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Sample records for ge detectors high-purity

  1. GELATIO: a general framework for modular digital analysis of high-purity Ge detector signals

    CERN Document Server

    Agostini, M; Zavarise, P; Volynets, O

    2011-01-01

    GELATIO is a new software framework for advanced data analysis and digital signal processing developed for the GERDA neutrinoless double beta decay experiment. The framework is tailored to handle the full analysis flow of signals recorded by high purity Ge detectors and photo-multipliers from the veto counters. It is designed to support a multi-channel modular and flexible analysis, widely customizable by the user either via human-readable initialization files or via a graphical interface. The framework organizes the data into a multi-level structure, from the raw data up to the condensed analysis parameters, and includes tools and utilities to handle the data stream between the different levels. GELATIO is implemented in C++. It relies upon ROOT and its extension TAM, which provides compatibility with PROOF, enabling the software to run in parallel on clusters of computers or many-core machines. It was tested on different platforms and benchmarked in several GERDA-related applications. A stable version is pr...

  2. Crystal growth and detector performance of large size high-purity Ge crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Guojian; Mei, Hao; Mei, Dongming; Irmscher, Klaus; Guan, Yutong; Yang, Gang

    2015-01-01

    High-purity germanium crystals approximately 12 cm in diameter were grown in a hydrogen atmosphere using the Czochralski method. The dislocation density of the crystals was determined to be in the range of 2000 - 4200 cm-2, which meets a requirement for use as a radiation detector. The axial and radial distributions of impurities in the crystals were measured and are discussed. A planar detector was also fabricated from one of the crystals and then evaluated for electrical and spectral performance. Measurements of gamma-ray spectra from Cs-137 and Am-241 sources demonstrate that the detector has excellent energy resolution.

  3. The GALATEA test-facility for High Purity Germanium Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Abt, I; Doenmez, B; Garbini, L; Irlbeck, S; Majorovits, B; Palermo, M; Schulz, O; Seitz, H; Stelzer, F

    2014-01-01

    GALATEA is a test facility designed to investigate bulk and surface effects in high purity germanium detectors. A vacuum tank houses an infrared screened volume with a cooled detector inside. A system of three stages allows an almost complete scan of the detector. The main feature of GALATEA is that there is no material between source and detector. This allows the usage of alpha and beta sources as well as of a laser beam to study surface effects. A 19-fold segmented true-coaxial germanium detector was used for commissioning.

  4. The GALATEA test-facility for high purity germanium detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abt, I.; Caldwell, A.; Dönmez, B.; Garbini, L.; Irlbeck, S.; Majorovits, B.; Palermo, M.; Schulz, O.; Seitz, H.; Stelzer, F.

    2015-05-01

    GALATEA is a test facility designed to investigate bulk and surface effects in high purity germanium detectors. A vacuum tank houses a cold volume with the detector inside. A system of three precision motorized stages allows an almost complete scan of the detector. The main feature of GALATEA is that there is no material between source and detector. This allows the usage of alpha and beta sources to study surface effects. A 19-fold segmented true-coaxial germanium detector was used for commissioning. A first analysis of data obtained with an alpha source is presented here.

  5. The GALATEA test-facility for high purity germanium detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abt, I.; Caldwell, A.; Dönmez, B.; Garbini, L.; Irlbeck, S.; Majorovits, B.; Palermo, M., E-mail: palermo@mpp.mpg.de; Schulz, O.; Seitz, H.; Stelzer, F.

    2015-05-11

    GALATEA is a test facility designed to investigate bulk and surface effects in high purity germanium detectors. A vacuum tank houses a cold volume with the detector inside. A system of three precision motorized stages allows an almost complete scan of the detector. The main feature of GALATEA is that there is no material between source and detector. This allows the usage of alpha and beta sources to study surface effects. A 19-fold segmented true-coaxial germanium detector was used for commissioning. A first analysis of data obtained with an alpha source is presented here.

  6. Performance of bare high-purity germanium detectors in liquid argon for the GERDA experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Heider, Marik Barnabé; Chkvorets, Oleg; Di Vacri, Assunta; Gusev, Konstantin; Schönert, Stefan; Shirchenko, Mark

    2008-01-01

    The GERmanium Detector Array, GERDA, will search for neutrinoless double beta decay in 76Ge at the National Gran Sasso Laboratory of the INFN. Bare high-purity germanium detectors enriched in 76Ge will be submerged in liquid argon serving simultaneously as a shield against external radioactivity and as a cooling medium. In GERDA Phase-I, reprocessed enriched-Ge detectors, which were previously operated by the Heidelberg-Moscow and IGEX collaborations, will be redeployed. Before operating the enriched detectors, tests are performed with non-enriched bare HPGe detectors in the GERDA underground Detector Laboratory to test the Phase-I detector assembly, the detector handling protocols, the refurbishment technology and to study the long-term stability in liquid argon. The leakage currents in liquid argon and liquid nitrogen have been extensively studied under varying gamma irradiation conditions. In total three non-enriched high-purity p-type prototype germanium detectors have been operated successfully. The dete...

  7. Characteristics of GRIFFIN high-purity germanium clover detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizwan, U.; Garnsworthy, A. B.; Andreoiu, C.; Ball, G. C.; Chester, A.; Domingo, T.; Dunlop, R.; Hackman, G.; Rand, E. T.; Smith, J. K.; Starosta, K.; Svensson, C. E.; Voss, P.; Williams, J.

    2016-06-01

    The Gamma-Ray Infrastructure For Fundamental Investigations of Nuclei, GRIFFIN, is a new experimental facility for radioactive decay studies at the TRIUMF-ISAC laboratory. The performance of the 16 high-purity germanium (HPGe) clover detectors that will make up the GRIFFIN spectrometer is reported. The energy resolution, efficiency, timing resolution, crosstalk and preamplifier properties of each crystal were measured using a combination of analog and digital data acquisition techniques. The absolute efficiency and add-back factors are determined for the energy range of 80-3450 keV. The detectors show excellent performance with an average over all 64 crystals of a FWHM energy resolution of 1.89(6) keV and relative efficiency with respect to a 3 in . × 3 in . NaI detector of 41(1)% at 1.3 MeV.

  8. Characterization of segmented large volume, high purity germanium detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruyneel, B. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik

    2006-07-01

    {gamma}-ray tracking in future HPGe arrays like AGATA will rely on pulse shape analysis (PSA) of multiple {gamma}-interactions. For this purpose, a simple and fast procedure was developed which enabled the first full characterization of a segmented large volume HPGe detector. An analytical model for the hole mobility in a Ge crystal lattice was developed to describe the hole drift anisotropy with experimental velocity values along the crystal axis as parameters. The new model is based on the drifted Maxwellian hole distribution in Ge. It is verified by reproducing successfully experimental longitudinal hole anisotropy data. A comparison between electron and hole mobility shows large differences for the longitudinal and tangential velocity anisotropy as a function of the electrical field orientation. Measurements on a 12 fold segmented, n-type, large volume, irregular shaped HPGe detector were performed in order to determine the parameters of anisotropic mobility for electrons and holes as charge carriers created by {gamma}-ray interactions. To characterize the electron mobility the complete outer detector surface was scanned in small steps employing photopeak interactions at 60 keV. A precise measurement of the hole drift anisotropy was performed with 356 keV rays. The drift velocity anisotropy and crystal geometry cause considerable rise time differences in pulse shapes depending on the position of the spatial charge carrier creation. Pulse shapes of direct and transient signals are reproduced by weighting potential calculations with high precision. The measured angular dependence of rise times is caused by the anisotropic mobility, crystal geometry, changing field strength and space charge effects. Preamplified signals were processed employing digital spectroscopy electronics. Response functions, crosstalk contributions and averaging procedures were taken into account implying novel methods due to the segmentation of the Ge-crystal and the digital electronics

  9. Impurity distribution in high purity germanium crystal and its impact on the detector performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guojian; Amman, Mark; Mei, Hao; Mei, Dongming; Irmscher, Klaus; Guan, Yutong; Yang, Gang

    High-purity germanium crystals were grown in a hydrogen atmosphere using the Czochralski method. The axial and radial distributions of impurities in the crystals were measured by Hall effect and Photo-thermal ionization spectroscopy (PTIS). Amorphous semiconductor contacts were deposited on the germanium crystals to make detectors. Three planar detectors were fabricated from three crystals with different net carrier concentrations (1.7, 7.9 and 10x1010 cm-3). We evaluated the electrical and spectral performance of three detectors. Measurements of gamma-ray spectra from 137Cs, 241Am and 60Co sources demonstrate that the detectors have excellent energy resolution. The relationship between the impurities and detector's energy resolution was analyzed. Keywords: High-purity germanium crystal, High-purity germanium detector This work is supported by DOE grant DE-FG02-10ER46709 and the state of South Dakota..

  10. High-precision efficiency calibration of a high-purity co-axial germanium detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blank, B., E-mail: blank@cenbg.in2p3.fr [Centre d' Etudes Nucléaires de Bordeaux Gradignan, UMR 5797, CNRS/IN2P3, Université de Bordeaux, Chemin du Solarium, BP 120, 33175 Gradignan Cedex (France); Souin, J.; Ascher, P.; Audirac, L.; Canchel, G.; Gerbaux, M.; Grévy, S.; Giovinazzo, J.; Guérin, H.; Nieto, T. Kurtukian; Matea, I. [Centre d' Etudes Nucléaires de Bordeaux Gradignan, UMR 5797, CNRS/IN2P3, Université de Bordeaux, Chemin du Solarium, BP 120, 33175 Gradignan Cedex (France); Bouzomita, H.; Delahaye, P.; Grinyer, G.F.; Thomas, J.C. [Grand Accélérateur National d' Ions Lourds, CEA/DSM, CNRS/IN2P3, Bvd Henri Becquerel, BP 55027, F-14076 CAEN Cedex 5 (France)

    2015-03-11

    A high-purity co-axial germanium detector has been calibrated in efficiency to a precision of about 0.15% over a wide energy range. High-precision scans of the detector crystal and γ-ray source measurements have been compared to Monte-Carlo simulations to adjust the dimensions of a detector model. For this purpose, standard calibration sources and short-lived online sources have been used. The resulting efficiency calibration reaches the precision needed e.g. for branching ratio measurements of super-allowed β decays for tests of the weak-interaction standard model.

  11. Simulation study comparing high-purity germanium and cadmium zinc telluride detectors for breast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, D. L.; Peterson, T. E.

    2014-11-01

    We conducted simulations to compare the potential imaging performance for breast cancer detection with High-Purity Germanium (HPGe) and Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) systems with 1% and 3.8% energy resolution at 140 keV, respectively. Using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP5) simulation package, we modelled both 5 mm-thick CZT and 10 mm-thick HPGe detectors with the same parallel-hole collimator for the imaging of a breast/torso phantom. Simulated energy spectra were generated, and planar images were created for various energy windows around the 140 keV photopeak. Relative sensitivity and scatter and the torso fractions were calculated along with tumour contrast and signal-to-noise ratios (SNR). Simulations showed that utilizing a ±1.25% energy window with an HPGe system better suppressed torso background and small-angle scattered photons than a comparable CZT system using a -5%/+10% energy window. Both systems provided statistically similar contrast and SNR, with HPGe providing higher relative sensitivity. Lowering the counts of HPGe images to match CZT count density still yielded equivalent contrast between HPGe and CZT. Thus, an HPGe system may provide equivalent breast imaging capability at lower injected radioactivity levels when acquiring for equal imaging time.

  12. Methods to improve and understand the sensitivity of high purity germanium detectors for searches of rare events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volynets, Oleksandr

    2012-07-27

    Observation of neutrinoless double beta-decay could answer fundamental questions on the nature of neutrinos. High purity germanium detectors are well suited to search for this rare process in germanium. Successful operation of such experiments requires a good understanding of the detectors and the sources of background. Possible background sources not considered before in the presently running GERDA high purity germanium detector experiment were studied. Pulse shape analysis using artificial neural networks was used to distinguish between signal-like and background-like events. Pulse shape simulation was used to investigate systematic effects influencing the efficiency of the method. Possibilities to localize the origin of unwanted radiation using Compton back-tracking in a granular detector system were examined. Systematic effects in high purity germanium detectors influencing their performance have been further investigated using segmented detectors. The behavior of the detector response at different operational temperatures was studied. The anisotropy effects due to the crystallographic structure of germanium were facilitated in a novel way to determine the orientation of the crystallographic axes.

  13. Effect of Advanced Synthetically Enhanced Detector Resolution Algorithm on Specificity and Sensitivity of Portable High Purity Germanium Gamma Detector Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    with a 50 mm diameter and 30 mm deep Ge crystal and low power Stirling Cooler . The detector is shown in Figure 9. 28 Figure 9. Ortec...recording some characteristics of their average behavior. The common behavior of particles in the physical system is then concluded from the 14...modeling. With increased computational power, Monte Carlo simulations of detector systems have become a complement to experimental detector work

  14. A prototype High Purity Germanium detector for high resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy at high count rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, R.J., E-mail: rjcooper@lbl.gov [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Amman, M.; Luke, P.N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Vetter, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2015-09-21

    Where energy resolution is paramount, High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors continue to provide the optimum solution for gamma-ray detection and spectroscopy. Conventional large-volume HPGe detectors are typically limited to count rates on the order of ten thousand counts per second, however, limiting their effectiveness for high count rate applications. To address this limitation, we have developed a novel prototype HPGe detector designed to be capable of achieving fine energy resolution and high event throughput at count rates in excess of one million counts per second. We report here on the concept, design, and initial performance of the first prototype device.

  15. Performance of a compact multi-crystal high-purity germanium detector array for measuring coincident gamma-ray emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, Chris; Daigle, Stephen; Buckner, Matt [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Erikson, Luke E.; Runkle, Robert C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Stave, Sean C., E-mail: Sean.Stave@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Champagne, Arthur E.; Cooper, Andrew; Downen, Lori [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Glasgow, Brian D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Kelly, Keegan; Sallaska, Anne [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States)

    2015-05-21

    The Multi-sensor Airborne Radiation Survey (MARS) detector is a 14-crystal array of high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors housed in a single cryostat. The array was used to measure the astrophysical S-factor for the {sup 14}N(p,γ){sup 15}O{sup ⁎} reaction for several transition energies at an effective center-of-mass energy of 163 keV. Owing to the granular nature of the MARS detector, the effect of gamma-ray summing was greatly reduced in comparison to past experiments which utilized large, single-crystal detectors. The new S-factor values agree within their uncertainties with the past measurements. Details of the analysis and detector performance are presented.

  16. Performance of A Compact Multi-crystal High-purity Germanium Detector Array for Measuring Coincident Gamma-ray Emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, Chris [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Triangle Univ. Nuclear Lab., Durham, NC (United States); Daigle, Stephen [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Triangle Univ. Nuclear Lab., Durham, NC (United States); Buckner, Matt [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Triangle Univ. Nuclear Lab., Durham, NC (United States); Erikson, Luke E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Runkle, Robert C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stave, Sean C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Champagne, Art [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Triangle Univ. Nuclear Lab., Durham, NC (United States); Cooper, Andrew [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Triangle Univ. Nuclear Lab., Durham, NC (United States); Downen, Lori [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Triangle Univ. Nuclear Lab., Durham, NC (United States); Glasgow, Brian D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kelly, Keegan [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Triangle Univ. Nuclear Lab., Durham, NC (United States); Sallaska, Anne [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Triangle Univ. Nuclear Lab., Durham, NC (United States)

    2015-02-18

    The Multi-sensor Airborne Radiation Survey (MARS) detector is a 14-crystal array of high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors housed in a single cryostat. The array was used to measure the astrophysical S-factor for the 14N(p,γ)15O* reaction for several transition energies at an effective center of mass energy of 163 keV. Owing to the segmented nature of the MARS detector, the effect of gamma-ray summing was greatly reduced in comparison to past experiments which utilized large, single-crystal detectors. The new S-factor values agree within the uncertainties with the past measurements. Details of the analysis and detector performance will be presented.

  17. High purity 100 GeV electron identification with synchrotron radiation arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    Depero, E.; Burtsev, V.; Chumakov, A.; Cooke, D.; Dermenev, A.V.; Donskov, S.V.; Dubinin, F.; Dusaev, R.R.; Emmenegger, S.; Fabich, A.; Frolov, V.N.; Gardikiotis, A.; Gninenko, S.N.; Hösgen, M.; Karneyeu, A.E.; Ketzer, B.; Kirsanov, M.M.; Konorov, I.V.; Kramarenko, V.A.; Kuleshov, S.V.; Lyubovitskij, V.E.; Lysan, V.; Matveev, V.A.; Mikhailov, Yu.V.; Myalkovskiy, V.V.; Peshekhonov, V.D.; Peshekhonov, D.V.; Polyakov, V.A.; Radics, B.; Rubbia, A.; Samoylenko, V.D.; Tikhomirov, V.O.; Tlisov, D.A.; Toropin, A.N.; Vasilishin, B.; Vasquez Arenas, G.; Ulloa, P.; Crivelli, P.

    In high energy experiments such as active beam dump searches for rare decays and missing energy events, the beam purity is a crucial parameter. In this paper we present a technique to reject heavy charged particle contamination in the 100 GeV electron beam of the H4 beam line at CERN SPS. The method is based on the detection with BGO scintillators of the synchrotron radiation emitted by the electrons passing through a bending dipole magnet. A 100 GeV $\\pi^-$ beam is used to test the method in the NA64 experiment resulting in a suppression factor of $10^{-5}$ while the efficiency for electron detection is $\\sim$95%. The spectra and the rejection factors are in very good agreement with the Monte Carlo simulation. The reported suppression factors are significantly better than previously achieved.

  18. High purity 100 GeV electron identification with synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depero, E.; Banerjee, D.; Burtsev, V.; Chumakov, A.; Cooke, D.; Dermenev, A. V.; Donskov, S. V.; Dubinin, F.; Dusaev, R. R.; Emmenegger, S.; Fabich, A.; Frolov, V. N.; Gardikiotis, A.; Gninenko, S. N.; Hösgen, M.; Karneyeu, A. E.; Ketzer, B.; Kirsanov, M. M.; Konorov, I. V.; Kramarenko, V. A.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Lyubovitskij, V. E.; Lysan, V.; Matveev, V. A.; Mikhailov, Yu. V.; Myalkovskiy, V. V.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Peshekhonov, D. V.; Polyakov, V. A.; Radics, B.; Rubbia, A.; Samoylenko, V. D.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tlisov, D. A.; Toropin, A. N.; Vasilishin, B.; Arenas, G. Vasquez; Ulloa, P.; Crivelli, P.

    2017-09-01

    In high energy experiments such as active beam dump searches for rare decays and missing energy events, the beam purity is a crucial parameter. In this paper we present a technique to reject heavy charged particle contamination in the 100 GeV electron beam of the H4 beam line at CERN SPS. The method is based on the detection with BGO scintillators of the synchrotron radiation emitted by the electrons passing through a bending dipole magnet. A 100 GeV π- beam is used to test the method in the NA64 experiment resulting in a suppression factor of 10-5 while the efficiency for electron detection is ∼95%. The spectra and the rejection factors are in very good agreement with the Monte Carlo simulation. The reported suppression factors are significantly better than previously achieved.

  19. Gamma-ray observations of SN 1987A with an array of high-purity germanium detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandie, W. G.; Nakano, G. H.; Chase, L. F., Jr.; Fishman, G. J.; Meegan, C. A.; Wilson, R. B.; Paciesas, W.

    A balloonborne gamma-ray spectrometer comprising an array of high-purity n-type germanium detectors was flown from Alice Springs, Northern Territory, Australia, on May 29 - 30, 1987, 96 days after the observed neutrino pulse. SN 1987A was within the 22-deg field of view for about 3300 s during May 29.9 - 30.3 UT. No excess gamma rays were observed at energies appropriate to the Ni(56) - Co(56) decay chain or from other lines in the energy region from 0.1 to 3.0 MeV. The data imply that there was less than 2.5×10-4 solar masses of Co(56) exposed to the Earth at the time of the observation. Additional balloon-borne observations are planned.

  20. GEANT4 simulation of photo-peak efficiency of small high purity germanium detectors for nuclear power plant applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehman, Shakeel Ur; Mirza, Sikander M. [Department of Physics and Applied Mathematics, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Nilore, Islamabad 45650 (Pakistan); Mirza, Nasir M., E-mail: nmm@pieas.edu.p [Department of Physics and Applied Mathematics, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Nilore, Islamabad 45650 (Pakistan); Siddique, Muhammad Tariq [Department of Physics and Applied Mathematics, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Nilore, Islamabad 45650 (Pakistan)

    2011-01-15

    GEANT4 - based Monte Carlo simulations have been carried out for the determination of photo-peak efficiency of heavily shielded small high purity germanium detector (HPGe) used for monitoring radiation levels in nuclear power plants. The GEANT4 simulated values of HPGe detector efficiency for point as well as for disk sources, for two different values of collimator diameter, have been found in good agreement with the corresponding published results obtained by using the MCNP code. The work has been extended to study the effect of radial displacement of a source relative to a detector on photo-peak efficiency for both point and disk source, and at various values of {gamma}-ray energies. Also the effect of disk source radius on photo-peak efficiency has been studied. Besides the results of different available physics models in GEANT4 have also been compared. The computed values of efficiency for point as well as for disk sources using the Penelope and Livermore physics models have been found correspondingly consistent for various values of {gamma}-ray energies while some differences (e.g., Penelope model yields 6.3% higher values of photo-peak efficiency for E{gamma} = 1.332 MeV, 10 mm collimator diameter) have been observed in the corresponding valued obtained by using the Standard physics model.

  1. 18F half-life measurement using a high-purity germanium detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jubong; Lee, K B; Park, T S; Lee, J M; Oh, P J; Lee, S H; Kang, Y S; Ahn, J K

    2012-11-01

    The half-life of (18)F has been measured using HPGe detectors with a (137)Cs reference source. The counting ratio of 511 keV γ-rays from (18)F to 622 keV γ-rays from (137)Cs was fitted for the half-life with a weighted least-square method. Uncertainties due to the systematic effects arising from the measurement of a high activity (18)F source were studied in detail. The half-life of (18)F was found to be (109.72±0.19) min. The result is in a good agreement with the recommended value of (109.728±0.019) min evaluated at the Laborotaire National Henri Becquerel (LNHB).

  2. Performance and stability tests of bare high purity germanium detectors in liquid argon for the GERDA experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnabe Heider, Marik

    2009-05-27

    GERDA will search for neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 76}Ge by using a novel approach of bare germanium detectors in liquid argon (LAr). Enriched germanium detectors from the previous Heidelberg-Moscow and IGEX experiments have been reprocessed and will be deployed in GERDA Phase-I. At the center of this thesis project is the study of the performance of bare germanium detectors in cryogenic liquids. Identical detector performance as in vacuum cryostats (2.2 keV FWHM at 1.3 MeV) was achieved in cryogenic liquids with a new low-mass detector assembly and contacts. One major result is the discovery of a radiation induced leakage current (LC) increase when operating bare detectors with standard passivation layers in LAr. Charge collection and build-up on the passivation layer were identified as the origin of the LC increase. It was found that diodes without passivation do not exhibit this feature. Three month-long stable operation in LAr at {proportional_to} 5 pA LC under periodic gamma irradiation demonstrated the suitability of the modi ed detector design. Based on these results, all Phase-I detectors were reprocessed without passivation layer and subsequently successfully characterized in LAr in the GERDA underground Detector Laboratory. The mass loss during the reprocessing was {proportional_to}300 g out of 17.9 kg and the exposure above ground {proportional_to} 5 days. This results in a negligible cosmogenic background increase of {proportional_to} 5.10{sup -4} cts/(keV.kg.y) at {sup 76}Ge Q{sub {beta}}{sub {beta}} for {sup 60}Co and {sup 68}Ge. (orig.)

  3. Characteristics of Signals Originating Near the Lithium-Diffused N+ Contact of High Purity Germanium P-Type Point Contact Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Aguayo, E; Avignone, F T; Barabash, A S; Barton, P J; Beene, J R; Bertrand, F E; Boswell, M; Brudanin, V; Busch, M; Chan, Y-D; Christofferson, C D; Collar, J I; Combs, D C; Cooper, R J; Detwiler, J A; Doe, P J; Efremenko, Yu; Egorov, V; Ejiri, H; Elliott, S R; Esterline, J; Fast, J E; Fields, N; Finnerty, P; Fraenkle, F M; Galindo-Uribarri, A; Gehman, V M; Giovanetti, G K; Green, M P; Guiseppe, V E; Gusey, K; Hallin, A L; Hazama, R; Henning, R; Hoppe, E W; Horton, M; Howard, S; Howe, M A; Johnson, R A; Keeter, K J; Kidd, M F; Knecht, A; Kochetov, O; Konovalov, S I; Kouzes, R T; LaFerriere, B D; Leon, J; Leviner, L E; Loach, J C; Looker, Q; Luke, P N; MacMullin, S; Marino, M G; Martin, R D; Merriman, J H; Miller, M L; Mizouni, L; Nomachi, M; Orrell, J L; Overman, N R; Perumpilly, G; Phillips, D G; Poon, A W P; Radford, D C; Rielage, K; Robertson, R G H; Ronquest, M C; Schubert, A G; Shima, T; Shirchenko, M; Snavely, K J; Steele, D; Strain, J; Timkin, V; Tornow, W; Varner, R L; Vetter, K; Vorren, K; Wilkerson, J F; Yakushev, E; Yaver, H; Young, A R; Yu, C -H; Yumatov, V

    2012-01-01

    A study of signals originating near the lithium-diffused n+ contact of p-type point contact (PPC) high purity germanium detectors (HPGe) is presented. The transition region between the active germanium and the fully dead layer of the n+ contact is examined. Energy depositions in this transition region are shown to result in partial charge collection. This provides a mechanism for events with a well defined energy to contribute to the continuum of the energy spectrum at lower energies. A novel technique to quantify the contribution from this source of background is introduced. Experiments that operate germanium detectors with a very low energy threshold may benefit from the methods presented herein.

  4. Characteristics of Signals Originating near the Lithium-Diffused N+ Contact of High Purity Germanium P-Type Point Contact Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguayo, E. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Amman, M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Avignone, F. T. [University of South Carolina/ORNL; Barabash, A.S. [Institute of Theoretical & Experimental Physics, Moscow, Russia; Barton, P. J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Beene, James R [ORNL; Bertrand Jr, Fred E [ORNL; Boswell, M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Brudanin, V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Busch, M. [Duke University; Chan, Y-D [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Christofferson, C. D. [South Dakota School of Mines & Technology, Rapid City, SD; Collar, Juan I. [University of Chicago; Combs, D. C. [University of North Carolina / Triangle Universities Nuclear Lababoratory, Durham; Cooper, Reynold J [ORNL; Detwiler, J.A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Doe, P. J. [University of Washington; Efremenko, Yuri [University of Tennessee (UTK) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Egorov, V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Ejiri, H. [Osaka University; Elliott, S. R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Esterline, J. [Duke University; Fast, J.E. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Fields, N. [University of Chicago; Finnerty, P. [University of North Carolina / Triangle Universities Nuclear Lababoratory, Durham; Fraenkle, F. M. [University of North Carolina / Triangle Universities Nuclear Lababoratory, Durham; Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo {nmn} [ORNL; Gehman, V. M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Giovanetti, G. K. [Univ, of North Carolina & Triangle Universities Nucl. Lab - Durham, NC; Green, M. P. [University of North Carolina / Triangle Universities Nuclear Lababoratory, Durham; Guiseppe, V.E. [University of South Dakota; Gusey, K. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Hallin, A. L. [University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada; Hazama, R. [Osaka University; Henning, R. [Univ, of North Carolina & Triangle Universities Nucl. Lab - Durham, NC; Hoppe, E.W. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Horton, M. [South Dakota School of Mines & Technology, Rapid City, SD; Howard, S. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology; Howe, M. A. [University of North Carolina / Triangle Universities Nuclear Lababoratory, Durham; Johnson, R. A. [University of Washington, Seattle; Keeter, K.J. [Black Hills State University, Spearfish, SD; Kidd, M. F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Knecht, A. [University of Washington, Seattle; Kochetov, O. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Konovalov, S.I. [Institute of Theoretical & Experimental Physics, Moscow, Russia; Kouzes, R. T. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); LaFerriere, B. D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Leon, J. [University of Washington, Seattle; Leviner, L. E. [University of North Carolina / Triangle Universities Nuclear Lababoratory, Durham; Loach, J.C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Looker, Q. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Luke, P.N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); MacMullin, S. [University of North Carolina / Triangle Universities Nuclear Lababoratory, Durham; Marino, M. G. [University of Washington, Seattle; Martin, R.D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Merriman, J. H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Miller, M. L. [University of Washington, Seattle; Mizouni, L. [PPNL/Univ. of South Carolina; Nomachi, M. [Osaka University; Orrell, John L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Overman, N. R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Perumpilly, G. [University of South Dakota; Phillips II, D. G. [University of North Carolina / Triangle Universities Nuclear Lababoratory, Durham; Poon, A.W.P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); et al.

    2013-01-01

    A study of signals originating near the lithium-diffused n+ contact of p-type point contact (PPC) high purity germanium detectors (HPGe) is presented. The transition region between the active germanium and the fully dead layer of the n+ contact is examined. Energy depositions in this transition region are shown to result in partial charge collection. This provides a mechanism for events with a well defined energy to contribute to the continuum of the energy spectrum at lower energies. A novel technique to quantify the contribution from this source of background is introduced. Experiments that operate germanium detectors with a very low energy threshold may benefit from the methods presented herein.

  5. Thulium-169 neutron inelastic scattering cross section measurements via the sup 1 sup 6 sup 9 Tm(n,n'gamma) reaction 25.40.fq; Inelastic neutron scattering; Nuclear reactions 169Tm(n,n'gamma); gamma-branching ratios; Neutron inelastic level cross sections; Compound and direct nuclear interaction; Time-of-flight method; High purity Ge detector

    CERN Document Server

    Ko, Y J; Kegel, G H R; Desimone, D J; Seo, P N; Young, P G

    2000-01-01

    Neutron inelastic scattering from thulium-169 has been studied for states above 100 keV via the (n,n'gamma) reaction at incident energies in the 0.2- to 1.0-MeV range. A high-resolution Ge spectrometer in conjunction with the time-of-flight technique was utilized. Thirty-six gamma-ray transitions from 16 levels were observed. Gamma-ray angular distributions were measured at E sub n =750 keV and excitation functions at 125 degrees were measured in 50 keV steps over the range of incident energies. Differential gamma-ray production cross sections and gamma-ray branching ratios were obtained. Inferred neutron inelastic level cross sections of the four lowest ground-state rotational band (K suppi=1/2 sup +) members are compared to the sum of calculated compound nucleus and direct interaction cross sections. For the remaining levels, measurements are compared to compound nucleus calculations only. The comparison shows generally good agreement particularly near threshold.

  6. Measurements of gamma (γ)-emitting radionuclides with a high-purity germanium detector: the methods and reliability of our environmental assessments on the Fukushima 1 Nuclear Power Plant accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimura, Tetsuro; Mimura, Mari; Komiyama, Chiyo; Miyamoto, Masaaki; Kitamura, Akira

    2014-01-01

    The severe accident of Fukushima 1 Nuclear Power Plant due to the Tohoku Region Pacific Coast Earthquake in 11 March 2011 caused wide contamination and pollution by radionuclides in Fukushima and surrounding prefectures. In the current JPR symposium, a group of plant scientists attempted to examine the impact of the radioactive contamination on wild and cultivated plants. Measurements of gamma (γ) radiation from radionuclides in "Fukushima samples", which we called and collected from natural and agricultural areas in Fukushima prefecture were mostly done with a high-purity Ge detector in the Graduate School of Maritime Sciences, Kobe University. In this technical note, we describe the methods of sample preparation and measurements of radioactivity of the samples and discuss the reliability of our data in regards to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Interlaboratory comparisons and proficiency test (IAEA proficiency test).

  7. Monte Carlo simulation of gamma-ray interactions in an over-square high-purity germanium detector for in-vivo measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saizu, Mirela Angela

    2016-09-01

    The developments of high-purity germanium detectors match very well the requirements of the in-vivo human body measurements regarding the gamma energy ranges of the radionuclides intended to be measured, the shape of the extended radioactive sources, and the measurement geometries. The Whole Body Counter (WBC) from IFIN-HH is based on an “over-square” high-purity germanium detector (HPGe) to perform accurate measurements of the incorporated radionuclides emitting X and gamma rays in the energy range of 10 keV-1500 keV, under conditions of good shielding, suitable collimation, and calibration. As an alternative to the experimental efficiency calibration method consisting of using reference calibration sources with gamma energy lines that cover all the considered energy range, it is proposed to use the Monte Carlo method for the efficiency calibration of the WBC using the radiation transport code MCNP5. The HPGe detector was modelled and the gamma energy lines of 241Am, 57Co, 133Ba, 137Cs, 60Co, and 152Eu were simulated in order to obtain the virtual efficiency calibration curve of the WBC. The Monte Carlo method was validated by comparing the simulated results with the experimental measurements using point-like sources. For their optimum matching, the impact of the variation of the front dead layer thickness and of the detector photon absorbing layers materials on the HPGe detector efficiency was studied, and the detector’s model was refined. In order to perform the WBC efficiency calibration for realistic people monitoring, more numerical calculations were generated simulating extended sources of specific shape according to the standard man characteristics.

  8. Neutron Damage in Mechanically-Cooled High-Purity Germanium Detectors for Field-Portable Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E.H. Seabury; C.J. Wharton; A.J. Caffrey; J.B. McCabe; C. DeW. Van Siclen

    2013-10-01

    Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation (PGNAA) systems require the use of a gamma-ray spectrometer to record the gamma-ray spectrum of an object under test and allow the determination of the object’s composition. Field-portable systems, such as Idaho National Laboratory’s PINS system, have used standard liquid-nitrogen-cooled high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors to perform this function. These detectors have performed very well in the past, but the requirement of liquid-nitrogen cooling limits their use to areas where liquid nitrogen is readily available or produced on-site. Also, having a relatively large volume of liquid nitrogen close to the detector can impact some assessments, possibly leading to a false detection of explosives or other nitrogen-containing chemical. Use of a mechanically-cooled HPGe detector is therefore very attractive for PGNAA applications where nitrogen detection is critical or where liquid-nitrogen logistics are problematic. Mechanically-cooled HPGe detectors constructed from p-type germanium, such as Ortec’s trans-SPEC, have been commercially available for several years. In order to assess whether these detectors would be suitable for use in a fielded PGNAA system, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been performing a number of tests of the resistance of mechanically-cooled HPGe detectors to neutron damage. These detectors have been standard commercially-available p-type HPGe detectors as well as prototype n-type HPGe detectors. These tests compare the performance of these different detector types as a function of crystal temperature and incident neutron fluence on the crystal.

  9. Using standard calibrated geometries to characterize a coaxial high purity germanium gamma detector for Monte Carlo simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Graaf, E. R.; Dendooven, P.; Brandenburg, S.

    2014-01-01

    A detector model optimization procedure based on matching Monte Carlo simulations with measurements for two experimentally calibrated sample geometries which are frequently used in radioactivity measurement laboratories results in relative agreement within 5% between simulated and measured efficienc

  10. Couples Magnetic and Structural Transitions in High-Purity Dy and Gd5SbxGe4-x

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chernyshov, Alexander S. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic materials exhibiting magnetic phase transitions simultaneously with structural rearrangements of their crystal lattices hold a promise for numerous applications including magnetic refrigeration, magnetomechanical devices and sensors. We undertook a detailed study of a single crystal of dysprosium metal, which is a classical example of a system where magnetic and crystallographic sublattices can be either coupled or decoupled from one another. Magnetocaloric effect, magnetization, ac magnetic susceptibility, and heat capacity of high purity single crystals of dysprosium have been investigated over broad temperature and magnetic field intervals with the magnetic field vector parallel to either the a- or c-axes of the crystal. Notable differences in the behavior of the physical properties when compared to Dy samples studied in the past have been observed between 110 K and 125 K, and between 178 K and ~210 K. A plausible mechanism based on the formation of antiferromagnetic clusters in the impure Dy has been suggested in order to explain the reduction of the magnetocaloric effect in the vicinity of the Neel point. Experimental and theoretical investigations of the influence of commensurability effects on the magnetic phase diagram and the value of the magnetocaloric effect have been conducted. The presence of newly found anomalies in the physical properties has been considered as evidence of previously unreported states of Dy. The refined magnetic phase diagram of dysprosium with the magnetic field vector parallel to the a-axis of a crystal has been constructed and discussed. The magnetic and crystallographic properties of Gd5SbxGe4-x pseudo-binary system were studied by x-ray diffraction (at room temperature), heat capacity, ac-magnetic susceptibility, and magnetization in the temperature interval 5-320 K in magnetic fields up to 100 kOe. The magnetic properties of three composition (x = 0.5, 1,2) were examined in detail. The

  11. Ge photocapacitive MIS infrared detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binari, S. C.; Miller, W. E.; Tsuo, Y. H.; Miller, W. E.

    1979-01-01

    An undoped Ge photocapacitive detector is reported which has peak normalized detectivities at wavelengh 1.4 microns and chopping frequencies 13-1000 Hz of 9 x 10 to the 12th, 4 x 10 to the 9th cm Hz to the 1/2th/W operating respectively at temperatures 77, 195, and 295 K. The observed temperature, spectral, and frequency response of the signal and noise are explained in terms of the measured space charge and interface state properties of the device.

  12. Ge/GaAs heterostructure matrix detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostamo, P. [Optoelectronics Laboratory, Helsinki University of Technology, P.O. Box 3500, 02015 HUT (Finland)]. E-mail: pasi.kostamo@hut.fi; Saeynaetjoki, A. [Optoelectronics Laboratory, Helsinki University of Technology, P.O. Box 3500, 02015 HUT (Finland); Knuuttila, L. [Optoelectronics Laboratory, Helsinki University of Technology, P.O. Box 3500, 02015 HUT (Finland); Lipsanen, H. [Optoelectronics Laboratory, Helsinki University of Technology, P.O. Box 3500, 02015 HUT (Finland); Andersson, H. [Oxford Instruments Analytical Oy (United Kingdom); Banzuzi, K. [Oxford Instruments Analytical Oy (United Kingdom); Nenonen, S. [Oxford Instruments Analytical Oy (United Kingdom); Sipilae, H. [Oxford Instruments Analytical Oy (United Kingdom); Vaijaervi, S. [Oxford Instruments Analytical Oy (United Kingdom); Lumb, D. [Science Payload and Advanced Concepts Office, ESA/ESTEC, Nordwijk (Netherlands)

    2006-07-01

    In this paper we present a novel germanium/gallium arsenide heterostructure X-ray detector with the active volume of germanium. The heterostructure is fabricated by depositing a gallium arsenide layer on a high-purity germanium wafer in a vertical metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy system. This approach provides a new alternative to traditional lithium diffused n+ contact which is not easily applicable for finely pixelated detectors. The detector chip fabrication utilizing this kind of heterostructure is straightforward and only standard lithographic processes need to be applied. Electrical properties of the small format detector matrices are studied. Very low reverse biased current at 77 K is observed. It is concluded that the diffusion of arsenic in germanium results in an n-type germanium layer under the epitaxial gallium arsenide.

  13. The effect of incremental gamma-ray doses and incremental neutron fluences upon the performance of self-biased sup 1 sup 0 B-coated high-purity epitaxial GaAs thermal neutron detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Gersch, H K; Simpson, P A

    2002-01-01

    High-purity epitaxial GaAs sup 1 sup 0 B-coated thermal neutron detectors advantageously operate at room temperature without externally applied voltage. Sample detectors were systematically irradiated at fixed grid locations near the core of a 2 MW research reactor to determine their operational neutron dose threshold. Reactor pool locations were assigned so that fast and thermal neutron fluxes to the devices were similar. Neutron fluences ranged between 10 sup 1 sup 1 and 10 sup 1 sup 4 n/cm sup 2. GaAs detectors were exposed to exponential fluences of base ten. Ten detector designs were irradiated and studied, differentiated between p-i-n diodes and Schottky barrier diodes. The irradiated sup 1 sup 0 B-coated detectors were tested for neutron detection sensitivity in a thermalized neutron beam. Little damage was observed for detectors irradiated at neutron fluences of 10 sup 1 sup 2 n/cm sup 2 and below, but signals noticeably degraded at fluences of 10 sup 1 sup 3 n/cm sup 2. Catastrophic damage was appare...

  14. Realization of the low background neutrino detector Double Chooz. From the development of a high-purity liquid and gas handling concept to first neutrino data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfahler, Patrick

    2012-12-17

    Neutrino physics is one of the most vivid fields in particle physics. Within this field, neutrino oscillations are of special interest as they allow to determine driving oscillation parameters, which are collected as mixing angles in the leptonic mixing matrix. The exact knowledge of these parameters is the main key for the investigation of new physics beyond the currently known Standard Model of particle physics. The Double Chooz experiment is one of three reactor disappearance experiments currently taking data, which recently succeeded to discover a non-zero value for the last neutrino mixing angle {Theta}{sub 13}. As successor of the CHOOZ experiment, Double Chooz will use two detectors with improved design, each of them now composed of four concentrically nested detector vessels each filled with different detector liquid. The integrity of this multi-layered structure and the quality of the used detector liquids are essential for the success of the experiment. Within this frame, the here presented work describes the production of two detector liquids, the filling and handling of the Double Chooz far detector and the installation of all necessary hardware components therefore. In order to meet the strict requirements existing for the detector liquids, all components were individually selected in an extensive material selection process at TUM, which compared samples from different companies for their key properties: density, transparency, light yield and radio purity. Based on these measurements, the composition of muon veto scintillator and buffer liquid were determined. For the production of the detector liquids, a simple surface building close to the far detector site was upgraded into a large-scale storage and mixing facility, which allowed to separately, mix, handle and store 90 m{sup 3} of muon veto scintillator and 110 m{sup 3} of buffer liquid. For the muon veto scintillator, a master-solution composed of 4800 l LAB, 180 kg PPO and 1.8 kg of bis/MSB was

  15. Improvement in Ge Detector Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    linear Stirling cooler manufactured by SunPower, Inc., Athens, Ohio. This hybrid system has the same footprint as a standard 30-liter LN2 Dewar and...are two such HPGe detector cooler /cryostat systems that we are modifying and evaluating for use in the RASA. The modifications will enhance vacuum... system incorporating a 4-watt pulse-tube cooler manufactured by Thales Cryogenics, Eindhoven, Netherlands, is being modified to incorporate ultra

  16. Modeling the detection efficiency of an HP-Ge detector for use in boron neutron capture therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Satoshi; Wakita, Akihisa; Ito, Masashi; Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Nishioka, Shie; Iijima, Kotaro; Kobayashi, Kazuma; Nishio, Teiji; Igaki, Hiroshi; Itami, Jun

    2017-07-01

    The multi-foil method is commonly used to determine upon an energy spectrum of neutrons in boron neutron capture therapy. The method requires to measure the radioactivation of the foils. This study develops a simple modeling procedure of a high-purity Ge detector, which is used to measure the radioactivation, in order to calculate the detection efficiency with GEANT4. By changing four parameters from their manufacturing specifications of the detector, the simulated detection efficiency is able to reproduce the actual detection efficiency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Characterisation of two AGATA asymmetric high purity germanium capsules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colosimo, S.J., E-mail: sjc@ns.ph.liv.ac.uk [Department of Physics, Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Moon, S.; Boston, A.J.; Boston, H.C.; Cresswell, J.R.; Harkness-Brennan, L.; Judson, D.S. [Department of Physics, Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Lazarus, I.H. [STFC Daresbury, Daresbury, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Nolan, P.J. [Department of Physics, Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Simpson, J. [STFC Daresbury, Daresbury, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Unsworth, C. [Department of Physics, Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-11

    The AGATA spectrometer is an array of highly segmented high purity germanium detectors. The spectrometer uses pulse shape analysis in order to track Compton scattered γ-rays to increase the efficiency of nuclear spectroscopy studies. The characterisation of two high purity germanium detector capsules for AGATA of the same A-type has been performed at the University of Liverpool. This work will examine the uniformity of performance of the two capsules, including a comparison of the resolution and efficiency as well as a study of charge collection. The performance of the capsules shows good agreement, which is essential for the efficient operation of the γ-ray tracking array.

  18. Analytical response function for planar Ge detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Alvarez, Juan A.; Maidana, Nora L.; Vanin, Vito R.; Fernández-Varea, José M.

    2016-04-01

    We model the response function (RF) of planar HPGe x-ray spectrometers for photon energies between around 10 keV and 100 keV. The RF is based on the proposal of Seltzer [1981. Nucl. Instrum. Methods 188, 133-151] and takes into account the full-energy absorption in the Ge active volume, the escape of Ge Kα and Kβ x-rays and the escape of photons after one Compton interaction. The relativistic impulse approximation is employed instead of the Klein-Nishina formula to describe incoherent photon scattering in the Ge crystal. We also incorporate a simple model for the continuous component of the spectrum produced by the escape of photo-electrons from the active volume. In our calculations we include external interaction contributions to the RF: (i) the incoherent scattering effects caused by the detector's Be window and (ii) the spectrum produced by photo-electrons emitted in the Ge dead layer that reach the active volume. The analytical RF model is compared with pulse-height spectra simulated using the PENELOPE Monte Carlo code.

  19. SuperCDMS SNOLAB Low-Mass Detectors: Ultra-Sensitive Phonon Calorimeters for a Sub-GeV Dark Matter Search

    CERN Document Server

    Kurinsky, Noah; Partridge, Richard; Cabrera, Blas; Pyle, Matt

    2016-01-01

    We present the technical design for the SuperCDMS high-voltage, low-mass dark matter detectors, designed to be sensitive to dark matter down to 300 MeV/$c^2$ in mass and resolve individual electron-hole pairs from low-energy scattering events in high-purity Ge and Si crystals. In this paper we discuss some of the studies and technological improvements which have allowed us to design such a sensitive detector, including advances in phonon sensor design and detector simulation. With this design we expect to achieve better than 10 eV (5 eV) phonon energy resolution in our Ge (Si) detectors, and recoil energy resolution below 1eV by exploiting Luke-Neganov phonon generation of charges accelerated in high fields.

  20. Testing the Ge detectors for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, W; Aguayo, E; Avignone, F T; Barabash, A S; Bertrand, F E; Boswell, M; Brudanin, V; Busch, M; Byram, D; Caldwell, A S; Chan, Y-D; Christofferson, C D; Combs, D C; Cuesta, C; Detwiler, J A; Doe, P J; Efremenko, Yu; Egorov, V; Ejiri, H; Elliott, S R; Fast, J E; Finnerty, P; Fraenkle, F M; Galindo-Uribarri, A; Giovanetti, G K; Goett, J; Green, M P; Gruszko, J; Guiseppe, V E; Gusev, K; Hallin, A L; Hazama, R; Hegai, A; Henning, R; Hoppe, E W; Howard, S; Howe, M A; Keeter, K J; Kidd, M F; Kochetov, O; Konovalov, S I; Kouzes, R T; LaFerriere, B D; Leon, J; Leviner, L E; Loach, J C; MacMullin, J; MacMullin, S; Martin, R D; Meijer, S; Mertens, S; Nomachi, M; Orrell, J L; O'Shaughnessy, C; Overman, N R; Phillips, D G; Poon, A W P; Pushkin, K; Radford, D C; Rager, J; Rielage, K; Robertson, R G H; Romero-Romero, E; Ronquest, M C; Schubert, A G; Shanks, B; Shima, T; Shirchenko, M; Snavely, K J; Snyder, N; Suriano, A M; Thompson, J; Timkin, V; Tornow, W; Trimble, J E; Varner, R L; Vasilyev, S; Vetter, K; Vorren, K; White, B R; Wilkerson, J F; Wiseman, C; Yakushev, E; Young, A R; Yu, C H; Yumatov, V

    2014-01-01

    High purity germanium (HPGe) crystals will be used for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, where they serve as both the source and the detector for neutrinoless double beta decay. It is crucial for the experiment to understand the performance of the HPGe crystals. A variety of crystal properties are being investigated, including basic properties such as energy resolution, efficiency, uniformity, capacitance, leakage current and crystal axis orientation, as well as more sophisticated properties, e.g. pulse shapes and dead layer and transition layer distributions. In this paper, we will present our measurements that characterize the HPGe crystals. We will also discuss our simulation package for the detector characterization setup, and show that additional information can be extracted from data-simulation comparisons.

  1. Effect of prolonged annealing on the performance of coaxial Ge gamma-ray detectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Owens, A.; Brandenburg, S.; Buis, E. -J.; Kozorezov, A. G.; Kraft, S.; Ostendorf, R. W.; Quarati, F.

    2007-01-01

    The effects of prolonged annealing at elevated temperatures have been investigated in a 53 cm(3) closed-end coaxial high purity germanium detector in the reverse electrode configuration. The detector was multiply annealed at 100 degrees C in block periods of 7 days. After each anneal cycle it was co

  2. Shape rheocasting of high purity aluminium

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Curle, UA

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available It is demonstrated experimentally that using the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research Rheo Casting System and high pressure die casting it is possible to semi-solid process and cast into a shape high purity aluminium without a...

  3. Preparation of High Purity Amorphous Boron Powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.V. Tilekar

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Amorphous boron powder of high purity (92-94 % with a particle size of l-2 mm is preferred as a fuel for fuel-rich propellants for integrated rocket ramjets and for igniter formulations. Thispaper describes the studies on process optimisation of two processes, ie, oxidative roasting of boron (roasting boron in air and roasting boron with zinc in an inert medium for preparing high purity boron. Experimental studies reveal that roasting boron with zinc at optimised process conditions yields boron of purity more than 93 per cent, whereas oxidative roasting method yields boron of purity - 92 per cent. Oxidative roasting has comparative edge over the other processes owing to its ease of scale-up and simplicity

  4. Nonlinear control of high purity distillation columns

    OpenAIRE

    Groebel, Markus; Allgöwer, Frank; Storz, Markus; Gilles, Ernst Dieter

    1994-01-01

    Two simple models of distillation columns are studied to investigate their suitability for the practical use with exact I/O-linearization. An extension of exact I/O-linearization, the asymptotically exact I/O-linearization is applied to the control of a high purity distillation column, using one of these models to derive the static state feedback law. Simulation studies demonstrate the advantage of asymptotically exact I/O-linearization versus classical exact I/O-linearization techniques. Exp...

  5. Comparative technique in measurements of Ge detectors effective volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidova, E. V.; Kirpichnikov, I. V.; Vasenko, A. A.

    1999-01-01

    A simple and quick procedure was proposed for measurements of large coaxial Ge detectors effective volumes. It included a comparison of background spectra collected with several detectors without any shielding in an underground laboratory. Such measurements were performed in Homestake (USA) and Canfranc (Spain) laboratories with several 1 kg and 2 kg detectors. Monte-Carlo calculations confirmed that ratios of numbers of events in continua of the spectra should be either equal or very close to the ratios of the detectors effective volumes.

  6. GeV dark matter searches with the NEWS detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Profumo, Stefano

    2016-03-01

    The proposed NEWS apparatus, a spherical detector with a small central electrode sensor operating as a proportional counter, promises to explore new swaths of the direct detection parameter space in the GeV and sub-GeV dark matter particle mass range by employing very light nuclear targets, such as H and He, and by taking advantage of a very low (sub-keV) energy threshold. Here we discuss and study two example classes of dark matter models that will be tested with NEWS: GeV-scale millicharged dark matter, and a GeV-Dirac Fermion dark matter model with a light (MeV-GeV) scalar or vector mediator, and indicate the physical regions of parameter space the experiment can probe.

  7. 12 GeV detector technology at Jefferson Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leckey, John P.; GlueX Collaboration

    2013-04-01

    The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) is presently in the middle of an upgrade to increase the energy of its CW electron beam from 6 GeV to 12 GeV along with the addition of a fourth experimental hall. Driven both by necessity and availability, novel detectors and electronics modules have been used in the upgrade. One such sensor is the Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM), specifically a Multi-Pixel Photon Counter (MPPC), which is an array of avalanche photodiode pixels operating in Geiger mode that are used to sense photons. The SiPMs replace conventional photomultiplier tubes and have several distinct advantages including the safe operation in a magnetic field and the lack of need for high voltage. Another key to 12 GeV success is advanced fast electronics. Jlab will use custom 250 MHz and 125 MHz 12-bit analog to digital converters (ADCs) and time to digital converters (TDCs) all of which take advantage of VME Switched Serial (VXS) bus with its GB/s high bandwidth readout capability. These new technologies will be used to readout drift chambers, calorimeters, spectrometers and other particle detectors at Jlab once the 12 GeV upgrade is complete. The largest experiment at Jlab utilizing these components is GlueX - an experiment in the newly constructed Hall D that will study the photoproduction of light mesons in the search for hybrid mesons. The performance of these components and their respective detectors will be presented.

  8. 12 GeV detector technology at Jefferson Lab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leckey, John P. [Indiana U.

    2013-04-01

    The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) is presently in the middle of an upgrade to increase the energy of its CW electron beam from 6 GeV to 12 GeV along with the addition of a fourth experimental hall. Driven both by necessity and availability, novel detectors and electronics modules have been used in the upgrade. One such sensor is the Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM), specifically a Multi-Pixel Photon Counter (MPPC), which is an array of avalanche photodiode pixels operating in Geiger mode that are used to sense photons. The SiPMs replace conventional photomultiplier tubes and have several distinct advantages including the safe operation in a magnetic field and the lack of need for high voltage. Another key to 12 GeV success is advanced fast electronics. Jlab will use custom 250 MHz and 125 MHz 12-bit analog to digital converters (ADCs) and time to digital converters (TDCs) all of which take advantage of VME Switched Serial (VXS) bus with its GB/s high bandwidth readout capability. These new technologies will be used to readout drift chambers, calorimeters, spectrometers and other particle detectors at Jlab once the 12 GeV upgrade is complete. The largest experiment at Jlab utilizing these components is GlueX - an experiment in the newly constructed Hall D that will study the photoproduction of light mesons in the search for hybrid mesons. The performance of these components and their respective detectors will be presented.

  9. 12 GeV detector technology at Jefferson Lab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leckey, John P. [Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Collaboration: GlueX Collaboration

    2013-04-19

    The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) is presently in the middle of an upgrade to increase the energy of its CW electron beam from 6 GeV to 12 GeV along with the addition of a fourth experimental hall. Driven both by necessity and availability, novel detectors and electronics modules have been used in the upgrade. One such sensor is the Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM), specifically a Multi-Pixel Photon Counter (MPPC), which is an array of avalanche photodiode pixels operating in Geiger mode that are used to sense photons. The SiPMs replace conventional photomultiplier tubes and have several distinct advantages including the safe operation in a magnetic field and the lack of need for high voltage. Another key to 12 GeV success is advanced fast electronics. Jlab will use custom 250 MHz and 125 MHz 12-bit analog to digital converters (ADCs) and time to digital converters (TDCs) all of which take advantage of VME Switched Serial (VXS) bus with its GB/s high bandwidth readout capability. These new technologies will be used to readout drift chambers, calorimeters, spectrometers and other particle detectors at Jlab once the 12 GeV upgrade is complete. The largest experiment at Jlab utilizing these components is GlueX - an experiment in the newly constructed Hall D that will study the photoproduction of light mesons in the search for hybrid mesons. The performance of these components and their respective detectors will be presented.

  10. Workshop on Preserving High Purity Uranium-233

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krichinsky, Alan M [ORNL; Giaquinto, Joseph [ORNL; Canaan, R Douglas {Doug} [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    A workshop was held on at the MARC X conference to provide a forum for the scientific community to communicate needs for high-purity 233U and its by-products in order to preserve critical items otherwise slated for downblending and disposal. Currently, only a small portion of the U.S. holdings of separated 233U is being preserved. However, many additional kilograms of 233U (>97% pure) still are destined to be downblended which will permanently destroy their potential value for many other applications. It is not likely that this material will ever be replaced due to a lack of operating production capability. Summaries of information conveyed at the workshop and feedback obtained from the scientific community are presented herein.

  11. A repair station for HpGe detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearman, Robert; Lister, Christopher; Mitchell, A. J.; Copp, Patrick; Jepeal, Steven; Chowdhury, Partha

    2013-10-01

    Hyper-pure Germanium detectors (HpGe) offer the highest energy resolution for gamma-ray nuclear spectroscopy (about 1.5 keV @ 1 MeV), and are used in all the world's leading detector arrays such as GammaSphere, AGATA and GRETINA. The detector crystals are operated in cryostats at 100 K to reduce thermal noise. To maintain low leakage current and low operating temperatures, cryostat hygiene is very important. Detectors must be regularly maintained by using a high-vacuum, oil-free annealing station. At elevated temperatures above 373 K the process of pumping and baking can also anneal away neutron damage to the detector crystals. This poster will show the design and building of a new HpGe repair station at U. Mass Lowell, and make comparisons of results obtained from this new station to the Gammasphere annealing factory at Argonne. This research is funded by the DOE National Nuclear Safety Administration and the Office of Science.

  12. Radiation effects on a Ge:Ga photoconductive detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, N.; Lemke, D.; Wolf, J.

    1984-11-01

    Co-60 is the gamma-ray source employed in the present study of the effects of irradiation on a Ge:Ga photoconductive IR detector, at a low photon background level of 4 x 10 to the 8th ph/sq cm per sec which immediately induced NEP-degrading spike noises while gradually increasing responsivity. After cessation of the irradiation, the spikes disappeared but responsivity lingered over several hours. Responsivity change rate is smaller, both before and after the irradiation, for a higher bias voltage. A flashing procedure is used to establish the effectiveness of long term effect cure. The IR detector will be used by the German IR Laboratory.

  13. Dynamic shear deformation in high purity Fe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerreta, Ellen K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bingert, John F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Trujillo, Carl P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lopez, Mike F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gray, George T [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The forced shear test specimen, first developed by Meyer et al. [Meyer L. et al., Critical Adiabatic Shear Strength of Low Alloyed Steel Under Compressive Loading, Metallurgical Applications of Shock Wave and High Strain Rate Phenomena (Marcel Decker, 1986), 657; Hartmann K. et al., Metallurgical Effects on Impact Loaded Materials, Shock Waves and High Strain rate Phenomena in Metals (Plenum, 1981), 325-337.], has been utilized in a number of studies. While the geometry of this specimen does not allow for the microstructure to exactly define the location of shear band formation and the overall mechanical response of a specimen is highly sensitive to the geometry utilized, the forced shear specimen is useful for characterizing the influence of parameters such as strain rate, temperature, strain, and load on the microstructural evolution within a shear band. Additionally, many studies have utilized this geometry to advance the understanding of shear band development. In this study, by varying the geometry, specifically the ratio of the inner hole to the outer hat diameter, the dynamic shear localization response of high purity Fe was examined. Post mortem characterization was performed to quantify the width of the localizations and examine the microstructural and textural evolution of shear deformation in a bcc metal. Increased instability in mechanical response is strongly linked with development of enhanced intergranular misorientations, high angle boundaries, and classical shear textures characterized through orientation distribution functions.

  14. Ultra-high purity arsenic for MBE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, R.G.L. (Johnson Matthey PLC, Royston (UK)); Emeny, M.T.; Whitehouse, C.R.; Lee, D. (Royal Signals and Radar Ets., Great Malvern (UK))

    1990-11-01

    A requirement for high purity elemental arsenic for use in compound semiconductors has become well established. The capabilities of molecular beam epitaxy as a fabrication technique are best exploited if the arsenic used has particular additional features. Prominent among these are a uniform distribution of impurities at levels down to 10 ppb, and a geometrically uniform distribution of material in the charge used. Once material such as this, of 7N purity or better, emerges from its processing, a major vulernability is from recontamination. Prevention of this is a further important requirement. Detailed examination of possible process strategies has led to an approach targeted on the manufacture of solid arsenic ''charges'' especially suited for MBE application. Factors involved are reviewed. An outline of the consequent production operation is described, based on vapour phase and laser processing. Continuous long-term reproducibility is achieved. Analysis of the product by glow discharge mass spectrometry with state-of-the-art sensitivity is used for qualification of the product and process. Results from this and supplementary techniques which have been used are presented. The utilisation of this material for GaAs has been widely tested successfully. The outcome of some of that work is shown. (orig.).

  15. Multielement trace determination in high purity advanced ceramics and high purity metals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Matschat; H-J Heinrich; M Czerwensky; S Kuxenko; H Kipphardt

    2005-07-01

    In the field of advanced ceramics two CRMs were developed in the last few years by the Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, one for silicon nitride and one for silicon carbide. Besides their application by industry they are appropriate to be used for the validation of special methods used for trace determination in accordance with high purity materials. This is demonstrated, for example, on ultrapure silicon carbide which was analysed by solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (SS ET AAS). BAM is also certifying primary pure reference materials used as the National Standards for inorganic analysis in Germany. The crucial point of this project is the certification of the total purity of high purity materials, each representing one element of the periodic table. A variety of different analytical methods was necessary to determine the trace contents of metallic and non-metallic impurities from almost the whole periodic table in the high purity materials. The primary CRMs of copper, iron and molybdenum are used as examples to demonstrate the modus operandi, analytical effects observed by using high resolution ICP mass spectrometry (HR ICP–MS) and the results.

  16. Application of Plasma Emission Detector in Determination of Trace Neon in High Purity Helium%等离子体发射检测器在检测高纯氦气中微量氖气的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡树国; 张体强

    2016-01-01

    Trace neon in helium prepared by gravimetric method was determined by gas chromatography with plasma emission detector and discharge ionization detector. Sensitivity and repeatability of trace neon in different detector were compared. The results showed that the detection sensitivity of PED was higher, the linear range of neon was 0.03-0.3μmol/mol,the correlation coefficients (r2) was 1.000,the detection limit was less than 1 nmol/mol,the RSD was less than 2%(n=6). By comparing the data of atmosphere pressure ion mass spectrometry,the reliability of the results was verified. The determination of trace neon in helium byplasma emission detector may decrease the uncertainty of neon reference material,which lays the foundation of development of high precision trace neon standard material.%采用等离子发射检测器(PED)和氦离子放电检测器(DID)对重量法制备的氦气中微量氖气进行了检测,对比了微量氖气在两种检测器上的灵敏度和重复性.结果显示,PED对氖气的检测灵敏度较高,氖气含量在0.03~0.3μmol/mol范围与响应值呈良好的线性关系,r2=1.000,检测限小于1 nmol/mol,测定结果的相对偏差小于2%(n=6).利用大气压离子质谱仪对检测限测试结果进行了验证.采用等离子发射检测器检测氦气中微量氖气的方法,可以降低微量氖气标准物质的定值不确定度,为研制高准确度微量氖气标准物质奠定基础.

  17. Probing Sub-GeV Dark Matter with Conventional Detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kouvaris, Chris; Pradler, Josef

    2017-01-01

    The direct detection of dark matter particles with mass below the GeV scale is hampered by soft nuclear recoil energies and finite detector thresholds. For a given maximum relative velocity, the kinematics of elastic dark matter nucleus scattering sets a principal limit on detectability. Here, we...... propose to bypass the kinematic limitations by considering the inelastic channel of photon emission from bremsstrahlung in the nuclear recoil. Our proposed method allows us to set the first limits on dark matter below 500 MeV in the plane of dark matter mass and cross section with nucleons. In situations...... where a dark-matter-electron coupling is suppressed, bremsstrahlung may constitute the only path to probe low-mass dark matter awaiting new detector technologies with lowered recoil energy thresholds....

  18. Probing Sub-GeV Dark Matter with Conventional Detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kouvaris, Chris; Pradler, Josef

    2017-01-01

    The direct detection of dark matter particles with mass below the GeV scale is hampered by soft nuclear recoil energies and finite detector thresholds. For a given maximum relative velocity, the kinematics of elastic dark matter nucleus scattering sets a principal limit on detectability. Here, we...... propose to bypass the kinematic limitations by considering the inelastic channel of photon emission from bremsstrahlung in the nuclear recoil. Our proposed method allows us to set the first limits on dark matter below 500 MeV in the plane of dark matter mass and cross section with nucleons. In situations...... where a dark-matter-electron coupling is suppressed, bremsstrahlung may constitute the only path to probe low-mass dark matter awaiting new detector technologies with lowered recoil energy thresholds....

  19. Probing Sub-GeV Dark Matter with Conventional Detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouvaris, Chris; Pradler, Josef

    2017-01-20

    The direct detection of dark matter particles with mass below the GeV scale is hampered by soft nuclear recoil energies and finite detector thresholds. For a given maximum relative velocity, the kinematics of elastic dark matter nucleus scattering sets a principal limit on detectability. Here, we propose to bypass the kinematic limitations by considering the inelastic channel of photon emission from bremsstrahlung in the nuclear recoil. Our proposed method allows us to set the first limits on dark matter below 500 MeV in the plane of dark matter mass and cross section with nucleons. In situations where a dark-matter-electron coupling is suppressed, bremsstrahlung may constitute the only path to probe low-mass dark matter awaiting new detector technologies with lowered recoil energy thresholds.

  20. Probing sub-GeV Dark Matter with conventional detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Kouvaris, Chris

    2016-01-01

    The direct detection of Dark Matter particles with mass below the GeV-scale is hampered by soft nuclear recoil energies and finite detector thresholds. For a given maximum relative velocity, the kinematics of elastic Dark Matter nucleus scattering sets a principal limit on detectability. Here we propose to bypass the kinematic limitations by considering the inelastic channel of photon emission in the nuclear recoil. Our proposed method allows to set the first limits on MeV-scale Dark Matter in the plane of Dark Matter mass and cross section with nucleons. In situations where a Dark Matter-electron coupling is suppressed, Bremsstrahlung may constitute the only path to probe low-mass Dark Matter awaiting new detector technologies with lowered recoil energy thresholds.

  1. Response function of semiconductor detectors, Ge and Si(Li); Funcao resposta de detectores semicondutores, Ge e Si(Li)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zevallos Chavez, Juan Yury

    2003-07-01

    The Response Function (RF) for Ge and Si(Li) semiconductor detectors was obtained. The RF was calculated for five detectors, four Hp Ge with active volumes of 89 cm{sup 3} , 50 cm{sup 3} , 8 cm{sup 3} and 5 cm{sup 3}, and one Si(Li) with 0.143 cm{sup 3} of active volume. The interval of energy studied ranged from 6 keV up to 1.5 MeV. Two kinds of studies were done in this work. The first one was the RF dependence with the detection geometry. Here the calculation of the RF for a geometry named as simple and an extrapolation of that RF, were both done. The extrapolation process analyzed both, spectra obtained with a shielding geometry and spectra where the source-detector distance was modified. The second one was the RF dependence with the detection electronics. This study was done varying the shaping time of the pulse in the detection electronics. The purpose was to verify the effect of the ballistic deficit in the resolution of the detector. This effect was not observed. The RF components that describe the region of the total absorption of the energy of the incident photons, and the partial absorption of this energy, were both treated. In particular, empirical functions were proposed for the treatment of both, the multiple scattering originated in the detector (crystal), and the photon scattering originated in materials of the neighborhood of the crystal. Another study involving Monte Carlo simulations was also done in order to comprehend the photon scattering structures produced in an iron shield. A deconvolution method is suggested, for spectra related to scattered radiation in order to assess the dose delivered to the scatterer. (author)

  2. Recent developments in semiconductor gamma-ray detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luke, Paul N.; Amman, Mark; Tindall, Craig; Lee, Julie S.

    2003-10-28

    The successful development of lithium-drifted Ge detectors in the 1960's marked the beginning of the significant use of semiconductor crystals for direct detection and spectroscopy of gamma rays. In the 1970's, high-purity Ge became available, which enabled the production of complex detectors and multi-detector systems. In the following decades, the technology of semiconductor gamma-ray detectors continued to advance, with significant developments not only in Ge detectors but also in Si detectors and room-temperature compound-semiconductor detectors. In recent years, our group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has developed a variety of gamma ray detectors based on these semiconductor materials. Examples include Ge strip detectors, lithium-drifted Si strip detectors, and coplanar-grid CdZnTe detectors. These advances provide new capabilities in the measurement of gamma rays, such as the ability to perform imaging and the realization of highly compact spectroscopy systems.

  3. On the measurement of positron emitters with Ge detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peyres, Virginia, E-mail: virginia.peyres@ciemat.e [Ciemat, Laboratorio de Metrologia de Radiaciones Ionizantes, Avda. Complutense 22, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Garcia-Torano, Eduardo [Ciemat, Laboratorio de Metrologia de Radiaciones Ionizantes, Avda. Complutense 22, Madrid 28040 (Spain)

    2011-05-01

    This paper discusses the problems related to the measurement of positron emitters with germanium detectors. Five positron emitters with important applications in nuclear medicine ({sup 22}Na, {sup 18}F, {sup 11}C, {sup 13}N and {sup 68}Ga) have been studied. Measurements and Monte Carlo simulations have been used to determine the optimal conditions of measurement in gamma-ray spectrometry systems. The results obtained indicate that adding adequate absorbers, detection efficiencies are close to those of gamma emitters of similar energy measured in the same conditions, which allows a rapid calibration of a Ge-based spectrometry system. More accurate results are also presented using a detailed Monte Carlo simulation. Comparison to experimental data shows a good agreement.

  4. Highly Accurate Sensor for High-Purity Oxygen Determination Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this STTR effort, Los Gatos Research (LGR) and the University of Wisconsin (UW) propose to develop a highly-accurate sensor for high-purity oxygen determination....

  5. Delta Doping High Purity CCDs and CMOS for LSST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blacksberg, Jordana; Nikzad, Shouleh; Hoenk, Michael; Elliott, S. Tom; Bebek, Chris; Holland, Steve; Kolbe, Bill

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation describing delta doping high purity CCD's and CMOS for LSST is shown. The topics include: 1) Overview of JPL s versatile back-surface process for CCDs and CMOS; 2) Application to SNAP and ORION missions; 3) Delta doping as a back-surface electrode for fully depleted LBNL CCDs; 4) Delta doping high purity CCDs for SNAP and ORION; 5) JPL CMP thinning process development; and 6) Antireflection coating process development.

