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Sample records for gated spect qgs

  1. Utility of QGS for 201Tl electrocardiogram-gated SPECT in cardiac function evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimazaki, Hiroshi; Oono, Ryuichi

    2001-01-01

    QGS (quantitative gated SPECT) was applied to 201 Tl SPECT, whose images are inferior to those of Tc SPECT, and its utility was evaluated. More specifically, the cardiac function index was calculated by QGS, and local wall motion was evaluated visually. Accuracy was assessed by comparison with left ventriculography. The subjects were 29 patients (21 males, 8 females; 6 with myocardial infarction, 18 with stenocardia, 2 with pericardial disease, 3 with other heart diseases) who had undergone myocardial scintigraphy and left ventriculography between February and May, 2000. 201 Tl (74 or 111 MBq) was administered to all patients. The resting image was obtained 10 minutes later, and the delayed image during loading was obtained 4 hours later. The conditions for acquiring the images were as follows. Two detectors were arranged at a 90-degree angle in the form of an L. The 180 degrees from 45 degrees right anterior oblique (RAO) to 45 degrees left posterior oblique (LPO) were divided into 30 sections at 6-degree intervals, and the image in each section was acquired for 60 seconds. The matrix was 64 x 64. As a cardiac function index, the left ventricular ejection function (LVEF) obtained by electrocardiogram-gated SPECT (QGS-EF) at the rest (14 cases) and the QGS-EF on the delayed images (15 cases) were compared with the LVEF determined by left ventriculography (LVG-EF). There was an excellent positive correlation between the data obtained by two methods, with a correlation coefficient of r=0.93 (y=1.04x-0.04). Most of the difference between the values fell within two standard deviations, and the error was in the clinically allowable range. There was no significant difference between the correlation coefficient at rest and during loading or between the cases that showed an obvious defect on the image and those that did not. The local wall motion of the left ventricle was visually evaluated in five stages in two directions (RAO, 30 degrees, and LAO, 60 degrees). The motion

  2. Evaluation of left ventricular ejection fraction using quantitative gated SPECT (QGS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musa, M. A. A.

    2010-07-01

    Electrocardiographic ally gated myocardial perfusion SPECT (G SPECT) is a state-of the art technique for the combined evaluation of myocardial perfusion and left ventricular function within a single study. It is currently one of the most commonly performed cardiology procedures in a nuclear medicine department. Automation of the image processing and quantification has made this techniques highly reproducible, practical and user friendly in the clinical setting . In patients with coronary artery disease, gating enhances the diagnostic and prognostic capability of myocardial perfusion imaging provides incremental information over the the perfusion data, and has shown potentials for myocardial viability assessment and sequential follow-up after therapy. Evaluation of the left ventricular (L V) function is important in clinical cardiology. Quantifying the degree and extent of the L V functional abnormalities permits a systematic assessment of the disease process on the myocardial performance. The aim of this thesis is to evaluate left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) in patients with no evidence of ischemic response during the stress test. This investigation was carried out in view of the few reports concerning the findings ventricular function with gated SPECT in these situations in the normal population, which is relevant when considering the possibility of myocardial stunning. Method: We prospectively studied 30 selected patients, in difference age and gender. A one-day protocol was used, with injection 555 MBq - 1.11 MBq (15 - 30 mCi) of 99 mTc-M1 B1 at stress and rest. Gated perfusion SPECT was acquired 30 to 60 minutes after radiotracer injection in both condition and processed using QGSPECT software. Difference between stress and rest LVEF was calculated. Result and conclusion: rest LVEF was higher in the stress (exercise) group, A trend line was done in both groups and r-value was (0.9) and p=0.04 in acceptance value. Standard deviation of LVEF also was

  3. Combination of physical exercise and adenosine improves accuracy of automatic calculation of stress LVEF in gated SPECT using QGS software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tehranipour, N.; AL-Nahhas, A.; Towey, D.

    2005-01-01

    Combining exercise and adenosine during the stress phase of myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) is known to reduce adverse effects and improve image quality. The aim of this study was to assess whether it can also improve the automatic calculation of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) by QGS software package, during the stress phase of Gated SPECT. One hundred patients who had stress Gated SPECT were retrospectively included in this study. Gated data of those who had adenosine only (50 patients = group A) was compared with those obtained in another group of 50 patients who had added bicycle exercise (Group B). All had identical image acquisition protocol using 99mT c-tetrofosmine. Clinical adverse effects, changes in blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), and ECG were monitored. Visual assessment of subdiaphragmatic uptake and accuracy of automatic regions of interest (ROI's) drawn by the software were noted. Regions of interest that involved sub-diaphragmatic uptake and resulting in low LVEF were manually adjusted to include the left ventricle only, and the frequency of manual adjustment was noted. No significant difference was noted in age, sex, baseline BP and HR between groups A and B. Adverse effects occurred less often in group B compared to group A (12% vs. 24%, p = 0.118). Maximum HR and BP achieved during stress were significantly higher in group B compared to group A (p 0.025, p = 0.001 respectively). The number of patients who had faulty ROI's and low LVEF, who needed manual adjustment of ROI.s, were higher in group A compared to group B (16% vs. 6%, p = 0.025). The values of LVEF showed significant improvement following manual adjustment of ROI's, increasing from a mean of 19.63 ± 15.96 to 62.13 ± 7.55 (p = 0.0001) and from 17.33 ± 9.5 to 49.67 ± 7.7 (p = 0.0014) in groups A and B respectively. The addition of exercise to adenosine significantly improves the automatic calculation of LVEF by QGS software during Gated SPECT and reduces the need

  4. Improved accuracy in estimation of left ventricular function parameters from QGS software with Tc-99m tetrofosmin gated-SPECT. A multivariate analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okizaki, Atsutaka; Shuke, Noriyuki; Sato, Junichi; Ishikawa, Yukio; Yamamoto, Wakako; Kikuchi, Kenjiro; Aburano, Tamio

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to verify whether the accuracy of left ventricular parameters related to left ventricular function from gated-SPECT improved or not, using multivariate analysis. Ninety-six patients with cardiovascular diseases were studied. Gated-SPECT with the quantitative gated SPECT (QGS) software and left ventriculography (LVG) were performed to obtain left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), end-diastolic volume (EDV) and end-systolic volume (ESV). Then, multivariate analyses were performed to determine empirical formulas for predicting these parameters. The calculated values of left ventricular parameters were compared with those obtained directly from the QGS software and LVG. Multivariate analyses were able to improve accuracy in estimation of LVEF, EDV and ESV. Statistically significant improvement was seen in LVEF (from r=0.6965 to r=0.8093, p<0.05). Although not statistically significant, improvements in correlation coefficients were seen in EDV (from r=0.7199 to r=0.7595, p=0.2750) and ESV (from r=0.5694 to r=0.5871, p=0.4281). The empirical equations with multivariate analysis improved the accuracy in estimating LVEF from gated-SPECT with the QGS software. (author)

  5. A newly developed maneuver, field change conversion (FCC), improved evaluation of the left ventricular volume more accurately on quantitative gated SPECT (QGS) analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajima, Osamu; Shibasaki, Masaki; Hoshi, Toshiko; Imai, Kamon

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a newly developed maneuver that reduces the reconstruction area by a half more accurately evaluates left ventricular (LV) volume on quantitative gated SPECT (QGS) analysis. The subjects were 38 patients who underwent left ventricular angiography (LVG) followed by G-SPECT within 2 weeks. Acquisition was performed with a general purpose collimator and a 64 x 64 matrix. On QGS analysis, the field magnification was 34 cm in original image (Original: ORI), and furthermore it was changed from 34 cm to 17 cm to enlarge the re-constructed image (Field Change Conversion: FCC). End-diastolic volume (EDV) and end-systolic volume (ESV) of the left ventricle were also obtained using LVG. EDV was 71±19 ml, 83±20 ml and 98±23 ml for ORI, FCC and LVG, respectively (p<0.001: ORI versus LVG, p<0.001: ORI versus FCC, p<0.001: FCC versus LVG). ESV was 28±12 ml, 34±13 ml and 41±14 ml for ORI, FCC and LVG, respectively (p<0.001: ORI versus LVG, p<0.001: ORI versus FCC, p<0.001: FCC versus LVG). FCC was better than ORI for calculating LV volume in clinical cases. Furthermore, FCC is a useful method for accurately measuring the LV volume on QGS analysis. (author)

  6. Assessment of left ventricular function by 201Tl FCG-gated myocardial SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toba, Masahiro; Ishida, Yoshio; Fukuchi, Kazuki; Fukushima, Kazuhito; Katafuchi, Tetsurou; Hayashida, Kohei; Oka, Hisashi; Takamiya, Makoto

    1999-01-01

    We applied the QGS program for LV function analysis (described by Germano, 1995) to a 201 Tl SPECT study at rest, and estimated its accuracy. We performed 201 Tl ECG-gated myocardial SPECT in 25 patients with ischemic heart disease under an acquisition time used in the routine 99m Tc ECG-gated SPECT study. The quality of the gated images was visually assessed with a 4-point grading system. LVEDV, LVESV, LVEF determined by the QGS program were compared with those by Simpson's method on biplane LVG in 25 patients. Regional wall motion scores in 7 myocardial segments were assessed on the three-dimensional display created by the QGS program and the cine display of biplane LVG with a 5-point grading system. Wall motion scores obtained by the QGS program were compared with those by LVG. Although 72.0% of 201 Tl ECG-gated SPECT images were fair or poor in image quality, there were good correlations between the values obtained by the QGS program and LVG (LVEDV: r=0.82, LVESV: r=0.88, LVEF: r=0.89). In addition, wall motion scores by the QGS program were correspondent to those by LVG in 77.1% of all 175 myocardial segments. We conclude that the QGS program provides high accuracy in evaluating left ventricular function even from 201 Tl ECG-gated myocardial SPECT data. (author)

  7. Reference Range of Functional Data of Gated Myocardial Perfusion SPECT by Quantitative Gated SPECT of Cedars-Sinai and 4D-MSPECT of Michigan University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Do Young; Kim, Moo Hyun; Kim, Young Dae [College of Medicine, Univ. of Donga, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    Various programs have been developed for gating of myocardial perfusion SPECT. Among the those program, the most popular program is the Quantitative Gated SPECT (QGS)? developed by Cedars-Sinai hospital and most recently released program is 4D-MSPECT? developed by university of Michigan. It is important to know the reference range of the functional data of gated myocardial perfusion SPECT because it is necessary to determine abnormality of individual patient and echocardiographic data is different from those of gated SPECT. Tc-99m MIBI gated myocardial perfusion SPECT image was reconstructed by dual head gamma camera (Siemens, BCAM, esoft) as routine procedure and analyzed using QGS? and 4D-MSPECT? program. All patients (M: F=9: 18, Age 69{+-}9 yrs) showed normal myocardial perfusion. The patients with following characteristics were excluded: previous angina or MI history, ECG change with Q wave or ST-T change, diabetes melitius, hypercholesterolemia, typical chest pain, hypertension and cardiomyopathy. Pre-test likelihood of all patients was low. (1) In stress gated SPECT by QGS?, EDV was 73{+-}25 ml, ESV 25{+-}14 ml, EF 67{+-}11 % and area of first frame of gating 106.4{+-}21cm{sup 2}. In rest gated SPECT, EDV was 76{+-}26 ml, ESV 27{+-}15 ml, EF 66{+-}12 and area of first frame of gating 108{+-}20cm{sup 2}. (2) In stress gated SPECT by 4D-MSPECT?, EDV was 76{+-}28 ml, ESV 23{+-}16 ml, EF 72{+-}11 %, mass 115{+-}24 g and ungated volume 42{+-}15 ml. In rest gated SPECT, EDV was 75{+-}27 ml, ESV 23{+-}12 ml, EF 71{+-}9%, mass 113{+-}25g and ungate dvolume 42{+-}15 ml, (3) s-EDV, s-EF, r-ESV and r-EF were significantly different between QGS? and 4D-MSPECT? (each p=0.016, p<0.001. p=0.003 and p=0.001). We determined the normal reference range of functional parameters by QGS? and 4D-MSPECT? program to diagnose individually the abnormality of patients. And the reference ranges have to adopted to be patients by each specific gating program.

  8. Evaluation of global and regional left ventricular function obtained by quantitative gated SPECT using {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin for left ventricular dysfunction

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    Ban, Kazunobu; Nakajima, Tohru; Iseki, Harukazu; Abe, Sumihisa; Handa, Shunnosuke; Suzuki, Yutaka [Tokai Univ., Isehara, Kanagawa (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-08-01

    The quantitative gated SPECT (QGS) software is able to calculate LV volumes and visualize LV wall motion and perfusion throughout the cardiac cycle using an automatic edge detection algorithm of the left ventricle. We evaluated the reliability of global and regional LV function assessment derived from QGS by comparing it with the results from left ventriculo-cineangiography (LVG). In 20 patients with left ventricular dysfunction who underwent ECG gated {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin SPECT, the end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV) and ejection fraction (LVEF) were calculated. The QGS-assessed regional wall motion was determined using the cinematic display. QGS-derived EDV, ESV and LVEF correlated well with those by LVG (p<0.001 for each). There was a good correlation between wall motion score (WMS) derived from the QGS and the LVG (r=0.40, p<0.05). In some patients with extensive myocardial infarction, there was a discrepancy in the regional wall motion results between QGS and LVG. The ECG-gated SPECT using QGS is useful to evaluate global and regional LV functions in left ventricular dysfunction. (author)

  9. Assessment of left ventricular function by thallium-201 quantitative gated cardiac SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Akira; Hano, Takuzo; Ohmori, Hisashi; Ibata, Masayo; Kawabe, Tetsuya; Kubo, Takashi; Kimura, Keizo; Nishio, Ichiro

    2002-01-01

    Present study was designed to evaluate the accuracy of the measurement of left ventricular volume by quantitative gated SPECT (QGS) software using 201 Tl and the effect of cutoff frequency of Butterworth prereconstruction filter on the calculation of volume. The RH-2 type cardiac phantom and 20 patients with ischemic heart disease were studied. Left ventricular end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV) and ejection fraction (EF) were calculated by the QGS software using the various frequency of Butterworth filter. These parameters were evaluated by Simpson's method using left ventriculography (LVG). The volume of the phantom calculated by QGS was under-estimated by 14%. In the clinical study, EDV and ESV measured by QGS were smaller than those obtained from LVG by 10%. When the cutoff frequency of Butterworth filter was 0.43 cycles/cm, the values measured by QGS were best correlated with those by LVG (EDV: r=0.80, p 201 Tl quantitative gated cardiac SPECT can estimate myocardial ischemia and left ventricular function simultaneously. (author)

  10. Assessment of left ventricular function by thallium-201 quantitative gated cardiac SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, Akira; Hano, Takuzo; Ohmori, Hisashi; Ibata, Masayo; Kawabe, Tetsuya; Kubo, Takashi; Kimura, Keizo; Nishio, Ichiro [Wakayama Medical Coll. (Japan)

    2002-02-01

    Present study was designed to evaluate the accuracy of the measurement of left ventricular volume by quantitative gated SPECT (QGS) software using {sup 201}Tl and the effect of cutoff frequency of Butterworth prereconstruction filter on the calculation of volume. The RH-2 type cardiac phantom and 20 patients with ischemic heart disease were studied. Left ventricular end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV) and ejection fraction (EF) were calculated by the QGS software using the various frequency of Butterworth filter. These parameters were evaluated by Simpson's method using left ventriculography (LVG). The volume of the phantom calculated by QGS was under-estimated by 14%. In the clinical study, EDV and ESV measured by QGS were smaller than those obtained from LVG by 10%. When the cutoff frequency of Butterworth filter was 0.43 cycles/cm, the values measured by QGS were best correlated with those by LVG (EDV: r=0.80, p<0.001; ESV: r=0.86, p<0.001; EF: r=0.80, p<0.001). These data suggest that {sup 201}Tl quantitative gated cardiac SPECT can estimate myocardial ischemia and left ventricular function simultaneously. (author)

  11. Effects of perfusion detect on the measurement of left ventricular mass, ventricular volume and post-stress left ventricular ejection fraction in gated myocardial perfusion SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Byeong Cheol; Bae, Sun Keun; Lee, Sang Woo; Jeong, Sin Young; Lee, Jae Tae; Lee, Kyu Bo

    2002-01-01

    The presence of perfusion defect may influence the left ventricular mass (LVM) measurement by quantitative gated myocardial perfusion SPECT (QGS), and ischemic myocardium, usually showing perfusion defect may produce post-stress LV dysfunction. This study was aimed to evaluated the effects of extent and reversibility of perfusion defect on the automatic measurement of LVM by QGS and to investigate the effect of reversibility of perfusion defect on post-stress LV dysfunction. Forty-six patients (male/female=34:12, mean age=64 years) with perfusion defect on myocardial perfusion SPECT underwent rest and post-stress QGS. Forty patients (87%) showed reversible defect. End-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV), LV ejection fraction (EF), and LV myocardial volume were obtained from QGS by autoquant program, and LVM was calculated by multiplying the LV myocardial volume by the specific gravity of myocardium. LVMs measured at rest and post-stress QGS showed good correlation, and higher correlation was founded in the subjects with fixed perfusion defect and with small defect (smaller than 20%). There were no significant differences in EDVs, ESVs and EFs between obtained by rest and post-stress QGS in patients with fixed myocardial defect. Whereas, EF obtained by post-stress QGS was lower than that by rest QGS in patients with reversible defect and 10 (25%) of them showed decreases in EF more than 5% in post-stress QGS, as compared to that of rest QGS. Excellent correlations of EDVs, ESVs, EFs between rest and post-stress QGS were noted. Patients with fixed defect had higher correlation between defect can affect LVM measurement by QGS and patients with reversible defect shows post-stress LV dysfunction more frequently than patients with fixed perfusion defect

  12. Assessment of left ventricular performance by ECG-gated SPECT. Comparison with magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tadamura, Eiji; Inubushi, Masayuki; Kubo, Shigeto; Matsumoto, Keiichi; Yokoyama, Hiroshi; Fujita, Toru; Konishi, Junji [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1999-10-01

    In the measurement of a left ventricular volume, MIBI-QGS was compared with MRI. Because it became clear by the experiment using phantom that a volume calculated with QGS was smaller than the actual volume, data of clinical study were corrected. Subjects were 20 patients with coronary artery disease. Fourteen patients had anamnesis of myocardial infarct. ECG-gated SPECT was performed one hour after intravenous injection of MIBI (600 MBq) in rest. End diastolic volume (EDV), end systolic volume (ESV) and ejection fraction (EF) were calculated using QGS. Cine-MR image was obtained by using MR system of 1.5 Tesla within 1 week after SPECT. A condition was as follows; segmented k-space gradient echo with view sharing, TR=11 ms, TE=1.4 ms, flip angle 20 degree, field of view 32 cm, matrix 256 x 196, 8 lines per segment. LVEF, ESV and EF were analysed by Bland-Altman method, and the difference between MIBI-gated-SPECT and MRI was no problem. Horizontal dislocation image and vertical major axis dislocation image were provided. Minor axis crossing images of 10-12 slice were also filmed in order to cover all left ventricles. As a result, availability of MIBI-QGS became clear. Some factors which produces the measurement error are examined. (K.H.)

  13. Comparison of automatic quantification software for the measurement of ventricular volume and ejection fraction in gated myocardial perfusion SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Staden, J.A.; Herbst, C.P.; Du Raan, H.; Lotter, M.G.; Otto, A.C.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: Gated myocardial perfusion SPECT has been used to calculate left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and left ventricular end-diastolic volume (LVEDV) and has correlated well with conventional methods. However, the comparative accuracy of and correlations across various types of gated SPECT software are not well understood. Materials and methods: Twelve patients participated in a radionuclide gated blood-pool (GBP) study in addition to undergoing 99m Tc-sestamibi gated SPECT. Three different software algorithms, Quantitative Gated SPECT (QGS) from Cedars-Sinai, MultiDim from Stanford University Medical School and GQUANT from Alfa Nuclear were used to compute LVEF and LVEDV. These software algorithms operate in 3-dimensional space, two dependent on surface detection and the other on statistical parameters. The LVEF as calculated from gated SPECT myocardial perfusion images were compared with LVEF calculated from the GBP studies in the same patients to assess accuracy of the three software algorithms. Results: The software success-rate was 92% (11/12 pts) for MultiDim and 100% for the QGS and GQUANT. Agreement between LVEF measured with MultiDim and QGS, MultiDim and GQUANT and QGS and GQUANT were excellent (LVEF-MuItidim 0.80 LVEF QGS +5.02, r = 0.93, LVEF GQUANT = 1.10 LVEF MuItidim -1.33, r 0.90 and LVEF GQUANT = 1.02 LVEF QGS -1.40, r = 0.96). The correlation coefficient for LVEF between gated SPECT and the GBP study was 0.95, 0.95 and 0.97, for MultiDim, GQUANT and QGS, respectively. Conclusion: All 3 software programs showed good correlation between LVEF for gated SPECT and the GBP study. Good agreement for LVEF was observed also between the three software algorithms. However, because each method has unique characteristics that depend on its specific algorithm and thus behaves differently in the various patients, the methods should not be used interchangeably. (author)

  14. Comparison of Gated SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging with Echocardiography for the Measurement of Left Ventricular Volumes and Ejection Fraction in Patients With Severe Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojaeifard, Maryam; Ghaedian, Tahereh; Yaghoobi, Nahid; Malek, Hadi; Firoozabadi, Hasan; Bitarafan-Rajabi, Ahmad; Haghjoo, Majid; Amin, Ahmad; Azizian, Nasrin; Rastgou, Feridoon

    2015-01-01

    Background: Gated single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) is known as a feasible tool for the measurement of left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) and volumes, which are of great importance in the management and follow-up of patients with coronary artery diseases. However, considering the technical shortcomings of SPECT in the presence of perfusion defect, the accuracy of this method in heart failure patients is still controversial. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to compare the results from gated SPECT MPI with those from echocardiography in heart failure patients to compare echocardiographically-derived left ventricular dimension and function data to those from gated SPECT MPI in heart failure patients. Patients and Methods: Forty-one patients with severely reduced left ventricular systolic function (EF ≤ 35%) who were referred for gated SPECT MPI were prospectively enrolled. Quantification of EF, end-diastolic volume (EDV), and end-systolic volume (ESV) was performed by using quantitative gated spect (QGS) (QGS, version 0.4, May 2009) and emory cardiac toolbox (ECTb) (ECTb, revision 1.0, copyright 2007) software packages. EF, EDV, and ESV were also measured with two-dimensional echocardiography within 3 days after MPI. Results: A good correlation was found between echocardiographically-derived EF, EDV, and ESV and the values derived using QGS (r = 0.67, r = 0.78, and r = 0.80 for EF, EDV, and ESV, respectively; P echocardiography. ECTb-derived EDV was also significantly higher than the EDV measured with echocardiography and QGS. The highest correlation between echocardiography and gated SPECT MPI was found for mean values of ESV different. Conclusions: Gated SPECT MPI has a good correlation with echocardiography for the measurement of left ventricular EF, EDV, and ESV in patients with severe heart failure. However, the absolute values of these functional parameters from echocardiography and gated

  15. A new automated method for analysis of gated-SPECT images based on a three-dimensional heart shaped model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomsky, Milan; Richter, Jens; Johansson, Lena

    2005-01-01

    A new automated method for quantification of left ventricular function from gated-single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images has been developed. The method for quantification of cardiac function (CAFU) is based on a heart shaped model and the active shape algorithm. The model....... The maximal differences between the CAFU estimations and the true left ventricular volumes of the digital phantoms were 11 ml for the end-diastolic volume (EDV), 3 ml for the end-systolic volume (ESV) and 3% for the ejection fraction (EF). The largest differences were seen in the smallest heart....... In the patient group the EDV calculated using QGS and CAFU showed good agreement for large hearts and higher CAFU values compared with QGS for the smaller hearts. In the larger hearts, ESV was much larger for QGS than for CAFU both in the phantom and patient studies. In the smallest hearts there was good...

  16. Assessment of sistemic ventricle function in corrected transposition of great arteries with Gated SPECT: comparison with radionuclide ventriculography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexanderson, E.; Espinola, N.; Duenas, D.; Fermon, S.; Acevedo, C.; Martinez, C.

    2002-01-01

    Corrected trasposition of great arteries is a uncommon congenital heart disease where the right ventricle works as the sistemic one. QGS Gated SPECT program was designed to recognize the contours of left ventricle being a good method to evaluate left ventricle ejection fraction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the right ventricle ejection fraction (RVEF) by gated SPECT using Tc-99mSestaMIBI in comparison with radionuclide ventriculography (RVG) in patients with corrected trasposition of great arteries. Methods: We performed gated SPECT and radionuclide ventriculography within 15 days of each other in 7 adults consecutive patients with the diagnosis of corrected trasposition of great arteries (5 men, 2 women; mean age 47 y). Gated tomographic data, including ventricular volumes and ejection fraction, were processed using QGS automatic algorithm, whereas equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography used standard techniques. Results: We found a good correlation between right ventricle ejection fraction obtained with Gated SPECT compared with equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography. The mean of the RVEF with Gated SPECT was 41.2% compared with 44.2% of RVEF with equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography. Both methods recognized abnormal RVEF in 5 patients ( 50%) with Gated SPECT and abnormal with RVG meanwhile another patient had normal RVEF with RVG and abnormal with Gated SPECT. Conclusion: Quantitative gated tomography, using Tc 99mSestaMIBI, has a good correlation with radionuclide ventriculography for the assessment of right ventricle ejection fraction in patients with corrected trasposition of great arteries. These results support the clinical use of this technique among these patients

  17. Assessment of global and regional LV function obtained by quantitative gated SPECT using {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin. Comparison with left ventricular cineangiography and echocardiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ban, Kazunobu; Nakajima, Toru; Aoki, Naoto; Abe, Sumihisa; Handa, Shunnosuke; Suzuki, Yutaka [Tokai Univ., Isehara, Kanagawa (Japan). School of Medicine

    1998-11-01

    The quantitative gated SPECT (QGS) software that has automatic edge detection algorithm of the left ventricle, is able to calculate LV volumes and visualize LV wall motion with perfusion throughout the cardiac cycle. We evaluated the reliability of global and regional LV function derived from QGS using {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin by comparing with left ventricular cineangiography (LVG) and echocardiography (ECHO). In 22 cardiac patients, end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV) and ejection fraction (LVEF) were calculated. Using cinematic display, regional LV wall motion were scored on a 3-point scale (1=normal, 2=hypokinesis, 3=akinesis; WMS). EDV, ESV and LVEF correlated well with those by LVG (p<0.001 for each). Correlation between WMS derived from QGS and ECHO was high (r=0.85, p<0.001). There was an inverse correlation between WMS and LVEF (r=0.77, p<0.001). In conclusion, QGS is useful to evaluate global LV function. Regional wall motion evaluated by QGS is good enough for clinical application. (author)

  18. Prognostic significance of stress myocardial gated SPECT among Japanese patients referred for coronary angiography: A study of data from the J-ACCESS database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Momose, Mitsuru [Tokyo Women' s Medical University, Department of Radiology, Tokyo (Japan); Nakajima, Kenichi [Kanazawa University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kanazawa (Japan); Nishimura, Tsunehiko [Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyoto (Japan)

    2009-08-15

    The J-ACCESS [Japanese investigation of prognosis based on gated single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)] study found that quantitative gated myocardial SPECT (QGS) is valuable for predicting the prognosis of Japanese patients with known or suspected ischaemic heart disease. The present study evaluates the incremental prognostic value of myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) with QGS among patients referred for coronary angiography (CAG). Among 4,031 Japanese patients registered at 117 hospitals for the J-ACCESS study, we selected 1,011 who underwent CAG within 3 months before or after MPI with QGS. Summed stress, rest and difference scores (SSS, SRS and SDS) were generated from myocardial perfusion images using a 20-segment scoring system. Myocardial ischaemia was judged visually. End-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV) and ejection fraction (EF) were determined by QGS. Numbers of diseased (> 75% stenosis) coronary vessels (CDV) were assessed by CAG. All patients were followed up for 3 years to determine cardiac events (CE) including cardiac death, non-fatal myocardial infarction and severe heart failure. Univariate and multivariate analyses of prognostic ability included age, cardiac risk factors (hypertension, hyperlipidaemia, diabetes mellitus and prior myocardial infarction), angiographic findings and the QGS parameters as independent variables. Cardiac events occurred more frequently with increasing numbers of coronary vessel lesions (p=0.0016). Cox univariate analysis revealed that diabetes, CDV, SSS, SDS, EDV, ESV and EF were significant predictors (Wald {chi}{sup 2}=5.99, 12.9, 8.39, 9.11, 35.5, 42.1 and 31.1, respectively), whereas multivariate analysis selected only ESV and SDS as significant predictors (Wald {chi}{sup 2}=36.4, 8.4; p = 0.0038, p < 0.001). MPI with QGS, especially with gated functional data, has incremental prognostic value in addition to angiographic findings. MPI with QGS findings predominantly contribute to the

  19. Left ventricular synchrony assessed by phase analysis of gated myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging in healthy subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yuetao; Wang Jianfeng; Yang Minfu; Niu Rong

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the value of Cedars-Sinai quantitative gated SPECT (QGS) phase analysis for left ventricular synchrony assessment in healthy subjects. Methods: Seventy-four healthy subjects (41 males, 33 females,average age: (60±13) years) underwent both rest and exercise 99 Tc m -MIBI G-MPI. QGS software was used to analyze the reconstructed rest gated SPECT images automatically, and then the parameters of left ventricular synchrony including phase bandwidth (BW) and phase standard deviation (SD) were obtained. The influences of gender and age (age<60 years, n=36; age ≥ 60 years, n=38) on left ventricular systolic synchronicity were analyzed. The phase angle for original segmental contraction was measured to determine the onset of the ventricular contraction using 17-segment model. Forty healthy subjects were selected by simple random sampling method to evaluate the intra-observer and interobserver repeatability of QGS phase analysis software. Two-sample t test and linear correlation analysis were used to analyze the data. Results: The BW and SD of left ventricular in healthy subjects were (37.22 ±11.71)°, (11.84±5.39)° respectively. Comparisons between male and female for BW and SD yielded no statistical significance (BW: (36.00±9.70)°, (38.73±13.84)°; SD: (11.88±5.56)°, (11.79±5.26)°; t=0.96 and-0.07, both P>0.05); whereas the older subjects (age≥60 years) had larger BW than the others (age<60 years ; (39.95± 12.65)°, (34.33± 10.00)°; t=-2.11, P<0.05) and no statistical significance was shown for SD between the two age groups ((11.18±4.31)°, (12.54±6.33)°; t=1.08, P>0.05). Of the 74 subjects, the mechanical activation started from the ventricular base to apex in 54 subjects (73%), and from apex to base in only 20 subjects (27%). High repeatability of phase analysis was observed for both intra-observer and inter-observer (r=0.867-0.906, all P<0.001). Conclusions: Good left ventricular segmental synchrony is shown in healthy

  20. Is 16-frame really superior to 8-frame gated SPECT for the assessment of left ventricular volumes and ejection fraction? Comparison of two simultaneously acquired gated SPECT studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montelatici, Giulia; Sciagra, Roberto; Passeri, Alessandro; Dona, Manjola; Pupi, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    Conflicting data exist about the difference between 8- and 16-frame gated single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) left ventricular volumes and ejection fraction (EF); moreover, the influence of framing on detection of stress-induced functional changes is unknown. In 133 patients, two separate gated SPECT studies, one with 8 and one with 16 frames, were simultaneously acquired during a single gantry orbit using dedicated software. In 33 of 133 patients, two additional studies (with 8 and 16 frames, respectively) were acquired using arrhythmia rejection. Left ventricular EF and volumes were calculated using the QGS software. Stress-induced ischemia was identified on summed perfusion images. Arrhythmia-rejection did not influence volumes and EF independently of framing rate. Using data without arrhythmia-rejection, there was a significant difference in volumes and EF between 8 and 16 frames both in resting and post-stress gated SPECT. However, the difference was small: 2.6% for resting and 2.8% for post-stress EF. Both using 8 and 16 frames, there were significantly larger volumes and lower EF in patients with than without stress-induced ischemia. A stress-induced decrease >5 EF units was observed in 26 of 133 patients using 8 and in 23 of 133 using 16 frames, respectively, with finding agreement in 19 patients. Comparing two simultaneously acquired studies, the use of 16 instead of 8 frames has minor and predictable influence on functional data. Furthermore, there are no differences in the detection of stress-induced functional changes. The advantage of 16 over 8 frames in the daily clinical practice appears questionable. (orig.)

  1. Global and regional left ventricular function: a comparison between gated SPECT, 2D echocardiography and multi-slice computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henneman, Maureen M.; Bax, Jeroen J.; Holman, Eduard R.; Schuijf, Joanne D.; Jukema, J.W.; Wall, Ernst E. van der; Stokkel, Marcel P.M.; Lamb, Hildo J.; Roos, Albert de

    2006-01-01

    Global and regional left ventricular (LV) function are important indicators of the cardiac status in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Therapy and prognosis are to a large extent dependent on LV function. Multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) has already earned its place as an imaging modality for non-invasive assessment of the coronary arteries, but since retrospective gating to the patient's ECG is performed, information on LV function can be derived. In 49 patients with known or suspected CAD, coronary angiography with MSCT imaging was performed, in addition to gated SPECT and 2D echocardiography. LV end-diastolic and LV end-systolic volumes and LV ejection fraction were analysed with dedicated software (CMR Analytical Software System, Medis, Leiden, The Netherlands for MSCT; gated SPECT by QGS, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA), and by the biplane Simpson's rule for 2D echocardiography. Regional wall motion was evaluated according to a 17-segment model and a three-point score system. Correlations were fairly good between gated SPECT and MSCT (LVEDV: r=0.65; LVESV: r=0.63; LVEF: r=0.60), and excellent between 2D echocardiography and MSCT (LVEDV: r=0.92; LVESV: r=0.93; LVEF: r=0.80). Agreement for regional wall motion was 95% (κ=0.66) between gated SPECT and MSCT, and 96% (κ=0.73) between 2D echocardiography and MSCT. Global and regional LV function and LV volumes can be adequately assessed with MSCT. Correlations with 2D echocardiography are stronger than with gated SPECT. (orig.)

  2. Rapid gated Thallium-201 perfusion SPECT - clinically feasible?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadhwa, S.S.; Mansberg, R.; Fernandes, V.B.; Wilkinson, D.; Abatti, D.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Standard dose energy window optimised Thallium-201 (Tl-201) SPECT has about half the counts of a standard dose from Technetium-99m Sestamibi (Tc99m-Mibi) gated perfusion SPECT. This study investigates the clinical feasibility of rapid energy window optimised Tl-201 gated perfusion SPECT (gated-TI) and compares quantitative left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and visually assessed image quality for wall motion and thickening to analogous values obtained from Tc99m-Mibi gated perfusion SPECT (gated - mibi). Methods: We studied 60 patients with a rest gated Tl-201 SPECT (100 MBq, 77KeV peak, 34% window, 20 sec/projection) followed by a post stress gated Sestamibi SPECT (1GBq, 140KeV, 20% window, 20 sec/projection) separate dual isotope protocol. LVEF quantitation was performed using commercially available software (SPECTEF, General Electric). Visual grading of image quality for wall thickening and motion was performed using a three-point scale (excellent, good and poor). Results: LVEF for gated Tl-201 SPECT was 59.6 ± 12.0% (Mean ± SD). LVEF for gated Sestamibi SPECT was 60.4 ±11.4% (Mean ± SD). These were not significantly different (P=0.27, T-Test). There was good correlation (r=0.9) between gated-TI and gated-mibi LVEF values. The quality of gated-Tl images was ranked as excellent, good and poor in 12, 50 and 38% of the patients respectively. Image quality was better in gated-mibi SPECT, with ratings of 12, 62 and 26% respectively. Conclusion: Rapid gated Thallium-201 acquisition with energy window optimisation can be effectively performed on majority of patients and offers the opportunity to assess not only myocardial perfusion and function, as with Technetium based agents, but also viability using a single day one isotope protocol

  3. Pulse wave as an alternate signal for data synchronization during gated myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Otto; Trojanova, Helena; Balon, Helena R; Kunikova, Ivana; Bilwachs, Milos; Penicka, Martin; Kaminek, Milan; Myslivecek, Miroslav

    2011-09-01

    Proper identification of the cardiac cycle is essential for gated SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging. We have developed an alternate method of ECG for gating, that is, using the peripheral pulse wave (PW) as the triggering signal for gated SPECT acquisition. The aim of this study is to compare the use of this method of gating with the standard ECG trigger. We tested the PW triggering by comparing it with the ECG trigger. We evaluated 33 patients (25 males, 8 females), average age of 61 years (39-80) referred for stress myocardial perfusion imaging. Data from all patients were acquired twice and were processed by CEqual and QGS software. We compared the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes (EDV, ESV). Paired t test and Pearson correlation coefficient were used for comparison. The mean LVEF, EDV, and ESV calculated with the ECG trigger were 0.52, 120, and 64, respectively, those with the pulse-wave trigger were 0.48, 126, and 71, respectively. Mean paired difference for LVEF was -0.034 (P<0.001), for EDV 5.9 (P=0.012), and for ESV 7.9 (P<0.001). Pearson correlation coefficient for LVEF was 0.955, for EDV 0.987, and for ESV 0.991 (P<0.001 for all correlations). Triggering of gated-data acquisition by the PW is feasible. Quantitative parameters of cardiac function correlate highly with those obtained from the ECG trigger and the absolute differences are not clinically significant across a wide range of values.

  4. Agreement of left ventricular ejection fraction and volumes between adenosine stress TL-201 gated SPECT and echocardiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pai, M. S. [College of Medicine, Univ. of Ewha, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Moon, D. H.; Kim, H. M.; Yang, Y. J.; Kang, D. H. [Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    Electrocardiogram-gated TI-201 SPECT measurements of left ventricular ejection fraction (EF), end-diastolic volume (EDV), and end-systolic volume (ESV) have shown high correlation with conventional methods. However, how much these parameters measured by TI-201 gated SPECT differ from those by echocardiography has not been assessed. Adenosine stress (Ad-G) and redistribution TI-201 gated SPECT (Re-G) and resting echocardiography were conducted in 337 patients (184 male, 153 female). EDV, ESV and LVEF measured by QGS software were compared with the results by echocardiography. Patients with arrhythmia (atrial fibrillation or frequent premature contractions) or evidence of fixed or reversible perfusion defects on TI-201 SPECT were excluded. EF, EDV and ESV measured by Ad-G (63.3{+-}9.8,73.8{+-}30.2,29.1{+-}20.1) and Re-G (65.2{+-}11.6,69.1{+-}30.1,26.5{+-}20.3) correlated well with those by Echo (61.4{+-}7.9,78.3{+-}2.7, 30.7{+-} 17.5 ; r of Ad-G=0.547, 0.850, 0.827, p<0.001 ; r of Re-G=0.585, 0.838, 0.819, p<0.001). However the difference (mean, SD, SEE of Echo - gated SPECT) was statistically significant (EF: Ad-G=1.71, 8.92, 0.48, Re-G=3.59, 10.39, 0.56, p<0.001 ; EDV: Ad-G=4.75, 16.21, 0.88, Re-G=9.53, 16.77, 0.91, p<0.001 ; ESV: Ad-G=1.75, 11.35, 0.61, p<0.05, Re-G=4.29, 11.7, 0.63, p<0.001). Bland-Altman plots showed that the difference of EDV and ESV did not vary in any systematic way over the range of measurement, whereas the difference of EF increased with increasing average EF by Echo and gated-SPECT. The difference of EF, EDV, and ESV between Ad-G and Echo was significantly smaller than those between Re-G and Echo (p<0.001). Gated TI-201 SPECT underestimates EDV and ESV over a wide range of volume. As a result, EF by gated TI-201 SPECT is overestimated especially in patients with small LV volume. Ad-G is preferable to Re-G in assessing left ventricular ejection fraction and volume in place of Echo because of smaller bias.

  5. Validation of Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction with the IQ•SPECT System in Small-Heart Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneyama, Hiroto; Shibutani, Takayuki; Konishi, Takahiro; Mizutani, Asuka; Hashimoto, Ryosuke; Onoguchi, Masahisa; Okuda, Koichi; Matsuo, Shinro; Nakajima, Kenichi; Kinuya, Seigo

    2017-09-01

    The IQ•SPECT system, which is equipped with multifocal collimators ( SMART ZOOM) and uses ordered-subset conjugate gradient minimization as the reconstruction algorithm, reduces the acquisition time of myocardial perfusion imaging compared with conventional SPECT systems equipped with low-energy high-resolution collimators. We compared the IQ•SPECT system with a conventional SPECT system for estimating left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) in patients with a small heart (end-systolic volume IQ•SPECT. End-systolic volume, end-diastolic volume, and LVEF were calculated using quantitative gated SPECT (QGS) and cardioREPO software. We compared the LVEF from gated myocardial perfusion SPECT to that from echocardiographic measurements. Results: End-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume, and LVEF as obtained from conventional SPECT, IQ•SPECT, and echocardiography showed a good to excellent correlation regardless of whether they were calculated using QGS or using cardioREPO. Although LVEF calculated using QGS significantly differed between conventional SPECT and IQ•SPECT (65.4% ± 13.8% vs. 68.4% ± 15.2%) ( P = 0.0002), LVEF calculated using cardioREPO did not (69.5% ± 10.6% vs. 69.5% ± 11.0%). Likewise, although LVEF calculated using QGS significantly differed between conventional SPECT and IQ•SPECT (75.0 ± 9.6 vs. 79.5 ± 8.3) ( P = 0.0005), LVEF calculated using cardioREPO did not (72.3% ± 9.0% vs. 74.3% ± 8.3%). Conclusion: In small-heart patients, the difference in LVEF between IQ•SPECT and conventional SPECT was less when calculated using cardioREPO than when calculated using QGS. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  6. Quantitative gated SPECT: the effect of reconstruction filter on calculated left ventricular ejection fractions and volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, Graham A.; McDade, Mark; Martin, William; Hutton, William

    2002-01-01

    Gated SPECT (GSPECT) offers the possibility of obtaining additional functional information from perfusion studies, including calculation of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). The calculation of LVEF relies upon the identification of the endocardial surface, which will be affected by the spatial resolution and statistical noise in the reconstructed images. The aim of this study was to compare LVEFs and ventricular volumes calculated from GSPECT using six reconstruction filters. GSPECT and radionuclide ventriculography (RNVG) were performed on 40 patients; filtered back projection was used to reconstruct the datasets with each filter. LVEFs and volumes were calculated using the Cedars-Sinai QGS package. The correlation coefficient between RNVG and GSPECT ranged from 0.81 to 0.86 with higher correlations for smoother filters. The narrowest prediction interval was 11±2%. There was a trend towards higher LVEF values with smoother filters, the ramp filter yielding LVEFs 2.55±3.10% (p<0.001) lower than the Hann filter. There was an overall fall in ventricular volumes with smoother filters with a mean difference of 13.98±10.15 ml (p<0.001) in EDV between the Butterworth-0.5 and Butterworth-0.3 filters. In conclusion, smoother reconstruction filters lead to lower volumes and higher ejection fractions with the QGS algorithm, with the Butterworth-0.4 filter giving the highest correlation with LVEFs from RNVG. Even if the optimal filter is chosen the uncertainty in the measured ejection fractions is still too great to be clinically acceptable. (author)

  7. Limited diagnostic accuracy of gated myocardial perfusion SPECT for wall motion analysis in patients with asymmetric septal hypertrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, J.H.; Ahn, B.C.; Bae, J.H.; Jeong, S.Y.; Lee, J.; Lee, K.B.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Although gated SPECT(G-SPECT) using Tc-99m MIBI is well-known diagnostic modality in the evaluation of myocardial perfusion and wall motion analysis, there were limited reports for subjects with asymmetric septal hypertrophy (ASH). This study was performed to evaluate the clinical usefulness of G-SPECT for assessments of myocardial perfusion and wall motion analysis in patients with ASH on 2D-echocardiography(Echo). Methods: Thirty patients (male 18, 59 12 years) with ASH on Echo (septal wall thickness 13 mm and 1.3 times as thick as that of posterior wall) underwent Tc-99m MIBI G-SPECT. Two studies were performed within one month. No patient had experienced any significant cardiac event, nor had changed medical and surgical therapy during the studies. Functional parameters of the left ventricle were acquired with QGS software(AutoQUANTTM). Three experts performed visual interpretation for the presence of septal thickening and perfusion abnormalities on G-SPECT and two experienced cardiologists measured dimension, thickness and wall motion of the left ventricle on Echo. Results: Mean septum thickness measured by Echo was 1.90 0.50 cm, and the septum/posterior wall thickness ratio was 1.85 0.51. On visual SPECT analysis, 14 patients (46.7%) were interpreted as with thickened septum and 17 patients (57%) as with abnormal perfusion. All 3 patients who underwent coronary angiography showed significant luminal stenosis and also had perfusion abnormalities on SPECT. On Echo, only one patient showed septal hypokinesia, who showed anteroseptal infarction on SPECT, and the others showed normal septal wall motion. But 13 patients (54%) among 24 patients showed septal hypokinesia on G-SPECT. Patients with thickened septum on SPECT had thicker septum (2.3 vs 1.6 cm) and higher septum/posterior wall thickness ratio (2.2 vs 1.6) on Echo, compared with patients without septal thickening on SPECT. Conclusions: Although G-SPECT could proffer diagnostic accuracy for

  8. The consequences of a new software package for the quantification of gated-SPECT myocardial perfusion studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veen, Berlinda J. van der; Dibbets-Schneider, Petra; Stokkel, Marcel P.M.; Scholte, Arthur J.

    2010-01-01

    Semiquantitative analysis of myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) has reduced inter- and intraobserver variability, and enables researchers to compare parameters in the same patient over time, or between groups of patients. There are several software packages available that are designed to process MPS data and quantify parameters. In this study the performances of two systems, quantitative gated SPECT (QGS) and 4D-MSPECT, in the processing of clinical patient data and phantom data were compared. The clinical MPS data of 148 consecutive patients were analysed using QGS and 4D-MSPECT to determine the end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume and left ventricular ejection fraction. Patients were divided into groups based on gender, body mass index, heart size, stressor type and defect type. The AGATE dynamic heart phantom was used to provide reference values for the left ventricular ejection fraction. Although the correlations were excellent (correlation coefficients 0.886 to 0.980) for all parameters, significant differences (p < 0.001) were found between the systems. Bland-Altman plots indicated that 4D-MSPECT provided overall higher values of all parameters than QGS. These differences between the systems were not significant in patients with a small heart (end-diastolic volume <70 ml). Other clinical factors had no direct influence on the relationship. Additionally, the phantom data indicated good linear responses of both systems. The discrepancies between these software packages were clinically relevant, and influenced by heart size. The possibility of such discrepancies should be taken into account when a new quantitative software system is introduced, or when multiple software systems are used in the same institution. (orig.)

  9. Gated SPECT evaluation of left ventricular function using a CZT camera and a fast low-dose clinical protocol: comparison to cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giorgetti, Assuero; Masci, Pier Giorgio; Marras, Gavino; Gimelli, Alessia; Genovesi, Dario; Lombardi, Massimo [Fondazione CNR/Regione Toscana ' ' G. Monasterio' ' , Pisa (Italy); Rustamova, Yasmine K. [Azerbaijan Medical University, Department of internal medicine Central Customs Hospital, Baku (Azerbaijan); Marzullo, Paolo [Istituto di Fisiologia Clinica del CNR, Pisa (Italy)

    2013-12-15

    CZT technology allows ultrafast low-dose myocardial scintigraphy but its accuracy in assessing left ventricular function is still to be defined. The study group comprised 55 patients (23 women, mean age 63 {+-} 9 years) referred for myocardial perfusion scintigraphy. The patients were studied at rest using a CZT camera (Discovery NM530c; GE Healthcare) and a low-dose {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin clinical protocol (mean dose 264 {+-} 38 MBq). Gated SPECT imaging was performed as a 6-min list-mode acquisition, 15 min after radiotracer injection. Images were reformatted (8-frame to 16-frame) using Lister software on a Xeleris workstation (GE Healthcare) and then reconstructed with a dedicated iterative algorithm. Analysis was performed using Quantitative Gated SPECT (QGS) software. Within 2 weeks patients underwent cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI, 1.5-T unit CVi; GE Healthcare) using a 30-frame acquisition protocol and dedicated software for analysis (MASS 6.1; Medis). The ventricular volumes obtained with 8-frame QGS showed excellent correlations with the cMRI volumes (end-diastolic volume (EDV), r = 0.90; end-systolic volume (ESV), r = 0.94; p < 0.001). However, QGS significantly underestimated the ventricular volumes (mean differences: EDV, -39.5 {+-} 29 mL; ESV, -15.4 {+-} 22 mL; p < 0.001). Similarly, the ventricular volumes obtained with 16-frame QGS showed an excellent correlations with the cMRI volumes (EDV, r = 0.92; ESV, r = 0.95; p < 0.001) but with significant underestimations (mean differences: EDV, -33.2 {+-} 26 mL; ESV, -17.9 {+-} 20 mL; p < 0.001). Despite significantly lower values (47.9 {+-} 16 % vs. 51.2 {+-} 15 %, p < 0.008), 8-frame QGS mean ejection fraction (EF) was closely correlated with the cMRI values (r = 0.84, p < 0.001). The mean EF with 16-frame QGS showed the best correlation with the cMRI values (r = 0.91, p < 0.001) and was similar to the mean cMRI value (49.6 {+-} 16 %, p not significant). Regional analysis showed a good

  10. Methods of gated-blood-pool-spect data processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosa, I.; Mester, J.; Tanaka, M.; Csernay, L.; Mate, E.; Szasz, K.

    1991-01-01

    Three techniques of gated SPECT were evaluated. The methods of Integral SPECT (ISPECT), enddyastole-endsystole SPECT (ED-ES SPECT) and Fourier SPECT were adapted and developed on the Hungarian nuclear medicine data processing system microSEGAMS. The methods are based on data reduction before back projection which results in processing times acceptable for the clinical routine. The clinical performance of the introduced techniques was tested in 10 patients with old posterior myocardial infarction and in 5 patients without cardiac disease. The left ventricular ejection faction determined by ISPECT correlated well with the planar values. The correlation coefficient was 0.89. The correlation coefficient of EF values determined by ED-ES SPECT and planar radionuclide ventriculography was lower (0.70). For the identification of left ventricular wall motion abnormalities ED-ES SPECT and Fourier SPECT exhibited a favourable performance, but ISPECT only moderate suitability. In the detection of regional phase delay Fourier-SPECT demonstrated higher sensitivity than the planar radionuclide ventriculography. (author) 4 refs.; 3 figs.; 2 tabs

  11. Value of gated SPECT in the analysis of regional wall motion of the interventricular septum after coronary artery bypass grafting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giubbini, Raffaele; Rossini, Pierluigi; Bertagna, Francesco; Bosio, Giovanni; Paghera, Barbara; Pizzocaro, Claudio; Canclini, Silvana; Terzi, Arturo; Germano, Guido

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was the evaluation of septal wall motion, perfusion and wall thickening after CABG in two groups of consecutive patients, one with grafted left anterior coronary artery and no history of myocardial infarction, and the other with previous anteroseptal myocardial infarction and impaired septal motion before surgery. The issue addressed was the ability of gated SPECT to differentiate between true paradoxical septal motion, characterised by paradoxical wall motion, depressed ejection fraction (EF), poor viability and compromised wall thickening, and pseudo-paradoxical motion, characterised by abnormal wall motion and regional EF but preserved perfusion and wall thickening. One hundred and thirty-two patients with previous anterior myocardial infarction, 82 patients with left anterior descending coronary disease and no history of myocardial infarction and 27 normal subjects underwent rest gated SPECT after 99m Tc-sestamibi injection, according to the standard QGS protocol. Quantitative regional EF, regional perfusion, regional wall motion and regional wall thickening were determined using a 20-segment model. Despite the presence of similar regional wall motion impairment in patients with and patients without septal infarction, in terms of regional EF (2.5%±3% vs 1.9%±4.9% p=NS) and inward septal motion (3±4.9 mm vs 2.3±6.1 mm p=NS), significant differences were observed in both perfusion (74.7%±6.2% vs 63.3%±13%, p>0.0001) and regional wall thickening (17.2%±7.4% vs 12.6%±7.2%, p>0.0001). Gated SPECT with perfusion tracers can reliably differentiate pseudo-paradoxical from true paradoxical septal motion in patients with previous CABG, and it may be the method of choice for evaluating left ventricular performance in this patient population. (orig.)

  12. Value of gated SPECT in the analysis of regional wall motion of the interventricular septum after coronary artery bypass grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giubbini, Raffaele; Rossini, Pierluigi; Bertagna, Francesco; Bosio, Giovanni; Paghera, Barbara; Pizzocaro, Claudio; Canclini, Silvana; Terzi, Arturo; Germano, Guido

    2004-10-01

    The aim of this study was the evaluation of septal wall motion, perfusion and wall thickening after CABG in two groups of consecutive patients, one with grafted left anterior coronary artery and no history of myocardial infarction, and the other with previous anteroseptal myocardial infarction and impaired septal motion before surgery. The issue addressed was the ability of gated SPECT to differentiate between true paradoxical septal motion, characterised by paradoxical wall motion, depressed ejection fraction (EF), poor viability and compromised wall thickening, and pseudo-paradoxical motion, characterised by abnormal wall motion and regional EF but preserved perfusion and wall thickening. One hundred and thirty-two patients with previous anterior myocardial infarction, 82 patients with left anterior descending coronary disease and no history of myocardial infarction and 27 normal subjects underwent rest gated SPECT after 99mTc-sestamibi injection, according to the standard QGS protocol. Quantitative regional EF, regional perfusion, regional wall motion and regional wall thickening were determined using a 20-segment model. Despite the presence of similar regional wall motion impairment in patients with and patients without septal infarction, in terms of regional EF (2.5%+/-3% vs 1.9%+/-4.9% p=NS) and inward septal motion (3+/-4.9 mm vs 2.3+/-6.1 mm p=NS), significant differences were observed in both perfusion (74.7%+/-6.2% vs 63.3%+/-13%, p>0.0001) and regional wall thickening (17.2%+/-7.4% vs 12.6%+/-7.2%, p>0.0001). Gated SPECT with perfusion tracers can reliably differentiate pseudo-paradoxical from true paradoxical septal motion in patients with previous CABG, and it may be the method of choice for evaluating left ventricular performance in this patient population.

  13. Value of gated SPECT in the analysis of regional wall motion of the interventricular septum after coronary artery bypass grafting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giubbini, Raffaele; Rossini, Pierluigi; Bertagna, Francesco; Bosio, Giovanni; Paghera, Barbara; Pizzocaro, Claudio; Canclini, Silvana; Terzi, Arturo [Spedali Civili di Brescia, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Brescia (Italy); Germano, Guido [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Artificial Intelligence Program, Department of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2004-10-01

    The aim of this study was the evaluation of septal wall motion, perfusion and wall thickening after CABG in two groups of consecutive patients, one with grafted left anterior coronary artery and no history of myocardial infarction, and the other with previous anteroseptal myocardial infarction and impaired septal motion before surgery. The issue addressed was the ability of gated SPECT to differentiate between true paradoxical septal motion, characterised by paradoxical wall motion, depressed ejection fraction (EF), poor viability and compromised wall thickening, and pseudo-paradoxical motion, characterised by abnormal wall motion and regional EF but preserved perfusion and wall thickening. One hundred and thirty-two patients with previous anterior myocardial infarction, 82 patients with left anterior descending coronary disease and no history of myocardial infarction and 27 normal subjects underwent rest gated SPECT after {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi injection, according to the standard QGS protocol. Quantitative regional EF, regional perfusion, regional wall motion and regional wall thickening were determined using a 20-segment model. Despite the presence of similar regional wall motion impairment in patients with and patients without septal infarction, in terms of regional EF (2.5%{+-}3% vs 1.9%{+-}4.9% p=NS) and inward septal motion (3{+-}4.9 mm vs 2.3{+-}6.1 mm p=NS), significant differences were observed in both perfusion (74.7%{+-}6.2% vs 63.3%{+-}13%, p>0.0001) and regional wall thickening (17.2%{+-}7.4% vs 12.6%{+-}7.2%, p>0.0001). Gated SPECT with perfusion tracers can reliably differentiate pseudo-paradoxical from true paradoxical septal motion in patients with previous CABG, and it may be the method of choice for evaluating left ventricular performance in this patient population. (orig.)

  14. Factors affecting accuracy of ventricular volume and ejection fraction measured by gated Tl-201 myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pai, Moon Sun; Yang, You Jung; Im, Ki Chun; Hong, Il Ki; Yun, Sung Cheol; Kang, Duk Hyun; Song, Jae Kwan; Moon, Dae Hyuk

    2005-01-01

    Systemic errors in the gated single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) measurement of left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV) and ejection fraction (EF) may occur. We evaluated whether patient-related factors affected the accuracy of EDV, ESV, and EF measured by electrocardiogram-gated Tl-201 SPECT. A total of 518 patients without perfusion defects on Tl-201 SPECT or coronary artery disease were studied. EDV, ESV, and EF were measured from echocardiography and adenosine stress/redistribution gated Tl-201 SPECT using commercially available software packages (QGS and 4D-MSPECT). We identified factors affecting the accuracy of gated SPECT via multiple linear regression analysis of the differences between echocardiography and gated SPECT. Gated SPECT analyzed with QGS underestimated EDV and ESV, and overestimated EF, but 4D-MSPECT overestimated all those values (p<0.001). Independent variables that increased the difference in EDV between echocardiography and gated SPECT were decreasing LV end-diastolic wall thickness, decreasing body surface area, female sex and increasing EDV (p< 0.001). Those for ESV were decreasing LV end-systolic wall thickness, female sex, and decreasing ESV (p<0.001). Increasing end-systolic wall thickness, male sex and decreasing age were independent determinants associated with an increased difference in EF (p< 0.001). Adenosine stress SPECT showed significantly higher EDV and ESV values and a lower EF than did redistribution SPECT (p< 0.001). In determination of EF, QGS demonstrated a smaller bias than did 4D-MSPECT. However, in men with LV hypertrophy, 4D-MSPECT was superior to QGS. Systemic error by gated Tl-201 SPECT is determined by individual patient-characteristics

  15. Variability of left ventricular ejection fraction and volumes with quantitative gated SPECT: influence of algorithm, pixel size and reconstruction parameters in small and normal-sized hearts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hambye, Anne-Sophie; Vervaet, Ann; Dobbeleir, Andre

    2004-01-01

    Several software packages are commercially available for quantification of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and volumes from myocardial gated single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), all of which display a high reproducibility. However, their accuracy has been questioned in patients with a small heart. This study aimed to evaluate the performances of different software and the influence of modifications in acquisition or reconstruction parameters on LVEF and volume measurements, depending on the heart size. In 31 patients referred for gated SPECT, 64 2 and 128 2 matrix acquisitions were consecutively obtained. After reconstruction by filtered back-projection (Butterworth, 0.4, 0.5 or 0.6 cycles/cm cut-off, order 6), LVEF and volumes were computed with different software [three versions of Quantitative Gated SPECT (QGS), the Emory Cardiac Toolbox (ECT) and the Stanford University (SU-Segami) Medical School algorithm] and processing workstations. Depending upon their end-systolic volume (ESV), patients were classified into two groups: group I (ESV>30 ml, n=14) and group II (ESV 2 to 128 2 were associated with significantly larger volumes as well as lower LVEF values. Increasing the filter cut-off frequency had the same effect. With SU-Segami, a larger matrix was associated with larger end-diastolic volumes and smaller ESVs, resulting in a highly significant increase in LVEF. Increasing the filter sharpness, on the other hand, had no influence on LVEF though the measured volumes were significantly larger. (orig.)

  16. Gated myocardial SPECT using spatial and temporal filtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatton, R.L.; Hutton, B.F.; Kyme, A.Z.; Larcos, G.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Standard protocols for examining myocardial perfusion and motion defects involve the use of gated SPECT images, and a composite of the gated frames. This study examines the usefulness of extracting one or a combination of frames from the gated image to assess perfusion, and whether the addition of a temporal filter to the gated image improves signal to noise. Choice of the most appropriate frame was also considered. Sixteen and eight frame gated SPECT studies were simulated using the dynamic NURBS-based cardiac torso (NCAT) phantom. Variously sized perfusion defects were included in the inferior wall to assess contrast to normal tissue. Scatter and attenuation were not included. Butterworth spatial cutoff frequencies were varied to establish the most appropriate combination of temporal/spatial filters to reduce noise and retain contrast in the images. The 16 frame data produced higher ejection fraction across all spatial filter cutoffs, and generally was unaffected by temporal filtering. Temporal filtering reduced the noise in a uniform liver region in the gated images to within 25% of the composite image noise. The lesion extent and contrast were greater in the end-diastolic frames compared to end-systolic and mid-cycle frames. In conclusion, by using a temporally filtered end-diastolic image from the gated sequence, a favourable balance between noise and contrast can be achieved. Work is progress to confirm these findings in the clinical situation. Copyright (2002) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  17. Assessment of automatic quantification of myocardial perfusion and left ventricular function derived from ECG gated myocardial SPECT with {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin in ischemic heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Mitsunori; Habara, Hirokazu; Tatsuno, Hironari; Fukuda, Hiroshi; Hamada, Noriko; Kazatani, Yukio [Ehime Prefectural Central Hospital (Japan)

    1999-09-01

    Non-invasive assessment of ischemic heart disease (IHD) requires information of both myocardial perfusion and left ventricular (LV) function. Recently, automatic quantification of ECG-gated myocardial scintigraphy with {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin (QGS) can provide both of them. QGS, coronary angiograms (CAG) and left venticulograms (LVG) were performed in 83 patients with severe IHD in same period. Significant stenosis of coronary artery in CAG were assessed by QGS. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of significant stenosis by QGS was excellent (85%, 93% and 88%). The LV end-distolic and end-systolic volumes (EDV and ESV), LV ejection fraction (EF) and regional LV wall motion determined by QGS were compared to LVG. There was a good correlation between the values obtained from QGS and LVG (EDV: r=0.86, ESV: r=0.94, EF: r=0.84, p<0.0001), but QGS tended to underestimate EDV and EF. High complete agreement of regional LV wall motion was gained with 427 (74.0%) out of total 581 segments. In conclusion, QGS data was considered to be useful for assessment of determine significant stenosis and LV function in severe IHD. (author)

  18. Evaluation of exercise-induced myocardial stunning by means of immediate post-exercise Tc-99m sestamibi gated SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouvrier, M.J.; Hitzel, A.; Vera, P.; Manrique, A.; Bernard, M.; Manrique, A.

    2009-01-01

    Aim: Repeated episodes of myocardial stunning may lead to chronic ventricular dysfunction. We attempted to assess the parameters related to post-exercise stunning in patients undergoing gated SPECT. Methods: Six hundred patients undergoing a one-day stress/rest 99m Tc-sestamibi gated SPECT were studied. Stress imaging was acquired within 15 minutes after injection. Summed perfusion scores (S.S.S., S.R.S. and S.D.S.) were calculated using Q.P.S., and L.V. function assessed using Q.G.S.. Stunning was defined as the association of ischemia (S.S.S. = 4 and SDS > 0) and a minimum of 5% decrease in post-stress E.F.. Results: Ischemia was found in 225 (37.5%) patients. Among these, 67 (30%) showed myocardial stunning. Patients with stunning had a lower rest E.S.V. (47 ± 24 ml vs 65 ± 52 ml, p < 0.0003) and E.D.V. (108± 35 ml vs 122 ± 66 ml, p 0.03), an increased rest L.V.E.F. (58 ± 10% vs 52 ± 13%, p < 0.0001) and a decreased post-stress L.V.E.F. (49 ± 10% vs 53 ± 13%, p < 0.02) compared to patients with no stunning. The number of myocardial segments showing reversible perfusion defects was increased in patients with stunning (2.7 ± 2.6 vs 1.7 ± 2.1, p < 0.02). On logistic regression, an extent of ischemia greater than two segments and a rest E.F. greater than 45% were independent predictors of the occurrence of myocardial stunning in patients with ischemia. Conclusions: In patients with ischemia, exercise-induced stunning was associated with an increased extent of ischemia but also preserved rest ventricular function. (authors)

  19. 'Motion frozen' quantification and display of myocardial perfusion gated SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slomka, P.J.; Hurwitz, G.A.; Baddredine, M.; Baranowski, J.; Aladl, U.E.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: Gated SPECT imaging incorporates both functional and perfusion information of the left ventricle (LV). However perfusion data is confounded by the effect of ventricular motion. Most existing quantification paradigms simply add all gated frames and then proceed to extract the perfusion information from static images, discarding the effects of cardiac motion. In an attempt to improve the reliability and accuracy of cardiac SPECT quantification we propose to eliminate the LV motion prior to the perfusion quantification via automated image warping algorithm. Methods: A pilot series of 14 male and 11 female gated stress SPECT images acquired with 8 time bins have been co-registered to the coordinates of the 3D normal templates. Subsequently the LV endo and epi-cardial 3D points (300-500) were identified on end-systolic (ES) and end-diastolic (ED) frames, defining the ES-ED motion vectors. The nonlinear image warping algorithm (thin-plate-spline) was then applied to warp end-systolic frame was onto the end-diastolic frames using the corresponding ES-ED motion vectors. The remaining 6 intermediate frames were also transformed to the ED coordinates using fractions of the motion vectors. Such warped images were then summed to provide the LV perfusion image in the ED phase but with counts from the full cycle. Results: The identification of the ED/ES corresponding points was successful in all cases. The corrected displacement between ED and ES images was up to 25 mm. The summed images had the appearance of the ED frames but have been much less noisy since all the counts have been used. The spatial resolution of such images appeared higher than that of summed gated images, especially in the female scans. These 'motion frozen' images could be displayed and quantified as regular non-gated tomograms including polar map paradigm. Conclusions: This image processing technique may improve the effective image resolution of summed gated myocardial perfusion images used for

  20. Pharmacologic stress-induced stunning: evaluation with quantitative gated SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, K. A.; Cho, I. H.; Won, K. J.; Lee, H. W.

    2000-01-01

    The after-effect of pharmacologic stress (adenosine) on left ventricular (LV) function, end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV) and ejection fraction (LVEF) were evaluated after pharmacologic stress with Tl-201 and 99m Tc-MIBI SPECT using an automated program in 153 subjects. The subjects were grouped as follows: 1) Tl-201 group (n=35, male 18, female 17, mean age: 58 years); normal scan (n=24), ischemia (n=8) and infarction (n=3). 2) 99m Tc-MIBI group (n=118, male 60, female 58, mean age: 62 years); normal scan (n=73), ischemia (n=20) and infarction (n=25) based on the interpretation of perfusion images. All patients were in sinus rhythm during the study. 1)Tl-201 group; In patients with ischemia (the mean time interval between injection and acquisition is 12.3 min), post-stress LVEF was significantly depressed after adenosine infusion (51.2 ± 6.3% vs 59.8± 8.2%, p 99m Tc-MIBI group; In patients with ischemia (the mean time interval between injection and acquisition is 80 min), post-stress LVEF was significantly depressed after adenosine infusion (p<0.001) and ΔLVEF was 5.1%. Eight patients (40%) showed an increase in LVEF greater than 5% from poststress to rest. Poststress ESV (37.1±17.3 ml) was significantly higher than ESV (31.3±15.5 ml, p<0.001) at rest, but no significant difference in EDV. These results showed that pharmacologic stress induced stunning is well noted in the early quantitative gated SPECT in ischemic patients and also observed in the delayed gated SPECT, even though the rate of stunning is less than the early SPECT

  1. The additive prognostic value of perfusion and functional data assessed by quantitative gated SPECT in women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y.G.C.J. America (Yves); J.J. Bax (Jeroen); H. Boersma (Eric); M. Stokkel (Marcel); E.E. van der Wall (Ernst)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The aim of this study was to assess the prognostic value of technetium-99m tetrofosmin gated SPECT imaging in women using quantitative gated single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging. Methods: We followed 453 consecutive female patients. Average follow-up was

  2. Assessment of left ventricular function by electrocardiogram-gated myocardial single photon emission computed tomography using quantitative gated single photon emission computed tomography software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Koichi; Adachi, Itaru; Konno, Masanori

    1999-01-01

    Electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated myocardial single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) can assess left ventricular (LV) perfusion and function easily using quantitative gated SPECT (QGS) software. ECG-gated SPECT was performed in 44 patients with coronary artery disease under post-stress and resting conditions to assess the values of LV functional parameters, by comparison to LV ejection fraction derived from gated blood pool scan and myocardial characteristics. A good correlation was obtained between ejection fraction using QGS and that using cardiac blood pool scan (r=0.812). Some patients with myocardial ischemia had lower ejection fraction under post-stress compared to resting conditions, indicating post-stress LV dysfunction. LV wall motion and wall thickening were significantly impaired in ischemic and infarcted myocardium, and the degree of abnormality in the infarcted areas was greater than in the ischemia area. LV functional parameters derived using QGS were useful to assess post-stress LV dysfunction and myocardial viability. In conclusion, ECG-gated myocardial SPECT permits simultaneous quantitative assessment of myocardial perfusion and function. (author)

  3. Implementation of angular response function modeling in SPECT simulations with GATE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Descourt, P; Visvikis, D; Carlier, T; Bardies, M; Du, Y; Song, X; Frey, E C; Tsui, B M W; Buvat, I

    2010-01-01

    Among Monte Carlo simulation codes in medical imaging, the GATE simulation platform is widely used today given its flexibility and accuracy, despite long run times, which in SPECT simulations are mostly spent in tracking photons through the collimators. In this work, a tabulated model of the collimator/detector response was implemented within the GATE framework to significantly reduce the simulation times in SPECT. This implementation uses the angular response function (ARF) model. The performance of the implemented ARF approach has been compared to standard SPECT GATE simulations in terms of the ARF tables' accuracy, overall SPECT system performance and run times. Considering the simulation of the Siemens Symbia T SPECT system using high-energy collimators, differences of less than 1% were measured between the ARF-based and the standard GATE-based simulations, while considering the same noise level in the projections, acceleration factors of up to 180 were obtained when simulating a planar 364 keV source seen with the same SPECT system. The ARF-based and the standard GATE simulation results also agreed very well when considering a four-head SPECT simulation of a realistic Jaszczak phantom filled with iodine-131, with a resulting acceleration factor of 100. In conclusion, the implementation of an ARF-based model of collimator/detector response for SPECT simulations within GATE significantly reduces the simulation run times without compromising accuracy. (note)

  4. Implementation of angular response function modeling in SPECT simulations with GATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Descourt, P; Visvikis, D [INSERM, U650, LaTIM, IFR SclnBioS, Universite de Brest, CHU Brest, Brest, F-29200 (France); Carlier, T; Bardies, M [CRCNA INSERM U892, Nantes (France); Du, Y; Song, X; Frey, E C; Tsui, B M W [Department of Radiology, J Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Buvat, I, E-mail: dimitris@univ-brest.f [IMNC-UMR 8165 CNRS Universites Paris 7 et Paris 11, Orsay (France)

    2010-05-07

    Among Monte Carlo simulation codes in medical imaging, the GATE simulation platform is widely used today given its flexibility and accuracy, despite long run times, which in SPECT simulations are mostly spent in tracking photons through the collimators. In this work, a tabulated model of the collimator/detector response was implemented within the GATE framework to significantly reduce the simulation times in SPECT. This implementation uses the angular response function (ARF) model. The performance of the implemented ARF approach has been compared to standard SPECT GATE simulations in terms of the ARF tables' accuracy, overall SPECT system performance and run times. Considering the simulation of the Siemens Symbia T SPECT system using high-energy collimators, differences of less than 1% were measured between the ARF-based and the standard GATE-based simulations, while considering the same noise level in the projections, acceleration factors of up to 180 were obtained when simulating a planar 364 keV source seen with the same SPECT system. The ARF-based and the standard GATE simulation results also agreed very well when considering a four-head SPECT simulation of a realistic Jaszczak phantom filled with iodine-131, with a resulting acceleration factor of 100. In conclusion, the implementation of an ARF-based model of collimator/detector response for SPECT simulations within GATE significantly reduces the simulation run times without compromising accuracy. (note)

  5. Left ventricular ejection fraction determined by gated Tl-201 perfusion SPECT and quantitative software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyun, In Young; Kim, Sung Eun; Seo, Jeong Kee; Hong, Eui Soo; Kwan, Jun; Park, Keum Soo; Lee, Woo Hyung

    2000-01-01

    We compared estimates of ejection fraction (EF) determined by gated Tl-201 perfusion SPECT (g-Tl-SPECT) with those by gated blood pool (GBP) scan. Eighteen subjects underwent g-Tl-SPECT and GBP scan. After reconstruction of g-Tl-SPECT, we measured EF with Cedars software. The comparison of the EF with g-Tl-SPECT and GBP scan was assessed by correlation analysis and Bland Altman plot. The estimates of EF were significantly different (p<0.05) with g-Tl-SPECT (40%±14%) and GBP scan (43%±14%). There was an excellent correlation of EF between g-Tl-SPECT and GBP scan (r=3D0.94, p<0.001). The mean difference of EF between GBP scan and g-Tl-SPECT was +3.2%. Ninety-five percent limits of agreement were ±9.8%. EF between g-Tl-SPECT and GBP scan were in poor agreement. The estimates of EF by g-Tl-SPECT was well correlated with those by GBP scan. However, EF of g-Tl-SPECT doesn't agree with EF of GBP scan. EF of g-Tl-SPECT can't be used interchangeably with EF of GBP scan.=20

  6. Gated 99mTc-MIBI single-photon emission computed tomography for the evaluation of left ventricular ejection fraction. Comparison with three-dimensional echocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipiec, P.; Wejner-Mik, P.; Krzeminska-Pakula, M.; Kapusta, A.; Kasprzak, J.D.; Kusmierek, J.; Plachcinska, A.; Szuminski, R.

