WorldWideScience

Sample records for gaussian pencil beams

  1. Fast pencil beam dose calculation for proton therapy using a double-Gaussian beam model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joakim eda Silva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The highly conformal dose distributions produced by scanned proton pencil beams are more sensitive to motion and anatomical changes than those produced by conventional radiotherapy. The ability to calculate the dose in real time as it is being delivered would enable, for example, online dose monitoring, and is therefore highly desirable. We have previously described an implementation of a pencil beam algorithm running on graphics processing units (GPUs intended specifically for online dose calculation. Here we present an extension to the dose calculation engine employing a double-Gaussian beam model to better account for the low-dose halo. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first such pencil beam algorithm for proton therapy running on a GPU. We employ two different parametrizations for the halo dose, one describing the distribution of secondary particles from nuclear interactions found in the literature and one relying on directly fitting the model to Monte Carlo simulations of pencil beams in water. Despite the large width of the halo contribution, we show how in either case the second Gaussian can be included whilst prolonging the calculation of the investigated plans by no more than 16%, or the calculation of the most time-consuming energy layers by about 25%. Further, the calculation time is relatively unaffected by the parametrization used, which suggests that these results should hold also for different systems. Finally, since the implementation is based on an algorithm employed by a commercial treatment planning system, it is expected that with adequate tuning, it should be able to reproduce the halo dose from a general beam line with sufficient accuracy.

  2. Vortices in Gaussian beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roux, FS

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available , t0)} = P(du, dv) {FR{g(u, v, t0)}} Replacement: u→ du = t− t0 i2 ∂ ∂u′ v → dv = t− t0 i2 ∂ ∂v′ CSIR National Laser Centre – p.13/30 Differentiation i.s.o integration Evaluate the integral over the Gaussian beam (once and for all). Then, instead... . Gaussian beams with vortex dipoles CSIR National Laser Centre – p.2/30 Gaussian beam notation Gaussian beam in normalised coordinates: g(u, v, t) = exp ( −u 2 + v2 1− it ) u = xω0 v = yω0 t = zρ ρ = piω20 λ ω0 — 1/e2 beam waist radius; ρ— Rayleigh range ω ω...

  3. The optimization of pencil beam widths for use in an electron pencil beam algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McParland, Brian J.; Cunningham, John R.; Woo, Milton K.

    1988-01-01

    Pencil beam algorithms for the calculation of electron beam dose distributions have come into widespread use. These algorithms, however, have generally exhibited difficulties in reproducing dose distributions for small field dimensions or, more specifically, for those conditions in which lateral scatter equilibrium does not exist. The work described here has determined that this difficulty can arise from the manner in which the width of the pencil beam is calculated. A unique approach for determining the pencil beam widths required to accurately reproduce small field dose distributions in a homogeneous phantom is described and compared with measurements and the results of other calculations. This method has also been extended to calculate electron beam dose distributions in heterogeneous media and the results of this work are presented. Suggestions for further improvements are discussed.

  4. A pencil beam algorithm for helium ion beam therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuchs, Hermann; Stroebele, Julia; Schreiner, Thomas; Hirtl, Albert; Georg, Dietmar [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/AKH Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria) and Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/AKH Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/AKH Vienna (Austria) and Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/AKH Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); PEG MedAustron, 2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/AKH Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria) and Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/AKH Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To develop a flexible pencil beam algorithm for helium ion beam therapy. Dose distributions were calculated using the newly developed pencil beam algorithm and validated using Monte Carlo (MC) methods. Methods: The algorithm was based on the established theory of fluence weighted elemental pencil beam (PB) kernels. Using a new real-time splitting approach, a minimization routine selects the optimal shape for each sub-beam. Dose depositions along the beam path were determined using a look-up table (LUT). Data for LUT generation were derived from MC simulations in water using GATE 6.1. For materials other than water, dose depositions were calculated by the algorithm using water-equivalent depth scaling. Lateral beam spreading caused by multiple scattering has been accounted for by implementing a non-local scattering formula developed by Gottschalk. A new nuclear correction was modelled using a Voigt function and implemented by a LUT approach. Validation simulations have been performed using a phantom filled with homogeneous materials or heterogeneous slabs of up to 3 cm. The beams were incident perpendicular to the phantoms surface with initial particle energies ranging from 50 to 250 MeV/A with a total number of 10{sup 7} ions per beam. For comparison a special evaluation software was developed calculating the gamma indices for dose distributions. Results: In homogeneous phantoms, maximum range deviations between PB and MC of less than 1.1% and differences in the width of the distal energy falloff of the Bragg-Peak from 80% to 20% of less than 0.1 mm were found. Heterogeneous phantoms using layered slabs satisfied a {gamma}-index criterion of 2%/2mm of the local value except for some single voxels. For more complex phantoms using laterally arranged bone-air slabs, the {gamma}-index criterion was exceeded in some areas giving a maximum {gamma}-index of 1.75 and 4.9% of the voxels showed {gamma}-index values larger than one. The calculation precision of the

  5. Pencil beam proton radiography using a multilayer ionization chamber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farace, Paolo; Righetto, Roberto; Meijers, Arturs

    2016-01-01

    A pencil beam proton radiography (PR) method, using a commercial multilayer ionization chamber (MLIC) integrated with a treatment planning system (TPS) was developed. A Giraffe (IBA Dosimetry) MLIC (+/- 0.5 mm accuracy) was used to obtain pencil beam PR by delivering spots uniformly positioned at a

  6. Technical Note: Spot characteristic stability for proton pencil beam scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chin-Cheng; Chang, Chang; Moyers, Michael F; Gao, Mingcheng; Mah, Dennis

    2016-02-01

    The spot characteristics for proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) were measured and analyzed over a 16 month period, which included one major site configuration update and six cyclotron interventions. The results provide a reference to establish the quality assurance (QA) frequency and tolerance for proton pencil beam scanning. A simple treatment plan was generated to produce an asymmetric 9-spot pattern distributed throughout a field of 16 × 18 cm for each of 18 proton energies (100.0-226.0 MeV). The delivered fluence distribution in air was measured using a phosphor screen based CCD camera at three planes perpendicular to the beam line axis (x-ray imaging isocenter and up/down stream 15.0 cm). The measured fluence distributions for each energy were analyzed using in-house programs which calculated the spot sizes and positional deviations of the Gaussian shaped spots. Compared to the spot characteristic data installed into the treatment planning system, the 16-month averaged deviations of the measured spot sizes at the isocenter plane were 2.30% and 1.38% in the IEC gantry x and y directions, respectively. The maximum deviation was 12.87% while the minimum deviation was 0.003%, both at the upstream plane. After the collinearity of the proton and x-ray imaging system isocenters was optimized, the positional deviations of the spots were all within 1.5 mm for all three planes. During the site configuration update, spot positions were found to deviate by 6 mm until the tuning parameters file was properly restored. For this beam delivery system, it is recommended to perform a spot size and position check at least monthly and any time after a database update or cyclotron intervention occurs. A spot size deviation tolerance of spot positions were <2 mm at any plane up/down stream 15 cm from the isocenter.

  7. SU-D-BRC-01: An Automatic Beam Model Commissioning Method for Monte Carlo Simulations in Pencil-Beam Scanning Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, N; Shen, C; Tian, Z; Jiang, S; Jia, X [UT Southwestern Medical Ctr, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is typically regarded as the most accurate dose calculation method for proton therapy. Yet for real clinical cases, the overall accuracy also depends on that of the MC beam model. Commissioning a beam model to faithfully represent a real beam requires finely tuning a set of model parameters, which could be tedious given the large number of pencil beams to commmission. This abstract reports an automatic beam-model commissioning method for pencil-beam scanning proton therapy via an optimization approach. Methods: We modeled a real pencil beam with energy and spatial spread following Gaussian distributions. Mean energy, and energy and spatial spread are model parameters. To commission against a real beam, we first performed MC simulations to calculate dose distributions of a set of ideal (monoenergetic, zero-size) pencil beams. Dose distribution for a real pencil beam is hence linear superposition of doses for those ideal pencil beams with weights in the Gaussian form. We formulated the commissioning task as an optimization problem, such that the calculated central axis depth dose and lateral profiles at several depths match corresponding measurements. An iterative algorithm combining conjugate gradient method and parameter fitting was employed to solve the optimization problem. We validated our method in simulation studies. Results: We calculated dose distributions for three real pencil beams with nominal energies 83, 147 and 199 MeV using realistic beam parameters. These data were regarded as measurements and used for commission. After commissioning, average difference in energy and beam spread between determined values and ground truth were 4.6% and 0.2%. With the commissioned model, we recomputed dose. Mean dose differences from measurements were 0.64%, 0.20% and 0.25%. Conclusion: The developed automatic MC beam-model commissioning method for pencil-beam scanning proton therapy can determine beam model parameters with

  8. Performance of a pencil ionization chamber in various radiation beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maia, A.F.; Caldas, L.V.E.

    2003-01-01

    Pencil ionization chambers were recommended for use exclusively in the computed tomography (CT) dosimetry, and, from the start, they were developed only with this application in view. In this work, we studied the behavior of a pencil ionization chamber in various radiation beams with the objective of extending its application. Stability tests were performed, and calibration coefficients were obtained for several standard radiation qualities of the therapeutical and diagnostic levels. The results show that the pencil ionization chamber can be used in several radiation beams other than those used in CT

  9. Technical Note: Spot characteristic stability for proton pencil beam scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Chin-Cheng; Chang, Chang; Mah, Dennis; Moyers, Michael F.; Gao, Mingcheng

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The spot characteristics for proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) were measured and analyzed over a 16 month period, which included one major site configuration update and six cyclotron interventions. The results provide a reference to establish the quality assurance (QA) frequency and tolerance for proton pencil beam scanning. Methods: A simple treatment plan was generated to produce an asymmetric 9-spot pattern distributed throughout a field of 16 × 18 cm for each of 18 proton energies (100.0–226.0 MeV). The delivered fluence distribution in air was measured using a phosphor screen based CCD camera at three planes perpendicular to the beam line axis (x-ray imaging isocenter and up/down stream 15.0 cm). The measured fluence distributions for each energy were analyzed using in-house programs which calculated the spot sizes and positional deviations of the Gaussian shaped spots. Results: Compared to the spot characteristic data installed into the treatment planning system, the 16-month averaged deviations of the measured spot sizes at the isocenter plane were 2.30% and 1.38% in the IEC gantry x and y directions, respectively. The maximum deviation was 12.87% while the minimum deviation was 0.003%, both at the upstream plane. After the collinearity of the proton and x-ray imaging system isocenters was optimized, the positional deviations of the spots were all within 1.5 mm for all three planes. During the site configuration update, spot positions were found to deviate by 6 mm until the tuning parameters file was properly restored. Conclusions: For this beam delivery system, it is recommended to perform a spot size and position check at least monthly and any time after a database update or cyclotron intervention occurs. A spot size deviation tolerance of <15% can be easily met with this delivery system. Deviations of spot positions were <2 mm at any plane up/down stream 15 cm from the isocenter

  10. Technical Note: Spot characteristic stability for proton pencil beam scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chin-Cheng, E-mail: chen.ccc@gmail.com; Chang, Chang; Mah, Dennis [ProCure Treatment Center, Somerset, New Jersey 08873 (United States); Moyers, Michael F. [ProCure Treatment Center, Somerset, New Jersey 08873 and Shanghai Proton and Heavy Ion Center, Shanghai 201321 (China); Gao, Mingcheng [CDH Proton Center, Warrenville, Illinois 60555 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Purpose: The spot characteristics for proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) were measured and analyzed over a 16 month period, which included one major site configuration update and six cyclotron interventions. The results provide a reference to establish the quality assurance (QA) frequency and tolerance for proton pencil beam scanning. Methods: A simple treatment plan was generated to produce an asymmetric 9-spot pattern distributed throughout a field of 16 × 18 cm for each of 18 proton energies (100.0–226.0 MeV). The delivered fluence distribution in air was measured using a phosphor screen based CCD camera at three planes perpendicular to the beam line axis (x-ray imaging isocenter and up/down stream 15.0 cm). The measured fluence distributions for each energy were analyzed using in-house programs which calculated the spot sizes and positional deviations of the Gaussian shaped spots. Results: Compared to the spot characteristic data installed into the treatment planning system, the 16-month averaged deviations of the measured spot sizes at the isocenter plane were 2.30% and 1.38% in the IEC gantry x and y directions, respectively. The maximum deviation was 12.87% while the minimum deviation was 0.003%, both at the upstream plane. After the collinearity of the proton and x-ray imaging system isocenters was optimized, the positional deviations of the spots were all within 1.5 mm for all three planes. During the site configuration update, spot positions were found to deviate by 6 mm until the tuning parameters file was properly restored. Conclusions: For this beam delivery system, it is recommended to perform a spot size and position check at least monthly and any time after a database update or cyclotron intervention occurs. A spot size deviation tolerance of <15% can be easily met with this delivery system. Deviations of spot positions were <2 mm at any plane up/down stream 15 cm from the isocenter.

  11. A Pencil Beam for the Linac4 commissioning

    CERN Document Server

    Lallement, JB

    2010-01-01

    In order to characterize the different accelerating structures and transport lines of Linac4 and to proceed to its commissioning, we need to produce a low current, low emittance beam. This note describes the generation of two pencil beams and their dynamic through the Linac.

  12. GPU-based fast pencil beam algorithm for proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, Rintaro; Nagamine, Yoshihiko; Kurihara, Tsuneya

    2011-01-01

    Performance of a treatment planning system is an essential factor in making sophisticated plans. The dose calculation is a major time-consuming process in planning operations. The standard algorithm for proton dose calculations is the pencil beam algorithm which produces relatively accurate results, but is time consuming. In order to shorten the computational time, we have developed a GPU (graphics processing unit)-based pencil beam algorithm. We have implemented this algorithm and calculated dose distributions in the case of a water phantom. The results were compared to those obtained by a traditional method with respect to the computational time and discrepancy between the two methods. The new algorithm shows 5-20 times faster performance using the NVIDIA GeForce GTX 480 card in comparison with the Intel Core-i7 920 processor. The maximum discrepancy of the dose distribution is within 0.2%. Our results show that GPUs are effective for proton dose calculations.

  13. A Case Study in Proton Pencil-Beam Scanning Delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kooy, Hanne M.; Clasie, Benjamin M.; Lu, H.-M.; Madden, Thomas M.; Bentefour, Hassan; Depauw, Nicolas M.S.; Adams, Judy A.; Trofimov, Alexei V.; Demaret, Denis; Delaney, Thomas F.; Flanz, Jacob B.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: We completed an implementation of pencil-beam scanning (PBS), a technology whereby a focused beam of protons, of variable intensity and energy, is scanned over a plane perpendicular to the beam axis and in depth. The aim of radiotherapy is to improve the target to healthy tissue dose differential. We illustrate how PBS achieves this aim in a patient with a bulky tumor. Methods and Materials: Our first deployment of PBS uses 'broad' pencil-beams ranging from 20 to 35 mm (full-width-half-maximum) over the range interval from 32 to 7 g/cm 2 . Such beam-brushes offer a unique opportunity for treating bulky tumors. We present a case study of a large (4,295 cc clinical target volume) retroperitoneal sarcoma treated to 50.4 Gy relative biological effectiveness (RBE) (presurgery) using a course of photons and protons to the clinical target volume and a course of protons to the gross target volume. Results: We describe our system and present the dosimetry for all courses and provide an interdosimetric comparison. Discussion: The use of PBS for bulky targets reduces the complexity of treatment planning and delivery compared with collimated proton fields. In addition, PBS obviates, especially for cases as presented here, the significant cost incurred in the construction of field-specific hardware. PBS offers improved dose distributions, reduced treatment time, and reduced cost of treatment.

  14. X-ray pencil beam facility for optics characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumrey, Michael; Cibik, Levent; Müller, Peter; Bavdaz, Marcos; Wille, Eric; Ackermann, Marcelo; Collon, Maximilien J.

    2010-07-01

    The Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) has used synchrotron radiation for the characterization of optics and detectors for astrophysical X-ray telescopes for more than 20 years. At a dedicated beamline at BESSY II, a monochromatic pencil beam is used by ESA and cosine Research since the end of 2005 for the characterization of novel silicon pore optics, currently under development for the International X-ray Observatory (IXO). At this beamline, a photon energy of 2.8 keV is selected by a Si channel-cut monochromator. Two apertures at distances of 12.2 m and 30.5 m from the dipole source form a pencil beam with a typical diameter of 100 μm and a divergence below 1". The optics to be investigated is placed in a vacuum chamber on a hexapod, the angular positioning is controlled by means of autocollimators to below 1". The reflected beam is registered at 5 m distance from the optics with a CCD-based camera system. This contribution presents design and performance of the upgrade of this beamline to cope with the updated design for IXO. The distance between optics and detector can now be 20 m. For double reflection from an X-ray Optical Unit (XOU) and incidence angles up to 1.4°, this corresponds to a vertical translation of the camera by 2 m. To achieve high reflectance at this angle even with uncoated silicon, a lower photon energy of 1 keV is available from a pair of W/B4C multilayers. For coated optics, a high energy option can provide a pencil beam of 7.6 keV radiation.

  15. Experimental determination and verification of the parameters used in a proton pencil beam algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szymanowski, H.; Mazal, A.; Nauraye, C.; Biensan, S.; Ferrand, R.; Murillo, M.C.; Caneva, S.; Gaboriaud, G.; Rosenwald, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    We present an experimental procedure for the determination and the verification under practical conditions of physical and computational parameters used in our proton pencil beam algorithm. The calculation of the dose delivered by a single pencil beam relies on a measured spread-out Bragg peak, and the description of its radial spread at depth features simple specific parameters accounting individually for the influence of the beam line as a whole, the beam energy modulation, the compensator, and the patient medium. For determining the experimental values of the physical parameters related to proton scattering, we utilized a simple relation between Gaussian radial spreads and the width of lateral penumbras. The contribution from the beam line has been extracted from lateral penumbra measurements in air: a linear variation with the distance collimator-point has been observed. Analytically predicted radial spreads within the patient were in good agreement with experimental values in water under various reference conditions. Results indicated no significant influence of the beam energy modulation. Using measurements in presence of Plexiglas slabs, a simple assumption on the effective source of scattering due to the compensator has been stated, leading to accurate radial spread calculations. Dose measurements in presence of complexly shaped compensators have been used to assess the performances of the algorithm supplied with the adequate physical parameters. One of these compensators has also been used, together with a reference configuration, for investigating a set of computational parameters decreasing the calculation time while maintaining a high level of accuracy. Faster dose computations have been performed for algorithm evaluation in the presence of geometrical and patient compensators, and have shown good agreement with the measured dose distributions

  16. Spatial superpositions of Gaussian beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Naidoo, Darryl

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available . At the plane of the lens we obtain a multi-ringed beam with a central intensity maximum which develops into a multi-ringed beam with a central null at the focal plane of the lens. The interesting feature of this beam is that it possesses two focal spots...

  17. Pencil beam proton radiography using a multilayer ionization chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farace, Paolo; Righetto, Roberto; Meijers, Arturs

    2016-06-01

    A pencil beam proton radiography (PR) method, using a commercial multilayer ionization chamber (MLIC) integrated with a treatment planning system (TPS) was developed. A Giraffe (IBA Dosimetry) MLIC (±0.5 mm accuracy) was used to obtain pencil beam PR by delivering spots uniformly positioned at a 5.0 mm distance in a 9  ×  9 square of spots. PRs of an electron-density (with tissue-equivalent inserts) phantom and a head phantom were acquired. The integral depth dose (IDD) curves of the delivered spots were computed by the TPS in a volume of water simulating the MLIC, and virtually added to the CT at the exit side of the phantoms. For each spot, measured and calculated IDD were overlapped in order to compute a map of range errors. On the head-phantom, the maximum dose from PR acquisition was estimated. Additionally, on the head phantom the impact on the range errors map was estimated in case of a 1 mm position misalignment. In the electron-density phantom, range errors were within 1 mm in the soft-tissue rods, but greater in the dense-rod. In the head-phantom the range errors were  -0.9  ±  2.7 mm on the whole map and within 1 mm in the brain area. On both phantoms greater errors were observed at inhomogeneity interfaces, due to sensitivity to small misalignment, and inaccurate TPS dose computation. The effect of the 1 mm misalignment was clearly visible on the range error map and produced an increased spread of range errors (-1.0  ±  3.8 mm on the whole map). The dose to the patient for such PR acquisitions would be acceptable as the maximum dose to the head phantom was  <2cGyE. By the described 2D method, allowing to discriminate misalignments, range verification can be performed in selected areas to implement an in vivo quality assurance program.

  18. Pencil beam proton radiography using a multilayer ionization chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farace, Paolo; Righetto, Roberto; Meijers, Arturs

    2016-06-07

    A pencil beam proton radiography (PR) method, using a commercial multilayer ionization chamber (MLIC) integrated with a treatment planning system (TPS) was developed. A Giraffe (IBA Dosimetry) MLIC (±0.5 mm accuracy) was used to obtain pencil beam PR by delivering spots uniformly positioned at a 5.0 mm distance in a 9  ×  9 square of spots. PRs of an electron-density (with tissue-equivalent inserts) phantom and a head phantom were acquired. The integral depth dose (IDD) curves of the delivered spots were computed by the TPS in a volume of water simulating the MLIC, and virtually added to the CT at the exit side of the phantoms. For each spot, measured and calculated IDD were overlapped in order to compute a map of range errors. On the head-phantom, the maximum dose from PR acquisition was estimated. Additionally, on the head phantom the impact on the range errors map was estimated in case of a 1 mm position misalignment. In the electron-density phantom, range errors were within 1 mm in the soft-tissue rods, but greater in the dense-rod. In the head-phantom the range errors were  -0.9  ±  2.7 mm on the whole map and within 1 mm in the brain area. On both phantoms greater errors were observed at inhomogeneity interfaces, due to sensitivity to small misalignment, and inaccurate TPS dose computation. The effect of the 1 mm misalignment was clearly visible on the range error map and produced an increased spread of range errors (-1.0  ±  3.8 mm on the whole map). The dose to the patient for such PR acquisitions would be acceptable as the maximum dose to the head phantom was  <2cGyE. By the described 2D method, allowing to discriminate misalignments, range verification can be performed in selected areas to implement an in vivo quality assurance program.

  19. Modeling skin collimation using the electron pencil beam redefinition algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, Pai-Chun M.; Hogstrom, Kenneth R.; Starkschall, George; Antolak, John A.; Boyd, Robert A.

    2005-01-01

    Skin collimation is an important tool for electron beam therapy that is used to minimize the penumbra when treating near critical structures, at extended treatment distances, with bolus, or using arc therapy. It is usually made of lead or lead alloy material that conforms to and is placed on patient surface. Presently, commercially available treatment-planning systems lack the ability to model skin collimation and to accurately calculate dose in its presence. The purpose of the present work was to evaluate the use of the pencil beam redefinition algorithm (PBRA) in calculating dose in the presence of skin collimation. Skin collimation was incorporated into the PBRA by terminating the transport of electrons once they enter the skin collimator. Both fixed- and arced-beam dose calculations for arced-beam geometries were evaluated by comparing them with measured dose distributions for 10- and 15-MeV beams. Fixed-beam dose distributions were measured in water at 88-cm source-to-surface distance with an air gap of 32 cm. The 6x20-cm 2 field (dimensions projected to isocenter) had a 10-mm thick lead collimator placed on the surface of the water with its edge 5 cm inside the field's edge located at +10 cm. Arced-beam dose distributions were measured in a 13.5-cm radius polystyrene circular phantom. The beam was arced 90 deg. (-45 deg. to +45 deg. ), and 10-mm thick lead collimation was placed at ±30 deg. . For the fixed beam at 10 MeV, the PBRA-calculated dose agreed with measured dose to within 2.0-mm distance to agreement (DTA) in the regions of high-dose gradient and 2.0% in regions of low dose gradient. At 15 MeV, the PBRA agreed to within a 2.0-mm DTA in the regions of high-dose gradient; however, the PBRA underestimated the dose by as much as 5.3% over small regions at depths less than 2 cm because it did not model electrons scattered from the edge of the skin collimation. For arced beams at 10 MeV, the agreement was 1-mm DTA in the high-dose gradient regions, and 2

  20. Reference dosimetry of proton pencil beams based on dose-area product: a proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomà, Carles; Safai, Sairos; Vörös, Sándor

    2017-06-21

    This paper describes a novel approach to the reference dosimetry of proton pencil beams based on dose-area product ([Formula: see text]). It depicts the calibration of a large-diameter plane-parallel ionization chamber in terms of dose-area product in a 60 Co beam, the Monte Carlo calculation of beam quality correction factors-in terms of dose-area product-in proton beams, the Monte Carlo calculation of nuclear halo correction factors, and the experimental determination of [Formula: see text] of a single proton pencil beam. This new approach to reference dosimetry proves to be feasible, as it yields [Formula: see text] values in agreement with the standard and well-established approach of determining the absorbed dose to water at the centre of a broad homogeneous field generated by the superposition of regularly-spaced proton pencil beams.

  1. SU-F-T-182: A Stochastic Approach to Daily QA Tolerances On Spot Properties for Proton Pencil Beam Scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    St James, S; Bloch, C; Saini, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Proton pencil beam scanning is used clinically across the United States. There are no current guidelines on tolerances for daily QA specific to pencil beam scanning, specifically related to the individual spot properties (spot width). Using a stochastic method to determine tolerances has the potential to optimize tolerances on individual spots and decrease the number of false positive failures in daily QA. Individual and global spot tolerances were evaluated. Methods: As part of daily QA for proton pencil beam scanning, a field of 16 spots (corresponding to 8 energies) is measured using an array of ion chambers (Matrixx, IBA). Each individual spot is fit to two Gaussian functions (x,y). The spot width (σ) in × and y are recorded (32 parameters). Results from the daily QA were retrospectively analyzed for 100 days of data. The deviations of the spot widths were histogrammed and fit to a Gaussian function. The stochastic spot tolerance was taken to be the mean ± 3σ. Using these results, tolerances were developed and tested against known deviations in spot width. Results: The individual spot tolerances derived with the stochastic method decreased in 30/32 instances. Using the previous tolerances (± 20% width), the daily QA would have detected 0/20 days of the deviation. Using a tolerance of any 6 spots failing the stochastic tolerance, 18/20 days of the deviation would have been detected. Conclusion: Using a stochastic method we have been able to decrease daily tolerances on the spot widths for 30/32 spot widths measured. The stochastic tolerances can lead to detection of deviations that previously would have been picked up on monthly QA and missed by daily QA. This method could be easily extended for evaluation of other QA parameters in proton spot scanning.

  2. Dosimetric assessment of the PRESAGE dosimeter for a proton pencil beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuu, C-S; Qian, X; Xu, Y; Adamovics, J; Cascio, E; Lu, H-M

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the feasibility of using PRESAGE dosimeters for proton pencil beam dosimetry. Two different formulations of phantom materials were tested for their suitability in characterizing a single proton pencil beam. The dosimetric response of PRESAGE was found to be linear up to 4Gy. First-generation optical CT scanner, OCTOPUS TM was used to implement dose distributions for proton pencil beams since it provides most accurate readout. Percentage depth dose curves and beam profiles for two proton energy, 110 MeV, and 93 MeV, were used to evaluate the dosimetric performance of two PRESAGE phantom formulas. The findings from this study show that the dosimetric properties of the phantom materials match with basic physics of proton beams.

  3. Optical vortex scanning inside the Gaussian beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masajada, J; Leniec, M; Augustyniak, I

    2011-01-01

    We discussed a new scanning method for optical vortex-based scanning microscopy. The optical vortex is introduced into the incident Gaussian beam by a vortex lens. Then the beam with the optical vortex is focused by an objective and illuminates the sample. By changing the position of the vortex lens we can shift the optical vortex position at the sample plane. By adjusting system parameters we can get 30 times smaller shift at the sample plane compared to the vortex lens shift. Moreover, if the range of vortex shifts is smaller than 3% of the beam radius in the sample plane the amplitude and phase distribution around the phase dislocation remains practically unchanged. Thus we can scan the sample topography precisely with an optical vortex

  4. A comparison on the propagation characteristics of focused Gaussian beam and fundamental Gaussian beam in vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Shixiong; Guo Hong; Liu Mingwei; Wu Guohua

    2004-01-01

    Propagation characteristics of focused Gaussian beam (FoGB) and fundamental Gaussian beam (FuGB) propagating in vacuum are investigated. Based on the Fourier transform and the angular spectral analysis, the transverse component and the second-order approximate longitudinal component of the electric field are obtained in the paraxial approximation. The electric field components, the phase velocity and the group velocity of FoGB are compared with those of FuGB. The spot size of FoGB is also discussed

  5. Effects of physics change in Monte Carlo code on electron pencil beam dose distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toutaoui, Abdelkader; Khelassi-Toutaoui, Nadia; Brahimi, Zakia; Chami, Ahmed Chafik

    2012-01-01

    Pencil beam algorithms used in computerized electron beam dose planning are usually described using the small angle multiple scattering theory. Alternatively, the pencil beams can be generated by Monte Carlo simulation of electron transport. In a previous work, the 4th version of the Electron Gamma Shower (EGS) Monte Carlo code was used to obtain dose distributions from monoenergetic electron pencil beam, with incident energy between 1 MeV and 50 MeV, interacting at the surface of a large cylindrical homogeneous water phantom. In 2000, a new version of this Monte Carlo code has been made available by the National Research Council of Canada (NRC), which includes various improvements in its electron-transport algorithms. In the present work, we were interested to see if the new physics in this version produces pencil beam dose distributions very different from those calculated with oldest one. The purpose of this study is to quantify as well as to understand these differences. We have compared a series of pencil beam dose distributions scored in cylindrical geometry, for electron energies between 1 MeV and 50 MeV calculated with two versions of the Electron Gamma Shower Monte Carlo Code. Data calculated and compared include isodose distributions, radial dose distributions and fractions of energy deposition. Our results for radial dose distributions show agreement within 10% between doses calculated by the two codes for voxels closer to the pencil beam central axis, while the differences are up to 30% for longer distances. For fractions of energy deposition, the results of the EGS4 are in good agreement (within 2%) with those calculated by EGSnrc at shallow depths for all energies, whereas a slightly worse agreement (15%) is observed at deeper distances. These differences may be mainly attributed to the different multiple scattering for electron transport adopted in these two codes and the inclusion of spin effect, which produces an increase of the effective range of

  6. Optical trapping with Super-Gaussian beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mc

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info McLaren1_2013.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 2236 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name McLaren1_2013.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 JT2A.34.pdf Optics in the Life... Sciences Congress Technical Digest © 2013 The Optical Society (OSA) Optical trapping with Super-Gaussian beams Melanie McLaren, Thulile Khanyile, Patience Mthunzi and Andrew Forbes* National Laser Centre, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research...

  7. Impact of beam angle choice on pencil beam scanning breath-hold proton therapy for lung lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorgisyan, Jenny; Perrin, Rosalind; Lomax, Antony J

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The breath-hold technique inter alia has been suggested to mitigate the detrimental effect of motion on pencil beam scanned (PBS) proton therapy dose distributions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the robustness of incident proton beam angles to day-to-day anatomical variation...

  8. Adaptive Laguerre-Gaussian variant of the Gaussian beam expansion method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagniot, Emmanuel; Fromager, Michael; Ait-Ameur, Kamel

    2009-11-01

    A variant of the Gaussian beam expansion method consists in expanding the Bessel function J0 appearing in the Fresnel-Kirchhoff integral into a finite sum of complex Gaussian functions to derive an analytical expression for a Laguerre-Gaussian beam diffracted through a hard-edge aperture. However, the validity range of the approximation depends on the number of expansion coefficients that are obtained by optimization-computation directly. We propose another solution consisting in expanding J0 onto a set of collimated Laguerre-Gaussian functions whose waist depends on their number and then, depending on its argument, predicting the suitable number of expansion functions to calculate the integral recursively.

  9. Dosimetric consequences of pencil beam width variations in scanned beam particle therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanrion, M A; Ammazzalorso, F; Wittig, A; Engenhart-Cabillic, R; Jelen, U

    2013-01-01

    Scanned ion beam delivery enables the highest degree of target dose conformation attainable in external beam radiotherapy. Nominal pencil beam widths (spot sizes) are recorded during treatment planning system commissioning. Due to changes in the beam-line optics, the actual spot sizes may differ from these commissioning values, leading to differences between planned and delivered dose. The purpose of this study was to analyse the dosimetric consequences of spot size variations in particle therapy treatment plans. For 12 patients with skull base tumours and 12 patients with prostate carcinoma, scanned-beam carbon ion and proton treatment plans were prepared and recomputed simulating spot size changes of (1) ±10% to simulate the typical magnitude of fluctuations, (2) ±25% representing the worst-case scenario and (3) ±50% as a part of a risk analysis in case of fault conditions. The primary effect of the spot size variation was a dose deterioration affecting the target edge: loss of target coverage and broadening of the lateral penumbra (increased spot size) or overdosage and contraction of the lateral penumbra (reduced spot size). For changes ⩽25%, the resulting planning target volume mean 95%-isodose line coverage (CI-95%) deterioration was ranging from negligible to moderate. In some cases changes in the dose to adjoining critical structures were observed. (paper)

  10. Feasibility of proton pencil beam scanning treatment of free-breathing lung cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jakobi, Annika; Perrin, Rosalind; Knopf, Antje; Richter, Christian

    BACKGROUND: The interplay effect might degrade the dose of pencil beam scanning proton therapy to a degree that free-breathing treatment might be impossible without further motion mitigation techniques, which complicate and prolong the treatment. We assessed whether treatment of free-breathing

  11. Measurement of stray neutron doses inside the treatment room from a proton pencil beam scanning system

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mojzeszek, N.; Farah, J.; Klodowska, M.; Ploc, Ondřej; Stolarczyk, L.; Waligorski, M. P. R.; Olko, P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 2 (2017), s. 80-84 ISSN 1120-1797 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : secondary neutrons * proton therapy * pencil beam scanning systtems * out-of-field doses * stray neutron doses * TEPC Subject RIV: FP - Other Medical Disciplines OBOR OECD: Radiology, nuclear medicine and medical imaging Impact factor: 1.990, year: 2016

  12. Laguerre Gaussian beam multiplexing through turbulence

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Trichili, A

    2014-08-17

    Full Text Available We analyze the effect of atmospheric turbulence on the propagation of multiplexed Laguerre Gaussian modes. We present a method to multiplex Laguerre Gaussian modes using digital holograms and decompose the resulting field after encountering a...

  13. The role of a microDiamond detector in the dosimetry of proton pencil beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goma, Carles [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland). Centre for Proton Therapy; Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich (Switzerland). Dept. of Physics; Marinelli, Marco; Verona-Rinati, Gianluca [Roma Univ. ' ' Tor Vergata' ' (Italy). Dipt. di Ingegneria Industriale; INFN, Roma (Italy); Safai, Sairos [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland). Centre for Proton Therapy; Wuerfel, Jan [PTW-Freiburg, Freiburg (Germany)

    2016-05-01

    In this work, the performance of a microDiamond detector in a scanned proton beam is studied and its potential role in the dosimetric characterization of proton pencil beams is assessed. The linearity of the detector response with the absorbed dose and the dependence on the dose-rate were tested. The depth-dose curve and the lateral dose profiles of a proton pencil beam were measured and compared to reference data. The feasibility of calibrating the beam monitor chamber with a microDiamond detector was also studied. It was found the detector reading is linear with the absorbed dose to water (down to few cGy) and the detector response is independent of both the dose-rate (up to few Gy/s) and the proton beam energy (within the whole clinically-relevant energy range). The detector showed a good performance in depth-dose curve and lateral dose profile measurements; and it might even be used to calibrate the beam monitor chambers-provided it is cross-calibrated against a reference ionization chamber. In conclusion, the microDiamond detector was proved capable of performing an accurate dosimetric characterization of proton pencil beams.

  14. Modeling of beam customization devices in the pencil-beam splitting algorithm for heavy charged particle radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanematsu, Nobuyuki, E-mail: nkanemat@nirs.go.jp [Department of Accelerator and Medical Physics, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Department of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6 Aramaki Aza Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)

    2011-03-07

    A broad-beam-delivery system for radiotherapy with protons or ions often employs multiple collimators and a range-compensating filter, which offer complex and potentially useful beam customization. It is however difficult for conventional pencil-beam algorithms to deal with fine structures of these devices due to beam-size growth during transport. This study aims to avoid the difficulty with a novel computational model. The pencil beams are initially defined at the range-compensating filter with angular-acceptance correction for upstream collimation followed by stopping and scattering. They are individually transported with possible splitting near the aperture edge of a downstream collimator to form a sharp field edge. The dose distribution for a carbon-ion beam was calculated and compared with existing experimental data. The penumbra sizes of various collimator edges agreed between them to a submillimeter level. This beam-customization model will be used in the greater framework of the pencil-beam splitting algorithm for accurate and efficient patient dose calculation.

  15. Modeling of beam customization devices in the pencil-beam splitting algorithm for heavy charged particle radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanematsu, Nobuyuki

    2011-03-07

    A broad-beam-delivery system for radiotherapy with protons or ions often employs multiple collimators and a range-compensating filter, which offer complex and potentially useful beam customization. It is however difficult for conventional pencil-beam algorithms to deal with fine structures of these devices due to beam-size growth during transport. This study aims to avoid the difficulty with a novel computational model. The pencil beams are initially defined at the range-compensating filter with angular-acceptance correction for upstream collimation followed by stopping and scattering. They are individually transported with possible splitting near the aperture edge of a downstream collimator to form a sharp field edge. The dose distribution for a carbon-ion beam was calculated and compared with existing experimental data. The penumbra sizes of various collimator edges agreed between them to a submillimeter level. This beam-customization model will be used in the greater framework of the pencil-beam splitting algorithm for accurate and efficient patient dose calculation.

  16. Coincidence Imaging and interference with coherent Gaussian beams

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Yang-jian; ZHU Shi-yao

    2006-01-01

    we present a theoretical study of coincidence imaging and interference with coherent Gaussian beams The equations for the coincidence image formation and interference fringes are derived,from which it is clear that the imaging is due to the corresponding focusing in the two paths .The quality and visibility of the images and fringes can be high simultaneously.The nature of the coincidence imaging and interference between quantum entangled photon pairs and coherent Gaussian beams are different .The coincidence image with coherent Gaussian beams is due to intensity-intensity correspondence,a classical nature,while that with entangled photon pairs is due to the amplitude correlation a quantum nature.

  17. Implementation of pencil kernel and depth penetration algorithms for treatment planning of proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, K.R.; Saxner, M.; Ahnesjoe, A.; Montelius, A.; Grusell, E.; Dahlgren, C.V.

    2000-01-01

    The implementation of two algorithms for calculating dose distributions for radiation therapy treatment planning of intermediate energy proton beams is described. A pencil kernel algorithm and a depth penetration algorithm have been incorporated into a commercial three-dimensional treatment planning system (Helax-TMS, Helax AB, Sweden) to allow conformal planning techniques using irregularly shaped fields, proton range modulation, range modification and dose calculation for non-coplanar beams. The pencil kernel algorithm is developed from the Fermi-Eyges formalism and Moliere multiple-scattering theory with range straggling corrections applied. The depth penetration algorithm is based on the energy loss in the continuous slowing down approximation with simple correction factors applied to the beam penumbra region and has been implemented for fast, interactive treatment planning. Modelling of the effects of air gaps and range modifying device thickness and position are implicit to both algorithms. Measured and calculated dose values are compared for a therapeutic proton beam in both homogeneous and heterogeneous phantoms of varying complexity. Both algorithms model the beam penumbra as a function of depth in a homogeneous phantom with acceptable accuracy. Results show that the pencil kernel algorithm is required for modelling the dose perturbation effects from scattering in heterogeneous media. (author)

  18. A study of lateral fall-off (penumbra) optimisation for pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterhalter, C.; Lomax, A.; Oxley, D.; Weber, D. C.; Safai, S.

    2018-01-01

    The lateral fall-off is crucial for sparing organs at risk in proton therapy. It is therefore of high importance to minimize the penumbra for pencil beam scanning (PBS). Three optimisation approaches are investigated: edge-collimated uniformly weighted spots (collimation), pencil beam optimisation of uncollimated pencil beams (edge-enhancement) and the optimisation of edge collimated pencil beams (collimated edge-enhancement). To deliver energies below 70 MeV, these strategies are evaluated in combination with the following pre-absorber methods: field specific fixed thickness pre-absorption (fixed), range specific, fixed thickness pre-absorption (automatic) and range specific, variable thickness pre-absorption (variable). All techniques are evaluated by Monte Carlo simulated square fields in a water tank. For a typical air gap of 10 cm, without pre-absorber collimation reduces the penumbra only for water equivalent ranges between 4-11 cm by up to 2.2 mm. The sharpest lateral fall-off is achieved through collimated edge-enhancement, which lowers the penumbra down to 2.8 mm. When using a pre-absorber, the sharpest fall-offs are obtained when combining collimated edge-enhancement with a variable pre-absorber. For edge-enhancement and large air gaps, it is crucial to minimize the amount of material in the beam. For small air gaps however, the superior phase space of higher energetic beams can be employed when more material is used. In conclusion, collimated edge-enhancement combined with the variable pre-absorber is the recommended setting to minimize the lateral penumbra for PBS. Without collimator, it would be favourable to use a variable pre-absorber for large air gaps and an automatic pre-absorber for small air gaps.

  19. Two-dimensional pencil beam scaling: an improved proton dose algorithm for heterogeneous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szymanowski, Hanitra; Oelfke, Uwe

    2002-01-01

    New dose delivery techniques with proton beams, such as beam spot scanning or raster scanning, require fast and accurate dose algorithms which can be applied for treatment plan optimization in clinically acceptable timescales. The clinically required accuracy is particularly difficult to achieve for the irradiation of complex, heterogeneous regions of the patient's anatomy. Currently applied fast pencil beam dose calculations based on the standard inhomogeneity correction of pathlength scaling often cannot provide the accuracy required for clinically acceptable dose distributions. This could be achieved with sophisticated Monte Carlo simulations which are still unacceptably time consuming for use as dose engines in optimization calculations. We therefore present a new algorithm for proton dose calculations which aims to resolve the inherent problem between calculation speed and required clinical accuracy. First, a detailed derivation of the new concept, which is based on an additional scaling of the lateral proton fluence is provided. Then, the newly devised two-dimensional (2D) scaling method is tested for various geometries of different phantom materials. These include standard biological tissues such as bone, muscle and fat as well as air. A detailed comparison of the new 2D pencil beam scaling with the current standard pencil beam approach and Monte Carlo simulations, performed with GEANT, is presented. It was found that the new concept proposed allows calculation of absorbed dose with an accuracy almost equal to that achievable with Monte Carlo simulations while requiring only modestly increased calculation times in comparison to the standard pencil beam approach. It is believed that this new proton dose algorithm has the potential to significantly improve the treatment planning outcome for many clinical cases encountered in highly conformal proton therapy. (author)

  20. An optical tweezer in asymmetrical vortex Bessel-Gaussian beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotlyar, V. V.; Kovalev, A. A., E-mail: alexeysmr@mail.ru; Porfirev, A. P. [Image Processing Systems Institute, 151 Molodogvardeiskaya St., 443001 Samara (Russian Federation); Department of Technical cybernetics, Samara State Aerospace University, Samara 443086 (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-14

    We study an optical micromanipulation that comprises trapping, rotating, and transporting 5-μm polystyrene microbeads in asymmetric Bessel-Gaussian (BG) laser beams. The beams that carry orbital angular momentum are generated by means of a liquid crystal microdisplay and focused by a microobjective with a numerical aperture of NA = 0.85. We experimentally show that given a constant topological charge, the rate of microparticle motion increases near linearly with increasing asymmetry of the BG beam. Asymmetric BG beams can be used instead of conventional Gaussian beam for trapping and transferring live cells without thermal damage.

  1. Beam shape coefficients of the most general focused Gaussian laser beam for light scattering applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lock, James A.

    2013-01-01

    The vector wave equation for electromagnetic waves, when subject to a number of constraints corresponding to propagation of a monochromatic beam, reduces to a pair of inhomogeneous differential equations describing the transverse electric and transverse magnetic polarized beam components. These differential equations are solved analytically to obtain the most general focused Gaussian beam to order s 4 , where s is the beam confinement parameter, and various properties of the most general Gaussian beam are then discussed. The radial fields of the most general Gaussian beam are integrated to obtain the on-axis beam shape coefficients of the generalized Lorenz–Mie theory formalism of light scattering. The beam shape coefficients are then compared with those of the localized Gaussian beam model and the Davis–Barton fifth-order symmetrized beam. -- Highlights: ► Derive the differential equation for the most general Gaussian beam. ► Solve the differential equation for the most general Gaussian beam. ► Determine the properties of the most general Gaussian beam. ► Determine the beam shape coefficients of the most general Gaussian beam

  2. Computational evaluation of a pencil ionization chamber in a standard diagnostic radiology beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendonca, Dalila Souza Costa; Neves, Lucio Pereira; Perini, Ana Paula; Belinato, Walmir

    2016-01-01

    In this work a pencil ionization chamber was evaluated. This evaluation consisted in the determination of the influence of the ionization chamber components in its response. For this purpose, the Monte Carlo simulations and the spectrum of the standard diagnostic radiology beam (RQR5) were utilized. The results obtained, showed that the influence of the ionization chamber components presented no significant influence on the chamber response. Therefore, this ionization chamber is a good alternative for dosimetry in diagnostic radiology. (author)

  3. Polarization coupling of vector Bessel–Gaussian beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Ryushi; Kozawa, Yuichi; Sato, Shunichi

    2013-01-01

    We report polarization coupling of radial and azimuthal electric field components of a vector light beam as predicted by the fact that the vector Helmholtz equation is expressed as coupled differential equations in cylindrical coordinates. To clearly observe the polarization variation of a beam as it propagates, higher order transverse modes of a vector Bessel–Gaussian beam were generated by a gain distribution modulation technique, which created a narrow ring-shaped gain region in a Nd:YVO 4 crystal. The polarization coupling was confirmed by the observation that the major polarization component of a vector Bessel–Gaussian beam alternates between radial and azimuthal components along with the propagation. (paper)

  4. Generation of singular optical beams from fundamental Gaussian beam using Sagnac interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Dinesh N.; Viswanathan, Nirmal K.

    2016-09-01

    We propose a simple free-space optics recipe for the controlled generation of optical vortex beams with a vortex dipole or a single charge vortex, using an inherently stable Sagnac interferometer. We investigate the role played by the amplitude and phase differences in generating higher-order Gaussian beams from the fundamental Gaussian mode. Our simulation results reveal how important the control of both the amplitude and the phase difference between superposing beams is to achieving optical vortex beams. The creation of a vortex dipole from null interference is unveiled through the introduction of a lateral shear and a radial phase difference between two out-of-phase Gaussian beams. A stable and high quality optical vortex beam, equivalent to the first-order Laguerre-Gaussian beam, is synthesized by coupling lateral shear with linear phase difference, introduced orthogonal to the shear between two out-of-phase Gaussian beams.

  5. Performance of three pencil-type ionization chambers (10 cm) in computed tomography standard beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, Maysa C. de; Xavier, Marcos; Caldas, Linda V.E.

    2015-01-01

    The use of computed tomography (CT) has increased over the years, thus generating a concern about the doses received by patients undergoing this procedure. Therefore, it is necessary to perform routinely beam dosimetry with the use of a pencil-type ionization chamber. This detector is the most utilized in the procedures of quality control tests on this kind of equipment. The objective of this work was to perform some characterization tests in standard CT beams, as the saturation curve, polarity effect, ion collection efficiency and linearity of response, using three ionization chambers, one commercial and two developed at the IPEN. (author)

  6. Propagation of Gaussian Beams through Active GRIN Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez-Varela, A I; Flores-Arias, M T; Bao-Varela, C; Gomez-Reino, C; De la Fuente, X

    2011-01-01

    We discussed light propagation through an active GRIN material that exhibits loss or gain. Effects of gain or loss in GRIN materials can be phenomenologically taken into account by using a complex refractive index in the wave equation. This work examines the implication of using a complex refractive index on light propagation in an active GRIN material illuminated by a non-uniform monochromatic wave described by a Gaussian beam. We analyze how a Gaussian beam is propagated through the active material in order to characterize it by the beam parameters and the transverse irradiance distribution.

  7. Pareto front analysis of 6 and 15 MV dynamic IMRT for lung cancer using pencil beam, AAA and Monte Carlo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosson, R O; Hauer, Anna Karlsson; Behrens, C.F.

    2010-01-01

    The pencil beam dose calculation method is frequently used in modern radiation therapy treatment planning regardless of the fact that it is documented inaccurately for cases involving large density variations. The inaccuracies are larger for higher beam energies. As a result, low energy beams are...

  8. Effects of spot parameters in pencil beam scanning treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraan, Aafke Christine; Depauw, Nicolas; Clasie, Ben; Giunta, Marina; Madden, Tom; Kooy, Hanne M

    2018-01-01

    distances, many beam directions, and low fractional dose values. The choice of spot parameters values is a trade-off between accelerator and beam line design, plan quality, and treatment efficiency. We recommend the use of small spot sizes for better organ-at-risk sparing and lateral interspot distances of 1.5σ to avoid long treatment times. We note that plan quality is influenced by the charge cutoff. Our results show that the charge cutoff can be sufficiently large (i.e., 10 6 protons) to accommodate limitations on beam delivery systems. It is, therefore, not necessary per se to include the charge cutoff in the treatment planning optimization such that Pareto navigation (e.g., as practiced at our institution) is not excluded and optimal plans can be obtained without, perhaps, a bias from the charge cutoff. We recommend that the impact of a minimum charge cut impact is carefully verified for the spot sizes and spot distances applied or that it is accommodated in the TPS. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  9. A pencil beam dose calculation model for CyberKnife system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Bin; Li, Yongbao; Liu, Bo; Zhou, Fugen [Image Processing Center, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Xu, Shouping [Department of Radiation Oncology, PLA General Hospital, Beijing 100853 (China); Wu, Qiuwen, E-mail: Qiuwen.Wu@Duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Purpose: CyberKnife system is initially equipped with fixed circular cones for stereotactic radiosurgery. Two dose calculation algorithms, Ray-Tracing and Monte Carlo, are available in the supplied treatment planning system. A multileaf collimator system was recently introduced in the latest generation of system, capable of arbitrarily shaped treatment field. The purpose of this study is to develop a model based dose calculation algorithm to better handle the lateral scatter in an irregularly shaped small field for the CyberKnife system. Methods: A pencil beam dose calculation algorithm widely used in linac based treatment planning system was modified. The kernel parameters and intensity profile were systematically determined by fitting to the commissioning data. The model was tuned using only a subset of measured data (4 out of 12 cones) and applied to all fixed circular cones for evaluation. The root mean square (RMS) of the difference between the measured and calculated tissue-phantom-ratios (TPRs) and off-center-ratio (OCR) was compared. Three cone size correction techniques were developed to better fit the OCRs at the penumbra region, which are further evaluated by the output factors (OFs). The pencil beam model was further validated against measurement data on the variable dodecagon-shaped Iris collimators and a half-beam blocked field. Comparison with Ray-Tracing and Monte Carlo methods was also performed on a lung SBRT case. Results: The RMS between the measured and calculated TPRs is 0.7% averaged for all cones, with the descending region at 0.5%. The RMSs of OCR at infield and outfield regions are both at 0.5%. The distance to agreement (DTA) at the OCR penumbra region is 0.2 mm. All three cone size correction models achieve the same improvement in OCR agreement, with the effective source shift model (SSM) preferred, due to their ability to predict more accurately the OF variations with the source to axis distance (SAD). In noncircular field validation

  10. Modelling lateral beam quality variations in pencil kernel based photon dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyholm, T; Olofsson, J; Ahnesjoe, A; Karlsson, M

    2006-01-01

    Standard treatment machines for external radiotherapy are designed to yield flat dose distributions at a representative treatment depth. The common method to reach this goal is to use a flattening filter to decrease the fluence in the centre of the beam. A side effect of this filtering is that the average energy of the beam is generally lower at a distance from the central axis, a phenomenon commonly referred to as off-axis softening. The off-axis softening results in a relative change in beam quality that is almost independent of machine brand and model. Central axis dose calculations using pencil beam kernels show no drastic loss in accuracy when the off-axis beam quality variations are neglected. However, for dose calculated at off-axis positions the effect should be considered, otherwise errors of several per cent can be introduced. This work proposes a method to explicitly include the effect of off-axis softening in pencil kernel based photon dose calculations for arbitrary positions in a radiation field. Variations of pencil kernel values are modelled through a generic relation between half value layer (HVL) thickness and off-axis position for standard treatment machines. The pencil kernel integration for dose calculation is performed through sampling of energy fluence and beam quality in sectors of concentric circles around the calculation point. The method is fully based on generic data and therefore does not require any specific measurements for characterization of the off-axis softening effect, provided that the machine performance is in agreement with the assumed HVL variations. The model is verified versus profile measurements at different depths and through a model self-consistency check, using the dose calculation model to estimate HVL values at off-axis positions. A comparison between calculated and measured profiles at different depths showed a maximum relative error of 4% without explicit modelling of off-axis softening. The maximum relative error

  11. Robust Proton Pencil Beam Scanning Treatment Planning for Rectal Cancer Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco Kiely, Janid Patricia, E-mail: jkiely@sas.upenn.edu; White, Benjamin M.

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate, in a treatment plan design and robustness study, whether proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) has the potential to offer advantages, relative to interfraction uncertainties, over photon volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in a locally advanced rectal cancer patient population. Methods and Materials: Ten patients received a planning CT scan, followed by an average of 4 weekly offline CT verification CT scans, which were rigidly co-registered to the planning CT. Clinical PBS plans were generated on the planning CT, using a single-field uniform-dose technique with single-posterior and parallel-opposed (LAT) fields geometries. The VMAT plans were generated on the planning CT using 2 6-MV, 220° coplanar arcs. Clinical plans were forward-calculated on verification CTs to assess robustness relative to anatomic changes. Setup errors were assessed by forward-calculating clinical plans with a ±5-mm (left–right, anterior–posterior, superior–inferior) isocenter shift on the planning CT. Differences in clinical target volume and organ at risk dose–volume histogram (DHV) indicators between plans were tested for significance using an appropriate Wilcoxon test (P<.05). Results: Dosimetrically, PBS plans were statistically different from VMAT plans, showing greater organ at risk sparing. However, the bladder was statistically identical among LAT and VMAT plans. The clinical target volume coverage was statistically identical among all plans. The robustness test found that all DVH indicators for PBS and VMAT plans were robust, except the LAT's genitalia (V5, V35). The verification CT plans showed that all DVH indicators were robust. Conclusions: Pencil beam scanning plans were found to be as robust as VMAT plans relative to interfractional changes during treatment when posterior beam angles and appropriate range margins are used. Pencil beam scanning dosimetric gains in the bowel (V15, V20) over VMAT suggest that using PBS to treat rectal

  12. Robust Proton Pencil Beam Scanning Treatment Planning for Rectal Cancer Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco Kiely, Janid Patricia; White, Benjamin M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate, in a treatment plan design and robustness study, whether proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) has the potential to offer advantages, relative to interfraction uncertainties, over photon volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in a locally advanced rectal cancer patient population. Methods and Materials: Ten patients received a planning CT scan, followed by an average of 4 weekly offline CT verification CT scans, which were rigidly co-registered to the planning CT. Clinical PBS plans were generated on the planning CT, using a single-field uniform-dose technique with single-posterior and parallel-opposed (LAT) fields geometries. The VMAT plans were generated on the planning CT using 2 6-MV, 220° coplanar arcs. Clinical plans were forward-calculated on verification CTs to assess robustness relative to anatomic changes. Setup errors were assessed by forward-calculating clinical plans with a ±5-mm (left–right, anterior–posterior, superior–inferior) isocenter shift on the planning CT. Differences in clinical target volume and organ at risk dose–volume histogram (DHV) indicators between plans were tested for significance using an appropriate Wilcoxon test (P<.05). Results: Dosimetrically, PBS plans were statistically different from VMAT plans, showing greater organ at risk sparing. However, the bladder was statistically identical among LAT and VMAT plans. The clinical target volume coverage was statistically identical among all plans. The robustness test found that all DVH indicators for PBS and VMAT plans were robust, except the LAT's genitalia (V5, V35). The verification CT plans showed that all DVH indicators were robust. Conclusions: Pencil beam scanning plans were found to be as robust as VMAT plans relative to interfractional changes during treatment when posterior beam angles and appropriate range margins are used. Pencil beam scanning dosimetric gains in the bowel (V15, V20) over VMAT suggest that using PBS to treat rectal cancer

  13. Experimental characterization and physical modelling of the dose distribution of scanned proton pencil beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedroni, E; Scheib, S; Boehringer, T; Coray, A; Grossmann, M; Lin, S; Lomax, A

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we present the pencil beam dose model used for treatment planning at the PSI proton gantry, the only system presently applying proton therapy with a beam scanning technique. The scope of the paper is to give a general overview on the various components of the dose model, on the related measurements and on the practical parametrization of the results. The physical model estimates from first physical principles absolute dose normalized to the number of incident protons. The proton beam flux is measured in practice by plane-parallel ionization chambers (ICs) normalized to protons via Faraday-cup measurements. It is therefore possible to predict and deliver absolute dose directly from this model without other means. The dose predicted in this way agrees very well with the results obtained with ICs calibrated in a cobalt beam. Emphasis is given in this paper to the characterization of nuclear interaction effects, which play a significant role in the model and are the major source of uncertainty in the direct estimation of the absolute dose. Nuclear interactions attenuate the primary proton flux, they modify the shape of the depth-dose curve and produce a faint beam halo of secondary dose around the primary proton pencil beam in water. A very simple beam halo model has been developed and used at PSI to eliminate the systematic dependences of the dose observed as a function of the size of the target volume. We show typical results for the relative (using a CCD system) and absolute (using calibrated ICs) dosimetry, routinely applied for the verification of patient plans. With the dose model including the nuclear beam halo we can predict quite precisely the dose directly from treatment planning without renormalization measurements, independently of the dose, shape and size of the dose fields. This applies also to the complex non-homogeneous dose distributions required for the delivery of range-intensity-modulated proton therapy, a novel therapy technique

  14. Modulation depth of Michelson interferometer with Gaussian beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Välikylä, Tuomas; Kauppinen, Jyrki

    2011-12-20

    Mirror misalignment or the tilt angle of the Michelson interferometer can be estimated from the modulation depth measured with collimated monochromatic light. The intensity of the light beam is usually assumed to be uniform, but, for example, with gas lasers it generally has a Gaussian distribution, which makes the modulation depth less sensitive to the tilt angle. With this assumption, the tilt angle may be underestimated by about 50%. We have derived a mathematical model for modulation depth with a circular aperture and Gaussian beam. The model reduces the error of the tilt angle estimate to below 1%. The results of the model have been verified experimentally.

  15. Sub-second pencil beam dose calculation on GPU for adaptive proton therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Joakim; Ansorge, Richard; Jena, Rajesh

    2015-06-21

    Although proton therapy delivered using scanned pencil beams has the potential to produce better dose conformity than conventional radiotherapy, the created dose distributions are more sensitive to anatomical changes and patient motion. Therefore, the introduction of adaptive treatment techniques where the dose can be monitored as it is being delivered is highly desirable. We present a GPU-based dose calculation engine relying on the widely used pencil beam algorithm, developed for on-line dose calculation. The calculation engine was implemented from scratch, with each step of the algorithm parallelized and adapted to run efficiently on the GPU architecture. To ensure fast calculation, it employs several application-specific modifications and simplifications, and a fast scatter-based implementation of the computationally expensive kernel superposition step. The calculation time for a skull base treatment plan using two beam directions was 0.22 s on an Nvidia Tesla K40 GPU, whereas a test case of a cubic target in water from the literature took 0.14 s to calculate. The accuracy of the patient dose distributions was assessed by calculating the γ-index with respect to a gold standard Monte Carlo simulation. The passing rates were 99.2% and 96.7%, respectively, for the 3%/3 mm and 2%/2 mm criteria, matching those produced by a clinical treatment planning system.

  16. Correction of experimental photon pencil-beams for the effects of non-uniform and non-parallel measurement conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceberg, Crister P.; Bjaerngard, Bengt E.

    1995-01-01

    An approximate experimental determination of photon pencil-beams can be based on the reciprocity theorem. The scatter part of the pencil-beam is then essentially the derivative with respect to the field radius of measured scatter-to-primary ratios in circular fields. Obtained in this way, however, the pencil-beam implicitly carries the influence from the lateral fluence and beam quality variations of the incident photons, as well as the effects of the divergence of the beam. In this work we show how these effects can be corrected for. The procedure was to calculate scatter-to-primary ratios using an analytical expression for the pencil-beam. By disregarding one by one the effects of the divergence and the fluence and beam quality variations, the influence of these effects were separated and quantified. For instance, for a 6 MV beam of 20x20 cm 2 field size, at 20 cm depth and a source distance of 100 cm, the total effect was 3.9%; 2.0% was due to the non-uniform incident profile, 1.0% due to the non-uniform beam quality, and 0.9% due to the divergence of the beam. At a source distance of 400 cm, all these effects were much lower, adding up to a total of 0.3 %. Using calculated correction factors like these, measured scatter-to-primary ratios were then stripped from the effects of non-uniform and non-parallel measurement conditions, and the scatter part of the pencil-beam was determined using the reciprocity theorem without approximations

  17. Monte Carlo investigation of the low-dose envelope from scanned proton pencil beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawakuchi, Gabriel O; Titt, Uwe; Mirkovic, Dragan; Ciangaru, George; Zhu, X Ronald; Sahoo, Narayan; Gillin, Michael T; Mohan, Radhe

    2010-01-01

    Scanned proton pencil beams carry a low-dose envelope that extends several centimeters from the individual beam's central axis. Thus, the total delivered dose depends on the size of the target volume and the corresponding number and intensity of beams necessary to cover the target volume uniformly. This dependence must be considered in dose calculation algorithms used by treatment planning systems. In this work, we investigated the sources of particles contributing to the low-dose envelope using the Monte Carlo technique. We used a validated model of our institution's scanning beam line to determine the contributions to the low-dose envelope from secondary particles created in a water phantom and particles scattered in beam line components. Our results suggested that, for high-energy beams, secondary particles produced by nuclear interactions in the water phantom are the major contributors to the low-dose envelope. For low-energy beams, the low-dose envelope is dominated by particles undergoing multiple Coulomb scattering in the beam line components and water phantom. Clearly, in the latter situation, the low-dose envelope depends directly on beam line design features. Finally, we investigated the dosimetric consequences of the low-dose envelope. Our results showed that if not modeled properly the low-dose envelope may cause clinically relevant dose disturbance in the target volume. This work suggested that this low-dose envelope is beam line specific for low-energy beams, should be thoroughly experimentally characterized and validated during commissioning of the treatment planning system, and therefore is of great concern for accurate delivery of proton scanning beam doses.

  18. Paint stripping with high power flattened Gaussian beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Forbes, A

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the researchers present results on improved paint stripping performance with an intra-cavity generated Flattened Gaussian Beam (FGB). A resonator with suitable diffractive optical elements was designed in order to produce a single mode...

  19. Vortex beam characterization in terms of Hypergeometric- Gaussian modes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sephton, Bereneice C

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available in Optics: The 100th OSA Annual Meeting and Exhibit/Laser Science XXXII , 17-21 October 2016, Rochester Riverside Convention Center, Rochester, New York United States Vortex beam characterization in terms of Hypergeometric- Gaussian modes Sephton...

  20. TH-CD-209-08: Quantification of the Interplay Effect in Proton Pencil Beam Scanning Treatment of Lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, M; Huang, S; Solberg, T; Teo, B; McDonough, J; Simone, C; Lin, L [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Mayer, R; Thomas, A [Walter Reed Military Hospital, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To quantify the dose degradation caused by the interplay effect based on a beam specific motion analysis in proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) treatment of lung tumors Methods: PBS plans were optimized on average CT using a beam-specific PTV method for 10 consecutive patients with locally advanced non-small-cell-lung-cancer (NSCLC) treated with proton therapy to 6660/180 cGy. End inhalation (CT0) and end exhalation (CT50) were selected as the two extreme scenarios to acquire the relative stopping power ratio difference (Δrsp) for a respiration cycle. The water equivalent difference (ΔWET) per radiological path was calculated from the surface of patient to the iCTV by integrating the Δrsp of each voxel. The motion magnitude of each voxel within the target follows a quasi-Gaussian distribution. A motion index (MI (>5mm WET)), defined as the percentage of target voxels with an absolute integral ΔWET larger than 5 mm, was adopted as a metric to characterize interplay. To simulate the treatment process, 4D dose was calculated by accumulating the spot dose on the corresponding respiration phase to the reference phase CT50 by deformable image registration based on spot timing and patient breathing phase. Results: The study indicated that the magnitude of target underdose in a single fraction plan is proportional to the MI (p<0.001), with larger motion equating to greater dose degradation and standard deviations. The target homogeneity, minimum, maximum and mean dose in the 4D dose accumulations of 37 fractions varied as a function of MI. Conclusion: The MI quantification metric can predict the level of dose degradation in PBS lung cancer treatment, which potentially serves as a clinical decision tool to assess whether patients are suitable to receive PBS treatment.

  1. TH-CD-209-08: Quantification of the Interplay Effect in Proton Pencil Beam Scanning Treatment of Lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, M; Huang, S; Solberg, T; Teo, B; McDonough, J; Simone, C; Lin, L; Mayer, R; Thomas, A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the dose degradation caused by the interplay effect based on a beam specific motion analysis in proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) treatment of lung tumors Methods: PBS plans were optimized on average CT using a beam-specific PTV method for 10 consecutive patients with locally advanced non-small-cell-lung-cancer (NSCLC) treated with proton therapy to 6660/180 cGy. End inhalation (CT0) and end exhalation (CT50) were selected as the two extreme scenarios to acquire the relative stopping power ratio difference (Δrsp) for a respiration cycle. The water equivalent difference (ΔWET) per radiological path was calculated from the surface of patient to the iCTV by integrating the Δrsp of each voxel. The motion magnitude of each voxel within the target follows a quasi-Gaussian distribution. A motion index (MI (>5mm WET)), defined as the percentage of target voxels with an absolute integral ΔWET larger than 5 mm, was adopted as a metric to characterize interplay. To simulate the treatment process, 4D dose was calculated by accumulating the spot dose on the corresponding respiration phase to the reference phase CT50 by deformable image registration based on spot timing and patient breathing phase. Results: The study indicated that the magnitude of target underdose in a single fraction plan is proportional to the MI (p<0.001), with larger motion equating to greater dose degradation and standard deviations. The target homogeneity, minimum, maximum and mean dose in the 4D dose accumulations of 37 fractions varied as a function of MI. Conclusion: The MI quantification metric can predict the level of dose degradation in PBS lung cancer treatment, which potentially serves as a clinical decision tool to assess whether patients are suitable to receive PBS treatment.

  2. Quality factor of aberrated gaussian laser beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mafusire, C

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available 15 20 25 30 35 M 4 © CSIR 2010 www.csir.co.za Conclusion • Laser beam quality depends on - y-Astigmatism - y-Coma - x-Coma - y-Triangular astigmatism - x-Triangular astigmatism - Spherical aberration...

