WorldWideScience

Sample records for gays

  1. Gay aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haber, David

    2009-01-01

    The oldest of the baby boomers (boomers) were age 63 in 2009 and on the verge of retirement. This cohort has had a history of making societal changes throughout its life cycle, and it is unlikely that retirement, as we know it, will remain unscathed. This article highlights two events-the Stonewall Inn riots and two prominent professional associations removing homosexuality from their list of personality disorders-and how they occurred early enough in the gay boomers life cycle to change their attitudes, behaviors, and lifestyles. This article introduces the reader to a broad array of facts, research findings, and issues that inform the topic of gay aging. A summary of the discrimination and legal concerns affecting the gay community are also highlighted. Two influential community programs are identified: Services and Advocacy for Gay Elders (SAGE) and the American Society on Aging's LGBT Aging Issues Network (LAIN). Gerontological educators need to be sensitive to the needs, desires, and resources of the coming cohort of gay boomers, who are more likely to advocate for responsive services, organizations, and policies than the current cohort of gay older adults.

  2. The gay cousin: learning to accept gay rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard-Hassmann, R E

    2001-01-01

    In 1996-97 the author interviewed 73 civic leaders in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, on their attitudes toward gay rights. Twelve respondents opposed gay rights, 40 were moderately favorable to gay rights, and 21 were strongly favorable. Almost all favored basic equality rights (education, housing, employment), and only 10 said they had difficulty with gay sexuality. Twenty-seven volunteered a concern with gay "flaunting," but this did not mean that they necessarily opposed gay rights. Respondents had the most difficulty accepting the rights of gays to marry and to adopt children, although almost all of those who opposed gay marriages agreed with the idea of a legal domestic partnership. Most agreed that children should be taught about homosexuality in schools. These 73 civic leaders reflect the rapidly changing attitudes to gay rights in Canada as a whole. Their more favorable attitudes were often a consequence of learning that someone close to them was gay or lesbian. They also responded to changes in religious teaching. Most respondents, including recent immigrants, were influenced by the dominant Canadian values of equality, respect for privacy, and respect for diversity. In general, the process these civic leaders were undergoing was one of humanizing gays, no longer thinking of them as the Other. In their view, human rights for gays did not mean mere formal equality, but rather concern and respect for gays.

  3. Young, Gay...and Ignored?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Debra

    1995-01-01

    Examines the failure of libraries to meet the information needs of gay and lesbian adolescents. Reviews research in homosexuality and the development of homosexual identities. Discusses library services for gays and lesbians, the experience of gays and lesbians in secondary schools, and the role of the school library; provides a content analysis…

  4. Gay and lesbian parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, M B; Turner, P H

    An anonymous survey of 23 gay and lesbian parents and 16 heterosexual single parents was conducted in order to see whether the parents' homosexuality created special problems or benefits or both, for their children. Both sets of parents reported relatively few serious problems and generally positive relationships with their children, with only a minority encouraging sex-typed toys, activities, and playmates. Heterosexual parents made a greater effort to provide an opposite-sex role model for their children, but no other differences in their parenting behaviors were found. Gay and lesbian parents saw a number of benefits and relatively few problems for their children as a result of their homosexuality, with lesbians perceiving greater benefits than gay men. Conversely, the gay males reported greater satisfaction with their first child, fewer disagreements with their partners over discipline, and a greater tendency to encourage play with sex-typed toys than did the lesbians. The findings suggest that being homosexual is clearly compatible with effective parenting and is not a major issue in parents' relationships with their children.

  5. Consuming My Way Gay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Eichler

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available As members of consumerist societies, we are socialized into what it means to be good citizens and participate in society through our consumption. For many, this is taught in the home, yet for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ individuals, home is often not a source of reliable information about our identities. As such, LGBTQ individuals turn to the marketplace to seek information about their sexual and gender identities. This autoethnographic account shares, through three vignettes, how coming out as a queer man is shaped by consumptive pedagogy—that is, learning through consumption. First, material goods are explored as the signifier of sexual orientation. Then, the gay bar as marketplace and the online marketplace for relationships are explored.

  6. Gay Couples, Gay Communities, and HIV: Challenges for Health Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reece, Michael

    2005-01-01

    For the last 2 decades, researchers and practitioners dedicated to improving the health of gay and bisexual men have largely focused their work on the need to reduce the incidence of HIV infection. This is certainly warranted given the intensity of this particular epidemic in the gay community and the challenges it has presented to the nation's…

  7. Gay, Mostly Gay, or Bisexual Leaning Gay? An Exploratory Study Distinguishing Gay Sexual Orientations Among Young Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savin-Williams, Ritch C; Cash, Brian M; McCormack, Mark; Rieger, Gerulf

    2017-01-01

    This exploratory study assessed physiological, behavioral, and self-report measures of sexual and romantic indicators of sexual orientation identities among young men (mean age = 21.9 years) with predominant same-sex sexual and romantic interests: those who described themselves as bisexual leaning gay (n = 11), mostly gay (n = 17), and gay (n = 47). Although they were not significantly distinguishable based on physiological (pupil dilation) responses to nude stimuli, on behavioral and self-report measures a descending linear trend toward the less preferred sex (female) was significant regarding sexual attraction, fantasy, genital contact, infatuation, romantic relationship, sex appeal, and gazing time to the porn stimuli. Results supported a continuum of sexuality with distinct subgroups only for the self-report measure of sexual attraction. The other behavioral and self-report measures followed the same trend but did not significantly differ between the bisexual leaning gay and mostly gay groups, likely the result of small sample size. Results suggest that romantic indicators are as good as sexual measures in assessing sexual orientation and that a succession of logically following groups from bisexual leaning gay, mostly gay, to gay. Whether these three groups are discrete or overlapping needs further research.

  8. Counseling Considerations with Gay Couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelpleck, Judy M.; Westfeld, John S.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the unique strengths of gay couples and major issues which need more consideration. Suggests guidelines for counselors and psychologists working with gay couples, based on a survey of homosexuals and professionals who work with them. Urges professionals to accept homosexuality and develop good counseling skills in this area. (Author/JAC)

  9. Effects of gay identity, gender and explicitness of advertising imagery on gay responses to advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakenfull, Gillian

    2007-01-01

    The present research draws from literature relating to gay identity in psychology and sociology and feminist theory to consider the effect of gay identity and gender on gays' and lesbians' attitudes toward various types of advertising content that are most commonly used to target gay consumers. As such, this study empirically tests whether gay males' and lesbians' responses to gay-oriented advertising content are moderated by individual characteristics: (1) the degree to which they identify as gay, and (2) their gender, and by the explicitness and gender of the gay-oriented advertising imagery.

  10. Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facts for Families Guide Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual Adolescents No. 63; Updated October 2013 Growing up is a demanding and challenging task for every adolescent. One important aspect is forming one's sexual identity. ...

  11. HIV Risk and Protection among Gay Male Couples: The Role of Gay Community Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fergus, Stevenson; Lewis, Megan A.; Darbes, Lynae A.; Butterfield, Rita M.

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the association between different types of integration in the gay community and HIV risk among gay male couples. Previous research linking gay community integration and involvement among couples to HIV risk has been equivocal. Each partner in 59 gay couples completed a separate anonymous questionnaire that assessed two types of…

  12. Gay and Lesbian Scene in Metelkova

    OpenAIRE

    Nataša Velikonja

    2013-01-01

    The article deals with the development of the gay and lesbian scene in ACC Metelkova, while specifying the preliminary aspects of establishing and building gay and lesbian activism associated with spatial issues. The struggle for space or occupying public space is vital for the gay and lesbian scene, as it provides not only the necessary socializing opportunities for gays and lesbians, but also does away with the historical hiding of homosexuality in the closet, in seclusion and silence. Beca...

  13. Gay Parents and Child Custody Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddle, Dorothy I.

    There are difficulties confronting gay parents when they seek custody of their children in a divorce suit. Court decisions are running about 50-50 in favor of the gay parent. Homophobia, the fear of same-sex intimacy or relationships, is rather strong in our society. The scant research done on gay families shows no negative effects on the children…

  14. Gay Parents and Child Custody Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddle, Dorothy I.

    There are difficulties confronting gay parents when they seek custody of their children in a divorce suit. Court decisions are running about 50-50 in favor of the gay parent. Homophobia, the fear of same-sex intimacy or relationships, is rather strong in our society. The scant research done on gay families shows no negative effects on the children…

  15. The Prevalence of Lisping in Gay Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Borsel, John; De Bruyn, Els; Lefebvre, Evelien; Sokoloff, Anouschka; De Ley, Sophia; Baudonck, Nele

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the stereotype that gay men lisp. Two clinicians who were unaware of the specific purpose of the study and the populations involved judged randomized audio-recordings of 175 gay males, 100 heterosexual males and 100 heterosexual females for the presence of lisping during reading of a standardized text. In the gay males a…

  16. General and gay-related racism experienced by Latino gay men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibañez, Gladys E; Van Oss Marin, Barbara; Flores, Stephen A; Millett, Gregorio; Diaz, Rafael M

    2009-07-01

    Latino gay men report experiences of racial discrimination within and outside the gay community. This study focused on correlates of racism within general and gay contexts. Racism was assessed in a probability sample of 911 Latino gay men recruited from 3 U.S. cities. Factor analysis of the 10-item scale produced 2 factors: (a) General Racism Experiences, and (b) Racism Experiences in Gay Contexts. The scale and each factor showed adequate reliability and validity. Latino gay men with darker skin, more Indian features, more time in the United States, and low self-esteem reported more racism in both general and gay contexts. The authors examine the psychometric properties of a measure that assesses interpersonal racism among Latinos, report correlates of racism within a gay context, and provide an assessment tool for understanding the role of racism in the lives of Latino gay men.

  17. Gay Male Fantasies and Realities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehne, Gregory K.

    1978-01-01

    In this study of 47 gay men, it was found that early sexual fantasies preceded interpersonal sexual experience by an average of four years and functioned as a source of self-knowledge. Current affectional and fantasy themes were related to respondents' lifestyles or desire for a male affectional relationship. (Author/WI)

  18. Beyond Gay-Straight Alliances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowski, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Decades' worth of studies point to the importance of parental involvement in K-12 schooling. Yet when it comes to policies related to lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) students, families are often deliberately left out of the conversation, according to several leading experts in LGBT youth development. Even in schools where…

  19. Beyond Gay-Straight Alliances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowski, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Decades' worth of studies point to the importance of parental involvement in K-12 schooling. Yet when it comes to policies related to lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) students, families are often deliberately left out of the conversation, according to several leading experts in LGBT youth development. Even in schools where…

  20. Suicidal Behavior and Gay-Related Stress among Gay and Bisexual Male Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotheram-Borus, Mary J.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    In contrast to attempted suicide rates of 9-12% among adolescents in community-based studies, attempted suicide was reported by 39% of 138 self-identified gay and bisexual adolescent males presenting in a social service agency for lesbian and gay adolescents. Findings suggest that gay youths are at increased risk for attempting suicide. (TJQ)

  1. Planned gay father families in kinship arrangements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, H.H.M.W.

    2010-01-01

    The current study examined whether there are differences between gay father families (n = 36) and heterosexual families (n = 36) on father-child relationship, fathers' experiences of parental stress and children's wellbeing. The gay fathers in this study all became parents while in same-sex relation

  2. Collection Development "Gay Parenting": Building Rainbow Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Lynne

    2008-01-01

    While gay parenthood has existed from time immemorial, it has only emerged as a viable means of family building within the past 20 years. Celebrities like Melissa Etheridge, who had children with ex-partner Julie Cypher and sperm donor David Crosby, and Rosie O'Donnell, who adopted, have ushered gay parenting into the popular consciousness and…

  3. Adolescent Sexuality: Gay and Lesbian Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cates, Jim A.

    1987-01-01

    Describes dynamics and interventions in relation to adolescents who express concern about gay and lesbian issues. Advocates therapeutic intervention based on psychological and emotional aspects of sexual preference, and cultural and social expectations of those who identify themselves as gay or lesbian. Describes three case studies. (Author/BB)

  4. The "Marital" Liaisons of Gay Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harry, Joseph

    1979-01-01

    Reports research on the nature of enduring sexual liaisons among homosexual men. Such relationships vary widely and may be subinstitutional adaptions to lack of community support. Gay men committed to the heterosexual world were less likely to enter enduring relationships. Open marriage is the more enduring form of gay male liaisons. (Author)

  5. Personality of Polish gay men and women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Kwiatkowski

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Sexuality is a part of one’s identity and personality that is shaped under the influence of biological and environmental factors and interactions with society. The results of research conducted so far and concerning the personality traits of gay men and women are not consistent, and only a small number of them concern the Polish population. Hence the objective of the present research was to provide personality profiles of men and women with different sexual orientations. Participants and procedure The participants (N = 346 included 84 gay women, 82 gay men, 95 heterosexual women and 85 heterosexual men. The following measures were used: a survey developed by the author, the Kinsey Scale, the EPQ-R (Eysenck Personality Questionnaire Revised adapted by Brzozowski and Drwal (1995, and the Sixteen-factor Personality Questionnaire of Cattell adapted by Nowakowska (1970. Results The results support the hypothesis that gay women and heterosexual men share similar personality traits, while gay men have more diverse traits, similar to the traits typical for heterosexual women and men. In particular, personalities of gay men are described by such traits as progressive attitude, independence, or willingness to take risks, which means traits linked to factor Q1. The highest values of that factor are observable in the case of gay men, as compared to gay women, and also in comparison with heterosexual men and women. Conclusions Sexual orientation is responsible for differences in personality traits of the studied group to a greater extent than their biological sex.

  6. Stereotypes of Older Lesbians and Gay Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Sara L.; Canetto, Silvia Sara

    2009-01-01

    This study examined stereotypes of older lesbians and gay men. Key findings are that older lesbians and gay men were perceived as similar to older heterosexual women and men with regard to aging stereotypes, such as being judicious. At the same time, sexual minorities were targets of unique stereotypes. Consistent with the implicit inversion…

  7. Gay and Lesbian Scene in Metelkova

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataša Velikonja

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the development of the gay and lesbian scene in ACC Metelkova, while specifying the preliminary aspects of establishing and building gay and lesbian activism associated with spatial issues. The struggle for space or occupying public space is vital for the gay and lesbian scene, as it provides not only the necessary socializing opportunities for gays and lesbians, but also does away with the historical hiding of homosexuality in the closet, in seclusion and silence. Because of their autonomy and long-term, continuous existence, homo-clubs at Metelkova contributed to the consolidation of the gay and lesbian scene in Slovenia and significantly improved the opportunities for cultural, social and political expression of gays and lesbians. Such a synthesis of the cultural, social and political, further intensified in Metelkova, and characterizes the gay and lesbian community in Slovenia from the very outset of gay and lesbian activism in 1984. It is this long-term synthesis that keeps this community in Slovenia so vital and politically resilient.

  8. The "Marital" Liaisons of Gay Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harry, Joseph

    1979-01-01

    Reports research on the nature of enduring sexual liaisons among homosexual men. Such relationships vary widely and may be subinstitutional adaptions to lack of community support. Gay men committed to the heterosexual world were less likely to enter enduring relationships. Open marriage is the more enduring form of gay male liaisons. (Author)

  9. Gay Teachers and the Right to Teach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honig, Doug

    1978-01-01

    The U.S. Supreme Court refused to review a Washington court ruling that found homosexuality immoral and a gay teacher unfit to teach public school children. No evidence was presented that the gay teacher had committed a single illegal or immoral act. The teacher freely acknowledged his homosexuality. (SW)

  10. Dating violence among gay men in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yong; Xiao, Shuiyuan; Liu, Kirin Qilin

    2013-08-01

    This is the first study on the prevalence of dating violence and threats of being forced to "come out of the closet" among Chinese gay men. Data on social demographic information and the experience of dating violence, including types of abuse, threats of "outing," and the gender of abusers were collected from 418 gay men and 330 heterosexual men by self-administered questionnaires. Mann-Whitney U test, χ(2) test, and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to test group differences. Up to 32.8% of the gay men had experienced one abuse or more. Among those experiencing abuse, 83.9% of the gay men never told anyone about their abuse. The experience of any form of abuse by gay men was 5.07 times higher than the rate of abuse among heterosexual men controlling for age in logistic regression models. In addition, 12.4% of the gay men have experienced the threat of being outed. Overall, dating violence is more prevalent in gay men than in heterosexuals. Efforts to prevent dating violence, especially among gay men, should be made in China.

  11. Tswanarising global gayness: the 'unAfrican' argument, Western gay media imagery, local responses and gay culture in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, John

    2013-01-01

    This paper is a strategic intervention in the debate over the value of globalised gay identity for emerging sexual minority communities in the South. Focusing on self-identifying gay men in Botswana using semi-structured interviews, it explores their views of what characterises 'modern gay culture' and relates these to international media clichés of a glamorous, stylish, hedonistic gayness. I argue that identifying with what is so visibly a Western image of gayness exposes sexual minority communities to the most dangerous of the justifications for homophobia in Africa, the argument that sexual dissidence is a neo-colonial conspiracy to subvert 'African values'. The 'unAfrican' argument has to be taken very seriously, not only because it taps into the intense, conflicted emotions at the heart of the post-colonial condition, but also because it contains an undeniable germ of truth. This poses a dilemma, since global gay discourses, including the media clichés, are an important source of inspiration for African sexual minorities. A communication activism strategy is proposed to undermine the unAfrican argument by cultivating and asserting the 'tswanarisation' of gay culture in Botswana that is already taking place. A similar strategy may also be effective in other African societies.

  12. Pedophilia and the gay movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandfort, T

    A history of literature and views existing within the COC (Cultural and Recreational Center), the major Dutch organization of homosexual men and women, regarding pedophilia and its relationship to homosexuality are discussed, beginning with definite separation between the pedophile and homosexual identities and ending with an abolishment of oppression towards pedophilia, for which the COC is in part responsible. The article argues that the homosexual identify is by no means a "constant" but a fluid identity, based on societal views and conditions. By accepting pedophilia, the COC hopefully will broaden the idea of the gay identity.

  13. Gay youth and gay adults: bridging the generation gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohan, Janis S; Russell, Glenda M; Montgomery, Suki

    2002-01-01

    Recent discussion of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and trans (LGBT) youth has included two emphases: the burgeoning trend toward youth-supportive organizations and focus on risk factors experienced by these youth. In practice, the two are intertwined: the need for youth-supportive endeavors is typically demonstrated by appeals to the risks LGBT youth face. Relatively little attention has been given to relationships between youth and adults in LGBT communities. This article employs data from a long-term qualitative study with LGBT youth, supported by information from numerous other settings to suggest that a failure on the part of both groups fully to comprehend the experience of the other hampers the optimal functioning of everyone involved. In particular, we suggest that the discourse about the dangers faced by LGBT youth, despite its being thoroughly well-intentioned. may actually place these teens at greater risk.

  14. Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CDC National Health Statistics Report: Sexual Behavior, Sexual Attraction, and Sexual Identity in the United States: Data ... X, Hoyt DR, et al. Mental disorder, subsistence strategies, and victimization among gay, lesbian, and bisexual homeless ...

  15. Health Issues for Gay Men: Prevention First

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nervosa, than are their straight counterparts. One potential explanation is that gay men identify with the cultural ... know about sexually transmitted diseases. National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention. http:// ...

  16. Children of gay or lesbian parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, M A; Perrin, E C; Futterman, D; Friedman, S B

    1994-09-01

    There are no data to suggest that children who have gay or lesbian parents are different in any aspects of psychological, social, and sexual development from children in heterosexual families. There has been fear that children raised in gay or lesbian households will grow up to be homosexual, develop improper sex-role behavior or sexual conflicts, and may be sexually abused. There has been concern that children raised by gay or lesbian parents will be stigmatized and have conflicts with their peer group, thus threatening their psychological health, self-esteem, and social relationships. These fears and concerns have not been substantiated by research. Pediatricians can facilitate the health care and development of these children by being aware of these and their own attitudes, by educating themselves about special concerns of gay or lesbian parents, and by being a resource and an advocate for children who have homosexual parents.

  17. Gay and Lesbian Partnership: Evidence from California

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Christopher Carpenter; Gary J. Gates

    2008-01-01

    .... We present the first systematic empirical analysis of partnership and cohabitation among self-identified gay men and lesbians using two independent, large, population-wwbased data sources from California...

  18. Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of children in the United States have lesbian, gay, bisexual and/or transgender (LGBT) parents. Some children of LGBT parents were conceived in heterosexual marriages or relationships. An increasing number of LGBT parents ...

  19. Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Health Risks Gay and Bisexual Men Resources LGBT Youth Transgender Persons Lesbian and Bisexual Women Health Services ... Bisexual Men Lesbian and Bisexual Women Transgender Persons LGBT Youth LGBT Youth Resources LGBT Youth Programs-At-A- ...

  20. Harbinger of plague: a bad case of gay bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarce, M

    1997-01-01

    In 1976, a group of physicians in private proctologic practice in New York City coined the illness "Gay Bowel Syndrome" in reference to a constellation of gay male anorectal disorders. Through analysis of biomedical discourse and popular media, it is apparent that Gay Bowel Syndrome is an essentialized category of difference that is neither gay-specific, confined to the bowel, nor a syndrome. The use and diagnosis of Gay Bowel Syndrome must be abandoned before it further lends itself to the formation of social policies and governing practices that seek to force gay male bodies into positions of social, cultural, and political subordination.

  1. Wedding Imagery and Public Support for Gay Marriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Paul R; Wilson, David C; Habegger, Michael

    2016-08-01

    This study uses an experiment embedded in a large, nationally representative survey to test whether exposure to imagery of a gay or lesbian couple's wedding influences support for gay marriage. It also tests whether any such effects depend on the nature of the image (gay or lesbian couple, kissing or not) and viewer characteristics (sex, age, race, education, religion, and ideology). Results show that exposure to imagery of a gay couple kissing reduced support for gay marriage relative to the baseline. Other image treatments (gay couple not kissing, lesbian couple kissing, lesbian couple not kissing) did not significantly influence opinion.

  2. Offsetting Risks: High School Gay-Straight Alliances and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, Nicholas C.; Flentje, Annesa; Cochran, Bryan N.

    2011-01-01

    Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth are at risk for engaging in negative health behaviors and for experiencing at-school victimization. Specific benefits of attending a high school with a gay-straight alliance (GSA), including lower levels of suicidality, have been published; however, it is unclear whether GSAs are related to…

  3. Offsetting Risks: High School Gay-Straight Alliances and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, Nicholas C.; Flentje, Annesa; Cochran, Bryan N.

    2011-01-01

    Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth are at risk for engaging in negative health behaviors and for experiencing at-school victimization. Specific benefits of attending a high school with a gay-straight alliance (GSA), including lower levels of suicidality, have been published; however, it is unclear whether GSAs are related to…

  4. "Kids not rights, is their craving": sex education, gay rights, and the threat of gay teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graydon, Michael

    2011-08-01

    In July 1977, the Ontario Humans Rights Commission recommended adding sexual orientation to the Code. This move was generally supported but Toronto newspapers and evangelists sought assurances that school boards could still dismiss homosexual teachers. They demanded children be shielded from gay teachers, who they accused of sexual predation. I historically link this to a reenergized fear of homosexuals which emerged during Toronto sex education debates in the 1970s. Later, influenced by Anita Bryant's Save the Children crusade, Toronto newspapers and evangelists argued gay teachers were the dangerous effect of gay rights. After the 1977 murder of Emanuel Jaques and the publication of Gerald Hannon's "Men Loving Boys, Loving Men" article, anti-gay sentiment in Toronto exploded, temporarily halting the progress of gay rights.

  5. Corpos Consumidos: cultura de consumo gay carioca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo André Teixeira Ayrosa

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available O estudo de grupos socialmente marginalizados, como gays, negros e moradores de favelas, entre outros, é de extrema relevância, uma vez que a tais minorias é praticamente negado o status de membros de uma sociedade moderna e de consumo (BARBOSA, 2006. O objetivo deste artigo é investigar como o discurso associado à posse do corpo é utilizado por homens gays para administrar o estigma relacionado à identidade homossexual. Como métodos de coleta de dados, foram adotados, antes de tudo, uma observação participante de um grupo gay da cidade do Rio de Janeiro e, posteriormente, 20 entrevistas semiestruturadas com homens gays no período compreendido entre os anos de 2005 e 2008. Os resultados sugerem que: (i o corpo é uma construção e, sendo assim, é construído e manipulado segundo os padrões estéticos da cultura gay; (ii o grupo gay estudado constrói o corpo de acordo com um ideal de hipermasculinidade; e (iii os significados associados ao corpo são usados como forma de demarcação na cultura gay. Esses resultados evidenciaram uma imensa gama de serviços estéticos ligados a esse culto ao corpo por parte do grupo. O corpo é, então, uma “insígnia” que faz daquele que o possui um vigilante de si mesmo, o qual controla, disciplina, domestica e aprisiona esse mesmo corpo, visando a atingir “a boa forma” ou a forma requerida pelo grupo de que faz parte. ----- Consumed Bodies: gay culture consumption in Rio ----- ABSTRACT ----- The study of socially marginalized groups, such as gays and blacks, among others, is highly relevant since these minorities are virtually denied the status of members of modern consumer society (BARBOSA, 2006. This study aims to investigate how possession of body is used by gay men to deal with the stigma of homosexual identity. The study is based on participant observation in a group of gay men in the city of Rio de Janeiro, as well as 20 semi-structured interviews with gay men conducted between

  6. Are gay communities dying or just in transition? Results from an international consultation examining possible structural change in gay communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon Rosser, B R; West, William; Weinmeyer, Richard

    2008-05-01

    This study sought to identify how urban gay communities are undergoing structural change, reasons for that change, and implications for HIV prevention planning. Key informants (N=29) at the AIDS Impact Conference from 17 cities in 14 countries completed surveys and participated in a facilitated structured dialog about if gay communities are changing, and if so, how they are changing. In all cities, the virtual gay community was identified as currently larger than the offline physical community. Most cities identified that while the gay population in their cities appeared stable or growing, the gay community appeared in decline. Measures included greater integration of heterosexuals into historically gay-identified neighborhoods and movement of gay persons into suburbs, decreased number of gay bars/clubs, less attendance at gay events, less volunteerism in gay or HIV/AIDS organizations, and the overall declining visibility of gay communities. Participants attributed structural change to multiple factors including gay neighborhood gentrification, achievement of civil rights, less discrimination, a vibrant virtual community, and changes in drug use. Consistent with social assimilation, gay infrastructure, visibility, and community identification appears to be decreasing across cities. HIV prevention planning, interventions, treatment services, and policies need to be re-conceptualized for MSM in the future. Four recommendations for future HIV prevention and research are detailed.

  7. Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Health: Stigma and Discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fact Sheets Reference Materials Gay Men’s Health Podcasts LGBT Health-Related Organizations New Media HIV/AIDS MMWRs ... becoming homeless. Around 40% of homeless youth are LGBT. A study published in 2009 compared gay, lesbian, ...

  8. The Outing of Philip Morris: Advertising Tobacco to Gay Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Elizabeth A.; Malone, Ruth E.

    2003-01-01

    Objectives. This case study describes the events surrounding the first time a major tobacco company advertised in gay media. Methods. We analyzed internal tobacco company documents, mainstream newspapers, and the gay press. Results. Philip Morris was unprepared for the attention its entry into the gay market received. The company’s reaction to this incident demonstrates that its approach to the gay community both parallels and diverges from industry strategies toward other marginalized communities. Conclusions. The tobacco industry’s relationship to the gay community is relatively undeveloped, a fact that may provide tobacco control advocates an opportunity for early intervention. The gay community’s particular vulnerabilities to the industry make development of gay tobacco control programs crucial to reducing gay smoking prevalence and industry presence in the community. PMID:12773366

  9. Identity and Sex: Concurent Aspects of Gay Tourism

    OpenAIRE

    Monterrubio, J. Carlos

    2008-01-01

    The present article aims to contribute to the recognition of two relevant aspects in gay travel; identity and sex. The paper explores the existing published work related to the relationships between tourism, gay men and identity. It concludes that the issue of identity commonly plays a crucial role as a travel reason in gay tourism. Also, it analyses the research evidence to suggest that sex is a frequently-present phenomenon in gay travel. By critically analysing the available research, the ...

  10. Jamaica, Three Years Later: Effects of Intensified Pro-Gay Activism on Severe Prejudice Against Lesbians and Gay Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Keon

    2016-01-01

    Jamaica has developed an international reputation for severe anti-gay prejudice. However, in the past few years, between 2012 and 2015, intensified waves of activism have increased the visibility of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) Jamaicans, and supported their social and legal inclusion in Jamaican society. This research investigated the effects of that activism by taking advantage of two large, representative surveys of Jamaicans' attitudes toward lesbians and gay men: one in 2012 and one in 2015. Over the three-year period there were significant reductions in desire for social distance and opposition to gay rights. However, there was no significant change in anti-gay attitudes, and there was evidence of an increase in anti-gay behaviors. There was also no evidence of polarization of responses to gay men and lesbians; rather, the most prejudiced Jamaicans showed the largest reductions in bias. Implications of these findings for activism in Jamaica and other anti-gay countries are discussed.

  11. Coping with Perceived Ethnic Prejudice on the Gay Scene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaspal, Rusi

    2017-01-01

    There has been only cursory research into the sociological and psychological aspects of ethnic/racial discrimination among ethnic minority gay and bisexual men, and none that focuses specifically upon British ethnic minority gay men. This article focuses on perceptions of intergroup relations on the gay scene among young British South Asian gay…

  12. Explaining Couple Cohesion in Different Types of Gay Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Eeden-Moorefield, Brad; Pasley, Kay; Crosbie-Burnett, Margaret; King, Erin

    2012-01-01

    This Internet-based study used data from a convenience sample of 176 gay men in current partnerships to examine differences in outness, cohesion, and relationship quality between three types of gay male couples: first cohabiting partnerships, repartnerships, and gay stepfamilies. Also, we tested whether relationship quality mediated the link…

  13. Gay Men in College: Identity Processes and Adaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Augelli, Anthony R.

    1991-01-01

    Surveyed male homosexual college students (n=61) about how they came to identify themselves as gay, how they discussed this with their families, what kind of social relationships with other gay people they have, and the nature of their involvement in gay social and political activities. (ABL)

  14. Gay Youth in American Public High Schools: Invisible Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Donald B.

    Gay youth enter high school with the knowledge that they are different and with the belief that heterosexuality is normal and that homosexuality is not normal. Also, gay youth enter high school with the belief that honesty and integrity are important personal values. Additionally, the gay youth enter high school without family knowledge of their…

  15. Admissions Comes Out: Recruiting Lesbian, Bisexual, Gay and Transgender Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einhaus, Carl F.; Viento, Wanda L. E.; Croteau, James M.

    2004-01-01

    The article addresses lesbian, bisexual, gay, and transgender students and uses the acronym "LBGT" when referring to all four of these sexual/gender orientation groupings. At times, however, we will refer to only lesbian or gay students, or only lesbian, bisexual, and gay (LBG) students when we are discussing a particular source that…

  16. Gay Men: Negotiating Procreative, Father, and Family Identities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowitz, Dana; Marsiglio, William

    2007-01-01

    Our qualitative study examines the social psychology of gay men's experiences with their procreative, father, and family identities. In-depth interviews were conducted with 19 childless gay men and 20 gay men in the United States who have fathered using diverse means excluding heterosexual intercourse. By focusing on men aged 19-55 residing…

  17. Men as Victims: "Victim" Identities, Gay Identities, and Masculinities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The impact and meanings of homophobic violence on gay men's identities are explored with a particular focus on their identities as men and as gay men. Homosexuality can pose a challenge to conventional masculinities, and for some gay men, being victimized on account of sexual orientation reawakens conflicts about their masculinity that they…

  18. Global identification predicts gay-male identity integration and well-being among Turkish gay men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koc, Yasin; Vignoles, Vivian L

    2016-12-01

    In most parts of the world, hegemonic masculinity requires men to endorse traditional masculine ideals, one of which is rejection of homosexuality. Wherever hegemonic masculinity favours heterosexuality over homosexuality, gay males may feel under pressure to negotiate their conflicting male gender and gay sexual identities to maintain positive self-perceptions. However, globalization, as a source of intercultural interaction, might provide a beneficial context for people wishing to create alternative masculinities in the face of hegemonic masculinity. Hence, we tested if global identification would predict higher levels of gay-male identity integration, and indirectly subjective well-being, via alternative masculinity representations for gay and male identities. A community sample of 219 gay and bisexual men from Turkey completed the study. Structural equation modelling revealed that global identification positively predicted gay-male identity integration, and indirectly subjective well-being; however, alternative masculinity representations did not mediate this relationship. Our findings illustrate how identity categories in different domains can intersect and affect each other in complex ways. Moreover, we discuss mental health and well-being implications for gay men living in cultures where they experience high levels of prejudice and stigma. © 2016 The British Psychological Society.

  19. Gay fathers' effects on children: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Paul

    2009-04-01

    Extrapolating results from studies of lesbians' children to gays' children and assertions of "no risk to children as a result of growing up in a family with 1 or more gay parents" are questioned. A review of 9 studies gave evidence that gays' children were (a) more apt to adopt homosexual interests and activities, (b) more apt to report sexual confusion, (c) more apt to be socially disturbed, (d) more apt to abuse substances, (e) less apt to get married, (f) more apt to have difficulty in attachment and loving relationships, (g) less religious and more unconventionally religious, (h) more apt to have emotional difficulties, (i) more frequently exposed to parental molestation, and (j) prone to more frequent sexual acting out.

  20. The acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in gay men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, H W; Hardy, A M; Morgan, W M; Darrow, W W

    1985-11-01

    The acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a major health problem for gay men in the United States. About three fourths of all reported cases have occurred in this population, and the number is projected to double in the next year. In Manhattan and San Francisco, AIDS is now the leading cause of premature mortality in men aged 25 to 44 years who have never married. In a sample of a cohort of gay men enrolled in a San Francisco clinic, 2.7% of the men had the syndrome and 26% had related conditions in 1984. Antibody to human T-lymphotropic virus, type III/lymphadenopathy-associated virus was found in sera from 67% of the men, including 58% of asymptomatic men. Behavioral factors associated with an increased risk of AIDS include large numbers of sexual partners, receptive anal intercourse, and "fisting." The adoption of safer lifestyles is currently the basis of attempts to control the syndrome in gay men.

  1. Development of the Gay and Lesbian Relationship Satisfaction Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belous, Christopher K; Wampler, Richard S

    2016-07-01

    This article describes the development and evaluation of the Gay and Lesbian Relationship Satisfaction Scale (GLRSS) as a measure of individuals' gay and lesbian same-gender relationship satisfaction and social support. Clinicians and researchers administer relationship satisfaction scales to persons in gay and lesbian relationships with a heteronormative assumption that scales developed and validated with opposite-gender couples measure identical relationship issues. Gay and Lesbian couples have unique concerns that influence relationship satisfaction, most notably social support. Using online recruitment and data collection, the GLRSS was evaluated with data from 275 gay and lesbian individuals in a same-gender relationship.

  2. HIV among Gay and Bisexual Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention VIH En Español Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... Email Updates on HIV Syndicated Content Website Feedback HIV Among Gay and Bisexual Men Format: Select One ...

  3. Cancer Facts for Gay and Bisexual Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are many lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender/transsexual (LGBT)-friendly providers. An LGBT community center or group may be able to ... symptoms of testicular cancer. The take-away The LGBT communities have a higher incidence of many risk ...

  4. Policy Issues in Gay and Lesbian Adoption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Ann

    1995-01-01

    Notes that adoption agencies have developed few specific policies on the issue of lesbian and gay adoption. Provides an overview of key considerations about homosexual adopters, including beliefs and values of agency professionals, the legal and social ramifications of adoption into a relationship not based on marriage, and possible consequences…

  5. A lover's cock and other gay poems gay sunshine press, san francisco, 1980. A lover's cock and other gay poems gay sunshine press, san francisco, 1980.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Dilamar Araújo

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The union of the two French symbolist poets Arthur Rimbaud and Paul Verlaine revolutionizes the nineteenth and the twentieth centuries with its homoerotic poems. But only now they are having their works printed by Gay Sunshine Press. The collection of erotic poems - A Lover's Cock - reveals to the reader the sexual liberation which happened a century ahead of its time. Rimbaud and Verlaine's is a bold, strong and direct style for a period when to be gay was infamous and unacceptable. In fact, they were ostracized by the Parisian society because of their rude behaviour. The union of the two French symbolist poets Arthur Rimbaud and Paul Verlaine revolutionizes the nineteenth and the twentieth centuries with its homoerotic poems. But only now they are having their works printed by Gay Sunshine Press. The collection of erotic poems - A Lover's Cock - reveals to the reader the sexual liberation which happened a century ahead of its time. Rimbaud and Verlaine's is a bold, strong and direct style for a period when to be gay was infamous and unacceptable. In fact, they were ostracized by the Parisian society because of their rude behaviour.

  6. College Students' Attitudes toward Gays and Lesbians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chonody, Jill M.; Siebert, Darcy Clay; Rutledge, Scott Edward

    2009-01-01

    A variety of pedagogical techniques have shown promising results in promoting acceptance and affirmation of gays and lesbians among students in social work, allied health, and education professions. In this article we examine whether 211 students enrolled in a human sexuality course in a southeastern university changed their attitudes toward gays…

  7. Legal Protections Gay Students Must Receive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Julie

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses practical guidance on schools' legal rights and responsibilities with respect to students, programs, and curriculum. Like all other individuals, lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) students are guaranteed equal protection under the Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution and free speech and association under the…

  8. Gay Rights on Campus, circa 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Elizabeth P.; Ford, Charles H.

    2011-01-01

    The environment for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) students, staff, and faculty on college campuses has certainly improved over the last generation, but recent dramatic episodes confirm the continuing need for vigilance and reform. Students remain the constituency most vulnerable to the effects of entrenched bigotry: the harassment…

  9. Improving Services to Gay and Lesbian Clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulaney, Diana D.; Kelly, James

    1982-01-01

    Examines the gap in the theoretical and clinical training of social workers in helping the homosexual client. Proposes specific approaches for improving services to clients who are gay or lesbian. Discusses other neglected clients including heterosexual spouses, children of a homosexual parent, and aging homosexuals. (Author/RC)

  10. Policy Issues in Gay and Lesbian Adoption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Ann

    1995-01-01

    Notes that adoption agencies have developed few specific policies on the issue of lesbian and gay adoption. Provides an overview of key considerations about homosexual adopters, including beliefs and values of agency professionals, the legal and social ramifications of adoption into a relationship not based on marriage, and possible consequences…

  11. Sampling Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Ilan H.; Wilson, Patrick A.

    2009-01-01

    Sampling has been the single most influential component of conducting research with lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) populations. Poor sampling designs can result in biased results that will mislead other researchers, policymakers, and practitioners. Investigators wishing to study LGB populations must therefore devote significant energy and…

  12. The birth of the (gay) clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Michael; Knopp, Larry

    2014-07-01

    We apply and extend Philo (2000)׳s arguments about Foucault׳s Birth of the Clinic as an inspiration for health geography and the study of governance of gays. Philo identified three spaces through which he argued disease is framed: disease tabled, embodied, and institutionalized. These focus attention on the spatialities through which the medical gaze is power-laden. We adopt this framework empirically through an historical geography of an urban public health system engaged with sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in the "homosexual" population of Seattle, Washington in the 1970s. It reveals the interaction of homophobia, heteronormativity and resistances across places typically understudied in queer historical geography. Our findings also extend this framework, however, by revealing other spaces that were important in the urban politics of sexual health: the gay city, the gay doctor, and the gay community. We suggest, therefore, that these and other spaces may be helpful in other health geographies interested in the dynamics of sexuality, governmentality, and urban public health.

  13. Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biblarz, Timothy J.; Savci, Evren

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews new scholarship on lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender families. The past decade witnessed rapid expansion of data and strong research designs. The most notable advance was in studies on variation among mostly planned lesbian comother families. Cumulative evidence suggests that although many of these families have…

  14. Legal Protections Gay Students Must Receive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Julie

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses practical guidance on schools' legal rights and responsibilities with respect to students, programs, and curriculum. Like all other individuals, lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) students are guaranteed equal protection under the Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution and free speech and association under the…

  15. Odd couples : a history of gay marriage in Scandinavia

    OpenAIRE

    Rydström, Jens

    2011-01-01

    The concept of marriage as a union of a man and a woman was fundamentally challenged by the introduction of registered partnership in Denmark in 1989. "http://www.aup.nl/do.php?a=show_visitor_book&isbn=9789052603810">Odd Couples. A History of Gay Marriage in Scandinavia is the first comprehensive history of registered partnership and gay marriage in Scandinavia. It presents an outstanding study of the interaction between gay activism and traditional party politics. Based on interviews, parlia...

  16. Fear of ostracism still silences some gay MDs, students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robb, N

    1996-10-01

    "Coming out" remains a very major decision for a gay or lesbian medical student. Canadian students interviewed for this article say they have feared being ostracized by their peers or encountering bias among older faculty members. A recent survey by the US-based Gay and Lesbian Medical Association found that 59% of gay and lesbian physician and medical student respondents have experienced job-related discrimination because of their sexuality. However, other gay/lesbian physicians and students are finding that their coming out is being greeted with tolerance, acceptance and understanding.

