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Sample records for gastrointestinal nematode infections

  1. Epidemiology and Control of Gastrointestinal Nematodes Infections ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study on the epidemiology and control of gastrointestinal nematode infections in lambs in a semi-arid area of Kajiado District of Kenya was carried out between January 2001 and December 2001. Forty Dorper lambs were randomly recruited at the age of 6 weeks and their faecal samples examined for strongyle-type ...

  2. Risk factors associated with gastrointestinal nematode infections of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was carried out in Nakuru and Mukurweini districts of Kenya to identify the risk factors associated with gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) infection in cattle on 128 dairy farms between June 16th 2010 and August 30th 2010. Faecal samples were collected from the rectum of 419 heads of cattle that were above three ...

  3. The prevalence of gastrointestinal nematode infection and their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A cross-sectional study was conducted in Nakuru and Mukurweini districts of Kenya to estimate the prevalence of gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) and the financial impact of such infections among smallholder dairy farms. Parasitological examination involving feacal egg count and larval culture was employed to determine ...

  4. Seasonal patterns of gastrointestinal nematode infections in sheep ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The seasonal patterns of trichostrongylid nematode infections in Dorper yearlings in a semi-arid area of Kajiado District, Kenya were investigated by analysis faecal egg output, herbage infectivity and post-mortem worm recovery. Rectal faecal samples from 60 animals as well as herbage samples from their grazing fields ...

  5. Prevalence and intensity of infection with gastrointestinal nematodes in sheep in eastern Serbia

    OpenAIRE

    Kulišić, Z.; Aleksić, Nevenka; Đorđević, M.; Gajić, B.; Tambur, Z.; Stevanović, Jevrosima; Stanimirović, Z.

    2013-01-01

    A coprological examination of 680 grazing sheep was performed in Eastern Serbia from March 2011 to November 2012 in order to determine the presence of gastrointestinal (GI) nematode parasites. Fecal samples were randomly collected and examined by using qualitative and quantitative coprological techniques. It was found that 74.56% sheep were infected. Samples that contained nematode eggs were processed for larval development and eleven nematode genera were i...

  6. Interactions Between Nutrition and Infections With Haemonchus contortus and Related Gastrointestinal Nematodes in Small Ruminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoste, H; Torres-Acosta, J F J; Quijada, J; Chan-Perez, I; Dakheel, M M; Kommuru, D S; Mueller-Harvey, I; Terrill, T H

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between host nutrition and feeding behaviour are central to understanding the pathophysiological consequences of infections of the digestive tract with parasitic nematodes. The manipulation of host nutrition provides useful options to control gastrointestinal nematodes as a component of an integrated strategy. Focussed mainly on the Haemonchus contortus infection model in small ruminants, this chapter (1) illustrates the relationship between quantitative (macro- and micro-nutrients) and qualitative (plant secondary metabolites) aspects of host nutrition and nematode infection, and (2) shows how basic studies aimed at addressing some generic questions can help to provide solutions, despite the considerable diversity of epidemiological situations and breeding systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A review of the epidemiology and control of gastrointestinal nematode infections in cattle in Zimbabwe

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    Davies M. Pfukenyi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In this review, the main gastrointestinal nematodes infecting cattle in Zimbabwe and the epidemiological factors influencing their occurrence are reviewed and discussed. Nineteen gastrointestinal nematode species that belong to seven families have been found to occur in cattle in Zimbabwe. The main genera reported to date are Cooperia, Haemonchus, Trichostrongylus and Oesophagostomumand the dominant species are Cooperia pectinata, Cooperia punctata, Haemonchus placei and Trichostrongylus axei. The mixed infection by several species from the genera is the cause of parasitic gastroenteritis in cattle in Zimbabwe. Production and husbandry practices, season, host age and environment are considered to be the main factors that influence gastrointestinal nematode infection in cattle. The geographical distribution of the gastrointestinal nematodes is also reviewed in relation to the climatic conditions of the country. Various control options are discussed and how they are applicable to the Zimbabwean situation. Based on reports and existing data on the epidemiological features of the gastrointestinal nematode infection in cattle, practical control measures are critically reviewed and recommendations are made for a national control programme.

  8. Prevalence of common gastro-intestinal nematode infections in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    (Hansen and Perry, 1994). Furthermore, nematode egg counting per gramme of faeces (epg) was done on the same samples using the modified McMaster technique, as described by Hansen and. Perry (1994). Identification of third stage nematode larvae. About three grammes of faeces were taken from each sample.

  9. Prevalence and intensity of infection with gastrointestinal nematodes in sheep in eastern Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulišić Z.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A coprological examination of 680 grazing sheep was performed in Eastern Serbia from March 2011 to November 2012 in order to determine the presence of gastrointestinal (GI nematode parasites. Fecal samples were randomly collected and examined by using qualitative and quantitative coprological techniques. It was found that 74.56% sheep were infected. Samples that contained nematode eggs were processed for larval development and eleven nematode genera were identified: Haemonchus (46.91%, Ostertagia (25.88%, Marshallagia (21.91%, Cooperia (14.12%, Trichostrongylus (39.85%, Nematodirus (35.88%, Bunostomum (23.97%, Strongyloides (17.06% Oesophagostomum (40.73%, Chabertia (32.79% and Trichuris (10.88%. Higher prevalence of infection was observed in females (p<0.01, as well as in adults (p<0.001. Regarding the intensity of infection, in 40.63% sheep it was low, in 51.87% moderate and in 7.50% high. There was no difference in intensity of infection considering sex and age of animals. Moreover, simultaneous infection with different number of nematode genera was dependent on sheep’s age (p<0.001. These results suggest that GI nematodes are a conspicuous problem of grazing sheep in the study area. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 046002

  10. Advances in the diagnosis of the gastrointestinal nematode infections in ruminants

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    Alessandro Francisco Talamini do Amarante

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Enumeration of nematode eggs in fecal samples using the McMaster technique and morphological identification of third stage larvae from fecal cultures have been extensively used with satisfactory results in the diagnosis of the gastrointestinal nematode infections in ruminants. In order to improve sensitivity and accuracy, other approaches for quantification of eggs have been employed, like the FLOTAC and Mini-FLOTAC techniques. Results obtained in different studies indicate that fecal egg counts are a reliable measure of the size of the worm burden. However, the immunological status of the animals should be taken into consideration to interpret the results of the fecal examination. Molecular techniques have also been useful in the diagnosis of parasitic diseases. The ultimate in diagnosis has been the development of robotic platforms that enable separation of eggs from feces. Because manipulation is minimal, good quality DNA from eggs is obtained, which is used for amplification, and finally, produces a result indicating the degree of the infection by the different parasite species in mix infections. The ideal method should be reliable, friendly to non-experts and quick to perform. With the advance in robotics, bioinformatics and molecular biology, methods with such characteristics are expected to become available and affordable to be used in laboratories for the routine diagnosis of gastrointestinal nematodes of ruminants.

  11. Epidemiology and effects of gastrointestinal nematode infection on milk productions of dairy ewes

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    Suarez V.H.

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available 66 Pampinta breed ewes were studied during milking to evaluate the infection and the effect of gastrointestinal nematode on milk production sheep system. Naturally infected ewes on pasture were randomly allocated to two groups: TG, suppressively treated group every four weeks with levamisole and UG, untreated group. Faecal nematode egg counts and larval differentiation were conducted monthly. Successive groups of worm free tracer lambs were grazed with ewes and then slaughtered for worm counts. Test-day milk yield of individual ewes was recorded and ewe machine-milking period length (MPL were estimated. Faecal egg counts and tracer nematode numbers increased towards midsummer and declined sharply toward the end of the study. TG (188.0 ± 60 liters produced more (p < 0.066 milk liters than UG (171.9 ± 52.2 and TG had significantly more extended (p < 0.041 MPL than those of UG. The present study showed that dairy sheep were negatively affected by worms, even when exposed to short periods of high acute nematode (mainly Haemonchus contortus infection.

  12. Nuclear techniqes in the study of genetic resistance to gastrointestinal nematode infections of sheep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dargie, J.D.

    1984-01-01

    The paper reviews genetic resistance of sheep to gastrointestinal nematodes from the standpoint of resistance to the parasites themselves and of resistance to the diseases they produce. Attention is focused on infections with the abomasal parasite Haemonchus contortus and the small intestinal nematode Trichostrongylus colubriformis, and on the role of nuclear techniques both in verifying the existence of genetically based differences in resistance to these parasites and in gaining an understanding of the mechanisms involved. It is concluded that resistance to disease per se is much less important than resistance to parasite establishment and survival and that genetic studies could contribute substantially to the identification of the factors and variables responsible for the present inability to successfully vaccinate young animals against these infections. (author)

  13. Gastrointestinal nematode infections in sheep raised in Botucatu, state of São Paulo, Brazil

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    Maurício Orlando Wilmsen

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal nematode infections were evaluated in sheep raised in Botucatu, state of São Paulo, Brazil between April 2008 and March 2011. Every month, two tracer lambs grazing with a flock of sheep were exposed to natural infection with gastrointestinal nematodes for 28 consecutive days. At the end of this period, the lambs were sacrificed for worm counts. Haemonchus contortus presented 100% of prevalence. The seasons exerted no significant influence on the mean intensity of H. contortus, which ranged from 315 worms in November 2010 to 2,5205 worms in January 2011. The prevalence of Trichostrongylus colubriformis was also 100%, with the lowest mean intensity (15 worms recorded in February 2011 and the highest (9,760 worms in October 2009. In the case of T. colubriformis, a significant correlation coefficient was found between worm counts vs. rainfall (r = −0.32; P <0.05. Three other nematodes species were found in tracer lambs, albeit in small numbers. Their prevalence and mean intensity (in parenthesis were as follows: Oesophagostomum columbianum 28% (25.2, Cooperia curticei 7% (4.5 and Trichuris spp. 2% (1. In conclusion, the environmental conditions of the area proved to be highly favorable for the year-round transmission of H. contortus and T. colubriformis.

  14. Seasonal distribution of gastrointestinal nematode infections in sheep in a semiarid region, northeastern Brazil

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    Maria de Fátima de Souza

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the seasonal distribution and gastrointestinal nematode parasite load in crossbred Santa Inês tracer lambs, and to correlate the rainfall during the study period with occurrences of parasitic infections. Sixty-four male tracer lambs between the ages of four and eight months were used in the study. Two tracer lambs were inserted into the herd every 28 days to determine the pattern of infective larvae available in the environment. Variation in the fecal egg count (FEC of nematodes was observed at the study site, with many samples containing undetectable parasite loads during the dry season. The larvae identified in coprocultures wereHaemonchus sp., Trichostrongylus sp.,Cooperia sp., Strongyloides sp. andOesophagostomum sp. The nematodes recovered at necropsy were Haemonchus contortus, Trichostrongylus colubriformis, Cooperia punctata, C. pectinata, Trichuris sp.,Oesophagostomum sp. and Skrajabinema ovis. The total number of larvae and the total number of immature and adult forms recovered from the tracers showed seasonal distributions that significantly correlated with the amount of rainfall received that month (p value ≅ 0.000 in all cases . The species H. contortus was predominant in the herd and should be considered to be main pathogenic nematode species in these hosts under these conditions.

  15. Prevalence of gastrointestinal nematode infections in goat flocks on semi-arid rangelands of northeastern Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivas-Salazar, Raquel; Estrada-Angulo, Alfredo; Mellado, Miguel; Aguilar-Caballero, Armando Jacinto; Castro-Pérez, Beatriz Isabel; Gutiérrez-Blanco, Eduardo; Ruiz-Zárate, Fernando

    2018-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) infection in goat flocks on semi-arid rangelands of northeastern Mexico (25° N, 350-400 mm annual precipitation). The study included 668 pluriparous goats from 18 herds in five municipalities of Coahuila and Nuevo Leon, Mexico. Five genetic groups were considered (predominance of Boer, Nubian, Alpine, Saanen, and Toggenburg). Fecal samples were taken from the rectum of each animal to determine the number of eggs per gram (EPG) of GIN. The prevalence of flocks with GIN infections was 88.9%. Similar results were observed for the number of goats infected in the flocks. The Alpine breed presented the highest prevalence and highest EPG loads of GIN, whereas Boer and Nubian were the genetic groups with the lowest (P arid zones of Mexico was found a high prevalence of infections with gastrointestinal nematodes. The municipality and the breed of the animals were factors that showed influence on this prevalence and the level of infection of the goats.

  16. The effect of gastrointestinal nematode infection level on grazing distance from dung.

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    Hizumi Lua Sarti Seó

    Full Text Available Avoiding grazing near feces is an efficient strategy to prevent parasitic infection and contamination; therefore, in the evolution of herbivorous species, this behavior may have developed as a mechanism to protect the host against infection by gastrointestinal nematodes. The aim of this study was to assess whether grazing distance from dung is related to the level of parasitic infection in cattle. Based on Fecal Egg Count (FEC means, 18 castrated male steers, aged 18 months, were divided into three groups: High (FEC ≥ 315; Medium (FEC = 130-160; and Low (FEC = 40-70. To analyze the response to a new natural infection by gastrointestinal nematodes and to standardize infection levels, all animals received anthelmintic treatment at twenty days prior to field observation. Three observers simultaneously collected data on grazing behavior for 2.5 hours/week for 12 weeks. Observers recorded the distance when grazing occurred at less than one meter from dung. Every two weeks, fecal samples were collected for FEC, as well as serum samples to measure immunoglobulin G (IgG levels against larvae and adult antigens of the parasitic species Haemonchus placei. All groups grazed farther from the dung on days of greater insolation (r = 0.62; P = 0.03. Animals with high levels of parasitism grazed farther from the dung (P < 0.05 but had lower levels (P < 0.0001 of IgG serum levels compared to those with medium and low levels of infection. FEC values varied over the experiment, remaining below 200 for the low and medium group and reaching 1000 (P < 0.01 for the animals with the highest rates of parasitism. Our results indicate that cattle showing high levels of parasitism are more likely to avoid contaminated areas than animals with lower infection levels, and the immune system seems to be involved in such behavior.

  17. The unique resistance and resilience of the Nigerian West African Dwarf goat to gastrointestinal nematode infections

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    Chiejina Samuel N

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background West African Dwarf (WAD goats serve an important role in the rural village economy of West Africa, especially among small-holder livestock owners. They have been shown to be trypanotolerant and to resist infections with Haemonchus contortus more effectively than any other known breed of goat. Methods In this paper we review what is known about the origins of this goat breed, explain its economic importance in rural West Africa and review the current status of our knowledge about its ability to resist parasitic infections. Conclusions We suggest that its unique capacity to show both trypanotolerance and resistance to gastrointestinal (GI nematode infections is immunologically based and genetically endowed, and that knowledge of the underlying genes could be exploited to improve the capacity of more productive wool and milk producing, but GI nematode susceptible, breeds of goats to resist infection, without recourse to anthelmintics. Either conventional breeding allowing introgression of resistance alleles into susceptible breeds, or transgenesis could be exploited for this purpose. Appropriate legal protection of the resistance alleles of WAD goats might provide a much needed source of revenue for the countries in West Africa where the WAD goats exist and where currently living standards among rural populations are among the lowest in the world.

  18. Chronic Gastrointestinal Nematode Infection Mutes Immune Responses to Mycobacterial Infection Distal to the Gut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obieglo, Katja; Feng, Xiaogang; Bollampalli, Vishnu Priya; Dellacasa-Lindberg, Isabel; Classon, Cajsa; Österblad, Markus; Helmby, Helena; Hewitson, James P.; Maizels, Rick M.

    2016-01-01

    Helminth infections have been suggested to impair the development and outcome of Th1 responses to vaccines and intracellular microorganisms. However, there are limited data regarding the ability of intestinal nematodes to modulate Th1 responses at sites distal to the gut. In this study, we have investigated the effect of the intestinal nematode Heligmosomoides polygyrus bakeri on Th1 responses to Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG). We found that H. polygyrus infection localized to the gut can mute BCG-specific CD4+ T cell priming in both the spleen and skin-draining lymph nodes. Furthermore, H. polygyrus infection reduced the magnitude of delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) to PPD in the skin. Consequently, H. polygyrus–infected mice challenged with BCG had a higher mycobacterial load in the liver compared with worm-free mice. The excretory–secretory product from H. polygyrus (HES) was found to dampen IFN-γ production by mycobacteria-specific CD4+ T cells. This inhibition was dependent on the TGF-βR signaling activity of HES, suggesting that TGF-β signaling plays a role in the impaired Th1 responses observed coinfection with worms. Similar to results with mycobacteria, H. polygyrus–infected mice displayed an increase in skin parasite load upon secondary infection with Leishmania major as well as a reduction in DTH responses to Leishmania Ag. We show that a nematode confined to the gut can mute T cell responses to mycobacteria and impair control of secondary infections distal to the gut. The ability of intestinal helminths to reduce DTH responses may have clinical implications for the use of skin test–based diagnosis of microbial infections. PMID:26819205

  19. Gastrointestinal nematodes infections and anthelmintic resistance in grazing sheep in the Eastern Inner Mongolia in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Tianlong; Wang, Min; Zhang, Guanghe; Han, Dongsheng; Li, Xinwei; Liu, Guowen; Li, Xiaobing; Wang, Zhe

    2017-12-20

    Gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) are a crucial restraint to grazing sheep production worldwide. This study was conducted to determine the infections and anthelmintic resistance (AR) of GIN in pasture-based sheep in the Eastern Inner Mongolia, China. GIN eggs were tested from 600 grazing sheep feces of 10 farms using saturated saline flotation method and McMaster's method. The egg hatch test (EHT) and the faecal egg count reduction test (FECRT) were used to evaluate resistance of GIN to anthelmintics. We found that the average infection rate was 79.2% (range: 45%-100%). The grand mean faecal egg count (FEC) was 1813.2 eggs per gram (EPG) (range: 0-32400 EPG). There were significant differences in GIN infection among different breeds of sheep. The sequence of infection intensity and infection rate were Small fat tail > Ujimqin > Ju Ud (pgrazing sheep were very common. AR, especially in Haemonchus, was a serious problem in these sheep flocks. Thus, actions are urgently required to taken to mitigate the worsening situation.

  20. Efficacy of oral afoxolaner plus milbemycin oxime chewables against induced gastrointestinal nematode infections in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fankhauser, Rebecca; Hamel, Dietmar; Dorr, Paul; Reinemeyer, Craig R; Crafford, Dionne; Bowman, Dwight D; Ulrich, Michael; Yoon, Stephen; Larsen, Diane L

    2016-07-30

    The efficacy of oral afoxolaner plus milbemycin oxime combination chewables against induced gastrointestinal nematode infections in dogs was evaluated in six separate studies. Two studies were performed to evaluate the efficacy of the product against Toxocara canis, two studies evaluated the efficacy against Toxascaris leonina, one study evaluated the efficacy against Ancylostoma braziliense, and one study evaluated the efficacy against Ancylostoma caninum. In the A. caninum study, the efficacy of milbemycin oxime alone and afoxolaner alone was also evaluated. Dogs in all studies were inoculated with infective eggs or larvae and confirmed to have patent infections based on a fecal examination prior to allocation to study group and treatment. Each study utilized a randomized block design with blocks based on pre-treatment body weight. All dogs were assigned to blocks based on body weight, and then each dog within a block was randomly assigned to treatment group. There were two groups of 10 dogs each in the T. canis, T. leonina, and A. braziliense studies: 1) an untreated (control) group and 2) a group treated with afoxolaner plus milbemycin oxime chewables (NexGard Spectra(®), Merial). This group was treated at a dose as close as possible to the minimum effective dose of afoxolaner and milbemycin oxime (2.5mg+0.5mg per kg body weight, respectively) once on Day 0 using whole chews. There were four groups of 10 dogs each in the A. caninum study: 1) untreated (control), 2) NexGard Spectra(®) as described above, 3) milbemycin oxime alone (dose of at least 0.5mg per kg of body weight) and 4) afoxalaner alone (dose of at least 2.5mg per kg body weight). For parasite recovery and counts, dogs were euthanized humanely and necropsied seven days after treatment. The efficacy of the afoxolaner plus milbemycin oxime combination was ≥98% against T. canis, ≥95.8% against T. leonina, and 90.2% against A. braziliense. Efficacy of the combination against A. caninum was 99

  1. COCCIDIA AND GASTROINTESTINAL NEMATODE INFECTIONS IN SEMI- INTENSIVELY MANAGED JAKHRANA GOATS OF SEMI- ARID REGION OF INDIA

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    Dinesh Kumar Sharma

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The coccidia and gastrointestinal nematode infections were monitored in 273 Jakhrana goats maintained at the Central Institute for Research on Goats, Makhdoom, Mathura, India to study the prevalence rate and to determine the effects of various environmental factors on intensity of infection. The animals were reared under semi intensive feeding system. The fecal samples were collected and examined for a period of 2 years. The data on faecal egg/oocystes count (FEC/FOC were analyzed by least-squares analysis after suitable log transformation (Loge FEC/FOC + 100. The prevalence and intensity of infection were determined in animals according to their ages (0-3 month, >3-6 month, >6-12 month and >1 year, sex, year and season of sample collection. The pre-dominant coccidia oocysts were Eimeria ninakohlyakimovae, and the major gastrointestinal nematode species identified as Haemonchus contortus The overall prevalence rates for coccidial and gastrointestinal nematode infections manifested as singles or concurrent states were 42.86 and 39.19%, respectively. The coccidial oocysts was highest (92.31% in >3-6 month aged kids followed by >6-12 month (75.51% and >1 year of age (40.86%. Females had higher occurrence (49.86% than males (45.20% for coccidial infection. The prevalence rate of oocysts was highest in rainy season (54.55% followed by summer (46.0% and winter (37.0% season. The gastrointestinal nematode prevalence was 33.33, 0.0, 57.14 and 41.00 percent in 0-3 month, >3-6 month, >6-12month and >1 year aged animals, respectively. Seasonal prevalence of gastrointestinal nematode infection was 28.74, 67.27 and 13.98 percent during summer, rainy and winter season, respectively. Concurrent infection with Eimeria and gastrointestinal nematodes were found in 17.22% of animals and restricted to animals of >6-12 month of age and above. The overall least-squares means for GOPG (oocysts/g of faeces and GFEC (eggs/g of faeces were 268.71 and 74.16, respectively

  2. Infection with the gastrointestinal nematode Ostertagia ostertagi in cattle affects mucus biosynthesis in the abomasum

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    Rinaldi Manuela

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The mucus layer in the gastrointestinal (GI tract is considered to be the first line of defense to the external environment. Alteration in mucus components has been reported to occur during intestinal nematode infection in ruminants, but the role of mucus in response to abomasal parasites remains largely unclear. The aim of the current study was to analyze the effects of an Ostertagia ostertagi infection on the abomasal mucus biosynthesis in cattle. Increased gene expression of MUC1, MUC6 and MUC20 was observed, while MUC5AC did not change during infection. Qualitative changes of mucins, related to sugar composition, were also observed. AB-PAS and HID-AB stainings highlighted a decrease in neutral and an increase in acidic mucins, throughout the infection. Several genes involved in mucin core structure synthesis, branching and oligomerization, such as GCNT3, GCNT4, A4GNT and protein disulphide isomerases were found to be upregulated. Increase in mucin fucosylation was observed using the lectin UEA-I and through the evaluation of fucosyltransferases gene expression levels. Finally, transcription levels of 2 trefoil factors, TFF1 and TFF3, which are co-expressed with mucins in the GI tract, were also found to be significantly upregulated in infected animals. Although the alterations in mucus biosynthesis started early during infection, the biggest effects were found when adult worms were present on the surface of the abomasal mucosa and are likely caused by the alterations in mucosal cell populations, characterized by hyperplasia of mucus secreting cells.

  3. Biological Effect of Leaf Aqueous Extract of Caesalpinia pyramidalis in Goats Naturally Infected with Gastrointestinal Nematodes

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    Roberto Robson Borges-dos-Santos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Forty-eight goats naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes were randomly divided into four groups (n=12: negative control (G1 (untreated, positive control (G2 (treated with doramectin, 1 mL/50 Kg b.w., and G3 and G4 treated with 2.5 and 5 mg/Kg b.w. of a leaf aqueous extract of Caesalpinia pyramidalis (CP. Fecal and blood samples were regularly collected for the evaluation of fecal egg count (FEC, hematological and immunological parameters to assess the anthelmintic activity. In treated animals with CP, there was noted a significant reduction of 54.6 and 71.2% in the mean FEC (P<0.05. An increase in IgA levels was observed in G3 and G4 (P<0.05, during the experimental period, suggesting that it was stimulated by the extract administration. In conclusion, the results showed that CP provoked a protective response in infected animals treated with them. This response could be partly explained by the CP chemical composition.

  4. Biological Effect of Leaf Aqueous Extract of Caesalpinia pyramidalis in Goats Naturally Infected with Gastrointestinal Nematodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges-dos-Santos, Roberto Robson; López, Jorge A.; Santos, Luciano C.; Zacharias, Farouk; David, Jorge Maurício; David, Juceni Pereira; Lima, Fernanda Washington de Mendonça

    2012-01-01

    Forty-eight goats naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes were randomly divided into four groups (n = 12): negative control (G1) (untreated), positive control (G2) (treated with doramectin, 1 mL/50 Kg b.w.), and G3 and G4 treated with 2.5 and 5 mg/Kg b.w. of a leaf aqueous extract of Caesalpinia pyramidalis (CP). Fecal and blood samples were regularly collected for the evaluation of fecal egg count (FEC), hematological and immunological parameters to assess the anthelmintic activity. In treated animals with CP, there was noted a significant reduction of 54.6 and 71.2% in the mean FEC (P < 0.05). An increase in IgA levels was observed in G3 and G4 (P < 0.05), during the experimental period, suggesting that it was stimulated by the extract administration. In conclusion, the results showed that CP provoked a protective response in infected animals treated with them. This response could be partly explained by the CP chemical composition. PMID:22548117

  5. Anthelmintic effects of forage chicory (Cichorium intybus) against gastrointestinal nematode parasites in experimentally infected cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena-Espinoza, Miguel Angel; Thamsborg, Stig M.; Desrues, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Two experiments studied the effects of dietary chicory against gastrointestinal nematodes in cattle. In Experiment (Exp.) 1, stabled calves were fed chicory silage (CHI1; n = 9) or ryegrass/clover hay (CTL1; n = 6) with balanced protein/energy intakes between groups. After 16 days, all calves...... received 10 000 Ostertagia ostertagi and 66 000 Cooperia oncophora third-stage larvae (L3) [day (D) 0 post-infection (p.i.)]. In Exp. 2, calves were assigned to pure chicory (CHI2; n=10) or ryegrass/clover (CTL2; n = 10) pastures. After 7 days, animals received 20 000 O. ostertagi L3/calf (D0 p.......i.) and were moved regularly preventing pasture-borne infections. Due to poor regrowth of the chicory pasture, CHI2 was supplemented with chicory silage. At D40 p.i. (Exp. 1) and D35 p.i. (Exp. 2) calves were slaughtered for worm recovery. In Exp.1, fecal egg counts (FEC) were similar between groups. However...

  6. Gastrointestinal nematode infections in roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) from the NW of the Iberian Peninsula: assessment of some risk factors.

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    Pato, F J; Vázquez, L; Díez-Baños, N; López, C; Sánchez-Andrade, R; Fernández, G; Díez-Baños, P; Panadero, R; Díaz, P; Morrondo, P

    2013-09-01

    Intestinal contents of 218 roe deer hunted in the northwest (NW) of the Iberian Peninsula during the 2008-2009 hunting seasons were examined in order to provide information on the gastrointestinal (GI) nematode prevalence and intensity of infection and the possible influence of some environmental and intrinsic factors such as climatic conditions, age and sex. All the animals studied harboured GI nematodes, and a total of 20 different species belonging to ten genera were identified. Spiculopteragia spiculoptera/Spiculopteragia mathevossiani, Ostertagia leptospicularis/Ostertagia kolchida and Nematodirus filicollis were the most common. This is the first citation for Chabertia ovina, Cooperia pectinata, Cooperia punctata, Cooperia oncophora, Haemonchus contortus, Nematodirus spathiger, Oesophagostomum venulosum, Teladorsagia trifurcata, Trichostrongylus capricola, Trichostrongylus colubriformis, Trichostrongylus vitrinus and Trichuris capreoli in roe deer from the Iberian Peninsula. Prevalence and intensity were significantly higher in the abomasum, where infections with more than one GI nematode species were the most common; in the other intestinal segments infections with only one GI nematode species were the most prevalent. When considering the influence of the different risk factors on the prevalence of GI nematodes, the highest prevalence for most of the genera were observed in roe deer from coastal areas, where climatic conditions are more favourable for the development and survival of third stage larvae in the environment. Regarding the sex of the animals, the prevalence was, in general, higher in males than in females, probably due to behavioural and physiological sex-related differences. On the contrary, no differences were found in relation to the age of the animals. This study reveals that roe deer from the NW of the Iberian Peninsula are widely and intensely infected with gastrointestinal nematodes, which probably affect the health status of these

  7. Effect of Musa spp. extract on eggs and larvae of gastrointestinal nematodes from infected sheep

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    Natalie Neuwirt

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Helminthes are listed as one of the main problems facing the development of goat and sheep production. Haemonchus contortus is the specie that causes greatest negative impact in ranching. Resistance to anti-parasitic drugs and demand for residue-free animal-derived food products has elevated the importance of herbal treatments. The aim of this study was to develop an extract of Musa spp. and assess by in vitro testing, the anthelmintic effect on eggs and larvae in the gastrointestinal nematodes in sheep. Stool samples from sheep naturally infected were used to obtain eggs and larvae and was then followed by a test of hatchability and a larval migration inhibition test. In vitro tests on the inhibition of larval hatchability at concentrations of 160 and 180 mg mL-1 of larval extracts and inhibition of migration at concentrations of 800 and 1000 mg mL-1 were observed. The results indicate that the use of banana leaf has an anthelmintic effect and that in vivo studies on the applicability of this technology to the field should be made to further understanding and bring more information to what has already been revealed in this study.

  8. Natural selection on individual variation in tolerance of gastrointestinal nematode infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Adam D; Nussey, Daniel H; Wilson, Alastair J; Berenos, Camillo; Pilkington, Jill G; Watt, Kathryn A; Pemberton, Josephine M; Graham, Andrea L

    2014-07-01

    Hosts may mitigate the impact of parasites by two broad strategies: resistance, which limits parasite burden, and tolerance, which limits the fitness or health cost of increasing parasite burden. The degree and causes of variation in both resistance and tolerance are expected to influence host-parasite evolutionary and epidemiological dynamics and inform disease management, yet very little empirical work has addressed tolerance in wild vertebrates. Here, we applied random regression models to longitudinal data from an unmanaged population of Soay sheep to estimate individual tolerance, defined as the rate of decline in body weight with increasing burden of highly prevalent gastrointestinal nematode parasites. On average, individuals lost weight as parasite burden increased, but whereas some lost weight slowly as burden increased (exhibiting high tolerance), other individuals lost weight significantly more rapidly (exhibiting low tolerance). We then investigated associations between tolerance and fitness using selection gradients that accounted for selection on correlated traits, including body weight. We found evidence for positive phenotypic selection on tolerance: on average, individuals who lost weight more slowly with increasing parasite burden had higher lifetime breeding success. This variation did not have an additive genetic basis. These results reveal that selection on tolerance operates under natural conditions. They also support theoretical predictions for the erosion of additive genetic variance of traits under strong directional selection and fixation of genes conferring tolerance. Our findings provide the first evidence of selection on individual tolerance of infection in animals and suggest practical applications in animal and human disease management in the face of highly prevalent parasites.

  9. Natural selection on individual variation in tolerance of gastrointestinal nematode infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam D Hayward

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Hosts may mitigate the impact of parasites by two broad strategies: resistance, which limits parasite burden, and tolerance, which limits the fitness or health cost of increasing parasite burden. The degree and causes of variation in both resistance and tolerance are expected to influence host-parasite evolutionary and epidemiological dynamics and inform disease management, yet very little empirical work has addressed tolerance in wild vertebrates. Here, we applied random regression models to longitudinal data from an unmanaged population of Soay sheep to estimate individual tolerance, defined as the rate of decline in body weight with increasing burden of highly prevalent gastrointestinal nematode parasites. On average, individuals lost weight as parasite burden increased, but whereas some lost weight slowly as burden increased (exhibiting high tolerance, other individuals lost weight significantly more rapidly (exhibiting low tolerance. We then investigated associations between tolerance and fitness using selection gradients that accounted for selection on correlated traits, including body weight. We found evidence for positive phenotypic selection on tolerance: on average, individuals who lost weight more slowly with increasing parasite burden had higher lifetime breeding success. This variation did not have an additive genetic basis. These results reveal that selection on tolerance operates under natural conditions. They also support theoretical predictions for the erosion of additive genetic variance of traits under strong directional selection and fixation of genes conferring tolerance. Our findings provide the first evidence of selection on individual tolerance of infection in animals and suggest practical applications in animal and human disease management in the face of highly prevalent parasites.

  10. Efficacy of ِِabamectin in lambs and goats naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes in Mosul city

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    S. D. Hassan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of abamectin in lambs and goats naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes. The study was conducted on 300 lambs, from both sexes, at age ranged between 6-9 months, and 150 native goats from both sexes, at age ranged between 1-2 years. The total infestation rate with gastrointestinal nematodes were 54% and 53.3% in lambs and goats, respectively. Results of fecal culture for obtained larvae 3 revealed the presence of seven genus of nematodes in that included Marshallagia spp. (66.6%, Ostertagia spp. (53.1%, Haemonchus spp. (24.7%, Nematodirus spp. (16.67%, Strongyloides spp. (9.8%, Cooperia spp. (4.4%, and Oesophagostomum spp. (3.08%, where as in goats the following genus was obtained included Marshellagia spp. (46.3%, Nematodirus spp. (37.5%, Strongyloides spp. (37.5%, Ostertagia spp. (33.7%, Haemonchus spp. (15%, Cooperia spp. (15%, Chabertia spp. (6.25%, and Trichuris spp. (2.5%. The most important clinical signs that were detected in lambs and goats were emaciation, pale mucous membrane, easily detached hair and wool and diarrhea. Abamectin at dose 0.2 mg/kg body weight subcutaneously (single dose had an efficacy of (97% in the first week and increased to (100% to the end of the study, whereas in goats it was (100% started from 1st week after the treatment to the end of the study period. Treated animals showed gradual improvement in presenting the clinical abnormalities. Total red blood cells count, hemoglobin concentration and packed cell volume were increased significantly. Total white blood cells count and eosinophils were decreased significantly compared with control the group. In conclusion abamectin had a high efficacy in the treatment of gastrointestinal nematodes in lambs and goats.

  11. The specific diagnosis of gastrointestinal nematode infections in livestock: larval culture technique, its limitations and alternative DNA-based approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeber, Florian; Kahn, Lewis

    2014-10-15

    The specific diagnosis of gastrointestinal nematode infections in ruminants is routinely based on larval culture technique and on the morphological identification of developed third-stage larvae. However, research on the ecology and developmental requirements of different species suggests that environmental conditions (e.g., temperature and humidity) for optimal development to occur vary between the different species. Thus, employing a common culture protocol for all species will favour the development of certain species over others and can cause a biased result in particular when species proportions in a mixed infection are to be determined. Furthermore, the morphological identification of L3 larvae is complicated by a lack of distinctive, obvious features that would allow the identification of all key species. In the present paper we review in detail the potential limitations of larval culture technique and morphological identification and provide account to some modern molecular alternatives to the specific diagnosis of gastrointestinal nematode infection in ruminants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of urea-molasses block supplementation on grazing weaner goats naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes

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    R.M. Waruiru

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The influence of feeding urea-molasses blocks (UMB on growth and gastrointestinal (GI nematode parasitism of weaner goats grazing the same pasture was investigated on a farm in Nyandarua District, Kenya. Thirty female Small East African goat kids at an average age of 5 months were initially treated with albendazole orally (5 mg kg-1 body mass and randomly assigned into one of two groups: group I were fed UMB prepared using a cold process and group II kids (controls received no block supplementation (NBS. The UMB were given in the evening when the animals returned from grazing and were consumed during the night at a rate of 95.0 g head-1 day-1. Supplementation was undertaken for 3 consecutive months from July to September 2001 and January to March 2002. Body mass of the kids and faecal egg counts were measured monthly and larval cultures were performed on positive faecal samples of kids of each group. Five goats from each group were randomly selected for slaughter and total counts and identification of worms at the end of June 2002. Significant differences (P < 0.05 were found in cumulative mass gains of kids in group I from September compared with those in group II. On termination of the study kids in group I had gained an average of (+ SD 20.4 ± 1.4 kg while those in group II had gained 11.8 + 1.1 kg. From January 2002, faecal egg counts of the kids in the UMB group differed significantly (P < 0.05 from those of the NBS group and at slaughter, the mean (+ SD worm counts for the UMB group was 482 + 299 while that of the NBS group was 1 302 + 410. In all the goats, Haemonchus contortus was the predominant nematode recovered. These results indicate that UMB had significant effects in the control of GI nematode parasitism and enhanced growth of the young goats.

  13. Evaluation of reference genes for real-time PCR studies of Brazilian Somalis sheep infected by gastrointestinal nematodes

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    Lilian Giotto Zaros

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Precise normalization with reference genes is necessary, in order to obtain reliable relative expression data in response to gastrointestinal nematode infection. By using sheep from temperate regions as models, three reference genes, viz., ribosomal protein LO (RPLO, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH and succinate dehydrogenase complex subunit A (SDHA, were investigated in the abomasum, abomasal lymph nodes and small intestine of Brazilian Somalis sheep, either resistant or susceptible to gastrointestinal nematodes infections. Real time PCR was carried out by using SYBR Green I dye, and gene stability was tested by geNorm. RPLO was an ideal reference gene, since its expression was constant across treatments, presented lower variation, and was ranked as the most stable in abomasum and lymph node tissues. On the other hand, SDHA was the most stable in the small intestine followed by RPLO and GAPDH. These findings demonstrate the importance of correctly choosing reference genes prior to relative quantification. In addition, we determined that reference genes used in sheep from temperate regions, when properly tested, can be applied in animals from tropical regions such as the Brazilian Somalis sheep.

  14. Correlates of resistance to gastrointestinal nematode infection in Nigerian West African dwarf sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idika, I K; Chiejina, S N; Mhomga, L I; Nnadi, P A; Ngongeh, L A

    2012-07-01

    To investigate correlates of resistance to GI nematode infection in Nigerian West African dwarf (WAD) sheep. Thirty three sheep were randomly assigned to two groups, A (n=27) which were used for experimental infections, and B (n=6) which served as uninfected control. Each infected animal received weekly escalating infections with infective larvae (60%Haemonchus contortus (H. contortus) and 40%Trichostrongylus colubriformis (T. colubriformis) for 4 weeks. The responses of all the infected and control sheep were assessed by faecal egg count (FEC), worm burden (Wb), packed cell volume (PCV), body weight (Bwt), and body condition score (BCS). On the basis of their individual faecal egg output, Lambs in group A with epg ≤1,000 on any sampling day were classified as low faecal egg count (LFEC) phenotype (n=16), those with epg between 1,000 and 10,000 as intermediate (n=5) and lambs with epg > 10,000 as high feacal egg count (HFEC) phenotype (n=6). The difference between the FEC classes was highly significant (P=0.001). The BCS and weight gained at the end of the experiment by the control and LFEC sheep was significantly higher (P≤0.05) than those of the intermediate and HFEC phenotypes. There was a significant and negative correlation between the parasitological measures and the trio of BCS, PCV and Bwt of sheep. The result of the study indicated that the FEC, weight gain, PCV, and BCS are correlates and potential selection criteria of GI nematode resistant WAD sheep. Copyright © 2012 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Expansion of Ashworthius sidemi in red deer and roe deer from the Lower Silesian Wilderness and its impact on infection with other gastrointestinal nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demiaszkiewicz, Aleksander W; Merta, Dorota; Kobielski, Janusz; Filip, Katarzyna J; Pyziel, Anna M

    2017-12-20

    Nematodes Ashworthius sidemi are typical parasites of Asiatic cervids, mostly sika deer (Cervus nippon). Migrating red deer have probably introduced this parasite to the area of Poland from neighbouring countries. The aim of the study was to determine prevalence and intensity of infection of red deer and roe deer from the Lower Silesian Wilderness with A. sidemi after one year from previous studies and to examine the influence of these parasites on other species of gastrointestinal nematodes. 31 abomasa of red deer and 3 abomasa of roe deer from Forest Dictrict of Ruszów have been examined on the presence of parasites. In comparison with previous studies, red deer showed significant, over triple increase of prevalence of A. sidemi and over fivefold increase of mean intensity of infection. Maximum intensity of infection has increased over 24 times. These results indicate on dynamic spread of this new aswortiosis foci. Apart from previously registered parasite species, four new nematodes have been found in examined red deer and roe deer during this year studies. Red deer have been infected with Spiculopteragia assymmetrica, typical for fallow deer and Haemonchus placei - typical for bovine, whereas roe deer have been infected with Trichostrongylus axei and Trichostrongylus capricola, parasites of sheep, goats and bovine. Prevalence of red deer infection with nematodes S. boehmi and Ostertagia leptospicularis was lower than two years ago while prevalence of infection with S. mathevossiani and O. kolchida was higher. Intensity of infection with these nematodes has increased.

  16. Long-term effects of drenches with condensed tannins from Acacia mearnsii on goats naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa-Júnior, Livio M; Costa, Jailson S; Lôbo, Ítala C P D; Soares, Alexandra M S; Abdala, Adibe L; Chaves, Daniel P; Batista, Zulmira S; Louvandini, Helder

    2014-10-15

    In this study, the long-term effects of exposure to a drench containing condensed tannins (CTs) from Acacia mearnsii on gastrointestinal nematodes in goats were investigated. Male cross-bred Anglo-Nubian goat kids between 3 and 5 months of age were dewormed at the beginning of the experiment. The goat kids were divided into one group that received weekly 24 g oral doses of A. mearnsii bark extract dissolved in water containing 16.7% CTs (GCT group, n = 8) and a second group that did not receive CTs (GC group, n = 8). All of the animals were kept in an Andropogon gayanus pasture and grazed with a herd of 100 naturally infected adult goats. Each animal was supplemented daily with 200 g of a concentrated mixture containing 18% crude protein. Fecal egg counts (FECs) were performed weekly for 192 days, and weight measurements and blood collections were done at two-week intervals in this period. The packed cell volume of the blood was calculated, and the plasma was used to determine the total protein, albumin, and glucose concentrations. After 192 days, the animals were slaughtered and the carcasses evaluated, with nematodes harvested for identification and counting. The FECs of the animals treated with CTs from A. mearnsii (GCT group) remained lower than the FECs of the control group animals for the majority of the first half of the experimental period. An observed increase in the FECs for both groups coincided with increased rainfall in the region where the experiment was conducted. The worm burden, scrotal circumference, carcass weight, leg circumference, carcass size and blood analysis were not significantly different between the groups. The packed cell volume (PCV) was constant in all of the animals throughout the experiment. In conclusion, repeated and prolonged treatment of goats with CTs from A. mearnsii helped to maintain low FECs in a period of low challenge but did not reduce nematode infections in the goats. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The potential of Nigerian bioactive plants for controlling gastrointestinal nematode infection in livestock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ademola, Isaiah Oluwafemi

    2016-12-01

    Bioactive compounds from marine and terrestrial organisms have been used extensively in the treatment of many diseases in both their natural form and as templates for synthetic modifications. This review summarizes present knowledge about anthelmintic effects of the extracts of bioactive plants in Nigeria against helminth parasites of ruminants. Plants traditionally used in livestock production are discussed. The main focus is hinged on in vitro and in vivo activities of secondary plant metabolites against nematodes of livestock. This review provides insight into preliminary studies of medicinal plants, which can be investigated further to discover promising molecules in the search for novel anthelmintic drugs and nutraceuticals.

  18. Risk factors of gastrointestinal nematode parasite infections in small ruminants kept in smallholder mixed farms in Kenya

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    Gachuiri Charles K

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Helminth infections in small ruminants are serious problems in the developing world, particularly where nutrition and sanitation are poor. This study investigated the burden and risk factors of gastrointestinal nematode parasite infections in sheep and goats kept in smallholder mixed farms in the Kenyan Central Highlands. Three hundred and seven small ruminants were sampled from 66 smallholder mixed farms in agro-ecological zones 1 (humid and 3 (semi-humid in the Kenyan Central highlands. The farms were visited once a month for eight months during which a health and production survey questionnaire was administered. Fecal samples were collected at each visit from each animal. Fecal egg counts (FEC were performed using the modified McMaster technique. Associations between potential risk factors and FEC were assessed using 3-level Poisson models fit in SAS using GLIMMIX macro. Correlations among repeated observations were adjusted for using three different correlation structures. Results A rise in FEC was observed two months after the onset of rains. Farmer education, age category, de-worming during the preceding month and grazing system were significant predictors of FEC. Additionally, there were significant interactions between grazing system and both de-worming and age category implying that the effect of grazing system is dependent on both de-worming status and age category; and that the effect of de-worming depends on the grazing system. The most important predictors of FEC in the study area were grazing system, de-worming status and education of the farmers. Conclusion Since several factors were important predictors of FEC, controlling gastrointestinal helminths of small ruminants in these resource-poor smallholder mixed farms requires a sustainable integrated helminth control strategy that includes adoption of zero-grazing and more farmer education probably through extension services. Achieving improved helminth controls

  19. Excretory/secretory products from the gastrointestinal nematode Trichuris muris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tritten, Lucienne; Tam, Mifong; Vargas, Mireille; Jardim, Armando; Stevenson, Mary M; Keiser, Jennifer; Geary, Timothy G

    2017-07-01

    To better control gastrointestinal nematode infections in humans and animals, it is important to understand the strategies used by these parasites to modulate the host immune system. In this regard, molecules released by parasites have been attributed crucially important roles in host-parasite negotiations. We characterized the excretory/secretory (E/S) microRNA (miRNA) and protein profiles from the mouse gastrointestinal nematode parasite Trichuris muris. Released miRNAs were subjected to miRNA sequencing and E/S proteins were analysed by mass spectrometry. Fourteen miRNAs were identified in T. muris exosome-like vesicles, as well as 73 proteins of nematode origin, 11 of which were unique to this study. Comparison with published nematode protein secretomes revealed high conservation at the functional level. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Prevalence and diversity of gastrointestinal nematodes of cattles in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of 384 faecal samples for the coproscopic examination were collected and processed using direct faecal floatation method in parasitology laboratory of Jimma University, School of Veterinary medicine. Out of the total sampled cattle, 190 (49.5%) had a gastrointestinal nematode infection. Coprological investigation ...

  1. Efficacy of two anthelmintics against gastrointestinal nematodes in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted to determine the efficacy of albendazole (ABZ) and ivermectin (IVM) against gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) in naturally infected goats in the pastoral region of Karamoja, Uganda. Fifty four (54) small East African goats (female = 36, male = 18), of 4-6 months and from 18 flocks, were allocated to ...

  2. Effects of anthelmintic treatment and feed supplementation on grazing Tuli weaner steers naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Magaya

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available A study was carried out to determine the epidemiology of gastrointestinal nematodes in indigenous Tuli cattle and the effect of dietary protein supplementation and anthelmintic treatment on productivity in young growing cattle. Forty steers with an average age of 18 months were divided into 4 groups; 1 fenbendazole (slow release bolus and cottonseed meal (FCSM group, 2 fenbendazole (FBZ group, 3 cottonseed meal (CSM group and 4 control (no cottonseed meal and no fenbendazole (control group. Performance parameters measured included wormeggs per gram of faeces (EPG, packed cell volume (PCV, albumin and live-weight gain. Results showed that faecal worm egg counts were lower and PCV was higher in the FCSM and FBZ groups than in the CSM and control groups (P < 0.01. Weight gains were higher in the CSMand FCSM groups than in the FBZ and control groups (P < 0.05. The cost benefits of anthelmintic treatment and dietary supplementation were apparent in this study. The improved growth performance of the FCSM, FBZ and CSM groups reflected a financial gain over the controls on termination of the study. The dominant genera of gastrointestinal nematodes on faecal culture, pasture larval counts and necropsy were Cooperia and Haemonchus. The incidences of Trichostrongylus, Oesophagostomum and Bunostomum were low.

  3. Prevalence of parasitic gastrointestinal nematodes of small ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A cross-sectional study was conducted from December, 2014 to May, 2015 on 914 animals (345 sheep and 569 goats) at Jalingo abattoir, Taraba State, Nigeria based on faecal examination. The objective of the study was to determine the prevalence rate of parasitic gastrointestinal nematodes in slaughtered small ...

  4. Epidemiological studies of parasitic gastrointestinal nematodes, cestodes and coccidia infections in cattle in the highveld and lowveld communal grazing areas of Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.M. Pfukenyi

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Between January 1999 and December 2000 faecal samples from 16 264 cattle at 12 dipping sites in the highveld and nine in the lowveld communal grazing areas of Zimbabwe were examined for gastrointestinal (GI nematode and cestodes eggs, and coccidia oocysts. Strongyle larvae were identified following culture of pooled faecal samples collected at monthly intervals. The effects of region, age, sex and season on the prevalence of GI nematodes, cestodes and coccidia were determined. Faecal egg and oocyst counts showed an overall prevalence of GI nematodes of 43 %, coccidia 19.8 % and cestodes 4.8 %. A significantly higher prevalence of infection with GI nematodes, cestodes and coccidia was recorded in calves (P < 0.01 than in adults. Pregnant and lactating cows had significantly higher prevalences than bulls, oxen and non-lactating (dry cows (P < 0.01. The general trend of eggs per gram (epg of faeces and oocysts per gram (opg of faeces was associated with the rainfall pattern in the two regions, with high epg and opg being recorded during the wet months. The most prevalent genera of GI nematodes were Cooperia, Haemonchus and Trichostrongylus in that order. Strongyloides papillosus was found exclusively in calves. Haemonchus was significantly more prevalent during the wet season than the dry season (P < 0.01. In contrast, Trichostrongylus was present in significantly (P < 0.01 higher numbers during the dry months than the wet months, while Cooperia and Oesophagostomum revealed no significant differences between the wet and dry season. These findings are discussed with reference to their relevance for strategic control of GI parasites in cattle in communal grazing areas of Zimbabwe.

  5. The contribution to the epidemiology of gastrointestinal nematodes of sheep with special focus on the survival of infective larvae in winter conditions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Makovcová, K.; Jankovská, I.; Vadlejch, J.; Langrová, I.; Vejl, P.; Lytvynets, Andrej

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 104, č. 4 (2009), s. 795-799 ISSN 0932-0113 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : gastrointestinal nematodes * sheep * survival Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 1.721, year: 2009

  6. THE PREVALENCE OF GASTROINTESTINAL NEMATODES OF BALI CATTLE BREEDERS IN NUSA PENIDA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Putu Agus Trisna Kusuma Antara

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Nusa Penida is a pure breeding area of bali cattle, in which the cattle are mainly kept in conventional maintenance system and potentially infected by parasite, especially gastrointestinal nematodes. This study aims were to determine the prevalence and type of gastrointestinal nematodes in bali cattle breeders in Nusa Penida. Fecal samples were taken from 50 bali cattle breeders kept in cages (simantri and another 50 samples were from cattle not kept in cage. The floating method was used for morphological examination and prevalence, the data was analyzed with descriptive analysis. The results showed, the prevalence of bovine gastrointestinal nematodes in Nusa Penida was 25%. The prevalence of nematode infection in bali cattle that kept cages was lower compared to the cattle that were not kept in cage. Strongyloides papillosus and Capillaria bovis were the gastrointestinal nematodes found in the infected cattle.

  7. Ovicidal and larvicidal activity of extracts of Opuntia ficus-indica against gastrointestinal nematodes of naturally infected sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Féboli, Aline; Laurentiz, Antonio C; Soares, Suelen C S; Augusto, Jeferson G; Anjos, Luciano A; Magalhães, Lizandra G; Filardi, Rosemeire S; Laurentiz, Rosangela S

    2016-08-15

    This study describes the in vitro anthelmintic activity of extracts from Opuntia ficus indica against gastrointestinal nematodes of sheep. The anthelmintic activity was evaluated by inhibition of egg hatching, larval development and larval migration assays. The residual aqueous fractions from cladodes and fruits showed higher ovicidal activity with EC50 values of 7.2mg/mL and 1.5mg/mL, respectively. The aqueous, hexane, and ethyl acetate fractions from fruits and the aqueous fraction from cladodes inhibited 100% of larval development at the lowest concentration tested (1.56mg/mL). The crude cladode and fruit ethanolic extracts inhibited larval migration and showed EC50 values of 0.74mg/mL and 0.27mg/mL, respectively. Phytochemical screening detected high concentrations of alkaloids, tannins, flavonoids, and saponins in the fruits and cladodes. The results demonstrated that O. ficus exhibits anthelmintic activity in vitro, suggesting that, beyond its nutritional potential, this plant can also be an ally for parasite control in sheep. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. IRF-8 regulates expansion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and Foxp3+ regulatory T cells and modulates Th2 immune responses to gastrointestinal nematode infection.

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    Rajesh M Valanparambil

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Interferon regulatory factor-8 (IRF-8 is critical for Th1 cell differentiation and negatively regulates myeloid cell development including myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC. MDSC expand during infection with various pathogens including the gastrointestinal (GI nematode Heligmosomoides polygyrus bakeri (Hpb. We investigated if IRF-8 contributes to Th2 immunity to Hpb infection. Irf8 expression was down-regulated in MDSC from Hpb-infected C57BL/6 (B6 mice. IRF-8 deficient Irf8-/- and BXH-2 mice had significantly higher adult worm burdens than B6 mice after primary or challenge Hpb infection. During primary infection, MDSC expanded to a significantly greater extent in mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN and spleens of Irf8-/- and BXH-2 than B6 mice. CD4+GATA3+ T cells numbers were comparable in MLN of infected B6 and IRF-8 deficient mice, but MLN cells from infected IRF-8 deficient mice secreted significantly less parasite-specific IL-4 ex vivo. The numbers of alternatively activated macrophages in MLN and serum levels of Hpb-specific IgG1 and IgE were also significantly less in infected Irf8-/- than B6 mice. The frequencies of antigen-experienced CD4+CD11ahiCD49dhi cells that were CD44hiCD62L- were similar in MLN of infected Irf8-/- and B6 mice, but the proportions of CD4+GATA3+ and CD4+IL-4+ T cells were lower in infected Irf8-/- mice. CD11b+Gr1+ cells from naïve or infected Irf8-/- mice suppressed CD4+ T cell proliferation and parasite-specific IL-4 secretion in vitro albeit less efficiently than B6 mice. Surprisingly, there were significantly more CD4+ T cells in infected Irf8-/- mice, with a higher frequency of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T (Tregs cells and significantly higher numbers of Tregs than B6 mice. In vivo depletion of MDSC and/or Tregs in Irf8-/- mice did not affect adult worm burdens, but Treg depletion resulted in higher egg production and enhanced parasite-specific IL-5, IL-13, and IL-6 secretion ex vivo. Our data thus provide a previously

  9. Residual effect of injectable moxidectin against lungworm and gastrointestinal nematodes in calves exposed to high pasture infectivity levels in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eysker, M.; Boersema, J.H.; Cornelissen, J.B.W.J.; Kloosterman, A.; Kooyman, F.N.J.

    1996-01-01

    The residual effect of a 0.2 mg kg−1 injectable formulation of moxidectin against lungworm and gastrointestinal nematodes in cattle was studied in a grazing experiment in the Netherlands. Five groups of four calves were grazed between May and October 1991 and one similar group was used as

  10. Anthelmintic activity of Cocos nucifera L. against sheep gastrointestinal nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, L M B; Bevilaqua, C M L; Costa, C T C; Macedo, I T F; Barros, R S; Rodrigues, A C M; Camurça-Vasconcelos, A L F; Morais, S M; Lima, Y C; Vieira, L S; Navarro, A M C

    2009-01-22

    The development of anthelmintic resistance has made the search for alternatives to control gastrointestinal nematodes of small ruminants imperative. Among these alternatives are several medicinal plants traditionally used as anthelmintics. This work evaluated the efficacy of Cocos nucifera fruit on sheep gastrointestinal parasites. The ethyl acetate extract obtained from the liquid of green coconut husk fiber (LGCHF) was submitted to in vitro and in vivo tests. The in vitro assay was based on egg hatching (EHT) and larval development tests (LDT) with Haemonchus contortus. The concentrations tested in the EHT were 0.31, 0.62, 1.25, 2.5 and 5 mg ml(-1), while in the LDT they were 5, 10, 20, 40 and 80 mg ml(-1). The in vivo assay was a controlled test. In this experiment, 18 sheep infected with gastrointestinal nematodes were divided into three groups (n=6), with the following doses administered: G1-400 mg kg(-1) LGCHF ethyl acetate extract, G2-0.2 mg kg(-1) moxidectin (Cydectin) and G3-3% DMSO. The worm burden was analyzed. The results of the in vitro and in vivo tests were submitted to ANOVA and analyzed by the Tukey and Kruskal-Wallis tests, respectively. The extract efficacy in the EHT and LDT, at the highest concentrations tested, was 100% on egg hatching and 99.77% on larval development. The parameters evaluated in the controlled test were not statistically different, showing that despite the significant results of the in vitro tests, the LGCHF ethyl acetate extract showed no activity against sheep gastrointestinal nematodes.

  11. Controlling gastrointestinal nematodes in cattle by Bacillus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Natália Berne; de Castro, Leonardo Mortagua; de Almeida Capella, Gabriela; Motta, Tairan Ourique; de Souza Stori de Lara, Ana Paula; de Moura, Micaele Quintana; Berne, Maria Elisabeth Aires; Leite, Fábio Pereira Leivas

    2017-10-15

    In this study, we tested the in vitro and in vivo larvicidal activity of Bacillus species against gastrointestinal nematodes in cattle, and their viability in the presence of anthelmintics. For in vitro tests, cattle feces naturally infected with trichostrongylides were incubated with spore suspensions of Bacillus circulans (Bcir), B. thuringiensis var. osvaldocruzi (Bto), B. thuringiensis var. israelensis (Bti) or B. thuringiensis var. kurstaki (Btk). Subsequently, residual larvae were counted and identified. All of the Bacillus species showed 60% or more larvicidal effects. Bcir and Bti were selected to be incubated with anthelmintics (moxidectin, nitroxynil and levamisole), and after 24, 72, and 144h, their viability was evaluated. Bti showed highest drug resistance, maintaining a concentration of 1×10 7 CFU/mL. Based on this result, Bti was selected for in vivo tests on calves naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes. The calves were dived into four groups: Group 1, Bti suspension of ∼1×10 9 CFU orally administered; Group 2, Bti suspension of ∼1×10 9 CFU orally administered with levamisole (subcutaneously, 150mg); Group 3, only levamisole (subcutaneously, 150mg), and Group 4 untreated. Then 24 and 48h after treatment, larvae numbers were counted. We observed a reduction of 84%, 100%, and 100% after 48h of treatment, respectively, for Groups 1, 2 and 3 treatments in comparison with the untreated. The tested Bacillus species showed larvicidal activity against bovine trichostrongylides, and its association with anthelmintics. It may serve as a promising integrated alternative for control of gastrointestinal nematodes in cattle. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Significance of anti-CarLA salivary IgA antibody in first grazing season cattle naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlin, Aurélie; Shaw, Richard; Chauvin, Alain; Bareille, Nathalie; Chartier, Christophe

    2017-08-30

    A carbohydrate larval surface antigen (CarLA) present on infective larvae of all trichostrongylid nematodes is a target antigen for host immunoglobulins (Ig). Levels of anti-CarLA salivary IgA antibody (CarLA-IgA) have been shown to be correlated to the level of protective immunity to GIN in sheep and deer but no information is available in cattle. The first objective of this study was to assess the pattern of CarLA-IgA response in 7 groups (G1-G7) of first grazing season cattle (FGSC) naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes. The second objective was to assess the phenotypic correlations between CarLA-IgA level, 3 parasitological indicators (faecal egg count-FEC, pepsinogen level, serum anti-O. ostertagi IgG antibody level-OstertagiaIgG), a clinical indicator (diarrhea score) and average daily weight gain (ADWG). Overall, CarLA-IgA response gradually increased over grazing season and showed large variations in speed and magnitude both between and within groups. Based on the mean group CarLA-IgA response pattern, the 7 groups could be allocated to 3 different classes: (i) 'Late High' class characterized by a high response at housing (G1 and G2); (ii) 'Low' class with a low response over time (G3, G4 and G5); and (iii) 'Early' class with an high initial then stable response (G6 and G7). This classification was consistent with the grazing management practices. In the 'Late High' class, the mean CarLA-IgA at housing was 6.05units/mL and negatively correlated with FEC while no correlation was seen with the other indicators nor ADWG. In the 'Low' class, CarLA response at housing was low (1.95units/mL) and mainly positively correlated with OstertagiaIgG. In the 'Early' class, mean CarLA-IgA ranged from 1.32 to 1.86units/mL during the grazing season and positive correlations were seen with parasitological and clinical indicators. These results suggest that, according to the intensity of larval challenge occurring during the first grazing season, Car

  13. Economic modelling of grazing management against gastrointestinal nematodes in dairy cattle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voort, van der M.; Meensel, Van J.; Lauwers, L.; Haan, de M.H.A.; Evers, A.G.; Huylenbroeck, Van G.; Charlier, J.

    2017-01-01

    Grazing management (GM) interventions, such as reducing the grazing time or mowing pasture before grazing, have been proposed to limit the exposure to gastrointestinal (GI) nematode infections in grazed livestock. However, the farm-level economic effects of these interventions have not yet been

  14. Probiotics and Gastrointestinal Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Britton, Robert A.; Versalovic, James

    2008-01-01

    Gastrointestinal infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, particularly in developing countries. The use of probiotics to prevent and treat a variety of diarrheal diseases has gained favor in recent years. Examples where probiotics have positively impacted gastroenteritis will be highlighted. However, the overall efficacy of these treatments and the mechanisms by which probiotics ameliorate gastrointestinal infections are mostly unknown. We will discuss possible m...

  15. Gastrointestinal Nematodes and Body Condition Scores of Goats ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gastrointestinal (GI) nematodes of 210 trade goats slaughtered in Nsukka area of Enugu state and their effects on body conditions was studied between May and August, 2011. The body condition of each goat were determined and scored on a scale of 1 – 5. Faecal samples were then collected from the goats before ...

  16. A survey of gastrointestinal nematodes in soil samples in Ibadan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This was to determine the comparative level of soil contamination by these helminthes. Out of the 60 top and deep soil samples collected from high-density areas, 12(20%) were positive for various pathogenic gastrointestinal nematodes. They include Ascaris sp., Toxocara canis, Trichuris trichiura, Strongyloides stercoralis, ...

  17. Effects of the repeated distribution of sainfoin hay on the resistance and the resilience of goats naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolini, V; De La Farge, F; Prevot, F; Dorchies, Ph; Hoste, H

    2005-02-28

    Due to the high prevalence of anthelmintic resistance in goats, the need to explore novel approaches to control nematodes and to reduce the exclusive reliance on chemotherapy is strongly demanded in this host species. In sheep, several studies have shown that the consumption of tannin-rich legume forages was associated with positive effects on host resilience and resistance to parasite infection. In goats, studies on such interactions between tanniferous plants and nematode infections remain few. The objectives of the current study were to examine under natural conditions the effects of consumption of sainfoin hay by goats on the parasite populations and on host resilience. Eighteen adult cull goats naturally infected with Haemonchus contortus, Teladorsagia circumcincta and Trichostrongylus colubriformis were used in the study. At the start of the assay, the goats were allocated into two groups, balanced according to weight and the levels of egg excretion. The two groups grazed separate pastures for 3 months with similar stocking rates. Goats from group S received each month indoors, for 7 days, sainfoin hay and control goats (group C) received hay of ryegrass. The diets in both groups were made isoenergetic and isoproteic and the refusals measured. Individual parasitological and pathophysiological measurements were performed fortnightly in order to compare host resistance and resilience. At the end of the study, five goats per group were necropsied. The distribution of sainfoin was associated with: (1) a higher consumption of hay; (2) significant, lower levels of nematode egg excretion which was associated with a decrease in worm fertility but no change in worm population; however, the number of intestinal worms was reduced by 50% in group S; (3) a better host resilience. In particular, after 2 months of grazing, two control goats died and half of the remaining animals needed to be treated whereas this was not the case in group S. These differences were related to

  18. Fasciola hepatica: Specificity of a coproantigen ELISA test for diagnosis of fasciolosis in faecal samples from cattle and sheep concurrently infected with gastrointestinal nematodes, coccidians and/or rumen flukes (paramphistomes), under field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajugu, P-E; Hanna, R E B; Edgar, H W; McMahon, C; Cooper, M; Gordon, A; Barley, J P; Malone, F E; Brennan, G P; Fairweather, I

    2015-09-15

    Chronic fasciolosis is often diagnosed by faecal egg counting (FEC), following concentration of the eggs in the sample by a zinc sulphate floatation method. However, concentration by a sedimentation technique gives improved sensitivity. Interpretation of FEC results for fasciolosis is complicated by factors such as the long pre-patent period and irregular egg shedding. Thus, FEC reduction tests (FECRT), when used alone, are not completely reliable for diagnosis of anthelmintic susceptibility or resistance in local fluke populations, especially when parasite burdens are small. A Fasciola hepatica coproantigen ELISA test has been introduced which more accurately reflects the presence of flukes in the host bile ducts in late pre-patent infections, and absence of flukes following successful chemotherapeutic intervention. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the specificity of the F. hepatica coproantigen ELISA technique, particularly regarding potential cross-reactivity with rumen fluke (paramphistome), gastrointestinal nematode and coccidian infections. The method involved parallel testing of a large battery of faecal samples from field-infected cattle and sheep using floatation and sedimentation FECs and coproantigen analysis. No evidence was found for significant false positivity in the F. hepatica coproantigen ELISA due to paramphistome, coccidian and/or gastrointestinal nematode co-infections. With sedimentation FECs less than 10 F. hepatica eggs per gram (epg), the likelihood of a positive coproantigen result for the sample progressively decreased. Diagnosis of fasciolosis should be based on consideration of both FEC and coproantigen ELISA findings, to ensure optimum sensitivity for pre-patent and low-level infections. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Cellular proliferation rate and insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP)-2 and IGFBP-3 and estradiol receptor alpha expression in the mammary gland of dairy heifers naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes during development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perri, A F; Dallard, B E; Baravalle, C; Licoff, N; Formía, N; Ortega, H H; Becú-Villalobos, D; Mejia, M E; Lacau-Mengido, I M

    2014-01-01

    Mammary ductal morphogenesis during prepuberty occurs mainly in response to insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and estradiol stimulation. Dairy heifers infected with gastrointestinal nematodes have reduced IGF-1 levels, accompanied by reduced growth rate, delayed puberty onset, and lower parenchyma-stroma relationship in their mammary glands. Immunohistochemical studies were undertaken to determine variations in cell division rate, IGF-1 system components, and estradiol receptors (ESR) during peripubertal development in the mammary glands of antiparasitic-treated and untreated Holstein heifers naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes. Mammary biopsies were taken at 20, 30, 40, and 70 wk of age. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen immunolabeling, evident in nuclei, tended to be higher in the parenchyma of the glands from treated heifers than in those from untreated. Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBP) type 2 and type 3 immunolabeling was cytoplasmic and was evident in stroma and parenchyma. The IGFBP2-labeled area was lower in treated than in untreated heifers. In the treated group, a maximal expression of this protein was seen at 40 wk of age, whereas in the untreated group the labeling remained constant. No differences were observed for IGFBP3 between treatment groups or during development. Immunolabeling for α ESR (ESR1) was evident in parenchymal nuclei and was higher in treated than in untreated heifers. In the treated group, ESR1 peaked at 30 wk of age and then decreased. These results demonstrate that the parasite burden in young heifers negatively influence mammary gland development, affecting cell division rate and parameters related to estradiol and IGF-1 signaling in the gland. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Origanum vulgare (Lamiaceae OVICIDAL POTENTIAL ON GASTROINTESTINAL NEMATODES OF CATTLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Laitano Dias de Castro

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to anthelmintic resistance in nematodes, several research studies have been developed seeking control alternatives to these parasites. This study evaluated the in vitro action of Origanum vulgare on gastrointestinal nematode eggs of cattle. In order to evaluate the ability to inhibit egg hatch, different dried leaves extracts of this plant were tested, such as dye, hydroalcoholic and aqueous extracts at concentrations varying from 0.62 to 80 mg/mL. Each assay was accompanied by control containing levamisole hydrochloride (0.2 mg/mL, distilled water and 70 ºGL grain alcohol at the same concentration of the extracts. Test results showed that the different O. vulgare extracts inhibited egg hatch of cattle gastrointestinal nematodes at a percentage that varied from 8.8 to 100%; dye and hydroalcoholic extract were the most promising inhibitors. In view of this ovicidal property, O. vulgare may be an important source of viable antiparasitic compounds for nematodiosis control in ruminants.

  1. The efficacy of an ivermectin/closantel injection against experimentally induced infections and field infections with gastrointestinal nematodes and liver fluke in cattle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borgsteede, F.H.M.; Taylor, S.; Gaasenbeek, C.P.H.; Couper, A.; Cromie, L.

    2008-01-01

    Three studies were performed to test the efficacy of an ivermectin/closantel injection (200 ¿g/kg¿1 ivermectin and 5 mg/kg¿1 closantel) in cattle. Two were experimentally induced infections of Ostertagia ostertagi, Cooperia oncophora and Fasciola hepatica in calves, and the third had natural field

  2. Combined strategies to control antinematicidal -resistant gastrointestinal nematodes in small ruminants on organized farms in pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamad, K.K.