  6. Neutron induced activity in natural and enriched {sup 70}Ge detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naya, J.E. [Toulouse-3 Univ., 31 (France). Centre d`Etude Spatiale des Rayonnements]|[NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)]|[Universities Space Research Association, 7501 Forbes Blvd, 206, Seabrook, MD 20706-2253 (United States); Jean, P.; Albernhe, F.; Borrel, V.; Lavigne, J.M.; Vedrenne, G.; von Ballmoos, P. [Toulouse-3 Univ., 31 (France). Centre d`Etude Spatiale des Rayonnements; Barthelmy, S.D. [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)]|[Universities Space Research Association, 7501 Forbes Blvd, 206, Seabrook, MD 20706-2253 (United States); Bartlett, L.M.; Gehrels, N.; Parsons, A.; Tueller, J. [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Cordier, B. [Service d`Astrophysique du CEA, CEN de Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette, Cedex (France); Leleux, P. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, 2 chemin du Cyclotron, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Teegarden, B.J. [Toulouse-3 Univ., 31 (France). Centre d`Etude Spatiale des Rayonnements]|[NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    1997-09-11

    The results of irradiations of isotopically enriched and natural Ge detectors with a neutron beam are presented. The analysis of the gamma-ray lines generated by decay of neutron induced unstable nuclei have provided us with a direct measurement of relevant interaction cross sections. Within a factor of 2, measurements and predictions are in good agreement. These results have important implications for the instrumental background in astrophysical gamma-ray spectrometers using germanium detectors. We confirm the reduction of the {beta}-background component, which dominates the continuum background in the 0.1-1 MeV energy range, using {sup 70}Ge enriched detectors. We clearly identify {beta}{sup +} decays inside the detector as a significant source of continuum background in the 1-4 MeV energy range. This component is about 2 times more intense in {sup 70}Ge enriched detectors than in natural ones. This is mainly due to the enhanced yield of {sup 69}Ge and {sup 68}Ga isotopes. The choice of either natural or {sup 70}Ge enriched as optimum detector material depends on the energies of astrophysical interest. Detectors made of enriched {sup 70}Ge are more appropriate for studies at energies below 1 MeV. For higher energies natural germanium is slightly better. The possibility of rejecting most of {beta}-background component by applying alternative analysis techniques makes natural Ge an appropriate material for future gamma-ray spectrometers. (orig.). 15 refs.

  7. Production, characterization and operation of {sup 76}Ge enriched BEGe detectors in GERDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agostini, M.; Bode, T.; Budjas, D.; Janicsko Csathy, J.; Lazzaro, A.; Schoenert, S. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department and Excellence Cluster Universe, Munich (Germany); Allardt, M.; Barros, N.; Domula, A.; Lehnert, B.; Wester, T.; Wilsenach, H.; Zuber, K. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Institut fuer Kern- und Teilchenphysik, Dresden (Germany); Andreotti, E. [Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, Geel (Belgium); Eberhard Karls Universitaet Tuebingen, Physikalisches Institut, Tuebingen (Germany); Bakalyarov, A.M.; Belyaev, S.T.; Lebedev, V.I.; Zhukov, S.V. [National Research Centre ' ' Kurchatov Institute' ' , Moscow (Russian Federation); Balata, M.; D' Andrea, V.; Ioannucci, L.; Junker, M.; Laubenstein, M.; Macolino, C.; Nisi, S.; Zavarise, P. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso and Gran Sasso Science Institute, Assergi (Italy); Barabanov, I.; Bezrukov, L.; Gurentsov, V.; Inzhechik, L.V.; Kazalov, V.; Kuzminov, V.V.; Lubsandorzhiev, B.; Yanovich, E. [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Baudis, L.; Benato, G.; Walter, M. [Physik Institut der Universitaet Zuerich, Zurich (Switzerland); Bauer, C.; Heisel, M.; Heusser, G.; Hofmann, W.; Kihm, T.; Kirsch, A.; Knoepfle, K.T.; Lindner, M.; Maneschg, W.; Salathe, M.; Schreiner, J.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Simgen, H.; Smolnikov, A.; Strecker, H.; Wagner, V.; Wegmann, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Becerici-Schmidt, N.; Caldwell, A.; Liao, H.Y.; Majorovits, B.; O' Shaughnessy, C.; Palioselitis, D.; Schulz, O.; Vanhoefer, L. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Munich (Germany); Bellotti, E.; Pessina, G. [Universita Milano Bicocca, Dipartimento di Fisica, Milan (Italy); INFN Milano Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Belogurov, S.; Kornoukhov, V.N. [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bettini, A.; Brugnera, R.; Garfagnini, A.; Hemmer, S.; Sada, C.; Von Sturm, K. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia dell' Universita di Padova, Padua (Italy); INFN Padova, Padua (Italy); Borowicz, D. [Jagiellonian University, Institute of Physics, Cracow (Poland); Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Brudanin, V.; Egorov, V.; Kochetov, O.; Nemchenok, I.; Rumyantseva, N.; Shevchik, E.; Zhitnikov, I.; Zinatulina, D. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Cattadori, C.; Gotti, C. [INFN Milano Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Chernogorov, A.; Demidova, E.V.; Kirpichnikov, I.V.; Vasenko, A.A. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Falkenstein, R.; Freund, K.; Grabmayr, P.; Hegai, A.; Jochum, J.; Schmitt, C.; Schuetz, A.K. [Eberhard Karls Universitaet Tuebingen, Physikalisches Institut, Tuebingen (Germany); Frodyma, N.; Misiaszek, M.; Pelczar, K.; Wojcik, M.; Zuzel, G. [Jagiellonian University, Institute of Physics, Cracow (Poland); Gangapshev, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Gusev, K. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); National Research Centre ' ' Kurchatov Institute' ' , Moscow (Russian Federation); Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department and Excellence Cluster Universe, Munich (Germany); Hult, M.; Lutter, G. [Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, Geel (Belgium); Klimenko, A.; Lubashevskiy, A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Lippi, I.; Stanco, L.; Ur, C.A. [INFN Padova, Padua (Italy); Pandola, L. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Pullia, A.; Riboldi, S. [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Fisica, Milan (Italy); INFN Milano (Italy); Shirchenko, M. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); National Research Centre ' ' Kurchatov Institute' ' , Moscow (Russian Federation); Collaboration: GERDA Collaboration

    2015-02-01

    The GERmanium Detector Array (GERDA) at the Gran Sasso Underground Laboratory (LNGS) searches for the neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ) of {sup 76}Ge. Germanium detectors made of material with an enriched {sup 76}Ge fraction act simultaneously as sources and detectors for this decay. During Phase I of the experiment mainly refurbished semi-coaxial Ge detectors from former experiments were used. For the upcoming Phase II, 30 new {sup 76}Ge enriched detectors of broad energy germanium (BEGe)- type were produced. A subgroup of these detectors has already been deployed in GERDA during Phase I. The present paper reviews the complete production chain of these BEGe detectors including isotopic enrichment, purification, crystal growth and diode production. The efforts in optimizing the mass yield and in minimizing the exposure of the {sup 76}Ge enriched germanium to cosmic radiation during processing are described. Furthermore, characterization measurements in vacuum cryostats of the first subgroup of seven BEGe detectors and their long-term behavior in liquid argon are discussed. The detector performance fulfills the requirements needed for the physics goals of GERDA Phase II. (orig.)

  8. Low cost routes to high purity silicon and derivatives thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laine, Richard M; Krug, David James; Marchal, Julien Claudius; Mccolm, Andrew Stewart

    2013-07-02

    The present invention is directed to a method for providing an agricultural waste product having amorphous silica, carbon, and impurities; extracting from the agricultural waste product an amount of the impurities; changing the ratio of carbon to silica; and reducing the silica to a high purity silicon (e.g., to photovoltaic silicon).

  9. Characterization and application of a GE amorphous silicon flat panel detector in a synchrotron light source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J.H. [XSD Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory (United States)], E-mail: jlee@aps.anl.gov; Almer, J. [XSD Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory (United States); Aydiner, C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (United States); Bernier, J.; Chapman, K.; Chupas, P.; Haeffner, D. [XSD Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory (United States); Kump, K. [GE Healthcare (United States); Lee, P.L.; Lienert, U.; Miceli, A. [XSD Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory (United States); Vera, G. [GE Healthcare (United States)

    2007-11-11

    Characterization, in the language of synchrotron radiation, was performed on a GE Revolution 41RT flat panel detector using the X-ray light source at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The detector has an active area of 41x41 cm{sup 2} with 200x200 {mu}m{sup 2} pixel size. The nominal working photon energy is around 80 keV. Modulation transfer function (MTF) was measured in terms of line spread function (LSF) using a 25 {mu}mx1 cm tungsten slit. Memory effects of the detector elements, called lag, were also measured. The large area and fast data capturing rate -8 fps in unbinned mode, 30 fps in binned or region of interest (ROI) mode-make the GE flat panel detector a unique and very versatile detector for synchrotron experiments. In particular, we present data from pair distribution function (PDF) measurements to demonstrate the special features of this detector.

  10. Simulation and modeling of BEGe detectors for GERDA phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agostini, Matteo; Barnabe Heider, Marik; Budjas, Dusan; Schoenert, Stefan [Max-Plank-Institute fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Ur, Calin A. [INFN - Padova (Italy); Bellotti, Enrico; Cattadori, Carla [INFN - Milano (Italy); Di Vacri, Assunta; Pandola, Luciano [INFN - LNGS, L' Aquila (Italy); Garfagnini, Alberto [INFN - Padova (Italy); University of Padova (Italy)

    2010-07-01

    The GERDA experiment aims to search for the neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 76}Ge by using high purity germanium detectors enriched in {sup 76}Ge. The background suppression in the GERDA experiment can be achieved by analyzing the time-development of the detector signals. To investigate the pulse shape discrimination capabilities of Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detectors, a complete simulation of the signal formation and evolution was developed. The results of the simulations will be presented and compared with measurements. The characteristic shapes of the BEGe detector signals and their dependence of the interaction position are discussed.

  11. New approach to calculate the true-coincidence effect of HpGe detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alnour, I. A., E-mail: aaibrahim3@live.utm.my, E-mail: ibrahim.elnour@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Pure and Applied Science, International University of Africa, 12223 Khartoum (Sudan); Wagiran, H. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Skudai,Johor (Malaysia); Ibrahim, N. [Faculty of Defence Science and Technology, National Defence University of Malaysia, Kem Sungai Besi, 57000 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Hamzah, S.; Elias, M. S. [Malaysia Nuclear Agency (MNA), Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor D.E. (Malaysia); Siong, W. B. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Resource Science & Technology, Universiti Malaysia Sarawak, 94300 Kota Samarahan, Sarawak (Malaysia)

    2016-01-22

    The corrections for true-coincidence effects in HpGe detector are important, especially at low source-to-detector distances. This work established an approach to calculate the true-coincidence effects experimentally for HpGe detectors of type Canberra GC3018 and Ortec GEM25-76-XLB-C, which are in operation at neutron activation analysis lab in Malaysian Nuclear Agency (NM). The correction for true-coincidence effects was performed close to detector at distances 2 and 5 cm using {sup 57}Co, {sup 60}Co, {sup 133}Ba and {sup 137}Cs as standard point sources. The correction factors were ranged between 0.93-1.10 at 2 cm and 0.97-1.00 at 5 cm for Canberra HpGe detector; whereas for Ortec HpGe detector ranged between 0.92-1.13 and 0.95-100 at 2 and 5 cm respectively. The change in efficiency calibration curve of the detector at 2 and 5 cm after correction was found to be less than 1%. Moreover, the polynomial parameters functions were simulated through a computer program, MATLAB in order to find an accurate fit to the experimental data points.

  12. Recrystallization behavior of high purity aluminum at 300 ℃

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Yu-xuan; ZHANG Xin-ming; YE Ling-ying; LUO Zhi-hui

    2006-01-01

    The recrystallization behavior of 98.5% cold rolled high purity aluminum foils annealed at 300 ℃ was investigated, and the evolution of the microstructures was followed by electron back scattered diffraction(EBSD). The results show that the recrystallization process of the high purity aluminum foils at 300 ℃ is a mixture of discontinuous- and continuous-recrystallization.The orientations of the recrystallization nuclei include not only the cube orientation, but also other orientations such as some near deformation texture components which are the results of strong recovery process. However, such continuously recrystallized grains are usually associated with relatively high free energy, so they would be consumed by the discontinuously-recrystallized grains (cube-oriented grains) in subsequent annealing. On the other hand, the pattern quality index of recrystallized grains shows dependence on the crystal orientation which might introduce some errors into evaluating volume fraction of recrystallization by integrating pattern quality index of EBSD.

  13. SIMULTANEOUS PRODUCTION OF HIGH-PURITY HYDROGEN AND SEQUESTRATION-READY CO2 FROM SYNGAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linda Denton; Hana Lorethova; Tomasz Wiltowski; Court Moorefield; Parag Kulkarni; Vladimir Zamansky; Ravi Kumar

    2003-12-01

    This final report summarizes the progress made on the program ''Simultaneous Production of High-Purity Hydrogen and Sequestration-Ready CO{sub 2} from Syngas (contract number DE-FG26-99FT40682)'', during October 2000 through September of 2003. GE Energy and Environmental Research (GE-EER) and Southern Illinois University (SIU) at Carbondale conducted the research work for this program. This program addresses improved methods to efficiently produce simultaneous streams of high-purity hydrogen and separated carbon dioxide from synthesis gas (syngas). The syngas may be produced through either gasification of coal or reforming of natural gas. The process of production of H{sub 2} and separated CO{sub 2} utilizes a dual-bed reactor and regenerator system. The reactor produces hydrogen and the regenerator produces separated CO{sub 2}. The dual-bed system can be operated under either a circulating fluidized-bed configuration or a cyclic fixed-bed configuration. Both configurations were evaluated in this project. The experimental effort was divided into lab-scale work at SIU and bench-scale work at GE-EER. Tests in a lab-scale fluidized bed system demonstrated the process for the conversion of syngas to high purity H{sub 2} and separated CO{sub 2}. The lab-scale system generated up to 95% H{sub 2} (on a dry basis). Extensive thermodynamic analysis of chemical reactions between the syngas and the fluidized solids determined an optimum range of temperature and pressure operation, where the extent of the undesirable reactions is minimum. The cycling of the process between hydrogen generation and oxygen regeneration has been demonstrated. The fluidized solids did not regenerate completely and the hydrogen purity in the reuse cycle dropped to 70% from 95% (on a dry basis). Changes in morphology and particle size may be the most dominant factor affecting the efficiency of the repeated cycling between hydrogen production and oxygen regeneration. The concept of

  14. Advanced far infrared detector and double donor studies in Ge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, C.S.

    1994-12-01

    This has application to astronomy and astrophysics. Selenium in Ge has been studied with a doping technique which limits complex formation. Only one ionization level has been found to correspond to selenium, which presumably occupies a substitutional site. This level is extremely unstable and its concentration decreases after annealing at 400C. Future work is planned to anneal the fast neutron damage before much selenium has formed in the {sup 74/76}Ge samples. It is expected that the observed selenium level can be better characterized and the missing selenium level is more likely to be discovered if other defects are removed before {sup 77}Se formation.

  15. Competitive growth of high purity aluminum grains in directional solidification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jiao; SHU Da; WANG De-lin; SUN Bao-de; CHEN Gang

    2006-01-01

    A self-made directional solidification setup was used to prepare high purity aluminum ingots of 100mm in diameter. The morphology of the growth interface was detected by SEM and AFM, and the grain lattice orientation was detected by XRD. The results indicate that the grains suffer competitive growth under any conditions in experiments. The lattice orientation of the preferred grains is determined by the flow field above the solid-liquid interface. The horizontal lattice position does not change during the growth process. However, the lattice orientation in the growth direction varies with the growth velocity and approaches to [100]gradually during the growth process.

  16. Textures in high purity aluminum foils and AA3004 sheets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖亚庆; 张新明; 唐建国; 邓运来; 陈志永

    2003-01-01

    The simulation of rolling texture with "minimum shear principle" and the strengthening of cube recrystallization texture by inhomogeneous rolling, low strain deformation and multistage annealing, of the formation and evolution of texture in high purity Al were presented. The plastic anisotropy of crystalline materials were also summarized, including determination of the co-yield surfaces and condition of slipping as well as mechanical twinning, prediction of plastic anisotropy of deep drawing with modified Tuckers method, evolution of earing behavior of Al alloy sheets for deep drawing with CMTP approach, and construction of texture balance design and some technologies to suppress plastic anisotropy in practical production.

  17. High purity NaI(Tl) scintillator to search for dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Fushimi, Ken-Ichi; Hazama, Ryuta; Ikeda, Haruo; Inoue, Kunio; Imagawa, Kyoshiro; Kanzaki, Gakuji; Kozlov, Alexandre; Orito, Reiko; Shima, Tatsushi; Takemoto, Yasuhiro; Teraoka, Yuri; Umehara, Saori; Yoshida, Sei

    2016-01-01

    A high purity and large volume NaI(Tl) scintillator was developed to search for cosmic dark matter. The required densities of radioactive impurities (RIs) such as U-chain, Th-chain are less than a few ppt to establish high sensitivity to dark matter. The impurity of RIs were effectively reduced by selecting raw materials of crucible and by performing chemical reduction of lead ion in NaI raw powder. The impurity of $^{226}$Ra was reduced less than 100 $\\mu$Bq/kg in NaI(Tl) crystal. It should be remarked that the impurity of $^{210}$Pb, which is difficult to reduce, is effectively reduced by chemical processing of NaI raw powder down to less than 30 $\\mu$Bq/kg. The expected sensitivity to cosmic dark matter by using 250 kg of the high purity and large volume NaI(Tl) scintillator (PICO-LON; Pure Inorganic Crystal Observatory for LOw-background Neutr(al)ino) is 7$\\times$10$^{-45}$ cm$^{2}$ for 50 GeV$/c^{2}$ WIMPs.

  18. Efficiency calibration of an extended-range Ge detector by a detailed Monte Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peyres, V. [Metrologia de Radiaciones Ionizantes, CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 22, Madrid 28040 (Spain)], E-mail: Virginia.peyres@ciemat.es; Garcia-Torano, E. [Metrologia de Radiaciones Ionizantes, CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 22, Madrid 28040 (Spain)

    2007-09-21

    A Monte Carlo simulation has been employed for calibrating an extended-range Ge detector in an energy range from 14 to 1800 keV. A set of sources from monoenergetic and multi-gamma emitters point were measured at 15 cm from the detector window and provided 26 experimental values to which the results of the simulations are compared. Discrepancies between simulated and experimental values are within 1 standard deviation, and relative differences are, in most cases, below 1%.

  19. Quality Control of CMS - GE1/1 Muon Detector Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Salem, Safaa

    2016-01-01

    This report summarizes the project I get assigned to as a CERN summer student from 27th of June 2016 to 19th of August 2016. It is mainly focused on Quality Control of CMS GE1/1 muon detector upgrade.

  20. An aerogel Cherenkov detector for multi-GeV photon detection with low sensitivity to neutrons

    CERN Document Server

    Maeda, Y; Masuda, T; Morii, H; Naito, D; Nakajima, Y; Nanjo, H; Nomura, T; Sasao, N; Seki, S; Shiomi, K; Sumida, T; Tajima, Y

    2014-01-01

    We describe a novel photon detector which operates under an intense flux of neutrons. It is composed of lead-aerogel sandwich counter modules. Its salient features are high photon detection efficiency and blindness to neutrons. As a result of Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, the efficiency for photons with the energy larger than 1 GeV is expected to be higher than 99.5% and that for 2 GeV/$c$ neutrons less than 1%. The performance on the photon detection under such a large flux of neutrons was measured for a part of the detector. It was confirmed that the efficiency to photons with the energy $>$1 GeV was consistent with the MC expectation within 8.2% uncertainty.

  1. Analysis of the effect of true coincidence summing on efficiency calibration for an HP GE detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodenas, J.; Gallardo, S.; Ballester, S.; Primault, V. [Valencia Univ. Politecnica, Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear (Spain); Ortiz, J. [Valencia Univ. Politecnica, Lab. de Radiactividad Ambiental (Spain)

    2006-07-01

    The H.P. (High Purity) Germanium detector is commonly used for gamma spectrometry in environmental radioactivity laboratories. The efficiency of the detector must be calibrated for each geometry considered. This calibration is performed using a standard solution containing gamma emitter sources. The usual goal is the obtaining of an efficiency curve to be used in the determination of the activity of samples with the same geometry. It is evident the importance of the detector calibration. However, the procedure presents some problems as it depends on the source geometry (shape, volume, distance to detector, etc.) and shall be repeated when these factors change. That means an increasing use of standard solutions and consequently an increasing generation of radioactive wastes. Simulation of the calibration procedure with a validated computer program is clearly an important auxiliary tool for environmental radioactivity laboratories. This simulation is useful for both optimising calibration procedures and reducing the amount of radioactivity wastes produced. The M.C.N.P. code, based on the Monte Carlo method, has been used in this work for the simulation of detector calibration. A model has been developed for the detector as well as for the source contained in a Petri box. The source is a standard solution that contains the following radionuclides: {sup 241}Am, {sup 109}Cd, {sup 57}Co, {sup 139}Ce, {sup 203}Hg, {sup 113}Sn, {sup 85}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 88}Y and {sup 60}Co; covering a wide energy range (50 to 2000 keV). However, there are two radionuclides in the solution ({sup 60}Co and {sup 88}Y) that emit gamma rays in true coincidence. The effect of the true coincidence summing produces a distortion of the calibration curve at higher energies. To decrease this effect some measurements have been performed at increasing distances between the source and the detector. As the true coincidence effect is observed in experimental measurements but not in the Monte Carlo

  2. Measurement of nuclear activity with Ge detectors and its uncertainty

    CERN Document Server

    Cortes, C A P

    1999-01-01

    presented in the fifth chapter and they are applied to establish the optimum conditions for the measurement of the activity of a gamma transmitter isolated radioactive source with a spectrometer with germanium detector. (Author) The objective of this work is to analyse the influence magnitudes which affect the activity measurement of gamma transmitter isolated radioactive sources. They prepared by means of the gravimetric method, as well as, determining the uncertainty of such measurement when this is carried out with a gamma spectrometer system with a germanium detector. This work is developed in five chapters: In the first one, named Basic principles it is made a brief description about the meaning of the word Measurement and its implications and the necessaries concepts are presented which are used in this work. In the second chapter it is exposed the gravimetric method used for the manufacture of the gamma transmitter isolated radioactive sources, it is tackled the problem to determine the main influence ...

  3. Development of high purity niobium used in SRF accelerating cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Niobium is widely used in SRF(Superconducting Radio Frequency)cavities due to its excellent superconductivity and workability.With the continuous development of technology,higher demands of material are raised.One of the key issues is that RRR(Residual Resistance Ratio)of the Nb material should be more than 300.which requires that the Nb ingot have even higher RRR.This article introduces the development and the experimental results of high purity niobium in OTIC in Ningxia(Ningxia Orient Tantalum Industry Co.Ltd.),and the test results of the single cell TESLA(Tera Electron volt energy Superconducting Linear Accelerator)shaped cavity manufactured by Peking University using Nb material from OTIC.

  4. Cube orientation in hot rolled high purity aluminum plate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨平; 毛卫民

    2003-01-01

    X-ray diffraction and orientation mapping in EBSD measurement were applied to obtain information ofdeformation and recrystallization with the emphasis on the cube orientation in hot rolled high purity aluminumplates. It is shown that cube orientations are retained to a large extent during hot rolling. Some deformed cubegrains are found to have experienced large extent of recovery according to their Kikuchi band contrasts. The de-formed cube-oriented grains in hot rolled plates are in an unfavorite growth condition with respect to their neighbor-ing grain orientations for the subsequent annealing. The reasons for the phenomena observed, as well as the influ-ence of hot rolling process on subsequent cold rolling and final annealing were discussed.

  5. High purity tellurium production using dry refining processes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N R Munirathnam; D S Prasad; J V Rao; T L Prakash

    2005-07-01

    Tellurium (99.95 at.% purity) is purified using dry processes such as selective vapourization and zone melting in a thoroughly etched and cleaned quartz boat, under continuous flow of hydrogen (H2) gas. The tellurium ingot was quadruple zone refined (QZR) under continuous flow of H2 gas. Thus, the purified tellurium of ultra high purity (UHP) grade is analysed for 60 impurity elements in the periodic table using glow discharge mass spectrometer (GDMS). The sum of all elemental impurities indicate that the purity of tellurium as 7N (99.99999 at.%). The total content of gas and gas forming impurities like O, N and C are found to be within acceptable limits for opto-electronic applications.

  6. HIGH-PURITY WATER PRODUCTION BY RO/EDI SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@ Electrodeionization(EDI),also known as continuous deionization(CDI)and packed-cell electrodialysis,is a novel hybrid separation process combining ion-exchange resin with ion-exchange membrane in one unit.The EDI process was discovered in the 1950's[1,2]in laboratory,the first commercial apparatus for the production of high-purity water was available in 1987[3].Now the EDI technology has been found and will be continuously found its great applications in many engineering fields. In EDI,the dilute compartments are filled with mixed-bed ion-exchange resins,which enhance the transport to the membranes under the force of a direct current.The ion transport is almost entire through the ion-exchange resins and is not effected through the water.Under certain conditions,water-splitting reaction occurs in the dilute chambers and then the relative high concentrations of H+ and OH- are able to regenerate the resins continuously, With the unique “electroregeneration",the EDI unit can be considered as a mixed-bed ion-exchange column with continuous regeneration.and therefore is capable of deep deionization.Comparing with electrodialysis and ion exchange respectively,EDI has put up much superiority in water desalination. In our experiments,the processes for production of high-purity water from tap water are consisted of pretreatment (with ultrafiltration,active carbon and 10 μm-filtration),RO and EDI.

  7. Physical characteristics of GE Senographe Essential and DS digital mammography detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghetti, Caterina; Borrini, Adriano; Ortenzia, Ornella; Rossi, Raffaella; Ordóñez, Pedro L

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate physical characteristics of two full field digital mammography (FFDM) systems (GE Senographe Essential and DS). Both are indirect conversion (x ray to light) alpha-Si flat panels coupled with a CsI(Tl) scintillator. The examined systems have the same pixel size (100 microm) but a different field of view: a conventional size 23 x 19.2 cm2 and a large field 24 X 30.7 cm2, specifically designed to image large breasts. In the GE Senographe Essential model relevant improvements in flat panel design were implemented and new deposition tools for metal, alpha-Si, and CsI(Tl) were introduced by GE. These changes in detector design are expected to be beneficial for advanced applications such as breast tomosynthesis. The presampling modulation transfer function (MTF), normalized noise power spectrum (NNPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) were measured for a wide range of exposure (25-240 microGy) with a RQA-M2 technique (28 kVp with a Mo/Mo target/filter combination and 2 mm of additional aluminum filtration). At 1, 2, and at 4 lp/mm MTF is equal to 0.9, 0.76, and 0.46 for the conventional field detector and to 0.85, 0.59, and 0.24 for the large field detector. The latter detector exhibits an improved NNPS due to a lower electronic noise and a better DQE that reaches 60%. In addition a contrast-detail analysis was performed with CDMAM 3.4 phantom and CDCOM software: GE Senographe DS showed statistically significant poorer detection ability in comparison with the GE Senographe Essential. These results could have been expected, at least qualitatively, considering the relative DQE of the two systems.

  8. An experimental study of antireflective coatings in Ge light detectors for scintillating bolometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mancuso M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Luminescent bolometers are double-readout devices able to measure simultaneously the phonon and the light yields after a particle interaction in the detector. This operation allows in some cases to tag the type of the interacting quantum, crucial issue for background control in rare event experiments such as the search for neutrinoless double beta decay and for interactions of particle dark matter candidates. The light detectors used in the LUCIFER and LUMINEU searches (projects aiming at the study of the double beta interesting candidates 82Se and 100Mo using ZnSe and ZnMoO4 scintillating bolometers consist of hyper-pure Ge thin slabs equipped with NTD thermistors. A substantial sensitivity improvement of the Ge light detectors can be obtained applying a proper anti-reflective coatings on the Ge side exposed to the luminescent bolometer. The present paper deals with the investigation of this aspect, proving and quantifying the positive effect of a SiO2 and a SiO coating and setting the experimental bases for future tests of other coating materials. The results confirm that an appropriate coating procedure helps in improving the sensitivity of bolometric light detectors by an important factor (in the range 20% – 35% and needs to be included in the recipe for the development of an optimized radio-pure scintillating bolometer.

  9. Analytical challenges in characterization of high purity materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K L Ramakumar

    2005-07-01

    Available analytical literature reveals that it is possible to identify a lot of procedures to carry out any determination using a plethora of analytical techniques. The fundamental analytical requirements for realizing the desired and acceptable information from a chemical analysis are representative nature of the sample, precision, accuracy, selectivity and sensitivity. These decide, to a larger extent, the selection of the most appropriate methodology in order to obtain chemical information from a system. A number of analytical methodologies are being used in the author’s laboratory for carrying out trace elemental analysis as a part of chemical quality control. Quite a good number of analytical challenges with specific reference to the characterization of high purity materials of relevance to nuclear technology were addressed and methodologies were developed for trace elemental analysis of both metallic and non-metallic constituents. A brief review of these analytical challenges and the analytical methodologies developed and also the future needs of analytical chemist are presented in this paper.

  10. Observing bulk diamond spin coherence in high-purity nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Helena S.; Kara, Dhiren M.; Atatüre, Mete

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centres in diamond are attractive for research straddling quantum information science, nanoscale magnetometry and thermometry. Whereas ultrapure bulk diamond NVs sustain the longest spin coherence times among optically accessible spins, nanodiamond NVs exhibit persistently poor spin coherence. Here we introduce high-purity nanodiamonds accommodating record-long NV coherence times, >60 μs, observed through universal dynamical decoupling. We show that the main contribution to decoherence comes from nearby nitrogen impurities rather than surface states. We protect the NV spin free precession, essential to d.c. magnetometry, by driving solely these impurities into the motional narrowing regime. This extends the NV free induction decay time from 440 ns, longer than that in type Ib bulk diamond, to 1.27 μs, which is comparable to that in type IIa (impurity-free) diamond. These properties allow the simultaneous exploitation of both high sensitivity and nanometre resolution in diamond-based emergent quantum technologies.

  11. An optimized protocol for the production of high purity maltose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehete, P N; Shah, N K; Ramamurthy, V; Kothari, R M

    1992-07-01

    An economical protocol, which is simple, rapid and reproducible for the production of maltose by enzymatic hydrolysis of tapioca starch, has been optimized. The protocol involves liquefaction of 35% (w/w) tapioca starch by bacterial α-amylase at 78±2°C to 3 to 5% (w/w) reducing sugars, followed by maximal (85±3% w/w maltose equivalent) saccharification with barley β-amylase and pullulanase at 50°C for 24 to 30 h. The post-saccharification recovery protocol comprised decolourization by charcoal, de-dextrinization by denatured spirit precipitation, de-ionization by passage through cation and anion exchangers and dehydration by vacuum drying. A white crystalline maltose powder was obtained with specifications comparable to commercial high purity maltose. The protocol yields at least 60% (w/w) recovery of maltose and is suitable for use by the pharmaceutical industry. The protocol is unique in that it utilizes cheap and easily hydrolysed tapioca starch, leaves no mother liquor, enabling higher recovery of maltose, and allows almost quantitative recovery of limit maltodextrins, a value-added marketable by-product.

  12. Recent developments in high purity niobium metal production at CBMM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdo, Gustavo Giovanni Ribeiro, E-mail: Gustavo.abdo@cbmm.com.br; Sousa, Clovis Antonio de Faria, E-mail: Clovis@cbmm.com.br; Guimarães, Rogério Contato, E-mail: Rogerio.guimaraes@cbmm.com.br; Ribas, Rogério Marques, E-mail: Rogerio.ribas@cbmm.com.br; Vieira, Alaércio Salvador Martins, E-mail: Alaercio.vieira@cbmm.com.b; Menezes, Andréia Duarte, E-mail: Amenezes@cbmm.com.br; Fridman, Daniel Pallos, E-mail: Daniel.fridman@cbmm.com.br; Cruz, Edmundo Burgos, E-mail: Edmundo@cbmm.com.br [CBMM – Companhia Brasileira de Metalurgia e Mineração Córrego da Mata, s/n Araxá, Minas Gerais 38183-903 Brazil (Brazil)

    2015-12-04

    CBMM is a global supplier of high quality niobium products including pure niobium, the focus of this paper. CBMM’s position has been consolidated over three decades of producing high purity niobium metal ingots. The company supplies, among other products, commercial and reactor grade niobium ingots. One of the main uses of CBMM’s ingots is for the manufacture of particle accelerators (superconducting radio frequency – SRF – cavities), where the purity and homogeneity of niobium metal is essentially important for good performance. CBMM constantly strives to improve process controls and product quality, and is currently implementing innovations in production, research and development to further improve ingot quality. The main aim is to reduce the content of interstitial elements, such as nitrogen (N), oxygen (O), carbon (C), and hydrogen (H), starting with the raw materials through the final step of ingot production. CBMM held the first trial to produce the world’s largest-diameter niobium ingot (as cast 535 mm). The results of this initial trial presented very low levels of interstitial impurities (N, O, C, H), allowing the achievement of residual resistivity ratio (RRR) values very close to 300 in a six-melt process in an electron beam furnace. These values were reached with 850 ppm of tantalum. SRF cavities will be produced with this material in order to study the effect of low impurities and high RRR on the Q factor and accelerating gradient.

  13. HREM study on stacking structure of SiGe/Si infrared detector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Stacking structure and defects in SiGe/P-Si infrared detector were studied by using localization high resolutionelectron microscopy (HREM). The photosensitive region in the detector consists of 3 P+-Si0.65 Ge0.35 layers and 2 UD-Si(undoped Si) layers. The interface between Si0.65 Ge0.35 and UD-Si is not sharp and has a transition zone with non-uniform contrast. The misfit stress of interface is distributed gradiently along the normal direction of the interface. Thereforethe crystal defects and serious lattice deformations on the interface have not been found. A defect area with a shape of in-verted triangle exists in the edge of photosensitive region. The main types of the defects in the area are stacking faults andmicrotwins. The stacking faults are on ( 1 11), and the thickness of the most microtwins is less than 4 interplanar spacingand the twin plane is (111). The Si0.65Ge0.35 and UD-Si layers on amorphous SiO2 layer consist of polycrystals grown byrandom nueleation, and are in wave

  14. Scintillator-Lucite sandwich detector for n/gamma separation in the GeV energy region

    CERN Document Server

    Watanabe, H; Harada, E; Inoue, S; Inagaki, T; Kobayashi, S; Kurilin, A S; Lim, G Y; Ogawa, I; Okuno, H; Omata, K; Sato, T; Shinkawa, T; Tsamalaidze, Z; Tsukamoto, T; Yoshimura, Y

    2002-01-01

    A Scintillator-Lucite Sandwich Detector (SLSD) has been developed for n/gamma separation in the GeV energy region. An efficient n/gamma separation is achieved by measuring a correlation between the scintillation and Cherenkov light yields. The basic performance of the detector has been tested with e, pi and p beams with momenta between 0.5 and 2.0 GeV/c; the results were compared with a Monte-Carlo simulation. The n/gamma separation capability of this detector has been studied by simulations in the energy range from 5 MeV to 12 GeV. The SLSD detector was successfully used for a beam survey of the new K sub L sup 0 beam line built for a K sub L sup 0-> pi sup 0 nu nu-bar experiment at the KEK 12-GeV proton synchrotron.

  15. The Status Quo and Development Trend of High-purity Gold Sputtering Targets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Anheng; XIE Hongchao; ZHU Yong

    2012-01-01

    This article gives a brief introduction to manufacturers and markets of sputtering targets as well as the manufacturing technology thereof.Then,it analyzes the application of high-purity gold sputtering targets in the fields of integrated circuit,information storage,flat panel display,etc.Based on the above,the article analyzes the processing development trend for the high-purity gold sputtering targets in aspects of ultra-high purity,manufacturing technology,analysis and testing technologies.

  16. Improvements to the Leake neutron detector II: Extension to 10 GeV energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leake, J. W.; Lowe, T.; Mason, R. S.

    2009-01-01

    We report on an improved design of neutron ambient dose equivalent (DE) detector, SNS-LINUS, consisting of a spherical polyethylene detector with internal shields of boron and lead based on the LINUS model thus extending the response to the GeV region. The computed Monte Carlo neutron ambient DE energy response is within a factor ±2.4 from 0.1 keV to 10 GeV with a detector weight of 7.8 kg that is significantly lower than other LINUS designs. The ambient DE response in the 50 keV-10 MeV range is within a factor ±1.36 (i.e. ±30%). The main applications are likely to be around particle accelerators, in aircraft or in spacecraft. The improved response in the 20 MeV energy region should make it attractive for use with fission sources. The computed responses of the SNS NGREM and LINUS detectors to pulsed neutrons and limits for their prudent use in portable monitors in such fields are given. The effect of large gamma bursts on the measurement of pulsed neutrons is discussed with recommendations made to enable operation up to 10 μGy of gamma radiation per burst. We propose a method of extending the dynamic range for pulsed neutron detection in which the neutron decay within the moderator is used to make measurements at a time at which the count rate losses are acceptable.

  17. Precision Electron-Beam Polarimetry at 1 GeV Using Diamond Microstrip Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Narayan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We report on the highest precision yet achieved in the measurement of the polarization of a low-energy, O(1  GeV, continuous-wave (CW electron beam, accomplished using a new polarimeter based on electron-photon scattering, in Hall C at Jefferson Lab. A number of technical innovations were necessary, including a novel method for precise control of the laser polarization in a cavity and a novel diamond microstrip detector that was able to capture most of the spectrum of scattered electrons. The data analysis technique exploited track finding, the high granularity of the detector, and its large acceptance. The polarization of the 180-μA, 1.16-GeV electron beam was measured with a statistical precision of <1% per hour and a systematic uncertainty of 0.59%. This exceeds the level of precision required by the Q_{weak} experiment, a measurement of the weak vector charge of the proton. Proposed future low-energy experiments require polarization uncertainty <0.4%, and this result represents an important demonstration of that possibility. This measurement is the first use of diamond detectors for particle tracking in an experiment. It demonstrates the stable operation of a diamond-based tracking detector in a high radiation environment, for two years.

  18. Improvements to the Leake neutron detector II: Extension to 10 GeV energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leake, J.W. [Sherwood Nutec Scientific, 23 Paddock Close, Wantage, Oxfordshire OX12 7EQ (United Kingdom)], E-mail: john5leake@vodafoneemail.co.uk; Lowe, T. [BAE Systems Ltd (United Kingdom); Mason, R.S. [Sherwood Nutec Scientific, 23 Paddock Close, Wantage, Oxfordshire OX12 7EQ (United Kingdom)

    2009-01-11

    We report on an improved design of neutron ambient dose equivalent (DE) detector, SNS-LINUS, consisting of a spherical polyethylene detector with internal shields of boron and lead based on the LINUS model thus extending the response to the GeV region. The computed Monte Carlo neutron ambient DE energy response is within a factor {+-}2.4 from 0.1 keV to 10 GeV with a detector weight of 7.8 kg that is significantly lower than other LINUS designs. The ambient DE response in the 50 keV-10 MeV range is within a factor {+-}1.36 (i.e. {+-}30%). The main applications are likely to be around particle accelerators, in aircraft or in spacecraft. The improved response in the 20 MeV energy region should make it attractive for use with fission sources. The computed responses of the SNS NGREM and LINUS detectors to pulsed neutrons and limits for their prudent use in portable monitors in such fields are given. The effect of large gamma bursts on the measurement of pulsed neutrons is discussed with recommendations made to enable operation up to 10 {mu}Gy of gamma radiation per burst. We propose a method of extending the dynamic range for pulsed neutron detection in which the neutron decay within the moderator is used to make measurements at a time at which the count rate losses are acceptable.

  19. Gamma-ray pulse height spectrum analysis on systems with multiple Ge detectors using spectrum summing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Killian, E.W. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1997-11-01

    A technique has been developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to sum high resolution gamma-ray pulse spectra from systems with multiple Ge detectors. Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company operates a multi-detector spectrometer configuration at the Stored Waste Examination Pilot Plant facility which is used to characterize the radionuclide contents in waste drums destined for shipment to Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. This summing technique was developed to increase the sensitivity of the system, reduce the count times required to properly quantify the radio-nuclides and provide a more consistent methodology for combining data collected from multiple detectors. In spectrometer systems with multiple detectors looking at non homogeneous waste forms it is often difficult to combine individual spectrum analysis results from each detector to obtain a meaningful result for the total waste container. This is particularly true when the counting statistics in each individual spectrum are poor. The spectrum summing technique adds the spectra collected by each detector into a single spectrum which has better counting statistics than each individual spectrum. A normal spectral analysis program can then be used to analyze the sum spectrum to obtain radio-nuclide values which have smaller errors and do not have to be further manipulated to obtain results for the total waste container. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  20. Monte Carlo simulations for the optimisation of low-background Ge detector designs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakenmueller, Janina; Heusser, Gerd; Maneschg, Werner; Schreiner, Jochen; Simgen, Hardy; Stolzenburg, Dominik; Strecker, Herbert; Weber, Marc; Westernmann, Jonas [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Laubenstein, Matthias [Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Via G. Acitelli 22, 67100 Assergi L' Aquila (Italy)

    2015-07-01

    Monte Carlo simulations for the low-background Ge spectrometer Giove at the underground laboratory of MPI-K, Heidelberg, are presented. In order to reduce the cosmogenic background at the present shallow depth (15 m w.e.) the shielding of the spectrometer includes an active muon veto and a passive shielding (lead and borated PE layers). The achieved background suppression is comparable to Ge spectrometers operated in much greater depth. The geometry of the detector and the shielding were implemented using the Geant4-based toolkit MaGe. The simulations were successfully optimised by determining the correct diode position and active volume. With the help of the validated Monte Carlo simulation the contribution of the single components to the overall background can be examined. This includes a comparison between simulated results and measurements with different fillings of the sample chamber. Having reproduced the measured detector background in the simulation provides the possibility to improve the background by reverse engineering of the passive and active shield layers in the simulation.

  1. The Hydrometallurgical Extraction and Recovery of High-Purity Silver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, James E.

    2012-06-01

    -bearing inputs, will be described in detail to demonstrate how typical chemical engineering unit process and unit operations have supplanted classic smelting and fire refining techniques. The Kennecott Copper Company, which has operated a hydrometallurgical circuit successfully for the recovery of high-purity silver from the slimes wet chlorination residue, has permitted me to provide some operation information and results using the technology. Both Phelps Dodge and Kennecott should be recognized for their forward-looking attitude in undertaking the conversion of conceptual chemistry into successful, full-scale plants. The process as employed at Phelps Dodge is discussed at length in reference (J.E. Hoffmann and B. Wesstrom: Hydrometallurgy, 1994, vol. 94, pp. 69-105).

  2. A light hydrocarbon fuel processor producing high-purity hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löffler, Daniel G.; Taylor, Kyle; Mason, Dylan

    This paper discusses the design process and presents performance data for a dual fuel (natural gas and LPG) fuel processor for PEM fuel cells delivering between 2 and 8 kW electric power in stationary applications. The fuel processor resulted from a series of design compromises made to address different design constraints. First, the product quality was selected; then, the unit operations needed to achieve that product quality were chosen from the pool of available technologies. Next, the specific equipment needed for each unit operation was selected. Finally, the unit operations were thermally integrated to achieve high thermal efficiency. Early in the design process, it was decided that the fuel processor would deliver high-purity hydrogen. Hydrogen can be separated from other gases by pressure-driven processes based on either selective adsorption or permeation. The pressure requirement made steam reforming (SR) the preferred reforming technology because it does not require compression of combustion air; therefore, steam reforming is more efficient in a high-pressure fuel processor than alternative technologies like autothermal reforming (ATR) or partial oxidation (POX), where the combustion occurs at the pressure of the process stream. A low-temperature pre-reformer reactor is needed upstream of a steam reformer to suppress coke formation; yet, low temperatures facilitate the formation of metal sulfides that deactivate the catalyst. For this reason, a desulfurization unit is needed upstream of the pre-reformer. Hydrogen separation was implemented using a palladium alloy membrane. Packed beds were chosen for the pre-reformer and reformer reactors primarily because of their low cost, relatively simple operation and low maintenance. Commercial, off-the-shelf balance of plant (BOP) components (pumps, valves, and heat exchangers) were used to integrate the unit operations. The fuel processor delivers up to 100 slm hydrogen >99.9% pure with thermal efficiency is

  3. Detector development for Jefferson Lab’s 12 GeV Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiang, Yi, E-mail: yqiang@jlab.org

    2015-05-01

    Jefferson Lab will soon finish its highly anticipated 12 GeV Upgrade. With doubled maximum energy, Jefferson Lab’s Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) will enable a new experimental program with substantial discovery potential, addressing important topics in nuclear, hadronic and electroweak physics. In order to take full advantage of the high energy, high luminosity beam, new detectors are being developed, designed and constructed to fit the needs of different physics topics. The paper will give an overview of various new detector technologies to be used for 12 GeV experiments. It will then focus on the development of two solenoid-based spectrometers, the GlueX and SoLID spectrometers. The GlueX experiment in Hall D will study the complex properties of gluons through exotic hybrid meson spectroscopy. The GlueX spectrometer, a hermetic detector package designed for spectroscopy and the associated partial wave analysis, is currently in the final stage of construction. Hall A, on the other hand, is developing the SoLID spectrometer to capture the 3D image of the nucleon from semi-inclusive processes and to study the intrinsic properties of quarks through mirror symmetry breaking. Such a spectrometer will have the capability to handle very high event rates while still maintaining a large acceptance in the forward region.

  4. First look at Gamma-ray background lines in the SPI Ge detector spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunderer, C. B.; Weidenspointner, G.; Cordier, B.; Diehl, R.; Jean, P.; v. Kienlin, A.; Knoedlseder, J.; Leleux, P.; Lichti, G.; Roques, J.-P.; Schanne, S.; Schoenfelder, V.; Shrader, C.; Skinner, G.; Strong, A.; Sturner, S.; Teegarden, B.; Vedrenne, G.

    2003-03-01

    ESA's INTEGRAL observatory has been launched successfully on October 17, 2002. Since November 2002, the 19 Ge detectors comprising the camera of one of its main instruments, the Spectrometer SPI, have been recording data. They cover the energy range from ˜ 20 keV to ˜ 8 MeV. The spectrometer is particularly suited to the observations of gamma-ray line emission from astrophysical objects of interest. However, since many astrophysically interesting lines have energies very close to energies of some instrumental background lines, and since some astrophysically interesting radioactive isotopes are also produced within spacecraft and instrument materials by cosmic-ray activation, a detailed study of the gamma-ray background lines seen with the SPI Ge detectors is necessary. We present the first steps taken towards understanding the line components of the gamma-ray background observed with SPI. This includes both isotope identification and preliminary studies of temporal variations. Emphasis is placed on the energy regions of particular interest to astrophysics, especially around the 60Fe and 26Al lines. Preliminary sensitivity estimates for some astrophysically interesting lines will also be presented. This work has been supported by the DLR.

  5. MAJORANA Collaboration's Experience with Germanium Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mertens, S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Abgrall, N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Avignone, III, F. T. [University of South Carolina/Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Barabash, A.S. [Institute of Theoretical & Experimental Physics (ITEP), Moscow, Russia; Bertrand, F. E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Efremenko, Yuri [University of Tennessee (UTK) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Galindo-Uribarri, A [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Radford, D. C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Romero-Romero, E. [UTK/ORNL; Varner, R. L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); White, B. R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Wilkerson, J. F. [UNC/Triangle Univ. Nucl. Lab, Durham, NC/ORNL; Yu, C.-H. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Majorana, [MAJORANA Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the Majorana Demonstrator project is to search for 0v beta beta decay in Ge-76. Of all candidate isotopes for 0v beta beta, Ge-76 has some of the most favorable characteristics. Germanium detectors are a well established technology, and in searches for 0v beta beta, the high purity germanium crystal acts simultaneously as source and detector. Furthermore, p-type germanium detectors provide excellent energy resolution and a specially designed point contact geometry allows for sensitive pulse shape discrimination. This paper will summarize the experiences the MAJORANA collaboration made with enriched germanium detectors manufactured by ORTEC (R)(R). The process from production, to characterization and integration in MAJORANA mounting structure will be described. A summary of the performance of all enriched germanium detectors will be given.

  6. Elemental boron-doped p(+)-SiGe layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy for infrared detector applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, T. L.; George, T.; Jones, E. W.; Ksendzov, A.; Huberman, M. L.

    1992-01-01

    SiGe/Si heterojunction internal photoemission (HIP) detectors have been fabricated utilizing molecular beam epitaxy of p(+)-SiGe layers on p(-)-Si substrates. Elemental boron from a high-temperature effusion cell was used as the dopant source during MBE growth, and high doping concentrations have been achieved. Strong infrared absorption, mainly by free-carrier absorption, was observed for the degenerately doped SiGe layers. The use of elemental boron as the dopant source allows a low MBE growth temperature, resulting in improved crystalline quality and smooth surface morphology of the Si(0.7)Ge(0.3) layers. Nearly ideal thermionic emission dark current characteristics have been obtained. Photoresponse of the HIP detectors in the long-wavelength infrared regime has been demonstrated.

  7. Quantification of Trace Amounts of Impurities in High Purity Cobalt by High Resolution Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua Lin XIE; Xi Du NIE; You Gen TANG

    2006-01-01

    An analytical method using high resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HR-ICP-MS) for rapid simultaneous determination of Be, Mg, Al, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Ge, As, Se, Mo, Ag, Cd, Sn, Sb, Ba, Pt, Au and Pb in high purity cobalt was described. Sample digestions were performed in closed microwave vessels using HNO3 and HCl. The matrix effects due to thc presence of excess HCl and Co were evaluated. The usefulness of high mass resolution for overcoming some spectral interference was demonstrated. The optimum conditions for the determination was tested and discussed. Correction for matrix effects, Sc, Rh and Bi were used as internal standards. The detection limits is 0.003-0.57 μg/g, the recovery ratio is 92.2%- 111.2%, and the RSD is less than 3.6%. The method is accurate, quick and convenient. It has been applied to the determination of trace impurities in high purity cobalt with satisfactory results.

  8. Quantification of trace amounts of impurities in high purity cobalt by high resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Hualin; HUANG Kelong; NIE Xidu; TANG Yougen

    2007-01-01

    An analytical method using high resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HR-ICP-MS) for rapid simultaneous determination of 24 elements (Be, Mg, Al, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Ge, As, Se, Mo, Ag, Cd, Sn,Sb, Ba, Pt, Au, and Pb) in high purity cobalt was described. Sample digestions were performed in closed microwave vessels using HNO3 and HCl. The matrix effects because of the presence of excess HCl and Co were evaluated. The usefulness of high mass resolution for overcoming some spectral interference was demonstrated. The optimum conditions for the determination were tested and discussed. The standard addition method was employed for quantitative analysis. The detection limits were 0.016-1.50 μg.g-1, the recovery ratios were 92.2%-111.2%, and the RSD was less than 3.6%. The method was accurate, quick, and convenient. It was applied to the determination of trace impurities in high purity cobalt with satisfactory results.

  9. Studies of Hadronic Event Structure in $e^+ e^-$ Annihilation from 30 GeV to 209 GeV with the L3 Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Bajo, A; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldew, S V; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Bartalini, P; Basile, M; Batalova, N; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Bellucci, L; Berbeco, R; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Biasini, M; Biglietti, M; Biland, A; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bottai, S; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brochu, F; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada, M; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chiefari, G; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colino, N; Costantini, S; de la Cruz, B; Cucciarelli, S; van Dalen, J A; De Asmundis, R; Déglon, P L; Debreczeni, J; Degré, A; Dehmelt, K; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Delmeire, E; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; De Salvo, A; Diemoz, M; Dierckxsens, M; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, M; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duda, M; Echenard, B; Eline, A; El-Hage, A; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Extermann, P; Falagán, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, M; Ferguson, T; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, F; Fisher, P H; Fisher, W; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gentile, S; Giagu, S; Gong, Z F; Grenier, G; Grimm, O; Grünewald, M W; Guida, M; van Gulik, R; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hirschfelder, J; Hofer, H; Hohlmann, M; Holzner, G; Hou, S R; Hu, Y; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, J K; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopal, M; Koutsenko, V F; Kräber, M H; Krämer, R W; Krüger, A; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Levtchenko, M; Levchenko, P M; Li, C; Likhoded, S; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lü, Y S; Luci, C; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mans, J; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Mazumdar, K; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Mihul, A; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Mohanty, G B; Muanza, G S; Muijs, A J M; Musicar, B; Musy, M; Nagy, S; Natale, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Nisati, A; Novák, T; Nowak, H; Ofierzynski, R A; Organtini, G; Pal, I; Palomares, C; Paolucci, P; Paramatti, R; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Pedace, M; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Piccolo, D; Pierella, F; Pioppi, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Pothier, J; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Quartieri, J; Rahal-Callot, G; Rahaman, M A; Raics, P; Raja, N; Ramelli, R; Rancoita, P G; Ranieri, R; Raspereza, A V; Razis, P A; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosca, A; Rosemann, C; Rosenbleck, C; Rosier-Lees, S; Roth, S; Rubio, J A; Ruggiero, G; Rykaczewski, H; Sakharov, A; Saremi, S; Sarkar, S; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Sciacca, C; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Son, D; Souga, C; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Sushkov, S; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Szillási, Z; Tang, X W; Tarjan, P; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Tellili, B; Teyssier, D; Timmermans, C; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Ulbricht, J; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vásquez, R; Veszpremi, V; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Vicinanza, D; Viertel, Gert M; Villa, S; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vodopyanov, I; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Wadhwa, M; Wang, Q; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, M; Wilkens, H; Wynhoff, S; Xia, L; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, J; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J; Yang, M; Yeh, S C; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, J; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zhuang, H L; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, B; Zöller, M

    2004-01-01

    In this Report, QCD results obtained from a study of hadronic event structure in high energy e^+e^- interactions with the L3 detector are presented. The operation of the LEP collider at many different collision energies from 91 GeV to 209 GeV offers a unique opportunity to test QCD by measuring the energy dependence of different observables. The main results concern the measurement of the strong coupling constant, \\alpha_s, from hadronic event shapes and the study of effects of soft gluon coherence through charged particle multiplicity and momentum distributions.

  10. Measurements with a Ge detector and Monte Carlo computations of dose rate yields due to cosmic muons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clouvas, A; Xanthos, S; Antonopoulos-Domis, M; Silva, J

    2003-02-01

    The present work shows how portable Ge detectors can be useful for measurements of the dose rate due to ionizing cosmic radiation. The methodology proposed converts the cosmic radiation induced background in a Ge crystal (energy range above 3 MeV) to the absorbed dose rate due to muons, which are responsible for 75% of the cosmic radiation dose rate at sea level. The key point is to observe in the high energy range (above 20 MeV) the broad muon peak resulting from the most probable energy loss of muons in the Ge detector. An energy shift of the muon peak was observed, as expected, for increasing dimensions of three Ge crystals (10%, 20%, and 70% efficiency). Taking into account the dimensions of the three detectors the location of the three muon peaks was reproduced by Monte Carlo computations using the GEANT code. The absorbed dose rate due to muons has been measured in 50 indoor and outdoor locations at Thessaloniki, the second largest town of Greece, with a portable Ge detector and converted to the absorbed dose rate due to muons in an ICRU sphere representing the human body by using a factor derived from Monte Carlo computations. The outdoor and indoor mean muon dose rate was 25 nGy h(-1) and 17.8 nGy h(-1), respectively. The shielding factor for the 40 indoor measurements ranges from 0.5 to 0.9 with a most probable value between 0.7-0.8.

  11. Background rejection capabilities of a Compton imaging telescope setup with a DSSD Ge planar detector and AGATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doncel, M., E-mail: doncel@usal.es [Laboratorio de Radiaciones Ionizantes, Universidad de Salamanca (Spain); Quintana, B. [Laboratorio de Radiaciones Ionizantes, Universidad de Salamanca (Spain); Gadea, A. [IFIC Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Recchia, F.; Farnea, E. [INFN sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy)

    2011-08-21

    In this work, we show the first Monte Carlo results about the performance of the Ge array which we propose for the DESPEC experiment at FAIR, when the background algorithm developed for AGATA is applied. The main objective of our study is to characterize the capabilities of the {gamma}-spectroscopy system, made up of AGATA detectors in a semi-spherical distribution covering a 1{pi} solid angle and a set of planar Ge detectors in a daisy configuration, to discriminate between {gamma} sources placed at different locations.

  12. Extrinsic germanium Blocked Impurity Bank (BIB) detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krabach, Timothy N.; Huffman, James E.; Watson, Dan M.

    1989-01-01

    Ge:Ga blocked-impurity-band (BIB) detectors with long wavelength thresholds greater than 190 microns and peak quantum efficiencies of 4 percent, at an operating temperature of 1.8 K, have been fabricated. These proof of concept devices consist of a high purity germanium blocking layer epitaxially grown on a Ga-doped Ge substrate. This demonstration of BIB behavior in germanium enables the development of far infrared detector arrays similar to the current silicon-based devices. Present efforts are focussed on improving the chemical vapor deposition process used to create the blocking layer and on the lithographic processing required to produce monolithic detector arrays in germanium. Approaches to test the impurity levels in both the blocking and active layers are considered.

  13. Pulse shapes and surface effects in segmented germanium detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenz, Daniel

    2010-03-24

    It is well established that at least two neutrinos are massive. The absolute neutrino mass scale and the neutrino hierarchy are still unknown. In addition, it is not known whether the neutrino is a Dirac or a Majorana particle. The GERmanium Detector Array (GERDA) will be used to search for neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 76}Ge. The discovery of this decay could help to answer the open questions. In the GERDA experiment, germanium detectors enriched in the isotope {sup 76}Ge are used as source and detector at the same time. The experiment is planned in two phases. In the first, phase existing detectors are deployed. In the second phase, additional detectors will be added. These detectors can be segmented. A low background index around the Q value of the decay is important to maximize the sensitivity of the experiment. This can be achieved through anti-coincidences between segments and through pulse shape analysis. The background index due to radioactive decays in the detector strings and the detectors themselves was estimated, using Monte Carlo simulations for a nominal GERDA Phase II array with 18-fold segmented germanium detectors. A pulse shape simulation package was developed for segmented high-purity germanium detectors. The pulse shape simulation was validated with data taken with an 19-fold segmented high-purity germanium detector. The main part of the detector is 18-fold segmented, 6-fold in the azimuthal angle and 3-fold in the height. A 19th segment of 5mm thickness was created on the top surface of the detector. The detector was characterized and events with energy deposited in the top segment were studied in detail. It was found that the metalization close to the end of the detector is very important with respect to the length of the of the pulses observed. In addition indications for n-type and p-type surface channels were found. (orig.)

  14. Measurement of 15 MeV gamma-rays with the Ge cluster detectors of EUROBALL

    CERN Document Server

    Million, B; Camera, F; Brambilla, S; Gadea, A; Giugni, D; Herskind, B; Kmiecik, M; Isocrate, R; Leoni, S; Maj, A; Prelz, F; Wieland, O

    2000-01-01

    A measurement of the response to 15.1 MeV gamma-rays has been made for the Ge cluster detectors in the EUROBALL array. Each cluster detector consists of seven germanium capsules surrounded by a single anticompton shield of BGO. The reaction D( sup 1 sup 1 B,gamma) sup 1 sup 2 C+n at E sub b sub e sub a sub m =19.1 MeV has been employed. The 'adding-back' of signals simultaneously present in the capsules composing each cluster detector has been made on an event by event basis. The intensity in full-energy peak increases by a factor of three as compared to that of the spectrum obtained by summing the individual spectra of the 7 capsules. The pulse height to energy conversion is found to be very linear from few hundreds keV to 15 MeV. The efficiency is discussed relative to that of large volume BaF sub 2 scintillators.

  15. A cleaner two-step synthesis of high purity diallyldimethylammonium chloride monomers for flocculant preparation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Bing-hui; FAN Bin; PENG Xian-jia; LUAN Zhao-kun

    2005-01-01

    In order to improve the flocculation efficiency of polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride (PDADMAC), high molecular weight PDADMAC should be prepared from high purity diallyldimethylammonium chloride(DADMAC) monomers. In this paper, a cleaner method with microwave irradiation and alkali solidification was proposed for preparing high pure DADMAC by selective heating under low temperature, and the prepared high purity DADMAC is characterized using FTIR and atomic absorption spectrometry. The new method provides a solution to the key technical problem of PDADMAC synthesis. Comparing with the conventional methods, the results showed that the advantages of the novel synthesis include: (a) high purity DADMAC is improved from 57% to 71%; (b) reaction time of tertiary amine preparation is shortened from 6 h to 7 min; (c) water instead of acetone was used as reaction medium; (d) toxic by-products,wastewater and waste gas are eliminated. Flocculant made from the synthesized high purity DADMAC monomers was proved more efficient in flocculation tests.

  16. Properties and Performances of High Purity Corundum Bricks for Chemical and Petrochemical Industries in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENRen-pin; LINYu-lian; 等

    1995-01-01

    The properties and performances of high purity corundum bricks for the refractory linings of the gasifiers in the ammonia and ethene synthesis and carbon black reaction furnaces in China are described.The high purity corundum bricks are characterized by high refractoriness,hot strength,dimensional stability and chemical inertness at elevated temperature,Their performances in the gasifiers and carbon black furnaces are very satisfied ,The failure mechansims of the refractory lining are discussed on the basis of the petrographic analysis.

  17. High-Purity Nickel Prepared by Electron Beam Melting: Purification Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Shang, Zaiyan; Chen, Ming; He, Jinjiang; Lv, Baoguo; Wang, Xingquan; Xiong, Xiaodong

    2013-12-01

    A bulk cylindrical high-purity nickel ingot, with purity of more than 99.999 pct (5N) in mass, was obtained from the raw nickel with 99.95 pct (3N5) initial purity by virtue of double electron beam melting (EBM). A chemical analysis was performed by using glow discharge mass spectrometry (GDMS) analysis for all elements in the periodic table except carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen, which were tested by the high-performance combustion and fusion method. The major impurities B, Na, Al, Si, P, S, Ca, Ti, Cr, Fe, Cu, Co, Zn, As, Ag, Sb, and Pb showed an excellent removal effect with removal efficiency of more than 85 pct following the double EBMs. Li, Mg, Cl, K, V, Mn, Ga, Ge, Cd, Se, In, Sn, Tl, Au, and Pt were below the detection limit. No significant change in concentration was found for the refractory elements W, Mo, Ta, Nb, and Ir. Be, F, Sc, Se, Br, Rb, Sr, Zr, Y, Ru, Rh, Pd, Te, I, Cs, Ba, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu, Hf, Re, Os, Hg, Bi, Th, and U were not detectable following the purification as compared to the raw nickel. Gaseous impurities, C, N, O, especially for N, was removed sufficiently. Theoretical calculations for removal efficiency of impurity Fe based on the calculated vapor pressure, activity coefficient, and melt temperature were in good agreement with measured results, and the purification mechanism was ascribed to the evaporation of major impurities and subsequently evacuation by repetitive EBM.

  18. Cryogenic readout techniques for germanium detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benato, G. [University of Zurich, (Switzerland); Cattadori, C. [INFN - Milano Bicocca, (Italy); Di Vacri, A. [INFN LNGS, (Italy); Ferri, E. [Universita Milano Bicocca/INFN Milano Bicocca, (Italy); D' Andrea, V.; Macolino, C. [GSSI/INFN LNGS, (Italy); Riboldi, S. [Universita degli Studi di Milano/INFN Milano, (Italy); Salamida, F. [Universita Milano Bicocca/INFN Milano Bicocca, (Italy)

    2015-07-01

    High Purity Germanium detectors are used in many applications, from nuclear and astro-particle physics, to homeland security or environment protection. Although quite standard configurations are often used, with cryostats, charge sensitive amplifiers and analog or digital acquisition systems all commercially available, it might be the case that a few specific applications, e.g. satellites, portable devices, cryogenic physics experiments, etc. also require the development of a few additional or complementary techniques. An interesting case is for sure GERDA, the Germanium Detector Array experiment, searching for neutrino-less double beta decay of {sup 76}Ge at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory of INFN - Italy. In GERDA the entire detector array, composed of semi-coaxial and BEGe naked crystals, is operated suspended inside a cryostat filled with liquid argon, that acts not only as cooling medium and but also as an active shield, thanks to its scintillation properties. These peculiar circumstances, together with the additional requirement of a very low radioactive background from all the materials adjacent to the detectors, clearly introduce significant constraints on the design of the Ge front-end readout electronics. All the Ge readout solutions developed within the framework of the GERDA collaboration, for both Phase I and Phase II, will be briefly reviewed, with their relative strength and weakness compared together and with respect to ideal Ge readout. Finally, the digital processing techniques developed by the GERDA collaboration for energy estimation of Ge detector signals will be recalled. (authors)

  19. Rich detector with a sodium fluoride radiator: /K identification up to 3 GeV/c

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, R.; Guyonnet, J.L.; Giomataris, Y.; Petroff, P.; Seguinot, J.; Tocqueville, J.; Ypsilantis, T.

    1988-12-15

    The use of a single crystal of sodium fluoride (NaF) as a Cherenkov radiator has been investigated. Its transparency has been measured and found to be good for photon energies below 9.6 eV. Data on its index of refraction are well fitted to a single-pole Sellmeier resonance formula. These data allow a realistic Monte Carlo simulation of a proximity-focused ring imaging Cherenkov (RICH) system. The photon detector is a multiwire proportional chamber (MWPC) with pad readout. The photosensitive gases considered are tetrakis(dimethylamine)ethylene (TMAE) and triethylamine (TEA). The simulation shows that a system having 10 cm radial thickness and 12% of a radiation length of material would identify pions and kaons below 3 GeV/c momentum. The pad dimensions required are about 5 mm x 5 mm.

  20. Application of multiparameter coincidence spectrometry using a Ge detectors array to neutron activation analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Hatsukawa, Y; Hayakawa, T; Toh, Y; Shinohara, N

    2002-01-01

    The method of multiparameter coincidence spectrometry based on gamma-gamma coincidence is widely used for the nuclear structure studies, because of its high sensitivity to gamma-rays. In this study, feasibility of the method of multiparameter coincidence spectrometry for analytical chemistry was examined. Two reference igneous rock samples (JP-1, JB-1a) issued by the Geological Survey of Japan were irradiated at a research reactor, and the gamma-rays from the radioisotopes produced via neutron capture reactions were measured using an array of 12 Ge detectors with BGO Compton suppressors, GEMINI. Simultaneously 24 elements were analyzed without chemical separation. The observed smallest component was Eu contained in JP-1 with abundance of 4 ppb.

  1. Theoretical consideration of the energy resolution in planar HPGe detectors for low energy X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samedov, Victor V. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), 31, Kashirskoye Shosse, 115409, Moscow, (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-01

    In this work, theoretical consideration of the processes in planar High Purity Ge (HPGe) detectors for low energy X-rays using the random stochastic processes formalism was carried out. Using the random stochastic processes formalism, the generating function of the processes of X-rays registration in a planar HPGe detector was derived. The power serial expansions of the detector amplitude and the variance in terms of the inverse bias voltage were derived. The coefficients of these expansions allow determining the Fano factor, electron mobility lifetime product, nonuniformity of the trap density, and other characteristics of the semiconductor material. (authors)

  2. Summer program Report : Quality control and Aging study for the GE1/1 detectors in CMS Muon endcap upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Rajan, Adithya

    2017-01-01

    In this report, I summarize the work I did during my tenure in the Summer program. The project started with conducting three quality controls -- gas leak test, High Voltage test and Gas gain test. These are necessary to check if the GE1/1 detectors pass the requirements necessary for its deployment in the CMS. Then, I explain how aging study of the detectors was conducted and how the data was analyzed to ascertain if the detector has undergone aging. Lastly, the ongoing process of setting up a further accelerated aging study within the GEM lab is explained, with some potential difficulties associated with it.

  3. Mathematical calibration of Ge detectors, and the instruments that use them

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bronson, F.L.; Young, B. [Canberra Industries, Meriden, CT (United States)

    1997-11-01

    Efficiency calibrations for Ge detectors are typically done with the use of multiple energy calibrations sources which are added to a bulk matrix intended to simulate the measurement sample, and then deposited in the sample container. This is rather easy for common laboratory samples. Bu, even there, for many environmental samples, waste assay samples, and operational health physics samples, accurate calibrations are difficult. For these situations, various mathematical corrections or direct calibration techniques are used at Canberra. EML has pioneered the use of mathematical calibrations following source-based detector characterization measurements for in situ measurements of environmental fallout. Canberra has expanded this by the use of MCNP for the source measurements required in EML. For other calibration situations, MCNP was used directly, as the primary calibration method. This is demonstrated to be at least as accurate as source based measurements, and probably better. Recently, a new method [ISOCS] has been developed and is nearing completion. This promises to be an easy to use calibration software that can be used by the customer for in situ gamma spectroscopy to accurately measure many large sized samples, such as boxes, drums, pipes, or to calibrate small laboratory-type samples. 8 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. Reducing 68Ge Background in Dark Matter Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Orrell, John L.

    2011-03-01

    Experimental searches for dark matter include experiments with sub-0.5 keV-energy threshold high purity germanium detectors. Experimental efforts, in partnership with the CoGeNT Collaboration operating at the Soudan Underground Laboratory, are focusing on energy threshold reduction via noise abatement, reduction of backgrounds from cosmic ray generated isotopes, and ubiquitous environmental radioactive sources. The most significant cosmic ray produced radionuclide is 68Ge. This paper evaluates reducing this background by freshly mining and processing germanium ore. The most probable outcome is a reduction of the background by a factor of two, and at most a factor of four. A very cost effective alternative is to obtain processed Ge as soon as possible and store it underground for 18 months.