  17. Medical schools seek to overcome "invisibility" of gay patients, gay issues in curriculum.

    OpenAIRE

    Robb, N

    1996-01-01

    Dr. Gary Gibson of Cambridge, Ont., went many years without identifying a single gay patient in his practice. When he "came out" about his homosexuality in 1981, about 15 of his patients revealed they were gay. Gibson, a professor of family medicine at the University of Western Ontario who is active in the College of Family Physicians of Canada, says such information is useful, because "if they don't identify, they may not get the medical advice they need." He wants medical students to receiv...

  18. Unsettled Relations: Schools, Gay Marriage, and Educating for Sexuality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Cris

    2013-01-01

    In this article, Cris Mayo examines the relationship among anti-LGBTQ policies, gay marriage, and sexuality education. Her concern is that because gay marriage is insufficiently different from heterosexual marriage, adding it as an issue to curriculum or broader culture debate elides rather than addresses sexual difference. In other words,…

  19. Missing!: Picture Books Reflecting Gay and Lesbian Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowell, Elizabeth H.

    2007-01-01

    Early childhood educators carefully reflect on the messages conveyed about family diversity in the materials they select to use. Picture books depicting gay and lesbian families can enhance the curriculum and make an important contribution to young children's development. Families comprised of same-sex parents or those who have gay and lesbian…

  20. Homecoming: the relevance of radical feminism for gay men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Sexual politics in the gay male world would be enhanced by a serious engagement with radical feminist politics, particularly critiques of pornography and the sex industry. As the domination/subordination dynamic at the heart of patriarchy damages homosexual men, such engagement is crucial to the future of a gay movement.

  1. Attitudes toward lesbians and gays among American and Dutch adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.L. Collier; S.S. Horn; H.M.W. Bos; T.G.M. Sandfort

    2014-01-01

    Attitudes toward lesbians and gays vary across national populations, and previous research has found relatively more accepting attitudes in the Netherlands as compared to the United States. In this study, we compared beliefs about and attitudes toward lesbians and gays in samples of Dutch and Americ

  2. Faith and Sexual Orientation Identity Development in Gay College Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Merrily; Glassmann, Danny; Garrett, J. Matthew; Badaszewski, Philip; Jones, Ginny; Pierre, Darren; Fresk, Kara; Young, Dallin; Correll-Hughes, Larry

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the experiences of gay-identified college men related to their faith and sexual orientation identity development. The findings suggest that for gay-identified college men, faith and sexual orientation identity development includes examination of one's faith and sexual orientation identity, important relationships, and a desire…

  3. Theory and Research in Gay and Lesbian Relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVito, Joseph A.

    This paper addresses the need for gay and lesbian relationship research and theory and some of the directions such research and theory might take. It suggests academic research into gay and lesbian relationships is needed because these relationships are a fact of modern life and are different from heterosexual relationships, and because such…

  4. Preservice Teacher Attitudes toward Gay and Lesbian Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbstrith, Julie C.; Tobin, Renée M.; Hesson-McInnis, Matthew S.; Schneider, W. Joel

    2013-01-01

    Gay and lesbian parents are raising an increasing number of children, but little is known about how these parents are viewed by school personnel. In this study, preservice teacher attitudes toward gay and lesbian parents were assessed using implicit, explicit, behavioral, and behavioroid measures. Implicit measures indicate that participants rated…

  5. Guidelines for Psychological Practice With Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Clients

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The "Guidelines for Psychological Practice With Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Clients" provide psychologists with (a) a frame of reference for the treatment of lesbian, gay, and bisexual clients and (b) basic information and further references in the areas of assessment, intervention, identity, relationships, diversity, education, training, and…

  6. Attitudes toward lesbians and gays among American and Dutch adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collier, K.L.; Horn, S.S.; Bos, H.M.W.; Sandfort, T.G.M.

    2015-01-01

    Attitudes toward lesbians and gays vary across national populations, and previous research has found relatively more accepting attitudes in the Netherlands as compared to the United States. In this study, we compared beliefs about and attitudes toward lesbians and gays in samples of Dutch and Americ

  7. Unsettled Relations: Schools, Gay Marriage, and Educating for Sexuality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Cris

    2013-01-01

    In this article, Cris Mayo examines the relationship among anti-LGBTQ policies, gay marriage, and sexuality education. Her concern is that because gay marriage is insufficiently different from heterosexual marriage, adding it as an issue to curriculum or broader culture debate elides rather than addresses sexual difference. In other words,…

  8. Are Teens "Post-Gay"? Contemporary Adolescents' Sexual Identity Labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Stephen T.; Clarke, Thomas J.; Clary, Justin

    2009-01-01

    Recent reports suggest that historically typical sexual identity labels--"gay," "lesbian" and "bisexual"--have lost meaning and relevance for contemporary adolescents. Yet there is little empirical evidence that contemporary teenagers are "post-gay." In this brief study we investigate youths' sexual identity labels. The Preventing School…

  9. A Teacher Fears for Kids over Freshly Ambushed Gay Rights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Bonnie J.

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about the passing of new laws forbidding gay marriage or legal recognition of same-sex unions in the United States and the impact of the gay rights issue on students. Across the nation, faculty who enjoy secure academic appointments, work with caring colleagues, and reside in university towns are subject to new…

  10. Prejudice or Preference? Attitudes of Gay and Lesbian Christians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Elizabeth A.; Gorsuch, Richard L.

    Research on the attitudes of heterosexual churchgoers is extensive. However, very little empirical information is available about the attitudes held by gay and lesbian Christians. In the current study, it was hypothesized that gay and lesbian Christians, unlike their heterosexual peers, would demonstrate desire for and acceptance of social…

  11. Faith and Sexual Orientation Identity Development in Gay College Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Merrily; Glassmann, Danny; Garrett, J. Matthew; Badaszewski, Philip; Jones, Ginny; Pierre, Darren; Fresk, Kara; Young, Dallin; Correll-Hughes, Larry

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the experiences of gay-identified college men related to their faith and sexual orientation identity development. The findings suggest that for gay-identified college men, faith and sexual orientation identity development includes examination of one's faith and sexual orientation identity, important relationships, and a desire…

  12. That’s Gay! Gay as a Slur Among College Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Postic

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the use of the word “gay” as a synonym for dumb or lame or stupid has become prevalent in our culture. Because of this, it is clear that many individuals do not consider the word to be a slur and are not offended by its use. Using an original data set (N = 790 collected from four Midwestern universities in the winter of 2011-2012, this article examines the characteristics of those college students who perceive the word gay to be a slur or who are offended. We find that those individuals who report having more gay friends are more likely to take offense at the use of the word gay as a slur even after controls are instituted. We also find that, contrary to expectations, attendance at religious services appears to have a direct relationship, with more frequent attenders more likely to express offense at the use of gay as a slur. Egalitarianism also emerged as a significant predictor. We offer suggestions as to why some college students perceive the word to be a slur while a majority of college students do not.

  13. Typology of gay consumers' interaction styles on complaining propensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Eric D; Ro, Heejung

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a typology of gay male consumers based on self-concept variables related to social interactions. Openness about sexual orientation, collective self-esteem, stigma-consciousness, and negative evaluation were used to identify clusters of gay male consumers. An initial test sample (n = 125) suggested a three-cluster solution, and a validation sample (n = 247) established reproducibility of the proposed typology. Three clusters with distinct interaction styles emerged: "confident gay," "diffident gay," and "guarded gay." Additionally, the usefulness of the typology is demonstrated by comparing the clusters on the basis of complaining propensity. Typologies of each cluster and implications for research and practice are discussed.

  14. Social and psychological creativity in gay male midlife identity management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajek, Christopher

    2016-06-01

    This study utilizes a qualitative thematic analysis methodology and a social identity theory framework to explore ways in which early midlife gay men report enhancing their social identities through social and psychological creativity. Face-to-face, semi-structured interviews were conducted with forty early midlife gay men (aged 40-53) in four US cities. Men discussed the collective and individual essences of their age and gay identities, including attitudes, beliefs, and behaviours that they embraced to self-enhance at midlife. These discussions emphasized differences from the younger gay outgroup, often in the context of intergenerational interaction. Identified were three strategies (and seven substrategies) that summarized the ways that interviewees constructed their identities in the interest of self-enhancement, specifically in the context of intergenerational comparisons with younger gay men. These strategies may be considered as extensions to social creativity strategies presented in Tajfel and Turner's (Psychology of intergroup relations. Chicago, IL: Nelson, 1986: 7) social identity theory.

  15. Sun, sand, and citizenship: the marketing of gay tourism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coon, David R

    2012-01-01

    This article investigates trends in the marketing of gay and lesbian tourism. It reviews gay and lesbian travel guides from the 1960s to the 1990s before examining more recent travel materials including brochures and Web sites promoting specific American cities. These promotional materials are a valuable object of inquiry because they are uniquely situated at the intersection of discussions of sexuality, the market, representation, space, and citizenship. Through an aggregate semiotic analysis and ideological criticism, this article examines themes and concerns raised by the recent wave of gay tourism marketing, including questions of visibility, privacy, and assimilation. I argue that while marketers' recent attempts to lure gay and lesbian tourists to specific destinations may seem to suggest increased tolerance and societal inclusion, the specific strategies that they employ actually reveal the second-class citizen status still experienced by gays and lesbians within the rest of American society.

  16. John Amaechi: changing the way sport reporters examine gay athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kian, Edward Ted M; Anderson, Eric

    2009-01-01

    In 2007, John Amaechi became the first former National Basketball Association (NBA) player to publicly announce he was gay. Former NBA star Tim Hardaway made a series of homophobic remarks a week later. A textual analysis was used to analyze narratives on Amaechi's revelation and/or Hardaway's comments published in 50 international newspapers. Four dominant themes emerged from the data. While most of these themes supported narratives that gay males remain unwelcome in men's team sports, all were challenged consistently, thus, showing the fluidity of hegemonic masculinity and the increasing societal acceptance of gays and gay lifestyles. Moreover, print media writers exhibited little homophobia and frequently called for more acceptance of gays, particularly within sport.

  17. Some like it mellow: on gay men complicating pornography discourses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corneau, Simon; van der Meulen, Emily

    2014-01-01

    Despite the proliferation of writing on pornography generally, much of the literature that focuses on gay pornography specifically conforms to either a pro- or anti-porn framework. This overly simplistic dichotomy positions pornography as a homogeneous construct, albeit one that is either "good" or "bad." Even theorists who situate pornography on a continuum, with erotica at one end and hardcore at the other, tend to reify these discourses. Further, it is not uncommon for researchers to draw conclusions about the effects of pornography consumption without defining exactly what pornography is. This ethnographic research draws on qualitative interviews with 20 consumers' of gay pornography in Toronto, Canada. By using a thematic analysis to document the ways in which gay men define, distinguish, and conceptualize gay pornography, five definitional categories were developed: Mellow; Commercial; Raunch; Amateur; and Bareback. These broad conceptualizations are discussed in reference to writing on gay pornography. Our research results emphasize the importance of clear definitions of pornography within pornography research.

  18. Emo Gay Boys and Subculture: Postpunk Queer Youth and (Re)thinking Images of Masculinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Brian M.

    2010-01-01

    This is an exploration of gay youth subculture and emo boys. The study is a mesh of findings and related theoretical understandings about gay emo subculture, masculinities, style, and alternative gay youth. This study looks at gay male teenagers who identify with emo, a movement that stems from music and aesthetics creating a particular visual for…

  19. Improving the Lives of Students, Gay and Straight Alike: Gay-Straight Alliances and the Role of School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Heather Elise

    2012-01-01

    Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) students face many risk factors every day when they enter their school's door. These students often fear for their safety at school, are victimized, have academic difficulties, suffer from issues with their identity development, and are at risk for suicide. School-based Gay-Straight Alliances (GSAs)…

  20. "Gay Boy Talk" Meets "Girl Talk": HIV Risk Assessment Assumptions in Young Gay Men's Sexual Health Communication with Best Friends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutchler, Matt G.; McDavitt, Bryce

    2011-01-01

    Young adults, particularly young gay men (YGM), are vulnerable to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Yet, little is known about how YGM discuss sexual health issues with their friends ("gay boy talk"). We conducted semi-structured interviews with YGM and their best friends (11 YGM/YGM dyads and 13 YGM/heterosexual female dyads). In this paper, we…

  1. "Gay Boy Talk" Meets "Girl Talk": HIV Risk Assessment Assumptions in Young Gay Men's Sexual Health Communication with Best Friends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutchler, Matt G.; McDavitt, Bryce

    2011-01-01

    Young adults, particularly young gay men (YGM), are vulnerable to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Yet, little is known about how YGM discuss sexual health issues with their friends ("gay boy talk"). We conducted semi-structured interviews with YGM and their best friends (11 YGM/YGM dyads and 13 YGM/heterosexual female dyads). In this paper, we…

  2. Improving the Lives of Students, Gay and Straight Alike: Gay-Straight Alliances and the Role of School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Heather Elise

    2012-01-01

    Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) students face many risk factors every day when they enter their school's door. These students often fear for their safety at school, are victimized, have academic difficulties, suffer from issues with their identity development, and are at risk for suicide. School-based Gay-Straight Alliances (GSAs)…

  3. Latino gay and bisexual men's relationships with non-gay-identified men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisen, Carol A; Zea, Maria Cecilia; Bianchi, Fernanda T; Poppen, Paul J; Shedlin, Michele G; Penha, Marcelo Montes

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated relationships between Latino gay-identified men in metropolitan New York City and their non-gay-identified male partners. Phase 1 consisted of in-depth interviews (N = 33), and Phase 2 consisted of quantitative surveys (N = 120) with Brazilian, Colombian, and Dominican men who have sex with men (MSM). A majority of participants reported having had sex with heterosexually identified men, and in many cases, the relationship was sustained over time. We found mixed results concerning an attitude sometimes attributed to Latinos that sexual orientation is defined by sexual role, with receptive MSM seen as gay and insertive MSM seen as straight. Although there were no significant associations between partner sexual orientation and unprotected anal intercourse, gay men were less likely to take the insertive role in oral or anal sex with straight-identified male partners than with gay partners.

  4. BEHAVIORAL RISK DISPARITIES IN A RANDOM SAMPLE OF SELF-IDENTIFYING GAY AND NON-GAY MALE UNIVERSITY STUDENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Scott D.; McCoy, Thomas P.; Wilkin, Aimee M.; Wolfson, Mark

    2013-01-01

    This internet-based study was designed to compare health risk behaviors of gay and non-gay university students from stratified random cross-sectional samples of undergraduate students. Mean age of the 4,167 male participants was 20.5 (±2.7) years. Of these, 206 (4.9%) self-identified as gay and 3,961 (95.1%) self-identified as heterosexual. After adjusting for selected characteristics and clustering within university, gay men had higher odds of reporting: multiple sexual partners; cigarette smoking; methamphetamine use; gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) use; other illicit drug use within the past 30 days and during lifetime; and intimate partner violence (IPV). Understanding the health risk behaviors of gay and heterosexual men is crucial to identifying associated factors and intervening upon them using appropriate and tailored strategies to reduce behavioral risk disparities and improve health outcomes. PMID:19882428

  5. [Sodomites, homosexuals, gay: from persecution to demedicalization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Segni Obiols, Silvia

    2006-01-01

    Since 1895, when Oscar Wilde was put on trial, almost 80 years passed until the beginning of the process that led to delete homosexuality from DSM (APA) and contributed to its despenalization. Over that period, moral and legal persecution and mass killings in concentrations camps gave way to gay pride. Here we analyze this process in relation to DSM and we search for answers to the question of why homosexuality between consenting adults was far more persecuted than sexual behaviors that clearly affects the rights of other persons as paedophilia or rape.

  6. Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Cecil R; Telingator, Cynthia J

    2016-12-01

    Families headed by sexual minorities encounter unique barriers to care and health equity despite greater cultural acceptance and visibility. Empirical research suggests that children in lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) families develop and function comparably to those from traditional families. In helping families, awareness of family structure is important. The health care provider should be familiar with family composition, and their community, social supports, race/ethnic concerns, financial issues, and other vulnerabilities. Cultivating an office culture and practice that supports all patients to comfortably discuss their family history, interpersonal experiences, needs, and vulnerabilities is essential for excellence in clinical care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Sitges (Catalunya y el carnaval gay: el turismo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lacaba Gutiérrez, José Juan

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, I explain the development of a tourist village in the Catalonian coast (northeast of Spain as a gay destination during carnival times during the month February. My intention is to include my reflections in this paper in the symbolic - cognitive studies about tourism and I want also to reflect about the idea of the constructions in gay culture of different places all around the world of leisure or/and pilgrimage. Sitges is a scale gay destination really knowledge in Western Europe during the hole year, but during carnival times, it's convert in a gay pilgrimage in different ways and there is have been crated during those last years gays places of leisure in the village that make me create the idea of the existence of a gay Carnival in Sitges Carnival. Because we cannot consider the gay carnival independent of what I call Sitges Carnival, I explain also the development and the historical conflicts between those two carnivals, and how those separate spaces have been created

  8. Men at sport: gay men's experiences in the sport workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalier, Elizabeth S

    2011-01-01

    Research on sexual identity and sport has revealed a shifting narrative about the experiences of gay men. While some suggest the atmosphere is hostile, others posit that homophobia and sexual prejudice are playing less of a role in gay men's experiences. This research focuses on the experiences of 10 gay men working in professional, collegiate, and club sport, as part of a larger dataset of 37 male and female employees. Five of the men were overtly and publicly out at work, while five were closeted (to varying degrees). This article focuses on three themes for gay men working in sport: 1) the importance of coming out in the workplace; 2) the role of the locker room as a contested terrain, and 3) the disconnect between their experiences at work and their perceptions of the workplace environment as negative or positive. Men in this study were basing their impressions on their total experience in sport (as current and former players, as employees, and as fans). It also suggests that the public "story" of gay men working in sport represents one of two extremes-either the proverbial "horror story," or the extremely positive representation of gay men's experiences. This research suggests that gay men's experiences in sport are more complex and nuanced than the public narrative implies.

  9. Can seduction make straight men gay?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, H

    1993-01-01

    The article raises the question of changing sexual preference: Can a man whose past sexual practice has been almost exclusively heterosexual change his practice to homosexual after being seduced by another man? To those who believe that homosexual preference is homosexual orientation, an innate biological predisposition, the answer is a resounding "no." Contrary to this response, the author presents three cases in which the men switch from heterosexual to homosexual relationships (exclusively in two cases) by means of a sexual encounter initiated by another man. The author credits part of the change to the gay liberation movement which rescued homosexual desire from the hidden, forbidden, and shameful. The evidence that these men experienced a genuine change in sexual preference, shows that life-long, exclusive homosexuality, as articulated by gay rhetoric, is more a statement about the culture in which it occurs than the "essence" of homosexuality. The author concludes that putting the question of "What do I like?" before the question of "Who am I?" would allow more sexual freedom for those interested in crossing the line that divides sexual preferences.

  10. Language, gay pornography, and audience reception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leap, William L

    2011-01-01

    Erotic imagery is an important component of gay pornographic cinema, particularly, where work of audience reception is concerned. However, to assume the audience engagement with the films is limited solely to the erotic realm is to underestimate the workings of ideological power in the context and aftermath of reception. For example, the director of the film under discussion here (Men of Israel; Lucas, 2009b) intended to present an erotic celebration of the nation-state. Yet, most viewers ignore the particulars of context in their comments about audience reception, placing the "Israeli" narrative within a broader framework, using transnational rather than film-specific criteria to guide their "reading" of the Israeli-centered narrative. This article uses as its entry point the language that viewers employ when describing their reactions to Men of Israel on a gay video club's Web site; this article shows how the work of audience reception may draw attention to a film's erotic details while invoking social and political messages that completely reframe the film's erotic narrative.

  11. Children of lesbian and gay parents: psychology, law, and policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Charlotte J

    2009-11-01

    Legal and policy questions relevant to the lives of lesbian and gay parents and their children have recently been subjects of vigorous debate. Among the issues for which psychological research has been seen as particularly relevant are questions regarding child custody after divorce, same-sex marriage, adoption, and foster care. This article provides an overview of the current legal terrain for lesbian and gay parents and their children in the United States today, an overview of relevant social science research, and some commentary on the interface between the two. It is concluded that research findings on lesbian and gay parents and their children provide no warrant for legal discrimination against these families.

  12. Predicting Gay Affirmative Practice from the Theory of Planned Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Allison R; Steffen, Ann M; Wayland, Sherrill

    2015-01-01

    This study utilized the theory of planned behavior to examine individual intentions to engage in gay affirmative practice among aging-focused professionals (N = 83) in the Midwestern United States. Participants completed self-report measures of perceived agency norms and individual attitudes related to the treatment of gay men and lesbians, intentions to provide gay affirmative care, and perceived behavioral control. Attitudes, norms and perceived behavioral control were examined as predictors of intentions; attitudes of individual aging-service professionals emerged as the strongest predictor. Results indicated that affirmative attitudes within the agency may be important in predicting intentions to provide this type of care.

  13. Proses Pengungkapan Diri(Self Disclosure) Kaum Gay (Studi Kasus Tentang Pengungkapan Diri(Self Disclosure) Kaum Gay Di Kota Medan)

    OpenAIRE

    Pasaribu, Rotua E.

    2015-01-01

    This study titled Gay Self Disclosure Process (Case Study About Disclosure Self (Self Disclosure) Gay in Medan). This study aims to determine how the process of self-disclosure gays with family, friends and the environment, any obstacles encountered when communicating with his family and friends, and to investigate the verbal and non-verbal communication among gays. The theory is considered relevant by the researchers for this study are: Communication, komunikai Inter-Personal, Penetration Th...

  14. Gay Abuse Screening Protocol (GASP): screening for abuse in gay male relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Edward; Cavacuiti, Chris

    2008-01-01

    Thirty-two male patients in gay relationships and eight family physicians were recruited from a family practice in order to determine comfort with an eight-question Gay Abuse Screening Protocol (GASP). The GASP was administered during a typical clinical encounter. After the encounter, physicians and patients each completed a 5-point Likert Scale questionnaire to assess their comfort levels with each of the 8 GASP questions (Likert Scale: 1 = not at all comfortable to 5 = very comfortable). The mean comfort score was high (Likert >4) for both patients (4.16 +/- 0.18) and physicians (4.71 +/- 0.18). However, mean comfort scores were significantly lower for abused patients (3.26 +/- 0.75) than nonabused patients (4.57 +/- 0.26). Patients were comfortable (Likert >3) with 76.2% of GASP items while physicians were comfortable with all GASP items.

  15. Gay guys using gay language: friendship, shared values and the intent-context-effect matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Mark; Wignall, Liam; Morris, Max

    2016-12-01

    This article draws on in-depth interviews with 35 openly gay male undergraduates from four universities in England to develop an understanding of the changing nature of language related to homosexuality. In addition to finding a diminution in the prevalence of homophobic language, we demonstrate that participants maintain complex and nuanced understandings of phrases that do not use homophobic pejoratives, such as 'that's so gay'. The majority of participants rejected the notion that these phrases are inherently homophobic, instead arguing that the intent with which they are said and the context in which they are used are vital in understanding their meaning and effect. We conceptualize an intent-context-effect matrix to understand the interdependency of these variables. Highlighting the situated nature of this matrix, we also demonstrate the importance of the existence of shared norms between those saying and hearing the phrase when interpreting such language. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2016.

  16. The GAy MEn Sex StudieS: Anodyspareunia Among Belgian Gay Men

    OpenAIRE

    Vansintejan, Johan; Vandevoorde,Jan; Devroey, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Anal intercourse is commonly associated with male homosexuality, but not all gay males engage in anal sex. Receptive anal intercourse can cause pain. Little is known about this sexual dysfunction. Aim This study aims to determine the 4-week incidence of anodyspareunia (AD) in a sample of Belgian men who have sex with men (MSM) population and to assess the relevance of possible predictors such as age, relationship, and sexual behavior. Methods An internet-based survey on sexual be...

  17. Is tobacco a gay issue? Interviews with leaders of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offen, Naphtali; Smith, Elizabeth A; Malone, Ruth E

    2008-02-01

    This study examined the extent of tobacco industry funding of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) organisations and whether leaders of these organisations thought tobacco was a priority health issue for their community. We interviewed leaders of 74 LGBT organisations and publications in the USA, reflecting a wide variety of groups. Twenty-two percent said they had accepted tobacco industry funding and few (24%) identified tobacco as a priority issue. Most leaders did not perceive tobacco as an issue relevant to LGBT identity. They saw smoking as a personal choice and individual right rather than as a health crisis fuelled by industry activities. As such, they were reluctant to judge a legal industry, fearing it might lead to having to evaluate other potential funders. They saw tobacco control as divisive, potentially alienating their peers who smoke. The minority who embraced tobacco control saw the industry as culpable and viewed their own roles as protecting the community from all harms, not just those specific to the gay community. Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender tobacco-control advocates should reframe smoking as an unhealthy response to the stresses of homophobia to persuade leaders that tobacco control is central to LGBT health.

  18. Investigating differences in public support for gay rights issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Public opinion surrounding two of the most well-known gay rights issues-same-sex marriage and adoption by gays and lesbians-varies widely: About 30% of the public favors same-sex marriage, while about 50% favors adoption. The purpose of this study was to examine and compare the demographic variables that predict attitudes toward same-sex marriage and adoption by gays and lesbians. Political ideology and attendance at religious services emerged as the strongest predictors. However, a close examination of the two issues shows that there were important differences between them. These differences may aid gay rights advocates in crafting media campaigns designed to increase support for same-sex marriage.

  19. Viral Hepatitis: Information for Gay and Bisexual Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Gay and Bisexual Men What is viral hepatitis? Viral hepatitis is an infection of the liver caused by ... the United States, the most common types of viral hepatitis are Hepatitis A, Hepatitis B, and Hepatitis C. ...

  20. Mixed News on Drug Abuse Among Lesbian, Gay Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/news/fullstory_161477.html Mixed News on Drug Abuse Among Lesbian, Gay Americans This group is more ... said Kana Enomoto, deputy principal administrator at the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). She spoke ...

  1. Psychological antecedents of heterosexuals' pro-gay activism behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Wayne W; Sagarin, Brad J

    2010-01-01

    Previous research on heterosexuals' attitudes toward gays is characterized by a focus on negative attitudes and minimal use of behavioral dependent variables. In an attempt to rectify this situation, the present study explored the psychological antecedents of heterosexuals' pro-gay activism behavior in an undergraduate sample using the theory of planned behavior (Ajzen, 1991). Findings suggest that intentions predict activism behavior (in the form of signing an online petition supporting the construction of a new lesbian, gay, and bisexual resource center on their campus). In addition, attitudes toward the possible outcomes of the behavior, attitudes toward the behavior itself, and self-identity were found to predict intentions. Directions for future research on pro-gay activism are discussed.

  2. Portuguese Older Gay Men: Pathways to Family Integrity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipa Daniela Marques

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Research in the field of older gay men remains scarce. This exploratory study examines older gay men's experiences in the construction of family integrity (versus disconnection and alienation. The family integrity approach is a developmental perspective that links ego integrity to a larger process of constructing meaning within the family system. The sample comprises ten participants (from 60 to 88 years old. A semi-structured interview was conducted and submitted to content analysis. The main findings suggest three experiences in older gay men's construction of family integrity: (i influence of homosexuality throughout life; (ii establishing a family of choice; (iii creating a legacy associated with homosexuality. Family integrity in older gay men seems to evolve from disclosure at a young age to making homosexuality a legacy in old age.

  3. Understanding and Counseling Gay Men: A Developmental Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumaer, James

    1987-01-01

    Reviews current concepts and research concerning homosexuality with emphasis on understanding gay men and their relationship behaviors. Presents counseling considerations from a developmental perspective, and includes a case example. (Author/KS)

  4. Reaching Out to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes-Hassell, Sandra; Hinckley, Alissa

    2001-01-01

    Librarians can provide access to responsible Internet resources designed specifically for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth. Web sites described in this article include: for youth, by youth; national organizations; and references. (AEF)

  5. Military Gay Ban Revisited: Is our Military Ready for Change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-20

    Lesbian, Gay, Bi-sexual, Transgender] ( LGBT ) rights is exploited by those seeking to divide us. But at its core, this issue is about who we are as...support from the lesbian, gay, bi-sexual, transgender ( LGBT ) community and in return made several campaign promises along the way. One of the campaign...community has not offered its own definition of morality and yet it, ridicules, and labels those who differ in opinion as “hypocrites, bigots, and

  6. New in Town: Gay Immigrants and Geosocial Dating Apps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shield, Andrew DJ

    2017-01-01

    relates to the ways users form offline social networks through these media; in this regard, gay dating platforms can be viewed as ‘social media’ not unlike mainstream social networking sites. The second research ques- tion relates to discussions of race and exclusion online; with regard to the ways some...... users transform their public profiles into soapboxes to broadcast political messages, these gay dating platforms – not unlike YouTube and Facebook – can also be spaces for social media activism....

  7. Attitudes toward straight, gay male, and transsexual parenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Brittany A; Zinner, Leah

    2015-01-01

    This study examined American attitudes toward transsexual and gay male parenting, compared to straight parenting. After reporting levels of transphobia, participants read a vignette regarding a couple seeking child adoption. Individuals high in transphobia perceived nontraditional couples as more emotionally unstable than straight couples and were less willing to grant custody of a child to the nontraditional couples vs. the straight couples. In addition, the transsexual couple faced more prejudice and discrimination than the gay male couple. Implications of these findings are discussed.

  8. Dynamics of the Gay-Berne fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Miguel, E.; Rull, L.F. (Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Sevilla, Apartado 1065, Sevilla 41080 (Spain)); Gubbins, K.E. (School of Chemical Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States))

    1992-03-15

    Using molecular-dynamics computer simulation, we study the dynamical behavior of the isotropic and nematic phases of highly anisotropic molecular fluids. The interactions are modeled by means of the Gay-Berne potential with anisotropy parameters {kappa}=3 and {kappa}{prime}=5. The linear-velocity autocorrelation function shows no evidence of a negative region in the isotropic phase, even at the higher densities considered. The self-diffusion coefficient parallel to the molecular axis shows an anomalous increase with density as the system enters the nematic region. This enhancement in parallel diffusion is also observed in the isotropic side of the transition as a precursor effect. The molecular reorientation is discussed in the light of different theoretical models. The Debye diffusion model appears to explain the reorientational mechanism in the nematic phase. None of the models gives a satisfactory account of the reorientation process in the isotropic phase.

  9. Moral elevation reduces prejudice against gay men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Calvin K; Haidt, Jonathan; Nosek, Brian A

    2014-01-01

    Disgust is linked to social evaluation. People with higher disgust sensitivity exhibit more sexual prejudice, and inducing disgust increases sexual prejudice. We tested whether inducing moral elevation, the theoretical opposite of disgust, would reduce sexual prejudice. In four studies (N = 3622), we induced elevation with inspiring videos and then measured sexual prejudice with implicit and explicit measures. Compared to control videos that elicited no particular affective state, we found that elevation reduced implicit and explicit sexual prejudice, albeit very slightly. No effect was observed when the target of social evaluation was changed to race (Black-White). Inducing amusement, another positive emotion, did not significantly affect sexual prejudice. We conclude that elevation weakly but reliably reduces prejudice towards gay men.

  10. El personaje gay en la literatura colombiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz María Rubio Rivas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Este documento aborda desde el campo de los estudios culturales, las representaciones del personaje gay en la novela colombiana de los primeros siete años del presente siglo. Fue posible reconocer en las representaciones, una serie de normas positivas y negativas que rigen la sexualidad y el género de los personajes, los cuales se encuentran inscritos en estructuras de poder y de subordinación basadas en dichas normas, impuestas o administradas a través de diversas estrategias. También se encontró, en mayor o menor medida, la presencia de estereotipos, creencias y atribuciones de causalidad, de las que se presenta una breve mención.

  11. Latino Gay and Bisexual Men’s Relationships with Non-Gay-Identified Men Who Have Sex With Men

    OpenAIRE

    Reisen, Carol A.; Zea, Maria Cecilia; Bianchi, Fernanda T.; Poppen, Paul J.; Shedlin, Michele G.; Penha, Marcelo Montes

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated relationships between Latino gay-identified men in metropolitan New York City and their non-gay-identified male partners. Phase 1 consisted of in-depth interviews (N = 33), and Phase 2 consisted of quantitative surveys (N = 120) with Brazilian, Colombian, and Dominican men who have sex with men (MSM). A majority of participants reported having had sex with heterosexually identified men, and in many cases, the relationship was sustained over time. We found mixed results...

  12. Ambivalent spaces--the emergence of a new gay male norm situated between notions of the commercial and the political in the Swedish gay press, 1969-1986.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertilsdotter Rosqvist, Hanna; Arnberg, Klara

    2015-01-01

    Within sexual geographies, sexual struggles over urban public spaces are frequently explored. Less common is research on sexual struggles within sexually shared spaces and gay spaces. The aim of the article is to examine discursive struggles of meanings of gay male identity enacted in discussions of commodification/capitalism, disclosure, and space in Swedish gay press during 1969-1986. We trace the ambivalent feelings or the emergence of a new gay male norm situated between commercialism and non-commercialism within the Swedish gay press back to the 1970s. In the article we show how a monosexualization process was taking place in both the Swedish gay press as well as within sexual spaces. We explore rhetorical struggles between two competing discursive meanings of (ideal homonormative) male homosexuality, gay culture, and space: one wider (inclusive) and one narrower (exclusive).

  13. To Your Health: NLM update transcript - Teen lesbian, gay, bisexual prevalence and health risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gay, and bisexual teens report they have attempted suicide compared to only about six percent of straight ... section of MedlinePlus.gov's gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender health topic page . The Nemours Foundation provides a ...

  14. Places for all? Cape Town’s public library services to gays and lesbians

    OpenAIRE

    Genevieve Hart; Ncumisa Mfazo

    2010-01-01

    The article reports on an investigation of the provision of gay and lesbian literature and of information services to gays and lesbians in Cape Town’s public libraries. Although by definition public libraries serve all members of a community, the international literature suggests that they neglect the reading and information needs and interests of gays and lesbians. The progressive South African Constitution views the rights of gays and lesbians as human rights; yet homophobia is prevalent. U...

  15. Sexual Identity Development among Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual Youths: Consistency and Change Over Time

    OpenAIRE

    Rosario, Margaret; Schrimshaw, Eric W.; Hunter, Joyce; Braun, Lisa

    2006-01-01

    A longitudinal report of 156 gay, lesbian, and bisexual youths examined changes in sexual identity over time. Fifty-seven percent of the youths remained consistently self-identified as gay/lesbian, 18% transited from bisexual to gay/lesbian, and 15% consistently identified as bisexual over time. Although youths who consistently identified as gay/lesbian did not differ from other youths on time since experiencing sexual developmental milestones, they reported current sexual orientation and sex...

  16. VISIBILIDADE GAY NA ESCOLA: ESTUDANTES QUEER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Ferraz da Silva

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Nesse artigo apresento as considerações e análises presentes na pesquisa em processo, que realizo numa escola pública. Sua constituição deve seu primeiro movimento às manifestações de desconforto e homofobia com relação a um grupo específico de três estudantes gays na comunidade escolar na qual atuo como professora. Percebo que a presença desse grupo desacomoda o cotidiano escolar e desenvolvo minha argumentação com base no potencial desestabilizador desses sujeitos, na intenção de pensar o impensável no currículo escolar. Esse trabalho parte da visibilidade de uma identidade sexual que foge à norma heterossexual e desafia a tendência normalizadora e homogeneizadora da educação. A maneira como esse grupo gay se posiciona e constrói seus corpos cruza as fronteiras do masculino/feminino, desnaturalizando as identidades sexuais e de gênero que se baseiam em características biológicas e se apresentando como diferença que escapa às classificações binárias. Na construção da pesquisa utilizo como referência o pensamento de Michel Foucault, especialmente com relação à construção histórica e discursiva de conceitos como sexualidade, identidade, diferença e normalidade que têm servido para criação e manutenção de padrões de conduta. Ao levar a problematização desses conceitos para o contexto escolar, considero produtiva a teorização queer para pensar a possibilidade de uma educação não heteronormativa, produtora de diferenças, que desconstrua identidades ao invés de tentar cristalizá-las.

  17. Sexualities on the Move: A Comparison of the Work Experiences of Gay Male Educators Teaching Overseas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizzi, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper expands on the extant research on gay male educators by comparing two research projects on such educators who taught in international settings. One study focused on five gay, male, adult educators who relocated to Canada from countries in the Global South and the second study focused on eight gay, male, adult educators who relocated to…

  18. How Organisational Culture Influences Teachers' Support of Openly Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Meghan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, I analyse the relationship between US high schools' organisational cultures and student perceptions of responses to anti-gay language in their school. Using data from 67 interviews with young people who identified as gay, lesbian or bisexual, I compare teachers' responses to anti-gay language in schools that do and schools that do…

  19. Relationship Preferences Among Gay and Lesbian Online Daters : Individual and Contextual Influences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potarca, Gina; Mills, Melinda; Neberich, Wiebke

    2015-01-01

    There is currently little knowledge about what gay men and lesbians seek in a romantic relationship. This study extends the literature on gay men and lesbians' partnership preferences by engaging in the first large-scale empirical study of the long-term dating intentions and monogamy beliefs of gay

  20. Relationship Preferences Among Gay and Lesbian Online Daters : Individual and Contextual Influences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potarca, Gina; Mills, Melinda; Neberich, Wiebke

    There is currently little knowledge about what gay men and lesbians seek in a romantic relationship. This study extends the literature on gay men and lesbians' partnership preferences by engaging in the first large-scale empirical study of the long-term dating intentions and monogamy beliefs of gay

  1. Teenage Queerness: Negotiating Heteronormativity in the Representation of Gay Teenagers in "Glee"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhaenens, Frederik

    2013-01-01

    Despite a significant increase in gay representation in contemporary television fiction, many media scholars argue that the representation of gay men and women is governed by heteronormativity. They postulate that even rounded and heterogeneous representations of gay men and women are characters that desire to participate in institutions,…

  2. Effects of the gay publishing boom on classes of titles retrieved under the subject headings "Homosexuality," "Gay Men," and "Gays" in the OCLC WorldCat database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, James V

    2002-01-01

    What do searchers find when they look for literature on homosexuality? This question has profound implications for older as well as younger gays in their coming out, as well as in their subsequent identity development. Library records provide credible data to answer the question, since they represent relatively free sources of information, unlike data from bookstores, publishers, and some World Wide Web sites. The records of WorldCat, the world's largest union database of library records, comprise over 30 million records listed in the Online Computer Library Center. For the purposes of the study, 18,757 records listed under "Homosexuality," "Gay Men," and "Gays" were downloaded; records for "Lesbian" and "Lesbians" were not examined. Findings of the study suggest that while there has indeed been considerable growth in terms of the quantity of gay literature produced since 1969, such gains may be offset by the deteriorating quality of cataloging copy, which makes the experience of browsing records a discouraging and confusing one.

  3. Structure, agency, and sexual development of Latino gay men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arreola, Sonya G; Ayala, George; Díaz, Rafael M; Kral, Alex H

    2013-01-01

    There is a high prevalence of childhood sexual abuse and HIV among Latino gay men, with limited proven HIV prevention interventions. This study used qualitative methods to explicate earlier findings showing differential health outcomes among Latino gay men who had no sex, voluntary, or forced sex before age 16. Analyses of in-depth interviews with 27 Latino gay men revealed that structural factors in childhood contribute to their developing sexuality by enhancing or inhibiting a sense of agency. Agency is essential for making decisions that are in line with their intentions to have healthy sexual lives. Findings suggest that interventions should focus on developing a sense of sexual agency among Latino gay men by (a) increasing their recognition of structural factors that contribute to feelings of worthlessness in order to relocate internalized blame and homophobia to external structural forces, (b) facilitating awareness of the social structural oppressions that lead to psychological and sexual risk in order to enhance their options for sexual health, and (c) shifting from individually focused constructions of sexual health to those that consider the structural factors that reduce agency and contribute to diminished sexual health among Latino gay men.

  4. Attitudes toward Lesbians and Gays among American and Dutch Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Kate L.; Horn, Stacey S.; Bos, Henny M. W.; Sandfort, Theo G. M.

    2014-01-01

    Attitudes toward lesbians and gays vary across national populations, and previous research has found relatively more accepting attitudes in the Netherlands as compared to the U.S. In this study, we compared beliefs about and attitudes toward lesbians and gays in samples of Dutch and American heterosexual adolescents, utilizing survey data from 1,080 American adolescents (mean age = 15.86 years) attending two schools and from 1,391 Dutch adolescents (mean age = 16.27 years) attending eight schools. Findings indicated the Dutch participants were more tolerant of lesbians and gays, after adjusting for the gender, age, and racial/ethnic minority status of the participants. However, between-country differences were attenuated by accounting for the beliefs about lesbians and gays that participants used to justify their attitudes. American participants were more likely to justify their attitudes using beliefs related to social norms and religious opposition, while the Dutch participants were more likely to justify their attitudes using beliefs related to individual rights and the biological/genetic basis of homosexuality. The results suggest that the relative importance of particular beliefs about lesbians and gays to attitudes at the group level may be context-dependent but also that certain beliefs are salient to attitudes across national contexts. PMID:24512056

  5. Les commerces gays et le processus de gentrification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Giraud

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Interrogeant le rôle des populations homosexuelles dans la gentrification d’un ancien quartier historique de Paris (celui du Marais, cet article aborde cette question dans sa dimension commerciale. Depuis le début des années 80, l’implantation de commerces gays dans ce secteur a accompagné les effets de la gentrification et les a même accélérés pour partie depuis les années 90. Aujourd’hui cependant, la relation entre cette présence commerciale spécifique et les transformations socio-économiques de ce quartier parisien apparaissent nettement plus ambigus.In this paper, we examinate the role of gay men towards gentrification and urban renaissance by focusing on gay business development in “Le Marais”. We demonstrate that, in this old neighbourhood of the city-center, the emergence of a gay commercial area has supported gentrification during the eighties and then contributed to the urban, economical and cultural renaissance. The historical link between gentrification and “gay spaces” has changed and became since a few years more and more diversified.