    2008-01-01

    Parameters of left ventricular systolic function directly influence the management of patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). Quantitative gated single-photon emission computed tomography (QGS; Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA) allows the computation of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) from myocardial perfusion imaging studies which are frequently performed on patients with suspected CAD. Three-dimensional (3D) echocardiography is considered to be the echocardiographic ''gold standard'' for the quantification of LVEF. We sought to compare QGS with 3D echocardiography in the evaluation of EF in patients with suspected CAD. Ninety-one consecutive patients with suspected CAD, scheduled for coronary angiography, underwent rest electrocardiographic-gated technetium-99m methoxyisobutylisonitrile SPECT (G-SPECT) with measurement of LVEF by QGS and transthoracic 3D echocardiography with off-line measurement of LVEF (Tomtec 4D LV Analysis 1.1). The diagnosis of CAD was based on coronary angiography, performed on every patient. Nine patients were excluded from the analysis owing to unsuitability for 3D echocardiography (8 patients) or G-SPECT (1 patient). In the remaining group of 82 patients, 71 (87%) had significant CAD, 34 (42%) had a history of myocardial infarction, and 50 (61%) had perfusion defects at rest G-SPECT images. The mean LVEF measured by QGS and 3D echocardiography was 53±13% and 53±10%, respectively. The mean difference in LVEF between 3D echocardiography and QGS was 0.1±6.0% (P=0.87), and the correlation between the values obtained by both methods was high (r=0.88, P< 0.001). The largest discrepancies were observed in patients with small ventricular volumes. In patients undergoing diagnostic work-up for CAD, the measurement of LVEF by QGS algorithm provides high correlation and satisfactory agreement with the results of reference ultrasound method- 3D echocardiography. (author)

  7. Impact of endothelial dysfunction on left ventricular remodeling after successful primary coronary angioplasty for acute myocardial infarction. Analysis by quantitative ECG-gated SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Shinro; Nakae, Ichiro; Matsumoto, Tetsuya; Horie, Minoru

    2006-01-01

    We hypothesized that endothelial cell integrity in the risk area would influence left ventricular remodeling after acute myocardial infarction. Twenty patients (61±8 y.o.) with acute myocardial infarction underwent 99m Tc-tetrofosmin imaging in the sub-acute phase and three months after successful primary angioplasty due to myocardial infarction. All patients were administered angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor after revascularization. Cardiac scintigraphies with quantitative gated SPECT were performed at the sub-acute stage and again 3 months after revascularization to evaluate left ventricular (LV) remodeling. The left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) and end-systolic and end-diastolic volume (ESV, EDV) were determined using a quantitative gated SPECT (QGS) program. Three months after myocardial infarction, all patients underwent cardiac catheterization examination with coronary endothelial function testing. Bradykinin (BK) (0.2, 0.6, 2.0 μg/min) was administered via the left coronary artery in a stepwise manner. Coronary blood flow was evaluated by Doppler flow velocity measurement. Patients were divided into two groups by BK-response: a preserved endothelial function group (n=10) and endothelial dysfunction group (n=10). At baseline, both global function and LV systolic and diastolic volumes were similar in both groups. However, LV ejection fraction was significantly improved in the preserved-endothelial function group, compared with that in the endothelial dysfunction group (42±10% to 48±9%, versus 41±4% to 42±13%, p<0.05). LV volumes progressively increased in the endothelial dysfunction group compared to the preserved-endothelial function group (123±45 ml to 128±43 ml, versus 111±47 ml to 109±49 ml, p<0.05). In re-perfused acute myocardial infarction, endothelial function within the risk area plays an important role with left ventricular remodeling after myocardial infarction. (author)

  8. Clinical evaluation of the Tl-201 ECG-gated myocardial SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mochizuki, Teruhito

    1989-01-01

    In order to evaluate the clinical usefulness of the Tl-201 ECG-gated myocardial single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), we compared the wall motion and the grade of the Tl-201 uptake of the ECG-gated myocardial SPECT with the wall motion of the ECG-gated blood pool SPECT. Materials were 87 patients of 50 old myocardial infarctions (OMIs), 19 hypertrophic cardiomyopathies (HCMs), 2 dilated cardiomyopathies (DCMs) and 16 others. After intravenous injection of 111-185 MBq (3-5 mCi) of Tl-201 at rest, the projection data were acquired using a rotating gamma-camera through 180deg, from RAO 45deg in 24 directions, each of which consisted of 80-100 beats. For the reconstruction of ED, ES and non-gated images, R-R interval was divided into about 20 (18-22) fractions. In 348 regions of interest (anterior, septal, lateral and inferior wall) in 87 cases, wall motion and the Tl-201 uptake were evaluated to three grades (normal, hypokinesis and akinesis; normal, low and defect, respectively), which were compared with the wall motion of the ECG-gated blood pool SPECT. The wall motion and the grade of the Tl-201 uptake of the ECG-gated myocardial SPECT correlated well with the wall motion of the ECG-gated blood pool SPECT (96.6% and 87.9%, respectively). In conclusion, the ECG-gated myocardial SPECT can provide clear perfusion images and is a very useful diagnostic strategy to evaluate the regional wall motion and perfusion simultaneously. (author)

  9. Evaluation of left ventricular function using electrocardiographically gated myocardial SPECT with (123)I-labeled fatty acid analog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanasato, M; Ando, A; Isobe, S; Nonokawa, M; Hirayama, H; Tsuboi, N; Ito, T; Hirai, M; Yokota, M; Saito, H

    2001-12-01

    Electrocardiographically (ECG) gated myocardial SPECT with (99m)Tc-tetrofosmin has been used widely to assess left ventricular (LV) function. However, the accuracy of variables using ECG gated myocardial SPECT with beta-methyl-p-(123)I-iodophenylpentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) has not been well defined. Thirty-six patients (29 men, 7 women; mean age, 61.6 +/- 15.6 y) with ischemic heart disease underwent ECG gated myocardial SPECT with (123)I-BMIPP and with (99m)Tc-tetrofosmin and left ventriculography (LVG) within 1 wk. LV ejection fraction (LVEF), LV end-diastolic volume (LVEDV), and LV end-systolic volume (LVESV) were determined on gated SPECT using commercially available software for automatic data analysis. These volume-related items on LVG were calculated with an area-length method and were estimated by 2 independent observers to evaluate interobserver validity. The regional wall motion with these methods was assessed visually. LVEF was 41.1% +/- 12.5% on gated SPECT with (123)I-BMIPP, 44.5% +/- 13.1% on gated SPECT with (99m)Tc-tetrofosmin, and 46.0% +/- 12.7% on LVG. Global LV function and regional wall motion between both gated SPECT procedures had excellent correlation (LVEF, r = 0.943; LVEDV, r = 0.934; LVESV, r = 0.952; regional wall motion, kappa = 0.92). However, the correlations of global LV function and regional wall motion between each gated SPECT and LVG were significantly lower. Gated SPECT with (123)I-BMIPP showed the same interobserver validity as gated SPECT with (99m)Tc-tetrofosmin. Gated SPECT with (123)I-BMIPP provides high accuracy with regard to LV function and is sufficiently applicable for use in clinical SPECT. This technique can simultaneously reveal myocardial fatty acid metabolism and LV function, which may be useful to evaluate various cardiac diseases.

  10. Assessment of poststress left ventricular ejection fraction by gated SPECT: comparison with equilibrium radionuclide angiocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acampa, Wanda; Liuzzi, Raffaele; De Luca, Serena; Capasso, Enza; Luongo, Luca; Cuocolo, Alberto; Caprio, Maria Grazia; Nicolai, Emanuele; Petretta, Mario

    2010-01-01

    We compared left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction obtained by gated SPECT with that obtained by equilibrium radionuclide angiocardiography in a large cohort of patients. Within 1 week, 514 subjects with suspected or known coronary artery disease underwent same-day stress-rest 99m Tc-sestamibi gated SPECT and radionuclide angiocardiography. For both studies, data were acquired 30 min after completion of exercise and after 3 h rest. In the overall study population, a good correlation between ejection fraction measured by gated SPECT and by radionuclide angiocardiography was observed at rest (r=0.82, p<0.0001) and after stress (r=0.83, p<0.0001). In Bland-Altman analysis, the mean differences in ejection fraction (radionuclide angiocardiography minus gated SPECT) were -0.6% at rest and 1.7% after stress. In subjects with normal perfusion (n=362), a good correlation between ejection fraction measured by gated SPECT and by radionuclide angiocardiography was observed at rest (r=0.72, p<0.0001) and after stress (r=0.70, p<0.0001) and the mean differences in ejection fraction were -0.9% at rest and 1.4% after stress. Also in patients with abnormal perfusion (n=152), a good correlation between the two techniques was observed both at rest (r=0.89, p<0.0001) and after stress (r=0.90, p<0.0001) and the mean differences in ejection fraction were 0.1% at rest and 2.5% after stress. In a large study population, a good agreement was observed in the evaluation of LV ejection fraction between gated SPECT and radionuclide angiocardiography. However, in patients with perfusion abnormalities, a slight underestimation in poststress LV ejection fraction was observed using gated SPECT as compared to equilibrium radionuclide angiocardiography. (orig.)

  11. Feasibility of one-eighth time gated myocardial perfusion SPECT functional imaging using IQ-SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caobelli, Federico; Thackeray, James T.; Bengel, Frank M. [Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Hannover (Germany); Soffientini, Alberto; Pizzocaro, Claudio; Guerra, Ugo Paolo [Fondazione Poliambulanza, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Brescia (Italy)

    2015-11-15

    IQ-SPECT, an add-on to general purpose cameras based on multifocal collimation, can reduce myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) acquisition times to one-fourth that of standard procedures (to 12 s/view). In a phantom study, a reduction of the acquisition time to one-eighth of the standard time (to 6 s/view) was demonstrated as feasible. It remains unclear whether such a reduction could be extended to clinical practice. Fifty patients with suspected or diagnosed CAD underwent a 2-day stress-rest {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi MPI protocol. Two consecutive SPECT acquisitions (6 and 12 s/view) were performed. Electrocardiogram-gated images were reconstructed with and without attenuation correction (AC). Polar maps were generated and visually scored by two blinded observers for image quality and perfusion in 17 segments. Global and regional summed stress score (SSS), summed rest score (SRS) and summed difference score (SDS) were determined. Left ventricular volumes and ejection fraction were calculated based on automated contour detection. Image quality was scored higher with the 12 s/view acquisition, both with and without AC. Summed scores were statistically comparable between the 6 s/view and the 12 s/view acquisition, both globally and in individual coronary territories (e.g. in images with AC, SSS were 6.6 ± 8.3 and 6.2 ± 8.2 with 6 s and 12 s/view, respectively, p = 0.10; SRS were 3.9 ± 5.6 and 3.5 ± 5.3, respectively, p = 0.19; and SDS were 2.8 ± 5.7 and 2.6 ± 5.7, respectively, p = 0.59). Both acquisitions allowed MPI-based diagnosis of CAD in 25 of the 50 patients (with AC). Calculated end-diastolic volume (EDV) and end-systolic volume (ESV) were modestly higher with the 6 s/view acquisition than with the 12 s/view acquisition (EDV +4.8 ml at rest and +3.7 ml after stress, p = 0.003; ESV +4.1 ml at rest and +2.6 ml after stress, p = 0.01), whereas the ejection fraction did not differ (-1.2 % at rest, p = 0.20, and -0.9 % after stress, p = 0.27). Image quality and

  12. Paradoxical motion of interventricular septum on Tc-99m MIBI gated SPECT study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ergun, E.L.; Erbas, B.; Beylergil, V.; Demirturk, O.S.; Pasaoglu, I.

    2004-01-01

    After uncomplicated cardiac surgery, abnormal motion of the interventricular septum is frequently observed. The interventricular septum has often been found to display dyskinetic, or paradoxical motion by echocardiographic studies. This study was undertaken to describe instances of paradoxical motion of interventricular septum on Tc-99m MIBI gated SPECT studies in patients after coronary artery by pass graft surgery. Tc-99m MIBI gated SPECT in conjunction with stress myocardial perfusion SPECT was performed in 18 patients who had history of cardiac bypass graft surgery. Paradoxical motion of the interventricular septum was defined visually from Tc-99m MIBI gated SPECT. Perfusion of the interventricular septum was examined from myocardial perfusion images in the same study. Paradoxical motion of the interventricular septum was observed in 4 patients (22%). The interventricular septum was normally perfused in all patients. It was concluded that paradoxical motion of the interventricular septum in patients who had a history of cardiac by-pass graft surgery is not an uncommon finding and it can be observed with gated SPECT. The exact mechanism of this phenomenon is not well-known. A normal perfusion in interventricular wall helps to discriminate this situation from a real abnormality. (author)

  13. The usefulness of treatment evaluation of severe heart failure by ECG-gated myocardial SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohkoshi, Nobuyuki; Watanabe, Shingo; Matsumoto, Tooru

    2011-01-01

    Our purpose of study was to investigate the usefulness of treatment evaluation of severe heart failure by Electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated myocardial single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). We evaluated the cardiac function in the case of severe heart failure by gated SPECT and compared it with the cardiac function obtained by left ventriculography (LVG), echocardiography, cardiac MRI, and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) values. We investigated the correlation of ejection fraction (EF), time lag of wall motion between the septal and lateral walls of the left ventricle for cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) and wall thickening (WT). We classified the left ventricular (LV) into basal, middle and apical areas for comparison of WT. We investigated the effect of a perfusion defect score in these comparisons. The gated SPECT results were correlated with comparative subjects in EF. The results were correlated with MRI on the middle area of the LV in the comparison of WT. We thought it was possible that there was an effect from a perfusion defect score in a time lag comparison of wall motion. Treatment evaluation of severe heart failure by gated SPECT is useful, because it is able to obtain three-dimensional cardiac function analysis, and it offers objectivity and reproducible quantitative evaluation. At the same time, perfusion SPECT is helpful for CRT and LV-plasty. (author)

  14. Comparison of left ventricular ejection fraction by 201Tl gated SPECT and gated blood pool scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, W.F.E.; Kelly, M.J.; O'Donnell, M.; Kalff, V.; Van Every, B.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: The aim of this study was to evaluate left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) determination by the Germano 201 Tl gated-SPECT myocardial perfusion (TLGSMP) method using gated blood pool scintigraphy (GBPS) as a reference. 21 patients underwent both TLGSMP and GBPS within eight days of each other from June 1997 to Jan 2000. Acquisition of TLGSMP was performed on a GE Optima NX dual head camera using Tl-201 dose of 1.5MBq/Kg and imaging time of 45 cardiac cycles/step with 16 steps/90 Deg of rotation per detector. All LVEF results were determined using a GE Genie workstation. GBPS results were compared with TLGSMP results for LVEF obtained from the reinjection images using automated Germano processing, and from the stress images using automatic and manual processing. Duplicate automatic analysis by a second observer produced identical mean TLGSMP LVEF results (r = 0.99). Stress TLGSMP LVEF by the automatic and manual processing correlate well (r = 0.99) but the manual LVEF is significantly lower. In conclusion LVEF determination using TLGSMP is highly reproducible and is also accurate when applied to reinjection data. Both manual processing and the use of stress data lead to underestimation of LVEF. Copyright (2000) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  15. Quantification of left ventricular function by gated myocardial perfusion SPECT using multidimTM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Jin; Song Wenzhong; Chen Mingxi

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the accuracy of left ventricular function by gated SPECT using the software Multidim TM . Methods: Rest gated SPECT was performed on 42 cases involved 26 normal subjects and 16 patients with myocardial infarct (MI). All cases underwent rest equilibrium radionuclide angiocardiography (ERNA) within 1 w. Results: (1)End diastolic volume (EDV), end systolic volume (ESV) and left ventricular ejection fraction(LVEF)were calculated using the software MultidimtMand ERNA. The correlation coefficient between the two Methods was 0.90,0.89,0.92 respectively(P TM , but the EDV and ESV value measured by this software maybe high with small heart. (authors)

  16. Gated spect myocardial perfusion scintigraphy for identifying septal perfusion artifacts in left bundle branch block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afzal, M.S.; Imran, M.B.; Akhtar, M.S.; Muhammand, K.; Nadeem, A.; Aslam, N.; Khurshid, S.J.; Farooq, U.I.; Sohaib, M.

    2006-01-01

    To determine the role of gated Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) for accurate assessment of myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) of patients with left bundle branch block (LBBB). MPS data of patients with LBBB was analyzed. Resting gated SPECT MPS was performed after an injection of 740 MBq 99mTc-MIBI in 10 normal and 25 subjects with LBBB (with low probability of coronary artery disease). Visual and quantitative analyses were done on non-gated (NG), end diastolic (ED), end systolic (ES) images. Calculations included septal to lateral wall ratio (SLR), myocardial thickening (MT=% increase in counts during systole) at end systolic phase and myocardial thickening at peak level (% peak MT). Septal hypoperfusion was noted in 19 (76%) patients on NG images and in only 1 (4%) patient on gated SPECT ED images. On NG images of LBBB group, SLR was lower than in controls (0.68 +- 0.07 vs. 0.87 +- 0.05, p<0.001). SLR of LBBB patients approached to that of control group in gated SPECT ED data (0.86 +- 0.06 vs 0.88 +- 0.06, p=ns). Myocardial thickening at ES for septum was markedly lower in LBBB group than in controls (21.83% +- 10.86 vs. 66.32% +- 20.15, p<0.001). (author)

  17. Prognostic value of gated 201Tl myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging in patients with coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zicheng; Chen Xiaoming; Xu Hao

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the prognostic value of gated 201 Tl myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging in patients with coronary artery disease and assessment of therapy strategy for the individual patient. Methods: Eighty-four patients underwent rest and exercise stress 201 Tl gated myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging and were followed up for (32.92 ± 16.77) months. Images were studied using 17 segments and 1 to 4 scoring. Global summed stress score (SSS), summed rest score (SRS) and summed difference score (SDS=SSS-SRS) were also calculated. Post-stress and rest ejection fraction (EF) were automatically measured. Results: Nine cardiac events occurred (3.90% per year). SSS, SDS, SRS and EF were the independent predictors of cardiac events (P 201 Tl myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging can provide prognostic assessment for the patients with coronary artery disease and guide in selection of therapeutic strategy. Among all of the indices SSS is the best predictors of cardiac events. (authors)

  18. End-expiration respiratory gating for a high-resolution stationary cardiac SPECT system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, Chung; Sinusas, Albert J; Liu, Chi; Harris, Mark; Le, Max; Biondi, James; Grobshtein, Yariv; Liu, Yi-Hwa

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory and cardiac motions can degrade myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) image quality and reduce defect detection and quantitative accuracy. In this study, we developed a dual respiratory and cardiac gating system for a high-resolution fully stationary cardiac SPECT scanner in order to improve the image quality and defect detection. Respiratory motion was monitored using a compressive sensor pillow connected to a dual respiratory–cardiac gating box, which sends cardiac triggers only during end-expiration phases to the single cardiac trigger input on the SPECT scanners. The listmode data were rebinned retrospectively into end-expiration frames for respiratory motion reduction or eight cardiac gates only during end-expiration phases to compensate for both respiratory and cardiac motions. The proposed method was first validated on a motion phantom in the presence and absence of multiple perfusion defects, and then applied on 11 patient studies with and without perfusion defects. In the normal phantom studies, the end-expiration gated SPECT (EXG-SPECT) reduced respiratory motion blur and increased myocardium to blood pool contrast by 51.2% as compared to the ungated images. The proposed method also yielded an average of 11.2% increase in myocardium to defect contrast as compared to the ungated images in the phantom studies with perfusion defects. In the patient studies, EXG-SPECT significantly improved the myocardium to blood pool contrast (p < 0.005) by 24% on average as compared to the ungated images, and led to improved perfusion uniformity across segments on polar maps for normal patients. For a patient with defect, EXG-SPECT improved the defect contrast and definition. The dual respiratory–cardiac gating further reduced the blurring effect, increased the myocardium to blood pool contrast significantly by 36% (p < 0.05) compared to EXG-SPECT, and further improved defect characteristics and visualization of fine structures at the expense of increased

  19. Impact of attenuation correction and gated acquisition in SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging: results of the multicentre SPAG (SPECT Attenuation Correction vs Gated) study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genovesi, Dario; Giorgetti, Assuero; Gimelli, Alessia; Kusch, Annette; D'Aragona Tagliavia, Irene; Casagranda, Mirta; Marzullo, Paolo; Cannizzaro, Giorgio; Giubbini, Raffaele; Bertagna, Francesco; Fagioli, Giorgio; Rossi, Massimiliano; Romeo, Annadina; Bertolaccini, Pietro; Bonini, Rita

    2011-01-01

    In clinical myocardial single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), attenuation artefacts may cause a loss of specificity in the identification of diseased vessels that can be corrected by means of gated SPECT (GSPECT) acquisition or CT attenuation correction (AC). The purpose of this multicentre study was to assess the impact of GSPECT and AC on the diagnostic performance of myocardial scintigraphy, according to patient's sex, body mass index (BMI) and site of coronary artery disease (CAD). We studied a group of 104 patients who underwent coronary angiography within 1 month before or after the SPECT study. Patients with a BMI > 27 were considered ''overweight''. Attenuation-corrected and standard GSPECT early images were randomly interpreted by three readers blinded to the clinical data. In the whole group, GSPECT and AC showed a diagnostic accuracy of 86.5% (sensitivity 82%, specificity 93%) and 77% (sensitivity 75.4%, specificity 81.4%), respectively (p < 0.05). In women, when anterior ischaemia was matched with CAD, AC failed to show any increase in specificity (AC 63.6% vs GSPECT 63.6%) with evident loss of sensitivity (AC 72.7% vs GSPECT 90.9%). AC significantly improved SPECT specificity in the identification of right CAD in overweight men (AC 100% vs GSPECT 66.7%, p <0.05). AC improved specificity in the evaluation of right CAD in overweight men. In the other evaluable subgroups specificity was not significantly affected while sensitivity was frequently reduced. (orig.)

  20. Impact of attenuation correction and gated acquisition in SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging: results of the multicentre SPAG (SPECT Attenuation Correction vs Gated) study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genovesi, Dario; Giorgetti, Assuero; Gimelli, Alessia; Kusch, Annette; D' Aragona Tagliavia, Irene; Casagranda, Mirta; Marzullo, Paolo [Fondazione CNR-Regione Toscana ' ' G. Monasterio' ' , Nuclear Medicine, Pisa (Italy); Cannizzaro, Giorgio [A.O.V. Cervello, Nuclear Medicine, Palermo (Italy); Giubbini, Raffaele; Bertagna, Francesco [Spedali Civili, Nuclear Medicine, Brescia (Italy); Fagioli, Giorgio; Rossi, Massimiliano; Romeo, Annadina [Ospedale Maggiore, Nuclear Medicine, Bologna (Italy); Bertolaccini, Pietro; Bonini, Rita [Ospedale SS Giacomo e Cristoforo, Nuclear Medicine, Massa (Italy)

    2011-10-15

    In clinical myocardial single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), attenuation artefacts may cause a loss of specificity in the identification of diseased vessels that can be corrected by means of gated SPECT (GSPECT) acquisition or CT attenuation correction (AC). The purpose of this multicentre study was to assess the impact of GSPECT and AC on the diagnostic performance of myocardial scintigraphy, according to patient's sex, body mass index (BMI) and site of coronary artery disease (CAD). We studied a group of 104 patients who underwent coronary angiography within 1 month before or after the SPECT study. Patients with a BMI > 27 were considered ''overweight''. Attenuation-corrected and standard GSPECT early images were randomly interpreted by three readers blinded to the clinical data. In the whole group, GSPECT and AC showed a diagnostic accuracy of 86.5% (sensitivity 82%, specificity 93%) and 77% (sensitivity 75.4%, specificity 81.4%), respectively (p < 0.05). In women, when anterior ischaemia was matched with CAD, AC failed to show any increase in specificity (AC 63.6% vs GSPECT 63.6%) with evident loss of sensitivity (AC 72.7% vs GSPECT 90.9%). AC significantly improved SPECT specificity in the identification of right CAD in overweight men (AC 100% vs GSPECT 66.7%, p <0.05). AC improved specificity in the evaluation of right CAD in overweight men. In the other evaluable subgroups specificity was not significantly affected while sensitivity was frequently reduced. (orig.)

  1. Diagnosis of severe and extensive coronary artery disease using gated myocardial perfusion SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Ihn Ho; Lee, Hyoung Woo; Won, Kyu Chang; Park, Jong Sun; Sin, Dog Gu; Kim, Young Jo; Shim, Bong Sub [College of Medicine, Yeungnam Univ., Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-07-01

    Left ventricular volumes and ejection fractions constitute important informations in the diagnosis and prognosis of cardiac disease. Aim of the study is to verify if the assessment of left ventricular function and perfusion together by gated myocardial perfusion SPECT is useful for diagnosing severe and extensive CAD. We examined 27 consecutive patients (17 males and 10 females, mean age : 60.1 years) who underwent two day rest/stress Tc-99m MIBI gated SPECT. Stress was done with adenosine. Post-stress gated SPECT was done at 1 hour after an injection of Tc-99m MIBI (740 MBq). All patients underwent coronary angiography after gated SPECT within 1 month. We divided them three groups with single vessel disease, double vessel disease and triple vessel disease or severe proximal left coronary artery stenosis. Extent of Defect (ED), Reversibility of Extent (RE), Severity of Defect (SD) and Severity of Reversibility (SR) were calculated by CEqual program. Post-stress LVEF, Rest LVEF, End-diastolic volume(EDV), End-systolic volume(ESV), Transient Ischemic Dilation (TID) of left ventricle (Post-stress EDV/Rest EDV) were calculated using gated SPECT quantification program. Left ventricle is divided with 18 segments and wall motion was scored (normal=0, mild hypokinesia =1, severe hypokinesia =2, akinesia =3 and dyskinesia =4), and then post-stress summed wall motion score was calculated. Post-stress summed wall motion score and post-stress LVEF were significant differences between three groups ( P <0.01). Extent of defect, Extent of reversibility, Severity of defect and severity of reversibility in Polar map were significant differences between three groups ( P <0.01). Post-stress Transient left ventricular dilatation and test LVEF were not significant differences between three groups ( P > 0.05). The gated SPECT pattern (low post-stress LVEF and post-stress summed wall motion score) add important diagnostic information over ungated perfusion data (high ED, ER and SR and

  2. Evaluation and reduction of respiratory motion artifacts in small animal SPECT with GATE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, C.-L.; Park, S.-J.; Kim, H.-J.

    2015-01-01

    The degradation of image quality caused by respiration is a major impediment to accurate lesion detection in single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging. This study was performed to evaluate the effects of lung motion on image quantification. A small animal SPECT system with NaI(Tl) was modeled in the Geant4 application for tomographic emission (GATE) simulation for a lung lesion using a 4D mouse whole-body phantom. SPECT images were obtained using 120 projection views acquired from 0 o to 360 o with a 3 o step. Slices were reconstructed using ordered subsets expectation maximization (OS-EM) without attenuation correction with five iterations and four subsets. Image quality was compared between the static mode without respiratory motion, and dynamic mode with respiratory motion in terms of spatial resolution was measured by the full width at half maximum (FWHM), signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). The FWHM of the non-gated image and the respiratory gated image were also compared. Spatial resolution improved as activity increased and lesion diameter decreased in the static and dynamic modes. The SNR and CNR increased significantly as lesion activity increased and lesion diameter decreased. Our results show that respiratory motion leads to reduced contrast and quantitative accuracy and that image quantification depends on both the amplitude and the pattern of the respiratory motion. We verified that respiratory motion can have a major effect on the accuracy of measurement of lung lesions and that respiratory gating can reduce activity smearing on SPECT images

  3. GATED SPECT TO EVALUATE LEFT VENTRICULAR MYOCARDIAL PERFUSION, FUNCTION AND DYSSYNCHRONY FOR RESYNCHRONIZATION THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.N. Ostroumov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The study included 15 consecutive patients with heart failure and substantial LV dyssynchrony undergoing CRT. Clinical and phase analysis of gated myocardial perfusion SPECT assessed at baseline, after 2–3 days and after 3–4 months of CRT. The results demonstrated inversely relationship between the response to CRT and the nonviable myocardium. Evaluation of myocardial viability is necessary to considered in the selection process for CRT.

  4. Left ventricular functional parameters by gated SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging in a Latin American country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapitan, Miguel; Beltran, Alvaro; Beretta, Mario; Mut, Fernando

    2018-04-01

    There is paucity of data on left ventricular (LV) functional parameters using gated SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) from the Latin American region. This study provides detailed information in low-risk patients both at rest and during exercise. We studied 90 patients (50 men) with a very low likelihood of coronary artery disease. Gated-SPECT MPI was performed with Tc-99m MIBI using a 2-day protocol, with 16 frames/R-R cycle. The LV ejection fraction and volumes were not different between the rest and post-stress images. LVEF was 68 ± 7% post-stress and 70 ± 7% at rest in women, and 62 ± 7% and 63 ± 7%, respectively, in men (P = .19, .26). LV volumes were larger in men than women (P stress. Transient ischemic dilatation was similar, with upper limits of 1.20 and 1.19 in women and men, respectively (P = NS). These data could prove helpful for the interpretation of gated SPECT MPI data in Latin America using identical protocol as used in this study.

  5. Reproducibility of non-invasive measurement for left ventricular contractility using gated myocardial SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyeon Min; Lee, Dong Soo; Kim, Yu Kyeong; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Kim, Seok Ki; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul

    2001-01-01

    We tried to establish the reproducibility of the measurement of maximal elastance (Emax) and to compare the degree of the reproducibility of two estimation methods: single pressure-volume loop method and parameter optimization method. In 47 patients (42 males and 5 females, 53 ± 10 years old) with suspected coronary artery disease (ejection fraction; 22-68%), gated Tc-99m MIBI myocardial SPECT and arterial tonometry were acquired, In 11 patients among these 47 patients, gated SPECT and tonometry were performed twice consecutively with patients in situ. Emax and void volume (Vo) were estimated using single pressure-volume loop method of Lee and parameter optimization method based on linear approximation of Yoshizawa. Correlation between the consecutive measurements by each method and correlation between the two estimation methods were compared. Reproducibility of Emax (r=0.96) and Vo (r=0.99) by single pressure-volume method was better than the reporducibility of Emax (r=0.89) and Vo (r=0.64) by parameter optimization method. Correlations of Emax and Vo were fair between the two methods. The correlation of Emax (r=0.77) was better thn that of Vo (r=0.65). Reproducibiity of Emax measurement by single pressure-volume loop method using gated myocardial SPECT and arterial tonometry was excellent. Reproducibility by parameter optimization method was also but was less than that achieved by single pressure-volume method

  6. Functional assessment of the right ventricle with gated myocardial perfusion SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadhwa, S.S.; Abbati, D.; Carolan, M.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Evaluation of right ventricular function can provide valuable information in a variety of cardiac and non-cardiac conditions. Functional assessment of the right ventricle is difficult owing to its anatomy and geometry. We describe a method of assessing right ventricular function using gated myocardial perfusion SPECT. In 20 patients right and left ventricular ejection fractions (RVEF, LVEF) were determined using gated blood pool (GBPS) and gated myocardial perfusion SPECT (GSPECT). To avoid contamination with right atrial activity the two frame method was adopted for gated blood pool data when measuring RVEF. In 9 patients with normal right ventricles, an index of wall thickening for the right ventricle was derived from the peak systolic and diastolic counts in the free wall. There was good linear correlation between the two methods adopted for calculation of LVEF and RVEF. Bland - Airman analysis demonstrated good agreement between the two methods with no specific bias. The mean LVEF was 47.9 +/-12% (GBPS) and 47.3 +/- 12.4 (GSPECT). The mean RVEF was 43.2 +/- 9.6% (GBPS) and 44.2 +/- 8.5% (GSPECT). In both cases the values were significantly different. The mean wall motion index was 35%. There was no correlation between the wall thickness index and ejection fraction however the index was greater in patients with normal right ventricle than in those with reduced RVER Gated SPECT offers an alternative to GBPS for the functional assessment of the right ventricle. Utilising GSPECT will allow the simultaneous assessment of both the right and left ventricles. Copyright (2002) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  7. Feasibility and diagnostic accuracy of Ecg-gated SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging by a two-hour protocol: The Myofast study;Faisabilite et precision diagnostique d'un protocole de scintigraphie myocardique synchronisee a l'ECG en deux heures: l'etude Myofast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunet, V.; Costo, S.; Sabatier, R.; Grollier, G.; Bouvard, G.; Agostini, D. [CHU Cote-de-Nacre, Service de medecine nucleaire, 14 - Caen (France)

    2010-04-15

    Aim of the study: To assess the feasibility of early stress and rest myocardial perfusion and function study using a fast {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin gated-SPECT protocol in patients with known coronary artery disease. Materials and methods: Forty-three patients (pts) (37 M, 6 F, mean age 63.8 +- 9.8 years) underwent a {sup 99m}Tc-Tetrofosmin gated-SPECT (Axis Picker-Philips) myocardial study and a coronary angiography (C.A.) within 3 months. Images were acquired (LEHR, eight bins, 40 sec per image) after injection of {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin (200 to 380 MBq) early (15 min) post-stress (36 dipyridamole, two dobutamine and five ergo-metric stress), and at rest after {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin reinjection (600 to 1150 MBq), in a total time not exceeding 2 hours. Processing was performed with Q.G.S. software using the 17-segment model. Pathological study was defined as a summed difference score (SDS) greater than or equal to 4 4, a fixed defect with summed rest score greater than or equal to 4 and/or L.V. dysfunction defined as myocardial stunning (variation between stress and rest L.V.E.F. greater than or equal to 4 5%), stress L.V.E.F. less than or equal to 45% or rest L.V.E.F. less than or equal to 40%. Results were compared with C.A., and stenosis greater than or equal to 4 50% was considered as significant. Results: For 100% the quality of SPECT imaging was good or excellent. For six patients gating was impossible because of arrhythmia. The overall sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 95%, 50%, and 91%, respectively. The concordance between gated SPECT and C.A. was moderate (kappa = 0.45, S.E. = 0.15). Interestingly, early-gated acquisition permitted to underline left ventricular dysfunction in 11 cases (30%), of whom eight had poly vascular disease. Stunning was detected in six of 37 cases (16%), of whom six had poly vascular disease. Conclusion: A one-day two-hour {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin gated-SPECT protocol to assess left ventricular perfusion and function is

  8. Benefits of quantitative gated SPECT in evaluation of perioperative cardiac risk in noncardiac surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Koji; Ohsumi, Yukio; Abe, Hirohiko; Hattori, Masahito; Minatoguchi, Shinya; Fujiwara, Hisayoshi

    2007-01-01

    Gated single-photon emission computed tomography (G-SPECT) was used to evaluate cardiac risk associated with noncardiac surgery and determine the benefits and indications of this technique for this type of surgery. Patients scheduled to undergo noncardiac surgery under the supervision of anesthesiologists and subjected to preoperative cardiac evaluation using G-SPECT during the 26-month period between June 2000 and August 2002 were followed for the presence/absence of cardiac events (id est (i.e.), cardiac death, myocardial infarction, unstable angina, congestive heart failure, or fatal arrhythmia) during surgery and the postoperative period until discharged. Relationships between the occurrence of cardiac events and preoperative G-SPECT findings were evaluated. A total of 39 patients underwent G-SPECT; 6 of the 39 exhibited abnormal ejection fraction (left ventricular ejection fraction, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF)≤50%) and end-systolic volume (end-systolic volume (ESV)≥50 ml). Surgery was suspended for three of these six patients and cardiac events developed in the remaining three patients. Both abnormal perfusion images (PI) and abnormal wall thickening (WT) were observed in all six patients. All six patients exhibited abnormal LVEF and/or ESV. Three patients had either abnormal PI or WT, and a cardiac event occurred in one of them. Of the five patients who experienced cardiac events during or after surgery, two exhibited a short run of ventricular tachycardia requiring a continuous administering of antiarrhythmic drugs, whereas the remaining three patients exhibited cardiac failure requiring inotropic support following surgery. The results of this study indicate that the occurrence of perioperative cardiac events can be predicted by considering the severity of expected surgical stress and preoperative G-SPECT findings for LVEF, PI, and WT. We conclude that G-SPECT is quite useful for cardiac risk assessment in patients undergoing noncardiac

  9. GATE simulation of a LYSO-based SPECT imager: Validation and detector optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Suying; Zhang, Qiushi; Xie, Zhaoheng; Liu, Qi; Xu, Baixuan; Yang, Kun; Li, Changhui; Ren, Qiushi

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a small animal SPECT system that is based on cerium doped lutetium–yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) scintillation crystal, position sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PSPMTs) and parallel hole collimator. Spatial resolution test and animal experiment were performed to demonstrate the imaging performance of the detector. Preliminary results indicated a spatial resolution of 2.5 mm at FWHM that cannot meet our design requirement. Therefore, we simulated this gamma camera using GATE (GEANT 4 Application for Tomographic Emission) aiming to make detector spatial resolution less than 2 mm. First, the GATE simulation process was validated through comparison between simulated and experimental data. This also indicates the accuracy and effectiveness of GATE simulation for LYSO-based gamma camera. Then the different detector sampling methods (crystal size with 1.5, and 1 mm) and collimator design (collimator height with 30, 34.8, 38, and 43 mm) were studied to figure out an optimized parameter set. Detector sensitivity changes were also focused on with different parameters set that generated different spatial resolution results. Tradeoff curves of spatial resolution and sensitivity were plotted to determine the optimal collimator height with different sampling methods. Simulation results show that scintillation crystal size of 1 mm and collimator height of 38 mm, which can generate a spatial resolution of ∼1.8 mm and sensitivity of ∼0.065 cps/kBq, can be an ideal configuration for our SPECT imager design

  10. Automated quantitative coronary computed tomography correlates of myocardial ischaemia on gated myocardial perfusion SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graaf, Michiel A. de; Boogers, Mark J.; Veltman, Caroline E.; El-Naggar, Heba M.; Bax, Jeroen J.; Delgado, Victoria; Broersen, Alexander; Kitslaar, Pieter H.; Dijkstra, Jouke; Kroft, Lucia J.; Younis, Imad Al; Reiber, Johan H.; Scholte, Arthur J.

    2013-01-01

    Automated software tools have permitted more comprehensive, robust and reproducible quantification of coronary stenosis, plaque burden and plaque location of coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) data. The association between these quantitative CTA (QCT) parameters and the presence of myocardial ischaemia has not been explored. The aim of the present investigation was to evaluate the association between QCT parameters of coronary artery lesions and the presence of myocardial ischaemia on gated myocardial perfusion single-photon emission CT (SPECT). Included in the study were 40 patients (mean age 58.2 ± 10.9 years, 27 men) with known or suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) who had undergone multidetector row CTA and gated myocardial perfusion SPECT within 6 months. From the CTA datasets, vessel-based and lesion-based visual analyses were performed. Consecutively, lesion-based QCT was performed to assess plaque length, plaque burden, percentage lumen area stenosis and remodelling index. Subsequently, the presence of myocardial ischaemia was assessed using the summed difference score (SDS ≥2) on gated myocardial perfusion SPECT. Myocardial ischaemia was seen in 25 patients (62.5 %) in 37 vascular territories. Quantitatively assessed significant stenosis and quantitatively assessed lesion length were independently associated with myocardial ischaemia (OR 7.72, 95 % CI 2.41-24.7, p 2 = 20.7) and lesion length (χ 2 = 26.0) to the clinical variables and the visual assessment (χ 2 = 5.9) had incremental value in the association with myocardial ischaemia. Coronary lesion length and quantitatively assessed significant stenosis were independently associated with myocardial ischaemia. Both quantitative parameters have incremental value over baseline variables and visually assessed significant stenosis. Potentially, QCT can refine assessment of CAD, which may be of potential use for identification of patients with myocardial ischaemia. (orig.)

  11. Assessment of left ventricular function using 201Tl electrocardiogram-gated myocardial single photon emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikubo, Naotsugu; Tamai, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    Advances in computed tomography (CT) technology make it possible to obtain left ventricular wall motion using 3D reconstruction. In this study, we compared the images obtained from CT and 201 Tl electrocardiogram (ECG) gated single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). In 20 patients with ischemic heart disease, we performed 201 Tl ECG gated SPECT (GE Healthcare Millennium VG) and ECG gated CT (Philips Medical Systems Brilliance iCT) to evaluate of left ventricular wall motion during the resting phase. In SPECT, left ventricular images were reconstructed using quantitative gated SPECT (QGS) software. In CT, the images were reconstructed using Virtual Place (AZE Software). The left ventricle was classified into five regions (anterior, lateral, inferior, septal, and apical). The amplitude of the wall motion was classified into five grades according to AHA classification. The values of the wall motion were separately checked by two radiographers. Assessment of left ventricular function myocardial wall movement using the three-dimensional movie display with ECG gated myocardial SPECT data was in agreement with the evaluation by cardiac CT inspection, and corresponded with wall motion in 88 of all 100 segments. SPECT analysis has the same quantity as that of obtained from CT for evaluation of left ventricular wall motion. (author)

  12. A priori motion models for four-dimensional reconstruction in gated cardiac SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalush, D.S.; Tsui, B.M.W.; Cui, Lin

    1996-01-01

    We investigate the benefit of incorporating a priori assumptions about cardiac motion in a fully four-dimensional (4D) reconstruction algorithm for gated cardiac SPECT. Previous work has shown that non-motion-specific 4D Gibbs priors enforcing smoothing in time and space can control noise while preserving resolution. In this paper, we evaluate methods for incorporating known heart motion in the Gibbs prior model. The new model is derived by assigning motion vectors to each 4D voxel, defining the movement of that volume of activity into the neighboring time frames. Weights for the Gibbs cliques are computed based on these open-quotes most likelyclose quotes motion vectors. To evaluate, we employ the mathematical cardiac-torso (MCAT) phantom with a new dynamic heart model that simulates the beating and twisting motion of the heart. Sixteen realistically-simulated gated datasets were generated, with noise simulated to emulate a real Tl-201 gated SPECT study. Reconstructions were performed using several different reconstruction algorithms, all modeling nonuniform attenuation and three-dimensional detector response. These include ML-EM with 4D filtering, 4D MAP-EM without prior motion assumption, and 4D MAP-EM with prior motion assumptions. The prior motion assumptions included both the correct motion model and incorrect models. Results show that reconstructions using the 4D prior model can smooth noise and preserve time-domain resolution more effectively than 4D linear filters. We conclude that modeling of motion in 4D reconstruction algorithms can be a powerful tool for smoothing noise and preserving temporal resolution in gated cardiac studies

  13. Análisis de fase mediante "Gated-SPECT" de perfusión miocárdica para valorar el sincronismo mecánico del ventrículo izquierdo realizado con dos programas distintos de procesamiento

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Marín Oyaga

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introducción y objetivos: El análisis de fase mediante Gated- SPECT de perfusión mio - cárdica ( GS-PMI es una nueva herramienta para medir la asincronía ventricular izquierda con importantes aplicaciones clínicas futuras en resincronización e insuficiencia cardiaca. Se puede medir mediante dos programas ( ECTb o QGS C-S . El objetivo es demostrar su factibilidad y verificar si existen diferencias entre ambos. Metodología: Estudio analítico, observacional y retrospectivo en pacientes con GS-PMI normales. Los parámetros obtenidos fueron: la desviación estándar de la fase (DE y el ancho de banda de histograma (AH . La evaluación de la diferencia entre los grupos se realizó usando pruebas para muestras independientes después de analizar la distribución de datos. Nivel de significación p<0,05. Se utilizó SPSS IBM V.21 ®. Resultados: Total pacientes: 193 (104 hombres. Edad media: 64 años (24-89.61/193 procesados con QGS C-S y 132/193 con ECT b. Postestrés: la media de la DE fue 6º±3,7º, con mediana de 5º y rango intercuartílico ( IR :3.6º. La media de AH fue 22,7º±10º, con mediana de 18º y IR :11.5º. Postreposo: la media de la DE fue 5,76º±4,82º y la mediana 4,5º con IR : 3.1º. La media de AH fue 21.67º± 14.06º y la mediana 18º, IR :12º. Entre ambos programas se encontraron diferencias significativas en la DE en postestrés (p=0,001 y postreposo (p=0,019, sin diferencias en el AH postestrés (p=0,31 y postreposo (p=0,18. Conclusión : Realizar el análisis fase de análisis por GS-PMI es factible. Sin embargo, la DE mostró diferencias significativas entre los dos programas. Aunque los valores mostrados podrían ser utilizados como valores normales, se recomienda que estos se obtengan y utilicen para cada programa por separado.

  14. Reproducibility of the assessment of myocardial function using gated Tc-99m-MIBI SPECT and quantitative software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Dong Soo; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Ahn, Ji Young; Jeong, Joon Ki; Lee, Myung Chul

    1998-01-01

    We investigated reproducibility of the quantification of left ventricular volume and ejection fraction, and grading of myocardial wall motion and systolic thickening when we used gated myocardial SPECT and Cedars quantification software. We performed gated myocardial SPECT in 33 consecutive patients twice in the same position after Tc-99m-MIBI SPECT. We used 16 frames per cycle for the gating of sequential Tc-99m-MIBI SPECT. After reconstruction, we used Cedars quantitative gated SPECT and calculated ventricular volume and ejection fraction (EF). Wall motion was graded using 5 point score. Wall thickening was graded using 4 point score. Coefficient of variation for re-examination of volume and fraction were calculated. Kappa values (k-value) for assessing reproducibility of wall motion or wall thickening were calculated. Enddiastolic volumes (EDV) ranged from 58 ml to 248 ml (122 ml +/-42 ml), endsystolic volumes (ESV) from 20 ml to 174 ml (65 ml+/-39 ml), and EF from 20% to 68% (51%+/-14%). Geometric mean of standard deviations of 33 patients was 5.0 ml for EDV, 3.9 ml for ESV and 1.9% for EF. Their average differences were not different from zero (p>0.05). k-value for wall motion using 2 consecutive images was 0.76 (confidence interval: 0.71-0.81). k-value was 0.87 (confidence interval: 0.83-0.90) for assessment of wall thickening. We concluded that quantification of functional indices, assessment of wall motion and wall thickening using gated Tc-99m MIBI SPECT was reproducible and we could use this method for the evaluation of short-acting drug effect

  15. Normal value of functional parameters in gated myocardial perfusion SPECT in patients with low risk of coronary artery disease: emory cardiac tool box program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, D. Y.; Kim, M. H.; Kim, Y. D.; Kim, D. K. [Donga University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01

    Absolute value of the functional data of gated myocardial perfusion SPECT is necessary to determine that individual patient is normal or not. Tc-99m MIBI gated myocardial perfusion SPECT was performed using emory cardiac tool box program. All patients (M:F=15:36, age 64{+-}10 yrs) showed normal myocardial perfusion. The patients with following characteristics were excluded; previous angina or MI, ECG change with Q wave or ST-T change, diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, typical chest pain and hypertension. In all patients, myocardial mass is 117{+-}23 g in stress gated SPECT, 106{+-}22 g in stress ungated SPECT and 102{+-}21 g in rest ungated SPECT. EDV is 90{+-}28 ml, ESV 26{+-}20 ml, SV 66{+-}21 ml, EF 73{+-}10 % and TID 1.06{+-}0.14. Myocardial mass in rest ungated SPECT is significantly different between men and women (p=0.025). Myocardial mass is significantly different between stress gated SPECT and stress ungated SPECT (p=0.000), and between stress ungated SPECT and rest ungated SPECT (p=0.003). We provide normal value of functional parameters to determine the abnormality of individual patients in patients with low risk of coronary artery disease.

  16. Diagnosis of silent myocardial ischemia in type 2 diabetic patients by electrocardiogram, ergometry and Gated-SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penna Quian, Yamile; Fernandez-Britto Rodriguez, Jose; Bacallao Gallestey, Jorge; Batista Cuellar, Juan Felipe; Coca Perez, Marco Antonio; Toirac Garcia, Noresma; Penna Coego, Andria

    2008-01-01

    31 asymptomatic type 2 diabetic patients were studied by lab tests, electrocardiogram, ergometry, Gated-SPECT and coronariography to determine the relation between the atherosclerotic risk factors and the silent myocardial ischemia. Patients were classified into two groups: positive SPECT and negative SPECT. Association tests were made for each variable and ROC curves were constructed to identify risk markers. In 35.5% of the patients silent myocardial ischemia was detected with a good angiographic correlation. A significant association was evidenced between positive SPECT and the atherosclerotic risk factors, namely, low values of HDLc, family pathological history of ischemic heart disease and peripheral vascular disease. The logistic regression models showed that low values of HDLc together with family pathological history of ischemic heart disease may be strong predictors of silent myocardial ischemia in asymptomatic type 2 diabetic patients

  17. Automated quantitative coronary computed tomography correlates of myocardial ischaemia on gated myocardial perfusion SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graaf, Michiel A. de; Boogers, Mark J.; Veltman, Caroline E. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Cardiology, Leiden (Netherlands); The Interuniversity Cardiology Institute of The Netherlands, Utrecht (Netherlands); El-Naggar, Heba M.; Bax, Jeroen J.; Delgado, Victoria [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Cardiology, Leiden (Netherlands); Broersen, Alexander; Kitslaar, Pieter H.; Dijkstra, Jouke [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Division of Image Processing, Leiden (Netherlands); Kroft, Lucia J. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands); Younis, Imad Al [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leiden (Netherlands); Reiber, Johan H. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Division of Image Processing, Leiden (Netherlands); Medis medical imaging systems B.V., Leiden (Netherlands); Scholte, Arthur J. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Cardiology, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2013-08-15

    Automated software tools have permitted more comprehensive, robust and reproducible quantification of coronary stenosis, plaque burden and plaque location of coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) data. The association between these quantitative CTA (QCT) parameters and the presence of myocardial ischaemia has not been explored. The aim of the present investigation was to evaluate the association between QCT parameters of coronary artery lesions and the presence of myocardial ischaemia on gated myocardial perfusion single-photon emission CT (SPECT). Included in the study were 40 patients (mean age 58.2 {+-} 10.9 years, 27 men) with known or suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) who had undergone multidetector row CTA and gated myocardial perfusion SPECT within 6 months. From the CTA datasets, vessel-based and lesion-based visual analyses were performed. Consecutively, lesion-based QCT was performed to assess plaque length, plaque burden, percentage lumen area stenosis and remodelling index. Subsequently, the presence of myocardial ischaemia was assessed using the summed difference score (SDS {>=}2) on gated myocardial perfusion SPECT. Myocardial ischaemia was seen in 25 patients (62.5 %) in 37 vascular territories. Quantitatively assessed significant stenosis and quantitatively assessed lesion length were independently associated with myocardial ischaemia (OR 7.72, 95 % CI 2.41-24.7, p < 0.001, and OR 1.07, 95 % CI 1.00-1.45, p = 0.032, respectively) after correcting for clinical variables and visually assessed significant stenosis. The addition of quantitatively assessed significant stenosis ({chi} {sup 2} = 20.7) and lesion length ({chi} {sup 2} = 26.0) to the clinical variables and the visual assessment ({chi} {sup 2} = 5.9) had incremental value in the association with myocardial ischaemia. Coronary lesion length and quantitatively assessed significant stenosis were independently associated with myocardial ischaemia. Both quantitative parameters have

  18. SPECT acquisition using dynamic projections: a novel approach for data-driven respiratory gating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutton, B.F.; Hatton, R.L.; Yip, N.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Movement of the heart due to respiration has been previously demonstrated to produce potentially serious artefacts. On-line respiratory gating is difficult, as it requires a high level of patient cooperation. We demonstrate that use of dynamic acquisition of projections permits identification of the respiratory dynamics, allowing retrospective selection of data corresponding to a fixed point in the respiratory cycle. To demonstrate the feasibility of the technique a dynamic study was acquired just prior to myocardial per-fusion SPECT acquisition, using 5 frames/sec for 20 seconds (64*64 matrix) in anterior and lateral projections (using a dual-head right-angled configuration). The dynamic was processed a) by compressing frames in the transverse direction so as to illustrate time dependence, b) by plotting the centre of mass in the axial direction as a function of time. Respiratory motion was enhanced by use of temporal smoothing and intensity thresholding. In ten patients studied the cyclic pattern of motion due to respiratory dynamics was clearly visible in nine. Respiration typically resulted in around 1cm axial translation but in some individuals, movements as large as 3 cm were identified. The respiration rate ranged from 12-18 /min in agreement with independent observation of the patient's breathing pattern. These results suggest that retrospective respiratory gating is feasible without the need for any external respiratory monitoring device, provide that dynamic acquisition of SPECT projections is implemented. Correction for respiratory motion may also be feasible using this technique. Copyright (2002) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  19. Serial assessment of left ventricular function in various patient groups with Tl-201 gated myocardial perfusion SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Lingge; Kadoya, Masumi; Momose, Mitsuhiro; Kurozumi, Masahiro; Matsushita, Tsuyoshi; Yamada, Akira

    2007-01-01

    The present study was performed to assess stress-related left ventricular (LV) function variations in various patient groups and to determine if they were affected by sex or the type of stress experienced. We used thallium (Tl)-201 gated myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) for the analysis. A total of 270 patients were examined by electrocardiography-gated myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging to assess LV function. After injection of Tl-201 at a dose of 111 MBq at peak stress, SPECT scans were acquired at 10 min (after stress) and 3 h (rest) after injection on a three-headed camera. In the normal perfusion group, the mean LV ejection fraction (LVEF) was significantly higher, and both the end-diastolic volume index (EDVI) and end-systolic volume index (ESVI) were significantly lower in women than in men (P<0.05). Poststress stunning occurred in 29 of 98 patients (30.0%) in the ischemia group and in 42 of 90 patients (46.7%) in the fixed group. There was a significant difference in poststress stunning between bicycle ergometer stress and dipyridamole stress (P<0.05). In patients with normal perfusion, LVEF, EDVI, and ESVI determined by gated Tl-201 SPECT should be corrected for sex. In addition, the influence of the type of stress should be considered when assessing stress-related LV function variations. (author)

  20. Physics process level discrimination of detections for GATE: assessment of contamination in SPECT and spurious activity in PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Beenhouwer, Jan; Staelens, Steven; Vandenberghe, Stefaan; Verhaeghe, Jeroen; Van Holen, Roel; Rault, Erwann; Lemahieu, Ignace

    2009-04-01

    The GEANT4 application for tomographic emission (GATE) is one of the most detailed Monte Carlo simulation tools for SPECT and PET. It allows for realistic phantoms, complex decay schemes, and a large variety of detector geometries. However, only a fraction of the information in each particle history is available for postprocessing. In order to extend the analysis capabilities of GATE, a flexible framework was developed. This framework allows all detected events to be subdivided according to their type: In PET, true coincidences from others, and in SPECT, geometrically collimated photons from others. The framework of the authors can be applied to any isotope, phantom, and detector geometry available in GATE. It is designed to enhance the usability of GATE for the study of contamination and for the investigation of the properties of current and future prototype detectors. The authors apply the framework to a case study of Bexxar, first assuming labeling with 124I, then with 131I. It is shown that with 124I PET, results with an optimized window improve upon those with the standard window but achieve less than half of the ideal improvement. Nevertheless, 124I PET shows improved resolution compared to 131I SPECT with triple-energy-window scatter correction.

  1. Evaluation of left ventricular function and volume in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy: Gated myocardial single-photon emission tomography (SPECT) versus echocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berk, Fatma; Isgoren, S.; Demir, H.; Kozdag, G.; Ural, D.; Komsuoglu, B.

    2005-01-01

    Left ventricular function, volumes and regional wall motion provide valuable diagnostic information and are of long-term prognostic importance in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). This study was designed to compare the effectiveness of 2D-echocardiography and gated single-photon emission tomography (SPECT) for evaluation of these parameters in patients with DCM. Gated SPECT and 2D-echocardiography were performed in 33 patients having DCM. Gated SPECT data, including left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), were processed using an automated algorithm. Standard technique was used for 2D-echocardiography. Regional wall motion was evaluated using both modalities and was scored by two independent observers using a 16-sement model with a 5-point scoring system. The overall agreement between the two imaging modalities for the assessment of regional wall motion was 56% (298/528 segments). With gated SPECT, LEVF, end-diastolic volume (EDV), and end-diastolic volume (EDV), and end-systolic volume (ESV) were 27+-9%, 217+-73mL, respectively, and 30.8%, 195+-58mL and, 137+-48 mL with echocardiography. The correlation between gated SPECT and 2-D-echocardiography was good (r=0.76, P<0.01) for the assessment of LVEF. The correlation for EDV and ESV were also good, but with wider limits of agreement (r=0.72, P<0.01 and r=0.73, P<0.01, respectively) and significantly higher values were obtained with gated SPECT (P<0.01). Gated SPECT and 2D-echocardiography correlate well for the assessment of LV function and LV volumes. Like 2D-echocardiography, gated SPECT provides reliable information about LV function and dimension with the additional advantage of perfusion data. (author)

  2. LV dyssynchrony as assessed by phase analysis of gated SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Chun; Li, Dianfu; Miao, Changqing; Zhou, Yanli; Cao, Kejiang; Feng, Jianlin; Lloyd, Michael S.; Chen, Ji

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate left ventricular (LV) mechanical dyssynchrony in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome pre- and post-radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFA) using phase analysis of gated single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). Forty-five WPW patients were enrolled and had gated SPECT MPI pre- and 2-3 days post-RFA. Electrophysiological study (EPS) was used to locate accessory pathways (APs) and categorize the patients according to the AP locations (septal, left and right free wall). Electrocardiography (ECG) was performed pre- and post-RFA to confirm successful elimination of the APs. Phase analysis of gated SPECT MPI was used to assess LV dyssynchrony pre- and post-RFA. Among the 45 patients, 3 had gating errors, and thus 42 had SPECT phase analysis. Twenty-two patients (52.4 %) had baseline LV dyssynchrony. Baseline LV dyssynchrony was more prominent in the patients with septal APs than in the patients with left or right APs (p < 0.05). RFA improved LV synchrony in the entire cohort and in the patients with septal APs (p < 0.01). Phase analysis of gated SPECT MPI demonstrated that LV mechanical dyssynchrony can be present in patients with WPW syndrome. Septal APs result in the greatest degree of LV mechanical dyssynchrony and afford the most benefit after RFA. This study supports further investigation in the relationship between electrical and mechanical activation using EPS and phase analysis of gated SPECT MPI. (orig.)

  3. LV dyssynchrony as assessed by phase analysis of gated SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chun; Li, Dianfu; Miao, Changqing; Zhou, Yanli; Cao, Kejiang [First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Department of Cardiology, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Feng, Jianlin [First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Lloyd, Michael S. [Emory University School of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Chen, Ji [Emory University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2012-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate left ventricular (LV) mechanical dyssynchrony in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome pre- and post-radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFA) using phase analysis of gated single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). Forty-five WPW patients were enrolled and had gated SPECT MPI pre- and 2-3 days post-RFA. Electrophysiological study (EPS) was used to locate accessory pathways (APs) and categorize the patients according to the AP locations (septal, left and right free wall). Electrocardiography (ECG) was performed pre- and post-RFA to confirm successful elimination of the APs. Phase analysis of gated SPECT MPI was used to assess LV dyssynchrony pre- and post-RFA. Among the 45 patients, 3 had gating errors, and thus 42 had SPECT phase analysis. Twenty-two patients (52.4 %) had baseline LV dyssynchrony. Baseline LV dyssynchrony was more prominent in the patients with septal APs than in the patients with left or right APs (p < 0.05). RFA improved LV synchrony in the entire cohort and in the patients with septal APs (p < 0.01). Phase analysis of gated SPECT MPI demonstrated that LV mechanical dyssynchrony can be present in patients with WPW syndrome. Septal APs result in the greatest degree of LV mechanical dyssynchrony and afford the most benefit after RFA. This study supports further investigation in the relationship between electrical and mechanical activation using EPS and phase analysis of gated SPECT MPI. (orig.)

  4. Prognostic Value of Normal Perfusion but Impaired Left Ventricular Function in the Diabetic Heart on Quantitative Gated Myocardial Perfusion SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Hwanjeong; Choi, Sehun; Han, Yeonhee [Research Institute of Chonbuk National Univ. Medical School and Hospitial, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Hoyoung; Chung, Junekey [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    This study aimed at identifying the predictive parameters on quantitative gated myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (QG-SPECT) in diabetic patients with normal perfusion but impaired function. Methods Among the 533 consecutive diabetic patients, 379 patients with normal perfusion on rest Tl-201/dipyridamole-stress Tc-{sup 99m} sestamibi Gated SPECT were enrolled. Patients were grouped into those with normal post-stress left ventricular function (Group I) and those with impaired function (EF <50 or impaired regional wall motion, Group II). We investigated cardiac events and cause of death by chart review and telephone interview. Survival analysis and Cox proportional hazard model analysis were performed. Between the Group I and II, cardiac events as well as chest pain symptoms, smoking, diabetic complications were significantly different (P<0.05). On survival analysis, event free survival rate in Group II was significantly lower than in Group I (P=0.016). In univariate Cox proportional hazard analysis on overall cardiac event, Group (II over I), diabetic nephropathy, summed motion score (SMS), summed systolic thickening score (STS), numbers of abnormal segmental wall motion and systolic thickening predicted more cardiac events (P<0.05). Multivariate analysis showed that STS was the only independent predictor cardiac event. The functional parameter, especially summed systolic thickening score on QG-SPECT had prognostic values, despite normal perfusion, in predicting cardiac events in diabetic patients, and QG-SPECT provides clinically useful risk stratification in diabetic patients with normal perfusion.

  5. Evaluation of left ventricular ejection fraction from radial long-axis tomography. A new reconstruction algorithm for ECG-gated technetium-99m Sestamibi SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujimura, Eiichiro; Kusuoka, Hideo; Uehara, Toshiisa

    1997-01-01

    Radial long-axis tomography can provide views similar to contrast left ventriculography (LVG) including the basal and apical areas of the left ventricle, not possible in routine short-axis tomography. We applied this method to ECG-gated Tc-99m Sestamibi (MIBI) myocardial SPECT images to estimate the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). ECG-gated Tc-99m MIBI SPECT was performed with a temporal resolution of 10 frames per R-R interval. LVEF was calculated on the basis of left ventricular volume estimates at end diastole (ED) and end systole (ES) with using an ellipsoid body model. To validate this method, LVEF's derived from ECG-gated Tc-99m MIBI SPECT were compared with those from LVG in 11 patients with coronary artery disease. There was a close linear correlation between LVEF values calculated from Tc-99m MIBI SPECT and those from LVG (r=0.89, p<0.001), although the gated SPECT underestimated LVEF compared to LVG. The technique showed excellent reproducibility (intra-observer variability, r=0.96, p<0.001; inter-observer variability, r=0.71, p<0.005). The radial long-axis tomography technique gives a good estimate of LVEF, in agreement with estimates based on LVG. ECG-gated Tc-99m MIBI SPECT can, therefore, be applicable to assess myocardial perfusion and ventricular function at the same time. (author)

  6. Evaluation of left ventricular ejection fraction from radial long-axis tomography. A new reconstruction algorithm for ECG-gated technetium-99m Sestamibi SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsujimura, Eiichiro; Kusuoka, Hideo; Uehara, Toshiisa [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine] [and others

    1997-08-01

    Radial long-axis tomography can provide views similar to contrast left ventriculography (LVG) including the basal and apical areas of the left ventricle, not possible in routine short-axis tomography. We applied this method to ECG-gated Tc-99m Sestamibi (MIBI) myocardial SPECT images to estimate the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). ECG-gated Tc-99m MIBI SPECT was performed with a temporal resolution of 10 frames per R-R interval. LVEF was calculated on the basis of left ventricular volume estimates at end diastole (ED) and end systole (ES) with using an ellipsoid body model. To validate this method, LVEF`s derived from ECG-gated Tc-99m MIBI SPECT were compared with those from LVG in 11 patients with coronary artery disease. There was a close linear correlation between LVEF values calculated from Tc-99m MIBI SPECT and those from LVG (r=0.89, p<0.001), although the gated SPECT underestimated LVEF compared to LVG. The technique showed excellent reproducibility (intra-observer variability, r=0.96, p<0.001; inter-observer variability, r=0.71, p<0.005). The radial long-axis tomography technique gives a good estimate of LVEF, in agreement with estimates based on LVG. ECG-gated Tc-99m MIBI SPECT can, therefore, be applicable to assess myocardial perfusion and ventricular function at the same time. (author)

  7. Quantitative gated SPECT- a comparative study of two algorithms for parameters of perfusion and LV function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, A.Z.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Aim: To compare the perfusion and LV function parameters as quantified by 4D-MSPECT and ECT in the same patient group and a qualitative comparison of the reconstructed slices by two different experts. Materials and methods: Thirty-one consecutive patients underwent gated myocardial perfusion SPECT using a two-day protocol. The gated and ungated data were reconstructed by back projection method. Quantitative analysis was performed on the same set of reconstructed slices by 4D-MSPECT and Emory Cardiac Tool Box. The reconstructed slices were read qualitatively by two different experts on their respective systems. Polar map and functional analysis was performed in both softwares and the results were compared. Results: The concordance between the two experts qualitatively was seen in 78/93(84%) coronary territories. The polar map defects were comparable in LAD (r-value of 0.87) and LCX (r-value of 0.76) territories whereas RCA defects (r-value of 0.04) were not at all correlating. The defect severity showed concordance in 68/93 (73%) coronary territories. There was concordance between 4DMSPECT and the qualitative interpretation in 84/93 (90%) coronary territories whereas ECT showed concordance in only 70/93(75%) coronary territories. The overall sensitivity is marginally higher for ECT (100% vs. 96%) but the overall specificity is much higher with 4 DMSPECT (88% vs. 65%). ESV showed good correlation(r=0.94) of the two softwares with no significant difference in means. EDV and LVEF although had good correlation(r = 0.96 and 0.89) showed high difference in means (p<0.01). Conclusion: Between 4D-MSPECT and ECT, 4D-MSPECT is marginally superior to ECT with reference to qualitative interpretation in view of better specificity. The LVEF values between the two softwares should also not be used interchangeably. (author)

  8. Prediction of functional recovery after revascularization using quantitative gated myocardial perfusion SPECT: a multi-center cohort study in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Kenichi; Tamaki, Nagara; Kuwabara, Yoichi; Kawano, Masaya; Matsunari, Ichiro; Taki, Junichi; Nishimura, Shigeyuki; Yamashina, Akira; Ishida, Yoshio; Tomoike, Hitonobu

    2008-01-01

    Prediction of left ventricular functional recovery is important after myocardial infarction. The impact of quantitative perfusion and motion analyses with gated single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) on predictive ability has not been clearly defined in multi-center studies. A total of 252 patients with recent myocardial infarction (n = 74) and old myocardial infarction (n = 175) were registered from 25 institutions. All patients underwent resting gated SPECT using 99m Tc-hexakis-2-methoxy-isobutyl isonitrile (MIBI) and repeated the study after revascularization after an average follow-up period of 132 ± 81 days. Visual and quantitative assessment of perfusion and wall motion were performed in 5,040 segments. Non-gated segmental percent uptake and end-systolic (ES) percent uptake were good predictors of wall motion recovery and significantly differed between improved and non-improved groups (66 ± 17% and 55 ± 18%, p 99m Tc-MIBI uptake provided a useful predictor of wall motion improvement. Application of quantitative approach with non-gated and ES percent uptake enhanced predictive accuracy over visual analysis particularly in a multi-center study. (orig.)

  9. Myocardial viability assessment with gated SPECT Tc-99m tetrofosmin % wall thickening. Comparison with F-18 FDG-PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Atsushi; Hasegawa, Shinji; Paul, A.K.; Xiuli, M.; Yoshioka, Jun; Maruyama, Kaoru; Hori, Masatsugu; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    2002-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the value of gated SPECT Tc-99m-tetrofosmin (TF) wall thickening (WT) in addition to TF exercise (Ex)/rest myocardial SPECT, in comparison with F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET. The study population consisted of 33 patients with old myocardial infarction (27 men and 6 women; mean age, 62±8 years old). All patients underwent Ex/rest TF SPECT and glucose loading FDG-PET. Polar map images of Ex/rest TF were generated and divided into 24 segments for further analysis. We classified LV segments according to the exercise-rest perfusion scintigraphy. LV segments with less than 70% of the maximum TF activity on the exercise image were defined as stress-induced defects. Among these, the segments whose TF acitvity increased by 10% from exercise to rest images or exceeded 70% of the maximum uptake were defined as reversible (viable) defects. The remaining defects on the rest image were irreversible (non-viable) defect segments, and were considered for viability study on the basis of %WT. %WT was calculated according to the standard method: {(counts ES-counts ED)/ counts ED} x 100. A viable segment on gated SPECT was defined as a segment whose %WT exceeded the lower limit of the normal value (mean-SD). PET viability was defined as FDG uptake exceeding 50% of the maximum count. Among the 792 segments evaluated in the 33 patients studied, there were 689 PET viable segments. Of the 689 segments analyzed, 198 (29%) were identified as having defects on Ex images. Among these defects, 55 (8%) were reversible or partially reversible, as evidenced by rest images, and 143 (21%) were irreversible. Of the irreversible segments on Ex/rest images, 106 (15%) demonstrated no apparent WT by gated TF SPECT, whereas 37 (6%) segments with irreversible defects did have apparent WT. Overall, the sensitivity of Ex/rest TF perfusion imaging was 79%. Sensitivity was improved from 79% to 85% by combining %WT and perfusion data, but specificity was reduced from 70

  10. Respiratory lung motion analysis using a nonlinear motion correction technique for respiratory-gated lung perfusion SPECT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ue, Hidenori; Haneishi, Hideaki; Iwanaga, Hideyuki; Suga, Kazuyoshi

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated the respiratory motion of lungs using a nonlinear motion correction technique for respiratory-gated single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images. The motion correction technique corrects the respiratory motion of the lungs nonlinearly between two-phase images obtained by respiratory-gated SPECT. The displacement vectors resulting from respiration can be computed at every location of the lungs. Respiratory lung motion analysis is carried out by calculating the mean value of the body axis component of the displacement vector in each of the 12 small regions into which the lungs were divided. In order to enable inter-patient comparison, the 12 mean values were normalized by the length of the lung region along the direction of the body axis. This method was applied to 25 Technetium (Tc)-99m-macroaggregated albumin (MAA) perfusion SPECT images, and motion analysis results were compared with the diagnostic results. It was confirmed that the respiratory lung motion reflects the ventilation function. A statistically significant difference in the amount of the respiratory lung motion was observed between the obstructive pulmonary diseases and other conditions, based on an unpaired Student's t test (P<0.0001). A difference in the motion between normal lungs and lungs with a ventilation obstruction was detected by the proposed method. This method is effective for evaluating obstructive pulmonary diseases such as pulmonary emphysema and diffuse panbronchiolitis. (author)

  11. LV dyssynchrony as assessed by phase analysis of gated SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun; Li, Dianfu; Miao, Changqing; Feng, Jianlin; Zhou, Yanli; Cao, Kejiang; Lloyd, Michael S; Chen, Ji

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate left ventricular (LV) mechanical dyssynchrony in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome pre- and post-radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFA) using phase analysis of gated single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). Forty-five WPW patients were enrolled and had gated SPECT MPI pre- and 2-3 days post-RFA. Electrophysiological study (EPS) was used to locate accessory pathways (APs) and categorize the patients according to the AP locations (septal, left and right free wall). Electrocardiography (ECG) was performed pre- and post-RFA to confirm successful elimination of the APs. Phase analysis of gated SPECT MPI was used to assess LV dyssynchrony pre- and post-RFA. Among the 45 patients, 3 had gating errors, and thus 42 had SPECT phase analysis. Twenty-two patients (52.4%) had baseline LV dyssynchrony. Baseline LV dyssynchrony was more prominent in the patients with septal APs than in the patients with left or right APs (p syndrome. Septal APs result in the greatest degree of LV mechanical dyssynchrony and afford the most benefit after RFA. This study supports further investigation in the relationship between electrical and mechanical activation using EPS and phase analysis of gated SPECT MPI.

  12. [Image fusion of gated-SPECT and CT angiography in coronary artery disease. Importance of anatomic-functional correlation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarena Pizzi, M; Aguadé Bruix, S; Cuéllar Calabria, H; Aliaga, V; Candell Riera, J

    2010-01-01

    A 77-year old patient was admitted for acute coronary syndrome without ST elevation. His risk was stratified using the myocardial perfusion gated SPECT, mild inferior ischemia being observed. Thus, medical therapy was optimized and the patient was discharged. He continued with exertional dyspnea so a coronary CT angiography was performed. It revealed severe lesions in the proximal RCA. SPECT-CT fusion images correlated the myocardial perfusion defect with a posterior descending artery from the RCA, in a co-dominant coronary area. Subsequently, cardiac catheterism was indicated for his treatment. The current use of image fusion studies is limited to patients in whom it is difficult to attribute a perfusion defect to a specific coronary artery. In our patient, the fusion images helped to distinguish between the RCA and the circumflex artery as the culprit artery of ischemia. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  13. Optimal left ventricular lead position assessed with phase analysis on gated myocardial perfusion SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boogers, Mark J.; Chen, Ji; Garcia, Ernest V.; Bommel, Rutger J. van; Borleffs, C.J.W.; Schalij, Martin J.; Wall, Ernst E. van der; Bax, Jeroen J.; Dibbets-Schneider, Petra; Hiel, Bernies van der; Younis, Imad Al

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to evaluate the relationship between the site of latest mechanical activation as assessed with gated myocardial perfusion SPECT (GMPS), left ventricular (LV) lead position and response to cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). The patient population consisted of consecutive patients with advanced heart failure in whom CRT was currently indicated. Before implantation, 2-D echocardiography and GMPS were performed. The echocardiography was performed to assess LV end-systolic volume (LVESV), LV end-diastolic volume (LVEDV) and LV ejection fraction (LVEF). The site of latest mechanical activation was assessed by phase analysis of GMPS studies and related to LV lead position on fluoroscopy. Echocardiography was repeated after 6 months of CRT. CRT response was defined as a decrease of ≥15% in LVESV. Enrolled in the study were 90 patients (72% men, 67±10 years) with advanced heart failure. In 52 patients (58%), the LV lead was positioned at the site of latest mechanical activation (concordant), and in 38 patients (42%) the LV lead was positioned outside the site of latest mechanical activation (discordant). CRT response was significantly more often documented in patients with a concordant LV lead position than in patients with a discordant LV lead position (79% vs. 26%, p<0.01). After 6 months, patients with a concordant LV lead position showed significant improvement in LVEF, LVESV and LVEDV (p<0.05), whereas patients with a discordant LV lead position showed no significant improvement in these variables. Patients with a concordant LV lead position showed significant improvement in LV volumes and LV systolic function, whereas patients with a discordant LV lead position showed no significant improvements. (orig.)