  5. Reducing 68Ge Background in Dark Matter Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Orrell, John L.

    2011-03-01

    Experimental searches for dark matter include experiments with sub-0.5 keV-energy threshold high purity germanium detectors. Experimental efforts, in partnership with the CoGeNT Collaboration operating at the Soudan Underground Laboratory, are focusing on energy threshold reduction via noise abatement, reduction of backgrounds from cosmic ray generated isotopes, and ubiquitous environmental radioactive sources. The most significant cosmic ray produced radionuclide is 68Ge. This paper evaluates reducing this background by freshly mining and processing germanium ore. The most probable outcome is a reduction of the background by a factor of two, and at most a factor of four. A very cost effective alternative is to obtain processed Ge as soon as possible and store it underground for 18 months.

  6. Growth of high purity semiconductor epitaxial layers by liquid phase epitaxy and their characterization

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Dhar

    2005-07-01

    This paper briefly describes our work and the results on the growth of several III–V epitaxial semiconductor materials in high purity form by liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) technique. Various possible sources of impurities in such growth are listed and step-by-step procedures adopted to reduce them are discussed in particular reference to the growth of GaAs layers. The technique of growing very high purity layers by treating the melt with erbium is described for the growth of InGaAs and GaSb layers.

  7. Improved Multinuclide Imaging of Special Nuclear Material Using a High Purity Germanium Double Sided Strip Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-01

    CAMAC Interface: The CAMAC interface is the means of communication with the DGF-4C. 30 Input logic unit [11] The input logic unit used is an...Initially, only a single DGF-4C module was used to verify that the communication with the host computer was functioning properly. All internal jumper...Appendix A. Collimator Design Code Graphics’Graphics’ Purpose: This code is used to help design efective collimators for imaging special mm

  8. SuperTIGER scintillator detector calibration with 30 GeV/nucleon Pb and its fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Makoto

    2016-07-01

    The SuperTIGER (Super Trans-Iron Galactic Element Recorder) long-duration balloon instrument has measured the abundances of galactic cosmic-ray elements to provide sensitive tests and clarification of the OB-association model of Galactic cosmic-ray origins. More than 600 nuclei with atomic number Z > 30 were observed on its first flight and the abundances of nuclei have been determined with clear individual element resolution and high statistical precision for 30 energy 30 GeV/nucleon Pb and its fragments to measure the saturation response of the scintillator detectors, which are essential to determine the abundances of nuclei with atomic number Z > 40. The beamtest results have been used to optimize the Geant4 simulation to represent the flight data, and will be used to interpret the flight data to extend the abundance determination to about _{60}Nd. SuperTIGER was developed by Washington University in St. Louis, NASA Goddard Flight Center, the California Institute of Technology, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and the University of Minnesota.

  9. Transition radiation detectors for electron identification beyond 1 GeV/ c

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appuhn, R. D.; Heinloth, K.; Lange, E.; Oedingen, R.; Schlösser, A.

    1988-01-01

    Transition radiation detectors (TRDs) have been tested for the separation of electrons from pions in the momentum range between 1 and 6 GeV/ c. Foams as well as fibres and foils served as radiator materials while two types of chambers, a longitudinal drift chamber (DC) and a multiwire proportional chamber (MWPC), both of 16 mm depth and dominantly filled with xenon, were used for detecting the transition radiation photons with a setup of four chambers. Analyzing the data we compared the methods of mean, truncated mean and of maximum likelihood of the total charge measurements and several methods of cluster analysis. As a result of the total charge measurements performed at test beams at CERN and DESY we obtained about 1% pion contamination at 90% electron efficiency for the polypropylene materials in the configuration of four modules with a total length of 40 cm. An improvement by a factor of about two for the electron/pion discrimination can be obtained in the case of a detailed analysis of the clusters.

  10. CoGeNT: A Search for Low-Mass Dark Matter using p-type Point Contact Germanium Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Aalseth, C E; Colaresi, J; Collar, J I; Leon, J Diaz; Fast, J E; Fields, N E; Hossbach, T W; Knecht, A; Kos, M S; Marino, M G; Miley, H S; Miller, M L; Orrell, J L; Yocum, K M

    2013-01-01

    CoGeNT employs p-type point-contact (PPC) germanium detectors to search for Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). By virtue of its low energy threshold and ability to reject surface backgrounds, this type of device allows an emphasis on low-mass dark matter candidates (WIMP mass around 10 GeV/c2). We report on the characteristics of the PPC detector presently taking data at the Soudan Underground Laboratory, elaborating on aspects of shielding, data acquisition, instrumental stability, data analysis, and background estimation. A detailed background model is used to investigate the low energy excess of events previously reported, and to assess the possibility of temporal modulations in the low-energy event rate. We conclude that the technique is ideally suited to search for the annual modulation signature expected from dark matter particle interactions in the region of WIMP mass and coupling favored by the DAMA/LIBRA claim.

  11. Variation of low temperature internal friction of microplastic deformation of high purity molybdenum single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal-Val, P.P. (AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kharkov. Fiziko-Tekhnicheskij Inst. Nizkikh Temperatur); Kaufmann, H.J. (Akademie der Wissenschaften der DDR, Berlin)

    1984-08-01

    Amplitude and temperature spectra of ultrasound absorption in weakly deformed high purity molybdenum single crystals of different orientations were measured. The results were discussed in terms of parameter changes related to quasiparticle or dislocation oscillations, respectively, dislocation point defect interactions as well as defect generation at microplastic deformation.

  12. Crystallographic Analysis of Nucleation at Hardness Indentations in High-Purity Aluminum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Chaoling; Zhang, Yubin; Lin, Fengxiang

    2016-01-01

    Nucleation at Vickers hardness indentations has been studied in high-purity aluminum cold-rolled 12 pct. Electron channeling contrast was used to measure the size of the indentations and to detect nuclei, while electron backscattering diffraction was used to determine crystallographic orientations...

  13. Scalable preparation of high purity rutin fatty acid esters following enzymatic synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lue, Bena-Marie; Guo, Zheng; Xu, Xuebing

    2010-01-01

    Investigations into expanded uses of modified flavonoids are often limited by the availability of these high purity compounds. As such, a simple, effective and relatively fast method for isolation of gram quantities of both long and medium chain fatty acid esters of rutin following scaled-up bios...

  14. High-Purity Fe3S4 Greigite Microcrystals for Magnetic and Electrochemical Performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Guowei; Zhang, Baomin; Yu, Feng; Novakova, Alla A.; Krivenkov, Maxim S.; Kiseleva, Tatiana Y.; Chang, Liao; Rao, Jiancun; Polyakov, Alexey O.; Blake, Graeme R.; de Groot, Robert A.; Palstra, Thomas T. M.

    2014-01-01

    High-purity Fe3S4 (greigite) microcrystals with octahedral shape were synthesized via a simple hydrothermal method using a surfactant. The as-prepared samples have the inverse spinel structure with high crystallinity. The saturation magnetization (M-s) reaches 3.74 mu(B) at 5 K and 3.51 mu(B) at roo

  15. Production of high-purity radium-223 from legacy actinium-beryllium neutron sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderquist, Chuck Z; McNamara, Bruce K; Fisher, Darrell R

    2012-07-01

    Radium-223 is a short-lived alpha-particle-emitting radionuclide with potential applications in cancer treatment. Research to develop new radiopharmaceuticals employing (223)Ra has been hindered by poor availability due to the small quantities of parent actinium-227 available world-wide. The purpose of this study was to develop innovative and cost-effective methods to obtain high-purity (223)Ra from (227)Ac. We obtained (227)Ac from two surplus actinium-beryllium neutron generators. We retrieved the actinium/beryllium buttons from the sources and dissolved them in a sulfuric-nitric acid solution. A crude actinium solid was recovered from the solution by coprecipitation with thorium fluoride, leaving beryllium in solution. The crude actinium was purified to provide about 40 milligrams of actinium nitrate using anion exchange in methanol-water-nitric acid solution. The purified actinium was then used to generate high-purity (223)Ra. We extracted (223)Ra using anion exchange in a methanol-water-nitric acid solution. After the radium was separated, actinium and thorium were then eluted from the column and dried for interim storage. This single-pass separation produces high purity, carrier-free (223)Ra product, and does not disturb the (227)Ac/(227)Th equilibrium. A high purity, carrier-free (227)Th was also obtained from the actinium using a similar anion exchange in nitric acid. These methods enable efficient production of (223)Ra for research and new alpha-emitter radiopharmaceutical development.

  16. Measurement of $R$ between 1.84 and 3.05 GeV at the KEDR detector

    CERN Document Server

    Anashin, V V; Baldin, E M; Barladyan, A K; Barnyakov, A Yu; Barnyakov, M Yu; Baru, S E; Basok, I Yu; Batrakov, A M; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bobrov, A V; Bobrovnikov, V S; Bogomyagkov, A V; Bondar, A E; Buzykaev, A R; Eidelman, S I; Grigoriev, D N; Glukhovchenko, Yu M; Karnaev, S E; Karpov, G V; Karpov, S V; Kasyanenko, P V; Kharlamova, T A; Kiselev, V A; Kolmogorov, V V; Kononov, S A; Kotov, K Yu; Kravchenko, E A; Kudryavtsev, V N; Kulikov, V F; Kurkin, G Ya; Kuyanov, I A; Levichev, E B; Maksimov, D A; Malyshev, V M; Maslennikov, A L; Meshkov, O I; Mishnev, S I; Morozov, I I; Muchnoi, N Yu; Neufeld, V V; Nikitin, S A; Nikolaev, I B; Okunev, I N; Onuchin, A P; Oreshkin, S B; Osipov, A A; Ovtin, I V; Peleganchuk, S V; Pivovarov, S G; Piminov, P A; Petrov, V V; Prisekin, V G; Rezanova, O L; Ruban, A A; Sandyrev, V K; Savinov, G A; Shamov, A G; Shatilov, D N; Shwartz, B A; Simonov, E A; Sinyatkin, S V; Skrinsky, A N; Sokolov, A V; Sukharev, A M; Starostina, E V; Talyshev, A A; Tayursky, V A; Telnov, V I; Tikhonov, Yu A; Todyshev, K Yu; Tumaikin, G M; Usov, Yu V; Vorobiov, A I; Zhilich, V N; Zhulanov, V V; Zhuravlev, A N

    2016-01-01

    Using the KEDR detector at the VEPP-4M $e^+e^-$ collider, we have determined the values of $R$ at thirteen points of the center-of-mass energy between 1.84 and 3.05 GeV. The achieved accuracy is about or better than $3.9\\%$ at most of the energy points with a systematic uncertainty less than $2.4\\%$.

  17. Strangeness in Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 130 GeV observed with the STAR detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnby, Lee S.; STAR Collaboration; Adler, C.; Ahammed, Z.; Allgower, C.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B. D.; Anderson, M.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V. V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bichsel, H.; Bland, L. C.; Blyth, C. O.; Bonner, B. E.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Cadman, R. V.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Cardenas, A.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Castro, M.; Cebra, D.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, S. P.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, B.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Deng, W. S.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Didenko, L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunin, V. B.; Dunlop, J. C.; Eckardt, V.; Efimov, L. G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Fachini, P.; Faine, V.; Filimonov, K.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Foley, K. J.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Gaudichet, L.; Germain, M.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Grabski, J.; Grachov, O.; Grigoriev, V.; Guedon, M.; Gushin, E.; Hallman, T. J.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J. W.; Heffner, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Herston, T.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Horsley, M.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Hümmler, H.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Ivanshin, Yu. I.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Janik, M.; Johnson, I.; Jones, P. G.; Judd, E. G.; Kaneta, M.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, S. R.; Klyachko, A.; Konstantinov, A. S.; Kotchenda, L.; Kovalenko, A. D.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A. I.; Kunde, G. J.; Kunz, C. L.; Kutuev, R. Kh.; Kuznetsov, A. A.; Lakehal-Ayat, L.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lange, S.; Lansdell, C. P.; Lasiuk, B.; Laue, F.; Lebedev, A.; Lednický, R.; Leontiev, V. M.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, Q.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, L.; Liu, Z.; Liu, Q. J.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Curto, G. Lo; Long, H.; Longacre, R. S.; Lopez-Noriega, M.; Love, W. A.; Lynn, D.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Marx, J.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu. A.; McShane, T. S.; Meissner, F.; Melnick, Yu.; Meschanin, A.; Messer, M.; Miller, M. L.; Milosevich, Z.; Minaev, N. G.; Mitchell, J.; Moiseenko, V. A.; Moore, C. F.; Morozov, V.; de Moura, M. M.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nelson, J. M.; Nevski, P.; Nikitin, V. A.; Nogach, L. V.; Norman, B.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Paic, G.; Pandey, S. U.; Panebratsev, Y.; Panitkin, S. Y.; Pavlinov, A. I.; Pawlak, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Peryt, W.; Petrov, V. A.; Pluta, J.; Porile, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Radomski, S.; Rai, G.; Ravel, O.; Ray, R. L.; Razin, S. V.; Reichhold, D.; Reid, J. G.; Retiere, F.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevski, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roy, C.; Rykov, V.; Sakrejda, I.; Sandweiss, J.; Saulys, A. C.; Savin, I.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Schroeder, L. S.; Schüttauf, A.; Schweda, K.; Seger, J.; Seliverstov, D.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shestermanov, K. E.; Shimanskii, S. S.; Shvetcov, V. S.; Skoro, G.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stephenson, E. J.; Stock, R.; Stolpovsky, A.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Struck, C.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugarbaker, E.; Suire, C.; umbera, M.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Szarwas, P.; Tai, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Thomas, J. H.; Thompson, M.; Tikhomirov, V.; Tokarev, M.; Tonjes, M. B.; Trainor, T. A.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Trofimov, V.; Tsai, O.; Turner, K.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; Vander Molen, A. M.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vigdor, S. E.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wang, F.; Ward, H.; Watson, J. W.; Wells, R.; Wenaus, T.; Westfall, G. D.; Whitten, C., Jr.; Wieman, H.; Willson, R.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wood, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Yakutin, A. E.; Yamamoto, E.; Yang, J.; Yepes, P.; Yurevich, V. I.; Zanevski, Y. V.; Zborovský, I.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, W. M.; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zubarev, A. N.

    2002-07-01

    The STAR detector has made a variety of measurements of strange and other hadronic species in Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 130 GeV. A comparison of kaon and pion production enables an examination of the systematics of strangeness production with energy by comparing them to lower energy collisions. Anti-baryon to baryon ratios indicate a much reduced net-baryon density and transverse momentum spectra show that a picture of transverse expansion seems appropriate.

  18. TEM study on Si0.65Ge0.35/p-Si HIP infrared detector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Microstructure of P+ -Si0.65Ge0.35/p-Si HIP infrared detector has been studied by using localization cross-section transmission electron microscopy. The photosensitive region of the detector consists of 6 P+ -Si0.65Ge0.35 layers and 5 UD-Si layers, whichare flat and have thickness of 6 nm and 32 nm, respectively. A stress field exists on the interface between Si0.65Ge0.35 and UD-Si layers, but no any crystal defect has been found in this region, except the edges of this region. Both Si0.65Ge0.35 and UD-Si layers on amorphous SiO2 layer consist of polycrystals and are in wave. There is defect area in the edges of photosensitive region.The area appears in a shape of inverse triangle and the maximum width is less than 120 nm. The crystal defects are stacking faults and microtwins.

  19. Characterization of different surface passivation routes applied to a planar HPGe detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maggioni, G.; Gelain, M.; Carturan, S. [University of Padova, Department of Physics and Astronomy ' ' G. Galilei' ' , Padova (Italy); Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Legnaro (Italy); Napoli, D.R. [Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Legnaro (Italy); Eberth, J. [Universitaet zu Koeln, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Koeln (Germany); Grimaldi, M.G.; Tati, S. [University of Catania, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Catania (Italy)

    2015-11-15

    The effects of different passivation methods applied to the same planar high-purity germanium gamma radiation detector have been studied. By means of the scanning with a low-energy collimated gamma source, it has been found that the surface passivation gives rise to a dead layer below the intrinsic Ge surface, whose thickness and distribution are strongly dependent on the passivation type. Measured bulk detector properties like the peak-to-Compton ratio and efficiency have shown a dependence on the passivation and an influence of the passivation type on the depletion voltage, whilst the optimal energy resolution has been the same for all the passivations. (orig.)

  20. A Novel Assembly Procedure of GE1\\slash1 Detectors for CMS High Luminosity Phase of the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Shah, Aashaq

    2017-01-01

    A CMS muon group is investigating the possibility of enhancing muon tracking and triggering capabilities in the region 1.6$\\textless$$\\eta$$\\textless$2.18 of the CMS experiment at the LHC by instrumenting the end-cap muon system with large-area tipple GEM detectors. These GE1/1 detectors are considered as an important technology for High-Luminosity phase of LHC and contain a triple-GEM with a 3\\slash1\\slash2\\slash1 mm drift\\slash transfer-1\\slash transfer-2\\slash induction field gap configuration and the active readout area of 0.345\\slash0.409m$^{2}$ for the short/long chambers. We describe a novel assembly procedure of such detectors at LHC.

  1. Measurement of the half-life of the two-neutrino double beta decay of Ge-76 with the Gerda experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Agostini, M; Andreotti, E; Bakalyarov, A M; Balata, M; Barabanov, I; Heider, M Barnabe; Barros, N; Baudis, L; Bauer, C; Becerici-Schmidt, N; Bellotti, E; Belogurov, S; Belyaev, S T; Benato, G; Bettini, A; Bezrukov, L; Bode, T; Brudanin, V; Brugnera, R; Budjas, D; Caldwell, A; Cattadori, C; Chernogorov, A; Cossavella, F; Demidova, E V; Denisov, A; Domula, A; Egorov, V; Falkenstein, R; Ferella, A D; Freund, K; Froborg, F; Frodyma, N; Gangapshev, A; Garfagnini, A; Gazzana, S; Grambayr, P; Gurentsov, V; Gusev, K; Guthikonda, K K; Hampel, W; Hegai, A; Heisel, M; Hemmer, S; Heusser, G; Hofmann, W; Hult, M; Inzhechik, L V; Ioannucci, L; Csathy, J Janicsko; Jochum, J; Junker, M; Kianovsky, S; Kirpichnikov, I V; Kirsch, A; Klimenko, A; Knoepfle, K T; Kochetov, O; Kornoukhov, V N; Kusminov, V; Laubenstein, M; Lazzaro, A; Lebedev, V I; Lehnert, B; Liao, H Y; Lindner, M; Lippi, I; Liu, X; Lubashevskiy, A; Lubsandorzhiev, B; Lutter, G; Machado, A A; Majorovits, B; Maneschg, W; Nemchenok, I; Nisi, S; O'Shaughnessy, C; Pandola, L; Pelczar, K; Peraro, L; Pullia, A; Riboldi, S; Ritter, F; Sada, C; Salathe, M; Schmitt, C; Schoenert, S; Schreiner, J; Schulz, O; Schwingenheuer, B; Shevchik, E; Shirchenko, M; Simgen, H; Smolnikov, A; Stanco, L; Strecker, H; Tarka, M; Ur, C A; Vasenko, A A; Volynets, O; von Sturm, K; Walter, M; Wegmann, A; Wojcik, M; Yanovich, E; Zavarise, P; Zhitnikov, I; Zhukov, S V; Zinatulina, D; Zuber, K; Zuzel, G

    2012-01-01

    The primary goal of the GERmanium Detector Array (Gerda) experiment at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso of INFN is the search for the neutrinoless double beta decay of Ge-76. High-purity germanium detectors made from material enriched in Ge-76 are operated directly immersed in liquid argon, allowing for a substantial reduction of the background with respect to predecessor experiments. The first 5.04 kg yr of data collected in Phase I of the experiment have been analyzed to measure the half-life of the neutrino-accompanied double beta decay of Ge-76. The observed spectrum in the energy range between 600 and 1800 keV is dominated by the double beta decay of Ge-76. The half-life extracted from Gerda data is T(1/2) = (1.84 +0.14 -0.10) 10^{21} yr.

  2. Determination of Trace Elements in High Purity Gold by High Resolution Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Hualin; HUANG Kelong; NIE Xidu; FU Liang

    2009-01-01

    Trace elements were determined in high purity gold by high resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry(HR-ICP-MS).Sample were decomposed by aqua regia.To overcome some potentially problematic spectral interference,measurements were acquired in both medium and high resolution modes.The matrix effects due to the presence of excessive HCl and Au were evaluated.The optimum conditions for the determination was tested and discussed.The standard addition method was employed for quantitative analysis.The detection limits range from 0.01 μg/g to 0.28 μg/g depending on the elements.The method is accurate,quick and convenient.It has been applied to the determination of trace elements in high purity gold with satisfactory results.

  3. The European Expression Of Interest For High Purity U-233 Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giaquinto, Joseph M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Younkin, James R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this letter report is to document the response for an Expression of Interest (EOI) sent to the European Safeguards and research and development (R&D) scientific communities for the distribution of small amounts of high purity 233U materials for use in safeguards, nonproliferation, and basic R&D in the nuclear disciplines. The intent for the EOI was to gauge the level of international interest for these materials from government and research institutions with programmatic missions in the nuclear security or nuclear R&D arena. The information contained herein is intended to provide information to assist key decision makers in DOE as to the ultimate disposition path for the high purity materials currently being recovered at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and only those items for which there is no United States (U.S.) sponsor identified.

  4. Production of solar grade silicon in an arc furnace using high purity starting materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulich, H. A.; Dietze, W.; Eisenbith, K.-H.; Schafer, J.; Schulze, F. W.; Urbach, H.-P.

    Solar cell-grade Si has been produced, using high purity SiO2 and C raw materials, by means of carbothermic reduction. The process involves the production of glass fibers from a melt of ordinary silica sand and glass-forming oxides, whose impurities are then leached out through treatment of the fibers with hot HCl. The high purity carbon is also prepared by treating carbon black with hot HCl. The purified SiO2 and C materials are reacted in an arc surface, yielding Si impurity concentrations corresponding to those of the highly purified materials. A three-phase, 550 kVA-arc furnace was constructed to prepare Si on a large scale.

  5. Electrolysis Process of High Purity Gold%高纯金的电解工艺

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶跃威

    2014-01-01

    介绍了遂昌金矿有限公司的高纯金电解工艺。实践表明,采用该工艺,在金阳极板含金95%~99%下经过一次金电解,金纯度即可达到99.997%以上。经检测,杂质含量低于高纯金(99.999%)的杂质要求。%The high-purity gold electrolysis process of Suichang Gold Mine Co. Ltd., is introduced. The production practice showed that, the content of gold can reach above 99.997% after only one cycle of electrolysis from the anode plate which contains 95%~99% gold. The test results showed that the impurities accord with the requirement of Chinese national standard of high-purity gold (99.999%).

  6. Characterization of Rod-like High-purity Fluorapatite Nanopowders Obtained by Sol-gel Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrin Sasani

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available high purity fluorapatite (FA with rod-like and spherical-like morphology was synthesized via sol-gel method. Chemical characterization of FA powders was done by XRD and FTIR analyses. Crystallite samples were calculated using Scherer method. Morphology of FA powders was investigated with TEM and SEM images. The results revealed that increasing the time of hydrolysis of phosphate sols significantly decreased the gelation time of FA sols. Also, mixing temperature of P and Ca sols affects the gelation time of samples and increasing pH decreases the gelation time of FA sols. Morphological and chemical characterization of samples showed that the FA powders have high purity and rod-like and spherical-like morphology.

  7. Fabrication of novel cryomill for synthesis of high purity metallic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Nirmal; Biswas, Krishanu

    2015-08-01

    The successful preparation of free standing metal nanoparticles with high purity in bulk quantity is the pre-requisite for any potential application. This is possible by using ball milling at cryogenic temperature. However, the most of ball mills available in the market do not allow preparing high purity metal nanoparticles by this route. In addition, it is not possible to carry out in situ measurements of process parameters as well as diagnostic of the process. In the present investigation, we present a detailed study on the fabrication of a cryomill, which is capable of avoiding contaminations in the product. It also provides in situ measurements and diagnostic of the low temperature milling process. Online monitoring of the milling temperature and observation of ball motion are the important aspects in the newly designed mill. The nanoparticles prepared using this fabricated mill have been found to be free standing and also free from contaminations.

  8. Microstructure Evolution in High Purity Aluminum Single Crystal Processed by Equal Channel Angular Pressing (ECAP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jinfang; Dong, Qing; Dai, Yongbing; Xing, Hui; Han, Yanfeng; Ma, Jianbo; Zhang, Jiao; Wang, Jun; Sun, Baode

    2017-01-22

    Aluminum single crystal with 99.999% purity was deformed at room temperature by equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) up to 16 passes. Grain size and misorientation of processed samples were quantitatively characterized by TEM and EBSD. The results show that the refinement efficiency of high purity aluminum single crystal was poor in the initial stage. Extrusion by fewer ECAP passes (n ≤ 8) resulted in only elongated grains containing a large number of subgrains and small misorientations between grains. Stable microstructures of nearly equiaxed grains with high misorientations were obtained by 15 passages, indicating that the initial extremely coarse grains and highly uniform grain orientation are not conducive to the accumulation of strain energy. The initial state of high purity aluminum has a significant effect on the refining efficiency of the ECAP process.

  9. [Simultaneously preparation of grams of high purity tyrosol, crenulatin and salidroside from Rhodiola crenulata].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xin; Wang, Xue-jing; Li, Shi-ping; Zhang, Qiao; Zhao, Yi-wu; Huang Wen-zhe; Wang, Zhen-zhong; Xiao, Wei

    2015-04-01

    Tyrosol, crenulatin and salidroside are the main active constituents of Rhodiola crenulata, with extensive pharmacological activities. In the study, grams of high purity tyrosol, crenulatin and salidroside were simultaneously separated from R. crenulata by the first time. Firstly, R. crenulata was extracted by 70% alcohol. Then, with the yields of three compounds as the index, the macroporous resin was optimized. At last, grams of high purity tyrosol, crenulatin and salidroside were isolated by D-101 macroporousresin, purified by column chromatography. Detected by HPLC, the purity of three compounds were higher than 98%. This method has the advantages of simple process and operation, less dosage of organic solvent, highly yield and reproducibility, suitable for the simultaneously preparation of tyrosol, crenulatin and salidroside.

  10. A Study of the Surface Quality of High Purity Copper after Heat Treatment

    CERN Document Server

    Aicheler, M; Atieh, S; Calatroni, S; Riddone, G; Lebet, S; Samoshkin, A

    2011-01-01

    Themanufacturing flow of accelerating structures for the compact linear collider, based on diamond-machined high purity copper components, include several thermal cycles (diffusion bonding, brazing of cooling circuits, baking in vacuum, etc.). The high temperature cycles may be carried out following different schedules and environments (vacuum, reducing hydrogen atmosphere, argon, etc.) and develop peculiar surface topographies which have been the object of extended observations. This study presents and discusses the results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy investigations.

  11. Impurity distribution and reduction behaviour of quartz in the production of high purity silicon

    OpenAIRE

    Dal Martello, Elena

    2012-01-01

    The production of solar grade silicon is based on the use of expensive high purity carbon and quartz feedstock as well as various silicon refining techniques. Impurities in the feedstock materials enter the silicon during the carbothermic reduction of quartz. The knowledge of the impurity distribution/removal in the feedstock and in the carbothermic reduction process is necessary for targeting less pure and cheaper raw materials.The aim of the present study is to investigate the impurity dist...

  12. Determination of Trace Iron in High Purity Sodium Fluoride by Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A method is described for the direct determination of iron in high purity sodium fluoride using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Interferences caused by the matrix are investigated. It is shown that the ashing temperature can be increased to 1 400°C and matrix interferences eliminated, the sensi tivity of iron increased in 1.27 fold by the addition of nickel nitrate. The method is applied to the determina tion of iron in sodium fluoride and satisfactory results are obtained.

  13. Aluminium. II - A review of deformation properties of high purity aluminium and dilute aluminium alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, R. P.

    1972-01-01

    The elastic and plastic deformation behavior of high-purity aluminum and of dilute aluminum alloys is reviewed. Reliable property data, including elastic moduli, elastic coefficients, tensile, creep, fatigue, hardness, and impact are presented. Single crystal tensile results are discussed. Rather comprehensive reference lists, containing publications of the past 20 years, are included for each of the above categories. Defect structures and mechanisms responsible for mechanical behavior are presented. Strengthening techniques (alloys, cold work, irradiation, quenching, composites) and recovery are briefly reviewed.

  14. Simultaneously Recovering High-Purity Chromium and Removing Organic Pollutants from Tannery Effluent

    OpenAIRE

    Jie Zong; Yan-Chun Li; Kang Hu

    2016-01-01

    Chromium pollution is a serious issue because of carcinogenic toxicities of the pollutants and low recovery rate of chromium because of the presence of organic, such as protein and fat. In this work, high recovery rate and high purity of the chromium ion were successfully prepared by the way of acid enzyme, flocculant, and Fenton oxidation. The experiments were characterized by TG, TOC, UV-VIS, and SEM. In the work, the tannery waste chrome liquor was used as experimental material. The result...

  15. Preparation and Characterization of High-Purity Metal Fluorides for Photonic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Photonics Technol. Lett., 4 446–8 (1992). 8D. F. Anderson, “ Cerium Fluoride – A Scintillator for High-Rate Applica- tions,” Nucl. Instrum. Meth. Phys... Cerium Doped Heavy Metal Fluoride Glasses, a Possible Alternative for Electromagnetic Calorimetry,” Instrum. Meth. Phys. Res. A, 380, 524–36 (1996). 10J...Preparation and Characterization of High-Purity Metal Fluorides for Photonic Applications* Wendy M. Patterson,‡,† Peter C. Stark,§ Thomas M. Yoshida

  16. Design of Antenna-on-Chip, Antenna-on-Package and Detectors from RF, Microwave to THz Frequency Range in SiGe-C Technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wane, S; Bardy, S.; Heijster, R.M.E.M. van; Goulet, F.; Gamand, P.

    2011-01-01

    Design solutions for on-chip signal detectors, Antenna-on- Chip and Antenna-on-Package (with Bond Wire elements), from RF, Microwave to THz frequency range, using state-of-theart SiGe BiCMOS technology are presented. Both CML and CMOS detectors are designed, fabricated and compared in terms of their

  17. Simple HPLC method for detection of trace ephedrine and pseudoephedrine in high-purity methamphetamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makino, Yukiko

    2012-03-01

    A simple and sensitive HPLC technique was developed for the qualitative determination of ephedrine and pseudoephedrine (ephedrines), used as precursors of clandestine d-methamphetamine hydrochloride of high purity. Good separation of ephedrines from bulk d-methamphetamine was achieved, without any extraction or derivatization procedure on a CAPCELLPACK C18 MGII (250 × 4.6 mm) column. The mobile phase consisted of 50 mM KH2 PO4-acetonitrile (94:6 v/v %) using an isocratic pump system within 20 min for detecting two analytes. One run took about 50 min as it was necessary to wash out overloaded methamphetamine for column conditioning. The analytes were detected by UV absorbance measurement at 210 nm. A sample (20 mg) was simply dissolved in 1 mL of water, and a 50 μL aliquot of the solution was injected into the HPLC. The detection limits for ephedrine and pseudoephedrine in bulk d-methamphetamine were as low as 3 ppm each. This analytical separation technique made it possible to detect ephedrine and/or pseudoephedrine in seven samples of high-purity d-methamphetamine hydrochloride seized in Japan. The presence of trace ephedrines in illicit methamphetamine may strongly indicate a synthetic route via ephedrine in methamphetamine profiling. This method is simple and sensitive, requiring only commonly available equipment, and should be useful for high-purity methamphetamine profiling.

  18. Development of Blocked-Impurity-Band-Type Ge Detectors Fabricated with the Surface-Activated Wafer Bonding Method for Far-Infrared Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanaoka, M.; Kaneda, H.; Oyabu, S.; Yamagishi, M.; Hattori, Y.; Ukai, S.; Shichi, K.; Wada, T.; Suzuki, T.; Watanabe, K.; Nagase, K.; Baba, S.; Kochi, C.

    2016-07-01

    We report the current status of the development of our new detectors for far-infrared (FIR) astronomy. We develop Blocked-Impurity-Band (BIB)-type Ge detectors to realize large-format compact arrays covering a wide FIR wavelength range up to 200 \\upmu m. We fabricated Ge junction devices of different physical parameters with a BIB-type structure, using the room temperature, surface-activated wafer bonding (SAB) method. We measured the absolute responsivity and the spectral response curve of each device at low temperatures, using an internal blackbody source in a cryostat and a Fourier transform spectrometer, respectively. The results show that the SAB Ge junction devices have significantly higher absolute responsivities and longer cut-off wavelengths of the spectral response than the conventional bulk Ge:Ga device. Based upon the results, we discuss the optimum parameters of SAB Ge junction devices for FIR detectors. We conclude that SAB Ge junction devices possess a promising applicability to next-generation FIR detectors covering wavelengths up to ˜ 200 \\upmu m with high responsivity. As a next step, we plan to fabricate a BIB-type Ge array device in combination with a low-power cryogenic readout integrated circuit.

  19. Neutrinoless double-{beta} decay of {sup 76}Ge: First results from the International Germanium Experiment (IGEX) with six isotopically enriched detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aalseth, C.E.; Avignone, F.T. III; Collar, J.I.; Hasenbalg, F. [University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina 29208 (United States); Brodzinski, R.L.; Hensley, W.K.; Miley, H.S.; Reeves, J.H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Garcia, E.; Gonzalez, D.; Morales, A.; Morales, J.; Ortiz de Solorzano, A.; Puimedon, J.; Salinas, A.; Sarsa, M.L.; Villar, J.A. [University of Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Kirpichnikov, I.V.; Starostin, A.S.; Vasenko, A.A. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, 117259 Moscow (Russia); Klimenko, A.A.; Osetrov, S.B.; Smolnikov, A.A.; Vasiliev, S.I. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Baksan Neutrino Observatory, 361609 Neutrino (Russia); Pogosov, V.S.; Tamanyan, A.G. [Yerevan Physical Institute, 375 036 Yerevan (Armenia)

    1999-04-01

    The International Germanium Experiment (IGEX) has six HPGe detectors, isotopically enriched to 86{percent} in {sup 76}Ge, containing approximately 90 active moles of {sup 76}Ge. Three detectors of 2 kg each operate in the Canfranc Underground Laboratory (Spain) with pulse-shape analysis electronics. One detector ({approximately}0.7 kg active volume) has been operating in the Baksan Low-Background Laboratory for several years, and two additional similar detectors will operate in Baksan. A maximum likelihood analysis of 74.84 active mole years of data yields a lower bound T{sub 1/2}{sup 0{nu}}{ge}0.8{times}10{sup 25}yr (90{percent} C.L.), corresponding to {l_angle}m{sub {nu}}{r_angle}{lt}(0.5{endash}1.5)eV, depending on the theoretical nuclear matrix elements used to extract the neutrino mass parameter. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  20. Searching for Dark Matter with the CoGeNT and C-4 Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kos, Mark

    2012-10-01

    Recently published CoGeNT data shows an excess of events at energies below 1.2 keV. The excess at low energies is compatible with light-WIMP nucleon scattering. While it is hard to imagine a background model to explain the spectral and temporal characteristics of the CoGeNT data, a thorough simulation of the external backgrounds is needed to quantify their contribution. In this analysis we simulate both external cavern neutrons and muon induced spallation events inside the CoGeNT shielding. We also model radioactive backgrounds from the shielding materials. The resulting background distributions are compared with the CoGeNT data and we discuss how closely the backgrounds resemble the CoGeNT data. We also discuss plans for the next larger generation of CoGeNT, C4. We will discuss the expected WIMP sensitivity of C4 and contrast to current dark matter experiments. We will also show how we plan to improve upon the CoGeNT design to lower the backgrounds for C4.

  1. Neutron induced background gamma activity in low-level Ge-spectroscopy systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovančević, N.; Krmar, M.; Mrda, D.; Slivka, J.; Bikit, I.

    2010-01-01

    Two high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors were located in two different passive shields: one in pre-WW II iron and the second in commercial low background lead. Gamma lines emitted after neutron capture, as well as after inelastic scattering on the germanium crystal were detected and then analyzed. The thermal and fast neutron fluxes were calculated and their values were compared for the two different kinds of detector shield. Several materials having different neutron slowing-down properties were packed in Marinelli geometry, positioned on the lead shielded detector and measured for around 10 6 s. The main goal was to estimate a possible influence of the sample on the intensity of the neutron induced Ge gamma lines. On the iron-shielded detector a massive (3 in. thick) NaI Compton suppression system showed a measurable activity from neutron capture and inelastic scattering on sodium and iodine nuclei.

  2. Búsqueda de charginos con el detector DELPHI de LEP a $E_{cm}=130 - 172 GeV$

    CERN Document Server

    Navas-Concha, S

    1997-01-01

    The goal of this work is the search for charginos using the data collected with the DELPHI detector at LEP during the years 1995~--~1996 at energies $ E_{cm} =$~130.4, 136.3, 161.4 and 172.4~GeV. In this thesis the methods used and the results obtained are described. This study has been performed within the theoretical framework of the Minimal Standard Supersymmetric Model (MSSM), assuming Grand Unification and $R$--parity conservation. Concerning the nature of the lightest supersymmetric particle, two cases have been treated: the ``NeutraliNO1LSP scenario'' and the ``Gravitino LSP scenario''.

  3. Measurement of Ruds and R between 3.12 and 3.72 GeV at the KEDR detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.V. Anashin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Using the KEDR detector at the VEPP-4M e+e− collider, we have measured the values of Ruds and R at seven points of the center-of-mass energy between 3.12 and 3.72 GeV. The total achieved accuracy is about or better than 3.3% at most of energy points with a systematic uncertainty of about 2.1%. At the moment it is the most accurate measurement of R(s in this energy range.

  4. Ultra-Fast Image Sensor Using Ge on Insulator MIS/Schottky Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-28

    14 m, respectively. These transitions result from the intraband transition of -doping well Fig. 7. The blueshift of the cutoff wavelength of the...m, respectively. The blueshift of the -QD sample may be due to the many body effect. The intraband transition in -doping quantum wells contributes...tively. The blueshift of the cutoff wavelength of the -SiGe01 sample is probably due to the additional quantum confinement of Si0.9Ge0.1 QW outside

  5. Verification tests of the GALLEX solar neutrino detector, with 71Ge produced in-situ from the beta-decay of 71As.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampel, W.; Handt, J.; Heusser, G.; Kaether, D.; Kiko, J.; Kirsten, T.; Laubenstein, M.; Neder, E.; Pernicka, E.; Rau, W.; Richter, H.; Ronn, U.; Schwan, U.; Wojcik, M.; Zakharov, Y.; von Ammon, R.; Ebert, K. H.; Fritsch, T.; Heidt, D.; Henrich, E.; Stieglitz, L.; Weirich, F.; Balata, M.; Hartmann, F. X.; Bellotti, E.; Cattadori, C.; Cremonesi, O.; Ferrari, N.; Fiorini, E.; Zanotti, L.; Altmann, M.; von Feilitzsch, F.; Mossbauer, R.; Berthomieu, G.; Schatzman, E.; Carmi, I.; Dostrovsky, I.; Bacci, C.; Belli, P.; Bernabei, R.; D'Angelo, S.; Paoluzi, L.; Cribier, M.; Rich, J.; Spiro, M.; Tao, C.; Vignaud, D.; Boger, J.; Hahn, R. L.; Rowley, J. K.; Stoenner, R. W.; Weneser, J.

    1998-09-01

    Previously, it was demonstrated that the GALLEX solar neutrino detector responds properly to low energy neutrinos, by exposing it to two intense 51Cr-neutrino sources; the recovery yield of the product 71Ge was reported to be 93%±8%. New experiments, in which known amounts of radioactive 71As have decayed to 71Ge in the full-scale gallium detector, strongly support this evidence. In several experiments, the gallium detector has been spiked with ≡105 71As atoms, under varying conditions of how the 71As was added (either carrier free, or with Ge carrier), how the gallium solution was mixed, and how long the 71Ge remained in the gallium. 71As decays by electron capture and positron emission to 71Ge, with a half life of 2.72 d. Hot atoms are produced by these decay modes with kinematics that mimic solar neutrino capture, although the 51Cr neutrino source provided a more perfect match. This relative disadvantage is offset by the much better statistics obtainable with the 71As. In all 71As experiments, the recovery of 71Ge from the gallium was 100%, with uncertainties of only ±1%. The combined results from the 51Cr sources and the 71As spikes rule out any loss mechanisms for 71Ge, including hot-atom chemical effects.

  6. Measurement of nuclear activity with Ge detectors and its uncertainty; Medicion de actividad nuclear con detectores de Ge y su incertidumbre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortes P, C.A

    1999-07-01

    The objective of this work is to analyse the influence magnitudes which affect the activity measurement of gamma transmitter isolated radioactive sources. They prepared by means of the gravimetric method, as well as, determining the uncertainty of such measurement when this is carried out with a gamma spectrometer system with a germanium detector. This work is developed in five chapters: In the first one, named Basic principles it is made a brief description about the meaning of the word Measurement and its implications and the necessaries concepts are presented which are used in this work. In the second chapter it is exposed the gravimetric method used for the manufacture of the gamma transmitter isolated radioactive sources, it is tackled the problem to determine the main influence magnitudes which affect in the measurement of their activity and the respective correction factors and their uncertainties are deduced. The third chapter describes the gamma spectrometry system which is used in this work for the measurement of the activity of isolated sources and also its performance and experimental arrangement that it is used. In the fourth chapter are applied the three previous items with the object of determining the uncertainty which would be obtained in the measurement of an isolated radioactive source elaborated with the gravimetric method in the experimental conditions less favourable predicted above the obtained results from the chapter two. The conclusions are presented in the fifth chapter and they are applied to establish the optimum conditions for the measurement of the activity of a gamma transmitter isolated radioactive source with a spectrometer with germanium detector. (Author)

  7. Impurity removal process for high-purity silica production by acid leaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezzaouia H.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In our days obtaining silica sand with very high purity is a primordial stage in photovoltaic industry. The effects of acids on the removal of impurity from silica sand have been studied using leaching acids: mixture composed of HF/HCl/H2O with a volume composition of (1:7:24.The obtained material was characterized using Ultraviolet-Visible absorbance (UV-Vis and Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES. Results of the application of this technique show a significant reduction of the amounts of undesirable impurities present in natural silica (such as Co, Fe, Ca, Al, Mg ….

  8. Formation and evolution of tweed structures on high-purity aluminum polycrystalline foils under cyclic tension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetsov, P. V., E-mail: kpv@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Vlasov, I. V. [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Sklyarova, E. A.; Smekalina, T. V. [National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    Peculiarities of formation and evolution of tweed structures on the surface of high-purity aluminum polycrystalline foils under cyclic tension were studied using an atom force microscope and a white light interferometer. Tweed structures of micron and submicron sizes were found on the foils at different number of cycles. In the range of 42,000 < N < 95,000 cycles destruction of tweed patterns is observed, which leads to their disappearance from the surface of the foils. Formation of tweed structures of various scales is discussed in terms of the Grinfeld instability.

  9. Formation and evolution of tweed structures on high-purity aluminum polycrystalline foils under cyclic tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, P. V.; Vlasov, I. V.; Sklyarova, E. A.; Smekalina, T. V.

    2015-10-01

    Peculiarities of formation and evolution of tweed structures on the surface of high-purity aluminum polycrystalline foils under cyclic tension were studied using an atom force microscope and a white light interferometer. Tweed structures of micron and submicron sizes were found on the foils at different number of cycles. In the range of 42,000 < N < 95,000 cycles destruction of tweed patterns is observed, which leads to their disappearance from the surface of the foils. Formation of tweed structures of various scales is discussed in terms of the Grinfeld instability.

  10. High-purity cobalt thin films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy prepared by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ootera, Yasuaki; Shimada, Takuya; Kado, Masaki; Quinsat, Michael; Morise, Hirofumi; Nakamura, Shiho; Kondo, Tsuyoshi

    2015-11-01

    A study of the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of high-purity cobalt thin films is described. The Co layer prepared by a thermal CVD technique with a Pt/Ta underlayer and a Pt cap layer shows a saturation magnetization (Ms) of ∼1.8 T and perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) with an anisotropy energy (Ku) of ∼105 J/m3. The cobalt thickness dependence of Ku reveals that the interfacial anisotropy at the Pt/Co interface is most likely the origin of the obtained PMA.

  11. Preparation of high-purity bismuth by sulphur deleadization in vacuum distillation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊利芝; 何则强; 刘文萍; 麻成金; 戴永年

    2004-01-01

    The feasibility of separation of impurities in refined bismuth and sulphur deleadization with vacuum distillation was studied theoretically. Experimental studies on sulphur deleadization were carried out under vacuum.The influences of amount of sulphur, distillation temperature, vacuum degree and distillation time on deleadization were investigated and an optimal technical condition was achieved. The content of lead in refined bismuth can be decreased from 30 μg/g to 0.21 μg/g, which has reached the level of "5N" high-purity bismuth. Other impurities in refined bismuth can be also removed effectively under certain conditions.

  12. Practical analysis of high purity chemicals--V. Precision silver chloride gravimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, K

    1971-09-01

    A reasonably simple gravimetric silver chloride procedure with fairly wide tolerance in conditions is presented in full detail with all critical steps and precautions delineated. The procedure allows the precision determination of chloride by analysts having limited expertise with exacting gravimetric methods, and can be performed with equipment common to nearly all laboratories and without dependence on a standard substance. The elapsed and actual working times for the assessment of a solid sample in triplicate are 65 and 10-12 hr respectively. The application of the procedure to the assay of some high-purity chloride salts and to the standardization of hydrochloric acid solutions is described.

  13. Development of twin Ge detector for high energy photon measurement and its performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shigetome, Yoshiaki; Harada, Hideo [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Works

    1998-03-01

    Prototype twin HPGe detector composed of two large HPGe crystals was developed to obtain better detection efficiency ({epsilon}) and P/T ratio, which was required for high energy photon spectroscopy. In this work, the performances of the twin HPGe detector were evaluated by computer simulation employing EGS4 code. (author)

  14. New constraints and discovery potential of sub-GeV dark matter with xenon detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Christopher

    2017-08-01

    Existing xenon dark matter (DM) direct detection experiments can probe the DM-nucleon interaction of DM with a sub-GeV mass through a search for photon emission from the recoiling xenon atom. We show that LUX's constraints on sub-GeV DM, which utilize the scintillation (S1) and ionization (S2) signals, are approximately 3 orders of magnitude more stringent than previous xenon constraints in this mass range, derived from the XENON10 and XENON100 S2-only searches. The new LUX constraints provide the most stringent direct detection constraints for DM particles with a mass below 0.5 GeV. In addition, the photon emission signal in LUX and its successor LZ maintain the discrimination between background and signal events so that an unambiguous discovery of sub-GeV DM is possible. We show that LZ has the potential to reconstruct the DM mass with ≃20 % accuracy for particles lighter than 0.5 GeV.

  15. Recovery of high purity sulfuric acid from the waste acid in toluene nitration process by rectification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kai; Meng, Qingqiang; Shu, Fan; Ye, Zhengfang

    2013-01-01

    Waste sulfuric acid is a byproduct generated from numerous industrial chemical processes. It is essential to remove the impurities and recover the sulfuric acid from the waste acid. In this study the rectification method was introduced to recover high purity sulfuric acid from the waste acid generated in toluene nitration process by using rectification column. The waste acid quality before and after rectification were evaluated using UV-Vis spectroscopy, GC/MS, HPLC and other physical and chemical analysis. It was shown that five nitro aromatic compounds in the waste acid were substantially removed and high purity sulfuric acid was also recovered in the rectification process at the same time. The COD was removed by 94% and the chrominance was reduced from 1000° to 1°. The recovered sulfuric acid with the concentration reaching 98.2 wt% had a comparable quality with commercial sulfuric acid and could be recycled back into the toluene nitration process, which could avoid waste of resources and reduce the environmental impact and pollution.

  16. Investigation of active slip systems in high purity single crystal niobium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baars, Derek

    The superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) community uses high purity niobium to manufacture SRF cavities for a variety of accelerator applications. Cavities are either made from large-grain sheets cut directly from the ingot and formed, or the ingot microstructure is broken down to form polycrystalline sheets or tubes. Reducing the number of costly electron beam welds to assemble the cavities is also desired. A greater understanding of the active slip systems and their relation to subsequent dislocation substructure would be of use in all these areas, to better understand how large grain niobium deforms and to develop more accurate computational models that will aid in the design and use of more cost-effective forming methods. Studies of slip in high-purity niobium suggest that temperature, material purity, and crystal orientation affect which slip systems are active during deformation, though have not examined the somewhat lesser purity niobium used for SRF cavities. As a step toward these goals, two sets of SRF-purity single crystal niobium samples were deformed to 40% strain in tension at room temperature. The first set was cut and welded back together. The second set consisted of deliberately orientated samples that resolved shear stress onto desired slip systems to evaluate different combinations of slip. Determining likely active slip systems was complex, though the evidence suggests that {112} slip may be dominant at yield at room temperature as suggested by theory, though {110} slip could not be ruled out.

  17. Recycling of high purity selenium from CIGS solar cell waste materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Anna M K; Foreman, Mark R StJ; Ekberg, Christian

    2014-10-01

    Copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) is a promising material in thin film solar cell production. To make CIGS solar cells more competitive, both economically and environmentally, in comparison to other energy sources, methods for recycling are needed. In addition to the generally high price of the material, significant amounts of the metals are lost in the manufacturing process. The feasibility of recycling selenium from CIGS through oxidation at elevated temperatures was therefore examined. During oxidation gaseous selenium dioxide was formed and could be separated from the other elements, which remained in solid state. Upon cooling, the selenium dioxide sublimes and can be collected as crystals. After oxidation for 1h at 800°C all of the selenium was separated from the CIGS material. Two different reduction methods for reduction of the selenium dioxide to selenium were tested. In the first reduction method an organic molecule was used as the reducing agent in a Riley reaction. In the second reduction method sulphur dioxide gas was used. Both methods resulted in high purity selenium. This proves that the studied selenium separation method could be the first step in a recycling process aimed at the complete separation and recovery of high purity elements from CIGS.

  18. Derivation of high purity neuronal progenitors from human embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Nistor

    Full Text Available The availability of human neuronal progenitors (hNPs in high purity would greatly facilitate neuronal drug discovery and developmental studies, as well as cell replacement strategies for neurodegenerative diseases and conditions, such as spinal cord injury, stroke, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, and Huntington's disease. Here we describe for the first time a method for producing hNPs in large quantity and high purity from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs in feeder-free conditions, without the use of exogenous noggin, sonic hedgehog or analogs, rendering the process clinically compliant. The resulting population displays characteristic neuronal-specific markers. When allowed to spontaneously differentiate into neuronal subtypes in vitro, cholinergic, serotonergic, dopaminergic and/or noradrenergic, and medium spiny striatal neurons were observed. When transplanted into the injured spinal cord the hNPs survived, integrated into host tissue, and matured into a variety of neuronal subtypes. Our method of deriving neuronal progenitors from hESCs renders the process amenable to therapeutic and commercial use.

  19. Device to generate high purity hydroxide solution in-line for ion chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masunaga, Hiroto; Higo, Yuji; Ishii, Mizuo; Maruyama, Noboru; Yamazaki, Shigeo

    2016-05-06

    Herein, we report a new device that generates a high-purity hydroxide solution in line. The device's container has three compartments that are isolated from each other by two cation exchange (CE) membranes. In each end of the container, an electrode is installed. The three compartments are filled with ion exchange resins. A bipolar boundary is a composite boundary comprising anion- and cation-exchangers. This device has two bipolar boundaries, which are used to separate the location of hydroxide solution generation from the location where water is electrolyzed. Therefore, it can produce high-purity hydroxide solutions that are free from gases and anionic impurities. The hydroxide solution is generated on the basis of an electrokinetic phenomenon at the surfaces of ion-exchange resins and membranes in an electric field; NaOH concentration can be controlled at rates from 0.01 to 100mM per 1mL/min by adjusting the electrical current (0-200mA) applied to the device. As the generated solution is used as an eluent for a suppressed anion chromatography, the electrical conductivity of the effluent from the suppressor is as low as that of ultra-pure water. Thus, the noise of the base-line electrical conductivity is improved, and so the detection limit of anions on the sub-ng/mL order can be achieved.

  20. Isolation of high-purity anthocyanin mixtures and monomers from blueberries using combined chromatographic techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Erlei; Yin, Yongguang; Xu, Caina; Liu, Jingbo

    2014-01-31

    Research on the isolation and preparation of anthocyanins has intensified in recent years because of the requirements of quantitative and bioactive analyses. However, simple and effective methods for the scale purification of pure anthocyanins from natural products are rarely reported. In this study, high-purity anthocyanin mixtures and monomers were successfully isolated from wild blueberries using a combination of column chromatography and semi-preparative HPLC. We established an effective elution system to separate high-purity anthocyanin mixtures with aqueous ethanol containing 0.01% HCl first in an Amberlite XAD-7HP column (ethanol/H2O=35:65) and then in a Sephadex LH-20 column (ethanol/H2O=25:75). Crude anthocyanin extracts were isolated using the Amberlite column, and a purity of 32% was obtained based on UV-vis analysis. Three fractions of anthocyanin mixtures were isolated from the crude extracts using the Sephadex column with purities ranging from 59% to 68%. Three pure monomeric anthocyanins of malvidin-3-O-glucoside, petunidin-3-O-glucoside, and delphinidin-3-O-glucoside were also isolated by semi-preparative HPLC and identified by HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS/MS. The purities of these anthocyanins were determined by analytical HPLC and estimated to be 97.7%, 99.3%, and 95.4%, respectively. The results of this study may help promote the purification of anthocyanins from most blueberry varieties as well as from other plant materials.

  1. Fused salt processing of impure plutonium dioxide to high-purity plutonium metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullins, L.J.; Christensen, D.C.; Babcock, B.R.

    1982-01-01

    A process for converting impure plutonium dioxide (approx. 96% pure) to high-purity plutonium metal (>99.9%) was developed. The process consists of reducing the oxide to an impure plutonium metal intermediate with calcium metal in molten calcium chloride. The impure intermediate metal is cast into an anode and electrorefined to produce high-purity plutonium metal. The oxide reduction step is being done now on a 0.6-kg scale with the resulting yield being >99.5%. The electrorefining is being done on a 4.0-kg scale with the resulting yield being 80 to 85%. The purity of the product, which averages 99.98%, is essentially insensitive to the purity of the feed metal. The yield, however, is directly dependent on the chemical composition of the feed. To date, approximately 250 kg of impure oxide has been converted to pure metal by this processing sequence. The availability of impure plutonium dioxide, together with the need for pure plutonium metal, makes this sequence a valuable plutonium processing tool.

  2. 3D Active Edge Silicon Detector Tests With 120 GeV Muons

    CERN Document Server

    Da Via, Cinzia; Hasi, Jasmine; Kenney, Christopher; Kok, Angela; Parker, Sherwood; Watts, Stephen; Anelli, Giovanni; Avati, Valentina; Bassetti, Valerio; Boccone, Vittorio; Bozzo, Marco; Eggert, Karsten; Ferro, Fabrizio; Inyakin, Alexandre; Kaplon, Jan; Lozano Bahilo, Julio; Morelli, Aldo; Niewiadomski, Hubert; Noschis, Elias; Oljemark, Fredrik; Oriunno, Marco; Österberg, Kenneth; Ruggiero, Gennaro; Snoeys, Walter; Tapprogge, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    3D detectors with electrodes penetrating through the silicon wafer and covering the edges were tested in the SPS beam line X5 at CERN in autumn 2003. Detector parameters including efficiency, signal-to-noise ratio, and edge sensitivity were measured using a silicon telescope as a reference system. The measured sensitive width and the known silicon width were equal within less than 10 mum.

  3. Prototyping and tests for an MRPC-based time-of-flight detector for 1 GeV neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yakorev, D. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), Dresden (Germany); Aumann, T. [GSI Helmholtz zentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Technische Universitaet Darmstadt (Germany); Bemmerer, D., E-mail: d.bemmerer@hzdr.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), Dresden (Germany); Boretzky, K. [GSI Helmholtz zentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Caesar, C. [GSI Helmholtz zentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Technische Universitaet Darmstadt (Germany); Ciobanu, M. [GSI Helmholtz zentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Cowan, T.; Elekes, Z. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), Dresden (Germany); Elvers, M. [Universitaet zu Koeln (Germany); Gonzalez Diaz, D. [GSI Helmholtz zentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Technische Universitaet Darmstadt (Germany); Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Hannaske, R. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), Dresden (Germany); Hehner, J.; Heil, M. [GSI Helmholtz zentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Kempe, M. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), Dresden (Germany); Maroussov, V. [Universitaet zu Koeln (Germany); Nusair, O. [GSI Helmholtz zentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Al Balqa' Applied University, Salt (Jordan); Simon, H. [GSI Helmholtz zentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Sobiella, M.; Stach, D.; Wagner, A. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), Dresden (Germany); and others

    2011-10-21

    The NeuLAND detector at the R{sup 3}B experiment at the future FAIR facility in Darmstadt aims to detect fast neutrons (0.2-1.0 GeV) with high time and spatial resolutions ({sigma}{sub t}<100ps,{sigma}{sub x,y,z}<1cm). This task can be performed either with a scintillator or based on the multigap resistive plate chamber (MRPC) technology. Here, prototyping and test for an MRPC-based solution are discussed. In order to reach 90% detection efficiency, the final detector must consist of 50 consecutive MRPC stacks. Each stack contains a 4 mm thick anode made of iron converter material, with an additional 4 mm of converter material between two stacks. The secondary charged particles stemming from hadronic interactions of the high energetic neutrons in the converter will be detected in the MRPCs. As part of the ongoing development effort, a number of prototypes for this detector have been developed and built. They have been tested in experiments with a single-electron beam with picosecond resolution at the superconducting linac ELBE (Dresden, Germany). The results of the tests are presented here, and an outlook is given.

  4. A multielement Ge detector with complete spectrum readout for x-ray fluorescence microprobe and microspectroscopy (abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivers, Mark L.; Sutton, Stephen R.; Rarback, Harvey

    1995-02-01

    Multielement Ge and Si(Li) detectors have been used in recent years to improve the increase count rate capability and to improve the solid-angle efficiency in fluorescence x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Such systems have typically been equipped with one or more single-channel analyzers (SCAs) for each detector element. Such SCA-based electronics are sufficient when only the counts in one or two well-resolved peaks are of interest. For the fluorescence (XRF) microprobe at beamline X-26A at the NSLS, SCA-based electronics were not a satisfactory solution for two reasons: (1) for XRF experiments, the entire fluorescence spectrum is required; (2) for micro-XAS studies of trace elements in complex systems, the fluorescence peak often sits on a significant background or partially overlaps another fluorescence peak, requiring software background subtraction or peak deconvolution. An electronics system which permits collection of the entire fluorescence spectrum from each detector element has been designed. The system is made cost-effective by the use of analog multiplexors, reducing the number of analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) and multichannel analyzers (MCAs) required. The system was manufactured by Canberra Industries and consists of: (1) a 13 element Ge detector (11 mm diameter detector elements), (2) 13 NIM spectroscopy amplifiers with programmable gains, (3) four analog multiplexors with maximum of eight inputs each, (4) four ADCs with programmable offsets and gains and 800 ns conversion time, and (5) two MCAs with Ethernet communications ports and two ADC inputs each. The amplifiers have shaping times which are adjustable from 0.5 to 12 μs. The analog multiplexors were modified to perform pileup rejection. The analog multiplexing does not significantly reduce the count rate capability of the system, even at the shortest amplifier shaping times. The average detector resolution is 170 eV at 12 μs shaping time and 200 eV at 4 μs shaping time. The maximum

  5. Theoretical investigation of tensile strained GeSn waveguide with Si₃N₄ liner stressor for mid-infrared detector and modulator applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingfang; Liu, Yan; Yan, Jing; Zhang, Chunfu; Hao, Yue; Han, Genquan

    2015-03-23

    We theoretically investigate a tensile strained GeSn waveguide integrated with Si₃N₄ liner stressor for the applications in mid-infrared (MIR) detector and modulator. A substantial tensile strain is induced in a 1 × 1 μm² GeSn waveguide by the expansion of 500 nm Si₃N₄ liner stressor and the contour plots of strain are simulated by the finite element simulation. Under the tensile strain, the direct bandgap E(G,Γ) of GeSn is significantly reduced by lowering the Γ conduction valley in energy and lifting of degeneracy of valence bands. Absorption coefficients of tensile strained GeSn waveguides with different Sn compositions are calculated. As the Si₃N₄ liner stressor expands by 1%, the cut-off wavelengths of tensile strained Ge(0.97)Sn(0.03), Ge(0.95)Sn(0.05), and Ge(0.90)Sn(0.10) waveguide photodetectors are extended to 2.32, 2.69, and 4.06 μm, respectively. Tensile strained Ge(0.90)Sn(0.10) waveguide electro-absorption modulator based on Franz-Keldysh (FK) effect is demonstrated in theory. External electric field dependence of cut-off wavelength and propagation loss of tensile strained Ge(0.90)Sn(0.10) waveguide is observed, due to the FK effect.

  6. Neutrinoless double-β decay of76Ge: First results from the International Germanium Experiment (IGEX) with six isotopically enriched detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalseth, C. E.; Avignone, F. T.; Brodzinski, R. L.; Collar, J. I.; Garcia, E.; González, D.; Hasenbalg, F.; Hensley, W. K.; Kirpichnikov, I. V.; Klimenko, A. A.; Miley, H. S.; Morales, A.; Morales, J.; Ortiz de Solórzano, A.; Osetrov, S. B.; Pogosov, V. S.; Puimedón, J.; Reeves, J. H.; Salinas, A.; Sarsa, M. L.; Smolnikov, A. A.; Starostin, A. S.; Tamanyan, A. G.; Vasenko, A. A.; Vasiliev, S. I.; Villar, J. A.

    1999-04-01

    The International Germanium Experiment (IGEX) has six HPGe detectors, isotopically enriched to 86% in 76Ge, containing approximately 90 active moles of 76Ge. Three detectors of 2 kg each operate in the Canfranc Underground Laboratory (Spain) with pulse-shape analysis electronics. One detector (~0.7 kg active volume) has been operating in the Baksan Low-Background Laboratory for several years, and two additional similar detectors will operate in Baksan. A maximum likelihood analysis of 74.84 active mole years of data yields a lower bound T0ν1/2>=0.8×1025 yr (90% C.L.), corresponding to <(0.5-1.5) eV, depending on the theoretical nuclear matrix elements used to extract the neutrino mass parameter.

  7. Fast-neutron induced background in LaBr{sub 3}:Ce detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiener, J., E-mail: Jurgen.Kiener@csnsm.in2p3.fr [Centre de Sciences Nucléaires et de Sciences de la Matière (CSNSM), CNRS-IN2P3 et Université Paris-Sud, 91405 Campus Orsay (France); Tatischeff, V.; Deloncle, I. [Centre de Sciences Nucléaires et de Sciences de la Matière (CSNSM), CNRS-IN2P3 et Université Paris-Sud, 91405 Campus Orsay (France); Séréville, N. de [Institut de Physique Nucléaire d' Orsay, CNRS-IN2P3 and Université Paris-Sud, 91406 Orsay (France); Laurent, P. [CEA/IRFU Service d' Astrophysique, Orme des Merisiers, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Laboratoire Astroparticules et Cosmologie (APC), 10, rue A. Domon et L. Duquet, 75205 Paris (France); Blondel, C. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/IRFU, Orme des Merisiers, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Chabot, M. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire d' Orsay, CNRS-IN2P3 and Université Paris-Sud, 91406 Orsay (France); Chipaux, R. [CEA/DMS/IRFU/SEDI, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Coc, A. [Centre de Sciences Nucléaires et de Sciences de la Matière (CSNSM), CNRS-IN2P3 et Université Paris-Sud, 91405 Campus Orsay (France); Dubos, S. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/IRFU, Orme des Merisiers, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Gostojic, A. [Centre de Sciences Nucléaires et de Sciences de la Matière (CSNSM), CNRS-IN2P3 et Université Paris-Sud, 91405 Campus Orsay (France); and others

    2015-10-21

    The response of a scintillation detector with a cylindrical 1.5-in. LaBr{sub 3}:Ce crystal to incident neutrons has been measured in the energy range E{sub n} = 2–12 MeV. Neutrons were produced by proton irradiation of a Li target at E{sub p} = 5–14.6 MeV with pulsed proton beams. Using the time-of-flight information between target and detector, energy spectra of the LaBr{sub 3}:Ce detector resulting from fast neutron interactions have been obtained at 4 different neutron energies. Neutron-induced γ rays emitted by the LaBr{sub 3}:Ce crystal were also measured in a nearby Ge detector at the lowest proton beam energy. In addition, we obtained data for neutron irradiation of a large-volume high-purity Ge detector and of a NE-213 liquid scintillator detector, both serving as monitor detectors in the experiment. Monte-Carlo type simulations for neutron interactions in the liquid scintillator, the Ge and LaBr{sub 3}:Ce crystals have been performed and compared with measured data. Good agreement being obtained with the data, we present the results of simulations to predict the response of LaBr{sub 3}:Ce detectors for a range of crystal sizes to neutron irradiation in the energy range E{sub n} = 0.5–10 MeV.

  8. The COMPASS sandwich veto detector and a first look at kaonic final states from a $\\pi^-$ (190 GeV} beam on a proton target

    CERN Document Server

    Schlüter, Tobias

    2011-01-01

    We introduce the sandwich veto detector that was built for the 2008 and 2009 hadron runs of the COMPASS experiment at CERN. During these beamtimes it was serving as a veto detector for neutral and charged particles outside the spectrometer acceptance, mostly thought to originate from reactions which excited the target. We also present first mass spectra from $\\pi^-(190\\,\\GeV) p \\to \\pi^- \\Kshort \\Kshort p$ that were measured in the 2008 hadron run.

  9. A rich detector with a sodium fluoride radiator:. pi. /K identification up to 3 GeV/c

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, R.; Guyonnet, J.L.; Giomataris, Y.; Petroff, P.; Seguinot, J.; Tocqueville, J.; Ypsilantis, T.

    1987-10-01

    The use of a single crystal of sodium fluoride (NaF) as a Cherenkov radiator has been investigated. Its transparency has been measured and found to be good for photon energies below 9.8 eV. Data on its index of refraction are well fitted to a single-pole Sellmeier resonance formula. These data allow a realistic Monte Carlo simulation of a proximity-focused ring imaging Cherenkov (RICH) system. The photon detector is a multiwire proportional chamber (MWPC) with pad readout. The photosensitive gases considered are tetrakis(dimethylamine)ethylene (TMAE) and triethylamine (TEA). The simulation shows that system having 10 cm radial thickness and 10% of a radiation length of material would identify pions and kaons below 3 GeV/c momentum. The pad dimensions required are about 5 mm /times/ 5 mm. 4 refs., 10 figs.

  10. Application of Thermodynamic Calculations to the Pyro-refining Process for Production of High Purity Bismuth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezbahul-Islam, Mohammad; Belanger, Frederic; Chartrand, Patrice; Jung, In-Ho; Coursol, Pascal

    2017-02-01

    The present work has been performed with the aim to optimize the existing process for the production of high purity bismuth (99.999 pct). A thermo-chemical database including most of the probable impurities of bismuth (Bi-X, X = Ag, Au, Al, Ca, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Pb, S, Sb, Sn, Si, Te, Zn) has been constructed to perform different thermodynamic calculations required for the refining process. Thermodynamic description for eight of the selected binaries, Bi-Ca, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, S, Sb, and Sn, has been given in the current paper. Using the current database, different thermodynamic calculations have been performed to explain the steps involved in the bismuth refining process.

  11. Effect of microplastic deformation on the electron ultrasonic absorption in high-purity molybdenum monocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal' -Val' , P.P.; Kaufmann, Kh.J.

    1983-03-01

    The low temperature (100-6 K) linear absorption of ultrasound (88 kHz) by high purity molybdenum single crystals have been studied. Both unstrained samples and samples sub ected to microplastic deformation (epsilon<=0.45%) were used. Unstrained samples displayed at T<30 K a rapid increase in the absorption with lowering temperature which is interpreted as an indication of electron viscosity due to electron-phonon collisions. After deformation this part of absorption disappeared. This seems to suggest that microplastic deformation brings about in the crystal a sufficiently large number of defects that can compete with phonons in restricting the electron mean free path. A low temperature dynamic annealing has been revealed in strained samples, that is almost complete recovery of the absorption nature under irradiation with high amplitude sound, epsilon/sub 0/ approximately 10/sup -4/, during 10 min, at 6 K. A new relaxation peak of absorption at 10 K has been found in strained samples.

  12. High Purity Tungsten Spherical Particle Preparation From WC-Co Spent Hard Scrap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Chulwoong

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten carbide-cobalt hard metal scrap was recycled to obtain high purity spherical tungsten powder by a combined hydrometallurgy and physical metallurgy pathway. Selective leaching of tungsten element from hard metal scrap occurs at solid / liquid interface and therefore enlargement of effective surface area is advantageous. Linear oxidation behavior of Tungsten carbide-cobalt and the oxidized scrap is friable to be pulverized by milling process. In this regard, isothermally oxidized Tungsten carbide-cobalt hard metal scrap was mechanically broken into particles and then tungsten trioxide particle was recovered by hydrometallurgical method. Recovered tungsten trioxide was reduced to tungsten particle in a hydrogen environment. After that, tungsten particle was melted and solidified to make a spherical one by RF (Ratio Frequency thermal plasma process. Well spherical tungsten micro-particle was successfully obtained from spent scrap. In addition to the morphological change, thermal plasma process showed an advantage for the purification of feedstock particle.