  3. Impact of dose engine algorithm in pencil beam scanning proton therapy for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tommasino, Francesco; Fellin, Francesco; Lorentini, Stefano; Farace, Paolo

    2018-06-01

    Proton therapy for the treatment of breast cancer is acquiring increasing interest, due to the potential reduction of radiation-induced side effects such as cardiac and pulmonary toxicity. While several in silico studies demonstrated the gain in plan quality offered by pencil beam scanning (PBS) compared to passive scattering techniques, the related dosimetric uncertainties have been poorly investigated so far. Five breast cancer patients were planned with Raystation 6 analytical pencil beam (APB) and Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation algorithms. Plans were optimized with APB and then MC was used to recalculate dose distribution. Movable snout and beam splitting techniques (i.e. using two sub-fields for the same beam entrance, one with and the other without the use of a range shifter) were considered. PTV dose statistics were recorded. The same planning configurations were adopted for the experimental benchmark. Dose distributions were measured with a 2D array of ionization chambers and compared to APB and MC calculated ones by means of a γ analysis (agreement criteria 3%, 3 mm). Our results indicate that, when using proton PBS for breast cancer treatment, the Raystation 6 APB algorithm does not allow obtaining sufficient accuracy, especially with large air gaps. On the contrary, the MC algorithm resulted into much higher accuracy in all beam configurations tested and has to be recommended. Centers where a MC algorithm is not yet available should consider a careful use of APB, possibly combined with a movable snout system or in any case with strategies aimed at minimizing air gaps. Copyright © 2018 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Propagation of hypergeometric Gaussian beams in strongly nonlocal nonlinear media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Bin; Bian, Lirong; Zhou, Xin; Chen, Kai

    2018-01-01

    Optical vortex beams have attracted lots of interest due to its potential application in image processing, optical trapping and optical communications, etc. In this work, we theoretically and numerically investigated the propagation properties of hypergeometric Gaussian (HyGG) beams in strongly nonlocal nonlinear media. Based on the Snyder-Mitchell model, analytical expressions for propagation of the HyGG beams in strongly nonlocal nonlinear media were obtained. The influence of input power and optical parameters on the evolutions of the beam width and radius of curvature is illustrated, respectively. The results show that the beam width and radius of curvature of the HyGG beams remain invariant, like a soliton when the input power is equal to the critical power. Otherwise, it varies periodically like a breather, which is the result of competition between the beam diffraction and nonlinearity of the medium.

  5. Using GPU to calculate electron dose for hybrid pencil beam model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Chengjun; Li Xia; Hou Qing; Wu Zhangwen

    2011-01-01

    Hybrid pencil beam model (HPBM) offers an efficient approach to calculate the three-dimension dose distribution from a clinical electron beam. Still, clinical radiation treatment activity desires faster treatment plan process. Our work presented the fast implementation of HPBM-based electron dose calculation using graphics processing unit (GPU). The HPBM algorithm was implemented in compute unified device architecture running on the GPU, and C running on the CPU, respectively. Several tests with various sizes of the field, beamlet and voxel were used to evaluate our implementation. On an NVIDIA GeForce GTX470 GPU card, we achieved speedup factors of 2.18- 98.23 with acceptable accuracy, compared with the results from a Pentium E5500 2.80 GHz Dual-core CPU. (authors)

  6. Propagation of truncated modified Laguerre-Gaussian beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, D.; Li, J.; Guo, Q.

    2010-01-01

    By expanding the circ function into a finite sum of complex Gaussian functions and applying the Collins formula, the propagation of hard-edge diffracted modified Laguerre-Gaussian beams (MLGBs) through a paraxial ABCD system is studied, and the approximate closed-form propagation expression of hard-edge diffracted MLGBs is obtained. The transverse intensity distribution of the MLGB carrying finite power can be characterized by a single bright and symmetric ring during propagation when the aperture radius is very large. Starting from the definition of the generalized truncated second-order moments, the beam quality factor of MLGBs through a hard-edged circular aperture is investigated in a cylindrical coordinate system, which turns out to be dependent on the truncated radius and the beam orders.

  7. Gyrator transform of Gaussian beams with phase difference and generation of hollow beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zhiyu; Xia, Hui; Yu, Tao; Xie, Ding; Xie, Wenke

    2018-03-01

    The optical expression of Gaussian beams with phase difference, which is caused by gyrator transform (GT), has been obtained. The intensity and phase distribution of transform Gaussian beams are analyzed. It is found that the circular hollow vortex beam can be obtained by overlapping two GT Gaussian beams with π phase difference. The effect of parameters on the intensity and phase distributions of the hollow vortex beam are discussed. The results show that the shape of intensity distribution is significantly influenced by GT angle α and propagation distance z. The size of the hollow vortex beam can be adjusted by waist width ω 0. Compared with previously reported results, the work shows that the hollow vortex beam can be obtained without any model conversion of the light source.

  8. Optimization of GEANT4 settings for Proton Pencil Beam Scanning simulations using GATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grevillot, Loic, E-mail: loic.grevillot@gmail.co [Universite de Lyon, F-69622 Lyon (France); Creatis, CNRS UMR 5220, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Centre de Lutte Contre le Cancer Leon Berard, F-69373 Lyon (France); IBA, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Frisson, Thibault [Universite de Lyon, F-69622 Lyon (France); Creatis, CNRS UMR 5220, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Centre de Lutte Contre le Cancer Leon Berard, F-69373 Lyon (France); Zahra, Nabil [Universite de Lyon, F-69622 Lyon (France); IPNL, CNRS UMR 5822, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Centre de Lutte Contre le Cancer Leon Berard, F-69373 Lyon (France); Bertrand, Damien; Stichelbaut, Frederic [IBA, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Freud, Nicolas [Universite de Lyon, F-69622 Lyon (France); CNDRI, INSA-Lyon, F-69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Sarrut, David [Universite de Lyon, F-69622 Lyon (France); Creatis, CNRS UMR 5220, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Centre de Lutte Contre le Cancer Leon Berard, F-69373 Lyon (France)

    2010-10-15

    This study reports the investigation of different GEANT4 settings for proton therapy applications in the context of Treatment Planning System comparisons. The GEANT4.9.2 release was used through the GATE platform. We focused on the Pencil Beam Scanning delivery technique, which allows for intensity modulated proton therapy applications. The most relevant options and parameters (range cut, step size, database binning) for the simulation that influence the dose deposition were investigated, in order to determine a robust, accurate and efficient simulation environment. In this perspective, simulations of depth-dose profiles and transverse profiles at different depths and energies between 100 and 230 MeV have been assessed against reference measurements in water and PMMA. These measurements were performed in Essen, Germany, with the IBA dedicated Pencil Beam Scanning system, using Bragg-peak chambers and radiochromic films. GEANT4 simulations were also compared to the PHITS.2.14 and MCNPX.2.5.0 Monte Carlo codes. Depth-dose simulations reached 0.3 mm range accuracy compared to NIST CSDA ranges, with a dose agreement of about 1% over a set of five different energies. The transverse profiles simulated using the different Monte Carlo codes showed discrepancies, with up to 15% difference in beam widening between GEANT4 and MCNPX in water. A 8% difference between the GEANT4 multiple scattering and single scattering algorithms was observed. The simulations showed the inability of reproducing the measured transverse dose spreading with depth in PMMA, corroborating the fact that GEANT4 underestimates the lateral dose spreading. GATE was found to be a very convenient simulation environment to perform this study. A reference physics-list and an optimized parameters-list have been proposed. Satisfactory agreement against depth-dose profiles measurements was obtained. The simulation of transverse profiles using different Monte Carlo codes showed significant deviations. This point

  9. Analytical linear energy transfer model including secondary particles: calculations along the central axis of the proton pencil beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsolat, F; De Marzi, L; Mazal, A; Pouzoulet, F

    2016-01-01

    In proton therapy, the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) depends on various types of parameters such as linear energy transfer (LET). An analytical model for LET calculation exists (Wilkens’ model), but secondary particles are not included in this model. In the present study, we propose a correction factor, L sec , for Wilkens’ model in order to take into account the LET contributions of certain secondary particles. This study includes secondary protons and deuterons, since the effects of these two types of particles can be described by the same RBE-LET relationship. L sec was evaluated by Monte Carlo (MC) simulations using the GATE/GEANT4 platform and was defined by the ratio of the LET d distributions of all protons and deuterons and only primary protons. This method was applied to the innovative Pencil Beam Scanning (PBS) delivery systems and L sec was evaluated along the beam axis. This correction factor indicates the high contribution of secondary particles in the entrance region, with L sec values higher than 1.6 for a 220 MeV clinical pencil beam. MC simulations showed the impact of pencil beam parameters, such as mean initial energy, spot size, and depth in water, on L sec . The variation of L sec with these different parameters was integrated in a polynomial function of the L sec factor in order to obtain a model universally applicable to all PBS delivery systems. The validity of this correction factor applied to Wilkens’ model was verified along the beam axis of various pencil beams in comparison with MC simulations. A good agreement was obtained between the corrected analytical model and the MC calculations, with mean-LET deviations along the beam axis less than 0.05 keV μm −1 . These results demonstrate the efficacy of our new correction of the existing LET model in order to take into account secondary protons and deuterons along the pencil beam axis. (paper)

  10. Supine craniospinal irradiation in pediatric patients by proton pencil beam scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farace, Paolo; Bizzocchi, Nicola; Righetto, Roberto; Fellin, Francesco; Fracchiolla, Francesco; Lorentini, Stefano; Widesott, Lamberto; Algranati, Carlo; Rombi, Barbara; Vennarini, Sabina; Amichetti, Maurizio; Schwarz, Marco

    2017-04-01

    Proton therapy is the emerging treatment modality for craniospinal irradiation (CSI) in pediatric patients. Herein, special methods adopted for CSI at proton Therapy Center of Trento by pencil beam scanning (PBS) are comprehensively described. Twelve pediatric patients were treated by proton PBS using two/three isocenters. Special methods refer to: (i) patient positioning in supine position on immobilization devices crossed by the beams; (ii) planning field-junctions via the ancillary-beam technique; (iii) achieving lens-sparing by three-beams whole-brain-irradiation; (iv) applying a movable-snout and beam-splitting technique to reduce the lateral penumbra. Patient-specific quality assurance (QA) program was performed using two-dimensional ion chamber array and γ-analysis. Daily kilovoltage alignment was performed. PBS allowed to obtain optimal target coverage (mean D98%>98%) with reduced dose to organs-at-risk. Lens sparing was obtained (mean D1∼730cGyE). Reducing lateral penumbra decreased the dose to the kidneys (mean Dmean4cm (mean γ>95%) than at depths<4cm. The reported methods allowed to effectively perform proton PBS CSI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. WE-E-BRB-01: Personalized Motion Management Strategies for Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, X.

    2016-01-01

    Strategies for treating thoracic and liver tumors using pencil beam scanning proton therapy Thoracic and liver tumors have not been treated with pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy until recently. This is because of concerns about the significant interplay effects between proton spot scanning and patient’s respiratory motion. However, not all tumors have unacceptable magnitude of motion for PBS proton therapy. Therefore it is important to analyze the motion and understand the significance of the interplay effect for each patient. The factors that affect interplay effect and its washout include magnitude of motion, spot size, spot scanning sequence and speed. Selection of beam angle, scanning direction, repainting and fractionation can all reduce the interplay effect. An overview of respiratory motion management in PBS proton therapy including assessment of tumor motion and WET evaluation will be first presented. As thoracic tumors have very different motion patterns from liver tumors, examples would be provided for both anatomic sites. As thoracic tumors are typically located within highly heterogeneous environments, dose calculation accuracy is a concern for both treatment target and surrounding organs such as spinal cord or esophagus. Strategies for mitigating the interplay effect in PBS will be presented and the pros and cons of various motion mitigation strategies will be discussed. Learning Objectives: Motion analysis for individual patients with respect to interplay effect Interplay effect and mitigation strategies for treating thoracic/liver tumors with PBS Treatment planning margins for PBS The impact of proton dose calculation engines over heterogeneous treatment target and surrounding organs I have a current research funding from Varian Medical System under the master agreement between University of Pennsylvania and Varian; L. Lin, I have a current funding from Varian Medical System under the master agreement between University of Pennsylvania and

  12. WE-E-BRB-00: Motion Management for Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    Strategies for treating thoracic and liver tumors using pencil beam scanning proton therapy Thoracic and liver tumors have not been treated with pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy until recently. This is because of concerns about the significant interplay effects between proton spot scanning and patient’s respiratory motion. However, not all tumors have unacceptable magnitude of motion for PBS proton therapy. Therefore it is important to analyze the motion and understand the significance of the interplay effect for each patient. The factors that affect interplay effect and its washout include magnitude of motion, spot size, spot scanning sequence and speed. Selection of beam angle, scanning direction, repainting and fractionation can all reduce the interplay effect. An overview of respiratory motion management in PBS proton therapy including assessment of tumor motion and WET evaluation will be first presented. As thoracic tumors have very different motion patterns from liver tumors, examples would be provided for both anatomic sites. As thoracic tumors are typically located within highly heterogeneous environments, dose calculation accuracy is a concern for both treatment target and surrounding organs such as spinal cord or esophagus. Strategies for mitigating the interplay effect in PBS will be presented and the pros and cons of various motion mitigation strategies will be discussed. Learning Objectives: Motion analysis for individual patients with respect to interplay effect Interplay effect and mitigation strategies for treating thoracic/liver tumors with PBS Treatment planning margins for PBS The impact of proton dose calculation engines over heterogeneous treatment target and surrounding organs I have a current research funding from Varian Medical System under the master agreement between University of Pennsylvania and Varian; L. Lin, I have a current funding from Varian Medical System under the master agreement between University of Pennsylvania and

  13. WE-E-BRB-01: Personalized Motion Management Strategies for Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, X. [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Strategies for treating thoracic and liver tumors using pencil beam scanning proton therapy Thoracic and liver tumors have not been treated with pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy until recently. This is because of concerns about the significant interplay effects between proton spot scanning and patient’s respiratory motion. However, not all tumors have unacceptable magnitude of motion for PBS proton therapy. Therefore it is important to analyze the motion and understand the significance of the interplay effect for each patient. The factors that affect interplay effect and its washout include magnitude of motion, spot size, spot scanning sequence and speed. Selection of beam angle, scanning direction, repainting and fractionation can all reduce the interplay effect. An overview of respiratory motion management in PBS proton therapy including assessment of tumor motion and WET evaluation will be first presented. As thoracic tumors have very different motion patterns from liver tumors, examples would be provided for both anatomic sites. As thoracic tumors are typically located within highly heterogeneous environments, dose calculation accuracy is a concern for both treatment target and surrounding organs such as spinal cord or esophagus. Strategies for mitigating the interplay effect in PBS will be presented and the pros and cons of various motion mitigation strategies will be discussed. Learning Objectives: Motion analysis for individual patients with respect to interplay effect Interplay effect and mitigation strategies for treating thoracic/liver tumors with PBS Treatment planning margins for PBS The impact of proton dose calculation engines over heterogeneous treatment target and surrounding organs I have a current research funding from Varian Medical System under the master agreement between University of Pennsylvania and Varian; L. Lin, I have a current funding from Varian Medical System under the master agreement between University of Pennsylvania and

  14. WE-E-BRB-00: Motion Management for Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-06-15

    Strategies for treating thoracic and liver tumors using pencil beam scanning proton therapy Thoracic and liver tumors have not been treated with pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy until recently. This is because of concerns about the significant interplay effects between proton spot scanning and patient’s respiratory motion. However, not all tumors have unacceptable magnitude of motion for PBS proton therapy. Therefore it is important to analyze the motion and understand the significance of the interplay effect for each patient. The factors that affect interplay effect and its washout include magnitude of motion, spot size, spot scanning sequence and speed. Selection of beam angle, scanning direction, repainting and fractionation can all reduce the interplay effect. An overview of respiratory motion management in PBS proton therapy including assessment of tumor motion and WET evaluation will be first presented. As thoracic tumors have very different motion patterns from liver tumors, examples would be provided for both anatomic sites. As thoracic tumors are typically located within highly heterogeneous environments, dose calculation accuracy is a concern for both treatment target and surrounding organs such as spinal cord or esophagus. Strategies for mitigating the interplay effect in PBS will be presented and the pros and cons of various motion mitigation strategies will be discussed. Learning Objectives: Motion analysis for individual patients with respect to interplay effect Interplay effect and mitigation strategies for treating thoracic/liver tumors with PBS Treatment planning margins for PBS The impact of proton dose calculation engines over heterogeneous treatment target and surrounding organs I have a current research funding from Varian Medical System under the master agreement between University of Pennsylvania and Varian; L. Lin, I have a current funding from Varian Medical System under the master agreement between University of Pennsylvania and

  15. Application of activity pencil beam algorithm using measured distribution data of positron emitter nuclei for therapeutic SOBP proton beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyatake, Aya; Nishio, Teiji

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Recently, much research on imaging the clinical proton-irradiated volume using positron emitter nuclei based on target nuclear fragment reaction has been carried out. The purpose of this study is to develop an activity pencil beam (APB) algorithm for a simulation system for proton-activated positron-emitting imaging in clinical proton therapy using spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) beams.Methods: The target nuclei of activity distribution calculations are 12 C nuclei, 16 O nuclei, and 40 Ca nuclei, which are the main elements in a human body. Depth activity distributions with SOBP beam irradiations were obtained from the material information of ridge filter (RF) and depth activity distributions of compounds of the three target nuclei measured by BOLPs-RGp (beam ON-LINE PET system mounted on a rotating gantry port) with mono-energetic Bragg peak (MONO) beam irradiations. The calculated data of depth activity distributions with SOBP beam irradiations were sorted in terms of kind of nucleus, energy of proton beam, SOBP width, and thickness of fine degrader (FD), which were verified. The calculated depth activity distributions with SOBP beam irradiations were compared with the measured ones. APB kernels were made from the calculated depth activity distributions with SOBP beam irradiations to construct a simulation system using the APB algorithm for SOBP beams.Results: The depth activity distributions were prepared using the material information of RF and the measured depth activity distributions with MONO beam irradiations for clinical therapy using SOBP beams. With the SOBP width widening, the distal fall-offs of depth activity distributions and the difference from the depth dose distributions were large. The shapes of the calculated depth activity distributions nearly agreed with those of the measured ones upon comparison between the two. The APB kernels of SOBP beams were prepared by making use of the data on depth activity distributions with SOBP beam

  16. Laser-driven acceleration with Bessel and Gaussian beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hafizi, B.; Esarey, E.; Sprangle, P.

    1997-01-01

    The possibility of enhancing the energy gain in laser-driven accelerators by using Bessel laser beams is examined. Scaling laws are derived for the propagation length, acceleration gradient, and energy gain in various accelerators for both Gaussian and Bessel beam drivers. For equal beam powers, the energy gain can be increased by a factor of N 1/2 by utilizing a Bessel beam with N lobes, provided that the acceleration gradient is linearly proportional to the laser field. This is the case in the inverse free electron laser and the inverse Cherenkov accelerators. If the acceleration gradient is proportional to the square of the laser field (e.g., the laser wakefield, plasma beat wave, and vacuum beat wave accelerators), the energy gain is comparable with either beam profile. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  17. Beam propagation factor and Kurtosis parameter of different types of flattened Gaussian beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saghafi, S.; Forbes, G.W.; Sheppard, C.J.R.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: The beam propagation factor, M 2 and the Kurtosis parameter, K, are considered for three different models of flattened Gaussian beams. Plots of M 2 versus K reveal similarities between these flattened beams. In fact, for this type of beam, it is possible to predict K from the value of M 2 We also determine the values of the parameters that characterize those different types of flattened Gaussian beam modes for any given value of M 2 . Finally, once K and M 2 have been measured for any flattened beam, these equations can be used to determine the closeness of this real beam to members of the three well-known classes of flattened beams. This can facilitate the analyses of the beam and its propagation. Copyright (1999) Australian Optical Society

  18. Dose distribution of secondary radiation in a water phantom for a proton pencil beam-EURADOS WG9 intercomparison exercise

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stolarczyk, L.; Trinkl, S.; Romero-Exposito, M.; Mojzeszek, N.; Ambrožová, Iva; Domingo, C.; Davídková, Marie; Farah, J.; Klodowska, M.; Kneževic, Z.; Liszka, M.; Majer, M.; Miljanic, S.; Ploc, Ondřej; Schwarz, M.; Harrison, R. M.; Olko, P.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 63, č. 8 (2018), č. článku 085017. ISSN 0031-9155 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : passive detectors * neutron dosimetry * gamma radiation dosimetry * water phantom measurements * secondary radiation measurements * pencil beam scanning proton radiotherapy Subject RIV: FP - Other Medical Disciplines OBOR OECD: Radiology, nuclear medicine and medical imaging Impact factor: 2.742, year: 2016

  19. ECE from MAST - Gaussian beams and antenna aiming problem

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Preinhaelter, Josef; Urban, Jakub; Pavlo, Pavol; Shevchenko, V.; Valovic, M.; Vahala, L.; Vahala, G.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 54, suppl.C (2004), C116-C122 ISSN 0011-4626. [Symposium on Plasma Physics and Technology /21./. Praha, 14.06.2004-17.06.2004] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/04/0360 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : ECEemission, Gaussian beams Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 0.292, year: 2004

  20. Gaussian beam diffraction in weakly anisotropic inhomogeneous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kravtsov, Yu.A., E-mail: kravtsov@am.szczecin.p [Institute of Physics, Maritime University of Szczecin, Szczecin 70-500 (Poland); Space Research Institute, Russian Academy of Science, Moscow 117 997 (Russian Federation); Berczynski, P., E-mail: pawel.berczynski@ps.p [Institute of Physics, West Pomeranian University of Technology, Szczecin 70-310 (Poland); Bieg, B., E-mail: b.bieg@am.szczecin.p [Institute of Physics, Maritime University of Szczecin, Szczecin 70-500 (Poland)

    2009-08-10

    Combination of quasi-isotropic approximation (QIA) of geometric optics with paraxial complex geometric optics (PCGO) is suggested, which allows describing both diffraction and polarization evolution of Gaussian electromagnetic beams in weakly anisotropic inhomogeneous media. Combination QIA/PCGO reduces Maxwell equations to the system of the ordinary differential equations of the first order and radically simplifies solution of various problems, related to microwave plasma diagnostics, including plasma polarimetry, interferometry and refractometry in thermonuclear reactors. Efficiency of the method is demonstrated by the example of electromagnetic beam diffraction in a linear layer of magnetized plasma with parameters, modeling tokamak plasma in the project ITER.

  1. Gaussian beam diffraction in weakly anisotropic inhomogeneous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kravtsov, Yu.A.; Berczynski, P.; Bieg, B.

    2009-01-01

    Combination of quasi-isotropic approximation (QIA) of geometric optics with paraxial complex geometric optics (PCGO) is suggested, which allows describing both diffraction and polarization evolution of Gaussian electromagnetic beams in weakly anisotropic inhomogeneous media. Combination QIA/PCGO reduces Maxwell equations to the system of the ordinary differential equations of the first order and radically simplifies solution of various problems, related to microwave plasma diagnostics, including plasma polarimetry, interferometry and refractometry in thermonuclear reactors. Efficiency of the method is demonstrated by the example of electromagnetic beam diffraction in a linear layer of magnetized plasma with parameters, modeling tokamak plasma in the project ITER.

  2. Detection of mixed-range proton pencil beams with a prompt gamma slit camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Priegnitz, M; Helmbrecht, S; Fiedler, F; Janssens, G; Smeets, J; Vander Stappen, F; Perali, I; Sterpin, E

    2016-01-01

    With increasing availability of proton and particle therapy centers for tumor treatment, the need for in vivo range verification methods comes more into the focus. Imaging of prompt gamma rays emitted during the treatment is one of the possibilities currently under investigation. A knife-edge shaped slit camera was recently proposed for this task and measurements proved the feasibility of range deviation detection in homogeneous and inhomogeneous targets. In the present paper, we concentrate on laterally inhomogeneous materials, which lead to range mixing situations when crossed by one pencil beam: different sections of the beam have different ranges. We chose exemplative cases from clinical irradiation and assembled idealized tissue equivalent targets. One-dimensional emission profiles were obtained by measuring the prompt gamma emission with the slit camera. It could be shown that the resulting range deviations can be detected by evaluation of the measured data with a previously developed range deviation detection algorithm. The retrieved value, however, strongly depends on the target composition, and is not necessarily in direct relation to the ranges of both parts of the beam. By combining the range deviation detection with an analysis of the slope of the distal edge of the measured prompt gamma profile, the origin of the detected range deviation, i.e. the mixed range of the beam, is also identified. It could be demonstrated that range mixed prompt gamma profiles exhibit less steep distal slopes than profiles from beams traversing laterally homogeneous material. For future application of the slit camera to patient irradiation with double scattered proton beams, situations similar to the range mixing cases are present and results could possibly apply. (paper)

  3. Generalized beam quality factor of aberrated truncated Gaussian laser beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mafusire, C

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available with a quadratic refractive index profile, a change in the beam quality factor can be used to infer the pre- sence of aberrations and thereby study the media of interest. For these reasons, among others, research into the beam qual- ity factor... very much like a normal lens (without the rotational symmetry associated with defocus) since the beam quality factor is calculated in the principal axes. With y-astigmatism, the lenslike behavior does not take place in the principal axes where...

  4. Ultrasonic Beam Propagation in Highly Anisotropic Materials Simulated by Multi-Gaussian Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Hyun Jo; Schmerr, Lester W.

    2007-01-01

    The necessity of nondestructively inspecting fiber-reinforced composites, austenitic steels, and other inherently anisotropic materials has stimulated considerable interest in developing beam models for anisotropic media. The properties of slowness surface play key role in the beam models based on the paraxial approximation. In this paper, we apply a modular multi-Gaussian beam (MMGB) model to study the effects of material anisotropy on ultrasonic beam profile. It is shown that the anisotropic effects of beam skew and excess beam divergence enter into the MMGB model through parameters defining the slope and curvature of the slowness surface. The overall beam profile is found when the quasi longitudinal (qL) beam propagates in the symmetry plane of a transversely isotropic gr/ep composite. Simulation results are presented to illustrate the effects of these parameters on ultrasonic beam diffraction and beam skew. The MMGB calculations are also checked by comparing the anisotropy factor and beam skew angle with other analytical solutions

  5. Gaussian beam profile shaping apparatus, method therefore and evaluation thereof

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickey, F.M.; Holswade, S.C.; Romero, L.A.

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus maps a Gaussian beam into a beam with a uniform irradiance profile by exploiting the Fourier transform properties of lenses. A phase element imparts a design phase onto an input beam and the output optical field from a lens is then the Fourier transform of the input beam and the phase function from the phase element. The phase element is selected in accordance with a dimensionless parameter which is dependent upon the radius of the incoming beam, the desired spot shape, the focal length of the lens and the wavelength of the input beam. This dimensionless parameter can also be used to evaluate the quality of a system. In order to control the radius of the incoming beam, optics such as a telescope can be employed. The size of the target spot and the focal length can be altered by exchanging the transform lens, but the dimensionless parameter will remain the same. The quality of the system, and hence the value of the dimensionless parameter, can be altered by exchanging the phase element. The dimensionless parameter provides design guidance, system evaluation, and indication as to how to improve a given system. 27 figs

  6. Impact of Intrafraction and Residual Interfraction Effect on Prostate Proton Pencil Beam Scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Shikui; Deville, Curtiland; Tochner, Zelig; Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin; McDonough, James; Vapiwala, Neha; Both, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To quantitatively evaluate the impact of interplay effect and plan robustness associated with intrafraction and residual interfraction prostate motion for pencil beam scanning proton therapy. Methods and Materials: Ten prostate cancer patients with weekly verification CTs underwent pencil beam scanning with the bilateral single-field uniform dose (SFUD) modality. A typical field had 10-15 energy layers and 500-1000 spots. According to their treatment logs, each layer delivery time was <1 s, with average time to change layers of approximately 8 s. Real-time intrafraction prostate motion was determined from our previously reported prospective study using Calypso beacon transponders. Prostate motion and beam delivering sequence of the worst-case scenario patient were synchronized to calculate the “true” dose received by the prostate. The intrafraction effect was examined by applying the worst-case scenario prostate motion on the planning CT, and the residual interfraction effect was examined on the basis of weekly CT scans. The resultant dose variation of target and critical structures was examined to evaluate the interplay effect. Results: The clinical target volume (CTV) coverage was degraded because of both effects. The CTV D 99 (percentage dose to 99% of the CTV) varied up to 10% relative to the initial plan in individual fractions. However, over the entire course of treatment the total dose degradation of D 99 was 2%-3%, with a standard deviation of <2%. Absolute differences between SFUD, intensity modulate proton therapy, and one-field-per-day SFUD plans were small. The intrafraction effect dominated over the residual interfraction effect for CTV coverage. Mean dose to the anterior rectal wall increased approximately 10% because of combined residual interfraction and intrafraction effects, the interfraction effect being dominant. Conclusions: Both intrafraction and residual interfraction prostate motion degrade CTV coverage within a clinically

  7. Impact of Intrafraction and Residual Interfraction Effect on Prostate Proton Pencil Beam Scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Shikui, E-mail: shktang@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); ProCure Proton Therapy Center, Somerset, New Jersey (United States); Deville, Curtiland; Tochner, Zelig [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); McDonough, James; Vapiwala, Neha; Both, Stefan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To quantitatively evaluate the impact of interplay effect and plan robustness associated with intrafraction and residual interfraction prostate motion for pencil beam scanning proton therapy. Methods and Materials: Ten prostate cancer patients with weekly verification CTs underwent pencil beam scanning with the bilateral single-field uniform dose (SFUD) modality. A typical field had 10-15 energy layers and 500-1000 spots. According to their treatment logs, each layer delivery time was <1 s, with average time to change layers of approximately 8 s. Real-time intrafraction prostate motion was determined from our previously reported prospective study using Calypso beacon transponders. Prostate motion and beam delivering sequence of the worst-case scenario patient were synchronized to calculate the “true” dose received by the prostate. The intrafraction effect was examined by applying the worst-case scenario prostate motion on the planning CT, and the residual interfraction effect was examined on the basis of weekly CT scans. The resultant dose variation of target and critical structures was examined to evaluate the interplay effect. Results: The clinical target volume (CTV) coverage was degraded because of both effects. The CTV D{sub 99} (percentage dose to 99% of the CTV) varied up to 10% relative to the initial plan in individual fractions. However, over the entire course of treatment the total dose degradation of D{sub 99} was 2%-3%, with a standard deviation of <2%. Absolute differences between SFUD, intensity modulate proton therapy, and one-field-per-day SFUD plans were small. The intrafraction effect dominated over the residual interfraction effect for CTV coverage. Mean dose to the anterior rectal wall increased approximately 10% because of combined residual interfraction and intrafraction effects, the interfraction effect being dominant. Conclusions: Both intrafraction and residual interfraction prostate motion degrade CTV coverage within a

  8. Technical Note : A direct ray-tracing method to compute integral depth dose in pencil beam proton radiography with a multilayer ionization chamber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farace, Paolo; Righetto, Roberto; Deffet, Sylvain; Meijers, Arturs; Vander Stappen, Francois

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To introduce a fast ray-tracing algorithm in pencil proton radiography (PR) with a multilayer ionization chamber (MLIC) for in vivo range error mapping. Methods: Pencil beam PR was obtained by delivering spots uniformly positioned in a square (45x45 mm(2) field-of-view) of 9x9 spots capable

  9. Evaluation of a new pencil-type ionization chamber for dosimetry in computerized tomography beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, Maysa C. de; Neves, Lucio P.; Silva, Natalia F. da; Santos, William de S.; Caldas, Linda V.E.

    2014-01-01

    For performing dosimetry in computed tomography beams (CT), use is made of a pencil-type ionization chamber, since this has a uniform response to this type of beam. The common commercial chambers in Brazil have a sensitive volume length of 10 cm. Several studies of prototypes of this type of ionization chamber have been conducted, using different materials and geometric configurations, in the Calibration Laboratory Instruments of the Institute of Nuclear and Energy Research (LCI) and these showed results within internationally acceptable limits. These ion chambers of 10 cm are widely used nowadays, however studies have revealed that they have underestimated the dose values. In order to solve this problem, we developed a chamber with sensitive volume length of 30 cm. As these are not yet very common and no study has yet been performed on LCI conditions on their behavior, is important that the characteristics of these dosemeters are known, and the influence of its various components. For your review, we will use the Monte Carlo code Penelope, freely distributed by the IAEA. This method has revealed results consistent with other codes. The results for this new prototype can be used in dosimetry of the CT of the hospitals and calibration laboratories as the LCI

  10. SU-F-T-209: Multicriteria Optimization Algorithm for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Using Pencil Proton Beam Scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beltran, C; Kamal, H [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To provide a multicriteria optimization algorithm for intensity modulated radiation therapy using pencil proton beam scanning. Methods: Intensity modulated radiation therapy using pencil proton beam scanning requires efficient optimization algorithms to overcome the uncertainties in the Bragg peaks locations. This work is focused on optimization algorithms that are based on Monte Carlo simulation of the treatment planning and use the weights and the dose volume histogram (DVH) control points to steer toward desired plans. The proton beam treatment planning process based on single objective optimization (representing a weighted sum of multiple objectives) usually leads to time-consuming iterations involving treatment planning team members. We proved a time efficient multicriteria optimization algorithm that is developed to run on NVIDIA GPU (Graphical Processing Units) cluster. The multicriteria optimization algorithm running time benefits from up-sampling of the CT voxel size of the calculations without loss of fidelity. Results: We will present preliminary results of Multicriteria optimization for intensity modulated proton therapy based on DVH control points. The results will show optimization results of a phantom case and a brain tumor case. Conclusion: The multicriteria optimization of the intensity modulated radiation therapy using pencil proton beam scanning provides a novel tool for treatment planning. Work support by a grant from Varian Inc.

  11. SU-F-T-209: Multicriteria Optimization Algorithm for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Using Pencil Proton Beam Scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beltran, C; Kamal, H

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a multicriteria optimization algorithm for intensity modulated radiation therapy using pencil proton beam scanning. Methods: Intensity modulated radiation therapy using pencil proton beam scanning requires efficient optimization algorithms to overcome the uncertainties in the Bragg peaks locations. This work is focused on optimization algorithms that are based on Monte Carlo simulation of the treatment planning and use the weights and the dose volume histogram (DVH) control points to steer toward desired plans. The proton beam treatment planning process based on single objective optimization (representing a weighted sum of multiple objectives) usually leads to time-consuming iterations involving treatment planning team members. We proved a time efficient multicriteria optimization algorithm that is developed to run on NVIDIA GPU (Graphical Processing Units) cluster. The multicriteria optimization algorithm running time benefits from up-sampling of the CT voxel size of the calculations without loss of fidelity. Results: We will present preliminary results of Multicriteria optimization for intensity modulated proton therapy based on DVH control points. The results will show optimization results of a phantom case and a brain tumor case. Conclusion: The multicriteria optimization of the intensity modulated radiation therapy using pencil proton beam scanning provides a novel tool for treatment planning. Work support by a grant from Varian Inc.

  12. Effect of Intrafraction Prostate Motion on Proton Pencil Beam Scanning Delivery: A Quantitative Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Shikui, E-mail: TangS@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Deville, Curtiland; McDonough, James; Tochner, Zelig [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Vapiwala, Neha; Both, Stefan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: To assess the dosimetric impact caused by the interplay between intrafraction prostate motion and the intermittent delivery of proton pencil beam scanning (PBS). Methods and Materials: A cohort of 10 prostate patients was treated with PBS using a bilateral single-field uniform dose (SFUD) modality. Bilateral intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans were generated for comparison. Because beam-on time in PBS was intermittent, the actual beam-on time was determined from treatment logs. Prostate motion was generalized according to real-time Calypso tracking data from our previously reported prospective photon trial. We investigated potential dose deviations by considering the interplay effect resulting from the worst-case scenario motion and the PBS delivery sequence. Results: For both bilateral-field SFUD and IMPT plans, clinical target volume (CTV) D{sub 99}% coverage was degraded <2% owing to prostate intrafraction motion when averaged over the course of treatment, but was >10% for the worst fraction. The standard deviation of CTV D{sub 99}% distribution was approximately 1.2%. The CTV coverage of individual fields in SFUD plans degraded as time elapsed after the initial alignment, owing to prostate drift. Intensity-modulated proton therapy and SFUD demonstrated comparable results when bilateral opposed fields were used. Single-field SFUD plans that were repainted twice, which could reduce half of the treatment time, resulted in similar CTV coverage as bilateral-field plans. Conclusions: Intrafraction prostate motion affects the actual delivered dose to CTV; however, when averaged over the course of treatment, CTV D{sub 99}% coverage degraded only approximately 2% even for the worst-case scenario. The IMPT plan results are comparable to those of the SFUD plan, and similar coverage can be achieved if treated by SFUD 1 lateral field per day when rescanning the field twice to shorten the treatment time and mitigate intrafraction motion.

  13. Ultrasound beam transmission using a discretely orthogonal Gaussian aperture basis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, R. A.

    2018-04-01

    Work is reported on development of a computational model for ultrasound beam transmission at an arbitrary geometry transmission interface for generally anisotropic materials. The work addresses problems encountered when the fundamental assumptions of ray theory do not hold, thereby introducing errors into ray-theory-based transmission models. Specifically, problems occur when the asymptotic integral analysis underlying ray theory encounters multiple stationary phase points in close proximity, due to focusing caused by concavity on either the entry surface or a material slowness surface. The approach presented here projects integrands over both the transducer aperture and the entry surface beam footprint onto a Gaussian-derived basis set, thereby distributing the integral over a summation of second-order phase integrals which are amenable to single stationary phase point analysis. Significantly, convergence is assured provided a sufficiently fine distribution of basis functions is used.

  14. Proton therapy posterior beam approach with pencil beam scanning for esophageal cancer. Clinical outcome, dosimetry, and feasibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Yue-Can [Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Department of Medical Oncology, Cancer Center, Shenyang (China); University of Washington Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Campus Box 356043, Seattle, WA (United States); Vyas, Shilpa; Apisarnthanarax, Smith; Zeng, Jing [University of Washington Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Campus Box 356043, Seattle, WA (United States); Dang, Quang; Schultz, Lindsay [Seattle Cancer Care Alliance Proton Therapy Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Bowen, Stephen R. [University of Washington Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Campus Box 356043, Seattle, WA (United States); University of Washington Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Seattle, WA (United States); Shankaran, Veena [University of Washington Medical Center, Department of Medical Oncology, Seattle, WA (United States); Farjah, Farhood [University of Washington Medical Center, Department of Surgery, Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Seattle, WA (United States); University of Washington Medical Center, Department of Surgery, Surgical Outcomes Research Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Oelschlager, Brant K. [University of Washington Medical Center, Department of Surgery, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2016-12-15

    The aim of this study is to present the dosimetry, feasibility, and preliminary clinical results of a novel pencil beam scanning (PBS) posterior beam technique of proton treatment for esophageal cancer in the setting of trimodality therapy. From February 2014 to June 2015, 13 patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer (T3-4N0-2M0; 11 adenocarcinoma, 2 squamous cell carcinoma) were treated with trimodality therapy (neoadjuvant chemoradiation followed by esophagectomy). Eight patients were treated with uniform scanning (US) and 5 patients were treated with a single posterior-anterior (PA) beam PBS technique with volumetric rescanning for motion mitigation. Comparison planning with PBS was performed using three plans: AP/PA beam arrangement; PA plus left posterior oblique (LPO) beams, and a single PA beam. Patient outcomes, including pathologic response and toxicity, were evaluated. All 13 patients completed chemoradiation to 50.4 Gy (relative biological effectiveness, RBE) and 12 patients underwent surgery. All 12 surgical patients had an R0 resection and pathologic complete response was seen in 25 %. Compared with AP/PA plans, PA plans have a lower mean heart (14.10 vs. 24.49 Gy, P < 0.01), mean stomach (22.95 vs. 31.33 Gy, P = 0.038), and mean liver dose (3.79 vs. 5.75 Gy, P = 0.004). Compared to the PA/LPO plan, the PA plan reduced the lung dose: mean lung dose (4.96 vs. 7.15 Gy, P = 0.020) and percentage volume of lung receiving 20 Gy (V{sub 20}; 10 vs. 17 %, P < 0.01). Proton therapy with a single PA beam PBS technique for preoperative treatment of esophageal cancer appears safe and feasible. (orig.) [German] Wir stellen die Vergleichsdosimetrie, Realisierbarkeit und die vorlaeufigen klinischen Ergebnisse einer neuen Pencil-Beam-Scanning(-PBS)/Posterior-Beam-Methode innerhalb der Protonentherapie fuer Speiseroehrenkrebs im Setting einer trimodalen Therapie vor. Von Februar 2014 bis Juni 2015 erhielten 13 Patienten mit lokal fortgeschrittenem

  15. A comparison study for dose calculation in radiation therapy: pencil beam Kernel based vs. Monte Carlo simulation vs. measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheong, Kwang-Ho; Suh, Tae-Suk; Lee, Hyoung-Koo; Choe, Bo-Young [The Catholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hoi-Nam; Yoon, Sei-Chul [Kangnam St. Mary' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01

    Accurate dose calculation in radiation treatment planning is most important for successful treatment. Since human body is composed of various materials and not an ideal shape, it is not easy to calculate the accurate effective dose in the patients. Many methods have been proposed to solve inhomogeneity and surface contour problems. Monte Carlo simulations are regarded as the most accurate method, but it is not appropriate for routine planning because it takes so much time. Pencil beam kernel based convolution/superposition methods were also proposed to correct those effects. Nowadays, many commercial treatment planning systems have adopted this algorithm as a dose calculation engine. The purpose of this study is to verify the accuracy of the dose calculated from pencil beam kernel based treatment planning system comparing to Monte Carlo simulations and measurements especially in inhomogeneous region. Home-made inhomogeneous phantom, Helax-TMS ver. 6.0 and Monte Carlo code BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc were used in this study. In homogeneous media, the accuracy was acceptable but in inhomogeneous media, the errors were more significant. However in general clinical situation, pencil beam kernel based convolution algorithm is thought to be a valuable tool to calculate the dose.

  16. Validation of nuclear models in Geant4 using the dose distribution of a 177 MeV proton pencil beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, David C; Paganetti, Harald; Makarova, Anastasia; Gottschalk, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    A proton pencil beam is associated with a surrounding low-dose envelope, originating from nuclear interactions. It is important for treatment planning systems to accurately model this envelope when performing dose calculations for pencil beam scanning treatments, and Monte Carlo (MC) codes are commonly used for this purpose. This work aims to validate the nuclear models employed by the Geant4 MC code, by comparing the simulated absolute dose distribution to a recent experiment of a 177 MeV proton pencil beam stopping in water. Striking agreement is observed over five orders of magnitude, with both the shape and normalisation well modelled. The normalisations of two depth dose curves are lower than experiment, though this could be explained by an experimental positioning error. The Geant4 neutron production model is also verified in the distal region. The entrance dose is poorly modelled, suggesting an unaccounted upstream source of low-energy protons. Recommendations are given for a follow-up experiment which could resolve these issues. (note)

  17. Application of the electron pencil beam redefinition algorithm to electron arc therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, P.-C.M.; Hogstrom, Kenneth R.; Starkschall, George; Boyd, Robert A.; Tucker, Susan L.; Antolak, John A.

    2006-01-01

    This project investigated the potential of summing fixed-beam dose distributions calculated using the pencil-beam redefinition algorithm (PBRA) at small angular steps (1 deg.) to model an electron arc therapy beam. The PRBA, previously modified to model skin collimation, was modified further by incorporating two correction factors. One correction factor that is energy, SSD (source-to-surface distance), and field-width dependent constrained the calculated dose output to be the same as the measured dose output for fixed-beam geometries within the range of field widths and SSDs encountered in arc therapy. Another correction factor (single field-width correction factor for each energy) compensated for large-angle scattering not being modeled, allowing a more accurate calculation of dose output at mid arc. The PBRA was commissioned to accurately calculate dose in a water phantom for fixed-beam geometries typical of electron arc therapy. Calculated central-axis depth doses agreed with measured doses to within 2% in the low-dose gradient regions and within 1-mm in the high-dose gradient regions. Off-axis doses agreed to within 2 mm in the high-dose gradient regions and within 3% in the low-dose gradient regions. Arced-beam calculations of dose output and depth dose at mid arc were evaluated by comparing to data measured using two cylindrical water phantoms with radii of 12 and 15 cm at 10 and 15 MeV. Dose output was measured for all combinations of phantom radii of curvature, collimator widths (4, 5, and 6 cm), and arc angles (0 deg., 20 deg., 40 deg., 60 deg., 80 deg., and 90 deg.) for both beam energies. Results showed the calculated mid-arc dose output to agree within 2% of measurement for all combinations. For a 90 deg.arc angle and 5x20 cm 2 field size, the calculated mid-arc depth dose in the low-dose gradient region agreed to within 2% of measurement for all depths at 10 MeV and for depths greater than depth of dose maximum R 100 at 15 MeV. For depths in the

  18. Coherence of the vortex Bessel-Gaussian beam in turbulent atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukin, Igor P.

    2017-11-01

    In this paper the theoretical research of coherent properties of the vortex Bessel-Gaussian optical beams propagating in turbulent atmosphere are developed. The approach to the analysis of this problem is based on the analytical solution of the equation for the transverse second-order mutual coherence function of a field of optical radiation. The behavior of integral scale of coherence degree of vortex Bessel-Gaussian optical beams depending on parameters of an optical beam and characteristics of turbulent atmosphere is particularly considered. It is shown that the integral scale of coherence degree of a vortex Bessel-Gaussian optical beam essentially depends on value of a topological charge of a vortex optical beam. With increase in a topological charge of a vortex Bessel-Gaussian optical beam the value of integral scale of coherence degree of a vortex Bessel-Gaussian optical beam are decreased.

  19. Coherence degree of the fundamental Bessel-Gaussian beam in turbulent atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukin, Igor P.

    2017-11-01

    In this article the coherence of a fundamental Bessel-Gaussian optical beam in turbulent atmosphere is analyzed. The problem analysis is based on the solution of the equation for the transverse second-order mutual coherence function of a fundamental Bessel-Gaussian optical beam of optical radiation. The behavior of a coherence degree of a fundamental Bessel-Gaussian optical beam depending on parameters of an optical beam and characteristics of turbulent atmosphere is examined. It was revealed that at low levels of fluctuations in turbulent atmosphere the coherence degree of a fundamental Bessel-Gaussian optical beam has the characteristic oscillating appearance. At high levels of fluctuations in turbulent atmosphere the coherence degree of a fundamental Bessel-Gaussian optical beam is described by an one-scale decreasing curve which in process of increase of level of fluctuations on a line of formation of a laser beam becomes closer to the same characteristic of a spherical optical wave.

  20. The backward phase flow and FBI-transform-based Eulerian Gaussian beams for the Schroedinger equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung Shingyu; Qian Jianliang

    2010-01-01

    We propose the backward phase flow method to implement the Fourier-Bros-Iagolnitzer (FBI)-transform-based Eulerian Gaussian beam method for solving the Schroedinger equation in the semi-classical regime. The idea of Eulerian Gaussian beams has been first proposed in . In this paper we aim at two crucial computational issues of the Eulerian Gaussian beam method: how to carry out long-time beam propagation and how to compute beam ingredients rapidly in phase space. By virtue of the FBI transform, we address the first issue by introducing the reinitialization strategy into the Eulerian Gaussian beam framework. Essentially we reinitialize beam propagation by applying the FBI transform to wavefields at intermediate time steps when the beams become too wide. To address the second issue, inspired by the original phase flow method, we propose the backward phase flow method which allows us to compute beam ingredients rapidly. Numerical examples demonstrate the efficiency and accuracy of the proposed algorithms.

  1. Evolution of a Gaussian laser beam in warm collisional magnetoplasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jafari, M. J.; Jafari Milani, M. R., E-mail: mrj.milani@gmail.com [Plasma Physics Research School, NSTRI, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Niknam, A. R. [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    In this paper, the spatial evolution of an intense circularly polarized Gaussian laser beam propagated through a warm plasma is investigated, taking into account the ponderomotive force, Ohmic heating, external magnetic field, and collisional effects. Using the momentum transfer and energy equations, both modified electron temperature and electron density in plasma are obtained. By introducing the complex dielectric permittivity of warm magnetized plasma and using the complex eikonal function, coupled differential equations for beam width parameter are established and solved numerically. The effects of polarization state of laser and magnetic field on the laser spot size evolution are studied. It is observed that in case of the right-handed polarization, an increase in the value of external magnetic field causes an increase in the strength of the self-focusing, especially in the higher values, and consequently, the self-focusing occurs in shorter distance of propagation. Moreover, the results demonstrate the existence of laser intensity and electron temperature ranges where self-focusing can occur, while the beam diverges outside of these regions; meanwhile, in these intervals, there exists a turning point for each of intensity and temperature in which the self-focusing process has its strongest strength. Finally, it is found that the self-focusing effect can be enhanced by increasing the plasma frequency (plasma density).

  2. Gaussian representation of high-intensity focused ultrasound beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soneson, Joshua E; Myers, Matthew R

    2007-11-01

    A method for fast numerical simulation of high-intensity focused ultrasound beams is derived. The method is based on the frequency-domain representation of the Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov (KZK) equation, and assumes for each harmonic a Gaussian transverse pressure distribution at all distances from the transducer face. The beamwidths of the harmonics are constrained to vary inversely with the square root of the harmonic number, and as such this method may be viewed as an extension of a quasilinear approximation. The technique is capable of determining pressure or intensity fields of moderately nonlinear high-intensity focused ultrasound beams in water or biological tissue, usually requiring less than a minute of computer time on a modern workstation. Moreover, this method is particularly well suited to high-gain simulations since, unlike traditional finite-difference methods, it is not subject to resolution limitations in the transverse direction. Results are shown to be in reasonable agreement with numerical solutions of the full KZK equation in both tissue and water for moderately nonlinear beams.

  3. Initial Report of Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy for Posthysterectomy Patients With Gynecologic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Lilie L., E-mail: lin@xrt.upenn.edu; Kirk, Maura; Scholey, Jessica; Taku, Nicolette; Kiely, Janid B.; White, Benjamin; Both, Stefan

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: To report the acute toxicities associated with pencil beam scanning proton beam radiation therapy (PBS) for whole pelvis radiation therapy in women with gynecologic cancers and the results of a dosimetric comparison of PBS versus intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans. Methods and Materials: Eleven patients with posthysterectomy gynecologic cancer received PBS to the whole pelvis. The patients received a dose of 45 to 50.4 Gy relative biological effectiveness (RBE) in 1.8 Gy (RBE) daily fractions. Acute toxicity was scored according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4. A dosimetric comparison between a 2-field posterior oblique beam PBS and an IMRT plan was conducted. The Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to assess the potential dosimetric differences between the 2 plans and PBS target coverage robustness relative to setup uncertainties. Results: The median patient age was 55 years (range 23-76). The primary site was cervical in 7, vaginal in 1, and endometrial in 3. Of the 11 patients, 7 received concurrent cisplatin, 1 each received sandwich carboplatin and paclitaxel chemotherapy, both sandwich and concurrent chemotherapy, and concurrent and adjuvant chemotherapy, and 1 received no chemotherapy. All patients completed treatment. Of the 9 patients who received concurrent chemotherapy, the rate of grade 2 and 3 hematologic toxicities was 33% and 11%, respectively. One patient (9%) developed grade 3 acute gastrointestinal toxicity; no patient developed grade ≥3 genitourinary toxicity. The volume of pelvic bone marrow, bladder, and small bowel receiving 10 to 30 Gy was significantly lower with PBS than with intensity modulated radiation therapy (P<.001). The target coverage for all PBS plans was robust relative to the setup uncertainties (P>.05) with the clinical target volume mean dose percentage received by 95% and 98% of the target volume coverage changes within 2% for the individual plans. Conclusions: Our

  4. On the exploration of effect of critical beam power on the propagation of Gaussian laser beam in collisionless magnetized plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urunkar, T. U.; Valkunde, A. T.; Vhanmore, B. D.; Gavade, K. M.; Patil, S. D.; Takale, M. V.

    2018-05-01

    It is quite known that critical power of the laser plays vital role in the propagation of Gaussian laser beam in collisionless plasma. The nonlinearity in dielectric constant considered herein is due to the ponderomotive force. In the present analysis, the interval of critical beam power has been explored to sustain the competition between diffraction and self-focusing of Gaussian laser beam during propagation in collisionless magnetized plasma. Differential equation for beam-width parameter has been established by using WKB and paraxial approximations under parabolic equation approach. The effect of critical power on the propagation of Gaussian laser beam has been presented graphically and discussed.

  5. Dose distributions of a proton beam for eye tumor therapy: Hybrid pencil-beam ray-tracing calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rethfeldt, Ch.; Fuchs, H.; Gardey, K.-U.

    2006-01-01

    For the case of eye tumor therapy with protons, improvements are introduced compared to the standard dose calculation which implies straight-line optics and the constant-density assumption for the eye and its surrounding. The progress consists of (i) taking account of the lateral scattering of the protons in tissue by folding the entrance fluence distribution with the pencil beam distribution widening with growing depth in the tissue, (ii) rescaling the spread-out Bragg peak dose distribution in water with the radiological path length calculated voxel by voxel on ray traces through a realistic density matrix for the treatment geometry, yielding a trajectory dependence of the geometrical range. Distributions calculated for some specific situations are compared to measurements and/or standard calculations, and differences to the latter are discussed with respect to the requirements of therapy planning. The most pronounced changes appear for wedges placed in front of the eye, causing additional widening of the lateral falloff. The more accurate prediction of the dose dependence at the field borders is of interest with respect to side effects in the risk organs of the eye

  6. Intra-cavity metamorphosis of a Gaussian beam to flat-top distribution

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Naidoo, Darryl

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We explore an intra-cavity beam shaping approach to generate a Gaussian distribution by the metamorphosis of a Gaussian beam into a flat-top distribution on opposing mirrors. The concept is tested external to the cavity through the use of two...

  7. Effects of dispersion and longitudinal chromatic aberration on the focusing of isodiffracting pulsed Gaussian light beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Dongmei; Guo Hong; Han Dingan; Liu Mingwei; Li Changfu

    2005-01-01

    Taking into account the dispersion and the longitudinal chromatic aberration (LCA) of the material of the lens, focusing of isodiffracting pulsed Gaussian light beam through single lens is analyzed. The smaller the cycle number of the isodiffracting pulsed Gaussian light beam is, the higher the order of the material dispersion should be considered

  8. Characterization of the microbunch time structure of proton pencil beams at a clinical treatment facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzoldt, J; Roemer, K E; Enghardt, W; Fiedler, F; Golnik, C; Hueso-González, F; Helmbrecht, S; Kormoll, T; Rohling, H; Smeets, J; Werner, T; Pausch, G

    2016-03-21

    Proton therapy is an advantageous treatment modality compared to conventional radiotherapy. In contrast to photons, charged particles have a finite range and can thus spare organs at risk. Additionally, the increased ionization density in the so-called Bragg peak close to the particle range can be utilized for maximum dose deposition in the tumour volume. Unfortunately, the accuracy of the therapy can be affected by range uncertainties, which have to be covered by additional safety margins around the treatment volume. A real-time range and dose verification is therefore highly desired and would be key to exploit the major advantages of proton therapy. Prompt gamma rays, produced in nuclear reactions between projectile and target nuclei, can be used to measure the proton's range. The prompt gamma-ray timing (PGT) method aims at obtaining this information by determining the gamma-ray emission time along the proton path using a conventional time-of-flight detector setup. First tests at a clinical accelerator have shown the feasibility to observe range shifts of about 5 mm at clinically relevant doses. However, PGT spectra are smeared out by the bunch time spread. Additionally, accelerator related proton bunch drifts against the radio frequency have been detected, preventing a potential range verification. At OncoRay, first experiments using a proton bunch monitor (PBM) at a clinical pencil beam have been conducted. Elastic proton scattering at a hydrogen-containing foil could be utilized to create a coincident proton-proton signal in two identical PBMs. The selection of coincident events helped to suppress uncorrelated background. The PBM setup was used as time reference for a PGT detector to correct for potential bunch drifts. Furthermore, the corrected PGT data were used to image an inhomogeneous phantom. In a further systematic measurement campaign, the bunch time spread and the proton transmission rate were measured for several beam energies between 69 and 225 Me

  9. Impact of Spot Size and Beam-Shaping Devices on the Treatment Plan Quality for Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moteabbed, Maryam, E-mail: mmoteabbed@partners.org; Yock, Torunn I.; Depauw, Nicolas; Madden, Thomas M.; Kooy, Hanne M.; Paganetti, Harald

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to assess the clinical impact of spot size and the addition of apertures and range compensators on the treatment quality of pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy and to define when PBS could improve on passive scattering proton therapy (PSPT). Methods and Materials: The patient cohort included 14 pediatric patients treated with PSPT. Six PBS plans were created and optimized for each patient using 3 spot sizes (∼12-, 5.4-, and 2.5-mm median sigma at isocenter for 90- to 230-MeV range) and adding apertures and compensators to plans with the 2 larger spots. Conformity and homogeneity indices, dose-volume histogram parameters, equivalent uniform dose (EUD), normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), and integral dose were quantified and compared with the respective PSPT plans. Results: The results clearly indicated that PBS with the largest spots does not necessarily offer a dosimetric or clinical advantage over PSPT. With comparable target coverage, the mean dose (D{sub mean}) to healthy organs was on average 6.3% larger than PSPT when using this spot size. However, adding apertures to plans with large spots improved the treatment quality by decreasing the average D{sub mean} and EUD by up to 8.6% and 3.2% of the prescribed dose, respectively. Decreasing the spot size further improved all plans, lowering the average D{sub mean} and EUD by up to 11.6% and 10.9% compared with PSPT, respectively, and eliminated the need for beam-shaping devices. The NTCP decreased with spot size and addition of apertures, with maximum reduction of 5.4% relative to PSPT. Conclusions: The added benefit of using PBS strongly depends on the delivery configurations. Facilities limited to large spot sizes (>∼8 mm median sigma at isocenter) are recommended to use apertures to reduce treatment-related toxicities, at least for complex and/or small tumors.

  10. Experimental Results and Numerical Simulation of the Target RCS using Gaussian Beam Summation Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghanmi Helmi

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a numerical and experimental study of Radar Cross Section (RCS of radar targets using Gaussian Beam Summation (GBS method. The purpose GBS method has several advantages over ray method, mainly on the caustic problem. To evaluate the performance of the chosen method, we started the analysis of the RCS using Gaussian Beam Summation (GBS and Gaussian Beam Launching (GBL, the asymptotic models Physical Optic (PO, Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (GTD and the rigorous Method of Moment (MoM. Then, we showed the experimental validation of the numerical results using experimental measurements which have been executed in the anechoic chamber of Lab-STICC at ENSTA Bretagne. The numerical and experimental results of the RCS are studied and given as a function of various parameters: polarization type, target size, Gaussian beams number and Gaussian beams width.

  11. Mean intensity of the fundamental Bessel-Gaussian beam in turbulent atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukin, Igor P.

    2017-11-01

    In the given article mean intensity of a fundamental Bessel-Gaussian optical beam in turbulent atmosphere is studied. The problem analysis is based on the solution of the equation for the transverse second-order mutual coherence function of a fundamental Bessel-Gaussian beam of optical radiation. Distributions of mean intensity of a fundamental Bessel- Gaussian beam optical beam in longitudinal and transverse to a direction of propagation of optical radiation are investigated in detail. Influence of atmospheric turbulence on change of radius of the central part of a Bessel optical beam is estimated. Values of parameters at which it is possible to generate in turbulent atmosphere a nondiffracting pseudo-Bessel optical beam by means of a fundamental Bessel-Gaussian optical beam are established.

  12. Evaluation of the energy dependence of ionization chambers pencil type calibrated beam tomography standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontes, Ladyjane Pereira; Potiens, Maria da Penha A.

    2015-01-01

    The Instrument Calibration Laboratory of IPEN (LCI - IPEN) performs calibrations of pencil-type ionization chambers (IC) used in measures of dosimetric survey on clinical systems of Computed Tomography (CT). Many users make mistakes when using a calibrated ionization chamber in their CT dosimetry systems. In this work a methodology for determination of factors of correction for quality (Kq) through the calibration curve that is specific for each ionization chamber was established. Furthermore, it was possible to demonstrate the energy dependence on an pencil-type Ionization Chamber(IC) calibrated at the LCI - IPEN. (author)

  13. Extension of filament propagation in water with Bessel-Gaussian beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaya, G.; Sayrac, M.; Boran, Y.; Kolomenskii, A. A. [Department of Physics, Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Kaya, N.; Schuessler, H. A. [Department of Physics, Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Science and Petroleum, Texas A& M University at Qatar, Doha 23874 (Qatar); Strohaber, J. [Department of Physics, Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Department of Physics, Florida A& M University, Tallahassee, Florida 32307 (United States); Amani, M. [Science and Petroleum, Texas A& M University at Qatar, Doha 23874 (Qatar)

    2016-03-15

    We experimentally studied intense femtosecond pulse filamentation and propagation in water for Bessel-Gaussian beams with different numbers of radial modal lobes. The transverse modes of the incident Bessel-Gaussian beam were created from a Gaussian beam of a Ti:sapphire laser system by using computer generated hologram techniques. We found that filament propagation length increased with increasing number of lobes under the conditions of the same peak intensity, pulse duration, and the size of the central peak of the incident beam, suggesting that the radial modal lobes may serve as an energy reservoir for the filaments formed by the central intensity peak.

  14. Extension of filament propagation in water with Bessel-Gaussian beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Kaya

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We experimentally studied intense femtosecond pulse filamentation and propagation in water for Bessel-Gaussian beams with different numbers of radial modal lobes. The transverse modes of the incident Bessel-Gaussian beam were created from a Gaussian beam of a Ti:sapphire laser system by using computer generated hologram techniques. We found that filament propagation length increased with increasing number of lobes under the conditions of the same peak intensity, pulse duration, and the size of the central peak of the incident beam, suggesting that the radial modal lobes may serve as an energy reservoir for the filaments formed by the central intensity peak.

  15. SU-E-T-209: Independent Dose Calculation in FFF Modulated Fields with Pencil Beam Kernels Obtained by Deconvolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azcona, J; Burguete, J

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain the pencil beam kernels that characterize a megavoltage photon beam generated in a FFF linac by experimental measurements, and to apply them for dose calculation in modulated fields. Methods: Several Kodak EDR2 radiographic films were irradiated with a 10 MV FFF photon beam from a Varian True Beam (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) linac, at the depths of 5, 10, 15, and 20cm in polystyrene (RW3 water equivalent phantom, PTW Freiburg, Germany). The irradiation field was a 50 mm diameter circular field, collimated with a lead block. Measured dose leads to the kernel characterization, assuming that the energy fluence exiting the linac head and further collimated is originated on a point source. The three-dimensional kernel was obtained by deconvolution at each depth using the Hankel transform. A correction on the low dose part of the kernel was performed to reproduce accurately the experimental output factors. The kernels were used to calculate modulated dose distributions in six modulated fields and compared through the gamma index to their absolute dose measured by film in the RW3 phantom. Results: The resulting kernels properly characterize the global beam penumbra. The output factor-based correction was carried out adding the amount of signal necessary to reproduce the experimental output factor in steps of 2mm, starting at a radius of 4mm. There the kernel signal was in all cases below 10% of its maximum value. With this correction, the number of points that pass the gamma index criteria (3%, 3mm) in the modulated fields for all cases are at least 99.6% of the total number of points. Conclusion: A system for independent dose calculations in modulated fields from FFF beams has been developed. Pencil beam kernels were obtained and their ability to accurately calculate dose in homogeneous media was demonstrated

  16. Proton pencil beam scanning for mediastinal lymphoma: the impact of interplay between target motion and beam scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, C.; Plastaras, J. P.; Tochner, Z. A.; White, B. M.; Hill-Kayser, C. E.; Hahn, S. M.; Both, S.

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) for the treatment of mediastinal lymphoma. A group of 7 patients of varying tumor size (100-800 cc) were planned using a PBS anterior field. We investigated 17 fractions of 1.8 Gy(RBE) to deliver 30.6 Gy(RBE) to the internal target volume (ITV). Spots with σ ranging from 4 mm to 8 mm were used for all patients, while larger spots (σ = 6-16 mm) were employed for patients with motion perpendicular to the beam (⩾5 mm), based on initial 4-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT) motion evaluation. We considered volumetric repainting such that the same field would be delivered twice in each fraction. The ratio of extreme inhalation amplitude and regular tidal inhalation amplitude (free-breathing variability) was quantified as an indicator of potential irregular breathing during the scanning. Four-dimensional dose was calculated on the 4D CT scans based on the respiratory trace and beam delivery sequence, implemented by partitioning the spots into separate plans on each 4D CT phase. Four starting phases (end of inhalation, end of exhalation, middle of inhalation and middle of exhalation) were sampled for each painting and 4 energy switching times (0.5 s, 1 s, 3 s and 5 s) were tested, which resulted in 896 dose distributions for the analyzed cohort. Plan robustness was measured for the target and critical structures in terms of the percent difference between ‘delivered’ dose (4D-evaluated) and planned dose (calculated on average CT). It was found that none of the patients exhibited highly variable or chaotic breathing patterns. For all patients, the ITV D98% was degraded by Wilcoxon signed-rank tests (p < 0.05). This feasibility study demonstrates that, for mediastinal lymphoma, the impact of the interplay effect on the PBS plan robustness is minimal when volumetric repainting and/or larger spots are employed.

  17. Target dose conversion modeling from pencil beam (PB) to Monte Carlo (MC) for lung SBRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Dandan; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Qinghui; Liang, Xiaoying; Zhen, Weining; Lin, Chi; Verma, Vivek; Wang, Shuo; Wahl, Andrew; Lei, Yu; Zhou, Sumin; Zhang, Chi

    2016-01-01

    A challenge preventing routine clinical implementation of Monte Carlo (MC)-based lung SBRT is the difficulty of reinterpreting historical outcome data calculated with inaccurate dose algorithms, because the target dose was found to decrease to varying degrees when recalculated with MC. The large variability was previously found to be affected by factors such as tumour size, location, and lung density, usually through sub-group comparisons. We hereby conducted a pilot study to systematically and quantitatively analyze these patient factors and explore accurate target dose conversion models, so that large-scale historical outcome data can be correlated with more accurate MC dose without recalculation. Twenty-one patients that underwent SBRT for early-stage lung cancer were replanned with 6MV 360° dynamic conformal arcs using pencil-beam (PB) and recalculated with MC. The percent D95 difference (PB-MC) was calculated for the PTV and GTV. Using single linear regression, this difference was correlated with the following quantitative patient indices: maximum tumour diameter (MaxD); PTV and GTV volumes; minimum distance from tumour to soft tissue (dmin); and mean density and standard deviation of the PTV, GTV, PTV margin, lung, and 2 mm, 15 mm, 50 mm shells outside the PTV. Multiple linear regression and artificial neural network (ANN) were employed to model multiple factors and improve dose conversion accuracy. Single linear regression with PTV D95 deficiency identified the strongest correlation on mean-density (location) indices, weaker on lung density, and the weakest on size indices, with the following R 2 values in decreasing orders: shell2mm (0.71), PTV (0.68), PTV margin (0.65), shell15mm (0.62), shell50mm (0.49), lung (0.40), dmin (0.22), GTV (0.19), MaxD (0.17), PTV volume (0.15), and GTV volume (0.08). A multiple linear regression model yielded the significance factor of 3.0E-7 using two independent features: mean density of shell2mm (P = 1.6E-7) and PTV volume

  18. SU-E-T-321: The Effects of a Dynamic Collimation System On Proton Pencil Beams to Improve Lateral Tissue Sparing in Spot Scanned Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, P; Wang, D; Flynn, R; Hyer, D [University Of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the lateral beam penumbra in pencil beam scanning proton therapy delivered using a dynamic collimator device capable of trimming a portion of the primary beam in close proximity to the patient. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations of pencil beams were performed using MCNPX. Each simulation transported a 125 MeV proton pencil beam through a range shifter, past acollimator, and into a water phantom. Two parameters were varied among the simulations, the source beam size (sigma in air from 3 to 9 mm), and the position of the edge of the collimator (placed from 0 to 30 mm from the central axis of the beam). Proton flux was tallied at the phantom surface to determine the effective beam sizefor all combinations of source beam size and collimator edge position. Results: Quantifying beam size at the phantom surface provides a useful measure tocompare performance among varying source beam sizes and collimation conditions. For arelatively large source beam size (9 mm) entering the range shifter, sigma at thesurface was found to be 10 mm without collimation versus 4 mm with collimation. Additionally, sigma at the surface achievable with collimation was found to be smallerthan for any uncollimated beam, even for very small source beam sizes. Finally, thelateral penumbra achievable with collimation was determined to be largely independentof the source beam size. Conclusion: Collimation can significantly reduce proton pencil beam lateral penumbra.Given the known dosimetric disadvantages resulting from large beam spot sizes,employing a dynamic collimation system can significantly improve lateral tissuesparing in spot-scanned dose distributions.