    2014-01-01

    Combined strategies to control antinematicidal -resistant gastrointestinal nematodes in small ruminants on organized farms in Pakistan Antinematicidal resistance has been rooted on all the continents particularly in areas where ovine and caprine are being reared intensively due to frequent annual use of broad-spectrum dewormers. Farmers rely on mono-strategic scheme by using synthetic drugs to treat their livestock which is deemed the easier way to control gastrointestinal nematode infections as compared to the other strategies. On the other hand, recurrent employment of antinematicidal chemotherapeutics has conduced to development and prevalence of resistance among nematode populations. In this regard, other advocating strategies such as grazing management, rotation of antinematicidal drugs (although it is too late), amelioration of animal immunity, genetic approaches, biological control, nutritional supplementation, avoidance of mass treatment, improvement of management, eradication of concurrent diseases, and phytotherapy should be considered too. Although, by far there are no commercialized substantial alternatives to chemotherapy, but the current substitutes could decrease the parasitic burden, which, in turn, restrict indiscriminate use of synthetic drugs. The resistance is more rampant on organized farms as compared to non organized farms in rural areas in Asian, African and South Latin American countries because tamed animal raisers in those areas depend on ethnobotanicals to treat parasitism due to high cost of allopathic drugs. Therefore, in this review, the different strategies to control the antinematicidal resistance on organized farms in Pakistan will be elaborated. (author)

  3. Control of infective larvae of gastrointestinal nematodes in heifers using different isolates of nematophagous fungi Controle de larvas infectantes de nematóides gastrintestinais de novilhas por diferentes isolados dos fungos nematófagos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoel Eduardo da Silva

    Full Text Available The effect of different nematophagous fungi [Duddingtonia flagrans (AC001 and CG722 and Monacrosporium thaumasium (NF34] with regard to controlling infective larvae (L3 of nematodes after gastrointestinal transit in female cattle (3/4 Holstein × Zebu was evaluated. A total of 24 pubescent female cattle were used, weighing approximately 320 kg each one. There were three treatment groups, each contained six animals that received 150 g of pellets (0.2 g of mycelium, orally in a single dose, in a sodium alginate matrix containing mycelial mass of the fungus D. flagrans (AC001 or CG722 or M. thaumasium (NF34; and one control group (without fungi. Fecal samples were collected from the animals at intervals of 12, 15, 18, 21, 24, 48, and 72 hours. At the end of 17 days, the L3 not subjected to predation were recovered by means of the Baermann method. The fungal isolates tested were capable of destroying the L3 after gastrointestinal transit. It was observed that within 72 hours, the isolates AC001, CG722, and NF34 showed a higher predatory activity (81.2%, 97.3%, and 98.3%, respectively. The results justify the need for studies in the field, and over longer intervals, in order to observe the efficiency of the fungus D. flagrans, or even M. thaumasium, for environmental control over nematodes in naturally infected cattle.No presente estudo, foi avaliado o efeito de diferentes fungos nematófagos [Duddingtonia flagrans (AC001 e CG722 e Monacrosporium thaumasium (NF34] no controle de larvas infectantes (L3 de nematóides após o trânsito gastrointestinal em fêmeas bovinas (3/4 Holandês x Zebu. Um total de 24 fêmeas bovinas pubescentes foram utilizadas, pesando aproximadamente 320 kg cada. Foram utilizados três grupos de tratamento; cada um contendo seis animais que receberam por via oral de 150 g de péletes (0,2 g de micélio, em dose única, em uma matriz de alginato de sódio contendo massa micelial dos fungos D. flagrans (AC001 ou

  4. Prevalence of common gastrointestinal nematode parasites in scavenging pigs of different ages and sexes in Eastern Centre province, Burkina Faso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.H. Tamboura

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The range and infestation intensities of gastrointestinal parasitic nematode species depend on the type of swine production system. The present study focused mainly on nematodes of veterinary importance in scavenging pigs in Burkina Faso, and aimed at determining the prevalence of gastro-intestinal nematode parasites by means of faecal egg per gram (EPG counts. Between November 2001 and October 2002, faecal samples from 383 pigs of different sexes and ages ( 12 months were collected from the rectum and examined for gastrointestinal nematodes parasites using the Mc Master method. Of the 383 pigs examined, 91 % were infected by one or more para sites. Ascaris suum (40 %; 100-1 400 EPG was the most prevalent parasite followed by Strongyloides ransomi (21 %; 100-4 200 EPG, Oesophagostomum spp. (18 %; 100-1 000 EPG, Hyostrongylus rubidus (11 %; 100-1 800 EPG, Globocephalus spp. 10 %; 100-400 EPG and Trichuris suis (1 %; 100-200 EPG. The prevalence was significantly higher in female pigs (n = 239 than in males. In addition, females excreted significantly (P < 0.05 more eggs in their faeces than males, except in the case of Globocephalus spp. The age of the animal had no effect on the prevalence of A. suum whereas there were significant differences in age categories concerning S. ransomi, H. rubidus, Oesophagostumum spp. and Globocephalus spp. Unexpectedly, the high prevalence of these common parasites was not accompanied by elevated EPG values, which suggests the existence of moderate infestations. The present work indicates that the common nematode infestations in pigs do not necessarily need a systematic herd anthelmintic treatment, as only a small number of worms is required to induce immunity. A further study is needed to formulate appropriate and cost-effective strategies for the control of gastro-intestinal nematode parasites in pigs in Burkina Faso.

  5. Mind the gaps in research on the control of gastrointestinal nematodes of farmed ruminants and pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charlier, J; Thamsborg, S M; Bartley, D J

    2018-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) nematode control has an important role to play in increasing livestock production from a limited natural resource base and to improve animal health and welfare. In this synthetic review, we identify key research priorities for GI nematode control in farmed ruminants and pigs...

  6. Anthelmintic activity of Melia azedarach fruits in lambs naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes / Atividade anti-helmíntica do fruto da Melia azedarach em cordeiros naturalmente infectados com nematódeos gastrintestinais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Guzzo

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the anthelmintic activity of Melia azedarach grounded dry fruits, in lambs naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes. Twenty four (24 mixed-breed Ile de France x Corriedale, male lambs, aged 3 month, were separeted into three (3 groups of eight (8 animals: the first group was medicated with 5mg.Kg-1 of albendazole orally, in a single dose, the second group was medicated with 2g.Kg-1 of Melia azedarach fruits orally, in a single dose, and the third group remained untreated, as control. The results showed that the group that presented the best efficacy was the one treated with albendazole (51.96%, followed by the group treated with Melia azedarach fruits that presented 33.21% of efficacy.Objetivou-se neste trabalho avaliar a atividade anti-helmíntica dos frutos secos e moídos da planta Melia azedarach, em cordeiros naturalmente infectados com nematódeos gastrintestinais. Utilizou-se 24 cordeiros, com 90 dias de idade, machos, mestiços Ile de France x Corridale, os quais foram divididos em 3 grupos de oito animais cada, sendo: grupo 1, medicado com 5mg.Kg-1 em dose única, de albendazole pela via oral (V.O; grupo 2, com 2g.Kg-1 (V.O, em dose única, do fruto do cinamomo (Melia azedarach e o grupo 3, controle, não recebeu nenhum tipo de tratamento. Os resultados encontrados demonstraram que o grupo tratado com albendazole foi o que apresentou melhor eficácia 51.96%, seguido do grupo tratado com frutos de cinamomo o qual apresentou eficácia de 33.21%.

  7. The effect of long-term feeding of fresh and ensiled cassava (Manihot esculenta) foliage on gastrointestinal nematode infections in goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokerya, S; Waller, P J; Try, P; Höglund, J

    2009-02-01

    The benefit of long-term feeding of fresh or ensiled cassava foliage on gastrointestinal parasite in goats was evaluated. Eighteen male goats (15.15 +/- 2.83 kg and between 4-6 months) were randomly allocated into three treatments supplemented with 200 g of wheat bran head(-1) day(-1). All groups were fed ad-libitum on either grass (CO), fresh cassava (CaF) or ensiled cassava foliage (CaS). At the beginning of the trial, each goat was inoculated with 3000 L3 containing approximately 50% Haemonchus contortus. Individual LWt, FEC and PCV were measured at weekly intervals for 10 weeks. At the termination of the experiment all goats were slaughtered for worm recovery and enumeration. The goats in CaF and CaS had similar weight gains while those in CO lost weight (p ensiled cassava foliage reduced the H. contortus population while the fresh foliage only reduced worm fecundity.

  8. Effect of spraying Arthrobotrys conoides conidia on pastures to control nematode infection in sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarete Kimie Falbo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of spraying pastures with conidia of the fungus Arthrobotrys conoides (GenBank ID: JN191309 for the biological control of gastrointestinal nematode infection-pressure in lambs was assessed. A 12,000-m2 area was divided into six 2,000-m2 fenced areas. Two groups were formed: the treatment group comprised three fenced areas, where conidia were sprayed on the pasture weekly at 7.5 x 104 conidia m-2; and the control group, also comprising three fenced areas, where conidia were not sprayed. The pastures included lopsided oat (Avena strigosa Schreb and Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.. Five naturally infected lambs, were placed between July and September in each fenced area. The effectiveness of biological control was assessed between May and September 2009 by counting the number of third-stage larvae (L3 in each pasture. Additionally, the egg output of the sentinel animals was monitored by counting the number of gastrointestinal nematode eggs per gram of faeces (EPG and the average weight gain was measured. The negative impact on soil was assessed by counting the number of free-living nematodes and phytonematodes. The number of gastrointestinal nematode larvae in the treated pastures decreased. This was significant at two examination days (end August and end of September. At the end of the study, conidia treatment reduced gastrointestinal nematodes on pasture by 52.4% compared to the control group; this difference was statistically significant. Regarding the whole examination period the average reductions in EPG in treatment group was 49.1% compared to the control group. The most common genera of gastrointestinal nematodes were Haemonchus and Trichostrongylus. Animal weight gain and soil nematode counts did not differ significantly.

  9. Effect of nematode infections on productivity of young and adult cattle on commercial dairy farms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ploeger, H.W.

    1989-01-01

    In this study relationships between levels of exposure to gastrointestinal and lung nematode infections and production were investigated on commercial dairy farms in the Netherlands. Little was known about these

    relationships, particularly with respect to second-year cattle and

  10. Faecal egg counts and immune markers in a line of Scottish Cashmere goats selected for resistance to gastrointestinal nematode parasite infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBean, David; Nath, Mintu; Kenyon, Fiona; Zile, Karina; Bartley, David J; Jackson, Frank

    2016-10-15

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of selection for low faecal egg count (FEC) in Scottish Cashmere goats in comparison to a control line of unselected goats grazing the same pasture. Goats from generations F2 through to F9 were monitored for FEC, bodyweight, peripheral eosinophilia and IgG, IgA and IgE response against Teladorsagia circumcincta from the end of their first grazing season, through winter housing (during which a single artificial challenge dose of 10,000 drug susceptible T. circumcincta was given) and the following full grazing season. The study demonstrated that selected line animals excreted a significantly lower number of parasite eggs (P0.05), although the selected line had significantly elevated or reduced levels (P<0.05) for all three within individual generations. There were significant associations between increased IgG and reduced FEC under artificial infection conditions (P=0.02). Increased IgA was also significantly associated with elevated FEC during the second grazing season (P<0.001). The study demonstrates that selection produced a line of goats with consistently reduced FEC compared with control animals, but did not identify a clear relationship between any of the immune markers measured and faecal egg output. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. First Report of Anthelmintic Resistance in Gastrointestinal Nematodes of Sheep from Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroto, R.; Jiménez, A. E.; Romero, J. J.; Alvarez, V.; De Oliveira, J. B.; Hernández, J.

    2011-01-01

    As the prevalence and severity of anthelmintic resistance continue to rise, nematode infections in sheep correspondingly reduce the profitability of the sheep industry. In Costa Rica, sheep production systems are increasing in both number and importance. A field trial study was carried out to detect the level of anthelmintic resistance to albendazole and ivermectin in gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) of sheep from seven farms in Costa Rica. Resistance was determined using the fecal egg count reduction test (FECRT). Three treatment groups were assessed on each farm: control, albendazole, and ivermectin. Haemonchus spp. (71%), Strongyloides sp. (57%), and Trichostrongylus spp. (43%) presented resistance levels to albendazole, whereas Strongyloides sp. (43%), Haemonchus spp. (29%), and Trichostrongylus spp. (29%) were resistant to ivermectin. Haemonchus spp., Strongyloides sp., and Trichostrongylus spp. were the most resistant GIN to both products. This study suggests that frequency of treatment, exclusive chemical control, and visual estimation of animal weight to calculate dosage may contribute to the high levels of anthelmintic resistance that were observed on the farms analyzed herein. PMID:21772962

  12. First Report of Anthelmintic Resistance in Gastrointestinal Nematodes of Sheep from Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Maroto

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available As the prevalence and severity of anthelmintic resistance continue to rise, nematode infections in sheep correspondingly reduce the profitability of the sheep industry. In Costa Rica, sheep production systems are increasing in both number and importance. A field trial study was carried out to detect the level of anthelmintic resistance to albendazole and ivermectin in gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN of sheep from seven farms in Costa Rica. Resistance was determined using the fecal egg count reduction test (FECRT. Three treatment groups were assessed on each farm: control, albendazole, and ivermectin. Haemonchus spp. (71%, Strongyloides sp. (57%, and Trichostrongylus spp. (43% presented resistance levels to albendazole, whereas Strongyloides sp. (43%, Haemonchus spp. (29%, and Trichostrongylus spp. (29% were resistant to ivermectin. Haemonchus spp., Strongyloides sp., and Trichostrongylus spp. were the most resistant GIN to both products. This study suggests that frequency of treatment, exclusive chemical control, and visual estimation of animal weight to calculate dosage may contribute to the high levels of anthelmintic resistance that were observed on the farms analyzed herein.

  13. Epidemiology, sero-diagnosis and therapeutic studies on nematodes infection in balochi range-sheep at district quetta, balochistan, pakistan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Razzaq

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Among the infectious organisms of parasitic origin, gastrointestinal nematodes are very important as they have been reported worldwide. The main aim of the present research study to highlight the annual epidemiological contributing factors associated with the prevalence of gastrointestinal nematodes and their control in sheep.A total 1200 faecal samples (100 per month were collected from farmers holding Balochi-sheep (either sexes, 1-5 years old during January-December 2012 and analyzed to determine the prevalence of nematodes based on microscopy and ELISA based diagnostic assay. Therapeutic efficacies of different synthetic and herbal medicines against these nematodes were assessed by field trials.Results showed that 23.92% Balochi-sheep were infected with nematodes. Five nematodes infections were recorded with highest prevalence of Haemonchus (7.75% followed by Nematodirus (7.58%, Strongyloides (4.42%, Trichostrongylus (2.33% and Trichuris (1.83%. The younger and older ewes (one and five years presented higher nematodes prevalence with peak during March/April and August/September. Haemonchus and Trichuris positive samples based on coprological examination were also showed 92-100% positive sensitivity for these nematodes by the ELISA. Sheep treated with Ivermectin showed higher reduction (97.76% in nematode egg counts followed by Atreefal deedan (96.42% and Oxfendazole (95.44%, respectively.The gastro-intestinal nematodes are prevalent in all age and either sex of Balochi-sheep with peak during summer. The ELISA based diagnosis is more accurte. The synthetic and herbal products are very effective against sheep nematodes.

  14. Benzimidazole-resistant gastrointestinal nematodes in indigenous Chiapas and Pelibuey sheep breeds from Chiapas, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liébano-Hernández, E; González-Olvera, M; Vázquez-Peláez, C; Mendoza-de-Gives, P; Ramírez-Vargas, G; Peralta-Lailson, M; Reyes-García, M E; Osorio, J; Sánchez-Pineda, H; López-Arellano, M E

    2015-01-01

    Because of the natural adaptation of Mexican sheep, the aim of the present study was to identify the presence or absence of gastrointestinal parasitic nematodes (GIN) resistant to benzimidazole (BZ) in both Chiapas and Pelibuey sheep breeds on local farms. Both male and female GIN-infected grazing sheep of the two breeds were selected. Sheep faecal samples were collected to obtain infective larvae (L3). This evolving stage of the parasite was used for taxonomic identification of the genus, based on its morphological characteristics. BZ anthelmintic resistance was evaluated using a nematode-compound in vitro interaction bioassay and the allele-specific polymerase chain reaction technique to detect mutations of residues 198 and 200 on isotype 1 of the β-tubulin gene. Three BZ-based compounds (febendazole (FBZ), tiabendazole (TBZ) and albendazole (ABZ)) at concentrations of 1, 0.5, 0.25, 0.125, 0.062 and 0.03 mg/ml were used to estimate the anthelmintic efficacy and lethal dose (LD50, LD90 and LD99) of the drugs. Two parasitic nematodes, Haemonchus and Teladorsagia, were identified in both isolates. Also, the proportions of anthelmintic resistance identified in GIN of the two sheep breeds were 68% in isolates from the Chiapas breed and 71.8% in the Pelibuey breed. The specific lethal activity obtained with FBZ was higher than 90%. However, TBZ and ABZ showed a lethal activity lower than 50%. High variability in the discriminating dose values was found among the BZ drugs. For example, FBZ LD ranged from 0.01 to 1.20 mg/ml; on the other hand, TBZ and ABZ required a dose ranging from 0.178 to 759 mg/ml. In addition, amino acid changes of Phe (TTC) to Tyr (TAC) at codon 200 of the β-tubulin gene, showing resistance to BZ, and no changes at codon 198 Glu (GAA) to Ala (GCA) were observed for both isolates. These results confirmed the presence of a genetic mutation associated with BZ in both Chiapas and Pelibuey nematode isolates.

  15. Current status for gastrointestinal nematode diagnosis in small ruminants: where are we and where are we going?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Sarah Jane Margaret; Sandeman, Mark; Gonzalez, Jorge; Piedrafita, David

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) parasites pose a significant economic burden particularly in small ruminant production systems. Anthelmintic resistance is a serious concern to the effective control of GIN parasites and has fuelled the focus to design and promote sustainable control of practices of parasite control. Many facets of sustainable GIN parasite control programs rely on the ability to diagnose infection both qualitatively and quantitatively. Diagnostics are required to determine anthelmintic efficacies, for targeted treatment programs and selection of animals for parasite resistant breeding. This review describes much of the research investigated to date to improve the current diagnostic for the above practices which is based on counting the number of parasite eggs in faeces.

  16. Gastrointestinal nematodes of donkeys in and around Alage, South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of lugol's iodine was added to the sediment to differentiate the larvae which stains the free living nematode yellow, while parasitic 3rd stage larvae remain unstained. The larvae was then identified under low power microscopy (10x objective), based on the shape and number of gut cells, relative size of sheath tail and shape ...

  17. A Survey of Nematode Infection in Oreochromis niloticus (L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The incidence and intensity of nematode infection was investigated in Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus from Lake Kyoga, Uganda and 11% of the 406 fish examined were parasitized by nematodes of the genus Contracaecum. The prevalence of these parasites was greatest in the smallest and largest size classes, but this ...

  18. [Gastrointestinal nematode parasitism in ewes and lambs raised in São Carlos, São Paulo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chagas, Ana Carolina De S; Oliveira, Márcia Cristina De S; Esteves, Sérgio N; De Oliveira, Henrique N; Giglioti, Rodrigo; Giglioti, Carolina; Carvalho, Camila De O; Ferrezini, Jenifer; Schiavone, Daniele C

    2008-09-01

    Gastrointestinal nematode infections were evaluated in Santa Inês crossbreed sheep (Santa Inês predominance) in a rotational grazing system and in lambs kept indoors, born from the breeding of these females with purebred Santa Ines, Dorper and Suffolk males. Fecal egg counts (FEC), fecal cultures, packed cell volume (PCV) and weights were evaluated during two years. Climate data were registered. Only animals that presented FEC higher than 4,000 and/or PCV lower than 21% were drenched with anthelmintic treatment and this rational use controlled the infection in the flock satisfactorily. An adequate diet during the rainy season and supplementation in dry period were important to increase relative resistance and resilience to parasites, since Haemonchus contortus was detected year-round in this region. The peripartum physiological condition influenced gastrointestinal nematode infections significantly. Crossbred (1/2) Santa Inês + (1/2) Dorper lambs did not show a significant difference in FEC when compared with other breeds, but they had greater live weight and reached slaughter weight earlier.

  19. [Fungal infections of the gastrointestinal tract].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maragkoudakis, Emmanouil; Realdi, Giuseppe; Dore, Maria Pina

    2005-06-01

    In immunocompetent subjects fungal infections of the gastrointestinal tract are uncommon. Candida esophagitis remains the single most common fungal infection in immunocompromised hosts or in H. pylori- infected patients who receive antibiotic therapy. Enteric fungal infections are uncommon even in HIV-infected patients. Antifungal agents such as amphotericin B, ketoconazole, fluconazole, and the various formulations of itraconazole are effective for most cases.

  20. Mind the gaps in research on the control of gastrointestinal nematodes of farmed ruminants and pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlier, J; Thamsborg, S M; Bartley, D J; Skuce, P J; Kenyon, F; Geurden, T; Hoste, H; Williams, A R; Sotiraki, S; Höglund, J; Chartier, C; Geldhof, P; van Dijk, J; Rinaldi, L; Morgan, E R; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, G; Vercruysse, J; Claerebout, E

    2017-11-10

    Gastrointestinal (GI) nematode control has an important role to play in increasing livestock production from a limited natural resource base and to improve animal health and welfare. In this synthetic review, we identify key research priorities for GI nematode control in farmed ruminants and pigs, to support the development of roadmaps and strategic research agendas by governments, industry and policymakers. These priorities were derived from the DISCONTOOLS gap analysis for nematodes and follow-up discussions within the recently formed Livestock Helminth Research Alliance (LiHRA). In the face of ongoing spread of anthelmintic resistance (AR), we are increasingly faced with a failure of existing control methods against GI nematodes. Effective vaccines against GI nematodes are generally not available, and anthelmintic treatment will therefore remain a cornerstone for their effective control. At the same time, consumers and producers are increasingly concerned with environmental issues associated with chemical parasite control. To address current challenges in GI nematode control, it is crucial to deepen our insights into diverse aspects of epidemiology, AR, host immune mechanisms and the socio-psychological aspects of nematode control. This will enhance the development, and subsequent uptake, of the new diagnostics, vaccines, pharma-/nutraceuticals, control methods and decision support tools required to respond to the spread of AR and the shifting epidemiology of GI nematodes in response to climatic, land-use and farm husbandry changes. More emphasis needs to be placed on the upfront evaluation of the economic value of these innovations as well as the socio-psychological aspects to prioritize research and facilitate uptake of innovations in practice. Finally, targeted regulatory guidance is needed to create an innovation-supportive environment for industries and to accelerate the access to market of new control tools. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  1. Contaminação da pastagem com larvas infectantes de nematoides gastrintestinais após o pastejo de ovelhas resistentes ou susceptíveis à verminose Pasture contamination with infective larvae of gastrointestinal nematodes after grazing by sheep resistant or susceptible to parasitic infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Cristiano Bassetto

    2009-12-01

    resistant group. Haemonchus spp., Trichostrongylus spp. and Oesophagostomum spp. third stage larvae were recovered from pasture. In average, the amount of Haemonchus spp. and Trichostrongylus spp. third stage larvae in the pasture were 2.19 and 2.31 times, respectively, higher in the paddocks grazed by susceptible group in comparison with those grazed by the resistant animals. Therefore, the susceptible animals should be eliminated from the flock in order to reduce pasture contamination and optimize the prophylaxis of gastrointestinal nematode infections.

  2. Influence of earthworms on development of the free-living stages of gastrointestinal nematodes in goat faeces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Alexis, S; Loranger-Merciris, G; Mahieu, M; Boval, M

    2009-07-07

    With the important infection of small ruminants by gastrointestinal nematodes, and in the face of reduced efficacy of anthelminthic treatments, a search for other biological options is necessary. The effect of earthworms on the free-living stages of Haemonchus contortus and Trichostrongylus colubriformis in faeces from goats naturally infected in tropical pastures was evaluated. Two levels (0 vs 14 individuals per container) of indigenous earthworms (50% Pontoscolex corethrus and 50% Perionyx excavatus) were added to containers filled with soil and faeces collected from 20 grazing goats. After 1 week, the numbers of free-living stages of each infective larvae species was measured. The addition of earthworms reduced by 34% (P0.21). These results must be confirmed in experiments on pasture, with other ratios and combinations of earthworms.

  3. Gastrointestinal parasitic infections in organized cattle farms of Meghalaya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Laha

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To know the gastrointestinal parasitic infections in cattle of Meghalaya, India. Materials and Methods: A total of 676 faecal samples of cattle were collected for a period of two years from different organized cattle farms of Meghalaya for detection of gastrointestinal parasitic infections, using standard techniques. Results: Out of 676 faecal samples examined, 191 (28.25% faecal samples were found positive for gastrointestinal parasitic infections. The eggs of Strongyle spp. were found predominant (65.96 % followed by Strongyloides spp. (25.13%, Eimeria spp. (17.80%, Trichuris spp. (13.08%, Moniezia spp. (10.47% and Nematodirus spp.(2.61%. The Nematodirrus spp. was identified as Nematodirus helvetianus, a first report of its kind from cattle of North-Eastern Region of India, particularly from the state Meghalaya. The eggs per gram of faeces in case of nematode parasites were ranged between 50 to 4000 and in case of coccidian infections the range of oocysts per gram of faeces (OPG was between 50 to 1400. Conclusion: Cattle maintained in organized cattle farms of Meghalaya suffers from GI parasitic infections throughout the year. It is highest during rainy season followed by cool, cold and hot season. [Vet World 2013; 6(2.000: 109-112

  4. Oxfendazole Resistance in Gastrointestinal Nematodes of Beetal Goats at Livestock Farms of Punjab (Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Saeed

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to screen goat farms for anthelmintic resistance (AR against oxfendazole (OXF and to determine contributory factors for its development. For this purpose, Beetal goat farms (n = 18 were randomly selected, with natural mixed gastrointestinal nematodosis infection. In vivo (faecal egg count reduction test and in vitro (egg hatch assay tests were used to ascertain the presence of AR while a scorecard was used to determine the role of possible contributory factors for oxfendazole resistance. For in vivo test, the experimental animals were divided into two groups of 10 animals each; one group received OXF treatment, while the other served as control. Pre- and post-treatment coproculture was performed to identify the species and genera of nematodes. Egg hatch assay (EHA was used to confirm the results of FECRT. Fecal egg count reduction test (FECRT revealed the development of resistance on six farms and post-treatment larval cultures indicated Haemonchus contortus, Trichostrongylus colubriformis, Cooperia curticei, Teladorsagia circumcincta and Oesophagostomum spp. as dominant species with resistance. Furthermore, EHA confirmed the results of FECRT. Among the presumptive factors for AR, the highest composite score was for rotation of anthelmintics followed by treatment frequency, dose rate and nature of medication. The scorecard for the development of AR, used in this study, may be helpful for the assessment of contributory factors of AR.

  5. Development of Anthelmintic Resistance Detection Methods of Gastrointestinal Nematodes on Livestock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyah Haryuningtyas

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The intensive usage of anthelmintic in most of farms led to resistances of livestock gastrointestinal nematodes against anthelmintic. Many reports of resistance that increased every year happen following the continuing helminth control programmes. The succesful implementation of helminth control programmes that designed to minimize the development of resistance in nematode populations depends on the availability of effective and sensitive method for its detection and monitoring. A variety of in vivo and in vitro tests have been developed for detecting nematode population resistance to the main anthelmintic groups. This paper will discuss the development of detection method of anthelmintic resistance based on conventional and molecular approach according to their strengths and weakness.

  6. Gastrointestinal nematode control programs with an emphasis on cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stromberg, Bert E; Gasbarre, Louis C

    2006-11-01

    Control strategies for nematode parasites rely on knowledge of the relationships between the parasites and their hosts. Specifically, these programs are based on identifying crucial points of interaction in the environment provided by the host, including genetics and the immune response, and critical periods in the physical environment in which the eggs and larval stages must develop. When these targets are identified and the interactions understood, cost-effective sustainable programs can be developed using currently available antiparasitic compounds. Resistance to the major classes of anthelmintic compounds requires consideration of new approaches, such as immunity or genetics of the host. Additionally, the efficacy of these compounds can be expanded with combined or concomitant use. Increased study of the use of novel approaches, including fungi, elements such as copper, and plant products, has also occurred. This article explores each of these areas to allow readers to appreciate how various approaches may be developed and incorporated into an effective parasite control program.

  7. Predatory Capacity in vitro of Native Nematophagous Fungi from Cundinamarca on Gastrointestinal Nematodes of Cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dildo Márquez Lara

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Dependence and indiscriminate use of chemical anthelmintics as the sole method for controlling gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN of cattle causes problems in the environment, public health, and the productivity of cattle. It is important to develop non-chemical control strategies. Nematophagous fungi can be a viable and promising alternative for the control of these endoparasites. This study aimed to isolate, identify and evaluate in vitro the potential of nematophagous fungi from Cundinamarca on L3 larvae of gastrointestinal nematodes of cattle. 60 soil samples from cattle ranches were sown in Petri boxes containing agar-water for trapping fungi, and three strains of the fungus Arthrobotrys oligospora (L1, XVIII, and XXI and one of Arthrobotrys musiformis (XXIV were identified by morphometric keys. 1 x 106 conidia or chlamydospores of each fungi were used, which faced 100 nematode larvae. Isolate XXIV (A. musiformis showed greater predatory capacity (96.8% than isolates (A. oligospora XVIII, L1, and XXI (69.68, 71.1, and 87.62%, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences (p > 0.05 among the strains with more predatory capacity. This is the first record of in vitro identification and evaluation of the predatory capacity of A. oligospora and A. musiformis, native fungi from Cundinamarca. The results suggest that these fungi could be used as biocontrol agents of nematodes in cattle.

  8. Gastrointestinal nematodes and anthelmintic resistance in Danish goat herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Signe A.; Sørensen, Camilla; Thamsborg, Stig M.

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites in Danish goats and the presence of anthelmintic resistance (AR) in 10 selected herds were investigated during April-September 2012. All Danish herds (n = 137) with 10 or more adult goats were invited to participate, and of these 27 herds met the inclu......The prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites in Danish goats and the presence of anthelmintic resistance (AR) in 10 selected herds were investigated during April-September 2012. All Danish herds (n = 137) with 10 or more adult goats were invited to participate, and of these 27 herds met...... the inclusion criterion of more than 10 young kids never treated with anthelmintics. Questionnaire data on management were collected, and faecal samples from 252 kids were analysed by the McMaster technique. From all herds with a mean faecal egg count (FEC) above 300 eggs per g of faeces, pooled samples were...

  9. Anthelmintic effect of thymol and thymol acetate on sheep gastrointestinal nematodes and their toxicity in mice

    OpenAIRE

    André, Weibson Paz Pinheiro; Cavalcante, Géssica Soares; Ribeiro, Wesley Lyeverton Correia; Santos, Jessica Maria Leite dos; Macedo, Iara Tersia Freitas; Paula, Haroldo César Beserra de; Morais, Selene Maia de; Melo, Janaina Viana de; Bevilaqua, Claudia Maria Leal

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Thymol is a monoterpene and acetylation form of this compound can reduce the toxicity and enhance its biological effects. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of thymol and thymol acetate (TA) on egg, larva and adult Haemonchus contortus and the cuticular changes, acute toxicity in mice and the efficacy on sheep gastrointestinal nematodes. In vitro tests results were analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and followed by comparison with Tukey test or Bonferroni. T...

  10. In vitro Anthelmintic Activity of Oily Extracts of Azadirachta indica and Aqueous Extracts of Nicotiana tabacum on Gastrointestinal Nematodes in Goats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Zapata Salas

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal nematodes are the most common parasites found in ruminants in the world. These parasites cause parasitic gastroenteritis and have a negative effect on productivity. Nematode control has been based on the use of anthelmintic chemicals—against which nematodes have developed a certain degree of resistance—which have been rated as residual substances in goat products that may cause adverse effects on the final consumer. As a result, the study of plant components has been proposed as a sustainable alternative to control nematodosis in goats. The anthelmintic potential of aqueous extracts of Nicotiana tabacum and oily extracts of Azadirachta indica on gastrointestinal nematodes affecting the goat chain was evaluated in vitro in this study. Nematicidal activity tests were performed on stool samples from goats with a high parasite load (trichostrongyles, by performing dose/ response curves. Percent inhibition in egg hatch for the aqueous extract of N. tabacum and the oily extract of A. indica was 99% and 80%, respectively. Extracts showed an effect on larva 3 (infective stage, with a mean lethal time of 8 ± 1 minutes for extracts of N. Tabacum, and of 8 ± 1 minutes for extract of A. indica. The in vitro results of the nematicidal activity show that N. tabacum and A. indica extracts can be a promising alternative for controlling nematodes in ruminants.

  11. Practices to optimise gastrointestinal nematode control on sheep, goat and cattle farms in Europe using targeted (selective) treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlier, J; Morgan, E R; Rinaldi, L; van Dijk, J; Demeler, J; Höglund, J; Hertzberg, H; Van Ranst, B; Hendrickx, G; Vercruysse, J; Kenyon, F

    2014-09-13

    Due to the development of anthelmintic resistance, there have been calls for more sustainable nematode control practices. Two important concepts were introduced to study and promote the sustainable use of anthelmintics: targeted treatments (TT), where the whole flock/herd is treated based on knowledge of the risk, or parameters that quantify the severity of infection; and targeted selective treatments (TST), where only individual animals within the grazing group are treated. The aim of the TT and TST approaches is to effectively control nematode-induced production impacts while preserving anthelmintic efficacy by maintaining a pool of untreated parasites in refugia. Here, we provide an overview of recent studies that assess the use of TT/TST against gastrointestinal nematodes in ruminants and investigate the economic consequences, feasibility and knowledge gaps associated with TST. We conclude that TT/TST approaches are ready to be used and provide practical benefits today. However, a major shift in mentality will be required to make these approaches common practice in parasite control. British Veterinary Association.

  12. Prevalence of drug-resistant gastrointestinal nematodes in an organized sheep farm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambalathaduvar Meenakshisundaram

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study was aimed to determine the resistance against albendazole, fenbendazole, levamisole and closantel in gastrointestinal (GI nematodes of sheep. Introduction: Anthelmintics are used traditionally as an integral part of helminthic control strategies for grazing livestock to prevent production losses from parasitic infections. The continuous and indiscriminate use of the same anthelmintics over years together as the sole means of control are now failing due to the emergence of resistance strains of helminths. Resistance to the commonly used anthelmintics in GI nematodes of sheep has become an increasingly widespread problem throughout the world. Materials and Methods: Fifty-five naturally infected Madras Red lambs of 6-12 months of age were selected and distributed randomly into five treatment groups of 11 animals each. Four groups were treated orally with albendazole (5 mg/kg, fenbendazole (7 mg/kg, levamisole (7.5 mg/kg and closantel (10 mg/kg respectively, whereas the fifth group served as untreated control. Fecal samples were collected per rectum of each lamb just prior to treatment (pre-treatment and on 7, 14, 21 and 28 days post-treatment. The anthelmintic resistance was evaluated by in vivo fecal egg count reduction test (FECRT, post-treatment larval culture and in vitro egg hatch assay. Results: In the FECRT, albendazole reduced the faecal egg count by 86.50%, 84.81%, 85.28% and 84.47% respectively for 4 weeks after treatment. Fecal egg count reduction using fenbendazole was 92.64, 93.04, 90.80 and 90.06% respectively for 4 weeks after treatment. The percent efficacy for levamisole and closantel was more than 95%. The post-treatment larval culture contained only Haemonchus contortus. In the in vitro egg hatch assay, the ED50 value for benzimidazole was 0.299 μg albendazole/ml and levamisole showed an ED50 value of 0.283 μg/ml. Conclusion: Our study confirmed the resistance of H. contortus to benzimidazole in sheep. .

  13. Prevalence and risk factors for intestinal nematode infections in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A community-based cross-sectional study was conducted between November 2010 and February 2011 to assess the prevalence of intestinal nematode infections among children aged 1 – 14 years living in two communities of rural Ebonyi State, Nigeria, characterize the risk factors for infection and develop environmental ...

  14. Analysis of nematode infection levels among indoor pigs in Thika ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The infection levels of various species of nematode infection were studied in 35 indoor pig herds in Thika district, Kenya. Faecal samples were ... To reduce these costs, it is recommended that animals should be treated after faecal examination and laboratory determination of the EPG levels.. Kenya Veterinarian Vol.

  15. Gastrointestinal immune responses in HIV infected subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LRR Castello-Branco

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available The gut associated lymphoid tissue is responsible for specific responses to intestinal antigens. During HIV infection, mucosal immune deficiency may account for the gastrointestinal infections. In this review we describe the humoral and cellular mucosal immune responses in normal and HIV-infected subjects.

  16. Current Status for Gastrointestinal Nematode Diagnosis in Small Ruminants: Where Are We and Where Are We Going?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Jane Margaret Preston

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal nematode (GIN parasites pose a significant economic burden particularly in small ruminant production systems. Anthelmintic resistance is a serious concern to the effective control of GIN parasites and has fuelled the focus to design and promote sustainable control of practices of parasite control. Many facets of sustainable GIN parasite control programs rely on the ability to diagnose infection both qualitatively and quantitatively. Diagnostics are required to determine anthelmintic efficacies, for targeted treatment programs and selection of animals for parasite resistant breeding. This review describes much of the research investigated to date to improve the current diagnostic for the above practices which is based on counting the number of parasite eggs in faeces.

  17. Parasitism by Oestrus ovis: influence of sheep breed and nematode infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, B F; Bassetto, C C; Shaw, R J; Canavessi, A M O; Amarante, A F T

    2012-05-25

    Previous studies showed that Santa Ines (SI) hair sheep were more resistant to gastrointestinal nematode infections (GIN) than Ile de France (IF) sheep. The present experiment aimed to evaluate if that reported resistance difference against GIN also occurred against Oestrus ovis infestation and also to evaluate the influence of O. ovis infestation on the gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) infections. SI (n=12) and IF (n=12) young male lambs were weaned at 2 months of age and moved to a paddock (0.3 ha) with Brachiaria decumbens grass, where they also received concentrate ration. The animals were kept together during the experimental period (September to early December 2009). Fecal and blood samples were taken from all animals every 2 weeks and body weight and nasal discharge score (oestrosis clinic signs) were recorded on the same occasion. In early December 2009, all lambs were sacrificed and O. ovis larvae and GIN were recovered, counted and identified according to the larval stage. All animals were infested by different larval instars of O. ovis without any statistical difference between breeds (P>0.05). The SI lambs had an average of 24.8 larvae, and the intensity of infection ranged between 14 and 39 larvae, while the IF lambs showed an average of 23.5 larvae with the minimum and maximum from 11 to 36 larvae, respectively. SI lambs presented the lowest nematode fecal egg counts (FECs) and the lowest mean numbers of Haemonchus contortus, Trichostrongylus colubriformis and Strongyloides papillosus, however, there was no significant differences between group means (P>0.05). Inverse relationship between numbers of O. ovis larvae and gastrointestinal nematodes was observed in both breeds. SI sheep showed a significant increase in blood eosinophils and total IgE serum levels and these variables were negatively correlated with nematode FEC. A negative correlation was observed between total IgE serum level and H. contortus burden in both breeds. In conclusion, there was

  18. Gastrointestinal nematode larvae in the grazing land of cattle in Guwahati, Assam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meena Das

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To know the prevalence of gastrointestinal nematode larvae (L3 in the grazing land of cattle in Guwahati, Kamrup district, Assam. Materials and Methods: Pastures were collected and examined for the presence of nematode larvae (L3 from six localities of Guwahati at monthly interval from August 2012 to July 2013. The counted larvae were then expressed as per kg dry matter of herbage (L3/kg DM. Results: Examination of pastures revealed presence of nematode larvae (L3 in pastures throughout the year which varied from 4.5 L3/kg DM in January to a maximum of 106.33 L3/kg DM in August. The L3 of Haemonchus contortus, Trichostrongylus spp., Oesophagostomum spp., Cooperia spp., and Mecistocirrus spp. were recovered from pastures. The average pasture larval burden (PLB was 34.75±3.48 L3/kg DM. Season-wise PLB revealed the presence of 23.89±3.01, 67.54±5.41, 26.67±1.92, and 7.28±0.89 L3/kg DM during pre-monsoon, monsoon, post-monsoon, and winter seasons, respectively. Monsoon season has significant (p<0.05 effect on PLB. However, analysis of variance of different locations with respect to season revealed that there was no significant difference but season-wise it was highly significant (p<0.01. Pearson correlation of environmental variables (temperature, relative humidity, and rainfall with PLB revealed correlation was statistically significant with rainfall (p<0.05. Conclusion: This study reveals the presence of five nematode larvae (L3 in the pastures of Guwahati, Assam throughout the year, statistically significant during monsoon season.

  19. The first reported case of resistance of gastrointestinal nematodes to benzimidazole anthelmintic in goats in Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickiewicz, Marcin; Czopowicz, Michał; Górski, Paweł; Kaba, Jarosław

    2017-01-01

    Fecal egg count reduction (FECR) test with albendazole and egg hatch test (EHT) with thiabendazole (TBZ) were performed in a dairy goat herd suspected of anthelmintic resistance to benzimidazoles. The herd had been regularly dewormed with fenbendazole for 5 previous years and despite that it remained infected with several species of gastrointestinal nematodes (Trichostrongylus colubriformis, Teladorsagia circumcincta, and Haemonchus contortus). Albendazole was administered per os at dose of 20 mg/kg to 10 goats (treated group), while 10 other goats remained untreated (control group). Fecal egg count (FEC) was determined using McMaster egg counting method before and 7 days after the treatment in the treated group, and once (at the latter moment) in the control group. EHT was performed on the pooled rectal sample collected from treated goats. EHT comprised the negative control and 7 consecutive concentrations of TBZ (0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 μg/ml) according to the standard procedure. Two hundred eggs/larvae were counted to determine percentage of unhatched eggs, which was adjusted by the natural mortality. TBZ dose effective in preventing hatching of 50% of eggs (ED50) was determined using the log-probit transformation. Median FEC (range) before the treatment was 1000 (250–3450) epg in the treated group and dropped to 150 (50–500) epg after the treatment (p=0.005). Median FEC (range) after the treatment was also significantly lower in the treated than in control group (p=0.009), where it was 725 (0–5050) epg. FECR between the treated and control group was 81% (95% CI: 49%, 93%). FECR in the treated group was 83% and 74% based on average and individual approach, respectively. ED50 value of TBZ was 0.78 μg/ml. Only H. contortus persisted in the treated group after treatment. The results indicate resistance of H. contortus to a benzimidazole anthelmintic, which is the first such case reported in Polish goats.

  20. Activated entomopathogenic nematode infective juveniles release lethal venom proteins.

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    Dihong Lu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs are unique parasites due to their symbiosis with entomopathogenic bacteria and their ability to kill insect hosts quickly after infection. It is widely believed that EPNs rely on their bacterial partners for killing hosts. Here we disproved this theory by demonstrating that the in vitro activated infective juveniles (IJs of Steinernema carpocapsae (a well-studied EPN species release venom proteins that are lethal to several insects including Drosophila melanogaster. We confirmed that the in vitro activation is a good approximation of the in vivo process by comparing the transcriptomes of individual in vitro and in vivo activated IJs. We further analyzed the transcriptomes of non-activated and activated IJs and revealed a dramatic shift in gene expression during IJ activation. We also analyzed the venom proteome using mass spectrometry. Among the 472 venom proteins, proteases and protease inhibitors are especially abundant, and toxin-related proteins such as Shk domain-containing proteins and fatty acid- and retinol-binding proteins are also detected, which are potential candidates for suppressing the host immune system. Many of the venom proteins have conserved orthologs in vertebrate-parasitic nematodes and are differentially expressed during IJ activation, suggesting conserved functions in nematode parasitism. In summary, our findings strongly support a new model that S. carpocapsae and likely other Steinernema EPNs have a more active role in contributing to the pathogenicity of the nematode-bacterium complex than simply relying on their symbiotic bacteria. Furthermore, we propose that EPNs are a good model system for investigating vertebrate- and human-parasitic nematodes, especially regarding the function of excretory/secretory products.

  1. Genome-wide scan of gastrointestinal nematode resistance in closed Angus population selected for minimized influence of MHC.

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    Eui-Soo Kim

    Full Text Available Genetic markers associated with parasite indicator traits are ideal targets for study of marker assisted selection aimed at controlling infections that reduce herd use of anthelminthics. For this study, we collected gastrointestinal (GI nematode fecal egg count (FEC data from post-weaning animals of an Angus resource population challenged to a 26 week natural exposure on pasture. In all, data from 487 animals was collected over a 16 year period between 1992 and 2007, most of which were selected for a specific DRB1 allele to reduce the influence of potential allelic variant effects of the MHC locus. A genome-wide association study (GWAS based on BovineSNP50 genotypes revealed six genomic regions located on bovine Chromosomes 3, 5, 8, 15 and 27; which were significantly associated (-log10 p=4.3 with Box-Cox transformed mean FEC (BC-MFEC. DAVID analysis of the genes within the significant genomic regions suggested a correlation between our results and annotation for genes involved in inflammatory response to infection. Furthermore, ROH and selection signature analyses provided strong evidence that the genomic regions associated BC-MFEC have not been affected by local autozygosity or recent experimental selection. These findings provide useful information for parasite resistance prediction for young grazing cattle and suggest new candidate gene targets for development of disease-modifying therapies or future studies of host response to GI parasite infection.

  2. Innate Immune Sensors and Gastrointestinal Bacterial Infections

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    Georgina L. Hold

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The gastrointestinal microbiota is a major source of immune stimulation. The interaction between host pattern-recognition receptors and conserved microbial ligands profoundly influences infection dynamics. Identifying and understanding the nature of these interactions is a key step towards obtaining a clearer picture of microbial pathogenesis. These interactions underpin a complex interplay between microbe and host that has far reaching consequences for both. Here, we review the role of pattern recognition receptors in three prototype diseases affecting the stomach, the small intestine, and large intestine, respectively (Helicobacter pylori infection, Salmonella infection, and inflammatory bowel disease. Specifically, we review the nature and impact of pathogen:receptor interactions, their impact upon pathogenesis, and address the relevance of pattern recognition receptors in the development of therapies for gastrointestinal diseases.

  3. Endosymbiont-based immunity in Drosophila melanogaster against parasitic nematode infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Shruti; Frazer, Joanna; Banga, Ashima; Pruitt, Katherine; Harsh, Sneh; Jaenike, John; Eleftherianos, Ioannis

    2018-01-01

    Associations between endosymbiotic bacteria and their hosts represent a complex ecosystem within organisms ranging from humans to protozoa. Drosophila species are known to naturally harbor Wolbachia and Spiroplasma endosymbionts, which play a protective role against certain microbial infections. Here, we investigated whether the presence or absence of endosymbionts affects the immune response of Drosophila melanogaster larvae to infection by Steinernema carpocapsae nematodes carrying or lacking their mutualistic Gram-negative bacteria Xenorhabdus nematophila (symbiotic or axenic nematodes, respectively). We find that the presence of Wolbachia alone or together with Spiroplasma promotes the survival of larvae in response to infection with S. carpocapsae symbiotic nematodes, but not against axenic nematodes. We also find that Wolbachia numbers are reduced in Spiroplasma-free larvae infected with axenic compared to symbiotic nematodes, and they are also reduced in Spiroplasma-containing compared to Spiroplasma-free larvae infected with axenic nematodes. We further show that S. carpocapsae axenic nematode infection induces the Toll pathway in the absence of Wolbachia, and that symbiotic nematode infection leads to increased phenoloxidase activity in D. melanogaster larvae devoid of endosymbionts. Finally, infection with either type of nematode alters the metabolic status and the fat body lipid droplet size in D. melanogaster larvae containing only Wolbachia or both endosymbionts. Our results suggest an interaction between Wolbachia endosymbionts with the immune response of D. melanogaster against infection with the entomopathogenic nematodes S. carpocapsae. Results from this study indicate a complex interplay between insect hosts, endosymbiotic microbes and pathogenic organisms.

  4. Seasonal variations in the gastro-intestinal nematode populations of Scottish hil sheep.

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    Reid, J F; Armour, J

    1975-05-01

    In each of two consecutive years, groups of breeding ewes were removed from a hill farm in the west of Scotland on four occasions, namely late pregnancy, early lactation, autumn and early winter. At slaughter the major nematode genus present in the alimentary tract was Ostertagia, with O circumcincta the predominant species but three species previously found in Scottish hill sheep, Bunostomum trigonocephalum, Strongyloides papillosis and Chabertia ovina were absent. An absolute increase in total nematode burden and faecal egg count was apparent in the ewes commencing in late pregnancy, reaching a maximum during lactation and falling again in autumn and early winter. This peri-parturient increase in the nematode population could not be solely attributed to the maturation of previously inhibited larval stages but was primarily the result of the development of recently ingested infection; the latter situation thought to be due to a temporary relaxation of immunological response by the ewe at parturition or early lactation. Serum pepsinogen values in ewes remained elevated throughout the grazing season and were always higher than those of their lambs, suggesting that the ewe, although allowing few parasites to become established, was under considerable challenge in the autumn. The worm burdens of the lambs were always low in autumn and early winter with Ostertagia spp being the major genus present during the autumn and Trichostrongylus spp being the predominant genus during the early winter.

  5. Gastro-intestinal nematodes of sheep and goats in three districts of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A cross-sectional study was conducted to estimate the prevalence and to identify the genera of gastrointestinal strongyles infecting sheep goats in Chena and. Gimbo (Kaffa Zone) and Semen-Bench (Bench Maji zones) districts, Southwest. Ethiopia. A total of 800 faecal samples were collected from sheep (n=492) and.

  6. Maize supplementation of Pelibuey sheep in a silvopastoral system: fodder selection, nutrient intake and resilience against gastrointestinal nematodes.

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    Retama-Flores, C; Torres-Acosta, J F J; Sandoval-Castro, C A; Aguilar-Caballero, A J; Cámara-Sarmiento, R; Canul-Ku, H L

    2012-01-01

    This trial evaluated the effect of maize supplementation on the ingestive behavior, nutrient intake and the resilience against gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) infection of hair sheep in a silvopastoral system containing tropical grasses and legume trees. In addition, it attempted to determine the metabolic cost of the natural GIN infection in supplemented and non-supplemented animals. Twenty-nine 3-month-old lambs (male and female), raised nematode free, were allocated to four groups: I-NS (infected, not supplemented, n = 8), I-S (infected, supplemented with maize at 1.5% live weight (LW), n = 7), T-NS (treated with moxidectin 0.2 mg/kg LW every 28 days, and not supplemented, n = 7) and T-S (treated with moxidectin and supplemented with maize at 1.5% LW, n = 7). During the 70-day trial, fodder intake, fodder selection, LW change (LWC), red blood cell counts (RBC), hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit (Ht) and eggs per gram of feces (EPG) were measured every 14 days. Supplement consumption was recorded daily. Metabolizable energy (ME) and protein (MP) consumption from the feeds were estimated. Maize supplementation helped to improve the resilience of hair sheep lambs against GIN infections. The I-S and T-NS groups showed similar LWC, RBC, Hb and Ht (P > 0.05) and both were higher than those in the I-NS group (P 0.05). No effect of sex was observed in the different variables. Although all groups showed low dry matter intake (DMI) (< 2% LW), supplemented groups (T-S and I-S) showed higher total DMI (fodder + maize; P < 0.05), hence higher ME and MP intakes than the non-supplemented groups (T-NS and I-NS). All groups showed similar fodder selection patterns. The estimated metabolic cost of parasitism was ME = 0.70 MJ/day and MP = 9.2 g/day in the I-S animals. Meanwhile, the cost in the I-NS animals was ME = 1.46 MJ/day and MP = 12.71 g/day. Maize supplementation was an economically viable strategy to control GIN compared with no intervention.

  7. Nematophagous fungi for biological control of gastrointestinal nematodes in domestic animals.

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    Braga, Fabio Ribeiro; de Araújo, Jackson Victor

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have been conducted using fungi in the biological control of domestic animals and humans. In this respect, a large amount of research has been undertaken to understand the particularities of each fungus used. These fungi have been demonstrated to act on all classes of helminthes. Therefore, they should not only be called nematophagous but also helmintophagous. Evidence of enzymatic action has also revealed their mechanism of action, as well as potential metabolites that could be synthesized as bioactive molecules. Cultural barriers to the use of fungi should be broken down, since the impact on the environment is minimal. In this context, much is already known about the mechanism of interaction of these organisms with their 'targets'. Recent research has pointed to the search for substances derived from nematophagous fungi that have demonstrated their ovicidal and/or larvicidal activity, thus being a global premise to be studied further. Crude extracts derived from nematophagous fungi of predator and ovicidal groups reduce the amount of larvae of gastrointestinal nematodes and prevent the hatching of their eggs, since they have been demonstrated to act with extracellular proteases and other enzymes. Furthermore, the activity of these enzymes has begun to be explored regarding their possible interaction with the exoskeleton of arthropods, which could emerge as an alternative method of tick control. Finally, it should be clear that nematophagous fungi in general are 'old friends' that are ready to the 'fight with our old enemies', the gastrointestinal helminth parasites harmful to human and animal health.

  8. Evaluation of gastro-intestinal nematode parasite control strategies for first-season grazing cattle in Sweden.

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    Dimander, Sten-Olof; Höglund, Johan; Uggla, Arvid; Spörndly, Eva; Waller, Peter J

    2003-02-13

    in 2000 and resulted in an average 65 kg advantage of the ivermectin treated calves compared with the untreated calves.Thus, this three-year grazing experiment has emphasised the importance of subclinical gastrointestinal nematode infections in FSGC in Sweden. In addition, the study has shown that adequate parasite control may be achievable without the use of anthelmintics.

  9. Variability in the fecal egg count and the parasitic burden of hair sheep after grazing in nematode infected paddocks

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    Roberto González-Garduño

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the variability in the fecal egg count (FEC and the parasitic burden of naive hair sheep after grazing in nematode infected paddocks. The research was carried out in Tabasco, Mexico, during two periods (August and December. In each period 32 lambs were grazed for one month on African star grass (Cynodon plectostachyus contaminated with gastrointestinal parasitic nematodes. FEC, packed cell volume (PCV and body weight (BW were recorded. Gastrointestinal worms were recovered at necropsy. Data were analyzed with the MIXED procedure of SAS using a model of repeated measurements over time. A higher number of Haemonchus contortus worms was found in December (2814±838 than in August (1166±305. The opposite occurred with Cooperia curticei (2167±393 and 3638±441, respectively. The FEC and correlation coefficient in respect to the worm burden were higher in December (6516 ± 1599, r=0.83, respectively than in August (4364±771, r=0.44, respectively. A high variability in resistance-susceptibility to gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN occurred in Katahdin × Pelibuey lambs after grazing.

  10. The effect of purified condensed tannins of forage plants from Botswana on the free-living stages of gastrointestinal nematode parasites of livestock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibe, O; Sutherland, I A; Lesperance, L; Harding, D R K

    2013-10-18

    The effect of condensed tannins (CT) extracted from forage plants from Botswana on the free-living stages of a number of species of gastrointestinal nematode parasites derived from infected sheep were investigated using in vitro assays. Fresh samples of five different plants (Viscum rotundifolium, Viscum verrucosum, Tapinanthus oleifolius, Grewia flava and Ipomoea sinensis) were collected over two summers (February 2009 and 2010). Fractionation of each crude extract on a Sephadex LH-20 column yielded low molecular weight phenolics and CT-containing fractions. The effect of each purified CT fraction on parasites was evaluated using either egg hatch, larval development or larval migration inhibition assays. Three gastrointestinal nematode species (Haemonchus contortus, Trichostrongylus colubriformis and Teladorsagia circumcincta) derived from infected sheep were evaluated in the study. CT from V. rotundifolium and I. sinensis fractions from samples collected in 2009 and 2010 did not inhibit larval development. However, CT isolated from V. verrucosum, T. oleifolius and G. flava collected in 2009 completely inhibited the development of all parasite species. These CT fractions were more potent in inhibiting larval development of H. contortus than fractions from the same plant species collected in 2010. However, a slight effect on larval migration was observed with some CT extracts. The results suggest that CT extracts of some forage plants from Botswana have anti-parasitic properties in vitro, and that further research is required to determine any in vivo efficacy from feeding the plants to goats in a field situation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Secreted proteomes of different developmental stages of the gastrointestinal nematode Nippostrongylus brasiliensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotillo, Javier; Sanchez-Flores, Alejandro; Cantacessi, Cinzia; Harcus, Yvonne; Pickering, Darren; Bouchery, Tiffany; Camberis, Mali; Tang, Shiau-Choot; Giacomin, Paul; Mulvenna, Jason; Mitreva, Makedonka; Berriman, Matthew; LeGros, Graham; Maizels, Rick M; Loukas, Alex

    2014-10-01

    Hookworms infect more than 700 million people worldwide and cause more morbidity than most other human parasitic infections. Nippostrongylus brasiliensis (the rat hookworm) has been used as an experimental model for human hookworm because of its similar life cycle and ease of maintenance in laboratory rodents. Adult N. brasiliensis, like the human hookworm, lives in the intestine of the host and releases excretory/secretory products (ESP), which represent the major host-parasite interface. We performed a comparative proteomic analysis of infective larval (L3) and adult worm stages of N. brasiliensis to gain insights into the molecular bases of host-parasite relationships and determine whether N. brasiliensis could indeed serve as an appropriate model for studying human hookworm infections. Proteomic data were matched to a transcriptomic database assembled from 245,874,892 Illumina reads from different developmental stages (eggs, L3, L4, and adult) of N. brasiliensis yielding∼18,426 unigenes with 39,063 possible isoform transcripts. From this analysis, 313 proteins were identified from ESPs by LC-MS/MS-52 in the L3 and 261 in the adult worm. Most of the proteins identified in the study were stage-specific (only 13 proteins were shared by both stages); in particular, two families of proteins-astacin metalloproteases and CAP-domain containing SCP/TAPS-were highly represented in both L3 and adult ESP. These protein families are present in most nematode groups, and where studied, appear to play roles in larval migration and evasion of the host's immune response. Phylogenetic analyses of defined protein families and global gene similarity analyses showed that N. brasiliensis has a greater degree of conservation with human hookworm than other model nematodes examined. These findings validate the use of N. brasiliensis as a suitable parasite for the study of human hookworm infections in a tractable animal model. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and

  12. Genetic regulation of parasite infection: empirical evidence of the functional significance of an IL4 gene SNP on nematode infections in wild primates

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    Kappeler Peter M

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Susceptibility to parasite infection affects fitness-related processes, such as mate choice and survival, yet its genetic regulation remains poorly understood. Interleukin-4 (IL4 plays a central role in the humoral immune defence against nematode parasite infections, inducing IgE switch and regulation of worm expulsion from the intestines. The evolutionary and functional significance of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in IL4-genes is known, yet empirical information on the effect of IL4 SNPs on gastro-intestinal infections is lacking. Using samples from a population of wild red-fronted lemurs (Eulemur fulvus rufus, Primates: Lemuridae, from western Madagascar, we explored the association of IL4-gene promoter polymorphisms with nematode infections and investigated a possible functional role of the IL4 polymorphism on male reproductive success. Results Using sequence analyses of lemur DNA we detected a new SNP in the IL4 gene promoter area. Carriers of the genotype T/T showed higher nematode infection intensities than individuals of genotypes C/T and C/C. Genetic population analyses using data from more than 10 years, suggested higher reproductive success of T/T males than expected. Conclusions Our results suggest a regulatory effect of an IL4 gene promoter polymorphism on the intensity of parasite infections in a natural population of red-fronted lemurs, with a seemingly disadvantageous genotype represented in low frequencies. Long-term population analyses, however, point in the direction of a negative frequency-dependent association, giving a fitness advantage to the rare genotype. Due to low frequencies of the genotype in question conclusive evidence of a functional role of IL4 polymorphism cannot be drawn here; still, we suggest the use of IL4 polymorphism as a new molecular tool for quick assessment of individual genetic constitution with regard to nematode infection intensities, contributing to a better

  13. Gastrointestinal nematodes in ostriches, Struthio camelus, in different regions of the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

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    Nicole Brand Ederli

    Full Text Available The ratite group is composed of ostriches, rheas, emus, cassowaries and kiwis. Little research has been done on parasitism in these birds. The aim of this study was to determine the distribution of infections by gastrointestinal nematodes in ostriches in the state of Rio de Janeiro. For this, fecal samples were collected from 192 on 13 farms. From each sample, four grams of feces were used to determine the eggs per gram of feces (EPG count, by means of the McMaster technique. Part of the feces sample was used for fecal cultures, to identify 100 larvae per sample. The results were subjected to descriptive central trend and dispersion analysis, using confidence intervals at the 5% error probability level in accordance with the Student t distribution, and Tukey’s test with a 95% confidence interval. The mean EPG in the state was 1,557, and the municipality of Três Rios had the lowest average (62. The city of Campos dos Goytacazes presented the highest mean EPG of all the municipalities analyzed. The northern region presented the highest mean EPG, followed by the southern, metropolitan, coastal lowland and central regions. Libyostrongylus species were observed on all the farms: L. douglassii predominated, followed by L. dentatus and Codiostomum struthionis.

  14. A Large Collection of Novel Nematode-Infecting Microsporidia and Their Diverse Interactions with Caenorhabditis elegans and Other Related Nematodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gaotian; Sachse, Martin; Prevost, Marie-Christine; Troemel, Emily R.; Félix, Marie-Anne

    2016-01-01

    Microsporidia are fungi-related intracellular pathogens that may infect virtually all animals, but are poorly understood. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has recently become a model host for studying microsporidia through the identification of its natural microsporidian pathogen Nematocida parisii. However, it was unclear how widespread and diverse microsporidia infections are in C. elegans or other related nematodes in the wild. Here we describe the isolation and culture of 47 nematodes with microsporidian infections. N. parisii is found to be the most common microsporidia infecting C. elegans in the wild. In addition, we further describe and name six new species in the Nematocida genus. Our sampling and phylogenetic analysis further identify two subclades that are genetically distinct from Nematocida, and we name them Enteropsectra and Pancytospora. Interestingly, unlike Nematocida, these two genera belong to the main clade of microsporidia that includes human pathogens. All of these microsporidia are horizontally transmitted and most specifically infect intestinal cells, except Pancytospora epiphaga that replicates mostly in the epidermis of its Caenorhabditis host. At the subcellular level in the infected host cell, spores of the novel genus Enteropsectra show a characteristic apical distribution and exit via budding off of the plasma membrane, instead of exiting via exocytosis as spores of Nematocida. Host specificity is broad for some microsporidia, narrow for others: indeed, some microsporidia can infect Oscheius tipulae but not its sister species Oscheius sp. 3, and conversely some microsporidia found infecting Oscheius sp. 3 do not infect O. tipulae. We also show that N. ausubeli fails to strongly induce in C. elegans the transcription of genes that are induced by other Nematocida species, suggesting it has evolved mechanisms to prevent induction of this host response. Altogether, these newly isolated species illustrate the diversity and ubiquity of

  15. Prevalence of gastrointestinal helminth infections in free-range laying hens under mountain farming production conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuthijaree, K; Lambertz, C; Gauly, M

    2017-12-01

    1. A cross-sectional study was conducted from September 2015 to July 2016 in South Tyrol, Northern Italy to examine the prevalence of gastrointestinal helminths in free-range laying hens under mountain farming production conditions. 2. A total of 280 laying hens from 14 free-range mountain farms (4 organic, 10 conventional) were randomly collected at the end of the laying period. Faecal samples were taken to analyse faecal egg counts (FEC) and faecal oocyst counts (FOC). The gastrointestinal tracts were removed post mortem and examined for the presence of helminths. 3. In faeces, FEC values averaged 258 eggs per g of faeces, which were dominated by Ascaridia galli and Heterakis gallinarum. Mean FOC was 80 oocysts/g. In the gastrointestinal tract, at least one nematode species was found in 99.3% of the examined hens. H. gallinarum was the most prevalent nematode (95.7%), followed by Capillaria spp. (66.8%) and A. galli (63.6%). Thirty per cent of the chickens were infected with cestodes (tapeworms). Correlation coefficients between worm counts of H. gallinarum, Capillaria spp. and A. galli ranged from 0.41 to 0.51. 5. The helminth prevalence did not differ between conventional and organic farms, whereas total worm burden was higher in organic compared with conventional farms (318.9 vs. 112.0). Prevalence and infection intensity did not differ between farms that used anthelmintic treatments and those that did not. 6. In conclusion, free-range laying hens under the studied mountain farming conditions are at high risk of nematode infection, especially in organic systems. The vast majority of hens are subclinical infected with at least one helminth species.

  16. Probiotics as drugs against human gastrointestinal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, Yolanda; Nadal, Inmaculada; Sánchez, Ester

    2007-06-01

    The commensal gut microbiota confer health benefits to their host by helping dietary digestion, regulating gut immunity, maintaining the microbial balance, and preventing pathogen colonization. A number of probiotic strains have been introduced in the market in dietary and pharmaceutical forms. Lactic acid bacteria (e.g. Lactobacillus) and Bifidobacterium constitute the main group of probiotics commercialized for human consumption. The treatment of gastrointestinal infections continues to be complicated due to the expansion of antibiotic resistances. Of the benefits of probiotics, those related to their preventive and therapeutic uses against gastrointestinal infections have an outstanding position, as reflected in a large number of patents. The mechanisms of action of probiotics against gastrointestinal pathogens addressed in diverse patent applications include: (i) modification of the environmental conditions, (ii) competition for nutrients and adhesion sites, (iii) production of antimicrobial metabolites and (iv) modulation of the immune and non-immune defense mechanisms of the host. The bioactive components of probiotics include cell-wall fractions, surface proteins, nucleic acids, organic and short-chain fatty acids, antimicrobial proteins and other less-well identified soluble factors. The effectiveness of probiotics is supported by solid clinical studies mainly on treatment of acute diarrhea in children and prevention of antibiotic associated disorders. Currently, probiotics and their bioactive compounds constitute attractive alternative drugs that can help to reduce the use of antibiotics as well as to improve conventional pharmacological therapies. The advances on the knowledge of the intricate host-microbe dialogues within the intestine and extraintestinal sites will result in the future development of a new generation probiotic-based products targeting broader range of pathologies and their etiologic agents.

  17. Ovicidal activity of succinic acid isolated from sisal waste (Agave sisalana against gastrointestinal nematodes of goats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathália Silva de Souza Santos

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: This study was conducted to evaluate the in vitro anthelmintic activity of the succinic acid (SA isolated from sisal waste against gastrointestinal nematodes of goats, using the egg hatching and larvae motility assays. In addition, potential cytotoxicity of SA on Vero cell cultures was investigated by means of MTT (3-4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl, 2,5diphenyltetrazolium bromide test. The SA induced a significant inhibition of egg hatching (P<0.05 at all concentrations tested (60 to 250µg mL-1, and the concentrations to inhibit 50% (EC50 and 90% (EC90 values (mean ± standard deviation were 90.3±2.8 and 130.6±3.5µg mL-1, respectively. The SA has not shown larvicidal activity. The SA was less toxic to the Vero cells, with the mean percentage of cell viability equal to 85±6.2% at the concentration of 130µg mL-1. The results suggested that SA has potential anthelmintic effect; although, more research is needed to confirm its activity in vivo.

  18. Anthelmintic effect of thymol and thymol acetate on sheep gastrointestinal nematodes and their toxicity in mice

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    Weibson Paz Pinheiro André

    Full Text Available Abstract Thymol is a monoterpene and acetylation form of this compound can reduce the toxicity and enhance its biological effects. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of thymol and thymol acetate (TA on egg, larva and adult Haemonchus contortus and the cuticular changes, acute toxicity in mice and the efficacy on sheep gastrointestinal nematodes. In vitro tests results were analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA and followed by comparison with Tukey test or Bonferroni. The efficacy of in vivo test was calculated by the BootStreet program. In the egg hatch test (EHT, thymol (0.5 mg/mL and TA (4 mg/mL inhibited larval hatching by 98% and 67.1%, respectively. Thymol and TA (8 mg/mL inhibited 100% of larval development. Thymol and TA (800 µg/mL reduced the motility of adult worms, by 100% and 83.4%, respectively. Thymol caused cuticular changes in adult worm teguments. In the acute toxicity test, the LD50 of thymol and TA were 1,350.9 mg/kg and 4,144.4 mg/kg, respectively. Thymol and TA reduced sheep egg count per gram of faeces (epg by 59.8% and 76.2%, respectively. In in vitro tests thymol presented better anthelmintic activity than TA. However TA was less toxic and in in vivo test efficacy was similar.

  19. Variation in the Ovine Abomasal Lymph Node Transcriptome between Breeds Known to Differ in Resistance to the Gastrointestinal Nematode.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albin M Ahmed

    Full Text Available Texel lambs are known to be more resistant to gastrointestinal nematode (GIN infection than Suffolk lambs, with a greater ability to limit infection. The objectives of this study were to: 1 profile the whole transcriptome of abomasal lymph node tissue of GIN-free Texel and Suffolk lambs; 2 identify differentially expressed genes and characterize the immune-related biological pathways and networks associated with these genes. Abomasal lymph nodes were collected from Texel (n = 6 and Suffolk (n = 4 lambs aged 19 weeks that had been GIN-free since 6 weeks of age. Whole transcriptome profiling was performed using RNA-seq on the Illumina platform. At the time of conducting this study, a well annotated Ovine genome was not available and hence the sequence reads were aligned with the Bovine (UMD3.1 genome. Identification of differentially expressed genes was followed by pathway and network analysis. The Suffolk breed accounted for significantly more of the differentially expressed genes, (276 more highly expressed in Suffolk v 162 in Texel; P < 0.001. The four most significant differentially expressed pathways were all related to immunity and were classified as: Role of Pattern Recognition Receptors in Recognition of Bacteria and Viruses, Activation of IRF by Cytosolic Pattern Recognition Receptors, Role of RIG-I-like Receptors in Antiviral Innate Immunity, and Interferon Signaling. Of significance is the fact that all of these four pathways were more highly expressed in the Suffolk. These data suggest that in a GIN-free environment, Suffolk lambs have a more active immune profile relative to the Texel: this immune profile may contribute to the poorer efficiency of response to a GIN challenge in the Suffolk breed compared to the Texel breed.

  20. Gastrointestinal trichostrongylosis can predispose ewes to clinical mastitis after experimental mammary infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavrogianni, V S; Papadopoulos, E; Gougoulis, D A; Gallidis, E; Ptochos, S; Fragkou, I A; Orfanou, D C; Fthenakis, G C

    2017-10-15

    Objective was to study, in an experimental model, the possible role of gastrointestinal nematode infection in predisposing ewes to mastitis during the lactation period. Twenty-four ewes (A or B [n=12]), free from nematode and trematode helminths, were used. Group A animals received 5000 third-stage larvae of a trichostrongylid helminth cocktail and group B ewes were unparasitised controls. Animals in group A developed gastrointestinal trichostrongylosis confirmed by >500epg in faecal samples; mean epg of group B ewes were mastitis; no ewe in group B developed clinical mastitis, but only subclinical (12 ewes) (P=0.002). M. haemolytica was isolated from 132/132 and 121/132 udder samples from group A or B, respectively (Pmastitis than in others which did not (0.709 and 0.162 versus 0.662 and 0.136, respectively; Pmastitis (in group A or B), inducible-lymphoid-follicles were observed in the teat, which were not observed in ewes with clinical disease. Total pathology scores summed over all days were 127 and 73 for group A or B ewes, respectively (maximum possible 192; Pmastitis. It is concluded that, in view of bacterial challenge, gastrointestinal trichostrongylosis and particularly Teladorsagia infection, might lead to clinical mastitis, through various pathogenetic pathways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Proteins secreted by root-knot nematodes accumulate in the extracellular compartment during root infection

    OpenAIRE

    Rosso, Marie-Noëlle; Vieira, Paulo; de Almeida-Engler, Janice; Castagnone-Sereno, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Root-knot nematodes are biotrophic parasites that invade the root apex of host plants and migrate towards the vascular cylinder where they induce the differentiation of root cells into hypertrophied multinucleated giant cells. Giant cells are part of the permanent feeding site required for nematode development into the adult stage. To date, a repertoire of candidate effectors potentially secreted by the nematode into the plant tissues to promote infection has been identified. However, the pre...

  2. Transcriptome Analysis of Resistant and Susceptible Alfalfa Cultivars Infected With Root-Knot Nematode Meloidogyne incognita

    OpenAIRE

    Postnikova, Olga A.; Hult, Maria; Shao, Jonathan; Skantar, Andrea; Nemchinov, Lev G.

    2015-01-01

    Nematodes are one of the major limiting factors in alfalfa production. Root-knot nematodes (RKN, Meloidogyne spp.) are widely distributed and economically important sedentary endoparasites of agricultural crops and they may inflict significant damage to alfalfa fields. As of today, no studies have been published on global gene expression profiling in alfalfa infected with RKN or any other plant parasitic nematode. Very little information is available about molecular mechanisms that contribute...