  14. GATE simulation of a new design of pinhole SPECT system for small animal brain imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozsahin, D. Uzun; Bläckberg, L.; Fakhri, G. El; Sabet, H.

    2017-01-01

    Small animal SPECT imaging has gained an increased interest over the past decade since it is an excellent tool for developing new drugs and tracers. Therefore, there is a huge effort on the development of cost-effective SPECT detectors with high capabilities. The aim of this study is to simulate the performance characteristics of new designs for a cost effective, stationary SPECT system dedicated to small animal imaging with a focus on mice brain. The conceptual design of this SPECT system platform, Stationary Small Animal SSA-SPECT, is to use many pixelated CsI:TI detector modules with 0.4 mm × 0.4 mm pixels in order to achieve excellent intrinsic detector resolution where each module is backed by a single pinhole collimator with 0.3 mm hole diameter. In this work, we present the simulation results of four variations of the SSA-SPECT platform where the number of detector modules and FOV size is varied while keeping the detector size and collimator hole size constant. Using the NEMA NU-4 protocol, we performed spatial resolution, sensitivity, image quality simulations followed by a Derenzo-like phantom evaluation. The results suggest that all four SSA-SPECT systems can provide better than 0.063% system sensitivity and < 1.5 mm FWHM spatial resolution without resolution recovery or other correction techniques. Specifically, SSA-SPECT-1 showed a system sensitivity of 0.09% in combination with 1.1 mm FWHM spatial resolution.

  15. DIAGNOSTIC VALUE of Tc-99m TETROFOSMİN GATED SPECT IN MYOCARDIAL VIABILITY INVESTIGATION AFTER ADMINISTRATION TRIMETAZIDINE and NITRATE IN THE PATIENTS WITH MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION

    OpenAIRE

    TURHAL, Özgül; TUTUŞ, Ahmet; KULA, Mustafa

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim: With the aim of investigating of the myocardial viability on the patients with MI, the results obtained from Tc-99m-tetrofosmin gated SPECT following the nitrate infusion and acute TMZ were compared.Method: For this study, 30 patients who had MI and were be planned of revascularization process were taken. The patients were applied Tc-99m-tetrofosmin gated SPECT basally and following nitrate infusion and acute TMZ separately each day. The data from perfusion were quantitatively e...

  16. Development of 4D mathematical observer models for the task-based evaluation of gated myocardial perfusion SPECT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Taek-Soo; Frey, Eric C.; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents two 4D mathematical observer models for the detection of motion defects in 4D gated medical images. Their performance was compared with results from human observers in detecting a regional motion abnormality in simulated 4D gated myocardial perfusion (MP) SPECT images. The first 4D mathematical observer model extends the conventional channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) based on a set of 2D spatial channels and the second is a proposed model that uses a set of 4D space-time channels. Simulated projection data were generated using the 4D NURBS-based cardiac-torso (NCAT) phantom with 16 gates/cardiac cycle. The activity distribution modelled uptake of 99mTc MIBI with normal perfusion and a regional wall motion defect. An analytical projector was used in the simulation and the filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithm was used in image reconstruction followed by spatial and temporal low-pass filtering with various cut-off frequencies. Then, we extracted 2D image slices from each time frame and reorganized them into a set of cine images. For the first model, we applied 2D spatial channels to the cine images and generated a set of feature vectors that were stacked for the images from different slices of the heart. The process was repeated for each of the 1,024 noise realizations, and CHO and receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis methodologies were applied to the ensemble of the feature vectors to compute areas under the ROC curves (AUCs). For the second model, a set of 4D space-time channels was developed and applied to the sets of cine images to produce space-time feature vectors to which the CHO methodology was applied. The AUC values of the second model showed better agreement (Spearman’s rank correlation (SRC) coefficient = 0.8) to human observer results than those from the first model (SRC coefficient = 0.4). The agreement with human observers indicates the proposed 4D mathematical observer model provides a good predictor of the

  17. Development of 4D mathematical observer models for the task-based evaluation of gated myocardial perfusion SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Taek-Soo; Frey, Eric C; Tsui, Benjamin M W

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents two 4D mathematical observer models for the detection of motion defects in 4D gated medical images. Their performance was compared with results from human observers in detecting a regional motion abnormality in simulated 4D gated myocardial perfusion (MP) SPECT images. The first 4D mathematical observer model extends the conventional channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) based on a set of 2D spatial channels and the second is a proposed model that uses a set of 4D space-time channels. Simulated projection data were generated using the 4D NURBS-based cardiac-torso (NCAT) phantom with 16 gates/cardiac cycle. The activity distribution modelled uptake of 99m Tc MIBI with normal perfusion and a regional wall motion defect. An analytical projector was used in the simulation and the filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithm was used in image reconstruction followed by spatial and temporal low-pass filtering with various cut-off frequencies. Then, we extracted 2D image slices from each time frame and reorganized them into a set of cine images. For the first model, we applied 2D spatial channels to the cine images and generated a set of feature vectors that were stacked for the images from different slices of the heart. The process was repeated for each of the 1,024 noise realizations, and CHO and receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis methodologies were applied to the ensemble of the feature vectors to compute areas under the ROC curves (AUCs). For the second model, a set of 4D space-time channels was developed and applied to the sets of cine images to produce space-time feature vectors to which the CHO methodology was applied. The AUC values of the second model showed better agreement (Spearman’s rank correlation (SRC) coefficient = 0.8) to human observer results than those from the first model (SRC coefficient = 0.4). The agreement with human observers indicates the proposed 4D mathematical observer model provides a good predictor of the

  18. Comparison of myocardial function between post-menopausal and pre-menopausal women: evaluation by gated myocardial SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, K. H.; Choa, Won Sick; Yoon, Min Ki

    2005-01-01

    In addition to inhibiting coronary atherosclerosis, estrogen is expected to have protective effects on cardiac myocytes. We investigated the difference in myocardial functional parameters evaluated by gated myocardial SPECT after adenosine-stress between post-menopausal and pre-menopausal healthy women. This study included 22 healthy post-menopausal women (mean age: 53.0 yr) and 20 pre-menopausal women (mean age: 43.0 yr) who performed Tc-99m tetrofosmin gated myocardial SPECT after adenosine-stress. Measured hemodynamic parameters, EDV, ESV, stroke volume, EF, cardiac output and cardiac index were compared between the two groups. For comparison, similar-aged two male groups with matched numbers were also studied. There was no significant difference in hemodynamic parameters. EDV, ESV, stroke volume, EF, or cardiac output between the post-menopausal and pre-menopausal women. However, post-menopausal women have a smaller cardiac index (mean: 1.95 L/min/m2 vs 2.20 L/min/m2; p=0.045) and adenosine-induced HR increase (mean : 80.5/min vs 89.7/min ; p=0.03), compared to the pre-menopausal women. On the contrary, the two male groups of the same age range and numbers with the women groups showed no significant difference in any myocardial parameters. These results suggest that menopause may be correlated with reduced increase in cardiac index and HR increase after adenosine-stress

  19. Comparison of myocardial function between post-menopausal and pre-menopausal women: evaluation by gated myocardial SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, K. H.; Choa, Won Sick; Yoon, Min Ki [Gachon Medical School, Gil Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    In addition to inhibiting coronary atherosclerosis, estrogen is expected to have protective effects on cardiac myocytes. We investigated the difference in myocardial functional parameters evaluated by gated myocardial SPECT after adenosine-stress between post-menopausal and pre-menopausal healthy women. This study included 22 healthy post-menopausal women (mean age: 53.0 yr) and 20 pre-menopausal women (mean age: 43.0 yr) who performed Tc-99m tetrofosmin gated myocardial SPECT after adenosine-stress. Measured hemodynamic parameters, EDV, ESV, stroke volume, EF, cardiac output and cardiac index were compared between the two groups. For comparison, similar-aged two male groups with matched numbers were also studied. There was no significant difference in hemodynamic parameters. EDV, ESV, stroke volume, EF, or cardiac output between the post-menopausal and pre-menopausal women. However, post-menopausal women have a smaller cardiac index (mean: 1.95 L/min/m2 vs 2.20 L/min/m2; p=0.045) and adenosine-induced HR increase (mean : 80.5/min vs 89.7/min ; p=0.03), compared to the pre-menopausal women. On the contrary, the two male groups of the same age range and numbers with the women groups showed no significant difference in any myocardial parameters. These results suggest that menopause may be correlated with reduced increase in cardiac index and HR increase after adenosine-stress.

  20. [Influence of the professional experience of the clinical cardiologist on the adequacy of the clinical indications of myocardial perfusion gated-SPECT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez-Rodriguez, Alberto; Avanzas, Pablo; Abreu-Gonzalez, Pedro; Sanchez Grande-Flecha, Alejandro; García-Baute, María Del Carmen; Gómez, María Ángeles

    2017-11-30

    During cardiology training, the cardiology fellow has to be trained in all things related to the indication, interpretation, and performing of nuclear cardiology studies using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The aim of the present study was to analyse the relationship between the adequacy of indications of myocardial perfusion gated-SPECT and the years of experience since the completion of cardiology training. A descriptive, retrospective analysis was performed on a single-centre register, in which the indications (adequate or inadequate use) were recorded according to myocardial perfusion gated-SPECT guidelines, prescribed by cardiologists of a university hospital. A total of 950 gated-SPECT tests were analysed according to the appropriate or inadequate indication. The sample of study was distributed in quartiles (years) since the cardiologist finished the residency. Cardiologists with less than 10 years of clinical experience reported a higher proportion of gated-SPECT tests compared to the more experienced cardiologists (87.6 vs. 9.3%, P<.001). After adjusting for age, gender, and cardiovascular risk factors, the multivariate analysis showed that, for each year of experience after completion of cardiology training, the probability of adequately indicating the test (OR: 1.33, 95% CI: 1.29-1.38, P<.001) was statistically significant. The professional experience of the clinical cardiologist is the most important factor to perform an appropriate indication of gated-SPECT myocardial perfusion. Copyright © 2017 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  1. The clinical use of myocardial gated SPECT imaging with 99TcmN-NOEt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Sijin; Hu Guang; Liu Jianzhong; Tian Mei; Li Xianfeng; Zhang Wanchun; Wang Jin

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical value of 99 Tc m N-NOEt myocardial perfusion imaging comparing with 99 Tc m -MIBI. Methods: Twenty patients (pts) were divided into 2 groups. Group 1 (G1), left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≥ 50%, 13 pts, the mean age was (49.9 +- 14.7) years. Group 2 (G2), LVEF 0.05 vs G1). All the pst underwent gated SPECT imaging at 30 and 120 min after injection of 925 MBq 99 Tc m N-NOEt at rest, and the heart to lung (H/L) activity ratio was calculated. Of the 6 pts in G2 and 1 pt in G1 underwent the 99 Tc m -MIBI imaging within 3 days to the former imaging at 120 min after 99 Tc m -MIBI injection under the same condition as at 99 Tc m N-NOEt imaging. The left ventricles of the 7 pts were divided into 63 segments with 9 segments for each, and the four-point scoring system was used to evaluate the tracer uptake in the segments. Results: The H/L ratio was 1.47 +- 0.47 and 1.59 +- 0.53 (P > 0.50) respectively in G1 and was 0.72 +- 0.11 and 0.89 +- 0.11 (P 99 Tc m N-NOEt and 99 Tc m -MIBI for the presence of defects was 93.65%, Kappa +- s = 0.87 +- 0.12. The mean score was 2.0 +- 0.84 (MIBI) and 2.38 +- 0.84 (NOEt) respectively (P > 0.05). Conclusions: 1) If the lung uptake of 99 Tc m N-NOET showed higher, it suggested that the left ventricular function was poor. 2) The results of LVEF, EDV and ESV were accordant between MIBI and NOEt. 3) The extent and intensity of myocardial defect with NOEt imaging was more severe than that with MIBI

  2. Myocardial gated single photon emission tomography (GSPECT) in men and women with low probability of coronary artery disease - qualitative assessment of beating slices and polar plots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dziuk, M.; Canizales, A.; Britton, K.E.

    2001-01-01

    Assessment of the variability of regional wall motion and thickening in men and women with normal left ventricular contraction and low probability of CAD by GSPECT. The rest 99mTcMyoview GSPECT protocol (700 Mbq) was performed in 28 women and 14 men. Qualitative beating slices - QLGS and polar plots - QGS were analyzed independently by scoring the colour scale (1 - severe impairment, 4 - normal). Then the regional wall motion and thickening in the anterior, lateral, inferior walls, the septum and apex were estimated. In all patients the motion in the inferior wall and septum assessed on polar maps were significantly different than one in QLGS but better in the apex. Regional wall thickening was underestimated in QGS polar plots in the anterior wall, septum, inferior and lateral wall. End diastolic and end systolic volumes were significantly greater in men (90±29, 69±25, p<0.02 and 40±20, 22±12, p<0.002 for EDV and ESV respectively). In the later group all walls except the inferior showed higher QGS thickening score in comparison to men. The motion score in the anterior wall was also significantly bigger (p<0.05). The visual regional motion and thickening assessment on beating slices in gated SPECT seems to be more reliable than polar plots in patients with normal left ventricular contraction and low probability of coronary artery disease. Gated SPECT polar maps show better myocardial thickening in women probably due to the smaller left ventricle size and subsequent partial volume effect. (author)

  3. Calculation of left ventricular volume and ejection fraction from ECG-gated myocardial SPECT. Automatic detection of endocardial borders by threshold method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukushi, Shoji; Teraoka, Satomi.

    1997-01-01

    A new method which calculate end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV) and ejection fraction (LVEF) of the left ventricle from myocardial short axis images of ECG-gated SPECT using 99m Tc myocardial perfusion tracer has been designed. Eight frames per cardiac cycle ECG-gated 180 degrees SPECT was performed. Threshold method was used to detect myocardial borders automatically. The optimal threshold was 45% by myocardial SPECT phantom. To determine if EDV, ESV and LVEF can also be calculated by this method, 12 patients were correlated ventriculography (LVG) for 10 days each. The correlation coefficient with LVG was 0.918 (EDV), 0.935 (ESV) and 0.900 (LVEF). This method is excellent at objectivity and reproductivity because of the automatic detection of myocardial borders. It also provides useful information on heart function in addition to myocardial perfusion. (author)

  4. Assessment of left ventricular function by gated myocardial perfusion and gated blood-pool SPECT. Can we use the same reference database?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, A.K.; Hasegawa, Shinji; Yoshioka, Jun; Yamaguchi, Hitoshi; Tsujimura, Eiichiro; Nishimura, Tsunehiko [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Graduate School of Medicine

    2000-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare left ventricular (LV) volume and ejection fraction (LVEF) measurements obtained with electrocardiographic gated single-photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging (GS-MPI) with those obtained with gated SPECT cardiac blood-pool imaging (GS-pool). Fifteen patients underwent GS-MPI with technetium-99m tetrofosmin and GS-pool with technetium-99m-erythrocyte, within a mean interval of 8{+-}3 days. Eight patients had suspected dilated cardiomyopathy and seven patients had angiographically significant coronary artery disease. End-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV) and LVEF measurements were estimated from GS-MPI images by means of Cedars-Sinai automatic quantitative program and from GS-pool images by the threshold technique. Mean differences between GS-MPI and GS-pool in EDV, ESV and LVEF measurements were -2.8{+-}10.5 ml [95% confidence interval (CI): -8.6{+-}3.0 ml], 2.6{+-}7.3 ml (CI: -1.4-6.6 ml) and -2.3{+-}5.1% (CI: -5.1-0.6%), respectively. No significant difference in the mean differences from 0 was found for EDV, ESV or LVEF measurements. Bland-Altman plots revealed no trend over the measured LV volumes and LVEF. For all parameters, regression lines approximated lines of identity. The excellent agreement between GS-MPI and GS-pool measurements suggests that, for estimation of LV volumes and LVEF, these two techniques may be used interchangeably and measurements by one method can serve as a reference for the other. (author)

  5. Influence of magnification on the calculated value of left ventricular ejection fraction and volumes using quantitative gated perfusion SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunez, M.; Beretta, M.; Alonso, O.; Alvarez, B.; Canepa, J.; Mut, F.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: To compare left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), end-diastolic volumes (EDV) and end-systolic volumes (ESV) measured by quantitative gated SPECT (QGSPECT) in studies acquired with and without magnification factor (zoom). Material and Methods: We studied 30 consecutive patients (17 men, ages 61±14 years) referred for myocardial perfusion evaluation with a 2-day protocol. Studies were performed after injection of 925 MBq (25 mCi) of 99mTc-MIBI in the resting state. Gated SPECT was first acquired using a x2 zoom factor and immediately repeated with x1 zoom (no magnification), using a 64x64 matrix and 8 frames/cardiac cycle. Patients with arrhythmia were not included in the investigation. According to the median EDV calculated with the x2 zoom acquisition, the population was further divided in two sub-groups regarding the size of the LV cavity. Average LVEF, EDV, ESV and difference between values (delta) were then calculated for the total population and for each sub-group (a and b). Results: For the total population, results are expressed.Pearson correlation showed r=0.954 between LVEF with and without zoom (p<0.0001), but linear regression analysis did not fit a specific model (p=0.18). Median EDV with zoom was 92.5 ml, allowing to separate 15 cases with EDV above (a) and 15 below that value (b). Results for both sub-groups are presented. Conclusion: Calculated LVEF is higher with no zoom, at the expense of decreasing both EDV and ESV. Although differences were very significant for all parameters, ESV changes were specially relevant with no zoom, particularly in patients with smaller hearts. Although good correlation was found between LVEF with and without zoom, no specific correction factor was found to convert one value into the other. Magnification factor should be kept constant in gated SPECT if calculated LVEF values QGSPECT are expected to be reliable, and validation of the method using different zoom factors should be considered

  6. Effect of streptozotocin-induced diabetes on left ventricular function in adult rats: an in vivo Pinhole Gated SPECT study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weytjens Caroline

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies have suggested that diabetes mellitus (DM may cause left ventricular (LV dysfunction directly resulting in increased susceptibility to heart failure. Using pinhole collimators and advances in data processing, gated SPECT was recently adapted to image the rat heart. The present study was aimed to assess this new imaging technique for quantifying LV function and remodeling from the Streptozotocin (STZ rat model compared to controls. Methods Twenty one rats were randomly assigned to control or diabetic group. Six months after the induction of diabetes by STZ, Pinhole 99 m Tc-sestamibi gated SPECT was performed for determining rat LV volumes and function. Post-mortem histopathologic analysis was performed to evaluate the determinant of LV remodeling in this model. Results After six months, the normalized to body weight LV End-systolic volume was significantly different in diabetic rats compared to controls (0.46 ± 0.02 vs 0.33 ± 0.03 μL/g; p = 0.01. The normalized LV End-diastolic volume was also different in both groups (1.51 ± 0.03 vs 0.88 ± 0.05 μL/g; p = 0.001 and the normalized stroke volume was significantly higher in STZ-rats (1.05 ± 0.02 vs 0.54 ± 0.06 μL/g; p = 0.001. The muscular fibers were thinner at histology in the diabetic rats (0.44 ± 0.07 vs 0.32 ± 0.06 AU; p = 0.01. Conclusion Pinhole 99 m Tc-sestamibi gated SPECT can successfully be applied for the evaluation of cardiac function and remodeling in STZ-induced diabetic rats. In this model, LV volumes were significantly changed compared to a control population, leading to a LV dysfunction. These findings were consistent with the histopathological abnormalities. Finally, these data further suggest the presence of diabetes cardiomyopathy.

  7. Automatic construction of 3D-ASM intensity models by simulating image acquisition: application to myocardial gated SPECT studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobon-Gomez, Catalina; Butakoff, Constantine; Aguade, Santiago; Sukno, Federico; Moragas, Gloria; Frangi, Alejandro F

    2008-11-01

    Active shape models bear a great promise for model-based medical image analysis. Their practical use, though, is undermined due to the need to train such models on large image databases. Automatic building of point distribution models (PDMs) has been successfully addressed and a number of autolandmarking techniques are currently available. However, the need for strategies to automatically build intensity models around each landmark has been largely overlooked in the literature. This work demonstrates the potential of creating intensity models automatically by simulating image generation. We show that it is possible to reuse a 3D PDM built from computed tomography (CT) to segment gated single photon emission computed tomography (gSPECT) studies. Training is performed on a realistic virtual population where image acquisition and formation have been modeled using the SIMIND Monte Carlo simulator and ASPIRE image reconstruction software, respectively. The dataset comprised 208 digital phantoms (4D-NCAT) and 20 clinical studies. The evaluation is accomplished by comparing point-to-surface and volume errors against a proper gold standard. Results show that gSPECT studies can be successfully segmented by models trained under this scheme with subvoxel accuracy. The accuracy in estimated LV function parameters, such as end diastolic volume, end systolic volume, and ejection fraction, ranged from 90.0% to 94.5% for the virtual population and from 87.0% to 89.5% for the clinical population.

  8. Gated-SPECT myocardial scintigraphy in left bundle branch block: A study in patients with and without coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falcao, A.M.; Moffa, P.J.; Chalela, W.A.; Soares, J.; Oliveira, C.G.; Kreling, J.C.; Ferreira, B.A.; Uchida, A.H.; Meneghetti, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    Introduction: Myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) is a non-invasive method helpful for evaluating coronary heart disease. In left bundle branch block (LBBB), the myocardial scintigraphy frequently reveals septal abnormalities in the absence of coronary artery disease (CAD) and gives rise to 'false-positive' results in patients (pts) with suspected CAD. The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic role of ECG-gated SPECT in pts with complete LBBB, with and without known CAD. Methods. This study included 46 pts, 29 women (63%), with mean age 63.8 ± 11.6yr, divided into two groups: Group 1 (n=21 pts) with LBBB and CAD angiographically confirmed and Group 2 (n=25 pts) with LBBB and normal coronangiography. All pts underwent MPS at rest and two stress tests - dipyridamole (DIP) and treadmill exercise test (ET) with Bruce protocol. Myocardial perfusion, wall motility and wall thickening were analyzed qualitatively by consensus of two observers in anterior, septal, inferior, lateral and apical myocardial segments. Scores were attributed to: perfusion as normal, reversible or fixed defects; motility as normal, hypokinesia, akinesia or dyskinesia and thickening if present or absent. The left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF) was automatically calculated from the ECG-gated SPECT. Results: The comparative analysis between groups 1 and 2 for both stresses (DIP and ET) for the parameters analyzed in the myocardial segments are presented: LVEF at rest, ET and DIP show statistically significant differences between groups 1 and 2 (p<0.0001). Conclusion: In the anterior and septal segments, only septal thickening was capable of differentiating between LBBB with and without CAD, independent of the kind of stress. In the other segments there was no influence of disturbance conduction for the perfusion analysis

  9. Development and optimization of SPECT gated blood pool cluster analysis for the prediction of CRT outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lalonde, Michel, E-mail: mlalonde15@rogers.com; Wassenaar, Richard [Department of Physics, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada); Wells, R. Glenn; Birnie, David; Ruddy, Terrence D. [Division of Cardiology, University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Ottawa, Ontario K1Y 4W7 (Canada)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Phase analysis of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) radionuclide angiography (RNA) has been investigated for its potential to predict the outcome of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). However, phase analysis may be limited in its potential at predicting CRT outcome as valuable information may be lost by assuming that time-activity curves (TAC) follow a simple sinusoidal shape. A new method, cluster analysis, is proposed which directly evaluates the TACs and may lead to a better understanding of dyssynchrony patterns and CRT outcome. Cluster analysis algorithms were developed and optimized to maximize their ability to predict CRT response. Methods: About 49 patients (N = 27 ischemic etiology) received a SPECT RNA scan as well as positron emission tomography (PET) perfusion and viability scans prior to undergoing CRT. A semiautomated algorithm sampled the left ventricle wall to produce 568 TACs from SPECT RNA data. The TACs were then subjected to two different cluster analysis techniques, K-means, and normal average, where several input metrics were also varied to determine the optimal settings for the prediction of CRT outcome. Each TAC was assigned to a cluster group based on the comparison criteria and global and segmental cluster size and scores were used as measures of dyssynchrony and used to predict response to CRT. A repeated random twofold cross-validation technique was used to train and validate the cluster algorithm. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to calculate the area under the curve (AUC) and compare results to those obtained for SPECT RNA phase analysis and PET scar size analysis methods. Results: Using the normal average cluster analysis approach, the septal wall produced statistically significant results for predicting CRT results in the ischemic population (ROC AUC = 0.73;p < 0.05 vs. equal chance ROC AUC = 0.50) with an optimal operating point of 71% sensitivity and 60% specificity. Cluster

  10. Development and optimization of SPECT gated blood pool cluster analysis for the prediction of CRT outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalonde, Michel; Wassenaar, Richard; Wells, R. Glenn; Birnie, David; Ruddy, Terrence D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Phase analysis of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) radionuclide angiography (RNA) has been investigated for its potential to predict the outcome of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). However, phase analysis may be limited in its potential at predicting CRT outcome as valuable information may be lost by assuming that time-activity curves (TAC) follow a simple sinusoidal shape. A new method, cluster analysis, is proposed which directly evaluates the TACs and may lead to a better understanding of dyssynchrony patterns and CRT outcome. Cluster analysis algorithms were developed and optimized to maximize their ability to predict CRT response. Methods: About 49 patients (N = 27 ischemic etiology) received a SPECT RNA scan as well as positron emission tomography (PET) perfusion and viability scans prior to undergoing CRT. A semiautomated algorithm sampled the left ventricle wall to produce 568 TACs from SPECT RNA data. The TACs were then subjected to two different cluster analysis techniques, K-means, and normal average, where several input metrics were also varied to determine the optimal settings for the prediction of CRT outcome. Each TAC was assigned to a cluster group based on the comparison criteria and global and segmental cluster size and scores were used as measures of dyssynchrony and used to predict response to CRT. A repeated random twofold cross-validation technique was used to train and validate the cluster algorithm. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to calculate the area under the curve (AUC) and compare results to those obtained for SPECT RNA phase analysis and PET scar size analysis methods. Results: Using the normal average cluster analysis approach, the septal wall produced statistically significant results for predicting CRT results in the ischemic population (ROC AUC = 0.73;p < 0.05 vs. equal chance ROC AUC = 0.50) with an optimal operating point of 71% sensitivity and 60% specificity. Cluster

  11. Comparison of Nitrate-augmented resting gated 99mTc-Sestamibi imaging with Low Dose Dobutamine SPECT for the detection of Myocardial Viability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parameswaran, R.V.; Dash, P.K.; Barooah, B.; Guruprasad, H.P.; Purantharan, N.

    2002-01-01

    Background: Dobutamine Echocardiography and Radionuclide imaging with Tl-201 and Technetium agents are two of the most established techniques available for the detection of viable myocardium. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of Low dose Dobutamine gated Myocardial SPECT in identifying additional areas of dysfunctional, but viable myocardium when compared to nitrate-augmented rest gated SPECT with SestaMIBI. Materials and Methods: 20 patients (19 males and 1 female, with an age range of 40- 65 yrs and a mean of 52.75yrs) all with history of MI or severe LV dysfunction were included in this study. Patients with LBBB, recent revascularisation, arrhythmias etc were excluded from the study. A routine stress-rest study was initially performed on them with 99mTc-SestaMIBI and both the stress as well as resting studies was gated and the resting study was augmented with 10mg of sublingual nitrate. After the resting study was over, the patient was infused with Low dose Dobutamine(5μg/kg/min), at which time the gated acquisition was started and the infusion was continued till the acquisition got completed. In the perfusion study with SestaMIBI, all infarct segments which have uptake less than 50% as compared to the maximally perfused area was deemed non-viable Results: A 17-segment Myocardial model was used for both perfusion as well as quantification of wall motion and wall thickening. 110 akinetic/dyskinetic segments were taken up for analysis. 93 of these segments were non-viable and improvement in wall motion was seen in 17 segments (15.4%) in the nitrate-augmented SPECT. Dobutamine study showed improvement in totally in 27 segments (24.5%), 10 of which were additional segments which were non-viable in Nitrate SPECT study, apart from the 17 segments which showed improvement in the Nitrate study. In Dobutamine study, there was also improvement in wall thickening in 10 (10.7%) out of 93 segments which had showed less than 50% of MIBI uptake. Conclusion

  12. Differential effects comparing exercise and pharmacologic stress on left ventricular function using gated Tc-99m sestamibi SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtaki, Yuka; Chikamori, Taishiro; Igarashi, Yuko; Hida, Satoshi; Tanaka, Hirokazu; Hatano, Tsuguhisa; Usui, Yasuhiro; Miyagi, Manabu; Yamashina, Akira

    2008-01-01

    Although post-ischemic stunning has emerged as an important marker for severe coronary artery disease (CAD), differences in stress methods may have different effects on left ventricular (LV) volumes and function. To assess differential effects comparing exercise and pharmacologic stress on the LV measurements, 99m Tc-sestamibi gated single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) acquired more than 30 min after stress and at rest was evaluated in 38 patients undergoing adenosine triphosphate (ATP) stress (ATP group) and 38 age- and sex-matched patients subjected to exercise stress (Ex group) among 268 patients with normal SPECT findings. Coronary risk factors and LV volumetric measurements at baseline were similar in the two groups. Compared with volumetric measurements at rest, end-diastolic volume (EDV) increased (72±21 ml to 74±21 ml; P=0.01), end-systolic volume increased (25±12 ml to 28±13 ml; P=0.001), and ejection fraction (EF) decreased after stress (66%±8% to 63%±9%; P<0.002) in the ATP group. In the Ex group, by contrast, no such change was observed. In addition, changes in EDV (3±6 vs. -1±5 ml; P=0.01) and the stress-to-rest ratio of EDV (1.04±0.09 vs. 0.99±0.08; P<0.02) after stress were greater in the ATP than in the Ex group. Differential effects of stress methods on LV volumes persist more than 30 min after the stress. These findings should be kept in mind when interpreting post-ischemic stunning. (author)

  13. Prognostic value of Tc-99m tetrofosmin myocardial perfusion gated SPECT in patients with diabetes mellitus and suspected coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Marcia Maria Sales dos; Pantoja, Mauricio da Rocha; Cwajg, Eduardo

    2008-01-01

    Background: The cardiovascular disease is the main cause of death among diabetic patients, which makes it crucial to identify the individuals at higher risk of cardiovascular events. Objective: To evaluate the prognostic value of scintigraphy with gated single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) and suspected coronary artery disease. Methods: Retrospective study with 232 diabetic patients submitted to scintigraphy with gated SPECT. Perfusion Gated SPECT (scores and number of altered segments) as well as ventricular function parameters (ejection fraction, left ventricle volume and contractility) were evaluated. Cardiac death, acute ischemic coronary syndrome, revascularization procedures or encephalic vascular accident were considered future cardiovascular events. The uni- and multivariate analyses were carried out by the multiple logistic regression model (p< 0.05). Results: At the univariate analysis, age (p=0.02), chest angina (p=0.01), insulin therapy (p=0.02), myocardial perfusion abnormalities (p<0.0001), the number of segments involved (p=0.0001), the perfusion scores (p=0.0001), the ejection fraction (p=0.004), the final systolic volume (p=0.03) and the finding of segmental alteration at the LV contractility (p<0.0001) were associated with future events at the univariate analysis. At the multivariate analysis, the male sex (p=0.007), age (p=0.03), angina (p=0.001), insulin therapy (p=0.007) and the SDS ≥ 3 (p=0.0001), and the number of altered segments ≥ 3 (p=0.0001) were predictors of cardiovascular events. Conclusion: The myocardial scintigraphy with gated SPECT adds independent information to the stratification of the risk of future cardiovascular events in patients with DM and suspected coronary artery disease. (author)

  14. Prediction of functional recovery after primary PCI using the estimate of myocardial salvage in gated SPECT early after acute myocardial infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calabretta, Raffaella; Castello, Angelo; Linguanti, Flavia; Tutino, Francesca; Ciaccio, Alfonso; Sciagra, Roberto [University of Florence, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Department of Experimental and Clinical Biomedical Sciences ' ' Mario Serio' ' , Florence (Italy); Giglioli, Cristina [Careggi University Hospital, Cardiothoracovascular Department, Florence (Italy)

    2018-04-15

    Primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) aims to achieve myocardial salvage (MS). Because the reference method for measuring MS requires myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) after tracer injection before PCI, alternative approaches have been proposed, but none has gained wide acceptance. Gated SPECT MPI can assess infarct size (IS), but can also show myocardial stunning. Thus, we compared functional and perfusion abnormalities early after AMI to estimate MS, and to predict left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) recovery at follow-up. We studied 120 patients with AMI. Gated SPECT MPI was performed early (before hospital discharge) and at 6 months after AMI to measure IS, MS and functional outcome. MS was defined as the difference between the number of segments with abnormal thickening (i.e. the stunned area or area at risk) and the number of segments with abnormal perfusion (i.e. the final IS), expressed as a percentage of the total number of segments in the AHA model. LVEF was calculated using quantitative gated SPECT. The area at risk was 40 ± 25%, IS was 17.3 ± 16% and MS was 22 ± 19%. Early LVEF was 46.6 ± 11.6% and late LVEF was 51.4 ± 11.6%, with 54 patients showing at least an increase in LVEF of more than 5 units. ROC analysis showed that MS was able to predict LVEF recovery with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.79 (p < 0.0001), and using a cut off >23% detected LVEF recovery with 74% sensitivity and 71% specificity. Conversely, IS was associated with an AUC 0.53 (not significant). MS assessed by a single early gated SPECT MPI study can accurately predict LVEF evolution after primary PCI for AMI. (orig.)

  15. Prognostic value of Tc-99m tetrofosmin myocardial perfusion gated SPECT in patients with diabetes mellitus and suspected coronary artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Marcia Maria Sales dos; Pantoja, Mauricio da Rocha; Cwajg, Eduardo [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil); CINTILAB, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); E-mail: mmsales@oi.com.br

    2008-01-15

    Background: The cardiovascular disease is the main cause of death among diabetic patients, which makes it crucial to identify the individuals at higher risk of cardiovascular events. Objective: To evaluate the prognostic value of scintigraphy with gated single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) and suspected coronary artery disease. Methods: Retrospective study with 232 diabetic patients submitted to scintigraphy with gated SPECT. Perfusion Gated SPECT (scores and number of altered segments) as well as ventricular function parameters (ejection fraction, left ventricle volume and contractility) were evaluated. Cardiac death, acute ischemic coronary syndrome, revascularization procedures or encephalic vascular accident were considered future cardiovascular events. The uni- and multivariate analyses were carried out by the multiple logistic regression model (p< 0.05). Results: At the univariate analysis, age (p=0.02), chest angina (p=0.01), insulin therapy (p=0.02), myocardial perfusion abnormalities (p<0.0001), the number of segments involved (p=0.0001), the perfusion scores (p=0.0001), the ejection fraction (p=0.004), the final systolic volume (p=0.03) and the finding of segmental alteration at the LV contractility (p<0.0001) were associated with future events at the univariate analysis. At the multivariate analysis, the male sex (p=0.007), age (p=0.03), angina (p=0.001), insulin therapy (p=0.007) and the SDS {>=} 3 (p=0.0001), and the number of altered segments {>=} 3 (p=0.0001) were predictors of cardiovascular events. Conclusion: The myocardial scintigraphy with gated SPECT adds independent information to the stratification of the risk of future cardiovascular events in patients with DM and suspected coronary artery disease. (author)

  16. Spatiotemporal processing of gated cardiac SPECT images using deformable mesh modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brankov, Jovan G.; Yang Yongyi; Wernick, Miles N.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we present a spatiotemporal processing approach, based on deformable mesh modeling, for noise reduction in gated cardiac single-photon emission computed tomography images. Because of the partial volume effect (PVE), clinical cardiac-gated perfusion images exhibit a phenomenon known as brightening--the myocardium appears to become brighter as the heart wall thickens. Although brightening is an artifact, it serves as an important diagnostic feature for assessment of wall thickening in clinical practice. Our proposed processing algorithm aims to preserve this important diagnostic feature while reducing the noise level in the images. The proposed algorithm is based on the use of a deformable mesh for modeling the cardiac motion in a gated cardiac sequence, based on which the images are processed by smoothing along space-time trajectories of object points while taking into account the PVE. Our experiments demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can yield significantly more-accurate results than several existing methods

  17. Reproducibility of an automatic quantitation of regional myocardial wall motion and systolic thickening on gated Tc-99m-MIBI myocardial SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paeng, Jin Chul; Lee, Dong Soo; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Kim, Yu Kyeong; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the reproducibility of the quantitative assessment of segmental wall motion and systolic thickening provided by an automatic quantitation algorithm. Tc-99m-MIBI gated myocardial SPECT with dipyridamole stress was performed in 31 patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease (4 with single, 6 with two, 11 with triple vessel disease; ejection fraction 51±14%) twice consecutively in the same position. Myocardium was divided into 20 segments. Segmental wall motion and systolic thickening were calculated and expressed in mm and % increase respectively, using AutoQUANT TM software. The reproducibility of this quantitative measurement of wall motion and thickening was tested. Correlations between repeated measurements on consecutive gated SPECT were excellent for wall motion (r=0.95) and systolic thickening (r=0.88). On Bland-Altman analysis, two standard deviation was 2 mm for repeated measurement of segmental wall motion, and 20% for that of systolic thickening. The weighted kappa values of repeated measurements were 0.807 for wall motion and 0.708 for systolic thickening. Sex, perfusion, or segmental location had no influence on reproducibility. Segmental wall motion and systolic thickening quantified using AutoQUANT TM software on gated myocardial SPECT offers good reproducibility and is significantly different when the change is more than 2 mm for wall motion and more than 20% for systolic thickening

  18. The value of regional wall motion abnormalities on 99Tcm-MIBI gated cardiac SPECT in predicting angiographic stenoses of coronary artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Dianfu; Huang Jun; Zhu Tiebing; Wang Liansheng; Yang Zhijian; Feng Jianlin; Li Jianhua; Chen Jianwei; Chang Guojun

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine the magnitude of angiographic stenoses of coronary artery in reversible regional wall motion abnormalities (RWMA) present in exercise stress 99 Tc m -methoxyisobutylisonitrile (MIBI) gated SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). Methods: One hundred and sixteen patients undergoing coronary angiography two weeks before and after the exercise stress 99 Tc m -MIBI gated SPECT MPI. Images were acquired 15 to 20 min after stress. A five grades and twenty segments marking system was introduced to assess the RWMA and thickening of left ventricles. Results: The sensitivity of reversible RWMA for detecting ≥75% angiographic stenoses was 65%, with a specificity of 97%. Reversible RWMA has a high positive predictive value (98%) for stratification between severe angiographic stenoses of 75% and non-severe stenoses (less than 75%). Multivariate analysis showed that the post-stress wall motion (SSSWM), exercise wall motion differentiation value (SDSWM) and summed stress score (SSS) were the independent risk factor of coronary artery jeopardy score. Conclusions: Reversible RWMA, as shown by exercise stress 99 Tc m -MIBI gated SPECT MPI, is a significant predictor of angiographic disease with very high specificity and positive predictive values. Exercise reversible RWMA can rise the assessment value of angiographic severity in MPI

  19. Normal LVEF measurements are significantly higher in females asassessed by post-stress resting Tc-99m sestamibi gated myocardial perfusion SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Ho; Shin, Eak Kyun

    1999-01-01

    Volume-LVEF relationship is one of the most important factors of automatic EF quantification algorithm from gated myocardial perfusion SPECT(gMPS) (Germano et al. JNM, 1995). Gender difference whereby normal LVEF measurements are higher in females assessed by gMPS (Yao et al. JNM 1997). To validate true physiologic value of LVEF vs sampling or measured error, various parameters were evaluated statistically in both gender and age matched 200 subjects (mean age= 58.41±15.01) with normal LVEF more than 50%, and a low likelihood of coronary artery disease. Correlation between LVEDVi(ml/m2) and LVEF was highly significant (r=-0.62, p<0.0001) with similar correlations noted in both male (r=-0.45, p<0.0001) and female (r=-0.67, p<0.0001) subgroups. By multivariate analysis, LV volume and stroke volume was the most significant factor influencing LVEF in male and female, respectively. In conclusion, there is a significant negative correlation between LV volume and LVEF as measured by Tc-99m gated SPECT. Higher normal LVEF value should be applied to females as assessed by post-stress resting Tc-99m Sestamibi gated myocardial perfusion SPECT

  20. Reversible wall motion abnormality on adenosine stress/rest thallium-201 gated myocardial SPECT is an independent predictor of coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Eun Kyung; Lee, Won Woo; So, Young; Eo, Jae Seon; Lee, Dong Soo; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul; Kim, Sang Eun; Kim, Cheol Ho; Lee, Sang Woo

    2004-01-01

    As early as 10 minutes after adenosine stress, immediate post-stress wall motion (ipsWM) can be evaluated on adenosine stress/rest TI-201 gated SPECT (gSPECT). To widen application of TI-201 in gated SPECT, we investigated image quality, LV parameters (EF, EDV, and ESV) reproducibility, and diagnostic competency of gSPECT regarding ipsWM evaluation Myocardial perfusion and wall motion were evaluated by 5-point scoring system in 20-segment model. Image quality was assessed using weighted Kappa (Kw) for inter-and intra-observer agreements of wall motion scores (n=49). Reproducibility was examined through repeated acquisition (n=31). Diagnostic competency was evaluated versus coronary angiography (CAG) and multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify significant predictors of coronary artery disease (CAD) among stress abnormal perfusion (SSSp), stress abnormal wall motion (SSSwm), and reversible abnormal wall motion (SDSwm) (n=60). Kw for ipsWM was significantly better than that for rest regarding inter- (0.717 vs 0.489) and intra-observer agreements (0.792 vs 0.688) (p<0.05). 2SD for ipsWM was smaller than that for rest at EF (8.6% vs 10.7%) and ESV (6.0ml vs 8.4ml). Sensitivities of SSSp, SSSwm, and SDSwm were 63.3% (19/30), 63.3% (19/30), and 43.3% (13/30) and specificities 83.3% (25/30), 83.3% (25/30), and 86.7% (26/30), respectively. By multivariate analysis, SSSp (p=0.013) and SDSwm (p=0.039) remained significant predictors. Additionally, SSSwm or SDSwm could find undetected CAD in 54.5% (6/11) of patients with normal perfusion. TI-201 can be successfully applied to gated SPECT for ipsWM evaluation. Moreover, reversible wall motion abnormality on gSPECT is an independent predictor of significant CAD

  1. Electrocardiographic-gated dual-isotope simultaneous acquisition SPECT using 18F-FDG and 99mTc-sestamibi to assess myocardial viability and function in a single study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsunari, Ichiro; Matsudaira, Masamichi; Hisada, Kinichi; Kanayama, Sugako; Yoneyama, Tatsuya; Nakajima, Kenichi; Taki, Junichi; Tonami, Norihisa; Nekolla, Stephan G.

    2005-01-01

    Dual-isotope simultaneous acquisition single-photon emission computed tomography (DISA SPECT) with 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and 99m Tc-sestamibi appears attractive for the detection of viable myocardium because it permits simultaneous assessment of glucose utilisation and perfusion. Another potential benefit of this approach is that the measurement of left ventricular (LV) function may be possible by ECG gating. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that both myocardial viability and LV function can be assessed by a single ECG-gated 18 F-FDG/ 99m Tc-sestamibi DISA SPECT study, based on comparison with 18 F-FDG/ 13 N-ammonia positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as reference techniques. Thirty-three patients with prior myocardial infarction underwent ECG-gated 18 F-FDG/ 99m Tc-sestamibi DISA SPECT and 18 F-FDG/ 13 N-ammonia PET on a single day. Of these, 25 patients also underwent cine-MRI to assess LV function. The LV myocardium was divided into nine regions, and each region was classified as viable or scar using a semiquantitative visual scoring system as well as quantitative analysis. The global and regional LV function measured by gated SPECT was compared with the results of MRI. There was good agreement in respect of viability (90-96%, κ0.74-0.85) between DISA SPECT and PET by either visual or quantitative analysis. Furthermore, although both global and regional LV function measured by gated SPECT agreed with those by MRI, 99m Tc-sestamibi showed a closer correlation with MRI than did 18 F-FDG. In conclusion, ECG-gated DISA SPECT provides information on myocardial viability, as well as global and regional LV function, similar to that obtained by PET and MRI. (orig.)

  2. Left ventricular diastolic dyssynchrony assessed with phase analysis of gated myocardial perfusion SPECT: a comparison with tissue Doppler imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boogers, Mark J.; Veltman, Caroline E.; Chen, Ji; Garcia, Ernest V.; Bommel, Rutger J. van; Mooyaart, Eline A.Q.; Wall, Ernst E. van der; Schalij, Martin J.; Bax, Jeroen J.; Delgado, Victoria; Younis, Imad Al; Hiel, Bernies van der; Dibbets-Schneider, Petra

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to evaluate the feasibility of phase analysis on gated myocardial perfusion SPECT (GMPS) for the assessment of left ventricular (LV) diastolic dyssynchrony in a head-to-head comparison with tissue Doppler imaging (TDI). The population consisted of patients with end-stage heart failure of New York Heart Association functional class III or IV with a reduced LV ejection fraction of ≤35%. LV diastolic dyssynchrony was calculated using TDI as the maximal time delay between early peak diastolic velocities of two opposing left ventricle walls (diastolic mechanical delay). Significant LV diastolic dyssynchrony was defined as a diastolic mechanical delay of >55 ms on TDI. Furthermore, phase analysis on GMPS was performed to evaluate LV diastolic dyssynchrony; diastolic phase standard deviation (SD) and histogram bandwidth (HBW) were used as markers of LV diastolic dyssynchrony. A total of 150 patients (114 men, mean age 66.0 ± 10.4 years) with end-stage heart failure were enrolled. Both diastolic phase SD (r = 0.81, p 55 ms) showed significantly larger diastolic phase SD (68.1 ± 13.4 vs. 40.7 ± 14.0 , p < 0.01) and diastolic HBW (230.6 ± 54.3 vs. 129.0 ± 55.6 , p < 0.01) as compared to patients without LV diastolic dyssynchrony on TDI (≤55 ms). Finally, phase analysis on GMPS showed a good intra- and interobserver reproducibility for the determination of diastolic phase SD (ICC 0.97 and 0.88) and diastolic HBW (ICC 0.98 and 0.93). Phase analysis on GMPS showed good correlations with TDI for the assessment of LV diastolic dyssynchrony. (orig.)

  3. Quantification of left ventricular regional functions using ECG-gated myocardial perfusion SPECT. Validation of left ventricular systolic functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Akira; Takahashi, Naoto; Iwahara, Shin-ichiro; Munakata, Kazuo; Hosoya, Tetsuo

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a program to quantify regional left ventricular (LV) function and wall motion synchrony using electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS). This preliminary study was undertaken to validate the use of this program for estimating regional LV systolic function. Patients were subjected to MPS by 99m Tc-sestamibi at rest. The study included 20 patients who were confirmed to have a low probability of coronary artery disease (LPG; low probability group), 19 heart disease patients who were examined by MPS and equilibrium radionuclide angiography (ERNA) (ERG; ERNA group), and 24 patients who were examined by MPS and 2-dimensional echocardiography (2DE) (2DEG; 2DE group). The values of the ejection fraction (EF) and peak ejection rate (PER) were estimated. The global functions evaluated by this program were compared with those obtained by ERNA in the ERG. For regional assessment, the reference values of the functional indices were obtained for 17 LV segments in LPG. The Z score, (reference average value of the segment-patient's value of the segment)/reference standard deviation of the segment, was used for the evaluation of regional functions; a score equal to or greater than 2 was defined as abnormal. Semiquantitative visual interpretation of 2DE was used as the standard to assess wall motion. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) of these criteria and the relationship between 2DE grading and Z scoring were validated in 2DEG. The values of the global EF and PER evaluated by this program correlated with those determined by ERNA (r=0.76 and 0.58, respectively; p -10 ). The potential of this program to quantify the regional systolic function was validated. (author)

  4. Prognostic study of risk stratification among Japanese patients with ischemic heart disease using gated myocardial perfusion SPECT: J-ACCESS study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Tsunehiko; Nakajima, Kenichi; Kusuoka, Hideo; Yamashina, Akira; Nishimura, Shigeyuki

    2008-01-01

    Although the prognostic value of myocardial perfusion imaging using gated single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) for predicting major cardiac events has been evaluated, little is known about the relevance of this procedure to the Japanese population. A total of 4,031 consecutive Japanese patients with suspected or confirmed ischemic heart diseases were registered at 117 hospitals in the Japanese Assessment of Cardiac Events and Survival Study by Quantitative Gated SPECT investigation. Gated stress/rest myocardial perfusion SPECT was performed and the patients were followed up for 3 years. Segmental perfusion scores and quantitative gated SPECT results were calculated. Major cardiac events were defined as cardiac death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, and severe heart failure. During the 3-year follow-up, cardiac death (n = 57) and nonfatal myocardial infarction (n = 39) occurred in 96 patients (2.4%/3 years) when hard events were the endpoints. When severe heart failure was included as an endpoint, major cardiac events that developed in 175 patients (4.3%/3 years) comprised cardiac death (n = 45), nonfatal myocardial infarction (n = 37), and severe heart failure (n = 93). Normal and severely abnormal summed stress score values were associated with low (2.31%/3 years) and high (9.21%/3 years) rates of major cardiac events, respectively. Rates of major cardiac events were significantly higher in patients with ejection fraction (EF) <45% than in those with EF 45% or higher (16.55 vs 2.94%/3 years; P < 0.001). The incidence of major cardiac events within 3 years was also significantly higher among patients with high end-systolic volumes. The major event rates were similar among nondiabetic patients with and diabetic patients without prior myocardial infarction at 5.06% and 5.73%/3 years, respectively. Cardiac event rates were significantly lower in the Japanese than in the USA and European populations. However, large myocardial perfusion defects and

  5. Comparison of exercise and pharmacological stress gated SPECT in detecting transient left ventricular dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Hakan; Tan, Yusuf Z; Isgoren, Serkan; Gorur, Gozde D; Kozdag, Guliz; Ural, Ertan; Berk, Fatma

    2008-06-01

    Transient left ventricular contractile dysfunction (TLVD) is observed owing to post-exercise stunning in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Pharmacological stimulation differs from exercise stress because it does not cause demand ischemia. The aim of this study was to determine whether TLVD could also be seen after pharmacological stress (dipyridamole). Of the patients in whom gated single-photon emission computed tomography (GSPECT) was performed in our institution from January 2004 to April 2007, 439 subjects with known or suspected CAD were included in the study. GSPECT was performed for all patients following exercise (group I, n = 220) or pharmacological stress (group II, n = 219) according to a 2-day (stress-rest) protocol after injection of Tc-99m methoxyisobutyl-isonitrile (MIBI). Stress, rest, and difference (stress-rest value) left ventricular ejection fractions (SLVEF, RLVEF, and DLVEF) and transient ischemic dilatation (TID) ratio were derived automatically. Summed stress score, summed rest score, and summed difference score (SDS) for myocardial perfusion were calculated using a 20-segment model and a five-point scoring system. An SDS > 3 was considered as ischemic. On the basis of the perfusion findings, patients were subdivided into a normal (group A, n = 216) and ischemia group (group B, n = 223). DLVEF and perfusion scores of all groups were compared. Relationships between DLVEF and perfusion, and between TID ratio and DLVEF were also evaluated. Stress-induced ischemia was observed in 223 of 439 patients (50.8%). In group A, the difference between stress and rest LVEF values was not significant (P = 0.670 and P = 0.200 for groups IA and IIA, respectively). However, LVEF was significantly decreased after stress compared with rest values for group B (P good correlations between TID ratios and DLVEF values in four subgroups (r = -0.55, r = -0.62, r = -0.59, and r = -0.41; for groups IA, IB, IIA, and IIB, respectively, P stress was observed

  6. Comparison of exercise and pharmacological stress gated SPECT in detecting transient left ventricular dysfunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demir, Hakan; Tan, Yusuf Z.; Isgoren, Serkan; Gorur, Gozde D.; Kozdag, Guliz; Ural, Ertan; Berk, Fatma

    2008-01-01

    Transient left ventricular contractile dysfunction (TLVD) is observed owing to post-exercise stunning in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Pharmacological stimulation differs from exercise stress because it does not cause demand ischemia. The aim of this study was to determine whether TLVD could also be seen after pharmacological stress (dipyridamole). Of the patients in whom gated single-photon emission computed tomography (GSPECT) was performed in our institution from January 2004 to April 2007, 439 subjects with known or suspected CAD were included in the study. GSPECT was performed for all patients following exercise (group I, n=220) or pharmacological stress (group II, n=219) according to a 2-day (stress-rest) protocol after injection of Tc-99m methoxyisobutyl-isonitrile (MIBI). Stress, rest, and difference (stress-rest value) left ventricular ejection fractions (SLVEF, RLVEF, and DLVEF) and transient ischemic dilatation (TID) ratio were derived automatically. Summed stress score, summed rest score, and summed difference score (SDS) for myocardial perfusion were calculated using a 20-segment model and a five-point scoring system. An SDS >3 was considered as ischemic. On the basis of the perfusion findings, patients were subdivided into a normal (group A, n=216) and ischemia group (group B, n=223). DLVEF and perfusion scores of all groups were compared. Relationships between DLVEF and perfusion, and between TID ratio and DLVEF were also evaluated. Stress-induced ischemia was observed in 223 of 439 patients (50.8%). In group A, the difference between stress and rest LVEF values was not significant (P=0.670 and P=0.200 for groups IA and IIA, respectively). However, LVEF was significantly decreased after stress compared with rest values for group B (P<0.0001 for groups IB and IIB). TLVD (≤-5% for DLVEF) was observed in 20 of 216 (9%) and 81 of 223 subjects (36%) in patients in groups A and B, respectively (P<0.0001). In group I, we found TLVD in 46 of

  7. Prevalence of positive gated myocardial SPECT in diabetic and non-diabetic women and impact of other factors; KIHD perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maseeh-uz-Zaman; Fatima, N.; Samad, A.; Rasheed, S.Z.; Ishaq, M.; Rehman, K.; Wali, A.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to assess the prevalence of coronary artery disease (CAD) among diabetic (DM) and nondiabetic (NDM) women using Gated SPECT (GSPECT) and to study the impact of other. risk factors like hypertension (HTN), dyslipidemia, family history and menopause. This is a prospective cross-sectional study on a consecutive sample of 287 women referred to Nuclear Cardiology Department of Karachi Institute of Heart Diseases (KIHD) for GSPECT for evaluation of known or suspected CAD (from January 2009 till June 2009). Women with a history of DM diagnosed less than 5 years were excluded. Same day (reststress) GSPECT study was conducted and fixed or reversible perfusion defects were considered positive GSPECT for CAD. GSPECT was positive for CAD in 41/115 (36%, P 0.002) diabetic women and 37/172 (21 %, P 0.005) non-diabetic cohort. In diabetic cohort, GSPECT was positive in 5/9 (56%, P 0.013) women with diabetes only, 17/35 (48%, P 0.02) DM with HTN, 12/15 (80%, P value 0.02) DM with dyslipidemia and 11/43 (26%, P 0.001) DM with >2 risk factors. GSPECT was normal in all 3 diabetic women with positive family history for CAD. In nondiabetic cohort, GSPECT was positive in 9/32 (28%, P value 0.739) women with no risk factor, 5/58 (26%, P 0.866) HTN only, 2/5 (40%, P value 0.655) only dyslipidemic women, 1/12. (8%, P 0.004) with family history only and 4/23 (17%, P value 0.166) non-diabetic with >2 risk factors. Interestingly, 35/93 post-menopausal diabetic (38%, p value 0.017) had positive GSPECT while 33/123 non-diabetic postmenopausal women (27%, p 0.03) had positive perfusion scans. GSPECT was positive in 6/26 (23%, P 0.006) and 4/49 (8%, P 0.05) in diabetic and non-diabetic pre-menopausal women. The prevalence of CAD in our diabetic women is as high as internationally reported and diabetes is a strong risk factor for CAD. Dyslipidemia with diabetes is a major contributor to CAD than HTN and F/H. Diabetes erases the protective effect of estrogen

  8. Prevalence of positive gated myocardial SPECT in diabetic and non-diabetic women and impact of other factors; KIHD perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maseeh-uz-Zaman,; Fatima, N; Samad, A; Rasheed, S Z; Ishaq, M; Rehman, K; Wali, A [Karachi, Inst. of Heart Diseases, Karachi (Pakistan)

    2009-07-15

    The objective of the present study was to assess the prevalence of coronary artery disease (CAD) among diabetic (DM) and nondiabetic (NDM) women using Gated SPECT (GSPECT) and to study the impact of other. risk factors like hypertension (HTN), dyslipidemia, family history and menopause. This is a prospective cross-sectional study on a consecutive sample of 287 women referred to Nuclear Cardiology Department of Karachi Institute of Heart Diseases (KIHD) for GSPECT for evaluation of known or suspected CAD (from January 2009 till June 2009). Women with a history of DM diagnosed less than 5 years were excluded. Same day (reststress) GSPECT study was conducted and fixed or reversible perfusion defects were considered positive GSPECT for CAD. GSPECT was positive for CAD in 41/115 (36%, P 0.002) diabetic women and 37/172 (21 %, P 0.005) non-diabetic cohort. In diabetic cohort, GSPECT was positive in 5/9 (56%, P 0.013) women with diabetes only, 17/35 (48%, P 0.02) DM with HTN, 12/15 (80%, P value 0.02) DM with dyslipidemia and 11/43 (26%, P 0.001) DM with >2 risk factors. GSPECT was normal in all 3 diabetic women with positive family history for CAD. In nondiabetic cohort, GSPECT was positive in 9/32 (28%, P value 0.739) women with no risk factor, 5/58 (26%, P 0.866) HTN only, 2/5 (40%, P value 0.655) only dyslipidemic women, 1/12. (8%, P 0.004) with family history only and 4/23 (17%, P value 0.166) non-diabetic with >2 risk factors. Interestingly, 35/93 post-menopausal diabetic (38%, p value 0.017) had positive GSPECT while 33/123 non-diabetic postmenopausal women (27%, p 0.03) had positive perfusion scans. GSPECT was positive in 6/26 (23%, P 0.006) and 4/49 (8%, P 0.05) in diabetic and non-diabetic pre-menopausal women. The prevalence of CAD in our diabetic women is as high as internationally reported and diabetes is a strong risk factor for CAD. Dyslipidemia with diabetes is a major contributor to CAD than HTN and F/H. Diabetes erases the protective effect of estrogen

  9. Asymmetrically thickened posterior wall is associated with decline of ejection fraction after stress on adenosine stress/rest thallium-201 gated myocardial SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bom Sahn; Lee, Won Woo; Lee, Dong Soo; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul; Kim, Sang Eun [College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    LV parameters (LVEF. ESVI and EDVI) on adenosine stress/rest thallium-201 gated myocardial SPECT (gSPECT) are various from stress to rest. We investigated the reason why they were various in patients without coronary artery disease. Seventy-one patients(M:F=32:39, age 58.1{+-}9.7yrs), who underwent gSPECT and coronary angiography (CAG) due to chest pain or preoperative evaluation were included. CAG results were normal or insignificant. Exclusion criteria were atrial fibrillation, thyroid disease, primary cardiomyopathy, myocardial bridge, LBBB, MI, and valvular heart disease. Patients were calssified into 3 groups by EF difference ({delta}EF=rest-stress EF) on gSPECT : group1 ({delta}EF{>=}10), group2 (0 {<=}{delta}EF<10), and group3 ({delta}EF<0). LV parameters on gSPECT and thicknesses of IVS (interventricular septum) and LVPW (left ventricular posterior wall) on echocardiography were compared among the 3 groups. Myocardial perfusion status were normal or mild reversible/persistent perfusion defect in 76.1% (54/71). LVEFs at stress were not different among all 3 groups : 59.3{+-}8.54% in group 1 (61.3{+-}10.22% in group 2 and 64.8{+-}7.58% in group 3 (p>0.05). But LVEF at rest was smaller in group 3 (58.7{+-}8.38%) than the other groups (72.5{+-}8.77% in group1 and 66.7{+-}10.6% in group2) (p<0.01). EDVIs and ESVI at stress were larger than those at rest in all groups (p<0.05) except ESVI in group 3 (16.2{+-}6.21ml at stress and 17.5{+-}6.41ml at rest, p<0.01), and that was attributed to EF<0 in group 3. In echocardiographical analysis, group 3 had significantly increased wall thickness of LVPW (10.7{+-}1.2mm versus 9.4{+-}1.6mm, p=0.01) and decreased wall thickness ratio of IVS/LVPW (0.963{+-}0.102 versus 1.048{+-}0.104, p=0.035) than group 1. In patients without coronary artery disease, LVEF, EDVI and ESVI on gSPECT were various and decline of LVEF from stress to rest was caused by unnormalized ESVI . Asymmetrically thickened LVPW may play a crucial role and

  10. Comparison of myocardial fatty acid metabolism with left ventricular function and perfusion in cardiomyopathies. By 123I-BMIPP SPECT and 99mTc-tetrofosmin electrocardiographically gated SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Chunlei; Shuke, Noriyuki; Okizaki, Atsutaka

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate myocardial fatty acid metabolism and its relationship with left ventricular (LV) function and perfusion in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Thirty-nine patients with cardiomyopathies (58±14 y), comprising 15 DCM and 24 HCM, and 9 age-matched healthy controls were studied with 123 I-15-(p-iodophenyl)-3-(R,S)-methylpentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) and 99m Tc-tetrofosmin (TF) electrocardiographically gated SPECT. As parameters of myocardial fatty acid metabolism, the heart-to-mediastinum ratio (H/M) and global washout of BMIPP were calculated from early and delayed planar images, while regional BMIPP uptake and washout were calculated from SPECT. In TF study, the H/M (H/M-TF) and LV ejection fraction (LVEF) were calculated as global parameters of perfusion and function, while regional TF uptake and wall thickening index were calculated as regional parameters of perfusion and function using the Quantitative Gated SPECT software. The differences in the parameters and the correlations between the parameters from the 2 studies were investigated by one-way ANOVA and multiple linear regression analysis. BMIPP uptake was decreased (p 0.05), but showed a significant correlation with H/M-TF (p 0.05) but had a significant correlation with regional perfusion (p<0.0001) in DCM. In HCM, regional BMIPP parameters showed significant multiple linear correlations with both regional function (p<0.005) and perfusion (p<0.0001). According to the partial correlation coefficients, delayed regional BMIPP uptake was the most significant factor for predicting regional function in HCM, while early regional BMIPP uptake was the only or the most significant factor for predicting regional perfusion in DCM and HCM, respectively. In DCM, BMIPP uptake and washout could not reflect LV function. In HCM, regional delayed BMIPP uptake might be useful for evaluating regional function. In DCM and HCM, early BMIPP uptake might be

  11. Regional wall thickening in gated myocardial perfusion SPECT in a Japanese population: effect of sex, radiotracer, rotation angles and frame rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhter, Nasima; Nakajima, Kenichi; Okuda, Koichi; Matsuo, Shinro; Yoneyama, Tatsuya; Taki, Junichi; Kinuya, Seigo [Kanazawa University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kanazawa, Ishikawa (Japan)

    2008-09-15

    Gated single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging of myocardium by {sup 99m}Tc and {sup 201}Tl is used extensively to measure quantitative cardiac functional parameters. However, factors affecting normal values for myocardial functional parameters and population-specific standards have not yet been established. The aim of the study was to determine the effect of sex, radiotracer, rotation angles and frame rates on resting myocardial wall thickening (WT) and to develop a Japanese standard of normal values for WT. Data from a total of 202 patients with low possibility of having cardiac problems were collected from nine hospitals throughout Japan. Patients were divided into five groups according to study protocol, and WT was evaluated according to the 17-segment and four-region (basal, mid and apical regions and the apex) polar map distribution. WT was generally higher in women than in men irrespective of the use of radiotracers, rotation angles or frame rates, and the difference was highly significant in the mid and apical regions. In any protocol used, resting myocardial thickening in the apex was higher than in the mid and apical regions, and thickening was lowest in the basal region, suggesting heterogeneous regional myocardial thickening (%) in normal subjects. Different rotation angles showed no significant change on WT, but different frame rates and tracers showed significant WT change in both sexes. Percent thickening of the myocardium was significantly higher in imaging by {sup 99m}Tc-labelled tracers than in {sup 201}Tl. Sex, radiotracers and frame rates had a significant effect on myocardial thickening, and the importance of population-specific standards should be emphasized. A normal database can serve as a standard for gated SPECT evaluation of myocardial thickening in a Japanese population and might be applicable to Asian populations having a similar physique. (orig.)

  12. Prediction of improvement of myocardial wall motion after coronary artery bypass surgery using rest Tl-201/dipyridamole stress gated Tc-99m-MIBI/24 hour delay Tl-201 SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Won Woo; Yeo, Jeong Yeo; Kim, Seok Ki; Kim, Ki Bong; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul

    1998-01-01

    Using rest Tl-201/ dipyridamole stress gated Tc-99m-MIBI/24 hour delay Tl-201 SPECT, we investigated the predictive values of the markers of the stress-rest reversibility (Rev), Tl-201 rest perfusion (Rest), Tl-201 24 hour redistribution (Del) and Tc-99m-MIBI gated systolic thickening (Thk) for wall motion improvement after coronary artery bypass surgery. In 39 patients (M:F=34:5, age 58±8), preoperative and postoperative (3 months) SPECT were compared. 24 hour delayed SPECT was done in 16 patients having perfusion defects at rest. Perfusion or wall motion was scored from 0 to 3 (0: normal to 3: defect or dyskinesia). Wall motion was abnormal in 142 segments among 585 segments of 99 artery territories which were surgically revascularized. After bypass surgery, ejection fraction increased from 37.8±9.0% to 45.5±12.3% in 22 patients who had decreased ejectin fraction preoperatively. Wall motion improved in 103 (72.5%) segments among 142 dysfunctional segments. Positive predictive values (PPV) of Rev, Rest, Del, and Thk were 83%, 76%, 43%, and 69% respectively. Negative predictive values (NPV) of Rev, Rest, Del, and Thk were 48%, 44%, 58%, and 21%, respectively. Rest/gated stress/delay SPECT had PPV of 74% and NPV of 46%. Through univariate logistic regression analysis revealed Rev( p=0.0008) and Rest (p=0.024) as significant predictors, stepwise multivariate test found Rev as the only good predictor (p=0.0008). Among independent predictors obtained by rest Tl-201/stress gated Tc-99m-MIBI/delayed Tl-201 myocardial SPECT for wall motion improvement after bypass surgery, stress-rest reversibility was the single most useful predictor

  13. Four-dimensional MAP-RBI-EM image reconstruction method with a 4D motion prior for 4D gated myocardial perfusion SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Taek-Soo; Tsui, Benjamin M.W. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Gullberg, Grant T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2011-07-01

    We evaluated and proposed here a 4D maximum a posteriori rescaled-block iterative (MAP-RBI)-EM image reconstruction method with a motion prior to improve the accuracy of 4D gated myocardial perfusion (GMP) SPECT images. We hypothesized that a 4D motion prior which resembles the global motion of the true 4D motion of the heart will improve the accuracy of the reconstructed images with regional myocardial motion defect. Normal heart model in the 4D XCAT (eXtended CArdiac-Torso) phantom is used as the prior in the 4D MAP-RBI-EM algorithm where a Gaussian-shaped distribution is used as the derivative of potential function (DPF) that determines the smoothing strength and range of the prior in the algorithm. The mean and width of the DPF equal to the expected difference between the reconstructed image and the motion prior, and smoothing range, respectively. To evaluate the algorithm, we used simulated projection data from a typical clinical {sup 99m}Tc Sestamibi GMP SPECT study using the 4D XCAT phantom. The noise-free projection data were generated using an analytical projector that included the effects of attenuation, collimator-detector response and scatter (ADS) and Poisson noise was added to generated noisy projection data. The projection datasets were reconstructed using the modified 4D MAP-RBI-EM with various iterations, prior weights, and sigma values as well as with ADS correction. The results showed that the 4D reconstructed image estimates looked more like the motion prior with sharper edges as the weight of prior increased. It also demonstrated that edge preservation of the myocardium in the GMP SPECT images could be controlled by a proper motion prior. The Gaussian-shaped DPF allowed stronger and weaker smoothing force for smaller and larger difference of neighboring voxel values, respectively, depending on its parameter values. We concluded the 4D MAP-RBI-EM algorithm with the general motion prior can be used to provide 4D GMP SPECT images with improved

  14. The role of quantitative Tc-99m-MIBI gated SPECT/F-18-FDG PET imaging in the monitoring of intracoronary bone marrow cell transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminek, M.; Myslivecek, M.

    2006-01-01

    A lot of unresolved questions still exist concerning the exact mechanism of the beneficial effects of bone marrow cell (BMC) transplantation for myocardial regeneration. The aim of this communication is to report the cases of patients with and without post-transplantation left ventricular function improvement. To this study we included consecutive patients with irreversible damage after a first acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction treated by coronary angioplasty with stent implantation. The irreversible damage was identified by dobutamine echocardiography and confirmed by rest gated Tc-99m-MIBI gated SPECT and in the majority of patients by F-18-FDG PET imaging as well. Using 4D-MSPECT software, we quantified MIBI/FDG uptake and gated SPECT left ventricular ejection fraction, end-diastolic/end-systolic volumes (LVEF, EDV/ESV) before BMC therapy and 3 months later. The results obtained in the initial group of patients in this study (27 patients in the BMC treated group, 16 patients in the control group) have been published previously [Eur J Nucl Med 2005; 32 (Suppl 1 ): S46]. Among the BMC group, we identified 13 responders to therapy with average LVEF improvement from 43.3%± 11% to 51.4%± 10.4% and EDV/ESV improvement from 145 ml/84 ml to 133 ml/67 ml. The remaining 14 patients were non-responders to therapy with no significant change in LVEF (39.1%±8.1% versus 39.8% ± 7.4%), the EDV/ESV increased from 166 ml/105 ml to 188 ml/116 ml. Responders to the cell therapy had prevailing MIBI uptake in the range of 31-50% of maximum in the infarction territory. On the other hand, non-responders to BMC therapy had prevailing MIBI uptake in the range of 0-30% of maximum. Two cases are presented in this report. Further studies with a larger cohort of patients would be helpful to evaluate our findings. We observed strong interindividual differences in the effectiveness of the cell therapy. Prevailing residual MIBI uptake in the range of 31-50% of maximum was in the

  15. Postoperative Functional Outcome After Off-Pump Versus On-Pump Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Using Gated Myocardial SPECT: A Comparison by Propensity Score Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Jin; Paeng, Jin Chul; Lee, Dong Soo; Kim, Ki Bong; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul; Kang, Won Jun

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the short-term and mid-term differences in perfusion and function after off-pump and on-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) using gated myocardial single photon emission computed tomography. A total of 70 patients with coronary artery disease who underwent CABG were included based on the propensity score matching results from 165 patients. Thirty-five patients underwent off-pump and 35 patients on-pump CABG. Rest 201 TI/dipyridamole stress 99m Tc-methoxyisobutylisonitrile gated single photon emission computed thermographs were performed preoperatively and postoperatively at short-term (103±23 days after surgery) and mid-term follow-up (502±111 days after surgery). Changes in left ventricular ejection fraction, end systolic volume, stress and rest segmental perfusion, and segmental wall thickening were compared between the two groups. The segments with preoperative rest 201 T1 uptake under 60% of maximum uptake were included in the segmental analysis. Left ventricular ejection fraction (P=0.001) and end systolic volume (P=0.008) showed significant improvement in both groups. There were no significant short-term and mid-term differences between the two groups in terms of left ventricular ejection fraction (P=0.309) and end systolic volume (P=0.938). Likewise, segmental rest (P=0.178) and stress perfusion (P=0.071), and systolic wall thickening (P=0.241) showed significant improvement in both groups with similar time courses. Off-pump CABG resulted in significant improvements in left ventricular ejection fraction, end systolic volume, and regional myocardial perfusion and function that are comparable to on-pump CABG at short-term and mid-term. Gated myocardial SPECT successfully revealed that off-pump CABG is as good as on-pump CABG from the viewpoint of myocardial perfusion and function.

  16. High diagnostic accuracy of low-dose gated-SPECT with solid-state ultrafast detectors: preliminary clinical results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gimelli, Alessia; Genovesi, Dario; Giorgetti, Assuero; Marzullo, Paolo [CNR, Fondazione Toscana Gabriele Monasterio, Pisa (Italy); Bottai, Matteo [University of South Carolina, Division of Biostatistics, Columbia, SC (United States); Karolinska Institutet, Division of Biostatistics, Stockholm (Sweden); Di Martino, Fabio [AOUP, UO Fisica Sanitaria, Pisa (Italy)

    2012-01-15

    Appropriate use of SPECT imaging is regulated by evidence-based guidelines and appropriateness criteria in an effort to limit the burden of radiation administered to patients. We aimed at establishing whether the use of a low dose for stress-rest single-day nuclear myocardial perfusion imaging on an ultrafast (UF) cardiac gamma camera using cadmium-zinc-telluride solid-state detectors could be used routinely with the same accuracy obtained with standard doses and conventional cameras. To this purpose, 137 consecutive patients (mean age 61 {+-} 8 years) with known or suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) were enrolled. They underwent single-day low-dose stress-rest myocardial perfusion imaging using UF SPECT and invasive coronary angiography. Patients underwent the first scan with a 7-min acquisition time 10 min after the end of the stress protocol (dose range 185 to 222 MBq of {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin). The rest scan (dose range 370 to 444 MBq of {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin) was acquired with a 6-min acquisition time. The mean summed stress scores (SSS) and mean summed rest scores (SRS) were obtained semiquantitatively. Coronary angiograms showed significant epicardial CAD in 83% of patients. Mean SSS and SRS were 10 {+-} 5 and 3 {+-} 3, respectively. Overall the area under the ROC curve for the SSS values was 0.904, while the areas under the ROC curves for each vascular territory were 0.982 for the left anterior descending artery, 0.931 for the left circumflex artery and 0.889 for the right coronary artery. This pilot study demonstrated the feasibility of a low-dose single-day stress-rest fasting protocol performed using UF SPECT, with good sensitivity and specificity in detecting CAD at low patient exposure, opening new perspectives in the use of myocardial perfusion in ischaemic patients. (orig.)

