis, William; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, John; Wilson, Michael Galante; Wilson, Alan; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winkelmann, Stefan; Winklmeier, Frank; Wittgen, Matthias; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wong, Wei-Cheng; Wooden, Gemma; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wraight, Kenneth; Wright, Catherine; Wright, Michael; Wrona, Bozydar; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wulf, Evan; Wunstorf, Renate; Wynne, Benjamin; Xaplanteris, Leonidas; Xella, Stefania; Xie, Song; Xie, Yigang; Xu, Chao; Xu, Da; Xu, Guofa; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yamada, Miho; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamamura, Taiki; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamaoka, Jared; Yamazaki, Takayuki; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Yi; Yang, Yi; Yang, Zhaoyu; Yanush, Serguei; Yao, Yushu; Yasu, Yoshiji; Ybeles Smit, Gabriel Valentijn; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yilmaz, Metin; Yoosoofmiya, Reza; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Riktura; Young, Charles; Youssef, Saul; Yu, Dantong; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yurkewicz, Adam; Zaets, Vassilli; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zajacova, Zuzana; Zalite, Youris; Zanello, Lucia; Zarzhitsky, Pavel; Zaytsev, Alexander; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeller, Michael; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zendler, Carolin; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zenonos, Zenonas; Zenz, Seth; Zerwas, Dirk; Zevi della Porta, Giovanni; Zhan, Zhichao; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Long; Zhao, Tianchi; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zheng, Shuchen; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Ning; Zhou, Yue; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhuravlov, Vadym; Zieminska, Daria; Zimmermann, Robert; Zimmermann, Simone; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Ziolkowski, Michael; Zitoun, Robert; Živković, Lidija; Zmouchko, Viatcheslav; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; Zolnierowski, Yves; Zsenei, Andras; zur Nedden, Martin; Zutshi, Vishnu; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2011-01-01

    A search for pair-produced scalar particles decaying to a four-jet final state is presented. The analysis is performed using an integrated luminosity of 34 pb^-1 recorded by the ATLAS detector in 2010. No deviation from the Standard Model is observed. For a scalar mass of 100 GeV (190 GeV) the limit on the scalar gluon pair production cross section at 95% confidence level is 1 nb (0.28 nb). When these results are interpreted as mass limits, scalar-gluons (hyperpions) with masses of 100 to 185 GeV (100 to 155 GeV) are excluded at 95% confidence level with the exception of a mass window of width about 5 GeV (15 GeV) around 140 GeV.

  7. Coated substrate apparatus and method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, Zhenan; Diao, Ying; Mannsfeld, Stefan Christian Bernhardt; Tee, Chee-Keong; Becerril-Garcia, Hector A.; Zhou, Yan

    2018-01-09

    A coated substrate is formed with aligned objects such as small molecules, macromolecules and nanoscale particulates, such as inorganic, organic or inorganic/organic hybrid materials. In accordance with one or more embodiments, an apparatus or method involves an applicator having at least one surface patterned with protruded or indented features, and a coated substrate including a solution-based layer of objects having features and morphology attributes arranged as a function of the protruded or indented features.

  8. Substrate channeling in proline metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arentson, Benjamin W.; Sanyal, Nikhilesh; Becker, Donald F.

    2012-01-01

    Proline metabolism is an important pathway that has relevance in several cellular functions such as redox balance, apoptosis, and cell survival. Results from different groups have indicated that substrate channeling of proline metabolic intermediates may be a critical mechanism. One intermediate is pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C), which upon hydrolysis opens to glutamic semialdehyde (GSA). Recent structural and kinetic evidence indicate substrate channeling of P5C/GSA occurs in the proline catabolic pathway between the proline dehydrogenase and P5C dehydrogenase active sites of bifunctional proline utilization A (PutA). Substrate channeling in PutA is proposed to facilitate the hydrolysis of P5C to GSA which is unfavorable at physiological pH. The second intermediate, gamma-glutamyl phosphate, is part of the proline biosynthetic pathway and is extremely labile. Substrate channeling of gamma-glutamyl phosphate is thought to be necessary to protect it from bulk solvent. Because of the unfavorable equilibrium of P5C/GSA and the reactivity of gamma-glutamyl phosphate, substrate channeling likely improves the efficiency of proline metabolism. Here, we outline general strategies for testing substrate channeling and review the evidence for channeling in proline metabolism. PMID:22201749

  9. Substrate Handbook for Biogas Production; Substrathandbok foer biogasproduktion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlsson, My; Uldal, Martina (AnoxKaldnes AB, Lund (Sweden))

    2009-02-15

    every day work. The Excel file is intended to work as a living document to be incorporated in calculation templates etc, where new data and information can be added gradually. It includes approximately 40 different substrates, for which the following parameters are given; TS-content, VS-content, methane content, gas yield, methane yield, nutrient composition, ABP-category, possible mechanical problems, other comments and source of information. In addition, the results from the BMP-tests and characterization of in total around 20 different substrates are given. These results points to the difficulty of proposing the final methane production for a substrate only from a rough characterization based on fat/protein/carbohydrate content

  10. The fitted channels π-p→π-pπ+π- and π-p→π-p2π+2π- at 147 GeV/c incident momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brick, D.; Fong, D.; Heller, M.; Shapiro, A.M.; Widgoff, M.; Bruyant, F.; Bogert, D.; Johnson, M.; Burnstein, R.; Fu, C.; Petersen, D.; Robertson, M.; Rubin, H.; Sard, R.; Snyder, A.; Tortora, J.; Chien, C.Y.; Lucas, P.; Pevsner, A.; Zdanis, R.; Barreiro, F.; Benary, O.; Brau, J.E.; Grunhaus, J.; Hafen, E.S.; Hulsizer, R.I.; Karshon, U.; Kistiakowsky, V.; Levy, A.; Napier, A.; Pless, I.A.; Silverman, J.P.; Trepagnier, P.C.; Wolfson, J.; Yamamoto, R.K.; Cohn, H.; Jacques, P.F.; Ou, T.C.; Plano, R.J.; Watts, T.L.; Brucker, E.; Koller, E.; Stamer, P.; Taylor, S.; Bugg, W.; Condo, G.; Handler, T.; Hart, E.; Kraybill, H.; Ljung, D.; Ludlam, T.; Taft, H.D.; Alyea, E.D. Jr.

    The results are reported on the 4- and 6-prong final states in π - p interactions at 147 GeV/c incident momentum obtained from a 105 000 picture exposure of the 30 in. bubble chamber Fermilab Hybrid Proportional Wire System to a tagged negative beam of 147 GeV/c momentum. The final states of the π - p→π - pπ + π - and π - p→π - p2π + 2π - processes are analyzed and the values of cross sections and of invariant mass distributions are presented. (Z.J.)

