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Sample records for gastroesophageal junction cancer

  1. Impact of splenectomy on surgical outcome in patients with cancer of the distal esophagus and gastro-esophageal junction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pultrum, B. B.; van Bastelaar, J.; Schreurs, Liesbeth; van Dullemen, H. M.; Groen, H.; Nijsten, M. W. N.; van Dam, G. M.; Plukker, J. T. H. M.

    We aim to determine the effect of splenectomy on clinical outcome in patients with cancer of the distal esophagus and gastro-esophageal junction (GEJ) after a curative intended resection. From January 1991 to July 2004, 210 patients underwent a potentially curative gastroesophageal resection with an

  2. Cauda Equina Syndrome Secondary to Leptomeningeal Carcinomatosis of Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal Alkhotani

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Leptomeningeal carcinomatosis (LMC is a diffuse or multifocal malignant infiltration of the pia matter and arachnoid membrane. The most commonly reported cancers associated with LMC are breast, lung, and hematological malignancies. Patients with LMC commonly present with multifocal neurological symptoms. We report a case of LMC secondary to gastroesophageal junction cancer present initially with cauda equina syndrome. A 51-year-old male patient with treated adenocarcinoma of the gastroesophageal junction presented with left leg pain, mild weakness, and saddle area numbness. Initial radiological examinations were unremarkable. Subsequently, he had worsening of his leg weakness, fecal incontinence, and urine retention. Two days later, he developed rapidly progressive cranial neuropathies including facial diplegia, sensorineural hearing loss, dysarthria, and dysphagia. MRI with and without contrast showed diffuse enhancement of leptomeninges surrounding the brain, spinal cord, and cauda equina extending to the nerve roots. Cerebrospinal fluid cytology was positive for malignant cells. The patient died within 10 days from the second presentation. In cancer patients with cauda equina syndrome and absence of structural lesion on imaging, LMC should be considered. To our knowledge, this is the first case of LMC secondary to gastroesophageal cancer presenting with cauda equina syndrome.

  3. Comparative Investigation of Postoperative Complications in Patients With Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer Treated With Preoperative Chemotherapy or Surgery Alone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Achiam, M P; Jensen, L.B.; Larsson, H.

    2016-01-01

    complications of patients with cancer at the gastroesophageal junction treated with either neoadjuvant chemotherapy or surgery alone in patients from "The Danish Clinical Registry of Carcinomas of the Esophagus, the Gastro-Esophageal Junction and the Stomach." MATERIALS AND METHODS: A historical follow-up study......, comparing postoperative complications between two cohorts before and after implementation of chemotherapy was completed. RESULTS: In all, 180 consecutive patients treated with perioperative chemotherapy and a comparative surgery-only group of patients were identified from The Danish Clinical Registry......BACKGROUND AND AIM: Gastroesophageal junction cancer is one of the leading causes to cancer-related death and the prognosis is poor. However, progress has been made over the last couple of decades with the introduction of multimodality treatment and optimized surgery. Three-year survival rates have...

  4. Comparative genomic hybridization of cancer of the gastroesophageal junction: deletion of 14Q31-32.1 discriminates between esophageal (Barrett's) and gastric cardia adenocarcinomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. van Dekken (Herman); E. Geelen; W.N.M. Dinjens (Winand); B.P.L. Wijnhoven (Bas); H.W. Tilanus (Hugo); H.J. Tanke (Hans); C. Rosenberg

    1999-01-01

    textabstractIncidence rates have risen rapidly for esophageal and gastric cardia adenocarcinomas. These cancers, arising at and around the gastroesophageal junction (GEJ), share a poor prognosis. In contrast, there is no consensus with respect to clinical staging

  5. Interobserver and Intraobserver Reproducibility with Volume Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Computed Tomography (DCE-CT in Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Lundsgaard Hansen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to assess inter- and intra-observer reproducibility of three different analytic methods to evaluate quantitative dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT measures from gastroesophageal junctional cancer. Twenty-five DCE-CT studies with gastroesophageal junction cancer were selected from a previous longitudinal study. Three radiologists independently reviewed all scans, and one repeated the analysis eight months later for intraobserver analysis. Review of the scans consisted of three analysis methods: (I Four, fixed small sized regions of interest (2-dimensional (2D fixed ROIs placed in the tumor periphery, (II 2-dimensional regions of interest (2D-ROI along the tumor border in the tumor center, and (III 3-dimensional volumes of interest (3D-VOI containing the entire tumor volume. Arterial flow, blood volume and permeability (ktrans were recorded for each observation. Inter- and intra-observer variability were assessed by Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC and Bland-Altman statistics. Interobserver ICC was excellent for arterial flow (0.88, for blood volume (0.89 and for permeability (0.91 with 3D-VOI analysis. The 95% limits of agreement were narrower for 3D analysis compared to 2D analysis. Three-dimensional volume DCE-CT analysis of gastroesophageal junction cancer provides higher inter- and intra-observer reproducibility with narrower limits of agreement between readers compared to 2D analysis.

  6. Expert Consensus Contouring Guidelines for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Esophageal and Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer

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    Wu, Abraham J., E-mail: wua@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Bosch, Walter R. [Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Chang, Daniel T. [Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, California (United States); Hong, Theodore S. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Jabbour, Salma K. [Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Kleinberg, Lawrence R. [Johns Hopkins Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Mamon, Harvey J. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Thomas, Charles R. [Knight Cancer Institute, Oregon Health & Sciences University, Portland, Oregon (United States); Goodman, Karyn A. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose/Objective(s): Current guidelines for esophageal cancer contouring are derived from traditional 2-dimensional fields based on bony landmarks, and they do not provide sufficient anatomic detail to ensure consistent contouring for more conformal radiation therapy techniques such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Therefore, we convened an expert panel with the specific aim to derive contouring guidelines and generate an atlas for the clinical target volume (CTV) in esophageal or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancer. Methods and Materials: Eight expert academically based gastrointestinal radiation oncologists participated. Three sample cases were chosen: a GEJ cancer, a distal esophageal cancer, and a mid-upper esophageal cancer. Uniform computed tomographic (CT) simulation datasets and accompanying diagnostic positron emission tomographic/CT images were distributed to each expert, and the expert was instructed to generate gross tumor volume (GTV) and CTV contours for each case. All contours were aggregated and subjected to quantitative analysis to assess the degree of concordance between experts and to generate draft consensus contours. The panel then refined these contours to generate the contouring atlas. Results: The κ statistics indicated substantial agreement between panelists for each of the 3 test cases. A consensus CTV atlas was generated for the 3 test cases, each representing common anatomic presentations of esophageal cancer. The panel agreed on guidelines and principles to facilitate the generalizability of the atlas to individual cases. Conclusions: This expert panel successfully reached agreement on contouring guidelines for esophageal and GEJ IMRT and generated a reference CTV atlas. This atlas will serve as a reference for IMRT contours for clinical practice and prospective trial design. Subsequent patterns of failure analyses of clinical datasets using these guidelines may require modification in the future.

  7. Computed Tomography (CT) Perfusion as an Early Predictive Marker for Treatment Response to Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer and Gastric Cancer - A Prospective Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundsgaard Hansen, Martin; Fallentin, Eva; Lauridsen, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate whether early reductions in CT perfusion parameters predict response to pre-operative chemotherapy prior to surgery for gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) and gastric cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty-eight patients with adenocarcinoma of the gastro-esophageal junction (GEJ......) and stomach were included. Patients received three series of chemotherapy before surgery, each consisting of a 3-week cycle of intravenous epirubicin, cisplatin or oxaliplatin, concomitant with capecitabine peroral. The patients were evaluated with a CT perfusion scan prior to, after the first series of......-operative chemotherapy in GEJ and gastric cancer. As a single diagnostic test, CT Perfusion only has moderate sensitivity and specificity in response assessment of pre-operative chemotherapy making it insufficient for clinical decision purposes....

  8. Advances in Gastric and Gastro-Esophageal Junction Surgery for Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haverkamp, L.

    2015-01-01

    Chapter 1 – Introduction Gastric cancer is conventionally treated by means of open distal or total gastrectomy. The open surgical approach is associated with high morbity and long postoperative hospital stay. Minimally invasive surgery is upcoming for gastric cancer, since promosing results in the

  9. Mediastinal microdialysis in the diagnosis of early anastomotic leakage after resection for cancer of the esophagus and gastroesophageal junction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mark Ellebæk; Qvist, N.; Fristrup, C.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anastomotic leakage (AL) after gastroesophageal resection for cancer is a serious complication. The aim was to evaluate mediastinal microdialysis in the detection of AL before clinical symptoms. METHODS: Sixty patients were included. Samples were collected every 4 hours in the 1st 8...... postoperative days and analyzed for several metabolites. RESULTS: Forty-four patients had an uncomplicated postoperative recovery, 7 developed anastomotic-related complications, and 5 developed major nonanastomotic-related complications. Six patients were excluded (early catheter malfunction and reoperation...

  10. Interobserver and Intraobserver Reproducibility with Volume Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Computed Tomography (DCE-CT) in Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundsgaard Hansen, Martin; Fallentin, Eva; Axelsen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    junction cancer were selected from a previous longitudinal study. Three radiologists independently reviewed all scans, and one repeated the analysis eight months later for intraobserver analysis. Review of the scans consisted of three analysis methods: (I) Four, fixed small sized regions of interest (2...

  11. Phase 1a/1b and pharmacogenetic study of docetaxel, oxaliplatin and capecitabine in patients with advanced cancer of the stomach or the gastroesophageal junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deenen, Maarten J; Meulendijks, Didier; Boot, Henk; Legdeur, Marie-Cecile J C; Beijnen, Jos H; Schellens, Jan H M; Cats, Annemieke

    2015-12-01

    The prognosis of gastroesophageal cancer is poor, and current regimens are associated with limited efficacy. The purpose of this study was to explore the safety and preliminary efficacy of docetaxel, oxaliplatin plus capecitabine for advanced cancer of the stomach or the gastroesophageal junction (GEJ). Secondary objectives included pharmacokinetic and pharmacogenetic analyses. Patients were treated in escalating dose levels with docetaxel and oxaliplatin (both on day 1), plus capecitabine b.i.d. on days 1-14 every 3 weeks, to determine the dose-limiting toxicity and maximum tolerated dose (MTD). An expansion cohort was treated at the MTD. A total of ten polymorphisms in pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic candidate genes were analyzed and tested for association with treatment outcome. A total of 34 evaluable patients were enrolled. The MTD was docetaxel 50 mg/m(2), oxaliplatin 100 mg/m(2) plus capecitabine 850 mg/m(2) b.i.d. The median number of treatment cycles was 6 (range 2-8). Grade ≥ 3 toxicities included neutropenia (24 %), leukocytopenia (15 %), febrile neutropenia (12 %), fatigue (9 %) and diarrhea (6 %). The overall response rate was 45 %; two patients achieved a complete response. Median progression-free survival and overall survival were 6.5 months (95 % CI 5.4-7.6) and 11.0 months (95 % CI 7.9-14.1), respectively. The polymorphisms ERCC1 354C>T, TYMS 1053C>T and rs2612091 in ENOSF1 were associated with severe toxicity; ERCC1 354C>T and ERCC2 2251A>C were associated with poor progression-free survival. Docetaxel, oxaliplatin plus capecitabine are a well-tolerable, safe and effective treatment regimen for patients with advanced cancer of the stomach or GEJ. Pharmacogenetic markers in pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic candidate genes may be predictive for treatment outcome.

  12. Minimally invasive esophagectomy provides significant survival advantage compared with open or hybrid esophagectomy for patients with cancers of the esophagus and gastroesophageal junction.

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    Palazzo, Francesco; Rosato, Ernest L; Chaudhary, Asadulla; Evans, Nathaniel R; Sendecki, Jocelyn A; Keith, Scott; Chojnacki, Karen A; Yeo, Charles J; Berger, Adam C

    2015-04-01

    Minimally invasive esophagectomy (MIE) is increasingly being used to treat patients with cancer of the esophagus and gastroesophageal junction. We previously reported that oncologic efficacy may be improved with MIE compared with open or hybrid esophagectomy (OHE). We compared survival of patients undergoing MIE and OHE. Our contemporary series of patients who underwent MIE (2008 to 2013) was compared with a cohort undergoing OHE (3-hole [n = 39], Ivor Lewis [n = 16], hybrid [n = 13], 2000 to 2013). Summary statistics were calculated by operation type; Kaplan-Meier methods were used to compare survival. Cox regression was used to assess the impact of operation type (MIE vs OHE) on mortality, adjusting for age, sex, total lymph nodes, lymph node ratio (LNR), neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT), and stage. The MIE (n = 104) and OHE (n = 68) groups were similar with respect to age and sex. The MIE group tended to have higher BMI, earlier stage disease, and was less likely to receive CRT. The MIE group experienced lower operative mortality (3.9% vs 8.8%, p = 0.35) and significantly fewer major complications. Five-year survival between groups was significantly different (MIE, 64%, OHE, 35%, p analysis demonstrated that patients undergoing OHE had a significantly worse survival compared with MIE independent of age, LNR, CRT, and pathologic stage (hazard ratio 2.00, p = 0.019). This study supports MIE for EC as a superior procedure with respect to overall survival, perioperative mortality, and severity of postoperative complications. Several biases may have affected these results: earlier stage in the MIE group and disparity in timing of the procedures. These results will need to be confirmed in future prospective studies with longer follow-up. Copyright © 2015 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparative genomic hybridization of cancer of the gastroesophageal junction: deletion of 14Q31-32.1 discriminates between esophageal (Barrett's) and gastric cardia adenocarcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dekken, H; Geelen, E; Dinjens, W N; Wijnhoven, B P; Tilanus, H W; Tanke, H J; Rosenberg, C

    1999-02-01

    Incidence rates have risen rapidly for esophageal and gastric cardia adenocarcinomas. These cancers, arising at and around the gastroesophageal junction (GEJ), share a poor prognosis. In contrast, there is no consensus with respect to clinical staging resulting in possible adverse effects on treatment and survival. The goal of this study was to provide more insight into the genetic changes underlying esophageal and gastric cardia adenocarcinomas. We have used comparative genomic hybridization for a genetic analysis of 28 adenocarcinomas of the GEJ. Eleven tumors were localized in the distal esophagus and related to Barrett's esophagus, and 10 tumors were situated in the gastric cardia. The remaining seven tumors were located at the junction and could not be classified as either Barrett-related, or gastric cardia. We found alterations in all 28 neoplasms. Gains and losses were distinguished in comparable numbers. Frequent loss (> or = 25% of all tumors) was detected, in decreasing order of frequency, on 4pq (54%), 14q (46%), 18q (43%), 5q (36%), 16q (36%), 9p (29%), 17p (29%), and 21q (29%). Frequent gain (> or = 25% of all tumors) was observed, in decreasing order of frequency, on 20pq (86%), 8q (79%), 7p (61%), 13q (46%), 12q (39%), 15q (39%), 1q (36%), 3q (32%), 5p (32%), 6p (32%), 19q (32%), Xpq (32%), 17q (29%), and 18p (25%). Nearly all patients were male, and loss of chromosome Y was frequently noted (64%). Recurrent high-level amplifications (> 10% of all tumors) were seen at 8q23-24.1, 15q25, 17q12-21, and 19q13.1. Minimal overlapping regions could be determined at multiple locations (candidate genes are in parentheses): minimal regions of overlap for deletions were assigned to 3p14 (FHIT, RCA1), 5q14-21 (APC, MCC), 9p21 (MTS1/CDKN2), 14q31-32.1 (TSHR), 16q23, 18q21 (DCC, P15) and 21q21. Minimal overlapping amplified sites could be seen at 5p14 (MLVI2), 6p12-21.1 (NRASL3), 7p12 (EGFR), 8q23-24.1 (MYC), 12q21.1, 15q25 (IGF1R), 17q12-21 (ERBB2/HER2-neu), 19q

  14. Genetic profiles of gastroesophageal cancer: combined analysis using expression array and tiling array--comparative genomic hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isinger-Ekstrand, Anna; Johansson, Jan; Ohlsson, Mattias

    2010-01-01

    We aimed to characterize the genomic profiles of adenocarcinomas in the gastroesophageal junction in relation to cancers in the esophagus and the stomach. Profiles of gains/losses as well as gene expression profiles were obtained from 27 gastroesophageal adenocarcinomas by means of 32k high-resol...

  15. Survival after adjuvant chemoradiotherapy or surgery alone in resectable adenocarcinoma at the gastro-esophageal junction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Steen Christian; Muhic, A; Jensen, Lene Bæksgaard

    2012-01-01

    Longterm survival after curative resection for adenocarcinoma at the gastro-esophageal junction (GEJ) range between 18% and 50%. In the pivotal Intergroup-0116 Phase III trial by Macdonald et all, adjuvant chemoradiotherapy improved both disease-free and overall survival in curatively resected pa...... patients with mainly gastric adenocarcinoma. We compared survival data for curatively resected patients with adeno-carcinoma solely at the gastro-esophageal junction (GEJ), treated with surgery alone or surgery and adjuvant chemoradio-therapy....

  16. Genetic profiles of gastroesophageal cancer: combined analysis using expression array and tiling array--comparative genomic hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isinger-Ekstrand, Anna; Johansson, Jan; Ohlsson, Mattias

    2010-01-01

    We aimed to characterize the genomic profiles of adenocarcinomas in the gastroesophageal junction in relation to cancers in the esophagus and the stomach. Profiles of gains/losses as well as gene expression profiles were obtained from 27 gastroesophageal adenocarcinomas by means of 32k high......15, 13q34, and 12q13, whereas different profiles with gains at 5p15, 7p22, 2q35, and 13q34 characterized gastric cancers. CDK6 and EGFR were identified as putative target genes in cancers of the esophagus and the gastroesophageal junction, with upregulation in one quarter of the tumors. Gains....../losses and gene expression profiles show strong similarity between cancers in the distal esophagus and the gastroesophageal junction with frequent upregulation of CDK6 and EGFR, whereas gastric cancer displays distinct genetic changes. These data suggest that molecular diagnostics and targeted therapies can...

  17. Genetic profiles of gastroesophageal cancer: combined analysis using expression array and tiling array--comparative genomic hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isinger-Ekstrand, Anna; Johansson, Jan; Ohlsson, Mattias

    2010-01-01

    /losses and gene expression profiles show strong similarity between cancers in the distal esophagus and the gastroesophageal junction with frequent upregulation of CDK6 and EGFR, whereas gastric cancer displays distinct genetic changes. These data suggest that molecular diagnostics and targeted therapies can......We aimed to characterize the genomic profiles of adenocarcinomas in the gastroesophageal junction in relation to cancers in the esophagus and the stomach. Profiles of gains/losses as well as gene expression profiles were obtained from 27 gastroesophageal adenocarcinomas by means of 32k high......15, 13q34, and 12q13, whereas different profiles with gains at 5p15, 7p22, 2q35, and 13q34 characterized gastric cancers. CDK6 and EGFR were identified as putative target genes in cancers of the esophagus and the gastroesophageal junction, with upregulation in one quarter of the tumors. Gains...

  18. Mismatch repair gene expression in gastroesophageal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dracea, Amelia; Angelescu, Cristina; Danciulescu, Mihaela; Ciurea, Marius; Ioana, Mihai; Burada, Florin

    2015-09-01

    Mismatch repair (MMR) genes play a critical role in maintaining genomic stability, and the impairment of MMR machinery is associated with different human cancers, mainly colorectal cancer. The purpose of our study was to analyze gene expression patterns of three MMR genes (MSH2, MHS6, and EXO1) in gastroesophageal cancers, a pathology in which the contribution of DNA repair genes remains essentially unclear. A total of 45 Romanian patients diagnosed with sporadic gastroesophageal cancers were included in this study. For each patient, MMR mRNA levels were measured in biopsied tumoral (T) and peritumoral (PT) tissues obtained by upper endoscopy. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) with specific TaqMan probes was used to measure gene expression levels for MSH2, MSH6, and EXO1 genes. A significant association was observed for the investigated MMR genes, all of which were detected to be upregulated in gastroesophageal tumor samples when compared with paired normal samples. In the stratified analysis, the association was limited to gastric adenocarcinoma samples. We found no statistically significant associations between MMR gene expression and tumor site or histological grade. In our study, MSH2, MSH6, and EXO1 genes were overexpressed in gastroesophageal cancers. Further investigations based on more samples are necessary to validate our findings.

  19. Effects of feeding on luminal pH and morphology of the gastroesophageal junction of snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessler, Scott M; Secor, Stephen M

    2012-10-01

    At the gastroesophageal junction, most vertebrates possess a functional lower esophageal sphincter (LES) which may serve to regulate the passage of liquids and food into the stomach and prevent the reflux of gastric contents into the esophagus. Snakes seemingly lack an LES and consume meals large enough to extend anteriorly from the stomach into the esophagus thereby providing the opportunity for the reflux of gastric juices. To explore whether snakes experience or can prevent gastric reflux, we examined post-feeding changes of luminal pH of the distal esophagus and stomach, the fine scale luminal pH profile at the gastroesophageal junction, and the morphology of the gastroesophageal junction for the Burmese python (Python molurus), the African brown house snake (Lamprophis fuliginosus), and the diamondback water snake (Nerodia rhombifer). For each species fasted, there was no distension of the gastroesophageal junction and only modest changes in luminal pH from the distal esophagus into the stomach. Feeding resulted in marked distension and changes in tissue morphology of the gastroesophageal junction. Simultaneously, there was a significant decrease in luminal pH of the distal esophagus for pythons and house snakes, and for all three species a steep gradient in luminal pH decreasing across a 3-cm span from the distal edge of the esophagus into the proximal edge of the stomach. The moderate acidification of the distal most portion of the esophagus for pythons and house snakes suggests that there is some anterior movement of gastric juices across the gastroesophageal junction. Given that this modest reflux of gastric fluid is localized to the most distal region of the esophagus, snakes are apparently able to prevent and protect against acid reflux in the absence of a functional LES. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. CT ASSESSMENT OF RESECTABILITY PRIOR TO TRANSHIATAL ESOPHAGECTOMY FOR ESOPHAGEAL GASTROESOPHAGEAL JUNCTION CARCINOMA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANOVERHAGEN, H; LAMERIS, JS; BERGER, MY; KLOOSWIJK, AIJ; TILANUS, HW; VANPEL, R; SCHUTTE, HE

    1993-01-01

    The ability of preoperative CT to assess resectability and to stage carcinoma of the esophagus and gastroesophageal junction was studied in 71 patients who underwent transhiatal esophagectomy. Patients with preoperatively proven distant metastases who did not have surgery were not included in the

  1. McKeown or Ivor Lewis totally minimally invasive esophagectomy for cancer of the esophagus and gastroesophageal junction: systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Workum, F.T.W.E. van; Berkelmans, G.H.; Klarenbeek, B.R.; Nieuwenhuijzen, G.A.; Luyer, M.D.; Rosman, C.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Minimally invasive esophagectomy (MIE) has consistently been associated with improved perioperative outcome and similar oncological safety compared to open esophagectomy. However, it is currently unclear what type of MIE is preferred for patients with resectable esophageal cancer.

  2. A bridging stent to surgery in patients with esophageal and gastroesophageal junction cancer has a dramatic negative impact on patient survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, D W; Nassar, M; Jensen, L S

    2017-01-01

    curves were constructed for R0 resected patients. Data were compared between the stent and no-stent group by nonparametric tests. Two hundred seventy three consecutive R0 resected patients with esophageal or GEJ cancer were identified. Of these patients, 63 had a stent as a bridge to surgery. The male.......6 months compared with 21.3 months for patients treated without a bridging stent (P ... was 9.1 months for the SG compared with 15.2 months for the NSG. The use of a stent as a bridging procedure to surgery in patients treated without neaoadjuvant therapy for an esophageal or GEJ cancer that later underwent R0 resection decreased the two year survival and the recurrence-free survival....

  3. Normal and abnormal physiology, pharmacology, and anatomy of the gastroesophageal junction high-pressure zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Larry; Vegesna, Anil; Ruggieri, Michael; Braverman, Alan

    2016-09-01

    The high-pressure zone of the gastroesophageal junction acts as a multifunctional valve that comprises different groups of smooth muscles located in the distal esophagus and the proximal stomach, in addition to the extrinsic crural diaphragm, composed of skeletal muscle. In this review article, we evaluate the current literature with respect to human subjects, discussing the anatomic locations and physiologic and pharmacologic processes controlling these muscles. These muscles work individually and as a group to prevent reflux of gastric contents while allowing anterograde passage of food and liquid and retrograde passage of gas. We also reviewed new findings with respect to abnormalities that are permissive of reflux of gastric contents into the esophagus, which may lead to gastroesophageal reflux disease. © 2016 New York Academy of Sciences.

  4. The Multidisciplinary Team Conference's Decision on M-Staging in Patients with Gastric- and Gastroesophageal Cancer is not Accurate without Staging Laparoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strandby, R B; Svendsen, L B; Fallentin, E; Egeland, C; Achiam, M P

    2016-06-01

    The implementation of the multidisciplinary team conference has been shown to improve treatment outcome for patients with gastric- and gastroesophageal cancer. Likewise, the staging laparoscopy has increased the detection of patients with disseminated disease, that is, patients who do not benefit from a surgical resection. The aim of this study was to compare the multidisciplinary team conference's decision in respect of M-staging with the findings of the following staging laparoscopy. Patients considered operable and resectable within the multidisciplinary team conference in the period 2010-2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Patient data were retrieved by searching for specific diagnosis and operation codes in the in-house system. The inclusion criteria were as follows: biopsy-verified cancer of the esophagus, gastroesophageal junction or stomach, and no suspicion of peritoneal carcinomatosis or liver metastases on multidisciplinary team conference before staging laparoscopy. Furthermore, an evaluation with staging laparoscopy was required. In total, 222 patients met the inclusion criteria. Most cancers were located in the gastroesophageal junction, n = 171 (77.0%), and most common with adenocarcinoma histology, n = 196 (88.3%). The staging laparoscopy was M1-positive for peritoneal carcinomatosis in eight patients (16.7%) with gastric cancer versus nine patients (5.3%) with gastroesophageal junction cancer. Furthermore, liver metastases were evident in zero patients (0.0%) and four patients (2.3%) with gastric- and gastroesophageal junction cancer, respectively. The staging laparoscopy findings regarding peritoneal carcinomatosis were significantly different between gastric- and gastroesophageal junction cancers, p = 0.01. No significant differences were found regarding T-/N-stage or histological tumor characteristics between the positive- and negative-staging laparoscopy group. The M-staging of the multidisciplinary team conference without staging

  5. Residence of liquids in the infra-junctional portion of the proximal stomach in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbieri C.L.A.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease may have disturbances of gastric motility, which could play a role in the pathophysiology of the disease. Recent studies have suggested that the gastric region just below the gastroesophageal junction may have a distinct physiological behavior. We determined whether patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease have abnormal residence of food in the infra-junctional portion of the stomach after ingesting a liquid nutrient meal. Fasted adult patients with reflux disease (N = 11 and healthy volunteers (N = 10 ingested a liquid meal (320 ml; 437 kcal labeled with 99m technetium-phytate and their total gastric emptying half-time and regional emptying from the stomach infra-junctional region were determined. In 8 patients, episodes of postprandial acidic reflux to the esophagus were measured for 2 h using pH monitoring. There were no differences between reflux patients and controls regarding total gastric emptying time (median: 68 min; range: 39-123 min vs 65 min and 60-99 min, respectively; P > 0.50. Food residence in the infra-junctional area was similar for patients and controls: 23% (range: 20-30 vs 27% (range: 19-30%; P = 0.28 and emptying from this area paralleled total gastric emptying (Rs = 0.79; P = 0.04. There was no correlation between residence of food in the infra-junctional area and episodes of gastroesophageal reflux (Rs = 0.06; P = 0.88. We conclude that it is unlikely that regional motor disturbances involving the infra-junctional region of the stomach play a relevant role in the pathogenesis of acidic gastroesophageal reflux.

  6. Prognostic Significance of the Location of Lymph Node Metastases in Patients With Adenocarcinoma of the Distal Esophagus or Gastroesophageal Junction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anderegg, Maarten C. J.; Lagarde, Sjoerd M.; Jagadesham, Vamshi P.; Gisbertz, Suzanne S.; Immanuel, Arul; Meijer, Sybren L.; Hulshof, Maarten C. C. M.; Bergman, Jacques J. G. H. M.; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W. M.; Griffin, S. Michael; van Berge Henegouwen, Mark I.

    2016-01-01

    To identify the prognostic significance of the location of lymph node metastases in patients with esophageal or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant therapy followed by esophagectomy. Detection of lymph node metastases in the upper mediastinum and around the celiac

  7. Hypoxia-regulated MicroRNAs in Gastroesophageal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Mette; Alsner, Jan; Sørensen, Brita Singers

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIM: The present study aimed to identify hypoxia-regulated microRNAs (HRMs) in vitro and investigate the clinical role of candidate HRMs in patients with gastroesophageal cancer (GEC). MATERIALS AND METHODS: microRNA expression changes induced by hypoxia in human GEC cell lines were...

  8. Intrathoracic anastomotic leakage after gastroesophageal cancer resection is associated with increased risk of recurrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Steen C; Calatayud, Dan; Jensen, Lone S

    2015-01-01

    rate. METHODS: This nationwide study included consecutively collected data on patients undergoing curative surgical resection with intrathoracic anastomosis, alive 8 weeks postoperatively, between 2003 and 2011. Patients with incomplete resection, or metastatic disease intraoperatively, were excluded......OBJECTIVE: Intrathoracic anastomotic leakage after intended curative resection for cancer in the esophagus or gastroesophageal junction has a negative impact on long-term survival. The aim of this study was to investigate whether an anastomotic leakage was associated with an increased recurrence......]: 1.17-2.29, P = .004) and all-cause mortality (HR = 1.57; 95% CI: 1.23-2.05, P resection....

  9. The Multidisciplinary Team Conference's Decision on M-Staging in Patients with Gastric- and Gastroesophageal Cancer is not Accurate without Staging Laparoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strandby, Rune Broni; Svendsen, Lars Bo; Fallentin, E.

    2016-01-01

    in the period 2010-2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Patient data were retrieved by searching for specific diagnosis and operation codes in the in-house system. The inclusion criteria were as follows: biopsy-verified cancer of the esophagus, gastroesophageal junction or stomach, and no suspicion of peritoneal......BACKGROUND: The implementation of the multidisciplinary team conference has been shown to improve treatment outcome for patients with gastric- and gastroesophageal cancer. Likewise, the staging laparoscopy has increased the detection of patients with disseminated disease, that is, patients who do...... carcinomatosis or liver metastases on multidisciplinary team conference before staging laparoscopy. Furthermore, an evaluation with staging laparoscopy was required. RESULTS: In total, 222 patients met the inclusion criteria. Most cancers were located in the gastroesophageal junction, n = 171 (77.0%), and most...

  10. Endoluminal delivery of radiofrequency energy to the gastroesophageal junction in uncomplicated GERD: efficacy and potential mechanism of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiBaise, John K; Brand, Randall E; Quigley, Eamonn M M

    2002-04-01

    The endoluminal delivery of radiofrequency energy to the gastroesophageal junction has been shown to decrease symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease in a multicenter study. In this single-center trial, we sought to further examine its efficacy and physiological effects in patients with uncomplicated gastroesophageal reflux disease. Patients with chronic heartburn requiring maintenance antisecretory therapy but without a hiatal hernia >2 cm, severe esophagitis, or complications of gastroesophageal reflux disease were prospectively studied. Radiofrequency energy was delivered to the gastroesophageal junction using a transorally delivered, flexible bougie-tipped catheter and a thermocouple-controlled generator, under sedation and analgesia. The primary outcome measure was effect on reflux symptoms, assessed at baseline and at 1, 3, and 6 months, after treatment. Other outcome measures included effects on antireflux medication use, quality of life, overall patient satisfaction, esophageal motility, esophageal acid exposure, esophageal wall thickness, appearance of the cardioesophageal flap valve, and vagal efferent function. A total of 18 patients underwent successful outpatient treatment without a serious adverse event. A significant improvement in symptom scores (Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease [GERD] Activity Index: 112.5 [range 76.2-140.6] vs 81.0 (74.2-97.6); p < 0.0001) and antacid use (17/wk [range 0-81] vs 0 (0-10); p < 0.0001) was noted at 6-month follow-up. No adverse effect on abdominal vagal function was identified and no significant change in any esophageal motility parameter was seen; however, a trend was noted toward a reduction in the number of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations induced by gastric air distension (3.5/h vs 1.0/h, p = 0.13). No detrimental effects on peristalsis or swallow-induced lower esophageal sphincter relaxation pressure were seen. Nonsignificant trends (p = 0.06) were noted regarding a decrease in the Hill score

  11. Defining the gastroesophageal junction in trauma: Epidemiology and management of a challenging injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberg, Morgan; Inaba, Kenji; Bardes, James M; OʼBrien, Daniel; Lam, Lydia; Benjamin, Elizabeth; Grabo, Daniel; Demetriades, Demetrios

    2017-11-01

    Injuries to the gastroesophageal (GE) junction are infrequently encountered because of the high mortality of associated injuries. Consequently, there is a paucity of literature on the patient demographics and treatment options. The aim of this study was to examine the epidemiology, surgical management, and outcomes of these rare injuries. Patients presenting to LAC + USC Medical Center (January 2008 to August 2016) with traumatic esophageal or gastric injury (DRG International Classification of Diseases-9th Rev.-Clinical Modification and 10th Rev. codes) were extracted from the trauma registry. Patient charts were reviewed, and all patients who sustained an injury to the GE junction were enrolled. Patient demographics, injury characteristics, procedures, and outcomes were analyzed. Of the 238 patients who sustained an injury to the esophagus or stomach during the study period, 28 (12%) were found to have a GE junction injury. Mean age was 26 years (range, 14-57 years), 89% male. Mechanism of injury was penetrating in 96% (n = 27), the majority of which were gunshot wounds (n = 22, 81%). Most patients (n = 18, 64%) were taken directly to the operating room. Ten (36%) underwent computed tomography scan before going to the operating room, all demonstrating a GE junction injury. All patients underwent repair via laparotomy. One (4%) also required thoracotomy to facilitate delayed reconstruction. GE junction injuries were typically managed with primary repair (n = 22, 79%). Associated injuries were frequent (n = 26, 93%), and injury severity was high (mean Injury Severity Score, 25 [9-75]). Mortality was 25% (n = 7), and all patients required intensive care unit admission. Most did not require total parenteral nutrition (n = 25, 89%) or a surgically placed feeding tube (n = 26, 93%). Of the 13 patients who presented for clinical follow-up, all but one (n = 12, 92%) were eating independently by the first clinic visit. GE junction injuries are uncommon and occur almost

  12. Integration of targeted agents in the neo-adjuvant treatment of gastro-esophageal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, D G; Ilson, D H

    2009-11-01

    Pre- and peri-operative strategies are becoming standard for the management of localized gastro-esophageal cancer. For localized gastric/gastro-esophageal junction (GEJ) cancer there are conflicting data that a peri-operative approach with cisplatin-based chemotherapy improves survival, with the benefits seen in esophageal cancer likely less than a 5-10% incremental improvement. Further trends toward improvement in local control and survival, when combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy are given pre-operatively, are suggested by recent phase III trials. In fit patients, a significant survival benefit with pre-operative chemoradiation is seen in those patients who achieve a pathologic complete response. In esophageal/GEJ cancer, definitive chemoradiation is now considered in medically inoperable patients. In squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus, surgery after primary chemoradiation is not clearly associated with an improved overall survival, however, local control may be better. In localized gastric/GEJ cancer, the integration of bevacizumab with pre-operative chemotherapy is being explored in large randomized studies, and with chemoradiotherapy in pilot trials. The addition of anti-epidermal growth factor receptor and anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 antibody treatment to pre-operative chemoradiation continues to be explored. Early results show the integration of targeted therapy is feasible. Metabolic imaging can predict early response to pre-operative chemotherapy and biomarkers may further predict response to pre-operative chemo-targeted therapy. A multimodality approach to localized gastro-esophageal cancer has resulted in better outcomes. For T3 or node-positive disease, surgery alone is no longer considered appropriate and neo-adjuvant therapy is recommended. The future of neo-adjuvant strategies in this disease will involve the individualization of therapy with the integration of molecular signatures, targeted therapy, metabolic imaging

  13. The clinical impact of hypoxia-regulated gene expression in loco-regional gastroesophageal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, M.; Alsner, J.; Tramm, T.

    2015-01-01

    squamous cell carcinomas (ESCC) compared with adenocarcinomas of the esophago-gastric junction and the stomach (AC), and was a potential prognostic marker in patients with ESCC. The purpose of the present study was to confirm these results. Materials and Methods: The study population consisted of 152......Purpose/Objective: In a former study (1), the hypoxia gene expression classifier, developed in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas, was applied in 89 patients with loco-regional gastroesophageal cancer (GC). Analysis of the 15 genes was indicative of hypoxia being more profound in esophagus...... were available in 135 patients; ESCC: 89 patients (66%), AC: 43 patients (32%) and other carcinomas: 3 patients (2%). Comparing the cohorts of the original and present study, patient characteristics were similar except for a significantly lower T- and N-stage in the present cohort. Tumor specimens were...

  14. Regional postprandial differences in pH within the stomach and gastroesophageal junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonian, Hrair P; Vo, Lien; Doma, Siva; Fisher, Robert S; Parkman, Henry P

    2005-12-01

    Our objective was to determine regional differences in intragastric pH after different types of meals. Ten normal subjects underwent 27-hr esophagogastric pH monitoring using a four-probe pH catheter. Meals were a spicy lunch, a high-fat dinner, and a typical bland breakfast. The fatty dinner had the highest postprandial buffering effect, elevating proximal and mid/distal gastric pH to 4.9 +/- 0.4 and 4.0 +/- 0.4, respectively, significantly (P meal to pH > 4 was also longer (150 min) compared to that of the spicy lunch (45 min) and the bland breakfast, which did not increase gastric pH to > 4 at any time. Proximal gastric acid pockets were seen between 15 and 90 min postprandially. These were located 3.4 +/- 0.8 cm below the proximal LES border, extending for a length of 2.3 +/- 0.8 cm, with a drop in mean pH from 4.7 +/- 0.4 to 1.5 +/- 0.9. Acid pockets were seen equally after the spicy lunch and fatty dinner but less frequently after the bland breakfast. We conclude that a high-volume fatty meal has the highest buffering effect on gastric pH compared to a spicy lunch or a bland breakfast. Buffering effects of meals are significantly higher in the proximal than in the mid/distal stomach. Despite the intragastric buffering effect of meals, focal areas of acidity were observed in the region of the cardia-gastroesophageal junction during the postprandial period.

  15. External beam radiation and high-dose-rate brachytherapy for elderly patients with gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to retrospectively observe and analyze the long-term treatment outcomes of 96 elderly patients with gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma (GEJAC who were treated with californium-252 (252Cf neutron brachytherapy (NBT in combination with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT with or without chemotherapy. Material and methods: From January 2002 to November 2012, 96 patients with GEJAC underwent treatment. The total radiation dose to the reference point via NBT was 8-25 Gy-eq in 2 to 5 fractions, with 1 fraction per week. The total dose via EBRT was 40-54 Gy, which was delivered over a period of 4 to 5.5 weeks with normal fraction. Results: The median survival time for the 96 patients was 15.3 months, and the 1-, 2-, 3-, and 5-year rates of overall survival (OS were 62.5%, 33.7%, 20.1%, and 7.9%, respectively. The 1-, 2-, 3-, and 5-year rates for local-regional control (LRC were 78.7%, 57.9%, 41.8%, and 26.4%, respectively. The patients’ age was an independent factor that was significantly associated with OS (p = 0.006 and LRC (p = 0.0005, according to univariate analysis. The 3-year OS (LRC was 31.9% (62.9% for patients aged 70-74 years and 16.1% (19.5% for patients aged ≥ 75 years. From the time of treatment completion to the development of local-regional recurrence or death, 5 (5.2% patients experienced fistula and 7 (7.3% experienced massive bleeding. Conclusions: The clinical data indicated that NBT in combination with EBRT produced favorable local control and long-term survival rates for elderly patients with GEJAC, and that the side effects were tolerable. The patient’s age could be used to select the appropriate treatment in an elderly patient.

  16. Multicenter phase II study of irinotecan, cisplatin, and bevacizumab in patients with metastatic gastric or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Manish A; Ramanathan, Ramesh K; Ilson, David H; Levnor, Alissa; D'Adamo, David; O'Reilly, Eileen; Tse, Archie; Trocola, Robin; Schwartz, Lawrence; Capanu, Marinela; Schwartz, Gary K; Kelsen, David P

    2006-11-20

    Bevacizumab improves survival in several solid tumor malignancies when combined with chemotherapy. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of the addition of bevacizumab to chemotherapy in the treatment of gastric and gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) adenocarcinoma. Forty-seven patients with metastatic or unresectable gastric/GEJ adenocarcinoma were treated with bevacizumab 15 mg/kg on day 1, irinotecan 65 mg/m2, and cisplatin 30 mg/m2 on days 1 and 8, every 21 days. The primary end point was to demonstrate a 50% improvement in time to progression over historical values. Secondary end points included safety, response, and survival. Patient characteristics were as follows: median age 59 years (range, 25 to 75); Karnofsky performance status 90% (70% to 100%); male:female, 34:13; and gastric/GEJ, 24:23. With a median follow-up of 12.2 months, median time to progression was 8.3 months (95% CI, 5.5 to 9.9 months). In 34 patients with measurable disease, the overall response rate was 65% (95% CI, 46% to 80%). Median survival was 12.3 months (95% CI, 11.3 to 17.2 months). We observed no increase in chemotherapy related toxicity. Possible bevacizumab-related toxicity included a 28% incidence of grade 3 hypertension, two patients with a gastric perforation and one patient with a near perforation (6%), and one patient with a myocardial infarction (2%). Grade 3 to 4 thromboembolic events occurred in 25% of patients. Although the primary tumor was unresected in 40 patients, we observed only one patient with a significant upper gastrointestinal bleed. Bevacizumab can be safely given with chemotherapy even with primary gastric and GEJ tumors in place. The response rate, time to disease progression (TTP), and overall survival are encouraging, with TTP improved over historical controls by 75%. Further development of bevacizumab in gastric and GEJ cancers is warranted.

  17. Which interval is most crucial to presentation and survival in gastroesophageal cancer: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Amanda; Khulusi, Sam; Watson, Roger

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the most crucial interval to encourage earlier diagnosis in with gastroesophageal cancer and to identify potential factors effecting this interval. Gastroesophageal malignancy is the eighth most commonly presenting cancer with one of the worst survival rates. Identifying the most crucial period for intervention to inform earlier diagnosis is an important step towards improving survival. Mixed methods literature review. CINAHL, MEDLINE and Academic search primer online databases were searched using keywords and inclusion/exclusion criteria. Empirical evidence published between 2000-2016 with a focus on gastroesophageal cancer presentation and survival was reviewed to inform this study. Twelve studies were extracted for further review. Selected studies were appraised and presented through Olensen's "delay interval" framework to inform the most crucial interval to survival in gastroesophageal cancer. The findings identify the patient interval as the most critical period for encouraging earlier presentation and reducing advanced stage presentation in gastroesophageal cancer. The article also highlighted some methodological limitations to cancer research, such as a lack of consensus in definitions which prevent statistical meta-analysis of cancer data, survivor bias in gastroesophageal cancer studies and a significant lack of qualitative evidence to reveal patient experience in presenting with this cancer. Further research into the patient interval is required to elicit information on how and why patients present with their cancer symptoms. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. How useful is esophageal high resolution manometry in diagnosing gastroesophageal junction disruption: causes affecting this disruption and its relationship with manometric alterations and gastroesophageal reflux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constanza Ciriza-de-los-Ríos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: High-resolution manometry (HRM is a breakthrough in the morphological study of the gastroesophageal junction (GEJ and its degrees of disruption. Objectives: a Assessment of risk factors involved in the disruption of the GEJ in patients with gastroesophageal reflux (GER symptoms; b the relationship between the type of GEJ and GER demonstrated by 24 hours pH-monitoring; and c identification of the alterations in the manometric parameters related to the morphology of the GEJ. Methods: One hundred and fifteen patients with symptoms of GER studied with HRM and classified by the type of GEJ (type I: Normal; type II: Sliding; type III: Hiatal hernia. Twenty four hour pH-monitoring without proton pump inhibitors was performed in all of them. Epidemiological aspects, manometric parameters (Chicago 2012 classification and the pH-monitoring results were evaluated. Results: Age (OR 1.033 [1.006-1.060]; p = 0.16, BMI (OR 1.097 [1.022-1.176]; p = 0. 01 and abdominal perimeter (OR 1.034 [1.005-1.063]; p = 0.0215 were independent risk factors for the GEJ type III (area under the curve 0.70. Disruption of the GEJ was associated with a lower resting pressure (p = 0.006, greater length (p < 0.001 and greater esophageal shortening (p < 0.001. Abnormal acidic reflux was found in the total period (p = 0.015, standing (p = 0.022 and supine (p = 0.001 in patients with GEJ type II and III with respect to type I. Conclusions: Increased age, overweight and central obesity pose a higher risk of GEJ type III (hiatal hernia. The greater disruption of the GEJ is associated with lower resting pressure, esophageal shortening, and higher acid exposure in the pH-monitoring.

  19. Multilayered epithelium at the gastroesophageal junction is a marker of gastroesophageal reflux disease: data from a prospective Central European multicenter study (histoGERD trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langner, Cord; Wolf, Eva-Maria; Plieschnegger, Wolfgang; Geppert, Michael; Wigginghaus, Bernd; Höss, Gabriele M; Eherer, Andreas; Schneider, Nora I; Rehak, Peter; Vieth, Michael

    2014-04-01

    Multilayered epithelium is defined as hybrid epithelium with characteristics of both squamous and columnar epithelia. Our aim was to evaluate the clinicopathological significance of the lesion by relating its presence to various histological and clinical and/or endoscopic features indicating gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). A total of 1,071 individuals participated in a prospective cross-sectional study (576 females and 495 males; median age 53 years). Biopsy material was systematically sampled from the gastroesophageal junction. The histological diagnosis of esophagitis was made according to the Esohisto consensus guidelines. The endoscopic diagnosis of esophagitis was made according to the modified Los Angeles classification and the diagnosis of Barrett's esophagus according to Prague's C & M criteria, respectively. Multilayered epithelium was identified in 103 (9.6 %) individuals, frequently within or adjacent to the ducts of esophageal glands. Its presence was associated with increasing age (p < 0.001), high BMI (p = 0.026), hiatal hernia (p < 0.001), and the endoscopic diagnoses of esophagitis (p = 0.002) and Barrett's esophagus (p < 0.001). Upon histology, multilayered epithelium was associated with features of the squamous epithelium indicating GERD, particularly intercellular space dilation (p = 0.005), and presence of cardiac mucosa (<0.001). For intestinal metaplasia, a trend was noted (p = 0.094). In conclusion, multilayered epithelium was observed in about every tenth individual undergoing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. The association with histological and clinical features indicating GERD advocates the lesion as a promising new marker for reflux esophagitis. The association with cardiac mucosa and Barrett's esophagus suggests multilayered epithelium to be an intermediate step in the development of columnar metaplasia and, ultimately, Barrett's esophagus.

  20. Perioperative chemo(radio)therapy versus primary surgery for resectable adenocarcinoma of the stomach, gastroesophageal junction, and lower esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronellenfitsch, Ulrich; Schwarzbach, Matthias; Hofheinz, Ralf; Kienle, Peter; Kieser, Meinhard; Slanger, Tracy E; Jensen, Katrin

    2013-05-31

    The outcome of patients with locally advanced gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma (adenocarcinoma of the esophagus, gastroesophageal (GE) junction, and stomach) is poor. There is conflicting evidence regarding the effects of perioperative chemotherapy on survival and other outcomes. To assess the effect of perioperative chemotherapy for gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma on survival and other clinically relevant outcomes in the overall population of participants in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and in prespecified subgroups. We performed computerized searches in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Database of Abstracts of Review of Effectiveness (DARE), the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) from The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (1966 to May 2011), EMBASE (1980 to May 2011), and LILACS (Literatura Latinoamericana y del Caribe en Ciencias de la Salud), combining the Cochrane highly sensitive search strategy with specific search terms. Moreover, we handsearched several online databases, conference proceedings, and reference lists of retrieved papers. We included RCTs which randomized patients with gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma, in the absence of distant metastases, to receive either chemotherapy with or without radiotherapy followed by surgery, or surgery alone. Two independent review authors identified eligible trials. We solicited individual patient data (IPD) from all selected trials. We performed meta-analyses based on intention-to-treat populations using the two-stage method to combine IPD with aggregate data from RCTs for which IPD were unavailable. We combined data from all trials providing IPD in a Cox proportional hazards model to assess the effect of several covariables on overall survival. We identified 14 RCTs with 2422 eligible patients. For eight RCTs with 1049 patients (43.3%), we were able to obtain IPD. Perioperative chemotherapy was associated with significantly longer overall survival (hazard ratio (HR) 0.81; 95

  1. Gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma displays abnormalities in homologous recombination and nucleotide excision repair

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    Dewalt RI

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Robin I Dewalt,1 Kenneth A Kesler,2 Zane T Hammoud,3 LeeAnn Baldridge,4 Eyas M Hattab,4 Shadia I Jalal1,5 1Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, 2Cardiothoracic Division, Department of Surgery, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 3Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI, USA; 4Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 5Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center, Indianapolis, IN, USA Objective: Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC continues to be a disease associated with high mortality. Among the factors leading to poor outcomes are innate resistance to currently available therapies, advanced stage at diagnosis, and complex biology. Platinum and ionizing radiation form the backbone of treatment for the majority of patients with EAC. Of the multiple processes involved in response to platinum chemotherapy or ionizing radiation, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA repair has been a major player in cancer sensitivity to these agents. DNA repair defects have been described in various malignancies. The purpose of this study was to determine whether alterations in DNA repair are present in EAC compared with normal gastroesophageal tissues. Methods: We analyzed the expression of genes involved in homologous recombination (HR, nonhomologous end-joining, and nucleotide excision repair (NER pathways in 12 EAC tumor samples with their matched normal counterparts. These pathways were chosen because they are the main pathways involved in the repair of platinum- or ionizing-radiation-induced damage. In addition, abnormalities in these pathways have not been well characterized in EAC. Results: We identified increased expression of at least one HR gene in eight of the EAC tumor samples. Alterations in the expression of EME1, a structure-specific endonuclease involved in HR, were the most prevalent, with messenger (mRNA overexpression in six of the EAC samples

  2. SUPRACLAVICULAR LYMPH-NODE METASTASES IN CARCINOMA OF THE ESOPHAGUS AND GASTROESOPHAGEAL JUNCTION - ASSESSMENT WITH CT, US, AND US-GUIDED FINE-NEEDLE ASPIRATION BIOPSY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANOVERHAGEN, H; LAMERIS, JS; BERGER, MY; VANDERVOORDE, F; TILANUS, HW; KLOOSWIJK, AIJ; ZONDERLAND, HM; VANPEL, R

    The preoperative assessment of supraclavicular lymph node metastases was prospectively studied in 100 patients with carcinoma of the esophagus and gastroesophageal junction. Findings at computed tomography (CT), ultrasound (US), and palpation were compared, and US-guided fine-needle aspiration

  3. Improved body weight and performance status and reduced serum PGE2 levels after nutritional intervention with a specific medical food in newly diagnosed patients with esophageal cancer or adenocarcinoma of the gastro-esophageal junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, Joyce; Uitdehaag, Madeleen J; Spaander, Manon; van Steenbergen-Langeveld, Sabine; Vos, Paul; Berkhout, Marloes; Lamers, Cor; Rümke, Hans; Tilanus, Hugo; Siersema, Peter; van Helvoort, Ardy; van der Gaast, Ate

    2015-03-01

    The majority of cancer patients loses weight and becomes malnourished during the course of their disease. Metabolic alterations and reduced immune competence lead to wasting and an increased risk of infectious complications. In the present study, the effect of a nutritionally complete medical food, which is high in protein and leucine and enriched with fish oil and specific oligosaccharides, was investigated on immune function, nutritional status, and inflammation in patients with esophageal cancer and compared with routine care. In this exploratory double-blind study, 64 newly diagnosed esophageal cancer patients were randomized. All patients received dietary counselling and dietary advice. In the Active group, all patients received the specific medical food for 4 weeks before the start of anticancer therapy. In the routine care control arm, patients with weight loss received a non-caloric placebo product, and patients with weight loss ≥5% received an iso-caloric control product to secure blinding of the study. The required study parameters of body weight and performance status were recorded at baseline and after 4 weeks of nutritional intervention, and patients were asked to complete quality of life questionnaires. In addition, blood samples were taken for the measurement of several immune, nutritional, and safety-parameters. No effect of the specific nutritional intervention could be detected on ex vivo stimulations of blood mononuclear cells. By contrast, body weight was significantly increased (P food (P food group and increased in the control group (P = 0.002). Nutritional intervention with the specific medical food significantly increased body weight and improved performance status compared with routine care in newly diagnosed esophageal cancer patients. This effect was accompanied by significantly reduced serum PGE2 levels. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the

  4. Stomach cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - stomach; Gastric cancer; Gastric carcinoma; Adenocarcinoma of the stomach ... JH, Alberts SR. Ashman JB, Jaroszewski DE, eds. Cancer of the stomach and gastroesophageal junction. In: Niederhuber JE, Armitage JO, ...

  5. EORTC-ROG expert opinion: radiotherapy volume and treatment guidelines for neoadjuvant radiation of adenocarcinomas of the gastroesophageal junction and the stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzinger, Oscar; Gerber, Erich; Bernstein, Zvi; Maingon, Philippe; Haustermans, Karin; Bosset, Jean François; Gulyban, Akos; Poortmans, Philip; Collette, Laurence; Kuten, Abraham

    2009-08-01

    The Gastro-Intestinal Working Party of the EORTC Radiation Oncology Group (GIWP-ROG) developed guidelines for target volume definition in neoadjuvant radiation of adenocarcinomas of the gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) and the stomach. Guidelines about the definition of the clinical target volume (CTV) are based on a systematic literature review of the location and frequency of local recurrences and lymph node involvement in adenocarcinomas of the GEJ and the stomach. Therefore, MEDLINE was searched up to August 2008. Guidelines concerning prescription, planning and treatment delivery are based on a consensus between the members of the GIWP-ROG. In order to support a curative resection of GEJ and gastric cancer, an individualized preoperative treatment volume based on tumour location has to include the primary tumour and the draining regional lymph nodes area. Therefore we recommend to use the 2nd English Edition of the Japanese Classification of Gastric Carcinoma of the Japanese Gastric Cancer Association which developed the concept of assigning tumours of the GEJ and the stomach to anatomically defined sub-sites corresponding respectively to a distinct lymphatic spread pattern. The GIWP-ROG defined guidelines for preoperative irradiation of adenocarcinomas of the GEJ and the stomach to reduce variability in the framework of future clinical trials.

  6. Intrathoracic Anastomotic Leakage after Gastroesophageal Cancer Resection Is Associated with Reduced Long-term Survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Steen Christian; Calatayud, Dan; Jensen, Lone Susanne

    2014-01-01

    and consecutively, nationwide collected patients who underwent gastroesophageal cancer resection between 2003 and 2011 in Denmark. The operation was carried out as an Ivor Lewis procedure. Only patients with intrathoracic anastomosis were included in the analysis. RESULTS: From 2003 to 2011, 1,296 patients......BACKGROUND: Most likely because of low statistical power, no previous studies have shown any significant association between long-term survival and anastomotic leakage in patients who have undergone gastroesophageal cancer resection. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The present study included, prospectively...... underwent gastroesophageal resection, and 128 (9.9 %) of these experienced anastomotic leakage. The overall 5-year survival rates in patients with and without anastomotic leakage were 20 and 35 % (P

  7. Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy for Esophageal or Junctional Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hagen, P.; Hulshof, M. C. C. M.; van Lanschot, J. J. B.; Steyerberg, E. W.; van Berge Henegouwen, M. I.; Wijnhoven, B. P. L.; Richel, D. J.; Nieuwenhuijzen, G. A. P.; Hospers, G. A. P.; Bonenkamp, J. J.; Cuesta, M. A.; Blaisse, R. J. B.; Busch, O. R. C.; ten Kate, F. J. W.; Creemers, G.-J.; Punt, C. J. A.; Plukker, J. T. M.; Verheul, H. M. W.; Spillenaar Bilgen, E. J.; van Dekken, H.; van der Sangen, M. J. C.; Rozema, T.; Biermann, K.; Beukema, J. C.; Piet, A. H. M.; van Rij, C. M.; Reinders, J. G.; Tilanus, H. W.; van der Gaast, A.; Bergman, J. J. G. H. M.; Bartelsman, J. F.; Bissumbar, A.; Blom, R. L.; Geijsen, E. D.; van Heijl, M.; Obertop, H.; Koning, C. C. E.; Offerhaus, G. J.; Omloo, J. M.; Wilmink, H.; Aparicio Pages, M. N.; van den Nieuwenhof-Biesheuvel, L.; Eijkenboom, W. M. H.; Koppert, L. B.; Meijer, D. A.; Siersema, P. D.; Spaander, M. C. V.; Verheij, C.; Vollebregt, C.; van Krieken, J. H. J. M.; van Mansum, W.; van Dam, G.; van Dullemen, H. M.; Eerens, A.; van der Jagt, E.; Karnebeld, A.; Kluin, Ph; Mul, V. E. M.; Pruim, J.; Siemerink, E.; Weersma, R. K.; Fraikin, T.; Peters, C. W. A. H.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND The role of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in the treatment of patients with esophageal or esophagogastric-junction cancer is not well established. We compared chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery with surgery alone in this patient population. METHODS We randomly assigned patients with

  8. Durable and Complete Response to Herceptin Monotherapy in Patients with Metastatic Gastroesophageal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenen P. Swofford

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal cancer is the sixth leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. The 2 most common histologies are squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma, which has seen an increase in incidence correlating with an increase in obesity in developed countries. Gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma has a preponderance to metastasize early, making it a highly lethal cancer with a low 5-year survival rate of ∼15–25%. Therefore, for the majority of patients, treatment focuses on palliation and prolongation of survival. Combination chemotherapy regimens, mostly platinum-based, have only modestly prolonged survival in patients with stage IV disease. Recently, it was discovered that the activation of the HER2 receptor plays an important role in a minority of adenocarcinomas of the distal esophagus and stomach. This introduced the treatment option of trastuzumab (Herceptin, a monoclonal antibody directed at the HER2 receptor, which has demonstrated improvement in overall and progression-free survival as noted in the ToGA trial. Currently, the role of Herceptin therapy beyond first-line therapy and outside of combination regimens is not well established. In this case report we review 2 cases of patients with gastroesophageal cancer, with HER2 overexpression, who achieved a robust response to trastuzumab in combination with chemotherapy and were able to maintain a durable response with maintenance trastuzumab monotherapy.

  9. A rehabilitation program for patients with gastroesophageal cancer--a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasen, Martin Robert; Bhargava, Ravi

    2010-05-01

    Gastroesophageal carcinoma has a 5-year survival rate of 20%. Esophagogastrectomy is a significant life-altering operation which interferes with a patient's ability to eat food as a normal social interaction. Dumping syndrome, delayed gastric emptying, and reflux are encountered after surgery. In addition, loss of appetite and body weight occurs. Fatigue is universally encountered. We conducted this study to evaluate whether a structured cancer nutrition and rehabilitation program has an effect on the symptoms and quality of life of patients with gastroesophageal cancer. Fifty-three patients with histologically documented gastroesophageal carcinoma were evaluated before and after an 8-week multidisciplinary program consisting of physicians, oncology nurse, dietitian, physical and occupational therapists, social worker, and psychologist. Twenty-two patients completed all the following questionnaires pre- and post-program: The Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (ESAS), Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment (PG-SGA), Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI), and the Distress Thermometer. There were 42 male and 11 female patients. The median age was 63 years (22-80 years). Thirty patients had gastric cancer and 23 had esophageal cancer. On the ESAS, appetite, strength, shortness of breath, and constipation all improved (p = 0.01). The PG-SGA score decreased significantly (p = 0.05). Fatigue and general activity as measured on the BFI improved significantly. The 6-min walk increased from 384 to 435 m (p = 0.01). The Cancer Nutrition and Rehabilitation program offers a multidimensional, holistic treatment approach emphasizing the patient as an individual. Participation in a cancer rehabilitation program ameliorates symptoms, improves nutrition, decreases global distress, and increases physical activities.

  10. Gap Junctional Intercellular Communication and Breast Cancer Metastasis to Bone

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Donahue, Henry

    2001-01-01

    .... We found that: 1) expressing the metastasis suppressing gene BRMS1 in diverse cancer cell lines, including breast and melanoma, restores homotypic gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC); 2...

  11. Dysphagia is not a Valuable Indicator of Tumor Response after Preoperative Chemotherapy for R0 Resected Patients with Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strandby, Rune B; Svendsen, Lars Bo; Bæksgaard, Lene

    2016-01-01

    was to evaluate dysphagia as a predictor of tumor response after preoperative chemotherapy and as a predictor of recurrence and survival. METHODS: Patients with adenocarcinoma of the gastroesophageal junction, treated between 2010 and 2012, were retrospectively reviewed. Dysphagia scores (Mellow-Pinkas) were...... obtained before and after three cycles of perioperative chemotherapy together with clinicopathological patient characteristics. A clinical response was defined as improvement of dysphagia by at least 1 score from the baseline. The tumor response was defined as down staging of T-stage from initial computer...... tomography (CT) scan (cT-stage) to pathologic staging of surgical specimen (pT-stage). Patients were followed until death or censored on June 27th, 2014. RESULTS: Of the 110 included patients, 59.1% had improvement of dysphagia after three cycles of perioperative chemotherapy, and 31.8% had a chemotherapy...

  12. ‘Gap Junctions and Cancer: Communicating for 50 Years’

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasen, Trond; Mesnil, Marc; Naus, Christian C.; Lampe, Paul D.; Laird, Dale W.

    2017-01-01

    Fifty years ago, tumour cells were found to lack electrical coupling, leading to the hypothesis that loss of direct intercellular communication is commonly associated with cancer onset and progression. Subsequent studies linked this phenomenon to gap junctions composed of connexin proteins. While many studies support the notion that connexins are tumour suppressors, recent evidence suggests that, in some tumour types, they may facilitate specific stages of tumour progression through both junctional and non-junctional signalling pathways. This Timeline article highlights the milestones connecting gap junctions to cancer, and underscores important unanswered questions, controversies and therapeutic opportunities in the field. PMID:27782134

  13. A Phase II Study of the c-Met Inhibitor Tivantinib in Combination with FOLFOX for the Treatment of Patients with Previously Untreated Metastatic Adenocarcinoma of the Distal Esophagus, Gastroesophageal Junction, or Stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant, Shubham; Patel, Manish; Kurkjian, Carla; Hemphill, Brian; Flores, Maria; Thompson, Dana; Bendell, Johanna

    2017-08-09

    This phase I/II study was designed to determine the maximum tolerated dose of tivantinib in combination with standard dose FOLFOX for the treatment of patients with advanced solid tumors and to evaluate the safety and efficacy of this combination for patients with previously untreated metastatic adenocarcinoma of the distal esophagus, gastroesophageal (GE) junction, or stomach. Patients with advanced solid tumors for which FOLFOX would be appropriate chemotherapy received escalating doses of tivantinib BID (days 1-14) in a standard 3 + 3 design in phase I. In phase II, patients with advanced GE cancer received standard FOLFOX day 1 and tivantinib (360 mg PO BID) days 1-14 of each 2-week cycle. Restaging occurred every four cycles. The primary phase II endpoint was response rate (RR). Forty-nine patients were enrolled (15 on phase I and 34 on phase II). The expansion dose was established as tivantinib 360 mg BID in combination with FOLFOX. Thirty-two phase II patients were treated for a median of eight cycles (range, 1-38), with an overall RR of 38%. Treatment-related toxicities included neutropenia, fatigue, diarrhea, nausea, and peripheral neuropathy. Median progression-free survival (PFS) was 6.1 hmonths with a median time to progression of 7.0 months. Median overall survival was 9.6 months. Two patients remain on study at the time of this analysis. The combination treatment of tivantinib plus FOLFOX in patients with advanced GE cancer showed a response and PFS in the range of historical controls for first-line FOLFOX therapy. However, two patients had extended time on study treatment (36 and 45 cycles) at the time of data cutoff.

  14. HER2 Heterogeneity in Gastroesophageal Cancer Detected by Testing Biopsy and Resection Specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazlollahi, Ladan; Remotti, Helen E; Iuga, Alina; Yang, Hui-Min; Lagana, Stephen M; Sepulveda, Antonia R

    2017-08-07

    - In advanced gastric, esophageal, and gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinomas (GE-GEJ-AC) that overexpress ERBB2 (erb-b2 receptor tyrosine kinase 2 or HER2), anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody therapy confers survival benefit. To select patients for treatment, HER2 expression and gene amplification are evaluated by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and in situ hybridization. - To determine whether GE-GEJ-AC tested for HER2 on biopsy specimens of a primary tumor show different IHC scores and/or HER2 amplification by in situ hybridization in matched resection specimens, potentially changing therapy eligibility. - Immunohistochemistry and silver in situ hybridization were performed in biopsy and/or resection specimens from 100 patients. HER2 testing was performed in matched resection and biopsy specimens of 15 cases to determine whether GE-GEJ-AC with IHC scores of 0, 1 + , and 2 + in biopsy and resection specimens had different IHC and silver in situ hybridization results. - The IHC 3 + cases showed HER2 amplification in 4 of 5 cases (80%), and IHC scores of 0, 1 + , and 2 + showed 3.5%, 14.3%, and 23.5% HER2 amplification by silver in situ hybridization. Among the 15 paired biopsy and resection specimens, 9 (60%) had at least pT2 stage GE-GEJ-AC with HER2 IHC scores of 0, 1 + , or 2 + in the biopsy, and 2 of those 9 cases (22%) had IHC 3 + and HER2 amplification by silver in situ hybridization on the resection specimen. - Our data suggest that HER2 testing should be repeated on resection specimens of GE-GEJ-AC with HER2 IHC scores of negative (0 and 1 + ) or equivocal (2 + ) and in situ hybridization amplification negative biopsy specimen results to evaluate for HER2 heterogeneity when patients are being considered for anti-HER2 therapy.

  15. HGF/MET-directed therapeutics in gastroesophageal cancer: a review of clinical and biomarker development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hack, Stephen P; Bruey, Jean-Marie; Koeppen, Hartmut

    2014-05-30

    Aberrant activation of the HGF/MET signaling axis has been strongly implicated in the malignant transformation and progression of gastroesophageal cancer (GEC). MET receptor overexpression in tumor samples from GEC patients has been consistently correlated with an aggressive metastatic phenotype and poor prognosis. In preclinical GEC models, abrogation of HGF/MET signaling has been shown to induce tumor regression as well as inhibition of metastatic dissemination. Promising clinical results in patient subsets in which MET is overexpressed have spurned several randomized studies of HGF/MET-directed agents, including two pivotal global Phase III trials. Available data highlight the need for predictive biomarkers in order to select patients most likely to benefit from HGF/MET inhibition. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge of mechanisms of MET activation in GEC, the current status of the clinical evaluation of MET-targeted therapies in GEC, characteristics of ongoing randomized GEC trials and the associated efforts to identify and validate biomarkers. We also discuss the considerations and challenges for HGF/MET inhibitor drug development in the GEC setting.

  16. A multicenter, phase II study of bortezomib (PS-341) in patients with unresectable or metastatic gastric and gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Manish A; Power, Derek G; Kindler, Hedy L; Holen, Kyle D; Kemeny, Margaret M; Ilson, David H; Tang, Laura; Capanu, Marinela; Wright, John J; Kelsen, David P

    2011-12-01

    The transcription factor nuclear factor-kB (NFkB) is implicated in gastric cancer carcinogenesis and survival, and its inhibition by proteosome inhibition is associated with preclinical gastric cancer anti-tumor activity. We examined the single agent efficacy of bortezomib, a selective proteasome inhibitor, in gastric adenocarcinoma. We performed a phase II trial of bortezomib in patients with advanced gastric adenocarcinoma. Bortezomib 1.3 mg/m(2) was administered on days 1, 4, 8, and 11 every 21 days. The primary endpoint was objective response rate(RR); the null hypothesis was RR <1% versus the alternative ≥15%. One response in the first stage(15 patients) was required before proceeding with an additional 18 patients. If at least 2 or more responses out of 33 were observed, further study with bortezomib was warranted. Correlative studies evaluated pre-treatment tumor expression of NFkB, IkB, p53, p21, and cyclin D1. We enrolled 16 patients (15 evaluable for response) from four institutions. No patients demonstrated an objective response(95% CI, 0-22%); one patient achieved stable disease. Fourteen out of 16 patients experienced ≥ grade 2 toxicity. The most common toxicity was fatigue in six patients (n = 4 grade 2, n = 2 grade 3). Seven patients experienced neuropathy (n = 5 grade 1, and 1 each grade 2 and 3). Seven (60%) had high cytoplasmic staining for NFkB. Single agent bortezomib is inactive in metastatic gastric adenocarcinoma and should not be pursued. Future study of proteasome inhibition in gastric adenocarcinoma should be considered in combination with targeted inhibition of other non-overlapping oncogenic pathways as a potential rational approach.