  19. Integral momenta of vortex Bessel-Gaussian beams in turbulent atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukin, Igor P

    2016-04-20

    The orbital angular momentum of vortex Bessel-Gaussian beams propagating in turbulent atmosphere is studied theoretically. The field of an optical beam is determined through the solution of the paraxial wave equation for a randomly inhomogeneous medium with fluctuations of the refraction index of the turbulent atmosphere. Peculiarities in the behavior of the total power of the vortex Bessel-Gaussian beam at the receiver (or transmitter) are examined. The dependence of the total power of the vortex Bessel-Gaussian beam on optical beam parameters, namely, the transverse wave number of optical radiation, amplitude factor radius, and, especially, topological charge of the optical beam, is analyzed in detail. It turns out that the mean value of the orbital angular momentum of the vortex Bessel-Gaussian beam remains constant during propagation in the turbulent atmosphere. It is shown that the variance of fluctuations of the orbital angular momentum of the vortex Bessel-Gaussian beam propagating in turbulent atmosphere calculated with the "mean-intensity" approximation is equal to zero identically. Thus, it is possible to declare confidently that the variance of fluctuations of the orbital angular momentum of the vortex Bessel-Gaussian beam in turbulent atmosphere is not very large.

  20. Impact of Spot Size and Beam-Shaping Devices on the Treatment Plan Quality for Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moteabbed, Maryam; Yock, Torunn I.; Depauw, Nicolas; Madden, Thomas M.; Kooy, Hanne M.; Paganetti, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to assess the clinical impact of spot size and the addition of apertures and range compensators on the treatment quality of pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy and to define when PBS could improve on passive scattering proton therapy (PSPT). Methods and Materials: The patient cohort included 14 pediatric patients treated with PSPT. Six PBS plans were created and optimized for each patient using 3 spot sizes (∼12-, 5.4-, and 2.5-mm median sigma at isocenter for 90- to 230-MeV range) and adding apertures and compensators to plans with the 2 larger spots. Conformity and homogeneity indices, dose-volume histogram parameters, equivalent uniform dose (EUD), normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), and integral dose were quantified and compared with the respective PSPT plans. Results: The results clearly indicated that PBS with the largest spots does not necessarily offer a dosimetric or clinical advantage over PSPT. With comparable target coverage, the mean dose (D_m_e_a_n) to healthy organs was on average 6.3% larger than PSPT when using this spot size. However, adding apertures to plans with large spots improved the treatment quality by decreasing the average D_m_e_a_n and EUD by up to 8.6% and 3.2% of the prescribed dose, respectively. Decreasing the spot size further improved all plans, lowering the average D_m_e_a_n and EUD by up to 11.6% and 10.9% compared with PSPT, respectively, and eliminated the need for beam-shaping devices. The NTCP decreased with spot size and addition of apertures, with maximum reduction of 5.4% relative to PSPT. Conclusions: The added benefit of using PBS strongly depends on the delivery configurations. Facilities limited to large spot sizes (>∼8 mm median sigma at isocenter) are recommended to use apertures to reduce treatment-related toxicities, at least for complex and/or small tumors.

  1. Simulation of ultrasonic surface waves with multi-Gaussian and point source beam models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Xinyu; Schmerr, Lester W. Jr.; Li, Xiongbing; Sedov, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    In the past decade, multi-Gaussian beam models have been developed to solve many complicated bulk wave propagation problems. However, to date those models have not been extended to simulate the generation of Rayleigh waves. Here we will combine Gaussian beams with an explicit high frequency expression for the Rayleigh wave Green function to produce a three-dimensional multi-Gaussian beam model for the fields radiated from an angle beam transducer mounted on a solid wedge. Simulation results obtained with this model are compared to those of a point source model. It is shown that the multi-Gaussian surface wave beam model agrees well with the point source model while being computationally much more efficient

  2. Modulation Transfer Function of a Gaussian Beam Based on the Generalized Modified Atmospheric Spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Gao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the modulation transfer function of a Gaussian beam propagating through a horizontal path in weak-fluctuation non-Kolmogorov turbulence. Mathematical expressions are obtained based on the generalized modified atmospheric spectrum, which includes the spectral power law value of non-Kolmogorov turbulence, the finite inner and outer scales of turbulence, and other optical parameters of the Gaussian beam. The numerical results indicate that the atmospheric turbulence would produce less negative effects on the wireless optical communication system with an increase in the inner scale of turbulence. Additionally, the increased outer scale of turbulence makes a Gaussian beam influenced more seriously by the atmospheric turbulence.

  3. Characterization and performances of a monitoring ionization chamber dedicated to IBA-universal irradiation head for Pencil Beam Scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courtois, C. [LPC (IN2P3-ENSICAEN-UNICAEN), 6 Boulevard Maréchal Juin, 14050 Caen (France); Boissonnat, G., E-mail: boissonnat@lpccaen.in2p3.fr [LPC (IN2P3-ENSICAEN-UNICAEN), 6 Boulevard Maréchal Juin, 14050 Caen (France); Brusasco, C. [IBA, 3 Chemin du Cyclotron, 31348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Colin, J.; Cussol, D.; Fontbonne, J.M. [LPC (IN2P3-ENSICAEN-UNICAEN), 6 Boulevard Maréchal Juin, 14050 Caen (France); Marchand, B.; Mertens, T.; Neuter, S. de [IBA, 3 Chemin du Cyclotron, 31348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Peronnel, J. [LPC (IN2P3-ENSICAEN-UNICAEN), 6 Boulevard Maréchal Juin, 14050 Caen (France)

    2014-02-01

    Every radiotherapy center has to be equipped with real-time beam monitoring devices. In 2008, we developed an ionization chamber in collaboration with the IBA (Ion Beam Applications) company. This monitoring device called IC2/3 was developed to be used in IBA universal irradiation head for Pencil Beam Scanning (PBS). Here we present the characterization of the IC2/3 monitor in the energy and flux ranges used in protontherapy. The equipment has been tested with an IBA cyclotron able to deliver proton beams from 70 to 230 MeV. This beam monitoring device has been validated and is now installed at the Westdeutsches Protonentherapiezentrum Essen protontherapy center (WPE, Germany). The results obtained in both terms of spatial resolution and dose measurements are at least equal to the initial specifications needed for PBS purposes. The detector measures the dose with a relative uncertainty lower than 1% in the range from 0.5 Gy/min to 8 Gy/min while the spatial resolution is better than 250μm. The technology has been patented and five IC2/3 chambers were delivered to IBA. Nowadays, IBA produces the IC2/3 beam monitoring device as a part of its Proteus 235 product.

  4. Tuneable Gaussian to flat-top resonator by amplitude beam shaping using a digital laser

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ngcobo, S

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we experimentally demonstrate a simple laser cavity that produces spatial tuneable laser modes from a Gaussian beam to a Flat-top beam and a Donut-beam. The laser cavity contains an opaque ring and an adjustable circular aperture...

  5. Off-Axis Gaussian Beams with Random Displacement in Atmospheric Turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahya Baykal

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Our recent work in which we study the propagation of the general Hermite-sinusoidal-Gaussian laser beams in wireless broadband access telecommunication systems is elaborated in this paper to cover the special case of an off-axis Gaussian beam. We mainly investigate the propagation characteristics in atmospheric turbulence of an off-axis Gaussian beam possessing Gaussian distributed random displacement parameters. Our interest is to search for different types of laser beams that will improve the performance of a wireless broadband access system when atmospheric turbulence is considered. Our formulation is based on the basic solution of the second order mutual coherence function evaluated at the receiver plane. For fixed turbulence strength, the coherence length calculated at the receiver plane is found to decrease as the variance of the random displacement is increased. It is shown that as the turbulence becomes stronger, coherence lengths due to off-axis Gaussian beams tend to approach the same value, irrespective of the variance of the random displacement. As expected, the beam spreading is found to be pronounced for larger variance of displacement parameter. Average intensity profiles when atmospheric turbulence is present are plotted for different values of the variance of the random displacement parameter of the off-axis Gaussian beam.

  6. Integral superposition of paraxial Gaussian beams in inhomogeneous anisotropic layered structures in Cartesian coordinates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Červený, V.; Pšenčík, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 25, - (2015), s. 109-155 ISSN 2336-3827 Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : integral superposition of paraxial Gaussian beams * inhomogeneous anisotropic media * S waves in weakly anisotropic media Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure

  7. Application of the fractional Fourier transformation to digital holography recorded by an elliptical, astigmatic Gaussian beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, F; Coëtmellec, S; Brunel, M; Allano, D; Lebrun, D; Janssen, A J E M

    2005-11-01

    The authors have studied the diffraction pattern produced by a particle field illuminated by an elliptic and astigmatic Gaussian beam. They demonstrate that the bidimensional fractional Fourier transformation is a mathematically suitable tool to analyse the diffraction pattern generated not only by a collimated plane wave [J. Opt. Soc. Am A 19, 1537 (2002)], but also by an elliptic and astigmatic Gaussian beam when two different fractional orders are considered. Simulations and experimental results are presented.

  8. Hermite-cosine-Gaussian laser beam and its propagation characteristics in turbulent atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyyuboğlu, Halil Tanyer

    2005-08-01

    Hermite-cosine-Gaussian (HcosG) laser beams are studied. The source plane intensity of the HcosG beam is introduced and its dependence on the source parameters is examined. By application of the Fresnel diffraction integral, the average receiver intensity of HcosG beam is formulated for the case of propagation in turbulent atmosphere. The average receiver intensity is seen to reduce appropriately to various special cases. When traveling in turbulence, the HcosG beam initially experiences the merging of neighboring beam lobes, and then a TEM-type cosh-Gaussian beam is formed, temporarily leading to a plain cosh-Gaussian beam. Eventually a pure Gaussian beam results. The numerical evaluation of the normalized beam size along the propagation axis at selected mode indices indicates that relative spreading of higher-order HcosG beam modes is less than that of the lower-order counterparts. Consequently, it is possible at some propagation distances to capture more power by using higher-mode-indexed HcosG beams.

  9. WE-E-BRB-02: Implementation of Pencil Beam Scanning (PBS) Proton Therapy Treatment for Liver Patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, L.

    2016-01-01

    Strategies for treating thoracic and liver tumors using pencil beam scanning proton therapy Thoracic and liver tumors have not been treated with pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy until recently. This is because of concerns about the significant interplay effects between proton spot scanning and patient’s respiratory motion. However, not all tumors have unacceptable magnitude of motion for PBS proton therapy. Therefore it is important to analyze the motion and understand the significance of the interplay effect for each patient. The factors that affect interplay effect and its washout include magnitude of motion, spot size, spot scanning sequence and speed. Selection of beam angle, scanning direction, repainting and fractionation can all reduce the interplay effect. An overview of respiratory motion management in PBS proton therapy including assessment of tumor motion and WET evaluation will be first presented. As thoracic tumors have very different motion patterns from liver tumors, examples would be provided for both anatomic sites. As thoracic tumors are typically located within highly heterogeneous environments, dose calculation accuracy is a concern for both treatment target and surrounding organs such as spinal cord or esophagus. Strategies for mitigating the interplay effect in PBS will be presented and the pros and cons of various motion mitigation strategies will be discussed. Learning Objectives: Motion analysis for individual patients with respect to interplay effect Interplay effect and mitigation strategies for treating thoracic/liver tumors with PBS Treatment planning margins for PBS The impact of proton dose calculation engines over heterogeneous treatment target and surrounding organs I have a current research funding from Varian Medical System under the master agreement between University of Pennsylvania and Varian; L. Lin, I have a current funding from Varian Medical System under the master agreement between University of Pennsylvania and

  10. WE-E-BRB-02: Implementation of Pencil Beam Scanning (PBS) Proton Therapy Treatment for Liver Patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, L. [University of Pennsylvania (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Strategies for treating thoracic and liver tumors using pencil beam scanning proton therapy Thoracic and liver tumors have not been treated with pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy until recently. This is because of concerns about the significant interplay effects between proton spot scanning and patient’s respiratory motion. However, not all tumors have unacceptable magnitude of motion for PBS proton therapy. Therefore it is important to analyze the motion and understand the significance of the interplay effect for each patient. The factors that affect interplay effect and its washout include magnitude of motion, spot size, spot scanning sequence and speed. Selection of beam angle, scanning direction, repainting and fractionation can all reduce the interplay effect. An overview of respiratory motion management in PBS proton therapy including assessment of tumor motion and WET evaluation will be first presented. As thoracic tumors have very different motion patterns from liver tumors, examples would be provided for both anatomic sites. As thoracic tumors are typically located within highly heterogeneous environments, dose calculation accuracy is a concern for both treatment target and surrounding organs such as spinal cord or esophagus. Strategies for mitigating the interplay effect in PBS will be presented and the pros and cons of various motion mitigation strategies will be discussed. Learning Objectives: Motion analysis for individual patients with respect to interplay effect Interplay effect and mitigation strategies for treating thoracic/liver tumors with PBS Treatment planning margins for PBS The impact of proton dose calculation engines over heterogeneous treatment target and surrounding organs I have a current research funding from Varian Medical System under the master agreement between University of Pennsylvania and Varian; L. Lin, I have a current funding from Varian Medical System under the master agreement between University of Pennsylvania and

  11. Adaptive beamlet-based finite-size pencil beam dose calculation for independent verification of IMRT and VMAT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Justin C; Li, Jonathan G; Arhjoul, Lahcen; Yan, Guanghua; Lu, Bo; Fan, Qiyong; Liu, Chihray

    2015-04-01

    The use of sophisticated dose calculation procedure in modern radiation therapy treatment planning is inevitable in order to account for complex treatment fields created by multileaf collimators (MLCs). As a consequence, independent volumetric dose verification is time consuming, which affects the efficiency of clinical workflow. In this study, the authors present an efficient adaptive beamlet-based finite-size pencil beam (AB-FSPB) dose calculation algorithm that minimizes the computational procedure while preserving the accuracy. The computational time of finite-size pencil beam (FSPB) algorithm is proportional to the number of infinitesimal and identical beamlets that constitute an arbitrary field shape. In AB-FSPB, dose distribution from each beamlet is mathematically modeled such that the sizes of beamlets to represent an arbitrary field shape no longer need to be infinitesimal nor identical. As a result, it is possible to represent an arbitrary field shape with combinations of different sized and minimal number of beamlets. In addition, the authors included the model parameters to consider MLC for its rounded edge and transmission. Root mean square error (RMSE) between treatment planning system and conventional FSPB on a 10 × 10 cm(2) square field using 10 × 10, 2.5 × 2.5, and 0.5 × 0.5 cm(2) beamlet sizes were 4.90%, 3.19%, and 2.87%, respectively, compared with RMSE of 1.10%, 1.11%, and 1.14% for AB-FSPB. This finding holds true for a larger square field size of 25 × 25 cm(2), where RMSE for 25 × 25, 2.5 × 2.5, and 0.5 × 0.5 cm(2) beamlet sizes were 5.41%, 4.76%, and 3.54% in FSPB, respectively, compared with RMSE of 0.86%, 0.83%, and 0.88% for AB-FSPB. It was found that AB-FSPB could successfully account for the MLC transmissions without major discrepancy. The algorithm was also graphical processing unit (GPU) compatible to maximize its computational speed. For an intensity modulated radiation therapy (∼12 segments) and a volumetric modulated arc

  12. Average spreading and beam quality evolution of Gaussian array beams propagating through oceanic turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhi, Dong; Chen, Yizhu; Tao, Rumao; Ma, Yanxing; Zhou, Pu; Si, Lei

    2015-01-01

    The propagation properties of a radial Gaussian beam array through oceanic turbulence are studied analytically. The analytical expressions for the average intensity and the beam quality (power-in-the-bucket (PIB) and M 2 -factor) of a radial beam array in a turbulent ocean are derived based on an account of statistical optics methods, the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle, and the second order moments of the Wigner distribution function. The influences of w, ε, and χ T on the average intensity are investigated. The array divergence increases and the laser beam spreads as the salinity-induced dominant, ε decreased, and χ T increased. Further, the analytical expression of PIB and the M 2 -factor in the target plane is obtained. The changes of PIB and the M 2 -factor with three oceanic turbulence parameters indicate that the stronger turbulence with a larger w, smaller ε, and larger χ T results in the value of PIB decreasing, the value of the M 2 -factor increasing, and the beam quality degrading. (letter)

  13. Using harmonic oscillators to determine the spot size of Hermite-Gaussian laser beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steely, Sidney L.

    1993-01-01

    The similarity of the functional forms of quantum mechanical harmonic oscillators and the modes of Hermite-Gaussian laser beams is illustrated. This functional similarity provides a direct correlation to investigate the spot size of large-order mode Hermite-Gaussian laser beams. The classical limits of a corresponding two-dimensional harmonic oscillator provide a definition of the spot size of Hermite-Gaussian laser beams. The classical limits of the harmonic oscillator provide integration limits for the photon probability densities of the laser beam modes to determine the fraction of photons detected therein. Mathematica is used to integrate the probability densities for large-order beam modes and to illustrate the functional similarities. The probabilities of detecting photons within the classical limits of Hermite-Gaussian laser beams asymptotically approach unity in the limit of large-order modes, in agreement with the Correspondence Principle. The classical limits for large-order modes include all of the nodes for Hermite Gaussian laser beams; Sturm's theorem provides a direct proof.

  14. Improvements in pencil beam scanning proton therapy dose calculation accuracy in brain tumor cases with a commercial Monte Carlo algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widesott, Lamberto; Lorentini, Stefano; Fracchiolla, Francesco; Farace, Paolo; Schwarz, Marco

    2018-05-04

    validation of a commercial Monte Carlo (MC) algorithm (RayStation ver6.0.024) for the treatment of brain tumours with pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy, comparing it via measurements and analytical calculations in clinically realistic scenarios. Methods: For the measurements a 2D ion chamber array detector (MatriXX PT)) was placed underneath the following targets: 1) anthropomorphic head phantom (with two different thickness) and 2) a biological sample (i.e. half lamb's head). In addition, we compared the MC dose engine vs. the RayStation pencil beam (PB) algorithm clinically implemented so far, in critical conditions such as superficial targets (i.e. in need of range shifter), different air gaps and gantry angles to simulate both orthogonal and tangential beam arrangements. For every plan the PB and MC dose calculation were compared to measurements using a gamma analysis metrics (3%, 3mm). Results: regarding the head phantom the gamma passing rate (GPR) was always >96% and on average > 99% for the MC algorithm; PB algorithm had a GPR ≤90% for all the delivery configurations with single slab (apart 95 % GPR from gantry 0° and small air gap) and in case of two slabs of the head phantom the GPR was >95% only in case of small air gaps for all the three (0°, 45°,and 70°) simulated beam gantry angles. Overall the PB algorithm tends to overestimate the dose to the target (up to 25%) and underestimate the dose to the organ at risk (up to 30%). We found similar results (but a bit worse for PB algorithm) for the two targets of the lamb's head where only two beam gantry angles were simulated. Conclusions: our results suggest that in PBS proton therapy range shifter (RS) need to be used with extreme caution when planning the treatment with an analytical algorithm due to potentially great discrepancies between the planned dose and the dose delivered to the patients, also in case of brain tumours where this issue could be underestimated. Our results also

  15. The Experimental Verification of Gaussian Beam Coupling for ECH Transmission Line at 400 GHz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choe Mun Seok

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We design a quasi-optical transmission line system for a 400 GHz gyrotron beam. The 400GHz Gaussian beam is injected to a corrugated waveguide bounced from a quasi-optical mirror. From detailed 2D field patterns of the output beam emitted from the corrugated waveguide, we analyze the mode contents and the source of non-ideal beam expansion

  16. Robustness of the Voluntary Breath-Hold Approach for the Treatment of Peripheral Lung Tumors Using Hypofractionated Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dueck, Jenny; Knopf, Antje-Christin; Lomax, Antony

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The safe clinical implementation of pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy for lung tumors is complicated by the delivery uncertainties caused by breathing motion. The purpose of this feasibility study was to investigate whether a voluntary breath-hold technique could limit the delive...

  17. Feasibility of Pencil Beam Scanned Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy in Breath-hold for Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorgisyan, Jenny; Munck Af Rosenschold, Per; Perrin, Rosalind

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: We evaluated the feasibility of treating patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with pencil beam scanned intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) in breath-hold. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Fifteen NSCLC patients who had previously received 66 Gy in 33 fractions wi...

  18. Consensus Guidelines for Implementing Pencil-Beam Scanning Proton Therapy for Thoracic Malignancies on Behalf of the PTCOG Thoracic and Lymphoma Subcommittee

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chang, Joe Y.; Zhang, Xiaodong; Knopf, Antje; Li, Heng; Mori, Shinichiro; Dong, Lei; Lu, Hsiao-Ming; Liu, Wei; Badiyan, Shahed N.; Both, Stephen; Meijers, Arturs; Lin, Liyong; Flampouri, Stella; Li, Zuofeng; Umegaki, Kikuo; Simone, Charles B.; Zhu, Xiaorong R.

    2017-01-01

    Pencil-beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy (PT), particularly intensity modulated PT, represents the latest advanced PT technology for treating cancers, including thoracic malignancies. On the basis of virtual clinical studies, PBS-PT appears to have great potential in its ability to tightly tailor

  19. Measurement of angle-correlated differential (n,2n) reaction cross section with pencil-beam DV neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takaki, S.; Kondo, K.; Shido, S.; Miyamaru, H.; Murata, I.; Ochiai, Kentaro; Nishitani, Takeo

    2006-01-01

    Angle-correlated differential cross-section for 9 Be(n,2n) reaction has been measured with the coincidence detection technique and a pencil-beam DT neutron source at FNS, JAEA. Energy spectra of two emitted neutrons were obtained for azimuthal and polar direction independently. It was made clear from the experiment that there are noise signals caused by inter-detector scattering. The ratio of the inter-detector scattering components in the detected signals was estimated by MCNP calculation to correct the measured result. By considering the inter-detector scattering components, the total 9 Be(n,2n) reaction cross-section agreed with the evaluated nuclear data within the experimental error. (author)

  20. Propagation dynamics of super-Gaussian beams in fractional Schrödinger equation: from linear to nonlinear regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lifu; Li, Chuxin; Zhong, Haizhe; Xu, Changwen; Lei, Dajun; Li, Ying; Fan, Dianyuan

    2016-06-27

    We have investigated the propagation dynamics of super-Gaussian optical beams in fractional Schrödinger equation. We have identified the difference between the propagation dynamics of super-Gaussian beams and that of Gaussian beams. We show that, the linear propagation dynamics of the super-Gaussian beams with order m > 1 undergo an initial compression phase before they split into two sub-beams. The sub-beams with saddle shape separate each other and their interval increases linearly with propagation distance. In the nonlinear regime, the super-Gaussian beams evolve to become a single soliton, breathing soliton or soliton pair depending on the order of super-Gaussian beams, nonlinearity, as well as the Lévy index. In two dimensions, the linear evolution of super-Gaussian beams is similar to that for one dimension case, but the initial compression of the input super-Gaussian beams and the diffraction of the splitting beams are much stronger than that for one dimension case. While the nonlinear propagation of the super-Gaussian beams becomes much more unstable compared with that for the case of one dimension. Our results show the nonlinear effects can be tuned by varying the Lévy index in the fractional Schrödinger equation for a fixed input power.

  1. The impact of MCS models and EFAC values on the dose simulation for a proton pencil beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Shih-Kuan; Chiang, Bing-Hao; Lee, Chung-Chi; Tung, Chuan-Jong; Hong, Ji-Hong; Chao, Tsi-Chian

    2017-01-01

    The Multiple Coulomb Scattering (MCS) model plays an important role in accurate MC simulation, especially for small field applications. The Rossi model is used in MCNPX 2.7.0, and the Lewis model in Geant4.9.6.p02. These two models may generate very different angular and spatial distributions in small field proton dosimetry. Beside angular and spatial distributions, step size is also an important issue that causes path length effects. The Energy Fraction (EFAC) value can be used in MCNPX 2.7.0 to control step sizes of MCS. In this study, we use MCNPX 2.7.0, Geant4.9.6.p02, and one pencil beam algorithm to evaluate the effect of dose deposition because of different MCS models and different EFAC values in proton disequilibrium situation. Different MCS models agree well with each other under a proton equilibrium situation. Under proton disequilibrium situations, the MCNPX and Geant4 results, however, show a significant deviation (up to 43%). In addition, the path length effects are more significant when EFAC is equal to 0.917 and 0.94 in small field proton dosimetry, and using a 0.97 EFAC value is the best for both accuracy and efficiency - Highlights: • MCS and EFAC are important in accurate MC simulation for proton pencil beams. • Bragg curves of MCNPX and Geant4 have a dose deviation up to 43%. • Lateral profiles from MCNPX is wider than those from Geant4. • Large EFAC caused path length effect, but no effects on lateral profiles. • 0.97 EFAC value is the best for both accuracy and efficiency.

  2. A Monte Carlo pencil beam scanning model for proton treatment plan simulation using GATE/GEANT4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grevillot, L; Freud, N; Sarrut, D [Universite de Lyon, CREATIS, CNRS UMR5220, Inserm U1044, INSA-Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, Centre Leon Berard, Lyon (France); Bertrand, D; Dessy, F, E-mail: loic.grevillot@creatis.insa-lyon.fr [IBA, B-1348, Louvain-la Neuve (Belgium)

    2011-08-21

    This work proposes a generic method for modeling scanned ion beam delivery systems, without simulation of the treatment nozzle and based exclusively on beam data library (BDL) measurements required for treatment planning systems (TPS). To this aim, new tools dedicated to treatment plan simulation were implemented in the Gate Monte Carlo platform. The method was applied to a dedicated nozzle from IBA for proton pencil beam scanning delivery. Optical and energy parameters of the system were modeled using a set of proton depth-dose profiles and spot sizes measured at 27 therapeutic energies. For further validation of the beam model, specific 2D and 3D plans were produced and then measured with appropriate dosimetric tools. Dose contributions from secondary particles produced by nuclear interactions were also investigated using field size factor experiments. Pristine Bragg peaks were reproduced with 0.7 mm range and 0.2 mm spot size accuracy. A 32 cm range spread-out Bragg peak with 10 cm modulation was reproduced with 0.8 mm range accuracy and a maximum point-to-point dose difference of less than 2%. A 2D test pattern consisting of a combination of homogeneous and high-gradient dose regions passed a 2%/2 mm gamma index comparison for 97% of the points. In conclusion, the generic modeling method proposed for scanned ion beam delivery systems was applicable to an IBA proton therapy system. The key advantage of the method is that it only requires BDL measurements of the system. The validation tests performed so far demonstrated that the beam model achieves clinical performance, paving the way for further studies toward TPS benchmarking. The method involves new sources that are available in the new Gate release V6.1 and could be further applied to other particle therapy systems delivering protons or other types of ions like carbon.

  3. SU-F-T-428: An Optimization-Based Commissioning Tool for Finite Size Pencil Beam Dose Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Y; Tian, Z; Song, T; Jia, X; Gu, X; Jiang, S [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Finite size pencil beam (FSPB) algorithms are commonly used to pre-calculate the beamlet dose distribution for IMRT treatment planning. FSPB commissioning, which usually requires fine tuning of the FSPB kernel parameters, is crucial to the dose calculation accuracy and hence the plan quality. Yet due to the large number of beamlets, FSPB commissioning could be very tedious. This abstract reports an optimization-based FSPB commissioning tool we have developed in MatLab to facilitate the commissioning. Methods: A FSPB dose kernel generally contains two types of parameters: the profile parameters determining the dose kernel shape, and a 2D scaling factors accounting for the longitudinal and off-axis corrections. The former were fitted using the penumbra of a reference broad beam’s dose profile with Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. Since the dose distribution of a broad beam is simply a linear superposition of the dose kernel of each beamlet calculated with the fitted profile parameters and scaled using the scaling factors, these factors could be determined by solving an optimization problem which minimizes the discrepancies between the calculated dose of broad beams and the reference dose. Results: We have commissioned a FSPB algorithm for three linac photon beams (6MV, 15MV and 6MVFFF). Dose of four field sizes (6*6cm2, 10*10cm2, 15*15cm2 and 20*20cm2) were calculated and compared with the reference dose exported from Eclipse TPS system. For depth dose curves, the differences are less than 1% of maximum dose after maximum dose depth for most cases. For lateral dose profiles, the differences are less than 2% of central dose at inner-beam regions. The differences of the output factors are within 1% for all the three beams. Conclusion: We have developed an optimization-based commissioning tool for FSPB algorithms to facilitate the commissioning, providing sufficient accuracy of beamlet dose calculation for IMRT optimization.

  4. Tuneable Gaussian to flat-top resonator by amplitude beam shaping

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ngcobo, S

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We outline a simple laser cavity comprising an opaque ring and a circular aperture that is capable of producing spatially tuneable laser modes, from a Gaussian beam to a Flat-top beam. The tuneability is achieved by varying the diameter...

  5. Spot size characterization of focused non-Gaussian X-ray laser beams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chalupsky, J.; Krzywinski, J.; Juha, L.; Hajkova, V.; Cihelka, J.; Burian, T.; Vysin, L.; Gaudin, J.; Gleeson, A.; Jurek, M.; Khorsand, A. R.; Klinger, D.; Wabnitz, H.; Sobierajski, R.; Stormer, M.; Tiedtke, K.; Toleikis, S.

    2010-01-01

    We present a new technique for the characterization of non-Gaussian laser beams which cannot be described by an analytical formula. As a generalization of the beam spot area we apply and refine the definition of so called effective area (A(eff)) [1] in order to avoid using the full-width at half

  6. Polarimetric imaging of turbid inhomogeneous slab media based on backscattering using a pencil beam for illumination: Monte Carlo simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuki, Soichi

    2018-04-01

    Polarimetric imaging of absorbing, strongly scattering, or birefringent inclusions is investigated in a negligibly absorbing, moderately scattering, and isotropic slab medium. It was proved that the reduced effective scattering Mueller matrix is exactly calculated from experimental or simulated raw matrices even if the medium is anisotropic and/or heterogeneous, or the outgoing light beam exits obliquely to the normal of the slab surface. The calculation also gives a reasonable approximation of the reduced matrix using a light beam with a finite diameter for illumination. The reduced matrix was calculated using a Monte Carlo simulation and was factorized in two dimensions by the Lu-Chipman polar decomposition. The intensity of backscattered light shows clear and modestly clear differences for absorbing and strongly scattering inclusions, respectively, whereas it shows no difference for birefringent inclusions. Conversely, some polarization parameters, for example, the selective depolarization coefficients exhibit only a slight difference for the absorbing inclusions, whereas they showed clear difference for the strongly scattering or birefringent inclusions. Moreover, these quantities become larger with increasing the difference in the optical properties of the inclusions relative to the surrounding medium. However, it is difficult to recognize inclusions that buried at the depth deeper than 3 mm under the surface. Thus, the present technique can detect the approximate shape and size of these inclusions, and considering the depth where inclusions lie, estimate their optical properties. This study reveals the possibility of the polarization-sensitive imaging of turbid inhomogeneous media using a pencil beam for illumination.

  7. Effects of relativistic and channel focusing on q-Gaussian laser beam propagating in a preformed parabolic plasma channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Li; Hong, Xue-Ren, E-mail: hxr_nwnu@163.com; Sun, Jian-An, E-mail: sunja@nwnu.edu.cn; Tang, Rong-An; Yang, Yang; Zhou, Wei-Jun; Tian, Jian-Min; Duan, Wen-Shan

    2017-07-12

    The propagation of q-Gaussian laser beam in a preformed plasma channel is investigated by means of the variational method. A differential equation for the spot size has been obtained by including the effects of relativistic self-focusing, ponderomotive self-channeling and preformed channel focusing. The propagation behaviors and their corresponding physical conditions are identified. The comparison of the propagation between q-Gaussian and Gaussian laser beams is done by theoretical and numerical analysis. It is shown that, in the same channel, the focusing power of q-Gaussian laser beam is lower than that of Gaussian laser beam, i.e., the q-Gaussian laser beam is easier to focus than Gaussian laser beam. - Highlights: • Some behaviors for Gaussian laser are also found for q-Gaussian one. • The parameter regions corresponding to different laser behaviors are given. • Influence of q on the laser propagation behavior is obvious. • The q-Gaussian laser beam is easier to focus than the Gaussian one.

  8. Effects of relativistic and channel focusing on q-Gaussian laser beam propagating in a preformed parabolic plasma channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Li; Hong, Xue-Ren; Sun, Jian-An; Tang, Rong-An; Yang, Yang; Zhou, Wei-Jun; Tian, Jian-Min; Duan, Wen-Shan

    2017-01-01

    The propagation of q-Gaussian laser beam in a preformed plasma channel is investigated by means of the variational method. A differential equation for the spot size has been obtained by including the effects of relativistic self-focusing, ponderomotive self-channeling and preformed channel focusing. The propagation behaviors and their corresponding physical conditions are identified. The comparison of the propagation between q-Gaussian and Gaussian laser beams is done by theoretical and numerical analysis. It is shown that, in the same channel, the focusing power of q-Gaussian laser beam is lower than that of Gaussian laser beam, i.e., the q-Gaussian laser beam is easier to focus than Gaussian laser beam. - Highlights: • Some behaviors for Gaussian laser are also found for q-Gaussian one. • The parameter regions corresponding to different laser behaviors are given. • Influence of q on the laser propagation behavior is obvious. • The q-Gaussian laser beam is easier to focus than the Gaussian one.

  9. SU-G-TeP1-04: Deriving Spot Shape Criteria for Proton Pencil Beam Scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wulff, J; Huggins, A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The shape of a single beam in proton PBS influences the resulting dose distribution. Spot profiles are modelled as two-dimensional Gaussian (single/ double) distributions in treatment planning systems (TPS). Impact of slight deviations from an ideal Gaussian on resulting dose distributions is typically assumed to be small due to alleviation by multiple Coulomb scattering (MCS) in tissue and superposition of many spots. Quantitative limits are however not clear per se. Methods: A set of 1250 deliberately deformed profiles with sigma=4 mm for a Gaussian fit were constructed. Profiles and fit were normalized to the same area, resembling output calibration in the TPS. Depth-dependent MCS was considered. The deviation between deformed and ideal profiles was characterized by root-mean-squared deviation (RMSD), skewness/ kurtosis (SK) and full-width at different percentage of maximum (FWxM). The profiles were convolved with different fluence patterns (regular/ random) resulting in hypothetical dose distributions. The resulting deviations were analyzed by applying a gamma-test. Results were compared to measured spot profiles. Results: A clear correlation between pass-rate and profile metrics could be determined. The largest impact occurred for a regular fluence-pattern with increasing distance between single spots, followed by a random distribution of spot weights. The results are strongly dependent on gamma-analysis dose and distance levels. Pass-rates of >95% at 2%/2 mm and 40 mm depth (=70 MeV) could only be achieved for RMSD<10%, deviation in FWxM at 20% and root of quadratic sum of SK <0.8. As expected the results improve for larger depths. The trends were well resembled for measured spot profiles. Conclusion: All measured profiles from ProBeam sites passed the criteria. Given the fact, that beam-line tuning can result shape distortions, the derived criteria represent a useful QA tool for commissioning and design of future beam-line optics.

  10. Effects of a modulated vortex structure on the diffraction dynamics of ring Airy Gaussian beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xianwei; Shi, Xiaohui; Deng, Zhixiang; Bai, Yanfeng; Fu, Xiquan

    2017-09-01

    The evolution of the ring Airy Gaussian beams with a modulated vortex in free space is numerically investigated. Compared with the unmodulated vortex, the unique property is that the beam spots first break up, and then gather. The evolution of the beams is influenced by the parameters of the vortex modulation, and the splitting phenomenon gets enhanced with multiple rings becoming light spots if the modulation depth increases. The symmetric branch pattern of the beam spots gets changed when the number of phase folds increases, and the initial modulation phase only impacts the angle of the beam spots. Moreover, a large distribution factor correlates to a hollow Gaussian vortex shape and weakens the splitting and gathering trend. By changing the initial parameters of the vortex modulation and the distribution factor, the peak intensity is greatly affected. In addition, the energy flow and the angular momentum are elucidated with the beam evolution features being confirmed.

  11. Wigner distribution function of Hermite-cosine-Gaussian beams through an apertured optical system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Dong; Zhao, Daomu

    2005-08-01

    By introducing the hard-aperture function into a finite sum of complex Gaussian functions, the approximate analytical expressions of the Wigner distribution function for Hermite-cosine-Gaussian beams passing through an apertured paraxial ABCD optical system are obtained. The analytical results are compared with the numerically integrated ones, and the absolute errors are also given. It is shown that the analytical results are proper and that the calculation speed for them is much faster than for the numerical results.

  12. SU-F-T-207: Does the Greater Flexibility of Pencil Beam Scanning Reduce the Need for a Proton Gantry?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, S; Depauw, N; Flanz, J; Adams, J; Gorissen, BL; Shih, H; Bortfeld, T; Lu, H [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Gantry-less proton treatment facility could lower the capital cost of proton therapy. This study investigates the dosimetric feasibility of using only coplanar pencil beam scanning (PBS) beams for those patients who had beam angles that would not have been deliverable without the gantry. Those coplanar beams are implemented on gantry-less horizontal beam-line with patients in sitting or standing positions. Methods: We have selected ten patients (seven head-and-neck, one thoracic, one abdominal and one pelvic case) with clinically delivered double scattering (DS) or PBS treatment plans with beam angles that were challenging to achieve without a gantry. After removing these beams angles, PBS plans were optimized for gantry-less intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) or single field optimization (SFO) with multi-criteria optimization (MCO). For head-and-neck patients who were treated by DS, we generated PBS plans with non-coplanar beams for comparison. Dose-volume-histograms (DVHs), target homogeneity index (HI), mean dose, D-2 and D-98 were reported. Robustness analysis was performed with ±2.5 mm setup errors and ±3.5% range uncertainties for three head-and-neck patients. Results: PBS-gantry-less plans provided more homogenous target coverage and significant improvements on organs-at-risk (OARs) sparing, compared to passive scattering treatments with a gantry. The PBS gantry-less treatments reduced the HI for target coverage by 1.3% to 47.2%, except for a suprasellar patient and a liver patient. The PBS-gantry-less plans reduced the D-mean of OARs by 3.6% to 67.4%. The PBS-gantry plans had similar target coverage and only marginal improvements on OAR sparing as compared to the PBS-gantry-less plans. These two PBS plans also had similar robustness relative to range uncertainties and setup errors. Conclusion: The gantry-less plans have with less mean dose to OARs and more homogeneous target coverage. Although the PBS-gantry plans have slightly improved

  13. Interaction of Airy-Gaussian beams in saturable media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Meiling; Peng, Yulian; Chen, Chidao; Chen, Bo; Peng, Xi; Deng, Dongmei

    2016-08-01

    Based on the nonlinear Schrödinger equation, the interactions of the two Airy-Gaussian components in the incidence are analyzed in saturable media, under the circumstances of the same amplitude and different amplitudes, respectively. It is found that the interaction can be both attractive and repulsive depending on the relative phase. The smaller the interval between two Airy-Gaussian components in the incidence is, the stronger the intensity of the interaction. However, with the equal amplitude, the symmetry is shown and the change of quasi-breathers is opposite in the in-phase case and out-of-phase case. As the distribution factor is increased, the phenomena of the quasi-breather and the self-accelerating of the two Airy-Gaussian components are weakened. When the amplitude is not equal, the image does not have symmetry. The obvious phenomenon of the interaction always arises on the side of larger input power in the incidence. The maximum intensity image is also simulated. Many of the characteristics which are contained within other images can also be concluded in this figure. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11374108 and 10904041), the Foundation for the Author of Guangdong Province Excellent Doctoral Dissertation (Grant No. SYBZZXM201227), and the Foundation of Cultivating Outstanding Young Scholars (“Thousand, Hundred, Ten” Program) of Guangdong Province, China. CAS Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment, University of Science and Technology of China.

  14. Interaction of Airy–Gaussian beams in saturable media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Meiling; Peng Yulian; Chen Chidao; Chen Bo; Peng Xi; Deng Dongmei

    2016-01-01

    Based on the nonlinear Schrödinger equation, the interactions of the two Airy–Gaussian components in the incidence are analyzed in saturable media, under the circumstances of the same amplitude and different amplitudes, respectively. It is found that the interaction can be both attractive and repulsive depending on the relative phase. The smaller the interval between two Airy–Gaussian components in the incidence is, the stronger the intensity of the interaction. However, with the equal amplitude, the symmetry is shown and the change of quasi-breathers is opposite in the in-phase case and out-of-phase case. As the distribution factor is increased, the phenomena of the quasi-breather and the self-accelerating of the two Airy–Gaussian components are weakened. When the amplitude is not equal, the image does not have symmetry. The obvious phenomenon of the interaction always arises on the side of larger input power in the incidence. The maximum intensity image is also simulated. Many of the characteristics which are contained within other images can also be concluded in this figure. (paper)

  15. Investigation of 0.38 THz backward-wave oscillator based on slotted sine waveguide and pencil electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Luqi; Wei, Yanyu; Wang, Bing; Shen, Wenan; Xu, Jin; Gong, Yubin [National Key Laboratory of Science and Technology on Vacuum Electronics, School of Physical Electronics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Park, Gun-Sik [The Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    A novel backward wave oscillator (BWO) is presented by utilizing a slotted sine waveguide with a pencil electron beam to produce the high power terahertz wave. The high frequency characteristics including dispersion properties, interaction impedances, and transmission characteristics of the slotted sine waveguide are analyzed in detail. The high frequency system including the output coupler, slow wave structure (SWS), and reflector are designed properly. A 3-D particle-in-cell mode is applied to predict the device performance of the BWO based on the novel SWS. The investigation results demonstrate that this device can generate over 8.05 W output power in the frequency range of 363.4–383.8 GHz by using a 30 mA pencil electron beam and adjusting the beam voltage from 20 kV to 32 kV.

  16. Optical propagation of the HE11 mode and Gaussian beams in hollow circular waveguides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crenn, J.P.

    1993-05-01

    The propagation of the HE 11 mode and Gaussian beams in hollow oversized circular waveguides is analyzed using optical theories. Different types of waveguides are considered: hollow dielectric or conducting waveguides, dielectric-lined waveguides, corrugated waveguides. General formulas are derived which give the power transmission through these different guides. The best wall materials and structures are determined from a comparison of the waveguide transmissions, at the infrared and millimeter wavelengths. The question of the coupling between the HE 11 mode and Gaussian beams is discussed and from a review of coupling coefficients derived before, an optimum value is pointed out. The problem of matching a Gaussian beam into circular waveguides in order to achieve the maximum power transmission is analyzed

  17. Self-repeating properties of four-petal Gaussian vortex beams in quadratic index medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Defeng; Li, Xiaohui; Chai, Tong; Zheng, Hairong

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, we investigate the propagation properties of four-petal Gaussian vortex (FPGV) beams propagating through the quadratic index medium, obtaining the analytical expression of FPGV beams. The effects of beam order n, topological charge m and beam waist ω0 are investigated. Results show that quadratic index medium support periodic distributions of FPGV beams. A hollow optical wall or an optical central principal maximum surrounded by symmetrical sidelobes will occur at the center of a period. At length, they will evolve into four petals structure, exactly same as the intensity distributions at source plane.

  18. Spot size characterization of focused non-Gaussian X-ray laser beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalupský, J; Krzywinski, J; Juha, L; Hájková, V; Cihelka, J; Burian, T; Vysín, L; Gaudin, J; Gleeson, A; Jurek, M; Khorsand, A R; Klinger, D; Wabnitz, H; Sobierajski, R; Störmer, M; Tiedtke, K; Toleikis, S

    2010-12-20

    We present a new technique for the characterization of non-Gaussian laser beams which cannot be described by an analytical formula. As a generalization of the beam spot area we apply and refine the definition of so called effective area (A(eff)) [1] in order to avoid using the full-width at half maximum (FWHM) parameter which is inappropriate for non-Gaussian beams. Furthermore, we demonstrate a practical utilization of our technique for a femtosecond soft X-ray free-electron laser. The ablative imprints in poly(methyl methacrylate) - PMMA and amorphous carbon (a-C) are used to characterize the spatial beam profile and to determine the effective area. Two procedures of the effective area determination are presented in this work. An F-scan method, newly developed in this paper, appears to be a good candidate for the spatial beam diagnostics applicable to lasers of various kinds.

  19. Theoretical and experimental study of Gaussian beam and mode propagation in over-dimensioned circular guides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crenn, J.P.

    1984-06-01

    A theoretical study of modes in circular hollow over-dimensioned waveguides is developed; it shows the interest of dielectric or weakly conducting wall guide use. An optical model computing the transmitted power of gaussian beams through these guides, for different types of walls, is established. The formulas obtained allow to optimize the guide and to adapt the beam. Applied to the EH 11 mode this optical model leads to new results. Systematical measurements of gaussian beam propagation in over-dimensioned guides are realised; they are concerned with beam power transmission, polarization, its structure and its radiation at the guide exit in function of the different characteristics of the beam and the guide [fr

  20. The robustness of truncated Airy beam in PT Gaussian potentials media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianni; Fu, Xiquan; Huang, Xianwei; Yang, Yijun; Bai, Yanfeng

    2018-03-01

    The robustness of truncated Airy beam in parity-time (PT) symmetric Gaussian potentials media is numerically investigated. A high-peak power beam sheds from the Airy beam due to the media modulation while the Airy wavefront still retain its self-bending and non-diffraction characteristics under the influence of modulation parameters. Increasing the modulation factor results in the smaller value of maximum power of the center beam, and the opposite trend occurs with the increment of the modulation depth. However, the parabolic trajectory of the Airy wavefront does not be influenced. By utilizing the unique features, the Airy beam can be used as a long distance transmission source under the PT symmetric Gaussian potentials medium.

  1. Adaptive beamlet-based finite-size pencil beam dose calculation for independent verification of IMRT and VMAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Justin C.; Li, Jonathan G.; Arhjoul, Lahcen; Yan, Guanghua; Lu, Bo; Fan, Qiyong; Liu, Chihray

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The use of sophisticated dose calculation procedure in modern radiation therapy treatment planning is inevitable in order to account for complex treatment fields created by multileaf collimators (MLCs). As a consequence, independent volumetric dose verification is time consuming, which affects the efficiency of clinical workflow. In this study, the authors present an efficient adaptive beamlet-based finite-size pencil beam (AB-FSPB) dose calculation algorithm that minimizes the computational procedure while preserving the accuracy. Methods: The computational time of finite-size pencil beam (FSPB) algorithm is proportional to the number of infinitesimal and identical beamlets that constitute an arbitrary field shape. In AB-FSPB, dose distribution from each beamlet is mathematically modeled such that the sizes of beamlets to represent an arbitrary field shape no longer need to be infinitesimal nor identical. As a result, it is possible to represent an arbitrary field shape with combinations of different sized and minimal number of beamlets. In addition, the authors included the model parameters to consider MLC for its rounded edge and transmission. Results: Root mean square error (RMSE) between treatment planning system and conventional FSPB on a 10 × 10 cm 2 square field using 10 × 10, 2.5 × 2.5, and 0.5 × 0.5 cm 2 beamlet sizes were 4.90%, 3.19%, and 2.87%, respectively, compared with RMSE of 1.10%, 1.11%, and 1.14% for AB-FSPB. This finding holds true for a larger square field size of 25 × 25 cm 2 , where RMSE for 25 × 25, 2.5 × 2.5, and 0.5 × 0.5 cm 2 beamlet sizes were 5.41%, 4.76%, and 3.54% in FSPB, respectively, compared with RMSE of 0.86%, 0.83%, and 0.88% for AB-FSPB. It was found that AB-FSPB could successfully account for the MLC transmissions without major discrepancy. The algorithm was also graphical processing unit (GPU) compatible to maximize its computational speed. For an intensity modulated radiation therapy (∼12 segments) and a

  2. Theoretical study of the attenuation of a gaussian beam penetrating into a dielectric circular wave guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crenn, J.P.

    1981-07-01

    It is proposed to draw up an approximate formula directly giving the attenuation of a gaussian beam penetrating into a superdimensioned dielectric circular wave guide. This formula is derived from optical laws, i.e. Fresnel's formulae of the reflexion of a wave on a dielectric to which a correcting term due to diffraction has been added. The results given by this formula are compared with the existing results, based on the breakdown of a gaussian beam into propagation modes, thereby enabling their validity and the field of use to be checked. An application is then made to the wave guides that will be employed in the infrared interferometer fitted in JET [fr

  3. Pencil-like mm-size electron beams produced with linear inductive voltage adders (LIVA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazarakis, M.G.; Poukey, J.W.; Rovang, D.C.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents design, analysis, and first results of the high brightness electron beam experiments currently under investigation at Sandia. Anticipated beam parameters are: energy 12 MeV, current 35-40 kA, rms radius 0.5 mm, pulse duration 40 ns FWHM. The accelerator is SABRE, a pulsed LIVA modified to higher impedance, and the electron source is a magnetically immersed foilless electron diode. 20 to 30 Tesla solenoidal magnets are required to insulate the diode and contain the beam to its extremely small sized (1 mm) envelope. These experiments are designed to push the technology to produce the highest possible electron current in a submillimeter radius beam. Design, numercial simulations, and first experimental results are presented

  4. Pencil-like mm-size electron beams produced with Linear Inductive Voltage Adders (LIVA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazarakis, M.G.; Poukey, J.W.; Rovang, D C.; Maenchen, J.E.; Cordova, S.R.; Menge, P.R.; Pepping, R.; Bennett, L.; Mikkelson, K.; Smith, D.L.; Halbleib, J.; Stygar, W.A.; Welch, D.R.

    1996-01-01

    We present the design, analysis, and first results of the high brightness electron beam experiments currently under investigation at Sandia National Laboratories. The anticipated beam parameters are the following: energy 12 MeV, current 35-40 kA, rms radius 0.5 mm, and pulse duration 40 ns FWHM. The accelerator is SABRE, a pulsed LIVA modified to higher impedance, and the electron source is a magnetically immersed foilless electron diode. Twenty to thirty Tesla solenoidal magnets are required to insulate the diode and contain the beam to its extremely small sized (1 mm) envelope. These experiments are designed to push the technology to produce the highest possible electron current in a submillimeter radius beam. Design, numerical simulations, and first experimental results are presented. (author)

  5. Improved efficiency of multi-criteria IMPT treatment planning using iterative resampling of randomly placed pencil beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Water, S.; Kraan, A. C.; Breedveld, S.; Schillemans, W.; Teguh, D. N.; Kooy, H. M.; Madden, T. M.; Heijmen, B. J. M.; Hoogeman, M. S.

    2013-10-01

    This study investigates whether ‘pencil beam resampling’, i.e. iterative selection and weight optimization of randomly placed pencil beams (PBs), reduces optimization time and improves plan quality for multi-criteria optimization in intensity-modulated proton therapy, compared with traditional modes in which PBs are distributed over a regular grid. Resampling consisted of repeatedly performing: (1) random selection of candidate PBs from a very fine grid, (2) inverse multi-criteria optimization, and (3) exclusion of low-weight PBs. The newly selected candidate PBs were added to the PBs in the existing solution, causing the solution to improve with each iteration. Resampling and traditional regular grid planning were implemented into our in-house developed multi-criteria treatment planning system ‘Erasmus iCycle’. The system optimizes objectives successively according to their priorities as defined in the so-called ‘wish-list’. For five head-and-neck cancer patients and two PB widths (3 and 6 mm sigma at 230 MeV), treatment plans were generated using: (1) resampling, (2) anisotropic regular grids and (3) isotropic regular grids, while using varying sample sizes (resampling) or grid spacings (regular grid). We assessed differences in optimization time (for comparable plan quality) and in plan quality parameters (for comparable optimization time). Resampling reduced optimization time by a factor of 2.8 and 5.6 on average (7.8 and 17.0 at maximum) compared with the use of anisotropic and isotropic grids, respectively. Doses to organs-at-risk were generally reduced when using resampling, with median dose reductions ranging from 0.0 to 3.0 Gy (maximum: 14.3 Gy, relative: 0%-42%) compared with anisotropic grids and from -0.3 to 2.6 Gy (maximum: 11.4 Gy, relative: -4%-19%) compared with isotropic grids. Resampling was especially effective when using thin PBs (3 mm sigma). Resampling plans contained on average fewer PBs, energy layers and protons than anisotropic

  6. Scattering of aerosol particles by a Hermite-Gaussian beam in marine atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qingqing; Cheng, Mingjian; Guo, Lixin; Li, Jiangting; Yan, Xu; Liu, Songhua

    2017-07-01

    Based on the complex-source-point method and the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory, the scattering properties and polarization of aerosol particles by a Hermite-Gaussian (HG) beam in marine atmosphere is investigated. The influences of beam mode, beam width, and humidity on the scattered field are analyzed numerically. Results indicate that when the number of HG beam modes u (v) increase, the radar cross section of aerosol particles alternating appears at maximum and minimum values in the forward and backward scattering, respectively, because of the special petal-shaped distribution of the HG beam. The forward and backward scattering of aerosol particles decreases with the increase in beam waist. When beam waist is less than the radius of the aerosol particle, a minimum value is observed in the forward direction. The scattering properties of aerosol particles by the HG beam are more sensitive to the change in relative humidity compared with those by the plane wave and the Gaussian beam (GB). The HG beam shows superiority over the plane wave and the GB in detecting changes in the relative humidity of marine atmosphere aerosol. The effects of relative humidity on the polarization of the HG beam have been numerically analyzed in detail.

  7. SU-E-T-400: Evaluation of Shielding and Activation at Two Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remmes, N; Mundy, D; Classic, K; Beltran, C; Kruse, J; Herman, M; Stoker, J; Nelson, K; Bues, M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To verify acceptably low dose levels around two newly constructed identical pencil beam scanning proton therapy facilities and to evaluate accuracy of pre-construction shielding calculations. Methods: Dose measurements were taken at select points of interest using a WENDI-2 style wide-energy neutron detector. Measurements were compared to pre-construction shielding calculations. Radiation badges with neutron dose measurement capabilities were worn by personnel and also placed at points throughout the facilities. Seven neutron and gamma detectors were permanently installed throughout the facility, continuously logging data. Potential activation hazards have also been investigated. Dose rates near water tanks immediately after prolonged irradiation have been measured. Equipment inside the treatment room and accelerator vault has been surveyed and/or wipe tested. Air filters from air handling units, sticky mats placed outside of the accelerator vault, and water samples from the magnet cooling water loops have also been tested. Results: All radiation badges have been returned with readings below the reporting minimum. Measurements of mats, air filters, cooling water, wipe tests and surveys of equipment that has not been placed in the beam have all come back at background levels. All survey measurements show the analytical shielding calculations to be conservative by at least a factor of 2. No anomalous events have been identified by the building radiation monitoring system. Measurements of dose rates close to scanning water tanks have shown dose rates of approximately 10 mrem/hr with a half-life less than 5 minutes. Measurements around the accelerator show some areas with dose rates slightly higher than 10 mrem/hr. Conclusion: The shielding design is shown to be adequate. Measured dose rates are below those predicted by shielding calculations. Activation hazards are minimal except in certain very well defined areas within the accelerator vault and for objects

  8. Experimental Comparison of Knife-Edge and Multi-Parallel Slit Collimators for Prompt Gamma Imaging of Proton Pencil Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeets, Julien; Roellinghoff, Frauke; Janssens, Guillaume; Perali, Irene; Celani, Andrea; Fiorini, Carlo; Freud, Nicolas; Testa, Etienne; Prieels, Damien

    2016-01-01

    More and more camera concepts are being investigated to try and seize the opportunity of instantaneous range verification of proton therapy treatments offered by prompt gammas emitted along the proton tracks. Focusing on one-dimensional imaging with a passive collimator, the present study experimentally compared in combination with the first, clinically compatible, dedicated camera device the performances of instances of the two main options: a knife-edge slit (KES) and a multi-parallel slit (MPS) design. These two options were experimentally assessed in this specific context as they were previously demonstrated through analytical and numerical studies to allow similar performances in terms of Bragg peak retrieval precision and spatial resolution in a general context. Both collimators were prototyped according to the conclusions of Monte Carlo optimization studies under constraints of equal weight (40 mm tungsten alloy equivalent thickness) and of the specificities of the camera device under consideration (in particular 4 mm segmentation along beam axis and no time-of-flight discrimination, both of which less favorable to the MPS performance than to the KES one). Acquisitions of proton pencil beams of 100, 160, and 230 MeV in a PMMA target revealed that, in order to reach a given level of statistical precision on Bragg peak depth retrieval, the KES collimator requires only half the dose the present MPS collimator needs, making the KES collimator a preferred option for a compact camera device aimed at imaging only the Bragg peak position. On the other hand, the present MPS collimator proves more effective at retrieving the entrance of the beam in the target in the context of an extended camera device aimed at imaging the whole proton track within the patient. PMID:27446802

  9. Experimental Comparison of Knife-Edge and Multi-Parallel Slit Collimators for Prompt Gamma Imaging of Proton Pencil Beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeets, Julien; Roellinghoff, Frauke; Janssens, Guillaume; Perali, Irene; Celani, Andrea; Fiorini, Carlo; Freud, Nicolas; Testa, Etienne; Prieels, Damien

    2016-01-01

    More and more camera concepts are being investigated to try and seize the opportunity of instantaneous range verification of proton therapy treatments offered by prompt gammas emitted along the proton tracks. Focusing on one-dimensional imaging with a passive collimator, the present study experimentally compared in combination with the first, clinically compatible, dedicated camera device the performances of instances of the two main options: a knife-edge slit (KES) and a multi-parallel slit (MPS) design. These two options were experimentally assessed in this specific context as they were previously demonstrated through analytical and numerical studies to allow similar performances in terms of Bragg peak retrieval precision and spatial resolution in a general context. Both collimators were prototyped according to the conclusions of Monte Carlo optimization studies under constraints of equal weight (40 mm tungsten alloy equivalent thickness) and of the specificities of the camera device under consideration (in particular 4 mm segmentation along beam axis and no time-of-flight discrimination, both of which less favorable to the MPS performance than to the KES one). Acquisitions of proton pencil beams of 100, 160, and 230 MeV in a PMMA target revealed that, in order to reach a given level of statistical precision on Bragg peak depth retrieval, the KES collimator requires only half the dose the present MPS collimator needs, making the KES collimator a preferred option for a compact camera device aimed at imaging only the Bragg peak position. On the other hand, the present MPS collimator proves more effective at retrieving the entrance of the beam in the target in the context of an extended camera device aimed at imaging the whole proton track within the patient.

  10. Development of a golden beam data set for the commissioning of a proton double-scattering system in a pencil-beam dose calculation algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slopsema, R. L.; Flampouri, S.; Yeung, D.; Li, Z.; Lin, L.; McDonough, J. E.; Palta, J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this investigation is to determine if a single set of beam data, described by a minimal set of equations and fitting variables, can be used to commission different installations of a proton double-scattering system in a commercial pencil-beam dose calculation algorithm. Methods: The beam model parameters required to commission the pencil-beam dose calculation algorithm (virtual and effective SAD, effective source size, and pristine-peak energy spread) are determined for a commercial double-scattering system. These parameters are measured in a first room and parameterized as function of proton energy and nozzle settings by fitting four analytical equations to the measured data. The combination of these equations and fitting values constitutes the golden beam data (GBD). To determine the variation in dose delivery between installations, the same dosimetric properties are measured in two additional rooms at the same facility, as well as in a single room at another facility. The difference between the room-specific measurements and the GBD is evaluated against tolerances that guarantee the 3D dose distribution in each of the rooms matches the GBD-based dose distribution within clinically reasonable limits. The pencil-beam treatment-planning algorithm is commissioned with the GBD. The three-dimensional dose distribution in water is evaluated in the four treatment rooms and compared to the treatment-planning calculated dose distribution. Results: The virtual and effective SAD measurements fall between 226 and 257 cm. The effective source size varies between 2.4 and 6.2 cm for the large-field options, and 1.0 and 2.0 cm for the small-field options. The pristine-peak energy spread decreases from 1.05% at the lowest range to 0.6% at the highest. The virtual SAD as well as the effective source size can be accurately described by a linear relationship as function of the inverse of the residual energy. An additional linear correction term as function of

  11. Development of a golden beam data set for the commissioning of a proton double-scattering system in a pencil-beam dose calculation algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slopsema, R. L., E-mail: rslopsema@floridaproton.org; Flampouri, S.; Yeung, D.; Li, Z. [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, 2015 North Jefferson Street, Jacksonville, Florida 32205 (United States); Lin, L.; McDonough, J. E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Civic Boulevard, 2326W TRC, PCAM, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Palta, J. [VCU Massey Cancer Center, Virginia Commonwealth University, 401 College Street, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this investigation is to determine if a single set of beam data, described by a minimal set of equations and fitting variables, can be used to commission different installations of a proton double-scattering system in a commercial pencil-beam dose calculation algorithm. Methods: The beam model parameters required to commission the pencil-beam dose calculation algorithm (virtual and effective SAD, effective source size, and pristine-peak energy spread) are determined for a commercial double-scattering system. These parameters are measured in a first room and parameterized as function of proton energy and nozzle settings by fitting four analytical equations to the measured data. The combination of these equations and fitting values constitutes the golden beam data (GBD). To determine the variation in dose delivery between installations, the same dosimetric properties are measured in two additional rooms at the same facility, as well as in a single room at another facility. The difference between the room-specific measurements and the GBD is evaluated against tolerances that guarantee the 3D dose distribution in each of the rooms matches the GBD-based dose distribution within clinically reasonable limits. The pencil-beam treatment-planning algorithm is commissioned with the GBD. The three-dimensional dose distribution in water is evaluated in the four treatment rooms and compared to the treatment-planning calculated dose distribution. Results: The virtual and effective SAD measurements fall between 226 and 257 cm. The effective source size varies between 2.4 and 6.2 cm for the large-field options, and 1.0 and 2.0 cm for the small-field options. The pristine-peak energy spread decreases from 1.05% at the lowest range to 0.6% at the highest. The virtual SAD as well as the effective source size can be accurately described by a linear relationship as function of the inverse of the residual energy. An additional linear correction term as function of

  12. SU-F-T-188: A Robust Treatment Planning Technique for Proton Pencil Beam Scanning Cranial Spinal Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, M; Mehta, M; Badiyan, S; Young, K; Malyapa, R; Regine, W; Langen, K [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Yam, M [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To propose a proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) cranial spinal irradiation (CSI) treatment planning technique robust against patient roll, isocenter offset and proton range uncertainty. Method: Proton PBS plans were created (Eclipse V11) for three previously treated CSI patients to 36 Gy (1.8 Gy/fractions). The target volume was separated into three regions: brain, upper spine and lower spine. One posterior-anterior (PA) beam was used for each spine region, and two posterior-oblique beams (15° apart from PA direction, denoted as 2PO-15) for the brain region. For comparison, another plan using one PA beam for the brain target (denoted as 1PA) was created. Using the same optimization objectives, 98% CTV was optimized to receive the prescription dose. To evaluate plan robustness against patient roll, the gantry angle was increased by 3° and dose was recalculated without changing the proton spot weights. On the re-calculated plan, doses were then calculated using 12 scenarios that are combinations of isocenter shift (±3mm in X, Y, and Z directions) and proton range variation (±3.5%). The worst-case-scenario (WCS) brain CTV dosimetric metrics were compared to the nominal plan. Results: For both beam arrangements, the brain field(s) and upper-spine field overlap in the T2–T5 region depending on patient anatomy. The maximum monitor unit per spot were 48.7%, 47.2%, and 40.0% higher for 1PA plans than 2PO-15 plans for the three patients. The 2PO-15 plans have better dose conformity. At the same level of CTV coverage, the 2PO-15 plans have lower maximum dose and higher minimum dose to the CTV. The 2PO-15 plans also showed lower WCS maximum dose to CTV, while the WCS minimum dose to CTV were comparable between the two techniques. Conclusion: Our method of using two posterior-oblique beams for brain target provides improved dose conformity and homogeneity, and plan robustness including patient roll.

  13. SU-D-BRE-03: Dosimetric Impact of In-Air Spot Size Variations for Commissioning a Room-Matched Beam Model for Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y; Giebeler, A; Mascia, A; Piskulich, F; Perles, L; Lepage, R; Dong, L

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To quantitatively evaluate dosimetric consequence of spot size variations and validate beam-matching criteria for commissioning a pencil beam model for multiple treatment rooms. Methods: A planning study was first conducted by simulating spot size variations to systematically evaluate dosimetric impact of spot size variations in selected cases, which was used to establish the in-air spot size tolerance for beam matching specifications. A beam model in treatment planning system was created using in-air spot profiles acquired in one treatment room. These spot profiles were also acquired from another treatment room for assessing the actual spot size variations between the two treatment rooms. We created twenty five test plans with targets of different sizes at different depths, and performed dose measurement along the entrance, proximal and distal target regions. The absolute doses at those locations were measured using ionization chambers at both treatment rooms, and were compared against the calculated doses by the beam model. Fifteen additional patient plans were also measured and included in our validation. Results: The beam model is relatively insensitive to spot size variations. With an average of less than 15% measured in-air spot size variations between two treatment rooms, the average dose difference was −0.15% with a standard deviation of 0.40% for 55 measurement points within target region; but the differences increased to 1.4%±1.1% in the entrance regions, which are more affected by in-air spot size variations. Overall, our single-room based beam model in the treatment planning system agreed with measurements in both rooms < 0.5% within the target region. For fifteen patient cases, the agreement was within 1%. Conclusion: We have demonstrated that dosimetrically equivalent machines can be established when in-air spot size variations are within 15% between the two treatment rooms

  14. Registration of pencil beam proton radiography data with X-ray CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deffet, Sylvain; Macq, Benoît; Righetto, Roberto; Vander Stappen, François; Farace, Paolo

    2017-10-01

    Proton radiography seems to be a promising tool for assessing the quality of the stopping power computation in proton therapy. However, range error maps obtained on the basis of proton radiographs are very sensitive to small misalignment between the planning CT and the proton radiography acquisitions. In order to be able to mitigate misalignment in postprocessing, the authors implemented a fast method for registration between pencil proton radiography data obtained with a multilayer ionization chamber (MLIC) and an X-ray CT acquired on a head phantom. The registration was performed by optimizing a cost function which performs a comparison between the acquired data and simulated integral depth-dose curves. Two methodologies were considered, one based on dual orthogonal projections and the other one on a single projection. For each methodology, the robustness of the registration algorithm with respect to three confounding factors (measurement noise, CT calibration errors, and spot spacing) was investigated by testing the accuracy of the method through simulations based on a CT scan of a head phantom. The present registration method showed robust convergence towards the optimal solution. For the level of measurement noise and the uncertainty in the stopping power computation expected in proton radiography using a MLIC, the accuracy appeared to be better than 0.3° for angles and 0.3 mm for translations by use of the appropriate cost function. The spot spacing analysis showed that a spacing larger than the 5 mm used by other authors for the investigation of a MLIC for proton radiography led to results with absolute accuracy better than 0.3° for angles and 1 mm for translations when orthogonal proton radiographs were fed into the algorithm. In the case of a single projection, 6 mm was the largest spot spacing presenting an acceptable registration accuracy. For registration of proton radiography data with X-ray CT, the use of a direct ray-tracing algorithm to compute

  15. Unstable propagation of a Gaussian laser beam in a plasma waveguide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feit, M.D.; Maiden, D.E.

    1976-01-01

    Laser heating of long magnetically confined plasma columns to fusion temperatures requires propagation of a trapped laser beam over considerable distances. The present paper employs the parabolic approximation to the wave equation to analyze the propagation of a Gaussian beam through a plasma with a parabolic transverse density profile. Although propagation is stable in the axially uniform case, exhibiting alternate focusing and defocusing of the beam, it is unstable to small axial perturbations of certain wavelengths. In particular, an exponentially growing beam radius results from perturbations at wavelengths near that associated with the alternate focusing and defocusing mentioned above

  16. Analyzing the Propagation Behavior of a Gaussian Laser Beam through Seawater and Comparing with Atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Dabbagh Kashani

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Study of the beam propagation behavior through oceanic media is a challenging subject. In this paper, based on generalized Collins integral, the mean irradiance profile of Gaussian laser beam propagation through ocean is investigated. Power In Special Bucket (PIB is calculated. Using analytical expressions and calculating seawater transmission, the effects of absorption and scattering on beam propagation are studied. Based on these formulae, propagation in ocean and atmosphere are compared. The effects of some optical and environmental specifications, such as divergence angle and chlorophyll concentration in seawater on beam propagation by using mean irradiance, PIB and analytical formula of oceanic transmission are studied. The calculated results are shown graphically.