  17. High diagnostic accuracy of low-dose gated-SPECT with solid-state ultrafast detectors: preliminary clinical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gimelli, Alessia; Genovesi, Dario; Giorgetti, Assuero; Marzullo, Paolo; Bottai, Matteo; Di Martino, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    Appropriate use of SPECT imaging is regulated by evidence-based guidelines and appropriateness criteria in an effort to limit the burden of radiation administered to patients. We aimed at establishing whether the use of a low dose for stress-rest single-day nuclear myocardial perfusion imaging on an ultrafast (UF) cardiac gamma camera using cadmium-zinc-telluride solid-state detectors could be used routinely with the same accuracy obtained with standard doses and conventional cameras. To this purpose, 137 consecutive patients (mean age 61 ± 8 years) with known or suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) were enrolled. They underwent single-day low-dose stress-rest myocardial perfusion imaging using UF SPECT and invasive coronary angiography. Patients underwent the first scan with a 7-min acquisition time 10 min after the end of the stress protocol (dose range 185 to 222 MBq of 99m Tc-tetrofosmin). The rest scan (dose range 370 to 444 MBq of 99m Tc-tetrofosmin) was acquired with a 6-min acquisition time. The mean summed stress scores (SSS) and mean summed rest scores (SRS) were obtained semiquantitatively. Coronary angiograms showed significant epicardial CAD in 83% of patients. Mean SSS and SRS were 10 ± 5 and 3 ± 3, respectively. Overall the area under the ROC curve for the SSS values was 0.904, while the areas under the ROC curves for each vascular territory were 0.982 for the left anterior descending artery, 0.931 for the left circumflex artery and 0.889 for the right coronary artery. This pilot study demonstrated the feasibility of a low-dose single-day stress-rest fasting protocol performed using UF SPECT, with good sensitivity and specificity in detecting CAD at low patient exposure, opening new perspectives in the use of myocardial perfusion in ischaemic patients. (orig.)

  18. Detection of myocardial stunning with gated SPECT and its relationship with location, extension and severity of perfusion defects induced by exercise or pharmacologic stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mut, F.; Beretta, M.; Vidal, I.; Rener, A.; Alonso, O.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the relationship between transient ventricular dysfunction detected by gated SPECT with the location, extension and severity of ischemic areas in patients with reversible perfusion defects. Material and Methods: We retrospectively studied 83 patients (61±11 yrs., 61 men, 27 with previous MI) submitted for coronary artery disease (CAD) evaluation with 99mTc-MIBI gated SPECT using a 2-day protocol whose perfusion imaging pattern had been reported positive for myocardial ischemia. Stress test was exercise in 54 cases, dipyridamole in 28 and dobutamine in 1. Previous work from our group demonstrated up to 12% change in LVEF from rest to post-stress in a population with low likelihood of CAD and a normal perfusion pattern. Thus, according to % variation of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) from rest to post-stress we further divided the population into 2 subgroups, (A) with less than 12% change in LVEF (n=56) and (B) with more than 12% negative variation (n=27). For evaluation of perfusion, a simplified 7-segment division of the myocardium was used and a combined ischemic score was obtained by multiplying the number of segments with reversible defects by the 1-4 assigned severity score. Results: There was no significant difference between the two groups regarding age, gender, stress result (clinical or ECG), number of fixed perfusion defects or rest LVEF. Dipyridamole test was more frequent among patients of group B. Post-stress LVEF was 49±14% for group A and 41±15% for group B, p=0.0125. Combined ischemic score was 6.82±6.5 vs. 11.96±12 respectively, p=0.014. In patients of group A, defects corresponding to the right coronary territory were more frequent, while the left descending artery territory was more commonly affected in group B patients, however this was not statistically significant. Left circumflex territory was equally affected in both groups. Conclusion: Transient ventricular dysfunction after a stress test can be

  19. Detection of myocardial viability by means of Single Proton Emission Computed Tomography (Perfused SPECT) dual {sup 201} Tl (rest of 15 minutes, 24 late hours and 24 hours reinjection) and gated-SPECT {sup 99m} Tc-SESTAMIBI in effort or stimulation of the coronary reserves; Deteccion de viabilidad miocardica mediante tomografia por emision de foton unico (SPECT perfusorio) dual {sup 201} Talio (Reposo de 15 minutos, 24 horas tardio y 24 horas reinyeccion) y gated-SPECT {sup 99m} Tc-SESTAMIBI en esfuerzo o estimulo de reserva coronaria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendoza V, R

    2004-07-01

    The objective of this work was to determine if the images of SPECT {sup 201} TI in rest of 15 minutes, 24 late hours and Gated-SPECT {sup 99m} Tc-SESTAMIBI in effort or stimulation of coronary reservation correlate with the study of 24 hours post reinjection of {sup 201}TI to determine the presence of having knitted viable myocardium. Material and methods: 29 patients were studied with coronary arterial illness (EAC) to who are carried out SPECT {sup 201} TI in rest with images of 15 minutes, 24 late hours and 24 hours reinjection, by means of the administration of {sup 201}TI to dose of 130 MBq and reinjection with 37 MBq. and Gated-SPECT {sup 99m}Tc-SESTAMIBI in effort or stimulation of coronary reservation, later to the administration of 1110 MBq. Results: 29 patients were included according to inclusion approaches and exclusion, of those which 22 (75.86%) they correspond at the masculine sex and 7 (24.13%) to the feminine one, with an average of 62.1 year-old age, 2320 segments myocardial were analysed so much it is phase post-effort as rest; they were diagnosed a total of 264 segments with heart attack, of which viability myocardium was observed in 174 segments. The statistical tests are analysis of frequencies. The non parametric test of Wilcoxon and Mann-Whitney. Conclusions: the viability myocardial at the 24 late hours and 24 hours reinjection was similar; significant difference exists between the study of 15 minutes and 24 hours reinjection, ischemic illness was also demonstrated in territories different to the heart attack area in the studies of 15 minutes, late 24 hours and 24 hours reinjection. (Author)

  20. Prognostic implications of post-stress ejection fraction decrease detected by gated SPECT in the absence of stress-induced perfusion abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dona, Manjola; Massi, Lucia; Settimo, Leonardo; Bartolini, Matteo; Gianni, Gianluca; Pupi, Alberto; Sciagra, Roberto [University of Florence, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Department of Clinical Physiopathology, Florence (Italy)

    2011-03-15

    The prognostic meaning of a post-stress ejection fraction (EF) decrease detected by perfusion gated SPECT is still unclear. We therefore followed up patients with post-stress EF decrease in the absence of stress-induced perfusion abnormalities. We prospectively enrolled 57 consecutive patients with post-stress EF drop {>=} 5 EF units and summed difference score (SDS) {<=} 1. They were followed up for more than 1 year and their outcome was compared with a group of sex- and age-matched controls with the same SDS but without EF decrease. During follow-up there were 13 events (1 cardiac death, 1 non-fatal myocardial infarction, 1 congestive heart failure and 10 late revascularizations). In the control group we registered six events. There was a significant difference (p < 0.0001) between the event-free survival curves of the two groups. The event rate of patients with post-stress EF decrease {>=} 5 EF units is relatively high and is significantly worse than that of a control group of patients with similarly normal SDS but without EF changes. Therefore, a post-stress EF decrease without stress-induced perfusion abnormalities should be cautiously interpreted. (orig.)

  1. Clinical usefulness of Tc-99m hexakis 2-methoxybutyl isonitrile gated SPECT in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy: retrospective analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Z.R.; Khan, A.Z.

    2010-01-01

    Background: In Dilated cardiomyopathy the heart is enlarged and ventricles are dilated. Gated myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography is considered state of the art for myocardial perfusion imaging. A retrospective analysis was conducted to evaluate patients with dilated cardiomyopathy with Tc-99m sestamibi gated myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography to evaluate its clinical utility. Methods: A 10 year retrospective medical record review was done from 1991 to 2001 at Wake Forest University, North Carolina, USA. Eligibility criteria included a diagnosis of dilated cardiomyopathy and availability of coronary angiography and Tc-99m sestamibi cardiac imaging results. 26 cases were selected for the final review and inclusion in the study. The study was done with standard protocols for cardiac sestamibi imaging. Results: A total of 26 cases were included in the final analysis. Cases were divided into two main groups. Group-A included 16 patients with no correlation between Tc-99m sestamibi and cardiac catheterisation reports. Group-B included 10 patients with good correlation between the above tests. There were no significant differences between the left ventricular ejection fraction, angina history, sex distribution and diabetic status between the two groups. We applied Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test and z-test to quantify the difference between the two groups. Data was tabulated and z-test was performed. The calculated p value was <0.0001. This is significantly less than the tabulated p-value at 5% level of significance, i.e., 1.96. Significant differences exist between Group-A and Group-B. Conclusion: Tc-99m sestamibi is an excellent agent for investigating myocardial perfusion in dilated cardiomyopathy. The reversible and fixed perfusion defects (small to medium sized) seen in dilated cardiomyopathy after performance of Tc-99m sestamibi gated single photon emission computed tomography imaging may not be due to coronary

  2. Gated blood-pool SPECT assessment of Wolff-Parkinson-White syndromes before and after radiofrequency ablation of accessory pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bontemps, L.; Ben Brahim, H.; Kraiem, T.; Chevalier, P.; Kirkorian, G.; Touboul, P.; Itti, R.

    1997-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) ablation of accessory pathways in Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome is supposed to be less aggressive than fulguration while providing excellent results. The aims of our study were therefore the evaluation of the functional results of this therapy in terms of left or right ejection fractions and its effects on the contraction synchronism between both ventricular chambers, derived from bi-ventricular Fourier phase histograms. A consecutive series of 44 patients has been investigated within 48 hours before and after RF therapy: 14 patients had right sided WPW and 30 patients left sided WPW. Only patients for whom RF treatment was considered as a success have been included in the study. Gated blood pool tomography has been performed in order to localize the site of pre-excitation and to build-up the phase histograms for both ventricles, and planar gated imaging has been used for right and left ejection fraction determination. Functional results demonstrate the absence of deleterious effect of RF on ventricular contraction and rather a slight increase of ejection fractions, with a more statistically significant difference for left WPW (LVEF = 62.2 % before RF vs 64.4 % after RF; p = 0.02) than for right WPW (RVEF = 36.3 % before RF vs 39.7 after RF; p = 0.16). Phase analysis, on the contrary, show only significant differences for right WPW, with a noticeable decrease of the pre-excitation (left-to-right phase difference 14.4 deg before RF vs 7.5 deg after RF; p = 0.03) and a significant reduction of the right ventricular phase dispersion (right phase standard deviation 26.5 deg before RF vs 19.0 deg after RF; p = 0.03). For left WPW no measurable differences can be demonstrated in the basal state and it is suggested to use stimulation techniques in order to enhance the competition between the normal and accessory conduction pathways. (authors)

  3. Stress-induced myocardial ischemia is associated with early post-stress left ventricular mechanical dyssynchrony as assessed by phase analysis of {sup 201}Tl gated SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chien-Cheng; Shen, Thau-Yun [Show Chwan Memorial Hospital, Department of Cardiology, Changhua (China); Chang, Ming-Che [Changhua Christian Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Changhua (China); Hung, Guang-Uei [Chang Bing Show Chwan Memorial Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Changhua (China); China Medical University, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Science, Taichung (China); Chen, Wan-Chen [Chang Bing Show Chwan Memorial Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Changhua (China); Kao, Chia-Hung [China Medical University, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Science, Taichung (China); Chen, Ji [Emory University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2012-12-15

    In {sup 201}Tl SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) data are acquired shortly after the stress injection to assess early post-stress left ventricle (LV) function. The purpose of this study was to use {sup 201}Tl SPECT MPI to investigate whether stress-induced myocardial ischemia is associated with LV mechanical dyssynchrony. Enrolled in the study were 75 patients who were referred for dipyridamole stress and rest {sup 201}Tl gated SPECT MPI. The early post-stress scan was started 5 min after injection, and followed by the rest scan 4 h later. The patients were divided into three groups: ischemia group (N = 25, summed stress score, SSS, {>=}5, summed rest score, SRS, <5), infarct group (N = 16, SSS {>=}5, SRS {>=}5) and normal group (N = 34, SSS <5, SRS <5). LV dyssynchrony parameters were calculated by phase analysis, and compared between the stress and rest images. In the ischemia group, LV dyssynchrony was significantly larger during stress than during rest. On the contrary, LV dyssynchrony during stress was significantly smaller than during rest in the normal and infarct groups. LV dyssynchrony during rest was significantly larger in the infarct group than in the normal and ischemia groups. There were no significant differences in LV dyssynchrony during rest between the normal and ischemia groups. Stress-induced myocardial ischemia caused dyssynchronous contraction in the ischemic region, leading to a deterioration in LV synchrony. Normal myocardium had more synchronous contraction during stress. The different dyssynchrony pattern between ischemic and normal myocardium early post-stress may aid the diagnosis of coronary artery disease using {sup 201}Tl gated SPECT MPI. (orig.)

  4. The problem in 180 deg data sampling and radioactivity decay correction in gated cardiac blood pool scanning using SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtake, Tohru; Watanabe, Toshiaki; Nishikawa, Junichi

    1986-01-01

    In cardiac blood pool scanning using SPECT, half 180 deg data collection (HD) vs. full 360 deg data collection (FD) and Tc-99m decay are problems in quantifying the ejection count (EC) (end-diastolic count - end-systolic count) of both ventricles and the ratio of the ejection count of the right and left ventricles (RVEC/LVEC). We studied the change produced by altering the starting position of data sampling in HD scans. In our results of phantom and 4 clinical cases, when the cardiac axis deviation was not large and there was not remarkable cardiac enlargement, the change in LVEC, RVEC and RVEC/LVEC was small (1 - 4 %) within 12 degree change of the starting position, and the difference between the results of HD scan with a good starting position (the average of LV peak and RV peak) and FD scan was not large (less than 7 %). Because of this, we think HD scan can be used in those cases. But when the cardiac axis deviation was large or there was remarkable cardiac enlargement, the change of LVEC, RVEC and RVEC/LVEC was large (more than 10 %) even within 12 degree change of the starting position. So we think FD scan would be better in those cases. In our results of 6 patients, the half-life of Tc-99m labeled albumin in blood varied from 2 to 4 hr (3.03 ± 0.59 hr, mean ± s.d.). Using a program for radioactivity (RA) decay correction, we studied the change in LVEC, RVEC and LVEC/RVEC in 11 cases. When RA decay correction was performed using a halflife of 3.0 hr, LVEC increased 7.5 %, RVEC increased 8.7 % and RVEC/LVEC increased 0.9 % on the average in HD scans of 8 cases (LPO to RAO, 32 views, 60 beat/1 view). We think RA decay correction would not be needed in quantifying RVEC/LVEC in most cases because the change of RVEC/LVEC was very small. (author)

  5. Wide beam reconstruction for half-dose or half-time cardiac gated SPECT acquisitions: optimization of resources and reduction in radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcassa, Claudio; Campini, Riccardo; Zoccarato, Orazio; Calza, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    A new iterative reconstruction algorithm (WBR trademark) has been recently proposed for cardiac single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The WBR trademark technology is designed to reduce noise, improving lesion identification without affecting the image resolution, allowing SPECT studies with reduced count statistic. This allows for either half-time (HT) or half-dose (HD) cardiac SPECT, with image quality and quantitative data comparable to standard-time (ST) or standard-dose (SD) SPECT. Few data exist on the comparison between conventional filtered backprojection (FBP) and this new algorithm in a clinical setting. The aim of this study was to compare the performance of FBP and WBR trademark. Phantoms studies were performed to compare spatial resolution and contrast recovery with FBP, ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) and WBR trademark. A group of 92 patients, with different cardiac pathology, scheduled for a stress-rest SPECT were studied: 52 patients (group A) were injected with a SD of tracer and underwent both ST and HT SPECT; 40 patients (group B) were injected with a half dose of tracer and underwent ST SPECT and immediately after an additional SPECT at double time/projection (DT), to compensate for the low count statistic. A 2-day 99m Tc-sestamibi protocol was used in all patients. SD/ST and HD/DT SPECT were reconstructed with a conventional FBP; SD/HT and HD/ST SPECT were reconstructed with WBR trademark. The summed stress score (SSS) and summed rest score (SRS) were calculated; the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was automatically derived. In group A (SD), no significant differences were observed between ST FBP SPECT and HT WBR trademark in SSS (11.1 and 11.7, respectively) and SRS (9.4 and 10.3, respectively, NS). LVEF on rest acquisitions was also comparable (50% on ST SPECT and 49% on HT SPECT, NS); LVEF on post-stress studies in HT SPECT (46%) was lower than ST SPECT (50%), although not statistically significant. In

  6. Quantitative evaluation of renal dynamic scan with 99mTc-MAG3 assessment of interoposterior myocardial infarction using ECG gated SPECT with 99mTc-MIBI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Keiichi; Kumita, Shinichiro; Mizumura, Sunao

    1997-01-01

    Simultaneous assessment of regional myocardial perfusion and local contraction ability of interoposterior myocardial infarction was examined by ECG gated SPECT. In thirteen cases of acute interoposterior myocardial infarction, the above-mentioned data were obtained by 180deg data acquisition method using L-shaped 2 detecting element type gamma camera. Mean and standard deviation of %Uptake and wall thickening (WT) in inferior wall were as follows: Infarction case; 57±9.2%/23±11.3%, normal case; 71±8.2%/61±10.2%. The significant depression (p<0.01/p<0.001) of both data were found in the infarction case. The both data in posterior wall were as follows: Infarction case; 55±10.7%/16±8.9%, normal case; 64±9.7%/41±15.0%. The significant depression (p<0.05/p<0.001) were also found in the infarction case. In both inferior wall and posterior wall, the AUC of ROC curve of WT was greater than that of %Uptake, and diagnostic ability of this method was favorable. The best sensitivity/specificity rate and the threshold were as follows: %Uptake of inferior wall 77/65, -0.5SD, WT of inferior wall 100/100, -2SD, %Uptake of posterior wall 62/82, -1SD, WT of posterior wall 85/88, -4SD. Accordingly, in diagnosis of interoposterior myocardial infarction, assessment of focus cardiac function, for example WT, is necessary as well as %Uptake. (K.H.)

  7. Avaliação da perfusão e função miocárdicas em vítimas de escorpionismo utilizando o Gated-SPECT Evaluación de la perfusión y función miocárdicas en víctimas de escorpionismo utilizando el Gated-SPECT Assessment of myocardial perfusion and function in victims of scorpion envenomation using Gated-SPECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Baldini de Figueiredo

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTO: O choque cardiogênico e o edema agudo de pulmão são as principais causas de óbito em pacientes com escorpionismo, cujo mecanismo fisiopatológico ainda é controverso. OBJETIVOS: Investigar a correlação entre os distúrbios da perfusão miocárdica e a função contrátil do ventrículo esquerdo, em vítimas de escorpionismo. MÉTODOS: Quinze pacientes submeteram-se à cintilografia de perfusão miocárdica sincronizada com ECG (Gated SPECT, dentro de 72 horas e 15 dias após o acidente escorpiônico. As imagens foram analisadas visualmente por escore semiquantitativo de perfusão (0 = normal, 4 = ausente e mobilidade (0 = normal, 4 = acinético, utilizando modelo de 17 segmentos. Para cada paciente foram calculados escores somados de perfusão (ESP e mobilidade (ESM. A fração de ejeção (FEVE foi calculada por software comercialmente disponível. RESULTADOS: Na avaliação inicial, 12 dos 15 pacientes apresentaram alterações da contratilidade e da perfusão miocárdica. O ESP foi de 12,5 ± 7,3, o ESM de 17,0 ± 12, 8 e a FEVE de 44,6 ± 16,0%. Houve correlação positiva entre o ESP e o ESM (r = 0,68; p = 0,005 e negativa entre o ESP e a FEVE (r = -0,75; p = 0,0021. Os estudos de seguimento mostraram recuperação da contratilidade global (FEVE de 68,9 ± 9,5, p = 0,0002, segmentar (ESM 2,6 ± 3,1, p = 0,0009 e da perfusão (ESP 3,7 ± 3,3, p = 0,0003. A melhora da FEVE correlacionou-se positivamente com a melhora do ESP (r = 0,72; p = 0,0035. CONCLUSÕES: Alterações perfusionais miocárdicas são comuns no envenenamento escorpiônico e correlacionam-se topograficamente com a disfunção contrátil. A recuperação da contratilidade correlaciona-se com a reversibilidade dos defeitos perfusionais. Estes achados sugerem a participação de alterações perfusionais miocárdicas na fisiopatologia desta forma de insuficiência ventricular aguda. (Arq Bras Cardiol 2010;94(4: 444-451FUNDAMENTO: El shock cardiog

  8. Detection of myocardial viability by means of Single Proton Emission Computed Tomography (Perfused SPECT) dual 201 Tl (rest of 15 minutes, 24 late hours and 24 hours reinjection) and gated-SPECT 99m Tc-SESTAMIBI in effort or stimulation of the coronary reserves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendoza V, R.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this work was to determine if the images of SPECT 201 TI in rest of 15 minutes, 24 late hours and Gated-SPECT 99m Tc-SESTAMIBI in effort or stimulation of coronary reservation correlate with the study of 24 hours post reinjection of 201 TI to determine the presence of having knitted viable myocardium. Material and methods: 29 patients were studied with coronary arterial illness (EAC) to who are carried out SPECT 201 TI in rest with images of 15 minutes, 24 late hours and 24 hours reinjection, by means of the administration of 201 TI to dose of 130 MBq and reinjection with 37 MBq. and Gated-SPECT 99m Tc-SESTAMIBI in effort or stimulation of coronary reservation, later to the administration of 1110 MBq. Results: 29 patients were included according to inclusion approaches and exclusion, of those which 22 (75.86%) they correspond at the masculine sex and 7 (24.13%) to the feminine one, with an average of 62.1 year-old age, 2320 segments myocardial were analysed so much it is phase post-effort as rest; they were diagnosed a total of 264 segments with heart attack, of which viability myocardium was observed in 174 segments. The statistical tests are analysis of frequencies. The non parametric test of Wilcoxon and Mann-Whitney. Conclusions: the viability myocardial at the 24 late hours and 24 hours reinjection was similar; significant difference exists between the study of 15 minutes and 24 hours reinjection, ischemic illness was also demonstrated in territories different to the heart attack area in the studies of 15 minutes, late 24 hours and 24 hours reinjection. (Author)

  9. Phase analysis of gated blood pool SPECT for multiple stress testing assessments of ventricular mechanical dyssynchrony in a tachycardia-induced dilated cardiomyopathy canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salimian, Samaneh; Thibault, Bernard; Finnerty, Vincent; Grégoire, Jean; Harel, François

    2017-02-01

    Stress-induced dyssynchrony has been shown to be independently correlated with clinical outcomes in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and narrow QRS complexes. However, the extent to which stress levels affect inter- and intraventricular dyssynchrony parameters remains unknown. Ten large dogs were submitted to tachycardia-induced DCM by pacing the right ventricular apex for 3-4 weeks to reach a target ejection fraction (EF) of 35% or less. Stress was then induced in DCM dogs by administering intravenous dobutamine up to a maximum of 20 μg·kg -1 ·min -1 . Hemodynamic and ventricular dyssynchrony data were analyzed by left ventricular (LV) pressure measurements and gated blood pool SPECT (GBPS) imaging. In order to assess mechanical dyssynchrony in DCM subjects and compare it with that of 8 normal counterparts, we extracted the following data: count-based indices of LV contraction homogeneity index (CHI), entropy and phase standard deviation, and interventricular dyssynchrony index. A significant LV intraventricular dyssynchrony (CHI: 96.4 ± 1.3% in control vs 78.6% ± 10.9% in DCM subjects) resulted in an intense LV dysfunction in DCM subjects (EF: 49.5% ± 8.4% in control vs 22.6% ± 6.0% in DCM), compared to control subjects. However, interventricular dyssynchrony did not vary significantly between the two groups. Under stress, DCM subjects showed a significant improvement in ventricular functional parameters at each level (EF: 22.6% ± 6.0% at rest vs 48.1% ± 5.8% at maximum stress). All intraventricular dyssynchrony indices showed a significant increase in magnitude of synchrony from baseline to stress levels of greater than or equal to 5 μg·kg -1 ·min -1 dobutamine. There were individual differences in the magnitude and pattern of change in interventricular dyssynchrony during the various levels of stress. Based on GBPS analyses, different levels of functional stress, even in close intervals, can have a significant impact on

  10. Comparison of gated blood pool SPECT and spiral multidetector computed tomography in the assessment of right ventricular functional parameters. Validation with first-pass radionuclide angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jung S.; Kim, Seong-Jang; Kim, In-Ju; Kim, Yong-Ki; Choo, Ki S.; Lee, Jun S.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare gated blood pool single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) (GBPS) and multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT) for the determination of right ventricular ejection fraction (RVEF) and right ventricular volumes (RVV) and to compare first-pass radionuclide angiography (FP-RNA) as the gold standard. Twenty consecutive patients (11 men, 9 women) referred for MDCT for the evaluation of the presence of coronary artery disease underwent FP-RNA and GBPS. The mean right ventricular end-diastolic volume (EDV) calculated with GBPS revealed a statistically significant lower value than that of MDCT. The mean right ventricular end-systolic volume (ESV) calculated with GBPS was also lower than that of MDCT. A comparison of right ventricular EDV from GBPS and MDCT yielded a correlation coefficient of 0.5972. Right ventricular ESV between GBPS and MDCT showed a correlation coefficient of 0.5650. The mean RVEFs calculated with FP-RNA (39.8%±4.0%), GBPS (43.7%±6.9%), and MDCT (40.4%±7.7%) showed no statistical differences (Kruskal-Wallis statistics 4.538, P=0.1034). A comparison of RVEFs from FP-RNA and GBPS yielded a correlation coefficient of 0.7251; RVEFs between FP-RNA and MDCT showed a correlation coefficient of 0.6166 and between GBPS and MDCT showed a correlation coefficient of 0.6367. The RVEF, EDV, and ESV calculated by GBPS had good correlation with those obtained with MDCT. In addition, there were no statistical differences of RVEF calculated from FP-RNA, GBPS, and MDCT. However, with regard to RVV, EDV and ESV from GBPS revealed statistically significantly lower values than those of MDCT. Although reasonable correlations among these modalities were obtained, the agreement among these three modalities was not good enough for interchangeable use in the clinical setting. Also, these results should be confirmed in patients with cardiac diseases in future larger population-based studies. (author)

  11. Wide beam reconstruction for half-dose or half-time cardiac gated SPECT acquisitions: optimization of resources and reduction in radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcassa, Claudio [S. Maugeri Fnd, IRCCS, Scientific Institute of Veruno, Cardiology Department (Italy); Campini, Riccardo; Zoccarato, Orazio; Calza, Paolo [S. Maugeri Fnd, IRCCS, Scientific Institute of Veruno, Nuclear Medicine Department (Italy)

    2011-03-15

    A new iterative reconstruction algorithm (WBR trademark) has been recently proposed for cardiac single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The WBR trademark technology is designed to reduce noise, improving lesion identification without affecting the image resolution, allowing SPECT studies with reduced count statistic. This allows for either half-time (HT) or half-dose (HD) cardiac SPECT, with image quality and quantitative data comparable to standard-time (ST) or standard-dose (SD) SPECT. Few data exist on the comparison between conventional filtered backprojection (FBP) and this new algorithm in a clinical setting. The aim of this study was to compare the performance of FBP and WBR trademark. Phantoms studies were performed to compare spatial resolution and contrast recovery with FBP, ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) and WBR trademark. A group of 92 patients, with different cardiac pathology, scheduled for a stress-rest SPECT were studied: 52 patients (group A) were injected with a SD of tracer and underwent both ST and HT SPECT; 40 patients (group B) were injected with a half dose of tracer and underwent ST SPECT and immediately after an additional SPECT at double time/projection (DT), to compensate for the low count statistic. A 2-day {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi protocol was used in all patients. SD/ST and HD/DT SPECT were reconstructed with a conventional FBP; SD/HT and HD/ST SPECT were reconstructed with WBR trademark. The summed stress score (SSS) and summed rest score (SRS) were calculated; the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was automatically derived. In group A (SD), no significant differences were observed between ST FBP SPECT and HT WBR trademark in SSS (11.1 and 11.7, respectively) and SRS (9.4 and 10.3, respectively, NS). LVEF on rest acquisitions was also comparable (50% on ST SPECT and 49% on HT SPECT, NS); LVEF on post-stress studies in HT SPECT (46%) was lower than ST SPECT (50%), although not statistically significant

  12. Incremental Diagnostic Performance of Combined Parameters in the Detection of Severe Coronary Artery Disease Using Exercise Gated Myocardial Perfusion Imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Ju Liu

    Full Text Available Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI using gated single-photon emission tomography (gSPECT may underestimate the severity of coronary artery disease (CAD. This study aimed to evaluate the significance of combined parameters derived from gSPECT, as well as treadmill stress test parameters, in the detection of severe CAD.A total of 211 consecutive patients referred for exercise MPI between June 2011 and June 2013 (who received invasive coronary angiography within six months after MPI were retrospectively reviewed. Exercise MPI was performed with Bruce protocol and 201Tl injected at peak exercise. Gated SPECT was performed using a cadmium-zinc-telluride camera and processed by QPS/QGS software. Perfusion defect abnormalities such as sum stress score (SSS; sum difference score, algorithm-derived total perfusion deficits, transient ischemic dilatation ratios of end-diastolic volumes and end-systolic volumes, post-stress changes in ejection fraction, and lung/heart ratio (LHR were calculated. Treadmill parameters, including ST depression (STD at the 1st and 3rd minutes of recovery stage (1'STD and 3'STD, maximal STD corrected by heart rate increment (ST/HR, heart rate decline in 1st and 3rd minutes of recovery stage, recovery heart rate ratio (HR ratio, systolic and mean blood pressure ratios (SBP ratio and MAP ratio during recovery phase were recorded. Diagnostic performances of these parameters were analyzed with receiver operating characteristic (ROC analysis and logistic regression for detection of left main (≥ 50% or 3-vessel disease (all ≥ 70% luminal stenosis on invasive angiography.Among various MPI and treadmill parameters used for detection of severe CAD, SSS and ST/HR had the highest AUC (0.78, 0.73, p = NS and best cut-off values (SSS > 6, ST/HR > 17.39 10-2mV/bpm, respectively. By univariate logistic regression, all parameters except 1'HRR, 3'HRR, SBP and MAP ratios increased the odds ratio of severe CAD. Only increased L/H ratio, 3'STD

  13. Determinants of the response of left ventricular ejection fraction to vasodilator stress in electrocardiographically gated {sup 82}rubidium myocardial perfusion PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Tracy L.Y.; Merrill, Jennifer; Bengel, Frank M. [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Volokh, Lana [GE Healthcare, Haifa (Israel)

    2008-02-15

    Myocardial perfusion imaging with {sup 82}Rb PET allows for ECG-gated studies to be obtained early after radiotracer injection, capturing ventricular function close to peak pharmacologic action of dipyridamole. This is different from gated SPECT and may potentially provide additional diagnostic information. We sought to identify potential correlates of the PET-derived ejection fraction response to vasodilator stress. One hundred ten consecutive patients undergoing {sup 82}Rb PET myocardial perfusion imaging during evaluation for coronary artery disease were included. Using a GE Discovery STRx PET-CT scanner, ECG-gated images (eight bins) were obtained at rest and 4 min after dipyridamole infusion, 90 s after infusion of 1,480-2,220 MBq of {sup 82}Rb. Summed rest, stress, and difference scores (SRS, SSS, and SDS) were determined using a five-point scoring system and 20-segment model. Ejection fraction was calculated using automated QGS software. Significant reversibility (SDS {>=} 4) was found in 23 patients (21%). Mean LVEF in all patients was 47 {+-} 13% at rest and 53 {+-} 13% during dipyridamole. LVEF increased in 89 patients, and decreased in 17 patients during vasodilation. The change in LVEF was inversely correlated with SDS (r = -0.26; p = 0.007). Additionally, it was inversely correlated with resting LVEF (r = -0.20; p = 0.03) and SSS (r = -0.25; p = 0.009). No significant correlations were observed with SRS, heart rate, blood pressure, age, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, or pretest likelihood of disease. At multivariate regression analysis, SDS was an independent predictor of the change in LVEF. Gated {sup 82}Rb PET during pharmacologic stress allows for assessment of the functional response to vasodilation. The magnitude of LVEF increase is determined by stress perfusion/reversible perfusion defects. Functional response to hyperemia may thus be incorporated in future evaluations of diagnostic and prognostic algorithms based on {sup 82}Rb PET. (orig.)

  14. Brain SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feistel, H.

    1991-01-01

    Brain SPECT investigations have gained broad acceptance since the introduction of the lipophilic tracer Tc-99m-HMPAO. Depending on equipment and objectives in different departments, the examinations can be divided into three groups: 1. Under normal conditions and standardised patient preparation the 'rest' SPECT can be performed in every department with a tomographic camera. In cerebrovascular disease there is a demand for determination of either the perfusion reserve in reversible ischemia or prognostic values in completed stroke. In cases of dementia, SPECT may yield useful results according to differential diagnosis. Central cerebral system involvement in immunologic disease may be estimated with higher sensitivity than in conventional brain imaging procedures. In psychiatric diseases there is only a relative indication for brain SPECT, since results during recent years have been contradictory and may be derived only in interventional manner. In brain tumor diagnostics SPECT with Tl-201 possibly permits grading. In inflammatory disease, especially in viral encephalitis, SPECT may be used to obtain early diagnosis. Normal pressure hydrocephalus can be distinguished from other forms of dementia and, consequently, the necessity for shunting surgery can be recognised. 2. In departments equipped for emergency cases an 'acute' SPECT can be performed in illnesses with rapid changing symptoms such as different forms of migraine, transient global amnesia, epileptic seizures (so-called 'ictal SPECT') or urgent forms like trauma. 3. In cooperation with several departments brain SPECT can be practised as an interventional procedure in clinical and in scientific studies. (orig./MG) [de

  15. Analysis of the diagnostic value of the Gated-SPECT study of myocardial perfusion in the diagnosis of coronary disease in users seen at the Hospital Rafael Angel Calderon Guardia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvo Montero, Karla; Coto Rodriguez, Maria Fernanda

    2011-01-01

    An analysis of the diagnostic value of the Gated-SPECT study of myocardial perfusion with Sestamibi marked with 99m Tc for the diagnosis of Coronary Disease was performed at the Hospital Rafael Angel Calderon Guardia. 13 patients with nuclear study and coronary angiography performed, were selected for the investigation. An estimate of the sensitivity, specificity and predictive values of the myocardial perfusion study was performed for the detection of the disease. Then, these values were related to socio-demographic and clinical characteristics of the patients submitted to the diagnosis. The need to use appropriate criteria to request this type of study was evidenced when determining that most of the patients presented risk factors compared to 26% of patients who did not present any factor [es

  16. Combined use of 64-slice computed tomography angiography and gated myocardial perfusion SPECT for the detection of functionally relevant coronary artery stenoses. First results in a clinical setting concerning patients with stable angina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hacker, M.; Hack, N.; Tiling, R.; Jakobs, T.; Nikolaou, K.; Becker, C.; Ziegler, F. von; Knez, A.; Koenig, A.; Klauss, V.

    2007-01-01

    Aim: In patients with stable angina pectoris both morphological and functional information about the coronary artery tree should be present before revascularization therapy is performed. High accuracy was shown for spiral computed tomography (MDCT) angiography acquired with a 64-slice CT scanner compared to invasive coronary angiography (ICA) in detecting obstructive'' coronary artery disease (CAD). Gated myocardial SPECT (MPI) is an established method for the noninvasive assessment of functional significance of coronary stenoses. Aim of the study was to evaluate the combination of 64-slice CT angiography plus MPI in comparison to ICA plus MPI in the detection of hemodynamically relevant coronary artery stenoses in a clinical setting. Patients, methods: 30 patients (63 ± 10.8 years, 23 men) with stable angina (21 with suspected, 9 with known CAD) were investigated. MPI, 64-slice CT angiography and ICA were performed, reversible and fixed perfusion defects were allocated to determining lesions separately for MDCT angiography and ICA. The combination of MDCT angiography plus MPI was compared to the results of ICA plus MPI. Results: Sensitivity, specificity, negative and positive predictive value for the combination of MDCT angiography plus MPI was 85%, 97%, 98% and 79%, respectively, on a vessel-based and 93%, 87%, 93% and 88%, respectively, on a patient-based level. 19 coronary arteries with stenoses =50% in both ICA and MDCT angiography showed no ischemia in MPI. Conclusion: The combination of 64-slice CT angiography and gated myocardial SPECT enabled a comprehensive non-invasive view of the anatomical and functional status of the coronary artery tree. (orig.)

  17. Combined use of 64-slice computed tomography angiography and gated myocardial perfusion SPECT for the detection of functionally relevant coronary artery stenoses. First results in a clinical setting concerning patients with stable angina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hacker, M.; Hack, N.; Tiling, R. [Klinikum Grosshadern (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Jakobs, T.; Nikolaou, K.; Becker, C. [Klinikum Grosshadern (Germany). Dept. of Clinical Radiology; Ziegler, F. von; Knez, A. [Klinikum Grosshadern (Germany). Dept. of Cardiology; Koenig, A.; Klauss, V. [Medizinische Poliklinik-Innenstadt, Univ. of Munich (Germany). Dept. of Cardiology

    2007-07-01

    Aim: In patients with stable angina pectoris both morphological and functional information about the coronary artery tree should be present before revascularization therapy is performed. High accuracy was shown for spiral computed tomography (MDCT) angiography acquired with a 64-slice CT scanner compared to invasive coronary angiography (ICA) in detecting ''obstructive'' coronary artery disease (CAD). Gated myocardial SPECT (MPI) is an established method for the noninvasive assessment of functional significance of coronary stenoses. Aim of the study was to evaluate the combination of 64-slice CT angiography plus MPI in comparison to ICA plus MPI in the detection of hemodynamically relevant coronary artery stenoses in a clinical setting. Patients, methods: 30 patients (63 {+-} 10.8 years, 23 men) with stable angina (21 with suspected, 9 with known CAD) were investigated. MPI, 64-slice CT angiography and ICA were performed, reversible and fixed perfusion defects were allocated to determining lesions separately for MDCT angiography and ICA. The combination of MDCT angiography plus MPI was compared to the results of ICA plus MPI. Results: Sensitivity, specificity, negative and positive predictive value for the combination of MDCT angiography plus MPI was 85%, 97%, 98% and 79%, respectively, on a vessel-based and 93%, 87%, 93% and 88%, respectively, on a patient-based level. 19 coronary arteries with stenoses =50% in both ICA and MDCT angiography showed no ischemia in MPI. Conclusion: The combination of 64-slice CT angiography and gated myocardial SPECT enabled a comprehensive non-invasive view of the anatomical and functional status of the coronary artery tree. (orig.)

  18. SPECT Myocardial Blood Flow Quantitation Concludes Equivocal Myocardial Perfusion SPECT Studies to Increase Diagnostic Benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lung-Ching; Lin, Chih-Yuan; Chen, Ing-Jou; Ku, Chi-Tai; Chen, Yen-Kung; Hsu, Bailing

    2016-01-01

    Recently, myocardial blood flow quantitation with dynamic SPECT/CT has been reported to enhance the detection of coronary artery disease in human. This advance has created important clinical applications to coronary artery disease diagnosis and management for areas where myocardial perfusion PET tracers are not available. We present 2 clinical cases that undergone a combined test of 1-day rest/dipyridamole-stress dynamic SPECT and ECG-gated myocardial perfusion SPECT scans using an integrated imaging protocol and demonstrate that flow parameters are capable to conclude equivocal myocardial perfusion SPECT studies, therefore increasing diagnostic benefits to add value in making clinical decisions.

  19. Quantification of myocardial perfusion SPECT for the assessment of coronary artery disease: should we apply scatter correction?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hambye, A.S.; Vervaet, A.; Dobbeleir, A.

    2002-01-01

    Compared to other non invasive testings for CAD diagnosis, myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) is considered as a very sensitive method which accuracy is however often dimmed by a certain lack of specificity, especially in patients with a small heart. With gated SPECT MPI, use of end-diastolic instead of summed images has been presented as an interesting approach for increasing specificity. Since scatter correction is reported to improve image contrast, it might potentially constitute another way to ameliorate MPI accuracy. We aimed at comparing the value of both approaches, either separate or combined, for CAD diagnosis. Methods. Hundred patients addressed for gated 99m-Tc sestamibi SPECT MPI were prospectively included (Group A). Thirty-five had an end-systolic volume <30ml by QGS-analysis (Group B). All had a coronary angiogram within 3 months of the MPI. Four polar maps (non-corrected and scatter-corrected summed, and non-corrected and scatter-corrected end-diastolic) were created to quantify the extent (EXT) and severity (TDS) of the perfusion defects if any. ROC-curve analysis was applied to define the optimal thresholds of EXT and TDS separating non-CAD from CAD-patients, using a 50%-stenosis on coronary angiogram as cutoff for disease positivity. Results. Significant CAD was present in 86 patients (25 in Group B). In Group A, assessment of EXT and TDS of perfusion defects on scatter-corrected summed images demonstrated the highest accuracy (76% for EXT; sens: 77%; spec: 71%, and 74% for TDS, sens: 73%, spec: 79%). Accuracy of EXT and TDS calculated from the other data sets was slightly but not significantly lower, especially because of a lower sensitivity. As a comparison, visual analysis was 90% accurate for the diagnosis of CAD (sens: 94%, spec: 64%). In group B, overall results were worse mainly due to a decreased sensitivity, with accuracies ranging between 51 and 63%. Again scatter-corrected summed data were the most accurate (EXT: 60%, TDS: 63%, visual

  20. Surveillance study for creating the national clinical database relating to ECG-gated myocardial perfusion SPECT of asymptomatic ischemic heart disease in patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus. J-ACCESS 2 study design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusuoka, Hideo; Yamasaki, Yoshimitsu; Izumi, Tohru; Kashiwagi, Atsunori; Kawamori, Ryuzo; Shimamoto, Kazuaki; Yamada, Nobuhiro; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    2008-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is an independent risk factor for acute myocardial infarction. Thus, a surveillance study was conducted as part of studies to create a national database related to electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) of ischemic heart disease. Single-photon emission computed tomography was conducted in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and their prognoses will be followed for 3 years, stratified by patients' clinical background and SPECT findings. A total of 513 patients from 50 institutions were enrolled in this study, 297 of whom were men (age 66.2±0.4 years, mean±standard error of the mean (SEM)) and 261 women (age 67.8±0.5 years). They have a history of retinopathy (25.3%), neuropathy (19.9%), cerebrovascular disorder, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and photocoagulation. Major risk factors for present disease were hypertension (82.3%) and hyperlipidemia (79.7%). In 244 patients (129 men and 115 women), body mass index (BMI) was 25 or more. Fifty-two of them (10.1%) underwent coronary angiography; of these, 26 (50.0%) had no coronary artery lesions with 75% or more stenosis, and only 1 (1.9%) had a left main trunk with 50% or more stenosis. An overwhelming majority of patients (94.3%) underwent SPECT imaging by a 1-day stress-followed-by-rest procedure. Stress procedure was exercise in most (70.8%) patients, followed by dipyridamole infusion in 14.6%, adenosine infusion in 6.6%, and adenosine triphosphate infusion in 5.7%. Endpoint of stress examination was most often fatigue in lower limbs (40.7%), followed by completion of pharmacological stress protocol (28.7%), and achievement of target heart rate (26.3%). The largest number of patients (198, 38.6%) received 99m Tc-tetrofosmin at an initial dosage of 200-300 MBq (mean 331±3 MBq) followed by a second dosage of 700-800 MBq (mean 748±8 MBq). Among them, 491 (95.7%) received some kind of therapeutic drug: hypoglycemic drugs were

  1. Volume and planar gated cardiac magnetic resonance imaging: a correlative study of normal anatomy with Thallium-201 SPECT and cadaver sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Go, R.T.; MacIntyre, W.J.; Yeung, H.N.

    1984-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) gated cardiac imaging was performed in ten subjects using a prototype 0.15-T resistive magnet imaging system. Volume and planar imaging techniques utilizing saturation recovery, proton TI-weighted relaxation time pulse sequences produced images of the heart and great vessels with exquisite anatomic detail that showed excellent correlation with cadaver sections of the heart. The left ventricular myocardial segments also showed excellent correlation with cadaver sections of the heart. The left ventricular myocardial segments also showed excellent correlation with the thallium-201 cardiac single photon emission computed tomography images. Volume acquisition allowed postprocessing selection of tomographic sections in various orientations to optimize visualization of a particular structure of interest. The excellent spatial and contrast resolution afforded by MR volume imaging, which does not involve the use of ionizing radiation and iodinated contrast material, should assure it a significant role in the diagnostic assessment of the cardiovascular system

  2. Gated SPECT evaluation of myocardial perfusion defects and left ventricular function in chronic atrial fibrillation (CAF) patients - a prevalence study between a General Hospital (GH) and a referral Cardiology Hospital (CH)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, G.; Guimaraes, M.; Marroni, B.; Zagoury, E.; Sprinz, C.; Andrea, S.; Louzada, A.; Ludwig, R.; Graef, C.

    2002-01-01

    Aims: to evaluate myocardial perfusion defects (MPD) prevalence and left ventricular function in CAF patients from a distinct referral basis (a GH and CH populations). Materials and Methods: a retrospective cross-sectional survey including 171 CAF (43 from GH and 128 from CH) and 5415 control patients (2222 from GH and 3193 from CH) submitted to rest/stress myocardial perfusion gated SPECT with Tc99m-MIBI. The following items were collected from CAF patients: the percentage of patients with MPD, the type (fixed, reversible or mixed) and number of segments with MPD and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). The control patients percentage of MPD, their type and number were also collected. Results: CAF from GH and CH were not significantly different in the number of patients with MPD, mean number of segments affected, and LVEF. In GH patients, the CAF group had more segments with MPD (2,4x1,6 p<0,01) and lower LVEF (37%x52% p<0,01) than control group. CAF patients from CH also showed lower LVEF (40%x58% p<0,01) and more fixed MPD (40%x18% p<0,01) than their control group population. Conclusion: our data showed similar prevalence of MPD and reduced LVEF values between CAF patients from a GH and referral CH. The CAF group from CH seemed to have more fixed MPD perhaps reflecting more severe coronary artery disease population or referral bias. The data appears to support the evaluation of myocardial ischemia as a part of CAF possible etiologies. Caution is advised in LVEF evaluation of CAF patients due to increased variability of R-R interval

  3. Age- and gender-specific differences in left ventricular cardiac function and volumes determined by gated SPET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondt, P. de; Wiele, C. van de; Winter, F. de; Dierckx, R.A.; Sutter, J. de; Backer, G. de

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine normative volumetric data and ejection fraction values derived from gated myocardial single-photon emission tomography (SPET) using the commercially available software algorithm QGS (quantitative gated SPET). From a prospective database of 876 consecutive patients who were referred for a 2-day stress-rest technetium-99m tetrofosmin (925 MBq) gated SPET study, 102 patients (43 men, 59 women) with a low (<10%) pre-test likelihood of coronary disease were included (mean age 57.6 years). For stress imaging, a bicycle protocol was used in 79 of the patients and a dipyridamole protocol in 23. Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and end-diastolic and -systolic volumes (EDV and ESV) were calculated by QGS. EDV and ESV were corrected for body surface area, indicated by EDVi and ESVi. To allow comparison with previous reports using other imaging modalities, men and women were divided into three age groups (<45 years, ≥45 years but <65 years and ≥65 years). Men showed significantly higher EDVi and ESVi values throughout and lower LVEF values when compared with women in the subgroup ≥65 years (P<0.05, ANOVA). Significant negative and positive correlations were found between age and EDVi and ESVi values for both women and men and between LVEF and age in women (Pearson P≤0.01). LVEF values at bicycle stress were significantly higher than at rest (P=0.000, paired t test), which was the result of a significant decrease in ESV (P=0.003), a phenomenon which did not occur following dipyridamole stress (P=0.409). The data presented suggest that LVEF and EDVi and ESVi as assessed by QGS are strongly gender-specific. Although the physiological significance of these results is uncertain and needs further study, these findings demonstrate that the evaluation of cardiac function and volumes of patients by means of QGS should consider age- and gender-matched normative values. (orig.)

  4. Utility of the premature cocked in SPECT of myocardial perfusion with technetium and artery-dilators. Inherent problems and analysis of local preliminary experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez, Daniela; Massardo, Teresa; Jaimovich, Rodrigo; Anzoategui, Wilfredo; Guzman, Alfonso; Lavados, Hugo; Alliende, Isabel

    2007-01-01

    Using myocardial perfusion studies, severe coronary artery disease (CAD) with left ventricular dysfunction could be observed through transient cavity dilation and radiopharmaceutical lung uptake increase, described initially with stress 201 Tl. Dipyridamole (DIP) induced ischemia also can diminish systolic function. Delayed post stress left ventricular ejection fraction (FEVI) may not be able to detect this phenomena, depending on the acquisition timing. There are diverse reports and results in this issue. Goal: Evaluate the correlation between left ventricular parameters and ischemia presence in early gated DIP tomography in patients referred for CAD evaluation along to review the new protocol difficulties.Methods: From 158 patients evaluated initially, 31% presenting extra-cardiac activity were excluded due to interference with automatic edge detection. The analyzed group included 109 subjects between 33 and 91 years, mean age 64.3 ± 11.7; 52% women. Thirty of them were known CAD patients; 18 with myocardial infarction and 31 with ischemia in perfusion images. 99m Tc-Sestamibi SPECT was carried out during the 60 min post DIP infusion, using 1 day protocol. Cedars QGS QPS Programs were used to measure LVEF and left ventricular volumes. Diastolic transient ischemic dilation (TID) calculation was performed as well as lung/heart index (LHR). Results: The mean time lapse between DIP injection and acquisition was 27 min (range: 18-43 min). There was not significant difference between DIP and rest LVEF (66.55±17.33% vs 67.58±18.41%) LVEF delta was 1.03±6.72%. There was not correlation observed between measured functional parameters and presence of ischemia, infarction or known CAD. There was clear difference in left ventricular volumes in patients with and without CAD and known myocardial infarction. Conclusion: Nor association between LHR, LVEF delta or TID and ischemia was demonstrated in early post DIP SPECT acquisition using Sestamibi. In addition, significant

  5. Clinical values of left ventricular mechanical dyssynchrony assessment by gated myocardial perfusion SPECT in patients with acute myocardial infarction and multivessel disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Sang-Geon; Park, Ki Seong; Kim, Jahae; Kim, Jong Sang; Song, Ho-Chun; Jabin, Zeenat; Kang, Sae-Ryung; Kwon, Seong Young; Jeong, Geum-Cheol; Song, Minchul; Min, Jung-Joon; Bom, Hee-Seung; Cho, Jae Yeong; Kim, Hyun Kuk

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic value of additional evaluation of left ventricular mechanical dyssynchrony (LVMD) by gated myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (GMPS) in patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI) and multivessel disease. One hundred and nine acute MI patients with >50 % stenosis in at least one non-culprit artery who underwent GMPS within 2 weeks were enrolled. All patients underwent successful revascularization of the culprit arteries. Those with previous MI, atrial fibrillation, or frequent ventricular premature complexes, cardiac devices, significant patient motion, or procedure-related events were excluded. Phase standard deviation (PSD) and phase histogram bandwidth (PBW) were measured for assessment of LVMD. Patients were followed up for a median of 26 months after index MI, for composite major adverse cardiac events (MACE), which consisted with all-cause death, unplanned hospitalization due to heart failure and severe ventricular arrhythmias (sustained ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation). Independent predictors of MACE were evaluated. MACE occurred in 22 patients (20 %). Stress PSD (53.3 ± 17.3 vs. 35.3 ± 18.9 ; p <0.001), stress PBW (147.6 ± 54.6 vs. 96.8 ± 59.2 ; p = 0.001) and resting PBW (126.8 ± 37.5 vs. 96.6 ± 48.9 ; p = 0.001) were significantly higher in patients with MACE compared to those without. Multivariate analysis revealed that stress PSD ≥45.5 and stress PBW ≥126.0 were predictive of MACE, as well as suboptimal non-culprit artery revascularization (SNR) and renin-angiotensin system (RAS) blockade medication. Higher stress PSD and stress PBW were associated with poorer prognosis both in patients with and without SNR, and those with RAS blockade medication, but not in those without RAS blockade medication. LVMD measured by GMPS showed added prognostic value in acute MI with multivessel disease. GMPS could serve as a comprehensive evaluation imaging

  6. Clinical values of left ventricular mechanical dyssynchrony assessment by gated myocardial perfusion SPECT in patients with acute myocardial infarction and multivessel disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Sang-Geon; Park, Ki Seong; Kim, Jahae; Kim, Jong Sang; Song, Ho-Chun [Chonnam National University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Gwang-ju (Korea, Republic of); Jabin, Zeenat; Kang, Sae-Ryung; Kwon, Seong Young; Jeong, Geum-Cheol; Song, Minchul; Min, Jung-Joon; Bom, Hee-Seung [Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hwasun-gun, Jeonnam (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Jae Yeong; Kim, Hyun Kuk [Chonnam National University Hospital, Department of Cardiology, Gwang-ju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic value of additional evaluation of left ventricular mechanical dyssynchrony (LVMD) by gated myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (GMPS) in patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI) and multivessel disease. One hundred and nine acute MI patients with >50 % stenosis in at least one non-culprit artery who underwent GMPS within 2 weeks were enrolled. All patients underwent successful revascularization of the culprit arteries. Those with previous MI, atrial fibrillation, or frequent ventricular premature complexes, cardiac devices, significant patient motion, or procedure-related events were excluded. Phase standard deviation (PSD) and phase histogram bandwidth (PBW) were measured for assessment of LVMD. Patients were followed up for a median of 26 months after index MI, for composite major adverse cardiac events (MACE), which consisted with all-cause death, unplanned hospitalization due to heart failure and severe ventricular arrhythmias (sustained ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation). Independent predictors of MACE were evaluated. MACE occurred in 22 patients (20 %). Stress PSD (53.3 ± 17.3 vs. 35.3 ± 18.9 ; p <0.001), stress PBW (147.6 ± 54.6 vs. 96.8 ± 59.2 ; p = 0.001) and resting PBW (126.8 ± 37.5 vs. 96.6 ± 48.9 ; p = 0.001) were significantly higher in patients with MACE compared to those without. Multivariate analysis revealed that stress PSD ≥45.5 and stress PBW ≥126.0 were predictive of MACE, as well as suboptimal non-culprit artery revascularization (SNR) and renin-angiotensin system (RAS) blockade medication. Higher stress PSD and stress PBW were associated with poorer prognosis both in patients with and without SNR, and those with RAS blockade medication, but not in those without RAS blockade medication. LVMD measured by GMPS showed added prognostic value in acute MI with multivessel disease. GMPS could serve as a comprehensive evaluation imaging

  7. Left ventricle function in patients with ischemic cardiopathy: determination of the expulsion fraction of the left ventricle with gated-SPECT. Experience in the CMN 20 de Noviembre ISSSTE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendoza, L.; Puente, A.; Hernandez, T.; Jimenez, L.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this work is to correlate the expulsion fraction of the left ventricle (FEVI) obtained by means of g-SPECT and other diagnostic methods: ECO 2D and ventriculography for heart catheterization (CTT). (Author)

  8. Two dimensional polar display of cardiac blood pool SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Norinari; Machida, Kikuo; Mamiya, Toshio; Takahashi, Taku; Takishima, Teruo; Hasegawa, Noriko; Hashimoto, Masanori; Ohno, Ken

    1989-01-01

    A new method of ECG gated cardiac blood pool SPECT to illustrate the left ventricular (LV) wall motion in a single static image, two dimensional polar display (2DPD), was described. Circumferential profiles of the difference between end diastolic and end systolic short axis images of the LV were displayed in a similar way to the bull's eye plot of 201 Tl myocardial SPECT. The diagnoses by 2DPDs agreed with those by cinematic displays of ECG gated blood pool SPECT in 74 out of 84 segments (85.5%) of abnormal motion, and 155 out of 168 segments (80.3%) of normal motion. It is concluded that 2DPD can evaluate regional wall motion by a single static image in a significant number of patients, and is also useful in comparing with the bull's eye image of 201 Tl myorcardial SPECT. (orig.)

  9. GATE: Improving the computational efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staelens, S.; De Beenhouwer, J.; Kruecker, D.; Maigne, L.; Rannou, F.; Ferrer, L.; D'Asseler, Y.; Buvat, I.; Lemahieu, I.

    2006-01-01

    GATE is a software dedicated to Monte Carlo simulations in Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET). An important disadvantage of those simulations is the fundamental burden of computation time. This manuscript describes three different techniques in order to improve the efficiency of those simulations. Firstly, the implementation of variance reduction techniques (VRTs), more specifically the incorporation of geometrical importance sampling, is discussed. After this, the newly designed cluster version of the GATE software is described. The experiments have shown that GATE simulations scale very well on a cluster of homogeneous computers. Finally, an elaboration on the deployment of GATE on the Enabling Grids for E-Science in Europe (EGEE) grid will conclude the description of efficiency enhancement efforts. The three aforementioned methods improve the efficiency of GATE to a large extent and make realistic patient-specific overnight Monte Carlo simulations achievable

  10. Brain SPECT. SPECT in der Gehirndiagnostik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feistel, H. (Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Nuklearmedizinische Klinik mit Poliklinik)

    1991-12-01

    Brain SPECT investigations have gained broad acceptance since the introduction of the lipophilic tracer Tc-99m-HMPAO. Depending on equipment and objectives in different departments, the examinations can be divided into three groups: 1. Under normal conditions and standardised patient preparation the 'rest' SPECT can be performed in every department with a tomographic camera. In cerebrovascular disease there is a demand for determination of either the perfusion reserve in reversible ischemia or prognostic values in completed stroke. In cases of dementia, SPECT may yield useful results according to differential diagnosis. Central cerebral system involvement in immunologic disease may be estimated with higher sensitivity than in conventional brain imaging procedures. In psychiatric diseases there is only a relative indication for brain SPECT, since results during recent years have been contradictory and may be derived only in interventional manner. In brain tumor diagnostics SPECT with Tl-201 possibly permits grading. In inflammatory disease, especially in viral encephalitis, SPECT may be used to obtain early diagnosis. Normal pressure hydrocephalus can be distinguished from other forms of dementia and, consequently, the necessity for shunting surgery can be recognised. 2. In departments equipped for emergency cases an 'acute' SPECT can be performed in illnesses with rapid changing symptoms such as different forms of migraine, transient global amnesia, epileptic seizures (so-called 'ictal SPECT') or urgent forms like trauma. 3. In cooperation with several departments brain SPECT can be practised as an interventional procedure in clinical and in scientific studies. (orig./MG).

  11. SPECT in psychiatry. SPECT in der Psychiatrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barocka, A. (Psychiatrische Klinik und Poliklinik, Erlangen (Germany)); Feistel, H. (Nuklearmedizinische Klinik, Erlangen (Germany)); Ebert, D. (Psychiatrische Klinik und Poliklinik, Erlangen (Germany)); Lungershausen, E. (Psychiatrische Klinik und Poliklinik, Erlangen (Germany))

    1993-08-13

    This review presents Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) as a powerful tool for clinical use and research in psychiatry. Its focus is on regional cerebral blood flow, measured with technetium labelled HMPAO. In addition, first results with brain receptor imaging, concerning dopamin-D[sub 2] and benzodiazepine receptors, are covered. Due to major improvements in image quality, and impressive number of results has been accumulated in the past three years. The authors caution against using SPECT results as markers for disease entities. A finding like 'hypofrontality' is considered typical of a variety of mental disorders. Clearly both, more experience with SPECT and contributions from psychopathology, are needed. (orig.)

  12. Brain SPECT in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guyot, M.; Baulieu, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    Brain SPECT in child involves specific trends regarding the patient cooperation, irradiation, resolution and especially interpretation because of the rapid scintigraphic modifications related to the brain maturation. In a general nuclear medicine department, child brain SPECT represents about 2 % of the activity. The choice indications are the perfusion children: thallium and MIBI in brain tumours, pharmacological and neuropsychological interventions. In the future, brain dedicated detectors and new radiopharmaceuticals will promote the development of brain SPECT in children. (author)

  13. Comparison between radioisotopic ventriculography in balance with Tc99-albumine-DTPA and quantitative gated SPECT with Tc-99m-MIBI for determining the eject fraction of left ventricle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguera, E. C; Jaime, Adelina; Pamellin, Miriam; Veliz, J

    2002-01-01

    Radionuclide ventriculography (RNV) and electrocardiography gated myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (GSPECT), can be used to assess the ventricular function.The purpose of this study was:1) to compare left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF(%) using post-stress or rest gated GSPECT with LVEF by resting RNV and 2) to evaluate the 99m-Tc99m human serum albumin (HAS) with diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid (DTPA) (99m-TcHSA-DTPA) as a potential use a as blood pool imaging agent (Au)

  14. SPECT in psychiatry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barocka, A.; Feistel, H.; Ebert, D.; Lungershausen, E.

    1993-01-01

    This review presents Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) as a powerful tool for clinical use and research in psychiatry. Its focus is on regional cerebral blood flow, measured with technetium labelled HMPAO. In addition, first results with brain receptor imaging, concerning dopamin-D 2 and benzodiazepine receptors, are covered. Due to major improvements in image quality, and impressive number of results has been accumulated in the past three years. The authors caution against using SPECT results as markers for disease entities. A finding like 'hypofrontality' is considered typical of a variety of mental disorders. Clearly both, more experience with SPECT and contributions from psychopathology, are needed. (orig.) [de

  15. Electrocardiograph-gated single photon emission computed tomography radionuclide angiography presents good interstudy reproducibility for the quantification of global systolic right ventricular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daou, Doumit; Coaguila, Carlos; Vilain, Didier

    2007-05-01

    Electrocardiograph-gated single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) radionuclide angiography provides accurate measurement of right ventricular ejection fraction and end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes. In this study, we report the interstudy precision and reliability of SPECT radionuclide angiography for the measurement of global systolic right ventricular function using two, three-dimensional volume processing methods (SPECT-QBS, SPECT-35%). These were compared with equilibrium planar radionuclide angiography. Ten patients with chronic coronary artery disease having two SPECT and planar radionuclide angiography acquisitions were included. For the right ventricular ejection fraction, end-diastolic volume and end-systolic volume, the interstudy precision and reliability were better with SPECT-35% than with SPECT-QBS. The sample sizes needed to objectify a change in right ventricular volumes or ejection fraction were lower with SPECT-35% than with SPECT-QBS. The interstudy precision and reliability of SPECT-35% and SPECT-QBS for the right ventricle were better than those of equilibrium planar radionuclide angiography, but poorer than those previously reported for the left ventricle with SPECT radionuclide angiography on the same population. SPECT-35% and SPECT-QBS present good interstudy precision and reliability for right ventricular function, with the results favouring the use of SPECT-35%. The results are better than those of equilibrium planar radionuclide angiography, but poorer than those previously reported for the left ventricle with SPECT radionuclide angiography. They need to be confirmed in a larger population.

  16. Gated single photon emission computer tomography for the detection of silent myocardial ischemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pena Q, Yamile; Coca P, Marco Antonio; Batista C, Juan Felipe; Fernandez-Britto, Jose; Quesada P, Rodobaldo; Pena C; Andria

    2009-01-01

    Background: Asymptomatic patients with severe coronary atherosclerosis may have a normal resting electrocardiogram and stress test. Aim: To assess the yield of Gated Single Photon Emission Computer Tomography (SPECT) for the screening of silent myocardial ischemia in type 2 diabetic patients. Material and methods: Electrocardiogram, stress test and gated-SPECT were performed on 102 type 2 diabetic patients aged 60 ± 8 years without cardiovascular symptoms. All subjects were also subjected to a coronary angiography, whose results were used as gold standard. Results: Gated-SPECT showed myocardial ischemia on 26.5% of studied patients. The sensibility, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 92.3%, 96%, 95%, 88.8%, 97.3%, respectively. In four and six patients ischemia was detected on resting electrocardiogram and stress test, respectively. Eighty percent of patients with doubtful resting electrocardiogram results and 70% with a doubtful stress test had a silent myocardial ischemia detected by gated-SPECT. There was a good agreement between the results of gated-SPECT and coronary angiography (k =0.873). Conclusions: Gated-SPECT was an useful tool for the screening of silent myocardial ischemia

  17. GATE V6: a major enhancement of the GATE simulation platform enabling modelling of CT and radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jan, S; Becheva, E [DSV/I2BM/SHFJ, Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Orsay (France); Benoit, D; Rehfeld, N; Stute, S; Buvat, I [IMNC-UMR 8165 CNRS-Paris 7 and Paris 11 Universities, 15 rue Georges Clemenceau, 91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Carlier, T [INSERM U892-Cancer Research Center, University of Nantes, Nantes (France); Cassol, F; Morel, C [Centre de physique des particules de Marseille, CNRS-IN2P3 and Universite de la Mediterranee, Aix-Marseille II, 163, avenue de Luminy, 13288 Marseille Cedex 09 (France); Descourt, P; Visvikis, D [INSERM, U650, Laboratoire du Traitement de l' Information Medicale (LaTIM), CHU Morvan, Brest (France); Frisson, T; Grevillot, L; Guigues, L; Sarrut, D; Zahra, N [Universite de Lyon, CREATIS, CNRS UMR5220, Inserm U630, INSA-Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, Centre Leon Berard (France); Maigne, L; Perrot, Y [Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, 24 Avenue des Landais, 63177 Aubiere Cedex (France); Schaart, D R [Delft University of Technology, Radiation Detection and Medical Imaging, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands); Pietrzyk, U, E-mail: buvat@imnc.in2p3.fr [Reseach Center Juelich, Institute of Neurosciences and Medicine and Department of Physics, University of Wuppertal (Germany)

    2011-02-21

    GATE (Geant4 Application for Emission Tomography) is a Monte Carlo simulation platform developed by the OpenGATE collaboration since 2001 and first publicly released in 2004. Dedicated to the modelling of planar scintigraphy, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) acquisitions, this platform is widely used to assist PET and SPECT research. A recent extension of this platform, released by the OpenGATE collaboration as GATE V6, now also enables modelling of x-ray computed tomography and radiation therapy experiments. This paper presents an overview of the main additions and improvements implemented in GATE since the publication of the initial GATE paper (Jan et al 2004 Phys. Med. Biol. 49 4543-61). This includes new models available in GATE to simulate optical and hadronic processes, novelties in modelling tracer, organ or detector motion, new options for speeding up GATE simulations, examples illustrating the use of GATE V6 in radiotherapy applications and CT simulations, and preliminary results regarding the validation of GATE V6 for radiation therapy applications. Upon completion of extensive validation studies, GATE is expected to become a valuable tool for simulations involving both radiotherapy and imaging.

  18. Brain SPECT in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tranquart, F.; Saliba, E.; Prunier, C.; Baulieu, F.; Besnard, J.C.; Guilloteau, D.; Baulieu, J.L.

    2001-01-01

    The modalities and the indications of perfusion and neurotransmission SPECT in childhood are presented. The perfusion as well as neurotransmission tracers have not yet authorization for use in children; they have to be used by prescription of magistral preparation or in research protocols. The radioprotection rules have to be strictly respected. The most frequent indication of perfusion SPECT is pharmacologically resistant epilepsy; the ictal SPECT before surgery allows the localization of the epileptogenic focus. Other indications are relevant in the prognosis of neonatal anoxia and encephalitis. In psychiatric disorders, especially in autism, the interest is the physiopathological approach of the brain dysfunctions. The neurotransmission SPECT is emerging as a consequence of the development of new radiotracer, as the dopaminergic system ligands. The decrease of the dopamine D2 receptors in the striatum can be imaged and quantified in the neonate. The lesions of dopamine system seem to be a consequence of the neonatal hypoxia-ischemia and it is predictive of motor sequelae. Brain SPECT should become a routine examination in child neurologic and psychiatric disorders. (authors)

  19. SPECT in psychiatry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasper, S.; Gruenwald, F.; Walter, H.; Klemm, E.; Podreka, I.; Biersack, H.J.

    1994-01-01

    In the last fifteen years different attempts have been undertaken to understand the biological basis of major psychiatric disorders. One important tool to determine patterns of brain dysfunction is single emission computed tomography (SPECT). Whereas SPECT investigations are already a valuable diagnostic instrument for the diagnosis of dementia of the Alzheimer Type (DAT) there have not been consistent findings that can be referred to as specific for any other particular psychiatric diagnostic entity. Nevertheless, SPECT studies have been able to demonstrate evidence of brain dysfunction in patients with schizophrenia, depression, anxiety disorders, and substance abuse in which other methods showed no clear abnormality of brain function. Our manuscript reviews the data which are currently available in the literature and stresses the need for further studies, especially for prediction and monitoring psychiatric treatment modalities. (orig.) [de

  20. Applications of cerebral SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McArthur, C., E-mail: claire.mcarthur@nhs.net [Department of Neuroradiology, Institute of Neurological Sciences, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Jampana, R.; Patterson, J.; Hadley, D. [Department of Neuroradiology, Institute of Neurological Sciences, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-15

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) can provide three-dimensional functional images of the brain following the injection of one of a series of radiopharmaceuticals that crosses the blood-brain barrier and distributes according to cerebral perfusion, neurotransmitter, or cell density. Applications include differentiating between the dementias, evaluating cerebrovascular disease, preoperative localization of epileptogenic foci, diagnosing movement disorders, and evaluation of intracerebral tumours, while also proving a useful research tool. Unlike positronemission tomography (PET), SPECT imaging is widely available and can be performed in any department that has access to a rotating gamma camera. The purpose of this review is to demonstrate the utility of cerebral SPECT and increase awareness of its role in the investigation of neurological and psychiatric disorders.

  1. Comparison of an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system and an artificial neural network in the cross-talk correction of simultaneous 99 m Tc / 201Tl SPECT imaging using a GATE Monte-Carlo simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidary, Saeed; Setayeshi, Saeed; Ghannadi-Maragheh, Mohammad

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) and the artificial neural network (ANN) to estimate the cross-talk contamination of 99 m Tc / 201 Tl image acquisition in the 201 Tl energy window (77 ± 15% keV). GATE (Geant4 Application in Emission and Tomography) is employed due to its ability to simulate multiple radioactive sources concurrently. Two kinds of phantoms, including two digital and one physical phantom, are used. In the real and the simulation studies, data acquisition is carried out using eight energy windows. The ANN and the ANFIS are prepared in MATLAB, and the GATE results are used as a training data set. Three indications are evaluated and compared. The ANFIS method yields better outcomes for two indications (Spearman's rank correlation coefficient and contrast) and the two phantom results in each category. The maximum image biasing, which is the third indication, is found to be 6% more than that for the ANN.

  2. Usefulness of brain SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raynaud, C.; Rancurel, G.; Kieffer, E.; Ricard, S.; Askienazy, S.; Moretti, J.L.; Bourdoiseau, M.; Rapin, J.; Soussaline, F.

    1983-01-01

    Brain SPECT was not effectively exploited until I-123 isopropyl amphetamine (IAMP), indicator able to penetrate the blood brain barrier, became available. Although the experience of research teams working with IAMP is quite restricted due to the high cost of the indicator, some applications now appear to be worth the cost and in some cases provide data which cannot be obtained with routine techniques, especially in cerebrovascular patients, in epilepsy and some cases of tumor. Brain SPECT appears as an atraumatic test which is useful to establish a functional evaluation of the cerebral parenchyma, and which is a complement to arteriography, X-ray scan and regional cerebral blood flow measurement

  3. Brain spect imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, R.G.L.; Hill, T.C.; Holman, B.L.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses how the rapid development of single-photon radiopharmaceuticals has given new life to tomographic brain imaging in nuclear medicine. Further developments in radiopharmaceuticals and refinements in neuro-SPECT (single-photon emission computed tomography) instrumentation should help to reinstate brain scintigraphy as an important part of neurologic diagnosis. SPECT of the brain evolved from experimentation using prototype instrumentation during the early 1960s. Although tomographic studies provided superior diagnostic accuracy when compared to planar techniques, the arrival of X-ray CT of the head resulted in the rapid demise of technetium brain imaging

  4. Left ventricular function in response to dipyridamole stress: head-to-head comparison between {sup 82}Rubidium PET and {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi SPECT ECG-gated myocardial perfusion imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giorgi, Maria Clementina; Meneghetti, Jose Claudio; Soares, Jose; Izaki, Marisa; Falcao, Andrea; Imada, Rodrigo; Chalela, William; Oliveira, Marco Antonio de; Nomura, Cesar [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Service - Heart Institute of the University of Sao Paulo Medical School, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Verberne, Hein J. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Academic Medical Center, P.O. Box 22700, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2017-05-15

    Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) with {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi (sestamibi) SPECT and rubidium-82 ({sup 82}Rb) PET both allow for combined assessment of perfusion and left ventricular (LV) function. We sought to compare parameters of LV function obtained with both methods using a single dipyridamole stress dose. A group of 221 consecutive patients (65.2 ± 10.4 years, 52.9% male) underwent consecutive sestamibi and {sup 82}Rb MPI after a single dipyridamole stress dose. Sestamibi and {sup 82}Rb summed rest (SRS), stress (SSS) and difference (SDS) scores, and LV end-diastolic (EDV) and end-systolic (ESV) volumes and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) were compared. Bland-Altman analysis showed that with increasing ESV and EDV the difference between the two perfusion tracers increased both at rest and post-stress. The mean difference in EDV and ESV between the two perfusion tracers at rest could both be independently explained by the {sup 82}Rb SDS and the sestamibi SRS. The combined models explained approximately 30% of the variation in these volumes between the two perfusion tracers (R{sup 2} = 0.261, p = 0.005; R{sup 2} = 0.296, p < 0.001, for EDV and ESV respectively). However, the mean difference in LVEF between sestamibi and {sup 82}Rb showed no significant trend post-stress (R{sup 2} = 0.001, p = 0.70) and only a modest linear increase with increasing LVEF values at rest (R{sup 2} = 0.032, p = 0.009). Differences in left ventricular volumes between sestamibi and {sup 82}Rb MPI increase with increasing volumes. However, these differences did only marginally affect LVEF between sestamibi and {sup 82}Rb. In clinical practice these results should be taken into account when comparing functional derived parameters between sestamibi and {sup 82}Rb MPI. (orig.)