  17. Biweekly cetuximab and irinotecan as second-line therapy in patients with gastro-esophageal cancer previously treated with platinum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoennemann, Katrine R; Bjerregaard, Jon K; Hansen, Tine P

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Until recently there has been no proven second-line therapy for patients with advanced gastro-esophageal cancer (GEC). Since 2004, Denmark has had a national health program where non-proven therapy can be offered to patients with advanced cancer, after approval by an expert panel...... appointed by the National Board of Health. This program has accelerated the introduction and implementation of new therapies in Denmark. Inspired by therapy in metastatic colorectal cancer, a combination of cetuximab and irinotecan (Cetiri) was chosen for second-line therapy in GEC patients. We report our......) on day 1 every 2nd week until progression or unacceptable toxicity. Toxicity was prospectively evaluated according to the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (NCI-CTCAE) version 3.0. RESULTS: From December 2007 to February 2009, 50 consecutive patients received Cetiri...

  18. Risk of lung cancer in patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease: a population-based cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Kuei Hsu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This large-scale, controlled cohort study estimated the risks of lung cancer in patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD in Taiwan. We conducted this population-based study using data from the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan during the period from 1997 to 2010. Patients with GERD were diagnosed using endoscopy, and controls were matched to patients with GERD at a ratio of 1:4. We identified 15,412 patients with GERD and 60,957 controls. Compared with the controls, the patients with GERD had higher rates of osteoporosis, diabetes mellitus, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, pneumonia, bronchiectasis, depression, anxiety, hypertension, dyslipidemia, chronic liver disease, congestive heart failure, atrial fibrillation, stroke, chronic kidney disease, and coronary artery disease (all P < .05. A total of 85 patients had lung cancer among patients with GERD during the follow-up of 42,555 person-years, and the rate of lung cancer was 0.0020 per person-year. By contrast, 232 patients had lung cancer among patients without GERD during the follow-up of 175,319 person-years, and the rate of lung cancer was 0.0013 per person-year. By using stepwise Cox regression model, the overall incidence of lung cancer remained significantly higher in the patients with GERD than in the controls (hazard ratio, 1.53; 95% CI [1.19–1.98]. The cumulative incidence of lung cancer was higher in the patients with GERD than in the controls (P = .0012. In conclusion, our large population-based cohort study provides evidence that GERD may increase the risk of lung cancer in Asians.

  19. Gastroesophageal scintigraphy for diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Michiomi; Aoki, Nobuhiko; Imura, Souichi; Eguchi, Hiroyuki; Tamamoto, Humihiko

    1995-01-01

    99m Tc-DTPA is a sensitive technique for the detection of gastro-esophageal reflux in children. Forty-eight children with gastro-esophageal reflux are scored by the results of the time activity curve of gastro-esophageal scintiscanning and the 24 hr esophageal pH tests. The score of gastro-esophageal scintiscanning is compared with the 24 hr esophageal pH score. There is a correlation in the score between the gastro-esophageal scintiscanning and the 24 hr esophageal pH test. (author)

  20. Gastroesophageal reflux leads to esophageal cancer in a surgical model with mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xiaoxin

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Esophago-gastroduodenal anastomosis with rats mimics the development of human Barrett's esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma by introducing mixed reflux of gastric and duodenal contents into the esophagus. However, use of this rat model for mechanistic and chemopreventive studies is limited due to lack of genetically modified rat strains. Therefore, a mouse model of esophageal adenocarcinoma is needed. Methods We performed reflux surgery on wild-type, p53A135V transgenic, and INK4a/Arf+/- mice of A/J strain. Some mice were also treated with omeprazole (1,400 ppm in diet, iron (50 mg/kg/m, i.p., or gastrectomy plus iron. Mouse esophagi were harvested at 20, 40 or 80 weeks after surgery for histopathological analysis. Results At week 20, we observed metaplasia in wild-type mice (5%, 1/20 and p53A135V mice (5.3%, 1/19. At week 40, metaplasia was found in wild-type mice (16.2%, 6/37, p53A135V mice (4.8%, 2/42, and wild-type mice also receiving gastrectomy and iron (6.7%, 1/15. Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma developed in INK4a/Arf+/- mice (7.1%, 1/14, and wild-type mice receiving gastrectomy and iron (21.4%, 3/14. Among 13 wild-type mice which were given iron from week 40 to 80, twelve (92.3% developed squamous cell carcinoma at week 80. None of these mice developed esophageal adenocarcinoma. Conclusion Surgically induced gastroesophageal reflux produced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, but not esophageal adenocarcinoma, in mice. Dominant negative p53 mutation, heterozygous loss of INK4a/Arf, antacid treatment, iron supplementation, or gastrectomy failed to promote esophageal adenocarcinoma in these mice. Further studies are needed in order to develop a mouse model of esophageal adenocarcinoma.

  1. Sequential treatment with epirubicin, oxaliplatin and 5FU (EOF) followed by docetaxel, oxaliplatin and 5FU (DOF) in patients with advanced gastric or gastroesophageal cancer: a single-institution experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrioli, Roberto; Francini, Edoardo; Roviello, Franco; Marrelli, Daniele; Fiaschi, Anna Ida; Laera, Letizia; Rossi, Giulia; Bianco, V; Brozzetti, S; Roviello, Giandomenico

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the activity and safety of epirubicin (EPI), oxaliplatin (l-OHP) and 5fluorouracil (5FU) (EOF) followed by docetaxel (D), l-OHP and 5FU (DOF) in patients with advanced gastric or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancer. Forty-five patients were enrolled: 26 gastric and 19 GEJ cancer. Median age was 69 years (range 34-83); ECOG performance status was 0-1 in 37 patients. Treatment consisted of EPI 50 mg/m(2) combined with l-OHP 130 mg/m(2) on day 1 and continuous infusion 5FU 750 mg/m(2) days 1-5 (EOF), every 3 weeks for a maximum of 4 cycles. After EOF completion, patients received D 70 mg/m(2) combined with l-OHP 130 mg/m(2) on day 1 and continuous infusion 5FU 750 mg/m(2) days 1-5 (DOF), every 3 weeks for a maximum of 4 cycles. After sequential EOF/DOF, the overall response rate was 51.1 % (95 % CI 35.7-66.2 %) and 93.3 % of patients were progression free 6 months after the onset of chemotherapy. The median progression-free survival was 9.5 months (95 % CI 8.0-11.9 months), and the median overall survival was 15.8 months (95 % CI 13.6-18.9 months). Grade 3 neutropenia was observed in 15 patients (33.3 %) after sequential EOF/DOF. The sequential treatment EOF/DOF is feasible in well-selected patients with advanced gastric or GEJ cancer and shows encouraging survival results.

  2. From Molecular Classification to Targeted Therapeutics: The Changing Face of Systemic Therapy in Metastatic Gastroesophageal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Murphy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Histological classification of adenocarcinoma or squamous cell carcinoma for esophageal cancer or using the Lauren classification for intestinal and diffuse type gastric cancer has limited clinical utility in the management of advanced disease. Germline mutations in E-cadherin (CDH1 or mismatch repair genes (Lynch syndrome were identified many years ago but given their rarity, the identification of these molecular alterations does not substantially impact treatment in the advanced setting. Recent molecular profiling studies of upper GI tumors have added to our knowledge of the underlying biology but have not led to an alternative classification system which can guide clinician’s therapeutic decisions. Recently the Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network has proposed four subtypes of gastric cancer dividing tumors into those positive for Epstein-Barr virus, microsatellite unstable tumors, genomically stable tumors, and tumors with chromosomal instability. Unfortunately to date, many phase III clinical trials involving molecularly targeted agents have failed to meet their survival endpoints due to their use in unselected populations. Future clinical trials should utilize molecular profiling of individual tumors in order to determine the optimal use of targeted therapies in preselected patients.

  3. [Update on gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra Pueyo, Jordi

    2014-02-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a highly frequent disorder classically characterized by the presence of heartburn and/or acid regurgitation that improves with drug therapy that reduces acid content in the stomach. However, especially in patients with non-erosive disease, response to proton pump inhibitors is unsatisfactory in approximately 1 out of 3 patients, and consequently, in these patients, it is important to establish a definitive diagnosis and an alternative therapeutic strategy. In the last few years, advances have been made in knowledge of the physiopathology of reflux, such as identification of the role of the acid pocket in producing reflux, technological advances that allow differentiation among acid reflux, non-acid reflux and slightly acid reflux, and advances in the treatment of reflux with drugs that attempt to act on the barrier function of the esophagogastric junction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  4. Carcinoembryonic antigen promotes colorectal cancer progression by targeting adherens junction complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bajenova, Olga, E-mail: o.bazhenova@spbu.ru [Theodosius Dobzhansky Center for Genome Bioinformatics, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg 199034 (Russian Federation); Department of Genetics and Biotechnology, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg 199034 (Russian Federation); Department of Surgery and Biomedical Sciences, Creighton University, Omaha, NE 68178 (United States); Chaika, Nina [Department of Surgery and Biomedical Sciences, Creighton University, Omaha, NE 68178 (United States); Tolkunova, Elena; Davydov-Sinitsyn, Alexander [Institute of Cytology, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg 194064 (Russian Federation); Gapon, Svetlana [Boston Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Thomas, Peter [Department of Surgery and Biomedical Sciences, Creighton University, Omaha, NE 68178 (United States); O’Brien, Stephen [Theodosius Dobzhansky Center for Genome Bioinformatics, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg 199034 (Russian Federation)

    2014-06-10

    Oncomarkers play important roles in the detection and management of human malignancies. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, CEACAM5) and epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin) are considered as independent tumor markers in monitoring metastatic colorectal cancer. They are both expressed by cancer cells and can be detected in the blood serum. We investigated the effect of CEA production by MIP101 colorectal carcinoma cell lines on E-cadherin adherens junction (AJ) protein complexes. No direct interaction between E-cadherin and CEA was detected; however, the functional relationships between E-cadherin and its AJ partners: α-, β- and p120 catenins were impaired. We discovered a novel interaction between CEA and beta-catenin protein in the CEA producing cells. It is shown in the current study that CEA overexpression alters the splicing of p120 catenin and triggers the release of soluble E-cadherin. The influence of CEA production by colorectal cancer cells on the function of E-cadherin junction complexes may explain the link between the elevated levels of CEA and the increase in soluble E-cadherin during the progression of colorectal cancer. - Highlights: • Elevated level of CEA increases the release of soluble E-cadherin during the progression of colorectal cancer. • CEA over-expression alters the binding preferences between E-cadherin and its partners: α-, β- and p120 catenins in adherens junction complexes. • CEA produced by colorectal cancer cells interacts with beta-catenin protein. • CEA over-expression triggers the increase in nuclear beta-catenin. • CEA over-expression alters the splicing of p120 catenin protein.

  5. Appropriateness of using patient-derived xenograft models for pharmacologic evaluation of novel therapies for esophageal/gastro-esophageal junction cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorin Dodbiba

    Full Text Available The high morbidity and mortality of patients with esophageal (E and gastro-esophageal junction (GEJ cancers, warrants new pre-clinical models for drug testing. The utility of primary tumor xenografts (PTXGs as pre-clinical models was assessed. Clinicopathological, immunohistochemical markers (p53, p16, Ki-67, Her-2/neu and EGFR, and global mRNA abundance profiles were evaluated to determine selection biases of samples implanted or engrafted, compared with the underlying population. Nine primary E/GEJ adenocarcinoma xenograft lines were further characterized for the spectrum and stability of gene/protein expression over passages. Seven primary esophageal adenocarcinoma xenograft lines were treated with individual or combination chemotherapy. Tumors that were implanted (n=55 in NOD/SCID mice had features suggestive of more aggressive biology than tumors that were never implanted (n=32. Of those implanted, 21/55 engrafted; engraftment was associated with poorly differentiated tumors (p=0.04 and older patients (p=0.01. Expression of immunohistochemical markers were similar between patient sample and corresponding xenograft. mRNA differences observed between patient tumors and first passage xenografts were largely due to loss of human stroma in xenografts. mRNA patterns of early vs late passage xenografts and of small vs large tumors of the same passage were similar. Complete resistance was present in 2/7 xenografts while the remaining tumors showed varying degrees of sensitivity, that remained constant across passages. Because of their ability to recapitulate primary tumor characteristics during engraftment and across serial passaging, PTXGs can be useful clinical systems for assessment of drug sensitivity of human E/GEJ cancers.

  6. Phase II study of modified docetaxel, cisplatin, and fluorouracil with bevacizumab in patients with metastatic gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Manish A; Jhawer, Minaxi; Ilson, David H; Lefkowitz, Robert A; Robinson, Edric; Capanu, Marinela; Kelsen, David P

    2011-03-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of a modified administration schedule of docetaxel, cisplatin, and fluorouracil (mDCF) with bevacizumab in patients with advanced gastroesophageal malignancies. Previously untreated patients with metastatic gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma received bevacizumab 10 mg/kg, docetaxel 40 mg/m², fluorouracil 400 mg/m², leucovorin 400 mg/m² on day 1, fluorouracil 1,000 mg/m²/d × 2 days intravenous continuous infusion beginning on day 1, and cisplatin 40 mg/m² on day 3. The primary objective was to improve 6-month progression-free survival (PFS) from 43% (historical DCF control) to 63% with the addition of bevacizumab. The target accrual was 44 patients to have 10% type I and II error rates. In total, 44 eligible patients with cancer were enrolled from October 2006 to October 2008: 22 gastric, 20 gastroesophageal junction (GEJ), and two esophagus. In 39 patients with measurable disease, the confirmed response rate was 67% (95% CI, 50% to 81%). Six-month PFS was 79% (95% CI, 63% to 88%), and median PFS was 12 months (95% CI, 8.8 to 18.2 months). With 26-month follow-up, median overall survival (OS) was 16.8 months (95% CI, 12.1 to 26.1 months), and 2-year survival was 37%. Treatment-related grade 3 to 4 toxicity was as follows: neutropenia without fever (50%), fatigue (25%), venous thromboembolism (39%), and nausea, vomiting, mucositis, neuropathy, and febrile neutropenia less than 10% each. In subset analysis, diffuse gastric cancer had significantly worse PFS and OS, and the response rate in proximal/GEJ tumors was 85% (95% CI, 62% to 97%). mDCF with bevacizumab appears tolerable and has notable patient outcomes in patients with advanced gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma. Six-month PFS was 79%, surpassing our predefined efficacy end point, and median and 2-year OS were 16.8 months and 37%, respectively.

  7. Tight junctions: a barrier to the initiation and progression of breast cancer?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brennan, Kieran

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer is a complex and heterogeneous disease that arises from epithelial cells lining the breast ducts and lobules. Correct adhesion between adjacent epithelial cells is important in determining the normal structure and function of epithelial tissues, and there is accumulating evidence that dysregulated cell-cell adhesion is associated with many cancers. This review will focus on one cell-cell adhesion complex, the tight junction (TJ), and summarize recent evidence that TJs may participate in breast cancer development or progression. We will first outline the protein composition of TJs and discuss the functions of the TJ complex. Secondly we will examine how alterations in these functions might facilitate breast cancer initiation or progression; by focussing on the regulatory influence of TJs on cell polarity, cell fate and cell migration. Finally we will outline how pharmacological targeting of TJ proteins may be useful in limiting breast cancer progression. Overall we hope to illustrate that the relationship between TJ alterations and breast cancer is a complex one; but that this area offers promise in uncovering fundamental mechanisms linked to breast cancer progression.

  8. Junctional adhesion molecule C (JAM-C) dimerization aids cancer cell migration and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido-Urbani, Sarah; Vonlaufen, Alain; Stalin, Jimmy; De Grandis, Maria; Ropraz, Patricia; Jemelin, Stéphane; Bardin, Florence; Scheib, Holger; Aurrand-Lions, Michel; Imhof, Beat A

    2018-04-01

    Most cancer deaths result from metastasis, which is the dissemination of cells from a primary tumor to distant organs. Metastasis involves changes to molecules that are essential for tumor cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix and to endothelial cells. Junctional Adhesion Molecule C (JAM-C) localizes at intercellular junctions as homodimers or more affine heterodimers with JAM-B. We previously showed that the homodimerization site (E66) in JAM-C is also involved in JAM-B binding. Here we show that neoexpression of JAM-C in a JAM-C-negative carcinoma cell line induced loss of adhesive property and pro-metastatic capacities. We also identify two critical structural sites (E66 and K68) for JAM-C/JAM-B interaction by directed mutagenesis of JAM-C and studied their implication on tumor cell behavior. JAM-C mutants did not bind to JAM-B or localize correctly to junctions. Moreover, mutated JAM-C proteins increased adhesion and reduced proliferation and migration of lung carcinoma cell lines. Carcinoma cells expressing mutant JAM-C grew slower than with JAM-C WT and were not able to establish metastatic lung nodules in mice. Overall these data demonstrate that the dimerization sites E66-K68 of JAM-C affected cell adhesion, polarization and migration and are essential for tumor cell metastasis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Combinational treatment of gap junctional activator and tamoxifen in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gakhar, Gunjan; Hua, Duy H; Nguyen, Thu Annelise

    2010-01-01

    Tamoxifen is a drug of choice for endocrine-responsive breast tumor patients. However, tamoxifen resistance has become a major concern for the treatment of breast cancer. Combinational therapies of tamoxifen and different drugs are being frequently studied. In this study, we tested the efficacy of substituted quinolines (code name=PQ1; a gap junctional activator) in combination with tamoxifen in T47D cells. Colony growth assay was performed using soft agar to measure the colony growth, whereas cell proliferation was measured by the MTT assay in T47D cells. The level of Ki67, survivin, and BAX was measured using confocal microscopy along with western blot analysis. Apoptosis-bromodeoxyuridine triphosphate labeling was also examined in the induced treatment of T47D cells. We observed a 55% decrease in the colony growth in the presence of combination of PQ1 and tamoxifen, whereas tamoxifen alone had little effect. A combination of 10 micromol/l tamoxifen and 200 or 500 nmol/l PQ1 resulted in only 16% cell viability compared with controls at 48 h in T47D cells by the MTT assay. We found a significant increase in BAX protein at 1 h in the presence of 500 nmol/l PQ1 alone, 10 micromol/l tamoxifen alone, and the combination of PQ1 and tamoxifen. A two-fold increase was observed in active caspase 3 in the presence of combinational treatment of 10 micromol/l tamoxifen and 200 or 500 nmol/l PQ1. In addition, flow cytometric analysis showed a 50% increase in the number of apoptotic cells in the presence of the combination of tamoxifen and PQ1 compared with the control. Furthermore, the results show that combinational treatment of tamoxifen and PQ1 significantly reduces the expression of survivin in T47D cells. Gap junction inhibitor studies with carbenexolone were also performed confirming the role of gap junctions in cell proliferation and cell death. The combinational treatment of PQ1 and tamoxifen has a significant increase in BAX expression, caspase 3 activation, and DNA

  10. Regulation and involvement in cancer and pathological conditions of MAGI1, a tight junction protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xuemin; Jia, Shuqin; Martin, Tracey A; Jiang, Wen G

    2014-07-01

    Membrane-associated guanylate kinase with an inverted repeat member 1 (MAGI1), is a member of a family of proteins which are emerging as important in coupling the extracellular environment to intracellular signaling pathways and the cytoskeleton at synapses and tight junctions. Early studies described it as a scaffold protein localized at cell-cell junctions. Recently, MAGI1 was found to recruit various kinds of molecules via its PSD-95/Disks Large/Zonula Occludins (PDZ) domains to strengthen the junctional complex. There is an increasing body of evidence showing its involvement in receptor synaptic localization and the homeostasis of ion channels in the nervous system. Furthermore, evidence has accumulated to confirm the critical role of MAGI1 in regulating cell-cell contacts, which is always disrupted in tumor progression and is associated with invasiveness and metastasis. It has also been shown in vitro that the abnormal expression of MAGI1 influences the adhesion and invasiveness of cancer cells. Due to the presence of docking domains for PDZ-binding molecules, MAGI1 associates with a variety of molecules such as phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN), brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor-1, β-catenin and the mouse homologue of the human NET1 DH domain protein. Pathway signaling analysis has indicated that MAGI1 is probably involved in many kinds of pathways especially the PTEN/Phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase/Akt pathway and the (Wg-Int)-β-catenin pathway which mediates intracellular functions. MAGI1 may therefore be a tumor suppressor and a therapy target for cancer and other diseases, although more in vitro and in vivo investigations are required. Copyright© 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  11. Genome wide single cell analysis of chemotherapy resistant metastatic cells in a case of gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hjortland, Geir Olav; Fodstad, Oystein; Smeland, Sigbjorn; Hovig, Eivind; Meza-Zepeda, Leonardo A; Beiske, Klaus; Ree, Anne H; Tveito, Siri; Hoifodt, Hanne; Bohler, Per J; Hole, Knut H; Myklebost, Ola

    2011-01-01

    expressed in the bone metastasis progressing on chemotherapy. Correspondingly, the erbB2 protein was found heterogeneously expressed by immunohistochemical staining of the primary tumor of the gastroesophageal junction, while negative in liver and bone metastases, but after three initial cycles of palliative chemotherapy with epirubicin, oxaliplatin and capecetabine, the representative bone metastasis stained strongly positive for erbB2. Global analysis of genetic aberrations, as illustrated by performing array-CGH analysis on genomic DNA from only a few selected tumor cells of interest sampled from a progressing bone metastasis, can identify relevant therapeutic targets and genetic aberrations involved in malignant progression, thus emphasizing the importance and feasibility of this powerful tool on the road to more personalized cancer therapies in the future

  12. Antineoplastic Effects of siRNA against TMPRSS2-ERG Junction Oncogene in Prostate Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgia Urbinati

    Full Text Available TMPRSS2-ERG junction oncogene is present in more than 50% of patients with prostate cancer and its expression is frequently associated with poor prognosis. Our aim is to achieve gene knockdown by siRNA TMPRSS2-ERG and then to assess the biological consequences of this inhibition. First, we designed siRNAs against the two TMPRSS2-ERG fusion variants (III and IV, most frequently identified in patients' biopsies. Two of the five siRNAs tested were found to efficiently inhibit mRNA of both TMPRSS2-ERG variants and to decrease ERG protein expression. Microarray analysis further confirmed ERG inhibition by both siRNAs TMPRSS2-ERG and revealed one common down-regulated gene, ADRA2A, involved in cell proliferation and migration. The siRNA against TMPRSS2-ERG fusion variant IV showed the highest anti-proliferative effects: Significantly decreased cell viability, increased cleaved caspase-3 and inhibited a cluster of anti-apoptotic proteins. To propose a concrete therapeutic approach, siRNA TMPRSS2-ERG IV was conjugated to squalene, which can self-organize as nanoparticles in water. The nanoparticles of siRNA TMPRSS2-ERG-squalene injected intravenously in SCID mice reduced growth of VCaP xenografted tumours, inhibited oncoprotein expression and partially restored differentiation (decrease in Ki67. In conclusion, this study offers a new prospect of treatment for prostate cancer based on siRNA-squalene nanoparticles targeting TMPRSS2-ERG junction oncogene.

  13. Cancer of the esophagus and esophagogastric junction-Major changes in the American Joint Committee on Cancer eighth edition cancer staging manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Thomas W; Gress, Donna M; Patil, Deepa T; Hofstetter, Wayne L; Kelsen, David P; Blackstone, Eugene H

    2017-07-08

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE New to the eighth edition of the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) Cancer Staging Manual for epithelial cancers of the esophagus and esophagogastric junction are separate, temporally related cancer classifications: 1) before treatment decision (clinical); 2) after esophagectomy alone (pathologic); and 3) after preresection therapy followed by esophagectomy (postneoadjuvant pathologic). The addition of clinical and postneoadjuvant pathologic stage groupings was driven by a lack of correspondence of survival, and thus prognosis, between both clinical and postneoadjuvant pathologic cancer categories (facts about the cancer) and pathologic categories. This was revealed by a machine-learning analysis of 6-continent data from the Worldwide Esophageal Cancer Collaboration, with consensus of the AJCC Upper GI Expert Panel. Survival is markedly affected by histopathologic cell type (squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma) in clinically and pathologically staged patients, requiring separate stage grouping for each cell type. However, postneoadjuvant pathologic stage groups are identical. For the future, more refined and granular data are needed. This requires: 1) more accurate clinical staging; 2) innovative solutions to pathologic staging challenges in endoscopically resected cancers; 3) integration of genomics into staging; and 4) precision cancer care with targeted therapy. It is the responsibility of the oncology team to accurately determine and record registry data, which requires eliminating both common errors and those related to incompleteness and inconsistency. Despite the new complexity of eighth edition staging of cancers of the esophagus and esophagogastric junction, these key concepts and new directions will facilitate precision cancer care. CA Cancer J Clin 2017;67:304-317. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  14. Endoscopic Appearance of the Gastroesophageal Valve and Competence of the Cardia

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    T. Ismail

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The endoscopic appearance of the gastroesophageal valve, viewed by the retroflexed gastroscope, has been studied in 51 patients with and without reflux esophagitis. Esophagitis was graded according to its severity, and the yield pressure (YP was measured in all patients to assess the competence of the cardia. There was a close relationship between the YP and the grades of the gastroesophageal valve. YP was significantly lower in patients with endoscopic oesophagitis than in patients with no evidence of reflux esophagitis (p <0.0001. An increased abnormality of the gastroesophageal valve was associated with all grades of esophagitis and with a low YP. The valve mechanism at the cardia has an important role in determining its competence. YP is possibly a measure of the flap valve component of the gastroesophageal junction.

  15. Total esophagogastrectomy plus extended lymphadenectomy with transverse colon interposition: A treatment for extensive esophagogastric junction cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceroni, Marco; Norero, Enrique; Henríquez, Juan Pablo; Viñuela, Eduardo; Briceño, Eduardo; Martínez, Cristian; Aguayo, Gloria; Araos, Fernando; González, Paulina; Díaz, Alfonso; Caracci, Mario

    2015-10-08

    To review the post-operative morbidity and mortality of total esophagogastrectomy (TEG) with second barrier lymphadenectomy (D2) with interposition of a transverse colon and to determine the oncological outcomes of TEG D2 with interposition of a transverse colon. This study consisted of a retrospective review of patients with a cancer diagnosis who underwent TEG between 1997 and 2013. Demographic data, surgery protocols, complications according to Clavien-Dindo classifications, final pathological reports, oncological follow-ups and causes of death were recorded. We used the TNM 2010 and Japanese classifications for nodal dissection of gastric cancer. We used descriptive statistical analysis and Kaplan-Meier survival curves. A P-value of less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. The series consisted of 21 patients (80.9% men). The median age was 60 years. The 2 main surgical indications were extensive esophagogastric junction cancers (85.7%) and double cancers (14.2%). The mean total surgery time was 405 min (352-465 min). Interposition of a transverse colon through the posterior mediastinum was used for replacement in all cases. Splenectomy was required in 13 patients (61.9%), distal pancreatectomy was required in 2 patients (9.5%) and resection of the left adrenal gland was required in 1 patient (4.7%). No residual cancer surgery was achieved in 75.1% of patients. A total of 71.4% of patients had a postoperative complication. Respiratory complications were the most frequently observed complication. Postoperative mortality was 5.8%. Median follow-up was 13.4 mo. Surgery specific survival at 5 years of follow-up was 32.8%; for patients with curative surgery, it was 39.5% at 5 years. TEG for cancer with interposition of a transverse colon is a very complex surgery, and it presents high post-operative morbidity and adequate oncological outcomes.

  16. [Gastroesophageal reflux disease and respiratory disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattioli, G; Caffarena, P E; Battistini, E; Fregonese, B; Barabino, A; Jasonni, V

    1995-01-01

    The patients treated for oesophageal atresia present a correlation between the clinical sintomatology after recanalization characterized by disfagia, dispnea, recurrent cough, chronic pneumopaties and oesophageal anomalies. Where morphological alterations accounting for the presence of gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) were not evident, possible functional alterations of the motility were considered. The incidence of GOR was considerably high and, expression of a congenital alteration of the lower oesophageal sphincter and of oesophageal peristalsis, becomes even more severe due to further stretching of the gastro-esophageal junction. The authors underline that the early demonstration of histological changes, even before recanalization, and the motility disorders of the oesophagus have to be well studied, while the LES is normalized, in order to prevent and treat the possible appearance of the well-known complications of GOR.

  17. Regulation of tight junctions by sex hormones in normal human endometrial epithelial cells and uterus cancer cell line Sawano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Someya, Masayuki; Kojima, Takashi; Ogawa, Marie; Ninomiya, Takafumi; Nomura, Kazuaki; Takasawa, Akira; Murata, Masaki; Tanaka, Satoshi; Saito, Tsuyoshi; Sawada, Norimasa

    2013-11-01

    The number of patients with uterine endometrial carcinoma, the cause of which involves sex hormones, has recently been growing rapidly because of increases in life expectancy and obesity. Tight junction proteins claudin-3 and -4 are receptors of Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE) and increase during endometrial carcinogenesis. In the present study of normal human endometrial epithelial (HEE) cells and the uterus cancer cell line Sawano, we investigate changes in the expression of tight junction proteins including claudin-3 and -4, the fence and barrier functions of the tight junction and the cytotoxic effects of CPE by sex hormones. In primary cultured HEE cells, treatment with progesterone (P4) but not estradiol (E2), induced claudin-1, -3, -4 and -7 and occludin, together with the downregulation of the barrier function but not the fence function. In Sawano cells, claudin-3 and -4 were upregulated by E2 but not by P4, together with a disruption of both the barrier and fence function. In primary cultured HEE cells, claudin-3 and -4 were localized at the apicalmost regions (tight junction areas) and no cytotoxicity of CPE was observed. In Sawano cells, claudin-3 and -4 were found not only in the apicalmost regions but also at the basolateral membrane and the cytotoxicity of CPE was enhanced by E2. Thus, tight junctions are physiological regulated by sex hormones in normal HEE cells during the menstrual cycle suggesting that safer and more effective therapeutic methods targeting claudins in uterine cancer can be developed.

  18. Sulforaphane counteracts aggressiveness of pancreatic cancer driven by dysregulated Cx43-mediated gap junctional intercellular communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yiyao; Isayev, Orkhan; Heilmann, Katharina; Schoensiegel, Frank; Liu, Li; Nessling, Michelle; Richter, Karsten; Labsch, Sabrina; Nwaeburu, Clifford C.; Mattern, Juergen; Gladkich, Jury; Giese, Nathalia; Werner, Jens; Schemmer, Peter; Gross, Wolfgang; Gebhard, Martha M.; Gerhauser, Clarissa; Schaefer, Michael; Herr, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    The extreme aggressiveness of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) has been associated with blocked gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) and the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs). We examined whether disturbed GJIC is responsible for a CSC phenotype in established and primary cancer cells and patient tissue of PDA using interdisciplinary methods based in physiology, cell and molecular biology, histology and epigenetics. Flux of fluorescent dyes and gemcitabine through gap junctions (GJs) was intact in less aggressive cells but not in highly malignant cells with morphological dysfunctional GJs. Among several connexins, only Cx43 was expressed on the cell surface of less aggressive and GJIC-competent cells, whereas Cx43 surface expression was absent in highly malignant, E-cadherin-negative and GJIC-incompetent cells. The levels of total Cx43 protein and Cx43 phosphorylated at Ser368 and Ser279/282 were high in normal tissue but low to absent in malignant tissue. si-RNA-mediated inhibition of Cx43 expression in GJIC-competent cells prevented GJIC and induced colony formation and the expression of stem cell-related factors. The bioactive substance sulforaphane enhanced Cx43 and E-cadherin levels, inhibited the CSC markers c-Met and CD133, improved the functional morphology of GJs and enhanced GJIC. Sulforaphane altered the phosphorylation of several kinases and their substrates and inhibition of GSK3, JNK and PKC prevented sulforaphane-induced CX43 expression. The sulforaphane-mediated expression of Cx43 was not correlated with enhanced Cx43 RNA expression, acetylated histone binding and Cx43 promoter de-methylation, suggesting that posttranslational phosphorylation is the dominant regulatory mechanism. Together, the absence of Cx43 prevents GJIC and enhances aggressiveness, whereas sulforaphane counteracts this process, and our findings highlight dietary co-treatment as a viable treatment option for PDA. PMID:24742583

  19. Features of obesity treatment in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E I Andreeva

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In the past few decades, the worldwide prevalence of such nosological forms as gastroesophageal reflux disease and obesity has been increasing. The combination of these pathologies is more often observed in patients who have nutrition and lifestyle issues, as well as genetic predisposition to these nosologies. Patients with obesity are noted to have predisposition to diaphragmatic hernias and mechanical damage of gastroesophageal junction, which occurs against the background of increased intragastric pressure and increased pressure gradient between the stomach and esophagus, as well as due to extension of the proximal part of the stomach. One of the basic pathogenetic moments of gastroesophageal reflux disease is spontaneous relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter. According to recent studies, in obesity the frequency of postprandial spontaneous relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter increases even in the absence of diaphragmatic hernia, non-erosive gastroesophageal reflux disease and reflux esophagitis. The variety of metabolic disorders observed in these patients requires a comprehensive approach to treatment, aimed both at effective reduction of the acid-peptic factor and at correction of excessive body weight. Both non-pharmacological and pharmacological methods are distinguished among the main treatment directions for both components of this combined pathology. An important role in therapy is given to activities that contribute to the maintenance of healthy lifestyle: smoking cessation, weight loss, dietary nutrition, health-improving physical culture. Among medications for patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease and obesity, which allow achieving an optimal acid-reducing effect, specific attention is assigned to a group of proton pump inhibitors (H+/K+-ATPase inhibitors, which have a lower affinity for hepatic cytochrome P450 enzyme system, do not affect its activity and do not clinically significantly cross-react with

  20. Pediatric GERD (Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Doctor Near You Pediatric GERD (Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease) Pediatric GERD (Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease) Patient Health ... pH probe: A small wire with an acid sensor is placed through the nose down to the ...

  1. Sex and Gender Differences in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Sun; Kim, Nayoung; Kim, Gwang Ha

    2016-01-01

    It is important to understand sex and gender-related differences in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) because gender-related biologic factors might lead to better prevention and therapy. Non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) affects more women than men. GERD symptoms are more frequent in patients with NERD than in those with reflux esophagitis. However, men suffer pathologic diseases such as reflux esophagitis, Barrett’s esophagus (BE), and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) more frequently than women. The prevalence of reflux esophagitis is significantly increased with age in women, especially after their 50s. The mean age of EAC incidence in women is higher than in men, suggesting a role of estrogen in delaying the onset of BE and EAC. In a chronic rat reflux esophagitis model, nitric oxide was found to be an aggravating factor of esophageal injury in a male-predominant way. In addition, the expression of esophageal occludin, a tight junction protein that plays an important role in the esophageal defense mechanism, was up-regulated in women. This explains the male predominance of reflux esophagitis and delayed incidence of BE or EAC in women. Moreover, the symptoms such as heartburn, regurgitation, and extra-esophageal symptoms have been more frequently reported by women than by men, suggesting that sex and gender play a role in symptom perception. Differential sensitivity with augmented symptoms in women might have diagnostic and therapeutic influence. Furthermore, recent studies have suggested that hormone replacement therapy has a protective effect against esophageal cancer. However, an anti-inflammatory role of estrogen remains compelling, which means further study is necessary in this area. PMID:27703114

  2. Gastroesophageal reflux and gastric emptying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, P.; Treves, S.T.

    1985-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) may be defined as a dysfunction of the distal esophagus causing return of gastric contents into the esophagus. GER is a rather common problem during infancy, with an incidence estimated as 1 in 500 infants. Several methods are available to diagnose and quantitate GER. These include fluoroscopy after barium feedings, in conjunction with an upper gastrointestinal series; esophageal manometry; endoscopy; pH probe monitoring, in conjunction with a Tuttle Test; and extended pH probe evaluation for a 24-h period. Gastroesophageal scintigraphy has been advocated as an alternative noninvasive study requiring no sedation. Scintigraphy offers the advantages of prolonged observation, high sensitivity, and low radiation exposure

  3. A retrospective matched cohort study evaluating the effects of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy feeding tubes on nutritional status and survival in patients with advanced gastroesophageal malignancies undergoing systemic anti-cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Scott; Williams, John P; Bhatti, Harsimrandeep; Kachaamy, Toufic; Weber, Jeffrey; Weiss, Glen J

    2017-01-01

    Many patients with cancer or other systemic illnesses can experience malnutrition. One way to mitigate malnutrition is by insertion of a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy feeding tube (PEG tube). The goal of this retrospective matched cohort study is to evaluate if PEG tube placement improved nutritional status and overall survival (OS) in advanced gastroesophageal (GE) cancer patients who are undergoing anti-neoplastic therapy. GE cancer patients who were treated and evaluated by a nutritionist and had at least 2 nutritionist follow-up visits were identified. Patients with PEG tube were matched to patients that did not undergo PEG placement (non-PEG). Clinical characteristics, GE symptoms reported at nutrition follow-up visits, and OS were recorded. 20 PEG and 18 non-PEG cases met criteria for further analyses. After correction for multiple testing, there were no OS differences between PEG and non-PEG, treatment naive and previously treated. However, PEG esophageal carcinoma has statistically significant inferior OS compared with non-PEG esophageal carcinoma. PEG placement did not significantly reduce the proportion of patients with weight loss between the initial nutrition assessment and 12-week follow-up. In this small study, PEG placement had inferior OS outcome for GE esophageal carcinoma, no improvement in OS for other evaluated groups, and did not reduce weight loss between baseline and 12-week follow-up. Unless there is prospective randomized trial that can show superiority of PEG placement in this population, PEG placement in this group cannot be endorsed.

  4. Transesophageal Echocardiography and Laryngeal Mask Airway for Placement of Permanent Central Venous Catheter in Cancer Patients with Radiographically Unidentifiable SVC-RA Junction: Effectiveness and Safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Hau Hsu

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available In patients who require a permanent central venous catheter (PCVC, the usual aim is to put the catheter tip at the superior vena cava and right atrium (SVC-RA junction. However, there is no study regarding how to guide the positioning of the catheter tip when the SVC-RA junction cannot be identified on chest radiograph. The objectives of this prospective study were: (1 to investigate the incidence and etiologies of radiographically undetermined SVC-RA junctions in cancer patients undergoing PCVC implantation; and (2 to evaluate the feasibility, effectiveness and safety of combined transesophageal echocardiography (TEE and laryngeal mask airway (LMA to guide the positioning of catheters during implantations in patients without this radiographic landmark. Over a 1-year study period, 83 consecutive patients with oncologic diseases who required implantation of a PCVC in a tertiary center were screened. Their preoperative chest radiographs were examined by radiologists to identify the presence of the SVC-RA junction. Patients without a radiographically identifiable SVC-RA junction were classified as cancer-related or cancer-unrelated in terms of etiology. For patients without this landmark, we used TEE with a pediatric biplane transducer and a LMA under intravenous general anesthesia during PCVC implantation to guide the positioning of the catheter tip at the SVC-RA junction. We found that in 16% (13/83 of patients, the SVC-RA junction could not be identified on radiograph. Among the 13 patients, only three (23% had cancer-related etiologies. In all of the 13 patients, the LMA was successfully placed after the TEE transducer was inserted. No episode of air leak from the LMA was found during surgery. All had the catheter tip positioned in the anatomic SVC-RA junction under TEE guidance. In conclusion, 16% of cancer patients requiring PCVC implantation had no identifiable SVC-RA junction on chest radiograph and most causes were cancer-unrelated. In

  5. Arrangement of expression and distribution of tight junction protein claudin-1 in cell dissociation of pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xiaodong; Egami, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Shinji; Kurizaki, Takashi; Nakagawa, Masahide; Hirota, Masahiko; Ogawa, Michio

    2004-12-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 2 (MEK2) was isolated previously as a potential factor related to cancer cell dissociation in highly (PC-1.0) and weakly (PC-1) invasive pancreatic cancer cells. On the other hand, changes of structure and function of tight junction (TJ) are reported to be correlated with carcinogenesis and tumor development. In this study, immunocytochemistry and Western blot analysis were performed in pancreatic cancer cells using anti-claudin-1, MEK2 and phosphorylated MEK1/2 (p-MEK1/2) antibodies to reveal the correlation between TJ and cancer cell dissociation, as well as the involvement of MEK2 in regulation of TJ in cell dissociation of pancreatic cancer. After incubation with conditioned medium of PC-1.0 cells, plasma membrane distribution of claudin-1 was obviously disrupted, and expressions of MEK2 and p-MEK1/2, as well as dissociation of cell colonies, were significantly induced in PC-1 and CAPAN-2 cells. However, U0126 (a MEK1/2 inhibitor) treatment apparently induced the plasma membrane distribution of claudin-1 and aggregation of single cells in PC-1.0 and AsPC-1 cells, synchronously seriously suppressed MEK2 and p-MEK1/2 expression. Arrangement of expression and distribution of claudin-1 is closely related to cell dissociation status in pancreatic cancer cells through MEK2 activation.

  6. Laparoscopy, computerised tomography and fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in the management of gastric and gastro-oesophageal junction cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, A; Galloway, S

    2016-07-01

    The staging laparoscopy has been used in the management of gastrointestinal cancers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of staging laparoscopy, in comparison with computed tomography (CT) and fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) imaging in staging patients with gastro-oesophageal junction (GOJ) and gastric cancers. The data were collected for patients between 1996 and 2013 undergoing investigation and treatment for GOJ and gastric cancers at a single institute. The pre-operative data (staging data), intraoperative details, post-operative course and follow-up were analysed for individual cases. Staging laparoscopy altered management plan in 64 (17 %) of 387 patients with negative staging CT and FDG-PET scan. Twenty-seven (7 %) patients with GOJ cancer (types I, II and III) were identified with pathological intraperitoneal nodes, 15 (4 %) gastric cancer with metastatic intraperitoneal deposits and liver metastases and 3 % gastric cancers with positive ascitic fluid for cancer cells. Ten (3 %) of patients were downstaged and were offered curative resection. Patients with metastatic disease were referred for palliative chemotherapy. The overall sensitivity of staging laparoscopy in diagnosing intraabdominal pathology was 86 % in comparison with CT (81 %) and FDG-PET (78 %). The diagnostic laparoscopy is useful for detecting and confirming nodal involvement and distant metastatic disease not evident on the staging CT scan and FDG-PET. This could potentially alter treatment and prognosis in patients with upper gastrointestinal cancer. The diagnostic laparoscopy should be performed as part of investigation and treatment planning for patients suffering from GOJ and gastric cancers. This can help to avoid surgery in patients with advanced disease.

  7. Impaired bolus transit across the esophagogastric junction in postfundoplication dysphagia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheffer, R. C. H.; Samsom, M.; Haverkamp, A.; Oors, J.; Hebbard, G. S.; Gooszen, H. G.

    2005-01-01

    This study assessed the effect of fundoplication on liquid and solid bolus transit across the esophagogastric junction (EGJ) in relation to EGJ dynamics and dysphagia. Twelve patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) were studied before and after fundoplication. Concurrent

  8. The Changing Face of Esophageal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melhado, Rachel E.; Alderson, Derek; Tucker, Olga

    2010-01-01

    The two main histological esophageal cancer types, adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, differ in incidence, geographic distribution, ethnic pattern and etiology. This article focuses on epidemiology with particular reference to geographic and temporal variations in incidence, along with a review of the evidence supporting environmental and genetic factors involved in esophageal carcinogenesis. Squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus remains predominantly a disease of the developing world. In contrast, esophageal adenocarcinoma is mainly a disease of western developed societies, associated with obesity and gastro-esophageal reflux disease. There has been a dramatic increase in the incidence of adenocarcinoma in developed countries in parallel with migration of both esophageal and gastric adenocarcinomas towards the gastro-esophageal junction

  9. The Changing Face of Esophageal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melhado, Rachel E., E-mail: raye732001@yahoo.co.uk; Alderson, Derek; Tucker, Olga [Academic Department of Surgery, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, University Hospitals Birmingham, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-28

    The two main histological esophageal cancer types, adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, differ in incidence, geographic distribution, ethnic pattern and etiology. This article focuses on epidemiology with particular reference to geographic and temporal variations in incidence, along with a review of the evidence supporting environmental and genetic factors involved in esophageal carcinogenesis. Squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus remains predominantly a disease of the developing world. In contrast, esophageal adenocarcinoma is mainly a disease of western developed societies, associated with obesity and gastro-esophageal reflux disease. There has been a dramatic increase in the incidence of adenocarcinoma in developed countries in parallel with migration of both esophageal and gastric adenocarcinomas towards the gastro-esophageal junction.

  10. Integrating evolutionary game theory into an agent-based model of ductal carcinoma in situ: Role of gap junctions in cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekian, Negin; Habibi, Jafar; Zangooei, Mohammad Hossein; Aghakhani, Hojjat

    2016-11-01

    There are many cells with various phenotypic behaviors in cancer interacting with each other. For example, an apoptotic cell may induce apoptosis in adjacent cells. A living cell can also protect cells from undergoing apoptosis and necrosis. These survival and death signals are propagated through interaction pathways between adjacent cells called gap junctions. The function of these signals depends on the cellular context of the cell receiving them. For instance, a receiver cell experiencing a low level of oxygen may interpret a received survival signal as an apoptosis signal. In this study, we examine the effect of these signals on tumor growth. We make an evolutionary game theory component in order to model the signal propagation through gap junctions. The game payoffs are defined as a function of cellular context. Then, the game theory component is integrated into an agent-based model of tumor growth. After that, the integrated model is applied to ductal carcinoma in situ, a type of early stage breast cancer. Different scenarios are explored to observe the impact of the gap junction communication and parameters of the game theory component on cancer progression. We compare these scenarios by using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test succeeds in proving a significant difference between the tumor growth of the model before and after considering the gap junction communication. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test also proves that the tumor growth significantly depends on the oxygen threshold of turning survival signals into apoptosis. In this study, the gap junction communication is modeled by using evolutionary game theory to illustrate its role at early stage cancers such as ductal carcinoma in situ. This work indicates that the gap junction communication and the oxygen threshold of turning survival signals into apoptosis can notably affect cancer progression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Feelings Expert Answers Q&A Movies & More for Teens Teens site Sitio para adolescentes Body Mind Sexual Health ... English Español Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) KidsHealth / For Teens / Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) What's in this article? ...

  12. Nanotube junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespi, Vincent Henry; Cohen, Marvin Lou; Louie, Steven Gwon Sheng; Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter

    2003-01-01

    The present invention comprises a new nanoscale metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, or metal-metal junction, designed by introducing topological or chemical defects in the atomic structure of the nanotube. Nanotubes comprising adjacent sections having differing electrical properties are described. These nanotubes can be constructed from combinations of carbon, boron, nitrogen and other elements. The nanotube can be designed having different indices on either side of a junction point in a continuous tube so that the electrical properties on either side of the junction vary in a useful fashion. For example, the inventive nanotube may be electrically conducting on one side of a junction and semiconducting on the other side. An example of a semiconductor-metal junction is a Schottky barrier. Alternatively, the nanotube may exhibit different semiconductor properties on either side of the junction. Nanotubes containing heterojunctions, Schottky barriers, and metal-metal junctions are useful for microcircuitry.

  13. Prevention and management of gastroesophageal varices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Yeon Seok

    2018-03-01

    Bleeding from gastroesophageal varices is a serious complication in patients with liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Although there has been significance improvement in the prognosis of variceal bleeding with advancement in diagnostic and therapeutic modalities for its management, mortality rate still remains high. Therefore, appropriate prevention and rapid, effective management of bleeding from gastroesophageal varices is very important. Recently, various studies about management of gastoesophageal varices, including prevention of development and aggravation of varices, prevention of first variceal bleeding, management of acute variceal bleeding, and prevention of variceal rebleeding, have been published. The present article reviews published articles and practice guidelines to present the most optimal management of patients with gastroesophageal varices.

  14. Breast cancer cell migration is regulated through junctional adhesion molecule-A-mediated activation of Rap1 GTPase

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McSherry, Elaine A

    2011-03-23

    Abstract Introduction The adhesion protein junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A) regulates epithelial cell morphology and migration, and its over-expression has recently been linked with increased risk of metastasis in breast cancer patients. As cell migration is an early requirement for tumor metastasis, we sought to identify the JAM-A signalling events regulating migration in breast cancer cells. Methods MCF7 breast cancer cells (which express high endogenous levels of JAM-A) and primary cultures from breast cancer patients were used for this study. JAM-A was knocked down in MCF7 cells using siRNA to determine the consequences for cell adhesion, cell migration and the protein expression of various integrin subunits. As we had previously demonstrated a link between the expression of JAM-A and β1-integrin, we examined activation of the β1-integrin regulator Rap1 GTPase in response to JAM-A knockdown or functional antagonism. To test whether JAM-A, Rap1 and β1-integrin lie in a linear pathway, we tested functional inhibitors of all three proteins separately or together in migration assays. Finally we performed immunoprecipitations in MCF7 cells and primary breast cells to determine the binding partners connecting JAM-A to Rap1 activation. Results JAM-A knockdown in MCF7 breast cancer cells reduced adhesion to, and migration through, the β1-integrin substrate fibronectin. This was accompanied by reduced protein expression of β1-integrin and its binding partners αV- and α5-integrin. Rap1 activity was reduced in response to JAM-A knockdown or inhibition, and pharmacological inhibition of Rap1 reduced MCF7 cell migration. No additive anti-migratory effect was observed in response to simultaneous inhibition of JAM-A, Rap1 and β1-integrin, suggesting that they lie in a linear migratory pathway. Finally, in an attempt to elucidate the binding partners putatively linking JAM-A to Rap1 activation, we have demonstrated the formation of a complex between JAM-A, AF-6

  15. Breast cancer cell migration is regulated through junctional adhesion molecule-A-mediated activation of Rap1 GTPase.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McSherry, Elaine A

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: The adhesion protein junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A) regulates epithelial cell morphology and migration, and its over-expression has recently been linked with increased risk of metastasis in breast cancer patients. As cell migration is an early requirement for tumor metastasis, we sought to identify the JAM-A signalling events regulating migration in breast cancer cells. METHODS: MCF7 breast cancer cells (which express high endogenous levels of JAM-A) and primary cultures from breast cancer patients were used for this study. JAM-A was knocked down in MCF7 cells using siRNA to determine the consequences for cell adhesion, cell migration and the protein expression of various integrin subunits. As we had previously demonstrated a link between the expression of JAM-A and beta1-integrin, we examined activation of the beta1-integrin regulator Rap1 GTPase in response to JAM-A knockdown or functional antagonism. To test whether JAM-A, Rap1 and beta1-integrin lie in a linear pathway, we tested functional inhibitors of all three proteins separately or together in migration assays. Finally we performed immunoprecipitations in MCF7 cells and primary breast cells to determine the binding partners connecting JAM-A to Rap1 activation. RESULTS: JAM-A knockdown in MCF7 breast cancer cells reduced adhesion to, and migration through, the beta1-integrin substrate fibronectin. This was accompanied by reduced protein expression of beta1-integrin and its binding partners alphaV- and alpha5-integrin. Rap1 activity was reduced in response to JAM-A knockdown or inhibition, and pharmacological inhibition of Rap1 reduced MCF7 cell migration. No additive anti-migratory effect was observed in response to simultaneous inhibition of JAM-A, Rap1 and beta1-integrin, suggesting that they lie in a linear migratory pathway. Finally, in an attempt to elucidate the binding partners putatively linking JAM-A to Rap1 activation, we have demonstrated the formation of a complex between

  16. Breast cancer cell migration is regulated through junctional adhesion molecule-A-mediated activation of Rap1 GTPase.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McSherry, Elaine A

    2011-03-23

    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The adhesion protein junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A) regulates epithelial cell morphology and migration, and its over-expression has recently been linked with increased risk of metastasis in breast cancer patients. As cell migration is an early requirement for tumor metastasis, we sought to identify the JAM-A signalling events regulating migration in breast cancer cells. METHODS: MCF7 breast cancer cells (which express high endogenous levels of JAM-A) and primary cultures from breast cancer patients were used for this study. JAM-A was knocked down in MCF7 cells using siRNA to determine the consequences for cell adhesion, cell migration and the protein expression of various integrin subunits. As we had previously demonstrated a link between the expression of JAM-A and β1-integrin, we examined activation of the β1-integrin regulator Rap1 GTPase in response to JAM-A knockdown or functional antagonism. To test whether JAM-A, Rap1 and β1-integrin lie in a linear pathway, we tested functional inhibitors of all three proteins separately or together in migration assays. Finally we performed immunoprecipitations in MCF7 cells and primary breast cells to determine the binding partners connecting JAM-A to Rap1 activation. RESULTS: JAM-A knockdown in MCF7 breast cancer cells reduced adhesion to, and migration through, the β1-integrin substrate fibronectin. This was accompanied by reduced protein expression of β1-integrin and its binding partners αV- and α5-integrin. Rap1 activity was reduced in response to JAM-A knockdown or inhibition, and pharmacological inhibition of Rap1 reduced MCF7 cell migration. No additive anti-migratory effect was observed in response to simultaneous inhibition of JAM-A, Rap1 and β1-integrin, suggesting that they lie in a linear migratory pathway. Finally, in an attempt to elucidate the binding partners putatively linking JAM-A to Rap1 activation, we have demonstrated the formation of a complex between JAM-A, AF

  17. Cystic Fibrosis and gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqbool, Asim; Pauwels, Ans

    2017-11-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux is common in children and adults with cystic fibrosis (CF). Pathological gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is also frequent in patients of all ages with CF. This article reviews the pathophysiology, diagnostic work-up, management options, complications, and future directions in the evaluation and management of GERD - unique to and pertinent for - patients with CF in particular. Copyright © 2017 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Gastroesophageal reflux after esophageal surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Osamu; Yokoi, Hideki; Maebeya, Shinji

    1989-01-01

    By means of esophageal transit scintigram using 99m Tc-DTPA, 15 patients (13 esophageal carcinomas and 2 cardia carcinomas) were studied, in whom esophagogastric anastomosis was done according to the posterior invagination anastomosis technique we had devised. In all 8 patients with anastomosis at cervical region, gastroesophageal reflux was not seen on both scintigrams before and after meals, and the average pressure gradient of high pressure zone at anastomosis was 39.8 cmH 2 O. In 2 of 7 patients with intrathoracic anastomosis, the scintigram before meals showed severe reflux. and the endoscopic findings showed diffuse and moderate erosion in the esophageal mucosa. The average pressure gradient across the anastomosis was 6.5 cmH 2 O. In these 2 patients, the new fornix with a sharp angle of His was not formed. In the remaining 5 patients with intrathoracic anastomosis, reflux was not seen on the scintigram before meals. However, in 2 of them, the scintigram after meal and endoscopic examination revealed mild reflux and mild esophagitis respectively. Furthermore in one patient very mild reflux was observed only on the scintigram after meals but the endoscopic findings showed the normal esophageal mucosa. In these 5 patients, the average pressure gradient across the anastomosis was 17.0 cmH 2 O, which was significantly higher (p<0.01) than that in 2 patients with severe reflux and was significantly lower (p<0.01) than the mean value of high pressure zone in 8 patients with cervical anastomosis. In conclusion, it is presumed that the formation of a large fornix enough to store food and a sharp angle of His are important factors in maintaining an anti-reflux mechanism. The esophageal transit scintigram was proved to be an excellent technique in detecting and evaluating quantitatively gastroesophageal reflux. (author)

  19. Gap junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodenough, Daniel A; Paul, David L

    2009-07-01

    Gap junctions are aggregates of intercellular channels that permit direct cell-cell transfer of ions and small molecules. Initially described as low-resistance ion pathways joining excitable cells (nerve and muscle), gap junctions are found joining virtually all cells in solid tissues. Their long evolutionary history has permitted adaptation of gap-junctional intercellular communication to a variety of functions, with multiple regulatory mechanisms. Gap-junctional channels are composed of hexamers of medium-sized families of integral proteins: connexins in chordates and innexins in precordates. The functions of gap junctions have been explored by studying mutations in flies, worms, and humans, and targeted gene disruption in mice. These studies have revealed a wide diversity of function in tissue and organ biology.

  20. Risk factor analysis for involvement of resection margins in gastric and esophagogastric junction cancer: an Italian multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissolati, Massimiliano; Desio, Matteo; Rosa, Fausto; Rausei, Stefano; Marrelli, Daniele; Baiocchi, Gian Luca; De Manzoni, Giovanni; Chiari, Damiano; Guarneri, Giovanni; Pacelli, Fabio; De Franco, Lorenzo; Molfino, Sarah; Cipollari, Chiara; Orsenigo, Elena

    2017-01-01

    Resection margin (RM) involvement is associated with negative prognosis after gastrectomy. Intraoperative frozen section (IFS) analysis allows radical resection to be achieved in a single operation but is time-consuming and resource-consuming. The aim of this study was to assess risk factors associated with RM involvement to identify patients who would benefit from IFS analysis. We retrospectively analyzed patients who underwent gastrectomy with curative intent for gastric or esophagogastric junction (EGJ) cancer from 2000 to 2014 in six Italian hospitals. RM status was assessed by IFS analysis and/or definitive histopathology examination. A set of 21 potential risk factors were compared in a multivariate analysis between patients with positive RMs on IFS analysis or definitive histopathology examination and a control cohort of similar patients with negative RMs, with the samples stratified into three subgroups (T1, T2-T4 Lauren intestinal pattern, T2-T4 Lauren diffuse/mixed pattern). One hundred forty-five patients had positive RMs. Survival was significantly worse in positive RM patients than in negative RM patients (89.5 months vs 28.9 months). Multivariate analysis showed that in T1 cancers a margin distance of less than 2 cm is a risk factor for RM involvement (odds ratio 15.7), in T2-T4 intestinal pattern cancers, serosa invasion (odds ratio 6.0), EGJ location (odds ratio 4.1), and a margin distance of less than 3 cm (odds ratio 4.0) are independent risk factors, and in T2-T4 diffuse/mixed pattern cancers, lymphatic infiltration (odds ratio 4.2), tumor diameter greater than 4 cm (odds ratio 3.5), EGJ location (odds ratio 2.8), and serosa invasion (odds ratio 2.2) are independent risk factors. Survival after gastrectomy is negatively affected by positive RMs. IFS analysis should be routinely used in patients with a high risk of positive RMs, especially in diffuse pattern cancers.

  1. Possible Mechanisms of Mercury Toxicity and Cancer Promotion: Involvement of Gap Junction Intercellular Communications and Inflammatory Cytokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Zefferino

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of observations indicate that heavy metals are able to alter cellular metabolic pathways through induction of a prooxidative state. Nevertheless, the outcome of heavy metal-mediated effects in the development of human diseases is debated and needs further insights. Cancer is a well-established DNA mutation-linked disease; however, epigenetic events are perhaps more important and harmful than genetic alterations. Unfortunately, we do not have reliable screening methods to assess/validate the epigenetic (promoter effects of a physical or a chemical agent. We propose a mechanism of action whereby mercury acts as a possible promoter carcinogen. In the present contribution, we resume our previous studies on mercury tested at concentrations comparable with its occurrence as environmental pollutant. It is shown that Hg(II elicits a prooxidative state in keratinocytes linked to inhibition of gap junction-mediated intercellular communication and proinflammatory cytokine production. These combined effects may on one hand isolate cells from tissue-specific homeostasis promoting their proliferation and on the other hand tamper the immune system defense/surveillance checkmating the whole organism. Since Hg(II is not a mutagenic/genotoxic compound directly affecting gene expression, in a broader sense, mercury might be an example of an epigenetic tumor promoter or, further expanding this concept, a “metagenetic” effector.

  2. Gastroesophageal pressure gradients in gastroesophageal reflux disease: relations with hiatal hernia, body mass index, and esophageal acid exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Durk R.; van Herwaarden, Margot A.; Smout, André J. P. M.; Samsom, Melvin

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The roles of intragastric pressure (IGP), intraesophageal pressure (IEP), gastroesophageal pressure gradient (GEPG), and body mass index (BMI) in the pathophysiology of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and hiatal hernia (HH) are only partly understood. METHODS: In total, 149 GERD

  3. Immunohistochemical quantification of expression of a tight junction protein, claudin-7, in human lung cancer samples using digital image analysis method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhe; Liu, Yi; Xu, Junfeng; Yin, Hongping; Yuan, Haiying; Gu, Jinjing; Chen, Yan-Hua; Shi, Liyun; Chen, Dan; Xie, Bin

    2018-03-01

    Tight junction proteins are correlated with cancer development. As the pivotal proteins in epithelial cells, altered expression and distribution of different claudins have been reported in a wide variety of human malignancies. We have previously reported that claudin-7 was strongly expressed in benign bronchial epithelial cells at the cell-cell junction while expression of claudin-7 was either altered with discontinued weak expression or completely absent in lung cancers. Based on these results, we continued working on the expression pattern of claudin-7 and its relationship with lung cancer development. We herein proposed a new Digital Image Classification, Fragmentation index, Morphological analysis (DICFM) method for differentiating the normal lung tissues and lung cancer tissues based on the claudin-7 immunohistochemical staining. Seventy-seven lung cancer samples were obtained from the Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University and claudin-7 immunohistochemical staining was performed. Based on C++ and Open Source Computer Vision Library (OpenCV, version 2.4.4), the DICFM processing module was developed. Intensity and fragmentation of claudin-7 expression, as well as the morphological parameters of nuclei were calculated. Evaluation of results was performed using Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC) analysis. Agreement between these computational results and the results obtained by two pathologists was demonstrated. The intensity of claudin-7 expression was significantly decreased while the fragmentation was significantly increased in the lung cancer tissues compared to the normal lung tissues and the intensity was strongly positively associated with the differentiation of lung cancer cells. Moreover, the perimeters of the nuclei of lung cancer cells were significantly greater than that of the normal lung cells, while the parameters of area and circularity revealed no statistical significance. Taken together, our DICFM approach may be applied as an

  4. Downregulation of tight junction-associated MARVEL protein marvelD3 during epithelial-mesenchymal transition in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Takashi; Takasawa, Akira; Kyuno, Daisuke; Ito, Tatsuya; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Hirata, Koichi; Tsujiwaki, Mitsuhiro; Murata, Masaki; Tanaka, Satoshi; Sawada, Norimasa

    2011-10-01

    The novel tight junction protein marvelD3 contains a conserved MARVEL (MAL and related proteins for vesicle trafficking and membrane link) domain like occludin and tricellulin. However, little is yet known about the detailed role and regulation of marvelD3 in normal epithelial cells and cancer cells, including pancreatic cancer. In the present study, we investigated marvelD3 expression in well and poorly differentiated human pancreatic cancer cell lines and normal pancreatic duct epithelial cells in which the hTERT gene was introduced into human pancreatic duct epithelial cells in primary culture, and the changes of marvelD3 during Snail-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) under hypoxia, TGF-β treatment and knockdown of FOXA2 in well differentiated pancreatic cancer HPAC cells. MarvelD3 was transcriptionally downregulated in poorly differentiated pancreatic cancer cells and during Snail-induced EMT of pancreatic cancer cells in which Snail was highly expressed and the fence function downregulated, whereas it was maintained in well differentiated human pancreatic cancer cells and normal pancreatic duct epithelial cells. Depletion of marvelD3 by siRNAs in HPAC cells resulted in downregulation of barrier functions indicated as a decrease in transepithelial electric resistance and an increase of permeability to fluorescent dextran tracers, whereas it did not affect fence function of tight junctions. In conclusion, marvelD3 is transcriptionally downregulated in Snail-induced EMT during the progression for the pancreatic cancer. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Gastric-Esophageal Stenting for Malignant Dysphagia: Results of Prospective Clinical Trial Evaluation of Long-Term Gastroesophageal Reflux and Quality of Life-Related Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philips, Prejesh; North, D Alan; Scoggins, Charles; Schlegel, Melissa; Martin, Robert C G

    2015-07-01

    Stenting across the gastroesophageal (GE) junction for adenocarcinoma has historically been contraindicated secondary to the concerns for severe GE reflux (GER) symptoms. The aim of this study was to assess reflux symptoms and quality of life (QOL) effects in patients undergoing esophageal stenting across the GE junction. We performed a prospective single arm QOL clinical trial evaluating patients with stage 2/3 GE junction adenocarcinoma, undergoing neoadjuvant therapy (from baseline to 10 weeks post-stenting) after stenting across the GE junction, for GER symptoms and QOL-GER assessments (EORTC-QLQ-O25 and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Esophageal [FACT-E]). Forty consecutive patients were enrolled in this clinical trial. The median age was 62 years (range 47 to 83 years); 84% were male and 19% were female patients. Median dysphagia score of 3 (only liquids tolerated) pre-stent was significantly improved to a score of 0 (ability to eat all foods) post-stent (p = 0.01). There was a significantly improved and sustained swallowing QOL from 2 weeks up to 10 weeks post-stent. The GER-QOL scores were similar 2 weeks post-stent, but were significantly improved throughout the rest of the study. Proton pump inhibitors were being used in 58% of patients pre-stent and in 85% of patients at 2- to 10-week follow-up. Planned chemotherapy and/or chemo-radiation therapy was completed in 95% of all patients. Stent migration (radiologic and/or complete) was seen in 63% of patients at some time during their therapy and corresponded to pathologic response in 85% of those patients. Esophageal stenting across the GE junction remains the optimal therapy for dysphagia relief in esophageal malignancies and does not adversely affect a patient's GER-QOL. Esophageal stenting across the GE junction is not contraindicated and should be the initial therapy in patient management. Copyright © 2015 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Gastroesophageal reflux disease and airway disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stein, Mark R

    1999-01-01

    ...: An Important but Little Known Cause of Pulmonary Complications,'' appeared (1). Of course, one could say that this 1962 work is a bit dated. Indeed, since then we have become much more aware of the importance and prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux. This is evidenced by the following statement taken from John Murray and Jay Nadel (2): ''Over one third of the US population have symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux and it is estimated that 10% of these individuals have respiratory symptoms that may be related...

  7. Total meso-esophagogastrectomy in surgically resectable Siewert type II-III junctional gastric cancer: Safety and long term oncologic outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siani LM

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To analyze our experience confronting meso-esophagogastric resection (transhiatally extended total gastrectomy en-bloc with its inviolate primitive dorsal and ventral mesenterium to less radical planes of surgery (intra-mesoesophagogastric and muscularis propria planes, in the multimodal management of junctional Siewert II/III resectable gastric cancer. Methods: 138 patients with stage I-III/C type II-III Siewert junctional cancers were enrolled. Proximal and distal marginal clearance, closest meso-esophageal resection margin (CRM, volume in mm3 of meso-esophageal tissue around the tumor, R0 resections rate, number of lymph nodes harvested and five years overall and disease-free survival were recorded for each plane of surgery. Results: Mortality and morbidity were 3.6% and 22.4% respectively; operative length was 235 ± 23 min.; mean blood loss was 195 ± 53cc. Mean meso-esophageal tissue volume including tumor was 35,157 mm3 for meso-esophagogastric resections, 25,397 mm3 for intra-mesoesophagogastric resections and 20,531 mm3 for “muscularis propria” resections, all statistically significant (p 1mm and pN0 were associated with increased recurrence-free survival. Conclusions: When compared to less extensive planes of surgery, transhiatally extended total meso-esophagogastrectomy confers a survival advantage in the intermediate stages of Siewert type II-III junctional gastric cancer, increasing R0 resection rate, decreasing CRM < 1mm and enhancing lymph node harvesting, with consequent impact on loco-regional control and survival; differently, in the extreme stages (I and IIIC N + patients, total meso-esophagogastrectomy is ineffective in altering the standard oncologic outcome. In our experience, total meso-esophagogastrectomy proved to be safe and oncologically effective, especially in stage II-IIIA/B, representing a pivotal part of multimodal management of type II/III EGJ cancers.