  13. Defects interaction processes in deformed high purity polycrystalline molybdenum at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambri, O.A., E-mail: olambri@fceia.unr.edu.ar [Laboratorio de Materiales, Escuela de Ingeniería Eléctrica, Centro de Tecnología e Investigación Eléctrica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Ingeniería y Agrimensura, Universidad Nacional de Rosario – CONICET, Avda. Pellegrini 250, (2000) Rosario (Argentina); Bonifacich, F.G. [Laboratorio de Materiales, Escuela de Ingeniería Eléctrica, Centro de Tecnología e Investigación Eléctrica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Ingeniería y Agrimensura, Universidad Nacional de Rosario – CONICET, Avda. Pellegrini 250, (2000) Rosario (Argentina); Bozzano, P.B. [Laboratorio de Microscopía Electrónica, Unidad de Actividad Materiales, Centro Atómico Constituyentes, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica e Instituto Sábato – Universidad Nacional de San Martín, Avda. Gral. Paz 1499, (1650) San Martín (Argentina); Zelada, G.I. [Laboratorio de Materiales, Escuela de Ingeniería Eléctrica, Centro de Tecnología e Investigación Eléctrica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Ingeniería y Agrimensura, Universidad Nacional de Rosario – CONICET, Avda. Pellegrini 250, (2000) Rosario (Argentina); and others

    2014-10-15

    Mechanical spectroscopy (damping and elastic modulus as a function of temperature) and transmission electron microscopy studies have been performed in high purity polycrystalline molybdenum plastically deformed to different values of tensile and torsion strain. Mechanical spectroscopy measurements were performed from room temperature up to 1285 K. A relaxation peak in polycrystalline molybdenum related to the movement of dislocations into lower energy configurations near grain boundaries has been discovered to appear around 1170 K. The activation energy of the peak is 4.2 eV ± 0.5 eV. This relaxation phenomenon involves the interaction between vacancies and mobile dislocations near the grain boundaries. It should be highlighted that this relaxation process is controlled by the arrangement of vacancies and dislocations which occur at temperature below 1070 K.

  14. Synthesis of Magnetite Nanoparticles by Top-Down Approach from a High Purity Ore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayan Priyadarshana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study attempts to synthesize magnetite nanoparticles from a high purity natural iron oxide ore found in Panvila, Sri Lanka, following a novel top-down approach. Powder X-Ray diffraction, elemental analysis, and chemical analysis data confirmed the ore to be exclusively magnetite with Fe2+ : Fe3+ ratio of 1 : 2. Surface modified magnetite nanoparticles were synthesized by destructuring of this ore using a top-down approach in the presence of oleic acid. These oleic acid coated nanoparticles were further dispersed in ethanol resulting in stable nanomagnetite dispersion. Interestingly, the nanoparticles demonstrated a spherical morphology with a particle size ranging from 20 to 50 nm. Magnetic force microscopic data was used to confirm the topography of the nanoparticles and to study the magnetic domain structure.

  15. Hot working of high purity Fe-C alloys in the {alpha}-range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montheillet, F; Le Coze, J, E-mail: montheil@emse.f [Ecole des Mines (SMS), CNRS UMR 5146, 158 cours Fauriel, 42023 Saint-Etienne Cedex 2 (France)

    2010-07-01

    The influence of carbon in solid solution on the stress-strain curves of {alpha}-iron was investigated using model alloys prepared from high purity iron. Uniaxial compression tests were carried out within the ferritic domain at temperatures between 700 and 880 {sup 0}C. Oscillating stress-strain curves observed at high temperatures and low strain rates indicate that discontinuous dynamic recrystallization takes place. The macroscopic strain rate sensitivities m and apparent activation energies Q associated with the flow stress are not significantly modified by carbon additions. By contrast, the 'mesoscopic' parameters h and r associated with strain hardening and dynamic recovery, respectively, are strongly dependent on the carbon content. Finally, an estimation of the grain boundary mobilities during dynamic recrystallization was carried out from the above rheological data.

  16. Role of deformation twins in static recrystallization kinetics of high-purity alpha titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Jong Woo; Lee, Taekyung; Hong, Seong-Gu; Lee, Yongmoon; Lee, Jeong Hun; Lee, Chong Soo

    2016-11-01

    The importance of deformation twins in static recrystallization kinetics of high-purity alpha titanium was investigated by carrying out thermal annealing tests of deformed materials in combination with electron-backscatterdiffraction- based microstructural analysis. Prior to thermal annealing, the material was compressed to a true strain of 0.22 along three directions to introduce different twinning characteristics. Our results showed that deformation twins substantially promoted the static recrystallization process by deepening the microstructural inhomogeneity induced by the formation of twin boundaries and twinning-induced crystallographic lattice reorientation. Twin morphology was also observed to be important because it influenced the extent of microstructural inhomogeneity. Intersecting twin morphology, caused by the activation of multiple twin variants, was more effective than parallel twin morphology, caused by the activation of a single twin variant (or a twin variant pair), because it gave rise to more twin boundaries, more twin boundary junctions (intersections, triple junctions, etc.), and greater in-grain crystallographic orientation spread.

  17. Annealing Behavior at Triple Junctions in High-Purity Aluminum After Slight Cold Rolling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Wenhong; Wang, Weiguo; Fang, Xiaoying; Qin, Congxiang

    2017-04-01

    High-purity polycrystalline aluminum samples with a typical grain size of approximately 30 μm were slightly cold-rolled with a thickness reduction of 15%, and then, off-line in situ electron backscatter diffraction was used to identify the annealing behavior at triple junctions during annealing at 400 °C. The results show that recrystallization nuclei are developed at some triple junctions during annealing. High-angle grain boundaries migrate from harder grains to softer grains at the triple junctions leading to the formation of nuclei. All such nuclei show Σ3 orientation relationships with the parent grains, and the bounded Σ3 boundaries are found to be incoherent. During further annealing, these nuclei are consumed by other growing grains, indicating that their presence is just a release of the strain concentration at the triple junctions.

  18. A Rapid and Cost-Effective Laser Based Synthesis of High Purity Cadmium Selenide Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondall, M A; Qahtan, Talal F; Dastageer, M A; Yamani, Z H; Anjum, D H

    2016-01-01

    A rapid and cost effective method is developed to synthesize high purity cadmium Selenide (CdSe) quantum dots in acetone medium using second harmonic of Nd:YAG nanosecond pulsed laser of 532 nm wavelength. The thermal agglomeration due the nanosecond pulse duration of the laser was successfully eliminated by using unfocussed laser beam and thereby providing a favorable conditions for the synthesis of quantum dots having the grain size of 3 nm. The morphological and optical characterizations like XRD, HRTEM, optical absorption of the synthesized CdSe quantum dots, reveal that the material possesses the similar characteristics of the one synthesized through cumbersome wet chemical methods. Relative to the CdSe bulk material, the synthesized CdSe quantum dots showed a blue shift in the measured band gap energy from near infrared spectral region to visible region, making this material very attractive for many solar energy harvesting applications like photo-catalysis and solar cells.

  19. All-fibre multiplexed source of high-purity heralded single photons

    CERN Document Server

    Francis-Jones, Robert J A; Mosley, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    Single photon sources based on spontaneous photon-pair generation have enabled pioneering experiments in quantum optics. However, their non-determinism presents a bottleneck to scaling up photonic and hybrid quantum-enhanced technologies. Furthermore, photon pairs are typically emitted into many correlated frequency modes, producing an undesirable mixed state on heralding. Here we present a complete fibre-integrated heralded single photon source that addresses both these difficulties simultaneously. We use active switching to provide a path to deterministic operation by multiplexing separate spontaneous sources, and dispersion engineering to minimise frequency correlation for high-purity single photon generation. All the essential elements -- nonlinear material with dispersion control, wavelength isolation, optical delay, and fast switching -- are incorporated in a low-loss alignment-free package that heralds photons in telecoms single-mode fibre. Our results demonstrate a scalable approach to delivering pure...

  20. Efficient single photon emission from a high-purity hexagonal boron nitride crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, L. J.; Pelini, T.; Waselowski, V.; Maze, J. R.; Gil, B.; Cassabois, G.; Jacques, V.

    2016-09-01

    Among a variety of layered materials used as building blocks in van der Waals heterostructures, hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) appears as an ideal platform for hosting optically active defects owing to its large band gap (˜6 eV ). Here we study the optical response of a high-purity hBN crystal under green laser illumination. By means of photon correlation measurements, we identify individual defects emitting a highly photostable fluorescence under ambient conditions. A detailed analysis of the photophysical properties reveals a high quantum efficiency of the radiative transition, leading to a single photon source with very high brightness (˜4 ×106 counts s-1). These results illustrate how the wide range of applications offered by hBN could be further extended to photonic-based quantum information science and metrology.

  1. Method of Preparation for High-Purity Nanocrystalline Anhydrous Cesium Perrhenate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Leszczyńska-Sejda

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper is devoted to the preparation of high-purity anhydrous nanocrystalline cesium perrhenate, which is applied in catalyst preparation. It was found that anhydrous cesium perrhenate with a crystal size <45 nm can be obtained using cesium ion sorption and elution using aqueous solutions of perrhenic acid with subsequent crystallisation, purification, and drying. The following composition of the as-obtained product was reported: 34.7% Cs; 48.6% Re and <2 ppm Bi; <3 ppm Zn; <2 ppm As; <10 ppm Ni; < 3 ppm Mg; <5 ppm Cu; <5 ppm Mo; <5 ppm Pb; <10 ppm K; <2 ppm Na; <5 ppm Ca; <3 ppm Fe.

  2. High Purity DNA Extraction with a SPE Microfluidic Chip Using KI as the Binding Salt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xing CHEN; Da Fu CUI; Chang Chun LIU

    2006-01-01

    Based on solid phase extraction method, a novel silicon-PDMS-glass microchip for high purity DNA extraction has been developed by using KI as the binding salt. The microfluidic chip fabricated by MEMS technology was composed of a silicon substrate with a coiled channel and a compounded PDMS-glass cover. With this microfluidic chip, the wall of the coiled channel was used as solid phase matrix for binding DNA and DNA was extracted by the fluxion of the binding buffer, washing buffer and elution buffer. KI as a substitute for guanidine, was used successfully as binding salt for purification DNA, obtaining higher purity of genomic DNA and about 13.9 ng DNA from 1 μL rat whole blood in 35 minutes.

  3. Crystallographic Analysis of Nucleation at Hardness Indentations in High-Purity Aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chaoling; Zhang, Yubin; Lin, Fengxiang; Wu, Guilin; Liu, Qing; Juul Jensen, Dorte

    2016-12-01

    Nucleation at Vickers hardness indentations has been studied in high-purity aluminum cold-rolled 12 pct. Electron channeling contrast was used to measure the size of the indentations and to detect nuclei, while electron backscattering diffraction was used to determine crystallographic orientations. It is found that indentations are preferential nucleation sites. The crystallographic orientations of the deformed grains affect the hardness and the nucleation potentials at the indentations. Higher hardness gives increased nucleation probabilities. Orientation relationships between nuclei developed at different indentations within one original grain are analyzed and it is found that the orientation distribution of the nuclei is far from random. It is suggested that it relates to the orientations present near the indentation tips which in turn depend on the orientation of the selected grain in which they form. Finally, possible nucleation mechanisms are briefly discussed.

  4. Annealing Behavior at Triple Junctions in High-Purity Aluminum After Slight Cold Rolling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Wenhong; Wang, Weiguo; Fang, Xiaoying; Qin, Congxiang

    2017-02-01

    High-purity polycrystalline aluminum samples with a typical grain size of approximately 30 μm were slightly cold-rolled with a thickness reduction of 15%, and then, off-line in situ electron backscatter diffraction was used to identify the annealing behavior at triple junctions during annealing at 400 °C. The results show that recrystallization nuclei are developed at some triple junctions during annealing. High-angle grain boundaries migrate from harder grains to softer grains at the triple junctions leading to the formation of nuclei. All such nuclei show Σ3 orientation relationships with the parent grains, and the bounded Σ3 boundaries are found to be incoherent. During further annealing, these nuclei are consumed by other growing grains, indicating that their presence is just a release of the strain concentration at the triple junctions.

  5. Status of Research on Application of High Purity Rare Earth Oxides in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Zhihong; Qiu Jufeng

    2004-01-01

    The solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is a high-efficient and environmentally friendly power generation system.The rare earth oxide materials are used extensively in the manufacturing of SOFC components.In particular, the CeO2doped with Gd2O3 or Sm2O3, lanthanide perovskite oxides are indispensable and key materials for developing the intermediate temperature SOFC.The research and development status of application of high purity rare earth oxides in SOFC was overviewed.The rare earth oxide-based and -doped materials were discussed for the SOFC components.Concerning the rare earth oxides applicable to SOFC, several topics were also pointed out for further researching and developing.

  6. High purity materials as targets for radioisotope production: Needs and challenges

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Shivarudrappa; K V Vimalnath

    2005-07-01

    Radionuclides have become powerful and indispensable tools in many endeavours of human activities, most importantly in medicine, industry, biology and agriculture, apart from R&D activities. Ready availability of radionuclides in suitable radiochemical form, its facile detection and elegant tracer concepts are responsible for their unprecedented use. Application of radioisotopes in medicine has given birth to a new branch, viz. nuclear medicine, wherein radioisotopes are used extensively in the diagnosis and treatment of variety of diseases including cancer. Artificial transmutation of an element employing thermal neutrons in a reactor or high energy particle accelerators (cyclotrons) are the routes of radioisotope production world over. Availability of high purity target materials, natural or enriched, are crucial for any successful radioisotope programme. Selection of stable nuclides in suitable chemical form as targets with desired isotopic and chemical purity are among the important considerations in radioisotope production. Mostly the oxide, carbonate or the metal itself are the preferred target forms for neutron activation in a research reactor. Chemical impurities, particularly from the elements of the same group, put a limitation on the purity of the final radioisotope product. Whereas the isotopic impurities result in the production of undesirable radionuclidic impurities, which affect their effective utilization. Isotope Group, BARC, is in the forefront of radioisotope production and supply in the country, meeting demands for gamut of radioisotope applications indigenously for over four decades now. Radioisotopes such as 131I, 99Mo, 32P, 51Cr, 153Sm, 82Br, 203Hg, 198Au etc are produced in TBq quantities every month and supplied to several users and to Board of Radiation and Isotope Technology (BRIT). Such a large production programme puts a huge demand on the reliable sources of availability of high purity target materials which are at present mostly met

  7. Preparation and characterization of (10)B boric acid with high purity for nuclear industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weijiang; Liu, Tianyu; Xu, Jiao

    2016-01-01

    Boric acid is often added into coolant as neutron capture agent for pressurized water reactor, whose amount is influenced by its abundance and purity. Therefore, the preparation of enriched (10)B boric acid with high purity is beneficial to nuclear industry. (10)B is also used in developing tumor-specific boronated drugs in boron neutron capture therapy. The boronated drug can be administered to patient intravenously, intratumorally, or deposited at tumor site in surgical excision. Thus, enriched (10)B boric acid is of practical significance in the field of medicine. Self-made boron trifluoride-methanol-complex solution was selected as one of the experimental reagents, and the preparation of (10)B acid was realized by one-step reaction for the complexes with water and calcium chloride. The determination of electrical conductivity in reaction process proves that the optimum reaction time was 16-20 h. Furthermore, the effect of reaction time, ratio of calcium chloride to complex as well as the amount of water on the purity and yield of boric acid was investigated. Finally, the optimum reaction time was 20 h, the optimal solid-liquid ratio (molar ratio) was 3:1, and the amount of water was 1 L of deionized water for each mol of the complex. H2O2 was added in the reaction process to remove Fe(2+). After recrystallization, IR spectra of (10)B boric acid was measured and compared with standard to verify the product of boric acid. The feasibility of the preparation method was determined by the detection of XRD of boric acid. To observe the morphology by polarizing microscope, crystal structure was obtained. The purity of the final product is 99.95 %, and the yield is 96.47 %. The ion concentration of boric acid accords with the national standard of high purity, which was determined by ICP.

  8. High purity polyimide analysis by solid sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Rafael F.; Carvalho, Gabriel S.; Duarte, Fabio A.; Bolzan, Rodrigo C.; Flores, Erico M. M.

    2017-03-01

    In this work, Cr, Cu, Mn, Na and Ni were determined in high purity polyimides (99.5%) by solid sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (SS-GFAAS) using Zeeman effect background correction system with variable magnetic field, making possible the simultaneous measurement at high or low sensitivity. The following analytical parameters were evaluated: pyrolysis and atomization temperatures, feasibility of calibration with aqueous solution, linear calibration range, sample mass range and the use of chemical modifier. Calibration with aqueous standard solutions was feasible for all analytes. No under or overestimated results were observed and up to 10 mg sample could be introduced on the platform for the determination of Cr, Cu, Mn, Na and Ni. The relative standard deviation ranged from 3 to 20%. The limits of detection (LODs) achieved using the high sensitivity mode were as low as 7.0, 2.5, 1.7, 17 and 0.12 ng g- 1 for Cr, Cu, Mn, Na and Ni, respectively. No addition of chemical modifier was necessary, except for Mn determination where Pd was required. The accuracy was evaluated by analyte spike and by comparison of the results with those obtained by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry after microwave-assisted digestion in a single reaction chamber system and also by neutron activation analysis. No difference among the results obtained by SS-GFAAS and those obtained by alternative analytical methods using independent techniques. SS-GFAAS method showed some advantages, such as the determination of metallic contaminants in high purity polyimides with practically no sample preparation, very low LODs, calibration with aqueous standards and determination in a wide range of concentration.

  9. An empirical formula for the efficiency detection of Ge detectors for cylindrical radioactive sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfassi, Z.B. [Department of Nuclear Engineering Ben Gurion University, Il-84105 Beer Sheva (Israel)]. E-mail: alfassi@bgu.ac.il; Groppi, F. [LASA, Universita degli Studi and INFN of Milano, Laboratory of Radiochemistry, via F.lli Cervi 201, 20090 Segrate (Italy)

    2007-05-01

    An empirical equation was developed for the count rate of a cylindrical radioactive source by an HPGe detector as a function of the volume and the height of the source. The equation can be used to calculate the height of the cylinder, which will yield maximum count rate for a known volume of environmental source.

  10. Monte Carlo simulation of background characteristics of a HPGe detector operating underground in the Gran Sasso National Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breier, R; Laubenstein, M; Povinec, P P

    2017-08-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of background components of an ultra-low background high purity germanium (HPGe) detector operating in a deep underground laboratory was carried out. The results show that the background of the HPGe detector is about two orders of magnitude higher than the MC prediction when accounting only for cosmic-ray induced background. The difference is due to natural radioactivity in the parts surrounding the Ge detector. To get reasonable agreement between MC simulations and the experiment, a contamination in the parts surrounding the Ge crystal from (40)K, (208)Tl and (214)Bi of 0.1mBqkg(-1) was required to include in the simulations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. ATLAS experiment first 900 GeV Collision Events in Stable-Beam Conditions with Inner Detector Fully Powered, December 6, 2009

    CERN Multimedia

    the ATLAS experiment; Neal Hartman; Phil Owen; Joao Pequenao

    2009-01-01

    On Sunday morning, December 6th, 2009, the LHC achieved for the first time 900 GeV collisions under stable-beam conditions. This allowed ATLAS to fully ramp the high voltage of the inner most pixel and silicon-strip tracking detectors.

  12. A tracking detector to study O(1 GeV) νμ CC interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardini, P.; Cecchini, S.; Cindolo, F.; D'Antone, I.; Degli Esposti, L.; Lax, I.; Mandrioli, G.; Marsella, G.; Mauri, N.; Pasqualini, L.; Patrizii, L.; Pozzato, M.; Sirri, G.; Surdo, A.; Tenti, M.

    2017-03-01

    A tracking system composed of planes of triangular shape scintillator bars coupled to Silicon PhotoMultipliers in analog mode read-out has been developed for applications in neutrino experiments. A spatial resolution of O(1 mm) is required for the determination of momentum and charge of muons produced in νμ CC interactions at few GeV energy scale. The performance of the system has been studied by exposing it to charged particle beams at the CERN-PS. Preliminary results are discussed.

  13. Si based mid-infrared GeSn photo detectors and light emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Wei; Pham, Thach; Margetis, Joe; Tran, Huong; Ghetmiri, Seyed A.; Mosleh, Aboozar; Sun, Greg; Soref, Richard A.; Tolle, John; Naseem, Hameed A.; Li, Baohua; Yu, Shui-Qing

    2015-08-01

    In this work, high performance GeSn photoconductor and light emitting diodes (LED) have been demonstrated. For the photoconductor, the high responsivity was achieved due to high photoconductive gain, which is attributed to the novel optical and electrical design. The longwave cutoff at 2.4 μm was also observed at room temperature. For LED, temperature-dependent study was conducted. The electroluminescence (EL) spectra at different temperatures were obtained and EL peak shift was observed. Moreover, the emission power at different temperatures was measured. High power emission at 2.1 μm was achieved.

  14. A neutron dose detector with REM response to 1 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, R.K.; Krebs, G.F.; Smith, A.R. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Hsu, H.H. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

    1992-07-01

    The limitation of current remmeters, which do not measure neutron dose equivalents above about 15 MeV, is a serious problem at high-energy accelerator facilities, where a much wider range of neutron energies exist. The purpose of this work was to measure the response of a modified Anderson-Braun (A-B) remmeter to neutron energies up to 1 GeV. The modifications to the standard A-B remmeter were based on the experimental results of Pb(n,xn) reactions.

  15. Fast-neutron induced background in LaBr3:Ce detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Kiener, J; Deloncle, I; de Séréville, N; Laurent, P; Blondel, C; Chabot, M; Chipaux, R; Coc, A; Dubos, S; Gostojic, A; Goutev, N; Hamadache, C; Hammache, F; Horeau, B; Limousin, O; Ouichaoui, S; Prévot, G; Rodríguez-Gasén, R; Yavahchova, M S

    2015-01-01

    The response of a scintillation detector with a cylindrical 1.5-inch LaBr3:Ce crystal to incident neutrons has been measured in the energy range En = 2-12 MeV. Neutrons were produced by proton irradiation of a Li target at Ep = 5-14.6 MeV with pulsed proton beams. Using the time-of-flight information between target and detector, energy spectra of the LaBr3:Ce detector resulting from fast neutron interactions have been obtained at 4 different neutron energies. Neutron-induced gamma rays emitted by the LaBr3:Ce crystal were also measured in a nearby Ge detector at the lowest proton beam energy. In addition, we obtained data for neutron irradiation of a large-volume high-purity Ge detector and of a NE-213 liquid scintillator detector, both serving as monitor detectors in the experiment. Monte-Carlo type simulations for neutron interactions in the liquid scintillator, the Ge and LaBr3:Ce crystals have been performed and compared with measured data. Good agreement being obtained with the data, we present the resul...

  16. Ionizing Radiation Detectors Based on Ge-Doped Optical Fibers Inserted in Resonant Cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saverio Avino

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of ionizing radiation (IR is a crucial issue in different areas of interest, from environmental safety and industrial monitoring to aerospace and medicine. Optical fiber sensors have recently proven good candidates as radiation dosimeters. Here we investigate the effect of IR on germanosilicate optical fibers. A piece of Ge-doped fiber enclosed between two fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs is irradiated with gamma radiation generated by a 6 MV medical linear accelerator. With respect to other FBG-based IR dosimeters, here the sensor is only the bare fiber without any special internal structure. A near infrared laser is frequency locked to the cavity modes for high resolution measurement of radiation induced effects on the fiber optical parameters. In particular, we observe a variation of the fiber thermo-optic response with the radiation dose delivered, as expected from the interaction with Ge defect centers, and demonstrate a detection limit of 360 mGy. This method can have an impact in those contexts where low radiation doses have to be measured both in small volumes or over large areas, such as radiation therapy and radiation protection, while bare optical fibers are cheap and disposable.

  17. Status of the Germanium Detector Array (GERDA) in the search of neutrinoless ββ decays of 76Ge at LNGS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönert, S.; Abt, I.; Altmann, M.; Bakalyarov, A. M.; Barabanov, I.; Bauer, C.; Bauer, M.; Bellotti, E.; Belogurov, S.; Belyaev, S. T.; Bettini, A.; Bezrukov, L.; Brudanin, V.; Bolotsky, V. P.; Caldwell, A.; Cattadori, C.; Chirchenko, M. V.; Chkvorets, O.; Demidova, E.; di Vacri, A.; Eberth, J.; Egorov, V.; Farnea, E.; Gangapshev, A.; Gasparro, J.; Grabmayr, P.; Grigoriev, G. Y.; Gurentsov, V.; Gusev, K.; Hampel, W.; Heusser, G.; Heisel, M.; Hofmann, W.; Hult, M.; Inzhechik, L. V.; Jochum, J.; Junker, M.; Katulina, S.; Kiko, J.; Kirpichnikov, I. V.; Klimenko, A.; Knapp, M.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Kochetov, O.; Kornoukhov, V. N.; Kröninger, K.; Kuzminov, V. V.; Laubenstein, M.; Lebedev, V. I.; Liu, X.; Majorovits, B.; Marissens, G.; Nemchenok, I.; Pandola, L.; Peiffer, P.; Pullia, A.; Alvarez, C. R.; Sandukovsky, V.; Scholl, S.; Schreiner, J.; Schwan, U.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Simgen, H.; Smolnikov, A.; Stelzer, F.; Tikhomirov, A. V.; Tomei, C.; Ur, C. A.; Vasenko, A. A.; Vasiliev, S.; Weißhaar, D.; Wojcik, M.; Yanovich, E.; Yurkowski, J.; Zhukov, S. V.; Zocca, F.; Zuzel, G.

    2006-12-01

    The Germanium Detector Array (GERDA) in the search for neutrinoless ββ decays of 76Ge at LNGS will operate bare germanium diodes enriched in 76Ge in an (optional active) cryogenic fluid shield to investigate neutrinoless ββ decay with a sensitivity of T 1/2 > 2 × 1026 yr after an exposure of 100 kg yr. Recent progress includes the installation of the first underground infrastructures at Gran Sasso, the completion of the enrichment of 37.5 kg of germanium material for detector construction, prototyping of low-mass detector support and contacts, and front-end and DAQ electronics, as well as the preparation for construction of the cryogenic vessel and water tank.

  18. Analysis of the dead layer of a detector of germanium with code ultrapure Monte Carlo SWORD-GEANT; Analisis del dead layer de un detector de germanio ultrapuro con el codigo de Monte Carlo SWORDS-GEANT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallardo, S.; Querol, A.; Ortiz, J.; Rodenas, J.; Verdu, G.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper the use of Monte Carlo code SWORD-GEANT is proposed to simulate an ultra pure germanium detector High Purity Germanium detector (HPGe) detector ORTEC specifically GMX40P4, coaxial geometry. (Author)

  19. Investigation of applicability of high purity tetraaminenickel(II perrhenate to Re-Ni alloy powder production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Majewski

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a method for preparation of high purity tetraaminenickel(II perrhenate is presented. This method comprises reacting of a concentrated solution of ammonia water with high purity anhydrous nickel(II perrhenate(VII. The resulting tetraaminenickel(II perrhenate is reduced under dissociated ammonia conditions, to obtain Re-Ni alloy powder. The article also provides information on selected physicochemical properties of the produced powder. Such Re-Ni alloy powder can be applied for tungsten heavy alloys production. Keywords: tetraaminenickel(II perrhenate, reduction, heavy alloys, rhenium

  20. Effect of SiO2 coating in bolometric Ge light detectors for rare event searches

    CERN Document Server

    Beeman, J W; Giuliani, A; Mancuso, M; Pessina, G; Plantevin, O; Rusconi, C

    2012-01-01

    In germanium-based light detectors for scintillating bolometers, a SiO$_2$ anti-reflective coating is often applied on the side of the germanium wafer exposed to light with the aim to improve its light collection efficiency. In this paper, we report about a measurement, performed in the temperature range 25-35 mK, of the light-collection increase obtained thanks to this method, which resulted to be of the order of 20%. The procedure followed has been carefully selected in order to minimize systematic effects. The employed light sources have the same spectral features (peaking at $\\sim 630$ nm wavelength) that will characterise future neutrinoless double beta decay experiments on the isotope $^{82}$Se and based on ZnSe crystals, such as LUCIFER. The coupling between source and light detector reproduces the configuration used in scintillating bolometers. The present measurement clarifies the role of SiO$_2$ coating and describes a method and a set-up that can be extended to the study of other types of coatings ...

  1. Effect of microplastic deformation on the electron ultrasonic absorption in high-purity molybdenum monocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal' -Val' , P.P. (AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kharkov. Fiziko-Tekhnicheskij Inst. Nizkikh Temperatur); Kaufmann, Kh.J. (Akademie der Wissenschaften der DDR, Berlin)

    1983-03-01

    The low temperature (100-6 K) linear absorption of ultrasound (88 kHz) by high purity molybdenum single crystals have been studied. Both unstrained samples and samples subjected to microplastic deformation (epsilon<=0.45%) were used. Unstrained samples displayed at T<30 K a rapid increase in the absorption with lowering temperature which is interpreted as an indication of electron viscosity due to electron-phonon collisions. After deformation this part of absorption disappeared. This seems to suggest that microplastic deformation brings about in the crystal a sufficiently large number of defects that can compete with phonons in restricting the electron mean free path. A low temperature ''dynamic annealing'' has been revealed in strained samples, that is, almost complete recovery of the absorption nature under irradiation with high amplitude sound, epsilon/sub 0/ approximately 10/sup -4/, during 10 min, at 6 K. A new relaxation peak of absorption at 10 K has been found in strained samples.

  2. Simultaneously Recovering High-Purity Chromium and Removing Organic Pollutants from Tannery Effluent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromium pollution is a serious issue because of carcinogenic toxicities of the pollutants and low recovery rate of chromium because of the presence of organic, such as protein and fat. In this work, high recovery rate and high purity of the chromium ion were successfully prepared by the way of acid enzyme, flocculant, and Fenton oxidation. The experiments were characterized by TG, TOC, UV-VIS, and SEM. In the work, the tannery waste chrome liquor was used as experimental material. The results showed that the percentage of reduction of TOC in the tannery waste chrome liquor by method of Fenton oxidation, acid enzyme, and the flocculant was 71.15%, 65.26%, and 22.05%, respectively. Therefore, the organism content of chrome tanning waste liquid was greatly reduced through the pretreatment. And the application experiment showed that the properties and grain surface and fibers of the tanned leather with commercial chromium powder and chrome tanning agent prepared from the chromium waste liquid treated with Fenton are nearly the same.

  3. Determination of nitrogen monoxide in high purity nitrogen gas with an atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, K.

    1985-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometric (API-MS) method was studied for the determination of residual NO in high purity N2 gas. The API-MS is very sensitive to NO, but the presence of O2 interferes with the NO measurement. Nitrogen gas in cylinders as sample gas was mixed with NO standard gas and/or O2 standard gas, and then introduced into the API-MS. The calibration curves of NO and O2 has linearity in the region of 0 - 2 ppm, but the slopes changed with every cylinder. The effect of O2 on NO+ peak was additive and proportional to O2 concentration in the range of 0 - 0.5 ppm. The increase in NO+ intensity due to O2 was (0.07 - 0.13)%/O2, 1 ppm. Determination of NO and O2 was carried out by the standard addition method to eliminate the influence of variation of slopes. The interference due to O2 was estimated from the product of the O2 concentration and the ratio of slope A to Slope B. Slope A is the change in the NO+ intensity with the O2 concentration. Slope B is the intensity with O2 concentration.

  4. Electrical properties of as-grown and proton-irradiated high purity silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krupka, Jerzy, E-mail: krupka@imio.pw.edu.pl [Institute of Microelectronics and Optoelectronics, Warsaw University of Technology, Koszykowa 75, 00-662 Warsaw (Poland); Karcz, Waldemar [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Kamiński, Paweł [Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, Wólczyńska 13, 301-919 Warsaw (Poland); Jensen, Leif [Topsil Semiconductor Materials A/S, Siliciumvej 1, DK-3600 Frederikssund (Denmark)

    2016-08-01

    The complex permittivity of as-grown and proton-irradiated samples of high purity silicon obtained by the floating zone method was measured as a function of temperature at a few frequencies in microwave spectrum by employing the quasi TE{sub 011} and whispering gallery modes excited in the samples under test. The resistivity of the samples was determined from the measured imaginary part of the permittivity. The resistivity was additionally measured at RF frequencies employing capacitive spectroscopy as well as in a standard direct current experiment. The sample of as-grown material had the resistivity of ∼85 kΩ cm at room temperature. The sample irradiated with 23-MeV protons had the resistivity of ∼500 kΩ cm at 295 K and its behavior was typical of the intrinsic material at room and at elevated temperatures. For the irradiated sample, the extrinsic conductivity region is missing and at temperatures below 250 K hopping conductivity occurs. Thermal cycle hysteresis of the resistivity for the sample of as-grown material is observed. After heating and subsequent cooling of the sample, its resistivity decreases and then slowly (∼50 h) returns to the initial value.

  5. Interaction between a high purity magnesium surface and PCL and PLA coatings during dynamic degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Song, Yang; Zhang, Shaoxiang; Li, Jianan; Zhao, Changli; Zhang, Xiaonong

    2011-04-01

    In this study, polycaprolactone (PCL) and polylactic acid (PLA) coatings were prepared on the surface of high purity magnesium (HPMs), respectively, and electrochemical and dynamic degradation tests were used to investigate the degradation behaviors of these polymer-coated HPMs. The experimental results indicated that two uniform and smooth polymer films with thicknesses between 15 and 20 µm were successfully prepared on the HPMs. Electrochemical tests showed that both PCL-coated and PLA-coated HPMs had higher free corrosion potentials (E(corr)) and smaller corrosion currents (I(corr)) in the modified simulated body fluid (m-SBF) at 37 °C, compared to those of the uncoated HPMs. Dynamic degradation tests simulating the flow conditions in coronary arteries were carried out on a specific test platform. The weight of the specimens and the pH over the tests were recorded to characterize the corrosion performance of those samples. The surfaces of the specimens after the dynamic degradation tests were also examined. The data implied that there was a special interaction between HPM and its polymer coatings during the dynamic degradation tests, which undermined the corrosion resistance of the coated HPMs. A model was proposed to illustrate the interaction between the polymer coatings and HPM. This study also suggested that this reciprocity may also exist on the implanted magnesium stents coated with biodegradable polymers, which is a potential obstacle for the further development of drug-eluting magnesium stents.

  6. Abridged acid-base wet-milling synthesis of high purity hydroyapatite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandi Carolina Ruiz-Mendoza

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available There is a plethora of routes to produce hydroxyapatite(HA and in general calcium phosphates(CP but production usually leads to a mixture of several phases. Besides ionic contamination, most of these methods are cumbersome, restricted to small volumes of product and require a lot of thermal energy. The acid-base route eliminates foreign ions or additives and its only byproduct is water. Heterogeneous reaction drawback is that solid reactants do not easily come in contact with each other and therefore addition and stirring times become very lengthy and still the product is a mixture. The synthesis started from calcium hydroxide and phosphoric acid (PA. Ball milling was used to favor kinetics and stoichiometry. Six sets of PA addition, paddle stirring and ball milling times were used. Products were evaluated by X ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X ray fluorescence (XRF and Ca/P ratio. Chemical analysis for calcium proceeded through oxalate precipitate and phosphorus by the phosphomolibdate technique. A set of conditions yielding high purity HA was established.

  7. Hydrogen in-situ refining method for preparing high purity gadolinium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Guoling [Beijing National Laboratory of Molecular Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Materials Chemistry and Applications, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Department of Materials Physics and Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, NO. 30, Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100083 (China); Li, Li [Beijing National Laboratory of Molecular Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Materials Chemistry and Applications, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Fu, Kai [Beijing National Laboratory of Molecular Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Materials Chemistry and Applications, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Department of Materials Physics and Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, NO. 30, Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100083 (China); Wang, Chongyun [Department of Materials Physics and Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, NO. 30, Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100083 (China); Zheng, Jie [Beijing National Laboratory of Molecular Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Materials Chemistry and Applications, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Xu, Li [State Grid Smart Grid Research Institute, Future Science& Technology Park, Changping, Beijing 102211 (China); Tian, Wenhuai [Department of Materials Physics and Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, NO. 30, Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100083 (China); Li, Xingguo, E-mail: xgli@pku.edu.cn [Beijing National Laboratory of Molecular Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Materials Chemistry and Applications, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2015-11-05

    The removal of non-metallic impurities, especially oxygen and nitrogen, from the rare-earth metal gadolinium (Gd) is challenging, due to their strong affinity to Gd metal. Herein we present an effective approach to prepare high purity Gd via a novel hydrogen in-situ refining method. The final concentrations of oxygen and nitrogen could be reduced to 30 and 19 mass ppm, respectively. The changes of lattice parameters were derived from XRD; enthalpy values and gaseous speciation associated with the gas–solid physiochemical reactions were determined through a combination of DSC/MS measurements and thermodynamic calculations. The results show that oxygen and nitrogen can be efficiently removed by degassing Gd with dissolved hydrogen. The underlying mechanism for the refinement is discussed systematically in this paper. - Highlights: • Hydrogen can shuttle gadolinium freely at high temperature. • The concentration of O and N dropped to 30 ppm and 19 ppm, respectively. • The hydrogen content could finally decrease to 17 ppm. • Hydrogen, water and ammonia signals can be detected successfully. • This method is environment friendly and no other recontaminations.

  8. Optimization of extraction of high purity all-trans-lycopene from tomato pulp waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poojary, Mahesha M; Passamonti, Paolo

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this work was to optimize the extraction of pure all-trans-lycopene from the pulp fractions of tomato processing waste. A full factorial design (FFD) consisting of four independent variables including extraction temperature (30-50 °C), time (1-60 min), percentage of acetone in n-hexane (25-75%, v/v) and solvent volume (10-30 ml) was used to investigate the effects of process variables on the extraction. The absolute amount of lycopene present in the pulp waste was found to be 0.038 mg/g. The optimal conditions for extraction were as follows: extraction temperature 20 °C, time 40 min, a solvent composition of 25% acetone in n-hexane (v/v) and solvent volume 40 ml. Under these conditions, the maximal recovery of lycopene was 94.7%. The HPLC-DAD analysis demonstrated that, lycopene was obtained in the all-trans-configuration at a very high purity grade of 98.3% while the amount of cis-isomers and other carotenoids were limited.

  9. Synthesis of high-purity Ti2AlN ceramic by hot pressing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Ming; CHEN Yan-lin; MEI Bing-chu; ZHU Jiao-qun

    2008-01-01

    High-purity Ti2AlN ceramic was prepared at 1300 ℃ by hot pressing(HP) of Ti/Al/TiN powders in stoichiometric proportion. The sintered product was characterized using X-ray diffraction(XRD) and MDI Jade 5.0 software (Materials Data Inc, Liverpool, CA). Scanning electron microscopy(SEM) and electron probe micro-analysis(EPMA) coupled with energy-dispersive spectroscopy(EDS) were utilized to investigate the morphology characteristics. The results show that Ti2AlN phase is well-developed with a close and lamellar structure. The grains are plate-like with the size of 3-5 μm, thickness of 8-10 μm and elongated dimension. The density of Ti2AlN is measured to be 4.22 g/cm3, which reaches 97.9% of its theory value. The distribution of Ti2AlN grains is homogeneous.

  10. Determination of halogens and sulfur in high-purity polyimide by IC after digestion by MIC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzyzaniak, Sindy R; Santos, Rafael F; Dalla Nora, Flavia M; Cruz, Sandra M; Flores, Erico M M; Mello, Paola A

    2016-09-01

    In this work, a method for sample preparation of high-purity polyimide was proposed for halogens and sulfur determination by ion chromatography (IC) with conductivity detection and, alternatively, by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). A relatively high polyimide mass (600mg) was completely digested by microwave-induced combustion (MIC) using 20bar of O2 and 50mmolL(-1) NH4OH as absorbing solution. These conditions allowed final solutions with low carbon content (IC and ICP-MS. The accuracy was evaluated using a certified reference material of polymer for Cl, Br and S and spike recovery experiments for all analytes. No statistical difference (t-test, 95% of confidence level) was observed between the results obtained for Cl, Br and S by IC after MIC and the certified values. In addition, spike recoveries obtained for F, Cl, Br, I and S ranged from 94% to 101%. The proposed method was suitable for polyimide decomposition for further determination of halogens and sulfur by IC and by ICP-MS (Br and I only). Taking into account the lack of methods and the difficulty of bringing this material into solution, MIC can be considered as a suitable alternative for the decomposition of polyimide for routine quality control of halogens and sulfur using IC or ICP-MS.

  11. Preparation and Characterization of High Purity Enriched10B Boric Acid via Anti-Solvent Recrystallization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张卫江; 刘天雨; 徐姣

    2016-01-01

    Self-made enriched10B boric acid as raw material was purified by recrystallization. The effects of final crystallization temperature, crystallization time, stirring speed, crystallization frequency and other factors on the purity were investigated. The appropriate operating condition was that the final crystallization temperature and time were 5,℃and 10 h respectively under a low-speed stirring for crystallizing twice, which would make the purity and yield of boric acid reach 99.94% and 95.36%, respectively. Taking this as foundation, recrystallization process was optimized with acetone as anti-solvent, whose amount was the most important index. The boric acid solution was added into acetone and recrystallized under the same condition, and the purity and yield of boric acid would reach 99.98% and 99.61%, respectively. The product detected by XRD was confirmed as boric acid crystal. Main ion concentration in the product was detected by ICP, which basically met the national standard of high purity. Crystal morphology of boric acid was observed by SEM.

  12. Characterization of high purity lycopene from tomato wastes using a new pressurized extraction approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naviglio, Daniele; Caruso, Tonino; Iannece, Patrizia; Aragòn, Alejandro; Santini, Antonello

    2008-08-13

    In this paper, a method for the extraction of high purity lycopene from tomato wastes is presented. The method is based on a pressurized extraction that uses the Extractor Naviglio, and it is performed in the 0.7-0.9 MPa range. Tomato skin, the byproduct deriving from manufacturing of tomato, in a water dispersion, are used as starting material. Lycopene is transferred, for the effect of the high pressure used, in the form of molecular aggregates into the water as a dispersion, while apolar compounds remain in the matrix. The aggregates are easily purified in a single subsequent step by using methanol, thus, obtaining lycopene at 98% chromatographic purity or higher. A new stationary phase, phenyl-hexyl silicone, and a simple water/acetonitrile gradient were used for HPLC analysis of lycopene. The extract was characterized by UV-Vis spectrophotometry, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. An average recovery of 2.8 mg lycopene/kg tomato waste can be obtained after 4 hours of extraction and using tap water as the extracting liquid. The recovery percentage was of about 10%. The exhausted tomato byproduct can be easily dried and used in agriculture or as feeding for animals.

  13. Influence of Ta Content in High Purity Niobium on Cavity Performance Preliminary Results*

    CERN Document Server

    Kneisel, P

    2004-01-01

    In a previous paper* a program designed to study the influence of the residual tantalum content on the superconducting properties of pure niobium metal for RF cavities was outlined. The main rationale for this program was based on a potential cost reduction for high purity niobium, if a less strict limit on the chemical specification for Ta content, which is not significantly affecting the RRR–value, could be tolerated for high performance cavities. Four ingots with different Ta contents have been melted and transformed into sheets. In each manufacturing step the quality of the material has been monitored by employing chemical analysis, neutron activation analysis, thermal conductivity measurements and evaluation of the mechanical properties. The niobium sheets have been scanned for defects by an eddy current device. From three of the four ingots—Ta contents 100, 600 and 1,200 wppm—two single cell cavities each of the CEBAF variety have been fabricated and a series of tests on each ...

  14. Recovery of high-purity metallic Pd from Pd(II)-sorbed biosorbents by incineration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Sung Wook; Lim, Areum; Yun, Yeoung-Sang

    2013-06-01

    This work reports a direct way to recover metallic palladium with high purity from Pd(II)-sorbed polyethylenimine-modified Corynebacterium glutamicum biosorbent using a combined method of biosorption and incineration. This study is focused on the incineration part which affects the purity of recovered Pd. The incineration temperature and the amount of Pd loaded on the biosorbent were considered as major factors in the incineration process, and their effects were examined. The results showed that both factors significantly affected the enhancement of the recovery efficiency and purity of the recovered Pd. SEM-EDX and XRD analyses were used to confirm that Pd phase existed in the ash. As a result, the recovered Pd was changed from PdO to zero-valent Pd as the incineration temperature was increased from 600 to 900°C. Almost 100% pure metallic Pd was recovered with recovery efficiency above 99.0% under the conditions of 900°C and 136.9 mg/g.

  15. MIS High-Purity Plutonium Oxide Metal Oxidation Product TS707001 (SSR123): Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veirs, Douglas Kirk [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Stroud, Mary Ann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Berg, John M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Narlesky, Joshua Edward [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Worl, Laura Ann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Martinez, Max A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Carillo, Alex [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-08-09

    A high-purity plutonium dioxide material from the Material Identification and Surveillance (MIS) Program inventory has been studied with regard to gas generation and corrosion in a storage environment. Sample TS707001 represents process plutonium oxides from several metal oxidation operations as well as impure and scrap plutonium from Hanford that are currently stored in 3013 containers. After calcination to 950°C, the material contained 86.98% plutonium with no major impurities. This study followed over time, the gas pressure of a sample with nominally 0.5 wt% water in a sealed container with an internal volume scaled to 1/500th of the volume of a 3013 container. Gas compositions were measured periodically over a six year period. The maximum observed gas pressure was 138 kPa. The increase over the initial pressure of 80 kPa was primarily due to generation of nitrogen and carbon dioxide gas in the first six months. Hydrogen and oxygen were minor components of the headspace gas. At the completion of the study, the internal components of the sealed container showed signs of corrosion, including pitting.

  16. Doping inorganic ions to regulate bioactivity of Ca-P coating on bioabsorbable high purity magnesium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongliu Wu; Xiaonong Zhang; Ruopeng Zhang; Xiao Li; Jiahua Ni; Changli Zhao; Yang Song; Jiawei Wang; Shaoxiang Zhang; Yufeng Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Performance of biomaterials was strongly affected by their surface properties and could be designed artificially to meet specific biomedical requirements. In this study, F-(F), SiO42-(Si), or HCO3-(C)-doped Ca–P coatings were fabricated by biomimetic deposition on the surface of biodegradable high-purity magnesium (HP Mg). The crystalline phases, morphologies and compositions of Ca–P coatings had been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The biomineralization and corrosion resistance of doped Ca–P coatings had also been investigated. The results showed that the Ca–P coating with or without doped elements mainly contained the plate-like dicalcium phosphate dehydrate (DCPD) phase. The doped F, Si, or C changed the surface morphology of Ca–P coatings after mineralization. Doped F enhanced the mineralization of Ca–P coating, and doped Si retarded the mineralization of Ca–P coating. However, H2 evolution of HP Mg discs with different Ca–P coatings was close to 0.4–0.7 ml/cm2 after two-week immersion. That meant that the corrosion resistance of the Ca–P coatings with different or without doped elements did not change significantly.

  17. A solvent-extraction module for cyclotron production of high-purity technetium-99m.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Petra; Boschi, Alessandra; Cicoria, Gianfranco; Uccelli, Licia; Pasquali, Micòl; Duatti, Adriano; Pupillo, Gaia; Marengo, Mario; Loriggiola, Massimo; Esposito, Juan

    2016-12-01

    The design and fabrication of a fully-automated, remotely controlled module for the extraction and purification of technetium-99m (Tc-99m), produced by proton bombardment of enriched Mo-100 molybdenum metallic targets in a low-energy medical cyclotron, is here described. After dissolution of the irradiated solid target in hydrogen peroxide, Tc-99m was obtained under the chemical form of (99m)TcO4(-), in high radionuclidic and radiochemical purity, by solvent extraction with methyl ethyl ketone (MEK). The extraction process was accomplished inside a glass column-shaped vial especially designed to allow for an easy automation of the whole procedure. Recovery yields were always >90% of the loaded activity. The final pertechnetate saline solution Na(99m)TcO4, purified using the automated module here described, is within the Pharmacopoeia quality control parameters and is therefore a valid alternative to generator-produced (99m)Tc. The resulting automated module is cost-effective and easily replicable for in-house production of high-purity Tc-99m by cyclotrons.

  18. Investigation of a direction sensitive sapphire detector stack at the 5 GeV electron beam at DESY-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karacheban, O.; Afanaciev, K.; Hempel, M.; Henschel, H.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J. L.; Levy, I.; Lohmann, W.; Schuwalow, S.

    2015-08-01

    Extremely radiation hard sensors are needed in particle physics experiments to instrument the region near the beam pipe. Examples are beam halo and beam loss monitors at the Large Hadron Collider, FLASH or XFEL. Currently artificial diamond sensors are widely used. In this paper single crystal sapphire sensors are considered as a promising alternative. Industrially grown sapphire wafers are available in large sizes, are of low cost and, like diamond sensors, can be operated without cooling. Here we present results of an irradiation study done with sapphire sensors in a high intensity low energy electron beam. Then, a multichannel direction-sensitive sapphire detector stack is described. It comprises 8 sapphire plates of 1 cm2 size and 525 μ m thickness, metallized on both sides, and apposed to form a stack. Each second metal layer is supplied with a bias voltage, and the layers in between are connected to charge-sensitive preamplifiers. The performance of the detector was studied in a 5 GeV electron beam. The charge collection efficiency measured as a function of the bias voltage rises with the voltage, reaching about 10% at 095 V. The signal size obtained from electrons crossing the stack at this voltage is about 02200 e, where e is the unit charge. The signal size is measured as a function of the hit position, showing variations of up to 20% in the direction perpendicular to the beam and to the electric field. The measurement of the signal size as a function of the coordinate parallel to the electric field confirms the prediction that mainly electrons contribute to the signal. Also evidence for the presence of a polarisation field was observed.

  19. High-purity isolation of anthocyanins mixtures from fruits and vegetables--a novel solid-phase extraction method using mixed mode cation-exchange chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jian; Giusti, M Monica

    2011-11-04

    Research on biological activity of anthocyanins requires the availability of high purity materials. However, current methods to isolate anthocyanins or anthocyanin mixtures are tedious and expensive or insufficient for complete isolation. We applied a novel cation-exchange/reversed-phase combination solid-phase extraction (SPE) technique, and optimized the use of water/organic buffer mobile phases to selectively separate anthocyanins. Crude extracts of various representative anthocyanin sources were purified with this technique and compared to 3 commonly used SPE techniques: C(18), HLB, and LH-20. Purified anthocyanin fractions were analyzed with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled to photodiode array (PDA) and mass spectrometry (MS) detectors and by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The UV-visible chromatograms quantitatively demonstrated that our novel technique achieved significantly higher (Panthocyanin purity than the C(18) cartridge, the next best method, for 11 of the 12 anthocyanin sources tested. Among them, eight were purified to greater than 99% purity (based on UV-visible chromatograms). The new method efficiently removed non-anthocyanin phenolics. MS and FT-IR results semi-quantitatively confirmed extensive reduction of impurities. Due to strong ionic interaction, our sorbent capacity was superior to others, resulting in the highest throughput and least use of organic solvents. This new methodology for isolation of anthocyanin mixtures drastically increased purity and efficiency while maintaining excellent recovery rate and low cost. The availability of high purity anthocyanin mixtures will facilitate anthocyanin studies and promote the application of anthocyanins in the food and nutraceutical industries.

  20. Measurement of the running of the fine structure constant below 1 GeV with the KLOE detector

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    Precision physics requires appropriate inclusion of higher order effects and the knowledge of very precise input parameters of the electroweak Standard Model. One of the basic input parameters is the effective QED coupling constant α(s) which depends on the energy scale because of charge screening by vacuum polarization. Hadronic non-perturbative effects limits the accuracy of α(s) from low energy to the Z mass scale. We present the measurement of the running of the QED coupling constant in the time-like region 0.6 < √s < 0.975 GeV with the KLOE detector at DAΦNE , using the ISR differential cross section dσ(e+e− → μ+μ− γ)/d√s. The result shows a clear contribution of the ρ−ω resonances to the photon propagator with a significance of the hadronic contribution to the running of α(s) of more than 5σ. It represents the first measurement of th...

  1. Measurement of the running of the fine structure constant below 1 GeV with the KLOE Detector

    CERN Document Server

    :,; Babusci, D; Bencivenni, G; Berlowski, M; Bloise, C; Bossi, F; Branchini, P; Budano, A; Balkeståhl, L Caldeira; Cao, B; Ceradini, F; Ciambrone, P; Curciarello, F; Czerwiński, E; D'Agostini, G; Dané, E; De Leo, V; De Lucia, E; De Santis, A; De Simone, P; Di Cicco, A; Di Domenico, A; Di Salvo, R; Domenici, D; D'Uffizi, A; Fantini, A; Felici, G; Fiore, S; Gajos, A; Gauzzi, P; Giardina, G; Giovannella, S; Graziani, E; Happacher, F; Heijkenskjöld, L; Johansson, T; Kamińska, D; Krzemien, W; Kupsc, A; Loffredo, S; Lukin, P A; Mandaglio, G; Martini, M; Mascolo, M; Messi, R; Miscetti, S; Morello, G; Moricciani, D; Moskal, P; Papenbrock, M; Passeri, A; Patera, V; del Rio, E Perez; Ranieri, A; Santangelo, P; Sarra, I; Schioppa, M; Silarski, M; Sirghi, F; Tortora, L; Venanzoni, G; Wiślicki, W; Wolke, M; Jegerlehner, F

    2016-01-01

    We have measured the running of the effective QED coupling constant $\\alpha(s)$ in the time-like region $0.6<\\sqrt s< 0.975$ GeV with the KLOE detector at DA$\\Phi$NE using the Initial State Radiation process $e^+e^-\\to\\mu^+ \\mu^-\\gamma$. It represents the first measurement of the running of $\\alpha(s)$ in this energy region. Our results show a more than 5$\\sigma$ significance of the hadronic contribution to the running of $\\alpha(s)$, which is the strongest direct evidence both in time- and space-like regions achieved in a single measurement. By using the $e^+e^-\\to\\pi^+\\pi^-$ cross section measured by KLOE, the real and imaginary part of the shift $\\Delta\\alpha(s)$ has been extracted. By a fit of the real part of $\\Delta\\alpha(s)$ and assuming the lepton universality the branching ratio $BR(\\omega\\to\\mu^+\\mu^-) = (6.6\\pm1.4_{stat}\\pm1.7_{syst})\\cdot 10^{-5} $ has been determined.

  2. Measurement of the running of the fine structure constant below 1 GeV with the KLOE detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Anastasi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available We have measured the running of the effective QED coupling constant α(s in the time-like region 0.6GeV with the KLOE detector at DAΦNE using the Initial-State Radiation process e+e−→μ+μ−γ. It represents the first measurement of the running of α(s in this energy region. Our results show a more than 5σ significance of the hadronic contribution to the running of α(s, which is the strongest direct evidence both in time- and space-like regions achieved in a single measurement. By using the e+e−→π+π− cross section measured by KLOE, the real and imaginary parts of the shift Δα(s have been extracted. From a fit of the real part of Δα(s and assuming the lepton universality the branching ratio BR(ω→μ+μ−=(6.6±1.4stat±1.7syst⋅10−5 has been determined.

  3. High-Purity Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: A Key Enabling Material in Emerging Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Jacques; Ding, Jianfu; Li, Zhao; Finnie, Paul; Lopinski, Gregory; Malenfant, Patrick R L

    2017-09-13

    Semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (sc-SWCNTs) are emerging as a promising material for high-performance, high-density devices as well as low-cost, large-area macroelectronics produced via additive manufacturing methods such as roll-to-roll printing. Proof-of-concept demonstrations have indicated the potential of sc-SWCNTs for digital electronics, radiofrequency circuits, radiation hard memory, improved sensors, and flexible, stretchable, conformable electronics. Advances toward commercial applications bring numerous opportunities in SWCNT materials development and characterization as well as fabrication processes and printing technologies. Commercialization in electronics will require large quantities of sc-SWCNTs, and the challenge for materials science is the development of scalable synthesis, purification, and enrichment methods. While a few synthesis routes have shown promising results in making near-monochiral SWCNTs, gram quantities are available only for small-diameter sc-SWCNTs, which underperform in transistors. Most synthesis routes yield mixtures of SWCNTs, typically 30% metallic and 70% semiconducting, necessitating the extraction of sc-SWCNTs from their metallic counterparts in high purity using scalable postsynthetic methods. Numerous routes to obtain high-purity sc-SWCNTs from raw soot have been developed, including density-gradient ultracentrifugation, chromatography, aqueous two-phase extraction, and selective DNA or polymer wrapping. By these methods (termed sorting or enrichment), >99% sc-SWCNT content can be achieved. Currently, all of these approaches have drawbacks and limitations with respect to electronics applications, such as excessive dilution, expensive consumables, and high ionic impurity content. Excess amount of dispersant is a common challenge that hinders direct inclusion of sc-SWCNTs into electronic devices. At present, conjugated polymer extraction may represent the most practical route to sc-SWCNTs. By the use of

  4. Raman and photoelectron spectroscopic investigation of high-purity niobium materials: Oxides, hydrides, and hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nageshwar; Deo, M. N.; Nand, Mangla; Jha, S. N.; Roy, S. B.

    2016-09-01

    We present investigations of the presence of oxides, hydrides, and hydrocarbons in high-purity (residual resistivity ratio, ˜300) niobium (Nb) materials used in fabrication of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities for particle accelerators. Raman spectroscopy of Nb materials (as-received from the vendor as well as after surface chemical- and thermal processing) revealed numerous peaks, which evidently show the presence of oxides (550 cm-1), hydrides (1277 and 1385 cm-1: ˜80 K temperature), and groups of hydrocarbons (1096, 2330, 2710, 2830, 2868, and 3080 cm-1). The present work provides direct spectroscopic evidence of hydrides in the electropolished Nb materials typically used in SRF cavities. Raman spectroscopy thus can provide vital information about the near-surface chemical species in niobium materials and will help in identifying the cause for the performance degradation of SRF cavities. Furthermore, photoelectron spectroscopy was performed on the Nb samples to complement the Raman spectroscopy study. This study reveals the presence of C and O in the Nb samples. Core level spectra of Nb (doublet 3d5/2 and 3d3/2) show peaks near 206.6 and 209.4 eV, which can be attributed to the Nb5+ oxidation state. The core level spectra of C 1 s of the samples are dominated by graphitic carbon (binding energy, 284.6 eV), while the spectra of O 1 s are asymmetrically peaked near binding energy of ˜529 eV, and that indicates the presence of metal-oxide Nb2O5. The valence-band spectra of the Nb samples are dominated by a broad peak similar to O 2p states, but after sputtering (for 10 min) a peak appears at ˜1 eV, which is a feature of the elemental Nb atom.

  5. High-purity 3D nano-objects grown by focused-electron-beam induced deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdoba, Rosa; Sharma, Nidhi; Kölling, Sebastian; Koenraad, Paul M.; Koopmans, Bert

    2016-09-01

    To increase the efficiency of current electronics, a specific challenge for the next generation of memory, sensing and logic devices is to find suitable strategies to move from two- to three-dimensional (3D) architectures. However, the creation of real 3D nano-objects is not trivial. Emerging non-conventional nanofabrication tools are required for this purpose. One attractive method is focused-electron-beam induced deposition (FEBID), a direct-write process of 3D nano-objects. Here, we grow 3D iron and cobalt nanopillars by FEBID using diiron nonacarbonyl Fe2(CO)9, and dicobalt octacarbonyl Co2(CO)8, respectively, as starting materials. In addition, we systematically study the composition of these nanopillars at the sub-nanometer scale by atom probe tomography, explicitly mapping the homogeneity of the radial and longitudinal composition distributions. We show a way of fabricating high-purity 3D vertical nanostructures of ˜50 nm in diameter and a few micrometers in length. Our results suggest that the purity of such 3D nanoelements (above 90 at% Fe and above 95 at% Co) is directly linked to their growth regime, in which the selected deposition conditions are crucial for the final quality of the nanostructure. Moreover, we demonstrate that FEBID and the proposed characterization technique not only allow for growth and chemical analysis of single-element structures, but also offers a new way to directly study 3D core-shell architectures. This straightforward concept could establish a promising route to the design of 3D elements for future nano-electronic devices.

  6. Evaluation of Prebiotic Effects of High-Purity Galactooligosaccharides in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki Bae Hong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Galactooligosaccharides (GOS are an important class of dietary prebiotics that exert beneficial effects on intestinal microbiota and gut barrier function. In this study, high-purity GOS (HP-GOS were investigated in vitro and in vivo and confirmed as prebiotic ingredients in rat diet. HP-GOS were successfully produced using a two-step process, enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation by yeast. They were found to serve as a good substrate and carbon source for supporting the growth of probiotic bacteria more effectively than other commercial GOS. Following administration of 1 % (by mass of HP-GOS to rats, the growth of Bifidobacterium bifidum and B. longum in the gut increased most rapidly up to 12 h, and thereafter the increase was slow. Therefore, 1 % HP-GOS was found to be acceptable for the growth of probiotic bacteria. Groups of animals that were orally administered HP-GOS and bifidobacteria during the study, and the group administered HP-GOS during the 2nd (days 13–15 and 4th (days 28–30 period of the study had significantly (p<0.05 higher numbers of bifidobacteria in faeces than groups receiving a single dose of bifidobacteria. HP-GOS affected the expression of genes encoding glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 and peptide YY (PYY. There was a significant upregulation of GLP-1 and PYY mRNA with HP-GOS and bifidobacteria intake. We propose that the prebiotic properties of HP-GOS are potentially valuable for the production of functional foods for human consumption.

  7. Porous and mesh alumina formed by anodization of high purity aluminum films at low anodizing voltage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abd-Elnaiem, Alaa M., E-mail: alaa.abd-elnaiem@science.au.edu.eg [KACST-Intel Consortium Center of Excellence in Nano-manufacturing Applications (CENA), Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Assiut University, Assiut 71516 (Egypt); Mebed, A.M. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Assiut University, Assiut 71516 (Egypt); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Al-Jouf University, Sakaka 2014 (Saudi Arabia); El-Said, Waleed Ahmed [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Assiut University, Assiut 71516 (Egypt); Abdel-Rahim, M.A. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Assiut University, Assiut 71516 (Egypt)

    2014-11-03

    Electrochemical oxidation of high-purity aluminum (Al) films under low anodizing voltages (1–10) V has been conducted to obtain anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) with ultra-small pore size and inter-pore distance. Different structures of AAO have been obtained e.g. nanoporous and mesh structures. Highly regular pore arrays with small pore size and inter-pore distance have been formed in oxalic or sulfuric acids at different temperatures (22–50 °C). It is found that the pore diameter, inter-pore distance and the barrier layer thickness are independent of the anodizing parameters, which is very different from the rules of general AAO fabrication. The brand formation mechanism has been revealed by the scanning electron microscope study. Regular nanopores are formed under 10 V at the beginning of the anodization and then serve as a template layer dominating the formation of ultra-small nanopores. Anodization that is performed at voltages less than 5 V leads to mesh structured alumina. In addition, we have introduced a simple one-pot synthesis method to develop thin walls of oxide containing lithium (Li) ions that could be used for battery application based on anodization of Al films in a supersaturated mixture of lithium phosphate and phosphoric acid as matrix for Li-composite electrolyte. - Highlights: • We develop anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) with small pore size and inter-pore distance. • Applying low anodizing voltages onto aluminum film leads to form mesh structures. • The value of anodizing voltage (1–10 V) has no effect on pore size or inter-pore distance. • Applying anodizing voltage less than 5 V leads to mesh structured AAO. • AAO can be used as a matrix for Li-composite electrolytes.

  8. Study of the process $e^+e^-\\to\\omega\\eta\\pi^0$ in the energy range $\\sqrt{s} <2$ GeV with the SND detector

    CERN Document Server

    Achasov, M N; Barnyakov, A Yu; Beloborodov, K I; Berdyugin, A V; Berkaev, D E; Bogdanchikov, A G; Botov, A A; Dimova, T V; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kardapoltsev, L V; Kharlamov, A G; Koop, I A; Korol, A A; Kovrizhin, D P; Koshuba, S V; Kupich, A S; Lysenko, A P; Melnikova, N A; Martin, K A; Pakhtusova, E V; Obrazovsky, A E; Perevedentsev, E A; Rogovsky, Yu A; Serednyakov, S I; Silagadze, Z K; Shatunov, Yu M; Shatunov, P Yu; Shtol, D A; Skrinsky, A N; Surin, I K; Tikhonov, Yu A; Usov, Yu V; Vasiljev, A V; Zemlyansky, I M

    2016-01-01

    The process $e^+e^-\\to\\omega\\eta\\pi^0$ is studied in the energy range $1.45-2.00$ GeV using data with an integrated luminosity of 33 pb$^{-1}$ accumulated by the SND detector at the $e^+e^-$ collider VEPP-2000. The $e^+e^-\\to\\omega\\eta\\pi^0$ cross section is measured for the first time. The cross section has a threshold near 1.75 GeV. Its value is about 2 nb in the energy range $1.8-2.0$ GeV. The dominant intermediate state for the process $e^+e^- \\to \\omega\\eta\\pi^0$ is found to be $\\omega a_0(980)$.

  9. Study of the Solar Anisotropy for Cosmic Ray Primaries of about 200 GeV Energy with the L3+C Muon Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P; Aguilar-Benitez, M; van den Akker, M; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, J; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, Valery P; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Bajo, A; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Bahr, J; Baldew, S V; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Barczyk, A; Barillere, R; Bartalini, P; Basile, M; Batalova, N; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Bellucci, L; Berbeco, R; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Biasini, M; Biglietti, M; Biland, A; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, G J; Bohm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bottai, S; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, M; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brochu, F; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A; Casaus, J; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada, M; Chamizo, M; Chiarusi, T; Chang, Y H; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chiefari, G; Cifarelli, L; Cindolo, F; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colino, N; Costantini, S; de la Cruz, B; Cucciarelli, S; van Dalen, J; de Asmundis, R; Deglon, P; Debreczeni, J; Degre, A; Dehmelt, K; Deiters, K; della Volpe, D; Delmeire, E; Denes, P; DeNotaristefani, F; De Salvo, A; Diemoz, M; Dierckxsens, M; Ding, L K; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, M; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duda, M; Duran, I; Echenard, B; Eline, A; El Hage, A; El Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Extermann, P; Faber, G; Falagan, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, M; Ferguson, T; Fesefeldt, H; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Freudenreich, K; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Iouri; Ganguli, S N; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gataullin, M; Gentile, S; Giagu, S; Gong, Z F; Grabosch, H J; Grenier, G; Grimm, O; Groenstege, H; Gruenewald, M W; Guida, M; Guo, Y N; Gupta, S; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Haller, Ch; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hayashi, Y; He, Z X; Hebbeker, T; Herve, Alain; Hirschfelder, J; Hofer, H; Hohlmann, M; Holzner, G; Hou, S R; Huo, A X; Hu, Y; Ito, N; Jin, B N; Jing, C L; Jones, Lawrence W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kantserov, V; Kaur, M; Kawakami, S; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, J K; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, W; Klimentov, A; Konig, A C; Kok, E; Korn, A; Kopal, M; Koutsenko, V; Kraber, M; Kuang, H H; Kraemer, R W; Kruger, A; Kuijpers, J; Kunin, A; Ladron de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Lei, Y; Leich, H; Leiste, R; Levtchenko, M; Levtchenko, P; Li, C; Li, L; Li, Z C; Likhoded, S; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, F L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, Y S; Luci, C; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma, W G; Ma, X H; Ma, Y Q; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Mana, C; Mans, J; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Mazumdar, K; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Meng, X W; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Mihul, A; van Mil, A; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Mohanty, G B; Monteleoni, B; Muanza, y G S; Muijs, A J M; Musicar, B; Musy, M; Nagy, S; Nahnhauer, R; Naumov, V A; Natale, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Nisati, A; Novak, T; Kluge, Hannelies; Ofierzynski, R; Organtini, G; Pal, I; Palomares, C; Paolucci, P; Paramatti, R; Parriaud, J -F; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, Thomas Cantzon; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, F; Pedace, M; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Piccolo, D; Pierella, F; Pieri, M; Pioppi, M; Piroue, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pojidaev, V; Pothier, J; Prokofev, D; Quartieri, J; Qing, C R; Rahal-Callot, G; Rahaman, Mohammad Azizur; Raics, P; Raja, N; Ramelli, R; Rancoita, P G; Ranieri, R; Raspereza, A; Ravindran, K C; Razis, P; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Rewiersma, P; Riemann, y S; Riles, Keith; Roe, B P; Rojkov, A; Romero, L; Rosca, A; Rosemann, C; Rosenbleck, C; Rosier-Lees, S; Roth, Stefan; Rubio, J A; Ruggiero, G; Rykaczewski, H; Saidi, R; Sakharov, A; Saremi, S; Sarkar, S; Salicio, J; Sanchez, E; Schafer, C; Schegelsky, V; Schmitt, V; Schoeneich, B; Schopper, H; Schotanus, D J; Sciacca, C; Servoli, L; Shen, C Q; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A; Son, D; Souga, C; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stoyanov, B; Straessner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sulanke, H; Sultanov, G; Sun, L Z; Sushkov, S; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Szillasi, Z; Tang, X W; Tarjan, P; Tauscher, L; Taylor, L; Tellili, B; Teyssier, D; Timmermans, Charles; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Toth, J; Trowitzsch, G; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Ulbricht, J; Unger, M; Valente, E; Verkooijen, H; Van de Walle, R T; Vasquez, R; Veszpremi, V; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitsky, I; Vicinanza, D; Viertel, G; Villa, S; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vodopianov, I; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Wadhwa, M; Wang, R G; Wang, Q; Wang, X L; Wang, X W; Wang, Z M; Weber, M; van Wijk, R; Wijnen, T A M; Wilkens, H; Wynhoff, S; Xia, L; Xu, Y P; Xu, J S; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, J; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J; Yang, M; Yang, X F; Yao, Z G; Yeh, S C; Yu, Z Q; Zalite, An; Zalite, Yu; Zhang, C; Zhang, F; Zhang, J; Zhang, S; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, J; Zhou, S J; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zhuang, H L; Zhu, Q Q; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, B; Zoller, M; Zwart, A N M

    2008-01-01

    Primary cosmic rays experience multiple deflections in the nonuniform galactic and heliospheric magnetic fields which may generate anisotropies. A study of anisotropies in the energy range between 100 and 500 GeV is performed. This energy range is not yet well explored. The L3 detector at the CERN electron-positron collider, LEP, is used for a study of the angular distribution of atmospheric muons with energies above 20 GeV. This distribution is used to investigate the isotropy of the time-dependent intensity of the primary cosmic-ray flux with a Fourier analysis. A small deviation from isotropy at energies around 200 GeV is observed for the second harmonics at the solar frequency. No sidereal anisotropy is found at a level above 10^-4. The measurements have been performed in the years 1999 and 2000.