  17. A GPU-based finite-size pencil beam algorithm with 3D-density correction for radiotherapy dose calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Xuejun; Jia Xun; Jiang, Steve B; Jelen, Urszula; Li Jinsheng

    2011-01-01

    Targeting at the development of an accurate and efficient dose calculation engine for online adaptive radiotherapy, we have implemented a finite-size pencil beam (FSPB) algorithm with a 3D-density correction method on graphics processing unit (GPU). This new GPU-based dose engine is built on our previously published ultrafast FSPB computational framework (Gu et al 2009 Phys. Med. Biol. 54 6287-97). Dosimetric evaluations against Monte Carlo dose calculations are conducted on ten IMRT treatment plans (five head-and-neck cases and five lung cases). For all cases, there is improvement with the 3D-density correction over the conventional FSPB algorithm and for most cases the improvement is significant. Regarding the efficiency, because of the appropriate arrangement of memory access and the usage of GPU intrinsic functions, the dose calculation for an IMRT plan can be accomplished well within 1 s (except for one case) with this new GPU-based FSPB algorithm. Compared to the previous GPU-based FSPB algorithm without 3D-density correction, this new algorithm, though slightly sacrificing the computational efficiency (∼5-15% lower), has significantly improved the dose calculation accuracy, making it more suitable for online IMRT replanning.

  18. Comparison of dose evaluation index by pencil beam convolution and anisotropic analytical algorithm in stereotactic radiotherapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachibana, Masayuki; Noguchi, Yoshitaka; Fukunaga, Jyunichi; Hirano, Naomi; Yoshidome, Satoshi; Hirose, Takaaki

    2009-01-01

    We previously studied dose distributions of stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) for lung cancer. Our aim is to compare in combination pencil beam convolution with the inhomogeneity correction algorithm of Batho power low [PBC (BPL)] to the anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) by using the dose evaluation indexes. There were significant differences in D95, planning target volume (PTV) mean dose, homogeneity index, and conformity index, V10, and V5. The dose distributions inside the PTV calculated by PBC (BPL) were more uniform than those of AAA. There were no significant differences in V20 and mean dose of total lung. There was no large difference for the whole lung. However, the surrounding high-dose region of PTV became smaller in AAA. The difference in dose evaluation indexes extended between PBC (BPL) and AAA that as many as low CT value of lung. When the dose calculation algorithm is changed, it is necessary to consider difference dose distributions compared with those of established practice. (author)

  19. Spatial properties of coaxial superposition of two coherent Gaussian beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Boubaha, B

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available that of the first focal point owing to its larger diameter, and subsequently decreases as K increases. 3. Interferometric Beam Shaping An interesting feature of the CGB is when the param- eter K is reduced, one observes that the number of rings shown in Fig. 1... for K . It is remarkable to notice that the beam shaping properties displayed in Fig. 5 are obtained from the interference of two coherent GBs, which are coaxially superposed by resorting to a two-wave interferom- eter or by generating the modulating...

  20. Uniform versus Gaussian Beams: A Comparison of the Effects of Diffraction, Obscuration, and Aberations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-12-16

    balancing is discussed for the two types of beams. Zernike polynomials representing balanced primary aberration for uniform and Gaussian annular beams...plotted on a logarithmic scale (Figs. 3c and 3d ). The positions of maxima and minima and the correspond- ing irradiance and encircled-power values are...aberration 2 4 (representing a term in the expansion of the aberration in terms of a set of " Zernike " polynomials which are orthonormal over the amplitude

  1. Technical Note: Validation of halo modeling for proton pencil beam spot scanning using a quality assurance test pattern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Liyong, E-mail: linl@uphs.upenn.edu; Huang, Sheng; Kang, Minglei; Solberg, Timothy D.; McDonough, James E.; Ainsley, Christopher G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Civic Center Boulevard, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the utility of a comprehensive test pattern in validating calculation models that include the halo component (low-dose tails) of proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) spots. Such a pattern has been used previously for quality assurance purposes to assess spot shape, position, and dose. Methods: In this study, a scintillation detector was used to measure the test pattern in air at isocenter for two proton beam energies (115 and 225 MeV) of two IBA universal nozzles (UN #1 and UN #2). Planar measurements were compared with calculated dose distributions based on the weighted superposition of location-independent (UN #1) or location-dependent (UN #2) spot profiles, previously measured using a pair-magnification method and between two nozzles. Results: Including the halo component below 1% of the central dose is shown to improve the gamma-map comparison between calculation and measurement from 94.9% to 98.4% using 2 mm/2% criteria for the 115 MeV proton beam of UN #1. In contrast, including the halo component below 1% of the central dose does not improve the gamma agreement for the 115 MeV proton beam of UN #2, due to the cutoff of the halo component at off-axis locations. When location-dependent spot profiles are used for calculation instead of spot profiles at central axis, the gamma agreement is improved from 98.0% to 99.5% using 2 mm/2% criteria. The two nozzles clearly have different characteristics, as a direct comparison of measured data shows a passing rate of 89.7% for the 115 MeV proton beam. At 225 MeV, the corresponding gamma comparisons agree better between measurement and calculation, and between measurements in the two nozzles. Conclusions: In addition to confirming the primary component of individual PBS spot profiles, a comprehensive test pattern is useful for the validation of the halo component at off-axis locations, especially for low energy protons.

  2. Scattering of Gaussian beam by a spherical particle with a spheroidal inclusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Huayong; Liao Tongqing

    2011-01-01

    A generalized Lorenz-Mie theory framework (GLMT) is applied to the study of Gaussian beam scattering by a spherical particle with an embedded spheroid at the center. By virtue of a transformation between the spherical and spheroidal vector wave functions, a theoretical procedure is developed to deal with the boundary conditions. Numerical results of the normalized differential scattering cross section are presented.

  3. Structured Laguerre-Gaussian beams for mitigation of spherical aberration in tightly focused regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddadi, S.; Bouzid, O.; Fromager, M.; Hasnaoui, A.; Harfouche, A.; Cagniot, E.; Forbes, A.; Aït-Ameur, K.

    2018-04-01

    Many laser applications utilise a focused laser beam having a single-lobed intensity profile in the focal plane, ideally with the highest possible on-axis intensity. Conventionally, this is achieved with the lowest-order Laguerre-Gaussian mode (LG00), the Gaussian beam, in a tight focusing configuration. However, tight focusing often involves significant spherical aberration due to the high numerical aperture of the systems involved, thus degrading the focal quality. Here, we demonstrate that a high-order radial LG p0 mode can be tailored to meet and in some instances exceed the performance of the Gaussian. We achieve this by phase rectification of the mode using a simple binary diffractive optic. By way of example, we show that the focusing of a rectified LG50 beam is almost insensitive to a spherical aberration coefficient of over three wavelengths, in contrast with the usual Gaussian beam for which the intensity of the focal spot is reduced by a factor of two. This work paves the way towards enhanced focal spots using structured light.

  4. Time-domain least-squares migration using the Gaussian beam summation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jidong; Zhu, Hejun; McMechan, George; Yue, Yubo

    2018-04-01

    With a finite recording aperture, a limited source spectrum and unbalanced illumination, traditional imaging methods are insufficient to generate satisfactory depth profiles with high resolution and high amplitude fidelity. This is because traditional migration uses the adjoint operator of the forward modeling rather than the inverse operator. We propose a least-squares migration approach based on the time-domain Gaussian beam summation, which helps to balance subsurface illumination and improve image resolution. Based on the Born approximation for the isotropic acoustic wave equation, we derive a linear time-domain Gaussian beam modeling operator, which significantly reduces computational costs in comparison with the spectral method. Then, we formulate the corresponding adjoint Gaussian beam migration, as the gradient of an L2-norm waveform misfit function. An L1-norm regularization is introduced to the inversion to enhance the robustness of least-squares migration, and an approximated diagonal Hessian is used as a preconditioner to speed convergence. Synthetic and field data examples demonstrate that the proposed approach improves imaging resolution and amplitude fidelity in comparison with traditional Gaussian beam migration.

  5. A Gaussian beam method for ultrasonic non-destructive evaluation modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquet, O.; Leymarie, N.; Cassereau, D.

    2018-05-01

    The propagation of high-frequency ultrasonic body waves can be efficiently estimated with a semi-analytic Dynamic Ray Tracing approach using paraxial approximation. Although this asymptotic field estimation avoids the computational cost of numerical methods, it may encounter several limitations in reproducing identified highly interferential features. Nevertheless, some can be managed by allowing paraxial quantities to be complex-valued. This gives rise to localized solutions, known as paraxial Gaussian beams. Whereas their propagation and transmission/reflection laws are well-defined, the fact remains that the adopted complexification introduces additional initial conditions. While their choice is usually performed according to strategies specifically tailored to limited applications, a Gabor frame method has been implemented to indiscriminately initialize a reasonable number of paraxial Gaussian beams. Since this method can be applied for an usefully wide range of ultrasonic transducers, the typical case of the time-harmonic piston radiator is investigated. Compared to the commonly used Multi-Gaussian Beam model [1], a better agreement is obtained throughout the radiated field between the results of numerical integration (or analytical on-axis solution) and the resulting Gaussian beam superposition. Sparsity of the proposed solution is also discussed.

  6. Application of the fractional Fourier transformation to digital holography recorded by an elliptical, astigmatic Gaussian beam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicolas, F.; Coëtmellec, S.; Brunel, M.; Allano, D.; Lebrun, D.; Janssen, A.J.E.M.

    2005-01-01

    The authors have studied the diffraction pattern produced by a particle field illuminated by an elliptic and astigmatic Gaussian beam. They demonstrate that the bidimensional fractional Fourier transformation is a mathematically suitable tool to analyse the diffraction pattern generated not only by

  7. Orbital angular momentum correlations with a phase-flipped Gaussian mode pump beam

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Romero, J

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available -1 Journal of Optics August 2012/ Vol. 14. No 8 Orbital angular momentum correlations with a phase- flipped Gaussian mode pump beam J Romero1,2, D Giovannini1, M G McLaren3,4, E J Galvez5, A Forbes3,4 and M J Padgett1 1 School of Physics...

  8. High power infrared super-Gaussian beams: generation, propagation and application

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Du Preez, NC

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper researchers present the design of a CO2 laser resonator that produces as the stable transverse mode a super–Gaussian laser beam. The resonator makes use of an intra–cavity diffractive mirror and a flat output coupler, generating...

  9. On the nuclear halo of a proton pencil beam stopping in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gottschalk, Bernard; Cascio, Ethan W; Daartz, Juliane; Wagner, Miles S

    2015-01-01

    The dose distribution of a proton beam stopping in water has components due to basic physics and may have others from beam contamination. We propose the concise terms core for the primary beam, halo (see Pedroni et al 2005 Phys. Med. Biol. 50 541–61) for the low dose region from charged secondaries, aura for the low dose region from neutrals, and spray for beam contamination.We have measured the dose distribution in a water tank at 177 MeV under conditions where spray, therefore radial asymmetry, is negligible. We used an ADCL calibrated thimble chamber and a Faraday cup calibrated integral beam monitor so as to obtain immediately the absolute dose per proton. We took depth scans at fixed distances from the beam centroid rather than radial scans at fixed depths. That minimizes the signal range for each scan and better reveals the structure of the core and halo.Transitions from core to halo to aura are already discernible in the raw data. The halo has components attributable to coherent and incoherent nuclear reactions. Due to elastic and inelastic scattering by the nuclear force, the Bragg peak persists to radii larger than can be accounted for by Molière single scattering. The radius of the incoherent component, a dose bump around midrange, agrees with the kinematics of knockout reactions.We have fitted the data in two ways. The first is algebraic or model dependent (MD) as far as possible, and has 25 parameters. The second, using 2D cubic spline regression, is model independent. Optimal parameterization for treatment planning will probably be a hybrid of the two, and will of course require measurements at several incident energies.The MD fit to the core term resembles that of the PSI group (Pedroni et al 2005), which has been widely emulated. However, we replace their T(w), a mass stopping power which mixes electromagnetic (EM) and nuclear effects, with one that is purely EM, arguing that protons that do not undergo hard single scatters continue to lose energy

  10. On the nuclear halo of a proton pencil beam stopping in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschalk, Bernard; Cascio, Ethan W.; Daartz, Juliane; Wagner, Miles S.

    2015-07-01

    The dose distribution of a proton beam stopping in water has components due to basic physics and may have others from beam contamination. We propose the concise terms core for the primary beam, halo (see Pedroni et al 2005 Phys. Med. Biol. 50 541-61) for the low dose region from charged secondaries, aura for the low dose region from neutrals, and spray for beam contamination. We have measured the dose distribution in a water tank at 177 MeV under conditions where spray, therefore radial asymmetry, is negligible. We used an ADCL calibrated thimble chamber and a Faraday cup calibrated integral beam monitor so as to obtain immediately the absolute dose per proton. We took depth scans at fixed distances from the beam centroid rather than radial scans at fixed depths. That minimizes the signal range for each scan and better reveals the structure of the core and halo. Transitions from core to halo to aura are already discernible in the raw data. The halo has components attributable to coherent and incoherent nuclear reactions. Due to elastic and inelastic scattering by the nuclear force, the Bragg peak persists to radii larger than can be accounted for by Molière single scattering. The radius of the incoherent component, a dose bump around midrange, agrees with the kinematics of knockout reactions. We have fitted the data in two ways. The first is algebraic or model dependent (MD) as far as possible, and has 25 parameters. The second, using 2D cubic spline regression, is model independent. Optimal parameterization for treatment planning will probably be a hybrid of the two, and will of course require measurements at several incident energies. The MD fit to the core term resembles that of the PSI group (Pedroni et al 2005), which has been widely emulated. However, we replace their T(w), a mass stopping power which mixes electromagnetic (EM) and nuclear effects, with one that is purely EM, arguing that protons that do not undergo hard single scatters continue to lose

  11. Hermite-Gaussian beams with self-forming spiral phase distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinchik, Alexander A.; Muzychenko, Yana B.

    2014-05-01

    Spiral laser beams is a family of laser beams that preserve the structural stability up to scale and rotate with the propagation. Properties of spiral beams are of practical interest for laser technology, medicine and biotechnology. Researchers use a spiral beams for movement and manipulation of microparticles. Spiral beams have a complicated phase distribution in cross section. This paper describes the results of analytical and computer simulation of Hermite-Gaussian beams with self-forming spiral phase distribution. In the simulation used a laser beam consisting of the sum of the two modes HG TEMnm and TEMn1m1. The coefficients n1, n, m1, m were varied. Additional phase depending from the coefficients n, m, m1, n1 imposed on the resulting beam. As a result, formed the Hermite Gaussian beam phase distribution which takes the form of a spiral in the process of distribution. For modeling was used VirtualLab 5.0 (manufacturer LightTrans GmbH).

  12. Collimated proton pencil-beam scanning for superficial targets: impact of the order of range shifter and aperture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäumer, C.; Janson, M.; Timmermann, B.; Wulff, J.

    2018-04-01

    To assess if apertures shall be mounted upstream or downstream of a range shifting block if these field-shaping devices are combined with the pencil-beam scanning delivery technique (PBS). The lateral dose fall-off served as a benchmark parameter. Both options realizing PBS-with-apertures were compared to the uniform scanning mode. We also evaluated the difference regarding the out-of-field dose caused by interactions of protons in beam-shaping devices. The potential benefit of the downstream configuration over the upstream configuration was estimated analytically. Guided by this theoretical evaluation a mechanical adapter was developed which transforms the upstream configuration provided by the proton machine vendor to a downstream configuration. Transversal dose profiles were calculated with the Monte-Carlo based dose engine of the commercial treatment planning system RayStation 6. Two-dimensional dose planes were measured with an ionization chamber array and a scintillation detector at different depths and compared to the calculation. Additionally, a clinical example for the irradiation of the orbit was compared for both PBS options and a uniform scanning treatment plan. Assuming the same air gap the lateral dose fall-off at the field edge at a few centimeter depth is 20% smaller for the aperture-downstream configuration than for the upstream one. For both options of PBS-with-apertures the dose fall-off is larger than in uniform scanning delivery mode if the minimum accelerator energy is 100 MeV. The RayStation treatment planning system calculated the width of the lateral dose fall-off with an accuracy of typically 0.1 mm–0.3 mm. Although experiments and calculations indicate a ranking of the three delivery options regarding lateral dose fall-off, there seems to be a limited impact on a multi-field treatment plan.

  13. SU-E-T-120: Analytic Dose Verification for Patient-Specific Proton Pencil Beam Scanning Plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, C; Mah, D

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To independently verify the QA dose of proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) plans using an analytic dose calculation model. Methods: An independent proton dose calculation engine is created using the same commissioning measurements as those employed to build our commercially available treatment planning system (TPS). Each proton PBS plan is exported from the TPS in DICOM format and calculated by this independent dose engine in a standard 40 x 40 x 40 cm water tank. This three-dimensional dose grid is then compared with the QA dose calculated by the commercial TPS, using standard Gamma criterion. A total of 18 measured pristine Bragg peaks, ranging from 100 to 226 MeV, are used in the model. Intermediate proton energies are interpolated. Similarly, optical properties of the spots are measured in air over 15 cm upstream and downstream, and fitted to a second-order polynomial. Multiple Coulomb scattering in water is approximated analytically using Preston and Kohler formula for faster calculation. The effect of range shifters on spot size is modeled with generalized Highland formula. Note that the above formulation approximates multiple Coulomb scattering in water and we therefore chose not use the full Moliere/Hanson form. Results: Initial examination of 3 patient-specific prostate PBS plans shows that agreement exists between 3D dose distributions calculated by the TPS and the independent proton PBS dose calculation engine. Both calculated dose distributions are compared with actual measurements at three different depths per beam and good agreements are again observed. Conclusion: Results here showed that 3D dose distributions calculated by this independent proton PBS dose engine are in good agreement with both TPS calculations and actual measurements. This tool can potentially be used to reduce the amount of different measurement depths required for patient-specific proton PBS QA

  14. SU-E-T-538: Evaluation of IMRT Dose Calculation Based on Pencil-Beam and AAA Algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Y; Duan, J; Popple, R; Brezovich, I

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of dose calculation for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) based on Pencil Beam (PB) and Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm (AAA) computation algorithms. IMRT plans of twelve patients with different treatment sites, including head/neck, lung and pelvis, were investigated. For each patient, dose calculation with PB and AAA algorithms using dose grid sizes of 0.5 mm, 0.25 mm, and 0.125 mm, were compared with composite-beam ion chamber and film measurements in patient specific QA. Discrepancies between the calculation and the measurement were evaluated by percentage error for ion chamber dose and γ〉l failure rate in gamma analysis (3%/3mm) for film dosimetry. For 9 patients, ion chamber dose calculated with AAA-algorithms is closer to ion chamber measurement than that calculated with PB algorithm with grid size of 2.5 mm, though all calculated ion chamber doses are within 3% of the measurements. For head/neck patients and other patients with large treatment volumes, γ〉l failure rate is significantly reduced (within 5%) with AAA-based treatment planning compared to generally more than 10% with PB-based treatment planning (grid size=2.5 mm). For lung and brain cancer patients with medium and small treatment volumes, γ〉l failure rates are typically within 5% for both AAA and PB-based treatment planning (grid size=2.5 mm). For both PB and AAA-based treatment planning, improvements of dose calculation accuracy with finer dose grids were observed in film dosimetry of 11 patients and in ion chamber measurements for 3 patients. AAA-based treatment planning provides more accurate dose calculation for head/neck patients and other patients with large treatment volumes. Compared with film dosimetry, a γ〉l failure rate within 5% can be achieved for AAA-based treatment planning. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  15. Amplitude calculations for 3D Gaussian beam migration using complex-valued traveltimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bleistein, Norman; Gray, Samuel H

    2010-01-01

    Gaussian beams are often used to represent Green's functions in three-dimensional Kirchhoff-type true-amplitude migrations because such migrations made using Gaussian beams yield superior images to similar migrations using classical ray-theoretic Green's functions. Typically, the integrand of a migration formula consists of two Green's functions—each describing propagation to the image point—one from the source and the other from the receiver position. The use of Gaussian beams to represent each of these Green's functions in 3D introduces two additional double integrals when compared to a Kirchhoff migration using ray-theoretic Green's functions, thereby adding a significant computational burden. Hill (2001 Geophysics 66 1240–50) proposed a method for reducing those four integrals to two, compromising slightly on the full potential quality of the Gaussian beam representations for the sake of more efficient computation. That approach requires a two-dimensional steepest descent analysis for the asymptotic evaluation of a double integral. The method requires evaluation of the complex traveltimes of the Gaussian beams as well as the amplitudes of the integrands at the determined saddle points. In addition, it is necessary to evaluate the determinant of a certain (Hessian) matrix of second derivatives. Hill (2001 Geophysics 66 1240–50) did not report on this last part; thus, his proposed migration formula is kinematically correct but lacks correct amplitude behavior. In this paper, we derive a formula for that Hessian matrix in terms of dynamic ray tracing quantities. We also show in a simple example how the integral that we analyze here arises in a true amplitude migration formula

  16. Development and Clinical Implementation of a Universal Bolus to Maintain Spot Size During Delivery of Base of Skull Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Both, Stefan, E-mail: Stefan.Both@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Shen, Jiajian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Phoenix, Arizona (United States); Kirk, Maura; Lin, Liyong; Tang, Shikui; Alonso-Basanta, Michelle; Lustig, Robert; Lin, Haibo; Deville, Curtiland; Hill-Kayser, Christine; Tochner, Zelig; McDonough, James [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: To report on a universal bolus (UB) designed to replace the range shifter (RS); the UB allows the treatment of shallow tumors while keeping the pencil beam scanning (PBS) spot size small. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with brain cancers treated from 2010 to 2011 were planned using the PBS technique with bolus and the RS. In-air spot sizes of the pencil beam were measured and compared for 4 conditions (open field, with RS, and with UB at 2- and 8-cm air gap) in isocentric geometry. The UB was applied in our clinic to treat brain tumors, and the plans with UB were compared with the plans with RS. Results: A UB of 5.5 cm water equivalent thickness was found to meet the needs of the majority of patients. By using the UB, the PBS spot sizes are similar with the open beam (P>.1). The heterogeneity index was found to be approximately 10% lower for the UB plans than for the RS plans. The coverage for plans with UB is more conformal than for plans with RS; the largest increase in sparing is usually for peripheral organs at risk. Conclusions: The integrity of the physical properties of the PBS beam can be maintained using a UB that allows for highly conformal PBS treatment design, even in a simple geometry of the fixed beam line when noncoplanar beams are used.

  17. Propagation of rotational Risley-prism-array-based Gaussian beams in turbulent atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feng; Ma, Haotong; Dong, Li; Ren, Ge; Qi, Bo; Tan, Yufeng

    2018-03-01

    Limited by the size and weight of prism and optical assembling, Rotational Risley-prism-array system is a simple but effective way to realize high power and superior beam quality of deflecting laser output. In this paper, the propagation of the rotational Risley-prism-array-based Gaussian beam array in atmospheric turbulence is studied in detail. An analytical expression for the average intensity distribution at the receiving plane is derived based on nonparaxial ray tracing method and extended Huygens-Fresnel principle. Power in the diffraction-limited bucket is chosen to evaluate beam quality. The effect of deviation angle, propagation distance and intensity of turbulence on beam quality is studied in detail by quantitative simulation. It reveals that with the propagation distance increasing, the intensity distribution gradually evolves from multiple-petal-like shape into the pattern that contains one main-lobe in the center with multiple side-lobes in weak turbulence. The beam quality of rotational Risley-prism-array-based Gaussian beam array with lower deviation angle is better than its counterpart with higher deviation angle when propagating in weak and medium turbulent (i.e. Cn2 beam quality of higher deviation angle arrays degrades faster as the intensity of turbulence gets stronger. In the case of propagating in strong turbulence, the long propagation distance (i.e. z > 10km ) and deviation angle have no influence on beam quality.

  18. Incorporating partial shining effects in proton pencil-beam dose calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yupeng; Zhang Xiaodong; Lii Mingfwu; Sahoo, Narayan; Zhu, Ron X; Gillin, Michael; Mohan, Radhe

    2008-01-01

    A range modulator wheel (RMW) is an essential component in passively scattered proton therapy. We have observed that a proton beam spot may shine on multiple steps of the RMW. Proton dose calculation algorithms normally do not consider the partial shining effect, and thus overestimate the dose at the proximal shoulder of spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) compared with the measurement. If the SOBP is adjusted to better fit the plateau region, the entrance dose is likely to be underestimated. In this work, we developed an algorithm that can be used to model this effect and to allow for dose calculations that better fit the measured SOBP. First, a set of apparent modulator weights was calculated without considering partial shining. Next, protons spilled from the accelerator reaching the modulator wheel were simplified as a circular spot of uniform intensity. A weight-splitting process was then performed to generate a set of effective modulator weights with the partial shining effect incorporated. The SOBPs of eight options, which are used to label different combinations of proton-beam energy and scattering devices, were calculated with the generated effective weights. Our algorithm fitted the measured SOBP at the proximal and entrance regions much better than the ones without considering partial shining effect for all SOBPs of the eight options. In a prostate patient, we found that dose calculation without considering partial shining effect underestimated the femoral head and skin dose

  19. Determination of Cross-Sectional Area of Focused Picosecond Gaussian Laser Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledesma, Rodolfo; Fitz-Gerald, James; Palmieri, Frank; Connell, John

    2018-01-01

    Measurement of the waist diameter of a focused Gaussian-beam at the 1/e(sup 2) intensity, also referred to as spot size, is key to determining the fluence in laser processing experiments. Spot size measurements are also helpful to calculate the threshold energy and threshold fluence of a given material. This work reports an application of a conventional method, by analyzing single laser ablated spots for different laser pulse energies, to determine the cross-sectional area of a focused Gaussian-beam, which has a nominal pulse width of approx. 10 ps. Polished tungsten was used as the target material, due to its low surface roughness and low ablation threshold, to measure the beam waist diameter. From the ablative spot measurements, the ablation threshold fluence of the tungsten substrate was also calculated.

  20. Composite optical vortices in noncollinear Laguerre–Gaussian beams and their propagation in free space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Ke; Liu Pusheng; Lü Baida

    2008-01-01

    Taking two Laguerre—Gaussian beams with topological charge l = ± 1 as an example, this paper studies the composite optical vortices formed by two noncollinear Laguerre—Gaussian beams with different phases, amplitudes, waist widths, off-axis distances, and their propagation in free space. It is shown by detailed numerical illustrative examples that the number and location of composite vortices at the waist plane are variable by varying the relative phase β, amplitude ratio η, waist width ratio ζ, or off-axis distance ratio μ. The net topological charge l net is not always equal to the sum l sum of charges of the two component beams. The motion, creation and annihilation of composite vortices take place in the free-space propagation, and the net charge during the propagation remains unchanged and equals to the net charge at the waist plane

  1. Propagation of Bessel-Gaussian beams through a double-apertured fractional Fourier transform optical system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Bin; Jiang, Chun; Zhu, Haibin

    2012-08-01

    Based on the scalar diffraction theory and the fact that a hard-edged aperture function can be expanded into a finite sum of complex Gaussian functions, an approximate analytical solution for Bessel-Gaussian (BG) beams propagating through a double-apertured fractional Fourier transform (FrFT) system is derived in the cylindrical coordinate. By using the approximate analytical formulas, the propagation properties of BG beams passing through a double-apertured FrFT optical system have been studied in detail by some typical numerical examples. The results indicate that the double-apertured FrFT optical system provides a convenient way for controlling the properties of the BG beams by properly choosing the optical parameters.

  2. Propagation of Gaussian laser beam in cold plasma of Drude model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Ying; Yuan Chengxun; Zhou Zhongxiang; Li Lei; Du Yanwei

    2011-01-01

    The propagation characters of Gaussian laser beam in plasmas of Drude model have been investigated by complex eikonal function assumption. The dielectric constant of Drude model is representative and applicable in describing the cold unmagnetized plasmas. The dynamics of ponderomotive nonlinearity, spatial diffraction, and collision attenuation is considered. The derived coupling equations determine the variations of laser beam and irradiation attenuation. The modified laser beam-width parameter F, the dimensionless axis irradiation intensity I, and the spatial electron density distribution n/n 0 have been studied in connection with collision frequency, initial laser intensity and beam-width, and electron temperature of plasma. The variations of laser beam and plasma density due to different selections of parameters are reasonably explained, and results indicate the feasible modification of the propagating characters of laser beam in plasmas, which possesses significance to fast ignition, extended propagation, and other applications.

  3. Electron acceleration by longitudinal electric field of a gaussian laser beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Satoshi; Sugihara, Ryo; Shimoda, Koichi.

    1991-11-01

    It is shown that the longitudinal electric field of a transverse magnetic mode of a Gaussian laser beam accelerates an electron to an ultra-relativistic energy. The electron is captured and accelerated in a length of the order of the Rayleigh range. The ultimate energy increment of the electron with a single laser beam is given by the product of transverse field intensity and the beam waist, and can be of the order of 100MeV. This fact implies that a multi-stage acceleration enables TeV-order-acceleration in a length of a few kilometers with the present state of the art. (author)

  4. Three-dimensional propagation and absorption of high frequency Gaussian beams in magnetoactive plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowak, S.; Orefice, A.

    1994-01-01

    In today's high frequency systems employed for plasma diagnostics, power heating, and current drive the behavior of the wave beams is appreciably affected by the self-diffraction phenomena due to their narrow collimation. In the present article the three-dimensional propagation of Gaussian beams in inhomogeneous and anisotropic media is analyzed, starting from a properly formulated dispersion relation. Particular attention is paid, in the case of electromagnetic electron cyclotron (EC) waves, to the toroidal geometry characterizing tokamak plasmas, to the power density evolution on the advancing wave fronts, and to the absorption features occurring when a beam crosses an EC resonant layer

  5. SU-E-T-314: The Application of Cloud Computing in Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy Monte Carlo Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Z [Reading Hospital, West Reading, PA (United States); Gao, M [ProCure Treatment Centers, Warrenville, IL (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Monte Carlo simulation plays an important role for proton Pencil Beam Scanning (PBS) technique. However, MC simulation demands high computing power and is limited to few large proton centers that can afford a computer cluster. We study the feasibility of utilizing cloud computing in the MC simulation of PBS beams. Methods: A GATE/GEANT4 based MC simulation software was installed on a commercial cloud computing virtual machine (Linux 64-bits, Amazon EC2). Single spot Integral Depth Dose (IDD) curves and in-air transverse profiles were used to tune the source parameters to simulate an IBA machine. With the use of StarCluster software developed at MIT, a Linux cluster with 2–100 nodes can be conveniently launched in the cloud. A proton PBS plan was then exported to the cloud where the MC simulation was run. Results: The simulated PBS plan has a field size of 10×10cm{sup 2}, 20cm range, 10cm modulation, and contains over 10,000 beam spots. EC2 instance type m1.medium was selected considering the CPU/memory requirement and 40 instances were used to form a Linux cluster. To minimize cost, master node was created with on-demand instance and worker nodes were created with spot-instance. The hourly cost for the 40-node cluster was $0.63 and the projected cost for a 100-node cluster was $1.41. Ten million events were simulated to plot PDD and profile, with each job containing 500k events. The simulation completed within 1 hour and an overall statistical uncertainty of < 2% was achieved. Good agreement between MC simulation and measurement was observed. Conclusion: Cloud computing is a cost-effective and easy to maintain platform to run proton PBS MC simulation. When proton MC packages such as GATE and TOPAS are combined with cloud computing, it will greatly facilitate the pursuing of PBS MC studies, especially for newly established proton centers or individual researchers.

  6. SU-E-T-314: The Application of Cloud Computing in Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy Monte Carlo Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Z; Gao, M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Monte Carlo simulation plays an important role for proton Pencil Beam Scanning (PBS) technique. However, MC simulation demands high computing power and is limited to few large proton centers that can afford a computer cluster. We study the feasibility of utilizing cloud computing in the MC simulation of PBS beams. Methods: A GATE/GEANT4 based MC simulation software was installed on a commercial cloud computing virtual machine (Linux 64-bits, Amazon EC2). Single spot Integral Depth Dose (IDD) curves and in-air transverse profiles were used to tune the source parameters to simulate an IBA machine. With the use of StarCluster software developed at MIT, a Linux cluster with 2–100 nodes can be conveniently launched in the cloud. A proton PBS plan was then exported to the cloud where the MC simulation was run. Results: The simulated PBS plan has a field size of 10×10cm 2 , 20cm range, 10cm modulation, and contains over 10,000 beam spots. EC2 instance type m1.medium was selected considering the CPU/memory requirement and 40 instances were used to form a Linux cluster. To minimize cost, master node was created with on-demand instance and worker nodes were created with spot-instance. The hourly cost for the 40-node cluster was $0.63 and the projected cost for a 100-node cluster was $1.41. Ten million events were simulated to plot PDD and profile, with each job containing 500k events. The simulation completed within 1 hour and an overall statistical uncertainty of < 2% was achieved. Good agreement between MC simulation and measurement was observed. Conclusion: Cloud computing is a cost-effective and easy to maintain platform to run proton PBS MC simulation. When proton MC packages such as GATE and TOPAS are combined with cloud computing, it will greatly facilitate the pursuing of PBS MC studies, especially for newly established proton centers or individual researchers

  7. Pareto front analysis of 6 and 15 MV dynamic IMRT for lung cancer using pencil beam, AAA and Monte Carlo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottosson, R O; Karlsson, A; Behrens, C F

    2010-08-21

    The pencil beam dose calculation method is frequently used in modern radiation therapy treatment planning regardless of the fact that it is documented inaccurately for cases involving large density variations. The inaccuracies are larger for higher beam energies. As a result, low energy beams are conventionally used for lung treatments. The aim of this study was to analyze the advantages and disadvantages of dynamic IMRT treatment planning for high and low photon energy in order to assess if deviating from the conventional low energy approach could be favorable in some cases. Furthermore, the influence of motion on the dose distribution was investigated. Four non-small cell lung cancer cases were selected for this study. Inverse planning was conducted using Varian Eclipse. A total number of 31 dynamic IMRT plans, distributed amongst the four cases, were created ranging from PTV conformity weighted to normal tissue sparing weighted. All optimized treatment plans were calculated using three different calculation algorithms (PBC, AAA and MC). In order to study the influence of motion, two virtual lung phantoms were created. The idea was to mimic two different situations: one where the GTV is located centrally in the PTV and another where the GTV was close to the edge of the PTV. PBC is in poor agreement with MC and AAA for all cases and treatment plans. AAA overestimates the dose, compared to MC. This effect is more pronounced for 15 than 6 MV. AAA and MC both predict similar perturbations in dose distributions when moving the GTV to the edge of the PTV. PBC, however, predicts results contradicting those of AAA and MC. This study shows that PB-based dose calculation algorithms are clinically insufficient for patient geometries involving large density inhomogeneities. AAA is in much better agreement with MC, but even a small overestimation of the dose level by the algorithm might lead to a large part of the PTV being underdosed. It is advisable to use low energy as a

  8. Pareto front analysis of 6 and 15 MV dynamic IMRT for lung cancer using pencil beam, AAA and Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ottosson, R O; Karlsson, A; Behrens, C F, E-mail: riolot01@heh.regionh.d [Department of Oncology (R), Division of Radiophysics (52AA), Copenhagen University Hospital Herlev, Herlev Ringvej 75, DK-2730 Herlev (Denmark)

    2010-08-21

    The pencil beam dose calculation method is frequently used in modern radiation therapy treatment planning regardless of the fact that it is documented inaccurately for cases involving large density variations. The inaccuracies are larger for higher beam energies. As a result, low energy beams are conventionally used for lung treatments. The aim of this study was to analyze the advantages and disadvantages of dynamic IMRT treatment planning for high and low photon energy in order to assess if deviating from the conventional low energy approach could be favorable in some cases. Furthermore, the influence of motion on the dose distribution was investigated. Four non-small cell lung cancer cases were selected for this study. Inverse planning was conducted using Varian Eclipse. A total number of 31 dynamic IMRT plans, distributed amongst the four cases, were created ranging from PTV conformity weighted to normal tissue sparing weighted. All optimized treatment plans were calculated using three different calculation algorithms (PBC, AAA and MC). In order to study the influence of motion, two virtual lung phantoms were created. The idea was to mimic two different situations: one where the GTV is located centrally in the PTV and another where the GTV was close to the edge of the PTV. PBC is in poor agreement with MC and AAA for all cases and treatment plans. AAA overestimates the dose, compared to MC. This effect is more pronounced for 15 than 6 MV. AAA and MC both predict similar perturbations in dose distributions when moving the GTV to the edge of the PTV. PBC, however, predicts results contradicting those of AAA and MC. This study shows that PB-based dose calculation algorithms are clinically insufficient for patient geometries involving large density inhomogeneities. AAA is in much better agreement with MC, but even a small overestimation of the dose level by the algorithm might lead to a large part of the PTV being underdosed. It is advisable to use low energy as a

  9. Pareto front analysis of 6 and 15 MV dynamic IMRT for lung cancer using pencil beam, AAA and Monte Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ottosson, R O; Karlsson, A; Behrens, C F

    2010-01-01

    The pencil beam dose calculation method is frequently used in modern radiation therapy treatment planning regardless of the fact that it is documented inaccurately for cases involving large density variations. The inaccuracies are larger for higher beam energies. As a result, low energy beams are conventionally used for lung treatments. The aim of this study was to analyze the advantages and disadvantages of dynamic IMRT treatment planning for high and low photon energy in order to assess if deviating from the conventional low energy approach could be favorable in some cases. Furthermore, the influence of motion on the dose distribution was investigated. Four non-small cell lung cancer cases were selected for this study. Inverse planning was conducted using Varian Eclipse. A total number of 31 dynamic IMRT plans, distributed amongst the four cases, were created ranging from PTV conformity weighted to normal tissue sparing weighted. All optimized treatment plans were calculated using three different calculation algorithms (PBC, AAA and MC). In order to study the influence of motion, two virtual lung phantoms were created. The idea was to mimic two different situations: one where the GTV is located centrally in the PTV and another where the GTV was close to the edge of the PTV. PBC is in poor agreement with MC and AAA for all cases and treatment plans. AAA overestimates the dose, compared to MC. This effect is more pronounced for 15 than 6 MV. AAA and MC both predict similar perturbations in dose distributions when moving the GTV to the edge of the PTV. PBC, however, predicts results contradicting those of AAA and MC. This study shows that PB-based dose calculation algorithms are clinically insufficient for patient geometries involving large density inhomogeneities. AAA is in much better agreement with MC, but even a small overestimation of the dose level by the algorithm might lead to a large part of the PTV being underdosed. It is advisable to use low energy as a

  10. Accuracy of pencil-beam redefinition algorithm dose calculations in patient-like cylindrical phantoms for bolus electron conformal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carver, Robert L; Hogstrom, Kenneth R; Chu, Connel; Fields, Robert S; Sprunger, Conrad P

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to document the improved accuracy of the pencil beam redefinition algorithm (PBRA) compared to the pencil beam algorithm (PBA) for bolus electron conformal therapy using cylindrical patient phantoms based on patient computed tomography (CT) scans of retromolar trigone and nose cancer. PBRA and PBA electron dose calculations were compared with measured dose in retromolar trigone and nose phantoms both with and without bolus. For the bolus treatment plans, a radiation oncologist outlined a planning target volume (PTV) on the central axis slice of the CT scan for each phantom. A bolus was designed using the planning.decimal(®) (p.d) software (.decimal, Inc., Sanford, FL) to conform the 90% dose line to the distal surface of the PTV. Dose measurements were taken with thermoluminescent dosimeters placed into predrilled holes. The Pinnacle(3) (Philips Healthcare, Andover, MD) treatment planning system was used to calculate PBA dose distributions. The PBRA dose distributions were calculated with an in-house C++ program. In order to accurately account for the phantom materials a table correlating CT number to relative electron stopping and scattering powers was compiled and used for both PBA and PBRA dose calculations. Accuracy was determined by comparing differences in measured and calculated dose, as well as distance to agreement for each measurement point. The measured doses had an average precision of 0.9%. For the retromolar trigone phantom, the PBRA dose calculations had an average ± 1σ dose difference (calculated - measured) of -0.65% ± 1.62% without the bolus and -0.20% ± 1.54% with the bolus. The PBA dose calculation had an average dose difference of 0.19% ± 3.27% without the bolus and -0.05% ± 3.14% with the bolus. For the nose phantom, the PBRA dose calculations had an average dose difference of 0.50% ± 3.06% without bolus and -0.18% ± 1.22% with the bolus. The PBA dose calculations had an average dose difference of 0.65%

  11. Influence of atmospheric turbulence on the energy focusability of Gaussian beams with spherical aberration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Jinping; Ji, Xiaoling

    2014-01-01

    By using the four-dimensional (4D) computer code of the time-dependent propagation of laser beams through atmospheric turbulence, the influence of atmospheric turbulence on the energy focusability of Gaussian beams with spherical aberration is studied in detail, where the mean-squared beam width, the power in the bucket (PIB), the β parameter and the energy Strehl ratio are taken as the characteristic parameters. It is shown that turbulence results in beam spreading, and the effect of spherical aberration on the beam spreading decreases due to turbulence. Gaussian beams with negative spherical aberration are more affected by turbulence than those with positive spherical aberration. For the negative spherical aberration case, the focus position moves to the source plane due to turbulence. It is mentioned that the influence of turbulence on the energy focusability defined by a certain energy (i.e. PIB = 63%) is very heavy when the negative spherical aberration is very heavy. On the other hand, the influence of turbulence on the energy focusability defined by the energy within a given bucket radius (i.e. mean-squared beam width) is heaviest when a certain negative spherical aberration coefficient is adopted. (papers)

  12. Ghost reflections of Gaussian beams in anamorphic optical systems with an application to Michelson interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El-Maksoud, Rania H

    2016-02-20

    In this paper, a methodology is developed to model and analyze the effect of undesired (ghost) reflections of Gaussian beams that are produced by anamorphic optical systems. The superposition of these beams with the nominal beam modulates the nominal power distribution at the recording plane. This modulation may cause contrast reduction, veiling parts of the nominal image, and/or the formation of spurious interference fringes. The developed methodology is based on synthesizing the beam optical paths into nominal and ghost optical beam paths. Similar to the nominal beam, we present the concept that each ghost beam is characterized by a beam size, wavefront radius of curvature, and Gouy phase in the paraxial regime. The nominal and ghost beams are sequentially traced through the system and formulas for estimating the electric field magnitude and phase of each ghost beam at the recording plane are presented. The effective electric field is the addition of the individual nominal and ghost electric fields. Formulas for estimating Gouy phase, the shape of the interference fringes, and the central interference order are introduced. As an application, the theory of the formation of the interference fringes by Michelson interferometer is presented. This theory takes into consideration the ghost reflections that are formed by the beam splitter. To illustrate the theory and to show its wide applicability, simulation examples that include a Mangin mirror, a Michelson interferometer, and a black box optical system are provided.

  13. Orbital angular momentum mode of Gaussian beam induced by atmospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Mingjian; Guo, Lixin; Li, Jiangting; Yan, Xu; Dong, Kangjun

    2018-02-01

    Superposition theory of the spiral harmonics is employed to numerical study the transmission property of the orbital angular momentum (OAM) mode of Gaussian beam induced by atmospheric turbulence. Results show that Gauss beam does not carry OAM at the source, but various OAM modes appear after affected by atmospheric turbulence. With the increase of atmospheric turbulence strength, the smaller order OAM modes appear firstly, followed by larger order OAM modes. The beam spreading of Gauss beams in the atmosphere enhance with the increasing topological charge of the OAM modes caused by atmospheric turbulence. The mode probability density of the OAM generated by atmospheric turbulence decreases, and peak position gradually deviate from the Gauss beam spot center with the increase of the topological charge. Our results may be useful for improving the performance of long distance laser digital spiral imaging system.

  14. Self-focusing and self-defocusing of elliptically shaped Gaussian laser beams in plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nayyar, V P; Soni, V S [Punjabi Univ., Patiala (India). Dept. of Physics

    1979-02-14

    This paper presents a study of the self-focusing and self-defocusing of elliptically shaped Gaussian laser beams in collisional and collisionless plasmas. The non-linear dependence of the dielectric constant inside a collisional plasma is due to inhomogeneous heating of energy carriers and in a collisionless plasma it is due to the ponderomotive force. It is found that the beam gets focused at different points in different planes, exhibiting the effect of astigmatism. In certain power regions considered, the beam either converges or defocuses in both the directions, while in some other regions of the power spectrum one dimension of the beam focuses while the other defocuses. The beam also propagates in an oscillatory waveguide.

  15. Launching and controlling Gaussian beams from point sources via planar transformation media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odabasi, Hayrettin; Sainath, Kamalesh; Teixeira, Fernando L.

    2018-02-01

    Based on operations prescribed under the paradigm of complex transformation optics (CTO) [F. Teixeira and W. Chew, J. Electromagn. Waves Appl. 13, 665 (1999), 10.1163/156939399X01104; F. L. Teixeira and W. C. Chew, Int. J. Numer. Model. 13, 441 (2000), 10.1002/1099-1204(200009/10)13:5%3C441::AID-JNM376%3E3.0.CO;2-J; H. Odabasi, F. L. Teixeira, and W. C. Chew, J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 28, 1317 (2011), 10.1364/JOSAB.28.001317; B.-I. Popa and S. A. Cummer, Phys. Rev. A 84, 063837 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevA.84.063837], it was recently shown in [G. Castaldi, S. Savoia, V. Galdi, A. Alù, and N. Engheta, Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 173901 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.173901] that a complex source point (CSP) can be mimicked by parity-time (PT ) transformation media. Such coordinate transformation has a mirror symmetry for the imaginary part, and results in a balanced loss/gain metamaterial slab. A CSP produces a Gaussian beam and, consequently, a point source placed at the center of such a metamaterial slab produces a Gaussian beam propagating away from the slab. Here, we extend the CTO analysis to nonsymmetric complex coordinate transformations as put forth in [S. Savoia, G. Castaldi, and V. Galdi, J. Opt. 18, 044027 (2016), 10.1088/2040-8978/18/4/044027] and verify that, by using simply a (homogeneous) doubly anisotropic gain-media metamaterial slab, one can still mimic a CSP and produce Gaussian beam. In addition, we show that a Gaussian-like beams can be produced by point sources placed outside the slab as well. By making use of the extra degrees of freedom (the real and imaginary parts of the coordinate transformation) provided by CTO, the near-zero requirement on the real part of the resulting constitutive parameters can be relaxed to facilitate potential realization of Gaussian-like beams. We illustrate how beam properties such as peak amplitude and waist location can be controlled by a proper choice of (complex-valued) CTO Jacobian elements. In particular, the beam waist

  16. Numerical simulation of Gaussian beam scattering by complex particles of arbitrary shape and structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Y.P.; Cui, Z.W.; Gouesbet, G.

    2012-01-01

    An efficient numerical method based on the surface integral equations is introduced to simulate the scattering of Gaussian beam by complex particles that consist of an arbitrarily shaped host particle and multiple internal inclusions of arbitrary shape. In particular, the incident focused Gaussian beam is described by the Davis fifth-order approximate expressions in combination with rotation defined by Euler angles. The established surface integral equations are discretized with the method of moments, where the unknown equivalent electric and magnetic currents induced on the surfaces of the host particle and the internal inclusions are expanded using the Rao-Wilton-Glisson (RWG) basis functions. The resultant matrix equations are solved by using the parallel conjugate gradient method. The proposed numerical method is validated and its capability illustrated in several characteristic examples.

  17. Type I parametric down conversion of highly focused Gaussian beams in finite length crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeronimo-Moreno, Yasser; Jáuregui, R

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the correlations in wave vector space of photon pairs generated by type I spontaneous parametric down conversion using a Gaussian pump beam. The analysis covers both moderate focused and highly focused regimes, paying special attention to the angular spectrum and the conditional angular spectrum. Simple analytic expressions are derived that allow a detailed study of the dependence of these spectra on the waist of the source and the length of the nonlinear crystal. These expressions are in good agreement with numerical expectations and reported experimental results. They are used to make a systematic search of optimization parameters that improve the feasibility of using highly focused Gaussian beams to generate idler and signal photons with predetermined mean values and spread of their transverse wave vectors. (papers)

  18. Extended wavelet transformation to digital holographic reconstruction: application to the elliptical, astigmatic Gaussian beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remacha, Clément; Coëtmellec, Sébastien; Brunel, Marc; Lebrun, Denis

    2013-02-01

    Wavelet analysis provides an efficient tool in numerous signal processing problems and has been implemented in optical processing techniques, such as in-line holography. This paper proposes an improvement of this tool for the case of an elliptical, astigmatic Gaussian (AEG) beam. We show that this mathematical operator allows reconstructing an image of a spherical particle without compression of the reconstructed image, which increases the accuracy of the 3D location of particles and of their size measurement. To validate the performance of this operator we have studied the diffraction pattern produced by a particle illuminated by an AEG beam. This study used mutual intensity propagation, and the particle is defined as a chirped Gaussian sum. The proposed technique was applied and the experimental results are presented.

  19. SU-F-T-208: An Efficient Planning Approach to Posterior Fossa Tumor Bed Boosts Using Proton Pencil Beam Scanning in Fixed-Beam Room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju, N; Chen, C; Gans, S; Hug, E; Cahlon, O; Chon, B; Tsai, H; Sine, K; Mah, D; Wolden, S; Yeh, B

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: A fixed-beam room could be underutilized in a multi-room proton center. We investigated the use of proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) on a fixed-beam as an alternative for posterior fossa tumor bed (PF-TB) boost treatments which were usually treating on a gantry with uniform scanning. Methods: Five patients were treated with craniospinal irradiation (CSI, 23.4 or 36.0 Gy(RBE)) followed by a PF-TB boost to 54 Gy(RBE) with proton beams. Three PF-TB boost plans were generated for each patient: (1) a uniform scanning (US) gantry plan with 4–7 posterior fields shaped with apertures and compensators (2) a PBS plan using bi-lateral and vertex fields with a 3-mm planning organ-at-risk volume (PRV) expansion around the brainstem and (3) PBS fields using same beam arrangement but replacing the PRV with robust optimization considering a 3-mm setup uncertainty. Results: A concave 54-Gy(RBE) isodose line surrounding the brainstem could be achieved using all three techniques. The mean V95% of the PTV was 99.7% (range: 97.6% to 100%) while the V100% of the PTV ranged from 56.3% to 93.1% depending on the involvement of the brainstem with the PTV. The mean doses received by 0.05 cm"3 of the brainstem were effectively identical: 54.0 Gy(RBE), 53.4 Gy(RBE) and 53.3 Gy(RBE) for US, PBS optimized with PRV, and PBS optimized with robustness plans respectively. The cochlea mean dose increased by 23% of the prescribed boost dose in average from the bi-lateral fields used in the PBS plan. Planning time for the PBS plan with PRV was 5–10 times less than the US plan and the robustly optimized PBS plan. Conclusion: We have demonstrated that a fixed-beam with PBS can deliver a dose distribution comparable to a gantry plan using uniform scanning. Planning time can be reduced substantially using a PRV around the brainstem instead of robust optimization.

  20. SU-F-T-208: An Efficient Planning Approach to Posterior Fossa Tumor Bed Boosts Using Proton Pencil Beam Scanning in Fixed-Beam Room

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, N; Chen, C; Gans, S; Hug, E; Cahlon, O; Chon, B; Tsai, H; Sine, K; Mah, D [Procure Treatment Center, Somerset, New Jersey (United States); Wolden, S [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Yeh, B [Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: A fixed-beam room could be underutilized in a multi-room proton center. We investigated the use of proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) on a fixed-beam as an alternative for posterior fossa tumor bed (PF-TB) boost treatments which were usually treating on a gantry with uniform scanning. Methods: Five patients were treated with craniospinal irradiation (CSI, 23.4 or 36.0 Gy(RBE)) followed by a PF-TB boost to 54 Gy(RBE) with proton beams. Three PF-TB boost plans were generated for each patient: (1) a uniform scanning (US) gantry plan with 4–7 posterior fields shaped with apertures and compensators (2) a PBS plan using bi-lateral and vertex fields with a 3-mm planning organ-at-risk volume (PRV) expansion around the brainstem and (3) PBS fields using same beam arrangement but replacing the PRV with robust optimization considering a 3-mm setup uncertainty. Results: A concave 54-Gy(RBE) isodose line surrounding the brainstem could be achieved using all three techniques. The mean V95% of the PTV was 99.7% (range: 97.6% to 100%) while the V100% of the PTV ranged from 56.3% to 93.1% depending on the involvement of the brainstem with the PTV. The mean doses received by 0.05 cm{sup 3} of the brainstem were effectively identical: 54.0 Gy(RBE), 53.4 Gy(RBE) and 53.3 Gy(RBE) for US, PBS optimized with PRV, and PBS optimized with robustness plans respectively. The cochlea mean dose increased by 23% of the prescribed boost dose in average from the bi-lateral fields used in the PBS plan. Planning time for the PBS plan with PRV was 5–10 times less than the US plan and the robustly optimized PBS plan. Conclusion: We have demonstrated that a fixed-beam with PBS can deliver a dose distribution comparable to a gantry plan using uniform scanning. Planning time can be reduced substantially using a PRV around the brainstem instead of robust optimization.

  1. Stationary self-focusing of Gaussian laser beam in relativistic thermal quantum plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patil, S. D.; Takale, M. V.

    2013-01-01

    In the present paper, we have employed the quantum dielectric response in thermal quantum plasma to model relativistic self-focusing of Gaussian laser beam in a plasma. We have presented an extensive parametric investigation of the dependence of beam-width parameter on distance of propagation in relativistic thermal quantum plasma. We have studied the role of Fermi temperature in the phenomenon of self-focusing. It is found that the quantum effects cause much higher oscillations of beam-width parameter and better relativistic focusing of laser beam in thermal quantum plasma in comparison with that in the relativistic cold quantum plasma and classical relativistic plasma. Our computations show more reliable results in comparison to the previous works

  2. Analytical calculations of intense Gaussian laser beam propagating in plasmas with relativistic collision correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Ying; Yuan Chengxun; Gao Ruilin; Zhou Zhongxiang

    2012-01-01

    Theoretical investigations of a Gaussian laser beam propagating in relativistic plasmas have been performed with the WKB method and complex eikonal function. We consider the relativistic nonlinearity induced by intense laser beam, and present the relativistically generalized forms of the plasma frequency and electron collision frequency in plasmas. The coupled differential equations describing the propagation variations of laser beam are derived and numerically solved. The obtained simulation results present the similar variation tendency with experiments. By changing the plasma density, we theoretically analyze the feasibility of using a plasmas slab of a fixed thickness to compress the laser beam-width and acquire the focused laser intensity. The present work complements the relativistic correction of the electron collision frequency with reasonable derivations, promotes the theoretical approaching to experiments and provides effective instructions to the practical laser-plasma interactions.

  3. Propagation characteristics of a Gaussian laser beam in plasma with modulated collision frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Ying; Yuan Chengxun; Zhou Zhongxiang; Gao Ruilin; Li Lei; Du Yanwei

    2012-01-01

    The propagation characteristics of a Gaussian laser beam in cold plasma with the electron collision frequency modulated by laser intensity are presented. The nonlinear dynamics of the ponderomotive force, which induce nonlinear self-focusing as opposed to spatial diffraction, are considered. The effective dielectric function of the Drude model and complex eikonal function are adopted in deriving coupled differential equations of the varying laser beam parameters. In the framework of ponderomotive nonlinearity, the frequency of electron collision in plasmas, which is proportional to the spatial electron density, is strongly interrelated with the laser beam propagation characteristics. Hence, the propagation properties of the laser beam and the modulated electron collision frequency distribution in plasma were studied and explained in depth. Employing this self-consistent method, the obtained simulation results approach practical conditions, which is of significance to the study of laser–plasma interactions.

  4. SU-F-T-197: Investigating Optimal Oblique-Beam Arrangement for Bilateral Metallic Prosthesis Prostate Cancer in Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rana, S; Tesfamicael, B; Park, S [McLaren Proton Therapy Center, Karmanos Cancer Institute at McLaren-Flint, Flint, MI (United States); Zheng, Y; Singh, H; Twyford, T [Procure Proton Therapy Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Cheng, C [Vantage Oncology, West Hills, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The main purpose of this study is to investigate the optimum oblique-beam arrangement for bilateral metallic prosthesis prostate cancer treatment in pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy. Methods: A computed tomography dataset of bilateral metallic prosthesis prostate cancer case was selected for this retrospective study. A total of four beams (rightanterior- oblique [RAO], left-anterior-oblique [LAO], left-posterior-oblique [LPO], and right-posterior-oblique [RPO]) were selected for treatment planning. PBS plans were generated using multi-field-optimization technique for a total dose of 79.2 Gy[RBE] to be delivered in 44 fractions. Specifically, five different PBS plans were generated based on 2.5% ± 2 mm range uncertainty using five different beam arrangements (i)LAO+RAO+LPO+RPO, (ii)LAO+RAO, (iii)LPO+RPO, (iv)RAO+LPO, and (v)LAO+RPO. Each PBS plan was optimized by applying identical dose-volume constraints to the PTV, rectum, and bladder. Treatment plans were then compared based on the dose-volume histograms results. Results: The PTV coverage was found to be greater than 99% in all five plans. The homogeneity index (HI) was found to be almost identical (range, 0.03–0.04). The PTV mean dose was found to be comparable (range, 81.0–81.1 Gy[RBE]). For the rectum, the lowest mean dose (8.0 Gy[RBE]) and highest mean dose (31.1 Gy[RBE]) were found in RAO+LAO plan and LPO+RPO plan, respectively. LAO+RAO plan produced the most favorable dosimetric results of the rectum in the medium-dose region (V50) and high-dose region (V70). For the bladder, the lowest (5.0 Gy[RBE]) and highest mean dose (10.3 Gy[RBE]) were found in LPO+RPO plan and RAO+LAO plan, respectively. Other dosimetric results (V50 and V70) of the bladder were slightly better in LPO+RPO plan than in other plans. Conclusion: Dosimetric findings from this study suggest that two anterior-oblique proton beams arrangement (LAO+RAO) is a more favorable option with the possibility of reducing rectal

  5. Generation of phase singularity through diffracting a plane or Gaussian beam by a spiral phase plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotlyar, Victor V; Almazov, Anton A; Khonina, Svetlana N; Soifer, Victor A; Elfstrom, Henna; Turunen, Jari

    2005-05-01

    We deduce and study an analytical expression for Fresnel diffraction of a plane wave by a spiral phase plate (SPP) that imparts an arbitrary-order phase singularity on the light field. Estimates for the optical vortex radius that depends on the singularity's integer order n (also termed topological charge, or order of the dislocation) have been derived. The near-zero vortex intensity is shown to be proportional to rho2n, where p is the radial coordinate. Also, an analytical expression for Fresnel diffraction of the Gaussian beam by a SPP with nth-order singularity is analyzed. The far-field intensity distribution is derived. The radius of maximal intensity is shown to depend on the singularity number. The behavior of the Gaussian beam intensity after a SPP with second-order singularity (n = 2) is studied in more detail. The parameters of the light beams generated numerically with the Fresnel transform and via analytical formulas are in good agreement. In addition, the light fields with first- and second-order singularities were generated by a 32-level SPP fabricated on the resist by use of the electron-beam lithography technique.

  6. Aperture correction with an asymmetrically trimmed gaussian weight in SPECT with a fan-beam collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamiya, Ryo; Ogawa, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study is to improve the spatial resolution of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images acquired with a fan-beam collimator. The aperture angle of a hole in the fan-beam collimator depends on the position of the collimator. To correct the aperture effect in an iterative image reconstruction, an asymmetrically trimmed Gaussian weight was used for a model. To confirm the validity of our method, point source phantoms and brain phantom were used in the simulation, and we applied the method to the clinical data. The results of the simulation showed that the spatial resolution of point sources improved from about 6 to 2 pixels full width at half maximum, and the corrected point sources were isotropic. The results of the simulation with the brain phantom showed that our proposed method could improve the spatial resolution of the phantom, and our method was effective for different fan-beam collimators with different focal lengths. The results of clinical data showed that the quality of the reconstructed image was improved with our proposed method. Our proposed aperture correction method with the asymmetrically trimmed Gaussian weighting function was effective in improving the spatial resolution of SPECT images acquired with the fan-beam collimator. (author)

  7. Generation of tunable chain of three-dimensional optical bottle beams via focused multi-ring hollow Gaussian beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, Geo M; Viswanathan, Nirmal K

    2010-11-01

    We report here the generation of a chain of three-dimensional (3-D) optical bottle beams by focusing a π-phase shifted multi-ring hollow Gaussian beam (HGB) using a lens with spherical aberration. The rings of the HGB of suitable radial (k(r)) and axial (k(z)) wave vectors are generated using a double-negative axicon chemically etched in the optical fiber tips. Moving the lens position with respect to the fiber tip results in variation of the semi-angle of the cones of wave vectors of the HGBs and their diameter, using which we demonstrate tunability in the size and the periodicity of the 3-D optical bottle beams over a wide range, from micrometers to millimeters. The propagation characteristics of the beams resulting from focusing of single- and multi-ring HGBs and resulting in a quasi-non-diffracting beam and a chain of 3-D optical bottle beams, respectively, are simulated using only the input beam parameters and are found to agree well with experimental results.

  8. Area of isodensity contours in Gaussian and non-Gaussian fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryden, B.S.

    1988-01-01

    The area of isodensity contours in a smoothed density field can be measured by the contour-crossing statistic N1, the number of times per unit length that a line drawn through the density field pierces an isodensity contour. The contour-crossing statistic distinguishes between Gaussian and non-Gaussian fields and provides a measure of the effective slope of the power spectrum. The statistic is easy to apply and can be used on pencil beams and slices as well as on a three-dimensional field. 10 references

  9. Propagation Characteristics of High-Power Vortex Laguerre-Gaussian Laser Beams in Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhili Lin

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The propagation characteristics of high-power laser beams in plasma is an important research topic and has many potential applications in fields such as laser machining, laser-driven accelerators and laser-driven inertial confined fusion. The dynamic evolution of high-power Laguerre-Gaussian (LG beams in plasma is numerically investigated by using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD method based on the nonlinear Drude model, with both plasma frequency and collision frequency modulated by the light intensity of laser beam. The numerical algorithms and implementation techniques of FDTD method are presented for numerically simulating the nonlinear permittivity model of plasma and generating the LG beams with predefined parameters. The simulation results show that the plasma has different field modulation effects on the two exemplified LG beams with different cross-sectional patterns. The self-focusing and stochastic absorption phenomena of high-power laser beam in plasma are also demonstrated. This research also provides a new means for the field modulation of laser beams by plasma.

  10. Aperture averaging and BER for Gaussian beam in underwater oceanic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gökçe, Muhsin Caner; Baykal, Yahya

    2018-03-01

    In an underwater wireless optical communication (UWOC) link, power fluctuations over finite-sized collecting lens are investigated for a horizontally propagating Gaussian beam wave. The power scintillation index, also known as the irradiance flux variance, for the received irradiance is evaluated in weak oceanic turbulence by using the Rytov method. This lets us further quantify the associated performance indicators, namely, the aperture averaging factor and the average bit-error rate (). The effects on the UWOC link performance of the oceanic turbulence parameters, i.e., the rate of dissipation of kinetic energy per unit mass of fluid, the rate of dissipation of mean-squared temperature, Kolmogorov microscale, the ratio of temperature to salinity contributions to the refractive index spectrum as well as system parameters, i.e., the receiver aperture diameter, Gaussian source size, laser wavelength and the link distance are investigated.

  11. Effect of exponential density transition on self-focusing of q-Gaussian laser beam in collisionless plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valkunde, Amol T.; Vhanmore, Bandopant D.; Urunkar, Trupti U.; Gavade, Kusum M.; Patil, Sandip D.; Takale, Mansing V.

    2018-05-01

    In this work, nonlinear aspects of a high intensity q-Gaussian laser beam propagating in collisionless plasma having upward density ramp of exponential profiles is studied. We have employed the nonlinearity in dielectric function of plasma by considering ponderomotive nonlinearity. The differential equation governing the dimensionless beam width parameter is achieved by using Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) and paraxial approximations and solved it numerically by using Runge-Kutta fourth order method. Effect of exponential density ramp profile on self-focusing of q-Gaussian laser beam for various values of q is systematically carried out and compared with results Gaussian laser beam propagating in collisionless plasma having uniform density. It is found that exponential plasma density ramp causes the laser beam to become more focused and gives reasonably interesting results.

  12. Measurements of refractive index and size of a spherical drop from Gaussian beam scattering in the primary rainbow region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haitao; Sun, Hui; Shen, Jianqi; Tropea, Cameron

    2018-03-01

    The primary rainbow observed when light is scattered by a spherical drop has been exploited in the past to measure drop size and relative refractive index. However, if higher spatial resolution is required in denser drop ensembles/sprays, and to avoid then multiple drops simultaneously appearing in the measurement volume, a highly focused beam is desirable, inevitably with a Gaussian intensity profile. The present study examines the primary rainbow pattern resulting when a Gaussian beam is scattered by a spherical drop and estimates the attainable accuracy when extracting size and refractive index. The scattering is computed using generalized Lorenz-Mie theory (GLMT) and Debye series decomposition of the Gaussian beam scattering. The results of these simulations show that the measurement accuracy is dependent on both the beam waist radius and the position of the drop in the beam waist.

  13. Beam shape coefficients calculation for an elliptical Gaussian beam with 1-dimensional quadrature and localized approximation methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Shen, Jianqi

    2018-06-01

    The use of a shaped beam for applications relying on light scattering depends much on the ability to evaluate the beam shape coefficients (BSC) effectively. Numerical techniques for evaluating the BSCs of a shaped beam, such as the quadrature, the localized approximation (LA), the integral localized approximation (ILA) methods, have been developed within the framework of generalized Lorenz-Mie theory (GLMT). The quadrature methods usually employ the 2-/3-dimensional integrations. In this work, the expressions of the BSCs for an elliptical Gaussian beam (EGB) are simplified into the 1-dimensional integral so as to speed up the numerical computation. Numerical results of BSCs are used to reconstruct the beam field and the fidelity of the reconstructed field to the given beam field is estimated. It is demonstrated that the proposed method is much faster than the 2-dimensional integrations and it can acquire more accurate results than the LA method. Limitations of the quadrature method and also the LA method in the numerical calculation are analyzed in detail.

  14. SU-E-T-621: Planning Methodologies for Cancer of the Anal Canal: Comparing IMRT, Rapid Arc, and Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGlade, J; Kassaee, A

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate planning methods for anal canal cancer and compare the results of 9-field Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT), Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (Varian, RapidArc), and Proton Pencil Beam Scanning (PBS). Methods: We generated plans with IMRT, RapidArc (RA) and PBS for twenty patients for both initial phase including nodes and cone down phase of treatment using Eclipe (Varian). We evaluated the advantage of each technique for each phase. RA plans used 2 to 4 arcs and various collimator orientations. PBS used two posterior oblique fields. We evaluated the plans comparing dose volume histogram (DVH), locations of hot spots, and PTV dose conformity. Results: Due to complex shape of target, for RA plans, multiple arcs (>2) are required to achieve optimal PTV conformity. When the PTV exceeds 15 cm in the superior-inferior direction, limitations of deliverability start to dominate. The PTV should be divided into a superior and an inferior structure. The optimization is performed with fixed jaws for each structure and collimator set to 90 degrees for the inferior PTV. Proton PBS plans show little advantage in small bowel sparing when treating the nodes. However, PBS plan reduces volumetric dose to the bladder at the cost of higher doses to the perineal skin. IMRT plans provide good target conformity, but they generate hot spots outside of the target volume. Conclusion: When using one planning technique for entire course of treatment, Multiple arc (>2) RA plans are better as compared to IMRT and PBS plans. When combining techniques, RA for the initial phase in combination with PBS for the cone down phase results in the most optimal plans

  15. SU-E-T-621: Planning Methodologies for Cancer of the Anal Canal: Comparing IMRT, Rapid Arc, and Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGlade, J; Kassaee, A [University of Pennsylvenia, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate planning methods for anal canal cancer and compare the results of 9-field Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT), Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (Varian, RapidArc), and Proton Pencil Beam Scanning (PBS). Methods: We generated plans with IMRT, RapidArc (RA) and PBS for twenty patients for both initial phase including nodes and cone down phase of treatment using Eclipe (Varian). We evaluated the advantage of each technique for each phase. RA plans used 2 to 4 arcs and various collimator orientations. PBS used two posterior oblique fields. We evaluated the plans comparing dose volume histogram (DVH), locations of hot spots, and PTV dose conformity. Results: Due to complex shape of target, for RA plans, multiple arcs (>2) are required to achieve optimal PTV conformity. When the PTV exceeds 15 cm in the superior-inferior direction, limitations of deliverability start to dominate. The PTV should be divided into a superior and an inferior structure. The optimization is performed with fixed jaws for each structure and collimator set to 90 degrees for the inferior PTV. Proton PBS plans show little advantage in small bowel sparing when treating the nodes. However, PBS plan reduces volumetric dose to the bladder at the cost of higher doses to the perineal skin. IMRT plans provide good target conformity, but they generate hot spots outside of the target volume. Conclusion: When using one planning technique for entire course of treatment, Multiple arc (>2) RA plans are better as compared to IMRT and PBS plans. When combining techniques, RA for the initial phase in combination with PBS for the cone down phase results in the most optimal plans.