  6. Decomposing trends in attitudes toward gay marriage, 1988–2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baunach, Dawn Michelle

    2011-01-01

    Objective. The objective of this article is to examine the trend in attitudes toward gay marriage through the analysis of data from the General Social Survey. Methods. Using linear decomposition techniques, I explain the change in attitudes toward gay marriage from 1988 to 2006. Results. Attitudes significantly liberalized over time; 71 percent opposed gay marriage in 1988, but by 2006, this figure dropped to 52 percent. Approximately two-thirds of this change was due to an intracohort change effect, or individuals' modifying their views over time, and one-third was due to a cohort succession effect, or later cohorts replacing earlier ones. This pattern was replicated across many subgroups of the U.S. public, including age, sex, residential, educational, and religious groups. Conclusion. The results suggest that the use of the “equality/tolerance” framing of gay marriage by its supporters and other societal events or “moments” may have convinced some people who used to disapprove of gay marriage in 1988 to approve of it by 2006.

  7. Attributions for sexual orientation vs. stereotypes : How beliefs about value violations account for attribution effects on anti-gay discrimination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reyna, Christine; Wetherell, Geoffrey; Yantis, Caitlyn; Brandt, Mark J.

    Attributions for sexual orientation strongly predict opposition to gay rights policies; however, we propose that beliefs that gays and lesbians violate important values drive gay rights opposition and account for the relationship between attributions and anti-gay discrimination. In two studies, we

  8. Development of a lesbian, gay, bisexual visibility management scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasser, Jon; Ryser, Gail R; Price, Larry R

    2010-01-01

    Many lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) individuals manage the degree to which their sexual orientation is known to others. Visibility management, the process of regulating the exposure of one's orientation, is an important part of the lesbian/gay/bisexual experience in community, family, and virtually all other social settings. The degree to which one allows his or her sexual orientation to be visible can have a profound impact on stress, health, self-esteem, interpersonal relationships, and quality of life. The purpose of the present study was to develop a valid and reliable measure of visibility management. The Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual-Visibility Management Scale was constructed and piloted with a small sample of LGB adults. Results support the potential utility of the LGB scale based on satisfactory evidence of construct validity, item-level discrimination, and subscale reliability.

  9. Sexual problems in gay men: an overview of empirical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandfort, T G; de Keizer, M

    2001-01-01

    This article summarizes the findings and theoretical perspectives of 19 empirical studies of sexual problems in gay men. In order to understand these problems better, various differences between male homosexual and heterosexual functioning are discussed first. The studies included differ widely in terms of the issues explored, the populations studied, and the way data have been collected. In a few studies, researchers generally have looked at the prevalence and experience of sexual problems. In other studies, researchers have focused on the etiology and treatment of specific problems, such as sexual desire disorders, sexual aversion, excitement and arousal problems, orgasm disorders, sexual pain disorders and sexual compulsivity. Overall it is surprising how little is known about these problems in gay men. This is also true, however, for same-sex sexuality in general. Suggestions are made for studies that will enable us to obtain a better understanding of sexual problems in gay men.

  10. A Minority Stress Model for Suicidal Ideation in Gay Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaels, Matthew S; Parent, Mike C; Torrey, Carrie L

    2016-02-01

    There is a dearth of research on mechanisms underlying higher rates of suicidal ideation among gay men compared to heterosexual men. The purpose of this study was to establish the link between social/psychological predictor variables and suicidal ideation by testing a hypothesized minority stress model. Structural equation modeling was used to assess the relationships posited in the model using data from a community sample of 167 gay men. Model fit was adequate and hypothesized relationships were partially supported. Also, depressive symptoms partially mediated the relationship between (less) outness predicting suicidal ideation. These findings imply that therapeutic approaches targeting the coming out process may be more effective than approaches targeting internalized homophobia when suicidal ideation is indicated in the clinical presentation of gay and bisexual men.

  11. The relationships between sense of belonging to the gay community, body image dissatisfaction, and self-esteem among Australian gay men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kousari-Rad, Pantea; McLaren, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    Body image dissatisfaction has been linked to belonging to the gay community and poor self-esteem among gay men. This study was designed to explore the applicability of a moderation model and a mediation model in explaining the relations between sense of belonging to the gay community, body image dissatisfaction and self-esteem among 90 self-identified Australian gay men. Participants completed the psychological subscale of the Sense of Belonging Instrument, the Body Satisfaction Scale, and the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. Results supported the moderation model; the relation between body image dissatisfaction and self-esteem was found to be statistically significant only at average and high levels of belonging to the gay community. The mediation model was also supported; body image dissatisfaction partially mediated the sense of belonging-self-esteem relation. Educating gay men and health professionals about the possible negative outcomes of "belonging" to an appearance-oriented community is important.

  12. Marriage and family therapists' comfort working with lesbian and gay male clients: the influence of religious practices and support for lesbian and gay male human rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Mary S; Murphy, Megan J; Blumer, Markie L C

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore potential influences on marriage and family therapists' comfort level when working with lesbian and gay male clients, including sex, age, race, sexual orientation, political orientation, religious practices of the therapist, as well as the level of support for lesbian and gay male human rights. Participants in this study were 199 experienced therapists. Results indicated that higher levels of religious practices were related to lower levels of support for lesbian and gay male human rights and to lower levels of comfort working with lesbian and gay male clients. When support for lesbian and gay male human rights was considered, the level of religious practices was no longer predictive of comfort working with lesbian and gay male clients.

  13. Predictors of parenting stress among gay adoptive fathers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornello, Samantha L; Farr, Rachel H; Patterson, Charlotte J

    2011-08-01

    The authors examined correlates of parenting stress among 230 gay adoptive fathers across the United States through an Internet survey. As with previous research on adoptive parents, results showed that fathers with less social support, older children, and children who were adopted at older ages reported more parenting stress. Moreover, gay fathers who had a less positive gay identity also reported more parenting stress. These 4 variables accounted for 33% of the variance in parenting stress; effect sizes were medium to large. Our results suggest the importance of social support and a positive gay identity in facilitating successful parenting outcomes among gay adoptive fathers.

  14. Polymorphous prejudice: liberating the measurement of heterosexuals' attitudes toward lesbians and gay men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Sean G

    2009-01-01

    A multidimensional measure of sexual prejudice was developed to assess the increasing complexity of heterosexuals' attitudes toward gay men and lesbians. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses revealed a valid and reliable 7-factor measure that assessed: 1) traditional heterosexism; 2) tendency to deny anti-gay discrimination continues; 3) aversion toward gay men; 4) aversion to lesbians; 5) judgments regarding the value of the gay and lesbian movement; 6) resistance to heteronormative expectations; and 7) endorsement of positive beliefs about gay people. A modern heterosexism theory was supported and queer/liberationist notions of anti-heteronormativity and positive beliefs were found to be related to pro-homosexual attitudes.

  15. Attitudinal and individual differences influence perceptions of mock child sexual assault cases involving gay defendants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Tisha R A; Bottoms, Bette L

    2013-01-01

    Many people hold negative attitudes and stereotypes about gay men, including the stereotype that gay men are likely to be child molesters. This article explored the implications of this stereotype for judgments made in a hypothetical legal case involving child sexual abuse accusations against a male teacher by either a male or female victim. Mock jurors who held the most anti-gay attitudes and those who endorsed the stereotype of gay men as child molesters made the most pro-prosecution judgments in scenarios involving gay defendants. A new scale (the Stereotypes about Gays and Child Abuse scale) was developed to assess the extent to which participants endorsed the stereotype of gay men as being likely to sexually abuse children. This scale was a stronger predictor of case judgments than existing, more general scales measuring biases against homosexuality.

  16. ‘The Ties that Bind Us’: The Hidden Knots of Gay Marriage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bronwyn Winter

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Gay marriage has become a major transnational gay rights issue: a key marker of gay citizenship, to the extent that it is considered self-evident that its legalisation represents progress. Yet it is becoming apparent that this ‘progress’ is concurrent with other forms of exclusion. In this article, I argue that gay marriage is a convenient liberal smokescreen, leaving other exclusions unaddressed or even enabling their reinforcement. The discussion involves examination of three case studies: Argentina, the first Latin American country to legalise gay marriage in 2010; France, which legalised gay marriage in May, 2013; and Australia, which has not legalised gay marriage at the time of this writing.

  17. Visibilidade gay na escola: estudantes queer / Gay visibility in school: queer students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Ferraz da Silva

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Nesse artigo apresento as considerações e análises presentes na pesquisa em processo, que realizo numa escola pública. Sua constituição deve seu primeiro movimento àsmanifestações de desconforto e homofobia com relação a um grupo específico de três estudantes gays na comunidade escolar na qual atuo como professora. Percebo que a presença desse grupo desacomoda o cotidiano escolar e desenvolvo minha argumentação com base no potencial desestabilizador desses sujeitos, na intenção de pensar o impensável no currículo escolar. Esse trabalho parte da visibilidade de uma identidade sexual que foge à norma heterossexual e desafia a tendência normalizadora e homogeneizadora da educação. A maneira como esse grupo gay se posiciona e constrói seus corpos cruza as fronteiras do masculino/feminino, desnaturalizando as identidadessexuais e de gênero que se baseiam em características biológicas e se apresentando como diferença que escapa às classificações binárias. Na construção da pesquisa utilizo como referência o pensamento de Michel Foucault, especialmente com relação à construção histórica e discursiva de conceitos como sexualidade, identidade, diferença enormalidade que têm servido para criação e manutenção de padrões de conduta. Ao levar a problematização desses conceitos para o contexto escolar, considero produtiva a teorização queer para pensar a possibilidade de uma educação não heteronormativa, produtora de diferenças, que desconstrua identidades ao invés de tentar cristalizá-las.Abstract This article presents the considerations and analysis that make part of my research in process in a public school. The construction of this research dues its first move to viewsof discomfort and homofobia related to a specific group of three gay students in a school where I work as a teacher. I realize that the presence of that group disarrenges the school quotidian and I develop my argumentation on the

  18. Children and Adolescents of Lesbian and Gay Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telingator, Cynthia J.; Patterson, Charlotte; Jellinek, Michael S.; Henderson, Schuyler W.

    2008-01-01

    Different pathways to parenthood exist for lesbians and gay men, including adoption and sperm or egg donation. Data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health showed few differences in terms of adjustment between adolescents living with opposite-sex couples and those living with same-sex couples. Recommendations for clinical work…

  19. Attitudes toward Gay Marriage in States Undergoing Marriage Law Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumbaugh, Stacey M.; Sanchez, Laura A.; Nock, Steven L.; Wright, James D.

    2008-01-01

    This study examines attitudes toward gay marriage within the context of concern over the weakening of heterosexual marriage. We use data from a three-state survey conducted in 1998 - 2000 and designed to explore attitudes toward marriage and divorce reform (N = 976). We find that women, Whites, and younger persons are more approving of gay…

  20. Condomless Sex: Gay Men, Barebacking, and Harm Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shernoff, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Social science research as well as a rise in sexually transmitted diseases and new HIV infections among men who have sex with men point to increasing numbers of gay men engaging in unprotected anal intercourse without condoms, a practice called "barebacking." There is some evidence that barebacking is linked to the rise of crystal methamphetamine…

  1. Gay Men Less Likely to Have Safe Sex Now: Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Map FAQs Customer Support Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Latest Health News → Article URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163561.html Gay Men Less Likely to Have Safe Sex Now: Survey Better treatments may translate into complacency, ...

  2. Lavoisier Preempted Gay-Lussac by 20 Years!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laing, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Lavoisier showed that water was formed by chemical reaction between hydrogen and oxygen. In Lavoisier's "Traite Elementaire" of 1789, he states that the reaction to form water requires exactly two volumes of hydrogen gas to react completely with one volume of oxygen gas. This was 20 years before Gay-Lussac studied the reactions between different…

  3. Dating violence experiences of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dank, Meredith; Lachman, Pamela; Zweig, Janine M; Yahner, Jennifer

    2014-05-01

    Media attention and the literature on lesbian, gay, and bisexual youth overwhelmingly focus on violence involving hate crimes and bullying, while ignoring the fact that vulnerable youth also may be at increased risk of violence in their dating relationships. In this study, we examine physical, psychological, sexual, and cyber dating violence experiences among lesbian, gay, and bisexual youth--as compared to those of heterosexual youth, and we explore variations in the likelihood of help-seeking behavior and the presence of particular risk factors among both types of dating violence victims. A total of 5,647 youth (51 % female, 74 % White) from 10 schools participated in a cross-sectional anonymous survey, of which 3,745 reported currently being in a dating relationship or having been in one during the prior year. Results indicated that lesbian, gay, and bisexual youth are at higher risk for all types of dating violence victimization (and nearly all types of dating violence perpetration), compared to heterosexual youth. Further, when looking at gender identity, transgender and female youth are at highest risk of most types of victimization, and are the most likely perpetrators of all forms of dating violence but sexual coercion, which begs further exploration. The findings support the development of dating violence prevention programs that specifically target the needs and vulnerabilities of lesbian, gay, and bisexual youth, in addition to those of female and transgender youth.

  4. Informal Mentoring for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulcahy, Molly; Dalton, Sarah; Kolbert, Jered; Crothers, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The authors identified the process that 10 lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) high school students used to establish an informal adult-mentor relationship with a school personnel member. Five major themes emerged: (a) how LGBT students determined whether this person would be a safe mentor, (b) a listing of the important qualities of…

  5. HIV among African American Gay and Bisexual Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention VIH En Español Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... Email Updates on HIV Syndicated Content Website Feedback HIV Among African American Gay and Bisexual Men Format: ...

  6. Sexual Addiction and the Internet: Implications for Gay Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dew, Brian J.; Chaney, Michael P.

    2004-01-01

    The authors present an overview of sexual addiction and explore the relationship between Internet use and sexual compulsivity. The role of Internet use in gay men's sexual behavior is described. Implications for the counseling profession are discussed, and a clinical case study is presented.

  7. Career Construction with a Gay Client: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maree, Jacobus Gideon

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on the value of career construction counselling (CCC) with a gay person. The participant was selected purposively, with the selection criteria calling for a mid-career woman who had sought career counselling. The intervention involved administration of the "Career Construction Interview" (CCI) and the creation of a…

  8. Spiritual Borderlands: A Black Gay Male College Student's Spiritual Journey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Means, Darris R.; Jaeger, Audrey J.

    2015-01-01

    This case study explored the spiritual journey and spaces of one Black gay male college student. Data collection included semi-structured interviews, field observations, and photovoice. Findings indicate that the student experienced tension during his spiritual journey because of his racial and sexual orientation identities but was able to…

  9. Victimization and suicidality among Dutch lesbian, gay, and bisexual youths

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bergen, D.D.; Bos, H.M.W.; van Lisdonk, J.; Keuzenkamp, S.; Sandfort, T.G.M.

    2013-01-01

    We examined Netherlands Institute for Social Research data, collected between May and August 2009, on 274 Dutch lesbian, gay, and bisexual youths. The data showed that victimization at school was associated with suicidal ideation and actual suicide attempts. Homophobic rejection by parents was also

  10. Victimization and Suicidality Among Dutch Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Youths

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bergen, Diana; Bos, Henny M.W.; van Lisdonk, jantine; Keuzenkamp, S; Sandfort, T.G.M

    2013-01-01

    We examined Netherlands Institute for Social Research data, collected between May and August 2009, on 274 Dutch lesbian, gay, and bisexual youths. The data showed that victimization at school was associated with suicidal ideation and actual suicide attempts. Homophobic rejection by parents was also

  11. Career Construction with a Gay Client: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maree, Jacobus Gideon

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on the value of career construction counselling (CCC) with a gay person. The participant was selected purposively, with the selection criteria calling for a mid-career woman who had sought career counselling. The intervention involved administration of the "Career Construction Interview" (CCI) and the creation of a…

  12. Sexuality Related Social Support among Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, Nathan Daniel; Willoughby, Brian L. B.; Lindahl, Kristin M.; Malik, Neena M.

    2010-01-01

    Lesbian, gay, and bisexual ("LGB") youth may face significant stressors related to their sexual orientation. Few studies, however, have examined youth's experiences of support for coping with these stressors. The current study compared LGB youth's perceptions of support for sexuality stress to their support for other types of problems. The links…

  13. On a problem of Berenstein-Gay and its generalizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volchkov, Valerii V; Volchkov, Vitaly V [Donetsk National University, Donetsk (Ukraine)

    2010-09-07

    We obtain a solution of the Berenstein-Gay problem on the local analogue of spectral analysis on Riemannian symmetric spaces X of rank 1. The proof is based on constructing transmutation maps connected with eigenfunction expansions of the Laplace-Beltrami operator on X.

  14. A Study of Young Lesbian and Gay People's School Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Kathryn

    2010-01-01

    This retrospective study used Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) to explore young lesbian and gay (LG) people's experiences of school in relation to their sexuality and their perceptions of how schools could be inclusive for young LG people. Participants were in the age range of 16 to 21 and provided insights into coping strategies,…

  15. The discourse of liberation: Frames used in characterising the gay ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kate H

    referred to as “AIDS frames”); the role of gender norms in forming attitudes towards same-sex attraction ... (hereafter referred to as “equality frames”); the legalisation of gay marriage (hereafter referred ..... Europe and the United States. Annual ...

  16. Helping Gay and Lesbian Students Integrate Sexual and Religious Identities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayne, Hannah Barnhill

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the impact of sexual and religious identity on college student development, examining developmental models and discussing how counselors can assist gay and lesbian students with integrating these 2 personal identities. Treatment approaches are presented, and the article concludes with an examination of ethical and…

  17. The Complexities of Workplace Experience for Lesbian and Gay Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferfolja, Tania; Hopkins, Lucy

    2013-01-01

    Discrimination against lesbians and gay men has been endemic throughout Australia's history. However, in twenty-first century Australian society there are signs of growing sophistication and acceptance of sexual diversities. Despite this, schools continue to be organisations where sexual "difference" is marginalised and silenced, having…

  18. Differences between Partners from Heterosexual, Gay, and Lesbian Cohabiting Couples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurdek, Lawrence A.

    2006-01-01

    Partners from four types of couples without children (gay unmarried, lesbian unmarried, heterosexual unmarried, and heterosexual married, Ns=1,412, 1,310, 1,036, and 1,728, respectively) were compared to partners from heterosexual married couples with children ("N"= 3,116) on mean levels of variables from a model of relationship adjustment as well…

  19. Preservice Elementary Teachers' Attitudes Toward Gay and Lesbian Parenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maney, Dolores W.; Cain, Richard E.

    1997-01-01

    This study assessed preservice elementary teachers' attitudes toward homosexual parents and their children. Surveys of 198 preservice teachers who completed the Gay and Lesbian Parenting Questionnaire indicated that some homophobia existed, though less than expected. Females had significantly more favorable attitudes toward homosexual parents and…

  20. Sexuality Related Social Support among Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, Nathan Daniel; Willoughby, Brian L. B.; Lindahl, Kristin M.; Malik, Neena M.

    2010-01-01

    Lesbian, gay, and bisexual ("LGB") youth may face significant stressors related to their sexual orientation. Few studies, however, have examined youth's experiences of support for coping with these stressors. The current study compared LGB youth's perceptions of support for sexuality stress to their support for other types of problems. The links…

  1. Heterogenous Couples in Heterosexual Marriages: Gay Men and Straight Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozett, Frederick W.

    1982-01-01

    Focuses on the spousal relationship of gay men who had been married. Describes the man's disclosure of his homosexuality, the wife's response, and the interactional effects on the marriage relationship. Suggests the wife appeared to be an enabler of his transition to a homosexual life-style. (Author/JAC)

  2. Suicidal Behavior in Adolescent and Young Adult Gay Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Stephen G.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Explored relationship of homosexuality to suicidal behavior by questionnaire responses from 52 men in gay and lesbian college organizations and 56 men in homosexual rap groups. Family background of alcoholism and physical abuse, social supports perceived as rejecting homosexuality, and no religious affiliation were associated with history of…

  3. GAY RELATIONSHIPS AS ALTERNATIVE FORMS OF FAMILY-MARRIAGE LIFE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Perlińska

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available My research and deliberation made in this study show that homosexuality is only one of the signs of human diversity - one from innumerable number of personality features. Therefore, one cannot talk about "gay identity", "homosexual personality", because, as far as I am concerned, it doesn't exist. Artificially generted gay population is only a group of peple being much different from one another and having only one common feature - their sexual orientation. Besides they differ from one another as much as one man from another. Gay relationships take on countless forms, but all of them, as the results of my research indicate, fulfil the majority of family in traditional point of view functions. The deliberation points out at one more conclusion - one cannot examine gay relationships as a separate model of family-marriage life. It should be forgotten about their different psyhosexual orientation and treat their trlationships, together with other interpersonal relationships, equally. Only from such position one can discern in their specific alternative models of family-marriage life.

  4. The construction of men who are nurses as gay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Thomas

    2007-12-01

    This paper is a report of a study to examine the construction of the stereotype of male nurses as gay, and to describe how this discourse impacts on a group of New Zealand male nurses. A discourse stereotyping male nurses as gay is accompanied by one which privileges hegemonic masculinity and marginalizes homosexuality. This social constructionist study drew on data collected from existing texts on men, nursing and masculinity and interviews with 18 New Zealand men conducted in 2003-2004. Discourse analysis, informed by masculinity theory and queer theory, was used to analyse the data. Despite the participants' beliefs that the majority of male nurses are heterosexual, the stereotype persists. A paradox emerged between the 'homosexual' general nurse and the 'heterosexual' psychiatric nurse. The stigma associated with homosexuality exposes male nurses to homophobia in the workplace. The heterosexual men employed strategies to avoid the presumption of homosexuality; these included: avoiding contact with gay colleagues and overt expression of their heterosexuality. There is a paradox between widespread calls for men to participate more in caring and discourses which stereotype male nurses as gay and conflate homosexuality and sexual predation. These stigmatizing discourses create a barrier to caring and, aligned with the presence of homophobia in the workplace, deter men's entry into the profession and may be important issues with respect to their retention. Nurse educators must ensure that nurses are able to resist collusion with stigmatizing discourses that marginalize men (and women) in the profession through the perpetration of gender and sexual stereotypes.

  5. The Complexities of Workplace Experience for Lesbian and Gay Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferfolja, Tania; Hopkins, Lucy

    2013-01-01

    Discrimination against lesbians and gay men has been endemic throughout Australia's history. However, in twenty-first century Australian society there are signs of growing sophistication and acceptance of sexual diversities. Despite this, schools continue to be organisations where sexual "difference" is marginalised and silenced, having…

  6. Dr. Geneva Gay: Multicultural Education for All Disciplines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwater, Mary M.

    2010-01-01

    This feature is an interview of Professor Geneva Gay, a leader and expert in multicultural education, especially multicultural curriculum. She graciously consented to a telephone interview, which was recorded. The interview was then transcribed by a professional; this feature is the result of that interview.

  7. Homosexuality in the Family: Lesbian and Gay Spouses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyers, Norman L.

    1987-01-01

    Reviews a 1983-84 study of the marital and parental behavior of lesbian wives and mothers and gay husbands and fathers. Discovered differences between the men and women in: overall demographics, marital history, marital problems and their impact, parenting issues, and dealing with homosexuality. (Author/ABB)

  8. Differences between Partners from Heterosexual, Gay, and Lesbian Cohabiting Couples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurdek, Lawrence A.

    2006-01-01

    Partners from four types of couples without children (gay unmarried, lesbian unmarried, heterosexual unmarried, and heterosexual married, Ns=1,412, 1,310, 1,036, and 1,728, respectively) were compared to partners from heterosexual married couples with children ("N"= 3,116) on mean levels of variables from a model of relationship adjustment as well…

  9. Attitudes toward Gay Marriage in States Undergoing Marriage Law Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumbaugh, Stacey M.; Sanchez, Laura A.; Nock, Steven L.; Wright, James D.

    2008-01-01

    This study examines attitudes toward gay marriage within the context of concern over the weakening of heterosexual marriage. We use data from a three-state survey conducted in 1998 - 2000 and designed to explore attitudes toward marriage and divorce reform (N = 976). We find that women, Whites, and younger persons are more approving of gay…

  10. Odd Couples : A History of Gay Marriage in Scandinavia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rydström, Jens

    2011-01-01

    Odd Couples. A History of Gay Marriage in Scandinavia is het eerste omvangrijke boek over de geschiedenis van het geregistreerd partnerschap en het homohuwelijk in Scandinavië. Dit boek presenteert een grondig onderzoek naar de wisselwerking tussen het homoactivisme en traditionele partijpolitiek.

  11. Groups for the Wives of Gay and Bisexual Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auerback, Sandra; Moser, Charles

    1987-01-01

    Found groups for wives of gay and bisexual men to be an effective therapeutic intervention for the problems that arise when a husband makes a disclosure to his wife that he is interested in pursuing homosexual relationships. The groups helped wives resolve the issues of the marriage and to make positive changes in their lives. (Author)

  12. Parents Awareness of Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Youths Sexual Orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daugelli, Anthony R.; Grossman, Arnold H.; Starks, Michael T.

    2005-01-01

    This study used a sample of 293 lesbian, gay, and bisexual youth to examine factors that differentiated youth whose parents knew of their sexual orientation from youth whose parents did not know. Earlier awareness and disclosure of same-gender attractions, greater childhood gender atypicality, and less internalized homophobia were characteristic…

  13. Teaching Literature Gay-Affirmatively: A Homosexual Individuation Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadownick, Douglas G.

    2007-01-01

    This article explores the possibility of a "homosexual hermeneutic" by which the great literary works of the western canon can be taught. This "interpretative methodology" is based in the author's own individuation process as gay. The author details his personal journey from engulfment in heteronormativity to the first crisis of his homosexual…

  14. Dual Minority Stress and Asian American Gay Men's Psychological Distress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yung-Chi; Tryon, Georgiana Shick

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated the direct and additive effects of racial minority stress and sexual minority stress on the psychological well-being among a community sample of 139 Asian American gay men. Self-esteem was tested to see whether it moderated or mediated the effects of perceived dual minority stress on psychological distress. Results…

  15. Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender and Questioning Youth Matter!

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Kathleen A.

    2009-01-01

    This brief presents general trends in the social and emotional well-being of youth who identify as Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, and Questioning (GLBTQ), followed by a guide of sexual orientation definitions. Additionally, readers learn a series of steps that schools must address in order to build inclusive, safe, and effective schools for…

  16. Toward an Affirmative Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Leadership Paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassinger, Ruth E.; Shullman, Sandra L.; Stevenson, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents an affirmative paradigm for understanding the leadership of sexual minorities--that is, lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people. Although research on LGBT issues in leadership to date is almost nonexistent, there are several bodies of literature that can contribute to an understanding of the unique leadership…

  17. Service Accessibility for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Questioning Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo-Polakovich, Ignacio David; Bell, Bailey; Gamache, Peter; Christian, Allison S.

    2013-01-01

    Although Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and/or Questioning (LGBTQ) youth experience alarming rates of behavioral and social problems, service use among these youth is disproportionately low. It is likely that decreased service accessibility plays a causal role in service underutilization among LGBTQ youth. To expand the existing…

  18. Suicidal Behavior in Adolescent and Young Adult Gay Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Stephen G.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Explored relationship of homosexuality to suicidal behavior by questionnaire responses from 52 men in gay and lesbian college organizations and 56 men in homosexual rap groups. Family background of alcoholism and physical abuse, social supports perceived as rejecting homosexuality, and no religious affiliation were associated with history of…

  19. Coming Out Resilient: Strategies To Help Gay and Lesbian Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuBeau, Tania; Emenheiser, David E.

    1999-01-01

    Focuses on ways that adolescents discover their sexual identity and how individuals and programs can foster resilience in gay/lesbian youth and make a positive difference in their lives. Highlights strategies related to school environment, community resources, school resources, curriculum and organizational policies to implement at specific stages…

  20. Heterogenous Couples in Heterosexual Marriages: Gay Men and Straight Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozett, Frederick W.

    1982-01-01

    Focuses on the spousal relationship of gay men who had been married. Describes the man's disclosure of his homosexuality, the wife's response, and the interactional effects on the marriage relationship. Suggests the wife appeared to be an enabler of his transition to a homosexual life-style. (Author/JAC)

  1. Relationship dynamics around depression in gay and lesbian couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomeer, Mieke Beth; Reczek, Corinne; Umberson, Debra

    2015-12-01

    Research on intimate relationship dynamics around depression has primarily focused on heterosexual couples. This body of work shows that wives are more likely than husbands to offer support to a depressed spouse. Moreover, when wives are depressed, they are more likely than husbands to try and shield their spouse from the stress of their own depression. Yet, previous research has not examined depression and relationship dynamics in gay and lesbian couples. We analyze in-depth interviews with 26 gay and lesbian couples (N = 52 individuals) in which one or both partners reported depression. We find evidence that dominant gender scripts are both upheld and challenged within gay and lesbian couples, providing important insight into how gender operates in relation to depression within same-sex contexts. Our results indicate that most gay and lesbian partners offer support to a depressed partner, yet lesbian couples tend to follow a unique pattern in that they provide support both as the non-depressed and depressed partner. Support around depression is sometimes viewed as improving the relationship, but if the support is intensive or rejected, it is often viewed as contributing to relationship strain. Support is also sometimes withdrawn by the non-depressed partner because of caregiver exhaustion or the perception that the support is unhelpful. This study points to the importance of considering depression within gay and lesbian relational contexts, revealing new ways support sustains and strains intimate partnerships. We emphasize the usefulness of deploying couple-level approaches to better understand depression in sexual minority populations.

  2. Methamphetamine use among gay and bisexual men in Australia : Trends in recent and regular use from the Gay Community Periodic Surveys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lea, Toby; Mao, Limin; Hopwood, Max; Prestage, Garrett; Zablotska, Iryna; de Wit, John; Holt, Martin

    BACKGROUND: Gay and bisexual men typically report high rates of illicit drug use, including methamphetamine use. This paper aimed to analyse trends in crystal methamphetamine ('crystal') and powder methamphetamine ('speed') use among gay and bisexual men in Australia, and characterise the

  3. Gay-Straight Alliances: Understanding Their Impact on the Academic and Social Experiences of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Questioning High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Adam; Schmidt, Kathryn; Clifton, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have examined the effectiveness of gay-straight alliances (GSAs) on the social and academic experiences of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) youths. The limited research on GSAs suggests that they are associated with positive youth development and increased safety; however, little qualitative information…

  4. Hepatitis vaccination of men who have sex with men at gay pride events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storholm, Erik David; Fisher, Dennis G; Reynolds, Grace L; Napper, Lucy E; Morrisse, Timothy A; Kochems, Lee M

    2010-06-01

    Prevention researchers have advocated primary prevention such as vaccination in alternative venues. However, there have been major questions about both the attendance of, and the ability to, vaccinate high-risk individuals in such settings. The current study seeks to assess the feasibility of vaccinating high-risk men who have sex with men (MSM) at Gay Pride events. The research questions are: Do gay men who are sampled at Gay Pride events engage in more or less risky behavior than gay men sampled at other venues? Do the gay men who receive hepatitis vaccinations at Gay Pride engage in more or less risky behavior than gay men at Gay Pride who do not receive hepatitis vaccination? Of the 3689 MSM that completed the Field Risk Assessment (FRA), 1095/3689 = 29.68% were recruited at either the 2006 or 2007 Long Beach, California Gay Pride events. The remaining, 2594/3689 = 70.32% were recruited at Long Beach gay bars, gay community organizations and institutions, and through street recruitment in various gay enclaves in the Long Beach area. Logistic regression analysis yielded eight factors that were associated with non-attendance of Gay Pride: Age, had sex while high in the last 12 months, had unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) in the last 12 months, had sex for drugs/money in the last 12 months, been diagnosed with a sexually transmitted infection (STI) in the last 12 months, used nitrites (poppers) in the last 12 months, and used methamphetamine in the last 12 months. Identifying as White, Asian, or African American compared to Hispanic was also associated with non-attendance. Bivariate analysis indicated that, of the MSM sampled at Gay Pride, 280/1095 = 25.57% received a hepatitis vaccination there. The MSM sampled at Gay Pride who reported engaging in UAI or having used any stimulant (cocaine, crack-cocaine, or methamphetamine) in the last 12 months were more likely to receive hepatitis vaccination on-site. The results provide evidence for the viability of

  5. Just Kill Me When I’m 50: Impact of Gay American Culture on Young Gay Men’s Perceptions of Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rob Jay Fredericksen

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Young gay men’s negative perceptions of growing older have been indicated in prior research [Bergling, 2004; Jones & Pugh, 2005; Cohler & Galatzer-Levy, 2000]. A recent resurgence of HIV infection rates among young gay men [Mitsch et al, 2008] calls into question whether these negative perceptions contribute to a lack of future-oriented health investments; i.e., a “live for now” outlook. Strength of future orientation has repeatedly predicted risk aversion [McCabe & Barnett, 2000], hence, it is of great social and public health value to ask: what does aging mean to today’s youngest generation of gay men? How do cultural norms in the gay community inform how today’s young gay men imagine growing older? This research explores these questions.

  6. Community Cleavages: Gay and Bisexual Men's Perceptions of Gay and Mainstream Community Acceptance in the Post-AIDS, Post-Rights Era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Nathaniel M; Bauer, Greta R; Coleman, Todd A; Blot, Soraya; Pugh, Daniel; Fraser, Meredith; Powell, Leanne

    2015-01-01

    Changes in gay and bisexual men's connectedness to the gay community are related to the declining public visibility of HIV/AIDS and greater acceptance for homosexuality and bisexuality in mainstream society. Little work, however, has focused on perceived acceptance for subgroups within the gay community or broader society. Using interviews (n = 20) and a survey (n = 202) of gay and bisexual men in a mid-sized Canadian city, we find perceived hierarchies of acceptance for the various subgroups as well as an age effect wherein middle-aged men perceive the least acceptance for all groups. These differences are linked with the uneven impact of social, political, and institutional changes relevant to gay and bisexual men in Canada.

  7. Community Cleavages: Gay and Bisexual Men’s Perceptions of Gay and Mainstream Community Acceptance in the Post-AIDS, Post-Rights Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Nathaniel M.; Bauer, Greta R.; Coleman, Todd A.; Blot, Soraya; Pugh, Daniel; Fraser, Meredith; Powell, Leanne

    2015-01-01

    Changes in gay and bisexual men’s connectedness to the gay community are related to the declining public visibility of HIV/AIDS and greater acceptance for homosexuality and bisexuality in mainstream society. Little work, however, has focused on perceived acceptance for subgroups within the gay community or broader society. Using interviews (n = 20) and a survey (n = 202) of gay and bisexual men in a mid-sized Canadian city, we find perceived hierarchies of acceptance for the various subgroups as well as an age effect wherein middle-aged men perceive the least acceptance for all groups. These differences are linked with the uneven impact of social, political, and institutional changes relevant to gay and bisexual men in Canada. PMID:26011048

  8. "He was treating me like trash, and I was loving it...": perspectives in gay male pornography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Todd G

    2004-01-01

    As the topic of gay male pornography has received limited attention from social scientists, little is known about how gay men perceive this medium. In the current study, a focus group methodology was used whereby participants examined specific scenes from commercially available gay pornography in terms of the messages they disseminate about the body and gay sexuality, in general. Findings suggest that discussants tended to view the medium from a utilitarian perspective. They saw pornography as a masturbatory aid, and did not believe that it possessed much significance vis-à-vis gay men's attitudes and behaviours. Those who identified potentially negative influences of this medium saw them as transitory and most likely to occur among gay men other than themselves.

  9. The Role of Religiosity in Satisfaction With Life: A Sample of Turkish Gay Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kıraç, Ferdi

    2016-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the role of religiosity in satisfaction with life in a sample of Turkish gay men. A one-way analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) revealed that the religiosity had a significant effect on life satisfaction of gay men. Extrinsically religious gay men displayed significantly higher life satisfaction scores than both intrinsically religious and nonreligious gay men. Moreover, intrinsically religious and nonreligious gay men did not significantly differ in terms of life satisfaction. Based on the findings of the study, we concluded that the role of a committed religiosity in enhancing satisfaction with life as documented by the overwhelming majority of previous research was reversed in the case of Turkish Muslim gay men.

  10. Parental influences on the self-esteem of gay and lesbian youths: a reflected appraisals model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savin-Williams, R C

    1989-01-01

    Based on a population of 317 gay and lesbian youths, the current investigation explores the appropriateness of a reflected appraisals perspective in predicting the degree to which parental attitudes, as perceived by youth, affects their self-esteem and comfortableness being gay. A lesbian was most comfortable with her sexual orientation if she also reported that her parents accepted her homosexuality; these variables did not, however, predict her level of self-esteem. Among the gay males, parental acceptance predicted comfortable being gay if the parents were also perceived as important components of a youth's self-worth; a male most comfortable with his sexual orientation had the highest level of self-esteem. Results are discussed in terms of: (a) sex of parent, (b) sex-role development, (c) comparisons of gays and lesbians, and (d) research on gay and lesbian youth.

  11. Implicit and explicit attitudes toward gay males and lesbians among heterosexual males and females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, Amanda B; Karpinski, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we examined explicit and implicit attitudes toward gay males and lesbians using the Single Category IAT (SC-IAT). In Study 1, we examined attitudes toward gay people in general. Participants reported positive explicit attitudes and neutral implicit attitudes toward gay people. In Study 2, we examined implicit and explicit attitudes toward gay men and lesbians separately. Participants rated gay men and lesbians positively on explicit attitude measures. Analysis of SC-IAT scores revealed neutral associations with gay men and positive associations with lesbians. As a secondary goal, we also tested the Balanced Identity Theory in both studies and did not find evidence of balance between implicit sexual orientation attitudes, implicit sexual identity, and implicit self-esteem using the SC-IAT.

  12. The 2007 Dutch Reformed Church Synod Resolution: Impact on gay ministers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marietjie van Loggerenberg

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available At the 2007 General Synod of the Dutch Reformed Church (DRC, a compromise resolution was accepted regarding homosexual members. The resolution, inter alia, requires of gay ministers to remain celibate as a prerequisite to be legitimated. This research is a qualitative inquiry to evaluate the impact this resolution has on the lives of gay ministers and gay candidate ministers. Apart from doing a literature study Narrative and Post-foundational perspectives were obtained by interviewing six gay ministers and/or candidate ministers as co-researchers, and also by engaging in dialogue with interdisciplinary experts from Sociology, Psychology and Law. From the stories told by the gay ministers and/or gay candidate ministers, certain themes emerged, revealing the immense impact caused by the resolution.

  13. Effects of interaction experiences and undergraduate coursework on attitudes toward gay and lesbian issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevecke, Jessica R; Rhymer, Katrina N; Almazan, Elbert P; Jacob, Susan

    2015-01-01

    College experiences can expand knowledge, decrease negative stereotypes, and increase acceptance toward diversity, especially regarding gay and lesbian issues. This study found that the more interaction undergraduate students have with gay and lesbian people on campus, the more accepting their attitudes are regarding (1) same-sex, consensual sex, (2) same-sex relations between adults is not unnatural, (3) vote for a gay presidential candidate, (4) friends with a feminine man, (5) friends with a masculine woman, (6) knowledge of GL issues important for future career, and (7) comfortable with GL roommate. Furthermore, the more undergraduate students are exposed to coursework addressing gay and lesbian issues, the more positive their attitudes are regarding the importance of knowledge of gay/lesbian issues for future career and comfort with a gay/lesbian roommate. Discussion explores possible long-term implications of systematic interaction experiences and coursework at all levels within the educational system to prevent negative attitude formation.

  14. Another issue comes out: gay rights policy voting in recent U.S. presidential elections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodebeck, Laurie A

    2015-01-01

    Drawing from the theory of policy voting, this study examines the impact of opinions about gay rights on voting for presidential candidates. Qualitative analysis of the major party platforms and candidate campaign rhetoric from the six presidential elections held between 1988 and 2008 indicates that Democratic and Republican presidential candidates began openly expressing opposing positions on gay rights issues in 1992. Quantitative analysis of public opinion shows that, starting in 1992 and continuing through 2008, gay rights issues became more salient to the public, and opinions about gay rights began to exert a significant effect on vote choice. The study concludes with a discussion of the partisan forces that shaped the electoral significance of gay rights issues during the period from 1988 to 2008 and speculation about the role of gay rights issues in shaping future partisan electoral strategy.