  3. Evaluation of the effectiveness of Duddingtonia flagrans and Monacrosporium thaumasium in the biological control of gastrointestinal nematodes in female bovines bred in the semiarid region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Manoel Eduardo da; Braga, Fabio Ribeiro; Borges, Luana Alcântara; Oliveira, Jair Mendes de; Lima, Walter dos Santos; Guimarães, Marcos Pezzi; Araújo, Jackson Victor de

    2014-06-01

    Brazil has a herd of 212 million cattle and 171 million hectares of pastures that produce approximately 96 % of Brazilian beef. The Brazilian production system enables animal infection by endoparasites, which are considered one of the main obstacles for the development of this industry and are responsible for considerable economic losses. The control of parasitic diseases is performed via the administration of antiparasitic drugs, but they leave residues of the products in the treated animal, affect non-target organisms and select resistant strains of the parasites. The species D. flagrans and M. thaumasium are promising and sustainable alternatives for controlling gastrointestinal helminths of ruminants and other herbivores. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of isolates of these species, formulated in a sodium alginate matrix and administered twice a week, to reduce the number of environmental infective larvae of gastrointestinal nematodes that affect prepubescent zebu females. The treated animals presented fewer eggs and a lower number of infective larvae per gram of faeces (p  0.05) among the treated and control groups. The use of sodium alginate pellets as vehicle for delivery of the fungus mycelia D. flagrans (isolate AC001) and M. thaumasium (isolate NF34A) proved effective in controlling trichostrongylids in prepubescent cows bred in the semi-arid region, with an effective reduction in the number of infective larvae in the pastures.

  4. Anthelmintic resistance and multidrug resistance in sheep gastro-intestinal nematodes in France, Greece and Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geurden, Thomas; Hoste, Herve; Jacquiet, Philippe; Traversa, Donato; Sotiraki, Smaragda; Frangipane di Regalbono, Antonio; Tzanidakis, Nikolaos; Kostopoulou, Despoina; Gaillac, Christie; Privat, Simon; Giangaspero, Annunziata; Zanardello, Claudia; Noé, Laura; Vanimisetti, Bindu; Bartram, David

    2014-03-17

    Anthelmintic resistance (AR) in ovine gastro-intestinal nematodes has been reported to affect the health and productivity of sheep globally. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of commonly used oral drenches in sheep in France, Greece and Italy. In each country, 10 farms were selected. On each farm, 50 animals were blocked based on the pre-treatment faecal egg count (FEC). Within each block, animals were randomly allocated to one of 5 treatment groups. In addition to an untreated control group, there were 4 groups treated per oral route: moxidectin (MOX) and ivermectin (IVM), both at 0.2mg/kg bodyweight, levamisole (LEV; at 7.5mg/kg bodyweight) and a benzimidazole (BZ; at 3.75-5mg/kg bodyweight). In France, animals were not treated with LEV, but with netobimin (NET; at 7.5mg/kg bodyweight). The FEC was monitored using a modified McMaster technique. Two weeks after treatment, individual faecal samples were taken from all animals and efficacy was calculated as the difference between arithmetic mean FEC of the control group versus each respective treatment group. The results of the present study indicate the high efficacy of treatment with oral formulations of MOX (99-100%) and IVM (98-100%) on all farms, except on 1 farm in Greece. On this farm, multi drug resistance (MDR) was identified involving 4 anthelmintics (efficacy MOX: 91%; IVM: 0%; BZ: 58% and LEV: 87%). In Greece and Italy, AR against LEV and BZ was observed on some farms, with MDR involving both anthelmintics on 3 farms in Greece and on 2 farms in Italy. In France, AR against BZ and NET was observed on all 10 farms included. In all countries, Teladorsagia sp. was the most common nematode larva identified after treatment, followed by Haemonchus sp. and Trichostrongylus sp., with differences among farms and treatments. The current study confirms the high efficacy of oral treatments with MOX and IVM, even on farms with worm populations resistant to BZ, LEV or NET. This study also

  5. Geophagy as risk behaviour for gastrointestinal nematode infections ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ascaris lumbricoides and hookworm were associated with geophagy while Trichuris trichiura and Strongyloides stercoralis had no association. Prevalence of A. lumbricoides, T. trichiura and S. stercoralis differed significantly (p<0.05) between geophagous and non-geophagous women. The soil types consumed had eggs ...

  6. The prevalence of gastrointestinal nematode infection and their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Republic of Kenya, Government Printers, Nairobi. First schedule: article 6 (1). Thrusfield M. (2007). Veterinary epidemiology, third edition. Blackwell publishers, London. pp 267- 304. Urquhart G. M., Armour J., Duncan J. L., Dunn A. M., Jennings F. W. (1996). Veterinary. Parasitology 2nd edition, Blackwell science, pp 4 -10.

  7. Anthelmintic activity of botanical extracts against sheep gastrointestinal nematodes, Haemonchus contortus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamaraj, Chinnaperumal; Rahuman, Abdul Abdul; Elango, Gandhi; Bagavan, Asokan; Zahir, Abdul Abduz

    2011-07-01

    The source of chemical anthelmintics (levamisole, flubendazole, and thiabendazole) had limited the success of gastrointestinal nematodiasis control in sheep and goats and thus awakened interest in the study of medicinal plant extracts as alternative sources of anthelmintics. The egg hatching and larvicidal effect of indigenous plant extracts were investigated against the sheep parasite, Haemonchus contortus. The purpose of the present study was to assess the efficacy of leaf, bark, and seed ethyl acetate, acetone and methanol extracts of Andrographis paniculata (Burm.f.) Wall. ex Nees., Anisomeles malabarica (L.) R. Br., Annona squamosa L., Datura metel L., and Solanum torvum Swartz were tested against the parasitic nematode of small ruminants H. contortus using egg hatch assay (EHA) and larval development assay (LDA). The assays were run in 24-well cell culture plates at room temperature with five replicates. All plant extracts showed moderate parasitic effects after 48 and exposure for egg hatching and LDA, respectively; however, 100% egg hatching and larvicidal inhibition were found in the methanol extracts of A. paniculata, A. squamosa, D. metel, and S. torvum at 25 mg/ml and the effect was similar to positive control of Albendazole (0.075 mg/ml) and Ivermectin (0.025mg/ml) against H. contortus, respectively. The EHA result showed the ED(50) of methanol extracts of A. paniculata and D. metel, which were 2.90 and 3.08 mg/ml, and in larval development assay, the ED(50) was 4.26 and 3.86 mg/ml, respectively. These effects remain to be confirmed through in vivo studies.

  8. Anthelmintic Activity of a Herbal Formulation Against Gastrointestinal Nematodes of Sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Arfan Zaman*§, Zafar Iqbal, Muhammad Nisar Khan and Ghulam Muhammad1

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to evaluate the anthelmintic activity of a herbal formulation (HF based on aqueous extracts of leaves of Azadirachta indica and Nicotiana tabacum, flowers of Calotropis procera and seeds of Trachyspermum ammi. In vitro, eggs and adult Haemonchus contortus were exposed to different concentrations of HF following the standard procedures of egg hatch test (EHT; 50 to 0.024414 mg ml-1 and adult motility assay (AMA; 200-0.1953125mg ml-1, respectively. The reference drugs used in the study were oxfendazole (0.0056704 to 0.0000027 mg ml-1 and levamisole (1.50 mg ml-1 for EHT and AMA, respectively. In vivo, pre and post-treatment (4 mg, 2 mg and 500 µg kg-1 body weight fecal egg counts were determined following standard fecal egg count reduction test in sheep naturally parasitized with mixed species of gastrointestinal nematodes. In EHT, LC50 values of HF and oxfendazole (reference drug were 275.1 and 0.016 µg ml-1, respectively. In AMA, 100% mortality of H. contortus was observed 6 hr post-exposure to 3.125-200 mg ml-1 concentrations of HF and 2 hr post-exposure to levamisole. In vivo, maximum (96.2% fecal egg count (EPG reduction was recorded in sheep treated with HF @ 4 mg kg-1 body weight; whereas, 89.3% reduction in EPG was recorded in sheep treated with levamisole @ 7.5 mg kg-1 body weight. A graded dose response was noted in all the tests used in the present study to evaluate the anthelmintic activity of HF. Therefore, HF seems to be promising as an anthelmintic for animals. Large scale trials on efficacy and safety, however, are recommended before the HF is considered for commercialization in crude form.

  9. Impact of integrated gastrointestinal nematode management training for U.S. goat and sheep producers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitley, N C; Oh, S-H; Lee, S J; Schoenian, S; Kaplan, R M; Storey, B; Terrill, T H; Mobini, S; Burke, J M; Miller, J E; Perdue, M A

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the impact of integrated parasite management (IPM) training, including FAMACHA(©) eyelid color scoring, on the ability of U.S. sheep and goat producers to control gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) on their farms. A survey was developed and provided to over 2000 producers trained from 2004 to 2008 in IPM with questions involving farm size (number of sheep/goats), location (U.S. state), impact of training on parasite control efforts and parasite problems on farm, and IPM practices used. Responses were divided into U.S. Census regions of the U.S. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression were used to describe results. Most of the 729 respondents were from the southern region of the U.S. (54.3%) and were small-scale producers (50 or less animals; 64.8%). Nearly all of the respondents (95.1%) agreed that IPM workshop attendance made a difference in their ability to control and monitor parasitism in their herd or flock and employed IPM practices to control GIN (96.3%). The most popular practices respondents used were rotational grazing (71.2%), genetic selection (choosing a parasite resistant breed and/or culling susceptible animals; 52.7%), grain supplementation on pasture to improve nutrition (44.0%), and increased height of plants being grazed (41.8%). Although reporting using a practice decreased (Preporting fewer problems, for each 1-point increase in the number of practices which producers employed to control internal parasitism in their herd or flock, they were 16% more likely to report fewer GIN problems (Pbenefit of IPM on their farm (Preporting savings of over $80 were more likely to report fewer problems (Preporting no economic benefit were less likely to report fewer problems with GIN (P<0.001). Overall, IPM training resulted in positive impacts for producers responding to the survey and should continue. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Anthelmintic efficacy of pumpkin seed (Cucurbita pepo Linnaeus, 1753) on ostrich gastrointestinal nematodes in a semiarid region of Paraíba State, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feitosa, Thais Ferreira; Vilela, Vinícius Longo Ribeiro; Athayde, Ana Célia Rodrigues; Braga, Fábio Ribeiro; Dantas, Elaine Silva; Vieira, Vanessa Diniz; de Melo, Lídio Ricardo Bezerra

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the in vivo effectiveness of pumpkin seed (Curcubita pepo Linnaeus, 1753) in naturally infected ostriches in the Cariri zone, semiarid region of Paraíba State, Brazil. Forty-eight ostriches were used, African Black breed, of 14 to 36 months old, naturally infected by gastrointestinal nematodes. These animals were divided into four groups of 12 ostriches. Group 1 consists of animals treated with 0.5 g/kg live weight (l. w.) of pumpkin seed meal; group 2 received 1 g/kg l. w. of pumpkin seed meal; group 3 was treated with Albendazole 5 %, at the dosage of 1 mL/10 kg l. w.; and Group 4 was the control group and do not received treatment. Groups 1 and 2 received the treatment for three consecutive days, orally, at intervals of 7 days, totaling nine administrations. The Albendazole 5 % was administered one time, at the beginning of the experiment, according to the manufacturer's recommendations. The groups treated with pumpkin seed showed a significant decrease in egg counts per gram of feces (EPG), wherein group 2 (1 g/kg l. w.) was the most effective. The control and drug groups showed no reduction in EPG. The results of the present study demonstrate that the administration of pumpkin seed was effective in controlling gastrointestinal helminths in naturally infected ostriches.

  11. Effects of supplemental feeding on gastrointestinal parasite infection in Rocky Mountain Elk (Cervus elaphus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Alicia M.; Ezenwa, Vanessa O.; Cross, Paul C.; Rogerson, Jared D.

    2007-01-01

    The effects of management practices on the spread and impact of parasites and infectious diseases in wildlife and domestic animals are of increasing concern worldwide, particularly in cases where management of wild species can influence disease spill-over into domestic animals. In the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, USA, winter supplemental feeding of Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus) may enhance parasite and disease transmission by aggregating elk on feedgrounds. In this study, we tested the effect of supplemental feeding on gastrointestinal parasite infection in elk by comparing fecal egg/oocyst counts of fed and unfed elk. We collected fecal samples from fed and unfed elk at feedground and control sites from January to April 2006, and screened all samples for parasites. Six different parasite types were identified, and 48.7% of samples were infected with at least one parasite. Gastrointenstinal (GI) nematodes (Nematoda: Strongylida), Trichuris spp., and coccidia were the most common parasites observed. For all three of these parasites, fecal egg/oocyst counts increased from January to April. Supplementally fed elk had significantly higher GI nematode egg counts than unfed elk in January and February, but significantly lower counts in April. These patterns suggest that supplemental feeding may both increase exposure and decrease susceptibility of elk to GI nematodes, resulting in differences in temporal patterns of egg shedding between fed and unfed elk.

  12. Utilization of composite fecal samples for detection of anthelmintic resistance in gastrointestinal nematodes of cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Melissa M; Paras, Kelsey L; Howell, Sue B; Kaplan, Ray M

    2017-06-15

    Recent reports indicate that anthelmintic resistance in gastrointestinal nematodes of cattle is becoming increasingly prevalent worldwide. Presently, the fecal egg count reduction test (FECRT) is the only means available for detection of resistance to anthelmintics in cattle herds at the farm level. However, the FECRT is labor and cost intensive, and consequently is only rarely performed on cattle farms unless for research purposes. If costs could be reduced, cattle producers might be more likely to pursue drug resistance testing on their farms. One approach to reducing the cost of the FECRT, is the use of composite fecal samples for performing fecal egg counts (FEC), rather than conducting FEC on fecal samples from 15 to 20 individual animals. In this study FECRT were performed on 14 groups of cattle using both individual and composite FEC methods To measure how well the results of composite sampling reproduce those of individual sampling, Lin's Concordance Correlation Coefficient was utilized to describe both the linear relationship between methods and the slope and y-intercept of the line relating the data sets. There was little difference between the approaches with 98% agreement in mean FEC found between methods Mean FEC based on individual counts ranged between 0 and 670.6 eggs per gram of feces, indicating that the results of this study are applicable to a wide range of FEC levels. Standard error of the mean FEC and range of FEC are reported for each group prior to and following treatment to describe the variability of the data set. There was greater than 95% agreement in drug efficacy between individual and composite sampling methods, demonstrating composite sampling is appropriate to evaluate drug efficacy. Notably, for all groups tested the efficacy calculated by composite sampling was within the 95% confidence interval for efficacy calculated using individual sampling. The use of composite samples was shown to reduce the number of FEC required by 79

  13. Linear distribution of nematodes in the gastrointestinal tract of tracer lambs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Makovcová, K.; Langrová, I.; Vadlejch, J.; Jankovská, I.; Lytvynets, Andrej; Borkovcová, M.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 104, č. 1 (2008), s. 123-126 ISSN 0932-0113 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : distribution * nematode s * sheep Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 1.473, year: 2008

  14. Gastrointestinal parasite infection of the Gray mouse lemur ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Faecal material from 169 individuals of Microcebus murinus living in five littoral forest fragments was analyzed for gastrointestinal parasites. The fragments differed in size and forest quality. Gastrointestinal parasite infection of M. murinus was characterised using parasite species richness, the prevalence of parasites, and ...

  15. Beliefs, intentions, and beyond: A qualitative study on the adoption of sustainable gastrointestinal nematode control practices in Flanders' dairy industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vande Velde, F; Charlier, J; Hudders, L; Cauberghe, V; Claerebout, E

    2018-05-01

    Emerging anthelmintic resistance emphasizes the need for sustainable control approaches against gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) infections in cattle. The uptake of diagnostic methods for sustainable control could enable more informed treatments and reduce excessive anthelmintic use. Unfortunately, the adoption of such methods remains relatively poor. A better understanding of farmers' motivations and behaviour would help to develop applicable advises and communication strategies for sustainable worm control strategies. A previous study created a general model for adoption intention of GIN diagnostics on dairy farms and measured the most important factors driving this intention (Vande Velde et al., 2015). The current research aimed to dig deeper into this model for the beliefs underlying these factors, and to identify additional factors impelling this specific behaviour. Data were collected through 22 semi-structured interviews with dairy farmers. Using analytic induction analysis, data were moved between deduction and induction. Results show that the adoption process of diagnostic methods for GIN occurs through three different phases: adoption intention, actual adoption and maintenance. Low infection awareness and low priority ('top of mind') of the disease are important barriers for adopting sustainable GIN control. Secondly, farmer behaviour is guided by two important social norms: the opinion of their veterinarian and their fellow farmers. However, farmers hold an incongruent relationship with both norms throughout different stages of behaviour: they do not value other farmers' opinions as a positive reference (intention phase), but follow and mimic their behaviour as a group (action phase). The veterinarian is seen as the most important positive reference, but also the responsible actor for GIN control. As such, the farmers do not hold themselves responsible for implementing sustainable control strategies. Thirdly, different types of motivations influence

  16. TABLE PREVALENCE OF GIT NEMATODES IN CATTLE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    A study was carried out on the prevalence of gastrointestinal (GI) nematodes infection in naturally infected cattle in Ogbomoso area of Oyo State using standard parasitological techniques. The results indicated that out of the 1000 cattle examined, 30(3%) were infected and parasites identified were Haemonchus contortus.

  17. Discrimination of gastrointestinal nematode eggs from crude fecal egg preparations by inhibitor-resistant conventional and real-time PCR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janina Demeler

    Full Text Available Diagnosis of gastrointestinal nematodes relies predominantly on coproscopic methods such as flotation, Kato-Katz, McMaster or FLOTAC. Although FLOTAC allows accurate quantification, many nematode eggs can only be differentiated to genus or family level. Several molecular diagnostic tools discriminating closely related species suffer from high costs for DNA isolation from feces and limited sensitivity since most kits use only small amounts of feces (<1 g. A direct PCR from crude egg preparations was designed for full compatibility with FLOTAC to accurately quantify eggs per gram feces (epg and determine species composition. Eggs were recovered from the flotation solution and concentrated by sieving. Lysis was achieved by repeated boiling and freezing cycles - only Trichuris eggs required additional mechanic disruption. Egg lysates were directly used as template for PCR with Phusion DNA polymerase which is particularly resistant to PCR inhibitors. Qualitative results were obtained with feces of goats, cattle, horses, swine, cats, dogs and mice. The finally established protocol was also compatible with quantitative real-time PCR in the presence of EvaGreen and no PCR inhibition was detectable when extracts were diluted at least fourfold. Sensitivity was comparable to DNA isolation protocols and spiked samples with five epg were reliably detected. For Toxocara cati a detection limit below one epg was demonstrated. It was possible to distinguish T. cati and Toxocara canis using high resolution melt (HRM analysis, a rapid tool for species identification. In human samples, restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP and HRM analysis were used to discriminate Necator americanus and Ancylostoma duodenale. The method is able to significantly improve molecular diagnosis of gastrointestinal nematodes by increasing speed and sensitivity while decreasing overall costs. For identification of species or resistance alleles, analysis of PCR products with many

  18. Discrimination of Gastrointestinal Nematode Eggs from Crude Fecal Egg Preparations by Inhibitor-Resistant Conventional and Real-Time PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demeler, Janina; Ramünke, Sabrina; Wolken, Sonja; Ianiello, Davide; Rinaldi, Laura; Gahutu, Jean Bosco; Cringoli, Giuseppe; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Georg; Krücken, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Diagnosis of gastrointestinal nematodes relies predominantly on coproscopic methods such as flotation, Kato-Katz, McMaster or FLOTAC. Although FLOTAC allows accurate quantification, many nematode eggs can only be differentiated to genus or family level. Several molecular diagnostic tools discriminating closely related species suffer from high costs for DNA isolation from feces and limited sensitivity since most kits use only small amounts of feces (sieving. Lysis was achieved by repeated boiling and freezing cycles – only Trichuris eggs required additional mechanic disruption. Egg lysates were directly used as template for PCR with Phusion DNA polymerase which is particularly resistant to PCR inhibitors. Qualitative results were obtained with feces of goats, cattle, horses, swine, cats, dogs and mice. The finally established protocol was also compatible with quantitative real-time PCR in the presence of EvaGreen and no PCR inhibition was detectable when extracts were diluted at least fourfold. Sensitivity was comparable to DNA isolation protocols and spiked samples with five epg were reliably detected. For Toxocara cati a detection limit below one epg was demonstrated. It was possible to distinguish T. cati and Toxocara canis using high resolution melt (HRM) analysis, a rapid tool for species identification. In human samples, restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and HRM analysis were used to discriminate Necator americanus and Ancylostoma duodenale. The method is able to significantly improve molecular diagnosis of gastrointestinal nematodes by increasing speed and sensitivity while decreasing overall costs. For identification of species or resistance alleles, analysis of PCR products with many different post PCR methods can be used such as RFLP, reverse-line-blot, Sanger sequencing and HRM. PMID:23620739

  19. Ultrastructural changes in the third-stage, infective larvae of ruminant nematodes treated with sainfoin (Onobrychis viciifolia) extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunet, S; Fourquaux, I; Hoste, H

    2011-12-01

    Plants rich in condensed tannins are an alternative to chemical anthelmintics to control gastrointestinal nematodes (GINs) in ruminants. Previous functional studies have shown that sainfoin extracts affect the two forms of infective larvae (L3), ensheathed and exsheathed. However, the mechanisms of action remain unknown. The aim of this study was thus to compare ultrastructural changes in ensheathed and exsheathed L3 of two GIN species after in vitro contact with sainfoin extracts using transmission electron microscopy. The main changes identified were an alteration of the hypodermis, the presence of numerous vesicles in the cytoplasm and degeneration and/or death of muscular and intestinal cells. The changes suggested similar and nonspecies-specific lesions in the two nematode species. Comparison of the modifications found in the ensheathed vs. exsheathed L3s revealed different locations of the main cellular changes depending on the larval form. It is hypothesized that these spatial differences in lesions are mainly influenced by the presence of the sheath which favors contact between the active compounds and either the cuticle or the digestive tract. Overall, our observations suggest that the functional changes observed in the biology of GIN L3s after contact with sainfoin extracts are mediated through a direct mode of action, i.e. different interactions between the bioactive plant metabolites and the nematode structure depending on the route of contact. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Detection and replication of QTL underlying resistance to gastrointestinal nematodes in adult sheep using the ovine 50K SNP array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atlija, Marina; Arranz, Juan-Jose; Martinez-Valladares, María; Gutiérrez-Gil, Beatriz

    2016-01-20

    Persistence of gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) infection and the related control methods have major impacts on the sheep industry worldwide. Based on the information generated with the Illumina OvineSNP50 BeadChip (50 K chip), this study aims at confirming quantitative trait loci (QTL) that were previously identified by microsatellite-based genome scans and identifying new QTL and allelic variants that are associated with indicator traits of parasite resistance in adult sheep. We used a commercial half-sib population of 518 Spanish Churra ewes with available data for fecal egg counts (FEC) and serum levels of immunoglobulin A (IgA) to perform different genome scan QTL mapping analyses based on classical linkage analysis (LA), a combined linkage disequilibrium and linkage analysis (LDLA) and a genome-wide association study (GWAS). For the FEC and IgA traits, we detected a total of three 5 % chromosome-wise significant QTL by LA and 63 significant regions by LDLA, of which 13 reached the 5 % genome-wise significance level. The GWAS also revealed 10 significant SNPs associated with IgAt, although no significant associations were found for LFEC. Some of the significant QTL for LFEC that were detected by LA and LDLA on OAR6 overlapped with a highly significant QTL that was previously detected in a different half-sib population of Churra sheep. In addition, several new QTL and SNP associations were identified, some of which show correspondence with effects that were reported for different populations of young sheep. Other significant associations that did not coincide with previously reported associations could be related to the specific immune response of adult animals. Our results replicate a FEC-related QTL located on OAR6 that was previously reported in Churra sheep and provide support for future research on the identification of the allelic variant that underlies this QTL. The small proportion of genetic variance explained by the detected QTL and the large number of

  1. Infections and infestations of the gastrointestinal tract. Part 1: Bacterial, viral and fungal infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, R., E-mail: rakslide@gmail.com [Department of Clinical Radiology, South Warwickshire NHS Foundation Trust, Warwick (United Kingdom); Rajesh, A. [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust (United Kingdom); Rawat, S. [Department of Radiology, Ruby Hall Clinic, Pune (India); Rajiah, P. [Imaging Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Ramachandran, I. [Department of Clinical Radiology, South Warwickshire NHS Foundation Trust, Warwick (United Kingdom)

    2012-05-15

    The purpose of this article is to review the imaging findings of various infections affecting the gastrointestinal tract. Barium examinations, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and ultrasonography all play an important role in the diagnostic workup of gastrointestinal tract infections. Knowledge of differential diagnosis, sites of involvement, and typical imaging features of different infections can help in accurate diagnosis and guide treatment.

  2. Prevalence and seasonal incidence of nematode parasites and fluke infections of sheep and goats in eastern Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sissay, Menkir M; Uggla, Arvid; Waller, Peter J

    2007-10-01

    A 2-year abattoir survey was carried out to determine the prevalence, abundance and seasonal incidence of gastro-intestinal (GI) nematodes and trematodes (flukes) of sheep and goats in the semi-arid zone of eastern Ethiopia. During May 2003 to April 2005, viscera including liver, lungs and GI tracts were collected from 655 sheep and 632 goats slaughtered at 4 abattoirs located in the towns of Haramaya, Harar, Dire Dawa and Jijiga in eastern Ethiopia. All animals were raised in the farming areas located within the community boundaries for each town. Collected materials were transported within 24 h to the parasitology laboratory of Haramaya University for immediate processing. Thirteen species belonging to 9 genera of GI nematodes (Haemonchus contortus, Trichostrongylus axei, T. colubriformis, T. vitrinus, Nematodirus filicollis, N. spathiger Oesopha-gostomum columbianum, O. venulosum, Strongyloides papillosus, Bunostomum trigonocephalum, Trichuris ovis, Cooperia curticei and Chabertia ovina), and 4 species belonging to 3 genera of trematodes (Fasciola hepatica, F. gigantica, Paramphistomum {Calicohoron} microbothrium and Dicrocoelium dendriticum) were recorded in both sheep and goats. All animals in this investigation were infected with multiple species to varying degrees. The mean burdens of adult nematodes were generally moderate in both sheep and goats and showed patterns of seasonal abundance that corresponded with the bi-modal annual rainfall pattern, with highest burdens around the middle of the rainy season. In both sheep and goats there were significant differences in the mean worm burdens and abundance of the different nematode species between the four geographic locations, with worm burdens in the Haramaya and Harar areas greater than those observed in the Dire Dawa and Jijiga locations. Similar seasonal variations were also observed in the prevalence of flukes. But there were no significant differences in the prevalence of each fluke species between the

  3. Burden of acute gastrointestinal infections in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Simavé Dembele, Elisa Huovinen, Denis Yelbéogo, Markku Kuusi, Guétawendé Sawadogo, Kaisa Haukka, Isidore Bonkoungou, Anja Siitonen, Alfred S. Traoré

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Gastrointestinal infections are one of the major health problems in developing countries. The present study aims to estimate the prevalence of gastrointestinal infections in Ouagadougou, the capital of Burkina Faso. Methods: A door-to-door survey of selected residents in Ouagadougou city was conducted. Of the Ouagadougou’s 30 districts, nine most populated ones were selected to the study. The residents of these districts have middle incomes as those of the secondary cite of Burkina Faso. Results: The overall prevalence of gastrointestinal infections in the 30 days prior to the interview was 77/491 (15.7%: among children 44/223 (19.7% and among adults 33/268 (12.3%. Diarrhea and abdominal pain were the most com­mon symptoms among 33 adult cases while diarrhea and vomiting were the most common among children. None of the cases were hospitalized and a stool sample was taken in three of 77 cases. Medication for gastrointestinal infections was received by 55% percent of adults and 77% of children. Conclusions: Our results shown that antibiotics with and without prescription were the most common medicine used. Washing hands before meals and boiling milk before drinking had a protective effect against gastrointestinal infections. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2016;6(2: 45-52

  4. The Role of Costimulatory Molecules in the Development of Memory and Effector T Helper 2 Cells During an in vivo Immune Response to the Murine Gastrointestinal Parasite Heligmosomoides polygyrus

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ekkens, Melinda

    2002-01-01

    ...+ T cell differentiation is not well understood. One model used to study the Th immune response involves oral infection of mice with the gastrointestinal nematode parasite Heligmosomoides polygyrus...

  5. Discovery of quantitative trait loci for resistance to parasitic nematode infection in sheep: I. Analysis of outcross pedigrees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greer Gordon J

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Currently most pastoral farmers rely on anthelmintic drenches to control gastrointestinal parasitic nematodes in sheep. Resistance to anthelmintics is rapidly increasing in nematode populations such that on some farms none of the drench families are now completely effective. It is well established that host resistance to nematode infection is a moderately heritable trait. This study was undertaken to identify regions of the genome, quantitative trait loci (QTL that contain genes affecting resistance to parasitic nematodes. Results Rams obtained from crossing nematode parasite resistant and susceptible selection lines were used to derive five large half-sib families comprising between 348 and 101 offspring per sire. Total offspring comprised 940 lambs. Extensive measurements for a range of parasite burden and immune function traits in all offspring allowed each lamb in each pedigree to be ranked for relative resistance to nematode parasites. Initially the 22 most resistant and 22 most susceptible progeny from each pedigree were used in a genome scan that used 203 microsatellite markers spread across all sheep autosomes. This study identified 9 chromosomes with regions showing sufficient linkage to warrant the genotyping of all offspring. After genotyping all offspring with markers covering Chromosomes 1, 3, 4, 5, 8, 12, 13, 22 and 23, the telomeric end of chromosome 8 was identified as having a significant QTL for parasite resistance as measured by the number of Trichostrongylus spp. adults in the abomasum and small intestine at the end of the second parasite challenge. Two further QTL for associated immune function traits of total serum IgE and T. colubiformis specific serum IgG, at the end of the second parasite challenge, were identified on chromosome 23. Conclusion Despite parasite resistance being a moderately heritable trait, this large study was able to identify only a single significant QTL associated with it. The QTL

  6. Orsay, Santeuil and Le Blanc viruses primarily infect intestinal cells in Caenorhabditis nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Carl J; Renshaw, Hilary; Frezal, Lise; Jiang, Yanfang; Félix, Marie-Anne; Wang, David

    2014-01-05

    The discoveries of Orsay, Santeuil and Le Blanc viruses, three viruses infecting either Caenorhabditis elegans or its relative Caenorhabditis briggsae, enable the study of virus-host interactions using natural pathogens of these two well-established model organisms. We characterized the tissue tropism of infection in Caenorhabditis nematodes by these viruses. Using immunofluorescence assays targeting proteins from each of the viruses, and in situ hybridization, we demonstrate viral proteins and RNAs localize to intestinal cells in larval stage Caenorhabditis nematodes. Viral proteins were detected in one to six of the 20 intestinal cells present in Caenorhabditis nematodes. In Orsay virus-infected C. elegans, viral proteins were detected as early as 6h post-infection. The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and capsid proteins of Orsay virus exhibited different subcellular localization patterns. Collectively, these observations provide the first experimental insights into viral protein expression in any nematode host, and broaden our understanding of viral infection in Caenorhabditis nematodes. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Pattern of gastrointestinal opportunistic infections among HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Twenty-two per cent (22%) of these had mixed parasitosis of cryptosporidium and hookworm. There was no significant association of CD4 cells count with intestinal parasitosis. x2 = 5.286 and p=0.259. However marital status was significantly associated with gastrointestinal opportunistic parasitosis with x2 of 12.693, ...

  8. Proteins secreted by root-knot nematodes accumulate in the extracellular compartment during root infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosso, Marie-Noëlle; Vieira, Paulo; de Almeida-Engler, Janice; Castagnone-Sereno, Philippe

    2011-08-01

    Root-knot nematodes are biotrophic parasites that invade the root apex of host plants and migrate towards the vascular cylinder where they induce the differentiation of root cells into hypertrophied multinucleated giant cells. Giant cells are part of the permanent feeding site required for nematode development into the adult stage. To date, a repertoire of candidate effectors potentially secreted by the nematode into the plant tissues to promote infection has been identified. However, the precise role of these candidate effectors during root invasion or during giant cell induction and maintenance remains largely unknown. Primarily, the identification of the destination of nematode effectors within plant cell compartment(s) is crucial to decipher their actual functions. We analysed the fine localization in root tissues of five nematode effectors throughout the migratory and sedentary phases of parasitism using an adapted immunocytochemical method that preserves host and pathogen tissues.  We showed that secretion of effectors from the amphids or the oesophageal glands is tightly regulated during the course of infection. The analysed effectors accumulated in the root tissues along the nematode migratory path and along the cell wall of giant cells, showing the apoplasm as an important destination compartment for these effectors during migration and feeding cell formation.

  9. Effect of changes in the nutritional status on the performances of growing Creole kids during an established nematode parasite infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceï, W; Archimède, H; Arquet, R; Félicité, Y; Feuillet, D; Nepos, A; Mulciba, P; Etienne, T; Alexandre, G; Bambou, J C

    2017-04-01

    In this study, we evaluated the effect of changes in the nutritional status on the performances of growing Creole kids during an established experimental gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) infection. Eighteen 6-month-old Creole kids were distributed in two main groups infected (I) and non-infected (NI) and were placed for a period of 4 weeks on each of three diets differing in their nutritional values: (1) fresh grass (FG, 6.7 MJ/kg dry matter (DM) and 7.9% crude protein (CP)) non-supplemented, (2) FG supplemented with a commercial concentrate (CC, 12.2 MJ/kg DM and 20.6% of CP), and (3) FG supplemented with dried banana (Ban, 11.1 MJ/kg DM and 4.3% CP). The experiment was designed as a split-plot with experimental infection (I and NI) as the main plot and the diets (FG, CC, and Ban) as the subplots with three replicates. We showed a significant effect of the diet changes on the fecal egg counts. A higher dry matter intake, digestibility, and growth rate were observed with the CC diet but together with a slight but significant increase of the intensity of the GIN infection. These data suggest that the improvement of the protein nutritional status during an establish GIN infection would improve the animal performance at the expense of the mechanism involved in the control of the infection.

  10. Transcriptome analysis of resistant and susceptible alfalfa cultivars infected with root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga A Postnikova

    Full Text Available Nematodes are one of the major limiting factors in alfalfa production. Root-knot nematodes (RKN, Meloidogyne spp. are widely distributed and economically important sedentary endoparasites of agricultural crops and they may inflict significant damage to alfalfa fields. As of today, no studies have been published on global gene expression profiling in alfalfa infected with RKN or any other plant parasitic nematode. Very little information is available about molecular mechanisms that contribute to pathogenesis and defense responses in alfalfa against these pests and specifically against RKN. In this work, we performed root transcriptome analysis of resistant (cv. Moapa 69 and susceptible (cv. Lahontan alfalfa cultivars infected with RKN Meloidogyne incognita, widespread root-knot nematode species and a major pest worldwide. A total of 1,701,622,580 pair-end reads were generated on an Illumina Hi-Seq 2000 platform from the roots of both cultivars and assembled into 45,595 and 47,590 transcripts in cvs Moapa 69 and Lahontan, respectively. Bioinformatic analysis revealed a number of common and unique genes that were differentially expressed in susceptible and resistant lines as a result of nematode infection. Although the susceptible cultivar showed a more pronounced defense response to the infection, feeding sites were successfully established in its roots. Characteristically, basal gene expression levels under normal conditions differed between the two cultivars as well, which may confer advantage to one of the genotypes toward resistance to nematodes. Differentially expressed genes were subsequently assigned to known Gene Ontology categories to predict their functional roles and associated biological processes. Real-time PCR validated expression changes in genes arbitrarily selected for experimental confirmation. Candidate genes that contribute to protection against M. incognita in alfalfa were proposed and alfalfa-nematode interactions with

  11. Transcriptome analysis of resistant and susceptible alfalfa cultivars infected with root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postnikova, Olga A; Hult, Maria; Shao, Jonathan; Skantar, Andrea; Nemchinov, Lev G

    2015-01-01

    Nematodes are one of the major limiting factors in alfalfa production. Root-knot nematodes (RKN, Meloidogyne spp.) are widely distributed and economically important sedentary endoparasites of agricultural crops and they may inflict significant damage to alfalfa fields. As of today, no studies have been published on global gene expression profiling in alfalfa infected with RKN or any other plant parasitic nematode. Very little information is available about molecular mechanisms that contribute to pathogenesis and defense responses in alfalfa against these pests and specifically against RKN. In this work, we performed root transcriptome analysis of resistant (cv. Moapa 69) and susceptible (cv. Lahontan) alfalfa cultivars infected with RKN Meloidogyne incognita, widespread root-knot nematode species and a major pest worldwide. A total of 1,701,622,580 pair-end reads were generated on an Illumina Hi-Seq 2000 platform from the roots of both cultivars and assembled into 45,595 and 47,590 transcripts in cvs Moapa 69 and Lahontan, respectively. Bioinformatic analysis revealed a number of common and unique genes that were differentially expressed in susceptible and resistant lines as a result of nematode infection. Although the susceptible cultivar showed a more pronounced defense response to the infection, feeding sites were successfully established in its roots. Characteristically, basal gene expression levels under normal conditions differed between the two cultivars as well, which may confer advantage to one of the genotypes toward resistance to nematodes. Differentially expressed genes were subsequently assigned to known Gene Ontology categories to predict their functional roles and associated biological processes. Real-time PCR validated expression changes in genes arbitrarily selected for experimental confirmation. Candidate genes that contribute to protection against M. incognita in alfalfa were proposed and alfalfa-nematode interactions with respect to resistance

  12. Comparison of three methods for gastrointestinal nematode diagnosis determination in grazing dairy cattle in relation to milk production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejía, M E; Perri, A F; Licoff, N; Miglierina, M M; Cseh, S; Ornstein, A M; Becu-Villalobos, D; Lacau-Mengido, I M

    2011-12-29

    Development of resistance to anthelmintic drugs has motivated the search for diagnostic methods to identify animals for targeted selective treatments. We compared three methods for the diagnosis of nematode infection in relation to milk production in a fully grazing dairy herd of 150 cows in the humid Pampa (Argentina). Animals had feces, blood and milk sampled during the first postpartum month for EPG, pepsinogen and anti-Ostertagia antibody determination, respectively. With the results obtained two groups of cows, divided in high and low parasite burden, were conformed for each method, and milk production was then compared between groups. When cows were separated by the EPG method (EPG=0 (N=106) vs. EPG>0 (N=44)) a difference of nearly 800 l of milk per cow per lactation was found (P 1000) or by anti-Ostertagia (ODR ≤ 0.5 vs. ODR > 0.5) results did not differ. Interestingly, proportion of cows in each group differed between methods (P<0.0001), and the anti-Ostertagia method yielded significantly more cows in the high index group compared to results using the EPG or Pepsinogen method. No correlations were found between parasite indexes determined by the different methods. High parasite burden estimation found may be ascribed to the production system, fully grazing all year round, and to the sampling time, at the beginning of lactation with cows in negative energy balance and depressed immunity. The fact that the cows were born and reared outside, on pasture with continuous nematode larvae exposure, may also account for the results obtained. In conclusion, EPG counting during the first postpartum month may be a useful tool for the diagnosis of production impairment induced by high nematode burden in adult grazing dairy cows. The anthelmintic treatment of only the EPG-positive recently calved cows would improve milk production, while reducing selective pressure on nematode population for the development of resistance. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  13. Genome-wide scan of gastrointestinal nematode resistance in closed Angus population selected for minimized influence of MHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastrointestinal (GI) parasitic infection is the main health constraint for small ruminant production, causing loss of weight and/or death. Red Maasai sheep have adapted to a tropical environment where extreme parasite exposure, especially with highly pathogenic Haemonchus contortus, is a constant. ...

  14. In vitro ovicidal and larvicidal activity of condensed tannins on gastrointestinal nematode infestations in sheep (Ovis aries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eidi Yoshihara

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Infestations of gastrointestinal parasitic nematodes in sheep result in significant costs to farmers. These infestations are controlled using synthetic anthelmintic treatments, which can result in the development of anthelmintic resistance in nematodes. The use of plants rich in condensed tannins (CTs is a promising alternative for controlling infestations of harmful parasites in sheep, and could allow reduction of the chemical products used. This study investigated the in vitro effect of CTs from Acacia mearnsii extract (AE on egg hatching and motility of third-stage larvae. Egg-hatching rate was measured after incubation with extracts for 48 h at 27 °C. The egg hatch test was performed with dilutions of 0.09, 0.19, 0.39, 0.78, 1.56, 3.12, 6.25, 12.5, 25, 50, and 100 mg mL-1. Distilled water was used as the negative control. The corresponding egg hatching inhibition percentages were 22.3, 32.3, 39.2, 49.1, 56.7, 59.0, 62.3, 77.3, 92.7, 98.3, and 100%. The concentration required to inhibit egg hatching in 50% of eggs (LC50 was 2.85 mg mL-1. The inhibition achieved with the negative control was 7.06%. A larval migration inhibition test was carried out after incubation with the extracts for 48 h at 27 oC, with AE and distilled water used in dilutions of 3.12, 6.25, 12.5, 25, 50, and 100 mg mL-1. The corresponding percentages of migration inhibition were 16.5, 37.0, 56.3, 79.4, 91.8, and 97.1%. The concentration required to inhibit migration of 50% of larvae (LC50 was 12.45 mg mL-1. The inhibition achieved with the negative control was 8.53%. The in vitro ovicidal and larvicidal activity of CTs from AE indicate the anthelmintic effect of AE, suggesting the potential of CT extracts to be used as alternatives for controlling gastrointestinal nematode infestations in small ruminants.

  15. The dynamics of nematode infections of farmed ruminants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roberts, M.G.; Heesterbeek, J.A.P.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper the dynamics and control of nematode parasites of farmed ruminants are discussed via a qualitative analysis of a differential equation model. To achieve this a quantity, 'the basic reproduction quotient' (Q0), whose definition coincides with previous definitions of R0 for

  16. Microbiomes associated with infective stages of root-knot and lesion nematodes in soil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Elhady

    Full Text Available Endoparasitic root-knot (Meloidogyne spp. and lesion (Pratylenchus spp. nematodes cause considerable damage in agriculture. Before they invade roots to complete their life cycle, soil microbes can attach to their cuticle or surface coat and antagonize the nematode directly or by induction of host plant defenses. We investigated whether the nematode-associated microbiome in soil differs between infective stages of Meloidogyne incognita and Pratylenchus penetrans, and whether it is affected by variation in the composition of microbial communities among soils. Nematodes were incubated in suspensions of five organically and two integrated horticultural production soils, recovered by sieving and analyzed for attached bacteria and fungi after washing off loosely adhering microbes. Significant effects of the soil type and nematode species on nematode-associated fungi and bacteria were revealed as analyzed by community profiling using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Attached microbes represented a small specific subset of the soil microbiome. Two organic soils had very similar bacterial and fungal community profiles, but one of them was strongly suppressive towards root-knot nematodes. They were selected for deep amplicon sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes and fungal ITS. Significant differences among the microbiomes associated with the two species in both soils suggested specific surface epitopes. Among the 28 detected bacterial classes, Betaproteobacteria, Bacilli and Actinobacteria were the most abundant. The most frequently detected fungal genera were Malassezia, Aspergillus and Cladosporium. Attached microbiomes did not statistically differ between these two soils. However, Malassezia globosa and four fungal species of the family Plectosphaerellaceae, and the bacterium Neorhizobium galegae were strongly enriched on M. incognita in the suppressive soil. In conclusion, the highly specific attachment of microbes to infective stages of

  17. In Vitro Pharmacodynamics of Benzimidazole and Tetrahydropyrimidine Derivatives in European Bison Gastro-Intestinal Nematodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura CĂTANĂ

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study was aimed to evaluate the efficacy of anthelmintic agents against intestinal nematodes found in European bison. It was performed between October 2016 and May 2017, using Egg Hatch Assay (EHA and Larval Development Assay (LDA. The parasites were obtained from faecal samples, harvested from bisons in Romania and Sweden. The efficacy of albendazole (ABZ, mebendazole (MBZ thiabendazole (TBZ and pyrantel (PYR was tested. In EHA, the maximum efficacy was observed in MBZ (EC50 = - 0.227 μg/ml, and then TBZ (EC50 = - 0.2228. ABZ had a weaker result, EC50 being 0.326 μg/ml. All tested benzimidazoles registered hatching percentages below 50%, reflecting the lack of parasitic resistance. MIC obtained in the LDA tests were 0.2144 μg/ml for TBZ, 0.2792 μg/ml for PYR, 0.5429 μg/ml for MBZ, while ABZ came last (MIC = 0.8187 μg/ml. The in vitro tests proved the antiparasitic molecules efficacy against bisons nematode population and a limited risk of inducing resistance phenomena.

  18. ( Allium sativum ) on Salmonella typhi infection, gastrointestinal flora ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of consumption of garlic (Allium sativum) in treating Salmonella typhi infection and on the gastrointestinal flora and hematological parameters of rats was investigated. Crude garlic extract inhibited the growth of S. typhi on agar plate with a zone of inhibition averaging 23.8 mm in diameter using the agar diffusion ...

  19. Survey of gastrointestinal parasite infection in African lion ( Panthera ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Little is known about gastrointestinal parasite infections in large carnivores in Africa and what is available is largely from East Africa. We collected faecal samples from nine spotted hyaenas (Crocuta crocuta), 15 lions (Panthera leo) and 13 African wild dog (Lycaon pictus) from Luangwa Valley, Zambia. The most common ...

  20. Human Pulmonary Infection by the Zoonotic Metastrongylus salmi Nematode. The First Reported Case in the Americas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvopina, Manuel; Caballero, Henry; Morita, Tatsushi; Korenaga, Masataka

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary metastrongylosis, a zoonotic disease found primarily in pigs, is caused by eight different species of the cosmopolitan nematode Metastrongylus genus. To date, only four human cases have been reported, all from Europe. Herein, a severe case of pulmonary infection caused by Metastrongylus salmi in an Ecuadorian man, with successful treatment with ivermectin, is described. PMID:27382078

  1. Mechanized Packing and Delivery System for Entomopathogenic Nematodes in Infected Mealworm Cadavers

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document describes a mechanized system to pack mealworm (Tenebrio molitor) cadavers infected with entomopathogenic nematodes between two sheets of masking tape. The document is also an operation manual for the machine and provides all the machine specifications, and wiring and pneumatic diagram...

  2. Ruminant self-medication against gastrointestinal nematodes: evidence, mechanism, and origins☆

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villalba Juan J.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal helminths challenge ruminants in ways that reduce their fitness. In turn, ruminants have evolved physiological and behavioral adaptations that counteract this challenge. Ruminants display anorexia and avoidance behaviors, which tend to reduce the incidence of parasitism. In addition, ruminants appear to learn to self-medicate against gastrointestinal parasites by increasing consumption of plant secondary compounds with antiparasitic actions. This selective feeding improves health and fitness. Here, we review the evidence for self-medication in ruminants, propose a hypothesis to explain self-medicative behaviors (based on post-ingestive consequences, and discuss mechanisms (e.g., enhanced neophilia, social transmission that may underlie the ontogeny and spread of self-medicative behaviors in social groups. A better understanding of the mechanisms that underlie and trigger self-medication in parasitized animals will help scientists devise innovative and more sustainable management strategies for improving ruminant health and well-being.

  3. Ruminant self-medication against gastrointestinal nematodes: evidence, mechanism, and origins☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalba, Juan J.; Miller, James; Ungar, Eugene D.; Landau, Serge Y.; Glendinning, John

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal helminths challenge ruminants in ways that reduce their fitness. In turn, ruminants have evolved physiological and behavioral adaptations that counteract this challenge. Ruminants display anorexia and avoidance behaviors, which tend to reduce the incidence of parasitism. In addition, ruminants appear to learn to self-medicate against gastrointestinal parasites by increasing consumption of plant secondary compounds with antiparasitic actions. This selective feeding improves health and fitness. Here, we review the evidence for self-medication in ruminants, propose a hypothesis to explain self-medicative behaviors (based on post-ingestive consequences), and discuss mechanisms (e.g., enhanced neophilia, social transmission) that may underlie the ontogeny and spread of self-medicative behaviors in social groups. A better understanding of the mechanisms that underlie and trigger self-medication in parasitized animals will help scientists devise innovative and more sustainable management strategies for improving ruminant health and well-being. PMID:24971486

  4. Gastrointestinal Infections Annual Surveillance Report 2014

    OpenAIRE

    Public Health Agency

    2015-01-01

    The Public Health Agency (PHA)�has a lead role in protecting the population from infection and environmental hazards through a range of core functions including communicable disease surveillance and monitoring, operational support & advice, and education, training and research.�

  5. The diversity and evolution of nematodes (Pharyngodonidae) infecting New Zealand lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mockett, Sarah; Bell, Trent; Poulin, Robert; Jorge, Fátima

    2017-04-01

    Host-parasite co-evolutionary studies can shed light on diversity and the processes that shape it. Molecular methods have proven to be an indispensable tool in this task, often uncovering unseen diversity. This study used two nuclear markers (18S rRNA and 28S rRNA) and one mitochondrial (cytochrome oxidase subunit I) marker to investigate the diversity of nematodes of the family Pharyngodonidae parasitizing New Zealand (NZ) lizards (lygosomine skinks and diplodactylid geckos) and to explore their co-evolutionary history. A Bayesian approach was used to infer phylogenetic relationships of the parasitic nematodes. Analyses revealed that nematodes parasitizing skinks, currently classified as Skrjabinodon, are more closely related to Spauligodon than to Skrjabinodon infecting NZ geckos. Genetic analyses also uncovered previously undetected diversity within NZ gecko nematodes and provided evidence for several provisionally cryptic species. We also examined the level of host-parasite phylogenetic congruence using a global-fit approach. Significant congruence was detected between gecko-Skrjabinodon phylogenies, but our results indicated that strict co-speciation is not the main co-evolutionary process shaping the associations between NZ skinks and geckos and their parasitic nematodes. However, further sampling is required to fully resolve co-phylogenetic patterns of diversification in this host-parasite system.

  6. Caenorhabditis elegans: a simple nematode infection model for Penicillium marneffei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowen Huang

    Full Text Available Penicillium marneffei, one of the most important thermal dimorphic fungi, is a severe threat to the life of immunocompromised patients. However, the pathogenic mechanisms of P. marneffei remain largely unknown. In this work, we developed a model host by using nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to investigate the virulence of P. marneffei. Using two P. marneffei clinical isolate strains 570 and 486, we revealed that in both liquid and solid media, the ingestion of live P. marneffei was lethal to C. elegans (P<0.001. Meanwhile, our results showed that the strain 570, which can produce red pigment, had stronger pathogenicity in C. elegans than the strain 486, which can't produce red pigment (P<0.001. Microscopy showed the formation of red pigment and hyphae within C. elegans after incubation with P. marneffei for 4 h, which are supposed to be two contributors in nematodes killing. In addition, we used C. elegans as an in vivo model to evaluate different antifungal agents against P. marneffei, and found that antifungal agents including amphotericin B, terbinafine, fluconazole, itraconazole and voriconazole successfully prolonged the survival of nematodesinfected by P. marneffei. Overall, this alternative model host can provide us an easy tool to study the virulence of P. marneffei and screen antifungal agents.

  7. End-season daily weight gains as rationale for targeted selective treatment against gastrointestinal nematodes in highly exposed first-grazing season cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlin, Aurélie; Chauvin, Alain; Lehebel, Anne; Brisseau, Nadine; Froger, Sébastien; Bareille, Nathalie; Chartier, Christophe

    2017-03-01

    A two-year study was carried out to assess the feasibility of a targeted selective treatment to control gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) in 24 groups of first grazing season (FGS) cattle. A two-step procedure aiming at defining exposure risk at group level and at identifying the most infected individuals within groups through measurement of the average daily weight gain (ADWG) at housing was used. The first step was to define retrospectively, by grazing management practices (GMP) indicators, two levels of groups' exposure to GIN determined by anti O. ostertagi antibody ODR level (cut-off 0.7). For the low level of exposure, no relationship between parasitological parameters and heifer growth was seen, whereas for the high level ADWG was negatively correlated with increasing Ostertagia ODR values. The best classification was obtained with an expert system modelling the number of Ostertagia L3 generations on plots. GMP input for the expert system included standard data (turnout/housing data and supplementary feeding amount) combined with paddock rotation planning and monthly temperatures. The threshold of 3 successive generations of L3 or more on plots allowed identifying the groups according to low or high infection exposure level, except two groups that were misidentified as being highly exposed. In the second step, individual ADWG was found to be negatively associated with Ostertagia ODR in heifers from groups classified as highly exposed (≥3 generations of L3). In these groups, sensitivity and specificity of ADWG thresholds were calculated for several individual Ostertagia ODR thresholds. The best compromise between sensitivity (i.e., correctly treating the heifers that need to be treated) and specificity (i.e., not treating animals that should not be treated) was equivalent respectively to 76% and 56% (AUC≈0.7) and was reached using an end-season ADWG threshold of 683g/day to detect animals exhibiting an Ostertagia ODR cut-off at 0.93. Other ADWG thresholds

  8. Changes in the prevalence of parasitic nematode infections in dogs from animal asylums in Warsaw and sourroundings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Górski, P; Szyja, A; Baska, P; Kazimierczak, K

    2009-01-01

    The distribution of parasitic nematodes of dogs from three shelters for homeless animals in the Warsaw region (Celestynów and Milanówek near Warsaw, Paluch in Warsaw) was investigated. It was found that since our previous investigations (1993-1995) the prevalence of nematode infections had increased in Celestynów and Milanówek and decreased in the municipal shelter in Warsaw (Paluch). The highest percentage of infected animals was found in Celestynów (as in 1993-1995). What can be the importance of local environmental conditions for the prevalence of nematode infections.

  9. The steppe species of gastrointestinal nematodes of small ruminants, with a focus on Marshallagia: climate as a key determinant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meradi, S.; Bentounsi, B.; Zouyed, I.; Cabaret, J.

    2011-01-01

    We intended to relate the geographic distribution of ruminant gastrointestinal nematodes in relation to steppe climate (and vegetation). Data are either from literature or from newly acquired/ available results. Simple or more sophisticated meteorological indices were used to characterize the climate. Regression analyses were used to correlate climatic factors and presence of endoparasites from steppe areas. The distribution of one (Marshallagia) out of five endoparasite genera was concentrated mostly in steppic areas whereas other species were found also in other areas. In wild hosts the distribution of Marshallagia was much larger from Sptizberg to New World (northern territories in Canada or extreme south of America). In domestic small ruminants the presence of Marshallagia was identified more frequently and constantly in the area of original domestication and its early diffusion (from Northern Africa to Kashmir, Caucasia). The distribution of this parasite was correlated to low rainfalls which were not the case for all other endoparasites. After host switch (reindeer or south America camelids), it has expanded in other climatic areas, either colder or dryer. PMID:21894268

  10. The steppe species of gastrointestinal nematodes of small ruminants, with a focus on Marshallagia: climate as a key determinant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meradi S.

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We intended to relate the geographic distribution of ruminant gastrointestinal nematodes in relation to steppe climate (and vegetation. Data are either from literature or from newly acquired/ available results. Simple or more sophisticated meteorological indices were used to characterize the climate. Regression analyses were used to correlate climatic factors and presence of endoparasites from steppe areas. The distribution of one (Marshallagia out of five endoparasite genera was concentrated mostly in steppic areas whereas other species were found also in other areas. In wild hosts the distribution of Marshallagia was much larger from Sptizberg to New World (northern territories in Canada or extreme south of America. In domestic small ruminants the presence of Marshallagia was identified more frequently and constantly in the area of original domestication and its early diffusion (from Northern Africa to Kashmir, Caucasia. The distribution of this parasite was correlated to low rainfalls which were not the case for all other endoparasites. After host switch (reindeer or south America camelids, it has expanded in other climatic areas, either colder or dryer.

  11. Risk factors for anthelmintic resistance development in cattle gastrointestinal nematodes in Argentina

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    Víctor Humberto Suarez

    Full Text Available Risk factors for anthelmintic resistance (AR on bovine ranches were studied. Data were derived from a survey made to 50 ranch owners, who had conducted a faecal egg-count-reduction test. The questionnaire contained descriptors of bovine ranch management and nematode control. A case-control design study was undertaken and AR cases were present in 26 herds. Associations between the binary outcome variable (AR versus not AR and risk factors recorded in the questionnaire were evaluated. Variables associated with the presence of AR at P 2 were subjected to a multivariable logistic regression model. The main effects contributing to general AR (avermectin AVM and/or benzimidazole in the final model were total number of annual treatments (OR 7.68; 95% CI 2.4 to 28.3 and use of more than 75% of AVM in the past (OR= 18.6; 95% CI 1.3 to 97.3, whereas for AVM resistance alone were total number of AVM annual treatments (OR= 11.5; 95% CI 2.9 to 45.5 and number of AVM Nov-Jan treatments (OR= 5.8; 95% CI 1.71 to 47.9. The results showed that treatment frequency, date of treatment and frequency of treatment in the past with a single drug were the main risk factors involved in AR development.

  12. [Recent findings on the genetics of gastro-intestinal nematode resistance in ruminants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carta, A; Scala, A

    2004-06-01

    The control of helminthiases in ruminants raised in open pasture has been mainly undertaken by using prophylactic measures in the environment, but these are often inadequate due to incorrect application. With the appearance of anthelmintics, the strategy for controlling these parasitoses, passed to pharmacological treatments which became effective in reducing their impact. However, the frequent and incorrect utilisation of these molecules resulted in resistance to anthelmintics and the presence of chemical residues in animal products for human consumption. Anthelmintic resistance is widespread throughout the world, heterogeneous and probably underestimated. This has encouraged the introduction of homeopathic agents and products derived from plants whose effectiveness has not been scientifically assessed. It is well known that it is possible to detect differences in resistance to the most important parasites between breeds. In Europe, it has been reported that some ovine autochthonous breeds, Scottish Blackface and Lacaune, showed higher resistance. The implementation of breeding strategies aimed at obtaining animals with naturally low susceptibility to nematode infestations could therefore play an increasingly important role. Standard animal breeding techniques have been largely successful in improving the performance of domestic animals in the last century. Standard quantitative selection requires field data on: i) individual phenotype performance; ii) expected covariance among animals due to blood relationship between them. The whole process of predicting the breeding value of animals in order to select subsequently the genetically superior parents of the next generation is entirely based on sophisticated computations (BLUP-animal model). In sheep, the main objective is always selecting for milk yield and sometimes, in addition, milk composition. However, due to the evolution of the EU agricultural policy and consumer demand in terms of healthy and organic food

  13. Field evaluation for anthelmintic-resistant ovine gastrointestinal nematodes by in vitro and in vivo assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díez-Baños, P; Pedreira, J; Sánchez-Andrade, R; Francisco, I; Suárez, J L; Díaz, P; Panadero, R; Arias, M; Painceira, A; Paz-Silva, A; Morrondo, P

    2008-08-01

    A coprological survey to analyze the presence of flock resistance to benzimidazoles (BZ) and macrocyclic lactones (ML) was performed in sheep under field conditions. Fecal samples were collected from 2,625 sheep in 72 commercial farms from Galicia (NW Spain). The in vitro (FECRT, fecal egg count reduction test) and in vivo (EHA, egg hatch assay, and LFIA, larval feeding inhibition assay) tests were used to assess the efficacy of these anthelmintics. Coprocultures were also developed to obtain knowledge on the main genera of trichostrongylid nematoda prior to, and after, the administration of the anthelmintics. By using the FECRT, BZ resistance was observed in 13 (18%) flocks, whereas ML resistance was only detected in 2 (3%) farms. The number of resistant flocks to BZ was 21 (29%) by using the EHA and 7 (10%) by means of the LFIA. None of the flocks used in this study showed simultaneous resistance to both employed anthelmintics. The results from the in vitro and in vivo tests revealed that 92% of the flocks FECRT resistant to BZ were also resistant with the EHA. The LFIA confirmed all the farms resistant to ML by using the in vivo test. After the administration of BZ, nematode larvae belonging to Teladorsagia circumcincta (32.2%), Trichostrongylus spp. (29%), Nematodirus spp. (6.5%), and Chabertia ovis (3.2%) were identified. In the flocks receiving ML, only T. circumcincta was identified (57%). We recommend the use of in vitro tests because they are more efficient. As the use of macrocyclic lactones is increasing in this region, further investigation is needed for detecting resistance to the anthelmintic family compounds by the LFIA.

  14. Role of macrophages in the altered epithelial function during a type 2 immune response induced by enteric nematode infection.

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    Luigi Notari

    Full Text Available Parasitic enteric nematodes induce a type 2 immune response characterized by increased production of Th2 cytokines, IL-4 and IL-13, and recruitment of alternatively activated macrophages (M2 to the site of infection. Nematode infection is associated with changes in epithelial permeability and inhibition of sodium-linked glucose absorption, but the role of M2 in these effects is unknown. Clodronate-containing liposomes were administered prior to and during nematode infection to deplete macrophages and prevent the development of M2 in response to infection with Nippostrongylus brasiliensis. The inhibition of epithelial glucose absorption that is associated with nematode infection involved a macrophage-dependent reduction in SGLT1 activity, with no change in receptor expression, and a macrophage-independent down-regulation of GLUT2 expression. The reduced transport of glucose into the enterocyte is compensated partially by an up-regulation of the constitutive GLUT1 transporter consistent with stress-induced activation of HIF-1α. Thus, nematode infection results in a "lean" epithelial phenotype that features decreased SGLT1 activity, decreased expression of GLUT2 and an emergent dependence on GLUT1 for glucose uptake into the enterocyte. Macrophages do not play a role in enteric nematode infection-induced changes in epithelial barrier function. There is a greater contribution, however, of paracellular absorption of glucose to supply the energy demands of host resistance. These data provide further evidence of the ability of macrophages to alter glucose metabolism of neighboring cells.

  15. Field evaluations of the efficacy and safety of Emodepside plus toltrazuril (Procox® oral suspension for dogs) against naturally acquired nematode and Isospora spp. infections in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altreuther, Gertraut; Gasda, Nadine; Adler, Kerstin; Hellmann, Klaus; Thurieau, Heloise; Schimmel, Annette; Hutchens, Douglas; Krieger, Klemens J

    2011-08-01

    Three controlled, blinded and randomised multicentre field studies evaluated the efficacy and safety of a new formulation containing emodepside plus toltrazuril (Procox® suspension for dogs) against naturally acquired parasite infections in dogs. In two studies dogs positive for gastrointestinal nematodes and/or Isospora spp. were treated with emodepside/toltrazuril suspension (at least 0.45 mg emodepside plus 9 mg toltrazuril per kg body weight) or a reference product containing either milbemycin oxime plus praziquantel (Milbemax®) or sulfadimethoxine (Kokzidiol SD®) at recommended dose rates. The third study investigated efficacy against prepatent natural Isospora spp. infections in comparison to an untreated control group by enrolling Isospora- negative dogs that were at risk to develop a patent infection during the study.No suspected adverse drug reactions were observed in any of the 403 dogs enrolled in the three studies including 234 dogs treated with emodepside/toltrazuril suspension. In dogs treated with emodepside/toltrazuril suspension against nematode infection faecal egg counts were reduced by 100 % (reference product: 99.7 %). Similarly, in the dogs that had been treated against patent Isospora spp. infection, faecal oocyst counts were reduced by 100 % (reference product: 99.0 %). In both studies, statistical analysis demonstrated non-inferiority and even superiority to the reference products (p ≤ 0.009). Dogs treated with emodepside/toltrazuril suspension during suspected prepatent Isospora spp. infection had 98.7 % lower faecal oocyst counts after treatment compared to untreated dogs (p toltrazuril suspension is safe and highly efficacious against nematodes and Isospora spp. under field conditions.

  16. Development of functional gastrointestinal disorders after Giardia lamblia infection

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    Hanevik Kurt

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID may occur following acute gastroenteritis. This long-term complication has previously not been described after infection with the non-invasive protozoan Giardia lamblia. This study aims to characterize persistent abdominal symptoms elicited by Giardia infection according to Rome II criteria and symptoms scores. Methods Structured interview and questionnaires 12–30 months after the onset of Giardia infection, and at least 6 months after Giardia eradication, among 82 patients with persisting abdominal symptoms elicited by the Giardia infection. All had been evaluated to exclude other causes. Results We found that 66 (80.5% of the 82 patients had symptoms consistent with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS and 17 (24.3% patients had functional dyspepsia (FD according to Rome II criteria. IBS was sub classified into D-IBS (47.0%, A-IBS (45.5% and C-IBS (7.6%. Bloating, diarrhoea and abdominal pain were reported to be most severe. Symptoms exacerbation related to specific foods were reported by 45 (57.7% patients and to physical or mental stress by 34 (44.7% patients. Conclusion In the presence of an IBS-subtype pattern consistent with post-infectious IBS (PI-IBS, and in the absence of any other plausible causes, we conclude that acute Giardia infection may elicit functional gastrointestinal diseases with food and stress related symptoms similar to FGID patients in general.

  17. Characterization of the abomasal transcriptome for mechanisms of resistance to gastrointestinal nematodes in cattle

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    Li Robert W

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The response of the abomasal transcriptome to gastrointestinal parasites was evaluated in parasite-susceptible and parasite-resistant Angus cattle using RNA-seq at a depth of 23.7 million sequences per sample. These cattle displayed distinctly separate resistance phenotypes as assessed by fecal egg counts. Approximately 65.3% of the 23 632 bovine genes were expressed in the fundic abomasum. Of these, 13 758 genes were expressed in all samples tested and likely represent core components of the bovine abomasal transcriptome. The gene (BT14427 with the most abundant transcript, accounting for 10.4% of sequences in the transcriptome, is located on chromosome 29 and has unknown functions. Additionally, PIGR (1.6%, Complement C3 (0.7%, and Immunoglobulin J chain (0.5% were among the most abundant transcripts in the transcriptome. Among the 203 genes impacted, 64 were significantly over-expressed in resistant animals at a stringent cutoff (FDR

  18. Establishment of gastro-intestinal helminth infections in free-range chickens: a longitudinal on farm study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongrak, Kalyakorn; Daş, Gürbüz; Moors, Eva; Sohnrey, Birgit; Gauly, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to monitor establishment and development of gastro-intestinal helminth infections in chickens over two production years (PY) on a free-range farm in Lower Saxony, Germany. The data were collected between July 2010 and June 2011 (PY1) and July 2011 and January 2013 (PY2), respectively. During PY1, Lohmann Brown classic (LB classic, N = 450) was tested, while in PY2 two different genotypes (230 LB classic, 230 LB plus) were used. The hens were kept in two mobile stalls that were moved to a new position at regular intervals. In both PY1 and PY2, 20 individual faecal samples per stall were randomly collected at monthly intervals in order to calculate the number of internal parasite eggs per gram of faeces (EPG). At the end of the laying periods, approximately 10% (N = 42) or more than 50% (N = 265) of hens were subjected to post-mortem parasitological examinations in PY1 and PY2, respectively. No parasite eggs were found in the faecal samples during PY1, whereas almost all of the hens (97.6%) were infected with Heterakis gallinarum (36 worms/hen) at the end of the period. In PY2, nematode eggs in faeces were found from the third month onwards at a low level, increasing considerably towards the final three months. There was no significant difference between the two genotypes of brown hens neither for EPG (P = 0.456) or for overall prevalence (P = 0.177). Mortality rate ranged from 18.3 to 27.4% but did not differ significantly between genotypes or production years. Average worm burden was 207 worms/hen in PY2. The most prevalent species were H. gallinarum (98.5%) followed by Ascaridia galli (96.2%) and Capillaria spp. (86.1%). Furthermore, three Capillaria species, C. obsignata, C. bursata and C. caudinflata were differentiated. In conclusion chickens kept on free-range farms are exposed to high risks of nematode infections and have high mortality rates with no obvious link to parasite infections. Once the farm environment is contaminated

  19. Natural and experimental infection of Caenorhabditis nematodes by novel viruses related to nodaviruses.

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    Marie-Anne Félix

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An ideal model system to study antiviral immunity and host-pathogen co-evolution would combine a genetically tractable small animal with a virus capable of naturally infecting the host organism. The use of C. elegans as a model to define host-viral interactions has been limited by the lack of viruses known to infect nematodes. From wild isolates of C. elegans and C. briggsae with unusual morphological phenotypes in intestinal cells, we identified two novel RNA viruses distantly related to known nodaviruses, one infecting specifically C. elegans (Orsay virus, the other C. briggsae (Santeuil virus. Bleaching of embryos cured infected cultures demonstrating that the viruses are neither stably integrated in the host genome nor transmitted vertically. 0.2 µm filtrates of the infected cultures could infect cured animals. Infected animals continuously maintained viral infection for 6 mo (∼50 generations, demonstrating that natural cycles of horizontal virus transmission were faithfully recapitulated in laboratory culture. In addition to infecting the natural C. elegans isolate, Orsay virus readily infected laboratory C. elegans mutants defective in RNAi and yielded higher levels of viral RNA and infection symptoms as compared to infection of the corresponding wild-type N2 strain. These results demonstrated a clear role for RNAi in the defense against this virus. Furthermore, different wild C. elegans isolates displayed differential susceptibility to infection by Orsay virus, thereby affording genetic approaches to defining antiviral loci. This discovery establishes a bona fide viral infection system to explore the natural ecology of nematodes, host-pathogen co-evolution, the evolution of small RNA responses, and innate antiviral mechanisms.

  20. Natural and experimental infection of Caenorhabditis nematodes by novel viruses related to nodaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Félix, Marie-Anne; Ashe, Alyson; Piffaretti, Joséphine; Wu, Guang; Nuez, Isabelle; Bélicard, Tony; Jiang, Yanfang; Zhao, Guoyan; Franz, Carl J; Goldstein, Leonard D; Sanroman, Mabel; Miska, Eric A; Wang, David

    2011-01-25

    An ideal model system to study antiviral immunity and host-pathogen co-evolution would combine a genetically tractable small animal with a virus capable of naturally infecting the host organism. The use of C. elegans as a model to define host-viral interactions has been limited by the lack of viruses known to infect nematodes. From wild isolates of C. elegans and C. briggsae with unusual morphological phenotypes in intestinal cells, we identified two novel RNA viruses distantly related to known nodaviruses, one infecting specifically C. elegans (Orsay virus), the other C. briggsae (Santeuil virus). Bleaching of embryos cured infected cultures demonstrating that the viruses are neither stably integrated in the host genome nor transmitted vertically. 0.2 µm filtrates of the infected cultures could infect cured animals. Infected animals continuously maintained viral infection for 6 mo (∼50 generations), demonstrating that natural cycles of horizontal virus transmission were faithfully recapitulated in laboratory culture. In addition to infecting the natural C. elegans isolate, Orsay virus readily infected laboratory C. elegans mutants defective in RNAi and yielded higher levels of viral RNA and infection symptoms as compared to infection of the corresponding wild-type N2 strain. These results demonstrated a clear role for RNAi in the defense against this virus. Furthermore, different wild C. elegans isolates displayed differential susceptibility to infection by Orsay virus, thereby affording genetic approaches to defining antiviral loci. This discovery establishes a bona fide viral infection system to explore the natural ecology of nematodes, host-pathogen co-evolution, the evolution of small RNA responses, and innate antiviral mechanisms.