  16. Inspection of commercial optical devices for data storage using a three Gaussian beam microscope interferometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flores, J. Mauricio; Cywiak, Moises; Servin, Manuel; Juarez P, Lorenzo

    2008-01-01

    Recently, an interferometric profilometer based on the heterodyning of three Gaussian beams has been reported. This microscope interferometer, called a three Gaussian beam interferometer, has been used to profile high quality optical surfaces that exhibit constant reflectivity with high vertical resolution and lateral resolution near λ. We report the use of this interferometer to measure the profiles of two commercially available optical surfaces for data storage, namely, the compact disk (CD-R) and the digital versatile disk (DVD-R). We include experimental results from a one-dimensional radial scan of these devices without data marks. The measurements are taken by placing the devices with the polycarbonate surface facing the probe beam of the interferometer. This microscope interferometer is unique when compared with other optical measuring instruments because it uses narrowband detection, filters out undesirable noisy signals, and because the amplitude of the output voltage signal is basically proportional to the local vertical height of the surface under test, thus detecting with high sensitivity. We show that the resulting profiles, measured with this interferometer across the polycarbonate layer, provide valuable information about the track profiles, making this interferometer a suitable tool for quality control of surface storage devices

  17. Acoustical tweezers using single spherically focused piston, X-cut, and Gaussian beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitri, Farid G

    2015-10-01

    Partial-wave series expansions (PWSEs) satisfying the Helmholtz equation in spherical coordinates are derived for circular spherically focused piston (i.e., apodized by a uniform velocity amplitude normal to its surface), X-cut (i.e., apodized by a velocity amplitude parallel to the axis of wave propagation), and Gaussian (i.e., apodized by a Gaussian distribution of the velocity amplitude) beams. The Rayleigh-Sommerfeld diffraction integral and the addition theorems for the Legendre and spherical wave functions are used to obtain the PWSEs assuming weakly focused beams (with focusing angle α ⩽ 20°) in the Fresnel-Kirchhoff (parabolic) approximation. In contrast with previous analytical models, the derived expressions allow computing the scattering and acoustic radiation force from a sphere of radius a without restriction to either the Rayleigh (a ≪ λ, where λ is the wavelength of the incident radiation) or the ray acoustics (a ≫λ) regimes. The analytical formulations are valid for wavelengths largely exceeding the radius of the focused acoustic radiator, when the viscosity of the surrounding fluid can be neglected, and when the sphere is translated along the axis of wave propagation. Computational results illustrate the analysis with particular emphasis on the sphere's elastic properties and the axial distance to the center of the concave surface, with close connection of the emergence of negative trapping forces. Potential applications are in single-beam acoustical tweezers, acoustic levitation, and particle manipulation.

  18. SU-E-T-37: A GPU-Based Pencil Beam Algorithm for Dose Calculations in Proton Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalantzis, G; Leventouri, T; Tachibana, H; Shang, C

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Recent developments in radiation therapy have been focused on applications of charged particles, especially protons. Over the years several dose calculation methods have been proposed in proton therapy. A common characteristic of all these methods is their extensive computational burden. In the current study we present for the first time, to our best knowledge, a GPU-based PBA for proton dose calculations in Matlab. Methods: In the current study we employed an analytical expression for the protons depth dose distribution. The central-axis term is taken from the broad-beam central-axis depth dose in water modified by an inverse square correction while the distribution of the off-axis term was considered Gaussian. The serial code was implemented in MATLAB and was launched on a desktop with a quad core Intel Xeon X5550 at 2.67GHz with 8 GB of RAM. For the parallelization on the GPU, the parallel computing toolbox was employed and the code was launched on a GTX 770 with Kepler architecture. The performance comparison was established on the speedup factors. Results: The performance of the GPU code was evaluated for three different energies: low (50 MeV), medium (100 MeV) and high (150 MeV). Four square fields were selected for each energy, and the dose calculations were performed with both the serial and parallel codes for a homogeneous water phantom with size 300×300×300 mm3. The resolution of the PBs was set to 1.0 mm. The maximum speedup of ∼127 was achieved for the highest energy and the largest field size. Conclusion: A GPU-based PB algorithm for proton dose calculations in Matlab was presented. A maximum speedup of ∼127 was achieved. Future directions of the current work include extension of our method for dose calculation in heterogeneous phantoms

  19. Gaussian beam-to-slab waveguide coupler by graded index photonic crystal lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahari, B; Abrishamian, M S

    2013-01-01

    In this numerical study, a Gaussian beam-to-slab waveguide coupler for both modes of TM and TE has been studied. For this purpose, a concrete structure is suggested, in which the graded index photonic crystal lens and the slab waveguide are in the same structure composed of Si material, and can be fabricated with a single-step lithography process. For maximum power coupling, half-holes have been used as an input matching layer. Power coupling of 80% over a 450 nm bandwidth for the TM mode, and 60% over a 180 nm bandwidth for the TE mode is achieved. (paper)

  20. Measurement of Gaussian laser beam radius using the knife-edge technique: improvement on data analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, Marcos A. de; Silva, Rubens; Lima, Emerson de; Pereira, Daniel P.; Oliveira, Paulo C. de

    2009-01-01

    We revisited the well known Khosrofian and Garetz inversion algorithm [Appl. Opt.22, 3406-3410 (1983)APOPAI0003-6935] that was developed to analyze data obtained by the application of the traveling knife-edge technique. We have analyzed the approximated fitting function that was used for adjusting their experimental data and have found that it is not optimized to work with a full range of the experimentally-measured data. We have numerically calculated a new set of coefficients, which makes the approximated function suitable for a full experimental range, considerably improving the accuracy of the measurement of a radius of a focused Gaussian laser beam

  1. Coherent mode decomposition using mixed Wigner functions of Hermite-Gaussian beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Takashi

    2017-04-15

    A new method of coherent mode decomposition (CMD) is proposed that is based on a Wigner-function representation of Hermite-Gaussian beams. In contrast to the well-known method using the cross spectral density (CSD), it directly determines the mode functions and their weights without solving the eigenvalue problem. This facilitates the CMD of partially coherent light whose Wigner functions (and thus CSDs) are not separable, in which case the conventional CMD requires solving an eigenvalue problem with a large matrix and thus is numerically formidable. An example is shown regarding the CMD of synchrotron radiation, one of the most important applications of the proposed method.

  2. Mathematic model analysis of Gaussian beam propagation through an arbitrary thickness random phase screen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yuzhen; Guo, Jin; Wang, Rui; Wang, Tingfeng

    2011-09-12

    In order to research the statistical properties of Gaussian beam propagation through an arbitrary thickness random phase screen for adaptive optics and laser communication application in the laboratory, we establish mathematic models of statistical quantities, which are based on the Rytov method and the thin phase screen model, involved in the propagation process. And the analytic results are developed for an arbitrary thickness phase screen based on the Kolmogorov power spectrum. The comparison between the arbitrary thickness phase screen and the thin phase screen shows that it is more suitable for our results to describe the generalized case, especially the scintillation index.

  3. SU-E-T-147: Beam Specific Planning Target Volumes Incorporating 4DCT for Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy of Thoracic Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, L; Kang, M; Huang, S; McDonough, J; Solberg, T; Simone, C [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Mayer, R [Henry Jackson Foundation, Bethesda, MD (United States); Thomas, A [ATC healthcare, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to determine whether organ sparing and target coverage can be simultaneously maintained for pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy treatment of thoracic tumors in the presence of motion, stopping power uncertainties and patient setup variations. Methods: Ten consecutive patients that were previously treated with proton therapy to 66.6/1.8 Gy (RBE) using double scattering (DS) were replanned with PBS. Minimum and maximum intensity images from 4DCT were used to introduce flexible smearing in the determination of the beam specific PTV (BSPTV). Datasets from eight 4DCT phases, using ±3% uncertainty in stopping power, and ±3 mm uncertainty in patient setup in each direction were used to create 8*12*10=960 PBS plans for the evaluation of ten patients. Plans were normalized to provide identical coverage between DS and PBS. Results: The average lung V20, V5, and mean doses were reduced from 29.0%, 35.0%, and 16.4 Gy with DS to 24.6%, 30.6%, and 14.1 Gy with PBS, respectively. The average heart V30 and V45 were reduced from 10.4% and 7.5% in DS to 8.1% and 5.4% for PBS, respectively. Furthermore, the maximum spinal cord, esophagus and heart dose were decreased from 37.1 Gy, 71.7 Gy and 69.2 Gy with DS to 31.3 Gy, 67.9 Gy and 64.6 Gy with PBS. The conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), and global maximal dose were improved from 3.2, 0.08, 77.4 Gy with DS to 2.8, 0.04 and 72.1 Gy with PBS. All differences are statistically significant, with p values <0.05, with the exception of the heart V45 (p= 0.146). Conclusion: PBS with BSPTV achieves better organ sparing and improves target coverage using a repainting method for the treatment of thoracic tumors. Incorporating motion-related uncertainties is essential This work was supported by the US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command under Contract Agreement No. DAMD17-W81XWH-07-2-0121 and W81XWH-09-2-0174.

  4. Designing Fresnel microlenses for focusing astigmatic multi-Gaussian beams by using fractional order Fourier transforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patino, A; Durand, P-E; Fogret, E; Pellat-Finet, P

    2011-01-01

    According to a scalar theory of diffraction, light propagation can be expressed by two-dimensional fractional order Fourier transforms. Since the fractional Fourier transform of a chirp function is a Dirac distribution, focusing a light beam is optically achieved by using a diffractive screen whose transmission function is a two-dimensional chirp function. This property is applied to designing Fresnel microlenses, and the orders of the involved Fourier fractional transforms depend on diffraction distances as well as on emitter and receiver radii of curvature. If the emitter is astigmatic (with two principal radii of curvature), the diffraction phenomenon involves two one-dimensional fractional Fourier transforms whose orders are different. This degree of freedom allows us to design microlenses that can focus astigmatic Gaussian beams, as produced by a line-shaped laser diode source.

  5. Measurement of the broadening and depolarization of a Gaussian beam to transmit in fog water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrano, G.; Reynoso, E; Davila, J. A.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a controlled experimental environment in the laboratory, a waterproof camera where it will introduce artificial fog and become a beam of linearly polarized Gaussian laser light, creating sprawl, broadening and depolarization is studied with a system capable of measuring such phenomena. Most studies on dispersion have focused on the lobes of backscattering, however the correct conditions with the incident light beam a substantial fraction of light is scattered in the forward direction forming a widened light lobe. With this light lobe formed could be studied with extreme precision many factors such as the existence of single or multiple scattering and the amount by which this is carried out. This is of great importance in the estimation of lidar returns because these foundations can learn important information such as extinction and backscatter coefficients, particulate pollutants in the atmosphere and thus understand the operation model of nature. (Author)

  6. Tight focusing properties of linearly polarized Gaussian beam with a pair of vortices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ziyang [Department of Physics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); College of Information Science and Engineering, Institute of Optics and Photonics, Huaqiao University, Xiamen, Fujian 361021 (China); Pu, Jixiong [College of Information Science and Engineering, Institute of Optics and Photonics, Huaqiao University, Xiamen, Fujian 361021 (China); Zhao, Daomu, E-mail: zhaodaomu@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2011-07-25

    The properties of a pair of vortices embedded in a Gaussian beam focused by a high numerical-aperture are studied on the basis of vector Debye integral. The vortices move and rotate in the vicinity of the focal plane for a pair of vortices with equal topological charges. For incident beam with a pair of vortices with opposite topological charges, the vortices move toward each other, annihilate and revive in the vicinity of focal plane. -- Highlights: → The properties of a pair of vortices focused by a high numerical-aperture are studied. → It is shown that the focusing vortices with equal topological charges move toward and rotate. → It is shown that the focusing vortices with opposite topological charges move toward each other, annihilate and revive.

  7. Effect of spherical aberration on scintillations of Gaussian beams in atmospheric turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, Xiaoling; Deng, Jinping

    2014-01-01

    The effect of spherical aberration on scintillations of Gaussian beams in weak, moderate and strong turbulence is studied using numerical simulation method. It is found that the effect of the negative spherical aberration on the on-axis scintillation index is quite different from that of the positive spherical aberration. In weak turbulence, the positive spherical aberration results in a decrease of the on-axis scintillation index on propagation, but the negative spherical aberration results in an increase of the on-axis scintillation index when the propagation distance is not large. In particular, in weak turbulence the negative spherical aberration may cause peaks of the on-axis scintillation index, and the peaks disappear in moderate and strong turbulence, which is explained in physics. The strong turbulence leads to less discrepancy among scintillations of Gaussian beams with and without spherical aberration. - Highlights: • In weak turbulence scintillations can be suppressed using positive spherical aberration. • In weak turbulence scintillations may be very large due to negative spherical aberration. • The effect of spherical aberration on scintillations is less with increasing of turbulence

  8. Effect of spherical aberration on scintillations of Gaussian beams in atmospheric turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Xiaoling, E-mail: jiXL100@163.com; Deng, Jinping

    2014-07-18

    The effect of spherical aberration on scintillations of Gaussian beams in weak, moderate and strong turbulence is studied using numerical simulation method. It is found that the effect of the negative spherical aberration on the on-axis scintillation index is quite different from that of the positive spherical aberration. In weak turbulence, the positive spherical aberration results in a decrease of the on-axis scintillation index on propagation, but the negative spherical aberration results in an increase of the on-axis scintillation index when the propagation distance is not large. In particular, in weak turbulence the negative spherical aberration may cause peaks of the on-axis scintillation index, and the peaks disappear in moderate and strong turbulence, which is explained in physics. The strong turbulence leads to less discrepancy among scintillations of Gaussian beams with and without spherical aberration. - Highlights: • In weak turbulence scintillations can be suppressed using positive spherical aberration. • In weak turbulence scintillations may be very large due to negative spherical aberration. • The effect of spherical aberration on scintillations is less with increasing of turbulence.

  9. Technical Note: A direct ray-tracing method to compute integral depth dose in pencil beam proton radiography with a multilayer ionization chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farace, Paolo; Righetto, Roberto; Deffet, Sylvain; Meijers, Arturs; Vander Stappen, Francois

    2016-12-01

    To introduce a fast ray-tracing algorithm in pencil proton radiography (PR) with a multilayer ionization chamber (MLIC) for in vivo range error mapping. Pencil beam PR was obtained by delivering spots uniformly positioned in a square (45 × 45 mm 2 field-of-view) of 9 × 9 spots capable of crossing the phantoms (210 MeV). The exit beam was collected by a MLIC to sample the integral depth dose (IDD MLIC ). PRs of an electron-density and of a head phantom were acquired by moving the couch to obtain multiple 45 × 45 mm 2 frames. To map the corresponding range errors, the two-dimensional set of IDD MLIC was compared with (i) the integral depth dose computed by the treatment planning system (TPS) by both analytic (IDD TPS ) and Monte Carlo (IDD MC ) algorithms in a volume of water simulating the MLIC at the CT, and (ii) the integral depth dose directly computed by a simple ray-tracing algorithm (IDD direct ) through the same CT data. The exact spatial position of the spot pattern was numerically adjusted testing different in-plane positions and selecting the one that minimized the range differences between IDD direct and IDD MLIC . Range error mapping was feasible by both the TPS and the ray-tracing methods, but very sensitive to even small misalignments. In homogeneous regions, the range errors computed by the direct ray-tracing algorithm matched the results obtained by both the analytic and the Monte Carlo algorithms. In both phantoms, lateral heterogeneities were better modeled by the ray-tracing and the Monte Carlo algorithms than by the analytic TPS computation. Accordingly, when the pencil beam crossed lateral heterogeneities, the range errors mapped by the direct algorithm matched better the Monte Carlo maps than those obtained by the analytic algorithm. Finally, the simplicity of the ray-tracing algorithm allowed to implement a prototype procedure for automated spatial alignment. The ray-tracing algorithm can reliably replace the TPS method in MLIC PR for in

  10. SU-E-T-110: An Investigation On Monitor Unit Threshold and Effects On IMPT Delivery in Proton Pencil Beam Planning System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syh, J; Ding, X; Syh, J; Patel, B; Rosen, L; Wu, H

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: An approved proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) treatment plan might not be able to deliver because of existed extremely low monitor unit per beam spot. A dual hybrid plan with higher efficiency of higher spot monitor unit and the efficacy of less number of energy layers were searched and optimized. The range of monitor unit threshold setting was investigated and the plan quality was evaluated by target dose conformity. Methods: Certain limitations and requirements need to be checks and tested before a nominal proton PBS treatment plan can be delivered. The plan needs to be met the machine characterization, specification in record and verification to deliver the beams. Minimal threshold of monitor unit, e.g. 0.02, per spot was set to filter the low counts and plan was re-computed. Further MU threshold increment was tested in sequence without sacrificing the plan quality. The number of energy layer was also alternated due to elimination of low count layer(s). Results: Minimal MU/spot threshold, spot spacing in each energy layer and total number of energy layer and the MU weighting of beam spots of each beam were evaluated. Plan optimization between increases of the spot MU (efficiency) and less energy layers of delivery (efficacy) was adjusted. 5% weighting limit of total monitor unit per beam was feasible. Scarce spreading of beam spots was not discouraging as long as target dose conformity within 3% criteria. Conclusion: Each spot size is equivalent to the relative dose in the beam delivery system. The energy layer is associated with the depth of the targeting tumor. Our work is crucial to maintain the best possible quality plan. To keep integrity of all intrinsic elements such as spot size, spot number, layer number and the carried weighting of spots in each layer is important in this study

  11. The Gaussian beam mode analysis of classical phase aberrations in diffraction-limited optical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trappe, Neil; Murphy, J. Anthony; Withington, Stafford

    2003-07-01

    Gaussian beam mode analysis (GBMA) offers a more intuitive physical insight into how light beams evolve as they propagate than the conventional Fresnel diffraction integral approach. In this paper we illustrate that GBMA is a computationally efficient, alternative technique for tracing the evolution of a diffracting coherent beam. In previous papers we demonstrated the straightforward application of GBMA to the computation of the classical diffraction patterns associated with a range of standard apertures. In this paper we show how the GBMA technique can be expanded to investigate the effects of aberrations in the presence of diffraction by introducing the appropriate phase error term into the propagating quasi-optical beam. We compare our technique to the standard diffraction integral calculation for coma, astigmatism and spherical aberration, taking—for comparison—examples from the classic text 'Principles of Optics' by Born and Wolf. We show the advantages of GBMA for allowing the defocusing of an aberrated image to be evaluated quickly, which is particularly important and useful for probing the consequences of astigmatism and spherical aberration.

  12. The Gaussian beam mode analysis of classical phase aberrations in diffraction-limited optical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trappe, Neil; Murphy, J Anthony; Withington, Stafford

    2003-01-01

    Gaussian beam mode analysis (GBMA) offers a more intuitive physical insight into how light beams evolve as they propagate than the conventional Fresnel diffraction integral approach. In this paper we illustrate that GBMA is a computationally efficient, alternative technique for tracing the evolution of a diffracting coherent beam. In previous papers we demonstrated the straightforward application of GBMA to the computation of the classical diffraction patterns associated with a range of standard apertures. In this paper we show how the GBMA technique can be expanded to investigate the effects of aberrations in the presence of diffraction by introducing the appropriate phase error term into the propagating quasi-optical beam. We compare our technique to the standard diffraction integral calculation for coma, astigmatism and spherical aberration, taking - for comparison - examples from the classic text 'Principles of Optics' by Born and Wolf. We show the advantages of GBMA for allowing the defocusing of an aberrated image to be evaluated quickly, which is particularly important and useful for probing the consequences of astigmatism and spherical aberration

  13. Calculation and Verification of a Planar Pencil Beam Kernel Through the Hankel Transform of Measured OARs for a Radiosurgery System with Cones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas Verdesoto, Milton X.; Alvarez Romero, Jose T.

    2010-01-01

    A planar multienergetic pencil beam kernel with rotational symmetry is calculated for a stereotactic radiosurgery system, SRS, BrainLAB with cones, employing the deconvolution method of the off axis ratio profile, OAR, corresponding to the cone of 35 mm in diameter for a 6 MV photon beam produced by a linear accelerator Varian 2100 C/D. Before the deconvolution, the experimental OAR is corrected for beam divergence and variations of the spectral fluence Φ, using a boundary function BF. The function BF and the fluence Φ are transformed to the conjugate space with the zero order Hankel function, which is the appropriate transform due to the radial symmetry of the circular beams generated by the cones. The kernel in the conjugate space is obtained as the ratio of the transform of BF to the transform of Φ, therefore the kernel in the real space is calculated as the inverse transform of the kernel in the conjugate space. To validate the kernel in the real space, it is convolved with the fluence of the cones of 7.5, 12.5, 15, 17.5, 20, 22.5, 25, 30 and 35 mm in diameter. The comparison of the OARs calculated and measured shows a maximum difference of 4.5% in the zones of high gradient of dose, and a difference less than 2% in the regions of low gradient of dose. Finally, the expanded uncertainty of the kernel is estimated and reported.

  14. Bayesian electron density inference from JET lithium beam emission spectra using Gaussian processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Sehyun; Svensson, J.; Brix, M.; Ghim, Y.-C.; Contributors, JET

    2017-03-01

    A Bayesian model to infer edge electron density profiles is developed for the JET lithium beam emission spectroscopy (Li-BES) system, measuring Li I (2p-2s) line radiation using 26 channels with  ∼1 cm spatial resolution and 10∼ 20 ms temporal resolution. The density profile is modelled using a Gaussian process prior, and the uncertainty of the density profile is calculated by a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) scheme. From the spectra measured by the transmission grating spectrometer, the Li I line intensities are extracted, and modelled as a function of the plasma density by a multi-state model which describes the relevant processes between neutral lithium beam atoms and plasma particles. The spectral model fully takes into account interference filter and instrument effects, that are separately estimated, again using Gaussian processes. The line intensities are inferred based on a spectral model consistent with the measured spectra within their uncertainties, which includes photon statistics and electronic noise. Our newly developed method to infer JET edge electron density profiles has the following advantages in comparison to the conventional method: (i) providing full posterior distributions of edge density profiles, including their associated uncertainties, (ii) the available radial range for density profiles is increased to the full observation range (∼26 cm), (iii) an assumption of monotonic electron density profile is not necessary, (iv) the absolute calibration factor of the diagnostic system is automatically estimated overcoming the limitation of the conventional technique and allowing us to infer the electron density profiles for all pulses without preprocessing the data or an additional boundary condition, and (v) since the full spectrum is modelled, the procedure of modulating the beam to measure the background signal is only necessary for the case of overlapping of the Li I line with impurity lines.

  15. Attenuation of laser power of a focused Gaussian beam during interaction between a laser and powder in coaxial laser cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jichang; Li Lijun; Zhang Yuanzhong; Xie Xiaozhu

    2005-01-01

    The power of a focused laser beam with a Gaussian intensity profile attenuated by powder in coaxial laser cladding is investigated experimentally and theoretically, and its resolution model is developed. With some assumptions, it is concluded that the attenuation of laser power is an exponential function and is determined by the powder feed rate, particle moving speed, spraying angles and waist positions and diameters of the laser beam and powder flow, grain diameter and run of the laser beam through the powder flow. The attenuation of laser power increases with powder feed rate or run of laser beam through the powder flow. In the experiment presented, 300 W laser power from a focused Gaussian beam is attenuated by a coaxial powder flow. The experimental results agree well with the values calculated with the developed model

  16. Propagation of flat-topped multi-Gaussian beams through a double-lens system with apertures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yanqi; Zhu, Baoqiang; Liu, Daizhong; Lin, Zunqi

    2009-07-20

    A general model for different apertures and flat-topped laser beams based on the multi-Gaussian function is developed. The general analytical expression for the propagation of a flat-topped beam through a general double-lens system with apertures is derived using the above model. Then, the propagation characteristics of the flat-topped beam through a spatial filter are investigated by using a simplified analytical expression. Based on the Fluence beam contrast and the Fill factor, the influences of a pinhole size on the propagation of the flat-topped multi-Gaussian beam (FMGB) through the spatial filter are illustrated. An analytical expression for the propagation of the FMGB through the spatial filter with a misaligned pinhole is presented, and the influences of the pinhole offset are evaluated.

  17. SU-F-T-178: Optimized Design of a Diamond Detector Specifically Dedicated to the Dose Distribution Measurements in Clinical Proton Pencil Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moignier, C; Pomorski, M; Agelou, M; Hernandez, J Garcia; Lazaro, D; Marsolat, F; De Marzi, L; Mazal, A; Tromson, D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In proton-therapy, pencil beam scanning (PBS) dosimetry presents a real challenge due to the small size of the beam (about 3 to 8 mm in FWHM), the pulsed high dose rate (up to 100 Gy/s) and the proton energy variation (about 30 MeV to 250 MeV). In the framework of French INSERM DEDIPRO project, a specifically dedicated single crystal diamond dosimeter (SCDDo) was developed with the objective of obtaining accurate measurements of the dose distribution in PBS modality. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations with MCNPX were performed. A small proton beam of 5 mm in FWHM was simulated as well as diamond devices with various size, thickness and holder composition. The calculated doses-to-diamond were compared with the doses-to-water in order to reduce the perturbation effects. Monte-Carlo simulations lead to an optimized SCDDo design for small proton beams dosimetry. Following the optimized design, SCDDos were mounted in water-equivalent holders with electrical connection adapted to standard electrometer. First, SCDDos performances (stability, repeatability, signal-to-background ratio…) were evaluated with conventional photon beams. Then, characterizations (dose linearity, dose rate dependence…) with wide proton beams were performed at proton-therapy center (IC-CPO) from Curie Institute (France) with the passive proton delivery technique, in order to confirm dosimetric requirements. Finally, depth-dose distributions were measured in a water tank, for native and modulated Bragg Peaks with the collimator of 12 cm, and compared to a commercial PPC05 parallel-plate ionization chamber reference detector. Lateral-dose profiles were also measured with the collimator of 5 mm, and compared to a commercial SFD diode. Results: The results show that SCDDo design does not disturb the dose distributions. Conclusion: The experimental dose distributions with the SCDDo are in good agreement with the commercial detectors and no energy dependence was observed with this device

  18. SU-F-T-178: Optimized Design of a Diamond Detector Specifically Dedicated to the Dose Distribution Measurements in Clinical Proton Pencil Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moignier, C; Pomorski, M; Agelou, M; Hernandez, J Garcia; Lazaro, D [Institut CEA LIST, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Marsolat, F; De Marzi, L; Mazal, A [Institut Curie - Centre de Protontherapie d’Orsay, Orsay (France); Tromson, D

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In proton-therapy, pencil beam scanning (PBS) dosimetry presents a real challenge due to the small size of the beam (about 3 to 8 mm in FWHM), the pulsed high dose rate (up to 100 Gy/s) and the proton energy variation (about 30 MeV to 250 MeV). In the framework of French INSERM DEDIPRO project, a specifically dedicated single crystal diamond dosimeter (SCDDo) was developed with the objective of obtaining accurate measurements of the dose distribution in PBS modality. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations with MCNPX were performed. A small proton beam of 5 mm in FWHM was simulated as well as diamond devices with various size, thickness and holder composition. The calculated doses-to-diamond were compared with the doses-to-water in order to reduce the perturbation effects. Monte-Carlo simulations lead to an optimized SCDDo design for small proton beams dosimetry. Following the optimized design, SCDDos were mounted in water-equivalent holders with electrical connection adapted to standard electrometer. First, SCDDos performances (stability, repeatability, signal-to-background ratio…) were evaluated with conventional photon beams. Then, characterizations (dose linearity, dose rate dependence…) with wide proton beams were performed at proton-therapy center (IC-CPO) from Curie Institute (France) with the passive proton delivery technique, in order to confirm dosimetric requirements. Finally, depth-dose distributions were measured in a water tank, for native and modulated Bragg Peaks with the collimator of 12 cm, and compared to a commercial PPC05 parallel-plate ionization chamber reference detector. Lateral-dose profiles were also measured with the collimator of 5 mm, and compared to a commercial SFD diode. Results: The results show that SCDDo design does not disturb the dose distributions. Conclusion: The experimental dose distributions with the SCDDo are in good agreement with the commercial detectors and no energy dependence was observed with this device

  19. Strong self-focusing of a cosh-Gaussian laser beam in collisionless magneto-plasma under plasma density ramp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanda, Vikas; Kant, Niti

    2014-01-01

    The effect of plasma density ramp on self-focusing of cosh-Gaussian laser beam considering ponderomotive nonlinearity is analyzed using WKB and paraxial approximation. It is noticed that cosh-Gaussian laser beam focused earlier than Gaussian beam. The focusing and de-focusing nature of the cosh-Gaussian laser beam with decentered parameter, intensity parameter, magnetic field, and relative density parameter has been studied and strong self-focusing is reported. It is investigated that decentered parameter “b” plays a significant role for the self-focusing of the laser beam as for b=2.12, strong self-focusing is seen. Further, it is observed that extraordinary mode is more prominent toward self-focusing rather than ordinary mode of propagation. For b=2.12, with the increase in the value of magnetic field self-focusing effect, in case of extraordinary mode, becomes very strong under plasma density ramp. Present study may be very useful in the applications like the generation of inertial fusion energy driven by lasers, laser driven accelerators, and x-ray lasers. Moreover, plasma density ramp plays a vital role to enhance the self-focusing effect

  20. Strong self-focusing of a cosh-Gaussian laser beam in collisionless magneto-plasma under plasma density ramp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanda, Vikas; Kant, Niti, E-mail: nitikant@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Lovely Professional University, G. T. Road, Phagwara, Punjab 144411 (India)

    2014-07-15

    The effect of plasma density ramp on self-focusing of cosh-Gaussian laser beam considering ponderomotive nonlinearity is analyzed using WKB and paraxial approximation. It is noticed that cosh-Gaussian laser beam focused earlier than Gaussian beam. The focusing and de-focusing nature of the cosh-Gaussian laser beam with decentered parameter, intensity parameter, magnetic field, and relative density parameter has been studied and strong self-focusing is reported. It is investigated that decentered parameter “b” plays a significant role for the self-focusing of the laser beam as for b=2.12, strong self-focusing is seen. Further, it is observed that extraordinary mode is more prominent toward self-focusing rather than ordinary mode of propagation. For b=2.12, with the increase in the value of magnetic field self-focusing effect, in case of extraordinary mode, becomes very strong under plasma density ramp. Present study may be very useful in the applications like the generation of inertial fusion energy driven by lasers, laser driven accelerators, and x-ray lasers. Moreover, plasma density ramp plays a vital role to enhance the self-focusing effect.

  1. SU-E-T-464: On the Equivalence of the Quality Correction Factor for Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorriaux, J; Paganetti, H; Testa, M; Giantsoudi, D; Schuemann, J; Bertrand, D; Orban de Xivry, J.; Lee, J; Palmans, H; Vynckier, S; Sterpin, E

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In current practice, most proton therapy centers apply IAEA TRS-398 reference dosimetry protocol. Quality correction factors (kQ) take into account in the dose determination process the differences in beam qualities used for calibration unit and for treatment unit. These quality correction factors are valid for specific reference conditions. TRS-398 reference conditions should be achievable in both scattered proton beams (i.e. DS) and scanned proton beams (i.e. PBS). However, it is not a priori clear if TRS-398 kQ data, which are based on Monte Carlo (MC) calculations in scattered beams, can be used for scanned beams. Using TOPAS-Geant4 MC simulations, the study aims to determine whether broad beam quality correction factors calculated in TRS-398 can be directly applied to PBS delivery modality. Methods: As reference conditions, we consider a 10×10×10 cm 3 homogeneous dose distribution delivered by PBS system in a water phantom (32/10 cm range/modulation) and an air cavity placed at the center of the spread-out-Bragg-peak. In order to isolate beam differences, a hypothetical broad beam is simulated. This hypothetical beam reproduces exactly the same range modulation, and uses the same energy layers than the PBS field. Ion chamber responses are computed for the PBS and hypothetical beams and then compared. Results: For an air cavity of 2×2×0.2 cm 3 , the ratio of ion chamber responses for the PBS and hypothetical beam qualities is 0.9991 ± 0.0016. Conclusion: Quality correction factors are insensitive to the delivery pattern of the beam (broad beam or PBS), as long as similar dose distributions are achieved. This investigation, for an air cavity, suggests that broad beam quality correction factors published in TRS-398 can be applied for scanned beams. J. Sorriaux is financially supported by a public-private partnership involving the company Ion Beam Applications (IBA)

  2. Excitation of a plasma wave by a right-handed Gaussian EM beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sodha, M.S.; Patheja, B.L.; Sharma, R.P.

    1979-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation of the excitation of an electron plasma wave in a hot collisionless magnetoplasma by a right-handed Gaussian EM beam (pump wave) when the plasma wave and the pump wave are propagating along the static magnetic field. On account of the Gaussian intensity distribution of the pump wave, pondermotive force becomes finite and the electrons are redistributed. This redistribution is highly dependent on whether ω/sub c/>2ω 0 or ω/sub c/ 0 , where ω/sub c/ is the electron cyclotron frequency and ω 0 is the pump-wave frequency. The modified background electron density leads to coupling between the plasma wave and the pump wave. When the initial power of the pump wave is greater than the critical power for self-focusing, oscillatory self-focusing of the pump wave occurs and the coupling of the two waves are modified. Moreover, the effect of changing the intensity of the magnetic field affects the self-focusing of the pump wave, and the plasma-wave excitation is accordingly affected

  3. Analytic methods to find beating transitions of asymmetric Gaussian beams in GNLS equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianetz, David; Schiff, Jeremy

    2018-01-01

    In a simple model of propagation of asymmetric Gaussian beams in nonlinear waveguides, described by a reduction to ordinary differential equations of generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equations with cubic-quintic (CQ) and saturable (SAT) nonlinearities and a graded-index profile, the beam widths exhibit two different types of beating behavior, with transitions between them. We present an analytic model to explain these phenomena, which originate in a 1:1 resonance in a 2 degree-of-freedom Hamiltonian system. We show how small oscillations near a fixed point close to 1:1 resonance in such a system can be approximated using an integrable Hamiltonian and, ultimately, a single first order differential equation. In particular, the beating transitions can be located from coincidences of roots of a pair of quadratic equations, with coefficients determined (in a highly complex manner) by the internal parameters and initial conditions of the original system. The results of the analytic model agree with the numerics of the original system over large parameter ranges, and allow new predictions that can be verified directly. In the CQ case, we identify a band of beam energies for which there is only a single beating transition (as opposed to 0 or 2) as the eccentricity is increased. In the SAT case, we explain the sudden (dis)appearance of beating transitions for certain values of the other parameters as the grade-index is changed.

  4. Ghost imaging and its visibility with partially coherent elliptical Gaussian Schell-model beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Meilan; Zhu, Weiting; Zhao, Daomu

    2015-01-01

    The performances of the ghost image and the visibility with partially coherent elliptical Gaussian Schell-model beams have been studied. In that case we have derived the condition under which the goal ghost image is achievable. Furthermore, the visibility is assessed in terms of the parameters related to the source to find that the visibility reduces with the increase of the beam size, while it is a monotonic increasing function of the transverse coherence length. More specifically, it is found that the inequalities of the source sizes in x and y directions, as well as the transverse coherence lengths, play an important role in the ghost image and the visibility. - Highlights: • We studied the ghost image and visibility with partially coherent EGSM beams. • We derived the condition under which the goal ghost image is achievable. • The visibility is assessed in terms of the parameters related to the source. • The source sizes and coherence lengths play role in the ghost image and visibility.

  5. Cylindrical particle manipulation and negative spinning using a nonparaxial Hermite-Gaussian light-sheet beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitri, F. G.

    2016-10-01

    Based on the angular spectrum decomposition method (ASDM), a nonparaxial solution for the Hermite-Gaussian (HG m ) light-sheet beam of any order m is derived. The beam-shape coefficients (BSCs) are expressed in a compact form and computed using the standard Simpson’s rule for numerical integration. Subsequently, the analysis is extended to evaluate the longitudinal and transverse radiation forces as well as the spin torque on an absorptive dielectric cylindrical particle in 2D without any restriction to a specific range of frequencies. The dynamics of the cylindrical particle are also examined based on Newton’s second law of motion. The numerical results show that a Rayleigh or Mie cylindrical particle can be trapped, pulled or propelled in the optical field depending on its initial position in the cross-sectional plane of the HG m light-sheet. Moreover, negative or positive axial spin torques can arise depending on the choice of the non-dimensional size parameter ka (where k is the wavenumber and a is the radius of the cylinder) and the location of the absorptive cylinder in the beam. This means that the HG m light-sheet beam can induce clockwise or anti-clockwise rotations depending on its shift from the center of the cylinder. In addition, individual vortex behavior can arise in the cross-sectional plane of wave propagation. The present analysis presents an analytical model to predict the optical radiation forces and torque induced by a HG m light-sheet beam on an absorptive cylinder for applications in optical light-sheet tweezers, optical micro-machines, particle manipulation and opto-fluidics to name a few areas of research.

  6. Acoustic radiation force on a double-layer microsphere by a Gaussian focused beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Rongrong; Cheng, Kaixuan; Liu, Jiehui; Mao, Yiwei; Gong, Xiufen; Liu, Xiaozhou

    2014-01-01

    A new model for calculating the radiation force on double-layer microsphere is proposed based on the ray acoustics approach. The axial acoustic radiation force resulting from a focused Gaussian beam incident on spherical shells immersed in water is examined theoretically in relation to its thickness and the contents of its double-layer. The attenuation both in the water and inside the sphere is considered in this method, which cannot be ignored while the high frequency ultrasonic is used. Results of numerical calculations are presented for fat and low density polyethylene materials, with the hollow region filled with animal oil, water, or air. These results show how the acoustic impedance and the sound velocity of both layers, together with the thickness of the shell, affect the acoustic radiation force.

  7. Spiral phase plates for the generation of high-order Laguerre-Gaussian beams with non-zero radial index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffato, G.; Carli, M.; Massari, M.; Romanato, F.

    2015-03-01

    The work of design, fabrication and characterization of spiral phase plates for the generation of Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) beams with non-null radial index is presented. Samples were fabricated by electron beam lithography on polymethylmethacrylate layers over glass substrates. The optical response of these phase optical elements was measured and the purity of the experimental beams was investigated in terms of Laguerre-Gaussian modes contributions. The farfield intensity pattern was compared with theoretical models and numerical simulations, while the expected phase features were confirmed by interferometric analyses. The high quality of the output beams confirms the applicability of these phase plates for the generation of high-order Laguerre-Gaussian beams. A novel application consisting in the design of computer-generated holograms encoding information for light beams carrying phase singularities is shown. A numerical code based on iterative Fourier transform algorithm has been developed for the computation of the phase pattern of phase-only diffractive optical element for illumination under LG beams. Numerical analysis and preliminary experimental results confirm the applicability of these devices as high-security optical elements.

  8. Density Transition Based Self-Focusing of cosh-Gaussian Laser Beam in Plasma with Linear Absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kant, Niti; Wani, Manzoor Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Density transition based self-focusing of cosh-Gaussian laser beam in plasma with linear absorption has been studied. The field distribution in the plasma is expressed in terms of beam width parameter, decentered parameter, and linear absorption coefficient. The differential equation for the beam width parameter is solved by following Wentzel–Kramers–Brillouin (WKB) and paraxial approximation through parabolic wave equation approach. The behaviour of beam width parameter with dimensionless distance of propagation is studied at optimum values of plasma density, decentered parameter and with different absorption levels in the medium. The results reveal that these parameters can affect the self-focusing significantly. (paper)

  9. Green function as an integral superposition of Gaussian beams in inhomogeneous anisotropic layered structures in Cartesian coordinates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Červený, V.; Pšenčík, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 26 (2016), s. 131-153 ISSN 2336-3827 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-05237S Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : elastodynamic Green function * inhomogeneous anisotropic media * integral superposition of Gaussian beams Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure

  10. Numerical modeling of Gaussian beam propagation and diffraction in inhomogeneous media based on the complex eikonal equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xingguo; Sun, Hui

    2018-05-01

    Gaussian beam is an important complex geometrical optical technology for modeling seismic wave propagation and diffraction in the subsurface with complex geological structure. Current methods for Gaussian beam modeling rely on the dynamic ray tracing and the evanescent wave tracking. However, the dynamic ray tracing method is based on the paraxial ray approximation and the evanescent wave tracking method cannot describe strongly evanescent fields. This leads to inaccuracy of the computed wave fields in the region with a strong inhomogeneous medium. To address this problem, we compute Gaussian beam wave fields using the complex phase by directly solving the complex eikonal equation. In this method, the fast marching method, which is widely used for phase calculation, is combined with Gauss-Newton optimization algorithm to obtain the complex phase at the regular grid points. The main theoretical challenge in combination of this method with Gaussian beam modeling is to address the irregular boundary near the curved central ray. To cope with this challenge, we present the non-uniform finite difference operator and a modified fast marching method. The numerical results confirm the proposed approach.

  11. Measurement of the orbital angular momentum density of Bessel beams by projection into a Laguerre–Gaussian basis

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schulze, C

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We present the measurement of the orbital angular momentum (OAM) density of Bessel beams and superpositions thereof by projection into a Laguerre–Gaussian basis. This projection is performed by an all-optical inner product measurement performed...

  12. Modeling of a VMJ PV array under Gaussian high intensity laser power beam condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Jeongsook; Kim, Gunzung; Park, Yongwan

    2018-02-01

    The high intensity laser power beaming (HILPB) system is one of the most promising systems in the long-rang wireless power transfer field. The vertical multi-junction photovoltaic (VMJ PV) array converts the HILPB into electricity to power the load or charges a battery. The output power of a VMJ PV array depends mainly on irradiance values of each VMJ PV cells. For simulating an entire VMJ PV array, the irradiance profile of the Gaussian HILPB and the irradiance level of the VMJ PV cell are mathematically modeled first. The VMJ PV array is modeled as a network with dimension m*n, where m represents the number of VMJ PV cells in a column, and n represents the number of VMJ PV cells in a row. In order to validate the results obtained in modeling and simulation, a laboratory setup was developed using 55 VMJ PV array. By using the output power model of VMJ PV array, we can establish an optimal power transmission path by the receiver based on the received signal strength. When the laser beam from multiple transmitters aimed at a VMJ PV array at the same time, the received power is the sum of all energy at a VMJ PV array. The transmitter sends its power characteristics as optically coded laser pulses and powers as HILPB. Using the attenuated power model and output power model of VMJ PV array, the receiver can estimate the maximum receivable powers from the transmitters and select optimal transmitters.

  13. SU-F-BRD-12: When Does Pencil Beam Scanning Become Superior to Passive Scattered Proton Therapy for Pediatric Head and Neck Cancers?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moteabbed, M; Depauw, N; Kooy, H; Yock, T; Paganetti, H [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric benefits of pencil beam scanning (PBS) compared with passive scattered (PS) proton therapy for treatment of pediatric head&neck patients as a function of the PBS spot size and explore the advantages of using apertures in PBS. Methods: Ten pediatric patients with head&neck cancers treated by PS proton therapy at our institution were retrospectively selected. The histologies included rhabdomyosarcoma, ependymoma, astrocytoma, craniopharyngioma and germinoma. The prescribed dose ranged from 36 to 54 Gy(RBE). Five PBS plans were created for each patient using variable spot size (average sigma at isocenter) and choice of beam specific apertures: (1) 10mm spots, (2) 10mm spots with apertures, (3) 6mm spots, (4) 6mm spots with apertures, and (5) 3mm spots. The plans were optimized for intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) with no single beam uniformity constraints. Dose volume indices as well as equivalent uniform dose (EUD) were compared between PS and PBS plans. Results: Although target coverage was clinically adequate for all cases, the plans with largest (10mm) spots provide inferior quality compared with PS in terms of dose to organs-at-risk (OAR). However, adding apertures to these plans ensured lower OAR dose than PS. The average EUD difference between PBS and PS plans over all patients and organs at risk were (1) 2.5%, (2) −5.1%, (3) -5%, (4) −7.8%, and (5) −9.5%. As the spot size decreased, more conformal plans were achieved that offered similar target coverage but lower dose to the neighboring healthy organs, while alleviating the need for using apertures. Conclusion: The application of PBS does not always translate to better plan qualities compared to PS depending on the available beam spot size. We recommend that institutions with spot size larger than ∼6mm at isocenter consider using apertures to guarantee clinically comparable or superior dosimetric efficacy to PS treatments.

  14. SU-E-CAMPUS-T-05: Validation of High-Resolution 3D Patient QA for Proton Pencil Beam Scanning and IMPT by Polymer Gel Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardin, A; Avery, S; Ding, X; Kassaee, A; Lin, L [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Maryanski, M [MGS Research, Inc., Madison, CT (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Validation of high-resolution 3D patient QA for proton pencil beam scanning and IMPT by polymer gel dosimetry. Methods: Four BANG3Pro polymer gel dosimeters (manufactured by MGS Research Inc, Madison, CT) were used for patient QA at the Robert's Proton Therapy Center (RPTC, Philadelphia, PA). All dosimeters were sealed in identical thin-wall Pyrex glass spheres. Each dosimeter contained a set of markers for 3D registration purposes. The dosimeters were mounted in a consistent and reproducible manner using a custom build holder. Two proton pencil beam scanning plans were designed using Varian Eclipse™ treatment planning system: 1) A two-field intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plan and 2) one single field uniform dose (SFUD) plan. The IMPT fields were evaluated as a composite plan and individual fields, the SFUD plan was delivered as a single field plan.Laser CT scanning was performed using the manufacturer's OCTOPUS-IQ axial transmission laser CT scanner using a 1 mm slice thickness. 3D registration, analysis, and OD/cm to absorbed dose calibrations were perfomed using DICOM RT-Dose and CT files, and software developed by the manufacturer. 3D delta index, a metric equivalent to the gamma tool, was used for dose comparison. Results: Very good agreement with single IMPT fields and with SFUD was obtained. Composite IMPT fields had a less satisfactory agreement. The single fields had 3D delta index passing rates (3% dose difference, 3 mm DTA) of 98.98% and 94.91%. The composite 3D delta index passing rate was 80.80%. The SFUD passing rate was 93.77%. Required shifts of the dose distributions were less than 4 mm. Conclusion: A formulation of the BANG3Pro polymer gel dosimeter, suitable for 3D QA of proton patient plans is established and validated. Likewise, the mailed QA analysis service provided by the manufacturer is a practical option when required resources are unavailable. We fully disclose that the subject of this research regards a

  15. Comparison of proton therapy treatment planning for head tumors with a pencil beam algorithm on dual and single energy CT images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudobivnik, Nace; Dedes, George; Parodi, Katia; Landry, Guillaume, E-mail: g.landry@lmu.de [Department of Medical Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich 85748 (Germany); Schwarz, Florian; Johnson, Thorsten; Sommer, Wieland H. [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig Maximilians University Hospital Munich, 81377 Munich (Germany); Agolli, Linda [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich 81377, Germany and Radiation Oncology, Sant’ Andrea Hospital, Sapienza University, Rome 00189 (Italy); Tessonnier, Thomas [Department of Medical Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich 85748, Germany and Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg (Germany); Verhaegen, Frank [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht 6229 ET, the Netherlands and Medical Physics Unit, Department of Oncology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 0G4 (Canada); Thieke, Christian; Belka, Claus [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich 81377 (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: Dual energy CT (DECT) has recently been proposed as an improvement over single energy CT (SECT) for stopping power ratio (SPR) estimation for proton therapy treatment planning (TP), thereby potentially reducing range uncertainties. Published literature investigated phantoms. This study aims at performing proton therapy TP on SECT and DECT head images of the same patients and at evaluating whether the reported improved DECT SPR accuracy translates into clinically relevant range shifts in clinical head treatment scenarios. Methods: Two phantoms were scanned at a last generation dual source DECT scanner at 90 and 150 kVp with Sn filtration. The first phantom (Gammex phantom) was used to calibrate the scanner in terms of SPR while the second served as evaluation (CIRS phantom). DECT images of five head trauma patients were used as surrogate cancer patient images for TP of proton therapy. Pencil beam algorithm based TP was performed on SECT and DECT images and the dose distributions corresponding to the optimized proton plans were calculated using a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation platform using the same patient geometry for both plans obtained from conversion of the 150 kVp images. Range shifts between the MC dose distributions from SECT and DECT plans were assessed using 2D range maps. Results: SPR root mean square errors (RMSEs) for the inserts of the Gammex phantom were 1.9%, 1.8%, and 1.2% for SECT phantom calibration (SECT{sub phantom}), SECT stoichiometric calibration (SECT{sub stoichiometric}), and DECT calibration, respectively. For the CIRS phantom, these were 3.6%, 1.6%, and 1.0%. When investigating patient anatomy, group median range differences of up to −1.4% were observed for head cases when comparing SECT{sub stoichiometric} with DECT. For this calibration the 25th and 75th percentiles varied from −2% to 0% across the five patients. The group median was found to be limited to 0.5% when using SECT{sub phantom} and the 25th and 75th percentiles

  16. SU-F-J-191: Dosimetric Evaluation of a Left Chestwall Patient Treated with a Compact Proton Pencil Beam Gantry Utilizing Daily Setup CBCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maynard, M; Chen, K; Rosen, L; Wu, H [Willis-Knighton Medical Center, Shreveport, LA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the robustness of the gradient technique for treating a multi-isocenter left chest wall patient with a compact proton pencil beam gantry. Both CBCT and stereoscopic imaging are used to facilitate daily treatment setup. Methods: To treat the elongated chest wall planning target volume (PTV) with the compact PBS system, a 28 fraction (5040 CcGE) treatment plan was created using two fields with gradient matching technique. Daily table shifts between treatment field isocenters were obtained from the record and verify system for each treatment fraction. Copies of the initial treatment plan were made for each fraction and the field isocenter coordinates for each plan copy were adjusted to reflect daily table shifts. Doses were re-calculated for each fraction, summed, and compared against the initial plan. Results: The table shifts (average and range) were 2.2 (−5.1–+3.9), 3.0 (−6.0–+4.0) and 3.0 (−10.1–+1.9) millimeters in the anterior-posterior, superior-inferior and right-left directions, respectively. Dose difference to the PTV, heart and ipsilateral lung were evaluated. The percentage of the PTV receiving the prescription dose decreased from 94.6% to 89.1%. The D95 of the PTV increased from 99.6% to 99.9%. The maximum dose in PTV increased from 106.6% to 109.2% and V105 increased from 1.0% to 16.5%. The V20 of the ipsilateral lung increased from 18.5% to 21.0%. The mean heart dose difference was negligible. Conclusion: Observed dose differences to lung and heart tissues due to daily setup variations remained acceptably low while maintaining sufficient dose coverage to the PTV. This initial case study demonstrates the robustness of the gradient technique to treat a large target, multi-isocenter plan with a compact proton pencil beam gantry equipped with CBCT and stereoscopic imaging modalities.

  17. A study on repainting strategies for treating moderately moving targets with proton pencil beam scanning at the new Gantry 2 at PSI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zenklusen, S M; Pedroni, E; Meer, D

    2010-01-01

    Treating moving targets using a scanning gantry for proton therapy is a promising but very challenging, not yet clinically demonstrated treatment modality. The interference of organ motion with the sequence of the beam delivery produces uncontrolled dose inhomogeneities within the target. One promising approach to overcome this difficulty is to increase the speed of scanning in order to apply the dose repeatedly (so-called repainting). To obtain sufficiently high scanning speeds a new, technologically improved gantry-Gantry 2-has been designed and is currently under construction at PSI. As there are many possible repainting strategies, the way repainting will be implemented on Gantry 2 will depend on the result of a careful analysis of the various treatment delivery strategies available. To achieve this aim, and prior to the start of experimental work with Gantry 2, simulations of dose distribution errors due to organ motion under various beam delivery strategies were investigated. The effects of motion on the dose distribution were studied for moderate motion amplitudes (5 mm) for spherical target volumes in a homogeneous medium and with homogeneous dose. In total over 200 000 dose distributions have been simulated and analyzed and selected results are discussed. From the obtained results we are confident to be able to treat moderately moving targets on Gantry 2 using repainted pencil-beam spot scanning. Continuous line scanning seems to be the most elegant solution; it provides higher repainting rates and produces superior results but is probably more difficult to realize. For larger motion amplitudes, continuous line scanning still shows good results, but we plan anyways to use a gating system for these cases, not only to reduce the inhomogeneity within the target volume but also to reduce safety margins.

  18. SU-F-T-215: An Investigation Of Multi-Scanner CT Hounsfield Unit Calibration for Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy Using 3D Gamma Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, J; Li, X; Liu, G; Liu, Q; Liang, J; Ding, X

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We compare and investigate the dosimetric impacts on pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton treatment plans generated with CT calibration curves from four different CT scanners and one averaged ‘global’ CT calibration curve. Methods: The four CT scanners are located at three different hospital locations within the same health system. CT density calibration curves were collected from these scanners using the same CT calibration phantom and acquisition parameters. Mass density to HU value tables were then commissioned in a commercial treatment planning system. Five disease sites were chosen for dosimetric comparisons at brain, lung, head and neck, adrenal, and prostate. Three types of PBS plans were generated at each treatment site using SFUD, IMPT, and robustness optimized IMPT techniques. 3D dose differences were investigated using 3D Gamma analysis. Results: The CT calibration curves for all four scanners display very similar shapes. Large HU differences were observed at both the high HU and low HU regions of the curves. Large dose differences were generally observed at the distal edges of the beams and they are beam angle dependent. Out of the five treatment sites, lung plans exhibits the most overall range uncertainties and prostate plans have the greatest dose discrepancy. There are no significant differences between the SFUD, IMPT, and the RO-IMPT methods. 3D gamma analysis with 3%, 3 mm criteria showed all plans with greater than 95% passing rate. Two of the scanners with close HU values have negligible dose difference except for lung. Conclusion: Our study shows that there are more than 5% dosimetric differences between different CT calibration curves. PBS treatment plans generated with SFUD, IMPT, and the robustness optimized IMPT has similar sensitivity to the CT density uncertainty. More patient data and tighter gamma criteria based on structure location and size will be used for further investigation.

  19. SU-G-JeP4-09: Impact of Interfractional Motion On Hypofractionated Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moteabbed, M; Trofimov, A; Sharp, G; Wang, Y; Zietman, A; Efstathiou, J; Lu, H [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of anatomy/setup variations on standard vs. hypofractionated anterolateral pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy for prostate cancer. Methods: Six prostate cancer patients treated with double-scattering proton therapy, who underwent weekly verification CT scans were selected. Implanted fiducials were used for localization, and endorectal balloons for immobilization. New PBS plans using combination of lateral and anterior-oblique (AO) (±35 deg) beams were created. AO beams were added to spare the femoral heads during hypofractionation. Lateral beams delivered 50.4 Gy(RBE) to prostate plus 5-15mm of seminal vesicles and AO beams 28.8 Gy(RBE) to prostate, in 44 fractions. PTV was laterally expanded by 2.5% to account for range uncertainty. No range margins were applied for AO beams, assuming delivery with in-vivo range verification. Field-specific apertures with 1.2cm margin were used. Spot size was ∼9.5mm sigma for 172MeV @isocenter in air. Plans were optimized as single-field-uniform-dose with ∼5% maximum non-uniformity. The planned dose was recomputed on each weekly CT after aligning the fiducials with the simulation CT, scaled and accumulated via deformable image registration. Hypofractionated treatments with 12 and 5 fractions were considered. Equivalent doses were calculated for prostate (α/β= 1.5Gy), bladder and rectum (α/β= 3Gy). Results: The biological equivalent prostate dose was 86.2 and 92.9 Gyeq for the hypofractionation scenarios at 4.32 and 7.35 Gy/fx, respectively. The equivalent prostate D98 was degraded by on average 2.7 Gyeq for standard, and 3.1 and 4.0 Gyeq for the hypofractionated plans after accumulation. Differences between accumulated and planned Dmean/D2/EUD were generally reduced when reducing the number of fractions for bladder and rectum. The average Dmean/D2/EUD differences over all patients and organs-at-risk were 0.74/4.0/9.23, 0.49/3.64/5.51, 0.37/3.21/3.49 Gyeq for 44, 12 and 5 fractions

  20. Geometrical determinations of IMRT photon pencil-beam path in radiotherapy wedges and limit divergence angle with the Anisotropic Analytic Algorithm (AAA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Casesnoves

    2014-08-01

    delivery model. Simulations results gave acceptable trigonometrical approximations/data that can be used for LINAC applications/planning-system software. The integral formulas presented are practical for dose delivery calculations/3D-approximations when using WF/other similar types of beam modification devices. Limit angle formulation and conformal wedge concept was also presented...................................................Cite this article as: Casesnoves F. Geometrical determinations of IMRT photon pencil-beam path in radiotherapy wedges and limit divergence angle with the Anisotropic Analytic Algorithm (AAA. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2014; 2(3:02031. DOI:10.14319/ijcto.0203.1

  1. Dipole saturated absorption modeling in gas phase: Dealing with a Gaussian beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupré, Patrick

    2018-01-01

    With the advent of new accurate and sensitive spectrometers, cf. combining optical cavities (for absorption enhancement), the requirement for reliable molecular transition modeling is becoming more pressing. Unfortunately, there is no trivial approach which can provide a definitive formalism allowing us to solve the coupled systems of equations associated with nonlinear absorption. Here, we propose a general approach to deal with any spectral shape of the electromagnetic field interacting with a molecular species under saturation conditions. The development is specifically applied to Gaussian-shaped beams. To make the analytical expressions tractable, approximations are proposed. Finally, two or three numerical integrations are required for describing the Lamb-dip profile. The implemented model allows us to describe the saturated absorption under low pressure conditions where the broadening by the transit-time may dominate the collision rates. The model is applied to two specific overtone transitions of the molecular acetylene. The simulated line shapes are discussed versus the collision and the transit-time rates. The specific collisional and collision-free regimes are illustrated, while the Rabi frequency controls the intermediate regime. We illustrate how to recover the input parameters by fitting the simulated profiles.

  2. Probabilistic behavior analysis of a sandwiched buckled beam under Gaussian white noise with energy harvesting perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokem Fokou, I.S.; Nono Dueyou Buckjohn, C.; Siewe Siewe, M.; Tchawoua, C.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a sandwiched buckled beam with axial compressive force under Gaussian white noise is considered as a piezoelectric energy harvester. A stochastic averaging method is proposed to analytically predict the system’s response, the stability and the estimation of system’s reliability. By using the generalized harmonic transformation, the Itô differential equations with respect to the mechanical and electrical amplitude are derived through this technique. From these differential equations, we construct the Fokker–Plank–Kolmogorov equation for the electrical and mechanical subsystem where the solution of each equation in the stationary state is a probability density. The mean first passage time (MFPT) is numerically provided in order to study the attractor stability(stable equilibrium point observed in the effective potential) which give rise to the noise-enhanced stability(NES) phenomenon. The mean square response and voltage are obtained for different white noise intensities and others system parameters. The effects of linear damping and noise intensity on the mean square voltage are investigated. We notice that harvested energy can be enhanced by suitable choice of noise intensity and others system parameters. In additional, by combining the random signal with harmonic excitation, the stochastic resonance(SR) phenomenon is observed via the mean residence time(TMR) which give rise to the large amplitude of vibrations and consequently, an optimization of harvested energy. The agreements between the analytical method and those obtained numerically validate the effectiveness of analytical investigations.

  3. Influence on dose calculation by difference of dose calculation algorithms in stereotactic lung irradiation. Comparison of pencil beam convolution (inhomogeneity correction: batho power law) and analytical anisotropic algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachibana, Masayuki; Noguchi, Yoshitaka; Fukunaga, Jyunichi; Hirano, Naomi; Yoshidome, Satoshi; Hirose, Takaaki

    2009-01-01

    The monitor unit (MU) was calculated by pencil beam convolution (inhomogeneity correction algorithm: batho power law) [PBC (BPL)] which is the dose calculation algorithm based on measurement in the past in the stereotactic lung irradiation study. The recalculation was done by analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA), which is the dose calculation algorithm based on theory data. The MU calculated by PBC (BPL) and AAA was compared for each field. In the result of the comparison of 1031 fields in 136 cases, the MU calculated by PBC (BPL) was about 2% smaller than that calculated by AAA. This depends on whether one does the calculation concerning the extension of the second electrons. In particular, the difference in the MU is influenced by the X-ray energy. With the same X-ray energy, when the irradiation field size is small, the lung pass length is long, the lung pass length percentage is large, and the CT value of the lung is low, and the difference of MU is increased. (author)

  4. Measurements of bone mineral density in the lumbar spine and proximal femur using lunar prodigy and the new pencil-beam dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Dongil; Kim, Deog-Yoon; Han, Chung Soo; Kim, Seonwoo; Bok, Hae Sook; Huh, Wooseong; Ko, Jae-Wook; Hong, Sung Hwa

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the correlation of the absolute bone mineral density (BMD) values of the lumbar spine and standard sites of the proximal femur obtained from a Lunar Prodigy and the newly developed pencil-beam dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (Dexxum). Between June 2008 and December 2008, 79 Korean volunteers were enrolled. Measurements were obtained on the same day using both densitometers. The absolute BMD values (g/cm 2 ) from the two densitometers were evaluated using Pearson's correlation analysis with Bonferroni's correction for the three clinically important sites. In order to evaluate precision, we performed duplicate Dexxum measurements, and calculated the within-subject coefficient of variation (WSCV). The Pearson's correlation coefficient (r) of BMD values for the total proximal femur, femoral neck, and lumbar spine by the two densitometers were 0.926, 0.948, and 0.955 respectively, and the null hypotheses of r = 0.8 were all rejected (p < 0.001 by one-sided Z-test with Fisher's z-transformation for each site). The T-scores (r ≥ 0.842) and Z-scores (r ≥ 0.709) also showed strong positive correlations. The duplicate BMD values of Dexxum showed a high level of precision (WSCV ≤ 4.27%). Dexxum measurements of BMD, T-scores, and Z-scores showed a strong linear correlation with those measured on Lunar Prodigy. (orig.)

  5. Diffraction of a Gaussian beam in a three-dimensional smoothly inhomogeneous medium: an eikonal-based complex geometrical-optics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berczynski, Pawel; Bliokh, Konstantin Yu; Kravtsov, Yuri A; Stateczny, Andrzej

    2006-06-01

    We present an ab initio account of the paraxial complex geometrical optics (CGO) in application to scalar Gaussian beam propagation and diffraction in a 3D smoothly inhomogeneous medium. The paraxial CGO deals with quadratic expansion of the complex eikonal and reduces the wave problem to the solution of ordinary differential equations of the Riccati type. This substantially simplifies the description of Gaussian beam diffraction as compared with full-wave or parabolic (quasi-optics) equations. For a Gaussian beam propagating in a homogeneous medium or along the symmetry axis in a lenslike medium, the CGO equations possess analytical solutions; otherwise, they can be readily solved numerically. As a nontrivial example we consider Gaussian beam propagation and diffraction along a helical ray in an axially symmetric waveguide medium. It is shown that the major axis of the beam's elliptical cross section grows unboundedly; it is oriented predominantly in the azimuthal (binormal) direction and does not obey the parallel-transport law.

  6. Relative biological effectiveness in a proton spread-out Bragg peak formed by pencil beam scanning mode

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Michaelidesová, Anna; Vachelová, Jana; Puchalská, M.; Pachnerová Brabcová, Kateřina; Vondráček, V.; Sihver, L.; Davídková, Marie

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 2 (2017), s. 359-368 ISSN 0158-9938 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : Relative biological effectiveness * Proton therapy * Clonogennic assay * Micronuclei assay * Monte Carlo simulations * Scanning beam Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders OBOR OECD: Nuclear physics Impact factor: 1.171, year: 2016

  7. Numerical investigations of non-collinear optical parametric chirped pulse amplification for Laguerre-Gaussian vortex beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lu; Yu, Lianghong; Liang, Xiaoyan

    2016-04-01

    We present for the first time a scheme to amplify a Laguerre-Gaussian vortex beam based on non-collinear optical parametric chirped pulse amplification (OPCPA). In addition, a three-dimensional numerical model of non-collinear optical parametric amplification was deduced in the frequency domain, in which the effects of non-collinear configuration, temporal and spatial walk-off, group-velocity dispersion and diffraction were also taken into account, to trace the dynamics of the Laguerre-Gaussian vortex beam and investigate its critical parameters in the non-collinear OPCPA process. Based on the numerical simulation results, the scheme shows promise for implementation in a relativistic twisted laser pulse system, which will diversify the light-matter interaction field.

  8. Extension of geometrical-optics approximation to on-axis Gaussian beam scattering. I. By a spherical particle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Feng; Ren, Kuan Fang; Cai, Xiaoshu

    2006-07-10

    The geometrical-optics approximation of light scattering by a transparent or absorbing spherical particle is extended from plane wave to Gaussian beam incidence. The formulas for the calculation of the phase of each ray and the divergence factor are revised, and the interference of all the emerging rays is taken into account. The extended geometrical-optics approximation (EGOA) permits one to calculate the scattering diagram in all directions from 0 degrees to 180 degrees. The intensities of the scattered field calculated by the EGOA are compared with those calculated by the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory, and good agreement is found. The surface wave effect in Gaussian beam scattering is also qualitatively analyzed by introducing a flux ratio factor. The approach proposed is particularly important to the further extension of the geometrical-optics approximation to the scattering of large spheroidal particles.

  9. SU-F-T-136: Breath Hold Lung Phantom Study in Using CT Density Versus Relative Stopping Power Ratio for Proton Pencil Beam Scanning System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syh, J; Wu, H; Rosen, L [Willis-Knighton Medical Center, Shreveport, LA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate mass density effects of CT conversion table and its variation in current treatment planning system of spot scanning proton beam using an IROC proton lung phantom for this study. Methods: A proton lung phantom study was acquired to Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Houston (IROC) Quality Assurance Center. Inside the lung phantom, GAF Chromic films and couples of thermal luminescent dosimeter (TLD) capsules embedded in specified PTV and adjacent structures to monitor delivered dosage and 3D dose distribution profiles. Various material such as cork (Lung), blue water (heart), Techron HPV (ribs) and organic material of balsa wood and cork as dosimetry inserts within phantom of solid water (soft tissue). Relative stopping power (RLSP) values were provided. Our treatment planning system (TPS) doesn’t require SP instead relative density was converted relative to water. However lung phantom was irradiated by planning with density override and the results were compared with IROC measurements. The second attempt was conducted without density override and compared with IROC’s. Results: The higher passing rate of imaging and measurement results of the lung phantom irradiation met the criteria by IROC without density override. The film at coronal plane was found to be shift due to inclined cylinder insertion. The converted CT density worked as expected to correlate relative stopping power. Conclusion: The proton lung phantom provided by IROC is a useful tool to qualify our commissioned proton pencil beam delivery with TPS within reliable confidence. The relative mass stopping power ratios of materials were converted from the relative physical density relative to water and the results were satisfied.