  15. Queer Kinship: An Exploration of the Rewards and Challenges of Planned Parenting among Gay Fathers

    OpenAIRE

    Barr, Ben-David

    2011-01-01

    Gay fathers are creating family forms and parenting practices that reach beyond the nuclear family model. Analysis suggests that fathers in this study are developing unique and queer versions of kinship. Fathers' desire for emotional connection leads to the creative assemblage of paid caregivers, friends, children's non-legal biological kin, and gay men's families of origin into kinship networks. These creative mixtures may be perceived as unusual family formations, but they assist gay father...

  16. A Nationwide Study of Norwegian Beliefs About Same-sex Marriage and Lesbian and Gay Parenthood

    OpenAIRE

    Hollekim, Ragnhild; Slaatten, Hilde; Anderssen, Norman

    2012-01-01

    In Norway, a gender-neutral Marriage Law that secured equal marriage and parenting rights for lesbian, gay and heterosexual couples took effect in January 2009. The aim of the current study was to explore Norwegian beliefs about equal marriage and parenting rights for lesbian, gay and heterosexual couples and the welfare of children with lesbian and gay parents. A sample of 1,246 Norwegians participated in the study by filling out a questionnaire. The majority reported...

  17. Seeking to Adopt in Florida: Lesbian and Gay Parents Navigate the Legal Process

    OpenAIRE

    Goldberg, Abbie E.; Weber, Elizabeth R; Moyer, April M.; Shapiro, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Utilizing interview data from 22 lesbian and gay parents in Florida, the current exploratory study examined participants’ experiences navigating the legal and social service systems after the repeal of the Florida ban on gay adoption. Participants reported both positive and negative experiences in seeking out lawyers (e.g., some attorneys were accommodating and knowledgeable about gay adoption; others demonstrated discomfort about working with same-sex couples), working with social service ag...

  18. Heteronormativity in a Nursing Context : Attitudes toward Homosexuality and Experiences of Lesbians and Gay Men

    OpenAIRE

    Röndahl, Gerd

    2005-01-01

    The general aim of the project was to describe the situation of lesbians and gay men in a nursing environment by studying the attitudes of nursing staff and students, and the experiences of gay nursing staff in their work environment and of gay patients and partners in their encounters with nursing. The study for papers I and II had a descriptive, comparative design. Nurses, assistant nurses, and nursing students completed the Attitudes Toward Homosexuality Scale (ATHS), the Causes of Homosex...

  19. Queering the Norm : A Look at the Portrayal of Gay Parents in

    OpenAIRE

    Roald, Silje Eirin

    2013-01-01

    The main concern in this thesis is the portrayal of gay parents in American media with a particular focus on the television shows The L Word and Modern Family. Looking at how the lesbian and gay male parents are portrayed in terms of gender, community and family relations, the thesis finds that the characters are portrayed through conventional gender roles even though they are homosexual. In this way, the lesbian parents, Bette and Tina, and the gay male parents, Cameron and Mitchell per...

  20. Teenage queerness: negotiating heteronormativity in the representation of gay teenagers in Glee

    OpenAIRE

    Dhaenens, Frederik

    2013-01-01

    Despite a significant increase in gay representation in contemporary television fiction, many media scholars argue that the representation of gay men and women is governed by heteronormativity. They postulate that even rounded and heterogeneous representations of gay men and women are characters that desireto participate in institutions, practices, norms, and values that consolidate the heterosexual matrix. Yet, within a cultural studies tradition, television is considered an ambiguous medium...

  1. Gay-Related Rejection Sensitivity as a Risk Factor for Condomless Sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Katie; Pachankis, John E

    2016-04-01

    Gay-related rejection sensitivity has been linked to numerous adverse health outcomes, but its relationship to condomless sex remains unexamined. The present study investigated the role of gay-related rejection sensitivity as a predictor of condomless sex. Gay and bisexual men completed questionnaires measuring rejection sensitivity and condom use self-efficacy as well as a timeline followback interview regarding past 90-day sexual behaviors. Gay-related rejection sensitivity was positively associated with the number of condomless anal sex acts with casual partners, and condom use self-efficacy mediated this association. These findings have important implications for effective HIV prevention efforts among this at-risk population.

  2. Hepatitis Vaccination of Men Who Have Sex with Men at Gay Pride Events

    OpenAIRE

    Storholm, Erik David; Fisher, Dennis G.; Reynolds, Grace L.; Napper, Lucy E.; Morrisse, Timothy A.; Kochems, Lee M.

    2010-01-01

    Prevention researchers have advocated primary prevention such as vaccination in alternative venues. However, there have been major questions about both the attendance of, and the ability to, vaccinate high-risk individuals in such settings. The current study seeks to assess the feasibility of vaccinating high-risk men who have sex with men (MSM) at Gay Pride events. The research questions are: Do gay men who are sampled at Gay Pride events engage in more or less risky behavior than gay men sa...

  3. Correlates of Unprotected Receptive Anal Intercourse Among Gay and Bisexual Men: Kampala, Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Raymond, H Fisher; Kajubi, Phoebe; Kamya, Moses R.; Rutherford, George W.; Mandel, Jeffrey S.; McFarland, Willi

    2009-01-01

    We conducted a respondent-driven sampling survey (N = 215) to characterize correlates of risk for HIV infection among gay and bisexual men in Kampala, Uganda. We used RDSAT software to produce population estimates for measures and created exportable weights for multivariable analysis. Overall, 60.5% of gay/bi men identify as gay and 39.5% as bisexual; 91.6% are Ugandans. Unprotected receptive anal intercourse (URAI) was associated with identifying as gay, being younger and having had an HIV t...

  4. Family support and acceptance, gay male identity formation, and psychological adjustment: a path model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elizur, Y; Ziv, M

    2001-01-01

    While heterosexist family undermining has been demonstrated to be a developmental risk factor in the life of persons with same-gender orientation, the issue of protective family factors is both controversial and relatively neglected. In this study of Israeli gay males (N = 114), we focused on the interrelations of family support, family acceptance and family knowledge of gay orientation, and gay male identity formation, and their effects on mental health and self-esteem. A path model was proposed based on the hypotheses that family support, family acceptance, family knowledge, and gay identity formation have an impact on psychological adjustment, and that family support has an effect on gay identity formation that is mediated by family acceptance. The assessment of gay identity formation was based on an established stage model that was streamlined for cross-cultural practice by defining three basic processes of same-gender identity formation: self-definition, self-acceptance, and disclosure (Elizur & Mintzer, 2001). The testing of our conceptual path model demonstrated an excellent fit with the data. An alternative model that hypothesized effects of gay male identity on family acceptance and family knowledge did not fit the data. Interpreting these results, we propose that the main effect of family support/acceptance on gay identity is related to the process of disclosure, and that both general family support and family acceptance of same-gender orientation play a significant role in the psychological adjustment of gay men.

  5. Impact of family environment on future mental health professionals' attitudes toward lesbians and gay men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissinger, Daniel B; Lee, Sang Min; Twitty, Lisa; Kisner, Harrison

    2009-01-01

    This study explored the relationship between dimensions of functioning in the family of origin of graduate students in helping profession programs and their attitudes toward lesbians and gay men. One hundred forty-three participants completed the Family Environment Scale (FES-R: Moos & Moos, 1986), the Attitudes Toward Lesbians and Gay Men scale (ATLG: Herek, 1994), and demographic questions. Results suggest that three family dimensions (conflict, intellectual-cultural orientation, and moral-religious emphasis) significantly predicted attitudes toward lesbians and gay men. The results also revealed that younger students held more negative attitudes toward lesbians and gay men than their older peers. Implications for educators, researchers, and practitioners are discussed.

  6. Contextual Factors Impacting Practice Beliefs and Practice Behaviors among Social Workers with Lesbian and Gay Clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, Mary H

    2015-01-01

    In this study the author explores contextual factors that impact practice beliefs and behaviors among social workers with lesbian and gay clients. The Gay Affirmative Practice scale was used to measure levels of gay affirmative practice beliefs and practice behaviors among social workers in a medical setting. A model is presented that illustrates how contextual factors related to education, training, relationships with lesbian and gay individuals, and religiosity affects social workers' practice behaviors. The results illustrate the importance of educational exposure and affirming practice beliefs on practice behaviors.

  7. Sexual identity development among gay, lesbian, and bisexual youths: consistency and change over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosario, Margaret; Schrimshaw, Eric W; Hunter, Joyce; Braun, Lisa

    2006-02-01

    A longitudinal report of 156 gay, lesbian, and bisexual youths examined changes in sexual identity over time. Fifty-seven percent of the youths remained consistently self-identified as gay/lesbian, 18% transited from bisexual to gay/lesbian, and 15% consistently identified as bisexual over time. Although youths who consistently identified as gay/lesbian did not differ from other youths on time since experiencing sexual developmental milestones, they reported current sexual orientation and sexual behaviors that were more same-sex centered and they scored higher on aspects of the identity integration process (e.g., more certain, comfortable, and accepting of their same-sex sexuality, more involved in gay-related social activities, more possessing of positive attitudes toward homosexuality, and more comfortable with others knowing about their sexuality) than youths who transited to a gay/lesbian identity and youths who consistently identified as bisexual. Contrary to the hypothesis that females are more sexually fluid than males, female youths were less likely to change identities than male youths. The finding that youths who transited to a gay/lesbian identity differed from consistently gay/lesbian youths suggests that identity integration continues after the adoption of a gay/lesbian sexual identity.

  8. Sexual Identity Development among Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual Youths: Consistency and Change Over Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosario, Margaret; Schrimshaw, Eric W.; Hunter, Joyce; Braun, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    A longitudinal report of 156 gay, lesbian, and bisexual youths examined changes in sexual identity over time. Fifty-seven percent of the youths remained consistently self-identified as gay/lesbian, 18% transited from bisexual to gay/lesbian, and 15% consistently identified as bisexual over time. Although youths who consistently identified as gay/lesbian did not differ from other youths on time since experiencing sexual developmental milestones, they reported current sexual orientation and sexual behaviors that were more same-sex centered and they scored higher on aspects of the identity integration process (e.g., more certain, comfortable, and accepting of their same-sex sexuality, more involved in gay-related social activities, more possessing of positive attitudes toward homosexuality, and more comfortable with others knowing about their sexuality) than youths who transited to a gay/lesbian identity and youths who consistently identified as bisexual. Contrary to the hypothesis that females are more sexually fluid than males, female youths were less likely to change identities than male youths. The finding that youths who transited to a gay/lesbian identity differed from consistently gay/lesbian youths suggests that identity integration continues after the adoption of a gay/lesbian sexual identity. PMID:16817067

  9. Between Two Worlds: an Ethnographic Study of Gay Consumer Culture in Rio de Janeiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Severino Joaquim Nunes Pereira

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available It is not easy to study socially marginalized groups such as gays, ethnic minorities, and others. This is, however,an extremely relevant topic in the consumer behavior area since the status of members of a modern consumersociety is largely denied to stigmatized social groups (Barbosa, 2006. The objective of this work is to shed lighton how gay men in Rio de Janeiro use the discourse associated with their possessions to build and maintain thesymbolic and hierarchical boundaries between the gay and heterosexual worlds, as well as to investigate the roleconsumption plays in this boundary setting. An ethnographic observation of a group of gay men in Rio deJaneiro was conducted, along with 20 semi-structured interviews with openly gay men between 2005 and 2008.The results suggest that: (a the world culturally built by gays seems to be divided into a gay world and aheterosexual world, where the division between these two worlds not only happens in their minds, but also intheir possessions and purchasing decisions; (b the meaning of gay mens’ places of consumption range fromprofane to sacred along their lives; and (c in the gay world, the body is seen both as a cultural construction andas an asset.

  10. Representação gay em corpus literário paralelo Gay representation in parallel literary corpus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adail Sebastião Rodrigues Júnior

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo apresenta parte dos resultados de minha pesquisa de doutorado, com foco em como personagens gays e suas realidades de mundo são representados por meio da transitividade (HALLIDAY; MATTHIESSEN, 2004. Os corpora sob análise são uma coletânea de contos gays intitulada Stud (ANDROS, 1969 e sua tradução brasileira As Aventuras de um Garoto de Programa (ANDROS, 1998, re-textualizada quase trinta anos após a publicação do original nos Estados Unidos da América. Cinco excertos foram escolhidos a fim de mostrar como partes dos corpos dos personagens são usadas para representar suas realidades de mundo, o que aponta para o papel do corpo na constituição de relações sociais homossexuais no contexto dos anos 1960 nos EUA. De igual modo, a tradução, embora feita nos anos 1990 no Brasil, enfatiza o mesmo papel empregado pelos fragmentos dos corpos dos personagens. Os resultados, portanto, abrem novas possibilidades de discussão de como os gays são representados no discurso literário.This paper aims at presenting part of the results of my doctorate research, with a focus on how gay characters and their world realities are represented by means of transitivity (HALLIDAY; MATTHIESSEN, 2004. The corpora under analysis are a collection of gay short stories entitled Stud (ANDROS, 1969 and its Brazilian translation As Aventuras de um Garoto de Programa (ANDROS, 1998, re-textualized almost thirty years after the original publication in the United States of America. Five excerpts were chosen in order to show how parts of the characters' bodies are used to represent their world realities, which points to the role of the body in the constitution of homosexual social relations in the context of the 1960s in the U.S. Likewise, the translation, though rendered in the 1990s in Brazil, emphasizes the same role played by fragments of the characters' bodies. Thus, the results open new possibilities for discussing further how gays are represented

  11. "Abomination"--life as a Bible belt gay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Bernadette

    2010-01-01

    Drawing on observation, autoethnography, and audio-taped interviews, this article explores the religious backgrounds and experiences of Bible Belt gays. In the Bible Belt, Christianity is not confined to Sunday worship. Christian crosses, messages, paraphernalia, music, news, and attitudes permeate everyday settings. Consequently, Christian fundamentalist dogma about homosexuality-that homosexuals are bad, diseased, perverse, sinful, other, and inferior-is cumulatively bolstered within a variety of other social institutions and environments in the Bible Belt. Of the 46 lesbians and gay men interviewed for this study (age 18-74 years), most describe living through spirit-crushing experiences of isolation, abuse, and self-loathing. This article argues that the geographic region of the Bible Belt intersects with religious-based homophobia. Informants explained that negative social attitudes about homosexuality caused a range of harmful consequences in their lives including the fear of going to hell, depression, low self-esteem, and feelings of worthlessness.

  12. Happy alone? Sad young men in East Asian gay cinema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, C

    2000-01-01

    This essay chooses as its texts three films representing contemporary gay male subjects from each of the "three" China's: HK, Taiwan, and the Mainland. Relocating the homoerotic image of the "sad young man," a trope popular from Hollywood rebellion films of the 1950s and 1960s, to contemporary China, I discuss how this masculine icon has been transformed from one of heroic rebellion to one of existential isolation. Indeed, as the politics of both the outmoded Confucian family and fractured Chinese nationhood intersect, what the sad young (gay) man rebels against is a political fluctuation which is no longer fixed; as the young man's opposition is no longer fixed, so too does he become alienated even from his own rebellious cause.

  13. T-Shirts on Gay Issues Spur Lawsuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrie, Caroline

    2005-01-01

    Young people have long sported T-shirts that schools wish they'd leave at home. Legal fights have been waged in recent years, for example, over shirts about guns, abortion, the Confederate battle flag, and the war in Iraq. But at a time when gay rights remains a divisive and unsettled issue nationally, a recent spate of disputes over T-shirts on…

  14. MARITAL RELATIONSHIP AND EXPECTATIONS ABOUT PARENTHOOD IN GAY COUPLES

    OpenAIRE

    Meletti, Alexandre Trevisani; Scorsolini-Comin,Fabio

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to understand the processes of construction of the marital relationship and expectations about parenthood in same-sex couples. It has been interviewed four gay couples (four men and four women) who have been living together for four years, on average. Semi-structured interviews have been used and the technique of the life history has been also performed in an individual appliance. They have also been audio taped, fully and literally transcribed. The content analysis ...

  15. Mental Health in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Youth

    OpenAIRE

    Russell, Stephen T.; Fish, Jessica N.

    2016-01-01

    Today’s lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth come out at younger ages, and public support for LGBT issues has dramatically increased, so why do LGBT youth continue to be at high risk for compromised mental health? We provide an overview of the contemporary context for LGBT youth, followed by a review of current science on LGBT youth mental health. Research in the past decade has identified risk and protective factors for mental health, which point to promising directions for p...

  16. Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Youth and Family Acceptance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz-Wise, Sabra L; Rosario, Margaret; Tsappis, Michael

    2016-12-01

    In this article, we address theories of attachment and parental acceptance and rejection, and their implications for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youths' identity and health. We also provide 2 clinical cases to illustrate the process of family acceptance of a transgender youth and a gender nonconforming youth who was neither a sexual minority nor transgender. Clinical implications of family acceptance and rejection of LGBT youth are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The psychological impact of AIDS on gay men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, S F; Charles, K A; Malyon, A K

    1984-11-01

    The profound psychological impact of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic on gay men needs to receive greater attention from mental health professionals. The specific treatment approach depends upon the individual's location on the AIDS-related conditions continuum. For men already diagnosed with AIDS, psychological themes include fears of death and dying, guilt, concerns about exposure of a homosexual life-style, fear of contagion, loss of self-esteem, decreased social support and increased dependency needs, stigmatization, loss of occupational and financial security, confusion over medical treatment options, and severe depression. The integration of a mental health service into AIDS special care hospital wards and participation in support groups are particularly useful for men with AIDS. Anxiety is the major clinical symptom among those who have not developed full-blown AIDS, but show signs of immune suppression. Issues for men in this "gray zone" include isolation, poor social and occupational functioning due to fatigue, shame, and frustration of achievement needs. Stress- reduction techniques are especially important with this population, to eliminate further compromise to the immune system or even to strengthen it. Many asymptomatic gay men ("the worried well") are manifesting acute psychological symptoms such as panic, generalized anxiety, obsessional thinking about AIDS, and somatization. Training in the negotiation of safe-sex agreements can reduce some of this anxiety. In general, the AIDS epidemic has introduced an existential component to psychotherapy with gay men, with a concern over issues such as the meaning of life and death.

  18. Intensive sex partying amongst gay men in Sydney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Michael; Prestage, Garrett

    2009-08-01

    Intensive sex partying is a framework developed to analyse specific frequent behaviours amongst a small minority of gay men in Sydney, Australia. The behaviours included a higher frequency of dance party attendance, more frequent sex, more anal sex, multiple sex partners, more unprotected anal intercourse with casual partners and more frequent drug taking. These occur at a contextual intersection between a sub-group of sexually adventurous gay men and 'party boys'. The men appear to be involved in both high-risk, adventurous sex practices and a specific form of partying distinguishable from dance partying and 'clubbing'. Sex partying occurs on multiple sites (domestic spaces; within dance parties; sex parties; sex-on-premises venues) and appears to be geared to the maximisation of sexual pleasure. Intensive sex partying describes this coincidence of factors and locates them in relation to the multiple pleasures offered by sex partying. It emphasises the importance of 'intensity' in order to understand better the relations between sex, drug use, pleasure, care and risk in some gay men's lives.

  19. Gay re-readings of the Harlem Renaissance poets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, G

    1993-01-01

    In the light of the long-established fact of their homosexuality or bisexuality, it is high time for the cluster of "Negro Renaissance" poets, Countee Cullen, Langston Hughes, Claude McKay, and Richard Bruce Nugent, to be reappraised by and for gay readers. This paper seeks to develop gay reading strategies in relation to the poems of these writers, in order to reveal for contemporary readers likely subtexts which, at the time of their writing, were publicly read as bearing on race alone. It is often possible to read a particular poem as referring (in images such as that of the social outcast) to either racial or sexual oppression, interchangeably; and possibly, therefore, to both at once, by way of an implicit comparison. Likewise, poems on miscegenation can just as well be read, via the theme of forbidden love, as referring to homosexuality. The fact that most published critical readings deal only with the racial issue does not invalidate the likelihood that the poem can be, and indeed requires to be, read as referring, also, to sexuality. Gay readings emerge, then, not merely from these writers' representations of attractive men and boys, but also in the midst of their most famously anti-racist themes.

  20. Muslim and gay: seeking identity coherence in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The process of accepting oneself as gay and of 'coming out' to family and friends is well documented. For Muslim men, this is complicated by the tension between their emerging sexual identity and their religious and cultural birth identity, which labels homosexuality as sinful. This paper explores this process in a sample of five gay Muslim men living in New Zealand, a liberal secular society where homosexuality is widely accepted and gay rights are endorsed in legislation. Identity Process Theory drives the analysis, which identifies five themes encapsulating the process of striving for psychological coherence: resistance, acceptance, tension, renegotiation and pretence. Initial phases of denial and anger at their emerging sexuality are strongly linked to the conflict with their religious identity. Later, acceptance of their sexuality as natural and even God-given protects them from blame for their 'sins'. In contrast to earlier work in the UK, for most men, renegotiation of their Muslim identity is adopted as the key strategy for achieving intrapsychic coherence. However, at an interpersonal level, families remain a source of conflict, temporarily resolved through pretence. Renegotiating religious identity leaves men having to pretend not just to be straight, but also to be strongly religious.

  1. Homosexuality and Pro-Gay Ideology as Pathogens? Implications of a Disease-Spread Lay Model for Understanding Anti-Gay Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filip-Crawford, Gabrielle; Neuberg, Steven L

    2015-09-03

    Negative behaviors targeting gay men and lesbians range from violent physical assault to casting a vote against gay marriage, with very different implications for those targeted. Existing accounts of such actions, however, are unable to differentially predict specific anti-gay behaviors, leaving a large theoretical hole in the literature and hindering the design of effective interventions. We propose (a) that many sexually prejudiced laypersons conceptualize homosexuality and pro-gay ideology as "contaminants" analogous to infectious pathogens and (b) that anti-gay behaviors can thus be viewed as strategic attempts to prevent, contain, treat, or eradicate the "pathogens" of homosexuality and pro-gay ideology. By considering analogues to disease-spread processes (e.g., susceptibility of specific subpopulations, inoculation procedures, prevalence in the local environment, interconnections among community members), we derive novel predictions regarding the incidence and nature of anti-gay behaviors and provide leverage for creating more tailored interventions to reduce such discrimination. © 2015 by the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Inc.

  2. Differentiating selves: middle-aged gay men in Manchester's less visible 'homospaces'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Paul

    2014-03-01

    Scholarship on gay bars/'villages' has overshadowed study of 'homospaces' (gay fields of existence) less available/inaccessible to a wider public - websites, saunas and social/support groups. Based on interviews with 27 men aged 39-61 living in Manchester, this article addresses what middle-aged gay men's accounts of these particular homospaces say about their experiences of age/ageing and how relations of ageism work within them. Specifically, I focus on how study participants use 'ageing capital' in these fields to differentiate themselves from their younger counterparts in three ways. First, ageing capital is implicated in capitulation to gay ageism and a reverse ageism - visible in accounts of differentiation from the 'superficial,' reckless ways of sexualized space that participants associated with younger gay men. Second, it was visible in accounts of resistance to/questioning of gay ageism - strategies that could make sexualized homospaces more habitable. Third, ageing capital was implicated in negotiation with ageing/gay ageism - visible in ambivalent stances hovering between compliance and resistance - towards ageing and ageism, which could reinforce constraints on uses/display of the body. The first and third accounts indicate the multidirectional character of gay ageism, limits on the deployment on ageing capital and show how middle-aged men can undermine their generational claims to represent a more authentic form of gay male embodiment. En route, I also complicate stereotypical thinking that gay social/support groups represent more inclusive, empowering space whilst overtly sexualized spaces of the 'gay scene' represent the opposite.

  3. Putting Lesbians in Their Place: Deconstructing Ex-Gay Discourses of Female Homosexuality in a Global Context

    OpenAIRE

    Christine M. Robinson; Sue E. Spivey

    2015-01-01

    The transnational ex-gay movement is an important context affecting lesbians and sexual minority women around the world. In 2015, the UN Human Rights Commissioner called for all nations to ban conversion therapies. This research investigates a neglected area of scholarship on the ex-gay movement by deconstructing and analyzing the implications of ex-gay discourses of female homosexuality in a global context. The ex-gay movement originated in the United States and has proliferated to nearly ev...

  4. Homeless Gay and Transgender Youth of Color in San Francisco: "No One Likes Street Kids"--Even in the Castro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reck, Jen

    2009-01-01

    This study, focused on five transgender and gay youth of color from San Francisco, explored how family problems, poverty, homophobia, and transphobia propelled them into homelessness and made gay-friendly spaces and resources especially meaningful to them. These young people describe seeking support in San Francisco's well-known gay enclave, the…

  5. Rules of Engagement as Survival Consciousness: Gay Male Law Enforcement Officers' Experiential Learning in a Masculinized Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Joshua C.; Rocco, Tonette S.

    2015-01-01

    Gay men face decisions associated with disclosure, the process of coming out as gay, when and if to disclose, and how much information. These decisions carry more weight in masculinized industries such as law enforcement. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to critically explore gay male law enforcement officers' experiences working in…

  6. Rules of Engagement as Survival Consciousness: Gay Male Law Enforcement Officers' Experiential Learning in a Masculinized Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Joshua C.; Rocco, Tonette S.

    2015-01-01

    Gay men face decisions associated with disclosure, the process of coming out as gay, when and if to disclose, and how much information. These decisions carry more weight in masculinized industries such as law enforcement. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to critically explore gay male law enforcement officers' experiences working in…

  7. Attitudes toward Lesbians and Gay Men among Hong Kong Chinese Social Work Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Diana K.; Wu, Joseph; Shardlow, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    There is a dearth of research on social work students' attitudes toward lesbians and gays in East Asian countries where intolerance toward nonheterosexuality has been documented. This article presents findings from the first study in Hong Kong using a Chinese version of Herek's Attitudes Toward Lesbians and Gay Men Scale (ATLG) to measure…

  8. Body Image Concerns of Gay Men: The Roles of Minority Stress and Conformity to Masculine Norms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmel, Sara B.; Mahalik, James R.

    2005-01-01

    The authors hypothesized that gay men's experiences of minority stress and their conformity to masculine norms would be associated with increased body image dissatisfaction and masculine body ideal distress. For this cross-sectional study, 357 gay males completed a Web-based survey, and 2 multiple regression analyses indicated that minority stress…

  9. Challenges of Being Simultaneously Gay or Lesbian and Spiritual and/or Religious: A Narrative Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Melinda; Dzelme, Kristina; Harris, Dale; Hecker, Lorna

    2001-01-01

    Describes the struggle that gays and lesbians face as they incorporate their sexual orientation and identity within the context of an existing religious or spiritual identity. Narrative directions are suggested for marriage and family therapists and their work with gays and lesbians who are confronted with these issues. (BF)

  10. Demographic Trends and Advocacy Experiences of Gay-Straight Alliance Advisors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graybill, Emily C.; Varjas, Kris; Meyers, Joel; Dever, Bridget V.; Greenberg, Daphne; Roach, Andrew T.; Morillas, Catalina

    2015-01-01

    Using an ecological model, the individual-, school-, and sociocultural-level characteristics that affect gay-straight alliance (GSA) advisors were examined in the current study. The formation of GSAs has been one way that schools have sought to improve the school climate for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth. Limited information…

  11. Examining the Role of Peer Relationships in the Lives of Gay and Bisexual Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, Stuart L.

    2015-01-01

    School social workers can serve as valuable supporters of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youths in the public school system by providing services aimed to improve school climates for all students. This article describes a qualitative study that examined gay and bisexual adolescent experiences with peer support using a…

  12. A Gay Immigrant Student's Perspective: Unspeakable Acts in the Language Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Cynthia D.

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on a subset of the student cohort that has, until recently, been largely hidden from view in the literature of language education: gay immigrants. Little is known about what sorts of classroom experiences gay immigrant students find engaging or alienating, or why this sort of knowledge is needed. This case study uses interview…

  13. Changes in Diversity Course Student Prejudice and Attitudes toward Heterosexual Privilege and Gay Marriage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Kim A.; Stewart, Briana

    2010-01-01

    This study examined diversity course influence on student prejudice against lesbians and gay men, awareness of heterosexual privilege, and support for gay marriage. The study included heterosexual female students in psychology of women, introduction to women's studies, and nondiversity psychology courses. Students in diversity courses expressed…

  14. Building an HIV/STI Prevention Program in a Gay Bathhouse: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binson, Diane; Blea, LeRoy; Cotten, Paul D.; Kant, Jeff; Woods, William J.

    2005-01-01

    Gay bathhouses have long been subject to community and public health pressures owing to the perceived link between the behaviors associated with these settings and various sexually transmitted infections. The straightforward solution of closing gay bathhouses has not worked for long when it has been tried. The more complex approach of working with…

  15. Self-Discovery through Character Connections: Opening up to Gayness in "Angels in America"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazar, David

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how he uses performance pedagogy to open students' minds to sexuality and gender issues. The author uses Tony Kushner's "Angels in America: A Gay Fantasia on National Themes"--an epic play about the AIDS epidemic and its impact on the gay community in the 1980s. Through the possibilities of drama available in…

  16. Trends in Canadian Newspaper Coverage of Gay-Straight Alliances, 2000-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herriot, Lindsay

    2011-01-01

    Gay-straight alliances (GSAs) in Canadian public schools have gained considerable attention from print media since reports first surfaced in the year 2000. This study tracked and analyzed Canadian newspaper reporting about GSA creation. It summarized the shift in public opinion toward lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) youth…

  17. Literature for Today's Gay and Lesbian Teens: Subverting the Culture of Silence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Terry L.; Vare, Jonatha W.

    2004-01-01

    Several books that provide guidance for the gay and lesbian teenagers, their friends and families are presented. The books depict the challenges faced by the gay and lesbian teenagers, conflicts among the young adults and parents or caretakers and the rejections faced by the heterosexual parents and friends.

  18. Ten Things Gay Men Should Discuss with Their Health Care Provider

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancer) Of all the sexually transmitted infections gay men are at risk for, human papilloma virus (HVP) — which cause anal and genital warts — is often thought to be little more than an unsightly inconvenience. However, these ... gay men. Some health professionals now recommend routine screening with ...

  19. Application of Herek's attitudes toward lesbians and gay men scale in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerendonk, Bas van de; Eisinga, Rob; Felling, Albert

    2003-01-01

    national sample of 921 respondents from the Dutch populadon completed the translated, slightly modified version of Herek's Attitudes Toward Lesbians and Gay Men Scale, originally developed in the USA for the assessment of attitudes toward lesbians and gay men. The present study was the first attempt

  20. Attitudes of Heterosexual Students toward Their Gay Male and Lesbian Peers. Research Report #3-95.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engstrom, Catherine McHugh; Sedlacek, William E.

    This study examined heterosexual college students attitudes toward gay men and lesbians, and in what types of situations were negative feelings expressed toward gay men and lesbians. A random sample of 224 residence hall students at the University of Maryland College Park completed the Situational Attitude Scale Sexual Orientation Survey, which…

  1. The Multidimensionality of Adolescents' Beliefs about and Attitudes toward Gay and Lesbian Peers in School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Stacey S.; Nucci, Larry

    2003-01-01

    This study investigated tenth- and twelfth-grade adolescents' ( N = 264) beliefs about homosexuality, their attitudes about gay and lesbian peers in school, and their evaluations of the treatment of gay, lesbian, and gender non-conforming peers. The results revealed differences in adolescents' beliefs about homosexuality and their attitudes toward…

  2. Expressive Writing for Gay-Related Stress: Psychosocial Benefits and Mechanisms Underlying Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachankis, John E.; Goldfried, Marvin R.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This study tested the effectiveness of an expressive writing intervention for gay men on outcomes related to psychosocial functioning. Method: Seventy-seven gay male college students (mean age = 20.19 years, SD = 1.99) were randomly assigned to write for 20 min a day for 3 consecutive days about either (a) the most stressful or…

  3. Survey of School Psychologists' Attitudes, Feelings, and Exposure to Gay and Lesbian Parents and Their Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hee-sook; Thul, Candrice A.; Berenhaut, Kenneth S.; Suerken, Cynthia K.; Norris, James L.

    2006-01-01

    School psychologists' attitudes and feelings toward gay and lesbian parents were surveyed in relation to their training and exposure, and professional services offered to gay and lesbian parents and their children. The relationship between attitudes, feelings, training, exposure, and demographic characteristics was explored as well. A stratified…

  4. Male Archetypes as Resources for Homosexual Identity Development in Gay Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, William P.; McMahon, Timothy R.

    1999-01-01

    The male archetypes of king, lover, magician, and warrior provide important and timeless insights into mature masculine qualities. Homosexual identity development models describe tasks that confront gay men as they move through the identity development process. Proposes that by understanding the metaphor of male archetypes, gay men will discover…

  5. Finding My Stride: A Gay Student Takes the Bold Step of Being True to Himself.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliot, Brian

    2000-01-01

    Tells the story of the developing self-confidence that enabled a gay high school student to tell his parents and others about his homosexuality and to face the world without apologies. Highlights the significance of stereotypical messages about gays in his younger years. (SLD)

  6. Threat and Guilt Aspects of Internalized Antilesbian and Gay Prejudice: An Application of Personal Construct Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Bonnie; van den Berg, Jacob J.; Epting, Franz R.

    2009-01-01

    Building on G. A. Kelly's (1991a, 1991b) personal construct theory, this study introduced concepts of threat and guilt as different manifestations of internalized antilesbian and gay prejudice. Results with 102 lesbian and gay participants indicated that internalized threat and guilt each accounted for unique variance in global internalized…

  7. A Phenomenological Exploration of the Experiences of Dual-Career Lesbian and Gay Couples

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Ryan, Leslie W.; McFarland, William P.

    2010-01-01

    Dual-career lesbian and gay couples face unique struggles as they encounter relational and workplace discrimination. This phenomenological study explored how relationship and career intersect for lesbian and gay couples. Three themes emerged that described how couples successfully blended relationship and career: planfulness, creating positive…

  8. Queer Leadership: A Phenomenological Study of the Experiences of out Gay and Lesbian Higher Education Presidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullard, Eric A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation was to better understand the experiences of "out" gay and lesbian higher education presidents. Of the more than 4,500 institutions of higher education in the United States, only 30 presidents have identified themselves as gay or lesbian. As institutions of higher education face large scale retirements at…

  9. More than Book Talks: Preservice Teacher Dialogue after Reading Gay and Lesbian Children's Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann-Wilmarth, Jill

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the author looks at how she attempted to teach her students--preservice teachers--to engage in dialogic conversation about gay and lesbian identity using children's literature with gay and lesbian characters as a jumping off point. Through her analysis, the author has identified two requirements for dialogic conversation among…

  10. The Intersection of Gay and Christian Identities on Christian College Campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentz, Joel M.; Wessel, Roger D.

    2011-01-01

    Because some Christian colleges prohibit same-sex sexual behaviors, the development of authentic sexual identities on these campuses may be difficult for gay and lesbian students. This article introduces the idea of an identity conflict that may occur between sexual and spiritual identities for gay and lesbian students at Christian colleges and…

  11. Lesbian, Gay, and Heterosexual Adoptive Parents' Perceptions of Inclusivity and Receptiveness in Early Childhood Education Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Abbie E.; Black, Kaitlin; Sweeney, Kristin; Moyer, April

    2017-01-01

    Little research has examined the experiences of lesbian/gay (LG) parent families or adoptive parent families in early childhood education settings. This study uses interview data to examine the perceptions and experiences of 45 lesbian, gay, and heterosexual couples (90 individuals) with 10 adopted children with respect to their (1) openness with…

  12. Heterosexual Adolescents' and Young Adults' Beliefs and Attitudes about Homosexuality and Gay and Lesbian Peers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Stacey S.

    2006-01-01

    Reports on the school climate for gay and lesbian students in the United States suggest that negative attitudes toward gay and lesbian individuals are quite common in adolescence. Very little research, however, has investigated adolescents' sexual prejudice from a developmental perspective. In this study, 10th- (N = 119) and 12th- (N = 145) grade…

  13. Poverty among Cohabiting Gay and Lesbian, and Married and Cohabiting Heterosexual Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokos, Anastasia H.; Keene, Jennifer Reid

    2010-01-01

    Using a subsample ( N = 1,365,145) of the 2000 Census 5% Public Use Microdata Sample, the authors investigate explanations for differing poverty chances of cohabiting gay and lesbian, and married and cohabiting heterosexual families. Gay and lesbian couples fare worse than married couples, but better economically than cohabiting heterosexuals.…

  14. Workplace Experiences of Australian Lesbian and Gay Teachers: Findings from a National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferfolja, Tania; Stavrou, Efty

    2015-01-01

    Historically, lesbian and gay teachers working in schools have experienced silencing, invisibility, and discrimination. This paper reports on research that examined the experiences of self-identified lesbian and gay teachers working in a variety of school types and school systems across Australia. Specifically, it explores these teachers'…

  15. Heterosexual Privilege Awareness, Prejudice, and Support of Gay Marriage among Diversity Course Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Kim; Stewart, Briana

    2010-01-01

    Although most research investigating diversity courses focuses on attitudes toward racial minorities and women, these courses may also influence student attitudes toward lesbians and gay men. The current study assessed student awareness of heterosexual privilege, prejudice against lesbians and gay men, and support for same-sex marriage. Students…

  16. Attitudes toward Lesbians and Gay Men among Hong Kong Chinese Social Work Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Diana K.; Wu, Joseph; Shardlow, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    There is a dearth of research on social work students' attitudes toward lesbians and gays in East Asian countries where intolerance toward nonheterosexuality has been documented. This article presents findings from the first study in Hong Kong using a Chinese version of Herek's Attitudes Toward Lesbians and Gay Men Scale (ATLG) to measure…

  17. Disclosure, discrimination and desire: experiences of Black and South Asian gay men in Britain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeown, Eamonn; Nelson, Simon; Anderson, Jane; Low, Nicola; Elford, Jonathan

    2010-10-01

    Using findings from a qualitative investigation based on in-depth email interviews with 47 Black and South Asian gay men in Britain, this paper explores the cross-cutting identities and discourses in relation to being both gay and from an ethnic minority background. Taking an intersectional approach, detailed accounts of identity negotiation, cultural pressures, experiences of discrimination and exclusion and the relationship between minority ethnic gay men and mainstream White gay culture are presented and explored. The major findings common to both groups were: cultural barriers limiting disclosure of sexuality to family and wider social networks; experiences of discrimination by White gay men that included exclusion as well as objectification; a lack of positive gay role models and imagery relating to men from minority ethnic backgrounds. Among South Asian gay men, a major theme was regret at being unable to fulfil family expectations regarding marriage and children, while among Black gay men, there was a strong belief that same-sex behaviour subverted cultural notions related to how masculinity is configured. The paper concludes by highlighting the importance of social location, particularly education and income, when examining the intersection of ethnicity and sexuality in future research.

  18. Are Gay and Lesbian Cohabiting Couples Really Different from Heterosexual Married Couples?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurdek, Lawrence A.

    2004-01-01

    Both partners from gay and lesbian cohabiting couples without children were compared longitudinally with both partners from heterosexual married couples with children (N at first assessment = 80, 53, and 80 couples, respectively) on variables from 5 domains indicative of relationship health. For 50% of the comparisons, gay and lesbian partners did…

  19. Gay Gifted Adolescent Suicide and Suicidal Ideation Literature: Research Barriers and Limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedillo, P. J.

    2015-01-01

    Little empirical research has been conducted regarding suicide and suicidal ideation about gay gifted adolescents, so most of what is presented in the literature is based on theories and assumptions. One key assumption was that the psychological challenges of gay gifted youth stemming from sexual identity and giftedness contribute to suicidal…

  20. Evangelical Christian College Students and Attitudes toward Gay Rights: A California University Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Joshua R.; Himes, Heather L.; Kwon, Ellen Miller; Bollinger, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    Research demonstrates that Evangelical Christians generally hold more negative attitudes toward gays and lesbians, and are less supportive of gay rights than the general U.S. population. To assess these attitudes, undergraduate students at an Evangelical Christian university in California (N = 319) completed the Attitudes Toward Lesbians and Gay…

  1. Religious affiliation and attitudes towards gay men: On the mediating role of masculinity threat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reese, G.; Steffens, M.C.; Jonas, K.J.

    2014-01-01

    Previous research suggests that people from some religious backgrounds hold more negative attitudes towards gay men than others do. The current research focuses on psychological variables as an alternative explanation to religious affiliation, testing whether masculinity beliefs regarding gay men an

  2. Gay-Straight Alliance (GSA) Members' Engagement with Sex Education in Canadian High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapointe, Alicia

    2014-01-01

    This paper offers an examination of gay-straight alliance (GSA) members' engagement with sex education, sexual health, and prejudice and discrimination in Canadian public high schools. It explores how five students' (four straight and one gay-identifying) participation in GSAs served as a springboard for learning about and challenging…

  3. Teaching about Gay Civil Rights: U.S. Courts and the Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Robert W.; Cruz, Bárbara C.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the authors explore the timely and sometimes controversial topic of gay civil rights and how the attendant issues might be taught in the social studies classroom. Many teachers shy away from teaching students about gay rights issues for a variety of reasons including personal beliefs, a lack of instructional time as a result of…

  4. Measuring Attitudes Regarding Bisexuality in Lesbian, Gay Male, and Heterosexual Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Jonathan J.; Rochlen, Aaron B.