  8. Emerging drugs for gastroesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeckxstaens, G. E.

    2009-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are very effective and safe drugs for the treatment of erosive and non-erosive gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Nevertheless, a significant proportion of GERD patients (30 - 40%) continue to suffer from symptoms during PPI treatment, which has stimulated the

  9. Association between Body Mass Index and Gastroesophageal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Gastroesophageal reflux disease [GERD] is a common disorder with very low rates in Africa and Asia, and high rates in North America and Europe. Several studies have demonstrated a positive link between body mass index [BMI] and reflux symptoms. The aim of this study was to establish the association ...

  10. Correlation of gastroesophageal reflex with aspiration pneumonia after surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirashima, Tokuji; Hashimoto, Hajime; Noro, Toshio; Takahashi, Tadao; Hino, Yasunori; Kuroiwa, Kouzirou

    1996-01-01

    In order to elucidate the correlation of gastroesophageal reflex (GER) with aspiration pneumonia after surgery, 48 patients (mean, 75.6 years) with gastric cancer treated at the hospital from March, 1994 to December, 1994 were subjected to this prospective study. The pharyngeal stimulation test, nutritional assessment, radionuclide esophageal scintigraphy (34 cases) were performed before surgery and relationship between those results and aspiration pneumonia were studied. Aspiration pneumonia occurred in 3 cases, and all of them were in, significantly, poor nutritional status, compared with other. A significant increase in the frequency of GER was observed when a naso-gastric tube (NGT) was placed, but surprisingly, all the patients with aspiration pneumonia were 3 out of 4 patients who had continuous GER without NGT. It is noteworthy, continuous GER without NGT was significantly (p<0.001) affected postoperative aspiration pneumonia and impaired phalyngeal reflex was frequently correlated with development of aspiration pneumonia, when malnutritional status existed. (author)

  11. A Modern Magnetic Implant for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganz, Robert A

    2017-09-01

    A magnetic implant for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) was Food and Drug Administration-approved in 2012 and has been extensively evaluated. The device is a ring of magnets that are placed around the gastroesophageal junction, augmenting the native lower esophageal sphincter and preventing reflux yet preserving lower esophageal sphincter physiologic function and allowing belching and vomiting. Magnetic force is advantageous, being permanent and precise, and forces between magnets decrease with esophageal displacement. Multiple patient cohorts have been studied using the magnetic device, and trials establish consistent, long-term improvement in pH data, GERD symptom scores, and proton-pump inhibitor use. A 5-year Food and Drug Administration trial demonstrated that most patients achieved normal pH scores, 85% stopped proton-pump inhibitors, and GERD health-related quality of life symptom scores improved from 27 to 4 at 5 years. Seven studies have compared magnetic augmentation with laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication and demonstrated that the magnetic device achieved comparable efficacy with regard to proton-pump inhibitor cessation, GERD symptom score improvement, and heartburn and regurgitation scores. However, to date there have been no randomized, controlled trials comparing the 2 techniques, and the study cohorts are not necessarily comparable regarding hiatal hernia size, severity of reflux, body mass index scores, or esophagitis scores. Dysphagia incidence was similar in both groups. Reoperation rates and safety profiles were also comparable, but the magnetic device demonstrated significant beneficial differences in allowing belching and vomiting. The magnetic device is safe, with the main adverse event being dysphagia with an approximate 3%-5% chronic incidence. Device removals in clinical trials have been between 0% and 7% and were uneventful. There have been no erosions, perforations, or infections in FDA clinical trials

  12. miR156a Mimic Represses the Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition of Human Nasopharyngeal Cancer Cells by Targeting Junctional Adhesion Molecule A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunhong Tian

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs have been documented as having an important role in the development of cancer. Broccoli is very popular in large groups of the population and has anticancer properties. Junctional adhesion molecule A (JAMA is preferentially concentrated at tight junctions and influences cell morphology and migration. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT is a developmental program associated with cancer progression and metastasis. In this study we aimed to investigate the role of miRNAs from broccoli in human nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC. We demonstrated that a total of 84 conserved miRNAs and 184 putative novel miRNAs were found in broccoli by sequencing technology. Among these, miR156a was expressed the most. In addition, synthetic miR156a mimic inhibited the EMT of NPC cells in vitro. Furthermore, it was confirmed that JAMA was the target of miR156a mimic as validated by 3' UTR luciferase reporter assays and western blotting. Knockdown of JAMA was consistent with the effects of miR156a mimic on the EMT of NPC, and the up-regulation of JAMA could partially restore EMT repressed by miR156a mimic. In conclusion, these results indicate that the miR156a mimic inhibits the EMT of NPC cells by targeting the 3' UTR of JAMA. These miRNA profiles of broccoli provide a fundamental basis for further research. Moreover, the discovery of miR156a may have clinical implications for the treatment of patients with NPC.

  13. Gastroesophageal reflux in relation to adenocarcinomas of the esophagus: a pooled analysis from the Barrett's and Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Consortium (BEACON.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael B Cook

    Full Text Available Previous studies have evidenced an association between gastroesophageal reflux and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA. It is unknown to what extent these associations vary by population, age, sex, body mass index, and cigarette smoking, or whether duration and frequency of symptoms interact in predicting risk. The Barrett's and Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Consortium (BEACON allowed an in-depth assessment of these issues.Detailed information on heartburn and regurgitation symptoms and covariates were available from five BEACON case-control studies of EA and esophagogastric junction adenocarcinoma (EGJA. We conducted single-study multivariable logistic regressions followed by random-effects meta-analysis. Stratified analyses, meta-regressions, and sensitivity analyses were also conducted.Five studies provided 1,128 EA cases, 1,229 EGJA cases, and 4,057 controls for analysis. All summary estimates indicated positive, significant associations between heartburn/regurgitation symptoms and EA. Increasing heartburn duration was associated with increasing EA risk; odds ratios were 2.80, 3.85, and 6.24 for symptom durations of <10 years, 10 to <20 years, and ≥20 years. Associations with EGJA were slighter weaker, but still statistically significant for those with the highest exposure. Both frequency and duration of heartburn/regurgitation symptoms were independently associated with higher risk. We observed similar strengths of associations when stratified by age, sex, cigarette smoking, and body mass index.This analysis indicates that the association between heartburn/regurgitation symptoms and EA is strong, increases with increased duration and/or frequency, and is consistent across major risk factors. Weaker associations for EGJA suggest that this cancer site has a dissimilar pathogenesis or represents a mixed population of patients.

  14. Poorly Differentiated Medullary Phenotype Predicts Poor Survival in Early Lymph Node-Negative Gastro-Esophageal Adenocarcinomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Treese

    Full Text Available 5-year survival rate in patients with early adenocarcinoma of the gastro-esophageal junction or stomach (AGE/S in Caucasian patients is reported to be 60-80%. We aimed to identify prognostic markers for patients with UICC-I without lymph-node involvement (N0.Clinical data and tissue specimen from patients with AGE/S stage UICC-I-N0, treated by surgery only, were collected retrospectively. Tumor size, lymphatic vessel or vein invasion, grading, classification systems (WHO, Lauren, Ming, expression of BAX, BCL-2, CDX2, Cyclin E, E-cadherin, Ki-67, TP53, TP21, SHH, Survivin, HIF1A, TROP2 and mismatch repair deficiency were analyzed using tissue microarrays and correlated with overall and tumor related survival.129 patients (48 female with a mean follow-up of 129.1 months were identified. 5-year overall survival was 83.9%, 5-year tumor related survival was 95.1%. Poorly differentiated medullary cancer subtypes (p<0.001 and positive vein invasion (p<0.001 were identified as risk factors for decreased overall-and tumor related survival. Ki-67 (p = 0.012 and TP53 mutation (p = 0.044 were the only immunohistochemical markers associated with worse overall survival but did not reach significance for decreased tumor related survival.In the presented study patients with AGE/S in stage UICC-I-N0 had a better prognosis as previously reported for Caucasian patients. Poorly differentiated medullary subtype was associated with reduced survival and should be considered when studying prognosis in these patients.

  15. E3B1/ABI-1 Isoforms Are Down-Regulated in Cancers of Human Gastrointestinal Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafia A. Baba

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The expression of E3B1/ABI-1 protein and its role in cancer progression and prognosis are largely unknown in the majority of solid tumors. In this study, we examined the expression pattern of E3B1/ABI-1 protein in histologically confirmed cases of esophageal (squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma, gastro-esophageal junction, colorectal cancers and corresponding normal tissues freshly resected from a cohort of 135 patients, by Western Blotting and Immunofluorescence Staining. The protein is present in its phosphorylated form in cells and tissues. Depending on the extent of phosphorylation it is either present in hyper-phosphorylated (M. Wt. 72 kDa form or in hypo-phosphorylated form (M. Wt. 68 kDa and 65 kDa. A thorough analysis revealed that expression of E3B1/ABI-1 protein is significantly decreased in esophageal, gastro-esophageal junction and colorectal carcinomas irrespective of age, gender, dietary and smoking habits of the patients. The decrease in expression of E3B1/ABI-1 was consistently observed for all the three isoforms. However, the decrease in the expression of isoforms varied with different forms of cancers. Down-regulation of E3B1/ABI-1 expression in human carcinomas may play a critical role in tumor progression and in determining disease prognosis.

  16. [Preoperative workup to assess indication for laparoscopic treatment in gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Holanda, S; Urdiales, G L; Fernández, J A; España, L; Rodríguez-Rubio, J; Martínez, M D; Fernández, F; Tojo, S; Fernández-Muñiz, P; Calleja, M; Valverde, D

    2008-07-01

    antireflux surgery performed by an experienced surgeon is a maintenance option for patients with well-documented gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Well-documented GERD is difficult to find, as GERD is a multifactorial disease in which the gastroesophageal junction, with its special anatomical and functional components, is important. In order to examine patient preoperative workups, and their indication for surgical treatment in GERD, we retrospectively studied patients who underwent a laparoscopic antireflux procedure. preoperative workups in patients from our health care area who underwent a laparoscopic antireflux procedure from December 1997 to February 2007 were retrospectively analyzed. Data related to epidemiological findings, symptoms, morphologic and functional evaluation, medical therapy, and indication for surgical treatment were recorded and statistically analyzed by means of a bivariate test. Differences were significant when the p value was equal to or less than 0.05. 100 patients (50 % female, 51.31 +/- 13.53 years of age) underwent a laparoscopic antireflux surgery after 56.47 +/- 61.33 months with symptoms. Ninety-five percent of patients had an anatomical abnormality. The pH monitoring test diagnosed three quarters of cases. The most frequent indication for GERD treatment was persistent or recurrent esophagitis despite adequate medical treatment (52 cases). based on our preoperative workup, as described, 100 percent of subjects were well documented and diagnosed with GERD (both non-erosive reflux disease and erosive reflux disease), and their indication for laparoscopic treatment was retrospectively assessed in 94% of cases.

  17. Evaluating outcomes of endoscopic full-thickness plication for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) with impedance monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Renteln, Daniel; Schmidt, Arthur; Riecken, Bettina; Caca, Karel

    2010-05-01

    Endoscopic full-thickness plication allows transmural suturing at the gastroesophageal junction to recreate the antireflux barrier. Multichannel intraluminal impedance monitoring (MII) can be used to detect nonacid or weakly acidic reflux, acidic swallows, and esophageal clearance time. This study used MII to evaluate the outcome of endoscopic full-thickness plication. In this study, 12 subsequent patients requiring maintenance proton pump inhibitor therapy underwent endoscopic full-thickness plication for treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease. With patients off medication, MII was performed before and 6-months after endoscopic full-thickness plication. The total median number of reflux episodes was significantly reduced from 105 to 64 (p = 0.016). The median number of acid reflux episodes decreased from 73 to 43 (p = 0.016). Nonacid reflux episodes decreased from 23 to 21 (p = 0.306). The median bolus clearance time was 12 s before treatment and 11 s at 6 months (p = 0.798). The median acid exposure time was reduced from 6.8% to 3.4% (p = 0.008), and the DeMeester scores were reduced from 19 to 12 (p = 0.008). Endoscopic full-thickness plication significantly reduced total reflux episodes, acid reflux episodes, and total reflux exposure time. The DeMeester scores and total acid exposure time for the distal esophagus were significantly improved. No significant changes in nonacid reflux episodes and median bolus clearance time were encountered.

  18. Disruption of endothelial adherens junction by invasive breast cancer cells is mediated by reactive oxygen species and is attenuated by AHCC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haidari, Mehran; Zhang, Wei; Wakame, Koji

    2013-12-18

    The effect of antioxidants on treatment of cancer is still controversial. Previously, we demonstrated that interaction of breast cancer cells with endothelial cells leads to tyrosine phosphorylation of VE-cadherin and disruption of endothelial adherens junction (EAJ). The molecular mechanism underlying the anti-metastatic effects of mushroom-derived active hexode correlated compound (AHCC) remains elusive. Several cellular and biochemical techniques were used to determine the contribution of oxidative stress in the disruption of EAJ and to test this hypothesis that AHCC inhibits the breast cancer cell-induced disruption of EAJ. Interaction of breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 cells) with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) leads to an increase in generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Treatment of HUVECs with H2O2 or phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) led to tyrosine phosphorylation of VE-cadherin, dissociation of β-catenin from VE-cadherin complex and increased transendothelial migration (TEM) of MDA-MB-231 cells. Induction of VE-cadherin tyrosine phosphorylation by PMA or by interaction of MDA-MB-231 cells with HUVECs was mediated by HRas and protein kinase C-α signaling pathways. Disruption of EAJ and phosphorylation of VE-cadherin induced by interaction of MDA-MB-231 cells with HUVECs were attenuated when HUVECs were pretreated with an antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine (NAC) or AHCC. AHCC inhibited TEM of MDA-MB-231 cells and generation of ROS induced by interaction of MDA-MB-231 cells with HUVECs. Our studies suggest that ROS contributes to disruption of EAJ induced by interaction of MDA-MB-231 cells with HUVECs and AHCC attenuates this alteration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. CBT-501 Study for Select Advanced or Relapsed/Recurrent Solid Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-07

    Solid Tumor; Advanced Cancer; ColoRectal Cancer; Endometrial Cancer; Gastric Cancer; Hepatocellular Cancer; Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer; Mesothelioma; Ovarian Cancer; Renal Cancer; Nasopharyngeal Cancer; Esophageal Cancer; Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma

  20. Antiproliferative Action of Conjugated Linoleic Acid on Human MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells Mediated by Enhancement of Gap Junctional Intercellular Communication through Inactivation of NF-κB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Abdur Rakib

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The major conjugated linoleic acid (CLA isomers, c9,t11-CLA and t10,c12-CLA, have anticancer effects; however, the exact mechanisms underlying these effects are unknown. Evidence suggests that reversal of reduced gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC in cancer cells inhibits cell growth and induces cell death. Hence, we determined that CLA isomers enhance GJIC in human MCF-7 breast cancer cells and investigated the underlying molecular mechanisms. The CLA isomers significantly enhanced GJIC of MCF-7 cells at 40 μM concentration, whereas CLA inhibited cell growth and induced caspase-dependent apoptosis. CLA increased connexin43 (Cx43 expression both at the transcriptional and translational levels. CLA inhibited nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB activity and enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS generation. No significant difference was observed in the efficacy of c9,t11-CLA and t10,c12-CLA. These results suggest that the anticancer effect of CLA is associated with upregulation of GJIC mediated by enhanced Cx43 expression through inactivation of NF-κB and generation of ROS in MCF-7 cells.

  1. Multimodality therapy of local regional esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsen, David P

    2005-12-01

    Recent trials regarding the use of multimodality therapy for patients with cancers of the esophagus and gastroesophageal junction have not conclusively shown benefit. Regimens containing cisplatin and fluorouracil administered preoperatively appear to be tolerable and do not increase operative morbidity or mortality when compared with surgery alone. Yet clinical trials have not clearly shown that such regimens improve outcome as measured by survival. Likewise, trials of postoperative chemoradiation have not reported a significant improvement in median or overall survival. The reasons for the lack of clinical benefit from multimodality therapy are not completely understood, but improvements in systemic therapy will probably be necessary before disease-free or overall survival improves substantially. Some new single agents such as the taxanes (docetaxel or paclitaxel) and the camptothecan analog irinotecan have shown modest activity for palliative therapy.

  2. Neuromuscular junction disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschuuren, Jan; Strijbos, Ellen; Vincent, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Diseases of the neuromuscular junction comprise a wide range of disorders. Antibodies, genetic mutations, specific drugs or toxins interfere with the number or function of one of the essential proteins that control signaling between the presynaptic nerve ending and the postsynaptic muscle membrane. Acquired autoimmune disorders of the neuromuscular junction are the most common and are described here. In myasthenia gravis, antibodies to acetylcholine receptors or to proteins involved in receptor clustering, particularly muscle-specific kinase, cause direct loss of acetylcholine receptors or interfere with the agrin-induced acetylcholine receptor clustering necessary for efficient neurotransmission. In the Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS), loss of the presynaptic voltage-gated calcium channels results in reduced release of the acetylcholine transmitter. The conditions are generally recognizable clinically and the diagnosis confirmed by serologic testing and electromyography. Screening for thymomas in myasthenia or small cell cancer in LEMS is important. Fortunately, a wide range of symptomatic treatments, immunosuppressive drugs, or other immunomodulating therapies is available. Future research is directed to understanding the pathogenesis, discovering new antigens, and trying to develop disease-specific treatments. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and Sleep Quality in a Chinese Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Jyh Chen

    2009-01-01

    Conclusion: The present study highlights the adverse effect of gastroesophageal reflux on sleep, even in the absence of reflux symptoms. This finding has therapeutic implications in patients with silent erosive disease, and future trials are warranted.

  4. Sleeve Gastrectomy and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Laffin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bariatric surgery, when combined with lifestyle and medical interventions, is a common and successful treatment modality in the obese patient. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy is one such procedure that has increased in popularity as a definitive bariatric operation. Although laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy has been shown to be effective in producing weight loss and improving type 2 diabetes mellitus, its effect on gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD has been inconsistent. This paper aims to summarize the available literature regarding GERD prevalence following laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy, 8 studies demonstrate increased GERD prevalence, and 5 demonstrate decreased GERD prevalence following laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy. The relationship between GERD and SG is complex and no clear relationship exists. The anatomic and physiologic changes caused by laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy are discussed in the context of these inconsistent results.

  5. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy and gastroesophageal reflux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenard, Fabien; Iannelli, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is the only effective procedure that provides long-term sustained weight loss. Sleeve gastrectomy (SG) has emerged over the last few years to be an ideal bariatric procedure because it has several advantages compared to more complex bariatric procedures, including avoiding an intestinal bypass. However, several published follow-up studies report an increased rate of gastroesophageal reflux (GERD) after a SG. GERD is described as either de novo or as being caused by aggravation of preexisting symptoms. However, the literature on this topic is ambivalent despite the potentially increased rate of GERDs that may occur after this common bariatric procedure. This article reviews the mechanisms responsible for GERD in obese subjects as well as the results after a SG with respect to GERD. Future directions for clinical research are discussed along with the current surgical options for morbidly obese patients with GERD and undergoing bariatric surgery. PMID:26420961

  6. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy and gastroesophageal reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenard, Fabien; Iannelli, Antonio

    2015-09-28

    Bariatric surgery is the only effective procedure that provides long-term sustained weight loss. Sleeve gastrectomy (SG) has emerged over the last few years to be an ideal bariatric procedure because it has several advantages compared to more complex bariatric procedures, including avoiding an intestinal bypass. However, several published follow-up studies report an increased rate of gastroesophageal reflux (GERD) after a SG. GERD is described as either de novo or as being caused by aggravation of preexisting symptoms. However, the literature on this topic is ambivalent despite the potentially increased rate of GERDs that may occur after this common bariatric procedure. This article reviews the mechanisms responsible for GERD in obese subjects as well as the results after a SG with respect to GERD. Future directions for clinical research are discussed along with the current surgical options for morbidly obese patients with GERD and undergoing bariatric surgery.

  7. Serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma localizes to the tubal-peritoneal junction: a pivotal clue to the site of origin of extrauterine high-grade serous carcinoma (ovarian cancer).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidman, Jeffrey D

    2015-03-01

    Recent data suggest that intraepithelial carcinoma of the fallopian tube [serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma (STIC)] is the precursor of high-grade extrauterine serous carcinoma. A more specific location for the origin of this lesion is suggested by the recently described junction between the fallopian tubal epithelium and the peritoneum [tubal-peritoneal junction (TPJ)]. Fallopian tubes from 202 patients with advanced-stage high-grade extrauterine serous carcinoma or carcinosarcoma were evaluated histologically as were 124 prophylactic salpingo-oophorectomy specimens. These included 54 patients with BRCA or other high-risk mutation or a family history of BRCA mutation and 70 with a personal or family history of breast carcinoma. STIC was found in 81 of 202 patients with serous carcinoma (40.1%). STIC was present in 73 of 141 (52%) cases in which the fimbriae were present and in 62 of 100 (62%) cases in which the TPJ was present (P not significant). In comparison with these groups, when fimbriae and TPJ were absent, STIC was found in 8 of 61 (13%) cases (PSTIC. The mean size of STIC was 1.7 mm. In 32 cases (39.5%), the lesion was flat and in 49 (60.5%), papillary. The mean size of flat STICs was 0.8 mm as compared with 2.3 mm for papillary STICs (P=0.00005). STIC was identified in the same tissue fragment as the junction in 48 cases. The mean distance of STIC to the junction was 1.8 mm. In 11 cases, STIC was flanked by peritoneal mesothelium on one side and tubal epithelium on the opposite side. In 51 patients, the mean distance of invasive carcinoma from the TPJ was 1.8 mm. This distance was 1.9 mm when STIC was present (37 cases) in comparison with 1.5 mm when STIC was absent (14 cases) (P not significant). In 27 of 42 cases (64%), STIC was contiguous with invasive carcinoma. Lamina propria invasion was present in 71% of cases in which STIC was present as compared with 26% of cases in which STIC was absent (PSTIC was present as compared with 26% of cases in

  8. Recommendations for clinical staging (cTNM) of cancer of the esophagus and esophagogastric junction for the 8th edition AJCC/UICC staging manuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Thomas W; Ishwaran, Hemant; Blackstone, Eugene H; Hofstetter, Wayne L; Kelsen, David P; Apperson-Hansen, Carolyn

    2016-11-01

    We report analytic and consensus processes that produced recommendations for clinical stage groups (cTNM) of esophageal and esophagogastric junction cancer for the AJCC/UICC cancer staging manuals, 8th edition. The Worldwide Esophageal Cancer Collaboration (WECC) provided data on 22,123 clinically staged patients with epithelial esophageal cancers. Risk-adjusted survival for each patient was developed using random survival forest analysis from which (1) data-driven clinical stage groups were identified wherein survival decreased monotonically and was distinctive between and homogeneous within groups and (2) data-driven anatomic clinical stage groups based only on cTNM. The AJCC Upper GI Task Force, by smoothing, simplifying, expanding, and assessing clinical applicability, produced (3) consensus clinical stage groups. Compared with pTNM, cTNM survival was "pinched," with poorer survival for early cStage groups and better survival for advanced ones. Histologic grade was distinctive for data-driven grouping of cT2N0M0 squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and cT1-2N0M0 adenocarcinoma, but consensus removed it. Grouping was different by histopathologic cell type. For SCC, cN0-1 was distinctive for cT3 but not cT1-2, and consensus removed cT4 subclassification and added subgroups 0, IVA, and IVB. For adenocarcinoma, N0-1 was distinctive for cT1-2 but not cT3-4a, cStage II subgrouping was necessary (T1N1M0 [IIA] and T2N0M0 [IIB]), advanced cancers cT3-4aN0-1M0 plus cT2N1M0 comprised cStage III, and consensus added subgroups 0, IVA, and IVB. Treatment decisions require accurate cStage, which differs from pStage. Understaging and overstaging are problematic, and additional factors, such as grade, may facilitate treatment decisions and prognostication until clinical staging techniques are uniformly applied and improved. © 2016 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  9. The RENAISSANCE (AIO-FLOT5) trial: effect of chemotherapy alone vs. chemotherapy followed by surgical resection on survival and quality of life in patients with limited-metastatic adenocarcinoma of the stomach or esophagogastric junction - a phase III trial of the German AIO/CAO-V/CAOGI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Batran, Salah-Eddin; Goetze, Thorsten O; Mueller, Daniel W; Vogel, Arndt; Winkler, Michael; Lorenzen, Sylvie; Novotny, Alexander; Pauligk, Claudia; Homann, Nils; Jungbluth, Thomas; Reissfelder, Christoph; Caca, Karel; Retter, Steffen; Horndasch, Eva; Gumpp, Julia; Bolling, Claus; Fuchs, Karl-Hermann; Blau, Wolfgang; Padberg, Winfried; Pohl, Michael; Wunsch, Andreas; Michl, Patrick; Mannes, Frank; Schwarzbach, Matthias; Schmalenberg, Harald; Hohaus, Michael; Scholz, Christian; Benckert, Christoph; Knorrenschild, Jorge Riera; Kanngießer, Veit; Zander, Thomas; Alakus, Hakan; Hofheinz, Ralf-Dieter; Roedel, Claus; Shah, Manish A; Sasako, Mitsuru; Lorenz, Dietmar; Izbicki, Jakob; Bechstein, Wolf O; Lang, Hauke; Moenig, Stefan P

    2017-12-28

    Historical data indicate that surgical resection may benefit select patients with metastatic gastric and gastroesophageal junction cancer. However, randomized clinical trials are lacking. The current RENAISSANCE trial addresses the potential benefits of surgical intervention in gastric and gastroesophageal junction cancer with limited metastases. This is a prospective, multicenter, randomized, investigator-initiated phase III trial. Previously untreated patients with limited metastatic stage (retroperitoneal lymph node metastases only or a maximum of one incurable organ site that is potentially resectable or locally controllable with or without retroperitoneal lymph nodes) receive 4 cycles of FLOT chemotherapy alone or with trastuzumab if Her2+. Patients without disease progression after 4 cycles are randomized 1:1 to receive additional chemotherapy cycles or surgical resection of primary and metastases followed by subsequent chemotherapy. 271 patients are to be allocated to the trial, of which at least 176 patients will proceed to randomization. The primary endpoint is overall survival; main secondary endpoints are quality of life assessed by EORTC-QLQ-C30 questionnaire, progression free survival and surgical morbidity and mortality. Recruitment has already started; currently (Feb 2017) 22 patients have been enrolled. If the RENAISSANCE concept proves to be effective, this could potentially lead to a new standard of therapy. On the contrary, if the outcome is negative, patients with gastric or GEJ cancer and metastases will no longer be considered candidates for surgical intervention. The article reports of a health care intervention on human participants and is registered on October 12, 2015 under ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02578368 ; EudraCT: 2014-002665-30.

  10. High-Throughput Flow Cytometry Screening Reveals a Role for Junctional Adhesion Molecule A as a Cancer Stem Cell Maintenance Factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lathia, Justin D; Li, Meizhang; Sinyuk, Maksim

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells reside in niches that regulate the balance between self-renewal and differentiation. The identity of a stem cell is linked with the ability to interact with its niche through adhesion mechanisms. To identify targets that disrupt cancer stem cell (CSC) adhesion, we performed a flow...... cytometry screen on patient-derived glioblastoma (GBM) cells and identified junctional adhesion molecule A (JAM-A) as a CSC adhesion mechanism essential for self-renewal and tumor growth. JAM-A was dispensable for normal neural stem/progenitor cell (NPC) function, and JAM-A expression was reduced in normal...... brain versus GBM. Targeting JAM-A compromised the self-renewal of CSCs. JAM-A expression negatively correlated to GBM patient prognosis. Our results demonstrate that GBM-targeting strategies can be identified through screening adhesion receptors and JAM-A represents a mechanism for niche-driven CSC...

  11. Markers of sarcopenia quantified by computed tomography predict adverse long-term outcome in patients with resected oesophageal or gastro-oesophageal junction cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamandl, Dietmar; Baltzer, Pascal A.; Ba-Ssalamah, Ahmed [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Comprehensive Cancer Center GET-Unit, Vienna (Austria); Paireder, Matthias; Asari, Reza; Schoppmann, Sebastian F. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Surgery, Upper-GI-Service, Comprehensive Cancer Center GET-Unit, Vienna (Austria)

    2016-05-15

    To assess the impact of sarcopenia and alterations in body composition parameters (BCPs) on survival after surgery for oesophageal and gastro-oesophageal junction cancer (OC). 200 consecutive patients who underwent resection for OC between 2006 and 2013 were selected. Preoperative CTs were used to assess markers of sarcopenia and body composition (total muscle area [TMA], fat-free mass index [FFMi], fat mass index [FMi], subcutaneous, visceral and retrorenal fat [RRF], muscle attenuation). Cox regression was used to assess the primary outcome parameter of overall survival (OS) after surgery. 130 patients (65 %) had sarcopenia based on preoperative CT examinations. Sarcopenic patients showed impaired survival compared to non-sarcopenic individuals (hazard ratio [HR] 1.87, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 1.15-3.03, p = 0.011). Furthermore, low skeletal muscle attenuation (HR 1.91, 95 % CI 1.12-3.28, p = 0.019) and increased FMi (HR 3.47, 95 % CI 1.27-9.50, p = 0.016) were associated with impaired outcome. In the multivariate analysis, including a composite score (CSS) of those three parameters and clinical variables, only CSS, T-stage and surgical resection margin remained significant predictors of OS. Patients who show signs of sarcopenia and alterations in BCPs on preoperative CT images have impaired long-term outcome after surgery for OC. (orig.)

  12. [6]-Gingerol Prevents Disassembly of Cell Junctions and Activities of MMPs in Invasive Human Pancreas Cancer Cells through ERK/NF-κB/Snail Signal Transduction Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Ok Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To study the effects of [6]-gingerol, a ginger phytochemical, on tight junction (TJ molecules, we investigated TJ tightening and signal transduction pathways in human pancreatic duct cell-derived cancer cell line PANC-1. The following methods were utilized: MTT assay to determine cytotoxicity; zymography to examine matrix metalloproteinase (MMP activities; transepithelial electrical resistance (TER and paracellular flux for TJ measurement; RT-PCR and immunoblotting for proteins related to TJ and invasion; and EMSA for NF-κB activity in PANC-1 cells. Results revealed that TER significantly increased and claudin 4 and MMP-9 decreased compared to those of the control. TJ protein levels, including zonula occludens (ZO- 1, occludin, and E-cadherin, increased in [6]-gingerol-treated cells, which correlated with a decrease in paracellular flux and MMP activity. Furthermore, NF-κB/Snail nuclear translocation was suppressed via downregulation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK pathway in response to [6]-gingerol treatment. Moreover, treatment with U0126, an ERK inhibitor, completely blocked NF-κB activity. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that [6]-gingerol regulates TJ-related proteins and suppresses invasion and metastasis through NF-κB/Snail inhibition via inhibition of the ERK pathway. Therefore, [6]-gingerol may suppress the invasive activity of PANC-1 cells.

  13. 21-Benzylidene Digoxin: A Proapoptotic Cardenolide of Cancer Cells That Up-Regulates Na,K-ATPase and Epithelial Tight Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Sayonarah C.; Pessoa, Marco T. C.; Neves, Luiza D. R.; Alves, Silmara L. G.; Silva, Luciana M.; Santos, Herica L.; Oliveira, Soraya M. F.; Taranto, Alex G.; Comar, Moacyr; Gomes, Isabella V.; Santos, Fabio V.; Paixão, Natasha; Quintas, Luis E. M.; Noël, François; Pereira, Antonio F.; Tessis, Ana C. S. C.; Gomes, Natalia L. S.; Moreira, Otacilio C.; Rincon-Heredia, Ruth; Varotti, Fernando P.; Blanco, Gustavo; Villar, Jose A. F. P.; Contreras, Rubén G.; Barbosa, Leandro A.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiotonic steroids are used to treat heart failure and arrhythmia and have promising anticancer effects. The prototypic cardiotonic steroid ouabain may also be a hormone that modulates epithelial cell adhesion. Cardiotonic steroids consist of a steroid nucleus and a lactone ring, and their biological effects depend on the binding to their receptor, Na,K-ATPase, through which, they inhibit Na+ and K+ ion transport and activate of several intracellular signaling pathways. In this study, we added a styrene group to the lactone ring of the cardiotonic steroid digoxin, to obtain 21-benzylidene digoxin (21-BD), and investigated the effects of this synthetic cardiotonic steroid in different cell models. Molecular modeling indicates that 21-BD binds to its target Na,K-ATPase with low affinity, adopting a different pharmacophoric conformation when bound to its receptor than digoxin. Accordingly, 21-DB, at relatively high µM amounts inhibits the activity of Na,K-ATPase α1, but not α2 and α3 isoforms. In addition, 21-BD targets other proteins outside the Na,K-ATPase, inhibiting the multidrug exporter Pdr5p. When used on whole cells at low µM concentrations, 21-BD produces several effects, including: 1) up-regulation of Na,K-ATPase expression and activity in HeLa and RKO cancer cells, which is not found for digoxin, 2) cell specific changes in cell viability, reducing it in HeLa and RKO cancer cells, but increasing it in normal epithelial MDCK cells, which is different from the response to digoxin, and 3) changes in cell-cell interaction, altering the molecular composition of tight junctions and elevating transepithelial electrical resistance of MDCK monolayers, an effect previously found for ouabain. These results indicate that modification of the lactone ring of digoxin provides new properties to the compound, and shows that the structural change introduced could be used for the design of cardiotonic steroid with novel functions. PMID:25290152

  14. Recommendations for Neoadjuvant Pathologic Staging (ypTNM) of Cancer of the Esophagus and Esophagogastric Junction for the 8th Edition AJCC/UICC Staging Manuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Thomas W.; Ishwaran, Hemant; Kelsen, David P.; Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Apperson-Hansen, Carolyn; Blackstone, Eugene H.

    2016-01-01

    We report analytic and consensus processes that produced recommendations for neoadjuvant pathologic stage groups (ypTNM) of esophageal and esophagogastric junction cancer for AJCC/UICC cancer staging manuals, 8th edition. The Worldwide Esophageal Cancer Collaboration (WECC) provided data for 22,654 patients with epithelial esophageal cancers; 7,773 had pathologic assessment after neoadjuvant therapy. Risk-adjusted survival for each patient was developed. Random Forest analysis identified data-driven neoadjuvant pathologic stage groups wherein survival decreased monotonically with increasing group, was distinctive between groups, and homogeneous within groups. An additional analysis produced data-driven anatomic neoadjuvant pathologic stage groups based only on ypT, ypN, and ypM categories. The AJCC Upper GI Task Force, by smoothing, simplifying, expanding, and assessing clinical applicability, produced consensus neoadjuvant pathologic stage groups. Grade and location were much less discriminating for stage grouping ypTNM than pTNM. Data-driven stage grouping without grade and location produced nearly identical groups for squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. However, ypTNM groups and their associated survival differed from pTNM. The need for consensus process was minimal. The consensus groups, identical for both cell types were as follows: ypStage I comprised ypT0-2N0M0; ypStage II ypT3N0M0; ypStage IIIA ypT0-2N1M0; ypStage IIIB ypT3N1M0, ypT0-3N2, and ypT4aN0M0; ypStage IVA ypT4aN1-2, ypT4bN0-2, and ypTanyN3M0; and ypStage IVB ypTanyNanyM1. Absence of equivalent pathologic (pTNM) categories for the peculiar neoadjuvant pathologic categories ypTisN0-3M0 and ypT0N0-3M0, dissimilar stage group compositions, and markedly different early- and intermediate-stage survival necessitated a unified, unique set of stage grouping for patients of either cell type who receive neoadjuvant therapy. PMID:27905170

  15. Recommendations for neoadjuvant pathologic staging (ypTNM) of cancer of the esophagus and esophagogastric junction for the 8th edition AJCC/UICC staging manuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Thomas W; Ishwaran, Hemant; Kelsen, David P; Hofstetter, Wayne L; Apperson-Hansen, Carolyn; Blackstone, Eugene H

    2016-11-01

    We report analytic and consensus processes that produced recommendations for neoadjuvant pathologic stage groups (ypTNM) of esophageal and esophagogastric junction cancer for the AJCC/UICC cancer staging manuals, 8th edition. The Worldwide Esophageal Cancer Collaboration provided data for 22,654 patients with epithelial esophageal cancers; 7,773 had pathologic assessment after neoadjuvant therapy. Risk-adjusted survival for each patient was developed. Random forest analysis identified data-driven neoadjuvant pathologic stage groups wherein survival decreased monotonically with increasing group, was distinctive between groups, and homogeneous within groups. An additional analysis produced data-driven anatomic neoadjuvant pathologic stage groups based only on ypT, ypN, and ypM categories. The AJCC Upper GI Task Force, by smoothing, simplifying, expanding, and assessing clinical applicability, produced consensus neoadjuvant pathologic stage groups. Grade and location were much less discriminating for stage grouping ypTNM than pTNM. Data-driven stage grouping without grade and location produced nearly identical groups for squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. However, ypTNM groups and their associated survival differed from pTNM. The need for consensus process was minimal. The consensus groups, identical for both cell types were as follows: ypStage I comprised ypT0-2N0M0; ypStage II ypT3N0M0; ypStage IIIA ypT0-2N1M0; ypStage IIIB ypT3N1M0, ypT0-3N2, and ypT4aN0M0; ypStage IVA ypT4aN1-2, ypT4bN0-2, and ypTanyN3M0; and ypStage IVB ypTanyNanyM1. Absence of equivalent pathologic (pTNM) categories for the peculiar neoadjuvant pathologic categories ypTisN0-3M0 and ypT0N0-3M0, dissimilar stage group compositions, and markedly different early- and intermediate-stage survival necessitated a unified, unique set of stage grouping for patients of either cell type who receive neoadjuvant therapy. © 2016 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  16. Proton pump inhibitor-refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease: challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mermelstein J

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Joseph Mermelstein,1 Alanna Chait Mermelstein,2 Maxwell M Chait3 1Gasteroenterology and Nutrition Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA; 2Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA; 3Department of Medicine, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY, USA Abstract: A significant percentage of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD will not respond to proton pump inhibitor (PPI therapy. The causes of PPI-refractory GERD are numerous and diverse, and include adherence, persistent acid, functional disorders, nonacid reflux, and PPI bioavailability. The evaluation should start with a symptom assessment and may progress to imaging, endoscopy, and monitoring of esophageal pH, impedance, and bilirubin. There are a variety of pharmacologic and procedural interventions that should be selected based on the underlying mechanism of PPI failure. Pharmacologic treatments can include antacids, prokinetics, alginates, bile acid binders, reflux inhibitors, and antidepressants. Procedural options include laparoscopic fundoplication and LINX as well as endoscopic procedures, such as transoral incisionless fundoplication and Stretta. Several alternative and complementary treatments of possible benefit also exist. Keywords: PPI failure, resistant GERD, acid-related diseases, gastroesophageal reflux disease, acid reflux, proton pump inhibitors

  17. Gastric cancer: current and evolving treatment landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Weijing; Yan, Li

    2016-08-31

    Gastric (including gastroesophageal junction) cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related death in the world. In China, an estimated 420,000 patients were diagnosed with gastric cancer in 2011, ranking this malignancy the second most prevalent cancer type and resulting in near 300,000 deaths. The treatment landscape of gastric cancer has evolved in recent years. Although systemic chemotherapy is still the mainstay treatment of metastatic disease, the introduction of agents targeting human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 and vascular endothelial growth factor/vascular endothelia growth factor receptor has brought this disease into the molecular and personalized medicine era. The preliminary yet encouraging clinical efficacy observed with immune checkpoint inhibitors, e.g., anti-programmed cell death protein 1/programmed death-ligand 1, will further shape the treatment landscape for gastric cancer. Molecular characterization of patients will play a critical role in developing new agents, as well as in implementing new treatment options for this disease.

  18. Status and prognosis of lymph node metastasis in patients with cardia cancer – A systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okholm, Cecilie; Svendsen, Lars Bo; Achiam, Michael P

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Adenocarcinoma of the gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) has a poor prognosis and survival rates significantly decreases if lymph node metastasis is present. An extensive lymphadenectomy may increase chances of cure, but may also lead to further postoperative morbidity and mortality....... Therefore, the optimal treatment of cardia cancer remains controversial. A systematic review of English publications dealing with adenocarcinoma of the cardia was conducted to elucidate patterns of nodal spread and prognostic implications. METHODS: A systematic literature search based on PRISMA guidelines...... identifying relevant studies describing lymph node metastasis and the associated prognosis. Lymph node stations were classified according to the Japanese Gastric Cancer Association guidelines. RESULTS: The highest incidence of metastasis is seen in the nearest regional lymph nodes, station no. 1...

  19. The diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Mouzan, Mohammad I.; Abdullah, Asaad M.

    2002-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a common disorder affecting children worldwide. The objective of this study is to report our experience on the accuracy of tests used for the diagnosis ofgastroesophageal reflux disease with emphasis on the advantages and disadvantages of each of them. This study took place in the Pediatric Gastroenterology Division, Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine and King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, during the period of 1994 through to 1999. Results of barium meal, 24-hour esophageal pH monitoring, endoscopy, and gastrointestinal scintigraphy are analyzed and compared in children with and without gastroesophageal reflux disease. One hundred and forty-four children were investigated. The diagnosis was confirmed in 85 and excluded in 59 children, who will be considered as patients without gastroesophageal reflux disease. The results of barium meal, 24 hour pH monitoring, endoscopy, and gastrointestinal scintigraphy were positive in 80%, 78%, 92%, and 70% of the patients with gastroesophageal disease. The same studies were falsely positive in 29%, 9%, 19%, and 0% of those without gastroesophageal reflux disease. Esophageal pH was the most specific diagnostic study (91%), whereas endoscopy was the most sensitive (92%) and had the best positive predictive value (95%). The results of this study are similar to reports from other parts of the world. It is stressed that all procedures have important advantages and disadvantages indicating that the selection of procedures should be individualized and based on the clinical situation. (author)

  20. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: Medical or Surgical Treatment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore Liakakos

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a common condition with increasing prevalence worldwide. The disease encompasses a broad spectrum of clinical symptoms and disorders from simple heartburn without esophagitis to erosive esophagitis with severe complications, such as esophageal strictures and intestinal metaplasia. Diagnosis is based mainly on ambulatory esophageal pH testing and endoscopy. There has been a long-standing debate about the best treatment approach for this troublesome disease. Methods and Results. Medical treatment with PPIs has an excellent efficacy in reversing the symptoms of GERD, but they should be taken for life, and long-term side effects do exist. However, patients who desire a permanent cure and have severe complications or cannot tolerate long-term treatment with PPIs are candidates for surgical treatment. Laparoscopic antireflux surgery achieves a significant symptom control, increased patient satisfaction, and complete withdrawal of antireflux medications, in the majority of patients. Conclusion. Surgical treatment should be reserved mainly for young patients seeking permanent results. However, the choice of the treatment schedule should be individualized for every patient. It is up to the patient, the physician and the surgeon to decide the best treatment option for individual cases.

  1. Gastric emptying in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Lin; Yang Xiaochuan; Kuang Anren; Li Lixia; Ouyang Qin

    2000-01-01

    Objective: The relationship between gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and gastric emptying rate was investigated. Results of endoscopy, 24-hour esophageal pH monitoring were also evaluated. Methods: 15 patients were evaluated with endoscopy, pH monitoring and radionuclide gastric emptying. The results were compared with that of 17 control subjects. Correlations of gastric emptying rate and esophagitis, 24-hour pH monitoring between GERD patients and control subjects were also analyzed. Results: Liquid gastric emptying rate of GERD patients was significantly lower than that of control subjects at 15 and 30 min (P 0.05), but there exhibited a linear correlation between 50% solid emptying time and esophagus pH total score (r=0.643, P<0.05). Conclusions: The results indicate a delayed liquid and solid gastric emptying in GERD patients. There is a linear correlation between 50% solid emptying time and esophagus pH total score. Delayed gastric emptying may be an important factor in the pathogenesis of GERD

  2. Evaluation of percutaneous transhepatic gastroesophageal varices embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Hongxiang; Chen Gensheng; Sun Huiling; Zeng Yun; Yan Zhiping

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical application of percutaneous transheaptic gastroesophgeal varices embolization (PTVE) for treatment and prevention of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with cirrhotic portal hypertension. Methods: 48 patients with cirrhotic portal hypertension and gastroesophageal varices were treated with PTVE for the prevention and control of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Results: The technical success of PTVE was 97.9% and the rate of hemostasis was 100%. During the procedure, steel coil displacement occurred in 1 case, vagus nerve reflection with blood pressure degression and heart rate decline in 4 cases. After the procedure, 1 patients developed refractory ascites and 1 patients died of abdominal bleeding. 2 cases died of hepatic failure and 2 cases occurred rehaemorrhagia in fore 6 mon. after one year follow-up; 3 cases losed follow-up and 5 cases occurred rehaemorrhagia in the late 6 mon. Conclusion: PTVE is mini-invasive and efficient in treating acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with cirrhotic portal hypertension. Increase of technical success and decreases of morbidity can be achieved on the condition of' proper maneuver. (authors)

  3. Lack of independent significance of a close (<1 mm) circumferential resection margin involvement in esophageal and junctional cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Farrell, N J; Donohoe, C L; Muldoon, C; Costelloe, J M; King, S; Ravi, N; Reynolds, J V

    2013-08-01

    For rectal cancer, an involved circumferential resection margin (CRM), defined as tumor cells within 1 mm of the CRM, is of established prognostic significance. This definition for the esophagus, however, is controversial, with the UK Royal College of Pathologists (RCP) recommending the 1 mm definition, while the College of American Pathologists (CAP) advises that only tumor cells at the cut margin (0 mm) define an incomplete (R1) resection. The aim of this study was to compare the clinical significance of both definitions in patients with pT3 tumors. CAP- and RCP-defined CRM status in patients treated by surgery only or by multimodal therapy was recorded prospectively in a comprehensive database from May 2003 to May 2011. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were generated, and factors affecting survival were assessed by univariate and multivariate analysis. A total of 157 of 340 patients had pT3 esophageal tumors, with RCP-positive CRM in 60 %, and 18 % by CAP. There were no significant differences between RCP-positive CRM and negative margins for node-positive disease, local recurrence, and survival. CAP-positive CRM was associated with positive nodes (P = 0.036) and poorer survival (P = 0.023). Multivariate analysis revealed nodal invasion to be the only independent prognostic variable (P = 0.004). A CRM margin of CRM.

  4. Gender difference in gastro-esophageal reflux diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asanuma, Kiyotaka; Iijima, Katsunori; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2016-02-07

    The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) has risen sharply in western countries over the past 4 decades. This type of cancer is considered to follow a transitional process that goes from gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) to Barrett's esophagus (BE, a metaplastic condition of the distal esophagus), a precursor lesion and ultimately adenocarcinoma. This spectrum of GERD is strongly predominant in males due to an unidentified mechanism. Several epidemiologic studies have described that the prevalence of GERD, BE and EAC in women is closely related to reproductive status, which suggests a possible association with the estrogen level. Recently, we revealed in an in vivo study that the inactivation of mast cells by the anti-inflammatory function of estrogen may account for the gender difference in the GERD spectrum. Other studies have described the contribution of female steroid hormones to the gender difference in these diseases. Estrogen is reported to modulate the metabolism of fat, and obesity is a main risk factor of GERDs. Moreover, estrogen could confer esophageal epithelial resistance to causative refluxate. These functions of estrogen might explain the approximately 20-year delay in the incidence of BE and the subsequent development of EAC in women compared to men, and this effect may be responsible for the male predominance. However, some observational studies demonstrated that hormone replacement therapy exerts controversial effects in GERD patients. Nevertheless, the estrogen-related endocrine milieu may prevent disease progression toward carcinogenesis in GERD patients. The development of innovative alternatives to conventional acid suppressors may become possible by clarifying the mechanisms of estrogen.

  5. Omeprazole for Refractory Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease during Pregnancy and Lactation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John K Marshall

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux is a common complication of pregnancy and lactation. However, the safety of many effective medical therapies, including oral proton pump inhibitors, has not been well defined. The administration of oral omeprazole to a 41-year-old female during the third trimester of pregnancy, after ranitidine and cisapride failed to control her refractory gastroesophageal reflux, is reported. No adverse fetal effects were apparent, and the patient elected to continue omeprazole therapy (20 mg/day while breastfeeding. Peak omeprazole concentrations in breast milk (58 nM, 3 h after ingestion were less than 7% of the peak serum concentration (950 nM at 4 h, indicating minimal secretion. Although omeprazole is a potentially useful therapy for refractory gastroesophageal reflux during pregnancy and lactation, further data are needed to define better its safety and efficacy.

  6. [Laparoscopic treatment of gastro-esophageal reflux by fundoplication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidraoui, Khalid; Chehab, Farid; Khaiz, Driss; Lakhloufi, Ali; Bouzidi, Abdelmjid

    2003-05-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the results of the laparoscopic fundoplication for gastroesophageal reflux disease. From January 1997 to February 2001, we performed 8 laparoscopic fundoplication. They are 5 men and 3 women with mean age of 45 [30-67 years]. The delay of apparition the symptoms varied from 6 months to 14 years. Seven patients had a heart burn. The preoperative evaluation included endoscopy, gastrointestinal contrast radiography, 24 hour pH monitoring and esophageal manometry. The surgical procedures were partial fundoplication (Toupet) in 7 cases and complete fundoplication (Nissen) in 1 case. There was no postoperative mortality. Two patients had a postoperative dysphagia. Two patients had persistent epigastric pain without gastroesophageal reflux in endoscopy and esophageal manometry. Laparoscopic fundoplication for treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease is a safe and effective procedure with satisfying results.

  7. Molecular electronic junction transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solomon, Gemma C.; Herrmann, Carmen; Ratner, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Whenasinglemolecule,oracollectionofmolecules,isplacedbetween two electrodes and voltage is applied, one has a molecular transport junction. We discuss such junctions, their properties, their description, and some of their applications. The discussion is qualitative rather than quantitative......, and focuses on mechanism, structure/function relations, regimes and mechanisms of transport, some molecular regularities, and some substantial challenges facing the field. Because there are many regimes and mechanisms in transport junctions, we will discuss time scales, geometries, and inelastic scattering...

  8. Radiological demonstration of gastroesophageal reflux. Diagnostic value of barium and bread studies compared with 24-hour pH monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aksglaede, K.; Thommesen, P.; Funch-Jensen, P.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To correlate gastroesophageal reflux (GER), demonstrated by a radiological method using food, with the reflux events, as determined by 24-h pH monitoring. Material and Methods: One hundred and seventeen patients with a median age of 47 years (86 male and 31 female) were examinated. In the supine left position, the patient consumed 360 ml of barium contrast. Fluoroscopy was performed with the patient in the supine right oblique position during mastication and swallowing a piece of rye bread with liver pate and barium. The test was positive if barium was observed ≥5 cm proximal to the gastroesophageal junction. An antimony pH-probe was placed 5 cm above the lower esophageal sphincter, previously determined by manometry. The position was controlled by radiography after positioning and before removal. The total time of esophageal pH<4 exceeding 5.0% was considered pathological. Results: The radiological method had a specificity of 100% and a sensitivity of 52% compared to 24-h pH monitoring. Conclusion: The high specificity of this radiological method justify direct therapeutic consequence of a positive test. However, a negative test still renders the problem unsolved. (orig.)

  9. Radiological demonstration of gastroesophageal reflux. Diagnostic value of barium and bread studies compared with 24-hour pH monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aksglaede, K.; Funch-Jensen, P.; Thommesen, P.

    1999-01-01

    To correlate gastroesophageal reflux (GER), demonstrated by a radiological method using food, with the reflux events, as determined by 24-h pH monitoring. One hundred and seventeen patients with a median age of 47 years (86 male and 31 female) were examined. In the supine left position, the patient consumed 360 ml of barium contrast. Fluoroscopy was performed with the patient in the supine right oblique position during mastication and swallowing a piece of rye bread with liver pate and barium. The test was positive if barium was observed >= 5 cm proximal to the gastroesophageal junction. An antimony pH-probe was placed 5 cm above the lower esophageal sphincter, previously determined by manometry. The position was controlled by radiography after positioning and before removal. The total time of esophageal pH<4 exceeding 5.0% was considered pathological. The radiological method had a specificity of 100% and a sensitivity of 52% compared to 24-h pH monitoring. The high specificity of this radiological method justify direct therapeutic consequence of a positive test. However, a negative test still renders the problem unsolved

  10. SEROSAL PATCH OF THE GASTROESOPHAGEAL JUNCTION: AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY IN DOGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MENDELSSONH PAULO

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Trinta e dois cães foram submetidos ao tamponamento seroso da junção esofagogástrica, com o objetivo de investigar experimentalmente o processo de reparação mucosa. A operação constou de cardiotomia, interessando um centímetro do esôfago e dois centímetros do estômago. Esta secção foi obliterada pelo fundo gástrico, originando uma superfície serosa elíptica, voltada para o lúmen, com três centímetros de comprimento por um centímetro de maior largura. Os animais foram divididos em quatro grupos de oito cães cada (Grupos: 1, 2, 3 e 4, sacrificados após uma, duas, quatro e oito semanas respectivamente. Os resultados foram avaliados quanto aos aspectos clínicos, pós-operatórios, e da análise macro e microscopicas dos espécimes obtidos. A evolução pós-operatória mostrou pequena morbidade, sem sinais de obstrução do trato digestivo. Ficou demonstrado à macroscopia, que a área do tamponamento exibe, na primeira semana, aspecto de lesão ulcerada, com fundo necrótico; na segunda e quarta semanas houve redução da área cruenta, até a completa cicatrização, melhor observada na oitava semana. À microscopia, a membrana serosa desapareceu precocemente, dando lugar a infiltrado inflamatório com intensa neoformação vascular, que serviu de leito para a proliferação epitelial.A neoepitelização fez-se das bordas para o centro da lesão. No esôfago, em camadas pluricelulares, completou-se em duas semanas, e no estômago, com epitélio unicelular estava completa na quarta semana.

  11. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and Sleep Quality in a Chinese Population

    OpenAIRE

    Mei-Jyh Chen; Ming-Shiang Wu; Jaw-Town Lin; Kuang-Yi Chang; Han-Mo Chiu; Wei-Chih Liao; Chien-Chuan Chen; Yo-Ping Lai; Hsiu-Po Wang; Yi-Chia Lee

    2009-01-01

    Although evidence suggests that gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) may interrupt sleep, the effects of symptomatic and endoscopically diagnosed GERD remain elusive because the patient population is heterogeneous. Accordingly, we designed a cross-sectional study to assess their association. Methods: Consecutive participants in a routine health examination were enrolled. Definition and severity of erosive esophagitis were assessed using the Los Angeles classification system. Demographic ...

  12. Inducing and Aggravating Factors of Gastroesophageal Reflux Symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhiyatam Mardhiyah

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux disease (subsequently abbreviated as GERD is a disease commonly found in the community. Several factors have been recognized as inducing and aggravating factors of GERD symptoms such as older age, female gender, obesity, smoking habit, alcohol consumption, certain diet and poor eating habit like eating fatty, spicy, and acid food.

  13. Dental approach to erosive tooth wear in gastroesophageal reflux ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-06-02

    Jun 2, 2014 ... Abstract. Background: The duration of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), the frequency of reflux, the pH and type of acid, and the quality and quantity of saliva affect the severity of dental erosion due to GERD. Objective: To ... Some medications cause salivary hypofunction and dental erosion; drugs ...

  14. Laparoscopic surgery for gastro-esophageal acid reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schijven, Marlies P.; Gisbertz, Suzanne S.; van Berge Henegouwen, Mark I.

    2014-01-01

    Gastro-esophageal reflux disease is a troublesome disease for many patients, severely affecting their quality of life. Choice of treatment depends on a combination of patient characteristics and preferences, esophageal motility and damage of reflux, symptom severity and symptom correlation to acid

  15. Dental approach to erosive tooth wear in gastroesophageal reflux ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The duration of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), the frequency of reflux, the pH and type of acid, and the quality and quantity of saliva affect the severity of dental erosion due to GERD. Objective: To summarize the diagnostic protocol and treatment of dental erosion due to GERD. Methods: A Medline ...

  16. ANTISECRETORY TREATMENT FOR PEDIATRIC GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE - A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ângelo Zambam de MATTOS

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Proton pump inhibitors and histamine H2 receptor antagonists are two of the most commonly prescribed drug classes for pediatric gastroesophageal reflux disease, but their efficacy is controversial. Many patients are treated with these drugs for atypical manifestations attributed to gastroesophageal reflux, even that causal relation is not proven. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the use of proton pump inhibitors and histamine H2 receptor antagonists in pediatric gastroesophageal reflux disease through a systematic review. METHODS: A systematic review was performed, using MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases. The search was limited to studies published in English, Portuguese or Spanish. There was no limitation regarding date of publication. Studies were considered eligible if they were randomized-controlled trials, evaluating proton pump inhibitors and/or histamine H2 receptor antagonists for the treatment of pediatric gastroesophageal reflux disease. Studies published only as abstracts, studies evaluating only non-clinical outcomes and studies exclusively comparing different doses of the same drug were excluded. Data extraction was performed by independent investigators. The study protocol was registered at PROSPERO platform (CRD42016040156. RESULTS: After analyzing 735 retrieved references, 23 studies (1598 randomized patients were included in the systematic review. Eight studies demonstrated that both proton pump inhibitors and histamine H2 receptor antagonists were effective against typical manifestations of gastroesophageal reflux disease, and that there was no evidence of benefit in combining the latter to the former or in routinely prescribing long-term maintenance treatments. Three studies evaluated the effect of treatments on children with asthma, and neither proton pump inhibitors nor histamine H2 receptor antagonists proved to be significantly better than placebo. One study compared

  17. Xenobiotic Modulation of Human Mammary Epithelial Cell Gap Junctional Intercellular Communication and Growth

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ruch, Randall

    1999-01-01

    .... These agents also inhibit gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC). This inhibition may contribute to the enhancement of breast epithelial growth and breast cancer formation by xenobiotics...

  18. Obesity and gastroesophageal reflux disease and gastroesophageal reflux symptoms in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoda M Malaty, J Kennard Fraley

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Hoda M Malaty1, J Kennard Fraley1,2, Suhaib Abudayyeh1, Kenneth W Fairly1, Ussama S Javed1, et al1Department of Medicine, 2Children’s Nutrition Research Center (CNRC, 4Department of Pediatrics, 5Texas Children’s Hospital, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA; 3Department of Gastroenterology, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR, USABackground: The association between body mass index (BMI and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD has been extensively studied among adults but few studies have examined such association in children. Aims: 1 to determine the relationship between BMI in children and GERD, and 2 to use the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS values for BMI as a valid source for comparison. Methods: We identified two cohorts of children aged between two and 17 years who were seen at Texas Children’s Hospital (TCH. The first cohort consisted of children diagnosed with GERD based on upper gastrointestinal endoscopic and histologic evaluation, which was recorded in the Pediatric Endoscopic Database System-Clinical Outcomes Research Initiative (PEDS-CORI at TCH. A diagnosis of GERD was based on the presence of erosive esophagitis or esophageal ulcers. Endoscopic reports that were incomplete or did not include demographic features, indications for endoscopy, or endoscopic findings were excluded. The second cohort consisted of all children with symptoms due to gastroesophageal reflux (GER who received outpatient gastrointestinal (GI consultation at TCH for any 9th revision of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases (ICD-9 code suggestive of GER. There was no overlap between the two cohorts as each child was indexed only once. Children with any comorbid illnesses were excluded.Measurements: The records for each child namely, age, gender, height, and weight were obtained on the same date as that of the diagnosis. Using the growth curves published by the NCHS, the gender/age specific weight

  19. Pathophysiology of gastroesophageal reflux disease: new understanding in a new era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herregods, T V K; Bredenoord, A J; Smout, A J P M

    2015-09-01

    The prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has increased in the last decades and it is now one of the most common chronic diseases. Throughout time our insight in the pathophysiology of GERD has been characterized by remarkable back and forth swings, often prompted by new investigational techniques. Even today, the pathophysiology of GERD is not fully understood but it is now recognized to be a multifactorial disease. Among the factors that have been shown to be involved in the provocation or increase of reflux, are sliding hiatus hernia, low lower esophageal sphincter pressure, transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation, the acid pocket, obesity, increased distensibility of the esophagogastric junction, prolonged esophageal clearance, and delayed gastric emptying. Moreover, multiple mechanisms influence the perception of GERD symptoms, such as the acidity of the refluxate, its proximal extent, the presence of gas in the refluxate, duodenogastroesophageal reflux, longitudinal muscle contraction, mucosal integrity, and peripheral and central sensitization. Understanding the pathophysiology of GERD is important for future targets for therapy as proton pump inhibitor-refractory GERD symptoms remain a common problem. In this review we provide an overview of the mechanisms leading to reflux and the factors influencing perception, in the light of historical developments. It is clear that further research remains necessary despite the recent advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of GERD. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. A randomized trial of endoscopic variceal ligation versus cyanoacrylate injection for treatment of bleeding junctional varices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Amin, H; Abdel Baky, L; Sayed, Z; Abdel Mohsen, E; Eid, K; Fouad, Y; El Khayat, H

    2010-01-01

    There is scarcity of data concerning the management of bleeding junctional gastroesophageal varices. Our aim was to compare the efficacy and safety of endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL) with cyanoacrylate injection for the treatment of bleeding junctional varices. One hundred fifty patients with bleeding junctional varices were included in the study. Patients were subjected after randomization to either EVL of junctional varices (group 1:75 patients) or cyanoacrylate injection (group 11:75 patients). Endoscopic sessions were continued till obliteration of the varices. Clinical as well as biochemical parameters and severity of liver disease were assessed in all patients. Control of active variceal bleeding was achieved in 61 patients (81%) in group I and in 68 patients (91%) in group II with no significant difference (p = 0.07). Re-bleeding was seen in 12 patients (16%) in group I and 5 patients in group II (6%). Junctional varix obliteration was achieved after one session in 33% of patients in group I and 52% of patients in group II, however after 2 sessions it was achieved in 67% in group I and 93 % in group II. After 3 sessions variceal obliteration was achieved in 99% in group 1. Fever, chest pain and dysphagia were observed more frequently in group II than in group I. Long term complications including spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, hepatic encephalopathy and hepatorenal syndrome were also observed more frequently group II than in group I. EVL may be a good alternative to cyanoacrylate injection in treatment of bleeding junctional varices.

  1. Quantum Junction Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Tang, Jiang

    2012-09-12

    Colloidal quantum dot solids combine convenient solution-processing with quantum size effect tuning, offering avenues to high-efficiency multijunction cells based on a single materials synthesis and processing platform. The highest-performing colloidal quantum dot rectifying devices reported to date have relied on a junction between a quantum-tuned absorber and a bulk material (e.g., TiO 2); however, quantum tuning of the absorber then requires complete redesign of the bulk acceptor, compromising the benefits of facile quantum tuning. Here we report rectifying junctions constructed entirely using inherently band-aligned quantum-tuned materials. Realizing these quantum junction diodes relied upon the creation of an n-type quantum dot solid having a clean bandgap. We combine stable, chemically compatible, high-performance n-type and p-type materials to create the first quantum junction solar cells. We present a family of photovoltaic devices having widely tuned bandgaps of 0.6-1.6 eV that excel where conventional quantum-to-bulk devices fail to perform. Devices having optimal single-junction bandgaps exhibit certified AM1.5 solar power conversion efficiencies of 5.4%. Control over doping in quantum solids, and the successful integration of these materials to form stable quantum junctions, offers a powerful new degree of freedom to colloidal quantum dot optoelectronics. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  2. How reflux causes symptoms: reflux perception in gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weijenborg, Pim W; Bredenoord, Albert J

    2013-06-01

    In gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms arise due to reflux of gastric content into the oesophagus. However, the relation between magnitude and onset of reflux and symptom generation in GERD patients is far from simple; gastroesophageal reflux occurs several times a day in everyone and the majority of reflux episodes remains asymptomatic. This review aims to address the question how reflux causes symptoms, focussing on factors leading to enhanced reflux perception. We will highlight esophageal sensitivity variance between subtypes of GERD, which is influenced by peripheral sensitization of primary afferents, central sensitization of spinal dorsal horn neurons, impaired mucosal barrier function and genetic factors. We will also discuss the contribution of specific refluxate characteristics to reflux perception, including acidity, and the role of bile, pepsin and gas and proximal extent. Further understanding of reflux perception might improve GERD treatment, especially in current partial responders to therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Sequential FDG-PET and induction chemotherapy in locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the Oesophago-gastric junction (AEG: The Heidelberg Imaging program in Cancer of the oesophago-gastric junction during Neoadjuvant treatment: HICON trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weichert Wilko

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 18-Fluorodeoxyglucose-PET (18F-FDG-PET can be used for early response assessment in patients with locally advanced adenocarcinomas of the oesophagogastric junction (AEG undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy. It has been recently shown in the MUNICON trials that response-guided treatment algorithms based on early changes of the FDG tumor uptake detected by PET are feasible and that they can be implemented into clinical practice. Only 40%-50% of the patients respond metabolically to therapy. As metabolic non-response is known to be associated with a dismal prognosis, metabolic non-responders are increasingly treated with alternative neoadjuvant chemotherapies or chemoradiation in order to improve their clinical outcome. We plan to investigate whether PET can be used as response assessment during radiochemotherapy given as salvage treatment in early metabolic non-responders to standard chemotherapy. Methods/Design The HICON trial is a prospective, non-randomized, explorative imaging study evaluating the value of PET as a predictor of histopathological response in metabolic non-responders. Patients with resectable AEG type I and II according to Siewerts classification, staged cT3/4 and/or cN+ and cM0 by endoscopic ultrasound, spiral CT or MRI and FDG-PET are eligible. Tumors must be potentially R0 resectable and must have a sufficient FDG-baseline uptake. Only metabolic non-responders, showing a 18FDG-PET scans will be performed before ( = Baseline and after 14 days of standard neoadjuvant therapy as well as after the first cycle of salvage docetaxel/cisplatin chemotherapy (PET 1 and at the end of radiochemotherapy (PET2. Tracer uptake will be assessed semiquantitatively using standardized uptake values (SUV. The percentage difference ΔSUV = 100 (SUVBaseline - SUV PET1/SUVBaseline will be calculated and assessed as an early predictor of histopathological response. In a secondary analysis, the association between the difference

  4. Debut of Gastroesophageal Reflux Concomitant with Administration of Sublingual Immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, J.

    2017-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GORD) is an often debilitating condition characterised by retrograde flow of content from stomach into the oesophagus, where the low pH of the stomach acid irritates the mucosa of the oesophagus. The most dominant symptoms in GORD are pyrosis, regurgitation, and d...... to administration of sublingual immunotherapy for house dust mite in allergic rhinitis. The patient had to stop the SLIT after two weeks of administration due to GORD. The cessation resulted in rapid resolution of symptoms....

  5. Usefulness of gastroesophageal reflux scintigraphy using the knee-chest position for the diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asakura, Yasushi; Imai, Yukinori; Ota, Shinichi; Fujiwara, Kenji; Miyamae, Tatsuya

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) scintigraphy using the knee-chest (KC) position for the diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The study subjects were 37 patients with GERD and 8 healthy volunteers (control group). Endoscopically observed esophageal mucosal breaks were evaluated with the Los Angeles classification. For GER scintigraphy, the subjects ingested liquid yogurt labeled with 99m Tc-diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid ( 99m Tc-DTPA) and water. Imaging was performed in the supine and KC position, and GER was graded as 1-4 according to the extent of GER assessed by scintigraphy. GER scintigraphy revealed no reflux in the control group (specificity: 100%). In the supine position, gastroesophageal reflux was observed in 49% of the patients with GERD, compared to 76% in the KC position. 21 of 23 (91%) patients with erosive esophagitis were shown to have GER with scintigraphy. GER scintigraphy revealed severe reflux (grade 3 or 4) (83%, 10/12) in the patients who had severe mucosal breaks (the Los Angels classification grade C or D). GER scintigraphy detected grade 1 or 2 reflux in 7 of the 14 patients who were endoscopically negative. There was a correlation between the endoscopically determined severity of mucosa and the reflux grade which was determined with GER scintigraphy. GER scintigraphy can detect gastroesophageal reflux with a high sensitivity in the KC position and might be a useful method in the screening and assessment of the severity of this disease. This method would be useful for the diagnosis of GERD in endoscopically negative patients. (author)

  6. Knowledge of pediatrician on gastroesophageal reflux/gastroesophageal reflux disease in children: a preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Surjono

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Gastroesophageal reflux (OER is involuntary movement of gastric content into esophagus due to transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation. This condition usually ignored by physician. Many GER cases have severe complication before properly managed. Ten years after incorporating GER into Indonesia pediatric training curriculum, the knowledge of GER among pediatrician need to be measured. Objectives To measure pediatrician's knowledge of GER/GERD in children. Methods This was a cross sectional study using questionnaire and interview. Result There were 387 respondents who filled the questionnaire and being interviewed. The majority of respondents were between 25-45 years old (33.6%. Respondents who graduated before the year 2000 were 48.3%, and after 2000 were 51.7%. Majority of respondents were general pediatrician (90.2% and 41.3% working in teaching hospitals Among pediatricians graduated after year 2000,6 6%,5 0.5% and 57.5% could gave more than 80% correct answer to questions about general knowledge, diagnosis and management of GERD as compared to 49.2%, 42.2% and 47% subjects graduated before year 2000. More pediatricians graduated before year 2000 answered the questions on general knowledge, diagnosis and management < 60% correctly compared to those graduated after year 2000 (42.2%, 25.2% and 28.3% vs. 14%,11.5% and 12%, respectively. Fifty five of 160 (34.4% respondents who working in teaching hospital gave more than 80% correct answer to questions about GERD. Compared to those working in non-teaching hospitals, only 17.6% were able to correctly answer more than 80% of questions. Conclusions Better knowledge about GER/GERD are found among pediatricians graduated after the topics has been introduced to the curriculum and among those practicing in teaching hospitals.