  10. Depth dose of critical organs of phantom based on surface dose exposed with Dual X-ray absorptiometry: pencil beam using TLD dosimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Akbar Sharafi

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA is one of the most widely used techniques fornon-invasive assessment of bone status. Radiation dosimetry is well established technique for pencilbeam and fan beam DXA system, for the assessment of the surface absorbed dose. No publishedassessment of the absorbed dose for the various depths of the critical organs such as the thyroid anduterus was found. Therefore, in this study, we measured the surface dose and depth dose of criticalorgans to determine the correlation between the depth dose and the surface dose.Materials and Methods: A Lunar DPX-MD (pencil beam system was used in this study. Ananthropomorphic phantom was designed. AP spine and femur scan modes were used to measure thesurface and depth doses of the thyroid left and right lobes and uterus in various deeps and scan centers.TLDs-400 were placed at the surface, near the source and also inserted at different depths in thyroidand uterus of the anthropomorphic phantom. Absorbed doses were measured on the phantom for APspine and femur scans. The correlation between the absorbed dose and the depth was found using thelinear regression analysis.Results: There was no significant correlation between the depth dose and the scan center doseexcept in the femur scan. AP spine effective dose were calculated as 0.064, 0.059, 0.061 and 0.242μSv for thyroid left, right lobes, uterus and ovary, respectively.Conclusion: It is concluded that there is significant correlation between the surface and the doseof various depths of the scanned sections.

  11. SU-F-T-373: Monte Carlo Versus Pencil Beam Dose Calculation for Spine SBRT Treatments Using HybridARC and Sliding Windows IMRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venencia, C; Pino, M; Caussa, L; Garrigo, E [Instituto de Radioterapia - Fundacion Marie Curie, Cordoba (Argentina); Molineu, A [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to quantify the dosimetric impact of Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation algorithm compared to Pencil Beam (PB) on Spine SBRT with HybridARC (HA) and sliding windows IMRT (dMLC) treatment modality. Methods: A 6MV beam (1000MU/min) produced by a Novalis TX (BrainLAB-Varian) equipped with HDMLC was used. HA uses 1 arc plus 8 IMRT beams (arc weight between 60–40%) and dIMRT 15 beams. Plans were calculated using iPlan v.4.5.3 (BrainLAB) and the treatment dose prescription was 27Gy in 3 fractions. Dose calculation was done by PB (4mm spatial resolution) with heterogeneity correction and MC dose to water (4mm spatial resolution and 4% mean variance). PTV and spinal cord dose comparison were done. Study was done on 12 patients. IROC Spine Phantom was used to validate HA and quantify dose variation using PB and MC algorithm. Results: The difference between PB and MC for PTV D98%, D95%, Dmean, D2% were 2.6% [−5.1, 6.8], 0.1% [−4.2, 5.4], 0.9% [−1.5, 3.8] and 2.4% [−0.5, 8.3]. The difference between PB and MC for spinal cord Dmax, D1.2cc and D0.35cc were 5.3% [−6.4, 18.4], 9% [−7.0, 17.0] and 7.6% [−0.6, 14.8] respectively. IROC spine phantom shows PTV TLD dose variation of 0.98% for PB and 1.01% for MC. Axial and sagittal film plane gamma index (5%-3mm) was 95% and 97% for PB and 95% and 99% for MC. Conclusion: PB slightly underestimates the dose for the PTV. For the spinal cord PB underestimates the dose and dose differences could be as high as 18% which could have unexpected clinical impact. CI shows no variation between PB and MC for both treatment modalities Treatment modalities have no impact with the dose calculation algorithms used. Following the IROC pass-fail criteria, treatment acceptance requirement was fulfilled for PB and MC.

  12. SU-E-T-262: Planning for Proton Pencil Beam Scanning (PBS): Applications of Gradient Optimization for Field Matching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, H; Kirk, M; Zhai, H; Ding, X; Liu, H; Hill-Kayser, C; Lustig, R; Tochner, Z; Deville, C; Vapiwala, N; McDonough, J; Both, S [University Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To propose the gradient optimization(GO) approach in planning for matching proton PBS fields and present two commonly used applications in our institution. Methods: GO is employed for PBS field matching in the scenarios that when the size of the target is beyond the field size limit of the beam delivery system or matching is required for beams from different angles to either improve the sparing of important organs or to pass through a short and simple beam path. Overlap is designed between adjacent fields and in the overlapped junction, the dose was optimized such that it gradually decreases in one field and the decrease is compensated by increase from another field. Clinical applications of this approach on craniospinal irradiation(CSI) and whole pelvis treatment were presented. Mathematical model was developed to study the relationships between dose errors, setup errors and junction lengths. Results: Uniform and conformal dose coverage to the entire target volumes was achieved for both applications using GO approach. For CSI, the gradient matching (6.7cm junction) between fields overcame the complexity of planning associated with feathering match lines. A slow dose gradient in the junction area significantly reduced the sensitivity of the treatment to setup errors. For whole pelvis, gradient matching (4cm junction) between posterior fields for superior target and bilateral fields for inferior target provided dose sparing to organs such as bowel, bladder and rectum. For a setup error of 3 mm in longitudinal direction from one field, mathematical model predicted dose errors of 10%, 6% and 4.3% for junction length of 3, 5 and 7cm. Conclusion: This GO approach improves the quality of the PBS treatment plan with matching fields while maintaining the safety of treatment delivery relative to potential misalignments.

  13. SU-E-T-262: Planning for Proton Pencil Beam Scanning (PBS): Applications of Gradient Optimization for Field Matching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, H; Kirk, M; Zhai, H; Ding, X; Liu, H; Hill-Kayser, C; Lustig, R; Tochner, Z; Deville, C; Vapiwala, N; McDonough, J; Both, S

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To propose the gradient optimization(GO) approach in planning for matching proton PBS fields and present two commonly used applications in our institution. Methods: GO is employed for PBS field matching in the scenarios that when the size of the target is beyond the field size limit of the beam delivery system or matching is required for beams from different angles to either improve the sparing of important organs or to pass through a short and simple beam path. Overlap is designed between adjacent fields and in the overlapped junction, the dose was optimized such that it gradually decreases in one field and the decrease is compensated by increase from another field. Clinical applications of this approach on craniospinal irradiation(CSI) and whole pelvis treatment were presented. Mathematical model was developed to study the relationships between dose errors, setup errors and junction lengths. Results: Uniform and conformal dose coverage to the entire target volumes was achieved for both applications using GO approach. For CSI, the gradient matching (6.7cm junction) between fields overcame the complexity of planning associated with feathering match lines. A slow dose gradient in the junction area significantly reduced the sensitivity of the treatment to setup errors. For whole pelvis, gradient matching (4cm junction) between posterior fields for superior target and bilateral fields for inferior target provided dose sparing to organs such as bowel, bladder and rectum. For a setup error of 3 mm in longitudinal direction from one field, mathematical model predicted dose errors of 10%, 6% and 4.3% for junction length of 3, 5 and 7cm. Conclusion: This GO approach improves the quality of the PBS treatment plan with matching fields while maintaining the safety of treatment delivery relative to potential misalignments

  14. Generation of Laguerre-Gaussian Beams Using a Diode Pumped Solid-State Digital Laser

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bell, Teboho

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The solid state digital laser was used in generation of Laguerre-Gaussian modes, LGpl, of different orders. This work demonstrates that we can generate high-order Laguerre-Gaussian modes with high purity using a digital laser....

  15. Selective excitation of higher-radial-order Laguerre-Gaussian beams using a solid-state digital laser

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bell, Teboho

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Filter (LF) was introduced to only transmit 1064 nm and block the 808 nm pump. The laser beam was transmitted out of the cavity through an output coupler mirror (M3 on Figure 1) and was 1:1 relay imaged using two 125 mm lenses (L3 and L4) to a Photon...; Published December 30, 2016 Citation: Bell T, Ngcobo S (2016) Selective Excitation of Higher-radial-order Laguerre-Gaussian Beams Using a Solid-state Digital Laser. J Laser Opt Photonics 3: 144. doi: 10.4172/2469-410X.1000144 Copyright: © 2016 Bell T, et...

  16. Influence of light absorption on relativistic self-focusing of Gaussian laser beam in cold quantum plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, S. D.; Valkunde, A. T.; Vhanmore, B. D.; Urunkar, T. U.; Gavade, K. M.; Takale, M. V.

    2018-05-01

    When inter particle distance is comparable to the de Broglies wavelength of charged particles, quantum effects in plasmas are unavoidable. We have exploited an influence of light absorption on self-focusing of Gaussian laser beam in cold quantum plasma by considering relativistic nonlinearity. Nonlinear differential equation governing beam-width parameter has been established by using parabolic equation approach under paraxial and WKB approximations. The effect of light absorption on variation of beam-width parameter with dimensionless distance of propagation is presented graphically and discussed. It is found that light absorption plays vital role in weakening the relativistic self-focusing of laser beam during propagation in cold quantum plasma and gives reasonably interesting results.

  17. Frequency Characteristics of Surface Wave Generated by Single-Line Pulsed Laser Beam with Two Kinds of Spatial Energy Profile Models: Gaussian and Square-Like

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Ho Geon; Kim, Myung Hwan; Choi, Sung Ho; Kim, Chung Seok; Jhang, Kyung Young [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-08-15

    Using a single-line pulsed laser beam is well known as a useful noncontact method to generate a directional surface acoustic wave. In this method, different laser beam energy profiles produce different waveforms and frequency characteristics. In this paper, we considered two typical kinds of laser beam energy profiles, Gaussian and square-like, to find out a difference in the frequency characteristics. To achieve this, mathematical models were proposed first for Gaussian laser beam profile and square-like respectively, both of which depended on the laser beam width. To verify the theoretical models, experimental setups with a cylindrical lens and a line-slit mask were respectively designed to produce a line laser beam with Gaussian spatial energy profile and square-like. The frequency responses of the theoretical models showed good agreement with experimental results in terms of the existence of harmonic frequency components and the shift of the first peak frequencies to low.

  18. SU-F-T-121: Abdominal Compression Effectively Reduces the Interplay Effect and Enables Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy of Liver Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souris, K; Glick, A; Kang, M; Lin, H; McDonough, J; Simone, C; Solberg, T; Ben-Josef, E; Lin, L; Janssens, G; Sterpin, E; Lee, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To study if abdominal compression can reduce breathing motion and mitigate interplay effect in pencil beam scanning proton therapy (PBSPT) treatment of liver tumors in order to better spare healthy liver volumes compared with photon therapy. Methods: Ten patients, six having large tumors initially treated with IMRT and four having small tumors treated with SBRT, were replanned for PBSPT. ITV and beam-specific PTVs based on 4D-CT were used to ensure target coverage in PBSPT. The use of an abdominal compression belt and volumetric repainting was investigated to mitigate the interplay effect between breathing motion and PBSPT dynamic delivery. An in-house Matlab script has been developed to simulate this interplay effect. The dose is computed on each phase individually by sorting all spots according to their simulated delivery timing. The final dose distribution is then obtained by accumulating all dose maps to a reference phase. Results: For equivalent target coverage PBSPT reduced average healthy liver dose by 9.5% of the prescription dose compared with IMRT/SBRT. Abdominal compression of 113.2±42.2 mmHg was effective for all 10 patients and reduced average motion by 2.25 mm. As a result, the average ITV volume decreased from 128.2% to 123.1% of CTV volume. Similarly, the average beam-specific PTV volume decreased from 193.2% to 183.3%. For 8 of the 10 patients, the average motion was reduced below 5 mm, and up to 3 repainting were sufficient to mitigate interplay. For the other two patients with larger residual motion, 4–5 repainting were needed. Conclusion: We recommend evaluation of the 4DCT motion histogram following simulation and the interplay effect following treatment planning in order to personalize the use of compression and volumetric repainting for each patient. Abdominal compression enables safe and more effective PBS treatment of liver tumors by reduction of motion and interplay effect. Kevin Souris is supported by IBA and Televie Grant

  19. SU-F-T-121: Abdominal Compression Effectively Reduces the Interplay Effect and Enables Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy of Liver Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souris, K [Universite catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium); University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Glick, A; Kang, M; Lin, H; McDonough, J; Simone, C; Solberg, T; Ben-Josef, E; Lin, L [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Janssens, G [IBA, Louvain-la-neuve (Belgium); Sterpin, E [Universite catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium); KU Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Lee, J [Universite catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To study if abdominal compression can reduce breathing motion and mitigate interplay effect in pencil beam scanning proton therapy (PBSPT) treatment of liver tumors in order to better spare healthy liver volumes compared with photon therapy. Methods: Ten patients, six having large tumors initially treated with IMRT and four having small tumors treated with SBRT, were replanned for PBSPT. ITV and beam-specific PTVs based on 4D-CT were used to ensure target coverage in PBSPT. The use of an abdominal compression belt and volumetric repainting was investigated to mitigate the interplay effect between breathing motion and PBSPT dynamic delivery. An in-house Matlab script has been developed to simulate this interplay effect. The dose is computed on each phase individually by sorting all spots according to their simulated delivery timing. The final dose distribution is then obtained by accumulating all dose maps to a reference phase. Results: For equivalent target coverage PBSPT reduced average healthy liver dose by 9.5% of the prescription dose compared with IMRT/SBRT. Abdominal compression of 113.2±42.2 mmHg was effective for all 10 patients and reduced average motion by 2.25 mm. As a result, the average ITV volume decreased from 128.2% to 123.1% of CTV volume. Similarly, the average beam-specific PTV volume decreased from 193.2% to 183.3%. For 8 of the 10 patients, the average motion was reduced below 5 mm, and up to 3 repainting were sufficient to mitigate interplay. For the other two patients with larger residual motion, 4–5 repainting were needed. Conclusion: We recommend evaluation of the 4DCT motion histogram following simulation and the interplay effect following treatment planning in order to personalize the use of compression and volumetric repainting for each patient. Abdominal compression enables safe and more effective PBS treatment of liver tumors by reduction of motion and interplay effect. Kevin Souris is supported by IBA and Televie Grant

  20. Theoretical Benefits of Dynamic Collimation in Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy for Brain Tumors: Dosimetric and Radiobiological Metrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moignier, Alexandra, E-mail: alexandra-moignier@uiowa.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Gelover, Edgar; Wang, Dongxu; Smith, Blake; Flynn, Ryan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Kirk, Maura; Lin, Liyong; Solberg, Timothy; Lin, Alexander [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Hyer, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: To quantify the dosimetric benefit of using a dynamic collimation system (DCS) for penumbra reduction during the treatment of brain tumors by pencil beam scanning proton therapy (PBS PT). Methods and Materials: Collimated and uncollimated brain treatment plans were created for 5 patients previously treated with PBS PT and retrospectively enrolled in an institutional review board–approved study. The in-house treatment planning system, RDX, was used to generate the plans because it is capable of modeling both collimated and uncollimated beamlets. The clinically delivered plans were reproduced with uncollimated plans in terms of target coverage and organ at risk (OAR) sparing to ensure a clinically relevant starting point, and collimated plans were generated to improve the OAR sparing while maintaining target coverage. Physical and biological comparison metrics, such as dose distribution conformity, mean and maximum doses, normal tissue complication probability, and risk of secondary brain cancer, were used to evaluate the plans. Results: The DCS systematically improved the dose distribution conformity while preserving the target coverage. The average reduction of the mean dose to the 10-mm ring surrounding the target and the healthy brain were 13.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 11.6%-15.7%; P<.0001) and 25.1% (95% CI 16.8%-33.4%; P<.001), respectively. This yielded an average reduction of 24.8% (95% CI 0.8%-48.8%; P<.05) for the brain necrosis normal tissue complication probability using the Flickinger model, and 25.1% (95% CI 16.8%-33.4%; P<.001) for the risk of secondary brain cancer. A general improvement of the OAR sparing was also observed. Conclusion: The lateral penumbra reduction afforded by the DCS increases the normal tissue sparing capabilities of PBS PT for brain cancer treatment while preserving target coverage.

  1. Theoretical Benefits of Dynamic Collimation in Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy for Brain Tumors: Dosimetric and Radiobiological Metrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moignier, Alexandra; Gelover, Edgar; Wang, Dongxu; Smith, Blake; Flynn, Ryan; Kirk, Maura; Lin, Liyong; Solberg, Timothy; Lin, Alexander; Hyer, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the dosimetric benefit of using a dynamic collimation system (DCS) for penumbra reduction during the treatment of brain tumors by pencil beam scanning proton therapy (PBS PT). Methods and Materials: Collimated and uncollimated brain treatment plans were created for 5 patients previously treated with PBS PT and retrospectively enrolled in an institutional review board–approved study. The in-house treatment planning system, RDX, was used to generate the plans because it is capable of modeling both collimated and uncollimated beamlets. The clinically delivered plans were reproduced with uncollimated plans in terms of target coverage and organ at risk (OAR) sparing to ensure a clinically relevant starting point, and collimated plans were generated to improve the OAR sparing while maintaining target coverage. Physical and biological comparison metrics, such as dose distribution conformity, mean and maximum doses, normal tissue complication probability, and risk of secondary brain cancer, were used to evaluate the plans. Results: The DCS systematically improved the dose distribution conformity while preserving the target coverage. The average reduction of the mean dose to the 10-mm ring surrounding the target and the healthy brain were 13.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 11.6%-15.7%; P<.0001) and 25.1% (95% CI 16.8%-33.4%; P<.001), respectively. This yielded an average reduction of 24.8% (95% CI 0.8%-48.8%; P<.05) for the brain necrosis normal tissue complication probability using the Flickinger model, and 25.1% (95% CI 16.8%-33.4%; P<.001) for the risk of secondary brain cancer. A general improvement of the OAR sparing was also observed. Conclusion: The lateral penumbra reduction afforded by the DCS increases the normal tissue sparing capabilities of PBS PT for brain cancer treatment while preserving target coverage.

  2. Robustness of the Voluntary Breath-Hold Approach for the Treatment of Peripheral Lung Tumors Using Hypofractionated Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dueck, Jenny, E-mail: jenny.dueck@psi.ch [Section of Radiotherapy, Department of Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Knopf, Antje-Christin [Joint Department of Physics at the Institute of Cancer Research and the Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Lomax, Antony [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Department of Physics, ETH Zürich, Zürich (Switzerland); Albertini, Francesca [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Persson, Gitte F. [Department of Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Josipovic, Mirjana [Section of Radiotherapy, Department of Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Aznar, Marianne [Section of Radiotherapy, Department of Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Weber, Damien C. [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); University of Zürich, Zürich (Switzerland); Munck af Rosenschöld, Per [Section of Radiotherapy, Department of Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: The safe clinical implementation of pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy for lung tumors is complicated by the delivery uncertainties caused by breathing motion. The purpose of this feasibility study was to investigate whether a voluntary breath-hold technique could limit the delivery uncertainties resulting from interfractional motion. Methods and Materials: Data from 15 patients with peripheral lung tumors previously treated with stereotactic radiation therapy were included in this study. The patients had 1 computed tomographic (CT) scan in voluntary breath-hold acquired before treatment and 3 scans during the treatment course. PBS proton treatment plans with 2 fields (2F) and 3 fields (3F), respectively, were calculated based on the planning CT scan and subsequently recalculated on the 3 repeated CT scans. Recalculated plans were considered robust if the V{sub 95%} (volume receiving ≥95% of the prescribed dose) of the gross target volume (GTV) was within 5% of what was expected from the planning CT data throughout the simulated treatment. Results: A total of 14/15 simulated treatments for both 2F and 3F met the robustness criteria. Reduced V{sub 95%} was associated with baseline shifts (2F, P=.056; 3F, P=.008) and tumor size (2F, P=.025; 3F, P=.025). Smaller tumors with large baseline shifts were also at risk for reduced V{sub 95%} (interaction term baseline/size: 2F, P=.005; 3F, P=.002). Conclusions: The breath-hold approach is a realistic clinical option for treating lung tumors with PBS proton therapy. Potential risk factors for reduced V{sub 95%} are small targets in combination with large baseline shifts. On the basis of these results, the baseline shift of the tumor should be monitored (eg, through image guided therapy), and appropriate measures should be taken accordingly. The intrafractional motion needs to be investigated to confirm that the breath-hold approach is robust.

  3. Robustness of the Voluntary Breath-Hold Approach for the Treatment of Peripheral Lung Tumors Using Hypofractionated Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dueck, Jenny; Knopf, Antje-Christin; Lomax, Antony; Albertini, Francesca; Persson, Gitte F.; Josipovic, Mirjana; Aznar, Marianne; Weber, Damien C.; Munck af Rosenschöld, Per

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The safe clinical implementation of pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy for lung tumors is complicated by the delivery uncertainties caused by breathing motion. The purpose of this feasibility study was to investigate whether a voluntary breath-hold technique could limit the delivery uncertainties resulting from interfractional motion. Methods and Materials: Data from 15 patients with peripheral lung tumors previously treated with stereotactic radiation therapy were included in this study. The patients had 1 computed tomographic (CT) scan in voluntary breath-hold acquired before treatment and 3 scans during the treatment course. PBS proton treatment plans with 2 fields (2F) and 3 fields (3F), respectively, were calculated based on the planning CT scan and subsequently recalculated on the 3 repeated CT scans. Recalculated plans were considered robust if the V 95% (volume receiving ≥95% of the prescribed dose) of the gross target volume (GTV) was within 5% of what was expected from the planning CT data throughout the simulated treatment. Results: A total of 14/15 simulated treatments for both 2F and 3F met the robustness criteria. Reduced V 95% was associated with baseline shifts (2F, P=.056; 3F, P=.008) and tumor size (2F, P=.025; 3F, P=.025). Smaller tumors with large baseline shifts were also at risk for reduced V 95% (interaction term baseline/size: 2F, P=.005; 3F, P=.002). Conclusions: The breath-hold approach is a realistic clinical option for treating lung tumors with PBS proton therapy. Potential risk factors for reduced V 95% are small targets in combination with large baseline shifts. On the basis of these results, the baseline shift of the tumor should be monitored (eg, through image guided therapy), and appropriate measures should be taken accordingly. The intrafractional motion needs to be investigated to confirm that the breath-hold approach is robust.

  4. Electron dose distributions caused by the contact-type metallic eye shield: Studies using Monte Carlo and pencil beam algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sei-Kwon; Yoon, Jai-Woong; Hwang, Taejin; Park, Soah; Cheong, Kwang-Ho; Han, Tae Jin; Kim, Haeyoung; Lee, Me-Yeon; Kim, Kyoung Ju; Bae, Hoonsik

    2015-01-01

    A metallic contact eye shield has sometimes been used for eyelid treatment, but dose distribution has never been reported for a patient case. This study aimed to show the shield-incorporated CT-based dose distribution using the Pinnacle system and Monte Carlo (MC) calculation for 3 patient cases. For the artifact-free CT scan, an acrylic shield machined as the same size as that of the tungsten shield was used. For the MC calculation, BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc were used for the 6-MeV electron beam of the Varian 21EX, in which information for the tungsten, stainless steel, and aluminum material for the eye shield was used. The same plan was generated on the Pinnacle system and both were compared. The use of the acrylic shield produced clear CT images, enabling delineation of the regions of interest, and yielded CT-based dose calculation for the metallic shield. Both the MC and the Pinnacle systems showed a similar dose distribution downstream of the eye shield, reflecting the blocking effect of the metallic eye shield. The major difference between the MC and the Pinnacle results was the target eyelid dose upstream of the shield such that the Pinnacle system underestimated the dose by 19 to 28% and 11 to 18% for the maximum and the mean doses, respectively. The pattern of dose difference between the MC and the Pinnacle systems was similar to that in the previous phantom study. In conclusion, the metallic eye shield was successfully incorporated into the CT-based planning, and the accurate dose calculation requires MC simulation. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Electron dose distributions caused by the contact-type metallic eye shield: Studies using Monte Carlo and pencil beam algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Sei-Kwon; Yoon, Jai-Woong; Hwang, Taejin; Park, Soah; Cheong, Kwang-Ho; Jin Han, Tae; Kim, Haeyoung; Lee, Me-Yeon; Ju Kim, Kyoung, E-mail: kjkim@hallym.or.kr; Bae, Hoonsik

    2015-10-01

    A metallic contact eye shield has sometimes been used for eyelid treatment, but dose distribution has never been reported for a patient case. This study aimed to show the shield-incorporated CT-based dose distribution using the Pinnacle system and Monte Carlo (MC) calculation for 3 patient cases. For the artifact-free CT scan, an acrylic shield machined as the same size as that of the tungsten shield was used. For the MC calculation, BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc were used for the 6-MeV electron beam of the Varian 21EX, in which information for the tungsten, stainless steel, and aluminum material for the eye shield was used. The same plan was generated on the Pinnacle system and both were compared. The use of the acrylic shield produced clear CT images, enabling delineation of the regions of interest, and yielded CT-based dose calculation for the metallic shield. Both the MC and the Pinnacle systems showed a similar dose distribution downstream of the eye shield, reflecting the blocking effect of the metallic eye shield. The major difference between the MC and the Pinnacle results was the target eyelid dose upstream of the shield such that the Pinnacle system underestimated the dose by 19 to 28% and 11 to 18% for the maximum and the mean doses, respectively. The pattern of dose difference between the MC and the Pinnacle systems was similar to that in the previous phantom study. In conclusion, the metallic eye shield was successfully incorporated into the CT-based planning, and the accurate dose calculation requires MC simulation.

  6. SU-F-T-598: Robotic Radiosurgery System Versus Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy for Definitive Intracranial Treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, M; Pompos, A; Gu, X; Yan, Y; Abdulrahman, R; Timmerman, R; Jiang, S

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize the dose distributions of Cyberknife and intensity-modulated-proton-therapy (IMPT). Methods: A total of 20 patients previously treated with Cyberknife were selected. The original planning-target-volume (PTV) was used in the ‘IMPT-ideal’ plan assuming a comparable image-guidance with Cyberknife. A 3mm expansion was made to create the proton-PTV for the ‘IMPT-3mm’ plan representing the current proton-therapy where a margin of 3mm is used to account for the inferior image-guidance. The proton range uncertainty was taken-care in beam-design by adding the proximal- and distal-margins (3%water-equivalent-depth+1mm) for both proton plans. The IMPT plans were generated to meet the same target coverage as the Cyberknife-plans. The plan quality of IMPT-ideal and IMPT-3mm were compared to the Cyberknife-plan. To characterize plan quality, we defined the ratio(R) of volumes encompassed by the selected isodose surfaces for Cyberknife and IMPT plans (VCK/VIMPT). Comparisons were made for both Cyberknife versus IMPT-ideal and Cyberknife versusIMPT-3mm to further discuss the impact of setup error margins used in proton therapy and the correlation with target size and location. Results: IMPT-ideal plans yield comparable plan quality as CK plans and slightly better OAR sparing while the IMPT-3mm plan results in a higher dose to the OARs, especially for centralized tumors. Comparing to the IMPT-ideal plans, a slightly larger 80% (Ravg=1.05) dose cloud and significantly larger 50% (Ravg=1.3) and 20% (Ravg=1.60) dose clouds are seen in CK plans. However, the 3mm expansion results in a larger high and medium dose clouds in IMPT-3mm plans (Ravg=0.65 for 80%-isodose; Ravg=0.93 for 50%-isodose). The trend increases with the size of the target and the distance from the brainstem to the center of target. Conclusion: Cyberknife is more preferable for treating centralized targets and proton therapy is advantageous for the large and peripheral targets. Advanced

  7. SU-F-T-598: Robotic Radiosurgery System Versus Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy for Definitive Intracranial Treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, M; Pompos, A; Gu, X; Yan, Y; Abdulrahman, R; Timmerman, R; Jiang, S [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To characterize the dose distributions of Cyberknife and intensity-modulated-proton-therapy (IMPT). Methods: A total of 20 patients previously treated with Cyberknife were selected. The original planning-target-volume (PTV) was used in the ‘IMPT-ideal’ plan assuming a comparable image-guidance with Cyberknife. A 3mm expansion was made to create the proton-PTV for the ‘IMPT-3mm’ plan representing the current proton-therapy where a margin of 3mm is used to account for the inferior image-guidance. The proton range uncertainty was taken-care in beam-design by adding the proximal- and distal-margins (3%water-equivalent-depth+1mm) for both proton plans. The IMPT plans were generated to meet the same target coverage as the Cyberknife-plans. The plan quality of IMPT-ideal and IMPT-3mm were compared to the Cyberknife-plan. To characterize plan quality, we defined the ratio(R) of volumes encompassed by the selected isodose surfaces for Cyberknife and IMPT plans (VCK/VIMPT). Comparisons were made for both Cyberknife versus IMPT-ideal and Cyberknife versusIMPT-3mm to further discuss the impact of setup error margins used in proton therapy and the correlation with target size and location. Results: IMPT-ideal plans yield comparable plan quality as CK plans and slightly better OAR sparing while the IMPT-3mm plan results in a higher dose to the OARs, especially for centralized tumors. Comparing to the IMPT-ideal plans, a slightly larger 80% (Ravg=1.05) dose cloud and significantly larger 50% (Ravg=1.3) and 20% (Ravg=1.60) dose clouds are seen in CK plans. However, the 3mm expansion results in a larger high and medium dose clouds in IMPT-3mm plans (Ravg=0.65 for 80%-isodose; Ravg=0.93 for 50%-isodose). The trend increases with the size of the target and the distance from the brainstem to the center of target. Conclusion: Cyberknife is more preferable for treating centralized targets and proton therapy is advantageous for the large and peripheral targets. Advanced

  8. ITAR: A modified TAR method to determine depth dose distribution for an ophthalmic device that performs kilovoltage x-ray pencil-beam stereotaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanlon, Justin; Chell, Erik; Firpo, Michael; Koruga, Igor

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: New technology has been developed to treat age-related macular degeneration (AMD) using 100 kVp pencil-beams that enter the patient through the radio-resistant sclera with a depth of interest between 1.6 and 2.6 cm. Measurement of reference and relative dose in a kilovoltage x-ray beam with a 0.42 cm diameter field size and a 15 cm source to axis distance (SAD) is a challenge that is not fully addressed in current guidelines to medical physicists. AAPM's TG-61 gives dosimetry recommendations for low and medium energy x-rays, but not all of them are feasible to follow for this modality. Methods: An investigation was conducted to select appropriate equipment for the application. PTW's Type 34013 Soft X-Ray Chamber (Freiburg, Germany) and CIRS's Plastic Water LR (Norfolk, VA) were found to be the best available options. Attenuation curves were measured with minimal scatter contribution and thus called Low Scatter Tissue Air Ratio (LSTAR). A scatter conversion coefficient (C scat ) was derived through Monte Carlo radiation transport simulation using MCNPX (LANL, Los Alamos, NM) to quantify the difference between a traditional TAR curve and the LSTAR curve. A material conversion coefficient (C mat ) was determined through experimentation to evaluate the difference in attenuation properties between water and Plastic Water LR. Validity of performing direct dosimetry measurements with a source to detector distance other than the treatment distance, and therefore a different field size due to a fixed collimator, was explored. A method—Integrated Tissue Air Ratio (ITAR)—has been developed that isolates each of the three main radiological effects (distance from source, attenuation, and scatter) during measurement, and integrates them to determine the dose rate to the macula during treatment. Results: LSTAR curves were determined to be field size independent within the range explored, indicating that direct dosimetry measurements may be performed with a source to

  9. SU-F-T-622: Comparative Analysis of Pencil Beam and Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm (AAA) for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) of Thoracic Spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badkul, R; Nicolai, W; Pokhrel, D; Jiang, H; Wang, F; Lominskac, C [University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Ramanjappa, T [S. K. University, Anantapur, AP (India)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the impact of Pencil Beam(PB) and Anisotropic Analytic Algorithm(AAA) dose calculation algorithms on OARs and planning target volume (PTV) in thoracic spine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods: Ten Spine SBRT patients were planned on Brainlab iPlan system using hybrid plan consisting of 1–2 non-coplanar conformal-dynamic arcs and few IMRT beams treated on NovalisTx with 6MV photon. Dose prescription varied from 20Gy to 30Gy in 5 fractions depending on the situation of the patient. PB plans were retrospectively recalculated using the Varian Eclipse with AAA algorithm using same MUs, MLC pattern and grid size(3mm).Differences in dose volume parameters for PTV, spinal cord, lung, and esophagus were analyzed and compared for PB and AAA algorithms. OAR constrains were followed per RTOG-0631. Results: Since patients were treated using PB calculation, we compared all the AAA DVH values with respect to PB plan values as standard, although AAA predicts the dose more accurately than PB. PTV(min), PTV(Max), PTV(mean), PTV(D99%), PTV(D90%) were overestimated with AAA calculation on average by 3.5%, 1.84%, 0.95%, 3.98% and 1.55% respectively as compared to PB. All lung DVH parameters were underestimated with AAA algorithm mean deviation of lung V20, V10, V5, and 1000cc were 42.81%,19.83%, 18.79%, and 18.35% respectively. AAA overestimated Cord(0.35cc) by mean of 17.3%; cord (0.03cc) by 12.19% and cord(max) by 10.5% as compared to PB. Esophagus max dose were overestimated by 4.4% and 5cc by 3.26% for AAA algorithm as compared to PB. Conclusion: AAA overestimated the PTV dose values by up to 4%.The lung DVH had the greatest underestimation of dose by AAA versus PB. Spinal cord dose was overestimated by AAA versus PB. Given the critical importance of accuracy of OAR and PTV dose calculation for SBRT spine, more accurate algorithms and validation of calculated doses in phantom models are indicated.

  10. SU-F-T-152: Experimental Validation and Calculation Benchmark for a Commercial Monte Carlo Pencil BeamScanning Proton Therapy Treatment Planning System in Heterogeneous Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, L; Huang, S; Kang, M; Ainsley, C; Simone, C; McDonough, J; Solberg, T [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Eclipse AcurosPT 13.7, the first commercial Monte Carlo pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy treatment planning system (TPS), was experimentally validated for an IBA dedicated PBS nozzle in the CIRS 002LFC thoracic phantom. Methods: A two-stage procedure involving the use of TOPAS 1.3 simulations was performed. First, Geant4-based TOPAS simulations in this phantom were experimentally validated for single and multi-spot profiles at several depths for 100, 115, 150, 180, 210 and 225 MeV proton beams, using the combination of a Lynx scintillation detector and a MatriXXPT ionization chamber array. Second, benchmark calculations were performed with both AcurosPT and TOPAS in a phantom identical to the CIRS 002LFC, with the exception that the CIRS bone/mediastinum/lung tissues were replaced with similar tissues that are predefined in AcurosPT (a limitation of this system which necessitates the two stage procedure). Results: Spot sigmas measured in tissue were in agreement within 0.2 mm of TOPAS simulation for all six energies, while AcurosPT was consistently found to have larger spot sigma (<0.7 mm) than TOPAS. Using absolute dose calibration by MatriXXPT, the agreements between profiles measurements and TOPAS simulation, and calculation benchmarks are over 97% except near the end of range using 2 mm/2% gamma criteria. Overdosing and underdosing were observed at the low and high density side of tissue interfaces, respectively, and these increased with increasing depth and decreasing energy. Near the mediastinum/lung interface, the magnitude can exceed 5 mm/10%. Furthermore, we observed >5% quenching effect in the conversion of Lynx measurements to dose. Conclusion: We recommend the use of an ionization chamber array in combination with the scintillation detector to measure absolute dose and relative PBS spot characteristics. We also recommend the use of an independent Monte Carlo calculation benchmark for the commissioning of a commercial TPS. Partially

  11. ITAR: A modified TAR method to determine depth dose distribution for an ophthalmic device that performs kilovoltage x-ray pencil-beam stereotaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanlon, Justin, E-mail: jhanlon@orayainc.com; Chell, Erik; Firpo, Michael; Koruga, Igor [Oraya Therapeutics, Inc., Newark, California 94560 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: New technology has been developed to treat age-related macular degeneration (AMD) using 100 kVp pencil-beams that enter the patient through the radio-resistant sclera with a depth of interest between 1.6 and 2.6 cm. Measurement of reference and relative dose in a kilovoltage x-ray beam with a 0.42 cm diameter field size and a 15 cm source to axis distance (SAD) is a challenge that is not fully addressed in current guidelines to medical physicists. AAPM's TG-61 gives dosimetry recommendations for low and medium energy x-rays, but not all of them are feasible to follow for this modality. Methods: An investigation was conducted to select appropriate equipment for the application. PTW's Type 34013 Soft X-Ray Chamber (Freiburg, Germany) and CIRS's Plastic Water LR (Norfolk, VA) were found to be the best available options. Attenuation curves were measured with minimal scatter contribution and thus called Low Scatter Tissue Air Ratio (LSTAR). A scatter conversion coefficient (C{sub scat}) was derived through Monte Carlo radiation transport simulation using MCNPX (LANL, Los Alamos, NM) to quantify the difference between a traditional TAR curve and the LSTAR curve. A material conversion coefficient (C{sub mat}) was determined through experimentation to evaluate the difference in attenuation properties between water and Plastic Water LR. Validity of performing direct dosimetry measurements with a source to detector distance other than the treatment distance, and therefore a different field size due to a fixed collimator, was explored. A method—Integrated Tissue Air Ratio (ITAR)—has been developed that isolates each of the three main radiological effects (distance from source, attenuation, and scatter) during measurement, and integrates them to determine the dose rate to the macula during treatment. Results: LSTAR curves were determined to be field size independent within the range explored, indicating that direct dosimetry measurements may be

  12. Acceleration of on-axis and ring-shaped electron beams in wakefields driven by Laguerre-Gaussian pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Guo-Bo [College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (MOE) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Chen, Min, E-mail: minchen@sjtu.edu.cn, E-mail: yanyunma@126.com; Luo, Ji; Zeng, Ming; Yuan, Tao; Yu, Ji-Ye; Yu, Lu-Le; Weng, Su-Ming [Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (MOE) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of IFSA (CICIFSA), Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Ma, Yan-Yun, E-mail: minchen@sjtu.edu.cn, E-mail: yanyunma@126.com [College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of IFSA (CICIFSA), Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Yu, Tong-Pu [College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Sheng, Zheng-Ming [Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (MOE) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of IFSA (CICIFSA), Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); SUPA, Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-14

    The acceleration of electron beams with multiple transverse structures in wakefields driven by Laguerre-Gaussian pulses has been studied through three-dimensional (3D) particle-in-cell simulations. Under different laser-plasma conditions, the wakefield shows different transverse structures. In general cases, the wakefield shows a donut-like structure and it accelerates the ring-shaped hollow electron beam. When a lower plasma density or a smaller laser spot size is used, besides the donut-like wakefield, a central bell-like wakefield can also be excited. The wake sets in the center of the donut-like wake. In this case, both a central on-axis electron beam and a ring-shaped electron beam are simultaneously accelerated. Further, reducing the plasma density or laser spot size leads to an on-axis electron beam acceleration only. The research is beneficial for some potential applications requiring special pulse beam structures, such as positron acceleration and collimation.

  13. Enhanced relativistic self-focusing of Hermite-cosh-Gaussian laser beam in plasma under density transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanda, Vikas; Kant, Niti

    2014-01-01

    Enhanced and early relativistic self-focusing of Hermite-cosh-Gaussian (HChG) beam in the plasmas under density transition has been investigated theoretically using Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin and paraxial ray approximation for mode indices m=0, 1, and 2. The variation of beam width parameter with normalized propagation distance for m=0, 1, and 2 is reported, and it is observed that strong self-focusing occurs as the HChG beam propagates deeper inside the nonlinear medium as spot size shrinks due to highly dense plasmas and the results are presented graphically. A comparative study between self-focusing of HChG beam in the presence and absence of plasmas density transition is reported. The dependency of beam width parameter on the normalized propagation distance for different values of decentered parameter “b” has also been presented graphically. For m=0 and 1, strong self-focusing is reported for b=1.8, and for m=2 and b=1.8, beam gets diffracted. The results obtained indicate the dependency of the self-focusing of the HChG beam on the selected values of decentered parameter. Moreover, proper selection of decentered parameter results strong self-focusing of HChG beam. Stronger self-focusing of laser beam is observed due to the presence of plasma density transition which might be very useful in the applications like the generation of inertial fusion energy driven by lasers, laser driven accelerators, etc

  14. Enhanced relativistic self-focusing of Hermite-cosh-Gaussian laser beam in plasma under density transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanda, Vikas; Kant, Niti, E-mail: nitikant@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Lovely Professional University, Phagwara 144411, Punjab (India)

    2014-04-15

    Enhanced and early relativistic self-focusing of Hermite-cosh-Gaussian (HChG) beam in the plasmas under density transition has been investigated theoretically using Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin and paraxial ray approximation for mode indices m=0, 1, and 2. The variation of beam width parameter with normalized propagation distance for m=0, 1, and 2 is reported, and it is observed that strong self-focusing occurs as the HChG beam propagates deeper inside the nonlinear medium as spot size shrinks due to highly dense plasmas and the results are presented graphically. A comparative study between self-focusing of HChG beam in the presence and absence of plasmas density transition is reported. The dependency of beam width parameter on the normalized propagation distance for different values of decentered parameter “b” has also been presented graphically. For m=0 and 1, strong self-focusing is reported for b=1.8, and for m=2 and b=1.8, beam gets diffracted. The results obtained indicate the dependency of the self-focusing of the HChG beam on the selected values of decentered parameter. Moreover, proper selection of decentered parameter results strong self-focusing of HChG beam. Stronger self-focusing of laser beam is observed due to the presence of plasma density transition which might be very useful in the applications like the generation of inertial fusion energy driven by lasers, laser driven accelerators, etc.

  15. Fundamentals of negative refractive index optical trapping: forces and radiation pressures exerted by focused Gaussian beams using the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosio, Leonardo A; Hernández-Figueroa, Hugo E

    2010-11-04

    Based on the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory (GLMT), this paper reveals, for the first time in the literature, the principal characteristics of the optical forces and radiation pressure cross-sections exerted on homogeneous, linear, isotropic and spherical hypothetical negative refractive index (NRI) particles under the influence of focused Gaussian beams in the Mie regime. Starting with ray optics considerations, the analysis is then extended through calculating the Mie coefficients and the beam-shape coefficients for incident focused Gaussian beams. Results reveal new and interesting trapping properties which are not observed for commonly positive refractive index particles and, in this way, new potential applications in biomedical optics can be devised.

  16. SU-F-T-123: The Simulated Effect of the Breath-Hold Reproducibility Treating Locally-Advanced Lung Cancer with Pencil Beam Scanned Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dueck, J [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Department of Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Perrin, R [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Persson, G F; Engelholm, S A [Department of Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Lomax, A [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Department of Physics, ETH, Zürich (Switzerland); Josipovic, M; Rosenschöld, AF [Department of Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Weber, D C [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); University of Zürich, Zürich (Switzerland); Munck, P

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The breath-hold (BH) technique has been suggested to mitigate motion and reduce target coverage degradation due to motion effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of inter-BH residual motion on the dose distribution for pencil beam scanned (PBS) proton therapy of locally-advanced lung cancer patients. Methods: A dataset of visually-guided BH CT scans was acquired (10 scans per patient) taken from five lung cancer patients: three intra-fractionally repeated CT scans on treatment days 2,16 and 31, in addition to the day 0 planning CT scan. Three field intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans were constructed on the planning CT scan. Dose delivery on fraction 2, 16 and 31 were simulated on the three consecutive CT scans, assuming BH duration of 20s and soft tissue match. The dose was accumulated in the planning CT using deformable image registration, and scaled to simulate the full treatment of 66Gy(RBE) in 33 fractions. Results: The mean dose to the lungs and heart, and maximum dose to the spinal cord and esophagus were within 1% of the planned dose. The CTV V95% decreased and the inhomogeneity (D5%–D95%) increased on average 4.1% (0.4–12.2%) and 5.8% (2.2–13.4%), respectively, over the five patient cases. Conclusion: The results showed that the BH technique seems to spare the OARs in spite of inter-BH residual motion. However, small degradation of target coverage occurred for all patients, with 3/5 patients having a decrease in V95% ≤1%. For the remaining two patients, where V95% decreased up to 12%, the cause could be related to treatment related anatomical changes and, as in photon therapy, plan adaptation may be necessary to ensure target coverage. This study showed that BH could be a potential treatment option to reliably mitigate motion for the treatment of locally-advanced lung cancer using PBS proton therapy.

  17. Efficient Interplay Effect Mitigation for Proton Pencil Beam Scanning by Spot-Adapted Layered Repainting Evenly Spread out Over the Full Breathing Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Per Rugaard; Eley, John; Langner, Ulrich; Simone, Charles B; Langen, Katja

    2018-01-01

    To develop and implement a practical repainting method for efficient interplay effect mitigation in proton pencil beam scanning (PBS). A new flexible repainting scheme with spot-adapted numbers of repainting evenly spread out over the whole breathing cycle (assumed to be 4 seconds) was developed. Twelve fields from 5 thoracic and upper abdominal PBS plans were delivered 3 times using the new repainting scheme to an ion chamber array on a motion stage. One time was static and 2 used 4-second, 3-cm peak-to-peak sinusoidal motion with delivery started at maximum inhalation and maximum exhalation. For comparison, all dose measurements were repeated with no repainting and with 8 repaintings. For each motion experiment, the 3%/3-mm gamma pass rate was calculated using the motion-convolved static dose as the reference. Simulations were first validated with the experiments and then used to extend the study to 0- to 5-cm motion magnitude, 2- to 6-second motion periods, patient-measured liver tumor motion, and 1- to 6-fraction treatments. The effect of the proposed method was evaluated for the 5 clinical cases using 4-dimensional (4D) dose reconstruction in the planning 4D computed tomography scan. The target homogeneity index, HI = (D 2 - D 98 )/D mean , of a single-fraction delivery is reported, where D 2 and D 98 is the dose delivered to 2% and 98% of the target, respectively, and D mean is the mean dose. The gamma pass rates were 59.6% ± 9.7% with no repainting, 76.5% ± 10.8% with 8 repaintings, and 92.4% ± 3.8% with the new repainting scheme. Simulations reproduced the experimental gamma pass rates with a 1.3% root-mean-square error and demonstrated largely improved gamma pass rates with the new repainting scheme for all investigated motion scenarios. One- and two-fraction deliveries with the new repainting scheme had gamma pass rates similar to those of 3-4 and 6-fraction deliveries with 8 repaintings. The mean HI for the 5 clinical cases was 14.2% with no

  18. Intra-cavity generation of superpositions of Laguerre-Gaussian beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Naidoo, Darryl

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we demonstrate experimentally the intra-cavity generation of a coherent superposition of Laguerre–Gaussian modes of zero radial order but opposite azimuthal order. The superposition is created with a simple intra-cavity stop...

  19. Geant4 simulation of clinical proton and carbon ion beams for the treatment of ocular melanomas with the full 3-D pencil beam scanning system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farina, Edoardo; Riccardi, Cristina; Rimoldi, Adele; Tamborini, Aurora [University of Pavia and the INFN section of Pavia, via Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Piersimoni, Pierluigi [Division of Radiation Research, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA 92354 (United States); Ciocca, Mario [Medical Physics Unit, CNAO Foundation, Strada Campeggi 53, 27100 Pavia (Italy)

    2015-07-01

    This work investigates the possibility to use carbon ion beams delivered with active scanning modality, for the treatment of ocular melanomas at the Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO) in Pavia. The radiotherapy with carbon ions offers many advantages with respect to the radiotherapy with protons or photons, such as a higher relative radio-biological effectiveness (RBE) and a dose release better localized to the tumor. The Monte Carlo (MC) Geant4 10.00 patch-03 toolkit is used to reproduce the complete CNAO extraction beam line, including all the active and passive components characterizing it. The simulation of proton and carbon ion beams and radiation scanned field is validated against CNAO experimental data. For the irradiation study of the ocular melanoma an eye-detector, representing a model of a human eye, is implemented in the simulation. Each element of the eye is reproduced with its chemical and physical properties. Inside the eye-detector a realistic tumor volume is placed and used as the irradiation target. A comparison between protons and carbon ions eye irradiations allows to study possible treatment benefits if carbon ions are used instead of protons. (authors)

  20. Alignment modification for pencil eye shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, M.D.; Pla, M.; Podgorsak, E.B.

    1989-01-01

    Accurate alignment of pencil beam eye shields to protect the lens of the eye may be made easier by means of a simple modification of existing apparatus. This involves drilling a small hole through the center of the shield to isolate the rayline directed to the lens and fabricating a suitable plug for this hole

  1. Vectorial analysis of the collimated beam of a small Gaussian source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Changqing; Wang, Ting; Zeng, Xiaodong; Feng, Zhejun; Zhang, Wenrui; Zhang, Xiaobing; Chen, Kun

    2018-03-01

    A vectorial analysis method to describe the collimated beam is proposed, the formulas of the intensity distribution and divergence angles represented in terms of Bessel functions are derived, and the propagation properties such as the vectorial structure of the collimated field and the shape of the beam spot are discussed in detail. Omitting the vectorial nature of the collimated beam can cause an error of 7.6% in determining the intensity distribution on the optical axis of the collimated beam.

  2. Self-focusing of a Hermite-cosh Gaussian laser beam in a magnetoplasma with ramp density profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanda, Vikas; Kant, Niti; Wani, Manzoor Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    The early and strong self-focusing of a Hermite-cosh-Gaussian laser beam in magnetoplasma in the presence of density ramp has been observed. Focusing and de-focusing nature of the Hermite-cosh-Gaussian laser beam with decentered parameter and magnetic field has been studied, and strong self-focusing is reported. It is investigated that decentered parameter 'b' plays a significant role for the self-focusing of the laser beam and is very sensitive as in case of extraordinary mode. For mode indices, m = 0, 1, 2, and b = 4.00, 3.14, and 2.05, strong self-focusing is observed. Similarly in case of ordinary mode, for m = 0, 1, 2 and b = 4.00, 3.14, 2.049, respectively, strong self-focusing is reported. Further, it is seen that extraordinary mode is more prominent toward self-focusing rather than ordinary mode of propagation. For mode indices m = 0, 1, and 2, diffraction term becomes more dominant over nonlinear term for decentered parameter b=0. For selective higher values of decentered parameter in case of mode indices m=0, 1, and 2, self-focusing effect becomes strong for extraordinary mode. Also increase in the value of magnetic field enhances the self-focusing ability of the laser beam, which is very useful in the applications like the generation of inertial fusion energy driven by lasers, laser driven accelerators, and x-ray lasers

  3. Self-focusing of a Hermite-cosh Gaussian laser beam in a magnetoplasma with ramp density profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanda, Vikas; Kant, Niti; Wani, Manzoor Ahmad [Department of Physics, Lovely Professional University, Phagwara 144411, Punjab (India)

    2013-11-15

    The early and strong self-focusing of a Hermite-cosh-Gaussian laser beam in magnetoplasma in the presence of density ramp has been observed. Focusing and de-focusing nature of the Hermite-cosh-Gaussian laser beam with decentered parameter and magnetic field has been studied, and strong self-focusing is reported. It is investigated that decentered parameter 'b' plays a significant role for the self-focusing of the laser beam and is very sensitive as in case of extraordinary mode. For mode indices, m = 0, 1, 2, and b = 4.00, 3.14, and 2.05, strong self-focusing is observed. Similarly in case of ordinary mode, for m = 0, 1, 2 and b = 4.00, 3.14, 2.049, respectively, strong self-focusing is reported. Further, it is seen that extraordinary mode is more prominent toward self-focusing rather than ordinary mode of propagation. For mode indices m = 0, 1, and 2, diffraction term becomes more dominant over nonlinear term for decentered parameter b=0. For selective higher values of decentered parameter in case of mode indices m=0, 1, and 2, self-focusing effect becomes strong for extraordinary mode. Also increase in the value of magnetic field enhances the self-focusing ability of the laser beam, which is very useful in the applications like the generation of inertial fusion energy driven by lasers, laser driven accelerators, and x-ray lasers.

  4. Tight focusing of a radially polarized Laguerre–Bessel–Gaussian beam and its application to manipulation of two types of particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nie, Zhongquan; Shi, Guang; Li, Dongyu; Zhang, Xueru; Wang, Yuxiao; Song, Yinglin

    2015-01-01

    The intensity distributions near the focus for radially polarized Laguerre–Bessel–Gaussian beams by a high numerical aperture objective in the immersion liquid are computed based on the vector diffraction theory. We compare the focusing properties of the radially polarized Laguerre–Bessel–Gaussian beams with those of Laguerre–Gaussian and Bessel–Gaussian modes. Furthermore, the effects of the optimally designed concentric three-zone phase filters on the intensity profiles in the focal region are examined. We further analyze the radiation forces on Rayleigh particles produced by the highly focused radially polarized Laguerre–Bessel–Gaussian beams using the specially engineered three-zone phase filters. - Highlights: • The tightly focusing of radially polarized LBG beams is examined. • The focusing performances of LBG beams are preferable over that of LG and BG modes. • A bright spot and an optical cage can be formed by special phase modulation. • These special focusing patterns can stably manipulate two types of particles

  5. Self-Focusing of Quadruple Gaussian Laser Beam in an Inhomogenous Magnetized Plasma with Ponderomotive Non-Linearity: Effect of Linear Absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, Munish; Vij, Shivani; Kant, Niti

    2015-01-01

    The propagation of quadruple Gaussian laser beam in a plasma characterized by axial inhomogeneity and nonlinearity due to ponderomotive force in the paraxial ray approximation is investigated. An appropriate expression for the nonlinear dielectric constant has been developed in the presence of external magnetic field, with linear absorption and due to saturation effects for arbitrary large intensity. The effects of different types of plasma axial inhomogeneities on self-focusing of laser beam have been studied with the typical laser and plasma parameters. Self-focusing of quadruple Gaussian laser beam in the presence of externally applied magnetic field and saturating parameter is found significantly improved in the case of extraordinary mode. Our results reveal that initially converging beam shows oscillatory convergence whereas initially diverging beam shows oscillatory divergence. The beam is more focussed at lower intensity in both cases viz. extraordinary and ordinary mode. (paper)

  6. Nonlinear propagation of an elliptically shaped Gaussian laser beam in an overdense plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nayyar, V P; Soni, V S [Punjabi Univ., Patiala (India). Dept. of Physics

    1979-04-01

    The self-focusing and self defocusing of an elliptically shaped high power laser beam in an extradense plasma is discussed. On account of the ponderomotive force induced by the spatial variation of irradiance in the transverse plane, an electron density gradient is created in the overdense plasma where the beam can penetrate. Self-focusing of the beam in the x and y directions for different critical powers has been extensively studied.

  7. Circular motion of particles suspended in a Gaussian beam with circular polarization validates the spin part of the internal energy flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelsky, O. V.; Bekshaev, A. Ya.; Maksimyak, P. P.

    2012-01-01

    switching to the right (left) circular polarization, the particles performed spinning motion in agreement with the angular momentum imparted by the field, but they were involved in an orbital rotation around the beam axis as well, which in previous works [Y. Zhao et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 073901 (2007......Non-spherical dielectric microparticles were suspended in a water-filled cell and exposed to a coherent Gaussian light beam with controlled state of polarization. When the beam polarization is linear, the particles were trapped at certain off-axial position within the beam cross section. After...... of inhomogeneously polarized paraxial beams [A. Bekshaev et al, J. Opt. 13, 053001 (2011)]....

  8. Transmission characteristics of Bessel-Gaussian vortex beams propagating along both longitudinal and transverse directions in a subway tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohui; Song, Yingxiong

    2018-02-01

    By exploiting the non-Kolmogorov model and Rytov approximation theory, a propagation model of Bessel-Gaussian vortex beams (BGVB) propagating in a subway tunnel is derived. Based on the propagation model, a model of orbital angular momentum (OAM) mode probability distribution is established to evaluate the propagation performance when the beam propagates along both longitudinal and transverse directions in the subway tunnel. By numerical simulations and experimental verifications, the influences of the various parameters of BGVB and turbulence on the OAM mode probability distribution are evaluated, and the results of simulations are consistent with the experimental statistics. The results verify that the middle area of turbulence is more beneficial for the vortex beam propagation than the edge; when the BGVB propagates along the longitudinal direction in the subway tunnel, the effects of turbulence on the OAM mode probability distribution can be decreased by selecting a larger anisotropy parameter, smaller coherence length, larger non-Kolmogorov power spectrum coefficient, smaller topological charge number, deeper subway tunnel, lower train speed, and longer wavelength. When the BGVB propagates along the transverse direction, the influences can be also mitigated by adopting a larger topological charge number, less non-Kolmogorov power spectrum coefficient, smaller refractive structure index, shorter wavelength, and shorter propagation distance.

  9. Generation of ultra-long pure magnetization needle and multiple spots by phase modulated doughnut Gaussian beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udhayakumar, M.; Prabakaran, K.; Rajesh, K. B.; Jaroszewicz, Z.; Belafhal, Abdelmajid; Velauthapillai, Dhayalan

    2018-06-01

    Based on vector diffraction theory and inverse Faraday effect (IFE), the light induced magnetization distribution of a tightly focused azimuthally polarized doughnut Gaussian beam superimposed with a helical phase and modulated by an optimized multi belt complex phase filter (MBCPF) is analysed numerically. It is noted that by adjusting the radii of different rings of the complex phase filter, one can achieve many novel magnetization focal distribution such as sub wavelength scale (0.29λ) and super long (52.2λ) longitudinal magnetic probe suitable for all optical magnetic recording and the formation of multiple magnetization chain with four, six and eight sub-wavelength spherical magnetization spots suitable for multiple trapping of magnetic particles are achieved.

  10. Fiber-coupling efficiency of Gaussian-Schell model beams through an ocean to fiber optical communication link

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Beibei; Shi, Haifeng; Zhang, Yixin

    2018-06-01

    We theoretically study the fiber-coupling efficiency of Gaussian-Schell model beams propagating through oceanic turbulence. The expression of the fiber-coupling efficiency is derived based on the spatial power spectrum of oceanic turbulence and the cross-spectral density function. Our work shows that the salinity fluctuation has a greater impact on the fiber-coupling efficiency than temperature fluctuation does. We can select longer λ in the "ocean window" and higher spatial coherence of light source to improve the fiber-coupling efficiency of the communication link. We also can achieve the maximum fiber-coupling efficiency by choosing design parameter according specific oceanic turbulence condition. Our results are able to help the design of optical communication link for oceanic turbulence to fiber sensor.

  11. Diffraction study of duty-cycle error in ferroelectric quasi-phase-matching gratings with Gaussian beam illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Prashant Povel; Kumar, Challa Sesha Sai Pavan; Choi, Hee Joo; Cha, Myoungsik

    2016-02-01

    Random duty-cycle error (RDE) is inherent in the fabrication of ferroelectric quasi-phase-matching (QPM) gratings. Although a small RDE may not affect the nonlinearity of QPM devices, it enhances non-phase-matched parasitic harmonic generations, limiting the device performance in some applications. Recently, we demonstrated a simple method for measuring the RDE in QPM gratings by analyzing the far-field diffraction pattern obtained by uniform illumination (Dwivedi et al. in Opt Express 21:30221-30226, 2013). In the present study, we used a Gaussian beam illumination for the diffraction experiment to measure noise spectra that are less affected by the pedestals of the strong diffraction orders. Our results were compared with our calculations based on a random grating model, demonstrating improved resolution in the RDE estimation.

  12. Third-harmonic generation by a Gaussian electromagnetic beam in a magnetoplasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sodha, M.S.; Umesh, G.

    1978-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation of nonlinear third-harmonic generation in a weakly collisional magnetoplasma due to simultaneous propagation of both the right and left circularly polarized modes, having a Gaussian intensity distribution; self-focusing has been taken into account. At moderate powers, the self-focusing is seen to enhance the harmonic output by two orders of magnitude; at high powers, propagation occurs in an almost uniform waveguide devoid of plasma, and the harmonic output is, consequently, decreased. In the vicinity (ω/sub c//ω=0.7) of the electron cyclotron resonance, the harmonic output of the extraordinary mode is enhanced by an order of magnitude; the present theory is not applicable at resonance

  13. Theory of the forces exerted by Laguerre-Gaussian light beams on dielectrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loudon, Rodney

    2003-01-01

    The classical theory of the electromagnetic field associated with paraxial Laguerre-Gaussian light is generalized to apply to propagation in a bulk dielectric, and the theory is quantized to obtain expressions for the electric and magnetic field operators. The forms of the Poynting vector and angular momentum density operators are derived and their expectation values for a single-photon wave packet are obtained. The Lorentz force operator in the dielectric is resolved into longitudinal, radial, and azimuthal components. The theory is extended to apply to an interface between two semi-infinite dielectric media, one of which is transparent with an incident single-photon pulse, and the other of which is weakly attenuating. For a pulse that is much shorter than the attenuation length, the theory can separately identify the surface and bulk contributions to the Lorentz force on the attenuating dielectric. Particular attention is given to the transfer of longitudinal and angular momentum to the dielectric from light incident from free space. The resulting expressions for the shift and rotation of a transparent dielectric slab are shown to agree with those obtained from Einstein box theories

  14. Application of the Gaussian beam summation method to the study of the ultrasonic wave propagation in a turbulent medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorina, D.

    1998-01-01

    Some systems for the control and the surveillance of fast reactors are based on the characteristics of the ultrasonic wave propagation. We present here the results of a numerical and experimental study of ultrasonic propagation in a thermal turbulent medium. A numerical model, based on the technique of superposition of discrete Fourier modes for representing isotropic and homogeneous turbulence and on the Gaussian beam summation method for calculating the acoustic field, has been implemented in order to study the propagation of a point source wave in a bidimensional turbulent medium. Our model is based on the following principle: the medium is represented by a great number of independent realizations of a turbulent field and for each of them we calculate the acoustic field in a deterministic way. Statistics over a great number of realizations enable us to access to the different quantities of the distorted acoustic field: variance of the time of flight fluctuations, scintillation index and intensity probability density function. In the case of small fluctuations, the results for these three quantities are in a good agreement with analytical solutions. When the level of the fluctuations grows, the model predicts correct evolutions. However, a great sensitivity to the location of a receiver in the vicinity of a caustic has been proved. Calculations in the temporal domain have also been performed. They give an illustration of the possible effects of the turbulence on an impulsion signal. An experimental device, fitted with thermocouples and acoustic transducers, has been used to study the ultrasonic propagation in turbulent water. The different measures permitted to characterize the turbulent field and to get aware of the effect of the turbulence on the acoustic propagation. The acoustical measures agree well with the analytical solution of Chernov and Rytov. They are show the importance of the knowledge of the real spectrum of the fluctuations and the limitations of

  15. Spot size characterization of focused non-Gaussian X-ray laser beams

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chalupský, Jaromír; Krzywinski, J.; Juha, Libor; Hájková, Věra; Cihelka, Jaroslav; Burian, Tomáš; Vyšín, Luděk; Gaudin, J.; Gleeson, A.; Jurek, M.; Khorsand, A.R.; Klinger, D.; Wabnitz, H.; Sobierajski, R.; Störmer, M.; Tiedtke, K.; Toleikis, S.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 26 (2010), s. 27836-27845 ISSN 1094-4087 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN300100702; GA MŠk LC510; GA MŠk(CZ) LC528; GA ČR GAP208/10/2302; GA MŠk LA08024; GA AV ČR IAAX00100903; GA MŠk(CZ) ME10046 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : X-ray laser * free-electron laser * beam characterization * ablation Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.749, year: 2010

  16. Pencil and paper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Bang; Kjærgaard, Rikke Schmidt

    2012-01-01

    Creating pictures is integral to scientific thinking. In the visualization process, putting pencil to paper is an essential act of inward reflec- tion and outward expression. It is a constructive activity that makes our thinking specific and explicit. Compared to other constructive approaches...... such as writing or verbal explanations, visual representa- tion places distinct demands on our reasoning skills by forcing us to contextualize our understanding spatially....

  17. Mechanism of the quasi-zero axial acoustic radiation force experienced by elastic and viscoelastic spheres in the field of a quasi-Gaussian beam and particle tweezing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitri, F G; Fellah, Z E A

    2014-01-01

    The present analysis investigates the (axial) acoustic radiation force induced by a quasi-Gaussian beam centered on an elastic and a viscoelastic (polymer-type) sphere in a nonviscous fluid. The quasi-Gaussian beam is an exact solution of the source free Helmholtz wave equation and is characterized by an arbitrary waist w₀ and a diffraction convergence length known as the Rayleigh range z(R). Examples are found where the radiation force unexpectedly approaches closely to zero at some of the elastic sphere's resonance frequencies for kw₀≤1 (where this range is of particular interest in describing strongly focused or divergent beams), which may produce particle immobilization along the axial direction. Moreover, the (quasi)vanishing behavior of the radiation force is found to be correlated with conditions giving extinction of the backscattering by the quasi-Gaussian beam. Furthermore, the mechanism for the quasi-zero force is studied theoretically by analyzing the contributions of the kinetic, potential and momentum flux energy densities and their density functions. It is found that all the components vanish simultaneously at the selected ka values for the nulls. However, for a viscoelastic sphere, acoustic absorption degrades the quasi-zero radiation force. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. X-ray beam-shaping via deformable mirrors: surface profile and point spread function computation for Gaussian beams using physical optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiga, D

    2018-01-01

    X-ray mirrors with high focusing performances are commonly used in different sectors of science, such as X-ray astronomy, medical imaging and synchrotron/free-electron laser beamlines. While deformations of the mirror profile may cause degradation of the focus sharpness, a deliberate deformation of the mirror can be made to endow the focus with a desired size and distribution, via piezo actuators. The resulting profile can be characterized with suitable metrology tools and correlated with the expected optical quality via a wavefront propagation code or, sometimes, predicted using geometric optics. In the latter case and for the special class of profile deformations with monotonically increasing derivative, i.e. concave upwards, the point spread function (PSF) can even be predicted analytically. Moreover, under these assumptions, the relation can also be reversed: from the desired PSF the required profile deformation can be computed analytically, avoiding the use of trial-and-error search codes. However, the computation has been so far limited to geometric optics, which entailed some limitations: for example, mirror diffraction effects and the size of the coherent X-ray source were not considered. In this paper, the beam-shaping formalism in the framework of physical optics is reviewed, in the limit of small light wavelengths and in the case of Gaussian intensity wavefronts. Some examples of shaped profiles are also shown, aiming at turning a Gaussian intensity distribution into a top-hat one, and checks of the shaping performances computing the at-wavelength PSF by means of the WISE code are made.

  19. Influence of wind speed on free space optical communication performance for Gaussian beam propagation through non Kolmogorov strong turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Peng; Yuan Xiuhua; Zeng Yanan; Zhao Ming; Luo Hanjun

    2011-01-01

    In free-space optical communication links, atmospheric turbulence causes fluctuations in both the intensity and the phase of the received signal, affecting link performance. Most theoretical treatments have been described by Kolmogorov's power spectral density model through weak turbulence with constant wind speed. However, several experiments showed that Kolmogorov theory is sometimes incomplete to describe atmospheric turbulence properly, especially through the strong turbulence with variable wind speed, which is known to contribute significantly to the turbulence in the atmosphere. We present an optical turbulence model that incorporates into variable wind speed instead of constant value, a non-Kolmogorov power spectrum that uses a generalized exponent instead of constant standard exponent value 11/3, and a generalized amplitude factor instead of constant value 0.033. The free space optical communication performance for a Gaussian beam wave of scintillation index, mean signal-to-noise ratio , and mean bit error rate , have been derived by extended Rytov theory in non-Kolmogorov strong turbulence. And then the influence of wind speed variations on free space optical communication performance has been analyzed under different atmospheric turbulence intensities. The results suggest that the effects of wind speed variation through non-Kolmogorov turbulence on communication performance are more severe in many situations and need to be taken into account in free space optical communication. It is anticipated that this work is helpful to the investigations of free space optical communication performance considering wind speed under severe weather condition in the strong atmospheric turbulence.

  20. Direction-dependent waist-shift-difference of Gaussian beam in a multiple-pass zigzag slab amplifier and geometrical optics compensation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhaoyang; Kurita, Takashi; Miyanaga, Noriaki

    2017-10-20

    Zigzag and non-zigzag beam waist shifts in a multiple-pass zigzag slab amplifier are investigated based on the propagation of a Gaussian beam. Different incident angles in the zigzag and non-zigzag planes would introduce a direction-dependent waist-shift-difference, which distorts the beam quality in both the near- and far-fields. The theoretical model and analytical expressions of this phenomenon are presented, and intensity distributions in the two orthogonal planes are simulated and compared. A geometrical optics compensation method by a beam with 90° rotation is proposed, which not only could correct the direction-dependent waist-shift-difference but also possibly average the traditional thermally induced wavefront-distortion-difference between the horizontal and vertical beam directions.

  1. The mass angular scattering power method for determining the kinetic energies of clinical electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blais, N.; Podgorsak, E.B.

