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Sample records for gawler craton australia

  1. 1.60 Ga felsic volcanic blocks in the moraines of the Terre Adelie Craton, Antarctica: comparisons with the Gawler Range Volcanics, South Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peucat, J.J.; Capdevila, R.; Pecora, L.; Fanning, C.M.; Testut, L.

    2002-01-01

    Rhyodacite and rhyolite blocks found in numerous moraines on the Terre Adelie Craton in Antarctica are samples of a high-temperature high-K calc-alkaline to alkali-calcic igneous suite emplaced at ca 1.60Ga. They comprise lavas and pyroclastic rocks, including ignimbritic varieties, chemically representative of anorogenic and post-orogenic igneous suites. The eruptive centres are probably close to the coast according to radar satellite images that show the trace of the ice streams. The volcanic suite is similar in age, petrography and chemical composition (major and trace elements as well as Nd isotopes) to the Gawler Range Volcanics from the Gawler Craton of South Australia. These similarities strengthen correlations previously established between the Gawler Craton and the Terre Adelie Craton (Mawson Continent). Moreover, the present petrological, geochemical and geochronological data give a new insight into the last major thermal event affecting the Mawson Continent. The results also highlight the useful contribution of moraines to our knowledge of Antarctic geology. Copyright (2002) Geological Society of Australia

  2. Geochemical signatures of copper redistribution in IOCG-type mineralisation, Gawler Craton, South Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uvarova, Yulia A.; Pearce, Mark A.; Liu, Weihua; Cleverley, James S.; Hough, Robert M.

    2018-04-01

    The Emmie Bluff iron oxide, copper, gold (IOCG) prospect is located in the Olympic Dam district, South Australia, and hosts sub-economic 150-m-thick Cu-Au mineralisation associated with the hematite-chlorite-sericite alteration with chalcopyrite commonly replacing pre-existing pyrite at a depth of 800 m. With the use of cutting-edge synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microscopy and field emission gun-scanning electron microscopy, it is shown for the first time that sub-economic IOCG mineralisation in the Olympic Dam district was affected by a late fluid event, which resulted in partial dissolution of Cu mineralisation and transport of Cu in the form of chloride complexes. The porous chlorite-sericite matrix associated with the late alteration of chalcopyrite hosts a Cu-Cl-OH phase previously undescribed in IOCG rocks, which was identified as one of the polymorphs of the atacamite group of minerals, Cu2Cl(OH)3. Thermodynamic modelling shows that "atacamite" is produced during dissolution of chalcopyrite by an oxidised, Cl-bearing fluid. An acidic environment is produced within millimetres of the chalcopyrite grains during oxidation. This process drives chlorite recrystallisation that is recorded by compositional variation of chlorite proximal to chalcopyrite. The existence of the atacamite is discussed in the context of fluid evolution and interaction with IOCG-type mineralisation and its implications to ore preservation versus destruction and remobilisation.

  3. Geochemical signatures of copper redistribution in IOCG-type mineralisation, Gawler Craton, South Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uvarova, Yulia A.; Pearce, Mark A.; Liu, Weihua; Cleverley, James S.; Hough, Robert M.

    2017-07-01

    The Emmie Bluff iron oxide, copper, gold (IOCG) prospect is located in the Olympic Dam district, South Australia, and hosts sub-economic 150-m-thick Cu-Au mineralisation associated with the hematite-chlorite-sericite alteration with chalcopyrite commonly replacing pre-existing pyrite at a depth of 800 m. With the use of cutting-edge synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microscopy and field emission gun-scanning electron microscopy, it is shown for the first time that sub-economic IOCG mineralisation in the Olympic Dam district was affected by a late fluid event, which resulted in partial dissolution of Cu mineralisation and transport of Cu in the form of chloride complexes. The porous chlorite-sericite matrix associated with the late alteration of chalcopyrite hosts a Cu-Cl-OH phase previously undescribed in IOCG rocks, which was identified as one of the polymorphs of the atacamite group of minerals, Cu2Cl(OH)3. Thermodynamic modelling shows that "atacamite" is produced during dissolution of chalcopyrite by an oxidised, Cl-bearing fluid. An acidic environment is produced within millimetres of the chalcopyrite grains during oxidation. This process drives chlorite recrystallisation that is recorded by compositional variation of chlorite proximal to chalcopyrite. The existence of the atacamite is discussed in the context of fluid evolution and interaction with IOCG-type mineralisation and its implications to ore preservation versus destruction and remobilisation.

  4. A Mesoproterozoic continental flood rhyolite province, the Gawler Ranges, Australia: the end member example of the Large Igneous Province clan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Pankhurst

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Rhyolite and dacite lavas of the Mesoproterozoic upper Gawler Range Volcanics (GRV (>30 000 km3 preserved, South Australia, represent the remnants of one of the most voluminous felsic magmatic events preserved on Earth. Geophysical interpretation suggests eruption from a central cluster of feeder vents which supplied large-scale lobate flows >100 km in length. Pigeonite inversion thermometers indicate eruption temperatures of 950–1100 °C. The lavas are A-type in composition (e.g. high Ga/Al ratios and characterised by elevated primary halogen concentrations (~1600 ppm fluorine, ~400 ppm chlorine. These depolymerised the magma such that temperature-composition-volatile non-Arrhenian melt viscosity modelling suggests they had viscosities of <3.5 log η (Pa s. These physicochemical properties have led to the emplacement of a Large Rhyolite Province, which has affinities in emplacement style to Large Basaltic Provinces. The low viscosity of these felsic magmas has produced a unique igneous system on a scale which is either not present or poorly preserved elsewhere on the planet. The Gawler Range Volcanic Province represents the erupted portion of the felsic end member of the family of voluminous, rapidly emplaced terrestrial magmatic provinces.

  5. Martian analogue test site - pilbara craton, western Australia

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    Brown, A.; Allwood, A.; Walter, M. R.; van Kranendonk, M.

    All exploration for life elsewhere depends on extrapolation from our knowledge of Earth. If the target is former microbial life, for example on Mars, there is no better analogue on Earth than the 3.5 billion year old rocks of the Pilbara region, Western Australia. This area is home to signs of the earliest life on Earth in the form of microbe, many famous stromatolitic horizons and carbon isotope biosignatures. These occur in a volcanic terrain, with weathering and hydrothermal alteration, which also has some similarity to Mars. The geology of this region is known in detail after decades of mapping and other studies. Current work includes studies to resolve disputes about the biogenicity of the microfossils and stromatolites. On balance, biological origins are most likely. In any event, problems of demonstrating biogenicity on other planets will be far more severe, and the work on the Pilbara materials will illuminate those problems. Also underway is mineral mapping of the volcanic, hydrothermal and fossiliferous units using both airborne and hand-held short-wave infrared spectrometers, We are able to map the fossiliferous units using this technique and contend that it would be a powerful exploration technique on Mars and elsewhere. Using the Pilbara as an analogue for other bodies in the Solar System can extend to using it as a place to test instrument packages under realistic conditions. The region has good air and road access, and good supporting infrastructure.

  6. Evolving electrical SCLM models of the Australian continent - results of the South Australia AusLAMP deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, K. E.; Thiel, S.; Heinson, G. S.

    2017-12-01

    The Australian Lithospheric Architecture Magnetotelluric Project (AusLAMP) is an Australian initiative to map the Australian continental lithosphere using magnetotelluric (MT) stations to obtain a resistivity model of the subsurface. It is a joint project between Geoscience Australia, state surveys, and Universities. We present new MT 3D inversion results of the largest coherent array of the AusLAMP MT deployments to date covering two-thirds of South Australia, funded largely by the Geological Survey of South Australia with additional funding by Geoscience Australia and The University of Adelaide. The model extends across the South Australian Gawler Craton, including the Eucla Basin to the west of the craton and the Flinders Ranges and Curnamona Province to the east. The MT array covers parts of the Australian lithosphere, which has been largely unexplored with seismic tomography methods and provide a unique insight into the tectonic evolution of the continent. We incorporate 284 long-period (10s-10,000s) MT stations separated roughly every half degree latitude and longitude across an area spanning 1200 km x 800 km, south of latitude -28.5 degrees and from longitude 129 degrees to 141 degrees. We invert 24 discrete periods of the impedance tenor between 7 s and 13,000 s, and 22 different periods of the tipper data between 7s-8000 s period. The results show a heterogeneous lower crust and mantle lithosphere with a primarily resistive mantle (>1000 Ωm) lithosphere in the central and western part of the Gawler Craton and Eucla Domain. The model shows a generally NS oriented electric LAB offset from deeper cratonic lithosphere in the west to a shallow lithosphere along the eastern margin of the Gawler Craton extending further east towards the Proterozoic and Phanerozoic eastern part of Australia. The lower crust is generally resistive with elongated lower crustal conductivity anomalies, which are associated with major translithospheric shear zones likely existent

  7. Multifractal spatial organisation in hydrothermal gold systems of the Archaean Yilgarn craton, Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, Mark; Ord, Alison; Hobbs, Bruce

    2015-04-01

    A range of factors controls the location of hydrothermal alteration and gold mineralisation in the Earth's crust. These include the broad-scale lithospheric architecture, availability of fluid sources, fluid composition and pH, pressure-temperature conditions, microscopic to macroscopic structural development, the distribution of primary lithologies, and the extent of fluid-rock interactions. Consequently, the spatial distribution of alteration and mineralization in hydrothermal systems is complex and often considered highly irregular. However, despite this, do they organize themselves in a configuration that can be documented and quantified? Wavelets, mathematical functions representing wave-like oscillations, are commonly used in digital signals analysis. Wavelet-based multifractal analysis involves incrementally scanning a wavelet across the dataset multiple times (varying its scale) and recording its degree of fit to the signal at each interval. This approach (the wavelet transform modulus maxima method) highlights patterns of self-similarity present in the dataset and addresses the range of scales over which these patterns replicate themselves (expressed by their range in 'fractal dimension'). Focusing on seven gold ore bodies in the Archaean Yilgarn craton of Western Australia, this study investigates whether different aspects of hydrothermal gold systems evolve to organize themselves spatially as multifractals. Four ore bodies were selected from the Sunrise Dam deposit (situated in the Laverton tectonic zone of the Kurnalpi terrane) in addition to the Imperial, Majestic and Salt Creek gold prospects, situated in the Yindarlgooda dome of the Mount Monger goldfield (approximately 40km due east of Kalgoorlie). The Vogue, GQ, Cosmo East and Astro ore bodies at Sunrise Dam were chosen because they exhibit different structural geometries and relationships between gold and associated host-rock alteration styles. Wavelet-based analysis was conducted on 0.5m and 1m

  8. Paired carbon isotope from three key intervals of the Turee Creek Group, Pilbara Craton, Australia

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    Ader, M.; Thomazo, C.; Busigny, V.; Baton, F.; Muller, E.; Chaduteau, C.; Vennin, E.; Buoncristiani, J. F.; Van Kranendonk, M. J.; Philippot, P.

    2017-12-01

    Strong links between the global carbon cycle, surface oxygenation and climate are expected through Earth history, but remain elusive in the carbon isotope record up until the end of the Mesoproterozoic. This is well exemplified at the time of the Great Oxydation Event (GOE) and its succeding global glaciation when δ13Ccarbseems to remain close to 0‰. The Turee Creek Group (Pilbara Craton, Austalia) was identified as a good target for reevaluating the C-isotope record of this period as it is the only continuous stratigraphic sedimentary section worldwide hosting both events. Paired carbon isotope data (Δ13Ccarb-org = δ13Ccarb - δ13Corg) were measured on drill cores collected at three of its in key stratigraphic horizons: the transition between the Kungarra Fm. and underlying BIFs of the Boolgeeda Iron Fm. (TCDP1); the base of the Meteorite Bore Member glacial diamictites (TCDP2); the transition of the carbonate-bearing Kazput Fm. and underlying quartzites of the Koolbye Fm. (TCDP3). The carbonate interval of Kazput Fm. with δ13Ccarb 0‰ is probably the only one recording primary δ13Ccarb values. Its Δ13Ccarb-org value of 27.5‰ is tipical of Rubisco-based photosynthesis. All other formations are carbonate-poor. Their δ13Ccarb are lower than -3‰, reaching -15‰, with a broad tendancy of decreasing δ13Ccarb with decreasing carbonate content. Δ13Ccarb-org values are lower than 25‰ and define a negative correlation with δ13Ccarb within each formation, indicating that these carbonates are largely diagenetic. δ13Corg values in the Kazput Fm., Coolbye Fm. and BIFs range from 24 to -29‰, typical of rubisco-based photosynthesis assimilating carbon from a dissolved inorganic carbon reservoir close to 0‰. In the upper Kungarra Fm. δ13Corg values cluster around -32‰. In the diamictite and lower Kungarra Fm., they decrease from -28 to -36‰ with increasing TOC, pointing to variable contributions of an isotopically negative organic matter pool that

  9. Tellurides from Sunrise Dam gold deposit, Yilgarn Craton, Western Australia: a new occurrence of nagyágite

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    Sung, Y.-H.; Ciobanu, C. L.; Pring, A.; Brügger, J.; Skinner, W.; Cook, N. J.; Nugus, M.

    2007-11-01

    The complex Pb-Sb-Au tellurosulfide nagyágite is found together with eight tellurides (hessite, petzite, calaverite, altaite, tellurantimony (and Bi-bearing tellurantimony), melonite, tetradymite and an unnamed Au(Ag)-As-telluride) in sulfide-sulfosalt assemblages from late, high-grade veins (D4) and post-D4 veinlets in the world-class orogenic gold deposit at Sunrise Dam, Eastern Goldfields Province of the Archaean Yilgarn Craton, Western Australia. The composition of nagyágite at Sunrise Dam conforms to ideal stoichiometry, with negligible As content and Au/(Au+Te) ratio of 0.325 [i.e., (Pb4.84Sb1.10 As0.05)5.99S5.99(Au0.98 Te2.03)3.01]. The diverse mineralogy of the post-D4 veinlets, relative to the host veins, is attributed to small-scale reaction fronts established along zones of replacement at the polished section scale. The association of telluride assemblages and native gold is interpreted in terms of remobilization of ore components (including Ag, Sb, Te and Au) from the pre-existing assemblages, and their redeposition during subsequent tectonic events. The presence of nagyágite and Au-Ag tellurides in veins, in quantities that may be significant in economic terms, as well as the character of their breakdown products, have implications for ore processing and gold recovery, as well as for the genetic interpretation of the deposit. The strong structural control upon formation of the telluride-bearing assemblages at Sunrise Dam and the ability of these minerals to reflect changes in the local environment, contradicts the current view that these tellurides have a magmatic affiliation.

  10. Crustal structure of a Proterozoic craton boundary: east Albany-Fraser Orogen, Western Australia, imaged with passive seismic and gravity anomaly data

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    Sippl, Christian; Brisbout, Lucy; Spaggiari, Catherine; Gessner, Klaus; Tkalcic, Hrvoje; Kennett, Brian; Murdie, Ruth

    2017-04-01

    We use passive seismic and gravity data to characterize the crustal structure and the crust-mantle boundary of the east Albany-Fraser Orogen in Western Australia, a Proterozoic orogen that reworked the southern and southeastern margin of the Archean Yilgarn Craton. The crustal thickness pattern retrieved from receiver functions shows a belt of substantially thickened crust - about 10 km thicker than the surrounding regions - that follows the trend of the orogen, but narrows to the southwest. Common conversion point profiles show a clear transition from a wide, symmetric Moho trough in the northeast to a one-sided, north-western Moho dip in the southwest, where the Moho appears to underthrust the craton towards its interior. The change from a Moho trough to an underthrust Moho appears to coincide with the inferred trace of the Ida Fault, a major terrane boundary within the Yilgarn Craton. Bulk crustal vp/vs ratios are mostly in the felsic to intermediate range, with clearly elevated values (≥1.8) at stations in the Fraser Zone granulite facies, dominantly mafic metamorphic rocks. Forward modelling of gravity anomaly data using the retrieved Moho geometry as a geometric constraint shows that a conspicuous, elongated gravity low on the northwestern side of the eastern Albany-Fraser Orogen is almost certainly caused by thickened Archean crust. To obtain a model that resembles the regional gravity pattern the following assumptions are necessary: high-density rocks occur in the upper crustal portion of the Fraser Zone, at depth inside the Moho trough and in parts of the eastern Nornalup Zone east of the Moho trough. Although our gravity models do not constrain at which crustal level these high-density rocks occur, active deep seismic surveys suggest that large extents of the east Albany-Fraser Orogen's lower crust include a Mesoproterozoic magmatic underplate known as the Gunnadorrah Seismic Province. The simplest interpretation of the imaged crustal structure is that

  11. Re-Os isotope systematics of the Radio Hill Ni-Cu-PGE complex, West Pilbara Craton, Western Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frick, L.R.; McBride, J.S.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: The Radio Hill Complex is one of several layered mafic-ultramafic intrusions that were emplaced into the west Pilbara Craton at ca. 2.9 Ga. It is believed to be genetically related to other similar intrusions in the area which include the Munni Munni, Andover, Dingo and Maitland Complexes (Hoatson et al. 1999). The Radio Hill Complex is the only one of these intrusions to contain economic quantities of Ni and Cu at the present time. This relatively small intrusion (∼1200 m stratigraphic thickness) is divided into two zones, an upper gabbroic zone and a lower ultramafic zone, the base of which possesses massive magmatic sulfide mineralisation (pyrrhotite, pentlandite, chalcopyrite, magnetite). Re-Os isotopic data have been obtained for a suite of samples from underground, outcrop (gabbroic zone samples) and drill core. Os concentrations in the mineralised zone are very high, ranging from 19 to 191 ppb Os, with low Re/Os ratios ( 10,000), where R-factor is defined as the mass ratio of silicate magma to sulfide magma that it has equilibrated with. However, modelling of the Radio Hill ore system using Re, Os and PGE (Hoatson et al. 1992) concentrations suggest that the R-factor in the Radio Hill ore was low (100-900). Therefore, the initial Os isotopic composition of the ore should be radiogenic (high gOs >+500) if local crustal contamination triggered sulfide saturation. The slightly radiogenic initial Os isotopic composition suggests that the bulk parental magma was a crustally-contaminated magma. R-factor modelling further suggests that the parental magma to this intrusion was neither a basalt nor a pure komatiite, but more likely a contaminated komatiite (with a relatively high Os concentration). This agrees with the previous findings of Hoatson et al. (1992) who proposed a parental magma of siliceous high-magnesium basalt (SHMB) composition. Our Re-Os isotope modelling agrees with the trace elements, Nd and Sr isotope modelling of Hoatson et al. (1992

  12. Zircon U-Pb dating of Archaean granite activity associated with the Jack Hills metasedimentary belt, Yilgarn Craton, Western Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pidgeon, R.T.; Wilde, S.A.; Compston, W.

    1990-01-01

    The present study investigates the timing of granitic activity associated with the Jack Hills belt and compares this with the timing of granite activity elsewhere in the Narryer Gneiss Complex in order to constrain models of craton formation. An additional aim was to investigate the granitoids as possible source rocks for detrital zircons found in metasediments within the belt, in particular the 4.2 Ga zircons which form about 12% of the detrital zircon suite from a sample of metaconglomerate. 4 refs., 2 figs

  13. High-K granites of the Rum Jungle Complex, N-Australia: Insights into the Late Archean crustal evolution of the North Australian Craton

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    Drüppel, K.; McCready, A. J.; Stumpfl, E. F.

    2009-08-01

    The Late Archean (c. 2.54-2.52 Ga) high-K granitoids of the Rum Jungle Complex, Northern Australia, display the igneous mineral assemblage of K-feldspar, quartz, plagioclase, biotite, and magnetite, and accessories such as zircon, monazite, titanite, allanite, apatite, and ilmenite. The granites underwent a variably severe greenschist facies alteration and associated deformation during the Barramundi Orogeny (1.88-1.85 Ga). The K-rich granitoids have variable compositions, mainly comprising syenogranite and quartz-monzonite. They can be subdivided into two major groups, (1) felsic granites and (2) intermediate to felsic granites, quartz-monzonites, and diorite. The felsic group (69-76 wt.% SiO 2) shares many features with typical Late Archean potassic granites. They are K- and LILE-rich and show marked depletion in Sr and Eu and the high field strength elements (HFSE), particularly Nb and Ti, relative to LILE and LREE. Compared to the average upper crust they have anomalously high Th (up to 123 ppm) and U (up to 40 ppm). The intermediate to felsic group (56-69 wt.% SiO 2) differs from the felsic group in having weakly lower Th and U but higher Mg#, Ti, Ba, Sr, Ni, Cr and REE, with a less pronounced negative Eu anomaly. This group displays well-defined trends in Harker diagrams, involving a negative correlation of Si with Sr, Ca, Na, and P whereas K, Rb, and Ba increase in the same direction, suggesting fractional crystallization of feldspar was more prominent than in the felsic suite. The mineralogical and geochemical characteristics of the felsic group are consistent with granite formation by intracrustal melting of plagioclase-rich igneous protoliths, probably of tonaltic to granodioritic composition, at moderate crustal levels. The intermediate to felsic granites, on the other hand, appear to be the products of mantle-crust interaction, possibly by melting of or mixing with more mafic igneous rocks. As evidenced by the presence of older inherited zircons crustal

  14. A whole rock absolute paleointensity determination of dacites from the Duffer Formation (ca. 3.467 Ga) of the Pilbara Craton, Australia: An impossible task?

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    Herrero-Bervera, Emilio; Krasa, David; Van Kranendonk, Martin J.

    2016-09-01

    We have conducted a whole-rock type magnetic and absolute paleointensity determination of the red dacite of the Duffer Formation from the Pilbara Craton, Australia. The age of the dated rock unit is 3467 ± 5 Ma (95% confidence). Vector analyses results of the step-wise alternating field demagnetization (NRM up to 100 mT) and thermal demagnetization (from NRM up to 650 °C) yield three components of magnetization. Curie point determinations indicate three characteristic temperatures, one at 150-200 °C, a second one at ∼450 °C and a third one at ∼580 °C. Magnetic grain-size experiments were performed on small specimens with a variable field translation balance (VFTB). The coercivity of remanence (Hcr) suggests that the NRM is carried by low-coercivity grains that are associated with a magnetite fraction as is shown by the high-temperature component with blocking temperatures above 450 °C and up to at least 580 °C. The ratios of the hysteresis parameters plotted as a modified Day diagram show that most grain sizes are scattered within the Single Domain (SD) and the Superparamagnetic and Single Domain SP-SD domain ranges. In addition to the rock magnetic experiments we have performed absolute paleointensity experiments on the samples using the modified Thellier-Coe double heating method to determine the paleointensities. Partial-TRM (p-TRM) checks were performed systematically to document magnetomineralogical changes during heating. The temperature was incremented by steps of 50 °C between room temperature and 590 °C. The paleointensity determinations were obtained from the slope of Arai diagrams. Our paleointensity results indicate that the paleofield obtained was ∼6.4 ± 0.68 (N = 11) micro-Teslas with a Virtual Dipole Moment (VDM) of 1.51 ± 0.81 × 1022 Am2, from a medium-to high-temperature component ranging from 300 to 590 °C that has been interpreted to be the oldest magnetization yet recorded in paleomagnetic studies of the Duffer Formation. The

  15. An equivalent layer magnetization model for Australia based on Magsat data

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    Mayhew, M. A.; Johnson, B. D.

    1987-01-01

    An equivalent layer magnetization model for Australia and adjacent oceanic areas is presented. The model is obtained by linear inversion of Magsat anomaly data measured in the altitude range 325-550 km. The anomaly data set has been isolated from the raw data set by use of models of the core field and very long wavelength external fields, and is internally consistent. Certain major structural features of the Australian continent are geographically associated with magnetization anomalies. A first-order difference is seen between the Tasman Zone and the Precambrian cratonic areas: magnetization anomalies are much more subdued in the former, possibly reflecting a shallowing of the Curie isotherm within the crust. A profile of the vertical integral of magnetization is presented for a crustal section extending from the Gawler Block to the southeast coast. It is shown that the magnetization variations are probably due partly, but not wholly, to depth to Curie isotherm variations; gross magnetization variations among at least three distinct crustal units must be involved.

  16. Lu-Hf isotopic memory of plume-lithosphere interaction in the source of layered mafic intrusions, Windimurra Igneous Complex, Yilgarn Craton, Australia

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    Nebel, O.; Arculus, R. J.; Ivanic, T. J.; Nebel-Jacobsen, Y. J.

    2013-10-01

    Most layered mafic intrusions (LMI) are formed via multiple magma injections into crustal magma chambers. These magmas are originally sourced from the mantle, likely via plume activity, but may interact with the overriding lithosphere during ascent and emplacement in the crust. The magma injections lead to the establishment of different layers and zones with complex macroscopic, microscopic and cryptic compositional layering through magmatic differentiation and associated cumulate formation, sometimes accompanied by crustal assimilation. These complex mineralogical and petrological processes obscure the nature of the mantle sources of LMI, and typically have limited the degree to which parental liquids can be fully characterised. Here, we present Lu-Hf isotope data for samples from distinct layers of the Upper Zone of the Windimurra Igneous Complex (WIC), an immense late-Archean LMI in the West Australian Yilgarn Craton. Lu-Hf isotope systematics of whole rocks are well correlated (MSWD=5.6, n=17) with an age of ˜3.05±0.05 Ga and initial ɛHf˜+8. This age, however, is older than whole rock Sm-Nd and zircon U-Pb ages of the intrusion, both of which are ca. 2.8 Ga. Stratigraphically-controlled initial Hf isotope variations (associated with multiple episodes of emplacement at ca. 2.8 Ga) indicate isotope mixing between a near-chondritic and an ultra-radiogenic component, the latter with ɛHf[2.8 Ga]>+15. This Hf isotope mixing creates a pseudochron-relationship at the time of intrusion of ˜250 Myr that is superimposed on subsequent radiogenic ingrowth after crystallisation, generating an age that predates the actual emplacement event. Mixing between late-stage crystallisation products (melt + crystals) from the Middle Zone and replenishing, plume-derived liquids was followed by crystal accumulation in a chemically evolving magma chamber. The ultra-radiogenic Hf isotope endmember in the WIC mantle source requires parent-daughter ratios consistent with very early

  17. When Rifts Meet Cratons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, W. P.; Ning, J.

    2017-12-01

    The longevity of cratons and the evolution of rifts are two outstanding issues in continental dynamics. Intriguingly, there are several active cases where the two seemingly antithetical tectonic settings abut each other. In most instances, rifting is not accompanied by widespread destruction of adjacent cratons. In the case of the East African rift system (EARS), the most prominent active rift system in the world, its western branch clearly circumvents the Tanzania craton and continues southward along the narrow Malawi rift. Meanwhile, a broad zone of scattered seismicity associated with normal faulting extends westward for about 1,000 km, as accentuated by the recent earthquake of Mw 6.8 in Botswana. Along the eastern branch of the EARS, the well-defined Kenya rift terminates against the Tanzania craton as a diffuse zone of extension (the northern Tanzania divergence.) Yet, farther southward, a band of concentrated seismicity follows the trace of the Davie ridge off the east coast of Africa for another 1,300 km. Similarly, the Ordos plateau (the western portion of the north China craton, NCC), comparable in size to the Tanzania craton, is straddled by the active Yinchuan and Shanxi rifts on its western and eastern flanks, respectively. Along the edges of the Colorado plateau, the very broad Basin and Range province of extension and the narrow Rio Grande rift surround the stable plateau. Therefore, it seems that rifting is not an effective process to destabilize cratons en masse. Widespread, low-angle detachment faulting and the intrusion of Mesozoic granitic plutons characterize the eastern portion of the NCC, an often-cited example of a craton's demise. Here we propose that these features are the consequence, not the cause of the destruction of the NCC. The exact cause(s) of this destruction process remain enigmatic, as the spatial extent of this event apparently reaches as far north as Lake Baikal.

  18. Geochemistry of C, N, S, Fe, and Mo in the 3.2 and 2.7 Ga sulfide-rich carbonaceous shales from Pilbara Craton, Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, K. E.

    2013-05-01

    Archean sulfidic black shales, if they are modern-weathering-free drillcores, provide unique information on the co-evolution of Earth and Life. To investigate temporal and spatial changes in the early environments, we conducted a series of geochemical and stable isotope analyses for organic C, organic N, S speciation (pyrite S, sulfate S, organic S, and elemental S), major and minor element compositions including Mo, Fe speciation, and micro FT-IR and laser Raman spectroscopy for extracted kerogen, for >100 samples in total. Here we report our recent progress in the studies of biogeochemical cycling of C, N, S, Fe, and Mo and the origin of organic matter in the 3.2 and 2.7 Ga black shales (drillcores CL1, CL2, DX, WRL1, RHDH2A). The CL1, CL2, DX drillcores were recovered by our "Dixon Island- Cleaverville Drilling Project" (DXCL-DP) in Pilbara, Western Australia. The WRL1 and RHDH2A drillcores were used by Brocks et al. (1999), Lindsay and Braiser (2002), Yamaguchi (2002), Yamaguchi et al. (2005), and Eigenbrode and Freeman (2006). All of the obtained data are very difficult to explain only by geochemical processes in strictly anoxic environments, where both atmosphere and oceans were completely anoxic, like an environment before the inferred "Great Oxidation Event" when pO2 was lower than 0.00001 PAL. Thus, our extensive data set may be used as a strong evidence for at least local and temporal existence of oxidized environment as far back as 3.2 Ga ago, and modern-style biogeochemical cycling of C, N, S, Fe, and Mo has been operating since then. This further implies that oxygenation of the atmosphere and oceans was substantial during deposition of the sediments, ~800 Ma earlier than commonly thought.

  19. Palaeomagnetism of the Palaeoproterozoic Boonadgin Dyke Suite, Yilgarn Craton: Possible connection with India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Li, Z. X.; Pisarevsky, S.; Kirscher, U.; Mitchell, R.; Stark, J. C.

    2017-12-01

    A palaeomagnetic study was carried out on the newly identified 1.9 Ga Boonadgin dyke swarm in the Yilgarn Craton, Western Australia. Ten dykes revealed a high-temperature characteristic remanent magnetisation (ChRM) with dual polarities, directing either SW shallow downward (4 sites) or NE shallow upward (6 sites). Our results reveal that the Yilgarn Craton was at an equatorial palaeolatitude at 1.9 Ga. Meanwhile, a paleopole from the ca. 1.9 Ga Dharwar dykes of South India, supported by a positive baked-contact test, puts India at a similar paleolatitude. The Boonadgin dyke swarm can be interpreted to represent an arm of a radiating dyke swarm that shared the same plume centre with coeval mafic dykes in the Dharwar and Bastar cratons of southern India. We therefore propose that the Western Australia Craton (WAC, consisting of the the Yilgarn and Pilbara cratons) and South India were connected at ca. 1.89 Ga.

  20. Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-03-01

    The smallest continent and one of the largest countries, Australia is a country of diverse geographical conditions and differing cultures of people unified by one predominant language and political system. Mountains, desert and rivers are some of the varying landscape features of Australia, although the climate and condition for most of the country is tropical. Original Australians, a hunting-gathering people called Aborigines, came to Australia over 38,000 years ago. Today the Aborigines compose about 1% of the population and live in traditional tribal areas as well as cities. The 1st European settlement came in 1788 from Great Britain. After World War II, the population doubled. Although the population is primarily composed of British and Irish immigrants, immigrants from other European countries such as Italy and Greece as well as refugees from Indochina, Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos are a significant factor to the growing Australian population. Australian and Aboriginal culture has took hold and took notice in the areas of opera, art, literature and film. The Australian Commonwealth is based on a constitution similar to that of the United States government. The National Parliament is bicameral with both the Senate and the House of Representatives having a select number of elected officials from each state and territory. The Australian economy is predominantly reliant on the sale of mineral and agricultural exports. History, economic changes, defense, international relations and notes to the traveler are also discussed in this overview of Australia.

  1. The Thermal Structure and Strength of Cratons and their Margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaupart, C. P.; Mareschal, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    The large cratons of today are made of younger terranes that wrap around older cores. Deformation due to accretion did not proceed in homogeneous fashion and was concentrated in the younger belts. This is illustrated clearly in the Archean Superior Province, Canada. In this area, one observes little imbrication of accreted crust and craton core, in contrast to the laterally extensive thrusting that has affected the younger terranes to the South. The boundary between the craton core and accreted belts is a nearly vertical interface delineated by steeply dipping electrical and seismic anomalies extending to the base of the lithosphere. These steeply dipping structures have been interpreted as relicts of the subduction that drove accretion. By contrast, the sub-crustal subduction remnant that is imaged beneath younger terranes to the south shows up as a moderately dipping (≈30°) structure. These observations suggest a stiff craton surrounded by weaker belts. This strength contrast may have affected later events, such as the Keweenawan rifing, which propagated northward through the accreted terranes but stopped short of impinging the craton core. In the Superior Province, crustal heat production is much higher in the accreted terranes than in the craton core, implying higher temperatures and lower mechanical strength. Such a remarkable dichotomy also exists in South Africa, where the Limpopo and Namaqua belts are characterized by higher heat flux and crustal heat production than the adjacent Archean Kaapvaal and Zimbabwe cratons. The generality of this cannot be assessed on the basis of heat flow and heat production data which are scarce in most other cratons. These cratons, however, are characterized by post-orogenic high temperature metamorphism which is best explained by high crustal heat production. This is true, for example, for the Jimperding metamorphic belt at the edge of the Yilgarn craton, Western Australia. Thus, cratons appear to be surrounded, and

  2. A Lower-Crust or Mantle Source for Mineralizing Fluids Beneath the Olympic Dam IOCG Deposit, Australia: New Evidence From Magnetotelluric Sounding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinson, G.

    2005-12-01

    The iron-oxide-copper-gold (IOCG) Olympic Dam (OD) deposit, situated along the margin of the Proterozoic Gawler Craton, South Australia, is the world's largest uranium deposit, and sixth largest copper deposit; it also contains significant reserves of gold, silver and rare-earth elements (REE). Gaining a better understanding of the mechanisms for genesis of the economic mineralisation is fundamental for defining exploration models in similar crustal-settings. To delineate crustal structures that may constrain mineral system fluid pathways, coincident deep crustal seismic and magnetotelluric (MT) transects were obtained along a 220 km section that crosses OD and the major crustal boundaries. We present results from 58 long-period (10-104 s) MT sites, with site spacing of 5 to 10 km. A 2D inversion of all MT data to a depth of 100 km shows four notable features: (a) sedimentary cover sequences with low resistivity (1000 Ω.m) Archaean crustal core, from a more conductive crust to the north (typically <500 Ω.m); (c) to the north of OD, the crust to about 20 km is quite resistive (~1000 Ω.m), but the lower crust is much more conductive (<100 Ω.m); and (d) beneath OD, we image a low-resistivity region (<100 Ω.m) throughout the crust, coincident with a seismically transparent region. We argue that the cause of the low-resistivity and low-reflectivity region beneath OD may be due to the upward movement of crustal-volatiles that have deposited conductive graphite mineralisation along grain boundaries, simultaneously annihilating acoustic impedance boundaries. The source of the volatiles may be from the mantle-degassing or retrograde metamorphism of the lower crust associated with Proterozoic crustal deformation.

  3. Magnetotelluric evidence for a deep-crustal mineralizing system beneath the Olympic Dam iron oxide copper-gold deposit, southern Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinson, Graham S.; Direen, Nicholas G.; Gill, Rob M.

    2006-07-01

    The iron oxide copper-gold Olympic Dam deposit, situated along the margin of the Proterozoic Gawler craton, South Australia, is the world's largest uranium deposit and sixth-largest copper deposit; it also contains significant reserves of gold, silver, and rare earth elements. Gaining a better understanding of the mechanisms for genesis of the economic liberalization is fundamental for defining exploration models in similar crustal settings. To delineate crustal structures that may constrain mineral system fluid pathways, coincident deep crustal seismic and magnetotelluric (MT) transects were obtained along a 220 km section that crosses Olympic Dam and the major crustal boundaries. In this paper we present results from 58 long-period (10 104 s) MT sites, with site spacing of 5 10 km. A two-dimensional inversion of MT data from 33 sites to a depth of 100 km shows four notable features: (1) sedimentary cover sequences with low resistivity (1000 Ω·m) Archean crustal core from a more conductive crust and mantle to the north (typically Olympic Dam, the upper-middle crust to ˜20 km is quite resistive (˜1000 Ω·m), but the lower crust is much more conductive (Olympic Dam, we image a low-resistivity region (Olympic Dam may be due to the upward movement of CO2-bearing volatiles near the time of deposit formation that precipitated conductive graphite liberalization along grain boundaries, simultaneously annihilating acoustic impedance boundaries. The source of the volatiles may be from the mantle degassing or retrograde metamorphism of the lower crust associated with Proterozoic crustal deformation.

  4. Rare Earth Element Fluorocarbonate Minerals from the Olympic Dam Cu-U-Au-Ag Deposit, South Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle S. Schmandt

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Olympic Dam is a world-class breccia-hosted iron-oxide copper-gold-uranium ore deposit located in the Gawler Craton, South Australia. It contains elevated concentrations of rare earth elements (REE which occur as the REE minerals bastnäsite, synchysite, florencite, monazite, and xenotime. This is the first study to focus on the mineralogy and composition of the most abundant REE mineral at Olympic Dam, bastnäsite, and subordinate synchysite. The sample suite extends across the deposit and represents different sulfide mineralization styles (chalcopyrite-bornite and bornite-chalcocite and breccias of various types, ranging from those dominated by clasts of granite, dykes, and hematite. The REE-fluorocarbonates (bastnäsite and synchysite typically occur as fine-grained (<50 μm disseminations in Cu-Fe-sulfides and gangue minerals, and also within breccia matrix. They are also locally concentrated within macroscopic REE-mineral-rich pockets at various locations across the deposit. Such coarse-grained samples formed the primary target of this study. Three general textural groups of bastnäsite are recognized: matrix (further divided into disseminated, fine-grained, and stubby types, irregular (sulfide-associated, and clast replacement. Textures are largely driven by the specific location and prevailing mineral assemblage, with morphology and grain size often controlled by the associated minerals (hematite, sulfides. Major element concentration data reveal limited compositional variation among the REE-fluorocarbonates; all are Ce-dominant. Subtle compositional differences among REE-fluorocarbonates define a spectrum from relatively La-enriched to (Ce + Nd-enriched phases. Granite-derived hydrothermal fluids were the likely source of F in the REE-fluorocarbonates, as well as some of the CO2, which may also have been contributed by associated mafic-ultramafic magmatism. However, transport of REE by Cl-ligands is the most likely scenario. Stubby bastn

  5. Proterozoic crustal evolution of the Eucla basement, Australia: Implications for destruction of oceanic crust during emergence of Nuna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkland, C. L.; Smithies, R. H.; Spaggiari, C. V.; Wingate, M. T. D.; Quentin de Gromard, R.; Clark, C.; Gardiner, N. J.; Belousova, E. A.

    2017-05-01

    younger magmatism; 2) recycled c. 1950 Ma crust reworked in primitive arcs and in intra-plate settings and; 3) minor evolved material representing fragments of hyperextended continent. The observed isotopic evolution pattern is comparable to that of other central Australian Proterozoic provinces, including the Musgrave Province, the northern margin of the Gawler Craton, and components within the Rudall Province. Linking these isotopic signatures defines the Mirning Ocean, and its subducted and underplated equivalents. In a global context we suggest c. 1950 Ma crust production reflects the onset of ordered oceanic spreading centres, which swept juvenile crustal fragments into Nuna.

  6. Short-Wavelength Infrared (SWIR) spectroscopy of low-grade metamorphic volcanic rocks of the Pilbara Craton

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abweny, Mohammad S.; van Ruitenbeek, Frank J A; de Smeth, Boudewijn; Woldai, Tsehaie; van der Meer, Freek D.; Cudahy, Thomas; Zegers, Tanja; Blom, Jan Kees; Thuss, Barbara

    This paper shows the results of Short-Wavelength Infrared (SWIR) spectroscopy investigations of volcanic rocks sampled from low-grade metamorphic greenstone belts of the Archean Pilbara Craton in Western Australia. From the reflectance spectra a range of spectrally active minerals were identified,

  7. Water in the Cratonic Mantle Lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peslier, A. H.

    2016-01-01

    The fact that Archean and Proterozoic cratons are underlain by the thickest (>200 km) lithosphere on Earth has always puzzled scientists because the dynamic convection of the surrounding asthenosphere would be expected to delaminate and erode these mantle lithospheric "keels" over time. Although density and temperature of the cratonic lithosphere certainly play a role in its strength and longevity, the role of water has only been recently addressed with data on actual mantle samples. Water in mantle lithologies (primarily peridotites and pyroxenites) is mainly stored in nominally anhydrous minerals (olivine, pyroxene, garnet) where it is incorporated as hydrogen bonded to structural oxygen in lattice defects. The property of hydrolytic weakening of olivine [4] has generated the hypothesis that olivine, the main mineral of the upper mantle, may be dehydrated in cratonic mantle lithospheres, contributing to its strength. This presentation will review the distribution of water concentrations in four cratonic lithospheres. The distribution of water contents in olivine from peridotite xenoliths found in kimberlites is different in each craton (Figure 1). The range of water contents of olivine, pyroxene and garnet at each xenolith location appears linked to local metasomatic events, some of which occurred later then the Archean and Proterozoic when these peridotites initially formed via melting. Although the low olivine water contents ( 6 GPa at the base of the Kaapvaal cratonic lithosphere may contribute to its strength, and prevent its delamination, the wide range of those from Siberian xenoliths is not compatible with providing a high enough viscosity contrast with the asthenophere. The water content in olivine inclusions from Siberian diamonds, on the other hand, have systematically low water contents (water contents. The olivine inclusions, however, may have been protected from metasomatism by their host diamond and record the overall low olivine water content of

  8. Seismic imaging of Southern African cratons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soliman, Mohammad Youssof Ahmad

    Cratonic regions are the oldest stable parts of continents that hold most of Earth’s mineral resources. There are several open questions regarding their formation and evolution. In this PhD study, passive source seismic methods have been used to investigate the crustal and lithosphere structures...... of the southern African regions. Some of the main research problems that have been dealt with during this research are about (1) the heterogeneity scale of crustal structure and composition, (2) the depth extent of the cratonic keels and their layering, and (3) the strength of crustal anisotropy. The core...

  9. Cyclic Cratonic Carbonates and Phanerozoic Calcite Seas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Bruce H.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses causes of cyclicity in cratonic carbonate sequences and evidence for and potential significance of postulated primary calcite sediment components in past Paleozoic seas, outlining problems, focusing on models explaining existing data, and identifying background. Future sedimentary geologists will need to address these and related areas…

  10. Seismic Structure of Southern African Cratons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soliman, Mohammad Youssof Ahmad; Artemieva, Irina; Levander, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Cratons are extremely stable continental crustal areas above thick depleted lithosphere. These regions have remained largely unchanged for more than 2.5 Ga. This study presents a new seismic model of the seismic structure of the crust and lithospheric mantle constrained by seismic receiver...

  11. Density heterogeneity of the cratonic lithosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cherepanova, Yulia; Artemieva, Irina

    2015-01-01

    correlation between mantle density variations and the tectonic setting. Three types of cratonic mantle are recognized from mantle density anomalies. 'Pristine' cratonic regions not sampled by kimberlites have the strongest depletion with density deficit of 1.8-3.0% (and SPT density of 3.29-3.33 t/m3...... variations in the isopycnic state, correlated with mantle depletion and best achieved for the Anabar Shield region and other intracratonic domains with a strongly depleted mantle. A comparison of synthetic Mg# for the bulk lithospheric mantle calculated from density with Mg# from petrological studies...... of peridotite xenoliths from the Siberian kimberlites suggests that melt migration may produce local patches of metasomatic material in the overall depleted mantle....

  12. Negative dynamic topography of the East European Craton: metasomatised cratonic lithosphere or mantle downwelling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemieva, I. M.

    2010-12-01

    While most of the East European Craton lacks surface topography, the topography of its basement exceeds 20 km, the amplitude of topography undulations at the crustal base reaches almost 30 km with an amazing amplitude of ca. 50 km in variation in the thickness of the consolidated crust, and the amplitude of topography variations at the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary exceeds 200 km. This paper examines the relative roles of the crust, the subcrustal lithosphere, and the dynamic support of the sublithospheric mantle in maintaining surface topography, using regional seismic data on the structure of the consolidated crust and the sedimentary cover, and thermal and large-scale seismic tomography data on the structure of the lithospheric mantle. The isostatic contribution of the crust to the surface topography of the East European Craton is almost independent of age (ca. 4.5 km) due to an interplay of age-dependent crustal and sedimentary thicknesses and lithospheric temperatures. On the contrary, the contribution of the subcrustal lithosphere to the topography strongly depends on the age, being slightly positive (+0.3+0.7 km) for the regions older than 1.6 Ga and negative (-0.5-1 km) for younger structures. This leads to age-dependent variations in the contribution of the sublithospheric mantle to the topography (residual, or dynamic topography). Positive dynamic topography at the cratonic margins, which exceeds 2 km in the Norwegian Caledonides and in the Urals, clearly links their on-going uplift with deep mantle processes. Negative residual topography beneath the Archean-Paleoproterozoic cratons (-1-2 km) indicates either smaller density deficit (ca. 0.9 per cent) in their subcrustal lithosphere than predicted by petrologic data or the presence of a strong downwelling in the mantle. Dynamic topography in the southern parts of the craton may be associated with the Peri-Tethys collisional tectonics. (Artemieva I.M., Global and Planetary Change, 2007, 58, 411-434).

  13. Heterogeneously hydrated mantle beneath the late Archean Yilgarn Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanic, T. J.; Nebel, O.; Jourdan, F.; Faure, K.; Kirkland, C. L.; Belousova, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    Archean mafic-ultramafic melts, crystallized as layered intrusions in the upper crust and extruded as komatiitic flows, are primary probes of upper mantle chemistry. However, the message from their primary chemical composition can be compromised by different modes of contamination. Contaminants are typically cryptic in terms of their geochemical and isotopic signals but may be related to metasomatised mantle sources, ambient crustal assimilation or subduction-related inputs. In this work we present critical evidence for both dry and wet Archean mantle sources for two juxtaposed layered intrusions in the Australian Yilgarn Craton. The ca. 2813 Ma Windimurra and ca. 2800 Ma Narndee Igneous Complexes in Western Australia are two adjacent layered intrusions and would be expected to derive via similar mantle sections. A key difference in their chemistry is the presence of crystal-bound water in the Narndee Igneous Complex, represented primarily by abundant hornblende. Such a primary hydrous phase is notably absent in the Windimurra Igneous Complex. New 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages for fresh Narndee hornblende (weighted mean: 2805 ± 14 Ma, MSWD = 1.8, probability = 0.18) agrees with the published U-Pb age of 2800 ± 6 Ma for the complex and is consistent with a magmatic origin for this phase. Zircon Hf and whole-rock Hf and Nd isotopes for the Narndee Igneous Complex indicate only minor crustal contamination, in agreement with H and O isotope values in amphibole and O isotope values in rare zircon crystals, plagioclase and pyroxene within both complexes. These findings illustrate a fast temporal transition, in proximal bodies, from anhydrous to hydrous mantle sources with very minor crustal contamination. These large layered mafic-ultramafic intrusions are igneous bodies with a primitive chemical bulk composition that requires large degrees of mantle melting. This has been attributed by many workers to mantle plume activity, yet not without dispute, as subduction-related flux

  14. Redox preconditioning deep cratonic lithosphere for kimberlite genesis - evidence from the central Slave Craton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaxley, G M; Berry, A J; Rosenthal, A; Woodland, A B; Paterson, D

    2017-02-14

    We present the first oxygen fugacity (fO 2 ) profile through the cratonic lithospheric mantle under the Panda kimberlite (Ekati Diamond Mine) in the Lac de Gras kimberlite field, central Slave Craton, northern Canada. Combining this data with new and existing data from garnet peridotite xenoliths from an almost coeval kimberlite (A154-N) at the nearby Diavik Diamond Mine demonstrates that the oxygen fugacity of the Slave cratonic mantle varies by several orders of magnitude as a function of depth and over short lateral distances. The lower part of the diamond-bearing Slave lithosphere (>120-130 km deep) has been oxidized by up to 4 log units in fO 2 , and this is clearly linked to metasomatic enrichment. Such coupled enrichment and oxidation was likely caused by infiltrating carbonate-bearing, hydrous, silicate melts in the presence of diamond, a process proposed to be critical for "pre-conditioning" deep lithospheric mantle and rendering it suitable for later generation of kimberlites and other SiO 2 -undersaturated magmas.

  15. EVOLUTION OF SOUTHERN AFRICAN CRATONS BASED ON SEISMIC IMAGING

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thybo, Hans; Soliman, Mohammad Youssof Ahmad; Artemieva, Irina

    2014-01-01

    present a new seismic model for the structure of the crust and lithospheric mantle of the Kalahari Craton, constrained by seismic receiver functions and finite-frequency tomography based on the seismological data from the South Africa Seismic Experiment (SASE). The combination of these two methods...... since formation of the craton, and (3) seismically fast lithospheric keels are imaged in the Kaapvaal and Zimabwe cratons to depths of 300-350 km. Relatively low velocity anomalies are imaged beneath both the paleo-orogenic Limpopo Belt and the Bushveld Complex down to depths of ~250 km and ~150 km...

  16. The electrical lithosphere in Archean cratons: examples from Southern Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoza, D. T.; Jones, A. G.; Muller, M. R.; Webb, S. J.

    2011-12-01

    The southern African tectonic fabric is made up of a number Archean cratons flanked by Proterozoic and younger mobile belts, all with distinctly different but related geological evolutions. The cratonic margins and some intra-cratonic domain boundaries have played major roles in the tectonics of Africa by focusing ascending magmas and localising cycles of extension and rifting. Of these cratons the southern extent of the Congo craton is one of the least-constrained tectonic boundaries in the African tectonic architecture and knowledge of its geometry and in particular the LAB beneath is crucial for understanding geological process of formation and deformation prevailing in the Archean and later. In this work, which forms a component of the hugely successful Southern African MagnetoTelluric Experiment (SAMTEX), we present the lithospheric electrical resistivity image of the southern boundary of the enigmatic Congo craton and the Neoproterozoic Damara-Ghanzi-Chobe (DGC) orogenic belt on its flanks. Magnetotelluric data were collected along profiles crossing all three of these tectonic blocks. The two dimensional resistivity models resulting from inverting the distortion-corrected responses along the profiles all indicate significant lateral variations in the crust and upper mantle structure along and across strike from the younger DGC orogen to the older adjacent craton. The are significant lithospheric thickness variations from each terrane. The The Moho depth in the DGC is mapped at 40 km by active seismic methods, and is also well constrained by S-wave receiver function models. The Damara belt lithosphere, although generally more conductive and significantly thinner (approximately 150 km) than the adjacent Congo and Kalahari cratons, exhibits upper crustal resistive features interpreted to be caused by igneous intrusions emplaced during the Gondwanan Pan-African magmatic event. The thinned lithosphere is consistent with a 50 mW.m-2 steady-state conductive

  17. Seismic structure of the Slave craton crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barantseva, O.; Vinnik, L. P.; Farra, V.; van der Hilst, R. D.; Artemieva, I. M.; Montagner, J. P.

    2017-12-01

    We present P- and S-receiver functions for 20 stations along a 200-km-long NNW-SSE seismological profile across the Slave craton, and estimate the average crustal Vp/Vs ratio which is indicative of rock composition. We observe high Vp/Vs ratio ( 1.85-2.00) for the bulk crust and elevated Vp values at a depth range from 20-30 km to 40 km. High Vp values (>7.0 km/s) suggest mafic composition of the lower crust. In case of dry lower crustal rocks, the Vp/Vs ratio is expected to range from 1.6 to 1.8, which is lower than the observed values of 1.9-2.0. Laboratory studies show that Vp/Vs 1.9-2.0 can be explained by the presence of numerous cracks saturated with an incompressible fluid. Our results are at odds with the structure of the cratonic crust in many regions worldwide, and may suggest a unique geodynamic evolution of the Slave crust. Possible explanations for the observed crustal structure include the presence of an underplated mafic material, possibly related to intraplate magmatism or paleosubduction. Receiver functions are highly sensitive to the change of acoustic impedance and S-wave velocities, but do not resolve the internal seismic structure with a high precision. We extend our study of the crustal structure by using ambient noise tomography (ANT). We measure Rayleigh wave dispersion from Green's functions that are estimated from one-year noise cross-correlation (NCF). The phase velocity maps are inverted for 1D wave speed profiles which are then combined to form 2D and 3D models of the crust of the Slave Province. The combined results of RF analyses and ANT are interpreted in terms of crustal structure, composition, and evolution.

  18. Geological evolution of the Antongil Craton, NE Madagascar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, D.I.; Thomas, Ronald J.; Goodenough, K.M.; De Waele, B.; Pitfield, P.E.J.; Key, R.M.; Bauer, W.; Walsh, G.J.; Lidke, D.J.; Ralison, A.V.; Rabarimanana, M.; Rafahatelo, J.-M.; Randriamananjara, T.

    2010-01-01

    The Antongil Craton, along with the Masora and Antananarivo cratons, make up the fundamental Archaean building blocks of the island of Madagascar. They were juxtaposed during the late-Neoproterozoic to early Palaeozoic assembly of Gondwana. In this paper we give a synthesis of the geology of the Antongil Craton and present previously published and new geochemical and U-Pb zircon analyses to provide an event history for its evolution.The oldest rocks in the Antongil Craton form a nucleus of tonalitic gneiss, characteristic of Palaeo-Mesoarchaean cratons globally, including phases dated between 3320 ?? 14. Ma to 3231 ?? 6. Ma and 3187 ?? 2. Ma to 3154 ?? 5. Ma. A series of mafic dykes was intruded into the Mesoarchaean tonalites and a sedimentary succession was deposited on the craton prior to pervasive deformation and migmatisation of the region. The age of deposition of the metasediments has been constrained from a volcanic horizon to around 3178 ?? 2. Ma and subject to migmatisation at around 2597 ?? 49. Ma. A subsequent magmatic episode generated voluminous, weakly foliated granitic rocks, that also included additions from both reworked older crustal material and younger source components. An earlier granodiorite-dominated assemblage, dated between 2570 ?? 18. Ma and 2542 ?? 5. Ma, is largely exposed in xenoliths and more continuously in the northern part of the craton, while a later monzogranite-dominated phase, dated between 2531 ?? 13. Ma and 2513 ?? 0.4. Ma is more widely developed. Together these record the stabilisation of the craton, attested to by the intrusion of a younger dyke swarm, the age of which is constrained by a sample of metagabbro dated at 2147 ?? 6. Ma, providing the first evidence for Palaeoproterozoic rocks from the Antongil Craton.The youngest events recorded in the isotopic record of the Antongil Craton are reflected in metamorphism, neocrystallisation and Pb-loss at 792 ?? 130. Ma to 763 ?? 13. Ma and 553 ?? 68. Ma. These events are

  19. Construction and destruction of some North American cratons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, D. B.; Humphreys, G.

    2015-12-01

    Construction histories of Archean cratons remain poorly understood; their destruction is even less clear because of, by definition, its rarity. By assembling geophysical and geochemical data in 3-D lithosphere models, a clearer understanding of the geometry of major structures within the Rae, Slave and Wyoming cratons of central North America is now possible. Little evidence exists of subducted slabs similar to modern oceanic lithosphere in these construction histories whereas underthrusting and wedging of proto-continental lithosphere is inferred from multiple dipping discontinuities. Archean continental building blocks may resemble the modern lithosphere of Ontong-Java-Hikurangi oceanic plateau. Radiometric dating of xenoliths provides estimates of rock types and ages at depth beneath sparse kimberlite occurrences. These ages can be correlated to surface rocks. The 3.6-2.6 Ga Rae, Slave and Wyoming cratons comprise smaller continental terranes that 'cratonized' during a granitic bloom at 2.61-2.55 ga. Cratonization probably represents the final differentiation of early crust into a relatively homogeneous, uniformly thin (35-42 km), tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite crust with pyroxenite layers near the Moho atop depleted lithospheric mantle. Peak thermo-tectonic events at 1.86-1.7 Ga broadly metasomatized, mineralized and recrystallized mantle and lower crustal rocks, apparently making mantle peridotite more 'fertile' and conductive by introducing or concentrating sulfides or graphite throughout the lithosphere at 80-120 km depths. This metasomatism may have also weakened the lithosphere or made it more susceptible to tectonic or chemical erosion. The arrival of the subducted Shatsky Rise conjugate at the Wyoming craton at 65-75 Ma appears to have eroded and displaced the thus weakened base of the craton below 140-160 km. This replaced old refertilized continental mantle with new depleted oceanic mantle. Is this the same craton?

  20. Water in the Cratonic Mantle: Insights from FTIR Data on Lac De Gras Xenoliths (Slave Craton, Canada)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peslier, Anne H.; Brandon, Alan D.; Schaffer, Lillian Aurora; O'Reilly, Suzanne Yvette; Griffin, William L.; Morris, Richard V.; Graff, Trevor G.; Agresti, David G.

    2014-01-01

    The mantle lithosphere beneath the cratonic part of continents is the deepest (> 200 km) and oldest (>2-3 Ga) on Earth, remaining a conundrum as to how these cratonic roots could have resisted delamination by asthenospheric convection over time. Water, or trace H incorporated in mineral defects, could be a key player in the evolution of continental lithosphere because it influences melting and rheology of the mantle. Mantle xenoliths from the Lac de Gras kimberlite in the Slave craton were analyzed by FTIR. The cratonic mantle beneath Lac de Gras is stratified with shallow (<145 km) oxidized ultradepleted peridotites and pyroxenites with evidence for carbonatitic metasomatism, underlain by reduced and less depleted peridotites metasomatized by kimberlite melts. Peridotites analyzed so far have H O contents in ppm weight of 7-100 in their olivines, 58 to 255 in their orthopyroxenes (opx), 11 to 84 in their garnet, and 139 in one clinopyroxene. A pyroxenite contains 58 ppm H2O in opx and 5 ppm H2O in its olivine and garnet. Olivine and garnet from the deep peridotites have a range of water contents extending to higher values than those from the shallow ones. The FTIR spectra of olivines from the shallow samples have more prominent Group II OH bands compared to the olivines from the deep samples, consistent with a more oxidized mantle environment. The range of olivine water content is similar to that observed in Kaapvaal craton peridotites at the same depths (129-184 km) but does not extend to as high values as those from Udachnaya (Siberian craton). The Slave, Kaapvaal and Siberian cratons will be compared in terms of water content distribution, controls and role in cratonic root longevity.

  1. The Teles Pires volcanic province: A paleogeoproterozoic silicic-dominated large igneous province in southwest Amazon craton and tectonic implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leite, Jayme Alfredo Dexheimer; Saes, Gerson Souza; Macambira, Moacir Jose Buenano

    2001-01-01

    Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs) are important features of the Earth history especially recognized during Paleo to Mezosoic times when they are related to the break up of supercontinents (Coffin and Eldhom, 1994). These provinces occur in several different tectonic settings such as volcanic passive margins, submarine ridges and continental and oceanic plateaux. Mafic-dominanted provinces are the most well known among the LIPs and the best examples are the Karoo, Kerguelem and Ontong-Java. LIPs including an important silicic component have been described in some basaltic provinces of southern Africa (Milner et al. 1992). More recently, silicic-dominated LIPs have been recognized in eastern Australia (Bryan et al., 2000), in southern South America (Pankhurst et al. 1998) and in Antartica Penninsula (Riley and Leat, 1999). The common characteristics of this kind of LIP include: 1) large volume of silicic rocks with dominance of ignimbrites, 2) active over 40 to 50 m.y.; and 3) spatially and temporally associated with plate break up. In this paper we present the main geologic and geochronologic characteristics of the Teles Pires volcanic province from southwest Amazon Craton, which allow its classification as a Paleoprotorozoic silicic-dominated LIP. Geologic implications of this suggestion includes the existence of a large cratonic plate as old as 1.81Ga for the Amazon Craton, therefore the proposed 1.85-1.55 Ga magmatic arc of Rio Negro-Juruena Province should be reviewed (au)

  2. Pampia: A large cratonic block missing in the Rodinia supercontinent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Victor A.; Vujovich, Graciela; Martino, Roberto; Otamendi, Juan

    2010-09-01

    The large cratonic block of Pampia, at present in southern South America, is commonly missing in recent comprehensive reconstructions of Rodinia. This block was the conjugate margin of the Amazonia craton that corresponds to the W-NW-trending segment of the Sunsás orogen. This segment developed between Sucre in Bolivia and Corumbá in Brazil as a result of a Mesoproterozoic collision. The western margin of Pampia partially coincides with the southern part of the Arequipa-Antofalla terrane that was also amalgamated during the Mesoproterozoic. The Cuyania terrane, a Laurentian rifted continental block, was accreted to the southern sector of this margin of Pampia in middle Ordovician times. The northern sector of the eastern margin of Pampia is the lower plate of the Brasiliano belt developed along the Paranapanema craton during the early Cambrian collision associated with the closure of the Clymene Ocean. The southern sector of the eastern margin partially coincides with the southern extension of the Transbrasiliano lineament, which juxtaposed the Rio de La Plata Craton with the Pampia cratonic block. Along this eastern margin the Pampean-Paraguay orogen was formed during the late Brasiliano cycle in latest Proterozoic-Early Cambrian time. The southern margin was generated by the collision of Patagonia during late Paleozoic times. This cratonic block of Pampia, so defined, has western and northern sectors formed by Mesoproterozoic orogens, while the eastern sector is partially formed by juvenile Neoproterozoic crust, although older rocks cannot be ruled out. The Pampia cratonic block was the locus of several magmatic belts associated with important metamorphism during the Paleozoic and preserved in the central part at lower crustal levels.

  3. The Role of Water in the Stability of Cratonic Keels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peslier, Anne H.; Woodland, Alan B.; Bell, David R.; Lazarov, Marina

    2011-01-01

    Cratons are typically underlain by large, deep, and old lithospheric keels (to greater than 200 km depth, greater than 2.5 Ga old) projecting into the asthenosphere (e.g., Jordan, 1978; Richardson et al., 1984). This has mystified Earth scientists as the dynamic and relatively hot asthenosphere should have eroded away these keels over time (e.g., Sleep, 2003; O'Neill et al., 2008; Karato, 2010). Three key factors have been invoked to explain cratonic root survival: 1) Low density makes the cratonic mantle buoyant (e.g., Poudjom Djomani et al., 2001). 2) Low temperatures (e.g., Pollack, 1986; Boyd, 1987), and 3) low water contents (e.g., Pollack, 1986), would make cratonic roots mechanically strong. Here we address the mechanism of the longevity of continental mantle lithosphere by focusing on the water parameter. Although nominally anhydrous , olivine, pyroxene and garnet can accommodate trace amounts of water in the form of H bonded to structural O in mineral defects (e.g., Bell and Rossman, 1992). Olivine softens by orders of magnitude if water (1-1000 ppm H2O) is added to its structure (e.g., Mackwell et al., 1985). Our recent work has placed constraints on the distribution of water measured in peridotite minerals in the cratonic root beneath the Kaapvaal in southern Africa (Peslier et al., 2010). At P greater than 5 GPa, the water contents of pyroxene remain relatively constant while those of olivine systematically decrease from 50 to less than 10 ppm H2O at 6.4 GPa. We hypothesized that at P greater than 6.4 GPa, i.e. at the bottom of the cratonic lithosphere, olivines are essentially dry (greater than 10 ppm H2O). As olivine likely controls the rheology of the mantle, we calculated that the dry olivines could be responsible for a contrast in viscosity between cratonic lithosphere and surrounding asthenosphere large enough to explain the resistance of cratonic root to asthenospheric delamination.

  4. Multi-stage crustal growth and cratonization of the North China Craton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingguo Zhai

    2014-07-01

    The ∼2.5 Ga metamorphic-magmatic event is stronger than in most other cratons in the world. How to understand the geological significance of the 2.5 Ga event? The following points are emphasized: (1 nearly all old rocks >2.5 Ga underwent metamorphism at ∼2.52–2.5 Ga; (2 Archean basement rocks in the NCC experienced strong partial melting and migmatization; (3 granitoid rocks derived from partial melting include potassium granites, TTG granites and monzonites. These granitoids rocks intruded both the Archean greenstone belts and micro-blocks; (4 ∼2.5 Ga mafic dikes (amphibolites, granitic dikes (veins and syenitic-ultramafic dykes are also developed. Therefore, we suggest an assembly model that all micro-blocks in the NCC were welded together by late Archean greenstone belts at the end of the late Neoarchean. We also propose that the various micro-blocks were surrounded by small ocean basins, and the old continental crust and the oceanic crust were hotter than today. Subduction and collision were on much smaller scales as compared to the Phanerozoic plate tectonic regime, although the tectonic style and mechanisms were more or less similar. The formation of crustal melt granites is one of the processes of cratonization, inducing generation of stable upper and lower crustal layers. This process also generated an upper crust of more felsic composition and a lower crust of more mafic composition, due to molten residual materials and some underplated gabbros.

  5. The story of a craton from heart to margins: illuminating cratonic lithosphere with Rayleigh wave phase velocities in Eastern Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrescu, L.; Darbyshire, F. A.; Gilligan, A.; Bastow, I. D.; Totten, E. J.

    2015-12-01

    Cratons are Precambrian continental nuclei that are geologically distinct from modern continental regions and are typically underlain by seismically fast lithospheric roots (keels) to at least 200 km depth. Both plate and non-plate tectonic origin theories such as stacking of subducted slabs or multiple mantle plume underplating have been proposed to explain keel growth.Eastern Canada is an ideal continental region to investigate cratonization processes and the onset of plate tectonics. It comprises part of the largest Archean craton in the world, the Superior Province, flanked by a ~1.1 Ga Himalayan-scale orogenic belt, the Grenville Province, and the 500-300 Ma old Appalachian orogenic province, following the same general SW-NE axial trend. The region is also cross-cut by the Great Meteor Hotspot track, providing an excellent opportunity to study the interaction of hotspot tectonism with progressively younger lithospheric domains.We investigate the lithospheric structure of Precambrian Eastern Canada using teleseismic earthquake data recorded at permanent and temporary networks. We measure interstation dispersion curves of Rayleigh wave phase velocities between ~15 and 220 s, and compare the results to standard continental and cratonic reference models. We combine the dispersion curves via a tomographic inversion which solves for isotropic phase velocity heterogeneity and azimuthal anisotropy across the region at a range of periods. The phase velocity maps indicate variations in lithospheric properties from the heart of the Superior craton to the SE Canadian coast.The new regional-scale models will help to understand the processes that generated, stabilized and reworked the cratonic roots through their billion-year tectonic history. We investigate how surface tectonic boundaries relate to deeper lithospheric structural changes, and consider the effects of the multiple Wilson cycles that affected Laurentia.

  6. New paleomagnetic results on ˜ ˜2367 Ma Dharwar giant dyke swarm, Dharwar craton, southern India: implications for Paleoproterozoic continental reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, N. Ramesh; Venkateshwarlu, M.; Shankar, Ravi; Nagaraju, E.; Parashuramulu, V.

    2018-02-01

    Here we report new paleomagnetic results and precise paleopole position of the extensional study on ˜ 2367 Ma mafic giant radiating dyke swarm in the Dharwar craton, southern India. We have sampled 29 sites on 12 dykes from NE-SW Karimnagar-Hyderabad dykes and Dhone-Gooty sector dykes, eastern Dharwar craton to provide unambiguous paleomagnetism evidence on the spectacular radiating dyke swarm and thereby strengthening the presence of single magmatic event at ˜ 2367 Ma. A total of 158 samples were subjected to detailed alternating field and thermal demagnetization techniques and the results are presented here along with previously reported data on the same dyke swarm. The remanent magnetic directions are showing two components, viz., seven sites representing four dykes show component (A) with mean declination of 94{{}°} and mean inclination of - 70{{}°} (k=87, α_{95}=10{{}°}) and corresponding paleopole at 16{{}°}N, 41{{}°}E (dp=15{{}°} and dm=17{{}°}) and 22 sites representing 8 dykes yielded a component (B) with mean declination of 41{{}°} and mean inclination of - 21{{}°} (k=41, α_{95}=9{{}°}) with a paleopole at 41{{}°}N, 200{{}°}E (dp=5{{}°} and dm=10{{}°}). Component (A) results are similar to the previously reported directions from the ˜ 2367 Ma dyke swarm, which have been confirmed fairly reliably to be of primary origin. The component (B) directions appear to be strongly overprinted by the 2080 Ma event. The grand mean for the primary component (A) combined with earlier reported studies gives mean declination of 97{{}°} and mean inclination of - 79{{}°} (k=55, α_{95}=3{{}°}) with a paleopole at 15{{}°}N, 57{{}°}E (dp=5{{}°}, dm=6{{}°}). Paleogeographical position for the Dharwar craton at ˜ 2367 Ma suggests that there may be a chance to possible spatial link between Dharwar dykes of Dharwar craton (India), Widgemooltha and Erayinia dykes of Yilgarn craton (Australia), Sebanga Poort Dykes of Zimbabwe craton (Africa) and Karelian

  7. Magnetic anomalies across Bastar craton and Pranhita–Godavari ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The exercise brought out intrusives into the basement below the PG basin as well as the. Bastar craton, supporting the hypothesis of Mishra et al (1987). The magnetization of the intrusives is used to infer qualitatively the paleo-position of the. Indian plate during the Paleoproterozoic. 2. Geology and tectonics of the area.

  8. Late Archaean mantle metasomatism below eastern Indian craton ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Trace, rare earth elements (REE), Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd and O isotope studies have been carried out on ultramafic (harzburgite and lherzolite) dykes belonging to the newer dolerite dyke swarms of eastern Indian craton. The dyke swarms were earlier considered to be the youngest mafic magmatic activity in this region having ages ...

  9. Proterozoic orogenic belts and rifting of Indian cratons: Geophysical constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.C. Mishra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Aravalli–Delhi and Satpura Mobile Belts (ADMB and SMB and the Eastern Ghat Mobile Belt (EGMB in India form major Proterozoic mobile belts with adjoining cratons and contemporary basins. The most convincing features of the ADMB and the SMB have been the crustal layers dipping from both sides in opposite directions, crustal thickening (∼45 km and high density and high conductivity rocks in upper/lower crust associated with faults/thrusts. These observations indicate convergence while domal type reflectors in the lower crust suggest an extensional rifting phase. In case of the SMB, even the remnant of the subducting slab characterized by high conductive and low density slab in lithospheric mantle up to ∼120 km across the Purna–Godavari river faults has been traced which may be caused by fluids due to metamorphism. Subduction related intrusives of the SMB south of it and the ADMB west of it suggest N–S and E–W directed convergence and subduction during Meso–Neoproterozoic convergence. The simultaneous E–W convergence between the Bundelkhand craton and Marwar craton (Western Rajasthan across the ADMB and the N–S convergence between the Bundelkhand craton and the Bhandara and Dharwar cratons across the SMB suggest that the forces of convergence might have been in a NE–SW direction with E–W and N–S components in the two cases, respectively. This explains the arcuate shaped collision zone of the ADMB and the SMB which are connected in their western part. The Eastern Ghat Mobile Belt (EGMB also shows signatures of E–W directed Meso–Neoproterozoic convergence with East Antarctica similar to ADMB in north India. Foreland basins such as Vindhyan (ADMB–SMB, and Kurnool (EGMB Supergroups of rocks were formed during this convergence. Older rocks such as Aravalli (ADMB, Mahakoshal–Bijawar (SMB, and Cuddapah (EGMB Supergroups of rocks with several basic/ultrabasic intrusives along these mobile belts, plausibly formed during

  10. Do cratons preserve evidence of stagnant lid tectonics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek Wyman

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence for episodic crustal growth extending back to the Hadean has recently prompted a number of numerically based geodynamic models that incorporate cyclic changes from stagnant lid to mobile lid tectonics. A large part of the geologic record is missing for the times at which several of these cycles are inferred to have taken place. The cratons, however, are likely to retain important clues relating to similar cycles developed in the Mesoarchean and Neoarchean. Widespread acceptance of a form of plate tectonics by ∼3.2 Ga is not at odds with the sporadic occurrence of stagnant lid tectonics after this time. The concept of scale as applied to cratons, mantle plumes and Neoarchean volcanic arcs are likely to provide important constraints on future models of Earth's geodynamic evolution. The Superior Province will provide some of the most concrete evidence in this regard given that its constituent blocks may have been locked into a stagnant lid relatively soon after their formation and then assembled in the next global plate tectonic interval. Perceived complexities associated with inferred mantle plume – volcanic arc associations in the Superior Province and other cratons may be related to an over estimation of plume size. A possible stagnant lid episode between ∼2.9 Ga and ∼2.8 Ga is identified by previously unexplained lapses in volcanism on cratons, including the Kaapvaal, Yilgarn and Superior Province cratons. If real, then mantle dynamics associated with this episode likely eliminated any contemporaneous mantle plume incubation sites, which has important implications for widespread plumes developed at ∼2.7 Ga and favours a shallow mantle source in the transition zone. The Superior Province provides a uniquely preserved local proxy for this global event and could serve as the basis for detailed numerical models in the future.