  1. Structural Basis for Carbohydrate Recognition and Anti-inflammatory Modulation by Gastrointestinal Nematode Parasite Toxascaris leonina Galectin*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Eun Young; Jeong, Mi Suk; Park, Sang Kyun; Ha, Sung Chul; Yu, Hak Sun; Jang, Se Bok

    2016-01-01

    Toxascaris leonina galectin (Tl-gal) is a galectin-9 homologue protein isolated from an adult worm of the canine gastrointestinal nematode parasite, and Tl-gal-vaccinated challenge can inhibit inflammation in inflammatory bowel disease-induced mice. We determined the first X-ray structures of full-length Tl-gal complexes with carbohydrates (lactose, N-acetyllactosamine, lacto-N-tetraose, sialyllactose, and glucose). Bonds were formed on concave surfaces of both carbohydrate recognition domains (CRDs) in Tl-gal. All binding sites were found in the HXXXR and WGXEER motifs. Charged Arg61/Arg196 and Glu80/Glu215 on the conserved motif of Tl-gal N-terminal CRD and C-terminal CRD are critical amino acids for recognizing carbohydrate binding, and the residues can affect protein folding and structure. The polar amino acids His, Asn, and Trp are also important residues for the interaction with carbohydrates through hydrogen bonding. Hemagglutination activities of Tl-gal were inhibited by interactions with carbohydrates and mutations. We found that the mutation of Tl-gal (E80A/E215A) at the carbohydrate binding region induced protein aggregation and could be caused in many diseases. The short linker region between the N-terminal and C-terminal CRDs of Tl-gal was very stable against proteolysis and maintained its biological activity. This structural information is expected to elucidate the carbohydrate recognition mechanism of Tl-gal and improve our understanding of anti-inflammatory mediators and modulators of immune response. PMID:27742836

  2. The use of nemabiome metabarcoding to explore gastro-intestinal nematode species diversity and anthelmintic treatment effectiveness in beef calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avramenko, Russell W; Redman, Elizabeth M; Lewis, Roy; Bichuette, Murilo A; Palmeira, Bruna M; Yazwinski, Thomas A; Gilleard, John S

    2017-11-01

    Next-generation deep amplicon sequencing, or metabarcoding, has revolutionized the study of microbial communities in humans, animals and the environment. However, such approaches have yet to be applied to parasitic helminth communities. We recently described the first example of such a method - nemabiome sequencing - based on deep-amplicon sequencing of internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS-2) rDNA, and validated its ability to quantitatively assess the species composition of cattle gastro-intestinal nematode (GIN) communities. Here, we present the first application of this approach to explore GIN species diversity and the impact of anthelmintic drug treatments. First, we investigated GIN species diversity in cow-calf beef cattle herds in several different regions, using coproculture derived L3s. A screen of 50 Canadian beef herds revealed parasite species diversity to be low overall. The majority of parasite communities were comprised of just two species; Ostertagia ostertagi and Cooperia oncophora. Cooperia punctata was present at much lower levels overall, but nevertheless comprised a substantive part of the parasite community of several herds in eastern Canada. In contrast, nemabiome sequencing revealed higher GIN species diversity in beef calves sampled from central/south-eastern USA and Sao Paulo State, Brazil. In these regions C. punctata predominated in most herds with Haemonchus placei predominating in a few cases. Ostertagia ostertagi and C. oncophora were relatively minor species in these regions in contrast to the Canadian herds. We also examined the impact of routine macrocyclic lactone pour-on treatments on GIN communities in the Canadian beef herds. Low treatment effectiveness was observed in many cases, and nemabiome sequencing revealed an overall increase in the proportion of Cooperia spp. relative to O. ostertagi post-treatment. This work demonstrates the power of nemabiome metabarcoding to provide a detailed picture of GIN parasite community

  3. Extremely low infection levels of pathogens and nematodes in Trypodendron spp. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae

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    Wegensteiner Rudolf

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The striped ambrosia beetles Trypodendron lineatum and T. domesticum are timber forest pests in the Palearctic region and North America. Because only a few pathogens are known for Trypodendron species, the aim of this work was to determine the spectrum of pathogen species of T. lineatum, T. laeve, and T. domesticum. Trypodendron species were collected in pheromone traps at nine localities in the Czech Republic, five localities in Poland, and one locality in Austria. In total, 2,439 T. lineatum, 171 T. domesticum, and 17 T. laeve beetles were dissected and examined. Infection was found in only two of the 17 specimens of T. laeve and in only two of the 171 specimens of T. domesticum; in all four cases, the parasites were nematodes. Parasitisation of T. lineatum by nematodes was found in T. lineatum at eight localities with a mean (± SE parasitisation level of 8.1 ± 4.7%. A Chytridiopsis sp. was detected in cells of the midgut epithelium of one T. lineatum specimen, and Gregarina sp. was detected in the midgut lumen of two T. lineatum specimens; no other pathogens were found in T. lineatum. The low infection rates and the tendency for infection by nematodes can be explained by the monogamy of Trypodendron spp. and their feeding on fungi in short galleries that are not connected to the galleries of conspecifics.

  4. The Dynamics, Prevalence and Impact of Nematode Infections in Organically Raised Sheep in Sweden

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    Waller PJ

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available A three-year survey (1997–99 was carried out on organically reared sheep flocks throughout Sweden. The aim was to determine the prevalence and intensity of nematode infections and to establish relationships between sheep management practices and parasite infections. Faecal samples from ewes and lambs were collected from 152 organic flocks around lambing-time and during the grazing-period for analysis. Results were compared with the different management practices that farmers use to prevent parasitism in their flocks. A high proportion of the flocks was infected with nematodes. The most prevalent species were Haemonchus contortus, Teladorsagia circumeincta, Trichostrongylus axei, T. colubriformis and Chabertia ovina and infections progressively increased during summer in lambs grazing on permanent pastures. Severity of parasitic infection in lambs was highly dependent on egg output from the ewes. H. contortus was found in 37% of the flocks, even at latitudes approximating the Polar Circle. Nematodirus battus was recorded for the first time in Sweden during the course of this study. Lambs turned out onto permanent pasture showed higher nematode faecal egg counts (epg than lambs that had grazed on pastures, which had not carried sheep the previous year. This beneficial effect of lambs grazing non-infected pastures persisted if the ewes were treated with an anthelmintic before turn-out and if the lambs were kept on pastures of low infectivity after weaning. In lambs, the prevalence and the magnitude of their egg counts were higher during autumn in flocks where lambs were slaughtered after 8 months of age, compared with flocks where all lambs were slaughtered before this age. These results will be used in providing advice to farmers of ways to modify their flock management in order to minimise the use of anthelmintics, but at the same time efficiently produce prime lambs.

  5. The kinetics of exsheathment of infective nematode larvae is disturbed in the presence of a tannin-rich plant extract (sainfoin) both in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunet, S; Aufrere, J; El Babili, F; Fouraste, I; Hoste, H

    2007-08-01

    The mode of action of bioactive plants on gastrointestinal nematodes remains obscure. Previous in vitro studies showed that exsheathment was significantly disturbed after contact with tannin-rich extracts. However, the role of important factors (extract concentration, parasite species) has not been assessed and no information is available on the occurrence in vivo. These questions represent the objectives of this study. The model incorporated the parasites Haemonchus contortus and Trichostrongylus colubriformis with sainfoin as the bioactive plant. A set of in vitro assays was performed, measuring the changes observed, after 3 h of contact with increasing concentrations of sainfoin, on the rate of artificial exsheathment. The results indicated that sainfoin extracts interfered with exsheathment in a dose-dependent manner and the process overall was similar for both nematodes. The restoration of control values observed after adding PEG to extracts confirms a major role for tannins. A second study was performed in vivo on rumen-cannulated sheep fed with different proportions of sainfoin in the diet to verify these in vitro results. The consumption of a higher proportion of sainfoin was indeed associated with significant delays in Haemonchus exsheathment. Overall, the results confirmed that interference with the early step of nematode infection might be one of the modes of action that contributes to the anthelmintic properties of tanniniferous plants.

  6. Genetic control of acquired resistance to gastrointestinal nematode parasites in sheep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Windon, R.G.; Wagland, B.M.; Dineen, J.K.

    1988-01-01

    A radiation attenuated larval vaccine has been used to evaluate the role of genetic components of the immune response in the control of Trichostrongylus colubriformis in sheep. Through selection based on age dependent responsiveness, lines of sheep have been established in which lambs are either high or low responders to vaccination and challenge infection. The estimated and realized heritabilities for the selected trait are 0.35-0.41. Significant interline differences were demonstrated and, within the lines, ewe lambs were consistently more responsive than rams or wethers. The effect of selection was not antigenically specific, since high responsiveness to T. colubriformis was associated with increased responsiveness to other related (T. rugatus) and unrelated parasites (Ostertagia circumcincta and Haemonchus contortus). In addition, high responders had a more vigorous reaction against naturally acquired infections than low responders. The general immunological competence was also increased in high responders; this was shown by the levels of serum complement fixing antibody to larval antigens after vaccination and challenge, in vitro blastogenic responses stimulated by larval antigens and the phagocytic function of peripheral leucocytes. No production penalty (weight gain and wool growth) was associated with heightened responsiveness. (author). 10 refs, 1 fig

  7. Eosinophils are important for protection, immunoregulation and pathology during infection with nematode microfilariae.

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    Emma T Cadman

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophil responses typify both allergic and parasitic helminth disease. In helminthic disease, the role of eosinophils can be both protective in immune responses and destructive in pathological responses. To investigate whether eosinophils are involved in both protection and pathology during filarial nematode infection, we explored the role of eosinophils and their granule proteins, eosinophil peroxidase (EPO and major basic protein-1 (MBP-1, during infection with Brugia malayi microfilariae. Using eosinophil-deficient mice (PHIL, we further clarify the role of eosinophils in clearance of microfilariae during primary, but not challenge infection in vivo. Deletion of EPO or MBP-1 alone was insufficient to abrogate parasite clearance suggesting that either these molecules are redundant or eosinophils act indirectly in parasite clearance via augmentation of other protective responses. Absence of eosinophils increased mast cell recruitment, but not other cell types, into the broncho-alveolar lavage fluid during challenge infection. In addition absence of eosinophils or EPO alone, augmented parasite-induced IgE responses, as measured by ELISA, demonstrating that eosinophils are involved in regulation of IgE. Whole body plethysmography indicated that nematode-induced changes in airway physiology were reduced in challenge infection in the absence of eosinophils and also during primary infection in the absence of EPO alone. However lack of eosinophils or MBP-1 actually increased goblet cell mucus production. We did not find any major differences in cytokine responses in the absence of eosinophils, EPO or MBP-1. These results reveal that eosinophils actively participate in regulation of IgE and goblet cell mucus production via granule secretion during nematode-induced pathology and highlight their importance both as effector cells, as damage-inducing cells and as supervisory cells that shape both innate and adaptive immunity.

  8. Philippine Survey of Nematode Parasite Infection and Load in the Giant African Snail Achatina fulica indicate Angiostrongylus cantonensis infection in Mindanao

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    Daisy May A. Constantino-Santos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Achatina fulica is a ubiquitous land snail commonly found throughout the Philippines. As a generalist feeder and being able to survive in a wide range of habitat types and conditions, the snail can easily establish itself in a new area after introduction. It also acts as host to a variety of parasites, including nematodes, which may accidentally infect humans. In this study, A. fulica individuals from 13 areas in the Philippines were sampled and analyzed for nematode infection rate and load. Of the 393 individuals sampled, 80 (20% were found to be infected, with 5049 nematodes isolated. The infection rates and parasite load were highly variable. Overall, the parasite load ranges from 1 to 867 per snail. Representative nematodes from A. fulica from Plaridel (n=8 and Davao City (n=26 in Mindanao were subjected to DNA extraction, PCR amplification, and sequencing of the SSU rRNA gene, which is the universal barcode for nematodes. Sequences successfully matched with the dog lungworm Oslerus osleri for the Plaridel nematodes and the rat lungworm Angiostrongylus cantonensis for the Davao City nematodes, respectively. The latter is known to infect humans and can cause eosinophilic meningoencephalitis. This study presents the first report of A. cantonensis in A. fulica from Mindanao and raises a public health concern.

  9. Integrated parasite management with special reference to gastro-intestinal nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqbool, I; Wani, Z A; Shahardar, R A; Allaie, I M; Shah, M M

    2017-03-01

    Domestic animals are susceptible to a large number of parasitic diseases, which lead to severe economic losses to livestock industry. So, it is necessary to control parasitic infections in these animals. Control of these helminths is undertaken mostly by anthelmintics, but because of their widespread use there is development of resistance across the globe. However, total dependence on a single method of control has proved to be non-sustainable and cost ineffective in the long term. A combination of treatment and management is necessary to control parasitism so that it will not cause further economic losses to producer as well as to livestock industry. To become practically and ecologically sustainable, parasitic control schemes need to be based on integrated parasite management.

  10. Frequency of human papillomavirus infection in patients with gastrointestinal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesch-Dietlen, F; Cano-Contreras, A D; Sánchez-Maza, Y J; Espinosa-González, J M; Vázquez-Prieto, M Á; Valdés-de la O, E J; Díaz-Roesch, F; Carrasco-Arroniz, M Á; Cruz-Palacios, A; Grube-Pagola, P; Sumoza-Toledo, A; Vivanco-Cid, H; Mellado-Sánchez, G; Meixueiro-Daza, A; Silva-Cañetas, C S; Carrillo-Toledo, M G; Lagunes-Torres, R; Amieva-Balmori, M; Gómez-Castaño, P C; Reyes-Huerta, J U; Remes-Troche, J M

    2018-02-15

    Cancer is the result of the interaction of genetic and environmental factors. It has recently been related to viral infections, one of which is human papillomavirus. The aim of the present study was to describe the frequency of human papillomavirus infection in patients with digestive system cancers. A prospective, multicenter, observational study was conducted on patients with gastrointestinal cancer at 2public healthcare institutes in Veracruz. Two tumor samples were taken, one for histologic study and the other for DNA determination of human papillomavirus and its genotypes. Anthropometric variables, risk factors, sexual habits, tumor location, and histologic type of the cancer were analyzed. Absolute and relative frequencies were determined using the SPSS version 24.0 program. Fifty-three patients were studied. They had gastrointestinal cancer located in: the colon (62.26%), stomach (18.87%), esophagus (7.55%), rectum (7.55%), and small bowel (3.77%). Human papillomavirus was identified in 11.32% of the patients, 66.7% of which corresponded to squamous cell carcinoma and 33.3% to adenocarcinoma. Only genotype 18 was identified. Mean patient age was 61.8±15.2 years, 56.60% of the patients were men, and 43.40% were women. A total of 15.8% of the patients had a family history of cancer and 31.6% had a personal history of the disease, 38.6% were tobacco smokers, and 61.4% consumed alcohol. Regarding sex, 5.3% of the patients said they were homosexual, 3.5% were bisexual, 29.8% engaged in oral sex, and 24.6% in anal sex. Our study showed that human papillomavirus infection was a risk factor for the development of gastrointestinal cancer, especially of squamous cell origin. Copyright © 2018 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  11. Ice-Active Substances from the Infective Juveniles of the Freeze Tolerant Entomopathogenic Nematode, Steinernema feltiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farman Ali

    Full Text Available Steinernema feltiae is a moderately freezing tolerant nematode, that can withstand intracellular ice formation. We investigated recrystallization inhibition, thermal hysteresis and ice nucleation activities in the infective juveniles of S. feltiae. Both the splat cooling assay and optical recrystallometry indicate the presence of ice active substances that inhibit recrystallization in the nematode extract. The substance is relatively heat stable and largely retains the recrystallization inhibition activity after heating. No thermal hysteresis activity was detected but the extract had a typical hexagonal crystal shape when grown from a single seed crystal and weak ice nucleation activity. An ice active substance is present in a low concentration, which may be involved in the freezing survival of this species by inhibiting ice recrystallization.

  12. Impact of drainage and sewerage on intestinal nematode infections in poor urban areas in Salvador, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, L R S; Cancio, Jacira Azevedo; Cairncross, Sandy

    2004-04-01

    This cross-sectional study was conducted in 1989 among children aged between 5 and 14 years old living in nine poor urban areas of the city of Salvador (pop. 2.44 million), capital of Bahia State, in Northeast Brazil. Three of these areas had benefited from both drainage and sewerage, 3 from improved drainage only, and 3 from neither. The children studied thus belonged to 3 exposure groups regarding their level of sanitation infrastructure. An extensive questionnaire was applied to collect information on each child and on the conditions of the household, and stool examinations of the children 5-14 years old were performed to measure nematode infection. Comparison of the sewerage group with the drainage-only group and the latter with the control (no sewerage or drainage) group showed that, when the level of community sanitation was better, the prevalence of infection among children was less, but risk factors identified for infection were more numerous and more significant. Intensity of infection with Trichuris, but not with Ascaris or hookworm, was also less. The results suggest that sewerage and drainage can have a significant effect on intestinal nematode infections, by reducing transmission occurring in the public domain.

  13. Binding of hematin by a nem class of glutathione transferase from the blood-feeding parasitic nematode Haemonchus contortus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossum, A.J.; Jefferies, J.R.; Rijsewijk, F.A.M.; LaCourse, E.J.; Teesdale, P.; Barrett, J.; Tait, A.; Brophy, P.M.

    2004-01-01

    The phase II detoxification system glutathione transferase (GST) is associated with the establishment of parasitic nematode infections within the gastrointestinal environment of the mammalian host. We report the functional analysis of a GST from an important worldwide parasitic nematode of small

  14. Trichuris muris: a model of gastrointestinal parasite infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klementowicz, Joanna E; Travis, Mark A; Grencis, Richard K

    2012-11-01

    Infection with soil-transmitted gastrointestinal parasites, such as Trichuris trichiura, affects more than a billion people worldwide, causing significant morbidity and health problems especially in poverty-stricken developing countries. Despite extensive research, the role of the immune system in triggering parasite expulsion is incompletely understood which hinders the development of anti-parasite therapies. Trichuris muris infection in mice serves as a useful model of T. trichiura infection in humans and has proven to be an invaluable tool in increasing our understanding of the role of the immune system in promoting either susceptibility or resistance to infection. The old paradigm of a susceptibility-associated Th1 versus a resistance-associated Th2-type response has been supplemented in recent years with cell populations such as novel innate lymphoid cells, basophils, dendritic cells and regulatory T cells proposed to play an active role in responses to T. muris infection. Moreover, new immune-controlled mechanisms of expulsion, such as increased epithelial cell turnover and mucin secretion, have been described in recent years increasing the number of possible targets for anti-parasite therapies. In this review, we give a comprehensive overview of experimental work conducted on the T. muris infection model, focusing on important findings and the most recent reports on the role of the immune system in parasite expulsion.

  15. Survey of gastrointestinal menatodes and anthelmintic resistance in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A cross-sectional study was carried out from November 2013 to April 2014 in pastoral area, Yabello districts, to estimate the prevalence and to identify risk factors associated with gastrointestinal strongyle infection in sheep and goats. Moreover, to assess the anthelmintic resistance in goats gastrointestinal nematodes a total ...

  16. Spatiotemporal analysis of predation by carabid beetles (Carabidae on nematode infected and uninfected slugs in the field.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjørn Arild Hatteland

    Full Text Available The dynamics of predation on parasites within prey has received relatively little attention despite the profound effects this is likely to have on both prey and parasite numbers and hence on biological control programmes where parasites are employed. The nematode Phasmarhabditis hermaphrodita is a commercially available biological agent against slugs. Predation on these slugs may, at the same time, result in intraguild predation on slug-parasitic nematodes. This study describes, for the first time, predation by carabid beetles on slugs and their nematode parasites on both spatial and temporal scales, using PCR-based methods. The highest nematode infection levels were found in the slugs Deroceras reticulatum and Arion silvaticus. Numbers of infected slugs decreased over time and no infected slugs were found four months after nematode application. The density of the most abundant slug, the invasive Arion vulgaris, was positively related to the activity-density of the carabid beetle, Carabus nemoralis. Predation on slugs was density and size related, with highest predation levels also on A. vulgaris. Predation on A. vulgaris decreased significantly in summer when these slugs were larger than one gram. Predation by C. nemoralis on slugs was opportunistic, without any preferences for specific species. Intraguild predation on the nematodes was low, suggesting that carabid beetles such as C. nemoralis probably do not have a significant impact on the success of biological control using P. hermaphrodita.

  17. A revised method of examining fish for infection with zoonotic nematode larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsi, Shokoofeh; Suthar, Jaydipbhai

    2016-06-16

    The infection of fish with zoonotic nematodes, particularly anisakid nematodes is of great interest to many researchers who study food safety, human or animal health or who use them as biological tags for stock assessment studies. Accurate examination of fish for infection with anisakid larvae is crucial in making accurate estimates of their occurrence, abundance and prevalence in their fish hosts. Here we describe a new method of examining fish for infection with these parasites. In 2015, a total of 261 fish were purchased from a fish market in New South Wales, Australia. All fish were first examined by routine visual examination for infection with zoonotic nematode larvae and all data were recorded. Subsequently all internal organs were placed in a container and filled with water and incubated in the room temperature overnight. The prevalence, mean intensity and mean abundance of anisakids were significantly higher (p<0.05) when the revised method of examination, i.e., combining visual examination and overnight incubation in room temperature, was employed (63.98, 8.23 and 5.27, respectively) compared to routine visual examination with or without the aid of a microscope (8.81, 3.78 and 0.33, respectively). The proposed method is effective and has several advantages, such as: not using UV or HCl for fish examination, allowing the examination of a larger number of fish in shorter time; larval specimens collected being suitable for both morphological and DNA sequencing; and being simple and inexpensive. The disadvantages would be the odour of the specimens after overnight incubation as well as not being suitable for use with frozen fish. We suggest that results, conclusions or recommendations made in studies that claim no anisakid/ascaridoid larvae were found in a fish should be approached carefully if it is only based on visual examination of the fish. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Metabolismo oxidativo de neutrófilos em ovelhas naturalmente infectadas por nematódeos gastrintestinais e correlação entre nível sérico de cortisol e carga parasitária Neutrophils oxidative metabolism in sheep naturally infected by gastrointestinal nematodes and correlation between serum level of cortisol and parasitary burden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.C. Ciarlini

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Estudaram-se as relações entre o metabolismo oxidativo dos neutrófilos, os níveis séricos de cortisol e a carga parasitária estimada pela contagem de ovos por grama de fezes (OPG no final da gestação, durante a lactação e após o desmame de ovelhas naturalmente infectadas por nematódeos gastrintestinais. Utilizaram-se 22 ovelhas da raça Suffolk, homogêneas quanto à idade (três a quatro anos, número de parições (terceira e época de parição. O cortisol sérico foi determinado por radioimunoensaio e o metabolismo oxidativo dos neutrófilos pelo teste de redução do tetrazólio nitroazul (NBT. Os maiores valores de OPG foram observados na quinta semana de lactação, e as maiores taxas de cortisol e de redução do NBT ocorreram na quarta semana pós-desmame. Verificou-se correlação positiva (r = 0,52; PThe relationships between neutrophils oxidative metabolism, cortisol serum levels and worm burden, estimated by fecal egg count (EPG, were studied in sheep naturally infected by gastrointestinal parasites at the end of pregnancy, during lactation, and after weaning. Twenty-two Suffolk sheep three to four year-old, of same parity and season of parturition were used. Serum cortisol was determined by radioimmunoassay and the neutrophils oxidative metabolism by the nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT reduction test. The highest EPG values were observed on the fifth week of lactation while the highest rates of cortisol and reduction of NBT occurred on the fourth week after weaning. A positive correlation (r = 0.52; P<0.01 was observed between the neutrophils capacity to reduce the NBT and the serum cortisol concentration in the pre-parturition period. Otherwise, the neutrophils oxidative metabolism decreased near to the parturition. A negative correlation (r = -0.39; P<0.01 between EPG and NBT reduction test was observed after weaning, which was coincident with the increase in the neutrophils capacity to reduce NBT, indicating that animals

  19. Activity of luxabendazole against liver flukes, gastrointestinal roundworms, and lungworms in naturally infected sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassai, T; Takáts, C; Fok, E; Redl, P

    1988-01-01

    The anthelmintic potential of luxabendazole was investigated in sheep harboring mixed naturally acquired helminth infections. Results were assessed by comparing worm counts of the treated groups (seven animals each) on days 7-8 posttreatment with those of the nontreated control group, except for protostrongylid lungworms, for which the changes in pre- and posttreatment group mean larval counts/g feces were assessed for intensity effect. A single oral treatment at doses of 10.0 or 12.5 mg/kg body wt removed 97.6% of the adult Fasciola hepatica and 63.2%-83.8% of the Dicrocoelium dendriticum. Luxabendazole at 7.5, 10.0, and 12.5 mg/kg proved 100% effective in removing adult worms of the genera Haemonchus, Ostertagia, Trichostrongylus, Cooperia and Nematodirus as well as tissue-associated larval stages of gastrointestinal nematodes of the abomasal mucosa. The drug showed an intensity effect of 79.7%-87.6% against Strongyloides papillosus. Luxabendazole removed all Dictyocaulus filaria and reduced the fecal excretion of larvae of protostrongylid species (Protostrongylus rufescens, Neostrongylus linearis, Cystocaulus ocreatus, Muellerius capillaris) by 97.8%-99.6%. The efficacy of luxabendazole compared favorably with that of Diplin Kombi (oxyclozanide and levamisole), which was used as a reference drug.

  20. The efficacy of anthelmintic drugs against nematodes infecting free-ranging eastern grey kangaroos, Macropus giganteus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cripps, Jemma; Beveridge, Ian; Coulson, Graeme

    2013-07-01

    Effective anthelmintics are valuable tools for biologists conducting manipulative field experiments to examine effects of parasites on wildlife. However, before such experiments are carried out the efficacy of these drugs must be determined. We conducted three field experiments (May 2010-September 2011) on free-ranging eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) at a golf course in Victoria, Australia, treating animals with the anthelmintic drugs moxidectin (subcutaneous, 1 mg/kg, 2 mg/kg), ivermectin (subcutaneous, 200 μg/kg), and albendazole (oral, 3.8 mg/kg). After treatment we monitored strongylid fecal egg counts (FECs) over time and assessed anthelmintic efficacy using fecal egg count reduction tests (FECRTs). We also performed a larval development assay (LDA) to evaluate directly the efficacy in the nematode population. Unexpectedly, moxidectin and ivermectin had low efficacy with maximum FEC reductions of 82% and 28%, respectively. However, treatment with albendazole reduced FECs by 100% in all kangaroos and egg counts remained low for up to 3 mo. The results from the LDA supported the FECRTs, with low macrocyclic lactone efficacy and high albendazole efficacy. Macrocyclic lactones, at recommended dose rates, were much less effective against strongylid nematodes in kangaroos than has been reported for domestic herbivores. This may be partly due to pharmacokinetics in the host and partly due to low susceptibility in some of the nematodes infecting eastern grey kangaroos.

  1. Infective Juveniles of the Entomopathogenic Nematode Steinernema scapterisci Are Preferentially Activated by Cricket Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Dihong; Sepulveda, Claudia; Dillman, Adler R

    2017-01-01

    Entomopathogenic nematodes are a subgroup of insect-parasitic nematodes that are used in biological control as alternatives or supplements to chemical pesticides. Steinernema scapterisci is an unusual member of the entomopathogenic nematode guild for many reasons including that it is promiscuous in its association with bacteria, it can reproduce in the absence of its described bacterial symbiont, and it is known to have a narrow host range. It is a powerful comparative model within the species and could be used to elucidate parasite specialization. Here we describe a new method of efficiently producing large numbers of S. scapterisci infective juveniles (IJs) in house crickets and for quantifying parasitic activation of the IJs upon exposure to host tissue using morphological features. We found that parasite activation is a temporal process with more IJs activating over time. Furthermore, we found that activated IJs secrete a complex mixture of proteins and that S. scapterisci IJs preferentially activate upon exposure to cricket tissue, reaffirming the description of S. scapterisci as a cricket specialist.

  2. Infective Juveniles of the Entomopathogenic Nematode Steinernema scapterisci Are Preferentially Activated by Cricket Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Entomopathogenic nematodes are a subgroup of insect-parasitic nematodes that are used in biological control as alternatives or supplements to chemical pesticides. Steinernema scapterisci is an unusual member of the entomopathogenic nematode guild for many reasons including that it is promiscuous in its association with bacteria, it can reproduce in the absence of its described bacterial symbiont, and it is known to have a narrow host range. It is a powerful comparative model within the species and could be used to elucidate parasite specialization. Here we describe a new method of efficiently producing large numbers of S. scapterisci infective juveniles (IJs) in house crickets and for quantifying parasitic activation of the IJs upon exposure to host tissue using morphological features. We found that parasite activation is a temporal process with more IJs activating over time. Furthermore, we found that activated IJs secrete a complex mixture of proteins and that S. scapterisci IJs preferentially activate upon exposure to cricket tissue, reaffirming the description of S. scapterisci as a cricket specialist. PMID:28046065

  3. Infective Juveniles of the Entomopathogenic Nematode Steinernema scapterisci Are Preferentially Activated by Cricket Tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dihong Lu

    Full Text Available Entomopathogenic nematodes are a subgroup of insect-parasitic nematodes that are used in biological control as alternatives or supplements to chemical pesticides. Steinernema scapterisci is an unusual member of the entomopathogenic nematode guild for many reasons including that it is promiscuous in its association with bacteria, it can reproduce in the absence of its described bacterial symbiont, and it is known to have a narrow host range. It is a powerful comparative model within the species and could be used to elucidate parasite specialization. Here we describe a new method of efficiently producing large numbers of S. scapterisci infective juveniles (IJs in house crickets and for quantifying parasitic activation of the IJs upon exposure to host tissue using morphological features. We found that parasite activation is a temporal process with more IJs activating over time. Furthermore, we found that activated IJs secrete a complex mixture of proteins and that S. scapterisci IJs preferentially activate upon exposure to cricket tissue, reaffirming the description of S. scapterisci as a cricket specialist.

  4. Efeito anti-helmíntico do hidrolato de Mentha villosa Huds. (Lamiaceae em nematóides gastrintestinais de bovinos Anthelmintic effect of hidrolact of Mentha villosa Huds. (Lamiaceae in gastrointestinal nematodes of cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Érica Maria Nascimento

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Atualmente, o estudo da atividade anti-helmíntica de plantas medicinais em ruminantes tem atraído bastante interesse. Mentha villosa Huds. (Lamiaceae é uma das espécies de hortelã que tem sido utilizada popularmente devido às diversas propriedades medicinais, inclusive para o controle de verminoses. O presente estudo teve como objetivo testar a atividade anti-helmíntica do hidrolato dessa planta em bezerras infectadas por nematóides gastrintestinais, tanto in vitro, pelo método de coprocultura quantitativa, quanto in vivo, por meio do teste de redução no número de ovos de nematóides nas fezes dos hospedeiros. No teste in vitro, o hidrolato nas concentrações de 40%, 60% e 80% e 100% apresentou porcentagem de eficácia de 91,88%, 94,15%, 98,40% e 100%, respectivamente, mostrando atividade ovicida significativa sobre nematóides gastrintestinais em bezerras. Entretanto, os resultados do teste in vivo mostraram ausência de atividade anti-helmíntica do hidrolato de M. villosa na dose de 0,1ml kg dia-1, nos animais tratados.Currently, it has been of great interest to study the anthelmintic activity of medicinal plants in ruminants. Mentha villosa Huds. (Lamiaceae is one of the mint species that has been popularly used based on various medicinal properties, even for the control of nematode infections. This study aimed to test the anthelmintic activity of hidrolact of this plant, both in vitro, by the quantitative coproculture method, and in vivo, in calves infected with gastrointestinal nematodes, through the egg count reduction test in feces of the hosts. In in vitro tests, the hidrolact at the concentrations 40%, 60% and 80% and 100% obtained percentage of effectiveness of 91.88%, 94.15%, 98.40% and 100% respectively, showing significant ovicidal activity against gastrointestinal nematodes in calves. However, the hidrolact of M. villosa showed no in vivo anthelmintic activity at 0.1ml kg-1 day-1 on the treated animals.

  5. Prevalence of Gastro-intestinal Parasites of Cattle in Ogbomoso ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was carried out on the prevalence of gastrointestinal (GI) nematodes infection in naturally infected cattle in Ogbomoso area of Oyo State using standard parasitological techniques. The results indicated that out of the 1000 cattle examined, 30(3%) were infected and parasites identified were Haemonchus contortus ...

  6. Metabolic cues for puberty onset in free grazing Holstein heifers naturally infected with nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Torga, G S; Mejia, M E; González-Iglesias, A; Formia, N; Becú-Villalobos, D; Lacau-Mengido, I M

    2001-07-01

    Leptin is a new plausible candidate for the molecular link between nutritional status and the reproductive axis. In previous studies we described that continuous natural nematode infections in heifers retarded growth and delayed the onset of puberty, and that the insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) was involved. In the present study we monitored the leptin levels during development in heifers naturally parasitized versus those chronically treated with ivermectin and we investigated whether growth hormone (GH) accounted for the differences in IGF-I previously noted. Insulin levels were also measured. Prolactin hormone was recorded as an indicator of immune system activation. We found a direct correlation between leptin and body weight during development and a prepubertal surge of the hormone 2 weeks before the first progesterone peak that indicates the onset of puberty. This suggests that leptin may act as a signal for this event. Insulin did not vary during growth and prepuberty. On the other hand, GH as not responsible for diminished IGF-I levels in parasitized animals as levels were similar in both groups. The GH levels were high at birth and then diminished rapidly and remained constant during development and puberty. The last hormone studied, prolactin, followed seasonal changes of sunlight duration and presented sporadic bursts in infected animals. These were related to high nematode infection and are probably involved in the immune response of the host.

  7. Probiotic alternatives to reduce gastrointestinal infections: the poultry experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nava, G M; Bielke, L R; Callaway, T R; Castañeda, M P

    2005-06-01

    The intestinal mucosa represents the most active defense barrier against the continuous challenge of food antigens and pathogenic microorganisms present in the intestinal lumen. Protection against harmful agents is conferred by factors such as gastric acid, peristalsis, mucus, intestinal proteolysis, and the intestinal biota. The establishment of beneficial bacterial communities and metabolites from these complex ecosystems has varying consequences for host health. This hypothesis has led to the introduction of novel therapeutic interventions based on the consumption of beneficial bacterial cultures. Mechanisms by which probiotic bacteria affect the microecology of the gastrointestinal tract are not well understood, but at least three mechanisms of action have been proposed: production/presence of antibacterial substances (e.g., bacteriocins or colicins), modulation of immune responses and specific competition for adhesion receptors to intestinal epithelium. The rapid establishment of bacterial communities has been thought to be essential for the prevention of colonization by pathogenic bacteria. Some animal models suggest that the reduction in bacterial translocation in neonatal animals could be associated with an increase in intestinal bacterial communities and bacteriocin-like inhibitory substances produced by these species. This review emphasizes the role of the intestinal microbiota in the reduction of the gastrointestinal infections and draws heavily on studies in poultry.

  8. Diversity, Host Specialization, and Geographic Structure of Filarial Nematodes Infecting Malagasy Bats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beza Ramasindrazana

    Full Text Available We investigated filarial infection in Malagasy bats to gain insights into the diversity of these parasites and explore the factors shaping their distribution. Samples were obtained from 947 individual bats collected from 52 sites on Madagascar and representing 31 of the 44 species currently recognized on the island. Samples were screened for the presence of micro- and macro-parasites through both molecular and morphological approaches. Phylogenetic analyses showed that filarial diversity in Malagasy bats formed three main groups, the most common represented by Litomosa spp. infecting Miniopterus spp. (Miniopteridae; a second group infecting Pipistrellus cf. hesperidus (Vespertilionidae embedded within the Litomosoides cluster, which is recognized herein for the first time from Madagascar; and a third group composed of lineages with no clear genetic relationship to both previously described filarial nematodes and found in M. griveaudi, Myotis goudoti, Neoromicia matroka (Vespertilionidae, Otomops madagascariensis (Molossidae, and Paratriaenops furculus (Hipposideridae. We further analyzed the infection rates and distribution pattern of Litomosa spp., which was the most diverse and prevalent filarial taxon in our sample. Filarial infection was disproportionally more common in males than females in Miniopterus spp., which might be explained by some aspect of roosting behavior of these cave-dwelling bats. We also found marked geographic structure in the three Litomosa clades, mainly linked to bioclimatic conditions rather than host-parasite associations. While this study demonstrates distinct patterns of filarial nematode infection in Malagasy bats and highlights potential drivers of associated geographic distributions, future work should focus on their alpha taxonomy and characterize arthropod vectors.

  9. Diversity, Host Specialization, and Geographic Structure of Filarial Nematodes Infecting Malagasy Bats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasindrazana, Beza; Dellagi, Koussay; Lagadec, Erwan; Randrianarivelojosia, Milijaona; Goodman, Steven M.; Tortosa, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    We investigated filarial infection in Malagasy bats to gain insights into the diversity of these parasites and explore the factors shaping their distribution. Samples were obtained from 947 individual bats collected from 52 sites on Madagascar and representing 31 of the 44 species currently recognized on the island. Samples were screened for the presence of micro- and macro-parasites through both molecular and morphological approaches. Phylogenetic analyses showed that filarial diversity in Malagasy bats formed three main groups, the most common represented by Litomosa spp. infecting Miniopterus spp. (Miniopteridae); a second group infecting Pipistrellus cf. hesperidus (Vespertilionidae) embedded within the Litomosoides cluster, which is recognized herein for the first time from Madagascar; and a third group composed of lineages with no clear genetic relationship to both previously described filarial nematodes and found in M. griveaudi, Myotis goudoti, Neoromicia matroka (Vespertilionidae), Otomops madagascariensis (Molossidae), and Paratriaenops furculus (Hipposideridae). We further analyzed the infection rates and distribution pattern of Litomosa spp., which was the most diverse and prevalent filarial taxon in our sample. Filarial infection was disproportionally more common in males than females in Miniopterus spp., which might be explained by some aspect of roosting behavior of these cave-dwelling bats. We also found marked geographic structure in the three Litomosa clades, mainly linked to bioclimatic conditions rather than host-parasite associations. While this study demonstrates distinct patterns of filarial nematode infection in Malagasy bats and highlights potential drivers of associated geographic distributions, future work should focus on their alpha taxonomy and characterize arthropod vectors. PMID:26751792

  10. In vitro and in vivo efficacy of extracts of leaves of Eucalyptus globulus on ovine gastrointestinal nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanojiya, Dharmendra; Shanker, Daya; Sudan, Vikrant; Jaiswal, Amit Kumar; Parashar, Rahul

    2015-01-01

    The rapid development of anthelminthic resistance has limited the success of traditional control programmes in several countries, thereby forcing the researchers to search for alternatives. In vitro anthelmintic activities of crude aqueous and hydro-alcoholic extracts of the leaves of Eucalyptus globulus were investigated against the egg and larvae of naturally infected sheep. In the phytochemical analyses, tannins and flavonoids were the main metabolites identified in the extract. The aqueous extract of E. globulus was also investigated for in vivo anthelmintic activity in naturally infected sheep. The various blood parameters, coupled with effects on marker enzymes and antioxidant status, were evaluated during the trial period. Methanolic extract showed better ED50 (3.756 mg/ml) and ED99 (33.809 mg/ml) values in comparison with aqueous extract (ED50 = 1.502 and ED99 = 7.10 mg/ml) in the egg hatch assay. Inverse was true in larval development and larval paralysis tests. The aqueous extract's ED50 = 19.994 and ED99 = 108.931 mg/ml values in the larval development test and ED50 = 19.994 and ED99 = 108.931 mg/ml in the larval paralysis test were more potent than those of its methanolic counterpart with ED50 = 15.595 and ED99 = 94.493 mg/ml and ED50 = 15.595 and ED99 = 94.493 mg/ml, respectively. A significant amount of 66% faecal egg count reduction was observed in in vivo trail using the aqueous extract on day 21 post treatment, although in initial stages it showed 58.0 and 80% effectiveness on days 7 and 14 post treatment. Though the FCER reduction was somewhat lower in terms of comparison with albendazole, nevertheless, significant and prolong reduction was noticed. No deleterious ill effect was found in any of the haematological and biochemical parameters suggesting that the plant could be safer for use in sheep. Though significant changes were observed in SGPT, RBCs, Hb and RDWc levels, other parameters showed nonsignificant variations within the

  11. Efficacy of ivermectin against gastrointestinal nematodes of cattle in Denmark evaluated by different methods for analysis of faecal egg count reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Peña-Espinoza

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy of ivermectin (IVM against gastrointestinal nematodes in Danish cattle was assessed by faecal egg count reduction test (FECRT. Six cattle farms with history of clinical parasitism and avermectin use were included. On the day of treatment (Day 0, 20 naturally infected calves per farm (total n = 120 were stratified by initial faecal egg counts (FEC and randomly allocated to a treatment group dosed with 0.2 mg IVM kg−1 body weight s.c. (IVM; n = 10 or an untreated control group (CTL; n = 10. Individual FEC were obtained at Day 0 and Day 14 post-treatment and pooled faeces by group were cultured to isolate L3 for detection of Ostertagia ostertagi and Cooperia oncophora by qPCR. Treatment efficacies were analysed using the recommended WAAVP method and two open-source statistical procedures based on Bayesian modelling: ‘eggCounts’ and ‘Bayescount’. A simulation study evaluated the performance of the different procedures to correctly identify FEC reduction percentages of simulated bovine FEC data representing the observed real data. In the FECRT, reduced IVM efficacy was detected in three farms by all procedures using data from treated animals only, and in one farm according to the procedures including data from treated and untreated cattle. Post-treatment, O. ostertagi and C. oncophora L3 were detected by qPCR in faeces of treated animals from one and three herds with declared reduced IVM efficacy, respectively. Based on the simulation study, all methods showed a reduced performance when FEC aggregation increased post-treatment and suggested that a treatment group of 10 animals is insufficient for the FECRT in cattle. This is the first report of reduced anthelmintic efficacy in Danish cattle and warrants the implementation of larger surveys. Advantages and caveats regarding the use of Bayesian modelling and the relevance of including untreated cattle in the FECRT are discussed.

  12. Efficacy of ivermectin against gastrointestinal nematodes of cattle in Denmark evaluated by different methods for analysis of faecal egg count reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Espinoza, Miguel; Thamsborg, Stig M; Denwood, Matthew J; Drag, Markus; Hansen, Tina V; Jensen, Vibeke F; Enemark, Heidi L

    2016-12-01

    The efficacy of ivermectin (IVM) against gastrointestinal nematodes in Danish cattle was assessed by faecal egg count reduction test (FECRT). Six cattle farms with history of clinical parasitism and avermectin use were included. On the day of treatment (Day 0), 20 naturally infected calves per farm (total n = 120) were stratified by initial faecal egg counts (FEC) and randomly allocated to a treatment group dosed with 0.2 mg IVM kg -1 body weight s.c. (IVM; n = 10) or an untreated control group (CTL; n = 10). Individual FEC were obtained at Day 0 and Day 14 post-treatment and pooled faeces by group were cultured to isolate L3 for detection of Ostertagia ostertagi and Cooperia oncophora by qPCR. Treatment efficacies were analysed using the recommended WAAVP method and two open-source statistical procedures based on Bayesian modelling: 'eggCounts' and 'Bayescount'. A simulation study evaluated the performance of the different procedures to correctly identify FEC reduction percentages of simulated bovine FEC data representing the observed real data. In the FECRT, reduced IVM efficacy was detected in three farms by all procedures using data from treated animals only, and in one farm according to the procedures including data from treated and untreated cattle. Post-treatment, O. ostertagi and C. oncophora L3 were detected by qPCR in faeces of treated animals from one and three herds with declared reduced IVM efficacy, respectively. Based on the simulation study, all methods showed a reduced performance when FEC aggregation increased post-treatment and suggested that a treatment group of 10 animals is insufficient for the FECRT in cattle. This is the first report of reduced anthelmintic efficacy in Danish cattle and warrants the implementation of larger surveys. Advantages and caveats regarding the use of Bayesian modelling and the relevance of including untreated cattle in the FECRT are discussed. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All

  13. Child care is not a substantial risk factor for gastrointestinal infection hospitalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads; Andersen, Lise Geisler; Simonsen, Jacob

    2008-01-01

    The objective was to study the effect of age at first enrollment into child care and other child care-related factors on the risk for hospitalization from gastrointestinal infection.......The objective was to study the effect of age at first enrollment into child care and other child care-related factors on the risk for hospitalization from gastrointestinal infection....

  14. Predatory activity of Butlerius nematodes and nematophagous fungi against Haemonchus contortus infective larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoel Eduardo da Silva

    Full Text Available Abstract The purpose of this study was to evaluate the predatory activity of the nematode Butlerius spp. and fungal isolates of Duddingtonia flagrans, Clonostachys rosea, Arthrobotrys musiformis and Trichoderma esau against H. contortus infective larvae (L3 in grass pots. Forty-eight plastic gardening pots containing 140 g of sterile soil were used. Panicum spp. grass seeds (200 mg were sown into each pot and individually watered with 10 mL of tap water. Twelve days after seeding, the pots were randomly divided into 6 groups (n=8. Two thousand H. contortus infective larvae (L3 were added to each group. Additionally, the following treatments were established: Group 1 – 2000 Butlerius spp. larvae; group 2 – A. musiformis (1x107 conidia; group 3 – T. esau (1x107 conidia; group 4 – C. rosea (1x107 conidia, group 5 – D. flagrans (1x107conidia and Group 6 – no biological controller (control group. The larval population of H. contortus exposed to Butlerius spp. was reduced by 61.9%. Population reductions of 90.4, 66.7, 61.9 and 85.7% were recorded in the pots containing A. musiformis, T. esau, C. rosea and D. flagrans, respectively. The results of this study indicate that the predatory nematode Butlerius spp. and the assessed fungi display an important predatory activity can be considered suitable potential biological control agents.

  15. Field study on nematode resistance in Nelore-breed cattle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bricarello, P A; Zaros, L G; Coutinho, L L; Rocha, R A; Kooyman, F N J; De Vries, E; Gonçalves, J R S; Lima, L G; Pires, A V; Amarante, A F T

    2007-01-01

    The present study evaluated Nelore cattle with different degrees of resistance to natural infections by gastrointestinal nematodes. One hundred weaned male cattle, 11-12 months of age, were kept on the same pasture and evaluated from October 2003 to February 2004. Faecal and blood samples were

  16. Dynamics of gastropod infection by first-stage larvae of protostrongylid nematodes--a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezác, P; Kindlmann, P; Dostálková, I; Holasová, E

    1993-12-01

    For the description of the dynamics of snail infection by the 1st-stage larvae of protostrongylid nematodes, Skorping (1988) used the miracidia-snail model (Anderson, 1978). Here it is shown that, in contrast to miracidia, in protostrongylids the instantaneous rate of infection, alpha, is strongly dependent on the experimental design (factors like host size and size of the experimental arena). With respect to this, Anderson's model is modified by incorporation of the experimental design. The parameter alpha in its new sense as the rate of penetration (probability that the infective larva will penetrate into the host during a time unit) is shown to remain dependent, although much less so, on the experimental design. Only the inclusion of the assumed effect of mucus, which decreases the rate of penetration, yields a parameter alpha 0 (the initial rate of penetration), which is completely independent of the design of the experiment, is species-specific, and also gives the best fit to the empirical data. As the above-mentioned factors can strongly influence the value of the instantaneous rate of infection in the laboratory experiments, alpha 0 is more suitable as a measure of either the larval infectivity for the snail or snail susceptibility to infection by the protostrongylid larvae.

  17. Metagenomic insights into communities, functions of endophytes, and their associates with infection by root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita, in tomato roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Bao-Yu; Cao, Yi; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2015-11-25

    Endophytes are known to play important roles in plant's health and productivity. In this study, we investigated the root microbiome of tomato in association with infection by root knot nematodes. Our objectives were to observe the effects and response of the bacterial endophytes before nematode attacks and to reveal the functional attributes of microbes in plant health and nematode pathogenesis. Community analysis of root-associated microbiomes in healthy and nematode-infected tomatoes indicated that nematode infections were associated with variation and differentiation of the endophyte and rhizosphere bacterial populations in plant roots. The community of the resident endophytes in tomato root was significantly affected by nemato-pathogenesis. Remarkably, some bacterial groups in the nematode feeding structure, the root gall, were specifically enriched, suggesting an association with nematode pathogenesis. Function-based metagenomic analysis indicated that the enriched bacterial populations in root gall harbored abundant genes related to degradation of plant polysaccharides, carbohydrate and protein metabolism, and biological nitrogen fixation. Our data indicated that some of the previously assumed beneficial endophytes or bacterial associates with nematode might be involved in nematode infections of the tomato roots.

  18. Infective Juveniles of the Entomopathogenic Nematode, Steinernema feltiae Produce Cryoprotectants in Response to Freezing and Cold Acclimation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farman Ali

    Full Text Available Steinernema feltiae is a moderately freeze-tolerant entomopathogenic nematode which survives intracellular freezing. We have detected by gas chromatography that infective juveniles of S. feltiae produce cryoprotectants in response to cold acclimation and to freezing. Since the survival of this nematode varies with temperature, we analyzed their cryoprotectant profiles under different acclimation and freezing regimes. The principal cryoprotectants detected were trehalose and glycerol with glucose being the minor component. The amount of cryoprotectants varied with the temperature and duration of exposure. Trehalose was accumulated in higher concentrations when nematodes were acclimated at 5°C for two weeks whereas glycerol level decreased from that of the non-acclimated controls. Nematodes were seeded with a small ice crystal and held at -1°C, a regime that does not produce freezing of the nematodes but their bodies lose water to the surrounding ice (cryoprotective dehydration. This increased the levels of both trehalose and glycerol, with glycerol reaching a higher concentration than trehalose. Nematodes frozen at -3°C, a regime that produces freezing of the nematodes and results in intracellular ice formation, had elevated glycerol levels while trehalose levels did not change. Steinernema feltiae thus has two strategies of cryoprotectant accumulation: one is an acclimation response to low temperature when the body fluids are in a cooled or supercooled state and the infective juveniles produce trehalose before freezing. During this process a portion of the glycerol is converted to trehalose. The second strategy is a rapid response to freezing which induces the production of glycerol but trehalose levels do not change. These low molecular weight compounds are surmised to act as cryoprotectants for this species and to play an important role in its freezing tolerance.

  19. Evaluation of Eucalyptus citriodora essential oil on goat gastrointestinal nematodes Avaliação do óleo essencial de Eucalyptus citriodora sobre nematóides gastrintestinais de caprinos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iara Tersia Freitas Macedo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Phytotherapy may be an alternative strategy for controlling gastrointestinal parasites. This study evaluated the anthelmintic efficacy of Eucalyptus citriodora essential oil (EcEO. The in vitro effects of EcEO were determined through testing the inhibition of egg hatching and larval development of Haemonchus contortus. EcEO was subjected to acute toxicity testing on mice, orally and intraperitoneally. The in vivo effects of EcEO were determined by the fecal egg count reduction test (FECRT in goats infected with gastrointestinal nematodes. The results showed that 5.3 mg.mL-1 EcEO inhibited egg hatching by 98.8% and 10.6 mg.mL-1 EcEO inhibited H. contortus larval development by 99.71%. The lethal doses for 50% of the mice were 4153 and 622.8 mg.kg-1, for acute toxicity orally and intraperitoneally. In the FECRT, the efficacy of EcEO and ivermectin was 66.25 and 79.16% respectively, on goat gastrointestinal nematodes eight days after treatment. EcEO showed in vitro and in vivo anthelmintic activity.Fitoterapia pode ser uma estratégia alternativa para o controle de parasitas gastrintestinais. Este estudo avaliou a eficácia anti-helmintica do óleo essencial de Eucalyptus citriodora (OeEc. Os efeitos in vitro do OeEc foram determinados através do teste de eclosão de ovos e inibição do desenvolvimento larvar de Haemonchus contortus. O OeEc foi submetido ao teste de toxicidade aguda oral e intraperitoneal, em camundongos. Os efeitos in vivo do OeEc foram avaliados através do teste de redução da contagem de ovos nas fezes (FECRT com caprinos infectados com nematóides gastrintestinais. Os resultados mostraram que 5,3 mg.mL-1 OeEc inibiram 98,8% a eclosão de ovos e 10,6 mg.mL-1 OeEc inibiram 99,71% o desenvolvimento larvar de H. contortus. As doses letais para 50% dos camundongos foram de 4153 e 622,8 mg.kg-1 pela via oral e intraperitoneal. No FECRT, a eficácia de OeEc e ivermectina foi de 66,25 e 79,16%, respectivamente, em caprinos 8 dias

  20. Soybean cyst nematode culture collections and field populations from North Carolina and Missouri reveal high incidences of infection by viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruark, Casey L; Koenning, Stephen R; Davis, Eric L; Opperman, Charles H; Lommel, Steven A; Mitchum, Melissa G; Sit, Tim L

    2017-01-01

    Five viruses were previously discovered infecting soybean cyst nematodes (SCN; Heterodera glycines) from greenhouse cultures maintained in Illinois. In this study, the five viruses [ScNV, ScPV, ScRV, ScTV, and SbCNV-5] were detected within SCN greenhouse and field populations from North Carolina (NC) and Missouri (MO). The prevalence and titers of viruses in SCN from 43 greenhouse cultures and 25 field populations were analyzed using qRT-PCR. Viral titers within SCN greenhouse cultures were similar throughout juvenile development, and the presence of viral anti-genomic RNAs within egg, second-stage juvenile (J2), and pooled J3 and J4 stages suggests active viral replication within the nematode. Viruses were found at similar or lower levels within field populations of SCN compared with greenhouse cultures of North Carolina populations. Five greenhouse cultures harbored all five known viruses whereas in most populations a mixture of fewer viruses was detected. In contrast, three greenhouse cultures of similar descent to one another did not possess any detectable viruses and primarily differed in location of the cultures (NC versus MO). Several of these SCN viruses were also detected in Heterodera trifolii (clover cyst) and Heterodera schachtii (beet cyst), but not the other cyst, root-knot, or reniform nematode species tested. Viruses were not detected within soybean host plant tissue. If nematode infection with viruses is truly more common than first considered, the potential influence on nematode biology, pathogenicity, ecology, and control warrants continued investigation.

  1. Cloning and functional analyses of a gene from sugar beet up-regulated upon cyst nematode infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samuelian, S.; Kleine, M.; Spira, C.P.; Klein Lankhorst, R.M.; Jung, C.

    2004-01-01

    The cDNA-AFLP technique was used to isolate sugar beet genes up-regulated upon infection with the beet cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii. Hairy root cultures were obtained from resistant plants carrying a Beta procumbens translocation as well as from a non-resistant control. mRNA was isolated from

  2. The alkaloid compound harmane increases the lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans during bacterial infection, by modulating the nematode's innate immune response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Henrik; Bojer, Martin Saxtorph; Marinus, Martin G.

    2013-01-01

    pathway; however, intriguingly the lifespan extension resulting from Harmane was higher in p38 MAPK-deficient nematodes. This indicates that Harmane has a complex effect on the innate immune system of C. elegans. Harmane could therefore be a useful tool in the further research into C. elegans immunity....... Since the innate immunity of C. elegans has a high degree of evolutionary conservation, drugs such as Harmane could also be possible alternatives to classic antibiotics. The C. elegans model could prove to be useful for selection and development of such drugs.......The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has in recent years been proven to be a powerful in vivo model for testing antimicrobial compounds. We report here that the alkaloid compound Harmane (2-methyl-β-carboline) increases the lifespan of nematodes infected with a human pathogen, the Shiga toxin...

  3. Prevalence of nematode infection and faecal egg counts in free-range laying hens: relations to housing and husbandry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwin, C M; Nasr, M A F; Gale, E; Petek, M; Stafford, K; Turp, M; Coles, G C

    2013-01-01

    1. Faecal samples from 19 commercial, 65 week old free-range egg laying flocks were examined to assess the prevalence and number of parasitic nematode eggs. Data were collected to characterise the housing, husbandry, behaviour and welfare of the flocks to examine possible relationships with the egg counts. 2. Eggs of at least one genus of nematode were present in the faeces of all 19 flocks. Heterakis eggs were detected in 17 (89%) flocks, Ascaridia in 16 (84%), Trichostrongylus in 9 (47%), and Syngamus in 6 (32%). Faecal egg counts (FEC) were greatest for Ascaridia and Heterakis. 3. For each nematode genus, there was no significant difference in FEC between organic (N = 9) and non-organic (N = 10) flocks, or between static (N = 8) and mobile (N = 11) flocks. 4. FEC were correlated with a range of housing, husbandry and management practices which varied between the nematode genus and included depth of the litter, percentage of hens using the range, and number of dead hens. Statistical analysis indicated relationships with FEC that included light intensity above the feeder, indoor and outdoor stocking density, fearfulness in the shed and on the range, distance to the nearest shelter, and swollen toes. 5. None of the FEC for any of the genera was correlated with weekly egg production or cumulative mortality. 6. Although nematode FEC were highly prevalent among the flocks, the overall lack of relation to other welfare and production measures suggests that these infections were not severe.

  4. Effects of the nematode Gyrinicola batrachiensis on development, gut morphology, and fermentation in bullfrog tadpoles (Rana catesbeiana): a novel mutualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryor, Gregory S; Bjorndal, Karen A

    2005-08-01

    We describe a novel mutualism between bullfrog tadpoles (Rana catesbeiana) and a tadpole-specific gastrointestinal nematode (Gyrinicola batrachiensis). Groups of tadpoles were inoculated with viable or nonviable nematode eggs, and development, morphology, and gut fermentation activity were compared between nematode-infected and uninfected tadpoles. Nematode infection accelerated tadpole development; the mean time to metamorphosis was 16 d shorter and the range of times to metamorphosis was narrower in nematode-infected tadpoles than in uninfected tadpoles. At metamorphosis, infected and uninfected bullfrogs did not differ in body size or condition. Colon width, wet mass of colon contents, and concentrations of most fermentation byproducts (short-chain fatty acids: SCFAs) in the hindgut were greater in infected tadpoles. Furthermore, in vitro fermentation yields for all SCFAs combined were over twice as high in infected tadpoles than in uninfected tadpoles. One explanation for accelerated development in infected tadpoles is the altered hindgut fermentation associated with the nematodes. Energetic contributions of fermentation were estimated to be 20% and 9% of the total daily energy requirement for infected and uninfected tadpoles, respectively. Infection by G. batrachiensis nematodes potentially confers major ecological and evolutionary advantages to R. catesbeiana tadpoles. The mutualism between these species broadens our understanding of the taxonomic diversity and physiological contributions of fermentative gut symbionts and suggests that nematodes inhabiting the gut regions of other ectothermic herbivores might have beneficial effects in those hosts. Copyright (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Susceptibility to rifaximin and other antimicrobial agents of bacteria isolated from acute gastrointestinal infections in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Novoa-Farías

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Resistance of enteropathogenic bacteria to various antibiotics used in gastrointestinal infections is high. Rifaximin was active against 99-100% of these enteropathogens at reachable concentrations in the intestine with the recommended dose.

  6. Soil-transmitted nematode infections and mebendazole treatment in Mafia Island schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albonico, M; Ramsan, M; Wright, V; Jape, K; Haji, H J; Taylor, M; Savioli, L; Bickle, Q

    2002-10-01

    In August 2000, a cross-sectional study was performed to assess the prevalence and intensity of soil-transmitted nematode infections in schoolchildren on Mafia Island. Hookworm infection was widespread (72.5% prevalence) whereas Trichuris trichiura was less prevalent (39.7%) and Ascaris lumbricoides was present at a low prevalence (4.2%), mainly in urban areas. In a subsample of the study population, both Necator americanus and Ancylostoma duodenale were found, although N. americanus was more prevalent. This survey was followed by a parasitological evaluation of mebendazole treatment using a single, 500-mg dose. The data on outcome were used for comparison with those from recent studies of similar treatment regimens in the neighbouring island of Pemba, Zanzibar, where periodic chemotherapy with mebendazole to schoolchildren has been implemented as part of a helminth-control programme since 1994. A higher efficacy of mebendazole against hookworm infection was found in Mafia Island (where a cure 'rate' of 31.3% and an egg-reduction 'rate' of 78.1% were recorded) when compared with that observed in Pemba Island, possibly indicating that hookworms may be developing mebendazole resistance on Pemba Island as a result of intense exposure to the drug there.

  7. Epidemiology and geographical distribution of gastrointestinal parasitic infection in humans in Slovakia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dudlová A.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Examinations of the set of 2,760 samples of human stools revealed the current epidemiological situation in the occurrence of gastrointestinal parasitoses in Slovakia. Prevalence of gastrointestinal parasitic infection was P = 6.81 % out of which the protozoan infections was P = 2.64 % and helminthiases P = 4.17 %, in the representation of endoparasitic species Entamoeba coli, Giardia intestinalis, Blastocystis hominis, Endolimax nana, Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura and Enterobius vermicularis.

  8. Characterization of resistance to pine wood nematode infection in Pinus thunbergii using suppression subtractive hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Pine wilt disease is caused by the pine wood nematode, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, which threatens pine forests and forest ecosystems worldwide and causes serious economic losses. In the 40 years since the pathogen was identified, the physiological changes occurring as the disease progresses have been characterized using anatomical and biochemical methods, and resistant trees have been selected via breeding programs. However, no studies have assessed the molecular genetics, e.g. transcriptional changes, associated with infection-induced physiological changes in resistant or susceptible trees. Results We constructed seven subtractive suppression hybridization (SSH) cDNA libraries using time-course sampling of trees inoculated with pine wood nematode at 1, 3, or 7 days post-inoculation (dpi) in susceptible trees and at 1, 3, 7, or 14 dpi in resistant trees. A total of 3,299 sequences was obtained from these cDNA libraries, including from 138 to 315 non-redundant sequences in susceptible SSH libraries and from 351 to 435 in resistant SSH libraries. Using Gene Ontology hierarchy, those non-redundant sequences were classified into 15 subcategories of the biological process Gene Ontology category and 17 subcategories of the molecular function category. The transcriptional components revealed by the Gene Ontology classification clearly differed between resistant and susceptible libraries. Some transcripts were discriminative: expression of antimicrobial peptide and putative pathogenesis-related genes (e.g., PR-1b, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6) was much higher in susceptible trees than in resistant trees at every time point, whereas expression of PR-9, PR-10, and cell wall-related genes (e.g., for hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein precursor and extensin) was higher in resistant trees than in susceptible trees at 7 and 14 dpi. Conclusions Following inoculation with pine wood nematode, there were marked differences between resistant and susceptible trees in transcript diversity

  9. The influence of reproductive physiology and nutrient supply on the periparturient relaxation of immunity to the gastrointestinal nematode Trichostrongylus colubriformis in Merino ewes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasley, A M; Kahn, L P; Windon, R G

    2012-09-10

    A pen experiment was conducted to investigate the interaction of early-weaning and nutrient supply on the periparturient relaxation of immunity to the gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) Trichostrongylus colubriformis in Merino ewes. Mixed-age pregnant and non-pregnant (dry) ewes were infected with 8,000 T. colubriformis L(3)/week, and fed either a high or low quality diet. Following parturition, lambs were either removed from their mothers at 2 days of age or allowed to continue suckling. Systemic immunity began to wane during late pregnancy with circulating eosinophils and plasma total antibody (Ab) levels declining from day -37 (relative to the midpoint of lambing) and day -24, respectively. Pregnant ewes fed the low quality diet exhibited an increasing faecal worm egg count (WEC) from day -24 and had higher intestinal worm burdens on day 13, whereas ewes fed the high quality diet had a delayed transient rise in WEC of lower magnitude. Dry and early-weaned ewes remained highly resistant to T. colubriformis at all times. In the post-lambing/lactation period, ewes fed the high quality diet had higher levels of local total Ab and numbers of goblet cells (GC) in the small intestine on days 13 and 41. Lactating/suckled ewes had a lower anti-parasite local immune response as indicated by reduced titres of total Ab, IgG(1), IgM and IgA and lower numbers of mucosal mast cells (MMC), globule leukocytes (GL) and GC in small intestinal tissue compared to their dry and early-weaned counterparts. Early-weaning resulted in rapid recovery of blood eosinophils and total Ab. On day 13 post-lambing, titres of total Ab, IgG(1), IgM, IgA and IgE, and numbers of MMC and GL were greater than those measured in dry and suckled ewes. When fed the high quality diet, ewes had a higher dry matter (DM) intake, maternal weight, fat score, greater fat depth and eye muscle depth, birthed heavier lambs that had higher growth rates, and produced more milk. The physiological status of pregnancy

  10. An Abattoir Survey on Gastrointestinal Nematodes in Sheep and Goats in Hemex-Export Abattoir, Debre Ziet, Central Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonfa Shankute

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The current study was carried out from November 2011 to March 2012 with the objective of determining the prevalence, species and worm burden of abomasal nematodes of sheep and goats slaughtered at Helmex export abattoir in Debre Zeit, central Ethiopia. A total of 199 sheep and 185 goats’ abomasums were subsequently collected and examined for adult parasites. Of these, 333 (86.7% were positive for one or more abomasal nematodes. The overall prevalence was 86.9 and 86.5% in sheep and goats, respectively. The recovered species were identified as Haemonchus contortus, Trichostrongylus axei and Teladorsagia species in both animals. Statistically significant difference (P > 0.05 was not found between hosts and ages in prevalence of these parasites. However, statistically significant difference (P < 0.05 was noticed between the level of prevalence and different body conditioned animals. The highest prevalence was in poor body condition (94.4%. The mean worm burden was 497.3 and 472.4 21 for sheep and goats, respectively. The current study epitomized that the prevalence of nematodiasis were high and consequently; sustainable control programs should warrant.

  11. Prevalence of liver fluke infections and other gastrointestinal tract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Educating the Fulani herdsmen on better field management, drug administration, and subsidizing the supply of better anthelminthic drugs will lead to improved cattle production and animal proteins. Keywords: Liverflukes, Gastrointestinal parasites, Slaughter house, cattle, Prevalence, Intensity, Douala, Cameroon ...

  12. Atividade ovicida de dois fármacos em caprinos naturalmente parasitados por nematódeos gastrintestinais, RS, Brasil Ovicidal activity of two medicaments against goat gastrointestinal nematode in RS, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Jane Tweedie de Mattos

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available A eficácia comparativa entre levamisole em duas doses diferentes e closantel foi avaliada sobre ovos de nematódeos gastrintestinais de caprinos naturalmente parasitados. Observou-se que a redução de ovos de nematódeos gastrintestinais foi de 93,23%, 91,25% e 70,42% nos grupos medicados com levamisole 8mg/kg, levamisole 11mg/kg e closantel 10mg/kg, respectivamente. O teste de desenvolvimento embrionário revelou que levamisole, nas duas doses, foi eficaz sobre Haemonchus spp., Ostertagia spp., Cooperia spp. e Oesophagostomum spp. O closantel não foi eficaz para Cooperia spp e Oesophagostomum spp.The efficacy of the anthelmintics levamisole in two different doses (8mg/kg and 11mg/kg and closantel (10mg/kg were compared against gastrointestinal nematodes in naturally infected goats. The reduction on the faecal egg count was 93.23% in the group treated with levamisole at the dose of 8mg/kg, 91.25% in the group treated with the dose of 11mg/kg and 70.42% in the group treated with closantel. The anthelmintic levamisole was effective against Haemonchus spp., Ostertagia spp., Cooperia spp and Oesophagostomum spp. However, closantel wasn't effective against Cooperia spp and Oesophagostomum spp.

  13. Evaluation of an FDA approved library against laboratory models of human intestinal nematode infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiser, Jennifer; Panic, Gordana; Adelfio, Roberto; Cowan, Noemi; Vargas, Mireille; Scandale, Ivan

    2016-07-01

    Treatment options for infections with soil-transmitted helminths (STH) - Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura and the two hookworm species, Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus - are limited despite their considerable global health burden. The aim of the present study was to test the activity of an openly available FDA library against laboratory models of human intestinal nematode infections. All 1,600 drugs were first screened against Ancylostoma ceylanicum third-stage larvae (L3). Active compounds were scrutinized and toxic compounds, drugs indicated solely for topical use, and already well-studied anthelmintics were excluded. The remaining hit compounds were tested in parallel against Trichuris muris first-stage larvae (L1), Heligmosomoides polygyrus third-stage larvae (L3), and adult stages of the three species in vitro. In vivo studies were performed in the H. polygyrus and T. muris mice models. Fifty-four of the 1,600 compounds tested revealed an activity of > 60 % against A. ceylanicum L3 (hit rate of 3.4 %), following incubation at 200 μM for 72 h. Twelve compounds progressed into further screens. Adult A. ceylanicum were the least affected (1/12 compounds active at 50 μM), while eight of the 12 test compounds revealed activity against T. muris L1 (100 μM) and adults (50 μM), and H. polygyrus L3 (200 μM). Trichlorfon was the only compound active against all stages of A. ceylanicum, H. polygyrus and T. muris. In addition, trichlorfon achieved high worm burden reductions of 80.1 and 98.9 %, following a single oral dose of 200 mg/kg in the T. muris and H. polygyrus mouse model, respectively. Drug screening on the larval stages of intestinal parasitic nematodes is feasible using small libraries and important given the empty drug discovery and development pipeline for STH infections. Differences and commonalities in drug activities across the different STH species and stages were confirmed. Hits identified might serve as a

  14. Advancing a multivalent ‘Pan-anthelmintic’ vaccine against soil-transmitted nematode infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Bin; Beaumier, Coreen M; Briggs, Neima; Jones, Kathryn M; Keegan, Brian P; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Hotez, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    Ascaris lumbricoides The Sabin Vaccine Institute Product Development Partnership is developing a Pan-anthelmintic vaccine that simultaneously targets the major soil-transmitted nematode infections, in other words, ascariasis, trichuriasis and hookworm infection. The approach builds off the current bivalent Human Hookworm Vaccine now in clinical development and would ultimately add both a larval Ascaris lumbricoides antigen and an adult-stage Trichuris trichiura antigen from the parasite stichosome. Each selected antigen would partially reproduce the protective immunity afforded by UV-attenuated Ascaris eggs and Trichuris stichosome extracts, respectively. Final antigen selection will apply a ranking system that includes the evaluation of expression yields and solubility, feasibility of process development and the absence of circulating antigen-specific IgE among populations living in helminth-endemic regions. Here we describe a five year roadmap for the antigen discovery, feasibility and antigen selection, which will ultimately lead to the scale-up expression, process development, manufacture, good laboratory practices toxicology and preclinical evaluation, ultimately leading to Phase 1 clinical testing. PMID:24392641

  15. Performance and Parasitology of Semi-intensively Managed West African Dwarf Sheep Exposed to Gastrointestinal Helminth Infect-ed Paddocks and Varied Protein-energy Feeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adekayode Olarinwaju SONIBARE

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The performance and parasitology of semi-intensively managed West African dwarf (WAD lambs were evaluated following exposure to gastrointestinal helminth infected paddock and varied protein-energy feeds.Methods: Twenty four lambs obtained from the Department of Animal Breeding and Genetics and brought to Directorate of University farm (DUFARM of Federal University of Agriculture Abeokuta, Ogun state, Nigeria, where the research was carried out in 2014, were grouped into four each containing six animals based on different energy-protein feed combination thus; group 1(G1 low energy low protein, group 2 (G2 low energy high protein, group 3 (G3 high energy low protein and group 4 (G4 high energy high protein. Experimental animals were supplemented with concentrate feed after grazing on daily in a nematode infected paddock. Clinical signs of infection were monitored. Live weight, faecal egg count (FEC, worm counts, packed cell volume (PCV, haemoglobin concentration (Hb and red blood cell count (RBC were determined using standard methods.Results: Anorexia and intermittent diarrhea were the observed signs. Worm counts did not differ significantly (P=0.309 among the groups. The weight and FEC differed significantly (P˂0.05 across the days and among the groups, while haematological parameters increased significantly (P˂0.05 across the days and among the groups.Conclusion: Lambs in G2 followed by G4 showed improved parameters and superior performance when compared to the other groups. It is therefore recommended that feed high in protein content is capable of mitigating deleterious effect of gastrointestinal helminth parasitism.