  11. 3 GeV Injector Design Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiedemann, H.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2009-12-16

    This Design Handbook is intended to be the main reference book for the specifications of the 3 GeV SPEAR booster synchrotron project. It is intended to be a consistent description of the project including design criteria, key technical specifications as well as current design approaches. Since a project is not complete till it's complete changes and modifications of early conceptual designs must be expected during the duration of the construction. Therefore, this Design Handbook is issued as a loose leaf binder so that individual sections can be replaced as needed. Each page will be dated to ease identification with respect to latest revisions. At the end of the project this Design Handbook will have become the 'as built' reference book of the injector for operations and maintenance personnel.

  12. Separated K(-) beams (10 GeV and above)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunce, G. M.

    Separated kaon beams with intensity similar to present pion beams are, in fact, possible to build now, with the potential of even high kaon flux in the future. It is particularly attractive to work with a kaon minus beam due to the large number of final state combinations which would be available, due to the strange quark. Cason and Donoghue showed that a kaon beam combined with a complete spectrometer capable of observing both neutral and charged particles would increase the available states for spectroscopy for masses from 1 to 3 GeV by a factor of 10. They urged a complete mapping of states, using a sky survey as an analogy. The present capability is similar to scans of the sky made only in the optical range. They also point out that the specific subject of confinement - whether there can be combinations of quarks and gluons not yet seen - is an exciting topic which is beginning to get theoretical guidance from QCD calculations on a lattice. This confluence of technical advance (intensity) and physics interest (confinement) makes a separated kaon beam particularly compelling.

  13. Thermoelectric Performance of Na-Doped GeSe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shaabani, Laaya; Aminorroaya-Yamini, Sima; Byrnes, Jacob; Akbar Nezhad, Ali; Blake, Graeme R

    2017-01-01

    Recently, hole-doped GeSe materials have been predicted to exhibit extraordinary thermoelectric performance owing largely to extremely low thermal conductivity. However, experimental research on the thermoelectric properties of GeSe has received less attention. Here, we have synthesized

  14. Local atomic environment in amorphous Ge15Te85

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jóvári, P.; Kaban, I.; Hoyer, W.; Delaplane, R. G.; Wannberg, A.

    2005-03-01

    The structure of amorphous Ge15Te85 has been studied by neutron and x-ray diffraction. Experimental data have been modelled simultaneously with the reverse Monte Carlo simulation method. The contrast between structure factors together with the application of some plausible physical constraints allowed the separation of the three partial pair correlation functions and determination of Ge and Te local environment.

  15. Stress evolution of Ge nanocrystals in dielectric matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahariqushchi, Rahim; Raciti, Rosario; Emre Kasapoğlu, Ahmet; Gür, Emre; Sezen, Meltem; Kalay, Eren; Mirabella, Salvatore; Aydinli, A.

    2018-05-01

    Germanium nanocrystals (Ge NCs) embedded in single and multilayer silicon oxide and silicon nitride matrices have been synthesized using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition followed by conventional furnace annealing or rapid thermal processing in N2 ambient. Compositions of the films were determined by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The formation of NCs under suitable process conditions was observed with high resolution transmission electron microscope micrographs and Raman spectroscopy. Stress measurements were done using Raman shifts of the Ge optical phonon line at 300.7 cm-1. The effect of the embedding matrix and annealing methods on Ge NC formation were investigated. In addition to Ge NCs in single layer samples, the stress on Ge NCs in multilayer samples was also analyzed. Multilayers of Ge NCs in a silicon nitride matrix separated by dielectric buffer layers to control the size and density of NCs were fabricated. Multilayers consisted of SiN y :Ge ultrathin films sandwiched between either SiO2 or Si3N4 by the proper choice of buffer material. We demonstrated that it is possible to tune the stress state of Ge NCs from compressive to tensile, a desirable property for optoelectronic applications. We also observed that there is a correlation between the stress and the crystallization threshold in which the compressive stress enhances the crystallization, while the tensile stress suppresses the process.

  16. Three-dimensional simulation of fabrication process-dependent effects on single event effects of SiGe heterojunction bipolar transistor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jin-Xin; Guo Bao-Long; Wu Xian-Xiang; He Chao-Hui; Li Pei; Guo Hong-Xia

    2017-01-01

    The fabrication process dependent effects on single event effects (SEEs) are investigated in a commercial silicon–germanium heterojunction bipolar transistor (SiGe HBT) using three-dimensional (3D) TCAD simulations. The influences of device structure and doping concentration on SEEs are discussed via analysis of current transient and charge collection induced by ions strike. The results show that the SEEs representation of current transient is different from representation of the charge collection for the same process parameters. To be specific, the area of C/S junction is the key parameter that affects charge collection of SEE. Both current transient and charge collection are dependent on the doping of collector and substrate. The base doping slightly influences transient currents of base, emitter, and collector terminals. However, the SEEs of SiGe HBT are hardly affected by the doping of epitaxial base and the content of Ge. (paper)

  17. Model-independent determination of the strain distribution for a SiGe/Si superlattice using X-ray diffractometry data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikulin, A.Y.; Stevenson, A.W.; Hashizume, H.

    1996-01-01

    The strain distribution in a Si 0.9 Ge 0.l/Si superlattice is determined from x-ray diffractometry data with a 25 Angstroms depth resolution. A logarithmic dispersion relation is used to determine the phase of the structure factor with information available a priori on the sample structure. Phase information is obtained from the observed reflection intensity via a logarithmic Hilbert transform and the a priori information is used to select the zeros to be included in the solution. The reconstructed lattice strain profile clearly resolves SiGe and Si layers of 90 - 160 Angstroms thickness alternately stacked on a silicon substrate. The SiGe layer is found to have a lattice spacing in the surface-normal direction significantly smaller than predicted by Vegard's law. The result is supported by very good agreement of the simulated rocking curve profile with the observation. 18 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs

  18. GeNF - experimental report 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreyer, A.; Vollbrandt, J.; Willumeit, R. (eds.) [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. for Materials Research

    2004-07-01

    At the Geesthacht Neutron Facility GeNF about 210 experiments were performed in 2003 by GKSS and by or for external users, partners or contractors. In most cases the measurements were performed and analysed in cooperation by the guest and by the GKSS staff or by the permanent external user group staff. The activities, which are based on a proposal procedure and on the in house R and D program, are reported in 76 contributions in the present annual experimental report for the year 2003. The contributions may contain one or also several combined experiments. During 2003 the GKSS research reactor FRG-1 achieved an operation time of 252 days at the full 5 MW reactor power providing a neutron flux of ca. 1,4 x 10{sup 14} thermal neutrons / cm{sup 2} s. The cold neutron source was available during the complete operation time. The focus of the in house R and D work at GeNF instruments was the characterisation of metal alloys, the analysis of stresses in welds and technical structures at ARES, FSS, DCD and SANS-2, the structural investigation of hydrogen containing substances such as polymers, colloids and biological macromolecules at SANS-1 as well as the characterisation of magnetic thin films at PNR and ROeDI. The reflectomer TOREMA was thoroughly upgraded to the instrument NeRo and now offers new measurement possibilities. In the appendices the progress of the project REFSANS at FRM-II is reported as well as the experimental activities of the newly installed GKSS outstation HARWI-II at DESY. (orig.)