  5. Myocardial perfusion SPECT for assessment of left ventricular function and volume- comparison with echocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Xu; Huang Gang

    2004-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate left ventricular volume and function by gated SPECT and comparison of the results with echocardiography. Methods: 65 Consecutive patients (49 male, 16 female; mean age 61+11 years) who underwent both gated 99m Tc-MIBI myocardial perfusion SPECT and echocardiography within a 15 days period were included in the study. Exclusion criteria were any change in clinical status between acquisition of the gated SPECT and echocardiography studies, acute myocardial infarction occurring less than 7 days before study, and surgical procedures occurring within 30 days of the study. The clinical diagnosis of each patient was not considered, as this was not relevant to the purpose of the study. The diagnoses were as follows: coronary artery disease (n=46), hypertensive heart disease (n=8), old myocardial infarction (n=5), myocarditis (n=2), and routine medical examination(n=4). A dose of 740 MBq of 99 Tc m -sestamibi was administered in resting condition. Gated SPECT images were obtained with ADAC Vertex MCD-AC SPECT system. The raw projection images were reconstructed with filtered back-projection (ramp filter), without attenuation correction. The data, including left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV) were obtained using AUTOQUANT software (ADAC corporation). The echocardiography study used its standard techniques. Two nuclear medicine physicians processed the raw images respectively to evaluate internal reproducibility of gated SPECT. In order to compare the results of gated SPECT with echocardiography on different left ventricular volumes, all patients were divided into two groups (EDV 90 ml, n=34) based by EDV measurements in echocardiography. Results: The correlation coefficient of LVEF, EDV, ESV between SPECT and echocardiography were 0.77, 0.86 and 0.90 respectively. P 0.07). The reproducibility of gated SPECT was excellent. There were no significant differences in

  6. Gated blood-pool SPECT assessment of Wolff-Parkinson-White syndromes before and after radiofrequency ablation of accessory pathways; Evaluation fonctionnelle par tomographie cavitaire du syndrome de Wolff-Parkinson-White, avant et apres traitement par radiofrequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bontemps, L.; Ben Brahim, H.; Kraiem, T.; Chevalier, P.; Kirkorian, G.; Touboul, P.; Itti, R. [Hopital Cardiologique de Lyon, 69 (France)

    1997-08-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) ablation of accessory pathways in Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome is supposed to be less aggressive than fulguration while providing excellent results. The aims of our study were therefore the evaluation of the functional results of this therapy in terms of left or right ejection fractions and its effects on the contraction synchronism between both ventricular chambers, derived from bi-ventricular Fourier phase histograms. A consecutive series of 44 patients has been investigated within 48 hours before and after RF therapy: 14 patients had right sided WPW and 30 patients left sided WPW. Only patients for whom RF treatment was considered as a success have been included in the study. Gated blood pool tomography has been performed in order to localize the site of pre-excitation and to build-up the phase histograms for both ventricles, and planar gated imaging has been used for right and left ejection fraction determination. Functional results demonstrate the absence of deleterious effect of RF on ventricular contraction and rather a slight increase of ejection fractions, with a more statistically significant difference for left WPW (LVEF = 62.2 % before RF vs 64.4 % after RF; p = 0.02) than for right WPW (RVEF = 36.3 % before RF vs 39.7 after RF; p = 0.16). Phase analysis, on the contrary, show only significant differences for right WPW, with a noticeable decrease of the pre-excitation (left-to-right phase difference 14.4 deg before RF vs 7.5 deg after RF; p = 0.03) and a significant reduction of the right ventricular phase dispersion (right phase standard deviation 26.5 deg before RF vs 19.0 deg after RF; p = 0.03). For left WPW no measurable differences can be demonstrated in the basal state and it is suggested to use stimulation techniques in order to enhance the competition between the normal and accessory conduction pathways. (authors). 17 refs.

  7. Left ventricular dyssynchrony assessed by gated SPECT phase analysis is an independent predictor of death in patients with advanced coronary artery disease and reduced left ventricular function not undergoing cardiac resynchronization therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uebleis, Christopher; Hellweger, Stefan; Lehner, Sebastian; Haug, Alexander; Bartenstein, Peter; Cumming, Paul; Hacker, Marcus [Ludwig-Maximilians University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Laubender, Ruediger Paul [Ludwig-Maximilians University, Institute of Medical Informatics, Biometry, and Epidemiology (IBE), Munich (Germany); Becker, Alexander [Ludwig-Maximilians University, Medical Department I, Munich (Germany); Sohn, Hae-Young [Ludwig-Maximilians University, Medical Department Innenstadt, Munich (Germany); Van Kriekinge, Serge D.; Slomka, Piotr J. [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); UCLA, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Left ventricular (LV) mechanical dyssynchrony (LVMD) was assessed by gated single-photon emission CT myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) as an independent predictor of death from any cause in patients with known coronary artery disease (CAD) and reduced LV function. Between 2001 and 2010, 135 patients (64 {+-} 11 years of age, 84 % men) with known CAD, reduced LV ejection fraction (LVEF, 38 {+-} 15 %) and without an implanted cardiac resynchronization therapy device underwent gated MPI at rest. LV functional evaluation, which included phase analysis, was conducted to identify patients with LVMD. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were calculated for death of any cause during a mean follow-up of 2.0 {+-} 1.7 years. Uni- and multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression models were calculated to identify independent predictors of death from any cause. Of the 135 patients, 30 (22 %) died during follow-up (18 cardiac deaths and 12 deaths from other causes). Kaplan-Meier curves showed a significantly shorter survival time in the patients with severely reduced LVEF (<30 %, n = 45) or with LVMD (n = 81, log-rank test P <0.005). Cox models identified LVMD, LVEF <30 % and a total perfusion deficit at rest of {>=}20 % as independent predictors of death from any cause. While patients with LVEF <30 % in conjunction with LVMD had similar survival times irrespective of whether they had early revascularization or medical therapy, those patients with LVEF {>=}30% and LVMD who underwent revascularization had significantly longer survival. In patients with known CAD and reduced LV function, dyssynchrony of the LV is an independent predictor of death from any cause. (orig.)

  8. Linear gate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suwono.

    1978-01-01

    A linear gate providing a variable gate duration from 0,40μsec to 4μsec was developed. The electronic circuity consists of a linear circuit and an enable circuit. The input signal can be either unipolar or bipolar. If the input signal is bipolar, the negative portion will be filtered. The operation of the linear gate is controlled by the application of a positive enable pulse. (author)

  9. Radiopharmaceuticals for brain - SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moretti, J.L.

    1992-01-01

    Perfusion tracers for brain SPECT imaging suitable for regional cerebral blood flow measurement and regional cerebral blood volume determination, with respect to their ability to pass the blood-brain-barrier, are described. Problems related t the use of specific radiotracers to map receptors distribution in the brain are also discussed in this lecture. 9 figs, 6 tabs

  10. Cluster computing software for GATE simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beenhouwer, Jan de; Staelens, Steven; Kruecker, Dirk; Ferrer, Ludovic; D'Asseler, Yves; Lemahieu, Ignace; Rannou, Fernando R.

    2007-01-01

    Geometry and tracking (GEANT4) is a Monte Carlo package designed for high energy physics experiments. It is used as the basis layer for Monte Carlo simulations of nuclear medicine acquisition systems in GEANT4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE). GATE allows the user to realistically model experiments using accurate physics models and time synchronization for detector movement through a script language contained in a macro file. The downside of this high accuracy is long computation time. This paper describes a platform independent computing approach for running GATE simulations on a cluster of computers in order to reduce the overall simulation time. Our software automatically creates fully resolved, nonparametrized macros accompanied with an on-the-fly generated cluster specific submit file used to launch the simulations. The scalability of GATE simulations on a cluster is investigated for two imaging modalities, positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Due to a higher sensitivity, PET simulations are characterized by relatively high data output rates that create rather large output files. SPECT simulations, on the other hand, have lower data output rates but require a long collimator setup time. Both of these characteristics hamper scalability as a function of the number of CPUs. The scalability of PET simulations is improved here by the development of a fast output merger. The scalability of SPECT simulations is improved by greatly reducing the collimator setup time. Accordingly, these two new developments result in higher scalability for both PET and SPECT simulations and reduce the computation time to more practical values

  11. Mnemonic activation by SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Migneco, O.; Darcourt, J.; Benoit, M; Malandain, G.; Thirion, J.P.; Robert, Ph.; Vidal, R.; Desvignes, Ph.; Benoliel, J.; Ayache, N.; Bussiere, F.

    1997-01-01

    Data of literature show that SPECT is able to detect cerebral activations induced by sensory-motor stimuli. The facts are not clearly established in what concerns the cognitive activations the amplitude of which is lower. We have studied an activation paradigm such as the Grober and Bruschke test which implies the long term explicit memory. It comprises a visual presentation of words followed by their indexed recall. By using a two-day protocol, 2 SPECTs were achieved in 4 healthy right-handed voluntaries as follows: one of activation (A) and one of control (B). The fifth subject benefited by a SPECT B and of an MRI. The injection for the examination A has been done during the indexed recall stage and for the examination B at the moment when the patient repeated several times the same 3 words. The SPECT data were collected 1 hour after the injection of 370 MBq of ECD making use of a 3-head camera equipped with UHR fan collimators and ending by a LMH on the reconstructed images of 8 mm. The MRI has been achieved by means of a Signa 1.5 Tesla magnet. The SPECT A and B of the subjects 1 to 4 were matched elastically to that of the subject 5 and that of the subject 5 was rigidly matched on its MRI. In this way the individual activation cards of the 4 subjects could be averaged and superimposed on the MRI of the 5. subject. One observes an internal temporal activation (maximal activation of left tonsil, +25% and right uncus, +23%) and a right cingulum activation (maximal activation, +25%), in agreement with the neuro-physiological data. The elastic matching makes possible the inter-subject averaging, what increases the signal-to-noise ratio of activation. The inter-modality rigid matching facilitates the anatomical localisation of the activation site. With these adapted tools, the cognitive activation is thus possible by SPECT and opens perspectives for early diagnosis of neurological troubles, namely of Alzheimer's disease

  12. Metabolic imaging using SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taki, Junichi; Matsunari, Ichiro

    2007-01-01

    In normal condition, the heart obtains more than two-thirds of its energy from the oxidative metabolism of long chain fatty acids, although a wide variety of substrates such as glucose, lactate, ketone bodies and amino acids are also utilised. In ischaemic myocardium, on the other hand, oxidative metabolism of free fatty acid is suppressed and anaerobic glucose metabolism plays a major role in residual oxidative metabolism. Therefore, metabolic imaging can be an important technique for the assessment of various cardiac diseases and conditions. In SPECT, several iodinated fatty acid traces have been introduced and studied. Of these, 123 I-labelled 15-(p-iodophenyl)3-R, S-methylpentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) has been the most commonly used tracer in clinical studies, especially in some of the European countries and Japan. In this review article, several fatty acid tracers for SPECT are characterised, and the mechanism of uptake and clinical utility of BMIPP are discussed in detail. (orig.)

  13. Myocardial Perfusion SPECT 2015 in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchert, Wolfgang; Schäfer, Wolfgang; Hacker, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Summary Aim The working group Cardiovascular Nuclear Medicine of the German Society of Nuclear Medicine presents the results of the 7th survey of myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) of the reporting year 2015. Method 268 questionnaires (173 practices [PR], 67 hospitals [HO], 28 university hospitals [UH]) were evaluated. Results of the last survey from 2012 are set in squared brackets. Results MPS of 121 939 [105 941] patients were reported. 98 % [95 %] of all MPS were performed with Tc-99m radiopharmaceuticals and 2 % [5 %] with Tl-201. 78 % [79 %] of all patients were studied in PR, 14 % [15 %] in HO, and 8 % [6 %] in UH. A pharmacological stress test was performed in 43 % [39 %] (22 % [24 %] adenosine, 20 % [9 %] regadenoson, 1% [6 %] dipyridamole or dobutamine). Attenuation correction was applied in 25 % [2009: 10 %] of MPS. Gated SPECT was performed in 78 % [70 %] of all rest MPS, in 80 % [73 %] of all stress and in 76 % [67 %] of all stress and rest MPS. 53 % [33 %] of all nuclear medicine departments performed MPS scoring by default, whereas 24 % [41 %] did not apply any quantification. 31 % [26 %] of all departments noticed an increase in their counted MPS and 29 % [29 %] no changes. Data from 89 departments which participated in all surveys showed an increase in MPS count of 11.1 % (PR: 12.2 %, HO: 4.8 %, UH: 18.4 %). 70 % [60 %] of the MPS were requested by ambulatory care cardiologists. Conclusion The 2015 MPS survey reveals a high-grade adherence of routine MPS practice to current guidelines. The positive trend in MPS performance and number of MPS already observed in 2012 continues. Educational training remains necessary in the field of SPECT scoring. PMID:27909712

  14. Role of myocardial perfusion SPECT in asymptomatic diabetic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, I.; Chun, K.; Won, K.; Lee, H.; Park, J.; Shin, D.; Kim, Y.; Shim, B.; Lee, J.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: It is important that early diagnosis and treatment of coronary artery disease in diabetic patients, but there are few reports on the prevalence of stress-induced myocardial perfusion abnormalities and the rates of cardiac event in patients with type 2 diabetes. We evaluated the scan findings on gated myocardial perfusion SPECT in asymptomatic diabetic patients. Methods: We performed pharmacological stress test and gated perfusion SPECT in 69 diabetic patients without cardiovascular symptom (mean age: 65 year, male 31 and female 38). Patients underwent two-day imaging protocol and stress study was performed injection of Tc-99m MIBI during adenosine infusion. We followed up these patients by reviewing medical records. Results: Fifty-two of 69 patients (74.5%) showed normal scan findings and 17 patients (24.6%) showed reversible or fixed perfusion defects. Three of 52 patients with normal scan findings showed decreased LV ejection fraction and decreased wall motion. Twenty-three patients with normal scan findings were possible to follow up for more than 1yr (mean time: 18.3±3.3 mo.) and they all had no cardiac event. Three patients with reversible perfusion defects were performed coronary angioplasty. Conclusion: Myocardial perfusion SPECT is a noninvasive method and maybe useful in early diagnosis and predicting prognosis in diabetic patients

  15. The origins of SPECT and SPECT/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutton, Brian F. [University College London, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); University of Wollongong, Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, Wollongong, NSW (Australia)

    2014-05-15

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has a long history of development since its initial demonstration by Kuhl and Edwards in 1963. Although clinical utility has been dominated by the rotating gamma camera, there have been many technological innovations with the recent popularity of organ-specific dedicated SPECT systems. The combination of SPECT and CT evolved from early transmission techniques used for attenuation correction with the initial commercial systems predating the release of PET/CT. The development and acceptance of SPECT/CT has been relatively slow with continuing debate as to what cost/performance ratio is justified. Increasingly, fully diagnostic CT is combined with SPECT so as to facilitate optimal clinical utility. (orig.)

  16. Neuropsychiatry: PET and SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quintana F, Juan Carlos

    2002-01-01

    Functional brain imaging with PET and SPECT have a definitive and well established role in the investigation of a variety of conditions such as dementia, epilepsy and drug addiction. With these methods it is possible to detect early rCBF (regional Cerebral Blood Flow) changes seen in dementia (even before clinical symptoms) and differentiate Alzheimer's disease from other dementias by means of the rCBF pattern change. 18-F-FDG PET imaging is a useful tool in partial epilepsy because both rCBF and brain metabolism are compromised at the epileptogenic focus. During the seizure, rCBF dramatically increases locally. Using SPECT it is possible to locate such foci with 97% accuracy. In drug addiction, particularly with cocaine, functional imaging has proven to be very sensitive to detect brain flow and metabolism derangement early in the course of this condition. These findings are important in many ways: prognostic value, they are used as a powerful reinforcement tool and to monitor functional recovery with rehabilitation. There are many other conditions in which functional brain imaging is of importance such as acute stroke treatment assessment, trauma rehabilitation and in psychiatric and abnormal movement diseases specially with the development of receptor imaging (au)

  17. Attenuation correction for SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoba, Minoru

    1986-01-01

    Attenuation correction is required for the reconstruction of a quantitative SPECT image. A new method for detecting body contours, which are important for the correction of tissue attenuation, is presented. The effect of body contours, detected by the newly developed method, on the reconstructed images was evaluated using various techniques for attenuation correction. The count rates in the specified region of interest in the phantom image by the Radial Post Correction (RPC) method, the Weighted Back Projection (WBP) method, Chang's method were strongly affected by the accuracy of the contours, as compared to those by Sorenson's method. To evaluate the effect of non-uniform attenuators on the cardiac SPECT, computer simulation experiments were performed using two types of models, the uniform attenuator model (UAM) and the non-uniform attenuator model (NUAM). The RPC method showed the lowest relative percent error (%ERROR) in UAM (11 %). However, 20 to 30 percent increase in %ERROR was observed for NUAM reconstructed with the RPC, WBP, and Chang's methods. Introducing an average attenuation coefficient (0.12/cm for Tc-99m and 0.14/cm for Tl-201) in the RPC method decreased %ERROR to the levels for UAM. Finally, a comparison between images, which were obtained by 180 deg and 360 deg scans and reconstructed from the RPC method, showed that the degree of the distortion of the contour of the simulated ventricles in the 180 deg scan was 15 % higher than that in the 360 deg scan. (Namekawa, K.)

  18. Performance of Thallium-201 Electrocardiography-gated Myocardial Perfusion Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography to Assess Left Ventricular Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-Uei Hung

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the performance of gated single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT with thallium-201 (201Tl in assessing left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF, end-diastolic volume (EDV, and end-systolic volume (ESV in Taiwanese by determining repeatability and correlation with two-dimensional (2D echocardiography. A total of 18 patients underwent two sequential gated SPECT acquisitions within 30 minutes in the resting state to assess repeatability. Another 28 patients who underwent gated SPECT and 2D echocardiography within 7 days were included for comparison. The two sequential measurements were well correlated with respect to LVEF, EDV, and ESV (r = 0.97, 0.95, and 0.97, respectively, all p < 0.0001. Bland-Altman analysis revealed that two standard deviations of the absolute difference between the two sequential measurements for LVEF, EDV, and ESV were 6.4%, 16.8 mL, and 8.6 mL, respectively. For LVEF, EDV, and ESV, correlations between redistribution 201Tl-gated SPECT and echocardiography were also excellent (all r = 0.83, p < 0.0001. LVEF was similar with 201Tl-gated SPECT and echocardiography, but EDV and ESV were significantly higher with echocardiography (p < 0.05. Our study revealed that 201Tl-gated SPECT has high repeatability and excellent correlation with echocardiography for the assessment of LVEF and volumes in Taiwanese. These results support the clinical application of gated SPECT in routine 201Tl myocardial perfusion imaging in Taiwanese.

  19. Evolution of the GATE project: new results and developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santin, G. [ESA-ESTEC, Keplerlaan 1, 2200 AG Noordwijk (Netherlands); Staelens, S. [ELIS Department, Ghent University, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Taschereau, R. [CRUMP Institute for Molecular Imaging, University of California Los Angeles, 700 Westwood Plaza A438, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1770 (United States); Descourt, P. [U650 INSERM, LaTIM, Brest (France); Schmidtlein, C.R. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, US (United States); Simon, L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris (France); Visvikis, D. [U650 INSERM, LaTIM, Brest (France); Jan, S. [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot (SHFJ), CEA-Orsay, Orsay (France); Buvat, I. [U678 INSERM, CHU Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France)

    2007-10-15

    We present the status of the Geant4 Application for Emission Tomography (GATE) project, a Monte Carlo simulator for Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) and Positron annihilation Emission Tomography (PET). Its main features are reminded, including modelling of time dependent phenomena and versatile, user-friendly scripting interface. The focus of this manuscript will be on new developments introduced in the past 4 years. New results have been achieved in the fields of validation on real medical and research PET and SPECT systems, voxel geometries, digitisation, distributed computing and dosimetry.

  20. Evolution of the GATE project: new results and developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santin, G.; Staelens, S.; Taschereau, R.; Descourt, P.; Schmidtlein, C.R.; Simon, L.; Visvikis, D.; Jan, S.; Buvat, I.

    2007-01-01

    We present the status of the Geant4 Application for Emission Tomography (GATE) project, a Monte Carlo simulator for Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) and Positron annihilation Emission Tomography (PET). Its main features are reminded, including modelling of time dependent phenomena and versatile, user-friendly scripting interface. The focus of this manuscript will be on new developments introduced in the past 4 years. New results have been achieved in the fields of validation on real medical and research PET and SPECT systems, voxel geometries, digitisation, distributed computing and dosimetry

  1. Determination of Three-Dimensional Left Ventricle Motion to Analyze Ventricular Dyssyncrony in SPECT Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Sá Rebelo, Marina; Aarre, Ann Kirstine Hummelgaard; Clemmesen, Karen-Louise

    2010-01-01

    A method to compute three-dimension (3D) left ventricle (LV) motion and its color coded visualization scheme for the qualitative analysis in SPECT images is proposed. It is used to investigate some aspects of Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy (CRT). The method was applied to 3D gated-SPECT images...... sets from normal subjects and patients with severe Idiopathic Heart Failure, before and after CRT. Color coded visualization maps representing the LV regional motion showed significant difference between patients and normal subjects. Moreover, they indicated a difference between the two groups...

  2. Performance of Myocardial Perfusion Imaging Using Multi-focus Fan Beam Collimator with Resolution Recovery Reconstruction in a Comparison with Conventional SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsutomo, Norikazu; Nagaki, Akio; Sasaki, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    IQ-SPECT is an advanced high-speed SPECT modality for myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI), which uses a multi-focus fan beam collimator with resolution recovery reconstruction. The aim of this study was to compare IQ-SPECT with conventional SPECT in terms of performance, based on standard clinical protocols. In addition, we examined the concordance between conventional and IQ-SPECT in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Fifty-three patients, undergoing rest-gated MPI for the evaluation of known or suspected CAD, were enrolled in this study. In each patient, conventional SPECT ( 99m Tc-tetrofosmin, 9.6 min and 201 Tl, 12.9 min) was performed, immediately followed by IQ-SPECT, using a short acquisition time (4.3 min for 99m Tc-tetrofosmin and 6.2 min for 201 Tl). A quantitative analysis was performed on an MPI polar map, using a 20-segment model of the left ventricle. An automated analysis by gated SPECT was carried out to determine the left ventricular volume and function including end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV), and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). The degree of concordance between conventional SPECT and IQ-SPECT images was evaluated according to linear regression and Bland-Altman analyses. The segmental percent uptake exhibited a significant correlation between IQ-SPECT and conventional SPECT (P<0.05). The mean differences in 99m Tc-tetrofosmin studies were 1.1±6.6% (apex), 2.8±5.7% (anterior wall), 2.9±6.2% (septal wall), 4.9±6.7% (lateral wall), and 1.8±5.6% (inferior wall). Meanwhile, regarding the 201 Tl-SPECT studies, these values were 1.6±6.9%, 2.0±6.6%, 2.1±5.9%, 3.3±7.2%, and 2.4±5.8%, respectively. Although the mean LVEF in IQ-SPECT tended to be higher than that observed in conventional SPECT (conventional SPECT=64.8±11.8% and IQ-SPECT=68.3±12.1% for 99m Tc-tetrofosmin; conventional SPECT= 56.0±11.7% and IQ-SPECT=61.5±12.2% for 201 Tl), quantitative parameters were not significantly different between

  3. Serial SPECT in children with partial epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoya, Machiko; Ushiku, Hideo

    1995-01-01

    We performed serial single-photon emission CT (SPECT) with N-isopropyl-p-( 123 I)-Iodoamphetamine to measure the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in 15 children with partial epilepsy. SPECT showed focal changes in 14 cases. Ten cases had abnormalities in the initial SPECT and another four cases in the second test. The cases with normal rCBF in initial SPECT had been tested in an early phase after the onset, and then decreased rCBF were observed in the second SPECT. The cases with both abnormal rCBF in the initial SPECT and improved rCBF in the second SPECT showed good prognosis in clinico-electrophysiological evolutions. In cases with abnormal changes of rCBF in the second SPECT, clinical prognosis was found to be not so good. These findings suggest that serial SPECT may be used to follow the course of epilepsy. (author)

  4. Comparative study of gated myocardial perfusion imaging using 99Tcm-tetrofosmin and 99Tcm-sestamibi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Ruihua; Ruan Qiao; Sun Ke; Han Xingmin; Sun Bingqi; Xie Xinli; Cheng Bing; Chen Yanlin; Liu Baoping

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To compare the results of 99 Tc m -tetrofosmin (TF) and 99 Tc m -MIBI G-MPI in evaluating left ventricular myocardial perfusion and other functional parameters. Methods: TF and MIBI were both labeled by 99 Tc m and the radiochemical purities were tested. During December 2011 to May 2012, 112 patients who had examinations of CAG and echocardiograph in one week after G-MPI were divided into 99 Tc m -TF group (47 patients) and 99 Tc m -MIBI group (65 patients) by simple random sampling. Patients who suffered from severe arrhythmia, clinically suspicious of myocarditis or cardiomyopathy were excluded. The research was approved by the ethics committee, and all patients signed informed consents. One-day 99 Tc m -TF G-MPI and two-day 99 Tc m -MIBI G-MPI were performed. The left ventricular functional parameters were acquired automatically by Cedars quantitative gated SPECT (QGS) software, including LVEF, EDV, ESV, peak filling rate (PFR), peak ejection rate (PER) and phase standard difference (SD). The data were analyzed using χ 2 test, two-sample t test, paired t test and linear correlation analysis by SPSS 17.0. Results: The radiochemical purities of 99 Tc m -TF and 99 Tc m -MIBI were (97.5±0.4) % and (99.1±0.2) % respectively. The coincidence rates of 99 Tc m -TF and 99 Tc m -MIBI G-MPI with CAG were 88.9% (40/45) and 90.5% (57/63), respectively. There was no significant difference between G-MPI results of the two agents (χ 2 =0.389, P>0.05). There was also no significant difference between left ventricular functional parameters of the two agents (LVEF:(62.60±13.56)% vs (60.52±7.08)%, t=0.940; EDV: (103.3±17.29) ml vs (98.52±19.37) ml, t=1.348; ESV: (41.73±12.69) ml vs (46.05±10.81) ml, t=0.851; PER: (2.73±0.67)EDV/s vs (2.61±1.04) EDV/s, t=0.725; PFR: (2.13±0.80) EDV/s vs (2.07±1.09) EDV/s, t=0.339; phase SD: (5.58±4.16)° vs (5.97±4.64)°, t=0.450; all P>0.05). There was no significant difference between left ventricular functional

  5. Quantification of 3D myocardium motion in gated SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez, Marco A.; Furuie, Sergio S.; Melo, Candido P.; Meneghetti, Jose C.; Moura, Lincoln

    1996-01-01

    A method to quantify 3 D left ventricle motion by the optical flow technique extended to the voxel space is described. The left ventricle wall motion is represented by a series of 3 D velocity vector which is computed automatically by the proposed method for each voxel on the sequence of cardiac volumes

  6. Influence of Respiratory Gating, Image Filtering, and Animal Positioning on High-Resolution Electrocardiography-Gated Murine Cardiac Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac parameters obtained from single-photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT images can be affected by respiratory motion, image filtering, and animal positioning. We investigated the influence of these factors on ultra-high-resolution murine myocardial perfusion SPECT. Five mice were injected with 99m technetium (99mTc-tetrofosmin, and each was scanned in supine and prone positions in a U-SPECT-II scanner with respiratory and electrocardiographic (ECG gating. ECG-gated SPECT images were created without applying respiratory motion correction or with two different respiratory motion correction strategies. The images were filtered with a range of three-dimensional gaussian kernels, after which end-diastolic volumes (EDVs, end-systolic volumes (ESVs, and left ventricular ejection fractions were calculated. No significant differences in the measured cardiac parameters were detected when any strategy to reduce or correct for respiratory motion was applied, whereas big differences (> 5% in EDV and ESV were found with regard to different positioning of animals. A linear relationship (p < .001 was found between the EDV or ESV and the kernel size of the gaussian filter. In short, respiratory gating did not significantly affect the cardiac parameters of mice obtained with ultra-high-resolution SPECT, whereas the position of the animals and the image filters should be the same in a comparative study with multiple scans to avoid systematic differences in measured cardiac parameters.

  7. Evaluating low pass filters on SPECT reconstructed cardiac orientation estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Shekhar

    2009-02-01

    Low pass filters can affect the quality of clinical SPECT images by smoothing. Appropriate filter and parameter selection leads to optimum smoothing that leads to a better quantification followed by correct diagnosis and accurate interpretation by the physician. This study aims at evaluating the low pass filters on SPECT reconstruction algorithms. Criteria for evaluating the filters are estimating the SPECT reconstructed cardiac azimuth and elevation angle. Low pass filters studied are butterworth, gaussian, hamming, hanning and parzen. Experiments are conducted using three reconstruction algorithms, FBP (filtered back projection), MLEM (maximum likelihood expectation maximization) and OSEM (ordered subsets expectation maximization), on four gated cardiac patient projections (two patients with stress and rest projections). Each filter is applied with varying cutoff and order for each reconstruction algorithm (only butterworth used for MLEM and OSEM). The azimuth and elevation angles are calculated from the reconstructed volume and the variation observed in the angles with varying filter parameters is reported. Our results demonstrate that behavior of hamming, hanning and parzen filter (used with FBP) with varying cutoff is similar for all the datasets. Butterworth filter (cutoff > 0.4) behaves in a similar fashion for all the datasets using all the algorithms whereas with OSEM for a cutoff < 0.4, it fails to generate cardiac orientation due to oversmoothing, and gives an unstable response with FBP and MLEM. This study on evaluating effect of low pass filter cutoff and order on cardiac orientation using three different reconstruction algorithms provides an interesting insight into optimal selection of filter parameters.

  8. Molecular imaging agents for SPECT (and SPECT/CT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gnanasegaran, Gopinath; Ballinger, James R.

    2014-01-01

    The development of hybrid single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) cameras has increased the diagnostic value of many existing single photon radiopharmaceuticals. Precise anatomical localization of lesions greatly increases diagnostic confidence in bone imaging of the extremities, infection imaging, sentinel lymph node localization, and imaging in other areas. Accurate anatomical localization is particularly important prior to surgery, especially involving the parathyroid glands and sentinel lymph node procedures. SPECT/CT plays a role in characterization of lesions, particularly in bone scintigraphy and radioiodine imaging of metastatic thyroid cancer. In the development of novel tracers, SPECT/CT is particularly important in monitoring response to therapies that do not result in an early change in lesion size. Preclinical SPECT/CT devices, which actually have spatial resolution superior to PET/CT devices, have become essential in characterization of the biodistribution and tissue kinetics of novel tracers, allowing coregistration of serial studies within the same animals, which serves both to reduce biological variability and reduce the number of animals required. In conclusion, SPECT/CT increases the utility of existing radiopharmaceuticals and plays a pivotal role in the evaluation of novel tracers. (orig.)

  9. Molecular imaging agents for SPECT (and SPECT/CT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnanasegaran, Gopinath [Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Ballinger, James R. [Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-15

    The development of hybrid single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) cameras has increased the diagnostic value of many existing single photon radiopharmaceuticals. Precise anatomical localization of lesions greatly increases diagnostic confidence in bone imaging of the extremities, infection imaging, sentinel lymph node localization, and imaging in other areas. Accurate anatomical localization is particularly important prior to surgery, especially involving the parathyroid glands and sentinel lymph node procedures. SPECT/CT plays a role in characterization of lesions, particularly in bone scintigraphy and radioiodine imaging of metastatic thyroid cancer. In the development of novel tracers, SPECT/CT is particularly important in monitoring response to therapies that do not result in an early change in lesion size. Preclinical SPECT/CT devices, which actually have spatial resolution superior to PET/CT devices, have become essential in characterization of the biodistribution and tissue kinetics of novel tracers, allowing coregistration of serial studies within the same animals, which serves both to reduce biological variability and reduce the number of animals required. In conclusion, SPECT/CT increases the utility of existing radiopharmaceuticals and plays a pivotal role in the evaluation of novel tracers. (orig.)

  10. SPECT in Focal Epilepsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roderick Duncan

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain perfusion changes during seizures were first observed in the 1930s. Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT was developed in the 1970s, and tracers suitable for the imaging of regional cerebral perfusion (rCP became available in the 1980s. The method was first used to study rCP in the interictal phase, and this showed areas of low perfusion in a proportion of cases, mainly in patients with temporal lobe epilepsies. However, the trapping paradigm of tracers such as hexamethyl propyleneamine oxime (HMPAO provided a practicable method of studying changes in rCP during seizures, and a literature was established in the late 1980s and early 1990s showing a typical sequence of changes during and after seizures of mesial temporal lobe origin; the ictal phase was associated with large increases in perfusion throughout the temporal lobe, with first the lateral, then the mesial temporal lobe becoming hypoperfused in the postictal phase. Activation and inhibition of other structures, such as the basal ganglia and frontal cortex, were also seen. Studies of seizures originating elsewhere in the brain have shown a variety of patterns of change, according to the structures involved. These changes have been used practically to aid the process of localisation of the epileptogenic zone so that epilepsy surgery can be planned.

  11. SPECT imaging with resolution recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bronnikov, A. V.

    2011-01-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a method of choice for imaging spatial distributions of radioisotopes. Many applications of this method are found in nuclear industry, medicine, and biomedical research. We study mathematical modeling of a micro-SPECT system by using a point-spread function (PSF) and implement an OSEM-based iterative algorithm for image reconstruction with resolution recovery. Unlike other known implementations of the OSEM algorithm, we apply en efficient computation scheme based on a useful approximation of the PSF, which ensures relatively fast computations. The proposed approach can be applied with the data acquired with any type of collimators, including parallel-beam fan-beam, cone-beam and pinhole collimators. Experimental results obtained with a micro SPECT system demonstrate high efficiency of resolution recovery. (authors)

  12. Organ volume estimation using SPECT

    CERN Document Server

    Zaidi, H

    1996-01-01

    Knowledge of in vivo thyroid volume has both diagnostic and therapeutic importance and could lead to a more precise quantification of absolute activity contained in the thyroid gland. In order to improve single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) quantitation, attenuation correction was performed according to Chang's algorithm. The dual-window method was used for scatter subtraction. We used a Monte Carlo simulation of the SPECT system to accurately determine the scatter multiplier factor k. Volume estimation using SPECT was performed by summing up the volume elements (voxels) lying within the contour of the object, determined by a fixed threshold and the gray level histogram (GLH) method. Thyroid phantom and patient studies were performed and the influence of 1) fixed thresholding, 2) automatic thresholding, 3) attenuation, 4) scatter, and 5) reconstruction filter were investigated. This study shows that accurate volume estimation of the thyroid gland is feasible when accurate corrections are perform...

  13. PET and SPECT in neurology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O. [Groningen University Medical Center (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Ghent Univ. (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine; Vries, Erik F.J. de; Waarde, Aren van [Groningen University Medical Center (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Otte, Andreas (ed.) [Univ. of Applied Sciences Offenburg (Germany). Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology

    2014-07-01

    PET and SPECT in Neurology highlights the combined expertise of renowned authors whose dedication to the investigation of neurological disorders through nuclear medicine technology has achieved international recognition. Classical neurodegenerative disorders are discussed as well as cerebrovascular disorders, brain tumors, epilepsy, head trauma, coma, sleeping disorders, and inflammatory and infectious diseases of the CNS. The latest results in nuclear brain imaging are detailed. Most chapters are written jointly by a clinical neurologist and a nuclear medicine specialist to ensure a multidisciplinary approach. This state-of-the-art compendium will be valuable to anybody in the field of neuroscience, from the neurologist and the radiologist/nuclear medicine specialist to the interested general practitioner and geriatrician. It is the second volume of a trilogy on PET and SPECT imaging in the neurosciences, the other volumes covering PET and SPECT in psychiatry and in neurobiological systems.

  14. PET and SPECT in neurology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O.; Ghent Univ.; Vries, Erik F.J. de; Waarde, Aren van; Otte, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    PET and SPECT in Neurology highlights the combined expertise of renowned authors whose dedication to the investigation of neurological disorders through nuclear medicine technology has achieved international recognition. Classical neurodegenerative disorders are discussed as well as cerebrovascular disorders, brain tumors, epilepsy, head trauma, coma, sleeping disorders, and inflammatory and infectious diseases of the CNS. The latest results in nuclear brain imaging are detailed. Most chapters are written jointly by a clinical neurologist and a nuclear medicine specialist to ensure a multidisciplinary approach. This state-of-the-art compendium will be valuable to anybody in the field of neuroscience, from the neurologist and the radiologist/nuclear medicine specialist to the interested general practitioner and geriatrician. It is the second volume of a trilogy on PET and SPECT imaging in the neurosciences, the other volumes covering PET and SPECT in psychiatry and in neurobiological systems.

  15. Normal anatomy of lung perfusion SPECT scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moskowitz, G.W.; Levy, L.M.

    1987-01-01

    Ten patients studies for possible pulmonary embolic disease had normal lung perfusion planar and SPECT scintigraphy. A computer program was developed to superimpose the CT scans on corresponding SPECT images. Superimposition of CT scans on corresponding SPECT transaxial cross-sectional images, when available, provides the needed definition and relationships of adjacent organs. SPECT transaxial sections provide clear anatomic definition of perfusion defects without foreground and background lung tissue superimposed. The location, shape, and size of the perfusion defects can be readily assessed by SPECT. An algorithm was developed for the differentiation of abnormal pulmonary perfusion patterns from normal structures on variation

  16. Radiopharmaceuticals for SPECT cancer detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chernov, V. I., E-mail: chernov@oncology.tomsk.ru; Medvedeva, A. A., E-mail: tickayaAA@oncology.tomsk.ru; Zelchan, R. V., E-mail: r.zelchan@yandex.ru; Sinilkin, I. G., E-mail: sinilkinig@oncology.tomsk.ru [Tomsk Cancer Research Institute, Kooperativny Street 5, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Tomsk Polytechnic University, Lenin Avenue 30, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Stasyuk, E. S.; Larionova, L. A. [Tomsk Polytechnic University, Lenin Avenue 30, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Slonimskaya, E. M.; Choynzonov, E. L. [Tomsk Cancer Research Institute, Kooperativny Street 5, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-02

    The purpose of the study was to assess the efficacy of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with {sup 199}Tl and {sup 99}mTc-MIBI in the detection of breast, laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancers. A total of 220 patients were included into the study: 120 patients with breast lesions (100 patients with breast cancer and 20 patients with benign breast tumors) and 100 patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal diseases (80 patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer and 20 patients with benign laryngeal/hypopharyngeal lesions). No abnormal {sup 199}Tl uptake was seen in all patients with benign breast and laryngeal lesions, indicating a 100% specificity of {sup 199}Tl SPECT. In the breast cancer patients, the increased {sup 199}Tl uptake in the breast was visualized in 94.8% patients, {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI—in 93.4% patients. The increased {sup 199}Tl uptake in axillary lymph nodes was detected in 60% patients, and {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI—in 93.1% patients. In patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer, the sensitivity of SPECT with {sup 199}Tl and {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI was 95%. The {sup 199}Tl SPECT sensitivity in identification of regional lymph node metastases in the patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer was 75% and the {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI SPECT sensitivity was 17%. The data obtained showed that SPECT with {sup 199}Tl and {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI can be used as one of the additional imaging methods in detection of tumors.

  17. PET and SPECT in psychiatry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O.; Otte, Andreas; Vries, Erik F.J. de; Waarde, Aren van

    2014-01-01

    Covers classical psychiatric disorders as well as other subjects such as suicide, sleep, eating disorders, and autism. Emphasis on a multidisciplinary approach. Written by internationally acclaimed experts. PET and SPECT in Psychiatry showcases the combined expertise of renowned authors whose dedication to the investigation of psychiatric disease through nuclear medicine technology has achieved international recognition. The classical psychiatric disorders as well as other subjects - such as suicide, sleep, eating disorders, and autism - are discussed and the latest results in functional neuroimaging are detailed. Most chapters are written jointly by a clinical psychiatrist and a nuclear medicine expert to ensure a multidisciplinary approach. This state of the art compendium will be valuable to all who have an interest in the field of neuroscience, from the psychiatrist and the radiologist/nuclear medicine specialist to the interested general practitioner and cognitive psychologist. It is the first volume of a trilogy on PET and SPECT imaging in the neurosciences; other volumes will focus on PET and SPECT in neurology and PET and SPECT of neurobiological systems.

  18. SPECT og PET i neurobiologien

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulson, O.B.; Lassen, N.A.

    1997-01-01

    PET (positron emission tomography) and SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) are isotopic methods in which the distribution is registered of radiolabelled tracers given in such small amounts that they are without effect on the organism or the organism's disposal of them. Thus, a series...

  19. PET and SPECT in psychiatry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O. [University Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Ghent Univ. (Belgium); Otte, Andreas [Univ. of Applied Sciences Offenburg (Germany). Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology; Vries, Erik F.J. de; Waarde, Aren van (eds.) [University Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging

    2014-09-01

    Covers classical psychiatric disorders as well as other subjects such as suicide, sleep, eating disorders, and autism. Emphasis on a multidisciplinary approach. Written by internationally acclaimed experts. PET and SPECT in Psychiatry showcases the combined expertise of renowned authors whose dedication to the investigation of psychiatric disease through nuclear medicine technology has achieved international recognition. The classical psychiatric disorders as well as other subjects - such as suicide, sleep, eating disorders, and autism - are discussed and the latest results in functional neuroimaging are detailed. Most chapters are written jointly by a clinical psychiatrist and a nuclear medicine expert to ensure a multidisciplinary approach. This state of the art compendium will be valuable to all who have an interest in the field of neuroscience, from the psychiatrist and the radiologist/nuclear medicine specialist to the interested general practitioner and cognitive psychologist. It is the first volume of a trilogy on PET and SPECT imaging in the neurosciences; other volumes will focus on PET and SPECT in neurology and PET and SPECT of neurobiological systems.

  20. Effect of bypass on the motor activation SPECT compared to the acetazolamide SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawaguchi, Shoichiro; Iwahashi, Hideaki; Sakaki, Toshisuke; Imai, Teruhiko; Ohishi, Hajime [Nara Medical Univ., Kashihara (Japan)

    2002-03-01

    The authors evaluated and analyzed motor activation single photon emission computed tomography (M-SPECT) in ischemic cerebrovascular disease compared to resting and acetazolamide (ACZ) activated SPECT studies. Seventeen cases with STA-MCA bypass performed for ischemic cerebrovascular disease were examined. The SPECT studies consisting of resting, ACZ activation, and motor activation stages were performed before bypass, at 1 month, and 3 months after bypass. The result of the M-SPECT was expressed as negative or positive. Before bypass: In all 17 cases, SPECT studies of the affected side showed reduction of resting cerebral blood flow (CBF) and reduction of cerebrovascular reserve capacity (CVRC). Eight cases were positive in the M-SPECT study. One week after bypass: The resting CBF increased in seven cases. Four showed preoperative positive M-SPECT. Eight cases showed improvement of the CVRC. Twelve cases were positive in M-SPECT, and two were negative in the preoperative M-SPECT. Three months after bypass: Thirteen cases showed improvement in the resting CBF, and fourteen cases showed improvement of the CVRC. Fourteen cases were positive in the M-SPECT, and among these, 6 were negative in the preoperative M-SPECT. There was a discrepancy between the improvement in CVRC and M-SPECT. M-SPECT study can provide information about the degree of hemodynamic compromise and effect of bypass surgery. (author)

  1. Effect of bypass on the motor activation SPECT compared to the acetazolamide SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawaguchi, Shoichiro; Iwahashi, Hideaki; Sakaki, Toshisuke; Imai, Teruhiko; Ohishi, Hajime

    2002-01-01

    The authors evaluated and analyzed motor activation single photon emission computed tomography (M-SPECT) in ischemic cerebrovascular disease compared to resting and acetazolamide (ACZ) activated SPECT studies. Seventeen cases with STA-MCA bypass performed for ischemic cerebrovascular disease were examined. The SPECT studies consisting of resting, ACZ activation, and motor activation stages were performed before bypass, at 1 month, and 3 months after bypass. The result of the M-SPECT was expressed as negative or positive. Before bypass: In all 17 cases, SPECT studies of the affected side showed reduction of resting cerebral blood flow (CBF) and reduction of cerebrovascular reserve capacity (CVRC). Eight cases were positive in the M-SPECT study. One week after bypass: The resting CBF increased in seven cases. Four showed preoperative positive M-SPECT. Eight cases showed improvement of the CVRC. Twelve cases were positive in M-SPECT, and two were negative in the preoperative M-SPECT. Three months after bypass: Thirteen cases showed improvement in the resting CBF, and fourteen cases showed improvement of the CVRC. Fourteen cases were positive in the M-SPECT, and among these, 6 were negative in the preoperative M-SPECT. There was a discrepancy between the improvement in CVRC and M-SPECT. M-SPECT study can provide information about the degree of hemodynamic compromise and effect of bypass surgery. (author)

  2. Clinical evaluation of SPECT in cerebrovascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshibuchi, Masao; Satoh, Mitsutaka; Kanda, Tetsuro; Nishi, Fumiaki; Yamane, Kanji; Fujimatsu, Masahiko; Edamitsu, Satoshi; Anno, Yasuro; Ohtake, Hisashi.

    1989-01-01

    In 131 patients with cerebrovascular disease, regional cerebral blood flow were determined by 123 I-IMP (N-isopropyl ( 123 I)-iodoamphetamine) or 99m Tc-HM-PAO ( 99m Tc (d, 1)-hexamethyl propyleneamine oxime) SPECT and findings were compared with those of X-CT or MRI. The perfusion deficit detected by SPECT was larger than the deficit by X-CT or MRI in every case. The perfusion deficit area was more clearly demonstrated by SPECT than by X-CT or MRI in patients with acute cerebral infarction. The hypoperfusion area determined by 123 I-IMP SPECT was wider than that by 99m Tc-HM-PAO SPECT. The crossed cerebellar diaschisis was observed in 56 out of 131 cases (43%). The results of operation were quantitatively evaluated by 123 I-IMP SPECT in 25 patients. (author)

  3. SPECT and PET imaging in epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semah, F.

    2007-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging are very useful for the management of patients with medically refractory partial epilepsy. Presurgical evaluation of patients with medically refractory partial epilepsy often included PET imaging using FDG. The use of SPECT in these patients adds some more information and gives the clinicians the possibility of having ictal imaging. Furthermore, PET and SPECT imaging are performed to better understand the pathophysiology of epilepsy. (authors)

  4. HMPAO-SPECT in cerebral seizures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruenwald, F.; Bockisch, A.; Reichmann, K.; Ammari, B.; Hotze, A.; Biersack, H.J.; Durwen, H.; Buelau, P.; Elger, C.E.; Rohde, A.; Penin, H.

    1988-01-01

    In nine patients with suspected psychogenic seizures and in three patients with proven epileptic seizures HMPAO-SPECT was performed prior to and during seizure. In the patients with lateron-proven psychogenic seizures no, or only slight, changes of regional cerebral blood flow were found. Patients with proven epilepsy revealed partly normal findings interictally but during seizure a markedly increased circumscript blood flow was found in all patients. Even though PET is superior to SPECT with respect to spatial resolution, in the diagnosis of seizures HMPAO-SPECT has the advantage of enabling injection of the tracer during the seizure and the performance of the SPECT study subsequently. (orig.) [de

  5. Segmented slant hole collimator for stationary cardiac SPECT: Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yanfei; Yu, Zhicong; Zeng, Gengsheng L

    2015-09-01

    This work is a preliminary study of a stationary cardiac SPECT system. The goal of this research is to propose a stationary cardiac SPECT system using segmented slant-hole collimators and to perform computer simulations to test the feasibility. Compared to the rotational SPECT, a stationary system has a benefit of acquiring temporally consistent projections. The most challenging issue in building a stationary system is to provide sufficient projection view-angles. A GATE (GEANT4 application for tomographic emission) Monte Carlo model was developed to simulate a two-detector stationary cardiac SPECT that uses segmented slant-hole collimators. Each detector contains seven segmented slant-hole sections that slant to a common volume at the rotation center. Consequently, 14 view-angles over 180° were acquired without any gantry rotation. The NCAT phantom was used for data generation and a tailored maximum-likelihood expectation-maximization algorithm was used for image reconstruction. Effects of limited number of view-angles and data truncation were carefully evaluated in the paper. Simulation results indicated that the proposed segmented slant-hole stationary cardiac SPECT system is able to acquire sufficient data for cardiac imaging without a loss of image quality, even when the uptakes in the liver and kidneys are high. Seven views are acquired simultaneously at each detector, leading to 5-fold sensitivity gain over the conventional dual-head system at the same total acquisition time, which in turn increases the signal-to-noise ratio by 19%. The segmented slant-hole SPECT system also showed a good performance in lesion detection. In our prototype system, a short hole-length was used to reduce the dead zone between neighboring collimator segments. The measured sensitivity gain is about 17-fold over the conventional dual-head system. The gate Monte Carlo simulations confirm the feasibility of the proposed stationary cardiac SPECT system with segmented slant

  6. Segmented slant hole collimator for stationary cardiac SPECT: Monte Carlo simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Yanfei, E-mail: ymao@ucair.med.utah.edu [Department of Radiology, Utah Center for Advanced Imaging Research (UCAIR), University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84108 and Department of Bioengineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States); Yu, Zhicong [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Zeng, Gengsheng L. [Department of Radiology, Utah Center for Advanced Imaging Research (UCAIR), University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84108 and Department of Engineering, Weber State University, Ogden, Utah 84408 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: This work is a preliminary study of a stationary cardiac SPECT system. The goal of this research is to propose a stationary cardiac SPECT system using segmented slant-hole collimators and to perform computer simulations to test the feasibility. Compared to the rotational SPECT, a stationary system has a benefit of acquiring temporally consistent projections. The most challenging issue in building a stationary system is to provide sufficient projection view-angles. Methods: A GATE (GEANT4 application for tomographic emission) Monte Carlo model was developed to simulate a two-detector stationary cardiac SPECT that uses segmented slant-hole collimators. Each detector contains seven segmented slant-hole sections that slant to a common volume at the rotation center. Consequently, 14 view-angles over 180° were acquired without any gantry rotation. The NCAT phantom was used for data generation and a tailored maximum-likelihood expectation-maximization algorithm was used for image reconstruction. Effects of limited number of view-angles and data truncation were carefully evaluated in the paper. Results: Simulation results indicated that the proposed segmented slant-hole stationary cardiac SPECT system is able to acquire sufficient data for cardiac imaging without a loss of image quality, even when the uptakes in the liver and kidneys are high. Seven views are acquired simultaneously at each detector, leading to 5-fold sensitivity gain over the conventional dual-head system at the same total acquisition time, which in turn increases the signal-to-noise ratio by 19%. The segmented slant-hole SPECT system also showed a good performance in lesion detection. In our prototype system, a short hole-length was used to reduce the dead zone between neighboring collimator segments. The measured sensitivity gain is about 17-fold over the conventional dual-head system. Conclusions: The GATE Monte Carlo simulations confirm the feasibility of the proposed stationary cardiac

  7. SPECT of aged backache patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Shigehiko; Nishikimi, Junzo; Mizuno, Naokado; Watanabe, Kentaro; Kondo, Masaki; Ozaki, Satoshi; Urasaki, Tetsuya; Muro, Toshiyuki [Prefectural Tajimi Hospital, Gifu (Japan)

    1995-12-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using {sup 99m}Tc-HMDP was performed on 53 middle-aged or elderly patients (male 20, female, 33; age range, 40-80 years old) with lumbago, i.e., 25 patients with lumbar spondylosis, 15 with lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis, 4 with spondylolytic spondylolisthesis, 3 with compression fracture, 3 with pulurent spondylitis, 2 with spondylous osteoporosis, and 1 with spinal osteodesmosis. {sup 99m}Tc-HMDP (740 MBq) was intravenously injected and regular SPECT was performed at 3 hours. Gamma camera was performed for about 10 seconds with 5deg intervals, and 36 steps (180deg) of collection was completed after about 6 minutes. The radioisotope accumulation, the presence or absence of sthenia, and its site were evaluated. Forty-seven (88.7%) patients showed excessive accumulation, i.e., 40 (75.5%) in peripheral vertebral osteophyte, 31 (58.5%) in vertebral articulations, and 10 (18.9%) in whole vertebral body. Significantly increased bilateral excessive accumulation was admitted in the vertebral articulations of sliding disc in degenerative spondylolisthesis. SPECT is considered useful in understanding the pathophysiology of degenerative lumber diseases. (S.Y.).

  8. SPECT of aged backache patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Shigehiko; Nishikimi, Junzo; Mizuno, Naokado; Watanabe, Kentaro; Kondo, Masaki; Ozaki, Satoshi; Urasaki, Tetsuya; Muro, Toshiyuki

    1995-01-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using 99m Tc-HMDP was performed on 53 middle-aged or elderly patients (male 20, female, 33; age range, 40-80 years old) with lumbago, i.e., 25 patients with lumbar spondylosis, 15 with lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis, 4 with spondylolytic spondylolisthesis, 3 with compression fracture, 3 with pulurent spondylitis, 2 with spondylous osteoporosis, and 1 with spinal osteodesmosis. 99m Tc-HMDP (740 MBq) was intravenously injected and regular SPECT was performed at 3 hours. Gamma camera was performed for about 10 seconds with 5deg intervals, and 36 steps (180deg) of collection was completed after about 6 minutes. The radioisotope accumulation, the presence or absence of sthenia, and its site were evaluated. Forty-seven (88.7%) patients showed excessive accumulation, i.e., 40 (75.5%) in peripheral vertebral osteophyte, 31 (58.5%) in vertebral articulations, and 10 (18.9%) in whole vertebral body. Significantly increased bilateral excessive accumulation was admitted in the vertebral articulations of sliding disc in degenerative spondylolisthesis. SPECT is considered useful in understanding the pathophysiology of degenerative lumber diseases. (S.Y.)

  9. Labeled receptor ligands for spect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kung, H.F.

    1989-01-01

    Receptor specific imaging agents for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) can potentially be useful in the understanding of basic biochemistry and pharmacology of receptors. SPECT images may also provide tools for evaluation of density and binding kinetics of a specific receptor, information important for diagnosis and patient management. Basic requirements for receptor imaging agents are: (a) they are labeled with short-lived isotopes, (b) they show high selectivity and specific uptake, (c) they exhibit high target/background ratio, and (d) they can be modeled to obtain quantitative information. Several good examples of CNS receptor specific ligands labeled with I-123 have been developed, including iodoQNB, iodoestrogen iodobenzadiazepine, iodobenazepine, iodobenzamides for muscarinic, estrogen benzadiazepine, D-1 and D-2 dopamine receptors. With the advent of newer and faster SPECT imaging devices, it may be feasible to quantitate the receptor density by in vivo imaging techniques. These new brain imaging agents can provide unique diagnostic information, which may not be available through other imaging modalities, such as CT and MRI

  10. New gate opening hours

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

    2009-01-01

    Please note the new opening hours of the gates as well as the intersites tunnel from the 19 May 2009: GATE A 7h - 19h GATE B 24h/24 GATE C 7h - 9h\t17h - 19h GATE D 8h - 12h\t13h - 16h GATE E 7h - 9h\t17h - 19h Prévessin 24h/24 The intersites tunnel will be opened from 7h30 to 18h non stop. GS-SEM Group Infrastructure and General Services Department

  11. An accurate projection algorithm for array processor based SPECT systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, M.A.; Schwinger, R.B.; Cool, S.L.

    1985-01-01

    A data re-projection algorithm has been developed for use in single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) on an array processor based computer system. The algorithm makes use of an accurate representation of pixel activity (uniform square pixel model of intensity distribution), and is rapidly performed due to the efficient handling of an array based algorithm and the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) on parallel processing hardware. The algorithm consists of using a pixel driven nearest neighbour projection operation to an array of subdivided projection bins. This result is then convolved with the projected uniform square pixel distribution before being compressed to original bin size. This distribution varies with projection angle and is explicitly calculated. The FFT combined with a frequency space multiplication is used instead of a spatial convolution for more rapid execution. The new algorithm was tested against other commonly used projection algorithms by comparing the accuracy of projections of a simulated transverse section of the abdomen against analytically determined projections of that transverse section. The new algorithm was found to yield comparable or better standard error and yet result in easier and more efficient implementation on parallel hardware. Applications of the algorithm include iterative reconstruction and attenuation correction schemes and evaluation of regions of interest in dynamic and gated SPECT

  12. The current status of SPECT or SPECT/CT in South Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Ik Dong; Choi, Eun Kyung; Chung, Yong An [Dept. of Radiology, Incheon Saint Mary' s HospitalThe Catholic University of Korea, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    The first step to nuclear medicine in Korea started with introduction of the gamma camera in 1969. Although planar images with the gamma camera give important functional information, they have the limitations that result from 2-dimensional images. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) due to its 3-dimensional image acquisition is superior to earlier planar gamma imaging in image resolution and diagnostic accuracy. As demand for a hybrid functional and anatomical imaging device has increased, integrated SPECT/CT systems have been used. In Korea, SPECT/CT was for the first time installed in 2003. SPECT/CT can eliminate many possible pitfalls on SPECT-alone images, making better attenuation correction and thereby improving image quality. Therefore, SPECT/CT is clinically preferred in many hospitals in various aspects. More recently, additional SPECT/CT images taken from the region with equivocal uptake on planar images have been helpful in making precise interpretation as part of their clinical workup in postoperative thyroid cancer patients. SPECT and SPECT/CT have various advantages, but its clinical application has gradually decreased in recent few years. While some researchers investigated the myocardial blood flow with cardiac PET using F-18 FDG or N-13 ammonia, myocardial perfusion SPECT is, at present, the radionuclide imaging study of choice for the risk stratification and guiding therapy in the coronary artery disease patients in Korea. New diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals for AD have received increasing attention; nevertheless, brain SPECT will remain the most reliable modality evaluating cerebral perfusion.

  13. Prepulse inhibition is associated with attention, processing speed, and 123I-FP-CIT SPECT in Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zoetmulder, Marielle; Biernat, Heidi B; Nikolic, Miki

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prepulse inhibition is a measure of sensorimotor gating, which reflects the ability to filter or 'gate' irrelevant information. Prepulse inhibition is dramatically altered in basal ganglia disorders associated with dysfunction in the midbrain dopaminergic system, and corresponding......'s disease have been extensively studied in relation to motor function, less is known about the potential role of sensorimotor processes in cognitive function. OBJECTIVE: We investigated the relationship between prepulse inhibition, cognition and nigrostriatal dysfunction, as measured with 123I......-FP-CIT-SPECT scanning, in patients with Parkinson's disease. METHODS: 38 Parkinson patients were assessed with prepulse inhibition, neuropsychological tests, and neurological investigation. A subset of these patients underwent 123I-FP-CIT-SPECT scanning. RESULTS: Patients with a higher level of prepulse inhibition...

  14. SPECT/CT and pulmonary embolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortensen, Jann [Copenhagen University Hospital, Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); The Faroese National Hospital, Department of Medicine, Torshavn (Faroe Islands); Gutte, Henrik [Copenhagen University Hospital, Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Herlev Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Copenhagen (Denmark); University of Copenhagen, Cluster for Molecular Imaging, Faculty of Health Sciences, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2014-05-15

    Acute pulmonary embolism (PE) is diagnosed either by ventilation/perfusion (V/P) scintigraphy or pulmonary CT angiography (CTPA). In recent years both techniques have improved. Many nuclear medicine centres have adopted the single photon emission CT (SPECT) technique as opposed to the planar technique for diagnosing PE. SPECT has been shown to have fewer indeterminate results and a higher diagnostic value. The latest improvement is the combination of a low-dose CT scan with a V/P SPECT scan in a hybrid tomograph. In a study comparing CTPA, planar scintigraphy and SPECT alone, SPECT/CT had the best diagnostic accuracy for PE. In addition, recent developments in the CTPA technique have made it possible to image the pulmonary arteries of the lungs in one breath-hold. This development is based on the change from a single-detector to multidetector CT technology with an increase in volume coverage per rotation and faster rotation. Furthermore, the dual energy CT technique is a promising modality that can provide functional imaging in combination with anatomical information. Newer high-end CT scanners and SPECT systems are able to visualize smaller subsegmental emboli. However, consensus is lacking regarding the clinical impact and treatment. In the present review, SPECT and SPECT in combination with low-dose CT, CTPA and dual energy CT are discussed in the context of diagnosing PE. (orig.)

  15. Can perfusion SPECT aid CTPA interpretation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gradinscak, D. J.; Roach, P.; Bailey, E.; Kueh, S.

    2009-01-01

    Full text:Objective: To determine whether fusion of perfusion SPECT and CTPA improves the diagnostic accuracy of CTPA. Methods: 35 patients with suspected PE who underwent both CTPA and SPECT V/Q within 48 hours were included. Of these, the majority (n=30) had PE as determined by the V/Q SPECT scan and the others (n=5) were negative for PE. The clinical reports of CTPA were reviewed and pulmonary emboli tabulated based on anatomical location. A second radiologist, blinded to the results of the clinical read and the V/Q SPECT scan, reviewed the CTPA with and without perfusion SPECT fusion for assistance. Results: A total 57 PE were reported on the clinical reports and 60 PE identified on the blinded read. Fused CTPA/perfursion SPECT images identified a further 5 PE not identified on the clinical read (8% increase) and 2 PE not identified on the blinded read (3% increase). The additional emboli detected resulted in a change in final diagnosis from PE negative to PE positive in 2 patients (6%) compared with the clinical read and 1 patient (3%) compared with the blinded read without SPECT fusion. Conclusion: Fused CTPA-SPECT perfusion improves the sensitivity of CTPA for the detection of PE in a small number of patients. Fused data may help guide the radiologist to identify sites of PE on CTPA.

  16. Clinical applications of SPECT-CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmadzadehfar, Hojjat; Biersack, Hans-Juergen (eds.) [University Hospital Bonn (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine

    2014-06-01

    Covers the full spectrum of clinical applications of SPECT/CT in diagnosis of benign and malignant diseases. Includes chapters on the use of SPECT/CT for dosimetry and for therapy planning. Completely up to date. Many helpful illustrations. SPECT/CT cameras have considerably improved diagnostic accuracy in recent years. Such cameras allow direct correlation of anatomic and functional information, resulting in better localization and definition of scintigraphic findings. In addition to this anatomic referencing, CT coregistration provides superior quantification of radiotracer uptake based on the attenuation correction capabilities of CT. Useful applications of SPECT/CT have been identified not only in oncology but also in other specialties such as orthopedics and cardiology. This book covers the full spectrum of clinical applications of SPECT/CT in diagnosis and therapy planning of benign and malignant diseases. Opening chapters discuss the technology and physics of SPECT/CT and its use for dosimetry. The role of SPECT/CT in the imaging of a range of pathologic conditions is then addressed in detail. Applications covered include, among others, imaging of the thyroid, bone, and lungs, imaging of neuroendocrine tumors, cardiac scintigraphy, and sentinel node scintigraphy. Individual chapters are also devoted to therapy planning in selective internal radiation therapy of liver tumors and bremsstrahlung SPECT/CT. Readers will find this book to be an essential and up-to-date source of information on this invaluable hybrid imaging technique.

  17. MR guided spatial normalization of SPECT scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crouch, B.; Barnden, L.R.; Kwiatek, R.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: In SPECT population studies where magnetic resonance (MR) scans are also available, the higher resolution of the MR scans allows for an improved spatial normalization of the SPECT scans. In this approach, the SPECT images are first coregistered to their corresponding MR images by a linear (affine) transformation which is calculated using SPM's mutual information maximization algorithm. Non-linear spatial normalization maps are then computed either directly from the MR scans using SPM's built in spatial normalization algorithm, or, from segmented TI MR images using DARTEL, an advanced diffeomorphism based spatial normalization algorithm. We compare these MR based methods to standard SPECT based spatial normalization for a population of 27 fibromyalgia patients and 25 healthy controls with spin echo T 1 scans. We identify significant perfusion deficits in prefrontal white matter in FM patients, with the DARTEL based spatial normalization procedure yielding stronger statistics than the standard SPECT based spatial normalization. (author)

  18. Brain imaging during seizure: ictal brain SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kottamasu, Sambasiva Rao

    1997-01-01

    The role of single photon computed tomography (SPECT) in presurgical localization of medically intractable complex partial epilepsy (CPE) in children is reviewed. 99m Technetium neurolite, a newer lipophylic agent with a high first pass brain extraction and little or no redistribution is injected during a seizure, while the child is monitored with a video recording and continuous EEG and SPECT imaging is performed in the next 1-3 hours with the images representing regional cerebral profusion at the time of injection. On SPECT studies performed with radiopharmaceutical injected during a seizure, ictal focus is generally hypervascular. Other findings on ictal brain SPECT include hypoperfusion of adjacent cerebral cortex and white matter, hyperperfusion of contralateral motor cortex, hyperperfusion of ipsilateral basal ganglia and thalamus, brain stem and contralateral cerebellum. Ictal brain SPECT is non-invasive, cost effective and highly sensitive for localization of epileptic focus in patients with intractable CPE. (author)

  19. Effects of Piecewise Spatial Smoothing in 4-D SPECT Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Wenyuan; Yang, Yongyi; King, Michael A.

    2014-02-01

    In nuclear medicine, cardiac gated SPECT images are known to suffer from significantly increased noise owing to limited data counts. Consequently, spatial (and temporal) smoothing has been indispensable for suppressing the noise artifacts in SPECT reconstruction. However, recently we demonstrated that the benefit of spatial processing in motion-compensated reconstruction of gated SPECT (aka 4-D) could be outweighed by its adverse effects on the myocardium, which included degraded wall motion and perfusion defect detectability. In this work, we investigate whether we can alleviate these adverse effects by exploiting an alternative spatial smoothing prior in 4-D based on image total variation (TV). TV based prior is known to induce piecewise smoothing which can preserve edge features (such as boundaries of the heart wall) in reconstruction. However, it is not clear whether such a property would necessarily be beneficial for improving the accuracy of the myocardium in 4-D reconstruction. In particular, it is unknown whether it would adversely affect the detectability of perfusion defects that are small in size or low in contrast. In our evaluation study, we first use Monte Carlo simulated imaging with 4-D NURBS-based cardiac-torso (NCAT) phantom wherein the ground truth is known for quantitative comparison. We evaluated the accuracy of the reconstructed myocardium using a number of metrics, including regional and overall accuracy of the myocardium, accuracy of the phase activity curve (PAC) of the LV wall for wall motion, uniformity and spatial resolution of the LV wall, and detectability of perfusion defects using a channelized Hotelling observer (CHO). For lesion detection, we simulated perfusion defects with different sizes and contrast levels with the focus being on perfusion defects that are subtle. As a preliminary demonstration, we also tested on three sets of clinical acquisitions. From the quantitative results, it was demonstrated that TV smoothing could

  20. Noise suppressed partial volume correction for cardiac SPECT/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Chung; Liu, Chi, E-mail: chi.liu@yale.edu [Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Liu, Hui [Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 and Key Laboratory of Particle and Radiation Imaging (Tsinghua University), Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Grobshtein, Yariv [GE Healthcare, Haifa 3910101 (Israel); Stacy, Mitchel R. [Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Sinusas, Albert J. [Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 and Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Purpose: Partial volume correction (PVC) methods typically improve quantification at the expense of increased image noise and reduced reproducibility. In this study, the authors developed a novel voxel-based PVC method that incorporates anatomical knowledge to improve quantification while suppressing noise for cardiac SPECT/CT imaging. Methods: In the proposed method, the SPECT images were first reconstructed using anatomical-based maximum a posteriori (AMAP) with Bowsher’s prior to penalize noise while preserving boundaries. A sequential voxel-by-voxel PVC approach (Yang’s method) was then applied on the AMAP reconstruction using a template response. This template response was obtained by forward projecting a template derived from a contrast-enhanced CT image, and then reconstructed using AMAP to model the partial volume effects (PVEs) introduced by both the system resolution and the smoothing applied during reconstruction. To evaluate the proposed noise suppressed PVC (NS-PVC), the authors first simulated two types of cardiac SPECT studies: a {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin myocardial perfusion scan and a {sup 99m}Tc-labeled red blood cell (RBC) scan on a dedicated cardiac multiple pinhole SPECT/CT at both high and low count levels. The authors then applied the proposed method on a canine equilibrium blood pool study following injection with {sup 99m}Tc-RBCs at different count levels by rebinning the list-mode data into shorter acquisitions. The proposed method was compared to MLEM reconstruction without PVC, two conventional PVC methods, including Yang’s method and multitarget correction (MTC) applied on the MLEM reconstruction, and AMAP reconstruction without PVC. Results: The results showed that the Yang’s method improved quantification, however, yielded increased noise and reduced reproducibility in the regions with higher activity. MTC corrected for PVE on high count data with amplified noise, although yielded the worst performance among all the methods

  1. Gate Simulation of a Gamma Camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abidi, Sana; Mlaouhi, Zohra

    2008-01-01

    Medical imaging is a very important diagnostic because it allows for an exploration of the internal human body. The nuclear imaging is an imaging technique used in the nuclear medicine. It is to determine the distribution in the body of a radiotracers by detecting the radiation it emits using a detection device. Two methods are commonly used: Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) and the Positrons Emission Tomography (PET). In this work we are interested on modelling of a gamma camera. This simulation is based on Monte-Carlo language and in particular Gate simulator (Geant4 Application Tomographic Emission). We have simulated a clinical gamma camera called GAEDE (GKS-1) and then we validate these simulations by experiments. The purpose of this work is to monitor the performance of these gamma camera and the optimization of the detector performance and the the improvement of the images quality. (Author)

  2. Quantitative Analysis of cardiac SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nekolla, S.G.; Bengel, F.M.

    2004-01-01

    The quantitative analysis of myocardial SPECT images is a powerful tool to extract the highly specific radio tracer uptake in these studies. If compared to normal data bases, the uptake values can be calibrated on an individual basis. Doing so increases the reproducibility of the analysis substantially. Based on the development over the last three decades starting from planar scinitigraphy, this paper discusses the methods used today incorporating the changes due to tomographic image acquisitions. Finally, the limitations of these approaches as well as consequences from most recent hardware developments, commercial analysis packages and a wider view of the description of the left ventricle are discussed. (orig.)

  3. SPECT og PET i neurobiologien

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulson, O.B.; Lassen, N.A.

    1997-01-01

    PET (positron emission tomography) and SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) are isotopic methods in which the distribution is registered of radiolabelled tracers given in such small amounts that they are without effect on the organism or the organism's disposal of them. Thus, a series...... of important biological processes in the intact organism can be studied. The methods have been used in many disciplines but in particular for neurobiological research on the brain--e.g., the brain's regional blood circulation and mapping of the brain's functional structure. The methods have also been used...

  4. Amplitude-based data selection for optimal retrospective reconstruction in micro-SPECT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuilly, M.; Malandain, G.; Guglielmi, J.; Marsault, R.; Pourcher, T.; Franken, P. R.; Darcourt, J.

    2013-04-01

    Respiratory motion can blur the tomographic reconstruction of positron emission tomography or single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images, which subsequently impair quantitative measurements, e.g. in the upper abdomen area. Respiratory signal phase-based gated reconstruction addresses this problem, but deteriorates the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and other intensity-based quality measures. This paper proposes a 3D reconstruction method dedicated to micro-SPECT imaging of mice. From a 4D acquisition, the phase images exhibiting motion are identified and the associated list-mode data are discarded, which enables the reconstruction of a 3D image without respiratory artefacts. The proposed method allows a motion-free reconstruction exhibiting both satisfactory count statistics and accuracy of measures. With respect to standard 3D reconstruction (non-gated 3D reconstruction) without breathing motion correction, an increase of 14.6% of the mean standardized uptake value has been observed, while, with respect to a gated 4D reconstruction, up to 60% less noise and an increase of up to 124% of the SNR have been demonstrated.

  5. Contralateral thalamic hypoperfusion on brain perfusion SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seok Mo; Bae, Sang Kyun; Yoo, Kyung Moo; Yum, Ha Yong

    2000-01-01

    Brain perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is useful for the localization of cerebrovascular lesion and sometimes reveals more definite lesion than radiologic imaging modality such as CT or MRI does. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic usefulness of brain perfusion SPECT in patients with hemisensory impairment. Thirteen consecutive patients (M:F= 8:5, mean age = 48) who has hemisensory impairment were included. Brain perfusion SPECT was performed after intravenous injection of 1110 MBq of Tc-99m ECD. The images were obtained using a dual-head gamma camera with ultra-high resolution collimator. Semiquantitative analysis was performed after placing multiple ROIs on cerebral cortex, basal ganglia, thalamus and cerebellum. There were 10 patients with left hemisensory impairment and 3 patients with right-sided symptom. Only 2 patients revealed abnormal signal change in the thalamus on MRI. But brain perfusion SPECT showed decreased perfusion in the thalamus in 9 patients. Six patients among 10 patients with left hemisensory impairment revealed decreased perfusion in the contralateral thalamus on brain SPECT. The other 4 patients revealed no abnormality. Two patients among 3 patients with right hemisensory impairment also showed decreased perfusion in the contralateral thalamus on brain SPECT. One patients with right hemisensory impairment showed ipsilateral perfusion decrease. Two patients who had follow-up brain perfusion SEPCT after treatment revealed normalization of perfusion in the thalamus. Brain perfusion SPECT might be a useful tool in diagnosing patients with hemisensory impairment

  6. SPECT of the brain: Present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazio, F.; Lenzi, G.L.

    1986-01-01

    In both PET and SPECT, most of the studies and the models have been addressed to two organs: brain and heart. So far, brain has certainly been investigated more. The several comparisons between planar scintigraphy and SPECT, between X-ray TCT and SPECT, and also between PET and SPECT, have tended to consider SPECT a cheap but scarcely useful tool for a nuclear medicine section. Again the authors feel that this is due to the fact that SPECT is really a ''physiological tomography'', with little known about its physiology or how it is measured. Thus the present state of the art of SPECT of the brain is characterized by a collection of data and reports on brain imaging and by a slowly growing basic understanding of the utilized modes. The introduction of a new brain-imaging radiopharmaceutical is immediately signaled by its ''first clinical application'' without parallel studies on the kinetics, the metabolic degradation, and the real suitability of the molecule as a tracer for measurement of regional CBF. Only a few attempts seek to narrow this discussion between clinic and biology, and the authors like to emphasize the need for nuclear medicine people to dedicate more time and effort

  7. Evaluation of left ventricular function and volumes in patients with ischaemic cardiomyopathy: gated single-photon emission computed tomography versus two-dimensional echocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vourvouri, E.C.; Poldermans, D.; Sianos, G.; Sozzi, F.B.; Schinkel, A.F.L.; Sutter, J. de; Roelandt, J.R.T.C.; Bax, J.J.; Parcharidis, G.; Valkema, R.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this study was to perform a head-to-head comparison between two-dimensional (2D) echocardiography and gated single-photon emission computed tomography (SPET) for the evaluation of left ventricular (LV) function and volumes in patients with severe ischaemic LV dysfunction. Thirty-two patients with chronic ischaemic LV dysfunction [mean LV ejection fraction (EF) 25%±6%] were studied with gated SPET and 2D echocardiography. Regional wall motion was evaluated by both modalities and scored by two independent observers using a 16-segment model with a 5-point scoring system (1= normokinesia, 2= mild hypokinesia, 3= severe hypokinesia, 4= akinesia and 5= dyskinesia). LVEF and LV end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were evaluated by 2D echocardiography using the Simpson's biplane discs method. The same parameters were calculated using quantitative gated SPET software (QGS, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center). The overall agreement between the two imaging modalities for assessment of regional wall motion was 69%. The correlations between gated SPET and 2D echocardiography for the assessment of end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were excellent (r=0.94, P<0.01, and r=0.96, P<0.01, respectively). The correlation for LVEF was also good (r=0.83, P<0.01). In conclusion: in patients with ischaemic cardiomyopathy, close and significant relations between gated SPET and 2D echocardiography were observed for the assessment of regional and global LV function and LV volumes; gated SPET has the advantage that it provides information on both LV function/dimensions and perfusion. (orig.)