  7. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and overall and Cause-specific Mortality: A Prospective Study of 50000 Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islami, Farhad; Pourshams, Akram; Nasseri-Moghaddam, Siavosh; Khademi, Hooman; Poutschi, Hossein; Khoshnia, Masoud; Norouzi, Alireza; Amiriani, Taghi; Sohrabpour, Amir Ali; Aliasgari, Ali; Jafari, Elham; Semnani, Shahryar; Abnet, Christian C.; Pharaoh, Paul D.; Brennan, Paul; Kamangar, Farin; Dawsey, Sanford M.; Boffetta, Paolo; Malekzadeh, Reza

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Only a few studies in Western countries have investigated the association between gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and mortality at the general population level and they have shown mixed results. This study investigated the association between GERD symptoms and overall and cause-specific mortality in a large prospective population-based study in Golestan Province, Iran. METHODS Baseline data on frequency, onset time, and patient-perceived severity of GERD symptoms were available for 50001 participants in the Golestan Cohort Study (GCS). We identified 3107 deaths (including 1146 circulatory and 470 cancer-related) with an average follow-up of 6.4 years and calculated hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) adjusted for multiple potential confounders. RESULTS Severe daily symptoms (defined as symptoms interfering with daily work or causing nighttime awakenings on a daily bases, reported by 4.3% of participants) were associated with cancer mortality (HR 1.48, 95% CI: 1.04-2.05). This increase was too small to noticeably affect overall mortality. Mortality was not associated with onset time or frequency of GERD and was not increased with mild to moderate symptoms. CONCLUSION We have observed an association with GERD and increased cancer mortality in a small group of individuals that had severe symptoms. Most patients with mild to moderate GERD can be re-assured that their symptoms are not associated with increased mortality. PMID:24872865

  8. Junction-FET dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomimasu, T.; Yamazaki, T.

    1976-01-01

    The performance of a new junction-FET dosimeter and its application to the beam profile measurement are presented. One of the two junction FET's making up an astable multivibrator is used as a small-size (approx.0.4x0.4 mm) high-level dose detector. The irradiated dose can be estimated by the amount of the decrease of the oscillator period of the multivibrator. The distinct advantages in its small size and superior resistive property to radiation effect enable us to measure the cross-sectional profile of the electron beam from a linac with high spatial resolution of about 0.4 mm

  9. Tunable Nitride Josephson Junctions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Missert, Nancy A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Henry, Michael David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lewis, Rupert M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Howell, Stephen W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wolfley, Steven L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brunke, Lyle Brent [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wolak, Matthaeus [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-12-01

    We have developed an ambient temperature, SiO2/Si wafer - scale process for Josephson junctions based on Nb electrodes and Ta x N barriers with tunable electronic properties. The films are fabricated by magnetron sputtering. The electronic properties of the TaxN barriers are controlled by adjusting the nitrogen flow during sputtering. This technology offers a scalable alternative to the more traditional junctions based on AlOx barriers for low - power, high - performance computing.

  10. Long-term outcome of 2920 patients with cancers of the esophagus and esophagogastric junction: evaluation of the New Union Internationale Contre le Cancer/American Joint Cancer Committee staging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gertler, Ralf; Stein, Hubert J; Langer, Rupert; Nettelmann, Marc; Schuster, Tibor; Hoefler, Heinz; Siewert, Joerg-Ruediger; Feith, Marcus

    2011-04-01

    We analyzed the long-term outcome of patients operated for esophageal cancer and evaluated the new seventh edition of the tumor-node-metastasis classification for cancers of the esophagus. Retrospective analysis and new classification. Data of a single-center cohort of 2920 patients operated for cancers of the esophagus according to the seventh edition are presented. Statistical methods to evaluate survival and the prognostic performance of the staging systems included Kaplan-Meier analyses and time-dependent receiver-operating-characteristic-analysis. Union Internationale Contre le Cancer stage, R-status, histologic tumor type and age were identified as independent prognostic factors for cancers of the esophagus. Grade and tumor site, additional parameters in the new American Joint Cancer Committee prognostic groupings, were not significantly correlated with survival. Esophageal adenocarcinoma showed a significantly better long-term prognosis after resection than squamous cell carcinoma (P concepts.

  11. Doped semiconductor nanocrystal junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borowik, Ł.; Mélin, T., E-mail: thierry.melin@isen.iemn.univ-lille1.fr [Institut d’Electronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie, CNRS-UMR8520, Avenue Poincaré, F-59652 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); Nguyen-Tran, T.; Roca i Cabarrocas, P. [Laboratoire de Physique des Interfaces et des Couches Minces, CNRS-UMR7647, Ecole Polytechnique, F-91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2013-11-28

    Semiconductor junctions are the basis of electronic and photovoltaic devices. Here, we investigate junctions formed from highly doped (N{sub D}≈10{sup 20}−10{sup 21}cm{sup −3}) silicon nanocrystals (NCs) in the 2–50 nm size range, using Kelvin probe force microscopy experiments with single charge sensitivity. We show that the charge transfer from doped NCs towards a two-dimensional layer experimentally follows a simple phenomenological law, corresponding to formation of an interface dipole linearly increasing with the NC diameter. This feature leads to analytically predictable junction properties down to quantum size regimes: NC depletion width independent of the NC size and varying as N{sub D}{sup −1/3}, and depleted charge linearly increasing with the NC diameter and varying as N{sub D}{sup 1/3}. We thus establish a “nanocrystal counterpart” of conventional semiconductor planar junctions, here however valid in regimes of strong electrostatic and quantum confinements.

  12. Robot-assisted gastroesophageal surgery: usefulness and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez Del Val, Ismael; Martinez Blazquez, Cándido; Loureiro Gonzalez, Carlos; Vitores Lopez, Jose Maria; Sierra Esteban, Valentin; Barrenetxea Asua, Julen; Del Hoyo Aretxabala, Izaskun; Perez de Villarreal, Patricia; Bilbao Axpe, Jose Esteban; Mendez Martin, Jaime Jesus

    2014-06-01

    Robot-assisted surgery overcomes some of the limitations of traditional laparoscopic surgery. We present our experience and lessons learned in two surgical units dedicated to gastro-esophageal surgery. From June 2009 to January 2013, we performed 130 robot-assisted gastroesophageal procedures, including Nissen fundoplication (29), paraesophageal hernia repair (18), redo for failed antireflux surgery (11), esophagectomy (19), subtotal (5) or wedge (4) gastrectomy, Heller myotomy for achalasia (22), gastric bypass for morbid obesity (12), thoracoscopic leiomyomectomy (4), Morgagni hernia repair (3), lower-third esophageal diverticulectomy (1) and two diagnostic procedures. There were 80 men and 50 women with a median age of 54 years (interquartile range: 46-65). Ten patients (7.7 %) had severe postoperative complications: eight after esophagectomy (three leaks-two cervical and one thoracic-managed conservatively), one stapler failure, one chylothorax, one case of gastric migration to the thorax, one case of biliary peritonitis, and one patient with a transient ventricular dyskinesia. One redo procedure needed reoperation because of port-site bleeding, and one patient died of pulmonary complications after a giant paraesophageal hernia repair; 30-day mortality was, therefore, 0.8 %. There were six elective and one forced conversions (hemorrhage), so total conversion was 5.4 %. Median length of stay was 4 days (IQ range 3-7). Robot-assisted gastroesophageal surgery is feasible and safe, and may be applied to most common procedures. It seems of particular value for Heller myotomy, large paraesophageal hernias, redo antireflux surgery, transhiatal dissection, and hand-sewn intrathoracic anastomosis.

  13. [Gastroesophageal reflux: clinical, endoscopic characteristics and associated risk factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelo Vega, Jean Marcel; Olivera Hermoza, Rogers; Páucar Sotomayor, Héctor; Flores Aldea, Juan Carlos

    2003-01-01

    We performed a case control study to describe the clinical and epidemiological characteristics, and identify the risk factors associated to gastroesophageal reflux among patients of the gastroenterology unit at the HNSE EsSalud - Cusco. There were included 645 patients with endoscopic diagnosis of esophagitis between january 1, 1999 and december 31, 2000. Afterwards, we selected a sample of 125 cases and 124 non related matched controls. The statistical profiles about gastroesophageal reflux, the digestive endoscopy service digests and the clinic histories of patients were reviewed; and the case and control samples were interviewed namelessly with their previous consent. Gastroesophageal reflux esophagitis was the diagnosis in 13% of endoscopies at the study period, with a little predominance in males (65%) and a middle age of 51,64. A 39,8% of cases concern of university proffesional patients. The main symptom was dyspepsia (84,18%) followed by the clasic clinical markers pirosis (44%) and regurgitation (30%), and nondigestive symptoms were unfrecuent (9%). Esophagitis was diagnosted mainly at mild stages of the disease (94% of cases) and we demonstrated an statistical association between esophagitis and hiatal hernia in the 32% of cases (pAINES (OR:19,36 and IC: 2,65-396,73) and coffee (OR:4,39 and IC: 1,72-11,65), and overweight (OR: 2,60 and IC: 2,60-6,78); the math associated factors were consumption of cigarretes, alcohol, mint and fatty food, postprandial liying position and taking of drugs such as benzodiacepines, calcium channel blockers and nitrates. The remaining factors have had not any kind of relation.

  14. Practical Aspects of Pathogenetic Therapy for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.P. Shipulin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD. Currently, there is being investigated a large number of new drugs, which can improve the treatment of acid-related disea-ses, but the best acid-reducing drugs yet are proton pump inhibitors (PPIs. In connection with this, the issue what drugs from the IPPs group should be preferred was and remains relevant for practitioners. Given the low potential of drug interactions, pantoprazole may be considered the drug of choice for acid-reducing therapy, especially in elderly patients, usually taking quite a lot of drugs; as well as in patients using drugs with a narrow therapeutic window.

  15. Risk Factors for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Saudi Arabia

    OpenAIRE

    Alkhathami, Ali Mesfer; Alzahrani, Abdulrahman Ahmad; Alzhrani, Mohammed Abdullah; Alsuwat, Obaidallah Buraykan; Mahfouz, Mohammad Eid Mahmoud

    2017-01-01

    Background Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is one of the most prevalent gastrointestinal tract diseases worldwide. GERD has an effect on the patients’ quality of life as well as the health care system that can be prevented by identifying its risk factors among the population. Hence, we applied this study to assess the GERD’s risk factors in Saudi Arabia. Methods A cross-sectional study was designed to assess the GERD’s risk factors among the community of Saudi Arabia. The sample was co...

  16. Fractional order junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, J. Tenreiro

    2015-01-01

    Gottfried Leibniz generalized the derivation and integration, extending the operators from integer up to real, or even complex, orders. It is presently recognized that the resulting models capture long term memory effects difficult to describe by classical tools. Leon Chua generalized the set of lumped electrical elements that provide the building blocks in mathematical models. His proposal of the memristor and of higher order elements broadened the scope of variables and relationships embedded in the development of models. This paper follows the two directions and proposes a new logical step, by generalizing the concept of junction. Classical junctions interconnect system elements using simple algebraic restrictions. Nevertheless, this simplistic approach may be misleading in the presence of unexpected dynamical phenomena and requires including additional "parasitic" elements. The novel γ -junction includes, as special cases, the standard series and parallel connections and allows a new degree of freedom when building models. The proposal motivates the search for experimental and real world manifestations of the abstract conjectures.

  17. Infant Gastroesophageal Reflux Information on the World Wide Web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balgowan, Regina; Greer, Leah C; D'Auria, Jennifer P

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the type and quality of health information about infant gastroesophageal reflux (GER) that a parent may find on the World Wide Web. The data collection tool included evaluation of Web site quality and infant GER-specific content on the 30 sites that met the inclusion criteria. The most commonly found content categories in order of frequency were management strategies, when to call a primary care provider, definition, and clinical features. The most frequently mentioned strategies included feeding changes, infant positioning, and medications. Thirteen of the 30 Web sites included information on both GER and gastroesophageal reflux disease. Mention of the use of medication to lessen infant symptoms was found on 15 of the 30 sites. Only 10 of the 30 sites included information about parent support and coping strategies. Pediatric nurse practitioners (PNPs) should utilize well-child visits to address the normalcy of physiologic infant GER and clarify any misperceptions parents may have about diagnosis and the role of medication from information they may have found on the Internet. It is critical for PNPs to assist in the development of Web sites with accurate content, advise parents on how to identify safe and reliable information, and provide examples of high-quality Web sites about child health topics such as infant GER. Copyright © 2016 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. All-trans retinoic acid restores gap junctional intercellular communication between oral cancer cells with upregulation of Cx32 and Cx43 expressions in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Dai, Yaohui; Huang, Yulei; Chen, Xiaohua; Wang, Hong; Hong, Yun; Xia, Juan; Cheng, Bin

    2013-07-01

    All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) has been demonstrated to inhibit tumor growth by restoration of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) via upregulation of connexin (Cx) expression in some solid tumors. However, the relationship between ATRA and GJIC remains unclear in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of ATRA on the GJIC function of OSCC. We measured the effects of ATRA on the viability and cell cycle distribution of SCC9 and Tca8113 OSCC cells. The GJIC function was observed using the scrape-loading dye transfer technique, and the mRNA and protein levels of Cx32 and Cx43 were detected by qRT-PCR, Western blot, and immunofluorescence assays. ATRA inhibited the growth of OSCC cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner (P <0.05) and caused cell cycle arrest. ATRA-treated cells showed a 2.69-fold and 2.06-fold enhancement of GJIC in SCC9 and Tca8113 cells, respectively (P <0.05). Moreover, ATRA induced upregulation of Cx32 and Cx43 at both the mRNA and protein levels in OSCC cells. Our results indicated that restoration of GJIC via enhanced Cx32 and Cx43 expression might serve as a novel mechanism for the anti-tumor effect of ATRA in OSCC.

  19. New insights into esophagogastric junction physiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheffer, Robertus Catharina Hortensia

    2004-01-01

    The studies presented in this thesis have reported on the elicitation of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs) in health, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and postfundoplication. The relationship between the esophageal acid exposure time and the underlying manometric

  20. Nasogastric intubation causes gastroesophageal reflux in patients undergoing elective laparotomy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Manning, B J

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: The routine use of nasogastric tubes in patients undergoing elective abdominal operation is associated with an increased incidence of postoperative fever, atelectasis, and pneumonia. Previous studies have shown that nasogastric tubes have no significant effect on the incidence of gastroesophageal reflux or on lower esophageal sphincter pressure in healthy volunteers. We hypothesized that nasogastric intubation in patients undergoing laparotomy reduces lower esophageal sphincter pressure and promotes gastroesophageal reflux in the perioperative period. METHODS: A prospective randomized case-control study was undertaken in which 15 consenting patients, admitted electively for bowel surgery, were randomized into 2 groups. Group 1 underwent nasogastric intubation after induction of anesthesia, and Group 2 did not. All patients had manometry and pH probes placed with the aid of endoscopic vision at the lower esophageal sphincter and distal esophagus, respectively. Nasogastric tubes, where present, were left on free drainage, and sphincter pressures and pH were recorded continuously during a 24-hour period. Data were analyzed with 1-way analysis of variance. RESULTS: The mean number of reflux episodes (defined as pH < 4) in the nasogastric tube group was 137 compared with a median of 8 episodes in the group managed without nasogastric tubes (P =.006). The median duration of the longest episode of reflux was 132 minutes in Group 1 and 1 minute in Group 2 (P =.001). A mean of 13.3 episodes of reflux lasted longer than 5 minutes in Group 1, with pH less than 4 for 37.4% of the 24 hours. This was in contrast to Group 2 where a mean of 0.13 episodes lasted longer than 5 minutes (P =.001) and pH less than 4 for 0.2% of total time (P =.001). The mean lower esophageal sphincter pressures were lower in Group 1. CONCLUSIONS. These findings demonstrate that patients undergoing elective laparotomy with routine nasogastric tube placement have significant gastroesophageal

  1. Cementoenamel junction: An insight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kharidi Laxman Vandana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The location and nature of cemento-enamel junction (CEJ are more than descriptive terms used simply to describe some aspects of tooth morphology; however, CEJ gains a lot of clinical significance due to various measurements dependent on it. It may be necessary to determine the location and pathological changes occurring at CEJ to make a diagnosis and treat diseases pertaining to epithelial attachment and gingival margin. However, the information related to CEJ is not discussed commonly. Hence, the present review paper provides an insight on CEJ in both primary and permanent dentition.

  2. The human myotendinous junction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, A B; Larsen, M; Mackey, Abigail

    2015-01-01

    The myotendinous junction (MTJ) is a specialized structure in the musculotendinous system, where force is transmitted from muscle to tendon. Animal models have shown that the MTJ takes form of tendon finger-like processes merging with muscle tissue. The human MTJ is largely unknown and has never...... been described in three dimensions (3D). The aim of this study was to describe the ultrastructure of the human MTJ and render 3D reconstructions. Fourteen subjects (age 25 ± 3 years) with isolated injury of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), scheduled for reconstruction with a semitendinosus...

  3. Correlations of differentially expressed gap junction connexins Cx26, Cx30, Cx32, Cx43 and Cx46 with breast cancer progression and prognosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivett Teleki

    Full Text Available Connexins and their cell membrane channels contribute to the control of cell proliferation and compartmental functions in breast glands and their deregulation is linked to breast carcinogenesis. Our aim was to correlate connexin expression with tumor progression and prognosis in primary breast cancers.Meta-analysis of connexin isotype expression data of 1809 and 1899 breast cancers from the Affymetrix and Illumina array platforms, respectively, was performed. Expressed connexins were also monitored at the protein level in tissue microarrays of 127 patients equally representing all tumor grades, using immunofluorescence and multilayer, multichannel digital microscopy. Prognostic correlations were plotted in Kaplan-Meier curves and tested using the log-rank test and cox-regression analysis in univariate and multivariate models.The expression of GJA1/Cx43, GJA3/Cx46 and GJB2/Cx26 and, for the first time, GJA6/Cx30 and GJB1/Cx32 was revealed both in normal human mammary glands and breast carcinomas. Within their subfamilies these connexins can form homo- and heterocellular epithelial channels. In cancer, the array datasets cross-validated each other's prognostic results. In line with the significant correlations found at mRNA level, elevated Cx43 protein levels were linked with significantly improved breast cancer outcome, offering Cx43 protein detection as an independent prognostic marker stronger than vascular invasion or necrosis. As a contrary, elevated Cx30 mRNA and protein levels were associated with a reduced disease outcome offering Cx30 protein detection as an independent prognostic marker outperforming mitotic index and necrosis. Elevated versus low Cx43 protein levels allowed the stratification of grade 2 tumors into good and poor relapse free survival subgroups, respectively. Also, elevated versus low Cx30 levels stratified grade 3 patients into poor and good overall survival subgroups, respectively.Differential expression of Cx43 and Cx

  4. Endosonography of gastroesophageal varices: evaluation and follow-up of 76 cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tio, T. L.; Kimmings, N.; Rauws, E.; Jansen, P.; Tytgat, G.

    1995-01-01

    Endosonography was performed in 76 patients who had endoscopically detected gastroesophageal varices or questionable submucosal lesions, or who were being evaluated for pancreatic carcinoma or pancreatitis. The result were compared with surgery or autopsy results. The patients were divided

  5. Restoration of occlusal vertical dimension in dental erosion caused by gastroesophageal reflux: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reston, Eduardo Galia; Closs, Luciane Quadrado; Busato, Adair Luiz Stefanello; Broliato, Gustavo André; Tessarollo, Fábio Rafael

    2010-01-01

    The authors describe a minimally invasive procedure for occlusal rehabilitation in a young patient presenting with mild mandibular prognathism and loss of occlusal vertical dimension caused by dental erosion from chronic gastroesophageal reflux.

  6. Exhaled breath concentrations of acetic acid vapour in gastro-esophageal reflux disease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dryahina, Kseniya; Pospíšilová, Veronika; Sovová, Kristýna; Shestivska, Violetta; Kubišta, Jiří; Spesyvyi, Anatolii; Pehal, F.; Turzíková, J.; Votruba, J.; Španěl, Patrik

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 3 (2014), 037109 ISSN 1752-7155 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : SIFT-MS * gastro-esophageal reflux * acetic acid Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.631, year: 2014

  7. Emerging dilemmas in the diagnosis and management of gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahrilas, Peter; Yadlapati, Rena; Roman, Sabine

    2017-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is common, but less so than widely reported because of inconsistencies in definition. In clinical practice, the diagnosis is usually based on a symptom assessment without testing, and the extent of diagnostic testing pursued should be limited to that which guides management or which protects the patient from the risks of a potentially morbid treatment or an undetected early (or imminent) esophageal adenocarcinoma or which does both. When testing is pursued, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy is the most useful initial diagnostic test because it evaluates for the major potential morbidities (Barrett’s, stricture, and cancer) associated with GERD and facilitates the identification of some alternative diagnostic possibilities such as eosinophilic esophagitis. However, endoscopy is insensitive for diagnosing GERD because most patients with GERD have non-erosive reflux disease, a persistent diagnostic dilemma. Although many studies have tried to objectify the diagnosis of GERD with improved technology, this is ultimately a pragmatic diagnosis based on response to proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy, and, in the end, response to PPI therapy becomes the major indication for continued PPI therapy. Conversely, in the absence of objective criteria for GERD and the absence of apparent clinical benefit, PPI therapy is not indicated and should be discontinued. PPIs are well tolerated and safe, but nothing is perfectly safe, and in the absence of measurable benefit, even a miniscule risk dominates the risk-benefit assessment. PMID:29034088

  8. Emerging dilemmas in the diagnosis and management of gastroesophageal reflux disease [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Kahrilas

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is common, but less so than widely reported because of inconsistencies in definition. In clinical practice, the diagnosis is usually based on a symptom assessment without testing, and the extent of diagnostic testing pursued should be limited to that which guides management or which protects the patient from the risks of a potentially morbid treatment or an undetected early (or imminent esophageal adenocarcinoma or which does both. When testing is pursued, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy is the most useful initial diagnostic test because it evaluates for the major potential morbidities (Barrett’s, stricture, and cancer associated with GERD and facilitates the identification of some alternative diagnostic possibilities such as eosinophilic esophagitis. However, endoscopy is insensitive for diagnosing GERD because most patients with GERD have non-erosive reflux disease, a persistent diagnostic dilemma. Although many studies have tried to objectify the diagnosis of GERD with improved technology, this is ultimately a pragmatic diagnosis based on response to proton pump inhibitor (PPI therapy, and, in the end, response to PPI therapy becomes the major indication for continued PPI therapy. Conversely, in the absence of objective criteria for GERD and the absence of apparent clinical benefit, PPI therapy is not indicated and should be discontinued. PPIs are well tolerated and safe, but nothing is perfectly safe, and in the absence of measurable benefit, even a miniscule risk dominates the risk-benefit assessment.

  9. Does the Use of Pacifier Affect Gastro-Esophageal Reflux in Preterm Infants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corvaglia, Luigi; Martini, Silvia; Corrado, Maria Francesca; Mariani, Elisa; Legnani, Elena; Bosi, Isabella; Faldella, Giacomo; Aceti, Arianna

    2016-05-01

    This crossover study showed that non-nutritive sucking, provided with a pacifier in 30 preterm infants, had no effect on acid and nonacid gastro-esophageal reflux evaluated by esophageal pH-impedance, and thus may be reasonably used in preterm neonates with symptoms of gastro-esophageal reflux. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02023216. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Is there a role for dynamic swallowing MRI in the assessment of gastroesophageal reflux disease and oesophageal motility disorders?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulinna-Cosentini, Christiane; Koelblinger, C.; Ba-Ssalamah, A.; Weber, M.; Kleinhansl, P.; Schima, W.; Lenglinger, J.; Riegler, M.; Cosentini, E.P.; Bischof, G.

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of dynamic MRI swallowing in patients with symptoms of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD). Thirty-seven patients (17 m/20f) with typical signs of GERD underwent MR swallowing in the supine position at 1.5 T with a phased-array body coil. Using dynamic, gradient echo sequences (B-FFE) in the coronal, sagittal and axial planes, the bolus passages of buttermilk spiked with gadolinium chelate were tracked. MRI, pH-metry and manometry were performed within 31 days and results were compared. MRI results were concordant with pH-metry in 82% (23/28) of patients diagnosed with abnormal oesophageal acid exposure by pH-metry. Five patients demonstrated typical symptoms of GERD and had positive findings with pH monitoring, but false negative results with MRI. In four of six patients (67%), there was a correct diagnosis of oesophageal motility disorder, according to manometric criteria, on dynamic MRI. The overall accuracy of MRI diagnoses was 79% (27/34). A statistically significant difference was found between the size of hiatal hernia, grade of reflux in MRI, and abnormal acid exposure on pH-monitoring. MR fluoroscopy may be a promising radiation-free tool in assessing the functionality and morphology of the GE junction. (orig.)

  11. Gastroesophageal Reflux and Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Fahim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The histological counterpart of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is usual interstitial pneumonia, in which areas of fibrosis of various ages are interspersed with normal lung. This pattern could be explained by repeated episodes of lung injury followed by abnormal wound healing responses. The cause of the initiating alveolar epithelial injury is unknown, but postulated mechanisms include immunological, microbial, or chemical injury, including aspirated gastric refluxate. Reflux is promoted by low basal pressure in the lower oesophageal sphincter and frequent relaxations, potentiated by hiatus hernia or oesophageal dysmotility. In susceptible individuals, repeated microaspiration of gastric refluxate may contribute to the pathogenesis of IPF. Microaspiration of nonacid or gaseous refluxate is poorly detected by current tests for gastroesophageal reflux which were developed for investigating oesophageal symptoms. Further studies using pharyngeal pH probes, high-resolution impedance manometry, and measurement of pepsin in the lung should clarify the impact of reflux and microaspiration in the pathogenesis of IPF.

  12. Air column in esophagus and symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moosavi, Alijavad; Raji, Hanieh; Teimoori, Mojtaba; Ghourchian, Shadi

    2012-01-01

    During imaging of the normal esophagus, air is often detected. The purpose of this study was to determine the correlation between the appearance of air bubbles on imaging and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) symptoms. The cross-sectional imaging study was conducted at Rasole Akram Hospital, Tehran, Iran. A total of 44 patients underwent X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanning; the presence of air in the esophagus and visible on CT imaging was scrutinized. The average age of the subjects was 59 and the male to female ratio was 0.83. We found a significant relationship between the presence of GERD symptoms, the size of air bubbles and esophageal dilation (ED) on the CT scan. Air bubbles in the esophagus may be seen frequently in CT scans, but their size and location can vary. The GERD symptoms can arise when a small diameter air column is present within the esophagus, especially in the middle and lower parts

  13. Neonatal apnea and gastroesophageal reflux (GER): is there a problem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Jawdeh, Elie G; Martin, Richard J

    2013-06-01

    Apnea of prematurity and gastroesophageal reflux (GER) are both common occurrences in preterm infants and widely perceived to be causally related. We seek in this review to provide a potential guideline for neonatal GER non-pharmacologic and pharmacologic therapy. Available physiologic data suggest that when there is a temporal relationship apnea may be more likely to predispose to GER via esophageal sphincter relaxation than vice versa. Measurement of multiple intraluminal impedance via esophageal catheter in addition to esophageal pH has enhanced our understanding of GER, although it also did not demonstrate a causal relationship between apnea and GER. The incidence of GER may be modified by thickening feeds and position change without adverse effects. In contrast, pharmacotherapy including acid suppression therapy may have adverse effects and should only be used in infants with clear evidence of clinical benefit. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. [Current Status of Translational Research on Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, In Du; Park, Moo In

    2016-09-25

    The prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and the incidence of some of its complications have risen strikingly over the last few decades. With the increase in our understanding of the pathophysiology of GERD along with the development of proton pump inhibitors, the diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to GERD have changed dramatically over the past decade. However, GERD still poses a problem to many clinicians since the spectrum of the disease has evolved to encompass more challenging presentations such as refractory GERD and extra-esophageal manifestations. The aim of this article is to provide a review of available current translational research on GERD. This review includes acid pocket, ambulatory pH monitoring, impedance pH monitoring, mucosa impedance, and high resolution manometry. This article discusses current translational research on GERD.

  15. Proton Pump Inhibitors in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: Friend or Foe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyawali, C Prakash

    2017-09-01

    Proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has been redefined, in light of recent advances highlighting GERD phenotypes that respond to PPIs, and fresh revelations of potential risks of long-term PPI therapy. Erosive esophagitis predicts excellent response to PPI therapy, but non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) with abnormal reflux parameters on ambulatory reflux monitoring also demonstrates a similar response. In contrast, response is suboptimal in the absence of abnormal reflux parameters. In this setting, if an alternate appropriate indication for PPI therapy does not coexist, risks may outweigh benefits of PPI therapy. Adverse events from long-term PPI therapy continue to be reported, most based on association rather than cause-and-effect. Appropriate indications need to be established before embarking on long-term PPI therapy. Future research will define true risks of long-term PPI therapy, and develop alternate management options for acid peptic diseases.

  16. VMAT radiation-induced nausea and vomiting in adjuvant breast cancer radiotherapy: The incidental effect of low-dose bath exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Lazzari

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: To investigate the hypothesis on low-dose bath exposure related to radiation-induced nausea and vomiting (RINV in adjuvant breast volumetric modulated arch therapy (VMAT. Methods and materials: A total of 106 consecutive breast cancer patients (pts treated with adjuvant radiotherapy (RT with VMAT from January 2013 to May 2016 were evaluated retrospectively. For each pt, a planning CT was reimported and the coeliac plexus and gastroesophageal junction with gastric mouth (GEJCPs were contoured as a new organ at risk (OAR in the upper abdominal area. RINV was associated with Dmax and Dmean to GEJCPs. Univariate analysis with χ2, t-test, and Pearson’s covariance was used for statistical analysis. Results: Of 106 pts, 64% complained of acute RINV according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE version 4.03. RINV was related to Dmax > 10 Gy and Dmean > 3 Gy to GEJCPs (P < 0.005. The radiation breast side and planning target volume (PTV correlated with RINV. Conclusions: RINV in VMAT breast radiotherapy could be a new emerging acute side effect due to a low dose bath to upper abdominal structures such as the GEJCPs. A Dmax < 10 Gy and Dmean < 3 Gy to GEJCPs should be constrained in VMAT planning to minimize RINV risk in breast radiotherapy. Keywords: Volumetric modulated arch therapy, Gastroesophageal junction, Coeliac plexus, Nausea, Vomit

  17. Gastroesophageal reflux disease in COPD: links and risks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee AL

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Annemarie L Lee,1–3 Roger S Goldstein1,2,4 1West Park Healthcare Centre, 2Department of Physical Therapy, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; 3Institute for Breathing and Sleep, Austin Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; 4Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada Abstract: COPD is a long-term condition associated with considerable disability with a clinical course characterized by episodes of worsening respiratory signs and symptoms associated with exacerbations. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is one of the most common gastrointestinal conditions in the general population and has emerged as a comorbidity of COPD. GERD may be diagnosed by both symptomatic approaches (including both typical and atypical symptoms and objective measurements. Based on a mix of diagnostic approaches, the prevalence of GERD in COPD ranges from 17% to 78%. Although GERD is usually confined to the lower esophagus in some individuals, it may be associated with pulmonary microaspiration of gastric contents. Possible mechanisms that may contribute to GERD in COPD originate from gastroesophageal dysfunction, including altered pressure in the lower esophageal sphincter (which normally protect against GERD and changes in esophageal motility. Proposed respiratory contributions to the development of GERD include respiratory medications that may alter esophageal sphincter tone and changes in respiratory mechanics, with increased lung hyperinflation compromising the antireflux barrier. Although the specific cause and effect relationship between GERD and COPD has not been fully elucidated, GERD may influence lung disease severity and has been identified as a significant predictor of acute exacerbations of COPD. Further clinical effects could include a poorer health-related quality of life and an increased cost in health care, although these factors require further clarification. There are both medical and surgical options available for the

  18. Prospective study on effect of Helicobacter pylori on gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabah Jalal Shareef

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: The Helicobacter pylori infections role in etiology of peptic ulcer is well known, but its role in gastroesophageal reflux disease is one of the important issues which has to be confirmed. We tried to find out the effect of Helicobacter pylori infection on gastroesophageal reflux disease. Methods: The current study was done on 100 patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease from January 1st to June 30th, 2014 in Rizgary Teaching Hospital, Erbil city. The diagnosis was made by history, clinical examination, and endoscopy. Helicobacter pylori infection was confirmed by gastric biopsy and histopathological examination. We tried to find out the effects of Helicobacter pylori infection in gastroesophageal reflux disease patients and its eradication on their symptoms. The data was analyzed with the statistical package for the social sciences (version 18. Results: The mean age ± SD of participants was 37.13 ± 12.5 (17-75 years. The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection was 75%. The endoscopy showed that 50 out of 75 patients had erosive esophagitis and 25 out of 75 patients had normal appearance known as non-erosive esophagitis. The study showed no significance of its eradication on symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Conclusion: The effect of Helicobacter pylori infection in gastroesophageal reflux disease patients was significant regarding endoscopic finding while inversely related to symptoms severity. The eradication of infection did not cause improvement in symptom severity i.e. triple therapy not advised in the course of treatment.

  19. Mixing in T-junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, Jacobus B.W.; van der Wal, S.

    1996-01-01

    The transport processes that are involved in the mixing of two gases in a T-junction mixer are investigated. The turbulent flow field is calculated for the T-junction with the k- turbulence model by FLOW3D. In the mathematical model the transport of species is described with a mixture fraction

  20. Fluid Flow at Branching Junctions

    OpenAIRE

    Sochi, Taha

    2013-01-01

    The flow of fluids at branching junctions plays important kinematic and dynamic roles in most biological and industrial flow systems. The present paper highlights some key issues related to the flow of fluids at these junctions with special emphasis on the biological flow networks particularly blood transportation vasculature.

  1. Terahertz pulse driven Josephson junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camerlingo, Carlo, E-mail: c.camerlingo@cib.na.cnr.it [CNR - Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto di Cibernetica ' E. Caianiello' , Via Campi Flegrei 34, I-80078 Pozzuoli (Italy)

    2011-09-15

    Theoretical model of the ac Josephson effect in pulsed current driven junctions. Evaluation of the voltage response of a THz pulsed radiation driven Josephson junction. The pulsed current bias induces steps in the junction I/V characteristics for voltages depending on the pulse rate. Working principles of a fast response detector for THz pulsed radiation. The voltage response of a Josephson junction to a pulsed terahertz current is evaluated in the limit of a negligible junction capacitance (overdamped limit). The time-dependent superconductor phase difference across the junction is calculated in the framework of the standard resistive shunted junction model by using a perturbative method. The pulsed current bias affects the time average value of the voltage across the junction and current steps are induced in the current-voltage characteristics for voltage values depending on the pulse repetition rate. The current step height is proportional to the square of the pulse time width ({tau}) to the period (T) ratio. A fast response detector for pulsed Terahertz radiation is proposed, with an expected responsivity of the order of 0.1 V/W and an equivalent noise power of about 3 x 10{sup -10} W/Hz{sup 1/2}.

  2. Electron transport in molecular junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Chengjun

    This thesis addresses the electron transport in molecular junctions, focusing on the energy level alignment and correlation effects. Various levels of theory have been applied to study the structural and electronic effects in different molecular junctions, starting from the single particle density...

  3. Topological Properties of Superconducting Junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pikulin, D.I.; Nazarov, Y.V.

    Motivated by recent developments in the field of one-dimensional topological superconductors, we investigate the topological properties of s-matrix of generic superconducting junctions where dimension should not play any role. We argue that for a finite junction the s-matrix is always topologically

  4. Ion bipolar junction transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tybrandt, Klas; Larsson, Karin C; Richter-Dahlfors, Agneta; Berggren, Magnus

    2010-06-01

    Dynamic control of chemical microenvironments is essential for continued development in numerous fields of life sciences. Such control could be achieved with active chemical circuits for delivery of ions and biomolecules. As the basis for such circuitry, we report a solid-state ion bipolar junction transistor (IBJT) based on conducting polymers and thin films of anion- and cation-selective membranes. The IBJT is the ionic analogue to the conventional semiconductor BJT and is manufactured using standard microfabrication techniques. Transistor characteristics along with a model describing the principle of operation, in which an anionic base current amplifies a cationic collector current, are presented. By employing the IBJT as a bioelectronic circuit element for delivery of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, its efficacy in modulating neuronal cell signaling is demonstrated.

  5. Conformal radiotherapy in the adjuvant treatment of gastric cancer: Review of 82 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassam, Zahra; Lockwood, Gina; O'Brien, Catherine; Brierley, James; Swallow, Carol; Oza, Amit; Siu, Lillian; Knox, Jennifer J.; Wong, Rebecca; Cummings, Bernard; Kim, John; Moore, Malcolm; Ringash, Jolie

    2006-01-01

    Background: The Intergroup 0116 study showed a survival benefit with adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for resected gastric cancer. We report our experience using conformal radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Eighty-two patients with resected gastric or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) adenocarcinoma, Stage IB to IV (M0), were treated with 45 Gy in 25 fractions using a 5-field conformal technique. Chemotherapy was in accordance with the Intergroup 0116 study, or infusional 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin in a phase I/II trial. Results: Mean age was 56.4 years. Median follow-up was 22.8 months. Grade 3 or greater acute toxicity (National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria of Adverse Events, version 3.0) was noted in 57% of patients (upper gastrointestinal tract 34%, hematologic 33%). One patient died of neutropenic sepsis. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3 late toxicity included esophageal strictures (3 patients) and small bowel obstruction (1 patient). Full course CRT was completed by 67% of patients. Of 26 patients who relapsed, 20 died. Site of first relapse was available on 23 patients: 8 locoregional and distant, 4 locoregional alone, 11 distant alone. Overall and relapse-free survival were 69% and 54% at 3 years. Conclusion: Adjuvant CRT for gastric cancer, even with conformal RT, is associated with significant toxicity. Survival was comparable to that reported in the Intergroup 0116 study

  6. Pneumo-CT assessing response to neoadjuvant therapy in esophageal cancer: Imaging-pathological correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulla, Marina; Gentile, Ernestina; Yeyati, Ezequiel Levy; Diez, Maria L; Cavadas, Demetrio; Garcia-Monaco, Ricardo D; Ros, Pablo R

    2013-01-01

    Pneumo-computed tomography (PnCT) is a technique primarily developed and used to study stenotic lesions of the esophagus, gastroesophageal junction and stomach for pre-surgical planning. It helps to define both upper and lower borders of neoplasms located in the aforementioned areas. It achieves maximum lumen distension with CO2 highlighting thickened areas of the esophageal wall, thus allowing an accurate quantification of their extents. Although there are other alternatives for distension (oral contrast agents, water and effervescent granules), they may be suboptimal. Patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer have a dismal prognosis despite surgical resection. Therefore, neoadjuvant treatment strategies using radiation therapy and chemotherapy were developed to improve survival. Neoadjuvant therapy improves esophageal tumor prognosis in a substantial proportion of patients, and the use of imaging techniques is mandatory to detect their response. PnCT combined with virtual endoscopy and multiplanar reconstruction enhances morphologic details in esophageal cancer, and thus would allow an improved assessment of response to neoadjuvant treatment. Therefore, more information could be provided to assess the efficacy of pre-surgical treatment. We describe the potential use of PnCT to assess the response to neoadjuvant therapy in esophageal cancer with an imaging pathologic correlation. PMID:24363830

  7. Biomarker analysis of cetuximab plus oxaliplatin/leucovorin/5-fluorouracil in first-line metastatic gastric and oesophago-gastric junction cancer: results from a phase II trial of the Arbeitsgemeinschaft Internistische Onkologie (AIO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luber, Birgit; Folprecht, Gunnar; Wöll, Ewald; Decker, Thomas; Endlicher, Esther; Lorenzen, Sylvie; Fend, Falko; Peschel, Christian; Lordick, Florian; Deplazes, Joëlle; Keller, Gisela; Walch, Axel; Rauser, Sandra; Eichmann, Martin; Langer, Rupert; Höfler, Heinz; Hegewisch-Becker, Susanna

    2011-01-01

    The activity of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-directed monoclonal antibody cetuximab combined with oxaliplatin/leucovorin/5-fluorouracil (FUFOX) was assessed in first-line metastatic gastric and oesophago-gastric junction (OGJ) cancer in a prospective phase II study showing a promising objective tumour response rate of 65% and a low mutation frequency of KRAS (3%). The aim of the correlative tumour tissue studies was to investigate the relationship between EGFR gene copy numbers, activation of the EGFR pathway, expression and mutation of E-cadherin, V600E BRAF mutation and clinical outcome of patients with gastric and OGJ cancer treated with cetuximab combined with FUFOX. Patients included in this correlative study (n = 39) were a subset of patients from the clinical phase II study. The association between EGFR gene copy number, activation of the EGFR pathway, abundance and mutation of E-cadherin which plays an important role in these disorders, BRAF mutation and clinical outcome of patients was studied. EGFR gene copy number was assessed by FISH. Expression of the phosphorylated forms of EGFR and its downstream effectors Akt and MAPK, in addition to E-cadherin was analysed by immunohistochemistry. The frequency of mutant V600E BRAF was evaluated by allele-specific PCR and the mutation profile of the E-cadherin gene CDH1 was examined by DHPLC followed by direct sequence analysis. Correlations with overall survival (OS), time to progression (TTP) and overall response rate (ORR) were assessed. Our study showed a significant association between increased EGFR gene copy number (≥ 4.0) and OS in gastric and OGJ cancer, indicating the possibility that patients may be selected for treatment on a genetic basis. Furthermore, a significant correlation was shown between activated EGFR and shorter TTP and ORR, but not between activated EGFR and OS. No V600E BRAF mutations were identified. On the other hand, an interesting trend between high E

  8. Efficacy and safety of apatinib as second-line therapy for advanced gastric cancer: a single-center observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Gou, Miaomiao; Han, Chun; Li, Juan; Wang, Lijie; Qiao, Qian; Hu, Yi; Bai, Li; Liu, Zhefeng

    2017-12-05

    Apatinib has been proven to be effective and safe among patients in the third-line treatment of advanced gastric cancer in phase II and III trials. We aimed to evaluate its efficacy and safety in second-line practice, and to explore the factors associated with efficacy. Between April 2015 and May 2017, a total of 23 patients with advanced gastric adenocarcinoma or adenocarcinoma of gastroesophageal junction were enrolled and followed up retrospectively after failing the first line of systemic therapy. The median progression-free survival was 4.43 months (95% confidence interval: 1.63-7.22) and the median overall survival was 9.11 months (95% confidence interval: 8.22-9.99). Two patients achieved a partial response and 14 patients achieved stable disease. The disease control rate was 69.6% and the objective response rate was 8.7%. The most common adverse events over grade 3 were hypertension (8.7%) and thrombocytopenia (8.7%). No treatment-related death was documented during the drug administration. Apatinib is an effective regimen for the second-line treatment of advanced gastric and gastroesophageal cancer with manageable toxicity.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/.

  9. Imaging of cervicothoracic junction trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wongwaisayawan S

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sirote Wongwaisayawan,1 Ruedeekorn Suwannanon,2 Rathachai Kaewlai11Department of Radiology, Ramathibodi Hospital and Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand; 2Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, ThailandAbstract: Cervicothoracic junction trauma is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in trauma patients. Imaging has played an important role in identifying injuries and guiding appropriate, timely therapy. Computed tomography is currently a method of choice for diagnosing cervicothoracic junction trauma, in which the pattern of injuries often suggests possible mechanisms and potential injuries. In this article, the authors describe and illustrate common and uncommon injuries that can occur in the cervicothoracic junction.Keywords: cervicothoracic junction, cervical spine, trauma, imaging, radiology

  10. The Control of Junction Flows

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Smith, Charles

    1997-01-01

    An experimental study of the effects of spatially-limited (i.e. localized) surface suction on unsteady laminar and turbulent junction flows was performed using hydrogen bubble flow visualization and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV...

  11. Gaviscon and domperidon responsive apnea episodes associated with gastro-esophageal reflux disease in twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgin, Huseyin; Eren, Abdulkadir; Kara, Semra

    2015-01-01

    The possible pathophysiology of the relationship between gastro-esophageal reflux disease and apnea of prematurity has been widely investigated. Various physiological protective reflex responses provide a plausible biological link between gastro-esophageal reflux and apnea of prematurity. It is uncertain whether or not there is a causal relationship between the two diseases. PATIENT'S FINDINGS: Twins were admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit due to feeding problems. Physical examination was normal except for reticulated, blueviolet skin changes. Short apneic attacks occurred on the first day in twin 1 and on the second day in twin 2, and these were initially treated by stimulation and increased ambient O2 concentration. Then, we conducted methylxanthine and continuous positive airway pressure treatment. Laboratory and radiological analysis were normal. As gastro-esophageal reflux disease was thought to be the causes of the treatment-refractory apnea, therapy with gaviscon and domperidon was begun for both cases. Apneic attacks did not recur after gaviscon and domperidon therapy. Pharmacological therapy for gastro-esophageal reflux disease has not definitively been shown to be effective in improving symptoms and hence, should be reserved especially for infants with treatment refractory apnea episodes suspected as being gastro-esophageal reflux in premature infants.

  12. Pattern of food intolerance in patients with gastro-esophageal reflux symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caselli, Michele; Lo Cascio, Natalina; Rabitti, Stefano; Eusebi, Leonardo H; Zeni, Elena; Soavi, Cecilia; Cassol, Francesca; Zuliani, Giovanni; Zagari, Rocco M

    2017-12-01

    Many food items have been involved in gastro-esophageal reflux disease pathogenesis and dietary modification has been proposed as first-line treatment. Test-based exclusion diets have shown to significantly reduce reflux symptoms. We aimed to assess the patterns of food intolerance in a series of patients with typical gastro-esophageal reflux symptoms (GERS). We retrospectively evaluated all patients with typical reflux symptoms, attending the Centre Study Association on Food Intolerance and Nutrition of Ferrara from January 2010 to October 2015, who resulted positive to at least one food item at the Leucocytotoxic Test. The presence and severity of typical GERS (heartburn and/or acid regurgitation) were assessed using the Gastro-esophageal Reflux Disease Impact Scale (GIS) questionnaire. Only individuals with a GIS Score of at least 5 points were included. Almost all patients (91.1%) were intolerant to at least 5 food items. The most frequent food intolerance (more than 33% of patients) were found for milk (55.4%), lettuce (46.4%), coffee (43.7%), brewer's yeast (42.9%), pork (42.9%), tuna (37.5%), rice (35.7%), sole (34.8%), asparagus (34.8%) and eggs (33.9%). Nine different clusters of food intolerance were detected. Patients with typical gastro-esophageal reflux symptoms seem to have intolerance to multiple food items, some of which (lettuce, brewer's yeast, tuna, rice, sole and asparagus) have not yet been associated to gastro-esophageal reflux disease.

  13. Zonulin is not increased in the cardiac and esophageal mucosa of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wex, Thomas; Mönkemüller, Klaus; Kuester, Doerthe; Fry, Lucia; Kandulski, Arne; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2009-06-01

    Human Zonulin, related to the Zonula occludens toxin of Vibrio cholerae, regulates intestinal permeability and is induced in inflammatory disorders of the lower GI tract. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is associated with an impairment of epithelial barrier function. Here, we studied expression of zonulin in the gastroesophageal mucosa of 58 patients with typical reflux symptoms and 27 asymptomatic controls. During endoscopy, multiple biopsies from gastroesophageal mucosa were obtained for routine histopathology (Helicobacter pylori-status, inflammation) and gene expression analysis (immunohistochemistry, ELISA). Patients with GERD presented with typical histopathological alterations like elongation of papillae (P=0.015), basal cell hyperplasia (PZonulin was found to be expressed ubiquitously in gastroesophageal mucosa. Mucosal levels in controls ranged between 2.2 and 3.7 ng/microg total protein. Mean values were significantly higher in antrum (3.3+/-1.7 ng/microg) than cardia (2.7+/-1.2n g/microg) and esophagus (2.2+/-1.3 ng/microg) (Pzonulin expression in gastroesophageal mucosa. In conclusion, despite its established role for intestinal permeability, Zonulin seems not to be involved in the regulation of epithelial barrier function in relation to GERD.

  14. Intercellular junctions in nerve-free hydra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McDowall, A W; Grimmelikhuijzen, C J

    1980-01-01

    Epithelial cells of nerve-free hydra contain septate and gap junctions. In thin sections the gap junctions are characterized by a gap of 3-4 nm. Freeze-fracture demonstrates the presence of septate junctions and two further types of structures: (i) the "E-type" or "inverted" gap junctions...

  15. Josephson junctions with ferromagnetic interlayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wild, Georg Hermann

    2012-03-04

    We report on the fabrication of superconductor/insulator/ferromagnetic metal/superconductor (Nb/AlO{sub x}/Pd{sub 0.82}Ni{sub 0.18}/Nb) Josephson junctions (SIFS JJs) with high critical current densities, large normal resistance times area products, and high quality factors. For these junctions, a transition from 0- to {pi}-coupling is observed for a thickness d{sub F}=6 nm of the ferromagnetic Pd{sub 0.82}Ni{sub 0.18} interlayer. The magnetic field dependence of the critical current of the junctions demonstrates good spatial homogeneity of the tunneling barrier and ferromagnetic interlayer. Magnetic characterization shows that the Pd{sub 0.82}Ni{sub 0.18} has an out-of-plane anisotropy and large saturation magnetization indicating negligible dead layers at the interfaces. A careful analysis of Fiske modes up to about 400 GHz provides valuable information on the junction quality factor and the relevant damping mechanisms. Whereas losses due to quasiparticle tunneling dominate at low frequencies, at high frequencies the damping is explained by the finite surface resistance of the junction electrodes. High quality factors of up to 30 around 200 GHz have been achieved. They allow to study the junction dynamics, in particular the switching probability from the zero-voltage into the voltage state with and without microwave irradiation. The experiments with microwave irradiation are well explained within semi-classical models and numerical simulations. In contrast, at mK temperature the switching dynamics without applied microwaves clearly shows secondary quantum effects. Here, we could observe for the first time macroscopic quantum tunneling in Josephson junctions with a ferromagnetic interlayer. This observation excludes fluctuations of the critical current as a consequence of an unstable magnetic domain structure of the ferromagnetic interlayer and affirms the suitability of SIFS Josephson junctions for quantum information processing.

  16. Evaluation of Gastroesophageal Reflux in Anesthetized Dogs with Brachycephalic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaver, Stephanie L; Barbur, Laura A; Jimenez, David A; Brainard, Benjamin M; Cornell, Karen K; Radlinsky, MaryAnn G; Schmiedt, Chad W

    Brachycephalic airway syndrome may predispose to gastroesophageal reflux (GER) because of the high negative intrathoracic pressures required to overcome conformational partial upper airway obstruction. To investigate this, 20 dogs presenting for elective correction of brachycephalic airway syndrome (cases) and 20 non-brachycephalic dogs (controls) undergoing other elective surgeries were prospectively enrolled. Dogs underwent a standardized anesthetic protocol, and esophageal pH was monitored. Signalment, body weight, historical gastrointestinal and respiratory disease, complete blood count, serum biochemical values, radiographic findings, and anesthetic and surgical time were compared between cases and controls, and dogs that did and did not have basic (pH > 7.5), acidic (pH dogs were evaluated, dogs with GER had increased creatinine (P = .01), % positive for esophageal fluid on radiographs (P = .05), and body weight (P = .04) compared to those without GER. GER was common in both cases and controls, and cases had lower esophageal pH; however, greater numbers are required to determine if a true difference exists in % GER.

  17. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: Association with gastroesophageal reflux disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Chul; Oh, Jae Hee; Byun, Joo Nam

    1992-01-01

    Multiple factors including gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) were evaluated for a case-control study in Chonnam area to investigate the causative entity of COPD. Data on the multiple causative factors from hospital records and interview survey were analyzed in three groups of COPD (64 cases as case group), normal lung (83 cases as control group 1) and non-COPD lung disease (45 case as control group 2). Smoking status, history of adulthood pulmonary infection and frequent history of URI, socioeconomic status, and GERD were significant different between COPD group and control group 1. Drinking status, physical height of the subjects and GERD were significant different between COPD group and control group 2. If control group 1 was used, odds ratio of GERD and COPD was 5.68 (95% confidence interval, 95% CI: 2.59-12.45) and 4.81 (95% CI: 1.89-10.53) when adjusted by age and smoking status. If control group 2 was used, odds ratio of GERD and COPD was 4.22 (95% CI: 1.69-10.56) and 4.59 (95% CI: 1.64-12.86) when adjusted by alcohol and adulthood respiratory infection status. In summary, there result suggested that GERD might play a causative role in the development of COPD

  18. Debut of Gastroesophageal Reflux Concomitant with Administration of Sublingual Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Juel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GORD is an often debilitating condition characterised by retrograde flow of content from stomach into the oesophagus, where the low pH of the stomach acid irritates the mucosa of the oesophagus. The most dominant symptoms in GORD are pyrosis, regurgitation, and dysphagia. Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT was first described in 1986. Following this description, the use has greatly increased in the treatment of allergic rhinitis, as an alternative to subcutaneously administered immunotherapy. Side effects are commonly of oropharyngeal and gastrointestinal nature, for example, swelling, itching, irritation, ulceration of the oropharynx and nausea, abdominal pain, vomiting, and diarrhoea. More serious side effects are dominated by respiratory tract and systemic manifestations. A 30-year-old male experienced refractory, relentless, and debilitation GORD subsequent to administration of sublingual immunotherapy for house dust mite in allergic rhinitis. The patient had to stop the SLIT after two weeks of administration due to GORD. The cessation resulted in rapid resolution of symptoms.

  19. Gastric emptying of solid food in patients with gastroesophageal reflux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shay, S.; Eggli, D.; Van Nostrand, D.; Johnson, L.

    1985-01-01

    While delayed solid gastric emptying (GE) has been reported in patients with gastroesophageal reflux (GER), the relationship of GE to daytime and/or nighttime reflux patterns, and the severity of endoscopic esophagitis are unknown. The authors measured GE in a study population of symptomatic patients (n=33) with abnormal 24 hour pH monitoring (24 hr pH). The study population was divided into two groups by esophagoscopy; those with (E+=22); and 2) those without (E-=11) erosive esophagitis and/or Barrett's esophagus. GE was measured in all patients and in 15 normal volunteers (NL) by the in vivo labelling of chicken liver with Tc-99m-SC, which was in turn diced into 1 cm. cubes and given in 7 1/2 oz. of beef stew. Upright one minute anterior and posterior digital images were obtained every 15 min. for 2.5 hours. 24 hour pH was divided into daytime (upright) and nighttime (supine) segments, and acid exposure was defined as % time pH < 4 for that posture. There was no correlation between GE T 1/2 and acid exposure, daytime or nighttime, for the patient population as a whole. However, patients with the longest GE T1/2 tended to have severe daytime reflux. The authors rarely found delayed solid food gastric emptying in patients with reflux; moreover, they found no association between GE and either diurnal reflux patterns on 24 hr pH or the severity of endoscopic esophagitis

  20. Respiratory complications of gastroesophageal reflux associated with paraesophageal hiatal hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greub, Gilbert; Liaudet, Lucas; Wiesel, Paul; Bettschart, Vincent; Schaller, Marie-Denise

    2003-08-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) may be associated with episodes of bronchoaspiration, sometimes leading to life-threatening respiratory complications. GERD is frequently observed in the setting of type 1 (sliding type) hiatal hernia, but only infrequently complicates the course of type 2 (paraesophageal) hernia. We performed a retrospective analysis of 50 patients operated for type 2 hiatal hernia in our hospital, to determine the prevalence of respiratory complaints related to GERD in this setting. We found 7 cases (14%) of type 2 hiatal hernia complicated by pulmonary manifestations as the only symptoms of GERD. These ranged from dyspnea to severe bronchoconstriction and acute respiratory failure. The series is illustrated by the report of 1 patient who experienced acute bronchospasm and cardiopulmonary arrest as a complication of GERD. In all patients, surgical repair of the hiatal hernia, together with an antireflux procedure, resulted in complete resolution of the respiratory complaints for follow-up periods up to 160 months. Our data emphasize the particular prevalence of respiratory involvement in the case of GERD complicating type 2 hiatal hernia, and also the excellent symptomatic results obtained by surgical therapy for this condition.

  1. [Gastroesophageal reflux disease in preschool children with asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Yukinori; Kameda, Makoto; Nishikido, Tomoki; Takamatu, Isamu; Doi, Satoru

    2008-05-01

    In pediatric intractable asthma, there is occasionally an association with GERD (gastroesophageal reflux disease). It is not clear in which cases GERD should be suspected or how effective the GERD therapy is in treating the asthma. Twenty-seven preschool children (asthma attack in spite of asthma therapy underwent 24-hour esophageal pH monitoring. We examined retrospectively the incidence of GERD and the effectiveness of famotidine in GERD positive patients. 18 of the 27 patients (66.7%) had positive results (GERD positive group). In 12 of the 15 patients (80%) who underwent GERD therapy (famotidine), respiratory symptoms were decreased. In the GERD positive group, the incidence of acid reflux during waking hours was more frequent than during sleeping hours. In 8 of 12 patients (66.7%) in whom famotidine was effective, cough and wheeze often occurred during the daytime and corresponded with the time when acid reflux must commonly occurred. We conclude that children suffering from recurrent asthma attack in spite of asthma therapy must be examined for the presence of GERD.

  2. Respiratory repercussions of gastroesophageal reflux and cine-esophagogastroscintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillemeteau, C.; Saudubray, F.; Guillet, J.

    1985-01-01

    Asthma and recurrent bronchopneumopathies in children are often associated with gastroesophageal reflux. Cine-esogastroscintigraphy is proposed for demonstrating reflux and establishing its direct or indirect responsibility in respiratory disease. 133 patients aged 5 months to 16 years were studied. Reflux was found in 65.5% of cases, either severe (44.4% of cases) or minor (21.1%). Episodes of reflux produced respiratory manifestations in 7% of patients. Inhalation of refluxed material was proved in 3% by demonstration of pulmonary contamination. Sensitivity of cine-esophagogastroscintigraphy is comparable to that of esophageal pH measurement for detection of reflux. It does not require positioning of a probe in the esophageal lumen. It provides quantitative parameters on esophageal transit, reflux and gastric voiding, and demonstrates pulmonary contamination. It is easy to perform and can be readily included in an outpatient clinic workup. Its sensitivity and reliability make it a useful tool for evaluation of therapeutic efficiency. The interlocking of various physiopathologic factors contributes to the polymorphism of respiratory manifestations of reflux [fr

  3. Respiratory repercussions of gastroesophageal reflux and cine-esophagogastroscintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillemeteau, C.; Saudubray, F.; Guillet, J.

    1984-01-01

    Asthma and recurrent bronchopneumopathies in children are often associated with gastroesophageal reflux. Cine-esogastroscintigraphy is proposed for demonstrating reflux and establishing its direct or indirect responsibility in respiratory disease. 133 patients aged 5 months to 16 years were studied. Reflux was found in 65.5% of cases, either severe (44.4% of cases) or minor (21.1%). Episodes of reflux produced respiratory manifestations in 7% of patients. Inhalation of refluxed material was proved in 3% by demonstration of pulmonary contamination. Sensitivity of cine-esophagogastroscintigraphy is comparable to that of esophageal pH measurement for detection of reflux. It does not require positioning of a probe in the esophageal lumen. It provides quantitative parameters on esophageal transit, reflux and gastric voiding, and demonstrates pulmonary contamination. It is easy to perform and can be readily included in an outpatient clinic workup. Its sensitivity and reliability make it a useful tool for evaluation of therapeutic efficiency. The interlocking of various physiopathologic factors contributes to the polymorphism of respiratory manifestations of reflux [fr

  4. Factors that influence therapeutic outcomes in symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quigley, Eamonn M M

    2012-02-03

    The term "symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux disease" (GERD) refers to those patients who present with the typical GERD symptoms of heartburn and regurgitation, yet do not have endoscopic evidence of esophagitis. The primary goals of managing symptomatic GERD are to control symptoms and improve quality of life. A clinical assessment of the GERD patient can identify important clinical features, such as atypical and extraesophageal symptoms for which acid-suppressive agents tend to be less effective. Performing an endoscopy can further identify the patient as having nonerosive reflux disease, erosive esophagitis, or Barrett\\'s esophagus-diagnoses which can help determine treatment but may not prove predictive of therapeutic response. Determining acid exposure through pH testing can predict therapeutic response, with those revealing an abnormal acid exposure time being more responsive to acid-suppressive therapy. However, the performance of an endoscopy and pH testing on each patient is clearly not practical. Whereas the natural history of symptomatic GERD is still largely undefined, acid-suppressive therapy appears to be the best approach available for both the short-term and long-term management of this disease.

  5. Extraoesophageal symptoms and signs of gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojan Tepeš

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is very common in developed world, with the prevalence of disease is between 6 and 20%. Pathologic reflux can provoke not only typical symptoms (heartburn and regurgitation but also atypical symptoms and diseases of extraoesophageal organs (pulmonary, ENT, mouth. High prevalence of GERD in patients with unexplained chest pain, asthma, chronic cough, chronic laryngitis, hoarsness and dental erosions is not a proof of causality. GERD can cause these diseases with reflux of acid and pepsin into pharynx, larynx, lungs and mouth (reflux theory or through vasovagal mechanisms (reflex theory. Conclusions Good therapeutic success with medical or operative treatment in early methodologically not well conducted studies has not been completely proven in double-blind placebo controlled studies. GERD is an ethyological reason for these extraoesophageal symptoms and diseases in an approximately one third of patients. With diagnostic modalities that we have now, we cannot clearly define in which patient is GERD is an ethyologic factor or a contributer, before we start the treatment. In patients suspected of having GERD, there is therapeutic option of a trial with high dose of proton pump inhibitor for 3 to 6 months. In other patients with low clinical suspicion of GERD, 24-hour pH testing should be done first.

  6. Pharmacological Therapy of Gastroesophageal Reflux in Preterm Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Corvaglia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although gastroesophageal reflux (GER is a very common phenomenon among preterm infants, its therapeutic management is still an issue of debate among neonatologists. A step-wise approach should be advisable, firstly promoting nonpharmacological interventions and limiting drugs to selected infants unresponsive to the conservative measures or who are suffering from severe GER with clinical complications. Despite of this, a concerning pharmacological overtreatment has been increasingly reported. Most of the antireflux drugs, however, have not been specifically assessed in preterm infants; moreover, serious adverse effects have been noticed in association to their administration. This review mainly aims to draw the state of the art regarding the pharmacological management of GER in preterm infants, analyzing the best piecies of evidence currently available on the most prescribed anti-reflux drugs. Although further trials are required, sodium alginate-based formulations might be considered promising; however, data regarding their safety are still limited. Few piecies of evidence on the efficacy of histamine-2 receptor blockers and proton pump inhibitors in preterm infants with GER are currently available. Nevertheless, a significantly increased risk of necrotizing enterocolitis and infections has been largely reported in association with their use, thereby leading to an unfavorable risk-benefit ratio. The efficacy of metoclopramide in GER’s improvement still needs to be clarified. Other prokinetic agents, such as domperidone and erythromycin, have been reported to be ineffective, whereas cisapride has been withdrawn due to its remarkable cardiac adverse effects.

  7. Does gastroesophageal reflux cause apnea in preterm infants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molloy, Eleanor J; Di Fiore, Juliann M; Martin, Richard J

    2005-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) and apnea are both common occurrences in premature infants but their relationship is controversial. We present the evidence for and against an association between GER and apnea and discuss the merits and limitations of the various methodologies employed in characterizing such a relationship. Overall, GER and apnea do not appear temporally related in preterm infants, despite strong physiologic evidence that stimulation of laryngeal afferents elicits central apnea and laryngeal adduction. In a subpopulation of infants with neurodevelopmental compromise, there may be an increased incidence of both apnea and GER, although the direct association between GER and apnea in this population is unclear. Therefore, we believe there is no evidence to support widespread use of anti-reflux medications in the treatment of apnea in preterm infants. Further studies are needed to clarify the existence of a small subpopulation of infants who may have GER-induced apnea, to identify potential triggering mechanisms, and to document benefit from newer pharmacological approaches. Copyright 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel

  8. Psychological modulation in patients surgically intervened for gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, F J Pérez; Carranque, G; Oehling, H; Hernández, J M; Oliva, H

    2014-08-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has been related with certain psychological dimensions. The influence of mood, emotional intelligence, and perceived quality of life on clinical symptoms and outcome of antireflux surgery was evaluated in GERD patients with and without hiatal hernia. The study included 61 patients who were diagnosed with GERD between 2003 and 2008: 16 of them without hiatal hernia (group A) and 45 of them with hiatal hernia (group B). All of these patients had undergone laparoscopic antireflux surgery. Patients were clinically examined and evaluated with the following instruments: Short Form (SF)-36 Health Survey, Gastrointestinal Quality of Life Index, Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) Scale, and Trait Meta-Mood Scale (TMMS)-24. Proportions were compared by using the chi-squared test; averages were compared by using the Student's t-test (with Bonferroni's correction). In general, our patients intervened for GERD showed results lower than normal or close to the lower limit of normal in the administered tests. Patients in the group without hernia were younger (P tolerance to stress and higher frustration, fear, and worry. On the basis of such unfavorable phychoemotional results observed with GERD patients (especially those without hernia) in the different tests, we propose that improving our knowledge of the psychological profile of GERD patients - particularly those without hiatal hernia - could help in designing individualized medical and psychological therapies and increase success rates. © 2012 Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2012, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  9. Prevalence of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Type II Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huihui Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims. Patients with type II diabetes mellitus (DM were known to have higher prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD in the Western countries, but data on the impact of GERD on DM patients in our country are scarce. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of GERD in type II DM patients in Shanghai, China, and to explore its possible risk factors. Methods. 775 type II DM cases were randomly collected. Reflux Disease Questionnaire (RDQ was used to check the presence of GERD. Patients’ characteristics, laboratory data, face-to-face interview, nerve conduction study, and needle electromyogram (EMG test were analyzed. Results. 16% patients were found with typical GERD symptoms. Pathophysiological factors such as peripheral neuropathy, metabolism syndrome, and obesity were found to have no significant differences between GERD and non-GERD type II DM patients in the present study. Conclusion. The prevalence of GERD in type II DM patients is higher than that in adult inhabitants in Shanghai, China. No difference in pathophysiological factors, such as peripheral neuropathy, and metabolism syndrome was found in DM-GERD patients, suggesting that further study and efforts are needed to explore deeper the potential risk factors for the high prevalence rate of GERD in DM patients.