  19. GeNF - Experimental report 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pranzas, P.K.; Schreyer, A.; Willumeit, R.

    2007-01-01

    At the Geesthacht Neutron Facility GeNF about 212 experiments were performed in 2006 by GKSS and by or for external users, partners or contractors. In most cases the measurements were performed and analysed in cooperation by the guests and by the GKSS staff or by the permanent external user group staff. The activities, which are based on a proposal procedure and on the in house R and D program, are reported in 71 contributions in the present annual experimental report for the year 2006. The contributions may contain one or also several combined experiments. During 2006 the GKSS research reactor FRG-1 achieved an operation time of 197 days at the full 5 MW reactor power providing a neutron flux of ca. 1.4 x 10 14 thermal neutrons/cm 2 s. The cold neutron source was available during the complete operation time. The focus of the in house R and D work at GeNF instruments was the characterisation of nanostructures in engineering materials, the analysis of stresses and textures in welds and technical structures at ARES-2, TEX-2, DCD and SANS-2, the structural investigation of hydrogen containing substances such as polymers, colloids and biological macromolecules at SANS-1 as well as the characterisation of magnetic thin films at PNR, NeRo, POLDI and ROeDI. The thoroughly upgraded residual stress diffractomer ARES-2 went in full operation in spring 2006 as well as the new neutron tomography device at GENRA-3. The installation of modern experiment control hardware and software based on LabView was completed on all designated instruments. In the appendices I and II the experimental reports of REFSANS at FRM II are attached as well as of the GKSS outstation HARWI-II at DESY. Both instruments started full operation in 2006. (orig.)

  20. GeNF - experimental report 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreyer, A.; Vollbrandt, J.; Willumeit, R.

    2004-01-01

    At the Geesthacht Neutron Facility GeNF about 210 experiments were performed in 2003 by GKSS and by or for external users, partners or contractors. In most cases the measurements were performed and analysed in cooperation by the guest and by the GKSS staff or by the permanent external user group staff. The activities, which are based on a proposal procedure and on the in house R and D program, are reported in 76 contributions in the present annual experimental report for the year 2003. The contributions may contain one or also several combined experiments. During 2003 the GKSS research reactor FRG-1 achieved an operation time of 252 days at the full 5 MW reactor power providing a neutron flux of ca. 1,4 x 10 14 thermal neutrons / cm 2 s. The cold neutron source was available during the complete operation time. The focus of the in house R and D work at GeNF instruments was the characterisation of metal alloys, the analysis of stresses in welds and technical structures at ARES, FSS, DCD and SANS-2, the structural investigation of hydrogen containing substances such as polymers, colloids and biological macromolecules at SANS-1 as well as the characterisation of magnetic thin films at PNR and ROeDI. The reflectomer TOREMA was thoroughly upgraded to the instrument NeRo and now offers new measurement possibilities. In the appendices the progress of the project REFSANS at FRM-II is reported as well as the experimental activities of the newly installed GKSS outstation HARWI-II at DESY. (orig.)

  1. GeNF - Experimental report 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pranzas, P.K.; Schreyer, A.; Willumeit, R. (eds.) [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. of Materials Research

    2007-07-01

    At the Geesthacht Neutron Facility GeNF about 212 experiments were performed in 2006 by GKSS and by or for external users, partners or contractors. In most cases the measurements were performed and analysed in cooperation by the guests and by the GKSS staff or by the permanent external user group staff. The activities, which are based on a proposal procedure and on the in house R and D program, are reported in 71 contributions in the present annual experimental report for the year 2006. The contributions may contain one or also several combined experiments. During 2006 the GKSS research reactor FRG-1 achieved an operation time of 197 days at the full 5 MW reactor power providing a neutron flux of ca. 1.4 x 10{sup 14} thermal neutrons/cm{sup 2}s. The cold neutron source was available during the complete operation time. The focus of the in house R and D work at GeNF instruments was the characterisation of nanostructures in engineering materials, the analysis of stresses and textures in welds and technical structures at ARES-2, TEX-2, DCD and SANS-2, the structural investigation of hydrogen containing substances such as polymers, colloids and biological macromolecules at SANS-1 as well as the characterisation of magnetic thin films at PNR, NeRo, POLDI and ROeDI. The thoroughly upgraded residual stress diffractomer ARES-2 went in full operation in spring 2006 as well as the new neutron tomography device at GENRA-3. The installation of modern experiment control hardware and software based on LabView was completed on all designated instruments. In the appendices I and II the experimental reports of REFSANS at FRM II are attached as well as of the GKSS outstation HARWI-II at DESY. Both instruments started full operation in 2006. (orig.)

  2. The natural catalytic function of CuGE glucuronoyl esterase in hydrolysis of genuine lignin-carbohydrate complexes from birch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosbech, Caroline; Holck, Jesper; Meyer, Anne S.

    2018-01-01

    Glucuronoyl esterases belong to carbohydrate esterase family 15 and catalyze de-esterification. Their natural function is presumed to be cleavage of ester linkages in lignin-carbohydrate complexes particularly those linking lignin and glucuronoyl residues in xylans in hardwood. Here, we show...... for the first time a detailed product profile of aldouronic acids released from birchwood lignin by a glucuronoyl esterase from the white-rot fungus Cerrena unicolor (CuGE). CuGE releases substrate for GH10 endo-xylanase which results in significantly increased product release compared to the action of endo...... with lignin and we propose that this is a direct result of enzymatic cleavage of the ester bonds connecting glucuronoxylan to lignin via 4-O-methyl glucuronoyl-ester linkages. This function appears important for the fungal organism's ability to effectively utilize all available carbohydrates...