  16. Soybean cyst nematode culture collections and field populations from North Carolina and Missouri reveal high incidences of infection by viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casey L Ruark

    Full Text Available Five viruses were previously discovered infecting soybean cyst nematodes (SCN; Heterodera glycines from greenhouse cultures maintained in Illinois. In this study, the five viruses [ScNV, ScPV, ScRV, ScTV, and SbCNV-5] were detected within SCN greenhouse and field populations from North Carolina (NC and Missouri (MO. The prevalence and titers of viruses in SCN from 43 greenhouse cultures and 25 field populations were analyzed using qRT-PCR. Viral titers within SCN greenhouse cultures were similar throughout juvenile development, and the presence of viral anti-genomic RNAs within egg, second-stage juvenile (J2, and pooled J3 and J4 stages suggests active viral replication within the nematode. Viruses were found at similar or lower levels within field populations of SCN compared with greenhouse cultures of North Carolina populations. Five greenhouse cultures harbored all five known viruses whereas in most populations a mixture of fewer viruses was detected. In contrast, three greenhouse cultures of similar descent to one another did not possess any detectable viruses and primarily differed in location of the cultures (NC versus MO. Several of these SCN viruses were also detected in Heterodera trifolii (clover cyst and Heterodera schachtii (beet cyst, but not the other cyst, root-knot, or reniform nematode species tested. Viruses were not detected within soybean host plant tissue. If nematode infection with viruses is truly more common than first considered, the potential influence on nematode biology, pathogenicity, ecology, and control warrants continued investigation.

  17. Coccidian and nematode infections influence prevalence of antibody to myxoma and rabbit hemorrhagic disease viruses in European rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertó-Moran, Alejandro; Pacios, Isabel; Serrano, Emmanuel; Moreno, Sacramento; Rouco, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    The interaction among several parasites in European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) is crucial to host fitness and to the epidemiology of myxomatosis and rabbit hemorrhagic disease. These diseases have caused significant reductions in rabbit populations on the Iberian Peninsula. Most studies have focused on the epidemiology and pathogenesis of these viruses individually, and little is known about interactions between these viruses and other parasites. Taking advantage of an experimental restocking program in Spain, the effects of coccidian and nematode infections on the probability of having detectable antibody to myxoma and rabbit hemorrhagic disease viruses were tested in European wild rabbits. For 14 mo, we monitored rabbit abundance and parasite loads (coccidia and nematodes) in three reintroduced rabbit populations. While coccidian and nematode loads explained seasonal antibody prevalences to myxoma virus, the pattern was less clear for rabbit hemorrhagic disease. Contrary to expectations, prevalence of antibody to myxoma virus was inversely proportional to coccidian load, while nematode load seemed to play a minor role. These results have implications for viral disease epidemiology and for disease management intended to increase rabbit populations in areas where they are important for ecosystem conservation.

  18. The transcriptomic changes of Huipizhi Heidou (Glycine max), a nematode-resistant black soybean during Heterodera glycines race 3 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuang; Chen, Yu; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Wang, Yuanyuan; Jung, Ki-Hong; Chen, Lijie; Xuan, Yuanhu; Duan, Yuxi

    2018-01-01

    Glycine max (soybean) is an extremely important crop, representing a major source of oil and protein for human beings. Heterodera glycines (soybean cyst nematode, SCN) infection severely reduces soybean production; therefore, protecting soybean from SCN has become an issue for breeders. Black soybean has exhibited a different grade of resistance to SCN. However, the underlying mechanism of Huipizhi Heidou resistance against SCN remains elusive. The Huipizhi Heidou (ZDD2315) and race 3 of Heterodera glycines were chosen to study the mechanism of resistance via examination of transcriptomic changes. After 5, 10, and 15days of SCN infection, whole roots were sampled for RNA extraction, and uninfected samples were simultaneously collected as a control. 740, 1413, and 4925 genes were isolated by padj (p-value adjusted)<0.05 after 5, 10, and 15days of the infection, respectively, and 225 differentially expressed genes were overlapped at all the time points. We found that the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) at 5, 10, and 15days after infection were involved in various biological function categories; in particular, induced genes were enriched in defense response, hormone mediated signaling process, and response to stress. To verify the pathways observed in the GO and KEGG enrichment results, effects of hormonal signaling in cyst-nematode infection were further examined via treatment with IAA (indo-3-acetic acid), salicylic acid (SA), gibberellic acid (GA), jasmonic acid (JA), and ethephon, a precursor of ethylene. The results indicate that five hormones led to a significant reduction of J2 number in the roots of Huipizhi Heidou and Liaodou15, representing SCN-resistant and susceptible lines, respectively. Taken together, our analyses are aimed at understanding the resistance mechanism of Huipizhi Heidou against the SCN race 3 via the dissection of transcriptomic changes upon J2 infection. The data presented here will help further research on the basis of soybean and

  19. Gastrointestinal helminths of the domestic pigeons ( Columba livia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gastrointestinal helminths of the domestic pigeons ( Columba livia domestica gmelin, 1789 aves:columbidae) in Zaria, northern Nigeria. ... Ascaridia columbae which was the most prevalent nematode was recovered in 9 out of the 12 months of the year. Single infection was more common (37.5%) than double 24 (10%) and ...

  20. Transcriptome analysis of root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita)-infected tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) roots reveals complex gene expression profiles and metabolic networks of both host and nematode during susceptible and resistance responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shukla, Neha; Yadav, Rachita; Kaur, Pritam

    2017-01-01

    Root knot nematodes (RKNs, Meloidogyne incognita) are economically important endoparasites having a wide-host range. We have taken a comprehensive transcriptomic approach to investigate the expression of both tomato and RKN genes in tomato roots at five infection time intervals from susceptible p...

  1. Haemonchus contortus and Trichostrongylus colubriformis did not adapt to long-term exposure to sheep that were genetically resistant or susceptible to nematode infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, K E; Elwin, R L; Bishop, S C; Goddard, M E; Woolaston, R R

    2009-04-01

    We tested the hypothesis that Haemonchus contortus and Trichostrongylus colubriformis would adapt to long-term exposure to sheep that were either genetically resistant or susceptible to H. contortus. Sheep genotypes were from lines with 10 years prior selection for low (resistant, R) or high (susceptible, S) faecal worm egg count (WEC) following H. contortus infection. Long-term exposure of H. contortus and T.colubriformis to R or S genotypes was achieved using serial passage for up to 30 nematode generations. Thus, we generated four nematode strains; one strain of each species solely exposed to R sheep and one strain of each species solely exposed to S sheep. Considerable host genotype differences in mean WEC during serial passage confirmed adequate nematode selection pressure for both H. contortus (R 4900 eggs per gram (epg), S 19,900 epg) and T. colubriformis (R 5300 epg, S 13,500 epg). Adaptation of nematode strain to host genotype was tested using seven cross-classified tests for H. contortus, and two cross-classified and one outbred genotype test for T. colubriformis. In the cross-classified design, where each strain infects groups of R, S or randomly bred control sheep, parasite adaptation would be indicated by a significant host genotype by nematode strain interaction for traits indicating parasite reproductive success; specifically WEC and, for H. contortus strains, packed cell volume. We found no significant evidence of parasite adaptation to host genotype (P>0.05) for either the H. contortus or T. colubriformis strains. Therefore, we argue that nematodes will not adapt quickly to sheep bred for nematode resistance, where selection is based on low WEC, although selecting sheep using a subset of immune functions may increase adaptation risk. Our results support the hypothesis that nematode resistance is determined by many genes each with relatively small effect. In conclusion, selection of sheep for nematode resistance using WEC should be sustainable in

  2. Effect of Entomopathogenic Nematodes (Rhabditida: Steinernematidae and Heterorhabditidae) on Meloidogyne mayaguensis Rammah and Hirschmann (Tylenchida: Meloidoginidae) Infection in Tomato Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, J. P.; Dolinski, C.; Souza, R. M.; Lewis, E. E.

    2007-01-01

    Some studies suggest that entomopathogenic nematodes (EPN) affect plant-parasitic nematode populations. Here, the effects of live and dead IJ of Heterorhabditis bacteriophora JPM4, H. baujardi LPP7, Steinernema feltiae SN and S. carpocapsae All were evaluated against eggs and J2 of the plant-parasitic nematode Meloidogyne mayaguensis. According to treatment, 100 IJ were applied with 350 eggs, 350 J2 or 175 eggs + 175 J2 to tomato plants. Bioassays were conducted in March to May and repeated in September to November 2005. Both experiments lasted 9 weeks, and the variable evaluated was number of galls per plant. When eggs were used for infections in the first trial, plants exhibited lower gall number compared to control when live and dead H. baujardi IJ and live S. feltiae IJ were added (9.7, 4.5, 7.3 and 85.7 galls, respectively). In the second trial, live S. feltiae and S. carpocapasae IJ influenced gall formation compared to control (14.33, 14.57 and 168.02 galls, respectively). When J2 were used for infections, plants with live H. baujardi IJ presented less galls when compared to control in both trials (38.3 and 355.7 galls in the first trial and 145.2 and 326.2 in the second one, respectively). Infection with a mixture of J2 and eggs resulted in fewer galls than when live S. feltiae IJ were present in both trials, compared to control (38.3 and 44.2 galls vs. 275.3 and 192.2 galls, respectively). We conclude that H. baujardi and S. feltiae apparently may be inhibiting egg hatching and J2 infection. PMID:19259509

  3. Analysis of the Transcriptome of the Infective Stage of the Beet Cyst Nematode, H. schachtii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Fosu-Nyarko

    Full Text Available The beet cyst nematode, Heterodera schachtii, is a major root pest that significantly impacts the yield of sugar beet, brassicas and related species. There has been limited molecular characterisation of this important plant pathogen: to identify target genes for its control the transcriptome of the pre-parasitic J2 stage of H. schachtii was sequenced using Roche GS FLX. Ninety seven percent of reads (i.e., 387,668 with an average PHRED score > 22 were assembled with CAP3 and CLC Genomics Workbench into 37,345 and 47,263 contigs, respectively. The transcripts were annotated by comparing with gene and genomic sequences of other nematodes and annotated proteins on public databases. The annotated transcripts were much more similar to sequences of Heterodera glycines than to those of Globodera pallida and root knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.. Analysis of these transcripts showed that a subset of 2,918 transcripts was common to free-living and plant parasitic nematodes suggesting that this subset is involved in general nematode metabolism and development. A set of 148 contigs and 183 singletons encoding putative homologues of effectors previously characterised for plant parasitic nematodes were also identified: these are known to be important for parasitism of host plants during migration through tissues or feeding from cells or are thought to be involved in evasion or modulation of host defences. In addition, the presence of sequences from a nematode virus is suggested. The sequencing and annotation of this transcriptome significantly adds to the genetic data available for H. schachtii, and identifies genes primed to undertake required roles in the critical pre-parasitic and early post-parasitic J2 stages. These data provide new information for identifying potential gene targets for future protection of susceptible crops against H. schachtii.

  4. Analysis of the Transcriptome of the Infective Stage of the Beet Cyst Nematode, H. schachtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fosu-Nyarko, John; Nicol, Paul; Naz, Fareeha; Gill, Reetinder; Jones, Michael G K

    2016-01-01

    The beet cyst nematode, Heterodera schachtii, is a major root pest that significantly impacts the yield of sugar beet, brassicas and related species. There has been limited molecular characterisation of this important plant pathogen: to identify target genes for its control the transcriptome of the pre-parasitic J2 stage of H. schachtii was sequenced using Roche GS FLX. Ninety seven percent of reads (i.e., 387,668) with an average PHRED score > 22 were assembled with CAP3 and CLC Genomics Workbench into 37,345 and 47,263 contigs, respectively. The transcripts were annotated by comparing with gene and genomic sequences of other nematodes and annotated proteins on public databases. The annotated transcripts were much more similar to sequences of Heterodera glycines than to those of Globodera pallida and root knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.). Analysis of these transcripts showed that a subset of 2,918 transcripts was common to free-living and plant parasitic nematodes suggesting that this subset is involved in general nematode metabolism and development. A set of 148 contigs and 183 singletons encoding putative homologues of effectors previously characterised for plant parasitic nematodes were also identified: these are known to be important for parasitism of host plants during migration through tissues or feeding from cells or are thought to be involved in evasion or modulation of host defences. In addition, the presence of sequences from a nematode virus is suggested. The sequencing and annotation of this transcriptome significantly adds to the genetic data available for H. schachtii, and identifies genes primed to undertake required roles in the critical pre-parasitic and early post-parasitic J2 stages. These data provide new information for identifying potential gene targets for future protection of susceptible crops against H. schachtii.

  5. Biotherapy for and protection against gastrointestinal pathogenic infections via action of probiotic bacteria

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    Mongkol Thirabunyanon

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The microbiota in the human intestine play an important function in human health and disease. Gastrointestinal infections by foodborne pathogens are a main cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Such infections can be caused by contaminated foods or other sources which come in contact with human intestinal epithelial cells. In recent years, probiotics have been recommended as alternative biotherapeutic agents against intestinal pathogenic infections. Two genera of probiotics, Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, are commercially valuable applications, several forms of which are available as capsules or in functional food products such as yogurt, fermented juices and sausages. Probiotics protect against gastrointestinal pathogenic infection via several mechanisms. These include production of antimicrobial substances, competition for nutrient substrates, competitive exclusion, enhancement of intestinal barrier function, and immunomodulation. Probiotic bacteria have been documented as being effective in biotherapeutic applications against gastrointestinal pathogens, e.g. Helicobacter pylori, Salmonella, Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, and rotaviruses. This alternative therapeutic application of probiotics to protect against gastrointestinal pathogenic infections may be of great importance for future medicinal use.

  6. Summary of Guidelines for Infection Prevention and Control for Flexible Gastrointestinal Endoscopy

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    Lawrence Hookey

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: High-quality processes to ensure infection prevention and control in the delivery of safe endoscopy services are essential. In 2010, the Public Health Agency of Canada and the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology (CAG developed a Canadian guideline for the reprocessing of flexible gastrointestinal endoscopy equipment.

  7. Helicobacter pylori infection and gastrointestinal symptoms on Chilean pregnant women

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    Gina Ferrer Poveda

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: the aim of this research was to determine the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection on Chilean pregnant women and its relationship with the appearance and severity of hyperemesis and dyspepsia. Methods: quantitative study of prevalence in a transversal cut with variable analysis. The sample was taken from 274 Chilean pregnant women from the Bío Bío province through vein puncture between June and December, 2005. Pregnant women were informed of this study, interviewed and signed an informed consent. The samples were processed using ImmunoComb II Helicobacter pylori IgG kit. Statistical analysis was performed by means of the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS Program. Results: out of the total number of pregnant women, 68.6% showed infection by Helicobacter pylori. 79.6% of the total sample had symptoms of dyspepsia, and 72.5% of this group presented Helicobacter pylori infection. 12.4% showed pregnancy hyperemesis; among them, 79.4% were infected with Helicobacter pylori. 73.4% of the pregnant women that showed gastric discomfort during the first three months had Helicobacter pylori infection. 53.7% of them continued with gastric discomfort after the first three months; of those, 95.8% were infected. Helicobacter pylori infection was present only in 1.5% of pregnant women without gastric discomfort. Conclusion: both, gastric discomfort of pregnant women and the continuity of severe symptoms of dyspepsia and hyperemesis after the first three months of gestation are significantly correlated with Helicobacter pylori infection.

  8. Risk factors for gastrointestinal parasite infections of dogs living around protected areas of the Atlantic Forest: implications for human and wildlife health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curi, N H A; Paschoal, A M O; Massara, R L; Santos, H A; Guimarães, M P; Passamani, M; Chiarello, A G

    2017-01-01

    Despite the ubiquity of domestic dogs, their role as zoonotic reservoirs and the large number of studies concerning parasites in urban dogs, rural areas in Brazil, especially those at the wildlife-domestic animal-human interface, have received little attention from scientists and public health managers. This paper reports a cross-sectional epidemiological survey of gastrointestinal parasites of rural dogs living in farms around Atlantic Forest fragments. Through standard parasitological methods (flotation and sedimentation), 13 parasite taxa (11 helminths and two protozoans) were found in feces samples from dogs. The most prevalent were the nematode Ancylostoma (47%) followed by Toxocara (18%) and Trichuris (8%). Other less prevalent (dogs younger than one year were more likely to be infected with Toxocara, and purebred dogs with Trichuris. The number of cats in the households was positively associated with Trichuris infection, while male dogs and low body scores were associated with mixed infections. The lack of associations with dog free-ranging behavior and access to forest or villages indicates that infections are mostly acquired around the households. The results highlight the risk of zoonotic and wildlife parasite infections from dogs and the need for monitoring and controlling parasites of domestic animals in human-wildlife interface areas.

  9. High Prevalence of Covert Infection With Gastrointestinal Helminths in Cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Susan; Adolph, Chris; Downie, Kathryn; Snider, Tim; Reichard, Mason

    2015-01-01

    Fecal flotation is routinely used to identify feline helminth infections in clinical practice, but it is known to have limitations of sensitivity, particularly for cestodes. To determine the prevalence of helminths in a contemporary population of cats and evaluate the ability of fecal flotation to detect these infections, helminths were recovered from intestinal tracts removed from 116 adult cats humanely euthanized by an animal control shelter in northeastern Oklahoma. Results were compared to those of fecal flotation performed using both passive and centrifugal techniques. Helminths were identified in 78/116 (67.2%) cats, including Toxocara cati (48/116; 41.4%), Ancylostoma tubaeforme (8/116; 6.9%), Dipylidium caninum (40/116; 34.5%), and Taenia taeniaeformis (30/116; 25.9%). Cats with T. cati were significantly more likely to harbor T. taeniaeformis (P = .001) than cats without ascarids. Centrifugal fecal flotation with sugar solution identified 37/48 (77.1%) T. cati infections, 8/30 (26.7%) T. taeniaeformis infections, and no D. caninum infections. Proglottids were detected on external examination in 19.0% (12/63) of cats with cestodes. Cestodes were present in over half of the cats examined in this study, but the majority of these infections were not evident by the detection of external proglottids or recovery of characteristic stages on fecal flotation.

  10. Cytological changes of Easter lily (Lilium longiflorum) upon root lesion nematode (Pratylenchus penetrans) infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilium longiflorum cv. Nellie White, commonly known as Easter lily, is an important floral crop with an annual wholesale value of over $26 million in the U.S. The root lesion nematode (RLN), Pratylenchus penetrans, is a major pest of lily due to the significant root damage it causes. In this study w...

  11. The Risk of Chronic Gastrointestinal Disorders Following Acute Infection with Intestinal Parasites

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    Jason Blitz

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infectious gastroenteritis (IGE is caused by numerous bacterial, viral, and parasitic pathogens. A history of IGE has been shown in previous studies to increase the risk of developing chronic gastrointestinal disorders and other chronic conditions. As bacteria and viruses represent the majority of pathogen-specific causes of IGE, post-infectious studies have primarily focused on these organisms. The objective of this study was to investigate an association between a history of parasite-associated IGE and the subsequent development of chronic post-infectious gastrointestinal and non-gastrointestinal disorders in a military population.Methods: International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM diagnostic coding data for primary exposures and outcomes were obtained for a retrospective cohort study of active component military personnel from 1998 to 2013. Exposed subjects consisted of individuals with documented infection with one of ten parasitic pathogens. Unexposed subjects were matched to exposed subjects on demographic and operational deployment history parameters. Adjusted odds ratios (aORs were estimated using logistic regression for several chronic disorders previously shown to be associated with a history of IGE.Results: A total of 896 subjects with a parasitic exposure were matched to 3681 unexposed subjects for multivariate regression analysis. Individuals infected with Balantidium coli, Ascaris lumbricoides, Strongyloides stercoralis, Necator americanus/Ancylostoma duodenale, and Taenia spp. had higher aOR for development of several chronic gastrointestinal disorders when compared with unexposed subjects after controlling for various covariates.Conclusion: We found that parasite-associated enteric infection increases the risk of development of post-infectious chronic gastrointestinal disorders in a military population. These results require confirmation in similar populations and in the

  12. Activation of intestinal epithelial Stat3 orchestrates tissue defense during gastrointestinal infection.

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    Nadine Wittkopf

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal infections with EHEC and EPEC are responsible for outbreaks of diarrheal diseases and represent a global health problem. Innate first-line-defense mechanisms such as production of mucus and antimicrobial peptides by intestinal epithelial cells are of utmost importance for host control of gastrointestinal infections. For the first time, we directly demonstrate a critical role for Stat3 activation in intestinal epithelial cells upon infection of mice with Citrobacter rodentium - a murine pathogen that mimics human infections with attaching and effacing Escherichia coli. C. rodentium induced transcription of IL-6 and IL-22 in gut samples of mice and was associated with activation of the transcription factor Stat3 in intestinal epithelial cells. C. rodentium infection induced expression of several antimicrobial peptides such as RegIIIγ and Pla2g2a in the intestine which was critically dependent on Stat3 activation. Consequently, mice with specific deletion of Stat3 in intestinal epithelial cells showed increased susceptibility to C. rodentium infection as indicated by high bacterial load, severe gut inflammation, pronounced intestinal epithelial cell death and dissemination of bacteria to distant organs. Together, our data implicate an essential role for Stat3 activation in intestinal epithelial cells during C. rodentium infection. Stat3 concerts the host response to bacterial infection by controlling bacterial growth and suppression of apoptosis to maintain intestinal epithelial barrier function.

  13. A gastrointestinal rotavirus infection mouse model for immune modulation studies

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    van Amerongen Geert

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rotaviruses are the single most important cause of severe diarrhea in young children worldwide. The current study was conducted to assess whether colostrum containing rotavirus-specific antibodies (Gastrogard-R® could protect against rotavirus infection. In addition, this illness model was used to study modulatory effects of intervention on several immune parameters after re-infection. Methods BALB/c mice were treated by gavage once daily with Gastrogard-R® from the age of 4 to 10 days, and were inoculated with rhesus rotavirus (RRV at 7 days of age. A secondary inoculation with epizootic-diarrhea infant-mouse (EDIM virus was administered at 17 days of age. Disease symptoms were scored daily and viral shedding was measured in fecal samples during the post-inoculation periods. Rotavirus-specific IgM, IgG and IgG subclasses in serum, T cell proliferation and rotavirus-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH responses were also measured. Results Primary inoculation with RRV induced a mild but consistent level of diarrhea during 3-4 days post-inoculation. All mice receiving Gastrogard-R® were 100% protected against rotavirus-induced diarrhea. Mice receiving both RRV and EDIM inoculation had a lower faecal-viral load following EDIM inoculation then mice receiving EDIM alone or Gastrogard-R®. Mice receiving Gastrogard-R® however displayed an enhanced rotavirus-specific T-cell proliferation whereas rotavirus-specific antibody subtypes were not affected. Conclusions Preventing RRV-induced diarrhea by Gastrogard-R® early in life showed a diminished protection against EDIM re-infection, but a rotavirus-specific immune response was developed including both B cell and T cell responses. In general, this intervention model can be used for studying clinical symptoms as well as the immune responses required for protection against viral re-infection.

  14. Incidence and control of bovine gastrointestinal nematodes in the East of the Province of La Pampa, Argentina

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    LORDI, L.V

    2011-04-01

    %; IN 16% perform a follow-up of parasite infections with an egg count and administer treatment based on this monitoring and the recommendation of a veterinarian. 94% of those surveyed indicated that VGE alone (55% or in conjunction with other pathologies were a major problem and 30% said it was the main health problem. The study shows the economic importance of GIPs for the competitiveness of the systems in the region. The use of a significant quantity of anthelmintics, mainly avermectins, and a low participation of veterinarians in planning the controls were observed. A trend indicating that large farms and fattening operations assign more importance to control, use of anthelmintics and participation of professionals was noted.

  15. Lauric acid in crown daisy root exudate potently regulates root-knot nematode chemotaxis and disrupts Mi-flp-18 expression to block infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Linlin; Li, Xiaolin; Huang, Li; Gao, Ying; Zhong, Lina; Zheng, Yuanyuan; Zuo, Yuanmei

    2014-01-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) crops can be severely damaged due to parasitism by the root-knot nematode (RKN) Meloidogyne incognita, but are protected when intercropped with crown daisy (Chrysanthemum coronarium L.). Root exudate may be the determining factor for this protection. An experiment using pots linked by a tube and Petri dish experiments were undertaken to confirm that tomato-crown daisy intercropping root exudate decreased the number of nematodes and alleviated nematode damage, and to determine crown daisy root exudate-regulated nematode chemotaxis. Following a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry assay, it was found that the intercropping protection was derived from the potent bioactivity of a specific root exudate component of crown daisy, namely lauric acid. The Mi-flp-18 gene, encoding an FMRFamide-like peptide neuromodulator, regulated nematode chemotaxis and infection by RNA interference. Moreover, it was shown that lauric acid acts as both a lethal trap and a repellent for M. incognita by specifically regulating Mi-flp-18 expression in a concentration-dependent manner. Low concentrations of lauric acid (0.5-2.0mM) attract M. incognita and consequently cause death, while high concentrations (4.0mM) repel M. incognita. This study elucidates how lauric acid in crown daisy root exudate regulates nematode chemotaxis and disrupts Mi-flp-18 expression to alleviate nematode damage, and presents a general methodology for studying signalling systems affected by plant root exudates in the rhizosphere. This could lead to the development of economical and feasible strategies for controlling plant-parasitic nematodes, and provide an alternative to the use of pesticides in farming systems.

  16. Nematode Peptides with host-directed anti-inflammatory activity rescue Caenorhabditis elegans from a Burkholderia pseudomallei infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Perng Lim

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, is among a growing number of bacterial pathogens that are increasingly antibiotic resistant. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs have been investigated as an alternative approach to treat microbial infections, as generally, there is a lower likelihood that a pathogen will develop resistance to AMPs. In this study, 36 candidate Caenorhabditis elegans genes that encode secreted peptides of <150 amino acids and previously shown to be overexpressed during infection by B. pseudomallei were identified from the expression profile of infected nematodes. RNA interference (RNAi-based knockdown of 12/34 peptide-encoding genes resulted in enhanced nematode susceptibility to B. pseudomallei without affecting worm fitness. A microdilution test demonstrated that two peptides, NLP-31 and Y43C5A.3, exhibited anti-B. pseudomallei activity in a dose dependent manner on different pathogens. Time kill analysis proposed that these peptides were bacteriostatic against B. pseudomallei at concentrations up to 8× MIC90. The SYTOX green assay demonstrated that NLP-31 and Y43C5A.3 did not disrupt the B. pseudomallei membrane. Instead, gel retardation assays revealed that both peptides were able to bind to DNA and interfere with bacterial viability. In parallel, microscopic examination showed induction of cellular filamentation, a hallmark of DNA synthesis inhibition, of NLP-31 and Y43C5A.3 treated cells. In addition, the peptides also regulated the expression of inflammatory cytokines in B. pseudomallei infected macrophage cells. Collectively, these findings demonstrate the potential of NLP-31 and Y43C5A.3 as anti-B. pseudomallei peptides based on their function as immune modulators.

  17. Th9 Cells Drive Host Immunity against Gastrointestinal Worm Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licona-Limón, Paula; Henao-Mejia, Jorge; Temann, Angela U; Gagliani, Nicola; Licona-Limón, Ileana; Ishigame, Harumichi; Hao, Liming; Herbert, De'broski R; Flavell, Richard A

    2013-10-17

    Type 2 inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-5, IL-9, and IL-13, drive the characteristic features of immunity against parasitic worms and allergens. Whether IL-9 serves an essential role in the initiation of host-protective responses is controversial, and the importance of IL-9- versus IL-4-producing CD4⁺ effector T cells in type 2 immunity is incompletely defined. Herein, we generated IL-9-deficient and IL-9-fluorescent reporter mice that demonstrated an essential role for this cytokine in the early type 2 immunity against Nippostrongylus brasiliensis. Whereas T helper 9 (Th9) cells and type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) were major sources of infection-induced IL-9 production, the adoptive transfer of Th9 cells, but not Th2 cells, caused rapid worm expulsion, marked basophilia, and increased mast cell numbers in Rag2-deficient hosts. Taken together, our data show a critical and nonredundant role for Th9 cells and IL-9 in host-protective type 2 immunity against parasitic worm infection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Recent advances in epidemiology and prevention of gastrointestinal endoscopy related infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Douglas B

    2005-08-01

    This article reviews recent publications relevant to endoscope reprocessing and the potential for transmission of infection during gastrointestinal endoscopy. There have been a number of established reprocessing failures of gastrointestinal endoscopes at various healthcare facilities across the US resulting in patient notifications. These episodes have been associated with user errors and reprocessing equipment failures, highlighting the need for increased compliance with established guidelines. Surveillance cultures may be useful to monitor the outcome of reprocessing, although their use is controversial. New technology to allow point-of-use monitoring is promising. Biofilm accumulation may be an issue when reprocessing gastrointestinal endoscopes. Although peracetic acid has been promoted as superior to aldehyde-type liquid chemical germicides with regard to soil fixation, it may only be a modest improvement. Electrolyzed acid water is an emerging liquid chemical germicide that may be equivalent to currently accepted disinfectants. There appears to be no benefit to an additional reprocessing cycle before use for endoscopes that have been appropriately cleaned, disinfected, and stored. With the recent media attention on gastrointestinal endoscope reprocessing failures, despite the absence of documented transmission of infection, increased compliance with existing guidelines and new initiatives to enhance endoscope reprocessing are increasingly important to maintain public confidence.

  19. Control of bovine gastrointestinal nematode parasites using pellets of the nematode-trapping fungus Monacrosporium thaumasium Controle de nematóides parasitos gastrintestinais de bovinos com pellets do fungo predador de nematóides Monacrosporium thaumasium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson Victor de Araújo

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available The viability of a formulation of the fungus Monacrosporium thaumasium associated with ivermectin was evaluated for the biological control of bovine gastrointestinal nematode parasites. Four groups of five calves each were placed in pastures with a stocking rate of 1.6 animal/hectare. In group 1 (control, the calves did not receive any treatment. In group 2, each animal received 20g of pellets of M. thaumasium orally twice a week during a six-month period that began with the onset of the rainy season (October 23, 2000. In group 3, each animal received 20g of pellets of M. thaumasium orally twice a week during the same period as 2, as well as two strategic treatments with ivermectin (200 mcg/kg on May 10, 2001 and July 5, 2001. In group 4, the animals were treated with ivermectin alone as described for group 3. EPG counts for group 1 were significantly greater (PA viabilidade de uma formulação do fungo Monacrosporium thaumasium associada com ivermectina foi avaliada no controle biológico de nematóides parasitos gastrintestinais de bovinos. Quatro grupos de cinco bezerros foram colocados em pastagens com uma taxa de lotação de 1,6 animal/hectare. No grupo 1 (controle, os bezerros não receberam nenhum tratamento. No grupo 2, cada animal recebeu 20 g de pellets de M. thaumasium, via oral, duas vezes por semana e durante um período de seis meses que começou na estação chuvosa (23 de outubro, 2000. No grupo 3, cada animal recebeu 20g de pellets de M. thaumasium, via oral, duas vezes por semana e durante o mesmo período do grupo 2, assim como dois tratamentos estratégicos com ivermectina (200 mcg/kg em 10 de maio de 2001 e em 5 de julho de 2001. No grupo 4, os animais foram tratados somente com ivermectina como descrito no grupo 3. As contagens de OPG dos animais do grupo 1 foram significativamente maiores (P< 0,01 do que os animais dos grupos 2 e 3 e a diferença no final do experimento foi próxima de 100%. Os OPGs dos animais do grupo 4

  20. Mid-season targeted selective anthelmintic treatment based on flexible weight gain threshold for nematode infection control in dairy calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlin, A; Ravinet, N; Madouasse, A; Bareille, N; Chauvin, A; Chartier, C

    2017-10-09

    The suitability of a single mid-season targeted selective treatment (TST) for gastrointestinal nematodes control, based on flexible average daily weight gain (ADWG) thresholds, was investigated in 23 groups of first grazing season calves. In each group, animals were weighed three times: before turnout, at mid-season and at housing. Just after the first weighing, each group was divided in two homogenous sub-groups in terms of age, breed and weight, and randomly allocated to one of two sub-groups intented for two different mid-season anthelmintic treatment strategies: (1) a treatment of all calves composing the sub-group (whole-group treatment (WT)) or (2) a targeted selective weight gain-based treatment (TST) of the animals showing an individual pre-treatment ADWG inferior to the mean pre-treatment ADWG of the corresponding WT sub-group. Anthelmintic treatment (levamisole 7.5 mg/kg BW) was performed 3 to 4 months after turnout. At housing, two parasitological parameters (the anti-Ostertagia ostertagi antibody level-Ostertagia optical density ratio (ODR) and the pepsinogen level) and a clinical parameter (the breech soiling score) were assessed at individual level in each group. Then, the high exposed groups to gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) were defined as groups for which untreated animals exhibited a mean Ostertagia ODR ⩾0.7 and among these groups, the ones characterized by high abomasal damage due to Ostertagia for which untreated animals exhibited a mean pepsinogen level ⩾2.5 U Tyr were also identified. Among TST sub-groups, the treatment ADWG thresholds varied from 338 to 941 g/day and the percentage of treated animals from 28% to 75%. Pre- and post-treatment ADWG as well as parasitological and clinical parameters measured at housing were similar between TST and WT sub-groups including the 17 high exposed groups to GIN. Within these 17 groups, the treatment allowed to significantly improve post-treatment ADWG compared with untreated animals. In the six

  1. Meloidogyne incognita Fatty Acid- and Retinol- Binding Protein (Mi-FAR-1 Affects Nematode Infection of Plant Roots and the Attachment of Pasteuria penetrans Endospores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Phani

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Root-knot nematode (RKN Meloidogyne incognita is an economically important pest of crops. Pasteuria penetrans, is a nematode hyperparasitic bacterium capable of suppressing the reproduction of RKN and thereby useful for its management. Secreted fatty acid and retinol-binding proteins are unique in nematodes and are engaged in nutrient acquisition, development and reproduction; they are also a component of the nematode cuticle and thought to be involved in the interface between hosts and parasites. Attachment of endospores to the cuticle of second stage juveniles of RKN is the primary step of infection and several factors have been identified to facilitate attachment. In this study, the full length of Mi-far-1 (573 bp was cloned from M. incognita and characterized. Analysis revealed that the Mi-far-1 was rich in α-helix structure, contained a predicted consensus casein kinase II phosphorylation site and a glycosylation site. Quantitative PCR showed the highest expression in the fourth stage juveniles and in situ hybridization revealed the presence of Mi-far-1 mRNA in the hypodermis below the cuticle. Single copy insertion pattern of Mi-far-1 in M. incognita genome was detected by Southern blotting. Knockdown of Mi-far-1 showed significantly increased attachment of P. penetrans’ endospores on juvenile cuticle surface and also affected host finding, root infection and nematode fecundity.

  2. Pasture contamination with infective larvae of gastrointestinal nematodes after grazing by sheep resistant or susceptible to parasitic infection

    OpenAIRE

    Bassetto, César Cristiano [UNESP; Silva, Bruna Fernanda da [UNESP; Fernandes, Simone [UNESP; Amarante, Alessandro Francisco Talamini do [UNESP

    2009-01-01

    O grau de contaminação da pastagem por larvas de terceiro estágio (L3) de nematoides gastrintestinais foi avaliado em piquetes pastejados por ovelhas resistentes ou susceptíveis à verminose. O experimento foi realizado de 23 de novembro de 2007 a 22 de julho de 2008. Inicialmente, realizou-se a contagem de ovos por grama de fezes (OPG) de amostras individuais de 130 ovelhas adultas da raça Bergamácia. Dessas, foram selecionadas as nove ovelhas com contagens mais elevadas de OPG (susceptíveis)...

  3. Investigation of gastrointestinal parasites of dairy cattle around Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chiu-Chen; Wang, Lian-Chen; Pan, Chien-Hung; Yang, Cheng-Hsiung; Lai, Cheng-Hung

    2014-02-01

    Parasitic nematodes are one of the most important causes of production losses in most cattle-producing countries of the world. The aim of the present study is to make a through estimate of helminth and protozoan infection prevalence in dairy cattle around Taiwan. Coprological techniques, including direct fecal smear, simple flotation, and simple sedimentation, were used to detect gastrointestinal helminths and protozoan in dairy cattle. A total of 1259 rectal fecal samples were collected from Holstein dairy cattle at 94 farms in 13 counties in Taiwan. The overall prevalence of gastrointestinal parasitic infection was 86.9%. The infection rates of protozoa, nematodes, trematodes, and cestodes were 81.3%, 7.9%, 1.6%, and 0.6%, respectively. Among all parasites, Buxtonella sulcata (61.7%) was the most predominant one, followed with Cryptosporidium spp. (32.6%) and Eimeria spp. (11.8%). There were significant differences in the prevalence of protozoa and nematodes between different age groups and distributional area groups. The present study demonstrated that gastrointestinal parasitic infections occur frequently in dairy cattle around Taiwan, especially protozoan infections. The results indicated that a superior management system and regular anthelmintic treatment should be used for the control of parasitic infections in dairy cattle farms. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Infection levels and species diversity of ascaridoid nematodes in Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua, are correlated with geographic area and fish size

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gay, M.; Bao, M.; MacKenzie, K.

    2018-01-01

    Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) is among the most important commercial fish species on the world market. Its infection by ascaridoid nematodes has long been known, Pseudoterranova even being named cod worm. In the present study, 755 individuals were sampled in the Barents, Baltic and North Seas durin...

  5. Molecular characteristics and efficacy of 16D10 siRNAs in inhibiting root-knot nematode infection in transgenic grape hairy roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root-knot nematodes (RKNs) infect many annual and perennial crops and are the most devastating soil-born pests in vineyards. To develop a biotech-based solution for controlling RKNs in grapes, we evaluated the efficacy of plant-derived RNA interference (RNAi) silencing of a conserved RKN effector ge...

  6. Risk factors for gastrointestinal parasite infections of dogs living around protected areas of the Atlantic Forest: implications for human and wildlife health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. H. A. Curi

    Full Text Available Abstract Despite the ubiquity of domestic dogs, their role as zoonotic reservoirs and the large number of studies concerning parasites in urban dogs, rural areas in Brazil, especially those at the wildlife-domestic animal-human interface, have received little attention from scientists and public health managers. This paper reports a cross-sectional epidemiological survey of gastrointestinal parasites of rural dogs living in farms around Atlantic Forest fragments. Through standard parasitological methods (flotation and sedimentation, 13 parasite taxa (11 helminths and two protozoans were found in feces samples from dogs. The most prevalent were the nematode Ancylostoma (47% followed by Toxocara (18% and Trichuris (8%. Other less prevalent (<2% parasites found were Capillaria, Ascaridia, Spirocerca, Taeniidae, Acantocephala, Ascaris, Dipylidium caninum, Toxascaris, and the protozoans Cystoisospora and Eimeria. Mixed infections were found in 36% of samples, mostly by Ancylostoma and Toxocara. Previous deworming had no association with infections, meaning that this preventive measure is being incorrectly performed by owners. Regarding risk factors, dogs younger than one year were more likely to be infected with Toxocara, and purebred dogs with Trichuris. The number of cats in the households was positively associated with Trichuris infection, while male dogs and low body scores were associated with mixed infections. The lack of associations with dog free-ranging behavior and access to forest or villages indicates that infections are mostly acquired around the households. The results highlight the risk of zoonotic and wildlife parasite infections from dogs and the need for monitoring and controlling parasites of domestic animals in human-wildlife interface areas.

  7. Characterization of Bacteria in Nigerian Yogurt as Promising Alternative to Antibiotics in Gastrointestinal Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayeni, Anthony Opeyemi; Ruppitsch, Werner; Ayeni, Funmilola Abidemi

    2018-03-14

    Gastrointestinal infections are endemic in Nigeria and several factors contribute to their continual survival, including bacterial resistance to commonly used antibiotics. Nigerian yogurts do not include probiotics, and limited information is available about the antimicrobial properties of the fermenters in the yogurt against gastrointestinal pathogens. Therefore, the antimicrobial potentials of bacteria in Nigeria-produced yogurts against intestinal pathogens were investigated in this study. Viable counts of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in 15 brands of yogurt were enumerated and the bacteria identified by partial sequencing of 16S rRNA gene. Susceptibility of the gastrointestinal pathogens (Salmonella, Shigella and E. coli ) to antibiotics by disc diffusion method, to viable LAB by the agar overlay method, and to the cell-free culture supernatant (CFCS) of the LAB were investigated. Co-culture analysis of LAB and pathogens were also done. Viable counts of 1.5 × 10 11 cfu/ml were observed in some yogurt samples. Two genera were identified: Lactobacillus (70.7%) and Acetobacter (29.3%). The Lactobacillus species reduced multidrug-resistant gastrointestinal pathogens by 4 to 5 log while the zones of inhibition ranged between 11 and 23. The Lactobacillus and Acetobacter strains examined displayed good activities against the multidrug-resistant tested pathogens. This is the first report of antimicrobial activities of acetic acid bacteria isolated from yogurt in Nigeria.

  8. A novel antimicrobial epoxide isolated from larval Galleria mellonella infected by the nematode symbiont, Photorhabdus luminescens (Enterobacteriaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Kaiji; Li, Jianxiong; Li, Bin; Webster, John M; Chen, Genhui

    2006-07-01

    A novel antimicrobial epoxide, 2-isopropyl-5-(3-phenyl-oxiranyl)-benzene-1,3-diol (1), was identified from larval Galleria mellonella infected by a symbiotically associated bacterium-nematode complex (Photorhabdus luminescens C9-Heterorhabditis megidis 90). Its structure was determined with spectroscopic analysis and confirmed by chemical synthesis starting from a known antibiotic, 2-isopropyl-5-(2-phenylethenyl)-benzene-1,3-diol (2). Epoxide 1 was active against Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Streptococcus pyogenes, and a drug-resistant, clinical strain of Staphylococcus aureus (RN4220) with minimum inhibitory concentrations in the range of 6.25-12.5 microg/ml. Epoxide 1 was cytotoxic against human cancer cell lines, MCF-7 wt, H460, and Jurkat, with GI(50) of 2.14, 0.63, and 0.42 microM, respectively, but was less toxic on normal, mouse splenic lymphocytes with a GI(50) of 45.00 microM.

  9. Malnutrition and Gastrointestinal and Respiratory Infections in Children: A Public Health Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocío Ortiz

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Infectious disease is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in developing countries, particularly in children. Increasing evidence suggests that protein-calorie malnutrition is the underlying reason for the increased susceptibility to infections observed in these areas. Moreover, certain infectious diseases also cause malnutrition, which can result in a vicious cycle. Malnutrition and bacterial gastrointestinal and respiratory infections represent a serious public health problem. The increased incidence and severity of infections in malnourished children is largely due to the deterioration of immune function; limited production and/or diminished functional capacity of all cellular components of the immune system have been reported in malnutrition. In this review, we analyze the cyclical relationship between malnutrition, immune response dysfunction, increased susceptibility to infectious disease, and metabolic responses that further alter nutritional status. The consequences of malnutrition are diverse and included: increased susceptibility to infection, impaired child development, increased mortality rate and individuals who come to function in suboptimal ways.

  10. Malnutrition and Gastrointestinal and Respiratory Infections in Children: A Public Health Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Leonor; Cervantes, Elsa; Ortiz, Rocío

    2011-01-01

    Infectious disease is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in developing countries, particularly in children. Increasing evidence suggests that protein-calorie malnutrition is the underlying reason for the increased susceptibility to infections observed in these areas. Moreover, certain infectious diseases also cause malnutrition, which can result in a vicious cycle. Malnutrition and bacterial gastrointestinal and respiratory infections represent a serious public health problem. The increased incidence and severity of infections in malnourished children is largely due to the deterioration of immune function; limited production and/or diminished functional capacity of all cellular components of the immune system have been reported in malnutrition. In this review, we analyze the cyclical relationship between malnutrition, immune response dysfunction, increased susceptibility to infectious disease, and metabolic responses that further alter nutritional status. The consequences of malnutrition are diverse and included: increased susceptibility to infection, impaired child development, increased mortality rate and individuals who come to function in suboptimal ways. PMID:21695035

  11. Role of extracellular polymeric substances in polymicrobial biofilm infections of Staphylococcus epidermidis and Candida albicans modelled in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Jillian E; Houston, Asia; Adams, Clare; Edwards, Sarah; Kjellerup, Birthe V

    2017-07-31

    Biofilms are formed by communities of microorganisms living in a self-produced extracellular polymeric matrix attached to a surface. When living in a biofilm microorganisms change phenotype and thus are less susceptible to antibiotic treatment and biofilm infections can become severe. The aim of this study was to determine if the presence of multikingdom microorganisms alters the virulence of a biofilm infection in a host organism. The coexistence of Candida albicans and Staphylococcus epidermidis in biofilm was examined in the nematode model Caenorhabditis elegans. It was evaluated if the hyphal form of C. albicans and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) formed by S. epidermidis increases biofilm virulence. Survival assays were performed, where C. elegans nematodes were exposed to S. epidermidis and C. albicans. Single inoculation assays showed a decreased survival rate after 2 days following exposure, while dual inoculation assays showed that a clinical S. epidermidis strain together with C. albicans significantly increased the virulence and decreased nematode survival. EPS seem to interfere with the bacterial attachment to hyphae, since the EPS overproducing S. epidermidis strain was most virulent. The clinical S. epidermidis paired with C. albicans led to a severe infection in the nematodes resulting in reduced survival. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Chloroquine-Azithromycin Combination Antimalarial Treatment Decreases Risk of Respiratory- and Gastrointestinal-Tract Infections in Malawian Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliams, Elizabeth A.; Jumare, Jibreel; Claassen, Cassidy W.; Thesing, Phillip C.; Nyirenda, Osward M.; Dzinjalamala, Fraction K.; Taylor, Terrie; Plowe, Christopher V.; Tracy, LaRee A.; Laufer, Miriam K.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Chloroquine-azithromycin is being evaluated as combination therapy for malaria. It may provide added benefit in treating or preventing bacterial infections that occur in children with malaria. Objective. We aim to evaluate the effect of treating clinical malaria with chloroquine-azithromycin on the incidence of respiratory-tract and gastrointestinal-tract infections compared to treatment with chloroquine monotherapy. Methods. We compared the incidence density and time to first events of respiratory-tract and gastrointestinal-tract infections among children assigned to receive chloroquine-azithromycin or chloroquine for all symptomatic malaria episodes over the course of 1 year in a randomized longitudinal trial in Blantyre, Malawi. Results. The incidence density ratios of total respiratory-tract infections and gastrointestinal-tract infections comparing chloroquine-azithromycin to chloroquine monotherapy were 0.67 (95% confidence interval [CI], .48, .94) and 0.74 (95% CI, .55, .99), respectively. The time to first lower-respiratory-tract and gastrointestinal-tract infections were significantly longer in the chloroquine-azithromycin arm compared to the chloroquine arm (P = .04 and P = .02, respectively). Conclusions. Children treated routinely with chloroquine-azithromycin had fewer respiratory and gastrointestinal-tract infections than those treated with chloroquine alone. This antimalarial combination has the potential to reduce the burden of bacterial infections among children in malaria-endemic countries. PMID:24652498

  13. Cytomegalovirus infection in gastrointestinal tract: A case series of three patients and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piyush Ranjan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytomegalovirus disease can involve any site of gastrointestinal tract from oral cavity to rectum. CMV disease most frequently occurs in patients′ with immune deficiency, such as the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, after organ transplantation, after cancer chemotherapy and in patients on immunosuppressive medications. The number of patients with immune deficiency has increased in recent years and has lead to a substantial increase in incidence of opportunistic CMV virus. Gastrointestinal CMV infection has also been reported in immunocompetent adults. Symptoms and signs depend on part of the gastrointestinal tract involved. Diagnosis depends either on a positive mucosal biopsy or by serology, quantitative PCR or CMV antigenemia. We report three cases of CMV infection in patients with three different underlying conditions and discuss the clinical features, diagnostic approach and treatment. All patients had positive serology with high viral load on PCR. Histology with immunohistochemistry was positive for CMV in two of the three cases. Ganciclovir response was seen in all patients in respect to clinical improvement, endoscopic resolution of lesions and clearing of the virus load.

  14. Condensed tannins act against cattle nematodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novobilský, Adam; Mueller-Harvey, Irene; Thamsborg, Stig Milan

    2011-01-01

    The use of natural plant anthelmintics was suggested as a possible alternative control of gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) in ruminants. Direct anthelmintic effects of tannin-containing plants have already been shown in sheep and goat GIN. These anthelmintic properties are mainly associated with ...... extracts. Our results, therefore, indicated that tannin-containing plants could act against cattle nematodes....

  15. Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Gastrointestinal Parasite Infection in a Developing Nation Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas R. Morgan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Postinfectious IBS is defined in the industrialized world as IBS onset following a sentinel gastrointestinal infection. In developing nations, where repeated bacterial and parasitic gastrointestinal infections are common, the IBS pathophysiology may be altered. Our aim was to investigate the relationship between intestinal parasite infection and IBS in the “nonsterile” developing world environment. IBS subjects were identified from a population-based sample of 1624 participants using the Rome II Modular Questionnaire. Stool samples from cases and randomly selected controls were examined for ova and parasites. Logistic regression models explored the relationship between IBS and parasite infection. The overall IBS prevalence among participants was 13.2% (9.3% males, 15.9% females. There was no difference in parasite carriage between IBS cases and controls, 16.6% versus 15.4% (P=0.78, nor among IBS subtypes. The pathophysiology of post-infectious IBS may be altered in the developing world as compared to industrialized nations and warrants investigation.

  16. Hemotropic Mycoplasma ovis infection in goats with concurrent gastrointestinal parasitism in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faez Firdaus Abdullah Jesse

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Hemotropic Mycoplasmosis is common in sheep and goats worldwide, which leads to huge economic losses. In this study, ten goats each were sampled from five herds belonging to the Ladang Angkat, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine (FVM for the assessment of Mycoplasma ovis infection and concomitant intestinal parasites burden. Giemsa stain and Modified McMaster techniques were used to study the hemotropic mycoplasmosis and gastrointestinal parasite burden, respectively. Questionnaires were equally administered to each farmer and a fly trap was used to trap biting flies around the goat herds. Out of 50 samples analyzed, 94.0% (n=47/50 were positive for M. ovis infection. Among the positive samples, 93.6% (n=44/47 were mild infection while 6.4% (n=3/47 were moderate infection, with highest infection rate of 38.5% parasitemia. There was a significant association (P<0.05 between infection status and parasites burden. However, there was a weak positive correlation (r=0.107, P=0.460 between M. ovis infection rates and parasitic burden. Though a high occurrence rate of M. ovis was observed among the infected goats, the levels of parasitemia were generally mild.

  17. Probiotics and respiratory and gastrointestinal tract infections in Finnish military conscripts - a randomised placebo-controlled double-blinded study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalima, K; Lehtoranta, L; He, L; Pitkäniemi, J; Lundell, R; Julkunen, I; Roivainen, M; Närkiö, M; Mäkelä, M J; Siitonen, S; Korpela, R; Pitkäranta, A

    2016-09-01

    Military conscripts are susceptible to respiratory and gastrointestinal tract infections. In previous studies probiotics have shown potency to reduce upper respiratory and gastrointestinal infections. The aim was to study whether probiotic intervention has an impact on seasonal occurrence of upper respiratory and gastrointestinal infections in two different conscript groups. In a randomised, double-blinded, placebo controlled study (https://clinicaltrials.gov NCT01651195), a total of 983 healthy adults were enrolled from two intakes of conscripts. Conscripts were randomised to receive either a probiotic combination of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) and Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis BB12 (BB12) or a control chewing tablet twice daily for 150 days (recruits) or for 90 days (reserve officer candidates). Clinical examinations were carried out and daily symptom diaries were collected. Outcome measures were the number of days with respiratory and gastrointestinal symptoms and symptom incidence, number and duration of infection episodes, number of antibiotic treatments received and number of days out of service because of the infection. Statistically no significant differences were found between the intervention groups either in the risk of symptom incidence or duration. However, probiotic intervention was associated with reduction of specific respiratory infection symptoms in military recruits, but not in reserve officer candidates. Probiotics did not significantly reduce overall respiratory and gastrointestinal infection morbidity.

  18. Diet and nematode infection in Proceratoprhys boiei (Anura: Cycloramphidae from two Atlantic rainforest remnants in Southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaís Klaion

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Proceratophrys boiei is an endemic cycloramphid anuran inhabiting the leaf litter of Atlantic rainforests in Southeastern Brazil. We analyzed the whole digestive tract of 38 individuals of Proceratophrys boiei collected in two Atlantic Rainforest areas in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, to study the diet composition and the helminth fauna associated with this species. The main food items in P. boiei's diet were Coleoptera, Orthoptera and Blattaria. Five nematode species were found: Aplectana delirae, Cosmocerca parva, Oxyascaris oxyascaris, Physaloptera sp. (larval stage only and an unidentified nematode. Overall prevalence was 71% and mean infection intensity was 7.3 ± 5.8 neatodes per individual.Proceratophrys boiei é um anuro da familia Cycloramphidae que vive no folhico e é endêmico de areas de floresta na Mata Atlantica do Sudeste do Brasil. Nós analisamos o trato digestivo de 38 indivíduos de Proceratophrys boiei provenientes de duas áreas de Mata Atlântica no Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Brasil, para estudar a composição da dieta e a fauna helmíntica associada a esta espécie. s principais itens alientares na dieta de P. boiei fora Coleoptera, rthoptera e Blattaria. Cinco espécies de nematóides foram encontradas: Aplectana delirae, Cosmocerca parva, Oxyascaris oxyascaris, Physaloptera sp. (apenas larvas e uma espécie de nematóide não identificada. A prevalência total foi de 71% e a intensidade media de infecção foi de 7,3 ± 5,8 nematóides por indivíduo.

  19. Factors Associated with Gastrointestinal Parasitic Infections among Young Population in Northeast Brazil

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    Juliana Vasconcelos Lyra da Silva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Intestinal parasitic infections constitute a major public health problem that is frequently associated with poverty, inadequate sanitation, and the nutritional status of the population. Objective. The aim of the present study is to investigate the possible association of parasitic infections, sanitary conditions, hygiene practices, and the nutritional and socioeconomic status of a poor youth population. Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted with 367 children and adolescents inhabiting a substandard settlement in the urban area of Maceió (Alagoas State, Brazil. Data collection included socioeconomic status, anthropometric measurements, fecal sample examinations, and laboratory blood analysis. The identification of factors associated with gastrointestinal parasitic infections was undertaken through bi- and multivariate analyses. Results. Stool sample analysis obtained from 300 individuals revealed that 204 (68% were infected with at least one parasite species and of these 130 (63.7% were polyparasitized. No significant associations were identified between low height for age (stunted, parasitic infections, and polyparasitism. There was also no association between family income and parasitosis. However, low socioeconomic status proved to be a potential risk factor for parasitic infections. Conclusion. Actions must be taken to improve sanitation, housing, and environmental conditions in order to eliminate the risk factors for parasitic infections, and thereby guarantee a better quality of life for this population.

  20. Gastrointestinal and urinary tract pathogenic infections among HIV seropositive patients at the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boaitey, Yaw Agyekum; Nkrumah, Bernard; Idriss, Ali; Tay, Samuel Crowther Kofi

    2012-08-21

    Gastrointestinal and urinary tract pathogenic infections are aggravating the incidence and progression of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection into Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) more especially in the developing countries. This study was conducted to assess the common gastrointestinal and urinary infections among HIV/AIDS patients at the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital (KATH) in Ghana between April and December 2008. This work reports on gastrointestinal and urinary tract pathogenic infections among 500 HIV seropositive and 300 HIV seronegative patients. There was a 35% (175/500) prevalence of intestinal parasites among HIV seropositive patients compared to 4.3% (13/300) in HIV seronegative patients. Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium accounted for 19% (95/500) and 14% (70/500) respectively, while Schistosoma mansoni, Strongyloides stercoralis and hookworm together accounted for 2% (10/500) of intestinal parasitic infections among the HIV seropositive patients. There was no significant difference (p > 0.05) in urinary parasitic infection between HIV seropositive 1% (2/500) and seronegative patients 0.7% (2/300). Most, 60 (86%) out of 70, of the urinary tract infection among the HIV seropositive patients was due to bacteria with E. coli being the most predominant isolate, 28 (47%) out of 60. There was no significant difference in infections based on age and gender. G. lamblia and Cryptosporidium were the most common gastrointestinal parasites detected while bacteria accounted for majority of the urinary tract infections among the HIV seropositive patients at the hospital.

  1. New insights into the evolution of Wolbachia infections in filarial nematodes inferred from a large range of screened species.

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    Emanuele Ferri

    Full Text Available Wolbachia are intriguing symbiotic endobacteria with a peculiar host range that includes arthropods and a single nematode family, the Onchocercidae encompassing agents of filariases. This raises the question of the origin of infection in filariae. Wolbachia infect the female germline and the hypodermis. Some evidences lead to the theory that Wolbachia act as mutualist and coevolved with filariae from one infection event: their removal sterilizes female filariae; all the specimens of a positive species are infected; Wolbachia are vertically inherited; a few species lost the symbiont. However, most data on Wolbachia and filaria relationships derive from studies on few species of Onchocercinae and Dirofilariinae, from mammals.We investigated the Wolbachia distribution testing 35 filarial species, including 28 species and 7 genera and/or subgenera newly screened, using PCR, immunohistochemical staining, whole mount fluorescent analysis, and cocladogenesis analysis. (i Among the newly screened Onchocercinae from mammals eight species harbour Wolbachia but for some of them, bacteria are absent in the hypodermis, or in variable density. (ii Wolbachia are not detected in the pathological model Monanema martini and in 8, upon 9, species of Cercopithifilaria. (iii Supergroup F Wolbachia is identified in two newly screened Mansonella species and in Cercopithifilaria japonica. (iv Type F Wolbachia infect the intestinal cells and somatic female genital tract. (v Among Oswaldofilariinae, Waltonellinae and Splendidofilariinae, from saurian, anuran and bird respectively, Wolbachia are not detected.The absence of Wolbachia in 63% of onchocercids, notably in the ancestral Oswaldofilariinae estimated 140 mya old, the diverse tissues or specimens distribution, and a recent lateral transfer in supergroup F Wolbachia, modify the current view on the role and evolution of the endosymbiont and their hosts. Further genomic analyses on some of the newly sampled species

  2. Radiologic findings of an AIDS patient with gastrointestinal mixed infection of cytomegalovirus and Candida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Isamu; Nakajima, Tetsuji.

    1988-08-01

    A radiologic examination was performed on a 50-year-old homosexual man with AIDS in his gastrointestinal tract. Main abnormalities were ulcerative lesions due to mixed infection of cytomegarovirus and Candida. Esophageal involvement was demonstrated as multiple granulations and ulcers ; gastric involvement, as two ulcers ; and intestinal involvement, as only rapid transit of barium. With the lapse of time, esophageal lesions almost disappeared ; while gastric ulcers remained the same and intestinal involvement was exacerbated. The ulcerations of terminal ileum and colon due to severe bleeding and perforation caused the death.

  3. Radiologic findings of an AIDS patient with gastrointestinal mixed infection of cytomegalovirus and Candida

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Isamu; Nakajima, Tetsuji.

    1988-01-01

    A radiologic examination was performed on a 50-year-old homosexual man with AIDS in his gastrointestinal tract. Main abnormalities were ulcerative lesions due to mixed infection of cytomegarovirus and Candida. Esophageal involvement was demonstrated as multiple granulations and ulcers ; gastric involvement, as two ulcers ; and intestinal involvement, as only rapid transit of barium. With the lapse of time, esophageal lesions almost disappeared ; while gastric ulcers remained the same and intestinal involvement was exacerbated. The ulcerations of terminal ileum and colon due to severe bleeding and perforation caused the death. (author)

  4. Changing Patterns of Gastrointestinal Parasite Infections in Cambodian Children: 2006–2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hor, Put Chhat; Soeng, Sona; Sun, Sopheary; Lee, Sue J.; Parry, Christopher M.; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Stoesser, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    We studied gastrointestinal parasites in symptomatic Cambodian children attending a provincial hospital in Siem Reap, Cambodia between 2006 and 2011. A total of 16 372 faecal samples were examined by direct microscopy. Parasites were detected in 3121 (19.1%) samples and most common were Giardia lamblia (8.0% of samples; 47.6% disease episodes), hookworm (5.1%; 30.3%) and Strongyloides stercoralis (2.6%; 15.6%). The proportion of infected children increased, and the number of disease episodes effectively treated with a single dose of mebendazole decreased, over the 5-year period. PMID:22723077

  5. Nematode infection in liver of the fish Gymnotus inaequilabiatus (Gymnotiformes: Gymnotidae) from the Pantanal Region in Brazil: pathobiology and inflammatory response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayyaf Dezfuli, Bahram; Fernandes, Carlos E; Galindo, Gizela M; Castaldelli, Giuseppe; Manera, Maurizio; DePasquale, Joseph A; Lorenzoni, Massimo; Bertin, Sara; Giari, Luisa

    2016-08-30

    A survey on endoparasitic helminths from freshwater fishes in the Pantanal Region (Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil) revealed the occurrence of third-larval stage of the nematode Brevimulticaecum sp. (Heterocheilidae) in most organs of Gymnotus inaequilabiatus (Gymnotidae) also known by the local name tuvira. The aim of the present study was to examine Brevimulticaecum sp.-infected tuvira liver at the ultrastructural level and clarify the nature of granulomas and the cellular elements involved in the immune response to nematode larvae. Thirty-eight adult specimens of tuvira from Porto Morrinho, were acquired in January and March 2016. Infected and uninfected liver tissues were fixed and prepared for histological and ultrastructure investigations. The prevalence of infection of tuvira liver by the nematode larvae was 95 %, with an intensity of infection ranging from 4 to 343 larvae (mean ± SD: 55.31 ± 73.94 larvae per liver). In livers with high numbers of nematode larvae, almost entire hepatic tissue was occupied by the parasites. Hepatocytes showed slight to mild degenerative changes and accumulation of pigments. Parasite larvae were surrounded by round to oval granulomas, the result of focal host tissue response to the infection. Each granuloma was typically formed by three concentric layers: an outer layer of fibrous connective tissue with thin elongated fibroblasts; a middle layer of mast cells entrapped in a thin fibroblast-connective mesh; and an inner layer of densely packed epithelioid cells, displaying numerous desmosomes between each other. Numerous macrophage aggregates occurred in the granulomas and in the parenchyma. Our results in tuvira showed that the larvae were efficiently sequestered within the granulomas, most of the inflammatory components were confined within the thickness of the granuloma, and the parenchyma was relatively free of immune cells and without fibrosis. Presumably this focal encapsulation of the parasites permits uninfected

  6. Identification of drought, cadmium and root-lesion nematode infection stress-responsive transcription factors in ramie

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    Zheng Xia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Drought, cadmium (Cd stress, and root lesion nematode (RLN infection are three of the most important stresses affecting ramie growth and development; therefore, ramie breeding programs focus on their management more than on any other abiotic or biotic stresses. The fact that only a small number of stress-responsive transcription factors (TFs have been identified so far is a major obstacle in the elucidation of mechanisms regulating the response to these three stresses in ramie. In this study, in order to uncover more stress-responsive TFs, a total of 179 nonredundant genes with full-length open reading frames from the MYB, AP2/ERF, bZIP, HD-ZIP, and COL families were obtained by searching for against the ramie transcriptome. Expression pattern analysis demonstrated that most of these genes showed relatively higher expression in the stem xylem and bast than in other tissues. Among these genes, 96 genes were found to be involved in responses to drought, Cd exposure, or RLN-infection. The expression of 54 of these genes was regulated by at least two stresses. These stress-responsive TFs probably have roles in the regulation of stress tolerance. The discovery of these stress-responsive TFs will be helpful for furthering our understanding of the mechanisms that regulate stress responses in ramie.

  7. Viabilidade de formulação peletizada do fungo nematófago Monacrosporium sinense, no controle biológico de nematóides parasitos gastrintestinais de bezerros Viability of pellet formulation of Monacrosporium sinense as biological control of gastrointestinal nematodes of calves

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    A.K. Campos

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available A viabilidade de uma formulação do fungo Monacrosporium sinense foi avaliada no controle de nematóides parasitos gastrintestinais de bovinos. Dois grupos de 10 bezerros cada um, mestiços Holandês x Zebu, de seis a nove meses de idade, foram colocados em pastagem de Brachiaria brizantha. Em um dos grupos, cada animal recebeu 20g de péletes em matriz de alginato de sódio, contendo massa miceliana do fungo M. sinense via oral, duas vezes por semana, durante seis meses, com início no mês de outubro; no outro grupo, controle, os bezerros não receberam esse tratamento. As contagens de ovos por grama de fezes (OPG e de larvas infectantes por kg de matéria seca foram maiores (PThe viability of a formulation of the fungus Monacrosporium sinense was evaluated as control of bovine gastrointestinal nematodes parasites. Two groups were used and they were made up of 10 Holstein X Zebu crossbred, six to eight-month-old. They were grazing on Brachiaria brizantha pasture. In the treated group, each animal received orally, twice a week 20g of pellets of sodium alginate containing mycelial of the fungus M. sinense, during six months, with the onset in October. In the control group, the calves did not receive that treatment. The counting of eggs per gram of faeces (EPG and the counting of infective larvae per kg of dry matter were higher (P<0.05 in the control group than in the treated group. The difference of the EPG between the groups at the end of the experimental period was 79%. The viability of the pellets germination and the predatory activity of the fungus after the encapsulation were evaluated in vitro. The percentage of pellets with positive culture for fungus varied between 90-100% and the percentage of reduction of infective larvae varied between 90.6-100%. The use of that dose and the periodic application of M. sinense pellets were efficient as control of bovine gastrointestinal nematode parasites.

  8. Behaviour of Heterodera glycines and Meloidogyne incognita infective juveniles exposed to nematode FMRFamide-like peptides in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant-parasitic nematodes depend upon a family of neuropeptides, the FMRFamide-like peptides (FLPs), to regulate locomotion and behavior. To exploit FLPs as leads to novel nematode control agents, an understanding of how specific FLPs affect behavior, and what differences exist between species, is i...

  9. 16D10 siRNAs inhibit root-knot nematode infection in transgenic grape hairy roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    To develop a biotech-based solution for controlling Root-knot nematodes (RKNs) in grapes, we evaluated the efficacy of plant-derived RNA interference (RNAi) silencing of a conserved RKN effector gene, 16D10, for nematode resistance in transgenic grape hairy roots. Two hairpin-based silencing constru...

  10. Factors That Increase Risk of Celiac Disease Autoimmunity After a Gastrointestinal Infection in Early Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemppainen, Kaisa M; Lynch, Kristian F; Liu, Edwin; Lönnrot, Maria; Simell, Ville; Briese, Thomas; Koletzko, Sibylle; Hagopian, William; Rewers, Marian; She, Jin-Xiong; Simell, Olli; Toppari, Jorma; Ziegler, Anette-G; Akolkar, Beena; Krischer, Jeffrey P; Lernmark, Åke; Hyöty, Heikki; Triplett, Eric W; Agardh, Daniel

    2017-05-01

    Little is known about the pathogenic mechanisms of gluten immunogenicity in patients with celiac disease. We studied temporal associations between infections and the development of celiac disease autoimmunity, and examined effects of HLA alleles, rotavirus vaccination status, and infant feeding. We monitored 6327 children in the United States and Europe carrying HLA risk genotypes for celiac disease from 1 to 4 years of age for presence of tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies (the definition of celiac disease autoimmunity), until March 31, 2015. Parental reports of gastrointestinal and respiratory infections were collected every third month from birth. We analyzed time-varying relationships among reported infections, rotavirus vaccination status, time to first introduction of gluten, breastfeeding, and risk of celiac disease autoimmunity using proportional hazard models. We identified 13,881 gastrointestinal infectious episodes (GIE) and 79,816 respiratory infectious episodes. During the follow-up period, 732 of 6327 (11.6%) children developed celiac disease autoimmunity. A GIE increased the risk of celiac disease autoimmunity within the following 3 months by 33% (hazard ratio [HR], 1.33; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.11-1.59). This risk increased 2-fold among children born in winter and introduced to gluten before age 6 months (HR, 2.08; 95% CI, 1.46-2.98), and increased 10-fold among children without HLA-DQ2 alleles and breastfed for fewer than 4 months (HR, 9.76; 95% CI, 3.87-24.8). Risk of celiac disease autoimmunity was reduced in children vaccinated against rotavirus and introduced to gluten before age 6 months (HR, 0.57; 95% CI, 0.36-0.88). Gastrointestinal infections increase the risk of celiac disease autoimmunity in children with genetic susceptibility to this autoimmune disorder. The risk is modified by HLA genotype, infant gluten consumption, breastfeeding, and rotavirus vaccination, indicating complex interactions among infections, genetic factors

  11. Drinking Water Quality and the Geospatial Distribution of Notified Gastro-Intestinal Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grilc, Eva; Gale, Ivanka; Veršič, Aleš; Žagar, Tina; Sočan, Maja

    2015-09-01

    Even brief episodes of fecal contamination of drinking water can lead directly to illness in the consumers. In water-borne outbreaks, the connection between poor microbial water quality and disease can be quickly identified. The impact of non-compliant drinking water samples due to E. coli taken for regular monitoring on the incidence of notified acute gastrointestinal infections has not yet been studied. The objective of this study was to analyse the geographical distribution of notified acute gastrointestinal infections (AGI) in Slovenia in 2010, with hotspot identification. The second aim of the study was to correlate the fecal contamination of water supply system on the settlement level with the distribution of notified AGI cases. Spatial analysis using geo-information technology and other methods were used. Hot spots with the highest proportion of notified AGI cases were mainly identified in areas with small supply zones. The risk for getting AGI was drinking water contaminated with E. coli from supply zones with 50-1000 users: RR was 1.25 and significantly greater than one (p-value less than 0.001). This study showed the correlation between the frequency of notified AGI cases and non-compliant results in drinking water monitoring.

  12. Comparison of molecular and McMaster microscopy techniques to confirm the presence of naturally acquired strongylid nematode infections in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeny, Joshua P A; Robertson, Ian D; Ryan, Una M; Jacobson, Caroline; Woodgate, Rob G

    2011-11-01

    Patent strongylid nematode infections were identified using McMaster worm egg counts (WEC) and PCR assays (ITS-2 nuclear ribosomal DNA) to screen genomic DNA extracted directly from lamb faecal samples. Lambs from four different farms in southern Western Australia were sampled rectally on two separate occasions, with McMaster WECs and PCRs conducted on a total of 858 samples. Negative controls (n=96) (WEC WEC. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Immune gene expression in the spleen of chickens experimentally infected with Ascaridia galli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Tina S.; Skovgaard, Kerstin; Norup, Liselotte R.

    2015-01-01

    Ascaridia galli is a gastrointestinal nematode infecting chickens. Chickens kept in alternative rearing systems or at free-range experience increased risk for infection with resulting high prevalences. A. gall infection causes reduced weight gain, decreased egg production and in severe cases...

  14. Persistent non-gastrointestinal metabolic acidosis in pediatric HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Rana; Uy, Constancia S; Oleske, James M; Coen, Pietro G; McSherry, George D

    2003-03-28

    To determine the incidence and to identify the clinical parameters associated with non-gastrointestinal renal tubular and high anion gap acidosis in a cohort of HIV-1-infected children. Records of 202 HIV-1-infected children were reviewed to identify patients with metabolic acidosis. Serum and urine chemistries of those children with persistent non-gastrointestinal acidosis were then studied prospectively. Serum and urinary anion gaps (SAG and UAG) were calculated. Those with acidosis (group 1) were compared with children without acidosis (group 2). Associations were determined with Pediatric HIV classification, height, weight, antiretroviral therapy, and Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia prophylaxis. Persistent acidosis was noted in 34 out of 202 children (17%): 16 out of 34 (47%, group 1A) had elevated SAG acidosis, and 18 out of 34 (53%) had normal SAG acidosis with a positive UAG (distal renal tubular) acidosis (group 1B). Those with acidifying defects more often received P. carinii pneumonia prophylaxis (P = 0.02 and 0.01 for groups 1 and 1A, respectively) independently of HIV-1 classification. This group was shorter in height than group 2 (P = 0.007). Differences in weight were not significant (P = 0.1). However, acidotic subjects were more immunocompromised than those in group 2 (multivariate P acidosis and renal tubular acidosis are not uncommon among HIV-infected children with advanced disease. These disorders may be associated with height growth failure and prophylaxis with sulfur/sulfone containing antibiotics. HIV infection and/or its associated therapies may cause renal tubular damage. The causes of elevated SAG acidosis require further investigation.