  10. High-Purity Aluminum Magnet Technology for Advanced Space Transportation Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, R. G.; Pullam, B.; Rickle, D.; Litchford, R. J.; Robertson, G. A.; Schmidt, D. D.; Cole, John (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Basic research on advanced plasma-based propulsion systems is routinely focused on plasmadynamics, performance, and efficiency aspects while relegating the development of critical enabling technologies, such as flight-weight magnets, to follow-on development work. Unfortunately, the low technology readiness levels (TRLs) associated with critical enabling technologies tend to be perceived as an indicator of high technical risk, and this, in turn, hampers the acceptance of advanced system architectures for flight development. Consequently, there is growing recognition that applied research on the critical enabling technologies needs to be conducted hand in hand with basic research activities. The development of flight-weight magnet technology, for example, is one area of applied research having broad crosscutting applications to a number of advanced propulsion system architectures. Therefore, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Louisiana State University (LSU), and the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL) have initiated an applied research project aimed at advancing the TRL of flight-weight magnets. This Technical Publication reports on the group's initial effort to demonstrate the feasibility of cryogenic high-purity aluminum magnet technology and describes the design, construction, and testing of a 6-in-diameter by 12-in-long aluminum solenoid magnet. The coil was constructed in the machine shop of the Department of Physics and Astronomy at LSU and testing was conducted in NHMFL facilities at Florida State University and at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The solenoid magnet was first wound, reinforced, potted in high thermal conductivity epoxy, and bench tested in the LSU laboratories. A cryogenic container for operation at 77 K was also constructed and mated to the solenoid. The coil was then taken to NHMFL facilities in Tallahassee, FL. where its magnetoresistance was measured in a 77 K environment under steady magnetic fields as high as 10 T. In

  11. Diffusion bonding and brazing of high purity copper for linear collider accelerator structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. W. Elmer

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Diffusion bonding and brazing of high purity copper were investigated to develop procedures for joining precision machined copper components for the Next Linear Collider (NLC. Diffusion bonds were made over a range of temperatures from 400 °C to 1000 °C, under two different loading conditions [3.45 kPa (0.5 psi and 3.45 MPa (500 psi], and on two different diamond machined surface finishes. Brazes were made using pure silver, pure gold, and gold-nickel alloys, and different heating rates produced by both radiation and induction heating. Braze materials were applied by both physical vapor deposition (PVD and conventional braze alloy shims. Results of the diffusion bonding experiments showed that bond strengths very near that of the copper base metal could be made at bonding temperatures of 700 °C or higher at 3.45 MPa bonding pressure. At lower temperatures, only partial strength diffusion bonds could be made. At low bonding pressures (3.45 kPa, full strength bonds were made at temperatures of 800 °C and higher, while no bonding (zero strength was observed at temperatures of 700 °C and lower. Observations of the fracture surfaces of the diffusion bonded samples showed the effects of surface finish on the bonding mechanism. These observations clearly indicate that bonding began by point asperity contact, and flatter surfaces resulted in a higher percentage of bonded area under similar bonding conditions. Results of the brazing experiments indicated that pure silver worked very well for brazing under both conventional and high heating rate scenarios. Similarly, pure silver brazed well for both the PVD layers and the braze alloy shims. The gold and gold-containing brazes had problems, mainly due to the high diffusivity of gold in copper. These problems led to the necessity of overdriving the temperature to ensure melting, the presence of porosity in the joint, and very wide braze joints. Based on the overall findings of this study, a two

  12. Characterization of high-purity niobium structures fabricated using the electron beam melting process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrazas Najera, Cesar Adrian

    Additive Manufacturing (AM) refers to the varied set of technologies utilized for the fabrication of complex 3D components from digital data in a layer-by-layer fashion. The use of these technologies promises to revolutionize the manufacturing industry. The electron beam melting (EBM) process has been utilized for the fabrication of fully dense near-net-shape components from various metallic materials. This process, catalogued as a powder bed fusion technology, consists of the deposition of thin layers (50 - 120microm) of metallic powder particles which are fused by the use of a high energy electron beam and has been commercialized by Swedish company Arcam AB. Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities are key components that are used in linear accelerators and other light sources for studies of elemental physics. Currently, cavity fabrication is done by employing different forming processes including deep-drawing and spinning. In both of the latter techniques, a feedstock high-purity niobium sheet with a thickness ranging from 3-4 mm is mechanically deformed and shaped into the desired geometry. In this manner, half cavities are formed that are later joined by electron beam welding (EBW). The welding step causes variability in the shape of the cavity and can also introduce impurities at the surface of the weld interface. The processing route and the purity of niobium are also of utmost importance since the presence of impurities such as inclusions or defects can be detrimental for the SRF properties of cavities. The focus of this research was the use of the EBM process in the manufacture of high purity niobium parts with potential SRF applications. Reactor grade niobium was plasma atomized and used as the precursor material for fabrication using EBM. An Arcam A2 system was utilized for the fabrication. The system had all internal components of the fabrication chamber replaced and was cleaned to prevent contamination of niobium powder. A mini-vat, developed at

  13. Direct Determination of Trace Impurities in High Purity Zinc Oxide by High Resolution Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Hualin; NIE Xidu; LI Libo; SONG Chuhua

    2006-01-01

    The determination of trace impurities in high purity zinc oxide by high resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HR-ICP-MS) was investigated. To overcome some potentially problematic spectral interference, measurements were acquired in both middle and high resolution modes. The matrix effects due to the presence of excess HCl and zinc were evaluated. The optimum conditions for the determination were tested and discussed. The standard addition method was employed for quantitative analysis. The detection limits ranged from 0.02 μg/g to 6 μg/g depending on the elements.The experimental results for the determination of Na, Mg, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Mo, Cd, Sb and Pb in several high purity zinc oxide powders were presented.

  14. Equilibrium between titanium ions and high-purity titanium electrorefining in a NaCl-KCl melt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-xun Song; Qiu-yu Wang; Guo-jing Hu; Xiao-bo Zhu; Shu-qiang Jiao; Hong-min Zhu

    2014-01-01

    TiClx (x=2.17) was prepared by using titanium sponge to reduce the concentration of TiCl4 in a NaCl−KCl melt under negative pressure. The as-prepared NaCl−KCl−TiClx melt was employed as the electrolyte, and two parallel crude titanium plates and one high-purity titanium plate were used as the anode and cathode, respectively. A series of electrochemical tests were performed to investigate the influence of electrolytic parameters on the current efficiency and quality of cathodic products. The results indicated that the quality of cathodic prod-ucts was related to the current efficiency, which is significantly dependent on the current density and the initial concentration of titanium ions. The significance of this study is the attainment of high-purity titanium with a low oxygen content of 30 × 10−6.

  15. Evaluation of purity with its uncertainty value in high purity lead stick by conventional and electro-gravimetric methods

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Nahar; SINGH, Niranjan; Tripathy, S Swarupa; Soni, Daya; Singh, Khem; GUPTA Prabhat K

    2013-01-01

    Background A conventional gravimetry and electro-gravimetry study has been carried out for the precise and accurate purity determination of lead (Pb) in high purity lead stick and for preparation of reference standard. Reference materials are standards containing a known amount of an analyte and provide a reference value to determine unknown concentrations or to calibrate analytical instruments. A stock solution of approximate 2 kg has been prepared after dissolving approximate 2 g of Pb stic...

  16. Potential utility of eGFP-expressing NOG mice (NOG-EGFP as a high purity cancer sampling system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shima Kentaro

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose It is still technically difficult to collect high purity cancer cells from tumor tissues, which contain noncancerous cells. We hypothesized that xenograft models of NOG mice expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP, referred to as NOG-EGFP mice, may be useful for obtaining such high purity cancer cells for detailed molecular and cellular analyses. Methods Pancreato-biliary cancer cell lines were implanted subcutaneously to compare the tumorigenicity between NOG-EGFP mice and nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID mice. To obtain high purity cancer cells, the subcutaneous tumors were harvested from the mice and enzymatically dissociated into single-cell suspensions. Then, the cells were sorted by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS for separation of the host cells and the cancer cells. Thereafter, the contamination rate of host cells in collected cancer cells was quantified by using FACS analysis. The viability of cancer cells after FACS sorting was evaluated by cell culture and subsequent subcutaneous reimplantation in NOG-EGFP mice. Results The tumorigenicity of NOG-EGFP mice was significantly better than that of NOD/SCID mice in all of the analyzed cell lines (p  Conclusions This method provides a novel cancer sampling system for molecular and cellular analysis with high accuracy and should contribute to the development of personalized medicine.

  17. \\textsc{MaGe} - a {\\sc Geant4}-based Monte Carlo Application Framework for Low-background Germanium Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Boswell, Melissa; Detwiler, Jason A; Finnerty, Padraic; Henning, Reyco; Gehman, Victor M; Johnson, Rob A; Jordan, David V; Kazkaz, Kareem; Knapp, Markus; Kröninger, Kevin; Lenz, Daniel; Leviner, Lance; Liu, Jing; Liu, Xiang; MacMullin, Sean; Marino, Michael G; Mokhtarani, Akbar; Pandola, Luciano; Schubert, Alexis G; Schubert, Jens; Tomei, Claudia; Volynets, Oleksandr

    2010-01-01

    We describe a physics simulation software framework, MAGE, that is based on the GEANT4 simulation toolkit. MAGE is used to simulate the response of ultra-low radioactive background radiation detectors to ionizing radiation, specifically the MAJORANA and GERDA neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments. MAJORANA and GERDA use high-purity germanium detectors to search for the neutrinoless double-beta decay of 76Ge, and MAGE is jointly developed between these two collaborations. The MAGE framework contains the geometry models of common objects, prototypes, test stands, and the actual experiments. It also implements customized event generators, GEANT4 physics lists, and output formats. All of these features are available as class libraries that are typically compiled into a single executable. The user selects the particular experimental setup implementation at run-time via macros. The combination of all these common classes into one framework reduces duplication of efforts, eases comparison between simulated data...

  18. The search for Higgs boson production in the four-jet channel at $192 < \\sqrt{s} < 202$ GeV with the ALEPH detector at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, D H

    2001-01-01

    A search for neutral Higgs boson production in e sup + e sup - collisions using data collected by the ALEPH detector at the LEP accelerator is presented. Approximately 413 pb sup - sup 1 of data collected at centre of mass energies between 188.6 and 201.6 GeV during 1998 and 1999 is used. The selection of candidates is described and the results of the search are presented and interpreted. Particular attention is given to the selection of the final states with four hadronic jets. No evidence of Higgs boson production is found. In the context of the Standard Model the lower limit on the Higgs boson mass is set at 105.2 GeV/c sup 2 at the 95% confidence level. A search for neutral Higgs boson production in e+e- collisions using data collected by the ALEPH detector and the LEP accelerator is presented. Approximately 413pb-1 of data collected at centre-of-mass energies between 188.6 and 201.6GeV during 1998 and 1999 is used. The selection of candidates is described and the results of the search are presented and i...

  19. Cross section and couplings measurements with the ATLAS detector for the 125 GeV Higgs Boson

    CERN Document Server

    Herde, Hannah; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Detailed measurements of the properties of the 125 GeV Higgs boson are fundamental for the understanding of the electroweak symmetry breaking mechanism. Measurements of the Higgs boson allow to study the gauge, loop induced and Yukawa couplings of the Higgs boson both in production and decay modes. This talk summarizes recent ATLAS measurements of the 125 GeV Higgs boson.

  20. Measurement of K+ production cross section by 8 GeV protons using high energy neutrino interactions in the SciBooNE detector

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, G

    2011-01-01

    The SciBooNE Collaboration reports K+ production cross section and rate measurements using high energy daughter muon neutrino scattering data off the SciBar polystyrene (C8H8) target in the SciBooNE detector. The K+ mesons are produced by 8 GeV protons striking a beryllium target in Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam line (BNB). Using observed neutrino and antineutrino events in SciBooNE, we measure d2{\\sigma}/dpd{\\Omega} = (5.34 \\times 0.76) mb/(GeV/c \\times sr) for p + Be -> K+ + X at mean K+ energy of 3.9 GeV and angle (with respect to the proton beam direction) of 3.7 degrees, corresponding to the selected K+ sample. Compared to Monte Carlo predictions using previous higher energy K+ production measurements, this measurement, which uses the NUANCE neutrino interaction generator, is consistent with a normalization factor of 0.85\\times0.12. This agreement is evidence that the extrapolation of the higher energy K+ measurements to an 8 GeV beam energy using Feynman scaling is valid. This measurement reduces the e...

  1. Status and Performance of New Silicon Stripixel Detector for the PHENIX Experiment at RHIC Beta Source, Cosmic-rays and Proton Beam at 120 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Nouicer, Rachid

    2009-01-01

    We are constructing a Silicon Vertex Tracker detector (VTX) for the PHENIX experiment at RHIC. Our main motivation is to enable measurements of heavy flavor production (charm and beauty) in p+p, p+d and A+A collisions. Such data will illuminate the properties of the matter created in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. The measurements also will reveal the distribution of gluons in protons from p+p collisions. The VTX detector consists of four layers of barrel detectors and covers |eta|< 1.2, and almost a 2pi in azimuth. The inner two silicon barrels consist of silicon pixel sensors; their technology accords with that of the ALICE1LHCB sensor-readout hybrid. The outer two barrels are silicon stripixel detectors with a new "spiral" design, and a single-sided sensor with 2-dimensional (X, U) readout. In this paper, we describe the silicon stripixel detector and discuss its performance, including its response to electrons from a beta source (90Sr), muons from cosmic-rays, and a 120 GeV proton beam. The results ...

  2. Study of the muon-pair production at centre-of-mass energies from 20 to 136 GeV with the ALEPH detector

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Comas, P; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Orteu, S; Padilla, C; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Bright-Thomas, P G; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Lutters, G; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Moneta, L; Oest, T; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rizzo, G; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Venturi, A; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Ferdi, C; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Daskalakis, G; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Brient, J C; Machefert, F P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Videau, H L; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Thomson, F; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Girone, M; Goodsir, S M; Martin, E B; Morawitz, P; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R W L; Sloan, Terence; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Hoffmann, C; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Coyle, P; Diaconu, C A; Konstantinidis, N P; Leroy, O; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Tilquin, A; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Ragusa, F; Berlich, R; Blum, Walter; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Chen, S; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Kelly, M S; Lehto, M H; Newton, W M; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Affholderbach, K; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Grupen, Claus; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Williams, R W; Armstrong, S R; Elmer, P; Feng, Z; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, J; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1997-01-01

    The total cross section and the forward-backward asymmetry for the process $e^+ e^- \\rightarrow \\mu^+ \\mu^- (n \\gamma)$ are measured in the energy range 20-136 GeV by reconstructing the effective centre-of-mass energy after initial state radiation. The analysis is based on the data recorded with the ALEPH detector at LEP between 1990 and 1995, corresponding to a total integrated luminosity of 143.5 $\\mathrm{pb}^{-1}$. Two different approaches are used: in the first one an exclusive selection of events with hard initial state radiation in the energy range 20-88 GeV is directly compared with the Standard Model predictions showing good agreement. In the second one, all events are used to obtain a precise measurement of the energy dependence of $\\sigma^0$ and $A_{\\mathrm{FB}}^0$ from a model independent fit, enabling constraints to be placed on models with extra Z bosons.

  3. Measurement of sigma(e+ e- -> pi+ pi-) from threshold to 0.85 GeV^2 using Initial State Radiation with the KLOE detector

    CERN Document Server

    Ambrosino, F; Antonelli, M; Archilli, F; Beltrame, P; Bencivenni, G; Bini, C; Bloise, C; Bocchetta, S; Bossi, F; Branchini, P; Capon, G; Capussela, T; Ceradini, F; Ciambrone, P; De Lucia, E; De Santis, A; De Simone, P; De Zorzi, G; Denig, A; Di Domenico, A; Di Donato, C; Di Micco, B; Dreucci, M; Felici, G; Fiore, S; Franzini, P; Gatti, C; Gauzzi, P; Giovannella, S; Graziani, E; Jacewicz, M; Kluge, W; Lee-Franzini, J; Leone, D; Martini, M; Massarotti, P; Meola, S; Miscetti, S; Moulson, M; Müller, S; Murtas, F; Napolitano, M; Nguyen, F; Palutan, M; Passeri, A; Patera, V; Santangelo, P; Sciascia, B; Spadaro, T; Taccini, C; Tortora, L; Valente, P; Venanzoni, G; Versaci, R

    2010-01-01

    We have measured the cross section of the radiative process e+e- -> pi+pi-gamma with the KLOE detector at the Frascati phi-factory DAPHNE, from events taken at a CM energy W=1 GeV. Initial state radiation allows us to obtain the cross section for e+e- -> pi+pi-, the pion form factor |F_pi|^2 and the dipion contribution to the muon magnetic moment anomaly, Delta a_mu^{pipi} = (478.5+-2.0_{stat}+-4.8_{syst}+-2.9_{th}) x 10^{-10} in the range 0.1 < M_{pipi}^2 < 0.85 GeV^2. The discrepancy between the Standard Model evaluation of a_mu and the value measured by the Muon g-2 collaboration at BNL is confirmed.

  4. Search for GeV gamma-ray bursts with the ARGO-YBJ detector: summary of eight years of observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartoli, B.; Catalanotti, S.; Piazzoli, B. D' Ettorre; Di Girolamo, T. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Università di Napoli " Federico II," Complesso Universitario di Monte Sant' Angelo, via Cinthia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Bernardini, P.; D' Amone, A.; De Mitri, I. [Dipartimento Matematica e Fisica " Ennio De Giorgi," Università del Salento, via per Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Bi, X. J.; Cao, Z.; Chen, S. Z. [Key Laboratory of Particle Astrophysics, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 918, 100049 Beijing (China); Branchini, P.; Budano, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Roma Tre, via della Vasca Navale 84, I-00146 Roma (Italy); Camarri, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Università di Roma " Tor Vergata," via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Cardarelli, R.; Sciascio, G. Di [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Roma Tor Vergata, via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Chen, T. L.; Danzengluobu [Tibet University, 850000 Lhasa, Xizang (China); Creti, P. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Lecce, via per Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Cui, S. W. [Hebei Normal University, Shijiazhuang 050016, Hebei (China); Dai, B. Z., E-mail: digirola@na.infn.it, E-mail: Piero.Vallania@to.infn.it, E-mail: vigorito@to.infn.it [Yunnan University, 2 North Cuihu Rd., 650091 Kunming, Yunnan (China); Collaboration: ARGO-YBJ Collaboration; and others

    2014-10-10

    The search for gamma-ray burst (GRB) emission in the energy range of 1-100 GeV in coincidence with the satellite detection has been carried out using the Astrophysical Radiation with Ground-based Observatory at YangBaJing (ARGO-YBJ) experiment. The high-altitude location (4300 m a.s.l.), the large active surface (∼6700 m{sup 2} of Resistive Plate Chambers), the wide field of view (∼2 sr, limited only by the atmospheric absorption), and the high duty cycle (>86%) make the ARGO-YBJ experiment particularly suitable to detect short and unexpected events like GRBs. With the scaler mode technique, i.e., counting all the particles hitting the detector with no measurement of the primary energy and arrival direction, the minimum threshold of ∼1 GeV can be reached, overlapping the direct measurements carried out by satellites. During the experiment lifetime from 2004 December 17 to 2013 February 7, a total of 206 GRBs occurring within the ARGO-YBJ field of view (zenith angle θ ≤ 45°) have been analyzed. This is the largest sample of GRBs investigated with a ground-based detector. Two light curve models have been assumed and since in both cases no significant excess has been found, the corresponding fluence upper limits in the 1-100 GeV energy region have been derived, with values as low as 10{sup –5} erg cm{sup –2}. The analysis of a subset of 24 GRBs with known redshift has been used to constrain the fluence extrapolation to the GeV region together with possible cutoffs under different assumptions on the spectrum.

  5. Curves for the response of a Ge(Li) detector to gamma rays in the energy range up to 11 MeV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kopecký, J.; Ratyński, W.; Warming, Inge Elisabeth

    1967-01-01

    The response function of a Ge(Li) coaxial detector with a sensitive volume of 17 cm3 for gamma rays of energies ranging from 2.23 to 10.83 MeV has been determined. The measurements were carried out with an experimental set-up using the neutron beam from the DR 3 reactor ar Risö and the (n, γ......) reaction as gamma-ray source. The important features of the spectra are discussed, and the double-escape peak efficiency is determined....

  6. Measurement of $R_{\\text{uds}}$ and $R$ between 3.12 and 3.72 GeV at the KEDR detector

    CERN Document Server

    Anashin, V V; Baldin, E M; Barladyan, A K; Barnyakov, A Yu; Barnyakov, M Yu; Baru, S E; Basok, I Yu; Batrakov, A M; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bobrov, A V; Bobrovnikov, V S; Bogomyagkov, A V; Bondar, A E; Buzykaev, A R; Eidelman, S I; Grigoriev, D N; Glukhovchenko, Yu M; Karnaev, S E; Karpov, G V; Karpov, S V; Kasyanenko, P V; Kharlamova, T A; Kiselev, V A; Kolmogorov, V V; Kononov, S A; Kotov, K Yu; Kravchenko, E A; Kudryavtsev, V N; Kulikov, V F; Kurkin, G Ya; Kuyanov, I A; Levichev, E B; Maksimov, D A; Malyshev, V M; Maslennikov, A L; Meshkov, O I; Mishnev, S I; Morozov, I I; Muchnoi, N Yu; Neufeld, V V; Nikitin, S A; Nikolaev, I B; Okunev, I N; Onuchin, A P; Oreshkin, S B; Osipov, A A; Ovtin, I V; Peleganchuk, S V; Pivovarov, S G; Piminov, P A; Petrov, V V; Prisekin, V G; Rezanova, O L; Ruban, A A; Sandyrev, V K; Savinov, G A; Shamov, A G; Shatilov, D N; Shwartz, B A; Simonov, E A; Sinyatkin, S V; Skrinsky, A N; Sokolov, A V; Sukharev, A M; Starostina, E V; Talyshev, A A; Tayursky, V A; Telnov, V I; Tikhonov, Yu A; Todyshev, K Yu; Tumaikin, G M; Usov, Yu V; Vorobiov, A I; Zhilich, V N; Zhulanov, V V; Zhuravlev, A N

    2016-01-01

    Using the KEDR detector at the VEPP-4M $e^+e^-$ collider, we have measured the values of $R_{\\text{uds}}$ and $R$ at seven points of the center-of-mass energy between 3.12 and 3.72 GeV. The total achieved accuracy is about or better than $3.3\\%$ at most of energy points with a systematic uncertainty of about $2.1\\%$. At the moment it is the most accurate measurement of $R(s)$ in this energy range.

  7. Limits on uranium and thorium bulk content in GERDA Phase I detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Agostini, M; Bakalyarov, A M; Balata, M; Barabanov, I; Baudis, L; Bauer, C; Becerici-Schmidt, N; Bellotti, E; Belogurov, S; Belyaev, S T; Benato, G; Bettini, A; Bezrukov, L; Bode, T; Borowicz, D; Brudanin, V; Brugnera, R; Caldwell, A; Cattadori, C; Chernogorov, A; D'Andrea, V; Demidova, E V; di Vacri, A; Domula, A; Doroshkevich, E; Egorov, V; Falkenstein, R; Fedorova, O; Freund, K; Frodyma, N; Gangapshev, A; Garfagnini, A; Grabmayr, P; Gurentsov, V; Gusev, K; Hakemüller, J; Hegai, A; Heisel, M; Hemmer, S; Hofmann, W; Hult, M; Inzhechik, L V; Csathy, J Janicsko; Jochum, J; Junker, M; Kazalov, V; Kihm, T; Kirpichnikov, I V; Kirsch, A; Kish, A; Klimenko, A; Kneißl, R; Knöpfle, K T; Kochetov, O; Kornoukhov, V N; Kuzminov, V V; Laubenstein, M; Lazzaro, A; Lebedev, V I; Lehnert, B; Liao, H Y; Lindner, M; Lippi, I; Lubashevskiy, A; Lubsandorzhiev, B; Lutter, G; Macolino, C; Majorovits, B; Maneschg, W; Medinaceli, E; Mingazheva, R; Misiaszek, M; Moseev, P; Nemchenok, I; Palioselitis, D; Panas, K; Pandola, L; Pelczar, K; Pullia, A; Riboldi, S; Rumyantseva, N; Sada, C; Salamida, F; Salathe, M; Schmitt, C; Schneider, B; Schönert, S; Schreiner, J; Schütz, A -K; Schulz, O; Schwingenheuer, B; Selivanenko, O; Shevchik, E; Shirchenko, M; Simgen, H; Smolnikov, A; Stanco, L; Stepaniuk, M; Vanhoefer, L; Vasenko, A A; Veresnikova, A; von Sturm, K; Wagner, V; Walter, M; Wegmann, A; Wester, T; Wiesinger, C; Wojcik, M; Yanovich, E; Zhitnikov, I; Zhukov, S V; Zinatulina, D; Zuber, K; Zuzel, G

    2016-01-01

    Internal contaminations of $^{238}$U, $^{235}$U and $^{232}$Th in the bulk of high purity germanium detectors are potential backgrounds for experiments searching for neutrinoless double beta decay of $^{76}$Ge. The data from GERDA Phase~I have been analyzed for alpha events from the decay chain of these contaminations by looking for full decay chains and for time correlations between successive decays in the same detector. No candidate events for a full chain have been found. Upper limits on the activities in the range of a few nBq/kg for $^{226}$Ra, $^{227}$Ac and $^{228}$Th, the long-lived daughter nuclides of $^{238}$U, $^{235}$U and $^{232}$Th, respectively, have been derived. With these upper limits a background index in the energy region of interest from $^{226}$Ra and $^{228}$Th contamination is estimated which satisfies the prerequisites of a future ton scale germanium double beta decay experiment.

  8. Calibration of LHCb RICH detectors with \\Lambda \\to p\\pi decay using data

    CERN Multimedia

    Popovici, Bogdan

    2008-01-01

    The LHCb physics programme will focus on high precision studies of CP violation and rare phenomena in B hadron decays. The RICH detectors of LHCb will provide hadron identification over the wide momentum range 1 to 100 GeV/c, and are central to the physics goals of the experiment. An excellent understanding of the hadron identification performance of the RICH detectors is essential. To achieve this goal, calibration strategies have been devised that will enable the performance to be measured from the data themselves. The decay chain $\\Lambda \\to p \\pi$ can be cleanly selected, based on its kinematic signature, without the use of RICH information. These events can be used as an unbiased sample for calibrating the RICH particle identification performance of pions and protons. In this way, the calibration method using the high purity samples of $\\Lambda$'s will be described.

  9. Application of the Monte Carlo method to the analysis of measurement geometries for the calibration of a HP Ge detector in an environmental radioactivity laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodenas, Jose [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Apartado 22012, E-46071 Valencia (Spain)], E-mail: jrodenas@iqn.upv.es; Gallardo, Sergio; Ballester, Silvia; Primault, Virginie [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Apartado 22012, E-46071 Valencia (Spain); Ortiz, Josefina [Laboratorio de Radiactividad Ambiental, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Apartado 22012, E-46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2007-10-15

    A gamma spectrometer including an HP Ge detector is commonly used for environmental radioactivity measurements. The efficiency of the detector should be calibrated for each geometry considered. Simulation of the calibration procedure with a validated computer program is an important auxiliary tool for environmental radioactivity laboratories. The MCNP code based on the Monte Carlo method has been applied to simulate the detection process in order to obtain spectrum peaks and determine the efficiency curve for each modelled geometry. The source used for measurements was a calibration mixed radionuclide gamma reference solution, covering a wide energy range (50-2000 keV). Two measurement geometries - Marinelli beaker and Petri boxes - as well as different materials - water, charcoal, sand - containing the source have been considered. Results obtained from the Monte Carlo model have been compared with experimental measurements in the laboratory in order to validate the model.

  10. Results of charged pions cross-section in proton carbon interaction at 31 GeV/c measured with the NA61/SHINE detector

    CERN Document Server

    Murphy, Sebastien

    2011-01-01

    Among other goals, the NA61/SHINE (SHINE=SPS Heavy Ion and Neutrino Experiment) detector at CERN SPS aims at precision hadro-production measurements to characterise the neutrino beam of the T2K experiment at J-PARC. These measurements are performed using a 31 GeV/c proton beam produced at the SPS with a thin carbon target and a full T2K replica target. Spectra of charged pion inclusive inelastic cross section were obtained from pilot data collected in 2007 1 with a 2 cm thick target (4% of the interaction length). The SHINE detector and its particle identification capabilities are described and the analysis techniques are briefly discussed.

  11. High Purity Hydrogen Production with In-Situ Carbon Dioxide and Sulfur Capture in a Single Stage Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nihar Phalak; Shwetha Ramkumar; Daniel Connell; Zhenchao Sun; Fu-Chen Yu; Niranjani Deshpande; Robert Statnick; Liang-Shih Fan

    2011-07-31

    Enhancement in the production of high purity hydrogen (H{sub 2}) from fuel gas, obtained from coal gasification, is limited by thermodynamics of the water gas shift (WGS) reaction. However, this constraint can be overcome by conducting the WGS in the presence of a CO{sub 2}-acceptor. The continuous removal of CO{sub 2} from the reaction mixture helps to drive the equilibrium-limited WGS reaction forward. Since calcium oxide (CaO) exhibits high CO{sub 2} capture capacity as compared to other sorbents, it is an ideal candidate for such a technique. The Calcium Looping Process (CLP) developed at The Ohio State University (OSU) utilizes the above concept to enable high purity H{sub 2} production from synthesis gas (syngas) derived from coal gasification. The CLP integrates the WGS reaction with insitu CO{sub 2}, sulfur and halide removal at high temperatures while eliminating the need for a WGS catalyst, thus reducing the overall footprint of the hydrogen production process. The CLP comprises three reactors - the carbonator, where the thermodynamic constraint of the WGS reaction is overcome by the constant removal of CO{sub 2} product and high purity H{sub 2} is produced with contaminant removal; the calciner, where the calcium sorbent is regenerated and a sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} stream is produced; and the hydrator, where the calcined sorbent is reactivated to improve its recyclability. As a part of this project, the CLP was extensively investigated by performing experiments at lab-, bench- and subpilot-scale setups. A comprehensive techno-economic analysis was also conducted to determine the feasibility of the CLP at commercial scale. This report provides a detailed account of all the results obtained during the project period.

  12. Mechanical energy losses in plastically deformed and electron plus neutron irradiated high purity single crystalline molybdenum at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zelada, Griselda I. [Laboratorio de Materiales, Escuela de Ingenieria Electrica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Ingenieria y Agrimensura, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Avda. Pellegrini 250, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Lambri, Osvaldo Agustin [Laboratorio de Materiales, Escuela de Ingenieria Electrica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Ingenieria y Agrimensura, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Avda. Pellegrini 250, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Instituto de Fisica Rosario - CONICET, Member of the CONICET& #x27; s Research Staff, Avda. Pellegrini 250, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Bozzano, Patricia B. [Laboratorio de Microscopia Electronica, Unidad de Actividad Materiales, Centro Atomico Constituyentes, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Avda. Gral. Paz 1499, 1650 San Martin (Argentina); Garcia, Jose Angel [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada II, Facultad de Ciencias y Tecnologia, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apdo. 644, 48080 Bilbao, Pais Vasco (Spain)

    2012-10-15

    Mechanical spectroscopy (MS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies have been performed in plastically deformed and electron plus neutron irradiated high purity single crystalline molybdenum, oriented for single slip, in order to study the dislocation dynamics in the temperature range within one third of the melting temperature. A damping peak related to the interaction of dislocation lines with both prismatic loops and tangles of dislocations was found. The peak temperature ranges between 900 and 1050 K, for an oscillating frequency of about 1 Hz. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Photocatalytic Degradation of Rhodamine B Dye with High Purity Anatase Nano-TiO2 Synthesized by a Hydrothermal Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Xiaoliang; YANG Xingyong; WANG Shuwei; WANG Sheng; ZHANG Qiaoxin; WANG Yufu

    2011-01-01

    High purity anatase nano-TiO2 powders with high photocatalytic activity were prepared by a hydrothermal synthesis method.X-ray diffraction(XRD),field emission transmission electron microscopy (FETEM),ultraviolet-visible(UV-Vis)light absorption spectrum and photoluminescence(PL)spectrum were adopted to characterize the catalyst.Effects of temperature,time and sol concentration of hydrothermal synthesis on particle size and phases were investigated.Photocatalytic activities in the degradation of Rhodamine B Dye were studied.The experimental results indicated that photocatalytic activity of the nano-TiO2 powers was much higher than that of P25(Degussa).

  14. Gas chromatographic separation of nitrogen, oxygen, argon, and carbon monoxide using custom-made porous polymers from high purity divinylbenzene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, G. E.; Ohara, D.; Hollis, O. L.

    1984-01-01

    Existing porous polymers were surveyed for their ability to separate the subject gases. Certain products that showed more promise than others were synthesized and the existing synthetic procedures studied and modified to produce new polymers with enhanced ability to separate the subject gases. Evaluation of the porous polymers was carried out practically by gas chromatography at ambient temperature. The modified synthetic procedures were somewhat simpler than the originals. The new porous polymers made with high purity divinylbenzene enabled use of shorter columns to obtain the separations desired.

  15. High-purity hydrogen generation by ultraviolet illumination with the membrane composed of titanium dioxide nanotube array and Pd layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Masashi; Noda, Kei; Matsushige, Kazumi

    2011-09-01

    High-purity hydrogen generation was observed by using a membrane composed of a bilayer of an anodized titanium dioxide nanotube array (TNA) and a hydrogen permeable metal. This membrane was fabricated by transferring a TNA embedded in a titanium foil onto a sputtered 10-μm-thick palladium film. Alcohols are reformed photocatalytically and concurrently generated hydrogen is purified through the Pd layer. H2 with a purity of more than 99% was obtained from liquid alcohols under ultraviolet illumination onto the membrane. Thus, we demonstrated the integration of photocatalytic hydrogen production and purification within a single membrane.

  16. Magnetic and magnetothermal properties and the magnetic phase diagram of high purity single crystalline terbium along the easy magnetization direction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zverev, V I; Tishin, A M; Chernyshov, A S; Mudryk, Ya; Gschneidner, K A; Pecharsky, V K

    2014-02-12

    The magnetic and magnetothermal properties of a high purity terbium single crystal have been re-investigated from 1.5 to 350 K in magnetic fields ranging from 0 to 75 kOe using magnetization, ac magnetic susceptibility and heat capacity measurements. The magnetic phase diagram has been refined by establishing a region of the fan-like phase broader than reported in the past, by locating a tricritical point at 226 K, and by a more accurate definition of the critical fields and temperatures associated with the magnetic phases observed in Tb.

  17. Considering Process Nonlinearity in Dual-Point Composition Control of a High-Purity Ideal Heat Integrated Distillation Column

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Dual-point composition control for a high-purity ideal heat integrated distillation column (HIDiC) is addressed in this work. Three measures are suggested and combined for overcoming process inherent nonlinearities:(1) variable scaling; (2) multi-model representation of process dynamics and (3) feedforward compensation. These strategies can offer the developed control systems with several distinct advantages: (1) capability of dealing with severe disturbances; (2) tight tuning of controller parameters and (3) high robustness with respect to variation of operating conditions. Simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed methodology.

  18. Isolated High-Purity Platinum Nanowire Growth via Field Emission from a Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhan; Nakajima, Masahiro; Saito, Yahachi; Ode, Yasuhito; Fukuda, Toshio

    2011-03-01

    Isolated high-purity platinum nanowire growth was presented via field emission from the tip of a multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) with a precursor of cyclopentadienyl-trimethyl-platinum(IV) (CpPtMe3) inside a scanning electron microscope (SEM). A nanomanipulation system was used to adjust the gap between the anode (tungsten probe) and cathode (MWCNT) in order to control the nanowire growth length which achieved a platinum nanowire length of 1.18 µm. The chemical composition of the platinum nanowire analyzed by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) shows that the purity of the platinum in the nanowire reaches 94.9 wt %.

  19. Preparation of uniform nanoparticles of ultra-high purity metal oxides, mixed metal oxides, metals, and metal alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodfield, Brian F.; Liu, Shengfeng; Boerio-Goates, Juliana; Liu, Qingyuan; Smith, Stacey Janel

    2012-07-03

    In preferred embodiments, metal nanoparticles, mixed-metal (alloy) nanoparticles, metal oxide nanoparticles and mixed-metal oxide nanoparticles are provided. According to embodiments, the nanoparticles may possess narrow size distributions and high purities. In certain preferred embodiments, methods of preparing metal nanoparticles, mixed-metal nanoparticles, metal oxide nanoparticles and mixed-metal nanoparticles are provided. These methods may provide tight control of particle size, size distribution, and oxidation state. Other preferred embodiments relate to a precursor material that may be used to form nanoparticles. In addition, products prepared from such nanoparticles are disclosed.

  20. The GeMSE Facility for Low-Background {\\gamma}-Ray Spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Sivers, M v; Rosén, Å V; Schumann, M

    2016-01-01

    We describe a new high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector setup for low-background {\\gamma}-ray spectrometry. The GeMSE facility is dedicated to material screening for rare event searches in astroparticle physics as well as to the characterization of meteorites. It is installed in a medium depth (~620 m.w.e.) underground laboratory in Switzerland in a multi-layer shielding and is equipped with an active muon veto. We have reached a very competitive integral background rate of (246$\\pm$2) counts/day (100-2700 keV) which allows the measurement of radioactive contaminations in the $\\mathcal{O}$(50){\\mu}Bq/kg range. We describe the data analysis based on Bayesian statistics, background simulations, the efficiency calibration and first sample measurements.

  1. The response of TL lithium fluoride detectors to 24 GeV/c protons for doses ranging up to 1 MGy

    CERN Document Server

    Obryk, B; Olko, P; Pajor, A; Glaser, M; Budzanowski, M; Bilski, P

    2010-01-01

    A new method of thermoluminescent (TL) measurement of radiation doses ranging from micrograys up to a megagray has been recently developed at IFJ. This method is based on a newly discovered behavior of LiF:Mg,Cu,P detectors at doses exceeding 1 kGy. Significant changes in their glow-curves are observed at higher doses; of special importance is occurrence of a new, well separated peak for doses above 50 kGy, thus these detectors can be used for measurements of doses at ultra-high dose range. In order to check the glow-curve features in the high dose region for different types of LiF:Mg,Cu,P and LiF:Mg,Ti detectors after irradiation with heavy charged particles, tests at the 24 GeV/c proton beam of IRRAD1 irradiation zone at the CERN Proton Synchrotron accelerator up to 1 MGy were performed. The occurrence of the high dose peak in the glow-curve of LiF:Mg,Cu,P detectors resulting from heavy particles irradiation was confirmed. Results of this investigation are presented in this paper. (C) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All...

  2. Magnetic Microcalorimeter Gamma Detectors for High-Precision Non-Destructive Analysis, FY14 Extended Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedrich, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-02-06

    Cryogenic gamma (γ) detectors with operating temperatures of ~0.1 K or below offer 10× better energy resolution than conventional high-purity germanium detectors that are currently used for non-destructive analysis (NDA) of nuclear materials. This can greatly increase the accuracy of NDA, especially at low-energies where gamma rays often have similar energies and cannot be resolved by Ge detectors. We are developing cryogenic γ–detectors based on metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMCs), which have the potential of higher resolution, faster count rates and better linearity than other cryogenic detector technologies. High linearity is essential to add spectra from different pixels in detector arrays that are needed for high sensitivity. Here we discuss the fabrication of a new generation of MMC γ–detectors in FY2014, and the resulting improvements in energy resolution and linearity of the new design. As an example of the type of NDA that cryogenic detectors enable, we demonstrate the direct detection of Pu-242 emissions with our MMC γ–detectors in the presence of Pu-240, and show that a quantitative NDA analysis agrees with the mass spectrometry

  3. Overview of High Purity Magnesium Oxide Application and Production%高纯氧化镁的应用和生产综述

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊洁

    2012-01-01

    As an important inorganic chemical product,high purity magnesium oxide was widely used in various fields of industry.The application of high purity magnesium oxide was introduced briefly,and the condition of the domestic and foreign high-purity magnesium oxide were compared.From the long-term development,the research and production of high-purity magnesium oxide had broad prospects.%高纯氧化镁作为一种重要的无机化工产品,在工业的各个领域得到了广泛的应用。对高纯氧化镁的应用做了简单的介绍;比较了国内外高纯氧化镁的研究状况。从长远发展看,高纯氧化镁的研究和生产前景广阔。

  4. Method for converting in-situ gamma ray spectra of a portable Ge detector to an incident photon flux energy distribution based on Monte Carlo simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A matrix stripping method for the conversion of in-situ gamma ray spectrum, obtained with portable Ge detector, to photon flux energy distribution is proposed. The detector response is fully described by its stripping matrix and full absorption efficiency curve. A charge collection efficiency function is introduced in the simulation to take into account the existence of a transition zone of increasing charge collection after the inactive Ge layer. Good agreement is obtained between simulated and experimental full absorption efficiencies. The characteristic stripping matrix is determined by Monte Carlo simulation for different incident photon energies using the Geant4 toolkit system. The photon flux energy distribution is deduced by stripping the measured spectrum of the partial absorption and cosmic ray events and then applying the full absorption efficiency curve. The stripping method is applied to a measured in-situ spectrum. The value of the absorbed dose rate in air deduced from the corresponding flux energy distribution agrees well with the value measured directly in-situ.

  5. High Purity Germanium Gamma-PHA Assay of Uranium Scrap Cans Used in 321-M Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salaymeh, S. R.; Dewberry, R. A.; Casella, V.

    2001-12-01

    The Analytical Development Section of SRTC was requested by the Facilities Disposition Division (FDD) to determine the holdup of enriched uranium in the 321-M facility as part of an overall deactivation project of the facility. The 321-M facility was used to fabricate enriched uranium fuel assemblies, lithium-aluminum target tubes, neptunium assemblies, and miscellaneous components for the production reactors. The facility also includes the 324-M storage building and the passageway connecting it to 321-M. The results of the holdup assays are essential for determining compliance with the Solid Waste's Waste Acceptance Criteria, Material Control & Accountability, and to meet criticality safety controls. This report describes and documents the use of a portable HPGe detector and EG&G DART system that contains a high voltage power supply, signal processing electronics, a personal computer with Gamma-Vision software, and space to store and manipulate multiple 4096-channel gamma-ray spectra to assay for 235U content. The system was used to assay a large number of scrap cans used to store highly enriched uranium (HEU) chips and filings. This report includes a description of two efficiency calibration configurations and also the results of the assay. A description of the quality control checks is included as well.

  6. Indirect determination of Li via 74Ge(n,γ)75mGe activation reaction induced by neutrons from 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sanjiv; Reddy, G. L. N.; Rao, Pritty; Verma, Rakesh; Ramana, J. V.; Vikramkumar, S.; Raju, V. S.

    2012-03-01

    An indirect method to determine Li by 74Ge(n,γ)75mGe activation reaction induced in a high purity Ge (detector) crystal by neutrons from the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction in a typical particle-induced γ-ray emission (PIGE) spectroscopy experimental set-up is described. Performed with proton beams of energies in excess of 1.88 MeV, the threshold energy (Eth) of the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction, the determination involves the activity measurement of 75mGe isotope that has a half-life of 47.7 s and decays with the emission of 139 keV γ-rays. Rapidity, selectivity and sensitivity down to ppm levels are the attractive features of the method. It is a suitable alternative to 7Li(p,p'γ)7Li reaction based PIGE technique in the analyses of matrices that contain light elements such as Be, B, F, Na and Al in significant proportions. Interferences can arise from elements, for example V and Ti, that have Eth ⩽ 1.88 MeV for (p,n) reaction. In the case of elements such as Cu, Mo which have with Eth > 1.88 MeV, the incident proton beam energy can be judiciously selected to avoid or minimize an interference. The method, under optimized irradiation conditions, does not entail a risk of neutron stimulated degradation of the performance of the detector. Besides analytical purposes, the measurement of the 75mGe activity can serve as a powerful tool to monitor even low (˜25 n/cm2 s) thermal neutron fluxes.

  7. Space Detectors for Gamma Rays (100 MeV-100 GeV): from Egret to Fermi LAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, David J.

    2015-01-01

    The design of spaceborne high-energy (E is greater than 100 MeV) gamma-ray detectors depends on two principal factors: (1) the basic physics of detecting and measuring the properties of the gamma rays; and (2) the constraints of operating such a detector in space for an extended period. Improvements in technology have enabled major advances in detector performance, as illustrated by two successful instruments, EGRET on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory and LAT on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope.

  8. Production of D* mesons in photon-photon collisions at $\\sqrt{s}_{ee}$ = 183 GeV and 189 GeV using the OPAL detector at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Patt, J

    2000-01-01

    The inclusive production of D*/sup +or-/ mesons in photon-photon collisions has been measured using the OPAL detector at LEP at e/sup +/e/sup -/ centre-of-mass energies square root (s/sub ee/) of 183 and 189 GeV. The D*/sup +/ mesons are reconstructed in their decay to D /sup 0/ pi /sup +/ with the D/sup 0/ observed in the two decay modes K/sup -/ pi /sup +/ and K/sup -/ pi /sup +/ pi /sup -/ pi /sup +/. After background subtraction, 121+or-14 (stat.) D*/sup +or-/ events have been selected. Jets are reconstructed using a cone jet finding algorithm to separate direct and single-resolved events. Differential cross-sections d sigma /dp/sub T//sup D/* and d sigma /d eta /sup D /* as functions of the D*/sup +or-/ transverse momentum p/sub T//sup D/* and pseudorapidity eta /sup D/* are presented in the kinematic region 2

    GeV and eta /sup D/*<1.5. They are compared to next-to-leading order (NLO) perturbative QCD calculations. The total cross-section for the process e/sup +/e/sup - / to ...

  9. Prompt emission from GRB 150915A in the GeV energy range detected at ground by the New-Tupi detector

    CERN Document Server

    Augusto, C R A; de Oliveira, M N; Nepomuceno, A A; Kopenkin, V; Sinzi, T

    2016-01-01

    Since 2014, a new detector (New-Tupi) consisting of four plastic scintillators ($150 \\times 75 \\times 5 cm^3$) placed in pairs and located in Niteroi, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, has been used for the search of transient solar events and photomuons from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). On September 15, 2015, at 21:18:24 UT, the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) triggered and located GRB 150915A (trigger 655721). The GRB light curve shows a weak complex structure of long duration $T_{90}=164.7 \\pm 49.7 $ sec, and a fluence in the 15-150 keV band of $8.0 \\pm 1.8 \\times 10^{-7}erg/cm^2$. GRB 150915A was fortuitously located in the field of view of the New-Tupi detector, and a search for prompt emission in the GeV energy range is presented here. The analysis was made using the "scaler" or "single-particle" technique. The New-Tupi detector registered a muon excess peak of 6.1s duration with a signal significance $6.9\\sigma$, the signal was within the T90 duration of the Swift BAT GRB, with an estimated fluence $4.8 \\times 10^...

  10. A transient conductance technique for characterisation of deep-level defects in highly irradiated detector-grade silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Alexiev, D; Mo, L; Rosenfeld, A H

    1999-01-01

    The use of conventional capacitance-based deep-level transient spectroscopy is not applicable when defect concentrations approach the background carrier concentration. Due to this limitation the technique cannot be used for examining heavily irradiated silicon, or semi-insulating semiconductor materials. Optical deep-level transient conductance spectroscopy can overcome the limitations of capacitance-based techniques through the measurement of a conductance transient measured with a marginal oscillator. This paper provides details of the application of this method to heavily damaged high-purity silicon. Silicon-based PIN detector structures irradiated with 1 MeV neutrons, to approximately 3x10 sup 1 sup 3 n/cm sup 2 and detectors irradiated with 24 GeV/c protons, to 3.8x10 sup 1 sup 3 p/cm sup 2 , were examined. (author)

  11. Search for Pauli exclusion principle violating atomic transitions and electron decay with a p-type point contact germanium detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abgrall, N.; Arnquist, I. J.; Avignone, F. T.; Barabash, A. S.; Bertrand, F. E.; Bradley, A. W.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, M.; Buuck, M.; Caldwell, A. S.; Chan, Y. -D.; Christofferson, C. D.; Chu, P. -H.; Cuesta, C.; Detwiler, J. A.; Dunagan, C.; Efremenko, Yu.; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S. R.; Finnerty, P. S.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Gilliss, T.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Goett, J.; Green, M. P.; Gruszko, J.; Guinn, I. S.; Guiseppe, V. E.; Henning, R.; Hoppe, E. W.; Howard, S.; Howe, M. A.; Jasinski, B. R.; Keeter, K. J.; Kidd, M. F.; Konovalov, S. I.; Kouzes, R. T.; LaFerriere, B. D.; Leon, J.; MacMullin, J.; Martin, R. D.; Massarczyk, R.; Meijer, S. J.; Mertens, S.; Orrell, J. L.; O’Shaughnessy, C.; Poon, A. W. P.; Radford, D. C.; Rager, J.; Rielage, K.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Romero-Romero, E.; Shanks, B.; Shirchenko, M.; Suriano, A. M.; Tedeschi, D.; Trimble, J. E.; Varner, R. L.; Vasilyev, S.; Vetter, K.; Vorren, K.; White, B. R.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wiseman, C.; Xu, W.; Yakushev, E.; Yu, C. -H.; Yumatov, V.; Zhitnikov, I.

    2016-11-11

    A search for Pauli-exclusion-principle-violating K electron transitions was performed using 89.5 kg-d of data collected with a p-type point contact high-purity germanium detector operated at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility. A lower limit on the transition lifetime of s at 90% C.L. was set by looking for a peak at 10.6 keV resulting from the X-ray and Auger electrons present following the transition. A similar analysis was done to look for the decay of atomic K-shell electrons into neutrinos, resulting in a lower limit of s at 90% C.L. It is estimated that the Majorana Demonstrator, a 44 kg array of p-type point contact detectors that will search for the neutrinoless double-beta decay of Ge, could improve upon these exclusion limits by an order of magnitude after three years of operation.

  12. Phase transformations of high-purity PbI{sub 2} nanoparticles synthesized from lead-acid accumulator anodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malevu, T.D., E-mail: malevutd@ufs.ac.za; Ocaya, R.O.; Tshabalala, K.G.

    2016-09-01

    High-purity hexagonal lead iodide nanoparticles have been synthesized from a depleted sealed lead acid battery anode. The synthesized product was found to consist of the rare 6R polytype form of PbI{sub 2} that is thought to have good potential in photovoltaic applications. We investigate the effects of annealing time and post-melting temperature on the structure and optical properties using 1.5418 Å CuKα radiation. Photoluminescence measurements were done under 150 W/221 nm wavelength xenon excitation. Phase transformation was observed through XRD peaks when annealing time increased from 0.5–5 h. The nanoparticle grain size and inter-planar distance appeared to be independent of annealing time. PL measurements show three broad peaks in a range of 400 nm to 700 nm that are attributed to excitonic, donor–acceptor pair and luminescence bands from the deep levels.

  13. Application of a Barrier Filter at a High Purity Synthetic Graphite Plant, CRADA 99-F035, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2000-08-31

    Superior Graphite Company and the US Department of Energy have entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to study the application of ceramic barrier filters at its Hopkinsville, Kentucky graphite plant. Superior Graphite Company is a worldwide leader in the application of advanced thermal processing technology to produce high purity graphite and carbons. The objective of the CRADA is to determine the technical and economic feasibility of incorporating the use of high-temperature filters to improve the performance of the offgas treatment system. A conceptual design was developed incorporating the ceramic filters into the offgas treatment system to be used for the development of a capital cost estimate and economic feasibility assessment of this technology for improving particulate removal. This CRADA is a joint effort of Superior Graphite Company, Parsons Infrastructure and Technology Group, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the US Department of Energy (DOE).

  14. Effects of electric field on recrystallization texture evolution in cold-rolled high-purity aluminum sheet during annealing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Yan; ZHAO Xiang; HE Chang-shu; ZHAO Zhi-peng; ZUO Liang; C. ESLING

    2007-01-01

    The effects of an external DC (direct current) electric field on recrystallization texture evolution in the cold-rolled aluminum sheets with 99.99% purity were investigated by means of X-ray diffraction techniques. The cold-rolled high-purity aluminum sheets were annealed for 60 min at 200, 300 and 400 ℃, respectively with and without an external DC electric field of 800 V/mm. The results show that with DC electric field, the recrystallization cube texture is strengthened at the stage of grain growth. Possible reason for the strengthening of the recrystallization cube texture with the applied electric field may be attributed to both selected nucleation and selected growth of cube oriented crystal nuclei.

  15. Formation and annihilation of intrinsic defects induced by electronic excitation in high-purity crystalline SiO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajihara, Koichi [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Urban Environmental Sciences, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 1-1 Minami-Osawa, Hachioji 192-0397 (Japan); Skuja, Linards [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Latvia, Kengaraga iela 8, LV1063 Riga (Latvia); Hosono, Hideo [Materials and Structures Laboratory and Frontier Research Center, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan)

    2013-04-14

    Formation and thermal annihilation of intrinsic defects in {alpha}-quartz were examined using high-purity samples, while minimizing the contributions of reactions involving metallic impurities. Electronic excitation with {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays was employed to avoid radiation-induced amorphization. The results clearly show that formation of oxygen vacancies (Si-Si bonds) as a result of decomposition of regular Si-O-Si bonds (Frenkel process) is the dominant intrinsic defect process. Compared with amorphous SiO{sub 2}, in {alpha}-quartz, the formation yield of Si-Si bonds is an order of magnitude smaller, the 7.6 eV optical absorption band is less broadened, and their thermal annihilation is complete at a lower temperature, around the {alpha}-{beta} quartz transition. In contrast, radiation-induced interstitial oxygen atoms practically do not form interstitial oxygen molecules.

  16. Industrial-scale separation of high-purity single-chirality single-wall carbon nanotubes for biological imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yomogida, Yohei; Tanaka, Takeshi; Zhang, Minfang; Yudasaka, Masako; Wei, Xiaojun; Kataura, Hiromichi

    2016-06-28

    Single-chirality, single-wall carbon nanotubes are desired due to their inherent physical properties and performance characteristics. Here, we demonstrate a chromatographic separation method based on a newly discovered chirality-selective affinity between carbon nanotubes and a gel containing a mixture of the surfactants. In this system, two different selectivities are found: chiral-angle selectivity and diameter selectivity. Since the chirality of nanotubes is determined by the chiral angle and diameter, combining these independent selectivities leads to high-resolution single-chirality separation with milligram-scale throughput and high purity. Furthermore, we present efficient vascular imaging of mice using separated single-chirality (9,4) nanotubes. Due to efficient absorption and emission, blood vessels can be recognized even with the use of ∼100-fold lower injected dose than the reported value for pristine nanotubes. Thus, 1 day of separation provides material for up to 15,000 imaging experiments, which is acceptable for industrial use.

  17. Recycling of AZ31 Mg alloy with high purity Mg deposition layer by hot working (solid recycling)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chino, Y.; Mabuchi, M. [Inst. for Structural and Engineering Materials, National Inst. of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Nagoya (Japan); Yamamoto, A.; Iwasaki, H.; Tsubakino, H. [Div. of Materials Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Himeji Inst. of Tech., Himeji (Japan)

    2003-07-01

    Solid recycling of AZ31 Mg alloy with vapor deposition coating layer of high purity Mg was evaluated. In the open die forging experiments, two AZ31 Mg alloy specimens with the pure Mg layer were sufficiently bonded by forging at 673 K. Furthermore, the Al and Zn of the AZ31 substrate diffused up to the center of the pure Mg layer. By the theoretical analysis, it is suggested that the grain boundary diffusion enhanced by grain refinement due to hot forging contributes to the solid state bonding of the specimens. Also, the solid recycled specimen was fabricated from the AZ31 Mg substrate with pure Mg layer by hot extrusion at 673 K. The solid recycled specimen showed almost the same tensile properties as the virgin extruded specimen. This is probably related not only to the grain boundary diffusion but also severe plastic deformation by hot extrusion. (orig.)

  18. Engineering of high purity ultra-long optical needle field through reversing the electric dipole array radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiming; Chen, Weibin; Zhan, Qiwen

    2010-10-11

    We report a new method to create high purity longitudinally polarized field with extremely long depth of focus in the focal volume of a high numerical aperture (NA) objective lens. Through reversing the radiated field from an electric dipole array situated near the focus of the high-NA lens, the required incident field distribution in the pupil plane for the creation of an ultra-long optical needle field can be found. Numerical examples demonstrate that an optical needle field with a depth of focus up to 8λ is obtainable. Throughout the depth of focus, this engineered focal field maintains a diffraction limited transverse spot size (<0.43λ) with high longitudinal polarization purity. From the calculated pupil plane distribution, a simplified discrete complex pupil filter can be designed and significant improvements over the previously reported complex filters are clearly demonstrated.

  19. Dielectric Performance of a High Purity HTCC Alumina at High Temperatures - a Comparison Study with Other Polycrystalline Alumina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liangyu

    2014-01-01

    A very high purity (99.99+%) high temperature co-fired ceramic (HTCC) alumina has recently become commercially available. The raw material of this HTCC alumina is very different from conventional HTCC alumina, and more importantly there is no glass additive in this alumina material for co-firing processing. Previously, selected HTCC and LTCC (low temperature co-fired ceramic) alumina materials were evaluated at high temperatures as dielectric and compared to a regularly sintered 96% polycrystalline alumina (96% Al2O3), where 96% alumina was used as the benchmark. A prototype packaging system based on regular 96% alumina with Au thickfilm metallization successfully facilitated long term testing of high temperature silicon carbide (SiC) electronic devices for over 10,000 hours at 500 C. In order to evaluate this new high purity HTCC alumina for possible high temperature packaging applications, the dielectric properties of this HTCC alumina substrate were measured and compared with those of 96% alumina and a previously tested LTCC alumina from room temperature to 550 C at frequencies of 120 Hz, 1 KHz, 10 KHz, 100 KHz, and 1 MHz. A parallel-plate capacitive device with dielectric of the HTCC alumina and precious metal electrodes were used for measurements of the dielectric constant and dielectric loss of the co-fired alumina material in the temperature and frequency ranges. The capacitance and AC parallel conductance of the capacitive device were directly measured by an AC impedance meter, and the dielectric constant and parallel AC conductivity of the dielectric were calculated from the capacitance and conductance measurement results. The temperature and frequency dependent dielectric constant, AC conductivity, and dissipation factor of the HTCC alumina substrate are presented and compared to those of 96% alumina and a selected LTCC alumina. Other technical advantages of this new co-fired material for possible high packaging applications are also discussed.

  20. High-purity 60GHz band millimeter-wave generation based on optically injected semiconductor laser under subharmonic microwave modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Li; Xia, Guangqiong; Chen, Jianjun; Tang, Xi; Liang, Qing; Wu, Zhengmao

    2016-08-08

    Based on an optically injected semiconductor laser (OISL) operating at period-one (P1) nonlinear dynamical state, high-purity millimeter-wave generation at 60 GHz band is experimentally demonstrated via 1/4 and 1/9 subharmonic microwave modulation (the order of subharmonic is with respect to the frequency fc of the acquired 60 GHz band millimeter-wave but not the fundamental frequency f0 of P1 oscillation). Optical injection is firstly used to drive a semiconductor laser into P1 state. For the OISL operates at P1 state with a fundamental frequency f0 = 49.43 GHz, by introducing 1/4 subharmonic modulation with a modulation frequency of fm = 15.32 GHz, a 60 GHz band millimeter-wave with central frequency fc = 61.28 GHz ( = 4fm) is experimentally generated, whose linewidth is below 1.6 kHz and SSB phase noise at offset frequency 10 kHz is about -96 dBc/Hz. For fm is varied between 13.58 GHz and 16.49 GHz, fc can be tuned from 54.32 GHz to 65.96 GHz under matched modulation power Pm. Moreover, for the OISL operates at P1 state with f0 = 45.02 GHz, a higher order subharmonic modulation (1/9) is introduced into the OISL for obtaining high-purity 60 GHz band microwave signal. With (fm, Pm) = (7.23 GHz, 13.00 dBm), a microwave signal at 65.07 GHz ( = 9fm) with a linewidth below 1.6 kHz and a SSB phase noise less than -98 dBc/Hz is experimentally generated. Also, the central frequency fc can be tuned in a certain range through adjusting fm and selecting matched Pm.

  1. Characterization of a broad energy germanium detector and application to neutrinoless double beta decay search in Ge-76

    CERN Document Server

    Agostini, M; Brugnera, R; Cattadori, C M; D'Andragora, A; di Vacri, A; Garfagnini, A; Laubenstein, M; Pandola, L; Ur, C A

    2010-01-01

    The performance of a 630 g commercial broad energy germanium (BEGe) detector has been systematically investigated. Energy resolution, linearity, stability vs. high-voltage (HV) bias, thickness and uniformity of dead layers have been measured and found to be excellent. Special attention has been dedicated to the study of the detector response as a function of bias HV. The nominal depletion voltage being 3000 V, the detector under investigation shows a peculiar behavior for biases around 2000 V: in a narrow range of about 100 V the charge collection is strongly reduced. The detector seems to be composed by two parts: a small volume around the HV contact where charges are efficiently collected as at higher voltage, and a large volume where charges are poorly collected. A qualitative explanation of this behavior is presented. An event-by-event pulse shape analysis based on A/E (maximum amplitude of the current pulse over the total energy released in the detector) has been applied to events in different energy reg...

  2. Astroparticle physics with a customized low-background broad energy Germanium detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aalseth, Craig E.; Amman, M.; Avignone, Frank T.; Back, Henning O.; Barabash, Alexander S.; Barbeau, P. S.; Bergevin, M.; Bertrand, F.; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Bugg, William; Burritt, Tom H.; Busch, Matthew; Capps, Greg L.; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Collar, J. I.; Cooper, R. J.; Creswick, R.; Detwiler, Jason A.; Diaz, J.; Doe, Peter J.; Efremenko, Yuri; Egorov, Viatcheslav; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, Steven R.; Ely, James H.; Esterline, James H.; Farach, H. A.; Fast, James E.; Fields, N.; Finnerty, P.; Fujikawa, Brian; Fuller, Erin S.; Gehman, Victor M.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Guiseppe, Vincente; Gusey, K.; Hallin, A. L.; Harper, Gregory; Hazama, R.; Henning, Reyco; Hime, Andrew; Hoppe, Eric W.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Howe, M. A.; Johnson, R. A.; Keeter, K.; Keillor, Martin E.; Keller, C.; Kephart, Jeremy D.; Kidd, Mary; Knecht, A.; Kochetov, Oleg; Konovalov, S.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Leviner, L.; Loach, J. C.; Luke, P.; MacMullin, S.; Marino, Michael G.; Martin, R. D.; Mei, Dong-Ming; Miley, Harry S.; Miller, M. L.; Mizouni, Leila; Myers, Allan W.; Nomachi, Masaharu; Orrell, John L.; Peterson, David; Phillips, D.; Poon, Alan; Prior, Gersende; Qian, J.; Radford, D. C.; Rielage, Keith; Robertson, R. G. H.; Rodriguez, Larry; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof P.; Salazar, Harold; Schubert, Alexis G.; Shima, T.; Shirchenko, M.; Steele, David; Strain, J.; Swift, Gary; Thomas, K.; Timkin, V.; Tornow, W.; Van Wechel, T. D.; Vanyushin, I.; Varner, R. L.; Vetter, Kai; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wolfe, B. A.; Xiang, W.; Yakushev, E.; Yaver, Harold; Young, A.; Yu, Chang-Hong; Yumatov, Vladimir; Zhang, C.; Zimmerman, S.

    2011-10-01

    The Majorana Collaboration is building the Majorana Demonstrator, a 60 kg array of high purity germanium detectors housed in an ultra-low background shield at the Sanford Underground Laboratory in Lead, SD. The Majorana Demonstrator will search for neutrinoless double-beta decay of 76Ge while demonstrating the feasibility of a tonne-scale experiment. It may also carry out a dark matter search in the 1-10 GeV/c² mass range. We have found that customized Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detectors produced by Canberra have several desirable features for a neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment, including low electronic noise, excellent pulse shape analysis capabilities, and simple fabrication. We have deployed a customized BEGe, the Majorana Low-Background BEGe at Kimballton (MALBEK), in a low-background cryostat and shield at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility in Virginia. This paper will focus on the detector characteristics and measurements that can be performed with such a radiation detector in a low-background environment.

  3. Astroparticle Physics with a Customized Low-Background Broad Energy Germanium Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aalseth, C E; Avignone, F T; Back, H O; Barabash, A S; Barbeau, P S; Bergevin, M; Bertrand, F E; Boswell, M; Brudanin, V; Bugg, W; Burritt, T H; Busch, M; Capps, G; Chan, Y-D; Collar, J I; Cooper, R J; Creswick, R; Detwiler, J A; Diaz, J; Doe, P J; Efremenko, Yu; Egorov, V; Ejiri, H; Elliott, S R; Ely, J; Esterline, J; Farach, H; Fast, J E; Fields, N; Finnerty, P; Fujikawa, B; Fuller, E; Gehman, V M; Giovanetti, G K; Guiseppe, V E; Gusey, K; Hallin, A L; Harper, G C; Hazama, R; Henning, R; Hime, A; Hoppe, E W; Hossbach, T W; Howe, M A; Johnson, R A; Keeter, K J; Keillor, M; Keller, C; Kephart, J D; Kidd, M F; Knecht, A; Kochetov, O; Konovalov, S I; Kouzes, R T; Leviner, L; Loach, J C; Luke, P N; MacMullin, S; Marino, M G; Martin, R D; Mei, D -M; Miley, H S; Miller, M L; Mizouni, L; Meyers, A W; Nomachi, M; Orrell, J L; Peterson, D; Phillips, D G; Poon, A W P; Prior, G; Qian, J; Radford, D C; Rielage, K; Robertson, R G H; Rodriguez, L; Rykaczewski, K P; Salazar, H; Schubert, A G; Shima, T; Shirchenko, M; Steele, D; Strain, J; Swift, G; Thomas, K; Timkin, V; Tornow, W; Van Wechel, T D; Vanyushin, I; Varner, R L; Vetter, K; Wilkerson, J F; Wolfe, B A; Xiang, W; Yakushev, E; Yaver, H; Young, A R; Yu, C -H; Yumatov, V; Zhang, C; Zimmerman, S

    2010-01-01

    The MAJORANA Collaboration is building the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, a 60 kg array of high purity germanium detectors housed in an ultra-low background shield at the Sanford Underground Laboratory in Lead, SD. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR will search for neutrinoless double-beta decay of 76Ge while demonstrating the feasibility of a tonne-scale experiment. It may also carry out a dark matter search in the 1-10 GeV/c^2 mass range. We have found that customized Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detectors produced by Canberra have several desirable features for a neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment, including low electronic noise, excellent pulse shape analysis capabilities, and simple fabrication. We have deployed a customized BEGe, the MAJORANA Low-Background BEGe at Kimballton (MALBEK), in a low-background cryostat and shield at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility in Virginia. This paper will focus on the detector characteristics and measurements that can be performed with such a radiation detector in a ...

  4. Surface events in HPGe detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abt, Iris; Dinter, Sabine; Faulstich, Florian; Majorovits, Bela; Stelzer, Franz [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Munich (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Events on or close to the surface of high purity germanium, HPGe, detectors can introduce backgrounds in low background applications of such devices. The Galatea test-stand, especially developed and constructed at the MPI fuer Physik allows an almost full surface scan of a detector with alpha and beta sources. Events induced by alpha and beta particles can be characterized and surface effects can be studied. First comparisons between data and Monte Carlo are presented.