  10. Review of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in the diabetic patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punjabi, Paawan; Hira, Angela; Prasad, Shanti; Wang, Xiangbing; Chokhavatia, Sita

    2015-09-01

    This article reviews the known pathophysiological mechanisms of comorbid gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in the diabetic patient, discusses therapeutic options in care, and provides an approach to its evaluation and management. We searched for review articles published in the past 10 years through a PubMed search using the filters diabetes mellitus, GERD, pathophysiology, and management. The search only yielded a handful of articles, so we independently included relevant studies from these review articles along with related citations as suggested by PubMed. We found diabetic patients are more prone to developing GERD and may present with atypical manifestations. A number of mechanisms have been proposed to elucidate the connection between these two diseases. Studies involving treatment options for comorbid disease suggest conflicting drug-drug interactions. Currently, there are no published guidelines specifically for the evaluation and management of GERD in the diabetic patient. Although there are several proposed mechanisms for the higher prevalence of GERD in the diabetic patient, this complex interrelationship requires further research. Understanding the pathophysiology will help direct diagnostic evaluation. In our review, we propose a management algorithm for GERD in the diabetic patient. © 2015 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  11. Belching during gastroscopy and its association with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, B S; Lee, S H; Jang, D K; Chung, K H; Hwang, J H; Jang, S E; Cha, B H; Ryu, J K; Kim, Y-T

    2016-05-01

    Belching may result from transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation; therefore, it has been proposed that belching may be a manifestation of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This study was conducted to investigate the frequency of belching during esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) and its association with GERD. A retrospective review was performed on prospectively collected clinical and endoscopic data from 404 subjects who underwent EGD without sedation from December 2012 to May 2013 in a training hospital in Korea. All detectable belching events during endoscopy were counted. Frequency and severity of belching events were compared between the group with and without GERD using an ordinal logistic regression model. There were 145 GERD patients (26 erosive reflux disease and 119 nonerosive reflux disease [NERD]). In the multivariable analysis, GERD was significantly associated with a higher frequency of belching events (odds ratio = 6.59, P GERD severity according to the Los Angeles classification (P GERD, including NERD. Future research should focus on its adjuvant role in the diagnosis of GERD/NERD and the necessity for applying differentiated endoscopy strategies for GERD patients, leading to less discomfort during EGD in patients at risk for intolerability. © 2015 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  12. Recent advances in diagnostic testing for gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Rishi D; Vaezi, Michael F

    2017-06-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has a large economic burden with important complications that include esophagitis, Barrett's esophagus, and adenocarcinoma. Despite endoscopy, validated patient questionnaires, and traditional ambulatory pH monitoring, the diagnosis of GERD continues to be challenging. Areas covered: This review will explore the difficulties in diagnosing GERD with a focus on new developments, ranging from basic fundamental changes (histology and immunohistochemistry) to direct patient care (narrow-band imaging, impedance, and response to anti-reflux surgery). We searched PubMed using the noted keywords. We included data from full-text articles published in English. Further relevant articles were identified from the reference lists of review articles. Expert commentary: Important advances in novel parameters in intraluminal impedance monitoring such as baseline impedance monitoring has created some insight into alternative diagnostic strategies in GERD. Recent advances in endoscopic assessment of esophageal epithelial integrity via mucosal impedance measurement is questioning the paradigm of prolonged ambulatory testing for GERD. The future of reflux diagnosis may very well be without the need for currently employed technologies and could be as simple as assessing changes in epithelia integrity as a surrogate marker for GERD. However, future studies must validate such an approach.

  13. FEATURES OF CLINICAL COURSE OF GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE IN NEWLY RECRUITED WITH CONNECTIVE TISSUE UNDIFFERENTIATED DYSPLASIA SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.I. Kashkina

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The presence of connective tissue undifferentiated dysplasia syndrome against a background of psychological stress at newly recruited can promote the risk of gastroesophageal reflux disease occurrence. To the utmost, correlation between the gastroesophageal reflux disease and such manifestations of connective tissue undifferentiated dysplasia syndrome as asthenic constitution, chest deformation, Gothic palate and hypermobility of joints was found

  14. Concomitant functional dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome decrease health-related quality of life in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Durk R.; van Herwaarden, Margot A.; Baron, Astrid; Smout, André J. P. M.; Samsom, Melvin

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Previous studies have reported an overlap between gastroesophageal reflux symptoms, functional dyspepsia (FD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of FD and IBS in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and the effect on

  15. Risk Factors on the Development of New-Onset Gastroesophageal Reflux Symptoms. A Population-Based Prospective Cohort Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallan, Andreas; Bomme, M.; Hveem, K.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a highly prevalent disorder. This study assessed the risk factors of new-onset gastroesophageal reflux symptoms (GERS). METHODS: The study was based on the HUNT study, a prospective population-based cohort study conducted in 1995-1997 and 2006...

  16. Peltier cooling in molecular junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Longji; Miao, Ruijiao; Wang, Kun; Thompson, Dakotah; Zotti, Linda Angela; Cuevas, Juan Carlos; Meyhofer, Edgar; Reddy, Pramod

    2018-02-01

    The study of thermoelectricity in molecular junctions is of fundamental interest for the development of various technologies including cooling (refrigeration) and heat-to-electricity conversion1-4. Recent experimental progress in probing the thermopower (Seebeck effect) of molecular junctions5-9 has enabled studies of the relationship between thermoelectricity and molecular structure10,11. However, observations of Peltier cooling in molecular junctions—a critical step for establishing molecular-based refrigeration—have remained inaccessible. Here, we report direct experimental observations of Peltier cooling in molecular junctions. By integrating conducting-probe atomic force microscopy12,13 with custom-fabricated picowatt-resolution calorimetric microdevices, we created an experimental platform that enables the unified characterization of electrical, thermoelectric and energy dissipation characteristics of molecular junctions. Using this platform, we studied gold junctions with prototypical molecules (Au-biphenyl-4,4'-dithiol-Au, Au-terphenyl-4,4''-dithiol-Au and Au-4,4'-bipyridine-Au) and revealed the relationship between heating or cooling and charge transmission characteristics. Our experimental conclusions are supported by self-energy-corrected density functional theory calculations. We expect these advances to stimulate studies of both thermal and thermoelectric transport in molecular junctions where the possibility of extraordinarily efficient energy conversion has been theoretically predicted2-4,14.

  17. Stenting as a palliative method in the management of advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the oesophagus and gastro-oesophageal junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Wlodarczyk

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the oesophagus and gastroesophageal junction usually requires palliative treatment, and the method of choice is stenting. There are several types of stents currently available, including: self-expandable metallic stents (fully or partially covered; self-expandable plastic stents; biodegradable stents. Each of the mentioned stents has its advantages and limitations, and requires a proper, patient-tailored selection. Due to the close anatomical relationship between the oesophagus and bronchial tree, some patients may require bilateral stenting. Oesophageal stenting may not only be considered as a palliative procedure, but can also be implemented to alleviate dysphagia during preoperative chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy.

  18. Personalized Clinical Decision Making in Gastrointestinal Malignancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hess, Søren; Bjerring, Ole Steen; Pfeiffer, Per

    2016-01-01

    and initial stages. This article outlines the potential use of fluorodeoxyglucose-PET/CT in clinical decision making with special regard to preoperative evaluation and response assessment in gastric cancer (including the gastroesophageal junction), pancreatic cancer (excluding neuroendocrine tumors...

  19. Electronic thermometry in tunable tunnel junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maksymovych, Petro

    2016-03-15

    A tunable tunnel junction thermometry circuit includes a variable width tunnel junction between a test object and a probe. The junction width is varied and a change in thermovoltage across the junction with respect to the change in distance across the junction is determined. Also, a change in biased current with respect to a change in distance across the junction is determined. A temperature gradient across the junction is determined based on a mathematical relationship between the temperature gradient, the change in thermovoltage with respect to distance and the change in biased current with respect to distance. Thermovoltage may be measured by nullifying a thermoelectric tunneling current with an applied voltage supply level. A piezoelectric actuator may modulate the probe, and thus the junction width, to vary thermovoltage and biased current across the junction. Lock-in amplifiers measure the derivatives of the thermovoltage and biased current modulated by varying junction width.

  20. Yield of Staging Laparoscopy and Lavage Cytology for Radiologically Occult Peritoneal Carcinomatosis of Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikoma, Naruhiko; Blum, Mariela; Chiang, Yi-Ju; Estrella, Jeannelyn S; Roy-Chowdhuri, Sinchita; Fournier, Keith; Mansfield, Paul; Ajani, Jaffer A; Badgwell, Brian D

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to identify the yield of staging laparoscopy with peritoneal lavage cytology for gastric cancer patients and to track it over time. The medical records of patients with gastric or gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma who underwent pretreatment staging laparoscopy at the authors' institution from 1995 to 2012 were reviewed. The yield of laparoscopy was defined as the proportion of patients who had positive findings on laparoscopy, including those with macroscopic carcinomatosis, positive cytology, or other clinically important findings. To compare the yield of laparoscopy over time, the patients were divided into three 6-year ranges based on the date of diagnosis. Associations between clinicopathologic factors and peritoneal disease were examined using uni- and multivariate analyses. The study included 711 patients. Among these patients, 43.5 % had gastroesophageal junction tumors, 72.9 % had poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma, and 53 % had signet ring cell morphology. Endoscopic ultrasound had most commonly identified T3 (83.9 %) and N-positive (66.4 %) tumors. At laparoscopy, 148 (20.8 %) patients had been found to have macroscopic peritoneal carcinomatosis. Among 514 macroscopically negative patients who underwent peritoneal lavage cytologic analysis, 68 (13.2 %) had positive cytology results for malignancy. The total laparoscopy yield was 36 %, which did not change over time (p = 0.58). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that positive cytology or carcinomatosis was associated with poorly differentiated histology, linitis plastica, and equivocal computed tomography findings. Laparoscopy remains a useful staging procedure to evaluate for peritoneal spread when treatment or surgery is considered, even with the current availability of high-quality imaging.

  1. Gastroesophageal reflux disease: the results of videolaparoscopic fundoplication at five years after surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasyshyn, Andriy R

    GERD reduces social activity and significantly affects the quality of life (QOL) of patients and the risk of complications (cancer of the esophagus, esophageal-gastric bleeding, strictures, perforation) is one of the most pressing problems of medicine of XXI century. The aim of the research is to evaluate the results of videolaparoscopic fundoplication at five years after surgery in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. We studied results of videolaparoscopic antireflux surgery (VLAS) during 2009-2016 years in Department of Surgery and Endoscopy Faculty of postgraduate medical education Lviv National Medical University. We have gathered the group of 195 patients who underwent VLAS. Among the complications of GERD, Barrett's esophagus was diagnosed in 9 (19.6 %), peptic ulcer of the esophagus in 10 (21.7 %), peptic stricture of the esophagus in 4 (8.7 %), esophageal-gastric bleeding in 23 (50.0 %) patients, including Malory-Weiss syndrome in 18, erosive ulcerous bleeding in 5 people. In 176 (90.2 %) patients completed Nissen fundoplication, in 14 (7.2 %) - Toupe, 5 (2.6 %) - Dor fundoplication. We use standart surgical techniques. The mean operative time was 95±25,2 minutes. In 2 patients after surgery capnothorax on left side had occurred and treated. The mean hospital stay was 3±2,4 days. There were no serious complications in the time of surgery and after it, as well as no conversions or repeated antireflux surgeries at five years after surgery. Videolaparoscopic antireflux surgery for GERD is an equally effective alternative to medical therapy and should be offered to appropriately selected patients by skilled surgeons.

  2. Gastro-esophageal reflux disease and exacerbations in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingebrigtsen, Truls S; Marott, Jacob L; Vestbo, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    (31 vs 21%, P = 0.004), more breathlessness (39 vs 22%, P history of respiratory infections (6.8 vs 1.4%, P disease. Among individuals with COPD and gastro-esophageal reflux disease, those who did......BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: We tested the hypothesis that gastro-esophageal reflux disease is a risk factor for exacerbations in individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). METHODS: Among 9622 participants in the Copenhagen City Heart Study, we identified 1259 individuals with COPD...... and information on gastro-esophageal reflux disease and the regular use of acid inhibitory treatment. These individuals were followed for 5 years with regard to medically treated COPD exacerbations, which we defined as a short course treatment with oral corticosteroids alone or in combination with antibiotics. We...

  3. Inhibitory Effect of Nasal Intermittent Positive Pressure Ventilation on Gastroesophageal Reflux.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny Cantin

    Full Text Available Non-invasive intermittent positive pressure ventilation can lead to esophageal insufflations and in turn to gastric distension. The fact that the latter induces transient relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter implies that it may increase gastroesophageal refluxes. We previously reported that nasal Pressure Support Ventilation (nPSV, contrary to nasal Neurally-Adjusted Ventilatory Assist (nNAVA, triggers active inspiratory laryngeal closure. This suggests that esophageal insufflations are more frequent in nPSV than in nNAVA. The objectives of the present study were to test the hypotheses that: i gastroesophageal refluxes are increased during nPSV compared to both control condition and nNAVA; ii esophageal insufflations occur more frequently during nPSV than nNAVA. Polysomnographic recordings and esophageal multichannel intraluminal impedance pHmetry were performed in nine chronically instrumented newborn lambs to study gastroesophageal refluxes, esophageal insufflations, states of alertness, laryngeal closure and respiration. Recordings were repeated without sedation in control condition, nPSV (15/4 cmH2O and nNAVA (~ 15/4 cmH2O. The number of gastroesophageal refluxes recorded over six hours, expressed as median (interquartile range, decreased during both nPSV (1 (0, 3 and nNAVA [1 (0, 3] compared to control condition (5 (3, 10, (p < 0.05. Meanwhile, the esophageal insufflation index did not differ between nPSV (40 (11, 61 h-1 and nNAVA (10 (9, 56 h-1 (p = 0.8. In conclusion, nPSV and nNAVA similarly inhibit gastroesophageal refluxes in healthy newborn lambs at pressures that do not lead to gastric distension. In addition, the occurrence of esophageal insufflations is not significantly different between nPSV and nNAVA. The strong inhibitory effect of nIPPV on gastroesophageal refluxes appears identical to that reported with nasal continuous positive airway pressure.

  4. TNF-alpha induced junctional modulation enhances response to radiation in Caco-2 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Yeonjoo; Ahn, Hyein; Park, Jina; Lee, Byungryong; Chung, Eunkyung [Hallym University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Jaeoun [KIRAMS, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-10-15

    The Adhesion molecules mediated cell-cell and cell matrix interactions are essential for variety of physiological and pathological processes including maintenance of normal tissues integrity as well as tumor development and progression. Cell-cell interaction is initiated by interactions of tight junctional proteins with neighboring cells. Tight junctions govern the paracellular permeability of endothelial and epithelial cells. Aberrations of tight junction formation are an early and key event during vascular spread cancer and inflammation. TNF-alpha plays an important role in the intestinal inflammation by increase of intestinal epithelial tight junction permeability. It has been reported that TNF alpha- modulated intestinal epithelial tight junction barrier is mediated by myosin light-chain kinase protein expression through NFk-B activation. However, the alterations of tight junctional proteins involved in the TNF-alpha-induced increase of intestinal TJ permeability remain unclear. Claudin is essential to the formation and maintenance of tight junction (TJ) and has been identified 24 members so far. Claudin-1, 3, 4, 6, 10 and 16 have been shown altered in various cancers and they may have important roles in cell survival, motility, and invasion of cancer cells. However, the functions of these proteins in tumorigenesis and inflammation are still being elucidated.

  5. Endoscopic management of gastroesophageal reflux disease in 2012: What works and what doesn′t

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Triadafilopoulos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux disease results primarily from the loss of an effective antireflux barrier, which forms a mechanical barrier against the retrograde movement of gastric contents. Multiple devices have been developed for the endoscopic treatment of GERD, using approaches such as sewing, transmural fasteners, endoscopic staplers, and thermal treatment. Devices that are currently commercially available for the endoscopic treatment of GERD in the US include: EndoCinch; EsophyX; Stretta. This article will highlight the endoscopic therapy of gastroesophageal reflux disease with focus on Stretta and EsophyX.

  6. Intrathoracic airway obstruction and gastroesophageal reflux: a canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, R; Pagala, M; Vaynblat, M; Marcus, M; Kazachkov, M

    2012-11-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is common in children with airway disorders. Previous studies have shown an association between upper airway obstruction and GER in experimental animal models. However, the cause and effect relationship between intrathoracic airway obstruction (IAO) and GER is obscure. The goal of this study is to investigate the association between IAO and GER using the canine model. In sedated dogs, a telemetric implant was placed subcutaneously (with one pressure sensor tip each in intrapleural space and abdomen) to monitor intrapleural pressure (IPP) and intrabdominal pressure (IAP). The IPP and the IAP were monitored intraoperatively and in conscious dogs on the 7th to 10th postoperative days. GER was assessed by determining the reflux index (RI), based on the intraesophageal pH recording performed continuously for a 24 hr period using a pH probe. After 2-3 weeks following placement of the telemetric implant, IAO was surgically created in the dog. After maintaining IAO for 2 weeks, the IPP, IAP, and pH measurements were monitored again following the same protocol as before IAO. After the creation of IAO, there was no significant change observed in the mean RI either in the distal (P = 0.716) or proximal (P = 0.962) esophageal lumens. The IPP became significantly more negative (P = 0.006) and the IAP turned significantly negative (P < 0.001) from being positive compared to the respective values before IAO. However, transdiaphragmatic pressure (Pdi) did not change significantly (P = 0.08). We conclude that moderate IAO does not cause GER in our animal model. It can be explained by the absence of significant change in Pdi after creation of IAO. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Gastroesophageal and extraesophageal reflux symptoms: similarities and differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drinnan, Michael; Powell, Jason; Nikkar-Esfahani, Ali; Heading, Robert C; Doyle, Jill; Griffin, S Michael; Leslie, Paula; Bradley, Paula T; James, Peter; Wilson, Janet A

    2015-02-01

    The association between extraesophageal reflux (EER) and symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is inadequately understood. We used the Comprehensive Reflux Symptom Scale (CReSS) to evaluate EER and reflux-symptom prevalence in gastroenterology and otolaryngology outpatients and symptom awareness among UK gastroenterologists. Cross-sectional cohort survey. Six hundred thirty-nine participants were surveyed: 103 controls, 359 patients undergoing esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD), and 177 otolaryngology clinic patients with throat symptoms. Participants completed the CReSS questionnaire. The study was undertaken in the Endoscopy Unit and the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, United Kingdom. Registered members of the British Gastroenterology Society were asked to rate how frequently reflux patients might complain of each CReSS item. The median CReSS total in volunteers (4) was significantly lower (P 15% of ENT patients and 28% of EGD patients. Three major, robust CReSS factors: esophageal, pharyngeal, and upper airway emerged. Of 259 gastroenterologists, >20% scored 8 of the 34 symptoms as never being reported by reflux patients. Endorsement of each EER CReSS item by 28% to 58% of patients with endoscopic evidence of GERD supports the Montreal consensus on an EER-GERD continuum. Gastroenterologists vary considerably in their appreciation of EER symptom relevance. The advantages of CReSS include standardized, comprehensive capture of patient experience; discriminant validity of ENT and GERD patients from volunteers; and discrete esophageal, pharyngeal, and upper airway subscales. 4. © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  8. Risk factors of gastroesophageal reflux disease in Shiraz, southern Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saberi-Firoozi, Mehdi; Khademolhosseini, Farnaz; Yousefi, Maryam; Mehrabani, Davood; Zare, Najaf; Heydari, Seyed Taghi

    2007-11-07

    To determine the prevalence and symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in a healthy general population in relation to demographic, lifestyle and health-seeking behaviors in Shiraz, southern Iran. A total of 1978 subjects aged > 35 years who referred to Gastroenterohepatology Research Center and who completed a questionnaire consisting of 27 questions for GERD in relation to demographic, lifestyle and health-seeking behaviors were included in this study for a period of five months. The validity and reliability of the questionnaire were determined. The prevalence of GERD was 15.4%, which was higher in females (17.3%), in rural areas (19.8%), and in illiterate subjects (21.5%) and those with a mean age of 50.25 years. The prevalence was significantly lower in subjects having fried food (14.8%), and fruit and vegetables (14.6%). More symptoms were noticed in subjects consuming pickles (22.1%), taking aspirin (21%) and in subjects with psychological distresses (27.2%) and headaches (22%). The correlation was statistically significant between GERD and halitosis (18.3%), dyspepsia (30.6%), anxiety (19.5%), nightmares (23.9%) and restlessness (18.5%). Their health seeking behavior showed that there was a significant restriction of diet (20%), consumption of herbal medicine (19%), using over-the-counter drugs (29.9%) and consulting with physicians (24.8%). Presence of GERD symptoms was also significantly related to a previous family history of the disease (22.3%). GERD is more common in females, rural and illiterate subjects and correlated with consumption of pickles, occurrence of headache, psychological distress, dyspepsia, halitosis, anxiety, nightmare and restlessness, and a family history of GERD and aspirin intake, but the correlation was negative with consumption of fat and fiber intake.

  9. Gastroesophageal Reflux is Not Associated with Dental Erosion in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Yvette K.; Heyman, Melvin B.; Vittinghoff, Eric; Dalal, Deepal H.; Wojcicki, Janet M.; Clark, Ann L.; Rechmann, Beate; Rechmann, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Background & Aims Dental erosion is a complication of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) in adults; in children, it is not clear if GER has a role in dental pathologic conditions. Dietary intake, oral hygiene, high bacterial load, and decreased salivary flow might contribute independently to GER development or dental erosion, but their potential involvement in dental erosion from GER is not understood. We investigated the prevalence of dental erosion among children with and without GER symptoms, and whether salivary flow rate or bacterial load contribute to location-specific dental erosion. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study of 59 children (ages 9–17 y) with symptoms of GER and 20 asymptomatic children (controls); all completed a questionnaire on dietary exposure. Permanent teeth were examined for erosion into dentin, erosion locations, and affected surfaces. The dentist was not aware of GER status, nor was the gastroenterologist aware of dental status. Stimulated salivary flow was measured and salivary bacterial load was calculated for total bacteria, Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacilli. Results Controlling for age, dietary intake, and oral hygiene, there was no association between GER symptoms and dental erosion, by tooth location or affected surface. Salivary flow did not correlate with GER symptoms or erosion. Erosion location and surface were independent of total bacteria and levels of Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacilli. Conclusions Location-specific dental erosion is not associated with GER, salivary flow, or bacterial load. Prospective studies are required to determine the pathogenesis of GER-associated dental erosion and the relationship between dental caries to GER and dental erosion. PMID:21820389

  10. Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy Does Not Increase Risk of Anastomotic Leak in Patients With Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikoma, Naruhiko; Das, Prajnan; Blum, Mariela; Estrella, Jeannelyn S; Devine, Catherine E; Wang, Xuemei; Fournier, Keith; Mansfield, Paul; Minsky, Bruce D; Ajani, Jaffer; Badgwell, Brian D

    2017-11-01

    We sought to determine whether preoperative chemoradiation therapy or chemotherapy increases the risk of anastomotic leak after gastrectomy in gastric cancer patients without gastroesophageal junction involvement. We reviewed data from a prospectively maintained database of patients who underwent gastrectomy at our institution between 2001 and 2016. The incidence of anastomotic leak and symptomatic intra-abdominal fluid collection was determined and tested for associations with the type of preoperative therapy. Risk factors for these adverse events were identified by univariate and multivariable logistic regression models. Of 346 included patients, 35% had upfront surgery, 44% had preoperative chemoradiation therapy, and 21% had preoperative chemotherapy. Anastomotic leak and intra-abdominal fluid collection were diagnosed in 3.5% and 7.5% of patients, respectively. Multivariable analysis revealed that concomitant organ resection was the only significant risk factor for anastomotic leak or intra-abdominal fluid collection (P=.014). The type of preoperative therapy was not a risk factor for anastomotic leak or intra-abdominal fluid collection. Anastomotic leak and intra-abdominal fluid collection were rare after gastrectomy, and neither type of preoperative therapy increased the risk of these adverse events. Our results add to the existing literature that preoperative therapy, including preoperative chemoradiation therapy, is safe for patients with gastric cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Esophagogastric junction contractile integral (EGJ-CI) quantifies changes in EGJ barrier function with surgical intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, D; Patel, A; Mello, M; Shriver, A; Gyawali, C P

    2016-05-01

    Esophagogastric junction contractile integral (EGJ-CI) assesses EGJ barrier function on esophageal high resolution manometry (HRM). We assessed EGJ-CI values in achalasia and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) to determine if postoperative EGJ-CI changes reflected surgical intervention. Twenty-one achalasia patients (42.8 ± 3.2 years, 62% F) with HRM before and after Heller myotomy (HM) and 68 GERD patients (53.9 ± 1.8 years, 66% F) undergoing antireflux surgery (ARS) were compared to 21 healthy controls (27.6 ± 0.6 years, 52% F). Esophagogastric junction contractile integral (mmHg.cm) was calculated using the distal contractile integral measurement across the EGJ, measured above the gastric baseline and corrected for respiration. Pre and postsurgical EGJ-CI and conventional lower esophageal sphincter pressure (LESP) metrics were compared within and between these groups using non-parametric tests. Correlation between EGJ-CI and conventional LESP metrics was assessed. Baseline EGJ-CI was higher in achalasia compared to GERD (p integral declined by 59.2% after HM in achalasia (p = 0.001), and increased by 26.3% after ARS in GERD (p = 0.005). End-expiratory and basal LESP decreased by 74.5% and 64.5% with HM, but increased by only 17.8% and 4.3% with ARS. Differences were noted between Dor vs Toupet fundoplication in achalasia (p = 0.007), and partial vs complete ARS in GERD (p = 0.03). Esophagogastric junction contractile integral correlated modestly with both end-expiratory and basal LESP (Pearson's r of 0.8 for all), but was less robust in GERD (0.7). Esophagogastric junction contractile integral has clinical utility in assessing EGJ barrier function at baseline and after surgical intervention to the EGJ, and could complement conventional EGJ metrics. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Gravitation at the Josephson Junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Atanasov

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A geometric potential from the kinetic term of a constrained to a curved hyperplane of space-time quantum superconducting condensate is derived. An energy conservation relation involving the geometric field at every material point in the superconductor is demonstrated. At a Josephson junction the energy conservation relation implies the possibility of transforming electric energy into geometric field energy, that is, curvature of space-time. Experimental procedures to verify that the Josephson junction can act as a voltage-to-curvature converter are discussed.

  13. Limited ability of the proton-pump inhibitor test to identify patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bytzer, Peter; Jones, Roger; Vakil, Nimish

    2012-01-01

    The efficacy of proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy often is assessed to determine whether patients' symptoms are acid-related and if patients have gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), although the accuracy of this approach is questionable. We evaluated the diagnostic performance of the PPI te...

  14. The diagnosis of gastro-esophageal reflux disease cannot be made with barium esophagograms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saleh, C. M. G.; Smout, A. J. P. M.; Bredenoord, A. J.

    2015-01-01

    For over 50 years, barium studies have been used to diagnose gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), but the value of this test is controversial. Our study aimed to determine if barium esophagograms can be used to diagnose GERD. Barium esophagograms and pH-impedance measurement were performed in 20

  15. Canadian Consensus Conference on the Management of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Adults – Update 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Armstrong

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is the most prevalent acid-related disorder in Canada and is associated with significant impairment of health-related quality of life. Since the last Canadian Consensus Conference in 1996, GERD management has evolved substantially.

  16. Gastroesophageal reflux: the acid test, scintigraphy or the pH probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seibert, J.J.; Byrne, W.J.; Euler, A.R.; Latture, T.; Leach, M.; Campbell, M.

    1983-01-01

    The best established technique for diagnosing gastroesophageal reflux in children is the 24 hr esophageal pH probe test. No simultaneous comparison of this technique with radionuclide scans has been reported. Therefore, simultaneous 1 hr pH monitoring and gastroesophageal scintigraphy were performed in 49 infants and children with suspected gastroesophageal reflux. Forty-seven of these patients also were later monitored by the 24 hr pH probe test. Upper gastrointestinal series were performed on all patients. All patients with a positive 1 hr pH monitoring also had positive simultaneous scintigraphy. All patients with positive scintigraphy and pH probe monitoring also had a positive upper gastrointestinal series for reflux. The sensitivity of gastroesophageal scintigraphy, when compared to the 24 hr probe as a standard, was 79%; its specificity was 93%. The sensitivity of the upper gastrointestinal series was 86%, when compared to the 24 hr pH probe test. However, its specificity was only 21%

  17. Endoscopic pH Monitoring for Patients with Suspected or Refractory Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian G Turner

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Wireless pH studies can offer prolonged pH monitoring, which may potentially facilitate the diagnosis and management of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the detection rate of abnormal esophageal acid exposure using prolonged pH monitoring in patients with suspected or refractory GERD symptoms.

  18. Efficacy of omeprazole/sodium bicarbonate treatment in gastroesophageal reflux disease: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuera-de-la-Tijera, Fátima

    2018-03-14

    Proton pump inhibitors are the most effective medical therapy for gastroesophageal reflux disease, but their onset of action may be slow. To assess the available literature regarding the efficacy of omeprazole/sodium bicarbonate in gastroesophageal reflux patients. A systematic review was conducted. A systematic literature search starting from 2000. Reviewed manuscripts concerning the effectiveness of omeprazole/sodium bicarbonate treatment in gastroesophageal reflux disease were reviewed and the data were extracted. Data were subsequently analyzed with descriptive statistics. This review included information of four studies. Two trials compared the efficacy of omeprazole/sodium bicarbonate versus omeprazole. One study compared the efficacy of once-daily morning or nighttime dosing. And another study compared omeprazole/sodium bicarbonate/alginate versus omeprazole. In total, there was no difference between omeprazole/sodium bicarbonate and omeprazole. However, there is a trend towards more sustained response and a greater proportion of patients with sustained total relief by 30 minutes with omeprazole/sodium bicarbonate. Omeprazole/sodium bicarbonate therapy is not more effective than omeprazole in the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease. However, data obtained suggest that it can have a more sustained response and sustained total relief.

  19. Effect of different recumbent positions on postprandial gastroesophageal reflux in normal subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Herwaarden, M. A.; Katzka, D. A.; Smout, A. J.; Samsom, M.; Gideon, M.; Castell, D. O.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is increased in the right compared to the left recumbent position. Esophageal acid exposure is related to the acidity at the cardia, but the effect of body position on the acidity at the cardia has not yet been investigated. We aimed to investigate the

  20. The Association Between Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and Recurrent Respiratory Papillomatosis : A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    San Giorgi, Michel R. M.; Helder, Herman M.; Lindeman, Robbert-Jan S.; de Bock, Geertruida H.; Dikkers, Frederik G.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis: Antireflux therapy is incorporated in many treatment protocols for recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) because gastroesophageal reflux (GERD) is thought to worsen the disease course of RRP. It is unclear if GERD really aggravates the disease course. The aims of this

  1. Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia: Long-term Risk of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peetsold, Marieke G.; Kneepkens, C. M. F. Frank; Heij, Hugo A.; Ijsselstijn, Hanneke; Tibboel, Dick; Gemke, Reinoud J. B. J.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a well-recognized consequence of congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). Results of studies examining predictive factors for early and late GERD are inconclusive. The aim of this study was to assess the incidence of early ( <2 years) and late GERD

  2. Electronic noise of superconducting tunnel junction detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jochum, J.; Kraus, H.; Gutsche, M.; Kemmather, B.; Feilitzsch, F. v.; Moessbauer, R.L.

    1994-01-01

    The optimal signal to noise ratio for detectors based on superconducting tunnel junctions is calculated and compared for the cases of a detector consisting of one single tunnel junction, as well as of series and of parallel connections of such tunnel junctions. The influence of 1 / f noise and its dependence on the dynamical resistance of tunnel junctions is discussed quantitatively. A single tunnel junction yields the minimum equivalent noise charge. Such a tunnel junction exhibits the best signal to noise ratio if the signal charge is independent of detector size. In case, signal charge increases with detector size, a parallel or a series connection of tunnel junctions would provide the optimum signal to noise ratio. The equivalent noise charge and the respective signal to noise ratio are deduced as functions of tunnel junction parameters such as tunneling time, quasiparticle lifetime, etc. (orig.)

  3. Saliva transit in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassiani, R A; Mota, G A; Aprile, L R O; Dantas, R O

    2015-10-01

    Saliva is an important factor in the neutralization of the acidity of the refluxed material that comes from the stomach to the esophagus. The impairment of saliva transit from oral cavity to distal esophagus may be one of the causes of esophagitis and symptoms in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). With the scintigraphic method, the transit of 2 mL of artificial saliva was measured in 30 patients with GERD and 26 controls. The patients with GERD had symptoms of heartburn and acid regurgitation, a 24-hour pH monitoring with more than 4.2% of the time with pH below four, 26 with erosive esophagitis, and four with non-erosive reflux disease. Fourteen had mild dysphagia for solid foods. Twenty-one patients had normal esophageal manometry, and nine had ineffective esophageal motility. They were 15 men and 15 women, aged 21-61 years, mean 39 years. The control group had 14 men and 12 women, aged 19-61 years, mean 35 years. The subjects swallowed in the sitting and supine position 2 mL of artificial saliva labeled with 18 MBq of (99m) Technetium phytate. The time of saliva transit was measured from oral cavity to esophageal-gastric transition, from proximal esophagus to esophageal-gastric transition, and the transit through proximal, middle, and distal esophageal body. There was no difference between patients and controls in the time for saliva to go from oral cavity to esophageal-gastric transition, and from proximal esophagus to esophageal-gastric transition, in the sitting and supine positions. In distal esophagus in the sitting position, the saliva transit duration was shorter in patients with GERD (3.0 ± 0.8 seconds) than in controls (7.6 ± 1.7 seconds, P = 0.03). In conclusion, the saliva transit from oral cavity to the esophageal-gastric transition in patients with GERD has the same duration than in controls. Saliva transit through the distal esophageal body is faster in patients with GERD than controls. © 2014 International Society for Diseases of the

  4. Gap junctions and motor behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiehn, Ole; Tresch, Matthew C.

    2002-01-01

    The production of any motor behavior requires coordinated activity in motor neurons and premotor networks. In vertebrates, this coordination is often assumed to take place through chemical synapses. Here we review recent data suggesting that electrical gap-junction coupling plays an important role...... to the production of motor behavior in adult mammals....

  5. Gap Junctions and Chagas Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adesse, Daniel; Goldenberg, Regina Coeli; Fortes, Fabio S.; Jasmin; Iacobas, Dumitru A.; Iacobas, Sanda; de Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Campos; de Narareth Meirelles, Maria; Huang, Huan; Soares, Milena B.; Tanowitz, Herbert B.; Garzoni, Luciana Ribeiro; Spray, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Gap junction channels provide intercellular communication between cells. In the heart, these channels coordinate impulse propagation along the conduction system and through the contractile musculature, thereby providing synchronous and optimal cardiac output. As in other arrhythmogenic cardiac diseases, chagasic cardiomyopathy is associated with decreased expression of the gap junction protein connexin43 (Cx43) and its gene. Our studies of cardiac myocytes infected with Trypanosoma cruzi have revealed that synchronous contraction is greatly impaired and gap junction immunoreactivity is lost in infected cells. Such changes are not seen for molecules forming tight junctions, another component of the intercalated disc in cardiac myocytes. Transcriptomic studies of hearts from mouse models of Chagas disease and from acutely infected cardiac myocytes in vitro indicate profound remodelling of gene expression patterns involving heart rhythm determinant genes, suggesting underlying mechanisms of the functional pathology. One curious feature of the altered expression of Cx43 and its gene expression is that it is limited in both extent and location, suggesting that the more global deterioration in cardiac function may result in part from spread of damage signals from more seriously compromised cells to healthier ones. PMID:21884887

  6. Dynamics of pi-junction interferometer circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornkev, V.K.; Mozhaev, P.B.; Borisenko, I.V.

    2002-01-01

    The pi-junction superconducting circuit dynamics was studied by means of numerical simulation technique. Parallel arrays consisting of Josephson junctions of both 0- and pi-type were studied as a model of high-T-c grain-boundary Josephson junction. The array dynamics and the critical current...... dependence on magnetic field are discussed. Experimental results for dc interferometers with 0 and pi high-T-c bi-crystal Josephson junctions are reported and discussed in comparison with numerical simulation....

  7. The diagnosis of gastro-esophageal reflux disease cannot be made with barium esophagograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, C M G; Smout, A J P M; Bredenoord, A J

    2015-02-01

    For over 50 years, barium studies have been used to diagnose gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), but the value of this test is controversial. Our study aimed to determine if barium esophagograms can be used to diagnose GERD. Barium esophagograms and pH-impedance measurement were performed in 20 subjects with reflux symptoms. pH-impedance measurements were used as gold standard for the diagnosis of GERD. Gastro-esophageal reflux measured with the barium study was defined as a positive outcome. 50% of patients presented gastro-esophageal reflux on the barium esophagogram. No significant differences were observed in acid exposure time between subjects with (median: 7.4%; interquartile range, IQR: 8.4%) or without reflux at barium esophagography (median: 5.95%; IQR: 13.05%; p > 0.05). Nor did we find differences in median proximal extent of reflux measured with impedance monitoring between patients with a positive (median: 6.7%; IQR: 1.95%) and negative barium study (median: 7.1%; IQR: 0.68%; p > 0.05). Patients with reflux on barium esophagogram did not have a positive symptom association probability more often than those who did not have reflux at barium esophagography. Lastly, there were no differences in numbers of acid, weakly acidic or total reflux episodes between those with positive or negative barium esophagogram (p > 0.05). No correlations were found between the maximum proximal extent of gastro-esophageal reflux during esophagography and pH-impedance parameters. Presence or absence of gastro-esophageal reflux during barium esophagography does not correlate with incidence or extent of reflux observed during 24-h pH-impedance monitoring and is not of value for the diagnosis of GERD. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Influence of central apnea in the preterm newborn with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Morán, Edgardo; Morales-Fuentes, Gerardo Alfonso; Inzunza-González, Jesús Alejandro; Cedillo-Ley, Ivonne; Gerardo-del Hoyo, Moisés; Silva-Ramírez, Horacio

    2011-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux occurs frequently in newborns. A relationship has been suspected between reflux and apnea of prematurity. The objective of this study is to determine this relationship, owing to the fact that premature newborns have immaturity of structures, especially esophageal smooth muscle. We conducted a longitudinal, analytical, comparative, and observational case/control study. The study was carried out at the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and in the Gastrointestinal Physiology Department of the Hospital Español (Mexico City) between January 2002 and December 2004. We included 22 patients: 11 females and 11 males. Mean age was 17.8 ± 8.4 days. Premature newborns represented 72.72% (n = 16). Mean gestational age was 33.1 ± 4.18 weeks. All cases were suspicious for central apnea except for three patients with a mixed cause of apnea. All were submitted to a 24-h pHmetry and a simultaneous polysomnography. Polysomnography was positive in 59% (n = 13) and pHmetry was positive in 50% (n = 11). Prematurity had a strong positive relation with central apnea of the newborn (odds ratio: 15 (p = 0.0154)). Odds ratio for association of central apnea and gastroesophageal reflux was 3.2 (p = 0.2037). We demonstrate that central apnea in the premature newborn is not a cause of gastroesophageal reflux. However, these patients are more likely to have gastroesophageal reflux in the first days of extrauterine life. It is recommended to exclude pathological gastroesophageal reflux when the newborn presents a clinical scenario compatible with central apnea.

  9. Modelling and Analysis of Long Josephson Junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, T.P.P.

    2002-01-01

    For various reasons people have been interested in Josephson junctions. Ranging from "understanding nature" to building quantum computers. In this thesis we focus on a special type of junction (the long junction) and to a special type of problem fluxon dynamics.

  10. Soliton bunching in annular Josephson junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vernik, I.V; Lazarides, Nickos; Sørensen, Mads Peter

    1996-01-01

    By studying soliton (fluxon) motion in long annular Josephson junctions it is possible to avoid the influence of the boundaries and soliton-soliton collisions present in linear junctions. A new experimental design consisting of a niobium coil placed on top of an annular junction has been used...

  11. Neoadjuvant irinotecan, cisplatin, and concurrent radiation therapy with celecoxib for patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleary, James M.; Mamon, Harvey J.; Szymonifka, Jackie; Bueno, Raphael; Choi, Noah; Donahue, Dean M.; Fidias, Panos M.; Gaissert, Henning A.; Jaklitsch, Michael T.; Kulke, Matthew H.; Lynch, Thomas P.; Mentzer, Steven J.; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A.; Swanson, Richard S.; Wain, John; Fuchs, Charles S.; Enzinger, Peter C.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer who are treated with trimodality therapy have a high recurrence rate. Preclinical evidence suggests that inhibition of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) increases the effectiveness of chemoradiation, and observational studies in humans suggest that COX-2 inhibition may reduce esophageal cancer risk. This trial tested the safety and efficacy of combining a COX2 inhibitor, celecoxib, with neoadjuvant irinotecan/cisplatin chemoradiation. This single arm phase 2 trial combined irinotecan, cisplatin, and celecoxib with concurrent radiation therapy. Patients with stage IIA-IVA esophageal cancer received weekly cisplatin 30 mg/m 2 plus irinotecan 65 mg/m 2 on weeks 1, 2, 4, and 5 concurrently with 5040 cGy of radiation therapy. Celecoxib 400 mg was taken orally twice daily during chemoradiation, up to 1 week before surgery, and for 6 months following surgery. Forty patients were enrolled with stage IIa (30 %), stage IIb (20 %), stage III (22.5 %), and stage IVA (27.5 %) esophageal or gastroesophageal junction cancer (AJCC, 5th Edition). During chemoradiation, grade 3–4 treatment-related toxicity included dysphagia (20 %), anorexia (17.5 %), dehydration (17.5 %), nausea (15 %), neutropenia (12.5 %), diarrhea (10 %), fatigue (7.5 %), and febrile neutropenia (7.5 %). The pathological complete response rate was 32.5 %. The median progression free survival was 15.7 months and the median overall survival was 34.7 months. 15 % (n = 6) of patients treated on this study developed brain metastases. The addition of celecoxib to neoadjuvant cisplatin-irinotecan chemoradiation was tolerable; however, overall survival appeared comparable to prior studies using neoadjuvant cisplatin-irinotecan chemoradiation alone. Further studies adding celecoxib to neoadjuvant chemoradiation in esophageal cancer are not warranted. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT00137852, registered August 29, 2005

  12. The predictive value of plasma cytokines on gastroesophageal anastomotic leakage at an early stage in patients undergoing esophagectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jie-Qiong; He, Yi-Zhou; Fang, Yuan; Wu, Wei; Zhong, Ming

    2017-08-01

    It's difficult to diagnose gastroesophageal anastomotic leakage (GAL) at early postoperative stage. This study was conducted to evaluate the early predictive value of plasma cytokines levels on GAL in patients undergoing esophagectomy. Consecutive esophageal cancer patients who underwent esophagectomy and admitted to Surgical Intensive Care Unit (SICU) just after surgery were retrospectively analyzed. The baseline and postoperative 1 day plasma cytokine levels were collected and analyzed to evaluate the predictive value for clinically important anastomotic leakage. Area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) analysis was also performed. A total of 183 patients were included. Sixteen patients (8.74%) experienced GAL (GAL group) and the others did not (non-GAL group). The concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-2R, IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10 in plasma on the first postoperative day significantly increased in the GAL group than in the non-GAL group (Pfair predictors of GAL (AUROC >0.7) and the other two cytokines were poorly predictive (AUROC <0.7). The mean length of ICU and hospital stay were significantly longer in the GAL group than in the non-GAL group (P<0.05). Plasma concentrations of IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10 on the first postoperative day can predict clinically important GAL in patients undergoing esophagectomy.

  13. Flexible 2D layered material junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balabai, R.; Solomenko, A.

    2018-03-01

    Within the framework of the methods of the electron density functional and the ab initio pseudopotential, we have obtained the valence electron density spatial distribution, the densities of electron states, the widths of band gaps, the charges on combined regions, and the Coulomb potentials for graphene-based flexible 2D layered junctions, using author program complex. It is determined that the bending of the 2D layered junctions on the angle α leads to changes in the electronic properties of these junctions. In the graphene/graphane junction, there is clear charge redistribution with different signs in the regions of junctions. The presence in the heterojunctions of charge regions with different signs leads to the formation of potential barriers. The greatest potential jump is in the graphene/fluorographene junction. The greatest value of the band gap width is in the graphene/graphane junction.

  14. Josephson junctions and dark energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jetzer, Philippe; Straumann, Norbert

    2006-08-01

    In a recent paper Beck and Mackey [C. Beck, M.C. Mackey, astro-ph/0603397] argue that the argument we gave in our paper [Ph. Jetzer, N. Straumann, Phys. Lett. B 606 (2005) 77, astro-ph/0411034] to disprove their claim that dark energy can be discovered in the Lab through noise measurements of Josephson junctions is incorrect. In particular, they emphasize that the measured noise spectrum in Josephson junctions is a consequence of the fluctuation dissipation theorem, while our argument was based on equilibrium statistical mechanics. In this note we show that the fluctuation dissipation relation does not depend upon any shift of vacuum (zero-point) energies, and therefore, as already concluded in our previous paper, dark energy has nothing to do with the proposed measurements.

  15. Josephson junctions and dark energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jetzer, Philippe; Straumann, Norbert

    2006-01-01

    In a recent paper Beck and Mackey [C. Beck, M.C. Mackey, astro-ph/0603397] argue that the argument we gave in our paper [Ph. Jetzer, N. Straumann, Phys. Lett. B 606 (2005) 77, astro-ph/0411034] to disprove their claim that dark energy can be discovered in the Lab through noise measurements of Josephson junctions is incorrect. In particular, they emphasize that the measured noise spectrum in Josephson junctions is a consequence of the fluctuation dissipation theorem, while our argument was based on equilibrium statistical mechanics. In this note we show that the fluctuation dissipation relation does not depend upon any shift of vacuum (zero-point) energies, and therefore, as already concluded in our previous paper, dark energy has nothing to do with the proposed measurements

  16. Josephson junctions and dark energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jetzer, Philippe [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-8057 Zurich (Switzerland)]. E-mail: jetzer@physik.unizh.ch; Straumann, Norbert [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-8057 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2006-08-03

    In a recent paper Beck and Mackey [C. Beck, M.C. Mackey, astro-ph/0603397] argue that the argument we gave in our paper [Ph. Jetzer, N. Straumann, Phys. Lett. B 606 (2005) 77, astro-ph/0411034] to disprove their claim that dark energy can be discovered in the Lab through noise measurements of Josephson junctions is incorrect. In particular, they emphasize that the measured noise spectrum in Josephson junctions is a consequence of the fluctuation dissipation theorem, while our argument was based on equilibrium statistical mechanics. In this note we show that the fluctuation dissipation relation does not depend upon any shift of vacuum (zero-point) energies, and therefore, as already concluded in our previous paper, dark energy hathing to do with the proposed measurements.

  17. PCBS AND TIGHT JUNCTION EXPRESSION

    OpenAIRE

    Eum, Sung Yong; András, Ibolya E.; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Hennig, Bernhard; Toborek, Michal

    2008-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners exhibit a broad range of adverse biological effects including neurotoxicity. The mechanisms by which PCBs cause neurotoxic effects are still not completely understood. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a physical and metabolic barrier separating brain microenvironment from the peripheral circulation and is mainly composed of endothelial cells connected by tight junctions. We examined the effects of several highly-chlorinated PCB congeners on expression ...

  18. Superconducting tunnel-junction refrigerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melton, R.G.; Paterson, J.L.; Kaplan, S.B.

    1980-01-01

    The dc current through an S 1 -S 2 tunnel junction, with Δ 2 greater than Δ 1 , when biased with eV 1 +Δ 2 , will lower the energy in S 1 . This energy reduction will be shared by the phonons and electrons. This device is shown to be analogous to a thermoelectric refrigerator with an effective Peltier coefficient π* approx. Δ 1 /e. Tunneling calculations yield the cooling power P/sub c/, the electrical power P/sub e/ supplied by the bias supply, and the cooling efficiency eta=P/sub c//P/sub e/. The maximum cooling power is obtained for eV= +- (Δ 2 -Δ 1 ) and t 1 =T 1 /T/sub c/1 approx. 0.9. Estimates are made of the temperature difference T 2 -T 1 achievable in Al-Pb and Sn-Pb junctions with an Al 2 O 3 tunneling barrier. The performance of this device is shown to yield a maximum cooling efficiency eta approx. = Δ 1 /(Δ 2 -Δ 1 ) which can be compared with that available in an ideal Carnot refrigerator of eta=T 1 /(T 2 -T 1 ). The development of a useful tunnel-junction refrigerator requires a tunneling barrier with an effective thermal conductance per unit area several orders of magnitude less than that provided by the A1 2 O 3 barrier in the Al-Pb and Sn-Pb systems

  19. Squeezed States in Josephson Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, X.; Nori, F.

    1996-03-01

    We have studied quantum fluctuation properties of Josephson junctions in the limit of large Josephson coupling energy and small charging energy, when the eigenstates of the system can be treated as being nearly localized. We have considered(X. Hu and F. Nori, preprints.) a Josephson junction in a variety of situations, e.g., coupled to one or several of the following elements: a capacitor, an inductor (in a superconducting ring), and an applied current source. By solving an effective Shrödinger equation, we have obtained squeezed vacuum (coherent) states as the ground states of a ``free-oscillating'' (linearly-driven) Josephson junction, and calculated the uncertainties of its canonical momentum, charge, and coordinate, phase. We have also shown that the excited states of the various systems we consider are similar to the number states of a simple harmonic oscillator but with different fluctuation properties. Furthermore, we have obtained the time-evolution operators for these systems. These operators can make it easier to calculate the time-dependence of the expectation values and fluctuations of various quantities starting from an arbitrary initial state.

  20. Nutritional support in patients with oesophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzetti, Federico

    2010-05-01

    Obesity and overweight are risk factors for developing an oesophageal cancer, especially the adenocarcinoma in the distal oesophagus or at the gastroesophageal junction, and many patients still are overweight at the clinical presentation even if they are losing weight. Main mechanisms involved in weight loss are a decreased nutrients' intake and an alteration in metabolism due to a cytokine-driven inflammatory status. Malnutrition is a risk factor for a poor compliance to chemotherapy and radiation therapy and finally for the oncologic outcome. There is scientific evidence that frequently both conditions exist but in the advanced stages of disease metabolic alterations play a major role and are responsible for the poor response to nutritional support. The literature about the nutritional support in patients with cancer of the oesophagus has been reviewed with special emphasis on randomised clinical trials whenever available. In surgical patients, both overweight and weight loss increase the risk of postoperative complications. In non-dysphagic patients receiving a neo-adjuvant oncologic treatment, the simple use of oral nutritional supplements is little effective in ameliorating the nutritional status, in contrast, an intensive dietetic surveillance associated with oral supplements can lead to better nutritional status, improved quality of life and better compliance with therapy. In dysphagic patients, many comparative non-randomised clinical studies have shown clinical benefits from tube feeding on the nutritional status and compliance with therapy. There is no apparent difference on the metabolic efficacy of the enteral versus parenteral nutrition. Studies on peri-operative nutrition in oesophagectomy patients were often underpowered and, hence, inconclusive, but the large experience on the nutritional support in patients with gastrointestinal cancer undergoing major abdominal surgery has clearly shown the benefits of the enteral nutrition. Both the American and

  1. Is the use of esomeprazole in gastroesophageal reflux disease a cost-effective option in Poland?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petryszyn, Pawel; Staniak, Aleksandra; Grzegrzolka, Jedrzej

    2016-03-01

    To compare the cost-effectiveness of therapy of gastroesophageal reflux disease with esomeprazole and other proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) in Poland. Studies comparing esomeprazole with other PPIs in the treatment of erosive esophagitis, non-erosive reflux disease and gastroesophageal reflux disease maintenance therapy were systematically reviewed. 9 randomized clinical trials were selected, meta-analyses were conducted. Cost data derived from Polish Ministry of Health and Pharmacies in Wroclaw. In the treatment of erosive esophagitis esomeprazole was significantly more effective than other PPIs. Both for 4- and 8-week therapy respective incremental cost-effectiveness ratio values were acceptably low. Differences in effectiveness of non-erosive reflux disease therapy were not significant. The replacement of pantoprazole 20 mg with more effective esomeprazole 20 mg in the 6-month maintenance therapy was associated with a substantially high incremental cost-effectiveness ratio.

  2. TREATMENT FOR GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE AMONG CHILDREN, SUFFERING FROM JUVENILE ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.M. Bzarova

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the evaluation results of esomeprazol efficacy in the complex therapy for gastroesophageal reflux disease among 152 children aged between 3 and 18, suffering from juvenile arthritis. The treatment scheme used in treatment induced the remission of gastro esophageal reflux disease among 45% of patients, conduced to considerable decrease of the esophagus affect intensity among 53% of patients, epithelized erosions of the mucous coat of esophagus among 30 of 32 children. The medication did not cause any clinically significant side responses among the cured children (even younger ones and may be applied to treat gastro esophageal reflux disease among the patients, suffering from juvenile arthritis.Key words: gastroesophageal reflux disease, children, treatment, reflux, esomeprazol, esophagitis, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

  3. Gastroesophageal reflux - correlation between diagnostic methods; Refluxo gastroesofagico - correlacao entre metodos diagnosticos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz, Maria das Gracas de Almeida; Penas, Maria Exposito; Fonseca, Lea Mirian Barbosa [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Radiologia-Medicina Nuclear; Lemme, Eponina Maria O. [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Clinia Medica-Gastroenterologia; Martinho, Maria Jose Ribeiro [Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Servico de Medicina Nuclear

    1999-02-01

    A group of 97 individuals with typical symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) was submitted to gastroesophageal reflux scintigraphy (GES) and compared to the results obtained from endoscopy, histopathology and 24 hours pHmetry. Twenty-four healthy individuals were used as a control group and they have done only the GERS. The results obtained showed that: (a) the difference in the reflux index (RI) for the control group and the sick individuals was statistically significant (p < 0.0001); (b) the correlation between GERS and the other methods showed the following results: sensitivity, 84%; specificity, 95%; positive predictive value, 98%; negative predictive value, 67%; accuracy, 87%. We have concluded that the scintigraphic method should be used to confirm the diagnosis of GERD and also recommended as initial investiative procedure. (author)

  4. Snus and risk of gastroesophageal reflux. A population-based case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lie, Tina Malene; Bomme, Maria; Hveem, Kristian

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Tobacco smoking is a risk factor for gastroesophageal reflux, but whether other tobacco products increase the risk is unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate if snus increases the risk of gastroesophageal reflux symptoms (GERS). MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study was based...... users, daily snus users had a reduced risk of GERS (OR 0.77, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.64-0.93), while previous snus users and those using risk (OR 1.20, 95% CI 1.00-1.46 and OR 1.41, 95% CI 1.02-1.96, respectively). There was no association between age when...... starting using snus and GERS. Snus users who started using snus to quit or cut down on cigarette smoking, who started using both snus and cigarettes or cigarettes alone had an increased risk of GERS. Snus users risk of GERS (OR 1.49, 95% CI 1.02-2.16), while those aged...

  5. Clinical and radiological characteristic of the gastroesophageal reflux disease in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brankov, O.; Racheva, G.; Totev, M.; Antonova, D.

    2007-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) in children is a normal physiologic process that can progress to gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) when pathologic symptoms and complications appear. The pathogenesis of GER is related to a decrease pressure and transient relaxations of the lower esophageal sphincter, which is the most important factors contributing to reflux. If the history and physical examination reveal concerns of GERD further evaluation is necessary: esophageal pH monitoring, endoscopy, barium swallowing. The gold standard for the diagnosis of GERD is the 24-hour pH probe. Barium contrast radiography is useful to detect anatomic abnormalities, such as gaped cardia, reflux of contrast material, hiatal hernia, esophageal stricture and shortened esophagus. When compared to esophageal pH monitoring, the upper Gl series is less sensitive and specific for the diagnosis of GER, but is helpful as widely used first-step diagnosis in cases with symptomatic GERD. (authors)

  6. Disturbance Of Sleep-Wake Regimen As Prognosis Criterion Of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Exacerbation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.V. Lyakisheva

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the present research is to define correlation of disease exacerbation risk within the next month and sleep-wake regimen changes in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. 40 patients with remission have been examined three times a week to determine qualitative and quantitative indices of sleep characteristic. During the following month the dynamic examination of the mentioned group of patients has been carried out for the purpose of timely acute condition diagnostics. It has been revealed that disturbances of sleep indices, such as late falling asleep, long-term falling asleep, frequency of awakening and unpleasant dreams become unfavorable risk factors for the development of the next recurrence of gastroesophageal reflux disease during the nearest month, but the remission of this disease is significantly connected with falling asleep duration and awakening time.

  7. Initial results of the oesophageal and gastric cancer registry from the Comunidad Valenciana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escrig, Javier; Mingol, Fernando; Martí, Roberto; Puche, José; Trullenque, Ramón; Barreras, José Antonio; Asencio, Francisco; Aguiló, Javier; Navarro, José Manuel; Alberich, Carmen; Salas, Dolores; Lacueva, Francisco Javier

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the initial results of the oesophagogastric cancer registry developed for the Sociedad Valenciana de Cirugía and the Health Department of the Comunidad Valenciana (Spain). Fourteen of the 24 public hospitals belonging to the Comunidad Valenciana participated. All patients with diagnosis of oesophageal or gastric carcinomas operated from January 2013 to December 2014 were evaluated. Demographic, clinical and pathological data were analysed. Four hundred and thirty-four patients (120 oesophageal carcinomas and 314 gastric carcinomas) were included. Only two hospitals operated more than 10 patients with oesophageal cancer per year. Transthoracic oesophaguectomy was the most frequent approach (84.2%) in tumours localized within the oesophagus. A total gastrectomy was performed in 50.9% patients with gastroesophageal junction (GOJ) carcinomas. Postoperative 30-day and 90-day mortality were 8% and 11.6% in oesophageal carcinoma and 5.9 and 8.6% in gastric carcinoma. Before surgery, middle oesophagus carcinomas were treated mostly (76,5%) with chemoradiotherapy. On the contrary, lower oesophagus and GOJ carcinomas were treated preferably with chemotherapy alone (45.5 and 53.4%). Any neoadjuvant treatment was administered to 73.6% of gastric cancer patients. Half patients with oesophageal carcinoma or gastric carcinoma received no adjuvant treatment. This registry revealed that half patients with oesophageal cancer were operated in hospitals with less than 10 cases per year at the Comunidad Valenciana. Also, it detected capacity improvement for some clinical outcomes of oesophageal and gastric carcinomas. Copyright © 2017 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. The prognostic impact of epidermal growth factor receptor in patients with metastatic gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atmaca Akin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR is a potential target of anticancer therapy in gastric cancer. However, its prognostic role in metastatic gastric or gastroesophageal junction (GE cancer has not been established yet. Methods EGFR status was analyzed by immunohistochemistry (IHC in paraffin-embedded samples from 357 patients who received chemotherapy in 4 first-line trials. Automated RNA extraction from paraffin and RT-quantitative PCR were additionally used to evaluate EGFR mRNA expression in 130 patients. Results EGFR protein expression (any grade and overexpression (3+ were observed in 43% and 11% of patients, respectively. EGFR positivity correlated with intestinal type histology (p = 0.05, but not with other clinicopathologic characteristics. Median follow-up was 18.2 months. Median overall survival (OS was similar in patients with EGFR positive vs. those with EGFR negative tumors, regardless whether positivity was defined as ≥1+ (10.6 vs. 10.9 months, p = 0.463 or as 3+ (8.6 vs. 10.8 months, p = 0.377. The multivariate analysis indicated that EGFR status is not an independent prognostic factor (hazard ratio 0.85, 0.56 to 1.12, p = 0.247. There were also no significant differences in overall survival when patients were categorized according to median (p = 0.116 or quartile (p = 0.767 distribution of EGFR mRNA gene expression. Similar distributions of progression-free survival according to EGFR status were observed. Conclusions Unlike different cancer types where EGFR-positive disease is associated with an adverse prognostic value, EGFR positivity is not prognostic of patient outcome in metastatic gastric or GE cancer.

  9. Epidemiological features of gastro-esophageal reflux disease in Iran based on general population

    OpenAIRE

    Pourhoseingholi, Asma; Pourhoseingholi, Mohamad Amin; Moghimi-Dehkordi, Bijan; Barzegar, Farnoosh; Safaee, Azadeh; Vahedi, Mohsen; Dulaimi, David Al; Prabhakaran, Sudhakaran

    2012-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to evaluate the epidemiology of GERD base on population study in Tehran providence. Background Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common and chronic problem. Recent reports from developing countries indicate increment in the incidence and prevalence of the disease over the past. Patients and methods This study was a cross-sectional household survey conducted from May 2006 to December 2007 in Tehran province, Iran. Participants completed a valid gastro-e...

  10. Arm span?height difference is correlated with gastroesophageal reflux symptoms in aged Japanese subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Eguchi, Hitoshi; Eguchi, Yuichiro; Fujiwara, Motoshi; Nishii, Midori; Tokushima, Yoshinori; Eguchi, Naoko; Tago, Masaki; Sakanishi, Yuta; Tomonaga, Motosuke; Yoshioka, Tsuneaki; Hyakutake, Masaki; Emura, Sei; Koizumi, Shunzo; Iwakiri, Ryuichi; Edakuni, Genichiro

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated an association between the symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and aging plus height. In this study we investigated whether the arm span?height difference was related to GERD symptoms with a focus on aged subjects in the general population, since the arm span reflects the height in young adulthood before decreasing due to vertebral deformities from aging. A total of 285 elderly individuals (105 females) who visited nursing homes for the elderly i...

  11. Prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms and related factors in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Nampei, Akihide; Shi, Kenrin; Ebina, Kosuke; Tomita, Tetsuya; Sugamoto, Kazuomi; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Hirao, Makoto; Hashimoto, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is common in patients with many chronic diseases, but has not been well recognized in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We investigated the prevalence of GERD symptoms in 278 outpatients with RA and their association with such clinical factors as age, sex, height, weight, body mass index, medications drugs, and functional status evaluated by the Modified Health Assessment Questionnaire (MHAQ). GERD symptoms were evaluated by Frequency Scale for the Symptoms of ...

  12. Changes in Ghrelin-Related Factors in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Nahata, Miwa; Saegusa, Yayoi; Harada, Yumi; Tsuchiya, Naoko; Hattori, Tomohisa; Takeda, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    To examine gastrointestinal hormone profiles and functional changes in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), blood levels of the orexigenic hormone ghrelin were measured in rats with experimentally induced GERD. During the experiment, plasma acyl ghrelin levels in GERD rats were higher than those in sham-operated rats, although food intake was reduced in GERD rats. Although plasma levels of the appetite-suppressing hormone leptin were significantly decreased in GERD rats, no changes were ob...

  13. Gastroesophageal reflux symptoms not responding to proton pump inhibitor: GERD, NERD, NARD, esophageal hypersensitivity or dyspepsia?

    OpenAIRE

    Bashashati, Mohammad; Hejazi, Reza A; Andrews, Christopher N; Storr, Martin A

    2014-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is a common gastrointestinal process that can generate symptoms of heartburn and chest pain. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are the gold standard for the treatment of GER; however, a substantial group of GER patients fail to respond to PPIs. In the past, it was believed that acid reflux into the esophagus causes all, or at least the majority, of symptoms attributed to GER, with both erosive esophagitis and nonerosive outcomes. However, with modern testing techniqu...

  14. Influence of obesity and bariatric surgery on gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dantas, Anna Carolina Batista; Santo, Marco Aurelio; Cleva, Roberto de; Sallum, Rubens Antônio Aissar; Cecconello, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal and gastric cancer (GC) are related to obesity and bariatric surgery. Risk factors, such as gastroesophageal reflux and Helicobacter pylori, must be investigated and treated in obese population. After surgery, GC reports are anecdotal and treatment is not standardized. This review aims to discuss GC related to obesity before and after bariatric surgery

  15. Gastroesophageal scintigraphy in children. A comparison of posterior and anterior imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyhan, M.; Yapar, A.F.; Aydin, M.; Sukan, A.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the posterior dynamic imaging with the anterior imaging in the evaluation of children with gastroesophageal reflux (GER). Sixty-eight children (26 female, 42 male; age range 4 months to 7 years, median 21 months) were studied. After 4-hour fasting, all the subjects underwent gastroesophageal scintigraphy. Synchronous dynamic imaging in the anterior and posterior projections was performed with the subject in the supine position with a dual-head gamma camera equipped with low-energy general-purpose collimators at a rate of 30 s/frame for 40 min. The anterior and posterior images were visually evaluated for the presence of gastroesophageal reflux by two nuclear medicine physicians. The anterior and posterior images were correlated by Pearson correlation analysis, and inter-observer variability was evaluated by paired t-test and kappa value. There was a good correlation between the two projections with r-values of 0.906-0.990. The inter-observer agreement for interpretation of the anterior and posterior imaging was excellent (k: 0.83). In conclusion, anterior and posterior dynamic imaging showed excellent correlation in detection of GER in children. Posterior imaging is superior to anterior imaging in that it is more comfortable, and it reduces motion artifacts, especially for infants and anxious children; thus, it may be preferred over anterior imaging. (author)

  16. A novel optical probe for pH sensing in gastro-esophageal apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldini, F.; Ghini, G.; Giannetti, A.; Senesi, F.; Trono, C.

    2011-03-01

    Monitoring gastric pH for long periods, usually 24 h, may be essential in analyzing the physiological pattern of acidity, in obtaining information on changes in activity during peptic ulcer disease, and in assessing the effect of antisecretory drugs. Gastro-esophageal reflux, which causes a pH decrease in the esophagus content from pH 7 even down to pH 2, can determine esophagitis with possible strictures and Barrett's esophagus. One of the difficulties of the optical measurement of pH in the gastro-esophageal apparatus lies in the required extended working range from 1 to 8 pH units. The present paper deals with a novel optical pH sensor, using methyl red as optical pH indicator. Contrary to all acidbase indicators characterized by working ranges limited to 2-3 pH units, methyl red, after its covalent immobilization on controlled pore glass (CPG), is characterized by a wide working range which fits with the clinical requirements. The novel probe design here described is suitable for gastro-esophageal applications and allows the optimization of the performances of the CPG with the immobilised indicator. This leads to a very simple configuration characterized by a very fast response time.

  17. [Occipitocervical junction: Aanatomy, craniometry and pathology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtner, J; Woitek, R; Asenbaum, U; Prayer, D; Schueller-Weidekamm, C

    2016-04-01

    The occipitocervical junction comprises of the occiput condyles, the atlas, and the axis. The radiological evaluation of this region is supported by craniometric measurement methods which are based on predefined anatomical landmarks. The main pathologies of the occipitocervical junction are traumatic injuries, congenital anomalies or normal variants, infections, arthropathies, and tumors. In this article, the anatomy of the occipitocervical junction as well as the most important craniometric measurement methods are explained. Moreover various pathologies and similar appearing normal variants are presented.

  18. Method for shallow junction formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Kurt H.

    1996-01-01

    A doping sequence that reduces the cost and complexity of forming source/drain regions in complementary metal oxide silicon (CMOS) integrated circuit technologies. The process combines the use of patterned excimer laser annealing, dopant-saturated spin-on glass, silicide contact structures and interference effects creates by thin dielectric layers to produce source and drain junctions that are ultrashallow in depth but exhibit low sheet and contact resistance. The process utilizes no photolithography and can be achieved without the use of expensive vacuum equipment. The process margins are wide, and yield loss due to contact of the ultrashallow dopants is eliminated.

  19. Josephson junctions as heterodyne detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taur, Y.; Claassen, J.H.; Richards, P.L.

    Heterodyne detection with a point-contact Josephson junction has been investigated both experimentally and theoretically. The measured performance of the device at 36 GHz is in good agreement with the theory. By operating vanadium point contacts at 1.4 K, the authors have achieved a single-sideband (SSB) mixer noise temperature of 54 K with a conversion gain of 1.35 and a signal bandwidth on the order of 1 GHz. A potentially impressive performance for these devices at submillimeter wavelengths can be extrapolated from the results

  20. Josephson junctions as heterodyne detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taur, Y.; Claassen, J.H.; Richards, P.L.

    1974-01-01

    Heterodyne detection with a point-contact Josephson junction has been investigated both experimentally and theoretically. The measured performance of the device at 36 GHz is in good agreement with the theory. By operating vanadium point contacts at 1.4 K, a single-sideband (SSB) mixer noise temperature of 54 K with a conversion gain of 1.35 and a signal bandwidth on the order of 1 GHz has been achieved. From the results one can extrapolate a potentially impressive performance for these devices at submillimeter wavelengths

  1. The comparative analyses of different diagnostic approaches in detection of gastroesophageal reflux disease in children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Ristic

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the different diagnostic approaches in detection of gastroesophageal reflux disease in children presented with symptoms suggesting gastroesophageal reflux disease.The study design was cross sectional. The study retrospectively included all children who underwent combined multiple intraluminal impedance and pH (pH-MII monitoring due to gastrointestinal and/or extraesophageal symptoms suggesting gastroesophageal reflux disease at University Children's Hospital in Belgrade, from July 2012 to July 2016.A total of 218 (117 boys/101 girls, mean age 6.7 years (range 0.06-18.0 years, met the inclusion criteria. Gastroesophageal reflux disease was found in 128 of 218 children (57.4% by pH-MII and in 76 (34.1% children by pH metry alone. Using pH-MII monitoring as gold standard, sensitivity of pH-metry was lowest in infants (22.9%, with tendency to increase in older age groups (reaching 76.4% in children ≥ 9 years. The sensitivity of pH-metry alone in children with extraesophageal symptoms was 38.1%, while the sensitivity of pH-metry in children with gastrointestinal symptoms was 63.8%. Reflux esophagitis was identified in 31 (26.1% of 119 children who underwent endoscopy. Logistic regression analysis showed that best predictors of endoscopic reflux esophagitis are the longest acid episode (OR = 1.52, p<0.05 and DeMeester reflux composite score (OR = 3.31, p<0.05. The significant cutoff values included DeMeester reflux composite score ≥ 29 (AUC 0.786, CI 0.695-0.877, p<0.01 and duration of longest acid reflux ≥ 18 minutes (AUC 0.784, CI 0.692-0.875, p<0.01.The results of our study suggested that compared with pH-metry alone, pH-MII had significantly higher detection rate of gastroesophageal reflux disease, especially in infants. Our findings also showed that pH-MII parameters correlated significantly with the endoscopically confirmed erosive esophagitis.