  15. Gastrointestinal protozoa in dairy calves: identification of risk factors for infection

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    Andreia Volpato

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study aimed to evaluate the occurrence of gastrointestinal protozoa in dairy calves and to identify potential risk factors for this type of infection. Materials and methods. For this purpose, 243 fecal samples were collected from calves up to 60 days of age in 43 dairy farms located in the West region of Santa Catarina state, Brazil. Samples were examined by centrifugal-flotation technique. Results. As a result, Giardia was present in 26.75% (65/243 of all samples, Eimeria in 21.81% (53/243, and Cryptosporidium in 20.99% (51/243. Additionally, 46.50% (113/243 of the samples were negative for any protozoa, while 39.10% (95/243 and 14.40% (35/208 showed single and mixed infections, respectively. There was a higher association between Cryptosporidium and Giardia (6.99% in cases of mixed infections. However, the triple protozoa association had the lowest prevalence in mixed infections (2.06%. Epidemiologically, a questionnaire was applied to determine risk factors for these parasitic infections. Based on the statistical model applied, some risk factors for Cryptosporidium infections were identified, highlighting feeding management, period of time that calves stayed with their mothers (cows, and contact with dogs; the risk of contracting Giardia increased according to the milk source, while the floor type bedding, and age were appointed as risks factors for Eimeria. Conclusions. Therefore, it is possible to confirm that Giardia, Cryptosporidium and Eimeria may infect dairy calves, and the knowledge of some risk factors associated to their infection in calves.

  16. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis of Resistant and Susceptible Common Bean Genotypes in Response to Soybean Cyst Nematode Infection.

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    Shalu Jain

    Full Text Available Soybean cyst nematode (SCN; Heterodera glycines Ichinohe reproduces on the roots of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. and can cause reductions in plant growth and seed yield. The molecular changes in common bean roots caused by SCN infection are unknown. Identification of genetic factors associated with SCN resistance could help in development of improved bean varieties with high SCN resistance. Gene expression profiling was conducted on common bean roots infected by SCN HG type 0 using next generation RNA sequencing technology. Two pinto bean genotypes, PI533561 and GTS-900, resistant and susceptible to SCN infection, respectively, were used as RNA sources eight days post inoculation. Total reads generated ranged between ~ 3.2 and 5.7 million per library and were mapped to the common bean reference genome. Approximately 70-90% of filtered RNA-seq reads uniquely mapped to the reference genome. In the inoculated roots of resistant genotype PI533561, a total of 353 genes were differentially expressed with 154 up-regulated genes and 199 down-regulated genes when compared to the transcriptome of non- inoculated roots. On the other hand, 990 genes were differentially expressed in SCN-inoculated roots of susceptible genotype GTS-900 with 406 up-regulated and 584 down-regulated genes when compared to non-inoculated roots. Genes encoding nucleotide-binding site leucine-rich repeat resistance (NLR proteins, WRKY transcription factors, pathogenesis-related (PR proteins and heat shock proteins involved in diverse biological processes were differentially expressed in both resistant and susceptible genotypes. Overall, suppression of the photosystem was observed in both the responses. Furthermore, RNA-seq results were validated through quantitative real time PCR. This is the first report describing genes/transcripts involved in SCN-common bean interaction and the results will have important implications for further characterization of SCN resistance genes in

  17. Evaluation of the contamination of infecting larvae of nematodes on pasture of Cynodon sp. in a milk producing system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caio Augusto Perazza

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to evaluate the contamination of infecting larvae of parasitic nematodes in cattle on Cynodon sp. pasture. The research was conducted in a milkproduction system situated in the town of Boa Esperança, in the southern region of Minas Gerais state, during the fall-winter seasons 2008. The samples of the grass were collected in ten points inserted into an outline in “W”, previously designed, in the period of morning between at 7:30 and 8:30, observing the presence of dew in all the collections performed. The samples were CUT close to the soil and separated in half, which constituted an upper and lower sample of each collecting point, their being afterwards placed into plastic bag, identified and carried to a plastic foam box . The samples were processed singly. The infecting larvae (L3 were identified and the amount per kilogram of dry matter in forage was estimated (L3/kg DM. The climatic conditions such as temperature, air relative humidity and rainfall enabled the development of the free life stages throughout the period. Even at low rainfall rates during the months of May to August, the counts of the amount of larvae in the pastures were high. Under the conditions of the dry period (Fall/Winter, the L3 forms of Cooperia sp. presented an expressive predominance in relation to the other genera throughout the period. The greatest amount of infecting larvae of this species was found in the months of July and August in the upper pasture, while for the samples of the lower part were found peaks in the months of June and August. The large number of genera of pathogenic helminths to animals in this study along the drier seasons of the year, especially in the upper pasture, demonstrates the importance of these agents as cause of losses in milk production in Minas Gerais state.

  18. Larval migration of the ascarid nematode Toxocara canis following infection and re-infection in the gerbil Meriones unguiculatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flecher, M C; Musso, C; Martins, I V F; Pereira, F E L

    2016-09-01

    A morphological and immunohistochemical study of larval migration patterns was performed in gerbils that were infected once (primary infected group) or twice (secondary infected group) with 1500 eggs of Toxocara canis. Animals from the primary infected and the re-infected group were killed at different times after infection, and larvae were counted in the intestines, liver, lungs and brain. Fragments of all organs were formalin fixed and paraffin embedded for histology and immunohistochemistry analyses (using polyclonal anti-Toxocara serum raised in rabbits infected with T. canis). In the primary infected group, larvae were more abundant in the intestine at 24 h, in the liver and lungs between 24 and 72 h and in the brain after 96 h; larvae predominated in the brain for up to 60 days after infection. In the re-infected group, an increase in the number of larvae in the liver and a reduction in the number of larvae in the brain was observed up to 60 days after re-infection. Inflammatory reactions were absent or limited. Eosinophils and loose granulomata were observed around the larvae and their antigens in the primary infected group and were more severe. Many eosinophils and typical epithelioid granulomata were observed around larvae in the re-infected group. These results demonstrate that the migration pattern of T. canis larvae in gerbils is similar to that in mice and rats, exhibiting a late neurotropic stage. In the re-infected group, there was histological evidence of an adaptive T-helper 2 (Th-2) response, and larvae were apparently retained within granulomata in the liver, without obvious signs of destruction.

  19. Gastric pH and Toxin Factors Modulate Infectivity and Disease Progression After Gastrointestinal Exposure to Bacillus anthracis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Tao; Rotstein, David; Sun, Chen; Fang, Hui; Frucht, David M

    2017-12-12

    Gastrointestinal (GI) anthrax is the most prevalent form of naturally acquired Bacillus anthracis infection, which is associated with exposure to vegetative bacteria in infected meat (carnivores) or to fermented rumen contents (herbivores). We assessed whether key host and pathogen factors modulate infectivity and progression of infection using a mouse model of GI infection. Gastric acid neutralization increases infectivity, but 30%-40% of mice succumb to infection without neutralization. Mice either fed or fasted before exposure showed similar infectivity rates. Finally, the pathogen's anthrax lethal factor is required to establish lethal infection, whereas its edema factor modulates progression and dissemination of infection. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  20. New perspectives on the gastrointestinal mode of transmission in invasive Listeria monocytogenes infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlech, W.F. III

    1984-01-01

    The route or mechanism of transmission of Listeria monocytogenes from its rural veterinary reservoir to newborn and older human populations has been obscure. Anecdotal reports of milk-borne infection from cows with Listeria mastitis have been published, but intensive investigations of small outbreaks of L. monocytogenes infections in humans have not supported a gastrointestinal mode of infection. Several recent studies, however, strongly suggest this possibility, and case-control studies of epidemic listeriosis in the Canadian Maritime provinces in 1981 documented an association between ingestion of uncooked vegetables and the development of illness (p = 0.02). In that study, coleslaw from a regional producer which was distributed throughout the Maritimes was considered to be the vehicle of transmission. Cabbage, the raw product in the production of coleslaw, was contaminated at a farm prior to arrival at the plant. Contamination occurred through fertilization with raw manure from a flock of sheep known to harbor L. monocytogenes. Therefore, an indirect link was established between Listeria monocytogenes infection of sheep on a cabbage farm and subsequent development of invasive listeriosis in humans. This study supports findings from other epidemiologic studies of human listeriosis and is consistent with results of investigations into the mode of transmission of natural and laboratory-acquired listeriosis in animals. 34 references.

  1. Resiniferatoxin modulates the Th1 immune response and protects the host during intestinal nematode infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Carrillo, J L; Contreras-Cordero, J F; Muñoz-López, J L; Maldonado-Tapia, C H; Muñoz-Escobedo, J J; Moreno-García, M A

    2017-09-01

    In the early stage of the intestinal phase of Trichinella spiralis infection, the host triggers a Th1-type immune response with the aim of eliminating the parasite. However, this response damages the host which favours the survival of the parasite. In the search for novel pharmacological strategies that inhibit the Th1 immune response and assist the host against T. spiralis infection, a recent study showed that resiniferatoxin had anti-inflammatory activity contributed to the host in T. spiralis infection. In this study, we evaluated whether RTX modulates the host immune response through the inhibition of Th1 cytokines in the intestinal phase. In addition, it was determined whether the treatment with RTX affects the infectivity of T. spiralis-L1 and the development of the T. spiralis life cycle. Our results show that RTX decreased serum levels of IL-12, INF-γ, IL-1β, TNF-α and parasite burden on muscle tissue. It was observed that T. spiralis-L1 treated with RTX decreased their infectivity affecting the development of the T. spiralis life cycle in mouse. These results demonstrate that RTX is able to inhibit the production of Th1 cytokines, contributing to the defence against T. spiralis, which places it as a potential drug modulator of the immune response. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. The gastrointestinal nematodes of Paramelomys lorentzii and Mammelomys spp. (Rodentia: Muridae) with descriptions of a new genus and three new species (Heligmonellidae) from Papua New Guinea and Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smales, Lesley R

    2017-12-20

    Unidentified cestodes and 14 species of nematode and larvae that could not be placed to family level, were collected from the digestive tracts of 27 individuals of Paramelomys lorentzii, four of Mammelomys lanosus and a single M. rattoides from Papua New Guinea and Papua Indonesia. Of these three were new species. Hughjonestrongylus woolleyae sp. nov. can be distinguished from its congeners in having up to 26 ridges in the synlophe and a dissymmetric dorsal ray. Parvinema bafunminensis gen. nov., sp. nov. can be distinguished from all other genera in the family by the combination of features in the synlophe; with a carene, up to 17 ridges, and the pattern of ridge sizes. Parvinema helgeni sp. nov. differs from P. bafunminensis in the length of the spicule and the number of eggs in the uterus. The nematode assemblage of P. lorentzii had similar species richness to, and was also dominated by heligmonellids, as that of Paramelomys rubex, although the two assemblages differed in species composition.

  3. Addition of a combination of onion (Allium cepa) and coconut (Cocos nucifera) to food of sheep stops gastrointestinal helminthic infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehlhorn, Heinz; Al-Quraishy, Saleh; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A S; Jatzlau, Antje; Abdel-Ghaffar, Fathy

    2011-04-01

    Sheep with gastrointestinal nematodes and cestodes were fed on three farms with a combination of specially prepared extracts of onion (Allium cepa) and coconut (Cocos nucifera) for 8 days containing each 60 g coconut and onion extract, combined with milk powder and/or polyethylene glycol (PEG) propylencarbonate (PC). In all cases, the worm stages disappeared from the feces and were also not found 9 and 20 days after the end of the feeding with this plant combination. Since all treated animals increased their body weight considerably (when compared to untreated animals), worm reduction was apparently as effective as it was shown in previous laboratory trials with rats and mice (Klimpel et al., Parasitol Res, in press, 2010; Abdel-Ghaffar et al., Parasitol Res, in press, 2010; in this volume).

  4. Gastrointestinal Basidiobolomycosis, a Rare and Under-diagnosed Fungal Infection in Immunocompetent Hosts: A Review Article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bita Geramizadeh

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal Basidiobolomycosis (GIB is an unusual, rare, but emerging fungal infection in the stomach, small intestine, colon, and liver. It has been rarely reported in the English literature and most of the reported cases have been from US, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, and Iran. In the last five years, 17 cases have been reported from one or two provinces in Iran, and it seems that it has been undiagnosed or probably unnoticed in other parts of the country. In this review, we explored the English literature from 1964 through 2013 via PubMed, Google, and Google scholar using the following search keywords: 1 Basidiobolomycosis 2 Basidiobolus ranarum 3 Gastrointestinal Basidiobolomycosis In this review, we attempted to collect all clinical, pathological, and radiological findings of the presenting patients; complemented with previous experiences regarding the treatment and prognosis of the GIB. Since 1964, only 71 cases have been reported, which will be fully described in terms of clinical presentations, methods of diagnosis and treatment as well as prognosis and follow up.

  5. Infection by the nematode Angiostrongylus cantonensis induces differential expression of miRNAs in mouse brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ze-Xun Mo

    2018-02-01

    Conclusion: This study suggested a critical role of miRNAs in the host defense during A. cantonensis infection, providing new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the interaction between mmu-miR-146a-5p and TNF-α in angiostrongyliasis in nonpermissive hosts.

  6. Helminth infections of sheep in North Sumatra, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorny, P; Batubara, A; Iskander, M; Pandey, V S

    1996-02-01

    Gastrointestinal tracts of 73 indigenous sheep were obtained from the Medan abattoir in North Sumatra, Indonesia, and examined for the presence of helminths. A total of 13 species of helminths, eight nematodes, one cestode and four trematodes were encountered. All sheep were infected by more than one species of nematodes. Trichostrongylus colubriformis, T. axei and Haemonchus contortus were the most common species. The intensity of the nematode infections was very high: the average burden was over 7500 worms. Trichostrongylus spp. accounted, on average, for 81.5% of the total nematode burden. No influence of age on total nematode burden could be shown. Eurytrema pancreaticum and Schistosoma spindale were found in 23.3% and 4.1% of the examined sheep, respectively. The results are discussed in relation to common management and helminth control systems.

  7. Multiplexed Molecular Diagnostics for Respiratory, Gastrointestinal, and Central Nervous System Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Kimberly E; Couturier, Marc Roger

    2016-11-15

    The development and implementation of highly multiplexed molecular diagnostic tests have allowed clinical microbiology laboratories to more rapidly and sensitively detect a variety of pathogens directly in clinical specimens. Current US Food and Drug Administration-approved multiplex panels target multiple different organisms simultaneously and can identify the most common pathogens implicated in respiratory viral, gastrointestinal, or central nervous system infections. This review summarizes the test characteristics of available assays, highlights the advantages and limitations of multiplex technology for infectious diseases, and discusses potential utilization of these new tests in clinical practice. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. A High Burden of Asymptomatic Gastrointestinal Infections in Traditional Communities in Papua New Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwood, Paul F; Soli, Kevin W; Maure, Tobias; Naito, Yuichi I; Morita, Ayako; Natsuhara, Kazumi; Tadokoro, Kiyoshi; Baba, Jun; Odani, Shingo; Tomitsuka, Eriko; Igai, Katsura; Larkins, Jo-Ann; Siba, Peter M; Pomat, William; McBryde, Emma S; Umezaki, Masahiro; Greenhill, Andrew R

    2017-12-01

    Stool samples were collected from 148 healthy adults living a traditional subsistence lifestyle in Papua New Guinea and screened for enteric pathogens using real-time RT-PCR/PCR assays. Enteric pathogens were detected in a high proportion (41%) of individuals. Clear differences were observed in the detection of pathogens between highland and lowland communities. In particular, there was a marked difference in detection rates of norovirus GII (20% and 0%, respectively) and Shigella sp. (15% and 0%, respectively). Analysis of the relationship between enteric pathogen carriage and microbial community composition of participants, using box plots to compare specific normal flora population numbers, did not suggest that gut microbial composition was directly associated with pathogen carriage. This study suggests that enteric pathogens are common in healthy individuals in Papua New Guinean highland communities, presumably acting as a reservoir of infection and thus contributing to a high burden of gastrointestinal illnesses.

  9. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection among adult patients with different gastrointestinal parasites in Tanta City district.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabah, Ahmed Ali; Gneidy, Morsy Rateb; Saleh, Naglaa Mostafa Kamel

    2015-04-01

    This study determined the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with different gastrointestinal symptoms. Two hundred and six patients were collected from outpatient clinic of medical department from March to June 2014. The age was ranged between 15 years old up to 60 years old. 76 males with mean age (33.2 ± 13.5) and 130 females with mean age (32.8 ± 14.9). All patients were submitted to full clinical examination and stool examination was performed to detect Helicobacter pylori antigen and other intestinal parasites. After getting a full history, the patient was asked specifically for history of taking non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, presence of heart burn, epigastric pain, flatulence, nausea or vomiting passing black stool hematemesis and presence of other diseases. The results showed that 69.4% of the patients were positive for Helicobacter pylori antigen (143/206). The prevalence among males and females was the same (69.7%-69.2%). The prevalence among different age groups was not significant but; some-how high among age group of 15 up to 25 years old (70%). 72 patients out of 140 were associated with Co-infection with Entamaeba histolytica mainly or Giardia lamblia (51.4%). Epigastric pain and heart burn were representing about 90% of symptoms in patients with positive Helicobacter pylori antigen. Consequently, the prevalence of H. pylori infection is high in and around Tanta City in the Nile Delta (about 70%).

  10. Gastrointestinal Anisakidosis – Watch What You Eat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayoob, Faez; Kesavan, Mayurathan; Gumaste, Vivek; Khalil, Ambreen

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal anisakidosis is an under-reported and often misdiagnosed parasitic infection caused by the larvae of a nematode anisakis. The majority of cases are seen in Japan due to the consumption of raw and undercooked seafood; however, the incidence is likely to rise in the United States given the rising popularity of Japanese cuisine like sashimi or sushi. This unique report highlights the importance of considering anisakiasis in the differential diagnoses for patients with nonspecific abdominal symptoms with a recent history of raw or undercooked fish consumption. PMID:27924249

  11. Gastrointestinal Anisakidosis - Watch What You Eat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Moiz; Ayoob, Faez; Kesavan, Mayurathan; Gumaste, Vivek; Khalil, Ambreen

    2016-11-02

    Gastrointestinal anisakidosis is an under-reported and often misdiagnosed parasitic infection caused by the larvae of a nematode anisakis. The majority of cases are seen in Japan due to the consumption of raw and undercooked seafood; however, the incidence is likely to rise in the United States given the rising popularity of Japanese cuisine like sashimi or sushi. This unique report highlights the importance of considering anisakiasis in the differential diagnoses for patients with nonspecific abdominal symptoms with a recent history of raw or undercooked fish consumption.

  12. Relationship between socioeconomic status and gastrointestinal infections in developed countries: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Tanith C; Adams, Natalie; Taylor-Robinson, David C; Barr, Benjamin; Hawker, Jeremy; O'Brien, Sarah; Violato, Mara; Whitehead, Margaret

    2016-01-21

    The association between low socioeconomic status (SES) and poor health is well documented in the existing literature. Nonetheless, evidence on the relationship between SES and gastrointestinal (GI) infections is limited, and the mechanisms underlying this relationship are not well understood with published studies pointing to conflicting results. This review aims to identify studies that investigate the relationship between SES and GI infections in developed countries, in order to assess the direction of the association and explore possible explanations for any differences in the risk, incidence or prevalence of GI infections across socioeconomic groups. Three systematic methods will be used to identify relevant literature: electronic database, reference list and grey literature searching. The databases MEDLINE, Scopus and Web of Science Core Collection will be searched using a broad range of search terms. Screening of the results will be performed by two reviewers using pre-defined inclusion and exclusion criteria. The reference lists of included studies will be searched, and Google will be used to identify grey literature. Observational studies reporting quantitative results on the prevalence or incidence of any symptomatic GI infections by SES, in a representative population sample from a member country of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), will be included. Data will be extracted using a standardised form. Study quality will be assessed using the Liverpool University Quality Assessment Tools (LQAT). A narrative synthesis will be performed including tabulation of studies for comparison. This systematic review will consolidate the existing knowledge on the relationship between SES and GI infections. The results will help to identify gaps in the literature and will therefore provide an evidence base for future empirical studies to deepen the understanding of the relationship, including effective study design and appropriate data

  13. Value of laboratory investigations in clinical suspicion of cytomegalovirus-induced upper gastrointestinal tract ulcerations in HIV-infected patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorigo-Zetsma, J. W.; van der Meer, J. T.; Tersmette, M.; ten Kate, F. J.; Wertheim-van Dillen, P. M.; van der Noordaa, J.

    1996-01-01

    To assess the value of laboratory investigations for the diagnosis and treatment of cytomegalovirus-induced upper gastrointestinal tract ulcerations, the medical records and biopsy material from HIV-infected patients were reviewed retrospectively during a 12-month period. Clinical diagnosis of

  14. Excretory/secretory products of anisakid nematodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehrdana, Foojan; Buchmann, Kurt

    2017-01-01

    Parasites from the family Anisakidae are widely distributed in marine fish populations worldwide and mainly nematodes of the three genera Anisakis, Pseudoterranova and Contracaecum have attracted attention due to their pathogenicity in humans. Their life cycles include invertebrates and fish...... as intermediate or transport hosts and mammals or birds as final hosts. Human consumption of raw or underprocessed seafood containing third stage larvae of anisakid parasites may elicit a gastrointestinal disease (anisakidosis) and allergic responses. Excretory and secretory (ES) compounds produced...... by the parasites are assumed to be key players in clinical manifestation of the disease in humans, but the molecules are likely to play a general biological role in invertebrates and lower vertebrates as well. ES products have several functions during infection, e.g. penetration of host tissues and evasion of host...

  15. The effects of concurrent experimental infections of sheep with Trichostrongylus colubriformis and T. vitrinus on nematode distributions, numbers and on pathological changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy E.A.

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous infections of Trichostrongylus colubriformis and T. vitrinus in the small intestine of the sheep were examined by comparing the numbers of worms which established and their distribution within the intestine in both monospecific infections and mixed infections. The results differed depending upon the species and number of parasites. The establishment of T. colubriformis was reduced and the distribution of the nematode population was displaced posteriorly within the intestine when 30,000 larvae of both species were administered, compared with pure infections of T. colubriformis. The reduced establishment was less marked with infections of 15,000 larvae of both species and there was only a slight posterior displacement of T. colubriformis. Neither effect was evident with infections of 7,500 larvae of both species. The rate of establishment and distribution of T. vitrinus were unaffected by the presence of T. colubriformis at all three rates of infection. Atrophy of villi and hypertrophy of crypts occurred at the main site of infection in the anterior duodenum. The severity of villus atrophy was related to the number of infective larvae administered and/or the worm burden. In the ileum, beyond the main site of infection, hypertrophy of villi was only found in sheep receiving the greatest number of infective larvae.

  16. Changes in hematology, serum biochemistry, and gastrointestinal nematode infection in lambs fed sericea lespedeza with or without dietary sodium molybdate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, M; Burke, J M; Coffey, K P; Kegley, E B; Miller, J E; Huff, G R; Smyth, E; Terrill, T H; Mosjidis, J A; Rosenkrans, C

    2015-04-01

    Sericea lespedeza (SL; Lespedeza cuneata) is a legume rich in condensed tannins that can be grazed or fed to small ruminants for parasite control. Condensed tannins, a secondary plant compound in SL, may lead to unintended consequences such as changes in production. In our preliminary research, there was consistently a reduction in serum and liver concentrations of Mo. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of SL with or without Mo supplementation on changes in BW, hematology, and serum biochemistry in lambs. Thirty ram lambs weaned in May (84 ± 1.5 d of age; 27 ± 1.1 kg) were blocked by BW, breed type (full or three-fourths Katahdin), and EBV of parasite resistance and randomly assigned to be fed 900 g of alfalfa-based supplement (CON; n = 10) or SL-based supplement (n = 20) for 103 d. Supplements were formulated to be isonitrogenous and isocaloric and to meet trace mineral requirements. Within the SL diet, half of the lambs received 490 mg sodium molybdate weekly (SLMO). Body condition scores and BW were determined every 14 d and blood and feces collected to determine hematological and serum biochemical profiles and fecal egg counts (FEC). Data were analyzed using a mixed model with repeated measures and orthogonal contrasts. The white blood cell counts tended to be reduced in SL- and SLMO-fed lambs compared with CON-fed lambs (P reduction in neutrophils (P reduction in blood packed cell volume (P dietary treatments disappeared after 42 d of feeding (treatment × day, P Body weight and FEC were similar among dietary treatments. Means of all measurements were within a normal range, even though there were subtle but significant differences between dietary groups. Feeding a diet high in condensed tannin-rich SL did not lead to serious effects on hematology or serum biochemistry in lambs.

  17. Colitis promotes adaptation of an intestinal nematode: a Heligmosomoides polygyrus mouse model system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Donskow-Łysoniewska

    Full Text Available The precise mechanism of the very effective therapeutic effect of gastrointestinal nematodes on some autoimmune diseases is not clearly understood and is currently being intensively investigated. Treatment with living helminths has been initiated to reverse intestinal immune-mediated diseases in humans. However, little attention has been paid to the phenotype of nematodes in the IBD-affected gut and the consequences of nematode adaptation. In the present study, exposure of Heligmosomoides polygyrus larvae to the changed cytokine milieu of the intestine during colitis reduced inflammation in an experimental model of dextran sulphate sodium (DSS- induced colitis, but increased nematode establishment in the moderate-responder BALB/c mouse strain. We used mass spectrometry in combination with two-dimensional Western blotting to determine changes in protein expression and changes in nematode antigens recognized by IgG1 in mice with colitis. We show that nematode larvae immunogenicity is changed by colitis as soon as 6 days post-infection; IgG1 did not recognize highly conserved proteins Lev-11 (isoform 1 of tropomyosin α1 chain, actin-4 isoform or FTT-2 isoform a (14-3-3 family protein. These results indicate that changes in the small intestine provoked by colitis directly influence the nematode proteome. The unrecognized proteins seem to be key antigenic epitopes able to induce protective immune responses. The proteome changes were associated with weak immune recognition and increased larval adaptation and worm growth, altered localization in the intestine and increased survival of males but reduced worm fecundity. In this report, the mechanisms influencing nematode survival and the consequences of changed immunogenicity that reflect the immune response at the site colonized by the parasite in mice with colitis are described. The results are relevant to the use of live parasites to ameliorate IBD.

  18. Eficácia de plantas para o controle de nematóides gastrintestinais de pequenos ruminantes: revisão de estudos publicados Plant efficacy in small ruminant gastrointestinal nematode control: a review of published studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.S. Nery

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available As helmintoses gastrintestinais constituem um dos principais fatores limitantes para a ovinocaprinocultura em todo o mundo e a saúde dos rebanhos depende de um efetivo controle antiparasitário. A resistência aos anti-helmínticos representa um dos entraves para esse controle e a busca por novas bases tem sido um desafio constante. A utilização da fitoterapia na medicina veterinária constitui um campo promissor de pesquisas. Estudos nesta área necessitam da inserção em um contexto agroecológico, tendo como fator limitante o manejo sustentável dos recursos naturais envolvidos. O presente artigo apresenta uma revisão dos estudos de plantas cientificamente testadas no Brasil e em outros países para o controle das parasitoses gastrintestinais em pequenos ruminantes.Gastrointestinal helminthiasis has been one of the main limiting factors to small ruminant breeding around the world and the health of these animals depends on an efficient parasitological control. Resistance to anthelmintics represents one of the barriers to this control and the search for new bases has been a constant challenge. The use of phytotherapy in Veterinary Medicine is a promising research field. Studies in this area require the insertion into an agroecological context, presenting as limitation the sustainable management of the involved natural resources. This paper presents a review of studies on plants scientifically tested in Brazil and other countries for gastrointestinal nematode control concerning small ruminants.

  19. In vitro effects of three woody plant and sainfoin extracts on 3rd-stage larvae and adult worms of three gastrointestinal nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolini, V; Fouraste, I; Hoste, H

    2004-07-01

    Most studies on the effects of tanniferous plants on nematodes have examined forages but have neglected the woody plants. Therefore, in vitro effects of extracts from 3 woody plants (Rubus fructicosus, Quercus robur, Corylus avellana) have been tested on trichostrongyles and compared to sainfoin, a legume forage. Because some in vivo results indicated that the effects of tannins differed depending on the parasitic species and/or stages, the effects were measured on 3rd-stage larvae (L3) and adult worms of Teladorsagia circumcincta, Haemonchlus contortus and Trichostrongylus colubriformis. The effects of plant extracts varied according to the plant sources, the parasite species and stages. For the woody plants, significant inhibitory effects were obtained on both stages of abomasal species. Results for T. colubriformis were more variable. Effects of sainfoin extracts were significant on T. colubriformis and H. contortus L3, and on abomasal adult worms. In order to assess the implications of tannins, polyethylene glycol (PEG), an inhibitor of tannins, was added to hazel tree, oak and sainfoin extracts. Without PEG, significant inhibitory effects on L3 and adult worms were confirmed. After addition of PEG, the larval migration and motility of adult worms were restored in most cases. These results confirm variations in effects depending on factors related to plants or parasites and suggest that tannins are partly responsible for the effects.

  20. Extended phenotype: nematodes turn ants into bird-dispersed fruits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hughes, D P; Kronauer, D J C; Boomsma, J J

    2008-01-01

    A recent study has discovered a novel extended phenotype of a nematode which alters its ant host to resemble ripe fruit. The infected ants are in turn eaten by frugivorous birds that disperse the nematode's eggs.......A recent study has discovered a novel extended phenotype of a nematode which alters its ant host to resemble ripe fruit. The infected ants are in turn eaten by frugivorous birds that disperse the nematode's eggs....

  1. Antibody expressing pea seeds as fodder for prevention of gastrointestinal parasitic infections in chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macek Jeanette

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coccidiosis caused by protozoans of genus Eimeria is a chicken parasitic disease of great economical importance. Conventional disease control strategies depend on vaccination and prophylactic use of anticoccidial drugs. Alternative solution to prevent and treat coccidiosis could be provided by passive immunization using orally delivered neutralizing antibodies. We investigated the possibility to mitigate the parasitic infection by feeding poultry with antibody expressing transgenic crop seeds. Results Using the phage display antibody library, we generated a panel of anti-Eimeria scFv antibody fragments with high sporozoite-neutralizing activity. These antibodies were expressed either transiently in agrobacteria-infiltrated tobacco leaves or stably in seeds of transgenic pea plants. Comparison of the scFv antibodies purified either from tobacco leaves or from the pea seeds demonstrated no difference in their antigen-binding activity and molecular form compositions. Force-feeding experiments demonstrated that oral delivery of flour prepared from the transgenic pea seeds had higher parasite neutralizing activity in vivo than the purified antibody fragments isolated from tobacco. The pea seed content was found to protect antibodies against degradation by gastrointestinal proteases (>100-fold gain in stability. Ad libitum feeding of chickens demonstrated that the transgenic seeds were well consumed and not shunned. Furthermore, feeding poultry with shred prepared from the antibody expressing pea seeds led to significant mitigation of infection caused both by high and low challenge doses of Eimeria oocysts. Conclusion The results suggest that our strategy offers a general approach to control parasitic infections in production animals using cost-effective antibody expression in crop seeds affordable for the animal health market.

  2. Histopathological and parasitological study of the gastrointestinal tract of dogs naturally infected with Leishmania infantum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinto Aldair JW

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to provide a systematic pathological and parasitological overview of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT, including the stomach, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, caecum and colon, of dogs naturally infected with Leishmania. Methods Twenty mongrel dogs naturally infected with Leishmania (Leishmania infantum and obtained from the Control Zoonosis Center of the Municipality of Ribeirão das Neves, Belo Horizonte Metropolitan area, Minas Gerais (MG state, Brazil, were analyzed. The dogs were divided into two groups: Group 1 comprised nine clinically normal dogs and group 2 comprised 11 clinically affected dogs. After necropsy, one sample was collected from each GIT segment, namely the stomach, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, caecum and colon. Furthermore, paraffin-embedded samples were used for histological and parasitological (immunohistochemistry evaluation and a morphometrical study were carried out to determine the parasite load (immunolabeled amastigote forms of Leishmania. The Friedman and the Mann Whitney tests were used for statistical analysis. The Friedman test was used to analyze each segment of the GIT within each group of dogs and the Mann Whitney test was used to compare the GIT segments between clinically unaffected and affected dogs. Results The infected dogs had an increased number of macrophages, plasma cells and lymphocytes, but lesions were generally mild. Parasite distribution in the GIT was evident in all intestinal segments and layers of the intestinal wall (mucosal, muscular and submucosal irrespective of the clinical status of the dogs. However, the parasite load was statistically higher in the caecum and colon than in other segments of the GIT. Conclusion The high parasite burden evident throughout the GIT mucosa with only mild pathological alterations led us to consider whether Leishmania gains an advantage from the intestinal immunoregulatory response (immunological tolerance.

  3. Antibody expressing pea seeds as fodder for prevention of gastrointestinal parasitic infections in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Jana; Saalbach, Isolde; Jahn, Doreen; Giersberg, Martin; Haehnel, Sigrun; Wedel, Julia; Macek, Jeanette; Zoufal, Karen; Glünder, Gerhard; Falkenburg, Dieter; Kipriyanov, Sergey M

    2009-09-11

    Coccidiosis caused by protozoans of genus Eimeria is a chicken parasitic disease of great economical importance. Conventional disease control strategies depend on vaccination and prophylactic use of anticoccidial drugs. Alternative solution to prevent and treat coccidiosis could be provided by passive immunization using orally delivered neutralizing antibodies. We investigated the possibility to mitigate the parasitic infection by feeding poultry with antibody expressing transgenic crop seeds. Using the phage display antibody library, we generated a panel of anti-Eimeria scFv antibody fragments with high sporozoite-neutralizing activity. These antibodies were expressed either transiently in agrobacteria-infiltrated tobacco leaves or stably in seeds of transgenic pea plants. Comparison of the scFv antibodies purified either from tobacco leaves or from the pea seeds demonstrated no difference in their antigen-binding activity and molecular form compositions. Force-feeding experiments demonstrated that oral delivery of flour prepared from the transgenic pea seeds had higher parasite neutralizing activity in vivo than the purified antibody fragments isolated from tobacco. The pea seed content was found to protect antibodies against degradation by gastrointestinal proteases (>100-fold gain in stability). Ad libitum feeding of chickens demonstrated that the transgenic seeds were well consumed and not shunned. Furthermore, feeding poultry with shred prepared from the antibody expressing pea seeds led to significant mitigation of infection caused both by high and low challenge doses of Eimeria oocysts. The results suggest that our strategy offers a general approach to control parasitic infections in production animals using cost-effective antibody expression in crop seeds affordable for the animal health market.

  4. Efficacy against nematode infections and safety of afoxolaner plus milbemycin oxime chewable tablets in domestic dogs under field conditions in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehbein, Steffen; Knaus, Martin; Mallouk, Yasmina; Breiltgens, Tatjana; Brianti, Emanuele; Capári, Balázs; Dantas-Torres, Filipe; Gau, Michel; Joachim, Anja; Kaulfuß, Karl-Heinz; Kirkova, Zvezdelina; Lechner, Joerg; Mihalca, Andrei D; Mirabito, Rosamaria; Petkevičius, Saulius; Rapti, Dhimitër; Shukullari, Enstela; Sedeilhan, Michel; Dollhofer, Doris; Kley, Katrin; Lebon, Wilfried; Visser, Martin; Jeannin, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Afoxolaner (AFX) plus milbemycin oxime (MO) combination chewable tablets (NexGard Spectra®, Merial) were evaluated for safety and efficacy against naturally acquired nematode infections in domestic dogs in a multi-centre, positive control, blinded field study using a randomized block design based on the order of presentation for allocation. In total, 408 dogs confirmed positive for naturally acquired infections of intestinal nematodes by pre-treatment faecal examination were studied in ten countries in Europe (Albania, Austria, Bulgaria, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Lithuania, Romania and Slovakia). Pre-treatment faecal examination revealed Toxocara, Toxascaris, hookworm, Trichuris and/or Capillaria nematode infections in 134, 30, 223, 155 and 14 dogs, respectively. Dogs were allocated to one of two treatment groups in a ratio of 1, AFX + MO chewables (≥2.5 mg AFX + ≥0.5 mg MO per kg body weight, according to dose bands; 207 dogs), and 1, MO plus praziquantel (PRZ) chewables (Milbemax®, Novartis; ≥0.5 mg MO + ≥5 mg PRZ per kg body weight, according to the manufacturer's instructions; 201 dogs) and treated once. For evaluation of efficacy based on reduction of faecal nematode egg counts, two faecal samples, one collected prior to treatment and one collected 9 to 21 days after treatment, were examined using modified McMaster techniques. For evaluation of systemic safety, dogs were examined by a veterinarian before treatment administration and at study end, and dog owners observed the health status of their dogs until the end of the study and reported any abnormal observation. For dogs treated with AFX + MO chewables, the efficacy was 99.7, 99.7, 97.2, 99.7 and 99.7 % for Toxocara, Toxascaris, hookworm, Trichuris and Capillaria, respectively; and the efficacy was 99.5, 99.4, 94.3, 99.9 and 98.0 %, respectively, for the MO + PRZ-treated dogs (p ≤ 0.002 for all nematodes and both treatments). For Toxocara, hookworm and Trichuris, non

  5. Prevalence and burden of gastrointestinal parasites of Djallonke sheep in Ayeduase, Kumasi, Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moses Owusu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study was conducted to determine the prevalence and burden of gastrointestinal (GIT parasites of Djallonke sheep in Ayeduase, Kumasi from January 2015 to July 2015. Materials and Methods: The presence of nematodal eggs and coccidial oocysts in fecal samples were analyzed using the saturated sodium chloride floatation technique. Identification of eggs or oocysts was done on the basis of morphology and size of the eggs or oocysts. Results: Out of 110 fecal samples of sheep examined, 108 were infected with GIT parasites, representing a prevalence rate of 98.2%. The total infection rate of GIT nematodes and coccidia oocysts were 94.5% and 51.8%, respectively. Strongyle nematode (94.5% was the most prevalent GIT nematode detected, followed by strongyloides (27.3%. The average nematodal burden in g/feces was significantly higher (p0.05 from each other. The average coccidia oocysts count in g/feces was significantly higher (p0.05 in the coccidia oocysts count of rams under 1 year, gimmers, ewes, and rams over 1 year. From the studied animals, 40%, 6.36%, 48.18%, and 5.45% had heavy, moderate, light, and no infestation, respectively, with GIT nematodes. Conclusion: Djallonke sheep in Ayeduase, Kumasi, were infested with varying amounts of GIT parasites. The infestation of Djallonke sheep by GIT parasites also varies among different age groups and sexes.

  6. Phytopathogenic Nematodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helder, J.; Vervoort, M.T.W.; Megen, van H.H.B.; Rybarczyk-Mydlowska, K.; Quist, C.W.; Smant, G.; Bakker, J.

    2015-01-01

    Soil is teeming with life, and rhizosphere soil is even more densely in habited than bulk soil. In terms of biomass, bacteria and fungi are dominant groups, whereas nematodes (roundworms) are the most abundant Metazoans. Bulk soil, soil not directly affected by living plant roots, typically harbours

  7. A compositional look at the human gastrointestinal microbiome and immune activation parameters in HIV infected subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ece A Mutlu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available HIV progression is characterized by immune activation and microbial translocation. One factor that may be contributing to HIV progression could be a dysbiotic microbiome. We therefore hypothesized that the GI mucosal microbiome is altered in HIV patients and this alteration correlates with immune activation in HIV. 121 specimens were collected from 21 HIV positive and 22 control human subjects during colonoscopy. The composition of the lower gastrointestinal tract mucosal and luminal bacterial microbiome was characterized using 16S rDNA pyrosequencing and was correlated to clinical parameters as well as immune activation and circulating bacterial products in HIV patients on ART. The composition of the HIV microbiome was significantly different than that of controls; it was less diverse in the right colon and terminal ileum, and was characterized by loss of bacterial taxa that are typically considered commensals. In HIV samples, there was a gain of some pathogenic bacterial taxa. This is the first report characterizing the terminal ileal and colonic mucosal microbiome in HIV patients with next generation sequencing. Limitations include use of HIV-infected subjects on HAART therapy.

  8. Microsatellite diversity of isolates of the parasitic nematode Haemonchus contortus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otsen, M.; Plas, M. E.; Lenstra, J. A.; Roos, M. H.; Hoekstra, R.

    2000-01-01

    The alarming development of anthelmintic resistance in important gastrointestinal nematode parasites of man and live-stock is caused by selection for specific genotypes. In order to provide genetic tools to study the nematode populations and the consequences of anthelmintic treatment, we isolated

  9. Epidemiological study on abomasal nematodes in slaughtered small ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gastrointestinal nematodes are one of the major causes of productivity losses in small ruminants in sub-Saharan Africa. A study was carried out to evaluate the prevalence, worm burden of abomasal nematodes and associated faecal egg counts (FEC) of small ruminants slaughtered from November, 2011 to October, 2012.

  10. Paracalc® - a novel tool to evaluate the economic importance of worm infections on the dairy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Charlier, C.; Voort, van der J.M.; Hogeveen, H.; Vercruysse, J.

    2012-01-01

    linical infections with gastrointestinal nematodes and liver fluke are important causes of production losses in grazing cattle. Although there is an extensive compilation of literature describing the effect of these infections on animal performance, only a few attempts have been made to convert

  11. Cattle and Nematodes Under Global Change: Transmission Models as an Ally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschave, Sien H; Charlier, Johannes; Rose, Hannah; Claerebout, Edwin; Morgan, Eric R

    2016-09-01

    Nematode infections are an important economic constraint to cattle farming. Future risk levels and transmission dynamics will be affected by changes in climate and farm management. The prospect of altered parasite epidemiology in combination with anthelmintic resistance requires the adaptation of current control approaches. Mathematical models that simulate disease dynamics under changing climate and farm management can help to guide the optimization of helminth control strategies. Recent efforts have increasingly employed such models to assess the impact of predicted climate scenarios on future infection pressure for gastrointestinal nematodes (GINs) in cattle, and to evaluate possible adaptive control measures. This review aims to consolidate progress in this field to facilitate further modeling and application. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Helicobacter pylori infection status had no influence on upper gastrointestinal symptoms: a cross-sectional analysis of 3,005 Japanese subjects without upper gastrointestinal lesions undergoing medical health checkups

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshioka, Tomomi; Takeshita, Eri; Sakata, Yasuhisa; Hara, Megumi; Akutagawa, Kayo; Sakata, Natsuko; Endo, Hiroyoshi; Ohyama, Takashi; Matsunaga, Keiji; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Shirai, Shinpei; Ito, Yoichiro; Tsuruoka, Nanae; Iwakiri, Ryuichi; Kusano, Motoyasu

    2017-01-01

    Background This study aimed to evaluate the influence of Helicobacter pylori infection and its eradication on the upper gastrointestinal symptoms of relatively healthy Japanese subjects. Methods A total of 3,005 subjects (male/female: 1,549/1,456) undergoing medical health checkups were enrolled in the present study, at five hospitals in Saga, Japan, from January to December 2013. They had no significant findings following upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. All subjects completed a questionnai...

  13. Susceptibility of bacteria isolated from acute gastrointestinal infections to rifaximin and other antimicrobial agents in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoa-Farías, O; Frati-Munari, A C; Peredo, M A; Flores-Juárez, S; Novoa-García, O; Galicia-Tapia, J; Romero-Carpio, C E

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial resistance may hamper the antimicrobial management of acute gastroenteritis. Bacterial susceptibility to rifaximin, an antibiotic that achieves high fecal concentrations (up to 8,000μg/g), has not been evaluated in Mexico. To determine the susceptibility to rifaximin and other antimicrobial agents of enteropathogenic bacteria isolated from patients with acute gastroenteritis in Mexico. Bacterial strains were analyzed in stool samples from 1,000 patients with diagnosis of acute gastroenteritis. The susceptibility to rifaximin (RIF) was tested by microdilution (<100, <200, <400 and <800μg/ml) and susceptibility to chloramphenicol (CHL), trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (T-S), neomycin (NEO), furazolidone (FUR), fosfomycin (FOS), ampicillin (AMP) and ciprofloxacin (CIP) was tested by agar diffusion at the concentrations recommended by the Clinical & Laboratory Standards Institute and the American Society for Microbiology. Isolated bacteria were: enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli) (EPEC) 531, Shigella 120, non-Typhi Salmonella 117, Aeromonas spp. 80, enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) 54, Yersinia enterocolitica 20, Campylobacter jejuni 20, Vibrio spp. 20, Plesiomonas shigelloides 20, and enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC 0:157) 18. The overall cumulative susceptibility to RIF at <100, <200, <400, and <800μg/ml was 70.6, 90.8, 99.3, and 100%, respectively. The overall susceptibility to each antibiotic was: AMP 32.2%, T-S 53.6%, NEO 54.1%, FUR 64.7%, CIP 67.3%, CLO 73%, and FOS 81.3%. The susceptibility to RIF <400 and RIF <800μg/ml was significantly greater than with the other antibiotics (p<0.001). Resistance of enteropathogenic bacteria to various antibiotics used in gastrointestinal infections is high. Rifaximin was active against 99-100% of these enteropathogens at reachable concentrations in the intestine with the recommended dose. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  14. Normothermia to prevent surgical site infections after gastrointestinal surgery: holy grail or false idol?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtinen, Simon J; Onicescu, Georgiana; Kuhn, Kathy M; Cole, David J; Esnaola, Nestor F

    2010-10-01

    To analyze the association between perioperative normothermia (temperature ≥36°C) and surgical site infections (SSIs) after gastrointestinal (GI) surgery. Although active warming during colorectal surgery reduces SSIs, there is limited evidence that perioperative normothermia is associated with lower rates of SSI. Nonetheless, hospitals participating in the Surgical Care Improvement Project must report normothermia rates during major surgery. We conducted a nested, matched, case-control study; cases consisted of GI surgery patients enrolled in our National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database between March 2006 and March 2009 who developed SSIs. Patient/surgery risk factors for SSI were obtained from the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database. Perioperative temperature/antibiotic/glucose data were obtained from medical records. Cases/controls were compared using univariate/random effects/logistic regression models. Independent risk factors for SSIs were identified using multivariate/random effects/logistic regression models. A total of 146 cases and 323 matched controls were identified; 82% of patients underwent noncolorectal surgery. Cases were more likely to have final intraoperative normothermia compared with controls (87.6% vs. 77.8%, P = 0.015); rates of immediate postoperative normothermia were similar (70.6% vs. 65.3%, respectively, P = 0.19). Emergent surgery/higher wound class were associated with higher rates of intraoperative normothermia. Independent risk factors for SSI were diabetes, surgical complexity, small bowel surgery, and nonlaparoscopic surgery. There was no independent association between perioperative normothermia and SSI (adjusted odds ratio, 1.05; 95% confidence interval, 0.48-2.33; P = 0.90). Pay-for-reporting measures focusing on perioperative normothermia may be of limited value in preventing SSI after GI surgery. Studies to define the benefit of active warming after noncolorectal GI surgery are warranted.

  15. Parasitic Nematode Interactions with Mammals and Plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jasmer, D.P.; Goverse, A.; Smant, G.

    2003-01-01

    Parasitic nematodes that infect humans, animals, and plants cause serious diseases that are deleterious to human health and agricultural productivity. Chemical and biological control methods have reduced the impact of these parasites. However, surviving environmental stages lead to persistent

  16. Co-Infection and Wild Animal Health: Effects of Trypanosomatids and Gastrointestinal Parasites on Coatis of the Brazilian Pantanal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olifiers, Natalie; Jansen, Ana Maria; Herrera, Heitor Miraglia; Bianchi, Rita de Cassia; D’Andrea, Paulo Sergio; Mourão, Guilherme de Miranda; Gompper, Matthew Edzart

    2015-01-01

    Wild animals are infected by diverse parasites, but how they influence host health is poorly understood. We examined the relationship of trypanosomatids and gastrointestinal parasites with health of wild brown-nosed coatis (Nasua nasua) from the Brazilian Pantanal. We used coati body condition and hematological parameters as response variables in linear models that were compared using an information theoretic approach. Predictors were high/low parasitemias by Trypanosoma cruzi and T. evansi, and indices representing the abundance of distinct groups of gastrointestinal parasites. We also analyzed how host health changed with host sex and reproductive seasonality. Hemoparasites was best related to coati body condition and hematological indices, whereas abundance of gastrointestinal parasites was relatively less associated with coati health. Additionally, some associations were best predicted by models that incorporated reproductive seasonality and host sex. Overall, we observed a lower health condition during the breeding season, when coatis are under reproductive stress and may be less able to handle infection. In addition, females seem to handle infection better than males. Body condition was lower in coatis with high parasitemias of T. evansi, especially during the reproductive season. Total red blood cell counts, packed cell volume, platelets and eosinophils were also lower in animals with high T. evansi parasitemias. Total white blood cell counts and mature neutrophils were lower in animals with high parasitemias for both Trypanosoma species, with neutrophils decreasing mainly during the reproductive season. Overall, decreases in hematological parameters of females with T. evansi high parasitemias were less evident. For T. cruzi, monocytes decreased in individuals with high parasitemias. High abundances of microfilariae in the bloodstream, and cestode eggs and coccidian oocysts in feces were also associated with coati blood parameters. This study shows the

  17. Co-Infection and Wild Animal Health: Effects of Trypanosomatids and Gastrointestinal Parasites on Coatis of the Brazilian Pantanal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olifiers, Natalie; Jansen, Ana Maria; Herrera, Heitor Miraglia; Bianchi, Rita de Cassia; D'Andrea, Paulo Sergio; Mourão, Guilherme de Miranda; Gompper, Matthew Edzart

    2015-01-01

    Wild animals are infected by diverse parasites, but how they influence host health is poorly understood. We examined the relationship of trypanosomatids and gastrointestinal parasites with health of wild brown-nosed coatis (Nasua nasua) from the Brazilian Pantanal. We used coati body condition and hematological parameters as response variables in linear models that were compared using an information theoretic approach. Predictors were high/low parasitemias by Trypanosoma cruzi and T. evansi, and indices representing the abundance of distinct groups of gastrointestinal parasites. We also analyzed how host health changed with host sex and reproductive seasonality. Hemoparasites was best related to coati body condition and hematological indices, whereas abundance of gastrointestinal parasites was relatively less associated with coati health. Additionally, some associations were best predicted by models that incorporated reproductive seasonality and host sex. Overall, we observed a lower health condition during the breeding season, when coatis are under reproductive stress and may be less able to handle infection. In addition, females seem to handle infection better than males. Body condition was lower in coatis with high parasitemias of T. evansi, especially during the reproductive season. Total red blood cell counts, packed cell volume, platelets and eosinophils were also lower in animals with high T. evansi parasitemias. Total white blood cell counts and mature neutrophils were lower in animals with high parasitemias for both Trypanosoma species, with neutrophils decreasing mainly during the reproductive season. Overall, decreases in hematological parameters of females with T. evansi high parasitemias were less evident. For T. cruzi, monocytes decreased in individuals with high parasitemias. High abundances of microfilariae in the bloodstream, and cestode eggs and coccidian oocysts in feces were also associated with coati blood parameters. This study shows the

  18. Differential susceptibilities to azithromycin treatment of chlamydial infection in the gastrointestinal tract and cervix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evidence from animal studies suggests that chlamydiae may persist in the gastrointestinal tract (GI) and be a reservoir for reinfection of the genital tract. We hypothesize that there may be a differential susceptibility of organisms in the GI and genital tracts. To determine the effect of azithromy...

  19. Prevalence of Helicobacter (formerly Campylobacter) pylori infection in Saudia Arabia, and comparison of those with and without upper gastrointestinal symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    al-Moagel, M A; Evans, D G; Abdulghani, M E; Adam, E; Evans, D J; Malaty, H M; Graham, D Y

    1990-08-01

    A causative role is now accepted for Helicobacter (formerly Campylobacter) pylori in type B gastritis, and evidence is accumulating that H. pylori infection plays a major contributory role in duodenal ulcer, gastric ulcer, and epidemic gastric cancer. The prevalence of H. pylori in any population remains unknown. We compared the prevalence of H. pylori infection in the Riyadh region of Saudia Arabia, using a specific and sensitive ELISA for IgG antibody against the high molecular weight cell-associated antigen of H. pylori (urease). Subjects were interviewed, demographic data were collected, and a serum sample was obtained. Subjects completed a questionnaire that included questions about level of education, smoking, medications used, presence and frequency of symptoms referable to the upper gastrointestinal tract, and family history of ulcer disease. We studied 557 individuals (ranging in age from 5 to 91 yr). The prevalence of H. pylori infection increased rapidly with age: from 40% of those ages 5-10 yr, to more than 70% of those 20 or older. H. pylori infection occurred with significantly more frequency in adults with less than 12 yr of schooling, compared with adults who had attended college. The high rate of acquisition of H. pylori infection in Saudia Arabia emphasizes that studies of H. pylori-disease associations must consider the baseline prevalence of H. pylori infection in that population.

  20. Evolutionary Expansion of WRKY Gene Family in Banana and Its Expression Profile during the Infection of Root Lesion Nematode, Pratylenchus coffeae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suthanthiram, Backiyarani; Subbaraya, Uma; Marimuthu Somasundram, Saraswathi; Muthu, Mayilvaganan

    2016-01-01

    The WRKY family of transcription factors orchestrate the reprogrammed expression of the complex network of defense genes at various biotic and abiotic stresses. Within the last 96 million years, three rounds of Musa polyploidization events had occurred from selective pressure causing duplication of MusaWRKYs with new activities. Here, we identified a total of 153 WRKY transcription factors available from the DH Pahang genome. Based on their phylogenetic relationship, the MusaWRKYs available with complete gene sequence were classified into the seven common WRKY sub-groups. Synteny analyses data revealed paralogous relationships, with 17 MusaWRKY gene pairs originating from the duplication events that had occurred within the Musa lineage. We also found 15 other MusaWRKY gene pairs originating from much older duplication events that had occurred along Arecales and Poales lineage of commelinids. Based on the synonymous and nonsynonymous substitution rates, the fate of duplicated MusaWRKY genes was predicted to have undergone sub-functionalization in which the duplicated gene copies retain a subset of the ancestral gene function. Also, to understand the regulatory roles of MusaWRKY during a biotic stress, Illumina sequencing was performed on resistant and susceptible cultivars during the infection of root lesion nematode, Pratylenchus coffeae. The differential WRKY gene expression analysis in nematode resistant and susceptible cultivars during challenged and unchallenged conditions had distinguished: 1) MusaWRKYs participating in general banana defense mechanism against P.coffeae common to both susceptible and resistant cultivars, 2) MusaWRKYs that may aid in the pathogen survival as suppressors of plant triggered immunity, 3) MusaWRKYs that may aid in the host defense as activators of plant triggered immunity and 4) cultivar specific MusaWRKY regulation. Mainly, MusaWRKY52, -69 and -92 are found to be P.coffeae specific and can act as activators or repressors in a

  1. Mucosal immunity in HIV infection: what can be done to restore gastrointestinal-associated lymphoid tissue function?

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Michael D; Asmuth, David M

    2014-06-01

    This review describes the impact of HIV infection on gut-associated lymphoid tissue, the mechanisms for persistent gut-associated lymphoid tissue dysfunction despite effective antiretroviral therapy, and potential strategies to restore gut-associated lymphoid tissue function and promote immune reconstitution. Recent studies indicate that unresolved microbial translocation and intestinal dysbiosis may continue to promote enteropathy as well as HIV-associated and non-HIV-associated conditions in many HIV patients who otherwise maintain therapeutic control of systemic viral replication. Several novel therapeutic approaches to reduce intestinal inflammation and mitigate microbial translocation may hold promise for restoring gastrointestinal health and thereby increasing the efficacy of immune reconstitution in HIV-infected patients undergoing antiretroviral therapy.

  2. Identification of Virulence Factors in Nematode-Trapping Fungi - Insights from Genomics, Transcriptomics and Proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    Andersson, Karl-Magnus

    2013-01-01

    Nematode-trapping fungi are soil-living organisms with the unique ability to capture and infect free-living nematodes. The interest in studying these fungi arises from their potential use as biological control agents for plant- and animal-parasitic nematodes. To enter the parasitic stage, nematode-trapping fungi develop different kinds of trapping structures. In order to understand more about the evolution of parasitism in the nematode-trapping fungi and to identify virulence factors in these...

  3. Activity changes of antioxidant and detoxifying enzymes in Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) larvae infected by the entomopathogenic nematode Heterorhabditis beicherriana (Rhabditida: Heterorhabditidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xingyue; Liu, Qizhi; Lewis, Edwin E; Tarasco, Eustachio

    2016-12-01

    Entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs) of the genera Steinernema and Heterorhabditis are lethal parasites of many insect species. To investigate defensive mechanisms towards EPNs in relation to antioxidative and detoxifying enzymes, we chose Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) as experimental insect. We studied the activity changes of superoxide dismutases (SODs), peroxidases (PODs), and catalases (CATs), as well as tyrosinase (TYR), acetylcholinesterase (AChE), carboxylesterase (CarE), and glutathione S-transferase (GSTs) for 40 h in T. molitor larvae infected with Heterorhabditis beicherriana infective juveniles (IJs) at 5 rates (0, 20, 40, 80, and 160 IJs/larva). We found that when T. molitor larvae infected with H. beicherriana at higher rates (80 and 160 IJs/larva), SOD activity quickly increased to more than 70 % higher than that control levels. The activities of POD and CAT increased after 24 h. TYR activity increased slowly at lower rates of infection for 16 h, followed by a slight decrease, and then increasing from 32 to 40 h. The other detoxifying enzymes (GST, CarE, and AChE) were enhanced at lower infection rates, but were inhibited at higher rates. Our results suggested that host antioxidative response and detoxification reactions played a central role in the defensive reaction to EPNs, and that this stress which was reflected by the higher level enzymes activity contributed to the death of hosts. Further study should explore the exact function of these enzymes using different species of EPNs and investigate the links between enzyme activity and host susceptibility to EPNs.

  4. The role of IgG1 hypergammaglobulinaemia in immunity to the gastrointestinal nematode Nematospiroides dubius. The immunochemical purification, antigen-specificity and in vivo anti-parasite effect of IgG1 from immune serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, D I; Williams, D J; Behnke, J M; Lee, T D

    1983-06-01

    Nematospiroides dubius, in common with many other species of metazoan parasite, induces an IgG1 hypergammaglobulinaemia during the course of infection. In the present study, immune sera raised in CFLP mice by repeated infection contained 24 ng/ml IgG1 compared with a resting level of 2.4 mg/ml. IgG2a and IgG2b levels were depressed following infection from 1.5 to 0.6 mg/ml and 0.64 to 0.42 mg/ml respectively. IgM levels were unaltered by infection (0.16 mg/ml) whilst IgA levels increased from 0.7 to 1.2 mg/ml. Immunochemical fractionation of immune sera by a combination of affinity chromatography and gel filtration revealed that the anti-parasite activity of the original serum could be largely accounted for by purified IgG1 fractions as assessed by immunoprecipitin and immunofluorescence assays. Purified IgG1 was shown to react with antigenic components common to both adult homogenate and adult excretory-secretory antigen. In addition, absorption studies revealed that as much as 48% of purified IgG1 from immune serum reacted with adult N. dubius antigen. In vivo, IgG1 was the only purified immunoglobulin isotype to cause significant reduction in worm numbers in the gastrointestinal tract when administered alone, and to have any noticeable co-operative effect when administered in conjunction with immune mesenteric lymph node cells. IgG1 also caused severe stunting of worms, and promoted the adherence of peritoneal exudate cells to the worm surface in vitro. It is suggested that one mechanism by which immune mesenteric lymph-node cells exert their protective activity following cell transfer is by elevating IgG1 levels in recipient mice.

  5. Genomes of parasitic nematodes (Meloidogyne hapla, Meloidogyne incognita, Ascaris suum and Brugia malayi) have a reduced complement of small RNA interference pathway genes: knockdown can reduce host infectivity of M. incognita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Sadia; Fosu-Nyarko, John; Jones, Michael G K

    2016-07-01

    The discovery of RNA interference (RNAi) as an endogenous mechanism of gene regulation in a range of eukaryotes has resulted in its extensive use as a tool for functional genomic studies. It is important to study the mechanisms which underlie this phenomenon in different organisms, and in particular to understand details of the effectors that modulate its effectiveness. The aim of this study was to identify and compare genomic sequences encoding genes involved in the RNAi pathway of four parasitic nematodes: the plant parasites Meloidogyne hapla and Meloidogyne incognita and the animal parasites Ascaris suum and Brugia malayi because full genomic sequences were available-in relation to those of the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. The data generated was then used to identify some potential targets for control of the root knot nematode, M. incognita. Of the 84 RNAi pathway genes of C. elegans used as model in this study, there was a 42-53 % reduction in the number of effectors in the parasitic nematodes indicating substantial differences in the pathway between species. A gene each from six functional groups of the RNAi pathway of M. incognita was downregulated using in vitro RNAi, and depending on the gene (drh-3, tsn-1, rrf-1, xrn-2, mut-2 and alg-1), subsequent plant infection was reduced by up to 44 % and knockdown of some genes (i.e. drh-3, mut-2) also resulted in abnormal nematode development. The information generated here will contribute to defining targets for more robust nematode control using the RNAi technology.

  6. Relationship between socioeconomic status and gastrointestinal infections in developed countries: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie L Adams

    Full Text Available The association between socioeconomic status (SES and health is well-documented; however limited evidence on the relationship between SES and gastrointestinal (GI infections exists, with published studies producing conflicting results. This systematic review aimed to assess the association between SES and GI infection risk, and explore possible sources of heterogeneity in effect estimates reported in the literature.MEDLINE, Scopus, Web of Science and grey literature were searched from 1980 to October 2015 for studies reporting an association between GI infections and SES in a representative population sample from a member-country of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. Harvest plots and meta-regression were used to investigate potential sources of heterogeneity such as age; level of SES variable; GI infection measurement; and predominant mode of transmission. The protocol was registered on PROSPERO: CRD42015027231.In total, 6021 studies were identified; 102 met the inclusion criteria. Age was identified as the only statistically significant potential effect modifier of the association between SES and GI infection risk. For children, GI infection risk was higher for those of lower SES versus high (RR 1.51, 95% CI;1.26-1.83, but there was no association for adults (RR 0.79, 95% CI;0.58-1.06. In univariate analysis, the increased risk comparing low and high SES groups was significantly higher for pathogens spread by person-to-person transmission, but lower for environmental pathogens, as compared to foodborne pathogens.Disadvantaged children, but not adults, have greater risk of GI infection compared to their more advantaged counterparts. There was high heterogeneity and many studies were of low quality. More high quality studies are needed to investigate the association between SES and GI infection risk, and future research should stratify analyses by age and pathogen type. Gaining further insight into this relationship will

  7. Allergen-specific IgE and IgG4 are markers of resistance and susceptibility in a human intestinal nematode infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Joseph D; Faulkner, Helen; Kamgno, Joseph; Kennedy, Malcolm W; Behnke, Jerzy; Boussinesq, Michel; Bradley, Janette E

    2005-06-01

    IgG4 has been proposed to act as a 'blocking antibody' due to its ability to compete for the same epitopes as IgE thus preventing IgE-dependent allergic responses. IgG4 and IgE are both elevated in helminth infections and strong anti-parasite IgE responses are associated with resistance to infection. We wished to determine the relationship between anti-parasite IgG4 and IgE and Ascaris lumbricoides infection status. We examined anti-parasite responses, including antibody levels to recombinant Ascaris allergen-1A (rABA-1A), a target of serum IgE in endemic populations. Worm burden was indirectly estimated by measuring parasite egg output in a cross-sectional human population (N = 105). Levels of anti-parasite IgG4 and IgE in patients' plasma were quantified by immunoassay. Global anti-parasite antibody responses did not bear any significant relationships with intensity of Ascaris infection. Individuals who had detectable levels of IgE but not IgG4 to rABA-1A (11%) had lower average levels of infection compared with individuals who produced anti-rABA-1A IgG4 (40%) and sero-negative individuals (49%) (P = 0.008). The ratio of IgG4/IgE in rABA-1A responders positively correlated with intensity of infection (P immunity in older children and adults (age 12-36) where infection levels were decreasing (P = 0.048). Therefore, in a gastrointestinal helminth infection, differential regulation of anti-allergen antibody isotypes relate to infection level. Our results are consistent with the concept that IgG4 antibody can block IgE-mediated immunity and therefore allergic processes in humans.

  8. Cytoskeleton remodling and alterations in smooth muscle contractility in the bovine jejunum during the early stage of Cooperia oncophora infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastrointestinal nematodes of the genus Cooperia are arguably the most important parasites of cattle. We characterized the bovine jejunal transcriptome in response to C. oncophora infection using RNA-seq technology. Approximately 71% of the 25,670 bovine genes were detected in the jejunal transcript...

  9. PREVALENCE, RISK FACTORS AND SYMPTOMS ASSOCIATED TO INTESTINAL PARASITE INFECTIONS AMONG PATIENTS WITH GASTROINTESTINAL DISORDERS IN NAHAVAND, WESTERN IRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed KIANI

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied the prevalence of intestinal parasites (IPs, their risk factors and associated symptoms among patients with gastrointestinal disorders. A total of 1,301 participants aged 22 days-90 years were enrolled in this study. We used a structured questionnaire to obtain socio-demographic and stool examination to investigate intestinal parasite infections. Data analysis was performed using SPSS16. The overall prevalence of intestinal parasites (IPs was 32.2% (419/1,301. Three hundred and fifty nine cases/1,301 (27.6% were infected with a single parasite and 60/1,301 cases (4.6% presented polyparasitism. The most common IP was Blastocystis sp. 350/1,301 (26.9%, followed by Entamoeba coli 38/1,301 (2.92%, Giardia lamblia 30/1,301 (2.3% and Cryptosporidium spp. 17/1,301 (1.3%. Regarding the socio-demographic variables, educational status (p = 0.001, contact with domestic animals and soil (p = 0.02, age above 15 years (p = 0.001 and seasons (p = 0.001 were significantly associated to intestinal parasitic infections. Concerning clinical characteristics, the presence of IPs was significantly associated to diarrhea (OR = 1.57; CI 95% = 1.24-1.98; p < 0.001 and dysentery (OR = 1.94; CI 95% = 1.03-3.66; p < 0.04. Our findings suggest that IPs are one of the main causal agents of gastrointestinal disorders. Improving the knowledge on local risk factors such as poverty, low level of education, poor sanitation, contact with soil and contact with domestic animal is warranted.

  10. Subclinical infection and asymptomatic carriage of gastrointestinal zoonoses: occupational exposure, environmental pathways, and the anonymous spread of disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quilliam, R S; Cross, P; Williams, A Prysor; Edwards-Jones, G; Salmon, R L; Rigby, D; Chalmers, R M; Thomas, D Rh; Jones, D L

    2013-10-01

    Asymptomatic carriage of gastrointestinal zoonoses is more common in people whose profession involves them working directly with domesticated animals. Subclinical infections (defined as an infection in which symptoms are either asymptomatic or sufficiently mild to escape diagnosis) are important within a community as unknowing (asymptomatic) carriers of pathogens do not change their behaviour to prevent the spread of disease; therefore the public health significance of asymptomatic human excretion of zoonoses should not be underestimated. However, optimal strategies for managing diseases where asymptomatic carriage instigates further infection remain unresolved, and the impact on disease management is unclear. In this review we consider the environmental pathways associated with prolonged antigenic exposure and critically assess the significance of asymptomatic carriage in disease outbreaks. Although screening high-risk groups for occupationally acquired diseases would be logistically problematical, there may be an economic case for identifying and treating asymptomatic carriage if the costs of screening and treatment are less than the costs of identifying and treating those individuals infected by asymptomatic hosts.

  11. A SNARE-like protein and biotin are implicated in soybean cyst nematode virulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Some phytoparasitic nematodes have the ability to infect and reproduce on plants that are normally considered resistant to nematode infection. Such nematodes are referred to as virulent and the mechanisms they use to evade or suppress host plant defenses are not well understood. Here, we report the ...

  12. First report on nematode parasite infection in the yellowbar angelfish Pomacanthus maculosus (Perciformes: Pomacanthidae) from the Iraqi coral reef, with description of a new species of Cucullanus (Nematoda: Ascaridida) using the integrated approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liang; Ali, Atheer H; Zhao, Wen-Ting; Lü, Liang; Xu, Zhen

    2016-12-01

    The yellowbar angelfish Pomacanthus maculosus (Forsskål) (Perciformes: Pomacanthidae) is a beautiful, marine ornamental fish with very important commercial value. However, to date, no information is available on nematode parasite infection in P. maculosus. In the present study, the integrated approaches including light and scanning electron microscopy, and sequencing and analysing ribosomal [small ribosomal DNA (18S) and internal transcribed spacer (ITS)] and mitochondrial [cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1)] target regions, respectively, were employed for the systematic evaluation of the nematode parasites firstly isolated from P. maculosus in the Iraqi coral reef. The results revealed that these nematodes represent a new species of Cucullanus (Ascaridida: Cucullanidae). The phylogenetic analyses based on 18S, ITS and cox1 sequences were constructed, respectively, to assess the phylogenetic relationships between the new species and the other cucullanids, and the monophyly of Cucullanus, as well as some its related genus-level taxa. The results supported C. extraneus n. sp. appear to be sister to C. hainanensis, and the genera Cucullanus, Dichelyne and Truttaedacnitis may be not monophyletic assemblages. This is the first report of the occurrence of nematode parasites in P. maculosus. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  13. Gastrointestinal parasites of cats in Denmark assessed by necropsy and concentration McMaster technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takeuchi-Storm, Nao; Mejer, H.; Al-Sabi, Mohammad Nafi Solaiman

    2015-01-01

    The large population of feral cats in Denmark may potentially transmit pathogens to household cats and zoonotic parasites to humans. A total of 99 euthanized cats; feral cats (n = 92) and household cats with outdoor access (n = 7), were collected from March to May 2014 from the Zealand region...... was the second most common gastrointestinal nematode of cats but had the highest intensity of infection. For T. cati, prevalence and worm burden were significantly higher in feral than household cats. No juvenile cats were infected with H. taeniaeformis, and age thus had a significant effect on prevalence...

  14. Timecourse microarray analyses reveal global changes in gene expression of susceptible Glycine max (soybean) roots during infection by Heterodera glycines (soybean cyst nematode).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkharouf, Nadim W; Klink, Vincent P; Chouikha, Imed B; Beard, Hunter S; MacDonald, Margaret H; Meyer, Susan; Knap, Halina T; Khan, Rana; Matthews, Benjamin F

    2006-09-01

    Changes in gene expression within roots of Glycine max (soybean), cv. Kent, susceptible to infection by Heterodera glycines (the soybean cyst nematode [SCN]), at 6, 12, and 24 h, and 2, 4, 6, and 8 days post-inoculation were monitored using microarrays containing more than 6,000 cDNA inserts. Replicate, independent biological samples were examined at each time point. Gene expression was analyzed statistically using T-tests, ANOVA, clustering algorithms, and online analytical processing (OLAP). These analyses allow the user to query the data in several ways without importing the data into third-party software. RT-PCR confirmed that WRKY6 transcription factor, trehalose phosphate synthase, EIF4a, Skp1, and CLB1 were differentially induced across most time-points. Other genes induced across most timepoints included lipoxygenase, calmodulin, phospholipase C, metallothionein-like protein, and chalcone reductase. RT-PCR demonstrated enhanced expression during the first 12 h of infection for Kunitz trypsin inhibitor and sucrose synthase. The stress-related gene, SAM-22, phospholipase D and 12-oxophytodienoate reductase were also induced at the early time-points. At 6 and 8 dpi there was an abundance of transcripts expressed that encoded genes involved in transcription and protein synthesis. Some of those genes included ribosomal proteins, and initiation and elongation factors. Several genes involved in carbon metabolism and transport were also more abundant. Those genes included glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, fructose-bisphosphate aldolase and sucrose synthase. These results identified specific changes in gene transcript levels triggered by infection of susceptible soybean roots by SCN.