  3. Interwell coupling effect in Si/SiGe quantum wells grown by ultra high vacuum chemical vapor deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loh Ter-Hoe

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractSi/Si0.66Ge0.34coupled quantum well (CQW structures with different barrier thickness of 40, 4 and 2 nm were grown on Si substrates using an ultra high vacuum chemical vapor deposition (UHV-CVD system. The samples were characterized using high resolution x-ray diffraction (HRXRD, cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM and photoluminescence (PL spectroscopy. Blue shift in PL peak energy due to interwell coupling was observed in the CQWs following increase in the Si barrier thickness. The Si/SiGe heterostructure growth process and theoretical band structure model was validated by comparing the energy of the no-phonon peak calculated by the 6 + 2-bandk·pmethod with experimental PL data. Close agreement between theoretical calculations and experimental data was obtained.

  4. Crystal growth kinetics in undercooled melts of pure Ge, Si and Ge-Si alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herlach, Dieter M.; Simons, Daniel; Pichon, Pierre-Yves

    2018-01-01

    We report on measurements of crystal growth dynamics in semiconducting pure Ge and pure Si melts and in Ge100-xSix (x = 25, 50, 75) alloy melts as a function of undercooling. Electromagnetic levitation techniques are applied to undercool the samples in a containerless way. The growth velocity is measured by the utilization of a high-speed camera technique over an extended range of undercooling. Solidified samples are examined with respect to their microstructure by scanning electron microscopic investigations. We analyse the experimental results of crystal growth kinetics as a function of undercooling within the sharp interface theory developed by Peter Galenko. Transitions of the atomic attachment kinetics are found at large undercoolings, from faceted growth to dendrite growth. This article is part of the theme issue `From atomistic interfaces to dendritic patterns'.

  5. Crystal growth kinetics in undercooled melts of pure Ge, Si and Ge-Si alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herlach, Dieter M; Simons, Daniel; Pichon, Pierre-Yves

    2018-02-28

    We report on measurements of crystal growth dynamics in semiconducting pure Ge and pure Si melts and in Ge 100- x Si x ( x  = 25, 50, 75) alloy melts as a function of undercooling. Electromagnetic levitation techniques are applied to undercool the samples in a containerless way. The growth velocity is measured by the utilization of a high-speed camera technique over an extended range of undercooling. Solidified samples are examined with respect to their microstructure by scanning electron microscopic investigations. We analyse the experimental results of crystal growth kinetics as a function of undercooling within the sharp interface theory developed by Peter Galenko. Transitions of the atomic attachment kinetics are found at large undercoolings, from faceted growth to dendrite growth.This article is part of the theme issue 'From atomistic interfaces to dendritic patterns'. © 2018 The Author(s).

  6. 20 GeV e+ x 400 GeV p: some synchrotron radiation considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphrey, J.W.; Limon, P.J.

    1977-01-01

    The possibility of a 20 GeV electron ring in the 400 x 400 GeV 2 ISABELLE tunnel is considered. The conclusions that can be drawn from these considerations are: (1) much work remains to be done on the implications of synchrotron radiation for insertion design; (2) in the absence of considerations concerning insertion areas with longitudinal polarization, placing the electron ring in the same vertical plane as the electron ring is mildly favored; (3) creating insertions for longitudinally polarized electrons is difficult, and elementary considerations indicate that the synchrotron radiation flux in the insertion region will increase by a factor of approximately 100 and the luminosity may decrease by a factor of approximately 10; and (4) the creation of insertions for longitudinally polarized electrons favors placing the electron ring in the same horizontal plane as the proton ring

  7. Abrupt Schottky Junctions in Al/Ge Nanowire Heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kral, S; Zeiner, C; Stöger-Pollach, M; Bertagnolli, E; den Hertog, M I; Lopez-Haro, M; Robin, E; El Hajraoui, K; Lugstein, A

    2015-07-08

    In this Letter we report on the exploration of axial metal/semiconductor (Al/Ge) nanowire heterostructures with abrupt interfaces. The formation process is enabled by a thermal induced exchange reaction between the vapor-liquid-solid grown Ge nanowire and Al contact pads due to the substantially different diffusion behavior of Ge in Al and vice versa. Temperature-dependent I-V measurements revealed the metallic properties of the crystalline Al nanowire segments with a maximum current carrying capacity of about 0.8 MA/cm(2). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) characterization has confirmed both the composition and crystalline nature of the pure Al nanowire segments. A very sharp interface between the ⟨111⟩ oriented Ge nanowire and the reacted Al part was observed with a Schottky barrier height of 361 meV. To demonstrate the potential of this approach, a monolithic Al/Ge/Al heterostructure was used to fabricate a novel impact ionization device.

  8. Band structure analysis in SiGe nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amato, Michele; Palummo, Maurizia; Ossicini, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    One of the main challenges for Silicon-Germanium nanowires (SiGe NWs) electronics is the possibility to modulate and engine their electronic properties in an easy way, in order to obtain a material with the desired electronic features. Diameter and composition constitute two crucial ways for the modification of the band gap and of the band structure of SiGe NWs. Within the framework of density functional theory we present results of ab initio calculations regarding the band structure dependence of SiGe NWs on diameter and composition. We point out the main differences with respect to the case of pure Si and Ge wires and we discuss the particular features of SiGe NWs that are useful for future technological applications.

  9. Band structure analysis in SiGe nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amato, Michele [' Centro S3' , CNR-Istituto Nanoscienze, via Campi 213/A, 41100 Modena (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze e Metodi dell' Ingegneria, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, via Amendola 2 Pad. Morselli, I-42100 Reggio Emilia (Italy); Palummo, Maurizia [European Theoretical Spectroscopy Facility (ETSF) (Italy); CNR-INFM-SMC, Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma, ' Tor Vergata' , via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Ossicini, Stefano, E-mail: stefano.ossicini@unimore.it [' Centro S3' , CNR-Istituto Nanoscienze, via Campi 213/A, 41100 Modena (Italy) and Dipartimento di Scienze e Metodi dell' Ingegneria, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, via Amendola 2 Pad. Morselli, I-42100 Reggio Emilia (Italy) and European Theoretical Spectroscopy Facility - ETSF (Italy) and Centro Interdipartimentale ' En and Tech' , Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, via Amendola 2 Pad. Morselli, I-42100 Reggio Emilia (Italy)

    2012-06-05

    One of the main challenges for Silicon-Germanium nanowires (SiGe NWs) electronics is the possibility to modulate and engine their electronic properties in an easy way, in order to obtain a material with the desired electronic features. Diameter and composition constitute two crucial ways for the modification of the band gap and of the band structure of SiGe NWs. Within the framework of density functional theory we present results of ab initio calculations regarding the band structure dependence of SiGe NWs on diameter and composition. We point out the main differences with respect to the case of pure Si and Ge wires and we discuss the particular features of SiGe NWs that are useful for future technological applications.