    1992-01-01

    A method for determining the kinetic energy of clinical electron beams is described, based on the measurement in air of the spatial spread of a pencil electron beam which is produced from the broad clinical electron beam. As predicted by the Fermi-Eyges theory, the dose distribution measured in air on a plane, perpendicular to the incident direction of the initial pencil electron beam, is Gaussian. The square of its spatial spread is related to the mass angular scattering power which in turn is related to the kinetic energy of the electron beam. The measured spatial spread may thus be used to determine the mass angular scattering power, which is then used to determine the kinetic energy of the electron beam from the known relationship between mass angular scattering power and kinetic energy. Energies obtained with the mass angular scattering power method agree with those obtained with the electron range method. (author)

  2. Analytical investigation on domain of decentered parameter for self-focusing of Hermite-cosh-Gaussian laser beam in collisional plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valkunde, Amol T.; Patil, Sandip D.; Vhanmore, Bandopant D.; Urunkar, Trupti U.; Gavade, Kusum M.; Takale, Mansing V.; Fulari, Vijay J.

    2018-03-01

    In the present paper, an analytically investigated domain of decentered parameter and its effect on the self-focusing of Hermit-cosh-Gaussian (HChG) laser beams in a collisional plasma have been studied theoretically. The nonlinearity in the dielectric constant of plasma arising due to the nonuniform heating of carriers along the wavefront of the laser beam has been employed in the present investigation. The nonlinear differential equation of beam width parameter for various laser modes of HChG beam is obtained by following the standard Akhamanov's parabolic equation approach under Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin and paraxial approximations. The analytical treatment has enabled us to define three distinct regions: self-focusing, self-trapping and defocusing, which are presented graphically.

  3. A technique for simultaneous detection of individual vortex states of Laguerre-Gaussian beams transmitted through an aqueous suspension of microparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khonina, S. N.; Karpeev, S. V.; Paranin, V. D.

    2018-06-01

    A technique for simultaneous detection of individual vortex states of the beams propagating in a randomly inhomogeneous medium is proposed. The developed optical system relies on the correlation method that is invariant to the beam wandering. The intensity distribution formed at the optical system output does not require digital processing. The proposed technique based on a multi-order phase diffractive optical element (DOE) is studied numerically and experimentally. The developed detection technique is used for the analysis of Laguerre-Gaussian vortex beams propagating under conditions of intense absorption, reflection, and scattering in transparent and opaque microparticles in aqueous suspensions. The performed experimental studies confirm the relevance of the vortex phase dependence of a laser beam under conditions of significant absorption, reflection, and scattering of the light.

  4. Geant4 simulation for a study of a possible use of carbon ions pencil beam for the treatment of ocular melanomas with the active scanning system at CNAO Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farina, E.; Piersimoni, P.; Riccardi, C.; Rimoldi, A.; Tamborini, A.; Ciocca, M.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work is to validate the Geant4 application reproducing the CNAO (National Centre for Oncological Hadrontherapy) beamline and to study of a possible use of carbon ion pencil beams for the treatment of ocular melanomas at the CNAO Centre. The promising aspect of carbon ions radiotherapy for the treatment of this disease lies in its superior relative radiobiological effectiveness (RBE). The Monte Carlo Geant4 toolkit is used to simulate the complete CNAO extraction beamline, with the active and passive components along it. A human eye modeled detector, including a realistic target tumor volume, is used as target. Cross check with previous studies at CNAO using protons allows comparisons on possible benefits on using such a technique with respect to proton beams. Before the eye-detector irradiation a validation of the Geant4 simulation with CNAO experimental data is carried out with both carbon ions and protons. Important beam parameters such as the transverse FWHM and scanned radiation field 's uniformity are tested within the simulation and compared with experimental measurements at CNAO Centre. The physical processes involved in secondary particles generation by carbon ions and protons in the eye-detector are reproduced to take into account the additional dose to the primary beam given to irradiated eye's tissues. A study of beam shaping is carried out to produce a uniform 3D dose distribution (shaped on the tumor) by the use of a spread out Bragg peak. The eye-detector is then irradiated through a two dimensional transverse beam scan at different depths. In the use case the eye-detector is rotated of an angle of 40 deg. in the vertical direction, in order to mis-align the tumor from healthy tissues in front of it. The treatment uniformity on the tumor in the eye-detector is tested. For a more quantitative description of the deposited dose in the eye-detector and for the evaluation of the ratio between the dose deposited in the tumor and

  5. Geant4 simulation for a study of a possible use of carbon ions pencil beam for the treatment of ocular melanomas with the active scanning system at CNAO Centre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farina, E. [University of Pavia-Department of Physics, via Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Piersimoni, P. [Division of Radiation Research, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA 92354 (United States); Riccardi, C.; Rimoldi, A.; Tamborini, A. [University of Pavia-Department of Physics, via Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); INFN Section of Pavia, via Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Ciocca, M. [Medical Physics Unit, Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica - CNAO Foundation, Strada Campeggi 53, 27100 Pavia (Italy)

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this work is to validate the Geant4 application reproducing the CNAO (National Centre for Oncological Hadrontherapy) beamline and to study of a possible use of carbon ion pencil beams for the treatment of ocular melanomas at the CNAO Centre. The promising aspect of carbon ions radiotherapy for the treatment of this disease lies in its superior relative radiobiological effectiveness (RBE). The Monte Carlo Geant4 toolkit is used to simulate the complete CNAO extraction beamline, with the active and passive components along it. A human eye modeled detector, including a realistic target tumor volume, is used as target. Cross check with previous studies at CNAO using protons allows comparisons on possible benefits on using such a technique with respect to proton beams. Before the eye-detector irradiation a validation of the Geant4 simulation with CNAO experimental data is carried out with both carbon ions and protons. Important beam parameters such as the transverse FWHM and scanned radiation field 's uniformity are tested within the simulation and compared with experimental measurements at CNAO Centre. The physical processes involved in secondary particles generation by carbon ions and protons in the eye-detector are reproduced to take into account the additional dose to the primary beam given to irradiated eye's tissues. A study of beam shaping is carried out to produce a uniform 3D dose distribution (shaped on the tumor) by the use of a spread out Bragg peak. The eye-detector is then irradiated through a two dimensional transverse beam scan at different depths. In the use case the eye-detector is rotated of an angle of 40 deg. in the vertical direction, in order to mis-align the tumor from healthy tissues in front of it. The treatment uniformity on the tumor in the eye-detector is tested. For a more quantitative description of the deposited dose in the eye-detector and for the evaluation of the ratio between the dose deposited in the tumor and

  6. Multiple Reflections and Fresnel Absorption of Gaussian Laser Beam in an Actual 3D Keyhole during Deep-Penetration Laser Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangzhong Jin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In deep penetration laser welding, a keyhole is formed in the material. Based on an experimentally obtained bending keyhole from low- and medium-speed laser penetration welding of glass, the keyhole profiles in both the symmetric plane are determined by polynomial fitting. Then, a 3D bending keyhole is reconstructed under the assumption of circular cross-section of the keyhole at each keyhole depth. In this paper, the behavior of focused Gaussian laser beam in the keyhole is analyzed by tracing a ray of light using Gaussian optics theory, the Fresnel absorption and multiple reflections in the keyhole are systematically studied, and the laser intensities absorbed on the keyhole walls are calculated. Finally, the formation mechanism of the keyhole is deduced.

  7. Comment on “Stationary self-focusing of Gaussian laser beam in relativistic thermal quantum plasma” [Phys. Plasmas 20, 072703 (2013)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habibi, M.; Ghamari, F.

    2014-01-01

    Patil and Takale in their recent article [Phys. Plasmas 20, 072703 (2013)], by evaluating the quantum dielectric response in thermal quantum plasma, have modeled the relativistic self-focusing of Gaussian laser beam in a plasma. We have found that there are some important shortcomings and fundamental mistakes in Patil and Takale [Phys. Plasmas 20, 072703 (2013)] that we give a brief description about them and refer readers to important misconception about the use of the Fermi temperature in quantum plasmas, appearing in Patil and Takale [Phys. Plasmas 20, 072703 (2013)

  8. Generation of sub-Poissonian non-Gaussian states from multimode twin beams by photon-number-resolving detectors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lamperti, M.; Allevi, A.; Bondani, M.; Machulka, R.; Michálek, Václav; Haderka, O.; Peřina Jr., J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 2 (2014), "1461017-1"-"1461017-7" ISSN 0219-7499 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/12/0382 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : quantum state engineering and measurements * parametric down-conversion * photodetectors * sub-Poissonian statistics * non-Gaussianity Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 0.877, year: 2014

  9. Application of Gaussian beam ray-equivalent model and back-propagation artificial neural network in laser diode fast axis collimator assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hao; Rossi, Giammarco; Braglia, Andrea; Perrone, Guido

    2016-08-10

    The paper presents the development of a tool based on a back-propagation artificial neural network to assist in the accurate positioning of the lenses used to collimate the beam from semiconductor laser diodes along the so-called fast axis. After training using a Gaussian beam ray-equivalent model, the network is capable of indicating the tilt, decenter, and defocus of such lenses from the measured field distribution, so the operator can determine the errors with respect to the actual lens position and optimize the diode assembly procedure. An experimental validation using a typical configuration exploited in multi-emitter diode module assembly and fast axis collimating lenses with different focal lengths and numerical apertures is reported.

  10. Formation of a uniform ion beam using octupole magnets for BioLEIR facility at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, T.; Barlow, R.; Ghithan, S.; Roy, G.; Schuh, S.

    2018-04-01

    The possibility to transform the Low Energy Ion Ring (LEIR) accelerator at CERN into a multidisciplinary, biomedical research facility (BioLEIR) was investigated based on a request from the biomedical community. BioLEIR aims to provide a unique facility with a range of fully stripped ion beams (e.g. He, Li, Be, B, C, N, O) and energies suitable for multidisciplinary biomedical, clinically-oriented research. Two horizontal and one vertical beam transport lines have been designed for transporting the extracted beam from LEIR to three experimental end-stations. The vertical beamline was designed for a maximum energy of 75 MeV/u, while the two horizontal beamlines shall deliver up to a maximum energy of 440 MeV/u. A pencil beam of 4.3 mm FWHM (Full Width Half Maximum) as well as a homogeneous broad beam of 40 × 40 mm2, with a beam homogeneity better than ±4%, are available at the first horizontal (H1) irradiation point, while only a pencil beam is available at the second horizontal (H2) and vertical (V) irradiation points. The H1 irradiation point shall be used to conduct systematic studies of the radiation effect from different ion species on cell-lines. The H1 beamline was designed to utilize two octupole magnets which transform the Gaussian beam distribution at the target location into an approximately uniformly distributed rectangular beam. In this paper, we report on the multi-particle tracking calculations performed using MAD-X software suite for the H1 beam optics to arrive at a homogeneous broad beam on target using nonlinear focusing techniques, and on those to create a Gaussian pencil beam on target by adjusting quadrupoles strengths and positions.

  11. A Monte-Carlo study to assess the effect of 1.5 T magnetic fields on the overall robustness of pencil-beam scanning proton radiotherapy plans for prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, Christopher; Landry, Guillaume; Resch, Andreas F.; Dedes, George; Kamp, Florian; Ganswindt, Ute; Belka, Claus; Raaymakers, Bas W.; Parodi, Katia

    2017-11-01

    Combining magnetic-resonance imaging (MRI) and proton therapy (PT) using pencil-beam scanning (PBS) may improve image-guided radiotherapy. We aimed at assessing the impact of a magnetic field on PBS-PT plan quality and robustness. Specifically, the robustness against anatomical changes and positioning errors in an MRI-guided scenario with a 30 cm radius 1.5 T magnetic field was studied for prostate PT. Five prostate cancer patients with three consecutive CT images (CT1-3) were considered. Single-field uniform dose PBS-PT plans were generated on the segmented CT1 with Monte-Carlo-based treatment planning software for inverse optimization. Plans were optimized at 90° gantry angle without B-field (no B), with  ±1.5 T B-field (B and minus B), as well as at 81° gantry angle and  +1.5 T (B G81). Plans were re-calculated on aligned CT2 and CT3 to study the impact of anatomical changes. Dose distributions were compared in terms of changes in DVH parameters, proton range and gamma-index pass-rates. To assess the impact of positioning errors, DVH parameters were compared for  ±5 mm CT1 patient shifts in anterior-posterior (AP) and left-right (LR) direction. Proton beam deflection considerably reduced robustness against inter-fractional changes for the B scenario. Range agreement, gamma-index pass-rates and PTV V95% were significantly lower compared to no B. Improved robustness was obtained for minus B and B G81, the latter showing only minor differences to no B. The magnetic field introduced slight dosimetric changes under LR shifts. The impact of AP shifts was considerably larger, and equivalent for scenarios with and without B-field. Results suggest that robustness equivalent to PT without magnetic field can be achieved by adaptation of the treatment parameters, such as B-field orientation (minus B) with respect to the patient and/or gantry angle (B G81). MRI-guided PT for prostate cancer might thus be implemented without compromising robustness

  12. Comparison of dose calculations between pencil-beam and Monte Carlo algorithms of the iPlan RT in arc therapy using a homogenous phantom with 3DVH software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Jin Ho; Shin, Hun-Joo; Kay, Chul Seung; Chae, Soo-Min; Son, Seok Hyun

    2013-01-01

    To create an arc therapy plan, certain current general calculation algorithms such as pencil-beam calculation (PBC) are based on discretizing the continuous arc into multiple fields to simulate an arc. The iPlan RT™ treatment planning system incorporates not only a PBC algorithm, but also a more recent Monte Carlo calculation (MCC) algorithm that does not need beam discretization. The objective of this study is to evaluate the dose differences in a homogenous phantom between PBC and MCC by using a three-dimensional (3D) diode array detector (ArcCHECK™) and 3DVH software. A cylindrically shaped ‘target’ region of interest (ROI) and a ‘periphery ROI’ surrounding the target were designed. An arc therapy plan was created to deliver 600 cGy to the target within a 350° rotation angle, calculated using the PBC and MCC algorithms. The radiation doses were measured by the ArcCHECK, and reproduced by the 3DVH software. Through this process, we could compare the accuracy of both algorithms with regard to the 3D gamma passing rate (for the entire area and for each ROI). Comparing the PBC and MCC planned dose distributions directly, the 3D gamma passing rates for the entire area were 97.7% with the gamma 3%/3 mm criterion. Comparing the planned dose to the measured dose, the 3D gamma passing rates were 98.8% under the PBC algorithm and 100% under the MCC algorithm. The difference was statistically significant (p = 0.034). Furthermore the gamma passing rate decreases 7.5% in the PBC when using the 2%/2 mm criterion compared to only a 0.4% decrease under the MCC. Each ROI as well as the entire area showed statistically significant higher gamma passing rates under the MCC algorithm. The failure points that did not satisfy the gamma criteria showed a regular pattern repeated every 10°. MCC showed better accuracy than the PBC of the iPlan RT in calculating the dose distribution in arc therapy, which was validated with the ArcCHECK and the 3DVH software. This may

  13. Ponderomotive and weakly relativistic self-focusing of Gaussian laser beam in plasma: Effect of light absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patil, S. D., E-mail: sdpatilphy@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Devchand College, Arjunnagar, Dist.: Kolhapur 591 237 (India); Takale, M. V. [Department of Physics, Shivaji University, Kolhapur 416 004 (India)

    2016-05-06

    This paper presents an influence of light absorption on self-focusing of laser beam propagation in plasma. The differential equation for beam-width parameter is obtained using the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin and paraxial approximations through parabolic equation approach. The nonlinearity in dielectric function is assumed to be aroused due to the combined effect of weakly relativistic and ponderomotive regime. To highlight the nature of propagation, behavior of beam-width parameter with dimensionless distance of propagation is presented graphically and discussed. The present work is helpful to understand issues related to the beam propagation in laser plasma interaction experiments where light absorption plays a vital role.

  14. SU-E-T-179: Exploring Appropriate Offset Values for Pencil Beam and Monte Carlo Dose Optimization in Lung Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Encompassing the Effects of Respiration and Tumor Location

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, G [Boca Raton, FL (United States); Shang, C [Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL (United States); Leventouri, T [Lynn Cancer Institute, Boca Raton, FL (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Exploring appropriate offset values in dose optimization with pencil beam (PB) algorithm to minimize dosimetric differences with plans calculated with Monte Carlo (MC) for lung cancer treatment with Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods: 20 cases of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, treated with gated full motion range SBRT were selected. According to the proximity of the Gross Tumor Volume (GTV) to the chest wall, two groups are defined: peripherally located when GTV merges with the chest wall for at least 50% of the lesion diameter, and centrally located when the GTV is surrounded by lung tissue. Treatment plans were created on 4D average intensity projection (AIP) CT set with Brainlab iPlanDose 4.1.2 planning system. The D97 of PTV was normalized to 50Gy using the fast PB and compared with MC. The optimized plan was then recomputed over each 4D respiratory phase, and compared with MC using the same plan MU's. Results: The mean difference in the PB and MC D97 of the ITV was 10.5% (±0.8%) of the prescription dose (50Gy). PB algorithm showed 2.3–2.4% less overestimation to the D97 of the ITV, when comparing to MC, in the maximum exhalation phase than in the maximal inhalation phase. Significantly smaller dose difference between PB and MC is also shown in plans for peripheral lesions (7.7 ± 0.7%) versus for central lesions (12.7±0.8%) (p< 0.01). Conclusion: The dosimetric differences between PB and MC can be reasonably predicted depending on the location of lesion in the lung, and may be used as offset value in dose optimization with PB. Since the maximal exhalation phase demonstrates less dose discrepancy between the two algorithms than that in maximal inhalation phase, caution is suggested when the latter is included as a major phase portion in the respiration gated lung SBRT.

  15. Superresolution beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ngcobo, S

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The transformation of a Gaussian beam (GB) into a symmetrical higher order TEMp0 Laguerre Gaussian beam (LGB) intensity distribution of which is further rectified and transformed into a Gaussian intensity distribution in the plane of a converging...

  16. Effect of gaussian beam on microstructural and mechanical properties of dissimilarlaser welding ofAA5083 and AA6061 alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, B.; Cheepu, Muralimohan; Sivaprasad, K.; Muthupandi, V.

    2018-03-01

    The present study focuses on a sheet thickness of 4 mm using different laser power and welding rate by the laser beam welding (LBW) at a beam size180 μm. The observations on the weldments are showing that thermal conductivity of the materials plays a major role on microstructural changes. The as-welded mechanical properties were studied by correlation with its microstructures. Due to the steeper temperature gradient during the laser beam welding AA6061 was showing the greater variation compares with AA5083 side in the micro hardness studies.Also, the tensile strength of 241 MPa has been reported as highest with the welds made of laser powerat 3.5 kW and welding rate at 3.5 mmin-1.

  17. Diffraction of a Gaussian laser beam by a straight edge leading to the formation of optical vortices and elliptical diffraction fringes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeylikovich, Iosif; Nikitin, Aleksandr

    2018-04-01

    The diffraction of a Gaussian laser beam by a straight edge has been studied theoretically and experimentally for many years. In this paper, we have experimentally observed for the first time the formation of the cusped caustic (for the Fresnel number F ≈ 100) in the shadow region of the straight edge, with the cusp placed near the center of the circular laser beam(λ = 0 . 65 μm) overlapped with the elliptical diffraction fringes. These fringes are originated at the region near the cusp of the caustic where light intensity is zero and the wave phase is singular (the optical vortex). We interpret observed diffraction fringes as a result of interference between the helical wave created by the optical vortex and cylindrical wave diffracted at the straight edge. We have theoretically revealed that the number of high contrast diffraction fringes observable in a shadow region is determined by the square of the diffracted angles in the range of spatial frequencies of the scattered light field in excellent agreement with experiments. The extra phase singularities with opposite charges are also observed along the shadow boundary as the fork-like diffraction fringes.

  18. Extension of geometrical-optics approximation to on-axis Gaussian beam scattering. II. By a spheroidal particle with end-on incidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Feng; Ren, Kuan Fang; Cai, Xiaoshu; Shen, Jianqi

    2006-07-10

    On the basis of our previous work on the extension of the geometrical-optics approximation to Gaussian beam scattering by a spherical particle, we present a further extension of the method to the scattering of a transparent or absorbing spheroidal particle with the same symmetric axis as the incident beam. As was done for the spherical particle, the phase shifts of the emerging rays due to focal lines, optical path, and total reflection are carefully considered. The angular position of the geometric rainbow of primary order is theoretically predicted. Compared with our results, the Möbius prediction of the rainbow angle has a discrepancy of less than 0.5 degrees for a spheroidal droplet of aspect radio kappa within 0.95 and 1.05 and less than 2 degrees for kappa within 0.89 and 1.11. The flux ratio index F, which qualitatively indicates the effect of a surface wave, is also studied and found to be dependent on the size, refractive index, and surface curvature of the particle.

  19. Differences in absorbed doses at risk organs and target tumoral of planning(PTV) in lung treatments using two algorithms of different calculations; Diferencias en las dosis absorbidas en organos de riesgo y volumen tumoral de planificacion (PTV) en tratamientos de pulmon usando dos algoritmos de calculo diferentes: pencil beam y collpased cone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uruena Llinares, A.; Santos Rubio, A.; Luis Simon, F. J.; Sanchez Carmona, G.; Herrador Cordoba, M.

    2006-07-01

    The objective of this paper is to compare, in thirty treatments for lung cancer,the absorbed doses at risk organs and target volumes obtained between the two used algorithms of calculation of our treatment planning system Oncentra Masterplan, that is, Pencil Beams vs Collapsed Cone. For it we use a set of measured indicators (D1 and D99 of tumor volume, V20 of lung, homogeneity index defined as (D5-D95)/D prescribed, and others). Analysing the dta, making a descriptor analysis of the results, and applying the non parametric test of the ranks with sign of Wilcoxon we find that the use of Pencil Beam algorithm underestimates the dose in the zone of the PTV including regions of low density as well as the values of maximum dose in spine cord. So, we conclude that in those treatments in which the spine dose is near the maximum permissible limit or those in which the PTV it includes a zone with pulmonary tissue must be used the Collapse Cone algorithm systematically and in any case an analysis must become to choose between time and precision in the calculation for both algorithms. (Authors)

  20. Current algorithms for computed electron beam dose planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brahme, A.

    1985-01-01

    Two- and sometimes three-dimensional computer algorithms for electron beam irradiation are capable of taking all irregularities of the body cross-section and the properties of the various tissues into account. This is achieved by dividing the incoming broad beams into a number of narrow pencil beams, the penetration of which can be described by essentially one-dimensional formalisms. The constituent pencil beams are most often described by Gaussian, experimentally or theoretically derived distributions. The accuracy of different dose planning algorithms is discussed in some detail based on their ability to take the different physical interaction processes of high energy electrons into account. It is shown that those programs that take the deviations from the simple Gaussian model into account give the best agreement with experimental results. With such programs a dosimetric relative accuracy of about 5% is generally achieved except in the most complex inhomogeneity configurations. Finally, the present limitations and possible future developments of electron dose planning are discussed. (orig.)

  1. Design of a QA method to characterize submillimeter-sized PBS beam properties using a 2D ionization chamber array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuting; Bentefour, Hassan; Flanz, Jacob; Kooy, Hanne; Clasie, Benjamin

    2018-05-01

    Pencil beam scanning (PBS) periodic quality assurance (QA) programs ensure the beam delivered to patients is within technical specifications. Two critical specifications for PBS delivery are the beam width and position. The aim of this study is to investigate whether a 2D ionization chamber array, such as the MatriXX detector (IBA Dosimetry, Schwarzenbruck, Germany), can be used to characterize submillimeter-sized PBS beam properties. The motivation is to use standard equipment, which may have pixel spacing coarser than the pencil beam size, and simplify QA workflow. The MatriXX pixels are cylindrical in shape with 4.5 mm diameter and are spaced 7.62 mm from center to center. Two major effects limit the ability of using the MatriXX to measure the spot position and width accurately. The first effect is that too few pixels sample the Gaussian shaped pencil beam profile and the second effect is volume averaging of the Gaussian profile over the pixel sensitive volumes. We designed a method that overcomes both limitations and hence enables the use of the MatriXX to characterize sub-millimeter-sized PBS beam properties. This method uses a cross-like irradiation pattern that is designed to increase the number of sampling data points and a modified Gaussian fitting technique to correct for volume averaging effects. Detector signals were calculated in this study and random noise and setup errors were added to simulate measured data. With the techniques developed in this work, the MatriXX detector can be used to characterize the position and width of sub-millimeter, σ  =  0.7 mm, sized pencil beams with uncertainty better than 3% relative to σ. With the irradiation only covering 60% of the MatriXX, the position and width of σ  =  0.9 mm sized pencil beams can be determined with uncertainty better than 3% relative to σ. If one were to not use a cross-like irradiation pattern, then the position and width of σ  =  3.6 mm sized pencil beams

  2. 76 FR 11267 - Cased Pencils From China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    ... China AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Scheduling of an expedited five-year review concerning the antidumping duty order on cased pencils from China. SUMMARY: The Commission hereby... cased pencils from China would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material injury within...

  3. Gaussian discriminating strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigovacca, L.; Farace, A.; De Pasquale, A.; Giovannetti, V.

    2015-10-01

    We present a quantifier of nonclassical correlations for bipartite, multimode Gaussian states. It is derived from the Discriminating Strength measure, introduced for finite dimensional systems in Farace et al., [New J. Phys. 16, 073010 (2014), 10.1088/1367-2630/16/7/073010]. As the latter the new measure exploits the quantum Chernoff bound to gauge the susceptibility of the composite system with respect to local perturbations induced by unitary gates extracted from a suitable set of allowed transformations (the latter being identified by posing some general requirements). Closed expressions are provided for the case of two-mode Gaussian states obtained by squeezing or by linearly mixing via a beam splitter a factorized two-mode thermal state. For these density matrices, we study how nonclassical correlations are related with the entanglement present in the system and with its total photon number.

  4. In-cell refabrication of experimental pencils from pencils pre-irradiated in a power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vignesoult, N.; Atabek, R.; Ducas, S.

    1980-05-01

    For the fuel-cladding study, small irradiated pencils were fabricated in a hot cell from long elements taken from power reactors. This reconstitution in a hot cell makes it possible to: - avoid long and costly fabrications of pencils and pre-irradiations in experimental reactors, - perform re-irradiations on very long fuel elements from power reactors, - fabricate several small pencils from one pre-irradiation pencil having homogeneous characteristics. This paper describes (a) the various in-cell fabrication stages of small pre-irradiated pencils, stressing the precautions taken to avoid any pollution and modifications in the characteristics of the pencil, in order to carry out a perfectly representative re-irradiation, (b) the equipment used and the quality control made, and (c) the results achieved and the qualification programme of this operation [fr

  5. Entangled Bessel-Gaussian beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    McLaren, M

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available by performing a Bell-type experiment and showing a violation of the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt inequality. In addition, we use quantum state tomography to indicate higher-dimensional entanglement in terms of BG modes....

  6. Cubic Pencils and Painlev\\'e Hamiltonians

    OpenAIRE

    Kajiwara, Kenji; Masuda, Tetsu; Noumi, Masatoshi; Ohta, Yasuhiro; Yamada, Yasuhiko

    2004-01-01

    We present a simple heuristic method to derive the Painlev\\'e differential equations from the corresponding geometry of rational surafces. We also give a direct relationship between the cubic pencils and Seiberg-Witten curves.

  7. Bio-physical effects of scanned proton beams: measurements and models for discrete high dose rates scanning systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De-Marzi, Ludovic

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis is to develop and optimize algorithms for intensity modulated proton therapy, taking into account the physical and biological pencil beam properties. A model based on the summation and fluence weighted division of the pencil beams has been used. A new parameterization of the lateral dose distribution has been developed using a combination of three Gaussian functions. The algorithms have been implemented into a treatment planning system, then experimentally validated and compared with Monte Carlo simulations. Some approximations have been made and validated in order to achieve reasonable calculation times for clinical purposes. In a second phase, a collaboration with Institut Curie radiobiological teams has been started in order to implement radiobiological parameters and results into the optimization loop of the treatment planning process. Indeed, scanned pencil beams are pulsed and delivered at high dose rates (from 10 to 100 Gy/s), and the relative biological efficiency of protons is still relatively unknown given the wide diversity of use of these beams: the different models available and their dependence with linear energy transfers have been studied. A good agreement between dose calculations and measurements (deviations lower than 3 % and 2 mm) has been obtained. An experimental protocol has been set in order to qualify pulsed high dose rate effects and preliminary results obtained on one cell line suggested variations of the biological efficiency up to 10 %, though with large uncertainties. (author) [fr

  8. Gaussian entanglement distribution via satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinidehaj, Nedasadat; Malaney, Robert

    2015-02-01

    In this work we analyze three quantum communication schemes for the generation of Gaussian entanglement between two ground stations. Communication occurs via a satellite over two independent atmospheric fading channels dominated by turbulence-induced beam wander. In our first scheme, the engineering complexity remains largely on the ground transceivers, with the satellite acting simply as a reflector. Although the channel state information of the two atmospheric channels remains unknown in this scheme, the Gaussian entanglement generation between the ground stations can still be determined. On the ground, distillation and Gaussification procedures can be applied, leading to a refined Gaussian entanglement generation rate between the ground stations. We compare the rates produced by this first scheme with two competing schemes in which quantum complexity is added to the satellite, thereby illustrating the tradeoff between space-based engineering complexity and the rate of ground-station entanglement generation.

  9. 76 FR 38697 - Cased Pencils From China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    ... China Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the subject five-year review, the United... China would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material injury to an industry in the... Publication 4239 (June 2011), entitled Cased Pencils from China: Investigation No. 731-TA-669 (Third Review...

  10. Non-gaussian turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoejstrup, J [NEG Micon Project Development A/S, Randers (Denmark); Hansen, K S [Denmarks Technical Univ., Dept. of Energy Engineering, Lyngby (Denmark); Pedersen, B J [VESTAS Wind Systems A/S, Lem (Denmark); Nielsen, M [Risoe National Lab., Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics, Roskilde (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    The pdf`s of atmospheric turbulence have somewhat wider tails than a Gaussian, especially regarding accelerations, whereas velocities are close to Gaussian. This behaviour is being investigated using data from a large WEB-database in order to quantify the amount of non-Gaussianity. Models for non-Gaussian turbulence have been developed, by which artificial turbulence can be generated with specified distributions, spectra and cross-correlations. The artificial time series will then be used in load models and the resulting loads in the Gaussian and the non-Gaussian cases will be compared. (au)

  11. SU-E-T-304: Dosimetric Comparison of Cavernous Sinus Tumors: Heterogeneity Corrected Pencil Beam (PB-Hete) Vs. X-Ray Voxel Monte Carlo (XVMC) Algorithms for Stereotactic Radiotherapy (SRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokhrel, D; Sood, S; Badkul, R; Jiang, H; Saleh, H; Wang, F [University of Kansas Hospital, Kansas City, KS (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare dose distributions calculated using PB-hete vs. XVMC algorithms for SRT treatments of cavernous sinus tumors. Methods: Using PB-hete SRT, five patients with cavernous sinus tumors received the prescription dose of 25 Gy in 5 fractions for planning target volume PTV(V100%)=95%. Gross tumor volume (GTV) and organs at risk (OARs) were delineated on T1/T2 MRI-CT-fused images. PTV (range 2.1–84.3cc, mean=21.7cc) was generated using a 5mm uniform-margin around GTV. PB-hete SRT plans included a combination of non-coplanar conformal arcs/static beams delivered by Novalis-TX consisting of HD-MLCs and a 6MV-SRS(1000 MU/min) beam. Plans were re-optimized using XVMC algorithm with identical beam geometry and MLC positions. Comparison of plan specific PTV(V99%), maximal, mean, isocenter doses, and total monitor units(MUs) were evaluated. Maximal dose to OARs such as brainstem, optic-pathway, spinal cord, and lenses as well as normal tissue volume receiving 12Gy(V12) were compared between two algorithms. All analysis was performed using two-tailed paired t-tests of an upper-bound p-value of <0.05. Results: Using either algorithm, no dosimetrically significant differences in PTV coverage (PTVV99%,maximal, mean, isocenter doses) and total number of MUs were observed (all p-values >0.05, mean ratios within 2%). However, maximal doses to optic-chiasm and nerves were significantly under-predicted using PB-hete (p=0.04). Maximal brainstem, spinal cord, lens dose and V12 were all comparable between two algorithms, with exception of one patient with the largest PTV who exhibited 11% higher V12 with XVMC. Conclusion: Unlike lung tumors, XVMC and PB-hete treatment plans provided similar PTV coverage for cavernous sinus tumors. Majority of OARs doses were comparable between two algorithms, except for small structures such as optic chiasm/nerves which could potentially receive higher doses when using XVMC algorithm. Special attention may need to be paid on a case

  12. Evaluating the variation of response of ionizing chamber type pencil for different collimators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, Lucio das Chagas de; Peixoto, Jose Guilherme Pereira

    2014-01-01

    The pencil ionization chamber is used in dosimetric procedures for X-ray beams in the energy range of a scanner. Calibration of such camera is still being extensively studied because the procedure is different from the others. To study the variation of response of the camera for different collimators was analyzed three different collimators. It was found that among the other showed the best response was the opening of 30 mm. (author)

  13. Dose error analysis for a scanned proton beam delivery system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coutrakon, G; Wang, N; Miller, D W; Yang, Y

    2010-01-01

    All particle beam scanning systems are subject to dose delivery errors due to errors in position, energy and intensity of the delivered beam. In addition, finite scan speeds, beam spill non-uniformities, and delays in detector, detector electronics and magnet responses will all contribute errors in delivery. In this paper, we present dose errors for an 8 x 10 x 8 cm 3 target of uniform water equivalent density with 8 cm spread out Bragg peak and a prescribed dose of 2 Gy. Lower doses are also analyzed and presented later in the paper. Beam energy errors and errors due to limitations of scanning system hardware have been included in the analysis. By using Gaussian shaped pencil beams derived from measurements in the research room of the James M Slater Proton Treatment and Research Center at Loma Linda, CA and executing treatment simulations multiple times, statistical dose errors have been calculated in each 2.5 mm cubic voxel in the target. These errors were calculated by delivering multiple treatments to the same volume and calculating the rms variation in delivered dose at each voxel in the target. The variations in dose were the result of random beam delivery errors such as proton energy, spot position and intensity fluctuations. The results show that with reasonable assumptions of random beam delivery errors, the spot scanning technique yielded an rms dose error in each voxel less than 2% or 3% of the 2 Gy prescribed dose. These calculated errors are within acceptable clinical limits for radiation therapy.

  14. Thermally induced diffraction losses for a Gaussian pump beam and optimization of the mode-to-pump ratio in an end-pumped Nd:GdVO4 laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y T; Li, W J; Pan, L L; Yu, J T; Zhang, R H

    2013-01-01

    The analytical model of thermally induced diffraction losses for a Gaussian pump beam are derived as functions of the mode-to-pump ratio and pump power in end-pumped Nd-doped lasers considering the energy transfer upconversion effects. The mode-to-pump ratio is optimized based on it. The results show that the optimum mode-to-pump ratio with the thermally induced diffraction losses is less than 0.65, and it is less than the results in which the thermally induced diffraction losses are neglected. The theoretical model is applied to a diode-end-pumped Nd:GdVO 4 laser operating at 1342 nm, and the theoretical calculations are in good agreement with the experimental results. (paper)

  15. Twist phase-induced characteristics changes of a radially polarized Gaussian Schell-Model beam in a uniaxial crystal orthogonal to the optical axis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Pengfei; Fu, Wenyu

    2017-10-01

    Based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel integral formula and unified theory of coherence and polarization, we obtained the cross-spectral density matrix elements for a radially polarized partially coherent twist (RPPCT) beam in a uniaxial crystal. Moreover, compared with free space, we explore numerically the evolution properties of a RPPCT beam in a uniaxial crystal. The calculation results show that the evolution properties of a RPPCT beam in crystals are substantially different from its properties in free space. These properties in crystals are mainly determined by the twist factor and the ratio of extraordinary index to ordinary refractive index. In a uniaxial crystal, the distribution of the intensity of a RPPCT beam all exhibits non-circular symmetry, and these distributions change with twist factor and the ratio of extraordinary index to ordinary refractive index. The twist factor affects their rotation orientation angles, and the ratio of extraordinary index to ordinary refractive index impacts their twisted levels. This novel characteristics can be used for free-space optical communications, particle manipulation and nonlinear optics, where partially coherent beam with controlled profile and twist factor are required.

  16. Pencil kernel correction and residual error estimation for quality-index-based dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyholm, Tufve; Olofsson, Joergen; Ahnesjoe, Anders; Georg, Dietmar; Karlsson, Mikael

    2006-01-01

    Experimental data from 593 photon beams were used to quantify the errors in dose calculations using a previously published pencil kernel model. A correction of the kernel was derived in order to remove the observed systematic errors. The remaining residual error for individual beams was modelled through uncertainty associated with the kernel model. The methods were tested against an independent set of measurements. No significant systematic error was observed in the calculations using the derived correction of the kernel and the remaining random errors were found to be adequately predicted by the proposed method

  17. Calculational methods for estimating skin dose from electrons in Co-60 gamma-ray beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, P.D.; Sibata, C.H.; Attix, F.H.; Paliwal, B.R.

    1983-01-01

    Several methods have been employed to calculate the relative contribution to skin dose due to scattered electrons in Co-60 gamma-ray beams. Either the Klein-Nishina differential scattering probability is employed to determine the number and initial energy of electrons scattered into the direction of a detector, or a Gaussian approximation is used to specify the surface distribution of initial pencil electron beams created by parallel or diverging photon fields. Results of these calculations are compared with experimental data. In addition, that fraction of relative surface dose resulting from photon interactions in air alone is estimated and compared with data extrapolated from measurements at large source-surface distance (SSD). The contribution to surface dose from electrons generated in air is 50% or more of the total skin dose for SSDs greater than 80 cm

  18. Calculational methods for estimating skin dose from electrons in Co-60 gamma-ray beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, P.D.; Sibata, C.H.; Attix, F.H.; Paliwal, B.R.

    1983-01-01

    Several methods have been employed to calculate the relative contribution to skin dose due to scattered electrons in Co-60 γ-ray beams. Either the Klein--Nishina differential scattering probability is employed to determine the number and initial energy of electrons scattered into the direction of a detector, or a Gaussian approximation is used to specify the surface distribution of initial pencil electron beams created by parallel or diverging photon fields. Results of these calculations are compared with experimental data. In addition, that fraction of relative surface dose resulting from photon interactions in air alone is estimated and compared with data extrapolated from measurements at large source--surface distance (SSD). The contribution to surface dose from electrons generated in air is 50% or more of the total skin dose for SSDs greater than 80 cm

  19. Evaluation of the influence of double and triple Gaussian proton kernel models on accuracy of dose calculations for spot scanning technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirayama, Shusuke; Takayanagi, Taisuke; Fujii, Yusuke; Fujimoto, Rintaro; Fujitaka, Shinichiro; Umezawa, Masumi; Nagamine, Yoshihiko; Hosaka, Masahiro; Yasui, Keisuke; Omachi, Chihiro; Toshito, Toshiyuki

    2016-03-01

    The main purpose in this study was to present the results of beam modeling and how the authors systematically investigated the influence of double and triple Gaussian proton kernel models on the accuracy of dose calculations for spot scanning technique. The accuracy of calculations was important for treatment planning software (TPS) because the energy, spot position, and absolute dose had to be determined by TPS for the spot scanning technique. The dose distribution was calculated by convolving in-air fluence with the dose kernel. The dose kernel was the in-water 3D dose distribution of an infinitesimal pencil beam and consisted of an integral depth dose (IDD) and a lateral distribution. Accurate modeling of the low-dose region was important for spot scanning technique because the dose distribution was formed by cumulating hundreds or thousands of delivered beams. The authors employed a double Gaussian function as the in-air fluence model of an individual beam. Double and triple Gaussian kernel models were also prepared for comparison. The parameters of the kernel lateral model were derived by fitting a simulated in-water lateral dose profile induced by an infinitesimal proton beam, whose emittance was zero, at various depths using Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. The fitted parameters were interpolated as a function of depth in water and stored as a separate look-up table. These stored parameters for each energy and depth in water were acquired from the look-up table when incorporating them into the TPS. The modeling process for the in-air fluence and IDD was based on the method proposed in the literature. These were derived using MC simulation and measured data. The authors compared the measured and calculated absolute doses at the center of the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) under various volumetric irradiation conditions to systematically investigate the influence of the two types of kernel models on the dose calculations. The authors investigated the difference

  20. Application of the Gaussian beam summation method to the study of the ultrasonic wave propagation in a turbulent medium; Application de la methode de sommation de faisceaux gaussiens a l`etude de la propagation ultrasonore en milieu turbulent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiorina, D

    1998-01-29

    Some systems for the control and the surveillance of fast reactors are based on the characteristics of the ultrasonic wave propagation. We present here the results of a numerical and experimental study of ultrasonic propagation in a thermal turbulent medium. A numerical model, based on the technique of superposition of discrete Fourier modes for representing isotropic and homogeneous turbulence and on the Gaussian beam summation method for calculating the acoustic field, has been implemented in order to study the propagation of a point source wave in a bidimensional turbulent medium. Our model is based on the following principle: the medium is represented by a great number of independent realizations of a turbulent field and for each of them we calculate the acoustic field in a deterministic way. Statistics over a great number of realizations enable us to access to the different quantities of the distorted acoustic field: variance of the time of flight fluctuations, scintillation index and intensity probability density function. In the case of small fluctuations, the results for these three quantities are in a good agreement with analytical solutions. When the level of the fluctuations grows, the model predicts correct evolutions. However, a great sensitivity to the location of a receiver in the vicinity of a caustic has been proved. Calculations in the temporal domain have also been performed. They give an illustration of the possible effects of the turbulence on an impulsion signal. An experimental device, fitted with thermocouples and acoustic transducers, has been used to study the ultrasonic propagation in turbulent water. The different measures permitted to characterize the turbulent field and to get aware of the effect of the turbulence on the acoustic propagation. The acoustical measures agree well with the analytical solution of Chernov and Rytov. They are show the importance of the knowledge of the real spectrum of the fluctuations and the limitations of

  1. A Fourier analysis on the maximum acceptable grid size for discrete proton beam dose calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Haisen S.; Romeijn, H. Edwin; Dempsey, James F.

    2006-01-01

    We developed an analytical method for determining the maximum acceptable grid size for discrete dose calculation in proton therapy treatment plan optimization, so that the accuracy of the optimized dose distribution is guaranteed in the phase of dose sampling and the superfluous computational work is avoided. The accuracy of dose sampling was judged by the criterion that the continuous dose distribution could be reconstructed from the discrete dose within a 2% error limit. To keep the error caused by the discrete dose sampling under a 2% limit, the dose grid size cannot exceed a maximum acceptable value. The method was based on Fourier analysis and the Shannon-Nyquist sampling theorem as an extension of our previous analysis for photon beam intensity modulated radiation therapy [J. F. Dempsey, H. E. Romeijn, J. G. Li, D. A. Low, and J. R. Palta, Med. Phys. 32, 380-388 (2005)]. The proton beam model used for the analysis was a near mono-energetic (of width about 1% the incident energy) and monodirectional infinitesimal (nonintegrated) pencil beam in water medium. By monodirection, we mean that the proton particles are in the same direction before entering the water medium and the various scattering prior to entrance to water is not taken into account. In intensity modulated proton therapy, the elementary intensity modulation entity for proton therapy is either an infinitesimal or finite sized beamlet. Since a finite sized beamlet is the superposition of infinitesimal pencil beams, the result of the maximum acceptable grid size obtained with infinitesimal pencil beam also applies to finite sized beamlet. The analytic Bragg curve function proposed by Bortfeld [T. Bortfeld, Med. Phys. 24, 2024-2033 (1997)] was employed. The lateral profile was approximated by a depth dependent Gaussian distribution. The model included the spreads of the Bragg peak and the lateral profiles due to multiple Coulomb scattering. The dependence of the maximum acceptable dose grid size on the

  2. Pencil-shaped radiation detection ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, A.

    1979-01-01

    A radiation detection ionization chamber is described. It consists of an elongated cylindrical pencil-shaped tubing forming an outer wall of the chamber and a center electrode disposed along the major axis of the tubing. The length of the chamber is substantially greater than the diameter. A cable connecting portion at one end of the chamber is provided for connecting the chamber to a triaxial cable. An end support portion is connected at the other end of the chamber for supporting and tensioning the center electrode. 17 claims

  3. Two-photon optics of Bessel-Gaussian modes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    McLaren, M

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we consider geometrical two-photon optics of Bessel-Gaussian modes generated in spontaneous parametric down-conversion of a Gaussian pump beam. We provide a general theoretical expression for the orbital angular momentum (OAM) spectrum...

  4. Gaussian entanglement revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lami, Ludovico; Serafini, Alessio; Adesso, Gerardo

    2018-02-01

    We present a novel approach to the separability problem for Gaussian quantum states of bosonic continuous variable systems. We derive a simplified necessary and sufficient separability criterion for arbitrary Gaussian states of m versus n modes, which relies on convex optimisation over marginal covariance matrices on one subsystem only. We further revisit the currently known results stating the equivalence between separability and positive partial transposition (PPT) for specific classes of Gaussian states. Using techniques based on matrix analysis, such as Schur complements and matrix means, we then provide a unified treatment and compact proofs of all these results. In particular, we recover the PPT-separability equivalence for: (i) Gaussian states of 1 versus n modes; and (ii) isotropic Gaussian states. In passing, we also retrieve (iii) the recently established equivalence between separability of a Gaussian state and and its complete Gaussian extendability. Our techniques are then applied to progress beyond the state of the art. We prove that: (iv) Gaussian states that are invariant under partial transposition are necessarily separable; (v) the PPT criterion is necessary and sufficient for separability for Gaussian states of m versus n modes that are symmetric under the exchange of any two modes belonging to one of the parties; and (vi) Gaussian states which remain PPT under passive optical operations can not be entangled by them either. This is not a foregone conclusion per se (since Gaussian bound entangled states do exist) and settles a question that had been left unanswered in the existing literature on the subject. This paper, enjoyable by both the quantum optics and the matrix analysis communities, overall delivers technical and conceptual advances which are likely to be useful for further applications in continuous variable quantum information theory, beyond the separability problem.

  5. Asymptomatic Intracorneal Graphite Deposits following Graphite Pencil Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Philip, Swetha Sara; John, Deepa; John, Sheeja Susan

    2012-01-01

    Reports of graphite pencil lead injuries to the eye are rare. Although graphite is considered to remain inert in the eye, it has been known to cause severe inflammation and damage to ocular structures. We report a case of a 12-year-old girl with intracorneal graphite foreign bodies following a graphite pencil injury.

  6. Calculating emittance for Gaussian and Non-Gaussian distributions by the method of correlations for slits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Cheng-Yang; Fermilab

    2006-01-01

    One common way for measuring the emittance of an electron beam is with the slits method. The usual approach for analyzing the data is to calculate an emittance that is a subset of the parent emittance. This paper shows an alternative way by using the method of correlations which ties the parameters derived from the beamlets to the actual parameters of the parent emittance. For parent distributions that are Gaussian, this method yields exact results. For non-Gaussian beam distributions, this method yields an effective emittance that can serve as a yardstick for emittance comparisons

  7. Introduction to the spectral theory of polynomial operator pencils

    CERN Document Server

    Markus, A S

    1988-01-01

    This monograph contains an exposition of the foundations of the spectral theory of polynomial operator pencils acting in a Hilbert space. Spectral problems for polynomial pencils have attracted a steady interest in the last 35 years, mainly because they arise naturally in such diverse areas of mathematical physics as differential equations and boundary value problems, controllable systems, the theory of oscillations and waves, elasticity theory, and hydromechanics. In this book, the author devotes most of his attention to the fundamental results of Keldysh on multiple completeness of the eigenvectors and associate vectors of a pencil, and on the asymptotic behavior of its eigenvalues and generalizations of these results. The author also presents various theorems on spectral factorization of pencils which grew out of known results of M. G. Kreibreven and Heinz Langer. A large portion of the book involves the theory of selfadjoint pencils, an area having numerous applications. Intended for mathematicians, resea...

  8. Pencil drawn strain gauges and chemiresistors on paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Cheng-Wei; Zhao, Zhibo; Kim, Jaemyung; Huang, Jiaxing

    2014-01-22

    Pencil traces drawn on print papers are shown to function as strain gauges and chemiresistors. Regular graphite/clay pencils can leave traces composed of percolated networks of fine graphite powders, which exhibit reversible resistance changes upon compressive or tensile deflections. Flexible toy pencils can leave traces that are essentially thin films of graphite/polymer composites, which show reversible changes in resistance upon exposure to volatile organic compounds due to absorption/desorption induced swelling/recovery of the polymer binders. Pencil-on-paper devices are low-cost, extremely simple and rapid to fabricate. They are light, flexible, portable, disposable, and do not generate potentially negative environmental impact during processing and device fabrication. One can envision many other types of pencil drawn paper electronic devices that can take on a great variety of form factors. Hand drawn devices could be useful in resource-limited or emergency situations. They could also lead to new applications integrating art and electronics.

  9. Gaussian cloning of coherent states with known phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexanian, Moorad

    2006-01-01

    The fidelity for cloning coherent states is improved over that provided by optimal Gaussian and non-Gaussian cloners for the subset of coherent states that are prepared with known phases. Gaussian quantum cloning duplicates all coherent states with an optimal fidelity of 2/3. Non-Gaussian cloners give optimal single-clone fidelity for a symmetric 1-to-2 cloner of 0.6826. Coherent states that have known phases can be cloned with a fidelity of 4/5. The latter is realized by a combination of two beam splitters and a four-wave mixer operated in the nonlinear regime, all of which are realized by interaction Hamiltonians that are quadratic in the photon operators. Therefore, the known Gaussian devices for cloning coherent states are extended when cloning coherent states with known phases by considering a nonbalanced beam splitter at the input side of the amplifier

  10. Monte Carlo evaluation of a photon pencil kernel algorithm applied to fast neutron therapy treatment planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderberg, Jonas; Alm Carlsson, Gudrun; Ahnesjö, Anders

    2003-10-01

    When dedicated software is lacking, treatment planning for fast neutron therapy is sometimes performed using dose calculation algorithms designed for photon beam therapy. In this work Monte Carlo derived neutron pencil kernels in water were parametrized using the photon dose algorithm implemented in the Nucletron TMS (treatment management system) treatment planning system. A rectangular fast-neutron fluence spectrum with energies 0-40 MeV (resembling a polyethylene filtered p(41)+ Be spectrum) was used. Central axis depth doses and lateral dose distributions were calculated and compared with the corresponding dose distributions from Monte Carlo calculations for homogeneous water and heterogeneous slab phantoms. All absorbed doses were normalized to the reference dose at 10 cm depth for a field of radius 5.6 cm in a 30 × 40 × 20 cm3 water test phantom. Agreement to within 7% was found in both the lateral and the depth dose distributions. The deviations could be explained as due to differences in size between the test phantom and that used in deriving the pencil kernel (radius 200 cm, thickness 50 cm). In the heterogeneous phantom, the TMS, with a directly applied neutron pencil kernel, and Monte Carlo calculated absorbed doses agree approximately for muscle but show large deviations for media such as adipose or bone. For the latter media, agreement was substantially improved by correcting the absorbed doses calculated in TMS with the neutron kerma factor ratio and the stopping power ratio between tissue and water. The multipurpose Monte Carlo code FLUKA was used both in calculating the pencil kernel and in direct calculations of absorbed dose in the phantom.

  11. Gaussian operations and privacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navascues, Miguel; Acin, Antonio

    2005-01-01

    We consider the possibilities offered by Gaussian states and operations for two honest parties, Alice and Bob, to obtain privacy against a third eavesdropping party, Eve. We first extend the security analysis of the protocol proposed in [Navascues et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 010502 (2005)]. Then, we prove that a generalized version of this protocol does not allow one to distill a secret key out of bound entangled Gaussian states

  12. Propagation of a general-type beam through a truncated fractional Fourier transform optical system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chengliang; Cai, Yangjian

    2010-03-01

    Paraxial propagation of a general-type beam through a truncated fractional Fourier transform (FRT) optical system is investigated. Analytical formulas for the electric field and effective beam width of a general-type beam in the FRT plane are derived based on the Collins formula. Our formulas can be used to study the propagation of a variety of laser beams--such as Gaussian, cos-Gaussian, cosh-Gaussian, sine-Gaussian, sinh-Gaussian, flat-topped, Hermite-cosh-Gaussian, Hermite-sine-Gaussian, higher-order annular Gaussian, Hermite-sinh-Gaussian and Hermite-cos-Gaussian beams--through a FRT optical system with or without truncation. The propagation properties of a Hermite-cos-Gaussian beam passing through a rectangularly truncated FRT optical system are studied as a numerical example. Our results clearly show that the truncated FRT optical system provides a convenient way for laser beam shaping.

  13. How to Simply Demonstrate Diamagnetic Levitation with Pencil Lead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koudelkova, Vera

    2016-01-01

    A new simple arrangement how to demonstrate diamagnetic levitation is presented. It uses pencil lead levitating in a track built from neodymium magnets. This arrangement can also be used as a classroom experiment.

  14. Nonclassicality by Local Gaussian Unitary Operations for Gaussian States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangyang Wang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A measure of nonclassicality N in terms of local Gaussian unitary operations for bipartite Gaussian states is introduced. N is a faithful quantum correlation measure for Gaussian states as product states have no such correlation and every non product Gaussian state contains it. For any bipartite Gaussian state ρ A B , we always have 0 ≤ N ( ρ A B < 1 , where the upper bound 1 is sharp. An explicit formula of N for ( 1 + 1 -mode Gaussian states and an estimate of N for ( n + m -mode Gaussian states are presented. A criterion of entanglement is established in terms of this correlation. The quantum correlation N is also compared with entanglement, Gaussian discord and Gaussian geometric discord.

  15. Establishment of a new calibration method of pencil ionization chamber for dosimetry in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, Daniel Menezes

    2010-01-01

    Pencil ionization chambers are used for beam dosimetry in computed tomography equipment (CT). In this study, a new calibration methodology was established, in order to make the Calibration Laboratory of Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (LCI) suitable to international metrological standards, dealing with specific procedures for calibration of these chambers used in CT. Firstly, the setup for the new RQT radiation qualities was mounted, in agreement with IEC61267 from the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). After the establishment of these radiation qualities, a specific calibration methodology for pencil ionization chambers was set, according to Technical Report Series No. 457, from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), which describes particularities of the procedure to be followed by the Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratories (SSDL's), concerning to collimation and positioning related to the radiation beam. Initially, PPV (kV) measurements and the determination of copper additional filtrations were carried out, measuring the half value layers (HVL) recommended by the IEC 61267 standard, after that the RQT 8, RQT 9 and RQT 10 radiation quality references were established. For additional filters, aluminum and copper of high purity (around 99.9%) were used. RQT's in thickness of copper filters equivalent to the set 'RQR (Al) + Additional Filtration (Cu)' was directly found by an alternative methodology used to determine additional filtrations, which is a good option when RQR's have not the possibility of be setting up. With the establishment of this new methodology for the ionization pencil chambers calibration, the LCI is ready to calibrate these instruments according to the most recent international standards. Therefore, an improvement in calibration traceability, as well as in metrological services offered by IPEN to all Brazil is achieved. (author)

  16. Generalized Gaussian Error Calculus

    CERN Document Server

    Grabe, Michael

    2010-01-01

    For the first time in 200 years Generalized Gaussian Error Calculus addresses a rigorous, complete and self-consistent revision of the Gaussian error calculus. Since experimentalists realized that measurements in general are burdened by unknown systematic errors, the classical, widespread used evaluation procedures scrutinizing the consequences of random errors alone turned out to be obsolete. As a matter of course, the error calculus to-be, treating random and unknown systematic errors side by side, should ensure the consistency and traceability of physical units, physical constants and physical quantities at large. The generalized Gaussian error calculus considers unknown systematic errors to spawn biased estimators. Beyond, random errors are asked to conform to the idea of what the author calls well-defined measuring conditions. The approach features the properties of a building kit: any overall uncertainty turns out to be the sum of a contribution due to random errors, to be taken from a confidence inter...

  17. Potential of discrete Gaussian edge feathering method for improving abutment dosimetry in eMLC-delivered segmented-field electron conformal therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eley, John G.; Hogstrom, Kenneth R.; Matthews, Kenneth L.; Parker, Brent C.; Price, Michael J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, 202 Nicholson Hall, Tower Drive, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803-4001 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, 202 Nicholson Hall, Tower Drive, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803-4001 (United States) and Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, 4950 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70809-3482 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, 202 Nicholson Hall, Tower Drive, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803-4001 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, 202 Nicholson Hall, Tower Drive, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803-4001 (United States) and Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, 4950 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70809-3482 (United States)

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to investigate the potential of discrete Gaussian edge feathering of the higher energy electron fields for improving abutment dosimetry in the planning volume when using an electron multileaf collimator (eMLC) to deliver segmented-field electron conformal therapy (ECT). Methods: A discrete (five-step) Gaussian edge spread function was used to match dose penumbras of differing beam energies (6-20 MeV) at a specified depth in a water phantom. Software was developed to define the leaf eMLC positions of an eMLC that most closely fit each electron field shape. The effect of 1D edge feathering of the higher energy field on dose homogeneity was computed and measured for segmented-field ECT treatment plans for three 2D PTVs in a water phantom, i.e., depth from the water surface to the distal PTV surface varied as a function of the x-axis (parallel to leaf motion) and remained constant along the y-axis (perpendicular to leaf motion). Additionally, the effect of 2D edge feathering was computed and measured for one radially symmetric, 3D PTV in a water phantom, i.e., depth from the water surface to the distal PTV surface varied as a function of both axes. For the 3D PTV, the feathering scheme was evaluated for 0.1-1.0-cm leaf widths. Dose calculations were performed using the pencil beam dose algorithm in the Pinnacle{sup 3} treatment planning system. Dose verification measurements were made using a prototype eMLC (1-cm leaf width). Results: 1D discrete Gaussian edge feathering reduced the standard deviation of dose in the 2D PTVs by 34, 34, and 39%. In the 3D PTV, the broad leaf width (1 cm) of the eMLC hindered the 2D application of the feathering solution to the 3D PTV, and the standard deviation of dose increased by 10%. However, 2D discrete Gaussian edge feathering with simulated eMLC leaf widths of 0.1-0.5 cm reduced the standard deviation of dose in the 3D PTV by 33-28%, respectively. Conclusions: A five-step discrete Gaussian edge

  18. Learning conditional Gaussian networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøttcher, Susanne Gammelgaard

    This paper considers conditional Gaussian networks. The parameters in the network are learned by using conjugate Bayesian analysis. As conjugate local priors, we apply the Dirichlet distribution for discrete variables and the Gaussian-inverse gamma distribution for continuous variables, given...... a configuration of the discrete parents. We assume parameter independence and complete data. Further, to learn the structure of the network, the network score is deduced. We then develop a local master prior procedure, for deriving parameter priors in these networks. This procedure satisfies parameter...... independence, parameter modularity and likelihood equivalence. Bayes factors to be used in model search are introduced. Finally the methods derived are illustrated by a simple example....

  19. Gaussian beams in inhomogeneous anisotropic layered structures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Červený, V.; Pšenčík, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 180, č. 2 (2010), s. 798-812 ISSN 0956-540X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/08/0332 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GA205/07/0032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : body waves * seismic anisotropy * theoretical seismology * wave propagation Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 2.411, year: 2010

  20. SU-F-T-180: Evaluation of a Scintillating Screen Detector for Proton Beam QA and Acceptance Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghebremedhin, A; Taber, M; Koss, P; Camargo, G; Patyal, B [Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, CA (United States); Ebstein, S [Lexitek, Inc, Wellesley, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To test the performance of a commercial scintillating screen detector for acceptance testing and Quality Assurance of a proton pencil beam scanning system. Method: The detector (Lexitek DRD 400) has 40cm × 40cm field, uses a thin scintillator imaged onto a 16-bit scientific CCD with ∼0.5mm resolution. A grid target and LED illuminators are provided for spatial calibration and relative gain correction. The detector mounts to the nozzle with micron precision. Tools are provided for image processing and analysis of single or multiple Gaussian spots. Results: The bias and gain of the detector were studied to measure repeatability and accuracy. Gain measurements were taken with the LED illuminators to measure repeatability and variation of the lens-CCD pair as a function with f-stop. Overall system gain was measured with a passive scattering (broad) beam whose shape is calibrated with EDR film placed in front of the scintillator. To create a large uniform field, overlapping small fields were recorded with the detector translated laterally and stitched together to cover the full field. Due to the long exposures required to obtain multiple spills of the synchrotron and very high detector sensitivity, borated polyethylene shielding was added to reduce direct radiation events hitting the CCD. Measurements with a micro ion chamber were compared to the detector’s spot profile. Software was developed to process arrays of Gaussian spots and to correct for radiation events. Conclusion: The detector background has a fixed bias, a small component linear in time, and is easily corrected. The gain correction method was validated with 2% accuracy. The detector spot profile matches the micro ion chamber data over 4 orders of magnitude. The multiple spot analyses can be easily used with plan data for measuring pencil beam uniformity and for regular QA comparison.

  1. SU-F-T-180: Evaluation of a Scintillating Screen Detector for Proton Beam QA and Acceptance Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghebremedhin, A; Taber, M; Koss, P; Camargo, G; Patyal, B; Ebstein, S

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To test the performance of a commercial scintillating screen detector for acceptance testing and Quality Assurance of a proton pencil beam scanning system. Method: The detector (Lexitek DRD 400) has 40cm × 40cm field, uses a thin scintillator imaged onto a 16-bit scientific CCD with ∼0.5mm resolution. A grid target and LED illuminators are provided for spatial calibration and relative gain correction. The detector mounts to the nozzle with micron precision. Tools are provided for image processing and analysis of single or multiple Gaussian spots. Results: The bias and gain of the detector were studied to measure repeatability and accuracy. Gain measurements were taken with the LED illuminators to measure repeatability and variation of the lens-CCD pair as a function with f-stop. Overall system gain was measured with a passive scattering (broad) beam whose shape is calibrated with EDR film placed in front of the scintillator. To create a large uniform field, overlapping small fields were recorded with the detector translated laterally and stitched together to cover the full field. Due to the long exposures required to obtain multiple spills of the synchrotron and very high detector sensitivity, borated polyethylene shielding was added to reduce direct radiation events hitting the CCD. Measurements with a micro ion chamber were compared to the detector’s spot profile. Software was developed to process arrays of Gaussian spots and to correct for radiation events. Conclusion: The detector background has a fixed bias, a small component linear in time, and is easily corrected. The gain correction method was validated with 2% accuracy. The detector spot profile matches the micro ion chamber data over 4 orders of magnitude. The multiple spot analyses can be easily used with plan data for measuring pencil beam uniformity and for regular QA comparison.

  2. Optimal multicopy asymmetric Gaussian cloning of coherent states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiurášek, Jaromír; Cerf, Nicolas J.

    2007-05-01

    We investigate the asymmetric Gaussian cloning of coherent states which produces M copies from N input replicas in such a way that the fidelity of each copy may be different. We show that the optimal asymmetric Gaussian cloning can be performed with a single phase-insensitive amplifier and an array of beam splitters. We obtain a simple analytical expression characterizing the set of optimal asymmetric Gaussian cloning machines and prove the optimality of these cloners using the formalism of Gaussian completely positive maps and semidefinite programming techniques. We also present an alternative implementation of the asymmetric cloning machine where the phase-insensitive amplifier is replaced with a beam splitter, heterodyne detector, and feedforward.

  3. Optimal multicopy asymmetric Gaussian cloning of coherent states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiurasek, Jaromir; Cerf, Nicolas J.

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the asymmetric Gaussian cloning of coherent states which produces M copies from N input replicas in such a way that the fidelity of each copy may be different. We show that the optimal asymmetric Gaussian cloning can be performed with a single phase-insensitive amplifier and an array of beam splitters. We obtain a simple analytical expression characterizing the set of optimal asymmetric Gaussian cloning machines and prove the optimality of these cloners using the formalism of Gaussian completely positive maps and semidefinite programming techniques. We also present an alternative implementation of the asymmetric cloning machine where the phase-insensitive amplifier is replaced with a beam splitter, heterodyne detector, and feedforward

  4. AUTONOMOUS GAUSSIAN DECOMPOSITION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindner, Robert R.; Vera-Ciro, Carlos; Murray, Claire E.; Stanimirović, Snežana; Babler, Brian [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Heiles, Carl [Radio Astronomy Lab, UC Berkeley, 601 Campbell Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Hennebelle, Patrick [Laboratoire AIM, Paris-Saclay, CEA/IRFU/SAp-CNRS-Université Paris Diderot, F-91191 Gif-sur Yvette Cedex (France); Goss, W. M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, 1003 Lopezville, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Dickey, John, E-mail: rlindner@astro.wisc.edu [University of Tasmania, School of Maths and Physics, Private Bag 37, Hobart, TAS 7001 (Australia)

    2015-04-15

    We present a new algorithm, named Autonomous Gaussian Decomposition (AGD), for automatically decomposing spectra into Gaussian components. AGD uses derivative spectroscopy and machine learning to provide optimized guesses for the number of Gaussian components in the data, and also their locations, widths, and amplitudes. We test AGD and find that it produces results comparable to human-derived solutions on 21 cm absorption spectra from the 21 cm SPectral line Observations of Neutral Gas with the EVLA (21-SPONGE) survey. We use AGD with Monte Carlo methods to derive the H i line completeness as a function of peak optical depth and velocity width for the 21-SPONGE data, and also show that the results of AGD are stable against varying observational noise intensity. The autonomy and computational efficiency of the method over traditional manual Gaussian fits allow for truly unbiased comparisons between observations and simulations, and for the ability to scale up and interpret the very large data volumes from the upcoming Square Kilometer Array and pathfinder telescopes.

  5. Bounded Gaussian process regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bjørn Sand; Nielsen, Jens Brehm; Larsen, Jan

    2013-01-01

    We extend the Gaussian process (GP) framework for bounded regression by introducing two bounded likelihood functions that model the noise on the dependent variable explicitly. This is fundamentally different from the implicit noise assumption in the previously suggested warped GP framework. We...... with the proposed explicit noise-model extension....

  6. AUTONOMOUS GAUSSIAN DECOMPOSITION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindner, Robert R.; Vera-Ciro, Carlos; Murray, Claire E.; Stanimirović, Snežana; Babler, Brian; Heiles, Carl; Hennebelle, Patrick; Goss, W. M.; Dickey, John

    2015-01-01

    We present a new algorithm, named Autonomous Gaussian Decomposition (AGD), for automatically decomposing spectra into Gaussian components. AGD uses derivative spectroscopy and machine learning to provide optimized guesses for the number of Gaussian components in the data, and also their locations, widths, and amplitudes. We test AGD and find that it produces results comparable to human-derived solutions on 21 cm absorption spectra from the 21 cm SPectral line Observations of Neutral Gas with the EVLA (21-SPONGE) survey. We use AGD with Monte Carlo methods to derive the H i line completeness as a function of peak optical depth and velocity width for the 21-SPONGE data, and also show that the results of AGD are stable against varying observational noise intensity. The autonomy and computational efficiency of the method over traditional manual Gaussian fits allow for truly unbiased comparisons between observations and simulations, and for the ability to scale up and interpret the very large data volumes from the upcoming Square Kilometer Array and pathfinder telescopes

  7. Quantum information with Gaussian states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiangbin; Hiroshima, Tohya; Tomita, Akihisa; Hayashi, Masahito

    2007-01-01

    Quantum optical Gaussian states are a type of important robust quantum states which are manipulatable by the existing technologies. So far, most of the important quantum information experiments are done with such states, including bright Gaussian light and weak Gaussian light. Extending the existing results of quantum information with discrete quantum states to the case of continuous variable quantum states is an interesting theoretical job. The quantum Gaussian states play a central role in such a case. We review the properties and applications of Gaussian states in quantum information with emphasis on the fundamental concepts, the calculation techniques and the effects of imperfections of the real-life experimental setups. Topics here include the elementary properties of Gaussian states and relevant quantum information device, entanglement-based quantum tasks such as quantum teleportation, quantum cryptography with weak and strong Gaussian states and the quantum channel capacity, mathematical theory of quantum entanglement and state estimation for Gaussian states

  8. Linear operator pencils on Lie algebras and Laurent biorthogonal polynomials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruenbaum, F A; Vinet, Luc; Zhedanov, Alexei

    2004-01-01

    We study operator pencils on generators of the Lie algebras sl 2 and the oscillator algebra. These pencils are linear in a spectral parameter λ. The corresponding generalized eigenvalue problem gives rise to some sets of orthogonal polynomials and Laurent biorthogonal polynomials (LBP) expressed in terms of the Gauss 2 F 1 and degenerate 1 F 1 hypergeometric functions. For special choices of the parameters of the pencils, we identify the resulting polynomials with the Hendriksen-van Rossum LBP which are widely believed to be the biorthogonal analogues of the classical orthogonal polynomials. This places these examples under the umbrella of the generalized bispectral problem which is considered here. Other (non-bispectral) cases give rise to some 'nonclassical' orthogonal polynomials including Tricomi-Carlitz and random-walk polynomials. An application to solutions of relativistic Toda chain is considered

  9. Detection and identification of concealed weapons using matrix pencil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adve, Raviraj S.; Thayaparan, Thayananthan

    2011-06-01

    The detection and identification of concealed weapons is an extremely hard problem due to the weak signature of the target buried within the much stronger signal from the human body. This paper furthers the automatic detection and identification of concealed weapons by proposing the use of an effective approach to obtain the resonant frequencies in a measurement. The technique, based on Matrix Pencil, a scheme for model based parameter estimation also provides amplitude information, hence providing a level of confidence in the results. Of specific interest is the fact that Matrix Pencil is based on a singular value decomposition, making the scheme robust against noise.