  5. Charged-particle multiplicities in $pp$ interactions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 900 GeV measured with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, G; Abbott, B; Abdallah, J; Abdelalim, A A; Abdesselam, A; Abdinov, O; Abi, B; Abolins, M; Abramowicz, H; Abreu, H; Acerbi, E; Acharya, B S; Ackers, M; Adams, D L; Addy, T N; Adelman, J; Aderholz, M; Adorisio, C; Adragna, P; Adye, T; Aefsky, S; Aguilar-Saavedra, J A; Aharrouche, M; Ahlen, S P; Ahles, F; Ahmad, A; Ahmed, H; Ahsan, M; Aielli, G; Akdogan, T; Åkesson, P F; Åkesson, T P A; Akimoto, G; Akimov, A V; Aktas, A; Alam, M S; Alam, M A; Albert, J; Albrand, S; Aleksa, M; Aleksandrov, I N; Aleppo, M; Alessandria, F; Alexa, C; Alexander, G; Alexandre, G; Alexopoulos, T; Alhroob, M; Aliev, M; Alimonti, G; Alison, J; Aliyev, M; Allport, P P; Allwood-Spiers, S E; Almond, J; Aloisio, A; Alon, R; Alonso, A; Alonso, J; Alviggi, M G; Amako, K; Amaral, P; Ambrosini, G; Ambrosio, G; Amelung, C; Ammosov, V V; Amorim, A; Amoros, G; Amram, N; Anastopoulos, C; Andeen, T; Anders, C F; Anderson, K J; Andreazza, A; Andrei, V; Andrieux, M L; Anduaga, X S; Angerami, A; Anghinolfi, F; Anjos, N; Annovi, A; Antonaki, A; Antonelli, M; Antonelli, S; Antos, J; Antunovic, B; Anulli, F; Aoun, S; Arabidze, G; Aracena, I; Arai, Y; Arce, A T H; Archambault, J P; Arfaoui, S; Arguin, J F; Argyropoulos, T; Arik, E; Arik, M; Armbruster, A J; Arms, K E; Armstrong, S R; Arnaez, O; Arnault, C; Artamonov, A; Arutinov, D; Asai, M; Asai, S; Asfandiyarov, R; Ask, S; Åsman, B; Asner, D; Asquith, L; Assamagan, K; Astbury, A; Astvatsatourov, A; Athar, B; Atoian, G; Aubert, B; Auerbach, B; Auge, E; Augsten, K; Aurousseau, M; Austin, N; Avolio, G; Avramidou, R; Axen, D; Ay, C; Azuelos, G; Azuma, Y; Baak, M A; Baccaglioni, G; Bacci, C; Bach, A M; Bachacou, H; Bachas, K; Bachy, G; Backes, M; Badescu, E; Bagnaia, P; Bai, Y; Bailey, D C; Bain, T; Baines, J T; Baker, O K; Baker, M D; Baker, S; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F; Banas, E; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Banfi, D; Bangert, A; Bansal, V; Baranov, S P; Baranov, S; Barashkou, A; Barber, T; Barberio, E L; Barberis, D; Barbero, M; Bardin, D Y; Barillari, T; Barisonzi, M; Barklow, T; Barlow, N; Barnett, B M; Barnett, R M; Baroncelli, A; Barone, M; Barr, A J; Barreiro, F; Barreiro Guimaraes da Costa, J; Barrillon, P; Bartheld, V; Bartko, H; Bartoldus, R; Bartsch, D; Bates, R L; Bathe, S; Batkova, L; Batley, J R; Battaglia, A; Battistin, M; Battistoni, G; Bauer, F; Bawa, H S; Bazalova, M; Beare, B; Beau, T; Beauchemin, P H; Beccherle, R; Becerici, N; Bechtle, P; Beck, G A; Beck, H P; Beckingham, M; Becks, K H; Beddall, A J; Beddall, A; Bednyakov, V A; Bee, C; Begel, M; Behar Harpaz, S; Behera, P K; Beimforde, M; Belanger, G A N; Belanger-Champagne, C; Belhorma, B; Bell, P J; Bell, W H; Bella, G; Bellagamba, L; Bellina, F; Bellomo, G; Bellomo, M; Belloni, A; Belotskiy, K; Beltramello, O; Belymam, A; Ben Ami, S; Benary, O; Benchekroun, D; Benchouk, C; Bendel, M; Benedict, B H; Benekos, N; Benhammou, Y; Benincasa, G P; Benjamin, D P; Benoit, M; Bensinger, J R; Benslama, K; Bentvelsen, S; Beretta, M; Berge, D; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E; Berger, N; Berghaus, F; Berglund, E; Beringer, J; Bernardet, K; Bernat, P; Bernhard, R; Bernius, C; Berry, T; Bertin, A; Bertinelli, F; Bertolucci, S; Besana, M I; Besson, N; Bethke, S; Bianchi, R M; Bianco, M; Biebel, O; Bieri, M; Biesiada, J; Biglietti, M; Bilokon, H; Binder, M; Bindi, M; Binet, S; Bingul, A; Bini, C; Biscarat, C; Bischof, R; Bitenc, U; Black, K M; Blair, R E; Blanch, O; Blanchard, J B; Blanchot, G; Blocker, C; Blocki, J; Blondel, A; Blum, W; Blumenschein, U; Boaretto, C; Bobbink, G J; Bocci, A; Bocian, D; Bock, R; Boehler, M; Boehm, M; Boek, J; Boelaert, N; Böser, S; Bogaerts, J A; Bogouch, A; Bohm, C; Bohm, J; Boisvert, V; Bold, T; Boldea, V; Boldyrev, A; Bondarenko, V G; Bondioli, M; Bonino, R; Boonekamp, M; Boorman, G; Boosten, M; Booth, C N; Booth, P S L; Booth, P; Booth, J R A; Bordoni, S; Borer, C; Borer, K; Borisov, A; Borissov, G; Borjanovic, I; Borroni, S; Bos, K; Boscherini, D; Bosman, M; Boterenbrood, H; Botterill, D; Bouchami, J; Boudreau, J; Bouhova-Thacker, E V; Boulahouache, C; Bourdarios, C; Boveia, A; Boyd, J; Boyer, B H; Boyko, I R; Bozhko, N I; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I; Braccini, S; Bracinik, J; Braem, A; Brambilla, E; Branchini, P; Brandenburg, G W; Brandt, A; Brandt, A; Brandt, G; Brandt, O; Bratzler, U; Brau, B; Brau, J E; Braun, H M; Bravo, S; Brelier, B; Bremer, J; Brenner, R; Bressler, S; Breton, D; Brett, N D; Bright-Thomas, P G; Britton, D; Brochu, F M; Brock, I; Brock, R; Brodbeck, T J; Brodet, E; Broggi, F; Bromberg, C; Brooijmans, G; Brooks, W K; Brown, G; Brubaker, E; Bruckman de Renstrom, P A; Bruncko, D; Bruneliere, R; Brunet, S; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Bruschi, M; Buanes, T; Bucci, F; Buchanan, J; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, P; Buckley, A G; Budagov, I A; Budick, B; Büscher, V; Bugge, L; Buira-Clark, D; Buis, E J; Bujor, F; Bulekov, O; Bunse, M; Buran, T; Burckhart, H; Burdin, S; Burgess, T; Burke, S; Busato, E; Bussey, P; Buszello, C P; Butin, F; Butler, B; Butler, J M; Buttar, C M; Butterworth, J M; Byatt, T; Caballero, J; Cabrera Urban, S; Caccia, M; Caforio, D; Cakir, O; Calafiura, P; Calderini, G; Calfayan, P; Calkins, R; Caloba, L P; Caloi, R; Calvet, D; Camard, A; Camarri, P; Cambiaghi, M; Cameron, D; Cammin, J; Campana, S; Campanelli, M; Canale, V; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Cantero, J; Capasso, L; Capeans Garrido, M D M; Caprini, I; Caprini, M; Caprio, M; Capua, M; Caputo, R; Caramarcu, C; Cardarelli, R; Cardiel Sas, L; Carli, T; Carlino, G; Carminati, L; Caron, B; Caron, S; Carpentieri, C; Carrillo Montoya, G D; Carron Montero, S; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Carvalho, J; Casadei, D; Casado, M P; Cascella, M; Caso, C; Castaneda Hernadez, A M; Castaneda-Miranda, E; Castillo Gimenez, V; Castro, N F; Castrovillari, F; Cataldi, G; Cataneo, F; Catinaccio, A; Catmore, J R; Cattai, A; Cattani, G; Caughron, S; Cauz, D; Cavallari, A; Cavalleri, P; Cavalli, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cavasinni, V; Cazzato, A; Ceradini, F; Cerna, C; Cerqueira, A S; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Cerutti, F; Cervetto, M; Cetin, S A; Cevenini, F; Chafaq, A; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K; Chapman, J D; Chapman, J W; Chareyre, E; Charlton, D G; Charron, S; Chatterjii, S; Chavda, V; Cheatham, S; Chekanov, S; Chekulaev, S V; Chelkov, G A; Chen, H; Chen, L; Chen, S; Chen, T; Chen, X; Cheng, S; Cheplakov, A; Chepurnov, V F; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R; Tcherniatine, V; Chesneanu, D; Cheu, E; Cheung, S L; Chevalier, L; Chevallier, F; Chiarella, V; Chiefari, G; Chikovani, L; Childers, J T; Chilingarov, A; Chiodini, G; Chizhov, V; Choudalakis, G; Chouridou, S; Christiansen, T; Christidi, I A; Christov, A; Chromek-Burckhart, D; Chu, M L; Chudoba, J; Ciapetti, G; Cicalini, E; Ciftci, A K; Ciftci, R; Cinca, D; Cindro, V; Ciobotaru, M D; Ciocca, C; Ciocio, A; Cirilli, M; Citterio, M; Clark, A; Clark, Philip James; Cleland, W; Clemens, J C; Clement, B; Clement, C; Clements, D; Clifft, R W; Coadou, Y; Cobal, M; Coccaro, A; Cochran, J; Coco, R; Coe, P; Coelli, S; Coggeshall, J; Cogneras, E; Cojocaru, C D; Colas, J; Cole, B; Colijn, A P; Collard, C; Collins, N J; Collins-Tooth, C; Collot, J; 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Wicek, F; Wicke, D; Wickens, F J; Wiedenmann, W; Wielers, M; Wienemann, P; Wiesmann, M; Wiesmann, M; Wiglesworth, C; Wiik, L A M; Wildauer, A; Wildt, M A; Wilhelm, I; Wilkens, H G; Williams, E; Williams, H H; Willis, W; Willocq, S; Wilson, J A; Wilson, M G; Wilson, A; Wingerter-Seez, I; Winklmeier, F; Wittgen, M; Woehrling, E; Wolter, M W; Wolters, H; Wosiek, B K; Wotschack, J; Woudstra, M J; Wraight, K; Wright, C; Wright, D; Wrona, B; Wu, S L; Wu, X; Wuestenfeld, J; Wulf, E; Wunstorf, R; Wynne, B M; Xaplanteris, L; Xella, S; Xie, S; Xie, Y; Xu, D; Xu, G; Xu, N; Yamada, M; Yamamoto, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamamoto, S; Yamamura, T; Yamaoka, J; Yamazaki, T; Yamazaki, Y; Yan, Z; Yang, H; Yang, S; Yang, U K; Yang, Y; Yang, Z; Yao, W M; Yao, Y; Yarradoddi, K; Yasu, Y; Ye, J; Ye, S; Yilmaz, M; Yoosoofmiya, R; Yorita, K; Yoshida, H; Yoshida, R; Young, C; Youssef, S P; Yu, D; Yu, J; Yuan, J; Yuan, L; Yurkewicz, A; Zaets, V G; Zaidan, R; Zaitsev, A M; Zajacova, Z; Zalite, Yo K; Zambrano, V; Zanello, L; Zarzhitsky, P; Zaytsev, A; Zdrazil, M; Zeitnitz, C; Zeller, M; Zema, P F; Zemla, A; Zendler, C; Zenin, A V; Zenin, O; Zenis, T; Zenonos, Z; Zenz, S; Zerwas, D; Zevi della Porta, G; Zhan, Z; Zhang, H; Zhang, J; Zhang, Q; Zhang, X; Zhao, L; Zhao, T; Zhao, Z; Zhemchugov, A; Zheng, S; Zhong, J; Zhou, B; Zhou, N; Zhou, Y; Zhu, C G; Zhu, H; Zhu, Y; Zhuang, X; Zhuravlov, V; Zilka, B; Zimmermann, R; Zimmermann, S; Zimmermann, S; Ziolkowski, M; Zitoun, R; Zivkovic, L; Zmouchko, V V; Zobernig, G; Zoccoli, A; Zolnierowski, Y; Zsenei, A; zur Nedden, M; Zutshi, V

    2010-01-01

    The first measurements from proton-proton collisions recorded with the ATLAS detector at the LHC are presented. Data were collected in December 2009 using a minimum-bias trigger during collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 900 GeV. The charged-particle multiplicity, its dependence on transverse momentum and pseudorapidity, and the relationship between mean transverse momentum and charged-particle multiplicity are measured for events with at least one charged particle in the kinematic range |eta|500 MeV. The measurements are compared to Monte Carlo models of proton-proton collisions and to results from other experiments at the same centre-of-mass energy. The charged-particle multiplicity per event and unit of pseudorapidity at eta = 0 is measured to be 1.333 +/- 0.003 (stat.) +/- 0.040 (syst.), which is 5-15% higher than the Monte Carlo models predict.

  6. Charged-particle multiplicities in $pp$ interactions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 900 GeV measured with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A.A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acerbi, E.; Acharya, B.S.; Ackers, M.; Adams, D.L.; Addy, T.N.; Adelman, J.; Aderholz, M.; Adorisio, C.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J.A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S.P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmed, H.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Akesson, P.F.; Akesson, T.P.A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A.V.; Aktas, A.; Alam, M.S.; Alam, M.A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I.N.; Aleppo, M.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Aliyev, M.; Allport, P.P.; Allwood-Spiers, S.E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, J.; Alviggi, M.G.; Amako, K.; Amaral, P.; Ambrosini, G.; Ambrosio, G.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V.V.; Amorim, A.; Amoros, G.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C.F.; Anderson, K.J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Andrieux, M.L.; Anduaga, X.S.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonelli, S.; Antos, J.; Antunovic, B.; Anulli, F.; Aoun, S.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A.T.H.; Archambault, J.P.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J.F.; Argyropoulos, T.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A.J.; Arms, K.E.; Armstrong, S.R.; Arnaez, O.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, M.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Asner, D.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Athar, B.; Atoian, G.; Aubert, B.; Auerbach, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Austin, N.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Ay, C.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M.A.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A.M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Bachy, G.; Backes, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D.C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J.T.; Baker, O.K.; Baker, M.D.; Baker, S.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, S.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Baranov, S.P.; Baranov, S.; Barashkou, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E.L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D.Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B.M.; Barnett, R.M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, M.; Barr, A.J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Bartheld, V.; Bartko, H.; Bartoldus, R.; Bartsch, D.; Bates, R.L.; Bathe, S.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J.R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Battistoni, G.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H.S.; Bazalova, M.; Beare, B.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P.H.; Beccherle, R.; Becerici, N.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, G.A.; Beck, H.P.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K.H.; Beddall, A.J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V.A.; Bee, C.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Behera, P.K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger, G.A.N.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Belhorma, B.; Bell, P.J.; Bell, W.H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, G.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Belymam, A.; Ben Ami, S.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Benchouk, C.; Bendel, M.; Benedict, B.H.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benincasa, G.P.; Benjamin, D.P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J.R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernardet, K.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertin, A.; Bertinelli, F.; Bertolucci, S.; Besana, M.I.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bianchi, R.M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieri, M.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Binder, M.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bischof, R.; Bitenc, U.; Black, K.M.; Blair, R.E.; Blanch, O.; Blanchard, J.B.; Blanchot, G.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Boaretto, C.; Bobbink, G.J.; Bocci, A.; Bocian, D.; Bock, R.; Boehler, M.; Boehm, M.; Boek, J.; Boelaert, N.; Boser, S.; Bogaerts, J.A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A.; Bondarenko, V.G.; Bondioli, M.; Bonino, R.; Boonekamp, M.; Boorman, G.; Boosten, M.; Booth, C.N.; Booth, P.S.L.; Booth, P.; Booth, J.R.A.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borer, K.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borroni, S.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Botterill, D.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.V.; Boulahouache, C.; Bourdarios, C.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyer, B.H.; Boyko, I.R.; Bozhko, N.I.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Braccini, S.; Bracinik, J.; Braem, A.; Brambilla, E.; Branchini, P.; Brandenburg, G.W.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J.E.; Braun, H.M.; Bravo, S.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Breton, D.; Brett, N.D.; Bright-Thomas, P.G.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F.M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brodbeck, T.J.

    2010-01-01

    The first measurements from proton-proton collisions recorded with the ATLAS detector at the LHC are presented. Data were collected in December 2009 using a minimum-bias trigger during collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 900 GeV. The charged-particle multiplicity, its dependence on transverse momentum and pseudorapidity, and the relationship between mean transverse momentum and charged-particle multiplicity are measured for events with at least one charged particle in the kinematic range |eta|500 MeV. The measurements are compared to Monte Carlo models of proton-proton collisions and to results from other experiments at the same centre-of-mass energy. The charged-particle multiplicity per event and unit of pseudorapidity at eta = 0 is measured to be 1.333 +/- 0.003 (stat.) +/- 0.040 (syst.), which is 5-15% higher than the Monte Carlo models predict.

  7. Superconducting nanowire single photon detectors fabricated from an amorphous Mo{sub 0.75}Ge{sub 0.25} thin film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, V. B.; Lita, A. E.; Vissers, M. R.; Marsili, F.; Pappas, D. P.; Mirin, R. P.; Nam, S. W. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 325 Broadway, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States)

    2014-07-14

    We present the characteristics of superconducting nanowire single photon detectors (SNSPDs) fabricated from amorphous Mo{sub 0.75}Ge{sub 0.25} thin-films. Fabricated devices show a saturation of the internal detection efficiency at temperatures below 1 K, with system dark count rates below 500 cps. Operation in a closed-cycle cryocooler at 2.5 K is possible with system detection efficiencies exceeding 20% for SNSPDs which have not been optimized for high detection efficiency. Jitter is observed to vary between 69 ps at 250 mK and 187 ps at 2.5 K using room temperature amplifiers.

  8. Simulation for photon detection in spectrometric system of high purity (HPGe) using MCNPX code; Simulacao de deteccao de fotons em sistema espectrometrico de alta pureza (HPGe) usando o codigo MCNPX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correa, Guilherme Jorge de Souza

    2013-07-01

    The Brazilian National Commission of Nuclear Energy defines parameters for classification and management of radioactive waste in accordance with the activity of materials. The efficiency of a detection system is crucial to determine the real activity of a radioactive source. When it's possible, the system's calibration should be performed using a standard source. Unfortunately, there are only a few cases that it can be done this way, considering the difficulty of obtaining appropriate standard sources for each type of measurement. So, computer simulations can be performed to assist in calculating of the efficiency of the system and, consequently, also auxiliary the classification of radioactive waste. This study aims to model a high purity germanium (HPGe) detector with MCNPX code, approaching the spectral values computationally obtained of the values experimentally obtained for the photopeak of {sup 137}Cs. The approach will be made through changes in outer dead layer of the germanium crystal modeled. (author)

  9. 高纯镓制备技术的研究进展%Study Status of Preparing Method for High-purity Gallium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    厉英; 曾杰; 闫晨; 刘杰

    2013-01-01

    High-purity gallium is mainly used in wireless communication and photoelectric semiconductor field in the form of GaAs, GaP and GaN. With the rapid development of the market on 3G smartphone and LED, the de mand for high-purity gallium increases steadily, so it is essential to enhance the research and production of high-purity gallium. The related methods for preparing high-purity gallium are reviewed, the advantages and disadvantages of the various methods are compared. It is pointed out that the combined process is an efficient and feasible method to produ cing high-purity gallium.%高纯镓主要以砷化镓、磷化镓、氮化镓的形式应用于无线通讯和光电半导体领域;随着3G智能手机、LED市场的快速发展,对高纯镓产品需求越来越大,因此应加强对高纯镓的研制和生产.总结了高纯镓的相关制备方法,分析比较了各种方法的优缺点,指出联合法是生产高纯镓的高效可行的方法.

  10. Search for An Annual Modulation in Three Years of CoGeNT Dark Matter Detector Data

    CERN Document Server

    Aalseth, C E; Colaresi, J; Collar, J I; Leon, J Diaz; Fast, J E; Fields, N E; Hossbach, T W; Knecht, A; Kos, M S; Marino, M G; Miley, H S; Miller, M L; Orrell, J L; Yocum, K M

    2014-01-01

    Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) are well-established dark matter candidates. WIMP interactions with sensitive detectors are expected to display a characteristic annual modulation in rate. We release a dataset spanning 3.4 years of operation from a low-background germanium detector, designed to search for this signature. A previously reported modulation persists, concentrated in a region of the energy spectrum populated by an exponential excess of unknown origin. Its phase and period agree with phenomenological expectations, but its amplitude is a factor $\\sim$4-7 larger than predicted for a standard WIMP galactic halo. We consider the possibility of a non-Maxwellian local halo velocity distribution as a plausible explanation, able to help reconcile recently reported WIMP search anomalies.

  11. Low Mass Dimuon Production in p-A Collisions at 400 GeV/c with the NA60 Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Uras, Antonio; De Falco, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    The NA60 experiment has studied low-mass muon pair production in proton-nucleus collisions with a system of Be, Cu, In, W, Pb and U targets using a 400 GeV/c proton beam at the CERN SPS. The mass spectrum is well described by the superposition of the two-body and Dalitz decays of the light neutral mesons eta, rho, omega, eta' and phi. A new measurement of the electromagnetic transition form factors of the eta and omega was performed. The values found agree with the previous available measurements, improving their uncertainty thanks to the higher statistics, and confirm the discrepancy with the prediction of the Vector Meson Dominance (VMD) model in the case of the electromagnetic form factor of the omega meson; for this latter, the comparison of the data to an improved calculation including also a direct point-like term is discussed. The pT spectra for the omega and phi mesons are studied in the full pT range accessible, up to pT = 2 GeV/c. The pT spectrum of the eta meson is also considered, starting from pT...

  12. Display of a high-pT H → ZZ* → eeμμ decay (mH = 130 GeV), after full simulation and reconstruction in the ATLAS detector

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS, Experiment

    2014-01-01

    The four leptons and the recoiling jet with ET = 135 GeV are clearly visible. Hits in the Inner Detector are shown in green for the four reconstructed leptons, both for the precision tracker (pixel and silicon micro-strip detectors) at the inner radii and for the transition radiation tracker at the outer radii. The other tracks reconstructed with pT > 0.5 GeV in the Inner Detector are shown in blue. The two electrons are depicted as reconstructed tracks in yellow and their energy deposits in each layer of the electromagnetic LAr calorimeter are shown in red. The two muons are shown as combined reconstructed tracks in orange, with the hit strips in the resistive-plate chambers and the hit drift tubes in the monitored drift-tube chambers visible as white lines in the barrel muon stations. The energy deposits from the muons in the barrel tile calorimeter can also be seen in purple.

  13. Study on the High-Purity Gallic Acid%高纯度没食子酸的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张薇; 张强; 马福波; 朱建国

    2000-01-01

    以工业没食子酸为原料,分析了其中所含杂质及存在的形式,提出了分离和纯化过程机理,采用离子交换树脂处理方法,研制出了适合微电子工业使用的高纯度没食子酸。结果表明,样品中所含各种金属离子均≤0.1mg/kg,没食子酸含量≥99.5%。%An analysis is made to fine out the impurities and their existing forms in the industrial gallic acid. According to the principles of separation and purfication,a treatment method of exchanging resin for ion is used to prepare high-purity gallic acid for the microelectronic industrial purposes. The results show that each metal iron in the sample product is less than 0.1 mg/kg and its purity is over 99.5%.

  14. Plastic deformation of high-purity a-titanium: model development and validation using the Taylor cylinder impact test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandola, Nitin; Revil-Baudard, Benoit; Cazacu, Oana

    2016-08-01

    Results of an experimental study on the quasi-static and high-rate plastic deformation due to impact of a high-purity, polycrystalline, a-titanium material are presented. To quantify the plastic anisotropy and tension-compression asymmetry of the material, first monotonic uniaxial compression and tension tests were carried out at room temperature under quasi-static conditions. It was found that the material is transversely isotropic and displays strong strength differential effects. To characterize the material's strain rate sensitivity, Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar tests in tension and compression were also conducted. Taylor impact tests were performed for impact velocity of 196 m/s. Plastic deformation extended to 64% of the length of the deformed specimen, with little radial spreading. To model simultaneously the observed anisotropy, strain-rate sensitivity, and tension-compression asymmetry of the material, a three-dimensional constitutive model was developed. Key in the formulation is a macroscopic yield function [1] that incorporates the specificities of the plastic flow, namely the combined effects of anisotropy and tension-compression asymmetry. Comparison between model predictions and data show the capabilities of the model to describe with accuracy the plastic behavior of the a-Ti material for both quasi-static and dynamic loadings, in particular, a very good agreement was obtained between the simulated and experimental post-test Taylor specimen geometries.

  15. Microwave-Hydrothermal Synthesis and Characterization of High-Purity Nb Doped BaTiO3 Nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Khanfekr

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of Nb doped BaTiO3 has been investigated under Microwave-Hydrothermal (MH conditions in the temperature of 150°C for only 2 h using C16H36O4Ti, BaH2O2.8H2O and NbCl5 as Ba, Ti and  Nb sources, respectively.  Typical experiments performed on MH processing have not yet reported for Nb doped BaTiO3.  In the MH process, the formation of high purity nano tetragonal Nb-BaTiO3 was strongly enhanced. New hydrothermal method was used instead of the previous solid state reaction for the BaTiO3±Nb2O3 system. The new method uses high pressure to create nano dimension particles in a lower time and temperature. In case of the phase evolution studies, the XRD pattern measurements and Raman spectroscopy were performed. TEM and FE-SEM images were taken for the detailed analysis of the particle size, surface and morphology.  Synthesis of Nb doped BaTiO3 with the Microwave-hydrothermal provides an advantage of fast crystallization and reduced crystal size when compared to existing methods.

  16. State-of-the-art in analytical characterization of high purity solid samples by different spectroscopic methods

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S S Grazhulene

    2005-07-01

    Facilities and some results of several spectroscopic methods which have potential applications in the field of analysis of solid high purity substances and which have been elaborated in Russia, will be discussed in this paper. Laser nondispersive atomic fluorescence method with glow discharge cathode sputtering atomiser, may be used for trace element determination as well as a tool for the investigation of technological processes, viz. deposition of thin films. Investigations on reduction of a background level in the new hollow cathode ion source for mass-spectrometry have been carried out. Laser mass spectrometry with tandem laser mass reflectron is successfully designed and applied for gaseous impurities determination in high pure silicon with limit of detection of 10-3–10-5 ppm wt. Several results of the layer-by-layer and bulk trace analysis of solids by high resolution mass spectrometry with radio frequency powered glow discharge ion source with the limits of detection at 10-1–10-3 ppm wt will be presented here. The traditional arc and spark emission technique still finds considerable use. One of the examples considered in the paper is the analysis of metalfullerenes. To overcome the calibration problem the fluorination process inside the electrode crater using zinc fluoride has been investigated.

  17. Control of the Gas Flow in an Industrial Directional Solidification Furnace for Production of High Purity Multicrystalline Silicon Ingots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijun Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A crucible cover was designed as gas guidance to control the gas flow in an industrial directional solidification furnace for producing high purity multicrystalline silicon. Three cover designs were compared to investigate their effect on impurity transport in the furnace and contamination of the silicon melt. Global simulations of coupled oxygen (O and carbon (C transport were carried out to predict the SiO and CO gases in the furnace as well as the O and C distributions in the silicon melt. Cases with and without chemical reaction on the cover surfaces were investigated. It was found that the cover design has little effect on the O concentration in the silicon melt; however, it significantly influences CO gas transport in the furnace chamber and C contamination in the melt. For covers made of metal or with a coating on their surfaces, an optimal cover design can produce a silicon melt free of C contamination. Even for a graphite cover without a coating, the carbon concentration in the silicon melt can be reduced by one order of magnitude. The simulation results demonstrate a method to control the contamination of C impurities in an industrial directional solidification furnace by crucible cover design.

  18. Towards a single step process to create high purity gold structures by electron beam induced deposition at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansilla, C.; Mehendale, S.; Mulders, J. J. L.; Trompenaars, P. H. F.

    2016-10-01

    Highly pure metallic structures can be deposited by electron beam induced deposition and they have many important applications in different fields. The organo-metallic precursor is decomposed and deposited under the electron beam, and typically it is purified with post-irradiation in presence of O2. However, this approach limits the purification to the surface of the deposit. Therefore, ‘in situ’ purification during deposition using simultaneous flows of both O2 and precursor in parallel with two gas injector needles has been tested and verified. To simplify the practical arrangements, a special concentric nozzle has been designed allowing deposition and purification performed together in a single step. With this new device metallic structures with high purity can be obtained more easily, while there is no limit on the height of the structures within a practical time frame. In this work, we summarize the first results obtained for ‘in situ’ Au purification using this concentric nozzle, which is described in more detail, including flow simulations. The operational parameter space is explored in order to optimize the shape as well as the purity of the deposits, which are evaluated through scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy measurements, respectively. The observed variations are interpreted in relation to other variables, such as the deposition yield. The resistivity of purified lines is also measured, and the influence of additional post treatments as a last purification step is studied.

  19. Inception and propagation of positive streamers in high-purity nitrogen: effects of the voltage rise-rate

    CERN Document Server

    Clevis, T T J; Ebert, U

    2012-01-01

    Controlling streamer morphology is important for numerous applications. Up to now, the effect of the voltage rise rate was only studied across a wide range. Here we show that even slight variations in the voltage rise can have significant effects. We have studied positive streamer discharges in a 16 cm point-plane gap in high-purity nitrogen 6.0, created by 25 kV pulses with a duration of 130 ns. The voltage rise varies by a rise rate from 1.9 kV/ns to 2.7 kV/ns and by the first peak voltage of 22 to 28 kV. A structural link is found between smaller discharges with a larger inception cloud caused by a faster rising voltage. This relation is explained by the greater stability of the inception cloud due to a faster voltage rise, causing a delay in the destabilisation. Time-resolved measurements show that the inception cloud propagates slower than an earlier destabilised, more filamentary discharge. This explains that the discharge with a faster rising voltage pulse ends up to be shorter. Furthermore, the effect...

  20. Nearly Blinking-Free, High-Purity Single-Photon Emission by Colloidal InP/ZnSe Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Vigneshwaran; Tessier, Mickaël D; Dupont, Dorian; Geiregat, Pieter; Hens, Zeger; Brainis, Edouard

    2017-10-11

    Colloidal core/shell InP/ZnSe quantum dots (QDs), recently produced using an improved synthesis method, have a great potential in life-science applications as well as in integrated quantum photonics and quantum information processing as single-photon emitters. Single-particle spectroscopy of 10 nm QDs with 3.2 nm cores reveals strong photon antibunching attributed to fast (70 ps) Auger recombination of multiple excitons. The QDs exhibit very good photostability under strong optical excitation. We demonstrate that the antibunching is preserved when the QDs are excited above the saturation intensity of the fundamental-exciton transition. This result paves the way toward their usage as high-purity on-demand single-photon emitters at room temperature. Unconventionally, despite the strong Auger blockade mechanism, InP/ZnSe QDs also display very little luminescence intermittency ("blinking"), with a simple on/off blinking pattern. The analysis of single-particle luminescence statistics places these InP/ZnSe QDs in the class of nearly blinking-free QDs, with emission stability comparable to state-of-the-art thick-shell and alloyed-interface CdSe/CdS, but with improved single-photon purity.

  1. Effects of carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus on creep rupture ductility of high purity Ni-Cr austenitic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakazawa, Takanori; Abo, Hideo; Tanino, Mitsuru; Komatsu, Hazime.

    1989-05-01

    Creep rupture ductility becomes one of the important properties of austenitic stainless steels as structural materials for fast breeder reactors. Using high purity nickel-chromium austenitic steels, the effects of carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus on creep rupture ductility were investigated. Creep rupture tests were conducted at 600deg C and extensive microstructural works were performed. The results were as follows. Rupture strength increases with carbon or nitrogen content. Although the rupture ductility decreases with carbon, change in ductility with nitrogen is small. The ductility loss with carbon is due to the grain boundary embrittlement by carbides. With nitrogen, there is no precipitation during creep. Addition of phosphorus to ultra low carbon and nitrogen steels increases their rupture strength and ductility. Fine precipitates of (Fe,Cr)/sub 2/P are uniformly dispersed in the grains and coarse (Fe,Cr)/sub 2/P also precipitates on the grain boundary during creep. Grain boundary migration occurs extensively and few wedge type cracks are observed in the P containing steels. It is concluded that, from the viewpoint of increasing creep rupture ductility, nitrogen is much more effective than carbon and phosphorus is also beneficial. (author).

  2. Development of High-purity Certified Reference Materials for 17 Proteinogenic Amino Acids by Traceable Titration Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Megumi; Yamazaki, Taichi; Kato, Hisashi; Eyama, Sakae; Goto, Mari; Yoshioka, Mariko; Takatsu, Akiko

    2015-01-01

    To ensure the reliability of amino acid analyses, the National Metrology Institute of Japan of the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (NMIJ/AIST) has developed high-purity certified reference materials (CRMs) for 17 proteinogenic amino acids. These CRMs are intended for use as primary reference materials to enable the traceable quantification of amino acids. The purity of the present CRMs was determined based on two traceable methods: nonaqueous acidimetric titration and nitrogen determination by the Kjeldahl method. Since neither method could distinguish compounds with similar structures, such as amino acid-related impurities, impurities were thoroughly quantified by combining several HPLC methods, and subtracted from the obtained purity of each method. The property value of each amino acid was calculated as a weighted mean of the corrected purities by the two methods. The uncertainty of the property value was obtained by combining measurement uncertainties of the two methods, a difference between the two methods, the uncertainty from the contribution of impurities, and the uncertainty derived from inhomogeneity. The uncertainty derived from instability was considered to be negligible based on stability monitoring of some CRMs. The certified value of each amino acid, property value with uncertainty, was given for both with or without enantiomeric separation.

  3. Polytype Stabilization of High-purity Semi-insulating 4H-SiC Crystal via the PVT Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-li MAO

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Because the conditions under which semi-insulating 4H-SiC crystals can grow are so specific, other polytypes such as 15R and 6H can easily emerge during the growth process. In this work, a polytype stabilization technology was developed by altering the following parameters: growth temperature, temperature field distribution, and C/Si ratio. In the growth process of high-purity semi-insulating 4H-SiC crystals, the generation of undesirable polytypes was prevented, and a crystal 100 % 4H-SiC polytype was obtained. A high C/Si ratio in powder source was shown to be advantageous for the stabilization of the 4H polytype. Several methods were applied to evaluate the quality of crystals precisely; these methods include Raman mapping, X-ray diffraction, and resistivity mapping. Results showed that the 3inch-wafer was entirely made of 4H polytype, the mean value of FWHM was approximately 40 arcsec, and the distribution of the resistivity value was between 106 Ω×cm and 107 Ω×cm.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.2.12914

  4. Generation of high-purity human ventral midbrain dopaminergic progenitors for in vitro maturation and intracerebral transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolbrant, Sara; Heuer, Andreas; Parmar, Malin; Kirkeby, Agnete

    2017-09-01

    Generation of precisely patterned neural cells from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) is instrumental in developing disease models and stem cell therapies. Here, we provide a detailed 16-d protocol for obtaining high-purity ventral midbrain (VM) dopamine (DA) progenitors for intracerebral transplantation into animal models and for in vitro maturation into neurons. We have successfully transplanted such cells into the rat; however, in principle, the cells can be used for transplantation into any animal model, and the protocol is designed to also be compatible with clinical transplantation into humans. We show how to precisely set the balance of patterning factors to obtain specifically the caudal VM progenitors that give rise to DA-rich grafts. By specifying how to perform quality control (QC), troubleshooting and adaptation of the procedure, this protocol will facilitate implementation in different laboratories and with a variety of hPSC lines. To facilitate reproducibility of experiments and enable shipping of cells between centers, we present a method for cryopreservation of the progenitors for subsequent direct transplantation or terminal differentiation into DA neurons. This protocol is free of xeno-derived products and can be performed under good manufacturing practice (GMP) conditions.

  5. Synthesis of High Purity SiC Powder for High-resistivity SiC Single Crystals Growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li WANG; Xiaobu HU; Xiangang XU; Shouzheng JIANG; Lina NING; Minhua JIANG

    2007-01-01

    High purity silicon carbide (SiC) powder was synthesized in-situ by chemical reaction between silicon and carbon powder. In order to ensure that the impurity concentration of the resulting SiC powder is suitable for high-resistivity SiC single crystal growth, the preparation technology of SiC powder is different from that of SiC ceramic. The influence of the shape and size of carbon particles on the morphology and phase composition of the obtained SiC powder were discussed. The phase composition and morphology of the products were investigated by X-ray diffraction, Raman microspectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The results show that the composition of resulting SiC by in-situ synthesis from Si/C mixture strongly depends on the nature of the carbon source, which corresponds to the particle size and shape, as well as the preparation temperature. In the experimental conditions, flake graphite is more suitable for the synthesis of SiC powder than activated carbon because of its relatively smaller particle size and flake shape, which make the conversion more complete. The major phase composition of the full conversion products is β-SiC, with traces of α-SiC.Glow discharge mass spectroscopy measurements indicated that SiC powder synthesized with this chemical reaction method can meet the purity demand for the growth of high-resistivity SiC single crystals.

  6. Cyanex 923 as the extractant in a rare earth element impurity analysis of high-purity cerium oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Taicheng; Li, Hongfei; Kang, JianZhen; Chen, Hangting

    2004-06-01

    In this work, the feasibility of employing Cyanex 923 as an extractant into the non-cerium REE (rare earth elements) impurity analysis of high-purity cerium oxide was investigated. Through investigations on the choice of the extraction medium, the optimium extraction acidity, matrix Ce4+ effect on the non-cerium REE ion extraction, the optimium extractant concentration and suitable extracting time, and oscillation strengh, it was found that when the phase ratio was at 1:1 and the acicidity was about 2% H2SO4, by gently shaking by hand for about 2 min, 10 mL of 30% Cyanex 923 could not extract even for a 20 ng amount of non-cerium REE3+ ions. However, the extraction efficiency for Ce4+ of 100 mg total amount under the same conditions was about 96%, indicating that a 25-fold preconcentration factor could be achieved. Thus, it was concluded that Cyanex 923 could be used in a REE impurity analysis of 99.9999% or so pure cerium oxide for primary sepapation to elimilate matrix-induced interferences encountered in an ICP-MS (inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy) determination.

  7. Direct determination of impurities in high purity silicon carbide by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry using slurry nebulization technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheng; Qiu, Deren; Ni, Zheming; Tao, Guangyi; Yang, Pengyuan

    2006-09-08

    A novel method for the determination of Al, Ca, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Ni and Ti in high purity silicon carbide (SiC) using slurry introduction axial viewed inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) was described. The various sizes of SiC slurry were dispersed by adding dispersant polyethylene imine (PEI). The stability of slurry was characterized by zeta potential measurement, SEM observation and signal stability testing. The optimal concentration of PEI was found to be 0.5 wt% for the SiC slurry. Analytical results of sub-mum size SiC by the slurry introduction were in good accordance with those by the alkaline fusion method which verified that determination could be calibrated by aqueous standards. For mum size SiC, results of most elements have a negative deviation and should be calibrated by the Certified Reference Material slurry. Owing to a rather low contamination in the sample preparation and stability of the slurry, the limits of detection (LODs), which are in the range of 40-2000 ng g(-1), superior to those of the conventional nebulization technique by ICP-OES or ICP-MS.

  8. Migration of grain boundaries and triple junctions in high-purity aluminum during annealing after slight cold rolling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Wenhong [Institute of Materials, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China); School of Mechanical Engineering, Shandong University of Technology, Zibo 255049 (China); Wang, Weiguo, E-mail: wang_weiguo@vip.163.com [Institute of Materials, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Fujian University of Technology, Fuzhou 350118 (China); Fang, Xiaoying [School of Mechanical Engineering, Shandong University of Technology, Zibo 255049 (China); Qin, Congxiang [Institute of Materials, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China); School of Mechanical Engineering, Shandong University of Technology, Zibo 255049 (China); Xing, Xiaoguang [School of Mechanical Engineering, Shandong University of Technology, Zibo 255049 (China)

    2015-09-15

    Grain orientations and grain boundary migrations near triple junctions in a high purity aluminum were analyzed by electron back scattered diffraction. The results indicate that there are good correlations between the Schmid factors or Taylor factors and the misorientation values of point to original point in grains near the triple junctions in a slightly deformed sample. Grains with higher Schmid factors or lower Taylor factors typically correspond to higher misorientation values near the triple junctions. In a subsequent annealing at 400 °C, both grain boundaries and triple junctions migrate, but the former leave ghost lines. During such migration, a grain boundary grows from the grain with lower Schmid factor (higher Taylor factor) into the grain with higher Schmid factor (lower Taylor factor). Usually, the amount of migration of a grain boundary is considerably greater than that of a triple junction, and the grain boundary becomes more curved after migration. These observations indicate that the triple junctions have drag effects on grain boundary migration. - Highlights: • Polycrystalline aluminum with fine grains about 30 μm were used. • Off-line in situ EBSD was used to identify TJs before and after annealing. • Grains with higher SFs have higher misorientation values near TJs after deformation. • Grain boundaries grow from hard grains into soft grains during annealing. • Triple junctions have drag effects on grain boundaries migration.

  9. Cobalt(I) Olefin Complexes: Precursors for Metal-Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition of High Purity Cobalt Metal Thin Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Jeff A; Pugh, Thomas; Johnson, Andrew L; Kingsley, Andrew J; Richards, Stephen P

    2016-07-18

    We report the synthesis and characterization of a family of organometallic cobalt(I) metal precursors based around cyclopentadienyl and diene ligands. The molecular structures of the complexes cyclopentadienyl-cobalt(I) diolefin complexes are described, as determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Thermogravimetric analysis and thermal stability studies of the complexes highlighted the isoprene, dimethyl butadiene, and cyclohexadiene derivatives [(C5H5)Co(η(4)-CH2CHC(Me)CH2)] (1), [(C5H5)Co(η(4)-CH2C(Me)C(Me)CH2)] (2), and [(C5H5)Co(η(4)-C6H8)] (4) as possible cobalt metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) precursors. Atmospheric pressure MOCVD was employed using precursor 1, to synthesize thin films of metallic cobalt on silicon substrates under an atmosphere (760 torr) of hydrogen (H2). Analysis of the thin films deposited at substrate temperatures of 325, 350, 375, and 400 °C, respectively, by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy reveal temperature-dependent growth features. Films grown at these temperatures are continuous, pinhole-free, and can be seen to be composed of hexagonal particles clearly visible in the electron micrograph. Powder X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy all show the films to be highly crystalline, high-purity metallic cobalt. Raman spectroscopy was unable to detect the presence of cobalt silicides at the substrate/thin film interface.

  10. Production of High-Purity Anhydrous Nickel(II Perrhenate for Tungsten-Based Sintered Heavy Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Leszczyńska-Sejda

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method for the production of high-purity anhydrous nickel(II perrhenate. The method comprises sorption of nickel(II ions from aqueous nickel(II nitrate solutions, using strongly acidic C160 cation exchange resin, and subsequent elution of sorbed nickel(II ions using concentrated perrhenic acid solutions. After the neutralization of the resulting rhenium-nickel solutions, hydrated nickel(II perrhenate is then separated and then dried at 160 °C to obtain the anhydrous form. The resulting compound is reduced in an atmosphere of dissociated ammonia in order to produce a Re-Ni alloy powder. This study provides information on the selected properties of the resulting Re-Ni powder. This powder was used as a starting material for the production of 77W-20Re-3Ni heavy alloys. Microstructure examination results and selected properties of the produced sintered heavy alloys were compared to sintered alloys produced using elemental W, Re, and Ni powders. This study showed that the application of anhydrous nickel(II perrhenate in the production of 77W-20Re-3Ni results in better properties of the sintered alloys compared to those made from elemental powders.

  11. HEROICA: an underground facility for the fast screening of germanium detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreotti, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Maneschg, W.; Barros, N.; Benato, G.; Brugnera, R.; Costa, F.; Falkenstein, R.; Guthikonda, K. K.; Hegai, A.; Hemmer, S.; Hult, M.; Jänner, K.; Kihm, T.; Lehnert, B.; Liao, H.; Lubashevskiy, A.; Lutter, G.; Marissens, G.; Modenese, L.; Pandola, L.; Reissfelder, M.; Sada, C.; Salathe, M.; Schmitt, C.; Schulz, O.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Turcato, M.; Ur, C.; von Sturm, K.; Wagner, V.; Westermann, J.

    2013-06-01

    HEROICA (Hades Experimental Research Of Intrinsic Crystal Appliances) is an infrastructure to characterize germanium detectors and has been designed and constructed at the HADES Underground Research Laboratory, located in Mol (Belgium). Thanks to the 223 m overburden of clay and sand, the muon flux is lowered by four orders of magnitude. This natural shield minimizes the exposure of radio-pure germanium material to cosmic radiation resulting in a significant suppression of cosmogenic activation in the germanium detectors. The project has been strongly motivated by a special production of germanium detectors for the GERDA experiment. GERDA, currently collecting data at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso of INFN, is searching for the neutrinoless double beta decay of 76Ge. In the near future, GERDA will increase its mass and sensitivity by adding new Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detectors. The production of the BEGe detectors is done at Canberra in Olen (Belgium), located about 30 km from the underground test site. Therefore, HADES is used both for storage of the crystals over night, during diode production, and for the characterization measurements. A full quality control chain has been setup and tested on the first seven prototype detectors delivered by the manufacturer at the beginning of 2012. The screening capabilities demonstrate that the installed setup fulfills a fast and complete set of measurements on the diodes and it can be seen as a general test facility for the fast screening of high purity germanium detectors. The results are of major importance for a future massive production and characterization chain of germanium diodes foreseen for a possible next generation 1-tonne double beta decay experiment with 76Ge.

  12. Indirect determination of Li via {sup 74}Ge(n,{gamma}){sup 75m}Ge activation reaction induced by neutrons from {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Sanjiv, E-mail: sanjucccm@rediffmail.com [National Centre for Compositional Characterization of Materials, BARC, ECIL Post, Hyderabad 500062 (India); Reddy, G.L.N.; Rao, Pritty [National Centre for Compositional Characterization of Materials, BARC, ECIL Post, Hyderabad 500062 (India); Verma, Rakesh [Analytical Chemistry Division, BARC, Mumbai 400085 (India); Ramana, J.V.; Vikramkumar, S.; Raju, V.S. [National Centre for Compositional Characterization of Materials, BARC, ECIL Post, Hyderabad 500062 (India)

    2012-03-01

    An indirect method to determine Li by {sup 74}Ge(n,{gamma}){sup 75m}Ge activation reaction induced in a high purity Ge (detector) crystal by neutrons from the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction in a typical particle-induced {gamma}-ray emission (PIGE) spectroscopy experimental set-up is described. Performed with proton beams of energies in excess of 1.88 MeV, the threshold energy (E{sub th}) of the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction, the determination involves the activity measurement of {sup 75m}Ge isotope that has a half-life of 47.7 s and decays with the emission of 139 keV {gamma}-rays. Rapidity, selectivity and sensitivity down to ppm levels are the attractive features of the method. It is a suitable alternative to {sup 7}Li(p,p Prime {gamma}){sup 7}Li reaction based PIGE technique in the analyses of matrices that contain light elements such as Be, B, F, Na and Al in significant proportions. Interferences can arise from elements, for example V and Ti, that have E{sub th} Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 1.88 MeV for (p,n) reaction. In the case of elements such as Cu, Mo which have with E{sub th} > 1.88 MeV, the incident proton beam energy can be judiciously selected to avoid or minimize an interference. The method, under optimized irradiation conditions, does not entail a risk of neutron stimulated degradation of the performance of the detector. Besides analytical purposes, the measurement of the {sup 75m}Ge activity can serve as a powerful tool to monitor even low ({approx}25 n/cm{sup 2} s) thermal neutron fluxes.

  13. Sub-band gap photo-enhanced secondary electron emission from high-purity single-crystal chemical-vapor-deposited diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yater, J. E.; Shaw, J. L.; Pate, B. B.; Feygelson, T. I.

    2016-02-01

    Secondary-electron-emission (SEE) current measured from high-purity, single-crystal (100) chemical-vapor-deposited diamond is found to increase when sub-band gap (3.06 eV) photons are incident on the hydrogenated surface. Although the light does not produce photoemission directly, the SEE current increases by more than a factor of 2 before saturating with increasing laser power. In energy distribution curves (EDCs), the emission peak shows a corresponding increase in intensity with increasing laser power. However, the emission-onset energy in the EDCs remains constant, indicating that the bands are pinned at the surface. On the other hand, changes are observed on the high-energy side of the distribution as the laser power increases, with a well-defined shoulder becoming more pronounced. From an analysis of this feature in the EDCs, it is deduced that upward band bending is present in the near-surface region during the SEE measurements and this band bending suppresses the SEE yield. However, sub-band gap photon illumination reduces the band bending and thereby increases the SEE current. Because the bands are pinned at the surface, we conclude that the changes in the band levels occur below the surface in the electron transport region. Sample heating produces similar effects as observed with sub-band gap photon illumination, namely, an increase in SEE current and a reduction in band bending. However, the upward band bending is not fully removed by either increasing laser power or temperature, and a minimum band bending of ˜0.8 eV is established in both cases. The sub-band gap photo-excitation mechanism is under further investigation, although it appears likely at present that defect or gap states play a role in the photo-enhanced SEE process. In the meantime, the study demonstrates the ability of visible light to modify the electronic properties of diamond and enhance the emission capabilities, which may have potential impact for diamond-based vacuum electron

  14. Dielectric Performance of High Purity HTCC Alumina at High Temperatures - A Comparison Study with Other Polycrystalline Alumina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang-Yu

    2012-01-01

    A very high purity (99.99+) high temperature co-fired ceramic (HTCC) alumina has recently become commercially available. The raw material of this HTCC alumina is very different from conventional HTCC alumina, and more importantly there is no glass additive in this co-fired material. Previously, selected HTCC and LTCC (low temperature co-fired ceramic) alumina materials were evaluated at high temperatures as dielectric and compared to a regularly sintered 96 polycrystalline alumina (96 Al2O3), where 96 alumina was used as the benchmark. A prototype packaging system based on regular 96 alumina with Au thick-film metallization successfully facilitated long term testing of high temperature silicon carbide (SiC) electronic devices for over 10,000 hours at 500C. In order to evaluate this new HTCC alumina for possible high temperature packaging applications, the dielectric properties of this HTCC alumina substrate were measured and compared with those of 96 alumina and a LTCC alumina from room temperature to 550C at frequencies of 120 Hz, 1 KHz, 10 KHz, 100 KHz, and 1 MHz. A parallel-plate capacitive device with dielectric of the HTCC alumina and precious metal electrodes were used for measurements of the dielectric constant and dielectric loss of the co-fired alumina material in the temperature and frequency ranges. The capacitance and AC parallel conductance of the capacitive device were directly measured by an AC impedance meter, and the dielectric constant and parallel AC conductivity of the dielectric were calculated from the capacitance and conductance measurement results. The temperature and frequency dependent dielectric constant, AC conductivity, and dissipation factor of the HTCC alumina substrate are presented and compared to those of 96 alumina. Other technical advantages of this new co-fired material for possible high packaging applications are also discussed.

  15. 高纯六氟化钨制备工艺研究%Preparation Technology of High Purity Tungsten Hexafluoride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈志刚; 陈财华; 冯振雷

    2014-01-01

    介绍了利用氟气与钨粉为原料制备高纯六氟化钨的工艺方法和设备体系。其过程是利用电解槽电解氟氢化钾制取氟气,并采用氟化钠吸附配合深冷工艺纯化氟气,净化后的氟气与固定床里的钨粉在一定温度条件下反应合成初级六氟化钨,通过低温冷凝回收,收集的初级六氟化钨经过固化后抽真空排轻等方法进行初步提纯,然后将初步提纯的产品蒸馏至填料式精馏塔内进行深度提纯,经过多步提纯后的成品六氟化钨纯度可达99.999%以上。%This paper introduces the processing and equipment system for high-purity tungsten hexafluoride using fluorine gas and tungsten powder as raw materials. Electrolytic cell is applied to prepare fluorine gas by electrolyzing the potassium bifluoride. Sodium fluoride adsorption with cryogenic mixture is used to purify the fluorine gas. Purified fluorine gas reacts with tungsten powder to synthesize the impure tungsten hexafluoride in the fixed bed reactor at a certain temperature. The impure tungsten hexafluoride is obtained by low-temperature condensation. Curing and vacuuming technologies are performed on impure tungsten hexafluoride use to remove the volatile impurity. Filler type distillation column is utilized to further purify by monitoring the distillation products intermittently to prevent unqualified products collection. The results show that the purity of tungsten hexafluoride reaches 99.999%.

  16. Investigation of a direction sensitive sapphire detector stack at the 5 GeV electron beam at DESY-II

    CERN Document Server

    Karacheban, O; Hempel, M; Henschel, H; Lange, W; Leonard, J L; Levy, I; Lohmann, W; Schuwalow, S

    2015-01-01

    Extremely radiation hard sensors are needed in particle physics experiments to instrument the region near the beam pipe. Examples are beam halo and beam loss monitoring systems at the Large Hadron Collider, FLASH or XFEL. Artificial diamond sensors are currently widely used as sensors in these systems. In this paper single crystal sapphire sensors are considered as a promising alternative. Industrially grown sapphire wafers are available in large sizes, are of low cost and, like diamond sensors, can be operated without cooling. Here we present results of an irradiation study done with sapphire sensors in a high intensity low energy electron beam. Then, a multichannel direction-sensitive sapphire detector stack is described. It comprises 8 sapphire plates of 1 cm^2 size and 525 micrometer thickness, metallized on both sides, and apposed to form a stack. Each second metal layer is supplied with a bias voltage, and the layers in between are connected to charge-sensitive preamplifiers. The performance of the dete...