  10. First evidence of low energy enhancement in Ge isotopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renstrøm T.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The γ-strength functions and level densities of 73,74Ge have been extracted from particle-γ coincidence data using the Oslo method. In addition the γ-strength function of 74Ge above the neutron separation threshold, Sn = 10.196 MeV has been extracted from photoneutron measurements. When combined, these two experiments give a γ-strength function covering the energy range of ∼1-13 MeV for 74Ge. This thorough investigation of 74Ge is a part of an international campaign to study the previously reported low energy enhancement in this mass region in the γ-strength function from ∼3MeV towards lower γ energies. The obtained data show that both 73,74Ge display an increase in strength at low γ energies.

  11. Mapping protease substrates using a biotinylated phage substrate library.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scholle, M. D.; Kriplani, U.; Pabon, A.; Sishtla, K.; Glucksman, M. J.; Kay, B. K.; Biosciences Division; Chicago Medical School

    2005-05-05

    We describe a bacteriophage M13 substrate library encoding the AviTag (BirA substrate) and combinatorial heptamer peptides displayed at the N terminus of the mature form of capsid protein III. Phages are biotinylated efficiently (> or = 50%) when grown in E. coli cells coexpressing BirA, and such viral particles can be immobilized on a streptavidin-coated support and released by protease cleavage within the combinatorial peptide. We have used this library to map the specificity of human Factor Xa and a neuropeptidase, neurolysin (EC3.4.24.16). Validation by analysis of isolated peptide substrates has revealed that neurolysin recognizes the motif hydrophobic-X-Pro-Arg-hydrophobic, where Arg-hydrophobic is the scissile bond.

  12. Substrate-Limited Saccharomyces cerevisiae Yeast Strains Allow Control of Fermentation during Bread Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struyf, Nore; Laurent, Jitka; Verspreet, Joran; Verstrepen, Kevin J; Courtin, Christophe M

    2017-04-26

    Identification and use of yeast strains that are unable to consume one or more otherwise fermentable substrate types could allow a more controlled fermentation process with more flexibility regarding fermentation times. In this study, Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with different capacities to consume substrates present in wheat were selected to investigate the impact of substrate limitation on dough fermentation and final bread volume. Results show that fermentation of dough with maltose-negative strains relies on the presence of fructan and sucrose as fermentable substrates and can be used for regular bread making. Levels of fructan and sucrose, endogenously present or added, hence determine the extent of fermentation and timing at the proofing stage. Whole meal is inherently more suitable for substrate-limited fermentation than white flour due to the presence of higher native levels of these substrates. Bread making protocols with long fermentation times are accommodated by addition of substrates such as sucrose.

  13. Materials Integration and Metamorphic Substrate Engineering from Silicon to Gallium Arsenide to Indium Phosphide for Advanced III-V/Silicon Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlin, Andrew M.

    Lattice-mismatched epitaxy in the III-V compound semiconductor system based on III-AsP and related alloys are of enormous importance, and considerable research interest, for many years. The reason is straightforward if one considers the limitations placed on available materials properties for devices dictated by lattice matching to the dominant substrate technologies - Si, GaAs (and/or Ge) and InP. For III-V epitaxy, the lattice constants of these substrates have defined a generation or more of device advances since growth of heterostructures possessing the same equilibrium lattice constants as the substrate yields essentially defect-free (specifically extended defect-free) materials and devices. Removing the restriction of lattice matching to current substrate technology opens a rich spectrum of bandgaps, bandgap combinations, conduction and valence band offsets, etc., that are desirable and exploitable for advancing device technologies for new functionality and greater performance. However successful exploitation of these properties requires mitigation of a variety of extended defects that result from the lattice mismatch between substrate and epitaxial heterostructures. A well known method to achieve this solution is through the use of compositionally (lattice constant-graded) buffer interlayers, in which the equilibrium lattice constants of interlayers are slowly altered by controlled changes in layer composition so that the mismatch strain between the initial substrate and the final device layers is spread across a thickness of buffer. The research accomplished has yielded success for both lattice constant ranges Si - GaAs and GaAs - InP. For the Si - GaAs system, a three step GaP nucleation process on Si has been developed and demonstrated, which maintains total avoidance of creating coalescence-related defects such as antiphase domains and stacking faults resulting from the initial III-V/IV interfaces while reducing overall threading dislocation density by

  14. Improving the electrode performance of Ge through Ge@C core-shell nanoparticles and graphene networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Ding-Jiang; Xin, Sen; Yan, Yang; Jiang, Ke-Cheng; Yin, Ya-Xia; Guo, Yu-Guo; Wan, Li-Jun

    2012-02-08

    Germanium is a promising high-capacity anode material for lithium ion batteries, but it usually exhibits poor cycling stability because of its huge volume variation during the lithium uptake and release process. A double protection strategy to improve the electrode performance of Ge through the use of Ge@C core-shell nanostructures and reduced graphene oxide (RGO) networks has been developed. The as-synthesized Ge@C/RGO nanocomposite showed excellent cycling performance and rate capability in comparison with Ge@C nanoparticles when used as an anode material for Li ion batteries, which can be attributed to the electronically conductive and elastic RGO networks in addition to the carbon shells and small particle sizes of Ge. The strategy is simple yet very effective, and because of its versatility, it may be extended to other high-capacity electrode materials with large volume variations and low electrical conductivities.

  15. Substrate curvature regulates cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiuxiu; Jiang, Yi

    2017-05-23

    Cell migration is essential in many aspects of biology. Many basic migration processes, including adhesion, membrane protrusion and tension, cytoskeletal polymerization, and contraction, have to act in concert to regulate cell migration. At the same time, substrate topography modulates these processes. In this work, we study how substrate curvature at micrometer scale regulates cell motility. We have developed a 3D mechanical model of single cell migration and simulated migration on curved substrates with different curvatures. The simulation results show that cell migration is more persistent on concave surfaces than on convex surfaces. We have further calculated analytically the cell shape and protrusion force for cells on curved substrates. We have shown that while cells spread out more on convex surfaces than on concave ones, the protrusion force magnitude in the direction of migration is larger on concave surfaces than on convex ones. These results offer a novel biomechanical explanation to substrate curvature regulation of cell migration: geometric constrains bias the direction of the protrusion force and facilitates persistent migration on concave surfaces.