  11. Rare earth element geochemistry of feldspars: examples from Fe-oxide Cu-Au systems in the Olympic Cu-Au Province, South Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontonikas-Charos, Alkis; Ciobanu, Cristiana L.; Cook, Nigel J.; Ehrig, Kathy; Krneta, Sasha; Kamenetsky, Vadim S.

    2018-04-01

    Rare earth element (REE) fractionation trends in feldspars are reported from Olympic Dam (including Wirrda Well and Phillip's Ridge) and Cape Donington (Port Lincoln), for comparison with two other igneous-hydrothermal terranes within the eastern Gawler Craton: Moonta-Wallaroo and Hillside. The case studies were selected as they represent 1590 Ma Hiltaba Suite and/or 1845 - 1810 Ma Donington Suite granites, and, aside from Cape Donington, are associated with Mesoproterozoic iron-oxide copper gold (IOCG)-type mineralization. Both plagioclase and alkali feldspar were analyzed within selected samples with the purpose of constraining and linking changes in REE concentrations and fractionation trends in feldspars to local and whole-rock textures and geochemistry. Two unique, reproducible fractionation trends were obtained for igneous plagioclase and alkali feldspars, distinguished from one another by light rare earth element enrichment, Eu-anomalies and degrees of fractionation (e.g. La/Lu slopes). Results for hydrothermal albite and K-feldspar indicate that REE concentrations and fractionation trends are generally inherited from igneous predecessors, however in some instances, significant amounts of REE appear to have been lost to the fluid. These results may have critical implications for the formation of world-class IOCG systems, in which widespread alkali metasomatism plays a key role by altering the physical and chemical properties of the host rocks during early stages of IOCG formation, as well as trapping trace elements (including REE).

  12. Western cratonic domains in Uruguay, geochronology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preciozzi, F; Pell, E; Muzio, R; Ledesma, J.J; Guerequiz, R

    2001-01-01

    The western cratonic domains in Uruguay are divided into three major units: Piedra Alta Terrane, Valentines Block and Pavas Terrane. Piedra Alta Terrane lacks of evidence of Neo proterozoic oro geneses (deformation, metamorphism or magmatism). Sarandi del Yi - Arroyo Solis Grande shear zone, separates it from Valentines Block. Valentines Block is separated from Pavas Terrane by Cueva del Tigre shear zone. Magmatic rocks with different ages, compositions and emplacements occur all over the Piedra Alta Terrane distributed in three metamorphic belts (Arroyo Grande, San Jose and Montevideo) as well as in the Central Gneissic-Migmatitic Complex. Samples from the gneissic-migmatitic complex, late tectonic granitoids and basic rocks associated to the metamorphic belts were analyzed using Rb/Sr, U/Pb, K/Ar and Sm/Nd methodologies. The age ranges obtained for granitoids and gneissicmigmatitic samples using Rb/Sr whole rock (WR) systematics are 1.7 to 2.5 Ga, showing two intervals: 1.9 to 2.05 Ga (intrusion of late granites) and 2.1 to 2.2 Ga (deformation and metamorphism). K/Ar cooling ages present several ranges: 1.3 to 1.35 Ga (probable local heating of the crust), 1.7 to 1.8 Ga (microgabbro magmatism, data confirmed by the Ar/Ar method) and ages between 2.0 to 2.2 Ga. Rb/Sr (WR) data yielded an isochronic age of 2094 ± 28.3 Ma, Ro = 0.70174 ± 0.00009, MSWD 19.74, interpreted as the time of the metamorphic event recognized for all the Piedra Alta Terrane. TDM Sm/Nd model ages presented a range from 2065 Ma to 2450 Ma. U/Pb systematics yield ages in migmatitic and gneissic rocks from 2.16 Ga to 2.21 Ga, showing metamorphism and deformation phenomena. While the ages of granitoids associated to the San Jose Belt are between 2.06 Ga and 2.08 Ga (Isla Mala) to 2.1 Ga (Granito de Cufre). None of them show metamorphic phenomena. Valentines Block (Preciozzi et al., 1979) comprises granulitic gneisses, granitoids and mafic rocks of different compositions. The geologic complexity

  13. Density structure of the cratonic mantle in southern Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Artemieva, Irina; Vinnik, Lev P.

    2016-01-01

    . An unusually high topography may be caused by a low density (high depletion) of the cratonic lithospheric mantle and/or by the dynamic support of the mantle with origin below the depth of isostatic compensation (assumed here to be at the lithosphere base). We use free-board constraints to examine the relative...... contributions of the both factors to surface topography in the cratons of southern Africa. Our analysis takes advantage of the SASE seismic experiment which provided high resolution regional models of the crustal thickness.We calculate the model of density structure of the lithospheric mantle in southern Africa...... and show that it has an overall agreement with xenolith-based data for lithospheric terranes of different ages. Density of lithospheric mantle has significant short-wavelength variations in all tectonic blocks of southern Africa and has typical SPT values of ca. 3.37-3.41g/cm3 in the Cape Fold and Namaqua...

  14. Australia's uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hampson, D.C.

    1980-01-01

    The subject is discussed as follows: structure of the uranium industry in Australia (export policies; development of mining programme; table of export contracts approved by Australian government, 1972; government policy towards the industry 1972-75 and since 1975); reserves (table of Australia's major uranium deposits; estimated world resources of uranium, excluding USSR, Eastern Europe and China; comparison of exploration expenditures and discovery of uranium in Australia and the USA); enrichment; resource potential; future demand (table of nuclear power reactors above 30 MW in operation or under construction, mid-1979; projection of Australian uranium production to 1990); government and union action. (U.K.)

  15. Lateral heterogeneity and vertical stratification of cratonic lithospheric keels: examples from Europe, Siberia, and North America

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Artemieva, Irina; Cherepanova, Yulia; Herceg, Matija

    from the Slave craton and the Baltic Shield. The lateral extent of depleted lithospheric keels diminishes with depth and, below a 150-200 km depth, is significantly smaller than geological boundaries of the cratons. A comparison of density structure of the cratonic lithosphere with crustal structure...... by an increase in mantle density as compared to light and strongly depleted lithospheric mantle of the Archean nuclei....

  16. A proterozoic tectonic model for northern Australia and its economic implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossiter, A.G.; Ferguson, J.

    1980-01-01

    It is argued that at the end of Archaean time the Australian continent was confined to the area now occupied by the Yilgarn, Pilbara, Gawler, and Musgrave Blocks, and the southern part of the Arunta Block. During the Early Proterozoic, sedimentary and volcanic rocks were laid down in an extensive depositional zone trending roughly east-west along the northern margin of the Archaean continent. Copper and gold mineralization, commonly showing stratigraphic control, is widespread in this belt. Following deformation and metamorphism of the Early Proterozoic rocks, felsic and mafic igneous activity, and accumulation of platform sediments on the newly stabilized crust, a predominantly north-south depositional zone developed along the eastern margin of the continent during the Middle Proterozoic. Lead and zinc assume much more importance in the mineral deposits of this belt. It is postulated that the present positions of rocks of the Pine Creek and Georgetown regions are due to horizontal displacements of several hundred kilometres along major fault zones. Apparent rifting of these blocks away from palaeo-continental margins may be related to the occurrence of uraniferous granitic rocks and uranium mineralization within them via a mantle plume mechanism. Although current data are limited, tectonic environments suggested for Proterozoic mafic igneous rocks of northern Australia by their geochemistry are compatible with the geological settings of these rocks and with the tectonic model put forward. (author)

  17. The Vendian-Early Palaeozoic sedimentary basins of the East European Craton

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sliaupa, S.; Fokin, P.A.; Lazauskiene, J.; Stephenson, R.A.

    2006-01-01

    Vendian-Early Palaeozoic sedimentation on the East European Craton (EEC) was confined to the cratonic margins with limited intracratonic subsidence. Generally, there are two geodynamic stages involved: in stage 1, basins formed in response to continental break-up processes; in stage 2, basins formed

  18. Craton-derived alluvium as a major sediment source in the Himalayan Foreland Basin of India

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sinha, R.; Kettanah, Y.; Gibling, M.R.

    2009-01-01

    foreland basin may reflect avulsion of orogenic rivers along the craton margin, in addition to dynamic transverse drainage systems from the Himalaya that pushed the axial drainage to the basin's feather edge. The wide spread of cratonic sediment would have been enhanced by slow subsidence in the distal...

  19. The 1000Ma reassembly of Dharwar and Bastar cratons – Evidence ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    8

    The Khammam schist belt, the. Dharwar craton and Bastar craton were joined together by the end of the Archaean. The ..... domain to be part of the EGMB. 3. Previous Geochronology Work. 1. 2. 3. 4 ...... Australia–Laurentia connection in the Paleoproterozoic–Mesoproterozoic revisited: evidence from new zircon U–Pb and ...

  20. Structure and extent of the southern African cratons: Integrated images from receiver functions and teleseimic tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soliman, Mohammad Youssof Ahmad; Levander, Alan; Bezada, Max

    2011-01-01

    in the heart of the Kaapvaal craton. The new P- and S- wave tomography models show velocity variations between the Archean and modified regions (such as the Bushveld complex) and the mobile belts surrounding the cratons. The high velocity (Vp=+1.0% and Vs=+0.4%) cratonic roots extend to 220-250 km depth......We present a high resolution seismic model of the South African cratonic region from receiver function and telesemic tomography interpretations of the P- and S- body wave data from the South Africa Seismic Experiment (Carlson et al, EOS 77, 1996) across the Kaapvaal and Zimbabwe cratons...... azimuth within the Kaapvaal and Zimbabwe boundaries. Modelling with theoretical receiver functions we find a best model with an average fast polarization axis trend=30o and an average strength 50% (dt = 0.5sec) for the crustal fabric of the total 170 km deep. By stacking and analysis of the SV and SH...

  1. Petrography and geochemistry of granitoids from the Samphire Pluton, South Australia: Implications for uranium mineralisation in overlying sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domnick, Urs; Cook, Nigel J.; Bluck, Russel; Brown, Callan; Ciobanu, Cristiana L.

    2018-02-01

    The Blackbush uranium deposit (JORC Inferred Resource: 12,580 tonnes U), located on the north-eastern Eyre Peninsula, is currently the only sediment-hosted U deposit investigated in detail in the Gawler Craton. Uranium is hosted within Eocene sandstone of the Kanaka Beds, overlying Mesoproterozoic granites of the Samphire pluton, affiliated with the Hiltaba Intrusive Suite ( 1.6 Ga). These are considered the most probable source rocks for uranium mineralisation. By constraining the petrography and mineralogy of the granites, insights into the post-emplacement evolution can be gained, which may provide an exploration indicator for other sediment-hosted uranium systems. Three geochemically distinct granite types were identified in the Samphire Pluton and correspond to domains interpreted from geophysical data. All granites show complex alteration overprints and textures with increasing intensity closer to the deposit, as well as crosscutting veining. Alkali feldspar has been replaced by porous K-feldspar and albite, and plagioclase is overprinted by an assemblage of porous albite + sericite ± calc-silicates (prehnite, pumpellyite and epidote). This style of feldspar alteration is regionally widespread and known from Hiltaba-aged granites associated with iron-oxide copper‑gold mineralisation at Olympic Dam and in the Moonta-Wallaroo region. In two granite types biotite is replaced by calcic garnet. Calc-silicates are indicative of Ca-metasomatism, sourced from the anorthite component of altered plagioclase. Minor clay alteration of feldspars is present in all samples. Mineral assemblages in veins include quartz + hematite, hematite + coffinite, fluorite + quartz, and clay minerals. Minor chlorite and sericite are found in all vein types. All granite types are anomalously rich in U (concentrations between 10 and 81 ppm). Highly variable Th/U ratios, as well as hydrothermal U minerals (mostly coffinite) in granites and veins, are clear evidence for U mobility

  2. Unsettling Australia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars

    This book is a critical intervention into debates on Australia's cultural history. The book demonstrates the interconnectedness of themes commonly seen as separate discursive formations, and shows the fruitfulness of bringing a combined cultural studies and postcolonial approach to bear on a number...

  3. Electromagnetic evidence of high angle convergence between the Congo and Kalahari cratons in southern Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoza, D. T.; Jones, A. G.; Muller, M. R.; Miensopust, M. P.; Webb, S. J.; Share, P.

    2010-12-01

    The southern African tectonic fabric is made up of a number Archean cratons flanked by Proterozoic and younger mobile belts, all with distinctly different but related geological evolutions. The cratonic margins and some intra-cratonic domain boundaries have played major roles in the tectonics of Africa by focusing ascending magmas and localising cycles of extension and rifting. Of these cratons the southern extent of the Congo craton is one of the least-constrained tectonic boundaries in the African tectonic architecture and knowledge of its geometry is crucial for understanding geological process of formation and deformation prevailing in the Archean and later. In this work, which forms a component of the hugely successful Southern African MagnetoTelluric Experiment (SAMTEX), we present the first-ever lithospheric electrical resistivity image of the southern boundary of the enigmatic Congo craton and the Neoproterozoic Damara-Ghanzi-Chobe (DGC) orogenic belt on its flanks. The DGC belt is highly complex and records the transpressive collision between the Congo to the north and Kalahari craton to the south. Magnetotelluric data were collected along a profile crossing all three of these tectonic blocks. The two-dimensional resistivity models resulting from inverting the distortion-corrected responses along the profiles all indicate significant lateral variations in the crust and upper mantle structure along and across strike from the younger DGC orogen to the older adjacent craton. The Moho depth in the DGC is mapped at 40 km by active seismic methods, and is also well constrained by S-wave receiver function models. The Damara belt lithosphere, although generally more conductive and significantly thinner (approximately 150 km) than the adjacent Congo and Kalahari cratons, exhibits upper crustal resistive features interpreted to be caused by igneous intrusions emplaced during the Gondwanan Pan-African magmatic event. The thinned lithosphere is consistent with a 50 m

  4. The tectonic evolution of Southern part of the Sao Francisco Craton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixeira, W.

    1986-01-01

    The potentiality of geochronology when it is applied to the geologic context of craton basement of archean areas is shown. Samples from southern part of the Sao Francisco Craton, in Brazil, were collected for petrographic analysis and geochronological data interpretation. The set of radiometric determinations was obtained by K-Ar, Rb-Sr, Pb-Pb and U-Pb methods. (M.C.K.) [pt

  5. Crustal and upper mantle structure of the Slave craton from P- and S- Receiver Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barantseva, Olga; Vinnik, Lev; Artemieva, Irina

    2017-04-01

    Teleseismic events recorded by POLARIS array in NW Canada (Slave craton) and Yellowknife station were used to calculate a sufficient number of receiver functions for P (PRF) and S (SRF) waves. Velocity (Vp and Vs) and Vp/Vs profiles from the Earth's surface down to 300 km are obtained through the simultaneous inversion of PRF and SRF with teleseismic travel time residuals for the crust and upper mantle. We observe highly heterogeneous structure of the cratonic upper mantle. The Lehman discontinuity (the bottom of the low velocity zone) is found in the western Slave craton, whereas it is not observed in the eastern part of the Slave craton. At stations located in the southern part of the craton, we observe an increase of S-wave velocities (as compared to IASP91 values) at the depths 45-150 km which is typical for depleted cratonic mantle. Low Vp/Vs ratio, obtained for the uppermost mantle (1.65-1.70) can be explained by a high fraction of Opx. A comparison of our results with available xenoliths data shows a good agreement between seismic velocity change at a depth of ca. 160 km and a decrease in mantle depletion at about the same depth.

  6. Intraplate Earthquakes and Deformation within the East Antarctic Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lough, A. C.; Wiens, D.; Nyblade, A.

    2017-12-01

    The apparent lack of tectonic seismicity within Antarctica has long been discussed. Explanations have ranged from a lack of intraplate stress due to the surrounding spreading ridges and low absolute plate velocity (Sykes, 1978), to the weight of ice sheets increasing the vertical normal stress (Johnston, 1987). The 26 station GAMSEIS/AGAP array deployed in East Antarctica from late 2008 to early 2010 provides the first opportunity to study the intraplate seismicity of the Antarctic interior using regional data. Here we report 27 intraplate tectonic earthquakes that occurred during 2009. Depth determination together with their corresponding uncertainty estimates, show that most events originate in the shallow to middle crust, indicating a tectonic and not a cryoseismic origin. The earthquakes are primarily located beneath linear alignments of basins adjacent to the Gamburtsev Subglacial Mountains (GSM) that have been denoted as the East Antarctic rift system (Ferraccioli et al, 2011). The geophysical properties of the `rift' system contrast sharply with those of the GSM and Vostok Subglacial Highlands on either side. Crustal thickness, seismic velocity, and gravity anomalies all indicate large lateral variation in lithospheric properties. We propose the events outline an ancient continental rift, a terrain boundary feature, or a combination of the two where rifting exploited pre-existing weakness. It is natural to draw parallels between East Antarctica and the St. Lawrence depression where rifting and a collisional suture focus intraplate earthquakes within a craton (Schulte and Mooney, 2005). We quantify the East Antarctic seismicity by developing a frequency-magnitude relation, constraining the lower magnitudes with the 2009 results and the larger magnitudes with 1982-2012 teleseismic seismicity. East Antarctica and the Canadian Shield show statistically indistinguishable b-values (near 1) and seismicity rates as expressed as the number of events with mb > 4 per

  7. Evolution of Parnaíba Cratonic Basin, Northeast Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Tribaldos, V.; White, N. J.; Coelho, D. L. O.; Julià, J.

    2017-12-01

    Cratonic sedimentary basins are underlain by thick (200-250 km) lithosphere. They are 2-3 km thick and subside continuously for hundreds of millions of years. The driving mechanism of these enigmatic basins is unclear, due to the paucity of crustal-scale constraints. To address this shortcoming, a multi-disciplinary study of the Parnaíba cratonic basin has been carried out. Here, we combine analysis of a 1400 km long deep seismic reflection profile that crosses the basin, teleseismic earthquakes recorded by 12 broadband and 10 short-period seismometers, 25 ancillary seismic reflection profiles, and 46 well logs. Our objective is to shed light on the subsidence history of this basin in the context of its stratigraphic architecture and crustal structure. Interpretation of the deep seismic profile and joint modeling of receiver functions and surface wave dispersion measurements show that the Moho occurs at depths of 35 and 38 km outside the basin at either end of the deep profile. Beneath the basin itself, Moho depths of 39 km and 40-42 km were obtained for the eastern and western parts, respectively. Given the uncertainties, these results suggest that the crust is slightly thinner beneath the basin compared with its edges. Lithologic descriptions and borehole analysis reveal a stratigraphic succession that comprises interbedded shallow marine and continental deposits bounded by basin-wide disconformities. On shallow profiles, this succession is manifest as packages of parallel-bedded reflections separated by rugose surfaces that correspond to significant disconformities that resemble buried landscapes. Graben structures of Proterozoic and Early Paleozoic age are imaged beneath the southwest and southeast regions of the basin, respectively. Water-loaded subsidence curves show an exponential decrease over 350 Ma. A thermal model suggests that unfaulted subsidence can be characterized with time constants of 70-100 Ma. The relationship between apparently prolonged

  8. Pangea: Geochronological correlation of successive environmental and strati-tectonic phases in Europe and Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veevers, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    A robust geochronology based on U-Pb zircon ages in Australia (n = 158) and Europe (n = 376) provides a rigorous test of (1) the model of a climatic-tectonic cycle of a single continent (Pangea) and ocean (Panthalassa) with an icehouse climate alternating with many continents and oceans with a greenhouse climate, and (2) the idea of coeval (320 to 300 Ma) right-lateral shear events in Eastern Australia and Europe followed by earliest Permian (~ 300 Ma) extension. During Pangean assembly, stress from the oblique collision of Laurussia and Gondwanaland bent the oroclines in Iberia, drove the intense shortening in Central Australia and terminal megakinking in the Lachlan orogen, and possibly drove the bending of oroclines in Eastern Australia. Extension I (~ 300 Ma, Carboniferous/Permian) followed the first outburst of self-induced (monsoonal) heat from the newly assembled Pangea, and generated fresh accommodation space for globally synchronous sedimentary successions, including the glacial base and succeeding coals of the Gondwana facies. Extension was relieved by sags on (isotropic) cratons and rifts on (anisotropic) fold belts with voluminous volcanics. In Europe, the Variscan orogen was cut into right-lateral magmatic rifts and the craton sagged to accumulate magmatic basins; likewise, the convergent margin of Eastern Australia was cut into a long magmatic rift and the cratonic foreland covered by the Gondwana facies. The end-Permian (251 Ma) sea-level drawdown, climate warming, and severe biotic extinction, with no obvious tectonic cause, were responsible for the Early-Middle Triassic coal gap. A second outburst of heat drove Extension II (235 Ma, Carnian, Late Triassic), expressed as rifts and sags that accumulated a second set of coal-bearing strata. At this time of its largest extent, Pangea underwent incipient breakup by rifting of the Atlantic Margins of North America, Morocco, and Western Europe that developed into 190 Ma drifting.

  9. Mid-Cretaceous phosphate platforms of the Russian Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilyin, Andrei V.

    1997-10-01

    The Mid-Cretaceous epicontinental sea covered the central part of the Russian Craton (RC). It was differentiated into a series of syn-sedimentary highs and lows. The highs are called phosphate platforms. They are confined to inherited tectonic uplifts where Precambrian basement is very shallowly buried and earlier Mesozoic and Palaeozoic sediments are thin or wedged out altogether. Cenomanian sediments on the highs represent condensed sequences and contain abundant hiatuses. They are crowned by an extensive phosphorite pavement, 30-50 cm thick, which is a multi-layered phosphorite hardground, built of phosphorite nodules firmly cemented by a phosphate matrix. The nodules consist of phosphatized radiolarians, diatoms and hexactinellid sponges. Analyses show no carbonate in excess of what is substituted for PO 3-4 in the francolite structure, nor is the enclosing sediment carbonate-bearing. Thus the Cenomanian phosphorites of the RC differ from those of the Anglo-Paris basin. During the Cenomanian, sea-level rose little because eustatic rise was compensated for by continued epirogenic uplift of the area. This delicate balance was abruptly broken by a major rise of sea-level which happened around the Cenomanian-Turonian boundary (CTB) and led to the drowning of the phosphate platforms and deposition of the chalk.

  10. The Neoproterozoic Puga (Varanger) cap carbonate, Amazon Craton, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccomini, C.; Nogueira, A. C.; Sial, A. N.; Moura, C. A.; Fairchild, T. R.

    2003-04-01

    Based on stratigraphic and isotopic data the basal carbonates of the Araras Group overlying diamictites of the Puga Formation at the southwest margin of the Amazon Craton are interpreted as a Neoproterozoic cap carbonate. Deposited below wavebase on a carbonate platform, this cap consists of two units separated by a transgressive erosional surface. The lower unit comprises moderately deep to shallow-water pinkish dolomudstone with stratiform fenestrate stromatolites, fenestrate planar lamination, ridge ("tepee-like structures") and tubiform structures. The upper unit includes deep-water bituminous lime mudstones with terrigenous grains, and subordinate shales. Alternating thin calcite crusts and lime mudstone laminae are commonly disrupted by calcite crystal fans (pseudomorphs after aragonite). Brecciated, faulted, and slumped limestone beds with multiple generations of cement indicate localized synsedimentary deformation. Negative excursions of δ13C and variations in 87Sr/86Sr are consistent with a Varanger age. However, unlike other cap carbonates, the basal contact with diamictites exhibits soft-sediment deformation, providing unequivocal sedimentological evidence of rapid dolostone precipitation after ice-melting. This fact confirms the existence of an abrupt change from icehouse to extreme greenhouse conditions, as proposed in the snowball earth hypothesis for Neoproterozoic glaciation. (Financial support: FAPESP grant 00/02903-8, CNPq and Pró-Reitoria de Pós-Graduação, USP).

  11. Extensive crustal melting during craton destruction: Evidence from the Mesozoic magmatic suite of Junan, eastern North China Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Santosh, M.; Tang, Li

    2018-05-01

    The cratonic destruction associated with the Pacific plate subduction beneath the eastern North China Craton (NCC) shows a close relationship with the widespread magmatism during the Late Mesozoic. Here we investigate a suite of intrusive and extrusive magmatic rocks from the Junan region of the eastern NCC in order to evaluate the role of extensive crustal melting related to decratonization. We present petrological, geochemical, zircon U-Pb geochronological and Lu-Hf isotopic data to evaluate the petrogenesis, timing and tectonic significance of the Early Cretaceous magmatism. Zircon grains in the basalt from the extrusive suite of Junan show multiple populations with Neoproterozoic and Early Paleozoic xenocrystic grains ranging in age from 764 Ma to 495 Ma as well as Jurassic grains with an age range of 189-165 Ma. The dominant population of magmatic zircon grains in the syenite defines three major age peaks of 772 Ma, 132 Ma and 126 Ma. Zircons in the granitoids including alkali syenite, monzonite and granodiorite yield a tightly restricted age range of 124-130 Ma representing their emplacement ages. The Neoproterozoic (841-547 Ma) zircon grains from the basalt and the syenite possess εHf(t) values of -22.9 to -8.4 and from -18.8 to -17.3, respectively. The Early Paleozoic (523-494 Ma) zircons from the basalt and the syenite also show markedly negative εHf(t) values of -22.7 to -18.0. The dominant population of Early Cretaceous (134-121 Ma) zircon grains presented in all the samples also displays negative εHf(t) values range from -31.7 to -21.1, with TDM of 1653-2017 Ma and TDMC in the range of 2193-3187 Ma. Accordingly, the Lu-Hf data suggest that the parent magma was sourced through melting of Mesoarchean to Paleoproterozoic basement rocks. Geochemical data on the Junan magmatic suite display features similar to those associated with the arc magmatic rocks involving subduction-related components, with interaction of fluids and melts in the suprasubduction

  12. Short-Wavelength Infrared (SWIR) spectroscopy of low-grade metamorphic volcanic rocks of the Pilbara Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abweny, Mohammad S.; van Ruitenbeek, Frank J. A.; de Smeth, Boudewijn; Woldai, Tsehaie; van der Meer, Freek D.; Cudahy, Thomas; Zegers, Tanja; Blom, Jan-Kees; Thuss, Barbara

    2016-05-01

    This paper shows the results of Short-Wavelength Infrared (SWIR) spectroscopy investigations of volcanic rocks sampled from low-grade metamorphic greenstone belts of the Archean Pilbara Craton in Western Australia. From the reflectance spectra a range of spectrally active minerals were identified, including chlorites, hornblende, actinolite, epidote and white micas. The rock samples were grouped into mineral assemblages based on their spectrally identified minerals and stratigraphic positions. The metamorphic amphibolite and greenschist facies could be identified from the SWIR spectroscopic data as well as three sub zones of the greenschist facies: 1) a zone containing Fe-chlorite; 2) a zone containing intermediate chlorite and epidote; and 3) a zone containing intermediate chlorite, actinolite and hornblende. Spectral parameters were calculated from the reflectance spectra to assess the metamorphic grade and zones. Plots of the depth parameters of the Fe-OH feature near 2250 nm versus the Mg-OH feature near 2390 nm differentiate the metamorphic amphibolite and greenschist facies and a transition zone between the two. The wavelength position parameter of the Mg-OH absorption feature near 2340 nm also serves to discriminate between the various metamorphic sub zones. The identification of the metamorphic grades of the volcanic sequences in greenstone belts with SWIR spectroscopy is useful for regional geological field studies, exploration for metamorphic mineral deposits hosted in the greenstone belts and the interpretation of hyperspectral remote sensing data sets covering similar types of terranes.

  13. The Preservation of Meso- Archean Refractory Lithospheric Mantle Underneath the Eastern Margin of the Tanzania Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Q.; Liu, J.; Pearson, G. D.; Gibson, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    Numerous studies on the petrology and geochemistry of peridotite xenoliths from the Tanzanian Craton and its rifted margins have investigated the origin, chemical change and thermal state of the cratonic roots from its core area (Nzega and Mwadui), its Northern (Marsabit) and Eastern margin Labait and Lashaine area (e.g. Dawson, 1964; Henjes-Kunst and Altherr, 1991; Lee & Rudnick, 1999; Chesley et al., 1999; Gibson et al., 2013). These studies suggest that the Tanzanian cratonic mantle formed via high degrees of melt extraction in the Archean (oldest Re-depletion age TRD = 3.4 Ga, Burton et al., 2000) and sev­eral episodes of refertilization. In order to gain further temporal and chemical understanding on the effects of tectonic processes on cratonic roots, we carried out a Re-Os isotopic study on peridotites (n = 11) from Lashaine, which will be followed by Lu-Hf, Sm-Nd and Sr isotope investigations of the constituent minerals of the same samples. The preliminary whole-rock Os isotope data from Lashaine peridotites show a large range of 187Os/188Os (0.1061 - 0.1261), with TRD ages from Meso-Archean to very young (3.1 Ga to 0.3 Ga). There is a negative correlation between TRD and bulk alumina contents. One sample with the lowest Al2O3 yields the oldest age of 3.1 Ga. Five samples range from 2.5 to 2.8 Ga, three give ages close to 2 Ga, and one sample with a high Al2O3 has a TRD at 0.3 Ga. The positive Al2O3-187Os/188Os correlation trend passes above the PM composition may reflect ancient metasomatism by high Re/Os melts or recent metasomatism by very radiogenic Os plume-derived melts. These processes could be related to the evolution of the peripheral Proterozoic mobile belts, or Cenozoic rifting on the Eastern margin. Collectively, our new Os isotope data demonstrate that Meso-Archean (at least 3.1 Ga old) mantle portions are still retained underneath the rifted Eastern margin of the Craton. This is in line with previous results indicating that Archean cratonic

  14. Data science implications in diamond formation and craton evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, F.; Huang, F.; Fox, P. A.

    2017-12-01

    Diamonds are so-called "messengers" from the deep Earth. Fluid and mineral inclusions in diamonds could reflect the compositions of fluids/melts and wall-rocks in which diamond formed. Recently many diamond samples are examined to study the water content in the mantle transition zone1, the mechanism of diamond formation2 and the mantle evolution history3. However, most of the studies can only explain local activities. Therefore, an overall project of data grouping, comparison and correlation is needed, but limited progress has been made due to a lack of benchmark datasets on diamond formation and effective computing algorithms. In this study, we start by proposing the very first complete and easily-accessible dataset on mineral and fluid inclusions in diamonds. We rescue, collect and organize the data available from papers, journals and other publications resources ([2-4] and more), and then apply several state-of-the-art machine learning methods to tackle this earth science problem by clustering diamond formation process into distinct groups primarily based on the compositions, the formation temperature and pressure, the age and so on. Our ongoing work includes further data exploration and training existing models. Our preliminary results show that diamonds formed from older cratons usually have higher formation temperature. Also peridotitic diamonds take a much larger population than the ecologitic ones. More details are being discovered when we finish constructing the database and training our model. We expect the result to demonstrate the advantages of using machine learning and data science in earth science research problems. Our methodology for knowledge discovery are very general and can be broadly applied to other earth science research problems under the same framework.[1] Pearson et al, Nature (2014); [2] Tomlinson et al, EPSL (2006); [3] Weiss et al, Nature (2016); [4] Stachel and Harris, Ore Geology Reviews (2008); Weiss et al, EPSL (2013)

  15. The geotectonic evolution of southern part of Sao Francisco Craton, based in geochronologic interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixeira, W.

    1985-01-01

    Interpretation of available radiometric data from poly metamorphic terranes of southern part of the Sao Francisco Craton demonstrates the importance of geochronology as a tool in the study of ancient crustal evolution. In addition, radiometric study of basic intrusive magmatism helps define the most important epochs of crustal rifting during the Proterozoic. The definition of the southern border of the cratonic area based on distinctive age patterns of the geochronological provinces is also discussed. Finally, the geochronologic evolution of the Bambui platform cover is presented. Approximately 250 radiometric age determinations (Rb-Sr, K-Ar and Pb-Pb methods) were interpreted principally through the use of iso chronic diagrams. The geologic history tectonomagnetic events identified in this study is compared to the crustal evolution of similar segments of the Sao Francisco Craton and elsewhere. (author)

  16. Compositional trends among Kaapvaal Craton garnet peridotite xenoliths and their effects on seismic velocity and density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schutt, Derek; Lesher, Charles

    2010-01-01

    garnet and clinopyroxene enrichment. Using the parameterization of Schutt and Lesher (2006) we show that at cratonic mantle temperatures and pressures, orthopyroxene enrichment results in little change in bulk density (ρbulk) and shear-wave velocity (VS), but decreases compressional wave velocities (VP......We examine the modes and compositions of garnet-bearing peridotite xenoliths from the Kaapvaal Craton to quantify factors governing density and seismic velocity variations within metasomatically altered cratonic mantle. Three distinct compositional trends are resolved by principal component...... analysis. The first reflects differences in residue composition resulting from partial melting. The second is associated with orthopyroxene (opx) enrichment, possibly due to silica addition by subduction zone fluids in the source region of the xenoliths. The third principal component reflects garnet...

  17. Plume-induced dynamic instabilities near cratonic blocks: Implications for P-T-t paths and metallogeny

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guillou-Frottier, L.; Burov, E.; Cloetingh, S.; Le Goff, E.; Deschamps, Y.; Huet, B.; Bouchot, V.

    2012-01-01

    Plume head - lithosphere interactions around cratonic blocks result in thermo-mechanical disturbances that lead to heating and burial phases of crustal rocks. We present results from numerical models of plume head - cratonic blocks interactions where a free upper surface condition and realistic

  18. Thermal erosion of cratonic lithosphere as a potential trigger for mass-extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilet, S.; Müntener, O.; Jean, G.; Schoene, B.; Schaltegger, U.

    2016-12-01

    The temporal coincidence between LIPs and mass extinctions has led many to pose a causal relationship between the two. However, there is still no consensus on a mechanistic model that explains how magmatism leads to the turnover of terrestrial and marine plants, invertebrates and vertebrates. Here, we present a synthesis of stratigraphic constraints on the Triassic-Jurassic and Pliensbachian-Toarcian boundaries combined with geochronological data demonstrating that these biotic crises are both associated with rapid change from an initial cool period to greenhouse conditions. As current hypothesis for LIPs seems unable to produce these successive climatic changes, we evaluate an alternative suggesting that the initial cooling could be due to gas release during the initial thermal erosion of the cratonic lithosphere due to emplacement of the CAMP and Karoo-Ferrar volcanic provinces. Karoo and CAMP areas were underlain by thick lithosphere (>200 km) prior to continental break up. Even in presence of abnormal potential mantle temperature, the presence of thick lithosphere excludes significant melting of the asthenospheric mantle without initial stage of thermal erosion of the cratonic lithosphere. Various studies on Kaapvaal craton have shown that sulfide minerals are enclosed in the basal part of the cratonic lithosphere. We argue that initial gas emission was dominated by sulfur liberated from sulfide-bearing cratonic lithosphere causing global cooling and eustatic regression, which was followed by warming/transgression associated with the progressive increase of CO2 in the atmosphere associated to LIPs emission. We suggest that the nature of the underlying lithosphere during large LIP eruption exerts an important control on the consequences at the Earth's surface. This model offers an explanation for why LIPs erupted through oceanic lithosphere are not associated with climatic and biotic crises comparable to LIPs emitted through cratonic lithosphere.

  19. What is a craton? How many are there? How do they relate? And how did they form?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleeker, W.; Davis, B. W.

    2004-05-01

    What is a craton? A craton is a large, coherent domain of Earth's continental crust that has attained and maintained long-term stability, having undergone little internal deformation, except perhaps near its margins due to interaction with neighbouring terranes. Stable continental crust is an end product of intense magmatic, tectonic, and metamorphic reworking; hence, cratons consist of polydeformed and metamorphosed crystalline and metamorphic rocks (e.g., typically "granite-greenstone terrains" in the most ancient cratons). Reworked crust only becomes a craton once the cumulative tectonic, magmatic, and metamorphic reprocessing has self-organized the crust and underlying lithosphere into a stable density, compositional, and thermal profile. Major late-stage "granite bloom" events play a critical role in attaining such stable lithospheric profiles. Once above average stability has been reached, deformation will be concentrated in adjacent domains with weaker strength profiles. Significant rifting events, assisted by mantle plume activity and mafic dyke swarms, are then needed to break up cratonic lithosphere. Where cratons are exposed, they form "shields" dominated by crystalline and metamorphic rocks; where younger, weakly deformed cover overlies cratonic basement, these areas are referred to as "platforms". Shields and platforms are physiographic terms rather than tectonic entities. Another concept, related but not identical to cratons is that of "structural provinces" and the two are commonly confused. Perhaps there is a slight bias for Archean cratons with buoyant mantle keels to form relatively high-standing areas, thus forming shields. However, large parts of Archean cratons are buried underneath platformal cover. There is no strict age connotation to the term "craton", and implied age depends on context. In a context of mantle keels, diamonds and kimberlites, there often is an implicit tendency to equate cratons with stable crust of Archean age. Elsewhere

  20. Geochronology of sedimentary and metasedimentary Precambrian rocks of the West African craton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clauer, N.; Jeannette, D.; Trompette, R.

    1982-01-01

    This contribution summarizes current knowledge of the geochronology of the Upper Proterozoic sedimentary rocks covering the West African craton. This was done by using direct dating methods. Correlations between the northern edge of the Tindouf basin and the northern and southern part of the Taoudeni basin, as well as the Volta basin, are proposed. Tectonic, volcanic and thermal activities in connection with the Pan-African orogeny are recorded only around the craton. They induced either sedimentation lacks in Morocco or sedimentation excesses in Hoggar. Unsolved problems such as the precise stratigraphic position of the uppermost Proterozoic tillitic episode and the correlation within the Moroccan Anti-Atlas are also raised. (Auth.)

  1. Origin and diamond prospectivity of Mesoproterozoic kimberlites from the Narayanpet field, Eastern Dharwar Craton, southern India

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chalapathi Rao, N.V.; Paton, Chad; Lehmann, B.

    2012-01-01

    The Mesoproterozoic Narayanpet Kimberlite Field (NKF) is located ~200km north of the well-known Wajrakarur Kimberlite Field (WKF) in the Eastern Dharwar Craton, southern India. Whereas a majority of the WKF occurrences are diamondiferous and contain mantle xenoliths and xenocrysts, their paucity...... is a characteristic feature of the NKF. This has been attributed alternately to the derivation of NKF magmas from a shallower depth, or to variability in thickness of the Sub-Continental Lithospheric Mantle (SCLM) beneath the Eastern Dharwar Craton. Recently, exploration by De Beers resulted in the discovery...

  2. Uranium mining in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    The mining of uranium in Australia is criticised in relation to it's environmental impact, economics and effects on mine workers and Aborigines. A brief report is given on each of the operating and proposed uranium mines in Australia

  3. Laser Hydrography in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-02-01

    r#00-Ails 584 ELECTRONICS RESEARCH LAO ADELAIDE IAUSTRALIA) F/S B/10 LASER HYDfiORAPHY IN AUSTRALIA . (U) FEB 82 M F PENNYJIJNCLASSIFIED ERLO Z B 9...RESEARCH CENTRE SALISBURY SOUTH AUSTRALIA TECHNICAL REPORT ERL-0229-TR LASER HYDROGRAPHY IN AUSTRALIA M.F. PENNY LJ--.I LA. Approved for Public Releae...ERL-0229-TR LASER HYDROGRAPHY IN AUSTRALIA M.F. Penny SUMMARY In response to a Royal Australian Navy requirement, the Electronics Research Laboratory

  4. The geological record of base metal sulfides in the cratonic mantle: A microscale 187Os/188Os study of peridotite xenoliths from Somerset Island, Rae Craton (Canada)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragagni, A.; Luguet, A.; Fonseca, R. O. C.; Pearson, D. G.; Lorand, J.-P.; Nowell, G. M.; Kjarsgaard, B. A.

    2017-11-01

    We report detailed petrographic investigations along with 187Os/188Os data in Base Metal Sulfide (BMS) on four cratonic mantle xenoliths from Somerset Island (Rae Craton, Canada). The results shed light on the processes affecting the Re-Os systematics and provide time constraints on the formation and evolution of the cratonic lithospheric mantle beneath the Rae craton. When devoid of alteration, BMS grains mainly consist of pentlandite + pyrrhotite ± chalcopyrite. The relatively high BMS modal abundance of the four investigated xenoliths cannot be reconciled with the residual nature of these peridotites, but requires addition of metasomatic BMS. This is especially evident in the two peridotites with the highest bulk Pd/Ir and Pd/Pt. Metasomatic BMS likely formed during melt/fluid percolation in the Sub Continental Lithospheric Mantle (SCLM) as well as during infiltration of the host kimberlite magma, when djerfisherite crystallized around older Fe-Ni-sulfides. On the whole-rock scale, kimberlite metasomatism is visible in a subset of bulk xenoliths, which defines a Re-Os errorchron that dates the host magma emplacement. The 187Os/188Os measured in the twenty analysed BMS grains vary from 0.1084 to >0.17 and it shows no systematic variation depending on the sulfide mineralogical assemblage. The largest range in 187Os/188Os is observed in BMS grains from the two xenoliths with the highest Pd/Ir, Pd/Pt, and sulfide modal abundance. The whole-rock TRD ages of these two samples underestimate the melting age obtained from BMS, demonstrating that bulk Re-Os model ages from peridotites with clear evidence of metasomatism should be treated with caution. The TRD ages determined in BMS grains are clustered around 2.8-2.7, ∼2.2 and ∼1.9 Ga. The 2.8-2.7 Ga TRD ages document the main SCLM building event in the Rae craton, which is likely related to the formation of the local greenstone belts in a continental rift setting. The Paleoproterozoic TRD ages can be explained by

  5. Mesoproterozoic evolution of the Rio de la Plata Craton in Uruguay: at the heart of Rodinia?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaucher, Claudio; Frei, Robert; Chemale, Farid

    2011-01-01

    detrital zircon ages occurring in Ediacaran sandstones of the RPC. If the RPC is fringed at both sides by Mesoproterozoic, Grenville-aged belts it is likely that it occupied a rather central position in Rodinia. A possible location between Laurentia and the Kalahari Craton, and to the south of Amazonia...

  6. Water and Metasomatism in the Slave Cratonic Lithosphere (Canada): An FTIR Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgore, McKensie; Peslier, Anne H.; Brandon, Alan D.; Schaffer, Lillian Aurora; Pearson, D. Graham; O'Reilly, Suzanne Yvette; Kopylova, Maya G.; Griffin, William L.

    2017-01-01

    Water in the mantle influences melting, viscosity, seismic velocity, and electrical conductivity. The role played by water in the long-term stabilization of cratonic roots is currently being debated. This study focuses on water contents of mantle minerals (olivine, pyroxene and garnet) from xenoliths found in kimberlites of the Archean Slave craton. 19 mantle xenoliths from central Lac de Gras, and 10 from northern Jericho were analyzed by FTIR for water, and their equilibration depths span the several compositional layers identified beneath the region. At both locations, the shallow peridotites have lower water contents in their olivines (11-30 ppm H2O) than those from the deeper layers (28-300 ppm H2O). The driest olivines, however, are not at the base of the cratonic lithosphere (>6 GPa) as in the Kaapvaal craton. Instead, the deepest olivines are hydrous (31-72 ppm H2O at Lac de Gras and 275 ppm H2O at Jericho). Correlations of water in clinopyroxene and garnet with their other trace element contents are consistent with water being added by metasomatism by melts resembling kimberlite precursors in the mantle approx.0.35 Ga ago beneath Lac de Gras. The northern Jericho xenoliths are derived from a region of the Slave craton that is even more chemically stratified, and was affected at depth by the 1.27 Ga Mackenzie igneous events. Metasomatism at Jericho may be responsible for the particularly high olivine water contents (up to 300 ppm H2O) compared to those at Lac de Gras, which will be investigated by acquiring trace-element data on these xenoliths. These data indicate that several episodes of metasomatic rehydration occurred in the deep part of the Slave craton mantle lithosphere, with the process being more intense in the northern part beneath Jericho, likely related to a translithospheric suture serving as a channel to introduce fluids and/or melts in the northern region. Consequently, rehydration of the lithosphere does not necessarily cause cratonic root

  7. High Water Contents in the Siberian Cratonic Mantle: An FTIR Study of Udachnaya Peridotite Xenoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucet, Luc S.; Peslier, Anne H.; Ionov, Dimitri A.; Brandon, Alan D.; Golovin, Alexander V.; Ashchepkov, Igor V.

    2013-01-01

    Water is believed to be a key factor controlling the long-term stability of cratonic lithosphere, but mechanisms responsible for the water content distribution in the mantle remain poorly constrained. Water contents were obtained by FTIR in olivine, pyroxene and garnet for 20 well-characterized peridotite xenoliths from the Udachnaya kimberlite (central Siberian craton) and equilibrated at 2-7 GPa. Water contents in minerals do not appear to be related to interaction with the host kimberlite. Diffusion modeling indicates that the core of olivines preserved their original water contents. The Udachnaya peridotites show a broad range of water contents in olivine (6.5 +/- 1.1 to 323 +- 65 ppm H2O (2 sigma)), and garnet (0 - 23 +/- 6 ppm H2O). The water contents of olivine and garnet are positively correlated with modal clinopyroxene, garnet and FeO in olivine. Water-rich garnets are also rich in middle rare earth elements. This is interpreted as the result of interaction between residual peridotites and water rich-melts, consistent with modal and cryptic metasomatism evidenced in the Siberian cratonic mantle. The most water-rich Udachnaya minerals contain 2 to 3 times more water than those from the Kaapvaal craton, the only craton with an intact mantle root for which water data is available. The highest water contents in olivine and orthopyroxene in this study (>= 300 ppm) are found at the bottom of the lithosphere (> 6.5 GPa). This is in contrast with the Kaapvaal craton where the olivines of peridotites equilibrated at > 6.4 GPa have peridotites at > 6 GPa is lower or similar (8.4× 10(exp 16) to 8.0× 10(exp 18) Pa./s) to that of the asthenosphere (peridotites are likely not representative of the overall Siberian cratonic lithosphere. Their composition is linked to spatially limited melt metasomatism in mantle regions above asthenospheric upwellings responsible for the kimberlite magmatism prior to their ascent and eruption.

  8. Contrasted continental rifting via plume-craton interaction: Applications to Central East African Rift

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Koptev

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The East African Rift system (EARS provides a unique system with the juxtaposition of two contrasting yet simultaneously formed rift branches, the eastern, magma-rich, and the western, magma-poor, on either sides of the old thick Tanzanian craton embedded in a younger lithosphere. Data on the pre-rift, syn-rift and post-rift far-field volcanic and tectonic activity show that the EARS formed in the context of the interaction between a deep mantle plume and a horizontally and vertically heterogeneous lithosphere under far-field tectonic extension. We bring quantitative insights into this evolution by implementing high-resolution 3D thermo-mechanical numerical deformation models of a lithosphere of realistic rheology. The models focus on the central part of the EARS. We explore scenarios of plume-lithosphere interaction with plumes of various size and initial position rising beneath a tectonically pre-stretched lithosphere. We test the impact of the inherited rheological discontinuities (suture zones along the craton borders, of the rheological structure, of lithosphere plate thickness variations, and of physical and mechanical contrasts between the craton and the embedding lithosphere. Our experiments indicate that the ascending plume material is deflected by the cratonic keel and preferentially channeled along one of its sides, leading to the formation of a large rift zone along the eastern side of the craton, with significant magmatic activity and substantial melt amount derived from the mantle plume material. We show that the observed asymmetry of the central EARS, with coeval amagmatic (western and magmatic (eastern branches, can be explained by the splitting of warm material rising from a broad plume head whose initial position is slightly shifted to the eastern side of the craton. In that case, neither a mechanical weakness of the contact between the craton and the embedding lithosphere nor the presence of second plume are required to

  9. Water and metasomatism in the Slave cratonic lithosphere (Canada): an FTIR study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgore, M.; Peslier, A. H.; Brandon, A. D.; Schaffer, L. A.; Pearson, D. G.; O'Reilly, S. Y.; Kopylova, M. G.; Griffin, W. L.

    2017-12-01

    Water in the mantle influences melting, viscosity, seismic velocity, and electrical conductivity. The role played by water in the long-term stabilization of cratonic roots is currently being debated [1]. This study focuses on water contents of mantle minerals (olivine, pyroxene and garnet) from xenoliths found in kimberlites of the Archean Slave craton. 19 mantle xenoliths from central Lac de Gras, and 10 from northern Jericho were analyzed by FTIR for water, and their equilibration depths span the several compositional layers identified beneath the region [2]. At both locations, the shallow peridotites have lower water contents in their olivines (11-30 ppm H2O) than those from the deeper layers (28-300 ppm H2O). The driest olivines, however, are not at the base of the cratonic lithosphere (>6 GPa) as in the Kaapvaal craton [1]. Instead, the deepest olivines are hydrous (31-72 ppm H2O at Lac de Gras and 275 ppm H2O at Jericho). Correlations of water in clinopyroxene and garnet with their other trace element contents are consistent with water being added by metasomatism by melts resembling kimberlite precursors in the mantle 0.35 Ga ago beneath Lac de Gras [1]. The northern Jericho xenoliths are derived from a region of the Slave craton that is even more chemically stratified, and was affected at depth by the 1.27 Ga Mackenzie igneous events [3,4]. Metasomatism at Jericho may be responsible for the particularly high olivine water contents (up to 300 ppm H2O) compared to those at Lac de Gras, which will be investigated by acquiring trace-element data on these xenoliths. These data indicate that several episodes of metasomatic rehydration occurred in the deep part of the Slave craton mantle lithosphere, with the process being more intense in the northern part beneath Jericho, likely related to a translithospheric suture serving as a channel to introduce fluids and/or melts in the northern region [5]. Consequently, rehydration of the lithosphere does not necessarily

  10. Geodynamic evolution of the West and Central Pilbara Craton in Western Australia : a mid-Archaean active continental margin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beintema, K.A.

    2003-01-01

    The Archaean era lasted for about one third of the Earth's history, from ca 4.0 until 2.5 billion years ago. Because the Archaean spans such a long time, knowledge about this era is for understanding the evolution of the Earth until the present day, especially because it is the time

  11. Geodynamic evolution of the West and Central Pilbara Craton in Western Australia : a mid-Archaean active continental margin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beintema, K.A.

    2003-01-01

    The Archaean era lasted for about one third of the Earth's history, from ca 4.0 until 2.5 billion years ago. Because the Archaean spans such a long time, knowledge about this era is for understanding the evolution of the Earth until the present day, especially because it is the time offormation of

  12. Kinematic and structural controls of Au metallogenic systems in the Early Earth: Examples from the eastern Pilbara Craton, NW Australia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guerreiro, F.M.

    2004-01-01

    This thesis is divided into eight chapters excluding the Introduction (Chapter 1):- Literature Review: Chapter 2 provides a detailed overview of the historical mining activities within the East Pilbara Superterrain. Details such gold production, grades and mining techniques are described,

  13. The Lu-Hf isotope composition of cratonic lithosphere: disequilibrium between garnet and clinopyroxene in kimberlite xenoliths

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simon, N.S.C.; Carlson, R.W.; Pearson, D.G.; Davies, G.R.

    2002-01-01

    12th Annual V.M. Goldschmidt Conference Davos Switzerland, The Lu-Hf isotope composition of cratonic lithosphere: disequilibrium between garnet and clinopyroxene in kimberlite xenoliths (DTM, Carnegie Institution of Washington), Pearson, D.G. (University of Durham)

  14. Energy in Australia 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuevas-Cubria, C.; Schultz, A.; Petchey, R.; Beaini, F.; New, R.

    2011-04-01

    Securing access to affordable, reliable and clean energy is one of the great challenges facing governments around the world. The Australian Government is committed to ensuring the security of Australia's domestic energy systems as a fundamental part of Australia's social and economic prosperity. Energy in Australia 2011 is a key reference for anyone with an interest in Australian energy issues. It provides a detailed overview of energy in Australia from production to consumption, and serves as a useful resource to inform industry, government and the community.

  15. Variations of the lithospheric strength across the edges of the North American craton and their relation to intraplate earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesauro, Magdala; Kaban, Mikhail; Mooney, Walter; Cloetingh, Sierd

    2016-04-01

    Seismic tomography models revealed a pronounced velocity contrast between the cratonic and off-cratonic regions of North America. However, the location of the transition between the fast/slow velocities characterizing the Archean-Proterozoic and Phanerozoic regions, respectively, is still under debate. In order to understand the structure of the edges of North American (NA) cratons, we analyze the results of two recent thermal and strength models of the NA continent, obtained using seismic and gravity data (Kaban et al., 2014; Tesauro et al., 2014; 2015). We could observe that in the peripheral parts of the cratons, as the Proterozoic Canadian Platform, the Grenville, and the western part of the Yavapai-Mazatzal province, the integrated strength for one model is 10 times larger than the other one, due to a temperature difference of >200°C in the uppermost mantle. The differences in the effective elastic thickness (Te) between the two models are less pronounced. In both models, Proterozoic regions reactivated by Meso-Cenozoic tectonics (e.g., Rocky Mountains and the Mississippi Embayment), are characterized by a weak lithosphere due to the absence of the mechanically strong part of the mantle lithospheric layer. Furthermore, intraplate earthquakes are distributed along the edges of the cratons, demonstrating that tectonic stress accumulates there, while the cores of the cratons remain undeformed. In both models, intraplate seismicity occurs in weak lithosphere or in the regions characterized by pronounced contrasts of strength and Te.

  16. Paleomagnetic study of 1765 Ma dyke swarm from the Singhbhum Craton: Implications to the paleogeography of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Ravi; Srinivasa Sarma, D.; Ramesh Babu, N.; Parashuramulu, V.

    2018-05-01

    We report the first key paleopole as a result of paleomagnetic study on a precisely dated 1765.3 ± 1.0 Ma WNW-ESE trending dyke swarm from Singhbhum Craton. This pole has been used in this study to propose the paleogeographic reconstruction of India with Baltica Craton and North China Craton. Incremental alternating field (AF) and thermal demagnetization, isolated high coercivity components with north to north-westerly declination and shallow negative inclination from 9 sampling sites which are representing different individual dykes. The primary origin of the ChRM is supported by the positive baked contact test. The WNW-ESE trending dykes yield a mean paleomagnetic direction with a declination = 329.2° and an inclination = -22.8° (k = 31.6; α95 = 9.3°). The positive bake contact test proves the primary nature of remanence. The pole position of Singhbhum Craton at 1765 Ma is 45°N, 311°E (dp = 5.2 and dm = 9.9). Paleogeographic reconstruction at ca. 1770 Ma, supported by geological, tectonic and metallogenic evidences indicate that the Baltica Craton and India linkage can be stable for at least ∼370 Ma (∼1770-1400 Ma). There is also reasonable evidence in support of India-North China Craton spatial proximity at ∼1770 Ma.

  17. New Constraints on Upper Mantle Structure Underlying the Diamondiferous Central Slave Craton, Canada, from Teleseismic Body Wave Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteve, C.; Schaeffer, A. J.; Audet, P.

    2017-12-01

    Over the past number of decades, the Slave Craton (Canada) has been extensively studied for its diamondiferous kimberlites. Not only are diamonds a valuable resource, but their kimberlitic host rocks provide an otherwise unique direct source of information on the deep upper mantle (and potentially transition zone). Many of the Canadian Diamond mines are located within the Slave Craton. As a result of the propensity for diamondiferous kimberlites, it is imperative to probe the deep mantle structure beneath the Slave Craton. This work is further motivated by the increase in high-quality broadband seismic data across the Northern Canadian Cordillera over the past decade. To this end we have generated a P and S body wave tomography model of the Slave Craton and its surroundings. Furthermore, tomographic inversion techniques are growing ever more capable of producing high resolution Earth models which capture detailed structure and dynamics across a range of scale lengths. Here, we present preliminary results on the structure of the upper mantle underlying the Slave Craton. These results are generated using data from eight different seismic networks such as the Canadian National Seismic Network (CNSN), Yukon Northwest Seismic Network (YNSN), older Portable Observatories for Lithospheric Analysis and Reseach Investigating Seismicity (POLARIS), Regional Alberta Observatory for Earthquake Studies Network (RV), USArray Transportable Array (TA), older Canadian Northwest Experiment (CANOE), Batholith Broadband (XY) and the Yukon Observatory (YO). This regional model brings new insights about the upper mantle structure beneath the Slave Craton, Canada.

  18. PALEOARCHEAN MAFIC ROCKS OF THE SOUTHWESTERN SIBERIAN CRATON: PRELIMINARY GEOCHRONOLOGY AND GEOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Ivanov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Siberian craton consists of Archean blocks, which were welded up into the same large unit by ca 1.9 Ga [Gladkochub et al., 2006; Rojas-Agramonte et al., 2011]. The history of the constituent Archean blocks is mosaic because of limited number of outcrops, insufficient sampling coverage because of their location in remote regions and deep forest and difficulties with analytical studies of ancient rocks, which commonly underwent metamorphic modifications and secondary alterations. In this short note, we report data on discovery of unusual for Archean mafic rocks of ultimate fresh appearance. These rocks were discovered within southwestern Siberian craton in a region near a boundary between Kitoy granulites of the Sharyzhalgai highgrade metamorphic complex and Onot green-schist belt (Fig. 1. Here we present preliminary data on geochronology of these rocks and provide their geochemical characterization.

  19. Depth of anisotropy in the North American craton from surface wave polarizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maupin, V.; Pettersen, O.

    2009-04-01

    Analysis of P-wave traveltimes has shown the the North American craton is characterized by a coherent pattern of anisotropy with significant dip of the fast axis in some regions. The depth distribution of the anisotropy is however little constrained by P-wave analysis, limiting the geodynamical interpretation of the model. Surface wave polarizations are very sensitive to dip of anisotropy and can provide the missing depth-constraint to the model. We present an analysis of surface wave polarizations recorded at a number of stations on the North American craton. We show that the frequency range in which we do not observe polarization anomalies implies that the dipping anisotropy is not located in the upper part of the lithosphere.

  20. Some problems of geologic relations between the Amazon craton and east margins fold belts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, F.F.M. de

    1986-01-01

    This paper deals with some geologic problems related to the limits between the Amazon craton and the fold belts developed at its margins during the Precambrian. These limits are diversified but clearly recognized. To the north, the Araguaia-Tocantins fold belt, of presumed Middle Proterozoic age, is separated from the cratonic block by a deep marginal fracture zone permeated by mafic and ultramafic rocks. The geologic, magmatic and aeromagnetic characteristics of this zone point out the presence of deep faults, supposed to be of Middle Proterozoic age. The southern Paraguay fold belt constitutes and accurated zone of linear structures supposed to be of Late Proterozoic development. Despite the great increase of knowledge during the last ten years many tectonic, stratigraphic and geochronologic problems remain unsolved. The aim of this paper is to point out some of these problems and suggest specific studies to solve them. (author)

  1. Olivine water contents in the continental lithosphere and the longevity of cratons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peslier, Anne H; Woodland, Alan B; Bell, David R; Lazarov, Marina

    2010-09-02

    Cratons, the ancient cores of continents, contain the oldest crust and mantle on the Earth (>2 Gyr old). They extend laterally for hundreds of kilometres, and are underlain to depths of 180-250 km by mantle roots that are chemically and physically distinct from the surrounding mantle. Forming the thickest lithosphere on our planet, they act as rigid keels isolated from the flowing asthenosphere; however, it has remained an open question how these large portions of the mantle can stay isolated for so long from mantle convection. Key physical properties thought to contribute to this longevity include chemical buoyancy due to high degrees of melt-depletion and the stiffness imparted by the low temperatures of a conductive thermal gradient. Geodynamic calculations, however, suggest that these characteristics are not sufficient to prevent the lithospheric mantle from being entrained during mantle convection over billions of years. Differences in water content are a potential source of additional viscosity contrast between cratonic roots and ambient mantle owing to the well-established hydrolytic weakening effect in olivine, the most abundant mineral of the upper mantle. However, the water contents of cratonic mantle roots have to date been poorly constrained. Here we show that olivine in peridotite xenoliths from the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary region of the Kaapvaal craton mantle root are water-poor and provide sufficient viscosity contrast with underlying asthenosphere to satisfy the stability criteria required by geodynamic calculations. Our results provide a solution to a puzzling mystery of plate tectonics, namely why the oldest continents, in contrast to short-lived oceanic plates, have resisted recycling into the interior of our tectonically dynamic planet.

  2. Lower Crustal Seismicity, Volatiles, and Evolving Strain Fields During the Initial Stages of Cratonic Rifting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, C.; Muirhead, J.; Ebinger, C. J.; Tiberi, C.; Roecker, S. W.; Ferdinand-Wambura, R.; Kianji, G.; Mulibo, G. D.

    2014-12-01

    The volcanically active East African rift system in southern Kenya and northern Tanzania transects thick cratonic lithosphere, and comprises several basins characterized by deep crustal seismicity. The US-French-Tanzania-Kenya CRAFTI project aims to understand the role of magma and volatile movement during the initiation and evolution of rifting in cratonic lithosphere. Our 38-station broadband network spans all or parts of fault-bounded rift segments, enabling comparison of lithospheric structure, fault kinematics, and seismogenic layer thickness with age and proximity to the deeply rooted Archaen craton. Seismicity levels are high in all basins, but we find profound differences in seismogenic layer thickness along the length of the rift. Seismicity in the Manyara basin occurs almost exclusively within the lower crust, and in spatial clusters that have been active since 1990. In contrast, seismicity in the ~ 5 My older Magadi basin is localized in the upper crust, and the long border fault bounding the west side of the basin is seismically inactive. Between these two basins lies the Natron rift segment, which shows seismicity between ~ 20 and ~2 km depth, and high concentrations at Oldoinyo Lengai and Gelai volcanoes. Older volcanoes on the uplifted western flank (e.g., Ngorongoro) experience swarms of activity, suggesting that active magmatism and degassing are widespread. Focal mechanisms of the frequent earthquakes recorded across the array are spatially variable, and indicate a stress field strongly influenced by (1) Holocene volcanoes, (2) mechanical interactions between adjacent rift basins, and (3) a far-field ESE-WNW extensional stress regime. We explore the spatial correlation between zones of intense degassing along fault systems and seismicity, and examine the influence of high gas pressures on lower and upper crustal seismicity in this youthful cratonic rift zone.

  3. Online Training in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzic, Joze

    2013-01-01

    On-line training is becoming an interesting phenomenon in Australia and has attracted a lot of interest across many industries and businesses (Chan and Ngai, 2007). The research reported here looks at the use of online training in corporations in Australia. It focuses on two aspects of online training, the factors that "warrant" its…

  4. Handbook on Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    A study unit on Australia for secondary students is divided into eight sections. Section 1 introduces students to the states, territories, and capitals of the country. Section two, land and people, discusses the size, location, geology, climate, flora and fauna, and population of Australia. Sections 3 and 4 outline Australian history and include…

  5. OPERATION GASLIGHT IN AUSTRALIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    seeking explanations of these phenomena. The reasons for wishing to make measurements in Australia are: (a) the trajectory of Black Knight provides a...other suitable firings in Australia provide better opportunity for optical observation than do firings on American ranges. (Author)

  6. Zircon Lu-Hf isotopes and granite geochemistry of the Murchison Domain of the Yilgarn Craton: Evidence for reworking of Eoarchean crust during Meso-Neoarchean plume-driven magmatism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanic, Timothy J.; Van Kranendonk, Martin J.; Kirkland, Christopher L.; Wyche, Stephen; Wingate, Michael T. D.; Belousova, Elena A.

    2012-09-01

    New in situ Lu-Hf data on zircons from GSWA geochronology samples has provided a unique isotopic dataset with a high temporal resolution for the Murchison Domain of the Yilgarn Craton in Western Australia. These data identify extended periods of juvenile mantle input (positive ɛHf values) into the crust firstly at c. 2980 Ma and then from c. 2820 Ma to c. 2640 Ma with significant pulses of crustal recycling at c. 2750 Ma and c. 2620 Ma (highly negative ɛHf values). Geochemical data from well-characterised granitic suites of the Murchison Domain provide additional constraints on the crustal evolution of the area and indicate a prolonged period of crustal melting and remelting at progressively shallower depths from c. 2750 to c. 2600 Ma. At c. 2760-2753 Ma, widespread calc-alkaline, intermediate to silicic volcanic rocks of the Polelle Group were erupted, accompanied by intrusion of felsic to intermediate melts derived from a variety of crustal sources that likely formed by partial mixing with basaltic melts. The intrusive rocks include a wide geochemical array of rocks in the Cullculli and Eelya suites that were sourced over a wide range of crustal depths. At this time a major departure to negative ɛHf values (<-5) occurred, indicating sampling of c. 3.80 Ga model aged source rocks as well as continued juvenile input. Post-volcanic granitic rocks emplaced between c. 2710 and c. 2600 Ma show geochemical evidence for progressive fractionation through time and derivation from an evolving crustal source. We interpret the driving force for this protracted history of mantle and crustal melting to be two mantle plumes at 2.81 and 2.72 Ga. These data document the process of cratonization through progressive melt depletion of the lower crust, progressively fractionating and shallower melts, culminating with a final phase of crustal recycling (ɛHf < - 5) and the cessation of juvenile input at c. 2630-2600 Ma during intrusion of the Bald Rock Supersuite, resulting in

  7. ∼2.5 Ga late cratonisation events in Dharwar craton: insights from the gold mineralisation ages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasa Sarma, D.; Ram Mohan, M.; McNaughton, Neal

    2013-01-01

    The history of volcanism, granitic magmatism, and gold mineralization is defined by U-Pb geochronology of magmatic zircons and hydrothermal monazite and xenotime respectively. The felsic volcanic host rocks from Hutti greenstone belt have a U-Pb zircon age of 258 ±7 Ma, about 40 m.y. older than the age of gold mineralization at 2547±10 Ma determined from hydrothermal monazite in the Hutti gold deposit. The syntectonic Kavital granitoid in the Hutti greenstone belt has a U-Pb zircon age of 2545±7 Ma, which overlaps with the timing of gold deposition and is consistent with structural interpretations. Zircon U-Pb ages for a felsic volcanic rock (2,588±10 Ma) and an intrusive granite (e''2,555±6 Ma) in the Gadag greenstone belt in the Western Dharwar Craton. In situ U-Pb dating of monazite and xenotime in gold reefs of the Gadag (2,522±6 Ma) and Ajjanahalli (2,520±9 Ma) gold deposits reveal a previously undated episode of gold mineralization at 2.52 Ga, substantially younger than the 2.55 Ga Hutti deposit in the eastern Dharwar Craton. The Hutti, Gadag and Ajjanahalli gold geochronology suggests that gold mineralization occurred throughout the Dharwar craton some 80 to 120 m.y. later than the major peak of Late Archean world-class orogenic gold mineralization in most other Archean cratons. Although gold mineralization across the craton postdates most of the magmatic activity and metamorphism at upper crustal levels, widespread thermal reworking of the lower middle crust, involving partial melting, metamorphism, and lower crustal granitoid intrusion, occurred concurrently with gold mineralization. It is likely that the large-scale hydrothermal fluid flow that produced widespread gold deposition was also part of this tectono-thermal event during the final stages of cratonization of the Dharwar Craton in southern India. (author)

  8. Radiation processing in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, G.

    2003-01-01

    Australia is a true pioneer in commercial irradiation processing as the first commercial irradiation processing plant in the world was commissioned in Melbourne in 1959. This talk will briefly discuss the establishment of the process in Australia. Steritech's three irradiation plants will be discussed in detail, especially the different engineering aspects and the effect that those differences have on irradiation performance and flexibility of operation.Steritech's new state of the art 'pallet irradiator' will be featured. The transportation and loading of Cobalt 60 into the plants will be demonstrated, and public opposition, and security issues since September 11th 2001, will be highlighted. The wide variety of products that are routinely processed at Steritechs plants will be revealed including some 'world firsts' for Australia. Finally, the talk will address the future of irradiation processing in Australia including the potential, or otherwise, of the irradiation of food items

  9. Uranium mining in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    Known uranium deposits and the companies involved in uranium mining and exploration in Australia are listed. The status of the development of the deposits is outlined and reasons for delays to mining are given

  10. Uranium production in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisk, B.G.

    1984-01-01

    The history of uranium mining and milling in Australia is briefly outlined, particular attention being given to the development of Australia's only two operating mills, Nabarlek and Ranger, and its only operating mine, Ranger. The latter project is used to illustrate the prerequisites for development of the industry and the complex roles of the various parties involved in establishing a new mine: equity holders, customers, financiers, the securities industry, trade unions, and the public. The moves currently being taken to resolve the future of the industry in Australia, particularly the examination of issues relating to Australia's role in the nuclear fuel cycle being conducted by the Australian Science and Technology Council, preclude any firm conclusions being drawn, but the various options open to the government are reviewed and the record of Australian governments and unions and the attitude of the Australian public are described. (Author) (3 tabs., fig.)

  11. Uranium mining in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackay, G.A.

    1978-01-01

    Western world requirements for uranium based on increasing energy consumption and a changing energy mix, will warrant the development of Australia's resources. By 1985 Australian mines could be producing 9500 tonnes of uranium oxide yearly and by 1995 the export value from uranium could reach that from wool. In terms of benefit to the community the economic rewards are considerable but, in terms of providing energy to the world, Australias uranium is vital

  12. Tectonics of the junction region between the East European craton and West Arctic platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baluev, A. S.; Morozov, Y. A.; Terekhov, E. N.; Bayanova, T. B.; Tyupanov, S. N.

    2016-09-01

    The region of the junction and interaction between the East European Craton (EEC) and the West Arctic Craton (WAC) is regarded as a complexly built zone or assembly of both the volumetric and dividing linear tectonic elements: the Trollfjord-Rybachi-Kanin (TRK) Lineament, the pericratonic subsidence zone of the EEC, the Karpinskii Lineament, the Murmansk Block of the Fennoscandian (Baltic) Shield, and the Kolmozero-Voronya Zone, which are briefly characterized in this paper. Evidences of thrusting have been established not only in the TRK Suture Zone and on the Rybachi Peninsula, which represent a fragment of the Timanides fold-thrust belt, but also to the southwest, in the Upper Riphean and Vendian terrigenous sequences making up the Sredni Peninsula and related to the pericratonic trough of the VEC. Two phases of fold-thrust deformations with elements of left-lateral strike-slip offset pertaining to the activity and evolution of the lineament suture dividing the Sredni and Rybachi peninsulas have been recorded. The variously oriented fault-fold systems within this fault zone are evidence for multistage deformation and can be explained by an at least twostage change in the kinematics that control displacement along the fault. The disintegrated granitic massifs of the Archean crystalline basement tectonically squeezed out in the upper crust as protrusions are localized within TRK Fault Zone. Plagiogranitic bodies, which underwent superposed fault-fold deformations of both kinematic stages, are an evidence of the vigorous tectonic event that predated folding and two-stage strike-slip displacement along the TRK Fault—by thrusting of Riphean sequences from north to south toward the Archean craton. The nappe-thrust regional structure was formed at this stage; elements of it have been recognized in the Sredni, Rybachi, and Kanin peninsulas. The main stages of tectonic evolution in the junction zone between the EEC and the WAP have been revealed and substantiated.