  8. Quantitation of myocardial blood flow and myocardial flow reserve with {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi dynamic SPECT/CT to enhance detection of coronary artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Bailing [University of Missouri-Columbia, Nuclear Science and Engineering Institute, Columbia, MO (United States); Chen, Fu-Chung; Chen, Chien-Cheng [Show Chwan Memorial Hospital, Section of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Changhua (China); Wu, Tao-Cheng [Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Section of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Taipei (China); Huang, Wen-Sheng [Changhua Christian Hospital, Department of Medical Research and Department of Nuclear Medicine, Changhua (China); Hou, Po-Nien [Chang Bing Show Chwan Memorial Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Lukong Town, Changhua Shien (China); Hung, Guang-Uei [Chang Bing Show Chwan Memorial Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Lukong Town, Changhua Shien (China); Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Science, Taichung (China); China Medical University, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Science, Taichung (China)

    2014-12-15

    Conventional dual-head single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT systems capable of fast dynamic SPECT (DySPECT) imaging have a potential for flow quantitation. This study introduced a new method to quantify myocardial blood flow (MBF) and myocardial flow reserve (MFR) with DySPECT scan and evaluated the diagnostic performance of detecting coronary artery disease (CAD) compared with perfusion using invasive coronary angiography (CAG) as the reference standard. This study included 21 patients with suspected or known CAD who had received DySPECT, ECG-gated SPECT (GSPECT), and CAG (13 with ≥50 % stenosis in any vessel; non-CAD group: 8 with patent arteries or <50 % stenosis). DySPECT and GSPECT scans were performed on a widely used dual-head SPECT/CT scanner. The DySPECT imaging protocol utilized 12-min multiple back-and-forth gantry rotations during injections of {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi (MIBI) tracer at rest or dipyridamole-stress stages. DySPECT images were reconstructed with full physical corrections and converted to the physical unit of becquerels per milliliter. Stress MBF (SMBF), rest MBF (RMBF), and MFR were quantified by a one-tissue compartment flow model using time-activity curves derived from DySPECT images. Perfusion images were processed for GSPECT scan and interpreted to obtain summed stress score (SSS) and summed difference score (SDS). Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analyses were conducted to evaluate the diagnostic performance of flow and perfusion. Using the criteria of ≥50 % stenosis as positive CAD, areas under the ROC curve (AUCs) of flow assessment were overall significantly greater than those of perfusion. For patient-based analysis, AUCs for MFR, SMBF, SSS, and SDS were 0.91 ± 0.07, 0.86 ± 0.09, 0.64 ± 0.12, and 0.59 ± 0.13. For vessel-based analysis, AUCs for MFR, SMBF, SSS, and SDS were 0.81 ± 0.05, 0.76 ± 0.06, 0.62 ± 0.07, and 0.56 ± 0.08, respectively. The preliminary data suggest that MBF quantitation with a

  9. Use of the GATE Monte Carlo package for dosimetry applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visvikis, D. [INSERM U650, LaTIM, University Hospital Medical School, F 29609 Brest (France)]. E-mail: Visvikis.Dimitris@univ-brest.fr; Bardies, M. [INSERM U601, CHU Nantes, F 44093 Nantes (France); Chiavassa, S. [INSERM U601, CHU Nantes, F 44093 Nantes (France); Danford, C. [Department of Medical Physics, MSKCC, New York (United States); Kirov, A. [Department of Medical Physics, MSKCC, New York (United States); Lamare, F. [INSERM U650, LaTIM, University Hospital Medical School, F 29609 Brest (France); Maigne, L. [Departement de Curietherapie-Radiotherapie, Centre Jean Perrin, F 63000 Clemont-Ferrand (France); Staelens, S. [UGent-ELIS, St-Pietersnieuwstraat, 41, B 9000 Gent (Belgium); Taschereau, R. [CRUMP Institute for Molecular Imaging, UCLA, Los Angeles (United States)

    2006-12-20

    One of the roles for Monte Carlo (MC) simulation studies is in the area of dosimetry. A number of different codes dedicated to dosimetry applications are available and widely used today, such as MCNP, EGSnrc and PTRAN. However, such codes do not easily facilitate the description of complicated 3D sources or emission tomography systems and associated data flow, which may be useful in different dosimetry application domains. Such problems can be overcome by the use of specific MC codes such as GATE (GEANT4 Application to Tomographic Emission), which is based on Geant4 libraries, providing a scripting interface with a number of advantages for the simulation of SPECT and PET systems. Despite this potential, its major disadvantage is in terms of efficiency involving long execution times for applications such as dosimetry. The strong points and disadvantages of GATE in comparison to other dosimetry specific codes are discussed and illustrated in terms of accuracy, efficiency and flexibility. A number of features, such as the use of voxelised and moving sources, as well as developments such as advanced visualization tools and the development of dose estimation maps allowing GATE to be used for dosimetry applications are presented. In addition, different examples from dosimetry applications with GATE are given. Finally, future directions with respect to the use of GATE for dosimetry applications are outlined.

  10. Quantum gate decomposition algorithms.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slepoy, Alexander

    2006-07-01

    Quantum computing algorithms can be conveniently expressed in a format of a quantum logical circuits. Such circuits consist of sequential coupled operations, termed ''quantum gates'', or quantum analogs of bits called qubits. We review a recently proposed method [1] for constructing general ''quantum gates'' operating on an qubits, as composed of a sequence of generic elementary ''gates''.

  11. SPECT assay of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaszczak, R.J.

    1992-02-01

    The long-term goal of this research project is to develop methods to improve the utility of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECI) to quantify the biodistribution of monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) labeled with clinically relevant radionuclides ( 123 I, 131 I, and 111 In) and with another radionuclide, 211 At, recently used in therapy. We describe here our progress in developing quantitative SPECT methodology for 111 In and 123 I. We have focused our recent research thrusts on the following aspects of SPECT: (1) The development of improved SPECT hardware, such as improved acquisition geometries. (2) The development of better reconstruction methods that provide accurate compensation for the physical factors that affect SPECT quantification. (3) The application of carefully designed simulations and experiments to validate our hardware and software approaches

  12. SPECT quantification of regional radionuclide distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaszczak, R.J.; Greer, K.L.; Coleman, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    SPECT quantification of regional radionuclide activities within the human body is affected by several physical and instrumental factors including attenuation of photons within the patient, Compton scattered events, the system's finite spatial resolution and object size, finite number of detected events, partial volume effects, the radiopharmaceutical biokinetics, and patient and/or organ motion. Furthermore, other instrumentation factors such as calibration of the center-of-rotation, sampling, and detector nonuniformities will affect the SPECT measurement process. These factors are described, together with examples of compensation methods that are currently available for improving SPECT quantification. SPECT offers the potential to improve in vivo estimates of absorbed dose, provided the acquisition, reconstruction, and compensation procedures are adequately implemented and utilized. 53 references, 2 figures

  13. Brain SPECT in psychiatry: Delusion or reality?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavel, D.G.; Davis, G.; Epstein, P.; Kohn, R.; Antonino, F.; Devore-Best, S.; Craita, I.; Liu, P.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: The need for functional information is becoming increasingly evident for proper therapeutic approaches to the treatment and follow up of psychiatric diseases. While data on this subject already exists, there is a general lack of consensus about the use of brain SPECT in this domain and also a considerable negative prejudice due to a number of factors including poor quality imaging and unrealistic expectations. Based on a large group of brain SPECT-s performed over the past 3 years we attempted to sort and refine the indications for SPECT in psychiatry. Materials and Methods: High resolution brain SPECT was performed with triple head gamma camera, super-high resolution fan beam collimator and Tc-HMPAO. A comprehensive semiquantitative color, 3D surface as well as multi-thresholded volume display was routinely used and supplemented by automatic realignment in case of longitudinal follow-up. Results: 470 brain SPECT-s done on 432 patients were all referred by psychiatrists or neuro-psychiatrists for a wide spectrum of psychiatric diseases and ranged in age from 7 to 88 years. The most common primary reasons for referral were : attention deficit hyperactive disorder (ADHD); anxiety; obsessive-compulsive disease, depression (refractory, chronic, bipolar ), impulse control problems; oppositional defiance, post traumatic brain injury; seizures, learning difficulties, pervasive development disorders, memory loss and differential of dementia. Among common denominators were long duration of the disease, unresponsiveness to treatment, worsening of clinical status, and presence of multiple conditions at the same time. The multiparametric display used enabled a comprehensive evaluation of the brain volume which included the hemispheric surfaces; the basal ganglia (striatum) and the thalamus, several components of the limbic and paralimbic systems: anterior and posterior cingulate and their respective subdivisions, insula-s and their subdivisions, apical and mesial

  14. Brain SPECT imaging in temporal lobe epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krausz, Y.; Yaffe, S.; Atlan, H.; Cohen, D.; Konstantini, S.; Meiner, Z.

    1991-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy is diagnosed by clinical symptoms and signs and by localization of an epileptogenic focus. A brain SPECT study of two patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, using 99m Tc-HMPAO, was used to demonstrate a perfusion abnormality in the temporal lobe, while brain CT and MRI were non-contributory. The electroencephalogram, though abnormal, did not localize the diseased area. The potential role of the SPECT study in diagnosis and localization of temporal lobe epilepsy is discussed. (orig.)

  15. Role of brain SPECT in epilepsy exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biraben, A.; Bernard, AM.

    1996-01-01

    The management of epileptic patients is currently developing in relation with the introduction of video EEG and the opening of medical centers dedicated to epilepsy. The role of SPECT is now well established to assess the temporal and spatial dynamic phenomena during seizures. Ictal SPECT has technical and organisational requirements but is a very sensitive method, which appears to be superior to other available imaging techniques. (author)

  16. Technical approach to improvement of SPECT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukukita, Hiroyoshi

    1985-01-01

    At present, a large number of SPECT systems are being widely used in Japan, hence, it is reasonable for us to know the physical and imaging characteristics of these SPECT devices, and also to recommend the optimum utility of SPECT systems. For this reason, a survey respect of characteristics of the commercialy available SPECT devices was carried out. In addition to this, various factors which have significant influence over SPECT image quality, such as, data acquisition matrix, reconstruction filter, γ-ray attenuation correction and daily quality control procedure, were also investigated. The materials used for this study are PET/SPECT phantom, Alderson liver phantom filled with Tc-99m solution, and either LFOV-E or ZLC-7500 interfaced to Scintipac 2400 minicomputer with 256 K byte of memory. Following are the results of this study. 1) The suitable data acquisition procedure was 128 x 128 matrix for linear sampling and approximately 64 views for angular sampling. 2) Reconstructed image using pre-processing filter with Wiener and Butterworth filters provided high quality image as compared with the Ramp filter. 3) Weighted backprojection method (WBP) proposed by Tanaka was superior to other methods, such as Sorenson method and Chang method in the object with non-uniform distribution of radionuclide. 4) It was found that uniformity correction of gamma camera and precise adjustment of the center of rotation are most important to maintain the images with a high quality. (author)

  17. Ejection fraction in myocardial perfusion imaging assessed with a dynamic phantom: comparison between IQ-SPECT and LEHR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hippeläinen, Eero; Mäkelä, Teemu; Kaasalainen, Touko; Kaleva, Erna

    2017-12-01

    Developments in single photon emission tomography instrumentation and reconstruction methods present a potential for decreasing acquisition times. One of such recent options for myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) is IQ-SPECT. This study was motivated by the inconsistency in the reported ejection fraction (EF) and left ventricular (LV) volume results between IQ-SPECT and more conventional low-energy high-resolution (LEHR) collimation protocols. IQ-SPECT and LEHR quantitative results were compared while the equivalent number of iterations (EI) was varied. The end-diastolic (EDV) and end-systolic volumes (ESV) and the derived EF values were investigated. A dynamic heart phantom was used to produce repeatable ESVs, EDVs and EFs. Phantom performance was verified by comparing the set EF values to those measured from a gated multi-slice X-ray computed tomography (CT) scan (EF True ). The phantom with an EF setting of 45, 55, 65 and 70% was imaged with both IQ-SPECT and LEHR protocols. The data were reconstructed with different EI, and two commonly used clinical myocardium delineation software were used to evaluate the LV volumes. The CT verification showed that the phantom EF settings were repeatable and accurate with the EF True being within 1% point from the manufacture's nominal value. Depending on EI both MPI protocols can be made to produce correct EF estimates, but IQ-SPECT protocol produced on average 41 and 42% smaller EDV and ESV when compared to the phantom's volumes, while LEHR protocol underestimated volumes by 24 and 21%, respectively. The volume results were largely similar between the delineation methods used. The reconstruction parameters can greatly affect the volume estimates obtained from perfusion studies. IQ-SPECT produces systematically smaller LV volumes than the conventional LEHR MPI protocol. The volume estimates are also software dependent.

  18. Efficacy of SPECT over planar bone scan in the diagnosis of solitary vertebral lesions in patients with low back pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudhakar, Pushpalatha; Bhushan, Shanti M.; Ranadhir, G.; Prabhakar Rao, V.V.S.; Sharma, Anshu Rajnish; Narsimuhulu, G.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of our study has been to evaluate the efficacy of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) over planar bone scan in identifying solitary vertebral lesions in patients with low backache and its ability to differentiate various pathologies according to the uptake pattern. Materials and Methods: The study included twenty patients out of whom six patients presented with known carcinoma and fourteen patients with low back pain. SPECT was done in all following planar skeletal survey. Benign and malignant lesions were identified according to the uptake pattern in vertebral elements, based on Gary F. Gates observations. Final diagnosis was obtained by means of biopsy or correlation with radiograph or computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and/or follow up. Results: SPECT detected additional 30% of solitary vertebral lesions that were obscured on planar scan. Seven out of twenty were localized in anterior vertebral body and were diagnosed as benign ostophytes in six and osteoma in one substantiating the previous observations. Out of six cases of known carcinoma, three were having solitary metastases and showed posterior vertebral body uptake with pedicle involvement. SPECT could localize specific lesions as source of pain in eleven patients with low back pain (78%) and identified various etiologies including benign tumors (osteoid osteoma and osteoma), facet arthritis, discitis, transverse process fractures and spondylolysis. Conclusion: Our study highlighted the higher diagnostic value of SPECT over planar skeletal scintigraphy in localizing solitary vertebral lesions in low backache patients. Based on SPECT pattern, malignant and benign lesions could be differentiated in the given clinical context. (author)

  19. Clinical evaluation of stress thallium spect in ischemic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sui, Osamu; Kimura, Nazuna; Soeki; Takeshi; Takeichi, Naoki; Shinohara, Hisanori; Tamura, Yoshiyuki; Fukuda, Nobuo

    1997-01-01

    Thallium SPECT was performed in patients with significant coronary artery stenosis, 67 cases were after maximal exercise and 74 cases were during coronary vasodilation induced by ATP (adenosine triphosphate) infusion. In patients suspected of angina pectoris, the sensitivity, specificity and predictive accuracy for detection of coronary artery disease (CAD) were 88%, 78% and 82% for exercise SPECT, and 100%, 72% and 84% for ATP SPECT studies, respectively. In patients with old myocardial infarction, these were 73%, 100% and 88% for exercise SPECT and 71%, 100% and 81% for ATP SPECT. These were 75%, 49% and 60% for treadmill exercise test in the patient group including both angina and myocardial infarction. For detection of diseased vessels, the diagnostic accuracy for left anterior descending artery and right coronary artery lesions was almost equal for ATP and exercise SPECT study, but ATP SPECT study was more sensitive than exercise SPECT study in detection of left circumflex artery lesions. ATP as well as exercise SPECT studies occasionally gave false positive results in patients with single-vessel disease. ATP as well as exercise SPECT studies underestimated the severity of multi-vessel disease. In general, the results of ATP SPECT imaging were highly concordant with the results of exercise SPECT imaging. ATP stress thallium SPECT imaging provided a safe and highly accurate diagnostic tool for detection of CAD. (author)

  20. Small-animal SPECT and SPECT/CT: application in cardiovascular research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golestani, Reza; Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O. [University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Groningen (Netherlands); Wu, Chao [University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Groningen (Netherlands); University Medical Center Utrecht, Image Sciences Institute and Rudolf Magnus Institute of Neurosciences, Utrecht (Netherlands); Tio, Rene A. [University Medical Center Groningen, Thorax Center, Department of Cardiology, Groningen (Netherlands); University Medical Center Groningen, Cardiovascular Imaging Group, P.O. Box 30001, Groningen (Netherlands); Zeebregts, Clark J. [University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Surgery, Division of Vascular Surgery, Groningen (Netherlands); University Medical Center Groningen, Cardiovascular Imaging Group, P.O. Box 30001, Groningen (Netherlands); Petrov, Artiom D. [University of California, Irvine, Division of Cardiology, School of Medicine, Irvine, California (United States); Beekman, Freek J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Image Sciences Institute and Rudolf Magnus Institute of Neurosciences, Utrecht (Netherlands); Delft University of Technology, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Section Radiation Detection and Medical Imaging, Delft (Netherlands); MILabs, Utrecht (Netherlands); Boersma, Hendrikus H. [University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Groningen (Netherlands); University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Clinical and Hospital Pharmacy, Hanzeplein 1, P.O. Box 30001, Groningen (Netherlands); University Medical Center Groningen, Cardiovascular Imaging Group, P.O. Box 30001, Groningen (Netherlands); Slart, Riemer H.J.A. [University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Groningen (Netherlands); University Medical Center Groningen, Cardiovascular Imaging Group, P.O. Box 30001, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2010-09-15

    Preclinical cardiovascular research using noninvasive radionuclide and hybrid imaging systems has been extensively developed in recent years. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is based on the molecular tracer principle and is an established tool in noninvasive imaging. SPECT uses gamma cameras and collimators to form projection data that are used to estimate (dynamic) 3-D tracer distributions in vivo. Recent developments in multipinhole collimation and advanced image reconstruction have led to sub-millimetre and sub-half-millimetre resolution SPECT in rats and mice, respectively. In this article we review applications of microSPECT in cardiovascular research in which information about the function and pathology of the myocardium, vessels and neurons is obtained. We give examples on how diagnostic tracers, new therapeutic interventions, pre- and postcardiovascular event prognosis, and functional and pathophysiological heart conditions can be explored by microSPECT, using small-animal models of cardiovascular disease. (orig.)

  1. Small-animal SPECT and SPECT/CT: application in cardiovascular research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golestani, Reza; Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O.; Wu, Chao; Tio, Rene A.; Zeebregts, Clark J.; Petrov, Artiom D.; Beekman, Freek J.; Boersma, Hendrikus H.; Slart, Riemer H.J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Preclinical cardiovascular research using noninvasive radionuclide and hybrid imaging systems has been extensively developed in recent years. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is based on the molecular tracer principle and is an established tool in noninvasive imaging. SPECT uses gamma cameras and collimators to form projection data that are used to estimate (dynamic) 3-D tracer distributions in vivo. Recent developments in multipinhole collimation and advanced image reconstruction have led to sub-millimetre and sub-half-millimetre resolution SPECT in rats and mice, respectively. In this article we review applications of microSPECT in cardiovascular research in which information about the function and pathology of the myocardium, vessels and neurons is obtained. We give examples on how diagnostic tracers, new therapeutic interventions, pre- and postcardiovascular event prognosis, and functional and pathophysiological heart conditions can be explored by microSPECT, using small-animal models of cardiovascular disease. (orig.)

  2. Signatures of Mechanosensitive Gating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Richard G

    2017-01-10

    The question of how mechanically gated membrane channels open and close is notoriously difficult to address, especially if the protein structure is not available. This perspective highlights the relevance of micropipette-aspirated single-particle tracking-used to obtain a channel's diffusion coefficient, D, as a function of applied membrane tension, σ-as an indirect assay for determining functional behavior in mechanosensitive channels. While ensuring that the protein remains integral to the membrane, such methods can be used to identify not only the gating mechanism of a protein, but also associated physical moduli, such as torsional and dilational rigidity, which correspond to the protein's effective shape change. As an example, three distinct D-versus-σ "signatures" are calculated, corresponding to gating by dilation, gating by tilt, and gating by a combination of both dilation and tilt. Both advantages and disadvantages of the approach are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Design of common software for quality control of SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiaohua; Gao Ruzhen; Chen Shengzu

    1993-01-01

    The goal of this study is to design a common testing system for SPECT quality control according to NEMA standard. Using the system, the performances of different types of SPECT can be tested, so that the acceptance testing, performance comparing and routine quality control for SPECT can be normalized. The system was based on IBM PC series of microcomputer. Testing data are acquired from various types of SPECT, then transferred into IBM PC through interface and tested with an unique testing program. Two parts were included: interface and SPECT testing program. It emphatically studied the managing program of RS232 interface, designing skills and the mathematic patterns of SPECT testing program. The system which was composed of 11 subroutines can be used to measure the performances for both gamma camera and SPECT. The system was tested on OMEGA 500/MCS 560 SPECT and the results showed that it is effective, accurate and easy to use

  4. SPECT-CT in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease; SPECT-CT in der Diagnostik der koronaren Herzerkrankung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hacker, M. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Klinikum der Univ. Muenchen (Germany)

    2006-09-15

    SPECT have a very low risk of death or fatal myocardial infarction (MI), therefore no intervention is required for these patients. According to the current guidelines for management of patients with chronic stable angina, both morphological and functional information about the coronary artery tree should be present before revascularization therapy is performed. The combination of 64-slice CT angiography plus gated myocardial SPECT could provide both non-invasive three-dimensional anatomical and functional information of the coronary artery tree. (orig.)

  5. SPECT/CT workflow and imaging protocols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckers, Catherine [University Hospital of Liege, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Oncological Imaging, Department of Medical Physics, Liege (Belgium); Hustinx, Roland [University Hospital of Liege, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Oncological Imaging, Department of Medical Physics, Liege (Belgium); Domaine Universitaire du Sart Tilman, Service de Medecine Nucleaire et Imagerie Oncologique, CHU de Liege, Liege (Belgium)

    2014-05-15

    Introducing a hybrid imaging method such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT greatly alters the routine in the nuclear medicine department. It requires designing new workflow processes and the revision of original scheduling process and imaging protocols. In addition, the imaging protocol should be adapted for each individual patient, so that performing CT is fully justified and the CT procedure is fully tailored to address the clinical issue. Such refinements often occur before the procedure is started but may be required at some intermediate stage of the procedure. Furthermore, SPECT/CT leads in many instances to a new partnership with the radiology department. This article presents practical advice and highlights the key clinical elements which need to be considered to help understand the workflow process of SPECT/CT and optimise imaging protocols. The workflow process using SPECT/CT is complex in particular because of its bimodal character, the large spectrum of stakeholders, the multiplicity of their activities at various time points and the need for real-time decision-making. With help from analytical tools developed for quality assessment, the workflow process using SPECT/CT may be separated into related, but independent steps, each with its specific human and material resources to use as inputs or outputs. This helps identify factors that could contribute to failure in routine clinical practice. At each step of the process, practical aspects to optimise imaging procedure and protocols are developed. A decision-making algorithm for justifying each CT indication as well as the appropriateness of each CT protocol is the cornerstone of routine clinical practice using SPECT/CT. In conclusion, implementing hybrid SPECT/CT imaging requires new ways of working. It is highly rewarding from a clinical perspective, but it also proves to be a daily challenge in terms of management. (orig.)

  6. SPECT/CT workflow and imaging protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckers, Catherine; Hustinx, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Introducing a hybrid imaging method such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT greatly alters the routine in the nuclear medicine department. It requires designing new workflow processes and the revision of original scheduling process and imaging protocols. In addition, the imaging protocol should be adapted for each individual patient, so that performing CT is fully justified and the CT procedure is fully tailored to address the clinical issue. Such refinements often occur before the procedure is started but may be required at some intermediate stage of the procedure. Furthermore, SPECT/CT leads in many instances to a new partnership with the radiology department. This article presents practical advice and highlights the key clinical elements which need to be considered to help understand the workflow process of SPECT/CT and optimise imaging protocols. The workflow process using SPECT/CT is complex in particular because of its bimodal character, the large spectrum of stakeholders, the multiplicity of their activities at various time points and the need for real-time decision-making. With help from analytical tools developed for quality assessment, the workflow process using SPECT/CT may be separated into related, but independent steps, each with its specific human and material resources to use as inputs or outputs. This helps identify factors that could contribute to failure in routine clinical practice. At each step of the process, practical aspects to optimise imaging procedure and protocols are developed. A decision-making algorithm for justifying each CT indication as well as the appropriateness of each CT protocol is the cornerstone of routine clinical practice using SPECT/CT. In conclusion, implementing hybrid SPECT/CT imaging requires new ways of working. It is highly rewarding from a clinical perspective, but it also proves to be a daily challenge in terms of management. (orig.)

  7. Indeterminate lesions on planar bone scintigraphy in lung cancer patients: SPECT, CT or SPECT-CT?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Punit; Kumar, Rakesh; Singh, Harmandeep; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Malhotra, Arun; Julka, Pramod Kumar; Thulkar, Sanjay

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to compare the role of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), computed tomography (CT) and SPECT-CT of selected volume in lung cancer patients with indeterminate lesions on planar bone scintigraphy (BS). The data of 50 lung cancer patients (53 ± 10.3 years; range 30-75; male/female 38/12) with 65 indeterminate lesions on planar BS (January 2010 to November 2010) were retrospectively evaluated. All of them underwent SPECT-CT of a selected volume. SPECT, CT and SPECT-CT images were independently evaluated by two experienced readers (experience in musculoskeletal imaging, including CT: 5 and 7 years) in separate sessions. A scoring scale of 1 to 5 was used, in which 1 is definitely metastatic, 2 is probably metastatic, 3 is indeterminate, 4 is probably benign and 5 is definitely benign. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were calculated for each modality, taking a score ≤2 as metastatic. With receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, areas under the curve (AUC) were calculated for each modality and compared. Clinical and imaging follow-up and/or histopathology were taken as reference standard. For both readers SPECT was inferior to CT (P = 0.004, P = 0.022) and SPECT-CT (P = 0.003, P = 0.037). However, no significant difference was found between CT and SPECT-CT for reader 1 (P = 0.847) and reader 2 (P = 0.592). The findings were similar for lytic as well as sclerotic lesions. Moderate inter-observer agreement was seen for SPECT images (κ = 0.426), while almost perfect agreement was seen for CT (κ = 0.834) and SPECT-CT (κ = 0.971). CT alone and SPECT-CT are better than SPECT for accurate characterisation of indeterminate lesions on planar BS in lung cancer patients. CT alone is not inferior to SPECT-CT for this purpose and might be preferred because of shorter acquisition time and wider availability. (orig.)

  8. Evaluation of left ventricular function and volume with multidetector-row computed tomography. Comparison with electrocardiogram-gated single photon emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Takeya; Yamashina, Shohei; Nanjou, Shuji; Yamazaki, Junichi

    2007-01-01

    This study compared left ventricular systolic function and volume determined by multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) and electrocardiogram-gated single photon emission computed tomography (G-SPECT) Thirty-seven patients with coronary artery disease and non-cardiovascular disease underwent MDCT. In this study, left ventricular ejection fraction (EF), left ventricular end-diastolic volume (EDV) and left ventricular end-systolic volume (ESV) were calculated using only two-phase imaging with MDCT. Left ventricular function and volume were compared using measurements from G-SPECT. We conducted MDCT and G-SPECT virtually simultaneously. Both the EF and ESV evaluated by MDCT closely correlated with G-SPECT (r=0.763, P 65 bpm) during MDCT significantly influenced the difference in EF calculated from MDCT and G-SPECT (P<0.05). Left ventricular function can be measured with MDCT as well as G-SPECT. However, a heart rate over 65 bpm during MDCT negatively affects the EF correlation between MDCT and G-SPECT. (author)

  9. Clinical applications of SPECT/CT: advantages and limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigo, P.

    2006-01-01

    The application of hybrid SPECT cameras in Nuclear Medicine follows the revolutionary introduction of PET/CT. This review focuses on the advantages and limitations of SPECT/CT in its various clinical indications. It appears that SPECT/CT will be a clear factor of progress for Nuclear Medicine. (author)

  10. SPECT in patients with cortical visual loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, I E; Galetta, S L; Gray, L G; Moster, M; Atlas, S W; Maurer, A H; Alavi, A

    1993-09-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with 99mTc-hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime (HMPAO) was used to investigate changes in cerebral blood flow in seven patients with cortical visual impairment. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) was the cause of cortical damage in two patients, cerebral ischemia in two patients and carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning, status epilepticus and Alzheimer's Disease (AD) each in three separate patients. The SPECT scans of the seven patients were compared to T2-weighted magnetic resonance image (MRI) scans of the brain to determine the correlation between functional and anatomical findings. In six of the seven patients, the qualitative interpretation of the SPECT studies supported the clinical findings (i.e., the visual field defect) by revealing altered regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in the appropriate regions of the visual pathway. MR scans in all of the patients, on the other hand, were either normal or disclosed smaller lesions than those detected by SPECT. We conclude that SPECT may reveal altered rCBF in patients with cortical visual impairment of various etiologies, even when MRI studies are normal or nondiagnostic.

  11. Noninvasive evaluation of ischemic stroke with SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, C.R.; Malik, M.M.; Gomez, S.M.; Wingkun, E.C.

    1988-01-01

    Technetium Tc 99m DTPA single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) brain scans of 20 patients with acute ischemic stroke were reviewed retrospectively and compared with clinical and radiologic (CT) data. Fourteen of the patients had abnormal SPECT studies. The abnormal findings were demonstrated by static views in eight patients, by the flow study in one patient, and by both sets of images in the other five patients. All abnormalities correlated with the clinical syndrome of presentation, and only two of the patients had no corresponding lesions on CT. Of the six patients with normal SPECT scans, two had abnormal CT studies, and in the other four, no lesions were shown at all. The ability of /sup 99m/Tc DTPA SPECT to display cerebral infarctions appears to be, at best, comparable to that of CT. SPECT also provides qualitative information regarding flow dynamics in the affected hemisphere of some patients (6/20 in our review). This, we believe, represents the objective demonstration of the preexisting insufficient collateral flow in the hemisphere at risk for ischemic stroke

  12. Optical XOR gate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vawter, G. Allen

    2013-11-12

    An optical XOR gate is formed as a photonic integrated circuit (PIC) from two sets of optical waveguide devices on a substrate, with each set of the optical waveguide devices including an electroabsorption modulator electrically connected in series with a waveguide photodetector. The optical XOR gate utilizes two digital optical inputs to generate an XOR function digital optical output. The optical XOR gate can be formed from III-V compound semiconductor layers which are epitaxially deposited on a III-V compound semiconductor substrate, and operates at a wavelength in the range of 0.8-2.0 .mu.m.

  13. Quantitative organ visualization using SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kircos, L.T.; Carey, J.E. Jr.; Keyes, J.W. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Quantitative organ visualization (QOV) was performed using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Organ size was calculated from serial, contiguous ECT images taken through the organ of interest with image boundaries determined using a maximum directional gradient edge finding technique. Organ activity was calculated using ECT counts bounded by the directional gradient, imaging system efficiency, and imaging time. The technique used to perform QOV was evaluated using phantom studies, in vivo canine liver, spleen, bladder, and kidney studies, and in vivo human bladder studies. It was demonstrated that absolute organ activity and organ size could be determined with this system and total imaging time restricted to less than 45 min to an accuracy of about +/- 10% providing the minimum dimensions of the organ are greater than the FWHM of the imaging system and the total radioactivity within the organ of interest exceeds 15 nCi/cc for dog-sized torsos. In addition, effective half-lives of approximately 1.5 hr or greater could be determined

  14. Contrast detail phantom for SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabrejas, M.L. de; Arashiro, J G; Giannone, C. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Camuyrano, M; Nohara, G [Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina). Facultad Ciencias Exactas

    1996-06-01

    A new low variable contrast phantom for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was constructed, tested and compared with other existing phantoms. It contains simulated cylindrical lesions of four different diameters (D{sub i}), embedded in a cylindrical scattering medium and a uniform section to evaluate tomographic uniformity. The concentration of tracer in the simulated lesions and the scattering medium (background) can be varied to simulate hot and cold lesions. Different applications of the phantom were tested, including determination of the minimum object contrast (OCm) necessary to detect lesions as a function of lesion size, lesion type (hot or cold) and acquisition and processing protocols by visual inspection. This parameter allows categorization of instruments comparing an `image quality index` (IQI). Preliminary comparison with the Britten contrast processing method showed that the detectable OCm was of the same order of magnitude, but the presented device seems more suitable for training and intercomparison purposes. The constructed phantom, of simple design, has proved to be useful for acquisition and processing condition evaluation, OCm estimation and external quality control. (author). 11 refs, 4 figs.

  15. SPECT I-123 iodoamphetamine brain imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tikofsky, R.S.; Liebman, A.; Hellman, R.S.; Collier, B.D.; Voslar, A.M.

    1988-01-01

    SPECT/IMP studies of 100 patients with a presumptive diagnosis of dementia were performed with a rotating gamma camera 15-20 minutes after intravenous injection of 3.5 mCi of IMP. Of these studies, 43 were interpreted as normal for age; 28 demonstrated decreased but not absent activity bilaterally in posterior parietal/occipital regions (consistent with Alzheimer-type dementia); 28 showed unilateral abnormalities in regional cerebral blood flow consistent with cerebrovascular disease; and one had mixed findings. Based on SPECT/IMP results, further diagnostic testing and/or management would be altered for 72% of patients, suggesting that SPECT/IMP provides valuable data, not available on clinical examination, to guide the evaluation and management of demented patients

  16. Stereotactic radiosurgery planning with ictal SPECT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackerly, T.; RMIT University, Bundoora, VIC; Geso, M.; O'Keefe, G.; Smith, R.

    2004-01-01

    This paper is motivated by a clinical requirement to utilise ictal SPECT images for target localisation in stereotactic radiosurgery treatment planning using the xknife system which only supports CT and MRI images. To achieve this, the SPECT images were converted from raw (pixel data only) format into a part 10 compliant DICOM CT fileset. The minimum requirements for the recasting of a raw format image as DICOM CT or MRI data set are described in detail. The method can be applied to the importation of raw format images into any radiotherapy treatment planning system that supports CT or MRI import. It is demonstrated that the combination of the low spatial resolution SPECT images, depicting functional information, with high spatial resolution MRI images, which show the structural information, is suitable for stereotactic radiosurgery treatment planning. Copyright (2004) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  17. Brain SPECT in severs traumatic head injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaulieu, F.; Eder, V.; Pottier, J.M.; Baulieu, J.L.; Fournier, P.; Legros, B.; Chiaroni, P.; Dalonneau, M.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this work was to compare the results of the early brain scintigraphy in traumatic brain injury to the long term neuropsychological behavior. Twenty four patients had an ECD-Tc99m SPECT, within one month after the trauma; scintigraphic abnormalities were evaluated according to a semi-quantitative analysis. The neuropsychological clinical investigation was interpreted by a synthetic approach to evaluate abnormalities related to residual motor deficit, frontal behavior, memory and language disorders. Fourteen patients (58%) had sequela symptoms. SPECT revealed 80 abnormalities and CT scan only 31. Statistical analysis of uptake values showed significantly lower uptake in left basal ganglia and brain stem in patients with sequela memory disorders. We conclude that the brain perfusion scintigraphy is able to detect more lesions than CT and that it could really help to predict the neuropsychological behavior after severe head injury. Traumatology could become in the future a widely accepted indication of perfusion SPECT. (authors)

  18. [Follow-up of patients with good exercise capacity in stress test with myocardial single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Javiera; Prat, Hernán; Swett, Eduardo; Berrocal, Isabel; Fernández, René; Zhindon, Juan Pablo; Castro, Ariel; Massardo, Teresa

    2015-11-01

    The evaluation of coronary artery disease (CAD) can be performed with stress test and myocardial SPECT tomography. To assess the predictive value of myocardial SPECT using stress test for cardiovascular events in patients with good exercise capacity. We included 102 males aged 56 ± 10 years and 19 females aged 52 ± 10 years, all able to achieve 10 METs and ≥ 85% of the theoretical maximum heart rate and at least 8 min in their stress test with gated 99mTc-sestamibi SPECT. Eighty two percent of patients were followed clinically for 33 ± 17 months. Sixty seven percent of patients were studied for CAD screening and the rest for known disease assessment. Treadmill stress test was negative in 75.4%; 37% of patients with moderate to severe Duke Score presented ischemia. Normal myocardial perfusion SPECT was observed in 70.2%. Reversible defects appeared in 24.8% of cases, which were of moderate or severe degree (> 10% left ventricular extension) in 56.6%. Only seven cases had coronary events after the SPECT. Two major (myocardial infarction and emergency coronary revascularization) and 5 minor events (elective revascularization) ere observed in the follow-up. In a multivariate analysis, SPECT ischemia was the only statistically significant parameter that increased the probability of having a major or minor event. Nearly a quarter of our patients with good exercise capacity demonstrated reversible defects in their myocardial perfusion SPECT. In the intermediate-term follow-up, a low rate of cardiac events was observed, being the isotopic ischemia the only significant predictive parameter.

  19. SPECT and PET imaging in epilepsia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landvogt, C.

    2007-01-01

    In preoperative localisation of epileptogenic foci, nuclear medicine diagnostics plays a crucial role. FDG-PET is used as first line diagnostics. In case of inconsistent MRI, EEG and FDG-PET findings, 11 C-Flumazenil-PET or ictal and interictal perfusion-SPECT should be performed. Other than FDG, Flumazenil can help to identify the extend of the region, which should be resected. To enhance sensitivity and specificity, further data analysis using voxelbased statistical analyses or SISCOM (substraction ictal SPECT coregistered MRI) should be performed

  20. Scatter and attenuation correction in SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ljungberg, Michael

    2004-01-01

    The adsorbed dose is related to the activity uptake in the organ and its temporal distribution. Measured count rate with scintillation cameras is related to activity through the system sensitivity, cps/MBq. By accounting for physical processes and imaging limitations we can measure the activity at different time points. Correction for physical factor, such as attenuation and scatter is required for accurate quantitation. Both planar and SPECT imaging can be used to estimate activities for radiopharmaceutical dosimetry. Planar methods have been the most widely used but is a 2D technique. With accurate modelling for imagine in iterative reconstruction, SPECT methods will prove to be more accurate

  1. Is attenuation correction of myocardial SPECT scans worth the effort?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bui, C.; Nguyen, D.; Dixson, H.; Saunders, C.; Cook, P.; Burnett, P.; Croll, F.; Dunn, R.; Hasche, E.; Kelleher, P.; Nasser, F.; Wilson, D.; Lee, K.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Gated (GS), attenuation-corrected (AC) and non-attenuation-corrected (NAC) myocardial SPECT scans were performed after injection of 99 Tc m -Sestamibi (MIBI) at peak stress in 253 patients between September 1998 and March 1999. 60 patients have undergone cardiac catheterisation (37 males, 23 females, age range 34-80). For whole heart analysis, significant coronary disease was defined as 50% or greater diameter narrowing in any of the coronary arteries and/or documented myocardial infarction. For vascular territory analysis, significant coronary disease was defined as 50% or greater diameter narrowing of any artery in that territory. The three coronary artery territories were assigned as: left anterior descending (LAD), left circumflex (LCA) and right coronary (RCA). The septum, apex and anterior wall; the lateral wall; and the inferior wall were assigned to the LAD; LCA; and RCA territories respectively. In conclusion for this selected subgroup of patients with angiographic follow-up, NAC, AC and GS were of similar accuracy in the detection of significant CAD in both whole heart analysis and individual vascular territory analysis. AC and GS were of superior specificity when compared with NAC in both whole heart analysis and individual vascular territory analysis. AC and GS may be of additional diagnostic value in improving the specificity of NAC. Further outcome data will be presented. Copyright (2000) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  2. Motor activation SPECT for the neurosurgical diseases. Clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguchi, Hiroshi; Kawaguchi, Shoichiro; Sakaki, Toshisuke; Imai, Teruhiko; Ohishi, Hajime

    1999-01-01

    We evaluated and analyzed the motor activation single photon emission computed tomography (M-SPECT) findings on patients with ischemic cerebrovascular diseases (CVD). The M-SPECT studies were carried out on 91 patients with ischemic cerebrovascular diseases. The M-SPECT study was performed using the finger opposition task in each case. The SPECT images were superimposed on the magnetic resonance images (MRIs) for each case using Image Fusion Software. The result of the M-SPECT was expressed as positive or negative. The cases with a marked increase of blood flow in the sensorio-motor cortex after the finger opposition task were categorized as positive, and those cases showing no marked increase of blood flow were categorized as negative. Among the 91 cases examined, 53 (58%) were categorized as positive in the M-SPECT study. Among the negative M-SPECT cases treated with revascularization surgery, there were some cases showing positive M-SPECT results postoperatively. The cases without any revascularization surgery did not change the M-SPECT findings in each during the follow-up period. The M-SPECT procedure for examining intracranial lesions could provide the cortical localization of the motor function. The M-SPECT procedure in the ischemic CVDs contributes to knowledge about the choices of treatment and the evaluation of the treatment result. (author)

  3. Motor activation SPECT for the neurosurgical diseases. Clinical application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noguchi, Hiroshi; Kawaguchi, Shoichiro; Sakaki, Toshisuke; Imai, Teruhiko; Ohishi, Hajime [Nara Medical Univ., Kashihara (Japan)

    1999-08-01

    We evaluated and analyzed the motor activation single photon emission computed tomography (M-SPECT) findings on patients with ischemic cerebrovascular diseases (CVD). The M-SPECT studies were carried out on 91 patients with ischemic cerebrovascular diseases. The M-SPECT study was performed using the finger opposition task in each case. The SPECT images were superimposed on the magnetic resonance images (MRIs) for each case using Image Fusion Software. The result of the M-SPECT was expressed as positive or negative. The cases with a marked increase of blood flow in the sensorio-motor cortex after the finger opposition task were categorized as positive, and those cases showing no marked increase of blood flow were categorized as negative. Among the 91 cases examined, 53 (58%) were categorized as positive in the M-SPECT study. Among the negative M-SPECT cases treated with revascularization surgery, there were some cases showing positive M-SPECT results postoperatively. The cases without any revascularization surgery did not change the M-SPECT findings in each during the follow-up period. The M-SPECT procedure for examining intracranial lesions could provide the cortical localization of the motor function. The M-SPECT procedure in the ischemic CVDs contributes to knowledge about the choices of treatment and the evaluation of the treatment result. (author)

  4. Advances in SPECT Instrumentation (Including Small Animal Scanners). Chapter 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Domenico, G.; Zavattini, G.

    2009-01-01

    Fundamental major efforts have been devoted to the development of positron emission tomography (PET) imaging modality over the last few decades. Recently, a novel surge of interest in single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) technology has occurred, particularly after the introduction of the hybrid SPECT-CT imaging system. This has led to a flourishing of investigations in new types of detectors and collimators, and to more accurate refinement of reconstruction algorithms. Along with SPECT-CT, new, fast gamma cameras have been developed for dedicated cardiac imaging. The existing gap between PET and SPECT in sensitivity and spatial resolution is progressively decreasing, and this trend is particularly apparent in the field of small animal imaging where the most important advances have been reported in SPECT tomographs. An outline of the basic features of SPECT technology, and of recent developments in SPECT instrumentation for both clinical applications and basic biological research on animal models is described. (author)

  5. Evaluation of usefulness of bone SPECT for lumbar spondylolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Osamu; Hashimoto, Manabu; Tomura, Noriaki; Watarai, Jiro

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of 99m Tc-MDP SPECT (bone SPECT) for lumbar spondylolysis. We analyzed 11 cases with 17 lesions. All cases were compared using plain radiography, computed tomography (CT), planar bone scintigraphy (PBS), and bone SPECT. Four lesions that showed a wide defect on CT were negative on bone SPECT and may have been chronic lesions. Thirteen lesions that were positive on bone SPECT were narrow or showed no defect on CT and may have been early lesions. Two cases showed no defect on CT but were positive on bone SPECT, and one of them progressed to bilateral spondylolysis after one year. This may have been a very early lesion. Thus bone SPECT is useful for the diagnosis of lumbar spondylolysis, especially in its early stage. (author)

  6. Evaluation of usefulness of bone SPECT for lumbar spondylolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Osamu; Hashimoto, Manabu; Tomura, Noriaki; Watarai, Jiro [Akita Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of {sup 99m}Tc-MDP SPECT (bone SPECT) for lumbar spondylolysis. We analyzed 11 cases with 17 lesions. All cases were compared using plain radiography, computed tomography (CT), planar bone scintigraphy (PBS), and bone SPECT. Four lesions that showed a wide defect on CT were negative on bone SPECT and may have been chronic lesions. Thirteen lesions that were positive on bone SPECT were narrow or showed no defect on CT and may have been early lesions. Two cases showed no defect on CT but were positive on bone SPECT, and one of them progressed to bilateral spondylolysis after one year. This may have been a very early lesion. Thus bone SPECT is useful for the diagnosis of lumbar spondylolysis, especially in its early stage. (author)

  7. Clinical application of cardiac SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Shigeyuki

    1999-01-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has replaced planar imaging techniques for myocardial scintigraphy. Thallium-201 was the dominant agent employed for myocardial perfusion imaging. Today new technetium-99m labelled radionuclides have been used as excellent alternatives to 201 Tl for detection of coronary artery disease, prognostification, and even assessment of myocardial viability. Pharmacologic stress imaging using either dipyridamole, adenosine or dobutamine is a substitute for exercise stress. Accurate determination of myocardial viability is vitally important for clinical decision making for patients with LV dysfunction who will most benefit from revascularization. Stunned and hibernated myocardium may result in profound regional LTV dysfunction in absence of necrosis. The various approach such as stress-redistribution-reinjection imaging, rest-redistribution imaging and stress-redistribution-24 hours delayed imaging has been utilized to assess myocardial viability with 201 Tl. Quantitative assessment of 99m Tc MIBI uptake reflect the degree of viability. 123 I-Metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), an analog of norepinephrine, has been used for scintigraphic assessment of regional cardiac adrenergic innervation. Cardiac sympathetic denervation, assessed by 123 I-MIBG, due to ischemia in non-Q myocardial infarction and unstable angina has been shown. Quantitative cardiac MIBG scintigram was shown to have prognostic value in patients with severe congestive heart failure. 23 I-BMIPP (ρ-methyl-iodophenyl pentadecanoic acid) has been used to assess myocardial fatty acid utilization. BMIPP has the memory function of ischemia in unstable angina, since decreased BMIPP uptake persists several days after ischemic episode. Nuclear cardiology in Japan has experienced an expansion in the techniques including use of new radionuclides, 99m Tc perfusion agents, 123 I-MIBG and 23 I-BMIPP and in associated clinical application to the various cardiac diseases

  8. Application of SPECT to psychiatry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Hiroshi

    1999-01-01

    Brain perfusion SPECT using 99m Tc-ethyl-cysteinate dimer ( 99m Tc-ECD) was applied to psychiatric diseases with aid of statistical parametric mapping (SPM) for analysis of data. To evaluate influence of aging on brain perfusion, noninvasive measurements of cerebral blood flow using 99m Tc-ECD were performed in 53 normal volunteers, age 18 to 87 years old. Mean cerebral blood flow (mCBF) was 43.9±5.0 ml/100 g/min and showed weak negative correlation with aging (r=0.451). Perisylvian cerebral cortices and medial frontal areas including anterior cingulate gyri showed greater negative correlation than other areas. These findings suggest the necessity of age-matched control regional CBF (rCBF) data to investigate rCBF abnormality in patients. Four drug-naive schizophrenic patients showed flow decrease in bilateral frontal and superior temporal areas and a left infero-posterior temporal area. Haloperidol administration induced flow decrease in bilateral frontal and left parietal areas, while flow increase in bilateral striatal and right hippocampal areas. Ten aged depressive patients showed flow decrease in bilateral frontal and left temporo-parietal areas. Even after remission patients showed flow decrease in the left frontal area as compared with normal subjects. Remission induced flow increase in the right frontal, right parietal, and right orbitofrontal areas compared with depression. These results suggest that CBF measurements using 99m Tc-ECD were useful for objective evaluation of regional abnormality in brain function in psychiatric diseases. (author)

  9. SPECT in psychiatry; Die Bedeutung der Hirn-SPECT in der Psychiatrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasper, S [Universitaetsklinik fuer Psychiatrie, Wien (Austria); Gruenwald, F [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Danos, P [Psychiatrische Universitaetsklinik, Bonn (Germany); Walter, H [Universitaetsklinik fuer Psychiatrie, Wien (Austria); Klemm, E [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Bruecke, T [Universitaetsklinik fuer Neurologie, Wien (Austria); Podreka, I [Universitaetsklinik fuer Neurologie, Wien (Austria); Biersack, H J [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    1994-10-01

    In the last fifteen years different attempts have been undertaken to understand the biological basis of major psychiatric disorders. One important tool to determine patterns of brain dysfunction is single emission computed tomography (SPECT). Whereas SPECT investigations are already a valuable diagnostic instrument for the diagnosis of dementia of the Alzheimer Type (DAT) there have not been consistent findings that can be referred to as specific for any other particular psychiatric diagnostic entity. Nevertheless, SPECT studies have been able to demonstrate evidence of brain dysfunction in patients with schizophrenia, depression, anxiety disorders, and substance abuse in which other methods showed no clear abnormality of brain function. Our manuscript reviews the data which are currently available in the literature and stresses the need for further studies, especially for prediction and monitoring psychiatric treatment modalities. (orig.) [Deutsch] In den vergangenen 15 Jahren wurde durch verschiedene methodologische Ansaetze versucht, die biologischen Ursachen psychiatrischer Erkrankungen naeher zu erforschen. Als eine bedeutende Methode hat sich dabei die Single-Photonen-Emissions-Computertomographie (SPECT) herausgestellt. Waehrend die SPECT-Untersuchungen bereits Eingang in die Routinediagnostik bei Demenzen vom Alzheimer-Typ gefunden haben, konnten fuer weitere psychiatrische Erkrankungen noch keine eindeutigen Befunde etabliert werden. Mit der SPECT-Methode ist es jedoch gelungen, funktionelle Veraenderungen des Gehirns von psychiatrischen Erkrankungen darzustellen, wie z.B. Schizophrenie, Depression, Angsterkrankungen bzw. Substanzmissbrauch. In Forschungsprotokollen wird durch die SPECT-Methode versucht, abzuklaeren, inwieweit es moeglich ist, innerhalb der Erkrankungsentitaeten psychiatrischer Erkrankungen oder auch diese uebergreifend eine Subklassifizierung zu finden und evtl. Gehirnsysteme ausfindig zu machen, die mit einer spezifischen

  10. Performance evaluation of D-SPECT: a novel SPECT system for nuclear cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlandsson, Kjell; Kacperski, Krzysztof; van Gramberg, Dean; Hutton, Brian F.

    2009-05-01

    D-SPECT (Spectrum Dynamics, Israel) is a novel SPECT system for cardiac perfusion studies. Based on CZT detectors, region-centric scanning, high-sensitivity collimators and resolution recovery, it offers potential advantages over conventional systems. A series of measurements were made on a β-version D-SPECT system in order to evaluate its performance in terms of energy resolution, scatter fraction, sensitivity, count rate capability and resolution. Corresponding measurements were also done on a conventional SPECT system (CS) for comparison. The energy resolution of the D-SPECT system at 140 keV was 5.5% (CS: 9.25%), the scatter fraction 30% (CS: 34%), the planar sensitivity 398 s-1 MBq-1 per head (99mTc, 10 cm) (CS: 72 s-1 MBq-1), and the tomographic sensitivity in the heart region was in the range 647-1107 s-1 MBq-1 (CS: 141 s-1 MBq-1). The count rate increased linearly with increasing activity up to 1.44 M s-1. The intrinsic resolution was equal to the pixel size, 2.46 mm (CS: 3.8 mm). The average reconstructed resolution using the standard clinical filter was 12.5 mm (CS: 13.7 mm). The D-SPECT has superior sensitivity to that of a conventional system with similar spatial resolution. It also has excellent energy resolution and count rate characteristics, which should prove useful in dynamic and dual radionuclide studies.

  11. PET and SPECT of neurobiological systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O. [Groningen Univ. (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Gent Univ. (Belgium). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Otte, Andreas [Univ. of Applied Sciences, Offenburg (Germany). Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology; Vries, Erik F.J. de; Waarde, Aren van (eds.) [Groningen Univ. (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging

    2014-04-01

    Addresses a variety of aspects of neurotransmission in the brain. Details the latest results in probe development. Emphasis on a multidisciplinary approach. Written by internationally acclaimed experts. PET and SPECT of Neurobiological Systems combines the expertise of renowned authors whose dedication to the development of novel probes and techniques for the investigation of neurobiological systems has achieved international recognition. Various aspects of neurotransmission in the brain are discussed, such as visualization and quantification of (more than 20 different) neuroreceptors, neuroinflammatory markers, transporters, and enzymes as well as neurotransmitter synthesis, ?-amyloid deposition, cerebral blood flow, and the metabolic rate of glucose. The latest results in probe development are also detailed. Most chapters are written jointly by radiochemists and nuclear medicine specialists to ensure a multidisciplinary approach. This state of the art compendium will be valuable to anyone in the field of clinical or preclinical neuroscience, from the radiochemist and radiologist/nuclear medicine specialist to the interested neurobiologist and general practitioner. It is the second volume of a trilogy on PET and SPECT imaging in the neurosciences. Other volumes focus on PET and SPECT in psychiatry and PET and SPECT in neurology''.

  12. Chilaiditi's syndrome demonstrated by SPECT/CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalini S Perumal

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Chilaiditi’s syndrome is a rare condition commonly diagnosed as an incidental radiological finding. The aim of this report is to show the role of SPECT-CT in this syndrome and state the functional and anatomical role of this hybrid imaging modality. Materials and Methods: A case report. Results: A 49-year-old female patient was referred for gallium-67 citrate for a possible granulomatous myositis and underwent SPECT-CT of the abdomen to assess the area of decreased gallium uptake on planar images of the liver. The combined SPECT and CT modality demonstrated findings consistent with the clinical evidence of Chilaiditi’s syndrome. The anatomical part of this hybrid modality made it easier to evaluate the area of gallium lack of uptake which was due to air in the colon. Conclusion: This case does not only show the role of SPECT-CT in this syndrome but also suggest that the use of such modality should be considered whenever available in the evaluation of patients in whom the localization of active disease becomes imperative.

  13. SPECT and PET in Eating Disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Waarde, Aren; Audenaert, Kurt; Busatto, Geraldo F.; Buchpiguel, Carlos; Dierckx, Rudi; Dierckx, Rudi AJO; Otte, Andreas; de Vries, Erik FJ; van Waarde, Aren; den Boer, Johan A

    2014-01-01

    Medical imaging techniques like PET and SPECT have been applied for investigation of brain function in anorexia and bulimia nervosa. Regional abnormalities have been detected in cerebral blood flow, glucose metabolism, the availability of several neurotransmitter receptors (serotonin 1A and 2A,

  14. Methodology for ventilation/perfusion SPECT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bajc, Marika; Neilly, Brian; Miniati, Massimo

    2010-01-01

    Ventilation/perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (V/Q SPECT) is the scintigraphic technique of choice for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism and many other disorders that affect lung function. Data from recent ventilation studies show that the theoretic advantages of Technegas ov...

  15. Brain SPECT with Tl-201 DDC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruine, J.F. de.

    1988-01-01

    The development, animal and human experiments and the first clinical results of a new blood flow tracer thallium-201 diethyldithiocarbamate (Tl-201 DDC) are discussed for functional brain imaging with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). 325 refs.; 43 figs.; 22 tabs

  16. Implementation and application of simulation platform of PET based on GATE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Bin; Zhao Shujun; Zhang Shixun; Liu Haojia

    2010-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a tool for obtaining functional image in vivo and GATE is a dedicated software for PET/SPECT simulation based on Mentor Carlo Method. It encapsulates the Geant4 libraries to achieve a modular and provides a number of new characteristics. In practice, a simulation platform of PET has been builded employing GATE based on Ubuntu operating system, including many keys and skills in the process. We have exploited benchmark PET, a testing example in GATE, and implemented PET scanner simulation in the end. Through analyzing the simulation data, the result demonstrate that predictive goal has been reached. The work provides the foundation for investigating PET scanner and optimizing the algorithm of tomograph image reconstruction. (authors)

  17. Anything wrong with brain SPECT? Not really

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavel, D.G.; Davis, G.; Craita, I.; Liu, P.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: Despite increased evidence about the usefulness of Brain SPECT in Neuro-Psychiatry, it continues to represent only a low percentage of Nuclear Medicine procedures. The prevalent perception is that it is an inadequate diagnostic tool, and/or is not changing patient management. There are objective reasons for this, as the lack of awareness by Psychiatrists about the value of SPECT, but most important is the frequently poor quality of images provided. This can be due to inadequate gamma cameras but is mostly due to poor quality software. Materials and Methods: High resolution brain SPECT via triple head gamma camera, super-high resolution fan beam collimator and Tc-HMPAO. A combination of commercial software and local optimization was used for the final displays as well as for realignment of sequential brain SPECT studies. Results: We found out that 6 basic software improvements are needed to generate a final display where features can be clearly distinguished and which can be also easily assimilated by the referring physician. 1) Color scales: simple and efficient tools needed to generate user friendly and semiquantitative color shades as needed. Unfortunately various color scales may be needed depending on printer and paper used. 2): 3 D displays allowing, multiple standardized thresholdings, any number of groupings, differential coloring (with functional meaning) and adequate labeling. Should be completely or at least mostly automatic. 3) Automatic realignment of sequential studies: such programs exist in various forms (free WWW versions, proprietary Beta versions, etc.) but are still not supplied by the gamma camera vendors for general use. Should provide SPECT -SPECT and SPECT MRI options. 4) Localization of structures and slices a) Triangulation of structures and b) Identification of section location. 5) Graphics improvement for generating any number of optimized summary displays to accompany reports. 6) Availability of voxel based quantification software

  18. Allowable variance set on left ventricular function parameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Li'na; Qi Zhongzhi; Zeng Yu; Ou Xiaohong; Li Lin

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the influence of allowable Variance settings on left ventricular function parameter of the arrhythmia patients during gated myocardial perfusion imaging. Method: 42 patients with evident arrhythmia underwent myocardial perfusion SPECT, 3 different allowable variance with 20%, 60%, 100% would be set before acquisition for every patients,and they will be acquired simultaneously. After reconstruction by Astonish, end-diastole volume(EDV) and end-systolic volume (ESV) and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) would be computed with Quantitative Gated SPECT(QGS). Using SPSS software EDV, ESV, EF values of analysis of variance. Result: there is no statistical difference between three groups. Conclusion: arrhythmia patients undergo Gated myocardial perfusion imaging, Allowable Variance settings on EDV, ESV, EF value does not have a statistical meaning. (authors)

  19. Brain pertechnetate SPECT in perinatal asphyxia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sfakianakis, G.; Curless, R.; Goldberg, R.; Clarke, L.; Saw, C.; Sfakianakis, E.; Bloom, F.; Bauer, C.; Serafini, A.

    1984-01-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography of the brain was performed in 6 patients with perinatal asphyxis aged 8-26 days. A single-head (LFOV) commercial SPECT system (Picker) was used and data were acquired 2-3 hr after an IV injection of 1-2 mCi Tc-99m-pertechnetate (360/sup 0/ rotation, 60 views, 64 x 64 matrix, 50K cts/view). Reconstruction in three planes was performed using MDS software (Hanning medium resolution filter, with or without attenuation correction using Sorenson's technique). For each clinical study, a ring type phantom source was used to identify the level of reconstruction noise in the tomographic planes. Abnormalities were found in all patients studied, 3 central (moderate intensity), 2 peripheral (1 severe, 1 moderate) and 1 diffuse (mild intensity). Despite use of oral perchlorate (50 mg) in one patient the choroid plexus was visible. Since attenuation correction tended to amplify noise, the clinical studies were interpreted both with and without this correction. All 3 patients with central lesions were found abnormal on early (1-4 mo) neurologic follow-up examination, whereas the others were normal. No correlation was found between SPECT and 24 hr blood levels of CPK, ammonia, base excess, or the Apgar scores. Ct scans were reported abnormal (3 diffuse, 1 peripheral, 1 central and 1 questionable). Planar scintigrams obtained immediately after SPECT were normal (2), questionable (2) and abnormal (2). Follow-up SPECT brain scintigrams in two of the patients showed partial resolution. SPECT of the brain appears promising in perinatal asphyxia but long-term correlation with patient development is necessary.

  20. Ventilation-perfused studies using SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zwijnenburg, A.

    1989-01-01

    A method for the quantitative analysis of ventilation-perfusion SPECT studies is decribed and an effort is made to evaluate its usefullness. The technical details of the emthod are described. In the the transaxial reconstructions of the tomographic studies the contour of the lungs is detected and regional values of lung volume, ventilation, perfusion and ventilation-perfusion ratios are calculated. The method is operator independent. The lung volume calculations from the SPECT studies are validated by comparing them with lung volume measurements using the helium dilution technique. A good correlation (r=0.91) was found between the two volumes. SPECT volume was greater than the volume measured with helium dilution, which was attributed to non-gas-containing structures in the. lungs. The use of ventilation-perfusion ratio SPECT is described to evaluate the effect of ionizing radiation on the lungs in patients treated with mantle field irradiation for Hodgkin's disease. Perfusion changes appear as early as 2 months after the start of irradiation. Ventilation changes appear later and relatively minor. No changes are seen outside the radiation portals. The ventilation-perfusion inequality in pulmonary sarcoidosis is treated. It is suggested that the decrease D LCO in these patients may be partly due to an even distribution of ventilation perfusion ratios. An effort is made to establish the properties of a new tracer used for the assessment of the metabolic function of the pulmonary endothelium. The lung uptake of I-123 IMP mimics the distribution of a perfusion tracer and it is suggested that this tracer may be useful for the early detection of pulmonary vascular damage, even when blood flow is still intact. Some aspects of the use of Kr-81m as a ventilation tracer are discussed as well as the effect of noise on Kr-81m SPECT reconstructions. (author). 146 refs.; 39 figs.; 8 tabs

  1. SPECT/CT imaging in children with papillary thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hwa-Young; Gelfand, Michael J.; Sharp, Susan E.

    2011-01-01

    SPECT/CT improves localization of single photon-emitting radiopharmaceuticals. To determine the utility of SPECT/CT in children with papillary thyroid carcinoma. 20 SPECT/CT and planar studies were reviewed in 13 children with papillary thyroid carcinoma after total thyroidectomy. Seven studies used I-123 and 13 used I-131, after elevating TSH by T4 deprivation or intramuscular thyrotropin alfa. Eight children had one study and five children had two to four studies. Studies were performed at initial post-total thyroidectomy evaluation, follow-up and after I-131 treatment doses. SPECT/CT was performed with a diagnostic-quality CT unit in 13 studies and a localization-only CT unit in 7. Stimulated thyroglobulin was measured (except in 2 cases with anti-thyroglobulin antibodies). In 13 studies, neck activity was present but poorly localized on planar imaging; all foci of uptake were precisely localized by SPECT/CT. Two additional foci of neck uptake were found on SPECT/CT. SPECT/CT differentiated high neck uptake from facial activity. In six studies (four children), neck uptake was identified as benign by SPECT/CT (three thyroglossal duct remnants, one skin contamination, two by precise anatomical CT localization). In two children, SPECT/CT supported a decision not to treat with I-131. When SPECT/CT was unable to identify focal uptake as benign, stimulated thyroglobulin measurements were valuable. In three of 13 studies with neck uptake, SPECT/CT provided no useful additional information. SPECT/CT precisely localizes neck iodine uptake. In small numbers of patients, treatment is affected. SPECT/CT should be used when available in thyroid carcinoma patients. (orig.)

  2. Amplifying genetic logic gates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Jerome; Yin, Peter; Ortiz, Monica E; Subsoontorn, Pakpoom; Endy, Drew

    2013-05-03

    Organisms must process information encoded via developmental and environmental signals to survive and reproduce. Researchers have also engineered synthetic genetic logic to realize simpler, independent control of biological processes. We developed a three-terminal device architecture, termed the transcriptor, that uses bacteriophage serine integrases to control the flow of RNA polymerase along DNA. Integrase-mediated inversion or deletion of DNA encoding transcription terminators or a promoter modulates transcription rates. We realized permanent amplifying AND, NAND, OR, XOR, NOR, and XNOR gates actuated across common control signal ranges and sequential logic supporting autonomous cell-cell communication of DNA encoding distinct logic-gate states. The single-layer digital logic architecture developed here enables engineering of amplifying logic gates to control transcription rates within and across diverse organisms.

  3. Cardiac gated ventilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, C.W. III; Hoffman, E.A.

    1995-01-01

    There are several theoretic advantages to synchronizing positive pressure breaths with the cardiac cycle, including the potential for improving distribution of pulmonary and myocardial blood flow and enhancing cardiac output. The authors evaluated the effects of synchronizing respiration to the cardiac cycle using a programmable ventilator and electron beam CT (EBCT) scanning. The hearts of anesthetized dogs were imaged during cardiac gated respiration with a 50 msec scan aperture. Multi slice, short axis, dynamic image data sets spanning the apex to base of the left ventricle were evaluated to determine the volume of the left ventricular chamber at end-diastole and end-systole during apnea, systolic and diastolic cardiac gating. The authors observed an increase in cardiac output of up to 30% with inspiration gated to the systolic phase of the cardiac cycle in a non-failing model of the heart

  4. Validation of use of the low energies library in the GATE program: assessment of the effective mass attenuation coefficient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argenta, J.; Brambilla, C.R.; Marques da Silva, A.M.; Hoff, G.

    2009-01-01

    GATE (Geant4 Application for Emission Tomography) is a versatile tool kit for nuclear medicine simulations of SPECT and PET studies. GATE takes advantage of well-validated libraries of physics processes models, geometry description, tracking of particles through materials, response of detector and visualization tools offered by Geant4. One package available to simulate electromagnetic interactions is LEP (Low Energy Electromagnetic Processes). The purpose of this work was to evaluate the LEP package used by GATE 4 for nuclear medicine shielding simulations. Several simulations were made involving a mono directional and 140 keV monoenergetic point source beam, passing through barriers of variable thickness of water and lead. The results showed good agreement with the theoretical model, indicating that GATE 4 uses correctly the LEP package. (author)

  5. Validation of use of the low energies library in the GATE program: assessment of the effective mass attenuation coefficient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argenta, Jackson; Brambilla, Claudia R.; Silva, Ana Maria Marques da; Hoff, Gabriela

    2010-01-01

    Geant4 Application for Emission Tomography program (GATE) is a versatile toolkit for nuclear medicine simulations of SPECT and PET studies. GATE takes advantage of well-validated libraries of physics processes models, geometry description, tracking of particles through materials, response of detector and visualization tools offered by Geant4 (version 4.0). One package available to simulate electromagnetic interactions is low energy electromagnetic processes (LEP). The purpose of this work was to evaluate the LEP package used by GATE 4 for nuclear medicine shielding simulations. Several simulations were made involving a monodirectional and 140 keV monoenergetic point source beam, passing through barriers of variable thickness of water and lead. The results showed good agreement with the theoretical model, indicating that GATE 4 uses correctly the LEP package. (author)

  6. Risk assessment after coronary angioplasty with SPECT myocardial perfusion studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camilletti, Jorge A.; Erriest, Juan; Mele, Anibal A.

    2007-01-01

    The chest pain can be use for stratifying the risk of the patients after coronary angioplasty. Nevertheless this strategy has shown to have a low accuracy in the detection of restenosis and myocardial ischemia. Aims: To establish the usefulness of the SPECT studies in the risk stratification after the coronary angioplasty. Evaluate the incidence of silent ischemia or symptomatic, and its impact on the prognosis. Method: There were included 107 patients (p) submitted to a gated SPECT between the year of the coronary angioplasty. The analysis of the images was performed according to different scores (SSS, SRS, SDS). These data was correlated with the symptoms of the patients. We define group 1 (G1) as the asymptomatic without ischemia (n 59p), group 2 (G2) as silent ischemia (n = 28p) and group 3 (G3) as symptomatic with ischemia (n = 20p). A clinical follow-up was done in search of events (target vessel revascularization, unstable angina, AMI and death). Results: Significant differences were not observed in the clinical variables between the different groups. The SSS was lower in the G1 compare with G2 and G3 (p 0.0001) and was similar between the last two, p = NS (SSS: G1: 2.2 ± 4.9; G2: 7.6 ± 5.9; G3: 9.5 ± 6.8). The SDS was greater in G3 vs. G1 and G2, p = 0.0001, and greater in G2 vs. G1, p = 0.0001 (SDS: G1: 0; G2: 4.8 ± 3.5; G3: 7.2 ± 6.5). No differences where observed in the SRS between the three groups. In the follow-up the total percentage of events was lesser when compare the G1 with the G2 and G3 (G1: 3.3%; G2 and G3: 18.7%; p 0.02). The percentage of annual events of the G3 symptomatic with ischemia (11.03%) and G2 silent ischemia (4.04%) did not present differences (p 0.7). When the events of the G2 (4.04%) were compared with the G1 (1.24%) we observed a trend to major frequency of events in the G2 (p = 0.6). Conclusions: The presence of myocardial ischemia after coronary angioplasty is a determinant of the prognosis. Nevertheless, the extension

  7. Quantitation of myocardial blood flow and myocardial flow reserve with 99mTc-sestamibi dynamic SPECT/CT to enhance detection of coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, Bailing; Chen, Fu-Chung; Chen, Chien-Cheng; Wu, Tao-Cheng; Huang, Wen-Sheng; Hou, Po-Nien; Hung, Guang-Uei

    2014-01-01

    Conventional dual-head single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT systems capable of fast dynamic SPECT (DySPECT) imaging have a potential for flow quantitation. This study introduced a new method to quantify myocardial blood flow (MBF) and myocardial flow reserve (MFR) with DySPECT scan and evaluated the diagnostic performance of detecting coronary artery disease (CAD) compared with perfusion using invasive coronary angiography (CAG) as the reference standard. This study included 21 patients with suspected or known CAD who had received DySPECT, ECG-gated SPECT (GSPECT), and CAG (13 with ≥50 % stenosis in any vessel; non-CAD group: 8 with patent arteries or 99m Tc-sestamibi (MIBI) tracer at rest or dipyridamole-stress stages. DySPECT images were reconstructed with full physical corrections and converted to the physical unit of becquerels per milliliter. Stress MBF (SMBF), rest MBF (RMBF), and MFR were quantified by a one-tissue compartment flow model using time-activity curves derived from DySPECT images. Perfusion images were processed for GSPECT scan and interpreted to obtain summed stress score (SSS) and summed difference score (SDS). Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analyses were conducted to evaluate the diagnostic performance of flow and perfusion. Using the criteria of ≥50 % stenosis as positive CAD, areas under the ROC curve (AUCs) of flow assessment were overall significantly greater than those of perfusion. For patient-based analysis, AUCs for MFR, SMBF, SSS, and SDS were 0.91 ± 0.07, 0.86 ± 0.09, 0.64 ± 0.12, and 0.59 ± 0.13. For vessel-based analysis, AUCs for MFR, SMBF, SSS, and SDS were 0.81 ± 0.05, 0.76 ± 0.06, 0.62 ± 0.07, and 0.56 ± 0.08, respectively. The preliminary data suggest that MBF quantitation with a conventional SPECT/CT system and the flow quantitation method is a clinically effective approach to enhance CAD detection. (orig.)

  8. Gate valve performance prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, D.H.; Damerell, P.S.; Wang, J.K.; Kalsi, M.S.; Wolfe, K.J.