  16. Evidence for the 125 GeV Higgs boson decaying to a pair of $\\tau$ leptons

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; Sirunyan, Albert M; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Knünz, Valentin; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Taurok, Anton; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; Bansal, Monika; Bansal, Sunil; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Luyckx, Sten; Ochesanu, Silvia; Roland, Benoit; Rougny, Romain; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Heracleous, Natalie; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Keaveney, James; Kim, Tae Jeong; Lowette, Steven; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Strom, Derek; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Favart, Laurent; Gay, Arnaud; Léonard, Alexandre; Marage, Pierre Edouard; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Perniè, Luca; Reis, Thomas; Seva, Tomislav; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Crucy, Shannon; Dildick, Sven; Garcia, Guillaume; Klein, Benjamin; Lellouch, Jérémie; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Sigamani, Michael; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Walsh, Sinead; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Beluffi, Camille; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Liao, Junhui; Militaru, Otilia; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Popov, Andrey; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Alves, Gilvan; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Dos Reis Martins, Thiago; Pol, Maria Elena; Henrique Gomes E Souza, Moacyr; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Malbouisson, Helena; Malek, Magdalena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santaolalla, Javier; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Almeida Dias, Flavia; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Genchev, Vladimir; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Marinov, Andrey; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Kozhuharov, Venelin; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Du, Ran; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Liang, Dong; Liang, Song; Meng, Xiangwei; Plestina, Roko; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Xianyou; Wang, Zheng; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Guo, Yifei; Li, Qiang; Li, Wenbo; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Zhang, Linlin; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Mekterovic, Darko; Morovic, Srecko; Sudic, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; Elgammal, Sherif; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Mahrous, Ayman; Radi, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Müntel, Mait; Murumaa, Marion; Raidal, Martti; Rebane, Liis; Tiko, Andres; Eerola, Paula; Fedi, Giacomo; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Kortelainen, Matti J; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas

    2014-05-22

    A search for a standard model Higgs boson decaying into a pair of tau leptons is performed using events recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC in 2011 and 2012. The dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 4.9 inverse-femtobarns at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, and 19.7 inverse-femtobarns at 8 TeV. Each tau lepton decays hadronically or leptonically to an electron or a muon, leading to six different final states for the tau-lepton pair, all considered in this analysis. An excess of events is observed over the expected background contributions, with a local significance larger than 3 standard deviations for $m_H$ values between 115 and 130 GeV. The best fit of the observed $H \\to \\tau-\\tau$ signal cross section for $m_H$ = 125 GeV is 0.78 +/- 0.27 times the standard model expectation. These observations constitute evidence for the 125 GeV Higgs boson decaying to a pair of tau leptons.

  17. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism in (Ge,Mn) compounds: Experiments and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardif, Samuel; Titov, Andrey; Arras, Emmanuel; Slipukhina, Ivetta; Hlil, El-Kébir; Cherifi, Salia; Joly, Yves; Jamet, Matthieu; Barski, André; Cibert, Joël; Kulatov, Erkin; Uspenskii, Yurii A.; Pochet, Pascal

    2014-03-01

    X-ray absorption (XAS) and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) spectra at the L2,3 edges of Mn in (Ge,Mn) compounds have been measured and are compared to the results of first principles calculation. Early ab initio studies show that the Density Functional Theory (DFT) can very well describe the valence band electronic properties but fails to reproduce a characteristic change of sign in the L3 XMCD spectrum of Mn in Ge3Mn5, which is observed in experiments. In this work we demonstrate that this disagreement is partially related to an underestimation of the exchange splitting of Mn 2p core states within the local density approximation. It is shown that the change in sign experimentally observed is reproduced if the exchange splitting is accurately calculated within the Hartree-Fock approximation, while the final states can be still described by the DFT. This approach is further used to calculate the XMCD in different (Ge,Mn) compounds. It demonstrates that the agreement between experimental and theoretical spectra can be improved by combining state of the art calculations for the core and valence states respectively.

  18. Dewetting induced Au-Ge composite nanodot evolution in SiO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, D. P.; Chettah, A.; Siva, V.; Kanjilal, D.; Sahoo, P. K.

    2018-01-01

    A composite nanostructure comprising of Au and Ge gradually evolves on SiO2 surface when a bilayer of Au and Ge is irradiated by medium keV Xe-ion beam. The morphology progresses through different stages from nucleating patches to extended islands and finally a Au-Ge composite nanodot array develops on the insulator surface. While ion energy and fluence are found to determine dimensions of the nanostructures, existence of a characteristic lateral length scale is also detected at every stage of evolution. Through morphological and compositional analysis, the observed evolution is understood as an effect of ion beam induced dewetting of Au top layer. Numerical estimation based on the unified thermal spike model using the present experimental condition demonstrates formation of molten zones around the ion track due to nuclear and electronic energy deposition in the target. Dewetting results from mass flow onto the surface driven by local melting along the ion track and combines with sputter erosion of the bilayer film to lead to composite nanodot evolution. The generality of the ion induced processes provides possible route towards metal-semiconductor hybrid nanostructure synthesis on insulator surface.

  19. Molecular beam epitaxy of GeTe-Sb2Te3 phase change materials studied by X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shayduk, Roman

    2010-01-01

    The integration of phase change materials into semiconductor heterostructures may lead to the development of a new generation of high density non-volatile phase change memories. Epitaxial phase change materials allow to study the detailed structural changes during the phase transition and to determine the scaling limits of the memory. This work is dedicated to the epitaxial growth of Ge-Sb-Te phase change alloys on GaSb(001). We deposit Ge-Sb-Te (GST) films on GaSb(001) substrates by means of molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The film orientation and lattice constant evolution is determined in real time during growth using grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GID). The nucleation stage of the growth is studied in situ using reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED). Four growth regimes of GST on GaSb(001) were observed: amorphous, polycrystalline, incubated epitaxial and direct epitaxial. Amorphous film grows for substrate temperatures below 100 C. For substrate temperatures in the range 100-160 C, the film grows in polycrystalline form. Incubated epitaxial growth is observed at temperatures from 180 to 210 C. This growth regime is characterized by an initial 0.6nm thick amorphous layer formation, which crystallizes epitaxially as the film thickness increases. The determined lattice constant of the films is 6.01 A, very close to that of the metastable GST phase. The films predominantly possess an epitaxial cube-on-cube relationship. At higher temperatures the films grow epitaxially, however the growth rate is rapidly decreasing with temperature. At temperatures above 270 C the growth rate is zero. The composition of the grown films is close to 2:2:5 for Ge, Sb and Te, respectively. The determined crystal structure of the films is face centered cubic (FCC) with a rhombohedral distortion. The analysis of X-ray peak widths gives a value for the rhombohedral angle of 89.56 . We observe two types of reflections in reciprocal space indicating two FCC sublattices in

  20. Formation and Device Application of Ge Nanowire Heterostructures via Rapid Thermal Annealing

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Jianshi; Wang, Chiu-Yen; Xiu, Faxian; Zhou, Yi; Chen, Lih-Juann; Wang, Kang L.