  10. New trace formulae for a quadratic pencil of the Schroedinger operator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Chuanfu

    2010-01-01

    This work deals with the eigenvalue problem for a quadratic pencil of the Schroedinger operator on a finite closed interval with the two-point boundary conditions. We will obtain new regularized trace formulas for this class of differential pencil.

  11. Interconversion of pure Gaussian states requiring non-Gaussian operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbour, Michael G.; García-Patrón, Raúl; Cerf, Nicolas J.

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the conditions under which local operations and classical communication enable entanglement transformations between bipartite pure Gaussian states. A set of necessary and sufficient conditions had been found [G. Giedke et al., Quant. Inf. Comput. 3, 211 (2003)] for the interconversion between such states that is restricted to Gaussian local operations and classical communication. Here, we exploit majorization theory in order to derive more general (sufficient) conditions for the interconversion between bipartite pure Gaussian states that goes beyond Gaussian local operations. While our technique is applicable to an arbitrary number of modes for each party, it allows us to exhibit surprisingly simple examples of 2 ×2 Gaussian states that necessarily require non-Gaussian local operations to be transformed into each other.

  12. Sums and Gaussian vectors

    CERN Document Server

    Yurinsky, Vadim Vladimirovich

    1995-01-01

    Surveys the methods currently applied to study sums of infinite-dimensional independent random vectors in situations where their distributions resemble Gaussian laws. Covers probabilities of large deviations, Chebyshev-type inequalities for seminorms of sums, a method of constructing Edgeworth-type expansions, estimates of characteristic functions for random vectors obtained by smooth mappings of infinite-dimensional sums to Euclidean spaces. A self-contained exposition of the modern research apparatus around CLT, the book is accessible to new graduate students, and can be a useful reference for researchers and teachers of the subject.

  13. Pencil graphite leads as simple amperometric sensors for microchip electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natiele Tiago da Silva, Eiva; Marques Petroni, Jacqueline; Gabriel Lucca, Bruno; Souza Ferreira, Valdir

    2017-11-01

    In this work we demonstrate, for the first time, the use of inexpensive commercial pencil graphite leads as simple amperometric sensors for microchip electrophoresis. A PDMS support containing one channel was fabricated through soft lithography and sanded pencil graphite leads were inserted into this channel to be used as working electrodes. The electrochemical and morphological characterization of the sensor was carried out. The graphite electrode was coupled to PDMS microchips in end-channel configuration and electrophoretic experiments were performed using nitrite and ascorbate as probe analytes. The analytes were successfully separated and detected in well-defined peaks with satisfactory resolution using the microfluidic platform proposed. The repeatability of the pencil graphite electrode was satisfactory (RSD values of 1.6% for nitrite and 12.3% for ascorbate, regarding the peak currents) and its lifetime was estimated to be ca. 700 electrophoretic runs over a cost of ca. $ 0.05 per electrode. The limits of detection achieved with this system were 2.8 μM for nitrite and 5.7 μM for ascorbate. For proof of principle, the pencil graphite electrode was employed for the real analysis of well water samples and nitrite was successfully quantified at levels below its maximum contaminant level established in Brazil and US. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. The inverse spectral problem for pencils of differential operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guseinov, I M; Nabiev, I M

    2007-01-01

    The inverse problem of spectral analysis for a quadratic pencil of Sturm-Liouville operators on a finite interval is considered. A uniqueness theorem is proved, a solution algorithm is presented, and sufficient conditions for the solubility of the inverse problem are obtained. Bibliography: 31 titles.

  15. Intranet Effectiveness: A Public Relations Paper-and-Pencil Checklist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murgolo-Poore, Marie E.; Pitt, Leyland F.; Ewing, Michael T.

    2002-01-01

    Describes a process directed at developing a simple paper-and-pencil checklist to assess Intranet effectiveness. Discusses the checklist purification procedure, and attempts to establish reliability and validity for the list. Concludes by identifying managerial applications of the checklist, recognizing the limitations of the approach, and…

  16. Rotating quantum Gaussian packets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodonov, V V

    2015-01-01

    We study two-dimensional quantum Gaussian packets with a fixed value of mean angular momentum. This value is the sum of two independent parts: the ‘external’ momentum related to the motion of the packet center and the ‘internal’ momentum due to quantum fluctuations. The packets minimizing the mean energy of an isotropic oscillator with the fixed mean angular momentum are found. They exist for ‘co-rotating’ external and internal motions, and they have nonzero correlation coefficients between coordinates and momenta, together with some (moderate) amount of quadrature squeezing. Variances of angular momentum and energy are calculated, too. Differences in the behavior of ‘co-rotating’ and ‘anti-rotating’ packets are shown. The time evolution of rotating Gaussian packets is analyzed, including the cases of a charge in a homogeneous magnetic field and a free particle. In the latter case, the effect of initial shrinking of packets with big enough coordinate-momentum correlation coefficients (followed by the well known expansion) is discovered. This happens due to a competition of ‘focusing’ and ‘de-focusing’ in the orthogonal directions. (paper)

  17. Perturbative Gaussianizing transforms for cosmological fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Alex; Mead, Alexander

    2018-01-01

    Constraints on cosmological parameters from large-scale structure have traditionally been obtained from two-point statistics. However, non-linear structure formation renders these statistics insufficient in capturing the full information content available, necessitating the measurement of higher order moments to recover information which would otherwise be lost. We construct quantities based on non-linear and non-local transformations of weakly non-Gaussian fields that Gaussianize the full multivariate distribution at a given order in perturbation theory. Our approach does not require a model of the fields themselves and takes as input only the first few polyspectra, which could be modelled or measured from simulations or data, making our method particularly suited to observables lacking a robust perturbative description such as the weak-lensing shear. We apply our method to simulated density fields, finding a significantly reduced bispectrum and an enhanced correlation with the initial field. We demonstrate that our method reconstructs a large proportion of the linear baryon acoustic oscillations, improving the information content over the raw field by 35 per cent. We apply the transform to toy 21 cm intensity maps, showing that our method still performs well in the presence of complications such as redshift-space distortions, beam smoothing, pixel noise and foreground subtraction. We discuss how this method might provide a route to constructing a perturbative model of the fully non-Gaussian multivariate likelihood function.

  18. Holographic non-Gaussianity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFadden, Paul; Skenderis, Kostas

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the non-Gaussianity of primordial cosmological perturbations within our recently proposed holographic description of inflationary universes. We derive a holographic formula that determines the bispectrum of cosmological curvature perturbations in terms of correlation functions of a holographically dual three-dimensional non-gravitational quantum field theory (QFT). This allows us to compute the primordial bispectrum for a universe which started in a non-geometric holographic phase, using perturbative QFT calculations. Strikingly, for a class of models specified by a three-dimensional super-renormalisable QFT, the primordial bispectrum is of exactly the factorisable equilateral form with f NL equil. = 5/36, irrespective of the details of the dual QFT. A by-product of this investigation is a holographic formula for the three-point function of the trace of the stress-energy tensor along general holographic RG flows, which should have applications outside the remit of this work

  19. Palm distributions for log Gaussian Cox processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coeurjolly, Jean-Francois; Møller, Jesper; Waagepetersen, Rasmus Plenge

    2017-01-01

    This paper establishes a remarkable result regarding Palm distributions for a log Gaussian Cox process: the reduced Palm distribution for a log Gaussian Cox process is itself a log Gaussian Cox process that only differs from the original log Gaussian Cox process in the intensity function. This new...... result is used to study functional summaries for log Gaussian Cox processes....

  20. IBS for non-gaussian distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedotov, A.; Sidorin, A.O.; Smirnov, A.V.

    2010-01-01

    In many situations distribution can significantly deviate from Gaussian which requires accurate treatment of IBS. Our original interest in this problem was motivated by the need to have an accurate description of beam evolution due to IBS while distribution is strongly affected by the external electron cooling force. A variety of models with various degrees of approximation were developed and implemented in BETACOOL in the past to address this topic. A more complete treatment based on the friction coefficient and full 3-D diffusion tensor was introduced in BETACOOL at the end of 2007 under the name 'local IBS model'. Such a model allowed us calculation of IBS for an arbitrary beam distribution. The numerical benchmarking of this local IBS algorithm and its comparison with other models was reported before. In this paper, after briefly describing the model and its limitations, they present its comparison with available experimental data.

  1. Geometry of Gaussian quantum states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Link, Valentin; Strunz, Walter T

    2015-01-01

    We study the Hilbert–Schmidt measure on the manifold of mixed Gaussian states in multi-mode continuous variable quantum systems. An analytical expression for the Hilbert–Schmidt volume element is derived. Its corresponding probability measure can be used to study typical properties of Gaussian states. It turns out that although the manifold of Gaussian states is unbounded, an ensemble of Gaussian states distributed according to this measure still has a normalizable distribution of symplectic eigenvalues, from which unitarily invariant properties can be obtained. By contrast, we find that for an ensemble of one-mode Gaussian states based on the Bures measure the corresponding distribution cannot be normalized. As important applications, we determine the distribution and the mean value of von Neumann entropy and purity for the Hilbert–Schmidt measure. (paper)

  2. Resource theory of non-Gaussian operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Quntao; Shor, Peter W.; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.

    2018-05-01

    Non-Gaussian states and operations are crucial for various continuous-variable quantum information processing tasks. To quantitatively understand non-Gaussianity beyond states, we establish a resource theory for non-Gaussian operations. In our framework, we consider Gaussian operations as free operations, and non-Gaussian operations as resources. We define entanglement-assisted non-Gaussianity generating power and show that it is a monotone that is nonincreasing under the set of free superoperations, i.e., concatenation and tensoring with Gaussian channels. For conditional unitary maps, this monotone can be analytically calculated. As examples, we show that the non-Gaussianity of ideal photon-number subtraction and photon-number addition equal the non-Gaussianity of the single-photon Fock state. Based on our non-Gaussianity monotone, we divide non-Gaussian operations into two classes: (i) the finite non-Gaussianity class, e.g., photon-number subtraction, photon-number addition, and all Gaussian-dilatable non-Gaussian channels; and (ii) the diverging non-Gaussianity class, e.g., the binary phase-shift channel and the Kerr nonlinearity. This classification also implies that not all non-Gaussian channels are exactly Gaussian dilatable. Our resource theory enables a quantitative characterization and a first classification of non-Gaussian operations, paving the way towards the full understanding of non-Gaussianity.

  3. Pencil lead microelectrode and the application on cell dielectrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, Bo-Chuan; Cheng, Tzong-Jih; Shih, Syuan-He [Department of Bio-Industrial Mechatronics Engineering, National Taiwan University, 136 Chou-Shan Rd., Taipei City 106, Taiwan (China); Chen, Richie L.C., E-mail: rlcchen@ntu.edu.tw [Department of Bio-Industrial Mechatronics Engineering, National Taiwan University, 136 Chou-Shan Rd., Taipei City 106, Taiwan (China)

    2011-11-30

    A microelectrode was fabricated by electrochemical etching of a pencil lead (0.5 mm in diameter) in 1.0 M NaOH aqueous solution. The pencil lead was dipped into the solution and then an ac voltage (3.0 V{sub rms} for 10 min) was imposed against a stainless plate under mild stirring (450 rpm). The electrochemically sharpened pencil tip was about 10 {mu}m in diameter (12 {+-} 3 {mu}m, n = 5), and the lateral part was insulated within a polypropylene micro-pipette tip (2-200 {mu}L volume range). The cyclic voltammograms conducted in 2.0 mM ferricyanide/ferrocyanide buffer solution (pH 7.0) are with low capacitive current and a typical sigmoidal signal of micro-sized electrodes. The microelectrode was used to perform dielectrophoresis of polystyrene latex microbeads (nominal diameter of 3 {mu}m) and human red blood cells. A conducting glass (indium tin oxide coated glass, 40 mm x 40 mm x 1 mm) served as the counter electrode (0.5 mm beneath the microelectrode) to generate the asymmetrical electric field and also as the window for microscopic observation. With the sinusoidal bias voltage (30 V{sub rms}) ranged from 20 Hz to 2 MHz, positive and negative dielectrophoretic phenomena were identified.

  4. Handbook of Gaussian basis sets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poirier, R.; Kari, R.; Csizmadia, I.G.

    1985-01-01

    A collection of a large body of information is presented useful for chemists involved in molecular Gaussian computations. Every effort has been made by the authors to collect all available data for cartesian Gaussian as found in the literature up to July of 1984. The data in this text includes a large collection of polarization function exponents but in this case the collection is not complete. Exponents for Slater type orbitals (STO) were included for completeness. This text offers a collection of Gaussian exponents primarily without criticism. (Auth.)

  5. Beam-width spreading of vortex beams in free space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiwei; Li, Jinhong; Duan, Meiling

    2018-01-01

    Based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle and the definition of second-order moments of the Wigner distribution function, the analytical expression for the beam-width spreading of Gaussian Schell-model (GSM) vortex beams in free space are derived, and used to study the influence of beam parameters on the beam-width spreading of GSM vortex beams. With the increment of the propagation distance, the beam-width spreading of GSM vortex beams will increase; the bigger the topological charge, spatial correlation length, wavelength and waist width are, the smaller the beam-width spreading is.

  6. Spacing grids for a fuel pencil bundle in a nuclear reactor assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feutrel, Claude.

    1977-01-01

    This invention relates to the lattices forming the spacing of a bundle of clad fuel pencils in a nuclear reactor assembly, particularly in a water cooled or fast reactor, the purpose of such lattices being to maintain these pencils parallel with respect to each other and according to a given lattice arrangement, whilst also providing these pencils with a flexible support according to different successive areas apportioned with their length in order to present them from vibrating under the effect of the circulation of a liquid coolant environment flowing in contact with these pencils [fr

  7. Characterization of Reagent Pencils for Deposition of Reagents onto Paper-Based Microfluidic Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheyenne H. Liu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Reagent pencils allow for solvent-free deposition of reagents onto paper-based microfluidic devices. The pencils are portable, easy to use, extend the shelf-life of reagents, and offer a platform for customizing diagnostic devices at the point of care. In this work, reagent pencils were characterized by measuring the wear resistance of pencil cores made from polyethylene glycols (PEGs with different molecular weights and incorporating various concentrations of three different reagents using a standard pin abrasion test, as well as by measuring the efficiency of reagent delivery from the pencils to the test zones of paper-based microfluidic devices using absorption spectroscopy and digital image colorimetry. The molecular weight of the PEG, concentration of the reagent, and the molecular weight of the reagent were all found to have an inverse correlation with the wear of the pencil cores, but the amount of reagent delivered to the test zone of a device correlated most strongly with the concentration of the reagent in the pencil core. Up to 49% of the total reagent deposited on a device with a pencil was released into the test zone, compared to 58% for reagents deposited from a solution. The results suggest that reagent pencils can be prepared for a variety of reagents using PEGs with molecular weights in the range of 2000 to 6000 g/mol.

  8. Gaussian density matrices: Quantum analogs of classical states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, A.; Revzen, M.

    1993-01-01

    We study quantum analogs of clasical situations, i.e. quantum states possessing some specific classical attribute(s). These states seem quite generally, to have the form of gaussian density matrices. Such states can always be parametrized as thermal squeezed states (TSS). We consider the following specific cases: (a) Two beams that are built from initial beams which passed through a beam splitter cannot, classically, be distinguished from (appropriately prepared) two independent beams that did not go through a splitter. The only quantum states possessing this classical attribute are TSS. (b) The classical Cramer's theorem was shown to have a quantum version (Hegerfeldt). Again, the states here are Gaussian density matrices. (c) The special case in the study of the quantum version of Cramer's theorem, viz. when the state obtained after partial tracing is a pure state, leads to the conclusion that all states involved are zero temperature limit TSS. The classical analog here are gaussians of zero width, i.e. all distributions are δ functions in phase space. (orig.)

  9. Field electron emission from pencil-drawn cold cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jiangtao; Yang, Bingjun; Liu, Xiahui; Yang, Juan; Yan, Xingbin, E-mail: xbyan@licp.cas.cn [Laboratory of Clean Energy Chemistry and Materials, State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2016-05-09

    Field electron emitters with flat, curved, and linear profiles are fabricated on flexible copy papers by direct pencil-drawing method. This one-step method is free of many restricted conditions such as high-temperature, high vacuum, organic solvents, and multistep. The cold cathodes display good field emission performance and achieve high emission current density of 78 mA/cm{sup 2} at an electric field of 3.73 V/μm. The approach proposed here would bring a rapid, low-cost, and eco-friendly route to fabricate but not limited to flexible field emitter devices.

  10. Computed tomography on a defective CANDU fuel pencil end cap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lupton, L.R.

    1985-09-01

    Five tomographic slices through a defective end cap from a CANDU fuel pencil have been generated using a Co-60 source and a first generation translate-rotate tomography scanner. An anomaly in the density distribution that is believed to have resulted from the defect has been observed. However, with the 0.30 mm spatial resolution used, it has not been possible to state unequivocally whether the change in density is caused by a defect in the weld or a statistical anomaly in the data. It is concluded that a microtomography system, with a spatial resolution in the range of 0.1 mm, could detect the flaw

  11. Device for the automatic evaluation of pencil dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schallopp, B.

    1976-01-01

    In connenction with the automation of radiation protection in nuclear power plants, an automatic reading device has been developed for the direct input of the readings of pencil dosimeters into a computer. Voltage measurements would be simple but are excluded, because the internal electrode of the dosimeter may not be touched, for operational reasons. This paper describes an optical/electronic conversion device in which the reading of the dosimeter is projected onto a Vidicon, scanned, and converted into a digital signal for output to the computer. (orig.) [de

  12. Revealing the radial modes in vortex beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sephton, Bereneice C

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Light beams that carry orbital angular momentum are often approximated by modulating an initial beam, usually Gaussian, with an azimuthal phase variation to create a vortex beam. Such vortex beams are well defined azimuthally, but the radial profile...

  13. Information geometry of Gaussian channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monras, Alex; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2010-01-01

    We define a local Riemannian metric tensor in the manifold of Gaussian channels and the distance that it induces. We adopt an information-geometric approach and define a metric derived from the Bures-Fisher metric for quantum states. The resulting metric inherits several desirable properties from the Bures-Fisher metric and is operationally motivated by distinguishability considerations: It serves as an upper bound to the attainable quantum Fisher information for the channel parameters using Gaussian states, under generic constraints on the physically available resources. Our approach naturally includes the use of entangled Gaussian probe states. We prove that the metric enjoys some desirable properties like stability and covariance. As a by-product, we also obtain some general results in Gaussian channel estimation that are the continuous-variable analogs of previously known results in finite dimensions. We prove that optimal probe states are always pure and bounded in the number of ancillary modes, even in the presence of constraints on the reduced state input in the channel. This has experimental and computational implications. It limits the complexity of optimal experimental setups for channel estimation and reduces the computational requirements for the evaluation of the metric: Indeed, we construct a converging algorithm for its computation. We provide explicit formulas for computing the multiparametric quantum Fisher information for dissipative channels probed with arbitrary Gaussian states and provide the optimal observables for the estimation of the channel parameters (e.g., bath couplings, squeezing, and temperature).

  14. On the representation of the diffracted field of Hermite-Gaussian modes in an alien basis and the young diffraction principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, V.N.; Strokovskii, G.A.

    1994-01-01

    An analytical form of expansion coefficients of a diffracted field for an arbitrary Hermite-Gaussian beam in an alien Hermite-Gaussian basis is obtained. A possible physical interpretation of the well-known Young phenomenological diffraction principle and experiments on diffraction of Hermite-Gaussian beams of the lowest types (n = 0 - 5) from half-plane are discussed. The case of nearly homogenous expansion corresponding to misalignment and mismatch of optical systems is also analyzed. 7 refs., 2 figs

  15. Electron beam treatment planning: A review of dose computation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, R.; Riley, R.; Laughlin, J.S.

    1983-01-01

    Various methods of dose computations are reviewed. The equivalent path length methods used to account for body curvature and internal structure are not adequate because they ignore the lateral diffusion of electrons. The Monte Carlo method for the broad field three-dimensional situation in treatment planning is impractical because of the enormous computer time required. The pencil beam technique may represent a suitable compromise. The behavior of a pencil beam may be described by the multiple scattering theory or, alternatively, generated using the Monte Carlo method. Although nearly two orders of magnitude slower than the equivalent path length technique, the pencil beam method improves accuracy sufficiently to justify its use. It applies very well when accounting for the effect of surface irregularities; the formulation for handling inhomogeneous internal structure is yet to be developed

  16. Measuring Vitamin C Content of Commercial Orange Juice Using a Pencil Lead Electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, David; Friend, Jeffrey; Kariuki, James

    2010-01-01

    A pencil lead successfully served as an electrode for the determination of ascorbic acid in commercial orange juice. Cyclic voltammetry was used as an electrochemical probe to measure the current produced from the oxidation of ascorbic acid with a variety of electrodes. The data demonstrate that the less expensive pencil lead electrode gives…

  17. Response rate of bricklayers and supervisors on an internet or a paper-and-pencil questionnaire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschman, Julitta S.; van der Molen, Henk F.; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.; Sluiter, Judith K.

    2012-01-01

    It is unclear whether or not internet surveys yield response rates comparable to paper-and-pencil surveys for specific occupational groups, such as construction workers. The objective of this study was to examine the differences in response rates between a paper-and-pencil questionnaire and an

  18. 76 FR 2337 - Certain Cased Pencils From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Results and Partial...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-13

    ... has autonomy from the government in making decisions regarding the selection of management; and (4... Financial Statistics. When relying on prices of imports into India as surrogate values, we have disregarded... the 2006-2007 financial statement of Triveni Pencils Ltd. (``Triveni''), an Indian producer of pencils...

  19. 78 FR 54452 - Certain Cased Pencils From the People's Republic of China: Rescission of Antidumping Duty...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-04

    ... the People's Republic of China: Rescission of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review; 2011-2012 AGENCY... certain cased pencils (pencils) from the People's Republic of China (PRC) for the period December 1, 2011, through November 30, 2012, based on the withdrawal of the review request by one company and on the...

  20. Tachyon mediated non-Gaussianity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutta, Bhaskar; Leblond, Louis; Kumar, Jason

    2008-01-01

    We describe a general scenario where primordial non-Gaussian curvature perturbations are generated in models with extra scalar fields. The extra scalars communicate to the inflaton sector mainly through the tachyonic (waterfall) field condensing at the end of hybrid inflation. These models can yield significant non-Gaussianity of the local shape, and both signs of the bispectrum can be obtained. These models have cosmic strings and a nearly flat power spectrum, which together have been recently shown to be a good fit to WMAP data. We illustrate with a model of inflation inspired from intersecting brane models.

  1. Pencil It in: Exploring the Feasibility of Hand-Drawn Pencil Electrochemical Sensors and Their Direct Comparison to Screen-Printed Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Bernalte

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We explore the fabrication, physicochemical characterisation (SEM, Raman, EDX and XPS and electrochemical application of hand-drawn pencil electrodes (PDEs upon an ultra-flexible polyester substrate; investigating the number of draws (used for their fabrication, the pencil grade utilised (HB to 9B and the electrochemical properties of an array of batches (i.e, pencil boxes. Electrochemical characterisation of the PDEs, using different batches of HB grade pencils, is undertaken using several inner- and outer-sphere redox probes and is critically compared to screen-printed electrodes (SPEs. Proof-of-concept is demonstrated for the electrochemical sensing of dopamine and acetaminophen using PDEs, which are found to exhibit competitive limits of detection (3σ upon comparison to SPEs. Nonetheless, it is important to note that a clear lack of reproducibility was demonstrated when utilising these PDEs fabricated using the HB pencils from different batches. We also explore the suitability and feasibility of a pencil-drawn reference electrode compared to screen-printed alternatives, to see if one can draw the entire sensing platform. This article reports a critical assessment of these PDEs against that of its screen-printed competitors, questioning the overall feasibility of PDEs’ implementation as a sensing platform.

  2. Improvement of Galilean refractive beam shaping system for accurately generating near-diffraction-limited flattop beam with arbitrary beam size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Haotong; Liu, Zejin; Jiang, Pengzhi; Xu, Xiaojun; Du, Shaojun

    2011-07-04

    We propose and demonstrate the improvement of conventional Galilean refractive beam shaping system for accurately generating near-diffraction-limited flattop beam with arbitrary beam size. Based on the detailed study of the refractive beam shaping system, we found that the conventional Galilean beam shaper can only work well for the magnifying beam shaping. Taking the transformation of input beam with Gaussian irradiance distribution into target beam with high order Fermi-Dirac flattop profile as an example, the shaper can only work well at the condition that the size of input and target beam meets R(0) ≥ 1.3 w(0). For the improvement, the shaper is regarded as the combination of magnifying and demagnifying beam shaping system. The surface and phase distributions of the improved Galilean beam shaping system are derived based on Geometric and Fourier Optics. By using the improved Galilean beam shaper, the accurate transformation of input beam with Gaussian irradiance distribution into target beam with flattop irradiance distribution is realized. The irradiance distribution of the output beam is coincident with that of the target beam and the corresponding phase distribution is maintained. The propagation performance of the output beam is greatly improved. Studies of the influences of beam size and beam order on the improved Galilean beam shaping system show that restriction of beam size has been greatly reduced. This improvement can also be used to redistribute the input beam with complicated irradiance distribution into output beam with complicated irradiance distribution.

  3. The Multivariate Gaussian Probability Distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahrendt, Peter

    2005-01-01

    This technical report intends to gather information about the multivariate gaussian distribution, that was previously not (at least to my knowledge) to be found in one place and written as a reference manual. Additionally, some useful tips and tricks are collected that may be useful in practical ...

  4. On Gaussian conditional independence structures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lněnička, Radim; Matúš, František

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 3 (2007), s. 327-342 ISSN 0023-5954 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100750603 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : multivariate Gaussian distribution * positive definite matrices * determinants * gaussoids * covariance selection models * Markov perfectness Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.552, year: 2007

  5. Gaussian processes for machine learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeger, Matthias

    2004-04-01

    Gaussian processes (GPs) are natural generalisations of multivariate Gaussian random variables to infinite (countably or continuous) index sets. GPs have been applied in a large number of fields to a diverse range of ends, and very many deep theoretical analyses of various properties are available. This paper gives an introduction to Gaussian processes on a fairly elementary level with special emphasis on characteristics relevant in machine learning. It draws explicit connections to branches such as spline smoothing models and support vector machines in which similar ideas have been investigated. Gaussian process models are routinely used to solve hard machine learning problems. They are attractive because of their flexible non-parametric nature and computational simplicity. Treated within a Bayesian framework, very powerful statistical methods can be implemented which offer valid estimates of uncertainties in our predictions and generic model selection procedures cast as nonlinear optimization problems. Their main drawback of heavy computational scaling has recently been alleviated by the introduction of generic sparse approximations.13,78,31 The mathematical literature on GPs is large and often uses deep concepts which are not required to fully understand most machine learning applications. In this tutorial paper, we aim to present characteristics of GPs relevant to machine learning and to show up precise connections to other "kernel machines" popular in the community. Our focus is on a simple presentation, but references to more detailed sources are provided.

  6. Grazing incidence beam expander

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akkapeddi, P.R.; Glenn, P.; Fuschetto, A.; Appert, Q.; Viswanathan, V.K.

    1985-01-01

    A Grazing Incidence Beam Expander (GIBE) telescope is being designed and fabricated to be used as an equivalent end mirror in a long laser resonator cavity. The design requirements for this GIBE flow down from a generic Free Electron Laser (FEL) resonator. The nature of the FEL gain volume (a thin, pencil-like, on-axis region) dictates that the output beam be very small. Such a thin beam with the high power levels characteristic of FELs would have to travel perhaps hundreds of meters or more before expanding enough to allow reflection from cooled mirrors. A GIBE, on the other hand, would allow placing these optics closer to the gain region and thus reduces the cavity lengths substantially. Results are presented relating to optical and mechanical design, alignment sensitivity analysis, radius of curvature analysis, laser cavity stability analysis of a linear stable concentric laser cavity with a GIBE. Fabrication details of the GIBE are also given.

  7. Correction of failure in antenna array using matrix pencil technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, SU; Rahim, MKA

    2017-01-01

    In this paper a non-iterative technique is developed for the correction of faulty antenna array based on matrix pencil technique (MPT). The failure of a sensor in antenna array can damage the radiation power pattern in terms of sidelobes level and nulls. In the developed technique, the radiation pattern of the array is sampled to form discrete power pattern information set. Then this information set can be arranged in the form of Hankel matrix (HM) and execute the singular value decomposition (SVD). By removing nonprincipal values, we obtain an optimum lower rank estimation of HM. This lower rank matrix corresponds to the corrected pattern. Then the proposed technique is employed to recover the weight excitation and position allocations from the estimated matrix. Numerical simulations confirm the efficiency of the proposed technique, which is compared with the available techniques in terms of sidelobes level and nulls. (paper)

  8. Beam-beam limit in e+e- circular colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohmi, K.; Tawada, M.; Kamada, S.; Oide, K.; Cai, Y.; Qiang, J.

    2004-01-01

    Beam-beam effects limit the luminosity of circular colliders. Once the bunch population exceeds a threshold, the luminosity increases at a slower rate. This phenomenon is called the beam-beam limit. Onset of the beam-beam limit has been analyzed with various simulation methods based on the weak-strong and strong-strong models. We have observed that an incoherent phenomenon is mainly concerned in the beam-beam limit. The simulation have shown that equilibrium distributions of the two colliding beams are distorted from Gaussians when the luminosity is limited. The beam-beam limit is estimated to be ξ∼0.1 for a B factory with damping time of several thousand turns

  9. Beam standardization and dosimetric methodology in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maia, Ana Figueiredo

    2005-01-01

    Special ionization chambers, named pencil ionization chambers, are used in dosimetric procedures in computed tomography beams (CT). In this work, an extensive study about pencil ionization chambers was performed, as a contribution to the accuracy of the dosimetric procedures in CT beams. The international scientific community has recently been discussing the need of the establishment of a specific calibration procedure for CT ionization chambers, once these chambers present special characteristics that differentiate them from other ionization chambers used in diagnostic radiology beams. In this work, an adequate calibration procedure for pencil ionization chambers was established at the Calibration Laboratory, of the Institute de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, in accordance with the most recent international recommendations. Two calibration methodologies were tested and analyzed by comparative studies. Moreover, a new extended length parallel plate ionization chamber, with a transversal section very similar to pencil ionization chambers, was developed. The operational characteristics of this chamber were determined and the results obtained showed that its behaviour is adequate as a reference system in CT standard beams. Two other studies were performed during this work, both using CT ionization chambers. The first study was about the performance of a pencil ionization chamber in standard radiation beams of several types and energies, and the results showed that this chamber presents satisfactory behaviour in other radiation qualities as of diagnostic radiology, mammography and radiotherapy. In the second study, a tandem system for verification of hal'-value layer variations in CT equipment, using a pencil ionization chamber, was developed. Because of the X rays tube rotation, the determination of half-value layers in computed tomography equipment is not an easy task, and it is usually not performed within quality control programs. (author)

  10. Analytic matrix elements with shifted correlated Gaussians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fedorov, D. V.

    2017-01-01

    Matrix elements between shifted correlated Gaussians of various potentials with several form-factors are calculated analytically. Analytic matrix elements are of importance for the correlated Gaussian method in quantum few-body physics.......Matrix elements between shifted correlated Gaussians of various potentials with several form-factors are calculated analytically. Analytic matrix elements are of importance for the correlated Gaussian method in quantum few-body physics....

  11. Gaussian process regression analysis for functional data

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Jian Qing

    2011-01-01

    Gaussian Process Regression Analysis for Functional Data presents nonparametric statistical methods for functional regression analysis, specifically the methods based on a Gaussian process prior in a functional space. The authors focus on problems involving functional response variables and mixed covariates of functional and scalar variables.Covering the basics of Gaussian process regression, the first several chapters discuss functional data analysis, theoretical aspects based on the asymptotic properties of Gaussian process regression models, and new methodological developments for high dime

  12. Gaussian statistics for palaeomagnetic vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, J.J.; Constable, C.G.

    2003-01-01

    With the aim of treating the statistics of palaeomagnetic directions and intensities jointly and consistently, we represent the mean and the variance of palaeomagnetic vectors, at a particular site and of a particular polarity, by a probability density function in a Cartesian three-space of orthogonal magnetic-field components consisting of a single (unimoda) non-zero mean, spherically-symmetrical (isotropic) Gaussian function. For palaeomagnetic data of mixed polarities, we consider a bimodal distribution consisting of a pair of such symmetrical Gaussian functions, with equal, but opposite, means and equal variances. For both the Gaussian and bi-Gaussian distributions, and in the spherical three-space of intensity, inclination, and declination, we obtain analytical expressions for the marginal density functions, the cumulative distributions, and the expected values and variances for each spherical coordinate (including the angle with respect to the axis of symmetry of the distributions). The mathematical expressions for the intensity and off-axis angle are closed-form and especially manageable, with the intensity distribution being Rayleigh-Rician. In the limit of small relative vectorial dispersion, the Gaussian (bi-Gaussian) directional distribution approaches a Fisher (Bingham) distribution and the intensity distribution approaches a normal distribution. In the opposite limit of large relative vectorial dispersion, the directional distributions approach a spherically-uniform distribution and the intensity distribution approaches a Maxwell distribution. We quantify biases in estimating the properties of the vector field resulting from the use of simple arithmetic averages, such as estimates of the intensity or the inclination of the mean vector, or the variances of these quantities. With the statistical framework developed here and using the maximum-likelihood method, which gives unbiased estimates in the limit of large data numbers, we demonstrate how to

  13. Gaussian statistics for palaeomagnetic vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, J. J.; Constable, C. G.

    2003-03-01

    With the aim of treating the statistics of palaeomagnetic directions and intensities jointly and consistently, we represent the mean and the variance of palaeomagnetic vectors, at a particular site and of a particular polarity, by a probability density function in a Cartesian three-space of orthogonal magnetic-field components consisting of a single (unimodal) non-zero mean, spherically-symmetrical (isotropic) Gaussian function. For palaeomagnetic data of mixed polarities, we consider a bimodal distribution consisting of a pair of such symmetrical Gaussian functions, with equal, but opposite, means and equal variances. For both the Gaussian and bi-Gaussian distributions, and in the spherical three-space of intensity, inclination, and declination, we obtain analytical expressions for the marginal density functions, the cumulative distributions, and the expected values and variances for each spherical coordinate (including the angle with respect to the axis of symmetry of the distributions). The mathematical expressions for the intensity and off-axis angle are closed-form and especially manageable, with the intensity distribution being Rayleigh-Rician. In the limit of small relative vectorial dispersion, the Gaussian (bi-Gaussian) directional distribution approaches a Fisher (Bingham) distribution and the intensity distribution approaches a normal distribution. In the opposite limit of large relative vectorial dispersion, the directional distributions approach a spherically-uniform distribution and the intensity distribution approaches a Maxwell distribution. We quantify biases in estimating the properties of the vector field resulting from the use of simple arithmetic averages, such as estimates of the intensity or the inclination of the mean vector, or the variances of these quantities. With the statistical framework developed here and using the maximum-likelihood method, which gives unbiased estimates in the limit of large data numbers, we demonstrate how to

  14. Reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces of Gaussian priors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaart, van der A.W.; Zanten, van J.H.; Clarke, B.; Ghosal, S.

    2008-01-01

    We review definitions and properties of reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces attached to Gaussian variables and processes, with a view to applications in nonparametric Bayesian statistics using Gaussian priors. The rate of contraction of posterior distributions based on Gaussian priors can be described

  15. Analysis of Tandem curves by set of cylindrical absorber layers and ionization chamber type pencil for evaluation of HVL in computerized tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontes, Ladyjane Pereira; Potiens, Maria da Penha Albuquerque

    2017-01-01

    A Tandem system consists of the use of different energy dependent dosimeters, where the ratio of the responses of the calibration curves to energy provides the effective energy of the beam. The efficiency of this system is related to the uncertainties inherent in the dosimeter used and the degree of energy dependence of each set. The greater the slope of the Tandem curve the better will be the identification of values close to HVL making the system useful. In this work, the Tandem system consists of ionization chamber of the pencil type and cylindrical absorber layers of materials with different energetic dependencies, for application in computed tomography. (author)

  16. Inflation in random Gaussian landscapes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masoumi, Ali; Vilenkin, Alexander; Yamada, Masaki, E-mail: ali@cosmos.phy.tufts.edu, E-mail: vilenkin@cosmos.phy.tufts.edu, E-mail: Masaki.Yamada@tufts.edu [Institute of Cosmology, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155 (United States)

    2017-05-01

    We develop analytic and numerical techniques for studying the statistics of slow-roll inflation in random Gaussian landscapes. As an illustration of these techniques, we analyze small-field inflation in a one-dimensional landscape. We calculate the probability distributions for the maximal number of e-folds and for the spectral index of density fluctuations n {sub s} and its running α {sub s} . These distributions have a universal form, insensitive to the correlation function of the Gaussian ensemble. We outline possible extensions of our methods to a large number of fields and to models of large-field inflation. These methods do not suffer from potential inconsistencies inherent in the Brownian motion technique, which has been used in most of the earlier treatments.

  17. General Galilei Covariant Gaussian Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasbarri, Giulio; Toroš, Marko; Bassi, Angelo

    2017-09-01

    We characterize general non-Markovian Gaussian maps which are covariant under Galilean transformations. In particular, we consider translational and Galilean covariant maps and show that they reduce to the known Holevo result in the Markovian limit. We apply the results to discuss measures of macroscopicity based on classicalization maps, specifically addressing dissipation, Galilean covariance and non-Markovianity. We further suggest a possible generalization of the macroscopicity measure defined by Nimmrichter and Hornberger [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 16 (2013)].

  18. Gaussian Embeddings for Collaborative Filtering

    OpenAIRE

    Dos Santos , Ludovic; Piwowarski , Benjamin; Gallinari , Patrick

    2017-01-01

    International audience; Most collaborative ltering systems, such as matrix factorization, use vector representations for items and users. Those representations are deterministic, and do not allow modeling the uncertainty of the learned representation, which can be useful when a user has a small number of rated items (cold start), or when there is connict-ing information about the behavior of a user or the ratings of an item. In this paper, we leverage recent works in learning Gaussian embeddi...

  19. Generation of shape-invariant flat-top laser beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ait-Ameur, K

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A great number of laser applications need in place of the usual Gaussian beam a flat-top intensity profile in the focal plane of a focusing lens. In general the transformation of the laser beam from the Gaussian to the flat-top shape is made by a...

  20. Wavelength-independent laser beam shaping

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Degama, MP

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a beam shaping device namely, a Diffractive Optical Element (DOE), which is used to change a beam having a Gaussian intensity profile into a beam with a uniform intensity profile. The DOE used in this work was fabricated from Zn...

  1. Beam-beam depolarization in SPEAR and PEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montague, B.W.

    1977-01-01

    In this note some approximate estimates are made of depolarization due to beam-beam forces in SPEAR and PEP, using the results of a calculation by Kondratenko. The model assumes head-on collisions between bunches of Gaussian distribution in the transverse directions; the force on the weak-beam particle is taken to be a δ-function at the interaction point. 1 ref

  2. Random wandering of laser beams with orbital angular momentum during propagation through atmospheric turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksenov, Valerii P; Kolosov, Valeriy V; Pogutsa, Cheslav E

    2014-06-10

    The propagation of laser beams having orbital angular momenta (OAM) in the turbulent atmosphere is studied numerically. The variance of random wandering of these beams is investigated with the use of the Monte Carlo technique. It is found that, among various types of vortex laser beams, such as the Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) beam, modified Bessel-Gaussian beam, and hypergeometric Gaussian beam, having identical initial effective radii and OAM, the LG beam occupying the largest effective volume in space is the most stable one.

  3. Psychometric comparison of paper-and-pencil and online personality assessments in a selection setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Joubert

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the study was to determine whether the Occupational Personality Questionnaire (OPQ32i yielded comparable results when two different modes of administration, namely paper and-pencil and Internet- based administration, were used in real-life, high-stakes selection settings. Two studies were conducted in which scores obtained online in unproctored settings were compared with scores obtained during proctored paper-and-pencil settings. The psychometric properties of the paper-and-pencil and Internet-based applications were strikingly similar. Structural equation modelling with EQS indicated substantial support for the hypothesis that covariance matrices of the paper-and-pencil and online applications in both studies were identical. It was concluded that relationships between the OPQ32i scales were not affected by mode of administration or supervision.

  4. Beam position monitor sensitivity for low-β beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafer, R.E.

    1993-01-01

    At low velocities, the EM field of a particle in a conducting beam tube is no longer a TEM wave, but has a finite longitudinal extent. The net effect of this is to reduce the coupling of the high-frequency Fourier components of the beam current to BPM (beam position monitor) electrodes, which modifies the BPM sensitivity to beam displacement. This effect is especially pronounced for high-frequency, large-aperture pickups used for low-β beams. Non-interceptive beam position monitors used in conjunction with high frequency RFQ (radio-frequency-quadrupole) and DTL (drift-tube-linac) accelerators fall into this category. When testing a BPM with a thin wire excited with either pulses or high-frequency sinusoidal currents, the EM wave represents the principal (TEM) mode in a coaxial transmission line, which is equivalent to a highly relativistic (β = 1) beam. Thus wire measurements are not suitable for simulating slow particle beams in high bandwidth diagnostic devices that couple to the image currents in the beam tube wall. Attempts to load the tin wire either capacitively or inductively to slow the EM wave down have met with limited success. In general, the equations used to represent the 2-D response of cylindrical-geometry BPMs to charged-particle beams make several assumptions: (1) the BPM electrodes are flush with and grounded to the surface of the conducting beam tube; (2) the beam is a line source (pencil beam); (3) the longitudinal extent of the EM field of a beam particle at the beam tube wall is zero, corresponding to a highly relativistic beam. The purpose of this paper is to make some quantitative estimates of the corrections to the conventional approximations when a BPM is used to measure the position of low velocity (low-β) beams

  5. Eddy current testing of PWR fuel pencils in the pool of the Osiris reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, M.; Marchand, L.

    1983-12-01

    A nondestructive testing bench is described. It is devoted to examination of high residual power fuel pencils without stress on the cladding nor interference with cooling. Guiding by fluid bearings decrease the background noise. Scanning speed is limited only by safety criteria and data acquisition configuration. Simultaneous control of various parameters is possible. Associated to an irradiation loop, loaded and unloaded in a reactor swinning pool, this bench can follow fuel pencil degradation after each irradiation cycle [fr

  6. Beam-Beam Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herr, W; Pieloni, T

    2014-01-01

    One of the most severe limitations in high-intensity particle colliders is the beam-beam interaction, i.e. the perturbation of the beams as they cross the opposing beams. This introduction to beam-beam effects concentrates on a description of the phenomena that are present in modern colliding beam facilities

  7. Upper bound for the span of pencil graph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvathi, N.; Vimala Rani, A.

    2018-04-01

    An L(2,1)-Coloring or Radio Coloring or λ coloring of a graph is a function f from the vertex set V(G) to the set of all nonnegative integers such that |f(x) ‑ f(y)| ≥ 2 if d(x,y) = 1 and |f(x) ‑ f(y)| ≥ 1 if d(x,y)=2, where d(x,y) denotes the distance between x and y in G. The L(2,1)-coloring number or span number λ(G) of G is the smallest number k such that G has an L(2,1)-coloring with max{f(v) : v ∈ V(G)} = k. [2]The minimum number of colors used in L(2,1)-coloring is called the radio number rn(G) of G (Positive integer). Griggs and yeh conjectured that λ(G) ≤ Δ2 for any simple graph with maximum degree Δ>2. In this article, we consider some special graphs like, n-sunlet graph, pencil graph families and derive its upper bound of (G) and rn(G).

  8. Chitosan/graphene oxide biocomposite film from pencil rod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gea, S.; Sari, J. N.; Bulan, R.; Piliang, A.; Amaturrahim, S. A.; Hutapea, Y. A.

    2018-03-01

    Graphene Oxide (GO) has been succesfully synthesized using Hummber method from graphite powder of pencil rod. The excellent solubility of graphene oxide (GO)in water imparts its feasibilty as new filler for reinforcement hydrophilic biopolymers. In this research, the biocomposite film was fabricated from chitosan/graphene oxide. The characteristics of graphene oxide were investigated using Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD). The results of the XRD showed graphene structur in 2θ, appeared at 9.0715°with interlayer spacing was about 9.74063Å. Preparation films with several variations of chitosan/graphene oxide was done by casting method and characterized by mechanical and morphological analysis. The mechanical properties of the tensile test in the film show that the film CS/GO (85: 15)% has the optimum Young’s modulus size of 2.9 GPa compared to other variations of CS / GO film. Morphological analysis film CS/GO (85:15)% by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), the obtained biocomposites film showed fine dispersion of GO in the CS matrix and could mix each other homogeneously.

  9. Doppler-shifted neutral beam line shape and beam transmission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamperschroer, J.H.; Grisham, L.R.; Kokatnur, N.; Lagin, L.J.; Newman, R.A.; O'Connor, T.E.; Stevenson, T.N.; von Halle, A.

    1994-04-01

    Analysis of Doppler-shifted Balmer-α line emission from the TFTR neutral beam injection systems has revealed that the line shape is well approximated by the sum of two Gaussians, or, alternatively, by a Lorentzian. For the sum of two Gaussians, the broad portion of the distribution contains 40% of the beam power and has a divergence five times that of the narrow part. Assuming a narrow 1/e- divergence of 1.3 degrees (based on fits to the beam shape on the calorimeter), the broad part has a divergence of 6.9 degrees. The entire line shape is also well approximated by a Lorentzian with a half-maximum divergence of 0.9 degrees. Up to now, fusion neutral beam modelers have assumed a single Gaussian velocity distribution, at the extraction plane, in each direction perpendicular to beam propagation. This predicts a beam transmission efficiency from the ion source to the calorimeter of 97%. Waterflow calorimetry data, however, yield a transmission efficiency of ∼75%, a value in rough agreement with predictions of the Gaussian or Lorentzian models presented here. The broad wing of the two Gaussian distribution also accurately predicts the loss in the neutralizer. An average angle of incidence for beam loss at the exit of the neutralizer is 2.2 degrees, rather than the 4.95 degrees subtended by the center of the ion source. This average angle of incidence, which is used in computing power densities on collimators, is shown to be a function of beam divergence

  10. Walk-off reduction, using an external optical plate and Bessel-Gaussian interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoume, Mansouri; Mohsen, Askarbioki; Saeed Ghavami, Sabouri; Alireza, Khorsandi

    2015-02-01

    To reduce the walk-off angle of the extraordinary third-harmonic ultraviolet wave at 355 nm generated by type II KTiOPO4 and type I β-BaB2O4 optical crystals, and the Gaussian output beam of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, a simple theoretical model was developed based on a rotatable BK7 plate of variable thickness. By rotating the plate up to 35° along the beam direction, we reduced the walk-off angle up to ˜ 13%. The same phenomenon is predicted by the model, confirming the performance of the model. It is found that, due to the walk-off effect, the intensity profile of the third-harmonic generation beam is slightly degraded. To compensate for the observed phenomena and further reduce the walk-off, we used a combination of a convex lens and an axicon to transform the beam profile of the interacting fundamental and second-harmonic generation waves to the zero-order Bessel-Gaussian form. As a result, the walk-off is decreased to ˜48.81 mrad, providing ˜30% relative reduction. By using the same BK7 plate rotated up to 35° along the third-harmonic beam direction, the walk-off angle is further reduced to 38.9 mrad. Moreover, it is observed that the beam profile of the emerged Bessel-Gaussian third-harmonic generation beam remains unchanged with no degradation.

  11. Transfer of non-Gaussian quantum states of mechanical oscillator to light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filip, Radim; Rakhubovsky, Andrey A.

    2015-11-01

    Non-Gaussian quantum states are key resources for quantum optics with continuous-variable oscillators. The non-Gaussian states can be deterministically prepared by a continuous evolution of the mechanical oscillator isolated in a nonlinear potential. We propose feasible and deterministic transfer of non-Gaussian quantum states of mechanical oscillators to a traveling light beam, using purely all-optical methods. The method relies on only basic feasible and high-quality elements of quantum optics: squeezed states of light, linear optics, homodyne detection, and electro-optical feedforward control of light. By this method, a wide range of novel non-Gaussian states of light can be produced in the future from the mechanical states of levitating particles in optical tweezers, including states necessary for the implementation of an important cubic phase gate.

  12. Detecting periodicities with Gaussian processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Durrande

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We consider the problem of detecting and quantifying the periodic component of a function given noise-corrupted observations of a limited number of input/output tuples. Our approach is based on Gaussian process regression, which provides a flexible non-parametric framework for modelling periodic data. We introduce a novel decomposition of the covariance function as the sum of periodic and aperiodic kernels. This decomposition allows for the creation of sub-models which capture the periodic nature of the signal and its complement. To quantify the periodicity of the signal, we derive a periodicity ratio which reflects the uncertainty in the fitted sub-models. Although the method can be applied to many kernels, we give a special emphasis to the Matérn family, from the expression of the reproducing kernel Hilbert space inner product to the implementation of the associated periodic kernels in a Gaussian process toolkit. The proposed method is illustrated by considering the detection of periodically expressed genes in the arabidopsis genome.

  13. Application of the correction factor for radiation qualityKq in dosimetry with pencil-type ionization chambers using a Tandem system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontes, Ladyjane Pereira; Potiens, Maria da Penha Albuquerque

    2017-01-01

    The pencil-type ionization chamber widely used in computed tomography (CT) dosimetry, is a measuring instrument that has a cylindrical shape and provides uniform response independent of the angle of incidence of ionizing radiation. Calibration and measurements performed with the pencil-type ionization chamber are done in terms of Kerma product in air-length (P k,l ) and values are given in Gy.cm. To obtain the values of (P k,l ) during clinical measurements, the readings performed with the ionization chamber are multiplied by the calibration coefficient (N k,l ) and the correction factor C for quality (K q ) which are given in Calibration certificates of the chambers. The application of the correction factor for radiation quality K q is done as a function of the effective energy of the beam that is determined by the Half Value layer (HVL) calculation. In order to estimate the HVL values in this work, a Tandem system made up of cylindrical aluminum and PMMA absorber layers was used as a low cost and easy to apply method. From the Tandem curve, it was possible to construct the calibration curve and obtain the appropriate K q to the beam of the computed tomography equipment studied. (author)

  14. Application of the correction factor for radiation qualityK{sub q} in dosimetry with pencil-type ionization chambers using a Tandem system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontes, Ladyjane Pereira; Potiens, Maria da Penha Albuquerque, E-mail: lpfontes@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-11-01

    The pencil-type ionization chamber widely used in computed tomography (CT) dosimetry, is a measuring instrument that has a cylindrical shape and provides uniform response independent of the angle of incidence of ionizing radiation. Calibration and measurements performed with the pencil-type ionization chamber are done in terms of Kerma product in air-length (P{sub k,l}) and values are given in Gy.cm. To obtain the values of (P{sub k,l}) during clinical measurements, the readings performed with the ionization chamber are multiplied by the calibration coefficient (N{sub k,l}) and the correction factor C for quality (K{sub q}) which are given in Calibration certificates of the chambers. The application of the correction factor for radiation quality K{sub q} is done as a function of the effective energy of the beam that is determined by the Half Value layer (HVL) calculation. In order to estimate the HVL values in this work, a Tandem system made up of cylindrical aluminum and PMMA absorber layers was used as a low cost and easy to apply method. From the Tandem curve, it was possible to construct the calibration curve and obtain the appropriate K{sub q} to the beam of the computed tomography equipment studied. (author)

  15. Monogamy inequality for distributed gaussian entanglement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiroshima, Tohya; Adesso, Gerardo; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2007-02-02

    We show that for all n-mode Gaussian states of continuous variable systems, the entanglement shared among n parties exhibits the fundamental monogamy property. The monogamy inequality is proven by introducing the Gaussian tangle, an entanglement monotone under Gaussian local operations and classical communication, which is defined in terms of the squared negativity in complete analogy with the case of n-qubit systems. Our results elucidate the structure of quantum correlations in many-body harmonic lattice systems.

  16. Breaking Gaussian incompatibility on continuous variable quantum systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinosaari, Teiko, E-mail: teiko.heinosaari@utu.fi [Turku Centre for Quantum Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Turku, FI-20014 Turku (Finland); Kiukas, Jukka, E-mail: jukka.kiukas@aber.ac.uk [Department of Mathematics, Aberystwyth University, Penglais, Aberystwyth, SY23 3BZ (United Kingdom); Schultz, Jussi, E-mail: jussi.schultz@gmail.com [Turku Centre for Quantum Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Turku, FI-20014 Turku (Finland); Dipartimento di Matematica, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy)

    2015-08-15

    We characterise Gaussian quantum channels that are Gaussian incompatibility breaking, that is, transform every set of Gaussian measurements into a set obtainable from a joint Gaussian observable via Gaussian postprocessing. Such channels represent local noise which renders measurements useless for Gaussian EPR-steering, providing the appropriate generalisation of entanglement breaking channels for this scenario. Understanding the structure of Gaussian incompatibility breaking channels contributes to the resource theory of noisy continuous variable quantum information protocols.

  17. The behavior of the instantaneous Poynting vector of symmetrical laser beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Litvin, IA

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available the radiation energy contained within the divergence angle of a Gaussian beam and the be- havior of the beam width during propagation. We have shown a connection between the behavior of the IPV at the beam waist plane and a well-known property of Gaussian... beams, namely the decreasing of the divergence of a Gaussian beam with an increase in the beam width. We have investigated the behavior of the IPV of paraxial BBs in detail and have shown that in the region of the ?double shadow? [21, 22] the BB car...

  18. Two kinds of Airy-related beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Yiqing; Zhou, Guoquan; Zhang, Lijun; Ru, Guoyun

    2015-01-01

    Two kinds of Airy-related beams are introduced in this manuscript. The normalized intensity distribution in the x-direction of the two kinds of Airy-related beams is close to that of the Gaussian beam. The normalized intensity distribution in the y-direction of the two kinds of Airy-related beams is close to that of the second-order and the third-order elegant Hermite–Gaussian beams, respectively. Analytical expressions of the two kinds of Airy-related beams passing through an ABCD paraxial optical system are derived. The beam propagation factors for the two kinds of Airy-related beams are 1.933 and 2.125, respectively. Analytical expressions of the beam half widths and the kurtosis parameters of the two kinds of Airy-related beams passing through an ABCD paraxial optical system are also presented. As a numerical example, the propagation properties of the two kinds of Airy-related beams are demonstrated in free space. Moreover, the comparison between the two kinds of Airy-related beams and their corresponding elegant Hermite–Gaussian beams along the two transverse directions are performed in detail. Upon propagation, the former kind of Airy-related beam will evolve from the central bright beam into the dark hollow beam. Contrarily, the latter kind of Airy-related beam will evolve from the dark hollow beam into the central bright beam. These two kinds of Airy-related beams can be used to describe specially distributed beams. (paper)

  19. Anorthite glass: a potential host matrix for 90Sr pencil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sengupta, Pranesh; Dey, G.K.; Fanara, Sara; Chakraborty, Sumit; Mishra, R.K.; Kaushik, C.P.

    2011-01-01

    With rising global concerns over health hazards, environmental pollution and possible malicious applications of radioactive materials, there is an increasing consciousness among public and Governmental agencies for its better control, accounting and security. Investigations carried out by International Atomic Energy Agency and other monitoring bodies reveal that among various radioactive materials, the easily dispersible ones are high activity sealed sources (generally called radioactive pencils) used for various peaceful applications. Ideally, these sealed sources should be safely secured within specialized facilities, but in practice, it is not always done. Hence, there is a need to take an extra precautionary measure to ensure that the matrices currently used for hosting the radionuclides within sealed sources are durable enough under harsh service conditions and situations arising due to possible mishaps (accidents, misplaced, stolen etc). Among the variety of useful radionuclides, 90 Sr is one which is regularly used to (i) combat bone cancer, (ii) destroy unwanted tissue on the surface of eye/skin, (iii) light up/provide energy to remotely accessible areas etc. However, due to its (i) toxicity, (ii) mobility, (iii) easy incorporation within human body, (iv) considerable half-life (∼ 29 years), (v) emission of beta (β - ) particles along with high energy gamma ( γ)-rays, and (vi) retention of significant toxicity within sources even after service life, release of 90 Sr poses a serious threat to the biosphere. Hence, there is a need to ensure that existing 90 Sr host matrices are capable of withstanding all sorts of adversity that may arise during service and under storage/disposal

  20. Synchrotron accelerator technology for proton beam therapy with high accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiramoto, Kazuo

    2009-01-01

    Proton beam therapy was applied at the beginning to head and neck cancers, but it is now extended to prostate, lung and liver cancers. Thus the need for a pencil beam scanning method is increasing. With this method radiation dose concentration property of the proton beam will be further intensified. Hitachi group has supplied a pencil beam scanning therapy system as the first one for M. D. Anderson Hospital in United States, and it has been operational since May 2008. Hitachi group has been developing proton therapy system to correspond high-accuracy proton therapy to concentrate the dose in the diseased part which is located with various depths, and which sometimes has complicated shape. The author described here on the synchrotron accelerator technology that is an important element for constituting the proton therapy system. (K.Y.)

  1. When non-Gaussian states are Gaussian: Generalization of nonseparability criterion for continuous variables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHugh, Derek; Buzek, Vladimir; Ziman, Mario

    2006-01-01

    We present a class of non-Gaussian two-mode continuous-variable states for which the separability criterion for Gaussian states can be employed to detect whether they are separable or not. These states reduce to the two-mode Gaussian states as a special case

  2. Quantum beamstrahlung from gaussian bunches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, P.

    1987-08-01

    The method of Baier and Katkov is applied to calculate the correction terms to the Sokolov-Ternov radiation formula due to the variation of the magnetic field strength along the trajectory of a radiating particle. We carry the calculation up to the second order in the power expansion of B tau/B, where tau is the formation time of radiation. The expression is then used to estimate the quantum beamstrahlung average energy loss from e + e - bunches with gaussian distribution in bunch currents. We show that the effect of the field variation is to reduce the average energy loss from previous calculations based on the Sokolov-Ternov formula or its equivalent. Due to the limitation of our method, only an upper bound of the reduction is obtained. 18 refs

  3. SU-E-J-78: Adaptive Planning Workflow in a Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blakey, M; Price, S; Robison, B; Niek, S; Moe, S; Renegar, J; Mark, A; Spenser, W [Provision Healthcare Partners, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The susceptibility of proton therapy to changes in patient setup and anatomy necessitates an adaptive planning process. With the right planning tools and clinical workflow, an adaptive plan can be created in a timely manner without adding significant workload to the treatment planning staff. Methods: In our center, a weekly QA CT is performed on most patients to assess setup, anatomy change, and tumor response. The QA CT is fused to the treatment planning CT, the contours are transferred via deformable registration, and the plan dose is recalculated on the QA CT. A physicist assesses the dose distribution, and an adaptive plan is requested based on tumor coverage or OAR dose changes. After the physician confirms or alters the deformed contours, a dosimetrist develops an adaptive plan using our TPS adaptation module. The plan is assessed for robustness and is then reviewed by the physician. Patient QA is performed within three days following the first adapted treatment. Results: Of the patients who received QA CTs, 19% required at least one adaptive plan (18.5% H&N, 18.5% brain, 11.1% breast, 14.8% chestwall, 14.8% lung, 18.5% pelvis and 3.8% abdomen). Of these patients, 14% went on a break, while the remainder was treated with the previous plan during the re-planning process. Adaptive plans were performed based on tumor shrinkage, anatomy change or positioning uncertainties for 37.9%, 44.8%, and 17.3% of the patients, respectively. On average, 3 full days are required between the QA CT and the first adapted plan treatment. Conclusion: Adaptive planning is a crucial component of proton therapy and should be applied to any site when the QA CT shows significant deviation from the plan. With an efficient workflow, an adaptive plan can be applied without delaying patient treatment or burdening the dosimetry and medical physics team.

  4. SU-E-J-78: Adaptive Planning Workflow in a Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blakey, M; Price, S; Robison, B; Niek, S; Moe, S; Renegar, J; Mark, A; Spenser, W

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The susceptibility of proton therapy to changes in patient setup and anatomy necessitates an adaptive planning process. With the right planning tools and clinical workflow, an adaptive plan can be created in a timely manner without adding significant workload to the treatment planning staff. Methods: In our center, a weekly QA CT is performed on most patients to assess setup, anatomy change, and tumor response. The QA CT is fused to the treatment planning CT, the contours are transferred via deformable registration, and the plan dose is recalculated on the QA CT. A physicist assesses the dose distribution, and an adaptive plan is requested based on tumor coverage or OAR dose changes. After the physician confirms or alters the deformed contours, a dosimetrist develops an adaptive plan using our TPS adaptation module. The plan is assessed for robustness and is then reviewed by the physician. Patient QA is performed within three days following the first adapted treatment. Results: Of the patients who received QA CTs, 19% required at least one adaptive plan (18.5% H&N, 18.5% brain, 11.1% breast, 14.8% chestwall, 14.8% lung, 18.5% pelvis and 3.8% abdomen). Of these patients, 14% went on a break, while the remainder was treated with the previous plan during the re-planning process. Adaptive plans were performed based on tumor shrinkage, anatomy change or positioning uncertainties for 37.9%, 44.8%, and 17.3% of the patients, respectively. On average, 3 full days are required between the QA CT and the first adapted plan treatment. Conclusion: Adaptive planning is a crucial component of proton therapy and should be applied to any site when the QA CT shows significant deviation from the plan. With an efficient workflow, an adaptive plan can be applied without delaying patient treatment or burdening the dosimetry and medical physics team

  5. Beam-transport study of an isocentric rotating ion gantry with minimum number of quadrupoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlovic, Marius; Griesmayer, Erich; Seemann, Rolf

    2005-01-01

    A beam-transport study of an isocentric gantry for ion therapy is presented. The gantry is designed with the number of quadrupoles down to the theoretical minimum, which is the feature published for the first time in this paper. This feature has been achieved without compromising the ion-optical functions of the beam-transport system that is capable of handling non-symmetric beams (beams with different emittances in vertical and horizontal plane), pencil-beam scanning, double-achromatic optics and beam-size control. Ion-optical properties of the beam-transport system are described, discussed and illustrated by computer simulations performed by the TRANSPORT-code

  6. Pencil-on-Paper Capacitors for Hand-Drawn RC Circuits and Capacitive Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan E. Thompson

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Electronic capacitors were constructed via hand-printing on paper using pencil graphite. Graphite traces were used to draw conductive connections and capacitor plates on opposing sides of a sheet of standard notebook paper. The paper served as the dielectric separating the plates. Capacitance of the devices was generally < 1000 pF and scaled with surface area of the plate electrodes. By combining a pencil-drawn capacitor with an additional resistive pencil trace, an RC low-pass filter was demonstrated. Further utility of the pencil-on-paper devices was demonstrated through description of a capacitive force transducer and reversible chemical sensing. The latter was achieved for water vapor when the hygroscopic cellulose matrix of the paper capacitor’s dielectric adsorbed water. The construction and demonstration of pencil-on-paper capacitive elements broadens the scope of paper-based electronic circuits while allowing new opportunities in the rapidly expanding field of paper-based sensors.

  7. Generation and application of high power flattened Gaussian beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Forbes, A

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available -0.03 -0.02 -0.01 0 0.01 0.02 0.03 Radius (m) M i r r o r S u r f a c e ( µ µ µ µ m ) Fox–Li analysis 0 0.05 0.1 0.15 0.2 0.25 0.3 0.35 0.4 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 Round Trip # L o s s 0 0.2 0.4 0...Repetition rate 5 JPulse energy 1.5 kWAverage power TEA CO2 laser movie Single mode or multimode? E~250 mJ, M2 ~ 1.1 E~6.3 J, M2 ~ 25 Design and fabrication of an intra-cavity DOE 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 -0.03 -0.02 -0.01 0 0.01 0.02 0.03 Radius (m) M i...

  8. Limit theorems for functionals of Gaussian vectors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongshuai DAI; Guangjun SHEN; Lingtao KONG

    2017-01-01

    Operator self-similar processes,as an extension of self-similar processes,have been studied extensively.In this work,we study limit theorems for functionals of Gaussian vectors.Under some conditions,we determine that the limit of partial sums of functionals of a stationary Gaussian sequence of random vectors is an operator self-similar process.

  9. Palm distributions for log Gaussian Cox processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coeurjolly, Jean-Francois; Møller, Jesper; Waagepetersen, Rasmus

    This paper reviews useful results related to Palm distributions of spatial point processes and provides a new result regarding the characterization of Palm distributions for the class of log Gaussian Cox processes. This result is used to study functional summary statistics for a log Gaussian Cox...

  10. Gaussian limit of compact spin systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellissard, J.; Angelis, G.F. de

    1981-01-01

    It is shown that the Wilson and Wilson-Villain U(1) models reproduce, in the low coupling limit, the gaussian lattice approximation of the Euclidean electromagnetic field. By the same methods it is also possible to prove that the plane rotator and the Villain model share a common gaussian behaviour in the low temperature limit. (Auth.)

  11. On the dependence structure of Gaussian queues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Es-Saghouani, A.; Mandjes, M.R.H.

    2009-01-01

    In this article we study Gaussian queues (that is, queues fed by Gaussian processes, such as fractional Brownian motion (fBm) and the integrated Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (iOU) process), with a focus on the dependence structure of the workload process. The main question is to what extent does the workload

  12. Shedding new light on Gaussian harmonic analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teuwen, J.J.B.

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation consists out of two rather disjoint parts. One part concerns some results on Gaussian harmonic analysis and the other on an optimization problem in optics. In the first part we study the Ornstein–Uhlenbeck process with respect to the Gaussian measure. We focus on two areas. One is

  13. Three-dimensional electron-beam dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiu, A.S.

    1988-01-01

    The MDAH pencil-beam algorithm developed by Hogstrom et al (1981) has been widely used in clinics for electron-beam dose calculations for radiotherapy treatment planning. The primary objective of this research was to address several deficiencies of that algorithm and to develop an enhanced version. Two enhancements were incorporated into the pencil-beam algorithm; one models fluence rather than planar fluence, and the other models the bremsstrahlung dose using measured beam data. Comparisons of the resulting calculated dose distributions with measured dose distributions for several test phantoms have been made. From these results it is concluded (1) that the fluence-based algorithm is more accurate to use for the dose calculation in an inhomogeneous slab phantom, and (2) the fluence-based calculation provides only a limited improvement to the accuracy the calculated dose in the region just downstream of the lateral edge of an inhomogeneity. A pencil-beam redefinition model was developed for the calculation of electron-beam dose distributions in three dimensions

  14. Bolt beam propagation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokair, I. R.

    BOLT (Beam on Laser Technology) is a rocket experiment to demonstrate electron beam propagation on a laser ionized plasma channel across the geomagnetic field in the ion focused regime (IFR). The beam parameters for BOLT are: beam current I(sub b) = 100 Amps, beam energy of 1--1.5 MeV (gamma =3-4), and a Gaussian beam and channel of radii r(sub b) = r(sub c) = 1.5 cm. The N+1 ioniz