  13. "13 BB star" - broadband seismic array at the edge of East European Craton in Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polkowski, Marcin; Grad, Marek; Wilde-Piórko, Monika; Suchcicki, Jerzy; Arant, Tadeusz

    2014-05-01

    "13 BB star" is a dense array of 13 Reftek 151-120 broadband seismometers located in unpopulated forests in northern Poland - just on the edge of East European Craton. The shape of array was designed as a "star" with one central station and 12 station located on two circles (radius of about 30 and 60 km) around it. This geometry allows us to study seismic waves (in particular surface waves) incoming from all azimuths. Our "13 BB star" array stations are self powered (solar panels and batteries), equipped with local storage system and on-line transmission of seismic and auxiliary data using 2G and 3G cellular network. We also developed on-line application for monitoring array status (transmission, connections, power, temperature, etc.) and on-line data visualization. Main advantages of our array are: 1) 120s broadband seismometers recording with 100Hz sampling, 2) density of array - distances between neighboring stations does not exceed 30 km, 3) station placement in underground wells, 4) stations located in forests far (usually 2-3 km) from industries, roads, villages and other human activity. "13 BB star" started operating in July 2013 and since that time recorded several local, regional, and teleseismic events proving good array functionality. The scientific aim of the "13 BB star" project is development of a quantitative model of the lithosphere-asthenosphere-structure in the marginal zone of the East European Craton in northern Poland. New acquired data will be analyzed using integrated seismic methods, which will yield images of lithosphere-asthenosphere system hitherto unknown for this area. The knowledge of detailed structure of the cratonic lithosphere-asthenosphere system is crucial for the better understanding of the regional, as well as global mantle dynamics and evolution of the Earth's interior. This work was supported by NCN-grant DEC 2011/02/A/ST10/00284.

  14. Gravimetric study on the western edge of the Rio de La Plata craton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rame, G; Miro, R

    2010-01-01

    This work is about the gravimetric study on the western edge of the Rio de la Plata craton which belongs to the Gondwana fragment in the south of Brazil, Uruguay and central eastern of Argentina. The work consisted of a survey of 332 gravimetric and topographic stations extended from the western edge of the Sierra Chica de Cordoba up to 200 km east on the pampas. The gravity values observed (gobs) were obtained using a LaCoste §Rom berg gravimeter G-961 and 200T Sodin both with 0.01 mGal, referred to IGSN71 (International Gravity Standardization Net 1971) network

  15. Sulfur and lead isotope characteristics of the Pontes e Lacerda gold deposits, SW Amazonian Craton Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geraldes, M.C.; Tassinari, C.C.G.; Babinski; M; Iyer, S

    2001-01-01

    This work deals with the characterization of the S and Pb isotope signatures in sulfides from the Pontes e Lacerda mesothermal gold deposits located in the SW sector of Amazonian craton. Stable and radiogenic isotopes have played an important role in the study of ore deposited and hydrothermal processes and they are most useful when can be used together. The purpose of this study is to constrain the sources and the mechanisms of gold deposition in Pontes e Lacerda region which may be a helpful contribution to an exploratory model in the area (au)

  16. Combined teleseismic imaging of the structure of southern African cratons using P-receiver functions and P-and S-finite-frequency tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soliman, Mohammad Youssof Ahmad; Thybo, Hans; Levander, Alan

    2011-01-01

    a relatively standard crustal thickness (~38 km) with a flat and sharp Moho discontinuity within the Kaapvaal and Zimbabwe cratons. The lowest Vp/Vs values ~1.69, are found near the locations of diamondiferous kimberlite pipes in the heart of the Kaapvaal craton. We also observe strong crustal anisotropy...

  17. Recent advances in understanding the characteristics of seismogenic intraplate deformation in Australia, and the potential for using global analogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Dan; McPherson, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    Continental intraplate Australia can be divided according to crustal type in terms of seismogenic potential and fault characteristics. Three 'superdomains' are recognized, representing cratonic, non-cratonic and extended crust. In the Australian context, cratonic crust is Archaean to Proterozoic in age and has not been significantly tectonically reactivated during the Phanerozoic Eon. Non-cratonic crust includes Phanerozoic accretionary terranes and older crust significantly deformed during Phanerozoic tectonic events. Extended crust includes any crustal type that has been significantly extended during the Mesozoic and Cenozoic, and often to a lesser degree in the Paleozoic. Aulacogens and passive margins fit into this category. Cratonic crust is characterized by the thickest lithosphere and has the lowest seismogenic potential, despite all eight documented historic surface ruptures in Australia having occurred within this category. Little strain accumulation is observed on individual faults and isolated single-rupture scarps are common. Where recurrence has been demonstrated, average slip rates of only a few metres per million years are indicated. In contrast, extended crust is associated with thinner lithosphere, better connection between faults, and strain localization on faults which can result in regional relief-building. The most active faults have accumulated several hundred metres of slip under the current crustal stress regime at rates of several tens of metres per million years. Non-cratonic crust is typically intermediate in lithospheric thickness and seismogenic character. The more active faults have accumulated tens to a couple of hundreds of metres of slip, at rates of a few to a few tens of metres per million years. Across all superdomains paleoseismological data suggest that the largest credible earthquakes are likely to exceed those experienced in historic times. In general, the concept of large earthquake recurrence might only be meaningful in

  18. Composition of the lithospheric mantle in the northern part of Siberian craton: Constraints from peridotites in the Obnazhennaya kimberlite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jing; Liu, Chuan-Zhou; Kostrovisky, Sergey I.; Wu, Fu-Yuan; Yang, Jin-Hui; Chu, Zhu-Yin; Yang, Yue-Heng; Kalashnikova, Tatiana; Fan, Sheng

    2017-12-01

    The character of the lithospheric mantle of the northern Siberian craton is not well established; nearly all published data are for mantle xenoliths from a single kimberlite in the center of the craton (Udachnaya). We report major elements of the whole rock, trace elements data of clinopyroxene and Re-Os isotope and PGE concentration of mantle xenoliths from the Obnazhennaya kimberlite pipe (160 Ma) in the northern part of Siberian craton. The Obnazhennaya mantle xenoliths include spinel harzburgites, spinel dunites, spinel lherzolites and spinel-garnet lherzolite. The spinel harzburgites and dunites have refractory compositions, with 0.23-1.35 wt% Al2O3, 0.41-3.11 wt% CaO and 0.00-0.09 wt% TiO2, whereas the lherzolites (both spinel- and spinel-garnet-) have more fertile compositions, containing 2.16-6.55 wt% Al2O3, 2.91-7.55 wt% CaO and 0.04-0.15 wt% TiO2. The trace element compositions and mineralogical textures of the Obnazhennaya xenoliths indicate the occurrence of metasomatic enrichments, including carbonatite melts, basaltic melts from Siberian Trap and kimberlitic melts. The spinel harzburgites and dunites have 187Os/188Os of 0.11227-0.11637, giving a TRD age of 1.6-2.2 Ga. This suggests that old cratonic mantle still existed beneath the Obnazhennaya. In contrast, both spinel and spinel-garnet lherzolites have more radiogenic 187Os/188Os ratios (0.11931-0.17627), enriched P-PGEs. But the higher Al2O3 and Os character of these lherzolites suggest that they were not juvenile mantle but the refertilized ancient mantle. Therefore, our results suggest that the cratonic mantle beneath the northern part of Siberian craton contain both ancient and reworked lithospheric mantle, and the metasomatism may not be effective at overprinting/eroding the pre-existing lithosphere.

  19. Updating the Geologic Barcodes for South China: Discovery of Late Archean Banded Iron Formations in the Yangtze Craton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Hui; Wu, Chang-Zhi; Yang, Tao; Santosh, M; Yao, Xi-Zhu; Gao, Bing-Fei; Wang, Xiao-Lei; Li, Weiqiang

    2017-11-08

    Banded iron formations (BIFs) in Archean cratons provide important "geologic barcodes" for the global correlation of Precambrian sedimentary records. Here we report the first finding of late Archean BIFs from the Yangtze Craton, one of largest Precambrian blocks in East Asia with an evolutionary history of over 3.3 Ga. The Yingshan iron deposit at the northeastern margin of the Yangtze Craton, displays typical features of BIF, including: (i) alternating Si-rich and Fe-rich bands at sub-mm to meter scales; (ii) high SiO 2  + Fe 2 O 3total contents (average 90.6 wt.%) and Fe/Ti ratios (average 489); (iii) relative enrichment of heavy rare earth elements and positive Eu anomalies (average 1.42); (iv) and sedimentary Fe isotope compositions (δ 56 Fe IRMM-014 as low as -0.36‰). The depositional age of the BIF is constrained at ~2464 ± 24 Ma based on U-Pb dating of zircon grains from a migmatite sample of a volcanic protolith that conformably overlied the Yingshan BIF. The BIF was intruded by Neoproterozoic (805.9 ± 4.7 Ma) granitoids that are unique in the Yangtze Craton but absent in the North China Craton to the north. The discovery of the Yingshan BIF provides new constraints for the tectonic evolution of the Yangtze Craton and has important implications in the reconstruction of Pre-Nuna/Columbia supercontinent configurations.

  20. Australia's uranium export policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, R.

    1987-01-01

    In developing the policy framework for the export of uranium, successive governments have been keenly aware that, in Australia, as in most countries, there has been considerable community interest and controversy surrounding the subject of uranium. When the Australian Labor Government was elected in 1983, it commissioned the Australian Science and Technology Council (ASTEC) to report on Australia's role in the nuclear fuel cycle. In particular, the report examined: (i) Australia's nuclear safeguards arrangements, giving particular attention to the effectiveness of the bilateral and multilateral agreements and to the scope for strengthening these agreements, (ii) the opportunities for Australia through the conditions of its involvement in the nuclear fuel cycle to further advance the cause of nuclear non-proliferation having regard to the policies and practices of recipient countries, (iii) the adequacy of existing technology for the handling and disposal of waste products by consuming countries, and the ways in which Australia could further contribute to the development of safe disposal methods. (orig./UA) [de

  1. Water Recycling in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross Young

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Australia is the driest inhabited continent on earth and, more importantly, experiences the most variable rainfall of all the continents on our planet. The vast majority of Australians live in large cities on the coast. Because wastewater treatments plants were all located near the coast, it was thought that large scale recycling would be problematic given the cost of infrastructure and pumping required to establish recycled water schemes. This all changed when Australia experienced a decade of record low rainfall and water utilities were given aggressive targets to increase the volume of water recycled. This resulted in recycled water being accepted as a legitimate source of water for non-drinking purposes in a diversified portfolio of water sources to mitigate climate risk. To ensure community support for recycled water, Australia lead the world in developing national guidelines for the various uses of recycled water to ensure the protection of public health and the environment. Australia now provides a great case study of the developments in maximizing water recycling opportunities from policy, regulatory and technological perspectives. This paper explores the evolution in thinking and how approaches to wastewater reuse has changed over the past 40 years from an effluent disposal issue to one of recognizing wastewater as a legitimate and valuable resource. Despite recycled water being a popular choice and being broadly embraced, the concept of indirect potable reuse schemes have lacked community and political support across Australia to date.

  2. Abnormal lithium isotope composition from the ancient lithospheric mantle beneath the North China Craton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yan-Jie; Zhang, Hong-Fu; Deloule, Etienne; Su, Ben-Xun; Ying, Ji-Feng; Santosh, M; Xiao, Yan

    2014-03-04

    Lithium elemental and isotopic compositions of olivines in peridotite xenoliths from Hebi in the North China Craton provide direct evidence for the highly variable δ(7)Li in Archean lithospheric mantle. The δ(7)Li in the cores of olivines from the Hebi high-Mg# peridotites (Fo > 91) show extreme variation from -27 to +21, in marked deviation from the δ(7)Li range of fresh MORB (+1.6 to +5.6) although the Li abundances of the olivines are within the range of normal mantle (1-2 ppm). The Li abundances and δ(7)Li characteristics of the Hebi olivines could not have been produced by recent diffusive-driven isotopic fractionation of Li and therefore the δ(7)Li in the cores of these olivines record the isotopic signature of the subcontinental lithospheric mantle. Our data demonstrate that abnormal δ(7)Li may be preserved in the ancient lithospheric mantle as observed in our study from the central North China Craton, which suggest that the subcontinental lithospheric mantle has experienced modification of fluid/melt derived from recycled oceanic crust.

  3. Probing the edge of the West African Craton: A first seismic glimpse from Niger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Leo, Jeanette F.; Wookey, James; Kendall, J.-Michael; Selby, Neil D.

    2015-03-01

    Constraints on crustal and mantle structure of the Eastern part of the West African Craton have to date been scarce. Here we present results of P receiver function and SK(K)S wave splitting analyses of data recorded at International Monitoring System array TORD in SW Niger. Despite lacking in lateral coverage, our measurements sharply constrain crustal thickness (˜41 km), VP/VS ratio (1.69 ± 0.03), mantle transition zone (MTZ) thickness (˜247 km), and a midlithospheric discontinuity at ˜67 km depth. Splitting delay times are low with an average of 0.63 ± 0.01 s. Fast directions follow the regional surface geological trend with an average of 57 ± 1°. We suggest that splitting is due to fossil anisotropic fabrics in the crust and lithosphere, incurred during the Paleoproterozoic Eburnean Orogeny, with possible contributions from the later Pan-African Orogeny and present-day mantle flow. The MTZ appears to be unperturbed, despite the proximity of the sampled region to the deep cratonic root.

  4. Organic matter in the Neoproterozoic cap carbonate from the Amazonian Craton, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa Júnior, Gustavo R.; Nogueira, Afonso C. R.; Santos Neto, Eugênio V.; Moura, Candido A. V.; Araújo, Bruno Q.; Reis, Francisco de A. M.

    2016-12-01

    Bitumen found in Neoproterozoic carbonates from the southern Amazonian Craton, Brazil, represents a great challenge for its geochemical characterization (origin, thermal maturity and the degree of preservation) within a context of petroleum system. This organic material occurs in the basal Araras Group, considered as a Neoproterozoic cap carbonate, composed of dolostones (Mirassol d'Oeste Formation) overlaid by limestones and shales (Guia Formation). Geochemical analyses in samples of carbonate with bitumen from two open pits (Terconi and Tangará quarries) have shown low to very low total organic carbon content. Analyses of representative samples of Guia and Mirassol d'Oeste formations allowed us to obtain Gas chromatography (GC) traces and diagnostic biomarkers. n-C14 to n-C37 alkane distribution patterns in all samples suggests a major contribution of marine algae. Mid-chain monomethyl alkanes (C14sbnd C25) identified in both sets of samples were also reported in all mid to late Proterozoic oils and source rocks. However, there are significant differences among terpane distribution between the Mirassol d'Oeste and Tangará da Serra regions. The integration of organic geochemistry data and geological information suggests an indigenous origin for studied bitumen, primarily accumulated as hydrocarbon fluids migrated to carbonate rocks with higher porosity and permeability, and afterwards, altered to bitumen or migrabitumen. Although further investigations are required, this work provides a significant contribution to the knowledge about the remnant of this hypothetical Neoproterozoic petroleum system developed in the Southern Amazonian Craton.

  5. Les organismes du Précambrien terminal du craton ouest africain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Eboureau

    1983-11-01

    Full Text Available THE ORGANISMS OF THE TERMINAL PRECAMBRIAN OF THE WESTERN AFRICAN CRATON The terminal Precamhrian (Lipalian of the western African Craton, in the Adrar of Mauritania, has provided, especially in the Guelb er Richát, many organisms with an archaic structure, often very simple. It concerns some coccoides, often grouped in more or less complex spheroides according to an evolutionary pattern that could be accurately established. The understanding of fossil forms from the Precambrian is, to a great extent, the result of an interpretation made of an included ‘black spot', which one adopted for the emissions of substance produced by these forms. Compared to the present species, the Precambrian organisms recall the coccoid Bacteria and the Cyanophyceae. These microorganisms are oolithes in origin and are by no means mineral, since they contain stain-sensitive glucides with Schiff’s reagent following the action of periodic acid. These forms, usually spherical, are classified amongst the Oncolithes. These organisms are also responsible for the massive calcareous or dolomitic reefs reaching considerable thickness and containing some known stromatolites in many parts of the world. Stromatolites are Conophyton. Collenia . . . They are spherical, lamellate or columnar. These reef formations of Africa reach a thickness of 3 000 m in the Adoudounian of Collenia of the Anti-Atlas, of 600 m in the Zemmour, of 150 m in the Adrar of Mauritania, of 100 m in the cliff of Hank in the north of the Taoudeni Basin.

  6. Correlations between the North China Craton and the Indian Shield: Constraints from regional metallogeny

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caifeng Li

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The correlation between the North China Craton (NCC and the Indian Shield (IND has been a hot topic in recent years. On the basis of ore deposit databases, the NCC and IND have shown broad similarity in metallogenesis from the middle Archaean to the Mesoproterozoic. The two blocks both have three major metallogenic systems: (1 the Archaean BIF metallogenic system; (2 the Paleoproterozoic Cu-Pb-Zn metallogenic system; and (3 the Mesoproterozoic Fe-Pb-Zn system. In the north margin of the NCC and the west margin of the IND, the Archaean BIF-Au-Cu-Pb-Zn deposits had the same petrogenesis and host rocks, the Paleoproterozoic Cu-Pb-Zn deposits were controlled by active belts, and the Mesoproterozoic Fe-Pb-Zn deposits were mainly related to multi-stage rifting. Matching regional mineralization patterns and geological features has established the continental assembly referred to as “NCWI”, an acronym for the north margin of the NCC (NC and the west margin of the IND (WI during the middle Archaean to the Mesoproterozoic. In this assembly, the available geological and metallogenic data from the Eastern Block and active belts of NC fit those from the Dharwar craton and the Aravalli–Delhi–Vindhyan belt of WI, respectively. Moreover, the depositional model and environment of Paleoproterozoic metasedimentary manganese deposits in NCWI implied that the assembly may be located at low latitudes, where the conditions were favorable for dissolving ice and precipitating manganese deposits.

  7. Paleomagnetic Results of the 925 Ma Mafic Dykes From the North China Craton: Implications for the Neoproterozoic Paleogeography of Rodinia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, X.; Peng, P.

    2017-12-01

    Precambrian mafic dyke swarms are useful geologic records for Neoproterozoic paleogeographic reconstruction. We present a paleomagnetic study of the 925 Ma Dashigou dyke swarm from 3 widely separated locations in the central and northern parts of the North China Craton, which are previously unsampled regions. Stepwise thermal and alternating field demagnetizations were successful in isolating two magnetic components. The lower unblocking temperature component represents the recent Earth magnetic field. The higher unblocking temperature component is the characteristic remanent magnetization and yields positive baked contact test. Results from detailed rock magnetic measurements corroborate the demagnetization behavior and show that titanomagnetites are the main magnetic carrier in these rocks. There was no regional event that has reset the remanent magnetization of all the dyke sites, as indicated by the magnetization directions of both overlying and underlying strata. The similarity of the virtual paleomagnetic poles for the 3 sampled regions also argues that the characteristic remanent magnetizations are primary magnetization when the dykes were emplaced. The paleomagnetic poles from the Dashigou dyke swarm of the North China Craton are not similar to those of the identical aged Bahia dykes from the São Francisco Craton, Brazil, indicating that these mafic dykes may be not parts of a common regional magmatic event that affected North China Craton and NE Brazil at about 925 Ma.

  8. Density structure of the cratonic mantle in Southern Africa. 2. Correlations with kimberlite distribution, seismic velocities, and Moho sharpness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Artemieva, Irina; Vinnik, Lev

    2016-01-01

    belts.Wedemonstrate that in southern Africa, the lithosphericmantle has a general trend in mantle density increase from Archean to younger lithospheric terranes. Density of the Kaapvaal mantle is typically cratonic, with a subtle difference between the eastern, more depleted, (3.31– 3.33 g/cm3...

  9. Psychiatry in Australia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    resurgence of cultural pride in Tasmanian Aboriginal descen- dants). The 20th century. By the start of the 20th ... administered by the Royal Australian and New Zealand. College of Psychiatrists. There are over 2 000 ... psychiatry in Australia followed suit, picking up new ideas and trends. After World War I this included fever ...

  10. Mathematical Sciences in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jan; Muchatuta, Michelle; Wood, Leigh

    2009-01-01

    This article investigates enrolment trends in mathematical sciences in Australian universities. Data has been difficult to extract and the coding for mathematical disciplines has made investigation challenging. We show that the number of mathematics major undergraduates in Australia is steadily declining though the number studying…

  11. Australia: a continuing genocide?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Damien

    2010-01-01

    Debates about genocide in Australia have for the most part focussed on past frontier killings and child removal practices. This article, however, focuses on contemporary culturally destructive policies, and the colonial structures that produce them, through the analytical lens of the concept of genocide. The article begins with a discussion of the meaning of cultural genocide, locating the idea firmly in Lemkin's work before moving on to engage with the debates around Lemkin's distinction between genocide and cultural 'diffusion.' In contrast to those scholars who prefer the word 'ethnocide,' the underlying conceptual contention is that the term 'cultural genocide' simply describes a key method of genocide and should be viewed, without the need for qualification, as genocide. While direct physical killing and genocidal child removal practices may have ceased in Australia, some indigenous activists persuasively contend that genocide is a continuing process in an Australia that has failed to decolonise. Concurring with these views the article argues that the contemporary expression of continuing genocidal relations in Australia can be seen principally, and perversely, in the colonial state's official reconciliation process, native title land rights regime and the recent interventionist 'solutions' to indigenous 'problems' in the Northern Territory.

  12. Economy Profile of Australia

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank Group

    2017-01-01

    Doing Business 2018 is the 15th in a series of annual reports investigating the regulations that enhance business activity and those that constrain it. This economy profile presents the Doing Business indicators for Australia. Doing Business presents quantitative indicators on business regulation and the protection of property rights that can be compared across 190 economies; for 2018 Aust...

  13. Creating White Australia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLisky, Claire Louise; Carey, Jane

    Vedtagelsen af White Australien som regeringens politik i 1901 viser, at hvidheden var afgørende for den måde, hvorpå den nye nation i Australien blev konstitueret. Og alligevel har historikere i vid udstrækning overset hvidhed i deres studier af Australiens race fortid. 'Creating White Australia...

  14. Dream house in Australia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Michael Asgaard

    2004-01-01

    This first book in the Utzon Library, which deals with Utzon's own houses, contains a number of drawings that have not previously been published. This is especially true of the four projects for his house in Bayview, Sydney, which unfortunately never got past the drawing stage, as Utzon had left ...... Australia when the authorities finally got around to approving the project....

  15. Lexicography in Australia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract: This paper describes the current setting for lexirography in Australia by reviewing the place of English since the first British settlement began in 1788. The emergence of Australian. English as the national language is traced, and its relations with the Australian Aboriginal lan- guages touched on. The greatest ...

  16. Banknote Quality in Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Arianna Cowling; Monica Howlett

    2012-01-01

    The Reserve Bank aims to keep the quality of banknotes in circulation high to ensure that they meet the needs of the public and to make it more difficult for counterfeits to be passed or remain in circulation. This article discusses the quality of banknotes in Australia and Reserve Bank initiatives that have improved the quality of banknotes in recent years.

  17. Australia's uranium export potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosher, D.V.

    1981-01-01

    During the period 1954-71 in Australia approximately 9000 MT of U 3 O 8 was produced from five separate localities. Of this, 7000 MT was exported to the United Kingdom and United States and the balance stockpiled by the Australian Atomic Energy Commission (AAEC). Australia's uranium ore reserves occur in eight deposits in three states and the Northern Territory. However, 83% of Australia's reserves are contained in four deposits in lower Proterozoic rocks in the East Alligator River region of the Northern Territory. The AAEC has calculated Australia's recoverable uranium reserves by eliminating estimated losses during the mining and milling of the ores. AAEC has estimated reasonably assured resources of 289,000 MT of uranium at a recovery cost of less than US$80 per kilogram uranium. The companies have collectively announced a larger ore reserve than the Australian Atomic Energy Commission. This difference is a result of the companies adopting different ore reserve categories. On August 25, 1977, the federal government announced that Australia would develop its uranium resources subject to stringent environmental controls, recognition of Aboriginal Land Rights, and international safeguards. Australian uranium production should gradually increase from 1981 onward, growing to 10,000 to 15,000 MT by 1985-86. Further increases in capacity may emerge during the second half of the 1980s when expansion plans are implemented. Exploration for uranium has not been intensive due to delays in developing the existing deposits. It is likely that present reserves can be substantially upgraded if more exploration is carried out. 6 figures, 3 tables

  18. Climate Change. Solutions for Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, T.; Hoegh-Guldberg, O.; Karoly, D.; Lowe, I.; McMichael, T.; Mitchell, C.; Pearman, G.; Scaife, P.; Reynolds, A. (eds.)

    2004-06-01

    The Australian Climate Group was convened in late 2003 by WWF Australia and the Insurance Australia Group (IAG) in response to the increasing need for action on climate change in Australia. This group proposes a set of solutions to lower the risk that climate change will reach a dangerous level.

  19. Cover sequences at the northern margin of the Antongil Craton, NE Madagascar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, W.; Walsh, G.J.; De Waele, B.; Thomas, Ronald J.; Horstwood, M.S.A.; Bracciali, L.; Schofield, D.I.; Wollenberg, U.; Lidke, D.J.; Rasaona, I.T.; Rabarimanana, M.H.

    2011-01-01

    The island of Madagascar is a collage of Precambrian, generally high-grade metamorphic basement domains, that are locally overlain by unmetamorphosed sedimentary rocks and poorly understood low-grade metasediments. In the Antalaha area of NE Madagascar, two distinct cover sequences rest on high-grade metamorphic and igneous basement rocks of the Archaean Antongil craton and the Neoproterozoic Bemarivo belt. The older of these two cover sequences, the Andrarona Group, consists of low-grade metasedimentary rocks. The younger sequence, the newly defined Ampohafana Formation, consists of unmetamorphosed sedimentary rocks. The Andrarona Group rests on Neoarchaean granites and monzogranites of the Antongil craton and consists of a basal metagreywacke, thick quartzites and an upper sequence of sericite-chlorite meta-mudstones, meta-sandstones and a volcaniclastic meta-sandstone. The depositional age of the volcaniclastic meta-sandstone is constrained in age by U–Pb laser-ablation ICP-MS analyses of euhedral zircons to 1875 ± 8 Ma (2σ). Detrital zircons of Archaean and Palaeoproterozoic age represent an input from the Antongil craton and a newly defined Palaeoproterozoic igneous unit, the Masindray tonalite, which underlies the Andrarona Group, and yielded a U–Pb zircon age of 2355 ± 11 Ma (2σ), thus constraining the maximum age of deposition of the basal part of the Andrarona Group. The Andrarona Group shows a low-grade metamorphic overprint in the area near Antalaha; illite crystallinity values scatter around 0.17°Δ2Θ CuKα, which is within the epizone. The Ampohafana Formation consists of undeformed, polymict conglomerate, cross-bedded sandstone, and red mudstone. An illite crystallinity value of >0.25°Δ2Θ CuKα obtained from the rocks is typical of the diagenetic zone. Occurrences of rhyodacite pebbles in the Ampohafana Formation and the intrusion of a basaltic dyke suggest a deposition in a WSW-ENE-trending graben system during the opening of the Indian

  20. Small-scale convection at a continental back-arc to craton transition: Application to the southern Canadian Cordillera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardebol, N. J.; Pysklywec, R. N.; Stephenson, R.

    2012-01-01

    A step in the depth of the lithosphere base, associated with lateral variations in the upper mantle temperature structure, can trigger mantle flow that is referred to as edge-driven convection. This paper aims at outlining the implications of such edge-driven flow at a lateral temperature transition from a hot and thin to a cold and thick lithosphere of a continental back-arc. This configuration finds application in the southern Canadian Cordillera, where a hot and thin back-arc is adjacent to the cold and thick North American Craton. A series of geodynamical models tested the thermodynamical behavior of the lithosphere and upper mantle induced by a step in lithosphere thickness. The mantle flow patterns, thickness and heat flow evolution of the lithosphere, and surface topography are examined. We find that the lateral temperature transition shifts cratonward due to the vigorous edge-driven mantle flow that erodes the craton edge, unless the craton has a distinct high viscosity mantle lithosphere. The mantle lithosphere viscosity structure determines the impact of edge-driven flow on crustal deformation and surface heat flow; a dry olivine rheology for the craton prevents the edge from migrating and supports a persistent surface heat flow contrast. These phenomena are well illustrated at the transition from the hot Canadian Cordillera to craton that is supported by a rheological change and that coincides with a lateral change in surface heat flow. Fast seismic wave velocities observed in the upper mantle cratonward of the step can be explained as downwellings induced by the edge-driven flow.

  1. Sone megafan: A non-Himalayan megafan of craton origin on the southern margin of the middle Ganga Basin, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Sudarsan; Saha, Dipankar; Dayal, Shankar

    2015-12-01

    Researchers in the last few decades have focused on the fluvial megafans at the base of Himalayan foothills in the Ganga Basin. No major effort has so far been made to delineate any such large depositional environment at the base of the northern Indian peninsular craton at the distal parts of the basin. In this work, for the first time, we document a megafan, unusually created by the cratonic Sone River in the marginal plains south of the Ganga. The geomorphology of the megafan surface, distribution of palaeochannels, sedimentology, and areal extent of the megafan are described. The study also reconstructs the tectonic and palaeoclimatic conditions, which might have helped in sediment supply from the cratonic catchment areas of the Sone. We suggest tectonic control over the Sone River channel dynamics and development of the megafan. The oval- and fan-shaped, craton-derived sediment body covers an area of around 12,000 km2 in the marginal plains and about 9000 km2 in the central alluvium north of the Ganga River. The megafan is around 190 km long and 240 km wide. The mean slope of the megafan surface is 0.03°. An onlap of Himalayan sediments has occurred over the megafan at its toe parts caused by southward encroachment of the Ganga during the Holocene. The megafan sediments comprise brownish yellow fine to coarse sand and gravels with an admixture of carbonaceous nodules (kankars). The thickness of the megafan sediment, which directly overlies the Precambrian basement, varies from only a few meters in the south near the peninsular craton to 1000 m at the north in the central alluvial plain. The granular zones form prolific aquifer systems in an otherwise poor hydrogeological setting of the marginal plains.

  2. Combined teleseismic imaging of the structure of southern African cratons using P-receiver functions and P-and S-finite-frequency tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soliman, Mohammad Youssof Ahmad; Thybo, Hans; Levander, Alan

    2011-01-01

    a relatively standard crustal thickness (~38 km) with a flat and sharp Moho discontinuity within the Kaapvaal and Zimbabwe cratons. The lowest Vp/Vs values ~1.69, are found near the locations of diamondiferous kimberlite pipes in the heart of the Kaapvaal craton. We also observe strong crustal anisotropy......We present a seismic model of the South-African cratonic region obtained by combining receiver functions and teleseismic P and S traveltime tomography. We determined receiver functions (RFs) for 82 stations by iterative deconvolution. Based on HK analysis (Zhou and Kananmori, JGR,2001), we measure...

  3. East-China Geochemistry Database (ECGD):A New Networking Database for North China Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; Ma, W.

    2010-12-01

    North China Craton is one of the best natural laboratories that research some Earth Dynamic questions[1]. Scientists made much progress in research on this area, and got vast geochemistry data, which are essential for answering many fundamental questions about the age, composition, structure, and evolution of the East China area. But the geochemical data have long been accessible only through the scientific literature and theses where they have been widely dispersed, making it difficult for the broad Geosciences community to find, access and efficiently use the full range of available data[2]. How to effectively store, manage, share and reuse the existing geochemical data in the North China Craton area? East-China Geochemistry Database(ECGD) is a networking geochemical scientific database system that has been designed based on WebGIS and relational database for the structured storage and retrieval of geochemical data and geological map information. It is integrated the functions of data retrieval, spatial visualization and online analysis. ECGD focus on three areas: 1.Storage and retrieval of geochemical data and geological map information. Research on the characters of geochemical data, including its composing and connecting of each other, we designed a relational database, which based on geochemical relational data model, to store a variety of geological sample information such as sampling locality, age, sample characteristics, reference, major elements, rare earth elements, trace elements and isotope system et al. And a web-based user-friendly interface is provided for constructing queries. 2.Data view. ECGD is committed to online data visualization by different ways, especially to view data in digital map with dynamic way. Because ECGD was integrated WebGIS technology, the query results can be mapped on digital map, which can be zoomed, translation and dot selection. Besides of view and output query results data by html, txt or xls formats, researchers also can

  4. Strong crustal seismic anisotropy in the Kalahari Craton based on Receiver Functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thybo, Hans; Soliman, Mohammad Youssof Ahmad; Artemieva, Irina

    2015-01-01

    anisotropy in the crust of the Kalahari craton, which is 30-40% of the total anisotropy as measured by SKS splitting. Our analysis is based on calculation of receiver functions for the data from the SASE experiment which shows strong splitting between the SV and SH components. The direction of the fast axes...... is uniform within tectonic units and parallel to orogenic strike in the Limpopo and Cape fold belts. It is further parallel to the strike of major dyke swarms which indicates that a large part of the observed anisotropy is controlled by lithosphere fabrics and macroscopic effects. The directions of the fast...... axes for the crustal anisotropy are parallel to the general directions determined from SKS splitting, although the directions from our analysis of receiver functions is more homogeneous than for SKS splitting. This analysis indicates parallel fast axes in the crust and in the mantle, which suggests...

  5. A remanent and induced magnetization model of Magsat vector anomalies over the west African craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toft, P. B.; Haggerty, S. E.

    1986-01-01

    Scalar and vector Magsat anomalies over the west African craton are analyzed by forward and inverse models. A forward model of the Man shield is based on Liberia. Induced magnetization contrasts due to sporadic iron-formations and to regional metamorphic rocks, and a contrast in remanent magnetization within the lower crust are included. This combination reproduces the location, magnitude and adopted local zero level of anomalies in the initial Magsat maps. An inverse model of the Reguibat shield estimates the magnetization contrast of its lithosphere, and when magnetism is restricted to shallower than 75 km both shields can be represented by a susceptibility contrast of +0.02. A residual anomaly between the shields involves a relative deficiency of induced magnetization along with other causes.

  6. The West-African craton margin in eastern Senegal: a seismological study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorbath, Catherine; Dorbath, Louis; Gaulon, Roland; Le Page, Alain

    1983-01-01

    A vertical short period seismological array was operated for six months in earstern Senegal. Large P wave travel-time anomalies are in fairly good relation with the gravity and geological features. Two-dimensional inversion of the data shows the existence of a major vertical discontinuity extending from the surface to 150-200 km depth. The other heterogeneities are mainly located in the crust and related to specific segments of the regional geology: craton, Mauritanides and Senegalo-Mauritanian basin. The main discontinuity dipping to the east is interpreted as the trace of an old subduction slab. We propose the following geodynamical process to explain the formation of the Mauritanides orogenic belt: continental collision after opening of a back-arc marginal basin in late Precambrian and its closure until Devonian

  7. Silurian sequence stratigraphy in the North American craton, Great Lakes area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaver, R.H.; ,

    1996-01-01

    A notable circumstance of late Early through Late Silurian sedimentation on the Great Lakes area craton is that at least two and possibly three cycles of third-order duration (if eustatically considered) are recognized in basin and shallow-platform settings alike. Both virtually pure and siliciclastic-rich carbonate rocks exist in parts of platform-situated sections in contrast to siliciclastic-rich to evaporite-dominated basin sections. Knowledge of the reef history, together with evidence of incidental periodic incursions of siliciclastic sediments, permitted understanding of a regional event or sequence stratigraphy more than 15 years ago before conventional biostratigraphic and physical stratigraphic evidence became adequate to corroborate. This midwestern US and Ontario Silurian record has become strategic for testing different schools of thought that champion either tectonism or eustasy to explain cyclical sequences.

  8. EARLY STAGE OF THE CENTRAL ASIAN OROGENIC BELT BUILDING: EVIDENCES FROM THE SOUTHERN SIBERIAN CRATON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. P. Gladkochub

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The origin of the Central-Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB, especially of its northern segment nearby the southern margin of the Siberian craton (SC is directly related to development and closure of the Paleo-Asian Ocean (PAO. Signatures of early stages of the PAO evolution are recorded in the Late Precambrian sedimentary successions of the Sayan-Baikal-Patom Belt (SBPB on the southern edge of SC. These successions are spread over 2000 km and can be traced along this edge from north-west (Sayan area to south-east (Baikal area and further to north-east (Patom area. Here we present the synthesis of all available and reliable LA-ICP-MS U-Pb geochronological studies of detrital zircons from these sedimentary successions.

  9. (142)Nd evidence for an enriched Hadean reservoir in cratonic roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Dewashish; Scherer, Erik E; Mezger, Klaus

    2009-06-25

    The isotope (146)Sm undergoes alpha-decay to (142)Nd, with a half-life of 103 million years. Measurable variations in the (142)Nd/(144)Nd values of rocks resulting from Sm-Nd fractionation could therefore only have been produced within about 400 million years of the Solar System's formation (that is, when (146)Sm was extant). The (142)Nd/(144)Nd compositions of terrestrial rocks are accordingly a sensitive monitor of the main silicate differentiation events that took place in the early Earth. High (142)Nd/(144)Nd values measured in some Archaean rocks from Greenland hint at the existence of an early incompatible-element-depleted mantle. Here we present measurements of low (142)Nd/(144)Nd values in 1.48-gigayear-(Gyr)-old lithospheric mantle-derived alkaline rocks from the Khariar nepheline syenite complex in southeastern India. These data suggest that a reservoir that was relatively enriched in incompatible elements formed at least 4.2 Gyr ago and traces of its isotopic signature persisted within the lithospheric root of the Bastar craton until at least 1.48 Gyr ago. These low (142)Nd/(144)Nd compositions may represent a diluted signature of a Hadean (4 to 4.57 Gyr ago) enriched reservoir that is characterized by even lower values. That no evidence of the early depleted mantle has been observed in rocks younger than 3.6 Gyr (refs 3, 4, 7) implies that such domains had effectively mixed back into the convecting mantle by then. In contrast, some early enriched components apparently escaped this fate. Thus, the mantle sampled by magmatism since 3.6 Gyr ago may be biased towards a depleted composition that would be balanced by relatively more enriched reservoirs that are 'hidden' in Hadean crust, the D'' layer of the lowermost mantle or, as we propose here, also within the roots of old cratons.

  10. Deep Structure and Subsidence of Parnaíba Cratonic Basin, NE Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Tribaldos, V.; White, N. J.; Coelho, D. L. O.; Julià, J.

    2016-12-01

    Cratonic basins are typically underlain by thick lithosphere and slowly subside over hundreds of millions of years. Their stratigraphy consist of unconformity-bounded sequences of continental and shallow marine sedimentary rocks. The origin and evolution of these basins remain enigmatic. Here, we address this problem by carrying out an integrative study of the Parnaíba cratonic basin in NE Brazil. We analyse a 1400 km long deep seismic reflection profile crossing the basin, teleseismic earthquakes recorded by 9 broadband and 10 short-period, 3 component seismometers, 25 ancillary seismic reflection profiles, and 46 wells distributed throughout the basin. Our aim is to constrain subsidence histories in the context of crustal structure and basin architecture. Combined interpretation of the deep seismic profile and 1D velocity models calculated by joint inversion of receiver functions and surface wave dispersion curves locates the Moho at 39 km beneath the city of Teresina on the basin's eastern region. At the eastern edge of the basin, the Moho lies at 37 km beneath Precambrian basement. In the centre of the basin, the Moho lies at 37 km. Beneath Teresina, an increase in S wave velocity at 30 km coincides with mid-crustal reflections on the deep seismic profile. This feature is interpreted as the top of a high-velocity body within the crust. Ancillary seismic profiles show that the stratigraphy is divisible into packages of undisturbed reflections separated by bright, rugged reflections that resemble buried paleolandscapes. Correlation of seismic profiles with well logs shows that these surfaces are basin-wide erosional unconformities that are observable in outcrop. Backstripped and water-loaded subsidence curves show exponential decrease in subsidence over the last 400 Ma. This background subsidence is punctuated by departures from the long-term trend at times when unconformities occur, which we interpret as mild regional uplift events.

  11. Crustal accretion and exhumation of the Rio de la Plata Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girelli, T. J.; Chemale, F., Jr.; Lavina, E.; Laux, J. H.; Bongiolo, E.; Lana, C.

    2017-12-01

    The Rio de la Plata is one key area for the reconstruction of the Paleoproterozoic Supercontinent in Western Gondwana. We present U-Pb-Hf isotopes, chemistry on minerals and whole-rock geochemistry from para and orthogneisses of the Santa Maria Chico Granulite Complex, one of the Rio de la Plata fragments partially affected by the Brasiliano Orogeny. U-Pb and Lu-Hf isotopes allowed the characterization of two main events: an oceanic juvenile crustal accretion (i) 2430 - 2290 Ma (ɛHf(t) -3.17 to +7.00); a continental arc (ii) 2240 - 2120 Ma (ɛHf(t)= -4 to +2.4). We recognized two main high-grade metamorphic events in the region linked to an arc volcanic setting (830 - 870 °C - 6.7 - 7.2 kbar, 2.3 Ga) and later to continent-continent collision (770 - 790 °C and 8.7 - 9.1 kbar, 2.1 - 2.0 Ga). The development of orogenic sedimentary basins (fore-arc and intra-arc) occurred during the last cycle with the maximum depositional age of 2.12 Ga and were metamorphosed during 2.06 Ga main granulitic event. The granulitic rocks were cut by 1.8 Ga alkaline granitic dikes related to crustal extension recognized in the different segments of the craton and widespread in the adjacent paleoplates at the time. The present data point to that Paleoproterozoic granulitic rocks of the Santa Maria Chico Granulite Complex and adjacent Nico Pérez and Rivera terranes, formed in a multi-stage volcanic arc to continental collision environment along 370 Ma (2430 to 2060 Ma). These terranes were amalgamated during the Paleoproterozoic to the core of the Rio de la Plata Craton as part of Columbia Supercontinent and later partially reworked during the amalgamation of Western Gondwana in the Neoproterozoic.

  12. Mineral industry in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parbo, S.A.

    1982-01-01

    The paper reviews the history and growth of the mineral industry in Australia and its significance to the nation's economic growth and overseas trade, particularly over the last twenty years during which time production of coal, iron ore, manganese and mineral sands has increased greatly and new discoveries of petroleum, bauxite and nickel have given rise to major new industries. Australia ranks fourteenths in the value of world trade and is among the world's largest exporters of alumina, iron ore, mineral sands, coal, lead, zinc and nickel. Some details of production, processing and exports of the major minerals are given. Comment is made on the policies and roles of the six State Governments and the Federal Government in respect of ownership and control of the mining, processing and exporting of both energy and non-energy minerals. (orig.) [de

  13. Pleistocene Paleoart of Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert G. Bednarik

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Pleistocene rock art is abundant in Australia, but has so far received only limited attention. Instead there has been a trend, begun over a century ago, to search for presumed depictions of extinct megafauna and the tracks of such species. All these notions have been discredited, however, and the current evidence suggests that figurative depiction was introduced only during the Holocene, never reaching Tasmania. Nevertheless, some Australian rock art has been attributed to the Pleistocene by direct dating methods, and its nature implies that a significant portion of the surviving corpus of rock art may also be of such age. In particular much of Australian cave art is of the Ice Age, or appears to be so, and any heavily weathered or patinated petroglyphs on particularly hard rocks are good candidates for Pleistocene antiquity. On the other hand, there is very limited evidence of mobiliary paleoart of such age in Australia.

  14. WAVFH delegates' reports: Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scanlan, W.A.

    1986-01-01

    Radiation measuring and control before Chernobyl: Continuous measurements of fallout in different parts of Australia, including the food producing areas, have been made since the mid 1950s. Levels have decreased rapidly since the cessation of atmospheric nuclear tests in the Southern Hemisphere in 1974 and in the Northern Hemisphere in 1980. Measurements of concentrations of radionuclides arising from fallout were made for the major groups of foods affected by the radioactive contaminants, starting in the 1950s and continuing until concentrations were so low that further effort in measurement was not warranted, i.e., less than 0.1 Bq/kg or 0.1 Bq/l. Changes in the concentrations of radionuclides in foods follow the same trends as the fallout levels. Based on the low levels of fallout measured in Australia since the 1950s, and taking into account the extremely low levels during the past decade, the concentrations of radionuclides arising from fallout in foods grown and processed in Australia are extremely small. Results from the fall-out from Chernobyl. Since the Chernobyl accident, measurements of the concentrations of 137 Cs in a variety of foodstuffs grown in Australia have been made, mainly for export purposes. A summary of the results of these measurements is given in Table 111 of Attachment 2. No 134 Cs has been detected, nor is it likely to be. By taking into account these measurements, the earlier measurements of foodstuffs, predictive modelling values and the very low levels of fall-out in deposit and in air, it is concluded that the concentrations of 137 Cs in all foodstuffs grown in Australia are extremely small. Accordingly, their consumption would result in no significant risk to the health of a population. With world atmospheric conditions being as they are, it will probably be 12 to 18 months before any fallout reaches Australia. Even if some fall-out does occur, it will be minimal and should not significantly increase our very low natural levels

  15. Australia's nuclear safeguards agreements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This is a compilation of the bilateral agreements concluded by Australia concerning co-operation in the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. The publication also includes the agreement with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) for the application of safeguards in connection with the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) and the agreement with EURATOM on transfers of nuclear materials from Australia to the European Atomic Energy Community. The other agreements were concluded with the following countries: Canada, Egypt, Finland, France, Japan, Republic of Korea, Philippines, Singapore, Sweden, Switzerland, USSR, United Kingdom and United States. They concern transfers of nuclear materials and equipment, research and development, exchange of information, etc. All contain provisions on safeguards, physical protection and restrictions on exports to third countries [fr

  16. Australia Online; Borderless University

    OpenAIRE

    ERDINC, Zeynep

    2015-01-01

    Around the world distance education is playing an important roll in the education sector. Many countries are in the process of developing and improving their distance education projects. One of the projects being online education has improved information delivery and development op International education. Distance education has been available in Australia for many years. More than 30 higher education institutions within the country now use the program. The purpose of the development of di...

  17. Australia's energy profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickson, A.

    1999-01-01

    Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics (ABARE)'s biennial fuel and electricity survey provides a comprehensive database with which is possible to examine recent trends and developments in Australia's energy market. Some key development are outlined in this article. While energy consumption in Australia has been increasing steadily since 1973-74, substantial changes have occurred 'behind the scenes' in terms of the states and sectors in which energy is consumed and the overall fuel mix. Historically, the south-eastern states of New South Wales and Victoria have accounted for the largest shares of total energy consumption In recent years, however, the dominance of New South Wales and Victoria (and particularly New South Wales) has come under pressure from the states of Queensland. Western Australia, and to a lesser extent, the Northern Territory. Each of these states has experienced rapid growth in energy consumption, due mainly to a number of strongly growing energy intensive industries, particularly in the mining and minerals processing sectors. High economic and population growth over this period were also important factors. An increase in the share of natural gas- and a corresponding decline in the share of crude oil - is the most evident change to have occurred in the fuel mix since 1973-1974. However, since 1993, the trend has changed, the share of coal (and particularly brown coal) increased strongly, making it the primary fuel source for thermal electricity generation. This recent shift has been driven by developments in Queensland and Victoria

  18. Australia's atomic conspiracy theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binnie, A.

    2001-01-01

    The author questions claims by the Newcastle University historian Wayne Reynolds in his book 'Australia's Bid for the Bomb', that the impetus behind the Snowy Mountains Scheme was to provide a secure source of power for the enrichment of uranium and production of heavy water so that Australia could produce its own atomic bombs. Reynolds also argued that the Australian Atomic Energy Commission (AAEC) was set up so that Australia had a trained scientific workforce to produce plutonium for the bomb. While the book is well researched, Reynolds does not seem to understand the principles of basic science and engineering. After the Second World War, a manufacturing and industrial base with a skilled and trained workforce was needed so it could be converted to war or defence manufacturing when the need arose. This new manufacturing community would require electrical power to sustain it. Hydroelectricity and atomic energy could help provide these needs. Even though war was still raging, Prime Minister John Curtin looked ahead and set up a Department of Post-War Reconstruction. It was through this department that the Snowy Mountains Scheme would be established. Curtin did not live to see this. He died in 1945 but his successor, Ben Chifley, continued the vision. The author believes, an understanding of the science behind these developments and an appreciation of how how humans interact with each others when it comes to getting something they want is likely to give a more balanced view of the past

  19. Psychiatry in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M Kaplan

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Psychiatry has been practised in Australia in one form or another since the peopling of the continent, originally with the practices of the Aboriginal shamans, and later with the psychiatric treatment necessitated by convict transportation. Over most of the last half-century psychiatry has been administered by the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists. There are over 2 000 psychiatrists in Australia, and num- bers are expected to increase in future. As in many other countries, there is ongoing pressure between the private and public sectors, with endemic under- funding of public and community services. Despite its small number of practitioners and relative isola- tion from major centres, Australian psychiatry has a distin- guished record in the field of research. The most famous dis- covery, by John Cade, was the use of lithium for treatment of mania. Recently governments at state and federal level have acknowledged the effect of psychiatric illness on patients and their families. This has led to the development of pro- grammes to improve public information and eliminate preju- dice. It is anticipated that the practice of psychiatry will flourish in Australia and that the country will remain a leading centre of excellence in psychiatric research and training.

  20. Hadean diamonds in zircon from Jack Hills, Western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menneken, Martina; Nemchin, Alexander A; Geisler, Thorsten; Pidgeon, Robert T; Wilde, Simon A

    2007-08-23

    Detrital zircons more than 4 billion years old from the Jack Hills metasedimentary belt, Yilgarn craton, Western Australia, are the oldest identified fragments of the Earth's crust and are unique in preserving information on the earliest evolution of the Earth. Inclusions of quartz, K-feldspar and monazite in the zircons, in combination with an enrichment of light rare-earth elements and an estimated low zircon crystallization temperature, have previously been used as evidence for early recycling of continental crust, leading to the production of granitic melts in the Hadean era. Here we present the discovery of microdiamond inclusions in Jack Hills zircons with an age range from 3,058 +/- 7 to 4,252 +/- 7 million years. These include the oldest known diamonds found in terrestrial rocks, and introduce a new dimension to the debate on the origin of these zircons and the evolution of the early Earth. The spread of ages indicates that either conditions required for diamond formation were repeated several times during early Earth history or that there was significant recycling of ancient diamond. Mineralogical features of the Jack Hills diamonds-such as their occurrence in zircon, their association with graphite and their Raman spectroscopic characteristics-resemble those of diamonds formed during ultrahigh-pressure metamorphism and, unless conditions on the early Earth were unique, imply a relatively thick continental lithosphere and crust-mantle interaction at least 4,250 million years ago.

  1. Apatite fission track dating of the Northern Western Shield, Western Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, U.D.; Kohn, B.P.; Gleadow, A.J.W.

    1999-01-01

    Full text:The investigation of the thermotectonic evolution of the northern part of the Precambrian Western Shield of Western Australia using apatite fission track (AFT) thermochronology is the main focus of this study. The study area encompasses Precambrian rocks of the Pilbara Craton and the northern part of the Yilgarn Craton including the Narryer Gneiss Complex. AFT data, mostly from the Archaean cratons reveal cooling ages ranging between 260±8 Ma and 400±20 Ma. Mean confined horizontal track lengths fall between ∼12 and 13 μm with standard deviations ranging from 1.1-2.2 μm. Forward modelling of time-temperature history paths for representative samples reveals a period of regional cooling of at least ∼50 deg C in the late Palaeozoic. Most paths also show a second period of cooling of 25 deg C from temperatures of ∼80-85 deg C. This later cooling episode occurred in the Mesozoic but its timing is less well constrained. Assuming that the average present day geothermal gradient of ∼18±2 deg C per km - 1 was prevalent since the late Palaeozoic, then the minimum of ∼75 deg C of cooling predicted by the fission track modelling suggests overall denudation of at least ∼ 3.7-4.6 km of section since that time. Phanerozoic basins (Perth, Carnarvon and Canning) adjacent to the north and west of the northern Western Shield mostly continue offshore and form complex structures containing up to ∼ 15 km of predominantly clastic sediments of early Ordovician to late Cretaceous age. The basins are likely to have been depocentres for much of the detritus derived from the denudation inferred from the cooling recorded by the AFT. Possible causative events which could be linked to the observed late Palaeozoic cooling are tectonism related to the collision of Gondwanaland with Laurussia in Carboniferous time forming the supercontinent Pangea or a possible far-field effect related to the Alice Springs Orogeny. Further low temperature thermochronological studies

  2. Australia's polio risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Nicolee; Paterson, Beverley J; Durrheim, David N

    2014-06-30

    Australia, like all polio-free countries and regions, remains at risk of a wild poliovirus importation until polio is eradicated globally. The most probable route of importation will be through a traveller arriving in Australia either by air or sea from a polio-endemic or re-infected country. While the overall risk of an imported wild poliovirus infection leading to transmission within Australia is assessed as being low, some areas of the country have been identified as at increased risk. Local areas with relatively high arrivals from polio endemic countries, areas of low vaccination coverage and the potential for transmission to occur when these 2 factors are combined, were identified by this review as Australia's main polio risk. The risk of an importation event leading to locally acquired cases is mitigated by generally high polio vaccination coverage in Australia. This high coverage extends to residents of the Torres Strait Islands who are in close proximity to Papua New Guinea, a country identified as at high risk of poliovirus transmission should an importation occur. In 2012, all states and territories had vaccination coverage of greater than 90% at 1 year of age and all exceeded 93% at 2 years of age. Population immunity to wild poliovirus type 1, which remains the major cause of paralysis globally, has been estimated at 82%. This is sufficient to prevent outbreaks of this type in Australia. Of the 211 eligible non-polio acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) cases classified between 2008 and 2011, 91% (193) were vaccinated against polio at least once. High quality surveillance for AFP, which is supplemented by sentinel enterovirus and environmental surveillance activities, gives confidence that an imported case would be detected and appropriate public health action would ensue. This work is copyright. You may download, display, print and reproduce the whole or part of this work in unaltered form for your own personal use or, if you are part of an organisation, for

  3. Australia needs nuclear education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemeny, L.G.

    1999-01-01

    A matter of increasing concern in Australian society is the absence of a Commonwealth Government policy on the peaceful use of nuclear energy. The lack of University level teaching facilities in nuclear energy engineering is also perceived to be an issue of national importance which must be addressed. More and more Australians deeply regret the lack of informed realism and scientific integrity which goes into endless debates on the technical, environmental and societal aspects of nuclear energy. Within the Australian community such important issues as uranium mining in Kakadu National Park, research reactor operation at Lucas Heights, the establishment of an international nuclear waste repository in Western Australia or the domestic use of nuclear electricity generation to minimise Australia's greenhouse emissions are still being debated at the intellectual level of radio talkback programs. Decision making in such areas deserves the disciplines of appropriate tertiary education. The Australian community has a right to know the relative risks and the environmental impacts of various fuel cycles as well as the technical limitations, true costs and energy audits of the 'alternative' energy technologies. Presently the Commonwealth of Australia is without a single School of Nuclear Engineering operating at a University level. Such a situation is believed to be unprecedented amongst the developed countries of the world. It is viewed with a measure of incredulity by the academic, diplomatic and political communities of the 'developing' countries of East Asia and the Pacific Basin. Many of these have a massive investment in the growth of peaceful nuclear energy and nuclear science and technology within their borders. Copyright (1999) Australian Institute of Energy News

  4. Australia's approach to monetary policy

    OpenAIRE

    Jane Sneddon Little

    2002-01-01

    According to Australia's Reserve Bank Act, the central bank's broad policy objectives include maintaining the stability of the currency, full employment, and the economic prosperity and welfare of the people of Australia. In 1993 the Reserve Bank of Australia adopted a specific, and thus transparent, inflation target as its operating objective; it aims to keep overall inflation between 2 percent and 3 percent on average over the business cycle.

  5. Australia and Gondwanaland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichert, C.

    1959-01-01

    Along the western margin of the Australian continent there exist four major sedimentary basins, filled with predominantly marine rocks from Cambrian to Tertiary in age, and up to 40,000 feet thick. Seaward these basins continue into depressions recognizable in the continental shelf and even the continental slope. Their very presence, the nature of their sediments and the composition and relationships of their fossil faunas indicate the existence of an open ocean to the west of Australia since early Paleozoic time. Composition of the Australian fossil land vertebrate faunas suggests isolation of the Australian continent since at least Permian time. ?? 1959 Ferdinand Enke Verlag Stuttgart.

  6. Australia's radiation protection standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    In Australia, public exposure to ionizing radiation above background is considered to be negligible. Average occupational exposures are about 0.5 millisievert per year, although there are some specialized industries and professions where they are much higher. The National Health and Medical Research Council has therefore adopted a position similar to that of the International Commission on Radiological Protection. For the moment, no revision of exposure limits is recommended, but users are remined of their responsibility to ensure that exposures are kept low, particularly in those workplaces where significant exposures take place

  7. 2.6-2.7 Ga continental crust growth in Yangtze craton, South China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, K.; Gao, S.; Wu, Y.

    2013-12-01

    A combined study of zircon U-Pb and Lu-Hf isotopes and whole rock major and trace elements and Sr-Nd isotopes has been conducted for 10 granitic and tonalitic-trondhjemitic-granodioritic (TTG) gneisses from the Kongling terrain, the only known Archean microcontinent in the Yangtze craton, South China. The results reveal a significant magmatic event at ~2.6-2.7 Ga (Fig. 1), in addition to the previously reported ~2.9 Ga and ~3.2-3.3 Ga magmatism (Zhang et al., 2006; Jiao et al., 2009; Gao et al., 2011). The ~2.6-2.7 Ga rocks show relatively high REE (530-1074 ppm), apparently negative Eu anomaly (Eu/Eu* = 0.22-0.35), low #Mg (19.51-22.63) and low LaN/YbN (10.3-24.2). Besides, they have high K-feldspar proportion and relatively evaluated (K2O+Na2O)/CaO, TFeO/MgO, Zr, Nb, Ce and Y contents. Their 10000 × Ga/Al ratios range between 3.00 and 3.54. All these features suggest that the protoliths of these gneisses are A-type granites. Most of the ~2.6-2.7 Ga zircon grains have ɛHf(t) values >0 (up to 7.93, close to the depleted mantle value). This clearly indicates a considerably higher proportion of new crustal components in the ~2.6-2.7 Ga granitoids compared to the ~3.2-3.3 Ga and ~2.9 Ga TTGs. Our results support the conclusion of worldwide studies of igneous and detrital zircons that age peaks at 2.65-2.76 Ga represent increases in the volume of juvenile continental crust. The present study also confirms the existence of the two older magmatic events in the Kongling terrain. Both whole rock ɛNd(t) values (-3.74 to 1.59) and the zircon ɛHf(t) values (-11.18 to 3.55) for the ~2.9 Ga TTG and the Hf isotopes of ~3.2-3.3 Ga igneous zircons (-7.37 to 3.12) are chondritic or subchondritic, suggesting that they were mainly generated by reworking of older rocks with a small amount of new crustal additions. References Gao, S., Yang, J., Zhou, L., Li, M., Hu, Z.C., Guo, J.L., Yuan, H.L., Gong, H.J., Xiao, G.Q., Wei, J.Q., 2011. Age and growth of the Archean Kongling terrain

  8. Deep Structure and Subsidence History of Parnaíba Cratonic Basin, NE Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Tribaldos, Verónica; White, Nicky; Coelho, Diogo; Julià, Jordi

    2017-04-01

    Cratonic sedimentary basins constitute some of the largest sedimentary basins on Earth. They are typically underlain by thick (i.e. 200 km) lithosphere and are characterized by slow, punctuated subsidence that occurs over hundreds of millions of years. Their stratigraphic records mainly consist of sequences of continental and shallow marine sedimentary rocks bounded by basin-wide erosional unconformities. Despite the importance of these basins, their origin and evolution remain poorly understood, mainly due to scarcity of well-constrained geological and geophysical data. In order to address this problem, an integrative study of the Parnaíba Cratonic basin in NE Brazil has been carried out within the framework of a multidisciplinary investigation. Here, we combine the analysis of a 1400 km long deep seismic reflection profile that crosses the basin, teleseismic earthquakes recorded by 12 broadband and 10 short-period, 3 component seismometers, 25 ancillary seismic reflection profiles, and 46 wells distributed across the basin. Our main goal is to constrain the basin's subsidence history in the context of its deep crustal structure and sedimentary architecture. Joint inversion of receiver functions and Rayleigh wave group dispersion measurements has been used to calculate 1D shear wave velocity models for crust and upper mantle beneath each seismic station. Combined interpretation of these velocity profiles and the deep seismic reflection profile has been carried out. Our results suggest Moho depths of approximately 35 km and 38 km beneath Precambrian basement east and west of the Parnaíba basin, respectively. In contrast, the Moho occurs at approximately 39 km beneath the city of Teresina, located on the eastern region of the basin, and at depths between 40 km and 42 km beneath the central and western areas of the basin. These results are combined to construct a sub-surface model underneath Parnaíba, and gravity modeling is used to test its validity. Average

  9. Paleomagnetism and geochronological studies on a 450 km long 2216 Ma dyke from the Dharwar craton, southern India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraju, E.; Parashuramulu, V.; Kumar, Anil; Srinivas Sarma, D.

    2018-01-01

    Paleomagnetic and geochronological studies were carried out on a ∼ 450 km long (from 17 sites) N-S striking Paleoproterozoic dyke swarm exposed along a natural crustal cross section of about 10 km (increasing from North to South) in the Dharwar Craton, to study the characteristics of paleomagnetism and geochronology in vertical dimension. U-Pb/Pb-Pb dating on baddeleyite gives a crystallisation age of 2216.0 ± 0.9 Ma for long dyke AKLD. Paleomagnetic data from this well dated ∼ 2216 Ma dyke swarm in Dharwar Craton are of excellent quality. High coercivity and high blocking temperature components are carried by single domain magnetite and show dual polarity remanence directions. Combined normal and reverse polarity remanences on AKLD and other N-S dykes define the most reliable paleomagnetic pole for ∼ 2216 Ma at latitude 36°S and longitude 312°E (A95 = 7°). Though paleomagnetic data is unavailable on other N-S dykes below the Cuddapah basin, high precision geochronology suggest that they are of similar age within errors. Though there is a variation in the crustal depth of Dharwar craton from north to south, consistent Pb-Pb/U-Pb baddeleyite geochronology and paleomagnetic studies along the AKLD established its continuity and preservation along its entire strike length. The virtual geomagnetic poles of these sites confirm a stable remanence and are almost identical to the previously reported paleomagnetic pole and also supported by positive reversal test. Positive paleomagnetic reversal test on these dykes signify that the remanent magnetization is primary and formed during initial cooling of the intrusions. Updated apparent polar wander path of Dharwar craton indicates relatively low drift rate during 2.21-2.08 Ga interval. Magnetogranulometry and SEM studies show that remanent magnetization in this dyke was carried by single domain magnetite residing within silicate minerals.

  10. Neoarchean history of the conjunction zone between the Belomorian mobile belt and the Karelian craton, Baltic shield: new isotopic data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseev, N.L.; Balaganskij, V.V.; Zinger, T.F.; Levchenkov, O.A.; Glebovitskij, V.A.; Makeev, A.F.; Yakovleva, S.Z.

    2004-01-01

    To study the neoarchean magmatism history of the conjunction zone between the Belomorian mobile belt and the Karelian craton one carried out U-Pb-isotope dating of volcanic zircons of the Kukas lake region. At the mentioned region one detected two pulses of the neoarchean volcanism that took place about 2877±45-2680.7±3.6 million years ago [ru

  11. Precambrian Processes, the Trans-Hudson Orogen, and Cratonic Keels: Insights From Teleseismic Tomography in Northern Hudson Bay, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddell, M. V.; Bastow, I. D.; Gilligan, A.; Kendall, J. M.; Darbyshire, F. A.

    2015-12-01

    Earth conditions in the Precambrian, and their effect upon the formation of cratons and orogenies from that era, are not fully understood. For example, the precise onset of modern plate tectonics remains ambiguous; it has been hypothesised to have begun anywhere from ~4.1Ga (Hopkins, 2008) to ~1Ga (Stern, 2005). Also, the exceptional depth to which fast wave-speed and geoid anomalies extend beneath some cratons points to the existence of thick "cratonic keels", the origin of which remains unexplained. To improve our understanding of the early Earth processes, geological evidence preserved within ancient plates that have remained largely unchanged since the Precambrian can be used. The rocks of northern Hudson Bay include Archean domains, the Paleoproterozoic Trans-Hudson Orogen (THO), and lie atop one of the largest cratonic keels on Earth (Bastow et al., 2013), making this region an ideal laboratory for study of Precambrian processes. Here, we use seismological data recorded at Canadian POLARIS and Hudson Bay Lithospheric Experiment (HuBLE) stations to perform a relative arrival-time study of northern Hudson Bay region and the THO. Waveforms are aligned using the adaptive stacking routine of Rawlinson et al. (2004), and inversions are produced using the Fast Marching Tomography (FMTOMO) inversion code of Rawlinson et al. (2006). Our inversions provide an improved velocity model of the lithosphere and upper mantle of northern Canada, suggesting updated boundaries between lithospheric blocks at mantle depths and constituting new body-wave constraints on their structure. The results are used to address a number of outstanding questions regarding the processes that formed the THO and the Laurentian Keel of North America.

  12. Paleoproterozoic volcanism in the southern Amazon Craton (Brazil): insight into its origin and deposit textures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roverato, Matteo; Juliani, Caetano

    2014-05-01

    The Brazilian Amazon craton hosts a primitive volcanic activity that took place in a region completely stable since 1.87 Ga. The current geotectonic context is very different from what caused the huge volcanism that we are presenting in this work. Volcanic rocks in several portions of the Amazon craton were grouped in the proterozoic Uatumã supergroup, a well-preserved magmatic region that covers an area with more than 1,200,000 km2. In this work one specific region is considered, the southwestern Tapajos Gold province (TGP) that is part of the Tapajós-Parina tectonic province (Tassinari and Macambri, 1999). TGP consists of metamorphic, igneous and sedimentary sequences resulted from a ca. 2.10-1.87 Ga ocean-continent orogeny. High-K andesites to felsic volcanic sequences and plutonic bodies, andesitic/rhyolitic epiclastic volcanic rocks and A-type granitic intrusions form part of this volcanism/plutonism. In this work we focus particularly our attention on welded, reomorphic and lava-like rhyolitic ignimbrites and co-ignimbrite brecchas. Fiamme texture of different welding intensity, stretched obsidian fragments, "glassy folds", relict pumices, lithics, rotated crystals of feldspars, bipiramidal quarz, and devetrification spherulites are the common features represented by our samples. Microscopical images are provided to characterize the deposits analyzed during this preliminary research. The lack of continuum outcrops in the field made more difficult the stratigraphic reconstruction, but the superb preservation of the deposits, apparently without any metamorphic evidences (not even low-grade), permits a clearly description of the textures and a differentiation between deposits. A detailed exploration of this ancient andesitic and rhyolitic volcanic activity could contribute greatly to the knowledge of the Amazon territory and in particular for the recognition of the various units that form the supergroup Uatumã, especially in relation to different eruptive

  13. Emplacement and deformation of the A-type Madeira granite (Amazonian Craton, Brazil)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siachoque, Astrid; Salazar, Carlos Alejandro; Trindade, Ricardo

    2017-04-01

    The Madeira granite is one of the Paleoproterozoic (1.82 Ga) A-type granite intrusions in the Amazonian Craton. It is elongated in the NE-SW direction and is composed of four facies. Classical structural techniques and the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) method were applied to the study of its internal fabric. Magnetic susceptibility measurements, thermomagnetic curves, remanent coercivity spectra, optical microscopy and SEM (scanning electron microscopy) analyses were carried out on the earlier and later facies of the Madeira granite: the rapakivi granite (RG) and the albite granite (AG) respectively. The last one is subdivided into the border albite granite (BAG) and the core albite granite (CAG) subfacies. AMS fabric pattern is controlled by pure magnetite in all facies, despite significant amounts of hematite in the BAG subfacies. Microstructural observations show that in almost all sites, magnetic fabric correlates to magmatic state fabrics that are defined by a weak NE-SW orientation of mafic and felsic silicates. However, strain mechanisms in both subfacies of AG also exhibit evidence for solid-state deformation at high to moderate temperatures. Pegmatite dyke, strike slip fault (SFA-B-C), hydrothermal vein, normal fault (F1-2) and joint (J) structures were observed and their orientation and kinematics is consistent with the magmatic and solid-state structures. Dykes, SFA-C and F1, are usually orientated along the N70°E/40°N plane, which is nearly parallel to the strike of AMS and magmatic foliations. In contrast, veins, SFB, F2 and some J are oriented perpendicular to the N70°E trend. Kinematic analysis in these structures shows evidence for a dextral sense of movement in the system in the brittle regime. The coherent structural pattern for the three facies of Madeira granite suggests that the different facies form a nested pluton. The coherence in orientation and kinematics from magmatic to high-temperature solid-state, and into the brittle

  14. Metasomatic Control of Water in Garnet and Pyroxene from Kaapvaal Craton Mantle Xenoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peslier, Anne H.; Woodland, Alan B.; Bell, David R.; Lazarov, Marina; Lapen, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR) and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) were used to determine water, rare earth (REE), lithophile (LILE), and high field strength (HFSE) element contents in garnet and pyroxene from mantle xenoliths, Kaapvaal craton, southern Africa. Water enters these nominally anhydrous minerals as protons bonded to structural oxygen in lattice defects. Pyroxene water contents (150-400 ppm in clinopyroxene; 40-250 ppm in orthopyroxene) correlate with their Al, Fe, Ca and Na and are homogeneous within a mineral grains and a xenolith. Garnets from Jagersfontein are chemically zoned for Cr, Ca, Ti and water contents. Garnets contain 0 to 20 ppm H2 Despite the fast diffusion rate of H in mantle m inerals, the observations above indicate that the water contents of mantle xenolith minerals were not disturbed during kimberlite entrainment and that the measured water data represent mantle values. Trace elements in all minerals show various degrees of light REE and LILE enrichments indicative of minimal to strong metasomatism. Water contents of peridotite minerals from the Kaapvaal lithosphere are not related to the degree of depletion of the peridotites. Instead, metasomatism exerts a clear control on the amount of water of mantle minerals. Xenoliths from each location record specific types of metasomatism with different outcomes for the water contents of mantle minerals. At pressures . 5.5 GPa, highly alkaline melts metasomatized Liqhobong and Kimberley peridotites, and increased the water contents of their olivine, pyroxenes and garnet. At higher pressures, the circulation of ultramafic melts reacting with peridotite resulted in co-variation of Ca, Ti and water at the edge of garnets at Jagersfontein, overall decreasing their water content, and lowered the water content of olivines at Finsch Mine. The calculated water content of these melts varies depending on whether the water content of the peridotite

  15. 3D Crustal Velocity Structure Model of the Middle-eastern North China Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Y.; Wang, F.; Lin, J.; Wei, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Lithosphere thinning and destruction in the middle-eastern North China Craton (NCC), a region susceptible to strong earthquakes, is one of the research hotspots in solid earth science. Up to 42 wide-angle reflection/refraction deep seismic sounding (DSS) profiles have been completed in the middle-eastern NCC, we collect all the 2D profiling results and perform gridding of the velocity and interface depth data, and build a 3D crustal velocity structure model for the middle-eastern NCC, named HBCrust1.0, using the Kriging interpolation method. In this model, four layers are divided by three interfaces: G is the interface between the sedimentary cover and crystalline crust, with velocities of 5.0-5.5 km/s above and 5.8-6.0 km/s below. C is the interface of the upper and lower crust, with velocity jump from 6.2-6.4 km/s to 6.5-6.6 km/s. M is the interface between the crust and upper mantle, with velocity 6.7-7.0 km/s at the crust bottom and 7.9-8.0 km/s on mantle top. Our results show that the first arrival time calculated from HBCust1.0 fit well with the observation. It also demonstrates that the upper crust is the main seismogenic layer, and the brittle-ductile transition occurs at depths near interface C. The depth of interface Moho varies beneath the source area of the Tangshan earth-quake, and a low-velocity structure is found to extend from the source area to the lower crust. Based on these observations, it can be inferred that stress accumulation responsible for the Tangshan earthquake may have been closely related to the migration and deformation of the mantle materials. Comparisons of the average velocities of the whole crust, the upper and the lower crust show that the average velocity of the lower crust under the central part of the North China Basin (NCB) in the east of the craton is obviously higher than the regional average, this high-velocity probably results from longterm underplating of the mantle magma. This research is founded by the Natural Science

  16. A historical overview of Moroccan magmatic events along northwest edge of the West African Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikenne, Moha; Souhassou, Mustapha; Arai, Shoji; Soulaimani, Abderrahmane

    2017-03-01

    Located along the northwestern edge of the West African Craton, Morocco exhibits a wide variety of magmatic events from Archean to Quaternary. The oldest magmatic rocks belong to the Archean Reguibat Shield outcrops in the Moroccan Sahara. Paleoproterozoic magmatism, known as the Anti-Atlas granitoids, is related to the Eburnean orogeny and initial cratonization of the WAC. Mesoproterozoic magmatism is represented by a small number of mafic dykes known henceforth as the Taghdout mafic volcanism. Massive Neoproterozoic magmatic activity, related to the Pan-African cycle, consists of rift-related Tonian magmatism associated with the Rodinia breakup, an Early Cryogenian convergent margin event (760-700 Ma), syn-collisional Bou-Azzer magmatism (680-640 Ma), followed by widespread Ediacaran magmatism (620-555 Ma). Each magmatic episode corresponded to a different geodynamic environment and produced different types of magma. Phanerozoic magmatism began with Early Cambrian basaltic (rift?) volcanism, which persisted during the Middle Cambrian, and into the Early Ordovician. This was succeeded by massive Late Devonian and Carboniferous, pre-Variscan tholeiitic and calc-alkaline (Central Morocco) volcanic flows in basins of the Moroccan Meseta. North of the Atlas Paleozoic Transform Zone, the Late Carboniferous Variscan event was accompanied by the emplacement of 330-300 Ma calc-alkaline granitoids in upper crustal shear zones. Post-Variscan alkaline magmatism was associated with the opening of the Permian basins. Mesozoic magmatism began with the huge volumes of magma emplaced around 200 Ma in the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP) which was associated with the fragmentation of Pangea and the subsequent rifting of Central Atlantic. CAMP volcanism occurs in all structural domains of Morocco, from the Anti-Atlas to the External Rif domain with a peak activity around 199 Ma. A second Mesozoic magmatic event is represented by mafic lava flows and gabbroic intrusions in

  17. Pan African Collisional Tectonics Along the Moroccan West African Craton Continued to Ediacaran-Cambrian Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hefferan, K. P.; Samson, S. D.; Rice, K.; Soulaimani, A.