    2011-01-01

    We reviewed the formation of Ge nanowire heterostructure and its field-effect characteristics by a controlled reaction between a single-crystalline Ge nanowire and Ni contact pads using a facile rapid thermal annealing process. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy demonstrated a wide temperature range of 400~500°C to convert the Ge nanowire to a single-crystalline Ni2Ge/Ge/Ni2Ge nanowire heterostructure with atomically sharp interfaces. More importantly, we studie...

  1. The impact of ultrathin Al2O3 films on the electrical response of p-Ge/Al2O3/HfO2/Au MOS structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botzakaki, M. A.; Skoulatakis, G.; Kennou, S.; Ladas, S.; Tsamis, C.; Georga, S. N.; Krontiras, C. A.

    2016-09-01

    It is well known that the most critical issue in Ge CMOS technology is the successful growth of high-k gate dielectrics on Ge substrates. The high interface quality of Ge/high-k dielectric is connected with advanced electrical responses of Ge based MOS devices. Following this trend, atomic layer deposition deposited ultrathin Al2O3 and HfO2 films were grown on p-Ge. Al2O3 acts as a passivation layer between p-Ge and high-k HfO2 films. An extensive set of p-Ge/Al2O3/HfO2 structures were fabricated with Al2O3 thickness ranging from 0.5 nm to 1.5 nm and HfO2 thickness varying from 2.0 nm to 3.0 nm. All structures were characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and AFM. XPS analysis revealed the stoichiometric growth of both films in the absence of Ge sub-oxides between p-Ge and Al2O3 films. AFM analysis revealed the growth of smooth and cohesive films, which exhibited minimal roughness (~0.2 nm) comparable to that of clean bare p-Ge surfaces. The electrical response of all structures was analyzed by C-V, G-V, C-f, G-f and J-V characteristics, from 80 K to 300 K. It is found that the incorporation of ultrathin Al2O3 passivation layers between p-Ge and HfO2 films leads to superior electrical responses of the structures. All structures exhibit well defined C-V curves with parasitic effects, gradually diminishing and becoming absent below 170 K. D it values were calculated at each temperature, using both Hill-Coleman and Conductance methods. Structures of p-Ge/0.5 nm Al2O3/2.0 nm HfO2/Au, with an equivalent oxide thickness (EOT) equal to 1.3 nm, exhibit D it values as low as ~7.4  ×  1010 eV-1 cm-2. To our knowledge, these values are among the lowest reported. J-V measurements reveal leakage currents in the order of 10-1 A cm-2, which are comparable to previously published results for structures with the same EOT. A complete mapping of the energy distribution of D its into the energy bandgap of p-Ge, from the valence band

  2. Three- and four-jet final states in photoproduction at HERA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chekanov, S.; Kooijman, P.

    2008-01-01

    Three- and four-jet final states have been measured in photoproduction at HERA using the ZEUS detector with an integrated luminosity of 121 pb^-1. The results are presented for jets with transverse energy E_T^jet>6 GeV and pseudorapidity |eta^jet|50 GeV, where M_nj is the invariant mass of the n-jet

  3. Dynamics and kinetics of Si/Si(1-x)Ge(x) MBE studies by reflectance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lees, A.

    1998-01-01

    Reflectance anisotropy (RA) and reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) have been used simultaneously to study the growth of Si and Si (1-x) Ge x on Si(001) surfaces by gas source molecular beam epitaxy (GSMBE). Dynamic oscillatory changes in the RA response have been investigated and attributed to periodic changes in the domain coverage of the (2x1) and (1x2) reconstructions. These measurements demonstrate that RA gives a more direct measure of domain coverage variations on the Si(001) surface than RHEED, which may include ordering and multiple scattering effects. RA was used to investigate domain coverage variations as a function of substrate temperature and as a result of growth interruption. The temperature dependence of the change in the RA response is interpreted as a growth mode change at higher temperatures and a change in the electronic configuration of the surface dimers due to chemisorbed hydrogen at low substrate temperatures. The change in the RA response during deposition of Si (1-x) Ge x are also investigated as a function of Ge concentration. Reflectance anisotropy spectroscopy (RAS) has been used to monitor changes in the surface hydrogen coverage during growth and the difference between the RA spectra obtained before and after hydrogen exposure has been used to quantify monohydride coverage as a function of substrate temperature, flux and hydrogen source. The kinetics of Si growth have also been investigated and isothermal hydrogen desorption measurements have been made. Interruption of the disilane supply leads to a change in the RA response which can be attributed to the associative desorption of molecular hydrogen. Subsequent to the interruption of growth, the hydrogen coverage is found to vary linearly with time, changing to an exponential like dependence as the hydrogen coverage approaches zero. This zeroth order coverage dependence of hydrogen desorption is attributed to a desorption pathway incorporating a saturated and

  4. Revisiting light stringy states in view of the 750 GeV diphoton excess

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anastasopoulos, Pascal, E-mail: pascal@hep.itp.tuwien.ac.at [Technische Universität Wien, Institut für Theoretische Physik, A-1040 Vienna (Austria); Bianchi, Massimo, E-mail: massimo.bianchi@roma2.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica and Sezione I.N.F.N., Università di Roma “Tor Vergata”, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy)

    2016-10-15

    We investigate light massive string states that appear at brane intersections. They replicate the massless spectrum in a richer fashion and may be parametrically lighter than standard Regge excitations. We identify the first few physical states and determine their BRST invariant vertex operators. In the supersymmetric case we reconstruct the super-multiplet structure. We then compute some simple interactions, such as the decay rate of a massive scalar or vector into two massless fermions. Finally we suggest an alternative interpretation of the 750 GeV diphoton excess at LHC in terms of a light massive string state, a replica of the Standard Model Higgs.