  15. Gastrointestinal parasite infections of sheep and goats in a semi-arid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    INFECTION DES MOUTONS ET DES CHEVRES PAR DES PARASITES GASTROINTESTINAUX DANS UNE ZONE SEMI-ARIDE DU DISTRICT DE MACHAKOS AU KENYA Résumé Une enquête sur les infections des petits ruminants par des parasites gastro-intestinaux et des douves du foie a été menée pendant 18 mois ...

  16. Local and long-distance calling: Conversations between the gut microbiota and intra- and extra-gastrointestinal tract infections

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    Joshua E Denny

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Preservation of health from infectious diseases depends upon both mucosal and systemic immunity via the collaborative effort of innate and adaptive immune responses. The proficiency of host immunity stems from robust defense mechanisms—physical barriers and specialized immune cells—and a failure of these mechanisms leads to pathology. Intriguingly, immunocompetence to pathogens can be shaped by the gut microbiome as recent publications highlight a dynamic interplay between the gut microbiome and host susceptibility to infection. Modulation of host immunity to enteric pathogens has long been studied where gut bacteria shape multiple facts of both innate and adaptive immunity. Conversely, the impact of gut commensals on host immunity to extra-gastrointestinal (GI tract infections has only recently been recognized. In this context, the gut microbiome can augment host immunity to extra-GI tract bacterial, viral, and parasitic pathogens. This review explores the research that affords insight into the role of the gut microbiome in various infectious diseases, with a particular emphasis on extra-GI tract infections. A better understanding of the link between the gut microbiome and infectious disease will be critical for improving global health in the years ahead.

  17. Gastrointestinal Helminths in Slaughtered Cattle in Ibadan, South-Western Nigeria

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    Olubukola Deborah Adedipe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As part of an ongoing project to investigate the epidemiology of gastrointestinal helminths of cattle in Nigeria, we carried out a systematic random sampling of cattle slaughtered in a major abattoir in Ibadan, south-western Nigeria. Using sedimentation and floatation methods, we analyzed fecal samples from 397 animals between March and May 2013. Overall, 163 (41.6% of the animals had at least one gastrointestinal helminth egg, comprising a total of eight helminths from different genera (i.e., four nematodes, three trematodes, and one cestode, with nematode infection being the highest (71.54%. In addition, eggs of four helminths of zoonotic importance were also obtained. Among the cattle examined, the Bunaji breed was the most infected (46%; 69/150. Furthermore, female animals (OR=1.1; 95% CI: 0.60–1.84 and animals with moderate body condition (OR=1.2; 95% CI: 0.80–1.79 are more likely to be positive to helminth infection. Our findings reveal that there were helminth infections of both zoonotic and socioeconomic importance among the cattle screened. Considering the impact of the infections on animal production and public health, we advocate that effective prophylactic measures be adopted as a first step to curtail helminth infections of cattle in Nigeria.

  18. Gastrointestinal viral load and enteroendocrine cell number are associated with altered survival in HIV-1 infected individuals.

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    Guido van Marle

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infects and destroys cells of the immune system leading to an overt immune deficiency known as HIV acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS. The gut associated lymphoid tissue is one of the major lymphoid tissues targeted by HIV-1, and is considered a reservoir for HIV-1 replication and of major importance in CD4+ T-cell depletion. In addition to immunodeficiency, HIV-1 infection also directly causes gastrointestinal (GI dysfunction, also known as HIV enteropathy. This enteropathy can manifest itself as many pathological changes in the GI tract. The objective of this study was to determine the association of gut HIV-1 infection markers with long-term survival in a cohort of men who have sex with men (MSM enrolled pre-HAART (Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy. We examined survival over 15-years in a cohort of 42 HIV-infected cases: In addition to CD4+ T cell counts and HIV-1 plasma viral load, multiple gut compartment (duodenum and colon biopsies were taken by endoscopy every 6 months during the initial 3-year period. HIV-1 was cultured from tissues and phenotyped and viral loads in the gut tissues were determined. Moreover, the tissues were subjected to an extensive assessment of enteroendocrine cell distribution and pathology. The collected data was used for survival analyses, which showed that patients with higher gut tissue viral load levels had a significantly worse survival prognosis. Moreover, lower numbers of serotonin (duodenum and somatostatin (duodenum and colon immunoreactive cell counts in the gut tissues of patients was associated with significant lower survival prognosis. Our study, suggested that HIV-1 pathogenesis and survival prognosis is associated with altered enteroendocrine cell numbers, which could point to a potential role for enteroendocrine function in HIV infection and pathogenesis.

  19. The Elusive Search for Reniform Nematode Resistance in Cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanal, Churamani; McGawley, Edward C; Overstreet, Charles; Stetina, Salliana R

    2018-02-05

    The reniform nematode (Rotylenchulus reniformis Linford and Oliveira) has emerged as the most important plant-parasitic nematode of cotton in the United States cotton belt. Success in the development of reniform nematode-resistant upland cotton cultivars (Gossypium hirsutum L.) has not been realized despite over three decades of breeding efforts. Research approaches ranging from conventional breeding to triple species hybrids to marker-assisted selection have been employed to introgress reniform nematode resistance from other species of cotton into upland cultivars. Reniform nematode-resistant breeding lines derived from G. longicalyx were developed in 2007. However, these breeding lines displayed stunting symptoms and a hypersensitive response to reniform nematode infection. Subsequent breeding efforts focused on G. barbadense, G. aridum, G. armoreanum, and other species that have a high level of resistance to reniform nematode. Marker-assisted selection has greatly improved screening of reniform nematode-resistant lines. The use of advanced molecular techniques such as CRISPER-Cas9 systems and alternative ways such as delivery of suitable "cry" proteins and specific double-stranded RNA to nematodes will assist in developing resistant cultivars of cotton. In spite of the efforts of cotton breeders and nematologists, successes are limited only to the development of reniform nematode-resistant breeding lines. In this article, we provide an overview of the approaches employed to develop reniform nematode-resistant upland cotton cultivars in the past, progress to date, major obstacles, and some promising future research activity.

  20. The clinical significance of gastrointestinal decontamination in the occurrence of endogenous infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, A; Nagao, T; Sawamura, S; Ikigai, H

    1984-12-01

    No significant difference was seen in the incidence of infections between subjects receiving complete, selective and no decontamination aimed at the intestinal microflora in studies evaluating the preventative potential against endogenous infections in the compromised host maintained under protective isolation. This finding is reported together with a report of Serratia marcescens septicemia in a patient with leukemia who was given antibiotics systemically and kept under protective isolation. The establishment of opportunistic infections in relation to these results is discussed in terms of the biological phenomena of the interaction between the intestinal flora and the host, and between the species comprising the intestinal flora.

  1. Coprological study of gastrointestinal parasites of captive animals at Rangpur Recreational Garden and Zoo in Bangladesh

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    M.M. Khatun

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A survey was undertaken to investigate the prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites in different groups of mammals housed at Rangpur Recreational Garden and Zoo in Bangladesh. A total of 45 fecal samples of different animals (11 carnivores, 26 herbivores and 8 primates were examined from April to September 2011 for the presence of gastrointestinal parasites. The overall prevalence of parasitic infection was 60% (27/45 of which 35.6% (16/45 were helminth infections and 24% (11/45 were protozoic infections. The identified parasites included protozoa (Balantidium coli and Coccidia sp., nematodes (Toxascaris leonina, Toxocara cati, Strongyloides sp., Dictyocaulus sp., Trichuris sp. and stomach worm, cestodes (Spirometra sp. and Moniezia benedeni and trematodes (Fasciola sp.. At least one parasite was identified in the fecal samples of all animals except of the samples from bear, python, water buck and olive baboon. Mixed infections were observed in Rhesus monkey (Trichuris sp. and Balantidium coli, in deer (Strongyloides sp. and Coccidia sp. and in lion (Toxascaris leonina and Spirometra sp.. Helminth infections were more common than protozoic infections in carnivores and herbivores, whereas in primates, protozoic infections were more common than helminth infections. The high prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites found in zoo animals in this study emphasizes the importance of controlling these parasitic infections in order to safeguard the health of housed wild animals and of the humans working with these animals.

  2. Absence of gastrointestinal infections in a cohort of patients with Zollinger-Ellison syndrome and other acid hypersecretors receiving long-term acid suppression with lansoprazole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Worthington Julie

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The relationship between proton pump inhibitor therapy and other acid suppressing medications and the risk of gastrointestinal infections remains controversial. Methods Patients enrolled in a long-term trial of lansoprazole for Zollinger-Ellison syndrome and other acid hypersecretory states had interval histories taken every six months regarding hospitalizations or other intercurrent medical conditions. All medications taken were also reviewed at each visit. In addition, available patients were specifically queried during the study period 2006–2007 regarding the development of any gastrointestinal infections, hospitalizations, and prescriptions for antibiotics. Results Ninety patients were enrolled in our long-term study and 81 were available for review. The median basal gastric pH for the cohort after stabilization on therapy was 2.9 and ranged from 1.1 – 8.4 with a median pentagastrin stimulated gastric pH of 1.60 (range 1.0 – 8.2. No patient developed a clinically significant gastrointestinal infection during the study. The median patient years of follow-up were 6.25 years. Conclusion In a cohort of patients with gastric acid hypersecretion in whom acid secretion status was monitored on lansoprazole, all were free of significant gastrointestinal infections on long-term follow-up. Trial registration NCT00204373

  3. Detection and molecular characterization of ascarid nematode infection (Toxascaris leonina and Toxocara cati) in captive Asiatic lions (Panthera leo persica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Rahul Mohanchandra; Lakshmikantan, Uthandaraman; Hasan, Shakir; Poornachandar, Anantula; Shivaji, Sisinthy

    2012-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the ascarid infection in Asiatic lions using scat samples, based on microscopic analysis, PCR amplification of the ITS-2 region of ribosomal DNA and sequence analysis of the amplicons. Microscopic analysis indicated the presence of eggs of Toxascaris leonina in eleven of the sixteen scat samples analysed and in one of these eleven scats eggs of Toxocara cati were also detected. In five of the scats eggs were not detectable. The presence of T. leonina in all the infected samples was also confirmed by PCR amplification of the ITS-2 of ribosomal RNA gene and five of these also showed amplicons corresponding to T. cati, respectively. Toxocara canis infection was not observed in any of the scat samples. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the ITS-2 region indicated 97% to 99% similarity with T. leonina and T. cati, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first molecular characterization of ascarid infection in captive Asiatic lions from a zoological garden of India. This study also indicates that Asiatic lions are more prone to infection either with T. leonina or T. cati and the parasite is not host specific.

  4. Gastrointestinal parasite infections and self-medication in wild chimpanzees surviving in degraded forest fragments within an agricultural landscape mosaic in Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Hideo; Bardi, Massimo; Huffman, Michael A.

    2017-01-01

    Monitoring health in wild great apes is integral to their conservation and is especially important where they share habitats with humans, given the potential for zoonotic pathogen exchange. We studied the intestinal parasites of wild chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) inhabiting degraded forest fragments amid farmland and villages in Bulindi, Uganda. We first identified protozoan and helminth parasites infecting this population. Sixteen taxa were demonstrated microscopically (9 protozoa, 5 nematodes, 1 cestode, and 1 trematode). DNA sequence analysis enabled more precise identification of larval nematodes (e.g. Oesophagostomum stephanostomum, O. bifurcum, Strongyloides fuelleborni, Necator sp. Type II) and tapeworm proglottids (genus Bertiella). To better understand the ecology of infections, we used multidimensional scaling analysis to reveal general patterns of association among parasites, climate, and whole leaf swallowing–a prevalent self-medicative behaviour at Bulindi linked to control of nodular worms (Oesophagostomum spp.). Prevalence of parasites varied with climate in diverse ways. For example, Oesophagostomum sp. was detected in faeces at higher frequencies with increasing rainfall but was most clearly associated with periods of low temperature. Certain parasites occurred together within chimpanzee hosts more or less frequently than expected by chance. For example, the commensal ciliate Troglodytella abrassarti was negatively associated with Balantidium coli and Oesophagostomum sp., possibly because the latter taxa make the large intestine less suitable for T. abrassarti. Whole leaves in faeces showed independent associations with the prevalence of Oesophagostomum sp., Strongyloides sp., and hookworm by microscopic examination, and with egestion of adult O. stephanostomum by macroscopic inspection. All parasites identified to species or genus have been reported in wild chimpanzees inhabiting less-disturbed environments than Bulindi

  5. Gastrointestinal parasite infections and self-medication in wild chimpanzees surviving in degraded forest fragments within an agricultural landscape mosaic in Uganda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew R McLennan

    Full Text Available Monitoring health in wild great apes is integral to their conservation and is especially important where they share habitats with humans, given the potential for zoonotic pathogen exchange. We studied the intestinal parasites of wild chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii inhabiting degraded forest fragments amid farmland and villages in Bulindi, Uganda. We first identified protozoan and helminth parasites infecting this population. Sixteen taxa were demonstrated microscopically (9 protozoa, 5 nematodes, 1 cestode, and 1 trematode. DNA sequence analysis enabled more precise identification of larval nematodes (e.g. Oesophagostomum stephanostomum, O. bifurcum, Strongyloides fuelleborni, Necator sp. Type II and tapeworm proglottids (genus Bertiella. To better understand the ecology of infections, we used multidimensional scaling analysis to reveal general patterns of association among parasites, climate, and whole leaf swallowing-a prevalent self-medicative behaviour at Bulindi linked to control of nodular worms (Oesophagostomum spp.. Prevalence of parasites varied with climate in diverse ways. For example, Oesophagostomum sp. was detected in faeces at higher frequencies with increasing rainfall but was most clearly associated with periods of low temperature. Certain parasites occurred together within chimpanzee hosts more or less frequently than expected by chance. For example, the commensal ciliate Troglodytella abrassarti was negatively associated with Balantidium coli and Oesophagostomum sp., possibly because the latter taxa make the large intestine less suitable for T. abrassarti. Whole leaves in faeces showed independent associations with the prevalence of Oesophagostomum sp., Strongyloides sp., and hookworm by microscopic examination, and with egestion of adult O. stephanostomum by macroscopic inspection. All parasites identified to species or genus have been reported in wild chimpanzees inhabiting less-disturbed environments than

  6. Infections with gastrointestinal parasitic helminths indigenous to Japan and their treatment historically studied in an attempt to control the diseases in countries where they are still rampant: (1) the Jomon to Edo periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, Jun; Sakagami, Hiroshi; Kuwada, Masahiro; Caceres, Armando; Sekiya, Hiroshi; Tamai, Eiji

    2009-01-01

    Infections with gastrointestinal parasitic helminthes were historically surveyed from the Jomon period to the end of the Edo period in Japan. The parasitic helminthes whose eggs or symptoms were shown in the remains and bibliographies are the roundworm, whipworm, liver fluke, Yokogawa's fluke and the cestode, Diphyllobothrium sp. The first two are soil-transmitted nematodes and the other three parasitic helminths are those with which people are infected following eating raw fish. The infection routes provide valuable information on the environments, life-style and customs in those days. The eggs of the soil-transmitted parasites have the thick shells resistant to the environments. Humans are infected with the parasites after the eggs are orally ingested with soil, dust, vegetables grown with night soil or manure. When the custom of the night soil was started in the history of Japan was discussed with this infection route. In ancient times, feces are thought to have been discarded. In the Medieval Period, they were started to be used as a fertilizer. No mature types of manure were used until the modern times (already in the Edo period). To our idea, no recoveries of eggs of hookworms causing severe anemia do not necessarily mean that people were not infected with the parasites in those days because the eggs are covered with thin shells liable to rupture. The latter fact of the eggs of the platihelminths, C. sinensis, M. yokogawai and D. latum has something to do with Japanese traditional eating customs, unequivocally demonstrating that they ate raw fish from the Nara Period, at latest, until today. Whether eggs of the cestode (D. latum) are found in Jomon remains, Momijiyama Iseki, Hokkaido should be investigated. If no eggs of the cestode are found in their toilet site or elsewhere, it could be concluded that they did not have the custom of eating raw salmon. Such a conclusion would be itself a new fact. One of the effective treatments for the cestode (D. latum

  7. Investigations into the biochemical basis for nematode resistance in roots of three musa cultivars in response to Radopholus similis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collingborn, F M; Gowen, S R; Mueller-Harvey, I

    2000-11-01

    The Musa cultivars, Dwarf Cavendish, Yangambi Km5 and Kunnan, exhibit considerable differences in resistance to Radopholus similis. Infection resulted in significant increases in condensed tannins and flavan-3,4-diols in roots (P < 0.001). The highly resistant cultivar Kunnan had the highest levels of condensed tannins before and after infection. The preinfection levels were similar to the postinfection levels of the two other cultivars. Tannins had mostly procyanidin character, but Kunnan also contained propelargonidins; these compounds may be involved in the resistance mechanism. It is suggested that the butanol/HCl assay be used as a rapid test in screening for resistance to R. similis.

  8. [Effects of prebiotics and probiotics on gastrointestinal tract lymphoid tissue in hiv infected patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feria, Manuel G; Taborda, Natalia A; Hernandez, Juan C; Rugeles, María T

    2017-02-01

    HIV infection induces alterations in almost all immune cell populations, mainly in CD4+ T cells, leading to the development of opportunistic infections. The gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) constitutes the most important site for viral replication, because the main target cells, memory T-cells, reside in this tissue. It is currently known that alterations in GALT are critical during the course of the infection, as HIV-1 induces loss of tissue integrity and promotes translocation of microbial products from the intestinal lumen to the systemic circulation, leading to a persistent immune activation state and immune exhaustion. Although antiretroviral treatment decreases viral load and substantially improves the prognosis of the infection, the alterations in GALT remains, having a great impact on the ability to establish effective immune responses. This emphasizes the importance of developing new therapeutic alternatives that may promote structural and functional integrity of this tissue. In this regard, therapy with probiotics/prebiotics has beneficial effects in GALT, mainly in syndromes characterized by intestinal dysbiosis, including the HIV-1 infection. In these patients, the consumption of probiotics/prebiotics decreased microbial products in plasma and CD4+ T cell activation, increased CD4+ T cell frequency, in particular Th17, and improved the intestinal flora. In this review, the most important findings on the potential impact of the probiotics/prebiotics therapy are discussed.

  9. Role of stress-related hormones in plant defence during early infection of the cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii in Arabidopsis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kammerhofer, N.; Radakovic, Z.; Regis, J.M.A.; Dobrev, Petre; Vaňková, Radomíra; Grundler, F.M.W.; Siddique, S.; Hofmann, J.; Wieczorek, K.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 207, č. 3 (2015), s. 778-789 ISSN 0028-646X R&D Projects: GA MŠk LD14120 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : defence responses * early infection * ethylene Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 7.210, year: 2015

  10. Aspects of gastrointestinal immunology and nutrition in human immunodeficiency virus-1 infection in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castello-Branco Luiz RR

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucosal surfaces have a fundamental participation in many aspects of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection pathogenesis. In Brazilian HIV-1 infected subjects, loss of weight and appetite are among the most debilitating symptoms. In this review we describe a defined mucosal immunogen that has profound but transient effects on HIV viral load, and we suggest that gut associated lymphoid tissue under constant immunostimulation is likely to provide a major contribution to the total levels of HIV. We also show that hypermetabolism appears to play a role in the wasting process in Brazilian patients coinfected with HIV and tuberculosis.

  11. Gastrointestinal Symptoms in HIV-Infected Patients: Female Sex and Smoking as Risk Factors in an Outpatient Cohort in Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annelisa Silva E Alves de Carvalho Santos

    Full Text Available This study aimed to estimate the incidence of gastrointestinal symptoms (GIS and associated factors in an outpatient cohort of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA followed between October 2009 and July 2011. We evaluated nausea and/or vomiting, dyspepsia, heartburn, diarrhea, constipation, and flatulence. The outcome variable was the presence of three or more GIS. Sociodemographic (sex, skin color, age, income, years of schooling, lifestyle (smoking status, alcohol consumption, physical activity level, clinical (antiretroviral therapy, time of HIV infection, CD4 lymphocyte count, viral load, and anthropometric (nutritional status and waist circumference variables were investigated. Data on sociodemographic and lifestyle variables were collected through a pre-tested and standardized questionnaire. CD4 count was determined by flow cytometry and viral load by branched DNA (bDNA assays for HIV-1. All variables were analyzed at a p<0.05 significance level. Among 290 patients, the incidence of three or more GIS was 28.8% (95% CI 23.17 to 33.84 and 74.48% presented at least one symptom. Female gender (IR 2.29, 95% CI 1.63 to 3.22 and smoking status (IR 1.93, 95% CI 1.30 to 2.88 were risk factors for the presence of three or more GIS after multivariate Poisson regression. A high incidence of gastrointestinal symptoms was found among PLWHA, and it was significantly associated with female sex and tobacco use. Those results reinforce the relevance of investigating the presence of GIS in PLWHA as it may affect treatment adherence.

  12. Influência do parasitismo por nematódeos sobre o perfil hematológico de caprinos Influence of nematodes on the hematological parameters of goats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.J.T. Mattos

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The interaction between ivermectin-resistant and ivermectin-sensitive nematodes and the effect of this anthelmintic on the hematological status of naturally infected goats was assessed using 36 animals. Of these animals, 12 were infected by ivermectin-sensitive gastrointestinal nematodes of the superfamily Trichostrongyloidea (G1s e G1s 12 were infected by ivermectin-resistant nematodes (G2r e G2r and 12 uninfect goats (G3np. Six infected goats of each group (G1sm e G2rm received oral ivermectin al the dose of 200µg/kg, while six were used as controls (G1sc e G2rc. Blood and fecal samples were collected on the day of medication (day zero, at seven, and at 14 days thereafter. The erythrocyte count and hematocrit levels in goats infected by sensitive strains of Haemonchus was greater than that of the group infected by a resistant strain. These values are lower in comparison to those observed in uninfected goats. The increase in the number of eggs per gram of feces, regardless of the strain, is inversely related to the hematocrit level. The use of ivermectin did not significantly change the hematological parameters of goats.

  13. In vitro and in vivo efficacy of Monepantel (AAD 1566 against laboratory models of human intestinal nematode infections.

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    Lucienne Tritten

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Few effective drugs are available for soil-transmitted helminthiases and drug resistance is of concern. In the present work, we tested the efficacy of the veterinary drug monepantel, a potential drug development candidate compared to standard drugs in vitro and in parasite-rodent models of relevance to human soil-transmitted helminthiases. METHODOLOGY: A motility assay was used to assess the efficacy of monepantel, albendazole, levamisole, and pyrantel pamoate in vitro on third-stage larvae (L3 and adult worms of Ancylostoma ceylanicum, Necator americanus and Trichuris muris. Ancylostoma ceylanicum- or N. americanus-infected hamsters, T. muris- or Ascaris suum-infected mice, and Strongyloides ratti-infected rats were treated with single oral doses of monepantel or with one of the reference drugs. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Monepantel showed excellent activity on A. ceylanicum adults (IC(50 = 1.7 µg/ml, a moderate effect on T. muris L3 (IC(50 = 78.7 µg/ml, whereas no effect was observed on A. ceylanicum L3, T. muris adults, and both stages of N. americanus. Of the standard drugs, levamisole showed the highest potency in vitro (IC(50 = 1.6 and 33.1 µg/ml on A. ceylanicum and T. muris L3, respectively. Complete elimination of worms was observed with monepantel (10 mg/kg and albendazole (2.5 mg/kg in A. ceylanicum-infected hamsters. In the N. americanus hamster model single 10 mg/kg oral doses of monepantel and albendazole resulted in worm burden reductions of 58.3% and 100%, respectively. Trichuris muris, S. ratti and A. suum were not affected by treatment with monepantel in vivo (following doses of 600 mg/kg, 32 mg/kg and 600 mg/kg, respectively. In contrast, worm burden reductions of 95.9% and 76.6% were observed following treatment of T. muris- and A. suum infected mice with levamisole (200 mg/kg and albendazole (600 mg/kg, respectively. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Monepantel reveals low or no activities against N. americanus

  14. Helminths of Wild Predatory Mammals of Ukraine. Nematodes

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    Varodi E. I.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The article summarizes information on the nematodes parasitic in wild Carnivora of Ukraine. Totally, 50 species of nematodes are known to parasitise carnivorans in the country, 30 species were registered in the present study. Nematodes were found in 14 species of examined hosts from the families Canidae, Mustelidae and Felidae. Maximum diversity of nematodes of carnivorans was observed in Polissia (forest zone in the north of the country and in Kherson Region in the south. Hosts from the family Canidae harboured 19 nematode species; studied species of the Mustelidae were infected with 15 nematode species, 6 of them were also found in Canidae. The wildcat (Felis silvestris Schreber and the lynx (Lynx lynx Linnaeus harboured only two species of nematodes, both are specific parasites of these hosts. The most comprehensive information concerns the nematode communities of the red fox (Vulpes vulpes Linnaeus and the wolf (Canis lupus Linnaeus, with 19 and 9 nematode species found, correspondingly. From 1 to 6 nematode species were found in other species of carnivorans.

  15. Cyst nematode-induced changes in plant development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goverse, A.

    1999-01-01

    This thesis describes a first attempt to investigate the biological activity of cyst nematode secretions on plant cell proliferation and the molecular mechanisms underlying feeding cell development in plant roots upon cyst nematode infection.

    To investigate the role of

  16. The effect of grazing forage containing condensed tannins on gastro-intestinal parasite infection and milk composition in Angora does.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, B R; Hart, S P; Miller, D; Tomita, G M; Loetz, E; Sahlu, T

    2005-06-10

    The objective of this study was to evaluate effects of the condensed tannin (CT)-containing forage sericea lespedeza (sericea lespedeza (SL); Lespedeza cuneata; 15.2% CT), on fecal egg count (FEC), larval development (larvae/10 g of feces), worm burden and immune response compared with a crabgrass (Digitaria ischaemum)/Kentucky 31 tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea; control forage (CTF)) forage low in CT (0.32% CT) in grazing Angora does and their kids. Fifty worm-free mixed-age does were randomly allocated to three treatments. One treatment (10 does; initial liveweight (LW) = 45+/-1.5 kg) entailed grazing of SL forage from April 25 to July 15, 2002 with a second treatment of CTF (20 does; initial LW = 43+/-1.4 kg) grazing during the same period. Does of the third treatment (20 does; initial LW = 44+/-1.4 kg) grazed a sward of SL for 2 weeks and then one of CTF for 2 weeks followed by alternating between the two pastures every 2-week rotational grazing (ROT). To gauge levels of infective larvae on pasture, three worm-free Angora kids (initial LW = 3.6+/-0.2 kg) were randomly selected as tracers. Tracers grazed for final 60 days and were euthanized for determination of worm burden. The immune response of does was measured by skin thickness reaction after the intradermal injection of 250 microg phytohemagglutinin (PHA). Mean FEC for SL and ROT were substantially lower (P kids was lower (P milk somatic cell counts (SCC) than does grazing non-CT-containing forage. In summary, grazing CT forages reduced FEC, larval development and worm burden, and also appeared to enhance immune response. The CT-containing forage SL reduced gastro-intestinal parasite infections of Angora does and kids.

  17. Significance of Helicobacter pylori infection and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in patients with bleeding from upper part of the gastrointestinal tract

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    Golubović Gradimir

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs use are considered to be the most important risk factors having influence on the onset of bleeding gastroduodenal lesions. Whether there is an interaction between H. pylori infection and the use of NSAIDs in the development of peptic ulcer disease is still controversial. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the prevalence of NSAIDs use and H. pylori infection in patients presented with bleeding gastroduodenal lesions. Methods. During the period from January 2003 - December 2003 we prospectively obtained data of all the patients (n=106 presented with signs of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. All the patients were admitted to the intensive care unit, with the endoscopy performed within 12 hours after admission. Histologic analysis was used for the detection of H. pylori infection. The NSAIDs and aspirin use data were obtained by anamnesis. Results. The results of our study revealed that the most common sources of upper gastrointestinal bleeding were duodenal (57 patients, 53.77% and ventricular (36 patients, 33.96% ulcers. The majority of the examined cases were associated with both H. pylori infection and NSAIDs use. A statistically significant difference among the studied groups of patients was proven. Conclusion. The majority of bleeding gastroduodenal lesions were associated with the coexistence of H. pylori infection and NSAIDs use, while their independent influences were statistically less important. Eradication of H. pylori infection in patients using NSAIDs might prevent upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage and reduce peptic ulcer bleeding risk. .

  18. Prevalence of Protozoa and Gastrointestinal Helminthes in Stray Cats in Zanjan Province, North-West of Iran

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    SA Altome

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cats and other felines act as definitive hosts for many intestinal parasites, some of which are responsible for several zoonotic diseases.  The aim of this study was to determine the type and prevalence of protozoa and gastrointestinal helminthes among stray cats. Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted. Digestive tracts of 100 stray cats in Zanjan Province, north-west of Iran were autopsied in order to recognize gastrointestinal helminthes and intestinal protozoan parasites. These cats were collected by baited cage trapped from October 2007 to September 2008. Gender and species of helminthes and protozoa were rec­ognized using authentic diagnostic criteria. Statistical evaluation was performed by SPSS version 14. Results: Forty-two percent of cats were infected with intestinal protozoan parasites, 33% were infected with cestodes and 39% infected with gastrointestinal nematodes. Four species protozoan parasites and eight gastrointestinal helminthes were recovered from the animals, including Taenia taeniaeformis, Dipylidium spp., Joyeuxiella pasqaulei, Toxocara cati, Phy­saloptera praeputialis, Rectalaria spp., Onicolla, Cystoisospora spp., Toxoplasma gondii, and Sarcocystis spp . Conclusions: The high infection rate of Toxoplasma and some gastrointestinal helminthes in stray cats is considered to be critical from the viewpoint of public health importance.

  19. Nematode Parasitemia in School aged Children in Sapele, Delta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two hundred (200) faecal samples were collected from school aged children in four randomly selected primary schools in Sapele metropolis of Delta State, Nigeria, to determine gastrointestinal nematode parasitemia. The formal-ether concentration technique was used to analyse the specimens and data obtained revealed ...

  20. Effect of tanniniferous browse meal on nematode faecal egg counts ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of tanniniferous browse meal on faecal egg counts (FEC) and intestinal worm burdens was investigated in sheep and goats infested experimentally with gastrointestinal nematodes. Initially, leaves of different browse tree species were assayed for condensed tannin (CT) content using a colorimetric method to ...

  1. Severe gastrointestinal involvement in adult-onset Henoch–Schönlein purpura associated with clarithromycin-resistant Helicobacter pylori infection

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    Guillermo Delgado-García

    2017-04-01

    Conclusion: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report describing resistance to clarithromycin-containing triple therapy in a H. pylori-infected adult patient with HSP. Gastrointestinal bleeding remains one of the most feared manifestations of HSP. These patients may benefit from H. pylori screening, as this might positively affect their prognosis. Further studies in adults are nevertheless needed to clarify this association and its therapeutic impact.

  2. The Nematode Caenorhabditis Elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Cynthia

    1988-01-01

    Discusses advantages of nematode use for studying patterns of cell division, differentiation, and morphogenesis. Describes nematode development. Cites experimental approaches available for genetic studies. Reviews the topics of control of cell division and differentiation, the nervous system, and muscle assembly and function of the organism. (RT)

  3. Nematode-Trapping Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiangzhi; Xiang, Meichun; Liu, Xingzhong

    2017-01-01

    Nematode-trapping fungi are a unique and intriguing group of carnivorous microorganisms that can trap and digest nematodes by means of specialized trapping structures. They can develop diverse trapping devices, such as adhesive hyphae, adhesive knobs, adhesive networks, constricting rings, and nonconstricting rings. Nematode-trapping fungi have been found in all regions of the world, from the tropics to Antarctica, from terrestrial to aquatic ecosystems. They play an important ecological role in regulating nematode dynamics in soil. Molecular phylogenetic studies have shown that the majority of nematode-trapping fungi belong to a monophyletic group in the order Orbiliales (Ascomycota). Nematode-trapping fungi serve as an excellent model system for understanding fungal evolution and interaction between fungi and nematodes. With the development of molecular techniques and genome sequencing, their evolutionary origins and divergence, and the mechanisms underlying fungus-nematode interactions have been well studied. In recent decades, an increasing concern about the environmental hazards of using chemical nematicides has led to the application of these biological control agents as a rapidly developing component of crop protection.

  4. Gastro-Intestinal Parasites of Warthogs (Phacochoerus Africanus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A survey was conducted to assess the prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites in warthogs from the Nazinga Game Ranch of Burkina Faso. The study revealed that Eight different nematodes and one estode species were present in the gastrointestinal tracks of the animals. In the stomach, Simondsia paradoxa was found at ...

  5. Mixed infection of Galleria mellonella with two entomopathogenic nematode (Nematoda: Rhabditida) species: Steinernema affine benefits from the presence of Steinernema kraussei

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Půža, Vladimír; Mráček, Zdeněk

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 102, č. 1 (2009), s. 40-43 ISSN 0022-2011 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : entomopathogenic nematodes * Steinernema affine * Steinernema kraussei Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.807, year: 2009

  6. Observations on the transmission and the seasonality of infection of the nematode Raphidascaris acus in Salmo trutta fario in a small trout stream in North Bohemia, Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Moravec, František

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 2 (2004), s. 91-97 ISSN 0440-6605 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA524/00/0267 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6022909 Keywords : parasitic nematode * Raphidascaris acus * seasonality Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 0.365, year: 2004

  7. Parasitic nematodes of the genus Syphacia Seurat, 1916 infecting Muridae in the British Isles, and the peculiar case of Syphacia frederici.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stewart, Alex; Lowe, Ann; Smales, Lesley; Bajer, Anna; Bradley, Jan; Dwużnik, Dorota; Franssen, Frits; Griffith, Jack; Stuart, Peter; Turner, Cyan; Zaleśny, Grzegorz; Behnke, Jerzy M

    2017-01-01

    Syphacia stroma (von Linstow, 1884) Morgan, 1932 and Syphacia frederici Roman, 1945 are oxyurid nematodes that parasitize two murid rodents, Apodemus sylvaticus and Apodemus flavicollis, on the European mainland. Only S. stroma has been recorded previously in Apodemus spp. from the British Isles.

  8. Dentirumai philippinensis n. gen., n. sp (Nematoda: Philometridae), a new tissue-infecting philometrid nematode from the loach goby Rhyacichthys aspro (Valenciennes) (Rhyacichthyidae) in the Philippines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Quiazon, K.M.A.; Moravec, František

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 87, č. 1 (2013), s. 59-65 ISSN 0022-149X R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC522 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Philometridae * Phillipine Archipelago * Parasitic nematode Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 1.303, year: 2013

  9. Characterization and Function of the Inflammatory Response to Infection by a Gastrointestinal Nematode Parasite: New Insights into Protective Th2 Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    identifies macrophages as important effector cells in protective Th2 responses, providing a possible explanation for the evolution of their...expression of chitinases and chitinase-like genes suggests a potential effector mechanism, as some helminth parasites feature a chitin cuticle that...M.B. Ascaris lumbricoides aggregation in relation to child growth status, delayed cutaneous hypersensitivity, and plant anthelmintic use in

  10. Efficacy of selected anthelmintics against gastrointestinal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study was conducted to investigate the efficacy of albendazole, tetramisole and ivermectin against gastrointestinal nematodes of sheep owned by smallholder farmers. Eighty three sheep were selected for the study and divided into four groups: the first group was treated with Albendazole, the second group ...

  11. Resistência anti-helmíntica de nematóides gastrintestinais em ovinos, Mato Grosso do Sul Anthelmintic resistance of gastrointestinal nematodes in sheep, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eurico A. Sczesny-Moraes

    2010-03-01

    , the use of chemicals is the most common. However, the continued, and indiscriminate, use of these products has selected populations of resistant helminths to anthelmintics, a phenomenon reported in the whole world. This study aimed to identify the species of gastrointestinal parasites and diagnose the status of anthelmintic resistance in sheep in the State of Mato Grosso do Sul Brazil. Feacal egg count reduction tests (FECRT were performed in flocks of sixteen farms, and the seven formulations used contained the following pharmacological bases: Albendazole, Ivermectin, Levamizol, Trichlorfon, Moxidectin, Closantel and one containing the first three in association. The species identified at necropsy, in adult sheep, were: Haemonchus contortus, Trichostrongylus colubriformis, Cooperia curticei, C. punctata, C. pectinata and Oesophagostomum columbianum, in order of prevalence. The formulations containing Albendazole and Ivermectin did not show efficacy in reducing the EPG in the flocks tested, with average reductions of 0.7 and -19.6%, respectively. Closantel presented an average efficacy of 6.7%; Levamisolee, Moxidectin and Trichlorfon, 28.7, 26.8 and 65% respectively, the combination of three bases (Albendazole, Ivermectin and Levamizol, an average efficacy of 55.8 %. The average percentages of infective larvae recovered in the faecal cultures, pre and post treatment were similar, indicating that resistance to the bases tested is present in all species cited, to a greater or lesser degree. The two genera predominantly resistant are Haemonchus sp., with 86.9%, followed by Trichostrongylus sp., with an average of 47.5%, Strongyloides sp. 33.6%, Oesophagostomum sp. 21.4% and Cooperia sp. 19.7%.

  12. Experience-dependent olfactory behaviors of the parasitic nematode Heligmosomoides polygyrus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicitas Ruiz

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Parasitic nematodes of humans and livestock cause extensive disease and economic loss worldwide. Many parasitic nematodes infect hosts as third-stage larvae, called iL3s. iL3s vary in their infection route: some infect by skin penetration, others by passive ingestion. Skin-penetrating iL3s actively search for hosts using host-emitted olfactory cues, but the extent to which passively ingested iL3s respond to olfactory cues was largely unknown. Here, we examined the olfactory behaviors of the passively ingested murine gastrointestinal parasite Heligmosomoides polygyrus. H. polygyrus iL3s were thought to reside primarily on mouse feces, and infect when mice consume feces containing iL3s. However, iL3s can also adhere to mouse fur and infect orally during grooming. Here, we show that H. polygyrus iL3s are highly active and show robust attraction to host feces. Despite their attraction to feces, many iL3s migrate off feces to engage in environmental navigation. In addition, H. polygyrus iL3s are attracted to mammalian skin odorants, suggesting that they migrate toward hosts. The olfactory preferences of H. polygyrus are flexible: some odorants are repulsive for iL3s maintained on feces but attractive for iL3s maintained off feces. Experience-dependent modulation of olfactory behavior occurs over the course of days and is mediated by environmental carbon dioxide (CO2 levels. Similar experience-dependent olfactory plasticity occurs in the passively ingested ruminant-parasitic nematode Haemonchus contortus, a major veterinary parasite. Our results suggest that passively ingested iL3s migrate off their original fecal source and actively navigate toward hosts or new host fecal sources using olfactory cues. Olfactory plasticity may be a mechanism that enables iL3s to switch from dispersal behavior to host-seeking behavior. Together, our results demonstrate that passively ingested nematodes do not remain inactive waiting to be swallowed, but rather display

  13. Disruptions of Host Immunity and Inflammation by Giardia Duodenalis: Potential Consequences for Co-Infections in the Gastro-Intestinal Tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, James A; Amat, Christina B; Buret, Andre G

    2015-11-10

    Giardia duodenalis (syn. G. intestinalis, or G. lamblia) is a leading cause of waterborne diarrheal disease that infects hundreds of millions of people annually. Research on Giardia has greatly expanded within the last few years, and our understanding of the pathophysiology and immunology on this parasite is ever increasing. At peak infection, Giardia trophozoites induce pathophysiological responses that culminate in the development of diarrheal disease. However, human data has suggested that the intestinal mucosa of Giardia-infected individuals is devoid of signs of overt intestinal inflammation, an observation that is reproduced in animal models. Thus, our understanding of host inflammatory responses to the parasite remain incompletely understood and human studies and experimental data have produced conflicting results. It is now also apparent that certain Giardia infections contain mechanisms capable of modulating their host's immune responses. As the oral route of Giardia infection is shared with many other gastrointestinal (GI) pathogens, co-infections may often occur, especially in places with poor sanitation and/or improper treatment of drinking water. Moreover, Giardia infections may modulate host immune responses and have been found to protect against the development of diarrheal disease in developing countries. The following review summarizes our current understanding of the immunomodulatory mechanisms of Giardia infections and their consequences for the host, and highlights areas for future research. Potential implications of these immunomodulatory effects during GI co-infection are also discussed.

  14. Exploring association between gastrointestinal heat retention syndrome and recurrent respiratory tract infections in children: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Fei; Yu, He; Ma, Jiaju; Wu, Liqun; Liu, Tiegang; Lv, Guokai; Zhen, Jianhua; Li, Xiaofei; Lewith, George; Gu, Xiaohong

    2016-02-27

    Recurrent respiratory tract infections (RRTIs) have a negative impact on both children's health and family wellbeing. Deficiency of ZhengQi used to be an instinct factor driving RRTI in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). Our clinical observations suggest that children with gastrointestinal heat retention syndrome (GHRS) may have a greater risk of catching respiratory tract infections (RTIs). GHRS is a new predisposing factor for RRTI and it is dietary related. This study is aimed to explore association between GHRS and RRTI. A prospective cohort study has been conducted in Beijing, China; children aged 1-18 were enrolled. TCM symptoms, demographic and physiological characteristics were recorded by using semi-structured questionnaire. GHRS was considered as a predisposing factor. Children were followed up for next 12 months. We contacted with their parents using a face-to-face questionnaire survey, via email or phone every 3 months. Episodes of RTIs were recorded in detail. Three hundred thirty four children were enrolled and 307 (91.92%) followed up for 12 months. The incidence of RTI was 4.32 episodes per child-year (95 % CI 4.03-4.61). 69 (43.13%) children in the group with GHRS suffered from RRTI; there were 48 (32.65%) children in group without GHRS. The risk ratio (RR) value of RRTI occurrence was 1.32 (95 % CI 0.91-1.91, P = 0.139), and the attributable risk percent (AR%) was 24.28%. Dry stool and irritability were positively correlated with RTI episodes, age and BMI were negatively correlated with RTI episodes in a linear regression model. Dry stool (OR = 1.510) was positively correlated with RRTI occurrence, age (OR = 0.889) and BMI (OR = 0.858) were negatively correlated with RRTI occurrence in our logistic regression model. GHRS is associated with RRTI in this cohort. Dry stool was positively associated with RRTI, and BMI was negatively associated with RRTI. Studies with larger sample size and longer follow up are needed to further

  15. Albendazole failure to control resistant nematodes in lambs: lack of effect of fasting-induced improvement on drug absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, L; Entrocasso, C; Lifschitz, A; Manazza, J; Ceballos, L; Borda, B; Lanusse, C

    2010-12-01

    Enhanced plasma availability of albendazole sulphoxide (ABZSO), the active metabolite of albendazole (ABZ), has been described in feed-restricted sheep. The aim of the present work was to determine if the absorption-related pharmacokinetic changes derived from fasting animals prior to drug treatment would modify the clinical efficacy of ABZ against resistant gastrointestinal nematodes in lambs. Forty Corriedale lambs, naturally infected with resistant gastrointestinal nematodes, were divided into 4 groups. Controls were fed ad libitum and did not receive any drug treatment. Treated animals were fed ad libitum up to 30 min prior to treatment with ABZ (3.8 mg/kg) by the intraruminal route. The control (fasted) animals were not fed during the 24-hr period prior to the start of the experiment and did not receive any drug treatment. A second treated group of animals were fasted 24 hr prior to the treatment with ABZ, as previously described for the fed-treated group. Blood samples were collected over a period of 72 hr post-treatment from 6 animals in each treated group. Plasma samples were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography. The pharmacokinetic parameters were statistically compared using parametric statistical tests. The estimation of the efficacy of the different treatments was performed by the fecal egg count reduction test (FECRT). Additionally, 4 animals randomly chosen from the control-fed and treated groups were killed 13 days post-treatment to evaluate the efficacy against different adult nematode parasites. The results were statistically compared by parametric and non-parametric tests. Significantly (P fasted compared to the fed animals. These kinetic results may be due to a fasting-induced delay in the GI transit time which increases ABZ dissolution and GI absorption. However, a poor ABZ efficacy (measured as FECRT), compatible with a high degree of nematode resistance, was obtained in both fed (48%) and fasted (49%) animals. Haemonchus

  16. Toxoplasma Co-infection Prevents Th2 Differentiation and Leads to a Helminth-Specific Th1 Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norus Ahmed

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Nematode infections, in particular gastrointestinal nematodes, are widespread and co-infections with other parasites and pathogens are frequently encountered in humans and animals. To decipher the immunological effects of a widespread protozoan infection on the anti-helminth immune response we studied a co-infection with the enteric nematode Heligmosomoides polygyrus in mice previously infected with Toxoplasma gondii. Protective immune responses against nematodes are dependent on parasite-specific Th2 responses associated with IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, IgE, and IgG1 antibodies. In contrast, Toxoplasma gondii infection elicits a strong and protective Th1 immune response characterized by IFN-γ, IL-12, and IgG2a antibodies. Co-infected animals displayed significantly higher worm fecundity although worm burden remained unchanged. In line with this, the Th2 response to H. polygyrus in co-infected animals showed a profound reduction of IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, and GATA-3 expressing T cells. Co-infection also resulted in the lack of eosinophilia and reduced expression of the Th2 effector molecule RELM-β in intestinal tissue. In contrast, the Th1 response to the protozoan parasite was not diminished and parasitemia of T. gondii was unaffected by concurrent helminth infection. Importantly, H. polygyrus specific restimulation of splenocytes revealed H. polygyrus-reactive CD4+ T cells that produce a significant amount of IFN-γ in co-infected animals. This was not observed in animals infected with the nematode alone. Increased levels of H. polygyrus-specific IgG2a antibodies in co-infected mice mirrored this finding. This study suggests that polarization rather than priming of naive CD4+ T cells is disturbed in mice previously infected with T. gondii. In conclusion, a previous T. gondii infection limits a helminth-specific Th2 immune response while promoting a shift toward a Th1-type immune response.

  17. Field evaluation of the efficacy and safety of a combination of spinosad and milbemycin oxime in the treatment and prevention of naturally acquired flea infestations and treatment of intestinal nematode infections in dogs in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Brad; Schnitzler, Beate; Wiseman, Scott; Snyder, Daniel E

    2015-01-15

    Two separate randomised, blinded, multicentre field trials were conducted to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a combination of spinosad and milbemycin oxime (MO) (Trifexis(®), Elanco Animal Health) in the treatment and prevention of naturally acquired flea infestations and intestinal nematode infections in European dogs. Treatments using Trifexis(®) and each control veterinary product (CVP) were administered once on Day 0 in both field studies. In the flea field trial, 11 veterinary clinics in France participated in the study. On Day 0, whole body flea comb counts were conducted on all dogs being evaluated for enrolment. Dogs with ≥7 fleas on Day 0 were enrolled, treated once on Day 0 with spinosad/MO or the CVP (Stronghold(®); selamectin) and then underwent post-treatment flea counts on Days 14 and 30. There were 150 spinosad/MO treated dogs and 71 CVP treated dogs included in the flea effectiveness population. Effectiveness against fleas (% reduction in geometric means; GM) was 98.97% and 97.37% for the spinosad/MO treated dogs, and 97.43% and 93.96% for the CVP dogs on Days 14 and 30, respectively, compared to the pre-treatment baseline flea counts. Of the spinosad/MO dogs, 89.3% and 80.0% had no live fleas on Days 14 and 30, compared to 77.5% and 70.4% of the CVP dogs, respectively. In the nematode field trial, data from 10 veterinary clinics in France and 19 in Ireland were pooled. Faecal samples from dogs at each clinic were analysed. A positive result at screening (parasite eggs from Toxocara canis, Toxascaris leonina, Trichuris vulpis or Ancylostoma caninum) allowed for enrolment. Dogs were randomised to spinosad/MO or the CVP (Milbemax(®); MO/praziquantel). On Day 8, a post-treatment faecal sample was taken and analysed. Of 2333 dogs screened for nematode eggs, 238 dogs were positive with one or more of these nematodes, and 229 were enrolled in the study. Of the 229 dogs, 151 were treated with a single dose of spinosad/MO, and 77 were treated with

  18. Gastrointestinal Infections and Diarrhea

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... person lives in and its level of sanitation, economic development, and hygiene standards. For example, countries that ... and treatment, consult your doctor. © 1995- The Nemours Foundation. All rights reserved. Images provided by The Nemours ...

  19. 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) concentration and ACC synthase expression in soybean roots, root tips, and soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines)-infected roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Mark L; Xue, Ping; Yang, Ronghui

    2010-01-01

    Colonization of plant roots by root knot and cyst nematodes requires a functional ethylene response pathway. However, ethylene plays many roles in root development and whether its role in nematode colonization is direct or indirect, for example lateral root initiation or root hair growth, is not known. The temporal requirement for ethylene and localized synthesis of ethylene during the life span of soybean cyst nematode (SCN) on soybean roots was further investigated. Although a significant increase in ethylene evolution was not detected from SCN-colonized roots, the concentration of the immediate precursor to ethylene, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC), was higher in SCN-colonized root pieces and root tips than in other parts of the root. Moreover, expression analysis of 17 ACC synthase (ACS) genes indicated that a select set of ACS genes is expressed in SCN-colonized root pieces that is clearly different from the set of genes expressed in non-colonized roots or root tips. Semi-quantitative real-time PCR indicated that ACS transcript accumulation correlates with the high concentration of ACC in root tips. In addition, an ACS-like sequence was found in the public SCN nucleotide database. Acquisition of a full-length sequence for this mRNA (accession GQ389647) and alignment with transcripts for other well-characterized ACS proteins indicated that the nematode sequence is missing a key element required for ACS activity and therefore probably is not a functional ACS. Moreover, no significant amount of ACC was found in any growth stage of SCN that was tested.

  20. Guillain-Barré Syndrome, Influenza Vaccination, and Antecedent Respiratory and Gastrointestinal Infections: A Case-Centered Analysis in the Vaccine Safety Datalink, 2009-2011.

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    Sharon K Greene

    Full Text Available Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS can be triggered by gastrointestinal or respiratory infections, including influenza. During the 2009 influenza A (H1N1 pandemic in the United States, monovalent inactivated influenza vaccine (MIV availability coincided with high rates of wildtype influenza infections. Several prior studies suggested an elevated GBS risk following MIV, but adjustment for antecedent infection was limited.We identified patients enrolled in health plans participating in the Vaccine Safety Datalink and diagnosed with GBS from July 2009 through June 2011. Medical records of GBS cases with 2009-10 MIV, 2010-11 trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV, and/or a medically-attended respiratory or gastrointestinal infection in the 1 through 141 days prior to GBS diagnosis were reviewed and classified according to Brighton Collaboration criteria for diagnostic certainty. Using a case-centered design, logistic regression models adjusted for patient-level time-varying sources of confounding, including seasonal vaccinations and infections in GBS cases and population-level controls.Eighteen confirmed GBS cases received vaccination in the 6 weeks preceding onset, among 1.27 million 2009-10 MIV recipients and 2.80 million 2010-11 TIV recipients. Forty-four confirmed GBS cases had infection in the 6 weeks preceding onset, among 3.77 million patients diagnosed with medically-attended infection. The observed-versus-expected odds that 2009-10 MIV/2010-11 TIV was received in the 6 weeks preceding GBS onset was odds ratio = 1.54, 95% confidence interval (CI, 0.59-3.99; risk difference = 0.93 per million doses, 95% CI, -0.71-5.16. The association between GBS and medically-attended infection was: odds ratio = 7.73, 95% CI, 3.60-16.61; risk difference = 11.62 per million infected patients, 95% CI, 4.49-26.94. These findings were consistent in sensitivity analyses using alternative infection definitions and risk intervals for prior

  1. Occurrence of gastrointestinal and renal helminths inZenaida auriculata (Des Murs, 1847 trap-captured from Brazil

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    Alessandra Taroda

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the prevalence of gastrointestinal and renal helminths from naturally infected Zenaida auriculatacaptured in Londrina, Paraná State. Two hundred and one Eared doves were trapped and the gastrointestinal and renal helminths were collected and identified according to morphological structures. One hundred and sixteen (57.71% doves were parasitized by helminths with specific prevalences forOrnithostrongylus quadriradiatus in 50 doves (24.88%,Ascaridia columbae in 47 (23.38%, Paratanaisia bragai and P. confusa in 34 (16.92%,Tetrameres fissispina in 17 (8.46%, Synhimantus nasuta in 14 (6.47%, Brachylaima mazzantii in 4 (1.99% and Raillietina allomyodes in 2 doves (1.00%. Seventy four/201 (37.00% birds were infected with only one species, and 96/201 (48.00% pigeons were infected with nematodes. The association between different classes of helminths occurred in 40/201 (20.00% animals. The results showed statistically differences between the presence of nematode (p = 0.00001 and trematode species (p ≤ 0.05 in the doves, and there was an association between the local of capture and the presence of trematodes and A. columbae (p ≤ 0.05. This study is the first to report the infection of Z. auriculata from Brazil with O. quadriradiatus, A. columbae, T. fissispina, S. nasuta, R. allomyodes, P. bragai and P. confusa.

  2. Male-biased gastrointestinal parasitism in a nearly monomorphic mountain ungulate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Guijosa, Jordi; Martínez-Carrasco, Carlos; López-Olvera, Jorge Ramón; Fernández-Aguilar, Xavier; Colom-Cadena, Andreu; Cabezón, Oscar; Mentaberre, Gregorio; Ferrer, David; Velarde, Roser; Gassó, Diana; Garel, Mathieu; Rossi, Luca; Lavín, Santiago; Serrano, Emmanuel

    2015-03-18

    Pyrenean chamois (Rupicapra pyrenaica pyrenaica) is a nearly monomorphic mountain ungulate with an unbiased sex-specific overwinter adult survival. Few differences in gastrointestinal parasitism have been reported by coprology as yet. This study aims to assess diversity, prevalence, intensity of infection and aggregation of gastrointestinal nematodes in male and female adult chamois. We expect no differences in the parasite infection rates between sexes. Gastrointestinal tracts of 28 harvested Pyrenean chamois in the Catalan Pyrenees (autumn 2012 and 2013) were necropsied and sexual differences in the diversity and structure of parasite community, prevalence, intensity of infection, and richness were investigated. We found 25 helminth species belonging to 13 different genera. Contrary to our expectations, male chamois showed different parasite communities, higher prevalence, intensity of infection and richness than females. Such sexual differences were clear irrespective of age of individuals. Hence, male chamois must cope with a more diverse and abundant parasite community than females, without apparent biological cost. Further research will be required to confirm this hypothesis.

  3. Blueberry Phenolics Reduce Gastrointestinal Infection of Patients with Cerebral Venous Thrombosis by Improving Depressant-Induced Autoimmune Disorder via miR-155-Mediated Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ning; Meng, Hao; Liu, Tianyi; Feng, Yingli; Qi, Yuan; Zhang, Donghuan; Wang, Honglei

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) often causes human depression, whereas depression-induced low immunity makes the patients susceptible to gastrointestinal infection. Blueberry possesses antidepressant properties which may improve autoimmunity and reduce gastrointestinal infection. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) performs antidepressant function and can be regulated by miR-155, which may be affected by blueberry. To explore the possible molecular mechanism, blueberry compounds were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Activity of compounds was tested by using HT22 cells. The present study tested 124 patients with CVT-induced mild-to-moderate depressive symptoms (Center for Epidemiologic Studies—Depression Scale [CES-D] ≥16) and gastrointestinal infection. Patients were randomly assigned to blueberry extract group (BG, received 10 mg blueberry extract daily) and placebo group (PG, received 10 mg placebo daily). After 3 months, depression, gastrointestinal infection and lipid profiles were investigated. Serum miR-155 and BDNF were measured using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and or Western Blot. Blueberry treatment improved depressive symptoms and lipid profiles, and also reduced gastrointestinal infection in the BG group (P blueberry extracts were the main phenolic acids with 0.18, 0.85, 0.26, 0.72, 0.66, 0.4,1, and 1.92 mg/g of gentisic acid, chlorogenic acid, [2]-epicatechin, p-coumaric acid, benzoic acid, p-anisic acid, and quercetin in blueberry extracts, respectively. Phenolics in blueberry are possible causal agents in improving antidepressant activity and reducing gastrointestinal infection. Administration of blueberry increased BDNF expression and miR-155. Blueberry cannot affect BDNF level when miR-155 is overexpressed or inhibited. Phenolics from blueberry reduced gastrointestinal infection of patients with CVT by improving antidepressant activity via upregulation of miR-155-mediated BDNF. PMID:29230173

  4. Comparison of stool immunoassay with standard methods for detection of Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with upper-gastrointestinal bleeding of peptic origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griñó, Pilar; Pascual, Sonia; Such, José; Casellas, Juan A; Niveiro, María; Andreu, Mariano; Sáez, Jesús; Aparicio, José R; Griñó, Emilio; Compañy, Luis; Laveda, Raquel; Pérez-Mateo, Miguel

    2003-05-01

    To assess the accuracy of the determination of Helicobacter pylori infection by a stool immunoassay in patients with upper-gastrointestinal bleeding (UGB) of peptic origin, in comparison with the routine histological study, serology, rapid urease and 13C-breath tests. Sixty-eight patients with endoscopically proven UGB of peptic origin were included. The presence of H. pylori was considered when observed on histology or, if negative, by the positive indications of two of the remaining tests (serology, rapid urease,13C-breath test). The accuracy of stool immunoassay was estimated according to results obtained with other diagnostic methods. Lesions causing gastrointestinal bleeding were 49 duodenal ulcers, 11 gastric ulcers, six pyloric channel ulcers, 13 acute lesions of the gastric mucosa, and 16 erosive duodenitis. H. pylori infection was present in 59 (86.76%) patients. Forty-one patients had received nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The sensitivity and specificity of the diagnostic methods were 47.5% and 100% for the rapid urease test, 93% and 87.5% for the breath test, 86.4% and 77.7% for serology, 89.4% and 100% for histology, and 96.6% and 33.3% for the stool test. The detection of H. pylori antigen in stools in patients with UGB of peptic origin has a good sensitivity (96.6%) but a low specificity (33.3%) for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection, which probably makes this test an inadequate tool in this setting if utilized alone.

  5. Island-Wide Surveillance of Gastrointestinal Protozoan Infection on Fiji by Expanding Lymphatic Filariasis Transmission Assessment Surveys as an Access Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Hye; Rinamalo, Milika; Rainima-Qaniuci, Meleresita; Talemaitoga, Nemani; Kama, Mike; Rafai, Eric; Lowry, John H; Choi, Min-Ho; Hong, Sung-Tae; Verweij, Jaco J; Kelly-Hope, Louise; Stothard, J Russell

    2018-04-01

    As part of lymphatic filariasis (LF) transmission assessment surveys (TAS) on Fiji, an island-wide assessment of gastrointestinal protozoan infection was performed by inspection of a concomitant stool sample collection to investigate the distribution of parasitic protozoa. All grade 1 and 2 students of 69 schools on the two main islands were targeted in two phases (one in the Western Division and the other in the Central and Northern Divisions, except Taveuni sub-Division of Northern), where fecal samples of 1,800 students were available for coproscopy using formalin-ether-acetate concentration. The overall prevalence of Giardia infection was 1.6%, having 2.2% in Western and 0.8% in Central/Northern Divisions ( P = 0.094). The school-level prevalence of giardiasis ranged from 0% to 15.4%, and hotspot analysis using the Getis-Ord Gi* method detected spatial heterogeneity of giardiasis prevalence in schools around Lautoka ( Z -score = 3.36, P value access platform for cosurveillance of gastrointestinal protozoan infection and has pinpointed hitherto unknown hotspots of giardiasis in urban city centers of Fiji. This calls for greater attention to apply tailored water, sanitation and hygiene measures for the control of these parasites.

  6. Stem nematode counteracts plant resistance of aphids in alfalfa, Medicago sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Ricardo A; Spears, Lori R

    2014-10-01

    Plants are exploited by a diverse community of insect herbivores and phytopathogens that interact indirectly through plant-mediated interactions. Generally, plants are thought to respond to insects and pathogens through different defensive signaling pathways. As plants are selected for resistance to one phytophagous organism type (insect vs. pathogen) in managed systems, it is not clear how this selection may affect community interactions. This study examined the effect of nematode-resistant varieties on aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum) suppression, and then determined how infection by the stem nematode, Ditylenchus dipsaci, mediated ecological effects on aphids and on plant defense proteins. Four alfalfa (Medicago sativa) varieties were selected with resistance to nematodes only (+,-), aphids only (-,+), nematodes and aphids (+,+), and susceptibility to nematodes and aphids (-,-). Field and greenhouse experiments were conducted to isolate the effect of nematode infection and aphid abundance on each variety. We found that varieties resistant to nematode, regardless of aphid resistance, had the lowest aphid counts, suggesting possible cross-resistance. Aphid abundance, however, increased when plants were exposed to nematodes. Resistant varieties were associated with elevated saponins but these compounds were not affected by insect or pathogen feeding. Concentrations of peroxidases and trypsin inhibitors, however, were increased in nematode resistant varieties when exposed to nematodes and aphids, respectively. The patterns of plant defense were variable, and a combination of resistance traits and changes in nutrient availability may drive positive interactions between nematodes and aphids aboveground.

  7. Social environment and weather during early life influence gastro-intestinal parasite loads in a group-living mammal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rödel, Heiko G; Starkloff, Anett

    2014-10-01

    Conditions experienced during early life have been frequently shown to exert long-term consequences on an animal's fitness. In mammals and birds, the time around and shortly after weaning is one of the crucial periods early in life. However, little is known about how social and abiotic environmental conditions experienced around this time affect fitness-related traits such as endoparasite loads. We studied consequences of social interactions and rainy weather conditions around and after weaning on gastro-intestinal nematode loads in juvenile European rabbits Oryctolagus cuniculus. Infestations with the gastric nematode Graphidium strigosum and with the intestinal nematode Passalurus ambiguus were higher in animals experiencing more rain during early life. This might have been due to the higher persistence of nematodes' infective stages outside the host body together with the animals' lower energy allocation for immune defence under more humid and thus energetically challenging conditions. In contrast, infestations with P. ambiguus were lower in animals with more positive social interactions with mother and litter siblings. We propose that social support provided by familiar group members buffered negative stress effects on immune function, lowering endoparasite infestations. This is supported by the negative correlation between positive social behaviour and serum corticosterone concentrations, indicating lower stress in juveniles which integrated more successfully into the social network of their group. In conclusion, the findings offer a pathway showing how differences in the abiotic environment and social life conditions experienced early in life could translate into long-term fitness consequences via the effects on endoparasite loads.

  8. JUSTIFICATION OF THE CHOICE OF OPTIMAL PROBIOTIC THERAPY OF ACUTE INTESTINAL INFECTIONS IN CHILDREN WITH FUNCTIONAL AND CHRONIC DISORDERS OF GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. R. Meskina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Studied the comparative efficacy of probiotics with different composition of strains in the complex treatment of acute intestinal infection in 89 children with functional disorders and chronic gastrointestinal tract. Conducted a dynamic study of the intestinal microflora bacteriological method and gas-liquid chromatography with the definition of short-chain fatty acid content of the level of carbohydrates in the feces and stool data. Set different dates for stopping diarrhea and features state of the intestinal ecosystem indicators after treatment in patients receiving comprehensive probiotic containing bifidobacteria and enterococcus, or probiotic containing lactobacillus. 

  9. PREVALENCE OF GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT DISEASES AND EFFICACY OF ERADICATION THERAPY FOR H.PYLORI INFECTION IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Zhdanova

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Prevalence of upper gastrointestinal tract pathology and estimations of clinical and pharmacoeconomic efficacy of different algorithms of therapy for H. pyloria assosiated diseases in children dwelling in Krasnodar region are presented in this article.Key words: h. Pylori, prevalence, treatment, eradication therapy, children.

  10. Interaction of Helicobacter pylori infection and low-dose aspirin in the upper gastrointestinal tract: implications for clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung Ki, En-Ling; Chan, Francis K L

    2012-04-01

    Low-dose aspirin has been shown to increase the risk of upper gastrointestinal tract injury. Risk factors in upper gastrointestinal complications in low-dose aspirin users are less well defined than in other NSAID users, and there are enough intrinsic differences in the two agents to discuss them separately. In particularly, the role of Helicobacter pylori and the benefit of its eradication in decreasing the risk of upper gastrointestinal tract injury in low-dose ASA users remains controversial. Various consensus groups have recommended H. pylori testing and eradication in low-dose ASA users with a prior history of peptic ulcer or ulcer bleeding. The basis of this recommendation is derived from a limited, albeit expanding evidence on the role of H. pylori in upper gastrointestinal tract injury in low-dose ASA users and on the effectiveness of H. pylori eradication in reducing the risk of complications such as rebleeding in high-risk patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Nematode cholinergic pharmacology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segerberg, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    Nematode acetylcholine (ACh) receptors were characterized using both biochemical and electrophysiological techniques, including: (1) receptor binding studies in crude homogenates of the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and the parasitic nematode Ascaris lumbricoides with the high-affinity probe ({sup 3}H)N-methylscopolamine (({sup 3}H)NMS) which binds to muscarinic receptors in many vertebrate and invertebrate tissues (2) measurement of depolarization and contraction induced by a variety of cholinergic agents, including N-methylscopolamine (NMS), in an innervated dorsal muscle strip preparation of Ascaris; (3) examination of the antagonistic actions of d-tubocurarine (dTC) and NMS at dorsal neuromuscular junction; (4) measurement of input resistance changes in Ascaris commissural motorneurons induced by ACh, dTC, NMS, pilocarpine and other cholinergic drugs.

  12. Abattoir survey of abamossal nematodes of sheep in Srinagar district (J & K).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gul, Nazima; Tak, Hidayatullah

    2016-06-01

    Gastrointestinal trichostrongyles of small ruminants are one of the major causes of productivity loss. Epidemiological study was carried out to determine parasitic infection of sheep with abamossal nematodes at various abattoirs in Srinagar district of Kashmir Valley from August 2011 to July 2012. On the basis of necroscopy, out of representative 281 abamossa, 53.3 % were recorded to be infected with Haemonchus species and 41.2 % with Ostertagia spp. Thus, Haemonchus spp. were more prevalent than Ostertagia spp. in ovines (P > 0.05). Infection prevalence percentage of Haemonchus spp. was highest in late summer season and early rainy season (62.85 %) with peak value in the month of July (71.42 %) and lowest in winter (42.85 %) with minimum value in the month of February (40 %). Similar trend was seen with Ostertagia spp. having highest infection prevalence value during summer season (52.8 %) with peak values in the month of July (64.2 %) and lowest infection in winter (34.2 %) with minimum value in February (30 %). Moreover, non-local breeds were more prevalent than local ones (P = 0.05).

  13. STUDY OF UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL ENDOSCOPY FINDINGS AND PRESENCE OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI INFECTION AMONG ADULT PATIENTS OF UPPER ABDOMINAL PAIN AND DYSPEPSIA

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    Manju Singh

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Dyspepsia is a common presenting complaint of various upper gastrointestinal disorders. The symptoms of causes of dyspepsia often overlap and this makes aetiological diagnosis difficult. Endoscopy is the ideal procedure for identifying organic diseases of the foregut and rapid urease test with endoscopy is a gold standard method for diagnosing the h.pylori infection. Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with various upper gastrointestinal pathologies. MATERIALS AND METHODS This hospital-based case-controlled study was carried out in a tertiary hospital, Dr. Bhim Rao Ambedkar Hospital, which is attached to Pt. J.N.M. Medical College, Raipur, and which provides open access service to endoscopy. Eighty two consecutive adult outpatients and admitted patients under Department of Surgery and Medicine with upper abdominal pain and dyspepsia were screened for eligibility and underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy using forward-viewing endoscopes from March 2015 to September 2016. Patients with dyspepsia who are over 18 years of age should undergoendoscopy (EGD for initial work up and divided in case having endoscopic findings and control having normal findings, then apply rapid urease test to all of these patients. RESULTS The most commonly identified endoscopic findings were gastritis (36%, Peptic Ulcer Disease (PUD (13.3%, oesophagitis (11%, duodenitis (7.3%. Gastric cancer was identified in 4.9% of patients and all of them were aged 18 years and above (p>0.05. H. pylori infection was detected in 51% (n=42 of patients. Gastritis andoesophagitis were statistically significantly associated with H. pylori (p0.05. Gastritis, GERD and PUD are the leading causes of dyspepsia. H. pylori infection is present in significant proportion of dyspeptic patients. CONCLUSION In present study, we are concluded that all upper abdominal pain is not due to acid peptic disease, but most of upper abdominal pain is due to acid peptic disease with H

  14. Comparison of two methods for the control of gastrointestinal nematodes in lambs and ewes/ Comparação de dois métodos de controle de nematódeos gastrintestinais em borregas e ovelhas de corte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iali da Silva Oliveira

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the control of nematode gastrintestinal on ovine meat breeds in Voisin pasturing system during one grazing year. The experiment was carried out at the Research Center Farm of the Passo Fundo University during the period of June 2005 to July 2006. The animals were kept in 85 pasture blocks with 810 square meters each. In the experiment 42 ewe hoggets and 42 Suffolk, Ile de France purebreed and crosses ewes were subdivided in four groups composed of 21 animals each. The groups had been assigned as G1 (traditional sheep, G2 (traditional young ewes both treated every 60 days with Levamisole; the groups G3 (Famacha® sheep and G4 (Famacha® young ewes were evaluated by the Famacha® method. The following variables were evaluated: live weight and worm egg counts (EPG. In relation to the live weights it was proven that it did not have statistics difference (P>0,05 between ewe hoggets and adult sheep of the traditional groups when compared with the ones of the Famacha® method. Differences in EPG counts during of the year in the ewe hoggets were found it had a significant reduction in the frequency of treatments for the Famacha® method when compared with the traditional method, of 90,39% for ewe hoggets and 90.93% for the sheep, becoming this method a viable alternative.Este trabalho teve como objetivo avaliar o controle de helmintos gastrintestinais em ovinos de corte em um sistema de pastoreio Voisin em quatro estações do ano. Foi realizado no Centro de Pesquisa Agropecuária da Universidade Passo Fundo no período de junho de 2005 a julho de 2006. Foram utilizados 84 fêmeas das raças Suffolk, Ile de France puras e mestiças as quais foram subdivididas em quatro grupos composto de 21 animais cada. Os grupos foram designados como G1 (ovelha tradicional, G2 (borrega tradicional tratadas a cada 60 dias com Levamisole; os grupos G3 (ovelha Famacha®, e G4 (borrega Famacha® foram avaliadas pelo m

  15. RNAseq Analysis of the Drosophila Response to the Entomopathogenic Nematode Steinernema

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    Shruti Yadav

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila melanogaster is an outstanding model to study the molecular and functional basis of host–pathogen interactions. Currently, our knowledge of microbial infections in D. melanogaster is well understood; however, the response of flies to nematode infections is still in its infancy. Here, we have used the potent parasitic nematode Steinernema carpocapsae, which lives in mutualism with its endosymbiotic bacteria Xenorhabdus nematophila, to examine the transcriptomic basis of the interaction between D. melanogaster and entomopathogenic nematodes. We have employed next-generation RNA sequencing (RNAseq to investigate the transcriptomic profile of D. melanogaster larvae in response to infection by S. carpocapsae symbiotic (carrying X. nematophila or axenic (lacking X. nematophila nematodes. Bioinformatic analyses have identified the strong induction of genes that are associated with the peritrophic membrane and the stress response, as well as several genes that participate in developmental processes. We have also found that genes with different biological functions are enriched in D. melanogaster larvae responding to either symbiotic or axenic nematodes. We further show that while symbiotic nematode infection enriched certain known immune-related genes, axenic nematode infection enriched several genes associated with chitin binding, lipid metabolic functions, and neuroactive ligand receptors. In addition, we have identified genes with a potential role in nematode recognition and genes with potential antinematode activity. Findings from this study will undoubtedly set the stage for the identification of key regulators of antinematode immune mechanisms in D. melanogaster, as well as in other insects of socioeconomic importance.