    2016-12-01

    Precision geochronologic dating and field mapping in the Anti-Atlas Mountains of Morocco document a Neoproterozoic Pan African orogenic cycle consisting of three distinct orogenic events: Iriri-Tichibanine orogeny (760-700 Ma), Bou Azzer orogeny (680-640 Ma) and the WACadomian orogeny (620 Ma to either 555 or 544 Ma). The Iriri-Tichibanine and Bou Azzer orogenies involved northward directed subduction beneath island arc volcanic terranes. These orogenic events generated calc-alkaline magmatism and supra-subduction zone ophiolites exposed in the Bou Azzer and Siroua erosional inliers. The WACadomian orogeny involved subduction and collision of the Cadomia arc complex with the West African Craton and generation of clastic sedimentary basins. The termination of the WACadomian orogeny has been the subject of debate as calc-alkaline to high K magmatism and folding continued to 544 Ma: Was 620-544 Ma calc-alkaline to high K magmatism and clastic basin development due to a) continental rift basin tectonics or b) southward directed subduction and collisional tectonics with associated back arc basin tectonism? We present field and geochemical data supporting the continuation of subduction-collisional tectonics to the Ediacaran-Cambrian boundary 544 Ma. Field mapping in the Central Anti-Atlas (Agadir Melloul) clearly documents an angular unconformity between Ouarzazate Group and Adoudounian limestones (N 30°31'28.91", W07°48'29.12"). Volcaniclastic rocks of Ouarzazate Group (615-545 Ma) are clearly folded and unconformably overlain by Adoudou Formation (541-529 Ma) limestones to the north. Geochemical discrimination diagrams on Latest Neoproterozoic calc-alkaline to high K igneous rocks throughout the Anti-Atlas plot in subduction and collisional arc magma domains. Back arc basin tectonism is likely responsible for localized extensional basins but continental rift tectonics and passive margin sedimentation did not begin in the Anti-Atlas Mountains until Early

  18. Exploring Moho sharpness in Northeastern North China Craton with frequency-dependence analysis of Ps receiver function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, P.; Yao, H.; Chen, L.; WANG, X.; Fang, L.

    2017-12-01

    The North China Craton (NCC), one of the oldest cratons in the world, has attracted wide attention in Earth Science for decades because of the unusual Mesozoic destruction of its cratonic lithosphere. Understanding the deep processes and mechanism of this craton destruction demands detailed knowledge about the deep structure of this region. In this study, we calculate P-wave receiver functions (RFs) with two-year teleseismic records from the North China Seismic Array ( 200 stations) deployed in the northeastern NCC. We observe both diffused and concentered PpPs signals from the Moho in RF waveforms, which indicates heterogeneous Moho sharpness variations in the study region. Synthetic Ps phases generated from broad positive velocity gradients at the depth of the Moho (referred as Pms) show a clear frequency dependence nature, which in turn is required to constrain the sharpness of the velocity gradient. Practically, characterizing such a frequency dependence feature in real data is challenging, because of low signal-to-noise ratio, contaminations by multiples generated from shallow structure, distorted signal stacking especially in double-peak Pms signals, etc. We attempt to address these issues by, firstly, utilizing a high-resolution Moho depth model of this region to predict theoretical delay times of Pms that facilitate more accurate Pms identifications. The Moho depth model is derived by wave-equation based poststack depth migration on both Ps phase and surface-reflected multiples in RFs in our previous study (Zhang et al., submitted to JGR). Second, we select data from a major back azimuth range of 100° - 220° that includes 70% teleseismic events due to the uneven data coverage and to avoid azimuthal influence as well. Finally, we apply an adaptive cross-correlation stacking of Pms signals in RFs for each station within different frequency bands. High-quality Pms signals at different frequencies will be selected after careful visual inspection and adaptive

  19. Indigenous actinorhizal plants of Australia

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Indigenous species of actinorhizal plants of Casuarinaceae, Elaeagnaceae and Rhamnaceae are found in specific regions of Australia. Most of these plants belong to Casuarinaceae, the dominant actinorhizal family in Australia. Many of them have significant environmental and economical value. The other two families with ...

  20. Building nuclear skills in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, R.

    2007-01-01

    Demand for nuclear skills in Australia has traditionally been met by recruitment but as the nuclear industry grows worldwide, such skills are in demand. This paper discusses he likely numbers of skilled people needed for a nuclear industry in Australia and what initiatives have been, or could be in, taken to address the needs

  1. Lexicography in Australia | Delbridge | Lexikos

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The emergence of Australian English as the national language is traced, and its relations with the Australian Aboriginal languages touched on. The greatest change in the language setting came with Australia's immigration policy in its post-World War II form. This resulted in the government's eventual recognition of Australia ...

  2. Mesozoic mafic dikes from the Shandong Peninsula, North China Craton: Petrogenesis and tectonic implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Shen; Hu Ruizhong; Zhao Junhong; Feng Caixia; Zou, Haibo

    2006-01-01

    Mesozoic mafic dikes are widely distributed in Luxi (Mengyin and Zichuan) and Jiaodong regions of the Shandong Peninsula, China, providing an opportunity of investigating the nature of the lost lithospheric mantle beneath the North China Craton (NCC). The mafic dikes are characterized by strong depletion in high field strength elements (HFSE), enrichment in light rare earth elements (LREE), highly variable Th/U ratios, high initial ( 87 Sr/ 86 Sr) i (0.7050-0.7099) and negative ε Nd (T) (-6.0 to -17.6). They were derived from melting of metasomatized portions of the subcontinental lithospheric mantle, followed by fractionation of clinopyroxenes. The similarity in Nd isotopic compositions between the Mengyin gabbro dikes and the Paleozoic peridotite xenoliths suggests that ancient lithospheric mantle was still retained at 120 Ma below Mengyin, although the ancient lithospheric mantle in many other places beneath NCC had been severely modified. There might be multiple enrichment events in the lithospheric mantle. An early-stage (before or during Paleozoic) rutile-rich metasomatism affected the lithospheric mantle below Mengyin, Jiaodong and Zichuan. Since then, the lithospheric mantle beneath Mengyin was isolated. A late-stage metasomatism by silicate melts modified the lithospheric mantle beneath Jiaodong and Zichuan but not Mengyin. The removal of the enriched lithospheric mantle and the generation of the mafic dikes may be mainly related to the convective overturn accompanying Jurassic-Cretaceous subduction of the paleo-Pacific plate. (author)

  3. Strong lateral variations of lithospheric mantle beneath cratons - Example from the Baltic Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, H. A.; Debayle, E.; Maupin, V.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding mechanisms for creation and evolution of Precambrian continental lithosphere requires to go beyond the large-scale seismic imaging in which shields often appear as laterally homogeneous, with a thick and fast lithosphere. We here present new results from a seismic experiment (POLENET-LAPNET) in the northern part of the Baltic Shield where we identify very high seismic velocities (Vs˜4.7 km/s) in the upper part of the mantle lithosphere and a velocity decrease of ˜0.2 km/s at approximately 150 km depth. We interpret this velocity decrease as refertilisation of the lower part of the lithosphere. This result is in contrast to the lithospheric structure immediately south of the study area, where the seismic velocities within the lithosphere are fast down to 250 km depth, as well as to that of southern Norway, where there is no indication of very high velocities in the lithospheric mantle (Vs of ˜4.4 km/s). While the relatively low velocities beneath southern Norway can tentatively be attributed to the opening of the Atlantic Ocean, the velocity decrease beneath northern Finland is not easily explained with present knowledge of surface tectonics. Our results show that shield areas may be laterally heterogeneous even over relatively short distances. Such variability may in many cases be related to lithosphere erosion and/or refertilisation at the edge of cratons, which may therefore be particularly interesting targets for seismic imaging.

  4. Cenozoic marine sedimentation and ice-volume variation on the East Antarctic craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, P. N.; Harwood, D. M.; McKelvey, B. C.; Mercer, J. H.; Stott, L. D.

    1984-05-01

    Recycled Cretaceous and Cenozoic marine microfossils have been recovered from samples of the Pliocene Sinus Formation. Samples were collected from outcrops in the Reedy, Beardmore, and Ferrar glacier areas of the Transantarctic Mountains between lat 77° and 86°S. The glaciogene sediments contained diatoms, foraminifera, calcareous nannoplankton, silicoflagellates, radiolarians, sponge spicules, palynomorphs, and ostracodes of Late Cretaceous, Paleocene, Eocene, late Oligocene, late Miocene, and Pliocene age. This suggests the presence of open marine basins on the East Antarctic craton during late Mesozoic and Cenozoic time. The apparent absence of early Oligocene and early through middle and earliest late Miocene assemblages suggests either that marine regression exposed the basin floors or that ice filled the basins during these times. The high-elevation setting of Sirius Formation outcrops suggests one of two hypotheses for their origin: (1) They are in situ Pliocene glaciomarine deposits that were uplifted 1,750 2,500 m with the Transantarctic Mountains to their present elevation; (2) the Sirius Formation deposits are a mixture of derived sediments stripped from sub-ice intracratonic basins and subsequently redeposited by ice flowing up the inland slope of the Transantarctic Mountains. We favor the second hypothesis, with transport to sites sometime within the past 3 m.y.

  5. Granulites of Bhopalpatnam and Kondagaon belts, Bastar craton, M. P.: petrological and fluid inclusion studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash Narasimha, K. N.; Janardhan, A. S.; Mishra, V. P.

    The Bhopalpatnam and Kondagaon granulite belts (BGB, KGB) occur surrounding the Bastar craton of central India. This paper deals with the geology, mineralogy and the fluid characteristics of these two belts. The geology of the two belts indicate that they abound in metasedimentary swathes. The metamorphic P-T conditions of the BGB range from 6 to 9 kbar at temperatures of 750°C, whilst those of the KGB vary from 4 to 6 kbar at temperatures of 700°C. The BGB shows an IBC path, while the KGB exhibits a dominant ITD path. These trends, based on mineral chemistry, are corroborated by fluid-inclusion studies. The lithologies of the BGB exhibit high-density CO 2 inclusions that represent the remnants of peak metamorphism. In contrast, the CO 2 inclusions of the KGB are of low density, indicative of post-peak conditions. The studies suggest that the CO 2-rich fluids may not have come from the supracrustal sediments. An external source, possibly underplated basalt, could have supplied the heat and the supercritical fluids. Based on lithological similarities, it can be stated that the BGB is an extension of the late Archaean Karimnagar granulite belt. The important problem which is still to be solved is the junction of the late Archaean BGB with the Eastern Ghats granulite belt.

  6. Revisiting the stratigraphy of the Mesoproterozoic Chhattisgarh Supergroup, Bastar craton, India based on subsurface lithoinformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Arunangshu; Ray, Ranjan Kumar; Tewari, Dinesh; Ingle, Vijay Kumar; Sahoo, Bikram Kumar; Y Khan, M. W.

    2014-04-01

    In the last 10 years, several teams of geologists from different institutions in India and abroad have vigorously investigated the Chhattisgarh basin (Bastar craton, India). Based on the new results and the lithologs of more than 350 water wells, resistivity and gamma-ray logs, and extensive geological traverses, we present a revised geological map, relevant cross sections, a new comprehensive stratigraphic column and a discussion of the new findings. Major outcomes of this revision are: (1) confirming the existence of two sub-basins (Hirri and Baradwar) and two depocentres; (2) establishing the age of the basin to be essentially Mesoproterozoic; (3) discarding the `unclassified Pandaria Formation' and classifying the package of Pandaria rock units into Chandi, Tarenga, Hirri and Maniari formations in the Hirri sub-basin; (4) accepting the `group' status of the Singhora Group and the newly proposed Kharsiya Groups in the Baradwar sub-basin; (5) establishing an intrabasinal correlation of formations; (6) reappraising the thicknesses of the different formations; and (7) finding that the geometry of the basin is `bowl-shaped', which is compatible with a sag model for the origin and evolution of the basin.

  7. Astronomy in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, F.; Couch, W.

    2017-12-01

    Australians have watched the sky for tens of thousands of years. The nineteenth century saw the foundation of government observatories in capital cities such as Sydney and Melbourne. While early twentieth-century astronomy focused largely on solar physics, the advent of radio astronomy at the end of the Second World War enabled Australia to take a leading role in the new science, with particular emphasis on low-frequency studies. Today, the radio quietness of its outback interior provides an excellent location for the Australian core of the Square Kilometre Array. Australian optical astronomy has flourished since the 1960s, with the 3.9-metre Anglo-Australian Telescope becoming the principal national facility in 1974. Access to ESO’s facilities at the La Silla Paranal Observatory is warmly welcomed by all Australian astronomers.

  8. South Australia, uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-02-01

    The Report sets out the salient data relating to the establishment of a uranium processing centre at Redcliff in South Australia. It is conceived as a major development project for the Commonwealth, the South Australian Government and Australian Industry comprising the refining and enrichment of uranium produced from Australian mines. Using the data currently available in respect of markets, demand, technology and possible financial return from overseas sales, the project could be initiated immediately with hexafluoride production, followed rapidly in stages by enrichment production using the centrifuge process. A conceptual development plan is presented, involving a growth pattern that would be closely synchronised with the mining and production of yellowcake. The proposed development is presented in the form of an eight-and-half-year programme. Costs in this Report are based on 1975 values, unless otherwise stated. (Author)

  9. Warragamba. Sydney, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seshadri, B.

    1959-02-01

    Full Text Available El pantano de Warragamba, cuyo objeto es el de producir energía hidroeléctrica en su primera fase de explotación y solamente agua potable cuando las necesidades de ésta así lo requieran, se haya situado en las proximidades de Sydney (Australia. Su extensa cuenca está constituida por una serie de ríos en cuyas cabeceras se han construido diques de retención, que no solamente almacenan grandes cantidades de agua, sino que sirven parcialmente para la regularización de caudales, función de gran interés en esta zona donde las avenidas, seguidas de extensas inundaciones, se hacen sentir con relativa frecuencia.

  10. THE STRUCTURE OF THE LITHOSPHERIC MANTLE OF THE SIBERAIN CRATON AND SEISMODYNAMICS OF DEFORMATION WAVES IN THE BAIKAL SEISMIC ZONE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Stepashko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available  The evolution and specific features of seismogynamics of the Baikal zones are reviewed in the context of interactions between deep deformation waves and the regional structure of the lithospheric mantle. The study is based on a model of the mantle structure with reference to chemical compositions of mantle peridotites from ophiolotic series located in the south-western framing of the Siberian craton (Fig. 1. The chemical zonation of the lithospheric mantle at the regional scale is determined from results of analyses of the heterogeneity of compositions of peridotites (Fig. 2, Table 1 and variations of contents of whole rock major components, such as iron, magnesium and silica (Fig. 3. According to spatial variations of the compositions of peridotites, the mantle has the concentric zonal structure, and the content of SiO2 is regularly decreasing, while concentrations of FeO∑ and MgO are increasing towards the centre of such structure (Fig. 4. This structure belongs to the mantle of the Siberian craton, which deep edge extends beyond the surface contour of the craton and underlies the north-western segment of the Central Asian orogenic belt.Results of the studies of peridotites of the Baikal region are consistent with modern concepts [Snyder, 2002; O’Reilly, Griffin, 2006; Chen et al., 2009] that suggest that large mantle lenses underlie the Archaean cratons (Fig. 5. The lenses are distinguished by high-density ultrabasic rocks and compose high-velocity roots of cratons which have remained isolated from technic processes. Edges of the mantle lenses may extend a few hundred kilometers beyond the limits of the cratons and underlie orogenic belts that frame the cratons, and this takes place in the south-western segment of the Siberian craton.The revealed structure of the lithospheric mantle is consistent with independent results of seismic and magmatectonical studies of the region. The Angara geoblock is located above the central part of the

  11. High-resolution sequence stratigraphy of lower Paleozoic sheet sandstones in central North America: The role of special conditions of cratonic interiors in development of stratal architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runkel, Anthony C.; Miller, J.F.; McKay, R.M.; Palmer, A.R.; Taylor, John F.

    2007-01-01

    Well-known difficulties in applying sequence stratigraphic concepts to deposits that accumulated across slowly subsiding cratonic interior regions have limited our ability to interpret the history of continental-scale tectonism, oceanographic dynamics of epeiric seas, and eustasy. We used a multi-disciplinary approach to construct a high-resolution stratigraphic framework for lower Paleozoic strata in the cratonic interior of North America. Within this framework, these strata proved readily amenable to modern sequence stratigraphic techniques that were formulated based on successions along passive margins and in foreland basins, settings markedly different from the cratonic interior. Parasequences, parasequence stacking patterns, systems tracts, maximum flooding intervals, and sequence-bounding unconformities can be confidently recognized in the cratonic interior using mostly standard criteria for identification. The similarity of cratonic interior and foreland basin successions in size, geometry, constituent facies, and local stacking patterns of nearshore parasequences is especially striking. This similarity indicates that the fundamental processes that establish shoreface morphology and determine the stratal expression of retreat and progradation were likewise generally the same, despite marked differences in tectonism, physiography, and bathymetry between the two settings. Our results do not support the widespread perception that Paleozoic cratonic interior successions are so anomalous in stratal geometries, and constitute such a poor record of time, that they are poorly suited for modern sequence stratigraphic analyses. The particular arrangement of stratal elements in the cratonic interior succession we studied is no more anomalous or enigmatic than the variability in architecture that sets all sedimentary successions apart from one another. Thus, Paleozoic strata of the cratonic interior are most appropriately considered as a package that belongs in a

  12. Asian student migration to Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, J; Hawthorne, L

    1996-01-01

    "This paper presents an overview of Asian student migration to Australia, together with an analysis of political and educational aspects of the overseas student programme. It focuses on some significant consequences of this flow for Australia. The characteristics of key student groups are contrasted to provide some perspective of the diversity of historical and cultural backgrounds, with the source countries of Malaysia, Indonesia and PRC [China] selected as case studies. Since the issue of PRC students in Australia has attracted considerable public attention and policy consideration, particular focus is placed on their experience." (SUMMARY IN FRE AND SPA) excerpt

  13. Toward the Defence of Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-04-01

    i~li tr - _y- ----Q QD . New York: Random House , 1987. Kerr, Pauline, " Australia -Indonesian Relations Developing.- FlifRi s_] rc~h, August 1989, pp...AD- A234 907Ol? RESEARCH REPORT 8 T(WILRD TVF DEFENCE OF AUSTRALIA O)T IC VZA P R 24 1 GROUP CAPTAIN BRENTON J. ESPELAND, AM ROYAL AUSTRALIAN AIR... AUSTRALIA by Group Captain B.J. Espeland, AM, RAAF A RESEARCH REPORT SUBMITTED TO THE FACULTY IN FULFILLMENT OF THE RESEARCH REQUIREMENT Research Advisor

  14. Algae Reefs in Shark Bay, Western Australia, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Numerous algae reefs are seen in Shark Bay, Western Australia, Australia (26.0S, 113.5E) especially in the southern portions of the bay. The south end is more saline because tidal flow in and out of the bay is restricted by sediment deposited at the north and central end of the bay opposite the mouth of the Wooramel River. This extremely arid region produces little sediment runoff so that the waters are very clear, saline and rich in algae.

  15. Dynamics of mantle rock metasomatic transformation in permeable lithospheric zones beneath Siberian craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharapov, Victor; Sorokin, Konstantin; Perepechko, Yury

    2015-04-01

    The numerical descriptions of hydrodynamic model of two - velocity heat and mass transfer in permeable zones above the asthenospheric lenses was formulated and solved basing on the study the composition of inclusions in minerals of low crust ultra metamorphic rocks and lithospheric mantle metasomatites and estimation of thermodynamic conditions of the processes. Experimental study of influence of the simulated hot reduced gas flows on the minerals of low crust and mantle xenolith of the Siberian craton platform (SP) give the basic information for this processes. In detail: 1. Thermobarometric study of composition of inclusions in granulite and lithospheric mantle rocks beneath the diamondiferous cratons allowed to estimate the gas phase compositions during the metamorphism and metasomatism as well as products of their re equilibration during decompression. 2. Results of the pilot study of the influence of hot gas impact flows on minerals of mantle xenoliths are taken into account. This allowed to reproduce the elements and heterophase kinetics of interactions within a temperature range of about 300 to 1300o on relative to the interactions between the solid, liquid and gas phases. 3. Correct mathematical two-velocities model of fluid dynamics for compressible multiphase fluid -rock systems. 4. Numerical schemes are simulated and solved for the problems of quantitative description of 2D dynamics behavior of P and T within the permeable zone above the asthenospheric lens. 5. Quantitative description of heterophase non isothermal fluid-rock interaction within the framework of the approximation was obtained on the basis of the parallel solutions of the exchange between the ideal gas flow and solid phase according to the model of multi-reservoir reactors based on minimization of the Gibbs potential. Qualitatively the results of numerical simulation are as follows: 1) appearance in permeable zones of the any composition fluid flows from the upper mantle magma chambers

  16. Shear-Velocity Structure and Azimuthal and Radial Anisotropy Beneath the Kaapvaal Craton From Bayesian Inversion of Surface-Wave Data: Inferences for the Architecture and Early Evolution of Cratons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedev, S.; Ravenna, M.; Adam, J.

    2017-12-01

    Seismic anisotropy provides essential information on the deformation of the lithosphere. Knowledge of anisotropy also allows us to isolate the isotropic-average seismic velocities, relatable to the lithospheric temperature and composition. We use Rayleigh and Love-wave phase velocities and their azimuthal anisotropy measured in broad period ranges across the footprint of the Southern Africa Seismic Experiment (SASE), from the Kaapvaal Craton to the Limpopo Belt. We invert the data using our recently developed, fully non-linear Markov Chain Monte Carlo method and determine, for the first time, both the isotropic-average S velocity and its radial and azimuthal anisotropy as a function of depth from the upper crust down to the asthenosphere. The probabilistic inversion provides a way to quantify non-uniqueness, using direct parameter-space sampling, and assess model uncertainties. The high-velocity anomaly indicative of the cold cratonic lithosphere bottoms at 200-250 km beneath the central and western Kaapvaal Craton, underlain by a low-velocity zone. Beneath northern Kaapvaal and Limpopo, by contrast, high velocities extend down to 300-350 km. Although this does not require a lithosphere that has maintained this thickness over a geologically long time, the data does require the mantle to be anomalously cold down to 300-350 km. Interestingly, topography correlates with the thickness of this high-velocity layer, with lower elevations where the lid is thicker. Radial shear-wave anisotropy is in the 2-5 percent range (Vsh > Vsv) from the lower crust down to 200 km, below which depth it decreases gradually. Radial variations in the amplitude of radial anisotropy show no clear relationship with those in the amplitude of azimuthal anisotropy or isotropic-average Vs anomalies. Azimuthal anisotropy changes the fast-propagation direction near the base of the lithosphere (200-300 km depth), from the laterally varying fast azimuths in the lower lithosphere to a spatially

  17. Chemical transfers along slowly eroding catenas developed on granitic cratons in southern Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khomo, Lesego; Bern, Carleton R.; Hartshorn, Anthony S.; Rogers, Kevin H.; Chadwick, Oliver A.

    2013-01-01

    A catena is a series of distinct but co-evolving soils arrayed along a slope. On low-slope, slowly eroding catenas the redistribution of mass occurs predominantly as plasma, the dissolved and suspended constituents in soil water. We applied mass balance methods to track how redistribution via plasma contributed to physical and geochemical differentiation of nine slowly eroding (~ 5 mm ky− 1) granitic catenas. The catenas were arrayed in a 3 × 3 climate by relief matrix and located in Kruger National Park, South Africa. Most of the catenas contained at least one illuviated soil profile that had undergone more volumetric expansion and less mass loss, and these soils were located in the lower halves of the slopes. By comparison, the majority of slope positions were eluviated. Soils from the wetter climates (550 and 730 mm precipitation yr− 1) generally had undergone greater collapse and lost more mass, while soils in the drier climate (470 mm yr− 1) had undergone expansion and lost less mass. Effects of differences in catena relief were less clear. Within each climate zone, soil horizon mass loss and strain were correlated, as were losses of most major elements, illustrating the predominant influence of primary mineral weathering. Nevertheless, mass loss and volumetric collapse did not become extreme because of the skeleton of resistant primary mineral grains inherited from the granite. Colloidal clay redistribution, as traced by the ratio of Ti to Zr in soil, suggested clay losses via suspension from catena eluvial zones. Thus illuviation of colloidal clays into downslope soils may be crucial to catena development by restricting subsurface flow there. Our analysis provides quantitative support for the conceptual understanding of catenas in cratonic landscapes and provides an endmember reference point in understanding the development of slowly eroding soil landscapes.

  18. Neoproterozoic extension in the greater dharwar craton: A reevaluation of the "betsimisaraka suture" in madagascar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, R.D.; Roig, J.-Y.; Delor, C.; Amlin, Y.; Goncalves, P.; Rabarimanana, M.H.; Ralison, A.V.; Belcher, R.W.

    2011-01-01

    The Precambrian shield of Madagascar is reevaluated with recently compiled geological data and new U-Pb sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) geochronology. Two Archean domains are recognized: the eastern Antongil-Masora domain and the central Antananarivo domain, the latter with distinctive belts of metamafic gneiss and schist (Tsaratanana Complex). In the eastern domain, the period of early crust formation is extended to the Paleo-Mesoarchean (3.32-3.15 Ga) and a supracrustal sequence (Fenerivo Group), deposited at 3.18 Ga and metamorphosed at 2.55 Ga, is identified. In the central domain, a Neoarchean period of high-grade metamorphism and anatexis that affected both felsic (Betsiboka Suite) and mafic gneisses (Tsaratanana Complex) is documented. We propose, therefore, that the Antananarivo domain was amalgamated within the Greater Dharwar Craton (India + Madagascar) by a Neoarchean accretion event (2.55-2.48 Ga), involving emplacement of juvenile igneous rocks, high-grade metamorphism, and the juxtaposition of disparate belts of mafic gneiss and schist (metagreenstones). The concept of the "Betsimisaraka suture" is dispelled and the zone is redefined as a domain of Neoproterozoic metasedimentary (Manampotsy Group) and metaigneous rocks (Itsindro-Imorona Suite) formed during a period of continental extension and intrusive igneous activity between 840 and 760 Ma. Younger orogenic convergence (560-520 Ma) resulted in east-directed overthrusting throughout south Madagascar and steepening with local inversion of the domain in central Madagascar. Along part of its length, the Manampotsy Group covers the boundary between the eastern and central Archean domains and is overprinted by the Angavo-Ifanadiana high-strain zone that served as a zone of crustal weakness throughout Cretaceous to Recent times.

  19. Meso–Cenozoic lithospheric thermal structure in the Bohai Bay Basin, eastern North China Craton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zongxing Li

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The Bohai Bay Basin is a region where part of the North China Craton has been thinned and destroyed. It has experienced two periods of crustal thinning that occurred during the Cretaceous and Paleogene, but investigations of its Mesozoic and Cenozoic lithospheric thermal structure are limited. Therefore, in this study, the distributions of mantle heat flow, crustal heat flow, and Moho temperatures during the Meso–Cenozoic are calculated based on analyses of the thermal history of the Bohai Bay Basin. The results indicate that the ratio of mantle heat flow to surface heat flow peaked during the late stages of the early Cretaceous and during the middle to late Paleogene. The corresponding mantle heat flow was more than 65% of the surface heat flow. Moho temperatures reached three peaks: 900–1100 °C in the late stages of the early Cretaceous; 820–900 °C in the middle to late Paleogene; and (in the Linqing Depression, Cangxian Uplift, and Jizhong Depression 770–810 °C during the early Neogene. These results reveal that the Bohai Bay Basin experienced significant geological change during the Cretaceous, including the transformation of lithospheric thermal structure from “cold mantle and hot crust” before the Cretaceous to “hot mantle and cold crust” after the Cretaceous. The results also indicate that the basin experienced two large-scale rifting events. Therefore, this work may provide the thermal parameters for further investigations of the geodynamic evolution of eastern China.

  20. Mesoarchean assembly and stabilization of the eastern Kaapvaal craton: A structural-thermochronological perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoene, Blair; de Wit, Maarten J.; Bowring, Samuel A.

    2008-10-01

    Understanding the construction and stabilization of Archean continental lithosphere has important implications for models of tectonic and thermal regimes in the early Earth, as well as for the subsequent evolution of continents. We provide new constraints for the amalgamation and stabilization of the eastern Kaapvaal craton in the vicinity of the Barberton greenstone belt circa 3.3-3.1 Ga. Isotope dilution thermal ionization mass spectrometry U-Pb geochronology and thermochronology are combined with mapping and structural analysis around the margins of this belt in order to constrain movement on major shear zones that separate high-grade orthogneiss terranes from low-grade supracrustal rocks and to relate this movement to the timing of differential exhumation. New and existing data are consistent with accretion at ˜3.23 Ga within an oblique subduction plate boundary manifested in the BGB as an asymmetric flower-like structural geometry. For >100 Ma following terrane assembly, transform boundary tectonics, manifested partially as transtension on reactivated faults, led to large-scale juxtaposition of middle to lower crustal basement orthogneiss complexes against upper crustal greenstone sequences and episodic emplacement of granitic batholiths. Stabilization of this portion of Archean lithosphere involved at least a three-stage process: (1) creation of a thick and rigid mantle lithosphere during crustal growth, subduction, and terrane assembly from circa 3.30 to 3.23 Ga, (2) generation of a rigid crust during strike-slip and transtensional tectonics coupled with migration of granites and heat-producing elements into the upper crust between circa 3.2 and 3.1 Ga, and (3) erosion and removal of the uppermost crust during regional peneplanation that lasted until circa 2.9 Ga.

  1. Carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur geochemistry of Archean and Proterozoic shales from the Kaapvaal Craton, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Yumiko; Naraoka, Hiroshi; Wronkiewicz, David J.; Condie, Kent C.; Ohmoto, Hiroshi

    1997-08-01

    The C, N, and S contents and VC and δ 13Cδ 34S values were analyzed for 100 shale samples from ten formations, 3.0 to 2.1 Ga in age, in the central and eastern regions of the Kaapvaal Craton, South Africa. The Kaapvaal shales are characterized by generally low contents of organic C (range 0.06-2.79 wt%, average 0.47 wt%), N (range kerogens from the shales indicated that the Kaapvaal shales lost considerable amounts of N, C, S, and H during diagenesis and regional metamorphism (up to the greenschist facies). From the theoretical relationships between the H/C ratios of kerogen and organic C contents of shales, the original C contents of the Archean and Proterozoic shales from the Kaapvaal Craton are estimated to be on average ˜2 wt%. These values are similar to the average organic C content of modern marine sediments. This suggests that the primary organic productivity and the preservation of organic matter in the ocean during the period of 3.0 to 2.1 Ga were similar to those in the Phanerozoic era, provided the flux of clastic sediments to the ocean was similar. This would also imply that the rate of O 2 accumulation in the atmosphere-ocean system, which has equaled the burial rate of organic matter in sediments, has been the same since ˜3.0 Ga. The δ 34S values of bulk-rock sulfides (mostly pyrite) range from +2.7 to +7.4%‰ for seven sulfide-rich samples of ˜2.9 Ga to ˜2.6 Ga. These values are consistent with a suggestion by Ohmoto (1992) and Ohmoto et al. (1993) that most pyrite crystals in Archean shales were formed by bacterial reduction of seawater sulfate with δ 34S values between +2 and +10‰, and that the Archean seawater was sulfate rich. Changes in the δ 13C org values during maturation of kerogen were evaluated with theoretical calculations from the experimental data of Peters et al. (1981) and Lewan (1983), and from the observations by Simoneit et al. (1981) on natural samples. These evaluations suggest that the magnitudes of δ 13C org

  2. Environmental radioactivity in Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Twining, John [Environmental Science Division, ANSTO, Menai (Australia)

    2002-06-01

    Environmental research mainly carried out at Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO) related to nuclear activities in Australia such as uranium mining, transfer factor studies related to U- and Th-series radionuclides, dose assessment modelling, radiation monitoring, and nuclear waste repository, is outlined. Many aspects of radioecology, marine and freshwater geochemistry and radiochemical dating techniques; bioaccumulation including archival monitoring and kinetics, ground water studies, atmospheric issues including climate change and geomorphology are being studied with the help of a high neutron flux reactor, a cyclotron and a tandem accelerator as well as modern analytical equipment. Only a very small number of examples of radioactivity applications are presented: Microbiotic crusts covering up to 50% of the soil surface at Maralinga nuclear test site where more than 80% of the residual Am-241 was found to retain within the top 5 mm after 30 years. SIMS analysis of crocodile bones indicating that the only metal affected by U mining in Kakadu region was lead (Pb). In mineral sands such as zircon, U(VI) is more stable than U(IV) as evidenced by ion beam and SEM imaging and XANES analysis. Use of radioisotopes in atmospheric and climate studies, terrestrial studies particularly in dating techniques, and aquatic-continental and aquatic-ocean waters, and in biological studies such as biokinetics of copper metabolism in rainbow fishes living downstream of a mine are presented. (S. Ohno)

  3. Neutron scattering in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knott, R.B.

    1994-01-01

    Neutron scattering techniques have been part of the Australian scientific research community for the past three decades. The High Flux Australian Reactor (HIFAR) is a multi-use facility of modest performance that provides the only neutron source in the country suitable for neutron scattering. The limitations of HIFAR have been recognized and recently a Government initiated inquiry sought to evaluate the future needs of a neutron source. In essence, the inquiry suggested that a delay of several years would enable a number of key issues to be resolved, and therefore a more appropriate decision made. In the meantime, use of the present source is being optimized, and where necessary research is being undertaken at major overseas neutron facilities either on a formal or informal basis. Australia has, at present, a formal agreement with the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (UK) for access to the spallation source ISIS. Various aspects of neutron scattering have been implemented on HIFAR, including investigations of the structure of biological relevant molecules. One aspect of these investigations will be presented. Preliminary results from a study of the interaction of the immunosuppressant drug, cyclosporin-A, with reconstituted membranes suggest that the hydrophobic drug interdigitated with lipid chains

  4. Australia's unresolved nuclear problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemeny, L.G.

    1987-01-01

    This paper examines three acts of monumental incompetence which have all but destroyed Australia's once great potential to play a leading role in nuclear technology in South East Asia. Political chicanery and monumental technological and economic foresight, professional weakness and vacillation in the engineering community and the vicious pseudo scientific propaganda of most branches of the media, the teaching profession and sadly, even the politicisation of our churches, has all but destroyed a potential Australian ''sunrise industry''. Over the next forty years the population of planet Earth will approximately double. Unless Australians realise that their children and grand-children, and future generations of our neighbouring third world countries will require nuclear technology for an equitable and acceptable shared life-style, they will continue to allow taxpayers' money to be wasted on costly, technically unacceptable and environmentally undesirable attempts to develop ''alternative'' or ''renewable'' energy sources. These are neither alternative nor renewable but politically trendy. The tragedy of such projects is that their limited applicability and suitability for small scale energy production by wealthy users in limited geographical locations will only increase the need for base load energy supplies of the conventional type. Unless this is nuclear, planet Earth faces environmental despolation of monumental proportions. (J.P.N.)

  5. New Precambrian paleomagnetic and geochronological results from the North China Craton and their implications for supercontinent Nuna reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S.

    2013-05-01

    A recent update of available global paleomagnetic data demonstrate that a coherent Nuna formed by ca. 1.75 Ga, and lasted till at least ca. 1.4 Ga (Zhang et al, 2012). This paleomagnetism-based reconstruction of Nuna is also in agreement with those proposed, geologically based models, including the SAMBA connection between Baltica, Amazonia and Western Africa (Johansson, 2009), the Nuna core connection between Laurentia, Baltica and Siberia (Evans and Mitchell, 2011), the proto-SWEAT connection between Laurentia, Mawson block and Australian blocks (Payne et al., 2009) and the NCB-India connection (Zhao et al., 2011). The North China Craton (NCC) is positioned by superimposing its four high quality poles between 1.78 Ga and ~1.44 Ga atop coeval poles from the combined cratonic assemblage, including Laurentia, Baltica, Siberia and Australian blocks. In this reconstruction, the present south margin of the NCB represented an active continental margin in Nuna and likely faced an open ocean, whilst its north margin was connected to a large landmass. Recently, Su et al (2012) reported a precise age of 1611±8 Ma (zircon U-Pb LA-MC- ICPMS) obtained from a tuff bed in the Luoyukou Formation in western Henan Province. This age suggested that two high quality paleomagnetic poles from the Baicaoping and Yunmengshan formations in this region, which were considered as of 1.2-1.3 Ga, should be of ~1.61 - 1.78 Ga. Although with poor age constraint, the two poles also support the NCC's position in the Nuna. In addition, new paleomagnetic results have been obtained from the well dated ~1.33 Ga mafic sills in the northern NCC (Zhang et al, 2011; Chen et al, 2013). However, because there is no coeval pole from other major cratons, whether the NCC had still connected with them is not conclusive.

  6. Saghro Group in the Ougnat Massif (Morocco), an evidence for a continuous Cadomian basin along the northern West African Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michard, André; Soulaimani, Abderrahmane; Ouanaimi, Hassan; Raddi, Youssef; Aït Brahim, Lahsen; Rjimati, Ech-Cherki; Baidder, Lahssen; Saddiqi, Omar

    2017-03-01

    The Saghro Group (SG) is a folded, low-grade volcano-sedimentary series up to 8 km thick that crops out within and to the north of the Pan-African suture zone in the central and eastern Anti-Atlas. Here we describe the SG of the Ougnat inliers that are exposed in the easternmost Anti-Atlas beneath the unconformable, Late Ediacaran Ouarzazate Group (OZG) volcanic rocks. The Ougnat SG mostly consists of volcaniclastic greywackes accumulated in a peritidal-to-shallow basin. The basin infilling was deformed by NNE-trending, mostly upright folds with axial-planar slaty cleavage and low-grade metamorphism. The deformed SG rocks were intruded by the ∼550 Ma Mellab hypovolcanic granodiorite. The latter also crosscuts the lowest OZG rocks that are dated to 574-571 Ma in the western Saghro region. The SG rocks that form the Siroua and Saghro inliers have an oldest age of 620-610 Ma and were folded at ∼610-580 Ma at the onset of the Cadomian orogenic events. We show that the SG rocks are similar to the ;Série verte; (SV) rocks that are exposed in the Ougarta and western Hoggar east of the Pan-African suture. We infer that the SG and SV rocks accumulated in a same, continuous basin that was bounding the West African Craton to the north and the east. This strongly subsiding basin formed close to a volcanic arc and was folded during the last Pan-African synmetamorphic events. Fold orientation and age of folding differ however along the edge of the West African Craton. The orogenic greywackes that form the remnants of the SG-SV basin thus constitute a precious record of the diachronic Cadomian event s.l. along the West African Craton northern margin.

  7. The joint inversion of phase dispersion curves and receiver functions at the margin of East European Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrapkiewicz, Kajetan; Wilde-Piórko, Monika; Polkowski, Marcin

    2017-04-01

    For the first time a joint inversion of Rayleigh-wave phase velocity dispersion curves and P receiver functions has been applied to study the south-western margin of East European Craton (EEC) in Poland. The area of investigation lies in the vicinity of Trans-European Suture Zone (TESZ) regarded as the most prominent lithospheric boundary in Europe separating the Precambrian EEC from assemblage of Phanerozoic-accreted terranes (e.g. Pharaoh, 1999). While the sedimentary and crystalline crust of EEC's margin has been precisely recognized with the borehole and refraction data compilation (Grad et al., 2016), the structure of lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) underneath remains poorly understood. To address this issue, the passive seismic experiment „13 BB Star" (2013-2016) was carried out in northern Poland - just at the margin of EEC. For each station of „13 BB Star" network we obtained a credible 1-D shear-wave velocity model with linearized damped least-squares inversion (Herrmann, 2013) down to the depth of 250 km. The joint inversion of receiver functions and surface-wave dispersion curves has proved to be a natural approach when inferring the nature of cratonic LAB (e.g. Bodin et al., 2014). It's sensitive to both absolute velocities and sharp discontinuities and thus provides a better vertical resolution compared to surface wave data alone. The results indicate the presence of steady 4 per cent grow in the shear-wave velocity between 120 and 180 km depth and gradual 6 per cent drop over 180-220 km depth range. The latter may be interpreted as the LAB with depth and absolute-velocity change similar to those reported for other cratons (Kind et al., 2012). National Science Centre Poland provided financial support for this work by NCN grant DEC-2011/02/A/ST10/00284.

  8. Australia's Next Top Fraction Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Peter Gould suggests Australia's next top fraction model should be a linear model rather than an area model. He provides a convincing argument and gives examples of ways to introduce a linear model in primary classrooms.

  9. Sustainability: Australia at the crossroads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodirsky, Benjamin L.; Popp, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    A modelling study argues that comprehensive policy change could limit Australia's environmental pollution while maintaining a materials-intensive path to economic growth. But other paths are worth considering. See Article p.49

  10. Tax Policy Formulation in Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Rob Heferen; Nicole Mitchell; Ian Amalo

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the tax policy making process in Australia. It outlines the role of key agencies in this process and highlights some of the key developments in governance and consultation arrangements that have occurred over the past decade.

  11. Crustal structure of the Siberian craton and the West Siberian basin: An appraisal of existing seismic data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cherepanova, Yulia; Artemieva, Irina M.; Thybo, Hans

    2013-01-01

    We present a digital model SibCrust of the crustal structure of the Siberian craton (SC) and the West Siberian basin (WSB), based on all seismic profiles published since 1960 and sampled with a nominal interval of 50 km. Data quality is assessed and quantitatively assigned to each profile based...... on acquisition and interpretation method and completeness of crustal model. The database represents major improvement in coverage and resolution and includes depth to Moho, thickness and average P-wave velocity of five crustal layers (sediments, and upper, middle, lower, and lowermost crust) and Pn velocity...

  12. Fluid Characteristics in the Giant Quartz Reef System of the Bundelkhand Craton, India: Constraints from Fluid Inclusion Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rout, D.; Panigrahi, M. K.; Pati, J. K.

    2017-12-01

    Giant quartz reefs are anomalous features indicating extensive mobilization of silica in the crust. Such reefs in the Abitibi belt, Canada and elsewhere are believed to be the result of activity of fluid of diverse sources on terrain boundaries. The Bundelkhand granitoid complex constituting a major part of the Bundelkhnad Craton in north-Central India is traversed by numerous such quartz reefs all across for a length of about 500 km. There are about 20 major reefs having dimensions of 35 to 40 km in length, 50 to 60 m in width standing out as prominent ridges in the region. Almost all are aligned parallel to each other in a sub-vertical to vertical manner following the NE-SW to NNE-SSW trend. Fluid inclusion petrography in quartz from these reefs reveal four types of inclusions viz. aqueous biphase (type-I), pure carbonic (type-II), aqueous carbonic (type-III) and polyphase (type-IV) inclusions. The type-I aqueous biphase inclusions are the dominant type in all the samples studied so far. Salinities calculated from temperature of melting of last ice (Tm) values are low to moderate, ranging from 0.18 to 18.19 wt% NaCl equivalents. Temperature of liquid-vapor homogenization (Th) values of these inclusions show a wide range from 101 ºC to 386 ºC (cluster around 150-250 ºC) essentially into liquid phase ruling out boiling during its course of evolution. Besides, aqueous Biphase inclusions, some data on pure CO2 inclusions furnish a near constant value of TmCO2 at -56.6 ºC in the Bundelkhand Craton indicating absence of CH4. Bivariate plot between Th and salinity suggest three possible water types which are controlling the overall activity of fluid in quartz reefs of Bundelkhand Craton viz. low-T low saline, high-T low saline and moderate-T and moderate saline. A low saline and CO2-bearing and higher temperature nature resembles a metamorphic fluid that may be a source for these giant quartz reefs. The low temperature low-salinity component could be a meteoric

  13. Geochemistry of organic-rich river waters in Amazonia: Insights on weathering processes of intertropical cratonic terrain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horbe, Adriana Maria Coimbra; Lages, Anderson da Silva; Moquet, Jean-Sébastien; Santos, Roberto Ventura; Seyler, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    In this study, eight organic-rich rivers that flow through the Brazilian craton in the southwestern Amazon rainforest are investigated. This investigation is the first of its type in this area and focuses on the effects of lithology, long-term weathering, thick soils, forest cover and hydrological period on the dissolved load compositions in rivers draining cratonic terrain. The major dissolved ion concentrations, alkalinity (TAlk), SiO 2 , trace element concentrations, and Sr isotope contents in the water were determined between April 2009 and January 2010. In addition, the isotopic values of oxygen and hydrogen were determined between 2011 and 2013. Overall, the river water is highly dilute and dominated by the major dissolved elements TAlk, SiO 2 and K + and the major dissolved trace elements Al, Fe, Ba, Mn, P, Zn and Sr, which exhibit large temporal and spatial variability and are closely correlated with the silicatic bedrock and hydrology. Additionally, rainwater and recycled water vapor and the size of the basin contribute to the geochemistry of the waters. The total weathering flux estimated from our results is 2–4 t km −2 .yr −1 , which is one of the lowest fluxes in the world. The CO 2 consumption rate is approximately 21–61 10 3  mol km −2  yr −1 , which is higher than expected given the stability of the felsic to basic igneous and metamorphic to siliciclastic basement rocks and the thick tropical soil cover. Thus, weathering of the cratonic terrain under intertropical humid conditions is still an important consumer of CO 2 . - Highlights: • Were studied rivers flowing the Brazilian craton covered by lateritic soils. • The river waters are highly diluted and dominated by TAlk, SiO 2 and K + . • There is spatial and temporal variability in the chemical composition. • The rain amount and recycled water vapor affect the O and D isotopes. • Geology, weathering, discharge and seasonality highlight a singular composition.

  14. Geochemistry of Archean Mafic Amphibolites from the Amsaga Area, West African Craton, Mauritania: Occurrence of Archean oceanic plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Atrassi, Fatima; Debaille, Vinciane; Mattielli, Nadine; Berger, Julien

    2015-04-01

    While Archean terrains are mainly composed of a TTG (Tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite) suite, more mafic lithologies such as amphibolites are also a typical component of those ancient terrains. Although mafic rocks represent only ~10% of the Archean cratons, they may provide key evidence of the role and nature of basaltic magmatism in the formation of the Archean crust as well as the evolution of the Archean mantle. This study focuses on the Archean crust from the West African craton in Mauritania (Amsaga area). The Amsaga Archean crust mainly consists of TTG and thrust-imbricated slices of mafic volcanic rocks, which have been affected by polymetamorphic events from the amphibolite to granulite facies. We report the results of a combined petrologic, Sm-Nd isotopic, major element and rare earth element (REE) study of the Archean amphibolites in the West African craton. This study was conducted in order to characterize these rocks, to constrain the time of their formation and to evaluate their tectonic setting and their possible mantle source. Our petrological observations show that these amphibolites have fine to medium granoblastic and nematoblastic textures. They are dominated by amphibolite-facies mineral assemblages (mainly amphibole and plagioclase), but garnet and clinopyroxene occur in a few samples. These amphibolites have tholeiitic basalt composition. On a primitive mantle-normalized diagram, they display fairly flat patterns without negative anomalies for either Eu or Nb-Ta. We have shown using Sm-Nd whole rock isotopic data that these amphibolites formed at 3.3 ±0.075 Ga. They have positive ɛNdi values (+5.2 ± 1.6). These samples show isotopically juvenile features, which rule out the possibility of significant contamination of the protolith magmas by ancient continental crust. Based on these geochemical data we propose that the tholeiitic basalts were formed in an oceanic plateau tectonic setting from a mantle plume source and that they have a

  15. Petrogenesis and Tectonic Implications of Paleoproterozoic Metapelitic Rocks in the Archean Kongling Complex from the Northern Yangtze Craton, South China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.; Zheng, J.; Wang, W.; Xiong, Q.

    2015-12-01

    The Archean Kongling Complex in the northern Yangtze Craton is an ideal target to investigate the Precambrian accretion and evolution of continental crust in South China. This study aims to unravel the crustal evolution and tectonic setting of the Yangtze Craton during the Paleoproterozoic time, using integrated studies of petrography, zircon U-Pb and Hf isotopes and whole-rock geochemistry of Paleoproterozoic metapelitic rocks in the Kongling Complex. These rocks contain garnet, sillimanite, biotite, plagioclase, minor graphite and ilmenite. Zircons from the samples show nebulous sector-zoning and rim-core structure, suggesting both metamorphic origin and detrital origin with metamorphic overprints. The metamorphic zircons and metamorphic overprints have concordant 207Pb/206Pb age at ~2.0 Ga, while detrital grains yield three distinct concordant-age populations of >2.5 Ga, 2.4-2.2 Ga and 2.2-2.1 Ga. The age patterns indicate that the depositional age of the metasedimentary rocks was 2.1-2.0 Ga. Those 2.2-2.1 Ga detrital zircons with variable ɛHf(t) values (-7.28 to 2.97) suggest the addition of juvenile materials from depleted mantle to the crust during 2.2-2.1 Ga. The 2.4-2.2 Ga zircons have Hf model ages (TDM2) of ~2.6-3.5 Ga and >2.5 Ga zircons have TDM2 ages varying from 2.9 Ga to 3.3 Ga. The new data suggest that the Kongling Complex was originally a Paleoarchean (old up to 3.5 Ga) continental nucleus, which experienced multiple episodes of growth and reworking events at 3.3-3.2 Ga, 2.9 Ga, 2.7-2.6 Ga, 2.4-2.2 Ga and 2.2-2.1 Ga. In combination with available data, the new results in this study suggest a continent-arc-continent evolution model to explain the tectonic evolution of the Yangtze Craton during the Paleoproterozoic time: the western margin of Yangtze Craton was originally an individual continent, which underwent a reworking event during 2.4-2.2 Ga and a crust growth event caused by continent-arc collision during 2.2-2.1 Ga; it subsequently collided

  16. Receiver Function Imaging of Mantle Transition Zone Discontinuities Beneath the Tanzania Craton and Adjacent Segments of the East African Rift System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Muchen; Liu, Kelly H.; Fu, Xiaofei; Gao, Stephen S.

    2017-12-01

    The mantle transition zone (MTZ) discontinuities beneath the Tanzania Craton and the Eastern and Western Branches of the East African Rift System are imaged by stacking over 7,100 receiver functions. The mean thickness of the MTZ beneath the Western Branch and Tanzania Craton is about 252 km, which is comparable to the global average and is inconsistent with the existence of present-day thermal upwelling originating from the lower mantle. In contrast, beneath the Eastern Branch, an up to 30 km thinning of the MTZ is observed and is attributable to upwelling of higher temperature materials from either the upper MTZ or the lower mantle. The observations are in agreement with the hypothesis that rifting in Africa is primarily driven by gradients of gravitational potential energy and lateral variations of basal traction force along zones of significant changes of lithospheric thickness such as the edges of the Tanzania Craton.

  17. Australia: uranium and nuclear policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crick, R.

    1991-01-01

    Australia's uranium and nuclear policies have gone through several stages of development since the commercialisation of the industry. The early stages laid the foundations and built the superstructure of Australia's uranium development, export and safeguards policies. The uranium industry and other governments have understood the nature and operation of these policies. An important aim of this paper will be to explain the design and current construction stage of policies. This needs to be done against the background of broader industry developments. Within the past twelve months (1989/90) there have been dramatic changes, both within Australia and internationally, which have affected the uranium market. Internationally, we have seen the spot price indicators for uranium fall to an all time low. Within Australia, we have seen the removal of the fixed floor price requirement for the sale of Australia uranium. This was replaced by a requirement that contract prices reflect the market. This change in policy allowed the outcome of several major long-term contract renegotiations to be approved. It also allowed Australian producers to secure several new long-term contracts, despite the overall depressed state of the market. The 'three mines' policy remains in place although only two, Ranger in Northern Territory and Olympic Dare in Southern Australia are currently operating. The biggest unknown is the extent of future uranium demand. (author)

  18. Zircon and monazite geochronology of the granulites and associated gneisses from the Rengali Province, India: Growth of the southern margin of the Singhbhum Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, S.; Das, K.; Kimura, K.; Hayasaka, Y.; Hidaka, H.; Dasgupta, A.; Ghosh, G.; Mukhopadhyay, J.

    2013-12-01

    Geological evidences show that cratons grew in size by multiple orogenic cycles which can best be studied in their marginal orogenic belts. Rengali Province, occurring at the southern margin of the Singhbhum Craton, India is one such belt, characterized by low- to high-grade metamorphic signatures. This is sharply different from the virtually unmetamorphosed cratonic rocks in north and ultrahigh temperature metamorphosed rocks of the Eastern Ghats Province in south. High-grade gneisses and granitoids (including charnockite) constitute the central highland of this province. Several large-scale faults and shear zones juxtapose rocks of contrasting metamorphic grades. Our geochronological investigation from samples of high-grade orthogneiss and paragneiss along with the intrusive granitoids from central and eastern part of the Rengali Province using zircon (SHRIMP) and monazite chemical techniques reveal a complex evolutionary history. Zircon grains of the metapelitic granulites from the eastern segment yield detrital ages in the time span of ca. 3528-3087 Ma, without perceptible evidence of subsequent metamorphism. In contrast, monazite grains from the same samples record strong metamorphic signature at ca. 2.8-2.7 Ga along with inherited populations of ca. 3.0-2.9 Ga. Charnockite from the eastern segment has protolith age of 3058×15 Ma while that from the central segment records high-grade metamorphism at 2818×15 Ma. Mafic granulite from the central segment preserves the oldest core age of 2844×7 Ma. Synkinematic leucogranite in the central and undeformed granitoid in the eastern segment were emplaced at 2807×13 Ma and 2809×13 Ma respectively. Most of the samples show zircon overgrowth at ca. 2500 Ma, which possibly caused by a separate tectonothermal overprinting. From the available geochronological data, we postulate the existence of marine basin which opened at ca. 3050 Ma, received sediments from the adjacent cratonic hinterland, switched to an active

  19. A primitive mantle source for the Neoarchean mafic rocks from the Tanzania Craton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.A. Cook

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Mafic rocks comprising tholeiitic pillow basalt, dolerite and minor gabbro form the basal stratigraphic unit in the ca. 2.8 to 2.6 Ga Geita Greenstone Belt situated in the NW Tanzania Craton. They outcrop mainly along the southern margin of the belt, and are at least 50 million years older than the supracrustal assemblages against which they have been juxtaposed. Geochemical analyses indicate that parts of the assemblage approach high Mg-tholeiite (more than 8 wt.% MgO. This suite of samples has a restricted compositional range suggesting derivation from a chemically homogenous reservoir. Trace element modeling suggests that the mafic rocks were derived by partial melting within the spinel peridotite field from a source rock with a primitive mantle composition. That is, trace elements maintain primitive mantle ratios (Zr/Hf = 32–35, Ti/Zr = 107–147, producing flat REE and HFSE profiles [(La/Ybpm = 0.9–1.3], with abundances of 3–10 times primitive mantle and with minor negative anomalies of Nb [(Nb/Lapm = 0.6–0.8] and Th [(Th/Lapm = 0.6–0.9]. Initial isotope compositions (ɛNd range from 1.6 to 2.9 at 2.8 Ga and plot below the depleted mantle line suggesting derivation from a more enriched source compared to present day MORB mantle. The trace element composition and Nd isotopic ratios are similar to the mafic rocks outcropping ∼50 km south. The mafic rocks outcropping in the Geita area were erupted through oceanic crust over a short time period, between ∼2830 and ∼2820 Ma; are compositionally homogenous, contain little to no associated terrigenous sediments, and their trace element composition and short emplacement time resemble oceanic plateau basalts. They have been interpreted to be derived from a plume head with a primitive mantle composition.

  20. Provenance of zircon of the lowermost sedimentary cover, Estonia, East-European Craton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konsa, M.

    1999-12-01

    Cambrian sequence, zircons resembling those of local basement sources are very rare or absent. Obviously, basal Vendian/Cambrian sedimentary rocks sealed off the basement as a source of zircon. Therefore a distant source, probably outside the Svecofennian Domain, could be supposed for the bulk clastic minerals and zircons of the upperpart of the Vendian and the lower part of the Cambrian. Probably, studies of isotopic ages of different typological varieties of zircons, both of obviously local and distant origin, could provide new information on respective source rock ages and areas, and on the general palaeogeographic pattern of the Vendian and Cambrian epicratonic sedimentary basins of the East-European Craton.

  1. Paleoproterozoic crustal evolution of the Hengshan–Wutai–Fuping region, North China Craton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunjing Wei

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available An arguable point regarding the Neoarchean and Paleoproterozoic crustal evolution of the North China Craton (NCC is whether the tectonic setting in the central belt during the mid-Paleoproterozoic (2.35–2.0 Ga was dominated by an extensional regime or an oceanic subduction–arc regime. A review of the mid-Paleoproterozoic magmatism and sedimentation for the Hengshan–Wutai–Fuping region suggests that a back-arc extension regime was dominant in this region. This conclusion is consistent with the observation that the 2.35–2.0 Ga magmatism shows a typical bimodal distribution where the mafic rocks mostly have arc affinities and the acidic rocks mainly comprise highly-fractioned calc-alkaline to alkaline (or A-type granites, and that this magmatism was coeval with development of extensional basins characteristic of transgressive sequences with volcanic interlayers such as in the Hutuo Group. Although the final amalgamation of the NCC was believed to occur at ∼1.85 Ga, recent zircon U–Pb age dating for mica schist in the Wutai Group suggests a collisional event may have occurred at ∼1.95 Ga. The metamorphic ages of ∼1.85 Ga, obtained mostly from the high-grade rocks using the zircon U–Pb approach, most probably indicate uplifting and cooling of these high-grade terranes. This is because (i phase modeling suggests that newly-grown zircon grains in high-grade rocks with a melt phase cannot date the age of peak pressure and temperature stages, but the age of melt crystallization in cooling stages; (ii the metamorphic P–T paths with isobaric cooling under 6–7 kb for the Hengshan and Fuping granulites suggest their prolonged stay in the middle–lower crust; and (iii the obtained metamorphic age data show a continuous distribution from 1.95 to 1.80 Ga. Thus, an alternative tectonic scenario for the Hengshan–Wutai–Fuping region involves: (i formation of a proto-NCC at ∼2.5 Ga; (ii back-arc extension during 2.35–2.0

  2. Geochemistry and Geochronology of the Early Paleoproterozoic Volcanism of the Karelian Craton: Petrogenetic and Geodynamic Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogina, M. M.; Zlobin, V. L.

    2009-04-01

    The Early Paleoproterozoic time is characterized worldwide by large-scale magmatic, especially volcanic activity, which was related to the onset of global rifting at the Archean-Proterozoic boundary. At the Karelian craton, its volcanic products compose giant nearly submeridional belts several hundreds kilometer long. The Early Paleoproterozoic volcanosedimentary sequences (2-3 km thick) from the bottom upward are made up of coarse-grade mature sediments, predominant pillow-textured and massive lavas, tuffs, and tuffobreccia of basaltic andesites and andesites, which through felsic tuffs grade into quartz porphyries. Two types of basaltic andesites are distinguished. The Type I show MORB-like flat to slightly LREE-depleted or insignificantly LREE-enriched patterns with (La/Sm)N = 0.7-1.5, and (La/Yb)N = 0.35-1.3, and minor negative or absent Eu, Nb, and Ti anomalies. The type II rocks show LREE enrichment relative to HREE, (La/Sm)N = 1.5-3.84 and (La/Yb)N=6.5-11.67, with minor negative to non-existent Eu anomalies (Eu/Eu) = 0.99-1.15, prominent negative Nb and Sr anomalies, and subtle Ti anomaly. Trace element patterns show that the rocks are enriched in LILE relative to HFSE and in LREE relative to HREE. Negative Nb and Ti anomalies could be inherited from a previous subduction event or result from crustal contamination. Nb-Ta-Th systematics can serve in support of the former interpretation, indicating that the rocks exibit "island arc" affinity with low to moderate (Nb/La)N ratio and extremely low (Nb/Th)N ratio. HREE patterns are weakly fractionated, and show no significant depletion, indicating that garnet was absent from the source rocks during generation of the primary magma. The relatively low Ni and Cr contents suggest that the rocks undergone significant fractional crystallization from mantle-derived melts. The upper age limit of the mafic rocks is constrained by the U-Pb SHIRMP zircon age of cross-cutting felsic dike at 2416

  3. Present mantle flow in North China Craton constrained by seismic anisotropy and numerical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, W.; Guo, Z.; Zhang, H.; Chen, Y. J.

    2017-12-01

    observed anisotropy, that are, the westward escaping flow origins from NE Tibet Plateau and/or Mongolia, and the mantle upwelling from the bottom of upper mantle. The proposed mantle flow may also feed the intraplate volcanoes in the TNCO and intensify the erosion to the cratonic keel of Ordos.

  4. A constrained African craton source for the Cenozoic Numidian Flysch: Implications for the palaeogeography of the western Mediterranean basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, M. F. H.; Bodin, S.; Redfern, J.; Irving, D. H. B.

    2010-07-01

    The provenance of the Numidian Flysch in the western Mediterranean remains a controversial subject which hinders understanding of this regionally widespread depositional system. The Numidian Flysch is a deep marine formation dated as Oligocene to Miocene which outcrops throughout the Maghreb and into Italy. Evidence that is widely used for provenance analysis has not previously been reviewed within the context of the Maghrebian Flysch Basin as a whole. The structural location within the Alpine belt indicates deposition proximal to the African margin, while the uniformity of the Numidian Flysch petrofacies suggests a single cratonic source, in stark contrast to heterolithic and immature flysch formations from the north of the basin. Detrital zircon ages constrain a source region with Pan-African and Eburnian age rocks, unaffected by either Hercynian or Alpine tectonic events, which precludes the European basement blocks to the north of the basin. Palaeocurrent trends which suggest a northern source are unreliable given foreland basin analogues and observed structural complications. An African craton source remains the only viable option once these data are reviewed in their entirety, and the Numidian Flysch therefore represents a major Cenozoic drainage system on the North African margin. Deposition is concurrent with regional Atlas uplift phases, and coincidental with globally cooling climates and high sea levels. The Numidian Flysch is therefore interpreted to represent a highstand passive margin deposit, with timing of deposition controlled primarily by hinterland uplift and climatic fluctuations.

  5. The 1590-1520 Ma Cachoeirinha magmatic arc and its tectonic implications for the Mesoproterozoic SW Amazonian craton crustal evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiz Amarildo S.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Isotopic and chemical data of rocks from the Cachoeirinha suite provide new insights on the Proterozoic evolution of the Rio Negro/Juruena Province in SW Amazonian craton. Six U-Pb and Sm-Nd analyses in granitoid rocks of the Cachoeirinha suite yielded ages of 1587-1522 Ma and T DM model ages of 1.88-1.75 Ga (EpsilonNd values of -0.8 to +1.0. In addition, three post-tectonic plutonic rocks yielded U-Pb ages from 1485-1389 Ma (T DM of 1.77-1.74 Ga and EpsilonNd values from -1.3 to +1.7. Variations in major and trace elements of the Cachoeirinha suite rocks indicate fractional crystallization process and magmatic arc geologic setting. These results suggest the following interpretations: (1 The interval of 1590-1520 Ma represents an important magmatic activity in SW Amazonian craton. (2 T DM and arc-related chemical affinity supportthe hypothesis that the rocks are genetically associated with an east-dipping subduction zone under the older (1.79-1.74 Ga continental margin. (3 The 1590-1520 Ma age of intrusive rocks adjacent to an older crust represents similar geological framework along the southern margin of Baltica, corroborating the hypothesis of tectonic relationship at that time.

  6. First ceratosaurian dinosaur from Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Erich M. G.; Carrano, Matthew T.; Holland, Timothy; Wagstaff, Barbara E.; Pickering, David; Rich, Thomas H.; Vickers-Rich, Patricia

    2012-05-01

    The basal theropod dinosaur clade Ceratosauria, and its subclade Abelisauroidea, is characteristic of late Mesozoic terrestrial vertebrate faunas in western Gondwana (South America, Africa, Madagascar, and India) and Europe. Yet unambiguous records of ceratosaurs have hitherto been absent from Australia, where the theropod assemblage appears to include several typically Laurasian clades. Here, we report the first evidence of ceratosaurs (and potentially abelisauroids) from eastern Gondwana--a diagnostic astragalocalcaneum from the Aptian (121-125 Ma) of Victoria, Australia. Ceratosauria thus occurred in both western and eastern Gondwana during the Early Cretaceous. This fossil adds to the poorly known dinosaur fauna of Australia, a major clade of basal theropods, emphasising that its mid-Cretaceous theropod diversity was surprisingly cosmopolitan despite relative geographic isolation, including clades that have been thought to be typical of both Gondwana and Laurasia--Ceratosauria, Spinosauridae, Carcharodontosauria, Tyrannosauroidea, and Deinonychosauria. Such a contemporaneous association of theropod clades is unknown from other Gondwanan continents and questions the views that the late Mesozoic dinosaur fauna of Australia was dominated by Gondwanan or Laurasian elements, extreme isolation, relictualism, and/or novelty as a `centre of origin'. The cosmopolitan theropod fauna of Australia probably reflects the global distribution of these clades early in their history, prior to significant continental breakup.

  7. The nuclear industry in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, D.G.

    1985-01-01

    The history of the development of the nuclear industry in Australia is essentially the history of uranium mining. Australia is a significant exporter of uranium concentrate yellowcake, but no other nuclear power or fuel cycle activity exists on a commercial scale. Industrial radiation processing and the production of radioisotopes and radio-pharmaceuticals are the only other endeavors. The uranium mining in early years and the second discovery period, the policy formulation in 1970s and the recent policy development are described. Australia's low cost reserve has risen to 474,000 t U, and in 1984, three mines produced around 4,400 t U as yellowcake. Once the Jervis Bay nuclear power plant with 500 MWe capacity was planned, but the project was postponed indefinitely. The Uranium Enrichment Group of Australia planned to build an enrichment plant as a joint venture with URENCO Ltd., but also this plan was interrupted. The lack of expansion into nuclear power and fuel cycle activities has been due to favorable fossil fuel resources and their distribution, population density and distribution, social factors and government policy in Australia. (Kako, I.)

  8. THE SOUTHERN FRAGMENT OF THE SIBERIAN CRATON: “LANDSCAPE” HISTORY OVER TWO BILLION YEARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkady M. Stanevich

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the state-of-the-art geology, concepts of evolution of interrelated geodynamic and biotic events throughout the history of the Earth have been developed (Fig. 1. Research results on sediments, bio-stratigraphy and geodynamics of the southern fragment of the Siberian craton (SSC, Fig. 2 provide for more or less reliable assessments of the status and evolution of ancient landscapes and biotas from the Lower Proterozoic to the Cenozoic.In the Lower Proterozoic, the geodynamic regime of the Urik-Iyskiy graben was similar to those of the westernpacific island-arc systems, which resulted in the orogen formation and established post-orogen granitoids of 1.86 bln years of age. At the beginning of the Early Riphean, volcano-sedimentary masses were accumulated in continental basins (Fig. 2, 3A. Collision orogenesis also resulted in the occurrence of the terrigeno-volcanogenic complex of the Akitkanskaya suite in the Western Pribaikalie and the transecting Irelskiy granitoids, aged 1.86 bln years, at the edge of the craton. Later on, most probably before the Riphean, peneplanation took place, and a shallow peripheral sea was formed with highly-mature sediments of the Purpolskaya suite. Different environments are reconstructed in the KodarUdokan zone. Sediments of the Udokanskaya suite, varying in thicknesses from 11 to 14 km, suggest a complicated evolution of sedimentation in the peripheral marine basin. Dozens of radiochronological datings of granitoids of the Chuiskiy and Kodarskiy complex which transect the Udokanskaya suite are within the range from 1.7 to 2.0 bln years. From the deposit composition and texture, it can be suggested that the middle, Chineiskaya sub-suite was formed under island-arc conditions; and glacial phenomena occurred in the late Udokan time.Further geological history of the SSC can be described only within the period after the Late Riphean sedimentations (see Fig. 3Б, В. The SSC evolution in the Neo-Proterozoic began with

  9. Practice nursing in rural Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegney, Desley

    2007-08-01

    Rural Australia faces unique issues in workforce management and health care delivery. This paper provides an integrated review of the existing literature describing the work of practice nurses in rural Australia and the perceptions of consumers. Distinct differences are evident in the role of the practice nurse between rural and metropolitan practices. A key difference is that the rural practice nurse is known within the community and plays an important role in care coordination. Findings from two studies of consumer perceptions of the role of PN in rural areas suggest that the more remotely located the consumer, the greater is their perception that the nurse works under the direct supervision of the doctor. Currently, remotely located residents do not support an expanded autonomous role for the nurse. Greater research is required to develop the role of the practice nurse in rural Australia.

  10. Relationship between Precambrian North Korean Peninsula and the North China Craton: Evidence from LA-ICP-MS U-Pb ages of detrital zircons from Neoproterozoic tillites of North Korea and Southern North China Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, B.; Zhai, M.; Peng, P.; Zhang, Y.; Wu, J.; Jia, X.; Zhang, H.; Lei, W.; Zhuang, G.

    2016-12-01

    Relationship between Precambrian Korean Peninsula and the North China Craton (NCC) is focus of attention. There are Neoproterozoic tillites in Phyongnam Basin, Nangrim massif, North Korea (NK) and Southern NCC. Nangrim massif was regarded as a part of the NCC according to similar Precambrian basements between Nangrim massif and Longgang massif in the Northeast NCC. But the comparation of Neoproterozoic rocks is lacked between NK and NCC. Detrital zircon LA-ICP-MS U-Pb ages of 2 pebbly phyllite samples of Pirangdong Series in Phyongnam Basin and 2 argillaceous cemented mix-conglomeate samples of Luoquan Series in Southern NCC was analyzed in this research. Detrital zircon ages of pebbly phyllites of Pirangdong Series distribute mainly at 1.85 Ga, 1.8 Ga, 1.6 Ga, 1.4 Ga and 1.2 Ga. A small number of them are at 3.2 Ga, 2.6 - 2.5 Ga, 2.3 Ga, 2.1 Ga and 900 - 860 Ma. Detrital zircon ages of mix-conglomeates of Luoquan Series mainly focus on 2.5 Ga, 2.2 Ga, 2.0 Ga, 1.8 Ga and 1.6 Ga. Minor of them distribute at 1.12 Ga. The similar age distribution of Pirangdong and Luoquan Series of 2.6 - 2.5 Ga, 2.1 - 2.0 Ga, 1.85 - 1.8 Ga and 1.6 Ga corresponds to Precambrian significant tectonic- magmatic- thermal events of the NCC, which indicates that the Precambrian basement rocks of the NCC are main provenances of both Pirangdong and Luoquan Series. This also confirm that the Phyongnam Basin is a part of Neoproterozoic sedimentary covers of the NCC. It is worth to mention that 1.2 - 1.0 Ga and 900 - 850 Ma magmatic rocks in the NCC are seldom reported which relate to the assemblage and breakup of Rodinia Supercontinent. whereas they crop out widely in the South China Craton (SCC) and was always regarded as a mark distingusing the two craton. 1.2 - 1.0 Ga and 900 - 850 Ma zircon ages preserved in sedimentary rocks not only in North Korea and Southern NCC but also in Northeast NCC and East NCC provide data to compare Neoproterozoic strata between NCC and SCC and important clues to

  11. Australia's uranium policy: an examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crook, K.A.W.; Derborough, M.A.; Diesendorf, M.; Inall, E.K.; Peaslee, D.C.; Taylor, S.R.