  2. Graphene Josephson Junction Microwave Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Kin Chung; Walsh, Evan; Lee, Gil-Ho; Efetov, Dmitri; Crossno, Jesse; Ranzani, Leonardo; Ohki, Thomas; Kim, Philip; Englund, Dirk

    Modern readout schemes for superconducting qubits have predominately relied on weak microwave signal detection and discrimination. Most schemes are based on heterodyne or homodyne receiver systems and only a few have demonstrated direct detection of microwave photons. The challenges of direct detection stem from the low energy of microwave photons and existing detector efficiency. We have designed, fabricated, and measured a graphene-based Josephson junction (gJJ) microwave detector. Exploiting its low electronic thermal conductivity and specific heat, an electron temperature rise on the order of 0.1 K due to a time average of about 10 photons in the graphene thermal photodetector is readout via a Josephson junction embedded in an 8 GHz microwave cavity. We will estimate the quantum efficiency and dark count probability of the gJJ microwave single photon detectors. This document does not contain technology or technical data controlled under either the U.S. International Traffic in Arms Regulations or the U.S. Export Administration Regulations.

  3. [The eyelid-cheek junction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpei, Ch; Fernandez, J; Chignon-Sicard, B

    2017-10-01

    The eyelid-cheek junction is a key area which generates many comments: from looking tired to looking good or rested, without forgetting charm, beauty, and a youthful appearance. In spite of many interesting medical and surgical procedures, treating this area is sometimes difficult and results are not always up to our expectations. Standardized blepharoplasty, which has often been improperly used, has shown its limits. Since the latest refinements, lipostructure has revolutionised blepharoplasty and serving as a reference, it has become an established technique. Subperiostal mediofacial lift allows outstanding results at the cost of a certain technical aggressiveness. Aesthetic medicine proposes worthy alternative and/or appropriate complementary solutions. Different procedures we dispose of have been reviewed together with their assets and their limits. A codification of therapeutic indications is proposed. The positioning of the eyelid-cheek clinical junction in relation with the low orbital bone rim influences our strategy in choosing the appropriate technique. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  4. Age does not influence efficacy of ramucirumab in advanced gastric cancer: Subgroup analyses of REGARD and RAINBOW.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muro, Kei; Cho, Jae Yong; Bodoky, Gyorgy; Goswami, Chanchal; Chao, Yee; Dos Santos, Lucas V; Shimada, Yasuhiro; Topuzov, Eldar; Van Cutsem, Eric; Tabernero, Josep; Zalcberg, John; Chau, Ian; Cascinu, Stefano; Cheng, Rebecca; Hsu, Yanzhi; Emig, Michael; Orlando, Mauro; Fuchs, Charles

    2017-09-29

    REGARD and RAINBOW were global, phase 3, randomized, double-blind trials of second-line ramucirumab for metastatic gastric or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma. Exploratory subgroup analyses were described to assess the efficacy and safety of ramucirumab in REGARD and RAINBOW in young (≤ 45 and RAINBOW). Subpopulation Treatment Effect Pattern Plots assessed efficacy and adverse events by age groups for ramucirumab versus placebo. The hazard ratios (HRs) for overall survival favored treatment with ramucirumab: REGARD ≤ 45 years (HR: 0.59, 95% confidence interval: 0.27-1.26), RAINBOW ≤ 45 years (0.56, 0.33-0.93), RAINBOW (0.97, 0.47-2.01); however, patient numbers were low in this subgroup (n = 36). Similar findings were observed for progression-free survival, for which HRs numerically favored ramucirumab-treated patients. Adverse events (including grade ≥ 3) were not associated with age. In comparison with placebo, ramucirumab conferred improvements in efficacy across age groups with a tolerable safety profile. Despite some limitations, these exploratory analyses support the use of ramucirumab in advanced gastric cancer, irrespective of age. © 2017 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  5. Characterizing variability in in vivo Raman spectra of different anatomical locations in the upper gastrointestinal tract toward cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergholt, Mads Sylvest; Zheng, Wei; Lin, Kan; Ho, Khek Yu; Teh, Ming; Yeoh, Khay Guan; So, Jimmy Bok Yan; Huang, Zhiwei

    2011-03-01

    Raman spectroscopy is an optical vibrational technology capable of probing biomolecular changes of tissue associated with cancer transformation. This study aimed to characterize in vivo Raman spectroscopic properties of tissues belonging to different anatomical regions in the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract and explore the implications for early detection of neoplastic lesions during clinical gastroscopy. A novel fiber-optic Raman endoscopy technique was utilized for real-time in vivo tissue Raman measurements of normal esophageal (distal, middle, and proximal), gastric (antrum, body, and cardia) as well as cancerous esophagous and gastric tissues from 107 patients who underwent endoscopic examinations. The non-negativity-constrained least squares minimization coupled with a reference database of Raman active biochemicals (i.e., actin, histones, collagen, DNA, and triolein) was employed for semiquantitative biomolecular modeling of tissue constituents in the upper GI. A total of 1189 in vivo Raman spectra were acquired from different locations in the upper GI. The Raman spectra among the distal, middle, and proximal sites of the esophagus showed no significant interanatomical variability. The interanatomical variability of Raman spectra among normal gastric tissue (antrum, body, and cardia) was subtle compared to cancerous tissue transformation, whereas biomolecular modeling revealed significant differences between the two organs, particularly in the gastroesophageal junction associated with proteins, DNA, and lipids. Cancerous tissues can be identified across interanatomical regions with accuracies of 89.3% [sensitivity of 92.6% (162/175) specificity of 88.6% (665/751)], and of 94.7% [sensitivity of 90.9% (30/33) specificity of 93.9% (216/230)] in the gastric and esophagus, respectively, using partial least squares-discriminant analysis together with the leave-one tissue site-out, cross validation. This work demonstrates that Raman endoscopy technique has

  6. Multiplication in Silicon p-n Junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moll, John L.

    1965-01-01

    Multiplication values were measured in the collector junctions of silicon p-n-p and n-p-n transistors before and after bombardment by 1016 neutrons/cm2. Within experimental error there was no change either in junction fields, as deduced from capacitance measurements, or in multiplication values...

  7. Gap junctions and connexin-interacting proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giepmans, Ben N G

    2004-01-01

    Gap junctions form channels between adjacent cells. The core proteins of these channels are the connexins. Regulation of gap junction communication (GJC) can be modulated by connexin-associating proteins, such as regulatory protein phosphatases and protein kinases, of which c-Src is the

  8. Intercellular junctions in rabbit eye ora serrata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobeschi, L; Freymuller, E; Smith, R L

    2006-10-01

    Summary The aim of this study was to describe and localize the intercellular junctions in the ora serrata region of albino and pigmented rabbit eyes. Eyes of albino and pigmented rabbits were fixed and processed for transmission electron microscopy. Light and electron microscope examination was carried out on semithin and ultrathin sections. The ora serrata region showed adherens, gap and tight junctions in the retinal and ciliary margins of albino and pigmented rabbit eyes. In the retinal margin, zonulae adherens between Müller cells and photoreceptors are associated with tight junctions. In the ciliary margin, epithelial cells are joined by adherens, gap and tight junctions localized between apical and apicolateral cell membranes. Tight junctions appear as zonulae occludens in the non-pigmented apicolateral cell membranes and as tight focal junctions between pigmented and non-pigmented apical cell membranes. Between the ciliary and retinal margins there are adherens and tight focal junctions which attach pigmented apical cell membranes to adjacent cells. There were no differences in the distribution of intercellular junctions between albino and pigmented rabbits.

  9. Comparison between established and the Worldwide Esophageal Cancer Collaboration staging systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaur, Puja; Hofstetter, Wayne L; Bekele, B Nebiyou; Correa, Arlene M; Mehran, Reza J; Rice, David C; Roth, Jack A; Vaporciyan, Ara A; Rice, Thomas W; Swisher, Stephen G

    2010-06-01

    Controversy exists regarding the optimal staging system for patients with gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma (GEJA). The Worldwide Esophageal Cancer Collaboration (WECC) has organized a multi-institutional database from which a novel esophageal staging system has been organized. We used a single institution experience to validate the hypothesis that the WECC system more accurately predicts survival in GEJA patients than both the American Joint Commission on Cancer 6th edition esophageal and gastric systems. We reviewed 449 GEJA patients (Siewert I-III) treated with neoadjuvant therapy followed by surgery or surgery-alone between 1990 and 2007. A blinded statistician performed a head-to-head comparison regarding the ability of each staging system to predict survival. A subgroup analysis of patients who underwent surgery only (n = 176) was also performed. All three systems predicted survival of patients with GEJA. However, a Bayesian variable selection model found that the WECC system was better than both American Joint Commission on Cancer esophageal and gastric systems (probability 0.99 and 0.98, respectively). Subset analysis suggested that the WECC staging was also optimum for predicting survival in surgery-alone patients. While the esophageal staging system is better at predicting survival than the gastric staging system, the WECC system may be the most favorable single-system predictor of survival for patients with resected GEJA. As suggested by the WECC system, incorporating the number of positive lymph nodes within the staging system may present an advantage in predicting survival. 2010 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Quantum synchronization effects in intrinsic Josephson junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machida, M.; Kano, T.; Yamada, S.; Okumura, M.; Imamura, T.; Koyama, T.

    2008-01-01

    We investigate quantum dynamics of the superconducting phase in intrinsic Josephson junctions of layered high-T c superconductors motivated by a recent experimental observation for the switching rate enhancement in the low temperature quantum regime. We pay attention to only the capacitive coupling between neighboring junctions and perform large-scale simulations for the Schroedinger equation derived from the Hamiltonian considering the capacitive coupling alone. The simulation focuses on an issue whether the switching of a junction induces those of the other junctions or not. The results reveal that the superconducting phase dynamics show synchronous behavior with increasing the quantum character, e.g., decreasing the junction plane area and effectively the temperature. This is qualitatively consistent with the experimental result

  11. Overlap junctions for high coherence superconducting qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, X.; Long, J. L.; Ku, H. S.; Lake, R. E.; Bal, M.; Pappas, D. P.

    2017-07-01

    Fabrication of sub-micron Josephson junctions is demonstrated using standard processing techniques for high-coherence, superconducting qubits. These junctions are made in two separate lithography steps with normal-angle evaporation. Most significantly, this work demonstrates that it is possible to achieve high coherence with junctions formed on aluminum surfaces cleaned in situ by Ar plasma before junction oxidation. This method eliminates the angle-dependent shadow masks typically used for small junctions. Therefore, this is conducive to the implementation of typical methods for improving margins and yield using conventional CMOS processing. The current method uses electron-beam lithography and an additive process to define the top and bottom electrodes. Extension of this work to optical lithography and subtractive processes is discussed.

  12. A 2008 questionnaire-based survey of gastroesophageal reflux disease and related diseases by physicians in East Asian countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Shin-ichi; Arakawa, Tetsuo; Sollano, Jose D; Zhu, Qi; Kachintorn, Udom; Rani, Abdul Aziz; Hahm, Ki-Baik; Joh, Takashi; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu; Matsumoto, Takayuki; Naito, Yuji; Takeuchi, Koji; Furuta, Kenji; Terano, Akira

    2009-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common gastrointestinal disease. This study was designed to examine current epidemiology, diagnosis, management, and treatment of patients diagnosed with GERD by surveying physicians in several East Asian countries. A questionnaire-based survey was completed in six countries including China, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, the Philippines, and Thailand between July 2008 and December 2008. In total, 876 physicians participated in the study. Most physicians in all countries, except Japan, frequently used international guidelines for the care of GERD patients, whereas approximately half of Japanese physicians did not use such guidelines. GERD was common among many patients, but Barrett's esophagus, particularly the long-segmental type, was rare. The incidence of esophageal cancer, particularly adenocarcinoma, was high in China, but low in other countries. Most physicians diagnosed GERD based on symptoms, followed by endoscopy in Japan and Korea, or in other countries, by the proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) test. Heartburn was recognized as the chief complaint in all countries except Korea. Most physicians in all countries used PPI as the first-line of treatment for GERD. Increasing the PPI dose was the treatment of choice for PPI-refractory erosive esophagitis in Korea, the Philippines, and Thailand. In contrast, in other countries, physicians used a combination of PPI and other drugs to treat PPI-refractory erosive esophagitis. Prescription of antidepressant drugs increased for PPI-refractory nonerosive reflux disease compared with PPI-refractory erosive esophagitis. The findings in the present survey are useful to understand the current epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of GERD in East Asian countries. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Expression profiles of Annexin A1, formylated peptide receptors and cyclooxigenase-2 in gastroesophageal inflammations and neoplasias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaoka, Rodolfo T C; Sertório, Nathália D; Magalini, Lara P J; Dos Santos, Leandro M; Souza, Helena R; Iyomasa-Pilon, Melina M; Possebon, Lucas; Costa, Sara S; Girol, Ana P

    2018-02-01

    The anti-inflammatory protein Annexin-A1 (ANXA1) is associated to tumor invasion process and its actions can be mediated by formylated peptides receptors (FPRs). Therefore, we evaluated the expression and correlation of ANXA1, FPR and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) enzyme in esophageal and stomach inflammations and neoplasias. The study of proteins was performed by immunohistochemistry in biopsies of esophagitis, Barrett's esophagus, squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma of the esophagus, as well as gastritis, stomach polypus and gastric adenocarcinoma. The intensity of the expressions was evaluated by densitometry. The immunohistochemical and densitometric analyzes showed specificity for the FPR1 receptor and modulation of the ANXA1, COX-2 and FPR1 expressions in the epithelial cells in the different studied conditions. Increased immunoreactivity of these proteins was observed in cases of inflammation and stomach polypus. Interestingly, moderate immunoreactivity for ANXA1 and FPR1 but increased immunolabeling for COX-2 were observed in Barrett́s esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinomas. Also, there was reduced expression of ANXA1 and FPR1 in esophageal carcinoma but COX-2 overexpression in this tumor. There was no expression of FPR2 but ANXA1 and FPR1 expressions were positively correlated in all clinical conditions studied. Positive correlation between ANXA1 and COX-2 were also observed in inflammation conditions while negative correlation between ANXA1 and COX-2 was observed in esophageal carcinoma. Our results demonstrate the unregulated expression of ANXA1 and COX-2 in precursor lesions of esophageal and stomach cancers, reinforcing their involvement in gastroesophageal carcinogenesis. In addition, the data show that the actions of ANXA1 in the inflammatory and neoplastic processes of the esophagus and stomach are specifically mediated by the FPR1 receptor. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Cranio-vertebral junction tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajkumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There are variety of diseases which affect the region of craniovertebral junction, including congenital, malignant lesions, traumatic and infective/inflammatory lesions. CVJ tuberculosis is an extremely rare condition, accounting for 0.3 to 1% of all cases of spinal TB. Few case series have been reported in the literature about this rare condition, but there appears to be lack of consensus even on basic issues like whether to undertake surgical intervention or prefer a conservative approach in cases of CVJ TB. These cases can present with a myriad of symptoms and one needs to have a high index of suspicion for early diagnosis. Early diagnosis and treatment is very important for a favorable outcome. In this article, we have tried to review the available literature and also share our experience about this condition so as to have a better understanding of the disease process and have a more rational treatment protocol.

  15. Josephson tunnel junction microwave attenuator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koshelets, V. P.; Shitov, S. V.; Shchukin, A. V.

    1993-01-01

    A new element for superconducting electronic circuitry-a variable attenuator-has been proposed, designed, and successfully tested. The principle of operation is based on the change in the microwave impedance of a superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) Josephson tunnel junction when dc biased...... at different points in the current-voltage characteristic. Both numerical calculations based on the Tien-Gordon theory and 70-GHz microwave experiments have confirmed the wide dynamic range (more than 15-dB attenuation for one stage) and the low insertion loss in the ''open'' state. The performance of a fully...... integrated submillimeter receiver circuit which comprises a flux-flow oscillator (FFO) as local oscillator, a superconducting variable attenuator, and a microwave SIS detector with tuned-out capacitance is also reported....

  16. Clinical and neurophysiologic characterization of an European family with hereditary sensory neuropathy, paroxysmal cough and gastroesophageal reflux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Barros

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In 2002, Spring et al reported a family with an autosomal dominant form of hereditary sensory neuropathy; patients also presented adult onset of gastroesophageal reflux and cough. Since then, no further families have been described. Objective: To study a new Portuguese family with these characteristics. Method: To describe the clinical and neurophysiologic characteristics of one family with features of sensory neuropathy associated with cough and gastroesophageal erflux. Results: Three of five siblings presented a similar history of paroxysmal cough (5th decade. About a decade later they experienced numbness and paraesthesia in the feets and in all cases there was evidence of an axonal sensory neuropathy. A history of gastroesophageal reflux of variable severity and age of onset was also present. Discussion: Molecular genetic studies have demonstrated genetic heterogeneity between the hereditary sensory neuropathy type 1 subtypes. The identification of these families is of major importance because further work is required to identify the underlying genetic defect.

  17. Esophageal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, M. B.

    2007-01-01

    The distribution of adenocarcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas in esophageal cancer (EC) has changed, and focus directed towards tumors of the distal esophagus and the esophagogastric junction. The genetic events leading to EC are not fully clarified, but important risk factors have been...

  18. Resonance Transport of Graphene Nanoribbon T-Shaped Junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao-Lan, Kong; Yong-Jian, Xiong

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the transport properties of T-shaped junctions composed of armchair graphene nanoribbons of different widths. Three types of junction geometries are considered. The junction conductance strongly depends on the atomic features of the junction geometry. When the shoulders of the junction have zigzag type edges, sharp conductance resonances usually appear in the low energy region around the Dirac point, and a conductance gap emerges. When the shoulders of the junction have armchair type edges, the conductance resonance behavior is weakened significantly, and the metal-metal-metal junction structures show semimetallic behaviors. The contact resistance also changes notably due to the various interface geometries of the junction

  19. Comorbidities in severe asthma: frequency of rhinitis, nasal polyposis, gastroesophageal reflux disease, vocal cord dysfunction and bronchiectasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Bisaccioni

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Severe asthma is found in approximately 10% of patients with asthma. Some factors associated with worse asthma control include rhinitis, gastroesophageal reflux disease, vocal cord dysfunction (VCD, nasal polyposis and bronchiectasis. Therefore, we evaluated the prevalence of these illnesses in patients with severe asthma. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective analysis of data obtained from electronic medical records of patients with severe asthma between January 2006 and June 2008. Symptoms of rhinitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease were evaluated as well as intolerance to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. We evaluated the results of esophagogastroduodenoscopy, videolaryngoscopy and CT scans of the chest in order to confirm gastroesophageal reflux disease, nasal polyposis, vocal cord dysfunction and bronchiectasis. RESULTS: We evaluated 245 patients. Rhinitis symptoms were present in 224 patients (91.4%; 18 (7.3% had intolerance to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and 8 (3.3% had nasal polyposis. Symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease were reported for 173 (70.6% patients, although the diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease was confirmed based on esophagogastroduodenoscopy or laryngoscopy findings in just 58 (33.6% patients. Vocal cord dysfunction was suspected in 16 (6.5% and confirmed through laryngoscopy in 4 (1.6%. The patient records provided CT scans of the chest for 105 patients, and 26 (24.8% showed bronchiectasis. DISCUSSION: Rhinitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease were the most common comorbidities observed, in addition to bronchiectasis. Therefore, in patients with severe asthma, associated diseases should be investigated as the cause of respiratory symptoms and uncontrolled asthma.

  20. Endoscopic treatment of gastroesophageal varices in young infants with cyanoacrylate glue: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivet, Christine; Robles-Medranda, Carlos; Dumortier, Jérôme; Le Gall, Catherine; Ponchon, Thierry; Lachaux, Alain

    2009-05-01

    In children, endoscopic sclerotherapy and variceal ligation (EVL) are the most used techniques for the treatment of gastroesophageal variceal bleeding (VB). However, these techniques achieve poor results in cases of gastric variceal bleeding, and EVL is not applicable in young infants. Our purpose was to evaluate the feasibility, efficacy, and safety of cyanoacrylate glue injection for the treatment of gastroesophageal varices in young infants. Single-center prospective study. From 2001 to 2005, 8 young infants (data and the results were registered and analyzed at 1, 6, and 12 months after treatment. The mean age and weight were 1.3 +/- 0.42 years (range 0.8 to 1.9 years) and 8.5 +/- 1.6 kg (range 5.5 to 10 kg). Glue injection was successfully performed in all infants. The mean volume injected was 1.15 +/- 0.62 mL (range 0.5 to 2 mL). Immediate control of bleeding was achieved in all cases. Ulcer bleeding as a complication was observed in 1 case. Varices relapse with bleeding was observed in 3 of 8 (37.5%) patients after a mean of 12.5 +/- 10.6 weeks (range 5 to 20 weeks). Patients with variceal rebleeding were retreated. Varices eradication was achieved in all cases after a mean of 1.4 +/- 0.52 sessions (range 1 to 2 sessions). Open prospective series with a relatively small number of patients. In young infants, the use of cyanoacrylate glue is safe and effective for the treatment of gastroesophageal VB.

  1. Reduced quality of life in patients with non-erosive gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Vargas

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is a highly prevalent condition in the Western world. It is a frequent cause of medical appointments and has a high impact on quality of life (QOL. This study aimed to assess health-related quality of life (HQ-QOL of patients with non-erosive gastroesophageal disease (NERD and compare their scores with the scores of patients with GERD symptoms and non-pathological acid reflux (non-NERD. Methods: We studied 42 patients with GERD symptoms—21 with positive pHmetry for acid reflux (NERD group and 21 with negative pHmetry for acid reflux (non-NERD group. We enrolled patients matched by age and gender. Patient inclusion criteria were based on clinical and endoscopic findings and pHmetry. All other major diseases having an impact on QOL were excluded as well as patients in regular use of proton pump inhibitors, prokinetics, histamine-2 receptor antagonists and anti-depressants. All subjects were asked to fill in a validated translation of the SF-36 questionnaire. We described scores trough median and interquartile range (IQR and assessed the significance of the comparisons through Mann-Whitney test and chi-square test or Student’s t-test when appropriate. Results: We found no significant differences in the eight domains of SF-36 between the two groups. Conclusion: QOL of patients with GERD symptoms was equivalent, regardless of acid reflux at pHmetry. Keywords: SF-36; quality of life; gastroesophageal reflux; pHmetry

  2. Leg raise increases pressure in lower and upper esophageal sphincter among patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitnar, P; Stovicek, J; Andel, R; Arlt, J; Arltova, M; Smejkal, M; Kolar, P; Kobesova, A

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relation between posturally increased intra-abdominal pressure and lower/upper esophageal sphincter pressure changes in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. We used high resolution manometry to measure pressure changes in lower and upper esophageal sphincter during bilateral leg rise. We also examined whether the rate of lower and upper esophageal sphincter pressure would increase during leg raise differentially in individuals with versus without normal resting pressure. Fifty eight patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease participated in the study. High resolution manometry was performed in relaxed supine position, then lower and upper esophageal sphincter pressure was measured. Finally, the subjects were instructed to keep their legs lifted while performing 90-degree flexion at the hips and knees and the pressure was measured again. Paired t-test and independent samples t-test were used. There was a significant increase in both lower (P leg raise compared to the initial resting position. Individuals with initially higher pressure in lower esophageal sphincter (>10 mmHg) exhibited a greater pressure increase during leg raise than those with initially lower pressure (pressure ≤10 mmHg; P = 0.002). Similarly individuals with higher resting upper esophageal sphincter pressure (>44 mmHg) showed a greater pressure increase during leg raise than those with lower resting pressure (≤44 mmHg; P leg activities on intraesophageal pressure in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease, indicating by means of high resolution manometry that diaphragmatic postural and sphincter function are likely interrelated in this population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of liquid meals with different volumes on gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Keng-Liang; Rayner, Christopher K; Chuah, Seng-Kee; Chiu, Yi-Chun; Chiu, King-Wah; Hu, Tsung-Hui; Chiu, Cheng-Tang

    2014-03-01

    Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are often advised to avoid large meals, based on their complaints of increased symptoms after eating too much, and epidemiological evidence of a link between high volume intake and the presence of GERD. However, the precise effects of meal volume on gastroesophageal reflux have not been well studied. We aimed to clarify the effect of meal volume on acid regurgitation and symptoms in patients with GERD. Fifteen patients (10 female, 5 male; mean 54 ± 10 years old) with GERD were studied twice each in random order, during 24 h ambulatory pH monitoring. On one day, they consumed a 600 mL liquid test meal three times (breakfast, lunch, and dinner), and on the other, they consumed a 300 mL test meal six times (breakfast, snack, lunch, snack, dinner, and snack). Gastric fundus and antral areas and antral contractions were measured by transabdominal ultrasound. Symptoms were recorded using questionnaires. During the 600 mL regimen, there were more reflux episodes (17 ± 4 vs 10 ± 2, P = 0.03) and a greater total acid reflux time (12.5 ± 5.9% vs 5.5 ± 3.6%; P = 0.045) than the 300 mL regimen. Both the cross-sectional area of the gastric fundus (P = 0.024) and the number of antral contractions (P = 0.014) were greater for the 600 mL regimen. Larger meals are associated with distension of the gastric fundus and an increase in gastroesophageal reflux when compared with smaller, more frequent meals.

  4. [Role of gastroesophageal reflux in acute recurrent laryngeal dyspnea in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrieu-Guitrancourt, J; Dehesdin, D; Le Luyer, B; Fouin, M; Peron, J M

    1984-01-01

    Recurrent laryngeal croup (RLC) in children is rarely discussed unless permanent laryngeal obstruction is involved or there is an allergic basis. An atypical case is described where gastro-esophageal reflux (GER) was not only associated with but was also directly related to the provocation of each period. A series of 15 patients with RLC were investigated for the presence of GER, and this was confirmed in 7 cases. These findings suggest that GER may be responsible for the onset of RLC, as is now admitted for numerous respiratory manifestations in children. Moreover, GER may be implicated in the course of various laryngeal obstructive lesions, particularly subglottic angioma.

  5. Colonic fermentation influences lower esophageal sphincter function in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piche, Thierry; des Varannes, Stanislas Bruley; Sacher-Huvelin, Sylvie

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Colonic fermentation of carbohydrates is known to influence gastric and esophageal motility in healthy subjects. This study investigated the effects of colonic fermentation induced by oral administration of fructooligosaccharides (FOS) in patients with gastroesophageal reflux...... 3 weeks. On day 7, esophageal motility and pH were recorded in fasting conditions and after a test meal containing 6.6 g of FOS or placebo. Breath hydrogen concentrations (reflecting colonic fermentation) and plasma concentrations of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), peptide YY, and cholecystokinin...

  6. Valley dependent transport in graphene L junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, K. S.

    2018-05-01

    We studied the valley dependent transport in graphene L junctions connecting an armchair lead and a zigzag lead. The junction can be used in valleytronic devices and circuits. Electrons injected from the armchair lead into the junction is not valley polarized, but they can become valley polarized in the zigzag lead. There are Fermi energies, where the current in the zigzag lead is highly valley polarized and the junction is an efficient generator of valley polarized current. The features of the valley polarized current depend sensitively on the widths of the two leads, as well as the number of dimers in the armchair lead, because this number has a sensitive effect on the band structure of the armchair lead. When an external potential is applied to the junction, the energy range with high valley polarization is enlarged enhancing its function as a generator of highly valley polarized current. The scaling behavior found in other graphene devices is also found in L junctions, which means that the results presented here can be extended to junctions with larger dimensions after appropriate scaling of the energy.

  7. Palladium electrodes for molecular tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Shuai; Sen Suman; Zhang Peiming; Gyarfas, Brett; Ashcroft, Brian; Lindsay, Stuart; Lefkowitz, Steven; Peng Hongbo

    2012-01-01

    Gold has been the metal of choice for research on molecular tunneling junctions, but it is incompatible with complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor fabrication because it forms deep level traps in silicon. Palladium electrodes do not contaminate silicon, and also give higher tunnel current signals in the molecular tunnel junctions that we have studied. The result is cleaner signals in a recognition-tunneling junction that recognizes the four natural DNA bases as well as 5-methyl cytosine, with no spurious background signals. More than 75% of all the recorded signal peaks indicate the base correctly. (paper)

  8. Shot noise in YBCO bicrystal Josephson junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Constantinian, K.Y.; Ovsyannikov, G.A.; Borisenko, I.V.

    2003-01-01

    We measured spectral noise density in YBCO symmetric bicrystal Josephson junctions on sapphire substrates at bias voltages up to 100 mV and T 4.2 K. Normal state resistance of the Josephson junctions, R-N = 20-90 Omega and ICRN up to 2.2 mV have been observed in the experimental samples. Noise...... may explain the experimentally measured linewidth broadening of Josephson oscillations at mm and submm wave frequencies in high-Tc superconducting junctions. Experimental results are discussed in terms of bound states existing at surfaces of d-wave superconducting electrodes....

  9. Soliton excitations in Josephson tunnel junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomdahl, P. S.; Sørensen, O. H.; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    1982-01-01

    A detailed numerical study of a sine-Gordon model of the Josephson tunnel junction is compared with experimental measurements on junctions with different L / λJ ratios. The soliton picture is found to apply well on both relatively long (L / λJ=6) and intermediate (L / λJ=2) junctions. We find good...... agreement for the current-voltage characteristics, power output, and for the shape and height of the zero-field steps (ZFS). Two distinct modes of soliton oscillations are observed: (i) a bunched or congealed mode giving rise to the fundamental frequency f1 on all ZFS's and (ii) a "symmetric" mode which...

  10. Parametric frequency conversion in long Josephson junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irie, F.; Ashihara, S.; Yoshida, K.

    1976-01-01

    Current steps at voltages corresponding to the parametric coupling between an applied r.f. field and junction resonant modes have been observed in long Josephson tunnel junctions in the flux-flow state. The observed periodic variations of the step height due to the applied magnetic field are explained quantitatively by a perturbational analysis using Josephson phase equations. The present study demonstrates that the moving vortex array can serve as a coherent pump wave for signal waves propagating in the barrier region, which indicates, as a result, the possibility of traveling-wave parametric devices with long Josephson tunnel junctions. (author)

  11. Microscopic tunneling theory of long Josephson junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbech-Jensen, N.; Hattel, Søren A.; Samuelsen, Mogens Rugholm

    1992-01-01

    We present a numerical scheme for solving a nonlinear partial integro-differential equation with nonlocal time dependence. The equation describes the dynamics in a long Josephson junction modeled by use of the microscopic theory for tunneling between superconductors. We demonstrate that the detai......We present a numerical scheme for solving a nonlinear partial integro-differential equation with nonlocal time dependence. The equation describes the dynamics in a long Josephson junction modeled by use of the microscopic theory for tunneling between superconductors. We demonstrate...... that the detailed behavior of a solitonic mode (fluxon dynamics) in the junction is different from the results of the conventional perturbed sine-Gordon model....

  12. delta-biased Josephson tunnel junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monaco, R.; Mygind, Jesper; Koshelet, V.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: The behavior of a long Josephson tunnel junction drastically depends on the distribution of the dc bias current. We investigate the case in which the bias current is fed in the central point of a one-dimensional junction. Such junction configuration has been recently used to detect...... the persistent currents circulating in a superconducting loop. Analytical and numerical results indicate that the presence of fractional vortices leads to remarkable differences from the conventional case of uniformly distributed dc bias current. The theoretical findings are supported by detailed measurements...

  13. Refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease Doença do refluxo gastroesofágico refratária

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquim Prado P. Moraes-Filho

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is a condition which develops when the reflux of stomach contents causes troublesome symptoms and/or complications. Its pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment have frequently been analyzed but it is interesting to review some aspects of the GERD refractory patients to the proton pump inhibitors treatment. The treatment encompasses behavioral measures and pharmacological therapy. The majority of the patients respond well to proton pump inhibitors treatment but 20%-42% of them may not do so well. Patients who are unresponsible to 4-8 weeks' treatment with proton pump inhibitors (omeprazole, pantoprazole, rabeprazole, lansoprazole, esomeprazole, pantoprazole-Mg might have so-called refractory GERD. RESULTS: In some cases the patients are not real refractory because either they do not have GERD or the disease was not correctly treated, but the term refractory is still employed. Although debatable, the Brazilian GERD Consensus based upon evidences recommends as first step in the diagnosis, the upper digestive endoscopy to exclude the diagnosis of peptic ulcer and cancer and in some cases identify the presence of esophageal mucosa erosions. CONCLUSIONS: The main causes of the so-called refractory GERD are: (1 functional heartburn; (2 low levels of adherence to proton pump inhibitors treatment; (3 inadequate proton pump inhibitors dosage; (4 wrong diagnosis; (5 co-morbidities and pill-induced esophagitis; (6 genotypic differences; (7 nonacid gastroesophageal reflux; (8 autoimmune skin diseases; (9 eosinophilic esophagitis.CONTEXTO: A doença do refluxo gastroesofágico (DRGE é a condição que se desenvolve quando o refluxo do conteúdo gástrico provoca sintomas incômodos e/ou complicações. A fisiopatologia, o diagnóstico e o tratamento da enfermidade têm sido convenientemente estudados, mas é interessante revisar alguns aspectos dos pacientes que são aparentemente refratários, ou seja, n

  14. Managing peptic ulcer and gastroesophageal reflux disease in elderly Chinese patients – focus on esomeprazole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang RS

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Raymond SY Tang, Justin CY Wu Institute of Digestive Disease, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong Abstract: Peptic ulcer disease (PUD and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD are not uncommon in elderly patients. Clinical presentations of these acid-related disorders may be atypical in the geriatric population. Older individuals are at increased risk for poor outcomes in complicated PUD and for development of GERD complications. Multiple risk factors (eg, Helicobacter pylori [HP], use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs], aspirin contribute to the development of PUD. Recent data has shown that HP-negative, NSAID-negative idiopathic peptic ulcers are on the rise and carry a higher risk of recurrent ulcer bleeding and mortality. Effective management of PUD in the geriatric population relies on identification and modification of treatable risk factors. Elderly patients with GERD often require long-term acid suppressive therapy. Proton pump inhibitors (PPI including esomeprazole are effective in the treatment of reflux esophagitis, maintenance of GERD symptomatic control, and management of PUD as well as its complications. Potential safety concerns of long-term PPI use have been reported in the literature. Clinicians should balance the risks and benefits before committing elderly patients to long-term PPI therapy. Keywords: elderly patients, peptic ulcer disease, gastroesophageal reflux disease, proton pump inhibitor, esomeprazole

  15. Lipid aspiration pneumonia due to gastroesophageal reflux. An unusual radiographic appearance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfson, B.J.; Allen, J.L.; Panitch, H.B.; Karmazin, N.

    1989-08-01

    The development of lipid aspiration pneumonia after chronic nasopharyngeal installation of mineral oil was first described in 1925 by Laughlin. Since that time this entity has been well recognized and numerous substances have been identified or implicated as the aspirated material. The classic radiographic appearance of severe chronic lipid aspiration pneumonia has been described as consisting of intense perihilar infiltrates. However, the radiographic findings are more often non-specific and usually consist of varying degrees of diffuse interstitial infiltrates that tend to be more prominent in the perihilar regions and the right lung. We are reporting a case of biopsy-proven lipid aspiration pneumonia in an infant with known gastro-esophageal reflux (GER) who had medium-chain triglyceride oil administered via nasogastric tube. Serial roentgenograms demonstrated a changing pulmonary pattern from diffuse bilateral interstitial infiltrates initially to a diffuse alveolar pattern at the time of the lung biopsy. Modern medicine has developed new methods for providing nourishment to sick newborns and infants to improve their nutritional status and help them to grow. One such method involves the administration of medium-chain triglycerides (MCT oil) into the GI tract via a nasogastric or nasoenteral tube. The purpose of this report is to describe a significant complication of this method of providing nutrition to an infant with gastroesophageal reflux (GER) and the diagnostic dilemma it presented. (orig.).

  16. [Gastroesophageal reflux disease and connective tissue dysplasia in aspect of premorbid and comorbid disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhulaĭ, G S; Sekareva, E V; Dzhulaĭ, T E

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the phenotypic and visceral signs of connective tissue dysplasia (CTD) and comorbid diseases of the digestive system in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) patients with different types of esophageal reflux as the predictors of its variants. In 124 patients with GERD the clinical features, phenotypic and visceral signs of undifferentiated CTD were studied in details. In 82.0% of patients with GERD associated with gastroesophageal type of reflux (GER) phenotypic and especially visceral signs of STD were detected, mainly in the form of cardiochalasia and hiatal hernia. In patients with duodenogastroesophageal reflux symptoms (DGER) the signs of STD were marked in 42.0% of cases, mostly in the form of biliary tract structure abnormalities. The risk of GERD associated with prevalence of GER, was 11.9 times higher in the presence of diagnostically meaningful combination of 6 or more signs of STD than in patients with DGER. Realization of predictor options in GER occurs in the preference of sharp, acidic foods, spices, taking medications that reduce lower esophageal sphincter tone. GERD, associated with DGER, is formed in patients with family history of diseases of the biliary tract and in the preference of food rich of calories. Study of STD symptoms as predictors of structural development of GERD and its variants is prospective to predict disease, choice of profession and eating behavior, primarily in young adults.

  17. [Clinical characteristics of gastroesophageal reflux disease with esophageal injury in korean: focusing on risk factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Jun; Jung, Min Kyu; Kim, Sung Kook; Jang, Byung Ik; Lee, Si Hyung; Kim, Kyeong Ok; Kim, Eun Soo; Cho, Kwang Bum; Park, Kyung Sik; Kim, Eun Young; Jung, Jin Tae; Kwon, Joong Goo; Lee, Joong Hyun; Yang, Chang Hun; Park, Chang Keun; Seo, Hyang Eun; Jeon, Seong Woo

    2011-05-25

    Recent studies suggest that the prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is increasing in Korea. However, studies on risk factors for GERD have yielded inconsistent results. The aims of this study were to compare clinical features between symptomatic syndromes without esophageal injury (=non-erosive disease [NED]) and syndromes with esophageal injury (=erosive disease [ED]), and to determine risk factors associated ED. A total of 450 subjects who visited gastroenterology clinics of six training hospitals in Daegu from March 2008 to April 2010 were consecutively enrolled. The subjects were asked to complete a questionnaire which inquired about gastroesophageal reflux symptoms. The questionnaire also included questions about smoking, alcohol drinking, consumption of coffee, use of drugs, exercise, and other medical history. The subjects were subdivided into NED and ED groups. The proportion of subjects in each NED and ED group was 172 (38.2%) and 278 (61.8%). Male gender, smoking, alcohol drinking, consumption of coffee, large waist circumference, infrequent medication of antacids, aspirin and NSAIDs, infrequent and mild GERD symptoms were all significantly associated with ED on univariate analysis. Age, hiatal hernia, diabetes mellitus, body mass index, change in weight during 1 year, and number of typical GERD symptoms were not independent risk factors for ED. However, the association between ED and alcohol drinking, infrequent medication of antacids, mild typical GERD symptoms remained as strong risk factors after adjustments on multivariate logistic analysis. Independent risk factors associated with ED were alcohol drinking, infrequent medication of antacids and mild typical GERD symptoms.

  18. Laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication for severe gastroesophageal reflux disease: pros and cons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMaria, E J; Siuta, M; Widmeyer, J; Zfass, A M

    1997-03-01

    The advent of the laparoscopic approach to Nissen fundoplication has led to a resurgence in enthusiasm for the surgical treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). However, controversy exists as to which subgroups of GERD patients are best treated surgically. The relative success of treatment with medical and surgical intervention in terms of both symptom control and objective resolution of esophageal injury must be weighed against the relative costs of each therapeutic strategy in both the short and long term, given that GERD tends to be a lifelong disorder. The following is the transcribed text of a debate held at the Medical College of Virginia as part of a continuing medical education program in which the statement "Laparoscopic antireflux surgery is superior to medical treatment for severe gastroesophageal reflux disease" was contested. Representatives from the departments of surgery and gastroenterology provided arguments supporting their respective sides of this issue. The purpose was not to promote polarization in treatment selection, but to review the available data in a forum that could promote development of a rational algorithm for clinical decision-making in patients with GERD who might benefit from antireflux surgery. Final comments from the authors are provided in an attempt to synthesize the arguments into a reasonable strategy for individual case management.

  19. Benefits of massage therapy for infants with symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neu, Madalynn; Pan, Zhaoxing; Workman, Rachel; Marcheggiani-Howard, Cassandra; Furuta, Glenn; Laudenslager, Mark L

    2014-10-01

    This randomized controlled pilot trial was conducted to evaluate the clinical efficacy of massage therapy (MT) for relief of symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The hypothesis was that, when compared to infants who received nonmassage therapy, infants who received MT would display fewer GERD symptoms, greater weight gain, greater amount of sleep, lower cortisol levels before and after treatment, and lower daily (area under the curve [AUC]) cortisol secretion. Participants were 36 infants born at term, 4-10 weeks of age at enrollment, healthy except for a diagnosis of GERD by their pediatrician, and with a score of at least 16 on the Infant Gastroesophageal Reflux Questionnaire-Revised (I-GERQ-R). Infants were randomized to receive either MT or a nonmassage sham treatment in their homes for 30 min twice a week for 6 weeks. Data collectors and parents were blind to study condition. GERD symptoms decreased in both groups and weight increased. Pretreatment salivary cortisol levels decreased significantly over time in the massage group while increasing in the nonmassage group. Daily cortisol level also decreased in the massage group and increased in the nonmassage group, but the difference was not significant. MT administered by a professional therapist did not affect symptoms of GERD differently than a sham treatment but did decrease infant stress as measured by cortisol. Research focusing on stress reduction in infants with GERD and multimodal treatments addressing GERD symptoms may yield the most effective treatment. © The Author(s) 2013.

  20. The Characteristics of Postprandial Proximal Gastric Acid Pocket in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing; Liu, Dong; Feng, Cheng; Luo, Yumei; Nian, Yuanyuan; Wang, Xueqin; Zhang, Jun

    2018-01-01

    Background Postprandial proximal gastric acid pocket (PPGAP) plays important roles in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). In this study, we analyzed the characteristics of PPGAP in GERD. Material/Methods There were 17 normal participants and 20 GERD patients who completed a gastroesophageal reflux disease questionnaire (GerdQ) and underwent a gastroscopy, a high-resolution manometry, an esophageal 24-hour pH monitoring, and a station pull-through pH monitoring to assess their symptomatic degree, endoscopic change, acid exposure, and PPGAP. Results PPGAP was present in all participants. Compared with normal participants, the PPGAP in GERD patients was significantly different, thus the disappearing time was significantly later (pGERD patients was positively correlated with GerdQ score (pGERD patients was positively correlated with the DeMeester score (pGERD patients was negatively correlated with the DeMeester score (pGERD patients had characteristics of long time period, long length, and high acidity. Its length was positively correlated with subjective symptomatic degree. Its period, length, and acidity were positively correlated with the objective acid exposure. PPGAP seems to be the originator of acid reflux events and plays important roles in GERD. PMID:29309401

  1. Effects of pectin liquid on gastroesophageal reflux disease in children with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimizu Nobuzo

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of thickeners is a standard therapy for decreasing episodes of regurgitation or vomiting in infants. However, it remains to be investigated whether thickener is effective for vomiting and/or chronic respiratory symptoms in children with cerebral palsy. Methods We enrolled 18 neurologically impaired children caused by cerebral palsy, with gastroesophageal reflux disease. In the first part of this study (pH monitoring, subjects were randomly allocated to two groups: fed with a high-pectin diet [enteral formula: pectin liquid = 2:1 (v/v], or a low-pectin diet [enteral formula: pectin liquid = 3:1 (v/v]. Two-channel esophageal pH monitoring was performed over 48 h. In the second part (clinical trial, subjects were fed a high- or low-pectin diet and non-pectin diet for 4 weeks in a crossover manner. Nurses recorded the feeding volume, number of episodes of vomiting, volume of gastric residue, episodes of cough and wheeze, frequency of using oxygen for dyspnea, and the day when the child could return to school. Cough and wheeze were recorded as a cough-score. Results The median value for the % time pH Conclusion Pectin liquid partially decreased gastroesophageal reflux as measured by eshophageal pH monitoring, and might improve vomiting and respiratory symptoms in children with cerebral palsy. Trial registration ISRCTN19787793

  2. Transparency of atom-sized superconducting junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van-der-Post, N.; Peters, E.T.; Van Ruitenbeek, J.M.; Yanson, I.K.

    1995-01-01

    We discuss the transparency of atom-size superconducting tunnel junctions by comparing experimental values of the normal resistance and Subgap Structure with the theoretical predictions for these phenomena by Landauer's formula and Multiple Andreev Reflection, respectively

  3. Josephson tunnel junctions in niobium films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiik, Tapio.

    1976-12-01

    A method of fabricating stable Josephson tunnel junctions with reproducible characteristics is described. The junctions have a sandwich structure consisting of a vacuum evaporated niobium film, a niobium oxide layer produced by the glow discharge method and a lead film deposited by vacuum evaporation. Difficulties in producing thin-film Josephson junctions are discussed. Experimental results suggest that the lower critical field of the niobium film is the most essential parameter when evaluating the quality of these junctions. The dependence of the lower critical field on the film thickness and on the Ginzburg-Landau parameter of the film is studied analytically. Comparison with the properties of the evaporated films and with the previous calculations for bulk specimens shows that the presented model is applicable for most of the prepared samples. (author)

  4. Chirality effect in disordered graphene ribbon junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long Wen

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the influence of edge chirality on the electronic transport in clean or disordered graphene ribbon junctions. By using the tight-binding model and the Landauer-Büttiker formalism, the junction conductance is obtained. In the clean sample, the zero-magnetic-field junction conductance is strongly chirality-dependent in both unipolar and bipolar ribbons, whereas the high-magnetic-field conductance is either chirality-independent in the unipolar or chirality-dependent in the bipolar ribbon. Furthermore, we study the disordered sample in the presence of magnetic field and find that the junction conductance is always chirality-insensitive for both unipolar and bipolar ribbons with adequate disorders. In addition, the disorder-induced conductance plateaus can exist in all chiral bipolar ribbons provided the disorder strength is moderate. These results suggest that we can neglect the effect of edge chirality in fabricating electronic devices based on the magnetotransport in a disordered graphene ribbon. (paper)

  5. Persistent junctional reciprocating tachycardia in the fetus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudijk, M. A.; Stoutenbeek, P.; Sreeram, N.; Visser, G. H. A.; Meijboom, E. J.

    2003-01-01

    Persistent junctional reciprocating tachycardia (PJRT) tends to be a persistent arrhythmia and requires aggressive therapeutic management. Diagnosis and management of this infrequently occurring tachycardia in the fetus at an early stage is of importance for the prevention of congestive heart

  6. Josephson junction arrays and superconducting wire networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobb, C.J.

    1992-01-01

    Techniques used to fabricate integrated circuits make it possible to construct superconducting networks containing as many as 10 6 wires or Josephson junctions. Such networks undergo phase transitions from resistive high-temperature states to ordered low-resistance low-temperature states. The nature of the phase transition depends strongly on controllable parameters such as the strength of the superconductivity in each wire or junction and the external magnetic field. This paper will review the physics of these phase transitions, starting with the simplest zero-magnetic field case. This leads to a Kosterlitz-Thouless transition when the junctions or wires are weak, and a simple mean-field fransition when the junctions or wires are strong. Rich behavior, resulting from frustration, occurs in the presence of a magnetic field. (orig.)

  7. Spinal Gap Junction Channels in Neuropathic Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Jeon, Young Hoon; Youn, Dong Ho

    2015-01-01

    Damage to peripheral nerves or the spinal cord is often accompanied by neuropathic pain, which is a complex, chronic pain state. Increasing evidence indicates that alterations in the expression and activity of gap junction channels in the spinal cord are involved in the development of neuropathic pain. Thus, this review briefly summarizes evidence that regulation of the expression, coupling, and activity of spinal gap junction channels modulates pain signals in neuropathic pain states induced...

  8. Construction of tunable peptide nucleic acid junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Tanghui; He, Liu; Tokura, Yu; Liu, Xin; Wu, Yuzhou; Shi, Zhengshuang

    2018-03-15

    We report here the construction of 3-way and 4-way peptide nucleic acid (PNA) junctions as basic structural units for PNA nanostructuring. The incorporation of amino acid residues into PNA chains makes PNA nanostructures with more structural complexity and architectural flexibility possible, as exemplified by building 3-way PNA junctions with tunable nanopores. Given that PNA nanostructures have good thermal and enzymatic stabilities, they are expected to have broad potential applications in biosensing, drug delivery and bioengineering.

  9. Effect of body position changes on postprandial gastroesophageal reflux and gastric emptying in the healthy premature neonate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wijk, Michiel P.; Benninga, Marc A.; Dent, John; Lontis, Ros; Goodchild, Louise; McCall, Lisa M.; Haslam, Ross; Davidson, Geoffrey P.; Omari, Taher

    2007-01-01

    Objective To identify a body-positioning regimen that promotes gastric emptying (GE) and reduces gastroesophageal reflux (GER) by changing body position 1 hour after feeding. Study design Ten healthy preterm infants (7 male; mean postmenstrual age, 36 weeks [range, 33 to 38 weeks]) were monitored

  10. Lipid-Laden Alveolar Macrophages and pH Monitoring in Gastroesophageal Reflux-Related Respiratory Symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Kitz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipid-laden alveolar macrophages and pH monitoring have been used in the diagnosis of chronic aspiration in children with gastroesophageal reflux (GER. This study was conducted to prove a correlation between the detection of alimentary pulmonary fat phagocytosis and an increasing amount of proximal gastroesophageal reflux. It was assumed that proximal gastroesophageal reflux better correlates with aspiration than distal GER. Patients from 6 months to 16 years with unexplained recurrent wheezy bronchitis and bronchial hyperreactivity, or recurrent pneumonia with chronic cough underwent 24-hour double-channel pH monitoring and bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL. Aspiration of gastric content was determined by counting lipid laden alveolar macrophages from BAL specimens. There were no correlations between any pH-monitoring parameters and counts of lipid-laden macrophages in the whole study population, even when restricting analysis to those with abnormal reflux index expressing clinically significant GER. Quantifying lipid-laden alveolar macrophages from BAL in children with gastroesophageal-related respiratory disorders does not have an acceptable specificity to prove chronic aspiration as an underlying etiology. Therefore, research for other markers of pulmonary aspiration is needed.

  11. Canadian Digestive Health Foundation Public Impact Series: Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Canada: Incidence, Prevalence, and Direct and Indirect Economic Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard N Fedorak

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Canadian Digestive Health Foundation initiated a scientific program to assess the incidence, prevalence, mortality and economic impact of digestive disorders across Canada. The current article presents the updated findings from the study concerning gastroesophageal reflux disease – a condition that develops when the reflux of stomach contents causes troublesome symptoms and/or complications (Montreal definition.

  12. Canadian Digestive Health Foundation Public Impact Series: gastroesophageal reflux disease in Canada: incidence, prevalence, and direct and indirect economic impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorak, Richard N; Veldhuyzen van Zanten, Sander; Bridges, Ron

    2010-07-01

    The Canadian Digestive Health Foundation initiated a scientific program to assess the incidence, prevalence, mortality and economic impact of digestive disorders across Canada. The current article presents the updated findings from the study concerning gastroesophageal reflux disease - a condition that develops when the reflux of stomach contents causes troublesome symptoms and/or complications (Montreal definition).

  13. Infant Boy with Microcephaly Gastroesophageal Refl ux and Nephrotic Syndrome (Galloway-Mowat Syndrome): A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaki, Majid; Rafeey, Mandana

    2012-01-01

    In this case report, we present the first diagnosed case of Galloway-Mowat syndrome in Iran. A 7 month old infant boy withmicrocephaly that had prominently stunted head growth afterbirth, gastroesophageal reflux, multiple craniofascial characters,hypothyroidism and nephrotic syndrome diagnosed at 5 monthsof age associated with rapid decline in renal function and heavyproteinuria in 2 months .

  14. Validation of the GSFQ, a Self-Administered Symptom Frequency Questionnaire for Patients with Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Paré

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although the diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is based primarily on symptoms experienced by a patient, relatively little attention has been paid to the development and validation of self-administered questionnaires specific to GERD symptoms. The present article presents the validation of the short, self-administered GERD Symptom Frequency Questionnaire (GSFQ.

  15. Pulmonary Function Impairment After Trachea-Esophageal Fistula: A Minor Role for Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peetsold, M. G.; Heij, H. A.; Nagelkerke, A. F.; Deurloo, J. A.; Gemke, R. J. B. J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Long-term impairment of pulmonary function in trachea-esophageal fistula (TEF) patients is, at least in part, commonly ascribed to gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD). The objective of this study was to examine the independent effects of the underlying condition and GERD on

  16. Open access capture of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease using an online patient-reported outcomes instrument

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tielemans, Merel M.; Jansen, Jan Bmj; van Oijen, Martijn Gh

    2012-01-01

    Persons with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) frequently search online for information about causes and treatment options. The GerdQ self-assessment questionnaire can be used for diagnosis of GERD and follow-up of symptoms. To assess whether it is feasible (1) to study the prevalence and

  17. Junction depth measurement using carrier illumination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borden, Peter

    2001-01-01

    Carrier Illumination [trade mark] (CI) is a new method recently developed to meet the need for a non-destructive, high throughput junction depth measurement on patterned wafers. A laser beam creates a quasi-static excess carrier profile in the semiconductor underlying the activated junction. The excess carrier profile is fairly constant below the junction, and drops rapidly in the junction, creating a steep index of refraction gradient at the junction edge. Interference with light reflected from this index gradient provides a signal that is analyzed to determine the junction depth. The paper summarizes evaluation of performance in full NMOS and PMOS process flows, on both bare and patterned wafers. The aims have been to validate (1) performance in the presence of underlying layers typically found at the source/drain (S/D) process steps and (2) measurement on patterned wafers. Correlation of CI measurements to SIMS and transistor drive current are shown. The data were obtained from NMOS structures using As S/D and LDD implants. Correlations to SRP, SIMS and sheet resistance are shown for PMOS structures using B 11 LDD implants. Gage capability measurements are also presented

  18. Ballistic Josephson junctions based on CVD graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tianyi; Gallop, John; Hao, Ling; Romans, Edward

    2018-04-01

    Josephson junctions with graphene as the weak link between superconductors have been intensely studied in recent years, with respect to both fundamental physics and potential applications. However, most of the previous work was based on mechanically exfoliated graphene, which is not compatible with wafer-scale production. To overcome this limitation, we have used graphene grown by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) as the weak link of Josephson junctions. We demonstrate that very short, wide CVD-graphene-based Josephson junctions with Nb electrodes can work without any undesirable hysteresis in their electrical characteristics from 1.5 K down to a base temperature of 320 mK, and their gate-tuneable critical current shows an ideal Fraunhofer-like interference pattern in a perpendicular magnetic field. Furthermore, for our shortest junctions (50 nm in length), we find that the normal state resistance oscillates with the gate voltage, consistent with the junctions being in the ballistic regime, a feature not previously observed in CVD-graphene-based Josephson junctions.

  19. Paclitaxel-Based Chemoradiotherapy in the Treatment of Patients With Operable Esophageal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelsey, Chris R.; Chino, Junzo P.; Willett, Christopher G.; Clough, Robert W.; Hurwitz, Herbert I.; Morse, Michael A.; Bendell, Johanna C.; D'Amico, Thomas A.; Czito, Brian G.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To compare a neoadjuvant regimen of cisplatin/5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and concurrent radiation therapy (RT) with paclitaxel-based regimens and RT in the management of operable esophageal (EC)/gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancer. Methods and Materials: All patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy (CT) and RT for EC/GEJ cancer at Duke University between January 1995 and December 2004 were included. Clinical end points were compared for patients receiving paclitaxel-based regimens (TAX) vs. alternative regimens (non-TAX). Local control (LC), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Chi-square analysis was performed to test the effect of TAX on pathologic complete response (pCR) rates and toxicity. Results: A total of 109 patients received CT-RT followed by esophagectomy (95 M; 14 F). Median RT dose was 45 Gy (range, 36-66 Gy). The TAX and non-TAX groups comprised 47% and 53% of patients, respectively. Most (83%) TAX patients received three drug regimens including platinum and a fluoropyrimidine. In the non-TAX group, 89% of the patients received cisplatin and 5-FU. The remainder received 5-FU or capecitabine alone. Grade 3-4 toxicity occurred in 41% of patients receiving TAX vs. 24% of those receiving non-TAX (p = 0.19). Overall pCR rate was 39% (39% with TAX vs. 40% with non-TAX, p = 0.9). Overall LC, DFS, and OS at 3 years were 80%, 34%, and 37%, respectively. At 3 years, there were no differences in LC (75% vs. 85%, p = 0.33) or OS (37% vs. 37%, p = 0.32) between TAX and non-TAX groups. Conclusions: In this large experience, paclitaxel-containing regimens did not improve pCR rates or clinical end points compared to non-paclitaxel-containing regimens

  20. Different histological status of gastritis in superficial adenocarcinoma of the esophagogastric junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Masayoshi; Kushima, Ryoji; Oda, Ichiro; Mojtahed, Kaveh; Nonaka, Satoru; Suzuki, Haruhisa; Yoshinaga, Shigetaka; Matsubara, Akiko; Taniguchi, Hirokazu; Sekine, Shigeki; Saito, Yutaka; Shimoda, Tadakazu

    2014-01-01

    Although many gastric cancers arise in chronic gastritis, the association between adenocarcinoma of the esophagogastric junction and the status of background gastritis remains unclear. We aim to investigate the histological status of gastritis in the background fundic gland mucosa of adenocarcinoma of the esophagogastric junction. The present study included 121 consecutive patients with superficial adenocarcinoma of the esophagogastric junction obtained by surgical and/or endoscopic resection. We re-evaluated the histogenesis of adenocarcinoma of the esophagogastric junction, including the background fundic gland mucosa using the Updated Sydney System. The prevalence of histologic atrophic gastric mucosa with gastritis (positive gastritis), non-atrophic gastric mucosa without gastritis (negative gastritis) and Barrett's adenocarcinoma was examined. Histologic-positive gastritis was found in 67 (55%) of all patients, in 24 (38%) of 63 Barrett's adenocarcinoma patients and in 43 (74%) of 58 non-Barrett's adenocarcinoma patients (P gastritis patients `and younger age in non-Barrett's adenocarcinoma without gastritis patients were shown. There were no differences in clinicopathological features related to the gastritis status in Barrett's adenocarcinoma patients. Reflux esophagitis was observed in most (81%) of all patients, and 32 (74%) of the non-Barrett's adenocarcinoma with gastritis patients. In the 67 positive gastritis patients, the mean Updated Sydney System scores of glandular atrophy and intestinal metaplasia were 1.45 and 1.10, respectively, and these scores were higher in the non-Barrett's adenocarcinoma patients than in the Barrett's adenocarcinoma patients. This study suggests that about half of the patients with adenocarcinoma of the esophagogastric junction harbor histological gastritis. Adenocarcinoma of the esophagogastric junction is considered to be a heterogeneous entity, including Barrett's esophagus-related, positive gastritis-related, and

  1. The effect of the speed of eating on acid reflux and symptoms of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valitova, Elen R; Bayrakçı, Berna; Bor, Serhat

    2013-01-01

    There is a general belief that gastroesophageal reflux attacks appear more frequently after quick meal, which is without powerful scientific basis, and the general advise to patients is to eat slowly. We aimed to determine whether the speed of eating has an impact on reflux attacks and symptoms in gastroesophageal reflux disease patients. 24-h intraesophageal pH monitoring was performed to 60 patients with frequent gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms (39 women) in a tertiary referral center. One hour after placing the pH probe, the patients were asked to have the same meal (744 kcal: 37,6% of carbohydrate, 21,2% of protein, and 41,2% of fat) within 5 or 30 minutes in random order for two consecutive days without extubating. The number of reflux episodes, acid exposure time, and the symptoms of 3-h postprandial period were analyzed. Thirty-eight patients had normal and 22 patients had pathologic pH monitoring for a total of 28 hours of measurement period. The number of reflux episodes increased in the 2 nd hour. The fast eating group had less reflux attacks and lower total reflux time in the 1 st hour and an insignificant increase in the 2 nd and 3 rd hours. The number of symptoms was higher following slow eating (113 vs. 100) without reaching significance. Speed of food intake has no significant impact on acidic reflux attacks in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. The classical advice "eat slowly" may not have any scientific basis. However, a similar study on patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease should be performed by combined multichannel intraluminal impedance and pH to evaluate the place of nonacid or weak acid reflux.

  2. Adenocarcinoma of the esophagogastric junction. Neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy and radical surgery. Early results and toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leibl, Bernhard J. [Klinikum Coburg (Germany). Dept. of Surgery; Coburg Cancer Center, Coburg (Germany); Vitz, Stephanie; Schaefer, Wolfgang; Alfrink, Martin; Grabenbauer, Gerhard G. [DiCura Coburg, Coburg (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Coburg Cancer Center, Coburg (Germany); Geschwendtner, Andreas [Klinikum Coburg (Germany). Dept. of Pathology; Coburg Cancer Center, Coburg (Germany)

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate treatment results and toxicity following a combined approach consisting of neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy and radical surgery in advanced adenocarcinoma of the esophagus and gastroesophageal junction. Patients and Methods: Between 2005 and 2009, a total of 41 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed nonmetastatic adenocarcinoma of the esophagus and the esophagogastric junction were evaluated, of whom 23 received neoadjuvant radiochemo-therapy (RCT). A total dose of 50.4 Gy with 2 cycles of simultaneous cisplatin/5-fluorouracil (FU) or Taxol/FU-chemotherapy were applied. A radical transthoracic subtotal esophageal and proximal gastric resection through a right thoracoabdominal laparotomy with intrathoracic anastomosis was performed 6-8 weeks following RCT. This was combined with a two-field lymphadenectomy of mediastinal and abdominal lymph nodes. Standard histopathological evaluation included the application of regression grading according to Werner and Hoefler. Toxicity was recorded on the basis of CTC criteria; survival curves were calculated according to Kaplan-Meier. V10, V15, and V20 data were correlated with pulmonary toxicity. Results: Overall survival for all 23 patients was 61% at 3 years. Of the original 23 patients, 18 (78%) patients proceeded to radical surgery. Reasons for no surgery included advanced age of 79, 82, and 86 years (n = 3), severe comorbidity (n = 1), and progression during radiochemotherapy (n = 1). Surgical morbidity (grade 3-4) and mortality rates were 35% and 6%, respectively. Resurgery was necessary in 3 cases (18%). Clear resection margins were achieved in 17 of 18 patients (94%). Twelve of 18 (67%) patients initially diagnosed with T3 tumors and 3 of 3 patients with T4 tumors experienced downstaging. The ypN0 rate was 12 of 18 patients (67%). Out of a total of 18 patients, regression grading revealed < 10% viable cells in 8 (44%) including 3 cases (17%) with complete regression, 10-50% viable

  3. Josephson tunnel junctions with ferromagnetic interlayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weides, M.P.

    2006-07-01

    Superconductivity and ferromagnetism are well-known physical properties of solid states that have been widely studied and long thought about as antagonistic phenomena due to difference in spin ordering. It turns out that the combination of both superconductor and ferromagnet leads to a very rich and interesting physics. One particular example, the phase oscillations of the superconducting order parameter inside the ferromagnet, will play a major role for the devices discussed in this work. In this thesis, I present Josephson junctions with a thin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} tunnel barrier and a ferromagnetic interlayer, i.e. superconductor-insulator-ferromagnet-superconductor (SIFS) stacks. The fabrication of junctions was optimized regarding the insulation of electrodes and the homogeneity of the current transport. The junctions were either in the 0 or {pi} coupled ground state, depending on the thickness of the ferromagnetic layer and on temperature. The influence of ferromagnetic layer thickness on the transport properties and the coupling (0, {pi}) of SIFS tunnel junctions was studied. Furthermore, using a stepped ferromagnetic layer with well-chosen thicknesses, I obtained the so-called 0-{pi} Josephson junction. At a certain temperature this 0-{pi} junction can be made perfectly symmetric. In this case the ground state corresponds to a vortex of supercurrent creating a magnetic flux which is a fraction of the magnetic flux quantum {phi}{sub 0}. Such structures allow to study the physics of fractional vortices and to build various electronic circuits based on them. The SIFS junctions presented here have an exponentially vanishing damping at T {yields} 0. The SIFS technology developed within the framework of this work may be used to construct classical and quantum devices such as oscillators, memory cells and qubits. (orig.)

  4. Model Building to Facilitate Understanding of Holliday Junction and Heteroduplex Formation, and Holliday Junction Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvarajah, Geeta; Selvarajah, Susila

    2016-01-01

    Students frequently expressed difficulty in understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in chromosomal recombination. Therefore, we explored alternative methods for presenting the two concepts of the double-strand break model: Holliday junction and heteroduplex formation, and Holliday junction resolution. In addition to a lecture and…

  5. Increasing gap junctional coupling: a tool for dissecting the role of gap junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsen, Lene Nygaard; Haugan, Ketil; Stahlhut, Martin

    2007-01-01

    . In a number of cases, gap junctions have been implicated in the initiation and progress of disease, and experimental uncoupling has been used to investigate the exact role of coupling. The inverse approach, i.e., to increase coupling, has become possible in recent years and represents a new way of testing......Much of our current knowledge about the physiological and pathophysiological role of gap junctions is based on experiments where coupling has been reduced by either chemical agents or genetic modification. This has brought evidence that gap junctions are important in many physiological processes...... the role of gap junctions. The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge obtained with agents that selectively increase gap junctional intercellular coupling. Two approaches will be reviewed: increasing coupling by the use of antiarrhythmic peptide and its synthetic analogs...

  6. Physical Activity and Gastrointestinal Cancers: Primary and Tertiary Preventive Effects and Possible Biological Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Steindorf

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal cancers account for 37% of all cancer deaths worldwide, underlining the need to further investigate modifiable factors for gastrointestinal cancer risk and prognosis. This review summarizes the corresponding evidence for physical activity (PA, including, briefly, possible biological mechanisms. Despite high public health relevance, there is still a scarcity of studies, especially for tertiary prevention. Besides the convincing evidence of beneficial effects of PA on colon cancer risk, clear risk reduction for gastroesophageal cancer was identified, as well as weak indications for pancreatic cancer. Inverse associations were observed for liver cancer, yet based on few studies. Only for rectal cancer, PA appeared to be not associated with cancer risk. With regard to cancer-specific mortality of the general population, published data were rare but indicated suggestive evidence of protective effects for colon and liver cancer, and to a lesser extent for rectal and gastroesophageal cancer. Studies in cancer patients on cancer-specific and total mortality were published for colorectal cancer only, providing good evidence of inverse associations with post-diagnosis PA. Overall, evidence of associations of PA with gastrointestinal cancer risk and progression is promising but still limited. However, the already available knowledge further underlines the importance of PA to combat cancer.

  7. Increased proximal reflux in a hypersensitive esophagus might explain symptoms resistant to proton pump inhibitors in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rohof, Wout O.; Bennink, Roelof J.; de Jonge, Hugo; Boeckxstaens, Guy E.