  16. Infection Status of Hospitalized Diarrheal Patients with Gastrointestinal Protozoa, Bacteria, and Viruses in the Republic of Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Shin-Hyeong; Lee, Jin-Hee; Lim, Yi-Young; Jeon, Ji-Hye; Yu, Jae-Ran; Kim, Tong-Soo; Lee, Won-Ja; Cho, Seung-Hak; Lee, Deog-Yong; Park, Mi-Seon; Jeong, Hye-Sook; Chen, Doo-Sung; Ji, Yeong-Mi; Kwon, Mi-Hwa

    2010-01-01

    To understand protozoan, viral, and bacterial infections in diarrheal patients, we analyzed positivity and mixed-infection status with 3 protozoans, 4 viruses, and 10 bacteria in hospitalized diarrheal patients during 2004-2006 in the Republic of Korea. A total of 76,652 stool samples were collected from 96 hospitals across the nation. The positivity for protozoa, viruses, and bacteria was 129, 1,759, and 1,797 per 10,000 persons, respectively. Especially, Cryptosporidium parvum was highly mixed-infected with rotavirus among pediatric diarrheal patients (29.5 per 100 C. parvum positive cases), and Entamoeba histolytica was mixed-infected with Clostridium perfringens (10.3 per 100 E. histolytica positive cases) in protozoan-diarrheal patients. Those infected with rotavirus and C. perfringens constituted relatively high proportions among mixed infection cases from January to April. The positivity for rotavirus among viral infection for those aged ≤ 5 years was significantly higher, while C. perfringens among bacterial infection was higher for ≥ 50 years. The information for association of viral and bacterial infections with enteropathogenic protozoa in diarrheal patients may contribute to improvement of care for diarrhea as well as development of control strategies for diarrheal diseases in Korea. PMID:20585526

  17. [Gastrointestinal bleeding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanas, Ángel

    2015-09-01

    In the Digestive Disease Week in 2015 there have been some new contributions in the field of gastrointestinal bleeding that deserve to be highlighted. Treatment of celecoxib with a proton pump inhibitor is safer than treatment with nonselective NSAID and a proton pump inhibitor in high risk gastrointestinal and cardiovascular patients who mostly also take acetylsalicylic acid. Several studies confirm the need to restart the antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy at an early stage after a gastrointestinal hemorrhage. The need for urgent endoscopy before 6-12 h after the onset of upper gastrointestinal bleeding episode may be beneficial in patients with hemodynamic instability and high risk for comorbidity. It is confirmed that in Western but not in Japanese populations, gastrointestinal bleeding episodes admitted to hospital during weekend days are associated with a worse prognosis associated with delays in the clinical management of the events. The strategy of a restrictive policy on blood transfusions during an upper GI bleeding event has been challenged. Several studies have shown the benefit of identifying the bleeding vessel in non varicose underlying gastric lesions by Doppler ultrasound which allows direct endoscopic therapy in the patient with upper GI bleeding. Finally, it has been reported that lower gastrointestinal bleeding diverticula band ligation or hemoclipping are both safe and have the same long-term outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. In-vitro predatory activity of nematophagous fungi from Costa Rica with potential use for controlling sheep and goat parasitic nematodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Soto-Barrientos

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In tropical and subtropical regions of the world, parasitic diseases are a main cause of losses in livestock productivity. The increased acquired resistence to anthelmintics by gastrointestinal nematodes, requires biological control be considered as a potential feasible and effective alternative. The most effective natural soil enemies of nematodes are nematophagous fungi. In order to collect and identify predator nematophagous fungi (PNF, samples were obtained from 51 farms distributed throughout the seven provinces of Costa Rica. The origin samples included: soil from different crops (potatoes, tomatoes, bananas, ornamental plants, squash and coffee; animal feces (cattle, sheep, goat and horse; soil and fallen leaves from forest; and plants with signs of nematode infection. Each sample was processed using three techniques for the extraction of fungi from soil: sprinkling technique, soil dilution and humidity chamber. Twenty four strains of nematophagous fungi were found in 19 farms; 83.3% of the fungi were isolated by sprinkling technique. The following fungi were idenified: Arthrobotrys oligospora (n=13; Candelabrella musiformis (n=9; and for the first time there was isolation of A. conoides (n=1 and A. dactyloides (n=1 in the country. Moreover, 16 strains from Trichoderma (n=13, Beauveria (n=1, Clonostachys (n=1 and Lecanicillium (n=1 were obtained. In addition, pH of each possible fungal isolation source was measured, and it varied from 5.2 to 9.9, however PNF isolates fell within the range of 5.6 to 7.5. The PNF strains were cultivated in four different media for the production of chhlamydospores: potato dextrose agar (PDA; corn meal agar (CMA; malt extract agar (MEA and potato carrot agar (PCA. Out of these cultures, 95.8% of the strains formed chlamydospores primarily in the PCA. Of these strains, the profilic spore producers were subjected to ruminant artificial gastrointestinal conditions. A total of 14 fungi were tested, out of which

  19. Risk Factors Associated with the Occurrence of Gastrointestinal Helminths among Indigenous Donkeys (Equus asinus in Northeastern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleh Mohammed Jajere

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. This survey study was conducted from April 2014 through March 2015 in Bauchi, Yobe, and Gombe states, northeastern Nigeria, to explore the risk factors associated with the occurrence of gastrointestinal helminthosis among indigenous donkeys (Equus asinus. Materials and Methods. A total of six hundred fresh faecal samples were randomly collected from indigenous donkeys of varying age, sex, and settlements. Simple flotation and sedimentation techniques were used for the detection of helminths eggs. Results. Three gastrointestinal nematode parasites were encountered including Strongyle, Parascaris equorum, and Oxyuris equi. An overall prevalence of 98.3% was obtained, of which 78.3%, 40.3%, and 17.5% were, respectively, from Strongyle, Parascaris equorum, and Oxyuris equi. Age, sex, and season were not statistically associated with the risk of helminth infection as were the different study areas (p>0.05. However, body condition score, settlement, anthelminthic medication history, and management practices were significantly associated with the risk of gastrointestinal helminthosis. Statistically high prevalence of helminthic infections was observed in donkeys, with poor (thin body condition, from rural settlements, that were not dewormed and raised under poor management systems (p<0.001. Conclusion. It is concluded from the study that gastrointestinal helminths particularly Strongyle were endemic among the indigenous donkeys in northeastern Nigeria. Further control and preventive measures were discussed.

  20. Risk Factors Associated with the Occurrence of Gastrointestinal Helminths among Indigenous Donkeys (Equus asinus) in Northeastern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed Jajere, Saleh; Rabana Lawal, Jallailudeen; Mohammed Bello, Amina; Wakil, Yakaka; Aliyu Turaki, Usman; Waziri, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Aim. This survey study was conducted from April 2014 through March 2015 in Bauchi, Yobe, and Gombe states, northeastern Nigeria, to explore the risk factors associated with the occurrence of gastrointestinal helminthosis among indigenous donkeys (Equus asinus). Materials and Methods. A total of six hundred fresh faecal samples were randomly collected from indigenous donkeys of varying age, sex, and settlements. Simple flotation and sedimentation techniques were used for the detection of helminths eggs. Results. Three gastrointestinal nematode parasites were encountered including Strongyle, Parascaris equorum, and Oxyuris equi. An overall prevalence of 98.3% was obtained, of which 78.3%, 40.3%, and 17.5% were, respectively, from Strongyle, Parascaris equorum, and Oxyuris equi. Age, sex, and season were not statistically associated with the risk of helminth infection as were the different study areas (p > 0.05). However, body condition score, settlement, anthelminthic medication history, and management practices were significantly associated with the risk of gastrointestinal helminthosis. Statistically high prevalence of helminthic infections was observed in donkeys, with poor (thin) body condition, from rural settlements, that were not dewormed and raised under poor management systems (p < 0.001). Conclusion. It is concluded from the study that gastrointestinal helminths particularly Strongyle were endemic among the indigenous donkeys in northeastern Nigeria. Further control and preventive measures were discussed.

  1. Low cost production of nematodes for biological control of insect pests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entomopathogenic nematodes are produced in two ways: in artificial media using liquid or solid fermentation methods (in vitro) or by mass producing insect hosts to be artificially exposed to mass infection by nematodes (in vivo). The yellow mealworm (Tenebrio molitor) is a good host for in vivo nema...

  2. Controlling Aphelenchoides subtenuis nematodes with a hot water treatment in Crocus and Allium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, van P.J.; Trompert, J.P.T.

    2011-01-01

    Several bulbous crops like Crocus, Allium and some species of Tulipa and Narcissus can be infected with the nematode Aphelenchoides subtenuis. The nematodes cause retarded growth, poor or no flowering and eventually death of the bulbs and corms. A hot water treatment after lifting the bulbs has

  3. Heterodera schachtii Tyrosinase-like protein a novel nematode effector modulating plant hormone homeostasis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Habash, S.; Radakovic, Z.S.; Vaňková, Radomíra; Siddique, S.; Dobrev, Petre; Gleason, C.; Grundler, F.M.W.; Elashry, A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, JUL 31 (2017), č. článku 6874. ISSN 2045-2322 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : arabidopsis-thaliana * cyst-nematode * parasitic nematode * transient expression * host plants * sequence * identification * infection * model * transformation Subject RIV: ED - Physiology OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  4. Enterococcus infection biology: lessons from invertebrate host models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Grace J; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2014-03-01

    The enterococci are commensals of the gastrointestinal tract of many metazoans, from insects to humans. While they normally do not cause disease in the intestine, they can become pathogenic when they infect sites outside of the gut. Recently, the enterococci have become important nosocomial pathogens, with the majority of human enterococcal infections caused by two species, Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium. Studies using invertebrate infection models have revealed insights into the biology of enterococcal infections, as well as general principles underlying host innate immune defense. This review highlights recent findings on Enterococcus infection biology from two invertebrate infection models, the greater wax moth Galleria mellonella and the free-living bacteriovorous nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

  5. Gastrointestinal helminths of two populations of wild pigeons (Columba livia in Brazil

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    Frederico Fontanelli Vaz

    Full Text Available Abstract The present study analyzed gastrointestinal helminth communities in 265 wild pigeons (Columba livia living in the municipalities of São Paulo and Tatuí, state of São Paulo, Brazil, over a one-year period. The birds were caught next to grain storage warehouses and were necropsied. A total of 790 parasites comprising one nematode species and one cestode genus were recovered from 110 pigeons, thus yielding an overall prevalence of 41.5%, mean intensity of infection of 7.2 ± 1.6 (range 1-144 and discrepancy index of 0.855. Only 15 pigeons (5.7% presented mixed infection. The helminths isolated from the birds were Ascaridia columbae (Ascaridiidae and Raillietina sp. (Davaineidae. The birds’ weights differed according to sex but this did not influence the intensity of infection. The overall prevalence and intensity of infection did not differ between the sexes, but the prevalence was higher among the birds from Tatuí (47.8%. The gastrointestinal helminth community of C. livia was characterized in the two areas studied and parasite homogeneity was observed over the 12 months analyzed at both locations. These results make contributions to the current literature on health aspects of wild C. livia populations.

  6. Gastrointestinal helminths of two populations of wild pigeons (Columba livia) in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, Frederico Fontanelli; Silva, Lidiane Aparecida Firmino da; Ferreira, Vivian Lindmayer; Silva, Reinaldo José da; Raso, Tânia Freitas

    2017-01-01

    The present study analyzed gastrointestinal helminth communities in 265 wild pigeons (Columba livia) living in the municipalities of São Paulo and Tatuí, state of São Paulo, Brazil, over a one-year period. The birds were caught next to grain storage warehouses and were necropsied. A total of 790 parasites comprising one nematode species and one cestode genus were recovered from 110 pigeons, thus yielding an overall prevalence of 41.5%, mean intensity of infection of 7.2 ± 1.6 (range 1-144) and discrepancy index of 0.855. Only 15 pigeons (5.7%) presented mixed infection. The helminths isolated from the birds were Ascaridia columbae (Ascaridiidae) and Raillietina sp. (Davaineidae). The birds' weights differed according to sex but this did not influence the intensity of infection. The overall prevalence and intensity of infection did not differ between the sexes, but the prevalence was higher among the birds from Tatuí (47.8%). The gastrointestinal helminth community of C. livia was characterized in the two areas studied and parasite homogeneity was observed over the 12 months analyzed at both locations. These results make contributions to the current literature on health aspects of wild C. livia populations.

  7. Upper gastrointestinal Kaposi's sarcoma in HIV-infected patients: ten years of endoscopy observation at a single Brazilian center

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    Rosamar Eulira Fontes Rezende

    2015-10-01

    Conclusions: GI KS is an infrequent finding in patients with HIV infection. Among those with GI KS, 80% had concomitant skin lesions. Immunohistochemical methods for CD31, CD34, and LNA-1 were important tools in the diagnostic assessment of lesions suggestive of KS in the GI tract. Further studies are required to confirm these data, and the need for routine endoscopic investigation of the GI tract in HIV-infected patients with cutaneous KS should be assessed.

  8. Polyclonal B cell differentiation and loss of gastrointestinal tract germinal centers in the earliest stages of HIV-1 infection.

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    Marc C Levesque

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The antibody response to HIV-1 does not appear in the plasma until approximately 2-5 weeks after transmission, and neutralizing antibodies to autologous HIV-1 generally do not become detectable until 12 weeks or more after transmission. Moreover, levels of HIV-1-specific antibodies decline on antiretroviral treatment. The mechanisms of this delay in the appearance of anti-HIV-1 antibodies and of their subsequent rapid decline are not known. While the effect of HIV-1 on depletion of gut CD4(+ T cells in acute HIV-1 infection is well described, we studied blood and tissue B cells soon after infection to determine the effect of early HIV-1 on these cells.In human participants, we analyzed B cells in blood as early as 17 days after HIV-1 infection, and in terminal ileum inductive and effector microenvironments beginning at 47 days after infection. We found that HIV-1 infection rapidly induced polyclonal activation and terminal differentiation of B cells in blood and in gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT B cells. The specificities of antibodies produced by GALT memory B cells in acute HIV-1 infection (AHI included not only HIV-1-specific antibodies, but also influenza-specific and autoreactive antibodies, indicating very early onset of HIV-1-induced polyclonal B cell activation. Follicular damage or germinal center loss in terminal ileum Peyer's patches was seen with 88% of follicles exhibiting B or T cell apoptosis and follicular lysis.Early induction of polyclonal B cell differentiation, coupled with follicular damage and germinal center loss soon after HIV-1 infection, may explain both the high rate of decline in HIV-1-induced antibody responses and the delay in plasma antibody responses to HIV-1. Please see later in the article for Editors' Summary.

  9. Targeted mutagenesis in a human-parasitic nematode.

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    Spencer S Gang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Parasitic nematodes infect over 1 billion people worldwide and cause some of the most common neglected tropical diseases. Despite their prevalence, our understanding of the biology of parasitic nematodes has been limited by the lack of tools for genetic intervention. In particular, it has not yet been possible to generate targeted gene disruptions and mutant phenotypes in any parasitic nematode. Here, we report the development of a method for introducing CRISPR-Cas9-mediated gene disruptions in the human-parasitic threadworm Strongyloides stercoralis. We disrupted the S. stercoralis twitchin gene unc-22, resulting in nematodes with severe motility defects. Ss-unc-22 mutations were resolved by homology-directed repair when a repair template was provided. Omission of a repair template resulted in deletions at the target locus. Ss-unc-22 mutations were heritable; we passed Ss-unc-22 mutants through a host and successfully recovered mutant progeny. Using a similar approach, we also disrupted the unc-22 gene of the rat-parasitic nematode Strongyloides ratti. Our results demonstrate the applicability of CRISPR-Cas9 to parasitic nematodes, and thereby enable future studies of gene function in these medically relevant but previously genetically intractable parasites.

  10. Prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites of cattle in Abeokuta, Ogun ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Analysis revealed significant (p<0.05) difference between the prevalence of nematodes and trematode as well as the mean faecal egg count of the cattle sampled in the abattoir and the University farm. In conclusion, gastrointestinal parasites are prevalent in cattle in the study area with Eimeria spp being most prevalent.

  11. Identification, Validation and Utilization of Novel Nematode-Responsive Root-Specific Promoters in Arabidopsis for Inducing Host-Delivered RNAi Mediated Root-Knot Nematode Resistance

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    Atul Kakrana

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The root-knot nematode (RKN, Meloidogyne incognita, is an obligate, sedentary endoparasite that infects a large number of crops and severely affects productivity. The commonly used nematode control strategies have their own limitations. Of late, RNA interference (RNAi has become a popular approach for the development of nematode resistance in plants. Transgenic crops capable of expressing dsRNAs, specifically in roots for disrupting the parasitic process, offer an effective and efficient means of producing resistant crops. We identified nematode-responsive and root-specific (NRRS promoters by using microarray data from the public domain and known conserved cis-elements. A set of 51 NRRS genes was identified which was narrowed down further on the basis of presence of cis-elements combined with minimal expression in the absence of nematode infection. The comparative analysis of promoters from the enriched NRRS set, along with earlier reported nematode-responsive genes, led to the identification of specific cis-elements. The promoters of two candidate genes were used to generate transgenic plants harboring promoter GUS constructs and tested in planta against nematodes. Both promoters showed preferential expression upon nematode infection, exclusively in the root in one and galls in the other. One of these NRRS promoters was used to drive the expression of splicing factor, a nematode-specific gene, for generating host-delivered RNAi-mediated nematode-resistant plants. Transgenic lines expressing dsRNA of splicing factor under the NRRS promoter exhibited upto a 32% reduction in number of galls compared to control plants.

  12. [Procalcitonin and C-reactive protein as early indicators of postoperative intra-abdominal infection after surgery for gastrointestinal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Comesaña, Elías; López-Gómez, Victoria; Estevez-Fernández, Sergio Manuel; Mariño Padín, Esther; Ballinas-Miranda, Julio; Carrera-Dacosta, Ester; Piñon-Cimadevila, Miguel Ángel; Barreiro-Morandeira, Francisco

    2014-04-01

    to evaluate the association between serum levels of procalcitonin and C-reactive protein, on the first 3 postoperative days, and the appearance of postoperative intra-abdominal infection. Prospective observational study including 67 patients operated on for colo-rectal, gastric and pancreatic cancer. Serum levels of procalcitonin and C-reactive protein were analyzed before surgery and daily until the third postoperative day. Values of procalcitonin (PCT) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were recorded as well as their accuracy for detection of postoperative intra-abdominal infection (PIAI). The incidence of postoperative intra-abdominal infection was 13.4%. CRP serum levels at 72h, PCT serum levels at 24, 48 and 72h and the ratio between serum levels of CRP at 72hours and serum levels of CRP at 48hours (CRP D3/CRP D2) were significantly associated with the appearance of postoperative intra-abdominal infection. The highest sensitivity corresponded to PCT at 72hours (88.9%); the highest specificity and positive predictive value corresponded to the ratio CRP D3/CRP D2 (96.49% and 71.4%, respectively); the highest negative predictive value to procalcitonin at 72h and 24h. Serum levels of PCT are significantly associated with the appearance of postoperative intra-abdominal infection. Sensitivity and predictive positive values are low, but negative predictive value is high, even at 24h after surgery. Copyright © 2013 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Lab-on-a-chip and SDS-PAGE analysis of hemolymph protein profile from Rhipicephalus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae) infected with entomopathogenic nematode and fungus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golo, Patrícia Silva; Dos Santos, Alessa Siqueira de Oliveira; Monteiro, Caio Marcio Oliveira; Perinotto, Wendell Marcelo de Souza; Quinelato, Simone; Camargo, Mariana Guedes; de Sá, Fillipe Araujo; Angelo, Isabele da Costa; Martins, Marta Fonseca; Prata, Marcia Cristina de Azevedo; Bittencourt, Vânia Rita Elias Pinheiro

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, lab-on-a-chip electrophoresis (LoaC) was suggested as an alternative method to the conventional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under denaturing conditions (SDS-PAGE) to analyze raw cell-free tick hemolymph. Rhipicephalus microplus females were exposed to the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae senso latu IBCB 116 strain and/or to the entomopathogenic nematode Heterorhabditis indica LPP1 strain. Hemolymph from not exposed or exposed ticks was collected 16 and 24 h after exposure and analyze by SDS-PAGE or LoaC. SDS-PAGE yielded 15 bands and LoaC electrophoresis 17 bands. Despite the differences in the number of bands, when the hemolymph protein profiles of exposed or unexposed ticks were compared in the same method, no suppressing or additional bands were detected among the treatments regardless the method (i.e., SDS-PAGE or chip electrophoresis using the Protein 230 Kit®). The potential of LoaC electrophoresis to detect protein bands from tick hemolymph was considered more efficient in comparison to the detection obtained using the traditional SDS-PAGE method, especially when it comes to protein subunits heavier than 100 KDa. LoaC electrophoresis provided a very good reproducibility, and is much faster than the conventional SDS-PAGE method, which requires several hours for one analysis. Despite both methods can be used to analyze tick hemolymph composition, LoaC was considered more suitable for cell-free hemolymph protein separation and detection. LoaC hemolymph band percent data reported changes in key proteins (i.e., HeLp and vitellogenin) exceptionally important for tick embryogenesis. This study reported, for the first time, tick hemolymph protein profile using LoaC.

  14. Gastrointestinal System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jepson, Mark A.; Bouwmeester, Hans

    2017-01-01

    The epithelial lining of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) acts as a barrier to uptake of potentially dangerous material while allowing absorption of processed food. The gut may be exposed to a diverse range of engineered nanomaterials due to their deliberate addition to food and consumer products

  15. Treatment of Nematodes with Ozone Gas: A Sustainable Alternative to Nematicides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Msayleb, Nahed; Ibrahim, Saiid

    This study tests Ozone as a Nematicides' alternative. Nematode-infected soil samples were treated with ascending doses of O3 by submerging the outlet of an "MB1000 Ozone Generator" in the 40 ml samples; then to test the O3 nematicidal effect by gas fumigation, Ozone gas was released into a sealed bag containing 80 g of each of the 6 nematode-infected soil samples with ascending doses and a repetition of each. With water-ozonation, 900 mg O3 were needed to kill 100% of nematodes, and the O3-Nematodes LD50 was identified by 420 mg. With the second experiment, O3 soil fumigation for 50 minutes at a dose of 1,125 mg in an air volume of 5 litres, were needed to control 95% of living nematodes.

  16. A survey of gastrointestinal helminth of stray dogs in Zabol city, southeastern of Iran

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    Geraili, A.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Canids are reservoir for some zoonoses helminthic disease. They are one of main public health problem. The aim of this study was to ascertain frequency of gastrointestinal helminthic infection of stray dogs in Zabol city, southeaster of Iran. In this descriptive study, 30 stray dogs were euthanized, intestine was removed by necropsy. Then, the intestines was opened by scalpel and their contents passed through mesh sieve. The helminth were collected. The nematodes were preserved in 70% ethanol with 5% glycerin and cestodes were preserved in 70% ethanol. The cestodes were stained by acetocarmine. The nematodes were cleared by lactophenol. The genus and species of helminth were identified by identification keys. Twenty two (73.3% of stray dogs had at least one intestinal helminthic infection. Recovered helminth from stray dogs include: Taenia hydatigena (53.3%, Taenia ovis (20%, Taenia multiceps (6.6%, Mesocestoides spp (10%, Toxocara canis (23.3%, Toxocara cati (3.3%. Data showed that the stray dogs in Zabol city harbor some important zoonoses helminth parasite like Toxocara.

  17. CHEMOTHERAPY OF GASTRO-INTESTINAL NAMATODES IN COMMON PEAFOWL (PAVO CRISTATUS

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    M. Ashraf, Faisal Noman Waraich, I.G. Ahmad and K. Pervez

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study was undertaken to find out the prevalence of gastro-intestinal nematodes in common peafowl (Pavo cristatus at Lahore Zoo and to evaluate the comparative efficacy of albendazole, levamisole HCI and oxfendazole. Fifty-two faecal samples of the birds were examined in Medicine Laboratory, College of Veterinary Sciences, Lahore, with direct smear method for the identification of nematode ova. Forty two samples out of 52 were found positive (80.77% for single or mixed infection of Capillaria spp., Ascaridia galliand Heterakis gallinae, and the individual percentages being 59.62, 38.46 and 13.46 respectively. Out of 42 infected birds 40 were chosen for medication and divided into four groups, each consisting of 10 birds (A= treated with albendazole, B=treated with levamisole, C = treated with oxfendazole and group D= untreated control. Faecal samples of experimental birds were examined for counting of eggs per gram of faeces on day '0' (pre-medication. Faecal egg counts were again carried out on day 5 and 10 post-medication and percentage reduction of EPG was calculated. Oxfendazole was found to be the most effective (98.88% among the three anthelmintics, followed by levamisole (97.3% and albendazole (95.60%.

  18. Social networks of educated nematodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entomopathogenic nematodes are obligate lethal parasitoids of insect larvae that navigate a chemically complex belowground environment while interacting with their insect hosts, plants, and each other. In this environment, prior exposure to volatile compounds appears to prime nematodes in a compound...

  19. cyst nematode in tiaret a

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    F. Labdelli

    1 sept. 2017 ... Syrie par [12], en Arabie saoudite par [16, 17], en Iran par [18] en Inde par [19]en Chine par[20] . .... qui a pour principe d'évaluer le taux de multiplication du nematode en fin de culture et le comparé à ..... cereal cyst nematode complex in relation to breeding resistant durum wheat Fundam. appl. Nemat ...

  20. Oral dosing with papaya latex is an effective anthelmintic treatment for sheep infected with Haemonchus contortus

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    Donnan Alison A

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cysteine proteinases in papaya latex have been shown to have potent anthelmintic properties in monogastric hosts such as rodents, pigs and humans, but this has not been demonstrated in ruminants. Methods In two experiments, sheep were infected concurrently with 5,000 infective larvae of Haemonchus contortus and 10,000 infective larvae of Trichostrongylus colubriformis and were then treated with the supernatant from a suspension of papaya latex from day 28 to day 32 post-infection. Faecal egg counts were monitored from a week before treatment until the end of the experiment and worm burdens were assessed on day 35 post-infection. Results We found that the soluble fraction of papaya latex had a potent in vivo effect on the abomasal nematode H. contortus, but not on the small intestinal nematode T. colubriformis. This effect was dose-dependent and at tolerated levels of gavage with papaya latex (117 μmol of active papaya latex supernatant for 4 days, the H. contortus worm burdens were reduced by 98%. Repeated treatment, daily for 4 days, was more effective than a single dose, but efficacy was not enhanced by concurrent treatment with the antacid cimetidine. Conclusions Our results provide support for the idea that cysteine proteinases derived from papaya latex may be developed into novel anthelmintics for the treatment of lumenal stages of gastro-intestinal nematode infections in sheep, particularly those parasitizing the abomasum.

  1. De novo transcriptome sequencing of the Octopus vulgaris hemocytes using Illumina RNA-Seq technology: response to the infection by the gastrointestinal parasite Aggregata octopiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos-Martínez, Sheila; Arteta, David; Catarino, Susana; Gestal, Camino

    2014-01-01

    Octopus vulgaris is a highly valuable species of great commercial interest and excellent candidate for aquaculture diversification; however, the octopus' well-being is impaired by pathogens, of which the gastrointestinal coccidian parasite Aggregata octopiana is one of the most important. The knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of the immune response in cephalopods, especially in octopus is scarce. The transcriptome of the hemocytes of O. vulgaris was de novo sequenced using the high-throughput paired-end Illumina technology to identify genes involved in immune defense and to understand the molecular basis of octopus tolerance/resistance to coccidiosis. A bi-directional mRNA library was constructed from hemocytes of two groups of octopus according to the infection by A. octopiana, sick octopus, suffering coccidiosis, and healthy octopus, and reads were de novo assembled together. The differential expression of transcripts was analysed using the general assembly as a reference for mapping the reads from each condition. After sequencing, a total of 75,571,280 high quality reads were obtained from the sick octopus group and 74,731,646 from the healthy group. The general transcriptome of the O. vulgaris hemocytes was assembled in 254,506 contigs. A total of 48,225 contigs were successfully identified, and 538 transcripts exhibited differential expression between groups of infection. The general transcriptome revealed genes involved in pathways like NF-kB, TLR and Complement. Differential expression of TLR-2, PGRP, C1q and PRDX genes due to infection was validated using RT-qPCR. In sick octopuses, only TLR-2 was up-regulated in hemocytes, but all of them were up-regulated in caecum and gills. The transcriptome reported here de novo establishes the first molecular clues to understand how the octopus immune system works and interacts with a highly pathogenic coccidian. The data provided here will contribute to identification of biomarkers for octopus resistance against

  2. Clinical and virological factors associated with gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with acute respiratory infection: a two-year prospective study in general practice medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laetitia Minodier

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gastrointestinal (GI symptoms, such as diarrhea, vomiting, abdominal pain and nausea are not an uncommon manifestation of an acute respiratory infection (ARI. We therefore evaluated clinical and microbiological factors associated with the presence of GI symptoms in patients consulting a general practitioner (GP for ARI. Methods Nasopharyngeal swabs, stool specimens and clinical data from patients presenting to GPs with an ARI were prospectively collected during two winter seasons (2014-2016. Samples were tested by quantitative real-time PCR for 12 respiratory pathogen groups and for 12 enteric pathogens. Results Two hundred and four of 331 included patients (61.6% were positive for at least one respiratory pathogen. Sixty-nine stools (20.8% were positive for at least one pathogen (respiratory and/or enteric. GI symptoms were more likely declared in case of laboratory confirmed-enteric infection (adjusted odds ratio (aOR = 3.2; 95% confidence interval [CI] [1.2–9.9]; p = 0.02 or human coronavirus (HCoV infection (aOR = 2.7; [1.2–6.8]; p = 0.02. Consumption of antipyretic medication before the consultation seemed to reduce the risk of developing GI symptoms for patients with laboratory-confirmed influenza (aOR = 0.3; [0.1–0.6]; p = 0.002. Conclusions The presence of GI symptoms in ARI patients could not be explained by the detection of respiratory pathogens in stools. However, the detection of enteric pathogens in stool samples could explained by the presence of GI symptoms in some of ARI cases. The biological mechanisms explaining the association between the presence of HCoVs in nasopharynx and GI symptoms need to be explored.

  3. Relato de nematóides da família Anisakidae em bacalhau comercializado em Ribeirão Preto, SP Report of nematodes of the Anisakidae family in codfish commercialized in Ribeirão Preto, SP

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    Sonia de Paula Toledo Prado

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available A anisaquíase é uma parasitose gastrointestinal dos seres humanos, resultante da ingestão acidental de larvas infectantes de nematóides da família Anisakidae. Foram analisadas 11 amostras de bacalhau sendo que 64% estavam em desacordo com a legislação em vigor por conter nematóides da família Anisakidae e, portanto, impróprias para o consumo.Anisakiasis is a human gastrointestinal parasitosis that results from accidental ingestion of infective larvae belonging to the Anisakidae family. Eleven codfish samples were analyzed and 64% did not conform to the present legislation, because they contained nematode larvae from the Anisakidae family and were therefore unfit for consumption.

  4. Aberrant chlamydial developmental forms in the gastrointestinal tract of pigs spontaneously and experimentally infected with Chlamydia suis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pospischil, Andreas; Borel, Nicole; Chowdhury, Emdad H; Guscetti, Franco

    2009-03-16

    The phenomenon of persistence is well known from in vitro studies, where it is associated with the production of aberrant bodies, but its occurrence in vivo is less well documented. The objective of this study was to search for aberrant bodies in intestinal tissues from pigs, describe their ultrastructure, and investigate the suitability of immunohistochemical staining for chlamydial heat shock protein 60 (cHSP60) to detect such forms. Intestinal tissues derived from pigs naturally and experimentally infected with Chlamydia (C.) suis were examined by immunohistochemistry, transmission electron microscopy and immunogold electron microscopy. The chlamydial species involved in the natural infection were determined using an Array Tube Microarray to C. suis and Chlamydophila abortus. Ultrastructurally, aberrant bodies were detected in the gut of both naturally and experimentally infected pigs. Immunogold electron microscopy showed that the aberrant bodies were labeled less strongly than the normal forms by antibodies against LPS and cHSP60 respectively. It was concluded that aberrant bodies occur in vivo in pigs and that the gnotobiotic pig model might be suitable for the study of chlamydial persistence in vivo. The antibody against cHSP60 does not appear to be suitable to specifically detect such forms.

  5. Higher levels of Zidovudine resistant HIV in the colon compared to blood and other gastrointestinal compartments in HIV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Marle Guido

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT is the largest lymphoid organ infected by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1. It serves as a viral reservoir and host-pathogen interface in infection. This study examined whether different parts of the gut and peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL contain different drug-resistant HIV-1 variants. Methods Gut biopsies (esophagus, stomach, duodenum and colon and PBL were obtained from 8 HIV-1 infected preHAART (highly active antiretroviral therapy patients at three visits over 18 months. Patients received AZT, ddI or combinations of AZT/ddI. HIV-1 Reverse transcriptase (RT-coding sequences were amplified from viral DNA obtained from gut tissues and PBL, using nested PCR. The PCR fragments were cloned and sequenced. The resulting sequences were subjected to phylogenetic analyses, and antiretroviral drug mutations were identified. Results Phylogenetic and drug mutation analyses revealed differential distribution of drug resistant mutations in the gut within patients. The level of drug-resistance conferred by the RT sequences was significantly different between different gut tissues and PBL, and varied with antiretroviral therapy. The sequences conferring the highest level of drug-resistance to AZT were found in the colon. Conclusion This study confirms that different drug-resistant HIV-1 variants are present in different gut tissues, and it is the first report to document that particular gut tissues may select for drug resistant HIV-1 variants.

  6. Co-infection of Sarcocystis sp. and Hadjelia truncata in fantail pigeons (Columba livia domestica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Khordadmehr

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Hadjelia truncata belongs to the family Habronematidae which affects different groups of birds such as Columbiformes. A large number of Sarcocystis sp. may infect birds as intermediate hosts, but wild Columbiformes, include pigeons, are rarely affected. The present study describes mixed infection of two pigeon flocks with sarcocystosis and nematodiasis (H. truncata which had neurologic and gas-trointestinal clinical signs. The common clinical signs included progressive weight loss, pectoral muscle atrophy, white diarrhoea, depression, torticollis, paralysis, trembling, and 23.4% mortality. At necropsy, a large number of nematodes were detected in the gizzards and diagnosed as H. truncata in parasitological studies. For greater certainty, histopathological examination was conducted routinely. Different development stage of this nematode associated with severe inflammatory cells infiltration and necrosis were observed in tissue sections. Accidentally, the large number of Sarcocystis cysts was observed in tunica muscularis mucosa of gizzard associated with infiltration of inflammatory cells, hyaline degeneration and necrosis around degenerated cysts.

  7. An extensive comparison of the effect of anthelmintic classes on diverse nematodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil-transmitted helminths are parasitic nematodes that inhabit the human intestine. These parasites, which include two hookworm species, Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus, the whipworm Trichuris trichiura, and the large roundworm Ascaris lumbricoides, infect upwards of two billion people...

  8. Reproduction of root knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) on Bt ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    2013-09-30

    Sep 30, 2013 ... ABSTRACT. Objective: The sedentary endoparasite Meloidogyne incognita is an important plant parasitic nematode that infects cotton causing significant yield losses. The objective of this study was to evaluate reproduction of M. incognita in Bt cotton (06Z604D), isoline (99M03) and HART 89M (local ...

  9. A mass spectrometric method for diagnosis of gastrointestinal infections by 13 C determination from respiratory CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuna, Stela; Ursu, D.; Cuna, C.; Berdea, P.; Sparchez, Z.

    2000-01-01

    The use of stable carbon isotopes in metabolic research on humans and large animals is expanding rapidly due to the increasing variety of labelled compounds, greater availability of analytical facilities, and absence of health risk from radiation.This study is focused on a new mass spectrometric technique to diagnose Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection of the gastric mucosa which results in ulcers and some forms of gastric cancer. The method is based on measuring 13 C-enrichment in exhaled air by isotope ratios mass spectrometry. In this breath test, 13 C-labelled urea is given orally to the patient. If HP is present, the 13 C-urea is decomposed rapidly by these bacteria to 13 CO 2 which circulates to the lungs and is expelled in the breath where it can be detected. The protocol of the method is described and one example of the use of 13 C-urea is presented. The 13 C-enrichment in CO 2 exhaled is measured by mass spectrometry with double collector and the results are expressed in relative delta (δ) per mil ( o / oo ) units. The instrumental precision was ± 0.12 o / oo . The δ 13 C was measured in both pre and post - dose breath samples collected from infected patient at 20, 40 and 60 min post-dose. The results showed 13 C increases of > 25 o / oo at 40 min, in good agreement with the data of literature. We concluded that these breath tests are ideally suited to diagnose HP infection as a nonradioactive, noninvasive and applicable to subjects of any population method. (authors)

  10. Prevalence and distribution of gastrointestinal parasites of working camels in Sokoto metropolis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mahmuda

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: An epidemiological study of gastrointestinal parasites of working camels in Sokoto metropolis was conducted between March and September, 2013, where the general prevalence and seasonal distribution were identified. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 faecal samples from working camels were examined using standard parasitological techniques (Centrifugal sedimentation and simple flotation. Microscopic examination of faecal samples revealed that some samples were positive for at least one or more parasite eggs/oocysts. Results: The overall prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites was found to be 78 (78.0% and seasonal prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites was found to be 35 (70.0% for the dry season and 43 (86.0% for the rainy season. Overall, the prevalence of nematodes, trematodes, cestodes, and protozoa were 87 (80.56%, 7 (6.48%, 4 (3.71% and 10 (9.26%, respectively. The prevalence of helminths parasites indicated as most dominant eggs of Strongyles 68 (62.96% followed by Strongyloides spp 10 (9.26%, and Trichuris spp 8 (7.41%, while Protozoan oocyst from the faecal samples recorded Coccidia spp 9 (8.33%. The prevalence by sex, age, and breed were also determined in the study animals. Conclusion: The presence of polyparasitism with high prevalence is an indication that favorable environmental conditions for infection, survival and perpetuation of the parasites exist in Sokoto metropolis.

  11. RNA interference in plant parasitic nematodes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-08-04

    Aug 4, 2008 ... nematodes. RNAi should help identify gene and, hence, protein targets for nematode control strategies. Key words: RNA interference, RNAi, gene expression, plant parasitic nematodes. INTRODUCTION. Plant parasitic nematodes are found as pests of crops throughout the world with many having a severe ...

  12. Early exposure of infants to GI nematodes induces Th2 dominant immune responses which are unaffected by periodic anthelminthic treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria J Wright

    Full Text Available We have previously shown a reduction in anaemia and wasting malnutrition in infants <3 years old in Pemba Island, Zanzibar, following repeated anthelminthic treatment for the endemic gastrointestinal (GI nematodes Ascaris lumbricoides, hookworm and Trichuris trichiura. In view of the low intensity of worm infections in this age group, this was unexpected, and it was proposed that immune responses to the worms rather than their direct effects may play a significant role in morbidity in infants and that anthelminthic treatment may alleviate such effects. Therefore, the primary aims of this study were to characterise the immune response to initial/early GI nematode infections in infants and the effects of anthelminthic treatment on such immune responses. The frequency and levels of Th1/Th2 cytokines (IL-5, IL-13, IFN-gamma and IL-10 induced by the worms were evaluated in 666 infants aged 6-24 months using the Whole Blood Assay. Ascaris and hookworm antigens induced predominantly Th2 cytokine responses, and levels of IL-5 and IL-13 were significantly correlated. The frequencies and levels of responses were higher for both Ascaris positive and hookworm positive infants compared with worm negative individuals, but very few infants made Trichuris-specific cytokine responses. Infants treated every 3 months with mebendazole showed a significantly lower prevalence of infection compared with placebo-treated controls at one year following baseline. At follow-up, cytokine responses to Ascaris and hookworm antigens, which remained Th2 biased, were increased compared with baseline but were not significantly affected by treatment. However, blood eosinophil levels, which were elevated in worm-infected children, were significantly lower in treated children. Thus the effect of deworming in this age group on anaemia and wasting malnutrition, which were replicated in this study, could not be explained by modification of cytokine responses but may be related to

  13. Tanniferous plants and control of gastrointestinal nematodes of small ruminants

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Lorena Mayana Beserra de; Bevilaqua, Claudia Maria Leal; Morais, Selene Maia de; Camurça-Vasconcelos, Ana Lourdes Fernandes; Macedo, Iara Tersia Freitas

    2011-01-01

    Os nematóides gastrintestinais são responsáveis por acentuada redução na produtividade de ovinos e caprinos. Na tentativa de controlar esses parasitos, são utilizados diversos anti-helmínticos sintéticos, mas o desenvolvimento da resistência tem tornado esse controle pouco eficaz. Na busca por alternativas de controle dos nematóides gastrintestinais, a utilização de plantas taniníferas tem despertado interesse de pesquisadores em várias regiões do mundo. Essa revisão visa a abordar os diverso...

  14. THE RATIONALE FOR ALPHA-INTERFERON IMMUNOTHERAPY IN INFANTS WITH FUNCTIONAL GASTROINTESTINAL DISORDERS AND ACUTE INVASIVE INTESTINAL INFECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. R. Meskina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute intestinal  infections  in children are a considerable  medical and social problem  worldwide. Immune therapy  could  help  to reduce the frequency of post-infectious functional intestinal dysfunction  in patients  with comorbidities. Aim: To evaluate  the  efficacy of human  recombinant interferon  alpha-2b, administered at acute  phase  of an acute  invasive intestinal  infection to infants in the first months  of age, suffering from functional  bowel  disorders. Materials and methods: This  was  an  open-label,  randomized (envelope method, prospective  study in two parallel groups. The study included  59 infants of the  first months  of life, who were breastfed, had a history of intestinal  dysfunction  and were hospitalized  to  an  infectious  department. We studied  efficacy of recombinant interferon  alpha-2b administered in rectal suppositories  at a dose  of   chromatography with measurement of short-chain fatty acids. Results: Standard treatment was ineffective in 63.3% (95% CI 43.9–80.0% of patients. Administration   of  interferon   alpha-2b   reduced the rate of treatment failure by day 14 to 32% (95% CI 9–56% and  the  risk of persistent  diarrhea  for more than  one month  to 29% (95% CI 5–53%. In those patients  who were administered interferon, inflammation at days 25 to 55 was less severe and the levels of i-forms of short-chain fatty acids were lower. Conclusion: Immunotherapy with recombinant interferon alpha-2b seems to be a promising way to improve  combination treatment of acute invasive intestinal infections in infants with a history of intestinal dysfunction, as it reduces the risk of post-infectious intestinal disorders.

  15. Generalists at the interface: Nematode transmission between wild and domestic ungulates

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    Josephine G. Walker

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Many parasitic nematode species are generalists capable of infecting multiple host species. The complex life cycle of nematodes, involving partial development outside of the host, facilitates transmission of these parasites between host species even when there is no direct contact between hosts. Infective nematode larvae persist in the environment, and where grazing or water sources are shared ingestion of parasite larvae deposited by different host species is likely. In this paper we examine the extent to which nematode parasite species have been observed in sympatric wild and domestic ungulates. First, using existing host–parasite databases, we describe expected overlap of 412 nematode species between 76 wild and 8 domestic ungulate host species. Our results indicate that host-specific parasites make up less than half of the nematode parasites infecting any particular ungulate host species. For wild host species, between 14% (for common warthog and 76% (for mouflon of parasitic nematode species are shared with domestic species. For domestic host species, between 42% (for horse and 77% (for llamas/alpacas of parasitic nematode species are shared with wild species. We also present an index of liability to describe the risk of cross-boundary parasites to each host species. We then examine specific examples from the literature in which transmission of nematode parasites between domestic and wild ungulates is described. However, there are many limitations in the existing data due to geographical bias and certain host species being studied more frequently than others. Although we demonstrate that many species of parasitic nematode are found in both wild and domestic hosts, little work has been done to demonstrate whether transmission is occurring between species or whether similar strains circulate separately. Additional research on cross-species transmission, including the use of models and of genetic methods to define strains, will provide

  16. Generalists at the interface: Nematode transmission between wild and domestic ungulates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Josephine G; Morgan, Eric R

    2014-12-01

    Many parasitic nematode species are generalists capable of infecting multiple host species. The complex life cycle of nematodes, involving partial development outside of the host, facilitates transmission of these parasites between host species even when there is no direct contact between hosts. Infective nematode larvae persist in the environment, and where grazing or water sources are shared ingestion of parasite larvae deposited by different host species is likely. In this paper we examine the extent to which nematode parasite species have been observed in sympatric wild and domestic ungulates. First, using existing host-parasite databases, we describe expected overlap of 412 nematode species between 76 wild and 8 domestic ungulate host species. Our results indicate that host-specific parasites make up less than half of the nematode parasites infecting any particular ungulate host species. For wild host species, between 14% (for common warthog) and 76% (for mouflon) of parasitic nematode species are shared with domestic species. For domestic host species, between 42% (for horse) and 77% (for llamas/alpacas) of parasitic nematode species are shared with wild species. We also present an index of liability to describe the risk of cross-boundary parasites to each host species. We then examine specific examples from the literature in which transmission of nematode parasites between domestic and wild ungulates is described. However, there are many limitations in the existing data due to geographical bias and certain host species being studied more frequently than others. Although we demonstrate that many species of parasitic nematode are found in both wild and domestic hosts, little work has been done to demonstrate whether transmission is occurring between species or whether similar strains circulate separately. Additional research on cross-species transmission, including the use of models and of genetic methods to define strains, will provide evidence to answer this

  17. The ability of the nematode-trapping fungus Duddingtonia flagrans to reduce the transmission of infective Ostertagia ostertagi larvae from faeces to herbage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez, A.S.; Larsen, M.; Nansen, P.

    1999-01-01

    -treated pats compared with control pats in all three experiments, reflecting the ability of the fungus to destroy free-living larval stages in the faecal pat environment. After 8 weeks on pasture there were no differences between control and fungus-treated pats with respect to wet weight, dry weight...... to determine the wet weight, dry weight, and content of organic matter. The infective larvae remaining in the pats were extracted. Faecal cultures showed that both fungal isolates significantly reduced the number of infective larvae. Significantly fewer larvae were recovered from herbage surrounding fungus......, and organic matter content. This indicates that the degradation of faeces was not negatively affected by the presence of the fungus....

  18. Ethnobotanical survey of traditionally used medicinal plants for infections of skin, gastrointestinal tract, urinary tract and the oral cavity in Borabu sub-county, Nyamira county, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omwenga, E O; Hensel, A; Shitandi, A; Goycoolea, F M

    2015-12-24

    Different communities throughout the world have specialized and profound knowledge on the use medicinal plants for various diseases. However, the detailed information on the respective use may extinct in near future as this knowledge is passed only orally among generations in most of the communities. The present survey aimed to document the use of medicinal plants by traditional healers from the Kisii community, Borabu sub-county in Nyamira county, Kenya, to treat infections of the urinary tract, oral cavity, gastrointestinal system and the skin and to evaluate the social context in which the healers work and practice. Validated questionnaires were applied to 50 traditional healers in the study region, followed by interviews and structured conversations. Information on the relevant traditionally used medicinal plants and their use were documented, including sampling and identification of voucher specimens. The ethnopharmacological survey revealed 25 medicinal plant species belonging to 19 families. It got evident that most of these species will be extinct in the near future unless appropriate measures are taken, as it turned out difficult to collect some of the wild growing species. Elaeodendron buchananii Loes, Erlangea marginata S. Moore, Acacia gerrardii Benth., Balanites orbicularis Sprague, Solanum renschii Vatke and Orthosiphon hildebrandtii Vatke have not been described before for its medicinal use. Among the 25 species collected from the various regions of Borabu sub-county Urtica dioica L. was the only medicinal plant that was collected from all regions. In contrast Erythrina abyssinica and Rhus natalensis were found in only two regions of the study area. The traditional medicinal use of the reported plants for infections should be documented and a great need of awareness from scientists and local government for improved preservation or field cultivation of some species is obvious. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Efficacy of pyrantel pamoate and ivermectin for the treatment of canine nematodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Jesus

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the efficacy of pyrantel pamoate and ivermectin on gastrointestinal nematodes in dogs. Fecal egg counts per gram (EPG were measured by the fecal egg count reduction test (FECRT in order to evaluate the anthelmintic efficiency and fecal float exams were also performed to assess the concordance between coproparasitological techniques. A total of 45 naturally infected dogs in the city of Bandeirantes, Paraná State, were selected and divided into three groups: Group 1, 15 animals that received pyrantel pamoate (145 mg in a single dose; Group 2, 15 animals that received ivermectin (3 mg; and Group 3, 15 animals that comprised an untreated control group. Fecal testing was performed two and 10 days after treatment. Toxocara was the most prevalent genus, followed by Ancylostoma and Trichuris. Ancylostoma had low resistance to ivermectin and pyrantel pamoate treatment, while Toxocara were resistant to both treatments. Statistical correlation testing to compare coproparasitogical techniques revealed moderate concordance, substantial and almost perfect concordance for detection of Ancylostoma, Trichuris, and Toxocara, respectively. The results of this study suggest that the gender Ancylostoma had low resistance and Toxocara is resistant to both drugs and because of their high prevalence in young animals means that others anthelmintic drugs may be recommended to combat infections. Additionally, the Gordon and Whitlock modified and Willis-Mollay techniques are effective for detection particularly of Toxocara in dogs.

  20. Efficacy of Procox® oral suspension for dogs (0.1% emodepside and 2% toltrazuril) against experimental nematode (Toxocara cati and Ancylostoma tubaeforme) infections in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petry, Gabriele; Kruedewagen, Eva; Bach, Thomas; Gasda, Nadine; Krieger, Klemens J

    2011-08-01

    Two exploratory studies were performed to determine the optimum therapeutic dose of Procox(®) for the removal of experimental infection with mature adult Toxocara (T.) cati and Ancylostoma (A.) tubaeforme in kittens. Procox(®) is a new oral suspension containing a combination of the nematocidal and coccidiocidal active principles emodepside (0.1 %) and toltrazuril (2 %).In the first study, 18 eight-weeks-old kittens were inoculated with 450 L3 larvae of T. cati. 56 days after infection, the kittens were allocated to three treatment groups and were treated with 0.5 mg emodepside/kg body weight (group 1), 0.25 mg emodepside/kg body weight (group 2) and 0.1 mg emodepside/kg body weight (group 3), respectively. In the second study, 10 eight-weeks-old kittens were inoculated with 350 L3 larvae of A. tubaeforme. Four weeks after infection, the kittens were allocated to two treatment groups and were treated with 0.1 mg emodepside/kg body weight (group 1) or 0.25 mg emodepside/kg body weight (group 2). In both studies, all kittens received a reference treatment with Drontal(®) (230 mg pyrantel embonate and 20 mg praziquantel per tablet) at the recommended dose of one tablet/4 kg body weight 5 days after treatment with Procox(®). Anthelmintic efficacy was calculated by reduction in worm numbers expelled with the faeces following treatment with Procox(®) as compared with faecal worm numbers after reference treatment with Drontal(®), by thus avoiding necropsy of the animals.In the T. cati study, emodepside was at 99.9 %, 100 % and 96.5 % effective at a dosage of 0.5 mg, 0.25 mg and 0.1 mg per kg body weight, respectively. Against A. tubaeforme emodepside was at 95.7 % and 100 % effective at a dosage of 0.1 mg and 0.25 mg per kg body weight. No adverse events were seen during either study.It can be concluded that Procox(®) is efficacious for the control of mature adult T. cati and A. tubaeforme infections in cats at a single-dose rate of 0.25 mg emodepside/kg body

  1. Adaptive radiation within marine anisakid nematodes: a zoogeographical modeling of cosmopolitan, zoonotic parasites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Kuhn

    Full Text Available Parasites of the nematode genus Anisakis are associated with aquatic organisms. They can be found in a variety of marine hosts including whales, crustaceans, fish and cephalopods and are known to be the cause of the zoonotic disease anisakiasis, a painful inflammation of the gastro-intestinal tract caused by the accidental consumptions of infectious larvae raw or semi-raw fishery products. Since the demand on fish as dietary protein source and the export rates of seafood products in general is rapidly increasing worldwide, the knowledge about the distribution of potential foodborne human pathogens in seafood is of major significance for human health. Studies have provided evidence that a few Anisakis species can cause clinical symptoms in humans. The aim of our study was to interpolate the species range for every described Anisakis species on the basis of the existing occurrence data. We used sequence data of 373 Anisakis larvae from 30 different hosts worldwide and previously published molecular data (n = 584 from 53 field-specific publications to model the species range of Anisakis spp., using a interpolation method that combines aspects of the alpha hull interpolation algorithm as well as the conditional interpolation approach. The results of our approach strongly indicate the existence of species-specific distribution patterns of Anisakis spp. within different climate zones and oceans that are in principle congruent with those of their respective final hosts. Our results support preceding studies that propose anisakid nematodes as useful biological indicators for their final host distribution and abundance as they closely follow the trophic relationships among their successive hosts. The modeling might although be helpful for predicting the likelihood of infection in order to reduce the risk of anisakiasis cases in a given area.

  2. Adaptive immunity alters distinct host feeding pathways during nematode induced inflammation, a novel mechanism in parasite expulsion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J Worthington

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal infection is often associated with hypophagia and weight loss; however, the precise mechanisms governing these responses remain poorly defined. Furthermore, the possibility that alterations in feeding during infection may be beneficial to the host requires further study. We used the nematode Trichinella spiralis, which transiently inhabits the small intestine before migrating to skeletal muscle, as a biphasic model of infection to determine the cellular and molecular pathways controlling feeding during enteric and peripheral inflammation. Through the infection of genetically modified mice lacking cholecystokinin, Tumor necrosis factor α receptors and T and B-cells, we observed a biphasic hypophagic response to infection resulting from two separate immune-driven mechanisms. The enteroendocrine I-cell derived hormone cholecystokinin is an essential mediator of initial hypophagia and is induced by CD4+ T-cells during enteritis. In contrast, the second hypophagic response is extra-intestinal and due to the anorectic effects of TNFα during peripheral infection of the muscle. Moreover, via maintaining naive levels of the adipose secreted hormone leptin throughout infection we demonstrate a novel feedback loop in the immunoendocrine axis. Immune driven I-cell hyperplasia and resultant weight loss leads to a reduction in the inflammatory adipokine leptin, which in turn heightens protective immunity during infection. These results characterize specific immune mediated mechanisms which reduce feeding during intestinal or peripheral inflammation. Importantly, the molecular mediators of each phase are entirely separate. The data also introduce the first evidence that I-cell hyperplasia is an adaptively driven immune response that directly impinges on the outcome to infection.

  3. Evaluation the effect of albendazole against nematodes in sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Al-Farwachi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Six sheep farms in Mosul city, Iraq randomly selected, were surveyed for gastrointestinal nematodes resistant to Albendazole. On each of 6 sheep farms, 20 lambs were randomly distributed into two equal groups untreated control group, and albendazole (benzimidazole group (10 mg/kg BW. Faecal egg counts and larval cultures were done at 7, 14, and 21 days after anthelmintic treatment. Resistance was apparent for albendazole on 4 farms out of 6 (66.7%. Post-treatment larval cultures indicated: Strongyloides papillosus, Marshalligia marshalli, Nematodirus spathiger and Haemonchus contortus.

  4. Arrested larval development in cattle nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, J; Duncan, M

    1987-06-01

    Most economically important cattle nematodes are able to arrest their larval development within the host - entering a period of dormancy or hypobiosis. Arrested larvae have a low death rate, and large numbers can accumulate in infected cattle during the grazing season. Because of this, outbreaks of disease caused by such nematodes can occur at times when recent infection with the parasites could not have occurred, for example during winter in temperature northern climates when cattle are normally housed. The capacity to arrest is a heritable trait. It is seen as an adaptation by the parasite to avoid further development to its free-living stages during times when the climate is unsuitable for free-living survival. But levels of arrestment can vary markedly in different regions, in different cattle, and under different management regimes. Climatic factors, previous conditioning, host immune status, and farm management all seem to affect arrestment levels. In this article, James Armour and Mary Duncan review the biological basis of the phenomenon, and discuss the apparently conflicting views on how it is controlled.

  5. PLANT-PARASITIC NEMATODES ON STONE FRUITS AND CITRUS IN LEBANON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Said K. Ibrahim

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Ibrahim Said K., Ibrahim Azar, Christian Naser, Badran Akikki and Ludmilla Ibrahim. 2016. Plant-parasitic nematodes on stone fruits and citrus in Lebanon. Lebanese Science Journal, 17(1: 9-24. This study aimed to determine the occurrence, distribution of plant parasitic nematodes on stone fruits in Lebanon and to determine the effect of plant extracts on the mortality of several nematode species. A total of 308 soil samples were collected from five different crops. Almost all surveyed areas showed infection with nematodes. The soil infestation rate with nematodes in collected soil samples from all 10 surveyed crops ranged from 66.6 to 100%. Eighteen out of 308 soil samples were free of nematodes (5.8%. All the collected soil samples from nectarine and plum orchards were infested with nematodes (100%, followed by citrus (97.6%, apple (88.7%, pear and quince (85.7%, and cherry (81.4%. The lowest infection (66.6% was detected on almond and apricot. The level of infestation varied from one area to another and ranged between 0.1 and 28 nematodes per 1 g of soil, with the highest number obtained on cherry. Several genera were identified based on morphological characters including: root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp., Tylenchulus, Xiphinema, Rotylenchus, Pratylenchus, and Longidorus. Tylenchulus and Radopholus spp. were the most common on citrus trees, whereas Pratylechus and Meloidogyne spp. were detected almost in all the samples collected from all the crops. Six chopped aromatic plants were tested in pot experiments to control nematodes population densities. The results revealed that carbofuran (nematicide was the most effective (88.48% in comparison to the plant materials. Allium sativum gave the highest control (76.52% followed by Tageta patula (72.0%, Cucurbita maxima (71.84% and Inula viscosa (63.96%. Origanum syriacum (55.04% and Thymus (53.72% were less effective in comparison to the rest of tested plant materials.

  6. Development of a sweet cherry pepper line with resistance to the southern root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita

    Science.gov (United States)

    The southern root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) is a major pathogen of pepper (Capsicum spp.), causing significant yield losses in heavily infected plants. The N-gene confers resistance to M. incognita, and has been successfully used to mitigate nematode damage in specific pepper varieties f...

  7. HOW FUNGI INTERACT WITH NEMATODE TO ACTIVATE THE PLANT DEFENCE RESPONSE TO TOMATO PLANTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonetti, P; Costanza, A; Zonno, M C; Molinari, S; Altomare, C

    2014-01-01

    Management of plant parasitic nematodes with nematode predators, parasites or antagonists is an eco-friendly approach that may avoid the problems arisen by the use of toxic chemicals. Fungi belonging to Trichoderma spp. are well known in literature for their role in control of plant parasitic nematodes. Root-knot nematodes (RKNs), Meloidogyne spp., are obligate parasites that cause the formation of familiar galls on the roots of many cultivated plants. The interaction between the M. incognita motile second stage juveniles (J2s) and the isolate ITEM 908 of Trichoderma harzianum was examined in its effect on the nematode infestation level of susceptible tomato plants. To gain insight into the mechanisms by which ITEM 908 interacts with nematode-infected tomato plants, the expression patterns of the genes PR1 (marker of Salycilic Acid-depending resistance signalling pathway) and JERF3 (marker of the Jasmonic Acid/Ethylene-depending resistance signalling pathway) were detected over time in: i) untreated roots; ii) roots pre-treated with the fungus; iii) roots inoculated with the nematode; iv) pre-treated and inoculated roots. Infestation parameters were checked in untreated plants and plants treated with the fungus to test the effect of the fungus on nematode infestation level and to compare this effect with the expression of the genes PR1 and JERF3, involved in induced resistance.

  8. Non-typhoidal Salmonella serotypes, antimicrobial resistance and co-infection with parasites among patients with diarrhea and other gastrointestinal complaints in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguale, Tadesse; Gebreyes, Wondwossen A; Asrat, Daniel; Alemayehu, Haile; Gunn, John S; Engidawork, Ephrem

    2015-11-04

    Non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) is an important public health problem worldwide. Consumption of animal-derived food products and direct and/or indirect contact with animals are the major routes of acquiring infection with NTS. Published information, particularly on the serotype distribution of NTS among human patients with gastroenteritis and associated risk factors, is scarce in Ethiopia. This study investigated the prevalence, risk factors, serotype distribution and antimicrobial susceptibility of Salmonella species among diarrheic out-patients attending health centers in Addis Ababa and patients with various gastrointestinal complaints at Tikur Anbessa Specialized Hospital (TASH). Stool samples were cultured for Salmonella species according to the WHO Global Foodborne Infections Network laboratory protocol. Salmonella serotyping was conducted using slide agglutination and microplate agglutination techniques. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed using the disk diffusion method according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. A total of 59 (6.2 %) stool samples, out of 957 were culture positive for Salmonella species. Fifty-five (7.2 %) of 765 diarrheic patients from health centers and 4 (2.1 %) of 192 patients from TASH were culture positive for Salmonella species. Multivariable logistic regression analysis after adjusting for all other variables revealed statistically significant association of Salmonella infection with consumption of raw vegetables (OR = 1.91, 95 % CI = 1.29-2.83, χ(2) = 4.74, p = 0.025) and symptom of watery diarrhea (OR = 3.3, 95 % CI = 1.23-8.88, χ(2) = 10.54, p = 0.005). Eleven serotypes were detected, and the most prominent were S. Typhimurium (37.3 %), S. Virchow (34 %), and S. Kottbus (10.2 %). Other serotypes were S. Miami, S. Kentucky, S. Newport, S. Enteritidis, S. Braenderup, S. Saintpaul, S. Concord and S. V:ROUGH-O. Resistance to three or more antimicrobials was detected in 27 (40.3 %) of the

  9. In vitro assessment of Argemone mexicana, Taraxacum officinale, Ruta chalepensis and Tagetes filifolia against Haemonchus contortus nematode eggs and infective (L3) larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasso Díaz, Gabriela; Hernández, Glafiro Torres; Zamilpa, Alejandro; Becerril Pérez, Carlos Miguel; Ramírez Bribiesca, J Efrén; Hernández Mendo, Omar; Sánchez Arroyo, Hussein; González Cortazar, Manasés; Mendoza de Gives, Pedro

    2017-08-01

    Argemone mexicana, Taraxacum officinale, Ruta chalepensis and Tagetes filifolia are plants with deworming potential. The purpose of this study was to evaluate methanolic extracts of aerial parts of these plants against Haemonchus contortus eggs and infective larvae (L3) and identify compounds responsible for the anthelmintic activity. In vitro probes were performed to identify the anthelmintic activity of plant extracts: egg hatching inhibition (EHI) and larvae mortality. Open column Chromatography was used to bio-guided fractionation of the extract, which shows the best anthelmintic effect. The lethal concentration to inhibit 50% of H. contortus egg hatching or larvae mortality (LC 50 ) was calculated using a Probit analysis. Bio-guided procedure led to the recognition of an active fraction (TF11) mainly composed by 1) quercetagitrin, 2) methyl chlorogenate and chlorogenic acid. Quercetagitrin (1) and methyl chlorogenate (2) did not show an important EHI activity (3-14%) (p < 0.05); however, chlorogenic acid (3) showed 100% of EHI (LC 50 248 μg/mL) (p < 0.05). Chlorogenic acid is responsible of the ovicidal activity and it seems that, this compound is reported for the first time with anthelmintic activity against a parasite of importance in sheep industry. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Gastrointestinal malformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garne, Ester; Loane, Maria; Dolk, Helen

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyse the degree to which gestational age (GA) has been shortened due to prenatal diagnosis of gastrointestinal malformations (GIM). The data source for the study was 14 population-based registries of congenital malformations (EUROCAT). All liveborn infants with GIMs...... malformations, although not statistically significant for gastroschisis. There was little difference in median birthweight by GA for the pre- and postnatally diagnosed infants. The difference in GA at birth between prenatally and postnatally diagnosed infants with GIMs is enough to increase the risk...... of mortality for the prenatally diagnosed infants. Clinicians need to balance the risk of early delivery against the benefits of clinical convenience when making case management decisions after prenatal diagnosis. Very few studies have been able to show benefits of prenatal diagnosis of congenital...

  11. Anthelmintic efficacy of ivermectin and abamectin, administered orally for seven consecutive days (100 µg/kg/day), against nematodes in naturally infected pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Welber Daniel Zanetti; Teixeira, Weslen Fabricio Pires; Felippelli, Gustavo; Cruz, Breno Cayeiro; Buzulini, Carolina; Maciel, Willian Giquelin; Fávero, Flávia Carolina; Gomes, Lucas Vinicius Costa; Prando, Luciana; Bichuette, Murilo A; Dos Santos, Thais Rabelo; da Costa, Alvimar José

    2014-12-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate ivermectin and abamectin, both administered orally in naturally infected domestic swine, as well as analysing if the EPG (eggs per gram of faeces) values were equivalent with the ivermectin and abamectin efficacy obtained by parasitological necropsies. The animals were randomly selected based on the average of three consecutive EPG counts of Strongylida, Ascaris suum and Trichuris for experiment I, and of Strongylida and Trichuris for experiment II. After the random draw, eight animals were treated, orally, during seven consecutive days with 100 µg/kg/day ivermectin (Ivermectina® premix, Ouro Fino Agronegócios), eight other animals were treated, orally, during seven consecutive days with 100 µg/kg/day abamectin (Virbamax® premix - Virbac do Brasil Indústria e Comércio Ltda.), and eight pigs were kept as controls. EPG counts were performed for each individual animal at 14th day post-treatment (DPT). All animals (control and treatment) were necropsied at the 14th DPT. The results from both experiments demonstrate that both ivermectin and abamectin, administered orally for a continuous period of seven days, at a daily dosage of 100 µg/kg, were highly effective (>95%) against Hyostrongylus rubidus, Strongyloides ransomi, Ascaris suum and Metastrongylus salmi. Against Oesophagostomum dentatum, abamectin presented over 95% efficacy against both evaluated strains, while ivermectin reached other strain as resistant. Regarding T. suis, both ivermectin and abamectin were effective (efficacies >90%) against one of the tested strains, while the other one was classified as resistant. Furthermore, the EPG values were equivalent with the ivermectin and abamectin efficacy obtained by parasitological necropsies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Gastric nematodes of Nile crocodiles, Crocodylus niloticus Laurenti, 1768, in the Okavango River, Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Junker

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The ascaridoid nematodes Dujardinascaris madagascariensis Chabaud & Caballero, 1966, Dujardinascaris dujardini (Travassos, 1920, Gedoelstascaris vandenbrandeni (Baylis, 1929 Sprent, 1978 and Multicaecum agile (Wedl, 1861 Baylis, 1923 were recovered from the stomach contents of Crocodylus niloticus Laurenti, 1768 from the Okavango River, Botswana, together with Eustrongylides sp., a dioctophymatoid nematode usually parasitizing piscivorous birds. Dujardinascaris madagascariensis was present in most of the infected hosts, while the remaining species were mostly represented in single collections in one to three hosts. All four ascaridoid nematodes represent new geographic records.

  13. On the track of the Red Queen: bark beetles, their nematodes, local climate and geographic parthenogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meirmans, S; Skorping, A; Løyning, M K; Kirkendall, L R

    2006-11-01

    Geographic parthenogenesis has been explained as resulting from parasite pressure (Red Queen hypothesis): several studies have found high degrees of sexuals where the prevalence of parasites is high. However, it is important to address whether prevalence of parasites mirrors risk of infection. We explored geographic parthenogenesis of Ips acuminatus bark beetles and their nematodes. Local climate is crucial for nematode stages outside the host, in spring and summer, and prevalence should thus be associated with those temperatures if prevalence reliably reflects exposure risk across populations. This was the case; however, high prevalence of a virulent nematode species was not associated with many sexuals, whereas highly sexual populations were characterized by high infection risk of benign nematodes. Low virulence of the latter makes Red Queen dynamics unlikely. Geographical patterns of parthenogenesis were instead associated with winter temperature and variance in temperature.

  14. Endoscopic Diagnosis of Hookworm Infection That Caused Anemia in an Elderly Person

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang-che Kuo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Hookworm infection is a common intestinal nematodes in the world. Patients with a light hookworm infection are usually asymptomatic, but a moderate or heavy hookworm burden can result in fatigue, recurrent abdominal pain, and iron-deficiency anemia. We presented a case of 61-year-old man complained of general malaise and melena for 6 months due to hookworm infection. There is no eosinophilia, and the stool exam only revealed positive of occult blood, without ova or parasite identified. Upper endoscopy revealed several squirming red worms in duodenum. Hookworm (Ancylostoma duodenale infection is diagnosed and eradiated by mebendazole successfully. His anemia is corrected after treatment. Hence, hookworm infection should be noted in eldler patients with long term anemia in Taiwan. It is also important to check carefully in the duodenum at routine upper gastrointestinal endoscopy.

  15. Observations on the transmission and the seasonality of infection of the nematode Cystidicoloides ephemeridarum in Salmo trutta fario in a small trout stream in North Bohemia, the Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Moravec, František; Frantová, Denisa

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 1 (2003), s. 41-46 ISSN 1230-2821 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA524/00/0267 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6022909 Keywords : parasitic nematode * Cystidicoloides * seasonality Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 0.495, year: 2003

  16. Gastrointestinal parasites in Danish goats - prevalence and risk factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sörensen, C.; Holm, S. A.; Thamsborg, S. M.

    2012-01-01

    The aims were to examine prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites in Danish goats, based on faecal examination, in relation to geographical distribution and risk factors, and to investigate the occurrence of anthelmintic resistance in nematodes in selected farms. In April 2012 all Danish goat farms......, and herds with a mean EPG>150 were offered a faecal egg count reduction test (FECRT). All herds were asked to complete a questionnaire about management and risk factors concerning parasites, particularly nematodes. Faecal egg counts were generally low; 2 out of 25 herds had a mean EPG>150. Herd prevalence...... of Nematodirus battus was 16%; likewise PNA‐staining revealed H. contortus in 16% of the herds (4 of 5 herds with individual EPG > 500). The overall prevalence of parasites detected by faecal examination were: Eimeria spp.100%, gastrointestinal trichostrongyles (excl. Nematodirus spp.) 66%, Trichuris ovis 36...

  17. PLANT-PARASITIC NEMATODES ON STONE FRUITS AND CITRUS IN LEBANON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, S.K.; Azar, I.; Naser, CH.; Akikki, B; Ibrahim, L.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the occurrence, distribution of plant parasitic nematodes on stone fruits in Lebanon and to determine the effect of plant extracts on the mortality of several nematode species. A total of 308 soil samples were collected from five different crops. Almost all surveyed areas showed infection with nematodes.The soil infestation rate with nematodes in collected soil samples from all 10 surveyed crops ranged from 66.6 to 100%. Eighteen ou