    1999-01-01

    Reports on studies on the development and validation of the Attitudes Regarding Bisexuality Scale (ARBS). In heterosexuals, subscales were strongly related to attitudes toward lesbians and gay men, frequency of religious attendance, political ideology, and prior contact. In lesbians and gay men, subscales correlated with prior experiences and…

  5. Attitudes of Heterosexual Students toward Their Gay Male and Lesbian Peers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engstrom, Catherine McHugh; Sedlacek, William

    1997-01-01

    Examines heterosexual college students' (N=224) stereotypical negative attitudes toward gay men and lesbians. Results indicate that participants reported more negative attitudes toward both gay male and lesbian peers than toward students whose sexual orientation was not disclosed in social, academic, and family situations. Implications of these…

  6. Gay Gifted Adolescent Suicide and Suicidal Ideation Literature: Research Barriers and Limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedillo, P. J.

    2015-01-01

    Little empirical research has been conducted regarding suicide and suicidal ideation about gay gifted adolescents, so most of what is presented in the literature is based on theories and assumptions. One key assumption was that the psychological challenges of gay gifted youth stemming from sexual identity and giftedness contribute to suicidal…

  7. Trends in Canadian Newspaper Coverage of Gay-Straight Alliances, 2000-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herriot, Lindsay

    2011-01-01

    Gay-straight alliances (GSAs) in Canadian public schools have gained considerable attention from print media since reports first surfaced in the year 2000. This study tracked and analyzed Canadian newspaper reporting about GSA creation. It summarized the shift in public opinion toward lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) youth…

  8. Gay Men's Book Clubs versus Wisconsin's Public Libraries: Political Perceptions in the Absence of Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruitt, John

    2010-01-01

    Because of an absence of dialogue, a tense relationship appears to exist between Wisconsin's gay men's book discussion groups and their local public libraries. Public library directors express interest in accommodating these groups if approached but face budget restrictions and local communities that may oppose these gatherings; gay men's book…

  9. Gay and Lesbian Students in Catholic High Schools: A Qualitative Study of Alumni Narratives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    The Catholic Magisterium has made a distinction between homosexual orientation (disordered but not sinful), homosexual activity (sinful, but judged "with prudence"), rights of gay and lesbian people, and the Church's pastoral responsibilities to gay and lesbian people. Both the Vatican and the American bishops have clearly stated that the topic of…

  10. Gay Men's Book Clubs versus Wisconsin's Public Libraries: Political Perceptions in the Absence of Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruitt, John

    2010-01-01

    Because of an absence of dialogue, a tense relationship appears to exist between Wisconsin's gay men's book discussion groups and their local public libraries. Public library directors express interest in accommodating these groups if approached but face budget restrictions and local communities that may oppose these gatherings; gay men's book…

  11. Challenges of Being Simultaneously Gay or Lesbian and Spiritual and/or Religious: A Narrative Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Melinda; Dzelme, Kristina; Harris, Dale; Hecker, Lorna

    2001-01-01

    Describes the struggle that gays and lesbians face as they incorporate their sexual orientation and identity within the context of an existing religious or spiritual identity. Narrative directions are suggested for marriage and family therapists and their work with gays and lesbians who are confronted with these issues. (BF)

  12. Heterosexual Privilege Awareness, Prejudice, and Support of Gay Marriage among Diversity Course Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Kim; Stewart, Briana

    2010-01-01

    Although most research investigating diversity courses focuses on attitudes toward racial minorities and women, these courses may also influence student attitudes toward lesbians and gay men. The current study assessed student awareness of heterosexual privilege, prejudice against lesbians and gay men, and support for same-sex marriage. Students…

  13. Application of Herek's attitudes toward lesbians and gay men scale in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerendonk, Bas van de; Eisinga, Rob; Felling, Albert

    2003-01-01

    national sample of 921 respondents from the Dutch populadon completed the translated, slightly modified version of Herek's Attitudes Toward Lesbians and Gay Men Scale, originally developed in the USA for the assessment of attitudes toward lesbians and gay men. The present study was the first attempt

  14. Changes in Diversity Course Student Prejudice and Attitudes toward Heterosexual Privilege and Gay Marriage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Kim A.; Stewart, Briana

    2010-01-01

    This study examined diversity course influence on student prejudice against lesbians and gay men, awareness of heterosexual privilege, and support for gay marriage. The study included heterosexual female students in psychology of women, introduction to women's studies, and nondiversity psychology courses. Students in diversity courses expressed…

  15. Resilience within the Family Networks of Lesbians and Gay Men: Intentionality and Redifinition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald, Ramona Faith

    2002-01-01

    Reviews literature on gay and lesbian family networks to highlight resilience processes that enable members to create and strengthen their family networks. Brief references are made to the literature that compares resilience in ethnic minority families. Urges further study of family networks of gays, lesbians, and other marginal families. (JDM)

  16. Are Gay and Lesbian Cohabiting Couples Really Different from Heterosexual Married Couples?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurdek, Lawrence A.

    2004-01-01

    Both partners from gay and lesbian cohabiting couples without children were compared longitudinally with both partners from heterosexual married couples with children (N at first assessment = 80, 53, and 80 couples, respectively) on variables from 5 domains indicative of relationship health. For 50% of the comparisons, gay and lesbian partners did…

  17. 78 FR 33957 - Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Pride Month, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-06

    ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8989 of May 31, 2013 Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Pride Month... reality. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) Americans and their allies have been hard at work... justice everywhere.'' In the past year, for the first time, voters in multiple States affirmed marriage...

  18. Big Gay Church: Sermons to and for an Underserved Population in Art Education Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoades, Mindi; Cosier, Kim; Davenport, Melanie G.; Sanders, James H., III; Wolfgang, Courtnie N.

    2013-01-01

    While the past decade shows dramatic progress in tolerance, acceptance, and support for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer/questioning (LGBTQ) people/rights in the United States, this population remains underserved. Statistics on LGBTQ youth suicide remain troublingly high; yet, when LGBTQ youth attend schools with Gay-Straight…

  19. When School Are Not Safe Places: Reconnecting Gay and Lesbian Young People to Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallon, Gerald P.

    1997-01-01

    Describes how two schools have made themselves more open to gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender students. Recommends that schools develop policies that protect students, train teachers and counselors in suicide- and violence prevention, provide support groups for straight and gay students, make information available in school libraries, and…

  20. Mental health and clinical correlates in lesbian, gay, bisexual, and queer young adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grant, Jon E; Odlaug, Brian Lawrence; Derbyshire, Katherine;

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the prevalence of mental health disorders and their clinical correlates in a university sample of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and queer (LGBQ) students.......This study examined the prevalence of mental health disorders and their clinical correlates in a university sample of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and queer (LGBQ) students....

  1. From Romance to Magical Realism: Limits and Possibilities in Gay Adolescent Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisp, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Authors of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer/questioning (LGBTQ) adolescent novels have recently moved away from addressing the "problem" of sexual identity and have instead focused on personal and societal "acceptance" of non-normative sexualities. Within the increasing number of "acceptance" titles published depicting gay males,…

  2. "What Does Gay Mean?" How To Talk with Kids about Sexual Orientation and Prejudice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponton, Lynn

    This brochure is written out of concern for the impact anti-gay prejudice and discrimination have on children--gay and straight. Although people have different views about homosexuality, most Americans believe that everyone should be treated fairly and with respect. American society has many kinds of families, and many people have neighbors,…

  3. Examining the Role of Peer Relationships in the Lives of Gay and Bisexual Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, Stuart L.

    2015-01-01

    School social workers can serve as valuable supporters of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youths in the public school system by providing services aimed to improve school climates for all students. This article describes a qualitative study that examined gay and bisexual adolescent experiences with peer support using a…

  4. Demographic Trends and Advocacy Experiences of Gay-Straight Alliance Advisors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graybill, Emily C.; Varjas, Kris; Meyers, Joel; Dever, Bridget V.; Greenberg, Daphne; Roach, Andrew T.; Morillas, Catalina

    2015-01-01

    Using an ecological model, the individual-, school-, and sociocultural-level characteristics that affect gay-straight alliance (GSA) advisors were examined in the current study. The formation of GSAs has been one way that schools have sought to improve the school climate for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth. Limited information…

  5. "That's so Gay": Heterosexual Male Undergraduates and the Perpetuation of Sexual Orientation Microagressions on Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodford, Michael R.; Howell, Michael L.; Kulick, Alex; Silverschanz, Perry

    2013-01-01

    "That's so gay," a popular expression on campuses, is a sexual orientation microaggression that can contribute to a hostile environment for lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) students. Using data from a campus climate survey conducted at a large urban university, we investigated use of the phrase among heterosexual male undergraduates who…

  6. Attitudes of Heterosexual Men and Women Toward HIV Negative and Positive Gay Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pala, Andrea Norcini; Villano, Paola; Clinton, Lauren

    2017-01-01

    Attitudes of Italian heterosexual men and women toward gay men, both HIV positive and negative, are poorly investigated. Italian culture is still extremely conservative and provides limited support to the gay community (e.g., lack of same-sex marriage recognition). Consequently, gay men experience social exclusion and disparities. The present study explores the association between homophobia and closeness with sexual orientation and HIV status. 261 heterosexual Italian men and women were assessed for feelings of closeness and homophobia after reading a vignette where the character was C1: heterosexual and HIV negative; C2: gay and HIV negative; or C3: gay and HIV positive. Experiences of homophobia and closeness varied depending on gender of participant and condition assigned, and higher levels of homophobia were correlated with lower levels of closeness regardless of HIV status. Implications and future directions are discussed. PMID:27892803

  7. Attitudes of Heterosexual Men and Women Toward HIV Negative and Positive Gay Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norcini Pala, Andrea; Villano, Paola; Clinton, Lauren

    2017-01-01

    Attitudes of Italian heterosexual men and women toward gay men, both HIV positive and negative, are poorly investigated. Italian culture is still extremely conservative and provides limited support to the gay community (e.g., lack of same-sex marriage recognition). Consequently, gay men experience social exclusion and disparities. The present study explores the association between homophobia and closeness with sexual orientation and HIV status. 261 heterosexual Italian men and women were assessed for feelings of closeness and homophobia after reading a vignette where the character was C1: heterosexual and HIV negative; C2: gay and HIV negative; or C3: gay and HIV positive. Experiences of homophobia and closeness varied depending on gender of participant and condition assigned, and higher levels of homophobia were correlated with lower levels of closeness regardless of HIV status. Implications and future directions are discussed.

  8. Coparenting among lesbian, gay, and heterosexual couples: associations with adopted children's outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, Rachel H; Patterson, Charlotte J

    2013-01-01

    Coparenting is associated with child behavior in families with heterosexual parents, but less is known about coparenting among lesbian- and gay-parent families. Associations were studied among self-reported divisions of labor, coparenting observations, and child adjustment (Mage  = 3 years) among 104 adoptive families headed by lesbian, gay, or heterosexual couples. Lesbian and gay couples reported sharing child care, whereas heterosexual couples reported specialization (i.e., mothers did more child care than fathers). Observations confirmed this pattern-lesbian and gay parents participated more equally than heterosexual parents during family interaction. Lesbian couples showed the most supportive and least undermining behavior, whereas gay couples showed the least supportive behavior, and heterosexual couples the most undermining behavior. Overall, supportive coparenting was associated with better child adjustment.

  9. "Appearance potent"? A content analysis of UK gay and straight men's magazines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowski, Glen S; Fawkner, Helen; Slater, Amy; Tiggemann, Marika

    2014-09-01

    With little actual appraisal, a more 'appearance potent' (i.e., a reverence for appearance ideals) subculture has been used to explain gay men's greater body dissatisfaction in comparison to straight men's. This study sought to assess the respective appearance potency of each subculture by a content analysis of 32 issues of the most read gay (Attitude, Gay Times) and straight men's magazines (Men's Health, FHM) in the UK. Images of men and women were coded for their physical characteristics, objectification and nudity, as were the number of appearance adverts and articles. The gay men's magazines featured more images of men that were appearance ideal, nude and sexualized than the straight men's magazines. The converse was true for the images of women and appearance adverts. Although more research is needed to understand the effect of this content on the viewer, the findings are consistent with a more appearance potent gay male subculture.

  10. Internalized Homophobia and Drug Use in a National Cohort of Gay and Bisexual Men: Examining Depression, Sexual Anxiety, and Gay Community Attachment as Mediating Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Raymond L; Starks, Tyrel J; Grov, Christian; Parsons, Jeffrey T

    2017-06-12

    The minority stress process of internalized homophobia (IH) has been associated with a range of adverse health outcomes among gay and bisexual men (GBM). However, evidence is mixed regarding the effect of IH on drug use, suggesting the potential role of multiple mediated pathways. Researchers have linked depression, sexual anxiety, and gay community attachment with IH. Depression, sexual anxiety, and gay community attachment have also been linked with drug use and drug-related problems suggesting potential mediating roles. A U.S. national sample of 1071 HIV-negative GBM completed at-home surveys, including measures of sociodemographic characteristics, IH, depression, sexual anxiety, gay community attachment, and drug use and associated problems. Adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics, depression mediated the association between IH and recent drug use. IH was positively associated with depression, and depression was positively associated with recent drug use. Gay community attachment partially mediated drug-related problems. IH had a positive direct association with drug-related problems and a negative direct association with gay community attachment. Gay community attachment had a positive association with drug-related problems. IH was positively associated with sexual anxiety, but sexual anxiety was not associated with either drug outcome. Efforts to reduce IH among HIV-negative GBM are likely to have a positive impact on mental health problems, as well as reduce risk for drug use and drug-related problems. Gay communities could provide the social support necessary for reducing IH; however, emphasis on community level interventions that address factors that increase risk for drug-related problems remains important.

  11. The Geneva gay men's health project : a community-research collaboration to assess and improve the health of gay men in Geneva, Switzerland

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Jen

    2013-01-01

    Comprehensive overviews of research in the late 1990s on health issues relevant to gay men, lesbians, bisexuals, and transgender people (LGBT) identified issues which appear to affect sexual minorities disproportionately, but the quality of the available data was deemed too poor to translate into policy initiatives. Dialogai, a gay organization in Geneva active in HIV prevention work, embarked on a community-research partnership with the Institute for Social and Preventive Medicine, Universi...

  12. The GAy MEn Sex StudieS erectile dysfunction among Belgian gay men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vansintejan J

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Johan Vansintejan, Jan Vandevoorde, Dirk Devroey Department of Family Medicine, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB, Brussels, Belgium Aim: To determine the prevalence of erectile dysfunction (ED in a sample of the Belgian men who have sex with men (MSM population, and to assess the relevance of major predictors such as age, relationship, and education. We investigated the use of phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5 inhibitors among Belgian MSM. Methods: An internet-based survey on sexual behavior and sexual dysfunctions, called GAy MEn Sex StudieS (GAMESSS, was administered to MSM, aged 18 years or older, between the months of April and December 2008. The questionnaire used was a compilation of the Kinsey's Heterosexual–Homosexual Rating Scale, Erection Quality Scale (EQS, and the shortened version of the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5. Results: Of the 1752 participants, 45% indicated having some problems getting an erection. In this group of MSM, 71% reported mild ED; 22% mild to moderate ED; 6% moderate ED; and 2% severe ED. Independent predictors for the presence of ED were: age (odds ratio [OR] = 1.04, P < 0.0001, having a steady relationship (OR = 0.59, P < 0.0001, frequency of sex with their partner (OR = 1.22, P < 0.0001, versatile sex role (OR = 1.58, P = 0.016, passive sex role (OR = 3.12, P < 0.0001, problems with libido (OR = 1.15, P = 0.011, ejaculation problems (OR = 1.33, P < 0.0001, and anodyspareunia (OR = 0.87, P < 0.0001. Ten percent of the Belgian MSM used a PDE5 inhibitor (age 43 ± 11 years; mean ± standard deviation and 83% of them were satisfied with the effects. "Street drugs" were used by 43% of MSM to improve ED. Conclusion: Forty-five percent of participating Belgian MSM reported some degree of ED and 10% used a PDE5 inhibitor to improve erections. Older MSM reported more ED. MSM, who were in a steady relationship or frequently had sex with a partner, reported less ED. MSM with ejaculation problems

  13. Not STRAIGHT forward for gays: A look at the lived experiences of gay men, living in Cape Town, with regard to their worker roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soeker, Shaheed; Bonn, Gerri-Lee; de Vos, Zahraa; Gobhozi, Thobile; Pape, Candice; Ribaudo, Shelly

    2015-06-05

    The South African constitution protects the rights of gays; however in the workplace gays experience discrimination and marginalization. As a result of marginalization they struggle to reach their potential regarding career development and the fulfilment of their worker role. The study explored the experiences and perceptions of gay males with regard to acquiring and maintaining their worker roles. The study is phenomenological and qualitative in design. Eleven of these men participated in two focus groups. One male participated in two in-depth interviews and one interview was conducted with a key informant. Three themes emerged: 1) Being boxed in, 2) The glass ceiling, 3) This is where I can wear my feather boa. The study findings clearly depicted the many barriers experienced by homosexual men and how this negatively impacts on their worker role. Minimal facilitatory factors exist, to assist gay males %in with regard to their worker role. It was found that homo-prejudice still exists in South Africa and its workplaces and has a negative impact not only on gay men's worker role but also their well-being. This significantly highlights the great need for occupational therapy intervention in the lives of these gay men, and their workplaces.

  14. How Many People are Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender?

    OpenAIRE

    GATES, GARY J.

    2011-01-01

    Drawing on information from four recent national and two state-level population-based surveys, the analyses suggest that there are more than 8 million adults in the US who are lesbian, gay, or bisexual, comprising 3.5% of the adult population. There are also nearly 700,000 transgender individuals in the US. In total, the study suggests that approximately 9 million Americans – roughly the population of New Jersey – identify as LGBT. Key findings from the study include among adults who identify...

  15. Religion and suicide risk in lesbian, gay and bisexual Austrians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kralovec, Karl; Fartacek, Clemens; Fartacek, Reinhold; Plöderl, Martin

    2014-04-01

    Religion is known to be a protective factor against suicide. However, religiously affiliated sexual minority individuals often report a conflict between religion and sexual identity. Therefore, the protective role of religion against suicide in sexual minority people is unclear. We investigated the effect of religion on suicide risk in a sample of 358 lesbian, gay and bisexual Austrians. Religion was associated with higher scores of internalized homophobia, but with fewer suicide attempts. Our data indicate that religion might be both a risk and a protective factor against suicidality in religiously affiliated sexual minority individuals.

  16. Bullying Among Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earnshaw, Valerie A; Bogart, Laura M; Poteat, V Paul; Reisner, Sari L; Schuster, Mark A

    2016-12-01

    Bullying of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth is prevalent in the United States, and represents LGBT stigma when tied to sexual orientation and/or gender identity or expression. LGBT youth commonly report verbal, relational, and physical bullying, and damage to property. Bullying undermines the well-being of LGBT youth, with implications for risky health behaviors, poor mental health, and poor physical health that may last into adulthood. Pediatricians can play a vital role in preventing and identifying bullying, providing counseling to youth and their parents, and advocating for programs and policies to address LGBT bullying. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Sex and the community: the implications of neighbourhoods and social networks for sexual risk behaviours among urban gay men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Brian C; Carpiano, Richard M; Easterbrook, Adam; Parsons, Jeffrey T

    2012-09-01

    Gay neighbourhoods have historically served as vital places for gay socialising, and gay social networks are important sources of social support. Yet, few studies have examined the influence of these forms of community on sexual health. Informed by theoretical frameworks on neighbourhoods and networks, we employ multi-level modelling to test hypotheses concerning whether gay neighbourhoods and social network factors are associated with five sexual risk behaviours: receptive and insertive unprotected anal intercourse (UAI), barebacking identity, recent internet use for finding sexual partners, and 'Party and Play' (PnP). Our analyses of a community-based sample of gay men in New York City reveal little evidence for the direct effect of gay enclaves on sexual risk with the exception of PnP, which was more likely among gay enclave residents. Having a network composed predominantly of other gay men was associated with insertive UAI, PnP, and internet use for meeting sexual partners. This network type also mediated the association between gay neighbourhoods and higher odds of insertive UAI as well as PnP. Our findings highlight the sexual health implications of two important facets of gay community and, in doing so, indicate the need to better contextualise the sexual health risks faced by gay men.

  18. Le tourisme gay : aller ailleurs pour être soi-même ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Jaurand

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available L’orientation dominante des études sur le tourisme, longtemps marquées par l’importance de la dimension économique et par un désintérêt pour les questions touchant au corps, au sexe ou au genre, explique le silence autour du tourisme gay (qui n’est pas le tourisme des gays jusqu’aux années 1990. Pourtant, ce tourisme identitaire existe depuis longtemps et sa visibilité se développe, surtout dans les pays développés occidentaux. La métaphore du voyage et la recherche du paradis (sexuel perdu sont au cœur de l’identité homosexuelle depuis le 19 e siècle. Le tourisme gay se caractérise par des structures (tour-opérateurs, hébergements, croisières… et des destinations spécifiques. Pour les gays il s’agit, dans l’espace-temps des vacances, propice au relâchement et à la recréation de soi, de fuir un monde structuré par le système hétérosexiste et de rejoindre les autres (gays. La recherche de la rencontre du semblable et la sexualisation assumée du tourisme gay, à travers la libération et la dénudation des corps, participent d’une véritable quête pour valider son identité de gay. Elles font que les destinations préférées par les gays sont les stations balnéaires et les grandes villes : elles sont en effet dotées d’espaces publics, d’équipements commerciaux et de formes d’hébergement fermées favorables aux interactions et à la réalisation d’une éphémère « communauté gay ». The mainstream orientation of tourism studies, focused on the sole economic dimension for a long time, without any interest for questions about the body, sex or gender, explains the silence surrounding gay tourism (which is not the tourism of gay men since the 1990s. However, this identity tourism has existed for a long time and its visibility is growing, especially in Western developed countries. The metaphor of the journey and the search for a (sexual paradise lost have been at the core of the

  19. “Si Nicaragua Venció”: Lesbian and Gay Solidarity with the Revolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily K. Hobson

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the radical imagination of lesbian and gay activism in solidarity with the Nicaraguan Revolution. It examines the reasons US lesbian and gay radicals supported that revolution and investigates the ways that homoerotic, especially lesbian, desire shaped their solidarity. Drawing on Herbert Marcuse and Michel Foucault, the article argues that lesbian and gay radicals viewed the Nicaraguan Revolution in erotic and heterotopic terms. Posters, fliers, and interviews reveal that US activists, people of color and white, represented the Revolution and solidarity through tropes of female masculinity and women’s affection. Many Nicaraguan lesbians and gay men shared these nonnormative images of socialist change. Yet while Nicaraguans claimed Sandinismo as their own, for US activists revolution remained a distant object of desire and solidarity a “seduction,” “crush,” or embrace.  United States activists who embraced developmentalist views of Latin American sexualities remained unable to witness lesbian and gay life inside Nicaragua, while lesbian and gay Sandinistas kept silent about FSLN homophobia so as not to undermine solidarity against the Contra war. Desire served as a powerful tool for mobilizing transnational solidarity. By failing to examine desire critically, however, US activists limited their communications with Nicaraguan lesbians and gay men and weakened the relationship they sought with revolution itself.

  20. Parent adjustment over time in gay, lesbian, and heterosexual parent families adopting from foster care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavner, Justin A; Waterman, Jill; Peplau, Letitia Anne

    2014-01-01

    Although increasing numbers of gay and lesbian individuals and couples are adopting children, gay men and lesbian women continue to face increased scrutiny and legal obstacles from the child welfare system. To date, little research has compared the experiences of gay or lesbian and heterosexual adoptive parents over time, limiting conceptual understandings of the similarities they share and the unique challenges that gay and lesbian adoptive parents may face. This study compared the adoption satisfaction, depressive symptoms, parenting stress, and social support at 2, 12, and 24 months postplacement of 82 parents (60 heterosexual, 15 gay, 7 lesbian) adopting children from foster care in Los Angeles County. Few differences were found between heterosexual and gay or lesbian parents at any of the assessments or in their patterns of change over time. On average, parents in both household types reported significant increases in adoption satisfaction and maintained low, nonclinical levels of depressive symptoms and parenting stress over time. Across all family types, greater parenting stress was associated with more depressive symptoms and lower adoption satisfaction. Results indicated many similarities between gay or lesbian and heterosexual adoptive parents, and highlight a need for services to support adoptive parents throughout the transition to parenthood to promote their well-being. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. The gay librarian: a comparative analysis of attitudes towards professional gender issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, J V

    1995-01-01

    Librarianship is a feminized profession, and like teaching, nursing, and social work with which it shares the occupational traits of a "semi-profession," its low status and prestige have been attributed to a negative feminine image. To date, discussion of a corresponding male librarian image, general male issues, and the broader topic of gender issues has been minimal within the profession, while serious discussion of gay male librarians and their professional identity has been virtually nil. This study compares the responses of straight and self-identified gay males to an exploratory survey of male members of the American Library Association. The topics covered by the survey include reasons for entry into the field, the existence and identity of a male librarian stereotype, and gender issues generally, including gender stratification of work and sexual discrimination and/or harassment. Self-identified gay subjects share many characteristics in common with the straight cohort, including the identification of a gay male stereotype and some denial surrounding gender equity issues. On the other hand, the tentative findings of this exploratory study raise the question of whether both gay and straight male subjects overestimate the number of gay men in librarianship. The report concludes with an update on gay issues within the profession since the survey was completed, and recommendations for further research.

  2. Moving toward a holistic conceptual framework for understanding healthy aging among gay men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halkitis, Perry N; Kapadia, Farzana; Ompad, Danielle C; Perez-Figueroa, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    In the last four decades, we have witnessed vast and important transitions in the social, economic, political, and health contexts of the lived experiences of gay men in the United States. This dynamic period, as evidenced most prominently by the transition of the gay rights movement to a civil rights movement, has shifted the exploration of gay men's health from one focusing primarily on HIV/AIDS into a mainstream consideration of the overall health and wellbeing of gay men. Against this backdrop, aging gay men in the United States constitute a growing population, for whom further investigations of health states and health-related disparities are warranted. In order to advance our understanding of the health and wellbeing of aging gay men, we outline here a multilevel, ecosocial conceptual framework that integrates salient environmental, social, psychosocial, and sociodeomgraphic factors into sets of macro-, meso-, and micro-level constructs that can be applied to comprehensively study health states and health care utilization in older gay men.

  3. Shear viscosity of binary mixtures: The Gay-Berne potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khordad, R., E-mail: khordad@mail.yu.ac.ir [Department of Physics, College of Sciences, Yasouj University, Yasouj 75914-353 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-05-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Most useful potential model to study the real systems is the Gay-Berne (GB) potential. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We use GB model to examine thermodynamical properties of some anisotropic binary mixtures in two different phases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The integral equation methods are applied to solve numerically the Percus-Yevick (PY) equation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We obtain expansion coefficients of correlation functions needed to calculate the properties of studied mixtures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The results are compared with the available experimental data [e.g., HFC-125 + propane, R-125/143a, methanol + toluene, etc.] - Abstract: The Gay-Berne (GB) potential model is an interesting and useful model to study the real systems. Using the potential model, we intend to examine the thermodynamical properties of some anisotropic binary mixtures in two different phases, liquid and gas. For this purpose, we apply the integral equation method and solve numerically the Percus-Yevick (PY) integral equation. Then, we obtain the expansion coefficients of correlation functions to calculate the thermodynamical properties. Finally, we compare our results with the available experimental data [e.g., HFC-125 + propane, R-125/143a, methanol + toluene, benzene + methanol, cyclohexane + ethanol, benzene + ethanol, carbon tetrachloride + ethyl acetate, and methanol + ethanol]. The results show that the GB potential model is capable for predicting the thermodynamical properties of binary mixtures with acceptable accuracy.

  4. Gay and lesbian couples in Italy: comparisons with heterosexual couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonelli, Paolo; Dèttore, Davide; Lasagni, Irene; Snyder, Douglas K; Balderrama-Durbin, Christina

    2014-12-01

    Assessing couple relationships across diverse languages and cultures has important implications for both clinical intervention and prevention. This is especially true for nontraditional relationships potentially subject to various expressions of negative societal evaluation or bias. Few empirically validated measures of relationship functioning have been developed for cross-cultural applications, and none have been examined for their psychometric sufficiency for evaluating same-sex couples across different languages and cultures. The current study examined the psychometric properties of an Italian translation of the Marital Satisfaction Inventory - Revised (MSI-R), a 150-item 13-scale measure of couple relationship functioning, for its use in assessing the intimate relationships of gay and lesbian couples in Italy. Results for these couples were compared to data from heterosexual married and unmarried cohabiting couples from the same geographical region, as well as to previously published data for gay, lesbian, and unmarried heterosexual couples from the United States. Findings suggest that, despite unique societal pressures confronting Italian same-sex couples, these relationships appear resilient and fare well both overall and in specific domains of functioning compared to heterosexual couples both in Italy and the United States.

  5. Gay men and intimate partner violence: a gender analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliffe, John L; Han, Christina; Maria, Estephanie Sta; Lohan, Maria; Howard, Terry; Stewart, Donna E; MacMillan, Harriet

    2014-05-01

    Though intimate partner violence (IPV) is predominately understood as a women's health issue most often emerging within heterosexual relationships, there is increasing recognition of the existence of male victims of IPV. In this qualitative study we explored connections between masculinities and IPV among gay men. The findings show how recognising IPV was based on an array of participant experiences, including the emotional, physical and sexual abuse inflicted by their partner, which in turn led to three processes. Normalising and concealing violence referred to the participants' complicity in accepting violence as part of their relationship and their reluctance to disclose that they were victims of IPV. Realising a way out included the participants' understandings that the triggers for, and patterns of, IPV would best be quelled by leaving the relationship. Nurturing recovery detailed the strategies employed by participants to mend and sustain their wellbeing in the aftermath of leaving an abusive relationship. In terms of masculinities and men's health research, the findings reveal the limits of idealising hegemonic masculinities and gender relations as heterosexual, while highlighting a plurality of gay masculinities and the need for IPV support services that bridge the divide between male and female as well as between homosexual and heterosexual. © 2014 The Authors. Sociology of Health & Illness © 2014 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness/John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. HIV seropositive gay men: understanding adoption of safe sexual practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, G; Savard, J; Kok, G; Fortin, C; Boyer, R

    1996-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the best predictors of safe sex practices among HIV seropositive gay men. A group of 96 homosexual men living with HIV completed a questionnaire that investigated theoretical constructs of the Ajzen's (1988) theory of planned behavior with respect to condom use for anal intercourse and sexual practices without anal intercourse. Other variables such as Triandis's (1977) construct of personal normative belief, psychological distress, and alcohol and drug use before sexual encounters were also investigated. Results indicated that the best predictor of intention to use condoms was perceived behavioral control. Personal normative belief was another important predictor of this intention. Although the best predictor of intention to have only sex without anal intercourse was perceived subjective norm, this intention was also significantly explained by perceived behavioral control. Moreover, perceived behavioral control was a significant predictor of having only sex without anal intercourse. Public health interventions among HIV seropositive gay men should aim mainly at increasing perception of behavioral control.

  7. New Italian lesbian, gay and bisexual psychotherapy guidelines: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingiardi, Vittorio; Nardelli, Nicola; Drescher, Jack

    2015-01-01

    Although homosexuality was depathologized in the last century and the majority of mental health professionals consider it to be a normal variant of human sexuality, some psychologists and psychiatrists still have negative attitudes toward lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) clients. Sometimes they provide interventions aimed at changing sexual orientation through 'reparative' or 'conversion' therapies. At other times their interventions are influenced by anti-gay prejudices or simply by lack of knowledge about sexual minorities. This paper argues for the need for appropriate treatment guidelines aimed at providing bias-free, respectful, and effective interventions given that Italian health associations have delayed providing them. Some of the main guidelines recently approved by the Consiglio Nazionale dell'Ordine degli Psicologi (National Council of the Italian Association of Psychologists) are presented. Issues addressed include differences between gender and sexual orientation, minority stress, including perceived stigma and internalized stigma, homophobic bullying, coming out, and resilience. Respectful listening to LGB and questioning clients, affirming their identities and fostering a sense of resilience are essential requirements for all mental health professionals wishing to provide effective interventions in a society where sexual minorities are subjected to discrimination throughout their entire life cycle.

  8. What Gay-Lussac didn't tell us

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrow, C. H.; Amato, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    Gay-Lussac's 1801 experiments establishing the law of volumes for gases are brilliantly simple, and he described them with a level of detail that was new to physics writing. But he did not present his actual measurements or tell us how he analyzed them to conclude that between 0 to 100 °C, a volume of any gas will expand by about 37.5%. We review his experiments and conclude that he measured initial and final volumes at slightly different pressures. By using the gas laws and his apparatus diagrams, we corrected his data so that they correspond to constant pressure. His corrected results give ΔV/V=36.6%, the currently accepted value for nearly ideal gases. Aside from their intrinsic interest, our analyses can provide students intriguing applications of the gas laws and Pascal's law and motivate them to consider Pascal's paradox. We also note the influence of ballooning and of the French Revolution on Gay-Lussac.

  9. Gay and bisexual men's interest in marriage: an Australian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philpot, Steven P; Ellard, Jeanne; Duncan, Duane; Dowsett, Gary W; Bavinton, Benjamin R; Down, Ian; Keen, Phillip; Hammoud, Mohamed A; Prestage, Garrett

    2016-05-31

    Same-sex marriage is a widely debated issue, including in Australia. This study used an online anonymous survey, with free-text responses, to investigate romantic and sexual relationships among Australian gay and bisexual men. We sought to identify what proportion of such men intended to marry their primary regular partner if marriage was made legally available to same-sex couples in Australia, as well as factors associated with intention or non-intention to marry. Most men in the sample did not intend to marry their primary regular partner. Even among men who considered themselves to be in a 'relationship' with their primary regular partner, less than half intended to marry him. However, many men who would not marry their current primary regular partner agreed that same-sex marriage should be available for gay and bisexual men in Australia. Reasons for intention to marry included a desire for social and legal equality, and ideas about marriage as a rite of passage, an expression of love and the most valued form of relationship in Australia. Those who did not intend to marry their primary regular partner offered a number of reasons, including that the nature of their relationship was incompatible with marriage, and reported a critical position towards marriage as a heteronormative institution.

  10. Primary care of lesbian and gay patients: educating ourselves and our students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, A E

    1996-01-01

    Although a significant proportion of the population is gay or lesbian, physicians receive little formal training about homosexuality, and the unique health care needs of these patients are often ignored. Gay men and women may have higher rates of depression, suicide, alcoholism, certain cancers, and cardiovascular disease than their heterosexual counterparts. In addition, they are at risk of being victims of violence because of their sexual orientation. Due to fear of stigmatization by the medical community, the most significant health risk for lesbians, gays, and bisexuals may be that they avoid routine health care. Gay youth are particularly vulnerable to internal and external pressures, resulting in higher rates of substance abuse, suicide, and homelessness. Older gay men and women, who generally view themselves positively, may be troubled by declining health and loneliness. Physicians can improve the health care of gay and bisexual men and women and their families by maintaining a non-homophobic attitude toward these patients, distinguishing sexual behavior from sexual identity, communicating with gender-neutral terms, and maintaining awareness of how their own attitudes affect clinical judgment. Medical educators should avoid making assumptions about the sexuality of their residents and students. Institutions need to realize that the presence of supportive heterosexual and openly gay faculty will help create an environment that fosters learning for all students. Scant research exists about the best ways to teach about the special challenges gay men and lesbians face. However, the majority of surveyed medical students prefer that issues regarding gays and lesbians be integrated throughout the entire medical school curriculum.

  11. Gender Nonconformity and Birth Order in Relation to Anal Sex Role Among Gay Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift-Gallant, Ashlyn; Coome, Lindsay A; Monks, D Ashley; VanderLaan, Doug P

    2017-04-04

    Androphilia is associated with an elevated number of older brothers among natal males. This association, termed the fraternal birth order effect, has been observed among gay men who exhibit marked gender nonconformity. Gender nonconformity has been linked to gay men's preferred anal sex role. The present study investigated whether these two lines of research intersect by addressing whether the fraternal birth order effect was associated with both gender nonconformity and a receptive anal sex role (243 gay men, 91 heterosexual men). Consistent with previous research, we identified the fraternal birth order effect in our sample of gay men. Also, gay men were significantly more gender-nonconforming on adulthood and recalled childhood measures compared to heterosexual men. When gay men were compared based on anal sex role (i.e., top, versatile, bottom), all groups showed significantly greater recalled childhood and adult male gender nonconformity than heterosexual men, but bottoms were most nonconforming. Only gay men with a bottom anal sex role showed evidence of a fraternal birth order effect. A sororal birth order effect was found in our sample of gay men, driven by versatiles. No significant associations were found between fraternal birth order and gender nonconformity measures. These results suggest that the fraternal birth order effect may apply to a subset of gay men who have a bottom anal sex role preference and that this subgroup is more gender-nonconforming. However, there were no significant associations between fraternal birth order and gender nonconformity at the individual level. As such, based on the present study, whether processes underpinning the fraternal birth order effect influence gender nonconformity is equivocal.

  12. Attitudes toward gay, lesbian, and bisexual persons among heterosexual liberal arts college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinrichs, Donald W; Rosenberg, Pamela J

    2002-01-01

    This research focuses on attitudes toward homosexuals and homosexuality among 692 heterosexual students at six liberal arts colleges. Attitudes, assessed in a variety of ways, are examined in relation to students' Greek affiliation, sex role attitudes, religion and religiosity, and contact with and knowledge of gays, lesbians, and bisexuals. Results suggest that attributes predicting acceptance of gay, lesbian, and bisexual persons are female sex, liberal sex-role attitudes, lower religiosity as measured both by beliefs and by attendance, membership in more liberal Protestant denominations, attendance at colleges that do not have Greek letter social organizations, and having positive contacts with gay, lesbian, and/or bisexual persons.

  13. Non-gay-identifying men who have sex with men: formative research results from Seattle, Washington.

    OpenAIRE

    Goldbaum, G; Perdue, T R; Higgins, D.

    1996-01-01

    Non-gay-identifying men who have sex with men are at risk for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. To understand these men and to develop interventions to reduce their HIV risks, the authors interviewed staff at agencies that serve non-gay-identifying men who have sex with men, business people who interact with them, and the men themselves. Interviews were augmented with focus groups of non-gay-identifying men who have sex with men and field observations at sites identified as places...

  14. Nursing's silence on lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender issues: the need for emancipatory efforts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliason, Michele J; Dibble, Suzanne; Dejoseph, Jeanne

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to selectively review the nursing literature for publications related to lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender health, using (1) a key word search of CINAHL, the database of nursing and allied health publications; (2) from the top-10 nursing journals by 5-year impact factor from 2005 to 2009, counting articles about lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender issues; and (3) content analysis of the articles found in those journals. Only 0.16% of articles focused on lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender health (8 of nearly 5000 articles) and were biased toward authors outside of the United States. We discuss the impact of this silence.

  15. Lesbians and Gay Men's Vacation Motivations, Perceptions, and Constraints: A Study of Cruise Vacation Choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeden, Clare; Lester, Jo-Anne; Jarvis, Nigel

    2016-08-01

    This study explores the push-pull vacation motivations of gay male and lesbian consumers and examines how these underpin their perceptions and purchase constraints of a mainstream and LGBT(1) cruise. Findings highlight a complex vacation market. Although lesbians and gay men share many of the same travel motivations as their heterosexual counterparts, the study reveals sexuality is a significant variable in their perception of cruise vacations, which further influences purchase constraints and destination choice. Gay men have more favorable perceptions than lesbians of both mainstream and LGBT cruises. The article recommends further inquiry into the multifaceted nature of motivations, perception, and constraints within the LGBT market in relation to cruise vacations.

  16. Comparative morality judgments about lesbians and gay men teaching and adopting children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Brenda J; Michaelson, Christina

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare morality judgments of American Catholics and the general public about lesbians and gay men adopting and teaching children. The general sample endorsed higher agreement that lesbians and gay men should be allowed to adopt and to teach children compared to the Catholic only sample. Older participants were less accepting than all other age groups, and there was an interaction effect between education and political ideology such that those with less education and with more politically conservative beliefs were generally less accepting of lesbians and gay men adopting and teaching children.

  17. 'Gay boy talk' meets 'girl talk': HIV risk assessment assumptions in young gay men's sexual health communication with best friends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutchler, Matt G; McDavitt, Bryce

    2011-06-01

    Young adults, particularly young gay men (YGM), are vulnerable to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Yet, little is known about how YGM discuss sexual health issues with their friends ('gay boy talk'). We conducted semi-structured interviews with YGM and their best friends (11 YGM/YGM dyads and 13 YGM/heterosexual female dyads). In this paper, we examine risk assessment assumptions conveyed within YGM's communication about sexual health with their friends and how, if at all, the sexual scripts guiding these assumptions may differ between YGM and young women. Findings demonstrated that, while these young adults clearly intended to support their friends and promote safer sex, they also conveyed assumptions about HIV risk assessment, especially regarding sexual partner selection, that may actually increase their friends' risk for HIV infection. Since inaccurate HIV risk assessment assumptions were transmitted via sexual health communication between peers, it is suggested that such assumptions may need to be addressed in HIV prevention programs working with YGM and their friends. Further, gender differences were identified within the sexual scripts shared between YGM and their friends, suggesting that such interventions should be tailored to the specific needs of different friendship networks.