  17. Measurement of underlying event characteristics using charged particles in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 900 GeV and 7 TeV with the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Abdesselam, Abdelouahab; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Acerbi, Emilio; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Ackers, Mario; Adams, David; Addy, Tetteh; Adelman, Jahred; Aderholz, Michael; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adragna, Paolo; Adye, Tim; Aefsky, Scott; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Aharrouche, Mohamed; Ahlen, Steven; Ahles, Florian; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmed, Hossain; Ahsan, Mahsana; Aielli, Giulio; Akdogan, Taylan; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alam, Mohammad; Alam, Muhammad Aftab; Albrand, Solveig; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Aleppo, Mario; Alessandria, Franco; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Aliyev, Magsud; Allport, Phillip; Allwood-Spiers, Sarah; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alon, Raz; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Jose; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral, Pedro; Amelung, Christoph; Ammosov, Vladimir; Amorim, Antonio; Amorós, Gabriel; Amram, Nir; Anastopoulos, Christos; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Andrieux, Marie-Laure; Anduaga, Xabier; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonelli, Stefano; Antos, Jaroslav; Antunovic, Bijana; Anulli, Fabio; Aoun, Sahar; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Arce, Ayana; Archambault, John-Paul; Arfaoui, Samir; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Theodoros; Arik, Engin; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arms, Kregg; Armstrong, Stephen Randolph; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnault, Christian; Artamonov, Andrei; Arutinov, David; Asai, Shoji; Silva, José; Asfandiyarov, Ruslan; Ask, Stefan; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astbury, Alan; Astvatsatourov, Anatoli; Atoian, Grigor; Aubert, Bernard; Auerbach, Benjamin; Auge, Etienne; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Austin, Nicholas; Avramidou, Rachel Maria; Axen, David; Ay, Cano; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Baccaglioni, Giuseppe; Bacci, Cesare; Bach, Andre; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Bachy, Gerard; Backes, Moritz; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bailey, David; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baker, Sarah; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, Fernando; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Piyali; Banerjee, Swagato; Banfi, Danilo; Bangert, Andrea Michelle; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barashkou, Andrei; Barbaro Galtieri, Angela; Barber, Tom; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Bardin, Dmitri; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Barrillon, Pierre; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartsch, Detlef; Bates, Richard; Batkova, Lucia; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Andreas; Battistin, Michele; Battistoni, Giuseppe; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beare, Brian; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Beckingham, Matthew; Becks, Karl-Heinz; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Begel, Michael; Behar Harpaz, Silvia; Behera, Prafulla; Beimforde, Michael; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Belhorma, Bouchra; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellina, Francesco; Bellomo, Giovanni; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belloni, Alberto; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Ben Ami, Sagi; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Benchouk, Chafik; Bendel, Markus; Benedict, Brian Hugues; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benjamin, Douglas; Benoit, Mathieu; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Berglund, Elina; Beringer, Jürg; Bernardet, Karim; Bernat, Pauline; Bernhard, Ralf; Bernius, Catrin; Berry, Tracey; Bertin, Antonio; Bertinelli, Francesco; Bertolucci, Federico; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besson, Nathalie; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biscarat, Catherine; Bischof, Reinhard; Bitenc, Urban; Black, Kevin; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanchot, Georges; Blocker, Craig; Blocki, Jacek; Blondel, Alain; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Boaretto, Christian; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocci, Andrea; Bock, Rudolf; Boddy, Christopher Richard; Boehler, Michael; Boek, Jennifer; Boelaert, Nele; Böser, Sebastian; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bogouch, Andrei; Bohm, Christian; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Boonekamp, Maarten; Boorman, Gary; Booth, Chris; Booth, Peter; Booth, Richard; Bordoni, Stefania; Borer, Claudia; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borjanovic, Iris; Borroni, Sara; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boterenbrood, Hendrik; Botterill, David; Bouchami, Jihene; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boulahouache, Chaouki; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bozhko, Nikolay; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, Ivanka; Braccini, Saverio; Bracinik, Juraj; Braem, André; Brambilla, Elena; Branchini, Paolo; Brandenburg, George; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brelier, Bertrand; Bremer, Johan; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Breton, Dominique; Brett, Nicolas; Bright-Thomas, Paul; Britton, Dave; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Brodbeck, Timothy; Brodet, Eyal; Broggi, Francesco; Bromberg, Carl; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, William; Brown, Gareth; Brubaker, Erik; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Brunet, Sylvie; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Buanes, Trygve; Bucci, Francesca; Buchanan, James; Buchanan, Norman; Buchholz, Peter; Buckingham, Ryan; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Budick, Burton; Büscher, Volker; Bugge, Lars; Buira-Clark, Daniel; Buis, Ernst-Jan; Bulekov, Oleg; Bunse, Moritz; Buran, Torleiv; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burgess, Thomas; Burke, Stephen; Busato, Emmanuel; Bussey, Peter; Buszello, Claus-Peter; Butin, François; Butler, Bart; Butler, John; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Buttinger, William; Byatt, Tom; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caccia, Massimo; Caforio, Davide; Cakir, Orhan; Calafiura, Paolo; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Calkins, Robert; Caloba, Luiz; Caloi, Rita; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camard, Arnaud; Camarri, Paolo; Cambiaghi, Mario; Cameron, David; Cammin, Jochen; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Canale, Vincenzo; Canelli, Florencia; Canepa, Anadi; Cantero, Josu; Capasso, Luciano; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Caprio, Mario; Capriotti, Daniele; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Caramarcu, Costin; Cardarelli, Roberto; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Bryan; Caron, Sascha; Carpentieri, Carmen; Carrillo Montoya, German D; Carron Montero, Sebastian; Carter, Antony; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Cascella, Michele; Caso, Carlo; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo Martin; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Cataldi, Gabriella; Cataneo, Fernando; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Cattani, Giordano; Caughron, Seth; Cavallari, Alvise; Cavalleri, Pietro; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Cazzato, Antonio; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerna, Cedric; Cerqueira, Augusto Santiago; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cervetto, Mario; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Cevenini, Francesco; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chan, Kevin; Chapleau, Bertrand; Chapman, John Derek; Chapman, John Wehrley; Chareyre, Eve; Charlton, Dave; Chavda, Vikash; Cheatham, Susan; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Li; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Tingyang; Chen, Xin; Cheng, Shaochen; Cheplakov, Alexander; Chepurnov, Vladimir; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Tcherniatine, Valeri; Cheu, Elliott; Cheung, Sing-Leung; Chevalier, Laurent; Chevallier, Florent; Chiefari, Giovanni; Chikovani, Leila; Childers, John Taylor; Chilingarov, Alexandre; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chizhov, Mihail; Choudalakis, Georgios; Chouridou, Sofia; Christidi, Illectra-Athanasia; Christov, Asen; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chu, Ming-Lee; Chudoba, Jiri; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Ciftci, Rena; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Ciobotaru, Matei Dan; Ciocca, Claudia; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirilli, Manuela; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Philip; Cleland, Bill; Clemens, Jean-Claude; Clement, Benoit; Clement, Christophe; Clifft, Roger; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coe, Paul; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Coggeshall, James; Cogneras, Eric; Cojocaru, Claudiu; Colas, Jacques; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collard, Caroline; Collins, Neil; Collins-Tooth, Christopher; Collot, Johann; Colon, German; Coluccia, Rita; Comune, Gianluca; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Conidi, Maria Chiara; Consonni, Michele; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conventi, Francesco; Cook, James; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cooper-Smith, Neil; Copic, Katherine; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Correard, Sebastien; Corriveau, Francois; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Costin, Tudor; Côté, David; Coura Torres, Rodrigo; Courneyea, Lorraine; Cowan, Glen; Cowden, Christopher; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Cristinziani, Markus; Crosetti, Giovanni; Crupi, Roberto; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Cuenca Almenar, Cristóbal; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cuneo, Stefano; Curatolo, Maria; Curtis, Chris; Cwetanski, Peter; Czirr, Hendrik; Czyczula, Zofia; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; D'Orazio, Alessia; Da Rocha Gesualdi Mello, Aline; Da Silva, Paulo Vitor; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dahlhoff, Andrea; Dai, Tiesheng; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dallison, Steve; Dam, Mogens; Dameri, Mauro; Damiani, Daniel; Danielsson, Hans Olof; Dankers, Reinier; Dannheim, Dominik; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darlea, Georgiana Lavinia; Daum, Cornelis; Dauvergne, Jean-Pierre; Davey, Will; Davidek, Tomas; Davidson, Nadia; Davidson, Ruth; Davies, Merlin; Davison, Adam; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Dawson, John; Daya, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; de Graat, Julien; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; De La Taille, Christophe; De Lotto, Barbara; De Mora, Lee; De Nooij, Lucie; De Oliveira Branco, Miguel; De Pedis, Daniele; de Saintignon, Paul; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dean, Simon; Dedes, George; Dedovich, Dmitri; Degenhardt, James; Dehchar, Mohamed; Deile, Mario; Del Papa, Carlo; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delpierre, Pierre; Delruelle, Nicolas; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demirkoz, Bilge; Deng, Jianrong; Denisov, Sergey; Dennis, Chris; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; DeWilde, Burton; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Dhullipudi, Ramasudhakar; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Luise, Silvestro; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diaz Gomez, Manuel Maria; Diblen, Faruk; Diehl, Edward; Dietl, Hans; Dietrich, Janet; Dietzsch, Thorsten; Diglio, Sara; Dindar Yagci, Kamile; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dionisi, Carlo; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djilkibaev, Rashid; Djobava, Tamar; do Vale, Maria Aline Barros; Do Valle Wemans, André; Doan, Thi Kieu Oanh; Dobbs, Matt; Dobinson, Robert; Dobos, Daniel; Dobson, Ellie; Dobson, Marc; Dodd, Jeremy; Dogan, Ozgen Berkol; Doglioni, Caterina; Doherty, Tom; Doi, Yoshikuni; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolenc, Irena; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Dohmae, Takeshi; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donega, Mauro; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dos Anjos, Andre; Dosil, Mireia; Dotti, Andrea; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Dowell, John; Doxiadis, Alexander; Doyle, Tony; Drasal, Zbynek; Drees, Jürgen; Dressnandt, Nandor; Drevermann, Hans; Driouichi, Chafik; Dris, Manolis; Drohan, Janice; Dubbert, Jörg; Dubbs, Tim; Dube, Sourabh; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Dudarev, Alexey; Dudziak, Fanny; Dührssen, Michael; Duerdoth, Ian; Duflot, Laurent; Dufour, Marc-Andre; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Duxfield, Robert; Dwuznik, Michal; Dydak, Friedrich; Dzahini, Daniel; Düren, Michael; Ebke, Johannes; Eckert, Simon; Eckweiler, Sebastian; Edmonds, Keith; Edwards, Clive; Efthymiopoulos, Ilias; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Ehrich, Thies; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Eisenhandler, Eric; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Ellis, Katherine; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Ely, Robert; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Engelmann, Roderich; Engl, Albert; Epp, Brigitte; Eppig, Andrew; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Eriksson, Daniel; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Ernwein, Jean; Errede, Deborah; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Escobar, Carlos; Espinal Curull, Xavier; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienne, Francois; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evangelakou, Despoina; Evans, Hal; Fabbri, Laura; Fabre, Caroline; Facius, Katrine; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Falou, Alain; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farley, Jason; Farooque, Trisha; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fasching, Damon; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Fatholahzadeh, Baharak; Fayard, Louis; Fazio, Salvatore; Febbraro, Renato; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Ivan; Fedorko, Woiciech; Fehling-Kaschek, Mirjam; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Felzmann, Ulrich; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Fenyuk, Alexander; Ferencei, Jozef; Ferguson, Douglas; Ferland, Jonathan; Fernandes, Bruno; Fernando, Waruna; Ferrag, Samir; Ferrando, James; Ferrara, Valentina; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrer, Maria Lorenza; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Ferro, Fabrizio; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filippas, Anastasios; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Gordon; Fischer, Peter; Fisher, Matthew; Fisher, Steve; Flammer, Joachim; Flechl, Martin; Fleck, Ivor; Fleckner, Johanna; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Flick, Tobias; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Föhlisch, Florian; Fokitis, Manolis; Fonseca Martin, Teresa; Fopma, Johan; Forbush, David Alan; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fortin, Dominique; Foster, Joe; Fournier, Daniel; Foussat, Arnaud; Fowler, Andrew; Fowler, Ken; Fox, Harald; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchino, Silvia; Francis, David; Frank, Tal; Franklin, Melissa; Franz, Sebastien; Fraternali, Marco; Fratina, Sasa; French, Sky; Froeschl, Robert; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gadfort, Thomas; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallas, Manuel; Gallo, Valentina Santina; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galyaev, Eugene; Gan, KK; Gao, Yongsheng; Gapienko, Vladimir; Gaponenko, Andrei; Garberson, Ford; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garitaonandia, Hegoi; Garonne, Vincent; Garvey, John; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaumer, Olivier; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gayde, Jean-Christophe; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gee, Norman; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Gellerstedt, Karl; Gemme, Claudia; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Gentile, Simonetta; Georgatos, Fotios; George, Simon; Gerlach, Peter; Gershon, Avi; Geweniger, Christoph; Ghazlane, Hamid; Ghez, Philippe; Ghodbane, Nabil; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giakoumopoulou, Victoria; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Gianotti, Fabiola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Adam; Gibson, Stephen; Gieraltowski, Gerry; Gilbert, Laura; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gildemeister, Otto; Gilewsky, Valentin; Gillberg, Dag; Gillman, Tony; Gingrich, Douglas; Ginzburg, Jonatan; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordano, Raffaele; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giovannini, Paola; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giugni, Danilo; Giusti, Paolo; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glazov, Alexandre; Glitza, Karl-Walter; Glonti, George; Godfrey, Jennifer; Godlewski, Jan; Goebel, Martin; Göpfert, Thomas; Goeringer, Christian; Gössling, Claus; Göttfert, Tobias; Goldfarb, Steven; Goldin, Daniel; Golling, Tobias; Gollub, Nils Peter; Golovnia, Serguei; Gomes, Agostinho; Gomez Fajardo, Luz Stella; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Gonella, Laura; Gong, Chenwei; Gonidec, Allain; Gonzalez, Saul; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Silva, Laura; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goodson, Jeremiah Jet; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorfine, Grant; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Gorokhov, Serguei; Gorski, Boguslaw Tomasz; Goryachev, Vladimir; Gosdzik, Bjoern; Gosselink, Martijn; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gouanère, Michel; Gough Eschrich, Ivo; Gouighri, Mohamed; Goujdami, Driss; Goulette, Marc Phillippe; Goussiou, Anna; Goy, Corinne; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grabski, Varlen; Grafström, Per; Grah, Christian; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Grancagnolo, Francesco; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Grau, Nathan; Gray, Heather; Gray, Julia Ann; Graziani, Enrico; Grebenyuk, Oleg; Greenfield, Debbie; Greenshaw, Timothy; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griesmayer, Erich; Griffiths, Justin; Grigalashvili, Nugzar; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Grishkevich, Yaroslav; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grognuz, Joel; Groh, Manfred; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Groth-Jensen, Jacob; Gruwe, Magali; Grybel, Kai; Guarino, Victor; Guicheney, Christophe; Guida, Angelo; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Guler, Hulya; Gunther, Jaroslav; Guo, Bin; Guo, Jun; Gupta, Ambreesh; Gusakov, Yury; Gushchin, Vladimir; Gutierrez, Andrea; Gutierrez, Phillip; Guttman, Nir; Gutzwiller, Olivier; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haas, Stefan; Haber, Carl; Hackenburg, Robert; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Hadley, David; Haefner, Petra; Härtel, Roland; Hahn, Ferdinand; Haider, Stefan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haller, Johannes; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamilton, Samuel; Han, Hongguang; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hance, Michael; Handel, Carsten; Hanke, Paul; Hansen, Christian Johan; Hansen, John Renner; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hansson, Per; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hare, Gabriel; Harenberg, Torsten; Harper, Devin; Harper, Robert; Harrington, Robert; Harris, Orin; Harrison, Karl; Hart, John; Hartert, Jochen; Hartjes, Fred; Haruyama, Tomiyoshi; Harvey, Alex; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hassani, Samira; Hatch, Mark; Hauff, Dieter; Haug, Sigve; Hauschild, Michael; Hauser, Reiner; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawes, Brian; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Donovan; Hayakawa, Takashi; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Hazen, Eric; He, Mao; Head, Simon; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heinemann, Beate; Heisterkamp, Simon; Helary, Louis; Heldmann, Michael; Heller, Mathieu; Hellman, Sten; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, Robert; Hendriks, Patrick John; Henke, Michael; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Henry-Couannier, Frédéric; Hensel, Carsten; Henß, Tobias; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Hershenhorn, Alon David; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hessey, Nigel; Hidvegi, Attila; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Daniel; Hill, John; Hill, Norman; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillert, Sonja; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hindson, Daniel; Hines, Elizabeth; Hirose, Minoru; Hirsch, Florian; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoffman, Julia; Hoffmann, Dirk; Hohlfeld, Marc; Holder, Martin; Hollins, Ivan; Holmes, Alan; Holmgren, Sven-Olof; Holy, Tomas; Holzbauer, Jenny; Homer, Jim; Homma, Yasuhiro; Horazdovsky, Tomas; Horn, Claus; Horner, Stephan; Horton, Katherine; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hott, Thomas; Hou, Suen; Houlden, Michael; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howarth, James; Howell, David; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hruska, Ivan; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Huang, Guang Shun; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Hughes-Jones, Richard; Huhtinen, Mika; Hurst, Peter; Hurwitz, Martina; Husemann, Ulrich; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibbotson, Michael; Ibragimov, Iskander; Ichimiya, Ryo; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Idarraga, John; Idzik, Marek; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Yuri; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Imbault, Didier; Imhaeuser, Martin; Imori, Masatoshi; Ince, Tayfun; Inigo-Golfin, Joaquin; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Ionescu, Gelu; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Ishii, Koji; Ishikawa, Akimasa; Ishino, Masaya; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Isobe, Tadaaki; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Itoh, Yuki; Ivashin, Anton; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, John; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakubek, Jan; Jana, Dilip; Jankowski, Ernest; Jansen, Eric; Jantsch, Andreas; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Jeanty, Laura; Jelen, Kazimierz; Jen-La Plante, Imai; Jenni, Peter; Jeremie, Andrea; Jež, Pavel; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Haoshuang; Ji, Weina; Jiang, Yi; Jimenez Belenguer, Marcos; Jin, Ge; Jin, Shan; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Joffe, David; Johansen, Lars; Johansen, Marianne; Johansson, Erik; Johansson, Per; Johnert, Sebastian; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Mark; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tegid; Jones, Tim; Jonsson, Ove; Joo, Kwang; Joram, Christian; Jorge, Pedro; Jorgensen, Sigrid; Joseph, John; Ju, Xiangyang; Juranek, Vojtech; Jussel, Patrick; Kabachenko, Vasily; Kabana, Sonja; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kadlecik, Peter; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kaiser, Steffen; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalinin, Sergey; Kalinovskaya, Lidia; Kama, Sami; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kanno, Takayuki; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kaplon, Jan; Kar, Deepak; Karagoz, Muge; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karr, Kristo; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kasmi, Azzedine; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Mayuko; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katsoufis, Elias; Katzy, Judith; Kaushik, Venkatesh; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kayl, Manuel; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Kazi, Sandor Istvan; Keates, James Robert; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keil, Markus; Kekelidze, George; Kelly, Marc; Kennedy, John; Kenney, Christopher John; Kenyon, Mike; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerschen, Nicolas; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Kessoku, Kohei; Ketterer, Christian; Khakzad, Mohsen; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Kharchenko, Dmitri; Khodinov, Alexander; Kholodenko, Anatoli; Khomich, Andrei; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khoriauli, Gia; Khovanskiy, Nikolai; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kilvington, Graham; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Min Suk; Kim, Peter; Kim, Shinhong; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Robert Steven Beaufoy; Kirk, Julie; Kirsch, Guillaume; Kirsch, Lawrence; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kittelmann, Thomas; Kiver, Andrey; Kiyamura, Hironori; Kladiva, Eduard; Klaiber-Lodewigs, Jonas; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klemetti, Miika; Klier, Amit; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinkby, Esben; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Klok, Peter; Klous, Sander; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluge, Thomas; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knobloch, Juergen; Knue, Andrea; Ko, Byeong Rok; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Koblitz, Birger; Kocian, Martin; Kocnar, Antonin; Kodys, Peter; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Koenig, Sebastian; König, Stefan; Köpke, Lutz; Koetsveld, Folkert; Koevesarki, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kohn, Fabian; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kokott, Thomas; Kolachev, Guennady; Kolanoski, Hermann; Kolesnikov, Vladimir; Koletsou, Iro; Koll, James; Kollar, Daniel; Kollefrath, Michael; Kolya, Scott; Komar, Aston; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Kondo, Takahiko; Kono, Takanori; Kononov, Anatoly; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kootz, Andreas; Koperny, Stefan; Kopikov, Sergey; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Koreshev, Victor; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Korotkov, Vladislav; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotamäki, Miikka Juhani; Kotov, Serguei; Kotov, Vladislav; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kral, Vlastimil; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasel, Olaf; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, James; Kreisel, Arik; Krejci, Frantisek; Kretzschmar, Jan; Krieger, Nina; Krieger, Peter; Krobath, Gernot; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kruth, Andre; Kubota, Takashi; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kuhn, Dietmar; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kummer, Christian; Kuna, Marine; Kundu, Nikhil; Kunkle, Joshua; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurata, Masakazu; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuykendall, William; Kuze, Masahiro; Kuzhir, Polina; Kvasnicka, Ondrej; Kwee, Regina; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rotonda, Laura; Labarga, Luis; Labbe, Julien; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Rémi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Laisne, Emmanuel; Lamanna, Massimo; Lambacher, Marion; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lancon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Landsman, Hagar; Lane, Jenna; Lange, Clemens; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Lapin, Vladimir; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Larionov, Anatoly; Larner, Aimee; Lasseur, Christian; Lassnig, Mario; Lau, Wing; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavorato, Antonia; Lavrijsen, Wim; Laycock, Paul; Lazarev, Alexandre; Lazzaro, Alfio; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Maner, Christophe; Le Menedeu, Eve; Leahu, Marius; Lebedev, Alexander; Lebel, Céline; Lechowski, Matthieu; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Hurng-Chun; Lee, Jason; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee JR, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Michel; Legendre, Marie; Leger, Annie; LeGeyt, Benjamin; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehmacher, Marc; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lehto, Mark; Lei, Xiaowen; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lellouch, Jeremie; Leltchouk, Mikhail; Lendermann, Victor; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatiana; Lenzen, Georg; Lenzi, Bruno; Leonhardt, Kathrin; Lepidis, Johannes; Leroy, Claude; Lessard, Jean-Raphael; Lesser, Jonas; Lester, Christopher; Leung Fook Cheong, Annabelle; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levitski, Mikhail; Lewandowska, Marta; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bo; Li, Haifeng; Li, Shu; Li, Xuefei; Liang, Zhihua; Liang, Zhijun; Liberti, Barbara; Lichard, Peter; Lichtnecker, Markus; Lie, Ki; Liebig, Wolfgang; Lifshitz, Ronen; Lilley, Joseph; Lim, Heuijin; Limosani, Antonio; Limper, Maaike; Lin, Simon; Linde, Frank; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipinsky, Lukas; Lipniacka, Anna; Liss, Tony; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Chuanlei; Liu, Dong; Liu, Hao; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Shengli; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Livermore, Sarah; Lleres, Annick; Lloyd, Stephen; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Lockwitz, Sarah; Loddenkoetter, Thomas; Loebinger, Fred; Loginov, Andrey; Loh, Chang Wei; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Loken, James; Long, Robin Eamonn; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Losty, Michael; Lou, Xinchou; Lounis, Abdenour; Loureiro, Karina; Lovas, Lubomir; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lowe, Andrew; Lu, Feng; Lu, Jiansen; Lu, Liang; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Ludwig, Andreas; Ludwig, Dörthe; Ludwig, Inga; Ludwig, Jens; Luehring, Frederick; Luijckx, Guy; Lumb, Debra; Luminari, Lamberto; Lund, Esben; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lundberg, Björn; Lundberg, Johan; Lundquist, Johan; Lungwitz, Matthias; Lupi, Anna; Lutz, Gerhard; Lynn, David; Lynn, James; Lys, Jeremy; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Maaßen, Michael; Macana Goia, Jorge Andres; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Macina, Daniela; Mackeprang, Rasmus; Madaras, Ronald; Mader, Wolfgang; Maenner, Reinhard; Maeno, Tadashi; Mättig, Peter; Mättig, Stefan; Magalhaes Martins, Paulo Jorge; Magnoni, Luca; Magradze, Erekle; Magrath, Caroline; Mahalalel, Yair; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahout, Gilles; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makouski, Mikhail; Makovec, Nikola; Mal, Prolay; Malecki, Pawel; Malecki, Piotr; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mameghani, Raphael; Mamuzic, Judita; Manabe, Atsushi; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Mangeard, Pierre-Simon; Mangin-Brinet, Mariane; Manjavidze, Ioseb; Mann, Alexander; Mann, Anthony; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Manz, Andreas; Mapelli, Alessandro; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchand, Jean-Francois; Marchese, Fabrizio; Marchesotti, Marco; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marin, Alexandru; Marino, Christopher; Marroquim, Fernando; Marshall, Robin; Marshall, Zach; Martens, Kalen; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Andrew; Martin, Brian; Martin, Brian; Martin, Franck Francois; Martin, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Philippe; Martin, Tim; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Mario; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Maß, Martin; Massa, Ignazio; Massaro, Graziano; Massol, Nicolas; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mathes, Markus; Matricon, Pierre; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Matsunaga, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Takashi; Mattravers, Carly; Maugain, Jean-Marie; Maxfield, Stephen; May, Edward; Mayne, Anna; Mazini, Rachid; Mazur, Michael; Mazzanti, Marcello; Mazzoni, Enrico; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; McGarvie, Scott; McGlone, Helen; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McLaren, Robert Andrew; Mclaughlan, Tom; McMahon, Steve; McMahon, Tania; McMahon, Tom; McPherson, Robert; Meade, Andrew; Mechnich, Joerg; Mechtel, Markus; Medinnis, Mike; Meera-Lebbai, Razzak; Meguro, Tatsuma; Mehdiyev, Rashid; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meinhardt, Jens; Meirose, Bernhard; Melachrinos, Constantinos; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Mendoza Navas, Luis; Meng, Zhaoxia; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Menot, Claude; Meoni, Evelin; Merkl, Doris; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meuser, Stefan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer, Joerg; Meyer, Thomas Christian; Meyer, W Thomas; Miao, Jiayuan; Michal, Sebastien; Micu, Liliana; Middleton, Robin; Miele, Paola; Migas, Sylwia; Migliaccio, Agostino; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikulec, Bettina; Mikuž, Marko; Miller, David; Miller, Robert; Mills, Bill; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Milstein, Dmitry; Minaenko, Andrey; Miñano, Mercedes; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mirabelli, Giovanni; Miralles Verge, Lluis; Miscetti, Stefano; Misiejuk, Andrzej; Mitra, Ankush; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitrofanov, Gennady; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Mitsui, Shingo; Miyagawa, Paul; Miyazaki, Kazuki; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mockett, Paul; Moed, Shulamit; Moeller, Victoria; Mönig, Klaus; Möser, Nicolas; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohn, Bjarte; Mohr, Wolfgang; Mohrdieck-Möck, Susanne; Moisseev, Artemy; Moles-Valls, Regina; Molina-Perez, Jorge; Moneta, Lorenzo; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montesano, Simone; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Moorhead, Gareth; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Moraes, Arthur; Morais, Antonio; Morange, Nicolas; Morel, Julien; Morello, Gianfranco; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morii, Masahiro; Morin, Jerome; Morita, Youhei; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morone, Maria-Christina; Morris, John; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moye, Tamsin; Moyse, Edward; Mudrinic, Mihajlo; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Müller, Thomas; Muenstermann, Daniel; Muijs, Sandra; Muir, Alex; Munwes, Yonathan; Murakami, Koichi; Murray, Bill; Mussche, Ido; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakamura, Koji; Nakano, Itsuo; Nanava, Gizo; Napier, Austin; Nash, Michael; Nasteva, Irina; Nation, Nigel; Nattermann, Till; Naumann, Thomas; Nauyock, Farah; Navarro, Gabriela; Neal, Homer; Nebot, Eduardo; Nechaeva, Polina; Negri, Andrea; Negri, Guido; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nelson, Andrew; Nelson, Silke; Nelson, Timothy Knight; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Nesterov, Stanislav; Neubauer, Mark; Neukermans, Lionel; Neusiedl, Andrea; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nicholson, Caitriana; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicolas, Ludovic; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Niedercorn, Francois; Nielsen, Jason; Niinikoski, Tapio; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolaev, Kirill; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Henrik; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nishiyama, Tomonori; Nisius, Richard; Nodulman, Lawrence; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Nomoto, Hiroshi; Nordberg, Markus; Nordkvist, Bjoern; Norniella Francisco, Olga; Norton, Peter; Novakova, Jana; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nožička, Miroslav; Nugent, Ian Michael; Nuncio-Quiroz, Adriana-Elizabeth; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; Nyman, Tommi; O'Neale, Steve; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Odier, Jerome; Odino, Gian Andrea; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohshima, Takayoshi; Ohshita, Hidetoshi; Ohska, Tokio Kenneth; Ohsugi, Takashi; Okada, Shogo; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olcese, Marco; Olchevski, Alexander; Oliveira, Miguel Alfonso; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver, Concepcion; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olivito, Dominick; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Omachi, Chihiro; Onofre, António; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Ordonez, Gustavo; Oreglia, Mark; Orellana, Frederik; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlov, Iliya; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Ortega, Eduardo; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Osuna, Carlos; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Ottersbach, John; Ottewell, Brian; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Ouyang, Qun; Owen, Mark; Owen, Simon; Oyarzun, Alejandro; Øye, Ola; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozone, Kenji; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Paganis, Efstathios; Paige, Frank; Pajchel, Katarina; Palestini, Sandro; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Palmer, Jody; Palmer, Matt; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panes, Boris; Panikashvili, Natalia; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Panuskova, Monika; Paolone, Vittorio; Paoloni, Alessandro; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Paramonov, Alexander; Park, Su-Jung; Park, Woochun; Parker, Andy; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passeri, Antonio; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Patricelli, Sergio; Pauly, Thilo; Pecsy, Martin; Pedraza Morales, Maria Isabel; Peeters, Simon Jan Marie; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Peng, Haiping; Pengo, Ruggero; Penson, Alexander; Penwell, John; Perantoni, Marcelo; Perez, Kerstin; Perez Cavalcanti, Tiago; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perez Reale, Valeria; Peric, Ivan; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrino, Roberto; Perrodo, Pascal; Persembe, Seda; Perus, Antoine; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Petereit, Emil; Peters, Onne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Jorgen; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Petschull, Dennis; Petteni, Michele; Pezoa, Raquel; Phan, Anna; Phillips, Alan; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Pickford, Andrew; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinfold, James; Ping, Jialun; Pinto, Belmiro; Pirotte, Olivier; Pizio, Caterina; Placakyte, Ringaile; Plamondon, Mathieu; Plano, Will; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskach, Anatoly; Poblaguev, Andrei; Poddar, Sahill; Podlyski, Fabrice; Poggioli, Luc; Poghosyan, Tatevik; Pohl, Martin; Polci, Francesco; Polesello, Giacomo; Policicchio, Antonio; Polini, Alessandro; Poll, James; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pomarede, Daniel Marc; Pomeroy, Daniel; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Portell Bueso, Xavier; Porter, Robert; Posch, Christoph; Pospelov, Guennady; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Prabhu, Robindra; Pralavorio, Pascal; Prasad, Srivas; Pravahan, Rishiraj; Prell, Soeren; Pretzl, Klaus Peter; Pribyl, Lukas; Price, Darren; Price, Lawrence; Price, Michael John; Prichard, Paul; Prieur, Damien; Primavera, Margherita; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Prudent, Xavier; Przysiezniak, Helenka; Psoroulas, Serena; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Purdham, John; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Pylypchenko, Yuriy; Qian, Jianming; Qian, Zuxuan; Qin, Zhonghua; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Quinonez, Fernando; Raas, Marcel; Radescu, Voica; Radics, Balint; Rador, Tonguc; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rahimi, Amir; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rajek, Silke; Rammensee, Michael; Rammes, Marcus; Ramstedt, Magnus; Randrianarivony, Koloina; Ratoff, Peter; Rauscher, Felix; Rauter, Emanuel; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Reichold, Armin; Reinherz-Aronis, Erez; Reinsch, Andreas; Reisinger, Ingo; Reljic, Dusan; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Zhongliang; Renkel, Peter; Rensch, Bertram; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Resende, Bernardo; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richards, Alexander; Richter, Robert; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ridel, Melissa; Rieke, Stefan; Rijpstra, Manouk; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Rios, Ryan Randy; Riu, Imma; Rivoltella, Giancesare; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Roa Romero, Diego Alejandro; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robinson, Mary; Robson, Aidan; Rocha de Lima, Jose Guilherme; Roda, Chiara; Roda Dos Santos, Denis; Rodier, Stephane; Rodriguez, Diego; Rodriguez Garcia, Yohany; Roe, Adam; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Rojo, Victoria; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romanov, Victor; Romeo, Gaston; Romero Maltrana, Diego; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rose, Matthew; Rosenbaum, Gabriel; Rosenberg, Eli; Rosendahl, Peter Lundgaard; Rosselet, Laurent; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rossi, Lucio; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rottländer, Iris; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexander; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubinskiy, Igor; Ruckert, Benjamin; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Gerald; Rühr, Frederik; Ruggieri, Federico; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rulikowska-Zarebska, Elzbieta; Rumiantsev, Viktor; Rumyantsev, Leonid; Runge, Kay; Runolfsson, Ogmundur; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Rust, Dave; Rutherfoord, John; Ruwiedel, Christoph; Ruzicka, Pavel; Ryabov, Yury; Ryadovikov, Vasily; Ryan, Patrick; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Rzaeva, Sevda; Saavedra, Aldo; Sadeh, Iftach; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Saleem, Muhammad; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvachua Ferrando, Belén; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Samset, Björn Hallvard; Sandaker, Heidi; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandhu, Pawan; Sandoval, Tanya; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sandvoss, Stephan; Sankey, Dave; Sansoni, Andrea; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Saraiva, João; Sarangi, Tapas; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, Edward; Sarri, Francesca; Sartisohn, Georg; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Takashi; Sasao, Noboru; Satsounkevitch, Igor; Sauvage, Gilles; Savard, Pierre; Savinov, Vladimir; Savva, Panagiota; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, David; Says, Louis-Pierre; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scallon, Olivia; Scannicchio, Diana; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schäfer, Uli; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R~Dean; Schamov, Andrey; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Scherzer, Max; Schiavi, Carlo; Schieck, Jochen; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schlereth, James; Schmidt, Evelyn; Schmidt, Michael; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitz, Martin; Schöning, André; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schram, Malachi; Schreiner, Alexander; Schroeder, Christian; Schroer, Nicolai; Schroers, Marcel; Schuh, Silvia; Schuler, Georges; Schultes, Joachim; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schumacher, Jan; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schweiger, Dietmar; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwierz, Rainer; Schwindling, Jerome; Scott, Bill; Searcy, Jacob; Sedykh, Evgeny; Segura, Ester; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Sellden, Bjoern; Sellers, Graham; Seman, Michal; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sevior, Martin; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shank, James; Shao, Qi Tao; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaver, Leif; Shaw, Christian; Shaw, Kate; Sherman, Daniel; Sherwood, Peter; Shibata, Akira; Shimizu, Shima; Shimojima, Makoto; Shin, Taeksu; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shochet, Mel; Short, Daniel; Shupe, Michael; Sicho, Petr; Sidoti, Antonio; Siebel, Anca-Mirela; Siegert, Frank; Siegrist, James; Sijacki, Djordje; Silbert, Ohad; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Daniel; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simmons, Brinick; Simonyan, Margar; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sipica, Valentin; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sisakyan, Alexei; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skinnari, Louise Anastasia; Skovpen, Kirill; Skubic, Patrick; Skvorodnev, Nikolai; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Sloan, Terrence; Sloper, John erik; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Ben Campbell; Smith, Douglas; Smith, Kenway; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snow, Steve; Snow, Joel; Snuverink, Jochem; Snyder, Scott; Soares, Mara; Sobie, Randall; Sodomka, Jaromir; Soffer, Abner; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldevila, Urmila; Solfaroli Camillocci, Elena; Solodkov, Alexander; Solovyanov, Oleg; Sondericker, John; Soni, Nitesh; Sopko, Vit; Sopko, Bruno; Sorbi, Massimo; Sosebee, Mark; Soukharev, Andrey; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spanò, Francesco; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spila, Federico; Spiriti, Eleuterio; Spiwoks, Ralf; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; Spurlock, Barry; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stahl, Thorsten; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staude, Arnold; Stavina, Pavel; Stavropoulos, Georgios; Steele, Genevieve; Stefanidis, Efstathios; Steinbach, Peter; Steinberg, Peter; Stekl, Ivan; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stevenson, Kyle; Stewart, Graeme; Stockmanns, Tobias; Stockton, Mark; Stodulski, Marek; Stoerig, Kathrin; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stonjek, Stefan; Strachota, Pavel; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strang, Michael; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Strong, John; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Strube, Jan; Stugu, Bjarne; Stumer, Iuliu; Stupak, John; Sturm, Philipp; Soh, Dart-yin; Su, Dong; Subramania, Siva; Sugaya, Yorihito; Sugimoto, Takuya; Suhr, Chad; Suita, Koichi; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Sushkov, Serge; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Yu; Sviridov, Yuri; Swedish, Stephen; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Szeless, Balazs; Sánchez, Javier; Ta, Duc; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taga, Adrian; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takahashi, Yuta; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tamsett, Matthew; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Satoshi; Tanaka, Shuji; Tanaka, Yoshito; Tani, Kazutoshi; Tannoury, Nancy; Tappern, Geoffrey; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tardif, Dominique; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tassi, Enrico; Tatarkhanov, Mous; Taylor, Christopher; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Gary; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Wendy; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, Matilde; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Tennenbaum-Katan, Yaniv-David; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terwort, Mark; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Tevlin, Christopher; Thadome, Jocelyn; Therhaag, Jan; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thioye, Moustapha; Thoma, Sascha; Thomas, Juergen; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Peter; Thompson, Stan; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Thun, Rudolf; Tic, Tomas; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timmermans, Charles; Tipton, Paul; Tique Aires Viegas, Florbela De Jes; Tisserant, Sylvain; Tobias, Jürgen; Toczek, Barbara; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Toggerson, Brokk; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokunaga, Kaoru; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Tonazzo, Alessandra; Tong, Guoliang; Tonoyan, Arshak; Topfel, Cyril; Topilin, Nikolai; Torchiani, Ingo; Torrence, Eric; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Traynor, Daniel; Trefzger, Thomas; Treis, Johannes; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alesandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Trinh, Thi Nguyet; Tripiana, Martin; Triplett, Nathan; Trischuk, William; Trivedi, Arjun; Trocmé, Benjamin; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trzupek, Adam; Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiakiris, Menelaos; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsionou, Dimitra; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsung, Jieh-Wen; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tua, Alan; Tuggle, Joseph; Turala, Michal; Turecek, Daniel; Turk Cakir, Ilkay; Turlay, Emmanuel; Tuts, Michael; Tylmad, Maja; Tyndel, Mike; Typaldos, Dimitrios; Tyrvainen, Harri; Tzanakos, George; Uchida, Kirika; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ugland, Maren; Uhlenbrock, Mathias; Uhrmacher, Michael; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Underwood, David; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Unno, Yoshinobu; Urbaniec, Dustin; Urkovsky, Evgeny; Urquijo, Phillip; Urrejola, Pedro; Usai, Giulio; Uslenghi, Massimiliano; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Vahsen, Sven; Valderanis, Chrysostomos; Valenta, Jan; Valente, Paolo; Valentinetti, Sara; Valkar, Stefan; Valladolid Gallego, Eva; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; van der Graaf, Harry; van der Kraaij, Erik; van der Poel, Egge; van der Ster, Daniel; Van Eijk, Bob; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; van Kesteren, Zdenko; van Vulpen, Ivo; Vandelli, Wainer; Vandoni, Giovanna; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vannucci, Francois; Varela Rodriguez, Fernando; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vassilakopoulos, Vassilios; Vazeille, Francois; Vegni, Guido; Veillet, Jean-Jacques; Vellidis, Constantine; Veloso, Filipe; Veness, Raymond; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Ventura, Daniel; Ventura, Silvia; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vertogardov, Leonid; Vetterli, Michel; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinek, Elisabeth; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Virchaux, Marc; Viret, Sébastien; Virzi, Joseph; Vitale, Antonio; Vitells, Ofer; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vives Vaque, Francesc; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vlasak, Michal; Vlasov, Nikolai; Vogel, Adrian; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Matteo; Volpini, Giovanni; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Loeben, Joerg; von Radziewski, Holger; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorobiev, Alexander; Vorwerk, Volker; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Voss, Thorsten Tobias; Vossebeld, Joost; Vovenko, Anatoly; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vu Anh, Tuan; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wagner, Peter; Wahlen, Helmut; Wahrmund, Sebastian; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walbersloh, Jorg; Walch, Shannon; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wall, Richard; Waller, Peter; Wang, Chiho; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Jin; Wang, Joshua C; Wang, Song-Ming; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Warsinsky, Markus; Wastie, Roy; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Anthony; Waugh, Ben; Weber, Jens; Weber, Marc; Weber, Michele; Weber, Pavel; Weidberg, Anthony; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Wellenstein, Hermann; Wells, Phillippa; Wen, Mei; Wenaus, Torre; Wendler, Shanti; Weng, Zhili; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Werth, Michael; Wessels, Martin; Whalen, Kathleen; Wheeler-Ellis, Sarah Jane; Whitaker, Scott; White, Andrew; White, Martin; Whitehead, Samuel Robert; Whiteson, Daniel; Whittington, Denver; Wicek, Francois; Wicke, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik, Liv Antje Mari; Wildauer, Andreas; Wildt, Martin Andre; Wilhelm, Ivan; Wilkens, Henric George; Will, Jonas Zacharias; Williams, Eric; Williams, Hugh; Willis, William; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, John; Wilson, Michael Galante; Wilson, Alan; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winkelmann, Stefan; Winklmeier, Frank; Wittgen, Matthias; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wooden, Gemma; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wraight, Kenneth; Wright, Catherine; Wrona, Bozydar; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wulf, Evan; Wunstorf, Renate; Wynne, Benjamin; Xaplanteris, Leonidas; Xella, Stefania; Xie, Song; Xie, Yigang; Xu, Chao; Xu, Da; Xu, Guofa; Yabsley, Bruce; Yamada, Miho; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamamura, Taiki; Yamaoka, Jared; Yamazaki, Takayuki; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Stephanie; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Yi; Yang, Yi; Yang, Zhaoyu; Yanush, Serguei; Yao, Weiming; Yao, Yushu; Yasu, Yoshiji; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yilmaz, Metin; Yoosoofmiya, Reza; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Riktura; Young, Charles; Youssef, Saul; Yu, Dantong; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yurkewicz, Adam; Zaets, Vassilli; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zajacova, Zuzana; Zalite, Youris; Zanello, Lucia; Zarzhitsky, Pavel; Zaytsev, Alexander; Zdrazil, Marian; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeller, Michael; Zema, Pasquale Federico; Zemla, Andrzej; Zendler, Carolin; Zenin, Anton; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zenonos, Zenonas; Zenz, Seth; Zerwas, Dirk; Zevi della Porta, Giovanni; Zhan, Zhichao; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Long; Zhao, Tianchi; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zheng, Shuchen; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Ning; Zhou, Yue; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhuravlov, Vadym; Zieminska, Daria; Zilka, Branislav; Zimmermann, Robert; Zimmermann, Simone; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Ziolkowski, Michael; Zitoun, Robert; Živković, Lidija; Zmouchko, Viatcheslav; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; Zolnierowski, Yves; Zsenei, Andras; zur Nedden, Martin; Zutshi, Vishnu; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of charged particle distributions, sensitive to the underlying event, have been performed with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The measurements are based on data collected using a minimum-bias trigger to select proton{proton collisions at center-of-mass energies of 900 GeV and 7 TeV. The "underlying event" is defined as those aspects of a hadronic interaction attributed not to the hard scattering process, but rather to the accompanying interactions of the rest of the proton. Three regions are defined in azimuthal angle with respect to the the highest-$p_T$ charged particle in the event, such that the region transverse to the dominant momentum-flow is most sensitive to the underlying event. In each of these regions, distributions of the charged particle multiplicity, $p_T$ density, and average $p_T$ are measured. The data show a higher underlying event activity than that predicted by Monte Carlo models tuned to pre-LHC data.

  18. Measurement of underlying event characteristics using charged particles in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 900 GeV and 7 TeV with the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Abdesselam, Abdelouahab; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Acerbi, Emilio; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Ackers, Mario; Adams, David; Addy, Tetteh; Adelman, Jahred; Aderholz, Michael; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adragna, Paolo; Adye, Tim; Aefsky, Scott; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Aharrouche, Mohamed; Ahlen, Steven; Ahles, Florian; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmed, Hossain; Ahsan, Mahsana; Aielli, Giulio; Akdogan, Taylan; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alam, Mohammad; Alam, Muhammad Aftab; Albrand, Solveig; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Aleppo, Mario; Alessandria, Franco; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Aliyev, Magsud; Allport, Phillip; Allwood-Spiers, Sarah; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alon, Raz; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Jose; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral, Pedro; Amelung, Christoph; Ammosov, Vladimir; Amorim, Antonio; Amorós, Gabriel; Amram, Nir; Anastopoulos, Christos; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Andrieux, Marie-Laure; Anduaga, Xabier; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonelli, Stefano; Antos, Jaroslav; Antunovic, Bijana; Anulli, Fabio; Aoun, Sahar; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Arce, Ayana; Archambault, John-Paul; Arfaoui, Samir; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Theodoros; Arik, Engin; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arms, Kregg; Armstrong, Stephen Randolph; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnault, Christian; Artamonov, Andrei; Arutinov, David; Asai, Shoji; Silva, José; Asfandiyarov, Ruslan; Ask, Stefan; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astbury, Alan; Astvatsatourov, Anatoli; Atoian, Grigor; Aubert, Bernard; Auerbach, Benjamin; Auge, Etienne; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Austin, Nicholas; Avramidou, Rachel Maria; Axen, David; Ay, Cano; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Baccaglioni, Giuseppe; Bacci, Cesare; Bach, Andre; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Bachy, Gerard; Backes, Moritz; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bailey, David; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baker, Sarah; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, Fernando; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Piyali; Banerjee, Swagato; Banfi, Danilo; Bangert, Andrea Michelle; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barashkou, Andrei; Barbaro Galtieri, Angela; Barber, Tom; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Bardin, Dmitri; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Barrillon, Pierre; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartsch, Detlef; Bates, Richard; Batkova, Lucia; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Andreas; Battistin, Michele; Battistoni, Giuseppe; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beare, Brian; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Beckingham, Matthew; Becks, Karl-Heinz; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Begel, Michael; Behar Harpaz, Silvia; Behera, Prafulla; Beimforde, Michael; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Belhorma, Bouchra; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellina, Francesco; Bellomo, Giovanni; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belloni, Alberto; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Ben Ami, Sagi; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Benchouk, Chafik; Bendel, Markus; Benedict, Brian Hugues; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benjamin, Douglas; Benoit, Mathieu; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Berglund, Elina; Beringer, Jürg; Bernardet, Karim; Bernat, Pauline; Bernhard, Ralf; Bernius, Catrin; Berry, Tracey; Bertin, Antonio; Bertinelli, Francesco; Bertolucci, Federico; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besson, Nathalie; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biscarat, Catherine; Bischof, Reinhard; Bitenc, Urban; Black, Kevin; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanchot, Georges; Blocker, Craig; Blocki, Jacek; Blondel, Alain; Blum, Walter

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of charged particle distributions, sensitive to the underlying event, have been performed with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The measurements are based on data collected using a minimum-bias trigger to select proton{proton collisions at center-of-mass energies of 900 GeV and 7 TeV. The "underlying event" is defined as those aspects of a hadronic interaction attributed not to the hard scattering process, but rather to the accompanying interactions of the rest of the proton. Three regions are defined in azimuthal angle with respect to the the highest-$p_T$ charged particle in the event, such that the region transverse to the dominant momentum-flow is most sensitive to the underlying event. In each of these regions, distributions of the charged particle multiplicity, $p_T$ density, and average $p_T$ are measured. The data show a higher underlying event activity than that predicted by Monte Carlo models tuned to pre-LHC data.

  19. Germanium detectors for nuclear spectroscopy: Current research and development activity at LNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Napoli, D. R., E-mail: daniel.r.napoli@lnl.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Viale dell’Università 2, 35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Maggioni, G., E-mail: maggioni@lnl.infn.it; Carturan, S.; Gelain, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Viale dell’Università 2, 35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Department of Physics and Astronomy “G. Galilei”, University of Padova, Via Marzolo 8, 35121 Padova (Italy); Eberth, J. [Institut für Kernphysik, Universität zu Köln, Zülpicher Straße 77, D-50937 Köln (Germany); Grimaldi, M. G.; Tatí, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Catania (Italy); Riccetto, S. [University of Camerino and INFN of Perugia (Italy); Mea, G. Della [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Viale dell’Università 2, 35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); University of Trento (Italy)

    2016-07-07

    High-purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors have reached an unprecedented level of sophistication and are still the best solution for high-resolution gamma spectroscopy. In the present work, we will show the results of the characterization of new surface treatments for the production of these detectors, studied in the framework of our multidisciplinary research program in HPGe detector technologies.

  20. Search for scalar diphoton resonances in the mass range 65-600 GeV with the ATLAS detector in pp collision data at √s = 8 TeV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aad, G.; et al., [Unknown; Aben, R.; Angelozzi, I.; Beemster, L.J.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bobbink, G.J.; Bos, K.; Boterenbrood, H.; Butti, P.; Castelli, A.; Colijn, A.P.; de Jong, P.; de Nooij, L.; Deigaard, I.; Deluca, C.; Deviveiros, P.O.; Dhaliwal, S.; Ferrari, P.; Gadatsch, S.; Geerts, D.A.A.; Hartjes, F.; Hessey, N.P.; Hod, N.; Igonkina, O.; Kluit, P.; Koffeman, E.; Lee, H.; Linde, F.; Mahlstedt, J.; Mechnich, J.; Oussoren, K.P.; Pani, P.; Salek, D.; Valencic, N.; van den Wollenberg, W.; van der Deijl, P.C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van der Leeuw, R.; van Vulpen, I.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J.C.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vreeswijk, M.; Weits, H.

    2014-01-01

    A search for scalar particles decaying via narrow resonances into two photons in the mass range 65-600 GeV is performed using 20.3  fb−1 of √s=8  TeV pp collision data collected with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The recently discovered Higgs boson is treated as a background. No s

  1. Ge(Li) detector gamma-ray spectrometer system for measurement of the spectra and production cross sections of. gamma. -rays produced by 14 MeV neutron nonelastic interaction with nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen Ronglin; Shi Xiamin; Wu Yongshun; Xing Jinjiang; Ding Dazhao

    1982-02-01

    A 42 cm/sup 3/ Ge(Li) detector gamma-ray spectrometer system for measuring the spectra and the production cross sections of ..gamma..-rays produced by fast neutron nonelastic interaction with nuclei is described in this paper. The incident neutrons are produced by T(d,n)/sup 4/He reaction in an high tension set with the incident deuteron energy of 200 keV. The time of flight technique is used to discriminate between the scattered neutrons and gamma-rays resulting from nonelastic interaction. The ..cap alpha..-particles are picked up by a Si(Au) surface barrier detector and the ARC timing discriminaters are used in both Si(Au) and Ge(Li) channels. The overall time resolution (FWHM) of this system is 4.1 ns typically for energy selection threshold at 400keV. The block diagram of spectrometer system is described in detail. The complex complete shielding damage of Ge(Li) detector in this fast neutron field is well discussed.

  2. Cryogenic detectors for dark matter search and neutrinoless double beta decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münster, Andrea; Schönert, Stefan; Willers, Michael

    2017-02-01

    The search for the neutrinoless double beta decay and the direct search for dark matter particles are amongst the most fundamental questions in astroparticle physics and cosmology. To achieve a high sensitivity, detectors with an excellent energy resolution and highly efficient particle identification capabilities are required. In recent years, cryogenic particle detectors have become one of the driving technologies in these fields. Future direct dark matter search experiments aim to improve the sensitivity for low mass dark matter particles (≲ 10 GeV /c2) down to the neutrino floor and the next generation of neutrinoless double beta decay experiments aims to improve the sensitivity on the half-life to ∼1026 -1027 years, corresponding to the parameter space predicted for the inverted mass ordering and degenerate mass range. To achieve these goals, significant improvements in detector performance and in radiopurity are required and both classes of experiments can benefit from the strong synergies in the fields of detector development and in the production of high purity single-crystals.

  3. Generation and characterization of high-purity, pulsed squeezed light at telecom wavelengths from pp-KTP

    CERN Document Server

    Gerrits, Thomas; Baek, Burm; Calkins, Brice; Lita, Adriana; Glancy, Scott; Knill, Emanuel; Nam, Sae Woo; Mirin, Richard P; Hadfield, Robert H; Bennink, Ryan S; Grice, Warren P; Dorenbos, Sander; Zijlstra, Tony; Klapwijk, Teun; Zwiller, Val

    2011-01-01

    We characterize a periodically poled KTP crystal designed to produce pure single-mode squeezed vacuum at 1570 nm. The type II downconversion is designed to produce two entangled squeezed modes with orthogonal polarizations but nearly identical factorizable spatio-temporal modes. Measurements show a raw (corrected) Hong-Ou-Mandel interference with 86 % (95 %) visibility and a nearly circular joint spectral probability distribution when spectral filtering with 8.6 nm bandwidth is applied. We use superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors to measure the joint spectral probability distribution, and use photon-number-resolving transition-edge sensors to perform Hong-Ou-Mandel interference experiments. Both types of detectors are used to measure second-order correlations: the nanowire detectors with time-domain histogramming, and the transition-edge sensors by directly measuring the photon-number probability distribution. Results from these two very different techniques are in good agreement.

  4. Unique low-molecular-weight lignin with high purity extracted from wood by deep eutectic solvents (DES): a source of lignin for valorization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez-Vasco, Carlos; Ma, Ruoshui; Quintero, Melissa; Guo, Mond; Geleynse, Scott; Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K.; Wolcott, Michael; Zhang, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a new method of applying Deep Eutectic Solvents (DES) for extracting lignin from woody biomass with high yield and high purity. DES mixtures prepared from Choline Chloride (ChCl) and four hydrogen-bond donors–acetic acid, lactic acid, levulinic acid and glycerol–were evaluated for treatment of hardwood (poplar) and softwood (D. fir). It was found that these DES treatments can selectively extract a significant amount of lignin from wood with high yields: 78% from poplar and 58% from D. fir. The extracted lignin has high purity (95%) with unique structural properties. We discover that DES can selectively cleave ether linkages in wood lignin and facilitate lignin removal from wood. The mechanism of DES cleavage of ether bonds between phenylpropane units was investigated. The results from this study demonstrate that DES is a promising solvent for wood delignification and the production of a new source of lignin with promising potential applications.

  5. Simultaneous determination of seven impurities in high-purity cobalt oxide by ICP-AES after matrix separation using 1-nitroso-2-naphthol as a precipitant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王艳; 周春山; 段青兵; 陈萍

    2002-01-01

    A method was developed for the simultaneous determination of seven trace impurities (Cd, Mn, Pb, Zn, Cu, Fe and Ni) in high-purity cobalt oxide by ICP-AES. The matrix effect was eliminated by preci- pitation with 1-nitroso-2-naphthol. The matrix effect of cobalt on the absorptions of trace impurities, the effects of reaction time, pH value, dosage of precipitant on the formation of cobalt-1-nitroso-2-naphthol complex, the effects of hydrochloric acid on the stability of this complex and masking of elements were studied. Recoveries of the impurities in spiked sample are from 90% to 110% with a precision of 1.1%-5.0% RSD. The detection limits of the seven elements are in the range of 0.01-0.24μg/g. The method can be applied to the analysis of high-purity cobalt metal, cobalt oxide and other cobalt compounds.

  6. Determination of trace selenium in high purity tellurium by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry after solid phase extraction of a diaminobenzidine-selenium chelate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Wang; Ying, Zeng; Jinyong, Xu

    2016-09-01

    Macroporous adsorption resin was used as the sorbent for solid phase extraction and determination of the trace Se content in high purity tellurium prior to hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry analysis. Selenium was converted into an organic Se chelate using 3,3‧-diaminobenzidine and was separated from the tellurium matrix by solid phase extraction. The resin was packed as a column for solid phase extraction. Under optimum conditions, trace Se can be quantitatively extracted and the tellurium matrix can be removed. The Se in the eluate was determined by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry. The limit of detection (3σ) of this method was 0.22 ng g- 1 and the relative standard deviation (RSD, n = 5) ranged from 2.0 to 2.5% for the three investigated tellurium samples. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of the trace Se content in high purity tellurium samples.

  7. Effects of 600 MeV proton irradiation on nucleation and growth of precipitates and helium bubbles in a high-purity Al-Mg-Si alloy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Bachu Narain; Leffers, Torben; Victoria, M.;

    1986-01-01

    Solution treated specimens of a high-purity Al-0.75%Mg-0.42%Si alloy were irradiated with 600 MeV protons at 150 and 240°C to a dose level of 0.47 and 0.55 dpa, respectively. Mg2Si-type precipitates formed during irradiation at 150 and 240°C; at 240°C, however, a large number of precipitates seem...

  8. An Overview of the Status of the LHCb RICH Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Harnew, Neville

    2008-01-01

    The LHCb experiment will make precision measurements of CP violation and rare b-hadron decays. Efficient particle identification with high purity over a wide momentum range is vital to these aims. The experiment employs two ring-imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detectors with three radiators, silica aerogel, C$_4$F$_{10}$ and CF$_4$, to cover the momentum range from around 1 to 100 GeV/$c$. The RICH system employs a number of innovative techniques, both in hardware and software. A total of 484 custom-built pixel Hybrid Photon Detectors (HPDs) will be used to measure the spatial positions of Cherenkov photons with wavelengths in the range 200 to 600 nm, covering an active area of around 3.3 m$^2$. The production of the HPDs has now been completed and the tube quality, including the photo-cathode quantum efficiency, far exceeds expectations. The installation of RICH1 is almost complete; RICH2 has been installed and aligned, and commissioning is almost complete. Reconstruction studies incorporating realistic backgrounds...

  9. Ionic liquid-based extraction followed by graphite-furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for the determination of trace heavy metals in high-purity iron metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumiya, Hiroaki; Kato, Tatsuya; Hiraide, Masataka

    2014-02-01

    The analysis of high-purity materials for trace impurities is an important and challenging task. The present paper describes a facile and sensitive method for the determination of trace heavy metals in high-purity iron metal. Trace heavy metals in an iron sample solution were rapidly and selectively preconcentrated by the extraction into a tiny volume of an ionic liquid [1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide] for the determination by graphite-furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). A nitrogen-donating neutral ligand, 2,4,6-tris(2-pyridyl)-1,3,5-triazine (TPTZ), was found to be effective in the ionic liquid-based selective extraction, allowing the nearly complete (~99.8%) elimination of the iron matrix. The combination with the optimized GFAAS was successful. The detectability reached sub-μg g(-1) levels in iron metal. The novel use of TPTZ in ionic liquid-based extraction followed by GFAAS was successfully applied to the determination of traces of Co, Ni, Cu, Cd, and Pb in certified reference materials for high-purity iron metal. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Space charge sign inversion and electric field reconstruction in 24 GeV/c proton-irradiated MCz Si p$^+$-n(TD)-n$^+$ detectors processed via thermal donor introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Z; Carini, G; Chen, W; Eremin, V; Gul, R; Harkonen, J; Li, M

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is the evaluation of radiation effects in detectors based on p-type magnetic czochralski (MCz) Si that was converted to n-type by thermal donor (TD) introduction. As-processed p+-p-n+ detectors were annealed at 430 °C resulting in p+-n(TD)-n+ structures. The space charge sign and the electric field distribution E(x) in MCz Si p+-n(TD)-n+ detectors irradiated by 24 GeV/c protons were analyzed using the data on the current pulse response and the Double Peak (DP) electric field distribution model for heavily irradiated detectors. The approach considers an irradiated detector as a structure with three regions in which the electric field depends on the coordinate, and the induced current pulse response arises from the drift process of free carriers in the detector with variable electric field. Reconstruction of the E(x) profile from the pulse response shapes is performed employing a new method for DP electric field reconstruction. This method includes: (a) a direct extraction of charge loss ...

  11. Thin Film Electrodes for Rare Event Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odgers, Kelly; Brown, Ethan; Lewis, Kim; Giordano, Mike; Freedberg, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    In detectors for rare physics processes, such as neutrinoless double beta decay and dark matter, high sensitivity requires careful reduction of backgrounds due to radioimpurities in detector components. Ultra pure cylindrical resistors are being created through thin film depositions onto high purity substrates, such as quartz glass or sapphire. By using ultra clean materials and depositing very small quantities in the films, low radioactivity electrodes are produced. A new characterization process for cylindrical film resistors has been developed through analytic construction of an analogue to the Van Der Pauw technique commonly used for determining sheet resistance on a planar sample. This technique has been used to characterize high purity cylindrical resistors ranging from several ohms to several tera-ohms for applications in rare event detectors. The technique and results of cylindrical thin film resistor characterization will be presented.

  12. Search for a Standard Model Higgs boson in the mass range 200-600 GeV in the $H \\to ZZ \\to l^+l^-q\\bar{q}$ decay channel with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdel Khalek, Samah; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Acerbi, Emilio; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Addy, Tetteh; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adragna, Paolo; Adye, Tim; Aefsky, Scott; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Agustoni, Marco; Aharrouche, Mohamed; Ahlen, Steven; Ahles, Florian; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahsan, Mahsana; Aielli, Giulio; Akdogan, Taylan; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alam, Mohammad; Alam, Muhammad Aftab; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alessandria, Franco; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allport, Phillip; Allwood-Spiers, Sarah; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alon, Raz; Alonso, Alejandro; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amelung, Christoph; Ammosov, Vladimir; Amorim, Antonio; Amram, Nir; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Anduaga, Xabier; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoun, Sahar; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Arce, Ayana; Arfaoui, Samir; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Arik, Engin; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnault, Christian; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Arutinov, David; Asai, Shoji; Asfandiyarov, Ruslan; Ask, Stefan; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astbury, Alan; Aubert, Bernard; Auge, Etienne; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Avramidou, Rachel Maria; Axen, David; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Baccaglioni, Giuseppe; Bacci, Cesare; Bach, Andre; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bahinipati, Seema; Bai, Yu; Bailey, David; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baker, Mark; Baker, Sarah; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Piyali; Banerjee, Swagato; Banfi, Danilo; Bangert, Andrea Michelle; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barbaro Galtieri, Angela; Barber, Tom; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Bardin, Dmitri; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Barrillon, Pierre; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartsch, Valeria; Bates, Richard; Batkova, Lucia; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Andreas; Battistin, Michele; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beale, Steven; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becks, Karl-Heinz; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Begel, Michael; Behar Harpaz, Silvia; Beimforde, Michael; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellina, Francesco; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belloni, Alberto; Beloborodova, Olga; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Benoit, Mathieu; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Berglund, Elina; Beringer, Jürg; Bernat, Pauline; Bernhard, Ralf; Bernius, Catrin; Berry, Tracey; Bertella, Claudia; Bertin, Antonio; Bertolucci, Federico; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Besson, Nathalie; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biscarat, Catherine; Bitenc, Urban; Black, Kevin; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanchot, Georges; Blazek, Tomas; Blocker, Craig; Blocki, Jacek; Blondel, Alain; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan

    2012-01-01

    A search for a heavy Standard Model Higgs boson decaying via $H \\to ZZ \\to l^+l^-q\\bar{q}$, where $l=e$ or $\\mu$, is presented. The search uses a data set of pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.7 fb$^{-1}$ collected in 2011 by the ATLAS detector at the CERN LHC. No significant excess of events above the estimated background is found. Upper limits at 95% confidence level on the production cross section of a Higgs boson with a mass in the range between 200 and 600 GeV are derived. A Standard Model Higgs boson with a mass in the range 300 $\\le m_H \\le$ 322 GeV or 353 $\\le m_H \\le$ 410 GeV is excluded at 95% CL. The corresponding expected exclusion range is 351 $\\le m_H \\le$ 404 GeV at 95% CL.

  13. Search for a Standard Model Higgs boson in the mass range 200-600 GeV in the $H \\to ZZ \\to l^+l^-q\\bar{q}$ decay channel with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdel Khalek, Samah; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Acerbi, Emilio; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Addy, Tetteh; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adragna, Paolo; Adye, Tim; Aefsky, Scott; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Agustoni, Marco; Aharrouche, Mohamed; Ahlen, Steven; Ahles, Florian; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahsan, Mahsana; Aielli, Giulio; Akdogan, Taylan; Å kesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alam, Mohammad; Alam, Muhammad Aftab; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alessandria, Franco; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allport, Phillip; Allwood-Spiers, Sarah; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alon, Raz; Alonso, Alejandro; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amelung, Christoph; Ammosov, Vladimir; Amorim, Antonio; Amram, Nir; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Anduaga, Xabier; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoun, Sahar; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Arce, Ayana; Arfaoui, Samir; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Arik, Engin; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnault, Christian; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Arutinov, David; Asai, Shoji; Asfandiyarov, Ruslan; Ask, Stefan; Å sman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astbury, Alan; Aubert, Bernard; Auge, Etienne; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Avramidou, Rachel Maria; Axen, David; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Baccaglioni, Giuseppe; Bacci, Cesare; Bach, Andre; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bahinipati, Seema; Bai, Yu; Bailey, David; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baker, Mark; Baker, Sarah; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Piyali; Banerjee, Swagato; Banfi, Danilo; Bangert, Andrea Michelle; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barbaro Galtieri, Angela; Barber, Tom; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Bardin, Dmitri; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Barrillon, Pierre; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartsch, Valeria; Bates, Richard; Batkova, Lucia; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Andreas; Battistin, Michele; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beale, Steven; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becks, Karl-Heinz; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Begel, Michael; Behar Harpaz, Silvia; Beimforde, Michael; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellina, Francesco; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belloni, Alberto; Beloborodova, Olga; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Benoit, Mathieu; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Berglund, Elina; Beringer, Jürg; Bernat, Pauline; Bernhard, Ralf; Bernius, Catrin; Berry, Tracey; Bertella, Claudia; Bertin, Antonio; Bertolucci, Federico; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Besson, Nathalie; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biscarat, Catherine; Bitenc, Urban; Black, Kevin; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanchot, Georges; Blazek, Tomas; Blocker, Craig; Blocki, Jacek; Blondel, Alain; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan

    2012-01-01

    A search for a heavy Standard Model Higgs boson decaying via $H \\to ZZ \\to l^+l^-q\\bar{q}$, where $l=e$ or $\\mu$, is presented. The search uses a data set of pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.7 fb$^{-1}$ collected in 2011 by the ATLAS detector at the CERN LHC. No significant excess of events above the estimated background is found. Upper limits at 95% confidence level on the production cross section of a Higgs boson with a mass in the range between 200 and 600 GeV are derived. A Standard Model Higgs boson with a mass in the range 300 $\\le m_H \\le$ 322 GeV or 353 $\\le m_H \\le$ 410 GeV is excluded at 95% CL. The corresponding expected exclusion range is 351 $\\le m_H \\le$ 404 GeV at 95% CL.

  14. Spectral Study of a Broad Energy HPGe Detector for First Measurement of Coherent Neutrino Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surbrook, Jason; Green, Matthew

    2014-09-01

    Intense neutrino flux at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in the energy domain below Eν = 50 MeV makes SNS a suitable location for measurement of Coherent Neutrino Scattering. Coherent scattering is assumed to occupy vital roles in supernovae (SN) events and measurement offers promising insight into SN mechanics and advancements in SN- ν detection. Furthermore, this interaction is well-calculable and therefore, a strong test of the Standard Model. P-Type Point Contact High-purity germanium detectors are excellent candidates for this measurement due to their sensitivity to low-energy nuclear recoils. One such, a Canberra Broad Energy HPGe detector, was tested for quality degradation from exposure to fast neutrons in the SNS target building, to assess usefulness in a future coherent scattering experiment. Analysis of the lead-shielded spectra was handled using tools developed for the Majorana Demonstrator neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment. Broad spectrum energy resolution and 68Ge decay rates were calculated. This poster will present findings that will help determine this detector's eligibility and exposure limitations for measurement in a future coherent neutrino scattering experiment at the SNS.

  15. High Quality SiGe Layer Deposited by a New Ultrahigh Vacuum Chemical Vapor Deposition System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    An ultrahigh vacuum chemical vapor deposition (UHV/CVD) system is developed and the details of its construction and operation are reported. Using high purity SiH4 and GeH4 reactant gases,the Si0.82Ge0.18 layer is deposited at 550℃. With the measurements by double crystal X-ray diffraction (DCXRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) techniques, it is shown that the crystalline quality of the SiGe layer is good,and the underlying SiGe/Si heterointerface is sharply defined.

  16. Progress in Catalytic Membrane Reactors for High Purity Hydrogen Production%膜催化反应器及其制氢技术的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫云飞; 张力; 李丽仙; 唐强

    2011-01-01

    As a kind of ideal fuel for fuel cell, hydrogen must be satisfied with the enough high purity. To produce high purity hydrogen at a low cost and large scale method has become a key research focus in the industrialization of fuel-cell technology. The membrane catalytic technology with catalysis and separation dual functions has been developed in recent years, which is a good method to produce high purity hydrogen. Based on the latest developments in the membrane catalytic reaction fields, the advantages, composition and type of membrane catalytic reactor are summarized. The preparation techniques, advantages and classification of inorganic membrane materials are described. Especially, the progress and application for high purity hydrogen production are reviewed in three kinds of catalytic membrane reactors, including oxygen-permeable membrane reactor, hydrogen-permeation membrane reactor and double-membranes reactor. The existing problems of catalytic membrane and membrane catalytic reactor in the industrialization process of hydrogen production using the membrane catalytic technology are also discussed. Additionally, the prospects of membrane catalytic reactors for hydrogen production is proposed.%燃料电池对其理想燃料氢气的纯度要求极高,如何低成本、大规模制取高纯氢气己成为燃料电池技术实现工业化的一个关键问题和研究热点.近年发展起来的兼具催化与分离双重功能的膜催化反应技术是实现制取高纯氢气的一个有效途径.本文结合膜催化反应领域的最新进展,综述了膜催化反应器的优点、组成、类型;介绍了无机膜材料的优点、分类及制备技术;详细综述了透氧膜催化反应器、透氢膜催化反应器及双膜催化反应器在制氢过程中的研究进展和应用,指出了膜催化反应制氢技术在工业化发展过程中存在的问题及应用前景.

  17. SYNTHESIS OF HIGH PURITY TiO2 NANOPARTICLES FROM Ti(SO4)2 IN PRESENCE OF EDTA AS COMPLEXING AGENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Li; Yu Guo; Youzhi Liu

    2005-01-01

    TiO2 nanoparticles were synthesized by a homogeneous controlled precipitation method using industrial titanium sulfate (Ti(SO4)2). The obtained powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and ICP plasma spectrometer. EDTA was used as complexing agent to improve the purity and the formation of TiO2 nanoparticles. Experimental results indicated that the high-purity TiO2 nanoparticles were 20 nm in mean size and nearly monodispersed.

  18. A study on the influence of trace elements (C, S, B, Al, N) on the hot ductility of the high purity austenitic alloy Fe-Ni 36% (INVAR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simonetta-Perrot, M.T.

    1994-11-01

    In order to study the damage mechanisms leading to the ductility decrease of the Invar alloy at 600 C, a high-purity Fe-Ni 36% sample has been doped with trace elements with the purpose of identifying the role of sulfur, sulfur with Al N or B N precipitates and sulfur with boron, on the ductility, the failure modes, the intergranular damage and the plastic deformation mechanisms prior to failure. A new AES segregation quantification method has been used to study the kinetics and thermodynamics of intergranular and surface segregations and determine the relation between sulfur segregation and grain joint fragility. refs., figs., tabs.

  19. Effect of Carbon on Grain Boundary Segregation of Phosphorus and Phosphorus-Induced Intergranular Fracture in High Purity Iron with Phosphorus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The segregation of carbon at grain boundaries and its effect on phosphorus segregation and phosphorus-induced intergranular fracture in the alloy of high purity iron with phosphorus were investigated by scanning Auger electron spectroscopy, impact test and SEM observation of fractured surface. The experimental results showed that the carbon segregation at grain boundaries decreases the phosphorus segregation, and a change of fracture mode from intergranular fracture to transgranular one, hence a decrease of ductile-brittle transition temperature is observed. The mechanism of these effects was discussed.

  20. A study on the influence of trace elements (C, S, B, Al, N) on the hot ductility of the high purity austenitic alloy Fe-Ni 36% (INVAR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simonetta-Perrot, M.T.

    1994-11-01

    In order to study the damage mechanisms leading to the ductility decrease of the Invar alloy at 600 C, a high-purity Fe-Ni 36% sample has been doped with trace elements with the purpose of identifying the role of sulfur, sulfur with Al N or B N precipitates and sulfur with boron, on the ductility, the failure modes, the intergranular damage and the plastic deformation mechanisms prior to failure. A new AES segregation quantification method has been used to study the kinetics and thermodynamics of intergranular and surface segregations and determine the relation between sulfur segregation and grain joint fragility. refs., figs., tabs.

  1. Active noise canceling system for mechanically cooled germanium radiation detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Karl Einar; Burks, Morgan T

    2014-04-22

    A microphonics noise cancellation system and method for improving the energy resolution for mechanically cooled high-purity Germanium (HPGe) detector systems. A classical adaptive noise canceling digital processing system using an adaptive predictor is used in an MCA to attenuate the microphonics noise source making the system more deployable.

  2. Cross section and coupling measurements with the ATLAS detector for the 125 GeV Higgs Boson in the fermion decay channels

    CERN Document Server

    Gregersen, Kristian; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Detailed measurements of the properties of the 125 GeV Higgs boson are fundamental for the understanding of the electroweak symmetry breaking mechanism. Measurements of the Higgs boson in fermion final states allow to study the Yukawa couplings of the Higgs boson through the decay mode and the gauge couplings of the Higgs boson through the production mode. This talk summarizes ATLAS measurements of the 125 GeV Higgs boson in decays involving b, tau and mu.

  3. Optimal recovery of high-purity rutin crystals from the whole plant of Fagopyrum esculentum Moench (buckwheat) by extraction, fractionation, and recrystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung Heon; Lee, Ki Won; Kim, Dong Young; Park, Hyung Hwan; Kwon, Ik Boo; Lee, Hyong Joo

    2005-10-01

    Rutin, one of the flavonoids derived from plants, is increasingly in demand in the food, pharmaceutical, and cosmetic industries due to its various biological and physiological activities including antioxidation, anti-inflammation, and anti-hypertension. The whole plant of buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench) is a major source of natural rutin. This study developed a low-cost process encompassing the efficient extraction, fractionation, and recrystallization to obtain high-purity rutin from buckwheat, and it could improve the economic utilization of this abundant low-value agricultural product. The sequential separation and purification procedures established in this study involved extraction with 50% (v/v) aqueous ethanol at 80 degrees C for 1 h followed by elution with water and aqueous ethanols at 20% and 30% (v/v) on a styrene-based resin column, and recrystallization at 4 degrees C for 12 h. These conditions resulted in the recovery of 92% of total rutin with over 95% purity. In the present study, high-purity rutin was obtained from whole buckwheat through low-cost processes, the separation and purification strategy established in this study could provide valuable information to the relevant industries.

  4. Direct Determination of Trace Impurities in High Purity Neodymium after In-Situ Analyte-Matrix Separation by Fluorination Assisted ETV-ICP-AES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruth Wanjau; Hu Bin(胡斌); He Man(何蔓); Jiang Zucheng(江祖成); Wu Yingliang(吴英亮)

    2004-01-01

    Using PTFE as a chemical modifier, a method for the determination of trace impurities in high purity Nd2O3 by in-situ separation and electrothermal vaporization-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ETV-ICP-AES) was developed. The analyte-matrix separation and the temperature program of graphite furnace were investigated and optimized. The solid samples were directly introduced into graphite furnace in the form of slurry, where selective volatilization between the matrix and the analytes took place. The Nd matrix was retained in the graphite furnace during the evaporation step, while the trace analyte impurities were vaporized and removed. As a result, the matrix interference that is serious without the modifier is suppressed effectively. The achievable detection limits are (μg·g-1): Ti 0.15, Mn 0.15, Ni 0.20, Co 0.54, respectively. The proposed method was applied to direct determination of trace impurities in high purity Nd2O3 with satisfactory results.

  5. Determination of rare earth elements in high purity rare earth oxides by liquid chromatography, thermionic mass spectrometry and combined liquid chromatography/thermionic mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stijfhoorn, D. E.; Stray, H.; Hjelmseth, H.

    1993-03-01

    A high-performance liquid Chromatographie (HPLC) method for the determination of rare earth elements in rocks has been modified and used for the determination of rare earth elements (REE) in high purity rare earth oxides. The detection limit was 1-1.5 ng or 2-3 mg/kg when a solution corresponding to 0.5 mg of the rare earth oxide was injected. The REE determination was also carried out by adding a mixture of selected REE isotopes to the sample and analysing the collected HPLC-fractions by mass spectrometry (MS) using a thermionic source. Since the matrix element was not collected, interference from this element during the mass spectrometric analysis was avoided. Detection limits as low as 0.5 mg/kg could then be obtained. Detection limits as low as 0.05 mg/kg were possible by MS without HPLC-pre-separation, but this approach could only be used for those elements that were not affected by the matrix. Commercial samples of high purity Nd 2O 3, Gd 2O 3 and Dy 2O 3 were analysed in this study, and a comparison of results obtained by HPLC, combined HPLC/MS and direct MS are presented.

  6. Development and validation of a reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography method for routine identification and purity assessment of high-purity steviol glycoside sweeteners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bililign, Tsion; Moore, Jeffrey C; Tan, Shane; Leeks, Allan T

    2014-02-12

    The widespread application of stevia-based sweeteners in food products has resulted in the need for reliable analytical methods for measuring the purity and identity of high-purity steviol glycoside ingredients. The objective of this research was to develop and validate a new reversed-phase separation method capable of separating and quantifying nine steviol glycosides present in typical high-purity stevia extract ingredients. Results of the study established the linearity of the method at a correlation factor of 1.000 for the two major components and other minor components of this food ingredient. Method accuracy values were in the range of 99.1-100.9%. The percent relative standard deviation for six independent assay determinations was 1.0%. The method was determined to be robust for minor changes in column temperature, initial acetonitrile content, flow rate, and wavelength. The validated high-performance liquid chromatography method was found to be suitable to be included by USP as a Food Chemicals Codex compendial standard for steviol glycosides.

  7. Study on the Production Process for High Purity Natural Anethole%高纯度天然大茴香脑生产技术研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李超群; 蒋天成

    2013-01-01

    The high purity natural anethole (>99%) was obtained by using natural star anise oil as raw material via static freezing, centrifugation and rectification employing fractionation tower filled with stainless steel wave filler. The quality of product was assessed following the standard of GB 23489—2009. The results showed that this process was simple and practical, which could be used as a novel method for producing high purity natural anethole.%以八角茴香油为原料,采用静态冷冻工艺冷冻、离心制备得到粗产品,再采用网波不锈钢填料分馏塔对粗产品进行精馏分离得到高纯度大茴香脑(纯度>99%).产品按国家标准GB 23489-2009的要求进行检验.此工艺路线简单、实用,产品品质优良,是生产高纯度天然大茴香脑的新型实用方法.

  8. The production of ultra-high purity single isotopes or tailored isotope mixtures by ICP-MS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liezers, Martin; Farmer, Orville T.; Dion, Michael P.; Thomas, Linda MP; Eiden, Gregory C.

    2015-01-01

    We report the development and testing of a simple collector arrangement for a commercial quadrupole ICP-MS that for the first time has been used to produce small quantities of highly enriched (>99.99%) single isotopes, with deposition rates >10 ng/hour. The collector assembly replaces the standard instrument detector allowing for implantation with simultaneous monitoring of the incident ion current. Even under zero bias implant conditions, low energy (<10 eV), ion collection efficiency was observed to be very high ~99%. 151Eu ion currents of 0.1-0.5 nA were collected on a simple, planar foil without resorting to any type of cup configuration. Recovery of the enriched isotope from such foils is much simpler than from a more complex cup configuration. High rejection of adjacent mass isotopes was demonstrated by selectively implanting 167Er without any discernible co-implantation of 166Er and 168Er. The important analytical possibilities of the new approach to isotope ratio measurement, tracer purification and radiation measurements are discussed.

  9. Measurement of the reaction {gamma}p{yields}K{sup 0}{sigma}{sup +} for photon energies up to 2.65 GeV with the SAPHIR detector at ELSA; Messung der Reaktion {gamma}p {yields} K{sup 0}{sigma}{sup +} fuer Photonenergien bis 2.65 GeV mit dem SAPHIR-Detektor an ELSA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawall, R.

    2004-01-01

    The reaction {gamma}p {yields} K{sup 0}{sigma}{sup +} was measured with the SAPHIR-detector at ELSA during the run periods 1997 and 1998. Results were obtained for cross sections in the photon energy range from threshold up to 2.65 GeV for all production angles and for the {sigma}{sup +}-polarization. Emphasis has been put on the determination and reduction of the contributions of background reactions and the comparison with other measurements and theoretical predictions. (orig.)

  10. Inclusive D meson production with the Mark II detector at SPEAR. [3. 9 to 7. 4 GeV (c. m. )

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coles, M.W.

    1980-09-01

    Neutral and charged D meson production cross sections were measured at center-of-mass energies between 3.9 GeV and 7.4 GeV. The quantity R/sub D/(=(sigma/sub D/sup +/+D/sup -// + sigma/sub D/sup 0/+ anti D/sup 0//)/2 sigma/sub ..mu../sup +/..mu../sup -//) is equal to 2 at 4 GeV and 4.4 GeV and about equal to 1 elsewhere. R/sub D/ + 2.5 approximately equals R (sigma/sub hadrons//sigma/sub ..mu../sup +/..mu../sup -//) at all energies. The exclusive cross sections for e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation into D anti D, D* anti D, and D* anti D* were measured at center-of-mass energies between 3.9 GeV and 4.3 GeV. sigma/sub D* anti D*/ decreases with increasing center-of-mass energy from 6.6 +- 1.3 nb near 4 GeV to 3.6 +- .9 nb near 4.3 GeV. sigma/sub D* anti D/ also decreases from 4.2 +- .9 nb to 1.8 +- .6 nb over the same energy region. sigma/sub D anti D/ is less than 0.5 +- .3 nb at all energies. The branching fractions for D*/sup +/ and D* decay were measured. B/sub D*/sup 0/..-->..D/sup 0/..pi../sup 0// = 0.5 +- .09, B/sub D*/sup +/..-->..D/sup 0/..pi../sup +// = 0.44 +- .10, and B/sub D*/sup +/..-->..D/sup +/..pi../sup 0// = 0.31 +- .07. At 5.2 GeV, the D meson differential cross section is well described by phase space for e/sup +/e/sup -/ ..-->.. D anti D..pi pi.. or D* anti D*..pi pi... Sd sigma/dz was parameterized as A(1-z)/sup n/ with n = 0.9 +- .4. Quasi-two-body production accounts for less than 20% of the total D cross section. No evidence was found for associated charmed baryon-D meson production. An upper limit of 0.4 nb (90% confidence level) was determined for associated production. 41 figures, 12 tables.

  11. Alpha particle response study of polycrstalline diamond radiation detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Amit; Topkar, Anita [Electronics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai-400085 (India)

    2016-05-23

    Chemical vapor deposition has opened the possibility to grow high purity synthetic diamond at relatively low cost. This has opened up uses of diamond based detectors for wide range of applications. These detectors are most suitable for harsh environments where standard semiconductor detectors cannot work. In this paper, we present the fabrication details and performance study of polycrystalline diamond based radiation detector. Effect of different operating parameters such as bias voltage and shaping time for charge collection on the performance of detector has been studied.

  12. Cross section and coupling measurements with the ATLAS detector for the 125 GeV Higgs Boson in the diboson decay channels

    CERN Document Server

    Dai, Tiesheng; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    To understand the electroweak symmetry breaking mechanism, the detailed measurements of the properties of the 125 GeV Higgs boson are essential. The Higgs boson decaying into the diboson final states allow to study the gauge and loop induced couplings of the Higgs boson both in production and decay modes. This talk summarizes ATLAS measurements of the 125 GeV Higgs boson cross-sections and couplings from final diboson state involving W, Z or photons based on 36.1 fb-1 ATLAS 13 Tev data.

  13. The GeMSE facility for low-background γ-ray spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Sivers, M.; Hofmann, B. A.; Rosén, Å. V.; Schumann, M.

    2016-12-01

    We describe a new high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector setup for low-background γ-ray spectrometry. The GeMSE facility (Germanium Material and meteorite Screening Experiment) is dedicated to material screening for rare event searches in astroparticle physics as well as to the characterization of meteorites. It is installed in a medium depth (~620 m.w.e.) underground laboratory in Switzerland in a multi-layer shielding and is equipped with an active muon veto. We have reached a very competitive integral background rate of (246±2) counts/day (100-2700 keV) and measured a sensitivity of ~0.5-0.6 mBq/kg for long-lived isotopes from the 238U/232Th chains in a ~1 kg sample screened for ~27 days. An extrapolation to higher sample masses and measurement times suggests a maximum sensitivity in the O(50) \\textmu Bq/kg range. We describe the data analysis based on Bayesian statistics, background simulations, the efficiency calibration and first sample measurements.