    1974-12-01

    The mining and export of Australian Uranium poses problems for the safety of the world that any responsible government is bound to consider. The following note lists the major problems, attempts to assess their importance, and to suggest what lines may be relevant to Australia for their solution. These problems were examined because of the concern about the appropriateness of attempting to fulfill projected world energy needs by any means; and their fulfillment, by using nuclear fuels carries special problems of biological, social and political hazards. Any development of Australia's uranium resources should be considered in this light. (author)

  12. Remembering the Battle for Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Rechniewski

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available For the last two years, Australia has commemorated, on the first Wednesday in September, the ‘Battle for Australia Day’, to mark the role of Australian forces fighting the Japanese in the Pacific in WWII. The aim of this article is to identify the agents involved in the campaign for the gazetting of this day and the justifications advanced; to trace the conflicting narratives and political and historical controversies surrounding the notion of a ‘Battle for Australia’; and to outline the shifts in domestic and international politics and generational change that provide the context for the inauguration of this day.

  13. Proterozoic evolution of the western margin of the Wyoming craton: Implications for the tectonic and magmatic evolution of the northern Rocky Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, D.A.; Mueller, P.A.; Mogk, D.W.; Wooden, J.L.; Vogl, J.J.

    2006-01-01

    Defining the extent and age of basement provinces west of the exposed western margin of the Archean Wyoming craton has been elusive because of thick sedimentary cover and voluminous Cretaceous-Tertiary magmatism. U-Pb zircon geochronological data from small exposures of pre-Belt supergroup basement along the western side of the Wyoming craton, in southwestern Montana, reveal crystallization ages ranging from ???2.4 to ???1.8 Ga. Rock-forming events in the area as young as ???1.6 Ga are also indicated by isotopic (Nd, Pb, Sr) signatures and xenocrystic zircon populations in Cretaceous-Eocene granitoids. Most of this lithosphere is primitive, gives ages ???1.7-1.86 Ga, and occurs in a zone that extends west to the Neoproterozoic rifted margin of Laurentia. These data suggest that the basement west of the exposed Archean Wyoming craton contains accreted juvenile Paleoproterozoic arc-like terranes, along with a possible mafic underplate of similar age. This area is largely under the Mesoproterozoic Belt basin and intruded by the Idaho batholith. We refer to this Paleoproterozoic crust herein as the Selway terrane. The Selway terrane has been more easily reactivated and much more fertile for magma production and mineralization than the thick lithosphere of the Wyoming craton, and is of prime importance for evaluating Neoproterozoic continental reconstructions. ?? 2006 NRC Canada.

  14. Constraining the composition and thermal state of lithospheric mantle from inversion of seismic data: Implications for the Kaapvaal and Siberian cratons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuskov, Oleg; Kronrod, Victor; Prokofyev, Alexey; Zhidikova, Alevtina

    2010-05-01

    Quantitative estimation of the temperature distribution in the Earth's mantle is a key problem in petrology and geophysics. In this study, we discuss the method of estimating temperature, composition and thickness of the subcontinental lithospheric mantle beneath some Archean cratons from absolute seismic velocities. The phase composition and physical properties of the lithospheric mantle were modelled within the Na2O-TiO2-CaO-FeO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 system including the non-ideal solid solution phases. For the computation of the phase diagram for a given chemical composition, we have used a method of minimization of the total Gibbs free energy combined with a Mie-Grüneisen equation of state. Our forward calculation of phase diagram, seismic velocities and density and inverse calculation of temperature includes anharmonic and anelastic parameters as well as mineral reaction effects, including modes and chemical compositions of coexisting phases. Sensitivity of density and velocities to temperature, pressure and composition was studied. Inverse code computes the temperature distribution in the upper mantle from seismic and compositional constraints. The output results contain the self-consistent information on phase assemblages, densities and velocities. The approach used here requires a small number of thermodynamically defined parameters and has important advantages over earlier procedures, which contain no information about entropy, enthalpy and Grüneisen parameter. We inverted for temperature the recent P and S velocity models of the Kaapvaal craton as well as the IASP91 reference Earth model. Several long-range seismic profiles were carried out in Russia with Peaceful Nuclear Explosions (PNE). The velocity models from PNEs recorded along these profiles were used to infer upper mantle temperature profiles beneath the Siberian craton. The seismic profiles were inverted on the basis of low and high temperature xenoliths of garnet peridotites from kimberlite pipes of

  15. Proterozoic intracontinental basin succession in the western margin of the São Francisco Craton: Constraints from detrital zircon geochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins-Ferreira, Marco Antonio Caçador; Chemale, Farid, Jr.; Dias, Airton Natanael Coelho; Campos, José Eloi Guimarães

    2018-01-01

    The age and stratigraphic position of Paleoproterozoic to Mesoproterozoic covers that occur along the western border of the São Francisco Craton (SFC) are still uncertain. Based on detailed sedimentological and stratigraphic survey, combined with U-Pb and Lu-Hf zircon dating, we present a new proposal for the stratigraphy and correlation with similar sequences, situated in other regions of the SFC, the Chapada Diamantina and Northern Espinhaço. Our study demonstrates that the so-called Traíras Formation (Araí Group) has a maximum depositional age of 1543 ± 31 Ma. The zircon distribution pattern shows a dominant Rhyacian source and minor contribution of Statherian, Calymmian, Neoarchean and Paleoarchean sources. The Rhyacian zircon grains have dominant positive εHf (t) signature, suggesting a large contribution from the juvenile Paleoproterozoic terranes, most probably from the Goiás Massif, located west of the study area. The Calymmian maximum depositional age, calculated for the upper Araí Group (Traíras Formation), leads to the conclusion that the Serra da Mesa Group (ca. 1.55 Ga maximum depositional age) and the Traíras Formation have coexisted in time, possibly forming a larger sag basin, although laterally heterogeneous. The data presented also allow a new geotectonic interpretation for the Goiás Massif, since it necessarily had to be connected to the São Francisco Craton during the Mesoproterozoic. This excludes the possibility that this massif was accreted to the São Francisco Craton in the Brasiliano Collage, as previously believed. The study also sheds light to the always debated tectonic relationship between the Serra da Mesa Granite (intrusive or basement) and Serra da Mesa Group (ca. 1.57 crystallization age and 1.55 Ga maximum depositional age, respectively). Furthermore, based on the new data, we present a stratigraphic revision for the actual Araí and Paranoá groups, proposing to raise the Traíras Formation to group status and its

  16. EarthScope in Midcontinent North America: Investigating the Architecture and Tectonic History of Cratonic-Platform Lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshak, S.; Larson, T.; Hamburger, M. W.; Pavlis, G. L.; Gilbert, H. J.; Parke, M.

    2010-12-01

    The transportable array of EarthScope will sweep across the Midcontinent of North America during 2011 and 2012. The central portion of this swath, between latitudes 36°N and 38°N, covers a "type example" of cratonic-platform lithosphere, where a veneer of Paleozoic sedimentary strata overlies Precambrian crystalline basement. In anticipating this scientific opportunity, we have compiled a unique suite of geologic, geophysical, subsurface, and topographic data sets for this area. The maps emphasize that, in spite of low topographic relief, the region has large subsurface structural relief. Specifically, its western portion includes a large intracratonic uplift (the Ozark Plateau), whereas its central portion includes a major intracratonic basin (the Illinois Basin). The elevation difference between the Cambrian-Precambrian unconformity at the crest of the Ozark Plateau and the same horizon at the base of the Illinois Basin (< 100 km to the east) is over 7.5 km. The region also includes the northern end of the Mississippi embayment (an anomalous depression), three major Proterozoic lithosphere accretionary boundaries (borders of the Yavapai, Mazatzal, and Grenville belts), one of the world's largest anorogenic igneous provinces (the Eastern Granite-Rhyolite Province), pronounced gravity and magnetic anomalies, and numerous fault-and-fold zones. Many of the zones remain active, both within and outside the notorious New Madrid seismic zone, making the central Midcontinent one of the most seismically active examples of cratonic platform lithosphere anywhere. As part of the USArray deployment in this region, a number of research groups (some of whom met at an EarthScope Workshop held in Urbana) have proposed dense, Flex-Array networks that would densify the sparser Transportable Array network. We propose an experiment that would span the Ozark Dome and the Illinois Basin, the Rough Creek Graben and other fault zones including the Wabash Valley seismic zone. This

  17. Lithospheric structure, composition, and thermal regime of the East European Craton: Implications for the subsidence of the Russian platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemieva, I.M.

    2003-01-01

    A new mechanism for Paleozoic subsidence of the Russian, or East European, platform is suggested, since a model of lithosphere tilting during the Uralian subduction does not explain the post-Uralian sedimentation record. Alternatively, I propose that the Proterozoic and Paleozoic rifting (when a platform-scale Central Russia rift system and a set of Paleozoic rifts were formed) modified the structure and composition of cratonic lithosphere, and these tectono-magmatic events are responsible for the post-Uralian subsidence of the Russian platform. To support this hypothesis, (a) the thermal regime and the thickness of the lithosphere are analyzed, and (b) lithospheric density variations of non-thermal origin are calculated from free-board constraints. The results indicate that Proterozoic and Paleozoic rifting had different effects on the lithospheric structure and composition. (1) Proterozoic rifting is not reflected in the present thermal regime and did not cause significant lithosphere thinning (most of the Russian platform has lithospheric thickness of 150-180 km and the lithosphere of the NE Baltic Shield is 250-300 km thick). Paleozoic rifting resulted in pronounced lithospheric thinning (to 120-140 km) in the southern parts of the Russian platform. (2) Lithospheric density anomalies suggest that Proterozoic-Paleozoic rifting played an important role in the platform subsidence. The lithospheric mantle of the Archean-early Proterozoic part of the Baltic Shield is ??? 1.4 ?? 0.2% less dense than the typical Phanerozoic upper mantle. However, the density deficit in the subcrustal lithosphere of most of the Russian platform is only about (0.4-0.8) ?? 0.2% and decreases southwards to ???0%. Increased densities (likely associated with low depletion values) in the Russian platform suggest strong metasomatism of the cratonic lithosphere during rifting events, which led to its subsidence. It is proposed that only the lower part of the cratonic lithosphere was

  18. Nature and source of the ore-forming fluids associated with orogenic gold deposits in the Dharwar Craton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswajit Mishra

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Neoarchean orogenic gold deposits, associated with the greenstone-granite milieus in the Dharwar Craton include (1 the famous Kolar mine and the world class Hutti deposit; (2 small mines at Hira-Buddini, Uti, Ajjanahalli, and Guddadarangavanahalli; (3 prospects at Jonnagiri; and (4 old mining camps in the Gadag and Ramagiri-Penakacherla belts. The existing diametric views on the source of ore fluid for formation of these deposits include fluids exsolved from granitic melts and extracted by metamorphic devolatilization of the greenstone sequences. Lode gold mineralization occurs in structurally controlled higher order splays in variety of host rocks such as mafic/felsic greenstones, banded iron formations, volcaniclastic rocks and granitoids. Estimated metamorphic conditions of the greenstones vary from lower greenschist facies to mid-amphibolite facies and mineralizations in all the camps are associated with distinct hydrothermal alterations. Fluid inclusion microthermometric and Raman spectroscopic studies document low salinity aqueous-gaseous (H2O + CO2 ± CH4 + NaCl ore fluids, which precipitated gold and altered the host rocks in a narrow P–T window of 0.7–2.5 kbar and 215–320 °C. While the calculated fluid O- and C-isotopic values are ambiguous, S-isotopic compositions of pyrite-precipitating fluid show distinct craton-scale uniformity in terms of its reduced nature and a suggested crustal sulfur source.Available ages on greenstone metamorphism, granitoid plutonism and mineralization in the Hutti Belt are tantamount, making a geochronology-based resolution of the existing debate on the metamorphic vs. magmatic fluid source impossible. In contrast, tourmaline geochemistry suggests involvement of single fluid in formation of gold mineralization, primarily derived by metamorphic devolatilization of mafic greenstones and interlayered sedimentary rocks, with minor magmatic contributions. Similarly, compositions of scheelite

  19. Structure and evolution of the lithospheric mantle beneath Siberian craton, thermobarometric study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashchepkov, Igor V.; Pokhilenko, Nikolai P.; Vladykin, Nikolai V.; Logvinova, Alla M.; Afanasiev, Valentin P.; Pokhilenko, Lyudmila N.; Kuligin, Sergei S.; Malygina, Elena V.; Alymova, Natalia A.; Kostrovitsky, Sergey I.; Rotman, Anatolii Y.; Mityukhin, Sergey I.; Karpenko, Mikhail A.; Stegnitsky, Yuri B.; Khemelnikova, Olga S.

    2010-04-01

    Monomineral thermobarometry (MTB) data derived from EMP analyses for heavy monomineral separates from > 20 Yakutian kimberlite pipes were used to compile a SSE-NNW traverse of the mantle beneath the Siberian craton. Orthopyroxene (Opx) MBT for the mantle section beneath Udachnaya gives three PT paths: a low temperature (LT) conductive branch (Boyd et al., 1997), estimated with thermometers of Krogh (1988) or/and O'Neill and Wood (1979), and two other HT paths. The three paths correspond to different values of Fe# in Ol (0.075, 0.085 and 0.11). They are reproduced by the modified MTB equations for clinopyroxene, garnet, chromite and ilmenites (Ashchepkov et al., 2008a), a mono-version of the O'Neill and Wood (1979) thermometer with corrections to Cr and Ca/Mg ratios which mark conductive geotherm. PT estimates for garnets and pyroxenes reflect mantle layering, whereas those for ilmenite reflect varying conditions of polybaric mantle protokimberlite systems and metasomatism. MTB for xenoliths from the Udachnaya, Mir, Dalnyaya, and Komsomolskaya kimberlites show the colder branches if PT path using heavy mineral analyses them according to PT for xenoliths according to TB (O'Neill and Wood, 1979; Finnerty and Boyd, 1987; McGregor, 1974; Brey and Kohler, 1990) producing smoother geotherms. MTB gives a wider range PT points reflecting heating near magmatic channels. Regularities of mantle sections and layering in the Daldyn field are recognized on the PT and P- X diagrams. The lower part of the mantle sections were heated by protokimberlite melts which created the megacrystalline associations. PT values of sub-calcic garnets correlate with those of picroilmenites. Mantle columns beneath the large pipes reveal stepped 7-12 layering for Udachnaya pipe units correlating with the peaks of Re/Os ages (Griffin et al., 2002b) is marked by periodic increase in Fe# in minerals. Pyroxenites and 'hot' eclogites (Pokhilenko et al., 1999) are found in layers at ˜ ˜ 40, 50-65, and

  20. Boron isotopes reveal multiple metasomatic events in the mantle beneath the eastern North China Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong-Yan; Zhou, Zhou; Ryan, Jeffrey G.; Wei, Gang-Jian; Xu, Yi-Gang

    2016-12-01

    Linkages inferred between the geochemical heterogeneity of the mantle beneath eastern Eurasia and the stagnant Pacific slab documented geophysically in its mantle transition zone are as yet not clearly characterized. In this paper we report new elemental and isotopic data for boron (B) on a suite of well-characterized Cenozoic basalts (alkali basalts, basanites and nephelinites), with ocean island basalt (OIB)-like trace element signatures from western Shandong of the eastern North China Craton (NCC). Correlations between major elements (e.g., FeOT versus SiO2), trace elements (e.g., CeN/PbN versus BaN/ThN) and radiogenic isotopes (e.g., 206Pb/204Pb versus 87Sr/86Sr) suggest these basalts are derived via the mixing of melts from two mantle components: a fluid mobile element (FME; such as Ba, K, Pb and Sr) enriched component, which is most evident in the alkali basalts, and a FME depleted mantle component that is more evident in the basanites and nephelinites. The alkali basalts in this study have lower B concentrations (1.4-2.2 μg/g) but higher δ11B (-4.9 to -1.4) values than the basanites and nephelinites (B = 2.1-5.0 μg/g; δ11B = -6.9 to -3.9), and all the samples have nearly constant B/Nb ratios between 0.03 and 0.07, similar to the observed range in B/Nb for intraplate lavas. Our high-SiO2 samples have higher δ11B than that of our low SiO2 samples, indicating that the B isotopic differences among our samples do not result from the addition of a continental crustal component in the mantle source, or direct crustal assimilation during the eruption process. The positive B versus Nb correlation suggests the B isotopic compositions of the western Shandong basalts primarily reflect the pre-eruptive compositions of their mantle sources. Correlations among B, Nd and Sr isotope signatures of the western Shandong basalts differ from those among basalts from plume settings (e.g., Azores and Hawaii), and are inconsistent with models suggesting single-step metasomatic

  1. Using U-Pb apatite thermochronology to track the structural evolution of granitoid-orthogneiss domes from the Archean Pilbara craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLennan, S. A.; Schoene, B.

    2017-12-01

    Granitoid-orthogneiss domes are an important component of all Archean crustal terranes. The Eastern Pilbara craton contains well-preserved examples of Mesoarchean granitoid-orthogneiss domes whose formation has been interpreted by many within a non-plate tectonic paradigm that hinges upon hotter crustal geotherms that drive partial convective overturn of the crust. This model makes predictions for the temperature-time histories of the domes that can be tested by high-temperature thermochronometry. We use U-Pb thermochronmetry in apatite, which is sensitive to mid crustal temperatures ( 400°C), and thus can track exhumation of gneiss domes from the lower to upper crust. These processes are not recorded in geochronometers (e.g., U-Pb zircon) or low temperature thermochronometers (e.g., U/Th-He, apatite fission track). The convective overturn model for the development of these domes predicts that exhumation of the granitoid ( 3.25 Ga) -orthogneiss (3.45 Ga) domes into the upper crust occurred rapidly (100 Ma after emplacement, followed by exhumation. A craton-wide deformational episode occurs at 3.0 Ga, but is poorly resolved in the eastern Pilbara craton. Our ca. 3.0 Ga apatite dates indicate that this period also drove structural modification in this area. When combined, these data indicate that the eastern Pilbara craton experience a ca. 400 Myr history of intrusion, deformation, and exhumation that resulted in the present crustal architecture, and highlight the utility of U-Pb in apatite as a tool to resolve tectonic histories by constraining the timing of exhumation or emplacement of material into the upper crust, and has wide applications to cratonic or orogenic studies.

  2. Measuring Research Impact in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Andrew; Mintrom, Michael

    2018-01-01

    The implementation of the national Research Engagement and Impact Assessment in Australia provides a timely opportunity to review attempts to improve the non-academic impact of academic research. The impact agenda represents a new phase in academic research evaluation and funding, characterised by a heightened need to demonstrate a return on…

  3. Indigenous actinorhizal plants of Australia

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-10-01

    Oct 1, 2013 ... Australia, increasing the soil fertility and the area of wild life habitat (including endangered species). Whether these improved clones ..... plants in the Australian scenario and possess excellent attri- butes typical of the ..... rainforests: Past, present, and future (eds) E Bermingham,. CW Dick and C Moritz ...

  4. Contextualising Multilingualism in Australia Today

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Robyn

    2015-01-01

    This paper will begin by looking at globalisation, education and transnationalism in the context of Australia's post-war immigration history leading to a brief examination of the international literature surrounding second and third generation immigration. A brief review of international educational trends in English language teaching in recent…

  5. Improving Reading in Australia's Outback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharratt, Lyn; Hayes, Peter; Coutts, James

    2015-01-01

    Ten years ago, six teachers established a program of literacy intervention and professional learning in remote northwestern Australia based on the Reading Recovery principles. This group of teachers was determined to learn what had to happen in order for them to make a difference with students and then to make it happen. Their work led to getting…

  6. Early College Entrance in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jae Yup; Young, Marie; Gross, Miraca U. M.

    2015-01-01

    Early college entry is an educational intervention that is being increasingly used in Australia. Following a review of the current Australian literature on early college entry, an overview is provided of the characteristics of, and the procedures associated with, one formal Australian early college entry program (the Early Admission for…

  7. Indigenous actinorhizal plants of Australia

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-10-01

    Oct 1, 2013 ... the pioneer succession species in areas such as land dis- turbed due to mining and earthquakes. ... Australia is one of the oldest land masses of the earth. As the smallest continent, it still has large .... some of them are rare and come under endangered category. Although species of this genus are found in ...

  8. Afrikaans Language Maintenance in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatoss, Aniko; Starks, Donna; van Rensburg, Henriette Janse

    2011-01-01

    Changes in the political climate in the home country have resulted in the emigration of South Africans to English speaking countries such as Britain, Canada, Australia and New Zealand. Despite the scale of movement of the South African population, language maintenance in these diasporic contexts has received little consideration. This paper…

  9. Governing International Education in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, Ravinder

    2004-01-01

    This paper uses the international education sector in Australia as a case study to argue against understanding globalization as an exogenous force. It introduces the notion of globalization as a governmentality and discusses alternative interpretations which take into account notions of subjectivity, positionality and space/time. The paper…

  10. Hf and Nd Isotopic and REE Investigations of Magnetite in a Proterozoic IOCG system: Fingerprinting Sources and Timing of Mineralisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, B. F.

    2016-12-01

    The Stuart Shelf on the margin of the Gawler Craton, South Australia, contains numerous economic and sub-econmic IOCG mineralised systems, including the giant Olympic Dam Cu-Au-U deposit. Hematite and magnetite have played a critical in the genesis of all of these deposits, and increasingly it appears that magnetite has been in equilibrium with either the final mineralised assemblage or was critical in transporting metals during the ore forming event. 14 magnetites and one hematite from three separate styles of iron oxide mineralisation associated with the Prominent Hill Cu-Au deposit were selected for detailed analysis. The REE and isotopic separations were all conducted by low blank wet chemistry and isotopes determined by TIMS (Nd) and MC-ICPMS (Hf). Magnetites associated with skarn style mineralsiation proximal to the ore body are unformly depleted in REE, whereas hematite within the ore and magmatic magmatites and whole rock gabbros from the nearby 1590Ma White Hill Gabbro intrusion are all relatively LREE enriched and display a comparable range in REE. Significantly however, magnetite separates almost invariably display more evolved Hf isotopic signatures than the host lithologies adjacent the economic mineralisation (dacites and metasediments at Prominent Hill mine) implying that the magnetites were sourcing their REE inventory dominantly from the local crust rather than a mantle derived source. In contrast, the magmatic magnetites from the White Hill Complex display Nd and Hf isotopes which are slightly more primitive, recording a greater relative mantle component, however still requiring a significant crustal input. Significantly, the hematite which contains the Au mineralisation preserves ɛNd (1590) = -4.04 and ɛHf (1590) = -6.05 essentially identical to the magmatic magnetites and their host gabbros in the White Hill complex and the basalts and dacites of the host Gawler Range Volcanics (ɛNd (1590) = -7.10 - -3.72 and ɛHf (1590) = -7.69 - -1

  11. Thermal evolution of the central Halls Creek Orogen, northern Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodorkos, S.; Cawood, P.A.; Oliver, N.H.S.

    1999-01-01

    The Halls Creek Orogen in northern Australia records the Palaeoproterozoic collision of the Kimberley Craton with the North Australian Craton. Integrated structural, metamorphic and geochronological studies of the Tickalara Metamorphics show that this involved a protracted episode of high temperature, low-pressure metamorphism associated with intense and prolonged mafic and felsic intrusive activity in the interval ca 1850-1820 Ma. Tectonothermal development of the region commenced with an inferred mantle perturbation event, probably at ca 1880 Ma. This resulted in the generation of mafic magmas in the upper mantle or lower crust, while upper crustal extension preceded the rapid deposition of the Tickalara sedimentary protoliths. An older age limit for these rocks is provided by a psammopelitic gneiss from the Tickalara Metamorphics, which yield a 207 Pb/ 206 Pb SHRIMP age of 1867 ± 4 Ma for the youngest detrital zircon suite. Voluminous layered mafic intrusives were emplaced in the middle crust at ca 1860-1855 Ma. prior to the attainment of lower granulite facies peak metamorphic conditions in the middle crust. Locally preserved layer-parallel D 1 foliations that were developed during prograde metamorphism were pervasively overprinted by the dominant regional S 2 gneissosity coincident with peak metamorphism. Overgrowths on zircons record a metamorphic 207 Pb/ 206 Pb age of 1845 ± 4 Ma. The S 2 fabric is folded around tight folds and cut by ductile shear zones associated with D 3 (ca 1830 Ma), and all pre-existing structures are folded around large-scale, open F 4 folds (ca 1820 Ma). Construction of a temperature-time path for the mid-crustal section exposed in the central Halls Creek Orogen, based on detailed SHRIMP zircon data, key field relationships and petrological evidence, suggests the existence of one protracted thermal event (>400-500degC for 25-30 million years) encompassing two deformation phases. Protoliths to the Tickalara Metamorphics were

  12. Rift propagation at craton margin.: Distribution of faulting and volcanism in the North Tanzanian Divergence (East Africa) during Neogene times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gall, B.; Nonnotte, P.; Rolet, J.; Benoit, M.; Guillou, H.; Mousseau-Nonnotte, M.; Albaric, J.; Deverchère, J.

    2008-02-01

    A revised kinematic model is proposed for the Neogene tectono-magmatic development of the North Tanzanian Divergence where the axial valley in S Kenya splits southwards into a wide diverging pattern of block faulting in association with the disappearance of volcanism. Propagation of rifting along the S Kenya proto-rift during the last 8 Ma is first assumed to have operated by linkage of discrete magmatic cells as far S as the Ngorongoro-Kilimanjaro transverse volcanic belt that follows the margin of cratonic blocks in N Tanzania. Strain is believed to have nucleated throughout the thermally-weakened lithosphere in the transverse volcanic belt that might have later linked the S Kenya and N Tanzania rift segments with marked structural changes along-strike. The North Tanzanian Divergence is now regarded as a two-armed rift pattern involving: (1) a wide domain of tilted fault blocks to the W (Mbulu) that encompasses the Eyasi and Manyara fault systems, in direct continuation with the Natron northern trough. The reactivation of basement fabrics in the cold and intact Precambrian lithosphere in the Mbulu domain resulted in an oblique rift pattern that contrasts with the orthogonal extension that prevailed in the Magadi-Natron trough above a more attenuated lithosphere. (2) To the E, the Pangani horst-like range is thought to be a younger (< 1 Ma) structure that formed in response to the relocation of extension S of the Kilimanjaro magmatic center. A significant contrast in the mechanical behaviour of the stretched lithosphere in the North Tanzanian diverging rift is assumed to have occurred on both sides of the Masai cratonic block with a mid-crustal decoupling level to the W where asymmetrical fault-basin patterns are dominant (Magadi-Natron and Mbulu), whereas a component of dynamical uplift is suspected to have caused the topographic elevation of the Pangani range in relation with possible far-travelled mantle melts produced at depth further N.

  13. Cratonic roots and lower crustal seismicity: Investigating the role of deep intrusion in the Western rift, Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drooff, C.; Ebinger, C. J.; Lavayssiere, A.; Keir, D.; Oliva, S. J.; Tepp, G.; Gallacher, R. J.

    2017-12-01

    Improved seismic imaging beneath the African continent reveals lateral variations in lithospheric thickness, and crustal structure, complementing a growing crust and mantle xenolith data base. Border fault systems in the active cratonic rifts of East Africa are characterized by lower crustal seismicity, both in magmatic sectors and weakly magmatic sectors, providing constraints on crustal rheology and, in some areas, magmatic fluid migration. We report new seismicity data from magmatic and weakly magmatic sectors of the East African rift zone, and place the work in the context of independent geophysical and geochemical studies to models for strain localization during early rifting stages. Specifically, multidisciplinary studies in the Magadi Natron rift sectors reveal volumetrically large magmatic CO2 degassing along border faults with seismicity along projections of surface dips to the lower crust. The magmatic CO2 degassing and high Vp/Vs ratios and reflectivity of the lower crust implies that the border fault serves a conduit between the lower crustal underplating and the atmospheric. Crustal xenoliths in the Eastern rift sector indicate a granulitic lower crust, which is relatively weak in the presence of fluids, arguing against a strong lower crust. Within magmatic sectors, seismic, structural, and geochemistry results indicate that frequent lower crustal earthquakes are promoted by elevated pore pressures from volatile degassing along border faults, and hydraulic fracture around the margins of magma bodies. Within some weakly magmatic sectors, lower crustal earthquakes also occur along projections of border faults to the lower crust (>30 km), and they are prevalent in areas with high Vp/Vs in the lower crust. Within the southern Tanganyika rift, focal mechanisms are predominantly normal with steep nodal planes. Our comparative studies suggest that pervasive metasomatism above a mantle plume, and melt extraction in thin zones between cratonic roots, lead to

  14. Geochemistry of Archean Mafic Amphibolites from the Amsaga Area, West African Craton, Mauritania: What Is the Message?

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Atrassi, F.; Debaille, V.; Mattielli, N. D. C.; Berger, J.

    2014-12-01

    While Archean terrains are mainly composed of a TTG (Tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite) suite, more mafic lithologies such as amphibolites are also a typical component of those ancient terrains. Although mafic rocks represent only ~10% of the Archean cratons, they may provide key evidence of the role and nature of basaltic magmatism in the formation of the Archean crust as well as the evolution of the Archean mantle. This study focuses on the Archean crust from the West African Craton in Mauritania (Amsaga area). The Amsaga Archean Crust mainly consists of TTG and thrust-imbricated slices of mafic volcanic rocks, which have been affected by polymetamorphic events from the amphibolite to granulite facies. Our main objectives aim to the identification of the mafic lithology origin and a better understanding of their role in the continental crust emplacement. Our petrological observations show that these amphibolites have fine to medium granoblastic and nematoblastic textures. The amphibolites are dominated by amphibolite-facies mineral assemblages (mainly amphibole and plagioclase), but garnet and clinopyroxene occur in a few samples. Two groups are distinct in their geochemical characteristics (major and trace elements), although both have tholeiitic basalt composition. The first group show LREE-enriched patterns and negative Nb-Ta anomalies. The second group is characterized by near-flat LREE patterns and flat HREE patterns. This second group clearly shows no Nb-Ta anomalies. The first group could be related to arc-like basalts, as it is many similarities with some Archean amphibolites probably formed in a supra-subduction zone, for instance the volcanic rocks from the southern edge of the Isua Supracrustal Belt. On the contrary, the second group has a MORB-like signature which is more unusual during the Archean. Different scenarios will be discussed regards to the Archean geodynamics.

  15. Australia - a nuclear weapons testing ground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobbs, Michael.

    1993-01-01

    Between 1952 and 1958 Britain conducted five separate nuclear weapons trials in Australia. Australia had the uninhabited wide open spaces and the facilities which such tests need and Britain was able to use its special relationship with Australia to get agreement to conduct atomic tests in Australia and establish a permanent test site at Maralinga. Other non-nuclear tests were conducted between 1953-1963. The story of Britain's involvement in atomic weapons testing in Australia is told through its postal history. Both official and private covers are used to show how the postal communications were established and maintained throughout the test years. (UK)

  16. A detailed view of the crust and lithospheric mantle beneath eastern Australia from transportable seismic array tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlinson, Nicholas; Pilia, Simone

    2014-05-01

    The WOMBAT transportable seismic array project has been ongoing in eastern Australia since 1998, when a 40 station temporary array of recorders was first installed in western Victoria. To date, 16 consecutive array deployments have taken place with a cumulative total of over 700 stations installed in an area spanning Tasmania, New South Wales, southern Queensland and much of South Australia. Station separation varies between 15 km in Tasmania and 50 km on the mainland, with the majority of stations 3-component 1 Hz instruments, although a number of broadband instruments are interspersed. Although best suited to P-wave tomography, the recorded seismic wavefield has also proven to be useful for ambient noise tomography and crustal receiver functions, thus allowing detailed information on both the crust and lithospheric mantle structure to be retrieved. In order to apply teleseismic tomography using a transportable array of instruments, a robust background model is required which contains the long wavelength features suppressed by the use of relative arrival time residual datasets which are array specific. Here, we use the recently released AuSREM mantle model which is based on regional surface and body wave datasets. Crustal and Moho structure, which is poorly resolved by teleseismic data, is also included (from the AuSREM crustal model) as prior information to minimise smearing of crustal information into the mantle. The final model exhibits a variety of well resolved features, including a low velocity zone associated with Quaternary intraplate volcanism; a pronounced velocity gradient transition zone between the Precambrian shield region of Australia in the west and the Palaeozoic orogens in the east; and the presence of a high velocity salient which extends almost to the east coast in northern New South Wales, which is interpreted to be Precambrian lithosphere. The ambient noise tomography results, which are now continuous between Tasmania and mainland Australia

  17. Electrical Conductivity Model of the Mantle Lithosphere of the Slave Craton (NW Canada) and its tectonic interpretation in the context of Geochemical Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lezaeta, P.; Chave, A.; Evans, R.; Jones, A. G.; Ferguson, I.

    2002-12-01

    The Slave Craton, northwestern Canada, contains the oldest known rocks on Earth, with exposed outcrop over an area of about 600x400 km2. The discovery of economic diamondiferous kimberlite pipes during the early 1990s motivated extensive research in the region. Over the last six years, four types of deep-probing magnetotelluric (MT) surveys were conducted within the framework of diverse geoscientific programs, aimed at determining the regional-scale electrical structures of the craton. Two of the surveys involved novel acquisition; one through frozen lake ice along ice roads during winter, and the second deploying ocean-bottom instrumentation from float planes during summer. The latter surveys required one year of recording between summers, thus allowing long period transfer functions that lead to mantle penetration depths of over 300 km. Two-dimensional modeling of the MT data from along the winter road showed the existence of a high conductivity zone at depths of 80-120 km beneath the central Slave craton. This anomalous region is spatially coincident with an ultradepleted harzburgitic layer in the upper mantle that was interpreted by others to be related to a subducted slab emplaced during the mid-Archean. A 3-D electrical conductivity model of the Slave lithosphere has been obtained, by trial and error, to fit the magnetic transfer and MT response functions from the lake experiments. This 3-D model traces the central Slave conductor as a NE-SW oriented mantle structure. Its NE-SW orientation coincides with that of a late fold belt system, with the first phase of craton-wide plutonism at ca 2630-2590 Ma, three-part subdivision of the craton based on SKS results, and with a G10 (garnet) geochemical mantle boundaries. All of these highlight a NE-SW structural grain to the lithospheric mantle of the craton, in sharp contrast to the N-S grain of the crust. Constraints on the depth range and lateral extension of the electrical conductive structure are obtained

  18. Firearms and suicide in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantor, C H; Lewin, T

    1990-12-01

    Australia has a moderate overall suicide rate but an extremely high male firearm suicide rate. Using data covering the years 1961-1985, a series of multiple regression based analyses were performed. During this period, overall suicide rates fell but firearm suicides remained constant with a resulting increase in the proportion of suicides by firearms. There has been an increase in suicides in the young offset by a decline in the elderly. Young males showed the greatest proportional increase in the use of firearms. A limited regional analysis supported the hypothesis that lack of legislative restrictions on long guns in Queensland with a greater household prevalence of such weapons and different cultural attitudes were associated with higher overall and firearm suicide rates. Such findings are consistent with reports from North America, although trends in Australia are more modest. Reducing the availability and cultural acceptance of firearms is likely to decrease suicide rates, especially in males.

  19. 40Ar/39Ar dating of 1.0-1.1 Ga magnetizations from the Sao Francisco and Kalahari cratons: tectonic implications for Pan-African and Brasiliano mobile belts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renne, P.R.; Onstott, T.C.; Agrella-Filho, M.S. d'; Pacca, I.G.; Teixeira, W.

    1990-01-01

    Paleomagnetic poles from 1.1-1.0 Ga dyke swarms in eastern Brazil (Sao Francisco Craton) are compared with 1.0 Ga poles from granulites of the Namaqua Province in southern Africa (Kalahari Graton). The intrusive ages of dykes are estimated from 40 Ar/ 39 Ar dating of outgassed biotites from baked country rocks. The age of magnetization for the granulites is derived by combining 40 Ar/ 39 Ar hornblende and biotite dates. When restored to a Mesozoic pre-drift configuration the paleomagnetic poles are in crude spatial agreement but are temporally discordant. To satisfy both paleomagnetic and geochronologic constraints, a reconstruction involving separation of the Sao Francisco and Kalahari cratons is required, indicating that the intervening Pan-African (Brasiliano) mobile belt may record a craton-craton collision. (orig.)

  20. Observing urban forests in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    E.G. McPherson

    2009-01-01

    From February 13 to 28, 2009 I had the good fortune of visiting Australia, and touring urban forests in Sydney, Canberra, Brisbane, and Melbourne. My visits were only a day or two in each city, so in no case did I get an in-depth view of the urban forest resource or its management. The following observations are based on rather superficial field assessments and brief...

  1. Radiological terrorism and Australia's response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, D.

    2003-01-01

    A terrorist attack in Australia involving dispersal of radioactive material is different from conventional terrorist attacks involving explosives. The trauma experienced by victims during an explosive incident includes cuts, broken limbs, burns and shock. When an explosive device involving radioactive materials is involved, there are a number of additional characteristics including the contamination of victims and the surrounding area and the potential requirement for ongoing monitoring and decontamination. Response actions may require additional complex emergency response measures including immediate protective actions to protect those potentially exposed to contamination, mass casualty care, and public and mental health. There are concerns that terrorist organizations are showing increasing interest in acquiring radiological material that could be used with explosive. A dirty bomb or technically known as a radiological dispersal device (RDD) is a device designed to spread radioactive contamination over a wide area and pose a health and safety threat to those within the contaminated area. The radioactive material could be in the form of a large chunk of material, fine powder, a liquid mist, or a gas. The material may also be spread in other ways, such as by simply emptying a container over the desired area. As RDD's do not require large amounts of explosives, there is unlikely to be a large numbers of casualties, however the areas contaminated by the radiological material may cause immediate and long term health risks to those exposed. An RDD is a weapon of Mass Disruption rather than destruction. While the likelihood of RDD's being employed by terrorist in Australia is still considered remote, Australia's emergency response organizations are developing plans to ensure a rapid and comprehensive response occurs should such an event occur in this country, The presentation will outline Australia's response arrangements at the local/state level and the type of federal

  2. Great Barrier Reef, Queensland, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    This detailed view of the Great Barrier Reef, Queensland, Australia (19.5S, 149.5E) shows several small patch reefs within the overall reef system. The Great Barrier Reef, largest in the world, comprises thousands of individual reefs of great variety and are closely monitored by marine ecologists. These reefs are about 6000 years old and sit on top of much older reefs. The most rapid coral growth occurs on the landward side of the reefs.

  3. Atomic Australia: 1944-1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cawte, Alice.

    1992-01-01

    This book tells how successive Australian governments pursued the elusive uranium dream. With Australian uranium committed to the West's atomic arsenals, Australia seemed set to become a nation powered by the atom. But by the mid-1950 the Australian government learnt that their expectations were premature, if not unrealistic. The background of the creation of the Australian Atomic Energy Commission is also given along with the examination of the uranium controversies of the 1970s and 1980s. 150 refs

  4. Taxation of Gambling in Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Alchin, T.

    1989-01-01

    This paper examines taxation of gambling in Australia and shows the proportions of taxation that each State receives. An interstate comparison of the components of gambling taxes is undertaken and some reasons for the differences between States are given such as the contributions to hospitals and the staid nature of residents of some other States. Taxation of gambling in NSW is examined in some depth and lottery revenue is used as an illustration of the growth, decline and resurgence of this ...

  5. Australia: Approaching an energy crossroads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falk, Jim; Settle, Domenica

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers energy policy in Australia in the context of its considerable energy resources, climate change and a recent change in government. It examines the possible paths that future energy use and policy in Australia could take, including published projections based largely on a 'business as usual' approach and projections based on a dramatic shift towards more efficient use of energy and renewable energy technologies. It also considers the various factors affecting future policy direction, including energy security, the advocacy in Australia for establishing nuclear electricity generation and other parts of the nuclear fuel-cycle, responses to climate change, and carbon sequestration. It concludes that while the Australian Government is currently reluctant to move away from a dependence on coal, and unlikely to adopt nuclear energy generation, a low-emissions future without waiting for the deployment of carbon capture and storage and without resorting to nuclear power is within reach. However, in the face of strong pressure from interest groups associated with energy intensive industry, making the necessary innovations will require further growth of community concern about climate change, and the development of greater understanding of the feasibility of employing low carbon-emissions options.

  6. Karst and agriculture in Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillieson David

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Much of the development and degradation of karst lands in Australia has occurred in the last two centuries since European settlement. Recent prolonged El Nino events add further climatic uncertainty and place real constraints on sustainable agriculture. The lower southeast of South Australia is perhaps the one area in Australia where karst, and particularly karst hydrology, impinge on the daily lives of the community in that pollution and overexploitation of the aquifer are readily apparent to the local population. Effluent from intensive dairy farms, piggeries and cheese factories enters the karst and has caused concern over pollution of water supplies. Human impacts on the Mole Creek karst of Tasmania have been well documented. The principal recent impacts on the karst arc associated with land clearance for farmland, forest cutting for timber, road building, refuse disposal and associated hydrological change. There is similar evidence of agricultural impacts un karst in central New South Wales, with clear evidence of vegetation clearance and soil stripping on the limestones at Wellington, Orange and Molong.

  7. Reconstructions before rifting and drifting reveal the geological connections between Antarctica and its conjugates in Gondwanaland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veevers, J. J.

    2012-03-01

    The initial (200-175 Ma) breakup of Pangea was marked by the emplacement of the Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs) of Karoo-Ferrar-SE Australia (KFS) in the back-arc of Panthalassan subduction and by the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP) between Africa and the Americas. Seafloor spreading 190-180 Ma (Stage 1) about the CAMP split Pangea into northern (Laurasia) and southern (Gondwanaland) parts. Subsequent stages at 167 Ma (2), 147 Ma (3), 130 Ma (4), 118 Ma (5), and 83 Ma (6) split conjugate Africa, South America, India, Australia, and Zealandia from Antarctica. Here I review the reconstruction of Antarctica in Gondwanaland. First, seafloor spreading is unwound to re-unite the continent-ocean boundaries (COBs), then the extended (rifted) crust about the suture is restored to its original thickness. A comprehensive review of the U-Pb zircon geochronology of the reconstructed margins of Antarctica and its conjugates shows that certain coeval structures are aligned across the suture. Cross structures of high-order spatial continuity and age correlation are the Lambert-Mahanadi Rift, Pranhita-Godavari-Robert Glacier trend, Gawler-Adélie Craton, and western part of the Gondwanide Fold Belt. Cross structures of high-order age correlation but low structural continuity or alignment are, from Africa to Antarctica, the East African-Antarctic Orogen, the Natal and Maud Belts, the Umkondo Group-Ritscherflya Supergroup and LIP, and the Kalahari-Grunehogna Craton; from Antarctica to Zealandia, the Ross-Western and Amundsen-Eastern Provinces; and from Africa through Antarctica to Australia the KFS LIP.

  8. Characterizing Lithospheric Thickness in Australia using Ps and Sp Scattered Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, H. A.; Fischer, K. M.; Rychert, C. A.

    2008-12-01

    more complicated signals at mantle depths. However, at some stations along the southern edge of the thick sub-cratonic lithosphere (previously imaged by surface waves) phases exist which may represent a lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary at depths of 110-115 km. Constraining the relationship of lithospheric thickness to the age and tectonic history of the overlying crust in Australia is important for better understanding the long term evolution of the continent.

  9. Comparative tectonic and dynamic analysis of cratons, orogens, basins, and metallogeny: A special volume to honor the career of Brian F. Windley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusky, Tim; Xiao, Wenjiao

    2015-11-01

    Cratons, orogens, and basins of the world each show a distinctive pattern of evolution and metallogeny, and relationships to supercontinent cycles. Some aspects of these histories have remained similar through time, yet others have changed with Earth's changing biota, heat production and flow, and atmospheric composition and temperature. To understand the similarities and differences between these cratons, orogens, and basins through time, we need systematic comparative tectonic analyses between these different elements from similar and widely different ages. One of the pioneers in comparative tectonic analysis is Brian F. Windley, whose research has spanned all of these topics, and more, for more than five decades. This special issue is a tribute to his career.

  10. The Diamondiferous Lithospheric Mantle Underlying the Eastern Superior Craton: Evidence From Mantle Xenoliths From the Renard Kimberlites, Quebec

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, L.; Stachel, T.; Armstrong, J. P.; Simonetti, A.

    2009-05-01

    The Renard kimberlite cluster consists of nine pipes located within a 2km2 area in the northern Otish Mountains of Quebec. The pipes are named Renards 1 to 10, with subsequent investigation revealing Renards 5 and 6 to join at depth (now Renard 65). The pipes are located within the eastern portion of the Superior craton, emplaced into Archean granitic and gneissic host rocks of the Opinica Subprovince (Percival, 2007). Amphibolite grade metamorphism, locally passing into the granulite facies (Percival et al., 1994) occurred in late Archean time (Moorhead et al., 2003). Radiometric dating of the hypabyssal Renard 1 kimberlite indicates Neoproterozoic emplacement, with a 206Pb/238U model age of 631.6±3.5 Ma (2σ) (Birkett et al., 2004). A later study on the main phases in Renard 2 and 3 gave a similar emplacement, with a 206Pb/238U model age of 640.5±2.8Ma (Fitzgerald et al., 2008). This makes this kimberlite district one of the oldest in Canada, similar in eruption age to the Wemindji kimberlites (629±29Ma: Letendre et al., 2003). These events are broadly coeval with the conversion from subduction magmatism to rifting in northern Laurentia (Birkett et al., 2004). The bodies are part of a late Neoproterozoic to Cambrian kimberlite field in eastern Canada (Girard, 2001; Moorhead et al, 2002; Letendre et al., 2003) and fit into the north-east of the Eocambrian/Cambrian Labrador Sea Province of Heaman et al. (2004). To better understand the diamondiferous lithospheric mantle beneath the Renard kimberlites, 116 microxenoliths and xenocrysts were analysed. The samples were dominantly peridotitic, composed primarily of purple garnet, emerald green clinopyroxene and olivine, with a few pink and red garnets. A minor eclogitic component comprises predominantly orange garnets and lesser amounts of clinopyroxene. A detailed study on the major, minor and trace element composition of xenolith minerals is currently underway. All but three of the clinopyroxenes analysed to date

  11. Numerical modeling of convective erosion and peridotite-melt interaction in big mantle wedge: Implications for the destruction of the North China Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lijuan

    2014-04-01

    The deep subduction of the Pacific Plate underneath East Asia is thought to have played a key role in the destruction of the North China Craton (NCC). To test this hypothesis, this paper presents a new 2-D model that includes an initial stable equilibrated craton, the formation of a big mantle wedge (BMW), and erosion by vigorous mantle convection. The model shows that subduction alone cannot thin the cold solid craton, but it can form a low-viscosity BMW. The amount of convective erosion is directly proportional to viscosity within the BMW (η0bmw), and the rheological boundary layer thins linearly with decreasing log10(η0bmw), thereby contributing to an increase in heat flow at the lithospheric base. This model also differs from previous modeling in that the increase in heat flow decays linearly with t1/2, meaning that the overall thinning closely follows a natural log relationship over time. Nevertheless, convection alone can only cause a limited thinning due to a minor increase in basal heat flow. The lowering of melting temperature by peridotite-melt interaction can accelerate thinning during the early stages of this convection. The two combined actions can thin the craton significantly over tens of Myr. This modeling, combined with magmatism and heat flow data, indicates that the NCC evolution has involved four distinct stages: modification in the Jurassic by Pacific Plate subduction and BMW formation, destruction during the Early Cretaceous under combined convective erosion and peridotite-melt interaction, extension in the Late Cretaceous, and cooling since the late Cenozoic.

  12. Electrical conductivity images across the Namibian passive margin: Implications for tectonic processes along the Kaoko Belt, the western Kongo Craton and the Walvis Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weckmann, Ute; Meqbel, Naser; Kapinos, Gerhard; Jegen-Kulcsar, Marion; Ritter, Oliver

    2014-05-01

    The Special Priority Programme SAMPLE of the German Science Foundation DFG is focussed on investigating processes related to the breakup of supercontinent Gondwana and the post breakup evolution of the passive continental margins of Africa and South America. Within this framework an amphibian magnetotelluric (MT) experiment was conducted at the Southern African passive continental margin, starting at the Walvis Ridge in the Atlantic Ocean and crossing onshore the entire Kaoko Belt and the western boundary of the Kongo Craton in Northern Namibia. High-quality MT data at 167 onshore and xx offshore sites show a strong variability within short distances and indicate complex subsurface structures in parts of the Kaoko Belt and along some of the major thrust and fault zones. To identify the main conductivity features and resolve their properties in more spatial detail we started our modelling procedure with 2D inversion for a sub-set of the data where the 3D effects are less dominant along the amphibian profile. However, to account for 3D effects in the MT data and to assess robustness of conductivity anomalies revealed in the 2D model we used the entire data set for the 3D inversion using ModEM. 2D and 3D inversion models show zones of high electrical conductivity that correlate with surface expressions of prominent faults such as the Purros Mylonite Zone and the Three Palm Mylonite Zone of the Kaoko Belt. Outcropping Etendeka flood basalts in the Western Kaoko Zones are imaged by 10-15km deep reaching zones of high resistivity. Additionally, the inversion models reveal a spatial correlation of resistive zones with the cratonic Northern Platform; however, the geologically defined onset of the Kongo Craton appears as an area of high conductivity. Compared with other craton boundaries in Southern Africa this is very untypical.

  13. Blueschist facies fault tectonites from the western margin of the Siberian Craton: Implications for subduction and exhumation associated with early stages of the Paleo-Asian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likhanov, Igor I.; Régnier, Jean-Luc; Santosh, M.

    2018-04-01

    The tectonic evolution of the Siberian Cratonic margins offers important clues for global paleogeographic reconstructions, particularly with regard to the complex geological history of Central Asia. The Yenisey Ridge fold-and-thrust belt at the western margin of the Siberian Craton forms part of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB) and is a key to understand the Precambrian tectonic evolution of the Siberian Craton and crustal growth in the CAOB, the world's largest Phanerozoic accretionary orogenic belt. Here we report for the first time, the occurrence of glaucophane schist relics in tectonites within the Yenisey shear zone which provides insights on Chilean-type convergent boundary. We present results from isotope geochronology (SHRIMP zircon analysis and mica 40Ar/39Ar dating), coupled with P-T calculations derived from conventional geothermobarometry and pseudosections in the system NCKFMASH that suggest two superimposed metamorphic events. During the first stage, glaucophane schists formed at around 640-620 Ma at P-T conditions of 8-10 kbar and 400-450 °C. In the second stage, the rocks experienced dynamic metamorphism (c. 600 Ma) at 11-15 kbar/550-640 °C. The differences in P-T parameters between weakly deformed rocks and intensely deformed tectonites and P-T paths suggest distinct tectonic processes. Geochemical features of the mafic tectonites suggest N-MORB and E-MORB affinity, and the zircon U-Pb ages suggest formation of the protoliths at 701.6 ± 8.4. The sequence of spreading, subduction and shear deformation identified in our study correlate with the early stages of development of the Paleo-Asian Ocean at the western margin of the Siberian Craton and supports the spatial proximity of Siberia and Laurentia at 700-600 Ma, as proposed for the Late Neoproterozoic paleogeographic reconstructions and as robustly constrained from large igneous province (LIP) record.

  14. Age of blastomilonites of the Yenisei regional shear zone as evidence of the Vendian accretionary-collision events at the western margin of the Siberian Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likhanov, I. I.; Reverdatto, V. V.; Zinov'ev, S. V.; Nozhkin, A. D.

    2013-05-01

    The age of the latest impulse of dynamometamorphic structural-compositional transformations (603-615 Ma) was established from the 40Ar-39Ar age of micas from balstomilonites of the Garevka metamorphic complex of the Yenisei Ridge confined to the Priyenisei shear zone. The age of these tectonic-thermal events marks the final stage of the Neoproterozoic evolution of the Yenisei Ridge related to the accretion of the Isakovka terrane to the western margin of the Siberian Craton. These results are in agreement with the age of metamorphic rocks of northwestern Prisayany, which are incorporated into the Sayany-Yenisei accretionary belt along with Yenisei Ridge. The conformable data on two regions indicate a global Vendian accretionary-collision event, which led to the formation of the Sayany-Yenisei accretionary belt, lateral thickening of the continental crust to the southwestern margin of the Siberian Craton, and its subsequent tectonic reworking. The synchronous Vendian orogenesis and consequence of the tectonic-thermal events along the periphery of the large Precambrian cratons of the Baltic and Siberia confirm their close spatial relation about 800 Ma ago, which agrees with contemporary paleomagnetic reconstructions.

  15. Gravity and magnetic modelling in the Vrancea Zone, south-eastern Carpathians: Redefinition of the edge of the East European Craton beneath the south-eastern Carpathians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocin, A.; Stephenson, R.; Matenco, L.; Mocanu, V.

    2013-11-01

    A 2D gravity and magnetic data model has been constructed along a 71 km densely observed profile, called DACIA PLAN GRAV MAN's. The profile crosses part of the nappe pile of the south-eastern Carpathians and includes the seismically active Vrancea Zone and was acquired with the objective to illuminate the basement structure and affinity in this area. The modelling approach was to create an initial model from well constrained geological information, integrate it with previous seismic ray tracing and tomographic models and then alter it outside the a priori constraints in order to reach the best fit between observed and calculated potential field anomalies. The results support a realignment of the position of the TTZ (Tornquist-Teisseyre Zone), the profound tectonic boundary within Europe that separates Precambrian cratonic lithosphere of the East European Craton (EEC) from younger accreted lithosphere of Phanerozoic mobile belts to its west. The TTZ is shown to lie further to the south-west than was previously inferred within Romania, where it is largely obscured by the Carpathian nappes. The crust of the EEC beneath the south-eastern Carpathians is inferred to terminate along a major crustal structure lying just west of the Vrancea seismogenic zone. The intermediate depth seismicity of the Vrancea Zone therefore lies within the EEC lithosphere, generally supporting previously proposed models invoking delamination of cratonic lithosphere as the responsible mechanism.

  16. U-Pb SHRIMP ages of detrital zircons from Hiriyur formation in Chitradurga Greenstone belt and its implication to the Neoarchean evolution of Dharwar craton, South India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasheeth, A.; Okudaira, T.; Horie, K.; Hokada, T.; Satish Kumar, M.

    2016-01-01

    We report newly obtained U-Pb SHRIMP ages of detrital zircons from metagreywackes in the Hiriyur Formation (Chitradurga Group, Dharwar Supergroup) from the central eastern part of the Chitradurga greenstone belt. U-Pb analyses yield three major Neoarchean age populations ranging from 2.70 - 2.54 Ga with some minor age population of Mesoarchean. The maximum age of deposition is constrained by the youngest detrital zircon population at 2546 Ma. This is the first report of the occurrence of supracrustal rocks less than 2.58 Ga in the central part of Chitradurga greenstone belt. Close evaluation of detrital ages with the published ages of surrounding igneous rocks suggest that the youngest detrital zircons might be derived from rocks of the Eastern Dharwar craton and the inferred docking of the western and eastern Dharwar cratons happened prior to the deposition of the Hiriyur Formation. The Chitradurga shear zone, dividing the Dharwar craton into western and eastern blocks, probably developed after the deposition. Furthermore, the lower intercept is interpreted as evidence for the Pan-African overprints in the study area. (author)

  17. Petrogenesis of the middle Jurassic appinite and coeval granitoids in the Eastern Hebei area of North China Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wenbo; Jiang, Neng; Xu, Xiyang; Hu, Jun; Zong, Keqing

    2017-05-01

    An integrated study of zircon U-Pb ages and Hf-O isotopic compositions, whole rock elemental and Sr-Nd isotope geochemistry was conducted on three lithologically diverse middle Jurassic plutons from the Eastern Hebei area of the North China Craton (NCC), in order to reveal both their petrogenesis and possible tectonic affinity. The three plutons have consistent magmatic zircon U-Pb ages from 167 ± 1 Ma to 173 ± 1 Ma. The Nianziyu pluton has typical characteristics of appinite with low SiO2 (43.7-52.6%), high Ca, Mg, Fe and H2O contents. It possesses subduction-related trace element patterns, enriched Nd-Hf isotopic signatures as well as elevated zircon δ18O values (6.2-7.2‰), arguing for an enriched mantle source metasomatized by fluids related to subduction. The Shuihutong monzogranites have high silica (SiO2 = 75.4-75.9%) and alkali contents, low Ca contents and striking negative Ba, Sr and Eu anomalies. Samples from the pluton have more evolved Nd-Hf isotopic values and are considered to be most likely derived from anatexis of ancient lower continental crust. Hybridization between mantle- and ancient lower crust-derived magmas is proposed for the mafic microgranular enclave-bearing Baijiadian granitoids, which are characterized by variable εNd (t) and εHf(t) values. Integrated with the regional geologic history, we suggest that the formation of the three middle Jurassic plutons were related to the subduction of the Paleo-Pacific ocean plate beneath the NCC. Their petrogenetic differences reflect complex magmatic processes in subduction settings involving melting of multiple sources, possible partly facilitated by fluid metasomatism and water-rich magma injection, accompanied with various degrees of magma mixing. The appearance of middle Jurassic appinitic rocks leads us to propose that the NCC destruction and lithosphere thinning were facilitated and controlled by the weakening of the lithospheric mantle after hydration because of the subduction of the

  18. Three-Dimensional Rheological Structure of North China Craton Determined by Integration of Multiple observations: Controlling Role for Lithospheric Rifting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, X.; Shan, B.; Li, Y.

    2017-12-01

    The North China Craton (NCC) has undergone significant lithospheric rejuvenation in late Mesozoic and Cenozoic, one feature of which is the widespread extension and rifting. The extension is distinct between the two parts of NCC: widespread rifting in the eastern NCC and localized narrow rifting in the west. The mechanism being responsible for this difference is uncertain and highly debated. Since lithospheric deformation can be regarded as the response of lithosphere to various dynamic actions, the rheological properties of lithosphere must have a fundamental influence on its tectonics and deformation behavior. In this study, we investigated the 3D thermal and rheological structure of NCC by developing a model integrating several geophysical observables (such as surface heatflow, regional elevation, gravity and geoid anomalies, and seismic tomography models). The results exhibit obvious lateral variation in rheological structure between the eastern and western NCC. The overall lithospheric strength is higher in the western NCC than in the east. Despite of such difference in rheology, both parts of NCC are characterized by mantle dominated strength regime, which facilitates the development of narrow rifting. Using ancient heatflow derived from mantle xenoliths studies, and taking the subduction-related dehydration reactions during Mesozoic into account, we constructed the thermal and rheological structure of NCC in Ordovician, early Cretaceous and early Cenozoic. Combining the evidence from numerical simulations, we proposed an evolution path of the rifting in NCC. The lithosphere of NCC in Ordovician was characterized by a normal craton features: low geotherm, high strength and mantle dominated regime. During Jurassic and Cretaceous, the mantle lithosphere in the eastern NCC was hydrated by fluid released by the suduction of the Pacific plate, resulting in weakening of the lithosphere and a transition from mantle dominated to crust dominated regime, which

  19. Lithospheric layering in the North American craton revealed by including Short Period Constraints in Full Waveform Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, C.; Calo, M.; Bodin, T.; Romanowicz, B. A.

    2017-12-01

    Recent receiver function studies of the North American craton suggest the presence of significant layering within the cratonic lithosphere, with significant lateral variations in the depth of the velocity discontinuities. These structural boundaries have been confirmed recently using a transdimensional Markov Chain Monte Carlo approach (TMCMC), inverting surface wave dispersion data and converted phases simultaneously (Calò et al., 2016; Roy and Romanowicz 2017). The lateral resolution of upper mantle structure can be improved with a high density of broadband seismic stations, or with a sparse network using full waveform inversion based on numerical wavefield computation methods such as the Spectral Element Method (SEM). However, inverting for discontinuities with strong topography such as MLDS's or LAB, presents challenges in an inversion framework, both computationally, due to the short periods required, and from the point of view of stability of the inversion. To overcome these limitations, and to improve resolution of layering in the upper mantle, we are developing a methodology that combines full waveform inversion tomography and information provided by short period seismic observables. We have extended the 30 1D radially anisotropic shear velocity profiles of Calò et al. 2016 to several other stations, for which we used a recent shear velocity model (Clouzet et al., 2017) as constraint in the modeling. These 1D profiles, including both isotropic and anisotropic discontinuities in the upper mantle (above 300 km depth) are then used to build a 3D starting model for the full waveform tomographic inversion. This model is built after 1) homogenization of the layered 1D models and 2) interpolation between the 1D smooth profiles and the model of Clouzet et al. 2017, resulting in a smooth 3D starting model. Waveforms used in the inversion are filtered at periods longer than 30s. We use the SEM code "RegSEM" for forward computations and a quasi-Newton inversion

  20. Spectral characteristics of banded iron formations in Singhbhum craton, eastern India: Implications for hematite deposits on Mars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahima Singh

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Banded iron formations (BIFs are major rock units having hematite layers intermittent with silica rich layers and formed by sedimentary processes during late Archean to mid Proterozoic time. In terrestrial environment, hematite deposits are mainly found associated with banded iron formations. The BIFs in Lake Superior (Canada and Carajas (Brazil have been studied by planetary scientists to trace the evolution of hematite deposits on Mars. Hematite deposits are extensively identified in Meridiani region on Mars. Many hypotheses have been proposed to decipher the mechanism for the formation of these deposits. On the basis of geomorphological and mineralogical studies, aqueous environment of deposition is found to be the most supportive mechanism for its secondary iron rich deposits. In the present study, we examined the spectral characteristics of banded iron formations of Joda and Daitari located in Singhbhum craton in eastern India to check its potentiality as an analog to the aqueous/marine environment on Mars. The prominent banding feature of banded iron formations is in the range of few millimeters to few centimeters in thickness. Fe rich bands are darker (gray in color compared to the light reddish jaspilitic chert bands. Thin quartz veins (<4 mm are occasionally observed in the hand-specimens of banded iron formations. Spectral investigations have been conducted in VIS/NIR region of electromagnetic spectrum in the laboratory conditions. Optimum absorption bands identified include 0.65, 0.86, 1.4 and 1.9 μm, in which 0.56 and 0.86 μm absorption bands are due to ferric iron and 1.4 and 1.9 μm bands are due to OH/H2O. To validate the mineralogical results obtained from VIS/NIR spectral radiometry, laser Raman and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic techniques were utilized and the results were found to be similar. Goethite-hematite association in banded iron formation in Singhbhum craton suggests dehydration activity, which has

  1. Nuclear power options for Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irwin, Tony

    2015-01-01

    Australia is slowly transitioning to low emissions technologies for electricity generation. International pressure for greenhouse gas reductions and community expectations are starting to speed up this process. Nuclear power would make a useful contribution to low emissions generation in Australia, as it does in more than 30 countries, but deployment will have to take into account local factors. 1) Australia does not have any experience of nuclear power. For many people the image they have of nuclear is the explosion at Fukushima. Safety is a concern and a modern reactor type with full natural (passive) safety features using only gravity and natural circulation for ultimate cooling is more likely to be acceptable. 2) The unit size will have to be compatible with the existing generation system. The largest single unit in the NEM (National Electricity Market) is 750 MWe (Kogan Creek, Queensland) and in many States even 750 MWe is too large. A 600 MWe single unit could probably be accommodated in certain areas but Small Modular Reactor (SMR) units of up to 200 MWe would allow more choice of location. 3) The nuclear power plant will have to be capable of backing up the increasing non-scheduled generation from renewable energy sources particularly wind and solar. The turbine generator of a nuclear power plant provides the rotating inertia necessary for frequency control. SMRs can load follow at typically 10%/min. 4) Australia does not have experience of licensing a nuclear power plant. The time to complete the licensing process will be minimised if the nuclear power plant was of a type that has been extensively licensed worldwide, e.g. a PWR or BWR. It would also assist licensing if the reactor had a generic design approval. Molten salt reactors or fast neutron reactors have attractive features, but licensing in an Australian context would be more difficult. 5) The nuclear power plant has to be economically viable in the Australian electricity market. Due to the current

  2. Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happel, Sue

    Designed for intermediate grade students, this 4-week unit contains 11 lessons on Australian culture and geography. Topics covered are: the map, history, geography, climate, economy, people, education, religion, recreation, government, cities, transportation, communication, wildlife, and plantlife. Each lesson includes text and questions on the…

  3. Australia: US Redoubt in Southeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1966-04-08

    security, maternity and child care, sickness and unemployment benefits, and for the Health Service. There is no question that Australia today...THE COLLEGE FOR SUCH BENEFIT TO THE USER AS MAY ACCRUE. STUDENT RESEARCH PAPER HIH1P3 8 April 1966 AUSTRALIA : US REDOUBT IN SOUTHEAST ASIA By...LOG # of 8 Copies 66-4-136 U « • USAWC RESEARCH ELEMENT (Research Paper) Australia : US Redoubt in Southeast Asia by Lt Col William W. Gist III

  4. Geology and geophysics of the Vila Nova Greenstone Belt, northeastern portion of the Amazonian Craton, Amapa, Brazil; Geologia e geofisica do greenstone belt Vila Nova, porcao NE do Craton Amazonico, Amapa, Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borghetti, Cristiano; Philipp, Ruy Paulo, E-mail: cborghetti@terra.com.br, E-mail: ruy.philipp@ufrgs.br [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre (Brazil)

    2017-01-15

    A few outcrops and strong weathering conditions prevail in the region of the Vila Nova Greenstone Belt in the southeastern Amapa (Brazil). This paper describes the use of airborne geophysical data for geological and structural analysis during geological mapping. This integration aims to improve the geological and tectonic understanding of this portion of the Amazonian Craton. The magnetometric and gamma-spectrometric qualitative interpretation of the images took place in a Geographic Information System (GIS) environment. Recognition of magnetometric and gamma-ray spectrometric units present in the study area was based on the hierarchical classification of polygons outlined by visual interpretation. The major geological domains and the structural patterns were defined by integration of geophysical data, geological mapping and petrographic analysis. The results allowed the recognition of Archean basement rocks composed of orthogneisses and granitoids of the Tumucumaque Complex, the metavolcano-sedimentary rocks of the Vila Nova Complex and Paleoproterozoic granite massifs. The integration of geophysical and field data resulted in the increase of the geological mapping definition, highlighting the importance of this methodology for recognition of complex structural and lithological fabrics in areas of difficult access and scarce fresh rock outcrops. (author)

  5. The new energy technologies in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Gleuher, M.; Farhi, R.

    2005-06-01

    The large dependence of Australia on the fossil fuels leads to an great emission of carbon dioxide. The Australia is thus the first greenhouse gases emitter per habitant, in the world. In spite of its sufficient fossil fuels reserves, the Australia increases its production of clean energies and the research programs in the domain of the new energies technology. After a presentation of the australia situation, the authors detail the government measures in favor of the new energy technologies and the situation of the hydroelectricity, the wind energy, the wave and tidal energy, the biomass, the biofuels, the solar energy, the ''clean'' coal, the hydrogen and the geothermal energy. (A.L.B.)

  6. Recent developments in Australia's uranium mining industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, I.B.; McKay, A.D.

    1998-01-01

    Australia's economic, demonstrated resources of uranium (U) at the end of 1996 amounted to 622,000 tonnes U, the largest of any country. Uranium is currently produced at two mining/milling operations in Australia - Ranger in the Alligator Rivers Region of the Northern Territory, and Olympic Dam in South Australia. Improved market conditions and recent changes to Government policies have encouraged Australian companies to commit to the expansion of existing operations and the development of new uranium mines. Australia's annual production is likely to increase from its present level of 6000 tonncs (t) U 3 O 8 to approximately 12 000 t U 3 O 8 by the year 2000. (author)

  7. BIBLIOGRAPHY OF CLIMATIC MAPS FOR AUSTRALIA,

    Science.gov (United States)

    AUSTRALIA , *CLIMATE), (*METEOROLOGICAL CHARTS, BIBLIOGRAPHIES), AIR MASS ANALYSIS, CLOUDS, CYCLONES, ANTICYCLONES, EARTHQUAKES, FLOODS, FOG, TROPICAL CYCLONES, HUMIDITY, OCEAN CURRENTS, ICE, RAIN, HAIL, WIND, THUNDERSTORMS

  8. Population dynamics in rural South Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugo, G J; Smailes, P J

    1992-01-01

    The authors examine recent trends in Australia in turnaround migration, or the movement of the population from urban to rural areas. "The paper assesses the major changes which have occurred in population trends within the non-metropolitan sector of the nation, South Australia and, in particular, a study area in the lower north region of South Australia. The analysis of the case study region draws upon a survey undertaken in 1968-1970 and partially replicated in 1980 and 1990. It appears that for Australia in general and for the study area the turnaround is continuing but at a slower pace and in a more spatially concentrated pattern." excerpt

  9. Neutron scattering science in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knott, Robert

    1999-01-01

    Neutron scattering science in Australia is making an impact on a number of fields in the scientific and industrial research communities. The unique properties of the neutron are being used to investigate problems in chemistry, materials science, physics, engineering and biology. The reactor HIFAR at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation research laboratories is the only neutron source in Australia suitable for neutron scattering science. A suite of instruments provides a wide range of opportunities for the neutron scattering community that extends throughout universities, government and industrial research laboratories. Plans are in progress to replace the present research reactor with a modern multi-purpose research reactor to offer the most advanced neutron scattering facilities. The experimental and analysis equipment associated with a modern research reactor will permit the establishment of a national centre for world class neutron science research focussed on the structure and functioning of materials, industrial irradiations and analyses in support of Australian manufacturing, minerals, petrochemical, pharmaceuticals and information science industries. (author)

  10. Neutron scattering science in Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knott, Robert [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Menai, NSW (Australia)

    1999-10-01

    Neutron scattering science in Australia is making an impact on a number of fields in the scientific and industrial research communities. The unique properties of the neutron are being used to investigate problems in chemistry, materials science, physics, engineering and biology. The reactor HIFAR at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation research laboratories is the only neutron source in Australia suitable for neutron scattering science. A suite of instruments provides a wide range of opportunities for the neutron scattering community that extends throughout universities, government and industrial research laboratories. Plans are in progress to replace the present research reactor with a modern multi-purpose research reactor to offer the most advanced neutron scattering facilities. The experimental and analysis equipment associated with a modern research reactor will permit the establishment of a national centre for world class neutron science research focussed on the structure and functioning of materials, industrial irradiations and analyses in support of Australian manufacturing, minerals, petrochemical, pharmaceuticals and information science industries. (author)

  11. Rural male suicide in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alston, Margaret

    2012-02-01

    The rate of suicide amongst Australia's rural men is significantly higher than rural women, urban men or urban women. There are many explanations for this phenomenon including higher levels of social isolation, lower socio-economic circumstances and ready access to firearms. Another factor is the challenge of climate transformation for farmers. In recent times rural areas of Australia have been subject to intense climate change events including a significant drought that has lingered on for over a decade. Climate variability together with lower socio-economic conditions and reduced farm production has combined to produce insidious impacts on the health of rural men. This paper draws on research conducted over several years with rural men working on farms to argue that attention to the health and well-being of rural men requires an understanding not only of these factors but also of the cultural context, inequitable gender relations and a dominant form of masculine hegemony that lauds stoicism in the face of adversity. A failure to address these factors will limit the success of health and welfare programs for rural men. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Uranium production economics in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorentino, C.M.R.; Butler, R.D.; Thomas, C.M.; McIlveen, G.R.; Huxlin, M.E.