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 30% of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease have symptoms resistant to treatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). Several mechanisms such as esophageal hypersensitivity, increased mucosal permeability, and possibly the position of the gastric acid pocket might underlie a

  8. The University of Chicago contribution to the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease and its complications: a tribute to David B. Skinner 1935-2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Christina L; Worrell, Stephanie G; Patti, Marco G; DeMeester, Tom R

    2015-03-01

    To highlight the contributions from the University of Chicago under the leadership of Dr David B. Skinner to the understanding of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and its complications. The invention of the esophagoscope confirmed that GERD was a premorbid condition. The medical world was divided between those who believed in a morphological lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and those who did not. Those who did not believe attempted to rearrange the anatomy of the foregut organs to stop reflux with minimal success. The discovery of the LES focused attention on the sphincter as the main deterrent to reflux and the hope that measurement of a low LES pressure would mark the presence of GERD. This turned out not to be so. In July 1973, with this history of confusion, Dr Skinner at the age of 36 assumed the chair of surgery at the University of Chicago. The publications of the University of Chicago's esophageal group were collected from private and public (PubMed) databases, reviewed, and seminal contributions selected. Twenty-four-hour esophageal pH monitoring led to the understanding of the LES, its contribution to GERD, and the complication of Barrett's esophagus. The relationship of Barrett's to adenocarcinoma was clarified. The rising incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma led to contributions in the staging of esophageal cancer and its treatment with an en bloc resection. Ten years after the death of Dr Skinner, we can appreciate the monumental contributions to benign and malignant esophageal disease under his leadership.

  9. Regulation of gap junctions by protein phosphorylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C. Sáez

    1998-05-01

    Full Text Available Gap junctions are constituted by intercellular channels and provide a pathway for transfer of ions and small molecules between adjacent cells of most tissues. The degree of intercellular coupling mediated by gap junctions depends on the number of gap junction channels and their activity may be a function of the state of phosphorylation of connexins, the structural subunit of gap junction channels. Protein phosphorylation has been proposed to control intercellular gap junctional communication at several steps from gene expression to protein degradation, including translational and post-translational modification of connexins (i.e., phosphorylation of the assembled channel acting as a gating mechanism and assembly into and removal from the plasma membrane. Several connexins contain sites for phosphorylation for more than one protein kinase. These consensus sites vary between connexins and have been preferentially identified in the C-terminus. Changes in intercellular communication mediated by protein phosphorylation are believed to control various physiological tissue and cell functions as well as to be altered under pathological conditions.

  10. Antibiotic Prophylaxis Using Third Generation Cephalosporins Can Reduce the Risk of Early Rebleeding in the First Acute Gastroesophageal Variceal Hemorrhage: A Prospective Randomized Study

    OpenAIRE

    Jun, Chung-Hwan; Park, Chang-Hwan; Lee, Wan-Sik; Joo, Young-Eun; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Choi, Sung-Kyu; Rew, Jong-Sun; Kim, Sei-Jong; Kim, Young-Dae

    2006-01-01

    Bacterial infection may be a critical trigger for variceal bleeding. Antibiotic prophylaxis can prevent rebleeding in patients with acute gastroesophageal variceal bleeding (GEVB). The aim of the study was to compare prophylactic third generation cephalosporins with on-demand antibiotics for the prevention of gastroesophageal variceal rebleeding. In a prospective trial, patients with the first acute GEVB were randomly assigned to receive prophylactic antibiotics (intravenous cefotaxime 2 g q ...

  11. Association between Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and Appendicitis: A Population-Based Case-Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Li-Ting; Tsai, Ming-Chieh; Lin, Herng-Ching; Lee, Cha-Ze

    2016-01-01

    Appendicitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are both prevalent diseases and might share similar pathological mechanisms. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between GERD and appendicitis using a large population-based dataset. This study used administrative claims data from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2005. We identified 7113 patients with appendicitis as cases, and 28452 matched patients without appendicitis as controls. This study revealed that GERD was found in 359 (5.05%) cases and 728 (2.56%) controls (p appendicitis were 1.96 (95% CI: 1.56~2.47), 2.36 (95% CI: 1.94~2.88), and 1.71 (95% CI: 1.31~2.22) than controls, respectively. We concluded that patients with appendicitis had higher odds of prior GERD than those without appendicitis regardless of age group. PMID:26932391

  12. Treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease: two new oral formulations dexlansoprazole MR and esomezol (esomeprazole strontium).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, Parth J; Oldfield, Edward C; Johnson, David A

    2014-06-01

    The prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease continues to increase with the aging population and the obesity epidemic. Therapeutic failures can have significant detrimental effects in patients. Recently, dexlansoprazole MR and esomeprazole strontium were introduced to the class of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). This article will review the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of dexlansoprazole MR and esomeprazole strontium. Using the keywords 'dexlansoprazole MR' and 'esomeprazole strontium' in the search engines of PubMed, Cochrane Reviews and Google, we were able to identify peer-reviewed publications, abstracts and presentations at national society educations meetings and present a balanced view of the available data. Dexlansoprazole MR and esomeprazole strontium offer an innovative delivery mechanism compared to conventional PPIs. Further trials are necessary in order to establish superiority.

  13. Quality of life scales for patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease: A literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Li Guan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is a common chronic disease of the gastrointestinal tract that occurs in 3.1% of the Chinese population [1]. Heartburn, acid regurgitation and epigastric pain are typical clinical symptoms of GERD. These symptoms can affect patients' work productivity, sleep, diet and daily activities, thus resulting in a reduced quality of life (QOL [2]. Although patient QOL is increasingly being considered as a medical outcome index in the evaluation of the impact of GERD symptoms on patients' health status, measuring patient QOL in clinical trials can be challenging due to the lack of a standard assessment tool. Therefore, we aim to review the commonly used generic, disease-specific and hybrid QOL questionnaires to evaluate patients with GERD to provide a reference for clinical nursing work.

  14. Single isotopic probe for gastro-esophageal reflux diagnosis in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurel, G.; Le Moing, G.; Mensch, B.

    1987-01-01

    Gastro-esophageal reflux (G.E.R.) in children has been implicated in various recurring respiratory diseases. Several techniques including oesophageal pH testing and scintigraphy have been devised to detect and quantify G.E.R. Limitations have been found for each test: short duration with gamma-camera and restricted acceptability of the pH probe by children. A single isotopic probe was designed for a non-invasive screening test of G.E.R. in infants. This device was checked by comparison with oesophageal scintigraphy using a gamma camera. Only 1 discrepancy was detected in 19 reflux episodes. This method, using a relatively inexpensive detector and data acquisition module, seems to be well accepted by children, and may be associated with a pH probe for GER diagnosis. (orig.)

  15. The Second Canadian Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Consensus: Moving Forward to New Concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABR Thomson

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is a disease with serious consequences that may result in significant impairment in quality of life and disease morbidity. Across all grades of severity of symptoms and severity of underlying esophageal disease, proton pump inhibitors (PPIs provide therapeutic gains over prokinetics (PKs or H2 receptor antagonists (H2RAs. The potential cost effectiveness of using medications with higher acquisition costs that may lower health care costs overall is often disregarded when conducting cost comparisons with medications having lower 'up-front' costs. Limiting therapy to less effective agents condemns many patients to protracted suffering, repeated physician visits and needless reinvestigation of symptoms that could have been resolved by appropriate initial therapy. Based on current data, use of any classification of symptom severity as a basis for selecting one class of therapeutic agents over another for first line therapy (ie PKs, H2RAs for 'mild' GERD, versus a PPI for 'severe' disease is unwarranted.

  16. Pathophysiology of gastroesophageal reflux disease in premature infants using a radionuclide method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Michiomi

    2001-01-01

    The cases of 36 very low birthweight infants (premature group) and 52 mature infants with birth weights as low as 1500 g (mature group) with gastro-esephageal reflux disease (GERD) were reviewed. These infants received 24 hour pH monitoring, reflux scintigraphy, gastric emptying, and antrum motility measurement. The results of 24-hour pH monitoring of the premature group are not different from these of the mature group. Time required for reflux scintigraphy of the premature group is higher than that of the mature group. Emptying time of premature group is slower than that of the mature group. Dietary management in premature infants with GERD is important. Using a nasoduodenal feeding tube is quite effective. Radionuclide method, in addition to 24-hour pH monitoring, should be used to evaluate total gastroesophageal function. (author)

  17. Clinical and functional features of gastroesophageal refl ux disease in children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.M. Boyarska

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our work was to study clinical and endoscopic peculiarities, infl uence of H.Pylori infection and gastric acidity on changes of mucosa of the esophagus in children and adolescents with gastroesophageal refl ux disease (GERD. 140 children (93 with GERD: 48.4% – children with oesophagitis, 51.6% – children with endoscopically negative form of GERD were examinated. Main complaints of heartburn were in 79,6% patients. Frequency and intensity of heartburn did not depend on oesophagitis presence. The correlation between frequency and severity of heartburn and endoscopic changes wasn’t detected. Esophageal endoscopic changes were combined with moderate infl ammation signs of stomach and duodenum. The correlation between H.Pylori and GERD wasn’t detected. According to acidometry data hyperacid state in stomach prevailed.

  18. Diaphragmatic-intercostal breathing and the occurrence of gastroesophageal reflux disease in singers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beverley du Plessis

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This article was inspired by our awareness of an increasing number of voice students and professional singers who specialize in Western art music and who present with symptoms relating to gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD. In our attempts to understand this phenomenon, we began questioning the relationship between diaphragmatic-intercostal breathing (DIB and the occurrence of GERD. This study uses two of the methods by which qualitative research can be done, namely literature reviews and case studies. The results of the literature review show that the way in which the lower esophageal sphincter (LES functions during DIB has direct bearing on the possible movement of gastric acids via the esophagus into the pharynx and the larynx. Acknowledging the fact that we are not medical experts, we then used the data from the case studies to suggest how singers might adjust their life styles in order to restrict or prevent occurrences of GERD.

  19. Insights into the genetics of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and GERD-related disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhmer, A C; Schumacher, J

    2017-02-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is associated with obesity and hiatal hernia, and often precedes the development of Barrett's esophagus (BE) and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA). Epidemiological studies show that the global prevalence of GERD is increasing. GERD is a multifactorial disease with a complex genetic architecture. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have provided initial insights into the genetic background of GERD. The present review summarizes current knowledge of the genetics of GERD and a possible genetic overlap between GERD and BE and EA. The review discusses genes and cellular pathways that have been implicated through GWAS, and provides an outlook on how future molecular research will enhance understanding of GERD pathophysiology. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Selected Ion Flow Tube Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Exhaled Breath for Volatile Organic Compound Profiling of Esophago-Gastric Cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kumar, S.; Huang, J.; Abbassi-Ghadi, N.; Španěl, Patrik; Smith, D.; Hanna, G. B.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 85, č. 12 (2013), s. 6121-6128 ISSN 0003-2700 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : SOLID-PHASE MICROEXTRACTION * SIFT-MS * GASTROESOPHAGEAL CANCER Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 5.825, year: 2013

  1. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and gastroesophageal reflux disease: the importance of obesity and gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basoglu, Ozen K; Vardar, Rukiye; Tasbakan, Mehmet Sezai; Ucar, Zeynep Zeren; Ayik, Sibel; Kose, Timur; Bor, Serhat

    2015-05-01

    It is claimed that gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) increases in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). We aimed to evaluate the prevalence of GERD in patients with OSAS and primary snoring and identify OSAS-related risk factors associated with GERD. In this prospective, cross-sectional, multicenter study, in total 1,104 patients were recruited for polysomnography: 147 subjects were in non-OSAS (primary snoring) and 957 patients were in OSAS group. All patients completed a validated GERD questionnaire. Demographic, anthropometric characteristics, and medical history were recorded. The prevalence of GERD was similar in OSAS (38.9%) and non-OSAS (32.0%) groups (p = 0.064). There was no difference in terms of major gastroesophageal reflux (GER) symptoms (heartburn/acid regurgitation) between non-OSAS and mild, moderate, and severe OSAS groups. The prevalence of GERD was increased in female OSAS patients (46.6%) compared to males (35.7%) (p = 0.002). In OSAS patients with GERD, body mass index was greater (34.0 ± 7.0 vs. 33.1 ± 6.8, p = 0.049), waist (115.5 ± 13.9 vs. 113.1 ± 13.4, p = 0.007) and hip (117.9 ± 13.7 vs. 114.2 ± 12.8, p gender, hip circumference, and daytime sleepiness. In this large cohort, the prevalence of GERD was significantly increased in those with primary snoring and OSAS compared to the general population, but severity of OSAS did not influence GERD prevalence. The present results suggest that OSAS was not likely a causative factor but female gender, obesity, and sleepiness were related with prevalence of GERD in OSAS patients.

  2. Italian survey on general pediatricians' approach to children with gastroesophageal reflux symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quitadamo, Paolo; Miele, Erasmo; Alongi, Angelo; Brunese, Francesco Paolo; Di Cosimo, Maria Elisabetta; Ferrara, Dante; Gambotto, Silvia; Lamborghini, Adima; Mercuri, Maddalena; Pasinato, Angela; Sansone, Renato; Vitale, Concetta; Villani, Alberto; Staiano, Annamaria

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the current approach of Italian general pediatricians to children with gastroesophageal reflux (GER) symptoms, evaluating the implementation of the 2009 North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition (NASPGHAN)-European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) guidelines. One hundred randomly identified Italian general pediatricians were asked to complete a case report-structured questionnaire investigating their approach to infants, children, and adolescents with symptoms suggestive of GER. Only 2 % of them showed complete adherence to the guidelines. Thirty-nine percent of them diagnosed GER disease based on clinical symptoms, irrespective of the age of the child; 56 % prescribed proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) in infants with unexplained crying and/or distressed behavior and 38 % in infants with uncomplicated recurrent regurgitation and vomiting; 57 % prescribed PPIs in children younger than 8-12 years of age with vomiting and heartburn, without specific testing; and 54 % discontinued PPI therapy abruptly. The overall rate of pediatricians over-prescribing PPIs was 79 %. According to our findings, most Italian general pediatricians do not seem to follow the recommendations of the 2009 NASPGHAN-ESPGHAN reflux guidelines and often prescribe PPIs despite a lack of efficacy for the symptoms being treated. We are well aware that the guidelines address the average situation and that the evaluation of individual patients may frequently reveal reasons for opening criteria for exceptions. Nevertheless, the over-diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) places undue burden on both families and national health system which has not been impacted by the publication of international guidelines.

  3. Factors that Determine the Development and Progression of Gastroesophageal Varices in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Robert J.; Sanyal, Arun J.; Ghany, Marc G.; Lee, William M.; Reid, Andrea E.; Naishadham, Deepa; Everson, Gregory T.; Kahn, Jeffrey A.; Di Bisceglie, Adrian M.; Szabo, Gyongyi; Morgan, Timothy R.; Everhart, James E.

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims We aimed to identify the incidence and predictors of de novo gastroesophageal variceal formation and progression in a large cohort of patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC) and advanced fibrosis. Methods All participants in the HALT-C Trial were offered an endoscopy before treatment and again after 4 years. Patients with varices at baseline also had a endoscopy at 2 years. Baseline laboratory and clinical parameters were analyzed as predictors of de novo variceal formation and variceal progression. Results De novo varices developed in 157 of the 598 (26.2%) patients. Most of the new varices were small (76.4%) and only 1% of patients developed variceal hemorrhage. The likelihood of developing varices was associated with subject race (Hispanic > Caucasian > African American, p= 0.0005), lower baseline levels of albumin (P=0.051), and higher levels of hyaluronic acid (P< 0.001) with an area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curve=0.70. Among 210 patients with existing gastroesophageal varices, 74 (35.2%) had variceal progression or bleeding during follow-up. Patients with a higher baseline ratios of serum aspartate /alanine aminotransferase (P=0.028) and lower platelet counts (P=0.0002) were at greatest risk of variceal progression (AUROC = 0.72). Prolonged, low-dose peginterferon α2a therapy and β-blockers did not influence the risk of developing new or enlarging varices. Conclusion Development of varices in patients with CHC is associated with patient race/ethnicity and laboratory markers of disease severity. Prolonged low dose peginterferon α2a therapy and β-blockers do not reduce the risk of variceal development nor progression. PMID:20211180

  4. The impact of the speed of food intake on gastroesophageal reflux events in obese female patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bor, Serhat; Erdogan, Askin; Bayrakci, Berna; Yildirim, Esra; Vardar, Rukiye

    2017-01-01

    Obesity increases the risk of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The majority of the reflux attacks occur postprandially. The influence of the speed of food intake on gastroesophageal reflux events is unclear in obese patients. To determine the influence of the speed of food intake on intraesophageal reflux events in obese patients with and without GERD. A total of 26 obese female patients were recruited. The patients underwent esophageal manometry to evaluate the upper limit of the lower esophageal sphincter and subsequently placement of a Multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH (MII-pH) catheter. All patients were asked to eat the same standard meal (double cheeseburger, 1 banana, 100 g yogurt and 200 mL water; total energy value, 744 kcal; 37.6% carbohydrates, 21.2% proteins and 41.2% lipids) within 5 or 30 minutes under observation in a random order on two consecutive days. All reflux episodes over a 3-hour postprandial period were manually analyzed and compared. The mean age was 46 ± 12 (18-66) years. The mean body mass index (BMI) was 39.9 ± 8.4 kg/m2. There was no difference between the fast- and slow-eating group in the number of refluxes within the 3-postprandial hours. The patients were divided into 2 groups according to the 24-hour MII-pH monitoring results, that is, 16 subjects with normal MII-pH monitoring and 10 patients with pathologic MII-pH monitoring. There was no effect of the speed of food intake in either the patients with or without GERD. In contrast to the general belief, this study suggested that the speed of food intake does not influence the number of refluxes in obese female patients with or without GERD. © 2016 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  5. Risk factors of early rebleeding after endoscopic treatment of gastroesophageal varices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YANG Yan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo explore risk factors of early rebleeding after endoscopic treatment of gastroesophageal varices by retrospectively analyzing cases and outcomes from the China-Japan Friendship Hospital. MethodsThree hundred cases of esophagus and/or gastric varices that had received endoscopic therapy between November 1995 and December 2010 were enrolled in the study. The cases were divided into two groups according to presence or absence of early rebleeding, defined as rebleeding within 24 h to six weeks of the operative procedure. Associations with variables of the endoscopic procedure, as well as laboratory and imaging findings, were analyzed by forward stepwise logistic regression analysis to identify independent risk factors of early rebleeding. ResultsPatients experiencing early rebleeding after endoscopic therapy were more likely to be male (P=004, ascites-positive (P=0032, to have a larger portal vein diameter (P=0046, and higher levels of serum creatinine (P=0049 and serum sodium (P=0033 Two significant candidate variables were identified: ascites-positivity (odds ratio (OR=3505, 95% confidence interval (CI: 1169, 10512, P=0025 and higher serum creatinine (OR=1016, 95% CI: 1002, 1031, P=0028. ConclusionEarly rebleeding after endoscopic therapy of gastroesophageal varices is mainly affected by the presence of ascites and higher serum creatinine. Patients with these risk factors should be paid careful attention before and after the endoscopic procedure.

  6. COMPARISON OF SAFETY AND EFFICACY OF LEVOSULPIRIDE AND ITOPRIDE IN TREATMENT OF GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Ibrahim Hassan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD is a common condition caused by reflux of the liquid acidic contents of the stomach into the oesophagus. Prokinetic medications can be used to treat or control the disease. Such medications can have mild-toserious adverse effects. Levosulpiride and itopride are two such medications, which are used for treating GERD. The aim of the study is to assess the safety and efficacy of levosulpiride and itopride in the management of GERD and to study the side effects and treatment outcome. MATERIALS AND METHODS A total 210 patients aged 18 to 90 years, 99 males and 111 females (male:female ratio of 1:1.1 with reflux oesophagitis were divided into three groups and an endoscopy test was done before starting treatment. The control group received rabeprazole and the two test groups received levosulpiride and itopride. Clinical adverse events were recorded at the end of week 1 and week 2. Following treatment, relief of symptoms was assessed at the end of 2 weeks. RESULTS There were total 210 patients (99 males and 111 females. The male-to-female ratio was 1:1.1. GERD was more common in the 31-50 year age group. Most common symptoms were of dyspepsia, regurgitation, vomiting and heartburn. Improvement of symptoms during the treatment was seen in 53% levosulpiride and 41% itopride patients, respectively. The main adverse effects were abdominal pain and nausea. The percentage of nausea was high with itopride than levosulpiride. CONCLUSION Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a common problem frequently seen in both genders and in younger people. Symptomatic relief and endoscopic recovery is early with levosulpiride than itopride. Levosulpiride gives better quality of life earlier in the treatment than itopride and has lesser side effects and better healing outcome.

  7. The Incidence of Lesions of Different Systems and Organs in Children with Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.Z. Gnateyko

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD — a chronic recurrent disease caused by the disturbances of the motor-evacuating function of the gastroesophageal zone and is characterized by spontaneous and/or regular reflux of the gastric or duodenal fluid that leads to the damage of the distal part of the esophagus. GERD is one of the most frequent diseases that affect the esophagus. Taking into the account the huge amount of the causes, which may lead to GERD, its etiology is still not well defined, and the contribution of each factor requires further analysis. The aim of the study was to analyze the peculiarities and the incidence of GERD association with other organ and system pathologies.Materials and methods. Clinical analysis of 73 cases of GERD in school-aged children has been performed. The incidence of GERD combination with other system and organ pathologies has been evaluated using thorough anamnesis and patient’s medical history analysis. Results. In 66 % of children with GERD, the association of this pathology with other digestive tract diseases has been revealed, in 50.7 % — with lesions of musculoskeletal system, in 12.3 % — with urinary tract pathology. Almost one third of children with GERD suffered from congenital defects of different organs and systems, such as dolichosigmoid, mitral valve prolapse, nephroptosis/rotation of the kidneys/pyelectasis/bladder-pelvic reflux, gallbladder deformities. The article presents the analysis of a clinical case of the combination of cardiovascular, digestive and urinary lesions that enables us to assume the presence of possible common etiology factor of the diagnosed diseases. The analyzed data regarding the association of GERD with other organ and system pathologies, as well as the results of other research groups indicate a probable common component in their etiology. The common factor in the described cases of the combination of pathologies may be a violation of the

  8. Gastroesophageal reflux after esophageal surgery. Evaluation by means of esophageal transit scintigram

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Osamu; Yokoi, Hideki; Maebeya, Shinji and others

    1989-04-01

    By means of esophageal transit scintigram using /sup 99m/Tc-DTPA, 15 patients (13 esophageal carcinomas and 2 cardia carcinomas) were studied, in whom esophagogastric anastomosis was done according to the posterior invagination anastomosis technique we had devised. In all 8 patients with anastomosis at cervical region, gastroesophageal reflux was not seen on both scintigrams before and after meals, and the average pressure gradient of high pressure zone at anastomosis was 39.8 cmH/sub 2/O. In 2 of 7 patients with intrathoracic anastomosis, the scintigram before meals showed severe reflux. and the endoscopic findings showed diffuse and moderate erosion in the esophageal mucosa. The average pressure gradient across the anastomosis was 6.5 cmH/sub 2/O. In these 2 patients, the new fornix with a sharp angle of His was not formed. In the remaining 5 patients with intrathoracic anastomosis, reflux was not seen on the scintigram before meals. However, in 2 of them, the scintigram after meal and endoscopic examination revealed mild reflux and mild esophagitis respectively. Furthermore in one patient very mild reflux was observed only on the scintigram after meals but the endoscopic findings showed the normal esophageal mucosa. In these 5 patients, the average pressure gradient across the anastomosis was 17.0 cmH/sub 2/O, which was significantly higher (p<0.01) than that in 2 patients with severe reflux and was significantly lower (p<0.01) than the mean value of high pressure zone in 8 patients with cervical anastomosis. In conclusion, it is presumed that the formation of a large fornix enough to store food and a sharp angle of His are important factors in maintaining an anti-reflux mechanism. The esophageal transit scintigram was proved to be an excellent technique in detecting and evaluating quantitatively gastroesophageal reflux. (author).

  9. Tunnel magnetoresistance in double spin filter junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saffarzadeh, Alireza

    2003-01-01

    We consider a new type of magnetic tunnel junction, which consists of two ferromagnetic tunnel barriers acting as spin filters (SFs), separated by a nonmagnetic metal (NM) layer. Using the transfer matrix method and the free-electron approximation, the dependence of the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) on the thickness of the central NM layer, bias voltage and temperature in the double SF junction are studied theoretically. It is shown that the TMR and electron-spin polarization in this structure can reach very large values under suitable conditions. The highest value of the TMR can reach 99%. By an appropriate choice of the thickness of the central NM layer, the degree of spin polarization in this structure will be higher than that of the single SF junctions. These results may be useful in designing future spin-polarized tunnelling devices

  10. Josephson junctions with ferromagnetic alloy interlayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Himmel, Nico

    2015-01-01

    Josephson junctions are used as active devices in superconducting electronics and quantum information technology. Outstanding properties are their distinct non-linear electrical characteristics and a usually sinusoidal relation between the current and the superconducting phase difference across the junction. In general the insertion of ferromagnetic material in the barrier of a Josephson junction is associated with a suppression of superconducting correlations. But also new phenomena can arise which may allow new circuit layouts and enhance the performance of applications. This thesis presents a systematic investigation for two concepts to fabricate Josephson junctions with a rather uncommon negative critical current. Such devices exhibit an intrinsic phase slip of π between the electrodes, so they are also known as π junctions. Both studies go well beyond existing experiments and in one system a π junction is shown for the first time. All the thin film junctions are based on superconducting Nb electrodes. In a first approach, barriers made from Si and Fe were investigated with respect to the realisation of π junctions by spin-flip processes. The distribution of Fe in the Si matrix was varied from pure layers to disperse compounds. The systematic fabrication of alloy barriers was facilitated by the development of a novel timing-based combinatorial sputtering technique for planetary deposition systems. An orthogonal gradient approach allowed to create binary layer libraries with independent variations of thickness and composition. Second, Nb vertical stroke AlO x vertical stroke Nb vertical stroke Ni 60 Cu 40 vertical stroke Nb (SIsFS) double barrier junctions were experimentally studied for the occurrence of proximity effect induced order parameter oscillations. Detailed dependencies of the critical current density on the thickness of s-layer and F-layer were acquired and show a remarkable agreement to existing theoretical predictions. Especially a variation of

  11. Phase-dependent noise in Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, Forrest; Peotta, Sebastiano; Di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2018-03-01

    In addition to the usual superconducting current, Josephson junctions (JJs) support a phase-dependent conductance related to the retardation effect of tunneling quasi-particles. This introduces a dissipative current with a memory-resistive (memristive) character that should also affect the current noise. By means of the microscopic theory of tunnel junctions we compute the complete current autocorrelation function of a Josephson tunnel junction and show that this memristive component gives rise to both a previously noted phase-dependent thermal noise, and an undescribed non-stationary, phase-dependent dynamic noise. As experiments are approaching ranges in which these effects may be observed, we examine the form and magnitude of these processes. Their phase dependence can be realized experimentally as a hysteresis effect and may be used to probe defects present in JJ based qubits and in other superconducting electronics applications.

  12. Silicon fiber with p-n junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homa, D.; Cito, A.; Pickrell, G.; Hill, C.; Scott, B. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 312 Holden Hall, Blacksburg, Virginia 24060 (United States)

    2014-09-22

    In this study, we fabricated a p-n junction in a fiber with a phosphorous doped silicon core and fused silica cladding. The fibers were fabricated via a hybrid process of the core-suction and melt-draw techniques and maintained overall diameters ranging from 200 to 900 μm and core diameters of 20–800 μm. The p-n junction was formed by doping the fiber with boron and confirmed via the current-voltage characteristic. The demonstration of a p-n junction in a melt-drawn silicon core fiber paves the way for the seamless integration of optical and electronic devices in fibers.

  13. Silicon fiber with p-n junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homa, D.; Cito, A.; Pickrell, G.; Hill, C.; Scott, B.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we fabricated a p-n junction in a fiber with a phosphorous doped silicon core and fused silica cladding. The fibers were fabricated via a hybrid process of the core-suction and melt-draw techniques and maintained overall diameters ranging from 200 to 900 μm and core diameters of 20–800 μm. The p-n junction was formed by doping the fiber with boron and confirmed via the current-voltage characteristic. The demonstration of a p-n junction in a melt-drawn silicon core fiber paves the way for the seamless integration of optical and electronic devices in fibers.

  14. Nanomembrane-based mesoscopic superconducting hybrid junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurmer, Dominic J; Bof Bufon, Carlos Cesar; Deneke, Christoph; Schmidt, Oliver G

    2010-09-08

    A new method for combining top-down and bottom-up approaches to create superconductor-normal metal-superconductor niobium-based Josephson junctions is presented. Using a rolled-up semiconductor nanomembrane as scaffolding, we are able to create mesoscopic gold filament proximity junctions. These are created by electromigration of gold filaments after inducing an electric field mediated breakdown in the semiconductor nanomembrane, which can generate nanometer sized structures merely using conventional optical lithography techniques. We find that the created point contact junctions exhibit large critical currents of a few milliamps at 4.2 K and an I(c)R(n) product placing their characteristic frequency in the terahertz region. These nanometer-sized filament devices can be further optimized and integrated on a chip for their use in superconductor hybrid electronics circuits.

  15. Ferromagnetic resonance with long Josephson junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovchanskiy, I. A.; Abramov, N. N.; Stolyarov, V. S.; Emelyanova, O. V.; Golubov, A. A.; Ustinov, A. V.; Ryazanov, V. V.

    2017-05-01

    In this work we propose a hybrid device based on a long Josephson junction (JJ) coupled inductively to an external ferromagnetic (FM) layer. The long JJ in a zero-field operation mode induces a localized AC magnetic field in the FM layer and enables a synchronized magnetostatic standing wave. The magnetostatic wave induces additional dissipation for soliton propagation in the junction and also enables a phase locking (resonant soliton synchronization) at a frequency of natural ferromagnetic resonance. The later manifests itself as an additional constant voltage step on the current-voltage characteristics at the corresponding voltage. The proposed device allows to study magnetization dynamics of individual micro-scaled FM samples using just DC technique, and also it provides additional phase locking frequency in the junction, determined exclusively by characteristics of the ferromagnet.

  16. Josephson junctions with ferromagnetic alloy interlayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Himmel, Nico

    2015-07-23

    Josephson junctions are used as active devices in superconducting electronics and quantum information technology. Outstanding properties are their distinct non-linear electrical characteristics and a usually sinusoidal relation between the current and the superconducting phase difference across the junction. In general the insertion of ferromagnetic material in the barrier of a Josephson junction is associated with a suppression of superconducting correlations. But also new phenomena can arise which may allow new circuit layouts and enhance the performance of applications. This thesis presents a systematic investigation for two concepts to fabricate Josephson junctions with a rather uncommon negative critical current. Such devices exhibit an intrinsic phase slip of π between the electrodes, so they are also known as π junctions. Both studies go well beyond existing experiments and in one system a π junction is shown for the first time. All the thin film junctions are based on superconducting Nb electrodes. In a first approach, barriers made from Si and Fe were investigated with respect to the realisation of π junctions by spin-flip processes. The distribution of Fe in the Si matrix was varied from pure layers to disperse compounds. The systematic fabrication of alloy barriers was facilitated by the development of a novel timing-based combinatorial sputtering technique for planetary deposition systems. An orthogonal gradient approach allowed to create binary layer libraries with independent variations of thickness and composition. Second, Nb vertical stroke AlO{sub x} vertical stroke Nb vertical stroke Ni{sub 60}Cu{sub 40} vertical stroke Nb (SIsFS) double barrier junctions were experimentally studied for the occurrence of proximity effect induced order parameter oscillations. Detailed dependencies of the critical current density on the thickness of s-layer and F-layer were acquired and show a remarkable agreement to existing theoretical predictions. Especially

  17. Strong Josephson Coupling in Planar Graphene Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jinho; Lee, Gil-Ho; Lee, Jae Hyeong; Takane, Yositake; Imura, Ken-Ichiro; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Lee, Hu-Jong

    A recent breakthrough of processing graphene, employing encapsulation by hexagonal boron nitride layers (BGB structure), allows realizing the ballistic carrier transport in graphene. Thereafter, ballistic Josephson coupling has been studied by closely edge-contacted BGB structure with two superconducting electrodes. Here, we report on the strong Josephson coupling with planar graphene junction in truly short and ballistic regime. Our device showed high transmission probability and the junction critical current (IC) oscillating for sweeping the gate voltage along with the normal conductance oscillation (Fabry-Perot oscillations), providing a direct evidence for the ballistic nature of the junction pair current. We also observed the convex-upward shape of decreasing critical currents with increasing temperature, canonical properties of the short Josephson coupling. By fitting these curves into theoretical models, we demonstrate the strong Josephson coupling in our devices, which is also supported by the exceptionally large value of ICRN ( 2 Δ / e RNis the normal resistance).

  18. A congenital form of junctional ectopic tachycardia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulino, Domenico; Dattilo, Giuseppe; Tulino, Viviana; Marte, Filippo; Patanè, Salvatore

    2010-11-19

    Accessory pathways have been described as well as their Ecg identification criteria also in pediatric population. Radiofrequency ablation is a curative treatment but its application has been more limited in the paediatric population. The congenital form of junctional ectopic tachycardia was firstly described by Coumel et al. in 1976. It usually occurs in the first six months of life presenting as a persistent sustained form, lasting up to 90% of the time and it is hampered by high mortality. Its clinical presentation may be dramatic, being associated in up to 60% of cases with cardiomegaly and/or heart failure. Secondary dilated cardiomyopathy, ventricular fibrillation and sudden cardiac death have also been reported. We present a case of congenital form of junctional ectopic tachycardia in a 12-day-old newborn infant. Also this case is illustrative of the congenital form of junctional ectopic tachycardia. Copyright © 2008 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Terahertz Responses of Intrinsic Josephson Junctions in High TC Superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, H. B.; Wu, P. H.; Yamashita, T.

    2001-01-01

    High frequency responses of intrinsic Josephson junctions up to 2.5THz, including the observation of Shapiro steps under various conditions, are reported and discussed in this Letter. The sample was an array of intrinsic Josephson junctions singled out from inside a high T C superconducting Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8+x single crystal, with a bow-tie antenna integrated to it. The number of junctions in the array was controllable, the junctions were homogeneous, the distribution of applied irradiation among the junctions was even, and the junctions could synchronously respond to high frequency irradiation

  20. Systematic study of shallow junction formation on germanium substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellings, Geert; Rosseel, Erik; Clarysse, Trudo

    2011-01-01

    Published results on Ge junctions are benchmarked systematically using RS–XJ plots. The electrical activation level required to meet the ITRS targets is calculated. Additionally, new results are presented on shallow furnace-annealed B junctions and shallow laser-annealed As junctions. Co-implanti......Published results on Ge junctions are benchmarked systematically using RS–XJ plots. The electrical activation level required to meet the ITRS targets is calculated. Additionally, new results are presented on shallow furnace-annealed B junctions and shallow laser-annealed As junctions. Co...

  1. Comparison of intensity-modulated radiotherapy and 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy as adjuvant therapy for gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minn, A Yuriko; Hsu, Annie; La, Trang; Kunz, Pamela; Fisher, George A; Ford, James M; Norton, Jeffrey A; Visser, Brendan; Goodman, Karyn A; Koong, Albert C; Chang, Daniel T

    2010-08-15

    The current study was performed to compare the clinical outcomes and toxicity in patients treated with postoperative chemoradiotherapy for gastric cancer using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) versus 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D CRT). Fifty-seven patients with gastric or gastroesophageal junction cancer were treated postoperatively: 26 with 3D CRT and 31 with IMRT. Concurrent chemotherapy was capecitabine (n=31), 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) (n=25), or none (n=1). The median radiation dose was 45 Gy. Dose volume histogram parameters for kidney and liver were compared between treatment groups. The 2-year overall survival rates for 3D CRT versus IMRT were 51% and 65%, respectively (P=.5). Four locoregional failures occurred each in the 3D CRT (15%) and the IMRT (13%) patients. Grade>or=2 acute gastrointestinal toxicity was found to be similar between the 3D CRT and IMRT patients (61.5% vs 61.2%, respectively) but more treatment breaks were needed (3 vs 0, respectively). The median serum creatinine from before radiotherapy to most recent creatinine was unchanged in the IMRT group (0.80 mg/dL) but increased in the 3D CRT group from 0.80 mg/dL to 1.0 mg/dL (P=.02). The median kidney mean dose was higher in the IMRT versus the 3D CRT group (13.9 Gy vs 11.1 Gy; P=.05). The median kidney V20 was lower for the IMRT versus the 3D CRT group (17.5% vs 22%; P=.17). The median liver mean dose for IMRT and 3D CRT was 13.6 Gy and 18.6 Gy, respectively (P=.19). The median liver V30 was 16.1% and 28%, respectively (PCancer Society.

  2. Electronic Properties of Carbon Nanotubes and Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anantram, M. P.; Han, Jie; Yang, Liu; Govindan, T. R.; Jaffe, R.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Metallic and semiconducting Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes (CNT) have recently been characterized using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and the manipulation of individual CNT has been demonstrated. These developments make the prospect of using CNT as molecular wires and possibly as electronic devices an even more interesting one. We have been modeling various electronic properties such as the density of states and the transmission coefficient of CNT wires and junctions. These studies involve first calculating the stability of junctions using molecular dynamics simulations and then calculating the electronic properties using a pi-electron tight binding Hamiltonian. We have developed the expertise to calculate the electronic properties of both finite-sized CNT and CNT systems with semi-infinite boundary conditions. In this poster, we will present an overview of some of our results. The electronic application of CNT that is most promising at this time is their use as molecular wires. The conductance can however be greatly reduced because of reflection due to defects and contacts. We have modeled the transmission through CNT in the presence of two types of defects: weak uniform disorder and strong isolated scatterers. We find that the conductance is affected in significantly different manners due to these defects Junctions of CNT have also been imaged using STM. This makes it essential to derive rules for the formation of junctions between tubes of different chirality, study their relative energies and electronic properties. We have generalized the rules for connecting two different CNT and have calculated the transmission and density of states through CNT junctions. Metallic and semiconducting CNT can be joined to form a stable junction and their current versus voltage characteristics are asymmetric. CNT are deformed by the application of external forces including interactions with a substrate or other CNT. In many experiments, these deformation are expected to

  3. Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms ... be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors ...

  4. Structure and function of gap junction proteins: role of gap junction proteins in embryonic heart development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahir, Bhavesh K; Pratten, Margaret K

    2014-01-01

    Intercellular (cell-to-cell) communication is a crucial and complex mechanism during embryonic heart development. In the cardiovascular system, the beating of the heart is a dynamic and key regulatory process, which is functionally regulated by the coordinated spread of electrical activity through heart muscle cells. Heart tissues are composed of individual cells, each bearing specialized cell surface membrane structures called gap junctions that permit the intercellular exchange of ions and low molecular weight molecules. Gap junction channels are essential in normal heart function and they assist in the mediated spread of electrical impulses that stimulate synchronized contraction (via an electrical syncytium) of cardiac tissues. This present review describes the current knowledge of gap junction biology. In the first part, we summarise some relevant biochemical and physiological properties of gap junction proteins, including their structure and function. In the second part, we review the current evidence demonstrating the role of gap junction proteins in embryonic development with particular reference to those involved in embryonic heart development. Genetics and transgenic animal studies of gap junction protein function in embryonic heart development are considered and the alteration/disruption of gap junction intercellular communication which may lead to abnormal heart development is also discussed.

  5. Fast thermometry with a proximity Josephson junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L. B.; Saira, O.-P.; Pekola, J. P.

    2018-01-01

    We couple a proximity Josephson junction to a Joule-heated normal metal film and measure its electron temperature under steady state and nonequilibrium conditions. With a timed sequence of heating and temperature probing pulses, we are able to monitor its electron temperature in nonequilibrium with effectively zero back-action from the temperature measurement in the form of additional dissipation or thermal conductance. The experiments demonstrate the possibility of using a fast proximity Josephson junction thermometer for studying thermal transport in mesoscopic systems and for calorimetry.

  6. Astroglial gap junctions shape neuronal network activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannasch, Ulrike; Derangeon, Mickael; Chever, Oana; Rouach, Nathalie

    2012-05-01

    Astrocytes, the third element of the tripartite synapse, are active players in neurotransmission. Up to now, their involvement in neuronal functions has primarily been investigated at the single cell level. However, a key property of astrocytes is that they communicate via extensive networks formed by gap junction channels. Recently, we have shown that this networking modulates the moment to moment basal synaptic transmission and plasticity via the regulation of extracellular potassium and glutamate levels. Here we show that astroglial gap junctional communication also regulates neuronal network activity. We discuss these findings and their implications for brain information processing.

  7. Gap junctions-guards of excitability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stroemlund, Line Waring; Jensen, Christa Funch; Qvortrup, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Cardiomyocytes are connected by mechanical and electrical junctions located at the intercalated discs (IDs). Although these structures have long been known, it is becoming increasingly clear that their components interact. This review describes the involvement of the ID in electrical disturbances...... of the heart and focuses on the role of the gap junctional protein connexin 43 (Cx43). Current evidence shows that Cx43 plays a crucial role in organizing microtubules at the intercalated disc and thereby regulating the trafficking of the cardiac sodium channel NaV1.5 to the membrane....

  8. Relationship between Critical Current Fluctuation of Superconducting Bicrystal Junction and Junction Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enpuku, Keiji; Minotani, Tadashi; Shiraishi, Fumio; Kandori, Atushi

    1999-04-01

    Critical current fluctuation of bicrystal junctions is estimated from the 1/f flux noise of the superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) at T=77 K. The relationships between the current fluctuation and junction parameters, such as critical current Io and resistance R, are obtained. The obtained parameter dependence can be well explained by using the parameter dependence of the resistance fluctuation reported by Marx and Gross [Appl. Phys. Lett. 70, 120 (1997)] and the relationship between Io and R obtained for the present junctions. The agreement indicates that the critical current fluctuation is correlated with the resistance fluctuation through the relationship between Io and R.

  9. [Scientific foundations for medical treatment based on modifying diet, lifestyle habits, and patient attitudes in chronic gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csendes, Attila; Burdiles, Patricio

    2007-02-01

    In most patients with chronic gastroesophageal reflux disease, treatment is medical. Among the main elements involved in treatment are general dietary measures, lifestyle habits, and patients' attitudes to symptom control. The present article summarizes the scientific foundations that support these measures: head elevation during nighttime sleep, smoking cessation, losing weight, avoiding rigorous exercise, and reducing or eliminating alcohol consumption. Dietary therapy is mainly based on avoiding fatty foods, chocolate, coffee, mint, and irritating fizzy drinks. Although each patient's response to these measures is highly individual, the mechanisms through which symptoms are reproduced is gradually becoming clearer: a large percentage of patients with uncomplicated gastroesophageal reflux disease will gain considerable relief simply by eliminating some of these habits.

  10. The Effect of Acid Suppression on Upper Airway Anatomy and Obstruction in Patients with Sleep Apnea and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, William C.; Robert, Jennifer J.T.; Houck, John R.; Giddens, Cheryl L.; Tawk, Maroun M.

    2009-01-01

    Study Objectives: This study was designed to assess the effect of acid suppression on upper airway structure and function in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Methods: This is a single-site within-subjects design. Twenty five patients with documented mild OSAS and objectively documented GERD via 24-hour pH measurement were included in the study. Patients were studied before and after 8 weeks of treatment with rabeprazole, 20 mg, twice a day. Subjects underwent laryngoscopy, polysomnography, and 24-hour pH monitoring. Subjective assessments of sleep obtained included the Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale. Results: Posterior commissure edema was significantly reduced (p Giddens CL; Tawk MM. The effect of acid suppression on upper airway anatomy and obstruction in patients with sleep apnea and gastroesophageal reflux disease. J Clin Sleep Med 2009;5(4):330-334. PMID:19968010

  11. [MDCT features and anatomic-pathology in right thoracic-abdominal junctional region diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yilan; Yang, Zhigang; Li, Hua; Deng, Wen; Li, Yuan; Guo, Yingkun

    2011-04-01

    This paper was objected to determine the relationship between MDCT features and anatomic-pathology of diseases in right thoracic-abdominal junctional region. We cut 3 cadavers transversely and another 3 vertically to observe the anatomy of thoracic-abdominal junctional zone. We scanned 69 patients with diseases in right thoracic-abdominal junctional zone by MDCT. The correlation between MDCT features of right thoracic-abdominal junctional region and the anatomic-pathology in this region was evaluated. We found results as that in cadaver sections, the right pulmonary ligament, which was below inferior pulmonary vein, attached the inferior lobe of right lung to the esophagus, that the coronary ligament, which interiorly extended from falciform ligament and laterally formed into right triangular ligament, contained two layers, and that the bare area of liver, which positioned between the two layers of coronary ligament, was directly next to diaphragm with no peritoneum covered. There were 50 cases with both pleural and ascitic fluid, while the pleural fluid was divided into anterior and posterior compartments by the right pulmonary ligament, whereas the ascitic fluid was limited in perihepatic space in majority. Among the 50 cases, 5 patients had lung cancer with diaphragmatic pleura, diaphragm and upper abdomen involved. 5 patients had right hepatic lobe cancer with subdiaphragmatic peritoneum, crura diaphragmatis and lower thoracic cavity involved. 1 patient had right adrenal carcinoma with phrenic metastasis. 8 patients had inflammation in right lower thorax and/or right upper abdomen. The spreads of these diseases include mainly direct invasion, blood and lymphatic spread routs in the region. Conclusion could be drawn that the MDCT features and distribution of right thoracic-abdominal junctional region diseases correlate with the anatomical characteristics in this region.

  12. Improving transition voltage spectroscopy of molecular junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Troels; Chen, Jingzhe; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2011-01-01

    Transition voltage spectroscopy (TVS) is a promising spectroscopic tool for molecular junctions. The principles in TVS is to find the minimum on a Fowler-Nordheim plot where ln(I/V2) is plotted against 1/V and relate the voltage at the minimum Vmin to the closest molecular level. Importantly, Vmin...

  13. Intrinsically shunted Josephson junctions for electronics applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belogolovskii, M.; Zhitlukhina, E.; Lacquaniti, V.; De Leo, N.; Fretto, M.; Sosso, A.

    2017-07-01

    Conventional Josephson metal-insulator-metal devices are inherently underdamped and exhibit hysteretic current-voltage response due to a very high subgap resistance compared to that in the normal state. At the same time, overdamped junctions with single-valued characteristics are needed for most superconducting digital applications. The usual way to overcome the hysteretic behavior is to place an external low-resistance normal-metal shunt in parallel with each junction. Unfortunately, such solution results in a considerable complication of the circuitry design and introduces parasitic inductance through the junction. This paper provides a concise overview of some generic approaches that have been proposed in order to realize internal shunting in Josephson heterostructures with a barrier that itself contains the desired resistive component. The main attention is paid to self-shunted devices with local weak-link transmission probabilities that are so strongly disordered in the interface plane that transmission probabilities are tiny for the main part of the transition region between two super-conducting electrodes, while a small part of the interface is well transparent. We discuss the possibility of realizing a universal bimodal distribution function and emphasize advantages of such junctions that can be considered as a new class of self-shunted Josephson devices promising for practical applications in superconducting electronics operating at 4.2 K.

  14. Generalized Eck peak in inhomogeneous Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fistul, Mikhail V.; Giuliani, Gabriele F.

    1997-02-01

    In inhomogeneous Josephson junctions the Eck peak characterizing the current-voltage characteristics is predicted to be replaced by a rather different yet prominent feature whose location and shape strongly depend on the strength of the applied magnetic field and the spatial correlations of the associated distorted Abrikosov flux lattice.

  15. Polyphosphonium-based ion bipolar junction transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielsson, Erik O; Tybrandt, Klas; Berggren, Magnus

    2014-11-01

    Advancements in the field of electronics during the past few decades have inspired the use of transistors in a diversity of research fields, including biology and medicine. However, signals in living organisms are not only carried by electrons but also through fluxes of ions and biomolecules. Thus, in order to implement the transistor functionality to control biological signals, devices that can modulate currents of ions and biomolecules, i.e., ionic transistors and diodes, are needed. One successful approach for modulation of ionic currents is to use oppositely charged ion-selective membranes to form so called ion bipolar junction transistors (IBJTs). Unfortunately, overall IBJT device performance has been hindered due to the typical low mobility of ions, large geometries of the ion bipolar junction materials, and the possibility of electric field enhanced (EFE) water dissociation in the junction. Here, we introduce a novel polyphosphonium-based anion-selective material into npn-type IBJTs. The new material does not show EFE water dissociation and therefore allows for a reduction of junction length down to 2 μm, which significantly improves the switching performance of the ion transistor to 2 s. The presented improvement in speed as well the simplified design will be useful for future development of advanced iontronic circuits employing IBJTs, for example, addressable drug-delivery devices.

  16. Maskless Arbitrary Writing of Molecular Tunnel Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byeon, Seo Eun; Kim, Miso; Yoon, Hyo Jae

    2017-11-22

    Since fabricating geometrically well-defined, noninvasive, and compliant electrical contacts over molecular monolayers is difficult, creating molecular-scale electronic devices that function in high yield with good reproducibility is challenging. Moreover, none of the previously reported methods to form organic-electrode contacts at the nanometer and micrometer scales have resulted in directly addressable contacts in an untethered form under ambient conditions without the use of cumbersome equipment and nanolithography. Here we show that in situ encapsulation of a liquid metal (eutectic Ga-In alloy) microelectrode, which is used for junction formation, with a convenient photocurable polymeric scaffold enables untethering of the electrode and direct writing of arbitrary arrays of high-yielding molecular junctions under ambient conditions in a maskless fashion. The formed junctions function in quantitative yields and can afford tunneling currents with high reproducibility; they also function at low temperatures and under bent. The results reported here promise a massively parallel printing technology to construct integrated circuits based on molecular junctions with soft top contacts.

  17. Macroscopic Refrigeration Using Superconducting Tunnel Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowell, Peter; O'Neil, Galen; Underwood, Jason; Zhang, Xiaohang; Ullom, Joel

    2014-03-01

    Sub-kelvin temperatures are often a prerequisite for modern scientific experiments, such as quantum information processing, astrophysical missions looking for dark energy signatures and tabletop time resolved x-ray spectroscopy. Existing methods of reaching these temperatures, such as dilution refrigerators, are bulky and costly. In order to increase the accessibility of sub-Kelvin temperatures, we have developed a new method of refrigeration using normal-metal/insulator/superconductor (NIS) tunnel junctions. NIS junctions cool the electrons in the normal metal since the hottest electrons selectively tunnel from the normal metal into the superconductor. By extending the normal metal onto a thermally isolated membrane, the cold electrons can cool the phonons through the electron-phonon coupling. When these junctions are combined with a pumped 3He system, they provide a potentially inexpensive method of reaching these temperatures. Using only three devices, each with a junction area of approximately 3,500 μm2, we have cooled a 2 cm3 Cu plate from 290 mK to 256 mK. We will present these experimental results along with recent modeling predictions that strongly suggest that further refinements will allow cooling from 300 mK to 120 mK. This work is supported by the NASA APRA program.

  18. Anatomy of the human atrioventricular junctions revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anderson, R. H.; Ho, S. Y.; Becker, A. E.

    2000-01-01

    There have been suggestions made recently that our understanding of the atrioventricular junctions of the heart is less than adequate, with claims for several new findings concerning the arrangement of the ordinary working myocardium and the specialised pathways for atrioventricular conduction. In

  19. impairs gap junction function causing congenital cataract

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Navya

    2017-03-24

    Mar 24, 2017 ... Connexin 46 (Cx46) is important for gap junction channels formation which plays crucial role in the preservation of lens homeostasis and transparency. Previously, we have identified a missense mutation. (p.V44M) of Cx46 in a congenital cataract family. This study aims at dissecting the potential.

  20. Two-dimensional bipolar junction transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharekhanlou, Behnaz; Khorasani, Sina; Sarvari, Reza

    2014-03-01

    Recent development in fabrication technology of planar two-dimensional (2D) materials has introduced the possibility of numerous novel applications. Our recent analysis has revealed that by definition of p-n junctions through appropriate patterned doping of 2D semiconductors, ideal exponential I-V characteristics may be expected. However, the theory of 2D junctions turns out to be very different to that of standard bulk junctions. Based on this theory of 2D diodes, we construct for the first time a model to describe 2D bipolar junction transistors (2D-BJTs). We derive the small-signal equivalent model, and estimate the performance of a 2D-BJT device based on graphone as the example material. A current gain of about 138 and maximum threshold frequency of 77 GHz, together with a power-delay product of only 4 fJ per 1 μm lateral width is expected at an operating voltage of 5 V. In addition, we derive the necessary formulae and a new approximate solution for the continuity equation in the 2D configuration, which have been verified against numerical solutions.

  1. Craniocervical junction abnormalities with atlantoaxial subluxation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Craniocervical junction abnormalities with atlantoaxial subluxation caused by ventral subluxation of C2 were diagnosed in a 6-month-old female Pomeranian with tetraplegia as a clinical sign. Lateral survey radiography of the neck with flexion revealed atlantoaxial subluxation with ventral subluxation of C2. Computed ...

  2. A comparison between gastroesophagheal ultrasonography vs. barium swallow in determining the pattern of gastroesophageal reflux in a pediatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatami, Alireza; Allameh, Mohammad Mahdi; Shahnazi, Makhtoom; Kiumarsi, Azadeh; Tajik, Ali

    2015-03-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is one of the most common gastrointestinal pathology in infants and young children. Ultrasonography (US) has been considered to be a reliable diagnostic tool for GERD but the severity of GERD and the clinical implications based on imaging findings has not been evaluated. To compare the diagnostic value of lower esophageal US with that of barium swallow in demonstrating the severity of GERD. Fifty one pediatric patients, age between 1 month to 12 years, 34 male and 17 female with clinical suspicion of GERD were included. The patients were initially submitted to barium swallow (BS) and subsequently to transabdominal US. During BS, the number of gastroesophageal reflux episodes was documented in a 5-minute period. Transabdominal US documented the number and duration of reflux episodes during a 5-minute period, the angle of His, mucosal thickness, and intraabdominal esophageal length (IAEL). Duration and number of reflux episodes in US were significantly higher in patients that had severe gastroesophageal refluxes at BS. At US the cutoff point of 9.5 seconds (sensitivity 80%, specificity 60%) for reflux duration and more than 2 episodes in 5 minute ultrasound study (sensitivity 75%, specificity 58%) were defined to correlate with severe gastroesophageal reflux at BS.The angle of His, the esophageal wall mucosal thickness, and the IAEL did not correlate with the severity of GERD detected in BS. US can predict the severity of GERD. Therefore, except in the case of specific patients in whom mechanical causes are suspected to be responsible for GERD, BS can be replaced by US.

  3. Surgical treatment of the non-complicated gastroesophageal reflux: fundoplication without division of the short gastric vessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FELIX Valter Nilton

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Background - There is today a significant greater number of laparoscopic antireflux procedures for the surgical treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease and there are yet controversies about the necessity of division of the short gastric vessels and full mobilization of the gastric fundus to perform an adequate fundoplication. Aim - To verify the results of the surgical treatment of non-complicated gastroesophageal reflux disease performing Rossetti modification of the Nissen fundoplication. Patients and Methods - Fourteen patients were operated consecutively and prospectively (mean age 44.07 years; all had erosive esophagitis without Barrett's endoscopic signals (grade 3, Savary-Miller and they were submitted to the Rossetti modification of the Nissen fundoplication. Endoscopy, esophageal manometry and pHmetry were performed before the procedure and around 18 months postoperatively. Results - There was no morbidity, transient dysphagia average was 18.42 days; there was no register of dehiscence or displacement of the fundoplication and only one patient revealed a light esophagitis at postoperative endoscopy; the others presented a normal endoscopic view of the distal esophagus. All noticed a marked improvement of preoperative symptoms. Lower esophageal sphincter pressure changed from 5.82 mm Hg (preoperative mean to 12 mm Hg (postoperative mean; lower esophageal sphincter relaxing pressure, from 0.38 mm Hg to 5.24 mm Hg and DeMeester score, from 16.75 to 0.8. Conclusion - Rossetti procedure (fundoplication without division of the short gastric vessels is an effective surgical method to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease.

  4. Post-Junctional Modulatory Effects of Hemicholinium on Isolated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: HC-3 has antimuscarinic actions on Ach- and carbacholinduced responses; a post-junctional action at the neuromuscular junction and differing anticholinesterase activities with DFP and physostigmine but not edrophonium. KEY WORDS: Post-Junctional, Anti-Muscarinic, Anti-Cholinesterase Jnl of Medical ...

  5. Phenomenological approach to bistable behavior of Josephson junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishi, K.; Nara, S.; Hamanaka, K.

    1985-01-01

    The interaction of unbiased Josephson junction with external electromagnetic field in the presence of externally applied uniform magnetic field is theoretically examined by means of phenomenological treatment. It is proposed that an irradiated junction with suitably chosen parameters shows a bistable behavior of voltage across the junction as a function of the radiation intensity

  6. Effect and its threshold of ELF magnetic fields on gap junctional intercellular communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Yiti; Hu Genlin; Zeng Qunli; Jiang Huai; Xu Zhengping

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To explore the relationship between extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields and carcinogenesis. Methods: The fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) technique was used to determine the effect of ELF magnetic fields and its threshold on gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC). Results: FRAP analysis indicated that 0.4 mT ELF or more could inhibit GJIC, and 0.2 mT ELF or more could enhance the inhibition of GJIC by TPA. Conclusion: ELF magnetic fields might act as a cancer promoter or work in synergy with other cancer promoters

  7. Gastroesophageal reflux: comparison of barium studies with 24-h pH monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, John J.; Levine, Marc S.; Redfern, Regina O.; Rubesin, Stephen E.; Laufer, Igor; Katzka, David A.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To determine the correlation between massive gastroesophageal reflux (GER) on barium studies and pathologic acid reflux on 24-h pH monitoring. Methods: A search of hospital records from January 1997 to January 2001 revealed 28 patients who underwent both barium studies and 24-h pH monitoring. The radiologic reports were reviewed to determine the presence and degree of GER. Patients with reflux to or above the thoracic inlet either spontaneously or with provocative maneuvers in the recumbent position were classified as having massive reflux, whereas the remaining patients with reflux below the thoracic inlet or no reflux comprised the control group. The pH monitoring reports were also reviewed to determine if pathologic acid reflux was present in the recumbent position. The findings on these studies were then compared to determine the frequency of pathologic acid reflux in the recumbent position on pH monitoring in patients with massive reflux on barium studies compared with the control group. Results: Massive GER was observed on barium studies in 11 (39%) of the 28 patients and reflux below the thoracic inlet or no reflux in the remaining 17 patients (61%) who comprised the control group. All 11 patients (100%) with massive reflux on barium studies had pathologic acid reflux on pH monitoring in the recumbent position compared with six (35%) of 17 patients in the control group (P=0.0009). The pH in the distal esophagus on pH monitoring was less than 4.0 for 13.1% of the recumbent period for patients with massive GER on barium studies compared with 6.2% of the recumbent period for the control group (P=0.0076). Conclusion: Although 24-h pH monitoring remains the gold standard for the detection of GER, our experience suggests that patients with massive reflux on barium studies are so likely to have pathologic acid reflux in the recumbent position that these individuals can be further evaluated and treated for their gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD

  8. A comparative pharmacodynamic study of IY-81149 versus omeprazole in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periclou, A P; Goldwater, R; Lee, S M; Park, D W; Kim, D Y; Cho, K D; Boileau, F; Jung, W T

    2000-09-01

    To evaluate and compare the pharmacodynamic effects of IY-81149 and omeprazole on gastric pH in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Sixty male and female volunteers with gastroesophageal reflux disease were enrolled in a double-blind, two-way, crossover, dose-ranging study. Subjects were randomized into three groups, with each group comparing the effect of one of three doses of IY-81149 (5, 10, or 20 mg) with 20 mg omeprazole. IY-81149 and omeprazole were administered once daily for 5 days. Continuous 24-hour pH measurements were performed before the first dose (baseline) and after the fifth dose in both periods. Gastric acid suppression was evaluated on the basis of the following parameters: AUC(0-24), median pH in a 24-hour interval (pHmedian), and the percent time in a 24-hour interval in which the gastric pH was greater than 4 (tpH > 4). The truncated AUC parameters AUC(0-8), AUC(8-16), and AUC(16-24) were also calculated. The effects of IY-81149 and omeprazole on gastric pH were compared by use of analyses of covariance. The dose-response relationship for IY-81149 was also evaluated. There were no statistically significant differences between 5 mg IY-81149 and 20 mg omeprazole in terms of AUC(0-24), pHmedian, tpH, 4, AUC(0-8), and AUC(8-16). IY-81149, at 10 mg, produced a significantly greater gastric acid suppression than omeprazole on the basis of the values of AUC(0-24), pHmedian, tpH > 4, AUC(8-16), and AUC(16-24). Administration of 20 mg IY-81149 produced a significantly greater gastric acid suppression on the basis of all parameters. All doses of IY-81149 were more effective than omeprazole during 16 to 24 hours after the dose was administered. Administration of 10 and 20 mg IY-81149 produced a statistically significantly greater and prolonged suppression of gastric pH than 20 mg omeprazole.

  9. The anatomical locus of T-junction processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirillo, James A

    2009-07-01

    Inhomogeneous surrounds can produce either asymmetrical or symmetrical increment/decrement induction by orienting T-junctions to selectively group a test patch with surrounding regions [Melfi, T., & Schirillo, J. (2000). T-junctions in inhomogeneous surrounds. Vision Research, 40, 3735-3741]. The current experiments aimed to determine where T-junctions are processed by presenting each eye with a different image so that T-junctions exist only in the fused percept. Only minor differences were found between retinal and cortical versus cortical-only conditions, indicating that T-junctions are processed cortically.

  10. Planar Josephson tunnel junctions in a transverse magnetic field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monacoa, R.; Aarøe, Morten; Mygind, Jesper

    2007-01-01

    Traditionally, since the discovery of the Josephson effect in 1962, the magnetic diffraction pattern of planar Josephson tunnel junctions has been recorded with the field applied in the plane of the junction. Here we discuss the static junction properties in a transverse magnetic field where...... demagnetization effects imposed by the tunnel barrier and electrodes geometry are important. Measurements of the junction critical current versus magnetic field in planar Nb-based high-quality junctions with different geometry, size, and critical current density show that it is advantageous to use a transverse...... magnetic field rather than an in-plane field. The conditions under which this occurs are discussed....

  11. Non-Lagrangian theories from brane junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao, Ling; Mitev, Vladimir

    2013-10-01

    In this article we use 5-brane junctions to study the 5D T N SCFTs corresponding to the 5D N=1 uplift of the 4D N=2 strongly coupled gauge theories, which are obtained by compactifying N M5 branes on a sphere with three full punctures. Even though these theories have no Lagrangian description, by using the 5-brane junctions proposed by Benini, Benvenuti and Tachikawa, we are able to derive their Seiberg-Witten curves and Nekrasov partition functions. We cross-check our results with the 5D superconformal index proposed by Kim, Kim and Lee. Through the AGTW correspondence, we discuss the relations between 5D superconformal indices and n-point functions of the q-deformed W N Toda theories.

  12. Relaxation oscillation logic in Josephson junction circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fulton, T.A.

    1981-01-01

    A dc powered, self-resetting Josephson junction logic circuit relying on relaxation oscillations is described. A pair of Josephson junction gates are connected in series, a first shunt is connected in parallel with one of the gates, and a second shunt is connected in parallel with the series combination of gates. The resistance of the shunts and the dc bias current bias the gates so that they are capable of undergoing relaxation oscillations. The first shunt forms an output line whereas the second shunt forms a control loop. The bias current is applied to the gates so that, in the quiescent state, the gate in parallel with the second shunt is at V O, and the other gate is undergoing relaxation oscillations. By controlling the state of the first gate with the current in the output loop of another identical circuit, the invert function is performed

  13. Non-Lagrangian theories from brane junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, Ling [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden); Mitev, Vladimir [Humboldt Univ., Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Mathematik und Inst. fuer Physik; Pomoni, Elli [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group; Taki, Masato [RIKEN Nishina Center, Saitama (Japan). Mathematical Physics Lab.; Yagi, Futoshi [International School of Advanced Studies (SISSA), Trieste (Italy); INFN, Trieste (Italy); Korea Institute for Advanced Study (KIAS), Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    In this article we use 5-brane junctions to study the 5D T{sub N} SCFTs corresponding to the 5D N=1 uplift of the 4D N=2 strongly coupled gauge theories, which are obtained by compactifying N M5 branes on a sphere with three full punctures. Even though these theories have no Lagrangian description, by using the 5-brane junctions proposed by Benini, Benvenuti and Tachikawa, we are able to derive their Seiberg-Witten curves and Nekrasov partition functions. We cross-check our results with the 5D superconformal index proposed by Kim, Kim and Lee. Through the AGTW correspondence, we discuss the relations between 5D superconformal indices and n-point functions of the q-deformed W{sub N} Toda theories.

  14. Electron transport in doped fullerene molecular junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Milanpreet; Sawhney, Ravinder Singh; Engles, Derick

    The effect of doping on the electron transport of molecular junctions is analyzed in this paper. The doped fullerene molecules are stringed to two semi-infinite gold electrodes and analyzed at equilibrium and nonequilibrium conditions of these device configurations. The contemplation is done using nonequilibrium Green’s function (NEGF)-density functional theory (DFT) to evaluate its density of states (DOS), transmission coefficient, molecular orbitals, electron density, charge transfer, current, and conductance. We conclude from the elucidated results that Au-C16Li4-Au and Au-C16Ne4-Au devices behave as an ordinary p-n junction diode and a Zener diode, respectively. Moreover, these doped fullerene molecules do not lose their metallic nature when sandwiched between the pair of gold electrodes.

  15. Junction conditions in extended Teleparallel gravities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De la Cruz-Dombriz, Álvaro [Departamento de Física Teórica I, Ciudad Universitaria, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Dunsby, Peter K.S.; Sáez-Gómez, Diego, E-mail: dombriz@fis.ucm.es, E-mail: peter.dunsby@uct.ac.za, E-mail: diego.saezgomez@uct.ac.za [Astrophysics, Cosmology and Gravity Centre (ACGC), Department of Mathematics and Applied Mathematics, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7701, Cape Town (South Africa)

    2014-12-01

    In the context of extended Teleparallel gravity theories, we address the issue of junction conditions required to guarantee the correct matching of different regions of spacetime. In the absence of shells/branes, these conditions turn out to be more restrictive than their counterparts in General Relativity as in other extended theories of gravity. In fact, the general junction conditions on the matching hypersurfaces depend on the underlying theory and a new condition on the induced tetrads in order to avoid delta-like distributions in the field equations. This result imposes strict consequences on the viability of standard solutions such as the Einstein-Straus-like construction. We find that the continuity of the scalar torsion is required in order to recover the usual General Relativity results.

  16. Magnetoamplification in a bipolar magnetic junction transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangaraju, N; Peters, J A; Wessels, B W

    2010-09-10

    We have demonstrated the first bipolar magnetic junction transistor using a dilute magnetic semiconductor. For an InMnAs p-n-p transistor magnetoamplification is observed at room temperature. The observed magnetoamplification is attributed to the magnetoresistance of the magnetic semiconductor InMnAs heterojunction. The magnetic field dependence of the transistor characteristics confirm that the magnetoamplification results from the junction magnetoresistance. To describe the experimentally observed transistor characteristics, we propose a modified Ebers-Moll model that includes a series magnetoresistance attributed to spin-selective conduction. The capability of magnetic field control of the amplification in an all-semiconductor transistor at room temperature potentially enables the creation of new computer logic architecture where the spin of the carriers is utilized.

  17. Excess junction current of silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, E. Y.; Legge, R. N.; Christidis, N.

    1973-01-01

    The current-voltage characteristics of n(plus)-p silicon solar cells with 0.1, 1.0, 2.0, and 10 ohm-cm p-type base materials have been examined in detail. In addition to the usual I-V measurements, we have studied the temperature dependence of the slope of the I-V curve at the origin by the lock-in technique. The excess junction current coefficient (Iq) deduced from the slope at the origin depends on the square root of the intrinsic carrier concentration. The Iq obtained from the I-V curve fitting over the entire forward bias region at various temperatures shows the same temperature dependence. This result, in addition to the presence of an aging effect, suggest that the surface channel effect is the dominant cause of the excess junction current.

  18. Electron and Phonon Transport in Molecular Junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Qian

    transmission at the Fermi energy. We propose and analyze a way of using π   stacking to design molecular junctions to control heat transport. We develop a simple model system to identify optimal parameter regimes and then use density functional theory (DFT) to extract model parameters for a number of specific......Molecular electronics provide the possibility to investigate electron and phonon transport at the smallest imaginable scale, where quantum effects can be investigated and exploited directly in the design. In this thesis, we study both electron transport and phonon transport in molecular junctions....... The system we are interested in here are π-stacked molecules connected with two semi-infinite leads. π-stacked aromatic rings, connected via π-π electronic coupling, provides a rather soft mechanical bridge while maintaining high electronic conductivity. We investigate electron transport...