  18. Race Fucker: representações raciais na pornografia gay Race Fucker: racial representations in gay pornography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osmundo Pinho

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Neste estudo, procuro explorar determinada perspectiva crítica relacionada à articulação entre raça, sexualidade e gênero, entendendo que a pornografia gay se prestaria exemplarmente a flagrar a produção de um sistema ordenado de classificações e categorias, estereótipos e representações, instituídos como um discurso capaz de ser lido como o inventário da fetichização socialmente produzida para o desejo sexual racializado. Para desenvolver essa perspectiva apresento uma breve discussão teórica sobre a pornografia, interrogada pela articulação prazer/poder e a leitura de três conjuntos êmicos de representação racial associados ao desejo homossexual: a negritude, a branquidade e a brasilidade.In this study the author seeks to explore a specific critical perspective related to the race, sexuality and gender articulation, understanding that gay pornography will be exemplary to show the production of a coordinated system of classifications and categories, stereotypes and representations built as a discourse that may be read as a socially produced inventory of fetichization for racialized sexual desire. In order to develop this view the author presents a short theoretical discussion on pornography, interrogated by the power/pleasure articulation and the reading of three hemic corpora of racial representation related to homosexual desire: blackness, whiteness and brazilianness.

  19. Comparing Heterosexuals' and Gay Men/Lesbians' Responses to Relationship Problems and the Effects of Internalized Homophobia on Gay Men/Lesbians' Responses to Relationship Problems in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okutan, Nur; Buyuksahin Sunal, Ayda; Sakalli Ugurlu, Nuray

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was twofold: (1) to investigate the effects of sexual orientation (heterosexuals and gay men/lesbians) and gender difference on responses to romantic relationship problems (Exit, Voice, Loyalty, and Neglect [EVLN] responses) and of perceived partner's EVLN responses in Turkey, and (2) to examine whether internalized homophobia was associated with EVLN responses and perceived partner's EVLN responses for gay men and lesbians. Responses to Dissatisfaction Scale-Accommodation Instrument, Internalized Homophobia, and Demographics Information were administered to 187 participants (44 lesbians, 44 gay men, 53 heterosexual women, 46 heterosexual men).The MANCOVA results showed that men reported higher loyalty than women, whereas women presented more exit responses than men. Further, the interactions between gender and sexual orientation on the participants' EVLN responses and on the perceived partner's EVLN responses were significant. With respect to heterosexual women, heterosexual men displayed more loyalty responses. Lesbians had higher scores on loyalty than did heterosexual women. Lesbians also had higher scores on perceived partner's exit response than did heterosexual women and gay men. On the contrary, heterosexual women reported more perceived partner's voice response than lesbians. In addition, lesbians reported higher perceived partner's neglect responses than heterosexual women. Compared to heterosexual women, heterosexual men reported higher perceived partner's exit response. Finally, internalized homophobia was associated with destructive responses for both lesbians and gay men.

  20. On the validity of popular masculinity rating scales with gay men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alt, Marcus; Lewis, Adam M; Liu, William Ming; Vilain, Eric; Sánchez, Francisco J

    2014-11-01

    During the past decade, greater quantitative attention has been given to how gay men's lives are affected by traditional notions of masculinity. Consequently, it is important that masculinity-related measures that are often used in research are valid for use with gay men. This study examined the factor structures, loadings, and psychometric properties of three commonly used masculinity-related measures: the Gender Role Conflict Scale, the Conformity to Masculine Norms Inventory, and the Reference Group Identity Dependence Scale. Data were collected via an online survey of 920 self-identified gay men (M(age) = 32.48 years, SD = 11.73). Confirmatory factor analyses indicated that while the goodness of fit statistics did not always indicate the model fit, there were similar endorsements of items across the three masculinity scales and subscale factor loadings consistent with published studies using mostly heterosexual male samples. Implications for future masculinity scale research on gay men are discussed.

  1. Queer(ed) risks: life insurance, HIV/AIDS, and the "gay question".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Neil

    2010-01-01

    In 2004 the Association of British Insurers (ABI) issued its second Statement of Best Practice on HIV and Insurance. This prohibited use of the "gay question" (employed by some underwriters in application forms for life insurance to identify heightened risk of infection with HIV), in response to growing criticism that the practice was actuarially unreliable, unfair to gay men, and unnecessary, given the availability of alternative "behaviour-based" risk criteria. While the overhaul of this controversial practice is clearly a victory for gay (male) identity politics, this paper argues that the interests of gay men seem to have dominated at the expense of a more far-reaching critique of the industry's evaluation of infection risk. It contends that a more radical (or "queerer") challenge is needed which can better understand and address the injustices created by criteria for appraising risk of infection that still remain in place.

  2. Binge Drinking and Internalised Sexual Stigma among Italian Lesbian, Gay and Bisexual Young Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verrastro Valera

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND – Literature has studied the relation between youth alcohol consumption and sexual orientation, showing that lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB young people are at increased risk to develop alcohol-related problems compared to heterosexuals.

  3. From an oppressed citizenship to affirmative identities: lesbian and gay political participation in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Nuño S; Menezes, Isabel

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we intend to articulate a multidimensional perspective on citizenship with a psychological understanding of lesbian and gay identities' development in the context of a Southern European country: Portugal. We begin by reviewing some legal statements and institutional regulations around gay and lesbian issues and the lack of opportunities for the affirmation of a non-hegemonic (sexual) identity in Portugal. Next, we describe participation efforts developed by the Portuguese LGBT nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) and the actual results that such efforts already produced in the political and cultural attitudes toward gay men and lesbians: particularly, the legal approval of domestic same-sex partnership is emphasized as a symbolic achievement of such political struggle. Finally, we explore the implications of communitarian participation for gay and lesbian identities' development, not just in terms of collective empowerment but also in what concerns individual development and well-being.

  4. Perceived Similarity With Gay Men Mediates the Effect of Antifemininity on Heterosexual Men's Antigay Prejudice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Carmen; Vázquez, Carolina; Falomir-Pichastor, Juan Manuel

    2015-01-01

    This research examined the hypothesis that heterosexual men's motivation to differentiate themselves from gay men mediates the relationship between the antifemininity norm of masculinity and antigay prejudice. We assessed masculinity through three concepts: status, thoughness, and antifemininity. Participants then reported their perceived similarity with gay men and their antigay prejudice. The results showed that antifemininity was the best predictor of both perceived similarity and antigay prejudice: The more people endorsed the antifemininity norm, the more they perceived themselves as dissimilar from gay men and showed antigay prejudice. More important, perceived similarity mediated the effect of antifemininity on antigay prejudice. These findings provide direct evidence for the link between masculinity and the motivation to differentiate oneself from gay men, and they suggest that antigay prejudice accomplishes the identity function of maintaining unambiguous gender boundaries.

  5. Gender nonconformity, homophobia, and mental distress in latino gay and bisexual men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandfort, Theo G M; Melendez, Rita M; Diaz, Rafael M

    2007-05-01

    This study explored whether gender nonconformity in gay and bisexual men is related to mental distress and if so, whether this relationship is mediated by negative experiences that are likely associated with gender nonconformity, including abuse and harassment. To study this question, data were analyzed from face-to face interviews with 912 self-identified gay and bisexual Latino men in three major U.S. cities collected by Diaz and colleagues (2001). Gay and bisexual Latino men who considered themselves to be effeminate had higher levels of mental distress and more frequently reported various negative experiences, compared with gay and bisexual Latino men who did not identify as effeminate. Higher levels of mental distress in effeminate men seemed to primarily result from more experiences of homophobia. Findings suggest the need for more attention to gender in research as well as counseling of sexual minority men.

  6. Intersecting Race and Gender Cues are Associated with Perceptions of Gay Men's Preferred Sexual Roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lick, David J; Johnson, Kerri L

    2015-07-01

    Preferences for anal sex roles (top/bottom) are an important aspect of gay male identity, but scholars have only recently begun to explore the factors that covary with these preferences. Here, we argue that the gendered nature of both racial stereotypes (i.e., Black men are masculine, Asian men are feminine) and sexual role stereotypes (i.e., tops are masculine, bottoms are feminine) link the categories Asian/bottom and the categories Black/top. We provide empirical evidence for these claims at three levels of analysis: At the cultural level based upon gay men's stereotypic beliefs about others (Study 1), at the interpersonal level based upon gay men's perceptions of others' sexual role preferences (Study 2), and at the intrapersonal level based upon racially diverse men's self-reported sexual roles on a public hookup website (Study 3). These studies offer the first systematic evidence of linkages between race categories and sexual roles in gay male communities.

  7. Examination of muscularity and body fat depictions in magazines that target heterosexual and gay men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzieri, Nicholas; Cook, Brian J

    2013-03-01

    Previous content analyses of magazine images have typically examined within genres but failed to include comparisons between publications intended for various populations. The purpose of this study was to examine depictions of muscularity and thinness of male images in several widely distributed magazines that target male audiences from a variety of genres. Twenty-three magazine titles with the highest circulation rates that targeted heterosexual men, gay men, and general audiences were selected for image analyses. We found that magazines that target gay male audiences depicted images of men who were thinner in comparison to magazines targeting heterosexual men. Both gay and heterosexual magazines depicted male images with greater muscularity than magazines intended for general audiences. Differences in male image depictions in magazines may contribute to the promotion of an unattainable body ideal in some subgroups of gay culture.

  8. Internet Pornography Use, Body Ideals, and Sexual Self-Esteem in Norwegian Gay and Bisexual Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvalem, Ingela Lundin; Træen, Bente; Iantaffi, Alex

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between perception of own appearance, Internet pornography consumption, preferences for pornographic actors' appearance, and sexual self-esteem in gay and bisexual men in Norway. An online survey of 477 gay and bisexual men showed that, despite the prevailing muscular and lean gay body ideal, many men with less ideal bodies also preferred to watch pornographic actors with body types similar to their own. Self-perceived attractiveness, having an ideal body type, and viewing Internet pornography in longer sessions each made a unique contribution to higher self-esteem as a sexual partner. Preferring to watch pornographic actors with ideal bodies was not related to sexual self-esteem. The findings underscore the importance for gay or bisexual men of both self-perceived attractiveness and being athletic or young and fit, for a positive self-evaluation of sexual performance and competence.

  9. In the slammer: the myth of the prison in American gay pornographic video.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, John

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the significance of the prison scenario and its various permutations in the texts of American commercial pornographic video. The paper will identify the prison as a highly eroticised all male environment, an arena where the active/passive dichotomy of gay pornography is staged and re-staged. The significances of the prison are multiple. The prison draws on a gay mythology of homosexual desire that has its origins in sources as diverse as the literature of the Marquis de Sade and Jean Genet and the erotic illustrations of Tom of Finland and Etienne. Prison scenarios take many shapes in gay pornography such as the American penitentiary, the military brig, and the fantasised dungeon of the leatherman. I see these scenarios as performing an important function within gay porn by offering idealised spaces for the acts of pornography: voyeurism, narcissistic display and active/ passive role-play.

  10. Hydrophobic solvation of Gay-Berne particles in modified water models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head-Gordon, Teresa; Lynden-Bell, Ruth M.

    2008-03-01

    The solvation of large hydrophobic solutes, modeled as repulsive and attractive Gay-Berne oblate ellipsoids, is characterized in several modified water liquids using the SPC/E model as the reference water fluid. We find that small amounts of attraction between the Gay-Berne particle and any model fluid result in wetting of the hydrophobic surface. However, significant differences are found among the modified and SPC/E water models and the critical distances in which they dewet the hydrophobic surfaces of pairs of repulsive Gay-Berne particles. We find that the dewetting trends for repulsive Gay-Berne particles in the various model liquids correlate directly with their surface tensions, the widths of the interfaces they form, and the openness of their network structure. The largest critical separations are found in liquids with the smallest surface tensions and the broadest interfaces as measured by the Egelstaff-Widom length.

  11. Identity in political context: lesbian/gay representation in the public sphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R R; Windes, R R

    1999-01-01

    Discourses constructed to represent lesbians and gay men in the public sphere generate an essentialist identity which is both necessary and damaging. Legislative debate illustrates the production of a constrictive and homogeneous identity rejected by many gay/lesbian scholars and activists. Discussion of the rhetorical power of identity claims has produced alternative stances toward variant sexuality. This discussion can be advanced by challenging dominant constructions of civil rights and the public sphere.

  12. A cognitive behavioural intervention to reduce sexually transmitted infections among gay men: randomised trial

    OpenAIRE

    Imrie, J.; Stephenson, J R; Cowan, F. M.; Wanigaratne, S; Billington, A. J. P.; Copas, A. J.; French, L.; French, P D; Johnson, A. M.; Behav Intervention Gay Men Project

    2001-01-01

    Objective To determine the effectiveness of a brief cognitive behavioural intervention in reducing the incidence of sexually transmitted infections among gay men.Design Randomised controlled trial with 12 months' follow up.Setting Sexual health clinic in London.Participants 343 gay men with an acute sexually transmitted infection or who reported having had unprotected anal intercourse in the past year.Main outcome measures Number of new sexually transmitted infections diagnosed during follow ...

  13. Revisiting lesbians' and gay men's lives in Italy: generation, relationships, and gender

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    ‘Revisiting lesbians' and gay men's lives’ is a study on same-sex desiring individuals' changing life course in Italy from the mid 1990s to the early 2010s. Focused on sexual developmental trajectories, same-sex cohabiting couples, and parental desires, its main argument is that, even in a relatively short time period, Italian lesbians' and gay men's lives changed in ways that further sexual and relational pluralism and provide empowering narratives and resources to communities of sexually di...

  14. Perceptions of Gay, Lesbian, and Heterosexual Domestic Violence Among Undergraduates in Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Ali M.; Lina Aldén; Mats Hammarstedt

    2013-01-01

    An experimental study of perceptions about gay, lesbian, and heterosexual domestic violence in Sweden. Undergraduate students (N = 1009) read one of eight fictitious scenarios of domestic violence in married couple relationships, where sexual orientation, sex of victim and batterer, and severity of violence were varied. Perceptions of seriousness of the described incident and attitudes toward women, gays and lesbians were measured. Domestic violence was perceived as more serious in cases wher...

  15. Being gay in the management echelon of the South African Department of Defence: a life history.

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    This study addresses the absence of scientific knowledge of leadership behaviour among gays in the management echelon of the South African Department of Defence and provides some tangible knowledge in this regard. This valuable knowledge was obtained through an in-depth qualitative research design, namely a life story of one South African citizen, who is gay, male and white, and who held a senior management position in the Department of Defence (DOD) for a number of years. Themes and hypothes...

  16. Hepatitis A outbreak among MSM linked to casual sex and gay saunas in Copenhagen, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazick, A; Howitz, Michael Frantz; Rex, S

    2005-01-01

    .2-26.9). Eleven of 18 cases and 14/62 controls had sex in gay saunas (ORMH 4.2, 95% CI 1.5-11.5). Sex at private homes appeared to be protective (ORMH 0.2, 95% CI 0.1-0.7). Casual sex including sex in gay saunas was an important risk factor for the spread of HAV among MSM in Copenhagen. The results...

  17. Application of Herek's attitudes toward lesbians and gay men scale in The Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Meerendonk, Bas van de; Eisinga, Rob; Felling, Albert

    2003-01-01

    national sample of 921 respondents from the Dutch populadon completed the translated, slightly modified version of Herek's Attitudes Toward Lesbians and Gay Men Scale, originally developed in the USA for the assessment of attitudes toward lesbians and gay men. The present study was the first attempt to test the applicability of the scale in the Netherlands. In line with previous American findings, all scale items loaded highly on one factor. The scores also correlated wich another measure of ...

  18. Moral reasoning and homosexuality: the acceptability of arguments about lesbian and gay issues

    OpenAIRE

    Ellis, S. J.

    2002-01-01

    In the political arena, lesbian and gay issues have typically been contested on grounds of human rights, but with variable success. Using a moral developmental framework, the purpose of this study was to explore preferences for different types of moral arguments when thinking about moral dilemmas around lesbian and gay issues. The analysis presented here comprised data collected from 545 students at UK universities, who completed a questionnaire, part of which comprised a moral dilemma task. ...

  19. Open arms, conflicted hearts: nurse-practitioner's attitudes towards working with lesbian, gay and bisexual patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorsen, Caroline; Van Devanter, Nancy

    2016-12-01

    To explore nurse-practitioner's attitudes towards working with lesbian, gay and bisexual patients. Literature suggests that lesbians, gay men and bisexuals have significant health disparities compared to heterosexuals. Although the reasons are multifactorial, research suggests that attitudes of healthcare providers (HCPs) may be a contributing factor in both accessing and receiving care. There is currently no literature exploring the attitudes of the approximately 300,000 nurse-practitioners in the United States. Thus, nurse-practitioners strengths and challenges in providing care to sexual minorities are unknown. As part of a larger study, Corbin & Strauss' grounded theory methodology was used to explore the attitudes towards lesbian, gay and bisexual patients among primary care nurse-practitioners in NYC. Data were collected via individual semi-structured interviews with nurse-practitioners currently in practice in primary or outpatient care in NYC (n = 19). Data were evaluated using the three-step constant comparison method. Nurse-practitioners in this study had varied, often overlapping and sometimes conflicting, attitudes about working with lesbian, gay and bisexual patients. The main theme identified was 'open arms, conflicted hearts' with three major subthemes - feeling at home, struggling to maintain professionalism and finding comfort under the umbrella of diversity. Nurse-practitioner participants in this study had varied attitudes about working with lesbian, gay and bisexual patients, ranging from open, confident and comfortable to ambivalent, cautious and unsure about working with lesbian, gay and bisexual patients generally and specifically regarding the health needs of this population. This study highlights the inadequate didactic and clinical preparation most nurse-practitioners feel they have to care for lesbian, gay and bisexual patients. There is a need for increased education for registered nurses and nurse-practitioners regarding lesbian, gay

  20. Marketing to the Homosexual (gay) market: a profile and strategy implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLozier, M W; Rodrigue, J

    1996-01-01

    This article describes a significant market to which marketers must devote greater attention. The gay market is well-educated, has high discretionary income, is informed socially and politically, is dedicated to career and home ownership, and places greater importance on friendship networks than do most Americans. Although a potentially lucrative market segment, gays represent a difficult segment to reach since alienation by other segments could be an explosive factor for many businesses.

  1. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender health issues, disparities, and information resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Becky

    2011-01-01

    Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) persons, while widely diverse in many ways, share health disparities related to the stigma and discrimination they experience, including disproportionate rates of psychiatric disorders, substance abuse, and suicide. Lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, and the transgender communities have additional health concerns and disparities unique to each population. This paper highlights the national recognition of these health issues and disparities and presents web-based information resources about them and their mitigation.

  2. Suicide Related Ideation and Behavior Among Canadian Gay and Bisexual Men: A Syndemic Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Ferlatte, Olivier; Dulai, Joshun; Hottes, Travis Salway; Trussler, Terry; Marchand, Rick

    2015-01-01

    Background While several studies have demonstrated that gay and bisexual men are at increased risk of suicide less attention has been given to the processes that generate the inherent inequity with the mainstream population. This study tested whether syndemic theory can explain the excess suicide burden in a sample of Canadian gay and bisexual men. Syndemic theory accounts for co-occurring and mutually reinforcing epidemics suffered by vulnerable groups due to the effects of social margina...

  3. Logging into Horror’s Closet: Gay Fans, the Horror Film and Online Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Scales, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Harry Benshoff has boldly proclaimed that ‘horror stories and monster movies, perhaps more than any other genre, actively invoke queer readings’ (1997, p. 6). For Benshoff, gay audiences have forged cultural identifications with the counter-hegemonic figure of the ‘monster queer’ who disrupts the heterosexual status quo. However, beyond identification with the monstrous outsider, there is at present little understanding of the interpretations that gay fans mobilise ...

  4. Light in hellas: how German classical philology engendered gay scholarship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dynes, Wayne R

    2005-01-01

    Beginning in the latter part of the eighteenth century, German classical philology acquired a hegemonic status that made it the envy of scholars in other nations. Among the tasks embraced by this great endeavor was the study of what is known of same-sex behavior in ancient Greece. Remarkably, the German philologists chose to present their findings straightforwardly in modern German, accessible to every educated reader. The deposit of this inquiry is the basis of our contemporary knowledge of ancient Greek homosexuality. Moreover, by providing models of homosexual behavior that were more positive than those prevalent in Europe at the time, the research fostered the emergence of the German Gay Movement in 1897.

  5. Students inadequate knowledge about lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondahl, Gerd

    2009-01-01

    Little consideration is given to personal relationships and sexuality issues in medical care education and little if any time is allocated to non-heterosexual aspects. The present study uses a descriptive, comparative design, and a modified version of the Knowledge about Homosexuality Questionnaire to investigate nursing and medical students' knowledge on lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) persons. The participants were students at a Swedish university in semester 6 of their education programs, and the response rate was 92% (n=124). The aim of the study was to look at the students' access to knowledge concerning LGBT. Shortcomings in LGBT knowledge were seen in the student groups surveyed irrespective of education program, gender or religious belief. Accordingly, it is likely that heteronormativity will continue to project its undemocratic spirit in all communication, treatment and care if something is not done with immediate effect.

  6. Death of a partner: perspectives of heterosexual and gay men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'brien, John M; Forrest, Linda M; Austin, Ann E

    2002-05-01

    Previous studies have examined how individuals cope with the death of a partner. Most of these studies have focused on the experiences of women or have studied men only in comparison to women. This qualitative study focused only on the experiences of men, both heterosexual and gay men, grieving the untimely death of a partner due to a terminal illness. In-person two-hour interviews were conducted with 12 men. Data were analyzed using the constant comparative method (Lincoln & Guba, 1985). Results identify the similarities and differences of grief in men as influenced by sexual orientation. Recommendations for practitioners providing therapeutic services to grieving men and researchers investigating men's grief are offered.

  7. Mental Health in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Stephen T; Fish, Jessica N

    2016-01-01

    Today's lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth come out at younger ages, and public support for LGBT issues has dramatically increased, so why do LGBT youth continue to be at high risk for compromised mental health? We provide an overview of the contemporary context for LGBT youth, followed by a review of current science on LGBT youth mental health. Research in the past decade has identified risk and protective factors for mental health, which point to promising directions for prevention, intervention, and treatment. Legal and policy successes have set the stage for advances in programs and practices that may foster LGBT youth mental health. Implications for clinical care are discussed, and important areas for new research and practice are identified.

  8. When gay is pretty: physical attractiveness and low homophobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innala, S M; Ernulf, K E

    1994-06-01

    Photographs of physically attractive men and women were presented as depicting homosexuals and heterosexuals to subjects on the University of California at Berkeley campus who were generally judged to be nonhomophobic opposite-sexed students. Analysis showed that the 62 women rated 3 men as significantly more physically attractive when they believed the men were homosexual than when they believed the men were heterosexual. The 65 men did not rate photographs of 3 women as more physically attractive when they believed the women were lesbian compared to when they believed the women were heterosexual. The results illustrate an effect of the "gay-pretty-boy stereotype," namely, that women judged to be nonhomophobic perceived homosexual men as more physically attractive than comparable heterosexual men.

  9. Polarizing Political Participation Frames in a Nordic Gay Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob Svensson

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This article is based on a research project studying political discussions in the Swedish LGBT (Lesbian, Gay, Bi-, Transsexual community Qruiser. These discussions were very antagonistic and rude. The aim is therefore to understand what motivated participation in these heated discussions. The focus is on Qruiser political forum threads. The research is nethnographic through online interviews, participant observations in, and content analyses of, political discussions threads during the month of November 2012. By using framing theory as an analytical tool, the paper seeks to answer which frames attracted and mobilized participation and how this was done. In the article I find that polarizing frames of the left vs the right, the xenophobic vs the political correct, together with a truth and a game frame was used to motivated participation in the Qruiser forum threads.

  10. Mental Health in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Stephen T.; Fish, Jessica N.

    2016-01-01

    Today’s lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth come out at younger ages, and public support for LGBT issues has dramatically increased, so why do LGBT youth continue to be at high risk for compromised mental health? We provide an overview of the contemporary context for LGBT youth, followed by a review of current science on LGBT youth mental health. Research in the past decade has identified risk and protective factors for mental health, which point to promising directions for prevention, intervention, and treatment. Legal and policy successes have set the stage for advances in programs and practices that may foster LGBT youth mental health. Implications for clinical care are discussed, and important areas for new research and practice are identified. PMID:26772206

  11. Role of appearance and nonverbal behaviors in the perception of sexual orientation among lesbians and gay men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Lynne; Gilroy, Paula J

    2002-08-01

    According to the zero-acquaintance paradigm gay men and lesbians possess the ability to identify other homosexuals accurately after only very brief interpersonal contact. Given the vulnerability gay men and lesbians face in terms of antigay violence and prejudice, perceptual accuracy provides self-protection. In an exploratory study, 123 respondents were classified as low, moderate, and high perceivers on the basis of their responses to a recognition index designed by the authors. Next, respondents rated on a series of 5-point Likert scales the helpfulness of several characteristics for identifying gay men and lesbians. Analysis supported the importance of eye contact for lesbians and gay men in identifying one another. For both lesbian and gay male participants, several other variables emerged as significantly helpful in identifying gay men: clothing style and fit, jewelry, facial expressions, posture, body type, walk or gait, and both the types and frequencies of gestures.

  12. Mostly heterosexual and mostly gay/lesbian: evidence for new sexual orientation identities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrangalova, Zhana; Savin-Williams, Ritch C

    2012-02-01

    A sample of 1,784 individuals responded to an online survey advertised on the Facebook social networking website. We explored the sexual orientation continuum by focusing on three components: self-reported sexual orientation identity, sexual attraction, and sexual partners. Results supported a 5-category classification of identity (heterosexual, mostly heterosexual, bisexual, mostly gay/lesbian, gay/lesbian) in that two added identity labels (mostly heterosexual and mostly gay/lesbian) were frequently chosen by participants and/or showed unique patterns of attraction and partners, distinct from their adjacent identities (heterosexual and bisexual, and bisexual and gay/lesbian, respectively). Those who reported an exclusive label (heterosexual, gay/lesbian) were not necessarily exclusive in other components; a significant minority of heterosexuals and the majority of gays/lesbians reported some attraction and/or partners toward their nonpreferred sex. The five identity groups differed in attraction and partners in a manner consistent with a continuous, rather than a categorical, distribution of sexual orientation. Findings also supported a sexual orientation continuum as consisting of two, rather than one, distinct dimensions (same- and other-sex sexuality). Having more same-sex sexuality did not necessarily imply having less other-sex sexuality, and vice versa. More men than women were at the exclusive ends of the continuum; however, men were not bimodally distributed in that a significant minority reported nonexclusivity in their sexuality.

  13. Contesting heteronormativity: the fight for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender recognition in India and Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Paul; Rydstrøm, Helle; Tonini, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Recent public debates about sexuality in India and Vietnam have brought the rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people sharply into focus. Drawing on legal documents, secondary sources and ethnographic fieldwork conducted in the urban centres of Delhi and Hanoi, this article shows how the efforts of civil society organisations dedicated to the fight for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender rights have had different consequences in these two Asian contexts. The paper considers how these organisations navigated government regulations about their formation and activities, as well as the funding priorities of national and international agencies. The HIV epidemic has had devastating consequences for gay men and other men who have sex with men, and has been highly stigmatising. As a sad irony, the epidemic has provided at the same time a strategic entry point for organisations to struggle for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender recognition. This paper examines how the fight for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender recognition has been doubly framed through health-based and rights-based approaches and how the struggle for recognition has positioned lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people in India and Vietnam differently.

  14. Political science. When contact changes minds: an experiment on transmission of support for gay equality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaCour, Michael J; Green, Donald P

    2014-12-12

    Can a single conversation change minds on divisive social issues, such as same-sex marriage? A randomized placebo-controlled trial assessed whether gay (n = 22) or straight (n = 19) messengers were effective at encouraging voters (n = 972) to support same-sex marriage and whether attitude change persisted and spread to others in voters' social networks. The results, measured by an unrelated panel survey, show that both gay and straight canvassers produced large effects initially, but only gay canvassers' effects persisted in 3-week, 6-week, and 9-month follow-ups. We also find strong evidence of within-household transmission of opinion change, but only in the wake of conversations with gay canvassers. Contact with gay canvassers further caused substantial change in the ratings of gay men and lesbians more generally. These large, persistent, and contagious effects were confirmed by a follow-up experiment. Contact with minorities coupled with discussion of issues pertinent to them is capable of producing a cascade of opinion change.

  15. Social Media in Gay London: Tinder as an Alternative to Hook-Up Apps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freddy MacKee

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article explores how the mobile app Tinder complements dating practices and the wider app ecosystem gay men use in London. Within the local gay community discourse, Tinder is said to be a site where the gay “nice guys” go, rendering the platform as a socially constructed environment where gay men behave in a diametrically opposed way to the normative hyper-sexualized behavior of widespread gay hook-up apps. The research question, therefore, is whether Tinder is in fact a place where these “nice guys” go and where one would find them. Through an ethnographic methodology conducted both online and offline, a case is built on how initial conceptions about the app cannot be fully studied or interpreted without understanding the place it holds among other social networks. Evidence is presented to support the case that gay users of Tinder do, in fact, curate the portrayal of their digital identity to present a considerably less sexualized persona with the hopes of finding dates or a relationship. This, however, does not mean that users refrain from using other platforms in parallel as a way of exploring different subject positions and motivations. Behavior and normativity on Tinder are largely explained both by context and also by the design of the platform, which imports and displays personal data from other social networks. Findings should be limited to the population and location proposed as the fieldsite.

  16. Minority stress and sexual problems among African-American gay and bisexual men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamboni, Brian D; Crawford, Isiaah

    2007-08-01

    Minority stress, such as racism and gay bashing, may be associated with sexual problems, but this notion has not been examined in the literature. African-American gay/bisexual men face a unique challenge in managing a double minority status, putting them at high risk for stress and sexual problems. This investigation examined ten predictors of sexual problems among 174 African-American gay/bisexual men. Covarying for age, a forward multiple regression analysis showed that the measures of self-esteem, male gender role stress, HIV prevention self-efficacy, and lifetime experiences with racial discrimination significantly added to the prediction of sexual problems. Gay bashing, psychiatric symptoms, low life satisfaction, and low social support were significantly correlated with sexual problems, but did not add to the prediction of sexual problems in the regression analysis. Mediation analyses showed that stress predicted psychiatric symptoms, which then predicted sexual problems. Sexual problems were not significantly related to HIV status, racial/ethnic identity, or gay identity. The findings from this study showed a relationship between experiences with racial and sexual discrimination and sexual problems while also providing support for mediation to illustrate how stress might cause sexual problems. Addressing minority stress in therapy may help minimize and treat sexual difficulties among minority gay/bisexual men.

  17. Estimating the Number of HIV-infected gay sauna patrons in Taipei area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Ying-Hen; Chen, Cathy W. S.; Lee, Shen-Ming; Chen, Yi-Ming A.; Wu, Shiow-Ing; Lai, Shu-Fen; Chang, An-Lung

    2006-04-01

    We make use of the voluntary HIV and syphilis test results conducted at five gay saunas in Taipei from August of 1999 to end of 2002 to estimate the number of HIV-positive gay saunas patrons in Taipei area by utilizing Hierarchical Bayes method in Generalized Removal Model for Open Populations (GERMO). Considering the effect of a nearby anonymous HIV quick test program on the gay sauna HIV serotesting data, we make use of the association between HIV and syphilis serotesting results from the gay sauna program to amend possible measurement error occurred at the time of data collection by utilizing the regression calibration method. The median estimates for the number of HIV-positive patrons of the five gay saunas increase from 120 (95% CI: 76.5-159.0) during the first half of 2000 to 224 (95% CI: 171.0-265.5) for the second half of 2002. The result, indicating two-fold increase within two and half years, confirms that the gay sauna patrons in Taipei area are at high risk for HIV infection.

  18. Friends with Benefits, but without the Sex: Straight Women and Gay Men Exchange Trustworthy Mating Advice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric M. Russell

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although research has made progress in elucidating the benefits exchanged within same- and opposite-sex friendships formed between heterosexual men and women, it is less clear why straight women and gay men form close relationships with one another. The current experiments begin to address this question by exploring a potential benefit hypothesized to be uniquely available to straight women and gay men in the context of these friendships: trustworthy mating advice. Experiment 1 revealed that straight women perceive mating-relevant advice from a gay man to be more trustworthy than similar advice offered by a straight man or woman. Experiment 2 demonstrated that gay men perceive mating advice offered by a straight woman to be more trustworthy than advice offered by a lesbian woman or another gay man. Overall, the results provide initial experimental evidence that relationships between gay men and straight women may be characterized by a mutual exchange of mating-relevant benefits in the absence of sexual interest or competition.

  19. Exploring a Dutch paradox: an ethnographic investigation of gay men's mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Sanjay; Gerrets, Rene

    2014-01-01

    Despite the Netherlands' reputation as a world leader with respect to gay rights, homosexual Dutch men have much higher rates of mood disorders, anxiety disorders and suicide attempts than heterosexual Dutch men. Epidemiologists report similar disparities elsewhere in Western Europe and North America. These findings have been the focus of a blossoming psychological literature, inspired by minority stress theory and deploying quantitative methods. Our investigation aims to complement this body of work by adopting an ethnographic approach. Drawing from fieldwork conducted in the Netherlands from 2009 to 2010, we explore sociocultural and contextual factors that have received relatively little attention with respect to gay mental health. In the Netherlands - considered a model for gay equality - how can one understand high rates of psychiatric disorders among gay men? This study points to heteronormativity, complex dynamics involving long-term relationships and processes within gay subcultures as key issues. Notwithstanding their putative socioeconomic, legal and political equality, gay men struggled - at various stages of the life cycle - with internalised norms that they found difficult to fulfil. The desire to embody these ideals, and structural constraints in meeting them, could be potent sources of disappointment and distress.

  20. The stories of adoptive gay parents about acceptance and discrimination in the pre-school of their child or children

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    M.Ed. Gay adoption in South Africa is a most recent equal right bestowed on the Gay Lesbian Bisexual and Transgender (GLBT) community. To date little research has been done in South Africa and globally on this phenomenon, and even less in relation to the schools children from gay headed families attend. The purpose of the inquiry was to explore the stories of adoptive gay parents about acceptance and discrimination in the pre-school of their child or children. The inquiry draws on Queer Th...

  1. Handedness is a biomarker of variation in anal sex role behavior and Recalled Childhood Gender Nonconformity among gay men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift-Gallant, Ashlyn; Coome, Lindsay A; Monks, D Ashley; VanderLaan, Doug P

    2017-01-01

    Developmental theories of the biological basis of sexual orientation suggest that sexually differentiated psychological and behavioural traits should be linked with sexual orientation. Subgroups of gay men delineated by anal sex roles differ according to at least one such trait: gender expression. The present study assessed the hypothesis that handedness, a biologically determined sexually differentiated trait, corresponds to differences in subgroups of gay men based on anal sex role. Furthermore, it assessed whether handedness mediates the association between gender nonconformity and male sexual orientation. Straight and gay men (N = 333) completed the Edinburgh Inventory of Handedness and the Recalled Childhood Gender Nonconformity Scale. Gay men also completed measures of anal sex role preference. As in previous studies, gay men showed greater non-right-handedness and gender nonconformity than straight men. Also, among gay men, bottoms/versatiles (i.e., gay men who take a receptive anal sex role, or who take on both a receptive and insertive anal sex role) were more gender-nonconforming than tops (i.e., gay men who take an insertive anal sex role). In support of the hypothesis, bottoms/versatiles were more non-right-handed than tops and handedness mediated the male sexual orientation and anal sex role differences in Recalled Childhood Gender Nonconformity. Together, these findings suggest that developmental processes linked to handedness underpin variation among men in sexual orientation and gender nonconformity as well as variation among subgroups of gay men that are delineated by anal sex roles.

  2. Handedness is a biomarker of variation in anal sex role behavior and Recalled Childhood Gender Nonconformity among gay men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift-Gallant, Ashlyn; Coome, Lindsay A.; Monks, D. Ashley; VanderLaan, Doug P.

    2017-01-01

    Developmental theories of the biological basis of sexual orientation suggest that sexually differentiated psychological and behavioural traits should be linked with sexual orientation. Subgroups of gay men delineated by anal sex roles differ according to at least one such trait: gender expression. The present study assessed the hypothesis that handedness, a biologically determined sexually differentiated trait, corresponds to differences in subgroups of gay men based on anal sex role. Furthermore, it assessed whether handedness mediates the association between gender nonconformity and male sexual orientation. Straight and gay men (N = 333) completed the Edinburgh Inventory of Handedness and the Recalled Childhood Gender Nonconformity Scale. Gay men also completed measures of anal sex role preference. As in previous studies, gay men showed greater non-right-handedness and gender nonconformity than straight men. Also, among gay men, bottoms/versatiles (i.e., gay men who take a receptive anal sex role, or who take on both a receptive and insertive anal sex role) were more gender-nonconforming than tops (i.e., gay men who take an insertive anal sex role). In support of the hypothesis, bottoms/versatiles were more non-right-handed than tops and handedness mediated the male sexual orientation and anal sex role differences in Recalled Childhood Gender Nonconformity. Together, these findings suggest that developmental processes linked to handedness underpin variation among men in sexual orientation and gender nonconformity as well as variation among subgroups of gay men that are delineated by anal sex roles. PMID:28234947

  3. A special kind of married man: notions of marriage and married men in the Swedish gay press, 1954–1986.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosqvist, Hanna Bertilsdotter

    2012-01-01

    There has long been ambivalence in the LGBT movement and related research as to the meaning of gay identity in relation to marriage. The article explores changing homonormative discourses of marriage and married men within the Swedish gay press from the mid 1950s to the mid 1980s. Expressions of the changes are a shift in language and in views of extramarital relationships, openness, and gay male identity. As a result of the shift, “married men,” including both “married homosexuals” and “bisexuals,” came to be distinguished from “gays.”

  4. A voice in the wilderness: gay and lesbian religious groups in the Western United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Michael J

    2006-01-01

    The paper describes a study of gay and lesbian religious groups located in the United States between the Mississippi River and the Pacific Ocean between March of 1989 and June of 1993. The researcher found 684 groups to have existed at some time in the region and conducted interviews to document 468 of these groups. While a history of these groups dates back to the 1930s in the region, large groups still existing today did not begin to form until the late 1960s. The six most common goals of the groups were social and support needs, worship, denominational and social politics, community service, and leadership in the gay and lesbian community. Being focused on gay and lesbian issues has an influence on when and how they came into existence (in the beginnings of the gay and lesbian movement, in response to the AIDS crisis, in response to anti-gay legislative initiatives), has an influence on the kinds of key themes addressed (ordination of gay and lesbian people, same-sex marriage, service for people with AIDS, sexual ethics in scripture), and has an influence on relationships with the larger community (shunning or inclusion in the larger society and in the larger religious community). However, the stronger influence is their identity as religious (and, therefore, social) institutions. They experience the same pressures of mainstream religion and as social institutions by facing issues of diversity, gender, age, politics, race, and disease. They face the same challenges as any religious institution today of being prophetic, responsive, changing, traditional, true, relevant, and even noticed. A distinct feature is their role on the fringes. They are on the fringe of religious life and on the fringe of gay and lesbian life.

  5. The effects of traditional family values on the coming out process of gay male adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, B S; Muzzonigro, P G

    1993-01-01

    The development of a gay or lesbian identity (often referred to as the coming out process) has been widely studied in adults; however, few studies have examined the process in gay adolescents. Even among these studies, little research has investigated the effects of race or family values on the coming out process. A small sample of African-American, Hispanic/Latino, Asian/Eurasian, and Caucasian gay male adolescents participated in this survey study. Coming out was operationalized in three stages: sensitization; awareness with confusion, denial, guilt, and shame; and acceptance. The majority of respondents reported feeling different from other boys as children. The average age of first crush on another boy was 12.7 years; average age for realizing they were gay was 12.5 years. Most respondents reported feeling confused during their first awareness that they were gay. Denial of identity was a coping strategy for about half the sample. Traditional family values played a greater role in predicting coming out experiences than did race. Families were categorized as having high or low traditional values based upon (1) the importance of religion, (2) emphasis on marriage, (3) emphasis on having children, and (4) whether a non-English language was spoken in the home. Families with a strong emphasis on traditional values were perceived as less accepting of homosexuality than were the low traditional families. Those who work with adolescents need to be aware that some will recognize their sexual orientation as gay, lesbian, or bisexual during this time of their lives. These youth need support in the coming out process because they may encounter stigmatization and disapproval not only from the larger society, but also from their families, peers, and sometimes the gay community itself.

  6. Pânicos morais e controle social: reflexões sobre o casamento gay Moral panics and social control: reflections about gay marriage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Miskolci

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available A partir da reconstituição histórica dos medos coletivos por trás da rejeição social a gays e lésbicas e de como estes mesmos temores moldam as reações afirmativas desses grupos, este artigo discute as relações entre pânicos morais e formas de controle social. A luta pela parceria civil entre pessoas do mesmo sexo, ou casamento gay, serve de exemplo contemporâneo da forma como nossa sociedade renegocia padrões normativos e práticas sexuais na moeda do controle social.Starting with a historical re-construction of the colective fears behind the social rejection of gays and lesbians and how these same fears shape the reaction of these groups this article discusses the relations between moral panics and forms of social control. The fight for gay marriage is a contemporary example of how our society renegotiates normative patterns and sexual practices. It does so always aiming a social control to keep and to reinforce conventional relational models.