    1990-02-01

    This review of the economics of production of uranium in Australia provides a detailed description of eleven important uranium deposits including capital and production costs estimates and supply curves. For each mine a detailed assessment has been made of its potential production capacity to the year 2000. Socio-economic factors that play an all-too-important role in the Australian uranium industry are extensively reviewed to provide an insight into the factors affecting Australia's ability to supply. The study is based on a detailed computer-based economic engineering model where all major costs such as labor, consumables and capital recovery charges are analyzed for each mine, and levellised break-even prices determined. It is argued that at the present low market prices, the three on-going operations are profitable, and at least three other deposits could be brought to viable production, given the necessary Government approval. Several other deposits appear to be marginal at the set Australian export floor price of US$26 per pound. Annual production could be raised from about 6,000 tonnes of U 3 O 8 to 16,000 tonnes by the turn of century, with the development of three additional deposits. It is concluded that, if Australian producers were allowed to compete freely on the international market, annual production would pass the 10,000 tonne/annum mark between 1995 and 2000. 35 figs., 38 tabs., 81 refs

  13. Geology and geophysics of the Vila Nova Greenstone Belt, northeastern portion of the Amazonian Craton, Amapa, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borghetti, Cristiano; Philipp, Ruy Paulo

    2017-01-01

    A few outcrops and strong weathering conditions prevail in the region of the Vila Nova Greenstone Belt in the southeastern Amapa (Brazil). This paper describes the use of airborne geophysical data for geological and structural analysis during geological mapping. This integration aims to improve the geological and tectonic understanding of this portion of the Amazonian Craton. The magnetometric and gamma-spectrometric qualitative interpretation of the images took place in a Geographic Information System (GIS) environment. Recognition of magnetometric and gamma-ray spectrometric units present in the study area was based on the hierarchical classification of polygons outlined by visual interpretation. The major geological domains and the structural patterns were defined by integration of geophysical data, geological mapping and petrographic analysis. The results allowed the recognition of Archean basement rocks composed of orthogneisses and granitoids of the Tumucumaque Complex, the metavolcano-sedimentary rocks of the Vila Nova Complex and Paleoproterozoic granite massifs. The integration of geophysical and field data resulted in the increase of the geological mapping definition, highlighting the importance of this methodology for recognition of complex structural and lithological fabrics in areas of difficult access and scarce fresh rock outcrops. (author)

  14. Three-dimensional lithospheric S wave velocity model of the NE Tibetan Plateau and western North China Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingchen; Li, Yonghua; Ding, Zhifeng; Zhu, Lupei; Wang, Chunyong; Bao, Xuewei; Wu, Yan

    2017-08-01

    We present a new 3-D lithospheric Vs model for the NE Tibetan Plateau (NETP) and the western North China Craton (NCC). First, high-frequency receiver functions (RFs) were inverted using the neighborhood algorithm to estimate the sedimentary structure beneath each station. Then a 3D Vs model with unprecedented resolution was constructed by jointly inverting RFs and Rayleigh wave dispersions. A low-velocity sedimentary layer with thicknesses varying from 2 to 10 km is present in the Yinchuan-Hetao graben, Ordos block, and western Alxa block. Velocities from the middle-lower crust to the uppermost mantle are generally high in the Ordos block and low in the Alxa block, indicating that the Alxa block is not part of the NCC. The thickened crust in southwestern Ordos block and western Alxa block suggests that they have been modified. Two crustal low-velocity zones (LVZs) were detected beneath the Kunlun Fault (KF) zone and western Qilian Terrane (QLT). The origin of the LVZ beneath the KF zone may be the combined effect of shear heating, localized asthenosphere upwelling, and crustal radioactivity. The LVZ in the western QLT, representing an early stage of the LVZ that has developed in the KF zone, acts as a decollement to decouple the deformation between the upper and lower crust and plays a key role in seismogenesis. We propose that the crustal deformation beneath the NETP is accommodated by a combination of shear motion, thickening of the upper-middle crust, and removal of lower crust.

  15. New paleomagnetic poles from Arctic Siberia support Indian Ocean option for the Neoproterozoic APWP of the Siberian craton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasenko, A.; Malyshev, S. V.

    2017-12-01

    Quantity and quality of paleomagnetic poles obtained so far for Neoproterozoic of Siberia are still insufficient even to outline the general trend of APWP of Siberia for this huge and very interesting time interval. Meanwhile, the solution of this problem is crucial for choice of polarity option for Siberian proterozoic paleomagnetic directions, for construction and testing of world paleotectonic and paleogeographic reconstructions. For example, whether or not the Siberian craton could be connected with Laurentia within the supercontinent Rodinia depends directly on paleomagnetic polarity option choice, which , in its turn, is determined by either we choose for neoproterozoic drift of Siberian paleomagnetic poles Pacific ocean trend [Smethurst et al., 1998] or Indian ocean [Pavlov et al., 2015] trend. To advance in solution of this problem we have carried out the paleomagnetic investigations of several sedimentary sections and sills of Arctic Siberia considered to be meso-neoproterozoic in age. In particular we have studied the terrigenous Udza and Unguohtah Formations and basic sills of the Udzha Uplift; the carbonate Khaipakh Formation of the Olenek Uplift; the carbonate Burovaya Formation of the Turukhansk Uplift; basic sills of the Kparaulakh Mountains.In this report we present the paleomagnetic poles obtained, discuss their bearing on construction of the adequate Siberian neoproterozoic APWP and show that our new data rather support the Indian ocean option.This research were supported by Grant from RF President #MK-739.2017.5

  16. Origin and tectonic evolution of early Paleozoic arc terranes abutting the northern margin of North China Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hao; Pei, Fu-Ping; Zhang, Ying; Zhou, Zhong-Biao; Xu, Wen-Liang; Wang, Zhi-Wei; Cao, Hua-Hua; Yang, Chuan

    2017-12-01

    The origin and tectonic evolution of the early Paleozoic arc terranes abutting the northern margin of the North China Craton (NCC) are widely debated. This paper presents detrital zircon U-Pb and Hf isotopic data of early Paleozoic strata in the Zhangjiatun arc terrane of central Jilin Province, northeast (NE) China, and compares them with the Bainaimiao and Jiangyu arc terranes abutting the northern margin of the NCC. Detrital zircons from early Paleozoic strata in three arc terranes exhibit comparable age groupings of 539-430, 1250-577, and 2800-1600 Ma. The Paleoproterozoic to Neoarchean ages and Hf isotopic composition of the detrital zircons imply the existence of the Precambrian fragments beneath the arc terranes. Given the evidences from geology, igneous rocks, and detrital zircons, we proposed that the early Paleozoic arc terranes abutting the northern margin of the NCC are a united arc terrane including the exotic Precambrian fragments, and these fragments shared a common evolutionary history from Neoproterozoic to early-middle Paleozoic.

  17. Ichnologic evidence of a Cambrian age in the southern Amazon Craton: Implications for the onset of the Western Gondwana history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Hudson P.; Mángano, M. Gabriela; Soares, Joelson L.; Nogueira, Afonso C. R.; Bandeira, José; Rudnitzki, Isaac D.

    2017-07-01

    Colonization of the infaunal ecospace by burrowing bilaterians is one of the most important behavioral innovations during the Ediacaran-Cambrian transition. The establishment of vertical burrows by suspension feeders in high-energy nearshore settings during Cambrian Age 2 is reflected by the appearance of the Skolithos Ichnofacies. For the first time, unquestionable vertical burrows typical of the Skolithos Ichnofacies, such as Skolithos linearis, Diplocraterion parallelum and Arenicolites isp., are recorded from nearshore siliciclastic deposits of the Raizama Formation, southeastern Amazon Craton, Brazil. Integration of ichnologic and sedimentologic datasets suggests that these trace fossils record colonization of high-energy and well-oxygenated nearshore sandy environments. Chronostratigraphically, the presence of these vertical burrows indicates an age not older than early Cambrian for the Raizama Formation, which traditionally has been regarded as Ediacaran. Therefore, the Raizama ichnofauna illustrates the advent of modern Phanerozoic ecology marked by the Agronomic Revolution. The discovery of the Skolithos Ichnofacies in these shallow-marine strata suggests possible connections between some central Western Gondwana basins.

  18. Australia's uranium policy - produce for export only

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    Australia's uranium policy is that the mining and export of uranium only be permitted from the Nabarlek, Ranger and Olympic Dam Mines subject to strict safeguard conditions. In addition, the government has decided against the development of further stages of the nuclear fuel cycle in Australia, resulting in all uranium production being for export only

  19. Feasibility of uranium enrichment in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-10-01

    The Council considered that provided the balance between costs and markets was found to be acceptable, there was no valid reason against the Government proceeding with a study on the feasibility of, and perhaps participating in the establishment of a commercial uranium enrichment industry in Australia. Areas covered include technical expertise and industrial structure in Australia, environmental aspects and safeguards

  20. Focus on: Hendra virus in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Kristopher

    2014-11-29

    Cases of Hendra virus infection in horses in Australia have been seen regularly since the virus was first isolated in 1994. Kristopher Hughes, associate professor of equine medicine at Charles Sturt University in Australia, gives an overview of how knowledge of the virus has developed in the past 20 years. British Veterinary Association.

  1. Action toward wilderness protection in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith Muir

    2007-01-01

    In 1992, a National Forest Policy Statement created a political opportunity to protect wilderness across Australia. The following decade saw over a million hectares of wilderness reserved in the state of New South Wales (NSW) but, until recently, little progress was made elsewhere in Australia. The success in NSW, as opposed to other states, can largely be attributed...

  2. Skilled Migration: Australia. Working Paper No. 63

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Chandra; Burke, Gerald

    2005-01-01

    Migration patterns to and from Australia are becoming complex with migration programmes increasingly targeted towards meeting the needs of the labour market and regional development. This paper provides an analysis of the permanent and temporary movements of people to and from Australia in the last three years and their impact on the skilled…

  3. The British Show in Australia, 1985

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Bond

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In 1984–85, The British Show, an exhibition largely made up of New British Sculpture, was curated for Australia and New Zealand. This essay discusses the context and effects of the exhibition on art in Australia. It also seeks to define the sources of originality and innovation of the artists included.

  4. Australia: Background and U.S. Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-08

    white powder that was thought CRS-13 54 “Indonesia Ambassador Recalled Early from Australia ,” Dow Jones News, June 14, 2005. 55 Mathew Moore...relations between Australia and Indonesia, which had been recovering since Australia’s involvement in East Timor in 1999. The East Timor intervention was...

  5. Providing and financing aged care in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ergas H

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Henry Ergas1,2, Francesco Paolucci31University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW, Australia; 2Deloitte Australia, Brindabella Business Park, Canberra Airport, ACT, Australia; 3Australian Centre for Economic Research on Health, The Australian National University, Acton, Canberra, ACT, AustraliaAbstract: This article focuses on the provision and financing of aged care in Australia. Demand for aged care will increase substantially as a result of population aging, with the number of Australians aged 85 and over projected to increase from 400,000 in 2010 to over 1.8 million in 2051. Meeting this demand will greatly strain the current system, and makes it important to exploit opportunities for increased efficiency. A move to greater beneficiary co-payments is also likely, though its extent may depend on whether aged care insurance and other forms of pre-payment can develop.Keywords: aged care, long-term care, sustainability, residential care, community care

  6. Uranium exploration and mining in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wutzler, B.

    1984-01-01

    Uranium minerals were discovered in Australia in the years 1850 to 1900 already, but most of them were not recognised as such. It was not until 1894 that the first significant uranium find was made in Carcoar, west of Sydney. At that time, the uranium output of the world, which only amounted to a few hundred cwts, was for the most part obtained from mining areas close to the border between Saxony and Bohemia. In South Australia, uranium ore was mined experimentally for the production of radium at Radium Hill from 1906 onwards and at Mt. Painter from 1910 onwards. It was not until World War II, however, that uranium gained importance as a valuable raw material that could also be used for military purposes. The second phase of uranium mining in Australia commenced in 1944. Within ten years Australia's presumed uranium potential was confirmed by extensive exploration. The development of uranium mining in Australia is described in the present paper. (orig.)

  7. Diabetes MILES Youth-Australia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagger, Virginia; Trawley, Steven; Hendrieckx, Christel

    2016-01-01

    Background: Type 1 diabetes is a complex and demanding condition, which places a substantial behavioural and psychological burden on young people and their families. Around one-third of adolescents with type 1 diabetes need mental health support. Parents of a child with type 1 diabetes are also...... at increased risk of psychological distress. A better understanding of the motivators, behaviours and psychological well-being of young people with diabetes and their parents will inform improvement of resources for supporting self-management and reducing the burden of diabetes. The Diabetes MILES (Management...... and Impact for Long-term Empowerment and Success) Youth-Australia Study is the first large-scale, national survey of the impact of diabetes on the psychosocial outcomes of Australian adolescents with type 1 diabetes and their parents. Methods/design: The survey was web-based to enable a large-scale, national...

  8. Atomic test site (south Australia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godman, N.A.; Cousins, Jim; Hamilton, Archie.

    1993-01-01

    The debate, which lasted about half an hour, is reported verbatin. It was prompted by the campaign by the Maralinga people of South Australia to have their traditional lands restored to them. Between 1953 and 1957 the United Kingdom government carried out of atomic tests and several hundred minor trials on the lands. A clean-up programme had taken place in 1967 but further decontamination was needed before the area is safe for traditional aboriginal life and culture. A small area will remain contaminated with plutonium for thousands of years. The cost and who would pay, the Australian or UK government was being negotiated. The UK government's position was that the site is remote, the health risk is slight and the clean-up operation of 1967 was acknowledged as satisfactory by the Australian government. (UK)

  9. Skin cancer prevention in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, C; Foley, P

    2009-11-01

    Australia has one of the highest skin cancer incidence and mortality rates in the world. The reason for these high rates is due in part to the high ambient UV radiation levels, combined with a predominantly susceptible fair-skinned population. To address this problem, since 1980 Australians have been exposed to social marketing campaigns to raise awareness of skin cancer prevention. These campaigns have used mass media alongside interventions in schools, workplaces, and in community and leisure settings to motivate sun protective behaviour. As a result of these interventions it can be demonstrated that social marketing campaigns can be a very effective method to not only motivate behaviour change, reduce sunburn, and increase awareness but more importantly, reduce melanoma rates and bring positive economic returns to government. However long term investment in this area is required otherwise any population gains in behaviour are very likely to be quickly eroded.

  10. Royal Commissions into Policing: Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Beckley

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Royal Commissions and Inquiries have investigated every police force in Australia in relation to their integrity, accountability and effectiveness—a factor of major importance to every citizen in maintaining their freedom, safety and security. The crucial question this paper poses is whether such tribunals are effective or otherwise in terms of the benefits and outcomes accrued from their findings. The paper is in the form of a critical discussion which investigates and analyses the Inquiries using the method of desk research of official documents over the last 50 years from which it identifies common findings and recommendations contained in the official discourse. The research concludes that lessons have not been learned in relation to policing operations, accountability and integrity in a number of cases and highlights a variety of adverse issues that persist into current policing practice.

  11. Ageing Holocaust survivors in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paratz, Elizabeth D; Katz, Benny

    2011-02-21

    In recent years, a phenomenon of "late effects of the Holocaust" has emerged, with impacts on the psychological and physical health of ageing Holocaust survivors. As Holocaust survivors age, they may experience heightened anxiety around normal processes of ageing, worsened post-traumatic stress disorder with cognitive decline, and fear of the medical system. Holocaust survivors are at increased risk of osteoporosis, cardiometabolic disease due to hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysfunction, cancer, and sequelae of Nazi medical experiments. From existing medical literature on this topic, practical principles of management are derived to create a framework for sensitive medical management of Holocaust survivors in Australia. The issues discussed are also relevant to the wider geriatric refugee or prisoner-of-war experience.

  12. Major faults and the development of dryland salinity in the western wheatbelt of Western Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Clarke

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Dryland salinity poses a major threat to agricultural production in the wheatbelt of Western Australia and much time and effort is expended on understanding the mechanisms which cause it and on developing techniques to halt or reverse its development. Whilst the location of much dryland salinity can be explained by its topographic position, a significant proportion of it cannot. This study investigated the hypothesis that major faults in the Yilgarn Craton represented in aeromagnetic data by intense curvilinear lows explained the location of areas of dryland salinity not explained by topography. Moreover, the causal mechanisms that might underpin a spatial relationship between major faults and dryland salinity were sought. In one fourth order catchment, nearly 85% of the salinity that was not explained topographically was within 2km of the centre line of a major fault, the remaining 15% being in the other 12km of the catchment. Three groups of similar third order catchments in the western wheatbelt of Western Australia were also investigated; in each case the catchment that was underlain by a major fault had dryland salinity an order of magnitude more than the unfaulted catchment(s. This evidence demonstrates a strong spatial association between major faults and the development of dryland salinity. Other evidence suggests that the underlying mechanism is hydraulic conductivity 5.2 to 2.9 times higher inside the fault zone compared to outside it and shows that geomorphology, salt store, regolith thickness, and degree of clearing are not the underlying mechanisms. In one of the groups of catchments, it has been calculated that an amount of recharge, significant in relation to recharge from rainfall, was entering from an adjacent catchment along a major fault. The paper concludes that geological features such as major faults affect the development of dryland salinity in the wheatbelt of Western Australia because of permeability differences in the

  13. New Insights from Seismic Imaging over the Youanmi Terrane, Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Omid; Juhlin, Christopher

    2014-05-01

    The Youanmi terrane is located in the central parts of the Yilgarn craton, Western Australia, an Archean granite-greenstone unit containing numerous mineral deposits such as gold, base metals, nickel, uranium and gemstones. The terrane is surrounded by the Kalgoorlie and Narryer terranes to the east and west, respectively. To the southwest it is bounded by the South West terrane. In order to study the transitions between the Youanmi terrane and the surrounding terranes, as well as identifying potential mineral rich areas, the Geological Survey of Western Australia acquired three deep crustal 2D seismic profiles with a total length of about 700 km in 2010. Correlated record lengths of 20 seconds allow the deep structure of the crust to be investigated with the data, down to Moho depths and greater. Initial processing using a conventional 2D flow show a highly reflective crust with several interesting features. We have now reprocessed the data following mainly the previous processing flow, but with a focus on the shallower crust, less than 10 seconds (about 27 km). Due to the complex geology in the region, 3D aspects of the structures need to be considered in the data processing. Therefore, we investigated the effect of cross-dip corrections to the data. The cross-dip correction has two advantages; (i) reflections are more coherent and enhanced after the correction and (ii) the orientation and dip angle of the geological structures of the corresponding reflections can be identified in the cross-line direction. Where the profiles intersect each other sparse 3D processing can be performed. First arrival travel-time tomography was also tested on parts of the dataset. Travel-time inversion may provide better velocity models at shallow depths than standard reflection seismic processing provides. Preliminary results show that the travel-time tomography has a depth of investigation of about 1 km, a depth that is of interest for mining purposes. Therefore, the tomography

  14. Australia's TERN: Advancing Ecosystem Data Management in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phinn, S. R.; Christensen, R.; Guru, S.

    2013-12-01

    Globally, there is a consistent movement towards more open, collaborative and transparent science, where the publication and citation of data is considered standard practice. Australia's Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network (TERN) is a national research infrastructure investment designed to support the ecosystem science community through all stages of the data lifecycle. TERN has developed and implemented a comprehensive network of ';hard' and ';soft' infrastructure that enables Australia's ecosystem scientists to collect, publish, store, share, discover and re-use data in ways not previously possible. The aim of this poster is to demonstrate how TERN has successfully delivered infrastructure that is enabling a significant cultural and practical shift in Australia's ecosystem science community towards consistent approaches for data collection, meta-data, data licensing, and data publishing. TERN enables multiple disciplines, within the ecosystem sciences to more effectively and efficiently collect, store and publish their data. A critical part of TERN's approach has been to build on existing data collection activities, networks and skilled people to enable further coordination and collaboration to build each data collection facility and coordinate data publishing. Data collection in TERN is through discipline based facilities, covering long term collection of: (1) systematic plot based measurements of vegetation structure, composition and faunal biodiversity; (2) instrumented towers making systematic measurements of solar, water and gas fluxes; and (3) satellite and airborne maps of biophysical properties of vegetation, soils and the atmosphere. Several other facilities collect and integrate environmental data to produce national products for fauna and vegetation surveys, soils and coastal data, as well as integrated or synthesised products for modelling applications. Data management, publishing and sharing in TERN are implemented through a tailored data

  15. Chemostratigraphy of the lower Bambuí Group, southwestern São Francisco Craton, Brazil: insights on Gondwana paleoenvironments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus Kuchenbecker

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The Bambuí Group, the most extensive carbonate-siliciclastic cover on the São Francisco craton, has been a matter of debate because of its potential correlations to global glacial events. Unfortunately, most available chemostratigraphic data came from samples collected on surface rock exposures, ever susceptible to the aggressive chemical weathering that characterizes the southeastern Brazil. On the other hand, we present here high-resolution chemostratigraphic studies based on C, O and Sr isotopic data from 53 samples collected along a weathering-free, continuous, 175 m thick sedimentary succession. This succession was recovered by borehole drilling in the southwestern São Francisco craton, where occur the Carrancas and Sete Lagoas formations, the lowermost units of the Bambuí Group. The drill cores reveal extremely irregular contacts between the basal diamictite and its basement, an Archaean foliated granodiorite. Geochronological and sedimentological data strongly suggest that the diamictite represents a lodgement till. This glaciogenic deposit is covered by a limestone succession which starts with impure carbonates showing aragonite pseudomorph fans and thin bands of black shale. The limestone pile grades to a marl-mudstone interval, which turns to a carbonate with biological components, succeeded by stromatolitic dolomite at the top. C and O isotopic signatures (referred to V-PDB allow to the subdivision of the lower carbonate-pelite section into three intervals. The first isotopic interval corresponds to a cap carbonate, and displays negative values of δ13C (c . -4‰, and a large oscillation of the δ18O (-6 to -15‰. The Interval II shows a striking homogeneity in δ13C and δ18O, around 1‰ and -7‰, respectively. At the top, Interval III shows a large positive excursion of the δ13C (up to 8‰ and δ18O (-8 to -3‰ values. Unaltered 86Sr/87Sr ratios range from 0.7075 to 0.7077, mainly at the top of the section. The

  16. Cyclic formation and stabilization of Archean lithosphere by accretionary orogenesis: Constraints from TTG and potassic granitoids, North China Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Cawood, Peter A.; Liu, Shuwen; Guo, Rongrong; Bai, Xiang; Wang, Kang

    2017-09-01

    Accretionary orogens are major sites of modern continental growth, yet their role in the development of Archean continental crust remains enigmatic. Diverse granitoid suites from tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite (TTG) to potassic granitoids appeared during late Archean, representing a period of major continental formation and stabilization. In this study, whole-rock geochemical and zircon U-Pb and Lu-Hf isotopic data are reported for Neoarchean granitoid gneisses from the Northern Liaoning Terrane, northeastern North China Craton (NCC). Older granitoid gneisses ( 2592-2537 Ma) define three magmatic zones migrating from southeast to northwest, each showing a common magmatic evolution from high-pressure TTGs to medium-/low-pressure TTGs and potassic granitoids. They have depleted zircon ƐHf(t) of +0.5 to +8.7. Younger 2529-2503 Ma potassic granitoids and TTGs occur throughout the terrane, which are marked by variable zircon ƐHf(t) of -4.7 to +8.1, and are coeval with regional high-grade metamorphism. Petrogenetic modeling and changing Sr/Y and (La/Yb)N of the granitoids suggest that the crust experienced episodic thickening and thinning and became progressively evolved through development of potassic granitoids and sedimentary successions. The metavolcanic basement to the granitoids display tholeiitic to calc-alkaline affinities, together with the top-to-the-northwest thrusting and associated volcanogenic massive sulfide-type Cu-Zn deposits, suggesting cyclic crustal formation of Northern Liaoning within an accretionary orogen with a SE-dipping subduction polarity. Cyclic crustal thickening and thinning is related to tectonic switching from advancing to retreating relations between the downgoing and overriding plate. After 2530 Ma, this accretionary system accreted to the ancient continental nucleus of NCC (Anshan-Benxi Terrane), signifying final lithosphere stabilization.

  17. Ambient noise tomography of the Cameroon Volcanic Line and Northern Congo craton: new constraints on the structure of the lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidarelli, M.; Aoudia, A.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the lithospheric structure of Cameroon inverting Rayleigh waves obtained from the cross-correlation of ambient seismic noise. We correlate seismic records between 32 broad-band stations and we obtain good quality Rayleigh waves for 310 interstation paths. We measure group velocity dispersion curves from the reconstructed Rayleigh waves in the period range 10-35 s and we invert the group velocities for tomographic images. After the tomography the group velocities are then inverted, together with longer period group velocity measurements from existing literature, to compute a 3-D S-wave velocity model of the Cameroon lithosphere down to 100 km depth. Our results provide an unprecedented mapping of the physical properties of the different crustal units and their correlations with surface geology, as well as with mantle lithospheric variations. The Cameroon Volcanic Line (CVL) appears as a segmented feature exhibiting different physical properties along strike. The active Mt Cameroon volcano is underlain by very low velocities, unlike the other segments of the CVL. The along-strike variations in crustal structure suggest that lateral heterogeneities in lithospheric thickness and physical properties have influenced the location and distribution of magmatism. The crust beneath the Central African Shear Zone exhibits a sizeable low velocity anomaly. The lithosphere beneath Cameroon is characterised by a heterogeneous crust with a relatively constant thickness and a low velocity uppermost mantle at the edge of the Congo Craton. Our results favour processes combining small-scale upwelling at the edge of a thick lithosphere and reactivation of Precambrian basement structures to explain the distribution of Holocene-Recent magmatism and plateau uplift. Our results also indicate that Mt Cameroon and surroundings areas are the most at risk zones for magmatic activity during this stage of CVL development.

  18. Paleogeographic Evolution of the Late Neoproterozoic and Early Phanerozoic with New Paleomagnetic Constraints from West African Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, B.; Besse, J.; Blein, O.; Greff-Lefftz, M.; Baudin, T.; Fernando, L.; Meslouh, S.; Belbadaoui, M.

    2015-12-01

    The paleogeographic evolution of the late Neoproterozoic and early Phanerozoic is dominated by the dispersion of Rodinia and the assembly of Gondwana. The timing of these two episodes is still highly debated, partly due to the low number of good quality paleomagnetic data. In order to better constrain the paleogeography for this epoch, we bring new paleomagnetic data on volcanic series from the West African Craton (WAC), which is a key block to understand the evolution of these two supercontinents. We have sampled well dated pyroclastic and lava flows from the groups of Ouarzazate (upper Ediacaran) and Taroudant (lower Cambrian) in the Anti-Atlas (Morocco). 500 samples from 105 sites were thermally demagnetized in laboratory. Our results highlight two major groups of directions, mainly carried by minerals of the titano-hematite family. Magnetite may also contribute sometimes to the magnetization. The first group displays a single polarity direction, with a shallow inclination and a south-east declination. This direction close to the expected direction derived from the Permo-Carboniferous segment of the Gondwana apparent polar wander path (APWP) is due to a remagnetization acquired during the Kiaman reversed polarity superchron (320-262Ma). The second group, observed in the Ouarzazate and Taroudant groups, consists of a dual polarity high inclination direction and may represent the characteristic magnetization. On the basis of geologic and paleomagnetic data from literature, we constructed an APWP for both WAC and Amazonia between 615 and 530Ma, assuming these two blocks were already accreted. We found a paleomagnetic solution in which Laurentia and WAC-Amazonia remained attached from ~615Ma up to the late Ediacaran, Laurentia remaining at low latitude during this period. Around ~550Ma, WAC-Amazonia separated from Laurentia and finally collided with the other Gondwanan blocks during the lower Cambrian, marking the final accretion of Gondwana.

  19. Lower Cambrian-Ediacaran Paleogeography and True Polar Wander with New Paleomagnetic Constraints from West African Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, B.; Besse, J.; Blein, O.; Greff-Lefftz, M.; Baudin, T.; Fernando, L.; Meslouh, S.; Belbadaoui, M.

    2014-12-01

    Paleomagnetic data from Laurentia and Baltica continents suggest fast large oscillations of the virtual geomagnetic poles (VGP) from high to low latitudes during the Ediacaran (635-542 Ma). These data are interpreted in the literature either as oscillations of the Earth magnetic dipole between polar and equatorial positions, or as True Polar Wander (TPW), implying a very fast tumbling of continents and perhaps, of whole Earth. In this study, we try to test these hypotheses by bringing new paleomagnetic data on volcanic series from another continent, the West African Craton (WAC). We have sampled well dated pyroclastic and lava flows from the Ouarzazate and Taroudant groups in the Anti-Atlas, (Morocco). 480 samples from 105 sites were thermally demagnetized in our laboratory. Our preliminary results highlight two major groups of directions, mainly carried by hematite, magnetite also contributing sometimes to the magnetization. The first group consists of a dual polarity high inclination direction that may represent the original magnetization. The observed paleolatitude is compatible with that predicted by the lower Cambrian-Ediacaran apparent polar wander path (APWP) of Gondwana, assuming that the WAC was already accreted to Gondwana at this age. Nevertheless, a complete agreement between our pole and the APWP needs a local rotation of around 80° on a vertical axis. The second group displays a single polarity direction, with a shallow inclination and a south-east declination. This direction is close to the expected direction derived from the Permo-Carboniferous segment of the Gondwana APWP, and may represent a remagnetization acquired during the Kiaman reversed polarity superchron. Our preliminary paleomagnetic results thus display large changes in the VGP position, as also evidenced by others on Baltica and Laurentia. However, their interpretation does not favor TPW episodes or equatorial Earth magnetic dipole during the lower Cambrian-Ediacaran periods, but

  20. The land Piedra Alta : A geotectonic unit in the juvenile Paleoproterozoic craton del Rio de la Plata ( Uruguay )

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preciozzi, F.; Sanchez Bettucci, L.; Oyhantcabal, P.; Pecoits, E.; Aubet, N.; Peel, E.; Basei, M.

    2003-01-01

    Brazilian Shield (Rio Grande do Sul) where Paleoproterozoic os land, located in the region Western, are covered by Paleozoic sediments of the Paraná Basin. The Neoproterozoic domains develop east of the Precambrian shield of Uruguay. The Exceptions to this comparative correlation are represented by the Campanero Unit and Field Suspect Punta del Este, only identified in Uruguayan territory. The Piedra Alta (Río de la Plata Craton, ss.) Is composed of a complex gneissic-migmatítico plant, essentially composed of porphyritic foliated granitoids interspersed with different types of mafic rocks Paleoproterozoicas Migmatites and, at least in the southern portion, where four metamorphic belts of different degree and extent are interleaved (Montevideo, San Jose, Cerros de San Juan and Arroyo Grande). Granites, granodiorites, and bodies mafic, of different composition, age and location environment are intruding the whole ground. The last magmatic activity is represented by a swarm of dykes aged mafic ca. 1750 - 1790 Ma (Bossi and Pitched, 1991, Halls et al., 2001) and meta tuffs acid intercalated in the Belt of Los Cerros de San Juan whose ages by the method U / Pb located in the vicinity of 1753 ± 5 Ma (Preciozzi et al, in prep.). The Piedra Alta Terrane no evidence of being affected by events tectonotérmicos Neoproterozoic and is separated from the Block Valentines by the shear zone Sarandi del Yi (Preciozzi et al., 1979). From geochronological studies U / Pb, Rb / Sr, K / Ar and Sm / Nd recent, carried out on the rocks Intrusive and Piedra Alta Land gneisses, it has been possible to observe a set of events that They affected the Land

  1. Late Cretaceous to Present evolution of the NW Africa peri-cratonic in the Africa-Eurasia plate convergence context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbal, B.; Bertotti, G.; Andriessen, P. A. M.

    2009-04-01

    Africa-Eurasia plate convergence is the main mechanism to explain topographic evolution and patterns of Tertiary vertical motions recorded around the entire Mediterranean and even further east. However, most of the studies are concentrated on the Eurasian side of the Mediterranean Realm. Along the NW Africa pericratonic zone (western Mediterranean side) extending longitudinally from the Anti-Atlas to the Rif Mountains, the highest topography is observed in the High Atlas intracontinental belt and in the Pan-African Anti-Atlas belt, and not in the youngest belt, the Rif. The combination of AFT and (U-Th)/He low-thermal dating, performed on pre-Cenozoic basement rocks along the Moroccan pericratonic transect (500km) yield ages ranging respectively between 90-9Ma and 65-7Ma, documenting vertical motions of subsidence and exhumation in between Late Cretaceous and Present. Time-Temperature models show that vertical movements are spatially zoned through Morocco, with the highest amplitude of vertical movements in the High Atlas (>4-5km) and more modest amounts in the Anti-Atlas and the Western Meseta (African peri-cratonic zone including the Western Meseta and the Anti-Atlas in addition to the Atlas and the Rif systems experienced Tertiary deformation. Two stages of folding are distinguished on the basis of low-thermal dating results along the pericratonic transect. The first is a lithospherical folding of ~500km in the Late Cretaceous (confirming that this process is a primary response to recently induced compressional stress fields) and the second is a crustal folding of ~100-150km wavelength in the Late Eocene that occurred independently to the mantle, requiring therefore the existence of a decoupling in between the base of the crust and the high mantle.

  2. Oil and Australia: forecasts 1995-2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This edition of Oil and Australia summarises the industry's forecasts of demand for petroleum products to the year 2004 and estimates the extent to which demand can be met from domestic production of crude oil, condensate and naturally occurring liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). The demand forecasts represent the average of forecasts prepared for forward planning purposes, of the five refining and marketing company members of the Australian Institute of Petroleum Ltd - Ampol Ltd, BP Australia Limited, Caltex Australia Limited, Mobil Oil Australia Ltd and The Shell Company of Australia Limited. The assumptions underlying the forecasts are also presented. The forecasts are a long term, directional view and assume no major policy changes will occur over the forecast period. A section on natural gas is included to provide a broader picture of the outlook for hydrocarbon energy needs, supply and export potential for Australia. natural gas is an important and growing energy source, and provides an opportunity for Australia to increase its exports and improve its balance of payments situation. 26 tabs., 14 figs

  3. Women and Ultramodern Buddhism in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Halafoff

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Buddhists started arriving in Australia in large numbers during the mid-1800s, and the first Buddhist societies and centres began to be formed in the mid-late 1900s. This paper examines the role of women in bringing Buddhism to and establishing it in Australia. Women have featured prominently in a small amount of scholarship, including Paul Croucher’s (1989 Buddhism in Australia: 1848–1988 and Cristina Rocha and Michelle Barker’s (eds. 2011 edited volume on Buddhism in Australia: Traditions in Change. This paper draws on these sources, but primarily on more recent digital oral histories of prominent Buddhist women and men in Australia, recorded as part of the first stage of the Buddhist Life Stories of Australia project in 2014–2015. These first-hand accounts bring the early female pioneers of Buddhism in Australia to life and provide a rich re-telling of this history with emphasis on women’s contributions to it. We also argue that these women’s experiences can best be understood through a framework of ‘ultramodern Buddhism,’ built upon theories of modern and post-modern Buddhism, as many of these women were trailblazers bridging dualisms of tradition and modernity, Asia and the West, and adhering to both feminist and Buddhist principles.

  4. K-Ar geochronology of mafic dyke swarms from the meridional part of Sao Francisco craton and implications on tectonic context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixeira, W.; Kawashita, K.; Pecchio, M.; Tame, N.R.

    1988-01-01

    The southern region of the Sao Francisco Craton is made up of gneissic-granitoid terranes (mainly of amphibolite facies) associated with supracrustals, which can be separed into two crustal provinces, the oldest formed during the Archean (3-2-2.6 Ga.), and the youngest in the Early Proterozoic (2.4-2.0 Ga.). Mafic dyke swarms inject the basement complexes in the area west of Belo Horizonte city, but not the Late proterozoic Bambui sedimentary cover. These dykes show NNW, NW, WNW, NNE and ENE trends and are of anorogenic character. Most dykes are tholeiitic in composition. Metamorphic recrystallization at greenschist to amphibolite facies as well as minor hidrothermal and/or deuteric transformations are characteristics in the majority of the these dykes. About sixty K/Ar determinations have been performed on plagioclases, amphiboles and whole rocks. They are interpretated combining the use of K/Ar diagrams and histogram, and according to the crustal evolution proposed for the craton. The available radiometric data suggest that the main period of mafic intrusions took place in the Early proterozoic as supported by the apparent ages on amphiboles. However, the beginning of the Middle Proterozoic (1.7-1.5 Ga.) probably corresponds to a period of tensional tectonics as well. On the other hand, most ages obtained on plagioclases and whole rocks, can be associated with Late Proterozoic processes of argon gain or loss. The results are tectonicaly associated with crustal rifting of the continental mass. This two radiometric groupings are characteristic for the evolution of the Early proterozoic crustal provine and of the Mid-Proterozoic intracratonic Espinhaco System respectively. The youngest Late Proterozoic apparent ages associated with the reflections of the contemporaneous evolution of the Braziliano marginal mobile belt which is also suggested by the partial resetting of the K/Ar ages of basement rocks within the eastern part of the Sao Francisco Craton. (author) [pt

  5. Petrology and petrogenesis of Mesoproterozoic lamproites from the Ramadugu field, NW margin of the Cuddapah basin, Eastern Dharwar craton, southern India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalapathi Rao, N. V.; Kumar, Alok; Sahoo, Samarendra; Dongre, A. N.; Talukdar, Debojit

    2014-05-01

    Petrography, mineral chemistry, and major and trace element data are presented for the newly discovered Mesoproterozoic (1.33-1.43 Ga) lamproites from the Ramadugu field (RLF), at the NW margin of the Paleo-Mesoproterozoic Cuddapah basin, in the Eastern Dharwar craton (EDC), southern India. RLF lamproites are emplaced as dykes, have a NW-SE trend and their petrography reveal the effects of low-temperature alteration. However, their textural features, mineralogy and geochemistry are closely similar to other well-characterised lamproites worldwide, including examples from the Eastern Dharwar craton, Leucite Hills, West Kimberley, Smoky Butte and Labrador. The RLF magmas have undergone varying degrees of olivine + clinopyroxene fractionation; yet their compatible and incompatible trace element concentrations are sufficiently high to signal a primitive character. Incompatible element ratios suggest limited contamination by continental crust. Geochemical evidence indicates the derivation of RLF magmas from metasomatised harzburgite within the garnet stability field. Rare earth element inversion modelling further highlights substantial involvement of the sub-continental lithospheric mantle in their genesis. The RLF lamproites are geochemically similar to the well-known extension-related ultrapotassic lavas from eastern Virunga and western Anatolia, and exclude an affinity with orogenic lamproites, such as those from the Mediterranean region. Bulk-rock geochemical models, recently developed to infer diamond potential, reveals that RLF lamproites are non-prospective. Lamproites of the RLF, together with those from the Krishna lamproite field and Cuddapah basin are interpreted as an expression of extensional events in the Eastern Dharwar craton possibly related to the break-up of the supercontinent of Columbia between 1.5 and 1.3 Ga.

  6. Pb/Pb single-zircon dating of Paleoproterozoic calc-alkaline/alkaline magmatism in the southeastern Sao Francisco Craton region, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordt-Evangelista, Hanna; Peres, Guilherme Gravina

    2000-01-01

    Two chemically and petrographically distinct intrusive bodies (a calc-alkaline trondhjemite and an alkaline quartz-syenite cut by granitic aplites) occur in the vicinity of Piranga (Minas Gerais State), near the southeastern border of the Sao Francisco craton, Brazil. They intrude the Rio das Velhas greenstone belt and the Mantiqueira complex, both of Archean age. Both intrusive bodies are variably deformed and mylonitized. Age determinations using the Pb/Pb single-zircon evaporation method yielded paleoproterozoic ages for the emplacement/crystallization of the trondhjemite (2058 ± 10 Ma, quartz-syenite (2036 ±4 Ma), as well as the younger aplites (2012 ± 8 Ma). These ages allow us to interpret the calc-alkaline as well as alkaline magmatism as manifestations of the Transamazonian event in the southeastern Sao Francisco craton region. Furthermore, the calc-alkaline trondhjemite is interpreted to have intrude during compressional deformation, while the alkaline quartz-syenite and its aplitic differentiates are post-orogenic, possibly extension-related In terms of the Rb vs. (Y+Nb) contents, the trondhjemite plots in the field of volcanic are granites, whereas the syenite and the aplites plot in the of post-collision granites. The mylonitic overprinting of the syenite and the trondhjemite is also Paleoproterozoic, as deduced from 2012± 8 Ma age of the undeformed younger aplitic dykes which cut the syenite. It is likely that this alkaline magmatism with a Paleoproterozoic post-collisional magmatic event well documented in the Transamazonian mobile belts of the northern Sao Francisco craton. (author)

  7. Late Pan-African and early Mesozoic brittle compressions in East and Central Africa: lithospheric deformation within the Congo-Tanzania Cratonic area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delvaux, D.; Kipata, M. L.; Macheyeki, A. S.

    2012-04-01

    Tectonic reconstructions leading to the formation of the Central-African part of Gondwana have so far not much taken into account constraints provided by the evolution of brittle structures and related stress field. This is largely because little is known on continental brittle deformation in Equatorial Africa before the onset of the Mesozoic Central-African and Late Cenozoic East-African rifts. We present a synthesis of fault-kinematic data and paleostress inversion results from field surveys covering parts of Tanzania, Zambia and the Democratic Republic of Congo. It is based on investigations along the eastern margin of the Tanzanian craton, in the Ubendian belt between the Tanzanian craton and Bangweulu block, in the Lufilian Arc between the Kalahari and Congo cratons and along the Congo intracratonic basin. Paleostress tensors were computed for a substantial database by interactive stress tensor inversion and data subset separation, and the relative succession of major brittle events established. Two of them appear to be of regional importance and could be traced from one region to the other. The oldest one is the first brittle event recorded after the paroxysm of the Terminal Pan-African event that led to the amalgamation Gondwana at the Precambrian-Cambrian transition. It is related to compressional deformation with horizontal stress trajectories fluctuating from an E-W compression in Central Tanzania to NE-SW in the Ubende belt and Lufilian Arc. The second event is a transpressional inversion with a consistent NW-SE compression that we relate to the far-field effects of the active margin south of Gondwana during the late Triassic - early Jurassic.

  8. New research reactor for Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.

    1992-01-01

    HIFAR, Australia's major research reactor was commissioned in 1958 to test materials for an envisaged indigenous nuclear power industry. HIFAR is a Dido type reactor which is operated at 10 MW. With the decision in the early 1970's not to proceed to nuclear power, HIFAR was adapted to other uses and has served Australia well as a base for national nuclear competence; as a national facility for neutron scattering/beam research; as a source of radioisotopes for medical diagnosis and treatment; and as a source of export revenue from the neutron transmutation doping of silicon for the semiconductor industry. However, all of HIFAR's capabilities are becoming less than optimum by world and regional standards. Neutron beam facilities have been overtaken on the world scene by research reactors with increased neutron fluxes, cold sources, and improved beams and neutron guides. Radioisotope production capabilities, while adequate to meet Australia's needs, cannot be easily expanded to tap the growing world market in radiopharmaceuticals. Similarly, neutron transmutation doped silicon production, and export income from it, is limited at a time when the world market for this material is expanding. ANSTO has therefore embarked on a program to replace HIFAR with a new multi-purpose national facility for nuclear research and technology in the form of a reactor: a) for neutron beam research, - with a peak thermal flux of the order of three times higher than that from HIFAR, - with a cold neutron source, guides and beam hall, b) that has radioisotope production facilities that are as good as, or better than, those in HIFAR, c) that maximizes the potential for commercial irradiations to offset facility operating costs, d) that maximizes flexibility to accommodate variations in user requirements during the life of the facility. ANSTO's case for the new research reactor received significant support earlier this month with the tabling in Parliament of a report by the Australian Science

  9. Rhyacian evolution of the eastern São Luís Craton: petrography, geochemistry and geochronology of the Rosário Suite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Karine Correa Nogueira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The São Luís Cráton comprises an area between northeast Pará state and northwest Maranhão that exposes Paleoproterozoic granitic suites and meta-volcanosedimentary sequences. In the east of this geotectonic unit, about 70 km south of São Luís, there is a portion of the São Luís Craton, represented by the intrusive Rosario Suite (RS. This work is focused on rocks of this suite, including petrographic, lithochemical and geochronological studies to understand the crustal evolution of these granitoid rocks. The rock spectrum varies from tonalitic to granodioritic, quartz dioritic and granitic compositions, and there are partial structural and mineralogical changes related to deformation along transcurrent shear zones. The geochemical studies show granitic metaluminous compositions of the calc-alkaline series with I-type affinity typical of magmatic arc. Rare earth elements show marked fractionation and slight Eu positive or negative anomalies (Eu/Eu* = 0.82 to 1.1. Zircon U-Pb data provided consistent ages of 2165 ± 7 Ma, 2170 ± 7 Ma, 2170 ± 7 Ma, 2161 ± 4 Ma and 2175 ± 8 Ma, dating emplacement of these granitoids as Paleoproterozoic (Rhyacian. Sm-Nd isotopic data provided model ages (TDM of 2.21 to 2.31 Ga with positive values of εNd +1.9 to +3.2 (t = 2.17 Ga, indicating predominantly Rhyacian crustal sources for the parental magmas, similar to those ones found in other areas of the São Luís Craton. The data, integrated with published geological and geochronological information, indicate the occurrence of an important continental crust formation event in this area. The Paleoproterozoic evolution between 2.17 and 2.15 Ga is related to the Transamazonian orogeny. The granitoids of the Rosario Suite represent the main phase of continental arc magmatism that has continuity in other parts of the São Luís Craton and can be correlated with Rhyacian accretionary magmatism in the northwestern portion of the Amazonian Craton that

  10. Lithospheric structure of the Northern Ordos and adjacent regions from surface wave tomography: implications to the tectonics of the North China Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    LI, S.; Guo, Z.; Chen, Y. J.

    2017-12-01

    We present a high-resolution upper mantle S velocity model of the northern Ordos block using ambient noise tomography and two-plane-wave tomography between 8 and 143 s. The Ordos block, regarded as the nuclei of the Archean craton of North China Craton, is underlain by high velocity down to 200 km, indicating the preservation of cratonic root at the interior. However, thick lithospheric keel (≥ 200 km) is not observed outside the Ordos, suggesting craton reworking around the Ordos. The most important findings is the prominent low velocity shown beneath the Datong volcano that migrates westward with depth. At 200 km depth, the low velocity locates almost 500 km west to the leading edge of the flat-lying Pacific slab in the mantle transition zone. This observation is in conflict with the previous interpretation that the Datong volcano is fed by the deep upwelling related to the subduction of the Pacific plate. The westward tilted low velocity beneath the Datong volcano, however, is in agreement with the predominant NW-SE trending alignment of fast direction revealed by SKS splitting in this area, suggesting the Datong volcano is likely due to the asthenospheric mantle flow from west. Two possible scenarios could be related to this mantle process. First, the low velocity beneath the Datong volcano may link to the large-scale, deep-rooted mantle upwelling beneath the Mongolia, northwest to the Datong volcano at deeper depth revealed by Zhang et al. (2016). We postulate that when the raising mantle materials reaches the shallow depth, it would be forced bent by the thick lithosphere beneath the Gobi in Mongolia and flow southeastward to Datong volcano. Second, it is also worth noting that the low velocity beneath the Datong volcano connects to the low velocity zone (LVZ) beneath the Ordos block below 200km, which further links the LVZ beneath the northeastern Tibet to the west. Therefore, the Datong volcano could be fed by the mantle flow from northeastern Tibet. The

  11. Integrated elemental and Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf isotopic studies of Mesozoic mafic dykes from the eastern North China Craton: implications for the dramatic transformation of lithospheric mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shen; Feng, Caixia; Santosh, M.; Feng, Guangying; Coulson, Ian M.; Xu, Mengjing; Guo, Zhuang; Guo, Xiaolei; Peng, Hao; Feng, Qiang

    2018-02-01

    Evolution of the lithospheric mantle beneath the North China Craton (NCC) from its Precambrian cratonic architecture until Paleozoic, and the transformation to an oceanic realm during Mesozoic, with implications on the destruction of cratonic root have attracted global attention. Here we present geochemical and isotopic data on a suite of newly identified Mesozoic mafic dyke swarms from the Longwangmiao, Weijiazhuang, Mengjiazhuang, Jiayou, Huangmi, and Xiahonghe areas (Qianhuai Block) along the eastern NCC with an attempt to gain further insights on the lithospheric evolution of the region. The Longwangmiao dykes are alkaline with LILE (Ba and K)- and LREE-enrichment ((La/Yb) N > 4.3) and EM1-like Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf isotopic signature ((87Sr/86Sr) i > 0.706; ε Nd (t) 16.6, (207Pb/204Pb) i > 15.4, (208Pb/204Pb) i > 36.8, ε Hf (t) 3.7), and display similar EM1-like isotopic features ((87Sr/86Sr) i > 0.706; ε Nd (t) 16.7, (207Pb/204Pb) i > 15.4, (208Pb/204Pb) i > 36.9, ε Hf (t) 2.4) and EM1-like isotopic features((87Sr/86Sr) i > 0.706; ε Nd (t) 16.7, (207Pb/204Pb) i > 15.4, (208Pb/204Pb) i > 36.9, ε Hf (t) 3.7) and EM1-like Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf isotopic features ((87Sr/86Sr) i > 0.706; ε Nd(t) 16.7, (207Pb/204Pb) i > 15.4, (208Pb/204Pb) i > 36.9, ε Hf (t) 9.3) and EM1-like isotopic composition ((87Sr/86Sr) i > 0.705; ε Nd (t) 16.9, (207Pb/204Pb) i > 15.5, (208Pb/204Pb) i > 36.9, ε Hf (t) 0.705; ε Nd (t) 16.9, (207Pb/204Pb) i > 15.5, (208Pb/204Pb) i > 36.9, ε Hf (t) < -8.6). Our data from the various mafic dyke suites suggest that the magmas were derived from EM1-like lithospheric mantle, corresponding to lithospheric mantle modified by the previously foundered lower crust beneath the eastern NCC. Our results suggest contrasting lithospheric evolution from Triassic (212 Ma) to Cretaceous (123 Ma) beneath the NCC. These mafic dykes mark an important phase of lithospheric thinning in the eastern North China Craton.

  12. Australia: The 'Good' Genocide Perpetrator?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatz, Colin

    2016-01-01

    In 1949, federal parliamentarians were indignant when asked to ratify the United Nations Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide (hereafter, UNGC). We could not in any way be associated with ‘the unthinkable’ crime, senior members claimed, because we are ‘a moral people’ with a ‘clean record'. This essay assesses the ‘decent’ Australian democrats who, as the indelible records show, set out to kill the Aboriginal people they deemed ‘vermin’ and then later, decided to engage in a eugenicist fantasy to rid Australia of Aborigines by intermarriage or, failing that, forcibly removing their children in large numbers. The colonial frontier killings were justified as ‘dispersing kangaroos'. Child removals were done ‘in their best interests'. This essay attempts to gain an insight into the mindset of those who did commit ‘the unthinkable’ crime of genocide: killing, removal of children, and ‘causing serious bodily and mental harm'. Subsequent policies infantalised the Aboriginal and Islander population and denied them basic human rights.

  13. Mesothelioma in Australia: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musk, Arthur Bill W; de Klerk, Nicholas; Brims, Fraser J

    2017-11-20

    The incidence of malignant mesothelioma in Australia is among the highest in the world as a result of widespread use of asbestos by industry and in construction throughout the 20th century. The risk of developing malignant mesothelioma after asbestos exposure is dose-related; a transient, low dose exposure confers a correspondingly very low risk of disease. Malignant mesothelioma is a heterogeneous disease, partly explaining the limited role of biomarkers in screening and diagnosis. The prognosis remains poor, and early advice on medico-legal compensation and a collaborative team approach to managing malignant mesothelioma are both essential. Chemotherapy can have a modest treatment effect in some people. New therapies, such as immunotherapy, do not yet have a defined role in the treatment of malignant mesothelioma. As treatment options for malignant mesothelioma are limited and no cure is available, there is no established role for early detection or screening of at risk populations. A multidisciplinary approach to caring for patients with malignant mesothelioma and their carers is vital.

  14. Pycnogonida from south-eastern Australia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stock, Jan H.

    1973-01-01

    Twenty species of Pycnogonida are recorded from shallow waters of the Australian states of Victoria and South Australia. Eight of these are new to science : Ammothea (Lecythorhynchus) ovatoides, Achelia transfugoides, Nymphon dubitabile, N. conirostrum, Pallenoides stylirostrum, Stylopallene

  15. Cogeneration in Australia. Situation and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    This Research Paper is mainly concerned with the status and prospects for cogeneration in Australia. An introductory chapter reviews the fundamentals of cogeneration, covering both technical and institutional aspects. A range of technologies are employed in cogeneration: these technologies and their efficiency and environmental impact effects are discussed in Chapter 2. The economics of cogeneration are a major factor in the profitability of current and potential plants. Potential factors affecting cogeneration economics are discussed .The status of cogeneration in Australia is reviewed for each State and Territory, and includes a number of case studies of existing plants. Government (federal, state, territory) policies that have a significant impact on the attractiveness of cogeneration are reviewed. Finally, the future prospects for cogeneration in Australia, drawing on the preceding chapters and a review of estimated potentials for cogeneration in Australia are presented

  16. PET joint SPECT in Australia nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper examines the scientific merit, clinical use and some historical aspects of the introduction and development of the positron emission tomography as a diagnostic technique in Australia. 4 refs

  17. Australia: uranium giant limps on export front

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haselhurst, D.

    1983-01-01

    Australia has large uranium reserves and uranium is now the country's tenth largest export earner. The two operating projects, at Ranger and Nabarlek, produce approximately 4000 t per year. Details are given of the extent of the copper/uranium/gold/silver deposit at Roxby Downs, South Australia. Trade is now moving in favour of the suppliers, but there is still opposition to the mining and export of uranium. The Australian Labor Party platform includes phasing out uranium mining

  18. The Transmission of Chinese Medicine in Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Garvey, Mary

    2011-01-01

    The paper explores some of the issues concerning the transmission of Chinese medicine in Australia, its practitioner training and the future of Chinese medicine as a distinct medical discipline in the Australian context. In China over the last century Chinese medicine was overhauled in order to align it with the biomedical perspective prevalent in the West. These changes, in turn, had important consequences for the transmission of CM in Australia and the West. But while the biomedicalisation ...

  19. Migrant Families in Australia. Working Paper 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storer, Des

    Since 1947, some 3.5 million migrants have entered Australia, giving birth to 2.2 million children. Whereas, in 1947 only 9.8% of Australia's populace were of overseas birth and less than 3% were of non-Anglo Saxon origin, by 1976, some 20% were of overseas birth, some 39% had been born overseas or had a parent born overseas, and some 25% had been…

  20. Paleomagnetism of Hadean to Neoarchean Detrital Zircons from the Jack Hills, Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciascia Borlina, C.; Weiss, B. P.; Lima, E. A.; Fu, R. R.; Bell, E. A.; Alexander, E.; Kirkpatrick, H.; Wielicki, M. M.; Harrison, M.; Ramezani, J.; Harrison, R.; Einsle, J. F.

    2017-12-01

    Determining the evolution of the Earth's magnetic field through geologic time will constrain the thermal evolution of the core and the mechanisms that have powered the geodynamo. Previous paleomagnetic studies indicate that an active dynamo existed at least as early as 3.5 billion years (Ga) ago. However, the history of the dynamo prior to this time and, in particular, its time of origin are largely unknown. One potential remanence carrier of the earlier geomagnetic field are 3.0-4.4 Ga detrital zircon crystals from the Jack Hills and other sites in the Yilgarn craton of Western Australia. Here we report new geomagnetic paleointensity data from Jack Hills zircons to assess whether they contain robust records of the early geodynamo. We studied the paleomagnetism of zircons that were selected based on a stringent set of criteria including concordant (>90%) U-Pb dates older than 3.5 Ga, minimal cracks and metamictization (to minimize the likelihood of containing secondary ferromagnetic deposits that may not have been removed after hydrochloric acid washing), and the presence of sharp (≤10 μm) internal Li-rich domains correlated with growth zonation (suggesting that they may have not been heated above the magnetite Curie temperature since their formation). All zircons that we have analyzed thus far exhibited unsuitable magnetic recording properties (demagnetize unstably and experience thermochemical alteration below 500oC) and therefore do not provide robust paleointensity constraints on the early dynamo. These results differ significantly from those of another recent paleomagnetic study that suggested that Jack Hills zircons contain records of a substantial dynamo extending back to 4.2 Ga. Reconciliation between these two studies is necessary so that the existence of the geodynamo before 3.5 Ga can be accepted.

  1. Réactivation du craton ouest-africain au Panafricain: paléocontraintes déduites de la fracturation des grès néoprotérozoïques de Karey Gorou (Niger, Afrique de l'Ouest)Reactivation of the West-African craton during the Panafrican tectonic cycle: evidence of paleostresses recorded by brittle deformation in the Neoproterozoic sandstones of Karey Gorou (Niger, West Africa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affaton, Pascal; Gaviglio, Patrick; Pharisat, André

    2000-11-01

    One distensive and three compressive episodes are displayed by faults in the Neoproterozoic sandstones lying on the eastern margin of the Palaeoproterozoic West-African craton in the Karey Gorou area in Niger. It concerns the submeridian distension related to reactivation of a fragmentation stage of this craton and with which are associated the doleritic veins dated at ca. 1 400 Ma. The three compressive episodes, striking NNW-SSE, WNW-ESE and WSW-ENE, are related to the Panafrican tectonic phases. In the Hoggar, these events are dated at ca. 680 Ma, ca. 600 Ma and 560-530 Ma respectively.

  2. L’italiano in Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinzia Campolo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 14 MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabella normale"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman";} L’articolo ricostruisce sinteticamente la storia della immigrazione italiana in Australia dai primi anni del 1800 ad oggi e descrive i tratti fondamentali che caratterizzano la presenza dell’italiano nel paese. Nonostante le prime difficoltà, rappresentate soprattutto dalla diffidenza e dall’ostilità con cui erano stati accolti i primi migranti, nel corso degli anni la comunità italiana è riuscita ad integrarsi  e a fondersi con quella australiana non solo nell’ambito del lavoro e dell’economia, ma anche sul piano sociale, linguistico e culturale, dando vita ad una vera e propria comunità italo-australiana con una sua specifica identità. Nel processo d’integrazione, pur rimanendo fedeli alle proprie origini linguistiche e culturali, gli immigrati italiani, soprattutto di seconda e terza generazione, si sono avvicinati all’inglese nella varietà linguistica chiamata italo-australiano, di cui si descrivono alcuni aspetti fondamentali messi in luce dalla ricerca linguistica.  Normal 0 14 MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabella normale"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman";} The article briefly reconstructs the history of Italian emigration to Australia from the beginning of 1800 up to the present and describes the basic features that have marked the presence of Italian

  3. Metallogenesis of Precambrian gold deposits in the Wutai greenstone belt: Constrains on the tectonic evolution of the North China Craton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju-Quan Zhang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The Wutai greenstone belt in central North China Craton (NCC hosts a number of Precambrian gold deposits and ore occurrences. Based on the host rock association, these can be divided into Banded Iron Formation (BIF, meta-volcano-sedimentary and meta-conglomerate types. The two former types formed during ∼2.5–2.3 Ga and the third one at ∼1.85 Ga. The characteristics of these Precambrian gold deposits are broadly similar with those of the orogenic gold deposits. Based on available geochronological data, here we reconstruct the major tectonic events and their relationship with gold mineralization in the Wutai-Hengshan-Fuping region during Neoarchean to Paleoproterozoic as follows. (1 ∼2.6–2.5 Ga: widespread intrusion of tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite (TTG magmas in the Hengshan terrane and Fuping continental arc, formation of the Wutai volcanic arc in the southern margin of Hengshan terrane with granitoids emplacement, and the Hengshan-Wutai intra-oceanic arc accretion to the Fuping arc at the end of Neoarchean. (2 ∼2.5–2.3 Ga: the subduction of Hengshan arc from north leading to persistent magmatism and orogenic gold mineralization. (3 ∼2.2–2.1 Ga: extension leading to the formation of graben structure in the Wutai and Fuping region, deposition of the Hutuo and Wanzi Group sediments, formation of placer gold through erosion of the orogenic gold deposits. (4 ∼2.2–2.0 Ga: widespread magmatism in the Wutai-Hengshan-Fuping region. (5 ∼1.95–1.8 Ga: regional metamorphism associated with collision of the Western and Eastern Blocks of the NCC and associated orogenic gold deposits. The multiple subduction-accretion-collision history and subsequent deep erosion has significantly affected most of the Precambrian gold deposits in the Wutai greenstone belt.

  4. Fluid-induced transition from banded kyanite- to bimineralic eclogite and implications for the evolution of cratons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, H.; Jacob, D. E.; Stern, R. A.; Petts, D.; Mattey, D. P.; Pearson, D. G.

    2017-06-01

    lithosphere. As kyanite contains around 100 ppm of H2O it is suggested that the kyanite-out reaction, once initiated by heating and restricted metasomatic influx, was promoted by the release of water contained in the kyanite. The steep (high-P low-T) prograde P-T path defining rapid compression at low heating rates is atypical for subduction transport of eclogites into the lithospheric mantle. Such a trajectory is best explained in a model where strong lateral compression forces eclogites downward to higher pressures, supporting models of cratonic lithosphere formation by lateral collision and compression.

  5. Long seismic activity in the Porto dos Gaúchos Seismic Zone(PGSZ) - Amazon Craton Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, L. V.; Bowen, B. M. D.; Schmidt, K.

    2017-12-01

    The largest earthquake ever observed in the stable continental interior of the South American plate occurred in Serra do Tombador (ST), Mato Grosso state - Brazil, on January 31, 1955 with magnitude 6.2 m b . Since then no other earthquake has been located near the 1955 epicenter. However, in Porto dos Gaúchos (PG), 100 km northeast of ST, a recurrent seismicity has been observed since 1959. Both ST and PG are located in the Phanerozoic Parecis basin whose sediments overlies the crystalline basement of Amazon craton. Two magnitude 5 earthquakes occurred in PG, in 1998 and 2005 with intensities up to VI and V, respectively. These two main shocks were followed by aftershock sequences, studied by local seismic networks, last up today, almost 30 years later, period in which it was detected more than seven thousand of seismic events. Both sequences occurred in the same WSW-ENE oriented fault zone with right-lateral strike-slip mechanisms. The epicentral zone is near the northern border of Parecis basin, where there are buried grabens, generally trending WNW-ESE, such as the deep Mesoproterozoic Caiabis graben which lies partly beneath the Parecis basin. The seismogenic fault is located in a basement high, which is probably related with the same seismogenic feature responsible for the earthquakes in PGSZ. The 1955 earthquake, despite the uncertainty in its epicenter, does not seem to be directly related to any buried graben either. The seismicity in the PGSZ, therefore, is not directly related to rifted crust.Not considering the possibility of miss location in the ST earthquake, its isolated occurrence - from the perspective of new studies on intraplate seismicity - lead us to think that the PGSZ was activated by stresses released by the earthquake of 1955 and that the seismogenic fault of ST would have closed a cycle of activity. This would explain its seismic quiescence. However, other studies are necessary to prove this hypothesis, such as the measurement of the

  6. Neoarchean ductile deformation in the Northeastern North China Craton: The Shuangshanzi ductile shear zone in Qinglong area, eastern Heibei, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Boran; Neubauer, Franz; Liu, Junlai; Jin, Wei; Li, Weimin; Liang, Chenyue

    2017-04-01

    thus developed to accommodate the upward and downward movements. It is possible that such a tectonic model also applies to many Archean granite-greenstone terrains. Keywords: Neoarchean tectonics, North China Craton, Ductile shear zone, Structural and microstructural analysis, EBSD fabric analysis

  7. Neoarchean ductile deformation of the Northeastern North China Craton: The Shuangshanzi ductile shear zone in Qinglong, eastern Hebei, North China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Boran; Neubauer, Franz; Liu, Junlai; Jin, Wei; Li, Weimin; Liang, Chenyue

    2017-05-01

    Archean granitic gneiss domes and greenstone belts are well-preserved in eastern North China Craton (NCC), one of the oldest Archean terrains in the world. The Shuangshanzi ductile shear zone in Qinglong, eastern Hebei Province is located between an Archean granitic gneiss dome and a greenstone belt within an uplift in eastern NCC. Supracrustal rocks from the Neoarchean Shuangshanzi and Zhuzhangzi Groups, and some Archean granitic gneisses were involved in the shearing along the eastern margin. In the southern part, the narrow NE-trending shear zone dips NW with dip angles of 40-60° and, in the northern part, the shear zone dips NWN with dip angles of 70-85°. Microstructural and EBSD fabric analyses suggest that the shear zone was developed at upper greenschist facies to lower amphibolite facies conditions with deformation temperatures of 400-550 °C. LA-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb dating of mylonitized granitic rocks and undeformed quartz diorite cutting the shear zone suggest that the Shuangshanzi ductile shear zone was formed between 2550 Ma and 2452 Ma. Detailed kinematic studies of the shear zone show a clear sinistral shear sense with a slightly oblique-slip component in the northern part and a sinistral transtensional slip component in the southern part. It is therefore suggested that the shear zone was formed during the Anziling doming with respect to the down-slipping Neoarchean Shuangshanzi and Zhuzhangzi Groups. The difference in kinematics along the southern and the northern sections is interpreted to be caused by the doming with an uneven clockwise spiral rotation. The BIF-rich supracrustal rocks have higher density than their neighboring granitic gneisses, and therefore can easily sink to form synclines by sagduction processes. The sagduction is mainly triggered by gravitational inversion of high density supracrustal rocks with respect to relatively light granitic gneisses within the dome. As a result, the gneisses synchronously moved upward. A shear zone

  8. Occurrence of Two Different Types of Paleoarchean TTGs in Singhbhum craton, Eastern India: Insight from Geochemistry and Zircon Saturation Thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, A.; Dey, S.

    2017-12-01

    Paleoarchean era is marked as an active period of continental crust genesis. A large part of the paleoarchean crust is made up of grey sodic granitoids collectively referred as Tonalite Trondjhemite Granodiorite (TTG). Generation and evolution of TTGs are still highly debated, though researchers agree on their generation through partial melting of hydrated basalt at garnet or amphibole stability field. Discrete remnants of paleoarchean TTGs are exposed in several parts of the Singhbhum craton, eastern India. Our study exhibits occurrence of two different types of TTGs based on REE pattern in a chondrite normalized REE diagram. Accordingly, TTGs have been grouped into two different types, namely (1) High HREE TTG [low SiO2; high HREE avg. (Gd/Er)n=2.23; less fractionated REE avg. (La/Yb)n=27.9 and relatively low Sr/Y avg. Sr/Y=53.59] and Low HREE TTG [high SiO2; depleted HREE avg. (Gd/Er)n=3.23; steeply fractionated REE avg. (La/Yb)n=46.11 and relatively high Sr/Y avg. Sr/Y= 95.49]. The two types of TTGs mainly differ in pressure sensitive signatures like Sr/Y and (La/Yb)n ratio. Considering the major element composition both the types are consistent with a low-K mafic source. This indicates, melting occurred at different crustal levels from a same/similar source. Moderate Al2O3, high Sr contents coupled with depleted HREE and Y are linked to the presence of garnet in either residual or fractionating phase. However, HREE variation is controlled by the amount of Garnet retained in the restite. Thus, in spite of melting of the source rock in garnet stability field, only the minor change in depth of melting and in turn different amount of retention of garnet in the source caused the difference in HREE pattern. Zircon saturation temperature (TZr) calculated on the basis of whole rock Zr concentration ranges from 735˚C to 760 ˚C (avg. 749˚C) for high HREE TTG and 750 ˚C to 802˚C (avg. 773˚C) for low HREE TTG. Absence of zircon xenocryst depicts zircon

  9. Geochemical constraints on genesis of Paleoproterozoic A-type granite in the south margin of North China Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Shuo; Xu, Yang; Ling, Ming-Xing; Kang, Qing-Qing; Jiang, Xiao-Yan; Sun, Sai-Jun; Wu, Kai; Zhang, Zhe-Kun; Luo, Ze-Bin; Liu, Yu-Long; Sun, Weidong

    2018-04-01

    Paleoproterozoic A-type granites are widely outcropped in the North China Craton (NCC), particularly in the Trans-North China Orogen. However, their genesis and tectonic significance remain obscure. Here we report systematic studies on geochronology and geochemical characteristics of A-type granite in Huayangchuan, south margin of the NCC. The samples are enriched in total alkali (K2O + Na2O > 8.97 wt%), and depleted in MgO (0.84-0.93 wt%), CaO (1.28-1.90 wt%) and P2O5 (0.18-0.20 wt%), with high FeOT/MgO (5.69-6.67). They are characterized by high Zr + Y + Nb + Ce values (1293-1392 ppm) and 10,000 × Ga/Al ratios (3.14-3.35), which are typical characteristics of A-type granite. The Huayangchuan A-type granite can be further classified as A1-type subgroup based on particular geochemical features, e.g., low Y/Nb (0.87-1.00) and Yb/Ta (0.88-1.10). High precision zircon U-Pb dating of the A-type granite by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) yields Paleoproterozoic 207Pb/206Pb ages of 1829.5 ± 2.5 Ma. The low zircon ɛHf(t) values (-6.97 to -10.45), along with zircon Hf model age of 2.7-2.9 Ga, indicate that the Huayangchuan A-type granite was derived from partial melting of the ancient continental crust with contribution of enriched mantle components. The low zircon δ18O composition (4.00 to 6.78‰) indicates that the zircons were crystallized from low δ18O magmas, which derived from the crust metasomatized by low δ18O mantle fluids or melts. The E-W trend A1-type granitic plutons in the NCC are generally outcropped in a rift tectonic regime, which is consistent with the development of the mantle plume in the Xiong'er district. The large volume of basaltic magmas, generated by mantle plume head, underplated the lower continental crust and formed the Huayangchuan A-type granite.

  10. Magnetic studies and U Pb geochronology of the Uruguayan dyke swarm, Rio de la Plata craton, Uruguay: paleomagnetic and economic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halls, Henry C.; Campal, Nestor; Davis, Don W.; Bossi, Jorge

    2001-09-01

    A U-Pb age on baddeleyite of 1790±5 Ma has been obtained from a single dyke of the Uruguayan tholeiitic dyke swarm from the Rio de la Plata craton. Palaeomagnetic results from this and 10 other dykes yield two components, one (A) has the following paleomagnetic parameters: declination=12°, inclination=-16°, α95=7°, latitude of paleopole=61°, longitude=-31°, dp=4°, dm=7°, paleolatitude=-8°, whereas another (B), about 20° steeper, has a direction closer to the present Earth's field direction in Uruguay. Neither magnetisation is considered primary, although the A component may represent a composite between B and a primary component. A field test for the primary nature of the remanences was inconclusive, and no primary pole positions of similar age from other South American cratons are available for comparison. The magnetic results demonstrate that darker-coloured andesite dykes that are sought for facing and monument stone (as 'black granite') can be easily differentiated from more andesi-basaltic, lighter coloured, less valuable dykes of the same swarm, using aeromagnetic data. The results suggest that a high resolution airborne magnetic survey could constitute an important exploration tool for the Uruguayan 'black granite' industry.

  11. The significance of 24-norcholestanes, triaromatic steroids and dinosteroids in oils and Cambrian-Ordovician source rocks from the cratonic region of the Tarim Basin, NW China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meijun; Wang, T.-G.; Lillis, Paul G.; Wang, Chunjiang; Shi, Shengbao

    2012-01-01

    Two oil families in Ordovician reservoirs from the cratonic region of the Tarim Basin are distinguished by the distribution of regular steranes, triaromatic steroids, norcholestanes and dinosteroids. Oils with relatively lower contents of C28 regular steranes, C26 20S, C26 20R + C27 20S and C27 20R regular triaromatic steroids, dinosteranes, 24-norcholestanes and triaromatic dinosteroids originated from Middle–Upper Ordovician source rocks. In contrast, oils with abnormally high abundances of the above compounds are derived from Cambrian and Lower Ordovician source rocks. Only a few oils have previously been reported to be of Cambrian and Lower Ordovician origin, especially in the east region of the Tarim Basin. This study further reports the discovery of oil accumulations of Cambrian and Lower Ordovician origin in the Tabei and Tazhong Uplifts, which indicates a potential for further discoveries involving Cambrian and Lower Ordovician sourced oils in the Tarim Basin. Dinosteroids in petroleum and ancient sediments are generally thought to be biomarkers for dinoflagellates and 24-norcholestanes for dinoflagellates and diatoms. Therefore, the abnormally high abundance of these compounds in extracts from the organic-rich sediments in the Cambrian and Lower Ordovician and related oils in the cratonic region of the Tarim Basin suggests that phytoplankton algae related to dinoflagellates have appeared and might have flourished in the Tarim Basin during the Cambrian Period. Steroids with less common structural configurations are underutilized and can expand understanding of the early development history of organisms, as well as define petroleum systems.