  5. Study of resonant magnet exciting system for the 3 GeV proton synchrotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koseki, Shoichiro; Zhang, Fengqing; Watanabe, Yasuhiro; Tani, Norio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Adachi, Toshikazu; Someya, Hirohiko [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    Exciting system for magnets of the 3 GeV Proton synchrotron is under consideration. A resonant exciting system is studied, and two type of power supply are compared. One is a parallel supply that is used generally. Another is a modified series supply. Either of them uses IGBT sinusoidal converters. Capacity of the power converter of the series supply for bending magnets becomes 28.8 MVAp. This is lager more than twice compared with the parallel supply. In the other hand, the series supply has good control performance and flexibility. More study is necessary to decide finally. (author)

  6. Porous substrates filled with nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Baumann, Theodore F.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Stadermann, Michael

    2014-08-19

    A composition comprising: at least one porous carbon monolith, such as a carbon aerogel, comprising internal pores, and at least one nanomaterial, such as carbon nanotubes, disposed uniformly throughout the internal pores. The nanomaterial can be disposed in the middle of the monolith. In addition, a method for making a monolithic solid with both high surface area and good bulk electrical conductivity is provided. A porous substrate having a thickness of 100 microns or more and comprising macropores throughout its thickness is prepared. At least one catalyst is deposited inside the porous substrate. Subsequently, chemical vapor deposition is used to uniformly deposit a nanomaterial in the macropores throughout the thickness of the porous substrate. Applications include electrical energy storage, such as batteries and capacitors, and hydrogen storage.

  7. Methods of etching a substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosmo, J.J.; Gambino, R.J.; Harper, J.M.E.

    1979-01-01

    The invention relates to a method of etching a substrate. The substrate is located opposite a target electrode in a vacuum chamber, and the surface of the target electrode is bombarded with energetic particles of atomic dimensions. The target electrode is an intermetallic composition (compound, alloy or finely divided homogeneous mixture) of two metals A and B such that upon bombardment the electrode emits negative ions of metal B which have sufficient energy to produce etching of the substrate. Many target materials are exemplified. Typically the metal A has an electronegativity XA and metal B has an electronegativity XB such that Xb - Xa is greater than about 2.55 electron volts, with the exception of combinations of metals having a fractional ionicity Q less than about 0.314. The source of the energetic particles may be an ionised gas in the vacuum chamber. The apparatus and its mode of operation are described in detail. (U.K.)

  8. Porous substrates filled with nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Baumann, Theodore F.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Stadermann, Michael

    2018-04-03

    A composition comprising: at least one porous carbon monolith, such as a carbon aerogel, comprising internal pores, and at least one nanomaterial, such as carbon nanotubes, disposed uniformly throughout the internal pores. The nanomaterial can be disposed in the middle of the monolith. In addition, a method for making a monolithic solid with both high surface area and good bulk electrical conductivity is provided. A porous substrate having a thickness of 100 microns or more and comprising macropores throughout its thickness is prepared. At least one catalyst is deposited inside the porous substrate. Subsequently, chemical vapor deposition is used to uniformly deposit a nanomaterial in the macropores throughout the thickness of the porous substrate. Applications include electrical energy storage, such as batteries and capacitors, and hydrogen storage.

  9. A Facile Method to In-Situ Synthesize Porous Ni2GeO4 Nano-Sheets on Nickel Foam as Advanced Anode Electrodes for Li-Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delong Ma

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A strategy for growth of porous Ni2GeO4 nanosheets on conductive nickel (Ni foam with robust adhesion as a high-performance electrode for Li-ion batteries is proposed and realized, through a facile two-step method. It involves the low temperature hydro-thermal synthesis of bimetallic (Ni, Ge hydroxide nanosheets precursor on Ni foam substrates and subsequent thermal transformation to porous Ni2GeO4 nanosheets. The as-prepared Ni2GeO4 nanosheets possess many interparticle mesopores with a size range from 5 to 15 nm. The hierarchical structure of porous Ni2GeO4 nanosheets supported by Ni foam promises fast electron and ion transport, large electroactive surface area, and excellent structural stability. The efficacy of the specially designed structure is demonstrated by the superior electrochemical performance of the generated Ni2GeO4 nanosheets including a high capacity of 1.8 mA·h·cm−2 at a current density of 50 μA·cm−2, good cycle stability, and high power capability at room temperature. Because of simple conditions, this fabrication strategy may be easily extended to other mixed metal oxides (MxGeOy.

  10. Formation and Device Application of Ge Nanowire Heterostructures via Rapid Thermal Annealing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianshi Tang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We reviewed the formation of Ge nanowire heterostructure and its field-effect characteristics by a controlled reaction between a single-crystalline Ge nanowire and Ni contact pads using a facile rapid thermal annealing process. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy demonstrated a wide temperature range of 400~500°C to convert the Ge nanowire to a single-crystalline Ni2Ge/Ge/Ni2Ge nanowire heterostructure with atomically sharp interfaces. More importantly, we studied the effect of oxide confinement during the formation of nickel germanides in a Ge nanowire. In contrast to the formation of Ni2Ge/Ge/Ni2Ge nanowire heterostructures, a segment of high-quality epitaxial NiGe was formed between Ni2Ge with the confinement of Al2O3 during annealing. A twisted epitaxial growth mode was observed in both two Ge nanowire heterostructures to accommodate the large lattice mismatch in the NixGe/Ge interface. Moreover, we have demonstrated field-effect transistors using the nickel germanide regions as source/drain contacts to the Ge nanowire channel. Our Ge nanowire transistors have shown a high-performance p-type behavior with a high on/off ratio of 105 and a field-effect hole mobility of 210 cm2/Vs, which showed a significant improvement compared with that from unreacted Ge nanowire transistors.

  11. GeNF - Experimental report 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pranzas, P.K.; Schreyer, A.; Willumeit, R.

    2008-01-01

    At the Geesthacht Neutron Facility GeNF about 203 experiments were performed in 2007 by GKSS and by or for external users, partners or contractors. In most cases the measurements were performed and analysed in cooperation by the guests and by the GKSS staff or by the permanent external user group staff. The activities, which are based on a proposal procedure and on the in house R and D program, are reported in 70 contributions in the present annual experimental report for the year 2007. The contributions may contain one or also several combined experiments. During 2007 the GKSS research reactor FRG-1 achieved an operation time of 204 days at the full 5 MW reactor power providing a neutron flux of ca. 1.4 x 10 14 thermal neutrons/cm 2 s. In May/June 2007 the FRG-1 was upgraded with a new cold neutron source yielding a flux increase at the five instruments using cold neutrons of up to 40 %. The focus of the in house R and D work at GeNF instruments in 2007 was the characterisation of nano-structures in engineering materials, the analysis of stresses and textures in welds and technical structures at SANS-2, DCD, ARES-2 and TEX-2, the structural investigation of hydrogen containing substances such as polymers, colloids and biological macromolecules at SANS-1 as well as the characterisation of magnetic