  7. Health Differences Among Lesbian, Gay, and Transgender Veterans by Rural/Small Town and Suburban/Urban Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauth, Michael R; Barrera, Terri L; Denton, F Nicholas; Latini, David M

    2017-06-01

    We explored the relationship between geographic location and health indicators for lesbian, gay, and transgender veterans. We solicited participation in an online survey through national and city LGBT organizations and personal contacts to examine differences in depression, anxiety, alcohol and tobacco use, and body mass index among lesbian, gay, and transgender veterans (n = 252) in suburban/urban and rural/small town locations. Bisexual participants were too few to include in the analyses. As expected, rural/small town lesbian, gay, and transgender veterans spent more time traveling to their primary care provider. Travel time was also positively related to depressive and anxiety symptoms. However, only suburban/urban and rural/small town gay men differed in measures of depression and anxiety and tobacco use. That is, rural/small town gay men reported greater depressive and anxiety symptoms and greater tobacco use than their suburban/urban counterparts. Consistent with this finding, rural/small town gay men reported less community-related identity than suburban/urban men. Suburban/urban lesbian women showed a nonsignificant trend for community identity compared with rural/small town women. Similar to civilian studies, suburban/urban and rural/small town lesbian, gay, and transgender veterans evidenced few health differences, with the exception of suburban/urban gay men. Although rural/small town gay male veterans evidenced more depression and anxiety and less community identity than suburban/urban men, social networks likely differ for lesbian, gay, and transgender subgroups. Lesbian, gay, and transgender veterans may also differ from their civilian counterparts in ways that we do not yet understand.

  8. The converging and diverging characteristics of HIV-positive and HIV-negative gay men in the Australian Gay Community Periodic Surveys, 2000-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Martin; Lee, Evelyn; Prestage, Garrett P; Zablotska, Iryna; de Wit, John; Mao, Limin

    2013-01-01

    To assess the changing health promotion needs of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive gay men in Australia, we analysed the social and behavioural characteristics of HIV-positive men in the Australian Gay Community Periodic Surveys. We looked at change over time in the characteristics of HIV-positive men (from 2000-2001 to 2008-2009) and compared HIV-positive men with their HIV-negative peers within each time period. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to assess independent changes over time within each HIV status group. A total of 21,620 responses were included in the analyses; 10,537 in 2000-2001 and 11,083 in 2008-2009. Between the two time periods, HIV-positive and HIV-negative men became more similar in the following areas: paid employment, sexual identity, number of male sex partners, the likelihood of having a regular male partner and having a seroconcordant regular male partner. The two groups diverged in these areas: age, ethnicity, educational level, social engagement with gay men, types of relationship with regular male partners, likelihood of unprotected anal intercourse with casual male partners and likelihood of HIV disclosure to casual male partners. Workforce participation and educational attainment have improved among HIV-positive gay men since 2000, but they still lag behind their HIV-negative peers in these areas. Because HIV-positive men are an ageing cohort, support services will need to increasingly address issues of HIV, sexuality and ageing with HIV-positive men. The increase in unprotected anal intercourse and HIV disclosure with casual partners means that education and support services will increasingly need to address effective HIV disclosure and non-condom-based risk reduction strategies with both HIV-positive and HIV-negative gay men.

  9. Chilling out in "Cosmopolitan Country": Urban/Rural Hybridity and the Construction of Daylesford as a "Lesbian and Gay Rural Idyll"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman-Murray, Andrew; Waitt, Gordon; Gibson, Chris

    2012-01-01

    This paper advances scholarship on "lesbian and gay rural idylls". A growing literature examines how "lesbian and gay rural idylls" are not only produced in opposition to the urban, but are themselves urban constructs. We extend these contentions by exploring the processes of idyllisation suffusing lesbian and gay festival…

  10. Between '0' and '1': safer sex and condom use among young gay men in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Tien Ee Dominic; Fung, Tsz Hin

    2016-01-01

    Young men who have sex with men are becoming the most at-risk subgroup for HIV incidence in Hong Kong. To understand how young gay men in Hong Kong interpret and implement safer sex and condom use, focus-group discussions and individual in-depth interviews were held. The 74 participants were nearly all ethnic Chinese gay men aged between 18 and 25 years. Findings indicate that the challenge for health intervention lies in young gay men's inconsistent condom use despite their high level of HIV-related knowledge. Participants described using condoms, testing for HIV and abstaining from anal sex as measures undertaken to prevent HIV infection. However, sociocultural norms and expectations pertaining to '0' (docile, bottom) and '1' (assertive, top) roles and trust between partners complicate the consistent implementation of risk-reduction measures. Influenced by heteronormative and romantic beliefs, sexual behaviours such as condomless anal sex and internal ejaculation hold symbolic meanings - exclusivity, commitment, intimacy, possession - for young gay men in Hong Kong, which override health concerns. These findings support more empowerment-driven HIV programming for young gay men.

  11. Sex toy use by gay and bisexual men in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberger, Joshua G; Schick, Vanessa; Herbenick, Debby; Novak, David S; Reece, Michael

    2012-04-01

    Recent studies have documented that vibrators are an important part of the sexual repertoires of both men and women and have demonstrated positive sexual health outcomes among individuals who use such products. However, little is known about the use of other sexual enhancement products, particularly among gay and bisexually identified men. This study sought to document the extent to which gay and bisexually identified men report using sex toys and the sexual and relational situations within which they used them. Data were collected via an internet-based survey from 25,294 gay and bisexually identified men throughout the U.S. recruited from an Internet site popular among men seeking social or sexual interactions with other men. A majority (78.5%) of gay and bisexually identified men reported having used at least one type of sex toy, including dildos (62.1%), non-vibrating cock rings (51.9%), vibrators (49.6%), butt plugs (34.0%), masturbation sleeves (27.9%), and anal beads or balls (19.3%). Among users, toys such as dildos or butt plugs were commonly inserted into one's own anus during masturbation (95.7%, n = 11,781) and insertion into their partners anus (72.0% n = 4,197) during partnered sexual activities. These data suggest that sex toy use is common among gay and bisexual men during both solo and partnered sexual activities and considered by these men as enhancing the quality of their sexual experiences.

  12. 'Gay times': identity, locality, memory, and the Brixton squats in 1970's London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Matt

    2013-01-01

    Through a thick description of a gay squatting community in south London in the 1970s, this piece explores the ways in which local histories complicate broader accounts of gay life, politics, and culture. Such a focus alerts us to the impact of personal encounters, of local politics, and material circumstances, of coincident local communities, of jobs (or the lack of them), and of major local events (like the Brixton riots of 1981). The local focus and the oral history sources also illuminate the complex ways in which unspoken and often unconscious imperatives associated with ethnicity, class, and the familial, social, and cultural contexts of our upbringings are played out under new and changing circumstances. Taking this approach fractures homogenizing assumptions about gay identity and community--even of a self-identified gay community like this squatting collective. It can also decentre sexuality as a primary category of identity and analysis as other factors come into sharper focus and shed light on the ebb and flow of identification and on the ways in which broader histories are woven into everyday lives. The piece thus considers different scales of analysis, the limits of identification, the inclusions and exclusions enacted when communities come together and identities coalesce, the continuities and discontinuities between broader and counter cultures (especially in relation to ideas and lived experiences of home), and the way memories of the squats and of the 1970s are modulated by subsequent national and gay politics, by AIDS, and by a profound sense of loss.

  13. Places for all? Cape Town’s public library services to gays and lesbians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genevieve Hart

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The article reports on an investigation of the provision of gay and lesbian literature and of information services to gays and lesbians in Cape Town’s public libraries. Although by definition public libraries serve all members of a community, the international literature suggests that they neglect the reading and information needs and interests of gays and lesbians. The progressive South African Constitution views the rights of gays and lesbians as human rights; yet homophobia is prevalent. Using a questionnaire, the study explored attitudes and practices of 69 senior librarians, responsible for collection development, across all six of Cape Town’s library districts. The situation was found to be “spotty” with only 26 respondents believing that their library service is meeting the needs of gays and lesbians. The survey found contradictions between stated beliefs and behaviours. Thus, although most agree that LGBT rights to information and equal services are human rights, only 55% consider LGBT people in their selection procedures and very little material is acquired. Information services are thin with, for example, only 10% of the libraries in the survey providing LGBT related information in their community information files.

  14. From Closet Talk to PC Terminology : Gay Speech and the Politics of Visibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascale Smorag

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Depuis l’époque où l’homosexualité était synonyme de perversion, voire de délit, jusqu’aux actuelles gay prides, la communauté gay, lesbienne, bisexuelle et transgenre n’a cessé de développer un langage distinctif, le gayspeak. Transgressant les normes sociales, ce parler, davantage glossaire qu’idiome, permet aujourd’hui à la communauté LGBT de reconstruire sa propre réalité tout en ouvrant vers de nouvelles perceptions identitaires. Militant tout autant que ludique, ce langage se veut également le défenseur d’un certain style de vie, cherchant à exprimer, de manière la plus visible, politiquement correcte et efficace qui soit, la richesse des comportements et des cultures du monde gay.This paper examines the extraordinary complexity of sexual orientations and subcultures as expressed by “gay speech,” an idiom the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender community has developed for itself. Since the times when homosexuality was a perversion to today’s vibrant Prides, gayspeak has been used to express the needs of a group which, feeling socially repressed, reinvented and subverted language. Whereas some activists are using it as a means to keep politics in the language, notably by reclaiming all discriminatory terminology, others rely upon this rich lexicon to assert the diversity of their specific lifestyles and subcultures.

  15. Perceptions of Gay, Lesbian, and Heterosexual Domestic Violence Among Undergraduates in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali M. Ahmed

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study of perceptions about gay, lesbian, and heterosexual domestic violence in Sweden. Undergraduate students (N = 1009 read one of eight fictitious scenarios of domestic violence in married couple relationships, where sexual orientation, sex of victim and batterer, and severity of violence were varied. Perceptions of seriousness of the described incident and attitudes toward women, gays and lesbians were measured. Domestic violence was perceived as more serious in cases where: the respondent was a woman, the batterer was a man, the victim was a woman, or the battering was severe. Wife-battering in a heterosexual relationship was considered the most serious case in both the less and more severe battering scenario. Where battering was less severe, domestic violence in gay and lesbian relationships was perceived as more serious than heterosexual husband-battering; this difference disappeared in the severe battering scenario. Negative attitudes toward gays, lesbians, and women were associated with less concern about domestic violence in all types of relationships. The findings suggest that stereotypes about gays, lesbians, and women affect perceptions of domestic violence, but mainly when violence is less severe.

  16. HIV risk and sense of community: French gay male discourses on barebacking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    This paper analyses the use of the concept of 'barebacking' as a risk category in the discourses of French gay men. It discusses how the rise and spread of the term barebacking contributes to reframing gay men's personal experiences of HIV prevention and their sense of belonging (or a lack thereof) to a gay community. The study is based on 30 qualitative interviews with French gay men conducted between 2005 and 2008. An import from the USA, the term barebacking emerged publicly in France in the late-1990s and was first used to describe intentionally unprotected sexual practices. Debates surrounding this risk category were marked by violent controversy over its use and its definition among HIV prevention actors. There remains a general lack of consensus on the definition of the term, despite its use by activists, in porn culture and in the daily discourses of gay men. By focusing on the relational roots of risk perception, I consider how uses of the term barebacking invoke a moral framework around risk taking.

  17. Differences and similarities between gay and straight individuals involved in the sadomasochistic subculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordling, Niklas; Sandnabba, N Kenneth; Santtila, Pekka; Alison, Laurence

    2006-01-01

    Results from some new analyses as well as a selective review of the results of six empirical studies on a self-identified sample of sadomasochistically-oriented individuals (22 women and 162 men) with an emphasis on differences between gay and straight participants are presented. The gay male respondents seemed to be better educated, to hold white-collar occupations and to be more sadistically oriented. The gay male respondents became aware of their sadomasochistic preferences and had their first experiences at an older age. They showed a preference for leather outfits, anal intercourse, rimming, dildos, wrestling, special equipment and uniform scenes, and the straight male respondents for verbal humiliation, mask and blindfold, gags, rubber outfits, cane whipping, vaginal intercourse, cross dressing, and straitjackets, and different role plays except for uniform scenes. Four separate sexual themes were identified: hypermasculinity; administration and receiving of pain; physical restriction and psychological humiliation. Gay male participants showed a preference for hypermasculinity and straight men respondents for humiliation. The number of lesbian respondents was too low to draw any definite conclusions. Differences between gay and straight male sadomasochists in the present sample were found. Clearly, sadomasochism cannot be thought of as a unitary phenomenon: People who identify themselves as sadomasochists mean different things by these identifications.

  18. Crystal methamphetamine and sexual sociality in an urban gay subculture: an elective affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Adam Isaiah; Halkitis, Perry N

    2006-01-01

    This paper draws on 49 qualitative interviews to explore the contextual antecedents of methamphetamine use in a sample of gay and bisexual Manhattan men. The paper distinguishes itself from the public health literature on crystal methamphetamine use in this population by shifting the analytic focus from individual-level factors of drug use to the role of social context. While individual-level factors--including self esteem and social awkwardness--are related to methamphetamine use, we argue that these factors arise in and are exacerbated by interactional pressures attendant to Manhattan's gay sexual subculture, which revolve around the expectation of peak sexual performance. Because methamphetamine is associated with increased self-esteem, increased libido, greater sexual endurance, diminished sexual inhibition, and a higher threshold for pain, the drug is used strategically by gay and bisexual men to negotiate sexual sociality and increase sexual pleasure. Hence, we suggest that there exists an elective affinity between Manhattan's gay sexual subculture and the particular pharmacological effects of methamphetamine-whereby the former strongly favours the latter as a systematic pattern of response. In turn, this relationship is linked to unsafe sexual practices or the social conditions that put gay men 'at risk of risk' of HIV infection.

  19. Qualitative analysis in gay men's health research: comparing thematic, critical discourse, and conversation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguinaldo, Jeffrey P

    2012-01-01

    Gay men's health typically relies on traditional forms of qualitative analysis, such as thematic analysis, and would benefit from a diversity of analytic approaches. Such diversity offers public health researchers a breadth of tools to address different kinds of research questions and, thus, substantiate different types of social phenomenon relevant to the health and wellbeing of gay men. In this article, I compare and contrast three qualitative analytic approaches: thematic, critical discourse, and conversation analysis. I demonstrate and distinguish their key analytic assumptions by applying each approach to a single data excerpt taken from a public health interview conducted for a broader study on gay men's health. I engage in a discussion of each approach in relation to three themes: its utility for gay men's health, its approach to dilemmas of voice, and its capacity for reflexivity. I advocate that qualitative researchers should capitalise on the full range of qualitative analytic approaches to achieve the goals of gay men's health. However, I specifically encourage qualitative researchers to engage with conversation analysis, not only because of its capacity to resolve dilemmas of voice and to achieve reflexivity, but also for its ability to capture forms of social life hitherto undocumented through thematic and critical discourse analysis.

  20. A Public Presentations of Gendered Bodies: A Look at Gay and Lesbian Online Dating Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Latinsky

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines how stereotypes and media presentations related to gender norms influence public presentations of gay men and lesbian women. Using online profiles from the online dating website Match.com, this paper examines the body types daters use to describe themselves, their ideal date, and if the poster has a photograph of themselves on their profile. These profiles are used as a method of observing public presentations that are in a unique situation to be tailored towards notions of publically displayed social desirability. Findings indicate that gay men present their online bodies as stereotypically masculine and athletic, while lesbian women are willing to display a slightly broader range of body types. In addition, regardless of gender, both gay men and lesbian women present their ideal dates as stereotypically attractive, with gay men having a particular affinity for dating athletic men. Regression analysis suggests that intersectional variables such as race and age influence a person’s willingness to display a profile picture in the public arena. Overall, this study concludes that heteronormative standards of masculinity combined with structural influences from both the media and peer groups likely have an impact on gay men’s ideal gendered body, while the comparative exclusion of lesbian women from these media influences allow other experiences of gender norms slightly more freedom.

  1. A Place at the Blackboard: Including Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Intersex, and Queer/Questioning Issues in the Education Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Todd A.; Harley, Debra A.

    2009-01-01

    It is known from history that lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people have always existed in society. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersexed, and queer/questioning (LGBTIQ) individuals, collectively known as sexual minorities, represent approximately 10% of the population. As many as nine students in every classroom of 30 are in…

  2. Gay Rights are Human Rights: The framing of new interpretations of international human rights norms’

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holzhacker, Ron

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to explore the development of the framing of the rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) persons and sexual orientation and gender identity in terms of a human rights paradigm. This decades-long process involved many actors, from within academia, gay

  3. Gay identity-related factors and sexual risk among men who have sex with men in San Francisco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Stephen A; Mansergh, Gordon; Marks, Gary; Guzman, Robert; Colfax, Grant

    2009-04-01

    This study explored the relationship between gay identity-related factors (gay community involvement, gay bar attendance, gay identity importance, and self-homophobia) and unprotected anal sex (UA) in the past 3 months among men who have sex with men (MSM) of three different race/ethnicity groups. Four hundred eighty-three MSM (mean age 34) were recruited in the San Francisco Bay Area (33% African American, 34% Latino and 33% White). Compared with White MSM, African American and Latino MSM were less likely to identify as gay, and to attend gay bars/clubs, and more likely to report self-homophobia. Just over one third of the sample reported UA (did not vary by race). Gay community involvement was associated with receptive UA with all partners (adjusted odds ratio [AOR = 1.30, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) = 1.06-1.60). Gay bar attendance was associated with insertive UA with all partners (AOR = 1.20, 95% CI = 1.01-1.43) and with HIV-discordant partners (AOR = 1.35, 95% CI = 1.08-1.69). Implications for prevention include addressing community norms and encouraging alternatives to bars as settings in which to meet and socialize with other MSM.

  4. Patterns of Alcohol and Other Drug Use Associated with Major Depression among Gay Men Attending General Practices in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Martin; Bryant, Joanne; Newman, Christy E.; Paquette, Dana M.; Mao, Limin; Kidd, Michael R.; Saltman, Deborah C.; Kippax, Susan C.

    2012-01-01

    Our aim was to clarify the role of alcohol and other drug (AOD) use in major depression among gay men attending general medical practices. A secondary analysis was conducted on survey data collected from 531 gay men attending high-HIV-caseload general practices in Adelaide and Sydney, Australia. The survey contained demographic, social,…

  5. The Pink Lesson Plan: Addressing the Emotional Needs of Gay and Lesbian Students in Canadian Teacher Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellini, Christine

    2012-01-01

    The history of civil rights in Canada illustrates a growing trend by the government to support the physical, emotional, mental, legal, and financial needs of gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgendered citizens. However, the education system presents a slightly different climate. Despite numerous policies and initiatives, gay and lesbian students…

  6. Closeted or out? Gay and Lesbian Educators Reveal Their Experiences about Their Sexual Identities in K-12 Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooker, Steven D.

    2010-01-01

    Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender school educators are practically invisible within the nature of heterosexist and homophobic education (Blount, 2005). "Openly gay and lesbian teachers were once thought of as immoral, and in some states coming out is still a risk to one's job" (McCarthy, 2003, p. 182). One's sexual orientation has nothing to…

  7. "They Think I Am a Pervert:" a Qualitative Analysis of Lesbian and Gay Teachers' Experiences with Stress at School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lineback, Sally; Allender, Molly; Gaines, Rachel; McCarthy, Christopher J.; Butler, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Qualitative methodologies were used to identify the demands and resources lesbian and gay (LG) teachers face in their schools. Data sources included 2 interviews each with 11 teachers who each identified as lesbian or gay. Analyses of interview data indicated 3 main findings. First, although all teachers experienced demands because of their sexual…

  8. State of the States 2002: GLSEN's Policy Analysis of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) Safer Schools Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Allison F.

    This report presents current information available on each state and the District of Columbia related to education issues that affect lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth. It summarizes the laws affecting students, LGBT students. Results from the 2001 National School Climate Survey of the Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network…

  9. State of the States, 2004. A Policy Analysis of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) Safer Schools Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    GLSEN (Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network), 2004

    2004-01-01

    The State of the States 2004 report summarizes the laws affecting students, particularly, lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) students in the 50 states and the District of Columbia. The Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network (GLSEN) prepared this State of the States 2004 report to continue the comprehensive collection of data and…

  10. The Pink Lesson Plan: Addressing the Emotional Needs of Gay and Lesbian Students in Canadian Teacher Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellini, Christine

    2012-01-01

    The history of civil rights in Canada illustrates a growing trend by the government to support the physical, emotional, mental, legal, and financial needs of gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgendered citizens. However, the education system presents a slightly different climate. Despite numerous policies and initiatives, gay and lesbian students…

  11. Gay Rights are Human Rights: The framing of new interpretations of international human rights norms’

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holzhacker, Ron

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to explore the development of the framing of the rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) persons and sexual orientation and gender identity in terms of a human rights paradigm. This decades-long process involved many actors, from within academia, gay a

  12. "I Am Bodied". "I Am Sexual". "I Am Human". Experiencing Deafness and Gayness: A Story of a Young Man

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinecka, Jitka

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines experiences of Deaf gay people through the eyes of a young Deaf man growing up in the predominantly hearing and heterosexual society of the Czech Republic. In the current disability and gender studies discourse there are several personal accounts of people with disabilities who also identify as gay or lesbian, but narratives…

  13. Gay--Straight Alliances Are Associated with Student Health: A Multischool Comparison of LGBTQ and Heterosexual Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poteat, V. Paul; Sinclair, Katerina O.; DiGiovanni, Craig D.; Koenig, Brian W.; Russell, Stephen T.

    2013-01-01

    Few studies have examined school-based factors associated with variability in the victimization and health of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) youth. Among 15,965 students in 45 Wisconsin schools, we identified differences based on Gay-Straight Alliance (GSA) presence. Youth in schools with GSAs reported less truancy,…

  14. Out of the Closet and into the Trenches: Gay Male Baby Boomers, Aging, and HIV/AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Dana; Bartlam, Bernadette; Smith, Ruth D.

    2012-01-01

    Regardless of HIV status, all gay male Baby Boomers are aging in a context strongly shaped by HIV/AIDS. For this subcohort within the Baby Boom generation, the disproportionately high volume of AIDS deaths among gay men aged 25-44 years at the epidemic's peak (1987-1996) created a cohort effect, decimating their social networks and shaping their…

  15. Heterosexism in Sport: Attitudes toward Lesbians and Gay Men among Collegiate Varsity and Recreational Club Sport Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Austin Robert

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated attitudes toward gay men and lesbians among collegiate varsity athletes and recreational sport club participants, including an investigation of differences in attitudes across competitive levels, team and individual sport divisions, sport by sport comparisons, gender, grade level, race, contact with gay men and lesbians and…

  16. "Some of My Best Friends": Intergroup Contact, Concealable Stigma, and Heterosexuals' Attitudes toward Gay Men and Lesbians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herek, Gregory M.; Capitanio, John P.

    1996-01-01

    In a 2-wave national telephone survey, a probability sample of English-speaking adults indicated their attitudes toward gay men at Wave 1 (n=538) and toward both gay men and lesbians approximately 1 year later (n=382). Discusses findings of the study and theoretical and policy implications of the results. (KW)

  17. LGBTQ Youth's Views on Gay-Straight Alliances: Building Community, Providing Gateways, and Representing Safety and Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porta, Carolyn M.; Singer, Erin; Mehus, Christopher J.; Gower, Amy L.; Saewyc, Elizabeth; Fredkove, Windy; Eisenberg, Marla E.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Gay-Straight Alliances (GSAs) are school-based clubs that can contribute to a healthy school climate for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) youth. While positive associations between health behaviors and GSAs have been documented, less is known about how youth perceive GSAs. Methods: A total of 58 LGBTQ youth…

  18. The Intention and Reflection Model of Self-Disclosure: Social Work Education for Student Identity Management in Gay Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satterly, Brent A.

    2007-01-01

    Little research exists on how self-disclosure is taught in social work education (Pianko, 2001). Few social work education programs include precontemplative components of exploring identity for gay male students. In this study, the data from 4 focus groups of gay male therapists, who discussed their self-disclosure, decision-making processes, were…

  19. Missives from the Adult World to LGBTQ Youth: A Review of "Gallup's Guide to Modern Gay, Lesbian, and Transgender Lifestyle"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Catherine G.

    2012-01-01

    "Gallup's Guide to Modern Gay, Lesbian, and Transgender Lifestyle" is a set of 15 volumes addressing lesbian, gay, transgender, queer, and questioning (LGTQ) topics of concern to young LGTQ readers. Each volume is attractively produced, is well presented, and answers questions systematically avoided in most school curricula. It would be a valuable…

  20. Contextualizing Gay-straight Alliances: Student, Advisor, and Structural Factors Related to Positive Youth Development among Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poteat, V. Paul; Yoshikawa, Hirokazu; Calzo, Jerel P.; Gray, Mary L.; DiGiovanni, Craig D.; Lipkin, Arthur; Mundy-Shephard, Adrienne; Perrotti, Jeff; Scheer, Jillian R.; Shaw, Matthew P.

    2015-01-01

    Gay-straight alliances (GSAs) may promote resilience. Yet, what GSA components predict well-being? Among 146 youth and advisors in 13 GSAs (58% lesbian, gay, bisexual, or questioning; 64% White; 38% received free/reduced-cost lunch), student (demographics, victimization, attendance frequency, leadership, support, control), advisor (years served,…

  1. The 2009 National School Climate Survey: The Experiences of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Youth in Our Nation's Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosciw, Joseph G.; Greytak, Emily A.; Diaz, Elizabeth M.; Bartkiewicz, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    For 20 years, GLSEN (Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network) has worked to ensure safe schools for all students, regardless of sexual orientation, gender identity or gender expression. For 10 of those years, GLSEN has been documenting the school experiences of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) youth: the prevalence of anti-LGBT…

  2. The 2003 National School Climate Survey. The School-Related Experiences of Our Nation's Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosciw, Joseph G.

    2004-01-01

    The experiences of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) students in schools have been under-documented. For this reason, a third national survey was conducted by the Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network (GLSEN). As in previous surveys, LGBT youth were asked about biased language in their schools, feelings of comfort and safety in…

  3. The 2011 National School Climate Survey: The Experiences of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Youth in Our Nation's Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosciw, Joseph G.; Greytak, Emily A.; Bartkiewicz, Mark J.; Boesen, Madelyn J.; Palmer, Neal A.

    2012-01-01

    In 1999, the Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network (GLSEN) identified the need for national data on the experiences of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) students and launched the first National School Climate Survey (NSCS). At the time, the school experiences of LGBT youth were under-documented and nearly absent from national…

  4. Shaking Up the Status Quo: Challenging Intolerance of the Lesbian, Gay and Bisexual Community at a Private Roman Catholic University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getz, Cheryl; Kirkley, Evelyn

    2006-01-01

    Prejudice and discrimination against lesbian, gay and bisexual students, faculty, and staff on college campuses is an important issue that demands attention. Intolerance for the lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) community is often intensified by a lack of knowledge and understanding between heterosexuals and the LGB community, a problem that could…

  5. Preventing tobacco use among lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender youths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remafedi, Gary; Carol, Helen

    2005-04-01

    A paucity of information regarding tobacco use among lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youths impedes prevention programs. The aim of the present study was to conduct formative qualitative research regarding subpopulations at risk for tobacco use, protective factors, patterns of use, and approaches to prevention. This report focuses on participants' recommendations for the development of preventive intervention. Purposive sampling and maximum variation sampling were used to select 30 LGBT youths and 30 interactors for face-to-face interviews. NUD*IST6 text software was used for the indexing and thematic analysis of qualitative data, based on a grounded theory approach. All participants offered suggestions for tobacco prevention pertaining to the optimal process of prevention and cessation programs, specific strategies to promote tobacco prevention and cessation, and general strategies to foster nonsmoking. Several key themes regarding prevention emerged: LGBT youth should be involved in the design and implementation of interventions; prevention programs should support positive identity formation as well as nonsmoking; the general approach to prevention should be entertaining, supportive, and interactive; and the public might not distinguish primary prevention from cessation activities. All but one young smoker had attempted to quit at least once; but only one individual had succeeded. By way of implications, prevention programs should involve young people in enjoyable and engaging activities, address the psychosocial and cultural underpinnings of tobacco use, support healthy psychosocial development, and consider offering pharmacological smoking cessation aids.

  6. Fractionation in Gay-Berne liquid crystal mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Razo, J Antonio; Díaz-Herrera, Enrique; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2007-10-01

    We present a constant-pressure molecular dynamics simulation study of the phase behavior of binary (50:50) Gay-Berne liquid crystal mixtures consisting of elongated particles with different lengths (LA>LB) and equal diameters. We focus on systems at dense liquid-state conditions. Considering three mixtures characterized by different values of LA(B) and different length ratios q=LB/LA<1, we find complex fluid-fluid phase behavior resulting from the interplay between nematic, smectic-A-type, or smectic-B-type orientational ordering, on the one hand, and demixing into two phases of different composition (fractionation), on the other hand. The driving "forces" of demixing transitions are the temperature and the length ratio. Indeed, in the system characterized by the largest value of q (q=0.86) orientational order occurs already in mixed states, whereas full fractionation is found at q=0.71. The two resulting states are either of type smectic-B-nematic (intermediate temperatures) or smectic-B-smectic-B (low temperatures). In the intermediate case q=0.80 we observe a stepwise ordering and demixing behavior on cooling the system from high temperatures. Moreover, our results show that the stability range of (partially) nematic structures in mixtures of sufficiently small q can be significantly larger than in the pure counterparts, in qualitative agreement with experimental observations.

  7. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered, or intersexed content for nursing curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Ann Marie Walsh; Barnsteiner, Jane; Siantz, Mary Lou de Leon; Cotter, Valeri T; Everett, Janine

    2012-01-01

    There has been limited identification of core lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered, or intersexed (LGBTI) experience concepts that should be included in the nursing curricula. This article addresses the gap in the literature. To move nursing toward the goals of health equity and cultural humility in practice, education, and research, nursing curricula must integrate core LGBTI concepts, experiences, and needs related to health and illness. This article reviews LGBTI health care literature to address the attitudes, knowledge, and skills needed to address curricular gaps and provide content suggestions for inclusion in nursing curricula. Also considered is the need to expand nursing students' definition of diversity before discussing the interplay between nurses' attitudes and culturally competent care provided to persons who are LGBTI. Knowledge needed includes a life span perspective that addresses developmental needs and their impact on health concerns throughout the life course; health promotion and disease prevention with an articulation of unique health issues for this population; mental health concerns; specific health needs of transgender and intersex individuals; barriers to health care; interventions and resources including Internet sites; and legal and policy issues. Particular assessment and communication skills for LGBTI patients are identified. Finally, there is a discussion of didactic, simulation, and clinical strategies for incorporating this content into nursing curricula at the undergraduate and graduate levels.

  8. Toward an affirmative lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender leadership paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassinger, Ruth E; Shullman, Sandra L; Stevenson, Michael R

    2010-04-01

    This article presents an affirmative paradigm for understanding the leadership of sexual minorities-that is, lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people. Although research on LGBT issues in leadership to date is almost nonexistent, there are several bodies of literature that can contribute to an understanding of the unique leadership challenges faced by sexual minority people. These include the literatures on stigma and marginalization, leadership in particular status groups (e.g., college students, women), and LGBT vocational issues (especially workplace climate and identity disclosure). We propose a new, multidimensional model of LGBT leadership enactment that incorporates sexual orientation (particularly regarding identity disclosure), gender orientation (including leader gender), and the situation (conceptualized here as group composition); the model also is embedded in context, the most relevant factors that affect the enactment of leadership being stigma and marginalization. We explicate this model with findings and concepts from relevant literatures, and we conclude the article with recommendations for building a scholarly literature in LGBT leadership. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Piety and the agnostic gay poet: Thom Gunn's biblical homoerotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klawitter, G

    1997-01-01

    Thom Gunn has relied on biblical stories throughout his writing career to carry gay-themed poems. Although he characterizes himself agnostic, it is difficult to reconcile this self-definition with the tenderness evident in his biblical poems, a tenderness that many would identify with a kind of piety. Two of these poems reflect Gunn's reaction to paintings by Caravaggio, "The Sacrifice of Isaac" and "The Conversion of St. Paul." For the former, Gunn seems to have intuited Caravaggio's fascination with the naked figure of Isaac who appears about to be sodomized by Abraham. For the Paul poem, Gunn chooses one of two Caravaggio paintings on the subject, the one which emphasizes Paul in a recumbent and vulnerable sexual position. Gunn has also written tenderly of the Virgin Mary and Christ. His poem "Lazarus Not Raised" is an unusual look at the New Testament Lazarus story from Lazarus's point of view as a dead man who is not particularly interested in coming back to life even though he is encouraged to do so by a bevy of male friends. In recent years Gunn has continued to use biblical flavors in his verse, maintaining all the time his agnosticism.

  10. Determinants of lesbian and gay affirmative practice among heterosexual therapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessi, Edward J; Dillon, Frank R; Kim, Hillary Mi-Sung

    2015-09-01

    The current study tested a conceptual model based on social-cognitive theory (Bandura, 1986), highlighting the influence of attitudes toward sexual minority individuals, training hours, affirmative counseling self-efficacy, and beliefs about affirmative practice on therapist engagement in lesbian and gay affirmative practice. We recruited via the Internet 443 heterosexual psychologists (n = 270), clinical social workers (n = 110), and marriage and family therapists (n = 63) residing in various parts of the United States. The majority of participants identified as female (70%) and White (88%). A path analysis indicated that beliefs and affirmative counseling self-efficacy mediated associations between attitudes and therapist engagement in affirmative practice. Furthermore, self-efficacy mediated the relation between training hours and engagement in affirmative practice. Results suggest that more affirmative attitudes are linked with higher levels of affirmative counseling self-efficacy and more positive beliefs, which in turn positively influences therapist engagement in affirmative practice. Additionally, more hours of training influence affirmative counseling self-efficacy, which in turn correlates with higher levels of therapist engagement in affirmative practice. The discussion includes implications for affirmative practice training.

  11. Social Support and the Mental Health of Older Gay Men: Findings From a National Community-Based Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Anthony

    2016-02-01

    This study examines different types and sources of social support in relation to psychological distress levels among older Australian gay men. A national community-based survey was conducted involving 242 gay-identified men aged 50 years and older. In univariable regressions, psychological distress was less likely if men were receiving emotional support, practical support, or had a sense of belonging, and also if they had a greater number of close friends and received some or a lot of support from family and gay friends but not from straight friends. Of all these factors, a multivariable regression showed that receiving emotional support was the only significant independent factor. Emotional support appears to play a greater role in the mental health of older gay men than many other types and sources of support. Ensuring access to emotional support may need to be considered when promoting healthier aging among gay men.

  12. Attitudes and Beliefs About the Acceptability and Justness of Peer Victimization of Lesbian and Gay University Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Stacey L; Davis, Alan K; Leith, Jaclyn; Hinman, Nova; Ashrafioun, Lisham; Burmeister, Jacob M; Dworsky, Dryw

    2016-06-01

    We evaluated the acceptability and justness of anti-lesbian and gay victimization among 473 undergraduates. Participants were assigned to one of four vignette conditions that described an individual being verbally victimized in a typical college setting. Each vignette varied by victim gender (male; female) and sexual orientation (lesbian/gay; heterosexual). Participants completed background questionnaires and a measure that assessed the acceptability of the actions described in the vignettes. Overall, victimization was rated as unacceptable regardless of the sexual orientation and gender of the victim. However, participants rated the victimization of lesbian and gay students as more harmful and unjust than victimization of heterosexual students. Although the acceptability of anti-lesbian and gay victimization was low, 3%-12% of participants rated anti-lesbian and gay victimization as slightly or completely acceptable and just. Given that victimization is associated with long-term negative outcomes, college administrators should consider interventions aimed at decreasing the acceptability of victimization among students.

  13. Judged by the Company You Keep? Exposure to Nonprejudiced Norms Reduces Concerns About Being Misidentified as Gay/Lesbian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascio, Jessica L; Plant, E Ashby

    2016-09-01

    Social contagion concerns, heterosexuals' fears about being misidentified as gay/lesbian, can lead to avoidant and hostile responses toward gay men/lesbians. We argue that apprehension about becoming the target of prejudice if misidentified as gay/lesbian contributes to contagion concerns. We hypothesized that exposing heterosexuals to others' nonprejudiced attitudes would reduce their contagion concerns. Consistent with these predictions, perceptions of peer prejudice statistically predicted contagion concerns, over and above personal prejudice (Study 1). In addition, participants exposed to a nonprejudiced versus a high-prejudiced norm (or control condition) expressed lower contagion concerns and less anxious/avoidant responses toward gay men/lesbians (Studies 2 and 4). Finally, exposure to fellow students' nonprejudiced views resulted in lower contagion concerns than a control group (Study 3) due to decreased concerns about becoming the target of prejudice if misidentified as gay/lesbian (Study 4). These results provide evidence that changing perceptions of others' prejudice can reduce contagion concerns.

  14. Non-disclosure of Sexual Orientation to Parents Associated with Sexual Risk Behaviors Among Gay and Bisexual MSM in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ye; Ma, Ying; Chen, Ren; Li, Feng; Qin, Xia; Hu, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the relationship between non-disclosure of sexual orientation to parents and sexual risk behaviors among gay and bisexual men who have sex with men (MSM) in China. A total of 295 eligible participants (gay n = 179, bisexual n = 116) were recruited from MSM venues and MSM organizations in Anhui Province, China. Overall, 16.6 % of participants chose to disclose their sexual orientation to parents. Fewer bisexual participants chose to disclose their sexual orientation than gay participants (9.5 vs. 21.2 %, p sexual orientation to parents was positively associated with the number of female sex partners (AOR = 3.40) and with engagement in unprotected anal intercourse with men (AOR = 2.49) among gay MSM, in the past 6 months. Our findings indicated that HIV/AIDS intervention programs should promote the disclosure of sexual orientation and should design interventions specific to gay and bisexual MSM separately.

  15. Advancing human rights through constitutional protection for gays and lesbians in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louw, Ronald

    2005-01-01

    As a consequence of the 1994 adoption of a justiciable Bill of Rights in South Africa, with an equality provision prohibiting discrimination on the ground of sexual orientation, a coalition of gay and lesbian organisations set about implementing a progressive agenda of gay and lesbian rights litigation. In striking down the offence of sodomy, the Constitutional Court established a jurisprudence of gay and lesbian rights to equality, dignity and privacy that proved to be the foundation for significant litigation around family law issues. Subsequent to the sodomy judgement, the Court has ruled that same-sex couples who are in permanent life partnerships should be entitled to the same rights as married couples to immigration, employment benefits, custody and adoption of children. Despite the extensive equality jurisprudence of the Court, it is still uncertain whether it will rule in the future in favour of same-sex marriage or in favour of a civil union/domestic partnership model.

  16. Machismo and Mexican American men: an empirical understanding using a gay sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Fernando; Rigali-Oiler, Marybeth; Arciniega, G Miguel; Tracey, Terence J G

    2011-07-01

    Machismo continues to be a defining aspect of Mexican American men that informs a wide array of psychological and behavioral dimensions. Although strides have been made in this area of research, understanding of the role of this construct in the lives of gay men remains incomplete. Our purpose in this study was to gain a deeper understanding of machismo using a sample of Mexican American gay men. This study examined for the first time whether a 2-factor model of machismo previously validated with heterosexual, Mexican American men generalized to a sample of 152 gay men of similar ethnic background. Relations between machismo, sexual risk, and internalized homophobia were also explored. Confirmatory factor analysis supported the 2-factor model with the current sample. Results also indicated machismo as predicting internalized homophobia and as an index of risky sex. Limitations are presented and implications are discussed.

  17. Correlates of homophobia, transphobia, and internalized homophobia in gay or lesbian and heterosexual samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warriner, Katrina; Nagoshi, Craig T; Nagoshi, Julie L

    2013-01-01

    This research assessed the correlates of homophobia and transphobia in heterosexual and homosexual individuals, based on a theory of different sources of perceived symbolic threat to social status. Compared to 310 heterosexual college students, a sample of 30 gay male and 30 lesbian college students scored lower on homophobia, transphobia, and religious fundamentalism. Mean gender differences were smaller for gay men and lesbians for homophobia, aggressiveness, benevolent sexism, masculinity, and femininity. Fundamentalism, right-wing authoritarianism, and hostile and benevolent sexism were correlated only with homophobia in lesbians, whereas fundamentalism and authoritarianism were correlated only with transphobia in gay men. Correlates of internalized homophobia were different than those found for homophobia and transphobia, which was discussed in terms of gender differences in threats to status based on sexual orientation versus gender identity.