    1994-01-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute is carrying out a program to improve the performance prediction methods for motor-operated valves. As part of this program, an analytical method to predict the stem thrust required to stroke a gate valve has been developed and has been assessed against data from gate valve tests. The method accounts for the loads applied to the disc by fluid flow and for the detailed mechanical interaction of the stem, disc, guides, and seats. To support development of the method, two separate-effects test programs were carried out. One test program determined friction coefficients for contacts between gate valve parts by using material specimens in controlled environments. The other test program investigated the interaction of the stem, disc, guides, and seat using a special fixture with full-sized gate valve parts. The method has been assessed against flow-loop and in-plant test data. These tests include valve sizes from 3 to 18 in. and cover a considerable range of flow, temperature, and differential pressure. Stem thrust predictions for the method bound measured results. In some cases, the bounding predictions are substantially higher than the stem loads required for valve operation, as a result of the bounding nature of the friction coefficients in the method

  9. Stanford, Duke, Rice,... and Gates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    This article presents an open letter to Bill Gates. In his letter, the author suggests that Bill Gates should build a brand-new university, a great 21st-century institution of higher learning. This university will be unlike anything the world has ever seen. He asks Bill Gates not to stop helping existing colleges create the higher-education system…

  10. Double optical gating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbertson, Steve

    The observation and control of dynamics in atomic and molecular targets requires the use of laser pulses with duration less than the characteristic timescale of the process which is to be manipulated. For electron dynamics, this time scale is on the order of attoseconds where 1 attosecond = 10 -18 seconds. In order to generate pulses on this time scale, different gating methods have been proposed. The idea is to extract or "gate" a single pulse from an attosecond pulse train and switch off all the other pulses. While previous methods have had some success, they are very difficult to implement and so far very few labs have access to these unique light sources. The purpose of this work is to introduce a new method, called double optical gating (DOG), and to demonstrate its effectiveness at generating high contrast single isolated attosecond pulses from multi-cycle lasers. First, the method is described in detail and is investigated in the spectral domain. The resulting attosecond pulses produced are then temporally characterized through attosecond streaking. A second method of gating, called generalized double optical gating (GDOG), is also introduced. This method allows attosecond pulse generation directly from a carrier-envelope phase un-stabilized laser system for the first time. Next the methods of DOG and GDOG are implemented in attosecond applications like high flux pulses and extreme broadband spectrum generation. Finally, the attosecond pulses themselves are used in experiments. First, an attosecond/femtosecond cross correlation is used for characterization of spatial and temporal properties of femtosecond pulses. Then, an attosecond pump, femtosecond probe experiment is conducted to observe and control electron dynamics in helium for the first time.

  11. Evaluation of attenuation and scatter correction requirements in small animal PET and SPECT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konik, Arda Bekir

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) are two nuclear emission-imaging modalities that rely on the detection of high-energy photons emitted from radiotracers administered to the subject. The majority of these photons are attenuated (absorbed or scattered) in the body, resulting in count losses or deviations from true detection, which in turn degrades the accuracy of images. In clinical emission tomography, sophisticated correction methods are often required employing additional x-ray CT or radionuclide transmission scans. Having proven their potential in both clinical and research areas, both PET and SPECT are being adapted for small animal imaging. However, despite the growing interest in small animal emission tomography, little scientific information exists about the accuracy of these correction methods on smaller size objects, and what level of correction is required. The purpose of this work is to determine the role of attenuation and scatter corrections as a function of object size through simulations. The simulations were performed using Interactive Data Language (IDL) and a Monte Carlo based package, Geant4 application for emission tomography (GATE). In IDL simulations, PET and SPECT data acquisition were modeled in the presence of attenuation. A mathematical emission and attenuation phantom approximating a thorax slice and slices from real PET/CT data were scaled to 5 different sizes (i.e., human, dog, rabbit, rat and mouse). The simulated emission data collected from these objects were reconstructed. The reconstructed images, with and without attenuation correction, were compared to the ideal (i.e., non-attenuated) reconstruction. Next, using GATE, scatter fraction values (the ratio of the scatter counts to the total counts) of PET and SPECT scanners were measured for various sizes of NEMA (cylindrical phantoms representing small animals and human), MOBY (realistic mouse/rat model) and XCAT (realistic human model

  12. Assessment of left ventricular function by gated cardiac blood-pool emission computed tomography using a rotating gamma camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narita, Michihiro; Kurihara, Tadashi; Murano, Kenichi; Usami, Masahisa; Honda, Minoru

    1991-01-01

    To elucidate the usefulness of gated cardiac blood-pool single photon emission CT (SPECT) with Tc-99m for the evaluation of left ventricular (LV) global and regional functions, 18 patients with coronary artery disease were studied. Thirty-two gated projection images were obtained over 360-degree at 16 frames per cardiac cycle. As LV volume was calculated by integrating the numbers of voxels which constituted LV and multiplying by the volume of a single voxel (0.1143 ml), we performed phantom studies to determine the appropriate cut-off level to detect LV outline. These cut-off levels were affected by the background activity and organ volume itself. So we constructed Volume-Cut-Level-Curve at each background activity. In clinical studies, short axis images which constituted LV were selected and provisional LV volumes were calculated at the cut-off levels of 45, 50 and 55%. These volumes were plotted on the Volume-Cut-Level-Curve and the true cut-off levels were obtained to calculate LV end-diastolic or end-systolic volume (EDV, ESV). The cut-off levels were different at every patient and ED or ES. EDV, ESV and LV ejection fraction obtained by SPECT were correlatd well with those obtained by contrast ventriculography (LVG) (r=0.89, 0.94, 0.94 each, p<0.01). For the LV wall motion analysis, LVGs obtained at two projections were compared with SPECT or gated cardiac blood-pool planar imaging (Planar) in 5 segments. In addition to visual comparison, wall motion scores (WMS) based on the degree of wall motion abnormality were calculated in each segment. Correlation of WMS between LVG and SPECT (r=0.84) was significantly (p<0.01) superior to that between LVG and Planar (r=0.62). Especially in SPECT, wall motion analyses at septal and infero-posterior segments were superior to those in Planar. Although gated SPECT requires relatively long time to perform, it is a useful method to detect LV global and regional functions. (author)

  13. Functional neuroimaging in epilepsy: FDG-PET and SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Kun; Lee, Dong Soo

    2003-01-01

    Finding epileptogenic zone is the most important step for the successful epilepsy surgery. F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) can be used in the localization of epileptogenic foci. In medial temporal lobe epilepsy, the diagnostic sensitivity of FDG-PET and ictal SPECT is excellent. However, detection of hippocampal sclerosis by MRI is so certain that use of FDG-PET and ictal SPECT in medial temporal lobe epilepsy is limited for some occasions. In neocortical epilepsy, the sensitivities of FDG-PET or ictal SPECT are fair. However, FDG-PET and ictal SPECT can have a crucial role in the localization of epileptogenic foci for non-lesional neocortical epilepsy. Interpretation of FDG-PET has been recently advanced by voxel-based analysis and automatic volume of interest analysis based on a population template. Both analytical methods can aid the objective diagnosis of epileptogenic foci. lctal SPECT was analyzed using subtraction methods and voxel-based analysis. Rapidity of injection of tracers, ictal EEG findings during injection of tracer, and repeated ictal SPECT were important technical issues of ictal SPECT. SPECT can also be used in the evaluation of validity of Wada test

  14. Functional neuroimaging in epilepsy: FDG-PET and SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Kun; Lee, Dong Soo [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-02-01

    Finding epileptogenic zone is the most important step for the successful epilepsy surgery. F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) can be used in the localization of epileptogenic foci. In medial temporal lobe epilepsy, the diagnostic sensitivity of FDG-PET and ictal SPECT is excellent. However, detection of hippocampal sclerosis by MRI is so certain that use of FDG-PET and ictal SPECT in medial temporal lobe epilepsy is limited for some occasions. In neocortical epilepsy, the sensitivities of FDG-PET or ictal SPECT are fair. However, FDG-PET and ictal SPECT can have a crucial role in the localization of epileptogenic foci for non-lesional neocortical epilepsy. Interpretation of FDG-PET has been recently advanced by voxel-based analysis and automatic volume of interest analysis based on a population template. Both analytical methods can aid the objective diagnosis of epileptogenic foci. lctal SPECT was analyzed using subtraction methods and voxel-based analysis. Rapidity of injection of tracers, ictal EEG findings during injection of tracer, and repeated ictal SPECT were important technical issues of ictal SPECT. SPECT can also be used in the evaluation of validity of Wada test.

  15. The clinical use of brain SPECT imaging in neuropsychiatry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amen, Daniel G; Wu, Joseph C; Carmichael, Blake

    2003-01-01

    This article reviews the literature on brain SPECT imaging in brain trauma, dementia, and temporal lobe epilepsy. Brain SPECT allows clinicians the ability to view cerebral areas of healthy, low, and excessive perfusion. This information can be correlated with what is known about the function or dysfunction of each area. SPECT has a number of advantages over other imaging techniques, including wider availability, lower cost, and high quality resolution with multi-headed cameras. There are a number of issues that compromise the effective use of SPECT, including low quality of some imaging cameras, and variability of image rendering and readings (Au)

  16. Influence of void on image quality of industrial SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J G; Jung, S H; Kim, J B; Moon, J; Kim, C H

    2013-01-01

    Industrial single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a promising technique to determine the dynamic behavior of industrial process media and has been developed in the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. The present study evaluated the influence of a void, which is presence in multiphase reactors of industrial process, on the image quality of an industrial SPECT. The results are very encouraging; that is, the performance of the industrial SPECT system is little influenced by the presence of a void, which means that industrial SPECT is an appropriate tool to estimate the dynamic characteristics of the process media in a water-air phase bubble column with a static gas sparger

  17. The effect of Compton scattering on quantitative SPECT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, J.W.; Jaszczak, R.J.; Starmer, C.F.

    1982-01-01

    A Monte Carlo code has been developed to simulate the response of a SPECT system. The accuracy of the code has been verified and has been used in this research to study and illustrate the effects of Compton scatter on quantitative SPECT measurements. The effects of Compton scattered radiation on gamma camera response have been discussed by several authors, and will be extended to rotating gamma camera SPECT systems. The unique feature of this research includes the pictorial illustration of the Compton scattered and the unscattered components of the photopeak data on SPECT imaging by simulating phantom studies with and without Compton scatter

  18. I-123 Iofetamine SPECT scan in children with neurological disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flamini, J.R.; Konkol, R.J.; Wells, R.G.; Sty, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    I-123 Iofetamine (IMP) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging of the brain in 42 patients (ages 14 days to 23 years) was compared with other localizing studies in children with neurological diseases. All had an EEG and at least one imaging study of the brain (computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), or both). Seventy-eight percent of the patients had an EEG within 24-72 hours of the IMP-SPECT scan. Thirty-five (83%) had a history of seizures, and the remainder had other neurological conditions without a history of seizures. In most cases, a normal EEG reading with normal CT or MRI result predicted a normal SPECT study. When the EEG was abnormal the majority of the IMP-SPECT scans were abnormal and localized the abnormality to the same region. A comparison with CT and MRI showed that structural abnormalities involving the cortex were usually well demonstrated with IMP-SPECT imaging. Structural lesions confined to the white matter were generally not detectable with IMP-SPECT. In a few cases, SPECT scans revealed abnormalities in deep brain areas not identified by EEG. IMP-SPECT imaging is a valuable technique for the detection and localization of abnormal cerebral metabolic activity in children with seizure disorders. A correlation with CT or MRI is essential for proper interpretation of abnormalities detected with IMP SPECT imaging

  19. Measurement of lung water with SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, R.Y.L.; Ficken, V.J.; Ekeh, S.U.; Ryals, C.J.; Allen, E.W.; Basmadjian, G.

    1990-01-01

    This paper investigates the use of iodoantipyrine (IAP) labeled with radioactive iodine (I-123) and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) to measure lung water. I-123 IAP was injected intravenously to six New Zealand White rabbits under anesthesia. After 1 hour, Tc-99m macroaggregates of albumin (MAA) were injected. SPECT imaging was performed in dual-energy mode. After a blood sample was drawn, the animals were sacrificed, and the lungs were removed. Blood samples were assayed for radioactivity. The lungs were weighed, dried, and weighted again to determine water content. The product of area defined by MAA in a tomogram and IAP count rate of central pixels of that region in the corresponding tomogram was taken as the relative amount of IAP in each lung

  20. Methodology for ventilation/perfusion SPECT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bajc, Marika; Neilly, Brian; Miniati, Massimo

    2010-01-01

    radiolabeled liquid aerosols are not restricted to the presence of obstructive lung disease. Radiolabeled macroaggregated human albumin is the imaging agent of choice for perfusion scintigraphy. An optimal combination of nuclide activities and acquisition times for ventilation and perfusion, collimators......Ventilation/perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (V/Q SPECT) is the scintigraphic technique of choice for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism and many other disorders that affect lung function. Data from recent ventilation studies show that the theoretic advantages of Technegas over......, and imaging matrix yields an adequate V/Q SPECT study in approximately 20 minutes of imaging time. The recommended protocol based on the patient remaining in an unchanged position during the initial ventilation study and the perfusion study allows presentation of matching ventilation and perfusion slices...

  1. New SPECT and PET dementia tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vergote, J.; Chalon, S.; Emond, P.; Vercouillie, J.; Guilloteau, D.; Vergote, J.; Guilloteau, D.; Pappata, J.S.

    2009-01-01

    Single photon emission tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) are techniques to study in vivo neurotransmitter systems, neuro inflammation and amyloid deposits in normal human brain and in dementia. These methods used to explore the integrity of dopaminergic, cholinergic and serotonergic systems in Alzheimer's disease and in other dementias allowed to understand how the neurotransmission was modified in these disorders. Progress in the understanding of pathophysiological and clinical signs of dementia requires an evolution of the radioligands used to carry out an increasingly early and differential diagnosis in addition to monitoring the progression of disease and the effects of therapies. New emerging radiotracers for neuro inflammation or amyloid deposits are essential. In this article, new SPECT and PET tracers are presented. (authors)

  2. SPECT/CT in pediatric patient management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadel, Helen R.

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid SPECT/CT imaging is becoming the standard of care in pediatric imaging. Indications are mainly for oncologic imaging including mIBG scintigraphy for neuroblastoma and I-123 post surgical imaging of children with thyroid carcinoma, bone scintigraphy for back pain, children referred from sports medicine and neurodevelopmentally delayed children presenting with pain symptoms. The studies provide improved diagnostic accuracy, and oncologic imaging that includes optimized CT as part of the SPECT/CT study may decrease the number of studies and sedation procedures an individual child may need. The studies, however, must be tailored on an individual basis as the addition of the CT study can increase exposure to the child and should only be performed after appropriate justification and with adherence to optimized low dose pediatric protocols. (orig.)

  3. Silicon Detectors for PET and SPECT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, Eric R.

    Silicon detectors use state-of-the-art electronics to take advantage of the semiconductor properties of silicon to produce very high resolution radiation detectors. These detectors have been a fundamental part of high energy, nuclear, and astroparticle physics experiments for decades, and they hold great potential for significant gains in both PET and SPECT applications. Two separate prototype nuclear medicine imaging systems have been developed to explore this potential. Both devices take advantage of the unique properties of high resolution pixelated silicon detectors, designed and developed as part of the CIMA collaboration and built at The Ohio State University. The first prototype is a Compton SPECT imaging system. Compton SPECT, also referred to as electronic collimation, is a fundamentally different approach to single photon imaging from standard gamma cameras. It removes the inherent coupling of spatial resolution and sensitivity in mechanically collimated systems and provides improved performance at higher energies. As a result, Compton SPECT creates opportunities for the development of new radiopharmaceuticals based on higher energy isotopes as well as opportunities to expand the use of current isotopes such as 131I due to the increased resolution and sensitivity. The Compton SPECT prototype consists of a single high resolution silicon detector, configured in a 2D geometry, in coincidence with a standard NaI scintillator detector. Images of point sources have been taken for 99mTc (140 keV), 131I (364keV), and 22Na (511 keV), demonstrating the performance of high resolution silicon detectors in a Compton SPECT system. Filtered back projection image resolutions of 10 mm, 7.5 mm, and 6.7 mm were achieved for the three different sources respectively. The results compare well with typical SPECT resolutions of 5-15 mm and validate the claims of improved performance in Compton SPECT imaging devices at higher source energies. They also support the potential of

  4. Hybrid SPECT/CT imaging in neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciarmiello, Andrea; Giovannini, Elisabetta; Meniconi, Martina; Cuccurullo, Vincenzo; Gaeta, Maria Chiara

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the SPECT/CT hybrid modality has led to a rapid development of imaging techniques in nuclear medicine, opening new perspectives for imaging staff and patients as well. However, while, the clinical role of positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) is well consolidated, the diffusion and the consequent value of single-photon emission tomography-computed tomography (SPECT-CT) has yet to be weighed, Hence, there is a need for a careful analysis, comparing the "potential" benefits of the hybrid modality with the "established" ones of the standalone machine. The aim of this article is to analyze the impact of this hybrid tool on the diagnosis of diseases of the central nervous system, comparing strengths and weaknesses of both modalities through the use of SWOT analysis.

  5. SPECT/CT in pediatric patient management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadel, Helen R. [British Columbia Children' s Hospital, University of British Columbia, Pediatric Radiologist and Nuclear Medicine Physician, Division of Nuclear Medicine Department of Radiology, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    2014-05-15

    Hybrid SPECT/CT imaging is becoming the standard of care in pediatric imaging. Indications are mainly for oncologic imaging including mIBG scintigraphy for neuroblastoma and I-123 post surgical imaging of children with thyroid carcinoma, bone scintigraphy for back pain, children referred from sports medicine and neurodevelopmentally delayed children presenting with pain symptoms. The studies provide improved diagnostic accuracy, and oncologic imaging that includes optimized CT as part of the SPECT/CT study may decrease the number of studies and sedation procedures an individual child may need. The studies, however, must be tailored on an individual basis as the addition of the CT study can increase exposure to the child and should only be performed after appropriate justification and with adherence to optimized low dose pediatric protocols. (orig.)

  6. Myocardial perfusion SPECT 2015 in Germany. Results of the 7th survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Oliver; Burchert, Wolfgang; Schäfer, Wolfgang; Hacker, Marcus

    2017-02-14

    The working group Cardiovascular Nuclear Medicine of the German Society of Nuclear Medicine presents the results of the 7th survey of myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) of the reporting year 2015. 268 questionnaires (173 practices [PR], 67 hospitals [HO], 28 university hospitals [UH]) were evaluated. Results of the last survey from 2012 are set in squared brackets. MPS of 121 939 [105 941] patients were reported. 98 % [95 %] of all MPS were performed with Tc-99m radiopharmaceuticals and 2 % [5 %] with Tl-201. 78 % [79 %] of all patients were studied in PR, 14 % [15 %] in HO, and 8 % [6 %] in UH. A pharmacological stress test was performed in 43 % [39 %] (22 % [24 %] adenosine, 20 % [9 %] regadenoson, 1 % [6 %] dipyridamole or dobutamine). Attenuation correction was applied in 25 % [2009: 10 %] of MPS. Gated SPECT was performed in 78 % [70 %] of all rest MPS, in 80 % [73 %] of all stress and in 76 % [67 %] of all stress and rest MPS. 53 % [33 %] of all nuclear medicine departments performed MPS scoring by default, whereas 24 % [41 %] did not apply any quantification. 31 % [26 %] of all departments noticed an increase in their counted MPS and 29 % [29 %] no changes. Data from 89 departments which participated in all surveys showed an increase in MPS count of 11.1 % (PR: 12.2 %, HO: 4.8 %, UH: 18.4 %). 70 % [60 %] of the MPS were requested by ambulatory care cardiologists. The 2015 MPS survey reveals a high-grade adherence of routine MPS practice to current guidelines. The positive trend in MPS performance and number of MPS already observed in 2012 continues. Educational training remains necessary in the field of SPECT scoring.

  7. Parallel Implementation of the Multi-Dimensional Spectral Code SPECT3D on large 3D grids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovkin, Igor E.; Macfarlane, Joseph J.; Woodruff, Pamela R.; Pereyra, Nicolas A.

    2006-10-01

    The multi-dimensional collisional-radiative, spectral analysis code SPECT3D can be used to study radiation from complex plasmas. SPECT3D can generate instantaneous and time-gated images and spectra, space-resolved and streaked spectra, which makes it a valuable tool for post-processing hydrodynamics calculations and direct comparison between simulations and experimental data. On large three dimensional grids, transporting radiation along lines of sight (LOS) requires substantial memory and CPU resources. Currently, the parallel option in SPECT3D is based on parallelization over photon frequencies and allows for a nearly linear speed-up for a variety of problems. In addition, we are introducing a new parallel mechanism that will greatly reduce memory requirements. In the new implementation, spatial domain decomposition will be utilized allowing transport along a LOS to be performed only on the mesh cells the LOS crosses. The ability to operate on a fraction of the grid is crucial for post-processing the results of large-scale three-dimensional hydrodynamics simulations. We will present a parallel implementation of the code and provide a scalability study performed on a Linux cluster.

  8. Adaptive Angular Sampling for SPECT Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Nan; Meng, Ling-Jian

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical approach for performing adaptive angular sampling in single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging. It allows for a rapid determination of the optimum sampling strategy that minimizes image variance in regions-of-interest (ROIs). The proposed method consists of three key components: (a) a set of close-form equations for evaluating image variance and resolution attainable with a given sampling strategy, (b) a gradient-based algor...

  9. Brain perfusion SPECT in dementia syndromes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Libus, P.; Stupalova, J.; Kuzelka, I.; Konrad, J.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: Brain perfusion SPECT is used in differential diagnostics of dementia syndromes. First of all the aim is to distinguish vascular dementia from degenerative dementia and to differentiate dementia from delirium, psychiatric syndromes, depression and secondary dementia, which is important in relation to therapy. The purpose of our study was to detect significance of BP SPECT and include it into the diagnostic process in dementia syndromes. Materials and methods: 51 women and 63 men aged 55 - 88 were evaluated in the study. The patients correspond to the general criteria of dementia diagnosis. They were sent to the examination by neurological, internal and psychiatric departments and out-patient departments. All patients were examined by 99mTc ECD SPECT using a double head camera PRISM 200 VP with LEHR collimator. The scintigraphic data were evaluated by the visual and semiquantitative analysis. Results: It was established that most patients in our group had vascular dementia, while Alzheimer's disease was second. In other groups we found out dementia at strategic infarct location, e.g. in gyrus angularis in the dominant hemisphere, frontal temporal lobe dementia and alcoholic dementia. Twenty-four patients had a normal diagnosis. Fifteen of them had a somatic reason of the delirious state and were re-classified into pseudodementia. Nine patients were not diagnostically included and the examination will repeated in four months time. Conclusion: We have found out a good applicability of brain perfusion SPECT in dementia syndromes diagnosis in our work. The best diagnosticable and most specific were the findings in multi-infarct dementia, Alzheimer's disease and frontal temporal lobe dementia. When vascular dementia is concerned we can even distinguish dementia at strategic infarction location, e.g. in thalamus, basal frontal telencefalon, in gyrus angularis of the dominant hemisphere, etc

  10. Neuropharmacological studies with SPECT in neuropsychiatric disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinz, Andreas; Jones, Douglas W.; Raedler, Thomas; Coppola, Richard; Knable, Michael B.; Weinberger, Daniel R. E-mail: weinberd@intra.nimh.nih.gov

    2000-10-01

    The last decade saw a rapid development of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) from a tool to assess cerebral blood flow to the study of specific neurotransmitter systems. Because of the relatively long half-life of SPECT radioisotopes, it is practical to measure the availability of neuroreceptors and transporters in conditions approaching equilibrium. The cost-efficiency of SPECT allowed studies in relatively large samples of patients with various neuropsychiatric disorders. We have applied this approach in studies of dopaminergic, serotonergic, and muscarinergic neurotransmission in patients with dementia, extrapyramidal disorders, schizophrenia, and alcoholism. No simple associations were observed between a single defect in one neurotransmitter system and a certain neuropsychiatric disease. Instead, complex dysfunction of several neurotransmitter systems in multiple, partially connected brain circuits have been implicated. Treatment effects also have been characterized. Microdialysis and neurotransmitter depletion studies showed that most radioligands and endogenous neurotransmitters compete for binding at receptors and transporters. Future research directions include the assessment of endogenous neurotransmitter concentrations measured by depletion studies and of genetic effects on neuroreceptor and transporter expression.

  11. Single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganatra, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    Tomography in nuclear medicine did not originate after the introduction of X-ray computerized tomography (CT). Even in the days of rectilinear scanner, tomography was attempted with multiple detector heads rotating around the patient, but the counts at each plane were never very high to obtain a satisfactory image. A high resolution focusing collimator can look at different depths but taking several slices in one projection was a time consuming process. Rectilinear scanners lose lot of counts in the collimator to look at one point, at on time, in one plane. It is true that attempts to do tomography with gamma camera really got a boost after the success of CT. By that time, algorithms for doing reconstruction of images also were highly refined and for advanced. Clinical application of SPECT has become widespread now, because of the development of suitable radiopharmaceuticals and improvement in instrumentation. The SPECT provides a direct measure of regional organ function and is performed with nuclides such as 123 I and 99 Tc m that emit a mono-image photon during their decay. SPECT is far less expensive than positron emission tomography

  12. Individual patient dosimetry using quantitative SPECT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, J.; Oliva, J.; Baum, R.; Fisher, S.

    2002-01-01

    An approach is described to provide individual patient dosimetry for routine clinical use. Accurate quantitative SPECT imaging was achieved using appropriate methods. The volume of interest (VOI) was defined semi-automatically using a fixed threshold value obtained from phantom studies. The calibration factor to convert the voxel counts from SPECT images into activity values was determine from calibrated point source using the same threshold value as in phantom studies. From selected radionuclide the dose within and outside a sphere of voxel dimension at different distances was computed through dose point-kernels to obtain a discrete absorbed dose kernel representation around the volume source with uniform activity distribution. The spatial activity distribution from SPECT imaging was convolved with this kernel representation using the discrete Fourier transform method to yield three-dimensional absorbed dose rate distribution. The accuracy of dose rates calculation was validated by software phantoms. The absorbed dose was determined by integration of the dose rate distribution for each volume of interest (VOI). Parameters for treatment optimization such as dose rate volume histograms and dose rate statistic are provided. A patient example was used to illustrate our dosimetric calculations

  13. Neuropharmacological studies with SPECT in neuropsychiatric disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinz, Andreas; Jones, Douglas W.; Raedler, Thomas; Coppola, Richard; Knable, Michael B.; Weinberger, Daniel R.

    2000-01-01

    The last decade saw a rapid development of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) from a tool to assess cerebral blood flow to the study of specific neurotransmitter systems. Because of the relatively long half-life of SPECT radioisotopes, it is practical to measure the availability of neuroreceptors and transporters in conditions approaching equilibrium. The cost-efficiency of SPECT allowed studies in relatively large samples of patients with various neuropsychiatric disorders. We have applied this approach in studies of dopaminergic, serotonergic, and muscarinergic neurotransmission in patients with dementia, extrapyramidal disorders, schizophrenia, and alcoholism. No simple associations were observed between a single defect in one neurotransmitter system and a certain neuropsychiatric disease. Instead, complex dysfunction of several neurotransmitter systems in multiple, partially connected brain circuits have been implicated. Treatment effects also have been characterized. Microdialysis and neurotransmitter depletion studies showed that most radioligands and endogenous neurotransmitters compete for binding at receptors and transporters. Future research directions include the assessment of endogenous neurotransmitter concentrations measured by depletion studies and of genetic effects on neuroreceptor and transporter expression

  14. Single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganatra, R D

    1993-12-31

    Tomography in nuclear medicine did not originate after the introduction of X-ray computerized tomography (CT). Even in the days of rectilinear scanner, tomography was attempted with multiple detector heads rotating around the patient, but the counts at each plane were never very high to obtain a satisfactory image. A high resolution focusing collimator can look at different depths but taking several slices in one projection was a time consuming process. Rectilinear scanners lose lot of counts in the collimator to look at one point, at on time, in one plane. It is true that attempts to do tomography with gamma camera really got a boost after the success of CT. By that time, algorithms for doing reconstruction of images also were highly refined and for advanced. Clinical application of SPECT has become widespread now, because of the development of suitable radiopharmaceuticals and improvement in instrumentation. The SPECT provides a direct measure of regional organ function and is performed with nuclides such as {sup 123}I and {sup 99}Tc{sup m} that emit a mono-image photon during their decay. SPECT is far less expensive than positron emission tomography

  15. Blood lipid levels and SPECT of myocardium perfusion to type 2 asymptomatic diabetic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pena Quian, Yamile; Fernandez-Britto Rodriguez, Jose; Coca Perez, Marco A; Batista Cuellar, Juan F; Rochela Vazquez, Luis Manuel

    2006-01-01

    SPECT, coronary angiography and laboratories test were performed on 31 asymptomatic type 2 diabetes patients, in order to determine the relationship among the lipid levels in blood and the results of the SPECT. Patients were classified in two groups (positive SPECT or negative SPECT). Simple descriptive statistics were calculated for all variables in both groups. Positive SPECT was detected in 35,5% of the patients and negative SPECT in 64,5%.The coronary angiography and SPECT showed good correlation. Low values of HDLc showed significant association with the positive results of the SPECT. The logistical regression showed an increment of the capacity to predict a positive SPECT if the values of HDLc are used. Conclusion: The present investigation demonstrated a significant association among the low levels of HDLc in blood and the positive results of the SPECT. The low values of HDLc could predict the possibility of a positive SPECT in asymptomatic diabetic type 2 patients (au)

  16. SPECT and PET imaging in epilepsia; SPECT und PET in der Diagnostik von Epilepsien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landvogt, C. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2007-09-15

    In preoperative localisation of epileptogenic foci, nuclear medicine diagnostics plays a crucial role. FDG-PET is used as first line diagnostics. In case of inconsistent MRI, EEG and FDG-PET findings, {sup 11}C-Flumazenil-PET or ictal and interictal perfusion-SPECT should be performed. Other than FDG, Flumazenil can help to identify the extend of the region, which should be resected. To enhance sensitivity and specificity, further data analysis using voxelbased statistical analyses or SISCOM (substraction ictal SPECT coregistered MRI) should be performed.

  17. Dopamine-transporter SPECT and Dopamine-D2-receptor SPECT in basal ganglia diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesse, S.; Barthel, H.; Seese, A.; Sabri, O.

    2007-01-01

    The basal ganglia comprise a group of subcortical nuclei, which are essential for motor control. Dysfunction of these areas, especially in dopaminergic transmission, results in disordered movement and neurological diseases such as Parkinson's disease, Wilson's disease, or Huntington disease. Positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) have enhanced the understanding of the underlying pathophysiology, but they much more contribute to the early differential diagnosis of patients suffering from Parkinsonian syndrome in routine care. The present article provides dopamine transporter and D 2 receptor SPECT findings in selected movement disorders. (orig.)

  18. SPECT data acquisition and image reconstruction in a stationary small animal SPECT/MRI system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jingyan; Chen, Si; Yu, Jianhua; Meier, Dirk; Wagenaar, Douglas J.; Patt, Bradley E.; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.

    2010-04-01

    The goal of the study was to investigate data acquisition strategies and image reconstruction methods for a stationary SPECT insert that can operate inside an MRI scanner with a 12 cm bore diameter for simultaneous SPECT/MRI imaging of small animals. The SPECT insert consists of 3 octagonal rings of 8 MR-compatible CZT detectors per ring surrounding a multi-pinhole (MPH) collimator sleeve. Each pinhole is constructed to project the field-of-view (FOV) to one CZT detector. All 24 pinholes are focused to a cylindrical FOV of 25 mm in diameter and 34 mm in length. The data acquisition strategies we evaluated were optional collimator rotations to improve tomographic sampling; and the image reconstruction methods were iterative ML-EM with and without compensation for the geometric response function (GRF) of the MPH collimator. For this purpose, we developed an analytic simulator that calculates the system matrix with the GRF models of the MPH collimator. The simulator was used to generate projection data of a digital rod phantom with pinhole aperture sizes of 1 mm and 2 mm and with different collimator rotation patterns. Iterative ML-EM reconstruction with and without GRF compensation were used to reconstruct the projection data from the central ring of 8 detectors only, and from all 24 detectors. Our results indicated that without GRF compensation and at the default design of 24 projection views, the reconstructed images had significant artifacts. Accurate GRF compensation substantially improved the reconstructed image resolution and reduced image artifacts. With accurate GRF compensation, useful reconstructed images can be obtained using 24 projection views only. This last finding potentially enables dynamic SPECT (and/or MRI) studies in small animals, one of many possible application areas of the SPECT/MRI system. Further research efforts are warranted including experimentally measuring the system matrix for improved geometrical accuracy, incorporating the co

  19. Clinical application of heart rate-synchronized myocardial SPECT with {sup 99m}Tc-labeled imaging agents for myocardial blood flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Tsunehiko; Uehara, Toshiisa; Fukuchi, Kazuki; Tsujimura, Eiichiro; Hasegawa, Shinji; Ito, Yasushi; Hashimoto, Katsuji; Matsuda, Shinichi; Yutani, Kenji [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Biomedical Research Center

    1996-11-01

    Application of gated SPECT to assess multiple heart functions simultaneously in authors` facility was reported. The myocardial SPECT at rest was performed 1 hr after intravenous administration of 740 MBq of {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi with Toshiba 3-detector type gamma camera GCA9300/HG. R wave monitored by ECG was used as a trigger to record images of 360deg direction (90 sec/6deg direction, 20 directions x 3). Data were processed by Toshiba GMS-5500A or Hitachi-Medico RW3000. Percent CI (count increase at a myocardial region) was calculated by =(ES-ED)=/ED x 100, where ES and ED were computed by circumferential profile analysis of reconstruction images at the end-systole and end-diastole stages, respectively. Left ventricular ejection fraction was calculated from %AC (area change between areas of left ventricle at end-systolic and -diasystolic stages). Ventricular wall-motion was assessed by bullet display of the gated SPECT images. The present procedure is expected to be widely used as a routine test of the myocardial functions and is beneficial from a viewpoint of cost/performance. (K.H.)

  20. Property of electrocardiogram gated single photon emission tomography by 99mTc-methoxy isobutyl isonitrile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imai, Kamon; Nishio, Yukari; Araki, Yasushi; Saito, Satoshi; Ozawa, Yukio; Yasugi, Tadao; Hagiwara, Kazuo; Kamata, Rikisaburo

    1992-01-01

    99m Tc-methoxy isobutyl isonitrile (MIBI) is a new developed myocardial perfusion imaging agent. Because this compound has higher photon energy than thallium (Tl), electrocardiogram gated single photon emission tomography (SPECT): end-diastolic (ED) and end-systolic (ES) short axis (SA) images could be taken. To investigate property of gated MIBI SPECT, MIBI myocardial scintigraphy, Tl scintigraphy (TMS) and analysis of left ventricular wall motion were performed in 6 patients with myocardial infarction. Left ventricule was divided into 8 segments. Perfusion defect (PD) was scored: '0' (normal), '1' (hypo-perfusion), '2' (defect). Wall motion abnormality (WMA) was also scored: '0' (normo-kinesis), '1' (hypo-kinesis), '2' (a-, dys-kinesis). Severity and extent of PD and WMA were calculated. Severity of WMA was 3.0±2.0 (M±SD), severity of PD was 3.3±1.7 in TMS, 3.7±1.3 in no-gated MIBI, 5.0±0.6 in ES-MIBI, 7.3±2.0 in ED-MIBI. Extent of WMA was 2.3±1.0. Extent of PD was 2.5±1.3 in TMS, 3.0±1.6 in no-gated MIBI, 3.5±0.8 in ES-MIBI, 4.8±1.0 in ED-MIBI. Compared with wall motion abnormality, severity and extent of PD in ED-MIBI was larger. From our data, it is concluded that perfusion defect in ED-MIBI was overestimated significantly. When we evaluate gated MIBI image, we must consider this property. (author)

  1. Implementation and Evaluation of Pinhole SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacArtain Anne Marie

    2002-08-01

    The aim of this work was to implement Pinhole SPECT into a working Nuclear Medicine department. It has been reported that pinhole SPECT has been successfully performed to visualise pathology in ankle bones using gamma camera and the images were constructed using a standard filtered back-projection algorithm (Bahk YW, 1998). The objective of this study was to produce and evaluate this technique with the equipment available in the nuclear medicine department. The system performance was assessed using both the low-energy high resolution and the pinhole collimators. Phantoms constructed using capillary tubes, filled with technetium 99m (pertechnetate) were imaged in different arrays to identify possible limitations in the reconstruction software. A thyroid phantom with hot and cold inserts was also imaged. Data was acquired in ''tep-and-shoot'' mode as the camera was rotated 180 degrees or 360 degrees around the phantom. Images were reconstructed using standard parallel back-projection algorithm and a weighted backprojection algorithm (Nowak). An attempt was made to process images of the phantom in Matlab using the Iradon function modified by application of a cone-beam type algorithm (Feldkamp L, 1984). Visual comparison of static images between the pinhole and the LEHR collimators showed the expected improved spatial resolution of the pinhole images. Pinhole SPECT images should be reconstructed using the appropriate cone beam algorithm. However, it was established that reconstructing pinhole SPECT images using a standard parallel backprojection algorithm yielded results which were deemed to be clinically useful. The Nowak algorithm results were a distinct improvement on those achieved with the parallel backprojection algorithm. Likewise the results from the cone beam algorithm were better than the former but not as good as those obtained from the Nowak algorithm. This was due to the fact that the cone beam algorithm did not include a weighting factor. Implementation

  2. Noise Gating Solar Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeForest, Craig; Seaton, Daniel B.; Darnell, John A.

    2017-08-01

    I present and demonstrate a new, general purpose post-processing technique, "3D noise gating", that can reduce image noise by an order of magnitude or more without effective loss of spatial or temporal resolution in typical solar applications.Nearly all scientific images are, ultimately, limited by noise. Noise can be direct Poisson "shot noise" from photon counting effects, or introduced by other means such as detector read noise. Noise is typically represented as a random variable (perhaps with location- or image-dependent characteristics) that is sampled once per pixel or once per resolution element of an image sequence. Noise limits many aspects of image analysis, including photometry, spatiotemporal resolution, feature identification, morphology extraction, and background modeling and separation.Identifying and separating noise from image signal is difficult. The common practice of blurring in space and/or time works because most image "signal" is concentrated in the low Fourier components of an image, while noise is evenly distributed. Blurring in space and/or time attenuates the high spatial and temporal frequencies, reducing noise at the expense of also attenuating image detail. Noise-gating exploits the same property -- "coherence" -- that we use to identify features in images, to separate image features from noise.Processing image sequences through 3-D noise gating results in spectacular (more than 10x) improvements in signal-to-noise ratio, while not blurring bright, resolved features in either space or time. This improves most types of image analysis, including feature identification, time sequence extraction, absolute and relative photometry (including differential emission measure analysis), feature tracking, computer vision, correlation tracking, background modeling, cross-scale analysis, visual display/presentation, and image compression.I will introduce noise gating, describe the method, and show examples from several instruments (including SDO

  3. A quantum Fredkin gate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Raj B.; Ho, Joseph; Ferreyrol, Franck; Ralph, Timothy C.; Pryde, Geoff J.

    2016-01-01

    Minimizing the resources required to build logic gates into useful processing circuits is key to realizing quantum computers. Although the salient features of a quantum computer have been shown in proof-of-principle experiments, difficulties in scaling quantum systems have made more complex operations intractable. This is exemplified in the classical Fredkin (controlled-SWAP) gate for which, despite theoretical proposals, no quantum analog has been realized. By adding control to the SWAP unitary, we use photonic qubit logic to demonstrate the first quantum Fredkin gate, which promises many applications in quantum information and measurement. We implement example algorithms and generate the highest-fidelity three-photon Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states to date. The technique we use allows one to add a control operation to a black-box unitary, something that is impossible in the standard circuit model. Our experiment represents the first use of this technique to control a two-qubit operation and paves the way for larger controlled circuits to be realized efficiently. PMID:27051868

  4. A quantum Fredkin gate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Raj B; Ho, Joseph; Ferreyrol, Franck; Ralph, Timothy C; Pryde, Geoff J

    2016-03-01

    Minimizing the resources required to build logic gates into useful processing circuits is key to realizing quantum computers. Although the salient features of a quantum computer have been shown in proof-of-principle experiments, difficulties in scaling quantum systems have made more complex operations intractable. This is exemplified in the classical Fredkin (controlled-SWAP) gate for which, despite theoretical proposals, no quantum analog has been realized. By adding control to the SWAP unitary, we use photonic qubit logic to demonstrate the first quantum Fredkin gate, which promises many applications in quantum information and measurement. We implement example algorithms and generate the highest-fidelity three-photon Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states to date. The technique we use allows one to add a control operation to a black-box unitary, something that is impossible in the standard circuit model. Our experiment represents the first use of this technique to control a two-qubit operation and paves the way for larger controlled circuits to be realized efficiently.

  5. A small-animal imaging system capable of multipinhole circular/helical SPECT and parallel-hole SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Jianguo; Bradley, Eric L.; Majewski, Stan; Popov, Vladimir; Saha, Margaret S.; Smith, Mark F.; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Welsh, Robert E.

    2008-01-01

    We have designed and built a small-animal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging system equipped with parallel-hole and multipinhole collimators and capable of circular or helical SPECT. Copper-beryllium parallel-hole collimators suitable for imaging the ∼35 keV photons from the decay of 125 I have been built and installed to achieve useful spatial resolution over a range of object-detector distances and to reduce imaging time on our dual-detector array. To address the resolution limitations in the parallel-hole SPECT and the sensitivity and limited field of view of single-pinhole SPECT, we have incorporated multipinhole circular and helical SPECT in addition to expanding the parallel-hole SPECT capabilities. The pinhole SPECT system is based on a 110 mm diameter circular detector equipped with a pixellated NaI(Tl) scintillator array (1x1x5 mm 3 /pixel). The helical trajectory is accomplished by two stepping motors controlling the rotation of the detector-support gantry and displacement of the animal bed along the axis of rotation of the gantry. Results obtained in SPECT studies of various phantoms show an enlarged field of view, very good resolution and improved sensitivity using multipinhole circular or helical SPECT. Collimators with one, three and five, 1-mm-diameter pinholes have been implemented and compared in these tests. Our objective is to develop a system on which one may readily select a suitable mode of either parallel-hole SPECT or pinhole circular or helical SPECT for a variety of small animal imaging applications

  6. Frequencies and implications of discordant findings of interictal SPECT and itcal SPECT in patients with intractable epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D. S.; Lee, S. K.; Jeong, J. K.; Lee, M. C.; Ko, C. S.

    1997-01-01

    Interictal SPECT could be used at best as a reference image to ictal SPECT, and cause sometimes confusion if it had given unexplained discordant findings from ictal SPECT. We investigated implications of discordant findings which occurred in 26 among 268 which found their epileptogenic zones using ictal EEG and/or operative outcome. Sensitivity of interictal SPECT was only 36%. Among these 268, 69 patients had no structural lesions on MR, 14 of whom had decreased perfusion on interictal SPECT (8 trues and 6 falses (adjacent or contralateral)). Structural lesion were found in 199 on MR, 103 of whom had decreased perfusion (89 trues and 14 falses). Among 26 having discordant cases, 10 interictal SPECT were proved wrong after operation and/or invasive EEG and the other 16 were on speculation using PET and ictal EEG. Ictal hyperperfusion was observed in 14 patients in these interictal SPECT. Six ictal studies were found postictal accompanied by contralateral propagation or not. Two patients had dual pathology, and the remaining 2 unknown. Interictal SPECT was done on the 2nd day after ictal study(24), the 3rd day (18), the 4th day(16), the 5th day (23). Four among 24 interictal studies (17%) of the 2nd day and the other 4 among 57 of 3rd to 5th day revealed ictal hyperperfusion on interictal SPECT. Six interictal studies (2.7% among 221) acquired on the indifferent day showed also ictal hyperperfusion. We could suggest that the next day is not desirable for interictal SPECT after ictal study, as ictal hyperperfusion on interictal study confounded more than postictal findings of ictal SPECT in the discrete localization than reassuring ictal study

  7. Frequencies and implications of discordant findings of interictal SPECT and itcal SPECT in patients with intractable epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D S; Lee, S K; Jeong, J K; Lee, M C; Ko, C S [College of Medicine, Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    Interictal SPECT could be used at best as a reference image to ictal SPECT, and cause sometimes confusion if it had given unexplained discordant findings from ictal SPECT. We investigated implications of discordant findings which occurred in 26 among 268 which found their epileptogenic zones using ictal EEG and/or operative outcome. Sensitivity of interictal SPECT was only 36%. Among these 268, 69 patients had no structural lesions on MR, 14 of whom had decreased perfusion on interictal SPECT (8 trues and 6 falses (adjacent or contralateral)). Structural lesion were found in 199 on MR, 103 of whom had decreased perfusion (89 trues and 14 falses). Among 26 having discordant cases, 10 interictal SPECT were proved wrong after operation and/or invasive EEG and the other 16 were on speculation using PET and ictal EEG. Ictal hyperperfusion was observed in 14 patients in these interictal SPECT. Six ictal studies were found postictal accompanied by contralateral propagation or not. Two patients had dual pathology, and the remaining 2 unknown. Interictal SPECT was done on the 2nd day after ictal study(24), the 3rd day (18), the 4th day(16), the 5th day (23). Four among 24 interictal studies (17%) of the 2nd day and the other 4 among 57 of 3rd to 5th day revealed ictal hyperperfusion on interictal SPECT. Six interictal studies (2.7% among 221) acquired on the indifferent day showed also ictal hyperperfusion. We could suggest that the next day is not desirable for interictal SPECT after ictal study, as ictal hyperperfusion on interictal study confounded more than postictal findings of ictal SPECT in the discrete localization than reassuring ictal study.

  8. Pre-evaluation study in SPECT images using a phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebelo, Marina de Sa; Furuie, Sergio Shiguemi; Abe, Rubens; Moura, Lincoln

    1996-01-01

    An alternative solution for the reconstruction of SPECT images using a Poisson Noise Model is presented. The proposed algorithm was applied on a real phantom and compared to the standard clinical procedures. Results have shown that the proposed method improves the quality of the SPECT images

  9. Ictal cerebral perfusion patterns in partial epilepsy: SPECT subtraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyang Woon; Hong, Seung Bong; Tae, Woo Suk; Kim, Sang Eun; Seo, Dae Won; Jeong, Seung Cheol; Yi, Ji Young; Hong, Seung Chyul

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the various ictal perfusion patterns and find the relationships between clinical factors and different perfusion patterns. Interictal and ictal SPECT and SPECT subtraction were performed in 61 patients with partial epilepsy. Both positive images showing ictal hyperperfusion and negative images revealing ictal hypoperfusion were obtained by SPECT subtraction. The ictal perfusion patterns of subtracted SPECT were classified into focal hyperperfusion, hyperperfusion-plus, combined hyperperfusion-hypoperfusion, and focal hypoperfusion only. The concordance rates with epileptic focus were 91.8% in combined analysis of ictal hyperperfusion and hypoperfusion images of subtracted SPECT, 85.2% in hyperperfusion images only of subtracted SPECT, and 68.9% in conventional ictal SPECT analysis. Ictal hypoperfusion occurred less frequently in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) than extratemporal lobe epilepsy. Mesial temporal hyperperfusion alone was seen only in mesial TLE while lateral temporal hyperperfusion alone was observed only in neocortical TLE. Hippocampal sclerosis had much lower incidence of ictal hypoperfusion than any other pathology. Some patients showed ictal hypoperfusion at epileptic focus with ictal hyperperfusion in the neighboring brain regions where ictal discharges propagated. Hypoperfusion as well as hyperperfusion in ictal SPECT should be considered for localizing epileptic focus. Although the mechanism of ictal hypoperfusion could be an intra-ictal early exhaustion of seizure focus or a steal phenomenon by the propagation of ictal discharges to adjacent brain areas, further study is needed to elucidate it.=20

  10. Ictal cerebral perfusion patterns in partial epilepsy: SPECT subtraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyang Woon; Hong, Seung Bong; Tae, Woo Suk; Kim, Sang Eun; Seo, Dae Won; Jeong, Seung Cheol; Yi, Ji Young; Hong, Seung Chyul [Sungkyunkwan Univ. School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-06-01

    To investigate the various ictal perfusion patterns and find the relationships between clinical factors and different perfusion patterns. Interictal and ictal SPECT and SPECT subtraction were performed in 61 patients with partial epilepsy. Both positive images showing ictal hyperperfusion and negative images revealing ictal hypoperfusion were obtained by SPECT subtraction. The ictal perfusion patterns of subtracted SPECT were classified into focal hyperperfusion, hyperperfusion-plus, combined hyperperfusion-hypoperfusion, and focal hypoperfusion only. The concordance rates with epileptic focus were 91.8% in combined analysis of ictal hyperperfusion and hypoperfusion images of subtracted SPECT, 85.2% in hyperperfusion images only of subtracted SPECT, and 68.9% in conventional ictal SPECT analysis. Ictal hypoperfusion occurred less frequently in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) than extratemporal lobe epilepsy. Mesial temporal hyperperfusion alone was seen only in mesial TLE while lateral temporal hyperperfusion alone was observed only in neocortical TLE. Hippocampal sclerosis had much lower incidence of ictal hypoperfusion than any other pathology. Some patients showed ictal hypoperfusion at epileptic focus with ictal hyperperfusion in the neighboring brain regions where ictal discharges propagated. Hypoperfusion as well as hyperperfusion in ictal SPECT should be considered for localizing epileptic focus. Although the mechanism of ictal hypoperfusion could be an intra-ictal early exhaustion of seizure focus or a steal phenomenon by the propagation of ictal discharges to adjacent brain areas, further study is needed to elucidate it.

  11. The assessment of whole body bone SPECT in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scortechini, Shonika

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Objectives: To assess the significance and practicability of oncology whole body bone SPECT as part of the standard skeletal survey and its impact on the traditional planar whole body bone imaging protocol. Method: Three consenting oncology patients were injected with a standard adult dose of Tc-99m MOP. Delayed Imaging of whole body sweep and SPECT acquisitions were performed on a Siemens Symbia T6. The patient was positioned supine with arms down with a SPECT scan length covering vortex to thighs. SPECT data was reconstructed and a single whole body zipped file created. Normal SPECT slices along with a cine/MIP of the zipped data were created for review. Results: Both image data sets were reviewed to assess if SPECT provided any further diagnostic clinical information not apparent in planer imaging. In our limited review, whole body SPECT did not add extra value to the planar whole body scans performed; it did however demonstrate vertebral involvement with greater resolution. The processing software and system limitations in seamlessly knitting data sets (creating image artefacts) was a major limiting factor in not pursuing further studies. Conclusion: Both imaging techniques offer differing advantages and limitations, however due to image artefact in the triple knitted SPECT approach with current software technology, it cannot be substituted for whole body imaging at this time.

  12. Multiple Independent Gate FETs: How Many Gates Do We Need?

    OpenAIRE

    Amarù, Luca; Hills, Gage; Gaillardon, Pierre-Emmanuel; Mitra, Subhasish; De Micheli, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Multiple Independent Gate Field Effect Transistors (MIGFETs) are expected to push FET technology further into the semiconductor roadmap. In a MIGFET, supplementary gates either provide (i) enhanced conduction properties or (ii) more intelligent switching functions. In general, each additional gate also introduces a side implementation cost. To enable more efficient digital systems, MIGFETs must leverage their expressive power to realize complex logic circuits with few physical resources. Rese...

  13. 100-nm gate lithography for double-gate transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnoperova, Azalia A.; Zhang, Ying; Babich, Inna V.; Treichler, John; Yoon, Jung H.; Guarini, Kathryn; Solomon, Paul M.

    2001-09-01

    The double gate field effect transistor (FET) is an exploratory device that promises certain performance advantages compared to traditional CMOS FETs. It can be scaled down further than the traditional devices because of the greater electrostatic control by the gates on the channel (about twice as short a channel length for the same gate oxide thickness), has steeper sub-threshold slope and about double the current for the same width. This paper presents lithographic results for double gate FET's developed at IBM's T. J. Watson Research Center. The device is built on bonded wafers with top and bottom gates self-aligned to each other. The channel is sandwiched between the top and bottom polysilicon gates and the gate length is defined using DUV lithography. An alternating phase shift mask was used to pattern gates with critical dimensions of 75 nm, 100 nm and 125 nm in photoresist. 50 nm gates in photoresist have also been patterned by 20% over-exposure of nominal 100 nm lines. No trim mask was needed because of a specific way the device was laid out. UV110 photoresist from Shipley on AR-3 antireflective layer were used. Process windows, developed and etched patterns are presented.

  14. SP-ECT imaging and its physical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Fujimi

    1983-01-01

    Recently, more than a hundred hospitals are provided with SPECT system for clinical examination in Japan. However, a standardization of measuring method and performance test of the systems is ont yet made. We have been studying some basic problems of SPECT system with special phantoms originaly designed by ourselves. We got a conclusion that a standardized phantom is necessary for comparing performances between SPECT systems. In clinical experiences with 3,332 cases, we think that SPECT image combined with conventional image presents much more informations for accurate diagnosis, especially in brain, bone and tumor imagings. Synthesized image of SPECT and XCT, double tracer image and transmission image are useful to visualize the body contour and the clinical diagnosis. (author)

  15. Study on SPECT image for children with cerebral infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Wenhuang; Xie Zhichun; Chen Yucai; Lin Haoxue; Zheng Aidong; Xie Hui

    1998-01-01

    To explore the diagnostic value of SPECT image for children with cerebral infarction (CCI), comparative research was made on 26 cases undergoing regional cerebral perfusion (rCP) image between SPECT imaging and CT scanning. The results showed that the rCP in the infarct and its distant area was decreased. The positive rate of SPECT and CT were 92.3% (24/26) and 84.5% (22/26) respectively. The difference was not significant (P = 0.67, P>0.05). But, the positive rate of SPECT image 2 days after onset in 9 CCI was 100% (9/9), significantly higher than 55.6% (5/9) in CT scanning (P = 0.04, P<0.05). These findings suggested that the SPECT imaging is a sensitive method for the early diagnosis of CCI, and also helpful for observation of the therapeutic effect and evaluation of the prognosis

  16. Radionuclide cisternography: SPECT and 3D-rendering. Radionuklidzisternographie: SPECT- und 3D-Technik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henkes, H; Huber, G; Piepgras, U [Universitaet des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany, F.R.). Abt. fuer Neuroradiologie; Hierholzer, J [Freie Univ. Berlin (Germany, F.R.). Strahlenklinik und Poliklinik; Cordes, M [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Belzberg Lab. of Neuroscience

    1991-10-01

    Radionuclide cisternography is indicated in the clinical work-up for hydrocephalus, when searching for CSF leaks, and when testing whether or not intracranial cystic lesions are communicating with the adjacent subarachnoid space. This paper demonstrates the feasibility and diagnostic value of SPECT and subsequent 3D surface rendering in addition to conventional rectilinear CSF imaging in eight patients. Planar images allowed the evaluation of CSF circulation and the detection of CSF fistula. They were advantageous in examinations 48 h after application of {sup 111}In-DTPA. SPECT scans, generated 4-24 h after tracer application, were superior in the delineation of basal cisterns, especially in early scans; this was helpful in patients with pooling due to CSF fistula and in cystic lesions near the skull base. A major drawback was the limited image quality of delayed scans, when the SPECT data were degraded by a low count rate. 3D surface rendering was easily feasible from SPECT data and yielded high quality images. The presentation of the spatial distribution of nuclide-contaminated CSF proved especially helpful in the area of the basal cisterns. (orig.).

  17. [Myokard-Perfusions-SPECT. Myocardial perfusion SPECT - Update S1 guideline].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Oliver; Bengel, Frank; Burchert, Wolfgang; Dörr, Rolf; Hacker, Marcus; Schäfer, Wolfgang; Schäfers, Michael A; Schmidt, Matthias; Schwaiger, Markus; Vom Dahl, Jürgen; Zimmermann, Rainer

    2017-08-14

    The S1 guideline for myocardial perfusion SPECT has been published by the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (AWMF) and is valid until 2/2022. This paper is a short summary with comments on all chapters and subchapters wich were modified and amended.

  18. {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO Brain SPECT in Seizure Disorder: Comparison Brain SPECT, MRI / CT and EEG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Hyung In [Kyunghee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Im, Ju Hyuk; Choi, Chang Woon; Lee, Dong Soo; Chung, June Key; No, Jae Kyu; Lee, Myung Chul; Koh, Chang Soon [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-03-15

    We studied 115 patients with seizure who had been performed brain SPECT brain MRI of CT and EEG. To evaluate the pattern of brain SPECT in seizure patients 28 of them had secondary epilepsies, 87 had primary epilepsies. In primary epilepsies, 42 were generalized seizure and 45 were partial seizure. The causes of secondary epilepsies were congenital malformation, cerebromalacia, cerebral infarction ultiple sclerosis, AV-malformation. granuloma and etc, in order. In 28 secondary epilepsies, 25 of them, brain SPECT lesions was concordant with MRI or CT lesions. 3 were disconcordant. The brain SPECT findings of generalized seizure were normal in 22 patients, diffuse irregular decreased perfusion in 8, decreased in frontal cortex in 4. temporal in 5 and frontotemporal in 3. In 45 partial seizure, 19 brain SPECT were concordant with EEG (42.4%).

  19. 99mTc-HMPAO Brain SPECT in Seizure Disorder: Comparison Brain SPECT, MRI / CT and EEG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Hyung In; Im, Ju Hyuk; Choi, Chang Woon; Lee, Dong Soo; Chung, June Key; No, Jae Kyu; Lee, Myung Chul; Koh, Chang Soon

    1994-01-01

    We studied 115 patients with seizure who had been performed brain SPECT brain MRI of CT and EEG. To evaluate the pattern of brain SPECT in seizure patients 28 of them had secondary epilepsies, 87 had primary epilepsies. In primary epilepsies, 42 were generalized seizure and 45 were partial seizure. The causes of secondary epilepsies were congenital malformation, cerebromalacia, cerebral infarction ultiple sclerosis, AV-malformation. granuloma and etc, in order. In 28 secondary epilepsies, 25 of them, brain SPECT lesions was concordant with MRI or CT lesions. 3 were disconcordant. The brain SPECT findings of generalized seizure were normal in 22 patients, diffuse irregular decreased perfusion in 8, decreased in frontal cortex in 4. temporal in 5 and frontotemporal in 3. In 45 partial seizure, 19 brain SPECT were concordant with EEG (42.4%).

  20. Expert Oracle GoldenGate

    CERN Document Server

    Prusinski, Ben; Chung, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Expert Oracle GoldenGate is a hands-on guide to creating and managing complex data replication environments using the latest in database replication technology from Oracle. GoldenGate is the future in replication technology from Oracle, and aims to be best-of-breed. GoldenGate supports homogeneous replication between Oracle databases. It supports heterogeneous replication involving other brands such as Microsoft SQL Server and IBM DB2 Universal Server. GoldenGate is high-speed, bidirectional, highly-parallelized, and makes only a light impact on the performance of databases involved in replica

  1. IMP-SPECT at patients with hallucinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podreka, I.; Mamoli, B.; Lesch, O.; Suess, E.; Wimberger, D.; Mayr, N.; Havelec, L.; Mueller, C.; Steiner, M.; Deecke, L.

    1986-01-01

    IMP-SPECT was performed in 14 normal volunteers. A 'regional index=RI' of tracer distribution was calculated for 18 regions in each hemisphere RI=(cts/voxel ROI)/(mean cts/voxel of all ROI's). 30 seizure patients (E) and 12 patients with acoustic, partialy also visual hallucinations (H) were investigated. Regions were defined as hypo- or hyperperfused if the RI exceeded the value of the corresponding normal-RI +- 2 std. EEG was recorded in all (E). 93.3% of EEG-findings were abnormal, 50% showed a focus, 46.7% paroxysmal activity. SPECT detected in 93.3% of (E) hypoperfused regions, mostly located in the temporal lobe. All (H) had decreased rCBF, predominantly in the frontal cortex. ANOVA and t-test revealed significant RI-differences in the frontal lobe, both hippocampi, right and left inferior occipital cortex, and right anterior basal ganglia. (H) had lower RI's in frontal lobes, higher RI's in both hippocampal regions as well as inferior occipital regions and anterior basal ganglia Differences between (E) and (H) were found in the frontal lobe ((H)sub(→)), right superior temporal region ((H)sup(→)), left hippocampus ((H)sup(→)), both inferior occipital regions ((H)sup(→)) and right anterior basal ganglia ((H)sup(→)). The study shows that by means of IMP-SPECT hypo- and hyperperfused areas can be detected in the hemispheres of (E) and (H), corresponding to disturbed brain function. Higher hippocampal CBF in (E) and (H) may be related to the role of this limbic structure in generation of seizures and psychotic states. Hallucinations are associated with increased CBF in the right temporal and associative visual cortex. (Author)

  2. SPECT/CT and pulmonary embolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Jann; Borgwardt, Henrik Gutte

    2014-01-01

    the best diagnostic accuracy for PE. In addition, recent developments in the CTPA technique have made it possible to image the pulmonary arteries of the lungs in one breath-hold. This development is based on the change from a single-detector to multidetector CT technology with an increase in volume......Acute pulmonary embolism (PE) is diagnosed either by ventilation/perfusion (V/P) scintigraphy or pulmonary CT angiography (CTPA). In recent years both techniques have improved. Many nuclear medicine centres have adopted the single photon emission CT (SPECT) technique as opposed to the planar...

  3. Brain SPECT in neurology: A critical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartenstein, P.; Essen Univ.; Weiller, C.; Essen Univ.

    1994-01-01

    SPECT of the brain with radiopharmaceuticals monitoring regional cerebral blood flow, receptor binding and metabolism offers a wide variety of potentially clinically useful applications. These can be found in neuro-oncology, epilepsy, cerebrovascular diseases, extrapyramidal disorders, dementia and the determination of brain death. The evaluation of the benefit of these methods in routine use requires a close cooperation between nuclear medicine physicians and neurologists, not only in the interpretation and analysis of the actual clinical studies, but also in the design and realization of clinically oriented research with large series of patients. (orig.) [de

  4. A novel optical gating method for laser gated imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginat, Ran; Schneider, Ron; Zohar, Eyal; Nesher, Ofer

    2013-06-01

    For the past 15 years, Elbit Systems is developing time-resolved active laser-gated imaging (LGI) systems for various applications. Traditional LGI systems are based on high sensitive gated sensors, synchronized to pulsed laser sources. Elbit propriety multi-pulse per frame method, which is being implemented in LGI systems, improves significantly the imaging quality. A significant characteristic of the LGI is its ability to penetrate a disturbing media, such as rain, haze and some fog types. Current LGI systems are based on image intensifier (II) sensors, limiting the system in spectral response, image quality, reliability and cost. A novel propriety optical gating module was developed in Elbit, untying the dependency of LGI system on II. The optical gating module is not bounded to the radiance wavelength and positioned between the system optics and the sensor. This optical gating method supports the use of conventional solid state sensors. By selecting the appropriate solid state sensor, the new LGI systems can operate at any desired wavelength. In this paper we present the new gating method characteristics, performance and its advantages over the II gating method. The use of the gated imaging systems is described in a variety of applications, including results from latest field experiments.

  5. Ventricular dyssynchrony assessed by gated myocardial perfusion SPECT using a geometrical approach: a feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veen, Berlinda J. van der; Younis, Imad Al; Ajmone-Marsan, Nina; Bax, Jeroen J.; Westenberg, Jos J.M.; Roos, Albert de; Stokkel, Marcel P.M.

    2012-01-01

    Left ventricular dyssynchrony may predict response to cardiac resynchronization therapy and may well predict adverse cardiac events. Recently, a geometrical approach for dyssynchrony analysis of myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) was introduced. In this study the feasibility of this geometrical method to detect dyssynchrony was assessed in a population with a normal MPS and in patients with documented ventricular dyssynchrony. For the normal population 80 patients (40 men and 40 women) with normal perfusion (summed stress score ≤2 and summed rest score ≤2) and function (left ventricular ejection fraction 55-80%) on MPS were selected; 24 heart failure patients with proven dyssynchrony on MRI were selected for comparison. All patients underwent a 2-day stress/rest MPS protocol. Perfusion, function and dyssynchrony parameters were obtained by the Corridor4DM software package (Version 6.1). For the normal population time to peak motion was 42.8 ± 5.1% RR cycle, SD of time to peak motion was 3.5 ± 1.4% RR cycle and bandwidth was 18.2 ± 6.0% RR cycle. No significant gender-related differences or differences between rest and post-stress acquisition were found for the dyssynchrony parameters. Discrepancies between the normal and abnormal populations were most profound for the mean wall motion (p value <0.001), SD of time to peak motion (p value <0.001) and bandwidth (p value <0.001). It is feasible to quantify ventricular dyssynchrony in MPS using the geometrical approach as implemented by Corridor4DM. (orig.)

  6. Time course evaluation of myocardial perfusion after reperfusion therapy by 99mTc-tetrofosmin SPECT in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, R; Nakamura, T

    2001-09-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging with 99mTc-labeled agents immediately after reperfusion therapy can underestimate myocardial salvage. It is also conceivable that delayed imaging is useful for assessing the risk area. However, to our knowledge, very few studies have sequentially evaluated these image changes. We conducted 99mTc-tetrofosmin (TF) and 123I-beta-methyl-p-iodophenylpentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) SPECT before and after reperfusion to treat acute myocardial infarction and quantified changes in TF myocardial accumulation and reverse redistribution. Seventeen patients with a first myocardial infarction underwent successful reperfusion. We examined SPECT images obtained at the onset (preimage), those acquired 30 min (early image) and 6 h (delayed image) after TF injection, and images acquired 1, 4, 7, and 20 d after reperfusion (post-1-d, post-4-d, post-7-d, and post-20-d image, respectively). We also examined BMIPP SPECT images after 7 +/- 1.8 d (BMIPP image). Polar maps were divided into 48 segments to calculate percentage uptake, and time course changes in segment numbers below 60% were observed as abnormal area. Moreover, cardiac function was analyzed by gated TF SPECT on 1 and 20 d after reperfusion. In reference to the abnormal area on the early images, the post-1-d image was significantly improved compared with the preimage (P < 0.01) as was the post-7-d image compared with the post-1-d and post-4-d images (P < 0.05, respectively). However, post-20-d and post-7-d images did not significantly differ. Therefore, the improvement in myocardial accumulation reached a plateau 7 d after reperfusion. On the other hand, the abnormal area on the delayed images was significantly greater (P < 0.01) compared with that on the early images from 4 to 20 d after reperfusion, as the value was essentially constant. The correlations of the abnormal area between the preimage and the post-7-d delayed image, the preimage and the BMIPP image, and the post-7-d delayed image and the

  7. Generation of complete electronic nuclear medicine reports including static, dynamic and gated images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beretta, M.; Pilon, R.; Mut, F.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: To develop a procedure for the creation of nuclear medicine reports containing static and dynamic images. The reason for implementing this technique is the lack of adequate solutions for an electronic format of nuclear medicine results allowing for rapid transmission via e-mail, specially in the case of dynamic and gated SPECT studies, since functional data is best presented in dynamic mode. Material and Methods: Clinical images were acquired in static, whole body, dynamic and gated mode, corresponding to bone studies, diuretic renogram, radionuclide cystography and gated perfusion SPECT, as well as respective time-activity curves. Image files were imported from a dedicated nuclear medicine computer system (Elscint XPert) to a Windows-based PC through a standard ethernet network with TCP-IP communications protocol, using a software developed by us which permits the conversion from the manufacturer's original format into a bitmap format (.bmp) compatible with commercially available PC software. For cardiac perfusion studies, background was subtracted prior to transferring to reduce the amount of information in the file; this was not done for other type of studies because useful data could be eliminated. Dynamic images were then processed using commercial software to create animated files and stored in .gif format. Static images were re-sized and stored in .jpg format. Original color or gray scale was always preserved. All the graphic material was then merged with a previously prepared report text using HTML format. The report also contained reference diagrams to facilitate interpretation. The whole report was then compressed into a self-extractable file, ready to be sent by electronic mail. Reception of the material was visually checked for data integrity including image quality by two experienced nuclear medicine physicians. Results: The report presented allows for simultaneous visualization of the text, diagrams and images either static, dynamic, gated or

  8. Juvenile spondylolysis: a comparative analysis of CT, SPECT and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, R.S.D.; Grainger, A.J.; Hide, I.G.; Papastefanou, S.; Greenough, C.G.

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate whether MRI correlates with CT and SPECT imaging for the diagnosis of juvenile spondylolysis, and to determine whether MRI can be used as an exclusive image modality. Juveniles and young adults with a history of extension low back pain were evaluated by MRI, CT and SPECT imaging. All images were reviewed blindly. Correlative analyses included CT vs MRI for morphological grading and SPECT vs MRI for functional grading. Finally, an overall grading system compared MRI vs CT and SPECT combined. Statistical analysis was performed using the kappa statistic. Seventy-two patients (mean age 16 years) were recruited. Forty pars defects were identified in 22 patients (31%), of which 25 were chronic non-union, five acute complete defects and ten acute incomplete fractures. Kappa scores demonstrated a high level of agreement for all comparative analyses. MRI vs SPECT (kappa: 0.794), MRI vs CT (kappa: 0.829) and MRI vs CT/SPECT (kappa: 0.786). The main causes of discrepancy were between MRI and SPECT for the diagnosis of stress reaction in the absence of overt fracture, and distinguishing incomplete fractures from intact pars or complete defects. MRI can be used as an effective and reliable first-line image modality for diagnosis of juvenile spondylolysis. However, localised CT is recommended as a supplementary examination in selected cases as a baseline for assessment of healing and for evaluation of indeterminate cases. (orig.)

  9. Clinical applications of SPECT/CT in imaging the extremities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huellner, Martin W.; Strobel, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Today, SPECT/CT is increasingly used and available in the majority of larger nuclear medicine departments. Several applications of SPECT/CT as a supplement to or replacement for traditional conventional bone scintigraphy have been established in recent years. SPECT/CT of the upper and lower extremities is valuable in many conditions with abnormal bone turnover due to trauma, inflammation, infection, degeneration or tumour. SPECT/CT is often used in patients if conventional radiographs are insufficient, if MR image quality is impaired due to metal implants or in patients with contraindications to MR. In complex joints such as those in the foot and wrist, SPECT/CT provides exact anatomical correlation of pathological uptake. In many cases SPECT increases the sensitivity and CT the specificity of the study, increasing confidence in the final diagnosis compared to planar images alone. The CT protocol should be adapted to the clinical question and may vary from very low-dose (e.g. attenuation correction only), to low-dose for anatomical correlation, to normal-dose protocols enabling precise anatomical resolution. The aim of this review is to give an overview of SPECT/CT imaging of the extremities with a focus on the hand and wrist, knee and foot, and for evaluation of patients after joint arthroplasty. (orig.)

  10. Quantitative assessment of 201TlCl myocardial SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uehara, Toshiisa

    1987-01-01

    Clinical evaluation of the quantitative analysis of Tl-201 myocardial tomography by SPECT (Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography) was performed in comparison with visual evaluation. The method of quantitative analysis has been already reported in our previous paper. In this study, the program of re-standardization in the case of lateral myocardial infarction was added. This program was useful mainly for the evaluation of lesions in the left circumflex coronary artery. Regarding the degree of diagnostic accuracy of myocardial infarction in general, quantitative evaluation of myocardial SPECT images was highest followed by visual evaluation of myocardial SPECT images, and visual evaluation of myocardial planar images. However, in the case of anterior myocardial infarction, visual evaluation of myocardial SPECT images has almost the same detectability as quantitative evaluation of myocardial SPECT images. In the case of infero-posterior myocardial infarction, quantitative evaluation was superior to visual evaluation. As for specificity, quantitative evaluation of SPECT images was slightly inferior to visual evaluation of SPECT images. An infarction map was made by quantitative analysis and this enabled us to determine the infarction site, extent and degree according to easily recognizable patterns. As a result, the responsible coronary artery lesion could be inferred correctly and the calculated infarction score could be correlated with the residual left ventricular function after myocardial infarction. (author)

  11. Evaluation of Tl-201 SPECT imaging findings in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinem Ozyurt

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To compare with histopathological findings the findings of prostate cancer imaging by SPECT method using Tl-201 as a tumor seeking agent. Methods: The study comprised 59 patients (age range 51-79 years, mean age 65.3 ± 6.8 years who were planned to have transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS-guided biopsies due to suspicion of prostate cancer between April 2011 and September 2011. Early planar, late planar and SPECT images were obtained for all patients. Scintigraphic evaluation was made in relation to uptake presence and patterns in the visual assessment and to Tumor/Background (T/Bg ratios for both planar and SPECT images in the quantitative assessment. Histopathological findings were compatible with benign etiology in 36 (61% patients and malign etiology in 23 (39% patients. Additionally, comparisons were made to evaluate the relationships between uptake patterns,total PSA values and Gleason scores. Results: A statistically significant difference was found between the benign and malignant groups in terms of uptake in planar and SPECT images and T/Bg ratios and PSA values. No statistically significant difference was found between uptake patterns of planar and SPECT images and Gleason scores in the malignant group. Conclusions: SPECT images were superior to planar images in the comparative assessment. Tl-201 SPECT imaging can provide an additional contribution to clinical practice in the diagnosis of prostate cancer and it can be used in selected patients.

  12. Clinical applications of SPECT/CT in imaging the extremities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huellner, Martin W. [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Medical Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); Strobel, Klaus [Lucerne Cantonal Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Radiology, Lucerne (Switzerland)

    2014-05-15

    Today, SPECT/CT is increasingly used and available in the majority of larger nuclear medicine departments. Several applications of SPECT/CT as a supplement to or replacement for traditional conventional bone scintigraphy have been established in recent years. SPECT/CT of the upper and lower extremities is valuable in many conditions with abnormal bone turnover due to trauma, inflammation, infection, degeneration or tumour. SPECT/CT is often used in patients if conventional radiographs are insufficient, if MR image quality is impaired due to metal implants or in patients with contraindications to MR. In complex joints such as those in the foot and wrist, SPECT/CT provides exact anatomical correlation of pathological uptake. In many cases SPECT increases the sensitivity and CT the specificity of the study, increasing confidence in the final diagnosis compared to planar images alone. The CT protocol should be adapted to the clinical question and may vary from very low-dose (e.g. attenuation correction only), to low-dose for anatomical correlation, to normal-dose protocols enabling precise anatomical resolution. The aim of this review is to give an overview of SPECT/CT imaging of the extremities with a focus on the hand and wrist, knee and foot, and for evaluation of patients after joint arthroplasty. (orig.)