  12. Seismic velocity model of the crust and upper mantle along profile PANCAKE across the Carpathians between the Pannonian Basin and the East European Craton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starostenko, V.; Janik, T.; Kolomiyets, K.

    2013-01-01

    Results are presented of a seismic wide-angle reflection/refraction survey along a profile between the Pannonian Basin (PB) and the East European Craton (EEC) called PANCAKE. The P- and S-wave velocity model derived can be divided into three sectors: the PB; the Carpathians, including the Transca......Results are presented of a seismic wide-angle reflection/refraction survey along a profile between the Pannonian Basin (PB) and the East European Craton (EEC) called PANCAKE. The P- and S-wave velocity model derived can be divided into three sectors: the PB; the Carpathians, including...... the Transcarpathian Depression and the Carpathian Foredeep; and the south-western part of the EEC, including the Trans European Suture Zone (TESZ). Seismic data support a robust model of the Vp velocity structure of the crust. In the PB, the 22-23km thick crust consists of a 2-5km thick sedimentary layer (Vp=2...... of the lower crust towards the Ukrainian Shield, where a high velocity lower crust (Vp>7.2km/s) is observed. Two low-velocity lenses in the upper crust of the EEC are interpreted beneath major sedimentary troughs (Lviv and Volyn-Podolsk). Mantle reflectors are observed at depths of ~45km and ~75km below the PB...

  13. The Capricorn Orogen Passive source Array (COPA) in Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessner, K.; Yuan, H.; Murdie, R.; Dentith, M. C.; Johnson, S.; Brett, J.

    2015-12-01

    COPA is the passive source component of a multi-method geophysical program aimed at assessing the mineral deposits potential of the Proterozoic Capricorn Orogen. Previous results from the active source surveys, receiver functions and magnetotelluric studies show reworked orogenic crust in the orogen that contrasts with more simple crust in the neighbouring Archean cratons, suggesting progressive and punctuated collisional processes during the final amalgamation of the Western Australian craton. Previous seismic studies are all based on line deployment or single station analyses; therefore it is essential to develop 3D seismic images to test whether these observations are representative for the whole orogen. With a careful design that takes advantage of previous passive source surveys, the current long-term and short-term deployments span an area of approximately 500 x 500 km. The 36-month total deployment can guarantee enough data recording for 3D structure imaging using body wave tomography, ambient noise surface wave tomography and P- and S-wave receiver function Common Conversion Point (CCP) stacking techniques. A successive instrument loan from the ANSIR national instrument pool, provided 34 broadband seismometers that have been deployed in the western half of the orogen since March 2014. We expect approximately 40-km lateral resolution near the surface for the techniques we propose, which due to low frequency nature of earthquake waves will degrade to about 100 km near the base of the cratonic lithosphere, which is expected at depths between 200 to 250 km. Preliminary results from the first half of the COPA deployment will be presented in the light of the hypotheses that 1) distinct crustal blocks can be detected continuously throughout the orogen (using ambient noise/body wave tomography); 2) distinct lithologies are present in the crust and upper mantle across the orogen (using receiver function CCP images); and 3) crustal and lithosphere deformation along

  14. Immigration in two federations: Canada and Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atchison, J

    1988-03-01

    The need for increasingly widespread application of a policy or program, settlement, and multiculturalism is urgent in both Canada and Australia. For both countries there is a clear pattern of coalescence and divergence and the distinct growth of immigration as a federal function. While Australia has strengthened federal functions in a area of increasingly geo-political need, Canada is moving towards a looser model of federalism. By 1918 both countries were strengthening their federal functions in immigration as discussions within the British Empire on the recommendations of the 1917 Dominions Royal Commission took root. Both countries were interested in agricultural immigration and land settlement. The Great Depression caused a major reduction in population growth rates. From 1933-1948 Canada had a poor record of providing sanctuary for Jews. In Australia, however, Jewish voluntary agencies were aiding the reception of refugees by 1937. The 1st permanent embodiment of commonwealth jurisdiction over immigration was the establishment of an Immigration Branch within the Department of Interior around 1938. Australia needed extra population for defense. The major structural link between government and the immigrant communities was through the Good Neighbor Movement, which began on a nationwide basis in 1950. Both Canada and Australia are major receiving countries for refugees. In 1973 Australia reached the position of effective, practical nondiscrimination achieved by Canada in 1967. Prime Minister Trudeau's policy was multiculturalism within a framework of bilingualism. By 1978 Australia had a new federalism policy, which in all areas concerned with immigrants, refugees and ethnicity, rationalized resources allocation and imposed a political philosophy. The foci of multiculturalism in Australia are 1) community languages; 2) creation of a tolerant, non-discriminatory society; and 3) equity and participation. In 1978 Australia specified population replacement and

  15. Examining supply changes in Australia's cocaine market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Caitlin E; Chalmers, Jenny; Bright, David A; Matthew-Simmons, Francis; Sindicich, Natasha

    2012-05-01

    Media attention to cocaine use and supply has increased following some of the largest cocaine seizures in Australia's history. Whether there has been an expansion in supply remains unclear. This paper examines the evidence behind assertions of increased supply in Australia and the scale and nature of any apparent increase, using proxy indicators of cocaine importation, distribution and use. Eight proxies of cocaine importation, distribution and use were adopted, including amount of importation, mode of importation and supply flows to Australia. Each proxy indicator was sourced using publicly available and Australia-wide data, including information on the total weight of border seizures, mode of detection and country of embarkation of individual seizures. Data permitting, trends were examined for up to a 12 year period (1997-1998 to 2009-2010). Since 2006-2007 there was evidence of increased cocaine importation, albeit less than between 1998-1999 and 2001-2002. There were further signs that the 2006-2007 expansion coincided with a diversification of trafficking routes to and through Australia (beyond the traditional site of entry-Sydney) and shifts in the geographic distribution of use. The congruity between indicators suggests that there has been a recent expansion in cocaine supply to and distribution within Australia, but that the more notable shift has concerned the nature of supply, with an apparent growth in importation and distribution beyond New South Wales. The diversification of cocaine supply routes may increase risks of market entrenchment and organised crime throughout Australia. © 2011 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  16. The renewable energy market in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Australia is committed to an 8 per cent reduction in its emissions of greenhouse gases above 1990 levels as a result of the Kyoto Protocol for the period 2008-2012. At present, the emissions stand at 17.4 per cent above 1990 levels. Total electrical power in Australia resulting from renewable energy is in the order of 10.5 per cent. A mandatory renewable energy target of 9500 gigawatt hour (GWh) of extra renewable energy is to be produced annually by 2010, under the Renewable Energy (Electricity) Act. An emissions trading system has been implemented, involving one renewable energy certificate (REC) created for each megawatt hour of renewable energy generated. A significant expansion of the demand for renewable energy is expected in Australia over the next ten years, according to the Australian Greenhouse Office. Increased opportunities for local and international firms operating in the field of renewable energy are being created by the Australian government through initiatives such as the Renewable Energy Commercialization Program, and the Renewable Remote Power Generation Program. Solar, biomass, and wind power are comprised in the wealth of renewable energy resources in Australia. The market remains largely undeveloped. Firms from the United States and the European Union are the leading exporters of renewable energy technology to Australia. Public utilities and independent power producers having entered the deregulated electricity market are the consumers of renewable energy technology and services. A country with minimal duties in most cases, Australia has much in common with Canada, including similar regulatory and legal systems. Australia applies a 10 per cent goods and services tax, which would apply to Canadian exports. It was advised to consult the Australian Customs Service for additional information concerning duties that might be applicable to the renewable energy industry. 28 refs., 3 tabs

  17. Coral reproduction in Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speed, Conrad W.; Babcock, Russ

    2016-01-01

    Larval production and recruitment underpin the maintenance of coral populations, but these early life history stages are vulnerable to extreme variation in physical conditions. Environmental managers aim to minimise human impacts during significant periods of larval production and recruitment on reefs, but doing so requires knowledge of the modes and timing of coral reproduction. Most corals are hermaphroditic or gonochoric, with a brooding or broadcast spawning mode of reproduction. Brooding corals are a significant component of some reefs and produce larvae over consecutive months. Broadcast spawning corals are more common and display considerable variation in their patterns of spawning among reefs. Highly synchronous spawning can occur on reefs around Australia, particularly on the Great Barrier Reef. On Australia’s remote north-west coast there have been fewer studies of coral reproduction. The recent industrial expansion into these regions has facilitated research, but the associated data are often contained within confidential reports. Here we combine information in this grey-literature with that available publicly to update our knowledge of coral reproduction in WA, for tens of thousands of corals and hundreds of species from over a dozen reefs spanning 20° of latitude. We identified broad patterns in coral reproduction, but more detailed insights were hindered by biased sampling; most studies focused on species of Acropora sampled over a few months at several reefs. Within the existing data, there was a latitudinal gradient in spawning activity among seasons, with mass spawning during autumn occurring on all reefs (but the temperate south-west). Participation in a smaller, multi-specific spawning during spring decreased from approximately one quarter of corals on the Kimberley Oceanic reefs to little participation at Ningaloo. Within these seasons, spawning was concentrated in March and/or April, and October and/or November, depending on the timing of

  18. Commercialisation of science in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, G.

    2003-01-01

    and the business proposition have merit - government assistance (e.g. BIF, R and D Start, STI funding) and some type of relationship with Big Pharma/Big Biotech provide assurances. In the life sciences, durable and strong IP is critical. This presentation will focus on choice of commercialisation strategy (i.e. licensing vs. start up vs. joint venture etc); the hazards of 'expropriation' for the small end of town; little c versus big C commercialisation; creating value in the biopharmaceutical sector; and persistent restraints to innovation in Australia

  19. Australia's replacement research reactor project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, K.J.

    1999-01-01

    HIFAR, a 10 MW tank type DIDO Class reactor has operated at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre for 43 years. HIFAR and the 10 kW Argonaut reactor 'Moata' which is in the Care and Maintenance phase of decommissioning are Australia's only nuclear reactors. The initial purpose for HIFAR was for materials testing to support a nuclear power program. Changing community attitude through the 1970's and a Government decision not to proceed with a planned nuclear power reactor resulted in a reduction of materials testing activities and a greater emphasis being placed on neutron beam research and the production of radioisotopes, particularly for medical purposes. HIFAR is not fully capable of satisfying the expected increase in demand for medical radiopharmaceuticals beyond the next 5 years and the radial configuration of the beam tubes severely restricts the scope and efficiency of neutron beam research. In 1997 the Australian Government decided that a replacement research reactor should be built by the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation at Lucas Heights subject to favourable results of an Environmental Impact Study. The Ei identified no reasons on the grounds of safety, health, hazard or risk to prevent construction on the preferred site and it was decided in May 1999 that there were no environmental reasons why construction of the facility should not proceed. In recent years ANSTO has been reviewing the operation of HIFAR and observing international developments in reactor technology. Limitations in the flexibility and efficiency achievable in operation of a tank type reactor and the higher intrinsic safety sought in fundamental design resulted in an early decision that the replacement reactor must be a pool type having cleaner and higher intensity tangential neutron beams of wider energy range than those available from HIFAR. ANSTO has chosen to use it's own resources supported by specialised external knowledge and experience to identify

  20. Geochemical characteristics of naturally acid and alkaline saline lakes in southern Western Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, Brenda Beitler; Benison, Kathleen C.

    2009-01-01

    Abundant shallow saline lakes on the Archean Yilgarn Craton in southern Western Australia exhibit a rare spectrum of geochemical conditions. Here the field geochemistry over three seasons (pH, salinity, and temperature), as well as major ions, trace elements, and H, O, and S stable isotopes of surface waters and shallow groundwaters from 59 ephemeral lakes in southern Western Australia (WA) are reported. Approximately 40% of the lakes and 84% of the measured groundwaters in WA are extremely acidic (pH 28%. The fluids are typically Na-Cl to Na-Mg-Cl-SO 4 brines with variable yet locally high amounts of Ca, K, Al, Fe, Si, and Br. The acid brine fluid compositions are unusual. For example, in some fluids the amount of Al>>Ca, the amount of Br > K, and comparison of total S to SO 4 2- values suggest the presence of other uncommon S-bearing species. Trends in δ 18 O and δ 2 H illustrate the separation between surface lake water and shallow groundwaters, and indicate the contribution of meteoric waters to the lakes. The chemical and isotopic compositions of these fluids indicate a spatially and temporally dynamic, yet regionally consistent, history of brine evolution that is fundamentally different from most other terrestrial closed basin brines. The WA lake brines do not evolve from surface evaporation of dilute inflow waters, but rather are fed by highly evolved regionally acid saline groundwaters. The lake waters then diversify with locally varying surface and near-surface processes such as meteoric dilution by flooding, evapoconcentration, mineral precipitation and dissolution, and fluid mixing. The WA lake waters and groundwaters are somewhat similar to those in an entirely different geologic setting in northeastern Victoria, illustrating the potential for different geochemical pathways to lead to the formation of similar lacustrine acid brines. Although these types of environments are rare in modern settings, ancient ephemeral acid saline lake deposits have been

  1. Status of radionuclide monitoring stations in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, P.A.

    2001-01-01

    The Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ANSTO) first became involved in the monitoring of radionuclides in the environment in 1955 when assessing the effects on the Australian population of the radioactive releases associated with the atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons. (At that time ARPANSA was known as the Commonwealth X-ray and Radium Laboratory). The United Kingdom had tested weapons in Australia in 1952 and 1953 and in August 1954 entered into an agreement with the Australian Government to establish a test range at Maralinga in South Australia. The government established a Maralinga Safety Committee and through this Committee ARPANSA became involved in the surveillance of radioactive fallout over Australia. The primary function of this surveillance was to ensure that the nuclear trials would not adversely effect the health of the Australian population. A program was established to reliably assess the deposition of radioactive fallout over Australia so that exposure to the population could be estimated. This task was performed in conjunction with the Bureau of Meteorology and the Department of Supply. Measurements were made on daily samples of fallout dawn from 10 centres throughout Australia. A low level radiochemical facility was established in 1961 for the measurement of 90 Sr and 137 Cs in environmental samples so that the long term distribution of fallout could be tracked. In the 1960s the program was extended to measure fresh fission products reaching Australia from atmospheric testing in other countries, usually originating from test sites in the northern hemisphere. The sampling program that was established was designed so that it could be rapidly expanded when a new testing program started. At this time a permanent fallout monitoring network was established around Australia using high volume air samplers capable of sampling up to 10000 m 3 per week. Approximately six stations have been operated at any one time but the

  2. Tick-borne infectious diseases in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Stephen R; Stenos, John

    2017-04-17

    Tick bites in Australia can lead to a variety of illnesses in patients. These include infection, allergies, paralysis, autoimmune disease, post-infection fatigue and Australian multisystem disorder. Rickettsial (Rickettsia spp.) infections (Queensland tick typhus, Flinders Island spotted fever and Australian spotted fever) and Q fever (Coxiella burnetii) are the only systemic bacterial infections that are known to be transmitted by tick bites in Australia. Three species of local ticks transmit bacterial infection following a tick bite: the paralysis tick (Ixodes holocyclus) is endemic on the east coast of Australia and causes Queensland tick typhus due to R. australis and Q fever due to C. burnetii; the ornate kangaroo tick (Amblyomma triguttatum) occurs throughout much of northern, central and western Australia and causes Q fever; and the southern reptile tick (Bothriocroton hydrosauri) is found mainly in south-eastern Australia and causes Flinders Island spotted fever due to R. honei. Much about Australian ticks and the medical outcomes following tick bites remains unknown. Further research is required to increase understanding of these areas.

  3. Does Lyme disease exist in Australia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collignon, Peter J; Lum, Gary D; Robson, Jennifer Mb

    2016-11-07

    There is no convincing evidence that classic Lyme disease occurs in Australia, nor is there evidence that the causative agent, Borrelia burgdorferi, is found in Australian animals or ticks. Lyme disease, however, can be acquired overseas but diagnosed in Australia; most people presenting with laboratory-confirmed Lyme disease in Australia were infected in Europe. Despite the lack of evidence that Lyme disease can be acquired in Australia, growing numbers of patients, their supporters, and some politicians demand diagnoses and treatment according to the protocols of the "chronic Lyme disease" school of thought. Antibiotic therapy for chronic "Lyme disease-like illness" can cause harm to both the individual (eg, cannula-related intravenous sepsis) and the broader community (increased antimicrobial resistance rates). Until there is strong evidence from well performed clinical studies that bacteria present in Australia cause a chronic debilitating illness that responds to prolonged antibiotics, treating patients with "Lyme disease-like illness" with prolonged antibiotic therapy is unjustified, and is likely to do much more harm than good.

  4. Radioactive waste management and disposal in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harries, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    A national near-surface repository at a remote and arid location is proposed for the disposal of solid low-level and short-lived intermediate-level radioactive wastes in Australia. The repository will be designed to isolate the radioactive waste from the human environment under controlled conditions and for a period long enough for the radioactivity to decay to low levels. Compared to countries that have nuclear power programs, the amount of waste in Australia is relatively small. Nevertheless, the need for a national disposal facility for solid low-level radioactive and short-lived intermediate-level radioactive wastes is widely recognised and the Federal Government is in the process of selecting a site for a national near-surface disposal facility for low and short-lived intermediate level wastes. Some near surface disposal facilities already exist in Australia, including tailings dams at uranium mines and the Mt Walton East Intractable Waste Disposal Facility in Western Australia which includes a near surface repository for low level wastes originating in Western Australia. 7 refs, 1 fig., 2 tabs

  5. The peculiar case of Marosticano xenoliths: a cratonic mantle fragment affected by carbonatite metasomatism in the Veneto Volcanic Province (Northern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brombin, Valentina; Bonadiman, Costanza; Coltorti, Massimo; Florencia Fahnestock, M.; Bryce, Julia G.; Marzoli, Andrea

    2017-04-01

    The Tertiary Magmatic Province of Veneto, known as Veneto Volcanic Province (VVP), in the Northern Italy, represents one of the most important volcanic provinces of the Adria Plate. It is composed by five volcanic districts: Val d'Adige, Marosticano, Mts. Lessini, Berici Hills and Euganean Hills. Most of the volcanic products are relatively undifferentiated lavas, from nephelinites to tholeiites in composition. Commonly VVP nephelinites and basanites carry mantle xenoliths. This study presents a petrological characterization of the new xenolith occurrence of Marosticano and comparison with previously studied VVP xenolith populations (i.e. from the Lessinean and Val d'Adige areas), which represent off-craton lithospheric mantle fragment affected by Na-alkaline silicate metasomatism (Siena & Coltorti 1989; Beccaluva et al., 2001; Gasperini et al., 2006). Marosticano (MA) peridotites are anhydrous spinel-bearing lherzolites and harzburgites, which are geochemically well distinguishible from the other VVP mantle xenoliths. Primary minerals record the "most restitic" composition of the VVP sampled mantle, even calling the geochemical features of a sub-cratonic mantle. Olivines in both lherzolites and harzburgites show high Ni contents compared with the Fo values (Ni→ lherzolite: 2600-3620 ppm; harzburgite: 2600-3540 ppm; Fo → lh: 91-92; hz: 90-93) that follow the trend of olivine from a cratonic area (Kelemen, 1998). Orthopyroxenes have mg# values with 1:1 ratio with coexisting olivines and Al2O3 contents always 0.5 wt%) contents are also the chemical characteristics of the clinopyroxenes. On the whole both MA pyroxenes show major element contents that recall the characteristics of those from cratonic (sp-bearing) peridotites (e.g. from Greenland, South Africa and Tanzania; Downes et al., 2004). In addition, the relationship between the high Fo content of olivine and the high chromium contents (cr#=(Cr/(Cr+Al)X100); lh: 30-53; hz: 38-67) in coexisting spinel, out of

  6. Prospects for the uranium industry in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-02-01

    The report covers the basic issues of the coming uranium era discussing the world supply and demand situation, the trend in uranium prices and the continuing move to nuclear power as the world's primary source of electrical energy. In Australia, unknowns such as future contract prices and quantities, production start dates, royalties and the outcome of the environmental inquiry create the speculative image of the uranium stocks. The first section of the report discusses the technical aspects of the nuclear industry but is necessarily brief because the real story is the world trend to nuclear power for economic and political reasons and the old story of supply and demand (discussed in section two). Within Australia some companies are better placed than others to benefit from the uranium era. Section three looks at prices and section four reviews the individual companies involved in the uranium industry in Australia. (author)

  7. Australia and Galicia in Transnational Narratives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Jesús Lorenzo Modia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the transnational features of narratives between Galicia and Australia from the year 1519 to the Present-day. Sailors like Pedro Fernandez de Quiros and Luis Váez de Torres, who reached Australia in the sixteenth century, will be considered as the starting point of a cultural dialogue still going on in today’s literature not only as regards the geography of the continent but also in the collective imagination of the country. Other connections between these countries are also established by contemporary novelists such as Peter Carey, Sally Morgan and Murray Bail, who use Galician history and places, filtered through British sources, to address Australia and its present-day characters and decolonizing conflicts. Finally, the works of other authors such as Robert Graves and Félix Calvino, who also deal with this literary dialogue in their fiction, are explored.

  8. Dermatology training and practice in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebaratnam, Deshan F; Murrell, Dédée F

    2014-10-01

    Dermatology is a relatively young discipline in Australia compared to other specialities within the medical fraternity. From its humble beginnings, the profession has evolved significantly over the decades and is now represented by the Australasian College of Dermatologists which is charged with training the next generation of dermatologists and advocating for and advancing the profession. The authors reviewed and describe the history of dermatology training and practice in Australia. Despite the progress in education, there are only 415 dermatologists serving a population of 23.3 million (1 per 58 000) and yet it has the highest incidence and prevalence of skin cancer in the world. The scope of clinical practice is wide in Australia, with clinicians well versed in medical and procedural dermatology. It is hoped that Australian dermatology will continue to bolster the dermatology profession globally. © 2014 The International Society of Dermatology.

  9. Coral reproduction in Western Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Gilmour

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Larval production and recruitment underpin the maintenance of coral populations, but these early life history stages are vulnerable to extreme variation in physical conditions. Environmental managers aim to minimise human impacts during significant periods of larval production and recruitment on reefs, but doing so requires knowledge of the modes and timing of coral reproduction. Most corals are hermaphroditic or gonochoric, with a brooding or broadcast spawning mode of reproduction. Brooding corals are a significant component of some reefs and produce larvae over consecutive months. Broadcast spawning corals are more common and display considerable variation in their patterns of spawning among reefs. Highly synchronous spawning can occur on reefs around Australia, particularly on the Great Barrier Reef. On Australia’s remote north-west coast there have been fewer studies of coral reproduction. The recent industrial expansion into these regions has facilitated research, but the associated data are often contained within confidential reports. Here we combine information in this grey-literature with that available publicly to update our knowledge of coral reproduction in WA, for tens of thousands of corals and hundreds of species from over a dozen reefs spanning 20° of latitude. We identified broad patterns in coral reproduction, but more detailed insights were hindered by biased sampling; most studies focused on species of Acropora sampled over a few months at several reefs. Within the existing data, there was a latitudinal gradient in spawning activity among seasons, with mass spawning during autumn occurring on all reefs (but the temperate south-west. Participation in a smaller, multi-specific spawning during spring decreased from approximately one quarter of corals on the Kimberley Oceanic reefs to little participation at Ningaloo. Within these seasons, spawning was concentrated in March and/or April, and October and/or November, depending

  10. Combined iron and magnesium isotope geochemistry of pyroxenite xenoliths from Hannuoba, North China Craton: implications for mantle metasomatism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin Miao; Cao, Hui Hui; Mi, Xue; Evans, Noreen J.; Qi, Yu Han; Huang, Fang; Zhang, Hong Fu

    2017-06-01

    We present high-precision iron and magnesium isotopic data for diverse mantle pyroxenite xenoliths collected from Hannuoba, North China Craton and provide the first combined iron and magnesium isotopic study of such rocks. Compositionally, these xenoliths range from Cr-diopside pyroxenites and Al-augite pyroxenites to garnet-bearing pyroxenites and are taken as physical evidence for different episodes of melt injection. Our results show that both Cr-diopside pyroxenites and Al-augite pyroxenites of cumulate origin display narrow ranges in iron and magnesium isotopic compositions (δ57Fe = -0.01 to 0.09 with an average of 0.03 ± 0.08 (2SD, n = 6); δ26Mg = - 0.28 to -0.25 with an average of -0.26 ± 0.03 (2SD, n = 3), respectively). These values are identical to those in the normal upper mantle and show equilibrium inter-mineral iron and magnesium isotope fractionation between coexisting mantle minerals. In contrast, the garnet-bearing pyroxenites, which are products of reactions between peridotites and silicate melts from an ancient subducted oceanic slab, exhibit larger iron isotopic variations, with δ57Fe ranging from 0.12 to 0.30. The δ57Fe values of minerals in these garnet-bearing pyroxenites also vary widely (-0.25 to 0.08 in olivines, -0.04 to 0.25 in orthopyroxenes, -0.07 to 0.31 in clinopyroxenes, 0.07 to 0.48 in spinels and 0.31-0.42 in garnets). In addition, the garnet-bearing pyroxenite shows light δ26Mg (-0.43) relative to the mantle. The δ26Mg of minerals in the garnet-bearing pyroxenite range from -0.35 for olivine and orthopyroxene, to -0.34 for clinopyroxene, 0.04 for spinel and -0.68 for garnet. These measured values stand in marked contrast to calculated equilibrium iron and magnesium isotope fractionation between coexisting mantle minerals at mantle temperatures derived from theory, indicating disequilibrium isotope fractionation. Notably, one phlogopite clinopyroxenite with an apparent later metasomatic overprint has the heaviest δ57Fe

  11. Generation of early Archean felsic volcanics and TTG gneisses through crustal melting, eastern Kaapvaal craton, southern Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröener, A.; Hoffmann, J.; Xie, H.; Wu, F.; Münker, C.; Hegner, E.; Wong, J.; Wan, Y.; Liu, D.

    2012-12-01

    crustal protolith, whereas some analyses suggest input from a juvenile source. Hf crustal model ages are 3.61-3.89 Ga and again imply a heterogeneous but predominantly crustal source. The oldest TTG gneisses of the AGC with zircon ages of 3.60-3.66 Ga occur in NW Swaziland. Whole-rock ɛNd(t)-values range from -2.0 to +0.9, and ɛHf(t)-values are -3.3 to +4.6. Hf-in-zircon isotopic data are similar to the BGB felsic rocks, and most analyses show negative ɛHf(t)-values, suggesting zircon derivation from an older crustal protolith, whereas only a few analyses suggest juvenile input. Hf crustal model ages are 3.79-4.13 Ga and again imply a heterogeneous source. Our data challenge the popular view that early Archaean TTGs and greenstones are principally of juvenile origin and formed in primitive arc or oceanic environments. We suggest extensive and continuous recycling of earliest-formed granitoid crust and mixing with juvenile material to produce successive generations of TTGs and associated felsic volcanic rocks in the eastern Kaapvaal craton.

  12. Recommendations for an energy policy for Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-10-01

    Over the next few years, Australia must modify its dependence on natural oil and place greater reliance on other fossil fuels and renewable energy sources. The recommendations contained in this report are the result of two years of study, and the long term energy prospects for Australia and energy resource policies for coal, liquid fuels, nuclear energy, solar energy and natural gas are considered in detail. Energy conservation policies and the identification of areas where energy research, development and demonstration need to be undertaken are also covered. (J.R.)

  13. Reengineering in Australia: factors affecting success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicity Murphy

    1998-11-01

    Full Text Available Business process reengineering (BPR is being used in many organisations worldwide to realign operations. Most of the research undertaken has been focused on North American or European practices. The study reported here replicates a US reengineering study in an Australian context by surveying large public and private sector Australian organisations. The study makes three main contributions by: (1 presenting a picture of BPR practices in Australia, (2 clarifying factors critical to the success of reengineering projects in Australia, and (3 providing a comparison of factors leading to success in Australian BPR projects with those found in the US.

  14. The Creeping Blight of Islamophobia in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Briskman

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In the latter months of 2014, following events in faraway Iraq and Syria, Australia responded forcefully at home. The manufactured fear of a terrorist attack resulted in police raids, increased counter-terrorism legislation and scare campaigns to alert the public to 'threat'. Although Islamophobia rose in Australia after 2001 it has been latent in recent years. It is on the rise again with collateral damage from government measures including verbal and physical attacks on Australian Muslims. Vitriol is also directed at asylum seekers and refugees. Media, government and community discourses converge to promote Islam as dangerous and deviant.

  15. UV/EB curing in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, R.; Garnett, J.; Loo Teck Ng

    1999-01-01

    Progress in LTV/EB curing is reviewed in Australia. Generally the technology is used by those industries where curing is well developed in Europe and North America, however the scale is an order of magnitude lower due to the smaller market size. The Asian economic crisis does not appear to have affected expansion of the technology in Australia. EB continues to be successfully used in the packaging and foam fields whilst in UV, security devices, particularly banknotes are steadily expanding especially in export markets have been studied

  16. Petrology, genesis and geodynamic implication of the Mesoproterozoic–Late Cretaceous Timmasamudram kimberlite cluster, Wajrakarur field, Eastern Dharwar Craton, southern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Dongre

    2017-05-01

    Depleted mantle (TDM Nd perovskite model ages of the 1100 Ma Timmasamudram kimberlites show that the metasomatic enrichment of their source regions are broadly similar to that of the Mesoproterozoic kimberlites of the EDC. The younger, late Cretaceous (ca. 90 Ma TK-1 (macrocrystic variant and TK-4 kimberlites, as well as the orangeites from the Bastar Craton, share similar Nd model ages of 1100 Ma, consistent with a similarity in the timing of source enrichment during the amalgamation of Rodinia supercontinent. The presence of late Cretaceous diamondiferous orangeite activity, presumably related to the location of the Marion hotspot in southern India at the time, suggests that thick lithosphere was preserved, at least locally, up to the late Cretaceous, and was not entirely destroyed during the breakup of Gondwana, as inferred by some recent geophysical models.

  17. Petroleum geology and resources of the Nepa-Botuoba High, Angara-Lena Terrace, and Cis-Patom Foredeep, southeastern Siberian Craton, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulmishek, Gregory F.

    2001-01-01

    Three structural provinces of this report, the Nepa-Botuoba High, the Angara-Lena Terrace, and the Cis-Patom Foredeep, occupy the southeastern part of the Siberian craton northwest of the Baikal-Patom folded region (fig. 1). The provinces are similar in many aspects of their history of development, stratigraphic composition, and petroleum geology characteristics. The sedimentary cover of the provinces overlies the Archean?Lower Proterozoic basement of the Siberian craton. Over most of the area of the provinces, the basement is covered by Vendian (uppermost Proterozoic, 650?570 Ma) clastic and carbonate rocks. Unlike the case in the more northwestern areas of the craton, older Riphean sedimentary rocks here are largely absent and they appear in the stratigraphic sequence only in parts of the Cis-Patom Foredeep province. Most of the overlying sedimentary section consists of Cambrian and Ordovician carbonate and clastic rocks, and it includes a thick Lower Cambrian salt-bearing formation. Younger rocks are thin and are present only in marginal areas. 1 A single total petroleum system (TPS) embraces all three provinces. The TPS is unique in two aspects: (1) its rich hydro-carbon reserves are derived from Precambrian source rocks and (2) preservation of oil and gas fields is extremely long owing to the presence of the Lower Cambrian undeformed salt seal. Discovered reserves of the TPS are about 2 billion barrels of oil and more than 30 trillion cubic feet of gas. The stratigraphic distribution of oil and gas reserves is narrow; all fields are in Vendian to lowermost Cambrian clastic and carbonate reservoirs that occur below Lower Cambrian salt. Both structural and stratigraphic traps are known. Source rocks are absent in the sedimentary cover of the provinces, with the possible exception of a narrow zone on the margin of the Cis-Patom Foredeep province. Source rocks are interpreted here to be Riphean and Vendian organic-rich shales of the Baikal-Patom folded region

  18. U-Pb and Lu-Hf systematics of zircons from Sargur metasediments, Dharwar Craton, Southern India: new insights on the provenance and crustal evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maibam, Bidyananda; Gerdes, Axel; Srinivasan, R.; Goswami, J.N.

    2017-01-01

    A study of U-Pb and Lu-Hf-Yb isotope data in zircons from metamorphosed psammopelite and quartzite from the type area of Archaean Sargur Group, Dharwar Craton, India is carried out. Two age populations are observed: an older population with concordant U-Pb ages between 2.7 and 2.8 Ga, and a younger population with ages in the 2.4 - 2.6 Ga age range. The εHf values of 0 to + 2.0 for the older zircon population suggest that they were derived from juvenile crust formed at 2.7- 2.8 Ga. Sub-chondritic εHf values for the younger population indicate metamorphism and/or crustal reworking at ∼2.5 Ga. Meta-sedimentary enclaves in the Sargur type area are therefore part of the gneiss-supracrustal complex of different antiquities and may not have an independent stratigraphic status. (author)

  19. Implications of new ^{40}Ar/^{39}Ar age of Mallapur Intrusives on the chronology and evolution of the Kaladgi Basin, Dharwar Craton, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Shilpa Patil; Pande, Kanchan; Kale, Vivek S.

    2018-04-01

    The Kaladgi Basin on the northern edge of the Dharwar craton has characters diverse from the other epicratonic Purana basins of Peninsular India. Sedimentological studies in the basin have established the presence of three cycles of flooding separated by an event of intra-basinal deformation accompanied by low grade incipient metamorphism. The overall structural configuration of the basin indicates its development by supracrustal extension accompanied by shearing in a trans-tensional regime during the Mesoproterozoic. This was followed by sagging that yielded Neoproterozoic sedimentation in a successor nested basin. ^{40}Ar/^{39}Ar dating of an intrusive mafic dyke along the axial plane of a fold has yielded a plateau age of 1154{± }4 Ma. This helps constraint the age of the various events during the evolution of this basin.

  20. Adakite-gabbro-anorthosite magmatism at the final (576-546 Ma) development stage of the Neoproterozoic active margin in the south-west of the Siberian craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernikovskaya, A. E.; Vernikovsky, V. A.; Matushkin, N. Yu.; Kadilnikov, P. I.; Romanova, I. V.; Larionov, A. N.

    2017-12-01

    In the late Neoproterozoic a prolonged active continental margin mode dominated the southwestern margin of the Siberian craton. Based on results of geological, petrological-geochemical, U-Th-Pb and Sm-Nd, Rb-Sr isotope investigations, for the first time we established that on the final evolution stage of this margin 576-546 Ma, intrusions of adakites and gabbro-anorthosites of the Zimoveyniy massif were emplaced in the South Yenisei Ridge. These new data indicate genetic relationships of the studied adakites and host NEB-metabasites. The formation of adakites could have been due to a crustal or a mantle-crustal source in a setting of transform sliding of lithospheric plates after the subduction stopped.

  1. A study of the hydrothermal alteration in Paleoproterozoic volcanic centers, São Félix do Xingu region, Amazonian Craton, Brazil, using short-wave infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cruz, Raquel Souza; Fernandes, Carlos Marcello Dias; Villas, Raimundo Netuno Nobre; Juliani, Caetano; Monteiro, Lena Virgínia Soares; de Almeida, Teodoro Isnard Ribeiro; Lagler, Bruno; de Carvalho Carneiro, Cleyton; Misas, Carlos Mario Echeverri

    2015-10-01

    Hypogene hydrothermal minerals have been identified by short-wave infrared spectroscopy in hydrothermally altered rocks from the Sobreiro and Santa Rosa formations, which belong to a Paleoproterozoic volcano-plutonic system in Amazonian craton. Three clay minerals are spectrally recognized: montmorillonite, kaolinite, and illite. The integration of these data with those available in the literature, including gold occurrences, suggests that those rocks are hydrothermal products of both volcanic thermal sources and later crustal intrusions, as evidenced by variable styles of propylitic, sericitic, potassic, and intermediate argillic alteration. The influence of meteoric fluids is emphasized. This low cost exploratory technique, which can be applied to hand samples, seems to be promising in the separation of hydrothermally altered volcano-plutonic centers in regions submitted to severe weathering conditions, in addition to aid elaborating models for prospecting mineral deposits.

  2. Evolution of the Dharwar Craton: a terrain of early Archean crustal stability, long term orogenic cycles and large scale palaeobiological activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, R.; Naqvi, S.M.

    1988-01-01

    Traceable history of the Dharwar Craton goes back to approximately 3400 m.y. old tonalitic to trondhjemitic fundamental gneiss whose REE composition indicates its derivation from a preexisting basalt which apparently had very short time of crustal residence. The fundamental gneiss is preserved only as rare relicts in the vast gneissic complex of the Indian Peninsula (the Peninsular Gneiss), and as pebbles in the conglomerates of the Archean Dharwar sequence. Study of these relicts, shows evidence of a deformation episode prior to the deposition of the high- and low-grade Dharwar supracrustal sequence. The Dharwar supracrustal sequence is briefly described. Geochemistry of the volcanic and sedimentary rocks of the Dharwar supracrustal belts are examined

  3. Lithospheric diamond formation as a consequence of methane-rich volatile flooding: An example from diamondiferous eclogite xenoliths of the Karelian craton (Finland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, K. A.; Cartigny, P.; Tappe, S.; O'Brien, H.; Klemme, S.

    2017-06-01

    A collection of 61 xenocrystic and 12 eclogite xenolith-derived diamonds from the 600 Ma Lahtojoki kimberlite in central Finland has been investigated. Calculated pressure and temperature conditions for the diamondiferous eclogites are in excess of 5.5 GPa and 1300 °C, suggesting residence depths greater than 180 km, near the base of the Karelian cratonic mantle lithosphere. Geochemically, the eclogite xenoliths have gabbroic compositions showing positive Eu and Sr anomalies, relatively low ΣREE and elevated Al2O3 contents, yet garnets have ambiguous δ18O values of 5.7‰ and 5.9‰. Gabbroic eclogite formation could therefore be linked to either subduction processes during the 1.9 Ga Svecofennian orogeny or to cumulate processes during 2.1 Ga rift-induced magmatism. Determination of the oxygen fugacity of Lahtojoki eclogite xenoliths from both this work and previous studies suggests that diamond-bearing eclogites may be more reduced (ΔFMQ-3.5) compared to barren eclogites (ΔFMQ-1.7). While recycled oceanic crust protoliths for the eclogites remain a possibility, the carbon isotopic compositions and nitrogen abundances of the Lahtojoki diamonds indicate mantle-derived volatile sources. All diamonds (i.e., loose and eclogite xenolith-derived) display a restricted range of δ13C values from -7.8‰ to -3.7‰ that overlaps with the carbon isotopic composition of Earth's mantle. The Lahtojoki diamond δ13C values form a negatively skewed distribution, indicating diamond growth from reduced mantle-derived carbon sources such as methane- (CH4) bearing fluids. Nitrogen contents of the Lahtojoki diamonds range from 40 to 1830 atomic ppm with a mean of ∼670 atomic ppm; these elevated nitrogen contents combined with the close association to eclogites suggest an eclogitic or crustal volatile source. However, the Karelian craton was periodically intruded by ultramafic alkaline magmas since at least 1.8 Ga, noting in particular the occurrence of phlogopite

  4. Micro-scale characterization of iron ores from a banded iron formation in Yishui county, western Shandong province of North China Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, I.; Lee, I.; Yang, X.

    2016-12-01

    Banded iron formations (BIFs) are widely distributed in North China Craton (NCC). Yishui BIF is located in Yishui county, western Shandong Province of NCC and is categorized as Algoma-type. The origin of iron and silica of BIFs in this region have been studied extensively for decades. The trace elemental concentrations of magnetite and hematite in iron ores from Yishui BIF are focused in this study to better understand the origins of BIF. To discuss micro-structural signatures of iron ores, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectrometer, electron microprobe (EPMA) and laser ablation inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometer (LA-ICP-MS) were utilized. Overall geochemical data represents abundance of trace elements, oxygen fugacity (fO2) condition during the formation of iron oxides, depositional environment of Yishui BIF, implying the involvement of volcanic eruption and hydrothermal exhalation during the chemical deposition.

  5. A Case of Language Revitalisation in "Settled" Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Presents a case of language revitalisation in "settled" Australia, considers the nature of the language ecology in indigenous Australia, and advances some of the reasons for the success of this case of language revitalization. (Author/VWL)

  6. Seagrasses in tropical Australia, productive and abundant for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Cymodocea serrulata; photosynthetic characteristics; seagrass production; Thalassia hemprichii; tropical seagrass; Zostera muelleri ... Margaret Greenway2. Australian Rivers Institute, Griffith University, Nathan campus Q. 4111 Australia; School of Engineering, Griffith University, Nathan campus Q. 4111 Australia ...

  7. Implications of climate change for tourism in Australia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amelung, B.; Nicholls, S.

    2014-01-01

    This study assesses the impacts of projected climate change on Australia's tourism industry. Based on application of the Tourism Climatic Index, it investigates potential changes in climatic attractiveness for Australia's major destinations, and discusses implications for tourist flows and tourism

  8. The Cretaceous adakitic-basaltic-granitic magma sequence on south-eastern margin of the North China Craton: Implications for lithospheric thinning mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sheng-Ao; Li, Shuguang; Guo, Sushu; Hou, Zhenhui; He, Yongsheng

    2012-03-01

    We present here a combined study of Early Cretaceous granodiorites, granites and mafic rocks from the Bengbu area on south-eastern margin of the North China Craton (NCC), in order to provide insights into the thinning mechanism of lithosphere on the cratonic margins. Zircon U-Pb and Ar-Ar dating reveals an adakitic-basaltic-granitic magma sequence with the adakitic intrusions (granodiorites; 123-115 Ma) formed prior to the granites and mafic dykes (both ca.112 Ma). The granodiorites are geochemically similar to low-Mg# adakitic rocks and isotopically have enriched Sr-Nd-Hf compositions, low radiogenic Pb (206Pb/204Pbi = 16.524-17.017), and mantle-like δ18Ozircon (5.8 ± 0.5‰). They were originated from the thickened lower continental crust (LCC) of the NCC. In contrast, the granites have low Sr/Y (generation of granitic and basaltic magmas. Anatexis of the pre-existing thickened LCC at 123-115 Ma that attenuated the LCC itself and left the residues denser as a result of felsic (adakitic) melt extraction is proposed to have resulted in gravitational instability and foundering of the lithosphere. Such a temporal sequence of magma generation and processes of lithospheric thinning also occurred on north margin of the NCC and are quite similar to the mountain-root removal beneath the Dabie Orogen in central China. This manifests that previous melting of the LCC is perhaps an important trigger responsible for lithospheric foundering in orogenic belts and cartonic margins, where the lithosphere underwent pre-thickening by continental collisions and had stabilized over a long time.

  9. Precambrian crustal evolution and Cretaceous–Palaeogene faulting in West Greenland: Evolution of Neoarchaean supracrustal belts at the northern margin of the North Atlantic Craton, West Greenland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stensgaard, Bo Møller

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The Archaean North Atlantic Craton of West Greenland collided at c. 1.9 Ga with a lesser-known Archaean craton to the north, to form the Nagssugtoqidian orogen. The Palaeoproterozoic metamorphic grade and strain intensity decrease northward through the orogen, allowing investigation of the reworked Archaean components in its northern part. Two Archaean supracrustal belts in this region – the Ikamiut and Kangilinaaq belts – are investigated here using field mapping, aeromagnetic data, zircon geochronology, and geochemistry. Both belts comprise quartzo-feldspathic and pelitic metasedimentary rocks, amphibolite, and minor calc-silicate rocks, anorthosite and ultramafic rocks. Pb-Pb and U-Pb dating of detrital zircons and host orthogneisses suggest deposition at c. 2800 Ma (Kangilinaaq belt and after 2740 Ma (Ikamiut belt; both belts have zircons with Neoarchaean metamorphic rims. Metasedimentary rocks and orthogneisses at Ikamiut share similar steep REE signatures with strong LREE enrichment, consistent with local derivation of the sediment and deposition directly onto or proximal to the regional orthogneiss precursors. Zircon age data from Kangilinaaq indicate both local and distal sources for the sediment there. Geochemical data for Kangilinaaq amphibolites indicate bimodal, mixed felsic–mafic source rocks with island-arc basaltic affinities, consistent with a shelf or arc setting. Both belts experienced a similar tectono-metamorphic history involving Neoarchaean amphibolite facies peak metamorphism at c. 2740–2700 Ma, possibly due to continued emplacement of tonalitic and granodioritic magmas. Nagssugtoqidian lower amphibolite facies metamorphism at c. 1850 Ma was associated with development of the large-scale F2 folds and shear zones that control the present outcrop pattern. The observed differences in the sources of the Kangilinaaq and Ikamiut belts and their shared post-Archaean history suggest they were formed in different

  10. Depth and sharpness variations of 410-km and 660-km discontinuities in North China Craton from dense array ambient noise interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, H.; Feng, J.; Poli, P.; Fang, L.; Wu, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that body waves between pairs of stations can be successfully retrieved from ambient noise cross-correlation at both regional and global scales, although surface waves are the dominant signals. However, it is still difficult to use these retrieved body wave signals to map lateral depth variations of main structural discontinuities or velocity contrasts because of its low signal to noise ratio (SNR). In this research, based on a dense seismic array in eastern North China Craton, reflected P-wave signals from 410-km and 660-km discontinuities can be successfully recovered from ambient noise cross-correlation. To improve SNR of the reflected phases, the cross-correlations are stacked within each bin with the phase-weighted stack (PWS) method. In addition, there exist apparent spatial variations of the relative amplitude ratios between the reflected P410P and P660P phases. The retrieved P410P and P660P phases from stacked correlations reveal lateral variations of both depths and sharpness of the 410-km and 660-km discontinuities along two profiles, which may be related with hot material upwelling and the effect of stagnant Pacific plate in the transition zone beneath North China Craton. The imaging results are generally consistent with the results from teleseismic receiver functions, which demonstrate the possibility of mapping high-resolution topography and sharpness of deep internal discontinuities without earthquake-station geometric limitations. Future joint imaging with both interferometric and passive signals will be better for understanding interface architectures and related dynamic processes of the Earth.

  11. The Hibiscus panduriformis complex (Malvaceae) in Australia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Juswara, L.S.; Craven, L.A.

    2005-01-01

    The Hibiscus panduriformis Burm.f. species complex in Australia is revised. Six species are recognised, of which one is the widespread H. panduriformis; one, H. austrinus, is based upon H. panduriformis var. australis; and four represent new species, H. apodus, H. calcicola, H. fluvialis, and H.

  12. Australia's South African war 1899-19021

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    immediately suggest, Australia's contribution to the war was too small to be decisive, ..... They were disbanded just as hard-won experience was turning ... At least one Australian at Colesberg behaved with the brutality Merriman denounced. In November 1899 Charles Cox, a captain from Sydney, ordered a Cape policeman ...

  13. Decreasing prevalence of social drinkers in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callinan, Sarah; Pennay, Amy; Livingston, Michael

    2017-04-01

    There has been a recent decrease in population level alcohol consumption in Australia, particularly in young people. Whether this is due to increasing abstinence or a shift in the way people think about alcohol is not known. The aim of this study is to investigate trends in self-identification of drinker types in Australia from 2001 to 2013 in light of shifting patterns of alcohol consumption in Australia. Five waves of the National Drug Strategy Household Survey from 2001 to 2013 (N=118,416) were used to assess trends in self-identification as a drinker type (non-, ex-, occasional, light, social, heavy and binge drinker). Consumption patterns and demographics of the self-identified groups were also examined. The pattern of self-identification has mostly remained steady over time. The two exceptions to this are a decrease in identification as a social drinker (28% to 22%) and a corresponding increase in identification as a non-drinker (from 19% to 27%). There are few changes over time in the demographic make-up of, or consumption patterns in, the social drinker category with the exception of those over 50, who continue to identify as social drinkers at the same rate. The recent increase in abstinence in Australia seems to be matched by a corresponding decrease in self-identified social drinkers, particularly among those under 50. This indicates that the decrease in consumption is not occurring in those most likely to experience harms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Language Planning and Language Policy in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddicoat, Anthony, Ed.

    1991-01-01

    A five-year period of particular activity in Australian language policy and language planning culminated with the 1991 publication of the White Paper called Australia's Language, which outlines proposed government programs in languages until 1994. Many of the papers in this theme issue of the journal of the Applied Linguistics Association of…

  15. The future of astronomy in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadler, Elaine M.

    2017-09-01

    Australian astronomy has a bright future, thanks largely to recent government investments in major new telescopes, instruments and research centres. There are some short-term challenges as Australia's focus continues to shift from the current (mainly) national facilities for radio and optical astronomy to new multinational and global facilities.

  16. "Smartening Up": Ongoing Challenges for Australia's Outback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cradduck, Lucy

    2016-01-01

    As the international community moves inexorably towards a "smart" future, the position of Australia's non-urban areas in that future is less certain. The (re-elected) Australian federal government made a commitment to moving Australian cities forward as part of the international "smart city" movement. However, the effectiveness…

  17. Hendra Virus Infection in Dog, Australia, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkland, Peter D; Gabor, Melinda; Poe, Ian; Neale, Kristie; Chaffey, Kim; Finlaison, Deborah S; Gu, Xingnian; Hick, Paul M; Read, Andrew J; Wright, Therese; Middleton, Deborah

    2015-12-01

    Hendra virus occasionally causes severe disease in horses and humans. In Australia in 2013, infection was detected in a dog that had been in contact with an infected horse. Abnormalities and viral RNA were found in the dog's kidney, brain, lymph nodes, spleen, and liver. Dogs should be kept away from infected horses.

  18. Australia modifies resource rent, uranium mining policies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    Current Australian government business and economic policies as they affect the mining industry are discussed. The distribution of constitutional and taxing powers in Australia between state and commonwealth governments and possible inappropriate taxes and other policies can have an adverse effect on resource development. The effects of these policies on both coal and uranium mining are discussed

  19. Psychiatric epidemiology and disaster exposure in Australia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reifels, L.; Mills, K.; Dückers, M.L.A.; O'Donnell, M.L.

    2017-01-01

    Aims. To examine the lifetime prevalence and risk of psychiatric disorders associated with natural and man-made disaster exposure in Australia. Methods. We utilised data from a nationally representative population survey (N = 8841) which were analysed through univariate and multivariate logistic

  20. Uranium mining in Canada and Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackenzie, B.W.; Whillans, R.T.; Williams, R.M.; Doggett, M.D.

    1991-01-01

    This study compared the impact of taxation on the economic viability and competitive position of uranium mining in Canada and Australia. The evaluation is based on four types of uranium deposit and four hypothetical project models. The deposits are assumed to have been discovered and delineated, and are awaiting a mine development decision. The models, initially appraised on a before-tax basis, are then subjected to taxation in each of six jurisdictions. Several taxation criteria are assessed in each case, including after-tax measures of investment incentive, discounted tax revenues, effective tax rates, intergovernmental tax shares, and comparative tax levels. The impact of taxation is shown to be both high and variable. The taxation systems in Saskatchewan and Australia's Northern Territory generate the most government revenue and provide the lowest incentive for investment. Canada's Northwest Territories and Ontario provide the best investment incentive and collect the least amount of taxes. South Australia and Western Australia tend to be positioned between these extremes. The study demonstrates that only the very best uranium mining projects have a chance of being developed under current market conditions, and even these can be rendered uneconomic by excessive taxation regimes. It follows that exceptionally good quality targets will have to be identified to provide the economic justification for uranium exploration. These realities will likely restrict uranium exploration and development activities for some time, not an unexpected response to a market situation where low prices have been caused largely by excess supply. (L.L.)

  1. Perception of Innovative Crop Insurance in Australia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meuwissen, M.P.M.; Molnar, T.A.

    2010-01-01

    Worldwide, extreme climate risks cause stakeholders in food supply chains to search for new risk management tools. In Australia, recently so-called crop yield simulation insurance has been introduced based on an integrated agrometeorological simulation model. Current uptake is relatively low,

  2. Doing Business 2014 Economy Profile : Australia

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank; International Finance Corporation

    2013-01-01

    This economy profile presents the Doing Business indicators for Australia. In a series of annual reports, Doing Business assesses regulations affecting domestic firms in 189 economies and ranks the economies in 10 areas of business regulation, such as starting a business, resolving insolvency and trading across borders. This year's report data cover regulations measured from June 2012 thro...

  3. Doing Business Economy Profile 2017 : Australia

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank Group

    2016-01-01

    This economy profile presents the Doing Business indicators for Australia. To allow useful comparison, it also provides data for other selected economies (comparator economies) for each indicator. Doing Business 2017 is the 14th in a series of annual reports investigating the regulations that enhance business activity and those that constrain it. Economies are ranked on their ease of doing...

  4. Developing a National Geography Curriculum for Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maude, Alaric Mervyn

    2014-01-01

    Australia is in the process of implementing a national geography curriculum to replace the separate state and territory curriculums. The paper describes the process of curriculum development, and identifies the different groups that were involved. These included the board and staff of the national curriculum authority, geography teachers across…

  5. The Sandalwood industry in Australia: a history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamela Statham

    1990-01-01

    From its inception in 1805, when it contributed to Sydney merchant incomes from whaling ventures, until today, when it earns several million dollars in export revenue, the sandalwood industry has played a small but significant part in Australia's economic development. The history of the industry falls into three major stages: first is the off-shore exploitation of...

  6. Depression in Aboriginal men in central Australia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, Alex D.H.; Mentha, Ricky; Rowley, Kevin G.

    2013-01-01

    groups comprising of members from primary Indigenous language groups in central Australia. First, focus group participants were asked to review and select a screening measure for adaptation. Bi-lingual experts then translated and back translated the language within the selected measure. Focus group...

  7. Australia and the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alder, K; Australian Atomic Energy Commission, Lucas Heights; Reynolds, J.; Western Mining Corporation, Western Australia

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear electricity industry based on uranium fuel is now well established in 31 countries. Nuclear's ability to provide large scale base load power at costs competitive with available and politically favoured alternatives is causing it to be increasingly selected for new capacity. The World Nuclear Association data shows that current new construction together with that planned and proposed as of December 2009, will bring world nuclear electricity generating capacity from the present 373 000 MW to 876 000 MWm an increase of 112 per cent. By comparison Australia's total generating capacity (mainly from coal) is 47 000 MW, or one eighth of existing world nuclear capacity. Nuclear growth can be expected to increase further, due to continuing world-wide energy supply security issues and politically driven climate change concerns. Australia has been mining uranium for 60 eventful years, much influenced by government policy changes. Australia's un-mined resources are now the largest in the world and it is already a major supplier to the nuclear fueld cycle, in a growing market. This situation offers long term opportunities for Australia to benefit more fully and at the same time contribute to global security by further participation in the uranium-based nuclear electricity industry fuel cycle

  8. Internet advertising of artificial tanning in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Team, Victoria; Markovic, Milica

    2006-08-01

    Artificial tanning, defined as deliberate exposure to ultraviolet rays produced by artificial tanning devices, is a new and emerging public health issue in Australia and globally. Epidemiological research suggests that artificial tanning may contribute to the incidence of melanoma, nonmelanoma skin cancer as well as other health problems. Given that Australia has a high incidence of skin cancer, we have undertaken a study to explore how artificial tanning has been promoted to its users. The aim was to analyze the completeness and accuracy of information about artificial tanning. A content analysis of web sites of tanning salons and distributors of tanning equipment in Australia was conducted. A total of 22 web sites were analyzed. None of the solarium operators or distributors of equipment provided full information about the risks of artificial tanning. Fifty-nine percent of web advertisements had no information and 41% provided only partial information regarding the risks of artificial tanning. Pictures with the image of bronze-tanned bodies, predominantly women, were used by all web advertisers. In light of the success of sun-safety campaigns in Australia, the findings of future epidemiological research on the prevalence of artificial tanning and sociological and anthropological research on why people utilize artificial tanning should be a basis for developing effective targeted health promotion on the elimination of artificial tanning in the country.

  9. Documentation--Refugees and Mass Migration: Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Charles A.

    1986-01-01

    Since World War II, Australia has been a major country of refugee settlement. This article traces its immigrant policy and resulting population from its interest in encouraging immigration for its own population growth and development to its current commitment to help refugees and Special Humanitarian Program (SHP) cases. (ETS)

  10. Atomic energy: agreement between Canada and Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    This agreement provides for the exchange of nuclear materials and equipment between Canada and Australia and specifies the safeguards and other protective measures that shall be employed to ensure the peaceful use of the nuclear technology shared between the two countries

  11. In Australia: Multiple Intelligences in Multiple Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vialle, Wilma

    1997-01-01

    In Australia, Gardner's multiple-intelligences theory has strongly influenced primary, preschool, and special education. A survey of 30 schools revealed that teachers use two basic approaches: teaching to, and teaching through, multiple intelligences. The first approach might develop children's music skills via playing an instrument. The second…

  12. Social Inclusion and Critical Consciousness in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diemer, Matthew A.; Ortega, Lilyana

    2010-01-01

    Australia's Indigenous population is excluded from a range of opportunities, experiences and amenities that facilitate wellbeing, self-determination and social inclusion. This social exclusion constrains the career development and occupational attainment of Indigenous youth, which represent key routes to societal inclusion. Critical…

  13. Food Literacy at Secondary Schools in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronto, Rimante; Ball, Lauren; Pendergast, Donna; Harris, Neil D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Food literacy can encourage adolescents to develop healthy dietary patterns. This study examined home economics teachers' (HET) perspectives of the importance, curriculum, self-efficacy, and food environments regarding food literacy in secondary schools in Australia. Methods: A 20-item cross-sectional survey was completed by 205 HETs.…

  14. Worker Education in Australia and New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagglund, George

    The history of the recent development of worker education in Australia and New Zealand shows that, in just the past 15 years or so, very significant improvements have occurred in delivery of trade union education. To a very large degree these developments took place because of the existence of a close relationship between the union movement and…

  15. Medical e-commerce for regional Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, D K; Mikelaitis, P

    2001-12-01

    The residents of rural and regional Australia have less access to health care services than in capital cities. There is a reluctance of General Practitioners to practice in the country. New information technology and government initiatives are now addressing this problem. High bandwidth videoconferencing is now being routinely used to provide psychiatric consultations to areas without this service. But this (like many other implementations of telecommunication technologies to health) has resulted in loss of revenue to regional Australia while benefiting capital cities. Thus, the current implementation of telecommunication technology to health has resulted in loss of revenue of the regions while increasing the bias towards the cities. Further, the system is not economically viable and requires the Government to inject funds for the smooth operation of the system. This paper proposes the use of telecommunication technology for enabling the communities of regional Australia to access health facilities via physical and virtual clinics. The proposed technique is self supporting and is based in the country with the intent to prevent the drain of resources from regional Australia. The technique attempts to eradicate the problem at the root level by providing a business opportunity that is based in and to cater for the needs of the remote communities. The proposed system would provide health services by physical and virtual clinics and while serving the communities would be profit centres- and thus attracting doctors and other resources to the remote communities.

  16. International Higher Education in Australia: Unplanned Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Mahsood; Nair, Chenicheri Sid

    2011-01-01

    International education is the third largest export industry in Australia and is worth almost A$20 billion. The last ten years have witnessed significant growth in both onshore and offshore enrolments of international students in Australian universities. The offshore component of all Australian universities has been subject to scrutiny by the…

  17. New Focus for Space Research in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairns, Iver

    Australia was the fourth nation to launch a spacecraft into orbit from its own territory, in 1967. Its second satellite followed 35 years later, when FedSat was launched in December 2002. Australia had and continues to have world experts in many areas of space science and technology. Several of these have participated in international missions, even sometimes with government support and funding to collaborate on designing and building an instrument for an international mission (e.g., AATSR on ESA's Envisat). Despite this Australia has no coordinated national space effort or dedicated funding for space research. Few linkages existed between Universities, Government units, and industry or across the field. This talk describes efforts to change this situation by developing the first Decadal Plan for Australian Space Science. The Plan's vision is "World-leading innovative space science and technology, strong domestic capability, and international collaborations that build Australia a long term, productive presence in Space". The talk describes the process and summarises the recommendations of the Australian space science community. These include creation of a national coordination committee (ACCSS), scientific themes and goals, and the science, education, and outreach projects necessary to accomplish them. The science projects involve ground-based assets, spacecraft missions, theory/modelling programs, and technology development and testing.

  18. Fabric Analysis in the Koppal Granitoid (Southern India) using AMS and its significance in understanding the structural evolution of Dharwar Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Sandeep; Mamtani, Manish A.; Rana, Virendra

    2016-04-01

    The Dharwar Craton in southern India is known to have formed by the accretion of East Dharwar Craton (EDC) and West Dharwar Craton (WDC) at ca. 2500 Ma. This accretion occurred along the Chitradurga Boundary Fault (CBF), which is considered to demarcate the WDC from the EDC (Chadwick et al., 2003). In recent years, several structural studies integrating field, anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) and paleostress analyses have been carried out on metabasalts and granite (Mulgund Granite) in the vicinity of Gadag town that lie in WDC, i.e., west of CBF (Mondal and Mamtani, 2013; 2014; 2016). These have established the following: (a) Rocks around Gadag have undergone three deformation events - D1/ D2 was due to NE-SW compression that led to the development of NW-SE fabric elements in the metabasalts and granitic rocks; the latter is manifested in the magnetic foliation recorded from AMS. D3 was on account of NW-SE compression that led to doubly plunging magnetic lineations. (b) The metabasalts are replete with quartz veins many of which are gold bearing. These dominantly strike in NW-SE direction and formed due to dilation during D3. (c) Strain partitioning took place at the contacts between the Mulgund Granite and surround rocks resulted in development of oblique-slip normal faults within the granite during late stages of D3. In comparison to such in-depth knowledge of the WDC, structural evolution of the rocks of EDC has remained to be poorly understood. Therefore, in the present study, the authors have focused on rocks of the Koppal region that lie to the east of CBF in EDC. The objectives of the research are to evaluate the deformation fabric in the region and compare the results with those of the WDC (cited above) to understand the kinematics associated with formation of the Dharwar Craton. To fulfill this objective, the authors have investigated Peninsular Gneisses and granitoids (Koppal Granitoid) around Koppal town (61 km east of Gadag). The field

  19. Modelling the determinants of international tourism demand to Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Christine; MacAleer, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Prior to the recent Asian currency and economic crises, tourism from Asia had rapidly become Australia's major tourism export industry. Tourists from Singapore, which is Australia's fifth major market, represented 6% of international tourist arrivals to Australia in 1996. The average annual growth rate of tourist arrivals from Singapore of around 20% over 1990-96 far exceeded the 10.5% average annual percentage growth rate of all tourist arrivals to Australia over the same period (Australian ...

  20. Beyond White Australia: Sri Lankan-born migration to Australia since 1947

    OpenAIRE

    Sherrard, Sharmini

    2017-01-01

    This thesis examines the history of Sri Lankan-born migration to Australia, which commenced in 1947 during the height of the White Australia policy. Its objective is to increase understanding of these immigrants. It examines the reasons for their departure, the impact of changes in intake policy on the ethnicity of the immigrants, and their settlement experiences. Intake policy has favoured people with occupational skills and English language proficiency. Skills and English language ability h...

  1. Intergenerational Differences in Acculturation Orientations of Turkish Speakers in Australia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yagmur, K.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, acculturation and language orientations among Turkish speakers in Australia (n = 283) are discussed. Compared to West European countries, the Turkish community in Australia is much smaller. Given the prevalent pluralism ideology in Australia, a high level of sociocultural adjustment

  2. Sex Education in South Australia: The Past and the Present

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukdar, Joy; Aspland, Tania; Datta, Poulomee

    2013-01-01

    In South Australia, sex education has been controversial since its inception. The Australasian White Cross league and the Family Planning Association of South Australia were the pioneers of sex education in South Australia. The framing of a national framework and the implementation of the SHARE (Sexual Health and Relationships Education) project…

  3. Internationalization in Australia and Canada: Lessons for the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Kelly

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the internationalization of postsecondary education in Australia and Canada. The author discusses the contextual similarities and differences between the two countries, the shifting rationale "from aid to trade" behind Australia's internationalization attempts and some of the reasons for Australia's success.…

  4. 76 FR 81401 - Importation of Litchi Fruit From Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-28

    ... Australia AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: We are... Australia into the continental United States, except Florida. As a condition of entry, the litchi fruit... protection organization of Australia and treated with irradiation at a dose of 400 gray for plant pests of...

  5. Recent developments in Australia's uranium mining industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKay, A.D.

    2001-01-01

    Uranium is produced at two mining/milling operations in Australia - Ranger in the Alligator Rivers Region of the Northern Territory, and Olympic Dam in South Australia. In 1996, Ranger produced 4138 tonnes (t) U 3 O 8 from stockpiled ore mined from Ranger No. 1 Orebody. The capacity of the Ranger mill is being expanded to 5000 tonnes per annum (tpa) U 3 O 8 to coincide with the commencement of mining from No. 3 Orebody in mid-1997. The Olympic Dam copper-uranium-gold-silver deposit is the world's largest deposit of low cost uranium. The operation currently has an annual production of 85,000 t copper, 1700 t U 3 O 8 and associated gold and silver. WMC Ltd proposes to expand annual production to 200 000 t copper and approximately 4600 t U 3 O 8 by end of 1999. The environmental impact of the expansion is being assessed jointly by both Commonwealth and South Australian Governments. A draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) was released in May. Since its election in March 1996, the Liberal/National Party Coalition Government has made a number of changes to the Commonwealth Government's policies relating to uranium mining, including removal of the former Government's 'three mines' policy, and relaxation of the guidelines for foreign investment in Australian uranium mines. These changes, together with an improved outlook for the uranium market, have resulted in proposals to develop new mines at Jabiluka (Northern Territory), Kintyre (Western Australia) and Beverley (South Australia). Energy Resources of Australia Ltd proposes to develop an underground mine at Jabiluka with the ore to be processed at Ranger mill. Initial production will be 1800 tpa U 3 O 8 which will increase to 4000 tpa U 3 O 8 by the 14th year. The draft EIS was released for public comment in October 1996, and the final EIS is to be released in June 1997. Canning Resources Ltd proposes to mine the Kintyre deposit by open cut methods commencing in 1999 with an annual production of 1200 tpa U 3 O 8

  6. The Transmission of Chinese Medicine in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Garvey

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper explores some of the issues concerning the transmission of Chinese medicine in Australia, its practitioner training and the future of Chinese medicine as a distinct medical discipline in the Australian context. In China over the last century Chinese medicine was overhauled in order to align it with the biomedical perspective prevalent in the West. These changes, in turn, had important consequences for the transmission of CM in Australia and the West. But while the biomedicalisation of CM has offered the path of least resistance, it has also lead to unworkable simplifications and methodological failures. The paper thus argues for a renewed access to the tradition’s primary sources in order to ally the distinctive features and methods of traditional practice with biomedicine, as an alternative to an outright integration into biomedical practice.

  7. Australia slaps duties on PVC imports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, I.

    1992-01-01

    The Australian Anti-Dumping Authority (ADA0) has imposed dumping duties on imports of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) resin from seven countries and on certain expanded polystyrene (EPS) beads from Korea and Singapore. The decisions come at the end of two separate investigations begun earlier this year. In its first finding, the ADA concluded that there has been dumping of PVC resin from Canada, China, France, Japan, Norway, Saudi Arabia, and Thailand, which has caused and threatens to cause material injury to the domestic PVC industry. An eighth country, Romania, was found not to have been exporting PVC to Australia. The case is the second of its kind in Australia focusing on PVC. In December 1991 the ADA found in favor of local producer sin a dumping complaint against Argentina, Brazil, Hungary, Israel, Korea, Mexico, Poland, Singapore, Taiwan, and the US

  8. Introduction to Trans Australia Airlines CRM training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Jim

    1987-01-01

    Trans Australia believes that its excellent accident rate record is due to a number of factors. It has a good group of standard operating procedures, and its crews are pretty well self-disciplined and adhere to those procedures. But the other thing that it believes is a factor in its safety record is that perhaps it is also due to its preparedness to be innovative, to keep up with what is going on in the rest of the world and, if it looks to have value, then to be amongst the first to try it out. Trans Australia commenced a program similar to Line Oriented Flight Training (LOFT) fairly early in 1979--that being its first windshear program-- which leads to why they are doing a course of resource management training, which we have chosen to call Aircrew Team Management (ATM). This course is detailed in another presentation.

  9. Ptyctimous mites (Acari, Oribatida) of Victoria (Australia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedbała, Wojciech; Szywilewska-Szczykutowicz, Anetta

    2017-11-06

    A list of 37 species of ptyctimous mites from the State of Victoria, Australia, is provided. Seven species new for science are described and further seven are recorded for the first time in Victoria. The genus Arphthicarus has been discovered in Victoria and is represented by two new species. Zoogeographical distribution of each species is provided. Analysis of the ptyctimous fauna from four Victorian areas (Otway Ranges, Yarra Ranges, Errinundra Plateau and Strzelecki Ranges) has revealed that four species occur in a large number of specimens in one of the areas. Similarity analyses indicate that the faunas of Errinundra Plateau and Yarra Ranges are the most similar. An overview of state of knowledge on the ptyctimous mites from State of Victoria, Australia and Australasian Region is presented.

  10. Northern Australia energy arc - Timor Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atherton, G.

    2000-01-01

    Early this year new Timor Gap Treaty arrangements were concluded between Australia and East Timor -with the blessing of Indonesia -and it was once again 'business as usual' in the Timor Sea. This was quickly confirmed in February when the US$1.4 billion (A$2.4 billion at current exchange rates) Stage 1 of the Bayu Undan Project was approved by the Timor Gap Zone of Co-operation Joint Authority. This meant the green light for the project, which involves the extraction and export of condensate (a light oil) and liquid petroleum gas (LPG) from the Bayu Undan fields, 500 km north west of Darwin. The proposed development would involve a total investment of $5 billion in offshore and onshore gas production and processing facilities, pipelines, petrochemical facilities and other customer developments. Royalties from Bayu Undan will be shared equally between Australia and east Timor, thus providing significant revenue to underpin the economic development of East Timor

  11. A “Funa” in Australia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Read

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available A Funa in Chile is a public denunciation of a person identified as associated with crimes against humanity during the Pinochet regime. It begins as a web site notice of a planned procession, to be followed by a peaceful rally and demonstration, Some involve no more than thirty people, others, particularly those directed at notorious figures, have attracted thousands. My questions are: What is the effect of Funas in Chile?Could a Funa occur in Australia? Against whom? Who would organise it? For what reason? What would be the consequences? In discussing the question I will draw upon my recent work in reconciliation studies both in Chile and Aboriginal Australia

  12. Travel and Health Research in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilks; Grenfell

    1997-06-01

    Travel and tourism is a major industry in Australia, employing 6.9% of the nation's workforce (535,600 persons) and generating AUS$46.9 billion in 1993-94.1 While economic and marketing analyses have traditionally dominated the field of tourism research in Australia, health and safety issues that impact on the business of tourism are now emerging.2 Travel medicine is still a small specialty area, though it has established a legitimate role within the tourism industry by providing services in prevention and treatment. To date, little attention has been given to empirical research, even though field studies are a critical component in the provision of accurate medical advice for patients. This paper reviews the Australian research that is available and identifies areas where further work should be conducted.

  13. The nuclear fuel cycle in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebeling, D.R.

    1988-01-01

    It is unlikely that Australia will operate nuclear power stations in the next few decades unless small, cheap and inherently safe stations were successfully developed overseas. Even then it would probably not proceed because of the low cost and availability of black coal in the east, brown coal in the south, gas in the west and the political problems in such an initiative. On the other hand, Australia has the largest known deposits of cheap uranium (∼ 500,000 tonnes), has a stable political system, a good technology base and an imbalance of trade problem. It would be sensible to consider development of the uranium resource with a fully-integrated (vertically diversified) industry in order to both beneficiate the mineral for profit and control the hazards implicit in the end products. This report discusses the advantages and disadvantages of each step in the fuel cycle from an Australian engineering standpoint

  14. The history of psychoanalysis in Australia.

    OpenAIRE

    Ellingsen, Peter John

    2017-01-01

    Rather than interrogated, as Freud suggested in the paper he sent to Sydney a century ago, psychoanalysis in Australia has largely been taken as a given. This has lent it an empty coherence that is suggestive of a lie: an "almost-ness" that sharpens the outline of truth. It is my thesis that, by failing to conceptualise what psychoanalysis is, analysts and those who historicised psychoanalysis have joined in a larger Australian indifference to subversive discourses of the self....