  18. Investigation into the temperature dependence of isotropic- nematic phase transition of Gay- Berne liquid crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Avazpour

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Density functional approach was used to study the isotropic- nematic (I-N transition and calculate the values of freezing parameters of the Gay- Berne liquid crystal model. New direct and pair correlation functions of a molecular fluid with Gay- Berne pair potential were used. These new functions were used in density functional theory as input to calculate the isotropic- nematic transition densities for elongation at various reduced temperatures. It was observed that the isotropic- nematic transition densities increase as the temperature increases. It was found that the new direct correlation function is suitable to study the isotropic- nematic transition of Gay- Berne liquids. Comparison to other works showed qualitative agreement

  19. Getting Off: development of a model program for gay and bisexual male methamphetamine users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reback, Cathy J; Veniegas, Rosemary; Shoptaw, Steven

    2014-01-01

    An evidence-based gay-specific cognitive behavioral therapy (GCBT) intervention for methamphetamine-using gay and bisexual men was adapted for use in a community-based setting, thereby moving research into practice. The 48-session, 16-week GCBT intervention was revised to 24 sessions requiring 8 weeks and renamed Getting Off: A Behavioral Treatment Intervention for Gay and Bisexual Male Methamphetamine Users. GCBT was modified for implementation within the limited resources and capacity of community-based organizations while also retaining drug use and HIV risk reduction outcomes. Since 2007, Getting Off has been sustained with public health funding at the community site and has been adopted by multiple community-based sites.

  20. Gay and bisexual male domestic violence victimization: challenges to feminist theory and responses to violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letellier, P

    1994-01-01

    This article demonstrates how same-sex male battering challenges contemporary feminist domestic violence theory. The author shows current theory to be heterosexist and therefore insufficient to explain the phenomenon of battering among gay/bisexual men. Domestic violence theories that integrate a sociopolitical and a psychological analysis of battering are presented as more inclusive of same-sex domestic violence. Differences between battered gay/bisexual men and battered women are illustrated, focusing on how these men conceptualize and respond to violence against them. The author also examines the social context of homophobia in which same-sex battering occurs; the impact of AIDS on gay/bisexual men as it pertains to battering; the misconception of "mutual combat"; and the difficulty of seeking help. The article highlights the need for empirical research on same-sex male battering.

  1. Gay and lesbian youth, emergent identities, and cultural scenes at home and abroad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herdt, G

    1989-01-01

    This introduction opens up the field of studies of gay and lesbian adolescents, both with regard to past and present studies in the research literature, and by allusion to the new studies collected in this issue. Historical and crosscultural elements of the context of the "coming out" process are discussed. Four preconceptions of gay youth are critically examined, regarding their heterosexuality, inversion, stigma, and heterogeneity. The anthropological construct of life crisis "rites of passage" is utilized as a heuristic framework for deconstructing attitudes regarding change and constancy in homosexual adolescents. Aspects of age, sex, class, and related variables related to the form and content of the coming out process are then examined in the United States and other societies. Finally, the social problems of gay youth, AIDS and its impact in particular, are briefly considered. The author concludes with a plea for new and urgent research.

  2. Application of Herek's attitudes toward lesbians and gay men scale in The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Meerendonk, Bas; Eisinga, Rob; Felling, Albert

    2003-08-01

    A national sample of 921 respondents from the Dutch population completed the translated, slightly modified version of Herek's Attitudes Toward Lesbians and Gay Men Scale, originally developed in the USA for the assessment of attitudes toward lesbians and gay men. The present study was the first attempt to test the applicability of the scale in the Netherlands. In line with previous American findings, all scale items loaded highly on one factor. The scores also correlated with another measure of attitudes toward lesbians and gay men, namely, 'denial of equal rights' (r = .76), and with 'traditional view of women' (r = .48), 'importance of traditional marriage' (r = .53), and 'authoritarianism' (r = .31). Data support the scale's acceptable reliability and construct and discriminant validity.

  3. Implicit Preferences for Straight People over Lesbian Women and Gay Men Weakened from 2006 to 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin C Westgate

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Legal rights and cultural attitudes towards lesbian women and gay men have shifted rapidly in the early 21st century. Using 683,976 visitors to Project Implicit from February 2006 to August 2013, we investigated whether shifts were also observable in implicit evaluations that occur outside of conscious awareness or control. Similar to public opinion polling, the estimated explicit preference for straight people over lesbian women and gay men was 26% weaker on the last day compared to the first. The estimated implicit preference for straight people declined by 13.4% over the same period. The largest shifts in implicit evaluations occurred among Hispanic, White, female, liberal, and young adult participants; the smallest shifts occurred among Black, Asian, male, conservative, and older adult participants. Societal change in evaluation of lesbian and gay people is not limited to what people are willing and able to report. However, change in implicit evaluation appears to be slower.

  4. Appreciating the Persona paradox: lessons from participatory design sessions with HIV+ gay men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Jae-Yung; Phillips, Craig; Currie, Leanne M

    2014-01-01

    Eliciting user requirements from HIV-positive gay men who smoke can be challenging. This is because of the complex relationship between social stigma and gender identities (e.g., gay, masculine, HIV+, and smoking status). Inspired to engage HIV-positive gay men in the development of a web-assisted tobacco intervention, we used personas as a main communication tool in our participatory design sessions. Personas are characters created by users that embody part of their own behaviours, thoughts, and motivations. In an apparent paradox, this article is a description of how the use of personas to ensure less realistic self-representation provided an impetus for more self-disclosure. Findings and feedbacks from this study reveal that personas are an effective design tool to engage users in sensitive topics. Implications for future work are also discussed.

  5. Internalized Stigma and Psychological Well-Being in Gay Men and Lesbians in Italy and Belgium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgia Lorenzi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have shown that internalized homophobia is a risk factor for mental health illness in homosexual individuals, whereas the perception of social support is a protective factor for their psychological well-being. In line with those studies, the present research has investigated the levels of internalized homophobia, anxiety, depression and social support, among two groups of gay men and lesbian individuals living in two European countries (N = 194: 86 Italian and 108 Belgian, where legislations grant different civil rights to lesbian and gay individuals (LG. The main goal of this research has been to verify the possible differences between the two groups. Results showed some significant differences in terms of observed levels of internalized homophobia, which was higher in the Belgian gay men’s group compared to the Italian one. Furthermore, path analysis emphasized the role of social support as a potential factor of mediation between internalized homophobia and mental health.

  6. A review of gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender youth issues for the pediatrician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steever, John B; Cooper-Serber, Emma

    2013-02-01

    CME EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES: 1.Review common gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender (GLBT) terminology and discuss sexual constructs as they are currently understood.2.Determine the prevalence of GLBT youth and identify health disparities in the GLBT population.3.Provide strategies to develop an accepting atmosphere for GLBT youth in the pediatric practice, including the maintenance of ongoing health and appropriate screening for at-risk behaviors. Gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgendered individuals have always been present in human society.1,2 References to same-sex couples and activity have been noted as far back as 600 B.C. on ancient Japanese and Chinese pottery. Ancient Greek and Roman art is full of depictions of same-sex couples; some scholars believe that Alexander the Great was gay.3.

  7. Social environment and sexual risk-taking among gay and transgender African American youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Robin; Bernadini, Stephen; Jemmott, John B

    2013-01-01

    More prevention effort is required as the HIV epidemic increases among gay and transgender African American youth. Using ecological systems theory and an integrative model of behaviour change, this study examines the sexual behaviour of gay and transgender African American young people as embedded within the unique social and structural environments affecting this population. Also examined is the important role played by mobile technology in the social and sexual lives of individuals. Seven focus groups were conducted with 54 African American young adults in a northeastern US city. The findings provide a rich examination of the social and sexual lives of gay and transgender African American youth, focusing on the social environment and the impact of the environment on sexual-risk behaviour.

  8. Positive associations among interpersonal contact, motivation, and implicit and explicit attitudes toward gay men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemm, Kristi M

    2006-01-01

    A correlational study explored the role of intergroup contact and motivation to respond without prejudice on heterosexuals' expression of explicit and implicit (unconscious) bias against gay men. Participants who reported having more relationships and closer relationships with gay, lesbian, or bisexual people tended to exhibit more favorable attitudes toward gay men on implicit as well as explicit attitude measures. Attitudes were also related to self-reported motivation to be non-prejudiced, including motivation stemming from sources internal as well as external to the individual. Multiple regression analyses showed that contact and motivation explain unique variance in attitude but that motivation is a relatively stronger predictor. The results are interpreted to suggest that implicit and explicit prejudice may be reduced through motivation coupled with positive contact experiences.

  9. Differences in African American and White Women’s Attitudes Toward Lesbians and Gay Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Wilson; Peterson, John L.; Parrott, Dominic J.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine racial differences in women’s attitudes toward lesbians and gay men and to offer an understanding of these differences. Participants were 224 18–30 year old heterosexual African American (64%) and White (36%) female undergraduates from a large urban university in the southeastern United States. Participants completed measures of social demographics, sexual orientation, and sexual prejudice. Results showed that African American, relative to White, women endorsed more negative attitudes toward lesbians and gay men. Also, unlike White women, African American women reported more negative attitudes toward gay men than lesbians. Implications are discussed regarding differences in cultural contexts that exist between African American and White women. PMID:20161368

  10. Factors influencing the career and academic choices of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Margaret S; Dimito, Anne

    2010-01-01

    This is an empirical study of academic and career choices for 119 lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) students using a questionnaire. Respondents who reported that their sexual orientation influenced their choices a great deal indicated that the influences were both positive and negative. This group was most likely to have experienced anti-LGBT discrimination in the past. In comparing lesbian, bisexual people, and gay males, gay males and respondents from visible minorities were the most likely to feel a negative impact, while bisexual respondents were the least likely. There were too few transgender respondents to include in these statistical comparisons; however, frequencies suggest that transgender people may be the most vulnerable of all. Results suggest that counselors need to take sexual orientation issues, particularly past experiences of discrimination, when working with LGBT clients.

  11. Luxury clothing: a mirror of gay consumers sexual option? [doi: 10.5329/RECADM.20121101010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce Gonçalves Altaf

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Through a qualitative exploratory research, the present paper investigates the behaviour of Brazilian gay consumers as to their luxury clothing consumption, assuming that this behaviour might help the construction of their self-concept once those products reflect their sexual option. A bibliographical review is followed by the results for in-depth interviews with 12 gay men, and completed with the use of a semantic scale that measures the interviewees’ self-concept and luxury clothing concept. An examination of the results is followed by their implications, indicating that the self-concept directly influences the male gay’s buying behaviour in this market.   Keywords Gay consumers; Luxury clothing consumption; Self-concept construction; Buying behaviour. 

  12. Structural stigma and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis reactivity in lesbian, gay, and bisexual young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzenbuehler, Mark L; McLaughlin, Katie A

    2014-02-01

    Youth exposed to extreme adverse life conditions have blunted cortisol responses to stress. This study aims to examine whether growing up in highly stigmatizing environments similarly shapes stigmatized individuals' physiological responses to identity-related stress. We recruited 74 lesbian, gay, and bisexual young adults (mean age = 23.68) from 24 states with varying levels of structural stigma surrounding homosexuality. State-level structural stigma was coded based on several dimensions, including policies that exclude sexual minorities from social institutions (e.g., same-sex marriage). Participants were exposed to a laboratory stressor, the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST), and neuroendocrine measures were collected. Lesbian, gay, and bisexual young adults who were raised in highly stigmatizing environments as adolescents evidenced a blunted cortisol response following the TSST compared to those from low-stigma environments. The stress of growing up in environments that target gays and lesbians for social exclusion may exert biological effects that are similar to traumatic life experiences.

  13. Hair today, gone tomorrow: a comparison of body hair removal practices in gay and heterosexual men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Yolanda; Tiggemann, Marika; Churchett, Libby

    2008-09-01

    Although hairlessness is rapidly becoming a component of the ideal male body, little research has examined men's concerns about their body hair or their hair removal practices. Samples of gay and heterosexual men completed questionnaires that assessed whether they had ever removed their back, buttock or pubic hair, the frequency with which they did so, the methods used and their self-reported reasons for removing this hair, as well as their level of appearance investment. Results indicated that many gay and heterosexual men remove their back, buttock and pubic hair regularly and that their primary reason for doing so is to maintain or improve their appearance. The frequency of hair removal was also associated with the motivational salience component of appearance investment. The findings offer further support to the premise that gay and heterosexual men exhibit similar body image concerns.

  14. Black gay men as sexual subjects: race, racialisation and the social relations of sex among Black gay men in Toronto.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husbands, Winston; Makoroka, Lydia; Walcott, Rinaldo; Adam, Barry D; George, Clemon; Remis, Robert S; Rourke, Sean B

    2013-01-01

    In this study of Black gay and bisexual men in Toronto, sexually active survey participants reported on their sexual behaviours with male partners of different ethnoracial backgrounds, and interview participants reflected on how their sexual relationships emerged in the context of race and interracial desire. Most survey participants reported sexual relationships with other Black men. Participants were more likely to be insertive with White and other ethnoracial men than with Black men. A significant number of participants who were receptive or versatile with Black partners switched to the insertive role when their sexual partners were not Black. Interview participants ascribed a sense of fulfilment to their sexual relationships with other Black men, but avoided relationships with White men or interpreted such relationships as either purely sexual and/or inflected by their racialised objectification. Others avoided sexual relationships with other Black men or preferred relationships with White men, sometimes in opposition to experiences of oppressive masculinity from some Black partners but mindful of the possibility of racialised encounters with their White partners. Study participants emerge as informed sexual subjects, self-conscious about their sexual relationships and variously inclined to negotiate or resist racialisation and oppression in the private and public spheres.

  15. Inclusive anti-bullying policies and reduced risk of suicide attempts in lesbian and gay youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzenbuehler, Mark L; Keyes, Katherine M

    2013-07-01

    To evaluate whether anti-bullying policies that are inclusive of sexual orientation are associated with a reduced prevalence of suicide attempts among lesbian, gay, and bisexual youths. A total of 31,852 11th-grade public school students (1,413 lesbian, gay, and bisexual individuals; 4.4%) in Oregon completed the Oregon Healthy Teens survey in 2006-2008. The independent variable was the proportion of school districts in the 34 counties participating in the Oregon Healthy Teens survey that adopted anti-bullying policies inclusive of sexual orientation. The outcome measure was any self-reported suicide attempt in the past 12 months. We stratified results by sexual orientation. Lesbian and gay youths living in counties with fewer school districts with inclusive anti-bullying policies were 2.25 times (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.13-4.49) more likely to have attempted suicide in the past year compared with those living in counties where more districts had these policies. Inclusive anti-bullying policies were significantly associated with a reduced risk for suicide attempts among lesbian and gay youths, even after controlling for sociodemographic characteristics (sex, race/ethnicity) and exposure to peer victimization (odds ratio, .18; 95% CI, .03-.92). In contrast, anti-bullying policies that did not include sexual orientation were not associated with lower suicide attempts among lesbian and gay youths (odds ratio, .38; 95% CI, .02-7.33). Inclusive anti-bullying policies may exert protective effects for the mental health of lesbian and gay youths, including reducing their risk for suicide attempts. Copyright © 2013 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The effects of death reminders on sex differences in prejudice toward gay men and lesbians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Russell J; Saucier, Donald A

    2011-01-01

    Terror management research shows that death reminders (mortality salience) increase prejudice toward worldview violators. Two studies investigated whether death reminders exacerbated differences in heterosexual men's and women's reports of sexual prejudice (negative attitudes based on sexual orientation). Results showed that following death reminders, sex differences in anti-gay discrimination and affective prejudice toward gay men (but not toward lesbians) were larger, and that these increased sex differences were mediated by gender role beliefs. The current studies suggest that researchers may attenuate the effects of death reminders by lessening the perceived worldview violation in addition to alleviating the existential terror of death.

  17. Predictors of Relationship Dissolution in Lesbian, Gay, and Heterosexual Adoptive Parents

    OpenAIRE

    Goldberg, Abbie E; Garcia, Randi

    2015-01-01

    Little work has examined relationship dissolution or divorce in adoptive parents or same-sex parent couples. The current study examined predictors of relationship dissolution across the first 5 years of parenthood among a sample of heterosexual, lesbian, and gay male adoptive couples. Of the 190 couples in the study, 15 (7.9%) dissolved their relationships during the first 5 years of adoptive parenthood. Specifically, 7 of 57 lesbian couples (12.3%), 1 of 49 gay male couples (2.0%), and 7 of ...

  18. Religion and Public Perceptions of Gays and Lesbians in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Timothy S

    2017-01-01

    Public support for gay and lesbian rights has increased in Western democracies, yet less is known regarding views in South Korea, or East Asia more broadly. Rather than broad cultural claims, this analysis asks to what extent religious identification explains perceptions of gays and lesbians. Public opinion survey data from South Korea finds that Protestants were consistently less supportive of homosexual issues compared to Catholics, Buddhists, and those without a religious identification. Furthermore, after controlling for religion, identification with the largest conservative party associated with less support.

  19. Trials and Triumph: Lesbian and Gay Young Adults Raised in a Rural Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angie L. Dahl

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The rural context at times is characterized by heteronormativity and conservatism. For individuals who identify as a sexual minority (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and/or queer, the rural context may pose particular challenges to the development of a healthy, coherent sense of self. Seven young adults (18–24 who identified as gay or lesbian participated in in-depth interviews regarding their experiences coming out in a rural Appalachian context. Findings suggest sexual minority individuals experience both trials and triumphs coming out in the rural context. Two overarching themes and six subthemes are discussed with implications for supporting sexual minority youth in the rural context.

  20. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender youths: who smokes, and why?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remafedi, Gary

    2007-01-01

    Existing research indicates the rate of smoking among lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youths exceeds the general population's, possibly due to stress, habitual substance abuse, socializing in smoky venues, and tobacco marketing. The study's overall aim was to conduct qualitative research regarding tobacco use and avoidance by LGBT youths. This report focuses on identifying priority subpopulations and corresponding risk and resiliency factors. Purposive and maximum variation sampling were used to select 30 LGBT youths and 30 interactors for face-to-face interviews. Almost a third of participants said that all LGBT youths are at risk for smoking. Other respondents specified a range of high-risk groups, encompassing many subpopulations. Contributing factors for smoking included personal characteristics, interpersonal issues, environmental conditions, and structural issues. More than a third of young smokers were not acquainted with LGBT nonsmokers and could not imagine how they avoid using tobacco. Half of the interactors and four youths ascribed favorable qualities to nonsmokers--such as self-esteem, will power, and concern for personal health, appearance, and well-being. In conclusion, smoking is a pervasive problem among LGBT youths. The findings corroborate prior explanations and implicate new ones. Some risks (e.g., limited opportunities to socialize with LGBT peers outside of smoking venues, the desire to appear more masculine, and sexuality-related stress) and resiliency factors (e.g., positive sexual identity) are unique to LGBT populations, reinforcing the need for culturally specific approaches to prevention and cessation. Highlighting the positive attributes of nonsmokers and nonsmoking might prove useful in prevention campaigns.

  1. "It Really Is Not Just Gay, but African American Gay": The Impact of Community and Church on the Experiences of Black Lesbians Living in North Central Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Clare F

    2016-09-01

    The experiences of Black lesbians highlight the unique circumstance found at the intersection of sexuality, race, and gender. However, most sexuality research tends to focus on White lesbians and White gay men, and most race research tends to focus on Black heterosexuals. Furthermore, research on the Black gay community tends to focus on those living in the Northeast or on the West Coast, neglecting experiences of those living in the more politically, socially, and religiously conservative South. This article draws on data obtained from semistructured interviews with 12 Black lesbians living in north central Florida, exploring their perspectives as they negotiate a social world of intersecting oppressions. Participants especially highlight how they contextualized their sexuality in racialized terms and negotiated it in racially defined communities.

  2. Predicting Portuguese Psychology Students' Attitudes Toward the Psychological Development of Children Adopted by Lesbians and Gay Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gato, Jorge; Fontaine, Anne Marie

    2016-11-01

    The present study seeks to ascertain the attitudes of Portuguese psychology students (future psychologists) toward the development of children adopted by lesbian and gay parents. Each participant (N = 182) read a vignette describing an adoption of a child by lesbian and gay persons. After reading the vignette, participants rated four different aspects of the future development of the adopted child (psychosocial adjustment, victimization, psychological disturbance, and normative sexuality). Furthermore, participants were asked about their gender, interpersonal contact with lesbians and gay men, gender role attitudes, and attitudes toward lesbians and gay men. Future psychologists' attitudes toward the developmental outcomes of children adopted by lesbians and gay men were associated with negative attitudes toward non-heterosexuals, which in turn correlated to interpersonal contact with lesbians and gay men and adherence to gender conservative values. These results clearly highlight the central role of social attitudes and the need for cultural competence training of future psychologists that encourages interpersonal contact with non-heterosexuals and discourages traditional gender roles and negative attitudes toward lesbian and gay men.

  3. Individualism-collectivism, self-efficacy, and other factors associated with risk taking among gay Asian and Caucasian men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Limin; Van de Ven, Paul; McCormick, John

    2004-02-01

    A theoretical framework, which included perspectives of individualism-collectivism and self-efficacy, was used to investigate factors associated with sexual risk practice among gay Asian and Caucasian men. "Risk" was defined as unprotected anal intercourse with any casual partner or with a regular partner whose HIV status was not concordant with the participant's. Altogether, 201 Caucasian and 199 Asian gay men, largely recruited from gay social venues in inner Sydney, completed an anonymous questionnaire. Most participants were gay self-identified and gay community attached, and more than half of the Asian men had been living in Sydney for at least 3 years. Overall, the Asian men were more collectivist oriented and the Caucasian men more individualist oriented. Data analyses revealed that higher self-efficacy in avoiding casual risk encounters and smaller proportion of gay friends were associated with less risk. The inclusion of individualism-collectivism and social cognitive variables in the examination of sexual risk practices among gay men from different cultural backgrounds holds promise.

  4. The discourse of liberation: Frames used in characterising the gay liberation movement in two South African newspapers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Danger Mongie

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This article reports on the quantitative findings of a study that straddles the applied linguistic field of critical discourse analysis and a sociolinguistic field recently referred to as “queer linguistics”. Drawing on a quantitative method of analysis, the study investigates the linguistic framing of LGBT mobilisation in two South African newspapers, City Press and the Mail & Guardian, across a period of almost 30 years. It aims to identify the characteristics of the discourses that topicalise the gay[1] liberation movement in order to investigate the ways in which linguistic means have been used in articulating the need and the right to liberation and how arguments against the gay liberation movement have been framed, reframed and counterframed in South African media. The study’s findings revealed that a number of frames, including ‘liberation’, ‘rights’ and ‘victimisation’, reoccurred in the framing of arguments for the gay liberation movement throughout the data collection period in both corpora, and while City Press primarily used these frames to express anti-gay sentiments, the Mail & Guardian primarily used these frames to express pro-gay sentiments. The findings also revealed that a number of frames, including ‘religion’, ‘morality’ and ‘nature’, reoccurred in the framing of arguments against the gay liberation movement, and again while City Press primarily used these frames to express anti-gay sentiments, the Mail & Guardian primarily used these frames to express pro-gay sentiments. Finally, the findings revealed that a single frame such as “religion” was typically used to express both pro- and anti-gay sentiments, bringing to light the important role that counterframing plays in bringing about social transformation.[1] The word “gay” is used as a hypernym in this article as this is a reflection of the way in which the liberation movement was typically topicalised in the data.

  5. Mixed Methods Research with Internally Displaced Colombian Gay and Bisexual Men and Transwomen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zea, Maria Cecilia; Aguilar-Pardo, Marcela; Betancourt, Fabian; Reisen, Carol A.; Gonzales, Felisa

    2014-01-01

    We discuss the use of mixed methods research to further understanding of displaced Colombian gay and bisexual men and transwomen, a marginalized population at risk. Within the framework of communicative action, which calls for social change through egalitarian dialog, we describe how our multinational, interdisciplinary research team explored the…

  6. Going against the Grain: Supporting Lesbian, Gay and Bisexual Clients as they "Come Out."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowie, Helen; Rivers, Ian

    2000-01-01

    Focuses upon sexual orientation as a counseling resource: a means by which to expand upon skills and understand the experiences of lesbian, gay, and bisexual clients. Considers the process of development from the perspective of the clients and explores the process of identity formation and the role of those professionals who provide support during…

  7. The Power and Limits of Marriage: Married Gay Men's Family Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocobock, Abigail

    2013-01-01

    Same-sex marriage has received much scholarly attention in the United States in the past decade. Yet we know little about how same-sex couples experience marriage. In this article, I present findings from in-depth interviews with 32 legally married gay men in Iowa. I focus on their experiences with families of origin and investigate the…

  8. Shame, internalized homophobia, identity formation, attachment style, and the connection to relationship status in gay men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jac; Trevethan, Robert

    2010-09-01

    This study reports on a survey of 166 gay men in Sydney, Australia, that explores the links between internalized shame, internalized homophobia, and attachment style. These variables were linked to the age of coming out, family and peer acceptance of their sexuality, relationship status, and previous marriage. Findings suggest a strong relationship between shame, internalized homophobia, and anxious and avoidant attachment style. Shame was predicted by internalized homophobia and anxious and avoidant attachment style. A significant proportion of gay men reported that they were not easily accepted when they first came out. There was a significant relationship between coming out and internalized homophobia but not with shame and attachment style. Furthermore, men who had never come out to family and friends reported higher levels of internalized homophobia but not higher levels of shame and attachment style. Of particular significance was the connection between previous marriage and higher levels of shame and internalized homophobia. Finally, gay men who were not currently in a relationship reported higher levels of shame anxious and avoidant attachment style. These findings are related to therapeutic work with gay men who have previously been married and those who are concerned with their current single status.

  9. Internalized Homophobia and Relationship Quality among Lesbians, Gay Men, and Bisexuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, David M.; Meyer, Ilan H.

    2009-01-01

    The authors examined the associations between internalized homophobia, outness, community connectedness, depressive symptoms, and relationship quality among a diverse community sample of 396 lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) individuals. Structural equation models showed that internalized homophobia was associated with greater relationship problems…

  10. Homophobia and communal coping for HIV risk management among gay men in relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachowski, Courtney; Stephenson, Rob

    2015-02-01

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) remain disproportionately affected by the HIV epidemic in the US and estimates suggest that one to two-thirds of new infections occur among main partners. Previous research has focused on individual MSM and their risk for HIV, yet couples' ability to manage risk has been largely understudied. In particular, the role that homophobia plays in shaping the ability of gay male couples to cope with HIV risk is currently understudied. A sample of 447 gay/bisexual men with main partners was taken from a 2011 survey of gay and bisexual men in Atlanta. Linear regression models were fitted for three couples' coping outcome scales (outcome efficacy, couple efficacy, communal coping) and included indicators of homophobia (internalized homophobia and homophobic discrimination). Findings indicate that reporting of increased levels of internalized homophobia were consistently associated with decreased outcome measures of couples' coping ability regarding risk management. The results highlight the role that homophobia plays in gay male couples' relationships and HIV risk, extending the existing literature in the field of same-sex relationships as influenced by homophobia.

  11. Using Theatre to Change Attitudes toward Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, Susan V.; Seher, Christin

    2014-01-01

    Despite the proliferation of educational interventions and attitude change strategies, the prevalence of homophobia and widespread discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people on college campuses persists. This study investigates the impact of theatre on changes in college students' attitudes. Using a pre- and…

  12. Internalized Homophobia and Relationship Quality among Lesbians, Gay Men, and Bisexuals

    OpenAIRE

    Frost, David M.; Meyer, Ilan H.

    2009-01-01

    We examined the associations between internalized homophobia, outness, community connectedness, depressive symptoms, and relationship quality among a diverse community sample of 396 lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) individuals. Structural equation models showed that internalized homophobia was associated with greater relationship problems both generally and among coupled participants independent of outness and community connectedness. Depressive symptoms mediated the association between inter...

  13. The "Gay Comfort Level": Examining a Media Advocacy Group's Efforts to Combat Youth Homophobia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachgal, Tara M.

    2011-01-01

    This article scrutinizes the efforts of a media advocacy group to redress the stigma of youth homosexuality among United States youth: a report published in 2003 by the Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation called, "How Youth Media Can Help Combat Homophobia Among American Teenagers." The report, authored by Rodger Streitmatter, concluded…

  14. Liaisons dangereuses: HIV risk behavior and prevention in steady gay relationships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davidovich, E.

    2006-01-01

    This dissertation studied sexual risk-taking behavior among gay men in steady relationships. The main targets of this study were to establish: (a) whether steady relationships form a risk environment for HIV-infection; (b) some of the determinants of risky and protective behavior between steady part

  15. Lesbian, Gay, and Heterosexual Couples in Open Adoption Arrangements: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Abbie E.; Kinkler, Lori A.; Richardson, Hannah B.; Downing, Jordan B.

    2011-01-01

    Little research has attended to the role of gender and sexual orientation in shaping open adoption dynamics. This qualitative, longitudinal study of 45 adoptive couples (15 lesbian, 15 gay, and 15 heterosexual couples) examined adopters' motivations for open adoption, changes in attitudes about openness, and early relationship dynamics. Key…

  16. Mixed Methods Research with Internally Displaced Colombian Gay and Bisexual Men and Transwomen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zea, Maria Cecilia; Aguilar-Pardo, Marcela; Betancourt, Fabian; Reisen, Carol A.; Gonzales, Felisa

    2014-01-01

    We discuss the use of mixed methods research to further understanding of displaced Colombian gay and bisexual men and transwomen, a marginalized population at risk. Within the framework of communicative action, which calls for social change through egalitarian dialog, we describe how our multinational, interdisciplinary research team explored the…

  17. Acculturation Strategies and Mental Health in Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Nele; Vanden Berghe, Wim; Dewaele, Alexis; Vincke, John

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we examine the impact of acculturation strategies on minority stress and mental health in lesbian, gay, or bisexual (LGB) youth in Flanders, Belgium. Building on previous identity minority studies and on the social stress model, we investigate how LGB youth acculturate within both the LGB subculture and mainstream society and how…

  18. Machismo and Mexican American Men: An Empirical Understanding Using a Gay Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Fernando; Rigali-Oiler, Marybeth; Arciniega, G. Miguel; Tracey, Terence J. G.

    2011-01-01

    Machismo continues to be a defining aspect of Mexican American men that informs a wide array of psychological and behavioral dimensions. Although strides have been made in this area of research, understanding of the role of this construct in the lives of gay men remains incomplete. Our purpose in this study was to gain a deeper understanding of…

  19. Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome: A Preliminary Examination of the Effects on Gay Couples and Coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carl, Douglas

    1986-01-01

    The Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) epidemic significantly influences attitudes about life and lifestyles. Homosexuals have to give increased consideration to coupling, the nature of coupled relationships, sex and intimacy, and death long before the normal time. Discusses impact of AIDS on the early stages of gay coupling and on the…

  20. Stigma, Social Context, and Mental Health: Lesbian and Gay Couples across the Transition to Adoptive Parenthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Abbie E.; Smith, JuliAnna Z.

    2011-01-01

    This is the first study to examine change in depression and anxiety across the first year of adoptive parenthood in same-sex couples (90 couples: 52 lesbian, 38 gay male). Given that sexual minorities uniquely contend with sexual orientation-related stigma, this study examined how both internalized and enacted forms of stigma affect the mental…

  1. Mental health concerns of gay and bisexual men seeking mental health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Michael B; Mimiaga, Matthew J; Safren, Steven A

    2008-01-01

    Little data exist about the mental health needs of gay and bisexual men. This is due to limitations of existing studies such as small and nonrepresentative samples, failure to assess sexual orientation, and concerns about stigmatization, possibly causing sexual minority individuals to be reluctant to disclose their sexual orientation to researchers. Fenway Community Health is a large urban health center that serves the LGBT community. The large number of gay and bisexual men who present for mental health treatment allows for a unique opportunity to gain insight into mental health, prevention, and intervention needs for this group. The current study is a review of the mental health information from all of the gay and bisexual men who reported that they were HIV-negative during their mental health intake over a six-month period at Fenway Community Health (January to June 2000; N = 92). The most frequent presenting problems were depression, anxiety, and relationship issues. Additionally, presenting problems included current or past abuse, substance abuse, finance and employment, recent loss, and family issues. The most frequent diagnoses were depression, anxiety disorders, and adjustment disorders. These findings support the notion that presenting problems and mental health concerns among gay and bisexual men are similar to those frequently reported by individuals in other mental health facilities, however, specific psychosocial stressors are unique to this population.

  2. The same but different: clinician-patient communication with gay and lesbian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonvicini, Kathleen A; Perlin, Michael J

    2003-10-01

    Surveys estimate that 3-6% of the patients seen by physicians are gay or lesbian. There are unique health risks of gays and lesbians that are important to the clinician in determining an accurate diagnosis, providing patient education, and arriving at an appropriate treatment plan. One of the most significant medical risks of these populations includes avoidance of routine health care and dissatisfaction with healthcare. Many of these healthcare risks are not addressed because of lack of communication based on a number of common assumptions including the assumption that the patient is heterosexual. This article includes a summary of the medical literature through computerized searches to March 2002 in MEDLINE, PsychInfo, HEALTHSTAR, and bibliographies in articles on health care with gay and lesbian patients. The search strategy included health care of gays and lesbians and clinician-patient communication, partner and family issues. Secondly, it will examine common communication barriers and provide strategies for enhancing communication with patients in a gender-neutral, non-judgmental manner including suggestions for enlisting the inclusion of patients' families.

  3. Barriers to Sexual Expression and Safe Sex Among Mexican Gay Men: A Qualitative Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verduzco, Ignacio Lozano

    2016-07-01

    Same-sex sexual practices among men in Mexico City are stigmatized. This article analyzes sexual practices and experiences of gay men in Mexico City and its implications on emotional and sexual health. The concept of sexual practices is used from a public health perspective, and the concept of sexual experiences from a psychological one, intending to understand both physical and emotional discomfort and pleasure in sexual contexts. The aim of this article is to analyze sexual practices and experiences of gay men in Mexico City and its implications on health, particularly emotions that can lead to depression, anxiety, substance abuse, and unsafe sex. Fifteen in-depth interviews were carried out with gay men of three generations who live in Mexico City. The data were analyzed using techniques from grounded theory to identify categories, and critical discourse analysis as an analytical approach to understand how social discourses affect subjectivity, emotions, and practices. Sexual practices and experiences are the result of homoerotic desire, which gender and heteronormative culture encourage to be kept hidden and clandestine. This leads men into risk contexts where practices are hardly negotiated, thus exposing themselves to sexually transmitted infections and abuse. These practices also produce a series of emotions such as guilt, shame, fear, and sadness that may develop into mental health issues such as depression and anxiety. Interventions at all levels must consider homophobic discrimination as part of gay men's daily lives and should be oriented toward decreasing it, to diminish discomforting emotions and reduce the probability of unsafe sex practices.

  4. Multicultural Inclusion of Lesbian and Gay Literature Themes in Elementary Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Stephanie R.; Watson, Dwight C.; Hood, Yolanda; Lasswell, Terri A.

    2016-01-01

    This article provides a rationale for and methods to assist elementary educators in creating spaces where the enhancement of awareness of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer/questioning (LGBTQ)-themed literature could be explored in elementary schools and classrooms. The authors assert that an approach to providing gender and sexuality…

  5. Identity Profiles in Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Youth: The Role of Family Influences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bregman, Hallie R.; Malik, Neena M.; Page, Matthew J. L.; Makynen, Emily; Lindahl, Kristin M.

    2013-01-01

    Sexual identity development is a central task of adolescence and young adulthood and can be especially challenging for sexual minority youth. Recent research has moved from a stage model of identity development in lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) youth to examining identity in a non-linear, multidimensional manner. In addition, although families…

  6. The Struggle for Mexico's First Gay-Straight Alliance: Como una Novela Real

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macgillivray, Ian K.

    2006-01-01

    In 2004, a group of high school students at a private American school in Mexico City started the first gay-straight alliance in Mexico. A small group of conservative parents and a Mormon principal organized in opposition. This paper details the students' struggle to keep their club and offers lessons learned about student activism, school change,…

  7. Lesbians, Gays, Bisexuals, and the Transgendered in Political Science: Report on a Discipline-Wide Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novkov, Julie; Barclay, Scott

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews the results of a discipline-wide survey concerning lesbians, gays, bisexuals, and the transgendered in the discipline. We find that both research and teaching on LGBT topics have made some headway into the discipline, and that political scientists largely accept that LGBT issues can be fundamentally political and are worth…

  8. School Curriculum, Policies, and Practices Regarding Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Christa M.; Atlas, Jana G.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined what elementary schools in New York State are doing to recognize lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) families in terms of curriculum, policies, and practices. In all, 116 school psychologists completed an online survey regarding their districts. Findings indicated that even though most school districts serve…

  9. Using Theatre to Change Attitudes toward Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, Susan V.; Seher, Christin

    2014-01-01

    Despite the proliferation of educational interventions and attitude change strategies, the prevalence of homophobia and widespread discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people on college campuses persists. This study investigates the impact of theatre on changes in college students' attitudes. Using a pre- and…

  10. A Content Analysis Exploring Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Topics in Foundations of Education Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macgillivray, Ian K.; Jennings, Todd

    2008-01-01

    This research analyzed the most widely used foundations of education textbooks for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) content. Because foundations of education coursework routinely introduces other diversity topics in education, the authors hold it is a good place to introduce LGBT topics. The ways in which LGBT topics are included in…

  11. Promising Strategies for Prevention of the Bullying of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosciw, Joseph G.; Bartkiewicz, Mark; Greytak, Emily A.

    2012-01-01

    Recent research suggests that lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth are at high risk for bullying. These high levels of victimization may negatively impact their educational experiences and well-being. This article demonstrates how the LGBT youth experience has changed in the past decade and provides an overview of effective…

  12. A Content Analysis of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Topics in Multicultural Education Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Todd; Macgillivray, Ian K.

    2011-01-01

    This research examines the treatment of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) topics in 12 popular multicultural education textbooks. Following a line-by-line analysis of each textbook, the findings report the extent to which LGBT topics were included in each text and the themes that became apparent in how LGBT topics were treated. The…

  13. Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Adolescent School Victimization: Implications for Young Adult Health and Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Stephen T.; Ryan, Caitlin; Toomey, Russell B.; Diaz, Rafael M.; Sanchez, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    Background: Adolescent school victimization due to lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT) status is commonplace, and is associated with compromised health and adjustment. Few studies have examined the long-term implications of LGBT school victimization for young adult adjustment. We examine the association between reports of LGBT school…

  14. 76 FR 32853 - Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, And Transgender Pride Month, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-07

    ... By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation The story of America's Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) community is the story of our fathers and sons, our mothers and daughters... to achieve this promise for LGBT Americans, and we rededicate ourselves to the pursuit of...

  15. Adolescent Perceptions of School Safety for Students with Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Stephen T.; McGuire, Jenifer K.; Lee, Sun-A; Larriva, Jacqueline C.; Laub, Carolyn

    2008-01-01

    A growing body of research indicates that lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) students are often unsafe at school. Little research has examined school safety for students with LGBT parents. We examined adolescents' perceptions of school safety for students with LGBT parents using data from a survey of 2,302 California sixth through…

  16. Predictors of US Teachers' Intervention in Anti-Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Bullying and Harassment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greytak, Emily A.; Kosciw, Joseph G.

    2014-01-01

    This study examines how United States (US) teachers' experiences and beliefs may be predictive of their intervention in anti-lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) bullying and harassment using a US national sample of teachers (N?=?726) who completed an online survey. Results from regression analysis indicated that knowing LGBT people,…

  17. Gay men's stereotypes about who is HIV infected: a further study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, R S; Skinner, M J; Hinchy, J

    1999-09-01

    Gay men's stereotypes about who is HIV-infected were investigated. Young uninfected (n=62), older uninfected (n=61), and infected (n=65) gay men read brief descriptions of men they did not know and estimated the likelihood that they were infected. Each description highlighted one characteristic of the man described. There were 3 versions of each sketch; the versions highlighting preferred sexual practice, for example, described the man as either preferring insertive anal intercourse, preferring receptive anal intercourse, or liking both equally. Results were largely the same for the 3 sample groups. For 6 of the 9 characteristics investigated--preferred haunts, preferred sexual practice, dress code, access to gay venues, occupation, and sexual orientation--significantly different estimates were given for the different versions. Results are discussed in relation to how AIDS education might counter the use by gay men of stereotypes to infer whether a given sex partner is infected. It is suggested that these stereotypes are likely to be present 'on line' (during actual sexual encounters), rather than 'off line' (in the cold light of day), thereby complicating the task of AIDS educators.

  18. Learning That "Gay Is Okay": Educators and Boys Re/Constituting Heteronormativity through Sexual Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slovin, L. J.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, I draw on observations from sexual health workshops in an elementary school classroom in Vancouver, Canada and friendship pair interviews with four boys who attended the workshops. I examine how the educators organising the workshops constructed sexual health, highlighting their reliance on both a "gay is okay" and a…

  19. Deaf, gay, HIV positive and proud: narrating an alternative identity in post-Apartheid South Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemse, K.; Morgan, R.; Meletse, J.

    2009-01-01

    This article explores the ways in which John Meletse, a young black man who is an openly gay Deaf activist living with HIV, prioritizes some identities over others when telling us about his life. In analyzing this narrative of self, this article explores the ways in which sexual, gender, and

  20. Adoptive Gay Father Families: Parent-Child Relationships and Children's Psychological Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golombok, Susan; Mellish, Laura; Jennings, Sarah; Casey, Polly; Tasker, Fiona; Lamb, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Findings are presented on a U.K. study of 41 gay father families, 40 lesbian mother families, and 49 heterosexual parent families with an adopted child aged 3-9 years. Standardized interview and observational and questionnaire measures of parental well-being, quality of parent-child relationships, child adjustment, and child sex-typed behavior…