  13. Juvenile spondylolysis: a comparative analysis of CT, SPECT and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, R.S.D. [Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Grainger, A.J. [Leeds General Infirmary, Department of Radiology, Leeds (United Kingdom); Hide, I.G. [Freeman Hospital, Department of Radiology, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom); Papastefanou, S. [James Cook University Hospital, Department Radiology, Middlesbrough (United Kingdom); Greenough, C.G. [James Cook University Hospital, Department of Trauma and Orthopaedics, Middlesbrough (United Kingdom)

    2005-02-01

    To evaluate whether MRI correlates with CT and SPECT imaging for the diagnosis of juvenile spondylolysis, and to determine whether MRI can be used as an exclusive image modality. Juveniles and young adults with a history of extension low back pain were evaluated by MRI, CT and SPECT imaging. All images were reviewed blindly. Correlative analyses included CT vs MRI for morphological grading and SPECT vs MRI for functional grading. Finally, an overall grading system compared MRI vs CT and SPECT combined. Statistical analysis was performed using the kappa statistic. Seventy-two patients (mean age 16 years) were recruited. Forty pars defects were identified in 22 patients (31%), of which 25 were chronic non-union, five acute complete defects and ten acute incomplete fractures. Kappa scores demonstrated a high level of agreement for all comparative analyses. MRI vs SPECT (kappa: 0.794), MRI vs CT (kappa: 0.829) and MRI vs CT/SPECT (kappa: 0.786). The main causes of discrepancy were between MRI and SPECT for the diagnosis of stress reaction in the absence of overt fracture, and distinguishing incomplete fractures from intact pars or complete defects. MRI can be used as an effective and reliable first-line image modality for diagnosis of juvenile spondylolysis. However, localised CT is recommended as a supplementary examination in selected cases as a baseline for assessment of healing and for evaluation of indeterminate cases. (orig.)

  14. Proceedings of clinical SPECT [single photon emission computed tomography] symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-09-01

    It has been five years since the last in-depth American College of Nuclear Physicians/Society of Nuclear Medicine Symposium on the subject of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was held. Because this subject was nominated as the single most desired topic we have selected SPECT imaging as the basis for this year's program. The objectives of this symposium are to survey the progress of SPECT clinical applications that have taken place over the last five years and to provide practical and timely guidelines to users of SPECT so that this exciting imaging modality can be fully integrated into the evaluation of pathologic processes. The first half was devoted to a consideration of technical factors important in SPECT acquisition and the second half was devoted to those organ systems about which sufficient clinical SPECT imaging data are available. With respect to the technical aspect of the program we have selected the key areas which demand awareness and attention in order to make SPECT operational in clinical practice. These include selection of equipment, details of uniformity correction, utilization of phantoms for equipment acceptance and quality assurance, the major aspect of algorithms, an understanding of filtered back projection and appropriate choice of filters and an awareness of the most commonly generated artifacts and how to recognize them. With respect to the acquisition and interpretation of organ images, the faculty will present information on the major aspects of hepatic, brain, cardiac, skeletal, and immunologic imaging techniques. Individual papers are processed separately for the data base

  15. SPECT/CT Fusion in the Diagnosis of Hyperparathyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monzen, Yoshio; Tamura, Akihisa; Okazaki, Hajime; Kurose, Taichi; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Kuraoka, Masatsugu

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to analyze the relationship between the diagnostic ability of fused single photon emission computed tomography/ computed tomography (SPECT/CT) images in localization of parathyroid lesions and the size of adenomas or hyperplastic glands. Five patients with primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) and 4 patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) were imaged 15 and 120 minutes after the intravenous injection of technetium99m-methoxyisobutylisonitrile ( 99m Tc-MIBI). All patients underwent surgery and 5 parathyroid adenomas and 10 hyperplastic glands were detected. Pathologic findings were correlated with imaging results. The SPECT/CT fusion images were able to detect all parathyroid adenomas even with the greatest axial diameter of 0.6 cm. Planar scintigraphy and SPECT imaging could not detect parathyroid adenomas with an axial diameter of 1.0 to 1.2 cm. Four out of 10 (40%) hyperplastic parathyroid glands were diagnosed, using planar and SPECT imaging and 5 out of 10 (50%) hyperplastic parathyroid glands were localized, using SPECT/CT fusion images. SPECT/CT fusion imaging is a more useful tool for localization of parathyroid lesions, particularly parathyroid adenomas, in comparison with planar and or SPECT imaging

  16. Improvements in SPECT technology for cerebral imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esser, P.D.

    1985-01-01

    Advancement in three major areas of SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) technology have resulted in improved image quality for cerebral studies. In the first area, single-crystal camera electronics, extensive use of microprocessors, custom digital circuitry, an data bus architecture have allowed precise external control of all gantry motions and improved signal processing. The new digital circuitry permits energy, uniformity, and linearity corrections to be an integral part of the processing electronics. Calibration of these correlations is controlled by algorithms stored in the camera's memory. The second area of improved SPECT technology is camera collimation and related imaging techniques. In this area, system resolution has been improved without loss of sensitivity by decreasing the air gap between patient and collimator surface. Since cerebral studies characteristically image high-contrast regions less than 1 cm in size, image quality has been improved by increasing collimator resolution even at the expense of sensitivity. Increased resolution also improved image contrast for studies using 123 I-labeled pharmaceuticals with 3% to 4% 124 I contamination. 65 references

  17. Rheumatoid arthritis: Clinical, SPECT and MRI investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ascoli, G.; Cinti, P.; Nonni, M.; Rossi, B.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: To demonstrate psychometric test and neuroimaging technic capacity in subclinical conditions of cerebral affection in patients with rheumatoid arthritis; to demonstrate agreement between topographic cerebral site and morphological signs in neuroimaging study; to evaluate agreement between cognitive deficits and rheumatoid severity. Material and Method: We have enrolled 20 patients, 17 pts. (85%) showed low score evocative for executive function limitation; 6 pts. (33%) showed attention anomaly, movement organization and verbal fluency. SPECT acquisition shows frontal lobe uptake in 95% (19/20 pts.) extended to parietal lobs in 42% (8/19pts.); 1 pt. Shows normal uptake and very high score. RMN study shows a specific sign of leukoencephalopaty in 35% (7/20pts.) and liquoral spaces increased in 25% (5/20 pts.). Conclusions: Frequent cognitive functions alteration during rheumatoid arthritis; very high topographic agreement between cognitive deficits and cerebral perfusion uptake showed by SPECT study; significant correlation between severity index and disease activity and cognitive deterioration; necessity of further longitudinal study for greater number of patient; pathogenetic disconnect mechanism cortical-subcortical by vasculitic reason or deafferentation jointed to negative interaction between motor limit and cognitive deficit

  18. Patient position matching between SPECT and CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eubig, C.; Lodhi, L.M.; Trueblood, J.H.; Kingsbury, T.; Burke, G.; Flickenger, F.

    1990-01-01

    Since the authors had previously developed an ability for accurate repositioning of patients by means of video imaging of their external features, it was their purpose to determine if separate video systems placed in SPECT and CT rooms could be positioned and a calibration procedure for each modality developed to assure easy identification and acquisition of corresponding congruent axial image sections through the patient. A video frame grabber is used to acquire an image of the patient in one room and superimpose it on a similar image of the patient in the other room. A radioactive ruler visible at CT images obtained with a gamma camera computer, and a CT scout image are used to adjust the initial relative position of the video cameras and calibrate the acquisition parameters of both systems. The success of this alignment procedure was tested with a body phantom. The body phantom studies indicate that this method of positioning the patient and acquiring corresponding aligned CT and SPECT axial sections can be successful where internal organ shift between the acquisitions is minimal. This should lead to a reduction of the time and computer resources necessary to fuse or superimpose images of corresponding patient sections acquired with different modalities

  19. Penn State DOE GATE Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anstrom, Joel

    2012-08-31

    The Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Program at The Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) was established in October 1998 pursuant to an award from the U.S. Department of Energy (U.S. DOE). The focus area of the Penn State GATE Program is advanced energy storage systems for electric and hybrid vehicles.

  20. Piezoconductivity of gated suspended graphene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medvedyeva, M.V.; Blanter, Y.M.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the conductivity of graphene sheet deformed over a gate. The effect of the deformation on the conductivity is twofold: The lattice distortion can be represented as pseudovector potential in the Dirac equation formalism, whereas the gate causes inhomogeneous density redistribution. We

  1. Interactions of collimation, sampling and filtering on spect spatial resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsui, B.M.W.; Jaszczak, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    The major factors which affect the spatial resolution of single-photon emission computer tomography (SPECT) include collimation, sampling and filtering. A theoretical formulation is presented to describe the relationship between these factors and their effects on the projection data. Numerical calculations were made using commercially available SPECT systems and imaging parameters. The results provide an important guide for proper selection of the collimator-detector design, the imaging and the reconstruction parameters to avoid unnecessary spatial resolution degradation and aliasing artifacts in the reconstructed image. In addition, the understanding will help in the fair evaluation of different SPECT systems under specific imaging conditions

  2. The role of brain SPECT in children with epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xingdang; Liu Yongchang; Lin Xiangtong

    1996-01-01

    The rCBF brain SPECT with 99m Tc-HMPAO was performed in 15 children with interictal epilepsy, and some cases were compared with EEG, X-ray CT and MRI. The results showed that the positive rate of SPECT was the highest (93.33%,), then the EEG (92.31%), and the CT and MRI were the lowest (66.67% and 75%). This study indicated that brain SPECT was an effective method for diagnosis and foci localization in epileptic children, and also was useful to the study of prognosis and relationship between changes of rCBF and progress in clinical pictures

  3. The future of SPECT in a time of PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansen, Floris P.; Vanderheyden, Jean-Luc

    2007-01-01

    As positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is becoming more prevalent in clinical practice, it is reasonable to ask if there will be a role for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in the future. This article considers that question, focusing on areas where SPECT can differentiate itself from PET for fundamental reasons: breadth of available radionuclides, simultaneous imaging of multiple agents, cost-effectiveness and adaptability to specific imaging situations. The conclusion is that SPECT will continue to evolve and exist alongside PET and will grow the field of molecular imaging with improved efficiency and patient workflow

  4. Atlas of Skeletal SPECT/CT Clinical Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    The atlas focuses specifically on single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) in musculoskeletal imaging, and thus illustrates the inherent advantages of the combination of the metabolic and anatomical component in a single procedure. In addition, the atlas provides information on the usefulness of several sets of specific indications. The publication, which serves more as a training tool rather than a textbook, will help to further integrate the SPECT and CT experience in clinical practice by presenting a series of typical cases with many different patterns of SPECT/CT seen in bone scintigraphy

  5. Transmission computed tomography data acquisition with a SPECT system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greer, K.L.; Harris, C.C.; Jaszczak, R.J.; Coleman, R.E.; Hedlund, L.W.; Floyd, C.E.; Manglos, S.H.

    1987-01-01

    Phantom and animal transmission computed tomography (TCT) scans were performed with a camera-based single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system to determine system linearity as a function of object density, which is important in the accurate determination of attenuation coefficients for SPECT attenuation compensation. Results from phantoms showed promise in providing a linear relationship in measuring density while maintaining good image resolution. Animal images were essentially free of artifacts. Transmission computed tomography scans derived from a SPECT system appear to have the potential to provide data suitable for incorporation in an attenuation compensation algorithm at relatively low (calculated) radiation doses to the subjects

  6. HM-PAO SPECT in the diagnosis of cerebrovascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordes, M.; Rummeny, E.; Reissmann, M.; Fox, K.; Panitz, N.; Pfannenstiel, P.

    1987-01-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) after injection of 99m-Tc-HM-PAO was used to examine 34 patients whose clinical findings could not exclude a cerebrovascular disease. In all patients an X-ray computed tomography examination was inconclusive for the clinical-neurological findings. The regional cerebral bloodflow was pathologically disturbed in 10 of 34 patients in the HM-PAO SPECT examination. The detection of the regional cerebral bloodflow with HM-PAO SPECT is helpful in the diagnosis of cerebrovascular disease. (orig.) [de

  7. On photonic controlled phase gates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kieling, K; Eisert, J; O'Brien, J L

    2010-01-01

    As primitives for entanglement generation, controlled phase gates have a central role in quantum computing. Especially in ideas realizing instances of quantum computation in linear optical gate arrays, a closer look can be rewarding. In such architectures, all effective nonlinearities are induced by measurements. Hence the probability of success is a crucial parameter of such quantum gates. In this paper, we discuss this question for controlled phase gates that implement an arbitrary phase with one and two control qubits. Within the class of post-selected gates in dual-rail encoding with vacuum ancillas, we identify the optimal success probabilities. We construct networks that allow for implementation using current experimental capabilities in detail. The methods employed here appear specifically useful with the advent of integrated linear optical circuits, providing stable interferometers on monolithic structures.

  8. Ventilation/perfusion SPECT or SPECT/CT for lung function imaging in patients with pulmonary emphysema?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froeling, Vera; Heimann, Uwe; Huebner, Ralf-Harto; Kroencke, Thomas J; Maurer, Martin H; Doellinger, Felix; Geisel, Dominik; Hamm, Bernd; Brenner, Winfried; Schreiter, Nils F

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the utility of attenuation correction (AC) of V/P SPECT images for patients with pulmonary emphysema. Twenty-one patients (mean age 67.6 years) with pulmonary emphysema who underwent V/P SPECT/CT were included. AC/non-AC V/P SPECT images were compared visually and semiquantitatively. Visual comparison of AC/non-AC images was based on a 5-point likert scale. Semiquantitative comparison assessed absolute counts per lung (aCpLu) and lung lobe (aCpLo) for AC/non-AC images using software-based analysis; percentage counts (PC = (aCpLo/aCpLu) × 100) were calculated. Correlation between AC/non-AC V/P SPECT images was analyzed using Spearman's rho correlation coefficient; differences were tested for significance with the Wilcoxon rank sum test. Visual analysis revealed high conformity for AC and non-AC V/P SPECT images. Semiquantitative analysis of PC in AC/non-AC images had an excellent correlation and showed no significant differences in perfusion (ρ = 0.986) or ventilation (ρ = 0.979, p = 0.809) SPECT/CT images. AC of V/P SPECT images for lung lobe-based function imaging in patients with pulmonary emphysema do not improve visual or semiquantitative image analysis.

  9. Incremental value of 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC SPECT/CT over whole-body planar scintigraphy and SPECT in patients with neuroendocrine tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trogrlic, Mate; Težak, Stanko

    2017-06-12

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the additional value of 99m Tc-HYNIC-TOC SPECT/CT over planar whole-body (WB) scintigraphy and SPECT alone in the detection and accurate localisation of neuroendocrine tumour (NET) lesions. This study included 65 patients with a definitive histological diagnosis of NET prior to scintigraphy. Planar WB scintigraphy, SPECT, and SPECT/CT images were acquired at 4 h post-administration of 670 MBq 99m Tc-HYNIC-TOC. Additional SPECT images at 10 min after tracer administration were also acquired. Clinical and imaging follow-up findings were considered as the reference standards (minimum follow-up period, 15 months). Patient and lesion-based analyses of the efficacies of the imaging modalities were performed. While 38 patients exhibited metastasis of NETs, 27 presented no evidence of metastasis. Upon patient-based analysis, the sensitivity and specificity of SPECT/CT were found to be 88.9 and 79.3 %, respectively. The diagnostic accuracies of WB scintigraphy, 4h-SPECT, and SPECT/CT were 72.3, 73.8, and 84.6 %, respectively. The area under curve (AUC) value for SPECT/CT (0.84) was the highest, followed by those for 4h-SPECT (0.75) and WB scintigraphy (0.74). The accuracy and AUC values of SPECT/CT were significantly better compared to those of WB scintigraphy (p < 0.001), 10 min-SPECT (p < 0.001), and 4 h-SPECT (p = 0.001). The findings of SPECT/CT led to the change in treatment plan of 11 patients (16.9 %). The sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy of SPECT/CT in the evaluation of NET lesions outperforms planar WB imaging or SPECT alone.

  10. Gated equilibrium bloodpool scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinders Folmer, S.C.C.

    1981-01-01

    This thesis deals with the clinical applications of gated equilibrium bloodpool scintigraphy, performed with either a gamma camera or a portable detector system, the nuclear stethoscope. The main goal has been to define the value and limitations of noninvasive measurements of left ventricular ejection fraction as a parameter of cardiac performance in various disease states, both for diagnostic purposes as well as during follow-up after medical or surgical intervention. Secondly, it was attempted to extend the use of the equilibrium bloodpool techniques beyond the calculation of ejection fraction alone by considering the feasibility to determine ventricular volumes and by including the possibility of quantifying valvular regurgitation. In both cases, it has been tried to broaden the perspective of the observations by comparing them with results of other, invasive and non-invasive, procedures, in particular cardiac catheterization, M-mode echocardiography and myocardial perfusion scintigraphy. (Auth.)

  11. SPECT3D - A multi-dimensional collisional-radiative code for generating diagnostic signatures based on hydrodynamics and PIC simulation output

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacFarlane, J. J.; Golovkin, I. E.; Wang, P.; Woodruff, P. R.; Pereyra, N. A.

    2007-05-01

    SPECT3D is a multi-dimensional collisional-radiative code used to post-process the output from radiation-hydrodynamics (RH) and particle-in-cell (PIC) codes to generate diagnostic signatures (e.g. images, spectra) that can be compared directly with experimental measurements. This ability to post-process simulation code output plays a pivotal role in assessing the reliability of RH and PIC simulation codes and their physics models. SPECT3D has the capability to operate on plasmas in 1D, 2D, and 3D geometries. It computes a variety of diagnostic signatures that can be compared with experimental measurements, including: time-resolved and time-integrated spectra, space-resolved spectra and streaked spectra; filtered and monochromatic images; and X-ray diode signals. Simulated images and spectra can include the effects of backlighters, as well as the effects of instrumental broadening and time-gating. SPECT3D also includes a drilldown capability that shows where frequency-dependent radiation is emitted and absorbed as it propagates through the plasma towards the detector, thereby providing insights on where the radiation seen by a detector originates within the plasma. SPECT3D has the capability to model a variety of complex atomic and radiative processes that affect the radiation seen by imaging and spectral detectors in high energy density physics (HEDP) experiments. LTE (local thermodynamic equilibrium) or non-LTE atomic level populations can be computed for plasmas. Photoabsorption rates can be computed using either escape probability models or, for selected 1D and 2D geometries, multi-angle radiative transfer models. The effects of non-thermal (i.e. non-Maxwellian) electron distributions can also be included. To study the influence of energetic particles on spectra and images recorded in intense short-pulse laser experiments, the effects of both relativistic electrons and energetic proton beams can be simulated. SPECT3D is a user-friendly software package that runs

  12. Scatter and cross-talk correction for one-day acquisition of 123I-BMIPP and 99mtc-tetrofosmin myocardial SPECT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneta, Tomohiro; Kurihara, Hideyuki; Hakamatsuka, Takashi; Ito, Hiroshi; Maruoka, Shin; Fukuda, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Shoki; Yamada, Shogo

    2004-12-01

    123I-15-(p-iodophenyl)-3-(R,S)-methylpentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) and 99mTc-tetrofosmin (TET) are widely used for evaluation of myocardial fatty acid metabolism and perfusion, respectively. ECG-gated TET SPECT is also used for evaluation of myocardial wall motion. These tests are often performed on the same day to minimize both the time required and inconvenience to patients and medical staff. However, as 123I and 99mTc have similar emission energies (159 keV and 140 keV, respectively), it is necessary to consider not only scattered photons, but also primary photons of each radionuclide detected in the wrong window (cross-talk). In this study, we developed and evaluated the effectiveness of a new scatter and cross-talk correction imaging protocol. Fourteen patients with ischemic heart disease or heart failure (8 men and 6 women with a mean age of 69.4 yr, ranging from 45 to 94 yr) were enrolled in this study. In the routine one-day acquisition protocol, BMIPP SPECT was performed in the morning, with TET SPECT performed 4 h later. An additional SPECT was performed just before injection of TET with the energy window for 99mTc. These data correspond to the scatter and cross-talk factor of the next TET SPECT. The correction was performed by subtraction of the scatter and cross-talk factor from TET SPECT. Data are presented as means +/- S.E. Statistical analyses were performed using Wilcoxon's matched-pairs signed-ranks test, and p corrected total count was 26.0 +/- 5.3%. EDV and ESV after correction were significantly greater than those before correction (p = 0.019 and 0.016, respectively). After correction, EF was smaller than that before correction, but the difference was not significant. Perfusion scores (17 segments per heart) were significantly lower after as compared with those before correction (p correction revealed significant differences in EDV, ESV, and perfusion scores. These observations indicate that scatter and cross-talk correction is required for one

  13. Characteristic findings of exercise ECG test, perfusion SPECT and coronary angiography in patients with exercise induced myocardial stunning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Byeong Cheol; Seo, Ji Hyoung; Bae, Jin Ho; Jeong, Shin Young; Park, Hun Sik; Lee, Jae Tae; Chae, Shung Chull; Lee, Kyu Bo [School of Medicine, Kyungpook National Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-06-01

    Transient wall motion abnormality and contractile dysfunction of the left ventricle (LV) can be observed in patients with coronary artery disease due to post-stress myocardial stunning. To understand clinical characteristics of stress induced LV dysfunction, we have compared the findings of exercise stress test, myocardial perfusion SPECT and coronary angiography between subjects with and without post-stress LV dysfunction. Among subjects who underwent exercise stress test, myocardial perfusion SPECT and coronary angiography within a month of interval, we enrolled 36 patients with post-stress LV ejection fraction (LVEF) was {>=}5% lower than rest (stunning group) and 16 patients with difference of post-stress and rest LVEF was lesser than 1% (non-stunning group) for this study. Treadmill exercise stress gated myocardial perfusion SPECT was performed with dual head SPECT camera using 740 MBq Tc-99m MIBI and coronary angiography was also performed by conventional Judkins method. Stunning group had a significantly higher incidence of hypercholesterolemia than non-stunning group(45.5 vs 7.1%, p=0.01). Stunning group also had higher incidence of diabetes mellitus and lower incidence of hypertension, but these were not statistically significant. Stunning group had larger and more severe perfusion defect in stress perfusion myocardial SPECT than non-stunning group(extent 18.2 vs 9.2%, p=0.029; severity 13.5 vs 6.9, p=0.040). Stunning group also had higher degree of reversibility of perfusion defect, higher incidence of positive exercise stress test and higher incidence of having severe stenosis(80{approx}99%) in coronary angiography than non-stunning group, but these were not statistically significant. In stunning group, all of 4 patients without perfusion defect had significant coronary artery stenosis and had received revascularization treatment. Patients with post-stress LV dysfunction had larger and more severe perfusion defect and severe coronary artery stenosis than

  14. SPECT for smokers brain perfusion evaluation; SPECT para avaliacao da perfusao cerebral em fumantes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maliska, C.M.; Martins, E.F.; Barros, D.S.; Lopes, M.M.S.; Lourenco, C.; Goncalves, S.; Goncalves, M.B.; Miranda, M.M.B.G.; Neto, L.M.; Penque, E.; Antonucci, J.B. [Instituto Nacional do Cancer, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2002-07-01

    Cigarette smoking increases brain stroke risk, however,five to fifteen years after ceasing this habit, brain perfusion recovers normal pattern. We propose to compare brain perfusion patterns performing brain SPECT scans of smokers and non-smokers. Thirteen volunteers age range 20-30 years old) composed of six non-smokers and seven smokers were studied by brain scans (SPECT).We used ECD- {sup 99m} Tc radiolabelled as recommended by the manufacturer. All patients received 740 MBq of the radiopharmaceutical through intravenous injection, with their eyes opened and their ears unplugged, in a quiet room. We used a one head SPECT camera ( General Electric/ StarCam 4000 and Siemens/ E.Cam) with low-energy ultrahigh resolution collimator. Imaging begin 40 minutes after tracer injection. For reconstruction we used a Butterworth filter.The preliminary results showed brain perfusion deficit areas on five of the smokers while all non- smokers had normal brain perfusion scans. We believe that smoking increases the possibility of brain perfusion deficits. (author)

  15. Brain lesion analysis using three-dimensional SPECT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Iekado; Onagi, Atsuo; Kuroki, Takao

    1995-01-01

    A three-headed gamma camera (PRISM 3000) is capable to scan the protocol of early dynamic SPECT and to analyze two radioisotopes at the same time. We have framed three-dimensional brain SPECT images for several brain diseases by using the Application Visualization System (AVS). We carried out volume measurements in brain tumors and/or AVMs by applying this methodology. Thallium-201 and/or 123I-IMP were used for brain SPECT imaging. The dynamic scan protocol was changed in accordance with the given disease. The protocol for brain tumors was derived from a preliminary comparative study with thallium-201 and 123I-IMP that had suggested a disparity in the detection of brain tumors and the differentiation between tumor tissue and normal brain. The three-dimension SPECT image represented the brain tumor or AVM in a striking fashion, and the changes with respect to tumor or AVM after radiosurgery or embolization were understood readily. (author)

  16. Initial Investigation of preclinical integrated SPECT and MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamamura, Mark J; Ha, Seunghoon; Roeck, Werner W; Wagenaar, Douglas J; Meier, Dirk; Patt, Bradley E; Nalcioglu, Orhan

    2010-02-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) can provide specific functional information while magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide high-spatial resolution anatomical information as well as complementary functional information. In this study, we utilized a dual modality SPECT/MRI (MRSPECT) system to investigate the integration of SPECT and MRI for improved image accuracy. The MRSPECT system consisted of a cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) nuclear radiation detector interfaced with a specialized radiofrequency (RF) coil that was placed within a whole-body 4 T MRI system. The importance of proper corrections for non-uniform detector sensitivity and Lorentz force effects was demonstrated. MRI data were utilized for attenuation correction (AC) of the nuclear projection data and optimized Wiener filtering of the SPECT reconstruction for improved image accuracy. Finally, simultaneous dual-imaging of a nude mouse was performed to demonstrated the utility of co-registration for accurate localization of a radioactive source.

  17. Clinical application of SPECT and PET in cerebrovascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ra, Young Shin

    2003-01-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography(SPECT) and positron emission tomography(PET) are modern imaging techniques that allow for both qualitative are quantitative assessment of hemodynamic changes in cerebrovascular diseases. SPECT has been becoming an indispensable method to investigate regional cerebral blood flow because equipment and isotope are easily available in most general hospitals. Acetazolamide stress SPECT has also been proved to be useful to evaluate the cerebrovascular reserve of occlusive cerebrovascular diseases and to select surgical candidate. PET has gained wide spread clinical use in the evaluation of the hemodynamic and metabolic consequences of extracranial or intracranial arterial obstructive disease despite its complexity and limited availability. PET has been established as an invaluable tool in the pathophysilogy investigation of acute ischemic stroke. The potentials, limitations, and clinical applications of SPECT and PET in various cerebrovascular diseases will be discussed in this article with reviews of literatures

  18. High-resolution SPECT for small-animal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi Yujin

    2006-01-01

    This article presents a brief overview of the development of high-resolution SPECT for small-animal imaging. A pinhole collimator has been used for high-resolution animal SPECT to provide better spatial resolution and detection efficiency in comparison with a parallel-hole collimator. The theory of imaging characteristics of the pinhole collimator is presented and the designs of the pinhole aperture are discussed. The detector technologies used for the development of small-animal SPECT and the recent advances are presented. The evolving trend of small-animal SPECT is toward a multi-pinhole and a multi-detector system to obtain a high resolution and also a high detection efficiency. (authors)

  19. Examination of brain function using PET and SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Yasuhito; Momose, Toshinitsu; Watanabe, Toshiaki; Oku, Shinya; Nishikawa, Junichi [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1996-12-31

    The purpose of the presentation is to elucidate the unique role of PET (positron emission computed tomography) and SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) in assessing physiological and biochemical functions of the brain.

  20. 99mTc-HMPAO SPECT in brain death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchida, Tatsuro; Sadato, Norihiro; Nishizawa, Sadahiko

    1993-01-01

    Brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with 99m Tc-d,l-hexamethyl-propyleneamine oxime (HMPAO) was performed twice in a 78-year-old man clinically diagnosed as brain death according to the standard criteria of the Japanese Ministry of Welfare. The first brain SPECT demonstrated the tracer accumulation in the brain, indicating preserved cerebral blood flow. The second brain SPECT performed 3 days later revealed cessation of the blood flow. In patients with preserved cerebral blood flow, the diagnosis of brain death cannot be made, even if they meet the existing criteria, because previous report noted the recovery in some of those patients. Brain perfusion SPECT plays an important role as a confirmatory test for the diagnosis of brain death. (author)

  1. Clinical application of SPECT and PET in cerebrovascular disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ra, Young Shin [Ulsan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-02-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography(SPECT) and positron emission tomography(PET) are modern imaging techniques that allow for both qualitative are quantitative assessment of hemodynamic changes in cerebrovascular diseases. SPECT has been becoming an indispensable method to investigate regional cerebral blood flow because equipment and isotope are easily available in most general hospitals. Acetazolamide stress SPECT has also been proved to be useful to evaluate the cerebrovascular reserve of occlusive cerebrovascular diseases and to select surgical candidate. PET has gained wide spread clinical use in the evaluation of the hemodynamic and metabolic consequences of extracranial or intracranial arterial obstructive disease despite its complexity and limited availability. PET has been established as an invaluable tool in the pathophysilogy investigation of acute ischemic stroke. The potentials, limitations, and clinical applications of SPECT and PET in various cerebrovascular diseases will be discussed in this article with reviews of literatures.

  2. SPECT/CT in the Diagnosis of Skull Base Osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damle, Nishikant Avinash; Kumar, Rakesh; Kumar, Praveen; Jaganthan, Sriram; Patnecha, Manish; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Bandopadhyaya, Gurupad; Malhotra, Arun

    2011-01-01

    Skull base osteomyelitis is a potentially fatal disease. We demonstrate here the utility of SPECT/CT in diagnosing this entity, which was not obvious on a planar bone scan. A 99mT c MDP bone scan with SPECT/CT was carried out on a patient with clinically suspected skull base osteomyelitis. Findings were correlated with contrast enhanced CT (CECT) and MRI. Planar images were equivocal, but SPECT/CT showed intense uptake in the body of sphenoid and petrous temporal bone as well as the atlas corresponding to irregular bone destruction on CT and MRI. These findings indicate that SPECT/CT may have an additional role beyond planar imaging in the detection of skull base osteomyelitis.

  3. Validation of the Gate simulation platform in single photon emission computed tomography and application to the development of a complete 3-dimensional reconstruction algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazaro, D.

    2003-10-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are currently considered in nuclear medical imaging as a powerful tool to design and optimize detection systems, and also to assess reconstruction algorithms and correction methods for degrading physical effects. Among the many simulators available, none of them is considered as a standard in nuclear medical imaging: this fact has motivated the development of a new generic Monte Carlo simulation platform (GATE), based on GEANT4 and dedicated to SPECT/PET (single photo emission computed tomography / positron emission tomography) applications. We participated during this thesis to the development of the GATE platform within an international collaboration. GATE was validated in SPECT by modeling two gamma cameras characterized by a different geometry, one dedicated to small animal imaging and the other used in a clinical context (Philips AXIS), and by comparing the results obtained with GATE simulations with experimental data. The simulation results reproduce accurately the measured performances of both gamma cameras. The GATE platform was then used to develop a new 3-dimensional reconstruction method: F3DMC (fully 3-dimension Monte-Carlo) which consists in computing with Monte Carlo simulation the transition matrix used in an iterative reconstruction algorithm (in this case, ML-EM), including within the transition matrix the main physical effects degrading the image formation process. The results obtained with the F3DMC method were compared to the results obtained with three other more conventional methods (FBP, MLEM, MLEMC) for different phantoms. The results of this study show that F3DMC allows to improve the reconstruction efficiency, the spatial resolution and the signal to noise ratio with a satisfactory quantification of the images. These results should be confirmed by performing clinical experiments and open the door to a unified reconstruction method, which could be applied in SPECT but also in PET. (author)

  4. Tc-99m MAG3 SPECT on transplanted kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Jong Gul; Kim, Soon; Zeon, Seok Kil

    1999-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the usefulness of a technetium-99m mercaptoacetyltriglycine (Tc-99m MAG3) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) performed on transplanted kidney. Thirty renal transplant patients were included in this study. Planar scan was performed for 30 minutes using 555 MBq Tc-99m MAG3. A post-voiding SPECT scan was acquired on the third, seventh, fourteenth and twenty eighth day after transplantation. SPECT scan showed interpretable image quality in 26 of 30 patients (86.7%) and 84 in 120 scans (70%). Fourteen of 26 patients with interpretable SPECT image showed decreased or increased radioactivity, but only 5 had abnormal findings on the planar scan. Focal SPECT defects were seen in allografts with normal function (n=3), acute tubular necrosis (n=3), and acute rejection (n=2). The defects are thought to reflect focally underperfused renal parenchyme or, in normal allografts, an artifact from uneven radioactivity distribution. Four of 10 paints with renal arterial variation showed focally decreased radioactivity and SPECT helped guide further studies that confirmed the exact cause. Five of 10 patients with acute tubular necrosis or acute rejection showed focally decreased radioactivity, but its relation to the patients' clinical course was not clear. Focally increased radioactivity was observed in 5 allografts with normal function and 1 with double ureter in which local clearance delay was observed. Tc-99m MAG3 SPECT renal scan can detect additional focal abnormalities compared to planar scan. Further study is necessary to elucidate the exact clinical significance of the SPECT findings

  5. MRI and SPECT findings in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ukada, F.; Sawada, H.; Seriu, N.; Shindou, K.; Nishitani, N.; Kameyama, M.

    1992-01-01

    MRI was performed in 21 patients and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with N-isopropyl-p- 123 I iodoamphetamine in 16 patients, to visualize upper motor neurone lesions in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. T2-weighted MRI revealed high signal along the course of the pyramidal tract in the internal capsule and cerebral peduncle in 4 of 21 patients. SPECT images were normal in 4 patients, but uptake was reduced in the cerebral cortex that includes the motor area in 11. (orig.)

  6. Brain SPECT using dipyridamole for evaluation of vascular reserve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Su Zy; Park, Chan Hee; Yoon, Soo Hwan; Pai, Moon Sun; Yoon, Suk Nam; Cho, Kyung Kee

    1997-01-01

    Baseline and stress brain SPECT studies using CO 2 inhalation, acetazolamide (Diamox R ) and adenosine administrations have been used in the evaluation of cerebral vascular reserve. Recently dipyridamole (Persantine R ) which is one of the pharmacologic myocardial perfusion SPECT agents as a potent vasodilator is suggested as another cerebral vasodilator. IV Diamox R is not available in Korea. Therefore, the purpose of our study was to evaluate dipyridamole in stress brain SPECT in patients with Moya Moya disease. Eight patients with angiographically proven Moya Moya disease were studied. Their ages ranged from 7 to 62 year old. There were 4 males and 4 females. Each patient had a baseline and persantine brain SPECT studies with 1 to 3 days' interval. Dipyridamole was given intravenously at a dose of 0.56 mg/kg over 4 minutes while watching vital signs such as blood pressure, heart rate, and electrocardiogram. Three minutes after the completion of the infusion, 99mTc-ECD (0.2 mCi/Ib body weight) was injected. Brain SPECT was performed 30 minutes later using a tripple head gamma camera equipped with LEHR collimators. A total of 128 projections with an acquisition time of 30 second per projection was obtained and reconstructed by filtered back projections without attenuation correction. The difference between the baseline and persantine studies was analysed by visual and semiquantitavely. During the infusion of persantine, heart rate, blood pressure and side effects such as headache, chest discomfort were similar to the persantine myocardial SPECT studies. Five of eight patients showed a significant decrease in rCBF on persantine brain SPECT in comparison to the baseline study. The remaining three revealed no significant change in rCBF. Our study suggests that the dipyridamole stress brain SPECT is feasible and useful in assessing cerebral blood flow reserve. However we need to evaluate more number of patients in the future

  7. Photon-gated spin transistor

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Fan; Song, Cheng; Cui, Bin; Peng, Jingjing; Gu, Youdi; Wang, Guangyue; Pan, Feng

    2017-01-01

    Spin-polarized field-effect transistor (spin-FET), where a dielectric layer is generally employed for the electrical gating as the traditional FET, stands out as a seminal spintronic device under the miniaturization trend of electronics. It would be fundamentally transformative if optical gating was used for spin-FET. We report a new type of spin-polarized field-effect transistor (spin-FET) with optical gating, which is fabricated by partial exposure of the (La,Sr)MnO3 channel to light-emitti...

  8. Diagnostic value of rest and stress gated 82Rb PET myocardial perfusion imaging using quantitative software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Hongcheng; Gu Yusen; Liu Wenguan; Zhu Weimin; Halkar, R.K.; Santana, C.A.; Feng Yusheng

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Gated myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) is regularly performed using SPECT. More recently, gated 82 Rb MPI has been used to assess left ventricular myocardial perfusion and function with new generation PET scanners. The objective of this study was to evaluate the value of rest and stress gated 82 Rb PET myocardial perfusion imaging and to determine whether the quantitative technique in- creased the confidence level of the interpreters. Methods: Thirty-two patients underwent rest and adenosine stress gated 82 Pb PET MPI. Emory Cardiac Toolbox quantitative software was used for processing and inter-predation. Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), end-diastolic, end-systolic and transient ischemia dilation ratio were automatically generated. Three interpreters (nuclear medicine doctors) independently reviewed the studies. Visual scoring (1-5 scales: excellent, good, unsure, poor, uninterpretable) was used to assess the overall quality of the gated images and the added confidence level of interpretation. Visual assessment of the LVEF was compared to the automatically generated LVEF. Comparison between the visual assessment and software generated was graded on a 1- 5 scales (helpful, probably helpful, unsure, probably not helpful, definitely not helpful). The analysed items were divided into two groups (favorable group and negative group). The percentage and 95% confidence intervals of each group were calculated. Results: A total of 192 gated studies were evaluated (64 gated x 3 interpreters ). The overall quality of the gated images was good [excellent 40.1% (77/192), good 43.2% (83/192), unsure 3.1% (6/192), poor 13.6% (26/192), uninterpretable 0]. The 95% confidence intervals of good and excellent quality range from 78.1% to 88.6%. The interpreter's agreed with the automated LVEF on 85.4% of the gated images [agree 76.6% (147/192), probably agree 8.8% (17/192), unsure 3.1% (6/192), probably disagree 8.8% (17/192), disagree 2.6% (5/192)]. And its 95

  9. Simulation Study of PET System Using GATE%基于GATE的PET系统仿真研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘豪佳; 张斌

    2014-01-01

    PET and SPECT is the most advanced nuclear medical imaging technology .GATE is a dedicated Monte Carlo simulation platform for PET and SPECT .This study validates two GATE models of Simens ECAT EXACT HR+PET scanner and Simens PET/CT Biograph 2.After the simulation of PET systems completed , testing and performance evaluation of simulation systems were proceeded according to NEMA 2001 performance protocols , including spatial resolution , scatter fraction and sensitivity .Test results show that , performances of GATE simulation systems agree well with the experimental values .%PET和SPECT是现代核医学最高水平的影像技术,GATE是专用于PET和SPECT的蒙特卡罗仿真工具。研究以西门子公司的PET扫描仪 ECAT EXACT HR+和PET/CT Biograph2为原型,分别使用GATE实现其系统的完整仿真。依据NEMA 2001标准,对仿真系统的空间分辨率、散射分数和灵敏度分别进行测试与评估。测试结果表明,仿真系统性能参数和实验结果之间具有良好的一致性。

  10. PET and SPECT investigations in Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asenbaum, S.

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear medicine offers a wide range of possibilities to investigate dementia. Various SPECT and PET tracers will be introduced in this article first. Different questions concerning evaluation of dementia are discussed taking Alzheimer's disease (AD) as an example. It is important to perform nuclear medicine investigations on high technical level, using standardized methods as statistical parametric mapping (SPM) for evaluation. If neuroprotective therapies are available, an early diagnosis, the determination of risk factors and longitudinal investigations will be the focus of interest and the main goal of nuclear medicine. Apart from measuring cerebral perfusion and glucose metabolism the development of new ligands, concerning the cholinergic system and the visualization of amyloid plaques, is of great importance. (orig.) [de

  11. Cerebral postischemic hyperperfusion in PET and SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Inn Ho

    2001-01-01

    Cerebral post-ischemic hyperperfusion has been observed at the acute and subacute periods of ischemic stroke. In the animal stroke model, early post-ischemic hyperperfusion is the mark of recanalization of the occluded artery with reperfusion. In the PET studies to both humans and experimental animals, early post-ischemic hyperperfusion is not a key factor in the development of tissue infarction and indicates the spontaneous reperfusion of the ischemic brain tissue without late infarction or with small infarction. But late post-ischemic hyperperfusion shows the worse prognosis with reperfusion injury associated with brain tissue necrosis. Early post-ischemic hyperperfusion defined by PET and SPECT may be useful in predicting the prognosis of ischemic stroke and the effect of thrombolytic therapy

  12. Cervical SPECT Camera for Parathyroid Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2012-08-31

    Primary hyperparathyroidism characterized by one or more enlarged parathyroid glands has become one of the most common endocrine diseases in the world affecting about 1 per 1000 in the United States. Standard treatment is highly invasive exploratory neck surgery called Parathyroidectomy. The surgery has a notable mortality rate because of the close proximity to vital structures. The move to minimally invasive parathyroidectomy is hampered by the lack of high resolution pre-surgical imaging techniques that can accurately localize the parathyroid with respect to surrounding structures. We propose to develop a dedicated ultra-high resolution (~ 1 mm) and high sensitivity (10x conventional camera) cervical scintigraphic imaging device. It will be based on a multiple pinhole-camera SPECT system comprising a novel solid state CZT detector that offers the required performance. The overall system will be configured to fit around the neck and comfortably image a patient.

  13. Myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging in patients with myocardial bridging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Wei; Qiu Hong; Yang Weixian; Wang Feng; He Zuoxiang

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Stress myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging was used to assess myocardial ischemia in patients with myocardial bridging. Methods: Ninety-six patients with myocardial bridging of the left anterior descending artery documented by coronary angiography were included in this study. All under- went exercise or pharmacological stress myocardial perfusion SPECT assessing myocardial ischemia. None had prior myocardial infarction. One year follow-up by telephone interview was performed in all patients. Results The mean stenotic severity of systolic phase on angiography was (65 ± 19)%. In the SPECT study, 20 of 96 (20.8%) patients showed abnormal perfusion. This percentage was significantly higher than that of stress electrocardiogram (ECG). The higher positive rate of SPECT perfusion images was showed in the group of patients with severe systolic narrowing (≥75%) than that with mild-to-moderate systolic narrowing (50% vs 6.3%, P<0.001). The prevalence of abnormal image was significantly higher in ELDERLY PEOPLE; patients with STT change on rest ECG than in those with normal rest ECG (54.2% vs 9.7%, P<0.001). During follow-up, one patient with abnormal SPECT perfusion image sustained angina and accepted percutaneous coronary intervention, and no cardiac event occurred in patients with normal images. Conclusions: Stress myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging can be used effectively for assessing myocardial ischemia and has potential prognostic value for patients with myocardial bridging. (authors)

  14. Usefulness of hyperventilation myocardial SPECT for diagnosing vasospastic angina pectoris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahara, Yorio; Shimoyama, Katsuya; Nishimura, Tooru; Sasaki, Akira; Taya, Makoto; Mizuno, Haruyoshi; Ono, Akifumi; Tsuya, Tsuneo; Ishikawa, Kyozo

    1990-01-01

    We evaluated the usefulness of hyperventilation myocardial scintigraphy (HV-SPECT) for diagnosing vasospastic angina pectoris. The subjects consisted of 11 patients with rest angina and 13 with rest and exertional angina in whom coronary spasm was demonstrated by coronary angiography, and 6 with exertional angina in whom a significant stenotic lesion was observed by coronary angiography. Hyperventilation was performed at a rate of 40/min for 5 minutes in all the patients. Ischemia was considered to be present when defect and redistribution were observed by SPECT. HV-SPECT revealed positive findings in 8 patients with rest angina (73%) and 9 with exertional and rest angina (69%) but only in 1 with exertional angina (17%). Ischemic ST changes on monitor ECG were observed in 13 of the 30 patients (43%); ST was enhanced in 4 patients and depressed in 9 patients. In the patients with rest angina, HV-SPECT induced ischemic findings more frequently than exercise SPECT (73% vs 55%). HV-SPECT seems to be useful as a non-invasive method for diagnosing angina pectoris resulting from coronary spasm. (author)

  15. Tc-99m Ciprofloxacin SPECT of Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Min Kyung; Hwang, Kyung Hoon [Gachon University Gil Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Min Ki [Good Samaritan Hospital, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Choe, Won Sick [Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    Tc-99m ciprofloxacin is available for imaging infection. However, there has been no study on employing single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with using Tc-99m ciprofloxacin to image active pulmonary tuberculosis. Therefore, we conducted this study to assess the efficacy of Tc-99m ciprofloxacin SPECT for imaging active pulmonary tuberculosis. Twenty-one participants were enrolled in this prospective study. They were divided into two groups according to the clinical and radiological assessment. Group one (Gr. 1) consisted of five normal volunteers and six patients with inactive pulmonary tuberculosis. Group two (Gr. 2) consisted of ten patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis. SPECT was performed 3 h after injecting 555 MBq (15 mCi) of Tc-99m ciprofloxacin. The findings of Tc-99m ciprofloxacin SPECT were interpreted by a nuclear medicine specialist and then the results were analyzed according to the patients' clinical and radiological classifications. The results of Tc-99m ciprofloxacin SPECT were as follows: eight true-positive cases, ten true-negative cases, one false-positive case and two false-negative cases. The sensitivity and specificity was 80.0% and 90.0%, respectively. The positive predictive value was 88.9% and the negative predictive value was 83.3%. Conclusions Tc-99m ciprofloxacin SPECT is feasible for imaging active pulmonary tuberculosis. It is a useful nuclear-imaging method for discriminating between the active and inactive tuberculosis states in patients with a past medical history of pulmonary tuberculosis.

  16. Reversible logic gates on Physarum Polycephalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schumann, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we consider possibilities how to implement asynchronous sequential logic gates and quantum-style reversible logic gates on Physarum polycephalum motions. We show that in asynchronous sequential logic gates we can erase information because of uncertainty in the direction of plasmodium propagation. Therefore quantum-style reversible logic gates are more preferable for designing logic circuits on Physarum polycephalum

  17. Demonstration of a Quantum Nondemolition Sum Gate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoshikawa, J.; Miwa, Y.; Huck, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    The sum gate is the canonical two-mode gate for universal quantum computation based on continuous quantum variables. It represents the natural analogue to a qubit C-NOT gate. In addition, the continuous-variable gate describes a quantum nondemolition (QND) interaction between the quadrature...

  18. Importance of SPECT/CT for knee and hip joint prostheses; Stellenwert der SPECT/CT bei Knie- und Hueftgelenkprothesen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strobel, K.; Steurer-Dober, I.; Huellner, M.W.; Veit-Haibach, P.; Allgayer, B. [Luzerner Kantonsspital (Switzerland). Institut fuer Nuklearmedizin und Roentgendiagnostik

    2012-07-15

    Complications, such as loosening or infections are common problems after hip or knee arthroplasty. If conventional X-rays are equivocal bone scintigraphy is the classical second-line imaging modality. Single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) offers metabolic and morphologic information in one imaging step and is becoming increasingly more available in larger hospitals. The SPECT/CT procedure is a promising method and is increasingly being used in daily routine to evaluate joint arthroplasty. The additional benefit compared with classical conventional bone scintigraphy has to be evaluated in further prospective studies. In our hospital SPECT/CT regularly gives important additional information regarding prosthetic joint complications. SPECT/CT is increasingly being used as the second step imaging standard modality if conventional X-rays are equivocal. (orig.) [German] Komplikationen wie Lockerung und Infekt stellen ein haeufiges Problem nach Hueft- und Kniegelenkprothesen dar. Wenn die konventionelle Roentgenaufnahme nicht zum Ziel fuehrt, ist die klassische konventionelle Skelettszintigraphie die am haeufigsten verwendete ''Second-line''-Bildgebung. Die ''single photon emission computed tomography''/CT (SPECT/CT) bietet metabolische und morphologische Informationen bzgl. Prothesenkomplikationen in einem Untersuchungsgang und ist zunehmend in groesseren Kliniken verfuegbar. Die SPECT/CT ist eine viel versprechende Methode und wird im klinischen Alltag bei der Evaluation von Gelenkprothesen zunehmend eingesetzt. Es sind noch mehr prospektive Studien noetig, um die Leistungsfaehigkeit und den Zusatznutzen gegenueber der klassischen Szintigraphie zu evaluieren. In unserer Klinik wird die Knochenszintigraphie bei der Abklaerung von Prothesenkomplikationen zumeist mit einer SPECT/CT kombiniert und liefert regelmaessig wichtige Zusatzinformationen. Die SPECT/CT entwickelt sich zunehmend zum Standard

  19. Evaluation of the diagnostic performance of SPECT coupled to tomodensitometry (SPECT-CT) in the daily practice of bone scintigraphy at the Nuclear Medical station of Nancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Netter, F.; Journo, A.; Mayer, J.C.; Grandpierre, S.; Daragon, N.; Karcher, G.; Olivier, P.; Scigliano, S.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of our study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of SPECT coupled to computed axial tomography (SPECT- CT) in our daily practice of bone scintigraphy. Subjects and methods: SPECT- CT obtained as a complement to the planar bone scintigraphy in 39 patients were studied. Each type of image was retrospectively read by two different observers: a nuclear medicine physician who was unaware of SPECT- CT results analysed planar bone scintigraphy, a second one who was unaware of planar bone scintigraphy results analysed SPECT- CT images. In this population of patients, 17 patients were addressed in an oncologic setting. The 22 other patients were addressed for pain of indeterminate origin without neoplastic context. Results: In 13% of the cases, SPECT- CT specified the precise location of increased uptake foci seen on planar bone scintigraphy. In 38% of cases, SPECT- CT confirmed a diagnosis suspected by the planar bone scintigraphy. In 10% of cases, SPECT- CT established a diagnosis that was uncertain with planar bone scintigraphy. In 26% of cases, SPECT- CT brought no additional information. Finally in 3% of cases, SPECT- CT proved to be more sensitive than planar images. Conclusion: Our study demonstrates the utility of SPECT- CT in the daily practice of bone scintigraphy, this complementary imaging study benefited to 74% of our patients. (authors)

  20. 123I-iomazenil brain receptor SPECT in focal epilepsy. In comparison with 99mTc-HMPAO brain SPECT, MRI and Video/EEG monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Hao; Wang Tongge; Huang Li; Michael Cordes

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical value of 123 I-Iomazenil brain receptor SPECT in diagnosis of focal epilepsy in comparison with 99m Tc-HMPAO brain SPECT, MRI and Video/EEG monitoring. Methods 123 I-Iomazenil brain receptor SPECT was performed on 40 patients with focal epilepsy. The results were compared with those obtained by 99m Tc-HMPAO brain SPECT, MRI and Video/EEG monitoring. Results: In 40 patients, the sensitivity of Video/EEG monitoring for localization of epileptogenic area was 95% (38/40). The sensitivity of 123 I-iomazenil brain receptor SPECT, 99m Tc-HMPAO brain SPECT and MRI for localization of epileptogenic area compared with Video/EEG monitoring ('gold standard') was 65.8%(25/38), 55.3%(21/38) and 47.4%(18/38), respectively. The localization of epileptogenic area with 123 I-Iomazenil brain receptor SPECT was in concordance with Video/EEG monitoring in 20 patients, 99m Tc-HMPAO brain SPECT in 15 patients and MRI in 16 patients, respectively. The sensitivity of 123 I-Iomazenil brain receptor SPECT combined with MRI for localization of epileptogenic area was 84.2%(32/38). Conclusions: 123 I-Iomazenil brain receptor SPECT is a useful method in detecting and localizing epileptogenic area. The combination of 123 I-Iomazenil brain receptor SPECT and MRI has a high sensitivity for detecting epileptogenic area

  1. Sequential SPECT/CT imaging starting with stress SPECT in patients with left bundle branch block suspected for coronary artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engbers, Elsemiek M.; Mouden, Mohamed [Isala, Department of Cardiology, Zwolle (Netherlands); Isala, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Zwolle (Netherlands); Timmer, Jorik R.; Ottervanger, Jan Paul [Isala, Department of Cardiology, Zwolle (Netherlands); Knollema, Siert; Jager, Pieter L. [Isala, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Zwolle (Netherlands)

    2017-01-15

    To investigate the impact of left bundle branch block (LBBB) on sequential single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/ CT imaging starting with stress-first SPECT. Consecutive symptomatic low- to intermediate-risk patients without a history of coronary artery disease (CAD) referred for SPECT/CT were included from an observational registry. If stress SPECT was abnormal, additional rest SPECT and, if feasible, coronary CT angiography (CCTA) were acquired. Of the 5,018 patients, 218 (4.3 %) demonstrated LBBB. Patients with LBBB were slightly older than patients without LBBB (65±12 vs. 61±11 years, p<0.001). Stress SPECT was more frequently abnormal in patients with LBBB (82 % vs. 46 %, p<0.001). After reviewing stress and rest images, SPECT was normal in 43 % of the patients with LBBB, compared to 77 % of the patients without LBBB (p<0.001). Sixty-four of the 124 patients with LBBB and abnormal stress-rest SPECT underwent CCTA (52 %), which could exclude obstructive CAD in 46 of the patients (72 %). Sequential SPECT/CT imaging starting with stress SPECT is not the optimal imaging protocol in patients with LBBB, as the majority of these patients have potentially false-positive stress SPECT. First-line testing using CCTA may be more appropriate in low- to intermediate-risk patients with LBBB. (orig.)

  2. Deep Gate Recurrent Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-22

    and Fred Cummins. Learning to forget: Continual prediction with lstm . Neural computation, 12(10):2451–2471, 2000. Alex Graves. Generating sequences...DSGU) and Simple Gated Unit (SGU), which are structures for learning long-term dependencies. Compared to traditional Long Short-Term Memory ( LSTM ) and...Gated Recurrent Unit (GRU), both structures require fewer parameters and less computation time in sequence classification tasks. Unlike GRU and LSTM

  3. Bill Gates vil redde Folkeskolen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fejerskov, Adam Moe

    2014-01-01

    Det amerikanske uddannelsessystem bliver for tiden udsat for hård kritik, ledt an af Microsoft stifteren Bill Gates. Gates har indtil videre brugt 3 mia. kroner på at skabe opbakning til tiltag som præstationslønning af lærere og strømlining af pensum på tværs af alle skoler i landet...

  4. Monte Carlo Optimization of Crystal Configuration for Pixelated Molecular SPECT Scanners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahani, Hojjat [Radiation Application Research School, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Center for Molecular and Cellular Imaging, Tehran University of Medical Science, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Raisali, Gholamreza [Radiation Application Research School, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kamali-Asl, Alireza [Radiation Medicine Department, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ay, Mohammad Reza, E-mail: mohammadreza_ay@sina.tums.ac.ir [Research Center for Molecular and Cellular Imaging, Tehran University of Medical Science, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Tehran University of Medical Science, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-02-01

    Resolution-sensitivity-PDA tradeoff is the most challenging problem in design and optimization of pixelated preclinical SPECT scanners. In this work, we addressed such a challenge from a crystal point-of-view by looking for an optimal pixelated scintillator using GATE Monte Carlo simulation. Various crystal configurations have been investigated and the influence of different pixel sizes, pixel gaps, and three scintillators on tomographic resolution, sensitivity, and PDA of the camera were evaluated. The crystal configuration was then optimized using two objective functions: the weighted-sum and the figure-of-merit methods. The CsI(Na) reveals the highest sensitivity of the order of 43.47 cps/MBq in comparison to the NaI(Tl) and the YAP(Ce), for a 1.5×1.5 mm{sup 2} pixel size and 0.1 mm gap. The results show that the spatial resolution, in terms of FWHM, improves from 3.38 to 2.21 mm while the sensitivity simultaneously deteriorates from 42.39 cps/MBq to 27.81 cps/MBq when pixel size varies from 2×2 mm{sup 2} to 0.5×0.5 mm{sup 2} for a 0.2 mm gap, respectively. The PDA worsens from 0.91 to 0.42 when pixel size decreases from 0.5×0.5 mm{sup 2} to 1×1 mm{sup 2} for a 0.2 mm gap at 15° incident-angle. The two objective functions agree that the 1.5×1.5 mm{sup 2} pixel size and 0.1 mm Epoxy gap CsI(Na) configuration provides the best compromise for small-animal imaging, using the HiReSPECT scanner. Our study highlights that crystal configuration can significantly affect the performance of the camera, and thereby Monte Carlo optimization of pixelated detectors is mandatory in order to achieve an optimal quality tomogram. - Highlights: • We optimized pixelated crystal configuration for the purpose of molecular SPECT imaging. • The weighted-sum and the figure-of-merit methods were used in order to search for an optimal crystal configuration. • The higher the pixel size, the poorer the resolution and simultaneously the higher the sensitivity and the PDA. • The

  5. Monte Carlo Optimization of Crystal Configuration for Pixelated Molecular SPECT Scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahani, Hojjat; Raisali, Gholamreza; Kamali-Asl, Alireza; Ay, Mohammad Reza

    2017-01-01

    Resolution-sensitivity-PDA tradeoff is the most challenging problem in design and optimization of pixelated preclinical SPECT scanners. In this work, we addressed such a challenge from a crystal point-of-view by looking for an optimal pixelated scintillator using GATE Monte Carlo simulation. Various crystal configurations have been investigated and the influence of different pixel sizes, pixel gaps, and three scintillators on tomographic resolution, sensitivity, and PDA of the camera were evaluated. The crystal configuration was then optimized using two objective functions: the weighted-sum and the figure-of-merit methods. The CsI(Na) reveals the highest sensitivity of the order of 43.47 cps/MBq in comparison to the NaI(Tl) and the YAP(Ce), for a 1.5×1.5 mm"2 pixel size and 0.1 mm gap. The results show that the spatial resolution, in terms of FWHM, improves from 3.38 to 2.21 mm while the sensitivity simultaneously deteriorates from 42.39 cps/MBq to 27.81 cps/MBq when pixel size varies from 2×2 mm"2 to 0.5×0.5 mm"2 for a 0.2 mm gap, respectively. The PDA worsens from 0.91 to 0.42 when pixel size decreases from 0.5×0.5 mm"2 to 1×1 mm"2 for a 0.2 mm gap at 15° incident-angle. The two objective functions agree that the 1.5×1.5 mm"2 pixel size and 0.1 mm Epoxy gap CsI(Na) configuration provides the best compromise for small-animal imaging, using the HiReSPECT scanner. Our study highlights that crystal configuration can significantly affect the performance of the camera, and thereby Monte Carlo optimization of pixelated detectors is mandatory in order to achieve an optimal quality tomogram. - Highlights: • We optimized pixelated crystal configuration for the purpose of molecular SPECT imaging. • The weighted-sum and the figure-of-merit methods were used in order to search for an optimal crystal configuration. • The higher the pixel size, the poorer the resolution and simultaneously the higher the sensitivity and the PDA. • The higher the pixel gap, the

  6. Optimization of SPECT calibration for quantification of images applied to dosimetry with iodine-131

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, Samira Marques de

    2018-01-01

    SPECT systems calibration plays an essential role in the accuracy of the quantification of images. In this work, in its first stage, an optimized SPECT calibration method was proposed for 131 I studies, considering the partial volume effect (PVE) and the position of the calibration source. In the second stage, the study aimed to investigate the impact of count density and reconstruction parameters on the determination of the calibration factor and the quantification of the image in dosimetry studies, considering the reality of clinical practice in Brazil. In the final step, the study aimed evaluating the influence of several factors in the calibration for absorbed dose calculation using Monte Carlo simulations (MC) GATE code. Calibration was performed by determining a calibration curve (sensitivity versus volume) obtained by applying different thresholds. Then, the calibration factors were determined with an exponential function adjustment. Images were performed with high and low counts densities for several source positions within the simulator. To validate the calibration method, the calibration factors were used for absolute quantification of the total reference activities. The images were reconstructed adopting two approaches of different parameters, usually used in patient images. The methodology developed for the calibration of the tomographic system was easier and faster to implement than other procedures suggested to improve the accuracy of the results. The study also revealed the influence of the location of the calibration source, demonstrating better precision in the absolute quantification considering the location of the target region during the calibration of the system. The study applied in the Brazilian thyroid protocol suggests the revision of the calibration of the SPECT system, including different positions for the reference source, besides acquisitions considering the Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) of the images. Finally, the doses obtained with the

  7. Preclinical imaging characteristics and quantification of Platinum-195m SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aalbersberg, E.A.; Wit-van der Veen, B.J. de; Vegt, E.; Vogel, Wouter V. [The Netherlands Cancer Institute (NKI-AVL), Department of Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Zwaagstra, O.; Codee-van der Schilden, K. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Petten (Netherlands)

    2017-08-15

    In vivo biodistribution imaging of platinum-based compounds may allow better patient selection for treatment with chemo(radio)therapy. Radiolabeling with Platinum-195m ({sup 195m}Pt) allows SPECT imaging, without altering the chemical structure or biological activity of the compound. We have assessed the feasibility of {sup 195m}Pt SPECT imaging in mice, with the aim to determine the image quality and accuracy of quantification for current preclinical imaging equipment. Enriched (>96%) {sup 194}Pt was irradiated in the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten, The Netherlands (NRG). A 0.05 M HCl {sup 195m}Pt-solution with a specific activity of 33 MBq/mg was obtained. Image quality was assessed for the NanoSPECT/CT (Bioscan Inc., Washington DC, USA) and U-SPECT{sup +}/CT (MILabs BV, Utrecht, the Netherlands) scanners. A radioactivity-filled rod phantom (rod diameter 0.85-1.7 mm) filled with 1 MBq {sup 195m}Pt was scanned with different acquisition durations (10-120 min). Four healthy mice were injected intravenously with 3-4 MBq {sup 195m}Pt. Mouse images were acquired with the NanoSPECT for 120 min at 0, 2, 4, or 24 h after injection. Organs were delineated to quantify {sup 195m}Pt concentrations. Immediately after scanning, the mice were sacrificed, and the platinum concentration was determined in organs using a gamma counter and graphite furnace - atomic absorption spectroscopy (GF-AAS) as reference standards. A 30-min acquisition of the phantom provided visually adequate image quality for both scanners. The smallest visible rods were 0.95 mm in diameter on the NanoSPECT and 0.85 mm in diameter on the U-SPECT{sup +}. The image quality in mice was visually adequate. Uptake was seen in the kidneys with excretion to the bladder, and in the liver, blood, and intestine. No uptake was seen in the brain. The Spearman correlation between SPECT and gamma counter was 0.92, between SPECT and GF-AAS it was 0.84, and between GF-AAS and gamma counter it was0.97 (all p < 0

  8. Latest design of gate valves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurzhofer, U.; Stolte, J.; Weyand, M.

    1996-12-01

    Babcock Sempell, one of the most important valve manufacturers in Europe, has delivered valves for the nuclear power industry since the beginning of the peaceful application of nuclear power in the 1960s. The latest innovation by Babcock Sempell is a gate valve that meets all recent technical requirements of the nuclear power technology. At the moment in the United States, Germany, Sweden, and many other countries, motor-operated gate and globe valves are judged very critically. Besides the absolute control of the so-called {open_quotes}trip failure,{close_quotes} the integrity of all valve parts submitted to operational forces must be maintained. In case of failure of the limit and torque switches, all valve designs have been tested with respect to the quality of guidance of the gate. The guidances (i.e., guides) shall avoid a tilting of the gate during the closing procedure. The gate valve newly designed by Babcock Sempell fulfills all these characteristic criteria. In addition, the valve has cobalt-free seat hardfacing, the suitability of which has been proven by friction tests as well as full-scale blowdown tests at the GAP of Siemens in Karlstein, West Germany. Babcock Sempell was to deliver more than 30 gate valves of this type for 5 Swedish nuclear power stations by autumn 1995. In the presentation, the author will report on the testing performed, qualifications, and sizing criteria which led to the new technical design.

  9. CMOS gate array characterization procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spratt, James P.

    1993-09-01

    Present procedures are inadequate for characterizing the radiation hardness of gate array product lines prior to personalization because the selection of circuits to be used, from among all those available in the manufacturer's circuit library, is usually uncontrolled. (Some circuits are fundamentally more radiation resistant than others.) In such cases, differences in hardness can result between different designs of the same logic function. Hardness also varies because many gate arrays feature large custom-designed megacells (e.g., microprocessors and random access memories-MicroP's and RAM's). As a result, different product lines cannot be compared equally. A characterization strategy is needed, along with standardized test vehicle(s), methodology, and conditions, so that users can make informed judgments on which gate arrays are best suited for their needs. The program described developed preferred procedures for the radiation characterization of gate arrays, including a gate array evaluation test vehicle, featuring a canary circuit, designed to define the speed versus hardness envelope of the gate array. A multiplier was chosen for this role, and a baseline multiplier architecture is suggested that could be incorporated into an existing standard evaluation circuit chip.

  10. Diagnostic role of (99)Tc(m)-MDP SPECT/CT combined SPECT/MRI Multi modality imaging for early and atypical bone metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-Liang; Li, Qian; Cao, Lin; Jiang, Shi-Xi

    2014-01-01

    The bone metastasis appeared early before the bone imaging for most of the above patients. (99)Tc(m)-MDP ((99)Tc(m) marked methylene diphosphonate) bone imaging could diagnosis the bone metastasis with highly sensitivity, but with lower specificity. The aim of this study is to explore the diagnostic value of (99)Tc(m)-MDP SPECT/CT combined SPECT/MRI Multi modality imaging for the early period atypical bone metastases. 15 to 30 mCi (99)Tc(m)-MDP was intravenously injected to the 34 malignant patients diagnosed as doubtful early bone metastases. SPECT, CT and SPECT/CT images were captured and analyzed consequently. For the patients diagnosed as early period atypical bone metastases by SPECT/CT, combining the SPECT/CT and MRI together as the SPECT/MRI integrated image. The obtained SPECT/MRI image was analyzed and compared with the pathogenic results of patients. The results indicated that 34 early period doubtful metastatic focus, including 34 SPECT positive focus, 17 focus without special changes by using CT method, 11 bone metastases focus by using SPECT/CT method, 23 doubtful bone metastases focus, 8 doubtful bone metastases focus, 14 doubtful bone metastases focus and 2 focus without clear image. Totally, SPECT/CT combined with SPECT/MRI method diagnosed 30 bone metastatic focus and 4 doubtfully metastatic focus. In conclusion, (99)Tc(m)-MDP SPECT/CT combined SPECT/MRI Multi modality imaging shows a higher diagnostic value for the early period bone metastases, which also enhances the diagnostic accuracy rate.

  11. Efficient simulation of voxelized phantom in GATE with embedded SimSET multiple photon history generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsin-Hon; Chuang, Keh-Shih; Lin, Yi-Hsing; Ni, Yu-Ching; Wu, Jay; Jan, Meei-Ling

    2014-10-01

    GEANT4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) is a powerful Monte Carlo simulator that combines the advantages of the general-purpose GEANT4 simulation code and the specific software tool implementations dedicated to emission tomography. However, the detailed physical modelling of GEANT4 is highly computationally demanding, especially when tracking particles through voxelized phantoms. To circumvent the relatively slow simulation of voxelized phantoms in GATE, another efficient Monte Carlo code can be used to simulate photon interactions and transport inside a voxelized phantom. The simulation system for emission tomography (SimSET), a dedicated Monte Carlo code for PET/SPECT systems, is well-known for its efficiency in simulation of voxel-based objects. An efficient Monte Carlo workflow integrating GATE and SimSET for simulating pinhole SPECT has been proposed to improve voxelized phantom simulation. Although the workflow achieves a desirable increase in speed, it sacrifices the ability to simulate decaying radioactive sources such as non-pure positron emitters or multiple emission isotopes with complex decay schemes and lacks the modelling of time-dependent processes due to the inherent limitations of the SimSET photon history generator (PHG). Moreover, a large volume of disk storage is needed to store the huge temporal photon history file produced by SimSET that must be transported to GATE. In this work, we developed a multiple photon emission history generator (MPHG) based on SimSET/PHG to support a majority of the medically important positron emitters. We incorporated the new generator codes inside GATE to improve the simulation efficiency of voxelized phantoms in GATE, while eliminating the need for the temporal photon history file. The validation of this new code based on a MicroPET R4 system was conducted for 124I and 18F with mouse-like and rat-like phantoms. Comparison of GATE/MPHG with GATE/GEANT4 indicated there is a slight difference in energy

  12. Inter-observer variation of diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease by SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshima, Motoo; Machida, Kikuo; Koizumi, Kiyoshi

    2001-01-01

    SPECT shows characteristic distribution in Alzheimer's disease. The purpose of this study is to define inter-observer variations in the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Fifty-seven patients, included 19 Alzheimer's disease were collected from four institutions. Five-graded score was used to interprete SPECT in 18 regions. Ten nuclear medicine physicians interpreted SPECT referred with MMSE and clinical information. Among 57 cases 19 Alzheimer's disease were selected in this study. Statistics were performed between SPECT score and MMSE score. In conclusion, inter-observer variation is present in SPECT interpretation. There was a good correlation SPECT and MMSE with proper brain SPECT physicians. They are superior to in the interpretation not only resident, but other specialists. Education in the interpretation of brain SPECT looks important. (author)

  13. Proceedings of clinical SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) symposium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-09-01

    It has been five years since the last in-depth American College of Nuclear Physicians/Society of Nuclear Medicine Symposium on the subject of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was held. Because this subject was nominated as the single most desired topic we have selected SPECT imaging as the basis for this year's program. The objectives of this symposium are to survey the progress of SPECT clinical applications that have taken place over the last five years and to provide practical and timely guidelines to users of SPECT so that this exciting imaging modality can be fully integrated into the evaluation of pathologic processes. The first half was devoted to a consideration of technical factors important in SPECT acquisition and the second half was devoted to those organ systems about which sufficient clinical SPECT imaging data are available. With respect to the technical aspect of the program we have selected the key areas which demand awareness and attention in order to make SPECT operational in clinical practice. These include selection of equipment, details of uniformity correction, utilization of phantoms for equipment acceptance and quality assurance, the major aspect of algorithms, an understanding of filtered back projection and appropriate choice of filters and an awareness of the most commonly generated artifacts and how to recognize them. With respect to the acquisition and interpretation of organ images, the faculty will present information on the major aspects of hepatic, brain, cardiac, skeletal, and immunologic imaging techniques. Individual papers are processed separately for the data base. (TEM)

  14. Radiotracers for SPECT imaging. Current scenario and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adak, S.; Vijaya Raj, K.K.; Mandal, S.

    2012-01-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has been the cornerstone of nuclear medicine and today it is widely used to detect molecular changes in cardiovascular, neurological and oncological diseases. While SPECT has been available since the 1980s, advances in instrumentation hardware, software and the availability of new radiotracers that are creating a revival in SPECT imaging are reviewed in this paper. The biggest change in the last decade has been the fusion of CT with SPECT, which has improved attenuation correction and image quality. Advances in collimator design, replacement of sodium iodide crystals in the detectors with cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors as well as advances in software and reconstruction algorithms have all helped to retain SPECT as a much needed and used technology. Today, a wide spectrum of radiotracers is available for use in cardiovascular, neurology and oncology applications. The development of several radiotracers for neurological disorders is briefly described in this review, including [ 123 I]FP-CIT (DaTSCAN trademark) available for Parkinson's disease. In cardiology, while technetium-99m labeled tetrofosmin and technetium-99m labeled sestamibi have been well known for myocardial perfusion imaging, we describe a recently completed multicenter clinical study on the use of [ 123 I]mIBG (AdreView trademark) for imaging in chronic heart failure patients. For oncology, while bone scanning has been prevalent, newer radiotracers that target cancer mechanisms are being developed. Technetium-99m labeled RGD peptides have been reported in the literature that can be used for imaging angiogenesis, while technetium-99m labeled duramycin has been used to image apoptosis. While PET/CT is considered to be the more advanced technology particularly for oncology applications, SPECT continues to be the modality of choice and the workhorse in many hospitals and nuclear medicine centers. The cost of SPECT instruments also makes them more

  15. Radiotracers for SPECT imaging. Current scenario and future prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adak, S.; Vijaya Raj, K.K.; Mandal, S. [GE Healthcare Medical Diagnostics, John F. Welch Technology Center, Bangalore (India).; Bhalla, R.; Pickett, R.; Luthra, S.K. [GE Healthcare Medical Diagnostics, The Grove Centre, Amersham (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has been the cornerstone of nuclear medicine and today it is widely used to detect molecular changes in cardiovascular, neurological and oncological diseases. While SPECT has been available since the 1980s, advances in instrumentation hardware, software and the availability of new radiotracers that are creating a revival in SPECT imaging are reviewed in this paper. The biggest change in the last decade has been the fusion of CT with SPECT, which has improved attenuation correction and image quality. Advances in collimator design, replacement of sodium iodide crystals in the detectors with cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors as well as advances in software and reconstruction algorithms have all helped to retain SPECT as a much needed and used technology. Today, a wide spectrum of radiotracers is available for use in cardiovascular, neurology and oncology applications. The development of several radiotracers for neurological disorders is briefly described in this review, including [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT (DaTSCAN trademark) available for Parkinson's disease. In cardiology, while technetium-99m labeled tetrofosmin and technetium-99m labeled sestamibi have been well known for myocardial perfusion imaging, we describe a recently completed multicenter clinical study on the use of [{sup 123}I]mIBG (AdreView trademark) for imaging in chronic heart failure patients. For oncology, while bone scanning has been prevalent, newer radiotracers that target cancer mechanisms are being developed. Technetium-99m labeled RGD peptides have been reported in the literature that can be used for imaging angiogenesis, while technetium-99m labeled duramycin has been used to image apoptosis. While PET/CT is considered to be the more advanced technology particularly for oncology applications, SPECT continues to be the modality of choice and the workhorse in many hospitals and nuclear medicine centers. The cost of SPECT instruments also

  16. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in neurocysticercosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braga, Francisco Jose H. N; Santos, Antonio C; Takanayagui, Oswaldo M; Agapejev, Svetlana; Maes, A

    2002-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NC) is a parasitic infectious disease caused by Taenia solium eggs that set in the brain. Its incidence is increasing both in the developing and the developed world, as a result of low economical and hygiene levels and immigration, respectively. Clinical manifestation of disease varies from no symptoms to epilepsy, increased intra-cranial pressure, arachnoiditis and dementia. In order to evaluate function (perfusion) of affected brains, we studied 40 patients (21 females and 19 males, 19-71 yo) by means of SPECT (ECD, ethyl cysteinate dimer, labelled with 99mTc) and with and without contrast CT. SPECT studies were all abnormal. No difference was noted between active and inactive disease. Two SPECT patterns were noted: a) several areas of focally reduced uptake, resulting from coalescent and big lesions and large destruction of brain tissue (small, isolated and symmetric cysts seen in CT were missed by SPECT); b) diffuse atrophy with reduction of the tracer up