  14. Characteristics of a 4-fold segmented clover detectore

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LOU Jian-Ling; LI Zhi-Huan; YE Yan-Lin; JIANG Dong-Xing; HUA Hui; LI Xiang-Qing; ZHANG Shuang-Quan; ZHENG Tao; GE Yu-Cheng; KONG Zan; L(U) Lin-Hui; LI Chen; LU Fei; FAN Feng-Ying; LI Zhong-Yu; CAO Zhong-Xin; MA Li-Ying; Faisal. J. Q.; XU Hu-Shan; HU Zheng-Guo; WANG Meng; LEI Xiang-Guo; DUAN Li-Min; XIAO Zhi-Gang; ZHAN Wen-Long; XIAO Guo-Qing; HUANG Tian-Heng; FU Fen; ZHANG Xue-Heng; ZHENG Chuan; YU Yu-Song; TU Xiao-Lin; ZHANG Ya-Peng; YANG Yan-Yun; ZHANG Hong-Bin; TANG Bin; TIAN Yu-Lin; OUYANG Zhen; HUANG Mei-Rong; XU Zhi-Guo; YUE Ke; GAO Qi

    2009-01-01

    Four high-purity germanium 4-fold segmented Clover detectors have been applied in the experiment of neutron-rich nucleus 21N. The performance of those four Clovers have been tested with radioactive sources and in-beam experiments, and the main results including energy resolution, peak-to-total ratios, the variation of the hit pattern distribution in different crystals of one Clover detector with the energy of γ ray, and absolute full energy peak detection efficiency curve, were presented.

  15. Un método reproducible para obtener peg biramificado monofuncional de alta pureza A reproducible method for obtaining a 2-arms monofunctional peg with high purity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A. Ramón

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available PEGylation has become a widely applied technique to enhancing in vitro and in vivo stability of therapeutic proteins and to increasing materials biocompatibility. PEG branched structures have proven useful for protein and peptide modification. Furthermore, they may be better than linear structures for many purposes. This paper describes an improved procedure for obtaining 2-arms PEG based on L-lysine. The efficiency of the synthesis was not related to moisture of the raw materials. This procedure does not use hazardous reagents as previous protocols do. It implemented a purification process for obtaining the desired structure with high purity ( > 99%. Finally, the procedure described here allows the obtaining of others PEGylation reagents.

  16. Possible influence of surface oxides on the optical response of high-purity niobium material used in the fabrication of superconducting radio frequency cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nageshwar; Deo, M. N.; Roy, S. B.

    2016-09-01

    We have investigated the possible influence of surface oxides on the optical properties of a high-purity niobium (Nb) material for fabrication of superconducting radio frequency (SCRF) cavities. Various peaks in the infrared region were identified using Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy. Optical response functions such as complex refractive index, dielectric and conductivity of niobium were compared with the existing results on oxides free Nb and Cu. It was observed that the presence of a mixture of niobium-oxides, and probably near other surface impurities, appreciably influence the conducting properties of the material causing deviation from the typical metallic characteristics. In this way, the key result of this work is the observation, identification of vibrational modes of some of surface complexes and study of its influences on the optical responses of materials. This method of spectroscopic investigation will help in understanding the origin of degradation of performance of SCRF cavities.

  17. Possible influence of surface oxides on the optical response of high-purity niobium material used in the fabrication of superconducting radio frequency cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Nageshwar [Magnetic and Superconducting Materials Section, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013, M.P. (India); Deo, M.N. [High Pressure & Synchrotron Radiation Physics Division, BARC, Mumbai 400085 (India); Roy, S.B. [Magnetic and Superconducting Materials Section, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013, M.P. (India)

    2016-09-11

    We have investigated the possible influence of surface oxides on the optical properties of a high-purity niobium (Nb) material for fabrication of superconducting radio frequency (SCRF) cavities. Various peaks in the infrared region were identified using Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy. Optical response functions such as complex refractive index, dielectric and conductivity of niobium were compared with the existing results on oxides free Nb and Cu. It was observed that the presence of a mixture of niobium-oxides, and probably near other surface impurities, appreciably influence the conducting properties of the material causing deviation from the typical metallic characteristics. In this way, the key result of this work is the observation, identification of vibrational modes of some of surface complexes and study of its influences on the optical responses of materials. This method of spectroscopic investigation will help in understanding the origin of degradation of performance of SCRF cavities.

  18. Internal friction of very high purity lead (99,9999%) at medium temperatures; Friccion interna en plomo de muy alta pureza (99,9999%) a temperaturas medias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallego, I.; Gutierrez-Urrutia, I.; San Juan, J. M.; No, M. L.

    2001-07-01

    Internal friction spectra of high purity lead (99,9999%) at medium temperatures exhibit a main relaxation peak at 230 K (P{sub 1}) which depends strongly on the dislocation arrangement. The mechanisms associated to P{sub 1} relaxation has an activation area between 500b2 and 2000b 2 and its activation energy is 0.65{+-}0.05 eV 863{+-}5KJ/mol, which is only 0.6 times the auto diffusion energy of lead. The behaviour of P{sub 1} peak and its dependence on thermomechanical treatments has allowed us to conclude that it is associated to the sliding of dislocations controlled by the climbing of jogs by diffusion of vacancies along the dislocation lines. At a slightly higher temperature, another relaxation (P{sub 1}) turns up in the spectra, which can be associated to different mechanisms. (Author) 12 refs.

  19. Radiochemical purity of Mo and Tc solution obtained after irradiation and dissolution of Mo-100-enriched and ultra-high-purity natural Mo disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tkac, Peter [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gromov, Roman [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Chemerisov, Sergey D. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Rotsch, David A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Vandegrift, George F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Four irradiations of ultra-high-purity natural Mo targets and one irradiation using 97.4% Mo-100-enriched material were performed. The purpose of these irradiations was to determine whether the presence of Sn stabilizer in the H2O2 used for the dissolution of sintered Mo disks can affect the radiochemical purity of the final K2MoO4 in 5M KOH solution. Results from radiochemical purity tests performed using thin-layer paper chromatography show that even 2– 3× excess of Sn-stabilized H2O2 typically used for dissolution of sintered Mo disks did not affect the radiochemical purity of the final product.

  20. 高纯乙腈连续精馏过程建模与分析%Modeling and analyzing of continuous process for rectifying high purity acetonitrile

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾涵卫; 孙小方; 蔡亦军; 夏陆岳; 周猛飞; 潘海天

    2012-01-01

    Based on the deep analysis of continuous process of rectifying high purity acetonitrile and its mechanics, with rational assumptions dynamic mathematical models of multi - tower for rectifying high purity acetonitrile were established by material balance, energy balance, environmental impact and hydraulic analysis, considering the character of multi-stage cascade and the difficulty of operating conditions optimization. Furthermore, the dynamic simulation and analysis were carried out respectively to the dealcoholization tower, vacuum tower and pressure tower. Simultaneously, investigating the tower pressure and steam heating effect on the separation process, and finding the further relative dynamic data of acetonitrile could provide a good foundation for the research of system integration optimization and control.%针对高纯乙腈连续精馏过程多塔串级及操作条件优化困难等特点,在深入分析乙腈连续精馏工艺流程及机理基础上,通过物料衡算、能量衡算、环境影响衡算和水力学分析等原理,结合必要的合理假设,建立乙腈连续精馏多塔的动态数学模型,对脱醇塔、减压塔和加压塔分别进行动态模拟和分析,考察塔内压力、加热蒸汽量等对分离过程的影响,并进一步寻找这些因素对出料乙腈的动态变化数据,为实施系统的集成优化与控制提供了良好基础.

  1. 高纯α-AlH3的合成及表征%Synthesis and Characterization of α-AlH3 with High Purity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张永岗; 开永茂; 汪伟; 邱少君; 李鸿波

    2012-01-01

    为制备高纯α-AlH3,将LiAlH4与AlCl3在乙醚溶液中反应,制备并分离出固体AlH3乙醚络合物,其在甲苯中90℃下脱醚2h可制得纯度为99.5%的α-AlH3,产率96.4%.对高纯α-AlH3进行了XRD、红外、元素分析、TG/DSC、SEM表征,同时考察了α-AlH3的结晶条件和稳定性.结果表明产品结晶性好、纯度高、性质稳定,合成方法具有操作简便、收率高、重现性好等优点.%In order to obtain α-AlH3 with high purity, solid AlH3-etherate was synthesized and separated from the reaction of LiAlH4 and A1C13 in diethyl ether, then α-A1H3 with purity of 99. 5 % was prepared via desolvation of the solid AlH3-etherate in toluene at 90℃ for 2 hours in the yield of 96. 4%. The product was characterized by XRD, IR, elemental analysis, TG/DSC, SEM, meanwhile the crystallization and stability of α-AlH3 was also studied. The results indicate that the product has good crystallization, high purity and stability, the synthetic method has the advantages of simple operation, high yield and good reproducibility.

  2. A hybrid enrichment process combining conjugated polymer extraction and silica gel adsorption for high purity semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jianfu; Li, Zhao; Lefebvre, Jacques; Cheng, Fuyong; Dunford, Jeffrey L.; Malenfant, Patrick R. L.; Humes, Jefford; Kroeger, Jens

    2015-09-01

    A novel purification process for the enrichment of sc-SWCNTs that combines selective conjugated polymer extraction (CPE) with selective adsorption using silica gel, termed hybrid-CPE (h-CPE), has been developed, providing a high purity sc-SWCNT material with a significant improvement in process efficiency and yield. Using the h-CPE protocol, a greater than 5 fold improvement in yield can be obtained compared to traditional CPE while obtaining sc-SWCNT with a purity >99.9% as assessed by absorption spectroscopy and Raman mapping. Thin film transistor devices using the h-CPE derived sc-SWCNTs as the semiconductor possess mobility values ranging from 10-30 cm2 V-1 s-1 and current ON/OFF ratio of 104-105 for channel lengths between 2.5 and 20 μm.A novel purification process for the enrichment of sc-SWCNTs that combines selective conjugated polymer extraction (CPE) with selective adsorption using silica gel, termed hybrid-CPE (h-CPE), has been developed, providing a high purity sc-SWCNT material with a significant improvement in process efficiency and yield. Using the h-CPE protocol, a greater than 5 fold improvement in yield can be obtained compared to traditional CPE while obtaining sc-SWCNT with a purity >99.9% as assessed by absorption spectroscopy and Raman mapping. Thin film transistor devices using the h-CPE derived sc-SWCNTs as the semiconductor possess mobility values ranging from 10-30 cm2 V-1 s-1 and current ON/OFF ratio of 104-105 for channel lengths between 2.5 and 20 μm. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr04851f

  3. Removal of an iron matrix with polyoxyethylene-type surfactant-coated amberlite XAD-4 for the determination of trace impurities in high-purity iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumiya, Hiroaki; Furuzawa, Shigeru; Hiraide, Masataka

    2005-08-15

    Admicellar sorbents for the removal of an iron matrix were prepared for the determination of trace impurities in high-purity iron. A 1.0-g amount of Amberlite XAD-4 (macroreticular styrene-divinylbenzene copolymer) was coated with 0.14-1.3 mmol of polyoxyethylene-type surfactants, including polyoxyethylene-4-tert-octylphenoxy ethers (Triton X series) and polyoxyethylene-4-isononylphenoxy ethers (PONPEs). The surfactant-coated XAD-4 was packed into a polypropylene column (7 mm i.d. x 50 mm high). A 5.0-cm(3) volume of sample solution was passed through the column at a flow rate of 0.5 cm(3) min(-1). Milligram amounts of iron(III) were effectively sorbed on the column from 8 mol dm(-3) hydrochloric acid solutions. Among the surfactants tested, polyoxyethylene(20)-4-isononylphenoxy ether (PONPE-20) showed the best performance: the iron leaked from the PONPE-20 column was 4 microg when 25 mg of iron(III) was introduced onto the column. Trace elements, such as Ti(IV), Cr(III), Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Ag(I), Cd(II), Pb(II), and Bi(III), were not retained on the column and thus quantitatively recovered in the column effluent. The effective separation of trace elements from an iron matrix allowed their accurate determinations by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry or graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. The detection limits (3sigma blank) were in the nanogram per gram range. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of trace impurities in high-purity iron samples.

  4. Optimized high energy resolution in γ-ray spectroscopy with AGATA triple cluster detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiens, Andreas

    2011-06-20

    achieved for events of each hit-segment multiplicity. For γ-ray energies of 1.33 MeV, an improvement of 20% was achieved. The study of electron trapping using a new position-sensitive correction method for the energy measurement was completed. The correction of electron trapping resulted in an additional improvement of the full width at half maximum of the peaks of the γ-spectra. A total energy resolution of 2.01 keV at 1.33 MeV was achieved with a segmented, large volume germanium detector. The position-sensitive operation enabled calculating the Fano factor, which resulted in F = 0.095 ± 0.005. Eventually, a significant improvement of the energy resolution was achieved. Consequently, the novel segmented high-purity germanium AGATA detectors are operated at significantly improved conditions superior to the common Ge detectors in energy and position resolution. The essential improvement arises from the redundant energy measurement of independent core and segment electrodes and from the correction of the position-dependent trapping effects.

  5. Hyperon production in proton-nucleus collisions at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}(s{sub NN}) = 41.6 GeV at HERA-B and design of silicon microstrip detectors for tracking at LHCb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agari, Michaela

    2006-07-01

    The topics of this thesis are the measurements of hyperon production in protonnucleus collisions at {radical}(s)=41.6 GeV with the Hera-B detector located at DESY, Hamburg (Germany), and the design of silicon microstrip sensors for the LHCb experiment at CERN, Geneva (Switzerland). {lambda}, {xi} and {omega} hyperons and their antiparticles were reconstructed from 113.5 . 10{sup 6} inelastic collisions of protons with fixed carbon, titanium and tungsten targets. With these samples, antiparticle-to-particle ratios, cross sections integrated for the accessible kinematic region of Hera-B and single differential cross sections as function of transverse momentum, d{sigma}/dp{sub T}{sup 2} (for {lambda} and {xi}) and rapidity, d{sigma}/dy (for {lambda} only), have been been measured as well as the dependence of these quantities on the atomic number of the target nucleus, as parameterized using the Glauber model. The obtained ratios follow the same trend as found for the energy dependence of measurements from nucleus-nucleus collisions. Silicon microstrip sensors have been designed for the tracking system of the LHCb detector. Evaluating the performance in beam tests at CERN, the strip geometry and sensor thickness were varied optimizing for a large signal-to-noise ratio, a small number of read-out channels and a low occupancy. The detector is currently being built to be operational for first proton-proton collisions in autumn 2007. (orig.)

  6. Improved energy resolution of highly segmented HPGe detectors by noise reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiens, A.; Birkenbach, B.; Bruyneel, B.; Eberth, J.; Hess, H.; Pascovici, Gh.; Reiter, P. [Institut fuer Kernpyhsik, Koeln (Germany); Bazzacco, D.; Farnea, E.; Michelagnoli, C.; Recchia, F. [INFN, Sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy); Collaboration: for the AGATA Collaboration

    2013-04-15

    Built-in redundancies in highly segmented high-purity Ge detectors are exploited to increase the energy resolution of these semiconductor devices for detection of electromagnetic radiation in the X-ray and {gamma}-ray regime. The information of the two electronically decoupled independent measurements, the cathode and the anode electrodes, provides an improved signal-to-noise ratio through a combination of the individually measured signals performed on an event-by-event basis. The average energy resolution values of the AGATA triple cluster detector for an energy deposition of 60keV was measured to be 1.1 keV (FWHM) for the 36 segments and 1.2 keV for the core. The averaged signals of the core and the segments show an improved resolution value of 0.87 keV which is close to the expected theoretical limit. At higher {gamma}-ray energy the averaging technique allows for an enhanced energy resolution with a FWHM of 2.15keV at 1.3MeV. By means of the position sensitive operation of AGATA a new value for the Fano factor was determined and the noise contributions to the FWHM of a {gamma}-ray peak separated. (orig.)

  7. Measurement of the pion form factor for M_{pipi}^2 between 0.1 and 0.85 GeV^2 with the KLOE detector

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2009-01-01

    The KLOE experiment at the phi-factory DA$\\Phi$NE has measured the pion form factor in the range between 0.1 < M_{pipi}^2 < 0.85 GeV^2 using events taken at sqrt{s}= 1 GeV with a photon emitted at large polar angles in the initial state. This measurement extends the M_{pipi}^2 region covered by KLOE ISR measurements of the pion form factor down to the two pion production threshold. The value obtained in this measurement of the dipion contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment of \\Delta a_mu^{pipi} = (478.5+-2.0_{stat}+-4.8_{syst}+-2.9_{theo}) 10^{-10} further confirms the discrepancy between the Standard Model evaluation for a_mu and the experimental value measured by the (g-2) collaboration at BNL.

  8. Search for scalar diphoton resonances in the mass range 65-600 GeV with the ATLAS detector in pp collision data at √s=8 TeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

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    2014-10-24

    A search for scalar particles decaying via narrow resonances into two photons in the mass range 65-600 GeV is performed using 20.3  fb(-1) of √s 8 TeV pp collision data collected with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The recently discovered Higgs boson is treated as a background. No significant evidence for an additional signal is observed. The results are presented as limits at the 95% confidence level on the production cross section of a scalar boson times branching ratio into two photons, in a fiducial volume where the reconstruction efficiency is approximately independent of the event topology. The upper limits set extend over a considerably wider mass range than previous searches.

  9. Search for Scalar Diphoton Resonances in the Mass Range $65-600$ GeV with the ATLAS Detector in $pp$ Collision Data at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 $TeV$

    CERN Document Server

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Bessidskaia, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Black, Curtis; Black, James; Black, Kevin; Blackburn, Daniel; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Bock, Christopher; Boddy, Christopher Richard; Boehler, Michael; Boek, Thorsten Tobias; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bohm, Christian; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldyrev, Alexey; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borri, Marcello; Borroni, Sara; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortolotto, Valerio; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boterenbrood, Hendrik; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouffard, Julian; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boutouil, Sara; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bozic, Ivan; Bracinik, Juraj; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Brazzale, Simone Federico; Brelier, Bertrand; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brennan, Amelia Jean; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Bristow, Kieran; Bristow, Timothy Michael; Britton, Dave; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Bronner, Johanna; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brosamer, Jacquelyn; Brost, Elizabeth; Brown, Jonathan; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Brunet, Sylvie; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Bryngemark, Lene; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Bucci, Francesca; Buchholz, Peter; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Buehrer, Felix; Bugge, Lars; Bugge, Magnar Kopangen; Bulekov, Oleg; Bundock, Aaron Colin; Burdin, Sergey; Burghgrave, Blake; Burke, Stephen; Burmeister, Ingo; Busato, Emmanuel; Büscher, Daniel; Büscher, Volker; Bussey, Peter; Buszello, Claus-Peter; Butler, Bart; Butler, John; Butt, Aatif Imtiaz; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buttinger, William; Buzatu, Adrian; Byszewski, Marcin; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cakir, Orhan; Calafiura, Paolo; Calandri, Alessandro; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Calkins, Robert; Caloba, Luiz; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarda, Stefano; Cameron, David; Caminada, Lea Michaela; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Campoverde, Angel; Canale, Vincenzo; Canepa, Anadi; Cano Bret, Marc; Cantero, Josu; Cantrill, Robert; Cao, Tingting; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Cardarelli, Roberto; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carter, Janet; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Casolino, Mirkoantonio; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castelli, Angelantonio; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Catastini, Pierluigi; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Cattani, Giordano; Caudron, Julien; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerio, Benjamin; Cerny, Karel; Cerqueira, Augusto Santiago; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cerv, Matevz; Cervelli, Alberto; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chalupkova, Ina; Chang, Philip; Chapleau, Bertrand; Chapman, John Derek; Charfeddine, Driss; Charlton, Dave; Chau, Chav Chhiv; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Cheatham, Susan; Chegwidden, Andrew; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Karen; Chen, Liming; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Xin; Chen, Ye; Cheng, Hok Chuen; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Cheu, Elliott; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Chiefari, Giovanni; Childers, John Taylor; Chilingarov, Alexandre; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chislett, Rebecca Thalatta; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Chouridou, Sofia; Chow, Bonnie Kar Bo; Chudoba, Jiri; Chwastowski, Janusz; Chytka, Ladislav; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Ciftci, Rena; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Ciocio, Alessandra; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Clemens, Jean-Claude; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coffey, Laurel; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Cole, Brian; Cole, Stephen; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Compostella, Gabriele; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Connell, Simon Henry; Connelly, Ian; Consonni, Sofia Maria; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cooper-Smith, Neil; Copic, Katherine; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Côté, David; Cottin, Giovanna; Cowan, Glen; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Cree, Graham; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Crescioli, Francesco; Cribbs, Wayne Allen; Crispin Ortuzar, Mireia; Cristinziani, Markus; Croft, Vince; Crosetti, Giovanni; Cuciuc, Constantin-Mihai; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Cuthbert, Cameron; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dafinca, Alexandru; Dai, Tiesheng; Dale, Orjan; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Daniells, Andrew Christopher; Dano Hoffmann, Maria; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darmora, Smita; Dassoulas, James; Dattagupta, Aparajita; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davignon, Olivier; Davison, Adam; Davison, Peter; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Nooij, Lucie; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dechenaux, Benjamin; Dedovich, Dmitri; Deigaard, Ingrid; Del Peso, Jose; Deliot, Frederic; Delitzsch, Chris Malena; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demilly, Aurelien; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deterre, Cecile; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Domenico, Antonio; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Di Valentino, David; Dias, Flavia; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Dietzsch, Thorsten; Diglio, Sara; Dimitrievska, Aleksandra; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; do Vale, Maria Aline Barros; Dobos, Daniel; Doglioni, Caterina; Doherty, Tom; Dohmae, Takeshi; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolezal, Zdenek; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donati, Simone; Dondero, Paolo; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doyle, Tony; Dris, Manolis; Dubbert, Jörg; Dube, Sourabh; Dubreuil, Emmanuelle; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Ducu, Otilia Anamaria; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Dudziak, Fanny; Duflot, Laurent; Duguid, Liam; Dührssen, Michael; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Düren, Michael; Durglishvili, Archil; Dwuznik, Michal; Dyndal, Mateusz; Ebke, Johannes; Edson, William; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Enari, Yuji; Endner, Oliver Chris; Endo, Masaki; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Ernis, Gunar; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Ernwein, Jean; Errede, Deborah; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evans, Hal; Ezhilov, Alexey; Fabbri, Laura; Facini, Gabriel; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Falla, Rebecca Jane; Faltova, Jana; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Feigl, Simon; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Feng, Haolu; Fenyuk, Alexander; Fernandez Perez, Sonia; Ferrag, Samir; Ferrando, James; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filipuzzi, Marco; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Finelli, Kevin Daniel; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Adam; Fischer, Julia; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Fitzgerald, Eric Andrew; Flechl, Martin; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Fletcher, Gareth Thomas; Fletcher, Gregory; Flick, Tobias; Floderus, Anders; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fortin, Dominique; Fournier, Daniel; Fox, Harald; Fracchia, Silvia; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Franchino, Silvia; Francis, David; Franconi, Laura; Franklin, Melissa; Fraternali, Marco; French, Sky; Friedrich, Conrad; Friedrich, Felix; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fulsom, Bryan Gregory; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gabrielli, Alessandro; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gadatsch, Stefan; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galster, Gorm Aske Gram Krohn; Gan, KK; Gao, Jun; Gao, Yongsheng; Garay Walls, Francisca; Garberson, Ford; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garonne, Vincent; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gecse, Zoltan; Gee, Norman; Geerts, Daniël Alphonsus Adrianus; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Gemme, Claudia; Gemmell, Alistair; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Matthias; George, Simon; Gerbaudo, Davide; Gershon, Avi; Ghodbane, Nabil; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Giannetti, Paola; Gianotti, Fabiola; Gibson, Stephen; Gillam, Thomas; Gillberg, Dag; Gilles, Geoffrey; Gingrich, Douglas; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giordano, Raffaele; Giorgi, Filippo Maria; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giugni, Danilo; Giuliani, Claudia; Giulini, Maddalena; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gkaitatzis, Stamatios; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gkougkousis, Evangelos Leonidas; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glaysher, Paul; Glazov, Alexandre; Glonti, George; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Goddard, Jack Robert; Godlewski, Jan; Goeringer, Christian; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gomez Fajardo, Luz Stella; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Goshaw, Alfred; Gössling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gouighri, Mohamed; Goujdami, Driss; Goulette, Marc Phillippe; Goussiou, Anna; Goy, Corinne; Grabas, Herve Marie Xavier; Graber, Lars; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grafström, Per; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gray, Heather; Graziani, Enrico; Grebenyuk, Oleg; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grishkevich, Yaroslav; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grohs, Johannes Philipp; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Grossi, Giulio Cornelio; Groth-Jensen, Jacob; Grout, Zara Jane; Guan, Liang; Guescini, Francesco; Guest, Daniel; Gueta, Orel; Guicheney, Christophe; Guido, Elisa; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gumpert, Christian; Gunther, Jaroslav; Guo, Jun; Gupta, Shaun; Gutierrez, Phillip; Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto; Gutschow, Christian; Guttman, Nir; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Haddad, Nacim; Haefner, Petra; Hageböck, Stephan; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haleem, Mahsana; Hall, David; Halladjian, Garabed; Hallewell, Gregory David; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamer, Matthias; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamilton, Samuel; Hamity, Guillermo Nicolas; Hamnett, Phillip George; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Hanke, Paul; Hanna, Remie; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew; Harenberg, Torsten; Hariri, Faten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harper, Devin; Harrington, Robert; Harris, Orin; Harrison, Paul Fraser; Hasegawa, Makoto; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hasib, A; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauschild, Michael; Hauser, Reiner; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Anthony David; Hayashi, Takayasu; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heim, Timon; Heinemann, Beate; Heinrich, Lukas; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Heller, Claudio; Heller, Matthieu; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, James; Henderson, Robert; Heng, Yang; Hengler, Christopher; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg-Schubert, Ruth; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hickling, Robert; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Ewan; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoenig, Friedrich; Hoffmann, Dirk; Hofmann, Julia Isabell; Hohlfeld, Marc; Holmes, Tova Ray; Hong, Tae Min; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Hopkins, Walter; Horii, Yasuyuki; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howard, Jacob; Howarth, James; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hsu, Catherine; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Diedi; Hu, Xueye; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Hülsing, Tobias Alexander; Hurwitz, Martina; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Ideal, Emma; Idrissi, Zineb; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikematsu, Katsumasa; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Iurii; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Inamaru, Yuki; Ince, Tayfun; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Isaksson, Charlie; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Iturbe Ponce, Julia Mariana; Iuppa, Roberto; Ivarsson, Jenny; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, Matthew; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jakubek, Jan; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansen, Hendrik; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Javadov, Namig; Javůrek, Tomáš; Jeanty, Laura; Jejelava, Juansher; Jeng, Geng-yuan; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Jentzsch, Jennifer; Jeske, Carl; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Haoshuang; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jimenez Belenguer, Marcos; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Johansson, Erik; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tim; Jongmanns, Jan; Jorge, Pedro; Joshi, Kiran Daniel; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Jung, Christian; Jungst, Ralph Markus; Jussel, Patrick; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalderon, Charles William; Kama, Sami; Kamenshchikov, Andrey; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kaneti, Steven; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Kareem, Mohammad Jawad; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karpov, Sergey; Karpova, Zoya; Karthik, Krishnaiyengar; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kasieczka, Gregor; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kaushik, Venkatesh; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kazama, Shingo; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keller, John; Kempster, Jacob Julian; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Kessoku, Kohei; Keung, Justin; Keyes, Robert; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Khodinov, Alexander; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khoriauli, Gia; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kim, Hee Yeun; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Shinhong; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Robert Steven Beaufoy; King, Samuel Burton; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kiss, Florian; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Kobayashi, Dai; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kogan, Lucy Anne; Kohlmann, Simon; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolanoski, Hermann; Koletsou, Iro; Koll, James; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kondrashova, Nataliia; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; König, Sebastian; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Köpke, Lutz; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Korotkov, Vladislav; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, Athina; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasnopevtsev, Dimitriy; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, Jana; Kravchenko, Anton; Kreiss, Sven; Kretz, Moritz; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Peter; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Kruker, Tobias; Krumnack, Nils; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kruse, Amanda; Kruse, Mark; Kruskal, Michael; Kubota, Takashi; Kuday, Sinan; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuhl, Andrew; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuna, Marine; Kunigo, Takuto; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kurumida, Rie; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rotonda, Laura; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Laier, Heiko; Lambourne, Luke; Lammers, Sabine; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lançon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Lasagni Manghi, Federico; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Law, Alexander; Laycock, Paul; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Menedeu, Eve; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Claire, Alexandra; Lee, Hurng-Chun; Lee, Jason; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Lefebvre, Michel; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehan, Allan; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leight, William Axel; Leisos, Antonios; Leister, Andrew Gerard; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatjana; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leone, Sandra; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Leroy, Claude; Lester, Christopher; Lester, Christopher Michael; Levchenko, Mikhail; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levy, Mark; Lewis, Adrian; Lewis, George; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bing; Li, Bo; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Lei; Li, Liang; Li, Shu; Li, Yichen; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberti, Barbara; Lie, Ki; Liebal, Jessica; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Lin, Simon; Lin, Tai-Hua; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Bo; Liu, Dong; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loddenkoetter, Thomas; Loebinger, Fred; Loevschall-Jensen, Ask Emil; Loginov, Andrey; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Lombardo, Vincenzo Paolo; Long, Brian Alexander; Long, Jonathan; Long, Robin Eamonn; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lopez Paredes, Brais; Lopez Paz, Ivan; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lu, Feng; Lu, Nan; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Luehring, Frederick; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lundberg, Olof; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lungwitz, Matthias; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Machado Miguens, Joana; Macina, Daniela; Madaffari, Daniele; Madar, Romain; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Maeno, Mayuko; Maeno, Tadashi; Maevskiy, Artem; Magradze, Erekle; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahlstedt, Joern; Mahmoud, Sara; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maier, Andreas Alexander; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Mal, Prolay; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Mandelli, Beatrice; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Manfredini, Alessandro; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany Andreina; Mann, Alexander; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mantifel, Rodger; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchand, Jean-Francois; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marino, Christopher; Marjanovic, Marija; Marroquim, Fernando; Marsden, Stephen Philip; Marshall, Zach; Marti, Lukas Fritz; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian; Martin, Brian; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Homero; Martinez, Mario; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massa, Lorenzo; Massol, Nicolas; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mättig, Peter; Mattmann, Johannes; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Mazzaferro, Luca; Mc Goldrick, Garrin; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Mechnich, Joerg; Medinnis, Michael; Meehan, Samuel; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meineck, Christian; Meirose, Bernhard; Melachrinos, Constantinos; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Meloni, Federico; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Meric, Nicolas; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Merritt, Hayes; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Middleton, Robin; Migas, Sylwia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Milic, Adriana; Miller, David; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Minaenko, Andrey; Minami, Yuto; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Miucci, Antonio; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mochizuki, Kazuya; Mohapatra, Soumya; Molander, Simon; Moles-Valls, Regina; Mönig, Klaus; Monini, Caterina; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Morange, Nicolas; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morgenstern, Marcus; Morii, Masahiro; Morisbak, Vanja; Moritz, Sebastian; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Morton, Alexander; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Motohashi, Kazuki; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Moyse, Edward; Muanza, Steve; Mudd, Richard; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Mueller, Thibaut; Mueller, Timo; Muenstermann, Daniel; Munwes, Yonathan; Murillo Quijada, Javier Alberto; Murray, Bill; Musheghyan, Haykuhi; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagai, Yoshikazu; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagarkar, Advait; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagata, Kazuki; Nagel, Martin; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Namasivayam, Harisankar; Nanava, Gizo; Naranjo Garcia, Roger Felipe; Narayan, Rohin; Nattermann, Till; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Nef, Pascal Daniel; Negri, Andrea; Negri, Guido; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nellist, Clara; Nelson, Andrew; Nelson, Timothy Knight; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neves, Ricardo; Newman, Paul; Nguyen, Duong Hai; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolics, Katalin; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nodulman, Lawrence; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Norberg, Scarlet; Nordberg, Markus; Novgorodova, Olga; Nowak, Sebastian; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Ntekas, Konstantinos; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; Nuti, Francesco; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'grady, Fionnbarr; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Obermann, Theresa; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Ochoa, Ines; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohman, Henrik; Oide, Hideyuki; Okamura, Wataru; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onyisi, Peter; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ouellette, Eric; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Oussoren, Koen Pieter; Ouyang, Qun; Ovcharova, Ana; Owen, Mark; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pachal, Katherine; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagáčová, Martina; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganis, Efstathios; Pahl, Christoph; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Palestini, Sandro; Palka, Marek; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Palmer, Jody; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Paolozzi, Lorenzo; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Patricelli, Sergio; Pauly, Thilo; Pearce, James; Pedersen, Lars Egholm; Pedersen, Maiken; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedro, Rute; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Pelikan, Daniel; Peng, Haiping; Penning, Bjoern; Penwell, John; Perepelitsa, Dennis; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrella, Sabrina; Peschke, Richard; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Peters, Yvonne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Pettersson, Nora Emilia; Pezoa, Raquel; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Pianori, Elisabetta; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pignotti, David; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinder, Alex; Pinfold, James; Pingel, Almut; Pinto, Belmiro; Pires, Sylvestre; Pitt, Michael; Pizio, Caterina; Plazak, Lukas; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskot, Vojtech; Plotnikova, Elena; Plucinski, Pawel; Pluth, Daniel; Poddar, Sahill; Podlyski, Fabrice; Poettgen, Ruth; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Pohl, Martin; Polesello, Giacomo; Policicchio, Antonio; Polifka, Richard; Polini, Alessandro; Pollard, Christopher Samuel; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Portell Bueso, Xavier; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potamianos, Karolos; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prasad, Srivas; Pravahan, Rishiraj; Prell, Soeren; Price, Darren; Price, Joe; Primavera, Margherita; Proissl, Manuel; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopapadaki, Eftychia-sofia; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Przybycien, Mariusz; Przysiezniak, Helenka; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Puddu, Daniele; Pueschel, Elisa; Puldon, David; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Qian, Jianming; Qin, Gang; Qin, Yang; Quadt, Arnulf; Quayle, William; Queitsch-Maitland, Michaela; Quilty, Donnchadha; Qureshi, Anum; Radescu, Voica; Radhakrishnan, Sooraj Krishnan; Radloff, Peter; Rados, Pere; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rangel-Smith, Camila; Rao, Kanury; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Tobias Christian; Ravenscroft, Thomas; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Readioff, Nathan Peter; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Rehnisch, Laura; Reisin, Hernan; Relich, Matthew; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Huan; Renaud, Adrien; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Rezanova, Olga; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Ridel, Melissa; Rieck, Patrick; Rieger, Julia; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Ritsch, Elmar; Riu, Imma; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Roda, Chiara; Rodrigues, Luis; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Ronzani, Manfredi; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Matthew; Rose, Peyton; Rosendahl, Peter Lundgaard; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rosten, Rachel; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rubinskiy, Igor; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Christian; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Ruschke, Alexander; Rutherfoord, John; Ruthmann, Nils; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Saavedra, Aldo; Sabato, Gabriele; Sacerdoti, Sabrina; Saddique, Asif; Sadeh, Iftach; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Yuki; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Saleem, Muhammad; Salek, David; Sales De Bruin, Pedro Henrique; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Sanchez, Arturo; Sánchez, Javier; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sandaker, Heidi; Sandbach, Ruth Laura; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Tanya; Sandoval, Carlos; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sankey, Dave; Sansoni, Andrea; Santoni, Claudio; Santos, Helena; Santoyo Castillo, Itzebelt; Sapp, Kevin; Sapronov, Andrey; Saraiva, João; Sarrazin, Bjorn; Sartisohn, Georg; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Yuichi; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Savard, Pierre; Savu, Dan Octavian; Sawyer, Craig; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, James; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scanlon, Tim; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Scarfone, Valerio; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schaefer, Douglas; Schaefer, Ralph; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schäfer, Uli; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R~Dean; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Scherzer, Max; Schiavi, Carlo; Schieck, Jochen; Schillo, Christian; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmidt, Evelyn; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Sebastian; Schneider, Basil; Schnellbach, Yan Jie; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Schoenrock, Bradley Daniel; Schorlemmer, Andre Lukas; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schramm, Steven; Schreyer, Manuel; Schroeder, Christian; Schuh, Natascha; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwarz, Thomas Andrew; Schwegler, Philipp; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Schwoerer, Maud; Sciacca, Gianfranco; Scifo, Estelle; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scuri, Fabrizio; Scutti, Federico; Searcy, Jacob; Sedov, George; Sedykh, Evgeny; Seema, Pienpen; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekula, Stephen; Selbach, Karoline Elfriede; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Sellers, Graham; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Serre, Thomas; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sfiligoj, Tina; Sforza, Federico; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shang, Ruo-yu; Shank, James; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Shehu, Ciwake Yusufu; Sherwood, Peter; Shi, Liaoshan; Shimizu, Shima; Shimmin, Chase Owen; Shimojima, Makoto; Shiyakova, Mariya; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shoaleh Saadi, Diane; Shochet, Mel; Short, Daniel; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Shushkevich, Stanislav; Sicho, Petr; Sidiropoulou, Ourania; Sidorov, Dmitri; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silva, José; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Daniel; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simoniello, Rosa; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sircar, Anirvan; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skovpen, Kirill; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Slawinska, Magdalena; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smestad, Lillian; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snidero, Giacomo; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Socher, Felix; Soffer, Abner; Soh, Dart-yin; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solodkov, Alexander; Soloshenko, Alexei; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Sommer, Philip; Song, Hong Ye; Soni, Nitesh; Sood, Alexander; Sopczak, Andre; Sopko, Bruno; Sopko, Vit; Sorin, Veronica; Sosebee, Mark; Soualah, Rachik; Soueid, Paul; Soukharev, Andrey; South, David; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spanò, Francesco; Spearman, William Robert; Spettel, Fabian; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spiller, Laurence Anthony; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; St Denis, Richard Dante; Staerz, Steffen; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stamm, Soren; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanescu-Bellu, Madalina; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staszewski, Rafal; Steinberg, Peter; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stern, Sebastian; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoebe, Michael; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stolte, Philipp; Stonjek, Stefan; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Stramaglia, Maria Elena; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Strubig, Antonia; Stucci, Stefania Antonia; Stugu, Bjarne; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Su, Dong; Su, Jun; Subramaniam, Rajivalochan; Succurro, Antonella; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suhr, Chad; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Siyuan; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Yu; Svatos, Michal; Swedish, Stephen; Swiatlowski, Maximilian; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Ta, Duc; Taccini, Cecilia; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taenzer, Joe; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tam, Jason; Tan, Kong Guan; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Shuji; Tanasijczuk, Andres Jorge; Tannenwald, Benjamin Bordy; Tannoury, Nancy; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tashiro, Takuya; Tassi, Enrico; Tavares Delgado, Ademar; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Wendy; Teischinger, Florian Alfred; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, Matilde; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Teoh, Jia Jian; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terzo, Stefano; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Therhaag, Jan; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thomas, Juergen; Thomas-Wilsker, Joshuha; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Peter; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Thong, Wai Meng; Tian, Feng; Tibbetts, Mark James; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tiouchichine, Elodie; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tolley, Emma; Tomlinson, Lee; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Tran, Huong Lan; Trefzger, Thomas; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alessandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Trischuk, William; Trocmé, Benjamin; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trovatelli, Monica; True, Patrick; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsionou, Dimitra; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsirintanis, Nikolaos; Tsiskaridze, Shota; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tuna, Alexander Naip; Tupputi, Salvatore; Turchikhin, Semen; Turecek, Daniel; Turra, Ruggero; Turvey, Andrew John; Tuts, Michael; Tykhonov, Andrii; Tylmad, Maja; Uchida, Kirika; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ughetto, Michael; Ugland, Maren; Uhlenbrock, Mathias; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Ungaro, Francesca; Unno, Yoshinobu; Unverdorben, Christopher; Urban, Jozef; Urbaniec, Dustin; Urquijo, Phillip; Usai, Giulio; Usanova, Anna; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Valencic, Nika; Valentinetti, Sara; Valero, Alberto; Valery, Loic; Valkar, Stefan; Valladolid Gallego, Eva; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Den Wollenberg, Wouter; Van Der Deijl, Pieter; van der Geer, Rogier; van der Graaf, Harry; Van Der Leeuw, Robin; van der Ster, Daniel; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; Van Nieuwkoop, Jacobus; van Vulpen, Ivo; van Woerden, Marius Cornelis; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vanguri, Rami; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vannucci, Francois; Vardanyan, Gagik; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; Veatch, Jason; Veloso, Filipe; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Ventura, Daniel; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Venturini, Alessio; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Viazlo, Oleksandr; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Vigne, Ralph; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Virzi, Joseph; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vives Vaque, Francesc; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vladoiu, Dan; Vlasak, Michal; Vogel, Adrian; Vogel, Marcelo; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Radziewski, Holger; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorobev, Konstantin; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Vykydal, Zdenek; Wagner, Peter; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wahlberg, Hernan; Wahrmund, Sebastian; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wall, Richard; Waller, Peter; Walsh, Brian; Wang, Chao; Wang, Chiho; Wang, Fuquan; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Kuhan; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Wang, Tan; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Wanotayaroj, Chaowaroj; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Wardrope, David Robert; Washbrook, Andrew; Wasicki, Christoph; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Ian; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Ben; Webb, Samuel; Weber, Michele; Weber, Stefan Wolf; Webster, Jordan S; Weidberg, Anthony; Weinert, Benjamin; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Weits, Hartger; Wells, Phillippa; Wenaus, Torre; Wendland, Dennis; Weng, Zhili; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Wessels, Martin; Wetter, Jeffrey; Whalen, Kathleen; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Ryan; Whiteson, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik-Fuchs, Liv Antje Mari; Wijeratne, Peter Alexander; Wildauer, Andreas; Wildt, Martin Andre; Wilkens, Henric George; Williams, Hugh; Williams, Sarah; Willis, Christopher; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, Alan; Wilson, John; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winklmeier, Frank; Winter, Benedict Tobias; Wittgen, Matthias; Wittig, Tobias; Wittkowski, Josephine; Wollstadt, Simon Jakob; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wozniak, Krzysztof; Wright, Michael; Wu, Mengqing; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wulf, Evan; Wyatt, Terry Richard; Wynne, Benjamin; Xella, Stefania; Xiao, Meng; Xu, Da; Xu, Lailin; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yakabe, Ryota; Yamada, Miho; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamamura, Taiki; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Hongtao; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Yi; Yanush, Serguei; Yao, Liwen; Yao, Weiming; Yasu, Yoshiji; Yatsenko, Elena; Yau Wong, Kaven Henry; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yeletskikh, Ivan; Yen, Andy L; Yildirim, Eda; Yilmaz, Metin; Yoosoofmiya, Reza; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Rikutaro; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Young, Charles; Young, Christopher John; Youssef, Saul; Yu, David Ren-Hwa; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jiaming; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yurkewicz, Adam; Yusuff, Imran; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zaman, Aungshuman; Zambito, Stefano; Zanzi, Daniele; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zengel, Keith; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zerwas, Dirk; Zevi della Porta, Giovanni; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Fangzhou; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Ruiqi; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Yongke; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Lei; Zhou, Ning; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhukov, Konstantin; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimine, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Christoph; Zimmermann, Robert; Zimmermann, Simone; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Zinonos, Zinonas; Ziolkowski, Michael; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zurzolo, Giovanni; Zutshi, Vishnu; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2014-01-01

    A search for scalar particles decaying via narrow resonances into two photons in the mass range $65-600$ GeV is performed using 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ of $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV $pp$ collision data collected with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The recently discovered Higgs boson is treated as a background. No significant evidence for an additional signal is observed. The results are presented as limits at the 95 % confidence level on the production cross-section of a scalar boson times branching ratio into two photons, in a fiducial volume where the reconstruction efficiency is approximately independent of the event topology. The upper limits set extend over a considerably wider mass range than previous searches.

  10. Studies of topological distributions of inclusive three- and four-jet events in p¯p collisions at s=1800 GeV with the D0 detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abachi, S.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adam, I.; Adams, D. L.; Adams, M.; Ahn, S.; Aihara, H.; Alitti, J.; Álvarez, G.; Alves, G. A.; Amidi, E.; Amos, N.; Anderson, E. W.; Aronson, S. H.; Astur, R.; Avery, R. E.; Baden, A.; Balamurali, V.; Balderston, J.; Baldin, B.; Bantly, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bazizi, K.; Bendich, J.; Beri, S. B.; Bertram, I.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Bischoff, A.; Biswas, N.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, P.; Boehnlein, A.; Bojko, N. I.; Borcherding, F.; Borders, J.; Boswell, C.; Brandt, A.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Buchholz, D.; Burtovoi, V. S.; Butler, J. M.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, D.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakraborty, D.; Chang, S.-M.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chen, L.-P.; Chen, W.; Chevalier, L.; Chopra, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Christenson, J. H.; Chung, M.; Claes, D.; Clark, A. R.; Cobau, W. G.; Cochran, J.; Cooper, W. E.; Cretsinger, C.; Cullen-Vidal, D.; Cummings, M. A.; Cutts, D.; Dahl, O. I.; de, K.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisenko, K.; Denisenko, N.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Dharmaratna, W.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; di Loreto, G.; Dixon, R.; Draper, P.; Drinkard, J.; Ducros, Y.; Dugad, S. R.; Durston-Johnson, S.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Engelmann, R.; Eno, S.; Eppley, G.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O. V.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fahey, S.; Fahland, T.; Fatyga, M.; Fatyga, M. K.; Featherly, J.; Feher, S.; Fein, D.; Ferbel, T.; Finocchiaro, G.; Fisk, H. E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flattum, E.; Forden, G. E.; Fortner, M.; Frame, K. C.; Franzini, P.; Fuess, S.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, A. N.; Gao, S. G.; Geld, T. L.; Genik, R. J.; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gibbard, B.; Glebov, V.; Glenn, S.; Gobbi, B.; Goforth, M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gómez, B.; Goncharov, P. I.; González Solís, J. L.; Gordon, H.; Goss, L. T.; Graf, N.; Grannis, P. D.; Green, D. R.; Green, J.; Greenlee, H.; Griffin, G.; Grossman, N.; Grudberg, P.; Grünendahl, S.; Gu, W. X.; Guglielmo, G.; Guida, J. A.; Guida, J. M.; Guryn, W.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutnikov, Y. E.; Hadley, N. J.; Haggerty, H.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Hahn, K. S.; Hall, R. E.; Hansen, S.; Hatcher, R.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hedin, D.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hernández-Montoya, R.; Heuring, T.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hoftun, J. S.; Hsieh, F.; Hu, Tao; Hu, Ting; Hu, Tong; Huehn, T.; Igarashi, S.; Ito, A. S.; James, E.; Jaques, J.; Jerger, S. A.; Jiang, J. Z.; Joffe-Minor, T.; Johari, H.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Johnstad, H.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Jöstlein, H.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, C. K.; Kahn, S.; Kalbfleisch, G.; Kang, J. S.; Kehoe, R.; Kelly, M. L.; Kernan, A.; Kerth, L.; Kim, C. L.; Kim, S. K.; Klatchko, A.; Klima, B.; Klochkov, B. I.; Klopfenstein, C.; Klyukhin, V. I.; Kochetkov, V. I.; Kohli, J. M.; Koltick, D.; Kostritskiy, A. V.; Kotcher, J.; Kourlas, J.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozlovski, E. A.; Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kunori, S.; Lami, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrat, J.-F.; Leflat, A.; Li, H.; Li, J.; Li, Y. K.; Li-Demarteau, Q. Z.; Lima, J. G.; Lincoln, D.; Linn, S. L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y. C.; Lobkowicz, F.; Loken, S. C.; Lökös, S.; Lueking, L.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K.; Madaras, R. J.; Madden, R.; Mandrichenko, I. V.; Mangeot, Ph.; Mani, S.; Mansoulié, B.; Mao, H. S.; Margulies, S.; Markeloff, R.; Markosky, L.; Marshall, T.; Martin, M. I.; Marx, M.; May, B.; Mayorov, A. A.; McCarthy, R.; McKibben, T.; McKinley, J.; McMahon, T.; Melanson, H. L.; de Mello Neto, J. R.; Merritt, K. W.; Miettinen, H.; Milder, A.; Mincer, A.; de Miranda, J. M.; Mishra, C. S.; Mohammadi-Baarmand, M.; Mokhov, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Montgomery, H. E.; Mooney, P.; Mudan, M.; Murphy, C.; Murphy, C. T.; Nang, F.; Narain, M.; Narasimham, V. S.; Narayanan, A.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neis, E.; Nemethy, P.; NešiĆ, D.; Nicola, M.; Norman, D.; Oesch, L.; Oguri, V.; Oltman, E.; Oshima, N.; Owen, D.; Padley, P.; Pang, M.; Para, A.; Park, C. H.; Park, Y. M.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Paterno, M.; Perkins, J.; Peryshkin, A.; Peters, M.; Piekarz, H.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Pluquet, A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Pope, B. G.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Pušeljić, D.; Qian, J.; Quintas, P. Z.; Raja, R.; Rajagopalan, S.; Ramirez, O.; Rao, M. V.; Rapidis, P. A.; Rasmussen, L.; Read, A. L.; Reucroft, S.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rockwell, T.; Roe, N. A.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Rusin, S.; Rutherfoord, J.; Santoro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schellman, H.; Sculli, J.; Shabalina, E.; Shaffer, C.; Shankar, H. C.; Shao, Y. Y.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shupe, M.; Singh, J. B.; Sirotenko, V.; Smart, W.; Smith, A.; Smith, R. P.; Snihur, R.; Snow, G. R.; Snyder, S.; Solomon, J.; Sood, P. M.; Sosebee, M.; Souza, M.; Spadafora, A. L.; Stephens, R. W.; Stevenson, M. L.; Stewart, D.; Stoianova, D. A.; Stoker, D.; Streets, K.; Strovink, M.; Sznajder, A.; Taketani, A.; Tamburello, P.; Tarazi, J.; Tartaglia, M.; Taylor, T. L.; Teiger, J.; Thompson, J.; Trippe, T. G.; Tuts, P. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Virador, P. R.; Vititoe, D.; Volkov, A. A.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, G.; Wang, J.; Warchol, J.; Wayne, M.; Weerts, H.; Wen, F.; Wenzel, W. A.; White, A.; White, J. T.; Wightman, J. A.; Wilcox, J.; Willis, S.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Wirjawan, J. V.; Womersley, J.; Won, E.; Wood, D. R.; Xu, H.; Yamada, R.; Yamin, P.; Yanagisawa, C.; Yang, J.; Yasuda, T.; Yoshikawa, C.; Youssef, S.; Yu, J.; Yu, Y.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, Y.; Zhu, Q.; Zhu, Z. H.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.; Zylberstejn, A.

    1996-06-01

    The global topologies of inclusive three- and four-jet events produced in p¯p interactions are described. The three- and four-jet events are selected from data recorded by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider operating at a center-of-mass energy of √s=1800 GeV. The measured, normalized distributions of various topological variables are compared with parton-level predictions of tree-level QCD calculations. The parton-level QCD calculations are found to be in good agreement with the data. The studies also show that the topological distributions of the different subprocesses involving different numbers of quarks are very similar and reproduce the measured distributions well. The parton-shower Monte Carlo generators provide a less satisfactory description of the topologies of the three- and four-jet events.

  11. Studies of topological distributions of the three- and four-jet events in {bar p}p collisions at {radical}s = 1800 GeV with the D0 detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abachi, S.; D0 Collaboration

    1995-07-01

    The global topologies of three- and four-jet events produced in {bar p}p interactions are described. the three- and four-jet events are selected from data recorded by the D0 detector at the Tevatron Collider operating at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1800 GeV. the measured normalized distributions of various topological variables are compared with parton-level predictions of the tree- level QCD calculations. The parton-level QCD calculations are found to be in good agreement with the data. The studies also show that the topological distributions of the different subprocesses involving different numbers of quarks are very similar and reproduce the measured distributions well.

  12. GeSn/Ge heterostructure short-wave infrared photodetectors on silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassenq, A; Gencarelli, F; Van Campenhout, J; Shimura, Y; Loo, R; Narcy, G; Vincent, B; Roelkens, G

    2012-12-03

    A surface-illuminated photoconductive detector based on Ge0.91Sn0.09 quantum wells with Ge barriers grown on a silicon substrate is demonstrated. Photodetection up to 2.2µm is achieved with a responsivity of 0.1 A/W for 5V bias. The spectral absorption characteristics are analyzed as a function of the GeSn/Ge heterostructure parameters. This work demonstrates that GeSn/Ge heterostructures can be used to developed SOI waveguide integrated photodetectors for short-wave infrared applications.

  13. Measurement of the high-field Q drop in a high-purity large-grain niobium cavity for different oxidation processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ciovati

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The most challenging issue for understanding the performance of superconducting radio-frequency (rf cavities made of high-purity (residual resistivity ratio >200 niobium is due to a sharp degradation (“Q-drop” of the cavity quality factor Q_{0}(B_{p} as the peak surface magnetic field (B_{p} exceeds about 90 mT, in the absence of field emission. In addition, a low-temperature (100–140°C in situ baking of the cavity was found to be beneficial in reducing the Q-drop. In this contribution, we present the results from a series of rf tests at 1.7 and 2.0 K on a single-cell cavity made of high-purity large (with area of the order of few cm^{2} grain niobium which underwent various oxidation processes, after initial buffered chemical polishing, such as anodization, baking in pure oxygen atmosphere, and baking in air up to 180°C, with the objective of clearly identifying the role of oxygen and the oxide layer on the Q-drop. During each rf test a temperature mapping system allows measuring the local temperature rise of the cavity outer surface due to rf losses, which gives information about the losses location, their field dependence, and space distribution. The results confirmed that the depth affected by baking is about 20–30 nm from the surface and showed that the Q-drop did not reappear in a previously baked cavity by further baking at 120°C in pure oxygen atmosphere or in air up to 180°C. These treatments increased the oxide thickness and oxygen concentration, measured on niobium samples which were processed with the cavity and were analyzed with transmission electron microscope and secondary ion mass spectroscopy. Nevertheless, the performance of the cavity after air baking at 180°C degraded significantly and the temperature maps showed high losses, uniformly distributed on the surface, which could be completely recovered only by a postpurification treatment at 1250°C. A statistic of the position of the “hot spots” on the

  14. Measurement of the high-field Q-drop in a high-purity large-grain niobium cavity for different oxidation processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi; Kneisel, Peter; gurevich, alex

    2007-06-01

    The most challenging issue for understanding the performance of superconducting radio-frequency (rf) cavities made of high-purity (residual resistivity ratio > 200) niobium is due to a sharp degradation (“Q-drop”) of the cavity quality factor Q0(Bp) as the peak surface magnetic field (Bp) exceeds about 90 mT, in the absence of field emission. In addition, a low-temperature (100 – 140 C) “in-situ” baking of the cavity was found to be beneficial in reducing the Q-drop. In this contribution, we present the results from a series of rf tests at 1.7 K and 2.0 K on a single-cell cavity made of high-purity large (with area of the order of few cm2) grain niobium which underwent various oxidation processes, after initial buffered chemical polishing, such as anodization, baking in pure oxygen atmosphere and baking in air up to 180 °C, with the objective of clearly identifying the role of oxygen and the oxide layer on the Q-drop. During each rf test a temperature mapping system allows measuring the local temperature rise of the cavity outer surface due to rf losses, which gives information about the losses location, their field dependence and space distribution. The results confirmed that the depth affected by baking is about 20 – 30 nm from the surface and showed that the Q-drop did not re-appear in a previously baked cavity by further baking at 120 °C in pure oxygen atmosphere or in air up to 180 °C. These treatments increased the oxide thickness and oxygen concentration, measured on niobium samples which were processed with the cavity and were analyzed with Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) and Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS). Nevertheless, the performance of the cavity after air baking at 180 °C degraded significantly and the temperature maps showed high losses, uniformly distributed on the surface, which could be completely recovered only by a post-purification treatment at 1250 °C. A statistic of the position of the “hot-spots” on the

  15. A Search for Lepton-Flavor-Violating Decays of the 125 GeV Higgs Boson with Hadronically Decaying Tau Leptons in the 20.3 inverse fembtobarns using the $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV Dataset Collected in 2012 by the ATLAS Detector at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00287453

    A Search for Lepton-Flavor-Violating Decays of the 125 GeV Higgs Boson with Hadronically Decaying Tau Leptons in the $20.3 fb^1$ proton-proton $\\sqrt{s}= 8$ TeV Dataset collected in 2012 by the ATLAS Detector at the Large Hadron Collider is reported.

  16. The MGDO software library for data analysis in Ge neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Agostini, M; Finnerty, P; Kröninger, K; Lenz, D; Liu, J; Marino, M G; Martin, R; Nguyen, K D; Pandola, L; Schubert, A G; Volynets, O; Zavarise, P

    2011-01-01

    The GERDA and Majorana experiments will search for neutrinoless double-beta decay of germanium-76 using isotopically enriched high-purity germanium detectors. Although the experiments differ in conceptual design, they share many aspects in common, and in particular will employ similar data analysis techniques. The collaborations are jointly developing a C++ software library, MGDO, which contains a set of data objects and interfaces to encapsulate, store and manage physical quantities of interest, such as waveforms and high-purity germanium detector geometries. These data objects define a common format for persistent data, whether it is generated by Monte Carlo simulations or an experimental apparatus, to reduce code duplication and to ease the exchange of information between detector systems. MGDO also includes general-purpose analysis tools that can be used for the processing of measured or simulated digital signals. The MGDO design is based on the Object-Oriented programming paradigm and is very flexible, a...

  17. Electro-magnetic physics studies at RHIC: Neutral pion production, direct photon HBT, photon elliptic flow in gold-gold collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV and the Muon Telescope Detector simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Guoji

    Electro-magnetic (E&M) probes such as direct photons and muons (mu) are important tools to study the properties of the extremely hot and dense matter created in heavy ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). In this thesis, several topics of E&M physics will be addressed, including neutral pion (pi0) production, direct photon HBT, and photon elliptic flow (v2) in Au+Au collisions at sNN = 200 GeV. A discussion on the simulation study of the new Muon Telescope Detector (MTD) will also be presented. The pi0 production is a fundamental measurement of hadron production and prerequisite for the background study of direct photons. Neutral pions are reconstructed using the photons detected by the STAR Barrel Electro-magnetic Calorimeter (BEMC) and the Time Projection Chamber (TPC). Spectra of pi 0 are measured at transverse momentum 1 information of the system size throughout the whole collision. A first attempt of direct photon HBT study at RHIC in 200 GeV Au+Au collisions is done using photons detected by the STAR BEMC and TPC. All unknown correlation at small Qinv is observed, whose magnitude is much larger than the expected HBT signal, and possible causes of the correlation will be discussed. Direct photon elliptic flow (v2) at intermediate to high pT is sensitive to the source of direct photon production. Results of inclusive photon v2 in 200 GeV Au+Au collisions are presented. The v2 of pi0 decay photons is calculated from the previously published pi results. The comparison between inclusive and decay photon v 2 indicates that direct photon v2 is small. A new large-area Muon Telescope Detector at mid-rapidity at RHIC is proposed and under investigation, using the Long-strip Multi-Gap Resistive Plate Chamber (Long-MRPC). Simulations indicate that the MTD can effectively identify mu and reject hadron backgrounds, and it can serve as a mu trigger. A beam test result of the Long-MRPC at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) is also discussed.

  18. Search for the 125 GeV Higgs boson in the ttH production mode with the ATLAS detector (ID#99)

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Shuyang; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    This poster presents the results of a combined ttH search in the γγ, multilepton and bb decay channels using up to 13.3 fb-1 of proton-proton collison data at sqrt(s)=13 TeV collected with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The poster is to be shown at PANIC17, which will be held in Beijing from Sep 1st to Sep 5th.

  19. 高纯度粉末状大豆磷脂微胶囊化的研究%Study on microencapsulation of high purity soybean phosphatide powder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张鑫; 李学红; 高正波

    2001-01-01

    选用新型壁材—微孔淀粉,对制备高纯度粉末状大豆磷脂微胶囊产品的工艺条件进行研究。以100g大豆磷脂,100g微孔淀粉和40g明胶在40℃条件下制备初始液,在进料温度50~60℃,进风温度160℃左右,出风温度90℃左右条件下进行喷雾干燥,可获得最佳效果。最高包埋率可达71%。%With a new wall material-aperture starch, the technological parameters for high-purity soybean powder phosphatide microencapsulation was studied. For 100g soybean phosphatide, 100g aperture starch and 40g gelatin were added to form a 1500mL preliminary solution at 40℃. Condition of spry drying: Slurry temperature 50~60℃, inlet air temperature 150~160℃ and outlet air temperature 90℃, could obtain the optimal result and the best microencapsulated productivity reached 71%.

  20. Genotypic and phenotypic diversity of Ralstonia pickettii and Ralstonia insidiosa isolates from clinical and environmental sources including High-purity Water. Diversity in Ralstonia pickettii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adley Catherine C

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ralstonia pickettii is a nosocomial infectious agent and a significant industrial contaminant. It has been found in many different environments including clinical situations, soil and industrial High Purity Water. This study compares the phenotypic and genotypic diversity of a selection of strains of Ralstonia collected from a variety of sources. Results Ralstonia isolates (fifty-nine from clinical, industrial and environmental origins were compared genotypically using i Species-specific-PCR, ii PCR and sequencing of the 16S-23S rRNA Interspatial region (ISR iii the fliC gene genes, iv RAPD and BOX-PCR and v phenotypically using biochemical testing. The species specific-PCR identified fifteen out of fifty-nine designated R. pickettii isolates as actually being the closely related species R. insidiosa. PCR-ribotyping of the 16S-23S rRNA ISR indicated few major differences between the isolates. Analysis of all isolates demonstrated different banding patterns for both the RAPD and BOX primers however these were found not to vary significantly. Conclusions R. pickettii species isolated from wide geographic and environmental sources appear to be reasonably homogenous based on genotypic and phenotypic characteristics. R. insidiosa can at present only be distinguished from R. pickettii using species specific PCR. R. pickettii and R. insidiosa isolates do not differ significantly phenotypically or genotypically based on environmental or geographical origin.

  1. S2- behaviors analysis in leaching SrS and precipitating high purity SrCO3 by reduction-decomposition process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭晓东; 刘相果; 谢卫东; 刘江; 贾上远; 权燕燕

    2004-01-01

    A new preparation method (reduction-decomposition process) for high purity SrCO3 was investigated,which mainly includes four processes: reduction, leaching, purification and precipitation. The affecting factors about S2- behaviors in leaching process and the effects of variables on purity and particle sizes distribution of SrCO3 were analyzed theoretically and practically. It is concluded that with the increase of temperature or decrease of pH value in leaching process, the strontium recovery increases, but SrS decomposes and hydrogen sulphide (H2S) gasdischarges. The purity of SrCO3 is dependent on dissolution-recrystallization times, for example, the purity of SrCO3 is as high as 99.97% when it is recrystallized three times. Besides, the solution concentration of Sr(OH)2and flow rate of CO2 have important effects on particle size distribution of SrCO3 particles, especially, the particle sizes of SrCO3 meanly distribute in 0.1 - 1.0μm when the flow rate of CO2 is about 2 000 mL/min and other parameters are invariable.

  2. Simultaneous determination of some trace metal impurities in high-purity sodium tungstate using coprecipitation and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Xiaoguo; KUANG Tongchun; LIU Qianjun

    2004-01-01

    A method based on the combination of coprecipitation with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spec trometry (ICP-AES) was developed for the determination of impurities in high-purity sodium tungstate. Six elements (Co,Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, and Pb) were coprecipitated by lanthanum hydroxide so as to be concentrated and separated from the tungsten matrix. Effects of some factors on the recoveries of the analytes and on the residual amount of sodium tungstate were investigated, and the optimum conditions for the coprecipitation were proposed. Matrix-matching calibration curve method was used for the analysis. It is shown that the elements mentioned above can be quantitatively recovered. The detection limits for Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, and Pb are 0.07, 0.4, 0.2, 0.1, 0.6, and 1.3 μg.g-1, respectively. The recoveries vary from 92.5% to 108%, and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) are in the range of 3.1%-5.5%.

  3. 氧化镁铵盐法制备高纯过氧化镁%Preparation of High Purity Magnesium Peroxide by Magnesia and Ammonium Salt Solutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱海丽; 吴小王

    2011-01-01

    在氯化铵溶液体系中,以氧化镁,过氧化氢为原料,制备高纯过氧化镁。研究表明采用氧化镁活性大于100,氯化铵/氧化镁不小于10%,过氧化氢:氧化镁不小于4∶1,反应温度大于40℃情况下,反应时间不小于30 min,可制备出纯度大于90%的过氧化镁。%In ammonium chloride solution,magnesium oxide and hydrogen peroxide as raw material,high purity magnesium peroxide was prepared.The results showed that using magnesium oxide activity was greater than 100,ammonium chloride and magnesium oxide was not less than 10%,hydrogen peroxide to magnesium oxide was not less than 4:1,the reaction temperature was higher than 40 ℃,and the reaction time was not less than 30 min,with magnesium peroxide purity above 90%.

  4. Genotypic and phenotypic diversity of Ralstonia pickettii and Ralstonia insidiosa isolates from clinical and environmental sources including High-purity Water.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, Michael P

    2011-08-30

    Abstract Background Ralstonia pickettii is a nosocomial infectious agent and a significant industrial contaminant. It has been found in many different environments including clinical situations, soil and industrial High Purity Water. This study compares the phenotypic and genotypic diversity of a selection of strains of Ralstonia collected from a variety of sources. Results Ralstonia isolates (fifty-nine) from clinical, industrial and environmental origins were compared genotypically using i) Species-specific-PCR, ii) PCR and sequencing of the 16S-23S rRNA Interspatial region (ISR) iii) the fliC gene genes, iv) RAPD and BOX-PCR and v) phenotypically using biochemical testing. The species specific-PCR identified fifteen out of fifty-nine designated R. pickettii isolates as actually being the closely related species R. insidiosa. PCR-ribotyping of the 16S-23S rRNA ISR indicated few major differences between the isolates. Analysis of all isolates demonstrated different banding patterns for both the RAPD and BOX primers however these were found not to vary significantly. Conclusions R. pickettii species isolated from wide geographic and environmental sources appear to be reasonably homogenous based on genotypic and phenotypic characteristics. R. insidiosa can at present only be distinguished from R. pickettii using species specific PCR. R. pickettii and R. insidiosa isolates do not differ significantly phenotypically or genotypically based on environmental or geographical origin.

  5. Trace amounts of rare earth elements in high purity samarium oxide by sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry after separation by HPLC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedreira, W.R. [Instituto de Geociencias, Universidade de Brasilia (UnB), 70910-900 Brasilia, DF (Brazil) and Fundacao Jorge Duprat Figueiredo de Seguranca e Medicina do Trabalho (FUNDACENTRO), 05409-002 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: walter.pedreira@fundacentro.gov.br; Queiroz, C.A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), 05508-900 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Abrao, A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), 05508-900 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Rocha, S.M. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), 05508-900 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Vasconcellos, M.E. de [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), 05508-900 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Boaventura, G.R. [Instituto de Geociencias, Universidade de Brasilia (UnB), 70910-900 Brasilia, DF (Brazil); Pimentel, M.M. [Instituto de Geociencias, Universidade de Brasilia (UnB), 70910-900 Brasilia, DF (Brazil)

    2006-07-20

    Today there is an increasing need for high purity rare earth compounds in various fields, the optical, the electronics, the ceramic, the nuclear and geochemistry. Samarium oxide has special uses in glass, phosphors, lasers and thermoelectric devices. Calcium chloride crystals treated with samarium have been employed in lasers, which produce light beams intense enough to burn metal. In general, the inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) presents some advantages for trace element analysis, due to high sensitivity and resolution, when compared with other analytical techniques such as ICP optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). In this work, sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was used. Sixteen elements (Sc, Y and 14 lanthanides) were determined selectively with the ICP-MS system using a concentration gradient method. The detection limits with the ICP-MS system were about 0.2 (La) pg mL{sup -1} to 8 (Gd) pg mL{sup -1}. The %R.S.D. of the methods varying between 0.9 and 1.5% for a set of five (n = 5) replicates was found for the IPEN's material and for the certificate reference sample. Determination of trace REEs in two high pure samarium oxides samples (IPEN and JMC) was performed. IPEN's material is highly pure (>99.99%) and was successfully analyzed without spectral interference (MO{sup +} and MOH{sup +})

  6. Use of zeo-karb 226 and dowex a-l in the analysis of high-purity zinc and zinc-base alloys for Tl and In.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, S G; Padmanabhan, P K; Nair, L D; Venkateswarlu, C

    1976-07-01

    Utility of Zeo-Karb 226 and Dowex A-l for the separation of Tl and In at 5-ppm level from high-purity zinc and zinc-base alloys has been investigated. With Zeo-Karb 226 (NH(4)(+)), T1(+) is conveniently separated from these materials and also from many other cations, with l.0M ammonium nitrate as the eluent. It is subsequently determined with Rhodamine B. This separation principle is also applied to the analysis of Pb-Tl alloys. Both Tl and In (along with Fe) are preconcentrated on Zeo-Karb 226(H(+)) from a solution of the sample at pH 3.0. Suitable methods of subsequent determination of Tl and In are described. In the case of Dowex A-1(H(+)), Tl(+), In(3+), Fe(3+) and Cu(2+) are retained from a solution of the sample at pH 2.0. An o-phenanthroline solution at pH 2.0 elutes all but traces of Cu(2+). In(3+) along with Fe(3+) is eluted with l.0M hydrochloric acid. Finally, Tl is eluted with 2.0M hydrochloric acid containing sulphurous acid.

  7. 鹅肝细胞的高纯分离及培养%Isolation and culture of high-purity goose hepatocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

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