  19. Characterization of magnetic tunnel junction test pads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østerberg, Frederik Westergaard; Kjær, Daniel; Nielsen, Peter Folmer

    2015-01-01

    relies on four-point probe measurements performed with a range of different probe pitches and was originally developed for infinite samples. Using the method of images, we derive a modified CIPT model, which compensates for the insulating boundaries of a finite rectangular sample geometry. We measure...... as a function of position on a square tunnel junction pad are used to investigate the sensitivity of the measurement results to probe misalignment....... on square tunnel junction pads with varying sizes and analyze the measured data using both the original and the modified CIPT model. Thus, we determine in which sample size range the modified CIPT model is needed to ensure validity of the extracted sample parameters, RA and TMR. In addition, measurements...

  20. Dissipation and traversal time in Josephson junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacciari, Ilaria; Ranfagni, Anedio; Moretti, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    The various ways of evaluating dissipative effects in macroscopic quantum tunneling are re-examined. The results obtained by using functional integration, while confirming those of previously given treatments, enable a comparison with available experimental results relative to Josephson junctions. A criterion based on the shortening of the semiclassical traversal time τ of the barrier with regard to dissipation can be established, according to which Δτ/τ > or approx. N/Q, where Q is the quality factor of the junction and N is a numerical constant of order unity. The best agreement with the experiments is obtained for N=1.11, as it results from a semiempirical analysis based on an increase in the potential barrier caused by dissipative effects.

  1. Shot noise in YBCO bicrystal Josephson junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Constantinian, K.Y.; Ovsyannikov, G.A.; Borisenko, I.V.

    2003-01-01

    We measured spectral noise density in YBCO symmetric bicrystal Josephson junctions on sapphire substrates at bias voltages up to 100 mV and T 4.2 K. Normal state resistance of the Josephson junctions, R-N = 20-90 Omega and ICRN up to 2.2 mV have been observed in the experimental samples. Noise...... measurements were carried out within frequency bands of 1-2 GHz and 0.3-300 kHz. At bias voltages 10 less than or equal to V less than or equal to 60 mV a linear voltage dependence of noise power has been registered, while at V less than or equal to 5 mV a noticeable noise rise has been observed. The latter...

  2. Charge Transport Phenomena in Peptide Molecular Junctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Luchini

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS is a valuable in situ spectroscopic analysis technique that provides a direct portrait of the electron transport properties of a molecular species. In the past, IETS has been applied to small molecules. Using self-assembled nanoelectronic junctions, IETS was performed for the first time on a large polypeptide protein peptide in the phosphorylated and native form, yielding interpretable spectra. A reproducible 10-fold shift of the I/V characteristics of the peptide was observed upon phosphorylation. Phosphorylation can be utilized as a site-specific modification to alter peptide structure and thereby influence electron transport in peptide molecular junctions. It is envisioned that kinases and phosphatases may be used to create tunable systems for molecular electronics applications, such as biosensors and memory devices.

  3. Nonlinearity in superconductivity and Josephson junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazarides, N.

    1995-01-01

    Within the framework of the Bardeen, Cooper and Schrieffers (BCS) theory, the influence of anisotropy on superconducting states are investigated. Crystal anisotropy exists in un-conventional low temperature superconductors as e.g. U 1-x Th x Be 13 and in high temperature superconductors. Starting from a phenomenological pairing interaction of the electrons or holes, the BCS approach is used to derive a set of coupled nonlinear algebraic equations for the momentum dependent gap parameter. The emphasis is put on bifurcation phenomena between s-, d-wave and mixed s- and d-wave symmetry and the influence on measurable quantities as the electron specific heat, spin susceptibility and Josephson tunnelling. Pitch-fork and perturbed pitch-fork bifurcations have been found separating s- and d-wave superconducting states from mixed s- and d-wave states. The additional superconducting states give rise to jumps in the electron specific heat below the transition temperature. These jumps are rounded in the case of perturbed pitch-fork bifurcations. An experiment to measure the sign of the interlayer interaction using dc SQUIDS is suggested. The Ambegaokar-Baratoff formalism has been used for calculating the quasiparticle current and the two phase coherent tunnelling currents in a Josephson junction made of anisotropic superconductors. It is shown that anisotropy can lead to a reduction in the product of the normal resistance and the critical current. For low voltages across the junction the usual resistively shunted Josephson model can be used. Finally, bunching in long circular Josephson junctions and suppression of chaos in point junctions have been investigated. (au) 113 refs

  4. Internal dynamics of long Josephson junction oscillators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Peter Leth; Lomdahl, P. S.; Scott, Alwyn C.

    1981-01-01

    Numerical computations on a sine-Gordon model of the Josephson junction fluxon oscillator are compared with experimental measurements. Good agreement is found for the voltage current characteristic, oscillator power output, and range of current bias over which oscillation is observed. Our numeric...... results imply a ''bunched-fluxon'' mode of oscillation at larger values of bias current. Applied Physics Letters is copyrighted by The American Institute of Physics....

  5. An epitaxial ferroelectric tunnel junction on silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhipeng; Guo, Xiao; Lu, Hui-Bin; Zhang, Zaoli; Song, Dongsheng; Cheng, Shaobo; Bosman, Michel; Zhu, Jing; Dong, Zhili; Zhu, Weiguang

    2014-11-12

    Epitaxially grown functional perovskites on silicon (001) and the ferroelectricity of a 3.2 nm thick BaTiO3 barrier layer are demonstrated. The polarization-switching-induced change in tunneling resistance is measured to be two orders of magnitude. The obtained results suggest the possibility of integrating ferroelectric tunnel junctions as binary data storage media in non-volatile memory cells on a silicon platform. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Josephson spin current in triplet superconductor junctions

    OpenAIRE

    Asano, Yasuhiro

    2006-01-01

    This paper theoretically discusses the spin current in spin-triplet superconductor / insulator / spin-triplet superconductor junctions. At low temperatures, a midgap Andreev resonant state anomalously enhances not only the charge current but also the spin current. The coupling between the Cooper pairs and the electromagnetic fields leads to the Frounhofer pattern in the direct current spin flow in magnetic fields and the alternative spin current under applied bias-voltages.

  7. Defect formation in long Josephson junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gordeeva, Anna; Pankratov, Andrey

    2010-01-01

    We study numerically a mechanism of vortex formation in a long Josephson junction within the framework of the one-dimensional sine-Gordon model. This mechanism is switched on below the critical temperature. It is shown that the number of fluxons versus velocity of cooling roughly scales according...... to the power law with the exponent of either 0.25 or 0.5 depending on the temperature variation in the critical current density....

  8. Development of Thin-Junction Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, W.; Carini, G.; Keister, J.; Li, Z.; Rehak, P.

    2007-10-01

    Two methods to produce a thin-junction sensor are reported here. The first method consists of a regular boron implantation with energies of 2 keV (dose of 1 times 1015/cm2) and 5 keV (dose of 1 times 1014/cm2) into silicon directly, and 10 keV (1 X 1014/cm2), 45 keV (1 times 1015/cm2) into Si through a thin oxide layer (500 A and 1000 A respectively) to form a junction. An aluminum layer was coated in the same vacuum system after back-sputtering to remove oxide on top of the implanted silicon substrate. This method may have the following advantages: 1) it may improve the soft X-ray radiation hardness of the device because there is no oxide layer on the junction; 2) it substantially attenuates the incident visible light; and 3) it allows detection of low energy X-ray down to 300 eV. The second method consists of a low energy of 2 keV and dose of 1 times 1015/cm2 boron implantation into the bare silicon followed by laser annealing that activates boron with minimal diffusion, to retain the ultra thin-junction. The laser annealing method was compared with control wafers. Two of the control wafers were implanted by boron with the same energy and dose as that of the laser annealed wafer. One of them was annealed using high temperature of 1000degC and time of 30 minutes thermal annealing. The other was annealed using our regular annealing temperature of 700degC and with longer annealing time of 17 hours. The remaining control wafer was implanted by boron with higher energy of 45 keV and dose of 1 times 1015/cm2 (our standard boron implantation energy and dose) and annealed using regular (700degC, 30 min) thermal annealing.

  9. RADIOLOGICAL EVALUATION OF CRANIOVERTEBRAL JUNCTION ANOMALIES

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    Joji Reddy

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Detailed discussions of the CVJ are conspicuously absent in many standard textbooks and chapters addressing the skull or cervical spine, since it lies in between these regions . CVJ anomalies are common in India subcontinent. OBJECTIVES : To outline the normal anatomy and various abnormalities of craniovertebral junction. To evaluate the most common developmental and acquired craniovertebral junction abnormalities . CRANIOMETRY AND DIAGNOSIS: Radiological evaluation of CVJ requir es identification of only a few anatomic structures. Over the years multiple lines , planes and angles have been described for assessment of CVJ relationship , initially with radiography and later with polytomography. Two lines have remained particularly use ful for evaluation of CVJ relationship with virtually any imaging modality: the chamberlain`s line and weckenheim ’ s clivus base line . Two angles also continue to be useful: the welcher basal angle and atlanto occipital joint axis angle. PATIENTS AND METHOD S: The prospective study of craniovertebral junction anomalies was carried out at Kurnool medical college , Governament general hospital Kurnool from NOV 2012 to AUG 2014. The patients are subjected to clinical evaluation and radiological evaluation. OBSERV ATIONS AND RESULTS : In our study there is male predominance with male to female ratio of 2:1 . Majority of patients are in the age group of 11 - 40 (73.26%. The commonest symptom seen is weakness of extremities ( 70% with associated numbness (50%. On clinica l examination pyramidal tract involvement noticed in 70% of cases. Basilar invagination is the most common followed by Atlantoocoipital assimilation (40% and AAD (30% . CONCLUSION : Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are invalvable adjuncts to the plain radiographs in the evaluation of the craniovertebral junction anomalies. Chamberlain’s line and McGregor line are the most commonly applied craniometric measurements

  10. Decreased Vision and Junctional Scotoma from Pituicytoma

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    Nancy Huynh

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Pituicytomas are rare neoplasms of the sellar region. We report a case of vision loss and a junctional scotoma in a 43-year-old woman caused by compression of the optic chiasm by a pituitary tumor. The morphological and immunohistochemical characteristics of the tumor were consistent with the diagnosis of pituicytoma. The tumor was debulked surgically, and the patient’s vision improved.

  11. Magnetic remanence of Josephson junction arrays

    OpenAIRE

    Passos, W. A. C.; Araujo-Moreira, F. M.; Ortiz, W. A.

    1999-01-01

    In this work we study the magnetic remanence exhibited by Josephson junction arrays in response to an excitation with an AC magnetic field. The effect, predicted by numerical simulations to occur in a range of temperatures, is clearly seen in our tridimensional disordered arrays. We also discuss the influence of the critical current distribution on the temperature interval within which the array develops a magnetic remanence. This effect can be used to determine the critical current distribut...

  12. Relationship between upper airway obstruction and gastroesophageal reflux in a dog model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boesch, Richard Paul; Shah, Prashant; Vaynblat, Mikhail; Marcus, Michael; Pagala, Murali; Narwal, Shivinder; Kazachkov, Mikhail

    2005-01-01

    The association between gastroesophageal reflux (GER) and upper airway obstruction in children is recognized but not well understood. Our objective was to determine if the creation of a model of upper airway obstruction in dogs would cause GER and to determine if the GER is related to intrathoracic pressure changes. Five dogs underwent evaluation with esophageal manometry and pH probe at baseline and 1 week after creation of an upper airway obstruction. Airway obstruction was created by placement of a fenestrated cuffed tracheostomy tube, which was then capped and the cuff was inflated, requiring the animals to breathe via the fenestrations. The negative inspiratory pressure (Pes) (+/- SD) increased from 11.8 +/- 4.8 cm H(2)O at baseline to 17.6 +/- 4.9 cm H(2)O 1 week after creation of an airway obstruction (p = .029). None of the dogs had GER at baseline with a reflux index (RI) value of 0.0; however, 1 week after creation of airway obstruction, three out of five dogs had GER, with a mean RI value of 21.2 +/- 21.2. There was a significant (p = .023) correlation (r = .928) of the changes in Pes and RI values following airway obstruction. Upper airway obstruction (UAO) does cause GER in this canine model. Severity of GER is significantly correlated with Pes changes.

  13. Pharmacokinetic evaluation of esomeprazole for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goirand, Françoise; Le Ray, Isabelle; Bardou, Marc

    2014-09-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are widely used for the treatment of acid-related diseases such as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). They are recommended by the American College of Gastroenterology for healing erosive esophagitis (EO) and as long-term treatment in patients with healed EO. The available PPIs differ somewhat in their pharmacokinetics and clinical properties, but whether these differences are of clinical relevance is a matter of debate. Some safety concerns have been raised with the use of PPIs, mostly an increased incidence of infectious diseases such as community-acquired pneumonia or Clostridium difficile diarrhea. This article explores the results of clinical studies on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of esomeprazole , as well as on its clinical efficacy to manage patients with GERD. GERD is a public health concern as its worldwide incidence and associated complications are increasing alongside the exponentially increasing problem of obesity. PPIs are the first pharmacological option because of their efficacy and overall positive risk-to-benefit ratio. Improved efficacy with the use of stereospecific isomers of PPIs, such as esomeprazole, has not yet been convincingly demonstrated. Nevertheless, because of individual experience with former treatment, some patients may report better symptom control when treated with a specific PPI rather than with others.

  14. Managing peptic ulcer and gastroesophageal reflux disease in elderly Chinese patients – focus on esomeprazole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Raymond SY; Wu, Justin CY

    2013-01-01

    Peptic ulcer disease (PUD) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are not uncommon in elderly patients. Clinical presentations of these acid-related disorders may be atypical in the geriatric population. Older individuals are at increased risk for poor outcomes in complicated PUD and for development of GERD complications. Multiple risk factors (eg, Helicobacter pylori [HP], use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs], aspirin) contribute to the development of PUD. Recent data has shown that HP-negative, NSAID-negative idiopathic peptic ulcers are on the rise and carry a higher risk of recurrent ulcer bleeding and mortality. Effective management of PUD in the geriatric population relies on identification and modification of treatable risk factors. Elderly patients with GERD often require long-term acid suppressive therapy. Proton pump inhibitors (PPI) including esomeprazole are effective in the treatment of reflux esophagitis, maintenance of GERD symptomatic control, and management of PUD as well as its complications. Potential safety concerns of long-term PPI use have been reported in the literature. Clinicians should balance the risks and benefits before committing elderly patients to long-term PPI therapy. PMID:24187492

  15. Safety and Tolerability of Esomeprazole in Children With Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilger, Mark A; Tolia, Vasundhara; Vandenplas, Yvan; Youssef, Nader N; Traxler, Barry; Illueca, Marta

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate safety, tolerability, and symptom improvement with once-daily esomeprazole in children with endoscopically proven gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). In this 8-week, multicenter, randomized, uncontrolled, double-blind study, children ages 1 to 11 years were stratified by weight to receive esomeprazole 5 or 10 mg (children esomeprazole 5 and 10 mg, respectively, and 83.9% and 82.8% of children ≥ 20 kg receiving esomeprazole 10 and 20 mg, respectively, regardless of causality. Overall, only 9.3% of patients reported 13 treatment-related AEs; the most common were diarrhea (2.8% [3/108]), headache (1.9% [2/108]), and somnolence (1.9% [2/108]). Vomiting, a serious AE in 2 patients, was not judged by the investigator to be related to treatment. At the final visit, PGA scores improved significantly from baseline (P esomeprazole (at daily doses of 5, 10, or 20 mg) was generally well tolerated. The frequency and severity of GERD-related symptoms were significantly reduced during the active treatment period.

  16. The prevalence of sexual behavior disorders in patients with treated and untreated gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iovino, Paola; Pascariello, Annalisa; Limongelli, Paolo; Tremolaterra, Fabrizio; Consalvo, Danilo; Sabbatini, Francesco; Amato, Giuseppe; Ciacci, Carolina

    2007-07-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a chronic disease. Sexual behavior is often altered in chronic illness. The aim of this study was to evaluate sexual behavior in patients affected with GERD before and after medical or surgical treatment in comparison to healthy controls (HC). Upper GI endoscopy and 24-h ambulatory pH testing were performed to confirm GERD in symptomatic patients. GERD patients completed an anonymous questionnaire on sexual life before and after medical or surgical treatment. Compared with HC, untreated patients with GERD showed more frequent difficulty in attaining orgasm and painful intercourse. GERD patients after surgical treatment had significantly more difficulty in attaining orgasm, while after continuous medical treatment GERD patients compared with HC had significantly more difficulty in attaining orgasm, higher painful intercourse, lower sexual desire, and perceived more frequently that the partner was unhelpful. When compared with untreated conditions, GERD patients after surgical treatment had a significant improvement in attaining orgasm and in painful intercourse but a significant decrease in sexual desire, a lower satisfaction with their sexual life, and a higher prevalence of an unhelpful partner, whereas GERD patients after medical treatment had a decrease in all indices of sexual behavior. Untreated GERD is associated with disorders in sexual behavior. Compared with HC, only the surgical group partially improved after treatment.

  17. Preventative effect of massage on gastric volvulus in infants with gastroesophageal reflux-induced pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Suqi; Xiong, Xiaoli; Wan, Qi; Liu, Fan; Tang, Jianqiao; Jiang, Zhixia; Zhou, Lishan; Yuan, Kai; Xie, Dong

    2015-10-01

    To study the preventative effects of massage on gastric volvulus (GV) in infants with gastroesophageal reflux (GER)-induced pneumonia. One-hundred and eighty GV with GER-induced pneumonia inpatients were divided randomly into four groups: basic treatment 1 (n = 60), basic treatment 2 (n = 30), massage treatment 1 (n = 60) and massage treatment 2 (n = 30). Clinical examinations selected between groups 1 and 2 were different. Radiography of the upper gastrointestinal tract using iodine-containing contrast was assessed in group 1 before and after treatment, whereas 24-h pH monitoring of the distal esophagus was assessed in group 2 before and after treatment. Symptom scores and chest radiography were assessed in all groups upon hospital admission and after procedures. Clinical effects were estimated after procedures in all groups. The prevalence of severe pneumonia among the four groups was compared. Massage treatment groups showed a significantly higher percentage of cure and total effect (P 0.05) than basic treatment groups. Furthermore, massage treatment groups had remarkably lower scores for symptoms and signs (P massage treatment groups compared with those in basic treatment groups. Finally, massage treatment groups demonstrated a lower prevalence of severe pneumonia than basic treatment groups (P Massage treatment can prevent GV with GER-induced pneumonia in infants by timely correction of stomach rotation and subsequent attenuation of GER.

  18. Managing peptic ulcer and gastroesophageal reflux disease in elderly Chinese patients--focus on esomeprazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Raymond S Y; Wu, Justin C Y

    2013-01-01

    Peptic ulcer disease (PUD) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are not uncommon in elderly patients. Clinical presentations of these acid-related disorders may be atypical in the geriatric population. Older individuals are at increased risk for poor outcomes in complicated PUD and for development of GERD complications. Multiple risk factors (eg, Helicobacter pylori [HP], use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs], aspirin) contribute to the development of PUD. Recent data has shown that HP-negative, NSAID-negative idiopathic peptic ulcers are on the rise and carry a higher risk of recurrent ulcer bleeding and mortality. Effective management of PUD in the geriatric population relies on identification and modification of treatable risk factors. Elderly patients with GERD often require long-term acid suppressive therapy. Proton pump inhibitors (PPI) including esomeprazole are effective in the treatment of reflux esophagitis, maintenance of GERD symptomatic control, and management of PUD as well as its complications. Potential safety concerns of long-term PPI use have been reported in the literature. Clinicians should balance the risks and benefits before committing elderly patients to long-term PPI therapy.

  19. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and Alkaline Reflux: the Mechanisms of the Development and Therapeutic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.D. Zviahintseva

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD — a pathology, which occupies a leading place among all acid-related diseases. The main mechanism of GERD is a violation of the motor-evacuation function of the stomach — slowing gastric emptying and duodenogastric reflux. Slow gastric emptying contributes to more frequent reflux, and the presence of duodenal contents in refluxate — alkaline reflux — is aggressive for the esophageal mucosa (EM. This is due to the presence of bile acids, lysolecithin and pancreatic enzymes in the esophageal refluxate. A long existing contact of aggressive factors in the stomach and the esophagus leads to the development of inflammatory and destructive lesions of the mucous membrane of these organs. According to many researchers, bile acids play a key role in the pathogenesis of the damaging effects on the EM. Drug correction of GERD with alkaline reflux includes, along with the administration of proton pump inhibitors, prokinetics (itopride hydrochloride and ursodeoxycholic acid preparations.

  20. Myth: gastroesophageal reflux is a pathological entity in the preterm infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poets, Christian F; Brockmann, Pablo E

    2011-10-01

    There is concern about possible consequences of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) in preterm infants. GER is perceived to be a frequent condition in these infants, often causing an exhaustive investigation and expensive therapy. We review current evidence for and against an association between GER and apnea, failure to thrive, wheezing and respiratory diseases. Although there are some limitations to the methodologies currently used for detecting GER, there is clearly a lack of unequivocal evidence supporting a causal relationship between GER and its assumed consequences, particularly in preterm infants. Despite physiologic data that stimulation of laryngeal efferents by GER may induce apnea, there is little evidence for a causal relationship between GER and apnea. Studies on preterm infants with failure to thrive have also not demonstrated an association between the latter and GER in most cases, and there is equally little evidence for a casual relationship with respiratory problems. Therefore, we believe that GER in preterm infants is only rarely associated with serious consequences and existing evidence does not support the widespread use of anti-reflux medications for treatment of these signs in this age group. An improvement of methods to identify the few preterm infants at risk for developing serious consequences of GER is urgently needed. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Modern Approaches to an Initial and Anti-Relapse Treatment of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M. Tkach

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the modern approaches to an initial and anti-relapse treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD, based on the recommendations of the last two American consensus. According to these data, the main drugs for the treatment of GERD are proton pump inhibitors (PPIs, which are divided into the first- and second-generation drugs and can be used in standard doses, as well as in double- and half-doses. Second-generation drugs are more effective and safe as they less dependent on CYP2C19 polymorphism of. It is concluded that in most cases, the initial treatment should begin with the use of standard or double-doses of PPI, and supporting one — with standard or half-doses used for a variety of schemes — constant, intermittent or therapy «on demand». The best preparation for a long-term treatment of GERD, especially if it is necessary to take other drugs, is pantoprazole.

  2. An update on the use of pantoprazole as a treatment for gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sony Mathews

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Sony Mathews, Ashley Reid, Chenlu Tian, Qiang CaiDivision of Digestive Diseases, Department of Medicine, Emory University, School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USAAbstract: Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is a chronic, recurrent disease that affects nearly 19 million people in the US. The mainstay of therapy for GERD is acid suppression. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs are the most effective medication for both initial treatment and maintenance therapy of GERD. Pantoprazole, a first-generation PPI, was approved by the FDA in 2000 for the treatment of erosive esophagitis associated with GERD. It has been used in more than 100 different countries worldwide. It is one of the few PPIs available in multiple forms: a delayed-release oral capsule, oral suspension, and intravenous. Pantoprazole been shown to improve acid reflux-related symptoms, heal esophagitis, and improve health-related quality of life more effectively than histamine-2 receptor antagonists. Evaluated in over 100 clinical trials, pantoprazole has an excellent safety profile, is as efficacious as other PPIs, and has a low incidence of drug interactions. It has also been shown to be safe and effective in special patient populations, such as the elderly and those with renal or moderate liver disease.Keywords: pantoprazole, GERD, esophagitis

  3. ACIDIC AND NEUTRAL LIQUID INGESTION IN PATIENTS WITH GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dafne Calsoni GOMES

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Context Sour acidic liquid has a slower distal esophageal transit than a neutral liquid. Our hypothesis was that an acidic sour bolus has a different ingestion dynamic than a neutral bolus. Method In 50 healthy volunteers and 29 patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD, we evaluated the ingestion dynamics of 100 mL of acidic sour liquid (concentrated lemon juice, pH: 3.0 and 100 mL of water (pH: 6.8. The time to ingest the total volume, the number of swallows to ingest the volume, the interval between swallows, the flux of ingestion and the volume ingested in each swallow was measured. Results In both groups, healthy volunteers and patients in treatment for GERD, the acidic liquid took longer to be ingested, a higher number of swallows, a slower flux of ingestion and a smaller volume in each swallow than the neutral bolus. There was no difference between healthy volunteers and patients with GERD. The ingestion in women was longer than in men for acidic and neutral liquids. Conclusion Acidic liquid has a different dynamic of ingestion than the neutral liquid, which may be consequence of the slower transit through the distal esophageal body or an anticipation to drink a sour bolus. Patients with GERD have the same prolonged ingestion of the acidic liquid bolus as seen in healthy volunteers.

  4. Acidic and neutral liquid ingestion in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Dafne Calsoni; Dantas, Roberto Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    Sour acidic liquid has a slower distal esophageal transit than a neutral liquid. Our hypothesis was that an acidic sour bolus has a different ingestion dynamic than a neutral bolus. In 50 healthy volunteers and 29 patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), we evaluated the ingestion dynamics of 100 mL of acidic sour liquid (concentrated lemon juice, pH: 3.0) and 100 mL of water (pH: 6.8). The time to ingest the total volume, the number of swallows to ingest the volume, the interval between swallows, the flux of ingestion and the volume ingested in each swallow was measured. In both groups, healthy volunteers and patients in treatment for GERD, the acidic liquid took longer to be ingested, a higher number of swallows, a slower flux of ingestion and a smaller volume in each swallow than the neutral bolus. There was no difference between healthy volunteers and patients with GERD. The ingestion in women was longer than in men for acidic and neutral liquids. Acidic liquid has a different dynamic of ingestion than the neutral liquid, which may be consequence of the slower transit through the distal esophageal body or an anticipation to drink a sour bolus. Patients with GERD have the same prolonged ingestion of the acidic liquid bolus as seen in healthy volunteers.

  5. Randomized study of lafutidine vs lansoprazole in patients with mild gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenaka, Ryuta; Okada, Hiroyuki; Kawano, Seiji; Komazawa, Yoshinori; Yoshinaga, Fumiya; Nagata, Shinji; Inoue, Masafumi; Komatsu, Hirohisa; Onogawa, Seiji; Kushiyama, Yoshinori; Mukai, Shinichi; Todo, Hiroko; Okanobu, Hideharu; Manabe, Noriaki; Tanaka, Shinji; Haruma, Ken; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2016-06-21

    To compare the clinical efficacy of the second-generation H2RA lafutidine with that of lansoprazole in Japanese patients with mild gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Patients with symptoms of GERD and a diagnosis of grade A reflux esophagitis (according to the Los Angeles classification) were randomized to receive lafutidine (10 mg, twice daily) or lansoprazole (30 mg, once daily) for an initial 8 wk, followed by maintenance treatment comprising half-doses of the assigned drug for 24 wk. The primary endpoint was the frequency and severity of heartburn during initial and maintenance treatment. The secondary endpoints were the sum score of questions 2 and 3 in the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS), and the satisfaction score. Between April 2012 and March 2013, a total of 53 patients were enrolled, of whom 24 and 29 received lafutidine and lansoprazole, respectively. After 8 wk, the frequency and severity of heartburn was significantly reduced in both groups. However, lafutidine was significantly inferior to lansoprazole with regard to the severity of heartburn during initial and maintenance treatment (P = 0.016). The sum score of questions 2 and 3 in the GSRS, and satisfaction scores were also significantly worse in the lafutidine group than the lansoprazole group (P = 0.0068 and P = 0.0048, respectively). The clinical efficacy of lafutidine was inferior to that of lansoprazole, even in Japanese patients with mild GERD.

  6. Clinical characteristics and effectiveness of lansoprazole in Japanese patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease and dyspepsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Yoshikazu; Miwa, Hiroto; Sanada, Katsuyuki; Miyata, Koji; Haruma, Ken

    2014-04-01

    Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) frequently have symptoms of dyspepsia in addition to reflux symptoms. Treatment options for dyspepsia are not standardized. The aim of this study was to clarify the therapeutic effect of lansoprazole on dyspepsia in Japanese patients with GERD. GERD patients with dyspepsia were enrolled and treated with lansoprazole 15 or 30 mg once daily for 4 weeks. Reflux and dyspeptic symptoms were assessed by questionnaires before treatment, and 2 and 4 weeks after the start of lansoprazole treatment. In the effectiveness analysis set (n = 12,653), heartburn was reported by 91.6 % of patients at study enrollment. Postprandial fullness was the most frequently reported dyspepsia symptom at the start of the study, reported by 79.0 % of enrolled patients. After 4 weeks of lansoprazole treatment, heartburn symptoms were improved in 75.7 % of patients and symptoms of postprandial fullness were improved in 68.7 % of patients. The therapeutic effect of low and high doses of lansoprazole on dyspepsia, as well as on reflux symptoms, was approximately 10 % higher in patients with endoscopy-confirmed erosive esophagitis (60.1-82.2 %), than in patients with non-erosive reflux diseases (53.0-73.3 %). Lansoprazole was well tolerated. In this large-scale clinical study, lansoprazole effectively relieved dyspepsia in addition to reflux symptoms in patients with GERD.

  7. Comorbidities are frequent in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease in a tertiary health care hospital

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    Joaquim Prado P Moraes-Filho

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Several aspects of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD have been studied, but the frequency of comorbidities is not yet fully understood. OBJECTIVES: To study the prevalence of GERD comorbidities in a tertiary care hospital. METHODS: We prospectively studied 670 consecutive adult patients from the outpatient department of our facility. A diagnosis was established using clinical, endoscopic and/or pHmetry-related findings. Each patient's medical file was reviewed with respect to the presence of other medical conditions and diagnoses. RESULTS: Of the 670 patients, 459 (68.6% were female, and the mean age was 55.94 (17-80 years. We registered 316 patients (47.1% with the erosive form of GERD and 354 patients (52.9% with the non-erosive form. A total of 1,664 instances of comorbidities were recorded in 586 patients (87.5%, with the most common being arterial hypertension (21%, hypercholesterolemia (9%, obesity (9%, type II diabetes mellitus (5% and depression (4%. Two or more comorbidities were present in 437 individuals (64.8%. The occurrence of comorbidities increased with age and was higher in patients with the non-erosive form of GERD. CONCLUSIONS: In a tertiary referral population, comorbidities were very common, and these may have worsened the already impaired health-related quality of life of these patients. Clinicians caring for GERD patients in this setting must be aware of the likelihood and nature of comorbid disorders and their impact on disease presentation and patient management.

  8. Total and abdominal obesity are risk factors for gastroesophageal reflux symptoms in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quitadamo, Paolo; Buonavolontà, Roberta; Miele, Erasmo; Masi, Paola; Coccorullo, Paola; Staiano, Annamaria

    2012-07-01

    The association between GERD and obesity has been frequently reported in adults. Data in children are scarce and inconclusive, evaluating only general obesity. Central adiposity has never been investigated in children as a possible risk factor for GERD. The aims of the present study were to evaluate the prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms in overweight and obese children in comparison with a general normal-weight population and whether the GERD symptoms are associated with waist circumference (WC). The study population consisted of 153 healthy children. A detailed clinical history and a physical examination were obtained from each patient. A questionnaire on reflux symptoms was completed by caregivers. The reflux symptomatic score resulted significantly higher in obese than in normal-weight children and in children with WC >90th percentile compared with those with WC obesity are risk factors for the development of GERD symptoms in children. The risk of GERD symptoms rises progressively with the increase in both body mass index and waist circumference, even in normal-weight children.

  9. Correlation between glycemic variability and gastroesophageal reflux in adolescentswith type 1 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I L Alimova

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To estimate an impact of glycemic variability on the development of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD in adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM.Materials and methods. We enrolled 33 patients with T1DM aged from 12 to 17 years. 24-h pH-monitoring was performed with “Gas- troskan 24” system (Istok-Sistema, Fryazino; 24-h continuous glucose monitoring utilized CGMS MMT-7310 (Medtronic Minimed, USA with subsequent night-time analysis.Results. As compared to stable night-time glycemia controls (SD <2.0 mmol/L, patients with higher night-time glycemic variability (SD>2.0 mmol/L showed longer period of esophageal acidification (17% [2–58]; p<0.001, higher incidence of acid reflux events with duration above 5 min (2 ev. [1-10]; p<0.001, longer period of most protracted acid reflux event (63 min [5–132]; p<0.001, as well as higher prevalence of pathologic acid GER events (76.4%; χ2=17.11; p<0.001 during night-time. Increase in glycemic in- stability positively correlated with incidence and severity of acid GER events. 6-8 months follow-up supported these findings. Conclusion. Glycemic variability in adolescents with T1DM is a significant risk factor for development of GERD with hypomotor dys- function according to pH-monitoring.

  10. Prospective evaluation of surgical management of sliding hiatal hernia and gastroesophageal reflux in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayhew, Philipp D; Marks, Stanley L; Pollard, Rachel; Culp, William T N; Kass, Philip H

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate response to surgical management of sliding hiatal hernia (SHH) and gastroesophageal reflux (GER) in dogs using standardized clinical scoring, videofluoroscopic swallow studies, and impedance planimetry. Prospective clinical trial. A total of 17 client-owned dogs. Dogs were included if they had clinical signs and videofluoroscopic evidence of SHH and/or GER. Owners were asked to complete a standardized canine dysphagia assessment tool (CDAT) preoperatively and postoperatively. Conscious videofluoroscopic swallowing studies and impedance planimetry (IP) were used to evaluate esophageal function and lower esophageal sphincter location and geometry preoperatively and in a subsection of dogs postoperatively. Preoperatively, 13/17 dogs included in the study had a history of regurgitation, and 4/17 had radiographic evidence of aspiration pneumonia. Postprandial regurgitation improved in 8/10 dogs with preoperative regurgitation, and for which completed preoperative and postoperative CDAT questionnaires were available (P hernia severity score improved postoperatively (P = .046) in dogs with preoperative and postoperative videofluoroscopic swallowing studies (n = 12). However, hernia frequency score (P = .2) and IP parameters did not differ significantly between time points. Clinical signs of SHH generally improved with surgery but did not consistently resolve. Videofluoroscopic studies provide evidence that GER and SHH can persist postoperatively in some patients. Based on IP findings, clinical improvement may be attributed to a mechanism independent of lower esophageal sphincter attenuation. © 2017 The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  11. Scintigraphy, pH measurement and radiography in the evaluation of gastroesophageal reflux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaul, B.; Petersen, H.; Grette, K.; Erichsen, H.; Myrvold, H.E.

    1985-01-01

    Scintigraphy as a diagnostic tool has been explored in 69 patients with gastroesophageal reflux (GER) symptoms and endoscopic esophagitis. In all subjects the presence of reflux was also evaluated by radiography and intraesophageal pH measurements (standard acid reflux test). The overall sensitivity of scintigraphy (85.5%) was significantly higher than those of radiography (27.5%) and pH measurements (69.5%). Scintigraphy was performed with normal saline and with acidified orange juice as the transport medium for the isotope 99mTc. The yield of positive scintigrams was higher (22.3 to 61.1%, depending on the grade of endoscopic esophagitis) with the latter variant. Moreover, demonstration of spontaneous reflux was greatly facilitated by the acid scintigraphy. This was particularly obvious in the grade I esophagitis, in which the freqency of spontaneous reflux with saline method was 3.4% and with acid medium 34/3%. Reflux (induced or spontaneous) was seen in 22 normal control subjects with the saline method, and in 1 subject only with the acid method. On the basis of these findings it is concluded that scintigraphy, especially the acid variant of the technique, is a valuable diagnostic procedure in GER disease

  12. Gastroesophageal reflux disease and risk for bipolar disorder: a nationwide population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wan-Shan; Hu, Li-Yu; Liu, Chia-Jen; Hsu, Chih-Chao; Shen, Cheng-Che; Wang, Yen-Po; Hu, Yu-Wen; Tsai, Chia-Fen; Yeh, Chiu-Mei; Chen, Pan-Ming; Su, Tung-Ping; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Lu, Ti

    2014-01-01

    Studies have shown that chronic inflammation may play a vital role in the pathophysiology of both gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and bipolar disorder. Among patients with GERD, the risk of bipolar disorder has not been well characterized. We explored the relationship between GERD and the subsequent development of bipolar disorder, and examined the risk factors for bipolar disorder in patients with GERD. We identified patients who were diagnosed with GERD in the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. A comparison cohort without GERD was matched according to age, sex, and comorbidities. The occurrence of bipolar disorder was evaluated in both cohorts based on diagnosis and the prescription of medications. The GERD cohort consisted of 21,674 patients, and the comparison cohort consisted of 21,674 matched control patients without GERD. The incidence of bipolar disorder (incidence rate ratio [IRR] 2.29, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.58-3.36, Pdisorder (HR 4.89, 95% CI 3.06-7.84, P = .004) were independent risk factors for the development of bipolar disorder among GERD patients. GERD may increase the risk of developing bipolar disorder. Based on our data, we suggest that attention should be focused on female patients younger than 60 years, and patients with alcohol use disorder, following a GERD diagnosis.

  13. Do gastrointestinal and respiratory signs and symptoms correlate with the severity of gastroesophageal reflux?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzun Hakan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gastroesophageal reflux (GER is a disorder that is common by seen in childhood and may lead to severe complications. In this study, we ascertained the incidence of GER among the children who had typical and atypical complaints of GER and whether there was a difference between two groups comparing the findings of 24-hour pH-meter. Methods 39 out of 70 patients with typical and atypical GER symptoms were diagnosed as GER by 24-hour pH-meter monitoring. The patients were divided into three groups, those having gastrointestinal complaints, those having respiratory complaints and those having both gastrointestinal and respiratory symptoms. Results Evaluated the GER prevalence in these groups, it was found to be 60% in the gastrointestinal group, 48.6% in the respiratory group and 75% in the mixed group. When pH-meter measurements of GER positive patients were compared within the clinical groups, the fraction of time that pH was lower than 4 was found to be significantly higher in the mixed group (p = 0.004. Conclusions The coexistence of gastrointestinal and respiratory symptoms in the patients with GER may be related to the severe reflux.

  14. Taste and Smell Disturbances in Patients with Gastroparesis and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabadi, Alisha; Saadi, Mohammed; Schey, Ron; Parkman, Henry P

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims Patients with gastroparesis and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) often report decreased enjoyment when eating. Some patients remark that food does not smell or taste the same. To determine if taste and/or smell disturbances are present in patients with gastroparesis and/or GERD and relate these to gastrointestinal symptom severity. Methods Patients with gastroparesis and/or GERD completed questionnaires evaluating taste and smell (Taste and Smell Survey [TSS]), Patient Assessment of Upper Gastrointestinal Symptom Severity Index (PAGI-SYM), and Demographics. TSS questioned the nature of taste/smell changes and the impact on quality of life. PAGI-SYM was used to calculate Gastroparesis Cardinal Symptom Index (GCSI) and Heartburn and Regurgitation Score (HB/RG). Results Seventy-six subjects were enrolled: healthy controls (n = 13), gastroparesis alone (n = 30), GERD alone (n = 10), and both gastroparesis and GERD (n = 23). Taste and smell disturbances were higher in patients with gastroparesis, GERD, and both gastroparesis and GERD compared to healthy controls. Taste and smell abnormalities were significantly correlated (r = 0.530, P Smell score was also strongly correlated to HB/RG (r = 0.513, P smell abnormalities are prominent in gastroparesis and GERD patients. Abnormalities in taste and smell are significantly correlated with both gastroparesis and GERD symptom severity. Awareness of this high prevalence of taste and smell dysfunction among patients with gastroparesis and GERD may help to better understand the food intolerances these patients often have. PMID:28147345

  15. Gastroesophageal reflux disease management according to contemporary international guidelines: a translational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Fabio; Riegler, Gabriele; de Leone, Annalisa; Dominici, Patrizia; Grossi, Enzo

    2011-03-07

    To test the Genval recommendations and the usefulness of a short trial of proton pump inhibitor (PPI) in the initial management and maintenance treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) patients. Five hundred and seventy seven patients with heartburn were recruited. After completing a psychometric tool to assess quality of life (PGWBI) and a previously validated GERD symptom questionnaire (QUID), patients were grouped into those with esophagitis (EE, n = 306) or without mucosal damage (NERD, n = 271) according to endoscopy results. The study started with a 2-wk period of high dose omeprazole (omeprazole test); patients responding to this PPI test entered an acute phase (3 mo) of treatment with any PPI at the standard dose. Finally, those patients with a favorable response to the standard PPI dose were maintained on a half PPI dose for a further 3-mo period. The test was positive in 519 (89.9%) patients, with a greater response in EE patients (96.4%) compared with NERD patients (82.6%) (P = 0.011). Both the percentage of completely asymptomatic patients, at 3 and 6 mo, and the reduction in heartburn intensity were significantly higher in the EE compared with NERD patients (P management of GERD patients. In addition, we observed that the overall response to PPI therapy is lower in NERD compared to EE patients.

  16. Managing gastroesophageal reflux disease – comparative efficacy and outcomes of dexlansoprazole MR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frye JW

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Jeanetta W Frye, David A Peura Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Virginia Health Sciences Center, Charlottesville, VA, USA Abstract: The management of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD has been revolutionized with the development of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs. Unfortunately, due to the inherent pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles of conventional PPIs, many patients continue to suffer from symptoms related to GERD despite appropriate use of PPIs. Dexlansoprazole MR is a PPI with a unique dual delayed-release delivery system that has been designed to address the unmet needs in GERD management. Specifically, dexlansoprazole MR addresses limitations with short plasma half-life and need for meal-associated dosing, characteristic of conventional PPIs. In addition, dexlansoprazole MR has been shown to be effective in several specific clinical situations. These include coadministration with clopidogrel, healing of all grades of erosive esophagitis, improvement in reflux-related quality of life, step down to once-per-day dosing, and treatment of Helicobacter pylori infections. Furthermore, dexlansoprazole MR has been found to induce symptom improvement in patients with nonerosive esophageal reflux disease, nocturnal heartburn and GERD-related sleep disturbance, and regurgitation. Overall, dexlansoprazole MR is a unique and useful tool in the management of GERD. Keywords: GERD, PPI, NERD

  17. Changes in Ghrelin-Related Factors in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miwa Nahata

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To examine gastrointestinal hormone profiles and functional changes in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD, blood levels of the orexigenic hormone ghrelin were measured in rats with experimentally induced GERD. During the experiment, plasma acyl ghrelin levels in GERD rats were higher than those in sham-operated rats, although food intake was reduced in GERD rats. Although plasma levels of the appetite-suppressing hormone leptin were significantly decreased in GERD rats, no changes were observed in cholecystokinin levels. Repeated administration of rat ghrelin to GERD rats had no effect on the reduction in body weight or food intake. Therefore, these results suggest that aberrantly increased secretion of peripheral ghrelin and decreased ghrelin responsiveness may occur in GERD rats. Neuropeptide Y and agouti-related peptide mRNA expression in the hypothalamus of GERD rats was significantly increased, whereas proopiomelanocortin mRNA expression was significantly decreased compared to that in sham-operated rats. However, melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH and prepro-orexin mRNA expression in the hypothalamus of GERD rats was similar to that in sham-operated rats. These results suggest that although GERD rats have higher plasma ghrelin levels, ghrelin signaling in GERD rats may be suppressed due to reduced MCH and/or orexin synthesis in the hypothalamus.

  18. Human leukocyte antigen HLADRB1 determinants susceptibility to gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batool Mutar MAHDI

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is characterized by diverse symptoms. There is an evidence for a genetic component to GERD as supported by familial aggregation of this disease. OBJECTIVE To investigate whether certain human leucocyte antigen genes HLA-DRB1 are associated with GERD. METHODS Patients and controls were prospectively recruited from GIT center at Al-Kindy Teaching Hospital (Baghdad-Iraq between January 2014 and July 2016. Sixty Iraqi Arab Muslims patients with a history of heartburn and dyspepsia compared with 100 Iraqi Arab Muslims controls. All study patients and control groups underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopic examinations and their serums were analyzed for CagA antibodies Immunoglobulin G (IgG for H. pylori. HLA-DRB1 genotyping were done to both groups. RESULTS A total of 60 patients with erosive gastritis; GERD (Grade II and III were evaluated, together with 100 controls. There is a significant increase of H. pylori infection (P=0.0001 in GERD patients than control group. HLA-DRB1* 15:01 was significantly increased in GERD patients in comparison with control group and an increased frequency of HLADRB1*11:01 in control group compared with patients group. CONCLUSION There is an association between HLA-DRB1 *15:01 in GERD patients with H. pylori positive patients.

  19. Acid gastroesophageal reflux in convalescent preterm infants: effect of posture and relationship to apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Ravindra Y; Rafferty, Gerrard F; Hannam, Simon; Greenough, Anne

    2007-11-01

    Concerns regarding gastroesophageal reflux (GER) and associated apnea episodes result in some practitioners having convalescent, prematurely born infants sleep in the prone position. We have tested the hypothesis that such infants would not suffer from clinically important acid GER or associated apnea episodes more in the supine compared with the prone position. Lower esophageal pH was measured and videopolysomnographic recordings of nasal airflow, chest and abdominal wall movements, electrocardiographic activity, and oxygen saturation were made on two successive days of 21 premature infants (median gestational age 28 wk) at a median postmenstrual age (PMA) of 36 wk. On each day, the infants were studied prone and supine. The acid reflux index was higher in the supine compared with the prone position (median 3% versus 0%, p = 0.002), but was low in both positions. The number of obstructive apnea episodes per hour was higher in the supine position (p = 0.008). There were, however, no statistically significant correlations between the amount of acid GER and the number of either obstructive or total apnea episodes in either the supine or prone position. Supine compared with prone sleeping neither increases clinically important acid GER nor obstructive apnea episodes associated with acid GER in asymptomatic, convalescent, prematurely born infants.

  20. Apnea is not prolonged by acid gastroesophageal reflux in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fiore, Juliann M; Arko, Marina; Whitehouse, Meghan; Kimball, Amy; Martin, Richard J

    2005-11-01

    To examine the temporal relationship between apnea and gastroesophageal reflux (GER) and to assess the effect of GER on apnea duration. A total of 119 preterm infants underwent 12-hour cardiorespiratory monitoring studies using respiratory inductance plethysmography, heart rate, oxygen saturation (SaO2), and esophageal pH. The studies were scored for GER (pH or =5 seconds) and apnea > or =15 seconds or > or =10 seconds that occurred within 30 seconds of GER. Apnea > or =10 seconds was used to assess whether GER would prolong apnea duration. There were 6255 episodes of GER. Only 1% of GER episodes were associated with apnea > or =15 seconds, and there was no difference in apnea rate before, during, or after GER. There was also no difference in rate of apnea > or =10 seconds before versus during GER; however, there was a decrease in apnea rate immediately after GER. The presence of GER during apnea did not prolong apnea duration, and GER had no effect on the lowest SaO2 or heart rate during apnea. There is no evidence of a temporal relationship between acid-based GER and apnea in preterm infants. In addition, GER does not prolong apnea duration and does not exacerbate the resultant decrease in heart rate and SaO2.

  1. sup(99m)Tc-HIDA dynamic scintigraphy for the diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux of bile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bortolotti, M.; Bersani, G.; Labo, G.; Abbati, A.; Turba, E.; Pozzoto, R.

    1985-01-01

    In 5 patients with partial gastric resection and esophagitis, in whom esophageal pH metry was unable to demonstrate significant gastroesophageal reflux (GER), we administered i.v. 5 mCi (185 MBq) of sup(99m)Tc-HIDA, the patient lying under a computer-assisted LFOV gamma camera. When gallbladder image was evident, caerulein was administered i.v. at a physiologic dose in order to induce gallbladder contraction, and in the subsequent 45 min the patient was asked to perform a standard series of manoeuvres that increase the intraabdominal pressure (Valsalva, etc.) and favour GER. Scintigraphic images and time/activity curves obtained from areas of interest corresponding to gastric remnant and distal esophagus showed that at least one of these manoeuvres in each case was followed by the appearance of the radiocompound in the distal esophagus, indicating asup(99m)Tc-HIDA-tagged bile GER. Consequently, we believe that HIDA-GER dynamic scintigraphy may be more useful than esophageal pH metry in demonstrating the bilairy origin of an esophagitis. (orig.)

  2. [Supraventricular tachycardia in newborns and its association with gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuertes, Ángeles; Alshweki, Ayham; Pérez-Muñuzuri, Alejandro; Couce, María-Luz

    2017-10-01

    Supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) is the most common arrhythmia in the neonatal period, but its association with other triggering processes is not well established. The aim of the study was to analyse the possible relationship between neonatal SVT and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), a condition which was recently linked to atrial arrhythmias. A retrospective longitudinal descriptive study was conducted over a period of 5years on newborns who were diagnosed with SVT in a level III neonatal unit, assessing morphological aspects, associated symptoms, and treatments received. Its association with GERD and the impact of this on SVT was studied. Eighteen patients (1.2 per 1000 newborns) were diagnosed with SVT. Fifty percent of them were combined with clinically significant GERD (P=.01), and all of them received drug treatment. The average time of control of SVT without GERD since diagnosis was 6 days (95% CI: 2.16-9.84, with a median of 3) and 7.6 days when both pathologies were present (95% CI: 4.14-10.9, with a median of 7) (P=.024). Patients with SVT in the neonatal period frequently have GERD, and this combination leads to more difficulty in controlling the tachycardia. The reflux could act as a trigger or perpetuator of arrhythmia, therefore it is important to find and treat GERD in infants with SVT. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Association of problem behavior with sleep problems and gastroesophageal reflux symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Katsuyoshi; Yagi, Takakazu; Maeda, Aya; Nagayama, Kunihiro; Uehara, Sawako; Saito-Sakoguchi, Yoko; Kanematsu, Kyoko; Miyawaki, Shouichi

    2014-02-01

    There are few large-scale epidemiologic studies examining the associations between sleep problems, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms, lifestyle and food habits and problem behaviors (PB) in adolescents. The aim of this study was to evaluate the associations among these factors in Japanese adolescents. A cross-sectional survey of 1840 junior high school students was carried out using questionnaires. The subjects were classified into PB or normal behavior (NB) groups using the Pediatric Symptom Checklist (PSC). The scores of the sleep-related factors, sleep bruxism, lifestyle and food habits, and GERD symptoms were compared. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine the factors related to PB. Mean subject age was 13.3 ± 1.8 years. The PB group had significantly longer sleep latency and higher GERD symptom score (P sleep bruxism, difficulty falling asleep within 30 min, nightmares, feeling of low sleep quality, daytime somnolence, and daytime lack of motivation. Feelings of low sleep quality had the strongest association with PB, with an adjusted odds ratio of 12.88 (95% confidence interval: 8.99-18.46). PB in adolescents are associated with sleep problems, including sleep bruxism, as well as lifestyle and food habits and GERD symptoms. © 2013 The Authors. Pediatrics International © 2013 Japan Pediatric Society.

  4. Gastroesophageal reflux symptoms not responding to proton pump inhibitor: GERD, NERD, NARD, esophageal hypersensitivity or dyspepsia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashashati, Mohammad; Hejazi, Reza A; Andrews, Christopher N; Storr, Martin A

    2014-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is a common gastrointestinal process that can generate symptoms of heartburn and chest pain. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are the gold standard for the treatment of GER; however, a substantial group of GER patients fail to respond to PPIs. In the past, it was believed that acid reflux into the esophagus causes all, or at least the majority, of symptoms attributed to GER, with both erosive esophagitis and nonerosive outcomes. However, with modern testing techniques it has been shown that, in addition to acid reflux, the reflux of nonacid gastric and duodenal contents into the esophagus may also induce GER symptoms. It remains unknown how weakly acidic or alkaline refluxate with a pH similar to a normal diet induces GER symptoms. Esophageal hypersensitivity or functional dyspepsia with superimposed heartburn may be other mechanisms of symptom generation, often completely unrelated to GER. Detailed studies investigating the pathophysiology of esophageal hypersensitivity are not conclusive, and definitions of the various disease states may overlap and are often confusing. The authors aim to clarify the pathophysiology, definition, diagnostic techniques and medical treatment of patients with heartburn symptoms who fail PPI therapy. PMID:24719900

  5. Impact of anthropometric measures and serum leptin on severity of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelkader, N A; Montasser, I F; Bioumy, E E; Saad, W E

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the impact of obesity, determined by different anthropometric measures, on clinical and endoscopic severity of GERD and the relation between serum leptin and clinical and endoscopic severity of GERD in Egyptian patients. The study was carried out at Ain Shams University Hospitals and Theodor Bilharz Research Institute, Cairo, Egypt. A total of 60 patients with clinically and endoscopically evident gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) were enrolled in this study as well as 20 healthy subjects matched for age and gender serving as the control group. Patients were divided according to their body mass index (BMI) into two groups: group 1 (n = 30): overweight and obese (BMI ≥ 25 and/or waist-to-height ratio [WHtR] ≥ 0.5) and group 2 (n = 30): normal weight (BMI ≥ 18 to GERD. Increased leptin hormone level is associated with clinical and endoscopic severity of GERD. Future trial on larger number of patients is emphasized. © 2014 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  6. Chronic Asthma and Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease: The Treatment Plans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Ghofraniha

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD regularly occurs when stomach acid moves up from the stomach into the esophagus. GERD might be associated with chronic asthma symptoms such as coughing and breathlessness. According to several studies on children and adults, GERD is proven to have a close relationship with asthma.  Medication treatment via proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs, such as Omeprazole, H2 receptor blockers (Ranitidine, and other antireflux medications, is appropriate for ameliorating GERD and asthma. Moreover, surgery is another useful approach to GERD and asthma treatment. In this regard, Nissen fundoplication (laparoscopic is a principal surgery method. Medical and surgical antireflux therapies are recognized as effective methods in the treatment of GERD-associated asthma. Our  review included studies that evaluated treatment of GERD-associated asthma. These studies accentuated the critical role of acid reflux suppression in relieving the patients suffering from a difficult to control asthma.

  7. Effect of Proton Pump Inhibitors in Bronchiectatic Patients with Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Byungkyu; Lee, Dong Ho; Lee, Chang Min; Hwang, Jae Jin; Yoon, Hyuk; Shin, Cheol Min; Park, Young Soo; Kim, Nayoung

    2016-07-25

    Bronchiectasis is aggravated by gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) owing to micro aspiration. Some researchers note the effect of antireflux surgery in bronchiectasis with GERD. However, few have investigated the effects of medical antireflux therapy. We investigated the effect of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) in bronchiectasis with GERD. From March 2003 to May 2015, the clinical records of patients who had bronchiectasis with GERD were reviewed. Patients underwent an initial pulmonary function test (PFT) and chest computed tomography when diagnosed with bronchiectasis. One group with typical GERD symptoms was treated with PPIs, while the other group was not. Both groups underwent PFTs within six months after completing PPI therapy. Population characteristics and associations were compared between the groups. Two hundred and fifty-seven patients (124 male, 133 female; mean age 67.6±10.0 years) were included. There were no significant differences between the groups in terms of forced vital capacity (FVC; p=0.239), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1; p=0.555), or FEV1/FVC (p=0.374) after PPI therapy. However, there were significant improvements in FVC (p=0.002) and FEV1 (p=0.006) in patients with high BMI in the PPI treatment group. PPIs have no effect on the pulmonary function in patients with bronchiectasis and GERD. However, PPIs were noted to produce improvements in lung function in patients with bronchiectasis and high BMI.

  8. Increased risk of pulmonary tuberculosis in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, W-C; Ou, S-M; Feng, J-Y; Hu, Y-W; Yeh, C-M; Su, V Y-F; Hu, L-Y; Chien, S-H; Su, W-J; Chen, T-J; Liu, C-J

    2016-02-01

    Previous studies have suggested a close correlation between gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and various respiratory disorders. However, the association between GERD and tuberculosis (TB) remains unexplored. Using data retrieved from Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database from 2000 to 2009, this longitudinal nationwide cohort study included a total of 63,930 patients with GERD and controls matched by age, sex and comorbidities. Risk factors associated with the development of pulmonary TB (PTB) were investigated. Active PTB was documented in 65 (0.20%) patients with GERD and 41 (0.13%) matched cohorts within 1 year of GERD diagnosis. The incidence rate of PTB in the GERD group and the matched cohort was respectively 24.1 and 15.2 cases per 10,000 person-years. In multivariate analysis, GERD was an independent risk factor for PTB (adjusted HR 1.63, 95%CI 1.10-2.40, P = 0.015). Among patients with GERD, independent predictors for PTB included older age, male sex, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma and exposure to proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). Patients with GERD have a significantly increased risk of PTB within 1 year of GERD diagnosis. Exposure to PPIs is an independent predictor for PTB among patients with GERD.

  9. Highly Charged Ion (HCI) Modified Tunnel Junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomeroy, J. M.; Grube, H.

    2009-01-01

    The neutralization energy carried by highly charged ions (HCIs) provides an alternative method for localizing energy on a target's surface, producing features and modifying surfaces with fluences and kinetic energy damage that are negligible compared to singly ionized atoms. Since each HCI can deposit an enormous amount of energy into a small volume of the surface (e.g., Xe 44+ delivers 51 keV of neutralization energy per HCI), each individual HCI's interaction with the target can produce a nanoscale feature. Many studies of HCI-surface features have characterized some basic principles of this unique ion-surface interaction, but the activity reported here has been focused on studying ensembles of HCI features in ultra-thin insulating films by fabricating multi-layer tunnel junction devices. The ultra-thin insulating barriers allow current to flow by tunneling, providing a very sensitive means of detecting changes in the barrier due to highly charged ion irradiation and, conversely, HCI modification provides a method of finely tuning the transparency of the tunnel junctions that spans several orders of magnitude for devices produced from a single process recipe. Systematic variation of junction bias, temperature, magnetic field and other parameters provides determination of the transport mechanism, defect densities, and magnetic properties of these nano-features and this novel approach to device fabrication.

  10. Superconducting junctions and method of making same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapituinik, A.

    1993-01-01

    A method of making Josephson junctions in high critical temperature superconductors is described comprising the consecutive steps of: first forming a layer of high Tc copper oxide superconductor on a substrate by forming the constituent components of the superconductor onto the substrate so as to epitaxially grow the superconductor on the substrate with copper-oxygen planes parallel to the surface of the substrate, said layer formed in a pattern to create a desired electronic circuit; then narrowing selected portions of the superconductor circuit at locations where Josephson junctions are desired; then creating weak link areas at said selected portions by moving an electrode across the surface of said selected portions, generally from one side of the selected portion to the other side of the selected portion, at a distance from the surface suitable to maintain a tunnel current between the electrode and the selected portion and maintaining said tunnel current directly into said junction locations while the electrode is proximate to the selected portions and sustaining said tunnel current through the electrodes long enough to physically remove superconducting material from the selected portion; and then depositing a noble metal in the selected portion by evaporating an electrode made from the noble metal

  11. Palliative stenting for relief of dysphagia in patients with inoperable esophageal cancer: impact on quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhusudhan, Chinthakandhi; Saluja, Sundeep S; Pal, Sujoy; Ahuja, Vineet; Saran, Pratap; Dash, Nihar R; Sahni, Peush; Chattopadhyay, Tushar K

    2009-01-01

    The aim of palliation in patients with inoperable esophageal cancer is to relieve dysphagia with minimal morbidity and mortality, and thus improve quality of life (QOL). The use of a self-expanding metal stent (SEMS) is a well-established modality for palliation of dysphagia in such patients. We assessed the QOL after palliative stenting in patients with inoperable esophageal cancer. Thirty-three patients with dysphagia due to inoperable esophageal cancer underwent SEMS insertion between October 2004 and December 2006. All patients had grade III/IV dysphagia and locally advanced unresectable cancer (n = 13), distant metastasis (n = 14), or comorbid conditions/poor general health status precluding a major surgical procedure (n = 6). Patients with grade I/II dysphagia and those with carcinoma of the cervical esophagus were excluded. The QOL was assessed using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30 (version 3) and EORTC QLQ-Esophagus (OES) 18 questionnaire (a QOL scale specifically designed for esophageal diseases) before and at 1, 4, and 8 weeks after placement of the stent. The mean age of the patients was 56 (range 34-78) years, and 22 were men. A covered SEMS was used in all patients. The most common site of malignancy was the lower third of the esophagus (n = 18, 55%). In 23 (77%) patients, the stent crossed the gastroesophageal junction. Seven patients required a reintervention for stent block (n = 5) and stent migration (n = 2). Dysphagia improved significantly immediately after stenting, and this improvement persisted until 8 weeks (16.5 vs. 90.6; P < 0.01). The global health status (5.8 vs. 71.7; P < 0.01) and all functional scores improved significantly after stenting from baseline until 8 weeks. Except pain (14.1 vs. 17.7; P = 0.67), there was significant improvement in deglutition (22.7 vs. 2.0; P < 0.01), eating (48 vs. 12.6; P < 0.01), and other symptom scales (19.7 vs. 12.1; P = 0.04) following stenting. The

  12. Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... example, in Japan, there are many cases of stomach cancer . But in the United States, this type of ... Blood tests (which look for chemicals such as tumor markers) Bone marrow biopsy (for lymphoma or leukemia) Chest ...

  13. The Frequencies of Gastroesophageal and Extragastroesophageal Symptoms in Patients with Mild Erosive Esophagitis, Severe Erosive Esophagitis, and Barrett’s Esophagus in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Shuo Kao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD may present with gastroesophageal and extraesophageal symptoms. Currently, the frequencies of gastroesophageal and extragastroesophageal symptoms in Asian patients with different categories of GERD remain unclear. Aim. To investigate the frequencies of gastroesophageal and extragastroesophageal symptoms in patients with mild erosive esophagitis, severe erosive esophagitis, and Barrett’s esophagus of GERD. Methods. The symptoms of symptomatic subjects with (1 Los Angeles grade A/B erosive esophagitis, (2 Los Angeles grade C/D erosive esophagitis, and (3 Barrett’s esophagus proven by endoscopy were prospectively assessed by a standard questionnaire for gastroesophageal and extragastroesophageal symptoms. The frequencies of the symptoms were compared by Chi-square test. Result. Six hundred and twenty-five patients (LA grade A/B: 534 patients; LA grade C/D: 37 patients; Barrett’s esophagus: 54 patients were assessed for gastroesophageal and extragastroesophageal symptoms. Patients with Los Angeles grade A/B erosive esophagitis had higher frequencies of symptoms including epigastric pain, epigastric fullness, dysphagia, and throat cleaning than patients with Los Angeles grade C/D erosive esophagitis. Patients with Los Angeles grade A/B erosive esophagitis also had higher frequencies of symptoms including acid regurgitation, epigastric acidity, regurgitation of food, nausea, vomiting, epigastric fullness, dysphagia, foreign body sensation of throat, throat cleaning, and cough than patients with Barrett’s esophagus. Conclusion. The frequencies of some esophageal and extraesophageal symptoms in patients with Los Angeles grade A/B erosive esophagitis were higher than those in patients with Los Angeles grade C/D erosive esophagitis and Barrett’s esophagus. The causes of different symptom profiles in different categories of GERD patients merit further investigations.

  14. Coulomb blockade in turnstile with multiple tunnel junctions

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, S C; Kang, D S; Kim, D C; Choi, C K; Ryu, J Y

    1999-01-01

    On the basis of the analytic solutions to the electrostatic problem of the multi-grated-small-junction systems, the stable domain for the Coulomb blockade of turnstile with multiple tunnel junctions at zero temperature has been analyzed as a function of the number of tunnel junction, the ratio of the gate capacitance to the junction capacitance, and the asymmetric factor. Our results show that domains form various shaped regions according to the asymmetric factor and their size depends on the number of junction and the ratio of the gate capacitance to the junction capacitance. In particular, it is shown that electrons can be transferred in positive and/or negative bias voltage depending on the asymmetric factor when an appropriate gate cycle is applied. Thus, the asymmetric factor plays an important role in determining the turnstile operation.

  15. Single P-N junction tandem photovoltaic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw [Kensington, CA; Ager, III, Joel W.; Yu, Kin Man [Lafayette, CA

    2011-10-18

    A single P-N junction solar cell is provided having two depletion regions for charge separation while allowing the electrons and holes to recombine such that the voltages associated with both depletion regions of the solar cell will add together. The single p-n junction solar cell includes an alloy of either InGaN or InAlN formed on one side of the P-N junction with Si formed on the other side in order to produce characteristics of a two junction (2J) tandem solar cell through only a single P-N junction. A single P-N junction solar cell having tandem solar cell characteristics will achieve power conversion efficiencies exceeding 30%.

  16. Ketorolac and Other NSAIDs Increase the Risk of Anastomotic Leakage After Surgery for GEJ Cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjederholt, Kaare Terp; Okholm, Cecilie; Svendsen, Lars Bo

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study is to investigate the impact of ketorolac and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on anastomotic leakage after surgery for gastro-esophageal-junction cancer. Within the last two decades, the incidence of gastro-esophageal-junction cancer has increased...

  17. Spectral Flow in Josephson Junctions and Effective Magnus Force

    OpenAIRE

    Makhlin, Yu. G.; Volovik, G. E.

    1995-01-01

    Momentum production during the phase slip process in SNS Josephson junction is discussed. It is caused by the spectral flow of bound states of fermions localized within the junction. This effectively reduces the Magnus force acting on vortices which provides an explanation for the experimental observation of the negligible Magnus force in 2D Josephson junction arrays. The flow of the fermionic levels is similar to that in sphalerons in particle physics, where it gives rise to the baryogenesis.

  18. Magnetic interaction between spatially extended superconducting tunnel junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbech-Jensen, Niels; Samuelsen, Mogens Rugholm

    2002-01-01

    A general description of magnetic interactions between superconducting tunnel junctions is given. The description covers a wide range of possible experimental systems, and we explicitly explore two experimentally relevant limits of coupled junctions. One is the limit of junctions with tunneling...... been considered through arrays of superconducting weak links based on semiconductor quantum wells with superconducting electrodes. We use the model to make direct interpretations of the published experiments and thereby propose that long-range magnetic interactions are responsible for the reported...

  19. Shottky-barrier formation. Abrupt metal-semiconductor junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guines, F.; Sanchez-Dehesa, J.; Flores, F.

    1983-02-01

    In this paper a realistic self-consistent calculation of an abrupt metal-semiconductor junction is presented by means of a tight-binding approach. A specific Si-Ag junction has been considered, and the charge neutrality level as well as the barrier height have been determined in good agreement with experiments. For a general junction it is shown that the interface properties depend essentially on the characteristics of the first metal layer and its interaction with the semiconductor.

  20. Gastroesophageal Acid Reflux Control 5 Years After Antireflux Surgery, Compared With Long-term Esomeprazole Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatlebakk, Jan G; Zerbib, Frank; Bruley des Varannes, Stanislas; Attwood, Stephen E; Ell, Christian; Fiocca, Roberto; Galmiche, Jean-Paul; Eklund, Stefan; Långström, Göran; Lind, Tore; Lundell, Lars R

    2016-05-01

    We compared the ability of laparoscopic antireflux surgery (LARS) and esomeprazole to control esophageal acid exposure, over a 5-year period, in patients with chronic gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). We also studied whether intraesophageal and intragastric pH parameters off and on therapy were associated with long-term outcomes. We analyzed data from a prospective, randomized, open-label trial comparing the efficacy and safety of LARS vs esomeprazole (20 or 40 mg/d) over 5 years in patients with chronic GERD. Ambulatory intraesophageal and intragastric 24-hour pH monitoring data were compared between groups before LARS or the start of esomeprazole treatment, and 6 months and 5 years afterward. A secondary aim was to evaluate the association between baseline and 6-month pH parameters and esomeprazole dose escalation, reappearance of GERD symptoms, and treatment failure over 5 years in patients receiving LARS or esomeprazole. In the LARS group (n = 116), the median 24-hour esophageal acid exposure was 8.6% at baseline and 0.7% after 6 months and 5 years (P esomeprazole group (n = 151), the median 24-hour esophageal acid exposure was 8.8% at baseline, 2.1% after 6 months, and 1.9% after 5 years (P esomeprazole). Gastric acidity was stable in both groups. Patients who required a dose increase to 40 mg/d had more severe supine reflux at baseline, and decreased esophageal acid exposure (P esomeprazole therapy. However, patients receiving LARS had significantly greater reductions in 24-hour esophageal acid exposure after 6 months and 5 years. Esophageal and gastric pH, off and on therapy, did not predict long-term outcomes of patients. Abnormal supine acid exposure predicted esomeprazole dose escalation. ClinicalTrials.Gov identifier: NCT00251927 (available: http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00251927). Copyright © 2016 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.