  15. The Growth Effects of Education in Australia.

    OpenAIRE

    Antonio Paradiso; Saten Kumar; B. Bhaskara Rao

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we estimate the growth effects of human capital with country-specific time series data for Australia. Previous empirical studies, based on international data, have been inconclusive, in terms of the extent of the contribution of human capital to growth. We extend the Solow (1956) growth model by using educational attainment as a measure of human capital, as developed by Barro and Lee (2010). The extended Solow (1956) model performs well after allowing for the presence of structu...

  16. Children's Environmental Health Indicators in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sly, J Leith; Moore, Sophie E; Gore, Fiona; Brune, Marie Noel; Neira, Maria; Jagals, Paul; Sly, Peter D

    2016-01-01

    Adverse environmental exposures in early life increase the risk of chronic disease but do not attract the attention nor receive the public health priority warranted. A safe and healthy environment is essential for children's health and development, yet absent in many countries. A framework that aids in understanding the link between environmental exposures and adverse health outcomes are environmental health indicators-numerical estimates of hazards and outcomes that can be applied at a population level. The World Health Organization (WHO) has developed a set of children's environmental health indicators (CEHI) for physical injuries, insect-borne disease, diarrheal diseases, perinatal diseases, and respiratory diseases; however, uptake of steps necessary to apply these indicators across the WHO regions has been incomplete. A first indication of such uptake is the management of data required to measure CEHI. The present study was undertaken to determine whether Australia has accurate up-to-date, publicly available, and readily accessible data on each CEHI for indigenous and nonindigenous Australian children. Data were not readily accessible for many of the exposure indicators, and much of the available data were not child specific or were only available for Australia's indigenous population. Readily accessible data were available for all but one of the outcome indicators and generally for both indigenous and nonindigenous children. Although Australia regularly collects data on key national indicators of child health, development, and well-being in several domains mostly thought to be of more relevance to Australians and Australian policy makers, these differ substantially from the WHO CEHI. The present study suggests that the majority of these WHO exposure and outcome indicators are relevant and important for monitoring Australian children's environmental health and establishing public health interventions at a local and national level and collection of appropriate

  17. Moderation in Australia-Policy and Achievements

    OpenAIRE

    CREINA STOCKLEY

    2004-01-01

    Alcohol has been consumed in Australia since European settlement in 1788. In 1998, approximately 60 % of Australians consumed an alcoholic beverage at least once per week. The effects of alcohol on the human body are dose dependent, where the harmful effects of alcohol are generally observed only when alcohol consumption exceeds moderate consumption levels of 30 to 40 g of alcohol per day. The discovery that a J-shaped curve described the relationship between level of alcohol consumption and ...

  18. Artificial Intelligence Research in Australia -- A Profile

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Elizabeth; Whitelaw, John

    1987-01-01

    Does the United States have a 51st state called Australia? A superficial look at the artificial intelligence (AI) research being done here could give that impression. A look beneath the surface, though, indicates some fundamental differences and reveals a dynamic and rapidly expanding AI community. General awareness of the Australian AI research community has been growing slowly for some time. AI was once considered a bit esoteric -- the domain of an almost lunatic fringe- but the large gover...

  19. Cairns and Townsville area, Queensland, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    Cairns and Townsville area, on the northeast coast of Queensland, Australia (17.0S, 146.0E) is one of the best sport diving localities in the world where divers can explore the rich and varied flora and fauna of the nearby Great Barrier Reef. Onshore, the timbered foothills of the Great Dividing Range, seen as dark green areas, separate the semi arid interior of Queensland.

  20. Increasing trends of herpes zoster in Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raina MacIntyre

    Full Text Available Increasing trends in incidence of herpes zoster (HZ have been reported in Australia and internationally. This may reflect the impact of childhood VZV vaccination programs introduced universally in Australia in late 2005. The objective of this study was to evaluate changes in incidence of HZ and PHN in Australia over time, and associated healthcare resource utilisation.Australian data on general practice (GP encounters for HZ, specific antiviral prescribing data from the pharmaceutical benefits scheme, emergency department presentations from the states of NSW and Victoria and national hospitalisation data for HZ were analysed for time trends using regression models. Two time periods (2000-2006 and 2006-2013 were compared which correspond broadly with the pre- and post- universal VZV vaccination period.All data sources showed increasing rates of HZ with age and over time. The GP database showed a significant annual increase in encounters for HZ of 2.5 per 100,000 between 1998 and 2013, and the rates of prescriptions for HZ increased by 4.2% per year between 2002 and 2012. In the 60+ population HZ incidence was estimated to increase from 11.9 to 15.4 per 1,000 persons using GP data or from 12.8 to 14.2 per 1,000 persons using prescription data (p<0.05, between the two periods. Hospitalisation data did not show the same increasing trend over time, except for the age group ≥80 years. Most emergency visits for HZ were not admitted, and showed significant increases over time.The burden of HZ in Australia is substantial, and continues to increase over time. This increase is seen both pre- and post-universal VZV vaccination in 2005, and is most prominent in the older population. The substantial burden of HZ, along with ageing of the Australian population and the importance of healthy ageing, warrants consideration of HZ vaccination for the elderly.

  1. Development of Australia's radiation protection standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, G.C.; Lokan, K.H.

    1994-01-01

    Australia is revising its existing recommendations concerning radiation protection in the light of guidance from the International Commission on Radiological Protection's Publication 60 and the International Atomic Energy Agency's revision of its Basic Safety Standards. The paper discusses the major refinements of the ICRP's recommendations and the additional guidance on its practical implementation offered by the IAEA's new Basic Safety Standards. Following public comment, the revised Australian recommendations are expected to be adopted by the end of 1994. 15 refs

  2. Gun Control in Australia: A Criminological Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rick Sarre

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In recent months there has been an upsurge in contributions to the popular press from social commentators insisting that guns make our nation safer. This essay questions these assertions. The paper provides evidence to support a contrary affirmation: that is, in order to have a reduction in gun violence, there needs to be a reduction in the number of guns generally, and a continuation of the legal controls that currently shape firearms policy in Australia.

  3. Socioeconomic differentials in life satisfaction in Australia

    OpenAIRE

    ANDREW GREGORY RUSH

    2017-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the relationship between life satisfaction and a range of social, health, economic and demographic indicators. The data used in this study was collected from the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) survey. Results showed variables such as job satisfaction, marital status, as well as indicators of health and communication participation, to be associated with higher satisfaction rates. By contrast, education, income, and number of children were unre...

  4. Spatial clusters of suicide in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xin; Hu, Wenbiao; Page, Andrew; Tong, Shilu

    2012-07-23

    Understanding the spatial distribution of suicide can inform the planning, implementation and evaluation of suicide prevention activity. This study explored spatial clusters of suicide in Australia, and investigated likely socio-demographic determinants of these clusters. National suicide and population data at a statistical local area (SLA) level were obtained from the Australian Bureau of Statistics for the period of 1999 to 2003. Standardised mortality ratios (SMR) were calculated at the SLA level, and Geographic Information System (GIS) techniques were applied to investigate the geographical distribution of suicides and detect clusters of high risk in Australia. Male suicide incidence was relatively high in the northeast of Australia, and parts of the east coast, central and southeast inland, compared with the national average. Among the total male population and males aged 15 to 34, Mornington Shire had the whole or a part of primary high risk cluster for suicide, followed by the Bathurst-Melville area, one of the secondary clusters in the north coastal area of the Northern Territory. Other secondary clusters changed with the selection of cluster radius and age group. For males aged 35 to 54 years, only one cluster in the east of the country was identified. There was only one significant female suicide cluster near Melbourne while other SLAs had very few female suicide cases and were not identified as clusters. Male suicide clusters had a higher proportion of Indigenous population and lower median socio-economic index for area (SEIFA) than the national average, but their shapes changed with selection of maximum cluster radii setting. This study found high suicide risk clusters at the SLA level in Australia, which appeared to be associated with lower median socio-economic status and higher proportion of Indigenous population. Future suicide prevention programs should focus on these high risk areas.

  5. Spatial clusters of suicide in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Xin

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the spatial distribution of suicide can inform the planning, implementation and evaluation of suicide prevention activity. This study explored spatial clusters of suicide in Australia, and investigated likely socio-demographic determinants of these clusters. Methods National suicide and population data at a statistical local area (SLA level were obtained from the Australian Bureau of Statistics for the period of 1999 to 2003. Standardised mortality ratios (SMR were calculated at the SLA level, and Geographic Information System (GIS techniques were applied to investigate the geographical distribution of suicides and detect clusters of high risk in Australia. Results Male suicide incidence was relatively high in the northeast of Australia, and parts of the east coast, central and southeast inland, compared with the national average. Among the total male population and males aged 15 to 34, Mornington Shire had the whole or a part of primary high risk cluster for suicide, followed by the Bathurst-Melville area, one of the secondary clusters in the north coastal area of the Northern Territory. Other secondary clusters changed with the selection of cluster radius and age group. For males aged 35 to 54 years, only one cluster in the east of the country was identified. There was only one significant female suicide cluster near Melbourne while other SLAs had very few female suicide cases and were not identified as clusters. Male suicide clusters had a higher proportion of Indigenous population and lower median socio-economic index for area (SEIFA than the national average, but their shapes changed with selection of maximum cluster radii setting. Conclusion This study found high suicide risk clusters at the SLA level in Australia, which appeared to be associated with lower median socio-economic status and higher proportion of Indigenous population. Future suicide prevention programs should focus on these high risk areas.

  6. Disaggregated Models of Unemployment in Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Jeff Borland

    2000-01-01

    This paper reviews evidence on causes of unemployment in Australia from disaggregated modelling of the labour market. Three main types of modelling are considered. First, information on unemployment rates of labour force participants with different skills is presented, and analyses that seek to explain why unemployment varies between skill groups are described. Second, descriptive evidence on unemployment rates by state and neighbourhood is presented, and possible causes of regional differenc...

  7. Asymmetric unemployment rate dynamics in Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Gunnar Bardsen; Stan Hurn; Zoe McHugh

    2011-01-01

    The unemployment rate in Australia is modelled as an asymmetric and nonlinear function of aggregate demand, productivity, real interest rates, the replacement ratio and the real exchange rate. If changes in unemployment are big, the management of of demand, real interest rates and the replacement ratio will be good instruments to start bringing it down. The model is developed by exploiting recent developments in automated model-selection procedures.

  8. Planning Australia’s Defense Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-03-01

    methods of grazing and agriculture, however, Australia’s agricultural sector consistently produces quantities of meat, wool and cereal grains large enough...over his annexation of the former Dutch colony in Western New Guinea and his threats against formation of the new nation of Malaysia . Many in PNG... Malaysia , Singapore, The Philippines and Brunei. Papua-New Guinea holds non-voting "observer" status in the organization. 100 emphasize that external avents

  9. Mining, regional Australia and the economic multiplier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Cleary

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Mining in Australia has traditionally delivered a strong development multiplier for regional communities where most mines are based. This relationship has weakened in recent decades as a result of the introduction of mobile workforces - typically known as fly in, fly out. Political parties have responded with policies known as ‘royalties for regions’, though in designing them they overlooked long established Indigenous arrangements for sharing benefits with areas affected directly by mining.

  10. Occupational skin disease in Victoria, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Jennifer L; Williams, Jason D; Matheson, Melanie C; Palmer, Amanda M; Burgess, John A; Dharmage, Shyamali C; Nixon, Rosemary L

    2016-05-01

    To describe the characteristics of patients with occupational skin disease (OSD) in a tertiary referral clinic in Victoria, Australia. A retrospective review was conducted of records from patients seen at the Occupational Dermatology Clinic in Melbourne, Australia between 1 January 1993 and 31 December 2010. Of the 2894 people assessed in the clinic during the 18-year period, 44% were women and 56% were men. In all, 2177 (75%) were diagnosed with occupational skin disease (OSD). Of the patients with a work-related skin condition, 45% (n = 979) were considered to be atopic. The most common diagnosis in those with OSD was irritant contact dermatitis (ICD) (44%), followed by allergic contact dermatitis (33%) and endogenous eczema (11%). Women were significantly more likely to have soaps and detergents (P care workers (21 per 100 000). We confirm the importance of occupational contact dermatitis as the most common cause of OSD, with ICD being the most common diagnosis. There are differences in the causes of ICD between our group of male and female workers. For the first time in Australia, rates of OSD in certain industries have been calculated. © 2015 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  11. Hendra virus: an emerging paramyxovirus in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalingam, Suresh; Herrero, Lara J; Playford, E Geoffrey; Spann, Kirsten; Herring, Belinda; Rolph, Michael S; Middleton, Deborah; McCall, Bradley; Field, Hume; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2012-10-01

    Hendra virus, first identified in 1994 in Queensland, is an emerging zoonotic pathogen gaining importance in Australia because a growing number of infections are reported in horses and people. The virus, a member of the family Paramyxoviridae (genus Henipavirus), is transmitted to horses by pteropid bats (fruit bats or flying foxes), with human infection a result of direct contact with infected horses. Case-fatality rate is high in both horses and people, and so far, more than 60 horses and four people have died from Hendra virus infection in Australia. Human infection is characterised by an acute encephalitic syndrome or relapsing encephalitis, for which no effective treatment is currently available. Recent identification of Hendra virus infection in a domestic animal outside the laboratory setting, and the large range of pteropid bats in Australia, underpins the potential of this virus to cause greater morbidity and mortality in both rural and urban populations and its importance to both veterinary and human health. Attempts at treatment with ribavirin and chloroquine have been unsuccessful. Education, hygiene, and infection control measures have hitherto been the mainstay of prevention, while access to monoclonal antibody treatment and development of an animal vaccine offer further opportunities for disease prevention and control. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Asians: the New Metics of Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lissa Cheng

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available The Asian immigration debate has become one of the most contentious topics of debate in Australia. Little about the debate is new and most of the arguments, both in favour and against, begin with demographic considerations, then move on to the economic consequences of immigration and the social and cultural ramifications. Delving deeper into the debate, one will realize that there is an underlying assumption of the economic theory of laissez-faire, which is the driving force of the debate. The new realities of global electronic commerce with laissez-faire economic theory have been transposed onto Australia's immigration policy. The government welcomes the "elite" of the knowledge workers because they are the real generators of wealth. However, the government is also aware that maximizing its benefit out of these immigrants, it must minimize the costs associated with them, such as maintenance cost of their sponsored parents. The analysis, while dispelling the myth of increasing immigration costs, confirmed the urgent need to shift the focus of societal pluralism from an economic one that is rooted in competition and self-interest individualism, to pluralism that is rooted in social organization. This is where society is seen as cooperative units rather than of competing units, that is Asians and non-Asians contributing to Australia as a cooperative group of people. The government promotion of division in society with its archaic politics to instill the 'metic' status for new immigrants may prove detrimental to its effort to attract elite wealth generator migrants.

  13. A genomic history of Aboriginal Australia

    KAUST Repository

    Malaspinas, Anna-Sapfo

    2016-09-20

    The population history of Aboriginal Australians remains largely uncharacterized. Here we generate high-coverage genomes for 83 Aboriginal Australians (speakers of Pama-Nyungan languages) and 25 Papuans from the New Guinea Highlands. We find that Papuan and Aboriginal Australian ancestors diversified 25-40 thousand years ago (kya), suggesting pre-Holocene population structure in the ancient continent of Sahul (Australia, New Guinea and Tasmania). However, all of the studied Aboriginal Australians descend from a single founding population that differentiated ∼10-32 kya. We infer a population expansion in northeast Australia during the Holocene epoch (past 10,000 years) associated with limited gene flow from this region to the rest of Australia, consistent with the spread of the Pama-Nyungan languages. We estimate that Aboriginal Australians and Papuans diverged from Eurasians 51-72 kya, following a single out-of-Africa dispersal, and subsequently admixed with archaic populations. Finally, we report evidence of selection in Aboriginal Australians potentially associated with living in the desert. © 2016 Macmillan Publishers Limited, part of Springer Nature. All rights reserved

  14. Multiculturalism and legal plurality in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Dabner

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The great multicultural experiment that is Australia has engendered a reconsideration of core values. Even the traditionally conservative legal system has not been immune. While the law remains anchored in its British Christian common-law traditions, the influence of other cultures and beliefs are emerging. Taking the term multiculturalism to encompass all cultures, including indigenous peoples as well as new comers, two instances of this are the partial accommodation of Indigenous customary law and a debate over the accommodation of Islamic law principles. The adoption of “foreign” legal concepts poses a dilemma for a liberal democratic society. On one hand, such a society might be expected to embrace wholesale legal plurality. However, there may be some foreign legal principles that are resisted on the basis that they are unacceptable to a free and equal society. The challenge is how to acknowledge the customary and religious laws of minorities whilst establishing one legal framework that applies to all, equally, and without discrimination and protects vulnerable parties. This article explores the implications for the legal system of a multicultural Australia. Taking the instances of Indigenous and Islamic law, it will be observed that legal plurality exists in Australia but largely in the shadows where the vulnerable of society lack protection. It proposes an institutional response that might help shine a light on these shadows.

  15. Nuclear regulation in Australia - future possibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, J.; Bardsley, J.

    1997-01-01

    Australia's current nuclear regulatory arrangements reflect two major factors: that we are a federation, with a constitutional division of powers between the Commonwealth and the States, and that we have no nuclear industry, other than uranium mining. Australia's only nuclear facilities are operated by a Commonwealth instrumentality, ANSTO. Current Commonwealth regulatory arrangements are a response to international treaty commitments -principally the NPT (Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons) -and to the commencement of commercial uranium mining and export in the late 1970's. Although at present no nuclear industry activities, other than mining, are in prospect, this might not always be the case, and with the establishment of ARPANSA (the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency) it is timely to give some thought to regulatory arrangements which might be appropriate to Australia's future circumstances. This paper will discuss the regulation activities relating to the nuclear fuel cycle , i e activities involved with the production and use of nuclear materials (uranium, thorium and plutonium) for the generation of energy through nuclear fission

  16. The regulation of herbal medicines in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briggs, David R.

    2002-01-01

    Complementary medicines, including herbal medicines in Australia are regulated under therapeutics goods legislation. Based on risk, Australia has developed a two tiered approach to the regulation of therapeutic goods. Listed medicines are considered to be of lower risk than Registered medicines. Most, but not all, complementary medicines are Listed medicines. Managing the risk associated with therapeutic goods, including complementary medicines, is exerted through the processes of licensing of manufacturers; pre-market assessment of products; and post-market regulatory activity. Herbal medicines may be associated with low or high risk depending on the toxicity of ingredients, proposed dosage, appropriateness of the indications and claims for self-diagnosis and management and the potential for adverse reactions. Registered medicines are individually evaluated for safety, quality and efficacy before they are released onto the market. Listed medicines are individually assessed by the Therapeutic Goods Administration for compliance with legislation, they are not evaluated before release. They may only be formulated from ingredients that have undergone pre-market evaluation for safety and quality and are considered low risk. Listed complementary medicines may only carry indications and claims for the symptomatic relief of non-serious conditions, health maintenance, health enhancement and risk reduction. An important feature of risk management in Australia is that early market access for low risk complementary medicines is supported by appropriate post-market regulatory activity

  17. Developments in Australia : native title and reconciliation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaney, F. [National Native Title Tribunal, Perth, WA (Australia)

    2004-07-01

    Until 1992, there was no recognition in the Australian legal system of property or other laws recognizing Indigenous rights concerning European colonial settlement and beyond. Native title was first recognized in 1992. This paper presented an outline of the history leading up to the creation of the National Native Title Tribunal in Perth, Australia, an organization whose aims are to create recognition of native title in Australia. The objects of the Native Title Act of 1993 were discussed, as well as attempts to reconcile indigenous and non-indigenous interests. Particular attention was drawn to the mining industry, as a practical example of the paradigm change in relation to indigenous rights, with an outline of the mining industry's values underlying principles concerning indigenous relations. It was concluded that while there are stringent limits on what is available through the native title process, mediation procedures mean that opportunities for agreement exist. Although reconciliation is in its infancy in Australia, there is a growing acceptance that Aboriginal rights must be considered. The agreement making which is encouraged by the native title process is an acknowledgment of a new relationship in which indigenous people are stakeholders. 72 refs., 5 figs.

  18. The practice of clinical neuropsychology in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponsford, Jennie

    2016-11-01

    This paper describes the development and practice of clinical neuropsychology in Australia. Clinical Neuropsychology has shown rapid growth in Australia over the past three decades. Comprehensive and specialized training programs are producing high quality graduates who are employed in a broad range of settings or private practice. Australia now has a substantial number of clinical neuropsychologists with specialist training. Whilst the majority of Australian clinical neuropsychologists still undertake assessment predominantly, there are growing opportunities for clinical neuropsychologists in rehabilitation and in a broad range of research contexts. Cultural issues relating to the assessment of Indigenous Australians and immigrants from many countries present significant challenges. Some major contributions have been made in the realms of test development and validation across various age groups. Australian clinical neuropsychologists are also contributing significantly to research in the fields of traumatic brain injury, aging and dementias, epilepsy, memory assessment, rehabilitation, substance abuse, and other psychiatric disorders. Expansion of roles of clinical neuropsychologists, in domains such as rehabilitation and research is seen as essential to underpin continuing growth of employment opportunities for the profession.

  19. Climate change in Australia: technical report 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide an up-to-date assessment of observed climate change over Australia, the likely causes, and projections of future changes to Australia's climate. It also provides information on how to apply the projections in impact studies and in risk assessments. The two main strategies for managing climate risk are mitigation (net reductions in greenhouse gas emissions) to slow climate change and adaptation to climate impacts that are unavoidable. A number of major advances have been made since the last report on climate change projections in Australia (CSIRO 2001) including: a much larger number of climate and ocean variables are projected (21 and 6 respectively); a much larger number (23) of climate models are used; the provision of probabilistic information on some of the projections, including the probability of exceeding the 10th, 50th and 90th percentiles; greater emphasis on projections from models that are better able to simulate observed Australian climate; a detailed assessment of observed changes in Australian climate and likely causes; and information on risk assessment, to provide guidance for using climate projections in impact studies

  20. Lower Devonian paleomagnetic dating of a large mafic sill along the western border of the Murzuq cratonic basin (Saharan metacraton, SE Algeria).

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-M. Derder, Mohamed; Maouche, Said; Liégeois, Jean-Paul; Henry, Bernard; Amenna, Mohamed; Ouabadi, Aziouz; Bellon, Hervé; Bruguier, Olivier; Bayou, Boualem; Bestandji, Rafik; Nouar, Omar; Bouabdallah, Hamza; Ayache, Mohamed; Beddiaf, Mohamed

    2017-04-01

    The Murzuq basin located in central North Africa, in Algeria, Libya and Niger is a key area, delineating a relictual cratonic area within the Saharan metacraton (Liégeois et al., 2013). On its western border, we discovered a very large sill ("Arrikine" sill), with a thickness up to 250m and a minimum length of 35 km. It is made of mafic rocks and is interbedded within the Silurian sediments of the Tassilis series. In the vicinity, the only known post-Pan-African magmatism is the Cenozoic volcanism in the In Ezzane area. Further south in Niger, also along the SW border of the Murzuq basin, large Paleozoic dolerite (Carte géologique du Sahara central, 1962) are probably related to the "Arrikine" sill magmatism, as they are in the same stratigraphical position. Several hundred kilometers westward and southwestward of Arrikine, Paleozoic magmatic products are known: Carboniferous basic intrusives (346 Ma; Djellit et al., 2006) are located in the Tin Serririne basin and Devonian ring complexes (407 Ma; Moreau et al, 1994) in the Aïr Mountains. For the Arrikine sill, K/Ar data gave a rejuvenation age (326 Ma) related to a K-rich aplitic phase and the LA-ICP-MS U-Pb method on zircon showed that only inherited zircons are present (0.6 to 0.7, 2.0 and 2.7 Ga ages), pointing to ages from the underlying basement corresponding to the Murzuq craton covered by Pan-African sediments (Derder et al., 2016). By contrast, a well-defined paleomagnetic pole yielded an age of 410-400 Ma by comparison with the Gondwana Apparent Polar Wander Path (APWP). This age, similar to that reported for the Aïr complexes (Moreau et al., 1994), can be correlated with the deep phreatic eruption before Pragian time thought to be at the origin of sand injections, which gave circular structures observed on different borders of the Murzuq basin (Moreau et al,. 2012). This Lower Devonian magmatism had therefore a regional extension and can be related to a "Caledonian" transtensive reactivation of the

  1. Nd-Sr Isotopic Geochemistry and U-Pb Geochronology of the Fé Granitic Gneiss and Lajedo Granodiorite: Implications for Paleoproterozoic Evolution of the Mineiro Belt, Southern São Francisco Craton, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson Teixeira; Ciro Alexandre Ávila; Luciana Cabral Nunes

    2008-01-01

    The Fé granitic gneiss and Lajedo granodiorite belong to a voluminous felsic-mafic plutonism, tectonically linked toPaleoproterozoic magmatic evolution of the Mineiro Belt, southern portion of the São Francisco Craton, central-easternBrazil. The Fé pluton is located north of the Lenheiros shear zone and is intrusive with respect to the Rio das Mortesgreenstone belt and pyroxenite - gabbroic bodies, as indicated by xenoliths of gneiss and amphibolite, in the first case, andpyroxenite in the la...

  2. Australia/Japan thermal coal settlements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLean, A.

    2000-01-01

    After prolonged negotiations, Australian suppliers and Japanese buyers have reached agreement on the benchmark thermal coal prices for the Japanese financial year 2000 (April 1, 2000 to March 31, 2001). The benchmark price as negotiated with the Chubu and Tohoku power utilities is about US$1.20 down on last year's price of $29.95. The actual price change to each supplier varies slightly depending on the calorific value of each product as calculated against a benchmark value of 6700kcal/kg on a gross air-dried basis. It is strange, but the Australians and Japanese both have some reason to crow about the outcome of the negotiation. In US dollar terms, compared with April 1, 1999, the suppliers have secured a price rise from A$45.39 to A$47.97; while the Japanese can point to having achieved a price reduction from Y3551/t to Y3162/t. The joys of exchange rate fluctuations. The result can only be seen as a good one for Australia, especially as it is alleged that one of the Australian suppliers opened negotiations by putting a US$1 price reduction on the table. It is worth noting that the significance of the benchmark coal price is waning, with the annual negotiations in Japan covering only 14Mt of a total seaborne trade of some 450Mt. Consequently, few tonnes are marketed at the benchmark price and Australia finds itself in fierce competition with suppliers from Indonesia, China and Russia for huge, short-term tenders at FOB prices. Recent winning Australian bids have been barely over US$20/t FOBT ex east coast Australia-nearly 30% below the new US$28.75 benchmark price. Finally, on the negotiating table will come the settlements for the semi coking coals. This is where Australia should hold the trump card. Japan simply cannot replace, from other countries, the near 30Mt of high quality coal it purchases each year from Australia. But already the whiff of a US$1.45-US$1.50 price reduction hangs in the air. Copyright (2000) Australian Journal of Mining

  3. Media and Australia's replacement reactor project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keenan, Pamela

    2001-01-01

    In September 1997, the Commonwealth Government of Australia announced a proposal to build a replacement nuclear research reactor at Lucas Heights in Sydney. Extensive public consultation, parliamentary debate and independent reports were prepared to ensure that the new facility would meet strict international requirements, national safety and environmental standards, and performance specifications servicing the needs of Australia - for decades to come. On 6 June 2000, Argentine company INVAP SE was announced as the preferred tenderer. In July 2000 contracts were signed between INVAP and the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation for the construction the replacement reactor, due to be completed in 2005. In order to retain a strong local presence, INVAP undertook a joint venture with two of Australia's foremost heavy construction businesses. Briefly the new research reactor will be a replacement for the ageing Australian Reactor (HIFAR). Nuclear science and technology, in Australia, is no stranger to media controversy and misinformation. Understandably the announcement of a preferred tenderer followed by the signing of contracts, attracted significant national and international media attention. However in the minds of the media, the issue is far from resolved and is now a constant 'news story' in the Australian media. Baseless media stories have made claims that the project will cost double the original estimates; question the credibility of the contractors; and raise issues of international security. The project is currently linked with Australia's requirements for long term nuclear waste management and there has been an attempt to bring national Indigenous People's issues into play. Some of these issues have been profiled in the press internationally. So, just to set the record straight and give you an appropriate impression of what's 'really happening' I would like to highlight a few issues, how ANSTO dealt with these, and what was finally reported

  4. High-Resolution Mapping Using a Sub-Audio Magnetic Survey at the Comet Gold Mine, Western Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piyaphong Chenrai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Comet Gold Mine in the Murchison mineral field lies within the Yilgarn Craton of Western Australia. Gold mineralization in this area is associated with a series of north-northeasterly trending structures, and has a long exploration history with some previous geophysical information. Other exploration information, such as geology and drill hole data, are integrated with the geophysical results to study the geophysical responses and generate a geophysical interpretation map. The response from the sub-audio magnetic (SAM survey was investigated over an area of 13 sq km. The SAM survey was completed using a transmitter current of 5 - 8 Amp with a 50 o/o duty cycle at 4 Hz frequency, which was considered a good instrumental setting for the Comet area. SAM anomalies were compared to results obtained from other geophysical methods and then integrated with geological data to generate a geophysical interpretation map at a 1 : 5000 scale. The new interpretation of geological units and structures at the Comet area should provide a better understanding of the geological and structural setting for mineralization in the Comet area. Our results show that the Comet Fault represents a faulted limb of the Comet fold structure that has both limbs dipping to the southeast and a plunge to the northeast. Magnetic anomalies associated with sedimentary iron formation (SIF are considered to be well correlated with some gold bearing horizons and the location of the Comet Fault, which has become more siliceous and has been altered by sulphide minerals and magnetite minerals.

  5. Mineralogical and geochemical characteristics of the Archaean LCT pegmatite deposit Cattlin Creek, Ravensthorpe, Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Matthias; Dittrich, Thomas; Seifert, Thomas; Schulz, Bernhard

    2014-05-01

    The LCT (lithium-cesium-tantalum) pegmatite Cattlin Creek is located about 550 km ESE of Perth, Western Australia. The complex-type, rare-element pegmatite is hosted in metamorphic rocks of the Archaean Ravensthorpe greenstone belt, which constitutes of the southern edge of the Southern Cross Terranes of the Yilgarn Craton. The deposit is currently mined for both lithium and tantalum by Galaxy Resources Limited since 2010. The pegmatitic melt intruded in a weak structural zone of crossing thrust faults and formed several pegmatite sills, of which the surface nearest mineralized pegmatite body is up to 21 m thick. The Cattlin Creek pegmatite is characterized by an extreme fractionation that resulted in the enrichment of rare elements like Li, Cs, Rb, Sn and Ta, as well as the formation of a vertical zonation expressed by distinct mineral assemblages. The border zone comprises a fine-grained mineral assemblage consisting of albite, quartz, muscovite that merges into a medium-grained wall zone and pegmatitic-textured intermediate zones. Those zones are manifested by the occurrence of megacrystic spodumene crystals with grain sizes ranging from a couple of centimeters up to several metres. The core zone represents the most fractionated part of the pegmatite and consists of lepidolite, cleavelandite, and quartz. It also exhibits the highest concentrations of Cs (0.5 wt.%), Li (0.4 wt.%), Rb (3 wt.%), Ta (0.3 wt.%) and F (4 wt.%). This zone was probably formed in the very last crystallization stage of the pegmatite and its minerals replaced earlier crystallized mineral assemblages. Moreover, the core zone hosts subordinate extremely Cs-enriched (up to 13 wt.% Cs2O) mineral species of beryl. The chemical composition of this beryl resamples that of the extreme rare beryl-variety pezzotaite. Other observed subordinate, minor and accessory minerals comprise tourmaline, garnet, cassiterite, apatite, (mangano-) columbite, tantalite, microlite (Bi-bearing), gahnite, fluorite

  6. Crustal and uppermost mantle S-wave velocity below the East European Craton in northern Poland from the inversion of ambient-noise records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepore, Simone; Polkowski, Marcin; Grad, Marek

    2018-02-01

    The P-wave velocities (V p) within the East European Craton in Poland are well known through several seismic experiments which permitted to build a high-resolution 3D model down to 60 km depth. However, these seismic data do not provide sufficient information about the S-wave velocities (V s). For this reason, this paper presents the values of lithospheric V s and P-wave-to-S-wave velocity ratios (V p/V s) calculated from the ambient noise recorded during 2014 at "13 BB star" seismic array (13 stations, 78 midpoints) located in northern Poland. The 3D V p model in the area of the array consists of six sedimentary layers having total thickness within 3-7 km and V p in the range 1.85.3 km/s, a three-layer crystalline crust of total thickness 40 km and V p within 6.15-7.15 km/s, and the uppermost mantle, where V p is about 8.25 km/s. The V s and V p/V s values are calculated by the inversion of the surface-wave dispersion curves extracted from the noise cross correlation between all the station pairs. Due to the strong velocity differences among the layers, several modes are recognized in the 0.021 Hz frequency band: therefore, multimodal Monte Carlo inversions are applied. The calculated V s and V p/V s values in the sedimentary cover range within 0.992.66 km/s and 1.751.97 as expected. In the upper crust, the V s value (3.48 ± 0.10 km/s) is very low compared to the starting value of 3.75 ± 0.10 km/s. Consequently, the V p/V s value is very large (1.81 ± 0.03). To explain that the calculated values are compared with the ones for other old cratonic areas.

  7. Geochemical constraints on komatiite volcanism from Sargur Group Nagamangala greenstone belt, western Dharwar craton, southern India: Implications for Mesoarchean mantle evolution and continental growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tushipokla

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We present field, petrographic, major and trace element data for komatiites and komatiite basalts from Sargur Group Nagamangala greenstone belt, western Dharwar craton. Field evidences such as crude pillow structure indicate their eruption in a marine environment whilst spinifex texture reveals their komatiite nature. Petrographic data suggest that the primary mineralogy has been completely altered during post-magmatic processes associated with metamorphism corresponding to greenschist to lower amphibolite facies conditions. The studied komatiites contain serpentine, talc, tremolite, actinolite and chlorite whilst tremolite, actinolite with minor plagioclase in komatiitic basalts. Based on the published Sm-Nd whole rock isochron ages of adjoining Banasandra komatiites (northern extension of Nagamangala belt and further northwest in Nuggihalli belt and Kalyadi belt we speculate ca. 3.2–3.15 Ga for komatiite eruption in Nagamangala belt. Trace element characteristics particularly HFSE and REE patterns suggest that most of the primary geochemical characteristics are preserved with minor influence of post-magmatic alteration and/or contamination. About 1/3 of studied komatiites show Al-depletion whilst remaining komatiites and komatiite basalts are Al-undepleted. Several samples despite high MgO, (Gd/YbN ratios show low CaO/Al2O3 ratios. Such anomalous values could be related to removal of CaO from komatiites during fluid-driven hydrothermal alteration, thus lowering CaO/Al2O3 ratios. The elemental characteristics of Al-depleted komatiites such as higher (Gd/YbN (>1.0, CaO/Al2O3 (>1.0, Al2O3/TiO2 (18 together with higher HREE, Y, Zr suggest their derivation from shallower upper mantle without garnet involvement in residue. The observed chemical characteristics (CaO/Al2O3, Al2O3/TiO2, MgO, Ni, Cr, Nb, Zr, Y, Hf, and REE indicate derivation of the komatiite and komatiite basalt magmas from heterogeneous mantle (depleted to primitive mantle at

  8. Effects of low-pressure igneous processes and subduction on Fe3+/ΣFe and redox state of mantle eclogites from Lace (Kaapvaal craton)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulbach, S.; Woodland, A. B.; Vasilyev, P.; Galvez, M. E.; Viljoen, K. S.

    2017-09-01

    Reconstructing the redox state of the mantle is critical in discussing the evolution of atmospheric composition through time. Kimberlite-borne mantle eclogite xenoliths, commonly interpreted as representing former oceanic crust, may record the chemical and physical state of Archaean and Proterozoic convecting mantle sources that generated their magmatic protoliths. However, their message is generally obscured by a range of primary (igneous differentiation) and secondary processes (seawater alteration, metamorphism, metasomatism). Here, we report the Fe3+/ΣFe ratio and δ18 O in garnet from in a suite of well-characterised mantle eclogite and pyroxenite xenoliths hosted in the Lace kimberlite (Kaapvaal craton), which originated as ca. 3 Ga-old ocean floor. Fe3+/ΣFe in garnet (0.01 to 0.063, median 0.02; n = 16) shows a negative correlation with jadeite content in clinopyroxene, suggesting increased partitioning of Fe3+ into clinopyroxene in the presence of monovalent cations with which it can form coupled substitutions. Jadeite-corrected Fe3+/ΣFe in garnet shows a broad negative trend with Eu*, consistent with incompatible behaviour of Fe3+ during olivine-plagioclase accumulation in the protoliths. This trend is partially obscured by increasing Fe3+ partitioning into garnet along a conductive cratonic geotherm. In contrast, NMORB-normalised Nd/Yb - a proxy of partial melt loss from subducting oceanic crust (1) - shows no obvious correlation with Fe3+/ΣFe, nor does garnet δ18OVSMOW (5.14 to 6.21‰) point to significant seawater alteration. Median bulk-rock Fe3+/ΣFe is roughly estimated at 0.025. This observation agrees with V/Sc systematics, which collectively point to a reduced Archaean convecting mantle source to the igneous protoliths of these eclogites compared to the modern MORB source. Oxygen fugacites (fO2) relative to the fayalite-magnetite-quartz buffer (FMQ) range from Δlog ⁡ fO2 = FMQ-1.3 to FMQ-4.6. At those reducing conditions, the solubility

  9. Late Paleoproterozoic-Neoproterozoic multi-rifting events in the North China Craton and their geological significance: A study advance and review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Mingguo; Hu, Bo; Zhao, Taiping; Peng, Peng; Meng, Qingren

    2015-11-01

    An important Paleoproterozoic mobile belt event took place in the North China Craton (NCC), termed the Hutuo Movement. This event has been interpreted to represent cratonic reworking characterized by rifting-subduction-collision processes. The NCC then evolved into a stable platform or para-platform tectonic setting in Earth's middle age period more than ~ 1.0 Ga. Thick Late Paleoproterozoic-Neoproterozoic sedimentary sequences were extensively deposited on the early metamorphic basement. The major sedimentary basins include the Xiong'er aulacogen system in the south-central NCC, the Yan-Liao aulacogen system in the north-central NCC, the Northern marginal rift system in the northwestern NCC and the Eastern marginal rift system in the eastern NCC. The following four stages of magmatic activity are recognized in the Late Paleoproterozoic to Neoproterozoic interval: (1) ~ 1800 to 1780 Ma Xiong'er igneous province (XIP), (2) ~ 1720 to 1620 Ma anorogenic magmatic association, (3) ~ 1350 to 1320 Ma diabase sill swarms, and (4) ~ 900 Ma mafic dyke swarms. These four magmatic events suggest that the NCC was situated in an intra-plate setting for a long time from ~ 1.8 Ga to ~ 0.7 Ga or even younger, and the magmatic events were associated with multi-stage rifting activities. We document that the NCC was in a long-term extensional tectonic setting during Late Paleoproterozoic-Neoproterozoic era. The main ore deposits in this period are magmatic type iron deposits related to anorthosite-gabbro bodies, REE-Nb-Fe and Pb-Zn-Cu-Fe deposits related to Mesoproterozoic-Neoproterozoic rifts. Orogenic metal deposits are absent. There is no evidence indicating that the Grenville or other orogenic events affected the NCC. The reason for the absence of Grenvillian aged events in the NCC is probably because it was far from the edge of the Nuna supercontinent, if such a supercontinent did exist. There is another possibility that the Earth's middle age represented a particular tectonic

  10. Rb-Sr geochronology and geochemical characteristics of mafic dikes in the Nova Lacerda and Conquista D'Oeste region, Mato Grosso, SW Amazonian Craton; Geocronologia Rb-Sr e caracteristicas geoquimicas dos diques maficos da regiao de Nova Lacerda e Conquista D'Oeste (MT), porcao sudoeste do Craton Amazonico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Paulo Cesar Correa da; Matos, Joao Batista de [Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso (UFMT), Cuiaba, MT (Brazil). Dept. de Recursos Minerais; Grupo de Pesquisas em Evolucao Crustal e Metalogenia Guapore, Cuiaba, MT (Brazil)], e-mail: pccorrea@ufmt.br, e-mail: jmatos@cpd.ufmt.br; Girardi, Vicente Antonio Vitorio [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias. Dept. de Mineralogia e Geotectonica], e-mail: girardi@usp.br; Ruiz, Amarildo Salina [Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso (UFMT), Cuiaba, MT (Brazil). Dept. de Geologia Geral; Grupo de Pesquisas em Evolucao Crustal e Metalogenia Guapore, Cuiaba, MT (Brazil)], e-mail: asruiz@rc.unesp.br

    2009-07-01

    In the Nova Lacerda and Conquista D'Oeste regions, Mato Grosso State, SW part of the Amazonian Craton, mafic dikes trending NNW intrude the Nova Lacerda Granite (1462{+-}12 Ma), within the Jauru Domain, in the Rondonia-San Ignacio Province (1.55 - 1.3 Ga). The mafic swarm comprises diabases, metadiabases and amphibolites. Metadiabases originated from uralitization of diabases. These rocks have tholeiitic affinity and predominant basaltic composition. Some samples are andesi-basalts. The ages of diabases and metabasites are 1380 {+-} 32 Ma and 1330 {+-} 120 Ma respectively. Geochemical data indicate that the compositional variation of diabases and metadiadases is due to fractional crystallization of evolved tholeiitic magmas. The origin of the basaltic magmas is related to a heterogeneous mantle source. (author)

  11. U-Pb geochronology of Martín García, Sola, and Dos Hermanas Islands (Argentina and Uruguay): Unveiling Rhyacian, Statherian, Ectasian, and Stenian of a forgotten area of the Río de la Plata Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, João O. S.; Chernicoff, Carlos J.; Zappettini, Eduardo O.; McNaughton, Neal J.; Greau, Y.

    2017-12-01

    The Río de la Plata Craton is one of the three major cratons of South America. The craton is largely covered by sedimentary basins where its most exposed area is Buenos Aires-Piedra Alta Province (Chernicoff et al., 2014). This province includes the Martín García Island in the confluence of Uruguay River and the Río de la Plata estuary. Despite to be a reference area for the craton the Martín García Island lacks modern geological investigation. We present U-Pb SIMS (secondary ion mass spectrometer) geochronological data on zircon and titanite, as well as Hf isotope determinations on zircon, from rocks of Martín García Island (Argentina), Sola and Dos Hermanas Islands (Uruguay) and from Paso Severino Formation (Uruguay). We investigated: 1) Rhyacian intermediate-to acidic plutonic, arc-type rocks of the Florida Belt dated between 2090 Ma and 2115 Ma, derived from juvenile Neoarchean crust (TDMHf: 2.52 Ga; average εHf: +3.62); 2) Rhyacian metadacite (San José metamorphic belt) of 2127 Ma; 3) Statherian metagabbros of 1724-1734 Ma, with Transplatense inheritance; 4) Early Ectasian metagabbro of 1392 Ma, with Rhyacian inheritance; and 5) Stenian metagabbros of 1193 Ma (TDMHf: 2.00 Ga, εHf: 0.1). Most of the dated orthogneisses show Brasilian-age (from 778 to 550 Ma) Pb loss in the zircons, interpreted to be caused by shearing or uplifting during Neoproterozoic. The results show that the area is not exclusively Rhyacian in age but encompasses Statherian, Ectasian, and Stenian gabbros. The last two are interpreted as distal intrusions associated to the Sunsás Orogen. All post-Transplatense metagabbros have geochemical signature of island arc basalt derived from primitive mantle with enrichment of LILE and depletion of HFSE. These characteristics point to the recurrence of magma chambers intermittently active during the Rhyacian, Statherian, Ectasian, and Stenian, all with a similar source. The term "Transplatense" is used to replace "Trans-Amazonian" events

  12. Reassessment of the geologic evolution of selected precambrian terranes in Brazil, based on new SHRIMP U-Pb data, part 1: central-eastern border of Sao Francisco Craton in Bahia state, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Luiz Carlos da; Pimentel, Marcio; Jost, Hardy; Armstrong, Richard

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses new U-Pb SHRIMP zircon data for 12 key-exposures of several geological units exposed at the eastern border of the Sao Francisco Craton. The samples represent mostly Archean basement units within the Paleoproterozoic Eastern Bahia Belt (Orogen). Samples were collected along several E-W tran sects trying to more accurately assess the areal distribution of the Archean polycyclic basement of the Sao Francisco Craton and to identify the limits of Paleoproterozoic metamorphic overprint resulting from the development of the Eastern Bahia Orogen. Owing to the polycyclic evolution and/or high grade metamorphic conditions which most of the rock units investigated have undergone, zircon morphology and the U-Pb analytical data exhibit very complex patterns. These are characterized by a combination of inheritance, partial resetting and new zircon growth during high grade metamorphism. As a consequence, very careful and detailed analyses of cathodoluminescence imagery were required to allow distinction between inheritance, newly melt-precipitated zircon and partially reset zircons, as well as between the ages of magmatic and metamorphic events. Except for one unit (sample LH 44), which present crystallization age of ca 3000 Ma - interpreted, therefore, as the eastern extension of the Serrinha Craton - the others are ascribed to two major age groups at ca. 2870-2500 Ma and ca. 2200?-2030 Ma. The former group includes ortho gneisses with crystallization ages between ca. 2870-2500 Ma, which have been mapped and interpreted, in its major extension, as juvenile Paleoproterozoic arc (Itabuna and Salvador-Curaca belts/domains). The new data presented in this study, however, indicate that these ortho gneisses represent a multi-episodic collage of primitive Archean orogenic arcs, which gave rise to the Archean basement of that part of the Sao Francisco Craton. All the investigated zircon populations were extensively recrystallized at ca. 2080-2050 Ma as a result of

  13. Supporting peritoneal dialysis in remote Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carruthers, Dale; Warr, Kevin

    2004-12-01

    Peritoneal dialysis is usually considered a first-choice treatment for end-stage renal disease for patients living in remote areas. The advantages of peritoneal dialysis over haemodialysis are that peritoneal dialysis preserves the residual renal function for longer, provides patients with more independence and gives patients a greater opportunity to return home quickly. In Australia, Aboriginal people suffer end-stage renal failure at disproportionately higher rates than the general population. Given that many Aboriginal people live in remote communities a task of peritoneal dialysis units is to ensure the successful setting up and maintenance of peritoneal dialysis programmes in the outback. This paper examines how peritoneal dialysis units located in the city are able to deliver peritoneal dialysis to patients located often hundreds of kilometres and at times thousands of kilometres away in very remote communities. In preparing this paper interviews were conducted with renal and remote community-based health professionals in Western Australia and the Northern Territory, and with peritoneal dialysis patients in Western Australia. The success of remote peritoneal dialysis programmes relies on many elements, most importantly an integrated approach to care by all members of the peritoneal dialysis team. The peritoneal dialysis team included not just health professionals but also patients, their families, their communities and other support people such as those involved in the transport of peritoneal dialysis supplies to the outback. Careful communication, a willingness to participate, friendliness and delivering care and supplies with a smile are essential ingredients to a winning program. Without all of these ingredients dialysis in the bush may fail.

  14. Defending Australia in the Asia Pacific Century: Force 2030

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-24

    networks are disrupted and the prospects for a long-term political solution are enhanced. 22 Defending Australia in the Asia Pacific Century: Force 2030...the part of the coalition of nations, which includes Australia , assisting Afghanistan. 4.46 Any solution to the problems faced by Afghanistan will...Austr-alian Govcrnmcnl Department of Ikfence DEFENDING AUSTRALIA IN THE ASIA PACIFIC CENTURY: FORCE 2030 Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB

  15. U.S.-Australia Civilian Nuclear Cooperation: Issues for Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    Howard Berman and Ranking Member Ileana Ros-Lehtinen introduced H.J.Res. 88, which provides for the approval of the U.S.- Australia agreement. The House ... Australia .6 6 House Foreign Affairs Committee Hearing, “Nuclear Cooperation After Iran and Khan: Are...Committee,” Washington, DC, November 5, 2009. 8 “National Security Strategy, The White House , Washington, DC, May 2010. U.S.- Australia Civilian Nuclear

  16. Forward Deployment of U.S. Naval Forces to Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-14

    potential. Beyond mere financial considerations, Australia -based ships would provide increased crisis -response capability to the theater commander...FORWARD DEPLOYMENT OF U.S. NAVAL FORCES TO AUSTRALIA A thesis presented to the Faculty of the U.S. Army Command and General...5b. GRANT NUMBER 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Forward Deployment of U.S. Naval Forces to Australia 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 5d. PROJECT NUMBER

  17. Climate Change Policies in Australia: Gender Equality, Power and Knowledge

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas K. Wanner

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the link between gender equality and climate change policies in Australia. It critically analyses the extent to which gender mainstreaming and gender dimensions have been taken into account in the national policy processes for climate change in Australia. The paper argues that climate change adaptation and mitigation policies in Australia neglect gender dimensions. This endangers the advances made in gender equality and works against socially equitable...

  18. The basement of the Punta de Este Terrane: A meso proterozoic heritage at the eastern border of Rio de La Plata craton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preciozzi, F.; Peel, E.; Sanchez, L.; Basei, M.

    2005-01-01

    U-Pb zircon ages between 1000 and 900 Ma corresponding to the nuclei of zircon crystals extracted from the basement of the Punta del Este Terrane (Eastern Uruguay) allowed the correlation of the protoliths of this domain with rocks attributed to the Namaqua Belt in Southwestern Africa. SHRIMP ages obtained for the ortho gneissic rocks allowed to place at ca. 750 Ma the generations of gneisses and migmatites. Differently from what occurred in Africa, reworking of this crustal segment during the Brasiliano-Pan african orogenesis was very intense, reaching the granulite facies around 640Ma. Acid volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks (Sierra de Aguirre Formation) with ages around 570 Ma, late sedimentary basins (San Carlos Formation) and post-tectonic granitoids (Santa Teresa and José Ignacio batholith s) mark the end of the events related with the Brasiliano/Pan-African orogenesis. The final collision between the Punta del Este Terrane and the western domains represented by the Dom Feliciano Belt and the Río de La Plata Craton may have occurred at around 535 Ma

  19. The Dom Feliciano belt and its relations with the craton of the Rio de la Plata and Punta del Este ground-Geology and geochronology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preciozzi, F.; Peel, E.; Sanchez, L.; Basei, M.; Ledesma, J.; Muzio, R.

    2005-01-01

    This research was framed in an interdisciplinary project, whose main objective was to make an approach to the geological, tectonic and geochronological evolution of Dom Feliciano Belt and adjacent land partners, especially the Río de la Plata Craton and Land Punta del Este. As was proposed in the project, special attention to geochronological studies from geological transects lent controlled. This yielded the expected level major step forward, not only with regard to the age of different units, but what makes the establishment of an adequate stratigraphy of them. Similarly, geochemical, petrographic and geochronological studies allowed essentially make geotectonic and geologic correlations with the southern portion of Brazil and the western portion of the land I africanos.lo expand involving more project goals in si.En effect began to manifest as a need to know the evolution of equivalent units both in the southern portion of Brazil and Africa Occidental.Estos fundamentalmnete work with West Africa were made with contributions from CONICYT Project 6009 under Projects Geological Correlation 438, 450 and 478 .this pertimitio exchange ideas with leading scientists worldwide many of whom ended up collaborating with it

  20. A non-zircon Hf isotope record in Archean black shales from the Pilbara craton confirms changing crustal dynamics ca. 3 Ga ago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebel-Jacobsen, Yona; Nebel, Oliver; Wille, Martin; Cawood, Peter A

    2018-01-17

    Plate tectonics and associated subduction are unique to the Earth. Studies of Archean rocks show significant changes in composition and structural style around 3.0 to 2.5 Ga that are related to changing tectonic regime, possibly associated with the onset of subduction. Whole rock Hf isotope systematics of black shales from the Australian Pilbara craton, selected to exclude detrital zircon components, are employed to evaluate the evolution of the Archean crust. This approach avoids limitations of Hf-in-zircon analyses, which only provide input from rocks of sufficient Zr-concentration, and therefore usually represent domains that already underwent a degree of differentiation. In this study, we demonstrate the applicability of this method through analysis of shales that range in age from 3.5 to 2.8 Ga, and serve as representatives of their crustal sources through time. Their Hf isotopic compositions show a trend from strongly positive εHf initial values for the oldest samples, to strongly negative values for the younger samples, indicating a shift from juvenile to differentiated material. These results confirm a significant change in the character of the source region of the black shales by 3 Ga, consistent with models invoking a change in global dynamics from crustal growth towards crustal reworking around this time.

  1. THE MIOCENE AND DEVONIAN MAGMATISM AT THE JUNCTION BETWEEN THE TUVA-MONGOLIAN MASSIF AND SIBERIAN CRATON: COMMON COMPONENT OF MANTLE SOURCES AND ITS ORIGIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V. Rasskazov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Devonian dikes of the Urik-Belaya and Shagayte-Gol-Urik zones and Miocene lavas of the Urik volcanic field are spatially associated with each other at the structural junction between the Neoproterozoic Tuva-Mongolian massif and Siberian craton. The former dike belt is represented by basalts and basaltic andesites of tholeiitic series and the latter one by trachybasalts, trachyandesitic basalts of moderately alkaline series and trachybasalts, phonotephrites of highly alkaline one. The Urik volcanic field is composed of trachybasalts and trachyandesitic basalts of moderately alkaline series. A partial similarity between magmatic series of different age is found in terms of major oxides, trace elements, and Sr, Pb isotopes. The common component corrected for age was defined through its converging mixing trends with those of the lithospheric mantle and crust. The component identification was a basis for deciphering the nature of isotopic and geochemical heterogeneity of evolved magmatic sources. It was inferred that the common component characterizes either a modified (depleted reservoir of the lower mantle or, more likely, a local region of the convecting asthenospheric mantle that underlies the Tuva-Mongolian massif. The latter interpretation assumes the formation of a locally convecting asthenosphere in the middle Neoproterozoic, along with the development of the Oka zone at the massif, and puts constrains on later sufficient processing of the asthenosphere due to rising plumes or subducting slabs.

  2. Calymmian magmatism in the basement of the Jauru Terrain (Rondonian - San Ignacio Province), Amazon Craton: U-Pb and Sm-Nd geochemistry and geochronology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fachetti, Frankie James Serrano; Costa, Ana Claudia Dantas da; Silva, Carlos Humberto da, E-mail: frankiefachetti@hotmail.com, E-mail: acdcosta@ufmt.br, E-mail: chsilva@ufmt.br [Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso (UFMT), Cuiaba, MT (Brazil). Instituto de Ciencias Exatas e da Terra

    2016-11-01

    The Taquarussu Orthogneiss and the Guadalupe Granodiorite, part of the Rondonian-San Ignacio Province basement, southwest of the Amazonian Craton, correspond to oriented bodies with a NW trend. The rocks show granodiorite composition with minor occurrences of coarse grained monzogranites consisting essentially of plagioclase, quartz, microcline, orthoclase and biotite. The accessory minerals are amphibole, titanite, garnet, apatite, epidote, zircon and opaque. The geochemical data indicate that the rocks are classified as granodiorites and monzogranites, with an intermediate to acid magmatism, sub-alkaline character, from the calc-alkaline to the high-K calc-alkaline series, with alumina ratios ranging from metaluminous to lightly peraluminous. The rocks were classified as generated in volcanic islands arc environment and the U-Pb data (SHRIMP zircon) show a concord age 1575 ± 6 Ma. The Sm-Nd model age (T{sub DM}) is 1.63 Ga with εNd (t = 1.57 Ga) ranging from -1.52 to +0.78. These data indicate that these rocks are probably a juvenile crust with a possible contamination of crustal rocks. (author)

  3. Petrography and geochronology (U/Pb-Sm/Nd) the Passagem Granite, Pensamiento Granitoid Complex, Paragua Terrane, SW Amazon Craton, Mato Grosso, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jesus, Gisely Carmo de; Sousa, Maria Zelia Aguiar de; Ruiz, Amarildo Salina; Matos, Joao Batista de

    2010-01-01

    The Passagem granite includes stocks, plugs and dikes located in the Ricardo Franco hill - Vila Bela da Santissima Trindade region - state of Mato Grosso, central Brazil. The Passagem Granite is included in the Paragua terrane - SW Amazonian Craton. It consists of isotropic monzogranite, sienogranite and more rarely granodiorites with leucocratic dark gray to white color. These rocks range from hypidomorphic inequigranular to xenomorphic texture, fine to medium grained. Biotite is the only primary mafic present as essential phase and characterize an expanded slightly acid sequence formed by a sub-alkaline magmatism of high-potassium calc-alkaline, slightly peraluminous composition from arc magmatic tectonic environment during a post-collisional period. Mechanism of fractional crystallization of plagioclase, biotite, titanite, apatite and zircon associated with simultaneous crustal assimilation are suggested for the evolution of these rocks. The results support the hypothesis of a post-collisional magmatism in the Paragua terrane at 1284 +- 20 Ma corresponding to the crystallization age of the Passagem granite. This paper propose that Passagem Granite represents as an extension in Brazilian terrane of the Pensamiento Granitoid Complex. (author)

  4. Stress state reconstruction and tectonic evolution of the northern slope of the Baikit anteclise, Siberian Craton, based on 3D seismic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskalenko, A. N.; Khudoley, A. K.; Khusnitdinov, R. R.

    2017-05-01

    In this work, we consider application of an original method for determining the indicators of the tectonic stress fields in the northern Baikit anteclise based on 3D seismic data for further reconstruction of the stress state parameters when analyzing structural maps of seismic horizons and corresponded faults. The stress state parameters are determined by the orientations of the main stress axes and shape of the stress ellipsoid. To calculate the stress state parameters from data on the spatial orientations of faults and slip vectors, we used the algorithms from quasiprimary stress computation methods and cataclastic analysis, implemented in the software products FaultKinWin and StressGeol, respectively. The results of this work show that kinematic characteristics of faults regularly change toward the top of succession and that the stress state parameters are characterized by different values of the Lode-Nadai coefficient. Faults are presented as strike-slip faults with normal or reverse component of displacement. Three stages of formation of the faults are revealed: (1) partial inversion of ancient normal faults, (2) the most intense stage with the predominance of thrust and strike-slip faults at north-northeast orientation of an axis of the main compression, and (3) strike-slip faults at the west-northwest orientation of an axis of the main compression. The second and third stages are pre-Vendian in age and correlate to tectonic events that took place during the evolution of the active southwestern margin of the Siberian Craton.

  5. Depositional environment and origin of the Lilaozhuang Neoarchean BIF-hosted iron-magnesite deposit on the southern margin of the North China Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hua; Zhang, LianChang; Fabre, Sébastien; Wang, ChangLe; Zhai, MingGuo

    2017-07-01

    The Neoarchean Lilaozhuang iron-magnesite deposit is located in the middle of the Huoqiu banded iron formation (BIF) ore belt in Anhui Province on the southern margin of the North China Craton. The Huoqiu BIF is the unique one that simultaneously develops quartz-type, silicate-type, and carbonate-type magnetite in the region. The Lilaozhuang deposit is characterized by magnesium-rich carbonate (magnesite) in magnetite ores. The BIF-hosted iron ores include mainly of silicate type and carbonate type, with a small amount of quartz type, which chiefly exhibit banded and massive structure, with minor disseminated structure. The magnesite ores occur as crystal-like bright white and exhibits massive structure. The Y/Ho ratio and REY pattern of both iron and magnesite ores are similar to that of seawater, while Eu shows positive anomaly, which is the sign of seafloor hydrothermal mixture. These features suggest that ore-forming materials of iron and magnesium in the Lilaozhuang deposit are mainly from the mixture of seafloor hydrothermal and seawater. Both ores do not exhibit negative Ce anomaly, which indicates that the deposit was formed in an environment showing a lack of oxygen. C-O isotopic compositions indicate that magnesite ore has been reformed by metamorphism of low amphibolite facies and later hydrothermal alteration. Based on the comprehensive analysis, authors suggest that iron and magnesite ores in the Lilaozhuang deposits formed in a confined sea basin on continental margin and was influenced by later complex geological processes.

  6. Moving to world's best uranium address

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noakes, Frank

    2006-01-01

    Most exploration dollars spent in South Australia are focused on exploiting uranium. This is for good reason as South Australia is the world's best address for uranium. Pressure to cut CO 2 emissions and the ballistic growth of the Chinese and Indian economies has heightened expectations that the worldwide use of uranium for power generation will mushroom beyond its current 17% market share. The recent Australia-China deal only seems to confirm this; hence uranium's growing popularity among miners and explorers. Such is the attractiveness of uranium-related floats, when Toro Energy sought $18m in March it was swamped with more than three times share application volume. In the north west, Southern Gold and Hindmarsh Resources are expectantly drilling for commercial uranium deposits all around the acreage that hosts the Challenger gold mine in the Gawler Craton. The first exploration drilling for uranium in quaternary-age river channels will take place in South Australia's far north in May. Red Metal says while older and deeper tertiary river channels in the area that host the Beverley uranium mine were explored for uranium, the younger near-surface channel has not had a single hole drilled for uranium. This is despite the area being one of the 'hottest radiogenic terrains in South Australia'. The company will target calcrete-style uranium mineralisation similar to the Yerrlirrie deposit in Western Australia (52,000t U308). Tasman Resources will start drilling to test seven uranium targets within 30km of Olympic Dam, the world's largest known uranium deposit, later this year. Tasman also holds tenements adjoining the Warrior uranium deposit near Tarcoola that contains known radiometric anomalies within the 40km-long Wynbring paleochannels. They are the fourth largest uranium explorer in South Australia. Alliance Resources and its JV partner Quasar Resources are exploring the Beverley 4 Mile uranium prospect at Arkaroola. Quasar is an affiliate of Heathgate Resources

  7. [New Guinea and Australia: their common pathology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozais, J P

    1985-01-01

    New Guinea and Australia have been joined together during several hundred millions of years. Inhabited by men 40,000 years ago, these populations (papous and aborigenes) have been separated of the others during several millenaries. The first invaders brought with them plasmodiums, Necator americanus, Wuchereria bancrofti and Dengue virus. Brugia malayi, because lack of primates, took non root in New Guinea; the virus of Murray Valley encephalitis is autochthonous; the high frequency of Burkitt lymphoma in New Guinea is, perhaps, a racial feature.

  8. Spent fuels transportation coming from Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Maritime transportation of spent fuels from Australia to France fits into the contract between COGEMA and ANSTO, signed in 1999. This document proposes nine information cards in this domain: HIFAR a key tool of the nuclear, scientific and technological australian program; a presentation of the ANSTO Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization; the HIFAR spent fuel management problem; the COGEMA expertise in favor of the research reactor spent fuel; the spent fuel reprocessing at La Hague; the transports management; the transport safety (2 cards); the regulatory framework of the transports. (A.L.B.)

  9. Regional radiation protection initiatives by Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grey, J.

    1993-01-01

    Australia both through the auspices of the IAEA and from Government Aid Grants has contributed to the improvement of radiation protection throughout the Asia/Pacific region. The assistance has been in the form of training and improvement to radiation protection infrastructures. The presentation describes the objectives, scope and diversity of the radiation protection infrastructure program and the benefits to the large number of persons included in the program. An outline of the current IAEA program is also discussed together with an explanation of how the program will assist national regulators in the education of radiation workers, in hazardous operations such as industrial radiography

  10. Adolescent school-based vaccination in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Kirsten; Quinn, Helen; Bachelor, Michael; Bryant, Vicki; Campbell-Lloyd, Sue; Newbound, Angela; Scully, Megan; Webby, Rosalind; McIntyre, Peter B

    2013-06-30

    Adolescents have become an increasingly prominent target group for vaccination in Australia and other developed countries. Over the past decade, voluntary school-based vaccination programs have evolved to become the primary method of delivering adolescent vaccines funded under Australia's National Immunisation Program (NIP). These programs operate at a state and territory level and offer NIP vaccines to adolescents in specific school grades using local teams of trained vaccine providers. This paper summarises the current operation of voluntary school-based vaccination programs in Australia. Information was obtained through a literature review, semi-structured interviews with those managing and implementing school-based vaccination programs in each jurisdiction and a review of program resources. Available coverage data was obtained from each state or territory. Vaccines are delivered at the school, during school hours, and typically target late primary or early secondary school grades. Written parental consent is required for any vaccine to be administered. Operation of the programs is influenced by various factors at the school and provider level. Despite variability in program implementation, collection and analysis of coverage data, comparable coverage has been achieved across all states and territories. Coverage is higher than that reported by other countries where adolescent vaccines are mandated for school entry or available only through community vaccination providers. Voluntary school-based vaccination programs are an established mechanism for the delivery of adolescent vaccines in Australia and vaccines offered will continue to evolve in light of national recommendations. Current gaps in evidence include a detailed understanding of the influence of procedural factors on uptake, the best ways to maximise consent form return and, standardisation of coverage data reporting. This work is copyright. Apart from any use as permitted under the Copyright Act 1968

  11. Plutonium isotope measurements from across continental Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tims, Stephen G.; Fifield, L. Keith; Hancock, Gary J.; Lal, Rajeev R.; Hoo, Wee T.

    2013-01-01

    The 240 Pu/ 239 Pu ratio of the global plutonium fallout from atmospheric nuclear weapons testing is typically in the range 0.17–0.19. However, the influence of regional nuclear installations or nearby weapons test sites can lead to local values outside this range. We report 240 Pu/ 239 Pu ratios at 14 representative sites across Australian continent, and find that the weapons tests carried out in Australia appear to have made a significant contribution to the total fallout in the center of the continent, despite their relatively small explosive yield.

  12. Plutonium isotope measurements from across continental Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tims, Stephen G., E-mail: steve.tims@anu.edu.au [Department of Nuclear Physics, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Fifield, L. Keith [Department of Nuclear Physics, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Hancock, Gary J. [CSIRO Land and Water, Black Mountain Laboratories, GPO Box 1666, Canberra, ACT 2601 (Australia); Lal, Rajeev R.; Hoo, Wee T. [Department of Nuclear Physics, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2013-01-15

    The {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu ratio of the global plutonium fallout from atmospheric nuclear weapons testing is typically in the range 0.17-0.19. However, the influence of regional nuclear installations or nearby weapons test sites can lead to local values outside this range. We report {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu ratios at 14 representative sites across Australian continent, and find that the weapons tests carried out in Australia appear to have made a significant contribution to the total fallout in the center of the continent, despite their relatively small explosive yield.

  13. Successful Swiss solar bicycles in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, K.

    2000-01-01

    The article takes a look at the Swiss 'Spirit of Bike' team's success in the 'Power Challenge' race across Australia using solar-bicycles based on commercially available models. Apart from the sporting aspects of race, technical details on the cycles and their supply of solar power are given. Also, the history behind the success of the team is presented and the monitoring of man (and woman) and machine during the race is described. The article also discusses the electric bicycles that are commercially available and the potential of these energy-efficient vehicles in Switzerland

  14. Real wages in Australia and Canada, 1870-1913

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greasley, David; Madsen, Jakob Brøchner; Oxley, Les

    2000-01-01

    in Canada. Immigration increased slightly Australia's real wages, but reduced wage levels in Canada, and tempered there the beneficial effects of rising productivity and improving terms of trade. In contrast, wage earners' share of national income rose after 1890 in Australia, with the productivity slowdown......Australia's and Canada's real wage experiences between 1870 and 1913 were distinctive. Faster productivity growth underpinned Canada's overtaking of Australia's wage levels. The globalization forces of migration and trade also shaped their comparative wages, principally by reducing wage growth...

  15. Two new species of Celtis (Celtidaceae) from Australia and Madagascar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sattarian, A.; Maesen, van der L.J.G.

    2005-01-01

    Celtis australiensis Sattarian is described from Australia and Celtis madagascariensis Sattarian is new for Madagascar. Both new Celtidaceae (formerly Ulmaceae–Celtidoideae) are illustrated with a photograph.

  16. Reworking of Archean mantle in the NE Siberian craton by carbonatite and silicate melt metasomatism: Evidence from a carbonate-bearing, dunite-to-websterite xenolith suite from the Obnazhennaya kimberlite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionov, Dmitri A.; Doucet, Luc S.; Xu, Yigang; Golovin, Alexander V.; Oleinikov, Oleg B.

    2018-03-01

    The Obnazhennaya kimberlite in the NE Siberian craton hosts a most unusual cratonic xenolith suite, with common rocks rich in pyroxenes and garnet, and no sheared peridotites. We report petrographic and chemical data for whole rocks (WR) and minerals of 20 spinel and garnet peridotites from Obnazhennaya with Re-depletion Os isotope ages of 1.8-2.9 Ga (Ionov et al., 2015a) as well as 2 pyroxenites. The garnet-bearing rocks equilibrated at 1.6-2.8 GPa and 710-1050 °C. Some xenoliths contain vermicular spinel-pyroxene aggregates with REE patterns in clinopyroxene mimicking those of garnet. The peridotites show significant scatter of Mg# (0.888-0.924), Cr2O3 (0.2-1.4 wt.%) and high NiO (0.3-0.4 wt.%). None are pristine melting residues. Low-CaO-Al2O3 (≤0.9 wt.%) dunites and harzburgites are melt-channel materials. Peridotites with low to moderate Al2O3 (0.4-1.8 wt.%) usually have CaO > Al2O3, and some have pockets of calcite texturally equilibrated with olivine and garnet. Such carbonates, exceptional in mantle xenoliths and reported here for the first time for the Siberian mantle, provide direct evidence for modal makeover and Ca and LREE enrichments by ephemeral carbonate-rich melts. Peridotites rich in CaO and Al2O3 (2.7-8.0 wt.%) formed by reaction with silicate melts. We infer that the mantle lithosphere beneath Obnazhennaya, initially formed in the Mesoarchean, has been profoundly modified. Pervasive inter-granular percolation of highly mobile and reactive carbonate-rich liquids may have reduced the strength of the mantle lithosphere leading the way for reworking by silicate melts. The latest events before the kimberlite eruption were the formation of the carbonate-phlogopite pockets, fine-grained pyroxenite veins and spinel-pyroxene symplectites. The reworked lithospheric sections are preserved at Obnazhennaya, but similar processes could erode lithospheric roots in the SE Siberian craton (Tok) and the North China craton, where ancient melting residues and

  17. Experiences of Overseas Trained Teachers Seeking Public School Positions in Western Australia and South Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Sushmitta Datta; Lavery, Shane

    2017-01-01

    Many overseas trained teachers migrate to Australia in search of different lifestyles. In their endeavour to find suitable teaching positions in public secondary schools, overseas trained teachers often confront multiple challenges. This study explored the different issues that 12 overseas trained teachers experienced before obtaining a teaching…

  18. Unlocking Australia's Language Potential. Profiles of 9 Key Languages in Australia. Volume 8: Modern Greek.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamis, A. M.; And Others

    The status of modern Greek in Australian society and education are detailed in this report. Chapters include discussion of these issues: the history of modern Greek in Australia (Greek immigration and settlement, public and private domains of use, language maintenance and shift, and language quality); the functions of modern Greek in Australia…

  19. Millipedes from Australia, 1: Antichiropodini from South Australia (Diplopoda, Polydesmida, Paradoxosomatidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeekel, C.A.W.

    1982-01-01

    Descriptions of two new species: Antichiropus mammillifer n.sp., the first species of the genus recorded from outside Western Australia, related to A. minimus Attems and A. sulcatus Attems, and Tridactylogonus obscurus n.g., n.sp., a small species, taxonomically rather isolated, and perhaps related

  20. Skilling Australia for the Future? A Study of Quality Assurance in Australia's Vocational Education and Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbola, Frank Wogbe; Lambert, Daniel Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    From the end of World War II until the early 1970s, vocational education and training (VET) in Australia was surprisingly static and resilient to government-led reform, due to the dominance of industry and union power. Following the oil shocks of 1973 and associated unemployment and declining union power, there have been calls on the federal and…